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Sample records for flow modeling conceptual

  1. Testing conceptual unsaturated zone flow models for Yucca Mountain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, T.P.; Lehman, L.L. [L. Lehman & Associates, Inc., Burnsville, MN (United States); Nieber, J.L. [Univ. of Minnesota, St. Paul, MN (United States)

    1994-12-31

    An important component of site characterization and suitability assessment of the proposed nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada is determination of the most appropriate conceptual model of the hydrologic mechanisms governing saturated and unsaturated flow for the site. As observers in the ITNRAVAL Unsaturated Zone Working Group, L. Lehman & Associates conducted a modeling exercise which numerically examined alternative conceptual flow models. Information was provided to the Working Group by the U.S. Geological Survey. Additional published data were utilized to fill in data gaps and to provide additional confidence in results. Data were modeled utilizing one and two dimensional matrix and fracture numerical models. Good agreement was obtained using a 2-dimensional dual porosity fracture flow model. Additional measures are needed to constrain the field conditions enough to validate conceptual models using numerical models. Geochemical data on tritium, chlorine-36, or carbon-14 concentrations or temperature profiles which can give estimates of time since recharge for water in the unsaturated zone, are needed to eliminate the non-uniqueness of various model solutions.

  2. Understanding hydrological flow paths in conceptual catchment models using uncertainty and sensitivity analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mockler, Eva M.; O'Loughlin, Fiachra E.; Bruen, Michael

    2016-05-01

    Increasing pressures on water quality due to intensification of agriculture have raised demands for environmental modeling to accurately simulate the movement of diffuse (nonpoint) nutrients in catchments. As hydrological flows drive the movement and attenuation of nutrients, individual hydrological processes in models should be adequately represented for water quality simulations to be meaningful. In particular, the relative contribution of groundwater and surface runoff to rivers is of interest, as increasing nitrate concentrations are linked to higher groundwater discharges. These requirements for hydrological modeling of groundwater contribution to rivers initiated this assessment of internal flow path partitioning in conceptual hydrological models. In this study, a variance based sensitivity analysis method was used to investigate parameter sensitivities and flow partitioning of three conceptual hydrological models simulating 31 Irish catchments. We compared two established conceptual hydrological models (NAM and SMARG) and a new model (SMART), produced especially for water quality modeling. In addition to the criteria that assess streamflow simulations, a ratio of average groundwater contribution to total streamflow was calculated for all simulations over the 16 year study period. As observations time-series of groundwater contributions to streamflow are not available at catchment scale, the groundwater ratios were evaluated against average annual indices of base flow and deep groundwater flow for each catchment. The exploration of sensitivities of internal flow path partitioning was a specific focus to assist in evaluating model performances. Results highlight that model structure has a strong impact on simulated groundwater flow paths. Sensitivity to the internal pathways in the models are not reflected in the performance criteria results. This demonstrates that simulated groundwater contribution should be constrained by independent data to ensure results

  3. DEVELOPING AND PROPOSING A CONCEPTUAL MODEL OF THE FLOW EXPERIENCE DURING ONLINE INFORMATION SEARCH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lazoc Alina

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Information search is an essential part of the consumer`s decision making process. The online medium offers new opportunities and challenges for information search activities (in and outside the marketing context. We are interested in the way human information experiences and behaviors are affected by this. Very often online games and social web activities are perceived as challenging, engaging and enjoyable, while online information search is far below this evaluation. Our research proposal implies that using the online medium for information search may provoke enjoyable experiences through the flow state, which may in turn positively influence an individual`s exploratory information behavior and encourage his/her pro-active market behavior. The present study sets out to improve the understanding of the online medium`s impact on human`s exploratory behavior. We hypothesize that the inclusion of the online flow experience in our research model will better explain exploratory information search behaviors. A 11-component conceptual framework is proposed to explain the manifestations of flow, its personal and technological determinants and its behavioral consequence in the context of online information search. Our research has the primary purpose to present an integrated online flow model. Its secondary objective is to stimulate extended research in the area of informational behaviors in the digital age. The paper is organized in three sections. In the first section we briefly report the analysis results of the most relevant online flow theory literature and, drawing on it, we are trying to identify variables and relationships among these. In the second part we propose a research model and use prior flow models to specify a range of testable hypothesis. Drawing on the conceptual model developed, the last section of our study presents the final conclusions and proposes further steps in evaluating the model`s validity. Future research directions

  4. The site-scale saturated zone flow model for Yucca Mountain: Calibration of different conceptual models and their impact on flow paths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zyvoloski, G.; Kwicklis, E.; Eddebbarh, A.-A.; Arnold, B.; Faunt, C.; Robinson, B.A.

    2003-01-01

    This paper presents several different conceptual models of the Large Hydraulic Gradient (LHG) region north of Yucca Mountain and describes the impact of those models on groundwater flow near the potential high-level repository site. The results are based on a numerical model of site-scale saturated zone beneath Yucca Mountain. This model is used for performance assessment predictions of radionuclide transport and to guide future data collection and modeling activities. The numerical model is calibrated by matching available water level measurements using parameter estimation techniques, along with more informal comparisons of the model to hydrologic and geochemical information. The model software (hydrologic simulation code FEHM and parameter estimation software PEST) and model setup allows for efficient calibration of multiple conceptual models. Until now, the Large Hydraulic Gradient has been simulated using a low-permeability, east-west oriented feature, even though direct evidence for this feature is lacking. In addition to this model, we investigate and calibrate three additional conceptual models of the Large Hydraulic Gradient, all of which are based on a presumed zone of hydrothermal chemical alteration north of Yucca Mountain. After examining the heads and permeabilities obtained from the calibrated models, we present particle pathways from the potential repository that record differences in the predicted groundwater flow regime. The results show that Large Hydraulic Gradient can be represented with the alternate conceptual models that include the hydrothermally altered zone. The predicted pathways are mildly sensitive to the choice of the conceptual model and more sensitive to the quality of calibration in the vicinity on the repository. These differences are most likely due to different degrees of fit of model to data, and do not represent important differences in hydrologic conditions for the different conceptual models. ?? 2002 Elsevier Science B

  5. Exploring Hydrological Flow Paths in Conceptual Catchment Models using Variance-based Sensitivity Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mockler, E. M.; O'Loughlin, F.; Bruen, M. P.

    2013-12-01

    Conceptual rainfall runoff (CRR) models aim to capture the dominant hydrological processes in a catchment in order to predict the flows in a river. Most flood forecasting models focus on predicting total outflows from a catchment and often perform well without the correct distribution between individual pathways. However, modelling of water flow paths within a catchment, rather than its overall response, is specifically needed to investigate the physical and chemical transport of matter through the various elements of the hydrological cycle. Focus is increasingly turning to accurately quantifying the internal movement of water within these models to investigate if the simulated processes contributing to the total flows are realistic in the expectation of generating more robust models. Parameter regionalisation is required if such models are to be widely used, particularly in ungauged catchments. However, most regionalisation studies to date have typically consisted of calibrations and correlations of parameters with catchment characteristics, or some variations of this. In order for a priori parameter estimation in this manner to be possible, a model must be parametrically parsimonious while still capturing the dominant processes of the catchment. The presence of parameter interactions within most CRR model structures can make parameter prediction in ungauged basins very difficult, as the functional role of the parameter within the model may not be uniquely identifiable. We use a variance based sensitivity analysis method to investigate parameter sensitivities and interactions in the global parameter space of three CRR models, simulating a set of 30 Irish catchments within a variety of hydrological settings over a 16 year period. The exploration of sensitivities of internal flow path partitioning was a specific focus and correlations between catchment characteristics and parameter sensitivities were also investigated to assist in evaluating model performances

  6. BUILDING CONCEPTUAL AND MATHEMATICAL MODEL FOR WATER FLOW AND SOLUTE TRANSPORT IN THE UNSATURATED ZONE AT KOSNICA SITE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stanko Ružičić

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Conceptual model of flow and solute transport in unsaturated zone at Kosnica site, which is the basis for modeling pollution migration through the unsaturated zone to groundwater, is set up. The main characteristics of the unsaturated zone of the Kosnica site are described. Detailed description of investigated profile of unsaturated zone, with all necessary analytical results performed and used in building of conceptual models, is presented. Experiments that are in progress and processes which are modeled are stated. Monitoring of parameters necessary for calibration of models is presented. The ultimate goal of research is risk assessment of groundwater contamination at Kosnica site that has its source in or on unsaturated zone.

  7. Groundwater Flow and Thermal Modeling to Support a Preferred Conceptual Model for the Large Hydraulic Gradient North of Yucca Mountain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McGraw, D.; Oberlander, P.

    2007-12-18

    The purpose of this study is to report on the results of a preliminary modeling framework to investigate the causes of the large hydraulic gradient north of Yucca Mountain. This study builds on the Saturated Zone Site-Scale Flow and Transport Model (referenced herein as the Site-scale model (Zyvoloski, 2004a), which is a three-dimensional saturated zone model of the Yucca Mountain area. Groundwater flow was simulated under natural conditions. The model framework and grid design describe the geologic layering and the calibration parameters describe the hydrogeology. The Site-scale model is calibrated to hydraulic heads, fluid temperature, and groundwater flowpaths. One area of interest in the Site-scale model represents the large hydraulic gradient north of Yucca Mountain. Nearby water levels suggest over 200 meters of hydraulic head difference in less than 1,000 meters horizontal distance. Given the geologic conceptual models defined by various hydrogeologic reports (Faunt, 2000, 2001; Zyvoloski, 2004b), no definitive explanation has been found for the cause of the large hydraulic gradient. Luckey et al. (1996) presents several possible explanations for the large hydraulic gradient as provided below: The gradient is simply the result of flow through the upper volcanic confining unit, which is nearly 300 meters thick near the large gradient. The gradient represents a semi-perched system in which flow in the upper and lower aquifers is predominantly horizontal, whereas flow in the upper confining unit would be predominantly vertical. The gradient represents a drain down a buried fault from the volcanic aquifers to the lower Carbonate Aquifer. The gradient represents a spillway in which a fault marks the effective northern limit of the lower volcanic aquifer. The large gradient results from the presence at depth of the Eleana Formation, a part of the Paleozoic upper confining unit, which overlies the lower Carbonate Aquifer in much of the Death Valley region. The

  8. Research program to develop and validate conceptual models for flow and transport through unsaturated, fractured rock; Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glass, R.J.; Tidwell, V.C.

    1991-09-01

    As part of the Yucca Mountain Project, our research program to develop and validate conceptual models for flow and transport through unsaturated fractured rock integrates fundamental physical experimentation with conceptual model formulation and mathematical modeling. Our research is directed toward developing and validating macroscopic, continuum-based models and supporting effective property models because of their widespread utility within the context of this project. Success relative to the development and validation of effective property models is predicted on a firm understanding of the basic physics governing flow through fractured media, specifically in the areas of unsaturated flow and transport in a single fracture and fracture-matrix interaction.

  9. GIS Conceptual Data Model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    In order to set up a conceptual data model that reflects the real world as accurately as possible,this paper firstly reviews and analyzes the disadvantages of previous conceptual data models used by traditional GIS in simulating geographic space,gives a new explanation to geographic space and analyzes its various essential characteristics.Finally,this paper proposes several detailed key points for designing a new type of GIS data model and gives a simple holistic GIS data model.

  10. Conceptual Model of the Geometry and Physics of Water Flow in a Fractured Basalt Vadose Zone: Box Canyon Site, Idaho

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Faybishenko, Boris [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Doughty, Christine [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Steiger, Michael [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Long, Jane C.S. [Univ. of Nevada, Reno, NV (US). Mackay School of Mines; Wood, Tom [Parsons Engineering, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Jacobsen, Janet [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Lore, Jason [Stanford Univ., CA (United States); Zawislanski, Peter T. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1999-03-01

    A conceptual model of the geometry and physics of water flow in a fractured basalt vadose zone was developed based on the results of lithological studies and a series of ponded infiltration tests conducted at the Box Canyon site near the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) in Idaho. The infiltration tests included one two-week test in 1996, three two-day tests in 1997, and one four-day test in 1997. For the various tests, initial infiltration rates ranged from 4.1 cm/day to 17.7 cm/day and then decreased with time, presumably due to mechanical or microbiological clogging of fractures and vesicularbasalt in the near-surface zone, as well as the effect of entrapped air. The subsurface moisture redistribution was monitored with tensiometers, neutron logging, time domain reflectrometry and ground penetrating radar. A conservative tracer, potassium bromide, was added to the pond water at a concentration of 3 g/L to monitor water flow with electrical resistivity probes and water sampling. Analysis of the data showed evidence of preferential flow rather than the propagation of a uniform wetting front. We propose a conceptual model describing the saturation-desaturation behavior of the basalt, in which rapid preferential flow through vertical column-bounding fractures occurs from the surface to the base of the basalt flow. After the rapid wetting of column-bounding fractures, a gradual wetting of other fractures and the basalt matrix occurs. Fractures that are saturated early in the tests may become desaturated thereafter, which we attribute to the redistribution of water between fractures and matrix. Lateral movement of water was also observed within a horizontal central fracture zone and rubble zone, which could have important implications for contaminant accumulation at contaminated sites.

  11. Conceptual model and numerical simulation of the groundwater-flow system of Bainbridge Island, Washington

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frans, Lonna M.; Bachmann, Matthew P.; Sumioka, Steve S.; Olsen, Theresa D.

    2011-01-01

    Groundwater is the sole source of drinking water for the population of Bainbridge Island. Increased use of groundwater supplies on Bainbridge Island as the population has grown over time has created concern about the quantity of water available and whether saltwater intrusion will occur as groundwater usage increases. A groundwater-flow model was developed to aid in the understanding of the groundwater system and the effects of groundwater development alternatives on the water resources of Bainbridge Island. Bainbridge Island is underlain by unconsolidated deposits of glacial and nonglacial origin. The surficial geologic units and the deposits at depth were differentiated into aquifers and confining units on the basis of areal extent and general water-bearing characteristics. Eleven principal hydrogeologic units are recognized in the study area and form the basis of the groundwater-flow model. A transient variable-density groundwater-flow model of Bainbridge Island and the surrounding area was developed to simulate current (2008) groundwater conditions. The model was calibrated to water levels measured during 2007 and 2008 using parameter estimation (PEST) to minimize the weighted differences or residuals between simulated and measured hydraulic head. The calibrated model was used to make some general observations of the groundwater system in 2008. Total flow through the groundwater system was about 31,000 acre-ft/ yr. The recharge to the groundwater system was from precipitation and septic-system returns. Groundwater flow to Bainbridge Island accounted for about 1,000 acre-ft/ yr or slightly more than 5 percent of the recharge amounts. Groundwater discharge was predominately to streams, lakes, springs, and seepage faces (16,000 acre-ft/yr) and directly to marine waters (10,000 acre-ft/yr). Total groundwater withdrawals in 2008 were slightly more than 6 percent (2,000 acre-ft/yr) of the total flow. The calibrated model was used to simulate predevelopment conditions

  12. Conceptual IT model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnaoudova, Kristina; Stanchev, Peter

    2015-11-01

    The business processes are the key asset for every organization. The design of the business process models is the foremost concern and target among an organization's functions. Business processes and their proper management are intensely dependent on the performance of software applications and technology solutions. The paper is attempt for definition of new Conceptual model of IT service provider, it could be examined as IT focused Enterprise model, part of Enterprise Architecture (EA) school.

  13. Conceptual modeling and the Lexicon

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoppenbrouwers, J.J.A.C.

    1997-01-01

    'Conceptual Modeling and the Lexicon' investigates the linguistic aspects of conceptual modeling, concentrating on the terminology part. The author combines theoretical ideas and empirical facts from various scientific fields, such as cognitive psychology, computer science, lexicography, psycholingu

  14. Interaction of various flow systems in small alpine catchments: conceptual model of the upper Gurk Valley aquifer, Carinthia, Austria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilberg, Sylke; Riepler, Franz

    2016-08-01

    Small alpine valleys usually show a heterogeneous hydraulic situation. Recurring landslides create temporal barriers for the surface runoff. As a result of these postglacial processes, temporal lakes form, and thus lacustrine fine-grained sedimentation intercalates with alluvial coarse-grained layers. A sequence of alluvial sediments (confined and thus well protected aquifers) and lacustrine sediments (aquitards) is characteristic for such an environment. The hydrogeological situation of fractured hard-rock aquifers in the framing mountain ranges is characterized by superficially high hydraulic conductivities as the result of tectonic processes, deglaciation and postglacial weathering. Fracture permeability and high hydraulic gradients in small-scaled alpine catchments result in the interaction of various flow systems in various kinds of aquifers. Spatial restrictions and conflicts between the current land use and the requirements of drinking-water protection represent a special challenge for water resource management in usually densely populated small alpine valleys. The presented case study describes hydrogeological investigations within the small alpine valley of the upper Gurktal (Upper Carinthia, Austria) and the adjacent Höllenberg Massif (1,772 m above sea level). Hydrogeological mapping, drilling, and hydrochemical and stable isotope analyses of springs and groundwater were conducted to identify a sustainable drinking-water supply for approximately 1,500 inhabitants. The results contribute to a conceptual hydrogeological model with three interacting flow systems. The local and the intermediate flow systems are assigned to the catchment of the Höllenberg Massif, whereas the regional flow system refers to the bordering Gurktal Alps to the north and provides an appropriate drinking water reservoir.

  15. Critical flow-storm approach to total maximum daily load(TMDL) development: an analytical conceptual model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Harry X.ZHANG; Shaw L.YU

    2008-01-01

    One of the key challenges in the total max-imum daily load (TMDL) development process is how to define the critical condition for a receiving water-body. The main concern in using a continuous simu-lation approach is the absence of any guarantee that the most critical condition will be captured during the selected representative hydrologic period, given the scar-city of long-term continuous data. The objectives of this paper are to clearly address the critical condition in the TMDL development process and to compare continu-ous and evEnt-based approaches in defining critical con-dition during TMDL development for a waterbody impacted by both point and nonpoint source pollution. A practical, event-based critical flow-storm (CFS) approach was developed to explicitly addresses the crit-ical condition as a combination of a low stream flow and a storm event of a selected magnitude, both having cer-tain frequencies of occurrence. This paper illustrated the CFS concept and provided its theoretical basis using a derived analytical conceptual model. The CFS approach clearly defined a critical condition, obtained reasonable results and could be considered as an alternative method in TMDL development.

  16. High flows in the 21st Century: analysis with a simple conceptual hydrological models using the input of 3 GCMs (A2 scenario)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lanen, H.A.J.; Wanders, N.

