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Sample records for flow stress formulation

  1. Effect of bottom stress formulation on modelled flow and turbidity maxima in cross-sections of tide-dominated estuaries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schramkowski, G.P.; de Swart, H.E.; Schuttelaars, H.

    2010-01-01

    A three-dimensional numerical model with a prognostic salinity field is used to investigate the effect of a partial slip bottom boundary condition on lateral flow and sediment distribution in a transect of a tidally dominated channel. The transect has a symmetrical Gaussian cross-channel bottom

  2. Flow Formulations for Curriculum-based Course Timetabling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bagger, Niels-Christian Fink; Kristiansen, Simon; Sørensen, Matias

    2017-01-01

    lower bound on one data instance in the benchmark data set from the second international timetabling competition. Regarding upper bounds, the formulation based on the minimum cost flow problem performs better on average than other mixed integer programming approaches for the CTT.......In this paper we present two mixed-integer programming formulations for the Curriculum based Course Timetabling Problem (CTT). We show that the formulations contain underlying network structures by dividing the CTT into two separate models and then connect the two models using flow formulation...... techniques. The first mixed-integer programming formulation is based on an underlying minimum cost flow problem, which decreases the number of integer variables significantly and improves the performance compared to an intuitive mixed-integer programming formulation. The second formulation is based...

  3. Flow stress anisotropy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Winther, G.

    1996-01-01

    stress Variation in the rolling plane, which may be as high as 20%, are presented. The traditional Taylor model is applied to the data to account for the effect of texture. However, texture effects alone are not enough to explain all of the observed anisotropy. New models which take the combined effects...... of texture and deformation microstructure into account are presented. The models are based on the Taylor and Sachs models but modified with an anisotropic critical shear stress to account for the effect of the microstructure. The agreement between experimental data and model predictions is definitely better...

  4. Grain Flow at High Stresses

    Science.gov (United States)

    McSaveney, M. J.

    2015-12-01

    The transport mechanism of rapid long-runout rock avalanches was a hotly debated topic when I came on the scene in 1967. So how come it is still debated today? My explanation is that it is the expected outcome of peer review, poor comprehension, and technological advances outpacing intellectual advances. Why think about the problem when we can model it! So let us think about the problem. Shreve thought that rock avalanches fell upon and trapped a layer of air. What physics was he thinking about? It is how feathers and tissue papers fall. When my rock avalanches fly, they fly like unlubricated bricks using the physics of projectiles and ballistics. But the main transport mechanism is not flight. The dominant impression from watching a rock avalanche in motion is of fluid flow, as Heim described it in 1882. A rock avalanche is a very large grain flow. Bagnold studied dispersive grain flows, but why should one assume that rock avalanches are dispersive grain flows as many do. The more common grain flow type is a dense grain flow and rock avalanches are dense grain flows in which the weight can and does generate very high stresses at grain contacts. Brittle rock deforms elastically up to its compressive strength, whereupon it breaks, releasing elastic strain as transient elastic strain (seismic energy to a seismologist, acoustic energy to a physicist). Melosh and others have shown that acoustic energy can fluidize a grain mass. There is no exotic physics behind grain flow at high stress. When grains break, the released elastic strain has to go somewhere, and it goes somewhere principally by transmission though grain contacts. Depending on the state of stress at the grain contact, the contact will pass the stress or will slip at conventional values of Coulomb friction. Enough thinking! A physical model of the entire process is too big for any laboratory. So whose numerical model will do it?

  5. Flow stress anisotropy in aluminium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juul Jensen, D.; Hansen, N.

    1990-01-01

    The plastic anisotropy of cold-rolled high purity aluminum (99.996%) and commercially pure aluminum (99.6%) has been investigated. Sample parameters were the initial grain size and the degree of plastic strain (ϵ < 3.00). Flow stresses (0.2% offset) were measured at room temperature by uniaxial t...

  6. On Displacement Height, from Classical to Practical Formulation: Stress, Turbulent Transport and Vorticity Considerations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sogachev, Andrey; Kelly, Mark

    2016-03-01

    Displacement height ( d) is an important parameter in the simple modelling of wind speed and vertical fluxes above vegetative canopies, such as forests. Here we show that, aside from implicit definition through a (displaced) logarithmic profile, accepted formulations for d do not consistently predict flow properties above a forest. Turbulent transport can affect the displacement height, and is an integral part of what is called the roughness sublayer. We develop a more general approach for estimation of d, through production of turbulent kinetic energy and turbulent transport, and show how previous stress-based formulations for displacement height can be seen as simplified cases of a more general definition including turbulent transport. Further, we also give a simplified and practical form for d that is in agreement with the general approach, exploiting the concept of vortex thickness scale from mixing-layer theory. We assess the new and previous displacement height formulations by using flow statistics derived from the atmospheric boundary-layer Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes model SCADIS as well as from wind-tunnel observations, for different vegetation types and flow regimes in neutral conditions. The new formulations tend to produce smaller d than stress-based forms, falling closer to the classic logarithmically-defined displacement height. The new, more generally defined, displacement height appears to be more compatible with profiles of components of the turbulent kinetic energy budget, accounting for the combined effects of turbulent transport and shear production. The Coriolis force also plays a role, introducing wind-speed dependence into the behaviour of the roughness sublayer; this affects the turbulent transport, shear production, stress, and wind speed, as well as the displacement height, depending on the character of the forest. We further show how our practical (`mixing-layer') form for d matches the new turbulence-based relation, as well as

  7. The modified couple stress functionally graded Timoshenko beam formulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asghari, M.; Rahaeifard, M.; Kahrobaiyan, M.H.; Ahmadian, M.T.

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, a size-dependent formulation is presented for Timoshenko beams made of a functionally graded material (FGM). The formulation is developed on the basis of the modified couple stress theory. The modified couple stress theory is a non-classic continuum theory capable to capture the small-scale size effects in the mechanical behavior of structures. The beam properties are assumed to vary through the thickness of the beam. The governing differential equations of motion are derived for the proposed modified couple-stress FG Timoshenko beam. The generally valid closed-form analytic expressions are obtained for the static response parameters. As case studies, the static and free vibration of the new model are respectively investigated for FG cantilever and FG simply supported beams in which properties are varying according to a power law. The results indicate that modeling beams on the basis of the couple stress theory causes more stiffness than modeling based on the classical continuum theory, such that for beams with small thickness, a significant difference between the results of these two theories is observed.

  8. Hamiltonian formulation of inviscid flows with free boundaries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abarbanel, H.D.I.; Brown, R.; Yang, Y.M.

    1988-01-01

    The formulation of the Hamiltonian structures for inviscid fluid flows with material free surfaces is presented in both the Lagrangian specification, where the fundamental Poisson brackets are canonical, and in the Eulerian specification, where the dynamics is given in noncanonical form. The noncanonical Eulerian brackets are derived explicitly from the canonical Lagrangian brackets. The Eulerian brackets are, with the exception of a single term at each material free surface separating flows in different phases, identical to those for isentropic flow of a compressible, inviscid fluid. The dynamics of the free surface is located in the Hamiltonian and in the definition of the Eulerian variables of mass density, rho(x, t), momentum density, M(x,t) [which is rho times the fluid velocity v(x,t)], and the specific entropy, σ(x,t). The boundary conditions for the Eulerian variables and the evolution equations for the free surfaces come from the Euler equations of the flow. This construction provides a unified treatment of inviscid flows with any number of free surfaces

  9. Methodology for formulating predictions of stress corrosion cracking life

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamauchi, Kiyoshi; Hattori, Shigeo; Shindo, Takenori; Kuniya, Jiro

    1994-01-01

    This paper presents a methodology for formulating predictions to evaluate the stress corrosion cracking (SCC) potential of each light-water reactor component, where an index is introduced as a life index or F index. The index denotes the SCC time ratio of a given SCC system to be evaluated against a reference SCC system. The life index is expressed by the products of several subdivided life indexes, which correspond to each SCC influencing factor. Each subdivided life index is constructed as a function containing the influencing factor variable, obtained by analyzing experimental SCC life data. The methodology was termed the subdivided factor method. Application of the life index to SCC life data and field data showed that it was effective for evaluating the SCC potential, i.e. the SCC life. Accordingly, the proposed methodology can potentially describe a phenomenon expressed by a function which consists of the variables of several influencing factors whether there are formulae which unite as a physical model or not. ((orig.))

  10. Reynolds stress and shear flow generation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Korsholm, Søren Bang; Michelsen, Poul; Naulin, V.

    2001-01-01

    The so-called Reynolds stress may give a measure of the self-consistent flow generation in turbulent fluids and plasmas by the small-scale turbulent fluctuations. A measurement of the Reynolds stress can thus help to predict flows, e.g. shear flows in plasmas. This may assist the understanding...... of improved confinement scenarios such as H-mode confinement regimes. However, the determination of the Reynolds stress requires measurements of the plasma potential, a task that is difficult in general and nearly impossible in hot plasmas in large devices. In this work we investigate an alternative method......, based on density measurements, to estimate the Reynolds stress, and demonstrate the validity range of this quantity, which we term the pseudo-Reynolds stress. The advantage of such a quantity is that accurate measurements of density fluctuations are much easier to obtain experimentally. Prior...

  11. Stress modeling in colloidal dispersions undergoing non-viscometric flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolata, Benjamin; Zia, Roseanna

    2017-11-01

    We present a theoretical study of the stress tensor for a colloidal dispersion undergoing non-viscometric flow. In such flows, the non-homogeneous suspension stress depends on not only the local average total stresslet-the sum of symmetric first moments of both the hydrodynamic traction and the interparticle force-but also on the average quadrupole, octupole, and higher-order moments. To compute the average moments, we formulate a six dimensional Smoluchowski equation governing the microstructural evolution of a suspension in an arbitrary fluid velocity field. Under the conditions of rheologically slow flow, where the Brownian relaxation of the particles is much faster than the spatiotemporal evolution of the flow, the Smoluchowski equation permits asymptotic solution, revealing a suspension stress that follows a second-order fluid constitutive model. We obtain a reciprocal theorem and utilize it to show that all constitutive parameters of the second-order fluid model may be obtained from two simpler linear-response problems: a suspension undergoing simple shear and a suspension undergoing isotropic expansion. The consequences of relaxing the assumption of rheologically slow flow, including the appearance of memory and microcontinuum behaviors, are discussed.

  12. Calculation of afterbody flows with a composite velocity formulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swanson, R. C.; Rubin, S. G.; Khosla, P. K.

    1983-01-01

    A recently developed technique for numerical solution of the Navier-Stokes equations for subsonic, laminar flows is investigated. It is extended here to allow for the computation of transonic and turbulent flows. The basic approach involves a multiplicative composite of the appropriate velocity representations for the inviscid and viscous flow regions. The resulting equations are structured so that far from the surface of the body the momentum equations lead to the Bernoulli equation for the pressure, while the continuity equation reduces to the familiar potential equation. Close to the body surface, the governing equations and solution techniques are characteristic of those describing interacting boundary layers. The velocity components are computed with a coupled strongly implicity procedure. For transonic flows the artificial compressibility method is used to treat supersonic regions. Calculations are made for both laminar and turbulent flows over axisymmetric afterbody configurations. Present results compare favorably with other numerical solutions and/or experimental data.

  13. Adjoint-consistent formulations of slip models for coupled electroosmotic flow systems

    KAUST Repository

    Garg, Vikram V; Prudhomme, Serge; van der Zee, Kris G; Carey, Graham F

    2014-01-01

    Models based on the Helmholtz `slip' approximation are often used for the simulation of electroosmotic flows. The objectives of this paper are to construct adjoint-consistent formulations of such models, and to develop adjoint

  14. A new formulation of mean stress effects in fatigue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manson, S. S.; Heidmann, K. R.

    1987-01-01

    A common method of treating the mean stress effect on fatigue life is to displace the elastic line on a Manson-Coffin-Basquin diagram while retaining the position of the plastic line. Manson and Halford pointed out that this procedure implies that mean stress significantly affects the cyclic stress-strain curve. Actually, however, they showed experimentally and by more general reasoning, that mean stress has little, if any, effect on the cyclic stress-strain curve. Thus, they concluded that it is necessary to displace the plastic line as well as the elastic line in order to keep the cyclic stress-strain curve unaltered. Another way to express the common displacement of the two lines is to keep the lines in place and change the horizontal coordinate to include a term relating to the displacement. Thus, instead of life, 2N sub f, as the horizontal coordinate, a new coordinate can become 2N sub f (1-sigma sub m/sigma sub f) superscript 1/b, thereby displacing both the elastic and plastic lines by an amount (1-sigma sub m/sigma sub f) superscript 1/b where sigma sub m is the mean stress and sigma sub f is the intercept of the elastic line at N sub f = 1/2 cycles and b is the slope of the elastic line.

  15. Grain orientation, deformation microstructure and flow stress

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hansen, N.; Huang, X.; Winther, G.

    2008-01-01

    Dislocation structures in deformed metals have been analyzed quantitatively by transmission electron microscopy, high-resolution electron microscopy and Kikuchi line analysis. A general pattern for the microstructural evolution with increasing strain has been established and structural parameters have been defined and quantified. It has been found that two dislocation patterns co-exist in all grains, however, with very different characteristics dependent on grain orientation. This correlation with the grain orientation has been applied in modeling of the tensile flow stress and the flow stress anisotropy of fcc polycrystals. In conclusion some future research areas are briefly outlined

  16. Adjoint-consistent formulations of slip models for coupled electroosmotic flow systems

    KAUST Repository

    Garg, Vikram V

    2014-09-27

    Background Models based on the Helmholtz `slip\\' approximation are often used for the simulation of electroosmotic flows. The objectives of this paper are to construct adjoint-consistent formulations of such models, and to develop adjoint-based numerical tools for adaptive mesh refinement and parameter sensitivity analysis. Methods We show that the direct formulation of the `slip\\' model is adjoint inconsistent, and leads to an ill-posed adjoint problem. We propose a modified formulation of the coupled `slip\\' model, which is shown to be well-posed, and therefore automatically adjoint-consistent. Results Numerical examples are presented to illustrate the computation and use of the adjoint solution in two-dimensional microfluidics problems. Conclusions An adjoint-consistent formulation for Helmholtz `slip\\' models of electroosmotic flows has been proposed. This formulation provides adjoint solutions that can be reliably used for mesh refinement and sensitivity analysis.

  17. Rapid assessment of viable but non-culturable Bacillus coagulans MTCC 5856 in commercial formulations using Flow cytometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majeed, Muhammed; Majeed, Shaheen; Nagabhushanam, Kalyanam; Punnapuzha, Ardra; Philip, Sheena

    2018-01-01

    Accurate enumeration of bacterial count in probiotic formulation is imperative to ensure that the product adheres to regulatory standards and citation in consumer product label. Standard methods like plate count, can enumerate only replicating bacterial population under selected culture conditions. Viable but non culturable bacteria (VBNC) retain characteristics of living cells and can regain cultivability by a process known as resuscitation. This is a protective mechanism adapted by bacteria to evade stressful environmental conditions. B. coagulans MTCC 5856(LactoSpore®) is a probiotic endospore which can survive for decades in hostile environments without dividing. In the present study, we explored the use of flow cytometry to enumerate the viable count of B. coagulans MTCC 5856 under acidic and alkaline conditions, high temperature and in commercial formulations like compressed tablets and capsules. Flow cytometry (FCM) was comparable to plate count method when the spores were counted at physiological conditions. We show that VBNC state is induced in B. coagulans MTCC 5856by high temperature and acidic pH. The cells get resuscitated under physiological conditions and FCM was sensitive to detect the VBNC spores. Flow cytometry showed excellent ability to assess the viable spore count in commercial probiotic formulations of B. coagulans MTCC 5856. The results establish Flow cytometry as a reliable method to count viable bacteria in commercial probiotic preparations. Sporulation as well as existence as VBNC could contribute to the extreme stability of B. coagulans MTCC 5856. PMID:29474436

  18. Rapid assessment of viable but non-culturable Bacillus coagulans MTCC 5856 in commercial formulations using Flow cytometry.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammed Majeed

    Full Text Available Accurate enumeration of bacterial count in probiotic formulation is imperative to ensure that the product adheres to regulatory standards and citation in consumer product label. Standard methods like plate count, can enumerate only replicating bacterial population under selected culture conditions. Viable but non culturable bacteria (VBNC retain characteristics of living cells and can regain cultivability by a process known as resuscitation. This is a protective mechanism adapted by bacteria to evade stressful environmental conditions. B. coagulans MTCC 5856(LactoSpore® is a probiotic endospore which can survive for decades in hostile environments without dividing. In the present study, we explored the use of flow cytometry to enumerate the viable count of B. coagulans MTCC 5856 under acidic and alkaline conditions, high temperature and in commercial formulations like compressed tablets and capsules. Flow cytometry (FCM was comparable to plate count method when the spores were counted at physiological conditions. We show that VBNC state is induced in B. coagulans MTCC 5856by high temperature and acidic pH. The cells get resuscitated under physiological conditions and FCM was sensitive to detect the VBNC spores. Flow cytometry showed excellent ability to assess the viable spore count in commercial probiotic formulations of B. coagulans MTCC 5856. The results establish Flow cytometry as a reliable method to count viable bacteria in commercial probiotic preparations. Sporulation as well as existence as VBNC could contribute to the extreme stability of B. coagulans MTCC 5856.

  19. Rapid assessment of viable but non-culturable Bacillus coagulans MTCC 5856 in commercial formulations using Flow cytometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majeed, Muhammed; Majeed, Shaheen; Nagabhushanam, Kalyanam; Punnapuzha, Ardra; Philip, Sheena; Mundkur, Lakshmi

    2018-01-01

    Accurate enumeration of bacterial count in probiotic formulation is imperative to ensure that the product adheres to regulatory standards and citation in consumer product label. Standard methods like plate count, can enumerate only replicating bacterial population under selected culture conditions. Viable but non culturable bacteria (VBNC) retain characteristics of living cells and can regain cultivability by a process known as resuscitation. This is a protective mechanism adapted by bacteria to evade stressful environmental conditions. B. coagulans MTCC 5856(LactoSpore®) is a probiotic endospore which can survive for decades in hostile environments without dividing. In the present study, we explored the use of flow cytometry to enumerate the viable count of B. coagulans MTCC 5856 under acidic and alkaline conditions, high temperature and in commercial formulations like compressed tablets and capsules. Flow cytometry (FCM) was comparable to plate count method when the spores were counted at physiological conditions. We show that VBNC state is induced in B. coagulans MTCC 5856by high temperature and acidic pH. The cells get resuscitated under physiological conditions and FCM was sensitive to detect the VBNC spores. Flow cytometry showed excellent ability to assess the viable spore count in commercial probiotic formulations of B. coagulans MTCC 5856. The results establish Flow cytometry as a reliable method to count viable bacteria in commercial probiotic preparations. Sporulation as well as existence as VBNC could contribute to the extreme stability of B. coagulans MTCC 5856.

  20. Coupled heat conduction and thermal stress formulation using explicit integration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marchertas, A.H.; Kulak, R.F.

    1982-06-01

    The formulation needed for the conductance of heat by means of explicit integration is presented. The implementation of these expressions into a transient structural code, which is also based on explicit temporal integration, is described. Comparisons of theoretical results with code predictions are given both for one-dimensional and two-dimensional problems. The coupled thermal and structural solution of a concrete crucible, when subjected to a sudden temperature increase, shows the history of cracking. The extent of cracking is compared with experimental data

  1. Gravity-driven groundwater flow and slope failure potential: 1. Elastic effective-stress model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iverson, Richard M.; Reid, Mark E.

    1992-01-01

    Hilly or mountainous topography influences gravity-driven groundwater flow and the consequent distribution of effective stress in shallow subsurface environments. Effective stress, in turn, influences the potential for slope failure. To evaluate these influences, we formulate a two-dimensional, steady state, poroelastic model. The governing equations incorporate groundwater effects as body forces, and they demonstrate that spatially uniform pore pressure changes do not influence effective stresses. We implement the model using two finite element codes. As an illustrative case, we calculate the groundwater flow field, total body force field, and effective stress field in a straight, homogeneous hillslope. The total body force and effective stress fields show that groundwater flow can influence shear stresses as well as effective normal stresses. In most parts of the hillslope, groundwater flow significantly increases the Coulomb failure potential Φ, which we define as the ratio of maximum shear stress to mean effective normal stress. Groundwater flow also shifts the locus of greatest failure potential toward the slope toe. However, the effects of groundwater flow on failure potential are less pronounced than might be anticipated on the basis of a simpler, one-dimensional, limit equilibrium analysis. This is a consequence of continuity, compatibility, and boundary constraints on the two-dimensional flow and stress fields, and it points to important differences between our elastic continuum model and limit equilibrium models commonly used to assess slope stability.

  2. Stress strain flow curves for Cu-OFP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sandstroem, Rolf; Hallgren, Josefin

    2009-04-01

    Stress strain curves of oxygen free copper alloyed with phosphorus Cu-OFP have been determined in compression and tension. The compression tests were performed at room temperature for strain rates between 10 -5 and 10 -3 1/s. The tests in tension covered the temperature range 20 to 175 deg C for strain rates between 10 -7 and 5x10 -3 1/s. The results in compression and tension were close for similar strain rates. A model for stress strain curves has been formulated using basic dislocation mechanisms. The model has been set up in such a way that fitting of parameters to the curves is avoided. By using a fundamental creep model as a basis a direct relation to creep data has been established. The maximum engineering flow stress in tension is related to the creep stress giving the same strain rate. The model reproduces the measured flow curves as function of temperature and strain rate in the investigated interval. The model is suitable to use in finite-element computations of structures in Cu-OFP

  3. Vibration response of a pipe subjected to two-phase flow: Analytical formulations and experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ortiz-Vidal, L. Enrique, E-mail: leortiz@sc.usp.br [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Sao Carlos School of Engineering, University of Sao Paulo (USP), Av., Trabalhador São-carlense, 400, 13566-970 São Carlos, SP (Brazil); Mureithi, Njuki W., E-mail: njuki.mureithi@polymtl.ca [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Polytechnique Montreal, Département de Géniemécanique 2900, H3T 1J7 Montreal, QC (Canada); Rodriguez, Oscar M.H., E-mail: oscarmhr@sc.usp.br [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Sao Carlos School of Engineering, University of Sao Paulo (USP), Av., Trabalhador São-carlense, 400, 13566-970 São Carlos, SP (Brazil)

    2017-03-15

    Highlights: • Analytical formulations for two-phase flow-induced vibration (2-FIV) are presented. • Standard deviation of acceleration pipe response is a function of the square of shear velocity. • Peak frequency is correlated to hydrodynamic mass and consequently to void fraction. • Dynamic pipe response increases with increasing mixture velocity and void fraction. • Hydrodynamic mass in 2-FIV in horizontal pipe is proportional to mixture density. - Abstract: This paper treats the two-phase flow-induced vibration in pipes. A broad range of two-phase flow conditions, including bubbly, dispersed and slug flow, were tested in a clamped-clamped straight horizontal pipe. The vibration response of both transversal directions for two span lengths was measured. From experimental results, an in-depth discussion on the nature of the flow excitation and flow-parameters influence is presented. The hydrodynamic mass parameter is also studied. Experimental results suggest that it is proportional to mixture density. On the other hand, two analytical formulations were developed and tested against experimental results. One formulation predicts the quadratic trend between standard deviation of acceleration and shear velocity found in experiments. The other formulation indicates that the peak-frequency of vibration response depends strongly on void fraction. It provides accurate predictions of peak-frequency, predicting 97.6% of the data within ±10% error bands.

  4. A Poisson equation formulation for pressure calculations in penalty finite element models for viscous incompressible flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sohn, J. L.; Heinrich, J. C.

    1990-01-01

    The calculation of pressures when the penalty-function approximation is used in finite-element solutions of laminar incompressible flows is addressed. A Poisson equation for the pressure is formulated that involves third derivatives of the velocity field. The second derivatives appearing in the weak formulation of the Poisson equation are calculated from the C0 velocity approximation using a least-squares method. The present scheme is shown to be efficient, free of spurious oscillations, and accurate. Examples of applications are given and compared with results obtained using mixed formulations.

  5. Investigation of isochronous stress-strain formulations for elevated temperature structural design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koo, Gyeong Hoi; Kim, Jong Bum

    2012-01-01

    For elevated temperature design evaluations by the ASME-NH rules, the most important material data is the isochronous stress-strain curves, which can provide design creep information. The main purpose of this paper is to investigate appropriate formulations to be able to generate the isochronous stress-strain curves and implement it to the computer program which is coded the ASME-NH design evaluation procedures. To do this, formulations by the strain-time relationship are investigated in detail and the sensitivity studies for rapid initial transient creep contributions, slower and longer transient creep contribution, and secondary creep contributions are carried out for type 316 austenitic stainless steel. From the results of this study, it is found that the strain-time relationship formulations can well describe the isochronous stress-strain curves with the transient creep contributions

  6. Two- and three-index formulations of the minimum cost multicommodity k-splittable flow problem

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gamst, Mette; Jensen, Peter Neergaard; Pisinger, David

    2010-01-01

    The multicommodity flow problem (MCFP) considers the efficient routing of commodities from their origins to their destinations subject to capacity restrictions and edge costs. Baier et al. [G. Baier, E. Köhler, M. Skutella, On the k-splittable flow problem, in: 10th Annual European Symposium...... of commodities has to be satisfied at the lowest possible cost. The problem has applications in transportation problems where a number of commodities must be routed, using a limited number of distinct transportation units for each commodity. Based on a three-index formulation by Truffot et al. [J. Truffot, C...... on Algorithms, 2002, 101–113] introduced the maximum flow multicommodity k-splittable flow problem (MCkFP) where each commodity may use at most k paths between its origin and its destination. This paper studies the -hard minimum cost multicommodity k-splittable flow problem (MCMCkFP) in which a given flow...

  7. On Displacement Height, from Classical to Practical Formulation: Stress, Turbulent Transport and Vorticity Considerations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sogachev, Andrey; Kelly, Mark C.

    2016-01-01

    conditions. The new formulations tend to produce smaller d than stress-based forms, falling closer to the classic logarithmically-defined displacement height. The new, more generally defined, displacement height appears to be more compatible with profiles of components of the turbulent kinetic energy budget...

  8. From coherent to incoherent mismatched interfaces: A generalized continuum formulation of surface stresses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dingreville, Rémi; Hallil, Abdelmalek; Berbenni, Stéphane

    2014-12-01

    The equilibrium of coherent and incoherent mismatched interfaces is reformulated in the context of continuum mechanics based on the Gibbs dividing surface concept. Two surface stresses are introduced: a coherent surface stress and an incoherent surface stress, as well as a transverse excess strain. The coherent surface stress and the transverse excess strain represent the thermodynamic driving forces of stretching the interface while the incoherent surface stress represents the driving force of stretching one crystal while holding the other fixed and thereby altering the structure of the interface. These three quantities fully characterize the elastic behavior of coherent and incoherent interfaces as a function of the in-plane strain, the transverse stress and the mismatch strain. The isotropic case is developed in detail and particular attention is paid to the case of interfacial thermo-elasticity. This exercise provides an insight on the physical significance of the interfacial elastic constants introduced in the formulation and illustrates the obvious coupling between the interface structure and its associated thermodynamics quantities. Finally, an example based on atomistic simulations of Cu/Cu2O interfaces is given to demonstrate the relevance of the generalized interfacial formulation and to emphasize the dependence of the interfacial thermodynamic quantities on the incoherency strain with an actual material system.

  9. Direct compression of chitosan: process and formulation factors to improve powder flow and tablet performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buys, Gerhard M; du Plessis, Lissinda H; Marais, Andries F; Kotze, Awie F; Hamman, Josias H

    2013-06-01

    Chitosan is a polymer derived from chitin that is widely available at relatively low cost, but due to compression challenges it has limited application for the production of direct compression tablets. The aim of this study was to use certain process and formulation variables to improve manufacturing of tablets containing chitosan as bulking agent. Chitosan particle size and flow properties were determined, which included bulk density, tapped density, compressibility and moisture uptake. The effect of process variables (i.e. compression force, punch depth, percentage compaction in a novel double fill compression process) and formulation variables (i.e. type of glidant, citric acid, pectin, coating with Eudragit S®) on chitosan tablet performance (i.e. mass variation, tensile strength, dissolution) was investigated. Moisture content of the chitosan powder, particle size and the inclusion of glidants had a pronounced effect on its flow ability. Varying the percentage compaction during the first cycle of a double fill compression process produced chitosan tablets with more acceptable tensile strength and dissolution rate properties. The inclusion of citric acid and pectin into the formulation significantly decreased the dissolution rate of isoniazid from the tablets due to gel formation. Direct compression of chitosan powder into tablets can be significantly improved by the investigated process and formulation variables as well as applying a double fill compression process.

  10. Improving stability of stabilized and multiscale formulations in flow simulations at small time steps

    KAUST Repository

    Hsu, Ming-Chen

    2010-02-01

    The objective of this paper is to show that use of the element-vector-based definition of stabilization parameters, introduced in [T.E. Tezduyar, Computation of moving boundaries and interfaces and stabilization parameters, Int. J. Numer. Methods Fluids 43 (2003) 555-575; T.E. Tezduyar, Y. Osawa, Finite element stabilization parameters computed from element matrices and vectors, Comput. Methods Appl. Mech. Engrg. 190 (2000) 411-430], circumvents the well-known instability associated with conventional stabilized formulations at small time steps. We describe formulations for linear advection-diffusion and incompressible Navier-Stokes equations and test them on three benchmark problems: advection of an L-shaped discontinuity, laminar flow in a square domain at low Reynolds number, and turbulent channel flow at friction-velocity Reynolds number of 395. © 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Formulation and numerical analysis of nonisothermal multiphase flow in porous media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martinez, M.J.

    1995-06-01

    A mathematical formulation is presented for describing the transport of air, water and energy through porous media. The development follows a continuum mechanics approach. The theory assumes the existence of various average macroscopic variables which describe the state of the system. Balance equations for mass and energy are formulated in terms of these macroscopic variables. The system is supplemented with constitutive equations relating fluxes to the state variables, and with transport property specifications. Specification of various mixing rules and thermodynamic relations completes the system of equations. A numerical simulation scheme, employing the method of lines, is described for one-dimensional flow. The numerical method is demonstrated on sample problems involving nonisothermal flow of air and water. The implementation is verified by comparison with existing numerical solutions

  12. A Finite Strain Model of Stress, Diffusion, Plastic Flow and Electrochemical Reactions in a Lithium-ion Half-cell

    OpenAIRE

    Bower, Allan F.; Guduru, Pradeep R.; Sethuraman, Vijay A.

    2011-01-01

    We formulate the continuum field equations and constitutive equations that govern deformation, stress, and electric current flow in a Li-ion half-cell. The model considers mass transport through the system, deformation and stress in the anode and cathode, electrostatic fields, as well as the electrochemical reactions at the electrode/electrolyte interfaces. It extends existing analyses by accounting for the effects of finite strains and plastic flow in the electrodes, and by exploring in deta...

  13. Stresses in non-equilibrium fluids: Exact formulation and coarse-grained theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krüger, Matthias; Solon, Alexandre; Démery, Vincent; Rohwer, Christian M.; Dean, David S.

    2018-02-01

    Starting from the stochastic equation for the density operator, we formulate the exact (instantaneous) stress tensor for interacting Brownian particles and show that its average value agrees with expressions derived previously. We analyze the relation between the stress tensor and forces due to external potentials and observe that, out of equilibrium, particle currents give rise to extra forces. Next, we derive the stress tensor for a Landau-Ginzburg theory in generic, non-equilibrium situations, finding an expression analogous to that of the exact microscopic stress tensor, and discuss the computation of out-of-equilibrium (classical) Casimir forces. Subsequently, we give a general form for the stress tensor which is valid for a large variety of energy functionals and which reproduces the two mentioned cases. We then use these relations to study the spatio-temporal correlations of the stress tensor in a Brownian fluid, which we compute to leading order in the interaction potential strength. We observe that, after integration over time, the spatial correlations generally decay as power laws in space. These are expected to be of importance for driven confined systems. We also show that divergence-free parts of the stress tensor do not contribute to the Green-Kubo relation for the viscosity.

  14. Dual and mixed nonsymmetric stress-based variational formulations for coupled thermoelastodynamics with second sound effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tóth, Balázs

    2018-03-01

    Some new dual and mixed variational formulations based on a priori nonsymmetric stresses will be developed for linearly coupled irreversible thermoelastodynamic problems associated with second sound effect according to the Lord-Shulman theory. Having introduced the entropy flux vector instead of the entropy field and defining the dissipation and the relaxation potential as the function of the entropy flux, a seven-field dual and mixed variational formulation will be derived from the complementary Biot-Hamilton-type variational principle, using the Lagrange multiplier method. The momentum-, the displacement- and the infinitesimal rotation vector, and the a priori nonsymmetric stress tensor, the temperature change, the entropy field and its flux vector are considered as the independent field variables of this formulation. In order to handle appropriately the six different groups of temporal prescriptions in the relaxed- and/or the strong form, two variational integrals will be incorporated into the seven-field functional. Then, eliminating the entropy from this formulation through the strong fulfillment of the constitutive relation for the temperature change with the use of the Legendre transformation between the enthalpy and Gibbs potential, a six-field dual and mixed action functional is obtained. As a further development, the elimination of the momentum- and the velocity vector from the six-field principle through the a priori satisfaction of the kinematic equation and the constitutive relation for the momentum vector leads to a five-field variational formulation. These principles are suitable for the transient analyses of the structures exposed to a thermal shock of short temporal domain or a large heat flux.

  15. Optimized and validated flow-injection spectrophotometric analysis of topiramate, piracetam and levetiracetam in pharmaceutical formulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadad, Ghada M; Abdel-Salam, Randa A; Emara, Samy

    2011-12-01

    Application of a sensitive and rapid flow injection analysis (FIA) method for determination of topiramate, piracetam, and levetiracetam in pharmaceutical formulations has been investigated. The method is based on the reaction with ortho-phtalaldehyde and 2-mercaptoethanol in a basic buffer and measurement of absorbance at 295 nm under flow conditions. Variables affecting the determination such as sample injection volume, pH, ionic strength, reagent concentrations, flow rate of reagent and other FIA parameters were optimized to produce the most sensitive and reproducible results using a quarter-fraction factorial design, for five factors at two levels. Also, the method has been optimized and fully validated in terms of linearity and range, limit of detection and quantitation, precision, selectivity and accuracy. The method was successfully applied to the analysis of pharmaceutical preparations.

  16. Comparative analysis of several sediment transport formulations applied to dam-break flows over erodible beds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cea, Luis; Bladé, Ernest; Corestein, Georgina; Fraga, Ignacio; Espinal, Marc; Puertas, Jerónimo

    2014-05-01

    Transitory flows generated by dam failures have a great sediment transport capacity, which induces important morphological changes on the river topography. Several studies have been published regarding the coupling between the sediment transport and hydrodynamic equations in dam-break applications, in order to correctly model their mutual interaction. Most of these models solve the depth-averaged shallow water equations to compute the water depth and velocity. On the other hand, a wide variety of sediment transport formulations have been arbitrarily used to compute the topography evolution. These are based on semi-empirical equations which have been calibrated under stationary and uniform conditions very different from those achieved in dam-break flows. Soares-Frazao et al. (2012) proposed a Benchmark test consisting of a dam-break over a mobile bed, in which several teams of modellers participated using different numerical models, and concluded that the key issue which still needs to be investigated in morphological modelling of dam-break flows is the link between the solid transport and the hydrodynamic variables. This paper presents a comparative analysis of different sediment transport formulations applied to dam-break flows over mobile beds. All the formulations analysed are commonly used in morphological studies in rivers, and include the formulas of Meyer-Peter & Müller (1948), Wong-Parker (2003), Einstein-Brown (1950), van Rijn (1984), Engelund-Hansen (1967), Ackers-White (1973), Yang (1973), and a Meyer-Peter & Müller type formula but with ad-hoc coefficients. The relevance of corrections on the sediment flux direction and magnitude due to the bed slope and the non-equilibrium hypothesis is also analysed. All the formulations have been implemented in the numerical model Iber (Bladé et al. (2014)), which solves the depth-averaged shallow water equations coupled to the Exner equation to evaluate the bed evolution. Two different test cases have been

  17. Tertiary instability of zonal flows within the Wigner-Moyal formulation of drift turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Hongxuan; Ruiz, D. E.; Dodin, I. Y.

    2017-10-01

    The stability of zonal flows (ZFs) is analyzed within the generalized-Hasegawa-Mima model. The necessary and sufficient condition for a ZF instability, which is also known as the tertiary instability, is identified. The qualitative physics behind the tertiary instability is explained using the recently developed Wigner-Moyal formulation and the corresponding wave kinetic equation (WKE) in the geometrical-optics (GO) limit. By analyzing the drifton phase space trajectories, we find that the corrections proposed in Ref. to the WKE are critical for capturing the spatial scales characteristic for the tertiary instability. That said, we also find that this instability itself cannot be adequately described within a GO formulation in principle. Using the Wigner-Moyal equations, which capture diffraction, we analytically derive the tertiary-instability growth rate and compare it with numerical simulations. The research was sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy.

  18. Bracket formulations and energy- and helicity-preserving numerical methods for incompressible two-phase flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Yukihito

    2018-03-01

    A diffuse interface model for three-dimensional viscous incompressible two-phase flows is formulated within a bracket formalism using a skew-symmetric Poisson bracket together with a symmetric negative semi-definite dissipative bracket. The budgets of kinetic energy, helicity, and enstrophy derived from the bracket formulations are properly inherited by the finite difference equations obtained by invoking the discrete variational derivative method combined with the mimetic finite difference method. The Cahn-Hilliard and Allen-Cahn equations are employed as diffuse interface models, in which the equalities of densities and viscosities of two different phases are assumed. Numerical experiments on the motion of periodic arrays of tubes and those of droplets have been conducted to examine the properties and usefulness of the proposed method.

  19. Finite element formulation for thermal stress analysis of thin reactor structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kulak, R.F.; Kennedy, J.M.; Belytschko, T.B.

    1978-01-01

    This paper describes the formulation of a finite-element procedure for the thermal stress analysis of thin wall reactor components. A general temperature-dependent constituent relationship is derived from a Gibbs potential function and a temperature-dependent yield surface. This form of constitutive relationship is applicable to problems of small strain. A similar form of a hypoelastic-plastic type is also developed for large strains. The variation of the yield surface with temperature is based upon a temperature-dependent, work-hardening model. The model uses a temperature-equivalent stress-plastic strain diagram which is generated from isothermal unaxial stress-strain data. The above constitutive relationships are incorporated into two computer codes and a previously developed numerical algorithm is used with minor modifications. A set of problems is presented validating the thermal analysis capability of the computer codes to a variety of problem types. (Auth.)

  20. The Average Network Flow Problem: Shortest Path and Minimum Cost Flow Formulations, Algorithms, Heuristics, and Complexity

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-13

    46, 1989. [75] S. Melkote and M.S. Daskin . An integrated model of facility location and transportation network design. Transportation Research Part A ... a work of the U.S. Government and is not subject to copyright protection in the United States. AFIT/DS/ENS/12-09 THE AVERAGE NETWORK FLOW PROBLEM...focused thinking (VFT) are used sparingly, as is the case across the entirety of the supply chain literature. We provide a VFT tutorial for supply chain

  1. On the Eulerian formulation of a stress induced platelet activation function

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bodnár, Tomáš

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 257, November (2014), s. 91-95 ISSN 0025-5564 Institutional support: RVO:61388998 Keywords : blood flow * platelet * stress * activation Subject RIV: BK - Fluid Dynamics Impact factor: 1.303, year: 2014 http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0025556414001163

  2. Ginseng essence, a medicinal and edible herbal formulation, ameliorates carbon tetrachloride-induced oxidative stress and liver injury in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuan-Hung Lu

    2017-07-01

    Conclusion: These findings demonstrate that GE improves CCl4-induced liver inflammation and fibrosis by attenuating oxidative stress. Therefore, GE could be a promising hepatoprotective herbal formulation for future development of phytotherapy.

  3. Forward Modeling and validation of a new formulation to compute self-potential signals associated with ground water flow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Bolève

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available The classical formulation of the coupled hydroelectrical flow in porous media is based on a linear formulation of two coupled constitutive equations for the electrical current density and the seepage velocity of the water phase and obeying Onsager's reciprocity. This formulation shows that the streaming current density is controlled by the gradient of the fluid pressure of the water phase and a streaming current coupling coefficient that depends on the so-called zeta potential. Recently a new formulation has been introduced in which the streaming current density is directly connected to the seepage velocity of the water phase and to the excess of electrical charge per unit pore volume in the porous material. The advantages of this formulation are numerous. First this new formulation is more intuitive not only in terms of establishing a constitutive equation for the generalized Ohm's law but also in specifying boundary conditions for the influence of the flow field upon the streaming potential. With the new formulation, the streaming potential coupling coefficient shows a decrease of its magnitude with permeability in agreement with published results. The new formulation has been extended in the inertial laminar flow regime and to unsaturated conditions with applications to the vadose zone. This formulation is suitable to model self-potential signals in the field. We investigate infiltration of water from an agricultural ditch, vertical infiltration of water into a sinkhole, and preferential horizontal flow of ground water in a paleochannel. For the three cases reported in the present study, a good match is obtained between finite element simulations performed and field observations. Thus, this formulation could be useful for the inverse mapping of the geometry of groundwater flow from self-potential field measurements.

  4. Extension to linear dynamics for hybrid stress finite element formulation based on additional displacements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sumihara, K.

    Based upon legitimate variational principles, one microscopic-macroscopic finite element formulation for linear dynamics is presented by Hybrid Stress Finite Element Method. The microscopic application of Geometric Perturbation introduced by Pian and the introduction of infinitesimal limit core element (Baby Element) have been consistently combined according to the flexible and inherent interpretation of the legitimate variational principles initially originated by Pian and Tong. The conceptual development based upon Hybrid Finite Element Method is extended to linear dynamics with the introduction of physically meaningful higher modes.

  5. GAUGE PRINCIPLE AND VARIATIONAL FORMULATION FOR FLOWS OF AN IDEAL FLUID

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    KAMBE Tsutomu

    2003-01-01

    A gauge principle is applied to mass flows of an ideal compressible fluid subject to Galilei transformation. A free-field Lagrangian defined at the outset is invariant with respect to global SO(3) gauge transformations as well as Galilei transformations. The action principle leads to the equation of potential flows under constraint of a continuity equation. However, the irrotational flow is not invariant with respect to local SO(3) gauge transformations. According to the gauge principle,a gauge-covariant derivative is defined by introducing a new gauge field. Galilei invariance of the derivative requires the gauge field to coincide with the vorticity, i.e. the curl of the velocity field. A full gauge-covariant variational formulation is proposed on the basis of the Hamilton's principle and an assoicated Lagrangian. By means of an isentropic material variation taking into account individual particle motion, the Euler's equation of motion is derived for isentropic flows by using the covariant derivative. Noether's law associated with global SO(3) gauge invariance leads to the conservation of total angular momentum. In addition, the Lagrangian has a local symmetry of particle permutation which results in local conservation law equivalent to the vorticity equation.

  6. Intercomparison of the Charnock and COARE bulk wind stress formulations for coastal ocean modelling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. M. Brown

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The accurate parameterisation of momentum and heat transfer across the air–sea interface is vital for realistic simulation of the atmosphere–ocean system. In most modelling applications accurate representation of the wind stress is required to numerically reproduce surge, coastal ocean circulation, surface waves, turbulence and mixing. Different formulations can be implemented and impact the accuracy of the instantaneous and long-term residual circulation, the surface mixed layer, and the generation of wave-surge conditions. This, in turn, affects predictions of storm impact, sediment pathways, and coastal resilience to climate change. The specific numerical formulation needs careful selection to ensure the accuracy of the simulation. Two wind stress parameterisations widely used in the ocean circulation and the storm surge communities respectively are studied with focus on an application to the NW region of the UK. Model–observation validation is performed at two nearshore and one estuarine ADCP (acoustic Doppler current profiler stations in Liverpool Bay, a hypertidal region of freshwater influence (ROFI with vast intertidal areas. The period of study covers both calm and extreme conditions to test the robustness of the 10 m wind stress component of the Coupled Ocean–Atmosphere Response Experiment (COARE bulk formulae and the standard Charnock relation. In this coastal application a realistic barotropic–baroclinic simulation of the circulation and surge elevation is set-up, demonstrating greater accuracy occurs when using the Charnock relation, with a constant Charnock coefficient of 0.0185, for surface wind stress during this one month period.

  7. A combined single-multiphase flow formulation of the premixing phase using the level set method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leskovar, M.; Marn, J.

    1999-01-01

    The premixing phase of a steam explosion covers the interaction of the melt jet or droplets with the water prior to any steam explosion occurring. To get a better insight of the hydrodynamic processes during the premixing phase beside hot premixing experiments, where the water evaporation is significant, also cold isothermal premixing experiments are performed. The specialty of isothermal premixing experiments is that three phases are involved: the water, the air and the spheres phase, but only the spheres phase mixes with the other two phases whereas the water and air phases do not mix and remain separated by a free surface. Our idea therefore was to treat the isothermal premixing process with a combined single-multiphase flow model. In this combined model the water and air phase are treated as a single phase with discontinuous phase properties at the water air interface, whereas the spheres are treated as usually with a multiphase flow model, where the spheres represent the dispersed phase and the common water-air phase represents the continuous phase. The common water-air phase was described with the front capturing method based on the level set formulation. In the level set formulation, the boundary of two-fluid interfaces is modeled as the zero set of a smooth signed normal distance function defined on the entire physical domain. The boundary is then updated by solving a nonlinear equation of the Hamilton-Jacobi type on the whole domain. With this single-multiphase flow model the Queos isothermal premixing Q08 has been simulated. A numerical analysis using different treatments of the water-air interface (level set, high-resolution and upwind) has been performed for the incompressible and compressible case and the results were compared to experimental measurements.(author)

  8. An Integrated Neuroscience Perspective on Formulation and Treatment Planning for Posttraumatic Stress Disorder: An Educational Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, David A; Arbuckle, Melissa R; Travis, Michael J; Dwyer, Jennifer B; van Schalkwyk, Gerrit I; Ressler, Kerry J

    2017-04-01

    Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is a common psychiatric illness, increasingly in the public spotlight in the United States due its prevalence in the soldiers returning from combat in Iraq and Afghanistan. This educational review presents a contemporary approach for how to incorporate a modern neuroscience perspective into an integrative case formulation. The article is organized around key neuroscience "themes" most relevant for PTSD. Within each theme, the article highlights how seemingly diverse biological, psychological, and social perspectives all intersect with our current understanding of neuroscience. Any contemporary neuroscience formulation of PTSD should include an understanding of fear conditioning, dysregulated circuits, memory reconsolidation, epigenetics, and genetic factors. Fear conditioning and other elements of basic learning theory offer a framework for understanding how traumatic events can lead to a range of behaviors associated with PTSD. A circuit dysregulation framework focuses more broadly on aberrant network connectivity, including between the prefrontal cortex and limbic structures. In the process of memory reconsolidation, it is now clear that every time a memory is reactivated it becomes momentarily labile-with implications for the genesis, maintenance, and treatment of PTSD. Epigenetic changes secondary to various experiences, especially early in life, can have long-term effects, including on the regulation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis, thereby affecting an individual's ability to regulate the stress response. Genetic factors are surprisingly relevant: PTSD has been shown to be highly heritable despite being definitionally linked to specific experiences. The relevance of each of these themes to current clinical practice and its potential to transform future care are discussed. Together, these perspectives contribute to an integrative, neuroscience-informed approach to case formulation and treatment planning. This may

  9. Vertical Distribution of Tidal Flow Reynolds Stress in Shallow Sea

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SONG Zhi-yao; NI Zhi-hui; LU Guo-nian

    2009-01-01

    Based on the results of the tidal flow Reynolds stresses of the field observations,indoor experiments,and numerical models,the parabolic distribution of the tidal flow Reynolds stress is proposed and its coefficients are determined theoretically in this paper.Having been well verified with the field data and experimental data,the proposed distribution of Reynolds stress is also compared with numerical model results,and a good agreement is obtained,showing that this distribution can well reflect the basic features of Reynolds stress deviating from the linear distribution that is downward when the tidal flow is of acceleration,upward when the tidal flow is of deceleration.Its dynamics cause is also discussed preliminarily and the influence of the water depth is pointed out from the definition of Reynolds stress,turbulent generation,transmission,and so on.The established expression for the vertical distribution of the tidal flow Reynolds stress is not only simple and explicit,but can also well reflect the features of the tidal flow acceleration and deceleration for further study on the velocity profile of tidal flow.

  10. Optimal power flow: a bibliographic survey I. Formulations and deterministic methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frank, Stephen [Colorado School of Mines, Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, Golden, CO (United States); Steponavice, Ingrida [University of Jyvaskyla, Department of Mathematical Information Technology, Agora (Finland); Rebennack, Steffen [Colorado School of Mines, Division of Economics and Business, Golden, CO (United States)

    2012-09-15

    Over the past half-century, optimal power flow (OPF) has become one of the most important and widely studied nonlinear optimization problems. In general, OPF seeks to optimize the operation of electric power generation, transmission, and distribution networks subject to system constraints and control limits. Within this framework, however, there is an extremely wide variety of OPF formulations and solution methods. Moreover, the nature of OPF continues to evolve due to modern electricity markets and renewable resource integration. In this two-part survey, we survey both the classical and recent OPF literature in order to provide a sound context for the state of the art in OPF formulation and solution methods. The survey contributes a comprehensive discussion of specific optimization techniques that have been applied to OPF, with an emphasis on the advantages, disadvantages, and computational characteristics of each. Part I of the survey (this article) provides an introduction and surveys the deterministic optimization methods that have been applied to OPF. Part II of the survey examines the recent trend towards stochastic, or non-deterministic, search techniques and hybrid methods for OPF. (orig.)

  11. Sirolimus formulation with improved pharmacokinetic properties produced by a continuous flow method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solymosi, Tamás; Angi, Réka; Basa-Dénes, Orsolya; Ránky, Soma; Ötvös, Zsolt; Glavinas, Hristos; Filipcsei, Genovéva; Heltovics, Gábor

    2015-08-01

    The oral bioavailability of Sirolimus is limited by poor dissolution of the compound in the gastrointestinal tract resulting in a low bioavailability and large inter-individual differences in blood levels. Several different formulation approaches were applied to overcome these disadvantageous pharmacokinetic properties including the marketed oral solution and a tablet form containing wet milled nanocrystals. These approaches deliver improved pharmacokinetics, yet, they share the characteristics of complex production method and composition. We have developed a nanostructured Sirolimus formulation prepared by the controlled continuous flow precipitation of the compound from its solution in the presence of stabilizers. We have shown that contrary to the batch production the process could be easily intensified and scaled up; apparently the uniformity of the precipitation is heavily dependent on the production parameters, most likely the mixing of the solvent and antisolvent. We compared the physicochemical and pharmacokinetic properties of the nanostructured formula with the marketed nanoformula. We found that our method produces particles in the size range of less than 100nm. The solid form redispersed instantaneously in water and in biorelevant media. Both the solid form and the redispersed colloid solution showed excellent stability even in accelerated test conditions. The oral administration of the nanostructured formula resulted in faster absorption, higher exposure and higher trough concentrations when compared to the marked form. These advantageous properties could allow the development of solid oral Sirolimus formulae with lower strength and gel based topical delivery systems. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Laboratory evaluation of different formulations of Stress Coat? for slime production in goldfish (Carassius auratus) and koi (Cyprinus carpio)

    OpenAIRE

    Shivappa, Raghunath B.; Christian, Larry S.; Law, Jerry M.; Lewbart, Gregory A.

    2017-01-01

    A study was carried out to assess the effect of Stress Coat® on slime production in goldfish (Carassius auratus) and koi (Cyprinus carpio). The study also investigated histological changes that might be associated with slime producing cells, and wound healing in koi. Several formulations of Stress Coat® were investigated and the results showed that polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP), also known as povidone, an ingredient of Stress Coat®, when used alone, showed significantly higher slime production i...

  13. Chronic Stress Impairs Collateral Blood Flow Recovery in Aged Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-10-15

    of oxidative stress in atherosclerosis. American of Journal in Cardiology , 91, 7A–11A. 11. Balkaya, M., Prinz, V., Custodis, F., et al. (2011...femoral artery occlusion (Figs. 2 and 5). Fig. 2 Blood flow recovery measurement after FAL. Blood flow mea- sured for control ( open circle) and stressed...peripheral arterial disease. Journal General and International Medication, 18(6), 461–467. 5. Yan, L. L., Liu, K., Matthews, K. A., et al. (2003). Psychosocial

  14. Reversal of CRF- and stress-induced anorexia by an ayurvedic formulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. S. Kulkarni

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Trikatu churna is one of the commonly used Ayurvedic formulations in the traditional system of medicine in India for the treatment of agnimandya, i.e. anorexia. Trikatu contains equal amounts of finely powdered rhizomes of Zingiber officinale Roscoe (Zingiberaceae and fruits of Piper longum L. and Piper nigrum L. (Piperaceae. The chief objective of the study was to determine the antianorectic effects of three drugs individually and to compare these effects with the effect of Trikatu. The activity of the drugs was studied after anorexia was induced in rats by (1 physical stress arising from immobilization for 60 min; (2 intraperitoneal injection of Escherichia coli lipopolysaccharide (LPS, 100 μg/kg body weight; and (3 intraperitoneal administration of fluoxetine (8 mg/kg body weight. Similar doses of the extracts were tested on freely feeding rats and on rats that had been deprived of food for 20 h. Corticotrophin-releasing factor (CRF, 0.3 μg/rat can induce anxiogenic-like behavior and reduced food intake. This model was also studied, and the results were compared. The components of Trikatu churna failed to individually reverse the inhibition of feeding. In contrast, Trikatu churna pretreatment reversed stress-, fluoxetine- and CRF-induced anorexia. The study provides strong evidence of the synergistic action of Ayurvedic formulas and also proves the ability of Trikatu churna to reduce stress and CRF-induced anorexia.

  15. Reversal of CRF- and stress-induced anorexia by an ayurvedic formulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. S. Kulkarni

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Trikatu churna is one of the commonly used Ayurvedic formulations in the traditional system of medicine in India for the treatment of agnimandya, i.e. anorexia. Trikatu contains equal amounts of finely powdered rhizomes of Zingiber officinale Roscoe (Zingiberaceae and fruits of Piper longum L. and Piper nigrum L. (Piperaceae. The chief objective of the study was to determine the antianorectic effects of three drugs individually and to compare these effects with the effect of Trikatu. The activity of the drugs was studied after anorexia was induced in rats by (1 physical stress arising from immobilization for 60 min; (2 intraperitoneal injection of Escherichia coli lipopolysaccharide (LPS, 100 μg/kg body weight; and (3 intraperitoneal administration of fluoxetine (8 mg/kg body weight. Similar doses of the extracts were tested on freely feeding rats and on rats that had been deprived of food for 20 h. Corticotrophin-releasing factor (CRF, 0.3 μg/rat can induce anxiogenic-like behavior and reduced food intake. This model was also studied, and the results were compared. The components of Trikatu churna failed to individually reverse the inhibition of feeding. In contrast, Trikatu churna pretreatment reversed stress-, fluoxetine- and CRF-induced anorexia. The study provides strong evidence of the synergistic action of Ayurvedic formulas and also proves the ability of Trikatu churna to reduce stress and CRF-induced anorexia.

  16. Finite-element formulations for the thermal stress analysis of two- and three-dimensional thin reactor structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kulak, R.F.; Kennedy, J.M.; Belytschko, T.B.; Schoeberle, D.F.

    1977-01-01

    This paper describes finite-element formulations for the thermal stress analysis of LMFBR structures. The first formulation is applicable to large displacement rotation problems in which the strains are small. For this formulation, a general temperature-dependent constituent relationship is derived from a Gibbs potential and a temperature dependent surface. A second formulation is presented for problems characterized by both large displacement-rotations and large strains. Here a set of large strain hypoelastic-plastic relationships are developed to linearly relate the rate of stress to the rate of deformation. These developments were incorporated into two ANL developed finite-element computer codes: the implicit version of STRAW and the 3D Implicit Structural Analaysis code. A set of problems is presented to validate both the 3D and 2D programs and to illustrate their applicability to a variety of problems. (Auth.)

  17. Stimulated bioluminescence by fluid shear stress associated with pipe flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cao Jing; Wang Jiangan; Wu Ronghua, E-mail: caojing981@126.com [Col. of Electronic Eng., Naval University of Engineering, Wuhan 430033 (China)

    2011-01-01

    Dinoflagellate can be stimulated bioluminescence by hydrodynamic agitation. Two typical dinoflagellate (Lingulodinium polyedrum and Pyrocystis noctiluca) was choosed to research stimulated bioluminescence. The bioluminescence intensity and shear stress intensity were measured using fully developed pipe flow. There is shear stress threshold to agitate organism bioluminescence. From these experiment, the response thresholds of the stimulated bioluminscence always occurred in laminar flows at a shear stress level of 0.6-3 dyn/cm{sup 2}. At the same time, the spectral characteristc of dinoflagellate was recorded, the wavelength of them is about 470nm, and the full width at half maximum is approximate 30nm.

  18. Optimal Water-Power Flow Problem: Formulation and Distributed Optimal Solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dall-Anese, Emiliano [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Zhao, Changhong [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Zamzam, Admed S. [University of Minnesota; Sidiropoulos, Nicholas D. [University of Minnesota; Taylor, Josh A. [University of Toronto

    2018-01-12

    This paper formalizes an optimal water-power flow (OWPF) problem to optimize the use of controllable assets across power and water systems while accounting for the couplings between the two infrastructures. Tanks and pumps are optimally managed to satisfy water demand while improving power grid operations; {for the power network, an AC optimal power flow formulation is augmented to accommodate the controllability of water pumps.} Unfortunately, the physics governing the operation of the two infrastructures and coupling constraints lead to a nonconvex (and, in fact, NP-hard) problem; however, after reformulating OWPF as a nonconvex, quadratically-constrained quadratic problem, a feasible point pursuit-successive convex approximation approach is used to identify feasible and optimal solutions. In addition, a distributed solver based on the alternating direction method of multipliers enables water and power operators to pursue individual objectives while respecting the couplings between the two networks. The merits of the proposed approach are demonstrated for the case of a distribution feeder coupled with a municipal water distribution network.

  19. Mass-flux subgrid-scale parameterization in analogy with multi-component flows: a formulation towards scale independence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.-I. Yano

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available A generalized mass-flux formulation is presented, which no longer takes a limit of vanishing fractional areas for subgrid-scale components. The presented formulation is applicable to a~situation in which the scale separation is still satisfied, but fractional areas occupied by individual subgrid-scale components are no longer small. A self-consistent formulation is presented by generalizing the mass-flux formulation under the segmentally-constant approximation (SCA to the grid–scale variabilities. The present formulation is expected to alleviate problems arising from increasing resolutions of operational forecast models without invoking more extensive overhaul of parameterizations.

    The present formulation leads to an analogy of the large-scale atmospheric flow with multi-component flows. This analogy allows a generality of including any subgrid-scale variability into the mass-flux parameterization under SCA. Those include stratiform clouds as well as cold pools in the boundary layer.

    An important finding under the present formulation is that the subgrid-scale quantities are advected by the large-scale velocities characteristic of given subgrid-scale components (large-scale subcomponent flows, rather than by the total large-scale flows as simply defined by grid-box average. In this manner, each subgrid-scale component behaves as if like a component of multi-component flows. This formulation, as a result, ensures the lateral interaction of subgrid-scale variability crossing the grid boxes, which are missing in the current parameterizations based on vertical one-dimensional models, and leading to a reduction of the grid-size dependencies in its performance. It is shown that the large-scale subcomponent flows are driven by large-scale subcomponent pressure gradients. The formulation, as a result, furthermore includes a self-contained description of subgrid-scale momentum transport.

    The main purpose of the present paper

  20. Comparison of gravimetric and mantle flow solutions for sub-lithopsheric stress modeling and their combination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eshagh, Mehdi; Steinberger, Bernhard; Tenzer, Robert; Tassara, Andrés

    2018-05-01

    Based on Hager and O'Connell's solution to mantle flow equations, the stresses induced by mantle convection are determined using the density and viscosity structure in addition to topographic data and a plate velocity model. The solution to mantle flow equations requires the knowledge of mantle properties that are typically retrieved from seismic information. Large parts of the world are, however, not yet covered sufficiently by seismic surveys. An alternative method of modeling the stress field was introduced by Runcorn. He formulated a direct relation between the stress field and gravity data, while adopting several assumptions, particularly disregarding the toroidal mantle flow component and mantle viscosity variations. A possible way to overcome theoretical deficiencies of Runcorn's theory as well as some practical limitations of applying Hager and O'Connell's theory (in the absence of seismic data) is to combine these two methods. In this study, we apply a least-squares analysis to combine these two methods based on the gravity data inversion constraint on mantle flow equations. In particular, we use vertical gravity gradients from the Gravity field and steady state Ocean Circulation Explorer that are corrected for the gravitational contribution of crustal density heterogeneities prior to applying a localized gravity-gradient inversion. This gravitational contribution is estimated based on combining the Vening Meinesz-Moritz and flexural isostatic theories. Moreover, we treat the non-isostatic effect implicitly by applying a band-limited kernel of the integral equation during the inversion. In numerical studies of modeling, the stress field within the South American continental lithosphere we compare the results obtained after applying Runcorn and Hager and O'Connell's methods as well as their combination. The results show that, according to Hager and O'Connell's (mantle flow) solution, the maximum stress intensity is inferred under the northern Andes

  1. Interplay between cytoskeletal stresses and cell adaptation under chronic flow.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deepika Verma

    Full Text Available Using stress sensitive FRET sensors we have measured cytoskeletal stresses in α-actinin and the associated reorganization of the actin cytoskeleton in cells subjected to chronic shear stress. We show that long-term shear stress reduces the average actinin stress and this effect is reversible with removal of flow. The flow-induced changes in cytoskeletal stresses are found to be dynamic, involving a transient decrease in stress (phase-I, a short-term increase (3-6 min (Phase-II, followed by a longer-term decrease that reaches a minimum in ~20 min (Phase-III, before saturating. These changes are accompanied by reorganization of the actin cytoskeleton from parallel F-actin bundles to peripheral bundles. Blocking mechanosensitive ion channels (MSCs with Gd(3+ and GsMTx4 (a specific inhibitor eliminated the changes in cytoskeletal stress and the corresponding actin reorganization, indicating that Ca(2+ permeable MSCs participate in the signaling cascades. This study shows that shear stress induced cell adaptation is mediated via MSCs.

  2. Second law analysis for hydromagnetic couple stress fluid flow through a porous channel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.O. Kareem

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available In this work, the combined effects of magnetic field and ohmic heating on the entropy generation rate in the flow of couple stress fluid through a porous channel are investigated. The equations governing the fluid flow are formulated, non-dimensionalised and solved using a rapidly convergent semi-analytical Adomian decomposition method (ADM. The result of the computation shows a significant dependence of fluid’s thermophysical parameters on Joule’s dissipation as well as decline in the rate of change of fluid momentum due to the interplay between Lorentz and viscous forces. Moreover, the rate of entropy generation in the flow system drops as the magnitude of the magnetic field increases.

  3. Flow stress, subgrain size, and subgrain stability at elevated temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sherby, O.D.; Klundt, R.H.; Miller, A.K.

    1977-01-01

    Well defined subgrain boundaries dominate the microstructural changes occurring during plastic flow of polycrystalline metals at elevated temperature. The quantitative influence of subgrain size on elevated-temperature plastic flow is considered. Based on the results of tests under constant-stress and constant-structure conditions, and equation is developed which predicts the creep rate as a function of subgrain size, stress, diffusion coefficient, and elastic modulus. In general, the subgrain size is a unique function of the current modulus-compensated flow stress, but if fine subgrains can be introduced and stabilized, large increases in creep strength may result. The applicability of the phenomenological relation developed to the behavior of dispersion-strengthened materials (where the second-phase particles may predetermine the effective subgrain size) is discussed. When subgrain effects are included, it is shown that the creep rate is less dependent on stacking fault energy than has been previously thought

  4. An entropy-variables-based formulation of residual distribution schemes for non-equilibrium flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garicano-Mena, Jesús; Lani, Andrea; Degrez, Gérard

    2018-06-01

    In this paper we present an extension of Residual Distribution techniques for the simulation of compressible flows in non-equilibrium conditions. The latter are modeled by means of a state-of-the-art multi-species and two-temperature model. An entropy-based variable transformation that symmetrizes the projected advective Jacobian for such a thermophysical model is introduced. Moreover, the transformed advection Jacobian matrix presents a block diagonal structure, with mass-species and electronic-vibrational energy being completely decoupled from the momentum and total energy sub-system. The advantageous structure of the transformed advective Jacobian can be exploited by contour-integration-based Residual Distribution techniques: established schemes that operate on dense matrices can be substituted by the same scheme operating on the momentum-energy subsystem matrix and repeated application of scalar scheme to the mass-species and electronic-vibrational energy terms. Finally, the performance gain of the symmetrizing-variables formulation is quantified on a selection of representative testcases, ranging from subsonic to hypersonic, in inviscid or viscous conditions.

  5. Local microstructure and flow stress in deformed metals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Xiaodan; Hansen, Niels; Nielsen, Chris Valentin

    2017-01-01

    The microstructure and flow stress of metals are related through many well-known strength-structure relationships based on structural parameters, where grain size and dislocation density are examples. In heterogeneous structures, the local stress and strain are important as they will affect...... the bulk properties. A microstructural method is presented which allows the local stress in a deformed metal to be estimated based on microstructural parameters determined by an EBSD analysis. These parameters are the average spacing of deformation introduced boundaries and the fraction of high angle...... boundaries. The method is demonstrated for two heterogeneous structures: (i) a gradient (sub)surface structure in steel deformed by shot peening; (ii) a heterogeneous structure introduced by friction between a tool and a workpiece of aluminum. Flow stress data are calculated based on the microstructural...

  6. Stress Analysis of Fuel Rod under Axial Coolant Flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jin, Hai Lan; Lee, Young Shin; Lee, Hyun Seung [Chungnam National University, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Park, Num Kyu; Jeon, Kyung Rok [Kerea Nuclear Fuel., Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-05-15

    A pressurized water reactor(PWR) fuel assembly, is a typical bundle structure, which uses light water as a coolant in most commercial nuclear power plants. Fuel rods that have a very slender and long clad are supported by fuel assembly which consists of several spacer grids. A coolant is a fluid which flows through device to prevent its overheating, transferring the heat produced by the device to other devices that use or dissipate it. But at the same time, the coolant flow will bring out the fluid induced vibration(FIV) of fuel rods and even damaged the fuel rod. This study has been conducted to investigate the flow characteristics and nuclear reactor fuel rod stress under effect of coolant. Fluid structure interaction(FSI) analysis on nuclear reactor fuel rod was performed. Fluid analysis of the coolant which flow along the axial direction and structural analysis under effect of flow velocity were carried out under different output flow velocity conditions

  7. Stress Analysis of Fuel Rod under Axial Coolant Flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jin, Hai Lan; Lee, Young Shin; Lee, Hyun Seung; Park, Num Kyu; Jeon, Kyung Rok

    2010-01-01

    A pressurized water reactor(PWR) fuel assembly, is a typical bundle structure, which uses light water as a coolant in most commercial nuclear power plants. Fuel rods that have a very slender and long clad are supported by fuel assembly which consists of several spacer grids. A coolant is a fluid which flows through device to prevent its overheating, transferring the heat produced by the device to other devices that use or dissipate it. But at the same time, the coolant flow will bring out the fluid induced vibration(FIV) of fuel rods and even damaged the fuel rod. This study has been conducted to investigate the flow characteristics and nuclear reactor fuel rod stress under effect of coolant. Fluid structure interaction(FSI) analysis on nuclear reactor fuel rod was performed. Fluid analysis of the coolant which flow along the axial direction and structural analysis under effect of flow velocity were carried out under different output flow velocity conditions

  8. Two-phase flow experiments through intergranular stress corrosion cracks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Collier, R.P.; Norris, D.M.

    1984-01-01

    Experimental studies of critical two-phase water flow, through simulated and actual intergranular stress corrosion cracks, were performed to obtain data to evaluate a leak flow rate model and investigate acoustic transducer effectiveness in detecting and sizing leaks. The experimental program included a parametric study of the effects of crack geometry, fluid stagnation pressure and temperature, and crack surface roughness on leak flow rate. In addition, leak detection, location, and leak size estimation capabilities of several different acoustic transducers were evaluated as functions of leak rate and transducer position. This paper presents flow rate data for several different cracks and fluid conditions. It also presents the minimum flows rate detected with the acoustic sensors and a relationship between acoustic signal strength and leak flow rate

  9. Estimation of flow rates through intergranular stress corrosion cracks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Collier, R.P.; Norris, D.M.

    1984-01-01

    Experimental studies of critical two-phase water flow, through simulated and actual intergranular stress corrosion cracks, were performed to obtain data to evaluate a leak flow rate model and investigate acoustic transducer effectiveness in detecting and sizing leaks. The experimental program included a parametric study of the effects of crack geometry, fluid stagnation pressure and temperature, and crack surface roughness on leak flow rate. In addition, leak detection, location, and leak size estimation capabilities of several different acoustic transducers were evaluated as functions of leak rate and transducer position. This paper presents flow rate data for several different cracks and fluid conditions. It also presents the minimum flow rate detected with the acoustic sensors and a relationship between acoustic signal strength and leak flow rate

  10. Tensor formulation of the model equations on strong conservation form for an incompressible flow in general coordinates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Bo Hoffmann

    2003-01-01

    This brief report expresses the basic equations of an incompressible flow model in a form which can be translated easily into the form used by a numerical solver. The application of tensor notation makes is possible to effectively address the issue ofnumerical robustness and stating the model...... equations on a general form which accommodate curvilinear coordinates. Strong conservation form is obtained by formulating the equations so that the flow variables, velocity and pressure, are expressed in thephysical coordinate system while the location of evaluation is expressed within the transformed...... form of the equations is included which allows for special solutions to be developed in the transformedcoordinate system. Examples of applications are atmospheric flows over complex terrain, aerodynamically flows, industrial flows and environmental flows....

  11. Flow rate dependency of critical wall shear stress in a radial-flow cell

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Detry, J.G.; Jensen, Bo Boye Busk; Sindic, M.

    2009-01-01

    In the present work, a radial-flow cell was used to study the removal of starch particle aggregates from several solid substrates (glass, stainless steel, polystyrene and PTFE) in order to determine the critical wall shear stress value for each case. The particle aggregates were formed by aspersion...... of a water or ethanol suspension of starch granules on the surfaces. Depending on the substrate and on the suspending liquid, the aggregates differed in size and shape. Aggregate removal was studied at two flow rates. At the lower flow rate (Re-inlet = 955), the values of critical wall shear stress...... for the different surfaces suggested that capillary forces were, for all of them, playing an important role in aggregate adhesion since aqueous based aggregates were always more difficult to remove. At the higher flow rate (Re-inlet = 2016) the critical wall shear stress increased as a result of the change...

  12. Variable thickness transient ground-water flow model. Volume 1. Formulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reisenauer, A.E.

    1979-12-01

    Mathematical formulation for the variable thickness transient (VTT) model of an aquifer system is presented. The basic assumptions are described. Specific data requirements for the physical parameters are discussed. The boundary definitions and solution techniques of the numerical formulation of the system of equations are presented

  13. Couple stress fluid flow in a rotating channel with peristalsis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abd elmaboud, Y.; Abdelsalam, Sara I.; Mekheimer, Kh. S.

    2018-04-01

    This article describes a new model for obtaining closed-form semi-analytical solutions of peristaltic flow induced by sinusoidal wave trains propagating with constant speed on the walls of a two-dimensional rotating infinite channel. The channel rotates with a constant angular speed about the z - axis and is filled with couple stress fluid. The governing equations of the channel deformation and the flow rate inside the channel are derived using the lubrication theory approach. The resulting equations are solved, using the homotopy perturbation method (HPM), for exact solutions to the longitudinal velocity distribution, pressure gradient, flow rate due to secondary velocity, and pressure rise per wavelength. The effect of various values of physical parameters, such as, Taylor's number and couple stress parameter, together with some interesting features of peristaltic flow are discussed through graphs. The trapping phenomenon is investigated for different values of parameters under consideration. It is shown that Taylor's number and the couple stress parameter have an increasing effect on the longitudinal velocity distribution till half of the channel, on the flow rate due to secondary velocity, and on the number of closed streamlines circulating the bolus.

  14. Reliability analysis for cementless hip prosthesis using a new optimized formulation of yield stress against elasticity modulus relationship

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kharmanda, G.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • We develop a new formulation between the yield stress and Young’s modulus of bone. • We validate the optimized formulation for cortical and trabecular bone. • We integrate the reliability analysis into artificially hip replacement design. - Abstract: Using classical design optimization methods for implant-bone studies does not completely guarantee a safety and satisfactory performance, due in part to the randomness of bone properties and loading. Here, the material properties of the different bone layers are considered as uncertain parameters. So their corresponding yield stress values will not be deterministic, that leads to integrate variable limitations into the optimization process. Here there is a strong need to find a reliable mathematical relationship between yield stress and material properties of the different bone layers. In this work, a new optimized formulation for yield stress against elasticity modulus relationship is first developed. This model is based on some experimental results. A validation of the proposed formulation is next carried out to show its accuracy for both bone layers (cortical and cancellous). A probabilistic sensitivity analysis is then carried out to show the role of each input parameter with respect to the limit state function. The new optimized formulation is next integrated into a reliability analysis problem in order to assess the reliability level of the stem–bone study where we deal with variable boundary limitations. An illustrative application is considered as a bi-dimensional example (contains only two variables) in order to present the results in an illustrative 2D space. Finally, a multi-variable problem considering several daily loading cases on a hip prosthesis shows the applicability of the proposed strategy

  15. Flow stress asymmetry and cyclic stress--strain response in a BCC Ti--V alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koss, D.A.; Wojcik, C.C.

    1976-01-01

    The cyclic stress-strain response of relatively stable bcc β-phase Ti--40 percent V alloy single crystals was studied. Flow stress asymmetry found in the alloy is attributed to the fact that screw dislocations, when gliding on a (211) plane, are more mobile in the twinning direction than in the antitwinning direction. Thus the flow stress of the crystal is greater when it is sheared in the antitwinning direction than in the twinning direction (the latter case results when crystals of the 100 orientation are stressed in tension and those of the 110 orientation are stressed in compression). Such behavior can be a result of the core of a screw dislocation being asymmetric under stress which causes the flow stress asymmetry observed. It should be noted that screw dislocations dominate the low temperature deformation structure of Ti-40V, which strongly suggests deformation is controlled by screw dislocation motion. The observation in Mo that the microyield stress is independent of crystal orientation could be a result of edge dislocation motion controlling microyield in that instance and this observation would not be inconsistent with screw dislocation motion controlling the macroscopic (epsilon/sub p/ greater than 0.05 percent) deformation measured here

  16. Finite-element formulations for the thermal stress analysis of two- and three-dimensional thin ractor structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kulak, R.F.; Kennedy, J.M.; Belytschko, T.B.; Schoeberle, D.F.

    1977-01-01

    This paper describes finite-element formulations for the thermal stress analysis of LMFBR structures. The first formulation is applicable to large displacement rotation problems in which the strains are small. For this formulation, a general temperature-dependent constituent relationship is derived from a Gibbs potential function and a temperature dependent yield surface. The temperature dependency of the yield surface is based upon a temperature-dependent, material-hardening model. The model uses a temperature-equivalent stress-plastic strain diagram which is generated from isothermal uniaxial stress-strain data. A second formulation is presented for problems characterized by both large displacement-rotations and large strains. Here a set of large strain hypoelastic-plastic relationships are developed to linearly relate the rate of stress to the rate of deformation. The temperature field is described through time-dependent values at mesh node points; the temperature fields in each element are then obtained by interpolation formulas. Hence, problems with both spatial and temporal dependent temperature fields can easily be treated. The above developments were incorporated into two ANL developed finite-element computer codes: the implicit version of STRAW and the 3D Implicit Structural Analysis Code. STRAW is a two-dimensional code with a plane stress/plane strain beam element. The 3D Implicit code has a triangular flat plate element which is capable of sustaining both membrane and bending loads. To insure numerical stability both codes are based on an iterative-incremental solution procedure with equilibrium checks based on an error in energy

  17. Multiphase flows of N immiscible incompressible fluids: A reduction-consistent and thermodynamically-consistent formulation and associated algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, S.

    2018-05-01

    We present a reduction-consistent and thermodynamically consistent formulation and an associated numerical algorithm for simulating the dynamics of an isothermal mixture consisting of N (N ⩾ 2) immiscible incompressible fluids with different physical properties (densities, viscosities, and pair-wise surface tensions). By reduction consistency we refer to the property that if only a set of M (1 ⩽ M ⩽ N - 1) fluids are present in the system then the N-phase governing equations and boundary conditions will exactly reduce to those for the corresponding M-phase system. By thermodynamic consistency we refer to the property that the formulation honors the thermodynamic principles. Our N-phase formulation is developed based on a more general method that allows for the systematic construction of reduction-consistent formulations, and the method suggests the existence of many possible forms of reduction-consistent and thermodynamically consistent N-phase formulations. Extensive numerical experiments have been presented for flow problems involving multiple fluid components and large density ratios and large viscosity ratios, and the simulation results are compared with the physical theories or the available physical solutions. The comparisons demonstrate that our method produces physically accurate results for this class of problems.

  18. Sensor for Boundary Shear Stress in Fluid Flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Xiaoqi; Badescu, Mircea; Sherrit, Stewart; Bar-Cohen, Yoseph; Lih, Shyh-Shiuh; Chang, Zensheu; Trease, Brian P.; Kerenyi, Kornel; Widholm, Scott E.; Ostlund, Patrick N.

    2012-01-01

    The formation of scour patterns at bridge piers is driven by the forces at the boundary of the water flow. In most experimental scour studies, indirect processes have been applied to estimate the shear stress using measured velocity profiles. The estimations are based on theoretical models and associated assumptions. However, the turbulence flow fields and boundary layer in the pier-scour region are very complex and lead to low-fidelity results. In addition, available turbulence models cannot account accurately for the bed roughness effect. Direct measurement of the boundary shear stress, normal stress, and their fluctuations are attractive alternatives. However, most direct-measurement shear sensors are bulky in size or not compatible to fluid flow. A sensor has been developed that consists of a floating plate with folded beam support and an optical grid on the back, combined with a high-resolution optical position probe. The folded beam support makes the floating plate more flexible in the sensing direction within a small footprint, while maintaining high stiffness in the other directions. The floating plate converts the shear force to displacement, and the optical probe detects the plate s position with nanometer resolution by sensing the pattern of the diffraction field of the grid through a glass window. This configuration makes the sensor compatible with liquid flow applications.

  19. Shrinkage / stress reduction and mechanical properties improvement in restorative composites formulated with thio-urethane oligomers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacchi, Atais; Yih, Jonathan A; Platta, Jacqueline; Knight, Joseph; Pfeifer, Carmem S

    2018-02-01

    Thio-urethane oligomers (TUs) have been shown to favorably modify methacrylate networks to reduce stress and significantly increase fracture toughness. Since those are very desirable features in dental applications, the objective of this work was to characterize restorative composites formulated with the addition of TUs. TUs were synthesized by combining thiols - pentaerythritol tetra-3-mercaptopropionate (PETMP) or trimethylol-tris-3-mercaptopropionate (TMP) - with isocyanates - 1,6-Hexanediol-diissocyante (HDDI) (aliphatic) or 1,3-bis(1-isocyanato-1-methylethyl)benzene (BDI) (aromatic) or dicyclohexylmethane 4,4'-Diisocyanate (HMDI) (cyclic), at 1:2 isocyanate:thiol, leaving pendant thiols. 20wt% TU were added to BisGMA-TEGDMA (70-30%). To this organic matrix, 70wt% silanated inorganic fillers were added. Near-IR was used to follow methacrylate conversion and rate of polymerization (Rp max ). Mechanical properties were evaluated in three-point bending (ISO 4049) for flexural strength/modulus (FS/FM) and toughness (T), and notched specimens (ASTM Standard E399-90) for fracture toughness (K IC ). Polymerization stress (PS) was measured on the Bioman. Volumetric shrinkage (VS) was measured with the bonded disk technique. Glass transition temperature (Tg) and heterogeneity of network were obtained with dynamic mechanical analysis. The addition of TUs led to an increase in mechanical properties (except for Tg and FS). Fracture toughness ranged from 1.6-1.94MPam 1/2 for TU-modified groups, an increase of 33-61% in relation to the control (1.21 ± 0.1MPam 1/2 ). Toughness showed a two-fold increase in relation to the control: from 0.91MPa to values ranging from 1.70-1.95MPa. Flexural modulus was statistically higher for the TU-modified groups. The Tg, as expected, decreased for all TU groups due to the greater flexibility imparted to the network (which also explains the increase in toughness and fracture toughness). Narrower tan-delta peaks suggest more homogeneous

  20. Effects of couple stresses in MHD channel flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soundalgekar, V.M.; Aranake, R.N.

    1977-01-01

    An analysis of fully developed MHD channel flow of an electrically conducting incompressible fluid, taking into account the couple stresses, is carried out. Exact solutions are derived for velocity profiles, current density, skin-friction and coefficient of mass flux. They are influenced by the magnetic field, the loading parameter k, and the non-dimensional parameter (a=b 1 /lambda). Their variations with respect to M, k and a are represented graphically, this is followed by a physical discussion. It is observed that the couple stresses are more effective in the presence of a very weak magnetic field. (Auth.)

  1. Effects of flow unsteadiness on the wall shear stress

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amiri, K; Cervantes, M J; Raisee, M

    2012-01-01

    Measurements were performed on pulsating fully turbulent flows in a pipe test rig with a diameter of 100 mm. Sinusoidal oscillatory flow at different frequencies was superimposed on a mean flow of averaged Reynolds number Re=20000 based on the pipe diameter. The measurements have been performed at different forcing frequencies (0.001 + < 0.08) covering all the oscillatory regimes; quasi-steady, relaxation, quasi laminar and high frequency. The amplitude of the flow oscillation was small enough to allow a linear response in the measurements, i.e., all flow parameters showed an oscillatory behavior at the frequency of the flow. The amplitude of the oscillatory flow was about 10% of the mean velocity in all cases. The results include mean and phase averaged values of different parameters. The centerline velocity was measured by a 2D LDA system. Hot film and constant temperature anemometry system was used to determine the wall shear stress. Bulk velocity and pressure gradient along the pipe were also acquired. The results showed a good agreement with the previous analytical, experimental and numerical results available in the literature.

  2. Guidelines for the formulation of Lagrangian stochastic models for particle simulations of single-phase and dispersed two-phase turbulent flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minier, Jean-Pierre; Chibbaro, Sergio; Pope, Stephen B.

    2014-11-01

    In this paper, we establish a set of criteria which are applied to discuss various formulations under which Lagrangian stochastic models can be found. These models are used for the simulation of fluid particles in single-phase turbulence as well as for the fluid seen by discrete particles in dispersed turbulent two-phase flows. The purpose of the present work is to provide guidelines, useful for experts and non-experts alike, which are shown to be helpful to clarify issues related to the form of Lagrangian stochastic models. A central issue is to put forward reliable requirements which must be met by Lagrangian stochastic models and a new element brought by the present analysis is to address the single- and two-phase flow situations from a unified point of view. For that purpose, we consider first the single-phase flow case and check whether models are fully consistent with the structure of the Reynolds-stress models. In the two-phase flow situation, coming up with clear-cut criteria is more difficult and the present choice is to require that the single-phase situation be well-retrieved in the fluid-limit case, elementary predictive abilities be respected and that some simple statistical features of homogeneous fluid turbulence be correctly reproduced. This analysis does not address the question of the relative predictive capacities of different models but concentrates on their formulation since advantages and disadvantages of different formulations are not always clear. Indeed, hidden in the changes from one structure to another are some possible pitfalls which can lead to flaws in the construction of practical models and to physically unsound numerical calculations. A first interest of the present approach is illustrated by considering some models proposed in the literature and by showing that these criteria help to assess whether these Lagrangian stochastic models can be regarded as acceptable descriptions. A second interest is to indicate how future

  3. Guidelines for the formulation of Lagrangian stochastic models for particle simulations of single-phase and dispersed two-phase turbulent flows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Minier, Jean-Pierre; Chibbaro, Sergio; Pope, Stephen B.

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we establish a set of criteria which are applied to discuss various formulations under which Lagrangian stochastic models can be found. These models are used for the simulation of fluid particles in single-phase turbulence as well as for the fluid seen by discrete particles in dispersed turbulent two-phase flows. The purpose of the present work is to provide guidelines, useful for experts and non-experts alike, which are shown to be helpful to clarify issues related to the form of Lagrangian stochastic models. A central issue is to put forward reliable requirements which must be met by Lagrangian stochastic models and a new element brought by the present analysis is to address the single- and two-phase flow situations from a unified point of view. For that purpose, we consider first the single-phase flow case and check whether models are fully consistent with the structure of the Reynolds-stress models. In the two-phase flow situation, coming up with clear-cut criteria is more difficult and the present choice is to require that the single-phase situation be well-retrieved in the fluid-limit case, elementary predictive abilities be respected and that some simple statistical features of homogeneous fluid turbulence be correctly reproduced. This analysis does not address the question of the relative predictive capacities of different models but concentrates on their formulation since advantages and disadvantages of different formulations are not always clear. Indeed, hidden in the changes from one structure to another are some possible pitfalls which can lead to flaws in the construction of practical models and to physically unsound numerical calculations. A first interest of the present approach is illustrated by considering some models proposed in the literature and by showing that these criteria help to assess whether these Lagrangian stochastic models can be regarded as acceptable descriptions. A second interest is to indicate how future

  4. Flow Formulation-based Model for the Curriculum-based Course Timetabling Problem

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bagger, Niels-Christian Fink; Kristiansen, Simon; Sørensen, Matias

    2015-01-01

    problem. This decreases the number of integer variables signicantly and improves the performance compared to the basic formulation. It also shows competitiveness with other approaches based on mixed integer programming from the literature and improves the currently best known lower bound on one data...... instance in the benchmark data set from the second international timetabling competition.......In this work we will present a new mixed integer programming formulation for the curriculum-based course timetabling problem. We show that the model contains an underlying network model by dividing the problem into two models and then connecting the two models back into one model using a maximum ow...

  5. Effects of couple stresses on MHD Couette flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soundalgekar, V.M.; Aranake, R.N.

    1978-01-01

    An exact analysis of the effects of the couple stresses on the MHD Couette flow of an electrically conducting, viscous incompressible fluid is carried out. Closed form solutions are derived for the velocity, the current density, the skin-friction at the lower plate, the force to move the upper plate, and the coefficient of mass flux for (i) A→infinity, and (ii) 2M/A 1, where a is the couple stress parameter and M is the Hartmann number. These are shown graphically followed by a discussion. During the course of discussion the effects of A are quantitatively compared with those in the ordinary case. It is observed that in the presence of a magnetic field the skin friction is affected by the couple stresses. (Auth.)

  6. Adipose tissue and skeletal muscle blood flow during mental stress

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Linde, B.; Hjemdahl, P.; Freyschuss, U.; Juhlin-Dannfelt, A.

    1989-01-01

    Mental stress (a modified Stroop color word conflict test (CWT)) increased adipose tissue blood flow (ATBF; 133Xe clearance) by 70% and reduced adipose tissue vascular resistance (ATR) by 25% in healthy male volunteers. The vasculatures of adipose tissue (abdomen as well as thigh), skeletal muscle of the calf (133Xe clearance), and the entire calf (venous occlusion plethysmography) responded similarly. Arterial epinephrine (Epi) and glycerol levels were approximately doubled by stress. Beta-Blockade by metoprolol (beta 1-selective) or propranolol (nonselective) attenuated CWT-induced tachycardia similarly. Metoprolol attenuated stress-induced vasodilation in the calf and tended to do so in adipose tissue. Propranolol abolished vasodilation in the calf and resulted in vasoconstriction during CWT in adipose tissue. Decreases in ATR, but not in skeletal muscle or calf vascular resistances, were correlated to increases in arterial plasma glycerol (r = -0.42, P less than 0.05), whereas decreases in skeletal muscle and calf vascular resistances, but not in ATR, were correlated to increases in arterial Epi levels (r = -0.69, P less than 0.01; and r = -0.43, P less than 0.05, respectively). The results suggest that mental stress increases nutritive blood flow in adipose tissue and skeletal muscle considerably, both through the elevation of perfusion pressure and via vasodilatation. Withdrawal of vasoconstrictor nerve activity, vascular beta 2-adrenoceptor stimulation by circulating Epi, and metabolic mechanisms (in adipose tissue) may contribute to the vasodilatation.

  7. Adipose tissue and skeletal muscle blood flow during mental stress

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Linde, B.; Hjemdahl, P.; Freyschuss, U.; Juhlin-Dannfelt, A.

    1989-01-01

    Mental stress [a modified Stroop color word conflict test (CWT)] increased adipose tissue blood flow (ATBF; 133Xe clearance) by 70% and reduced adipose tissue vascular resistance (ATR) by 25% in healthy male volunteers. The vasculatures of adipose tissue (abdomen as well as thigh), skeletal muscle of the calf (133Xe clearance), and the entire calf (venous occlusion plethysmography) responded similarly. Arterial epinephrine (Epi) and glycerol levels were approximately doubled by stress. Beta-Blockade by metoprolol (beta 1-selective) or propranolol (nonselective) attenuated CWT-induced tachycardia similarly. Metoprolol attenuated stress-induced vasodilation in the calf and tended to do so in adipose tissue. Propranolol abolished vasodilation in the calf and resulted in vasoconstriction during CWT in adipose tissue. Decreases in ATR, but not in skeletal muscle or calf vascular resistances, were correlated to increases in arterial plasma glycerol (r = -0.42, P less than 0.05), whereas decreases in skeletal muscle and calf vascular resistances, but not in ATR, were correlated to increases in arterial Epi levels (r = -0.69, P less than 0.01; and r = -0.43, P less than 0.05, respectively). The results suggest that mental stress increases nutritive blood flow in adipose tissue and skeletal muscle considerably, both through the elevation of perfusion pressure and via vasodilatation. Withdrawal of vasoconstrictor nerve activity, vascular beta 2-adrenoceptor stimulation by circulating Epi, and metabolic mechanisms (in adipose tissue) may contribute to the vasodilatation

  8. Density-based global sensitivity analysis of sheet-flow travel time: Kinematic wave-based formulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosseini, Seiyed Mossa; Ataie-Ashtiani, Behzad; Simmons, Craig T.

    2018-04-01

    Despite advancements in developing physics-based formulations to estimate the sheet-flow travel time (tSHF), the quantification of the relative impacts of influential parameters on tSHF has not previously been considered. In this study, a brief review of the physics-based formulations to estimate tSHF including kinematic wave (K-W) theory in combination with Manning's roughness (K-M) and with Darcy-Weisbach friction formula (K-D) over single and multiple planes is provided. Then, the relative significance of input parameters to the developed approaches is quantified by a density-based global sensitivity analysis (GSA). The performance of K-M considering zero-upstream and uniform flow depth (so-called K-M1 and K-M2), and K-D formulae to estimate the tSHF over single plane surface were assessed using several sets of experimental data collected from the previous studies. The compatibility of the developed models to estimate tSHF over multiple planes considering temporal rainfall distributions of Natural Resources Conservation Service, NRCS (I, Ia, II, and III) are scrutinized by several real-world examples. The results obtained demonstrated that the main controlling parameters of tSHF through K-D and K-M formulae are the length of surface plane (mean sensitivity index T̂i = 0.72) and flow resistance (mean T̂i = 0.52), respectively. Conversely, the flow temperature and initial abstraction ratio of rainfall have the lowest influence on tSHF (mean T̂i is 0.11 and 0.12, respectively). The significant role of the flow regime on the estimation of tSHF over a single and a cascade of planes are also demonstrated. Results reveal that the K-D formulation provides more precise tSHF over the single plane surface with an average percentage of error, APE equal to 9.23% (the APE for K-M1 and K-M2 formulae were 13.8%, and 36.33%, respectively). The superiority of Manning-jointed formulae in estimation of tSHF is due to the incorporation of effects from different flow regimes as

  9. Robust simulations of viscoelastic flows at high Weissenberg numbers with the streamfunction/log-conformation formulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Comminal, Raphaël; Spangenberg, Jon; Hattel, Jesper Henri

    2015-01-01

    potential of the velocity field, and provides a pressureless formulation of the conservation laws, which automatically enforces the incompressibility. The resulting numerical method is free from velocity-pressure decoupling errors, and can achieve stable calculations for large Courant numbers, which improve...

  10. Lagrangian and Hamiltonian Formulation of Transmission Line Systems with Boundary Energy Flow

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jeltsema, Dimitri; Schaft, Arjan J. van der

    The classical Lagrangian and Hamiltonian formulation of an electrical transmission line is reviewed and extended to allow for varying boundary conditions, The method is based on the definition of an infinite-dimensional analogue of the affine Lagrangian and Hamiltonian input-output systems

  11. Anchoring Distortions Coupled with Plane Couette & Poiseuille Flows of Nematic Polymers in Viscous Solvents: Morphology in Molecular Orientation, Stress & Flow

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Zhou, Hong; Forest, M. G

    2006-01-01

    .... The morphology has various physical realizations, all coupled through the model equations: the orientational distribution of the ensemble of rods, anisotropic viscoelastic stresses, and flow feedback...

  12. Dipyridamole cerebral flow stress test evaluating ischemic cerebrovascular diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xiu, Y.; Chen, S.; Sun, X.; Liu, S.; Li, W.; Fan, W.; Wang, X.

    2000-01-01

    To detect the clinical value of dipyridamole cerebral blood flow stress test in cerebrovascular diseases (CVD). Nineteen patients (9 male, 10 female, mean age=65) who were diagnosed as CVD were included. One suffered from infarct, two suffered from thrombosis, one feel dizziness. All 4 performed rest and stress test. The other 15 were VBI, 9 of them performed stress test. Rest and stress test were done two-day method using Elscint Apex SP-6 SPECT equipped with low energy all purpose collimator. Rest perfusion imaging was started 30 min after injecting 1.11 GBq 99m Tc-ECD. Dipyridamole stress test was done within one week. 0.56 mg/Kg dipyridamole was injected intravenously during 4 min the same dose of ECD was injected 2 min later. The acquisition started 30 min later with the same parameter. Heart rate, ECG and the patient's complaint were monitored 2 min before and after dipyridamole. After correction for attenuation, transverse, coronal and sagittal slices were reconstructed. Eighteen ROIs were drawn symmetrically on cingulate, frontal, temporal-parietal, temporal, occipital, vision cortex, basal ganglia, superior frontal and parietal on the 3 rd , 6 th , 9 th transverse slices, selecting the contralateral as the reference region. The counts per pixel in each ROI were divided by the counts of the mirror region to obtain the relative uptake ratio. We think it abnormality when the ratio is above 1,1 or below 0.9. The sensitivity for rest and stress rCBF test was compared. rCBF was decreased at 10 of 19 patients (sensitivity 52.6%). 14 had low rCBF after dipyridamole (sensitivity 72.3%), Among the patients who studied stress test, 6 had normal rCBF at rest and low rCBF after stress. The abnormal area was enlarged after dipyridamole for 1 patients, 2 improved and 2 unchanged. 8 of 15 VBI had normal rCBF at rest (sensitivity 53.3%). 9 of 15 VBI performed stress test. rCBF was normal at rest for 5 patients, rCBF was decreased after stress, it was improved for one

  13. Stress, Flow and Particle Transport in Rock Fractures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koyama, Tomofumi

    2007-09-15

    The fluid flow and tracer transport in a single rock fracture during shear processes has been an important issue in rock mechanics and is investigated in this thesis using Finite Element Method (FEM) and streamline particle tracking method, considering evolutions of aperture and transmissivity with shear displacement histories under different normal stresses, based on laboratory tests. The distributions of fracture aperture and its evolution during shear were calculated from the initial aperture fields, based on the laser-scanned surface roughness features of replicas of rock fracture specimens, and shear dilations measured during the coupled shear-flow-tracer tests in laboratory performed using a newly developed testing apparatus in Nagasaki University, Nagasaki, Japan. Three rock fractures of granite with different roughness characteristics were used as parent samples from which nine plaster replicas were made and coupled shear-flow tests was performed under three normal loading conditions (two levels of constant normal loading (CNL) and one constant normal stiffness (CNS) conditions). In order to visualize the tracer transport, transparent acrylic upper parts and plaster lower parts of the fracture specimens were manufactured from an artificially created tensile fracture of sandstone and the coupled shear-flow tests with fluid visualization was performed using a dye tracer injected from upstream and a CCD camera to record the dye movement. A special algorithm for treating the contact areas as zero-aperture elements was used to produce more accurate flow field simulations by using FEM, which is important for continued simulations of particle transport, but was often not properly treated in literature. The simulation results agreed well with the flow rate data obtained from the laboratory tests, showing that complex histories of fracture aperture and tortuous flow channels with changing normal stresses and increasing shear displacements, which were also captured

  14. A new treatment of capillarity to improve the stability of IMPES two-phase flow formulation

    KAUST Repository

    Kou, Jisheng; Sun, Shuyu

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, we present an efficient numerical method for two-phase immiscible flow in porous media with different capillarity pressures. In highly heterogeneous permeable media, the saturation is discontinuous due to different capillary pressure

  15. Formulation of work stress in 1960-2000: analysis of scientific works from the perspective of historical sociology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Väänänen, Ari; Anttila, Erkko; Turtiainen, Jussi; Varje, Pekka

    2012-09-01

    During the latter part of the 20th century, work stress became an important societal issue and a huge amount of scientific attention went to studying it. This paper examines the process of formulating and defining the concept of work stress in the occupational health sciences and in industrial and organizational psychology from the early 1960s to the late 1990s. The empirical material of the study encompasses 108 scientific articles, books, book chapters, 'state of the art' reviews, book reviews, and written conference presentations. The data are analysed in the frameworks of historical sociology, critical psychology, and the anthropology of knowledge. We argue that work stress as a life-structuring concept gained ground in psychosocial and occupational health sciences (and also in lay understanding) in the 1960s simultaneously with the rise of social reformist movements that called for fundamental changes emphasizing democratic and human-orientated work organizations and socially responsible values. With the passing of time, however, the focus on structural improvement of work life waned and the emphasis shifted towards the apolitical occupational health aspects of work stress. Researchers with a psychological orientation emphasized micro-level characteristics as factors affecting work stress, whereas stress-orientated epidemiologists turned to the study of specific occupational stress models and/or risk factors. The emergence and development of work stress research can be seen as a chain of attempts to define and identify new risks and experiences occurring in work life. The process, driven by a gradual shift from industrial environments towards organizational frameworks characterized by social and psychological dimensions, reflected the overall shift towards modern democratic work life and the information society in which employees' emotions and well-being became an issue. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. A stabilized second-order time accurate finite element formulation for incompressible viscous flow with heat transfer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Curi, Marcos Filardy

    2011-01-01

    In view of the problem of global warming and the search for clean energy sources, a worldwide expansion on the use of nuclear energy is foreseen. Thus, the development of science and technology regarding nuclear power plants is essential, in particular in the field of reactor engineering. Fluid mechanics and heat transfer play an important role in the development of nuclear reactors. Computational Fluid Mechanics (CFD) is becoming ever more important in the optimization of cost and safety of the designs. This work presents a stabilized second-order time accurate finite element formulation for incompressible flows with heat transfer. A second order time discretization precedes a spatial discretization using finite elements. The terms that stabilize the finite element method arise naturally from the discretization process, rather than being introduced a priori in the variational formulation. The method was implemented in the program 'ns n ew s olvec2d av 2 M PI' written in FORTRAN90, developed in the Parallel Computing Laboratory at the Institute of Nuclear Engineering (LCP/IEN). Numerical solutions of some representative examples, including free, mixed and forced convection, demonstrate that the proposed stabilized formulation attains very good agreement with experimental and computational results available in the literature. (author)

  17. Mathematical formulations of failure criteria for the case of multiaxial stress

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peiter, A.

    1979-01-01

    Assured characteristic values of stress analyses cannot be simply applied to new kinds of stresses. In order to avoid excessive safety specifications and overdimensioning, a functional relationship between the various operational stresses has to be established. This will also facilitate an optimum materials evaluation. Shape and position of incipient cracks or crack propagations, appearance and surface of fractures as well as operating parameters serve as a basis for the hypotheses to be set up in order to give a phenomenological description of verified relations and of those assumed to be involved in a process. (orig.) [de

  18. A novel antioxidant formulation designed to treat male infertility associated with oxidative stress: promising preclinical evidence from animal models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gharagozloo, P; Gutiérrez-Adán, A; Champroux, A; Noblanc, A; Kocer, A; Calle, A; Pérez-Cerezales, S; Pericuesta, E; Polhemus, A; Moazamian, A; Drevet, J R; Aitken, R J

    2016-02-01

    Does a novel antioxidant formulation designed to restore redox balance within the male reproductive tract, reduce sperm DNA damage and increase pregnancy rates in mouse models of sperm oxidative stress? Oral administration of a novel antioxidant formulation significantly reduced sperm DNA damage in glutathione peroxidase 5 (GPX5), knockout mice and restored pregnancy rates to near-normal levels in mice subjected to scrotal heat stress. Animal and human studies have documented the adverse effect of sperm DNA damage on fertilization rates, embryo quality, miscarriage rates and the transfer of de novo mutations to offspring. Semen samples of infertile men are known to be deficient in several key antioxidants relative to their fertile counterparts. Antioxidants alone or in combination have demonstrated limited efficacy against sperm oxidative stress and DNA damage in numerous human clinical trials, however these studies have not been definitive and an optimum combination has remained elusive. The efficacy of the antioxidant formulation was evaluated in two well-established mouse models of oxidative stress, scrotal heating and Gpx5 knockout (KO) mice, (n = 12 per experimental group), by two independent laboratories. Mice were provided the antioxidant product in their drinking water for 2-8 weeks and compared with control groups for sperm DNA damage and pregnancy rates. In the Gpx5 KO model, oxidative DNA damage was monitored in spermatozoa by immunocytochemical detection of 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine (8OHdG). In the scrotal heat stress model, male fertility was tested by partnering with three females for 5 days. The percentage of pregnant females, number of vaginal plugs, resorptions per litter, and litter size were recorded. Using immunocytochemical detection of 8OHdG as a biomarker of DNA oxidation, analysis of control mice revealed that around 30% of the sperm population was positively stained. This level increased to about 60% in transgenic mice deficient in the

  19. A three-dimensional multiphase flow model for assesing NAPL contamination in porous and fractured media, 1. Formulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huyakorn, P. S.; Panday, S.; Wu, Y. S.

    1994-06-01

    A three-dimensional, three-phase numerical model is presented for stimulating the movement on non-aqueous-phase liquids (NAPL's) through porous and fractured media. The model is designed for practical application to a wide variety of contamination and remediation scenarios involving light or dense NAPL's in heterogeneous subsurface systems. The model formulation is first derived for three-phase flow of water, NAPL and air (or vapor) in porous media. The formulation is then extended to handle fractured systems using the dual-porosity and discrete-fracture modeling approaches The model accommodates a wide variety of boundary conditions, including withdrawal and injection well conditions which are treated rigorously using fully implicit schemes. The three-phase of formulation collapses to its simpler forms when air-phase dynamics are neglected, capillary effects are neglected, or two-phase-air-liquid, liquid-liquid systems with one or two active phases are considered. A Galerkin procedure with upstream weighting of fluid mobilities, storage matrix lumping, and fully implicit treatment of nonlinear coefficients and well conditions is used. A variety of nodal connectivity schemes leading to finite-difference, finite-element and hybrid spatial approximations in three dimensions are incorporated in the formulation. Selection of primary variables and evaluation of the terms of the Jacobian matrix for the Newton-Raphson linearized equations is discussed. The various nodal lattice options, and their significance to the computational time and memory requirements with regards to the block-Orthomin solution scheme are noted. Aggressive time-stepping schemes and under-relaxation formulas implemented in the code further alleviate the computational burden.

  20. DECOVALEX I - Test Case 1: Coupled stress-flow model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosengren, L.; Christianson, M.

    1995-12-01

    This report presents the results of the coupled stress-flow model, test case 1 of Decovalex. The model simulates the fourth loading cycle of a coupled stress-flow test and subsequent shearing up to and beyond peak shear resistance. The first loading sequence (A) consists of seven normal loading steps: 0, 5, 15, 25, 15, 5, 0 MPa. The second loading sequence (B) consists of the following eight steps: unstressed state, normal boundary loading of 25 MPa (no shearing), and then shearing of 0.5, 0.8, 2, 4, 2, 0 mm. Two different options regarding the rock joint behaviour were modeled in accordance with the problem definition. In option 1 a linear elastic joint model with Coulomb slip criterion was used. In option 2 a non-linear empirical (i.e. Barton-Bandis) joint model was used. The hydraulic condition during both load sequence A and B was a constant head of 5 m at the inlet point and 0 m at the outlet point. All model runs presented in this report were performed using the two-dimensional distinct element computer code UDEC, version 1.8. 30 refs, 36 figs

  1. Modification of Flow Stress Curves and Constitutive Equations During Hot Compression Deformation of 5083 Aluminum Alloy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    FU Ping

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The flow stress behavior of 5083 aluminum alloy was investigated under hot compression deformation at 523-723K,strain rates of 0.01-10s-1 and true strains of 0-0.7 with Gleeble-3800 thermal simulator. Based on the heat transfer effect on alloy deformation heat effect, the flow stress curves were corrected. The results show that influence of heat conduction can not be neglected and becomes more obvious with the increase of true strain. The corrected flow stress has little influence on the peak stress, but the steady flow stress softening trends to be diminished to some degree. The flow stress can be predicted by the Zener-Hollomon parameters in the constitutive equation. The corrected measured value exhibits a good agreement with the flow stress predicted by the constitutive equation, and the average relative error is only 5.21%.

  2. Mass flow discharge and total temperature characterisation of a pyrotechnic gas generator formulation for airbag systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neutz, Jochen; Koenig, Andreas [Fraunhofer Institut fuer Chemische Technologie ICT, Pfinztal (Germany); Knauss, Helmut; Jordan, Sebastian; Roediger, Tim; Smorodsky, Boris [Universitaet Stuttgart (Germany). Institut fuer Aerodynamik und Gasdynamik; Bluemcke, Erich Walter [AUDI AG, Department I/EK-523, Ingolstadt (Germany)

    2009-06-15

    The mass flow characteristics of gas generators for airbag applications have to comply with a number of requirements for an optimal deployment of the airbag itself. Up to now, the mass flow was determined from pressure time histories of so-called can tests. This procedure suffers from the missing knowledge on the temperature of the generated gas entering the can. A new test setup described in this paper could overcome this problem by providing highly time resolved information on the gas's total temperature and the mass flow of the generator. The test setup consisted of a combustion chamber with a specially designed Laval nozzle in combination with a temperature sensor of high time resolution. The results showed a high time resolved temperature signal, which was disturbed by the formation of a slag layer on the sensor. Plausibility considerations with experimentally and thermodynamically determined combustion temperatures led to satisfying results for the overall temperature as characteristic parameter of airbag inflating gases flows from pyrotechnics. (Abstract Copyright [2009], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  3. System incremental cost calculations using the participation factor load-flow formulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meisel, J.

    1993-01-01

    The load-flow problem is reformulated such that the use of a slack-bus generator is included only as a special case. This reformulation, known as the participation factor load-flow, includes a total mismatch variable and a defined participation vector, which, in general, distributes this mismatch to all system buses. The slack-bus constraint can still be obtained by defining a particular participation vector. In using the participation factor load-flow in the transpose Jacobian approach to the economic optimal dispatch problem, the paper shows that the value of the system-λ can be controlled such that this value represents the minimal incremental change in generation costs per unit change in system total demand with this demand distributed according to the specified participation vector. Methods using the conventional B-coefficient loss formulas or slack-bus load-flows give system-λ values whereby the unit change in demand must be placed on a fictitious single load-bus or on the slack-bus, respectively. Having a system-λ value which more accurately represents a proposed energy interchange between interconnected systems is very important in developing valid costs for each system. An extensive 28-bus, 8-generator system is included to illustrate these results

  4. Free surface modeling of contacting solid metal flows employing the ALE formulation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Stelt, A.A.; Bor, Teunis Cornelis; Geijselaers, Hubertus J.M.; Akkerman, Remko; Huetink, Han; Merklein, M.; Hagenah, H.

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, a numerical problem with contacting solid metal flows is presented and solved with an arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian (ALE) finite element method. The problem consists of two domains which mechanically interact with each other. For this simulation a new free surface boundary condition

  5. A volume-filtered formulation to capture particle-shock interactions in multiphase compressible flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shallcross, Gregory; Capecelatro, Jesse

    2017-11-01

    Compressible particle-laden flows are common in engineering systems. Applications include but are not limited to water injection in high-speed jet flows for noise suppression, rocket-plume surface interactions during planetary landing, and explosions during coal mining operations. Numerically, it is challenging to capture these interactions due to the wide range of length and time scales. Additionally, there are many forms of the multiphase compressible flow equations with volume fraction effects, some of which are conflicting in nature. The purpose of this presentation is to develop the capability to accurately capture particle-shock interactions in systems with a large number of particles from dense to dilute regimes. A thorough derivation of the volume filtered equations is presented. The volume filtered equations are then implemented in a high-order, energy-stable Eulerian-Lagrangian framework. We show this framework is capable of decoupling the fluid mesh from the particle size, enabling arbitrary particle size distributions in the presence of shocks. The proposed method is then assessed against particle-laden shock tube data. Quantities of interest include fluid-phase pressure profiles and particle spreading rates. The effect of collisions in 2D and 3D are also evaluated.

  6. Wall shear stress fixed points in blood flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arzani, Amirhossein; Shadden, Shawn

    2017-11-01

    Patient-specific computational fluid dynamics produces large datasets, and wall shear stress (WSS) is one of the most important parameters due to its close connection with the biological processes at the wall. While some studies have investigated WSS vectorial features, the WSS fixed points have not received much attention. In this talk, we will discuss the importance of WSS fixed points from three viewpoints. First, we will review how WSS fixed points relate to the flow physics away from the wall. Second, we will discuss how certain types of WSS fixed points lead to high biochemical surface concentration in cardiovascular mass transport problems. Finally, we will introduce a new measure to track the exposure of endothelial cells to WSS fixed points.

  7. Simulation of turbulent separated flows using a novel, evolution-based, eddy-viscosity formulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castellucci, Paul

    Currently, there exists a lack of confidence in the computational simulation of turbulent separated flows at large Reynolds numbers. The most accurate methods available are too computationally costly to use in engineering applications. Thus, inexpensive models, developed using the Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) equations, are often extended beyond their applicability. Although these methods will often reproduce integrated quantities within engineering tolerances, such metrics are often insensitive to details within a separated wake, and therefore, poor indicators of simulation fidelity. Using concepts borrowed from large-eddy simulation (LES), a two-equation RANS model is modified to simulate the turbulent wake behind a circular cylinder. This modification involves the computation of one additional scalar field, adding very little to the overall computational cost. When properly inserted into the baseline RANS model, this modification mimics LES in the separated wake, yet reverts to the unmodified form at the cylinder surface. In this manner, superior predictive capability may be achieved without the additional cost of fine spatial resolution associated with LES near solid boundaries. Simulations using modified and baseline RANS models are benchmarked against both LES and experimental data for a circular cylinder wake at Reynolds number 3900. In addition, the computational tool used in this investigation is subject to verification via the Method of Manufactured Solutions. Post-processing of the resultant flow fields includes both mean value and triple-decomposition analysis. These results reveal substantial improvements using the modified system and appear to drive the baseline wake solution toward that of LES, as intended.

  8. Thermo-elastic stress analysis of containment wall penetrations using improved finite element formulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramani, D.T.; Dimopoulos, A.; Heglin, B.M.

    1979-01-01

    An increased application of finite element techniques, particularly in evaluating structural integrity of nuclear containment walls around penetration points, has aroused considerable interest. Due to extreme thermal effects in the vicinity of penetrations, the concrete containment wall is subject to unwarranted cracking effects, which must be controlled in accordance with ASME-III Code. This paper essentially deals with a unique finite element method of analysis in which nonlinear heat transfer problem across the penetration assembly in the nuclear containment drywell wall, is formulated. Using this technique, thermal analysis, dealing with an evaluation of temperature distribution around axisymmetric penetration assembly accomodating main steam lines or other vital piping at 600 0 F, is carried out. The method of analysis considers steady-state heat transfer energy balance across the process-pipe, insulation layer, guard-pipe sleeve, two intermediate air layers and an axisymmetric opening in the concrete containment wall, the outer faces of which are maintained at ambient temperature of 120 0 F. (orig.)

  9. A new treatment of capillarity to improve the stability of IMPES two-phase flow formulation

    KAUST Repository

    Kou, Jisheng

    2010-12-01

    In this paper, we present an efficient numerical method for two-phase immiscible flow in porous media with different capillarity pressures. In highly heterogeneous permeable media, the saturation is discontinuous due to different capillary pressure functions. One popular scheme is to split the system into a pressure and a saturation equation, and to apply IMplicit Pressure Explicit Saturation (IMPES) approach for time stepping. One disadvantage of IMPES is instability resulting from the explicit treatment for capillary pressure. To improve stability, the capillary pressure is usually incorporated in the saturation equation which gradients of saturation appear. This approach, however, does not apply to the case of different capillary pressure functions for multiple rock-types, because of the discontinuity of saturation across rock interfaces. In this paper, we present a new treatment of capillary pressure, which appears implicitly in the pressure equation. Using an approximation of capillary function, we substitute the implicit saturation equation into the pressure equation. The coupled pressure equation will be solved implicitly and followed by the explicit saturation equation. Five numerical examples are provided to demonstrate the advantages of our approach. Comparison shows that our proposed method is more efficient and stable than the classical IMPES approach. © 2010 Elsevier Ltd.

  10. The effect of Cissus quadrangularis (CQR-300 and a Cissus formulation (CORE on obesity and obesity-induced oxidative stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agbor Gabriel A

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Aim Obesity is generally linked to complications in lipid metabolism and oxidative stress. The aim of this study was to compare the effect of a proprietary extract of Cissus quadrangularis (CQR-300 to that of a proprietary formulation containing CQR-300 (CORE on weight, blood lipids, and oxidative stress in overweight and obese people. Methods The first part of the study investigated the in vitro antioxidant properties of CQR-300 and CORE using 3 different methods, while the second part of the study was a double-blind placebo controlled design, involving initially 168 overweight and obese persons (38.7% males; 61.3% females; ages 19–54, of whom 153 completed the study. All participants received two daily doses of CQR-300, CORE, or placebo and were encouraged to maintain their normal levels of physical activity. Anthropometric measurements and blood sampling were done at the beginning and end of the study period. Results CQR-300 as well as CORE exhibited antioxidant properties in vitro. They also acted as in vivo antioxidants, bringing about significant (p Conclusion CQR-300 (300 mg daily and CORE (1028 mg daily brought about significant reductions in weight and blood glucose levels, while decreasing serum lipids thus improving cardiovascular risk factors. The increase in plasma 5-HT and creatinine for both groups hypothesizes a mechanism of controlling appetite and promoting the increase of lean muscle mass by Cissus quadrangularis, thereby supporting the clinical data for weight loss and improving cardiovascular health.

  11. Turbulent oscillating channel flow subjected to a free-surface stress.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kramer, W.; Clercx, H.J.H.; Armenio, V.

    2010-01-01

    The channel flow subjected to a wind stress at the free surface and an oscillating pressure gradient is investigated using large-eddy simulations. The orientation of the surface stress is parallel with the oscillating pressure gradient and a purely pulsating mean flow develops. The Reynolds number

  12. Renal sympathetic nerve, blood flow, and epithelial transport responses to thermal stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Thad E

    2017-05-01

    Thermal stress is a profound sympathetic stress in humans; kidney responses involve altered renal sympathetic nerve activity (RSNA), renal blood flow, and renal epithelial transport. During mild cold stress, RSNA spectral power but not total activity is altered, renal blood flow is maintained or decreased, and epithelial transport is altered consistent with a sympathetic stress coupled with central volume loaded state. Hypothermia decreases RSNA, renal blood flow, and epithelial transport. During mild heat stress, RSNA is increased, renal blood flow is decreased, and epithelial transport is increased consistent with a sympathetic stress coupled with a central volume unloaded state. Hyperthermia extends these directional changes, until heat illness results. Because kidney responses are very difficult to study in humans in vivo, this review describes and qualitatively evaluates an in vivo human skin model of sympathetically regulated epithelial tissue compared to that of the nephron. This model utilizes skin responses to thermal stress, involving 1) increased skin sympathetic nerve activity (SSNA), decreased skin blood flow, and suppressed eccrine epithelial transport during cold stress; and 2) increased SSNA, skin blood flow, and eccrine epithelial transport during heat stress. This model appears to mimic aspects of the renal responses. Investigations of skin responses, which parallel certain renal responses, may aid understanding of epithelial-sympathetic nervous system interactions during cold and heat stress. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Implementation and modification of a three-dimensional radiation stress formulation for surf zone and rip-current applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, N.; Voulgaris, G.; Warner, John C.

    2011-01-01

    Regional Ocean Modeling System (ROMS v 3.0), a three-dimensional numerical ocean model, was previously enhanced for shallow water applications by including wave-induced radiation stress forcing provided through coupling to wave propagation models (SWAN, REF/DIF). This enhancement made it suitable for surf zone applications as demonstrated using examples of obliquely incident waves on a planar beach and rip current formation in longshore bar trough morphology (Haas and Warner, 2009). In this contribution, we present an update to the coupled model which implements a wave roller model and also a modified method of the radiation stress term based on Mellor (2008, 2011a,b,in press) that includes a vertical distribution which better simulates non-conservative (i.e., wave breaking) processes and appears to be more appropriate for sigma coordinates in very shallow waters where wave breaking conditions dominate. The improvements of the modified model are shown through simulations of several cases that include: (a) obliquely incident spectral waves on a planar beach; (b) obliquely incident spectral waves on a natural barred beach (DUCK'94 experiment); (c) alongshore variable offshore wave forcing on a planar beach; (d) alongshore varying bathymetry with constant offshore wave forcing; and (e) nearshore barred morphology with rip-channels. Quantitative and qualitative comparisons to previous analytical, numerical, laboratory studies and field measurements show that the modified model replicates surf zone recirculation patterns (onshore drift at the surface and undertow at the bottom) more accurately than previous formulations based on radiation stress (Haas and Warner, 2009). The results of the model and test cases are further explored for identifying the forces operating in rip current development and the potential implication for sediment transport and rip channel development. Also, model analysis showed that rip current strength is higher when waves approach at angles of 5

  14. Generation of sheared poloidal flows via Reynolds stress and transport barrier physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hidalgo, C.; Pedrosa, M.A.; Sanchez, E.; Balbin, R.; Lopez-Fraguas, A.; Milligen, B. van; Silva, C.; Fernandes, H.; Varandas, C.A.F.; Riccardi, C.; Carrozza, R.; Fontanesi, M.; Carreras, B.A.; Garcia, L.

    2000-01-01

    A view of the latest experimental results and progress in the understanding of the role of poloidal flows driven by fluctuations via Reynolds stress is given. Reynolds stress shows a radial gradient close to the velocity shear layer location in tokamaks and stellarators, indicating that this mechanism may drive significant poloidal flows in the plasma boundary. Observation of the generation of ExB sheared flows via Reynolds stress at the ion Bernstein resonance layer has been noticed in toroidal magnetized plasmas. The experimental evidence of sheared ExB flows linked to the location of rational surfaces in stellarator plasmas might be interpreted in terms of Reynolds stress sheared driven flows. These results show that ExB sheared flows driven by fluctuations can play an important role in the generation of transport barriers. (author)

  15. Unsteady Helical Flows of a Size-Dependent Couple-Stress Fluid

    OpenAIRE

    Rubbab, Qammar; Mirza, Itrat Abbas; Siddique, Imran; Irshad, Saadia

    2017-01-01

    The helical flows of couple-stress fluids in a straight circular cylinder are studied in the framework of the newly developed, fully determinate linear couple-stress theory. The fluid flow is generated by the helical motion of the cylinder with time-dependent velocity. Also, the couple-stress vector is given on the cylindrical surface and the nonslip condition is considered. Using the integral transform method, analytical solutions to the axial velocity, azimuthal velocity, nonsymmetric force...

  16. Interfacial shear stress in stratified flow in a horizontal rectangular duct

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lorencez, C.; Kawaji, M.; Murao, Y.

    1995-01-01

    Interfacial shear stress has been experimentally examined for both cocurrent and countercurrent stratified wavy flows in a horizontal interfacial shear stress from the measurements were examined and the results have been compared with existing correlations. Some differences were found in the estimated interfacial shear stress from the measurements were examined and the results have been compared with existing correlations. Some differences were found in the estimated interfacial shear stress values at high gas flow rates which could be attributed to the assumptions and procedures involved in each method. The interfacial waves and secondary motions were also found to have significant effects on the accuracy of Reynolds stress and turbulence kinetic energy extrapolation methods

  17. Interfacial shear stress in stratified flow in a horizontal rectangular duct

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lorencez, C.; Kawaji, M. [Univ. of Toronto (Canada); Murao, Y. [Tokushima Univ. (Japan)] [and others

    1995-09-01

    Interfacial shear stress has been experimentally examined for both cocurrent and countercurrent stratified wavy flows in a horizontal interfacial shear stress from the measurements were examined and the results have been compared with existing correlations. Some differences were found in the estimated interfacial shear stress from the measurements were examined and the results have been compared with existing correlations. Some differences were found in the estimated interfacial shear stress values at high gas flow rates which could be attributed to the assumptions and procedures involved in each method. The interfacial waves and secondary motions were also found to have significant effects on the accuracy of Reynolds stress and turbulence kinetic energy extrapolation methods.

  18. Exact solutions for MHD flow of couple stress fluid with heat transfer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Najeeb Alam Khan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper aims at presenting exact solutions for MHD flow of couple stress fluid with heat transfer. The governing partial differential equations (PDEs for an incompressible MHD flow of couple stress fluid are reduced to ordinary differential equations by employing wave parameter. The methodology is implemented for linearizing the flow equations without extra transformation and restrictive assumptions. Comparison is made with the result obtained previously.

  19. Flow and Stress Field Analysis of Different Fluids and Blades for Fermentation Process

    OpenAIRE

    Cheng-Chi Wang; Po-Jen Cheng; Kuo-Chi Liu; Ming-Yi Tsai

    2014-01-01

    Fermentation techniques are applied for the biotechnology and are widely used for food manufacturing, materials processing, chemical reaction, and so forth. Different fluids and types of blades in the tank for fermentation cause distinct flow and stress field distributions on the surface between fluid and blade and various flow reactions in the tank appear. This paper is mainly focused on the analysis of flow field with different fluid viscosities and also studied the stress field acting on t...

  20. Extension of the flow-rate-of-strain tensor formulation of plasma rotation theory to non-axisymmetric tokamaks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stacey, W. M. [Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, Georgia 30332 (United States); Bae, C. [National Fusion Research Institute, Daejoen (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-06-15

    A systematic formalism for the calculation of rotation in non-axisymmetric tokamaks with 3D magnetic fields is described. The Braginskii Ωτ-ordered viscous stress tensor formalism, generalized to accommodate non-axisymmetric 3D magnetic fields in general toroidal flux surface geometry, and the resulting fluid moment equations provide a systematic formalism for the calculation of toroidal and poloidal rotation and radial ion flow in tokamaks in the presence of various non-axisymmetric “neoclassical toroidal viscosity” mechanisms. The relation among rotation velocities, radial ion particle flux, ion orbit loss, and radial electric field is discussed, and the possibility of controlling these quantities by producing externally controllable toroidal and/or poloidal currents in the edge plasma for this purpose is suggested for future investigation.

  1. Experimental evaluation of the pure configurational stress assumption in the flow dynamics of entangled polymer melts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Henrik K.; Bejenariu, Anca Gabriela; Hassager, Ole

    2010-01-01

    to the flow in the non-linear flow regime. This has allowed highly elastic measurements within the limit of pure orientational stress, as the time of the flow was considerably smaller than the Rouse time. A Doi-Edwards [J. Chem. Soc., Faraday Trans. 2 74, 1818-1832 (1978)] type of constitutive model...... with the assumption of pure configurational stress was accurately able to predict the startup as well as the reversed flow behavior. This confirms that this commonly used theoretical picture for the flow of polymeric liquids is a correct physical principle to apply. c 2010 The Society of Rheology. [DOI: 10.1122/1.3496378]...

  2. Cool-down flow-rate limits imposed by thermal stresses in LNG pipelines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novak, J. K.; Edeskuty, F. J.; Bartlit, J. R.

    Warm cryogenic pipelines are usually cooled to operating temperature by a small, steady flow of the liquid cryogen. If this flow rate is too high or too low, undesirable stresses will be produced. Low flow-rate limits based on avoidance of stratified two-phase flow were calculated for pipelines cooled with liquid hydrogen or nitrogen. High flow-rate limits for stainless steel and aluminum pipelines cooled by liquid hydrogen or nitrogen were determined by calculating thermal stress in thick components vs flow rate and then selecting some reasonable stress limits. The present work extends these calculations to pipelines made of AISI 304 stainless steel, 6061 aluminum, or ASTM A420 9% nickel steel cooled by liquid methane or a typical natural gas. Results indicate that aluminum and 9% nickel steel components can tolerate very high cool-down flow rates, based on not exceeding the material yield strength.

  3. Finite-element three-dimensional ground-water (FE3DGW) flow model - formulation, program listings and users' manual

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gupta, S.K.; Cole, C.R.; Bond, F.W.

    1979-12-01

    The Assessment of Effectiveness of Geologic Isolation Systems (AEGIS) Program is developing and applying the methodology for assessing the far-field, long-term post-closure safety of deep geologic nuclear waste repositories. AEGIS is being performed by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) under contract with the Office of Nuclear Waste Isolation (OWNI) for the Department of Energy (DOE). One task within AEGIS is the development of methodology for analysis of the consequences (water pathway) from loss of repository containment as defined by various release scenarios. Analysis of the long-term, far-field consequences of release scenarios requires the application of numerical codes which simulate the hydrologic systems, model the transport of released radionuclides through the hydrologic systems to the biosphere, and, where applicable, assess the radiological dose to humans. Hydrologic and transport models are available at several levels of complexity or sophistication. Model selection and use are determined by the quantity and quality of input data. Model development under AEGIS and related programs provides three levels of hydrologic models, two levels of transport models, and one level of dose models (with several separate models). This document consists of the description of the FE3DGW (Finite Element, Three-Dimensional Groundwater) Hydrologic model third level (high complexity) three-dimensional, finite element approach (Galerkin formulation) for saturated groundwater flow

  4. Electrochemical study and flow injection analysis of paracetamol in pharmaceutical formulations based on screen-printed electrodes and carbon nanotubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fanjul-Bolado, Pablo; Lamas-Ardisana, Pedro Jose; Hernandez-Santos, David; Costa-Garcia, Agustin

    2009-01-01

    Acetaminophenol or paracetamol is one of the most commonly used analgesics in pharmaceutical formulations. Acetaminophen is electroactive and voltammetric mechanistic studies for the electrode processes of the acetaminophenol/N-acetyl-p-quinoneimine redox system are presented. Carbon nanotubes modified screen-printed electrodes with enhanced electron transfer properties are used for the study of the electrochemical-chemical oxidation mechanism of paracetamol at pH 2.0. Quantitative analysis of paracetamol by using its oxidation process (in a Britton-Robinson buffer solution pH 10.0) at +0.20 V (vs. an Ag pseudoreference electrode) on an untreated screen-printed carbon electrode (SPCE) was carried out. Thus, a cyclic voltammetric based reproducible determination of acetaminophen (R.S.D., 2.2%) in the range 2.5 x 10 -6 M to 1 x 10 -3 M, was obtained. However, when SPCEs are used as amperometric detectors coupled to a flow injection analysis (FIA) system, the detection limit achieved for paracetamol was 1 x 10 -7 M, one order of magnitude lower than that obtained by voltammetric analysis. The repeatability of the amperometric detection with the same SPCE is 2% for 15 successive injections of 10 -5 M acetaminophen and do not present any memory effect. Finally, the applicability of using screen-printed carbon electrodes for the electrochemical detection of paracetamol (i.e. for quality control analysis) was demonstrated by using two commercial pharmaceutical products.

  5. Electrochemical study and flow injection analysis of paracetamol in pharmaceutical formulations based on screen-printed electrodes and carbon nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fanjul-Bolado, Pablo [DropSens, S.L., Edificio Severo Ochoa, Campus El Cristo, 33006 Oviedo, Asturias (Spain); Lamas-Ardisana, Pedro Jose [Departamento de Quimica Fisica y Analitica, Universidad de Oviedo, Julian Claveria 8, 33006 Oviedo, Asturias (Spain); Hernandez-Santos, David [DropSens, S.L., Edificio Severo Ochoa, Campus El Cristo, 33006 Oviedo, Asturias (Spain); Costa-Garcia, Agustin, E-mail: costa@fq.uniovi.es [Departamento de Quimica Fisica y Analitica, Universidad de Oviedo, Julian Claveria 8, 33006 Oviedo, Asturias (Spain)

    2009-04-13

    Acetaminophenol or paracetamol is one of the most commonly used analgesics in pharmaceutical formulations. Acetaminophen is electroactive and voltammetric mechanistic studies for the electrode processes of the acetaminophenol/N-acetyl-p-quinoneimine redox system are presented. Carbon nanotubes modified screen-printed electrodes with enhanced electron transfer properties are used for the study of the electrochemical-chemical oxidation mechanism of paracetamol at pH 2.0. Quantitative analysis of paracetamol by using its oxidation process (in a Britton-Robinson buffer solution pH 10.0) at +0.20 V (vs. an Ag pseudoreference electrode) on an untreated screen-printed carbon electrode (SPCE) was carried out. Thus, a cyclic voltammetric based reproducible determination of acetaminophen (R.S.D., 2.2%) in the range 2.5 x 10{sup -6} M to 1 x 10{sup -3} M, was obtained. However, when SPCEs are used as amperometric detectors coupled to a flow injection analysis (FIA) system, the detection limit achieved for paracetamol was 1 x 10{sup -7} M, one order of magnitude lower than that obtained by voltammetric analysis. The repeatability of the amperometric detection with the same SPCE is 2% for 15 successive injections of 10{sup -5} M acetaminophen and do not present any memory effect. Finally, the applicability of using screen-printed carbon electrodes for the electrochemical detection of paracetamol (i.e. for quality control analysis) was demonstrated by using two commercial pharmaceutical products.

  6. A Two-Phase Flow Solver for Incompressible Viscous Fluids, Using a Pure Streamfunction Formulation and the Volume of Fluid Technique

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Comminal, Raphaël; Spangenberg, Jon; Hattel, Jesper Henri

    Accurate multi-phase flow solvers at low Reynolds number are of particular interest for the simulation of interface instabilities in the co-processing of multilayered material. We present a two-phase flow solver for incompressible viscous fluids which uses the streamfunction as the primary variable...... of the flow. Contrary to fractional step methods, the streamfunction formulation eliminates the pressure unknowns, and automatically fulfills the incompressibility constraint by construction. As a result, the method circumvents the loss of temporal accuracy at low Reynolds numbers. The interface is tracked...

  7. A Two-Phase Flow Solver for Incompressible Viscous Fluids, Using a Pure Streamfunction Formulation and the Volume of Fluid Technique

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Comminal, Raphaël; Spangenberg, Jon; Hattel, Jesper Henri

    2014-01-01

    Accurate multi-phase flow solvers at low Reynolds number are of particular interest for the simulation of interface instabilities in the co-processing of multilayered material. We present a two-phase flow solver for incompressible viscous fluids which uses the streamfunction as the primary variable...... of the flow. Contrary to fractional step methods, the streamfunction formulation eliminates the pressure unknowns, and automatically fulfills the incompressibility constraint by construction. As a result, the method circumvents the loss of temporal accuracy at low Reynolds numbers. The interface is tracked...

  8. Prediction of flow- induced dynamic stress in an axial pump impeller using FEM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gao, J Y; Hou, Y S; Xi, S Z; Cai, Z H; Yao, P P; Shi, H L

    2013-01-01

    Axial pumps play an important role in water supply and flood control projects. Along with growing requirements for high reliability and large capacity, the dynamic stress of axial pumps has become a key problem. Unsteady flow is a significant reason which results structural dynamic stress of a pump. This paper reports on a flow-induced dynamic stress simulation in an axial pump impeller at three flow conditions by using FEM code. The pressure pulsation obtained from flow simulation using CFD code was set as the force boundary condition. The results show that the maximum stress of impeller appeared at joint between blade and root flange near trailing edge or joint between blade and root flange near leading edge. The dynamic stress of the two zones was investigated under three flow conditions (0.8Q d , 1.0Q d , 1.1Q d ) in time domain and frequency domain. The frequencies of stress at zones of maximum stress are 22.9Hz and 37.5Hz as the fundamental frequency and its harmonics. The fundamental frequencies are nearly equal to vane passing frequency (22.9 Hz) and 3 times blade passing frequency (37.5Hz). The first dominant frequency at zones of maximum stress is equal to the vane passing frequency due to rotor-stator interaction between the vane and the blade. This study would be helpful for axial pumps in reducing stress, improving structure design and fatigue life

  9. Ocular blood flow decreases during passive heat stress in resting humans

    OpenAIRE

    Ikemura, Tsukasa; Miyaji, Akane; Kashima, Hideaki; Yamaguchi, Yuji; Hayashi, Naoyuki

    2013-01-01

    Background Heat stress induces various physiological changes and so could influence ocular circulation. This study examined the effect of heat stress on ocular blood flow. Findings Ocular blood flow, end-tidal carbon dioxide (P ETCO2) and blood pressure were measured for 12 healthy subjects wearing water-perfused tube-lined suits under two conditions of water circulation: (1) at 35°C (normothermia) for 30 min and (2) at 50°C for 90 min (passive heat stress). The blood-flow velocities in the s...

  10. Shear flow generation by Reynolds stress and suppression of resistive g-modes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugama, H.; Horton, W.