    2011-01-01

    The study on high flows with a conceptual hydrological model leads to the following conclusions for about 1500 randomly selected land points across the world that have an intermediate soil water supply capacity and an intermediary responding groundwater system: · the probability distributions of Q10

  17. Conceptual Model for Flow and Transport through Unsaturated Silty Loams and Sands in North Mississippi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coleman, S. H.; Corley, D. S.; van Volkenburg, G. J.; Wildman, J. C.; Holt, R. M.

    2008-05-01

    We conducted a five-day ponded infiltration test at the University of Mississippi (UM) Soil Moisture Observatory (SMO). The 5 acre SMO is located in a former agricultural field at the UM Field Station, a 740 acre tract of land with restricted access located 11 miles from the UM campus in Oxford, Mississippi. At the infiltration site, the near surface soils consist of about infiltration test, the soil surface was leveled and a 2.0 m diameter infiltration ring was installed. Six neutron access tubes were installed to a depth of 2.5 m around the infiltration ring. A constant ponding depth of 13 cm was maintained throughout the duration of the experiment. Blue dye was added to the water to enable mapping of infiltration paths. During the experiment, moisture content profiles were periodically measured at each neutron access tube. Neutron probe data suggested that infiltration was dominated by capillary forces. However, later mapping of a trench through the infiltration site revealed that infiltration in the upper silt loam was dominated by macropore flow along roots and microfractures in the soil. In the sand, gravity driven fingers formed below the root-zone, where deep roots focused flow.

  18. Conceptual Modeling for Discrete-Event Simulation

    CERN Document Server

    Robinson, Stewart

    2010-01-01

    What is a conceptual model? How is conceptual modeling performed in general and in specific modeling domains? What is the role of established approaches in conceptual modeling? This book addresses these issues

  19. Ecosystem conceptual model- Mercury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alpers, Charles N.; Eagles-Smith, Collin A.; Foe, Chris; Klasing, Susan; Marvin-DiPasquale, Mark C.; Slotton, Darell G.; Windham-Myers, Lisamarie

    2008-01-01

    mercury conceptual model and its four submodels (1. Methylation, 2. Bioaccumulation, 3. Human Health Effects, and 4. Wildlife Heath Effects) can be used to understand the general relationships among drivers and outcomes associated with mercury cycling in the Delta. Several linkages between important drivers and outcomes have been identified as important but highly uncertain (i.e. poorly understood). For example, there may be significant wildlife health effect of mercury on mammals and reptiles in the Delta, but there is currently very little or no information about it. The characteristics of such linkages are important when prioritizing and funding restoration projects and associated monitoring in the Delta and its tributaries.

  20. Event-Based Conceptual Modeling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bækgaard, Lars

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of the paper is to obtain insight into and provide practical advice for event-based conceptual modeling. We analyze a set of event concepts and use the results to formulate a conceptual event model that is used to identify guidelines for creation of dynamic process models and static...... information models. We characterize events as short-duration processes that have participants, consequences, and properties, and that may be modeled in terms of information structures. The conceptual event model is used to characterize a variety of event concepts and it is used to illustrate how events can...... be used to integrate dynamic modeling of processes and static modeling of information structures. The results are unique in the sense that no other general event concept has been used to unify a similar broad variety of seemingly incompatible event concepts. The general event concept can be used...

  1. Chance-constrained overland flow modeling for improving conceptual distributed hydrologic simulations based on scaling representation of sub-daily rainfall variability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Jing-Cheng; Huang, Guohe; Huang, Yuefei; Zhang, Hua; Li, Zhong; Chen, Qiuwen

    2015-08-15

    Lack of hydrologic process representation at the short time-scale would lead to inadequate simulations in distributed hydrological modeling. Especially for complex mountainous watersheds, surface runoff simulations are significantly affected by the overland flow generation, which is closely related to the rainfall characteristics at a sub-time step. In this paper, the sub-daily variability of rainfall intensity was considered using a probability distribution, and a chance-constrained overland flow modeling approach was proposed to capture the generation of overland flow within conceptual distributed hydrologic simulations. The integrated modeling procedures were further demonstrated through a watershed of China Three Gorges Reservoir area, leading to an improved SLURP-TGR hydrologic model based on SLURP. Combined with rainfall thresholds determined to distinguish various magnitudes of daily rainfall totals, three levels of significance were simultaneously employed to examine the hydrologic-response simulation. Results showed that SLURP-TGR could enhance the model performance, and the deviation of runoff simulations was effectively controlled. However, rainfall thresholds were so crucial for reflecting the scaling effect of rainfall intensity that optimal levels of significance and rainfall threshold were 0.05 and 10 mm, respectively. As for the Xiangxi River watershed, the main runoff contribution came from interflow of the fast store. Although slight differences of overland flow simulations between SLURP and SLURP-TGR were derived, SLURP-TGR was found to help improve the simulation of peak flows, and would improve the overall modeling efficiency through adjusting runoff component simulations. Consequently, the developed modeling approach favors efficient representation of hydrological processes and would be expected to have a potential for wide applications.

  2. Model Breaking Points Conceptualized

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vig, Rozy; Murray, Eileen; Star, Jon R.

    2014-01-01

    Current curriculum initiatives (e.g., National Governors Association Center for Best Practices and Council of Chief State School Officers 2010) advocate that models be used in the mathematics classroom. However, despite their apparent promise, there comes a point when models break, a point in the mathematical problem space where the model cannot,…

  3. Model Breaking Points Conceptualized

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vig, Rozy; Murray, Eileen; Star, Jon R.

    2014-01-01

    Current curriculum initiatives (e.g., National Governors Association Center for Best Practices and Council of Chief State School Officers 2010) advocate that models be used in the mathematics classroom. However, despite their apparent promise, there comes a point when models break, a point in the mathematical problem space where the model cannot,…

  4. Chance-constrained overland flow modeling for improving conceptual distributed hydrologic simulations based on scaling representation of sub-daily rainfall variability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Jing-Cheng [State Key Laboratory of Hydroscience & Engineering, Department of Hydraulic Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Huang, Guohe, E-mail: huang@iseis.org [Institute for Energy, Environment and Sustainable Communities, University of Regina, Regina, Saskatchewan S4S 0A2 (Canada); Huang, Yuefei [State Key Laboratory of Hydroscience & Engineering, Department of Hydraulic Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Zhang, Hua [College of Science and Engineering, Texas A& M University — Corpus Christi, Corpus Christi, TX 78412-5797 (United States); Li, Zhong [Institute for Energy, Environment and Sustainable Communities, University of Regina, Regina, Saskatchewan S4S 0A2 (Canada); Chen, Qiuwen [Center for Eco-Environmental Research, Nanjing Hydraulics Research Institute, Nanjing 210029 (China)

    2015-08-15

    Lack of hydrologic process representation at the short time-scale would lead to inadequate simulations in distributed hydrological modeling. Especially for complex mountainous watersheds, surface runoff simulations are significantly affected by the overland flow generation, which is closely related to the rainfall characteristics at a sub-time step. In this paper, the sub-daily variability of rainfall intensity was considered using a probability distribution, and a chance-constrained overland flow modeling approach was proposed to capture the generation of overland flow within conceptual distributed hydrologic simulations. The integrated modeling procedures were further demonstrated through a watershed of China Three Gorges Reservoir area, leading to an improved SLURP-TGR hydrologic model based on SLURP. Combined with rainfall thresholds determined to distinguish various magnitudes of daily rainfall totals, three levels of significance were simultaneously employed to examine the hydrologic-response simulation. Results showed that SLURP-TGR could enhance the model performance, and the deviation of runoff simulations was effectively controlled. However, rainfall thresholds were so crucial for reflecting the scaling effect of rainfall intensity that optimal levels of significance and rainfall threshold were 0.05 and 10 mm, respectively. As for the Xiangxi River watershed, the main runoff contribution came from interflow of the fast store. Although slight differences of overland flow simulations between SLURP and SLURP-TGR were derived, SLURP-TGR was found to help improve the simulation of peak flows, and would improve the overall modeling efficiency through adjusting runoff component simulations. Consequently, the developed modeling approach favors efficient representation of hydrological processes and would be expected to have a potential for wide applications. - Highlights: • We develop an improved hydrologic model considering the scaling effect of rainfall. • A

  5. Use of models in conceptual design

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bonnema, G. Maarten; Houten, van Fred J.A.M.

    2006-01-01

    This article investigates the use of product models by conceptual designers. After a short introduction, abstraction applied in conceptual design is described. A model that places conceptual design in a three-dimensional space is used. Applications of conceptual design from the literature are used t

  6. Use of models in conceptual design

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bonnema, Gerrit Maarten; van Houten, Frederikus J.A.M.

    2006-01-01

    This article investigates the use of product models by conceptual designers. After a short introduction, abstraction applied in conceptual design is described. A model that places conceptual design in a three-dimensional space is used. Applications of conceptual design from the literature are used t

  7. A conceptual hydrogeologic model for the hydrogeologic framework, geochemistry, and groundwater-flow system of the Edwards-Trinity and related aquifers in the Pecos County region, Texas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Jonathan V.; Stanton, Gregory P.; Bumgarner, Johnathan R.; Pearson, Daniel K.; Teeple, Andrew; Houston, Natalie A.; Payne, Jason; Musgrove, MaryLynn

    2013-01-01

    The Edwards-Trinity aquifer is a vital groundwater resource for agricultural, industrial, and municipal uses in the Trans-Pecos region of west Texas. A conceptual model of the hydrogeologic framework, geochemistry, and groundwater-flow system in the 4,700 square-mile study area was developed by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) in cooperation with the Middle Pecos Groundwater Conservation District, Pecos County, City of Fort Stockton, Brewster County, and Pecos County Water Control and Improvement District No. 1. The model was developed to gain a better understanding of the groundwater system and to establish a scientific foundation for resource-management decisions. Data and information were collected or obtained from various sources to develop the model. Lithologic information obtained from well reports and geophysical data were used to describe the hydrostratigraphy and structural features of the groundwater system, and aquifer-test data were used to estimate aquifer hydraulic properties. Groundwater-quality data were used to evaluate groundwater-flow paths, water and rock interaction, aquifer interaction, and the mixing of water from different sources. Groundwater-level data also were used to evaluate aquifer interaction as well as to develop a potentiometric-surface map, delineate regional groundwater divides, and describe regional groundwater-flow paths.

  8. Revised conceptualization of the North China Basin groundwater flow system: Groundwater age, heat and flow simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Guoliang; Han, Dongmei; Currell, Matthew J.; Zheng, Chunmiao

    2016-09-01

    Groundwater flow in deep sedimentary basins results from complex evolution processes on geological timescales. Groundwater flow systems conceptualized according to topography and/or groundwater table configuration generally assume a near-equilibrium state with the modern landscape. However, the time to reach such a steady state, and more generally the timescales of groundwater flow system evolution are key considerations for large sedimentary basins. This is true in the North China Basin (NCB), which has been studied for many years due to its importance as a groundwater supply. Despite many years of study, there remain contradictions between the generally accepted conceptual model of regional flow, and environmental tracer data. We seek to reconcile these contractions by conducting simulations of groundwater flow, age and heat transport in a three dimensional model, using an alternative conceptual model, based on geological, thermal, isotope and historical data. We infer flow patterns under modern hydraulic conditions using this new model and present the theoretical maximum groundwater ages under such a flow regime. The model results show that in contrast to previously accepted conceptualizations, most groundwater is discharged in the vicinity of the break-in-slope of topography at the boundary between the piedmont and central plain. Groundwater discharge to the ocean is in contrast small, and in general there are low rates of active flow in the eastern parts of the basin below the central and coastal plain. This conceptualization is more compatible with geochemical and geothermal data than the previous model. Simulated maximum groundwater ages of ∼1 Myrs below the central and coastal plain indicate that residual groundwater may be retained in the deep parts of the basin since being recharged during the last glacial period or earlier. The groundwater flow system has therefore probably not reached a new equilibrium state with modern-day hydraulic conditions. The

  9. Aspects of a conceptual groundwater flow model of the Serra Geral basalt aquifer (Sao Paulo, Brazil) from physical and structural geology data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, Amélia J.; Maldaner, Carlos H.; Negri, Francisco; Rouleau, Alain; Wahnfried, Ingo D.

    2016-08-01

    A preliminary conceptual model of groundwater flow was developed for the Serra Geral fractured basalt aquifer in order to assess the recharge to the underlying sandstone Guarani Aquifer System, one of the main aquifer systems in Brazil, which supplies water to millions of people. Detailed geological investigations included macroscopic description of the basalt flow units and the underlying sandstone. Petrographic and chemical analyzes were conducted on rock samples from outcrops and from five drilled boreholes. Detailed fracture surveys were accomplished at outcrops to characterize fracture sets and their potential to transmit water in the current tectonic context. Four basalt flows were identified in the Ribeirao Preto area and were named B1, B2, B3 and B4 (from oldest to youngest). The cooling process in flow B3 led to the generation of large sub-horizontal fractures at the contacts B2/B3 and B3-C/B3-E, which are the most transmissive structures. Groundwater flow in the basalt appears to be of the stratabound type because fractures, in general, do not propagate through the basalt vesicular layers, which behave as a regional hydraulic barrier for the vertical groundwater flow. However, it is proposed that the localized, continuous and closely spaced subvertical tectonic fractures, the only features that have the potential to crosscut the vesicular layers and the intertrappe sediments, can vertically connect the sub-horizontal transmissive fractures. Weathering and water seepage, observed in rock exposures, indicate that subvertical NE-trending fractures would be the most transmissive in the Ribeirao Preto area.

  10. A conceptual model of flow to the Waikoropupu Springs, NW Nelson, New Zealand, based on hydrometric and tracer (18O, Cl,3H and CFC evidence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. T. Thomas

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The Waikoropupu Springs, a large karst resurgence 4 km from the coast, are supplied by the Arthur Marble Aquifer (AMA underlying the Takaka Valley, South Island, New Zealand. New evidence on the recharge sources in the catchment, combined with previous results, is used to establish a new recharge model for the AMA. Combined with the oxygen-18 mass balance, this yields a quantitative description of the inputs and outputs to the aquifer. It shows that the Main Spring is sourced mainly from the karst uplands (74%, with smaller contributions from the Upper Takaka River (18% and valley rainfall (8%, while Fish Creek Spring contains mostly Upper Takaka River water (50%. In addition, much of the Upper Takaka River contribution to the aquifer (58% bypasses the springs and is discharged offshore via submarine springs. The chemical concentrations of the Main Spring show input of 0.5% of sea water on average, which varies with flow and derives from the deep aquifer. Tritium measurements spanning 40 yr, and CFC-11 measurements, give a mean residence time of 8 yr for the Main Spring water using the preferred two-component model. Our conceptual flow model, based on the flow, chloride, oxygen-18 and age measurements, invokes two different flow systems with different recharge sources to explain the flow within the AMA. One system contains deeply penetrating old water with mean age 10.2 yr and water volume 3 km3, recharged from the karst uplands. The other, at shallow levels below the valley floor, has much younger water with mean age 1.2 yr and water volume 0.4 km3, recharged by Upper Takaka River and valley rainfall. The flow systems contribute in different proportions to the Main Spring, Fish Creek Springs and offshore springs. Their very different behaviours, despite being in the same aquifer, are attributed to the presence of a diorite intrusion below the surface of the lower valley, which diverts the deep flow towards the Waikoropupu Springs and allows

  11. A conceptual model of flow to the Waikoropupu Springs, NW Nelson, New Zealand, based on hydrometric and tracer (18O, Cl,3H and CFC evidence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. T. Thomas

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available The Waikoropupu Springs, a large karst resurgence 4 km from the coast, are supplied by the Arthur Marble Aquifer (AMA underlying the Takaka Valley, South Island, New Zealand. New evidence on the recharge sources in the catchment, combined with previous results, is used to establish a new recharge model for the AMA. Combined with the oxygen-18 mass balance, this yields a quantitative description of the inputs and outputs to the aquifer. It shows that the Main Spring is sourced mainly from the karst uplands (74%, with smaller contributions from the Upper Takaka River (18% and valley rainfall (8%, while Fish Creek Spring contains mostly Upper Takaka River water (50%. In addition, much of the Upper Takaka River contribution to the aquifer (58% bypasses the springs and is discharged offshore via submarine springs. The chemical concentrations of the Main Spring show input of 0.5% of sea water on average, which varies with flow and derives from the deep aquifer. Tritium measurements spanning 40 years, and CFC-11 measurements, give a mean residence time of 8 years for the Main Spring water using the preferred two-component model. Our conceptual flow model, based on the flow, chloride, oxygen-18 and age measurements, invokes two different flow systems with different recharge sources to explain the flow within the AMA. One system contains deeply penetrating old water with mean age 10.2 years and water volume 3 km3, recharged from the karst uplands. The other, at shallow levels below the valley floor, has much younger water, with mean age 1.2 years and water volume 0.4 km3, recharged by Upper Takaka River and valley rainfall. The flow systems contribute in different proportions to the Main Spring, Fish Creek Springs and offshore springs. Their very different behaviours, despite being in the same aquifer, are attributed to the presence of a diorite intrusive below the surface of the lower valley, which diverts the deep flow towards the Waikoropupu Springs

  12. Conceptual Models for Search Engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendry, D. G.; Efthimiadis, E. N.

    Search engines have entered popular culture. They touch people in diverse private and public settings and thus heighten the importance of such important social matters as information privacy and control, censorship, and equitable access. To fully benefit from search engines and to participate in debate about their merits, people necessarily appeal to their understandings for how they function. In this chapter we examine the conceptual understandings that people have of search engines by performing a content analysis on the sketches that 200 undergraduate and graduate students drew when asked to draw a sketch of how a search engine works. Analysis of the sketches reveals a diverse range of conceptual approaches, metaphors, representations, and misconceptions. On the whole, the conceptual models articulated by these students are simplistic. However, students with higher levels of academic achievement sketched more complete models. This research calls attention to the importance of improving students' technical knowledge of how search engines work so they can be better equipped to develop and advocate policies for how search engines should be embedded in, and restricted from, various private and public information settings.

  13. A conceptual model of political market orientation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ormrod, Robert P.

    2005-01-01

    . The remaining four constructs are attitudinal, designed to capture the awareness of members to the activities and importance of stakeholder groups in society, both internal and external to the organisation. The model not only allows the level of a party's political market orientation to be assessed, but also......This article proposes eight constructs of a conceptual model of political market orientation, taking inspiration from the business and political marketing literature. Four of the constructs are 'behavioural' in that they aim to describe the process of how information flows through the organisation...

  14. Accounting for capacity and flow of ecosystem services: A conceptual model and a case study for Telemark, Norway

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schroter, M.; Barton, D.N.; Remme, R.P.; Hein, L.G.