    1993-08-01

    Suppression of resistive g-mode turbulence by background shear flow generated from a small external flow source and amplified by the fluctuation-induced Reynolds stress is demonstrated and analyzed. The model leads to a paradigm for the low-to-high (L-H) confinement mode transition. To demonstrate the L-H transition model, single-helicity nonlinear fluid simulations using the vorticity equation for the electrostatic potential, the pressure fluctuation equation and the background poloidal flow equation are used in the sheared slab configuration. The relative efficiency of the external flow and the Reynolds stress for producing shear flow depends on the poloidal flow damping parameter ν which is given by neoclassical theory. For large ν, the external flow is a dominant contribution to the total background poloidal shear flow and its strength predicted by the neoclassical theory is not enough to suppress the turbulence significantly. In contrast, for small ν, we show that the fluctuations drive a Reynolds stress that becomes large and suddenly, at some critical point in time, shear flow much larger than the external flow is generated and leads to an abrupt, order unity reduction of the turbulent transport just like that of the L-H transition in tokamak experiments. It is also found that, even in the case of no external flow, the shear flow generation due to the Reynolds stress occurs through the nonlinear interaction of the resistive g-modes and reduces the transport. To supplement the numerical solutions we derive the Landau equation for the mode amplitude of the resistive g-mode taking into account the fluctuation-induced shear flow and analyze the opposite action of the Reynolds stress in the resistive g turbulence compared with the classical shear flow Kelvin-Helmholtz (K-H) driven turbulence

  11. High urinary flow in women with stress incontinence: corrected flow-age nomogram evaluation after a transobturator tape procedure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitagawa, Yasuhide; Narimoto, Kazutaka; Urata, Satoko; Kawaguchi, Shohei; Kuribayashi, Masato; Namiki, Mikio

    2016-07-01

    We noninvasively compared urinary flow in both pre- and post-transobturator tape (TOT) procedures in stress urinary incontinence (SUI) patients using previously reported corrected flow-age nomograms in healthy women. This retrospective cohort study included patients who underwent a successful TOT procedure to treat SUI. Non-instrumented uroflowmetry was performed before and 3 months after surgery. Corrected maximum flow rate (cQmax) and average flow rate (cQave) were calculated using Qmax/√voided volume (VV) and Qave/√VV respectively. The ratio of corrected flow to age-adjusted corrected flow in healthy women was calculated in each patient. Each parameter was compared against pre-TOT and 3-months post-TOT values. Sixty-two patients were eligible for study inclusion. All urinary flow parameters were significantly higher pre-TOT than at 3 months post-TOT. The number of patients with cQmax and cQave over mean flow-age nomogram, compared with healthy women, before the TOT procedure decreased 3 months post-TOT; however, in many patients, cQmax and cQave were higher than in the corrected flow-age nomogram post-TOT. No significant difference in the ratio of cQmax to age-adjusted cQmax between pre- and post-TOT in the normal urinary flow group was observed, but significantly decreased in the high urinary flow group 3 months after TOT. Urinary flow rates were higher in SUI patients compared with age-matched controls and successful TOT procedures normalized urinary flows in patients with high urinary flow. A simple evaluation of urinary flow using a corrected flow-age nomogram may be clinically useful in SUI patients.

  12. Doppler optical coherence tomography imaging of local fluid flow and shear stress within microporous scaffolds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Yali; Bagnaninchi, Pierre O.; Yang, Ying; Haj, Alicia El; Hinds, Monica T.; Kirkpatrick, Sean J.; Wang, Ruikang K.

    2009-05-01

    Establishing a relationship between perfusion rate and fluid shear stress in a 3D cell culture environment is an ongoing and challenging task faced by tissue engineers. We explore Doppler optical coherence tomography (DOCT) as a potential imaging tool for in situ monitoring of local fluid flow profiles inside porous chitosan scaffolds. From the measured fluid flow profiles, the fluid shear stresses are evaluated. We examine the localized fluid flow and shear stress within low- and high-porosity chitosan scaffolds, which are subjected to a constant input flow rate of 0.5 ml.min-1. The DOCT results show that the behavior of the fluid flow and shear stress in micropores is strongly dependent on the micropore interconnectivity, porosity, and size of pores within the scaffold. For low-porosity and high-porosity chitosan scaffolds examined, the measured local fluid flow and shear stress varied from micropore to micropore, with a mean shear stress of 0.49+/-0.3 dyn.cm-2 and 0.38+/-0.2 dyn.cm-2, respectively. In addition, we show that the scaffold's porosity and interconnectivity can be quantified by combining analyses of the 3D structural and flow images obtained from DOCT.

  13. PIV Measurement of Wall Shear Stress and Flow Structures within an Intracranial Aneurysm Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chow, Ricky; Sparrow, Eph; Campbell, Gary; Divani, Afshin; Sheng, Jian

    2012-11-01

    The formation and rupture of an intracranial aneurysm (IA) is a debilitating and often lethal event. Geometric features of the aneurysm bulb and upstream artery, such as bulb size, bulb shape, and curvature of the artery, are two groups of factors that define the flow and stresses within an IA. Abnormal flow stresses are related to rupture. This presentation discusses the development of a quasi-3D PIV technique and its application in various glass models at Re = 275 and 550 to experimentally assess at a preliminary level the impact of geometry and flow rate. Some conclusions are to be drawn linking geometry of the flow domain to rupture risk. The extracted results also serve as the baseline case and as a precursor to a companion presentation by the authors discussing the impact of flow diverters, a new class of medical devices. The PIV experiments were performed in a fully index-matched flow facility, allowing for unobstructed observations over complex geometry. A reconstruction and analysis method was devised to obtain 3D mean wall stress distributions and flow fields. The quasi 3D measurements were reconstructed from orthogonal planes encompassing the entire glass model, spaced 0.4mm apart. Wall shear stresses were evaluated from the near-wall flow viscous stresses.

  14. Reynolds-Stress and Triple-Product Models Applied to Flows with Rotation and Curvature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsen, Michael E.

    2016-01-01

    Predictions for Reynolds-stress and triple product turbulence models are compared for flows with significant rotational effects. Driver spinning cylinder flowfield and Zaets rotating pipe case are to be investigated at a minimum.

  15. Endothelial shear stress estimation in the human carotid artery based on Womersley versus Poiseuille flow

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schwarz, Janina C. V.; Duivenvoorden, Raphaël; Nederveen, Aart J.; Stroes, Erik S. G.; VanBavel, Ed

    2015-01-01

    Endothelial shear stress (ESS) dynamics are a major determinant of atherosclerosis development. The frequently used Poiseuille method to estimate ESS dynamics has important limitations. Therefore, we investigated whether Womersley flow may provide a better alternative for estimation of ESS while

  16. A finite volume procedure for fluid flow, heat transfer and solid-body stress analysis

    KAUST Repository

    Jagad, P. I.; Puranik, B. P.; Date, A. W.

    2018-01-01

    A unified cell-centered unstructured mesh finite volume procedure is presented for fluid flow, heat transfer and solid-body stress analysis. An in-house procedure (A. W. Date, Solution of Transport Equations on Unstructured Meshes with Cell

  17. Numerical simulation of random stresses on an annular turbulent flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marti-Moreno, Marta

    2000-01-01

    The flow along a circular cylinder may induce structural vibrations. For the predictive analysis of such vibrations, the turbulent forcing spectrum needs to be characterized. The aim of this work is to study the turbulent fluid forces acting on a single tube in axial flow. More precisely we have performed numerical simulations of an annular flow. These simulations were carried out on a cylindrical staggered mesh by a finite difference method. We consider turbulent flow with Reynolds number up to 10 6 . The Large Eddy Simulation Method has been used. A survey of existent experiments showed that hydraulic diameter acts as an important parameter. We first showed the accuracy of the numerical code by reproducing the experiments of Mulcahy. The agreement between pressure spectra from computations and from experiments is good. Then, we applied this code to simulate new numerical experiments varying the hydraulic diameter and the flow velocity. (author) [fr

  18. Flow and Stress Field Analysis of Different Fluids and Blades for Fermentation Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng-Chi Wang

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Fermentation techniques are applied for the biotechnology and are widely used for food manufacturing, materials processing, chemical reaction, and so forth. Different fluids and types of blades in the tank for fermentation cause distinct flow and stress field distributions on the surface between fluid and blade and various flow reactions in the tank appear. This paper is mainly focused on the analysis of flow field with different fluid viscosities and also studied the stress field acting on the blades with different scales and shapes of them under specific rotational speed. The results show that the viscosity of fluid influences the flow field and stress distributions on the blades. The maximum stress that acts on the blade is increased with the increasing of viscosity. On the other hand, the ratio of blade length to width influences stress distributions on the blade. At the same time, the inclined angle of blade is also the key parameter for the consideration of design and appropriate inclined angle of blade will decrease the maximum stress. The results provide effective means of gaining insights into the flow and stress distribution of fermentation process.

  19. The Strain and Grain Size Dependence of the Flow Stress of Copper

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Niels; Ralph, B.

    1982-01-01

    Tensile stress strain data for 99.999% copper at room and liquid nitrogen temperature as a function of grain size are presented together with some microstructural observations made by transmission electron microscopy. It is shown that the flow stress data, at constant strain may be expressed...

  20. The stress generated by non-Brownian fibers in turbulent channel flow simulations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gillissen, J.J.J.; Boersma, B.J.; Mortensen, P.H.; Andersson, H.I.

    2007-01-01

    Turbulent fiber suspension channel flow is studied using direct numerical simulation. The effect of the fibers on the fluid mechanics is governed by a stress tensor, involving the distribution of fiber position and orientation. Properties of this function in channel flow are studied by computing the

  1. Effect of couple stresses on hydromagnetic flow of blood through a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The function of the coronary network is to supply blood to the heart; however, in cases of Coronary Artery Disease, the geometry has great influence on the nature of the blood flow and the overall performance of the heart. In this paper, the unsteady non-Newtonian flow of blood under couple stresses and a uniform external ...

  2. Laboratory evaluation of different formulations of Stress Coat® for slime production in goldfish (Carassius auratus) and koi (Cyprinus carpio).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shivappa, Raghunath B; Christian, Larry S; Law, Jerry M; Lewbart, Gregory A

    2017-01-01

    A study was carried out to assess the effect of Stress Coat ® on slime production in goldfish ( Carassius auratus) and koi ( Cyprinus carpio ). The study also investigated histological changes that might be associated with slime producing cells, and wound healing in koi. Several formulations of Stress Coat ® were investigated and the results showed that polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP), also known as povidone, an ingredient of Stress Coat ® , when used alone, showed significantly higher slime production in goldfish than salt and Stress Coat ® without PVP after 25 h. The results also showed that koi treated with compounds containing PVP showed better wound healing than those not exposed to PVP. Histology results showed no difference between compounds tested with regards to density and number of slime producing cells.

  3. Laboratory evaluation of different formulations of Stress Coat® for slime production in goldfish (Carassius auratus and koi (Cyprinus carpio

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raghunath B. Shivappa

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available A study was carried out to assess the effect of Stress Coat® on slime production in goldfish (Carassius auratus and koi (Cyprinus carpio. The study also investigated histological changes that might be associated with slime producing cells, and wound healing in koi. Several formulations of Stress Coat® were investigated and the results showed that polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP, also known as povidone, an ingredient of Stress Coat®, when used alone, showed significantly higher slime production in goldfish than salt and Stress Coat® without PVP after 25 h. The results also showed that koi treated with compounds containing PVP showed better wound healing than those not exposed to PVP. Histology results showed no difference between compounds tested with regards to density and number of slime producing cells.

  4. Temperature and blood flow distribution in the human leg during passive heat stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiesa, Scott T; Trangmar, Steven J; González-Alonso, José

    2016-05-01

    The influence of temperature on the hemodynamic adjustments to direct passive heat stress within the leg's major arterial and venous vessels and compartments remains unclear. Fifteen healthy young males were tested during exposure to either passive whole body heat stress to levels approaching thermal tolerance [core temperature (Tc) + 2°C; study 1; n = 8] or single leg heat stress (Tc + 0°C; study 2; n = 7). Whole body heat stress increased perfusion and decreased oscillatory shear index in relation to the rise in leg temperature (Tleg) in all three major arteries supplying the leg, plateauing in the common and superficial femoral arteries before reaching severe heat stress levels. Isolated leg heat stress increased arterial blood flows and shear patterns to a level similar to that obtained during moderate core hyperthermia (Tc + 1°C). Despite modest increases in great saphenous venous (GSV) blood flow (0.2 l/min), the deep venous system accounted for the majority of returning flow (common femoral vein 0.7 l/min) during intense to severe levels of heat stress. Rapid cooling of a single leg during severe whole body heat stress resulted in an equivalent blood flow reduction in the major artery supplying the thigh deep tissues only, suggesting central temperature-sensitive mechanisms contribute to skin blood flow alone. These findings further our knowledge of leg hemodynamic responses during direct heat stress and provide evidence of potentially beneficial vascular alterations during isolated limb heat stress that are equivalent to those experienced during exposure to moderate levels of whole body hyperthermia. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  5. Shear flow generation by Reynolds stress and suppression of resistive g modes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugama, H.; Horton, W.

    1993-01-01

    The authors have investigated suppression of the resistive g mode turbulence by background shear flow produced by the external source and by the fluctuation-induced Reynolds stress. For that purpose, the authors used the model consisting of the equations describing the electrostatic potential φ≡(φ 0 +φ) and the pressure fluctuation p of the resistive g mode, and the equation for the background poloidal flow. They have done the single-helicity nonlinear simulations using the model equations in the sheared slab configuration. They find that, in the nonlinear turbulent regime, significant suppression of the turbulent transport is realized only when the shear flow v' E exceeds that which makes the fastest-growing linear modes marginally stable. With the shear flow which decreases the fastest linear growth rates by about a half, the turbulent transport in the saturated state is about the same as in the case of no shear flow. As seen from the equation for the background flow v E , the relative efficiency of the external flow and the Reynolds stress for producing shear flow depends on the parameter ν. For large ν, the external flow is a dominant contribution to the total background poloidal shear flow although its strength predicted by the neoclassical theory is not enough to suppress the turbulence significantly. On the other hand, for small ν, they observe that, as the fluctuations grow, the Reynolds stress becomes large and suddenly at some critical point in time shear flow much larger than the external one is generated and leads to the significant reduction of the turbulent transport just like that of the L-H transition in tokamak experiments. It is remarkable that the Reynolds stress due to the resistive g mode fluctuations works not as a conventional viscosity term weakening the shear flow but as a negative viscosity term enhancing it

  6. Analytical solutions of couple stress fluid flows with slip boundary conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Devakar M.

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available In the present article, the exact solutions for fundamental flows namely Couette, Poiseuille and generalized Couette flows of an incompressible couple stress fluid between parallel plates are obtained using slip boundary conditions. The effect of various parameters on velocity for each problem is discussed. It is found that, for each of the problems, the solution in the limiting case as couple stresses approaches to zero is similar to that of classical viscous Newtonian fluid. The results indicate that, the presence of couple stresses decreases the velocity of the fluid.

  7. Bubble Formation in Yield Stress Fluids Using Flow-Focusing and T-Junction Devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laborie, Benoit; Rouyer, Florence; Angelescu, Dan E; Lorenceau, Elise

    2015-05-22

    We study the production of bubbles inside yield stress fluids (YSFs) in axisymmetric T-junction and flow-focusing devices. Taking advantage of yield stress over capillary stress, we exhibit a robust break-up mechanism reminiscent of the geometrical operating regime in 2D flow-focusing devices for Newtonian fluids. We report that when the gas is pressure driven, the dynamics is unsteady due to hydrodynamic feedback and YSF deposition on the walls of the channels. However, the present study also identifies pathways for potential steady-state production of bubbly YSFs at large scale.

  8. Determination of stresses in gas-turbine disks subjected to plastic flow and creep

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millenson, M B; Manson, S S

    1948-01-01

    A finite-difference method previously presented for computing elastic stresses in rotating disks is extended to include the computation of the disk stresses when plastic flow and creep are considered. A finite-difference method is employed to eliminate numerical integration and to permit nontechnical personnel to make the calculations with a minimum of engineering supervision. Illustrative examples are included to facilitate explanation of the procedure by carrying out the computations on a typical gas-turbine disk through a complete running cycle. The results of the numerical examples presented indicate that plastic flow markedly alters the elastic-stress distribution.

  9. Animal models of surgically manipulated flow velocities to study shear stress-induced atherosclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winkel, Leah C; Hoogendoorn, Ayla; Xing, Ruoyu; Wentzel, Jolanda J; Van der Heiden, Kim

    2015-07-01

    Atherosclerosis is a chronic inflammatory disease of the arterial tree that develops at predisposed sites, coinciding with locations that are exposed to low or oscillating shear stress. Manipulating flow velocity, and concomitantly shear stress, has proven adequate to promote endothelial activation and subsequent plaque formation in animals. In this article, we will give an overview of the animal models that have been designed to study the causal relationship between shear stress and atherosclerosis by surgically manipulating blood flow velocity profiles. These surgically manipulated models include arteriovenous fistulas, vascular grafts, arterial ligation, and perivascular devices. We review these models of manipulated blood flow velocity from an engineering and biological perspective, focusing on the shear stress profiles they induce and the vascular pathology that is observed. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. STAFAN, Fluid Flow, Mechanical Stress in Fractured Rock of Nuclear Waste Repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huyakorn, P.; Golis, M.J.

    1989-01-01

    1 - Description of program or function: STAFAN (Stress And Flow Analysis) is a two-dimensional, finite-element code designed to model fluid flow and the interaction of fluid pressure and mechanical stresses in a fractured rock surrounding a nuclear waste repository. STAFAN considers flow behavior of a deformable fractured system with fracture-porous matrix interactions, the coupling effects of fluid pressure and mechanical stresses in a medium containing discrete joints, and the inelastic response of the individual joints of the rock mass subject to the combined fluid pressure and mechanical loading. 2 - Restrictions on the complexity of the problem: STAFAN does not presently contain thermal coupling, and it is unable to simulate inelastic deformation of the rock mass and variably saturated or two-phase flow in the fractured porous medium system

  11. Ocular blood flow decreases during passive heat stress in resting humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikemura, Tsukasa; Miyaji, Akane; Kashima, Hideaki; Yamaguchi, Yuji; Hayashi, Naoyuki

    2013-12-06

    Heat stress induces various physiological changes and so could influence ocular circulation. This study examined the effect of heat stress on ocular blood flow. Ocular blood flow, end-tidal carbon dioxide (P(ET)CO2) and blood pressure were measured for 12 healthy subjects wearing water-perfused tube-lined suits under two conditions of water circulation: (1) at 35 °C (normothermia) for 30 min and (2) at 50 °C for 90 min (passive heat stress). The blood-flow velocities in the superior temporal retinal arteriole (STRA), superior nasal retinal arteriole (SNRA), and the retinal and choroidal vessels (RCV) were measured using laser-speckle flowgraphy. Blood flow in the STRA and SNRA was calculated from the integral of a cross-sectional map of blood velocity. PETCO2 was clamped at the normothermia level by adding 5% CO2 to the inspired gas. Passive heat stress had no effect on the subjects' blood pressures. The blood-flow velocity in the RCV was significantly lower after 30, 60 and 90 min of passive heat stress than the normothermic level, with a peak decrease of 18 ± 3% (mean ± SE) at 90 min. Blood flow in the STRA and SNRA decreased significantly after 90 min of passive heat stress conditions, with peak decreases of 14 ± 3% and 14 ± 4%, respectively. The findings of this study suggest that passive heat stress decreases ocular blood flow irrespective of the blood pressure or arterial partial pressure of CO2.

  12. Temperature and strain-rate dependence of the flow stress of ultrapure tantalum single crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Werner, M.

    1987-01-01

    Measurements of the temperature dependence of the cyclic flow stress of ultrapure tantalum single crystals (RRR >∼ 14000) are extended to lower temperatures. After cyclic deformation well into saturation at 400 K, the temperature dependence of the flow stress is measured between 80 and 450 K at five different plastic resolved shear-strain rates, ε pl , in the range 2 x 10 -5 to 6 x 10 -3 s -1 . Below a critical temperature T k the flow stress is dominantly controlled by the mobility of screw dislocations. A recent theory of Seeger describes the 'thermal' component, σ*, of the flow stress (resolved shear stress) in the temperature and stress regime where the strain rate is determined by the formation and migration of kink pairs. The analytical expressions are valid in well-defined ranges of stress and temperature. The evaluation of the experimental data yields a value for the formation enthalpy of two isolated kinks 2H k = 0.98 eV. From the low-stress (σ* k = 2.0 x 10 -6 m 2 s -1 . The product of the density of mobile screw dislocations and the distance between insurmountable obstacles is found to be 2 x 10 -5 m -1 . The stress dependence of the kink-pair formation enthalpy H kp follows the theoretically predicted curve in the elastic-interaction stress regime. At the transition to the line-tension approximation (near σ* ∼ 80 MPa) the activation volume increases rather abruptly. Moreover, the quantitative analysis involves kinks other than those of minimum height. The most likely candidates are kinks on {211} planes. (author)

  13. Estimation of shear stress in counter-current gas-liquid annular two-phase flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abe, Yutaka; Akimoto, Hajime; Murao, Yoshio

    1991-01-01

    The accuracy of the correlations of the friction factor is important for the counter-current flow (CCF) analysis with two-fluid model. However, existing two fluid model codes use the correlations of friction factors for co-current flow or correlation developed based on the assumption of no wall shear stress. The assessment calculation for two fluid model code with those existing correlations of friction factors shows the falling water flow rate is overestimated. Analytical model is developed to calculate the shear stress distribution in water film at CCF in order to get the information on the shear stress at the interface and the wall. The analytical results with the analysis model and Bharathan's CCF data shows that the wall shear stress acting on the falling water film is almost same order as the interfacial shear stress and the correlations for co-current flow cannot be applied to the counter-current flow. Tentative correlations of the interfacial and the wall friction factors are developed based on the results of the present study. (author)

  14. Characterization Of Flow Stress Of Different AA6082 Alloys By Means Of Hot Torsion Test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Donati, Lorenzo; El Mehtedi, Mohamad

    2011-01-01

    FEM simulations are become the most powerful tools in order to optimize the different aspects of the extrusion process and an accurate flow stress definition of the alloy is a prerequisite for a reliable effectiveness of the simulation. In the paper the determination of flow stress by means of hot torsion test is initially presented and discussed: the several approximations that are usually introduced in flow stress computation are described and computed for an AA6082 alloy in order to evidence the final effect on curves shapes. The procedure for regressing the parameters of the sinhyperbolic flow stress definition is described in detailed and applied to the described results. Then four different alloys, extracted by different casting batches but all namely belonging to the 6082 class, were hot torsion tested in comparable levels of temperature and strain rate up to specimen failure. The results are analyzed and discussed in order to understand if a mean flow stress behavior can be identified for the whole material class at the different tested conditions or if specific testing conditions (chemical composition of the alloy, specimen shape, etc) influence the materials properties to a higher degree.

  15. A numerical formulation using unstructured grids for modeling two-phase flows in porous media considering heterogeneities and capillarity effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hurtado, F.S.V.; Maliska, C.R.

    2005-01-01

    This paper briefly describes a two-dimensional numerical formulation using unstructured grids, developed for simulating two-phase immiscible displacements in porous media. The Element-based Finite Volume Method (EbFVM) is used for discretizing the model differential equations. (authors)

  16. A numerical formulation using unstructured grids for modeling two-phase flows in porous media considering heterogeneities and capillarity effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hurtado, F.S.V.; Maliska, C.R. [Santa Catarina Federal Univ., Computational Fluid Dynamics Lab., Mechanical Engineering Dept., Florianopolis, SC (Brazil)

    2005-07-01

    This paper briefly describes a two-dimensional numerical formulation using unstructured grids, developed for simulating two-phase immiscible displacements in porous media. The Element-based Finite Volume Method (EbFVM) is used for discretizing the model differential equations. (authors)

  17. Flow stress anisotropy caused by geometrically necessary boundaries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, N.; Juul Jensen, D.

    1992-01-01

    of dislocations. A model has been proposed for this microstructural anisotropy based on the assumptions that (i) the average slip plane is at an angle of 45-degrees to the direction of the applied stress and that (ii) a strengthening parameter is the mean distance in the slip plane between the geometrically...... necessary boundaries. For different macroscopic arrangements of such boundaries, the model predictions are in good qualitative and quantitative agreement with experiments....

  18. Non-Newtonian plastic flow of a Ni-Si-B metallic glass at low stresses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Csach, K.; Fursova, Y.V.; Khonik, V.A.; Ocelik, V.

    1998-01-01

    The problem of the rheological behavior of metallic glasses (MGs) is quite important both from theoretical and practical viewpoints. Early experiments carried out on MGs at temperatures T > 300 K using low shear stress levels revealed plastic flow to be Newtonian while measurements at relative high shear stresses (more than 200 to 400 MPa, depending on temperature, thermal prehistory of samples and chemical composition) indicated a non-linear behavior with 1 < m < 12. Numerous investigations performed later both on as-cast and relaxed MGs of various chemical compositions using a number of testing methods (tensile creep, tensile and bend stress relaxation) showed that a transition from Newtonian behavior at low stresses to a non-linear flow at high stresses was observed. At present, such a situation is considered to be generally accepted. The authors performed precise creep measurements of a Ni-Si-B metallic glass. The results obtained indicate that plastic flow in this case at low tensile stress (12 le σ le 307 MPa) is clearly non-Newtonian and, consequently, the viscosity is stress dependent

  19. Oxidative stress biomarkers in different tissues of rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss exposed to Disinfectant-CIP formulated with peracetic acid and hydrogen peroxide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tkachenko Halyna

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of study was to determine the effects of exposure to the product DEZYNFEKTANT-CIP (Eng. - Disinfectant-CIP, which is formulated with peracetic acid and hydrogen peroxide, on oxidative stress biomarkers (lipid peroxidation (LPO levels and the carbonyl content of oxidatively modified proteins and antioxidant defenses (superoxide dismutase (SOD, catalase (CAT, glutathione reductase (GR, glutathione peroxidase (GPx, total antioxidant capacity in muscle, gill, hepatic, and cardiac tissues of rainbow trout, Oncorhynchus mykiss (Walbaum. LPO and carbonyl contents changed with tissue type. Exposure to Disinfectant-CIP led to a significant decrease in LPO in muscle tissues and carbonyl content in muscle and gill tissues. The inhibition of SOD and CAT activity in muscle, hepatic, and cardiac tissues was observed probably because of increased oxidative stress during disinfection; however, hepatic and cardiac GPx activity increased in an attempt to counteract oxidative stress. We suggest that oxidative stress during the oxidation of peracetic acid and hydrogen peroxide could be counteracted by the antioxidant system in trout tissues. Correlative analysis between oxidative stress biomarkers and antioxidant defense confirms the pivotal role of SOD and CAT against CIP-induced oxidative stress

  20. Communication: a relationship between hardness and flow stress of ordered Zr3Al polycrystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schulson, E.M.; Roy, J.A.

    1977-01-01

    The purpose of this note is to describe a relationship between hardness and flow stress for the ordered L1$sub 2$ phase Zr$sub 3$Al, a possible structural material for use in nuclear power reactors. Experimental data obtained with the Zr-8.9% Al alloy lead to the conclusion that the hardness of polycrystalline Zr$sub 3$Al obeys an expression of the Hall-Petch form. When combined with a similar expression for flow stress, established previously, a simple relationship is obtained for flow stress in terms of hardness of well annealed material. Hardness measurements thus provide a rapid and inexpensive assessment of the strength of Zr$sub 3$Al. 8 refs

  1. Stress and flow analyses of ultraviolet-curable resin during curing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umezaki, Eisaku; Okano, Akira; Koyama, Hiroto

    2014-06-01

    The stress and flow generated in ultraviolet (UV)-curable resin during curing in molds were measured to investigate their relationship. The specimens were molds consisting of glass plates and acrylic bars, and UV-curable liquid resin. The specimens were illuminated from above with UV rays. Photoelastic and visual images were separately obtained at a constant time interval using cameras during curing. To help obtain the visual images, acrylic powder was mixed with the liquid resin. The stress was obtained from the photoelastic images by a digital photoelastic technique with phase stepping, and the flow was obtained from the visual images by a particle-tracking velocimetry technique. Results indicate that the stress generated in the UV-curable resin during curing depends on the degree of contact between the mold and the cured area of the resin, and is hardly related to the flow.

  2. FlowPing - The New Tool for Throughput and Stress Testing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ondrej Vondrous

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This article presents a new tool for network throughput and stress testing. The FlowPing tool is easy to use, and its basic output is very similar to standard Linux ping application. The FlowPing tool is not limited to reach-ability or round trip time testing but is capable of complex UDP based throughput stress testing with rich reporting capabilities on client and server sides. Our new tool implements features, which allow the user to perform tests with variable packet size and traffic rate. All these features can be used in one single test run. This allows the user to use and develop new methodologies for network throughput and stress testing. With the FlowPing tool, it is easy to perform the test with the slowly increasing the amount of network traffic and monitor the behavior of network when the congestion occurs.

  3. Monodimensional estimation of maximum Reynolds shear stress in the downstream flow field of bileaflet valves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grigioni, Mauro; Daniele, Carla; D'Avenio, Giuseppe; Barbaro, Vincenzo

    2002-05-01

    Turbulent flow generated by prosthetic devices at the bloodstream level may cause mechanical stress on blood particles. Measurement of the Reynolds stress tensor and/or some of its components is a mandatory step to evaluate the mechanical load on blood components exerted by fluid stresses, as well as possible consequent blood damage (hemolysis or platelet activation). Because of the three-dimensional nature of turbulence, in general, a three-component anemometer should be used to measure all components of the Reynolds stress tensor, but this is difficult, especially in vivo. The present study aimed to derive the maximum Reynolds shear stress (RSS) in three commercially available prosthetic heart valves (PHVs) of wide diffusion, starting with monodimensional data provided in vivo by echo Doppler. Accurate measurement of PHV flow field was made using laser Doppler anemometry; this provided the principal turbulence quantities (mean velocity, root-mean-square value of velocity fluctuations, average value of cross-product of velocity fluctuations in orthogonal directions) needed to quantify the maximum turbulence-related shear stress. The recorded data enabled determination of the relationship, the Reynolds stresses ratio (RSR) between maximum RSS and Reynolds normal stress in the main flow direction. The RSR was found to be dependent upon the local structure of the flow field. The reported RSR profiles, which permit a simple calculation of maximum RSS, may prove valuable during the post-implantation phase, when an assessment of valve function is made echocardiographically. Hence, the risk of damage to blood constituents associated with bileaflet valve implantation may be accurately quantified in vivo.

  4. Influence of flow stress choice on the plastic collapse estimation of axially cracked steam generator tubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tonkovic, Zdenko; Skozrit, Ivica; Alfirevic, Ivo

    2008-01-01

    The influence of the choice of flow stress on the plastic collapse estimation of axially cracked steam generator (SG) tubes is considered. The plastic limit and collapse loads of thick-walled tubes with external axial semi-elliptical surface cracks are investigated by three-dimensional non-linear finite element (FE) analyses. The limit pressure solution as a function of the crack depth, length and tube geometry has been developed on the basis of extensive FE limit load analyses employing the elastic-perfectly plastic material behaviour and small strain theory. Unlike the existing solutions, the newly developed analytical approximation of the plastic limit pressure for thick-walled tubes is applicable to a wide range of crack dimensions. Further, the plastic collapse analysis with a real strain-hardening material model and a large deformation theory is performed and an analytical approximation for the estimation of the flow stress is proposed. Numerical results show that the flow stress, defined by some failure assessment diagram (FAD) methods, depends not only on the tube material, but also on the crack geometry. It is shown that the plastic collapse pressure results, in the case of deeper cracks obtained by using the flow stress as the average of the yield stress and the ultimate tensile strength, can become unsafe

  5. Correlation between vortices and wall shear stress in a curved artery model under pulsatile flow conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, Christopher; Plesniak, Michael W.

    2017-11-01

    One of the most physiologically relevant factors within the cardiovascular system is the wall shear stress. The wall shear stress affects endothelial cells via mechanotransduction and atherosclerotic regions are strongly correlated with curvature and branching in the human vasculature, where the shear stress is both oscillatory and multidirectional. Also, the combined effect of curvature and pulsatility in cardiovascular flows produces unsteady vortices. In this work, our goal is to assess the correlation between multiple vortex pairs and wall shear stress. To accomplish this, we use an in-house high-order flux reconstruction Navier-Stokes solver to simulate pulsatile flow of a Newtonian blood-analog fluid through a rigid 180° curved artery model. We use a physiologically relevant flow rate and generate results using both fully developed and uniform entrance conditions, the latter motivated by the fact that flow upstream to a curved artery may not be fully developed. Under these two inflow conditions, we characterize the evolution of various vortex pairs and their subsequent effect on several wall shear stress metrics. Supported by GW Center for Biomimetics and Bioinspired Engineering.

  6. Molecular characteristics of stress overshoot for polymer melts under start-up shear flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Sohdam; Kim, Jun Mo; Baig, Chunggi

    2017-12-21

    Stress overshoot is one of the most important nonlinear rheological phenomena exhibited by polymeric liquids undergoing start-up shear at sufficient flow strengths. Despite considerable previous research, the fundamental molecular characteristics underlying stress overshoot remain unknown. Here, we analyze the intrinsic molecular mechanisms behind the overshoot phenomenon using atomistic nonequilibrium molecular dynamics simulations of entangled linear polyethylene melts under shear flow. Through a detailed analysis of the transient rotational chain dynamics, we identify an intermolecular collision angular regime in the vicinity of the chain orientation angle θ ≈ 20° with respect to the flow direction. The shear stress overshoot occurs via strong intermolecular collisions between chains in the collision regime at θ = 15°-25°, corresponding to a peak strain of 2-4, which is an experimentally well-known value. The normal stress overshoot appears at approximately θ = 10°, at a corresponding peak strain roughly equivalent to twice that for the shear stress. We provide plausible answers to several basic questions regarding the stress overshoot, which may further help understand other nonlinear phenomena of polymeric systems.

  7. A new sensor for stress measurement based on blood flow fluctuations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fine, I.; Kaminsky, A. V.; Shenkman, L.

    2016-03-01

    It is widely recognized that effective stress management could have a dramatic impact on health care and preventive medicine. In order to meet this need, efficient and seamless sensing and analytic tools for the non-invasive stress monitoring during daily life are required. The existing sensors still do not meet the needs in terms of specificity and robustness. We utilized a miniaturized dynamic light scattering sensor (mDLS) which is specially adjusted to measure skin blood flow fluctuations and provides multi- parametric capabilities. Based on the measured dynamic light scattering signal from the red blood cells flowing in skin, a new concept of hemodynamic indexes (HI) and oscillatory hemodynamic indexes (OHI) have been developed. This approach was utilized for stress level assessment for a few usecase scenario. The new stress index was generated through the HI and OHI parameters. In order to validate this new non-invasive stress index, a group of 19 healthy volunteers was studied by measuring the mDLS sensor located on the wrist. Mental stress was induced by using the cognitive dissonance test of Stroop. We found that OHIs indexes have high sensitivity to the mental stress response for most of the tested subjects. In addition, we examined the capability of using this new stress index for the individual monitoring of the diurnal stress level. We found that the new stress index exhibits similar trends as reported for to the well-known diurnal behavior of cortisol levels. Finally, we demonstrated that this new marker provides good sensitivity and specificity to the stress response to sound and musical emotional arousal.

  8. An algebraic stress/flux model for two-phase turbulent flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumar, R.

    1995-12-01

    An algebraic stress model (ASM) for turbulent Reynolds stress and a flux model for turbulent heat flux are proposed for two-phase bubbly and slug flows. These mathematical models are derived from the two-phase transport equations for Reynolds stress and turbulent heat flux, and provide C μ , a turbulent constant which defines the level of eddy viscosity, as a function of the interfacial terms. These models also include the effect of heat transfer. When the interfacial drag terms and the interfacial momentum transfer terms are absent, the model reduces to a single-phase model used in the literature

  9. Turbulent Reynolds stress and quadrant event activity in wind flow over a coastal foredune

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, Connie A.; Walker, Ian J.; Hesp, Patrick A.; Bauer, Bernard O.; Davidson-Arnott, Robin G. D.

    2012-05-01

    Recent research on quasi-instantaneous turbulent kinematic Reynolds stresses (RS, - u'w') and decomposed quadrant event activity (e.g., ejections and sweeps) over dunes in fluvial settings and in wind tunnels has shown that turbulent stresses at the toe of a dune often exceed time-averaged, streamwise shear stress (ρ u * 2) estimates. It is believed that semi-coherent turbulent structures are conveyed toward the bed along concave streamlines in this region and that impact of these structures cause fluctuations in local surface stresses that assist in grain entrainment. This has been hypothesized to explain how sand is supplied to the windward slope through a region of flow stagnation. Toward the crest, surface stress increases and becomes dominated by streamwise accelerations resulting from streamline compression and convexity that suppress vertical motions. High-frequency (32 Hz) measurements of turbulent wind flow from 3-D ultrasonic anemometers are analyzed for oblique onshore flow over a vegetated coastal foredune in Prince Edward Island, Canada. Reynolds stress and quadrant activity distributions varied with height (0.60 m and 1.66 m) and location over the dune. In general, quadrant 2 ejection (u' 0) and quadrant 4 sweep activity (u' > 0, w' 0, w' > 0) and quadrant 3 inward interaction (u' dune and may help to explain sand transport potential and dune maintenance. For example, areas with a high frequency of ejection and sweep activity may have higher rates of sediment entrainment and transport, whereas areas with lower ejection and sweep activity and an increase in outward and inward interactions, which contribute negatively to Reynolds stress generation, may experience a greater potential for deposition. Further research on associations between quadrant event activity and coincident sand transport is required to confirm this hypothesis and the resultant significance of the flow exuberance effect in aeolian dune morphodynamics.

  10. Non-linear hydrotectonic phenomena: Part I - fluid flow in open fractures under dynamical stress loading

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Archambeau, C.B.

    1994-01-01

    A fractured solid under stress loading (or unloading) can be viewed as behaving macroscopically as a medium with internal, hidden, degrees of freedom, wherein changes in fracture geometry (i.e. opening, closing and extension) and flow of fluid and gas within fractures will produce major changes in stresses and strains within the solid. Likewise, the flow process within fractures will be strongly coupled to deformation within the solid through boundary conditions on the fracture surfaces. The effects in the solid can, in part, be phenomenologically represented as inelastic or plastic processes in the macroscopic view. However, there are clearly phenomena associated with fracture growth and open fracture fluid flows that produce effects that can not be described using ordinary inelastic phenomenology. This is evident from the fact that a variety of energy release phenomena can occur, including seismic emissions of previously stored strain energy due to fracture growth, release of disolved gas from fluids in the fractures resulting in enhanced buoyancy and subsequent energetic flows of gas and fluids through the fracture system which can produce raid extension of old fractures and the creation of new ones. Additionally, the flows will be modulated by the opening and closing of fractures due to deformation in the solid, so that the flow process is strongly coupled to dynamical processes in the surrounding solid matrix, some of which are induced by the flow itself

  11. Flow-based determination of methionine in pharmaceutical formulations exploiting TGA-capped CdTe quantum dots for enhancing the luminol-KIO{sub 4} chemiluminescence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Min, E-mail: mzhou8367@sina.com [Key Laboratory of Eco-Environment-Related Polymer Materials, Ministry of Education, Key Laboratory of Polymer Materials of Gansu Province, Key Laboratory of Bioelectrochemistry & Environmental Analysis of Gansu Province, College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Northwest Normal University, Lanzhou 730070 (China); Wang, Ailian [Key Laboratory of Eco-Environment-Related Polymer Materials, Ministry of Education, Key Laboratory of Polymer Materials of Gansu Province, Key Laboratory of Bioelectrochemistry & Environmental Analysis of Gansu Province, College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Northwest Normal University, Lanzhou 730070 (China); Jiuquan Enviromental Protection Bureau, Jiuquan 735000 (China); Li, Cong; Luo, Xiaowei; Ma, Yongjun [Key Laboratory of Eco-Environment-Related Polymer Materials, Ministry of Education, Key Laboratory of Polymer Materials of Gansu Province, Key Laboratory of Bioelectrochemistry & Environmental Analysis of Gansu Province, College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Northwest Normal University, Lanzhou 730070 (China)

    2017-03-15

    A novel flow-injection chemiluminescence method (FI-CL) was established for the determination of methionine in this paper, based on its strong enhancement on CL intensity of the luminol-KIO{sub 4} system catalyzed by thioglycolic acid-capped CdTe quantum dots in alkaline media. Under the optimized conditions, the relative CL intensity was in proportion to methionine concentration in the range from 1.0×10{sup −8} to 1.0×10{sup −5} g mL{sup −1} with a detection limit of 6.6×10{sup −9} g mL{sup −1} (3σ). The relative standard deviation (RSD) of the CL intensity for 1.0×10{sup −6} g mL{sup −1} standard methionine solution was 0.97% (n=11). The proposed method was successfully applied to determine methionine in commercial pharmaceutical formulations with recoveries between 98.0% and 101.9%. The possible CL mechanism was discussed as well. - Graphical abstract: Methionine in commercial pharmaceutical formulations was determined by flow-injection chemiluminescence and the possible chemiluminescence mechanism was discussed as well.

  12. Stress and Damage Induced Gas Flow Pattern and Permeability Variation of Coal from Songzao Coalfield in Southwest China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minghui Li

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The permeability of coal is a critical parameter in estimating the performance of coal reservoirs. Darcy’s law describes the flow pattern that the permeability has a linear relationship with the flow velocity. However, the stress induced deformation and damage can significantly influence the gas flow pattern and permeability of coal. Coals from Songzao coalfield in Chongqing, southwest China were collected for the study. The gas flow velocities under different injection gas pressures and effective stresses in the intact coal and damaged coal were tested using helium, incorporating the role of gas flow pattern on the permeability of coal. The relationships between the flow velocity and square of gas pressure gradient were discussed, which can help us to investigate the transformation conditions of gas linear flow and gas nonlinear flow in the coal. The results showed that the gas flow in the intact coal existed pseudo-initial flow rate under low effective stress. The low-velocity non-Darcy gas flow gradually occurred and the start-up pressure gradient increased in the coal as the effective stress increased. The gas flow rate in the damaged coal increased nonlinearly as the square of pressure gradient increased under low effective stress. The instability of gas flow caused by high ratio of injection gas pressure over effective stress in the damaged coal contributed to the increase of the gas flow rate. As the effective stress increased, the increase of gas flow rate in coal turned to be linear. The mechanisms of the phenomena were explored according to the experimental results. The permeability of coal was corrected based on the relationships between the flow velocity and square of gas pressure gradient, which showed advantages in accurately estimating the performance of coal reservoirs.

  13. A film-based wall shear stress sensor for wall-bounded turbulent flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amili, Omid; Soria, Julio

    2011-07-01

    In wall-bounded turbulent flows, determination of wall shear stress is an important task. The main objective of the present work is to develop a sensor which is capable of measuring surface shear stress over an extended region applicable to wall-bounded turbulent flows. This sensor, as a direct method for measuring wall shear stress, consists of mounting a thin flexible film on the solid surface. The sensor is made of a homogeneous, isotropic, and incompressible material. The geometry and mechanical properties of the film are measured, and particles with the nominal size of 11 μm in diameter are embedded on the film's surface to act as markers. An optical technique is used to measure the film deformation caused by the flow. The film has typically deflection of less than 2% of the material thickness under maximum loading. The sensor sensitivity can be adjusted by changing the thickness of the layer or the shear modulus of the film's material. The paper reports the sensor fabrication, static and dynamic calibration procedure, and its application to a fully developed turbulent channel flow at Reynolds numbers in the range of 90,000-130,000 based on the bulk velocity and channel full height. The results are compared to alternative wall shear stress measurement methods.

  14. influence of delta ferrite on the flow stress grain size relationship

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    SIZE RELATIONSHIP OF AN AUSTENITIC STAINLESS STEEL by ... The effect of delta ferrite on the flow stress-grain size relation is investigated. ... some of these deviations, new models have .... J. N. Petch, J of Iron and Steel Inst., 174 25,.

  15. DETECTING FOREST STRESS AND DECLINE IN RESPONSE TO INCREASING RIVER FLOW IN SOUTHWEST FLORIDA, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forest stress and decline resulting from increased river flows were investigated in Myakka River State Park (MRSP), Florida, USA. Since 1977, land-use changes around the upper Myakka River watershed have resulted in significant increases in water entering the river, which have...

  16. Muscle blood flow and muscle metabolism during exercise and heat stress

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Bodil; Savard, G; Richter, Erik

    1990-01-01

    The effect of heat stress on blood flow and metabolism in an exercising leg was studied in seven subjects walking uphill (12-17%) at 5 km/h on a treadmill for 90 min or until exhaustion. The first 30 min of exercise were performed in a cool environment (18-21 degrees C); then subjects moved...

  17. Flow of Hydrolysed Polyacrylamide Mother Liquor through Filter Bag: Detecting the Effects of Formulation and Process Properties on Pressure Drop

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zi-Ming Feng

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Hydrolysed polyacrylamide (HPAM mother liquor is mainly used to extract oil. The HPAM solution is needed to filter the impurity using a bag filter before it is injected into the oil well. Therefore, the pressure drop of HPAM mother liquor must be less than 0.02 MPa in the processing of impurity filtration. The influence factors on pressure drop need to be researched. In this work, the computational fluid dynamics program (CFD was used to research some key influence factors on pressure drop, such as porosity, outlet pressure of filter, inlet flow rate and viscosity of mother liquor. The simulation results indicated that with increasing porosity, outlet pressure, inlet flow rate and mother liquor viscosity, the pressure drop had increased after flowing through the filter bag.

  18. Application of a Full Reynolds Stress Model to High Lift Flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee-Rausch, E. M.; Rumsey, C. L.; Eisfeld, B.

    2016-01-01

    A recently developed second-moment Reynolds stress model was applied to two challenging high-lift flows: (1) transonic flow over the ONERA M6 wing, and (2) subsonic flow over the DLR-F11 wing-body configuration from the second AIAA High Lift Prediction Workshop. In this study, the Reynolds stress model results were contrasted with those obtained from one- and two{equation turbulence models, and were found to be competitive in terms of the prediction of shock location and separation. For an ONERA M6 case, results from multiple codes, grids, and models were compared, with the Reynolds stress model tending to yield a slightly smaller shock-induced separation bubble near the wing tip than the simpler models, but all models were fairly close to the limited experimental surface pressure data. For a series of high-lift DLR{F11 cases, the range of results was more limited, but there was indication that the Reynolds stress model yielded less-separated results than the one-equation model near maximum lift. These less-separated results were similar to results from the one-equation model with a quadratic constitutive relation. Additional computations need to be performed before a more definitive assessment of the Reynolds stress model can be made.

  19. Effect of the induced magnetic field on peristaltic flow of a couple stress fluid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mekheimer, Kh.S.

    2008-01-01

    We have analyzed the MHD flow of a conducting couple stress fluid in a slit channel with rhythmically contracting walls. In this analysis we are taking into account the induced magnetic field. Analytical expressions for the stream function, the magnetic force function, the axial pressure gradient, the axial induced magnetic field and the distribution of the current density across the channel are obtained using long wavelength approximation. The results for the pressure rise, the frictional force per wave length, the axial induced magnetic field and distribution of the current density across the channel have been computed numerically and the results were studied for various values of the physical parameters of interest, such as the couple stress parameter γ, the Hartmann number M, the magnetic Reynolds number R m and the time averaged mean flow rate θ. Contour plots for the stream and magnetic force functions are obtained and the trapping phenomena for the flow field is discussed

  20. Numerical predictions and measurements of Reynolds normal stresses in turbulent pipe flow of polymers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Resende, P.R. [Centro de Estudos de Fenomenos de Transporte, DEMEGI, Faculdade de Engenharia, Universidade do Porto, Rua Dr. Roberto Frias s/n, 4200-465 Porto (Portugal)]. E-mail: resende@fe.up.pt; Escudier, M.P. [Department of Engineering, University of Liverpool, Brownlow Street, Liverpool L69 3GH (United Kingdom)]. E-mail: escudier@liv.ac.uk; Presti, F [Department of Engineering, University of Liverpool, Brownlow Street, Liverpool L69 3GH (United Kingdom); Pinho, F.T. [Centro de Estudos de Fenomenos de Transporte, DEM, Universidade do Minho Campus de Azurem, 4800-058 Guimaraes (Portugal)]. E-mail: fpinho@dem.uminho.pt; Cruz, D.O.A. [Departamento de Engenharia Mecanica, Universidade Federal do Para-UFPa Campus Universitario do Guama, 66075-900 Belem, Para (Brazil)]. E-mail: doac@ufpa.br

    2006-04-15

    An anisotropic low Reynolds number k-{epsilon} turbulence model has been developed and its performance compared with experimental data for fully-developed turbulent pipe flow of four different polymer solutions. Although the predictions of friction factor, mean velocity and turbulent kinetic energy show only slight improvements over those of a previous isotropic model [Cruz, D.O.A., Pinho, F.T., Resende, P.R., 2004. Modeling the new stress for improved drag reduction predictions of viscoelastic pipe flow. J. Non-Newt. Fluid Mech. 121, 127-141], the new turbulence model is capable of predicting the enhanced anisotropy of the Reynolds normal stresses that accompanies polymer drag reduction in turbulent flow.

  1. Numerical predictions and measurements of Reynolds normal stresses in turbulent pipe flow of polymers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Resende, P.R.; Escudier, M.P.; Presti, F; Pinho, F.T.; Cruz, D.O.A.

    2006-01-01

    An anisotropic low Reynolds number k-ε turbulence model has been developed and its performance compared with experimental data for fully-developed turbulent pipe flow of four different polymer solutions. Although the predictions of friction factor, mean velocity and turbulent kinetic energy show only slight improvements over those of a previous isotropic model [Cruz, D.O.A., Pinho, F.T., Resende, P.R., 2004. Modeling the new stress for improved drag reduction predictions of viscoelastic pipe flow. J. Non-Newt. Fluid Mech. 121, 127-141], the new turbulence model is capable of predicting the enhanced anisotropy of the Reynolds normal stresses that accompanies polymer drag reduction in turbulent flow

  2. The choice of a constitutive formulation for modeling limb flexion-induced deformations and stresses in the human femoropopliteal arteries of different ages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desyatova, Anastasia; MacTaggart, Jason; Poulson, William; Deegan, Paul; Lomneth, Carol; Sandip, Anjali; Kamenskiy, Alexey

    2017-06-01

    Open and endovascular treatments for peripheral arterial disease are notorious for high failure rates. Severe mechanical deformations experienced by the femoropopliteal artery (FPA) during limb flexion and interactions between the artery and repair materials play important roles and may contribute to poor clinical outcomes. Computational modeling can help optimize FPA repair, but these simulations heavily depend on the choice of constitutive model describing the arterial behavior. In this study finite element model of the FPA in the standing (straight) and gardening (acutely bent) postures was built using computed tomography data, longitudinal pre-stretch and biaxially determined mechanical properties. Springs and dashpots were used to represent surrounding tissue forces associated with limb flexion-induced deformations. These forces were then used with age-specific longitudinal pre-stretch and mechanical properties to obtain deformed FPA configurations for seven age groups. Four commonly used invariant-based constitutive models were compared to determine the accuracy of capturing deformations and stresses in each age group. The four-fiber FPA model most accurately portrayed arterial behavior in all ages, but in subjects younger than 40 years, the performance of all constitutive formulations was similar. In older subjects, Demiray (Delfino) and classic two-fiber Holzapfel-Gasser-Ogden formulations were better than the Neo-Hookean model for predicting deformations due to limb flexion, but both significantly overestimated principal stresses compared to the FPA or Neo-Hookean models.

  3. Relationship among perceived stress, xerostomia, and salivary flow rate in patients visiting a saliva clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulthuis, Marjolein S; Jan Jager, Derk H; Brand, Henk S

    2018-03-09

    This aimed to assess the potential role of chronic stress in saliva secretion, xerostomia, and oral health in a population attending a saliva clinic. Data of 114 patients who met the inclusion criteria and completed all questionnaires were analyzed in this study. Participants completed several validated questionnaires, including the Perceived Stress Scale, the Oral Health Impact Profile (OHIP-14), Xerostomia Inventory (XI), and Bother xerostomia Index (BI). Subsequently, the unstimulated, chewing-stimulated, and citric acid-stimulated saliva secretion rates were determined gravimetrically. Data were evaluated using Spearman's correlation analysis and the Mann-Whitney U test. A significant correlation was observed between perceived stress and XI score (r = 0.312, p = 0.001), as well as between perceived stress and BI score (r = 0.334, p = 0.001). Stress levels also were significantly associated with OHIP-14 scores (r = 0.420, p stress and salivary flow rate could not be established. In this population, perceived chronic stress seems to be related to several aspects of dry mouth, including the perception of dry mouth, suffering from dry mouth, and the impact on quality of life. These effects were independent of the use of psychotropic medication. No actual reduction in salivary flow was found. Further studies to explore the causal linkage of stress with xerostomia seem warranted. Perceived chronic stress seems to be related with several aspects of dry mouth. This finding might be relevant in future prevention and treatment of xerostomia.

  4. A tensor formulation of the equation of transfer for spherically symmetric flows. [radiative transfer in seven dimensional Riemannian space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haisch, B. M.

    1976-01-01

    A tensor formulation of the equation of radiative transfer is derived in a seven-dimensional Riemannian space such that the resulting equation constitutes a divergence in any coordinate system. After being transformed to a spherically symmetric comoving coordinate system, the transfer equation contains partial derivatives in angle and frequency, as well as optical depth due to the effects of aberration and the Doppler shift. However, by virtue of the divergence form of this equation, the divergence theorem may be applied to yield a numerical differencing scheme which is expected to be stable and to conserve luminosity. It is shown that the equation of transfer derived by this method in a Lagrangian coordinate system may be reduced to that given by Castor (1972), although it is, of course, desirable to leave the equation in divergence form.

  5. Estimation of the supplementary axial wall stress generated at peak flow by an arterial stenosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doriot, Pierre-Andre

    2003-01-01

    Mechanical stresses in arterial walls are known to be implicated in the development of atherosclerosis. While shear stress and circumferential stress have received a lot of attention, axial stress has not. Yet, stenoses can be intuitively expected to produce a supplementary axial stress during flow systole in the region immediately proximal to the constriction cone. In this paper, a model for the estimation of this effect is presented, and ten numerical examples are computed. These examples show that the cyclic increase in axial stress can be quite considerable in severe stenoses (typically 120% or more of the normal stress value). This result is in best agreement with the known mechanical or morphological risk factors of stenosis progression and restenosis (hypertension, elevated pulse pressure, degree of stenosis, stenosis geometry, residual stenosis, etc). The supplementary axial stress generated by a stenosis might create the damages in the endothelium and in the elastic membranes which potentiate the action of the other risk factors (hyperlipidaemia, diabetes, etc). It could thus be an important cause of stenosis progression and of restenosis

  6. Estimation of the supplementary axial wall stress generated at peak flow by an arterial stenosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doriot, Pierre-André

    2003-01-01

    Mechanical stresses in arterial walls are known to be implicated in the development of atherosclerosis. While shear stress and circumferential stress have received a lot of attention, axial stress has not. Yet, stenoses can be intuitively expected to produce a supplementary axial stress during flow systole in the region immediately proximal to the constriction cone. In this paper, a model for the estimation of this effect is presented, and ten numerical examples are computed. These examples show that the cyclic increase in axial stress can be quite considerable in severe stenoses (typically 120% or more of the normal stress value). This result is in best agreement with the known mechanical or morphological risk factors of stenosis progression and restenosis (hypertension, elevated pulse pressure, degree of stenosis, stenosis geometry, residual stenosis, etc). The supplementary axial stress generated by a stenosis might create the damages in the endothelium and in the elastic membranes which potentiate the action of the other risk factors (hyperlipidaemia, diabetes, etc). It could thus be an important cause of stenosis progression and of restenosis.

  7. Transient director patterns upon flow start-up of nematic liquid crystals (an explanation for stress oscillation damping)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ternet, D.J.; Larson, R.G.; Leal, L.G.

    2001-01-01

    In this work we attempt to determine the origin of damped stress oscillations upon flow start-up of a nematic liquid crystalline monodomain. These damped stress oscillations were first observed by Gu et¿al. (1993) in the cone-plate flow cell and have since also been observed by Mather et¿al. (1997)

  8. Momentum balance and stresses in a suspension of spherical particles in a plane Couette flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahmani, Mona; Hammouti, Abdelkader; Wachs, Anthony

    2018-04-01

    Non-Brownian suspension of monodisperse spherical particles, with volume fractions ranging between ϕ = 0.05 and 0.38 and particle Reynolds numbers ranging between Rep = 0.002 and 20, in plane Couette shear flows is investigated using three-dimensional particle-resolved numerical simulations. We examine the effects of volume fraction and particle Reynolds number on the macroscopic and microscopic stresses in the fluid phase. The effective viscosity of the suspension is in a good agreement with the previous empirical and experimental studies. At Rep = 20, however, the effective viscosity increases significantly compared to the lower particle Reynolds number simulations in the Stokes flow regime. Examining the stresses over the depth of the Couette gap reveals that this increase in wall shear stresses at high particle Reynolds numbers is mainly due to the significantly higher particle phase stress contributions. Next, we examine the momentum balance in the fluid and particle phase for different regimes to assess the significance of particle/particle interaction and fluid and particle inertia. At the highest particle Reynolds number and volume fraction, the particle inertia plays a dominant role in the momentum balance and the fluid inertia is non-negligible, while the short-lived contact forces are negligible compared to these effects. For all other regimes, the fluid inertia is negligible, but the particle inertia and contact forces are important in the momentum balance. Reynolds stresses originated from velocity fluctuations do not contribute significantly to the suspension stresses in any of the regimes we have studied, while the reduction in the shear-induced particle rotation can be a reason for higher wall shear stress at Rep = 20. Finally, we study the kinematics of particles, including their velocity fluctuations, rotation, and diffusion over the depth of the Couette gap. The particle diffusion coefficients in the cross flow direction exhibit an abrupt

  9. A total pressure-saturation formulation of two-phase flow incorporating dynamic effects in the capillary-pressure-saturation relationship

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dahle, H K; Celia, M A; Hassanizadeh, S M; Karlsen, K H

    2002-07-01

    New theories suggest that the relationship between capillary pressure and saturation should be enhanced by a dynamic term that is proportional to the time rate of change of saturation. This so-called dynamic capillary pressure formulation is supported by laboratory experiments, and can be included in various forms of the governing equations for two-phase flow in porous media. An extended model of two-phase flow in porous media may be developed based on fractional flow curves and a total pressure - saturation description that includes the dynamic capillary pressure terms. A dimensionless form of the resulting equation set provides an ideal tool to study the relative importance of the dynamic capillary pressure effect. This equation provides a rich set of mathematical research questions, and numerical solutions to the equation provide insights into the behavior of two-phase immiscible flow. For typical two-phase flow systems, dynamic capillary pressure acts to retard infiltration fronts, with responses dependent on system parameters including boundary conditions. Recent theoretical work suggests that the traditional algebraic relationship between capillary pressure and saturation may be inadequate. Instead, a so-called dynamic capillary pressure formulation is needed, where capillary pressure is defined as a thermodynamic variable, and the difference between phase pressures is only equal to the capillary pressure at equilibrium. Under dynamic conditions, the disequilibrium between phase-pressure differences and the capillary pressure is taken to be proportional to the time rate of change of saturation. A recent study by Hassanizadeh et al. presents experimental evidence, culled from the literature, to support this claim. Numerical simulations using dynamic pore-scale network models and upscaling also support the claim. Hassanizadeh et al. also presented numerical solutions for an enhanced version of Richards' equation that included the dynamic terms. A preliminary

  10. Augmentative effect of pulsatility on the wall shear stress in tube flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakata, M; Tatsumi, E; Tsukiya, T; Taenaka, Y; Nishimura, T; Nishinaka, T; Takano, H; Masuzawa, T; Ohba, K

    1999-08-01

    Wall shear stress (WSS) has been considered to play an important role in the physiological and metabolic functions of the vascular endothelial cells. We investigated the effects of the pulse rate and the maximum flow rate on the WSS to clarify the influence of pulsatility. Water was perfused in a 1/2 inch transparent straight cylinder with a nonpulsatile centrifugal pump and a pulsatile pneumatic ventricular assist device (VAD). In nonpulsatile flow (NF), the flow rate was changed 1 to 6 L/min by 1 L/min increments to obtain standard values of WSS at each flow rate. In pulsatile flow (PF), the pulse rate was controlled at 40, 60, and 80 bpm, and the maximum flow rate was varied from 3.3 to 12.0 L/min while the mean flow rate was kept at 3 L/min. The WSS was estimated from the velocity profile at measuring points using the laser illuminated fluorescence method. In NF, the WSS was 12.0 dyne/cm2 at 3 L/min and 33.0 dyne/cm2 at 6 L/min. In PF, the pulse rate change with the same mean, and the maximum flow rate did not affect WSS. On the other hand, the increase in the maximum flow rate at the constant mean flow rate of 3 L/min augmented the mean WSS from 13.1 to 32.9 dyne/cm2. We concluded that the maximum flow rate exerted a substantial augmentative effect on WSS, and the maximum flow rate was a dominant factor of pulsatility in this effect.

  11. A multiscale fixed stress split iterative scheme for coupled flow and poromechanics in deep subsurface reservoirs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dana, Saumik; Ganis, Benjamin; Wheeler, Mary F.

    2018-01-01

    In coupled flow and poromechanics phenomena representing hydrocarbon production or CO2 sequestration in deep subsurface reservoirs, the spatial domain in which fluid flow occurs is usually much smaller than the spatial domain over which significant deformation occurs. The typical approach is to either impose an overburden pressure directly on the reservoir thus treating it as a coupled problem domain or to model flow on a huge domain with zero permeability cells to mimic the no flow boundary condition on the interface of the reservoir and the surrounding rock. The former approach precludes a study of land subsidence or uplift and further does not mimic the true effect of the overburden on stress sensitive reservoirs whereas the latter approach has huge computational costs. In order to address these challenges, we augment the fixed-stress split iterative scheme with upscaling and downscaling operators to enable modeling flow and mechanics on overlapping nonmatching hexahedral grids. Flow is solved on a finer mesh using a multipoint flux mixed finite element method and mechanics is solved on a coarse mesh using a conforming Galerkin method. The multiscale operators are constructed using a procedure that involves singular value decompositions, a surface intersections algorithm and Delaunay triangulations. We numerically demonstrate the convergence of the augmented scheme using the classical Mandel's problem solution.

  12. Estimation of gas wall shear stress in horizontal stratified gas-liquid pipe flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Newton, C.H.; Behnia, M.

    1996-01-01

    Two-phase pipe flows occur in many industrial applications, such as condensers and evaporators, chemical processing equipment, nuclear reactors, and oil pipelines. A variety of basic mechanistic flow models for predicting the pressure gradient and liquid loading characteristics of these types of flows to assist in design calculations has emerged over the past two decades, especially for the stratified and slug flow regimes. These models generally rely on a number of basic assumptions and empirical closure equations. Possibly the most notable of these relates to the evaluation of interfacial shear stresses. However, one of the most important yet least discussed assumptions used in most of these models is that the phase wall shear stresses can be accurately estimated from correlations developed for single-phase pipe flows. The object of this article is to present measurements of gas wall shear up to locations in close proximity to the gas-liquid interface for a variety of interface conditions in developed flow, and to determine the effects of the interface on average gas wall friction factors. In this context the interface may be smooth, rippled or wavy

  13. Influence of sequential room-temperature compressive creep on flow stress of TA2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mengyuan, Zhang; Boqin, Gu; Jiahui, Tao

    2018-03-01

    This paper studied the sequential room temperature compressive creep and its effects on compressive properties of TA2 with stress-control loading pattern by using cylindrical compressive test specimen. The significant time-dependent deformation under constant load was observed in the TA2 at room temperature, and the deformation was dependent on the loading process under the same loading stress rate. It was also found that the occurrence of room temperature compressive creep obviously enhanced the subsequent yielding strength and flow stress of TA2 due to the increase of network dislocation density. And the effects of room temperature creep on the strain rate-stress behavior could be explained by the local mobile dislocation density model.

  14. Analysis of Zero Reynolds Shear Stress Appearing in Dilute Surfactant Drag-Reducing Flow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weiguo Gu

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Dilute surfactant solution of 25 ppm in the two-dimensional channel is investigated experimentally compared with water flow. Particle image velocimetry (PIV system is used to take 2D velocity frames in the streamwise and wall-normal plane. Based on the frames of instantaneous vectors and statistical results, the phenomenon of zero Reynolds shear stress appearing in the drag-reducing flow is discussed. It is found that 25 ppm CTAC solution exhibits the highest drag reduction at Re = 25000 and loses drag reduction completely at Re = 40000. When drag reduction lies in the highest, Reynolds shear stress disappears and reaches zero although the RMS of the velocity fluctuations is not zero. By the categorization in four quadrants, the fluctuations of 25 ppm CTAC solution are distributed in all four quadrants equally at Re = 25000, which indicates that turnaround transportation happens in drag-reducing flow besides Reynolds shear stress transportation. Moreover, the contour distribution of streamwise velocity and the fluctuations suggests that turbulence transportation is depressed in drag-reducing flow. The viscoelasticity is possible to decrease the turbulence transportation and cause the turnaround transportation.

  15. The longitudinal relationship of work stress with peak expiratory flow: a cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loerbroks, Adrian; Karrasch, Stefan; Lunau, Thorsten

    2017-10-01

    Research has suggested that psychological stress is associated with reduced lung function and with the development of respiratory disease. Among the major potential sources of stress in adulthood are working conditions. We aimed to examine the relationship of work stress with lung function. We drew on 4-year prospective data from the Survey of Health, Ageing and Retirement in Europe. The analyzed sample comprised 2627 workers aged 50 years or older who were anamnestically free of respiratory disease. Work stress at baseline was operationalized by abbreviated instruments measuring the well-established effort-reward imbalance model (seven items) and the control component of the job-demand control (two items). Peak expiratory flow (PEF) was determined at baseline and at follow-up. Continuous and categorized (i.e., by the tertile) work stress variables were employed in multivariable linear regression models to predict PEF change. Work stress did not show statistically significant associations with PEF change. For instance, the unstandardized regression coefficient for PEF decline according to high versus low effort-reward imbalance was -1.41 (95% confidence interval = -3.75, 0.94). Our study is the first to examine prospective relationships between work stress and PEF. Overall, we did not observe meaningful associations. Future studies should consider a broader spectrum of spirometric parameters and should expand research to younger and possibly less-selected working populations (i.e., aged <50 years).

  16. Finite-element formulations for the thermal stress analysis of two- and three-dimensional thin reactor structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kulak, R.F.; Kennedy, J.M.; Belytschko, T.B.; Schoeberle, D.F.

    1977-01-01

    In several postulated LMFBR subassembly-to-subassembly failure propagation events, it is hypothesized that the duct wall of an accident subassembly fails and deposits molten fuel on the outer wall of an adjacent subassembly. It is therefore necessary to determine if the deposited fuel will fail the adjacent wall and thus propagate the event. This entails a thermal stress analysis, and since at times the adjacent subassembly is internally pressurized, thermomechanical analysis are also of value. Solutions are presented for several elastic plastic thermal problems. Some of these examples are compared to available analytic solutions. In addition, the hypothetical accident of molten fuel deposition on the adjacent hexcan is addressed. Combinations of pressure and thermal loading are considered. It is shown that the principal feature of the response is a large in-plane compressive stress which would undoubtedly cause buckling

  17. Experimental study of the flow rules of a 316 stainless steel at high and low stresses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delobelle, P.; Oytana, C.

    1984-01-01

    Creep flow rules of 316L stainless steel are studied in tensile and axial-torsion experiments. Through tensile and biaxial proportional loadings it is shown that at low creep values of epsilonkT/DGb a single kinematical variable: the internal stress takes a part in these laws. This is confirmed in non-proportional experiments. The power law with the power of nsup(*)approx.=2 relates applied and internal stresses. At higher creep rates a second scalar internal variable must be introduced and the power law no longer applies. Limiting functions in steady creep are determined for hardening and recovery. (orig.)

  18. Measurement and analysis of flow wall shear stress in an interior subchannel of triangular array rods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fakori-Monazah, M.R.; Todreas, N.E.

    1977-08-01

    A simulated model of triangular array rods with pitch to diameter ratio of 1.10 (as a test section) and air as the fluid flow was used to study the LMFBR hydraulic parameters. The wall shear stress distribution around the rod periphery, friction factors, static pressure distributions and turbulence intensity corresponding to various Reynolds numbers ranging from 4140 to 36170 in the central subchannel were measured. Various approaches for measurement of wall shear stress were compared. The measurement was performed using the Preston tube technique with the probe outside diameter equal to 0.014 in

  19. Comparison of the stress distribution in the metallic layers of flexible pipes using two alternative Bflex formulations

    OpenAIRE

    Shi, Yunzhu

    2014-01-01

    Axisymmetric load is the most common load acting on flexible pipe. Modelling axisymmetric load correctly is very important to estimate the strength of a flexible pipe. The purpose of the thesis is to compare the stress distribution in metallic layers under three load case, i.e. tension, internal pressure and external pressure. Literature study and discussion to mechanical properties of flexible pipe and finite element modelling method are included in the thesis. The modelling program is BFLEX...

  20. Reynolds-Stress and Triple-Product Models Applied to a Flow with Rotation and Curvature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsen, Michael E.

    2016-01-01

    Turbulence models, with increasing complexity, up to triple product terms, are applied to the flow in a rotating pipe. The rotating pipe is a challenging case for turbulence models as it contains significant rotational and curvature effects. The flow field starts with the classic fully developed pipe flow, with a stationary pipe wall. This well defined condition is then subjected to a section of pipe with a rotating wall. The rotating wall introduces a second velocity scale, and creates Reynolds shear stresses in the radial-circumferential and circumferential-axial planes. Furthermore, the wall rotation introduces a flow stabilization, and actually reduces the turbulent kinetic energy as the flow moves along the rotating wall section. It is shown in the present work that the Reynolds stress models are capable of predicting significant reduction in the turbulent kinetic energy, but triple product improves the predictions of the centerline turbulent kinetic energy, which is governed by convection, dissipation and transport terms, as the production terms vanish on the pipe axis.

  1. Physical modelling of granular flows at multiple-scales and stress levels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Take, Andy; Bowman, Elisabeth; Bryant, Sarah

    2015-04-01

    The rheology of dry granular flows is an area of significant focus within the granular physics, geoscience, and geotechnical engineering research communities. Studies performed to better understand granular flows in manufacturing, materials processing or bulk handling applications have typically focused on the behavior of steady, continuous flows. As a result, much of the research on relating the fundamental interaction of particles to the rheological or constitutive behaviour of granular flows has been performed under (usually) steady-state conditions and low stress levels. However, landslides, which are the primary focus of the geoscience and geotechnical engineering communities, are by nature unsteady flows defined by a finite source volume and at flow depths much larger than typically possible in laboratory experiments. The objective of this paper is to report initial findings of experimental studies currently being conducted using a new large-scale landslide flume (8 m long, 2 m wide slope inclined at 30° with a 35 m long horizontal base section) and at elevated particle self-weight in a 10 m diameter geotechnical centrifuge to investigate the granular flow behavior at multiple-scales and stress levels. The transparent sidewalls of the two flumes used in the experimental investigation permit the combination of observations of particle-scale interaction (using high-speed imaging through transparent vertical sidewalls at over 1000 frames per second) with observations of the distal reach of the landslide debris. These observations are used to investigate the applicability of rheological models developed for steady state flows (e.g. the dimensionless inertial number) in landslide applications and the robustness of depth-averaged approaches to modelling dry granular flow at multiple scales. These observations indicate that the dimensionless inertial number calculated for the flow may be of limited utility except perhaps to define a general state (e.g. liquid

  2. Flow and bed shear stresses in scour protections around a pile in a current

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Anders Wedel; Liu, Xiaofeng; Sumer, B. Mutlu

    2013-01-01

    on it in an unfavourable manner. Using physical models and 3D computational fluid dynamic (CFD) numerical simulations, the velocity and bed shear stresses are investigated in complex scour protections around mono piles in steady current. In the physical model the scour protections consisted of an upper cover layer...... simulations are capable of calculating the flow velocities when the scour protection is represented by regular arranged spheres, while the turbulence in general is underestimated. The velocity can also be calculated using porous media flow approach, but the accuracy is not as good as for spheres...

  3. Tensile flow stress of ceramic particle-reinforced metal in the presence of particle cracking

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mueller, R. [Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne (EPFL), Laboratory for Mechanical Metallurgy, CH-1015 Lausanne (Switzerland); Rossoll, A. [Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne (EPFL), Laboratory for Mechanical Metallurgy, CH-1015 Lausanne (Switzerland)], E-mail: andreas.rossoll@epfl.ch; Weber, L. [Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne (EPFL), Laboratory for Mechanical Metallurgy, CH-1015 Lausanne (Switzerland); Bourke, M.A.M. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), LANSCE-12, P.O. Box 1663, MS H805, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Dunand, D.C. [Northwestern University, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Evanston, IL 60208 (United States); Mortensen, A. [Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne (EPFL), Laboratory for Mechanical Metallurgy, CH-1015 Lausanne (Switzerland)

    2008-10-15

    A simplified model is proposed to quantify the effect of damage in the form of particle cracking on the elastic and plastic behaviour of particle-reinforced metal matrix composites under uniaxial tensile loading: cracked particles are simply replaced, in a mean-field model, with as much matrix. Pure aluminium reinforced with 44 vol.% alumina particles, tested in tension and unloaded at periodic plastic deformations, is analysed by neutron diffraction during each reloading elastic step, at 30%, 50%, 70% and 90% of the tensile flow stress. The data give the evolution of the elastic matrix strains in the composite and also measure the progress of internal damage by particle cracking. The test gives (i) the evolution of the in situ matrix flow stress, and (ii) the evolution of load partitioning during elastic deformation with increasing composite damage. Predictions of the present model compare favourably with relevant results in the literature, and with results from the present neutron diffraction experiments.

  4. Tensile flow stress of ceramic particle-reinforced metal in the presence of particle cracking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mueller, R.; Rossoll, A.; Weber, L.; Bourke, M.A.M.; Dunand, D.C.; Mortensen, A.

    2008-01-01

    A simplified model is proposed to quantify the effect of damage in the form of particle cracking on the elastic and plastic behaviour of particle-reinforced metal matrix composites under uniaxial tensile loading: cracked particles are simply replaced, in a mean-field model, with as much matrix. Pure aluminium reinforced with 44 vol.% alumina particles, tested in tension and unloaded at periodic plastic deformations, is analysed by neutron diffraction during each reloading elastic step, at 30%, 50%, 70% and 90% of the tensile flow stress. The data give the evolution of the elastic matrix strains in the composite and also measure the progress of internal damage by particle cracking. The test gives (i) the evolution of the in situ matrix flow stress, and (ii) the evolution of load partitioning during elastic deformation with increasing composite damage. Predictions of the present model compare favourably with relevant results in the literature, and with results from the present neutron diffraction experiments

  5. Characterization of acoustic emission signals generated by water flow through intergranular stress corrosion cracks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Claytor, T.N.; Kupperman, D.S.

    1985-05-01

    A program is under way at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) to develop an independent capability to assess the effectiveness of current and proposed techniques for acoustic leak detection (ALD) in reactor coolant systems. The program will establish whether meaningful quantitative data on flow rates and leak location can be obtained from acoustic signatures of leaks due to intergranular stress corrosion cracks (TGSCCs) and fatigue cracks, and whether these can be distinguished from other types of leaks. 5 refs., 3 figs

  6. Stress corrosion cracking susceptibility of steam generator tubing on secondary side in restricted flow areas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fulger, M.; Lucan, D.; Radulescu, M.; Velciu, L.

    2003-01-01

    Nuclear steam generator tubes operate in high temperature water and on the secondary side in restricted flow areas many nonvolatile impurities accidentally introduced into circuit tend to concentrate. The concentration process leads to the formation of highly aggressive alkaline or acid solutions in crevices, and these solutions can cause stress corrosion cracking (SCC) on stressed tube materials. Even though alloy 800 has shown to be highly resistant to general corrosion in high temperature water, it has been found that the steam generator tubes may crack during service from the primary and/or secondary side. Stress corrosion cracking is still a serious problem occurring on outside tubes in operating steam generators. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the environmental factors affecting the stress corrosion cracking of steam generators tubing. The main test method was the exposure for 1000 hours into static autoclaves of plastically stressed C-rings of Incoloy 800 in caustic solutions (10% NaOH) and acidic chloride solutions because such environments may sometimes form accidentally in crevices on secondary side of tubes. Because the kinetics of corrosion of metals is indicated by anodic polarization curves, in this study, some stressed specimens were anodically polarized in caustic solutions in electrochemical cell, and other in chloride acidic solutions. The results presented as micrographs, potentiokinetic curves, and electrochemical parameters have been compared to establish the SCC behavior of Incoloy 800 in such concentrated environments. (authors)

  7. Comparison of erythrocyte dynamics in shear flow under different stress-free configurations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cordasco, Daniel; Yazdani, Alireza; Bagchi, Prosenjit

    2014-04-01

    An open question that has persisted for decades is whether the cytoskeleton of a red blood cell is stress-free or under a stress. This question is important in the context of theoretical modeling of cellular motion under a flowing condition where it is necessary to make an assumption about the stress-free state. Here, we present a 3D numerical study to compare the cell dynamics in a simple shear flow under two different stress-free states, a biconcave discocyte representing the resting shape of the cell, and a nearly spherical oblate shape. We find that whether the stress-free states make a significant difference or not depends on the viscosity of the suspending medium. If the viscosity is close to that of blood plasma, the two stress-free states do not show any significant difference in cell dynamics. However, when the suspending medium viscosity is well above that of the physiological range, as in many in vitro studies, the shear rate separating the tank-treading and tumbling dynamics is observed to be higher for the biconcave stress-free state than the spheroidal state. The former shows a strong shape oscillation with repeated departures from the biconcave shape, while the latter shows a nearly stable biconcave shape. It is found that the cell membrane in the biconcave stress-free state is under a compressive stress and a weaker bending force density, leading to a periodic compression of the cell. The shape oscillation then leads to a higher energy barrier against membrane tank-tread leading to an early transition to tumbling. However, if the cells are released with a large off-shear plane angle, the oscillations can be suppressed due to an azimuthal motion of the membrane along the vorticity direction leading to a redistribution of the membrane points and lowering of the energy barrier, which again results in a nearly similar behavior of the cells under the two different stress-free states. A variety of off-shear plane dynamics is observed, namely, rolling

  8. Algebraic stress model for axial flow in a bare rod-bundle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    de Lemos, M.J.S.

    1987-01-01

    The problem of predicting transport properties for momentum and heat across the boundaries of interconnected channels has been the subject of many investigations. In the particular case of axial flow through rod-bundles, transport coefficients for channel faces aligned with rod centers are known to be considerably higher than those calculated by simple isotropic theories. And yet, it was been found that secondary flows play only a minor role in this overall transport, being turbulence highly enhanced across that hypothetical surface. In order to numerically predict the correct amount of the quantity being transported, the approach taken by many investigators was then to artificially increase the diffusion coefficient obtained via a simple isopropic theory (usually the standard k-ε model) and numerically match the correct experimentally observed mixing rates. The present paper reports an attempt to describe the turbulent stresses by means of an Algebraic Stress Model for turbulence. Relative turbulent kinetic energy distribution in all three directions are presented and compared with experiments in a square lattice. The strong directional dependence of transport terms are then obtained via a model for the Reynolds stresses. The results identify a need for a better representation of the mean-flow field part of the pressure-strain correlation term

  9. Sensor for direct measurement of the boundary shear stress in fluid flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Xiaoqi; Badescu, Mircea; Bar-Cohen, Yoseph; Lih, Shyh-Shiuh; Sherrit, Stewart; Chang, Zensheu; Chen, Beck; Widholm, Scott; Ostlund, Patrick

    2011-04-01

    The formation of scour patterns at bridge piers is driven by the forces at the boundary of the water flow. In most experimental scour studies, indirect processes have been applied to estimate the shear and normal stress using measured velocity profiles. The estimations are based on theoretical models and associated assumptions. However, the turbulence flow fields and boundary layer in the pier-scour region are very complex. In addition, available turbulence models cannot account accurately for the bed roughness effect. Direct measurement of the boundary shear and normal stress and their fluctuations are attractive alternatives. However, this approach is a challenging one especially for high spatial resolution and high fidelity measurements. The authors designed and fabricated a prototype miniature shear stress sensor including an EDM machined floating plate and a high-resolution optical encoder. Tests were performed both in air as well as operation in water with controlled flow. The sensor sensitivity, stability and signal-to-noise level were measured and evaluated. The detailed test results and a discussion of future work will be presented in this paper.

  10. Ionophore-Based Potentiometric Sensors for the Flow-Injection Determination of Promethazine Hydrochloride in Pharmaceutical Formulations and Human Urine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suad Mustafa Al-Araji

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Plasticised poly(vinyl chloride-based membranes containing the ionophores (α-, β- and γ-cyclodextrins (CD, dibenzo-18-crown-6 (DB18C6 and dibenzo-30-crown-10 (DB30C10 were evaluated for their potentiometric response towards promethazine (PM in a flow injection analysis (FIA set-up. Good responses were obtained when β- and γ-CDs, and DB30C10 were used. The performance characteristics were further improved when tetrakis(4-chlorophenyl borate (KTPB was added to the membrane. The sensor based on β-CD, bis(2-ethylhexyl adipate (BEHA and KTPB exhibited the best performance among the eighteen sensor compositions that were tested. The response was linear from 1 x 10−5 to 1 x 10−2 M, slope was 61.3 mV decade−1, the pH independent region ranged from 4.5 to 7.0, a limit of detection of 5.3 x 10−6 M was possible and a lifetime of more than a month was observed when used in the FIA system. Other plasticisers such as dioctyl phenylphosphonate and tributyl phosphate do not show significant improvements in the quality of the sensors. The promising sensors were further tested for the effects of foreign ions (Li+, Na+, K+, Mg2+, Ca2+, Co2+, Cu2+, Cr3+, Fe3+, glucose, fructose. FIA conditions (e.g., effects of flow rate, injection volume, pH of the carrier stream were also studied when the best sensor was used (based on β-CD. The sensor was applied to the determination of PM in four pharmaceutical preparations and human urine that were spiked with different levels of PM. Good agreement between the sensor and the manufacturer’s claimed values (for pharmaceutical preparations was obtained, while mean recoveries of 98.6% were obtained for spiked urine samples. The molecular recognition features of the sensors as revealed by molecular modelling were rationalised by the nature of the interactions and complexation energies between the host and guest molecules.

  11. Flow through internal elastic lamina affects shear stress on smooth muscle cells (3D simulations).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tada, Shigeru; Tarbell, John M

    2002-02-01

    We describe a three-dimensional numerical simulation of interstitial flow through the medial layer of an artery accounting for the complex entrance condition associated with fenestral pores in the internal elastic lamina (IEL) to investigate the fluid mechanical environment around the smooth muscle cells (SMCs) right beneath the IEL. The IEL was modeled as an impermeable barrier to water flow except for the fenestral pores, which were assumed to be uniformly distributed over the IEL. The medial layer was modeled as a heterogeneous medium composed of a periodic array of cylindrical SMCs embedded in a continuous porous medium representing the interstitial proteoglycan and collagen matrix. Depending on the distance between the IEL bottom surface and the upstream end of the proximal layer of SMCs, the local shear stress on SMCs right beneath the fenestral pore could be more than 10 times higher than that on the cells far removed from the IEL under the conditions that the fenestral pore diameter and area fraction of pores were kept constant at 1.4 microm and 0.05, respectively. Thus these proximal SMCs may experience shear stress levels that are even higher than endothelial cells exposed to normal blood flow (order of 10 dyn/cm(2)). Furthermore, entrance flow through fenestral pores alters considerably the interstitial flow field in the medial layer over a spatial length scale of the order of the fenestral pore diameter. Thus the spatial gradient of shear stress on the most superficial SMC is noticeably higher than computed for endothelial cell surfaces.

  12. Study of flow stress and spall strength of additively manufactured Ti-6-4 alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Amitay; Paris, Vitaly; Yosef-Hai, Arnon; Gudinetsky, Eli; Tiferet, Eitan

    2017-06-01

    The use of additive manufacturing (AM) by Electron Beam Melting (EBM) or Selective Laser Melting (SLM) has extensively grown in the past few years. A major goal in AM is to manufacture materials with mechanical properties at least as good as traditionally manufactured materials. In this work we present results of planar impact tests and Split Hopkinson Pressure Bar tests (SHPB) on Ti-6-4 manufactured by EBM and SLM processes. Results of planar impact tests on SLM samples display slightly higher spall strength compared to EBM while the stress at Hugoniot elastic limit (HEL) is practically the same. Stress strain curves based on SHPB measurements at two different strain rates present similar plastic flow stresses for SLM and EBM processed Ti-6-4 alloy, while the flow stress is about 20% higher than reported for commercial reference material. The strain to failure of both materials shows considerable strain rate sensitivity. The results of post-mortem analysis of spall fracture will also be presented.

  13. Unified Hall-Petch description of nano-grain nickel hardness, flow stress and strain rate sensitivity measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, R. W.; Balasubramanian, N.

    2017-08-01

    It is shown that: (i) nano-grain nickel flow stress and hardness data at ambient temperature follow a Hall-Petch (H-P) relation over a wide range of grain size; and (ii) accompanying flow stress and strain rate sensitivity measurements follow an analogous H-P relationship for the reciprocal "activation volume", (1/v*) = (1/A*b) where A* is activation area. Higher temperature flow stress measurements show a greater than expected reduction both in the H-P kɛ and in v*. The results are connected with smaller nano-grain size (tested at very low imposed strain rates.

  14. Statistical properties of wall shear stress fluctuations in turbulent channel flows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keirsbulck, L.; Labraga, L.; Gad-el-Hak, M.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Accurate measurements of instantaneous wall shear stress are conducted. ► LDA is used to measure near-wall streamwise velocity. ► Electrochemical probe is used to measure wall shear stress. ► Frequency response and non-uniform correction methods were used to provide an accurate, well-resolved wall-statistics database. ► Reynolds number dependency of the statistical wall quantities is investigated. - Abstract: Instantaneous velocity and wall shear stress measurements are conducted in a turbulent channel flow in the Kármán number range of Re τ = 74–400. A one-dimensional LDA system is used to measure the streamwise velocity fluctuations, and an electrochemical technique is utilized to measure the instantaneous wall shear stress. For the latter, frequency response and nonuniform correction methods are used to provide an accurate, well-resolved wall statistics database. The Reynolds number dependency of the statistical wall quantities is carefully investigated. The corrected relative wall shear stress fluctuations fit well with the best DNS data available and meet the need for clarification of the small discrepancy observed in the literature between the experimental and numerical results of such quantities. Higher-order statistics of the wall shear stress, spectra, and the turbulence kinetic energy budget at the wall are also investigated. The present paper shows that the electrochemical technique is a powerful experimental method for hydrodynamic studies involving highly unsteady flows. The study brings with it important consequences, especially in the context of the current debate regarding the appropriate scaling as well as the validation of new predictive models of near-wall turbulence.

  15. Flow shear stress differentially regulates endothelial uptake of nanocarriers targeted to distinct epitopes of PECAM-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Jingyan; Shuvaev, Vladimir V; Davies, Peter F; Eckmann, David M; Muro, Silvia; Muzykantov, Vladimir R

    2015-07-28

    Targeting nanocarriers (NC) to endothelial cell adhesion molecules including Platelet-Endothelial Cell Adhesion Molecule-1 (PECAM-1 or CD31) improves drug delivery and pharmacotherapy of inflammation, oxidative stress, thrombosis and ischemia in animal models. Recent studies unveiled that hydrodynamic conditions modulate endothelial endocytosis of NC targeted to PECAM-1, but the specificity and mechanism of effects of flow remain unknown. Here we studied the effect of flow on endocytosis by human endothelial cells of NC targeted by monoclonal antibodies Ab62 and Ab37 to distinct epitopes on the distal extracellular domain of PECAM. Flow in the range of 1-8dyn/cm(2), typical for venous vasculature, stimulated the uptake of spherical Ab/NC (~180nm diameter) carrying ~50 vs 200 Ab62 and Ab37 per NC, respectively. Effect of flow was inhibited by disruption of cholesterol-rich plasmalemma domains and deletion of PECAM-1 cytosolic tail. Flow stimulated endocytosis of Ab62/NC and Ab37/NC via eliciting distinct signaling pathways mediated by RhoA/ROCK and Src Family Kinases, respectively. Therefore, flow stimulates endothelial endocytosis of Ab/NC in a PECAM-1 epitope specific manner. Using ligands of binding to distinct epitopes on the same target molecule may enable fine-tuning of intracellular delivery based on the hemodynamic conditions in the vascular area of interest. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Wall shear stress characterization of a 3D bluff-body separated flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fourrié, Grégoire; Keirsbulck, Laurent; Labraga, Larbi

    2013-10-01

    Efficient flow control strategies aimed at reducing the aerodynamic drag of road vehicles require a detailed knowledge of the reference flow. In this work, the flow around the rear slanted window of a generic car model was experimentally studied through wall shear stress measurements using an electrochemical method. The mean and fluctuating wall shear stress within the wall impact regions of the recirculation bubble and the main longitudinal vortex structures which develop above the rear window are presented. Correlations allow a more detailed characterization of the recirculation phenomenon within the separation bubble. In the model symmetry plane the recirculation structure compares well with simpler 2D configurations; specific lengths, flapping motion and shedding of large-scale vortices are observed, these similarities diminish when leaving the middle plane due to the strong three-dimensionality of the flow. A specific attention is paid to the convection processes occurring within the recirculation: a downstream convection velocity is observed, in accordance with 2D recirculations from the literature, and an upstream convection is highlighted along the entire bubble length which has not been underlined in some previous canonical configurations.

  17. A conservative flow routing formulation: Déjà vu and the variable-parameter Muskingum method revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reggiani, Paolo; Todini, Ezio; Meißner, Dennis

    2014-11-01

    A wide range of approaches are used for flow routing in hydrological models. One of the most attractive solutions is the variable-parameter Muskingum (VPM) method. Its major advantage consists in the fact that (i) it can be applied to poorly-gauged basins with unknown channel geometries, (ii) it requires short execution time and (iii) it adequately captures, also in the presence of mild slopes, the most salient features of a dynamic wave such as the looped rating curve and the steepening of the rising limb of the hydrograph. In addition, the method offers the possibility to derive average water levels for a reach segment, a quantity which is essential in flood forecasting and flood risk assessment. For reasons of computational economy the method is also appropriate for applications, in which hydrological and global circulation models (GCM) are coupled, and where computational effort becomes an issue. The VPM approach is presented from a philosophical and conceptual perspective, by showing the derivation of its mass and momentum balance properties from the point to the finite scale, and by demonstrating its strengths by means of an application in an operational context. The principal novel contributions of the article relate to (a) the extension of the Muskingum-Cunge-Todini approach to accept uniformly distributed lateral inflow, (b) the use of power law cross sections and (c) the validation of the method through a long-term simulation of a real-world case, including the comparison of results to those obtained using a full Saint Venant equations model.

  18. Ursodeoxycholic Acid (UDCA) Exerts Anti-Atherogenic Effects by Inhibiting Endoplasmic Reticulum (ER) Stress Induced by Disturbed Flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Jihwa; Kim, Kyoung Hwa; Lee, Seok Cheol; An, Shung Hyun; Kwon, Kihwan

    2015-10-01

    Disturbed blood flow with low-oscillatory shear stress (OSS) is a predominant atherogenic factor leading to dysfunctional endothelial cells (ECs). Recently, it was found that disturbed flow can directly induce endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress in ECs, thereby playing a critical role in the development and progression of atherosclerosis. Ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA), a naturally occurring bile acid, has long been used to treat chronic cholestatic liver disease and is known to alleviate endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress at the cellular level. However, its role in atherosclerosis remains unexplored. In this study, we demonstrated the anti-atherogenic activity of UDCA via inhibition of disturbed flow-induced ER stress in atherosclerosis. UDCA effectively reduced ER stress, resulting in a reduction in expression of X-box binding protein-1 (XBP-1) and CEBP-homologous protein (CHOP) in ECs. UDCA also inhibits the disturbed flow-induced inflammatory responses such as increases in adhesion molecules, monocyte adhesion to ECs, and apoptosis of ECs. In a mouse model of disturbed flow-induced atherosclerosis, UDCA inhibits atheromatous plaque formation through the alleviation of ER stress and a decrease in adhesion molecules. Taken together, our results revealed that UDCA exerts anti-atherogenic activity in disturbed flow-induced atherosclerosis by inhibiting ER stress and the inflammatory response. This study suggests that UDCA may be a therapeutic agent for prevention or treatment of atherosclerosis.

  19. Microstructure Evolution and Flow Stress Model of a 20Mn5 Hollow Steel Ingot during Hot Compression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Min; Ma, Qing-Xian; Luo, Jian-Bin

    2018-03-21

    20Mn5 steel is widely used in the manufacture of heavy hydro-generator shaft due to its good performance of strength, toughness and wear resistance. However, the hot deformation and recrystallization behaviors of 20Mn5 steel compressed under high temperature were not studied. In this study, the hot compression experiments under temperatures of 850-1200 °C and strain rates of 0.01/s-1/s are conducted using Gleeble thermal and mechanical simulation machine. And the flow stress curves and microstructure after hot compression are obtained. Effects of temperature and strain rate on microstructure are analyzed. Based on the classical stress-dislocation relation and the kinetics of dynamic recrystallization, a two-stage constitutive model is developed to predict the flow stress of 20Mn5 steel. Comparisons between experimental flow stress and predicted flow stress show that the predicted flow stress values are in good agreement with the experimental flow stress values, which indicates that the proposed constitutive model is reliable and can be used for numerical simulation of hot forging of 20Mn5 hollow steel ingot.

  20. A nodally condensed SUPG formulation for free-surface computation of steady-state flows constrained by unilateral contact - Application to rolling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arora, Shitij; Fourment, Lionel

    2018-05-01

    In the context of the simulation of industrial hot forming processes, the resultant time-dependent thermo-mechanical multi-field problem (v →,p ,σ ,ɛ ) can be sped up by 10-50 times using the steady-state methods while compared to the conventional incremental methods. Though the steady-state techniques have been used in the past, but only on simple configurations and with structured meshes, and the modern-days problems are in the framework of complex configurations, unstructured meshes and parallel computing. These methods remove time dependency from the equations, but introduce an additional unknown into the problem: the steady-state shape. This steady-state shape x → can be computed as a geometric correction t → on the domain X → by solving the weak form of the steady-state equation v →.n →(t →)=0 using a Streamline Upwind Petrov Galerkin (SUPG) formulation. There exists a strong coupling between the domain shape and the material flow, hence, a two-step fixed point iterative resolution algorithm was proposed that involves (1) the computation of flow field from the resolution of thermo-mechanical equations on a prescribed domain shape and (2) the computation of steady-state shape for an assumed velocity field. The contact equations are introduced in the penalty form both during the flow computation as well as during the free-surface correction. The fact that the contact description is inhomogeneous, i.e., it is defined in the nodal form in the former, and in the weighted residual form in the latter, is assumed to be critical to the convergence of certain problems. Thus, the notion of nodal collocation is invoked in the weak form of the surface correction equation to homogenize the contact coupling. The surface correction algorithm is tested on certain analytical test cases and the contact coupling is tested with some hot rolling problems.

  1. Laser reflection method for determination of shear stress in low density transitional flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sathian, Sarith P.; Kurian, Job

    2006-03-01

    The details of laser reflection method (LRM) for the determination of shear stress in low density transitional flows are presented. The method is employed to determine the shear stress due to impingement of a low density supersonic free jet issuing out from a convergent divergent nozzle on a flat plate. The plate is smeared with a thin oil film and kept parallel to the nozzle axis. For a thin oil film moving under the action of aerodynamic boundary layer, the shear stress at the air-oil interface is equal to the shear stress between the surface and air. A direct and dynamic measurement of the oil film slope generated by the shear force is done using a position sensing detector (PSD). The thinning rate of the oil film is directly measured which is the major advantage of the LRM. From the oil film slope history, calculation of the shear stress is done using a three-point formula. The range of Knudsen numbers investigated is from 0.028 to 0.516. Pressure ratio across the nozzle varied from 3,500 to 8,500 giving highly under expanded free jets. The measured values of shear, in the overlapping region of experimental parameters, show fair agreement with those obtained by force balance method and laser interferometric method.

  2. Velocity and shear stress distribution downstream of mechanical heart valves in pulsatile flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giersiepen, M; Krause, U; Knott, E; Reul, H; Rau, G

    1989-04-01

    Ten mechanical valves (TAD 27 mm): Starr-Edwards Silastic Ball, Björk-Shiley Standard, Björk-Shiley Concave-Convex, Björk-Shiley Monostrut, Hall-Kaster (Medtronic-Hall), OmniCarbon, Bicer Val, Sorin, Saint-Jude Medical and Hemex (Duromedics) are investigated in a comparative in vitro study. The velocity and turbulent shear stress profiles of the valves were determined by Laser Doppler anemometry in two different downstream axes within a model aortic root. Depending on the individual valve design, velocity peaks up to 1.5 m/s and turbulent shear stress peaks up to 150 N/m2 were measured during the systolic phase. These shear stress peaks mainly occurred in areas of flow separation and intense momentum exchange. Directly downstream of the valves (measuring axis 0.55.dAorta) turbulent shear stress peaks occurred at peak systole and during the deceleration phase, while in the second measuring axis (1.5.dAorta) turbulence levels were lower. Shear stress levels were high at the borders of the fluid jets. The results are discussed from a fluid-dynamic point of view.

  3. Direct measurement of wall shear stress in a reattaching flow with a photonic sensor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ayaz, U K; Ioppolo, T; Ötügen, M V

    2013-01-01

    Wall shear stress measurements are carried out in a planar backward-facing step flow using a micro-optical sensor. The sensor is essentially a floating element system and measures the shear stress directly. The transduction method to measure the floating element deflection is based on the whispering gallery optical mode (WGM) shifts of a dielectric microsphere. This method is capable of measuring floating element displacements of the order of a nanometer. The floating element surface is circular with a diameter of ∼960 µm, which is part of a beam that is in contact with the dielectric microsphere. The sensor is calibrated for shear stress as well as pressure sensitivity yielding 7.3 pm Pa −1 and 0.0236 pm Pa −1 for shear stress and pressure sensitivity, respectively. Hence, the contribution by the wall pressure is less than two orders of magnitude smaller than that of shear stress. Measurements are made for a Reynolds number range of 2000–5000 extending to 18 step heights from the step face. The results are in good agreement with those of earlier reports. An analysis is also carried out to evaluate the performance of the WGM sensor including measurement sensitivity and bandwidth. (paper)

  4. Assessment of Reynolds stress components and turbulent pressure loss using 4D flow MRI with extended motion encoding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haraldsson, Henrik; Kefayati, Sarah; Ahn, Sinyeob; Dyverfeldt, Petter; Lantz, Jonas; Karlsson, Matts; Laub, Gerhard; Ebbers, Tino; Saloner, David

    2018-04-01

    To measure the Reynolds stress tensor using 4D flow MRI, and to evaluate its contribution to computed pressure maps. A method to assess both velocity and Reynolds stress using 4D flow MRI is presented and evaluated. The Reynolds stress is compared by cross-sectional integrals of the Reynolds stress invariants. Pressure maps are computed using the pressure Poisson equation-both including and neglecting the Reynolds stress. Good agreement is seen for Reynolds stress between computational fluid dynamics, simulated MRI, and MRI experiment. The Reynolds stress can significantly influence the computed pressure loss for simulated (eg, -0.52% vs -15.34% error; P Reynolds stress (P Reynolds stress tensor. The additional information provided by this method improves the assessment of pressure gradients across a stenosis in the presence of turbulence. Unlike conventional methods, which are only valid if the flow is laminar, the proposed method is valid for both laminar and disturbed flow, a common presentation in diseased vessels. Magn Reson Med 79:1962-1971, 2018. © 2017 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine. © 2017 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  5. State of stress in exhumed basins and implications for fluid flow: insights from the Illizi Basin, Algeria

    KAUST Repository

    English, Joseph M.; Finkbeiner, Thomas; English, Kara L.; Yahia Cherif, Rachida

    2017-01-01

    start to become hydraulically conductive again and enable fluid flow and hydrocarbon leakage during fault reactivation. We constrain the present day in situ stresses of the exhumed Illizi Basin in Algeria and demonstrate that the primary north

  6. Study Of Topical Anti-Inflammatory Potency And Clinical Efficacy Of Formulations Of Mometasone And Betamethasone By Cutaneous Blood Flow Measurements In Psoriatic Patients Using Laser Doppler Velocimetry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mulekar S. V

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available Laser Doppier Velocimetry (LDV was used to measure cutaneous blood flow (CBF in psoriatic skin lesions to assess the effect of once daily application of Mometasone furoate (MF in a base claimed to possess a “reservoir” effect, as against Betamethasone-17-valarate (BV in a conventional cream base, applied twice daily, for 4 weeks. Bilaterally symmetrical active lesions were studied in 10 psoriatics, at baseline and at the end of 2 and 4 weeks’ treatment. The formulations were also evaluated for topical anti-inflammatory potency in terms of their ability to inhibit the Post-Ischaemic-Reactive-Hyperaemic-Response (PIRHR induced on normal uninvolved skin treated under occlusion. The lesions were also assessed subjectively for clinical Psoriatic Hyperaemia Index (PHI = CBF on lesions/CBF on uninvolved skin: 8.42 + 1.74 & 10.13 + 1.70 correlating with high CPI (9 + 0.50 & 9.1 + 0.51. During treatment with MF or BV, the lesions resolved rapidly, with a concomitant decrease in PHI and CPI (Week 2 : PHI = 3.40 + 0.46 & 5.19 + 1.65, CPI = 4.15 + 0.86& 5.20 + 0.87 and Week 4 : PHI = 1.99 + 0.23 & 2.81 + 0.74 CPI = 2.00 + 0.50 & 2.88 + 0.72 respectively. The two formulations Inhibited PIRHR to same extent (auc/min: Control = 1871 + 399.22, MF = 536.11 + 153.34 & BV = 567.5 + 110.76, indicating equal potency. The results show that pharmaceutical factor such as vehicle can significantly influence the clinical efficacy of corticoids.

  7. Elongational flow of polymer melts at constant strain rate, constant stress and constant force

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Manfred H.; Rolón-Garrido, Víctor H.

    2013-04-01

    Characterization of polymer melts in elongational flow is typically performed at constant elongational rate or rarely at constant tensile stress conditions. One of the disadvantages of these deformation modes is that they are hampered by the onset of "necking" instabilities according to the Considère criterion. Experiments at constant tensile force have been performed even more rarely, in spite of the fact that this deformation mode is free from necking instabilities and is of considerable industrial relevance as it is the correct analogue of steady fiber spinning. It is the objective of the present contribution to present for the first time a full experimental characterization of a long-chain branched polyethylene melt in elongational flow. Experiments were performed at constant elongation rate, constant tensile stress and constant tensile force by use of a Sentmanat Extensional Rheometer (SER) in combination with an Anton Paar MCR301 rotational rheometer. The accessible experimental window and experimental limitations are discussed. The experimental data are modelled by using the Wagner I model. Predictions of the steady-start elongational viscosity in constant strain rate and creep experiments are found to be identical, albeit only by extrapolation of the experimental data to Hencky strains of the order of 6. For constant stress experiments, a minimum in the strain rate and a corresponding maximum in the elongational viscosity is found at a Hencky strain of the order of 3, which, although larger than the steady-state value, follows roughly the general trend of the steady-state elongational viscosity. The constitutive analysis also reveals that constant tensile force experiments indicate a larger strain hardening potential than seen in constant elongation rate or constant tensile stress experiments. This may be indicative of the effect of necking under constant elongation rate or constant tensile stress conditions according to the Considère criterion.

  8. The Effect of Grain Size and Strain on the Tensile Flow Stress of Aluminium at Room Temperature

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Niels

    1977-01-01

    stress-grain size relationship was analyzed in terms of matrix strengthening and grain boundary strengthening according to the dislocation concept of Ashby. At intermediate strains this approach gives a good description of the effect of strain, grain size and purity on the flow stress.......Tensile-stress-strain data over a strain range from 0.2 to 30% were obtained at room temperature for 99.999 and 99.5% aluminium as a function of grain size. The yield stress-grain size relationship can be expressed by a Petch-Hall relation with approximately the same slope for the two materials....... The flow stress-grain size relationship can adequately be expressed by a modified Petch-Hall relation; for 99.999% aluminium material the slope increases with strain through a maximum around 15–20%, whereas for 99.5% aluminium the slope decreases with the strain to zero at strains about 10%. The flow...

  9. The interplay between Reynolds stress and zonal flows: direct numerical simulation as a bridge between theory and experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vergote, M; Schoor, M Van; Xu, Y; Jachmich, S; Weynants, R

    2006-01-01

    We describe the results of a measurement campaign on the CASTOR tokamak where the drive of flows and zonal flows by Reynolds stress was investigated by means of a dual probe head system allowing us to measure the properties of the electrostatic turbulence and the rotation velocities at the same location and at the same moment. We compare these experimental results with a turbulence model linked to a one dimensional fluid model describing the electrostatic turbulence and its influence on the background flow. The turbulence is simulated locally on the basis of the Hasegawa-Wakatani equations, completed with magnetic inhomogeneity terms. In the fluid model the toroidal geometry is correctly taken into account, while various sources and sinks like viscosity, interaction with neutrals, Reynolds stress and electric current induced by biasing are included. The good agreement of the predicted flow with the measured one demonstrates that in a pure cylindrical geometry the modelled strength of Reynolds stress acceleration of flow is overestimated

  10. Modeling flow stress constitutive behavior of SA508-3 steel for nuclear reactor pressure vessels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun Mingyue, E-mail: mysun@imr.ac.cn [Shenyang National Laboratory for Materials Science, Institute of Metal Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 72 Wenhua Road, Shenyang 110016 (China); Luhan, Hao; Shijian, Li; Dianzhong, Li; Yiyi, Li [Shenyang National Laboratory for Materials Science, Institute of Metal Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 72 Wenhua Road, Shenyang 110016 (China)

    2011-11-15

    Highlights: > A series of flow stress constitutive equations for SA508-3 steel were successfully established. > The experimental results under different conditions have validated the constitutive equations. > An industrial application of the model was present to simulate a large conical shell forging process. - Abstract: Based on the measured stress-strain curves under different temperatures and strain rates, a series of flow stress constitutive equations for SA508-3 steel were firstly established through the classical theories on work hardening and softening. The comparison between the experimental and modeling results has confirmed that the established constitutive equations can correctly describe the mechanical responses and microstructural evolutions of the steel under various hot deformation conditions. We further represented a successful industrial application of this model to simulate a forging process for a large conical shell used in a nuclear steam generator, which evidences its practical and promising perspective of our model with an aim of widely promoting the hot plasticity processing for heavy nuclear components of fission reactors.

  11. Spatio-temporal structure of turbulent Reynolds stress zonal flow drive in 3D magnetic configuration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmid, B; Ramisch, M; Manz, P; Stroth, U

    2017-01-01

    The poloidal dependence of the zonal flow drive and the underlying Reynolds stress structure are studied at the stellarator experiment TJ-K by means of a poloidal Langmuir-probe array. This gives the unique possibility to study the locality of the Reynolds stress in a complex toroidal magnetic geometry. It is found that the Reynolds stress is not homogeneously distributed along the flux surface but has a strong poloidal asymmetry where it is concentrated on the outboard side with a maximum above the midplane. The average tilt of the turbulent structures is thereby reflected in the anisotropy of the bivariant velocity distribution. Using a conditional averaging technique the temporal dynamics reveal that the zonal flow drive is also maximal in this particular region. The results suggest an influence of the magnetic field line curvature, which controls the underlying plasma turbulence. The findings are a basis for further comparison with turbulence simulations in 3D geometry and demonstrate the need for a global characterisation of plasma turbulence. (paper)

  12. Modeling flow stress constitutive behavior of SA508-3 steel for nuclear reactor pressure vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun Mingyue; Hao Luhan; Li Shijian; Li Dianzhong; Li Yiyi

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → A series of flow stress constitutive equations for SA508-3 steel were successfully established. → The experimental results under different conditions have validated the constitutive equations. → An industrial application of the model was present to simulate a large conical shell forging process. - Abstract: Based on the measured stress-strain curves under different temperatures and strain rates, a series of flow stress constitutive equations for SA508-3 steel were firstly established through the classical theories on work hardening and softening. The comparison between the experimental and modeling results has confirmed that the established constitutive equations can correctly describe the mechanical responses and microstructural evolutions of the steel under various hot deformation conditions. We further represented a successful industrial application of this model to simulate a forging process for a large conical shell used in a nuclear steam generator, which evidences its practical and promising perspective of our model with an aim of widely promoting the hot plasticity processing for heavy nuclear components of fission reactors.

  13. Stress Linearization and Strength Evaluation of the BEP's Flow Plates for a Dual Cooled Fuel Assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jae Yong; Yoon, Kyung Ho; Kang, Heung Seok; Lee, Young Ho; Lee, Kang Hee; Kim, Hyung Kyu

    2009-01-01

    A fuel assembly is composed of 5 major components, such as a top end piece (TEP), a bottom end piece (BEP), spacer grids (SGs), guide tubes (GTs) and an instrumentation tube (IT) and fuel rods (FRs). There are no ASME criteria about all components except for a TEP/BEP. The TEP/BEP should satisfy stress intensity limits in case of condition A and B of ASME, Section III, Division 1 . Subsection NB. In a dual cooled fuel assembly, the array and position of fuels are changed from those of a conventional PWR fuel assembly to achieve a power uprating. The flow plates of top/bottom end pieces (TEP/BEP) have to be modified into proper shape to provide flow holes to direct the heated coolant into/out of the fuel assembly but structural intensity of these plates within a 22.241 kN axial loading should satisfy Tresca stress limits in ASME code. In this paper, stress linearization procedure and strength evaluation of a newly designed BEP for the dual cooled fuel assembly are described

  14. Padé approximant for normal stress differences in large-amplitude oscillatory shear flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poungthong, P.; Saengow, C.; Giacomin, A. J.; Kolitawong, C.; Merger, D.; Wilhelm, M.

    2018-04-01

    Analytical solutions for the normal stress differences in large-amplitude oscillatory shear flow (LAOS), for continuum or molecular models, normally take the inexact form of the first few terms of a series expansion in the shear rate amplitude. Here, we improve the accuracy of these truncated expansions by replacing them with rational functions called Padé approximants. The recent advent of exact solutions in LAOS presents an opportunity to identify accurate and useful Padé approximants. For this identification, we replace the truncated expansion for the corotational Jeffreys fluid with its Padé approximants for the normal stress differences. We uncover the most accurate and useful approximant, the [3,4] approximant, and then test its accuracy against the exact solution [C. Saengow and A. J. Giacomin, "Normal stress differences from Oldroyd 8-constant framework: Exact analytical solution for large-amplitude oscillatory shear flow," Phys. Fluids 29, 121601 (2017)]. We use Ewoldt grids to show the stunning accuracy of our [3,4] approximant in LAOS. We quantify this accuracy with an objective function and then map it onto the Pipkin space. Our two applications illustrate how to use our new approximant reliably. For this, we use the Spriggs relations to generalize our best approximant to multimode, and then, we compare with measurements on molten high-density polyethylene and on dissolved polyisobutylene in isobutylene oligomer.

  15. Wall morphology, blood flow and wall shear stress: MR findings in patients with peripheral artery disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galizia, Mauricio S.; Barker, Alex; Collins, Jeremy; Carr, James [Northwestern University, Department of Radiology, Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, IL (United States); Liao, Yihua [Northwestern University' s Feinberg School of Medicine, Department of Preventive Medicine, Chicago, IL (United States); McDermott, Mary M. [Northwestern University' s Feinberg School of Medicine, Department of Preventive Medicine, Chicago, IL (United States); Northwestern University' s Feinberg School of Medicine, Department of Medicine, Chicago, IL (United States); Markl, Michael [Northwestern University, Department of Radiology, Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, IL (United States); Northwestern University, Department Biomedical Engineering, McCormick School of Engineering, Chicago, IL (United States)

    2014-04-15

    To investigate the influence of atherosclerotic plaques on femoral haemodynamics assessed by two-dimensional (2D) phase-contrast (PC) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with three-directional velocity encoding. During 1 year, patients with peripheral artery disease and an ankle brachial index <1.00 were enrolled. After institutional review board approval and written informed consent, 44 patients (age, 70 ± 12 years) underwent common femoral artery MRI. Patients with contra-indications for MRI were excluded. Sequences included 2D time-of-flight, proton-density, T1-weighted and T2-weighted MRI. Electrocardiogram (ECG)-gated 2D PC-MRI with 3D velocity encoding was acquired. A radiologist classified images in five categories. Blood flow, velocity and wall shear stress (WSS) along the vessel circumference were quantified from the PC-MRI data. The acquired images were of good quality for interpretation. There were no image quality problems related to poor ECG-gating or slice positioning. Velocities, oscillatory shear stress and total flow were similar between patients with normal arteries and wall thickening/plaque. Patients with plaques demonstrated regionally increased peak systolic WSS and enhanced WSS eccentricity. Combined multi-contrast morphological imaging of the peripheral arterial wall with PC-MRI with three-directional velocity encoding is a feasible technique. Further study is needed to determine whether flow is an appropriate marker for altered endothelial cell function, vascular remodelling and plaque progression. (orig.)

  16. Roughness topographical effects on mean momentum and stress budgets in developed turbulent channel flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aghaei Jouybari, Mostafa; Yuan, Junlin

    2017-11-01

    Direct numerical simulations of turbulent channel flows are carried out over two surfaces: a synthesized sand-grain surface and a realistic turbine roughness that is characterized by more prominent large-scale surface features. To separate the effects of wall-normal variation of the roughness area fraction from the (true) variation of flow statistics, the governing equations are area-averaged using intrinsic averaging, contrary to the usually practice based on the total area (i.e., superficial averaging). Additional terms appear in the mean-momentum equation resulted from the wall-normal variation of the solid fraction and play a role in the near-wall balance. Results from surfaces with a step solidity function (e.g., cubes) will also be discussed. Compared to the sand grains, the turbine surface generates stronger form-induced fluctuations, despite weaker dispersive shear stress. This is associated with more significant form-induced productions (comparable to shear production) in Reynolds stress budgets, weaker pressure work, and, consequently, more anisotropic redistribution of turbulent kinetic energy in the roughness sublayer, which potentially leads to different turbulent responses between the two surfaces in non-equilibrium flows.

  17. Stress dependent fluid flow in porous rock: experiments and network modelling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flornes, Olav

    2005-07-01

    During the lifetime of a hydrocarbon reservoir, the pore pressure decreases because fluids are drained. Changed pore pressure causes a deformation of the reservoir rock, and the flow channels may be narrowed by the increased weight carried by the rock matrix. Knowledge of how the rocks ability to transport fluids, the permeability, is changed by increased stress can be important for effective reservoir management. In this work, we present experimental results for how permeability changes with applied stress. The materials tested are several different sandstones and one limestone, all having porosities higher than 19 percent. Application of stress is done in a number of different ways. We subject the sample to an isotropic stress, and see how changing this applied stress affects permeability as opposed to changing the pore fluid pressure. This allows for investigating the effective stress law for permeability. Permeability decreased by 10 to 20 percent, when we deformed the materials hydro statically within the elastic regime. For all of our samples, we observed a higher permeability change than predicted by a conventional model for relating porosity and permeability, the Kozeny Carman model. For Red Wildmoor, a sandstone having some clay content, we observed that a change in pore pressure was slightly more important for permeability than a change in the applied stress with the same amount. A sandstone with no clay content, Bad Durckheim, showed the opposite behavior, with applied stress slightly more important than pore pressure. We present a new method for measuring permeability in two directions in the same experiment. We apply different anisotropic stresses, and see if a high stress in one direction causes a difference in permeability changes parallel and perpendicular to maximum stress. We observe that deforming the sample axially, causes a larger decrease in axial permeability than in the radial at low confining pressure. At high confining pressure, the

  18. Numerical analysis of three-dimensional turbulent flow in a 90deg bent tube by algebraic Reynolds stress model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugiyama, Hitoshi; Akiyama, Mitsunobu; Shinohara, Yasunori; Hitomi, Daisuke

    1997-01-01

    A numerical analysis has been performed for three dimensional developing turbulent flow in a 90deg bent tube with straight inlet and outlet sections by an algebraic Reynolds stress model. To our knowledge, very little has been reported about detailed comparison between calculated results and experimental data containing Reynolds stresses. In calculation, an algebraic Reynolds stress model together with a boundary-fitted coordinate system is applied to a 90deg bent tube in order to solve anisotropic turbulent flow precisely. The calculated results display comparatively good agreement with the experimental data of time averaged velocity and secondary vectors. In addition, the present method predicts as a characteristic feature that the intensity of secondary flow near the inner wall is increased immediately downstream from the bend outlet by the pressure gradient. With regard to comparison of Reynolds stresses, the present method is able to reproduce well the distributions of streamwise normal stress and shear stress defined streamwise and radial velocity fluctuation except for the shear stress defined streamwise and circumferential velocity fluctuation. The present calculation has been found to simulate many features of the developing flow in bent tube satisfactorily, but it has a tendency to underpredict the Reynolds stresses. (author)

  19. Wall shear stress from a rotating cylinder in cross flow using the electrochemical technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Labraga, L.; Bourabaa, N.; Berkah, T.

    2002-01-01

    The wall shear rate from a rotating cylinder in a uniform flow was measured with flush-mounted electrochemical mass transfer probes. The experiments were performed using two rectangular electrodes in a sandwich arrangement. Initially, the frequency response of that probe was numerically studied using an inverse mass transfer method in order to restore the whole wall shear stress in the time domain starting from the measured transfer coefficients given by the split probe. The experiments were performed in the range of velocity ratios 0 4, points of zero shear stress on the rotating cylinder vanish, which is in fact consistent with the previous arguments that the cylinder is surrounded by a set of closed streamlines. This experimental study shows that, when their dynamic behaviour is known, the electrochemical probes are able to sense complex fine structures not observed up to now by previous analytical, numerical or experimental methods, even when non-linear effects are not negligible. (orig.)

  20. A finite volume procedure for fluid flow, heat transfer and solid-body stress analysis

    KAUST Repository

    Jagad, P. I.

    2018-04-12

    A unified cell-centered unstructured mesh finite volume procedure is presented for fluid flow, heat transfer and solid-body stress analysis. An in-house procedure (A. W. Date, Solution of Transport Equations on Unstructured Meshes with Cell-Centered Colocated Variables. Part I: Discretization, International Journal of Heat and Mass Transfer, vol. 48 (6), 1117-1127, 2005) is extended to include the solid-body stress analysis. The transport terms for a cell-face are evaluated in a structured grid-like manner. The Cartesian gradients at the center of each cell-face are evaluated using the coordinate transformation relations. The accuracy of the procedure is demonstrated by solving several benchmark problems involving different boundary conditions, source terms, and types of loading.

  1. Universal rescaling of flow curves for yield-stress fluids close to jamming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinkgreve, M.; Paredes, J.; Michels, M. A. J.; Bonn, D.

    2015-07-01

    The experimental flow curves of four different yield-stress fluids with different interparticle interactions are studied near the jamming concentration. By appropriate scaling with the distance to jamming all rheology data can be collapsed onto master curves below and above jamming that meet in the shear-thinning regime and satisfy the Herschel-Bulkley and Cross equations, respectively. In spite of differing interactions in the different systems, master curves characterized by universal scaling exponents are found for the four systems. A two-state microscopic theory of heterogeneous dynamics is presented to rationalize the observed transition from Herschel-Bulkley to Cross behavior and to connect the rheological exponents to microscopic exponents for the divergence of the length and time scales of the heterogeneous dynamics. The experimental data and the microscopic theory are compared with much of the available literature data for yield-stress systems.

  2. On Shear Stress Distributions for Flow in Smooth or Partially Rough Annuli

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kjellstroem, B; Hedberg, S

    1966-08-15

    It is commonly assumed that for turbulent flow in annuli the radii of zero shear and maximum velocity are coincident. By inspection of the differential equations for such flow and by an integral analysis it is shown that this is not necessarily true. To check whether important differences could occur, experiments were made in which velocity and shear stress distributions were measured in one smooth and two partially rough annuli. The results show no difference in the radii for the smooth annulus, but for the partially rough annuli there was a small but significant difference. This difference explains the breakdown of Hall's transformation theory reported by other investigators. The error introduced by use of Hall's theory is however small, of the order of 10 % or less.

  3. Shear stress from hot-film sensors in unsteady gas flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cole, K.D.

    1991-01-01

    In this paper a data analysis procedure is proposed for obtaining unsteady wall shear stress from flush-mounted hot-film anemometer measurements. The method is based on a two-dimensional heat transfer model of the unsteady heat transfer in both the hot-film sensor and in the gas flow. The sensor thermal properties are found from preliminary calibration experiments at zero flow. Numerical experiments are used to demonstrate the data analysis method using simulated sensor signals that are corrupted with noise. The numerical experiments show that noise in the data propagates into the results so that data smoothing may be important in analyzing experimental data. Because the data analysis procedure is linear, a linear digital filter is constructed that could be used for processing large amounts of experimental data. However, further refinements will be needed before the method can be applied to experimental data

  4. On Shear Stress Distributions for Flow in Smooth or Partially Rough Annuli

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kjellstroem, B.; Hedberg, S.

    1966-08-01

    It is commonly assumed that for turbulent flow in annuli the radii of zero shear and maximum velocity are coincident. By inspection of the differential equations for such flow and by an integral analysis it is shown that this is not necessarily true. To check whether important differences could occur, experiments were made in which velocity and shear stress distributions were measured in one smooth and two partially rough annuli. The results show no difference in the radii for the smooth annulus, but for the partially rough annuli there was a small but significant difference. This difference explains the breakdown of Hall's transformation theory reported by other investigators. The error introduced by use of Hall's theory is however small, of the order of 10 % or less

  5. Stress-Activated Electric Currents in the Earth Crust: How they Can and Cannot Flow (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freund, F. T.; Bleier, T. E.; Bortnik, J.; Dahlgren, R.

    2010-12-01

    Dormant electronic charge carriers exist in rocks. They “wake up” when stresses are applied: electrons e’ and positive holes, h., the latter being defect electrons in the oxygen anion sublattice of minerals [1, 2]. The h. can flow out of the stressed subvolume. They can spread into the unstressed surrounding, turning the rocks into p-type semiconductors. They travel fast and far using energy levels at the upper edge of the valence bands. Contrary to the h., the co-activated electrons e’ cannot flow out and propagate through unstressed rocks: they are stuck in the activation volume. The situation is akin to that in an electrochemical battery except that, in the “rock battery”, the positive charge carriers are not cations but positive holes h.. In the laboratory it is easy to close the battery circuit by offering the electrons a metal contact and connecting the stressed and unstressed rock with a metal wire. This is useful to demonstrate the functioning of the “rock battery”. In the field the h. outflow from a stressed rock volume is restricted as long as there is no return path. This is an important point when we try to understand why pre-earthquake EM emission is widely considered “unreliable” [3, 4]. However, there are at least three conditions, under which circuit closure can be achieved in the field under realistic pre-earthquake situations: (i) via n-type conducting rocks; (ii) via electrolytic conductivity of water; and (iii) via the air when the air above the epicentral region becomes highly ionized. We report on examples where these three conditions might have allowed large currents to flow and strong EM signals to be emitted. [1] Freund, F.T. et al.: Electric currents streaming out of stressed igneous rocks - A step towards understanding pre-earthquake low frequency EM emissions, Phys. Chem. Earth 31, 389-396 (2006). [2] Freund, F.T.: Charge generation and propagation in rocks, J. Geodyn. 33, 545-572 (2002). [3] Johnston, M.J.S. and

  6. Parameters of Blood Flow in Great Arteries in Hypertensive ISIAH Rats with Stress-Dependent Arterial Hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seryapina, A A; Shevelev, O B; Moshkin, M P; Markel', A L

    2016-08-01

    Magnetic resonance angiography was used to examine blood flow in great arteries of hypertensive ISIAH and normotensive Wistar rats. In hypertensive ISIAH rats, increased vascular resistance in the basin of the abdominal aorta and renal arteries as well as reduced fraction of total renal blood flow were found. In contrast, blood flow through both carotid arteries in ISIAH rats was enhanced, which in suggests more intensive blood supply to brain regulatory centers providing enhanced stress reactivity of these rats characterized by stress-dependent arterial hypertension.

  7. Role of advanced refuelling and heating on edge Reynolds stress-induced poloidal flow in HL-1M

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hong Wenyu; Wang Enyao; Li Qiang; Cao Jianyong; Yan Longwen

    2002-01-01

    The radial profile of electrostatic Reynolds stress, plasma poloidal rotations, radial and poloidal electric fields have been measured in the plasma boundary region of the HL-1M tokamak using a multi-array of Mach/Langmuir probes. In the experiments of ohmic discharge, lower hybrid current drive, supersonic molecular beam injection (SMBI) and multi-shot pellet injection, the correlation between the Reynolds stress and poloidal flow in the edge plasma is presented. The radial profile changes of the Reynolds stress and poloidal flow velocity V pol with lower hybrid wave injection power and SMBI injection are obtained. The results indicate that the sheared poloidal flow can be generated in tokamak plasma due to the radially varying Reynolds stress

  8. Modeling of the flow stress for AISI H13 Tool Steel during Hard Machining Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umbrello, Domenico; Rizzuti, Stefania; Outeiro, José C.; Shivpuri, Rajiv

    2007-04-01

    In general, the flow stress models used in computer simulation of machining processes are a function of effective strain, effective strain rate and temperature developed during the cutting process. However, these models do not adequately describe the material behavior in hard machining, where a range of material hardness between 45 and 60 HRC are used. Thus, depending on the specific material hardness different material models must be used in modeling the cutting process. This paper describes the development of a hardness-based flow stress and fracture models for the AISI H13 tool steel, which can be applied for range of material hardness mentioned above. These models were implemented in a non-isothermal viscoplastic numerical model to simulate the machining process for AISI H13 with various hardness values and applying different cutting regime parameters. Predicted results are validated by comparing them with experimental results found in the literature. They are found to predict reasonably well the cutting forces as well as the change in chip morphology from continuous to segmented chip as the material hardness change.

  9. Modeling of the flow stress for AISI H13 Tool Steel during Hard Machining Processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Umbrello, Domenico; Rizzuti, Stefania; Outeiro, Jose C.; Shivpuri, Rajiv

    2007-01-01

    In general, the flow stress models used in computer simulation of machining processes are a function of effective strain, effective strain rate and temperature developed during the cutting process. However, these models do not adequately describe the material behavior in hard machining, where a range of material hardness between 45 and 60 HRC are used. Thus, depending on the specific material hardness different material models must be used in modeling the cutting process. This paper describes the development of a hardness-based flow stress and fracture models for the AISI H13 tool steel, which can be applied for range of material hardness mentioned above. These models were implemented in a non-isothermal viscoplastic numerical model to simulate the machining process for AISI H13 with various hardness values and applying different cutting regime parameters. Predicted results are validated by comparing them with experimental results found in the literature. They are found to predict reasonably well the cutting forces as well as the change in chip morphology from continuous to segmented chip as the material hardness change

  10. Heat stress redistributes blood flow in arteries of the brain during dynamic exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Kohei; Oue, Anna; Yoneya, Marina; Sadamoto, Tomoko; Ogoh, Shigehiko

    2016-04-01

    We hypothesized that heat stress would decrease anterior and posterior cerebral blood flow (CBF) during exercise, and the reduction in anterior CBF would be partly associated with large increase in extracranial blood flow (BF). Nine subjects performed 40 min of semirecumbent cycling at 60% of the peak oxygen uptake in hot (35°C; Heat) and thermoneutral environments (25°C; Control). We evaluated BF and conductance (COND) in the external carotid artery (ECA), internal carotid artery (ICA), and vertebral artery (VA) using ultrasonography. During the Heat condition, ICA and VA BF were significantly increased 10 min after the start of exercise (P Heat. Compared with the Control, either BF or COND of ICA and VA at the end of Heat tended to be lower, but not significantly. In contrast, ECA BF and COND at the end of Heat were both higher than levels in the Control condition (P Heat, a reduction in ICA BF appears to be associated with a decline in end-tidal CO2 tension (r = 0.84), whereas VA BF appears to be affected by a change in cardiac output (r = 0.87). In addition, a change in ECA BF during Heat was negatively correlated with a change in ICA BF (r = -0.75). Heat stress resulted in modification of the vascular response of head and brain arteries to exercise, which resulted in an alteration in the distribution of cardiac output. Moreover, a hyperthermia-induced increase in extracranial BF might compromise anterior CBF during exercise with heat stress. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  11. Large-Scale, Continuous-Flow Production of Stressed Biomass (Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geller, Jil T.; Borglin, Sharon E.; Fortney, Julian L.; Lam, Bonita R.; Hazen, Terry C.; Biggin, Mark D.

    2010-05-01

    The Protein Complex Analysis Project (PCAP, http://pcap.lbl.gov/), focuses on high-throughput analysis of microbial protein complexes in the anaerobic, sulfate-reducing organism, DesulfovibriovulgarisHildenborough(DvH).Interest in DvHas a model organism for bioremediation of contaminated groundwater sites arises from its ability to reduce heavy metals. D. vulgarishas been isolated from contaminated groundwater of sites in the DOE complex. To understand the effect of environmental changes on the organism, midlog-phase cultures are exposed to nitrate and salt stresses (at the minimum inhibitory concentration, which reduces growth rates by 50percent), and compared to controls of cultures at midlogand stationary phases. Large volumes of culture of consistent quality (up to 100 liters) are needed because of the relatively low cell density of DvHcultures (one order of magnitude lower than E. coli, for example) and PCAP's challenge to characterize low-abundance membrane proteins. Cultures are grown in continuous flow stirred tank reactors (CFSTRs) to produce consistent cell densities. Stressor is added to the outflow from the CFSTR, and the mixture is pumped through a plug flow reactor (PFR), to provide a stress exposure time of 2 hours. Effluent is chilled and held in large carboys until it is centrifuged. A variety of analyses -- including metabolites, total proteins, cell density and phospholipidfatty-acids -- track culture consistency within a production run, and differences due to stress exposure and growth phase for the different conditions used. With our system we are able to produce the requisite 100 L of culture for a given condition within a week.

  12. A study on regional cerebral blood flow at rest and stress state in anxiety disorder patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wan Li; Liu Jian

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To investigate he characteristics of rest and stress regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) in naive anxiety disorder patients. Methods: Twenty naive anxiety disorder patients were enrolled in the study with twenty healthy volunteers as controls. The rest and stress 99 Tc m -ethylene cystein dimer (ECD) SPECT were performed separately at 2 consecutive days, Raven reasoning test was used as a stressor. Results: 1) Compared to the healthy controls, the patients' rest rCBF of the frontal lobe, temporal lobe, thalamus and basal ganglia were significantly lower (P<0.05 and 0.01). 2)The patients' stress rCBF of the frontal lobe, temporal lobe, part occipital lobe, part parietal lobe, thalamus and basal ganglia were significantly lower compared to the healthy controls' (P<0.05 and 0.01). 3) Opposite to the healthy controls, the rCBF of patients increased significantly after stressor simulating. Conclusions: The hypofunction of frontal lobe, temporal lobe, thalamus and basal ganglia may exist in naive anxiety disorder patients. The abnormal rCBF of patients after simulating may be one of the characteristics of anxiety disorder

  13. Non-Newtonian stress tensor and thermal conductivity tensor in granular plane shear flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alam, Meheboob; Saha, Saikat

    2014-11-01

    The non-Newtonian stress tensor and the heat flux in the plane shear flow of smooth inelastic disks are analysed from the Grad-level moment equations using the anisotropic Gaussian as a reference. Closed-form expressions for shear viscosity, pressure, first normal stress difference (N1) and the dissipation rate are given as functions of (i) the density or the area fraction (ν), (ii) the restitution coefficient (e), (iii) the dimensionless shear rate (R), (iv) the temperature anisotropy [ η, the difference between the principal eigenvalues of the second moment tensor] and (v) the angle (ϕ) between the principal directions of the shear tensor and the second moment tensor. Particle simulation data for a sheared hard-disk system is compared with theoretical results, with good agreement for p, μ and N1 over a large range of density. In contrast, the predictions from a Navier-Stokes order constitutive model are found to deviate significantly from both the simulation and the moment theory even at moderate values of e. We show that the gradient of the deviatoric part of the kinetic stress drives a heat current and the thermal conductivity is characterized by an anisotropic 2nd rank tensor for which explicit expressions are derived.

  14. Three-dimensional flow structure and patterns of bed shear stress in an evolving compound meander bend

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engel, Frank; Rhoads, Bruce L.

    2016-01-01

    Compound meander bends with multiple lobes of maximum curvature are common in actively evolving lowland rivers. Interaction among spatial patterns of mean flow, turbulence, bed morphology, bank failures and channel migration in compound bends is poorly understood. In this paper, acoustic Doppler current profiler (ADCP) measurements of the three-dimensional (3D) flow velocities in a compound bend are examined to evaluate the influence of channel curvature and hydrologic variability on the structure of flow within the bend. Flow structure at various flow stages is related to changes in bed morphology over the study timeframe. Increases in local curvature within the upstream lobe of the bend reduce outer bank velocities at morphologically significant flows, creating a region that protects the bank from high momentum flow and high bed shear stresses. The dimensionless radius of curvature in the upstream lobe is one-third less than that of the downstream lobe, with average bank erosion rates less than half of the erosion rates for the downstream lobe. Higher bank erosion rates within the downstream lobe correspond to the shift in a core of high velocity and bed shear stresses toward the outer bank as flow moves through the two lobes. These erosion patterns provide a mechanism for continued migration of the downstream lobe in the near future. Bed material size distributions within the bend correspond to spatial patterns of bed shear stress magnitudes, indicating that bed material sorting within the bend is governed by bed shear stress. Results suggest that patterns of flow, sediment entrainment, and planform evolution in compound meander bends are more complex than in simple meander bends. Moreover, interactions among local influences on the flow, such as woody debris, local topographic steering, and locally high curvature, tend to cause compound bends to evolve toward increasing planform complexity over time rather than stable configurations.

  15. Modeling the flow in a 90 deg. rectangular duct using one Reynolds-stress and two eddy-viscosity models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yakinthos, K.; Vlahostergios, Z.; Goulas, A.

    2008-01-01

    A new effort to model the flow in a 90 deg. rectangular duct by adopting three low-Reynolds-number turbulence models, two eddy-viscosity models (a linear and a non-linear) and a Reynolds-stress model, is presented. The complex flow development is a challenge for the application of turbulence models in order to assess their capability to capture the secondary flow and the developing vortices due to curvature and strong pressure gradient effects. The numerical results show that both the non-linear eddy-viscosity and the Reynolds-stress models can provide good results, especially for the velocity distributions. The superiority of the Reynolds-stress model is shown primarily in the Reynolds-stress distributions, which have the best quality among the predictions from the other models. On the other hand, the main advantage of the non-linear model is its simplicity and the smaller needed CPU cost, compared to the Reynolds-stress model. Additionally, in some stations of the flow development, the non-linear model provides good velocity distributions. The linear model gives lower quality predictions for the Reynolds-stress distributions, although it is capable in providing quite satisfactory results for the velocity distributions

  16. Granulated decontamination formulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tucker, Mark D.

    2007-10-02

    A decontamination formulation and method of making that neutralizes the adverse health effects of both chemical and biological compounds, especially chemical warfare (CW) and biological warfare (BW) agents, and toxic industrial chemicals. The formulation provides solubilizing compounds that serve to effectively render the chemical and biological compounds, particularly CW and BW compounds, susceptible to attack, and at least one reactive compound that serves to attack (and detoxify or kill) the compound. The formulation includes at least one solubilizing agent, a reactive compound, a sorbent additive, and water. A highly adsorbent sorbent additive (e.g., amorphous silica, sorbitol, mannitol, etc.) is used to "dry out" one or more liquid ingredients into a dry, free-flowing powder that has an extended shelf life, and is more convenient to handle and mix in the field.