    2014-01-01

    Understanding the flow of ecosystem services and the capacity of ecosystems to generate these services is an essential element for understanding the sustainability of ecosystem use as well as developing ecosystem accounts. We conduct spatially explicit analyses of nine ecosystem services in Telemark

  15. toolkit computational mesh conceptual model.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baur, David G.; Edwards, Harold Carter; Cochran, William K.; Williams, Alan B.; Sjaardema, Gregory D.

    2010-03-01

    The Sierra Toolkit computational mesh is a software library intended to support massively parallel multi-physics computations on dynamically changing unstructured meshes. This domain of intended use is inherently complex due to distributed memory parallelism, parallel scalability, heterogeneity of physics, heterogeneous discretization of an unstructured mesh, and runtime adaptation of the mesh. Management of this inherent complexity begins with a conceptual analysis and modeling of this domain of intended use; i.e., development of a domain model. The Sierra Toolkit computational mesh software library is designed and implemented based upon this domain model. Software developers using, maintaining, or extending the Sierra Toolkit computational mesh library must be familiar with the concepts/domain model presented in this report.

  16. Uncertainty and the Conceptual Site Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, V.; Nicholson, T. J.

    2007-12-01

    Our focus is on uncertainties in the underlying conceptual framework upon which all subsequent steps in numerical and/or analytical modeling efforts depend. Experienced environmental modelers recognize the value of selecting an optimal conceptual model from several competing site models, but usually do not formally explore possible alternative models, in part due to incomplete or missing site data, as well as relevant regional data for establishing boundary conditions. The value in and approach for developing alternative conceptual site models (CSM) is demonstrated by analysis of case histories. These studies are based on reported flow or transport modeling in which alternative site models are formulated using data that were not available to, or not used by, the original modelers. An important concept inherent to model abstraction of these alternative conceptual models is that it is "Far better an approximate answer to the right question, which is often vague, than the exact answer to the wrong question, which can always be made precise." (Tukey, 1962) The case histories discussed here illustrate the value of formulating alternative models and evaluating them using site-specific data: (1) Charleston Naval Site where seismic characterization data allowed significant revision of the CSM and subsequent contaminant transport modeling; (2) Hanford 300-Area where surface- and ground-water interactions affecting the unsaturated zone suggested an alternative component to the site model; (3) Savannah River C-Area where a characterization report for a waste site within the modeled area was not available to the modelers, but provided significant new information requiring changes to the underlying geologic and hydrogeologic CSM's used; (4) Amargosa Desert Research Site (ADRS) where re-interpretation of resistivity sounding data and water-level data suggested an alternative geologic model. Simple 2-D spreadsheet modeling of the ADRS with the revised CSM provided an improved

  17. A conceptual model of the hydrogeologic framework, geochemistry, and groundwater-flow system of the Edwards-Trinity and related aquifers in the Pecos County region, Texas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bumgarner, Johnathan R.; Stanton, Gregory P.; Teeple, Andrew; Thomas, Jonathan V.; Houston, Natalie A.; Payne, Jason; Musgrove, MaryLynn

    2012-01-01

    A conceptual model of the hydrogeologic framework, geochemistry, and groundwater-flow system of the Edwards-Trinity and related aquifers, which include the Pecos Valley, Igneous, Dockum, Rustler, and Capitan Reef aquifers, was developed as the second phase of a groundwater availability study in the Pecos County region in west Texas. The first phase of the study was to collect and compile groundwater, surface-water, water-quality, geophysical, and geologic data in the area. The third phase of the study involves a numerical groundwater-flow model of the Edwards-Trinity aquifer in order to simulate groundwater conditions based on various groundwater-withdrawal scenarios. Resource managers plan to use the results of the study to establish management strategies for the groundwater system. The hydrogeologic framework is composed of the hydrostratigraphy, structural features, and hydraulic properties of the groundwater system. Well and geophysical logs were interpreted to define the top and base surfaces of the Edwards-Trinity aquifer units. Elevations of the top and base of the Edwards-Trinity aquifer generally decrease from the southwestern part of the study area to the northeast. The thicknesses of the Edwards-Trinity aquifer units were calculated using the interpolated top and base surfaces of the hydrostratigraphic units. Some of the thinnest sections of the aquifer were in the eastern part of the study area and some of the thickest sections were in the Pecos, Monument Draw, and Belding-Coyanosa trough areas. Normal-fault zones, which formed as growth and collapse features as sediments were deposited along the margins of more resistant rocks and as overlying sediments collapsed into the voids created by the dissolution of Permian-age evaporite deposits, were delineated based on the interpretation of hydrostratigraphic cross sections. The lowest aquifer transmissivity values were measured in the eastern part of the study area; the highest transmissivity values were

  18. A Conceptual Model to Link Anomalously High Temperature Gradients in the Cerros del Rio Volcanic Field to Regional Flow in the Espanola Basin, New Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fillingham, E. J.; Keller, S. N.; McCullough, K. R.; Watters, J.; Weitering, B.; Wilce, A. M.; Folsom, M.; Kelley, S.; Pellerin, L.

    2015-12-01

    proposed conceptual model of the regional flow system in the Espanola Basin addresses the anomalously high geothermal gradients in the monitoring wells in and near the Cerros del Rio volcanic field in addition to the recovering water levels in the Buckman well field.

  19. Carbon Tetrachloride Flow and Transport in the Subsurface of the 216-Z-18 Crib and 216-Z-1A Tile Field at the Hanford Site: Multifluid Flow Simulations and Conceptual Model Update

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oostrom, Mart; Rockhold, Mark L.; Thorne, Paul D.; Last, George V.; Truex, Michael J.

    2006-10-31

    Carbon tetrachloride (CT) was discharged to the 216-Z-9, Z-1A, and Z-18 waste sites that are included in the 200-PW-1 Operable Unit in Hanford 200 West Area. Fluor Hanford, Inc. is conducting a Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) remedial investigation/feasibility study (RI/FS) for the 200-PW-1 Operable Unit. As part of this overall effort, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) was contracted to improve the conceptual model of how CT is distributed in the Hanford 200 West Area subsurface through use of numerical flow and transport modeling. This work supports the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) efforts to characterize the nature and distribution of CT in the 200 West Area and subsequently select an appropriate final remedy.

  20. Real-world semantics of conceptual models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wieringa, Roel

    2011-01-01

    Conceptual modelling is the addition of more real-world semantics to the computations performed by a computer. It is argued that in a proper engineering approach to computing, three kinds of conceptual modelling need to be distinguished, (1) modelling a software solution, (2) modelling the domain in

  1. A Conceptual Data Model of Datum Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCaleb, Michael R.

    1999-01-01

    A new conceptual data model that addresses the geometric dimensioning and tolerancing concepts of datum systems, datums, datum features, datum targets, and the relationships among these concepts, is presented. Additionally, a portion of a related data model, Part 47 of STEP (ISO 10303-47), is reviewed and a comparison is made between it and the new conceptual data model.

  2. Conceptual and logical level of database modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunka, Frantisek; Matula, Jiri

    2016-06-01

    Conceptual and logical levels form the top most levels of database modeling. Usually, ORM (Object Role Modeling) and ER diagrams are utilized to capture the corresponding schema. The final aim of business process modeling is to store its results in the form of database solution. For this reason, value oriented business process modeling which utilizes ER diagram to express the modeling entities and relationships between them are used. However, ER diagrams form the logical level of database schema. To extend possibilities of different business process modeling methodologies, the conceptual level of database modeling is needed. The paper deals with the REA value modeling approach to business process modeling using ER-diagrams, and derives conceptual model utilizing ORM modeling approach. Conceptual model extends possibilities for value modeling to other business modeling approaches.

  3. Conceptual and numerical models of groundwater flow and solute transport in fracture zones: Application to the Aspo Island (Sweden); Modelos conceptuales y numericos de flujo y transporte de solutos en zonas de fractura: aplicacion a la isla de Aspo (Suecia)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Molinero, J.; Samper, J.

    2003-07-01

    Several countries around the world are considering the final disposal of high-level radioactive waste in deep repositories located in fractured granite formations. Evaluating the long term safety of such repositories requires sound conceptual and numerical models which must consider simultaneously groundwater flow, solute transport and chemical and radiological processes. These models are being developed from data and knowledge gained from in situ experiments carried out at deep underground laboratories such as that of Aspo, Sweden, constructed in fractured granite. The Redox Zone Experiment is one of such experiments performed at Aspo in order to evaluate the effects of the construction of the access tunnel on the hydrogeological and hydrochemical conditions of a fracture zone intersected by the tunnel. Previous authors interpreted hydrochemical and isotopic data of this experiment using a mass-balance approach based on a qualitative description of groundwater flow conditions. Such an interpretation, however, is subject to uncertainties related to an over-simplified conceptualization of groundwater flow. Here we present numerical models of groundwater flow and solute transport for this fracture zone. The first model is based on previously published conceptual model. It presents noticeable un consistencies and fails to match simultaneously observed draw downs and chloride breakthrough curves. To overcome its limitations, a revised flow and transport model is presented which relies directly on available hydrodynamic and transport parameters, is based on the identification of appropriate flow and transport boundary conditions and uses, when needed, solute data extrapolated from nearby fracture zones. A significant quantitative improvement is achieved with the revised model because its results match simultaneously drawdown and chloride data. Other improvements are qualitative and include: ensuring consistency of hydrodynamic and hydrochemical data and avoiding

  4. A conceptual model of political market orientation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ormrod, Robert P.

    2005-01-01

    This article proposes eight constructs of a conceptual model of political market orientation, taking inspiration from the business and political marketing literature. Four of the constructs are 'behavioural' in that they aim to describe the process of how information flows through the organisation....... The remaining four constructs are attitudinal, designed to capture the awareness of members to the activities and importance of stakeholder groups in society, both internal and external to the organisation. The model not only allows the level of a party's political market orientation to be assessed, but also...... aids the party in making a context-specific decision with regard to the reallocation - or not - of party resources in order to attain the party's long-term objectives....

  5. Towards Ontological Foundations for UML Conceptual Models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Guizzardi, Giancarlo; Herre, Heinrich; Wagner, Gerd; Meerman, Robert; Tari, Zahir

    2002-01-01

    UML class diagrams can be used as a language for expressing a conceptual model of a domain. We use the General Ontological Language (GOL) and its underlying upper level ontology, proposed in [1], to evaluate the ontological correctness of a conceptual UML class model and to develop guidelines for

  6. A Multivariate Model of Conceptual Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taasoobshirazi, Gita; Heddy, Benjamin; Bailey, MarLynn; Farley, John

    2016-01-01

    The present study used the Cognitive Reconstruction of Knowledge Model (CRKM) model of conceptual change as a framework for developing and testing how key cognitive, motivational, and emotional variables are linked to conceptual change in physics. This study extends an earlier study developed by Taasoobshirazi and Sinatra ("J Res Sci…

  7. Supra regional ground water modelling - in-depth analysis of the groundwater flow patterns in eastern Smaaland. Comparison with different conceptual descriptions; Storregional grundvattenmodellering - foerdjupad analys av floedesfoerhaallanden i oestra Smaaland. Jaemfoerelse av olika konceptuella beskrivningar

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ericsson, Lars O. [Lars O Ericsson Consulting AB, Stockholm (Sweden); Holmen, Johan [Golder Associates, Uppsala (Sweden); Rhen, Ingvar; Blomquist, Niklas [SWECO VIAK, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2006-05-15

    One of many geoscientific questions in connection with the siting of a final repository for spent nuclear fuel in Sweden has to do with understanding the large-scale flow patterns of the naturally circulating groundwater. The recharge and discharge of the groundwater is therefore a subject for both SKB's research activities and the interest of the regulatory authorities. This report aims at providing an in-depth scientific analysis of the groundwater flow pattern based on the criteria and suitability indicators which SKB has previously presented with respect to recharge and discharge aspects in a supra regional perspective. The analysis was conducted within the framework of a project whose goals were to: evaluate conceptual simplifications and model uncertainties in supra regional groundwater modelling, and to carry out an in-depth and comprehensive analysis of regional flow conditions in eastern Smaaland. Achieving these goals has required an approach based on the use of available geoscientific data on the Smaaland region combined with an analysis of different conceptual assumptions and system descriptions. The following general conclusions can be drawn from the study and the applied methodology: The factor of greatest importance for the regional flow pattern (from repository depth) is the topography. The discharge areas are mainly found in the low-lying parts of the topography, along valleys, and the recharge areas occur on the heights. The topographic undulation is of greater importance than the properties of the conductivity field. Different lithological units, regional deformation zones, local heterogeneity, Quaternary deposits etc are of less importance than the undulation of the topography. For areas described and analyzed with the most realistic assumptions, the groundwater flow pattern can be described as a primarily local flow process. The median flow path length in the study is on the order of 2 km, and the fraction of supra regional flow paths

  8. Conceptual Models Core to Good Design

    CERN Document Server

    Johnson, Jeff

    2011-01-01

    People make use of software applications in their activities, applying them as tools in carrying out tasks. That this use should be good for people--easy, effective, efficient, and enjoyable--is a principal goal of design. In this book, we present the notion of Conceptual Models, and argue that Conceptual Models are core to achieving good design. From years of helping companies create software applications, we have come to believe that building applications without Conceptual Models is just asking for designs that will be confusing and difficult to learn, remember, and use. We show how Concept

  9. Using a conceptual flow, inquiry based learning, and language development to yield enduring understanding in science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunderson, Angelica E.

    This project was designed to incorporate three curriculum development strategies that have been created to increase student achievement in various content areas. Conceptual flow design, the 5E Instructional Model, and English language development strategies were used to create a seventh grade Genetics Unit. The unit was evaluated by three external experts and carried out in two seventh grade classrooms in an effort to assess its effectiveness. Based on the evaluators' feedback, the initial conceptual flow and lessons were found to be inconsistent and confusing. Overall, the organization of this unit seemed to support student achievement. The conceptual flow and the lesson layout of the unit were revised based on the evaluation data. All revisions and the established protocols will serve as models for further science curriculum development in the Norwalk-La Mirada Unified School District.

  10. Front-end conceptual platform modeling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guðlaugsson, Tómas Vignir; Ravn, Poul Martin; Mortensen, Niels Henrik

    2014-01-01

    Platform thinking has been the subject of investigation and deployment in many projects in both academia and industry. Most contributions involve the restructuring of product programs, and only a few support front-end development of a new platform in parallel with technology development....... This contribution deals with the development of product platforms in front-end projects and introduces a modeling tool: the Conceptual Product Platform model. State of the art within platform modeling forms the base of a modeling formalism for a Conceptual Product Platform model. The modeling formalism is explored...... through an example and applied in a case in which the Conceptual Product Platform model has supported the front-end development of a platform for an electro-active polymer technology. The case describes the contents of the model and how its application supported the development work in the project...

  11. UZ Flow Models and Submodels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    P. Dixon

    2004-02-11

    The purpose of this Model Report is to document the unsaturated zone (UZ) fluid flow and tracer transport models and submodels as well as the flow fields generated utilizing the UZ Flow and Transport Model of Yucca Mountain (UZ Model), Nevada. This work was planned in ''Technical Work Plan (TWP) for: Performance Assessment Unsaturated Zone'' (BSC 2002 [160819], Section 1.10, Work Package AUZM06). The UZ Model has revised, updated, and enhanced the previous UZ Flow Model REV 00 ICN 01 (BSC 2001 [158726]) by incorporation of the conceptual repository design with new grids, recalibration of property sets, and more comprehensive validation effort. The flow fields describe fracture-fracture, matrix-matrix, and fracture-matrix liquid flow rates and their spatial distributions as well as moisture conditions in the UZ system. These 3-D UZ flow fields are used directly by Performance Assessment (PA). The model and submodels evaluate important hydrogeologic processes in the UZ as well as geochemistry and geothermal conditions. These provide the necessary framework to test conceptual hypotheses of flow and transport at different scales and predict flow and transport behavior under a variety of climatic conditions. In addition, this Model Report supports several PA activities, including abstractions, particle-tracking transport simulations, and the UZ Radionuclide Transport Model.

  12. Stormwater infiltration trenches: a conceptual modelling approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freni, Gabriele; Mannina, Giorgio; Viviani, Gaspare

    2009-01-01

    In recent years, limitations linked to traditional urban drainage schemes have been pointed out and new approaches are developing introducing more natural methods for retaining and/or disposing of stormwater. These mitigation measures are generally called Best Management Practices or Sustainable Urban Drainage System and they include practices such as infiltration and storage tanks in order to reduce the peak flow and retain part of the polluting components. The introduction of such practices in urban drainage systems entails an upgrade of existing modelling frameworks in order to evaluate their efficiency in mitigating the impact of urban drainage systems on receiving water bodies. While storage tank modelling approaches are quite well documented in literature, some gaps are still present about infiltration facilities mainly dependent on the complexity of the involved physical processes. In this study, a simplified conceptual modelling approach for the simulation of the infiltration trenches is presented. The model enables to assess the performance of infiltration trenches. The main goal is to develop a model that can be employed for the assessment of the mitigation efficiency of infiltration trenches in an integrated urban drainage context. Particular care was given to the simulation of infiltration structures considering the performance reduction due to clogging phenomena. The proposed model has been compared with other simplified modelling approaches and with a physically based model adopted as benchmark. The model performed better compared to other approaches considering both unclogged facilities and the effect of clogging. On the basis of a long-term simulation of six years of rain data, the performance and the effectiveness of an infiltration trench measure are assessed. The study confirmed the important role played by the clogging phenomenon on such infiltration structures.

  13. Climate model uncertainty vs. conceptual geological uncertainty in hydrological modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. O. Sonnenborg

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Projections of climate change impact are associated with a cascade of uncertainties including CO2 emission scenario, climate model, downscaling and impact model. The relative importance of the individual uncertainty sources is expected to depend on several factors including the quantity that is projected. In the present study the impacts of climate model uncertainty and geological model uncertainty on hydraulic head, stream flow, travel time and capture zones are evaluated. Six versions of a physically based and distributed hydrological model, each containing a unique interpretation of the geological structure of the model area, are forced by 11 climate model projections. Each projection of future climate is a result of a GCM-RCM model combination (from the ENSEMBLES project forced by the same CO2 scenario (A1B. The changes from the reference period (1991–2010 to the future period (2081–2100 in projected hydrological variables are evaluated and the effects of geological model and climate model uncertainties are quantified. The results show that uncertainty propagation is context dependent. While the geological conceptualization is the dominating uncertainty source for projection of travel time and capture zones, the uncertainty on the climate models is more important for groundwater hydraulic heads and stream flow.

  14. Analysis of Subjective Conceptualizations Towards Collective Conceptual Modelling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kano Glückstad, Fumiko; Herlau, Tue; Schmidt, Mikkel N.