  17. The New Frontier of Cardiac Computed Tomography Angiography: Fractional Flow Reserve and Stress Myocardial Perfusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pontone, Gianluca; Muscogiuri, Giuseppe; Andreini, Daniele; Guaricci, Andrea I; Guglielmo, Marco; Mushtaq, Saima; Baggiano, Andrea; Conte, Edoardo; Beltrama, Virginia; Annoni, Andrea; Formenti, Alberto; Mancini, Elisabetta; Rabbat, Mark G; Pepi, Mauro

    2016-12-01

    The increased number of patients with coronary artery disease (CAD) in developed countries is of great clinical relevance and involves a large burden of the healthcare system. The management of these patients is focused on relieving symptoms and improving clinical outcomes. Therefore the ideal test would provide the correct diagnosis and actionable information. To this aim, several non-invasive functional imaging modalities are usually used as gatekeeper to invasive coronary angiography (ICA), but their diagnostic yield remains low with limited accuracy when compared to obstructive CAD at the time of ICA or invasive fractional flow reserve (FFR). Invasive FFR is considered the gold standard for the evaluation of functionally relevant CAD. Therefore, an urgent need for non-invasive techniques that evaluate both the functional and morphological severity of CAD is growing. Coronary computed tomography angiography (CCTA) has emerged as a unique non-invasive technique providing coronary artery anatomic imaging. More recently, the evaluation of FFR with CCTA (FFR CT ) has demonstrated high diagnostic performance compared to invasive FFR. Additionally, stress myocardial computed tomography perfusion (CTP) represents a novel tool for the diagnosis of ischemia with high diagnostic accuracy. Compared to nuclear imaging and cardiac magnetic resonance imaging, both FFR CT and stress-CTP, allow us to integrate the anatomical evaluation of coronary arteries with the functional relevance of coronary artery lesions having the potential to revolutionize the diagnostic paradigm of suspected CAD. FFR CT and stress-CTP could be assimilated in diagnostic pathways of patients with stable CAD and will likely result in a decrease of invasive diagnostic procedures and costs. The current review evaluates the technical aspects and clinical experience of FFR CT and stress-CTP in the evaluation of functionally relevant CAD discussing the strengths and weaknesses of each approach.

  18. Impact of competitive flow on wall shear stress in coronary surgery: computational fluid dynamics of a LIMA-LAD model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nordgaard, Håvard; Swillens, Abigail; Nordhaug, Dag; Kirkeby-Garstad, Idar; Van Loo, Denis; Vitale, Nicola; Segers, Patrick; Haaverstad, Rune; Lovstakken, Lasse

    2010-12-01

    Competitive flow from native coronary vessels is considered a major factor in the failure of coronary bypass grafts. However, the pathophysiological effects are not fully understood. Low and oscillatory wall shear stress (WSS) is known to induce endothelial dysfunction and vascular disease, like atherosclerosis and intimal hyperplasia. The aim was to investigate the impact of competitive flow on WSS in mammary artery bypass grafts. Using computational fluid dynamics, WSS was calculated in a left internal mammary artery (LIMA) graft to the left anterior descending artery in a three-dimensional in vivo porcine coronary artery bypass graft model. The following conditions were investigated: high competitive flow (non-significant coronary lesion), partial competitive flow (significant coronary lesion), and no competitive flow (totally occluded coronary vessel). Time-averaged WSS of LIMA at high, partial, and no competitive flow were 0.3-0.6, 0.6-3.0, and 0.9-3.0 Pa, respectively. Further, oscillatory WSS quantified as the oscillatory shear index (OSI) ranged from (maximum OSI = 0.5 equals zero net WSS) 0.15 to 0.35, OSI similar to the no competitive flow condition. Graft flow is highly dependent on the degree of competitive flow. High competitive flow was found to produce unfavourable WSS consistent with endothelial dysfunction and subsequent graft narrowing and failure. Partial competitive flow, however, may be better tolerated as it was found to be similar to the ideal condition of no competitive flow.

  19. Prolonged effect of fluid flow stress on the proliferative activity of mesothelial cells after abrupt discontinuation of fluid streaming

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aoki, Shigehisa; Ikeda, Satoshi; Takezawa, Toshiaki; Kishi, Tomoya; Makino, Junichi; Uchihashi, Kazuyoshi; Matsunobu, Aki; Noguchi, Mitsuru; Sugihara, Hajime; Toda, Shuji

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: ► Late-onset peritoneal fibrosis leading to EPS remains to be elucidated. ► Fluid streaming is a potent factor for peritoneal fibrosis in PD. ► We focused on the prolonged effect of fluid streaming on mesothelial cell kinetics. ► A history of fluid streaming exposure promoted mesothelial proliferative activity. ► We have thus identified a potent new factor for late-onset peritoneal fibrosis. -- Abstract: Encapsulating peritoneal sclerosis (EPS) often develops after transfer to hemodialysis and transplantation. Both termination of peritoneal dialysis (PD) and transplantation-related factors are risks implicated in post-PD development of EPS, but the precise mechanism of this late-onset peritoneal fibrosis remains to be elucidated. We previously demonstrated that fluid flow stress induced mesothelial proliferation and epithelial–mesenchymal transition via mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling. Therefore, we speculated that the prolonged bioactive effect of fluid flow stress may affect mesothelial cell kinetics after cessation of fluid streaming. To investigate how long mesothelial cells stay under the bioactive effect brought on by fluid flow stress after removal of the stress, we initially cultured mesothelial cells under fluid flow stress and then cultured the cells under static conditions. Mesothelial cells exposed to fluid flow stress for a certain time showed significantly high proliferative activity compared with static conditions after stoppage of fluid streaming. The expression levels of protein phosphatase 2A, which dephosphorylates MAPK, in mesothelial cells changed with time and showed a biphasic pattern that was dependent on the duration of exposure to fluid flow stress. There were no differences in the fluid flow stress-related bioactive effects on mesothelial cells once a certain time had passed. The present findings show that fluid flow stress exerts a prolonged bioactive effect on mesothelial cells after termination

  20. Evaluation of Aortic Blood Flow and Wall Shear Stress in Aortic Stenosis and Its Association With Left Ventricular Remodeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Knobelsdorff-Brenkenhoff, Florian; Karunaharamoorthy, Achudhan; Trauzeddel, Ralf Felix; Barker, Alex J; Blaszczyk, Edyta; Markl, Michael; Schulz-Menger, Jeanette

    2016-01-01

    Background Aortic stenosis (AS) leads to variable stress for the left ventricle (LV) and consequently a broad range of LV remodeling. Study aim was to describe blood flow patterns in the ascending aorta of AS patients and determine their association with remodeling. Methods and Results Thirty-seven patients with AS (14 mild, 8 moderate, 15 severe; age 63±13 years) and 37 healthy controls (age 60±10 years) underwent 4D-flow MRI. Helical and vortical flow formations and flow eccentricity were assessed in the ascending aorta. Normalized flow displacement from the vessel center and peak systolic wall shear stress (WSSpeak) in the ascending aorta were quantified. LV remodeling was assessed based on LV mass index (LVMI-I) and the ratio of LV mass to enddiastolic volume (relative wall mass; RWM). Marked helical and vortical flow formation and eccentricity were more prevalent in patients with AS than in healthy subjects, and AS patients exhibited an asymmetric and elevated distribution of WSSpeak. In AS, aortic orifice area was strongly negatively associated with vortical flow formation (p=0.0274), eccentricity (p=0.0070) and flow displacement (p=0.0021). Bicuspid aortic valve was associated with more intense helical (p=0.0098) and vortical flow formation (p=0.0536), higher flow displacement (p=0.11) and higher WSSpeak (p=0.0926). LVM-I and RWM were significantly associated with aortic orifice area (p=0.0611, p=0.0058) and flow displacement (p=0.0058, p=0.0283). Conclusions In this pilot study, AS leads to abnormal blood flow pattern and WSSpeak in the ascending aorta. In addition to aortic orifice area, normalized flow displacement was significantly associated with LV remodeling. PMID:26917824

  1. Generation of sheared poloidal flows by electrostatic and magnetic Reynolds stress in the boundary plasma of HT-7 tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu, G.S.; Wan, B.N.; Li, J.

    2005-01-01

    The radial profiles of electrostatic and magnetic Reynolds stress (Maxwell stress) have been measured in the plasma boundary region of HT-7 tokamak. Experimental results show that the radial gradient of electrostatic Reynolds stress (ERS) changes sign across the last closed flux surface, and the neoclassical flow damping and the damping due to charge exchange processes are balanced by the radial gradient of ERS, which sustains the equilibrium sheared flow structure in a steady state. The contribution of magnetic Reynolds stress was found unimportant in a low β plasma. Detailed analyses indicate that the propagation properties of turbulence in radial and poloidal directions and the profiles of potential fluctuation level are responsible for the radial structure of ERS. (author)

  2. Numerical investigation on effect of aortic root geometry on flow induced structural stresses developed in a bileaflet mechanical heart valve

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbas, S. S.; Nasif, M. S.; Said, M. A. M.; Kadhim, S. K.

    2017-10-01

    Structural stresses developed in an artificial bileaflet mechanical heart valve (BMHV) due to pulsed blood flow may cause valve failure due to yielding. In this paper, von-Mises stresses are computed and compared for BMHV placed in two types of aortic root geometries that are aortic root with axisymmetric sinuses and with axisymmetric bulb, at different physiological blood flow rates. With BMHV placed in an aortic root with axisymmetric sinuses, the von-Mises stresses developed in the valve were found to be up to 47% higher than BMHV placed in aortic root with axisymmetric bulb under similar physiological conditions. High velocity vectors and therefore high von-Mises stresses have been observed for BMHV placed in aortic root with axisymmetric sinuses, that can lead to valve failure.

  3. An analysis of the flow stress of a two-phase alloy system, Ti-6Al-4V

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reed-Hill, R.E.; Iswaran, C.V.; Kaufman, M.J.

    1996-01-01

    An analysis of the tensile deformation behavior of a two-phase body-centered cubic (bcc)-hexagonal close-packed (hcp) alloy, Ti-6Al-4V, has been made. This has shown that the temperature dependence of the flow stress, the logarithm of the effective stress, and the strain-rate sensitivities can be described by simple analytical equations if the thermally activated strain-rate equation contains the Yokobori activation enthalpy H = H 0 ln (σ* 0 /σ*), where H 0 is a constant, σ* the effective stress, and σ* 0 its 0 K value. The flow stress-temperature plateau region (500 to 600 K) also can be rationalized analytically in terms of oxygen dynamic strain aging in the alpha phase

  4. Effect of T-stress on the cleavage crack growth resistance resulting from plastic flow

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tvergaard, Viggo

    1998-01-01

    Crack growth is studied numerically for cases where fracture occurs by atomic separation, sc that the length scale of the fracture process is typically much smaller than the dislocation spacing. Thus, the crack growth mechanism is brittle, but due to plastic flow at some distance from the crack tip......, the materials show crack growth resistance. It is shown here that the resistance is strongly dependent on the value of the non-singular T-stress, acting parallel to the crack plane. The numerical technique employed makes use of a thin dislocation-free strip of elastic material inside which the crack propagates......, with the material outside described by continuum plasticity. Thus the width of the strip is a material length scale comparable to the dislocation spacing or the dislocation cell size....

  5. Hydromagnetic effect on inclined peristaltic flow of a couple stress fluid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G.C. Shit

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we have investigated the effect of channel inclination on the peristaltic transport of a couple stress fluid in the presence of externally applied magnetic field. The slip velocity at the channel wall has been taken into account. Under the long wave length and low-Reynolds number assumptions, the analytical solutions for axial velocity, stream function, pressure gradient and pressure rise are obtained. The computed results are presented graphically by taking valid numerical data for non-dimensional physical parameters available in the existing scientific literatures. The results revealed that the trapping fluid can be eliminated and the central line axial velocity can be reduced with a considerable extent by the application of magnetic field. The flow phenomena for the pumping characteristics, trapping and reflux are furthermore investigated. The study shows that the slip parameter and Froude number play an important role in controlling axial pressure gradient.

  6. Porous media fluid flow, heat, and mass transport model with rock stress coupling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Runchal, A.K.

    1980-01-01

    This paper describes the physical and mathematical basis of a general purpose porous media flow model, GWTHERM. The mathematical basis of the model is obtained from the coupled set of the classical governing equations for the mass, momentum and energy balance. These equations are embodied in a computational model which is then coupled externally to a linearly elastic rock-stress model. This coupling is rather exploratory and based upon empirical correlations. The coupled model is able to take account of time-dependent, inhomogeneous and anisotropic features of the hydrogeologic, thermal and transport phenomena. A number of applications of the model have been made. Illustrations from the application of the model to nuclear waste repositories are included

  7. Rivulet flow round a horizontal cylinder subject to a uniform surface shear stress

    KAUST Repository

    Paterson, C.

    2014-09-14

    © 2014 © The Author, 2014. Published by Oxford University Press; all rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com. The steady flow of a slowly varying rivulet with prescribed flux in the azimuthal direction round a large stationary horizontal cylinder subject to a prescribed uniform azimuthal surface shear stress is investigated. In particular, we focus on the case where the volume flux is downwards but the shear stress is upwards, for which there is always a solution corresponding to a rivulet flowing down at least part of one side of the cylinder. We consider both a rivulet with constant non-zero contact angle but slowly varying width (that is, de-pinned contact lines) and a rivulet with constant width but slowly varying contact angle (that is, pinned contact lines), and show that they have qualitatively different behaviour. When shear is present, a rivulet with constant non-zero contact angle can never run all the way from the top to the bottom of the cylinder, and so we consider the scenario in which an infinitely wide two-dimensional film of uniform thickness covers part of the upper half of the cylinder and \\'breaks\\' into a single rivulet with constant non-zero contact angle. In contrast, a sufficiently narrow rivulet with constant width can run all the way from the top to the bottom of the cylinder, whereas a wide rivulet can do so only if its contact lines de-pin, and so we consider the scenario in which the contact lines of a wide rivulet de-pin on the lower half of the cylinder.

  8. Estimation of flow stress of radiation induced F/M steels using molecular dynamics and discrete dislocation dynamics approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    More, Ameya; Dutta, B.K.; Durgaprasad, P.V.; Arya, A.K.

    2012-01-01

    Fe-Cr based Ferritic/Martensitic (F/M) steels are the candidate structural materials for future fusion reactors. In this work, a multi-scale approach comprising atomistic Molecular Dynamics (MD) simulations and Discrete Dislocation Dynamics (DDD) simulations are used to model the effect of irradiation dose on the flow stress of F/M steels. At the atomic scale, molecular dynamics simulations are used to study the dislocation interaction with irradiation induced defects, i.e. voids and He bubbles. Whereas, the DDD simulations are used to estimate the change in flow stress of the material as a result of irradiation hardening. (author)

  9. Modelling and simulation of temperature and concentration dispersion in a couple stress nanofluid flow through stenotic tapered arteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramana Reddy, J. V.; Srikanth, D.; Das, Samir K.

    2017-08-01

    A couple stress fluid model with the suspension of silver nanoparticles is proposed in order to investigate theoretically the natural convection of temperature and concentration. In particular, the flow is considered in an artery with an obstruction wherein the rheology of blood is taken as a couple stress fluid. The effects of the permeability of the stenosis and the treatment procedure involving a catheter are also considered in the model. The obtained non-linear momentum, temperature and concentration equations are solved using the homotopy perturbation method. Nanoparticles and the two viscosities of the couple stress fluid seem to play a significant role in the flow regime. The pressure drop, flow rate, resistance to the fluid flow and shear stress are computed and their effects are analyzed with respect to various fluids and geometric parameters. Convergence of the temperature and its dependency on the degree of deformation is effectively depicted. It is observed that the Nusselt number increases as the volume fraction increases. Hence magnification of molecular thermal dispersion can be achieved by increasing the nanoparticle concentration. It is also observed that concentration dispersion is greater for severe stenosis and it is maximum at the first extrema. The secondary flow of the axial velocity in the stenotic region is observed and is asymmetric in the tapered artery. The obtained results can be utilized in understanding the increase in heat transfer and enhancement of mass dispersion, which could be used for drug delivery in the treatment of stenotic conditions.

  10. Flow-injection spectrophotometric determination of captopril in pharmaceutical formulations using a new solid-phase reactor containing AgSCN immobilized in a polyurethane resin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando Campanhã Vicentini

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available A simple flow-injection analysis procedure was developed for determining captopril in pharmaceutical formulations employing a novel solid-phase reactor containing silver thiocyanate immobilized in a castor oil derivative polyurethane resin. The method was based on silver mercaptide formation between the captopril and Ag(I in the solid-phase reactor. During such a reaction, the SCN- anion was released and reacted with Fe3+, which generated the FeSCN2+ complex that was continuously monitored at 480 nm. The analytical curve was linear in the captopril concentration range from 3.0 × 10-4 mol L-1 to 1.1 × 10-3 mol L-1 with a detection limit of 8.0 × 10-5 mol L-1. Recoveries between 97.5% and 103% and a relative standard deviation of 2% for a solution containing 6.0 × 10-4 mol L-1 captopril (n = 12 were obtained. The sample throughput was 40 h-1 and the results obtained for captopril in pharmaceutical formulations using this procedure and those obtained using a pharmacopoeia procedure were in agreement at a 95% confidence level.Um procedimento simples de análise por injeção em fluxo foi desenvolvido para a determinação de captopril em formulações farmacêuticas empregando um novo reator em fase sólida contendo tiocianato de prata imobilizado em resina poliuretana obtida a partir de óleo de mamona. O método foi baseado na formação de um mercapto composto de prata, no reator em fase sólida, obtido entre o captopril e Ag (I imobilizada. Durante a reação, íons SCN- eram liberados e reagiam com Fe3+, gerando o complexo FeSCN2+, que foi continuamente monitorado em 480 nm. A curva analítica foi linear no intervalo de concentração de captopril entre 3,0 × 10-4 a 1,1 × 10-3 mol L-1 com um limite de detecção de 8,0 × 10-5 mol L-1. Recuperações entre 97,5-103% e desvio padrão relativo de 2% para uma solução contendo 6,0 × 10-4 mol L-1 de captopril (n = 12 foram obtidos. A frequência de amostragem foi de 40 h-1 e os resultados

  11. Measurements of wall shear stress in a planar turbulent Couette flow with porous walls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beuther, Paul

    2013-11-01

    Measurements of drag on a moving web in a multi-span festoon show a stronger than expected dependency on the porosity of the web. The experiments suggest a wall shear stress 3-4 times larger than non-porous webs or historical Couette flow data for solid walls. Previous DNS studies by Jimenez et al. (JFM Vol 442) of boundary layers with passive porous surfaces predict a much smaller increase in wall shear stress for a porous wall of only 40%. Other DNS studies by Quadrio et al. (JFM Vol 576) of porous walls with periodic transpiration do show a large increase in drag under certain periodic conditions of modest amplitude. Although those results are aligned in magnitude with this study, the exact reason for the observed high drag for porous webs in this present study is not understood because there was no external disturbance applied to the web. It can be hypothesized that natural flutter of the web results in a similar mechanism shown in the periodic DNS study, but when the natural flutter was reduced by increasing web tension, there was only a small decrease of the drag. A key difference in this study is that because of the multiple parallel spans in a festoon, any transpiration in one layer must act in the opposite manner on the adjacent span.

  12. Relating high-temperature flow stress of AISI 316 stainless steel to strain and strain rate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matteazzi, S.; Paitti, G.; Boerman, D.

    1982-01-01

    The authors have performed an experimental determination of tensile stress-strain curves for different strain rates (4.67 x 10 - 5 , 4.67 x 10 - 2 s - 1 ) and for a variety of temperature conditions (773-1073 K) of AISI 316H stainless steel (annealed conditions) and also a computer analysis of the experimental curves using a fitting program which takes into consideration different constitutive relations describing the plastic flow behaviour of the metals. The results show that the materials tested are clearly affected by strain rate only at the highest temperature investigated (1073 K) and that the plastic strain is the more significant variable. Of the constitutive equations considered, Voce's relation gives the best fit for the true stress-time-strain curves. However, the Ludwik and Ludwigson equations also provide a description of the experimental data, whereas Hollomon's equation does not suitably characterize AISI 316H stainless steel and can be applied with some accuracy only at 1073 K. (author)

  13. Stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... can be life-saving. But chronic stress can cause both physical and mental harm. There are at least three different types of stress: Routine stress related to the pressures of work, family, and other daily responsibilities Stress brought about ...

  14. In situ monitoring of localized shear stress and fluid flow within developing tissue constructs by Doppler optical coherence tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Yali; Bagnaninchi, Pierre O.; Wang, Ruikang K.

    2008-02-01

    Mechanical stimuli can be introduced to three dimensional (3D) cell cultures by use of perfusion bioreactor. Especially in musculoskeletal tissues, shear stress caused by fluid flow generally increase extra-cellular matrix (ECM) production and cell proliferation. The relationship between the shear stress and the tissue development in situ is complicated because of the non-uniform pore distribution within the cell-seeded scaffold. In this study, we firstly demonstrated that Doppler optical coherence tomography (DOCT) is capable of monitoring localized fluid flow and shear stress in the complex porous scaffold by examining their variation trends at perfusion rate of 5, 8, 10 and 12 ml/hr. Then, we developed the 3D porous cellular constructs, cell-seeded chitosan scaffolds monitored during several days by DOCT. The fiber based fourier domain DOCT employed a 1300 nm superluminescent diode with a bandwidth of 52 nm and a xyz resolution of 20×20×15 μm in free space. This setup allowed us not only to assess the cell growth and ECM deposition by observing their different scattering behaviors but also to further investigate how the cell attachment and ECM production has the effect on the flow shear stress and the relationship between flow rate and shear stress in the developing tissue construct. The possibility to monitor continuously the constructs under perfusion will easily indicate the effect of flow rate or shear stress on the cell viability and cell proliferation, and then discriminate the perfusion parameters affecting the pre-tissue formation rate growth.

  15. A control systems approach to quantify wall shear stress normalization by flow-mediated dilation in the brachial artery.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frank C G van Bussel

    Full Text Available Flow-mediated dilation is aimed at normalization of local wall shear stress under varying blood flow conditions. Blood flow velocity and vessel diameter are continuous and opposing influences that modulate wall shear stress. We derived an index FMDv to quantify wall shear stress normalization performance by flow-mediated dilation in the brachial artery. In 22 fasting presumed healthy men, we first assessed intra- and inter-session reproducibilities of two indices pFMDv and mFMDv, which consider the relative peak and relative mean hyperemic change in flow velocity, respectively. Second, utilizing oral glucose loading, we evaluated the tracking performance of both FMDv indices, in comparison with existing indices [i.e., the relative peak diameter increase (%FMD, the peak to baseline diameter ratio (Dpeak/Dbase, and the relative peak diameter increase normalized to the full area under the curve of blood flow velocity with hyperemia (FMD/shearAUC or with area integrated to peak hyperemia (FMD/shearAUC_peak]. Inter-session and intra-session reproducibilities for pFMDv, mFMDv and %FMD were comparable (intra-class correlation coefficients within 0.521-0.677 range. Both pFMDv and mFMDv showed more clearly a reduction after glucose loading (reduction of ~45%, p≤0.001 than the other indices (% given are relative reductions: %FMD (~11%, p≥0.074; Dpeak/Dbase (~11%, p≥0.074; FMD/shearAUC_peak (~20%, p≥0.016 and FMD/shearAUC (~38%, p≤0.038. Further analysis indicated that wall shear stress normalization under normal (fasting conditions is already far from ideal (FMDv << 1, which (therefore does not materially change with glucose loading. Our approach might be useful in intervention studies to detect intrinsic changes in shear stress normalization performance in conduit arteries.

  16. A two-dimensional continuum model of biofilm growth incorporating fluid flow and shear stress based detachment

    KAUST Repository

    Duddu, Ravindra; Chopp, David L.; Moran, Brian

    2009-01-01

    of the biofilm. The model considers fluid flow around the biofilm surface, the advection-diffusion and reaction of substrate, variable biomass volume fraction and erosion due to the interfacial shear stress at the biofilm-fluid interface. The key assumptions

  17. Viscous flux flow velocity and stress distribution in the Kim model of a long rectangular slab superconductor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yong; Chai, Xueguang

    2018-05-01

    When a bulk superconductor endures the magnetization process, enormous mechanical stresses are imposed on the bulk, which often leads to cracking. In the present work, we aim to resolve the viscous flux flow velocity υ 0/w, i.e. υ 0 (because w is a constant) and the stress distribution in a long rectangular slab superconductor for the decreasing external magnetic field (B a ) after zero-field cooling (ZFC) and field cooling (FC) using the Kim model and viscous flux flow equation simultaneously. The viscous flux flow velocity υ 0/w and the magnetic field B* at which the body forces point away in all of the slab volumes during B a reduction, are determined by both B a and the decreasing rate (db a /dt) of the external magnetic field normalized by the full penetration field B p . In previous studies, υ 0/w obtained by the Bean model with viscous flux flow is only determined by db a /dt, and the field B* that is derived only from the Kim model is a positive constant when the maximum external magnetic field is chosen. This means that the findings in this paper have more physical contents than the previous results. The field B* stress changing with decreasing field B a after ZFC if B* ≤ 0. The effect of db a /dt on the stress is significant in the cases of both ZFC and FC.

  18. On the fixed-stress split scheme as smoother in multigrid methods for coupling flow and geomechanics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    F.J. Gaspar Lorenz (Franscisco); C. Rodrigo (Carmen)

    2017-01-01

    textabstractThe fixed-stress split method has been widely used as solution method in the coupling of flow and geomechanics. In this work, we analyze the behavior of an inexact version of this algorithm as smoother within a geometric multigrid method, in order to obtain an efficient monolithic solver

  19. Prediction of strongly-heated gas flows in a vertical tube using explicit algebraic stress/heat-flux models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baek, Seong Gu; Park, Seung O.

    2003-01-01

    This paper provides the assessment of prediction performance of explicit algebraic stress and heat-flux models under conditions of mixed convective gas flows in a strongly-heated vertical tube. Two explicit algebraic stress models and four algebraic heat-flux models are selected for assessment. Eight combinations of explicit algebraic stress and heat-flux models are used in predicting the flows experimentally studied by Shehata and McEligot (IJHMT 41(1998) p.4333) in which property variation was significant. Among the various model combinations, the Wallin and Johansson (JFM 403(2000) p. 89) explicit algebraic stress model-Abe, Kondo, and Nagano (IJHFF 17(1996) p. 228) algebraic heat-flux model combination is found to perform best. We also found that the dimensionless wall distance y + should be calculated based on the local property rather than the property at the wall for property-variation flows. When the buoyancy or the property variation effects are so strong that the flow may relaminarize, the choice of the basic platform two-equation model is a most important factor in improving the predictions

  20. Interfacial shear stress and hold-up in an air-water annular two-phase flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fukano, T.; Ousaka, A.; Kawakami, Y.; Tominaga, A.

    1991-01-01

    This paper reports on an experimental investigation that was made into hold-up, frictional pressure drop and interfacial shear stress of an air-water two-phase annular flow in horizontal and vertical up- and downward flows to make clear the effects of tube diameter and flow direction on them. The tube diameters examined are 10mm, 16mm and 26mm. Both the hold-up and the pressure drop considerably changed with time. Especially, the amplitude of the variation of the hold-up was quite larger in comparison with its averaged value in the cause of disturbance wave flow. for the time averaged hold-up and interfacial friction factor, we got new correlations, by which we can estimate them within an accuracy of ±20% and ±30%, respectively, independent of the flow direction and the tube diameter

  1. Neural and non-neural control of skin blood flow during isometric handgrip exercise in the heat stressed human

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shibasaki, M.; Rasmussen, P.; Secher, Niels H.

    2009-01-01

    as an absence of sweating and cutaneous vasodilatation during a whole-body heat stress. Upon this confirmation, adenosine was perfused through one of the microdialysis probes to increase skin blood flow similar to that of the unblocked site. After internal temperature increased approximately 0.7 degrees C......During heat stress, isometric handgrip (IHG) exercise causes cutaneous vasoconstriction, but it remains controversial whether neural mechanisms are responsible for this observation. The objective of this study was to test the hypothesis that cutaneous vasoconstriction during IHG exercise in heat...... stressed individuals occurs via a neural mechanism. An axillary nerve blockade was performed to block efferent nerve traffic to the left forearm in seven healthy subjects. Two intradermal microdialysis probes were placed within forearm skin of the blocked area. Forearm skin blood flow was measured by laser...

  2. Irreversibility analysis of hydromagnetic flow of couple stress fluid with radiative heat in a channel filled with a porous medium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.S. Eegunjobi

    Full Text Available Numerical analysis of the intrinsic irreversibility of a mixed convection hydromagnetic flow of an electrically conducting couple stress fluid through upright channel filled with a saturated porous medium and radiative heat transfer was carried out. The thermodynamics first and second laws were employed to examine the problem. We obtained the dimensionless nonlinear differential equations and solves numerically with shooting procedure joined with a fourth order Runge-Kutta-Fehlberg integration scheme. The temperature and velocity obtained, used to analyse the entropy generation rate together with some various physical parameters of the flow. Our results are presented graphically and talk over. Keywords: MHD channel flow, Couple stress fluid, Porous medium, Thermal radiation, Entropy generation, Injection/suction

  3. State of stress in exhumed basins and implications for fluid flow: insights from the Illizi Basin, Algeria

    KAUST Repository

    English, Joseph M.

    2017-05-31

    The petroleum prospectivity of an exhumed basin is largely dependent on the ability of pre-existing traps to retain oil and gas volumes during and after the exhumation event. Although faults may act as lateral seals in petroleum traps, they may start to become hydraulically conductive again and enable fluid flow and hydrocarbon leakage during fault reactivation. We constrain the present day in situ stresses of the exhumed Illizi Basin in Algeria and demonstrate that the primary north–south and NW–SE (vertical strike-slip) fault systems in the study area are close to critical stress (i.e. an incipient state of shear failure). By contrast, the overpressured and unexhumed Berkine Basin and Hassi Messaoud areas to the north do not appear to be characterized by critical stress conditions. We present conceptual models of stress evolution and demonstrate that a sedimentary basin with benign in situ stresses at maximum burial may change to being characterized by critical stress conditions on existing fault systems during exhumation. These models are supportive of the idea that the breaching of a closed, overpressured system during exhumation of the Illizi Basin may have been a driving mechanism for the regional updip flow of high-salinity formation water within the Ordovician reservoirs during Eocene–Miocene time. This work also has implications for petroleum exploration in exhumed basins. Fault-bounded traps with faults oriented at a high angle to the maximum principal horizontal stress direction in strike-slip or normal faulting stress regimes are more likely to have retained hydrocarbons in exhumed basins than fault-bounded traps with faults that are more optimally oriented for shear failure and therefore have a greater propensity to become critically stressed during exhumation.

  4. Microstructure-sensitive flow stress modeling for force prediction in laser assisted milling of Inconel 718

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pan Zhipeng

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Inconel 718 is a typical hard-to-machine material that requires thermally enhanced machining technology such as laser-assisted milling. Based upon finite element analysis, this study simulates the forces in the laser-assisted milling process of Inconel 718 considering the effects of grain growth due to γ' and γ" phases. The γ" phase is unstable and becomes the δ phase, which is likely to precipitate at a temperature over 750 °C. The temperature around the center of spot in the experiments is 850 °C, so the phase transformation and grain growth happen throughout the milling process. In the analysis, this study includes the microstructure evolution while accounting for the effects of dynamic recrystallization and grain growth through the Avrami model. The grain growth reduces the yield stress and flow stress, which improves the machinability. In finite element analysis (FEA, several boundary conditions of temperature varying with time are defined to simulate the movement of laser spot, and the constitutive model is described by Johnson-Cook equation. In experiments, this study collects three sets of cutting forces and finds that the predicted values are in close agreements with measurements especially in feed direction, in which the smallest error is around 5%. In another three simulations, this study also examines the effect of laser preheating on the cutting forces by comparison with a traditional milling process without laser assist. When the laser is off, the forces increase in all cases, which prove the softening effect of laser-assisted milling. In addition, when the axial depth of milling increases, the laser has a more significant influence, especially in axial direction, in which the force with laser is more than 18% smaller than the one without laser. Overall, this study validates the influence of laser-assisted milling on Inconel 718 by predicting the cutting forces in FEA.

  5. Influence of Coherent Structures on the Wall Shear Stress in Axial Flow Between a Cylinder and a Plane Wall

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khabbouchi, Imed; Guellouz, Mohamed Sadok; Tavoularis, Stavros

    2009-01-01

    Synchronised hot-film and hot-wire measurements were made in the narrower region of a rectangular channel containing a cylindrical rod. The hot-film probe was mounted flush with the channel bottom wall to measure the wall shear stress, while the hot-wire probe was placed at a fixed position, selected in order to easily detect the passage of coherent structures. Mean and rms profiles of the wall shear stress show the influence of the gap to diameter ratio on their respective distributions. The latter presented peculiarities that could only be explained by the presence of coherent structures in the flow between the rod and the wall. Evidence of this presence is seen in the velocity power spectra. The strong influence of the coherent structures on the wall shear stress spatial and temporal distributions is established through velocity-wall shear stress cross-correlations functions and through conditionally sampled measurements

  6. Role of symmetry-breaking induced by Er × B shear flows on developing residual stresses and intrinsic rotation in the TEXTOR tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu, Y.; Shesterikov, I.; Berte, M.; Dumortier, P.; Van Schoor, M.; Vergote, M.; Hidalgo, C.; Krämer-Flecken, A.; Koslowski, R.

    2013-01-01

    Direct measurements of residual stress (force) have been executed at the edge of the TEXTOR tokamak using multitip Langmuir and Mach probes, together with counter-current NBI torque to balance the existing toroidal rotation. Substantial residual stress and force have been observed at the plasma boundary, confirming the existence of a finite residual stress as possible mechanisms to drive the intrinsic toroidal rotation. In low-density discharges, the residual stress displays a quasi-linear dependence on the local pressure gradient, consistent with theoretical predictions. At high-density shots the residual stress and torque are strongly suppressed. The results show close correlation between the residual stress and the E r × B flow shear rate, suggesting a minimum threshold of the E × B flow shear required for the k ∥ symmetry breaking. These findings provide the first experimental evidence of the role of E r × B sheared flows in the development of residual stresses and intrinsic rotation. (letter)

  7. Calculation of lobe mixer flow with reynolds stress model. Oryoku hoteishiki model ni yoru lobe mixer ryu no suchi keisan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamamoto, Makoto; Arakawa, Chuichi; Tagori, Tetsuo [Ishikawajima-Harima Heavy Industries, Co., Ltd., Tokyo (Japan) Univ. of Tokyo, Tokyo (Japan). Faculty of Engineering Univ. of Tsukuba, Tsukuba (Japan)

    1990-02-25

    It is considered that exhaust gas energy of turbofan engine is partly collected to realize the improvement of propulsion efficiency together with the reduction of noise appeared by the change in velocity distribution of exhaust gas flow. Then Lobe mixer was studied and its effectiveness was widely recognized, however the development of more realistic prediction method of exhaust nozzle system including Lobe mixer, is not completed yet. The stress equation model with low Reynolds Number which is easily used by the expansion of Launder Reece Rodi model in three dimension coordinate system was newly constructed. Applicability of the stress equation in more complicated flow field was greatly improved. While the above model was applied to Lobe mixer system, then the qualitative reproduction of mixing process accompanied with flow around Lobe and longitudinal eddy of core or bi-pass flow, was realized. There is room for improvement of pressure strain correlation term and behavior of Reynolds stress very close by wall surface in this model. 16 refs., 9 figs., 1 tab.

  8. 3-D flow characterization and shear stress in a stenosed carotid artery bifurcation model using stereoscopic PIV technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kefayati, Sarah; Poepping, Tamie L

    2010-01-01

    The carotid artery bifurcation is a common site of atherosclerosis which is a major leading cause of ischemic stroke. The impact of stenosis in the atherosclerotic carotid artery is to disturb the flow pattern and produce regions with high shear rate, turbulence, and recirculation, which are key hemodynamic factors associated with plaque rupture, clot formation, and embolism. In order to characterize the disturbed flow in the stenosed carotid artery, stereoscopic PIV measurements were performed in a transparent model with 50% stenosis under pulsatile flow conditions. Simulated ECG gating of the flowrate waveform provides external triggering required for volumetric reconstruction of the complex flow patterns. Based on the three-component velocity data in the lumen region, volumetric shear-stress patterns were derived.

  9. Effects of iodinated contrast media on common carotid and brachial artery blood flow and wall shear stress

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Irace, C.; Tamburini, S.; Bertucci, B.; Franceschi, M.S. de; Gnasso, A.

    2006-01-01

    The aim of our study was to evaluate the effect of the intravenous contrast media iomeprol on wall shear stress, blood flow and vascular parameters in the common carotid and brachial artery. Thirty outpatients undergoing thoracic or abdominal spiral CT scans were studied. The internal diameter and flow velocity of the common carotid and brachial artery were evaluated by ultrasound, and blood viscosity was measured before and after low osmolality iomeprol (Iomeron 350) injection. The wall shear stress, blood flow and pulsatility index were calculated. To test the differences between groups, the Wilcoxon rank test and Mann Whitney U test were applied. Blood viscosity decreased slightly, but significantly after contrast media (4.6±0.7 vs. 4.5±0.7 mPa.s, P=0.02). Contrarily, blood flow and wall shear stress did not change in the common carotid artery, but significantly decreased in the brachial artery (0.9±0.4 vs. 0.6±0.3 ml/s, P<0.0001, and 41.5±13.9 vs. 35.3±11.0 dynes/cm2, P<0.002, respectively), whereas the pulsatility index significantly increased in the brachial artery (5.0±3.3 vs. 7.5±5.3, P<0.001). Iomeprol injection causes blood flow and wall shear stress reduction of the brachial artery; the rise in the pulsatility index suggests an increase in peripheral vascular resistance. Further investigation is needed to evaluate whether these modifications can be clinically relevant. (orig.)

  10. Umbilical blood flow ultrasound characteristics of perioperative fetal intrauterine hypoxia and their relationship with maternal and fetal oxidative stress injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Mei He

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To study the relationship between umbilical blood flow ultrasound characteristics of perioperative fetal intrauterine hypoxia and maternal as well as fetal oxidative stress injury. Methods: 108 puerperae giving birth in our hospital between May 2014 and October 2016 were selected and divided into normal pregnancy group with neonatal Apgar score >7 points and intrauterine hypoxia group with neonatal Apgar score ≤7 points, color Doppler diasonograph was used to determine umbilical blood flow ultrasound parameters, umbilical cord blood was collected to determine the levels of oxidative stress products, and the placenta was collected to determine the levels of oxidative stress products and related apoptosis molecules. Results: During 24–30 weeks, 31–36 weeks and 37–41 weeks of pregnancy, umbilical blood flow resistance index (RI, pulsatility index (PI and diastolic velocity/systolic velocity (S/D of intrauterine hypoxia group were significantly higher than those of normal pregnancy group (P<0.05; malondialdehyde (MDA, oxidized low-density lipoprotein (ox- LDL, 8-isoprostanes (8-iso, and heat shock protein 70 (HSP-70 levels in umbilical cord blood of intrauterine hypoxia group were significantly higher than those of normal pregnancy group (P<0.05, MDA, oxLDL, 8-ios, HSP-70, Fas, FasL and Bax levels in placenta tissue were significantly higher than those of normal pregnancy group (P<0.05, and Bcl-2 and XIAP levels were significantly lower than those of normal pregnancy group (P<0.05; RI, PI and S/ D were positively correlated with MDA, oxLDL, 8-ios and HSP-70 levels in umbilical cord blood and placenta tissue, positively correlated with Fas, FasL and Bax levels in placenta tissue, and negatively correlated with Bcl-2 and XIAP levels in placental tissue. Conclusions: The increased umbilical blood flow resistance and decreased flow volume of fetal intrauterine hypoxia are closely related to maternal, fetal and placental oxidative

  11. Mixed convection flow of couple stress nanofluid over oscillatory stretching sheet with heat absorption/generation effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sami Ullah Khan

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this article is to highlight the unsteady mixed convective couple stress nanoliquid flow passed through stretching surface. The flow is generated due to periodic oscillations of sheet. An appropriate set of dimensionless variables are used to reduce the independent variables in governing equations arising from mathematical modeling. An analytical solution has been computed by employing the technique of homotopy method. The outcomes of various sundry parameters like couple stress parameter, the ratio of angular velocity to stretching rate, thermophoresis parameter, Hartmann number, Prandtl number, heat source/sink parameter, Schmidt number described graphically and in tabular form. It is observed that the velocity profile increases by increasing mixed convection parameter and concentration buoyancy parameter. The temperature enhances for larger values of Hartmann number and Brownian. The concentration profile increases by increasing thermophoresis parameter. Results show that wall shear stress increases by increasing couple stress parameter and ratio of oscillating frequency to stretching rate. Keywords: Oscillatory surface, Couple stress fluid, Nanoparticles, Heat absorption/generation

  12. Effects of virtual water flow on regional water resources stress: A case study of grain in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Shikun; Wang, Yubao; Engel, Bernie A; Wu, Pute

    2016-04-15

    Scarcity of water resources is one of the major challenges in the world, particularly for the main water consumer, agriculture. Virtual water flow (VWF) promotes water redistribution geographically and provides a new solution for resolving regional water shortage and improving water use efficiency in the world. Virtual water transfer among regions will have a significant influence on the water systems in both grain export and import regions. In order to assess the impacts of VWF related grain transfer on regional water resources conditions, the study takes mainland China as study area for a comprehensive evaluation of virtual water flow on regional water resources stress. Results show that Northeast China and Huang-Huai-Hai region are the major grain production regions as well as the major virtual water export regions. National water savings related to grain VWF was about 58Gm(3), with 48Gm(3) blue water and 10Gm(3) green water. VWF changes the original water distribution and has a significant effect on water resources in both virtual water import and export regions. Grain VWF significantly increased water stress in grain export regions and alleviated water stress in grain import regions. Water stress index (WSI) of Heilongjiang and Inner Mongolia has been increased by 138% and 129% due to grain export. Stress from water shortages is generally severe in export regions, and issues with the sustainability of grain production and VWF pattern are worthy of further exploration. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Surface stress, initial stress and Knudsen-dependent flow velocity effects on the electro-thermo nonlocal wave propagation of SWBNNTs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghorbanpour Arani, A., E-mail: aghorban@kashanu.ac.ir [Faculty of Mechanical Engineering, University of Kashan, Kashan, Islamic Republic of Iran. (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Institute of Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, University of Kashan, Kashan, Islamic Republic of Iran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Roudbari, M.A. [Faculty of Mechanical Engineering, University of Kashan, Kashan, Islamic Republic of Iran. (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2014-11-01

    This paper investigates the electro-thermal nonlocal wave propagation of fluid-conveying single-walled Boron Nitride nanotubes (SWBNNTs) using nonlocal piezoelasticity with surface stress, initial stress and Knudsen-dependent flow velocity effect. SWBNNT is embedded in a vicsoelastic medium which is simulated as visco-Pasternak foundation. Using Euler–Bernoulli beam (EBB) model, Hamilton's principle and nonlocal piezoelasticity theory, the higher order governing equation is derived. A detailed parametric study is conducted, focusing on the combined effects of the electric parameters, viscoelastic medium, initial stress, surface stress, Knudsen number (Kn) and small scale on the wave propagation behaviour of the fluid-conveying SWBNNT. The results show that for smaller values of wave number the dispersion relation for different fluid viscosities seems to be similar. At the higher values of wave numbers, increase in the wave frequency values is remarkable due to increase in fluid viscosity. The electric field as a smart controller, surface effect, initial stress, temperature change and slip velocity effect have significant role on the wave frequency. The results of this work is hoped to be of use in design and manufacturing of smart MEMS/NEMS in advanced medical applications such as drug delivery systems with great applications in biomechanics.

  14. Surface stress, initial stress and Knudsen-dependent flow velocity effects on the electro-thermo nonlocal wave propagation of SWBNNTs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghorbanpour Arani, A.; Roudbari, M.A.

    2014-01-01

    This paper investigates the electro-thermal nonlocal wave propagation of fluid-conveying single-walled Boron Nitride nanotubes (SWBNNTs) using nonlocal piezoelasticity with surface stress, initial stress and Knudsen-dependent flow velocity effect. SWBNNT is embedded in a vicsoelastic medium which is simulated as visco-Pasternak foundation. Using Euler–Bernoulli beam (EBB) model, Hamilton's principle and nonlocal piezoelasticity theory, the higher order governing equation is derived. A detailed parametric study is conducted, focusing on the combined effects of the electric parameters, viscoelastic medium, initial stress, surface stress, Knudsen number (Kn) and small scale on the wave propagation behaviour of the fluid-conveying SWBNNT. The results show that for smaller values of wave number the dispersion relation for different fluid viscosities seems to be similar. At the higher values of wave numbers, increase in the wave frequency values is remarkable due to increase in fluid viscosity. The electric field as a smart controller, surface effect, initial stress, temperature change and slip velocity effect have significant role on the wave frequency. The results of this work is hoped to be of use in design and manufacturing of smart MEMS/NEMS in advanced medical applications such as drug delivery systems with great applications in biomechanics

  15. Numerical prediction of cavitating flow around a hydrofoil using pans and improved shear stress transport k-omega model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang De-Sheng

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The prediction accuracies of partially-averaged Navier-Stokes model and improved shear stress transport k-ω turbulence model for simulating the unsteady cavitating flow around the hydrofoil were discussed in this paper. Numerical results show that the two turbulence models can effectively reproduce the cavitation evolution process. The numerical prediction for the cycle time of cavitation inception, development, detachment, and collapse agrees well with the experimental data. It is found that the vortex pair induced by the interaction between the re-entrant jet and mainstream is responsible for the instability of the cavitation shedding flow.

  16. Rivulet flow round a horizontal cylinder subject to a uniform surface shear stress

    KAUST Repository

    Paterson, C.; Wilson, S. K.; Duffy, B. R.

    2014-01-01

    large stationary horizontal cylinder subject to a prescribed uniform azimuthal surface shear stress is investigated. In particular, we focus on the case where the volume flux is downwards but the shear stress is upwards, for which there is always a

  17. Stress analysis of mixing of non-newtonian flows in cylindrical vessel induced by co-rotating stirrers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Memon, R.A.; Solangi, M.A.

    2013-01-01

    The impacts of rotational velocity and inertia on velocity gradients and stresses are addressed under present study. The non-Newtonian behaviour of inelastic rotating flows is predicted by employing Power law model. A numerical model has been developed for mixing flow within a cylindrical vessel along a couple of stirrers. A time marching FEM (Finite Element Method) is employed to predict the required solution. Predicted solutions are presented for minimum to maximum values in terms of contour plots of velocity gradients and shear stresses, over the range. The long term application of this research will be used to improve the design of mixers and processing products. The predicted results are used to generate the capability and are in good agreement with numerical results to the mixer design that will ultimately effect the processing of dough products. (author)

  18. Induction of cyclic electron flow around photosystem I during heat stress in grape leaves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yongjiang; Geng, Qingwei; Du, Yuanpeng; Yang, Xinghong; Zhai, Heng

    2017-03-01

    Photosystem II (PSII) in plants is susceptible to high temperatures. The cyclic electron flow (CEF) around PSI is thought to protect both PSII and PSI from photodamage. However, the underlying physiological mechanisms of the photosynthetic electron transport process and the role of CEF in grape at high temperatures remain unclear. To investigate this issue, we examined the responses of PSII energy distribution, the P700 redox state and CEF to high temperatures in grape leaves. After exposing 'Cabernet Sauvignon' leaves to various temperatures (25, 30, 35, 40 and 45°C) in the light (600μmol photons m -2 s -1 ) for 4h, the maximum quantum yield of PSII (Fv/Fm) significantly decreased at high temperatures (40 and 45°C), while the maximum photo-oxidizable P700 (Pm) was not affected. As the temperature increased, higher initial rates of increase in post-illumination Chl fluorescence were detected, which were accompanied by an increase in high energy state quenching (qE). The chloroplast NAD(P)H dehydrogenase-dependent CEF (NDH-dependent CEF) activities were different among grape cultivators. 'Gold Finger' with greater susceptibility to photoinhibition, exhibited lower NDH-dependent CEF activities under acute heat stress than a more heat tolerant 'Cabernet Sauvignon'. These results suggest that overclosure of PSII reaction centers at high temperature resulted in the photoinhibition of PSII, while the stimulation of CEF in grape played an important role in the photoprotection of PSII and PSI at high temperatures through contributing to the generation of a proton gradient. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Normalization of flow-mediated dilation to shear stress area under the curve eliminates the impact of variable hyperemic stimulus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mickleborough Timothy D

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Normalization of brachial artery flow-mediated dilation (FMD to individual shear stress area under the curve (peak FMD:SSAUC ratio has recently been proposed as an approach to control for the large inter-subject variability in reactive hyperemia-induced shear stress; however, the adoption of this approach among researchers has been slow. The present study was designed to further examine the efficacy of FMD normalization to shear stress in reducing measurement variability. Methods Five different magnitudes of reactive hyperemia-induced shear stress were applied to 20 healthy, physically active young adults (25.3 ± 0. 6 yrs; 10 men, 10 women by manipulating forearm cuff occlusion duration: 1, 2, 3, 4, and 5 min, in a randomized order. A venous blood draw was performed for determination of baseline whole blood viscosity and hematocrit. The magnitude of occlusion-induced forearm ischemia was quantified by dual-wavelength near-infrared spectrometry (NIRS. Brachial artery diameters and velocities were obtained via high-resolution ultrasound. The SSAUC was individually calculated for the duration of time-to-peak dilation. Results One-way repeated measures ANOVA demonstrated distinct magnitudes of occlusion-induced ischemia (volume and peak, hyperemic shear stress, and peak FMD responses (all p AUC (p = 0.785. Conclusion Our data confirm that normalization of FMD to SSAUC eliminates the influences of variable shear stress and solidifies the utility of FMD:SSAUC ratio as an index of endothelial function.

  20. Ganoderma Triterpenoids Exert Antiatherogenic Effects in Mice by Alleviating Disturbed Flow-Induced Oxidative Stress and Inflammation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pei-Ling Hsu

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Ganoderma mushrooms, used in traditional Chinese medicine to promote health and longevity, have become widely accepted as herbal supplements. Ganoderma lucidum (GL, a commonly seen ganoderma species, is commercially cultivated under controlled conditions for more consistent chemical composition. The medicinal properties of GL are attributable to its antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activities. We intended to assess the effect of GL in atherosclerosis, an arterial condition associated with chronic oxidative stress and inflammation, using a carotid-artery-ligation mouse model. Flow turbulence created in the ligated artery induces oxidative stress and neointimal hyperplasia, a feature of early atherogenesis. Daily oral GL prevented neointimal thickening 2 weeks after ligation. Moreover, the ganoderma triterpenoid (GT crude extract isolated from GL abolished ligation-induced neointima formation. Mechanistically, endothelial dysfunction was observed 3 days after ligation before any structural changes could be detected. GTs alleviated the oxidative stress and restored the atheroresistent status of endothelium by inhibiting the induction of a series of atherogenic factors, including endothelin-1, von Willebrand factor, and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 after 3-day ligation. The anti-inflammatory activity of GTs was tested in cultured human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs exposed to disturbed flow in an in vitro perfusion system. GTs abolished the induction of proinflammatory VCAM-1, TNF-α, and IL-6 by oscillatory shear stress. Moreover, the antioxidant activity of GTs was tested in HUVECs against the insult of H2O2. GTs dissipated the cellular superoxide accumulation imposed by H2O2, thereby mitigating H2O2-induced cell damage and proatherogenic response. Our results revealed the atheroprotective properties of ganoderma mushrooms and identified triterpenoids as the critical constituents for those effects. GTs prevent atherogenesis by

  1. Covariant Formulation of Hooke's Law.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gron, O.

    1981-01-01

    Introducing a four-vector strain and a four-force stress, Hooke's law is written as a four-vector equation. This formulation is shown to clarify seemingly paradoxical results in connection with uniformly accelerated motion, and rotational motion with angular acceleration. (Author/JN)

  2. Shear stress induced by an interstitial level of slow flow increases the osteogenic differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells through TAZ activation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyung Min Kim

    Full Text Available Shear stress activates cellular signaling involved in cellular proliferation, differentiation, and migration. However, the mechanisms of mesenchymal stem cell (MSC differentiation under interstitial flow are not fully understood. Here, we show the increased osteogenic differentiation of MSCs under exposure to constant, extremely low shear stress created by osmotic pressure-induced flow in a microfluidic chip. The interstitial level of shear stress in the proposed microfluidic system stimulated nuclear localization of TAZ (transcriptional coactivator with PDZ-binding motif, a transcriptional modulator of MSCs, activated TAZ target genes such as CTGF and Cyr61, and induced osteogenic differentiation. TAZ-depleted cells showed defects in shear stress-induced osteogenic differentiation. In shear stress induced cellular signaling, Rho signaling pathway was important forthe nuclear localization of TAZ. Taken together, these results suggest that TAZ is an important mediator of interstitial flow-driven shear stress signaling in osteoblast differentiation of MSCs.

  3. An experimental study for the interface shear stress of near vertical air-water separated flow on evaporation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kwon, H.; Park, G. C.

    2000-01-01

    The object of experiment is improved model of evaporative heat transfer coefficient using interfacial friction factor on evaporation. Experiments have been conducted with near-vertical(87 .deg.) flat plate on evaporation for air-water countercurrent stratified flow. Experiment facility is consisted of 1.7m length and 0.2 X 0.005m cross section, the one side direct heating system which have 10kw power capacity. The interfacial shear stress, pressure drop and temperatures in test section were measured. These parameters were measured by DP-103 pressure transducer, K-type thermocouple, RTD and Hot Wire Anemometer(HWA). Experimental results were inclination as increased interfacial shear stress with increased the evaporation rate. Interfacial shear stress was increased as increased water flow rate and air flow rate too. For the evaluation of the measured evaporative heat transfer coefficients and physical understanding of the evaporation phenomena, the evaporative heat transfer coefficients were obtained through the simple calculation process by the use of mass transfer coefficient correlation and the experimental data of wavy film surface effect on shear and on evaporation

  4. Stress Perfusion Coronary Flow Reserve Versus Cardiac Magnetic Resonance for Known or Suspected CAD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Shingo; Saito, Naka; Nakachi, Tatsuya; Fukui, Kazuki; Iwasawa, Tae; Taguri, Masataka; Kosuge, Masami; Kimura, Kazuo

    2017-08-15

    Phase-contrast (PC) cine magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the coronary sinus is a noninvasive method to quantify coronary flow reserve (CFR). This study sought to compare the prognostic value of CFR by cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) and stress perfusion CMR to predict major adverse cardiac events (MACE). Participants included 276 patients with known coronary artery disease (CAD) and 400 with suspected CAD. CFR was calculated as myocardial blood flow during adenosine triphosphate infusion divided by myocardial blood flow at rest using PC cine MRI of the coronary sinus. During a median follow-up of 2.3 years, 47 patients (7%) experienced MACE. Impaired CFR (10% ischemia on stress perfusion CMR were significantly associated with MACE in patients with known CAD (hazard ratio [HR]: 5.17 and HR: 5.10, respectively) and suspected CAD (HR: 14.16 and HR: 6.50, respectively). The area under the curve for predicting MACE was 0.773 for CFR and 0.731 for stress perfusion CMR (p = 0.58) for patients with known CAD, and 0.885 for CFR and 0.776 for stress perfusion CMR (p = 0.059) in the group with suspected CAD. In patients with known CAD, sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive values to predict MACE were 64%, 91%, 38%, and 97%, respectively, for CFR, and 82%, 59%, 15%, and 97%, respectively, for stress perfusion CMR. In the suspected CAD group, these values were 65%, 99%, 80%, and 97%, respectively, for CFR, and 72%, 83%, 22%, and 98%, respectively, for stress perfusion CMR. The predictive values of CFR and stress perfusion CMR for MACE were comparable in patients with known CAD. In patients with suspected CAD, CFR showed higher HRs and areas under the curve than stress perfusion CMR, suggesting that CFR assessment by PC cine MRI might provide better risk stratification for patients with suspected CAD. Copyright © 2017 American College of Cardiology Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Rapid computation of single PET scan rest-stress myocardial blood flow parametric images by table look up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guehl, Nicolas J; Normandin, Marc D; Wooten, Dustin W; Rozen, Guy; Ruskin, Jeremy N; Shoup, Timothy M; Woo, Jonghye; Ptaszek, Leon M; Fakhri, Georges El; Alpert, Nathaniel M

    2017-09-01

    We have recently reported a method for measuring rest-stress myocardial blood flow (MBF) using a single, relatively short, PET scan session. The method requires two IV tracer injections, one to initiate rest imaging and one at peak stress. We previously validated absolute flow quantitation in ml/min/cc for standard bull's eye, segmental analysis. In this work, we extend the method for fast computation of rest-stress MBF parametric images. We provide an analytic solution to the single-scan rest-stress flow model which is then solved using a two-dimensional table lookup method (LM). Simulations were performed to compare the accuracy and precision of the lookup method with the original nonlinear method (NLM). Then the method was applied to 16 single scan rest/stress measurements made in 12 pigs: seven studied after infarction of the left anterior descending artery (LAD) territory, and nine imaged in the native state. Parametric maps of rest and stress MBF as well as maps of left (f LV ) and right (f RV ) ventricular spill-over fractions were generated. Regions of interest (ROIs) for 17 myocardial segments were defined in bull's eye fashion on the parametric maps. The mean of each ROI was then compared to the rest (K 1r ) and stress (K 1s ) MBF estimates obtained from fitting the 17 regional TACs with the NLM. In simulation, the LM performed as well as the NLM in terms of precision and accuracy. The simulation did not show that bias was introduced by the use of a predefined two-dimensional lookup table. In experimental data, parametric maps demonstrated good statistical quality and the LM was computationally much more efficient than the original NLM. Very good agreement was obtained between the mean MBF calculated on the parametric maps for each of the 17 ROIs and the regional MBF values estimated by the NLM (K 1map LM  = 1.019 × K 1 ROI NLM  + 0.019, R 2  = 0.986; mean difference = 0.034 ± 0.036 mL/min/cc). We developed a table lookup method for fast

  6. Simultaneous fluid-flow, heat-transfer and solid-stress computation in a single computer code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spalding, D B [Concentration Heat and Momentum Ltd, London (United Kingdom)

    1998-12-31

    Computer simulation of flow- and thermally-induced stresses in mechanical-equipment assemblies has, in the past, required the use of two distinct software packages, one to determine the forces and the temperatures, and the other to compute the resultant stresses. The present paper describes how a single computer program can perform both tasks at the same time. The technique relies on the similarity of the equations governing velocity distributions in fluids to those governing displacements in solids. The same SIMPLE-like algorithm is used for solving both. Applications to 1-, 2- and 3-dimensional situations are presented. It is further suggested that Solid-Fluid-Thermal, ie SFT analysis may come to replace CFD on the one hand and the analysis of stresses in solids on the other, by performing the functions of both. (author) 7 refs.

  7. Simultaneous fluid-flow, heat-transfer and solid-stress computation in a single computer code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spalding, D.B. [Concentration Heat and Momentum Ltd, London (United Kingdom)

    1997-12-31

    Computer simulation of flow- and thermally-induced stresses in mechanical-equipment assemblies has, in the past, required the use of two distinct software packages, one to determine the forces and the temperatures, and the other to compute the resultant stresses. The present paper describes how a single computer program can perform both tasks at the same time. The technique relies on the similarity of the equations governing velocity distributions in fluids to those governing displacements in solids. The same SIMPLE-like algorithm is used for solving both. Applications to 1-, 2- and 3-dimensional situations are presented. It is further suggested that Solid-Fluid-Thermal, ie SFT analysis may come to replace CFD on the one hand and the analysis of stresses in solids on the other, by performing the functions of both. (author) 7 refs.

  8. A two-dimensional continuum model of biofilm growth incorporating fluid flow and shear stress based detachment

    KAUST Repository

    Duddu, Ravindra

    2009-05-01

    We present a two-dimensional biofilm growth model in a continuum framework using an Eulerian description. A computational technique based on the eXtended Finite Element Method (XFEM) and the level set method is used to simulate the growth of the biofilm. The model considers fluid flow around the biofilm surface, the advection-diffusion and reaction of substrate, variable biomass volume fraction and erosion due to the interfacial shear stress at the biofilm-fluid interface. The key assumptions of the model and the governing equations of transport, biofilm kinetics and biofilm mechanics are presented. Our 2D biofilm growth results are in good agreement with those obtained by Picioreanu et al. (Biotechnol Bioeng 69(5):504-515, 2000). Detachment due to erosion is modeled using two continuous speed functions based on: (a) interfacial shear stress and (b) biofilm height. A relation between the two detachment models in the case of a 1D biofilm is established and simulated biofilm results with detachment in 2D are presented. The stress in the biofilm due to fluid flow is evaluated and higher stresses are observed close to the substratum where the biofilm is attached. © 2008 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Analysis of thermal stress of the piston during non-stationary heat flow in a turbocharged Diesel engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gustof, P.; Hornik, A.

    2016-09-01

    In the paper, numeric calculations of thermal stresses of the piston in a turbocharged Diesel engine in the initial phase of its work were carried out based on experimental studies and the data resulting from them. The calculations were made using a geometrical model of the piston in a five-cylinder turbocharged Diesel engine with a capacity of about 2300 cm3, with a direct fuel injection to the combustion chamber and a power rating of 85 kW. In order to determine the thermal stress, application of own mathematical models of the heat flow in characteristic surfaces of the piston was required to show real processes occurring on the surface of the analysed component. The calculations were performed using a Geostar COSMOS/M program module. A three-dimensional geometric model of the piston was created in this program based on a real component, in order to enable the calculations and analysis of thermal stresses during non-stationary heat flow. Modelling of the thermal stresses of the piston for the engine speed n=4250 min-1 and engine load λ=1.69 was carried out.

  10. A stabilized second-order time accurate finite element formulation for incompressible viscous flow with heat transfer; Uma formulacao de elementos finitos estabilizada de segunda ordem no tempo para escoamentos viscosos com transferencia de calor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Curi, Marcos Filardy

    2011-07-01

    In view of the problem of global warming and the search for clean energy sources, a worldwide expansion on the use of nuclear energy is foreseen. Thus, the development of science and technology regarding nuclear power plants is essential, in particular in the field of reactor engineering. Fluid mechanics and heat transfer play an important role in the development of nuclear reactors. Computational Fluid Mechanics (CFD) is becoming ever more important in the optimization of cost and safety of the designs. This work presents a stabilized second-order time accurate finite element formulation for incompressible flows with heat transfer. A second order time discretization precedes a spatial discretization using finite elements. The terms that stabilize the finite element method arise naturally from the discretization process, rather than being introduced a priori in the variational formulation. The method was implemented in the program 'ns{sub n}ew{sub s}olvec2d{sub av}2{sub M}PI' written in FORTRAN90, developed in the Parallel Computing Laboratory at the Institute of Nuclear Engineering (LCP/IEN). Numerical solutions of some representative examples, including free, mixed and forced convection, demonstrate that the proposed stabilized formulation attains very good agreement with experimental and computational results available in the literature. (author)

  11. Effect of Temperature Reversion on Hot Ductility and Flow Stress-Strain Curves of C-Mn Continuously Cast Steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Zhihua; Li, Wei; Long, Mujun; Gui, Lintao; Chen, Dengfu; Huang, Yunwei; Vitos, Levente

    2015-08-01

    The influence of temperature reversion in secondary cooling and its reversion rate on hot ductility and flow stress-strain curve of C-Mn steel has been investigated. Tensile specimens were cooled at various regimes. One cooling regime involved cooling at a constant rate of 100 °C min-1 to the test temperature, while the others involved temperature reversion processes at three different reversion rates before deformation. After hot tensile test, the evolution of mechanical properties of steel was analyzed at various scales by means of microstructure observation, ab initio prediction, and thermodynamic calculation. Results indicated that the temperature reversion in secondary cooling led to hot ductility trough occurring at higher temperature with greater depth. With increasing temperature reversion rate, the low temperature end of ductility trough extended toward lower temperature, leading to wider hot ductility trough with slightly reducing depth. Microstructure examinations indicated that the intergranular fracture related to the thin film-like ferrite and (Fe,Mn)S particles did not changed with varying cooling regimes; however, the Widmanstatten ferrite surrounding austenite grains resulted from the temperature reversion process seriously deteriorated the ductility. In addition, after the temperature reversion in secondary cooling, the peak stress on the flow curve slightly declined and the peak of strain to peak stress occurred at higher temperature. With increasing temperature reversion rate, the strain to peak stress slightly increased, while the peak stress showed little variation. The evolution of plastic modulus and strain to peak stress of austenite with varying temperature was in line with the theoretical prediction on Fe.

  12. Stress-induced decrease of uterine blood flow in sheep is mediated by alpha 1-adrenergic receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dreiling, Michelle; Bischoff, Sabine; Schiffner, Rene; Rupprecht, Sven; Kiehntopf, Michael; Schubert, Harald; Witte, Otto W; Nathanielsz, Peter W; Schwab, Matthias; Rakers, Florian

    2016-09-01

    Prenatal maternal stress can be transferred to the fetus via a catecholamine-dependent decrease of uterine blood flow (UBF). However, it is unclear which group of adrenergic receptors mediates this mechanism of maternal-fetal stress transfer. We hypothesized that in sheep, alpha 1-adrenergic receptors may play a key role in catecholamine mediated UBF decrease, as these receptors are mainly involved in peripheral vasoconstriction and are present in significant number in the uterine vasculature. After chronic instrumentation at 125 ± 1 days of gestation (dGA; term 150 dGA), nine pregnant sheep were exposed at 130 ± 1 dGA to acute isolation stress for one hour without visual, tactile, or auditory contact with their flockmates. UBF, blood pressure (BP), heart rate (HR), stress hormones, and blood gases were determined before and during this isolation challenge. Twenty-four hours later, experiments were repeated during alpha 1-adrenergic receptor blockage induced by a continuous intravenous infusion of urapidil. In both experiments, ewes reacted to isolation with an increase in serum norepinephrine, cortisol, BP, and HR as typical signs of activation of sympatho-adrenal and the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis. Stress-induced UBF decrease was prevented by alpha 1-adrenergic receptor blockage. We conclude that UBF decrease induced by maternal stress in sheep is mediated by alpha 1-adrenergic receptors. Future studies investigating prevention strategies of impact of prenatal maternal stress on fetal health should consider selective blockage of alpha 1-receptors to interrupt maternal-fetal stress transfer mediated by utero-placental malperfusion.

  13. The Effects Of L-Arginine And L-Name On Coronary Flow And Oxidative Stress In Isolated Rat Hearts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sobot Tanja

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this experimental study was to assess the effects of the acute administration of L-arginine alone and in combination with L-NAME (a non-selective NO synthase inhibitor on the coronary flow and oxidative stress markers in isolated rat hearts. The experimental study was performed on hearts isolated from Wistar albino rats (n=12, male, 8 weeks old, body mass of 180-200 g. Retrograde perfusion of the isolated preparations was performed using a modified method according to the Langendorff technique with a gradual increase in the perfusion pressure (40–120 cmH2O. The following values were measured in the collected coronary effluents: coronary flow, released nitrites (NO production marker, superoxide anion radical and the index of lipid peroxidation (measured as thiobarbiturate reactive substances. The experimental protocol was performed under controlled conditions, followed by the administration of L-arginine alone (1 mmol and L-arginine (1 mmol + L-NAME (30 μmol. The results indicated that L-arginine did not significantly increase the coronary flow or the release of NO, TBARS and the superoxide anion radical. These effects were partially blocked by the joint administration of L-arginine + L-NAME, which indicated their competitive effect. Hence, the results of our study do not demonstrate significant effects of L-arginine administration on the coronary flow and oxidative stress markers in isolated rat hearts.