    2013-01-01

    This work is conducted as a preliminary study for a project where individuals' conceptualizations of domain knowledge will thoroughly be analyzed across 150 subjects from 6 countries. The project aims at investigating how humans' conceptualizations dier according to dierent types of mother langua...

  15. Analysis of Subjective Conceptualizations Towards Collective Conceptual Modelling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Glückstad, Fumiko Kano; Herlau, Tue; Schmidt, Mikkel Nørgaard

    2013-01-01

    This work is conducted as a preliminary study for a project where individuals' conceptualizations of domain knowledge will thoroughly be analyzed across 150 subjects from 6 countries. The project aims at investigating how humans' conceptualizations differ according to different types of mother la...

  16. Analysis of Subjective Conceptualizations Towards Collective Conceptual Modelling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kano Glückstad, Fumiko; Herlau, Tue; Schmidt, Mikkel N.

    2013-01-01

    This work is conducted as a preliminary study for a project where individuals' conceptualizations of domain knowledge will thoroughly be analyzed across 150 subjects from 6 countries. The project aims at investigating how humans' conceptualizations dier according to dierent types of mother langua...

  17. Analysis of Subjective Conceptualizations Towards Collective Conceptual Modelling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Glückstad, Fumiko Kano; Herlau, Tue; Schmidt, Mikkel Nørgaard

    2013-01-01

    This work is conducted as a preliminary study for a project where individuals' conceptualizations of domain knowledge will thoroughly be analyzed across 150 subjects from 6 countries. The project aims at investigating how humans' conceptualizations differ according to different types of mother la...

  18. Event-Based Conceptual Modeling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bækgaard, Lars

    The paper demonstrates that a wide variety of event-based modeling approaches are based on special cases of the same general event concept, and that the general event concept can be used to unify the otherwise unrelated fields of information modeling and process modeling. A set of event......-based modeling approaches are analyzed and the results are used to formulate a general event concept that can be used for unifying the seemingly unrelated event concepts. Events are characterized as short-duration processes that have participants, consequences, and properties, and that may be modeled in terms...... of information structures. The general event concept can be used to guide systems analysis and design and to improve modeling approaches....

  19. FRSAD conceptual modeling of aboutness

    CERN Document Server

    Zeng, Marcia; Žumer, Maja

    2012-01-01

    The first comprehensive exploration of the development and use of the International Federation of Library Associations and Institutions' (IFLA) newly released model for subject authority data, covering everything from the rationale for creating the model to practical steps for implementing it.

  20. Logistics and Transport - a conceptual model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jespersen, Per Homann; Drewes, Lise

    2004-01-01

    This paper describes how the freight transport sector is influenced by logistical principles of production and distribution. It introduces new ways of understanding freight transport as an integrated part of the changing trends of mobility. By introducing a conceptual model for understanding...... the interaction between logistics and transport, it points at ways to over-come inherent methodological difficulties when studying this relation...

  1. Conceptual Models of Frontal Cyclones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eagleman, Joe R.

    1981-01-01

    This discussion of weather models uses maps to illustrate the differences among three types of frontal cyclones (long wave, short wave, and troughs). Awareness of these cyclones can provide clues to atmospheric conditions which can lead toward accurate weather forecasting. (AM)

  2. The conceptualization model problem—surprise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bredehoeft, John

    2005-03-01

    The foundation of model analysis is the conceptual model. Surprise is defined as new data that renders the prevailing conceptual model invalid; as defined here it represents a paradigm shift. Limited empirical data indicate that surprises occur in 20-30% of model analyses. These data suggest that groundwater analysts have difficulty selecting the appropriate conceptual model. There is no ready remedy to the conceptual model problem other than (1) to collect as much data as is feasible, using all applicable methods—a complementary data collection methodology can lead to new information that changes the prevailing conceptual model, and (2) for the analyst to remain open to the fact that the conceptual model can change dramatically as more information is collected. In the final analysis, the hydrogeologist makes a subjective decision on the appropriate conceptual model. The conceptualization problem does not render models unusable. The problem introduces an uncertainty that often is not widely recognized. Conceptual model uncertainty is exacerbated in making long-term predictions of system performance. C'est le modèle conceptuel qui se trouve à base d'une analyse sur un modèle. On considère comme une surprise lorsque le modèle est invalidé par des données nouvelles; dans les termes définis ici la surprise est équivalente à un change de paradigme. Des données empiriques limitées indiquent que les surprises apparaissent dans 20 à 30% des analyses effectuées sur les modèles. Ces données suggèrent que l'analyse des eaux souterraines présente des difficultés lorsqu'il s'agit de choisir le modèle conceptuel approprié. Il n'existe pas un autre remède au problème du modèle conceptuel que: (1) rassembler autant des données que possible en utilisant toutes les méthodes applicables—la méthode des données complémentaires peut conduire aux nouvelles informations qui vont changer le modèle conceptuel, et (2) l'analyste doit rester ouvert au fait

  3. Internal Branding Implementation: Developing a Conceptual Model

    OpenAIRE

    Katja Terglav; Robert Kase; Maja Konecnik Ruzzier

    2012-01-01

    Internal branding is the process, which enables balanced view of the brand at all company levels. Its significance is aligning values and behaviors of employees with brand values and brand promises. In the article, we focus mainly on its implementation, which requires coordination of different functions in the company, for instance, internal marketing and human resource management. Based on findings of qualitative research, we present a conceptual model of internal branding implementation. Re...

  4. Critical conceptualism in environmental modeling and prediction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christakos, G

    2003-10-15

    Many important problems in environmental science and engineering are of a conceptual nature. Research and development, however, often becomes so preoccupied with technical issues, which are themselves fascinating, that it neglects essential methodological elements of conceptual reasoning and theoretical inquiry. This work suggests that valuable insight into environmental modeling can be gained by means of critical conceptualism which focuses on the software of human reason and, in practical terms, leads to a powerful methodological framework of space-time modeling and prediction. A knowledge synthesis system develops the rational means for the epistemic integration of various physical knowledge bases relevant to the natural system of interest in order to obtain a realistic representation of the system, provide a rigorous assessment of the uncertainty sources, generate meaningful predictions of environmental processes in space-time, and produce science-based decisions. No restriction is imposed on the shape of the distribution model or the form of the predictor (non-Gaussian distributions, multiple-point statistics, and nonlinear models are automatically incorporated). The scientific reasoning structure underlying knowledge synthesis involves teleologic criteria and stochastic logic principles which have important advantages over the reasoning method of conventional space-time techniques. Insight is gained in terms of real world applications, including the following: the study of global ozone patterns in the atmosphere using data sets generated by instruments on board the Nimbus 7 satellite and secondary information in terms of total ozone-tropopause pressure models; the mapping of arsenic concentrations in the Bangladesh drinking water by assimilating hard and soft data from an extensive network of monitoring wells; and the dynamic imaging of probability distributions of pollutants across the Kalamazoo river.

  5. Conceptual Model of Dynamic Geographic Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martínez-Rosales Miguel Alejandro

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available In geographic environments, there are many and different types of geographic entities such as automobiles, trees, persons, buildings, storms, hurricanes, etc. These entities can be classified into two groups: geographic objects and geographic phenomena. By its nature, a geographic environment is dynamic, thus, it’s static modeling is not sufficient. Considering the dynamics of geographic environment, a new type of geographic entity called event is introduced. The primary target is a modeling of geographic environment as an event sequence, because in this case the semantic relations are much richer than in the case of static modeling. In this work, the conceptualization of this model is proposed. It is based on the idea to process each entity apart instead of processing the environment as a whole. After that, the so called history of each entity and its spatial relations to other entities are defined to describe the whole environment. The main goal is to model systems at a conceptual level that make use of spatial and temporal information, so that later it can serve as the semantic engine for such systems.

  6. Conceptual Frameworks in the Doctoral Research Process: A Pedagogical Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berman, Jeanette; Smyth, Robyn

    2015-01-01

    This paper contributes to consideration of the role of conceptual frameworks in the doctoral research process. Through reflection on the two authors' own conceptual frameworks for their doctoral studies, a pedagogical model has been developed. The model posits the development of a conceptual framework as a core element of the doctoral…

  7. A Structural Equation Model of Conceptual Change in Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taasoobshirazi, Gita; Sinatra, Gale M.

    2011-01-01

    A model of conceptual change in physics was tested on introductory-level, college physics students. Structural equation modeling was used to test hypothesized relationships among variables linked to conceptual change in physics including an approach goal orientation, need for cognition, motivation, and course grade. Conceptual change in physics…

  8. Conceptual model of communications in public health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Марія Андріївна Знаменська

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Actuality. The role of communications in effective reform of public health in the country is discovered in scientific literature last time. But there are no works that fully present the system of communications in public health; this fact defined actuality of the given research.Methods. The next scientific methods are used in this work: structural and logical analysis, conceptual modeling. The systematic approach became a base of research. Results. There was elaborated conceptual model of the system of communications in public health its node idea is a consistent solution of the priority problem of supply the population of the country in whole and the separate task groups of communicative impact with complex objective information in the system of public health. At constructing of the model there were separated the next groups of problems: structural construction of the system of communication; supply of the system with resources; methods and means of communication; monitoring and assessment of efficiency of communication.Conclusions. The use of this model allows at optimal costs to eliminate the organizational and administrative defects and increase an awareness of the people in organization of public health, in maintenance and improvement of personal health. 

  9. A conceptual model of referee efficacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guillén, Félix; Feltz, Deborah L

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents a conceptual model of referee efficacy, defines the concept, proposes sources of referee specific efficacy information, and suggests consequences of having high or low referee efficacy. Referee efficacy is defined as the extent to which referees believe they have the capacity to perform successfully in their job. Referee efficacy beliefs are hypothesized to be influenced by mastery experiences, referee knowledge/education, support from significant others, physical/mental preparedness, environmental comfort, and perceived anxiety. In turn, referee efficacy beliefs are hypothesized to influence referee performance, referee stress, athlete rule violations, athlete satisfaction, and co-referee satisfaction.

  10. A conceptual model of referee efficacy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Félix eGuillén

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a conceptual model of referee efficacy, defines the concept, proposes sources of referee specific efficacy information, and suggests consequences of having high or low referee efficacy. Referee efficacy is defined as the extent to which referees believe they have the capacity to perform successfully in their job. Referee efficacy beliefs are hypothesized to be influenced by mastery experiences, referee knowledge/education, support from significant others, physical/mental preparedness, environmental comfort, and perceived anxiety. In turn, referee efficacy beliefs are hypothesized to influence referee performance, referee stress, athlete rule violations, athlete satisfaction, and co-referee satisfaction.

  11. Propulsion System Models for Rotorcraft Conceptual Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Wayne

    2014-01-01

    The conceptual design code NDARC (NASA Design and Analysis of Rotorcraft) was initially implemented to model conventional rotorcraft propulsion systems, consisting of turboshaft engines burning jet fuel, connected to one or more rotors through a mechanical transmission. The NDARC propulsion system representation has been extended to cover additional propulsion concepts, including electric motors and generators, rotor reaction drive, turbojet and turbofan engines, fuel cells and solar cells, batteries, and fuel (energy) used without weight change. The paper describes these propulsion system components, the architecture of their implementation in NDARC, and the form of the models for performance and weight. Requirements are defined for improved performance and weight models of the new propulsion system components. With these new propulsion models, NDARC can be used to develop environmentally-friendly rotorcraft designs.

  12. Product Modelling and Functional Reasoning in Conceptual Design

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    林志航; 宋慧军; 陈康宁

    2004-01-01

    In this paper, a product model in conceptual design, Domain Structure Template, is proposed, which combines the functional domain and the physical domain with the behaviour domain. Seven types of primary mappings units connecting functions, behaviours and carriers during conceptual design process are identified according to the characteristics of the conceptual design of mechanical products.Based on these seven primary mappings, a hierarchical functional reasoning framework characterizing the process of conceptual design is presented. A case study for the conceptual design of industry sewing machines with chain-stitch is described to demonstrate the product modelling and the scheme generation based on the presented model.

  13. An analogue conceptual rainfall-runoff model for educational purposes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrnegger, Mathew; Riedl, Michael; Schulz, Karsten

    2016-04-01

    Conceptual rainfall-runoff models, in which runoff processes are modelled with a series of connected linear and non-linear reservoirs, remain widely applied tools in science and practice. Additionally, the concept is appreciated in teaching due to its somewhat simplicity in explaining and exploring hydrological processes of catchments. However, when a series of reservoirs are used, the model system becomes highly parametrized and complex and the traceability of the model results becomes more difficult to explain to an audience not accustomed to numerical modelling. Since normally the simulations are performed with a not visible digital code, the results are also not easily comprehensible. This contribution therefore presents a liquid analogue model, in which a conceptual rainfall-runoff model is reproduced by a physical model. This consists of different acrylic glass containers representing different storage components within a catchment, e.g. soil water or groundwater storage. The containers are equipped and connected with pipes, in which water movement represents different flow processes, e.g. surface runoff, percolation or base flow. Water from a storage container is pumped to the upper part of the model and represents effective rainfall input. The water then flows by gravity through the different pipes and storages. Valves are used for controlling the flows within the analogue model, comparable to the parameterization procedure in numerical models. Additionally, an inexpensive microcontroller-based board and sensors are used to measure storage water levels, with online visualization of the states as time series data, building a bridge between the analogue and digital world. The ability to physically witness the different flows and water levels in the storages makes the analogue model attractive to the audience. Hands-on experiments can be performed with students, in which different scenarios or catchment types can be simulated, not only with the analogue but

  14. Representation of the Conceptual Change Model in Science Teacher Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorley, N. Richard; Stofflett, Rene T.

    1996-01-01

    Analyzes key concepts of the conceptual change model: intelligibility, plausibility, and fruitfulness, together with conceptions of learning as conceptual change and the nature of conceptual change teaching. Organizes representations of these around a framework developed for representing scientific conceptions in terms of verbal and symbolic…

  15. Misrepresentation and amendment of soil moisture in conceptual hydrological modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhuo, Lu; Han, Dawei

    2016-04-01

    Although many conceptual models are very effective in simulating river runoff, their soil moisture schemes are generally not realistic in comparison with the reality (i.e., getting the right answers for the wrong reasons). This study reveals two significant misrepresentations in those models through a case study using the Xinanjiang model which is representative of many well-known conceptual hydrological models. The first is the setting of the upper limit of its soil moisture at the field capacity, due to the 'holding excess runoff' concept (i.e., runoff begins on repletion of its storage to the field capacity). The second is neglect of capillary rise of water movement. A new scheme is therefore proposed to overcome those two issues. The amended model is as effective as its original form in flow modelling, but represents more logically realistic soil water processes. The purpose of the study is to enable the hydrological model to get the right answers for the right reasons. Therefore, the new model structure has a better capability in potentially assimilating soil moisture observations to enhance its real-time flood forecasting accuracy. The new scheme is evaluated in the Pontiac catchment of the USA through a comparison with satellite observed soil moisture. The correlation between the XAJ and the observed soil moisture is enhanced significantly from 0.64 to 0.70. In addition, a new soil moisture term called SMDS (Soil Moisture Deficit to Saturation) is proposed to complement the conventional SMD (Soil Moisture Deficit).

  16. A conceptual model for manufacturing performance improvement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.A. Karim

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Important performance objectives manufacturers sought can be achieved through adopting the appropriate manufacturing practices. This paper presents a conceptual model proposing relationship between advanced quality practices, perceived manufacturing difficulties and manufacturing performances.Design/methodology/approach: A survey-based approach was adopted to test the hypotheses proposed in this study. The selection of research instruments for inclusion in this survey was based on literature review, the pilot case studies and relevant industrial experience of the author. A sample of 1000 manufacturers across Australia was randomly selected. Quality managers were requested to complete the questionnaire, as the task of dealing with the quality and reliability issues is a quality manager’s major responsibility.Findings: Evidence indicates that product quality and reliability is the main competitive factor for manufacturers. Design and manufacturing capability and on time delivery came second. Price is considered as the least important factor for the Australian manufacturers. Results show that collectively the advanced quality practices proposed in this study neutralize the difficulties manufacturers face and contribute to the most performance objectives of the manufacturers. The companies who have put more emphasize on the advanced quality practices have less problem in manufacturing and better performance in most manufacturing performance indices. The results validate the proposed conceptual model and lend credence to hypothesis that proposed relationship between quality practices, manufacturing difficulties and manufacturing performances.Practical implications: The model shown in this paper provides a simple yet highly effective approach to achieving significant improvements in product quality and manufacturing performance. This study introduces a relationship based ‘proactive’ quality management approach and provides great

  17. Three-dimensional conceptual model for the Hanford Site unconfined aquifer system: FY 1994 status report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thorne, P.D.; Chamness, M.A.; Vermeul, V.R.; Macdonald, Q.C.; Schubert, S.E.

    1994-11-01

    This report documents work conducted during the fiscal year 1994 to development an improved three-dimensional conceptual model of ground-water flow in the unconfined aquifer system across the Hanford Site Ground-Water Surveillance Project, which is managed by Pacific Northwest Laboratory. The main objective of the ongoing effort to develop an improved conceptual model of ground-water flow is to provide the basis for improved numerical report models that will be capable of accurately predicting the movement of radioactive and chemical contaminant plumes in the aquifer beneath Hanford. More accurate ground-water flow models will also be useful in assessing the impacts of changes in facilities and operations. For example, decreasing volumes of operational waste-water discharge are resulting in a declining water table in parts of the unconfined aquifer. In addition to supporting numerical modeling, the conceptual model also provides a qualitative understanding of the movement of ground water and contaminants in the aquifer.

  18. A conceptual model of an Arctic sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    St-Laurent, P.; Straneo, F.; Barber, D. G.

    2012-06-01

    We propose a conceptual model for an Arctic sea that is driven by river runoff, atmospheric fluxes, sea ice melt/growth, and winds. The model domain is divided into two areas, the interior and boundary regions, that are coupled through Ekman and eddy fluxes of buoyancy. The model is applied to Hudson and James Bays (HJB, a large inland basin in northeastern Canada) for the period 1979-2007. Several yearlong records from instruments moored within HJB show that the model results are consistent with the real system. The model notably reproduces the seasonal migration of the halocline, the baroclinic boundary current, spatial variability of freshwater content, and the fall maximum in freshwater export. The simulations clarify the important differences in the freshwater balance of the western and eastern sides of HJB. The significant role played by the boundary current in the freshwater budget of the system, and its sensitivity to the wind-forcing, are also highlighted by the simulations and new data analyses. We conclude that the model proposed is useful for the interpretation of observed data from Arctic seas and model outputs from more complex coupled/climate models.