  14. The effect of cooling management on blood flow to the dominant follicle and estrous cycle length at heat stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honig, Hen; Ofer, Lior; Kaim, Moshe; Jacobi, Shamay; Shinder, Dima; Gershon, Eran

    2016-07-15

    The use of ultrasound imaging for the examination of reproductive organs has contributed substantially to the fertility management of dairy cows around the world. This method has many advantages such as noninvasiveness and immediate availability of information. Adding Doppler index to the ultrasound imaging examination, improved the estimation of blood volume and flow rate to the ovaries in general and to the dominant follicle in particular. The aim of this study was to examine changes in the blood flow to the dominant follicle and compare them to the follicular development throughout the cycle. We further set out to examine the effects of different types of cooling management during the summer on the changes in blood flow to the dominant follicle. For this purpose, 24 Israeli-Holstein dairy cows, under heat stress, were randomly assigned one of two groups: one was exposed to five cooling sessions per day (5CS) and the other to eight cooling sessions per day (8CS). Blood flow to the dominant follicle was measured daily using Doppler index throughout the estrous cycle. No differences in the preovulatory dominant follicle diameter were detected between the two cooling management regimens during the cycle. However, the length of the first follicular wave was significantly longer, whereas the second follicular wave was nonsignificantly shorter in the 5CS group as compared to the 8CS group. In addition, no difference in blood flow was found during the first 18 days of the cycle between the two groups. However, from Day 20 until ovulation a higher rate of blood flow was measured in the ovaries of cows cooled 8 times per day as compared to the 5CS group. No differences in progesterone levels were noted. Finally, the estrous cycle length was shorter in the 8CS group as compared to the 5CS group. Our data suggest that blood flow to the dominant follicle and estrous cycle length is affected by heat stress. Using the appropriate cooling management during heat stress can

  15. Letter: The link between the Reynolds shear stress and the large structures of turbulent Couette-Poiseuille flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gandía-Barberá, Sergio; Hoyas, Sergio; Oberlack, Martin; Kraheberger, Stefanie

    2018-04-01

    The length and width of the long and wide structures appearing in turbulent Couette flows are studied by means of a new dataset of direct numerical simulation covering a stepped transition from pure Couette flow to pure Poiseuille one, at Reτ ≈ 130, based on the stationary wall. The existence of these structures is linked to the averaged Reynolds stress, u v ¯ : as soon as in any part of the channel u v ¯ changes its sign, the structures disappear. The length and width of the rolls are found to be, approximately, 50h and 2.5h, respectively. For this Reynolds number, simulations with a domain shorter than 100h cannot properly describe the behaviour of the longest structures of the flow.

  16. Stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... taking care of an aging parent. With mental stress, the body pumps out hormones to no avail. Neither fighting ... with type 1 diabetes. This difference makes sense. Stress blocks the body from releasing insulin in people with type 2 ...

  17. Tablet coating by injection molding technology - Optimization of coating formulation attributes and coating process parameters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desai, Parind M; Puri, Vibha; Brancazio, David; Halkude, Bhakti S; Hartman, Jeremy E; Wahane, Aniket V; Martinez, Alexander R; Jensen, Keith D; Harinath, Eranda; Braatz, Richard D; Chun, Jung-Hoon; Trout, Bernhardt L

    2018-01-01

    We developed and evaluated a solvent-free injection molding (IM) coating technology that could be suitable for continuous manufacturing via incorporation with IM tableting. Coating formulations (coating polymers and plasticizers) were prepared using hot-melt extrusion and screened via stress-strain analysis employing a universal testing machine. Selected coating formulations were studied for their melt flow characteristics. Tablets were coated using a vertical injection molding unit. Process parameters like softening temperature, injection pressure, and cooling temperature played a very important role in IM coating processing. IM coating employing polyethylene oxide (PEO) based formulations required sufficient room humidity (>30% RH) to avoid immediate cracks, whereas other formulations were insensitive to the room humidity. Tested formulations based on Eudrajit E PO and Kollicoat IR had unsuitable mechanical properties. Three coating formulations based on hydroxypropyl pea starch, PEO 1,000,000 and Opadry had favorable mechanical (35% elongation, >95×10 4 J/m 3 toughness) and melt flow (>0.4g/min) characteristics, that rendered acceptable IM coats. These three formulations increased the dissolution time by 10, 15 and 35min, respectively (75% drug release), compared to the uncoated tablets (15min). Coated tablets stored in several environmental conditions remained stable to cracking for the evaluated 8-week time period. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Effects of polymer stresses on analogy between momentum and heat transfer in drag-reduced turbulent channel flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kyoungyoun; Sureshkumar, Radhakrishna

    2018-03-01

    The effects of polymer stresses on the analogy between momentum and heat transfer are examined by using a direct numerical simulation (DNS) of viscoelastic turbulent channel flows using a constant heat flux boundary condition. The Reynolds number based on the friction velocity and channel half height is 125, and the Prandtl number is 5. The polymer stress is modeled using the finitely extensible nonlinear elastic-Peterlin constitutive model, and low (15%), intermediate (34%), and high drag reduction (DR) (52%) cases are examined. The Colburn analogy is found to be inapplicable for viscoelastic turbulent flows, suggesting dissimilarity between the momentum and heat transfer at the macroscopic coefficient level. The mean temperature profile also shows behaviour different from the mean velocity profile in drag-reduced flows. In contrast to the dissimilarity in the mean profiles, the turbulent Prandtl number Prt predicted by the DNS is near unity. This implies that turbulent heat transfer is still analogous to turbulent momentum transfer in drag-reduced flows, as in Newtonian flow. An increase in DR is accompanied by an increase in the correlation coefficient ρuθ between the instantaneous fluctuations in the streamwise velocity u and temperature θ. The correlation coefficient between u' and wall-normal velocity fluctuations v', ρ-u v, exhibits a profile similar to that of ρ-θ v in drag-reduced and Newtonian flows. Finally, the budget analysis of the transport equations of turbulent heat flux shows a strong similarity between the turbulent momentum and heat transfer, which is consistent with the predictions of Prt near unity.

  19. Paraquat induces oxidative stress, neuronal loss in substantia nigra region and Parkinsonism in adult rats: Neuroprotection and amelioration of symptoms by water-soluble formulation of Coenzyme Q10

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sridhar TS

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Parkinson's disease, for which currently there is no cure, develops as a result of progressive loss of dopamine neurons in the brain; thus, identification of any potential therapeutic intervention for disease management is of a great importance. Results Here we report that prophylactic application of water-soluble formulation of coenzyme Q10 could effectively offset the effects of environmental neurotoxin paraquat, believed to be a contributing factor in the development of familial PD. In this study we utilized a model of paraquat-induced dopaminergic neurodegeneration in adult rats that received three weekly intra-peritoneal injections of the herbicide paraquat. Histological and biochemical analyses of rat brains revealed increased levels of oxidative stress markers and a loss of approximately 65% of dopamine neurons in the substantia nigra region. The paraquat-exposed rats also displayed impaired balancing skills on a slowly rotating drum (rotorod evidenced by their reduced spontaneity in gait performance. In contrast, paraquat exposed rats receiving a water-soluble formulation of coenzyme Q10 in their drinking water prior to and during the paraquat treatment neither developed neurodegeneration nor reduced rotorod performance and were indistinguishable from the control paraquat-untreated rats. Conclusion Our data confirmed that paraquat-induced neurotoxicity represents a convenient rat model of Parkinsonian neurodegeneration suitable for mechanistic and neuroprotective studies. This is the first preclinical evaluation of a water-soluble coenzyme Q10 formulation showing the evidence of prophylactic neuroprotection at clinically relevant doses.

  20. Normalization of flow-mediated dilation to shear stress area under the curve eliminates the impact of variable hyperemic stimulus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padilla, Jaume; Johnson, Blair D; Newcomer, Sean C; Wilhite, Daniel P; Mickleborough, Timothy D; Fly, Alyce D; Mather, Kieren J; Wallace, Janet P

    2008-09-04

    Normalization of brachial artery flow-mediated dilation (FMD) to individual shear stress area under the curve (peak FMD:SSAUC ratio) has recently been proposed as an approach to control for the large inter-subject variability in reactive hyperemia-induced shear stress; however, the adoption of this approach among researchers has been slow. The present study was designed to further examine the efficacy of FMD normalization to shear stress in reducing measurement variability. Five different magnitudes of reactive hyperemia-induced shear stress were applied to 20 healthy, physically active young adults (25.3 +/- 0. 6 yrs; 10 men, 10 women) by manipulating forearm cuff occlusion duration: 1, 2, 3, 4, and 5 min, in a randomized order. A venous blood draw was performed for determination of baseline whole blood viscosity and hematocrit. The magnitude of occlusion-induced forearm ischemia was quantified by dual-wavelength near-infrared spectrometry (NIRS). Brachial artery diameters and velocities were obtained via high-resolution ultrasound. The SSAUC was individually calculated for the duration of time-to-peak dilation. One-way repeated measures ANOVA demonstrated distinct magnitudes of occlusion-induced ischemia (volume and peak), hyperemic shear stress, and peak FMD responses (all p index of endothelial function.

  1. 19 mm sized bileaflet valve prostheses' flow field investigated by bidimensional laser Doppler anemometry (part II: maximum turbulent shear stresses)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbaro, V; Grigioni, M; Daniele, C; D'Avenio, G; Boccanera, G

    1997-11-01

    The investigation of the flow field generated by cardiac valve prostheses is a necessary task to gain knowledge on the possible relationship between turbulence-derived stresses and the hemolytic and thrombogenic complications in patients after valve replacement. The study of turbulence flows downstream of cardiac prostheses, in literature, especially concerns large-sized prostheses with a variable flow regime from very low up to 6 L/min. The Food and Drug Administration draft guidance requires the study of the minimum prosthetic size at a high cardiac output to reach the maximum Reynolds number conditions. Within the framework of a national research project regarding the characterization of cardiovascular endoprostheses, an in-depth study of turbulence generated downstream of bileaflet cardiac valves is currently under way at the Laboratory of Biomedical Engineering of the Istituto Superiore di Sanita. Four models of 19 mm bileaflet valve prostheses were used: St Jude Medical HP, Edwards Tekna, Sorin Bicarbon, and CarboMedics. The prostheses were selected for the nominal Tissue Annulus Diameter as reported by manufacturers without any assessment of valve sizing method, and were mounted in aortic position. The aortic geometry was scaled for 19 mm prostheses using angiographic data. The turbulence-derived shear stresses were investigated very close to the valve (0.35 D0), using a bidimensional Laser Doppler anemometry system and applying the Principal Stress Analysis. Results concern typical turbulence quantities during a 50 ms window at peak flow in the systolic phase. Conclusions are drawn regarding the turbulence associated to valve design features, as well as the possible damage to blood constituents.

  2. Measurement of coronary flow response to cold pressor stress in asymptomatic women with cardiovascular risk factors using spiral velocity-encoded cine MRI at 3 Tesla

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maroules, Christopher D.; Peshock, Ronald M.; Chang, Alice Y.; Kontak, Andrew; Dimitrov, Ivan; Kotys, Melanie

    2010-01-01

    Background: Coronary sinus (CS) flow in response to a provocative stress has been used as a surrogate measure of coronary flow reserve, and velocity-encoded cine (VEC) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is an established technique for measuring CS flow. In this study, the cold pressor test (CPT) was used to measure CS flow response because it elicits an endothelium-dependent coronary vasodilation that may afford greater sensitivity for detecting early changes in coronary endothelial function. Purpose: To investigate the feasibility and reproducibility of CS flow reactivity (CSFR) to CPT using spiral VEC MRI at 3 Tesla in a sample of asymptomatic women with cardiovascular risk factors. Material and Methods: Fourteen asymptomatic women (age 38 years ± 10) with cardiovascular risk factors were studied using 3D spiral VEC MRI of the CS at 3 T. The CPT was utilized as a provocative stress to measure changes in CS flow. CSFR to CPT was calculated from the ratio of CS flow during peak stress to baseline CS flow. Results: CPT induced a significant hemodynamic response as measured by a 45% increase in rate-pressure product (P<0.01). A significant increase in CS volume flow was also observed (baseline, 116 ± 26 ml/min; peak stress, 152 ± 34 ml/min, P=0.01). CSFR to CPT was 1.31 ± 0.20. Test-retest variability of CS volume flow was 5% at baseline and 6% during peak stress. Conclusion: Spiral CS VEC MRI at 3 T is a feasible and reproducible technique for measuring CS flow in asymptomatic women at risk for cardiovascular disease. Significant changes in CSFR to CPT are detectable, without demanding pharmacologic stress

  3. Measurement and Interpretation of Flow Stress Data for the Simulation of Metal-Forming Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    fitting constants that differ in each equation): Ludwik Equation: c)εb(aσ += , (29) Voce Equation: )]εcexp([1*a][baσ −−−+= (30) Swift...stress at low strains (ɘ.2) and to overestimate the stress for high strains. For heavily prestrained materials, c ~ 1. The Voce and Swift equations tend

  4. An accurate tangential force-displacement model for granular-flow simulations: Contacting spheres with plastic deformation, force-driven formulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vu-Quoc, L.; Lesburg, L.; Zhang, X.

    2004-01-01

    An elasto-plastic frictional tangential force-displacement (TFD) model for spheres in contact for accurate and efficient granular-flow simulations is presented in this paper; the present TFD is consistent with the elasto-plastic normal force-displacement (NFD) model presented in [ASME Journal of Applied Mechanics 67 (2) (2000) 363; Proceedings of the Royal Society of London, Series A 455 (1991) (1999) 4013]. The proposed elasto-plastic frictional TFD model is accurate, and is validated against non-linear finite-element analyses involving plastic flows under both loading and unloading conditions. The novelty of the present TFD model lies in (i) the additive decomposition of the elasto-plastic contact area radius into an elastic part and a plastic part, (ii) the correction of the particles' radii at the contact point, and (iii) the correction of the particles' elastic moduli. The correction of the contact-area radius represents an effect of plastic deformation in colliding particles; the correction of the radius of curvature represents a permanent indentation after impact; the correction of the elastic moduli represents a softening of the material due to plastic flow. The construction of both the present elasto-plastic frictional TFD model and its consistent companion, the elasto-plastic NFD model, parallels the formalism of the continuum theory of elasto-plasticity. Both NFD and TFD models form a coherent set of force-displacement (FD) models not available hitherto for granular-flow simulations, and are consistent with the Hertz, Cattaneo, Mindlin, Deresiewicz contact mechanics theory. Together, these FD models will allow for efficient simulations of granular flows (or granular gases) involving a large number of particles

  5. Numerical simulation of viscoelastic free‐surface flows using a streamfunction/log‐conformation formulation and the volume‐of‐fluid method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Comminal, Raphael Benjamin

    materials, where viscoelastic effects cause dynamical instabilities, despite the very simple geometry. This thesis reviews the popular differential constitutive models derived from molecular theories of dilute polymer solutions, polymer networks, and entangled polymer melts, as well as the inelastic...... streamfunction formulation is formally more accurate than the velocity–pressure decoupled method, because it is immune of decoupling errors. Moreover, the absence of decoupling enhances the stability of the calculation. The governing equations (conservation laws and constitutive models) are discretized......–linear–interface–construction technique. In addition, a new Cellwise Conservative Unsplit (CCU) advection scheme is presented. The CCU scheme updates the liquid volume fractions based on cellwise backward‐tracking of the liquid volumes. The algorithm calculates non‐overlapping and conforming adjacent donating regions, which ensures...

  6. Comparative study of the two-fluid momentum equations for multi-dimensional bubbly flows: Modification of Reynolds stress

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Seung Jun; Park, Ik Kyu; Yoon, Han Young [Thermal-Hydraulic Safety Research Division, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Jae, Byoung [School of Mechanical Engineering, Chungnam National University, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-01-15

    Two-fluid equations are widely used to obtain averaged behaviors of two-phase flows. This study addresses a problem that may arise when the two-fluid equations are used for multi-dimensional bubbly flows. If steady drag is the only accounted force for the interfacial momentum transfer, the disperse-phase velocity would be the same as the continuous-phase velocity when the flow is fully developed without gravity. However, existing momentum equations may show unphysical results in estimating the relative velocity of the disperse phase against the continuous-phase. First, we examine two types of existing momentum equations. One is the standard two-fluid momentum equation in which the disperse-phase is treated as a continuum. The other is the averaged momentum equation derived from a solid/ fluid particle motion. We show that the existing equations are not proper for multi-dimensional bubbly flows. To resolve the problem mentioned above, we modify the form of the Reynolds stress terms in the averaged momentum equation based on the solid/fluid particle motion. The proposed equation shows physically correct results for both multi-dimensional laminar and turbulent flows.

  7. Influence of oxidative stress on cardiovascular parameters in patients with combined flow of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and arterial hypertension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. G. Deinega

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. It is well known that active forms of oxygen, such as hydrogen peroxide, superoxide anion, hydroxyl radical and others are involved in different pathological conditions, such as cell necrosis, senescence, apoptosis, autophagy, inflammatory responses, remodeling of extracellular matrix and blood vessels, endothelial dysfunction, inactivation of antiproteases, and impaired tissue repair. The pathological increased production of mentioned active forms is called “oxidative stress”. From the literature data, we know that oxidative stress is involved in pathogenesis of arterial hypertension (AH, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD, atherosclerosis and others. The influence of oxidative stress on cardiovascular disorders in patients with combined flow of COPD and AH is not clearly known. Objective. To study peculiarities and links between parameters of oxidative stress and lesions of heart and vessels in patients with combined flow of COPD and AH. Materials and methods. A total of 101 patients with COPD, AH and with combined flow of COPD and AH were examined. The patients were divided into 3 groups. The first group was formed by patients with AH (n=29 the second group was formed by patients with COPD (n=29, the third group was formed by patients with combined flow of COPD and AH (n=57. Control group was formed from healthy persons of the same age and sex (n=22.All patients underwent spirography, echocardiography, ultrasound measurement of common carotid artery intimal-medial thickness and estimation of endhothelium-dependent vasodilatation. As oxidative stress markers, the levels of oxidative protein modification, spontaneous and iron induced aldehydephenylhydrazone’s (APH, ketondinitrophenylhydrazone’s (KPH and medium size molecules (MSM were measured. Results. Patients with combined flow of COPD and AH had higher levels of spontaneous APH (p<0,01 comparing with first and second group. The levels of spontaneous KPH were

  8. Analysis of Metal Flow Behavior and Residual Stress Formation of Complex Functional Profiles under High-Speed Cold Roll-Beating

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fengkui Cui

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available To obtain a good surface layer performance of the complex functional profile during the high-speed cold roll-beating forming process, this paper analyzed the metal plastic flow and residual stress-formed mechanism by using a theoretical model of the metal flow and residual stress generation. By using simulation software, the cold roll-beating forming process of a spline shaft was simulated and analyzed. The metal flow and residual stress formation law in the motion were researched. In a practical experiment, the changes in the grains in the spline tooth profile section and the residual stress distribution on the tooth profile were studied. A microcorrespondence relationship was established between the metal plastic flow and the residual stress generation. The conclusions indicate that the rate at which the metal flow decreases changes gradually at different metal layers. The residual stress value is directly related to the plastic flow difference. As the roll-beating speed increases, the uneven degree of plastic deformation at the workpiece surface increases, and the residual stress in the tooth profile is generally greater. At the same roll-beating speed, the rate change trend of the metal flow decreases gradually from the surface to the inner layer and from the dedendum to the addendum. The residual stress distribution on the surface of the tooth profile decreases from the dedendum to the addendum. These findings provide a basis and guidance for the controlled use of residual stress, obtaining better surface layer quality in the high-speed cold roll-beating process of the complex functional profile.

  9. Crystallization Formulation Lab

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Crystallization Formulation Lab fills a critical need in the process development and optimization of current and new explosives and energetic formulations. The...

  10. Lagrangian viscoelastic flow computations using a generalized molecular stress function model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Henrik K.

    2002-01-01

    A new finite element technique for the numerical simulation of 3D time-dependent flow of viscoelastic fluid is presented. The technique is based on a Lagrangian kinematics description of the fluid flow. It represents a further development of the 3D Lagrangian integral method (3D-LIM) from a Rivlin...

  11. A natural pharma standard supplement formulation to control treatment-related toxicity and oxidative stress in genitourinary cancer: a preliminary study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ledda, A; Belcaro, G; Dugall, M; Luzzi, R; Hosoi, M; Feragalli, B; Cotellese, R; Cosentino, V; Cosentino, M; Eggenhoffner, R; Pellizzato, M; Fratter, A; Giacomelli, L

    2017-09-01

    Oncological treatments are associated with toxicities that may decrease compliance to treatment in most genitourinary cancer patients. Supplementation with pharmaceutical-standardized supplement may be a supplementary method to control the side effects after chemo- and radiotherapy and the increased oxidative stress associated to treatments. This registry study evaluated a natural combination of supplements containing curcumin, cordyceps, and astaxanthin (Oncotris™) used as supplementary management in genitourinary cancer patients who had undergone oncological therapy. Patients with genitourinary cancers (prostate or bladder malignancies) who had undergone and completed cancer treatments (radiotherapy, chemotherapy or intravesical immunotherapy with increased oxidative stress and residual symptoms) were recruited in this registry, supplement study. Registry subjects (n = 61) freely decided to follow either a standard management (SM) (control group = 35) or SM plus oral daily supplementation (supplement group = 26). Evaluation of severity of treatment-related residual side effects, blood count test, prostate-specific antigen (PSA) test and plasma free radicals (oxidative stress) were performed at inclusion and at the end of the observational period (6 weeks). Two patients dropped out during the registry. Therefore, the analysis included 59 participants: 26 individuals in the supplementation group and 33 in the control group. In the supplement group, the intensity of signs and symptoms (treatment-related) and residual side effects significantly decreased at 6 weeks: minimal changes were observed in controls. Supplementation with Oncotris™ was associated with a significant improvement in blood cell count and with a decreased level of plasmatic PSA and oxidative stress. Naturally-derived supplements, specifically Oncotris™ (patent pending), could support the body to overcome the treatment-related toxicities - and the relative oxidative stress in cancer patients.

  12. Morphology Dependent Flow Stress in Nickel-Based Superalloys in the Multi-Scale Crystal Plasticity Framework

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shahriyar Keshavarz

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper develops a framework to obtain the flow stress of nickel-based superalloys as a function of γ-γ’ morphology. The yield strength is a major factor in the design of these alloys. This work provides additional effects of γ’ morphology in the design scope that has been adopted for the model developed by authors. In general, the two-phase γ-γ’ morphology in nickel-based superalloys can be divided into three variables including γ’ shape, γ’ volume fraction and γ’ size in the sub-grain microstructure. In order to obtain the flow stress, non-Schmid crystal plasticity constitutive models at two length scales are employed and bridged through a homogenized multi-scale framework. The multi-scale framework includes two sub-grain and homogenized grain scales. For the sub-grain scale, a size-dependent, dislocation-density-based finite element model (FEM of the representative volume element (RVE with explicit depiction of the γ-γ’ morphology is developed as a building block for the homogenization. For the next scale, an activation-energy-based crystal plasticity model is developed for the homogenized single crystal of Ni-based superalloys. The constitutive models address the thermo-mechanical behavior of nickel-based superalloys for a large temperature range and include orientation dependencies and tension-compression asymmetry. This homogenized model is used to obtain the morphology dependence on the flow stress in nickel-based superalloys and can significantly expedite crystal plasticity FE simulations in polycrystalline microstructures, as well as higher scale FE models in order to cast and design superalloys.

  13. Dislocation-Disclination Substructures Formed in FCC Polycrystals Under Large Plastic Deformations: Evolution and Association with Flow Stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozlov, É. V.; Koneva, N. A.; Trishkina, L. I.

    2014-06-01

    The evolution of dislocation substructures formed in polycrystalline Cu-Al and Cu-Mn alloys undergoing large plastic deformations is studied, using transmission electron microscopy. Microband and fragmented substructures are examined. The Al and Mn alloying element concentrations for which the substructures are formed have been found. The mechanisms involved in the formation of the substructures during the substructural evolution in the alloys subjected to deformation have been revealed. Parameters describing the substructures under study have been measured. The dependence of the parameters on the flow stress has been established.

  14. The flow stress of high-purity refractory body-centred cubic metals and its modification by atomic defects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seeger, A.

    1995-01-01

    The strong temperature and strain-rate dependence of the flow stress of high-purity refractory body-centred cubic metals has been shown to be an intrinsic property and is usually ascribed to a high Peierls barrier of a o left angle 111 right angle /2 screw dislocations. These barriers are overcome by the formation of kink pairs on the screw dislocations. The paper reports on recent, very complete flow-stress data on ultra-high purity Mo crystals obtained by two different experimental techniques and covering the temperature range 4 K to 460 K. The results are in accord with earlier work of Brunner and Diehl on α-Fe, who showed that below the so-called knee temperature, T K , three regimes in the temperature variation of the flow-stress should be distinguished. Two of them are fully accounted for by the same glide mechanism, namely elementary glide steps on {211} planes. The so-called upper bend separating these two regimes in an inherent feature of the theory of kink-pair formation and does not indicate a change in the glide mechanism. There is, however, strong evidence that the so-called lower bend, separating the range of {211} elementary glide steps from the low-temperature flow-stress regime, is due to a change in the glide mechanism. It is argued that at the lower bend the screw-dislocation cores undergo a ''first-order phase transition'' from a low-temperature configuration that allows glide of a given screw dislocation on any of its three {110} glide planes to a high-temperature configuration that can glide only on one definite {211} plane. Between T K and the lower-bend temperature, T, bcc metals may show the unique phenomena of alloy and irradiation softening. With regard to the latter phenomenon, Brunner and Diehl distinguish between ''primary'' and ''secondary'' softening. It is shown that alloy softening and the ''secondary irradiation softening'' of bcc metals may be explained by an ''overheating'' of the phase transition in the dislocation core. (orig./WL)

  15. Modeling of time dependent localized flow shear stress and its impact on cellular growth within additive manufactured titanium implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ziyu; Yuan, Lang; Lee, Peter D; Jones, Eric; Jones, Julian R

    2014-11-01

    Bone augmentation implants are porous to allow cellular growth, bone formation and fixation. However, the design of the pores is currently based on simple empirical rules, such as minimum pore and interconnects sizes. We present a three-dimensional (3D) transient model of cellular growth based on the Navier-Stokes equations that simulates the body fluid flow and stimulation of bone precursor cellular growth, attachment, and proliferation as a function of local flow shear stress. The model's effectiveness is demonstrated for two additive manufactured (AM) titanium scaffold architectures. The results demonstrate that there is a complex interaction of flow rate and strut architecture, resulting in partially randomized structures having a preferential impact on stimulating cell migration in 3D porous structures for higher flow rates. This novel result demonstrates the potential new insights that can be gained via the modeling tool developed, and how the model can be used to perform what-if simulations to design AM structures to specific functional requirements. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Flow and wall shear stress characterization after endovascular aneurysm repair and endovascular aneurysm sealing in an infrarenal aneurysm model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boersen, Johannes T; Groot Jebbink, Erik; Versluis, Michel; Slump, Cornelis H; Ku, David N; de Vries, Jean-Paul P M; Reijnen, Michel M P J

    2017-12-01

    Endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) with a modular endograft has become the preferred treatment for abdominal aortic aneurysms. A novel concept is endovascular aneurysm sealing (EVAS), consisting of dual endoframes surrounded by polymer-filled endobags. This dual-lumen configuration is different from a bifurcation with a tapered trajectory of the flow lumen into the two limbs and may induce unfavorable flow conditions. These include low and oscillatory wall shear stress (WSS), linked to atherosclerosis, and high shear rates that may result in thrombosis. An in vitro study was performed to assess the impact of EVAR and EVAS on flow patterns and WSS. Four abdominal aortic aneurysm phantoms were constructed, including three stented models, to study the influence of the flow divider on flow (Endurant [Medtronic, Minneapolis, Minn], AFX [Endologix, Irvine, Calif], and Nellix [Endologix]). Experimental models were tested under physiologic resting conditions, and flow was visualized with laser particle imaging velocimetry, quantified by shear rate, WSS, and oscillatory shear index (OSI) in the suprarenal aorta, renal artery (RA), and common iliac artery. WSS and OSI were comparable for all models in the suprarenal aorta. The RA flow profile in the EVAR models was comparable to the control, but a region of lower WSS was observed on the caudal wall compared with the control. The EVAS model showed a stronger jet flow with a higher shear rate in some regions compared with the other models. Small regions of low WSS and high OSI were found near the distal end of all stents in the common iliac artery compared with the control. Maximum shear rates in each region of interest were well below the pathologic threshold for acute thrombosis. The different stent designs do not influence suprarenal flow. Lower WSS is observed in the caudal wall of the RA after EVAR and a higher shear rate after EVAS. All stented models have a small region of low WSS and high OSI near the distal outflow

  17. Deformation and Stress Response of Carbon Nanotubes/UHMWPE Composites under Extensional-Shear Coupling Flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Junxia; Cao, Changlin; Yu, Dingshan; Chen, Xudong

    2018-02-01

    In this paper, the effect of varying extensional-shear couple loading on deformation and stress response of Carbon Nanotubes/ ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene (CNTs/UHMWPE) composites was investigated using finite element numerical simulation, with expect to improve the manufacturing process of UHMWPE-based composites with reduced stress and lower distortion. When applying pure extensional loading and pure X-Y shear loading, it was found that the risk of a structural breakage greatly rises. For identifying the coupling between extensional and shear loading, distinct generations of force loading were defined by adjusting the magnitude of extensional loading and X-Y shear loading. It was shown that with the decrement of X-Y shear loading the deformation decreases obviously where the maximal Mises stress in Z-direction at 0.45 m distance is in the range from 24 to 10 MPa and the maximal shear stress at 0.61 m distance is within the range from 0.9 to 0.3 MPa. In addition, all the stresses determined were clearly below the yield strength of CNTs/UHMWPE composites under extensional-shear couple loading.

  18. The effect of light level, CO2 flow rate, and anesthesia on the stress response of mice during CO2 euthanasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, Karin; Ethun, Kelly; Taylor, Douglas K

    2016-09-21

    Euthanasia protocols are designed to mitigate the stress experienced by animals, and an environment that induces minimal stress helps achieve that goal. A protocol that is efficient and practical in a typical animal research facility is also important. Light intensity, isoflurane, and CO2 flow rate were studied for their impact on the stress response of mice during CO2 euthanasia. Behavior was observed and scored during euthanasia and serum corticosterone was measured immediately after death. Unsurprisingly, animals euthanized with a high-flow rate of CO2 became unconscious in the least amount of time, while animals euthanized with a low-flow rate required the most time to reach unconsciousness. There was a significant increase in anxious behaviors in animals in the isoflurane group (F1,12 = 6.67, P = 0.024), the high-flow rate CO2 group (F1,12 = 10.24, P = 0.007), and bright chamber group (F1,12 = 7.27, P = 0.019). Serum corticosterone was highest in the isoflurane group (124.72 ± 83.98 ng/ml), however there was no significant difference in corticosterone levels observed for the other study variables of light and flow-rate. A darkened chamber and low CO2 flow rates help to decrease stress experienced during CO2 euthanasia, while the use of isoflurane was observed to increase the stress response during euthanasia.

  19. Decontamination formulation with sorbent additive

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tucker; Mark D. , Comstock; Robert H.

    2007-10-16

    A decontamination formulation and method of making that neutralizes the adverse health effects of both chemical and biological compounds, especially chemical warfare (CW) and biological warfare (BW) agents, and toxic industrial chemicals. The formulation provides solubilizing compounds that serve to effectively render the chemical and biological compounds, particularly CW and BW compounds, susceptible to attack, and at least one reactive compound that serves to attack (and detoxify or kill) the compound. The formulation includes at least one solubilizing agent, a reactive compound, a bleaching activator, a sorbent additive, and water. The highly adsorbent, water-soluble sorbent additive (e.g., sorbitol or mannitol) is used to "dry out" one or more liquid ingredients, such as the liquid bleaching activator (e.g., propylene glycol diacetate or glycerol diacetate) and convert the activator into a dry, free-flowing powder that has an extended shelf life, and is more convenient to handle and mix in the field.

  20. Skin blood flow and local temperature independently modify sweat rate during passive heat stress in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wingo, Jonathan E; Low, David A; Keller, David M; Brothers, R Matthew; Shibasaki, Manabu; Crandall, Craig G

    2010-11-01

    Sweat rate (SR) is reduced in locally cooled skin, which may result from decreased temperature and/or parallel reductions in skin blood flow. The purpose of this study was to test the hypotheses that decreased skin blood flow and decreased local temperature each independently attenuate sweating. In protocols I and II, eight subjects rested supine while wearing a water-perfused suit for the control of whole body skin and internal temperatures. While 34°C water perfused the suit, four microdialysis membranes were placed in posterior forearm skin not covered by the suit to manipulate skin blood flow using vasoactive agents. Each site was instrumented for control of local temperature and measurement of local SR (capacitance hygrometry) and skin blood flow (laser-Doppler flowmetry). In protocol I, two sites received norepinephrine to reduce skin blood flow, while two sites received Ringer solution (control). All sites were maintained at 34°C. In protocol II, all sites received 28 mM sodium nitroprusside to equalize skin blood flow between sites before local cooling to 20°C (2 sites) or maintenance at 34°C (2 sites). In both protocols, individuals were then passively heated to increase core temperature ~1°C. Both decreased skin blood flow and decreased local temperature attenuated the slope of the SR to mean body temperature relationship (2.0 ± 1.2 vs. 1.0 ± 0.7 mg·cm(-2)·min(-1)·°C(-1) for the effect of decreased skin blood flow, P = 0.01; 1.2 ± 0.9 vs. 0.07 ± 0.05 mg·cm(-2)·min(-1)·°C(-1) for the effect of decreased local temperature, P = 0.02). Furthermore, local cooling delayed the onset of sweating (mean body temperature of 37.5 ± 0.4 vs. 37.6 ± 0.4°C, P = 0.03). These data demonstrate that local cooling attenuates sweating by independent effects of decreased skin blood flow and decreased local skin temperature.

  1. Stress degradation studies and development of stability-indicating TLC-densitometry method for determination of prednisolone acetate and chloramphenicol in their individual and combined pharmaceutical formulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Musharraf Syed

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract A rapid and reproducible stability indicating TLC method was developed for the determination of prednisolone acetate and chloramphenicol in presence of their degraded products. Uniform degradation conditions were maintained by refluxing sixteen reaction mixtures for two hours at 80°C using parallel synthesizer including acidic, alkaline and neutral hydrolysis, oxidation and wet heating degradation. Oxidation at room temperature, photochemical and dry heating degradation studies were also carried out. Separation was done on TLC glass plates, pre-coated with silica gel 60F-254 using chloroform: methanol (14:1 v/v. Spots at Rf 0.21 ± 0.02 and Rf 0.41 ± 0.03 were recognized as chloramphenicol and prednisolone acetate, respectively. Quantitative analysis was done through densitometric measurements at multiwavelength (243 nm, λmax of prednisolone acetate and 278 nm, λmax of chloramphenicol, simultaneously. The developed method was optimized and validated as per ICH guidelines. Method was found linear over the concentration range of 200-6000 ng/spot with the correlation coefficient (r2 ± S.D. of 0.9976 ± 3.5 and 0.9920 ± 2.5 for prednisolone acetate and chloramphenicol, respectively. The developed TLC method can be applied for routine analysis of prednisolone acetate and chloramphenicol in presence of their degraded products in their individual and combined pharmaceutical formulations.

  2. Parametric study of irradiation effects on the ductile damage and flow stress behavior in ferritic-martensitic steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chakraborty, Pritam; Biner, S.Bulent

    2015-01-01

    Ferritic-martensitic steels are currently being considered as structural materials in fusion and Gen-IV nuclear reactors. These materials are expected to experience high dose radiation, which can increase their ductile to brittle transition temperature and susceptibility to failure during operation. Hence, to estimate the safe operational life of the reactors, precise evaluation of the ductile to brittle transition temperatures of ferritic-martensitic steels is necessary. Owing to the scarcity of irradiated samples, particularly at high dose levels, micro-mechanistic models are being employed to predict the shifts in the ductile to brittle transition temperatures. These models consider the ductile damage evolution, in the form of nucleation, growth and coalescence of voids; and the brittle fracture, in the form of probabilistic cleavage initiation, to estimate the influence of irradiation on the ductile to brittle transition temperature. However, the assessment of irradiation dependent material parameters is challenging and influences the accuracy of these models. In the present study, the effects of irradiation on the overall flow stress and ductile damage behavior of two ferritic-martensitic steels is parametrically investigated. The results indicate that the ductile damage model parameters are mostly insensitive to irradiation levels at higher dose levels though the resulting flow stress behavior varies significantly.

  3. Stress

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Keller, Hanne Dauer

    2015-01-01

    Kapitlet handler om stress som følelse, og det trækker primært på de få kvalitative undersøgelser, der er lavet af stressforløb.......Kapitlet handler om stress som følelse, og det trækker primært på de få kvalitative undersøgelser, der er lavet af stressforløb....

  4. Stress !!!

    OpenAIRE

    Fledderus, M.

    2012-01-01

    Twee op de vijf UT-studenten hebben last van ernstige studiestress, zo erg zelfs dat het ze in hun privéleven belemmert. Die cijfers komen overeen met het landelijk beeld van stress onder studenten. Samen met 14 andere universiteits- en hogeschoolbladen enquêteerde UT Nieuws bijna 5500 studenten. Opvallend is dat mannelijke studenten uit Twente zich veel minder druk lijken te maken over hun studie. Onder vrouwen ligt de stress juist erg hoog ten opzichte van het landelijk gemiddelde.

  5. Influence of Sewer Sediments on Flow Friction and Shear Stress Distribution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Perrusquia, G.; Petersen, O.; Larsen, Torben

    1995-01-01

    Most sewers contain more or less deposited sediments. The paper discusses the distribution of the boundary shear stresses and the hydraulic resistance in part-full sewer pipes with such deposited sediments. The discussion is based on a series of numerical experiments using a validated numerical...

  6. Coupled ADCPs can yield complete Reynolds stress tensor profiles in geophysical surface flows

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vermeulen, B.; Hoitink, A.J.F.; Sassi, M.G.

    2011-01-01

    We introduce a new technique to measure profiles of each term in the Reynolds stress tensor using coupled acoustic Doppler current profilers (ADCPs). The technique is based on the variance method which is extended to the case with eight acoustic beams. Methods to analyze turbulence from a single

  7. Analysis of heat transfer and stress in the pipe with hot fluid flowing through

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Charoensri, Apisara; Pichestapong, Pipat; Rodthongkom, Chouvana

    2003-10-01

    At incomplete mixing area of high temperature and low temperature liquid near the surface of structures, temperature fluctuation of liquid gives thermal fatigue damage to wall structure. This phenomenon is called thermal striping. For designing of piping system, it is important to know thermal stresses of structure due to heat convection. In this study, authors proposed a simplified evaluation method to predict thermal stress from temperature fluctuation, for rational design against thermal striping. It is required to estimate structural responses to temperature fluctuation of fluid. The attenuation process is a thermal coupling problem between fluids and structures and has a sensitive characteristics to frequencies of temperature fluctuations were analyzed by FINAS, which is a computer program based on the finite element method by comparisons of theoretical method. When the inner surface of the pipe is due to heat convection of contained fluid with sinusoidal temperature fluctuation and the outer surface is kept insulated, temperature distribution of structure is analyzed by solving the equation of transient heat conduction. From these temperature distributions, induced thermal stresses in the structure are calculated by thermal elastic analysis. Frequency response characteristics of structures and its mechanism were investigated by both numerical and theoretical methods. Based on above investigation, a structural response diagram was derived, which can predict stress amplitude of structures from temperature amplitude and frequency of fluids

  8. Skin blood flow and local temperature independently modify sweat rate during passive heat stress in humans

    OpenAIRE

    Wingo, Jonathan E.; Low, David A.; Keller, David M.; Brothers, R. Matthew; Shibasaki, Manabu; Crandall, Craig G.

    2010-01-01

    Sweat rate (SR) is reduced in locally cooled skin, which may result from decreased temperature and/or parallel reductions in skin blood flow. The purpose of this study was to test the hypotheses that decreased skin blood flow and decreased local temperature each independently attenuate sweating. In protocols I and II, eight subjects rested supine while wearing a water-perfused suit for the control of whole body skin and internal temperatures. While 34°C water perfused the suit, four microdial...

  9. Coronary Computed Tomography Angiography Derived Fractional Flow Reserve and Plaque Stress

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørgaard, Bjarne Linde; Leipsic, Jonathon; Koo, Bon-Kwon

    2016-01-01

    Fractional flow reserve (FFR) measured during invasive coronary angiography is an independent prognosticator in patients with coronary artery disease and the gold standard for decision making in coronary revascularization. The integration of computational fluid dynamics and quantitative anatomic...... and physiologic modeling now enables simulation of patient-specific hemodynamic parameters including blood velocity, pressure, pressure gradients, and FFR from standard acquired coronary computed tomography (CT) datasets. In this review article, we describe the potential impact on clinical practice...... and the science behind noninvasive coronary computed tomography (CT) angiography derived fractional flow reserve (FFRCT) as well as future applications of this technology in treatment planning and quantifying forces on atherosclerotic plaques....

  10. A multi-component parallel-plate flow chamber system for studying the effect of exercise-induced wall shear stress on endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yan-Xia; Xiang, Cheng; Liu, Bo; Zhu, Yong; Luan, Yong; Liu, Shu-Tian; Qin, Kai-Rong

    2016-12-28

    In vivo studies have demonstrated that reasonable exercise training can improve endothelial function. To confirm the key role of wall shear stress induced by exercise on endothelial cells, and to understand how wall shear stress affects the structure and the function of endothelial cells, it is crucial to design and fabricate an in vitro multi-component parallel-plate flow chamber system which can closely replicate exercise-induced wall shear stress waveforms in artery. The in vivo wall shear stress waveforms from the common carotid artery of a healthy volunteer in resting and immediately after 30 min acute aerobic cycling exercise were first calculated by measuring the inner diameter and the center-line blood flow velocity with a color Doppler ultrasound. According to the above in vivo wall shear stress waveforms, we designed and fabricated a parallel-plate flow chamber system with appropriate components based on a lumped parameter hemodynamics model. To validate the feasibility of this system, human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) line were cultured within the parallel-plate flow chamber under abovementioned two types of wall shear stress waveforms and the intracellular actin microfilaments and nitric oxide (NO) production level were evaluated using fluorescence microscope. Our results show that the trends of resting and exercise-induced wall shear stress waveforms, especially the maximal, minimal and mean wall shear stress as well as oscillatory shear index, generated by the parallel-plate flow chamber system are similar to those acquired from the common carotid artery. In addition, the cellular experiments demonstrate that the actin microfilaments and the production of NO within cells exposed to the two different wall shear stress waveforms exhibit different dynamic behaviors; there are larger numbers of actin microfilaments and higher level NO in cells exposed in exercise-induced wall shear stress condition than resting wall shear stress condition

  11. Constitutive Modeling of the Flow Stress of GCr15 Continuous Casting Bloom in the Heavy Reduction Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Cheng; Wang, Zilin; Wu, Chenhui; Zhu, Miaoyong

    2018-04-01

    According to the calculation results of a 3D thermomechanical-coupled finite-element (FE) model of GCr15 bearing steel bloom during a heavy reduction (HR) process, the variation ranges in the strain rate and strain under HR were described. In addition, the hot deformation behavior of the GCr15 bearing steel was studied over the temperature range from 1023 K to 1573 K (750 °C to 1300 °C) with strain rates of 0.001, 0.01, and 0.1 s-1 in single-pass thermosimulation compression experiments. To ensure the accuracy of the constitutive model, the temperature range was divided into two temperature intervals according to the fully austenitic temperature of GCr15 steel [1173 K (900 °C)]. Two sets of material parameters for the constitutive model were derived based on the true stress-strain curves of the two temperature intervals. A flow stress constitutive model was established using a revised Arrhenius-type constitutive equation, which considers the relationships among the material parameters and true strain. This equation describes dynamic softening during hot compression processes. Considering the effect of glide and climb on the deformation mechanism, the Arrhenius-type constitutive equation was modified by a physically based approach. This model is the most accurate over the temperatures ranging from 1173 K to 1573 K (900 °C to 1300 °C) under HR deformation conditions (ignoring the range from 1273 K to 1573 K (1000 °C to 1300 °C) with a strain rate of 0.1 s-1). To ensure the convergence of the FE calculation, an approximated method was used to estimate the flow stress at temperatures greater than 1573 K (1300 °C).

  12. Approximate solution of oil film load-carrying capacity of turbulent journal bearing with couple stress flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yongfang; Wu, Peng; Guo, Bo; Lü, Yanjun; Liu, Fuxi; Yu, Yingtian

    2015-01-01

    The instability of the rotor dynamic system supported by oil journal bearing is encountered frequently, such as the half-speed whirl of the rotor, which is caused by oil film lubricant with nonlinearity. Currently, more attention is paid to the physical characteristics of oil film due to an oil-lubricated journal bearing being the important supporting component of the bearing-rotor systems and its nonlinear nature. In order to analyze the lubrication characteristics of journal bearings efficiently and save computational efforts, an approximate solution of nonlinear oil film forces of a finite length turbulent journal bearing with couple stress flow is proposed based on Sommerfeld and Ocvirk numbers. Reynolds equation in lubrication of a finite length turbulent journal bearing is solved based on multi-parametric principle. Load-carrying capacity of nonlinear oil film is obtained, and the results obtained by different methods are compared. The validation of the proposed method is verified, meanwhile, the relationships of load-carrying capacity versus eccentricity ratio and width-to-diameter ratio under turbulent and couple stress working conditions are analyzed. The numerical results show that both couple stress flow and eccentricity ratio have obvious influence on oil film pressure distribution, and the proposed method approximates the load-carrying capacity of turbulent journal bearings efficiently with various width-to-diameter ratios. This research proposes an approximate solution of oil film load-carrying capacity of turbulent journal bearings with different width-to-diameter ratios, which are suitable for high eccentricity ratios and heavy loads.

  13. Parallel simulation of two-phase incompressible and immiscible flows in porous media using a finite volume formulation and a modified IMPES approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Da Silva, R S; De Carvalho, D K E; Antunes, A R E; Lyra, P R M; Willmersdorf, R B

    2010-01-01

    In this paper a finite volume method with a 'Modified Implicit Pressure, Explicit Saturation' (MIMPES) approach is used to model the 3-D incompressible and immiscible two-phase flow of water and oil in heterogeneous and anisotropic porous media. A vertex centered finite volume method with an edge-based data structure is adopted to discretize both the elliptic pressure and the hyperbolic saturation equations using parallel computers with distributed memory. Due to the explicit solution of the saturation equation in the IMPES method, severe time step restrictions are imposed on the simulation. In order to circumvent this problem, an edge-based implementation of the MIMPES method was used. In this method, the pressure equation is solved and the velocity field is computed much less frequently than the saturation field. Following the work of Hurtado, a mean relative variation of the velocity field throughout the simulation is used to automatically control the updating process, allowing for much larger time-steps in a very simple way. In order to run large scale problems, we have developed a parallel implementation using clusters of PC's. The simulator uses open source parallel libraries like FMDB, ParMetis and PETSc. Results of speed-up and efficiency are presented to validate the performance of the parallel simulator.

  14. Normal stress differences from Oldroyd 8-constant framework: Exact analytical solution for large-amplitude oscillatory shear flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saengow, C.; Giacomin, A. J.

    2017-12-01

    The Oldroyd 8-constant framework for continuum constitutive theory contains a rich diversity of popular special cases for polymeric liquids. In this paper, we use part of our exact solution for shear stress to arrive at unique exact analytical solutions for the normal stress difference responses to large-amplitude oscillatory shear (LAOS) flow. The nonlinearity of the polymeric liquids, triggered by LAOS, causes these responses at even multiples of the test frequency. We call responses at a frequency higher than twice the test frequency higher harmonics. We find the new exact analytical solutions to be compact and intrinsically beautiful. These solutions reduce to those of our previous work on the special case of the corotational Maxwell fluid. Our solutions also agree with our new truncated Goddard integral expansion for the special case of the corotational Jeffreys fluid. The limiting behaviors of these exact solutions also yield new explicit expressions. Finally, we use our exact solutions to see how η∞ affects the normal stress differences in LAOS.

  15. An integrated workflow for stress and flow modelling using outcrop-derived discrete fracture networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bisdom, Kevin; Nick, Hamid; Bertotti, Giovanni

    2017-01-01

    stresssensitive fracture permeability and matrix flow to determine the full permeability tensor. The applicability of this workflow is illustrated using an outcropping carbonate pavement in the Potiguar basin in Brazil, from which 1082 fractures are digitised. The permeability tensor for a range of matrix...

  16. Stress and neutron scattering measurements on linear polymer melts undergoing steady elongational flow

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hassager, Ole; Mortensen, Kell; Bach, Anders

    2012-01-01

    We use small-angle neutron scattering to measure the molecular stretching in polystyrene melts undergoing steady elongational flow at large stretch rates. The radius of gyration of the central segment of a partly deuterated polystyrene molecule is, in the stretching direction, increasing...... exhibited by the linear polystyrene melt....

  17. 3D time-dependent flow computations using a molecular stress function model with constraint release

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Henrik Koblitz

    2002-01-01

    The numerical simulation of time dependent viscoelastic flow (in three dimensions) is of interest in connection with a variety of polymer processing operations. The application of the numerical simulation techniques is in the analysis and design of polymer processing problems. This is operations,......, such as thermoforming, blow moulding, compression moulding, gas-assisted injection moulding, simultaneous multi-component injection moulding....

  18. Flow stress and dynamic strain-ageing of β-transformed Zircaloy-4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woo, O.T.; Tseng, D.; Tangri, K.; MacEwen, S.R.

    1979-01-01

    The 0.2% yield stress of β-transformed Zircaloy-4 was found to be independent of prior-β grain size but varied as the inverse of the transformed β plate width. A dislocation loop expansion model originally proposed by Langford and Cohen (1969) for cold-drawn iron wires is used to explain the inverse plate width dependence. Both air-cooled and water-quenched samples exhibited dynamic strain-ageing effects in approximately the same temperature range of 573 to 673 K: (a) a local minimum in strain-rate sensitivity is associated with a peak or an inflection point in the temperature dependence of the 0.2% yield stress for water-quenched or air-cooled samples respectively, and (b) yield drops were observed in strain rate change tests. (Auth.)

  19. Conflicting deductions from machining and other tests, concerning flow stress at high strain rates and temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Childs, T.H.C.

    1974-01-01

    This paper is concerned with the friction interaction between an En1A chip and a cemented tungsten--titanium carbide cutting tool during turning En1A on a lathe at speeds between 0.25 and 7.5 m s -1 and at feeds of 0.13 and 0.26 mm rev -1 . The mean friction stress has been measured and deductions made from chip shape measurements about the variation of the friction stress over the rake face. Three regimes of continuous chip formation were seen. In the first, the mean friction stress was independent of strain rate and temperature, in the second it depended on temperature and in the third, at the highest cutting speeds, it depended on temperature and feed. In the third regime, softening of the chip material caused by frictional heating limited the friction force, but the softening temperature depended on the heating rate of the chip material. Softening occurred at 700 0 C when the rate of heating from room temperature was 5.4 x 10 5 0 C s -1 and at 1160 0 C when the rate was 1.7 x 10 7 0 C s -1 . (U.S.)

  20. Shock, stress or signal? Implications of freshwater flows for a top-level estuarine predator.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew D Taylor

    Full Text Available Physicochemical variability in estuarine systems plays an important role in estuarine processes and in the lifecycles of estuarine organisms. In particular, seasonality of freshwater inflow to estuaries may be important in various aspects of fish lifecycles. This study aimed to further understand these relationships by studying the movements of a top-level estuarine predator in response to physicochemical variability in a large, temperate south-east Australian estuary (Shoalhaven River. Mulloway (Argyrosomus japonicus, 47-89 cm total length were surgically implanted with acoustic transmitters, and their movements and migrations monitored over two years via fixed-position VR2W acoustic receivers configured in a linear array along the length of the estuary. The study period included a high degree of abiotic variability, with multiple pulses (exponentially high flows over a short period of time in fresh water to the estuary, as well as broader seasonal variation in flow, temperature and conductivity. The relative deviation of fish from their modal location in the estuary was affected primarily by changes in conductivity, and smaller fish (n = 4 tended to deviate much further downstream from their modal position in the estuary than larger fish (n = 8. High-flow events which coincided with warmer temperatures tended to drive mature fish down the estuary and potentially provided a spawning signal to stimulate aggregation of adults near the estuary mouth; however, this relationship requires further investigation. These findings indicate that pulse and press effects of freshwater inflow and associated physicochemical variability play a role in the movements of mulloway, and that seasonality of large freshwater flows may be important in spawning. The possible implications of river regulation and the extraction of freshwater for consumptive uses on estuarine fishes are discussed.

  1. Stress !!!

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fledderus, M.

    2012-01-01

    Twee op de vijf UT-studenten hebben last van ernstige studiestress, zo erg zelfs dat het ze in hun privéleven belemmert. Die cijfers komen overeen met het landelijk beeld van stress onder studenten. Samen met 14 andere universiteits- en hogeschoolbladen enquêteerde UT Nieuws bijna 5500 studenten.

  2. Electromagnetic energy density and stress tensor in a warm plasma with finite flow velocity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Cheong R.; Lee, Nam C.

    2004-01-01

    The expressions of the average of energy density and the average stress tensor of the electromagnetic field in a warm collisionless plasma moving with a finite velocity are obtained by using a microscopic method that uses the fluid description of plasma. The result contains terms involved with derivatives of the dielectric tensor with respect to the velocity, which explicitly represent the effects of the finite velocity of the medium. In the zero-velocity limit, the results reduce to the well-known expressions for a plasma at rest with temporal and spatial dispersion

  3. Regulating the Flow of Change to Reduce Fontline Nurse Stress and Burnout.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koppel, Jenna; Virkstis, Katherine; Strumwasser, Sarah; Katz, Marie; Boston-Fleischhauer, Carol

    2015-11-01

    The nursing workforce is at the center of many changes associated with care delivery transformation. To achieve this transformation, frontline nursing staff must be engaged in their work, committed to their organization's mission, and capable of delivering high-quality care. To identify top opportunities for driving nursing engagement, researchers from The Advisory Board Company analyzed engagement survey responses from more than 343 000 employees at 575 healthcare organizations. In this article, the authors describe 3 strategies for addressing 1 of the greatest opportunities for improving nurse engagement: ensuring nurses feel their organization helps them reduce stress and burnout.

  4. Turbulent Bubbly Flow in a Vertical Pipe Computed By an Eddy-Resolving Reynolds Stress Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-09-19

    the numerical code OpenFOAM R©. 1 Introduction Turbulent bubbly flows are encountered in many industrially relevant applications, such as chemical in...performed using the OpenFOAM -2.2.2 computational code utilizing a cell- center-based finite volume method on an unstructured numerical grid. The...the mean Courant number is always below 0.4. The utilized turbulence models were implemented into the so-called twoPhaseEulerFoam solver in OpenFOAM , to

  5. Modelling the Flow Stress of Alloy 316L using a Multi-Layered Feed Forward Neural Network with Bayesian Regularization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abiriand Bhekisipho Twala, Olufunminiyi

    2017-08-01

    In this paper, a multilayer feedforward neural network with Bayesian regularization constitutive model is developed for alloy 316L during high strain rate and high temperature plastic deformation. The input variables are strain rate, temperature and strain while the output value is the flow stress of the material. The results show that the use of Bayesian regularized technique reduces the potential of overfitting and overtraining. The prediction quality of the model is thereby improved. The model predictions are in good agreement with experimental measurements. The measurement data used for the network training and model comparison were taken from relevant literature. The developed model is robust as it can be generalized to deformation conditions slightly below or above the training dataset.

  6. Using an equation based on flow stress to estimate structural integrity of annealed Type 304 stainless steel plate and pipes containing surface defects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reuter, W.G.; Place, T.A.

    1981-01-01

    An accurate assessment of the influence of defects on structural component integrity is needed. Generally accepted analytical techniques are not available for the very ductile materials used in many nuclear reactor components. Some results are presented from a test programme to obtain data by which to evaluate proposed models. Plate and pipe specimens containing surface flaws were fabricated from annealed Type 304 stainless steel and tested at room temperature. An evaluation of an empirical equation based on flow stress is presented. In essentially all instances the flow stress is not a constant but varies as a function of the size of the surface flaw. (author)

  7. Numerical Evaluation and Optimization of Multiple Hydraulically Fractured Parameters Using a Flow-Stress-Damage Coupled Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Wang

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Multiple-factor analysis and optimization play a critical role in the the ability to maximizethe stimulated reservoir volume (SRV and the success of economic shale gas production. In this paper, taking the typical continental naturally fractured silty laminae shale in China as anexample, response surface methodology (RSM was employed to optimize multiple hydraulic fracturing parameters to maximize the stimulated area in combination with numerical modeling based on the coupled flow-stress-damage (FSD approach. This paper demonstrates hydraulic fracturing effectiveness by defining two indicesnamelythe stimulated reservoir area (SRA and stimulated silty laminae area (SLA. Seven uncertain parameters, such as laminae thickness, spacing, dip angle, cohesion, internal friction angle (IFA, in situ stress difference (SD, and an operational parameter-injection rate (IR with a reasonable range based on silty Laminae Shale, Southeastern Ordos Basin, are used to fit a response of SRA and SLA as the objective function, and finally identity the optimum design under the parameters based on simultaneously maximizingSRA and SLA. In addition, asensitivity analysis of the influential factors is conducted for SRA and SLA. The aim of the study is to improve the artificial ability to control the fracturing network by means of multi-parameteroptimization. This work promises to provide insights into the effective exploitation of unconventional shale gas reservoirs via optimization of the fracturing design for continental shale, Southeastern Ordos Basin, China.

  8. Flow under standing waves Part 1. Shear stress distribution, energy flux and steady streaming

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gislason, Kjartan; Fredsøe, Jørgen; Deigaard, Rolf

    2009-01-01

    The conditions for energy flux, momentum flux and the resulting streaming velocity are analysed for standing waves formed in front of a fully reflecting wall. The exchange of energy between the outer wave motion and the near bed oscillatory boundary layer is considered, determining the horizontal...... energy flux inside and outside the boundary layer. The momentum balance, the mean shear stress and the resulting time averaged streaming velocities are determined. For a laminar bed boundary layer the analysis of the wave drift gives results similar to the original work of Longuet-Higgins from 1953......-dimensional simulations of standing waves have also been made by application of a general purpose Navier-Stokes solver. The results agree well with those obtained by the boundary layer analysis. Wave reflection from a plane sloping wall is also investigated by using the same numerical model and by physical laboratory...

  9. Heat transfer, velocity-temperature correlation, and turbulent shear stress from Navier-Stokes computations of shock wave/turbulent boundary layer interaction flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, C. R.; Hingst, W. R.; Porro, A. R.

    1991-01-01

    The properties of 2-D shock wave/turbulent boundary layer interaction flows were calculated by using a compressible turbulent Navier-Stokes numerical computational code. Interaction flows caused by oblique shock wave impingement on the turbulent boundary layer flow were considered. The oblique shock waves were induced with shock generators at angles of attack less than 10 degs in supersonic flows. The surface temperatures were kept at near-adiabatic (ratio of wall static temperature to free stream total temperature) and cold wall (ratio of wall static temperature to free stream total temperature) conditions. The computational results were studied for the surface heat transfer, velocity temperature correlation, and turbulent shear stress in the interaction flow fields. Comparisons of the computational results with existing measurements indicated that (1) the surface heat transfer rates and surface pressures could be correlated with Holden's relationship, (2) the mean flow streamwise velocity components and static temperatures could be correlated with Crocco's relationship if flow separation did not occur, and (3) the Baldwin-Lomax turbulence model should be modified for turbulent shear stress computations in the interaction flows.

  10. Reynolds stress scaling in pipe flow turbulence-first results from CICLoPE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Örlü, R; Fiorini, T; Segalini, A; Bellani, G; Talamelli, A; Alfredsson, P H

    2017-03-13

    This paper reports the first turbulence measurements performed in the Long Pipe Facility at the Center for International Cooperation in Long Pipe Experiments (CICLoPE). In particular, the Reynolds stress components obtained from a number of straight and boundary-layer-type single-wire and X-wire probes up to a friction Reynolds number of 3.8×10 4 are reported. In agreement with turbulent boundary-layer experiments as well as with results from the Superpipe, the present measurements show a clear logarithmic region in the streamwise variance profile, with a Townsend-Perry constant of A 2 ≈1.26. The wall-normal variance profile exhibits a Reynolds-number-independent plateau, while the spanwise component was found to obey a logarithmic scaling over a much wider wall-normal distance than the other two components, with a slope that is nearly half of that of the Townsend-Perry constant, i.e. A 2,w ≈A 2 /2. The present results therefore provide strong support for the scaling of the Reynolds stress tensor based on the attached-eddy hypothesis. Intriguingly, the wall-normal and spanwise components exhibit higher amplitudes than in previous studies, and therefore call for follow-up studies in CICLoPE, as well as other large-scale facilities.This article is part of the themed issue 'Toward the development of high-fidelity models of wall turbulence at large Reynolds number'. © 2017 The Author(s).

  11. Optimization of VPSC Model Parameters for Two-Phase Titanium Alloys: Flow Stress Vs Orientation Distribution Function Metrics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, V. M.; Semiatin, S. L.; Szczepanski, C.; Pilchak, A. L.

    2018-06-01

    The ability to predict the evolution of crystallographic texture during hot work of titanium alloys in the α + β temperature regime is greatly significant to numerous engineering disciplines; however, research efforts are complicated by the rapid changes in phase volume fractions and flow stresses with temperature in addition to topological considerations. The viscoplastic self-consistent (VPSC) polycrystal plasticity model is employed to simulate deformation in the two phase field. Newly developed parameter selection schemes utilizing automated optimization based on two different error metrics are considered. In the first optimization scheme, which is commonly used in the literature, the VPSC parameters are selected based on the quality of fit between experiment and simulated flow curves at six hot-working temperatures. Under the second newly developed scheme, parameters are selected to minimize the difference between the simulated and experimentally measured α textures after accounting for the β → α transformation upon cooling. It is demonstrated that both methods result in good qualitative matches for the experimental α phase texture, but texture-based optimization results in a substantially better quantitative orientation distribution function match.

  12. Increased oxidative stress and severe arterial remodeling induced by permanent high-flow challenge in experimental pulmonary hypertension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fadel Elie

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Involvement of inflammation in pulmonary hypertension (PH has previously been demonstrated and recently, immune-modulating dendritic cells (DCs infiltrating arterial lesions in patients suffering from idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension (IPAH and in experimental monocrotaline-induced PH have been reported. Occurrence of perivascular inflammatory cells could be linked to local increase of oxidative stress (OS, as it has been shown for systemic atherosclerosis. The impact of OS on vascular remodeling in PH is still to be determined. We hypothesized, that augmented blood-flow could increase OS and might thereby contribute to DC/inflammatory cell-recruitment and smooth-muscle-cell-proliferation. Methods We applied a monocrotaline-induced PH-model and combined it with permanent flow-challenge. Thirty Sprague-Dawley rats were assigned to following groups: control, monocrotaline-exposure (MCT, monocrotaline-exposure/pneumonectomy (MCT/PE. Results Hemodynamic exploration demonstrated most severe effects in MCT/PE, corresponding in histology to exuberant medial and adventitial remodeling of pulmonary muscular arteries, and intimal remodeling of smaller arterioles; lung-tissue PCR evidenced increased expression of DCs-specific fascin, CD68, proinflammatory cytokines (IL-6, RANTES, fractalkine in MCT/PE and to a lesser extent in MCT. Major OS enzyme NOX-4 was maximal in MCT/PE. Antioxidative stress enzymes Mn-SOD and glutathion-peroxidase-1 were significantly elevated, while HO-1 showed maximal expression in MCT with significant decrease in MCT/PE. Catalase was decreased in MCT and MCT/PE. Expression of NOX-4, but also of MN-SOD in MCT/PE was mainly attributed to a highly increased number of interstitial and perivascular CXCR4/SDF1 pathway-recruited mast-cells. Stress markers malonedialdehyde and nitrotyrosine were produced in endothelial cells, medial smooth muscle and perivascular leucocytes of hypertensive vasculature

  13. Cyclic electron flow may provide some protection against PSII photoinhibition in rice (Oryza sativa L.) leaves under heat stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Essemine, Jemaa; Xiao, Yi; Qu, Mingnan; Mi, Hualing; Zhu, Xin-Guang

    2017-04-01

    Previously we have shown that a quick down-regulation in PSI activity compares to that of PSII following short-term heat stress for two rice groups including C4023 and Q4149, studied herein. These accessions were identified to have different natural capacities in driving cyclic electron flow (CEF) around PSI; i.e., low CEF (lcef) and high CEF (hcef) for C4023 and Q4149, respectively. The aim of this study was to investigate whether these two lines have different mechanisms of protecting photosystem II from photodamage under heat stress. We observed a stepwise alteration in the shape of Chl a fluorescence induction (OJIP) with increasing temperature treatment. The effect of 44°C treatment on the damping in Chl a fluorescence was more pronounced in C4023 than in Q4149. Likewise, we noted a disruption in the I-step, a decline in the F v due to a strong damping in the F m , and a slight increase in the F 0 . Normalized data demonstrated that the I-step seems more susceptible to 44°C in C4023 than in Q4149. We also measured the redox states of plastocyanin (PC) and P 700 by monitoring the transmission changes at 820nm (I 820 ), and observed a disturbance in the oxidation/reduction kinetics of PC and P 700 . The decline in the amplitude of their oxidation was shown to be about 29% and 13% for C4023 and Q4149, respectively. The electropotential component (Δφ) of ms-DLE appeared more sensitive to temperature stress than the chemical component (ΔpH), and the impact of heat was more evident and drastic in C4023 than in Q4149. Under heat stress, we noticed a concomitant decline in the primary photochemistry of PSII as well as in both the membrane energization process and the lumen protonation for both accessions, and it is evident that heat affects these parameters more in C4023 than in Q4149. All these data suggest that higher CET can confer higher photoprotection to PSII in rice lines, which can be a desirable trait during rice breeding, especially in the context of a

  14. Stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chambers, David W

    2008-01-01

    We all experience stress as a regular, and sometimes damaging and sometimes useful, part of our daily lives. In our normal ups and downs, we have our share of exhaustion, despondency, and outrage--matched with their corresponding positive moods. But burnout and workaholism are different. They are chronic, dysfunctional, self-reinforcing, life-shortening habits. Dentists, nurses, teachers, ministers, social workers, and entertainers are especially susceptible to burnout; not because they are hard-working professionals (they tend to be), but because they are caring perfectionists who share control for the success of what they do with others and perform under the scrutiny of their colleagues (they tend to). Workaholics are also trapped in self-sealing cycles, but the elements are ever-receding visions of control and using constant activity as a barrier against facing reality. This essay explores the symptoms, mechanisms, causes, and successful coping strategies for burnout and workaholism. It also takes a look at the general stress response on the physiological level and at some of the damage American society inflicts on itself.

  15. Age-related changes in aortic 3D blood flow velocities and wall shear stress: Implications for the identification of altered hemodynamics in patients with aortic valve disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Ooij, Pim; Garcia, Julio; Potters, Wouter V.; Malaisrie, S. Chris; Collins, Jeremy D.; Carr, James C.; Markl, Michael; Barker, Alex J.

    2016-01-01

    To investigate age-related changes in peak systolic aortic 3D velocity and wall shear stress (WSS) in healthy controls and to investigate the importance of age-matching for 3D mapping of abnormal aortic hemodynamics in bicuspid aortic valve disease (BAV). 4D flow MRI (fields strengths = 1.5-3T;

  16. Hot ductility and flow stress of AISI 4130 and 52100-type steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barbier, Damien [Vallourec Research Center France, F-59620 Aulnoye-Aymeries (France); Guérin, Jean-Dominique, E-mail: jean-dominique.guerin@univ-valenciennes.fr [UVHC, LAMIH UMR CNRS 8201, F-59313 Valenciennes (France); Univ Lille Nord de France, F-59000 Lille (France); Dubar, Mirentxu [UVHC, LAMIH UMR CNRS 8201, F-59313 Valenciennes (France); Univ Lille Nord de France, F-59000 Lille (France); Bénard, Thierry; Bonneau, Sébastien [Vallourec Research Center France, F-59620 Aulnoye-Aymeries (France); Cabrera, Eli Saùl Puchi [School of Metallurgical Engineering and Materials Science, Universidad Central de Venezuela (Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of)

    2017-04-06

    The present communication reports the main findings of an investigation that has been conducted in order to examine the ductility of both the AISI 4130 and 52100 steel grades, in a wide range of temperatures, spanning from room temperature up to 1250 °C, deformed in tension at strain rates of approximately 0.005 s{sup −1}. The ductility of the investigated alloys has been determined employing two different methodologies. The first one is based on the classical definition of this property, as determined from the reduction in the cross sectional area of the tensile specimen after fracture. The second method, which is proposed in this work, is based on the measurement of the energy under the engineering stress-strain curve and the decomposition of the total deformation energy into the uniform plastic and non-uniform or fracture energy components. Complementary axisymmetric compression tests have also been carried out in the temperature range of 600 °Cto 900 °C, in order to determine the strain related to the onset of dynamic recrystallization (DRX) at temperatures above 800 °C, as well as the strain corresponding to the occurrence of necking at these temperatures. The ductility values determined from both methods are observed to increase from approximately 10–80% when the testing temperature increases from room temperature to 1200 °C. Both measurements are also observed to agree up to temperatures of about 600 °C. Also, it has been determined that above this temperature, the ductility values derived from the energy criterion are somewhat higher than those computed from the reduction in the cross section area of the specimens. It has been shown that the onset of DRX gives rise to an improvement in the ductility of both steels, which is also related to a significant increase in the strain for the beginning of necking. The advantage of the energy criterion, in comparison with that based on the area reduction after fracture, is discussed.