  19. Conceptual Data Modelling of Modern Human Migration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kosta Sotiroski

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The processes of human migrations have been present for ages, since the very beginnings of human history on the planet Earth. Nowadays, these are amplified to a large scale due to the modern means of communication, transportation, information and knowledge exchange, as well as the complex processes of globalization. Knowing the social, demographic, ethnical and educational structure of the migrants, as well as their geographical trajectory and temporal dynamics of their spatial moving across territories, countries and continents, is of a crucial meaning for both national governments and international policies. There is an emphasized need for identifying, acquiring, organizing, storing, retrieving and analyzing data related to human migration processes. The relational databases provide an ultimate solution, whilst the E-R diagram represents a common graphical tool for conceptual data modelling and relational database design. Within the paper we develop and propose a logical data model of the modern human migration.

  20. Quantum Gravity models - brief conceptual summary

    CERN Document Server

    Lukierski, jerzy

    2014-01-01

    After short historical overview we describe the difficulties with application of standard QFT methods in quantum gravity (QG). The incompatibility of QG with the use of classical continuous space-time required conceptually new approach. We present briefly three proposals: loop quantum gravity (LQG), the field-theoretic framework on noncommutative space-time and QG models formulated on discretized (triangularized) space-time. We evaluate these models as realizing expected important properties of QG: background independence, consistent quantum diffeomorphisms, noncommutative or discrete structure of space-time at very short distances, finite/renormalizable QG corrections. We only briefly outline an important issue of embedding QG into larger geometric and dynamical frameworks (e.g. supergravity, (super)strings, p-branes, M-theory), with the aim to achieve full unification of all fundamental interactions.

  1. Conceptual models used in clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wardle, M G; Mandle, C L

    1989-02-01

    Nurses' difficulties in articulation of conceptual models may be due to several factors--not the least of which are the existence of discrete theories for each area of nursing specialization, dissociation in curricula of theory from practice, a holistic conceptual framework that may be inadequately defined at the process level, and an impulse toward idealism on the part of the nurses themselves. These observations challenge both the theorists and the practitioners of modern nursing to describe more clearly the definition of quality for the science and art of nursing. Nurses are beginning to grasp the idea of holism. It is not the summation of parts to make a whole. Holism is the identification of life patterns, which are reflective of the whole. Nurses in practice and research are starting to create methods of inquiry that portray the wholeness of the autonomous person in continual, dynamic change and exchange with a changing universe. These initial explorations are leading to the evolution of the concepts of person, environment, and health into a distinctive theoretical base for nursing practice. In practice, research, and education, nurses must be committed to excellent, current descriptions of these human life patterns.

  2. The Conceptual Integration Modeling Framework: Abstracting from the Multidimensional Model

    CERN Document Server

    Rizzolo, Flavio; Pottinger, Rachel; Wong, Kwok

    2010-01-01

    Data warehouses are overwhelmingly built through a bottom-up process, which starts with the identification of sources, continues with the extraction and transformation of data from these sources, and then loads the data into a set of data marts according to desired multidimensional relational schemas. End user business intelligence tools are added on top of the materialized multidimensional schemas to drive decision making in an organization. Unfortunately, this bottom-up approach is costly both in terms of the skilled users needed and the sheer size of the warehouses. This paper proposes a top-down framework in which data warehousing is driven by a conceptual model. The framework offers both design time and run time environments. At design time, a business user first uses the conceptual modeling language as a multidimensional object model to specify what business information is needed; then she maps the conceptual model to a pre-existing logical multidimensional representation. At run time, a system will tra...

  3. Summary of Vadose -- Zone Conceptual Models for Flow and Contaminant Transport and 1999 - 2003 Progress on Resolving Deficiencies in Understanding the Vadose Zone at the INEEL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robert C. Starr; Dana L. Dettmers; Brennon R. Orr; Thomas R. Wood

    2003-12-01

    The thick vadose zone that underlies the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory has been recognized both as an avenue through which contaminants disposed at or near the ground surface can migrate to groundwater in the underlying Eastern Snake River Plain aquifer, and as a barrier to the movement of contaminants into the aquifer. Flow and contaminant transport in the vadose zone at the INEEL is complicated by the highly heterogeneous nature of the geologic framework and by the variations in the behavior of different contaminants in the subsurface. The state of knowledge concerning flow and contaminant transport in the vadose zone at and near the INEEL IN 1999 was summarized in Deficiencies in Vadose Zone Understanding at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (Wood et al., 2000). These authors identified deficiencies in knowledge of flow and contaminant transport processes in the vadose zone, and provided recommendations for additional work that should be conducted to address these deficiencies. In the period since (Wood et al., 2000) was prepared, research has been published that, to some degree, address these deficiencies. This document provides a bibliography of reports, journal articles, and conference proceedings published 1999 through mid-2003 that are relevant to the vadose zone at or near the INEEL and provides a brief description of each work. Publications that address specific deficiencies or recommendations are identified, and pertinent information from selected publications is presented.

  4. DEFICIENT INFORMATION MODELING OF MECHANICAL PRODUCTS FOR CONCEPTUAL SHAPE DESIGN

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    In allusion to the deficient feature of product information in conceptual design, a framework of deficient information modeling for conceptual shape design is put forward, which includes qualitative shape modeling (a qualitative solid model), uncertain shape modeling (an uncertain relation model) and imprecise shape modeling (an imprecise region model). In the framework, the qualitative solid model is the core, which represents qualitatively (using symbols) the conceptual shapes of mechanical products. The uncertain relation model regarding domain relations as objects and the imprecise region model regarding domains as objects are used to deal with the uncertain and imprecise issues respectively, which arise from qualitative shape modeling or exist in product information itself.

  5. A unifying conceptual model of entrepreneurial management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Senderovitz, Martin

    This article offers a systematic analysis and synthesis of the area of entrepreneurial management. Through a presentation of two main perspectives on entrepreneurial management and a newly developed unifying conceptual entrepreneurial management model, the paper discusses a number of theoretical...... disagreements, managerial dilemmas and paradoxes. On the basis of the findings and conclusions of the study, the article contributes with and overview of the entrepreneurial management field, and offers an answer to the overall research question: What constitutes the most essential areas and challenges...... of entrepreneurial management? The paper builts on the seminal work by Stevenson (1983, 1990) and proposes a discussion and elaboration of the understanding and definition of entrepreneurial management in terms of the relationship between entrepreneurial opportunities and firm resources....

  6. Shallow groundwater in the Matanuska-Susitna Valley, Alaska—Conceptualization and simulation of flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kikuchi, Colin P.

    2013-01-01

    The Matanuska-Susitna Valley is in the Upper Cook Inlet Basin and is currently undergoing rapid population growth outside of municipal water and sewer service areas. In response to concerns about the effects of increasing water use on future groundwater availability, a study was initiated between the Alaska Department of Natural Resources and the U.S. Geological Survey. The goals of the study were (1) to compile existing data and collect new data to support hydrogeologic conceptualization of the study area, and (2) to develop a groundwater flow model to simulate flow dynamics important at the regional scale. The purpose of the groundwater flow model is to provide a scientific framework for analysis of regional-scale groundwater availability. To address the first study goal, subsurface lithologic data were compiled into a database and were used to construct a regional hydrogeologic framework model describing the extent and thickness of hydrogeologic units in the Matanuska-Susitna Valley. The hydrogeologic framework model synthesizes existing maps of surficial geology and conceptual geochronologies developed in the study area with the distribution of lithologies encountered in hundreds of boreholes. The geologic modeling package Geological Surveying and Investigation in Three Dimensions (GSI3D) was used to construct the hydrogeologic framework model. In addition to characterizing the hydrogeologic framework, major groundwater-budget components were quantified using several different techniques. A land-surface model known as the Deep Percolation Model was used to estimate in-place groundwater recharge across the study area. This model incorporates data on topography, soils, vegetation, and climate. Model-simulated surface runoff was consistent with observed streamflow at U.S. Geological Survey streamgages. Groundwater withdrawals were estimated on the basis of records from major water suppliers during 2004-2010. Fluxes between groundwater and surface water were

  7. Semantic techniques for enabling knowledge reuse in conceptual modelling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gracia, J.; Liem, J.; Lozano, E.; Corcho, O.; Trna, M.; Gómez-Pérez, A.; Bredeweg, B.

    2010-01-01

    Conceptual modelling tools allow users to construct formal representations of their conceptualisations. These models are typically developed in isolation, unrelated to other user models, thus losing the opportunity of incorporating knowledge from other existing models or ontologies that might enrich

  8. Creating a Universe, a Conceptual Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James R. Johnson

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Space is something. Space inherently contains laws of nature: universal rules (mathematics, space dimensions, types of forces, types of fields, and particle species, laws (relativity, quantum mechanics, thermodynamics, and electromagnetism and symmetries (Lorentz, Gauge, and symmetry breaking. We have significant knowledge about these laws of nature because all our scientific theories assume their presence. Their existence is critical for developing either a unique theory of our universe or more speculative multiverse theories. Scientists generally ignore the laws of nature because they “are what they are” and because visualizing different laws of nature challenges the imagination. This article defines a conceptual model separating space (laws of nature from the universe’s energy source (initial conditions and expansion (big bang. By considering the ramifications of changing the laws of nature, initial condition parameters, and two variables in the big bang theory, the model demonstrates that traditional fine tuning is not the whole story when creating a universe. Supporting the model, space and “nothing” are related to the laws of nature, mathematics and multiverse possibilities. Speculation on the beginning of time completes the model.

  9. Assessment of conceptual model uncertainty for the regional aquifer Pampa del Tamarugal – North Chile

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Rojas

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available In this work we assess the uncertainty in modelling the groundwater flow for the Pampa del Tamarugal Aquifer (PTA – North Chile using a novel and fully integrated multi-model approach aimed at explicitly accounting for uncertainties arising from the definition of alternative conceptual models. The approach integrates the Generalized Likelihood Uncertainty Estimation (GLUE and Bayesian Model Averaging (BMA methods. For each member of an ensemble M of potential conceptualizations, model weights used in BMA for multi-model aggregation are obtained from GLUE-based likelihood values. These model weights are based on model performance, thus, reflecting how well a conceptualization reproduces an observed dataset D. GLUE-based cumulative predictive distributions for each member of M are then aggregated obtaining predictive distributions accounting for conceptual model uncertainties. For the PTA we propose an ensemble of eight alternative conceptualizations covering all major features of groundwater flow models independently developed in past studies and including two recharge mechanisms which have been source of debate for several years. Results showed that accounting for heterogeneities in the hydraulic conductivity field (a reduced the uncertainty in the estimations of parameters and state variables, and (b increased the corresponding model weights used for multi-model aggregation. This was more noticeable when the hydraulic conductivity field was conditioned on available hydraulic conductivity measurements. Contribution of conceptual model uncertainty to the predictive uncertainty varied between 6% and 64% for ground water head estimations and between 16% and 79% for ground water flow estimations. These results clearly illustrate the relevance of conceptual model uncertainty.

  10. Assessment of conceptual model uncertainty for the regional aquifer Pampa del Tamarugal – North Chile

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Rojas

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available In this work we assess the uncertainty in modelling the groundwater flow for the Pampa del Tamarugal Aquifer (PTA – North Chile using a novel and fully integrated multi-model approach aimed at explicitly accounting for uncertainties arising from the definition of alternative conceptual models. The approach integrates the Generalized Likelihood Uncertainty Estimation (GLUE and Bayesian Model Averaging (BMA methods. For each member of an ensemble M of potential conceptualizations, model weights used in BMA for multi-model aggregation are obtained from GLUE-based likelihood values. These model weights are based on model performance, thus, reflecting how well a conceptualization reproduces an observed dataset D. GLUE-based cumulative predictive distributions for each member of M are then aggregated obtaining predictive distributions accounting for conceptual model uncertainties. For the PTA we propose an ensemble of eight alternative conceptualizations covering all major features of groundwater flow models independently developed in past studies and including two recharge mechanisms which have been source of debate for several years. Results showed that accounting for heterogeneities in the hydraulic conductivity field (a reduced the uncertainty in the estimations of parameters and state variables, and (b increased the corresponding model weights used for multi-model aggregation. This was more noticeable when the hydraulic conductivity field was conditioned on available hydraulic conductivity measurements. Contribution of conceptual model uncertainty to the predictive uncertainty varied between 6% and 64% for ground water head estimations and between 16% and 79% for ground water flow estimations. These results clearly illustrate the relevance of conceptual model uncertainty.

  11. National Identity: Conceptual models, discourses and political change

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harder, Peter

    2014-01-01

    on the interplay between conceptual, geopolitical and social factors in shaping the ongoing change in the role and nature of ‘Britishness’. A key question for this article is: What are relations between conceptual models and macro-social, causal factors in shaping the intersubjective status of Britishness?......Cognitive Linguistics has demonstrated the applicability of a conceptual approach to the understanding of political issues, cf. Lakoff (2008) and many others. From a different perspective, critical discourse analysis has approached political concepts with a focus on issues involving potentially...... divisive features such as race, class, gender and ethnic identity. Although discourses are not identical to conceptual models, conceptual models are typically manifested in discourse, and discourses are typically reflections of conceptualizations, a theme explored e.g. in Hart and Lukes (2007). As argued...

  12. A Conceptual Framework for the Indirect Method of Reporting Net Cash Flow from Operating Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ting J.

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes the fundamental concept of the reconciliation behind the indirect method of the statement of cash flows. A conceptual framework is presented to demonstrate how accrual and cash-basis accounting methods relate to each other and to illustrate the concept of reconciling these two accounting methods. The conceptual framework…

  13. A conceptual, distributed snow redistribution model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frey, S.; Holzmann, H.

    2015-11-01

    When applying conceptual hydrological models using a temperature index approach for snowmelt to high alpine areas often accumulation of snow during several years can be observed. Some of the reasons why these "snow towers" do not exist in nature are vertical and lateral transport processes. While snow transport models have been developed using grid cell sizes of tens to hundreds of square metres and have been applied in several catchments, no model exists using coarser cell sizes of 1 km2, which is a common resolution for meso- and large-scale hydrologic modelling (hundreds to thousands of square kilometres). In this paper we present an approach that uses only gravity and snow density as a proxy for the age of the snow cover and land-use information to redistribute snow in alpine basins. The results are based on the hydrological modelling of the Austrian Inn Basin in Tyrol, Austria, more specifically the Ötztaler Ache catchment, but the findings hold for other tributaries of the river Inn. This transport model is implemented in the distributed rainfall-runoff model COSERO (Continuous Semi-distributed Runoff). The results of both model concepts with and without consideration of lateral snow redistribution are compared against observed discharge and snow-covered areas derived from MODIS satellite images. By means of the snow redistribution concept, snow accumulation over several years can be prevented and the snow depletion curve compared with MODIS (Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer) data could be improved, too. In a 7-year period the standard model would lead to snow accumulation of approximately 2900 mm SWE (snow water equivalent) in high elevated regions whereas the updated version of the model does not show accumulation and does also predict discharge with more accuracy leading to a Kling-Gupta efficiency of 0.93 instead of 0.9. A further improvement can be shown in the comparison of MODIS snow cover data and the calculated depletion curve, where

  14. CONCEPTUAL MODELING BASED ON LOGICAL EXPRESSION AND EVOLVEMENT

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yl Guodong; ZHANG Shuyou; TAN Jianrong; JI Yangjian

    2007-01-01

    Aiming at the problem of abstract and polytype information modeling in product conceptual design, a method of conceptual modeling based on logical expression and evolvement is presented. Based on the logic expressions of the product conceptual design information, a function/logic/structure mapping model is set up. First, the function semantics is transformed into logical expressions through function/logic mapping. Second, the methods of logical evolvement are utilized to describe the function analysis, function/structure mapping and structure combination. Last, the logical structure scheme is transformed into geometrical sketch through logic/structure mapping. The conceptual design information and modeling process are described uniformly with logical methods in the model, and an effective method for computer aided conceptual design based on the model is implemented.

  15. Showing Automatically Generated Students' Conceptual Models to Students and Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez-Marin, Diana; Pascual-Nieto, Ismael

    2010-01-01

    A student conceptual model can be defined as a set of interconnected concepts associated with an estimation value that indicates how well these concepts are used by the students. It can model just one student or a group of students, and can be represented as a concept map, conceptual diagram or one of several other knowledge representation…

  16. Conceptual models of the wind-driven and thermohaline circulation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Drijfhout, S.S.; Marshall, D.P.; Dijkstra, H.A.

    2013-01-01

    Conceptual models are a vital tool for understanding the processes that maintain the global ocean circulation, both in nature and in complex numerical ocean models. In this chapter we provide a broad overview of our conceptual understanding of the wind-driven circulation, the thermohaline

  17. Conceptual models of the wind-driven and thermohaline circulation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Drijfhout, S.S.; Marshall, D.P.; Dijkstra, H.A.

    2013-01-01

    Conceptual models are a vital tool for understanding the processes that maintain the global ocean circulation, both in nature and in complex numerical ocean models. In this chapter we provide a broad overview of our conceptual understanding of the wind-driven circulation, the thermohaline circulatio

  18. Conceptual models of the wind-driven and thermohaline circulation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Drijfhout, S.S.; Marshall, D.P.; Dijkstra, H.A.

    2013-01-01

    Conceptual models are a vital tool for understanding the processes that maintain the global ocean circulation, both in nature and in complex numerical ocean models. In this chapter we provide a broad overview of our conceptual understanding of the wind-driven circulation, the thermohaline circulatio

  19. A conceptual model of check dam hydraulics for gully control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Castillo

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available There is little information in scientific literature regarding the modifications induced by check dam systems in flow regimes in restored gully reaches, despite it being a crucial issue for the design of conservation measures. Here, we develop a conceptual model to classify flow regimes in straight rectangular channels for initial and dam-filling conditions as well as a method of estimating efficiency in order to provide guidelines for optimal design. The model integrates several previous mathematical approaches for assessing the main processes involved (hydraulic jump HJ, impact flow, gradually varied flows. Its performance was compared with the simulations obtained from IBER, a bi-dimensional hydrodynamic model. The impact of check dam spacing (defined by the geometric factor of influence c on efficiency was explored. Eleven main classifications of flow regimes were identified depending on the element and level of influence. The model produced similar results when compared with IBER, but led to higher estimations of HJ and impact lengths. Total influence guaranteed maximum efficiency and HJ control defining the location of the optimal c. Geometric total influence (c = 1 was a valid criterion for the different stages of the structures in a wide range of situations provided that hydraulic roughness conditions remained high within the gully, e.g. through revegetation. Our total influence criterion involved shorter spacing than that habitually recommended in technical manuals for restoration, but was in line with those values found in spontaneous and stable step-pools systems, which might serve as a reference for man-made interventions.

  20. Conceptual model for heart failure disease management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrikopoulou, Efstathia; Abbate, Kariann; Whellan, David J

    2014-03-01

    The objective of this review is to propose a conceptual model for heart failure (HF) disease management (HFDM) and to define the components of an efficient HFDM plan in reference to this model. Articles that evaluated 1 or more of the following aspects of HFDM were reviewed: (1) outpatient clinic follow-up; (2) self-care interventions to enhance patient skills; and (3) remote evaluation of worsening HF either using structured telephone support (STS) or by monitoring device data (telemonitoring). The success of programs in reducing readmissions and mortality were mixed. Outpatient follow-up programs generally resulted in improved outcomes, including decreased readmissions. Based on 1 meta-analysis, specialty clinics improved outcomes and nonspecialty clinics did not. Results from self-care programs were inconsistent and might have been affected by patient cognitive status and educational level, and intervention intensity. Telemonitoring, despite initially promising meta-analyses demonstrating a decrease in the number and duration of HF-related readmissions and all-cause mortality rates at follow-up, has not been shown in randomized trials to consistently reduce readmissions or mortality. However, evidence from device monitoring trials in particular might have been influenced by technology and design issues that might be rectified in future trials. Results from the literature suggest that the ideal HFDM plan would include outpatient follow-up at an HF specialty clinic and continuous education to improve patient self-care. The end result of this plan would lead to better understanding on the part of the patient and improved patient ability to recognize and respond to signs of decompensation. Copyright © 2014 Canadian Cardiovascular Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Modeling in transport phenomena a conceptual approach

    CERN Document Server

    Tosun, Ismail

    2007-01-01

    Modeling in Transport Phenomena, Second Edition presents and clearly explains with example problems the basic concepts and their applications to fluid flow, heat transfer, mass transfer, chemical reaction engineering and thermodynamics. A balanced approach is presented between analysis and synthesis, students will understand how to use the solution in engineering analysis. Systematic derivations of the equations and the physical significance of each term are given in detail, for students to easily understand and follow up the material. There is a strong incentive in science and engineering to

  2. A CONCEPTUAL MODEL FOR IMPROVED PROJECT SELECTION AND PRIORITISATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. J. Viljoen

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available

    ENGLISH ABSTRACT: Project portfolio management processes are often designed and operated as a series of stages (or project phases and gates. However, the flow of such a process is often slow, characterised by queues waiting for a gate decision and by repeated work from previous stages waiting for additional information or for re-processing. In this paper the authors propose a conceptual model that applies supply chain and constraint management principles to the project portfolio management process. An advantage of the proposed model is that it provides the ability to select and prioritise projects without undue changes to project schedules. This should result in faster flow through the system.

    AFRIKAANSE OPSOMMING: Prosesse om portefeuljes van projekte te bestuur word normaalweg ontwerp en bedryf as ’n reeks fases en hekke. Die vloei deur so ’n proses is dikwels stadig en word gekenmerk deur toue wat wag vir besluite by die hekke en ook deur herwerk van vorige fases wat wag vir verdere inligting of vir herprosessering. In hierdie artikel word ‘n konseptuele model voorgestel. Die model berus op die beginsels van voorsieningskettings sowel as van beperkingsbestuur, en bied die voordeel dat projekte geselekteer en geprioritiseer kan word sonder onnodige veranderinge aan projekskedules. Dit behoort te lei tot versnelde vloei deur die stelsel.

  3. Business models for material efficiency services. Conceptualization and application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Halme, Minna; Anttonen, Markku; Kuisma, Mika; Kontoniemi, Nea [Helsinki School of Economics, Department of Marketing and Management, P.O. Box 1210, 00101 Helsinki (Finland); Heino, Erja [University of Helsinki, Department of Biological and Environmental Sciences (Finland)

    2007-06-15

    Despite the abundant research on material flows and the growing recognition of the need to dematerialize the economy, business enterprises are still not making the best possible use of the many opportunities for material efficiency improvements. This article proposes one possible solution: material efficiency services provided by outside suppliers. It also introduces a conceptual framework for the analysis of different business models for eco-efficient services and applies the framework to material efficiency services. Four business models are outlined and their feasibility is studied from an empirical vantage point. In contrast to much of the previous research, special emphasis is laid on the financial aspects. It appears that the most promising business models are 'material efficiency as additional service' and 'material flow management service'. Depending on the business model, prominent material efficiency service providers differ from large companies that offer multiple products and/or services to smaller, specialized providers. Potential clients (users) typically lack the resources (expertise, management's time or initial funds) to conduct material efficiency improvements themselves. Customers are more likely to use material efficiency services that relate to support materials or side-streams rather than those that are at the core of production. Potential client organizations with a strategy of outsourcing support activities and with experience of outsourcing are more keen to use material efficiency services. (author)

  4. A Conceptual Model for Water Sensitive City in Surabaya

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pamungkas, A.; Tucunan, K. P.; Navastara, A.; Idajati, H.; Pratomoatmojo, N. A.

    2017-08-01

    Frequent inundated areas, low quality of water supply, highly dependent water sources from external are some key problems in Surabaya water balance. Many aspects of urban development have stimulated those problems. To uncover the complexity of water balance in Surabaya, a conceptual model for water sensitive city is constructed to find the optimum solution. A system dynamic modeling is utilized to assist and enrich the idea of conceptual model. A secondary analysis to a wide range data directs the process in making a conceptual model. FGD involving many experts from multidiscipline are also used to finalize the conceptual model. Based on those methods, the model has four main sub models that are; flooding, land use change, water demand and water supply. The model consists of 35 key variables illustrating challenges in Surabaya urban water.

  5. Design developing conceptual models blade with geometric combined surface

    OpenAIRE

    Juraev, T. H.; Bukhara Technological Institute of Engineering, Bukhara

    2013-01-01

    A conceptual model of the blade using the methods of geometricmodeling principles of industrial design and CAD technologies. Variants are functional use of the proposed model for various working bodies.

  6. Toolkit for Conceptual Modeling (TCM): User's Guide and Reference

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dehne, F.; Wieringa, R.J.

    1997-01-01

    The Toolkit for Conceptual Modeling (TCM) is a suite of graphical editors for a number of graphical notation systems that are used in software specification methods. The notations can be used to represent the conceptual structure of the software - hence the name of the suite. This manual describes

  7. Toolkit for Conceptual Modeling (TCM): User's Guide and Reference

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dehne, F.; Wieringa, Roelf J.

    The Toolkit for Conceptual Modeling (TCM) is a suite of graphical editors for a number of graphical notation systems that are used in software specification methods. The notations can be used to represent the conceptual structure of the software - hence the name of the suite. This manual describes

  8. An ontologically well-founded profile for UML conceptual models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Guizzardi, Giancarlo; Wagner, Gerd; Guarino, Nicola; Sinderen, van Marten; Persson, Anne; Stirna, Janis

    2004-01-01

    UML class diagrams can be used as a language for expressing a conceptual model of a domain. In a series of papers [1,2,3] we have been using the General Ontological Language (GOL) and its underlying upper level ontology, proposed in [4,5], to evaluate the ontological correctness of a conceptual UML

  9. Model of Conceptual Change for INQPRO: A Bayesian Network Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ting, Choo-Yee; Sam, Yok-Cheng; Wong, Chee-Onn

    2013-01-01

    Constructing a computational model of conceptual change for a computer-based scientific inquiry learning environment is difficult due to two challenges: (i) externalizing the variables of conceptual change and its related variables is difficult. In addition, defining the causal dependencies among the variables is also not trivial. Such difficulty…

  10. Using Conceptual Change Theories to Model Position Concepts in Astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Chih-Chiang; Hung, Jeng-Fung

    2012-01-01

    The roles of conceptual change and model building in science education are very important and have a profound and wide effect on teaching science. This study examines the change in children's position concepts after instruction, based on different conceptual change theories. Three classes were chosen and divided into three groups, including a…

  11. Validated dynamic flow model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Torben

    2011-01-01

    The purpose with this deliverable 2.5 is to use fresh experimental data for validation and selection of a flow model to be used for control design in WP3-4. Initially the idea was to investigate the models developed in WP2. However, in the project it was agreed to include and focus on a additive...... model turns out not to be useful for prediction of the flow. Moreover, standard Box Jenkins model structures and multiple output auto regressive models proves to be superior as they can give useful predictions of the flow....

  12. Lumped conceptual hydrological model for Purna river basin, India

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    V D Loliyana; P L Patel

    2015-12-01

    In present study, a lumped conceptual hydrological model, NAM (MIKE11), is calibrated while optimizing the runoff simulations on the basis of minimization of percentage water balance (% WBL) and root mean square error (RMSE) using measured stream flow data of eight years from 1991 to 1998 for Yerli catchment (area = 15,701 km2) of upper Tapi basin, Maharashtra in Western India. The sensitivity of runoff volume and peak-runoff has been undertaken with reference to nine NAM parameters using the data of calibration period. The runoff volume and peak-runoff have been found to be highly sensitive with reference to maximum water content in root zone storage (Lmax) and overland flow coefficient (CQOF) respectively. On the other hand, runoff volume is found to be moderately sensitive with maximum water content in surface storage (Umax). The calibrated model has been validated for independent stream flow data of Yerli gauging site for years 2001–2004, and Gopalkheda gauging site for years 1991–1998 and 2001–2004. The model performance has been assessed using statistical performance indices, and compared the same with their yardsticks suggested in published literature. The simulated results demonstrated that calibrated model is able to simulate hydrographs satisfactorily for Yerli (NSE = 0.86–0.88, r = 0.93–0.96, EI = 1.05–1.12) as well as Gopalkheda subcatchments (NSE = 0.76–0.92 and r = 0.88–0.96, EI = 0.89–0.91) at monthly time scale. The model also performs reasonably well in simulating the annual hydrographs at daily time scale. The calibrated model may be useful in prediction of water yield and flooding conditions in the Purna catchment.

  13. Data flow modeling techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kavi, K. M.

    1984-01-01

    There have been a number of simulation packages developed for the purpose of designing, testing and validating computer systems, digital systems and software systems. Complex analytical tools based on Markov and semi-Markov processes have been designed to estimate the reliability and performance of simulated systems. Petri nets have received wide acceptance for modeling complex and highly parallel computers. In this research data flow models for computer systems are investigated. Data flow models can be used to simulate both software and hardware in a uniform manner. Data flow simulation techniques provide the computer systems designer with a CAD environment which enables highly parallel complex systems to be defined, evaluated at all levels and finally implemented in either hardware or software. Inherent in data flow concept is the hierarchical handling of complex systems. In this paper we will describe how data flow can be used to model computer system.

  14. Revised conceptual hydrogeologic model of a crystalline rock environment, Whiteshell Research Area, Southeastern Manitoba, Canada; Modele hydrogeologique conceptual revise d`un milieu de roche cristalline, aire de recherche de whiteshell, sud-est du manitoba au canada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stevenson, D.R.; Brown, A.; Davison, C.C.; Gascoyne, M.; McGregor, R.G.

    1996-04-01

    A revised conceptual hydrogeologic model of regional groundwater flow in the crystalline rocks of the Whiteshell Research Area (WRA) has been developed by a team of AECL geoscientists. The boundaries of the revised conceptual model were selected to coincide with the natural hydraulic boundaries assumed for the regional groundwater flow systems in the WRA. The rocks of the modeled region were divided on the basis of fracture characteristics into three categories: fractured zones (FZs); moderately fractured rock (MFR); and sparsely fractured rock (SFR). The hydraulic properties of the revised conceptual model were modified during an interative process of mathematical model calibration and conceptual model revision. This process included sensitivity analysis and matching of equivalent fresh water hydraulic head and groundwater flux values calculated by the mathematical model and comparison with the field measurements.

  15. A conceptual framework for a mentoring model for nurse educators ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A conceptual framework for a mentoring model for nurse educators. ... recruiting and retaining nurse educators to meet the demands of teaching and learning ... approaches focusing on reasoning strategies, literature control and empirical data ...

  16. Conceptual Model of Multidimensional Marketing Information System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kriksciuniene, Dalia; Urbanskiene, Ruta

    This article is aimed to analyse, why the information systems at the enterprise not always satisfy the expectations of marketing management specialists. The computerized systems more and more successfully serve information needs of those areas of enterprise management, where they can create the information equivalent of real management processes. Yet their inability to effectively fulfill marketing needs indicate the gaps not only in ability to structure marketing processes, but in the conceptual development of marketing information systems (MkIS) as well.

  17. Shallow groundwater in the Matanuska-Susitna Valley, Alaska—Conceptualization and simulation of flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kikuchi, Colin P.

    2013-01-01

    The Matanuska-Susitna Valley is in the Upper Cook Inlet Basin and is currently undergoing rapid population growth outside of municipal water and sewer service areas. In response to concerns about the effects of increasing water use on future groundwater availability, a study was initiated between the Alaska Department of Natural Resources and the U.S. Geological Survey. The goals of the study were (1) to compile existing data and collect new data to support hydrogeologic conceptualization of the study area, and (2) to develop a groundwater flow model to simulate flow dynamics important at the regional scale. The purpose of the groundwater flow model is to provide a scientific framework for analysis of regional-scale groundwater availability. To address the first study goal, subsurface lithologic data were compiled into a database and were used to construct a regional hydrogeologic framework model describing the extent and thickness of hydrogeologic units in the Matanuska-Susitna Valley. The hydrogeologic framework model synthesizes existing maps of surficial geology and conceptual geochronologies developed in the study area with the distribution of lithologies encountered in hundreds of boreholes. The geologic modeling package Geological Surveying and Investigation in Three Dimensions (GSI3D) was used to construct the hydrogeologic framework model. In addition to characterizing the hydrogeologic framework, major groundwater-budget components were quantified using several different techniques. A land-surface model known as the Deep Percolation Model was used to estimate in-place groundwater recharge across the study area. This model incorporates data on topography, soils, vegetation, and climate. Model-simulated surface runoff was consistent with observed streamflow at U.S. Geological Survey streamgages. Groundwater withdrawals were estimated on the basis of records from major water suppliers during 2004-2010. Fluxes between groundwater and surface water were

  18. Conceptual Models and Guidelines for Clinical Assessment of Financial Capacity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marson, Daniel

    2016-09-01

    The ability to manage financial affairs is a life skill of critical importance, and neuropsychologists are increasingly asked to assess financial capacity across a variety of settings. Sound clinical assessment of financial capacity requires knowledge and appreciation of applicable clinical conceptual models and principles. However, the literature has presented relatively little conceptual guidance for clinicians concerning financial capacity and its assessment. This article seeks to address this gap. The article presents six clinical models of financial capacity : (1) the early gerontological IADL model of Lawton, (2) the clinical skills model and (3) related cognitive psychological model developed by Marson and colleagues, (4) a financial decision-making model adapting earlier decisional capacity work of Appelbaum and Grisso, (5) a person-centered model of financial decision-making developed by Lichtenberg and colleagues, and (6) a recent model of financial capacity in the real world developed through the Institute of Medicine. Accompanying presentation of the models is discussion of conceptual and practical perspectives they represent for clinician assessment. Based on the models, the article concludes by presenting a series of conceptually oriented guidelines for clinical assessment of financial capacity. In summary, sound assessment of financial capacity requires knowledge and appreciation of clinical conceptual models and principles. Awareness of such models, principles and guidelines will strengthen and advance clinical assessment of financial capacity.

  19. A conceptual framework for managing information flow in innovation systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Temel, T.

    2007-01-01

    This study introduces a framework for managing information flow in innovation systems. An organisation's capacity to receive information, to share it with others and to learn from it is assumed to be the key factor that shapes the flow patterns and, hence, the performance of the innovation system

  20. Towards a Model of Technology Adoption: A Conceptual Model Proposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costello, Pat; Moreton, Rob

    A conceptual model for Information Communication Technology (ICT) adoption by Small Medium Enterprises (SMEs) is proposed. The research uses several ICT adoption models as its basis with theoretical underpinning provided by the Diffusion of Innovation theory and the Technology Acceptance Model (TAM). Taking an exploratory research approach the model was investigated amongst 200 SMEs whose core business is ICT. Evidence from this study demonstrates that these SMEs face the same issues as all other industry sectors. This work points out weaknesses in SMEs environments regarding ICT adoption and suggests what they may need to do to increase the success rate of any proposed adoption. The methodology for development of the framework is described and recommendations made for improved Government-led ICT adoption initiatives. Application of the general methodology has resulted in new opportunities to embed the ethos and culture surrounding the issues into the framework of new projects developed as a result of Government intervention. A conceptual model is proposed that may lead to a deeper understanding of the issues under consideration.

  1. Southern marl prairies conceptual ecological model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, S.M.; Loftus, W.F.; Gaiser, E.E.; Huffman, A.E.

    2005-01-01

    About 190,000 ha of higher-elevation marl prairies flank either side of Shark River Slough in the southern Everglades. Water levels typically drop below the ground surface each year in this landscape. Consequently, peat soil accretion is inhibited, and substrates consist either of calcitic marl produced by algal periphyton mats or exposed limestone bedrock. The southern marl prairies support complex mosaics of wet prairie, sawgrass sawgrass (Cladium jamaicense), tree islands, and tropical hammock communities and a high diversity of plant species. However, relatively short hydroperiods and annual dry downs provide stressful conditions for aquatic fauna, affecting survival in the dry season when surface water is absent. Here, we present a conceptual ecological model developed for this landscape through scientific concensus, use of empirical data, and modeling. The two major societal drivers affecting the southern marl prairies are water management practices and agricultural and urban development. These drivers lead to five groups of ecosystem stressors: loss of spatial extent and connectivity, shortened hydroperiod and increased drought severity, extended hydroperiod and drying pattern reversals, introduction and spread of non-native trees, and introduction and spread of non-native fishes. Major ecological attributes include periphyton mats, plant species diversity and community mosaic, Cape Sable seaside sparrow (Ammodramus maritimus mirabilis), marsh fishes and associated aquatic fauna prey base, American alligator (Alligator mississippiensis), and wading bird early dry season foraging. Water management and development are hypothesized to have a negative effect on the ecological attributes of the southern marl prairies in the following ways. Periphyton mats have decreased in cover in areas where hydroperiod has been significantly reduced and changed in community composition due to inverse responses to increased nutrient availability. Plant species diversity and

  2. An empirical conceptual gully evolution model for channelled sea cliffs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leyland, Julian; Darby, Stephen E.