  17. Hypoxic Air Inhalation and Ischemia Interventions Both Elicit Preconditioning Which Attenuate Subsequent Cellular Stress In vivo Following Blood Flow Occlusion and Reperfusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrington, James H; Chrismas, Bryna C R; Gibson, Oliver R; Tuttle, James; Pegrum, J; Govilkar, S; Kabir, Chindu; Giannakakis, N; Rayan, F; Okasheh, Z; Sanaullah, A; Ng Man Sun, S; Pearce, Oliver; Taylor, Lee

    2017-01-01

    Ischemic preconditioning (IPC) is valid technique which elicits reductions in femoral blood flow occlusion mediated reperfusion stress (oxidative stress, Hsp gene transcripts) within the systemic blood circulation and/or skeletal muscle. It is unknown whether systemic hypoxia, evoked by hypoxic preconditioning (HPC) has efficacy in priming the heat shock protein (Hsp) system thus reducing reperfusion stress following blood flow occlusion, in the same manner as IPC. The comparison between IPC and HPC being relevant as a preconditioning strategy prior to orthopedic surgery. In an independent group design, 18 healthy men were exposed to 40 min of (1) passive whole-body HPC (FiO 2 = 0.143; no ischemia. N = 6), (2) IPC (FiO 2 = 0.209; four bouts of 5 min ischemia and 5 min reperfusion. n = 6), or (3) rest (FiO 2 = 0.209; no ischemia. n = 6). The interventions were administered 1 h prior to 30 min of tourniquet derived femoral blood flow occlusion and were followed by 2 h subsequent reperfusion. Systemic blood samples were taken pre- and post-intervention. Systemic blood and gastrocnemius skeletal muscle samples were obtained pre-, 15 min post- (15PoT) and 120 min (120PoT) post-tourniquet deflation. To determine the cellular stress response gastrocnemius and leukocyte Hsp72 mRNA and Hsp32 mRNA gene transcripts were determined by RT-qPCR. The plasma oxidative stress response (protein carbonyl, reduced glutathione/oxidized glutathione ratio) was measured utilizing commercially available kits. In comparison to control, at 15PoT a significant difference in gastrocnemius Hsp72 mRNA was seen in HPC (-1.93-fold; p = 0.007) and IPC (-1.97-fold; p = 0.006). No significant differences were observed in gastrocnemius Hsp32 and Hsp72 mRNA, leukocyte Hsp72 and Hsp32 mRNA, or oxidative stress markers ( p > 0.05) between HPC and IPC. HPC provided near identical amelioration of blood flow occlusion mediated gastrocnemius stress response (Hsp72 mRNA), compared to an established IPC

  18. Hypoxic Air Inhalation and Ischemia Interventions Both Elicit Preconditioning Which Attenuate Subsequent Cellular Stress In vivo Following Blood Flow Occlusion and Reperfusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James H. Barrington

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Ischemic preconditioning (IPC is valid technique which elicits reductions in femoral blood flow occlusion mediated reperfusion stress (oxidative stress, Hsp gene transcripts within the systemic blood circulation and/or skeletal muscle. It is unknown whether systemic hypoxia, evoked by hypoxic preconditioning (HPC has efficacy in priming the heat shock protein (Hsp system thus reducing reperfusion stress following blood flow occlusion, in the same manner as IPC. The comparison between IPC and HPC being relevant as a preconditioning strategy prior to orthopedic surgery. In an independent group design, 18 healthy men were exposed to 40 min of (1 passive whole-body HPC (FiO2 = 0.143; no ischemia. N = 6, (2 IPC (FiO2 = 0.209; four bouts of 5 min ischemia and 5 min reperfusion. n = 6, or (3 rest (FiO2 = 0.209; no ischemia. n = 6. The interventions were administered 1 h prior to 30 min of tourniquet derived femoral blood flow occlusion and were followed by 2 h subsequent reperfusion. Systemic blood samples were taken pre- and post-intervention. Systemic blood and gastrocnemius skeletal muscle samples were obtained pre-, 15 min post- (15PoT and 120 min (120PoT post-tourniquet deflation. To determine the cellular stress response gastrocnemius and leukocyte Hsp72 mRNA and Hsp32 mRNA gene transcripts were determined by RT-qPCR. The plasma oxidative stress response (protein carbonyl, reduced glutathione/oxidized glutathione ratio was measured utilizing commercially available kits. In comparison to control, at 15PoT a significant difference in gastrocnemius Hsp72 mRNA was seen in HPC (−1.93-fold; p = 0.007 and IPC (−1.97-fold; p = 0.006. No significant differences were observed in gastrocnemius Hsp32 and Hsp72 mRNA, leukocyte Hsp72 and Hsp32 mRNA, or oxidative stress markers (p > 0.05 between HPC and IPC. HPC provided near identical amelioration of blood flow occlusion mediated gastrocnemius stress response (Hsp72 mRNA, compared to an established IPC

  19. Rapid dual-injection single-scan 13N-ammonia PET for quantification of rest and stress myocardial blood flows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rust, T C; DiBella, E V R; McGann, C J; Christian, P E; Hoffman, J M; Kadrmas, D J

    2006-01-01

    Quantification of myocardial blood flows at rest and stress using 13 N-ammonia PET is an established method; however, current techniques require a waiting period of about 1 h between scans. The objective of this study was to test a rapid dual-injection single-scan approach, where 13 N-ammonia injections are administered 10 min apart during rest and adenosine stress. Dynamic PET data were acquired in six human subjects using imaging protocols that provided separate single-injection scans as gold standards. Rest and stress data were combined to emulate rapid dual-injection data so that the underlying activity from each injection was known exactly. Regional blood flow estimates were computed from the dual-injection data using two methods: background subtraction and combined modelling. The rapid dual-injection approach provided blood flow estimates very similar to the conventional single-injection standards. Rest blood flow estimates were affected very little by the dual-injection approach, and stress estimates correlated strongly with separate single-injection values (r = 0.998, mean absolute difference = 0.06 ml min -1 g -1 ). An actual rapid dual-injection scan was successfully acquired in one subject and further demonstrates feasibility of the method. This study with a limited dataset demonstrates that blood flow quantification can be obtained in only 20 min by the rapid dual-injection approach with accuracy similar to that of conventional separate rest and stress scans. The rapid dual-injection approach merits further development and additional evaluation for potential clinical use

  20. Viscoelastic Flow Modelling for Polymer Flooding

    Science.gov (United States)

    de, Shauvik; Padding, Johan; Peters, Frank; Kuipers, Hans; Multi-scale Modelling of Multi-phase Flows Team

    2015-11-01

    Polymer liquids are used in the oil industry to improve the volumetric sweep and displacement efficiency of oil from a reservoir. Surprisingly, it is not only the viscosity but also the elasticity of the displacing fluid that determine the displacement efficiency. The main aim of our work is to obtain a fundamental understanding of the effect of fluid elasticity, by developing an advanced computer simulation methodology for the flow of non-Newtonian fluids through porous media. We simulate a 3D unsteady viscoelastic flow through a converging diverging geometry of realistic pore dimension using computational fluid dynamics (CFD).The primitive variables velocity, pressure and extra stresses are used in the formulation of models. The viscoelastic stress part is formulated using a FENE-P type of constitutive equation, which can predict both shear and elongational stress properties during this flow. A Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS) approach using Finite volume method (FVM) with staggered grid has been applied. A novel second order Immersed boundary method (IBM) has been incorporated to mimic porous media. The effect of rheological parameters on flow characteristics has also been studied. The simulations provide an insight into 3D flow asymmetry at higher Deborah numbers. Micro-Particle Image Velocimetry experiments are carried out to obtain further insights. These simulations present, for the first time, a detailed computational study of the effects of fluid elasticity on the imbibition of an oil phase.

  1. Starting solutions for the flow of second grade fluids in a rectangular channel due to an oscillating shear stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vieru, Dumitru; Fetecau, Corina; Rana, Mehwish

    2012-05-01

    The unsteady motion of a second grade fluid between two parallel side walls perpendicular to a plate is studied by means of the Fourier sine and cosine transforms. Initially, the fluid is at rest and at time t = 0+, the plate applies an oscillating shear to the fluid. The solutions that have been obtained, presented under integral and series form and written as a sum between steady time-periodic and transient solutions can be easily reduced to the similar solutions for Newtonian fluids performing the same motion. They describe the motion of the fluid some time after its initiation. After that time, when the transient solutions disappear, the motion of the fluid is described by the steady time-periodic solutions that are independent of the initial conditions. In the absence of side walls, more exactly when the distance between walls tends to infinity, all solutions reduce to those corresponding to the motion over an infinite plate. As it was to be expected, the steady time-periodic solutions corresponding to sine and cosine oscillations of the shear stress on the boundary differ by a phase shift. Finally, the influence of side walls on the fluid motion, the required time to reach the steady periodic flow, as well as the distance between walls for which the velocity of the fluid in the middle of the channel is unaffected by their presence are established by numerical calculus and graphical illustrations. As expected, the time needed to reach the steady periodic flows is lower in the presence of side walls. It is lower for Newtonian fluids in comparison with second grade fluids and greater for sine oscillations in comparison to the cosine oscillations of the boundary shear.

  2. An Entropy-Assisted Shielding Function in DDES Formulation for the SST Turbulence Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ling Zhou

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The intent of shielding functions in delayed detached-eddy simulation methods (DDES is to preserve the wall boundary layers as Reynolds-averaged Navier–Strokes (RANS mode, avoiding possible modeled stress depletion (MSD or even unphysical separation due to grid refinement. An entropy function fs is introduced to construct a DDES formulation for the k-ω shear stress transport (SST model, whose performance is extensively examined on a range of attached and separated flows (flat-plate flow, circular cylinder flow, and supersonic cavity-ramp flow. Two more forms of shielding functions are also included for comparison: one that uses the blending function F2 of SST, the other which adopts the recalibrated shielding function fd_cor of the DDES version based on the Spalart-Allmaras (SA model. In general, all of the shielding functions do not impair the vortex in fully separated flows. However, for flows including attached boundary layer, both F2 and the recalibrated fd_cor are found to be too conservative to resolve the unsteady flow content. On the other side, fs is proposed on the theory of energy dissipation and independent on from any particular turbulence model, showing the generic priority by properly balancing the need of reserving the RANS modeled regions for wall boundary layers and generating the unsteady turbulent structures in detached areas.

  3. Influence of yield stress on free convective boundary-layer flow of a non-Newtonian nanofluid past a vertical plate in a porous medium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hady, F. M.; Ibrahim, F. S.; Abdel-Gaied, S. M.; Eid, M. R.

    2011-01-01

    The effect of yield stress on the free convective heat transfer of dilute liquid suspensions of nanofluids flowing on a vertical plate saturated in porous medium under laminar conditions is investigated considering the nanofluid obeys the mathematical model of power-law. The model used for non-Newtonian nanofluid incorporates the effects of Brownian motion and thermophoresis. The governing boundary- layer equations are cast into dimensionless system which is solved numerically using a deferred correction technique and Newton iteration. This solution depends on yield stress parameter Ω, a power-law index n, Lewis number Le, a buoyancy-ratio number Nr, a Brownian motion number Nb, and a thermophoresis number Nt. Analyses of the results found that the reduced Nusselt and Sherwood numbers are decreasing functions of the higher yield stress parameter for each dimensionless numbers, n and Le, except the reduced Sherwood number is an increasing function of higher Nb for different values of yield stress parameter

  4. Effects of electric field and Coriolis force on electrohydrodynamic stability of poorly conducting couple stress parallel fluid flow in a channel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shankar, B.M.; Rudraiah, N.

    2013-01-01

    The linear stability of electrohydrodynamic poorly conducting couple stress viscous parallel fluid flow in a channel is studied in the presence of a non-uniform transverse electric field and Coriolis force using energy method and supplemented with Galerkin Technique. The sufficient condition for stability is obtained for sufficiently small values of the Reynolds number, R e . From this condition we show that strengthening or weakening of the stability criterion is dictated by the values of the strength of electric field, the coefficient of couple stress fluid and independent of Taylor number. In particular, it is shown that the interaction of electric field with couple stress is more effective in stabilizing the poorly conducting couple stress fluid compared to that in an ordinary Newtonian viscous fluid. (author)

  5. Audits of radiopharmaceutical formulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castronovo, F.P. Jr.

    1992-01-01

    A procedure for auditing radiopharmaceutical formulations is described. To meet FDA guidelines regarding the quality of radiopharmaceuticals, institutional radioactive drug research committees perform audits when such drugs are formulated away from an institutional pharmacy. All principal investigators who formulate drugs outside institutional pharmacies must pass these audits before they can obtain a radiopharmaceutical investigation permit. The audit team meets with the individual who performs the formulation at the site of drug preparation to verify that drug formulations meet identity, strength, quality, and purity standards; are uniform and reproducible; and are sterile and pyrogen free. This team must contain an expert knowledgeable in the preparation of radioactive drugs; a radiopharmacist is the most qualified person for this role. Problems that have been identified by audits include lack of sterility and apyrogenicity testing, formulations that are open to the laboratory environment, failure to use pharmaceutical-grade chemicals, inadequate quality control methods or records, inadequate training of the person preparing the drug, and improper unit dose preparation. Investigational radiopharmaceutical formulations, including nonradiolabeled drugs, must be audited before they are administered to humans. A properly trained pharmacist should be a member of the audit team

  6. Predicting bed shear stress and its role in sediment dynamics and restoration potential of the Everglades and other vegetated flow systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsen, Laurel G.; Harvey, Judson; Crimaldi, John P.

    2009-01-01

    Entrainment of sediment by flowing water affects topography, habitat suitability, and nutrient cycling in vegetated floodplains and wetlands, impacting ecosystem evolution and the success of restoration projects. Nonetheless, restoration managers lack simple decision-support tools for predicting shear stresses and sediment redistribution potential in different vegetation communities. Using a field-validated numerical model, we developed state-space diagrams that provide these predictions over a range of water-surface slopes, depths, and associated velocities in Everglades ridge and slough vegetation communities. Diminished bed shear stresses and a consequent decrease in bed sediment redistribution are hypothesized causes of a recent reduction in the topographic and vegetation heterogeneity of this ecosystem. Results confirmed the inability of present-day flows to entrain bed sediment. Further, our diagrams showed bed shear stresses to be highly sensitive to emergent vegetation density and water-surface slope but less sensitive to water depth and periphyton or floating vegetation abundance. These findings suggested that instituting a pulsing flow regime could be the most effective means to restore sediment redistribution to the Everglades. However, pulsing flows will not be sufficient to erode sediment from sloughs with abundant spikerush, unless spikerush density first decreases by natural or managed processes. Our methods provide a novel tool for identifying restoration parameters and performance measures in many types of vegetated aquatic environments where sediment erosion and deposition are involved.

  7. Reactive decontamination formulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giletto, Anthony [College Station, TX; White, William [College Station, TX; Cisar, Alan J [Cypress, TX; Hitchens, G Duncan [Bryan, TX; Fyffe, James [Bryan, TX

    2003-05-27

    The present invention provides a universal decontamination formulation and method for detoxifying chemical warfare agents (CWA's) and biological warfare agents (BWA's) without producing any toxic by-products, as well as, decontaminating surfaces that have come into contact with these agents. The formulation includes a sorbent material or gel, a peroxide source, a peroxide activator, and a compound containing a mixture of KHSO.sub.5, KHSO.sub.4 and K.sub.2 SO.sub.4. The formulation is self-decontaminating and once dried can easily be wiped from the surface being decontaminated. A method for decontaminating a surface exposed to chemical or biological agents is also disclosed.

  8. Stress concentrations at structural discontinuities in active fault zones in the western United States: Implications for permeability and fluid flow in geothermal fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siler, Drew; Hinz, Nicholas H.; Faulds, James E.

    2018-01-01

    Slip can induce concentration of stresses at discontinuities along fault systems. These structural discontinuities, i.e., fault terminations, fault step-overs, intersections, bends, and other fault interaction areas, are known to host fluid flow in ore deposition systems, oil and gas reservoirs, and geothermal systems. We modeled stress transfer associated with slip on faults with Holocene-to-historic slip histories at the Salt Wells and Bradys geothermal systems in western Nevada, United States. Results show discrete locations of stress perturbation within discontinuities along these fault systems. Well field data, surface geothermal manifestations, and subsurface temperature data, each a proxy for modern fluid circulation in the fields, indicate that geothermal fluid flow is focused in these same areas where stresses are most highly perturbed. These results suggest that submeter- to meter-scale slip on these fault systems generates stress perturbations that are sufficiently large to promote slip on an array of secondary structures spanning the footprint of the modern geothermal activity. Slip on these secondary faults and fractures generates permeability through kinematic deformation and allows for transmission of fluids. Still, mineralization is expected to seal permeability along faults and fractures over time scales that are generally shorter than either earthquake recurrence intervals or the estimated life span of geothermal fields. This suggests that though stress perturbations resulting from fault slip are broadly important for defining the location and spatial extent of enhanced permeability at structural discontinuities, continual generation and maintenance of flow conduits throughout these areas are probably dependent on the deformation mechanism(s) affecting individual structures.

  9. Statistical analysis of the description accuracy of dependence of flow stresses upon the deformation rate in the state of superplasticity by phenomenological equations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bojtsov, V.V.; Tsepin, M.A.; Karpilyanskij, N.N.; Ershov, A.N.

    1982-01-01

    Results of statistical analysis of the description accuracy of superplasticity S-form curve by different analytic expressions, suggested on the basis of phenomenological and metallophysical concepts about the nature of superplastic deformation, are given. Experimental investigations into the dependence of flow stresses on the deformation rate were conducted on VT3-1 two-phase titanium alloy. Test samples were cut out of a rod, 30 mm in diameter, produced by lengthwise rolling in α+#betta#-region. Optimal temperature of superplasticity manifestation was determined by the method of stress relaxation from a relaxation time value to a given stress. It was established that the Smirnov phemonemological equation describes in the best way the rate dependence of flow stress of superplastic material. This equation can be used for solution of problems of studying mechanism, physical nature of superplastic deformation, analysing strain-stress state and the structure of deformation zone during the processes of pressure shaping of superplastic materials, when considerably wide range (in the limits of 7-8 orders) of deformation rate variation takes place

  10. CFD modeling of secondary flows in fuel rod bundles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baglietto, Emilio; Ninokata, Hisashi

    2004-01-01

    An optimized non-linear eddy viscosity model is introduced, for calculations of detailed coolant velocity distribution in a tight lattice fuel bundle. The low Reynolds formulation has been optimized based on DNS data for channel flow. The non-linear stress-strain relationship has been modified in the coefficients to model the flow anisotropy, which causes the formation of turbulence driven secondary flows inside the bundle subchannels. Predictions of the model are first compared to experimental measurements of secondary flows in a triangularly arrayed rod bundle with p/d=1.3. Subsequently wall shear stress and velocity predictions are compared with different experimental data for a rod bundle with p/d=1.17. The model shows to be able to correctly reproduce the scale of the secondary motion, and to accurately reproduce both wall shear stress and velocity distributions inside the rod bundle subchannels. (author)

  11. Influence of wall couple stress in MHD flow of a micropolar fluid in a porous medium with energy and concentration transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalid, Asma; Khan, Ilyas; Khan, Arshad; Shafie, Sharidan

    2018-06-01

    The intention here is to investigate the effects of wall couple stress with energy and concentration transfer in magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) flow of a micropolar fluid embedded in a porous medium. The mathematical model contains the set of linear conservation forms of partial differential equations. Laplace transforms and convolution technique are used for computation of exact solutions of velocity, microrotations, temperature and concentration equations. Numerical values of skin friction, couple wall stress, Nusselt and Sherwood numbers are also computed. Characteristics for the significant variables on the physical quantities are graphically discussed. Comparison with previously published work in limiting sense shows an excellent agreement.

  12. Preparation of radiopharmaceutical formulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simon, J.; Garlich, J.R.; Frank, R.K.; McMillan, K.

    1998-01-01

    Radiopharmaceutical formulations for complexes comprising at least one radionuclide complexed with a ligand, or its physiologically-acceptable salts thereof, especially 153 samarium-ethylenediaminetetramethylenephosphonic acid, which optionally contains a divalent metal ion, e.g. calcium, and is frozen, thawed, and then administered by injection. Alternatively, the radiopharmaceutical formulations must contain the divalent metal and are frozen only if the time before administration is sufficiently long to cause concern for radiolysis of the ligand. 2 figs., 9 tabs

  13. Tariff formulation and equalization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Svartsund, Trond

    2003-01-01

    The primary goal of the transmission tariff is to provide for socioeconomic use of the transmission grid. The present tariff structure is basically right. The responsibility for the formulation of the tariff resides with the local grid owner. This must take place in agreement with the current regulations which are passed by the authorities. The formulation must be adaptable to the local requirements. EBL (Norwegian Electricity Industry Association) is content with the current regulations

  14. Influence of Microstructure Representation on Flow Stress and Grain Size Prediction in Through-Process Modeling of AA5182 Sheet Production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lohmar, Johannes; Bambach, Markus; Karhausen, Kai F.

    2013-01-01

    Integrated computational materials engineering is an up to date method for developing new materials and optimizing complete process chains. In the simulation of a process chain, material models play a central role as they capture the response of the material to external process conditions. While much effort is put into their development and improvement, less attention is paid to their implementation, which is problematic because the representation of microstructure in the model has a decisive influence on modeling accuracy and calculation speed. The aim of this article is to analyze the influence of different microstructure representation concepts on the prediction of flow stress and microstructure evolution when using the same set of material equations. Scalar, tree-based and cluster-based concepts are compared for a multi-stage rolling process of an AA5182 alloy. It was found that implementation influences the predicted flow stress and grain size, in particular in the regime of coupled hardening and softening.

  15. Relationships Among Cognitive Function and Cerebral Blood Flow, Oxidative Stress, and Inflammation in Older Heart Failure Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kure, Christina E; Rosenfeldt, Franklin L; Scholey, Andrew B; Pipingas, Andrew; Kaye, David M; Bergin, Peter J; Croft, Kevin D; Wesnes, Keith A; Myers, Stephen P; Stough, Con

    2016-07-01

    The mechanisms for cognitive impairment in heart failure (HF) are unclear. We investigated the relative contributions of cerebral blood flow velocity (BFV), oxidative stress, and inflammation to HF-associated cognitive impairment. Thirty-six HF patients (≥60 years) and 40 healthy controls (68 ± 7 vs 67 ± 5 years, P > .05; 69% vs 50% male, P > .05) completed the Cognitive Drug Research computerized assessment battery and Stroop tasks. Common carotid (CCA) and middle cerebral arterial BFV were obtained by transcranial Doppler. Blood samples were collected for oxidant (diacron-reactive oxygen metabolites; F2-isoprostanes), antioxidant (coenzyme Q10; CoQ10), and inflammatory markers (high-sensitivity C-reactive protein). Compared with controls, patients exhibited impaired attention (Cognitive Drug Research's Power of Attention domain, congruent Stroop) and executive function (incongruent Stroop). Multiple regression modeling showed that CCA-BFV and CoQ10 but not group predicted performance on attention and executive function. Additionally, in HF patients, CCA-BFV and CoQ10 (β = -0.34 vs β = -0.35) were significant predictors of attention, and CCA-BFV (β = -0.34) was a predictor of executive function. Power of Attention and executive function is impaired in older HF patients, and reduced CCA-BFV and CoQ10 are associated with worse cognition. Interventions addressing these mechanisms may improve cognition in older HF patients. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. An exponential strain dependent Rusinek–Klepaczko model for flow stress prediction in austenitic stainless steel 304 at elevated temperatures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amit Kumar Gupta

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, to predict flow stress of Austenitic Stainless Steel (ASS 304 at elevated temperatures the extended Rusinek–Klepaczko (RK model has been modified using an exponential strain dependent term for dynamic strain aging (DSA region. Isothermal tensile tests are conducted on ASS 304 for a temperature range of 323–923 K with an interval of 50 K and at strain rates of 0.0001 s−1, 0.001 s−1, 0.01 s−1 and 0.1 s−1. DSA phenomenon is observed from 623 to 923 K at 0.0001 s−1, 0.001 s−1 and 0.01 s−1. Material constants are calculated using data obtained from these tensile tests for non-DSA and DSA region separately. The predicted results from the RK model are compared with the experimental data to check the accuracy of the constitutive relation. It is observed that to find out the constants of this model, some initial assumptions are required, and these initial values affect the predicted values. Hence, Genetic Algorithm (GA is used to optimize the constants for RK model. Statistical measures such as the correlation coefficient, the average absolute error and standard deviation are used to measure the accuracy of the model. The resulting values of the correlation coefficient for ASS 304 for non-DSA and DSA region using modified extended RK model are 0.9828 and 0.9701. This modified, extended RK model is compared with Johnson–Cook (JC, Zerilli–Armstrong (ZA and Arrhenius models and it is observed that specifically in DSA region, the modified extended RK model gives highly accurate predictions.

  17. MODELS OF MAJOR ADVERSE CARDIAC EVENT RISK USING RESULTS OF EXERCISE STRESS ECHOCARDIOGRAPHY WITH NONINVASIVE CORONARY ARTERY FLOW ASSESSMENT IN PATIENTS WITH ISCHEMIC HEART DISEASE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. V. Zagatina

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Ultrasound non-invasive coronary artery imaging contributes to the diagnosis of ischemic heart disease (IHD in clinical practice. However, data of the prognostic value obtained from a complex analysis of contractility disorders and coronary blood flow parameters during exercise tests in the world literature are still not available. Aim. To develop risk models for adverse outcomes in patients with probable or definite IHD based on the results of a stress test with a noninvasive coronary blood flow study. Material and methods. Medical data of 689 patients with probable or definite IHD who underwent stress echocardiography with satisfactory visualization of the anterior interventricular artery (AIVA were included in the analysis. All patients had stress echocardiography on a horizontal bicycle ergometer. Registration of coronary blood flow in the middle third of the AIVA was performed at rest and at the peak of the load with calculation of the coronary reserve value. Further patient follow-up lasted 3 years. Models of further negative outcomes were developed on the basis of the stress echocardiography results and of coronary blood flow parameters. Results. Three models that take into account the factors associated with further mortality, mortality/myocardial infarction and sum of negative outcomes were developed in the study. These models divide a cohort of patients with probable or definite IHD into groups of low, medium and very high risks. Factors associated with the risk of death include: age >56 years, load power <100 W, breach of contractility in the blood supply zone of the circumflex artery initially and during exercise, the difference in blood flow velocities in the AIVA<10 cm/s, coronary reserve of AIVA<2. The risk model of death, taking into account these factors, suggests dividing patients into low-risk group if there are ≤2 factors (mortality 0.6% for 3 years, medium risk – from 2 to 4 factors (mortality 1.8%, high risk – ≥5

  18. Direct, CMOS In-Line Process Flow Compatible, Sub 100 °C Cu-Cu Thermocompression Bonding Using Stress Engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panigrahi, Asisa Kumar; Ghosh, Tamal; Kumar, C. Hemanth; Singh, Shiv Govind; Vanjari, Siva Rama Krishna

    2018-05-01

    Diffusion of atoms across the boundary between two bonding layers is the key for achieving excellent thermocompression Wafer on Wafer bonding. In this paper, we demonstrate a novel mechanism to increase the diffusion across the bonding interface and also shows the CMOS in-line process flow compatible Sub 100 °C Cu-Cu bonding which is devoid of Cu surface treatment prior to bonding. The stress in sputtered Cu thin films was engineered by adjusting the Argon in-let pressure in such a way that one film had a compressive stress while the other film had tensile stress. Due to this stress gradient, a nominal pressure (2 kN) and temperature (75 °C) was enough to achieve a good quality thermocompression bonding having a bond strength of 149 MPa and very low specific contact resistance of 1.5 × 10-8 Ω-cm2. These excellent mechanical and electrical properties are resultant of a high quality Cu-Cu bonding having grain growth between the Cu films across the boundary and extended throughout the bonded region as revealed by Cross-sectional Transmission Electron Microscopy. In addition, reliability assessment of Cu-Cu bonding with stress engineering was demonstrated using multiple current stressing and temperature cycling test, suggests excellent reliable bonding without electrical performance degradation.

  19. Direct, CMOS In-Line Process Flow Compatible, Sub 100 °C Cu-Cu Thermocompression Bonding Using Stress Engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panigrahi, Asisa Kumar; Ghosh, Tamal; Kumar, C. Hemanth; Singh, Shiv Govind; Vanjari, Siva Rama Krishna

    2018-03-01

    Diffusion of atoms across the boundary between two bonding layers is the key for achieving excellent thermocompression Wafer on Wafer bonding. In this paper, we demonstrate a novel mechanism to increase the diffusion across the bonding interface and also shows the CMOS in-line process flow compatible Sub 100 °C Cu-Cu bonding which is devoid of Cu surface treatment prior to bonding. The stress in sputtered Cu thin films was engineered by adjusting the Argon in-let pressure in such a way that one film had a compressive stress while the other film had tensile stress. Due to this stress gradient, a nominal pressure (2 kN) and temperature (75 °C) was enough to achieve a good quality thermocompression bonding having a bond strength of 149 MPa and very low specific contact resistance of 1.5 × 10-8 Ω-cm2. These excellent mechanical and electrical properties are resultant of a high quality Cu-Cu bonding having grain growth between the Cu films across the boundary and extended throughout the bonded region as revealed by Cross-sectional Transmission Electron Microscopy. In addition, reliability assessment of Cu-Cu bonding with stress engineering was demonstrated using multiple current stressing and temperature cycling test, suggests excellent reliable bonding without electrical performance degradation.

  20. A boundary integral method for two-dimensional (non)-Newtonian drops in slow viscous flow

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Toose, E.M.; Geurts, B.J.; Kuerten, J.G.M.

    1995-01-01

    A boundary integral method for the simulation of the time-dependent deformation of Newtonian or non-Newtonian drops suspended in a Newtonian fluid is developed. The boundary integral formulation for Stokes flow is used and the non-Newtonian stress is treated as a source term which yields an extra

  1. Topical formulations with superoxide dismutase: influence of formulation composition on physical stability and enzymatic activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Mambro, Valéria M; Borin, Maria F; Fonseca, Maria J V

    2003-04-24

    Three different topical formulations were supplemented with superoxide dismutase (SOD) and evaluated concerning physical and chemical stabilities in order to determine the most stable formulation that would maintain SOD activity. Physical stability was evaluated by storing the formulation at room temperature, and at 37 and 45 degrees C for 28 days. Samples were collected at 7-day intervals for assessment of rheological behavior. Chemical stability was evaluated by the measurement of enzymatic activity in formulations stored at room temperature and at 45 degrees C for 75 days. The formulations showed a pseudoplastic behavior, with a flow index of less than 1. There was no significant difference in the initial values of flow index, hysteresis loop or minimum apparent viscosity. The simple emulsion and the one stabilized with hydroxyethylcellulose showed decreased viscosity by the 21st day and with higher temperature, but no significant changes concerning the presence of SOD. Although there were no significant changes concerning storage time or temperature, the formulation stabilized with hydroxyethylcellulose showed a marked loss of SOD activity. The addition of SOD to the formulations studied did not affect their physical stability. Simple emulsions or emulsions stabilized with carboxypolymethylene seem to be better bases for enzyme addition than emulsion stabilized with hydroxyethylcellulose.

  2. Influence of wall couple stress in MHD flow of a micropolar fluid in a porous medium with energy and concentration transfer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asma Khalid

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available The intention here is to investigate the effects of wall couple stress with energy and concentration transfer in magnetohydrodynamic (MHD flow of a micropolar fluid embedded in a porous medium. The mathematical model contains the set of linear conservation forms of partial differential equations. Laplace transforms and convolution technique are used for computation of exact solutions of velocity, microrotations, temperature and concentration equations. Numerical values of skin friction, couple wall stress, Nusselt and Sherwood numbers are also computed. Characteristics for the significant variables on the physical quantities are graphically discussed. Comparison with previously published work in limiting sense shows an excellent agreement. Keywords: Micropolor fluid, Microrotation, MHD, Porosity, Wall couple stress, Exact solutions

  3. Stress response assessment of Lactobacillus sakei strains selected as potential autochthonous starter cultures by flow cytometry and nucleic acid double-staining analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonomo, M G; Milella, L; Martelli, G; Salzano, G

    2013-09-01

    The aim of this study was to apply the flow cytometry to Lactobacillus sakei strains, selected as potential autochthonous starters, to investigate dynamics and physiological heterogeneity of microbial behaviour under different stress conditions. A simultaneous nucleic acid double-staining assay was applied to discriminate cell populations in different physiological states after exposure to heat (50 and 55°C) and acid (pH 2·5 and 3·0) stresses. Alive cells with intact membranes, damaged cells still alive but with injured membranes, so with even a recovery ability, and dead cells with a permanent membrane damage were differentiated with a significant increase in damaged cells after stronger stress treatments. The existence and characteristics of subpopulations displaying heterogeneity in particular conditions are highly relevant, because specific subpopulations may show improved survival, changes and dynamics under stress conditions. This assay has potential for physiological research on lactic acid bacteria and for application in the food industry. The assessment of intermediate physiological states in Lb. sakei strains with recovery possibility could be an important criterion for application of potential starter cultures. Application of flow cytometry and characterization of sorted subpopulations may contribute to further understanding of diversity and heterogeneity in physiology of bacterial populations. © 2013 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  4. Computerized X-ray Microtomography Observations and Fluid Flow Measurements of the Effect of Effective Stress on Fractured Reservoir Seal Shale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welch, N.; Crawshaw, J.; Boek, E.

    2014-12-01

    The successful storage of carbon dioxide in geologic formations requires an in-depth understanding of all reservoir characteristics and morphologies. An intact and substantial seal formation above a storage reservoir is required for a significant portion of the initial sealing mechanisms believed to occur during carbon dioxide storage operations. Shales are a common seal formation rock types found above numerous hydrocarbon reservoirs, as well as potential saline aquifer storage locations. Shales commonly have very low permeability, however they also have the tendency to be quite fissile, and the formation of fractures within these seals can have a significant detrimental effect on the sealing potential of a reservoir and amount to large areas of high permeability and low capillary pressures compared to the surrounding intact rock. Fractured shales also have an increased current interest due to the increasing development of shale gas reservoirs using hydraulic fracturing techniques. This work shows the observed changes that occur within fractured pieces of reservoir seal shale samples, along with quarry analogues, using an in-situ micro-CT fluid flow imaging apparatus with a Hassler type core holder. Changes within the preferential flow path under different stress regimes as well as physical changes to the fracture geometry are reported. Lattice Boltzmann flow simulations were then performed on the extracted flow paths and compared to experiment permeability measurements. The preferential flow path of carbon dioxide through the fracture network is also observed and compared to the results two-phase Lattice Boltzmann fluid flow simulations.

  5. Petrov-Galerkin mixed formulations for bidimensional elasticity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toledo, E.M.; Loula, A.F.D.; Guerreiro, J.N.C.

    1989-10-01

    A new formulation for two-dimensional elasticity in stress and displacements is presented. Consistently adding to the Galerkin classical formulation residuals forms of constitutive and equilibrium equations, the original saddle point is transformed into a minimization problem without any restrictions. We also propose a stress post processing technique using both equilibrium and constitutive equations. Numerical analysis error estimates and numerical results are presented confirming the predicted rates of convergence. (A.C.A.S.) [pt

  6. Statistical analysis of the turbulent Reynolds stress and its link to the shear flow generation in a cylindrical laboratory plasma device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yan, Z.; Yu, J. H.; Holland, C.; Xu, M.; Mueller, S. H.; Tynan, G. R.

    2008-01-01

    The statistical properties of the turbulent Reynolds stress arising from collisional drift turbulence in a magnetized plasma column are studied and a physical picture of turbulent driven shear flow generation is discussed. The Reynolds stress peaks near the maximal density gradient region, and is governed by the turbulence amplitude and cross-phase between the turbulent radial and azimuthal velocity fields. The amplitude probability distribution function (PDF) of the turbulent Reynolds stress is non-Gaussian and positively skewed at the density gradient maximum. The turbulent ion-saturation (Isat) current PDF shows that the region where the bursty Isat events are born coincides with the positively skewed non-Gaussian Reynolds stress PDF, which suggests that the bursts of particle transport appear to be associated with bursts of momentum transport as well. At the shear layer the density fluctuation radial correlation length has a strong minimum (∼4-6 mm∼0.5C s /Ω ci , where C s is the ion acoustic speed and Ω ci is the ion gyrofrequency), while the azimuthal turbulence correlation length is nearly constant across the shear layer. The results link the behavior of the Reynolds stress, its statistical properties, generation of bursty radially going azimuthal momentum transport events, and the formation of the large-scale shear layer.

  7. Influence of stress-induced deformations on observed water flow in fractures of the Climax Granitic Stock

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilder, D.G.

    1987-01-01

    Three examples of stress induced influence on fracture dominated hydrology were noted in drifts 1400 ft below surface in granite. Seepage into portions of shears near a fault zone and an adjoining drift, and mineralization of the joints were the three indicators of shear stress. Interpretation of these results are given

  8. Asymmetrical to symmetrical magnetic fabric of dikes: Paleo-flow orientations and Paleo-stresses recorded on feeder-bodies from the Motru Dike Swarm (Romania)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Féménias, Olivier; Diot, Hervé; Berza, Tudor; Gauffriau, Antoine; Demaiffe, Daniel

    2004-08-01

    The fabric in a dike is representative of the magmatic flow, considered as Newtonian. The anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility of the rocks gives a good representation of the shape-preferred orientation which, in turn, is a marker of the magmatic flow. Generally, a symmetrical pattern of the fabric across the dike is in agreement with a flow of magma within a channel: the flow direction is then reliable with this imbrication. An asymmetrical fabric is dependent on the flow and displacement of the wall. We present the case of both symmetrical and asymmetrical dike fabrics recording different emplacements. From a Pan-African calc-alkaline dike swarm (of basaltic-andesitic-dacitic-rhyolitic composition) of the Alpine Danubian window from South Carpathians (Romania), two populations of dikes have been described: thick (1-30 m) N-S-trending dikes and thin (movement of the walls. In contrast, the thin dikes are symmetrical and frequently display an arteritic morphology that limits the dike length, with no cartographic extension. We propose to relate the two types of dikes to the same regional stress field in a continuum of emplacement during a regional brittle event.

  9. Formulating viscous hydrodynamics for large velocity gradients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pratt, Scott

    2008-01-01

    Viscous corrections to relativistic hydrodynamics, which are usually formulated for small velocity gradients, have recently been extended from Navier-Stokes formulations to a class of treatments based on Israel-Stewart equations. Israel-Stewart treatments, which treat the spatial components of the stress-energy tensor τ ij as dynamical objects, introduce new parameters, such as the relaxation times describing nonequilibrium behavior of the elements τ ij . By considering linear response theory and entropy constraints, we show how the additional parameters are related to fluctuations of τ ij . Furthermore, the Israel-Stewart parameters are analyzed for their ability to provide stable and physical solutions for sound waves. Finally, it is shown how these parameters, which are naturally described by correlation functions in real time, might be constrained by lattice calculations, which are based on path-integral formulations in imaginary time

  10. Stress Analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burcharth, Hans F.

    The following types of forces contribute to the stresses in a Dolos in a pack exposed to waves: 1)Gravity forces Compaction forces (mainly due to settlements, gravity and flow forces) 2) Flow forces 3) Impact forces (impacts between moving concrete blocks)......The following types of forces contribute to the stresses in a Dolos in a pack exposed to waves: 1)Gravity forces Compaction forces (mainly due to settlements, gravity and flow forces) 2) Flow forces 3) Impact forces (impacts between moving concrete blocks)...

  11. A Modified Eyring Equation for Modeling Yield and Flow Stresses of Metals at Strain Rates Ranging from 10−5 to 5 × 104 s−1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramzi Othman

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In several industrial applications, metallic structures are facing impact loads. Therefore, there is an important need for developing constitutive equations which take into account the strain rate sensitivity of their mechanical properties. The Johnson-Cook equation was widely used to model the strain rate sensitivity of metals. However, it implies that the yield and flow stresses are linearly increasing in terms of the logarithm of strain rate. This is only true up to a threshold strain rate. In this work, a three-constant constitutive equation, assuming an apparent activation volume which decreases as the strain rate increases, is applied here for some metals. It is shown that this equation fits well the experimental yield and flow stresses for a very wide range of strain rates, including quasi-static, high, and very high strain rates (from 10−5 to 5 × 104 s−1. This is the first time that a constitutive equation is showed to be able to fit the yield stress over a so large strain rate range while using only three material constants.

  12. Continuous stroke volume monitoring by modelling flow from non-invasive measurement of arterial pressure in humans under orthostatic stress

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Harms, M.P.M.; Wesseling, K.H.; Pott, F.; Jenstrup, M.; Goudoever, J. van; Secher, N.H.; Lieshout, J.J. van

    1999-01-01

    The relationship between aortic flow and pressure is described by a three-element model of the arterial input impedance, including continuous correction for variations in the diameter and the compliance of the aorta (Modelflow). We computed the aortic flow from arterial pressure by this model, and

  13. The structure of the solution obtained with Reynolds-stress-transport models at the free-stream edges of turbulent flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cazalbou, J.-B.; Chassaing, P.

    2002-02-01

    The behavior of Reynolds-stress-transport models at the free-stream edges of turbulent flows is investigated. Current turbulent-diffusion models are found to produce propagative (possibly weak) solutions of the same type as those reported earlier by Cazalbou, Spalart, and Bradshaw [Phys. Fluids 6, 1797 (1994)] for two-equation models. As in the latter study, an analysis is presented that provides qualitative information on the flow structure predicted near the edge if a condition on the values of the diffusion constants is satisfied. In this case, the solution appears to be fairly insensitive to the residual free-stream turbulence levels needed with conventional numerical methods. The main specific result is that, depending on the diffusion model, the propagative solution can force turbulence toward definite and rather extreme anisotropy states at the edge (one- or two-component limit). This is not the case with the model of Daly and Harlow [Phys. Fluids 13, 2634 (1970)]; it may be one of the reasons why this "old" scheme is still the most widely used, even in recent Reynolds-stress-transport models. In addition, the analysis helps us to interpret some difficulties encountered in computing even very simple flows with Lumley's pressure-diffusion model [Adv. Appl. Mech. 18, 123 (1978)]. A new realizability condition, according to which the diffusion model should not globally become "anti-diffusive," is introduced, and a recalibration of Lumley's model satisfying this condition is performed using information drawn from the analysis.

  14. Evaluation of anisotropic effective stress-strain criteria for the biaxial yield and flow of 2024 aluminum tubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stout, M.G.; Hecker, S.S.; Bourcier, R.

    1983-01-01

    2024 aluminum tubes, heat treated to a T6 and T8 temper, were tested in combinations of tension-internal pressure and tension-torsion loading. Yield loci and flow behavior were determined for both modes of loading and compared to theoretical predictions. Both tempers of 2024 aluminum exhibited crystallographic textures and anisotropic yield and flow. Hill's quadratic yield criterion and the associated flow rule under-estimate balanced biaxial yield and flow, which is consistent with hydraulic bulge data on other face-centered cubic metals. Hill's nonquadratic criterion, which adds one additional parameter, and Bassani's criterion, which adds two parameters, predict the anisotropic yield behavior much more accurately. Predictions of the complete flow behavior, including strain paths, with these anisotropic criteria could be improved markedly by including provisions for planar anisotropy

  15. Variational formulation based analysis on growth of yield front in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    The analysis of rotating disk behavior has been of great interest to many ... strain hardening using Tresca's yield condition and its associated flow rule ...... Determination of Stresses in Gas-Turbine Disks Subjected to Plastic Flow and Creep.

  16. Formulation and Evaluation of Bioadhesive Cyproheptadine Tablets ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Results: The shear stress of 3 % solution of HPMC was greater than that of an equivalent concentration of Carbopol 934P. The values of K, n, R2 and detachment force for the optimized formulation (F0) were 0.269, 0.696, 0.964 and 0.066 Newton (N), respectively, and showed good correlation with the predicted values, thus ...

  17. High-Order Entropy Stable Formulations for Computational Fluid Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpenter, Mark H.; Fisher, Travis C.

    2013-01-01

    A systematic approach is presented for developing entropy stable (SS) formulations of any order for the Navier-Stokes equations. These SS formulations discretely conserve mass, momentum, energy and satisfy a mathematical entropy inequality. They are valid for smooth as well as discontinuous flows provided sufficient dissipation is added at shocks and discontinuities. Entropy stable formulations exist for all diagonal norm, summation-by-parts (SBP) operators, including all centered finite-difference operators, Legendre collocation finite-element operators, and certain finite-volume operators. Examples are presented using various entropy stable formulations that demonstrate the current state-of-the-art of these schemes.

  18. A simplified method to calculate the stresses in straight pipes due to laminar flow of a stratified medium with two different temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cutrim, J.H.; Kizivat, V.

    1984-01-01

    A simplified method to calculate the stresses in straight pipes due to laminar flow of a stratified medium with two different temperatures is presented. It is based on the equilibrium equations and conservative assumptions as usual in practice. Numerical results are obtained for the 'banana' and 'pera' modes of deformation due to thermal stratification; the former case appears to be most important. In order to be able to perform such a fatigue damage analysis in practice under several complex load conditions, an existing program for fatigue damage analysis was provided with more substantial details. All the assumptions crucial for the use of ASME code were retained. The inclusion of stresses due to stratifications in the fatigue damage analysis is completed through extension of ASME NB 3650. (Author) [pt

  19. On the stability of the production of bubbles in yield-stress fluid using flow-focusing and T-junction devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laborie, B.; Rouyer, F.; Angelescu, D. E.; Lorenceau, E.

    2016-06-01

    We investigate experimentally the stability of bubble production in yield-stress fluids (YSF) and highly viscous silicone oil, using flow-focusing and T-junction devices. When the exit channel is initially pre-filled with the fluid and the gas is pressure-driven, the production is highly unstable, despite a regular frequency of bubble production in the junction. As observed for pressure-driven bubble trains in Newtonian fluids, we report that two mechanisms can explain these observations: (i) drastic reduction of the hydrodynamic pressure drop along the channel during the transient bubble production, which induces a rapid increase of the gas flow rate and (ii) thin film deposition resulting in a cascade of plug break-up and bubble coalescence. While the drastic reduction of the pressure drop is inevitable in such two-phase flows, we show that modifying the surfaces of the channel can help to stabilize the system when the continuous phase is a YSF. To do so, we measure the thickness of the film deposited on the channel wall for rough and smooth channels. Our results are rationalized by introducing the inverse of the Bingham number Bi-1 comparing the viscous stress to the yield stress. For Bi-1 ≥ 1, a fast fluidization process associated to efficient deposition of YSF on the channel wall leads to a rapid destabilization of bubble production. However, for Bi-1 < 1, the deposition driven by capillarity can be hindered by the wall-slip induced by the existence of the yield stress: the thickness of the deposited film is very thin and corresponds to the equivalent roughness of the channels. It is typically 40 μm thick for rough surfaces and below the limit of resolution of our set-up for smooth surfaces. In this regime of Bi-1 and for smooth surfaces, the length of the plugs barely vanishes, thus the start-up flow is less prone to destabilization. These results therefore potentially open routes to steady production of aerated YSF on smooth channels in the regime of

  20. Physical and chemical stability of different formulations with superoxide dismutase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Mambro, V M; Campos, P M B G Maia; Fonseca, M J V

    2004-10-01

    Topical formulations with superoxide dismutase (SOD), a scavenger of superoxide radicals, have proved to be effective against some skin diseases. Nevertheless, formulations with proteins are susceptible to both chemical and physical instability. Three different formulations (anionic and non-ionic gel and emulsion) were developed and supplemented with SOD in order to determine the most stable formulation that would maintain SOD activity. Physical stability was evaluated by assessing the rheological behavior of the formulations stored at room temperature, 37 and 45 degrees C. Chemical stability was evaluated by the measurement of enzymatic activity in the formulations stored at room temperature and at 45 degrees C. Formulations showed a flow index less than one, characterizing pseudoplastic behavior. There was no significant difference in initial values of flow index, tixotropy or minimum apparent viscosity. Neither gel showed significant changes in minimum apparent viscosity concerning storage time or temperature, as well, SOD presence and its activity. The emulsion showed decreased viscosity by the 28th day, but no significant changes concerning storage temperature or SOD presence, although it showed a decreased activity. The addition of SOD to the formulations studied did not affect their physical stability but gel formulations seem to be better bases for enzyme addition.

  1. Influence of stress-induced deformations on observed water flow in fractures at the Climax granitic stock

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilder, D.G.

    1987-06-01

    Three examples of stress-induced displacement influence on fracture-dominated hydrology were noted in drifts 1400 ft below surface in granite. Seepage into drifts was limited to portions of shears near a fault zone. No water entered the drifts from the fault itself, although its orientation relative to Basin and Range extension is favorable for fracture opening. Localization of seepage appears to result from excavation block motion that increased apertures of the shear zones in contrast to the fault where asperities had been destroyed by earlier shearing thus minimizing aperture increases. Seepage was also noted, in an adjoining drift, from a set of shallow-dip healed fractures that intersected the rib, and from vertical fractures that increased the crown. The restricted location of this seepage apparently was a result of shear opening of the joints that occurred because of cantilevered support of tabular rock between joints. Interpretation of paleostresses based on joint chronologies and orientations indicates that sets subjected to shear stresses at a time when normal stresses were low contained mineral infilling. Sets subjected to shear stresses at a time when the normal stresses were significant had minimal mineral infilling. 8 refs., 7 figs

  2. Quality by Design approach for studying the impact of formulation and process variables on product quality of oral disintegrating films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazumder, Sonal; Pavurala, Naresh; Manda, Prashanth; Xu, Xiaoming; Cruz, Celia N; Krishnaiah, Yellela S R

    2017-07-15

    The present investigation was carried out to understand the impact of formulation and process variables on the quality of oral disintegrating films (ODF) using Quality by Design (QbD) approach. Lamotrigine (LMT) was used as a model drug. Formulation variable was plasticizer to film former ratio and process variables were drying temperature, air flow rate in the drying chamber, drying time and wet coat thickness of the film. A Definitive Screening Design of Experiments (DoE) was used to identify and classify the critical formulation and process variables impacting critical quality attributes (CQA). A total of 14 laboratory-scale DoE formulations were prepared and evaluated for mechanical properties (%elongation at break, yield stress, Young's modulus, folding endurance) and other CQA (dry thickness, disintegration time, dissolution rate, moisture content, moisture uptake, drug assay and drug content uniformity). The main factors affecting mechanical properties were plasticizer to film former ratio and drying temperature. Dissolution rate was found to be sensitive to air flow rate during drying and plasticizer to film former ratio. Data were analyzed for elucidating interactions between different variables, rank ordering the critical materials attributes (CMA) and critical process parameters (CPP), and for providing a predictive model for the process. Results suggested that plasticizer to film former ratio and process controls on drying are critical to manufacture LMT ODF with the desired CQA. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  3. Systematic Equation Formulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindberg, Erik

    2007-01-01

    A tutorial giving a very simple introduction to the set-up of the equations used as a model for an electrical/electronic circuit. The aim is to find a method which is as simple and general as possible with respect to implementation in a computer program. The “Modified Nodal Approach”, MNA, and th......, and the “Controlled Source Approach”, CSA, for systematic equation formulation are investigated. It is suggested that the kernel of the P Spice program based on MNA is reprogrammed....

  4. Flow and wall shear stress in end-to-side and side-to-side anastomosis of venous coronary artery bypass grafts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Poulikakos Dimos

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Purpose Coronary artery bypass graft (CABG surgery represents the standard treatment of advanced coronary artery disease. Two major types of anastomosis exist to connect the graft to the coronary artery, i.e., by using an end-to-side or a side-to-side anastomosis. There is still controversy because of the differences in the patency rates of the two types of anastomosis. The purpose of this paper is to non-invasively quantify hemodynamic parameters, such as mass flow and wall shear stress (WSS, in end-to-side and side-to-side anastomoses of patients with CABG using computational fluid dynamics (CFD. Methods One patient with saphenous CABG and end-to-side anastomosis and one patient with saphenous CABG and side-to-side anastomosis underwent 16-detector row computed tomography (CT. Geometric models of coronary arteries and bypasses were reconstructed for CFD analysis. Blood flow was considered pulsatile, laminar, incompressible and Newtonian. Peri-anastomotic mass flow and WSS were quantified and flow patterns visualized. Results CFD analysis based on in-vivo CT coronary angiography data was feasible in both patients. For both types of CABG, flow patterns were characterized by a retrograde flow into the native coronary artery. WSS variations were found in both anastomoses types, with highest WSS values at the heel and lowest WSS values at the floor of the end-to-side anastomosis. In contrast, the highest WSS values of the side-to-side anastomosis configuration were found in stenotic vessel segments and not in the close vicinity of the anastomosis. Flow stagnation zones were found in end-to-side but not in side-to-side anastomosis, the latter also demonstrating a smoother stream division throughout the cardiac cycle. Conclusion CFD analysis of venous CABG based on in-vivo CT datasets in patients was feasible producing qualitative and quantitative information on mass flow and WSS. Differences were found between the two types of anastomosis

  5. Effects of non-fatiguing respiratory muscle loading induced by expiratory flow limitation during strenuous incremental cycle exercise on metabolic stress and circulating natural killer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rolland-Debord, Camille; Morelot-Panzini, Capucine; Similowski, Thomas; Duranti, Roberto; Laveneziana, Pierantonio

    2017-12-01

    Exercise induces release of cytokines and increase of circulating natural killers (NK) lymphocyte during strong activation of respiratory muscles. We hypothesised that non-fatiguing respiratory muscle loading during exercise causes an increase in NK cells and in metabolic stress indices. Heart rate (HR), ventilation (VE), oesophageal pressure (Pes), oxygen consumption (VO 2 ), dyspnoea and leg effort were measured in eight healthy humans (five men and three women, average age of 31 ± 4 years and body weight of 68 ± 10 kg), performing an incremental exercise testing on a cycle ergometer under control condition and expiratory flow limitation (FL) achieved by putting a Starling resistor. Blood samples were obtained at baseline, at peak of exercise and at iso-workload corresponding to that reached at the peak of FL exercise during control exercise. Diaphragmatic fatigue was evaluated by measuring the tension time index of the diaphragm. Respiratory muscle overloading caused an earlier interruption of exercise. Diaphragmatic fatigue did not occur in the two conditions. At peak of flow-limited exercise compared to iso-workload, HR, peak inspiratory and expiratory Pes, NK cells and norepinephrine were significantly higher. The number of NK cells was significantly related to ΔPes (i.e. difference between the most and the less negative Pes) and plasmatic catecholamines. Loading of respiratory muscles is able to cause an increase of NK cells provided that activation of respiratory muscles is intense enough to induce a significant metabolic stress.

  6. Asymmetrical to symmetrical magnetic fabric of dykes: Paleo-flow orientations and Paleo-stresses recorded on feeder-bodies from the Motru Dyke Swarm (Romania)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Femenias, O.; Diot, H.; Berza, T.; Gauffriau, A.; Demaiffe, D.

    2003-04-01

    The fabric of crystals in a dyke is representative of the flow of magma, considered as a newtonian fluid. The AMS of the rocks (=magnetic mineralogy subfabric) gives a good representation of the shape preferred orientation related to the total fabric which, in turn is marker of the magmatic flow acquired during emplacement of the fluid within the dyke width. Generally, a symmetrical distribution of the fabric in terms of foliation and lineation across the dyke is in agreement with a model involving symmetrical differential displacements of the flow of the fluid within a channel. In this case, the flow direction is in relation with the imbrication of the symmetric foliations. In this study, we present the cases of both symmetrical and asymmetrical dyke fabric recording and involving different process of emplacement during a regional deformation. From a regional survey of a large Pan-African calc-alkaline dyke swarm (of basaltic-andesitic-dacitic-rhyolitic composition) of the Alpine Danubian window from South Carpathians of Romania, two populations of dykes have been described: thick (from 1 to 30 meters) N-S trending dykes and thin (less than 1 meter) E-W dykes. These two populations crosscut the country rocks without simple chronological relations between them. The thick dykes display asymmetrical fabric that involve a relatively long history of emplacement and important distance of flow. They record the regional sinistral movement of the walls. By contrast, the thin dykes are symmetrical and display frequently an arteritic morphology that limits the dyke length, with no cartographic extension. The mean orientations of the two types of dykes can be related to the same regional stress field and a continuum of emplacement is proposed for the two types of dykes during the regional deformation.

  7. Drug delivery and formulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breitkreutz, Jörg; Boos, Joachim

    2011-01-01

    Paediatric drug delivery is a major challenge in drug development. Because of the heterogeneous nature of the patient group, ranging from newborns to adolescents, there is a need to use appropriate excipients, drug dosage forms and delivery devices for different age groups. So far, there is a lack of suitable and safe drug formulations for children, especially for the very young and seriously ill patients. The new EU legislation will enforce paediatric clinical trials and drug development. Current advances in paediatric drug delivery include interesting new concepts such as fast-dissolving drug formulations, including orodispersible tablets and oral thin strips (buccal wafers), and multiparticulate dosage forms based on mini-tabletting or pelletization technologies. Parenteral administration is likely to remain the first choice for children in the neonatal period and for emergency cases. Alternative routes of administration include transdermal, pulmonary and nasal drug delivery systems. A few products are already available on the market, but others still need further investigations and clinical proof of concept.

  8. Ether formulations of relativity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duffy, M.C.

    1980-01-01

    Contemporary ether theories are surveyed and criticised, especially those formally identical to orthodox Relativity. The historical development of Relativity, Special and General, in terms of an ether, is briefly indicated. Classical interpretations of Generalized Relativity using ether are compared to Euclidean formulations using a background space. The history of a sub-group of theories, formulating a 'new' Relativity involving modified transforms, is outlined. According to the theory with which they agree, recent supposed detections of drift are classified and criticised. Cosmological evidence suggesting an ether is mentioned. Only ether theories formally identical to Relativity have been published in depth. They stand criticised as being contrary to the positivist spirit. The history of mechanical analogues is traced, from Hartley's representing gravitating matter as spherical standing waves, to recent suggestions that vortex-sponge might model electromagnetic, quantum, uncertainty and faster-than-light phenomena. Contemporary theories are particular physical theories, themselves 'second interpretations' of a primary mathematical model. Mechanical analogues are auxiliary, not necessary, to other theory, disclosing relationships between classical and non-classical descriptions of assemblies charging state. The ether-relativity polemic, part of a broader dispute about relativity, is founded on mistaken conceptions of the roles of mathematical and physical models, mechanical analogues; and a distored view of history, which indicates that ether theories have become relativistic. (author)

  9. Upscaling of Forchheimer flows

    KAUST Repository

    Aulisa, Eugenio; Bloshanskaya, Lidia I.; Efendiev, Yalchin R.; Ibragimov, Akif I.

    2014-01-01

    analytical results (Aulisa et al., 2009) [1] and formulate the resulting system in terms of a degenerate nonlinear flow equation for the pressure with the nonlinearity depending on the pressure gradient. The coarse scale parameters for the steady state

  10. Production of Superoxide in Bacteria Is Stress- and Cell State-Dependent: A Gating-Optimized Flow Cytometry Method that Minimizes ROS Measurement Artifacts with Fluorescent Dyes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McBee, Megan E; Chionh, Yok H; Sharaf, Mariam L; Ho, Peiying; Cai, Maggie W L; Dedon, Peter C

    2017-01-01

    The role of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in microbial metabolism and stress response has emerged as a major theme in microbiology and infectious disease. Reactive fluorescent dyes have the potential to advance the study of ROS in the complex intracellular environment, especially for high-content and high-throughput analyses. However, current dye-based approaches to measuring intracellular ROS have the potential for significant artifacts. Here, we describe a robust platform for flow cytometric quantification of ROS in bacteria using fluorescent dyes, with ROS measurements in 10s-of-1000s of individual cells under a variety of conditions. False positives and variability among sample types (e.g., bacterial species, stress conditions) are reduced with a flexible four-step gating scheme that accounts for side- and forward-scattered light (morphological changes), background fluorescence, DNA content, and dye uptake to identify cells producing ROS. Using CellROX Green dye with Escherichia coli, Mycobacterium smegmatis , and Mycobacterium bovis BCG as diverse model bacteria, we show that (1) the generation of a quantifiable CellROX Green signal for superoxide, but not hydrogen peroxide-induced hydroxyl radicals, validates this dye as a superoxide detector; (2) the level of dye-detectable superoxide does not correlate with cytotoxicity or antibiotic sensitivity; (3) the non-replicating, antibiotic tolerant state of nutrient-deprived mycobacteria is associated with high levels of superoxide; and (4) antibiotic-induced production of superoxide is idiosyncratic with regard to both the species and the physiological state of the bacteria. We also show that the gating method is applicable to other fluorescent indicator dyes, such as the 5-carboxyfluorescein diacetate acetoxymethyl ester and 5-cyano-2,3-ditolyl tetrazolium chloride for cellular esterase and reductive respiratory activities, respectively. These results demonstrate that properly controlled flow cytometry coupled

  11. Experimental Study of Pressure Drop and Wall Shear Stress Characteristics of γ /Al2O3-Water Nanofluid in a Circular pipe under Turbulent flow induced vibration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adil Abbas AL-Moosawy

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Experimental study of γ /Al2O3 with mean diameter of less than 50 nm was dispersed in the distilled water that flows through a pipe consist of five sections as work station ,four sections made of carbon steel metal and one sections made of Pyrex glass pipe, with five nanoparticles volume concentrations of 0%,0.1%,0.2%,0.3%,and 0.4% with seven different volume flow rates 100, 200 , 300, 400, 500, 600 ,and 700ℓ/min were investigated to calculated pressure distribution for the cases without rubber ,with 3mm rubber and with 6mm rubber used to support the pipe. Reynolds number was between 20000 and 130000. Frequency value through pipe was measured for all stations of pipe for all cases. The results show that the pressure drop and wall shear stress of the nanofluid increase by increasing the nanoparticles volume concentrations or Reynolds number, the values of frequency through the pipe increase continuously when wall shear stress increases and the ratio of increment increases as nanofluid concentrations increase. Increasing of vibration frequency lead to increasing the friction factor between the pipe and the wall and thus increasing in pressure drop. Several equations between the wall shear stress and frequency for all volume concentration and for three cases without rubber, with rubber has 3mm thickness ,and with rubber has 6mm thickness. Finally, the results led to that γ /Al2O3 could function as a good and alternative conventional working fluid in heat transfer applications. A good agreement is seen between the experimental and those available in the literature

  12. Effects of electric field and Coriolis force on electrohydrodynamic stability of poorly conducting couple stress parallel fluid flow in a channel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shankar, B.M.; Rudraiah, N.

    2013-01-01

    The effective functioning of microfluidic devices in chemical, electrical and mechanical engineering involving fluidics particularly those having vibrations and petroleum products containing organic, inorganic and other microfluidics require understanding and control of stability of poorly conducting parallel fluid flows. The electrical conductivity, σ, of a poorly conducting fluidics, increases with the temperature and the concentration of freely suspended particles like RBC, WBC and so on in the blood, the hylauronic acid (HA) and nutrients of synovial fluid in synovial joints will spin producing microrotation, forming micropolar fluid of Eringen. The presence of Deuterium - Tritium (DT) in inertial fusion target (IFT) may also be modeled using micropolar fluid theory of Eringen. A particular case of micropolar fluid theory when microrotation balances with the natural vorticity of a poorly conducting fluidics in the presence of an electric field is called ‘electrohydrodynamic couple stress fluid’ (EHDCF). These EHDCFs exhibit a variation of electrical conductivity, ∇ σ, increasing with temperature and concentration of freely suspended particles, releases the charges from the nuclei forming distribution of charge density, ρ e . These charges induce an electric field, 1 E i . If need be, we can apply an electric field, 1 E a , by embedding electrodes of different potentials at the boundaries. The total electric field, 1 E = 1 E i + 1 E a , produces a current density, 1 J = ρ σ 1 E, according to Ohm’s law and also produces an electric force, 1 F σ = σ 1 E. This current 1 J acts as sensing and the force, 1 F σ acts as actuation. These two properties make the poorly conducting couple stress fluid to act as a smart material. The objective of this paper is to show that EHDCV in presence of coriolis force plays a significant role in controlling the stability of parallel flows which is essential for an effective functioning of machineries that occur in

  13. A simple model to understand the role of membrane shear elasticity and stress-free shape on the motion of red blood cells in shear flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viallat, Annie; Abkarian, Manouk; Dupire, Jules

    2015-11-01

    The analytical model presented by Keller and Skalak on the dynamics of red blood cells in shear flow described the cell as a fluid ellipsoid of fixed shape. It was extended to introduce shear elasticity of the cell membrane. We further extend the model when the cell discoid physiological shape is not a stress-free shape. We show that spheroid stress-free shapes enables fitting experimental data with values of shear elasticity typical to that found with micropipettes and optical tweezers. For moderate shear rates (when RBCs keep their discoid shape) this model enables to quantitatively determine an effective cell viscosity, that combines membrane and hemoglobin viscosities and an effective shear modulus of the membrane that combines shear modulus and stress-free shape. This model allows determining RBC mechanical parameters both in the tanktreading regime for cells suspended in a high viscosity medium, and in the tumbling regime for cells suspended in a low viscosity medium. In this regime,a transition is predicted between a rigid-like tumbling motion and a fluid-like tumbling motion above a critical shear rate, which is directly related to the mechanical parameters of the cell. A*MIDEX (n ANR-11-IDEX-0001-02) funded by the ''Investissements d'Avenir'', Region Languedoc-Roussillon, Labex NUMEV (ANR-10-LABX-20), BPI France project DataDiag.

  14. Local topology via the invariants of the velocity gradient tensor within vortex clusters and intense Reynolds stress structures in turbulent channel flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buchner, Abel-John; Kitsios, Vassili; Atkinson, Callum; Soria, Julio; Lozano-Durán, Adrián

    2016-01-01

    Previous works have shown that momentum transfer in the wall–normal direction within turbulent wall–bounded flows occurs primarily within coherent structures defined by regions of intense Reynolds stress [1]. Such structures may be classified into wall–attached and wall–detached structures with the latter being typically weak, small–scale, and isotropically oriented, while the former are larger and carry most of the Reynolds stresses. The mean velocity fluctuation within each structure may also be used to separate structures by their dynamic properties. This study aims to extract information regarding the scales, kinematics and dynamics of these structures within the topological framework of the invariants of the velocity gradient tensor (VGT). The local topological characteristics of these intense Reynolds stress structures are compared to the topological characteristics of vortex clusters defined by the discriminant of the velocity gradient tensor. The alignment of vorticity with the principal strain directions within these structures is also determined, and the implications of these findings are discussed. (paper)

  15. Wall shear stress measurement of near-wall flow over inclined and curved boundaries by stereo interfacial particle image velocimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nguyen, Thien Duy; Wells, John Craig; Nguyen, Chuong Vinh

    2010-01-01

    In investigations of laminar or turbulent flows, wall shear is often important. Nevertheless, conventional particle image velocimetry (PIV) is difficult in near-wall regions. A near-wall measurement technique, named interfacial PIV (IPIV) [Nguyen, C., Nguyen, T., Wells, J., Nakayama, A., 2008. Proposals for PIV of near-wall flow over curved boundaries. In: Proceedings of 14th International Symposium on Applications of Laser Technique to Fluid Mechanics], handles curved boundaries by means of conformal transformation, directly measures the wall gradient, and yields the near-wall tangential velocity profile at one-pixel resolution. In this paper, we show the feasibility of extending IPIV to measure wall gradients by stereo reconstruction. First, we perform a test on synthetic images generated from a direct numerical simulation (DNS) snapshot of turbulent flow over sinusoidal bed. Comparative assessment of wall gradients derived by IPIV, stereo-IPIV and particle image distortion (PID) [Huang, H.T., Fiedler, H.E., Wang, J.J., 1993. Limitation and improvement of PIV. Experiments in Fluids 15(4), 263-273] is evaluated with DNS data. Also, the sensitivity of IPIV and stereo-IPIV results to the uncertainty of identified wall position is examined. As a practical application of IPIV and stereo-IPIV to experimental images, results from turbulent open channel flow over a backward-facing step are discussed in detail.