    2008-12-01

    Incised coastal channels are a specific form of incised channel that are found in locations where stream channels flowing to cliffed coasts have the excess energy required to cut down through the cliff to reach the outlet water body. The southern coast of the Isle of Wight, southern England, comprises soft cliffs that vary in height between 15 and 100 m and which are retreating at rates ≤ 1.5 m a - 1 , due to a combination of wave erosion and landslides. In several locations, river channels have cut through the cliffs to create deeply (≤ 45 m) incised gullies, known locally as 'Chines'. The Chines are unusual in that their formation is associated with dynamic shoreline encroachment during a period of rising sea-level, whereas existing models of incised channel evolution emphasise the significance of base level lowering. This paper develops a conceptual model of Chine evolution by applying space for time substitution methods using empirical data gathered from Chine channel surveys and remotely sensed data. The model identifies a sequence of evolutionary stages, which are classified based on a suite of morphometric indices and associated processes. The extent to which individual Chines are in a state of growth or decay is estimated by determining the relative rates of shoreline retreat and knickpoint recession, the former via analysis of historical aerial images and the latter through the use of a stream power erosion model.

  3. Towards reconstruction of the flow duration curve: development of a conceptual framework with a physical basis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Yokoo

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we investigate the climatic and landscape controls on the flow duration curve (FDC with the use of a physically-based rainfall-runoff model. The FDC is a stochastic representation of within-year variability of runoff, which arises from the transformation, by the catchment, of within-year variability of precipitation that can itself be characterized by a corresponding duration curve for precipitation (PFDC. Numerical simulations are carried out with the rainfall-runoff model under a variety of combinations of climatic inputs (i.e., precipitation, potential evaporation, including their within-year variability and landscape properties (i.e., soil type and depth. The simulations indicated that the FDC can be disaggregated into two components, with sharply differing characteristics and origins: the FDC for surface (fast runoff (SFDC and the FDC for subsurface (slow runoff (SSFDC. SFDC closely tracked PFDC and can be approximated with the use of a simple, nonlinear (threshold filter model. On the other hand, SSFDC tracked the FDC that is constructed from the regime curve (ensemble mean within-year variation of streamflow, which can be closely approximated by a linear filter model. Sensitivity analyses were carried out to understand the climate and landscape controls on each component, gaining useful physical insights into their respective shapes. In particular the results suggested that evaporation from dynamic saturated areas, especially in the dry season, can contribute to a sharp dip at the lower tail of the FDCs. Based on these results, we develop a conceptual framework for the reconstruction of FDCs in ungauged basins. This framework partitions the FDC into: (1 a fast flow component, governed by a filtered version of PFDC, (2 a slow flow component governed by the regime curve, and (3 a correction to SSFDC to capture the effects of high evapotranspiration at low flows.

  4. A Conceptual Model For Effluent-Dependent Riverine Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, M. T.; Meyerhoff, R. D.; Osterkamp, W. R.; Smith, E. L.; Hawkins, R. H.

    2001-12-01

    The Arid West Water Quality Research Project (WQRP) is a multi-year, EPA-funded scientific endeavor directed by the Pima County, Wastewater Management Department in southern Arizona and focussed upon several interconnected ecological questions. These questions are crucial to water quality management in the arid and semi arid western US. A key component has been the ecological, hydrological and geomorphological investigation of habitat created by the discharge of treated effluent into ephemeral streams. Such environments are fundamentally different from the dry streams or rivers they displace; however, they are clearly not the perennial streams they superficially resemble. Under Arizona State regulations, such streams can bear the use designation of "Effluent Dependent Waters," or EDWs. Before this investigation, a hydrological/ecological conceptual model for these unique ecosystems had not been published. We have constructed one for general review that is designed to direct future work in the WQRP. The project investigated ten representative, yet contrasting EDW sites distributed throughout arid areas of the western US, to gather both historical and reconnaissance level field data, including in-stream and riparian, habitat and morphometric fluvial data. In most cases, the cross sectional area of the prior channel is oversized relative to the discharge of the introduced effluent. Where bed control is absent, the channels are incised downstream of the discharge point, further suggesting a disequilibrium between the channel and the regulated effluent flow. Several of the studied stream systems primarily convey storm water and are aggradational, exhibiting braided or anastomizing channels, high energy bedforms, and spatially dynamic interfluves. Active channels are formed in response to individual storm events and can be highly dynamic in both location and cross-sectional morphology. This poses a geomorphological challenge in the selection of a discharge point. We

  5. A conceptual framework of groundwater flow in some crystalline aquifers in Southeastern Ghana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yidana, Sandow Mark; Ganyaglo, Samuel; Banoeng-Yakubo, Bruce; Akabzaa, Thomas

    2011-02-01

    A conceptual groundwater flow model was developed for the crystalline aquifers in southeastern part of the Eastern region, Ghana. The objective was to determine approximate levels of groundwater recharge, estimate aquifer hydraulic parameters, and then test various scenarios of groundwater extraction under the current conditions of recharge. A steady state groundwater flow model has been calibrated against measured water levels of 19 wells in the area. The resulting recharge is estimated to range from 8.97 × 10 -5 m/d to 7.14 × 10 -4 m/d resulting in a basin wide average recharge of about 9.6% of total annual precipitation, which results in a basin wide quantitative recharge of about 2.4 million m 3/d in the area. This compares to recharge estimated from the chloride mass balance of 7.6% of precipitation determined in this study. The general groundwater flow in the area has also been determined to conform to the general northeast-southwest structural grain of the country. The implication is that the general hydrogeology is controlled by post genetic structural entities imposed on the rocks to create ingresses for sufficient groundwater storage and transport. Calibrated aquifer hydraulic conductivities range between 0.99 m/d and over 19.4 m/d. There is a significant contribution of groundwater discharge to stream flow in the study area. Increasing groundwater extraction will have an effect on stream flow. This study finds that the current groundwater extraction levels represent only 0.17% of the annual recharge from precipitation, and that groundwater can sustain future increased groundwater demands from population growth and industrialization.

  6. Multicomponent flow modeling

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GIOVANGIGLI; Vincent

    2012-01-01

    We present multicomponent flow models derived from the kinetic theory of gases and investigate the symmetric hyperbolic-parabolic structure of the resulting system of partial differential equations.We address the Cauchy problem for smooth solutions as well as the existence of deflagration waves,also termed anchored waves.We further discuss related models which have a similar hyperbolic-parabolic structure,notably the SaintVenant system with a temperature equation as well as the equations governing chemical equilibrium flows.We next investigate multicomponent ionized and magnetized flow models with anisotropic transport fluxes which have a different mathematical structure.We finally discuss numerical algorithms specifically devoted to complex chemistry flows,in particular the evaluation of multicomponent transport properties,as well as the impact of multicomponent transport.

  7. Conceptual model for assessment of inhalation exposure to manufactured nanoparticles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schneider, T.; Brouwer, D.H.; Koponen, I.K.; Jensen, K.A.; Fransman, W.; Duuren-Stuurman, B. van; Tongeren, M. van; Tielemans, E.

    2011-01-01

    As workplace air measurements of manufactured nanoparticles are relatively expensive to conduct, models can be helpful for a first tier assessment of exposure. A conceptual model was developed to give a framework for such models. The basis for the model is an analysis of the fate and underlying

  8. A Multidisciplinary Design Optimization Model for AUV Synthetic Conceptual Design

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    BU Guang-zhi; ZHANG Yu-wen

    2006-01-01

    Autonomous undersea vehicle (AUV) is a typical complex engineering system. This paper studies the disciplines and coupled variables in AUV design with multidisciplinary design optimization (M DO) methods. The framework of AUV synthetic conceptual design is described first, and then a model with collaborative optimization is studied. At last,an example is given to verify the validity and efficiency of MDO in AUV synthetic conceptual design.

  9. The phenomenon of information a conceptual approach to information flow

    CERN Document Server

    Pérez-Montoro, Mario

    2007-01-01

    This study examines critically major theories of information and offers an original treatment of information flows that attempts to remedy weaknesses in earlier treatments and may serve as a basis on which a satisfactory analysis of the concept of information can be developed.

  10. Modeling Change Over Time: Conceptualization, Measurement, Analysis, and Interpretation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-11-12

    2007 to 29-11-2008 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Modeling Change Over Time: Conceptualization, Measurement, Analysis, and Interpretation 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER...Multilevel Modeling Portal (www.ats.ucla.edu/stat/ mlm /) and the Web site of the Center for Multilevel Modeling (http://multilevel.ioe.ac.uk/index.html

  11. Conceptual model for assessment of inhalation exposure: Defining modifying factors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tielemans, E.; Schneider, T.; Goede, H.; Tischer, M.; Warren, N.; Kromhout, H.; Tongeren, M. van; Hemmen, J. van; Cherrie, J.W.

    2008-01-01

    The present paper proposes a source-receptor model to schematically describe inhalation exposure to help understand the complex processes leading to inhalation of hazardous substances. The model considers a stepwise transfer of a contaminant from the source to the receptor. The conceptual model is c

  12. CML: the commonKADS conceptual modelling language

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schreiber, G.; Wielinga, B.J.; Akkermans, J.M.; Velde, van de W.; Anjewierden, A.A.

    1994-01-01

    We present a structured language for the specification of knowledge models according to the CommonKADS methodology. This language is called CML (Conceptual Modelling Language) and provides both a structured textual notation and a diagrammatic notation for expertise models. The use of our CML is illu

  13. Conceptual and numerical modeling approach of the Guarani Aquifer System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Rodríguez

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In large aquifers, relevant for their considerable size, regional groundwater modeling remains challenging given geologic complexity and data scarcity in space and time. Yet, it may be conjectured that regional scale groundwater flow models can help in understanding the flow system functioning and the relative magnitude of water budget components, which are important for aquifer management. The Guaraní Aquifer System is the largest transboundary aquifer in South America. It contains an enormous volume of water; however, it is not well known, being difficult to assess the impact of exploitation currently used to supply over 25 million inhabitants. This is a sensitive issue because the aquifer is shared by four countries. Moreover, an integrated groundwater model, and therefore a global water balance, were not available. In this work, a transient regional scale model for the entire aquifer based upon five simplified, equally plausible conceptual models represented by different hydraulic conductivity parametrizations is used to analyze the flow system and water balance components. Combining an increasing number of hydraulic conductivity zones and an appropriate set of boundary conditions, the hypothesis of a continuous sedimentary unit yielded errors within the calibration target in a regional sense. The magnitude of the water budget terms resulted very similar for all parametrizations. Recharge and stream/aquifer fluxes were the dominant components representing, on average, 84.2% of total inflows and 61.4% of total outflows, respectively. However, leakage was small compared to stream discharges of main rivers. For instance, the simulated average leakage for the Uruguay River was 8 m3 s−1 while the observed absolute minimum discharge was 382 m3 s−1. Streams located in heavily pumped regions switched from a gaining condition in early years to a losing condition over time. Water is discharged through

  14. A chaotic-dynamical conceptual model to describe fluid flow and contaminant transport in a fractured vadose zone. 1997 progress report and presentations at the annual meeting, Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, December 3--4, 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Faybishenko, B.; Doughty, C.; Geller, J. [and others

    1998-07-01

    Understanding subsurface flow and transport processes is critical for effective assessment, decision-making, and remediation activities for contaminated sites. However, for fluid flow and contaminant transport through fractured vadose zones, traditional hydrogeological approaches are often found to be inadequate. In this project, the authors examine flow and transport through a fractured vadose zone as a deterministic chaotic dynamical process, and develop a model of it in these terms. Initially, the authors examine separately the geometric model of fractured rock and the flow dynamics model needed to describe chaotic behavior. Ultimately they will put the geometry and flow dynamics together to develop a chaotic-dynamical model of flow and transport in a fractured vadose zone. They investigate water flow and contaminant transport on several scales, ranging from small-scale laboratory experiments in fracture replicas and fractured cores, to field experiments conducted in a single exposed fracture at a basalt outcrop, and finally to a ponded infiltration test using a pond of 7 by 8 m. In the field experiments, they measure the time-variation of water flux, moisture content, and hydraulic head at various locations, as well as the total inflow rate to the subsurface. Such variations reflect the changes in the geometry and physics of water flow that display chaotic behavior, which they try to reconstruct using the data obtained. In the analysis of experimental data, a chaotic model can be used to predict the long-term bounds on fluid flow and transport behavior, known as the attractor of the system, and to examine the limits of short-term predictability within these bounds. This approach is especially well suited to the need for short-term predictions to support remediation decisions and long-term bounding studies. View-graphs from ten presentations made at the annual meeting held December 3--4, 1997 are included in an appendix to this report.

  15. A conceptual model for determining career choice of CHROME alumna based on farmer's conceptual models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Lisa Simmons

    This qualitative program evaluation examines the career decision-making processes and career choices of nine, African American women who participated in the Cooperating Hampton Roads Organization for Minorities in Engineering (CHROME) and who graduated from urban, rural or suburban high schools in the year 2000. The CHROME program is a nonprofit, pre-college intervention program that encourages underrepresented minority and female students to enter science, technically related, engineering, and math (STEM) career fields. The study describes career choices and decisions made by each participant over a five-year period since high school graduation. Data was collected through an Annual Report, Post High School Questionnaires, Environmental Support Questionnaires, Career Choice Questionnaires, Senior Reports, and standardized open-ended interviews. Data was analyzed using a model based on Helen C. Farmer's Conceptual Models, John Ogbu's Caste Theory and Feminist Theory. The CHROME program, based on its stated goals and tenets, was also analyzed against study findings. Findings indicated that participants received very low levels of support from counselors and teachers to pursue STEM careers and high levels of support from parents and family, the CHROME program and financial backing. Findings of this study also indicated that the majority of CHROME alumna persisted in STEM careers. The most successful participants, in terms of undergraduate degree completion and occupational prestige, were the African American women who remained single, experienced no critical incidents, came from a middle class to upper middle class socioeconomic background, and did not have children.

  16. Identifying students’ mental models of sound propagation: The role of conceptual blending in understanding conceptual change

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zdeslav Hrepic

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available We investigated introductory physics students’ mental models of sound propagation. We used a phenomenographic method to analyze the data in the study. In addition to the scientifically accepted Wave model, students used the “Entity” model to describe the propagation of sound. In this latter model sound is a self-standing entity, different from the medium through which it propagates. All other observed alternative models contain elements of both Entity and Wave models, but at the same time are distinct from each of the constituent models. We called these models “hybrid” or “blend” models. We discuss how students use these models in various contexts before and after instruction and how our findings contribute to the understanding of conceptual change. Implications of our findings for teaching are summarized.

  17. Developing Conceptual Models for Assessing Climate Change Impacts to Contaminant Availability in Terrestrial Ecosystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-03-01

    Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. ERDC/EL TN-15-1 March 2015 Developing Conceptual Models for Assessing Climate Change ...about climate change , contaminant availability, and TER-S conservation on installations. CONCEPTUAL MODEL BACKGROUND: Conceptual models are... Conceptual Models for Assessing Climate Change Impacts to Contaminant Availability in Terrestrial Ecosystems 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c

  18. Un modelo multidimensional conceptual espacio-temporal A conceptual spatio-temporal multidimensional model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco Moreno

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Hoy, gracias a los sistemas de posicionamiento global y dispositivos móviles equipados con sensores de rastreo, se puede recopilar una gran cantidad de datos sobre objetos móviles, es decir, datos espacio-temporales relacionados con el movimiento seguido por esos objetos. Por otro lado, las bodegas de datos, usualmente modeladas mediante una vista multidimensional de los datos, son bases de datos especializadas para soportar la toma de decisiones. Desafortunadamente, las bodegas de datos convencionales están principalmente orientadas al manejo de datos alfanuméricos. En este artículo, se incorporan elementos temporales a un modelo multidimensional conceptual espacial dando origen a un modelo multidimensional conceptual espacio-temporal. La propuesta se ilustra con un caso de estudio relacionado con la migración de animalesToday, thanks to global positioning systems technologies and mobile devices equipped with tracking sensors, and a lot of data about moving objects can be collected, e.g., spatio-temporal data related to the movement followed by objects. On the other hand, data warehouses, usually modeled using a multidimensional view of data, are specialized databases to support the decision-making process. Unfortunately, conventional data warehouses are mainly oriented to manage alphanumeric data. In this article, we incorporate temporal elements to a conceptual spatial multidimensional model resulting in a spatio-temporal multidimensional model. We illustrate our proposal with a case study related to animal migration.

  19. Seepage weathering impacts on erosivity of arid stream banks: A new conceptual model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nachshon, Uri

    2016-05-01

    Field observations have indicated the formation of horizontal, pipe shape cavities, along gully and dry stream channel banks in the semi-arid region of the northern Negev Desert, Israel. Piping is a well-known phenomenon in humid regions due to subsurface water flow and seepage weathering. However, in dry environments where rain events are scarce and subsurface water flow is rare, it is proposed here that capillary flow of saline water in the vadose zone leads to similar processes. It is suggested that where saline and shallow ground water persists, capillary flow may result in salt accumulation and precipitation at the top of the capillary fringe, consequently rendering this zone to be more susceptible to erosion. A conceptual model is presented and field observations, laboratory experiments, and a physically-based model are used to prove the feasibility of the proposed conceptual model and to explain why salts accumulate at the top of the capillary fringe, even though evaporation acts all along the vertical stream channel or gully banks. It is suggested that the low evaporative flux, in comparison to the liquid water flux, disables salt accumulation along the profile to the top of the capillary fringe where the liquid water flux is minimal. The presented findings strengthen the conceptual model, but thorough field studies are needed to estimate the impact of the proposed mechanism on erosion processes on a field scale.

  20. A conceptual model for assessing the impact of electronic procurement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boer, de Luitzen; Harink, Jeroen; Heijboer, Govert

    2002-01-01

    This paper aims to contribute to the development of a conceptual model for studying the direct and indirect impact of various forms of electronic procurement (EP) on a firm's integral purchasing (-related) costs. The model builds on existing classifications of purchasing-related costs and benefits a

  1. A Conceptual Model for Episodes of Acute, Unscheduled Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pines, Jesse M; Lotrecchiano, Gaetano R; Zocchi, Mark S; Lazar, Danielle; Leedekerken, Jacob B; Margolis, Gregg S; Carr, Brendan G

    2016-10-01

    We engaged in a 1-year process to develop a conceptual model representing an episode of acute, unscheduled care. Acute, unscheduled care includes acute illnesses (eg, nausea and vomiting), injuries, or exacerbations of chronic conditions (eg, worsening dyspnea in congestive heart failure) and is delivered in emergency departments, urgent care centers, and physicians' offices, as well as through telemedicine. We began with a literature search to define an acute episode of care and to identify existing conceptual models used in health care. In accordance with this information, we then drafted a preliminary conceptual model and collected stakeholder feedback, using online focus groups and concept mapping. Two technical expert panels reviewed the draft model, examined the stakeholder feedback, and discussed ways the model could be improved. After integrating the experts' comments, we solicited public comment on the model and made final revisions. The final conceptual model includes social and individual determinants of health that influence the incidence of acute illness and injury, factors that affect care-seeking decisions, specific delivery settings where acute care is provided, and outcomes and costs associated with the acute care system. We end with recommendations for how researchers, policymakers, payers, patients, and providers can use the model to identify and prioritize ways to improve acute care delivery.