  16. Damage to photosystem II due to heat stress without light-driven electron flow: involvement of enhanced introduction of reducing power into thylakoid membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marutani, Yoko; Yamauchi, Yasuo; Kimura, Yukihiro; Mizutani, Masaharu; Sugimoto, Yukihiro

    2012-08-01

    Under a moderately heat-stressed condition, the photosystems of higher plants are damaged in the dark more easily than they are in the presence of light. To obtain a better understanding of this heat-derived damage mechanism that occurs in the dark, we focused on the involvement of the light-independent electron flow that occurs at 40 °C during the damage. In various plant species, the maximal photochemical quantum yield of photosystem (PS) II (Fv/Fm) decreased as a result of heat treatment in the dark. In the case of wheat, the most sensitive plant species tested, both Fv/Fm and oxygen evolution rapidly decreased by heat treatment at 40 °C for 30 min in the dark. In the damage, specific degradation of D1 protein was involved, as shown by immunochemical analysis of major proteins in the photosystem. Because light canceled the damage to PSII, the light-driven electron flow may play a protective role against PSII damage without light. Light-independent incorporation of reducing power from stroma was enhanced at 40 °C but not below 35 °C. Arabidopsis mutants that have a deficit of enzymes which mediate the incorporation of stromal reducing power into thylakoid membranes were tolerant against heat treatment at 40 °C in the dark, suggesting that the reduction of the plastoquinone pool may be involved in the damage. In conclusion, the enhanced introduction of reducing power from stroma into thylakoid membranes that occurs around 40 °C causes over-reduction of plastoquinone, resulting in the damage to D1 protein under heat stress without linear electron flow.

  17. Screening of mucoadhesive vaginal gel formulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Ochoa Andrade

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Rational design of vaginal drug delivery formulations requires special attention to vehicle properties that optimize vaginal coating and retention. The aim of the present work was to perform a screening of mucoadhesive vaginal gels formulated with carbomer or carrageenan in binary combination with a second polymer (carbomer, guar or xanthan gum. The gels were characterised using in vitroadhesion, spreadability and leakage potential studies, as well as rheological measurements (stress and frequency sweep tests and the effect of dilution with simulated vaginal fluid (SVF on spreadability. Results were analysed using analysis of variance and multiple factor analysis. The combination of polymers enhanced adhesion of both primary gelling agents, carbomer and carrageenan. From the rheological point of view all formulations presented a similar behaviour, prevalently elastic and characterised by loss tangent values well below 1. No correlation between rheological and adhesion behaviour was found. Carbomer and carrageenan gels containing the highest percentage of xanthan gum displayed good in vitro mucoadhesion and spreadability, minimal leakage potential and high resistance to dilution. The positive results obtained with carrageenan-xanthan gum-based gels can encourage the use of natural biocompatible adjuvants in the composition of vaginal products, a formulation field that is currently under the synthetic domain.

  18. Vozy formule 1

    OpenAIRE

    Zbožínek, Adam

    2009-01-01

    Tato práce uvádí základní pravidla a předpoklady pro konstrukci a použití vozů formule 1. Hlavní zaměření je na aerodynamiku, která je nejdůležitější disciplínou v tomto motoristickém sportu, dále je tato práce zaměřena na základní faktory týkající se motoru vozu, kol, nové technologie KERS a provedení volantu. This work shows basic rules and conditions for construction and use of cars formula 1. The main part of this work focus on the aerodynamics which is the most important discipline of...

  19. Assessment of strategy formulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Acur, Nuran; Englyst, Linda

    2006-01-01

    of the success criteria through face-to-face interviews with 46 managers, workshops involving 40 managers, and two in-depth case studies. The success criteria have been slightly modified due to the empirical results, to yield the assessment tool. Findings – The resulting assessment tool integrates three generic...... approaches to strategy assessment, namely the goal-centred, comparative and improvement approaches, as found in the literature. Furthermore, it encompasses three phases of strategy formulation processes: strategic thinking, strategic planning and embedding of strategy. The tool reflects that the different......, but cases and managerial perceptions indicate that the need for accurate and detailed plans might be overrated in the literature, as implementation relies heavily on continuous improvement and empowerment. Concerning embedding, key aspects relate both to the goal-centred and improvement approaches, while...

  20. Kit systems for granulated decontamination formulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tucker, Mark D.

    2010-07-06

    A decontamination formulation and method of making that neutralizes the adverse health effects of both chemical and biological compounds, especially chemical warfare (CW) and biological warfare (BW) agents, and toxic industrial chemicals. The formulation provides solubilizing compounds that serve to effectively render the chemical and biological compounds, particularly CW and BW compounds, susceptible to attack, and at least one reactive compound that serves to attack (and detoxify or kill) the compound. The formulation includes at least one solubilizing agent, a reactive compound, a sorbent additive, and water. A highly adsorbent sorbent additive (e.g., amorphous silica, sorbitol, mannitol, etc.) is used to "dry out" one or more liquid ingredients into a dry, free-flowing powder that has an extended shelf life, and is more convenient to handle and mix in the field. The formulation can be pre-mixed and pre-packaged as a multi-part kit system, where one or more of the parts are packaged in a powdered, granulated form for ease of handling and mixing in the field.

  1. Stress analysis for CANDU reactor structure assembly following a postulated p/t, c/t rupture after flow blockage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soliman, S A; Lee, T; Ibrahim, A M; Hodgson, S [Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd., Saskatoon, SK (Canada)

    1996-12-31

    This paper describes the collapse load calculations for the reactor structure assembly under the postulated fuel channel flow blockage Level D (faulted) loading condition. Under the flow blockage condition, the primary coolant flow path is obstructed between the inlet and outlet feeder connections to the headers. This, in turn, is postulated to cause the pressure tube and calandria tube to rupture and release hot molten fuel into the moderator, producing a hydrodynamic transient within the calandria shell. The most severe hydrodynamic loads occur within a fraction of a second (0.14 second). The peak pressure for the limiting case scenario for Level D condition is 120 psig, due to a single channel failure event. Under this accident condition, it is shown that the reactor structure assembly can withstand the pressure transient and the structural integrity of the core is assured. A finite element model is generated and used to calculate the minimum collapse load. The ANSYS code is used with element type Stif-43 for elastic/plastic, large deformation and small strain analysis. (author). 1 ref., 3 tabs., 9 figs.

  2. Stress analysis for CANDU reactor structure assembly following a postulated p/t, c/t rupture after flow blockage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soliman, S.A.; Lee, T.; Ibrahim, A.M.; Hodgson, S.

    1995-01-01

    This paper describes the collapse load calculations for the reactor structure assembly under the postulated fuel channel flow blockage Level D (faulted) loading condition. Under the flow blockage condition, the primary coolant flow path is obstructed between the inlet and outlet feeder connections to the headers. This, in turn, is postulated to cause the pressure tube and calandria tube to rupture and release hot molten fuel into the moderator, producing a hydrodynamic transient within the calandria shell. The most severe hydrodynamic loads occur within a fraction of a second (0.14 second). The peak pressure for the limiting case scenario for Level D condition is 120 psig, due to a single channel failure event. Under this accident condition, it is shown that the reactor structure assembly can withstand the pressure transient and the structural integrity of the core is assured. A finite element model is generated and used to calculate the minimum collapse load. The ANSYS code is used with element type Stif-43 for elastic/plastic, large deformation and small strain analysis. (author). 1 ref., 3 tabs., 9 figs

  3. Relationship Between Endothelial Wall Shear Stress and High-Risk Atherosclerotic Plaque Characteristics for Identification of Coronary Lesions That Cause Ischemia: A Direct Comparison With Fractional Flow Reserve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Donghee; Starikov, Anna; Ó Hartaigh, Bríain; Gransar, Heidi; Kolli, Kranthi K; Lee, Ji Hyun; Rizvi, Asim; Baskaran, Lohendran; Schulman-Marcus, Joshua; Lin, Fay Y; Min, James K

    2016-12-19

    Wall shear stress (WSS) is an established predictor of coronary atherosclerosis progression. Prior studies have reported that high WSS has been associated with high-risk atherosclerotic plaque characteristics (APCs). WSS and APCs are quantifiable by coronary computed tomography angiography, but the relationship of coronary lesion ischemia-evaluated by fractional flow reserve-to WSS and APCs has not been examined. WSS measures were obtained from 100 evaluable patients who underwent coronary computed tomography angiography and invasive coronary angiography with fractional flow reserve. Patients were categorized according to tertiles of mean WSS values defined as low, intermediate, and high. Coronary ischemia was defined as fractional flow reserve ≤0.80. Stenosis severity was determined by minimal luminal diameter. APCs were defined as positive remodeling, low attenuation plaque, and spotty calcification. The likelihood of having positive remodeling and low-attenuation plaque was greater in the high WSS group compared with the low WSS group after adjusting for minimal luminal diameter (odds ratio for positive remodeling: 2.54, 95% CI 1.12-5.77; odds ratio for low-attenuation plaque: 2.68, 95% CI 1.02-7.06; both Prelationship was observed between WSS and fractional flow reserve when adjusting for either minimal luminal diameter or APCs. WSS displayed no incremental benefit above stenosis severity and APCs for detecting lesions that caused ischemia (area under the curve for stenosis and APCs: 0.87, 95% CI 0.81-0.93; area under the curve for stenosis, APCs, and WSS: 0.88, 95% CI 0.82-0.93; P=0.30 for difference). High WSS is associated with APCs independent of stenosis severity. WSS provided no added value beyond stenosis severity and APCs for detecting lesions with significant ischemia. © 2016 The Authors. Published on behalf of the American Heart Association, Inc., by Wiley Blackwell.

  4. Comparison of clinical tools for measurements of regional stress and rest myocardial blood flow assessed with 13N-ammonia PET/CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slomka, Piotr J; Alexanderson, Erick; Jácome, Rodrigo; Jiménez, Moises; Romero, Edgar; Meave, Aloha; Le Meunier, Ludovic; Dalhbom, Magnus; Berman, Daniel S; Germano, Guido; Schelbert, Heinrich

    2012-02-01

    Several models for the quantitative analysis of myocardial blood flow (MBF) at stress and rest and myocardial flow reserve (MFR) with (13)N-ammonia myocardial perfusion PET have been implemented for clinical use. We aimed to compare quantitative results obtained from 3 software tools (QPET, syngo MBF, and PMOD), which perform PET MBF quantification with either a 2-compartment model (QPET and syngo MBF) or a 1-compartment model (PMOD). We considered 33 adenosine stress and rest (13)N-ammonia studies (22 men and 11 women). Average age was 54.5 ± 15 y, and average body mass index was 26 ± 4.2. Eighteen patients had a very low likelihood of disease, with no chest pain, normal relative perfusion results, and normal function. All data were obtained on a PET/CT scanner in list mode with CT attenuation maps. Sixteen dynamic frames were reconstructed (twelve 10-s, two 30-s, one 1-min, and one 6-min frames). Global and regional stress and rest MBF and MFR values were obtained with each tool. Left ventricular contours and input function region were obtained automatically in system QPET and syngo MBF and manually in PMOD. The flow values and MFR values were highly correlated among the 3 packages (R(2) ranging from 0.88 to 0.92 for global values and from 0.78 to 0.94 for regional values. Mean reference MFR values were similar for QPET, syngo MBF, and PMOD (3.39 ± 1.22, 3.41 ± 0.76, and 3.66 ± 1.19, respectively) by 1-way ANOVA (P = 0.74). The lowest MFR in very low likelihood patients in any given vascular territory was 2.25 for QPET, 2.13 for syngo MBF, and 2.23 for PMOD. Different implementations of 1- and 2-compartment models demonstrate an excellent correlation in MFR for each vascular territory, with similar mean MFR values.

  5. Seismic monitoring of hydraulic fracturing: techniques for determining fluid flow paths and state of stress away from a wellbore

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fehler, M.; House, L.; Kaieda, H.

    1986-01-01

    Hydraulic fracturing has gained in popularity in recent years as a way to determine the orientations and magnitudes of tectonic stresses. By augmenting conventional hydraulic fracturing measurements with detection and mapping of the microearthquakes induced by fracturing, we can supplement and idependently confirm information obtained from conventional analysis. Important information obtained from seismic monitoring includes: the state of stress of the rock, orientation and spacing of the major joint sets, and measurements of rock elastic parameters at locations distant from the wellbore. While conventional well logging operations can provide information about several of these parameters, the zone of interrogation is usually limited to the immediate proximity of the borehole. The seismic waveforms of the microearthquakes contain a wealth of information about the rock in regions that are otherwise inaccessible for study. By reliably locating the hypocenters of many microearthquakes, we have inferred the joint patterns in the rock. We observed that microearthquake locations do not define a simple, thin, planar distribution, that the fault plane solutions are consistent with shear slippage, and that spectral analysis indicates that the source dimensions and slip along the faults are small. Hence we believe that the microearthquakes result from slip along preexisting joints, and not from tensile extension at the tip of the fracture. Orientations of the principal stresses can be estimated by using fault plane solutions of the larger microearthquakes. By using a joint earthquake location scheme, and/or calibrations with downhole detonators, rock velocities and heterogeneities thereof can be investigated in rock volumes that are far enough from the borehole to be representative of intrincis rock properties.

  6. Scan-rescan reproducibility of segmental aortic wall shear stress as assessed by phase-specific segmentation with 4D flow MRI in healthy volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Palen, Roel L F; Roest, Arno A W; van den Boogaard, Pieter J; de Roos, Albert; Blom, Nico A; Westenberg, Jos J M

    2018-05-26

    The aim was to investigate scan-rescan reproducibility and observer variability of segmental aortic 3D systolic wall shear stress (WSS) by phase-specific segmentation with 4D flow MRI in healthy volunteers. Ten healthy volunteers (age 26.5 ± 2.6 years) underwent aortic 4D flow MRI twice. Maximum 3D systolic WSS (WSSmax) and mean 3D systolic WSS (WSSmean) for five thoracic aortic segments over five systolic cardiac phases by phase-specific segmentations were calculated. Scan-rescan analysis and observer reproducibility analysis were performed. Scan-rescan data showed overall good reproducibility for WSSmean (coefficient of variation, COV 10-15%) with moderate-to-strong intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC 0.63-0.89). The variability in WSSmax was high (COV 16-31%) with moderate-to-good ICC (0.55-0.79) for different aortic segments. Intra- and interobserver reproducibility was good-to-excellent for regional aortic WSSmax (ICC ≥ 0.78; COV ≤ 17%) and strong-to-excellent for WSSmean (ICC ≥ 0.86; COV ≤ 11%). In general, ascending aortic segments showed more WSSmax/WSSmean variability compared to aortic arch or descending aortic segments for scan-rescan, intraobserver and interobserver comparison. Scan-rescan reproducibility was good for WSSmean and moderate for WSSmax for all thoracic aortic segments over multiple systolic phases in healthy volunteers. Intra/interobserver reproducibility for segmental WSS assessment was good-to-excellent. Variability of WSSmax is higher and should be taken into account in case of individual follow-up or in comparative rest-stress studies to avoid misinterpretation.

  7. Stress path dependent hydromechanical behaviour of heterogeneous carbonate rock

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dimanov A.

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The influence of stress paths, representative of reservoir conditions, on the hydromechanical behavior of a moderately heterogeneous carbonate has been investigated. Multiscale structural heterogeneities, common for instance in carbonate rocks, can strongly alter the mechanical response and significantly influence the evolution of flow properties with stress. Using a triaxial cell, the permeability evolutions during compression and the effects of brittle (fracture and plastic (pore collapse deformations at yield, were measured. A strong scattering was observed on the mechanical response both in term of compressibility and failure threshold. Using the porosity scaling predicted by an adapted effective medium theory (based on crack growth under Hertzian contact, we have rescaled the critical pressures by the normalized porosity deviation. This procedure reduces efficiently the scattering, revealing in the framework of proportional stress path loading, a linear relation between the critical pressures and the stress path parameter through all the deformation regimes. It leads to a new formulation for the critical state envelope in the 'mean stress, deviatoric stress' diagram. The attractive feature of this new yield envelope formulation relies on the fact that only the two most common different mechanical tests 'Uniaxial Compression' and 'Hydrostatic Compression', are needed to define entirely the yield envelope. Volumic strains and normalized permeabilities are finally mapped in the stresses diagram and correlated.

  8. Baseline LAW Glass Formulation Testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kruger, Albert A.; Mooers, Cavin; Bazemore, Gina; Pegg, Ian L.; Hight, Kenneth; Lai, Shan Tao; Buechele, Andrew; Rielley, Elizabeth; Gan, Hao; Muller, Isabelle S.; Cecil, Richard

    2013-01-01

    The major objective of the baseline glass formulation work was to develop and select glass formulations that are compliant with contractual and processing requirements for each of the LAW waste streams. Other objectives of the work included preparation and characterization of glasses with respect to the properties of interest, optimization of sulfate loading in the glasses, evaluation of ability to achieve waste loading limits, testing to demonstrate compatibility of glass melts with melter materials of construction, development of glass formulations to support ILAW qualification activities, and identification of glass formulation issues with respect to contract specifications and processing requirements

  9. Multiple Temperature Model for Near Continuum Flows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    XU, Kun; Liu, Hongwei; Jiang, Jianzheng

    2007-01-01

    In the near continuum flow regime, the flow may have different translational temperatures in different directions. It is well known that for increasingly rarefied flow fields, the predictions from continuum formulation, such as the Navier-Stokes equations, lose accuracy. These inaccuracies may be partially due to the single temperature assumption in the Navier-Stokes equations. Here, based on the gas-kinetic Bhatnagar-Gross-Krook (BGK) equation, a multitranslational temperature model is proposed and used in the flow calculations. In order to fix all three translational temperatures, two constraints are additionally proposed to model the energy exchange in different directions. Based on the multiple temperature assumption, the Navier-Stokes relation between the stress and strain is replaced by the temperature relaxation term, and the Navier-Stokes assumption is recovered only in the limiting case when the flow is close to the equilibrium with the same temperature in different directions. In order to validate the current model, both the Couette and Poiseuille flows are studied in the transition flow regime

  10. A Reynolds stress model for near-wall turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durbin, P. A.

    1993-01-01

    The paper formulates a tensorially consistent near-wall second-order closure model. Redistributive terms in the Reynolds stress equations are modeled by an elliptic relaxation equation in order to represent strongly nonhomogeneous effects produced by the presence of walls; this replaces the quasi-homogeneous algebraic models that are usually employed, and avoids the need for ad hoc damping functions. The model is solved for channel flow and boundary layers with zero and adverse pressure gradients. Good predictions of Reynolds stress components, mean flow, skin friction, and displacement thickness are obtained in various comparisons to experimental and direct numerical simulation data. The model is also applied to a boundary layer flowing along a wall with a 90-deg, constant-radius, convex bend.

  11. Direct numerical simulation of particle-laden turbulent channel flows with two- and four-way coupling effects: models of terms in the Reynolds stress budgets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dritselis, Chris D, E-mail: dritseli@mie.uth.gr [Mechanical Engineering Department, University of Thessaly, Pedion Areos, 38334 Volos (Greece)

    2017-04-15

    In the first part of this study (Dritselis 2016 Fluid Dyn. Res. 48 015507), the Reynolds stress budgets were evaluated through point-particle direct numerical simulations (pp-DNSs) for the particle-laden turbulent flow in a vertical channel with two- and four-way coupling effects. Here several turbulence models are assessed by direct comparison of the particle contribution terms to the budgets, the dissipation rate, the pressure-strain rate, and the transport rate with the model expressions using the pp-DNS data. It is found that the models of the particle sources to the equations of fluid turbulent kinetic energy and dissipation rate cannot represent correctly the physics of the complex interaction between turbulence and particles. A relatively poor performance of the pressure-strain term models is revealed in the particulate flows, while the algebraic models for the dissipation rate of the fluid turbulence kinetic energy and the transport rate terms can adequately reproduce the main trends due to the presence of particles. Further work is generally needed to improve the models in order to account properly for the momentum exchange between the two phases and the effects of particle inertia, gravity and inter-particle collisions. (paper)

  12. Direct numerical simulation of particle-laden turbulent channel flows with two- and four-way coupling effects: models of terms in the Reynolds stress budgets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dritselis, Chris D

    2017-01-01

    In the first part of this study (Dritselis 2016 Fluid Dyn. Res. 48 015507), the Reynolds stress budgets were evaluated through point-particle direct numerical simulations (pp-DNSs) for the particle-laden turbulent flow in a vertical channel with two- and four-way coupling effects. Here several turbulence models are assessed by direct comparison of the particle contribution terms to the budgets, the dissipation rate, the pressure-strain rate, and the transport rate with the model expressions using the pp-DNS data. It is found that the models of the particle sources to the equations of fluid turbulent kinetic energy and dissipation rate cannot represent correctly the physics of the complex interaction between turbulence and particles. A relatively poor performance of the pressure-strain term models is revealed in the particulate flows, while the algebraic models for the dissipation rate of the fluid turbulence kinetic energy and the transport rate terms can adequately reproduce the main trends due to the presence of particles. Further work is generally needed to improve the models in order to account properly for the momentum exchange between the two phases and the effects of particle inertia, gravity and inter-particle collisions. (paper)

  13. Oscillatory fluid flow induces the osteogenic lineage commitment of mesenchymal stem cells: The effect of shear stress magnitude, frequency, and duration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stavenschi, Elena; Labour, Marie-Noelle; Hoey, David A

    2017-04-11

    A potent regulator of bone anabolism is physical loading. However, it is currently unclear whether physical stimuli such as fluid shear within the marrow cavity is sufficient to directly drive the osteogenic lineage commitment of resident mesenchymal stem cells (MSC). Therefore, the objective of the study is to employ a systematic analysis of oscillatory fluid flow (OFF) parameters predicted to occur in vivo on early MSC osteogenic responses and late stage lineage commitment. MSCs were exposed to OFF of 1Pa, 2Pa and 5Pa magnitudes at frequencies of 0.5Hz, 1Hz and 2Hz for 1h, 2h and 4h of stimulation. Our findings demonstrate that OFF elicits a positive osteogenic response in MSCs in a shear stress magnitude, frequency, and duration dependent manner that is gene specific. Based on the mRNA expression of osteogenic markers Cox2, Runx2 and Opn after short-term fluid flow stimulation, we identified that a regime of 2Pa shear magnitude and 2Hz frequency induces the most robust and reliable upregulation in osteogenic gene expression. Furthermore, long-term mechanical stimulation utilising this regime, elicits a significant increase in collagen and mineral deposition when compared to static control demonstrating that mechanical stimuli predicted within the marrow is sufficient to directly drive osteogenesis. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  14. Implications of stress range for inelastic analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karabin, M.E.; Dhalla, A.K.

    1981-01-01

    The elastic stress range over a complete load cycle is routinely used to formulate simplified rules regarding the inelastic behavior of structures operating at elevated temperature. For example, a 300 series stainless steel structure operating at elevated temperature, in all probability, would satisfy the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code criteria if the linearized elastic stress range is less than three times the material yield strength. However, at higher elastic stress ranges it is difficult to judge, a priori, that a structural component would comply with inelastic Code criteria after a detailed inelastic analysis. The purpose of this paper is to illustrate that it is not the elastic stress range but the stress intensities at specific times during a thermal transient which provide a better insight into the inelastic response of the structure. The specific example of the CRBRP flued head design demonstrates that the temperature differential between various parts of the structure can be changed by modifying the insulation pattern and heat flow path in the structure, without significantly altering the elastic stress range over a complete load cycle. However, the modified design did reduce the stress intensity during steady state elevated temperature operation. This modified design satisfied the inelastic Code criteria whereas the initial design failed to comply with the strain accumulation criterion

  15. A second order turbulence model based on a Reynolds stress approach for two-phase boiling flow. Part 1: Application to the ASU-annular channel case

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mimouni, S., E-mail: stephane.mimouni@edf.f [Electricite de France R and D Division, 6 Quai Watier, F-78400 Chatou (France); Archambeau, F.; Boucker, M.; Lavieville, J. [Electricite de France R and D Division, 6 Quai Watier, F-78400 Chatou (France); Morel, C. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, 17 rue des Martyrs, F-38000 Grenoble (France)

    2010-09-15

    High-thermal performance PWR (pressurized water reactor) spacer grids require both low pressure loss and high critical heat flux (CHF) properties. Numerical investigations on the effect of angles and position of mixing vanes and to understand in more details the main physical phenomena (wall boiling, entrainment of bubbles in the wakes, recondensation) are required. In the field of fuel assembly analysis or design by means of CFD codes, the overwhelming majority of the studies are carried out using two-equation eddy viscosity models (EVM), especially the standard K-{epsilon} model, while the use of Reynolds Stress Transport Models (RSTM) remains exceptional. But extensive testing and application over the past three decades have revealed a number of shortcomings and deficiencies in eddy viscosity models. In fact, the K-{epsilon} model is totally blind to rotation effects and the swirling flows can be regarded as a special case of fluid rotation. This aspect is crucial for the simulation of a hot channel in a fuel assembly. In fact, the mixing vanes of the spacer grids generate a swirl in the coolant water, to enhance the heat transfer from the rods to the coolant in the hot channels and to limit boiling. First, we started to evaluate computational fluid dynamics results against the AGATE-mixing experiment: single-phase liquid water tests, with Laser-Doppler liquid velocity measurements upstream and downstream of mixing blades. The comparison of computed and experimental azimuthal (circular component in a horizontal plane) liquid velocity downstream of a mixing vane for the AGATE-mixing test shows that the rotating flow is qualitatively well reproduced by CFD calculations but azimuthal liquid velocity is underestimated with the K-{epsilon} model. Before comparing performance of EVM and RSTM models on fuel assembly geometry, we performed calculations with a simpler geometry, the ASU-annular channel case. A wall function model dedicated to boiling flows is also

  16. Direct numerical simulation of particle-laden turbulent channel flows with two- and four-way coupling effects: budgets of Reynolds stress and streamwise enstrophy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dritselis, Chris D

    2016-01-01

    The budgets of the Reynolds stress and streamwise enstrophy are evaluated through direct numerical simulations for the turbulent particle-laden flow in a vertical channel with momentum exchange between the two phases. The influence of the dispersed particles on the budgets is examined through a comparison of the particle-free and the particle-laden cases at the same Reynolds number of Re b = 5600 based on the bulk fluid velocity and the distance between the channel walls. Results are obtained for particle ensembles with four response times in simulations with and without streamwise gravity and inter-particle collisions at average mass (volume) fractions of 0.2 (2.7 × 10 −5 ) and 0.5 (6.8 × 10 −5 ). The particle feedback force on the flow of the carrier phase is modeled by a point-force approximation (PSIC-method). It is shown that all the terms in the budgets of the Reynolds stress components are decreased in the presence of particles. The level of reduction depends on the particle response time and it is higher under the effects of gravity and inter-particle collisions. A considerable reduction in all the terms of the streamwise enstrophy budget is also observed. In particular, all production mechanisms, and mainly vortex stretching, are inhibited in the particulate flows and thus the production of streamwise vorticity is significantly damped. A further insight into the direct particle effects on the fluid turbulence is provided by analyzing in detail the fluid–fluid, fluid–particle and particle–particle correlations, and the spectra of the fluid–particle energy exchange rate. The present results indicate that the turbulence production, dissipation and pressure–strain term are generally large quantities, but their summation is relatively small and comparable to the fluid–particle direct energy exchange rate. Consequently, the particle contribution can potentially increase or decrease the fluctuating fluid velocities and eventually control the

  17. Formulation of optimal international freight transport objective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Jarašūnienė

    2002-10-01

    Full Text Available To increase the attraction of Lithuania as a transit country striving to promote carriers' border crossing activities and facilitate customs clearance procedures as well as freight delivery to clients it is necessary to identify the main obstacles, to analyse them and to select adequate measures and means for their elimination. Therefore, on the basis of the formulation of transport freight management objective, as well as basing on the assessment of indeterminacy of external impacts, it would be possible to deduce the main causes of idle time of transport means in customs, to estimate the dependence of service time in proportion to transport flow.

  18. Variational formulation of the Gardner's restacking algorithm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dodin, I.Y.; Fisch, N.J.

    2004-01-01

    The incompressibility of the phase flow of Hamiltonian wave-plasma interactions restrains the class of realizable wave-driven transformations of the particle distribution. After the interaction, the distribution remains composed of the original phase-space elements, or local densities, which are only rearranged (''restacked'') by the wave. A variational formalism is developed to study the corresponding limitations on the energy and momentum transfer. A case of particular interest is a toroidal plasma immersed in a dc magnetic field. The restacking algorithm by Gardner [Phys. Fluids 6, 839 (1963)] is formulated precisely. The minimum energy state for a plasma with a given current is determined

  19. Recent progress in the development of the Elliptic Blending Reynolds-stress model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manceau, Rémi

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Various modifications of the Elliptic Blending Reynolds stress model, proposed during the last decade, are revisited. • Using theoretical arguments and detailed comparison with DNS data, a reference model is formulated. • The model satisfactorily reproduces the effects of spanwise rotation on turbulence, for cases without and with separation. - Abstract: The Elliptic Blending Reynolds Stress Model (EB-RSM), originally proposed by Manceau and Hanjalić (2002) to extend standard, weakly inhomogeneous Reynolds stress models to the near-wall region, has been subject to various modifications by several authors during the last decade, mainly for numerical robustness reasons. The present work revisits all these modifications from the theoretical standpoint and investigates in detail their influence on the reproduction of the physical mechanisms at the origin of the influence of the wall on turbulence. The analysis exploits recent DNS databases for high-Reynolds number channel flows, spanwise rotating channel flows with strong rotation rates, up to complete laminarization, and the separated flow after a sudden expansion without and with system rotation. Theoretical arguments and comparison with DNS results lead to the selection of a recommended formulation for the EB-RSM model. This formulation shows satisfactory predictions for the configurations described above, in particular as regards the modification of the mean flow and turbulent anisotropy on the anticyclonic or pressure side

  20. Fabrication of artificial arteriovenous fistula and analysis of flow field and shear stress by using μ-PIV technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Sun Cheol; Kim, Hyun Kyu [Div. of Vascular Surgery, Dept. of Surgery, College of Medicine, The Catholic University of Korea, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Song, Ryun Geun; Kim, Sun Ho; Lee, Jin Kee [School of Mechanical Engineering, Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Seung Hyun [School of Engineering, Brown University, Providence (United States)

    2016-12-15

    Radio-cephalic arteriovenous fistula (RC-AVF) is an operation performed to achieve vascular access for hemodialysis. Although RC-AVF is a reliable and well-known method, this technique presents high rates of early failure depending on the vessel condition. These failures are due to blood shear stress around the anastomosis site and the vascular access failure caused by thrombosis secondary to stenosis formation, as well as vascular access reocclusion after percutaneous interventions. In this work, we fabricate in vitro 3D RC-AVF by using polydimethylsiloxane and 3D printing technology to understand the underlying mechanism and predict AVF failure. Micro- Particle image velocimetry (μ-PIV) focusing on the cardiac pulse cycle is used to measure the velocity field within the artificial blood vessel. Results are confirmed by numerical simulation. Accordingly, the in vitro AVF model agrees well with the simulations. Overall, this research would provide the future possibility of using the proposed method to reduce in vivo AVF failure for various conditions.

  1. Scalewise invariant analysis of the anisotropic Reynolds stress tensor for atmospheric surface layer and canopy sublayer turbulent flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brugger, Peter; Katul, Gabriel G.; De Roo, Frederik; Kröniger, Konstantin; Rotenberg, Eyal; Rohatyn, Shani; Mauder, Matthias

    2018-05-01

    Anisotropy in the turbulent stress tensor, which forms the basis of invariant analysis, is conducted using velocity time series measurements collected in the canopy sublayer (CSL) and the atmospheric surface layer (ASL). The goal is to assess how thermal stratification and surface roughness conditions simultaneously distort the scalewise relaxation towards isotropic state from large to small scales when referenced to homogeneous turbulence. To achieve this goal, conventional invariant analysis is extended to allow scalewise information about relaxation to isotropy in physical (instead of Fourier) space to be incorporated. The proposed analysis shows that the CSL is more isotropic than its ASL counterpart at large, intermediate, and small (or inertial) scales irrespective of the thermal stratification. Moreover, the small (or inertial) scale anisotropy is more prevalent in the ASL when compared to the CSL, a finding that cannot be fully explained by the intensity of the mean velocity gradient acting on all scales. Implications to the validity of scalewise Rotta and Lumley models for return to isotropy as well as advantages to using barycentric instead of anisotropy invariant maps for such scalewise analysis are discussed.

  2. Shear-stress-induced structural arrangement of water molecules in nanoscale Couette flow with slipping at wall boundary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, Jau-Wen

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated the structuring of water molecules in a nanoscale Couette flow with the upper plate subjected to lateral forces with various magnitudes and water slipping against a metal wall. It was found that when the upper plate is subjected to a force, the water body deforms into a parallelepiped. Water molecules in the channel are then gradually arranged into lattice positions, creating a layered structure. The structural arrangement of water molecules is caused by the water molecules accommodating themselves to the increase in energy under the application of a lateral force on the moving plate. The ordering arrangement of water molecules increases the rotational degree of freedom, allowing the molecules to increase their Coulomb potential energy through polar rotation that accounts for the energy input through the upper plate. With a force continuously applied to the upper plate, the water molecules in contact with the upper plate move forward until slip between the water and upper plate occurs. The relation between the structural arrangement of water molecules, slip at the wall, and the shear force is studied. The relation between the slip and the locking/unlocking of water molecules to metal atoms is also studied

  3. Single-particle Schroedinger fluid. I. Formulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kan, K.K.; Griffin, J.J.

    1976-01-01

    The problem of a single quantal particle moving in a time-dependent external potential well is formulated specifically to emphasize and develop the fluid dynamical aspects of the matter flow. This idealized problem, the single-particle Schroedinger fluid, is shown to exhibit already a remarkably rich variety of fluid dynamical features, including compressible flow and line vortices. It provides also a sufficient framework to encompass simultaneously various simplified fluidic models for nuclei which have earlier been postulated on an ad hoc basis, and to illuminate their underlying restrictions. Explicit solutions of the single-particle Schroedinger fluid problem are studied in the adiabatic limit for their mathematical and physical implications (especially regarding the collective kinetic energy). The basic generalizations for extension of the treatment to the many-body Schroedinger fluid are set forth

  4. 4D Flow Analysis of BAV-Related Fluid-Dynamic Alterations: Evidences of Wall Shear Stress Alterations in Absence of Clinically-Relevant Aortic Anatomical Remodeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Filippo Piatti

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Bicuspid aortic valve (BAV is the most common congenital cardiac disease and is a foremost risk factor for aortopathies. Despite the genetic basis of BAV and of the associated aortopathies, BAV-related alterations in aortic fluid-dynamics, and particularly in wall shear stresses (WSSs, likely play a role in the progression of aortopathy, and may contribute to its pathogenesis. To test whether WSS may trigger aortopathy, in this study we used 4D Flow sequences of phase-contrast cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (CMR to quantitatively compare the in vivo fluid dynamics in the thoracic aorta of two groups of subjects: (i five prospectively enrolled young patients with normo-functional BAV and with no aortic dilation and (ii ten age-matched healthy volunteers. Through the semi-automated processing of 4D Flow data, the aortic bulk flow at peak systole was quantified, and WSSs acting on the endothelium of the ascending aorta were characterized throughout the systolic phase in terms of magnitude and time-dependency through a method recently developed by our group. Variables computed for each BAV patient were compared vs. the corresponding distribution of values obtained for healthy controls. In BAV patients, ascending aorta diameter was measured on cine-CMR images at baseline and at 3-year follow-up. As compared to controls, normo-functional BAV patients were characterized by minor bulk flow disturbances at peak systole. However, they were characterized by evident alterations of WSS distribution and peak values in the ascending aorta. In particular, in four BAV patients, who were characterized by right-left leaflet fusion, WSS peak values exceeded by 27–46% the 90th percentile of the distribution obtained for healthy volunteers. Only in the BAV patient with right-non-coronary leaflet fusion the same threshold was exceeded by 132%. Also, evident alterations in the time-dependency of WSS magnitude and direction were observed. Despite, these fluid

  5. Evaluation of zinc oxide nanoparticles toxicity on marine algae chlorella vulgaris through flow cytometric, cytotoxicity and oxidative stress analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suman, T Y; Radhika Rajasree, S R; Kirubagaran, R

    2015-03-01

    The increasing industrial use of nanomaterials during the last decades poses a potential threat to the environment and in particular to organisms living in the aquatic environment. In the present study, the toxicity of zinc oxide nanoparticles (ZnO NPs) was investigated in Marine algae Chlorella vulgaris (C. vulgaris). High zinc dissociation from ZnONPs, releasing ionic zinc in seawater, is a potential route for zinc assimilation and ZnONPs toxicity. To examine the mechanism of toxicity, C. vulgaris were treated with 50mg/L, 100mg/L, 200mg/L and 300 mg/L ZnO NPs for 24h and 72h. The detailed cytotoxicity assay showed a substantial reduction in the viability dependent on dose and exposure. Further, flow cytometry revealed the significant reduction in C. vulgaris viable cells to higher ZnO NPs. Significant reductions in LDH level were noted for ZnO NPs at 300 mg/L concentration. The activity of antioxidant enzyme superoxide dismutase (SOD) significantly increased in the C. vulgaris exposed to 200mg/L and 300 mg/L ZnO NPs. The content of non-enzymatic antioxidant glutathione (GSH) significantly decreased in the groups with a ZnO NPs concentration of higher than 100mg/L. The level of lipid peroxidation (LPO) was found to increase as the ZnO NPs dose increased. The FT-IR analyses suggested surface chemical interaction between nanoparticles and algal cells. The substantial morphological changes and cell wall damage were confirmed through microscopic analyses (FESEM and CM). Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Geopotential Stress

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schiffer, Christian; Nielsen, S.B.

    Density heterogeneity in the Earth’s lithosphere causes lateral pressure variations. Horizontal gradients of the vertically integrated lithostatic pressure, the Geopotential Energy (GPE), are a source of stresses (Geopotential Stress) that contribute to the Earth’s Stress Field. In theory the GPE...... is linearly related to the lithospheric part of the Geoid. The Geopotential Stress can be calculated if either the density structure and as a consequence the GPE or the lithospheric contribution to the Geoid is known. The lithospheric Geoid is usually obtained by short pass filtering of satellite Geoid...... are not entirely suitable for the stress calculations but can be compiled and adjusted. We present an approach in which a global lithospheric density model based on CRUST2.0 is obtained by simultaneously fitting topography and surface heat flow in the presence of isostatic compensation and long-wavelength lateral...

  7. Determination of wall shear stress from mean velocity and Reynolds shear stress profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volino, Ralph J.; Schultz, Michael P.

    2018-03-01

    An analytical method is presented for determining the Reynolds shear stress profile in steady, two-dimensional wall-bounded flows using the mean streamwise velocity. The method is then utilized with experimental data to determine the local wall shear stress. The procedure is applicable to flows on smooth and rough surfaces with arbitrary pressure gradients. It is based on the streamwise component of the boundary layer momentum equation, which is transformed into inner coordinates. The method requires velocity profiles from at least two streamwise locations, but the formulation of the momentum equation reduces the dependence on streamwise gradients. The method is verified through application to laminar flow solutions and turbulent DNS results from both zero and nonzero pressure gradient boundary layers. With strong favorable pressure gradients, the method is shown to be accurate for finding the wall shear stress in cases where the Clauser fit technique loses accuracy. The method is then applied to experimental data from the literature from zero pressure gradient studies on smooth and rough walls, and favorable and adverse pressure gradient cases on smooth walls. Data from very near the wall are not required for determination of the wall shear stress. Wall friction velocities obtained using the present method agree with those determined in the original studies, typically to within 2%.

  8. Novel Formulations for Antimicrobial Peptides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Maria Carmona-Ribeiro

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Peptides in general hold much promise as a major ingredient in novel supramolecular assemblies. They may become essential in vaccine design, antimicrobial chemotherapy, cancer immunotherapy, food preservation, organs transplants, design of novel materials for dentistry, formulations against diabetes and other important strategical applications. This review discusses how novel formulations may improve the therapeutic index of antimicrobial peptides by protecting their activity and improving their bioavailability. The diversity of novel formulations using lipids, liposomes, nanoparticles, polymers, micelles, etc., within the limits of nanotechnology may also provide novel applications going beyond antimicrobial chemotherapy.

  9. Novel Formulations for Antimicrobial Peptides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carmona-Ribeiro, Ana Maria; Carrasco, Letícia Dias de Melo

    2014-01-01

    Peptides in general hold much promise as a major ingredient in novel supramolecular assemblies. They may become essential in vaccine design, antimicrobial chemotherapy, cancer immunotherapy, food preservation, organs transplants, design of novel materials for dentistry, formulations against diabetes and other important strategical applications. This review discusses how novel formulations may improve the therapeutic index of antimicrobial peptides by protecting their activity and improving their bioavailability. The diversity of novel formulations using lipids, liposomes, nanoparticles, polymers, micelles, etc., within the limits of nanotechnology may also provide novel applications going beyond antimicrobial chemotherapy. PMID:25302615

  10. A Study of Nonlinear Elasticity Effects on Permeability of Stress Sensitive Shale Rocks Using an Improved Coupled Flow and Geomechanics Model: A Case Study of the Longmaxi Shale in China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chenji Wei

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Gas transport in shale gas reservoirs is largely affected by rock properties such as permeability. These properties are often sensitive to the in-situ stress state changes. Accurate modeling of shale gas transport in shale reservoir rocks considering the stress sensitive effects on rock petrophysical properties is important for successful shale gas extraction. Nonlinear elasticity in stress sensitive reservoir rocks depicts the nonlinear stress-strain relationship, yet it is not thoroughly studied in previous reservoir modeling works. In this study, an improved coupled flow and geomechanics model that considers nonlinear elasticity is proposed. The model is based on finite element methods, and the nonlinear elasticity in the model is validated with experimental data on shale samples selected from the Longmaxi Formation in Sichuan Basin China. Numerical results indicate that, in stress sensitive shale rocks, nonlinear elasticity affects shale permeability, shale porosity, and distributions of effective stress and pore pressure. Elastic modulus change is dependent on not only in-situ stress state but also stress history path. Without considering nonlinear elasticity, the modeling of shale rock permeability in Longmaxi Formation can overestimate permeability values by 1.6 to 53 times.

  11. Effect of Preoperative Low Maximal Flow Rate on Postoperative Voiding Trials after the Midurethral Sling Procedure in Women with Stress Urinary Incontinence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chae, Ji Y; Bae, Jae H; Lee, Jeong G; Park, Hong S; Moon, Du G; Oh, Mi M

    2017-06-02

    To evaluate the effects of preoperative low maximal flow rate (Qmax) on voiding trials after the midurethral sling (MUS) procedure in women with stress urinary incontinence (SUI). One hundred and sixty-eight women who underwent MUS procedure were enrolled. Preoperative free uroflowmetry was performed and patients were divided by Qmax. Low Qmax was defined as a Qmax under 15 mL/sec with voided volume at least 150 mL. Surgical results, failure of voiding trial, and postoperative uroflowmetry parameters were compared between the groups. Failure of voiding trial was defined by a PVR more than 100 mL on postoperative uroflowmetry. At the discharge day, there were 42 cases showing failure of voiding trial and 33 cases requiring CIC, but only one patient showed failure of voiding trial at 12 months postoperatively. Overall, 48 patients had preoperative low Qmax. Low Qmax group showed lower Qmax in all of postoperative uroflowmetry, but there were no significant differences in the rate of postoperative voiding trial failure or CIC. The low Qmax group was then divided into two groups according to the preoperative detrusor pressure at Qmax over and under 20 cmH 2 O in pressure flow study. Comparing the two groups, no significant differences were observed in the cure rate, voiding trial failure or CIC. Our results suggest that women with preoperative low Qmax experienced no definite unfavorable voiding problem from the MUS procedure compared to those with normal voiding function. MUS procedure may be regarded as a safe and successful procedure in SUI women with low Qmax. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  12. Stability of non-linear constitutive formulations for viscoelastic fluids

    CERN Document Server

    Siginer, Dennis A

    2014-01-01

    Stability of Non-linear Constitutive Formulations for Viscoelastic Fluids provides a complete and up-to-date view of the field of constitutive equations for flowing viscoelastic fluids, in particular on their non-linear behavior, the stability of these constitutive equations that is their predictive power, and the impact of these constitutive equations on the dynamics of viscoelastic fluid flow in tubes. This book gives an overall view of the theories and attendant methodologies developed independently of thermodynamic considerations as well as those set within a thermodynamic framework to derive non-linear rheological constitutive equations for viscoelastic fluids. Developments in formulating Maxwell-like constitutive differential equations as well as single integral constitutive formulations are discussed in the light of Hadamard and dissipative type of instabilities.

  13. Structural and numerical modeling of fluid flow and evolving stress fields at a transtensional stepover: A Miocene Andean porphyry copper system as a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuñez, R. C.; Griffith, W. A.; Mitchell, T. M.; Marquardt, C.; Iturrieta, P. C.; Cembrano, J. M.

    2017-12-01

    Obliquely convergent subduction orogens show both margin-parallel and margin-oblique fault systems that are spatially and temporally associated with ore deposits and geothermal systems within the volcanic arc. Fault orientation and mechanical interaction among different fault systems influence the stress field in these arrangements, thus playing a first order control on the regional to local-scale fluid migration paths as documented by the spatial distribution of fault-vein arrays. Our selected case study is a Miocene porphyry copper-type system that crops out in the precordillera of the Maule region along the Teno river Valley (ca. 35°S). Several regional to local faults were recognized in the field: (1) Two first-order, N-striking subvertical dextral faults overlapping at a right stepover; (2) Second-order, N60°E-striking steeply-dipping, dextral-normal faults located at the stepover, and (3) N40°-60°W striking subvertical, sinistral faults crossing the stepover zone. The regional and local scale geology is characterized by volcano-sedimentary rocks (Upper Eocene- Lower Miocene), intruded by Miocene granodioritic plutons (U-Pb zircon age of 18.2 ± 0.11 Ma) and coeval dikes. We implement a 2D boundary element displacement discontinuity method (BEM) model to test the mechanical feasibility of kinematic model of the structural development of the porphyry copper-type system in the stepover between N-striking faults. The model yields the stress field within the stepover region and shows slip and potential opening distribution along the N-striking master faults under a regionally imposed stress field. The model shows that σ1 rotates clockwise where the main faults approach each other, becoming EW when they overlap. This, in turn leads to the generation of both NE- and NW-striking faults within the stepover area. Model results are consistent with the structural and kinematic data collected in the field attesting for enhanced permeability and fluid flow transport

  14. Hamiltonian formulation for the Martin-Taylor model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vasconcelos, D.B.; Viana, R.L.

    1993-01-01

    Locally stochastic layer and its optimization are studied. In order to accomplish this task, it is employed a Hamiltonian formulation of magnetic field line flow with a subsequent application of Escande-Doveil renormalization method which have been extensively used to obtain accurate estimates of stochasticity thresholds in systems exhibiting Hamiltonian chaos. (author)

  15. Lagrangian vector field and Lagrangian formulation of partial differential equations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.Chen

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we consider the Lagrangian formulation of a system of second order quasilinear partial differential equations. Specifically we construct a Lagrangian vector field such that the flows of the vector field satisfy the original system of partial differential equations.

  16. Formulation and Evaluation of Mouth Dissolving Tablets of Tramadol ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Results: The tablet formulation prepared with Pharmaburst (F13) showed good flow properties, low disintegration time (15 s) and improved drug release (99 % at 30 min) compared with those of the reference product (88 % at 30 min) and passed 6 months accelerated stability test. Bioequivalence of the test product with that ...

  17. Predicting NonInertial Effects with Algebraic Stress Models which Account for Dissipation Rate Anisotropies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jongen, T.; Machiels, L.; Gatski, T. B.

    1997-01-01

    Three types of turbulence models which account for rotational effects in noninertial frames of reference are evaluated for the case of incompressible, fully developed rotating turbulent channel flow. The different types of models are a Coriolis-modified eddy-viscosity model, a realizable algebraic stress model, and an algebraic stress model which accounts for dissipation rate anisotropies. A direct numerical simulation of a rotating channel flow is used for the turbulent model validation. This simulation differs from previous studies in that significantly higher rotation numbers are investigated. Flows at these higher rotation numbers are characterized by a relaminarization on the cyclonic or suction side of the channel, and a linear velocity profile on the anticyclonic or pressure side of the channel. The predictive performance of the three types of models are examined in detail, and formulation deficiencies are identified which cause poor predictive performance for some of the models. Criteria are identified which allow for accurate prediction of such flows by algebraic stress models and their corresponding Reynolds stress formulations.

  18. Effects of auditory recall experience on regional cerebral blood flow as assessed by 99m-Tc-HMPAO SPECT in 13 Post Traumatic Stress Disorder patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pagani, M.M.E.; Salmaso, D.; Soares, J.; Aberg-Wistedt, A.; Sundin, O.; Jacobsson, H.; Larsson, S.A.; Haellstroem, T.

    2002-01-01

    Aim: Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) is a severe condition affecting about 8% of population and increasing the risk of depression. PTSD patients, among other symptoms, suffer from intrusive distressing recollections of the traumatic event and avoidance of stimuli related to trauma. The aim of this study was to investigate the differences in regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) between two groups of subjects exposed to the same type of traumatic stressor either developing PTSD or not. Materials and Methods: Thirteen subway drivers developing PTSD (PTSD) and 19 not developing PTSD (CTR) after being exposed to earlier person-under-the-train accident were included in the study. The rCBF distribution was compared between the two groups during a situation involving an auditory evoked re-experiencing of their traumatic event. 99m Tc-HMPAO SPECT, using a three-headed gamma camera, was performed and the radiopharmaceutical uptake in 7 bilateral regions of the brain was assessed using a standardised digitalised brain atlas. The chosen regions were those supposed to be involved in fear and emotional response and were located in the thalamus, limbic cortex and prefrontal, temporal and parietal lobes. Analysis of variance (ANOVA) was used to test the significance of the differences in flow in such functional regions. Results: In the global analysis, rCBF significantly differed between groups (0.04), hemispheres (p<0.02) and regions (p<0.0001). There was also a significant region x hemisphere interaction (p<0.0001). As compared to CTR, PTSD rCBF increased in the primary and associative auditory cortex (p<0.03) and in the temporal poles (p<0.02). Significant hemispheric differences were found in these latter regions (p<0.001 and p<0.0001, respectively), anterior cingulate cortex (p<0001) and multi-medial parietal association cortex (p<0.0001). Conclusions: Higher rCBF values in PTSD patients under recall of their traumatic experience were found as compared to CTR. The

  19. Neonates need tailored drug formulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allegaert, Karel

    2013-02-08

    Drugs are very strong tools used to improve outcome in neonates. Despite this fact and in contrast to tailored perfusion equipment, incubators or ventilators for neonates, we still commonly use drug formulations initially developed for adults. We would like to make the point that drug formulations given to neonates need to be tailored for this age group. Besides the obvious need to search for active compounds that take the pathophysiology of the newborn into account, this includes the dosage and formulation. The dosage or concentration should facilitate the administration of low amounts and be flexible since clearance is lower in neonates with additional extensive between-individual variability. Formulations need to be tailored for dosage variability in the low ranges and also to the clinical characteristics of neonates. A specific focus of interest during neonatal drug development therefore is a need to quantify and limit excipient exposure based on the available knowledge of their safety or toxicity. Until such tailored vials and formulations become available, compounding practices for drug formulations in neonates should be evaluated to guarantee the correct dosing, product stability and safety.

  20. Microcanonical formulation of quantum field theories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iwazaki, A.

    1984-03-01

    A microcanonical formulation of Euclidean quantum field theories is presented. In the formulation, correlation functions are given by a microcanonical ensemble average of fields. Furthermore, the perturbative equivalence of the formulation and the standard functional formulation is proved and the equipartition low is derived in our formulation. (author)

  1. Proceedings from glaciation and hydrogeology. Workshop on the impact of climate change and glaciations on rock stresses, groundwater flow and hydrochemistry - Past, present and future

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    King-Clayton, L.; Chapman, N. [eds.] [QuantiSci Ltd (United Kingdom); Ericsson, L.O. [ed.] [SKB, Stockholm (Sweden); Kautsky, F. [ed.] [SKI, Stockholm (Sweden)

    1997-04-01

    Assessment of the long term safety of radioactive waste disposal requires assimilation of evidence for the impact of climate change and especially glaciation on the geosphere, particularly in terms of its implications for: the distribution and stability of stress regimes, groundwater flux and flow patterns, groundwater chemistry, and thermal conditions. This workshop was intended to promote informal scientific discussion and the exchange of information and ideas between a wide range of disciplines such as climatology, glaciology, hydrology, hydrochemistry, rock mechanics and structural geology. Participants from outside the radioactive waste community were welcome. Of particular need were palaeosignatures, direct observational information and models of the impact of continental ice sheets and periglacial conditions on crystalline bedrock. The workshop has highlighted the fact that there is a great deal of interest in the area of climate change and its impact on the performance of a deep geological repository, but that there are still many issues remaining that require further resolution. The first half of these proceedings gives overviews of the discussions and conclusions from the different sessions at the workshop, as well as the general conclusion and summary. In the second half, summaries of 49 contributions to the workshop are printed. These summaries have been indexed separately.

  2. Proceedings from glaciation and hydrogeology. Workshop on the impact of climate change and glaciations on rock stresses, groundwater flow and hydrochemistry - Past, present and future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    King-Clayton, L.; Chapman, N.; Kautsky, F.

    1997-04-01

    Assessment of the long term safety of radioactive waste disposal requires assimilation of evidence for the impact of climate change and especially glaciation on the geosphere, particularly in terms of its implications for: the distribution and stability of stress regimes, groundwater flux and flow patterns, groundwater chemistry, and thermal conditions. This workshop was intended to promote informal scientific discussion and the exchange of information and ideas between a wide range of disciplines such as climatology, glaciology, hydrology, hydrochemistry, rock mechanics and structural geology. Participants from outside the radioactive waste community were welcome. Of particular need were palaeosignatures, direct observational information and models of the impact of continental ice sheets and periglacial conditions on crystalline bedrock. The workshop has highlighted the fact that there is a great deal of interest in the area of climate change and its impact on the performance of a deep geological repository, but that there are still many issues remaining that require further resolution. The first half of these proceedings gives overviews of the discussions and conclusions from the different sessions at the workshop, as well as the general conclusion and summary. In the second half, summaries of 49 contributions to the workshop are printed. These summaries have been indexed separately

  3. DNA Damage Response Resulting from Replication Stress Induced by Synchronization of Cells by Inhibitors of DNA Replication: Analysis by Flow Cytometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halicka, Dorota; Zhao, Hong; Li, Jiangwei; Garcia, Jorge; Podhorecka, Monika; Darzynkiewicz, Zbigniew

    2017-01-01

    Cell synchronization is often achieved by transient inhibition of DNA replication. When cultured in the presence of such inhibitors as hydroxyurea, aphidicolin or excess of thymidine the cells that become arrested at the entrance to S-phase upon release from the block initiate progression through S then G 2 and M. However, exposure to these inhibitors at concentrations commonly used to synchronize cells leads to activation of ATR and ATM protein kinases as well as phosphorylation of Ser139 of histone H2AX. This observation of DNA damage signaling implies that synchronization of cells by these inhibitors is inducing replication stress. Thus, a caution should be exercised while interpreting data obtained with use of cells synchronized this way since they do not represent unperturbed cell populations in a natural metabolic state. This chapter critically outlines virtues and vices of most cell synchronization methods. It also presents the protocol describing an assessment of phosphorylation of Ser139 on H2AX and activation of ATM in cells treated with aphidicolin, as a demonstrative of one of several DNA replication inhibitors that are being used for cell synchronization. Phosphorylation of Ser139H2AX and Ser1981ATM in individual cells is detected immunocytochemically with phospho-specific Abs and intensity of immunofluorescence is measured by flow cytometry. Concurrent measurement of cellular DNA content followed by multiparameter analysis allows one to correlate the extent of phosphorylation of these proteins in response to aphidicolin with the cell cycle phase.

  4. Functional assessment of sequential coronary artery fistula and coronary artery stenosis with fractional flow reserve and stress adenosine myocardial perfusion imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuan Leong Yew

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Coronary artery fistula is an abnormal connection between one coronary artery to another coronary artery or cardiac chambers. The coronary artery fistula may cause significant shunting of blood and cause “pseudo-stenosis” or “steal phenomenon”. This will also accentuate pre-existing mild-moderate de novo coronary lesions with resultant greater pressure gradient difference across the lesions. Thus, fractional flow reserve can be a useful tool to guide intervention decision on the coronary artery fistula. There are very few published reports regarding the use of FFR to assess coronary artery fistula. In fact, there is no outcome data regarding the deferment of coronary artery fistula intervention when the FFR is not physiologically significant. This case highlighted the use of FFR to evaluate the functional significance of coronary fistula in the setting of ischemia evaluation and it was proven to be safe to defer intervention with good 3 year clinical outcome. Stress adenosine myocardial perfusion imaging correlated with the FFR result.

  5. A patient-specific virtual stenotic model of the coronary artery to analyze the relationship between fractional flow reserve and wall shear stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kyung Eun; Kim, Gook Tae; Lee, Jeong Sang; Chung, Ju-Hyun; Shin, Eun-Seok; Shim, Eun Bo

    2016-11-01

    As the stenotic severity of a patient increases, fractional flow reserve (FFR) decreases, whereas the maximum wall shear stress (WSSmax) increases. However, the way in which these values can change according to stenotic severity has not previously been investigated. The aim of this study is to devise a virtual stenosis model to investigate variations in the coronary hemodynamic parameters of patients according to stenotic severity. To simulate coronary hemodynamics, a three-dimensional (3D) coronary artery model of computational fluid dynamics is coupled with a lumped parameter model of the coronary micro-vasculature and venous system. To validate the present method, we first simulated 13 patient-specific models of the coronary arteries and compared the results with those obtained clinically. Then, virtually narrowed coronary arterial models derived from the patient-specific cases were simulated to obtain the WSSmax and FFR values. The variations in FFR and WSSmax against the percentage of diameter stenosis in clinical cases were reproducible by the virtual stenosis models. We also found that the simulated FFR values were linearly correlated with the WSSmax values, but the linear slope varied by patient. We implemented 130 additional virtual models of stenosed coronary arteries based on data from 13 patients and obtained statistically meaningful results that were identical to the large-scale clinical studies. And the slope of the correlation line between FFR and WSSmax may help clinicians to design treatment plans for patients. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Cost efficiency of the non-associative flow rule simulation of an industrial component

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galdos, Lander; de Argandoña, Eneko Saenz; Mendiguren, Joseba

    2017-10-01

    In the last decade, metal forming industry is becoming more and more competitive. In this context, the FEM modeling has become a primary tool of information for the component and process design. Numerous researchers have been focused on improving the accuracy of the material models implemented on the FEM in order to improve the efficiency of the simulations. Aimed at increasing the efficiency of the anisotropic behavior modelling, in the last years the use of non-associative flow rule models (NAFR) has been presented as an alternative to the classic associative flow rule models (AFR). In this work, the cost efficiency of the used flow rule model has been numerically analyzed by simulating an industrial drawing operation with two different models of the same degree of flexibility: one AFR model and one NAFR model. From the present study, it has been concluded that the flow rule has a negligible influence on the final drawing prediction; this is mainly driven by the model parameter identification procedure. Even though the NAFR formulation is complex when compared to the AFR, the present study shows that the total simulation time while using explicit FE solvers has been reduced without loss of accuracy. Furthermore, NAFR formulations have an advantage over AFR formulations in parameter identification because the formulation decouples the yield stress and the Lankford coefficients.

  7. Tactile friction of topical formulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skedung, L; Buraczewska-Norin, I; Dawood, N; Rutland, M W; Ringstad, L

    2016-02-01

    The tactile perception is essential for all types of topical formulations (cosmetic, pharmaceutical, medical device) and the possibility to predict the sensorial response by using instrumental methods instead of sensory testing would save time and cost at an early stage product development. Here, we report on an instrumental evaluation method using tactile friction measurements to estimate perceptual attributes of topical formulations. Friction was measured between an index finger and an artificial skin substrate after application of formulations using a force sensor. Both model formulations of liquid crystalline phase structures with significantly different tactile properties, as well as commercial pharmaceutical moisturizing creams being more tactile-similar, were investigated. Friction coefficients were calculated as the ratio of the friction force to the applied load. The structures of the model formulations and phase transitions as a result of water evaporation were identified using optical microscopy. The friction device could distinguish friction coefficients between the phase structures, as well as the commercial creams after spreading and absorption into the substrate. In addition, phase transitions resulting in alterations in the feel of the formulations could be detected. A correlation was established between skin hydration and friction coefficient, where hydrated skin gave rise to higher friction. Also a link between skin smoothening and finger friction was established for the commercial moisturizing creams, although further investigations are needed to analyse this and correlations with other sensorial attributes in more detail. The present investigation shows that tactile friction measurements have potential as an alternative or complement in the evaluation of perception of topical formulations. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. New formulation of the discrete element method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojek, Jerzy; Zubelewicz, Aleksander; Madan, Nikhil; Nosewicz, Szymon

    2018-01-01

    A new original formulation of the discrete element method based on the soft contact approach is presented in this work. The standard DEM has heen enhanced by the introduction of the additional (global) deformation mode caused by the stresses in the particles induced by the contact forces. Uniform stresses and strains are assumed for each particle. The stresses are calculated from the contact forces. The strains are obtained using an inverse constitutive relationship. The strains allow us to obtain deformed particle shapes. The deformed shapes (ellipses) are taken into account in contact detection and evaluation of the contact forces. A simple example of a uniaxial compression of a rectangular specimen, discreti.zed with equal sized particles is simulated to verify the DDEM algorithm. The numerical example shows that a particle deformation changes the particle interaction and the distribution of forces in the discrete element assembly. A quantitative study of micro-macro elastic properties proves the enhanced capabilities of the DDEM as compared to standard DEM.

  9. Multilayer shallow shelf approximation: Minimisation formulation, finite element solvers and applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jouvet, Guillaume, E-mail: jouvet@vaw.baug.ethz.ch [Institut für Mathematik, Freie Universität Berlin (Germany); Laboratory of Hydraulics, Hydrology and Glaciology, ETH Zurich (Switzerland)

    2015-04-15

    In this paper, a multilayer generalisation of the Shallow Shelf Approximation (SSA) is considered. In this recent hybrid ice flow model, the ice thickness is divided into thin layers, which can spread out, contract and slide over each other in such a way that the velocity profile is layer-wise constant. Like the SSA (1-layer model), the multilayer model can be reformulated as a minimisation problem. However, unlike the SSA, the functional to be minimised involves a new penalisation term for the interlayer jumps of the velocity, which represents the vertical shear stresses induced by interlayer sliding. Taking advantage of this reformulation, numerical solvers developed for the SSA can be naturally extended layer-wise or column-wise. Numerical results show that the column-wise extension of a Newton multigrid solver proves to be robust in the sense that its convergence is barely influenced by the number of layers and the type of ice flow. In addition, the multilayer formulation appears to be naturally better conditioned than the one of the first-order approximation to face the anisotropic conditions of the sliding-dominant ice flow of ISMIP-HOM experiments.

  10. Matrix formulation of pebble circulation in the pebbed code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gougar, H.D.; Terry, W.K.; Ougouag, A.M.

    2002-01-01

    The PEBBED technique provides a foundation for equilibrium fuel cycle analysis and optimization in pebble-bed cores in which the fuel elements are continuously flowing and, if desired, recirculating. In addition to the modern analysis techniques used in or being developed for the code, PEBBED incorporates a novel nuclide-mixing algorithm that allows for sophisticated recirculation patterns using a matrix generated from basic core parameters. Derived from a simple partitioning of the pebble flow, the elements of the recirculation matrix are used to compute the spatially averaged density of each nuclide at the entry plane from the nuclide densities of pebbles emerging from the discharge conus. The order of the recirculation matrix is a function of the flexibility and sophistication of the fuel handling mechanism. This formulation for coupling pebble flow and neutronics enables core design and fuel cycle optimization to be performed by the manipulation of a few key core parameters. The formulation is amenable to modern optimization techniques. (author)

  11. Formulations and algorithms for problems on rock mass and support deformation during mining

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seryakov, VM

    2018-03-01

    The analysis of problem formulations to calculate stress-strain state of mine support and surrounding rocks mass in rock mechanics shows that such formulations incompletely describe the mechanical features of joint deformation in the rock mass–support system. The present paper proposes an algorithm to take into account the actual conditions of rock mass and support interaction and the algorithm implementation method to ensure efficient calculation of stresses in rocks and support.

  12. Physical degradation of proteins in well-defined fluid flows studied within a four-roll apparatus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, S; Krause, H J; Weber, C; Peukert, W

    2011-12-01

    In most applications of biotechnology and downstream processing proteins are exposed to fluid stresses in various flow configurations which often lead to the formation of unwanted protein aggregates. In this paper we present physical degradation experiments for proteins under well-defined flow conditions in a four-roll apparatus. The flow field was characterized numerically by computational fluid dynamics (CFD) and experimentally by particle image velocimetry (PIV). The local shear strain rate as well as the local shear and elongation rate was used to characterize the hydrodynamic stress environment acting on the proteins. Lysozyme was used as a model protein and subjected to well-defined fluid stresses in high and low stress environment. By using in situ turbidity measurements during stressing the aggregate formation was monitored directly in the fluid flow. An increase in absorbance at 350 nm was attributed to a higher content of visible particles (>1 µm). In addition to lysozyme, the formation of aggregates was confirmed for two larger proteins (bovine serum albumin and alcohol dehydrogenase). Thus, the presented experimental setup is a helpful tool to monitor flow-induced protein aggregation with high reproducibility. For instance, screening experiments for formulation development of biopharmaceuticals for fill and finish operations can be performed in the lab-scale in a short time-period if the stress distributions in the application are transferred and applied in the four-roll mill. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Experimental and Numerical Analysis of Egg-Shaped Sewer Pipes Flow Performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuel Regueiro-Picallo

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available A Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD model was developed to analyze the open-channel flow in a new set of egg-shaped pipes for small combined sewer systems. The egg-shaped cross-section was selected after studying several geometries under different flow conditions. Once the egg-shaped cross-section was defined, a real-scale physical model was built and a series of partial-full flow experiments were performed in order to validate the numerical simulations. Furthermore, the numerical velocity distributions were compared with an experimental formulation for analytic geometries, with comparison results indicating a satisfactory concordance. After the hydraulic performance of the egg-shaped pipe was analyzed, the numerical model was used to compare the average velocity and shear stress against an equivalent area circular pipe under low flow conditions. The proposed egg shape showed a better flow performance up to a filling ratio of h/H = 0.25.

  14. A Galerkin least squares approach to viscoelastic flow.

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