  2. A new conceptual model for aeolian transport rates on beaches

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Vries, S.; Stive, M.J.F.; Van Rijn, L.; Ranasinghe, R.

    2012-01-01

    In this paper a new conceptual model for aeolian sediment transport rates is presented. Traditional sediment transport formulations have known limitations when applied to coastal beach situations. A linear model for sediment transport rates with respect to wind speed is proposed and supported by

  3. Conceptual Frameworks and Research Models on Resilience in Leadership

    OpenAIRE

    Janet Ledesma

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this article was to discuss conceptual frameworks and research models on resilience theory. The constructs of resilience, the history of resilience theory, models of resilience, variables of resilience, career resilience, and organizational resilience will be examined and discussed as they relate to leadership development. The literature demonstrates that there is a direct relationship between the stress...

  4. Based Instructional Model on Students' Conceptual Change and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    FIRST LADY

    instructional model-Generative Learning Model (GLM) on students' conceptual change ... today's work force requires people who could think and have acquired the ... education is one of the most powerful instrument for enabling all members of ... psychology and education such as developmental psychology, cognitive and.

  5. Conceptual Model of Artifacts for Design Science Research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bækgaard, Lars

    2015-01-01

    We present a conceptual model of design science research artifacts. The model views an artifact at three levels. At the artifact level a selected artifact is viewed as a combination of material and immaterial aspects and a set of representations hereof. At the design level the selected artifact...

  6. Design of Conceptual Model in Digital Map Database

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    The components of map information are analyzed theoretically in this paper,and the map information includes mainly the spatial information,attributive information and temporal characteristics information.Then the digital map entity is defined according to construction characteristics of the map information.Finally,on the basis of the analyses of the construction characteristics of digital map entity and present conceptual model of digital map database,an Abstracted conceptual model of digital map database is presented.And the Normal Form theory of relational database is discussed particularly.

  7. Motivation to Improve Work through Learning: A Conceptual Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kueh Hua Ng

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This study aims to enhance our current understanding of the transfer of training by proposing a conceptual model that supports the mediating role of motivation to improve work through learning about the relationship between social support and the transfer of training. The examination of motivation to improve work through motivation to improve work through a learning construct offers a holistic view pertaining to a learner's profile in a workplace setting, which emphasizes learning for the improvement of work performance. The proposed conceptual model is expected to benefit human resource development theory building, as well as field practitioners by emphasizing the motivational aspects crucial for successful transfer of training.

  8. Transport hub flow modelling

    OpenAIRE

    Despagne, Wilfried; Frenod, Emmanuel

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to investigate the road freight haulage activity. Using the physical and data flow information from a freight forwarder, we intend to model the flow of inbound and outbound goods in a freight transport hub. Approach: This paper presents the operation of a road haulage group. To deliver goods within two days to any location in France, a haulage contractor needs to be part of a network. This network handles the processing of both physical goods and data. We...

  9. Three-dimensional conceptual model for service-oriented simulation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wen-guang WANG; Wei-ping WANG; Justyna ZANDER; Yi-fan ZHU

    2009-01-01

    In this letter, we propose a novel three-dimensional conceptual model for an emerging service-oriented simulation paradigm. The model can be used as a guideline or an analytic means to find the potential and possible future directions of the current simulation frameworks, In particular, the model inspects the crossover between the disciplines of modeling and simulation,service-orientation, and software/systems engineering. Finally, two specific simulation frameworks are studied as examples.

  10. A new conceptual model for aeolian transport rates on beaches

    OpenAIRE

    de Vries, S.; Stive, M.J.F.; van Rijn, L.; Ranasinghe, R.

    2012-01-01

    In this paper a new conceptual model for aeolian sediment transport rates is presented. Traditional sediment transport formulations have known limitations when applied to coastal beach situations. A linear model for sediment transport rates with respect to wind speed is proposed and supported by both data and numerical model simulations. The presented model does not solve complex wind fields and is therefore very easily applicable. Physical principles such as the presence of a threshold veloc...

  11. Three-dimensional conceptual model for service-oriented simulation

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Wenguang; Zander, Justyna; Zhu, Yifan; 10.1631/jzus.A0920258

    2009-01-01

    In this letter, we propose a novel three-dimensional conceptual model for an emerging service-oriented simulation paradigm. The model can be used as a guideline or an analytic means to find the potential and possible future directions of the current simulation frameworks. In particular, the model inspects the crossover between the disciplines of modeling and simulation, service-orientation, and software/systems engineering. Finally, two specific simulation frameworks are studied as examples.

  12. Hydrogeological conceptual model development and numerical modelling using CONNECTFLOW, Forsmark modelling stage 2.3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Follin, Sven (SF GeoLogic AB, Taeby (Sweden)); Hartley, Lee; Jackson, Peter; Roberts, David (Serco TAP (United Kingdom)); Marsic, Niko (Kemakta Konsult AB, Stockholm (Sweden))

    2008-05-15

    of spatial variability of the hydraulic properties within soil layers and horizontal versus vertical anisotropy in the hydraulic conductivity of soils. For the deformation zones, the same prescription for assigning transmissivities was followed as for stage 2.2, but a new method for automating the local conditioning of the deformation zone transmissivity in the vicinity of a measurement interval was used. The numerical simulations carried out in stage 2.2 demonstrated that the three geological units: deformation zones, fracture domains and regolith, can be parameterised by means of single-hole hydraulic tests and satisfactorily transformed into heterogeneous hydraulic conductor domains (HCD), hydraulic rock mass domains (HRD) and hydraulic soil domains (HSD). This means that the conceptual model developed from the interpretation of Forsmark data in stage 2.2 can be used to predict a wide range of different types of data and processes such as 1) large-scale cross-hole test responses, 2) natural point-water heads in the bedrock and the regolith, and 3) hydrochemistry profiles along the many cored boreholes drilled in close proximity to the so called target area. It is noted that a primary idea of the confirmatory testing applied in stage 2.2 is that the same groundwater flow and solute transport model is used for each type of simulation to make it transparent that a single implementation of the conceptual model could be calibrated against all three types of field observations, although it may have been possible to improve the modelling of a particular data type by refining the model around a relevant observation borehole, for example. The conceptual modelling in stage 2.2 invoked a number of hypotheses, three of which that were addressed in stage 2.3 by means of complementary field investigations (hydraulic tests). The results from these investigations do not falsify (contradict) any of the three hypotheses, hence none of them should be rejected. In fact, the three

  13. Multilevel Models: Conceptual Framework and Applicability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roxana-Otilia-Sonia Hrițcu

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Individuals and the social or organizational groups they belong to can be viewed as a hierarchical system situated on different levels. Individuals are situated on the first level of the hierarchy and they are nested together on the higher levels. Individuals interact with the social groups they belong to and are influenced by these groups. Traditional methods that study the relationships between data, like simple regression, do not take into account the hierarchical structure of the data and the effects of a group membership and, hence, results may be invalidated. Unlike standard regression modelling, the multilevel approach takes into account the individuals as well as the groups to which they belong. To take advantage of the multilevel analysis it is important that we recognize the multilevel characteristics of the data. In this article we introduce the outlines of multilevel data and we describe the models that work with such data. We introduce the basic multilevel model, the two-level model: students can be nested into classes, individuals into countries and the general two-level model can be extended very easily to several levels. Multilevel analysis has begun to be extensively used in many research areas. We present the most frequent study areas where multilevel models are used, such as sociological studies, education, psychological research, health studies, demography, epidemiology, biology, environmental studies and entrepreneurship. We support the idea that since hierarchies exist everywhere, multilevel data should be recognized and analyzed properly by using multilevel modelling.

  14. Virtual Business Collaboration Conceptual Knowledge Model (VBCKM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morcous Massoud Yassa

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Within the context of virtual business collaboration modeling, many pervious works have been accepted to consider some essential virtual business collaborative models. A practical dynamic virtual organization may be a combination of those models and some other elemental features with some modifications to meet the business opportunity requirements. Therefore, some guidelines and rules are needed to help in constructing a practical collaboration model. This work aims to determine the essential features that must be considered in order to automate the creation of dynamic virtual organization. By integrate “Select-and-Modify” approach with “CommonKADS” methodology, the work of this paper propose a strategy-driven approach for virtual business collaboration modeling construction. Also, some generic knowledge-based components have been designed to support this creation, which can increase the flexibility of the knowledge-based approach facilitates future integration. This paper is considered as integration and extension to the recent work “New Federated Collaborative Networked Organization Model (FCNOM”, which has proposed an integrated framework that combines the existed collaborative-networked organization perspectives, as well as, proposes new.

  15. Designing Public Library Websites for Teens: A Conceptual Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naughton, Robin Amanda

    2012-01-01

    The main goal of this research study was to develop a conceptual model for the design of public library websites for teens (TLWs) that would enable designers and librarians to create library websites that better suit teens' information needs and practices. It bridges a gap in the research literature between user interface design in human-computer…

  16. Conceptualizations of Creativity: Comparing Theories and Models of Giftedness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Angie L.

    2012-01-01

    This article reviews seven different theories of giftedness that include creativity as a component, comparing and contrasting how each one conceptualizes creativity as a part of giftedness. The functions of creativity vary across the models, suggesting that while the field of gifted education often cites the importance of creativity, the…

  17. A Conceptual Model of the World of Work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    VanRooy, William H.

    The conceptual model described in this paper resulted from the need to organize a body of knowledge related to the world of work which would enable curriculum developers to prepare accurate, realistic instructional materials. The world of work is described by applying Malinowski's scientific study of the structural components of culture. It is…

  18. A New Conceptual Model for Understanding International Students' College Needs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alfattal, Eyad

    2016-01-01

    This study concerns the theory and practice of international marketing in higher education with the purpose of exploring a conceptual model for understanding international students' needs in the context of a four-year college in the United States. A transcendental phenomenological design was employed to investigate the essence of international…

  19. Conceptualizations of Creativity: Comparing Theories and Models of Giftedness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Angie L.

    2012-01-01

    This article reviews seven different theories of giftedness that include creativity as a component, comparing and contrasting how each one conceptualizes creativity as a part of giftedness. The functions of creativity vary across the models, suggesting that while the field of gifted education often cites the importance of creativity, the…

  20. A Conceptual Model for Effective Distance Learning in Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farajollahi, Mehran; Zare, Hosein; Hormozi, Mahmood; Sarmadi, Mohammad Reza; Zarifsanaee, Nahid

    2010-01-01

    The present research aims at presenting a conceptual model for effective distance learning in higher education. Findings of this research shows that an understanding of the technological capabilities and learning theories especially constructive theory and independent learning theory and communicative and interaction theory in Distance learning is…

  1. Designing Public Library Websites for Teens: A Conceptual Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naughton, Robin Amanda

    2012-01-01

    The main goal of this research study was to develop a conceptual model for the design of public library websites for teens (TLWs) that would enable designers and librarians to create library websites that better suit teens' information needs and practices. It bridges a gap in the research literature between user interface design in…

  2. Conceptual model for reinforced grass on inner dike slopes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    ComCoast

    2005-01-01

    A desk study has been carried out in order to develop a conceptual model for the erosion of inner dike slopes with reinforced grass cover. Based on the results the following can be concluded: The presence of a geosynthetic in a grass slope can be taken into account in the EPM method by increasing

  3. Mapping the Territory: A Conceptual Model of Scholastic Journalism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, Mary

    1991-01-01

    Describes scholastic journalism as the teaching of secondary school students to gather, process, and present information to an audience. Offers a model focusing upon scholastic journalism's conceptual areas of law and ethics, history and cultural diversity, technology and financial support, media and content, pedagogy, and working context as a…

  4. A new conceptual model of convection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walcek, C. [State Univ. of New York, Albany, NY (United States)

    1995-09-01

    Classical cumulus parameterizations assume that cumulus clouds are entraining plumes of hot air rising through the atmosphere. However, ample evidence shows that clouds cannot be simulated using this approach. Dr. Walcek suggests that cumulus clouds can be reasonably simulated by assuming that buoyant plumes detrain mass as they rise through the atmosphere. Walcek successfully simulates measurements of tropical convection using this detraining model of cumulus convection. Comparisons with measurements suggest that buoyant plumes encounter resistance to upward movement as they pass through dry layers in the atmosphere. This probably results from turbulent mixing and evaporation of cloud water, which generates negatively buoyant mixtures which detrain from the upward moving plume. This mass flux model of detraining plumes is considerably simpler than existing mass flux models, yet reproduces many of the measured effects associated with convective activity. 1 fig.

  5. A Conceptualized Investment Model of Crowdfunding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tomczak, A.; Brem, Alexander

    2013-01-01

    Crowdfunding is growing in popularity as a new form of both investment opportunity and source of venture capital. This article takes a view on whether crowdfunding is a replacement or an addition to traditional seed capital sources in the early stages of a new venture. With access to angel...... investment decreasing since the financial crisis of 2008, crowdfunding is of great importance to start-ups seeking starting capital. However, little effort has been made to define the investment model of crowdfunding with both crowdfunder and crowdfundee in mind. Drawing on an in-depth review of current...... literature on crowdfunding, this article creates an investment model of crowdfunding with various reward models available to investor and investee in mind. This article provides an extensive survey of the environment of crowdfunding based on current literature. It offers a jumping off point and a thorough...

  6. A Conceptualized Investment Model of Crowdfunding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tomczak, A.; Brem, Alexander

    2013-01-01

    investment decreasing since the financial crisis of 2008, crowdfunding is of great importance to start-ups seeking starting capital. However, little effort has been made to define the investment model of crowdfunding with both crowdfunder and crowdfundee in mind. Drawing on an in-depth review of current......Crowdfunding is growing in popularity as a new form of both investment opportunity and source of venture capital. This article takes a view on whether crowdfunding is a replacement or an addition to traditional seed capital sources in the early stages of a new venture. With access to angel...... literature on crowdfunding, this article creates an investment model of crowdfunding with various reward models available to investor and investee in mind. This article provides an extensive survey of the environment of crowdfunding based on current literature. It offers a jumping off point and a thorough...

  7. Learning strategies: a synthesis and conceptual model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hattie, John A. C.; Donoghue, Gregory M.

    2016-08-01

    The purpose of this article is to explore a model of learning that proposes that various learning strategies are powerful at certain stages in the learning cycle. The model describes three inputs and outcomes (skill, will and thrill), success criteria, three phases of learning (surface, deep and transfer) and an acquiring and consolidation phase within each of the surface and deep phases. A synthesis of 228 meta-analyses led to the identification of the most effective strategies. The results indicate that there is a subset of strategies that are effective, but this effectiveness depends on the phase of the model in which they are implemented. Further, it is best not to run separate sessions on learning strategies but to embed the various strategies within the content of the subject, to be clearer about developing both surface and deep learning, and promoting their associated optimal strategies and to teach the skills of transfer of learning. The article concludes with a discussion of questions raised by the model that need further research.

  8. Conceptualizing Evolving Models of Educational Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraser, Kym; Gosling, David; Sorcinelli, Mary Deane

    2010-01-01

    Educational development, which the authors use to refer to the field of professional and strategic development associated with university and college learning and teaching, can be described in many ways by referring to its different aspects. In this article the authors endeavor to categorize many of the models that have been used to describe…

  9. Conceptual Model of Water Resources in the Kabul Basin, Afghanistan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mack, Thomas J.; Akbari, M. Amin; Ashoor, M. Hanif; Chornack, Michael P.; Coplen, Tyler B.; Emerson, Douglas G.; Hubbard, Bernard E.; Litke, David W.; Michel, Robert L.; Plummer, L. Niel; Rezai, M. Taher; Senay, Gabriel B.; Verdin, James P.; Verstraeten, Ingrid M.

    2010-01-01

    The United States (U.S.) Geological Survey has been working with the Afghanistan Geological Survey and the Afghanistan Ministry of Energy and Water on water-resources investigations in the Kabul Basin under an agreement supported by the United States Agency for International Development. This collaborative investigation compiled, to the extent possible in a war-stricken country, a varied hydrogeologic data set and developed limited data-collection networks to assist with the management of water resources in the Kabul Basin. This report presents the results of a multidisciplinary water-resources assessment conducted between 2005 and 2007 to address questions of future water availability for a growing population and of the potential effects of climate change. Most hydrologic and climatic data-collection activities in Afghanistan were interrupted in the early 1980s as a consequence of war and civil strife and did not resume until 2003 or later. Because of the gap of more than 20 years in the record of hydrologic and climatic observations, this investigation has made considerable use of remotely sensed data and, where available, historical records to investigate the water resources of the Kabul Basin. Specifically, this investigation integrated recently acquired remotely sensed data and satellite imagery, including glacier and climatic data; recent climate-change analyses; recent geologic investigations; analysis of streamflow data; groundwater-level analysis; surface-water- and groundwater-quality data, including data on chemical and isotopic environmental tracers; and estimates of public-supply and agricultural water uses. The data and analyses were integrated by using a simplified groundwater-flow model to test the conceptual model of the hydrologic system and to assess current (2007) and future (2057) water availability. Recharge in the basin is spatially and temporally variable and generally occurs near streams and irrigated areas in the late winter and early

  10. Conceptual Models as Tools for Communication Across Disciplines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marieke Heemskerk

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available To better understand and manage complex social-ecological systems, social scientists and ecologists must collaborate. However, issues related to language and research approaches can make it hard for researchers in different fields to work together. This paper suggests that researchers can improve interdisciplinary science through the use of conceptual models as a communication tool. The authors share lessons from a workshop in which interdisciplinary teams of young scientists developed conceptual models of social-ecological systems using data sets and metadata from Long-Term Ecological Research sites across the United States. Both the process of model building and the models that were created are discussed. The exercise revealed that the presence of social scientists in a group influenced the place and role of people in the models. This finding suggests that the participation of both ecologists and social scientists in the early stages of project development may produce better questions and more accurate models of interactions between humans and ecosystems. Although the participants agreed that a better understanding of human intentions and behavior would advance ecosystem science, they felt that interdisciplinary research might gain more by training strong disciplinarians than by merging ecology and social sciences into a new field. It is concluded that conceptual models can provide an inspiring point of departure and a guiding principle for interdisciplinary group discussions. Jointly developing a model not only helped the participants to formulate questions, clarify system boundaries, and identify gaps in existing data, but also revealed the thoughts and assumptions of fellow scientists. Although the use of conceptual models will not serve all purposes, the process of model building can help scientists, policy makers, and resource managers discuss applied problems and theory among themselves and with those in other areas.

  11. Conceptual design interpretations, mindset and models

    CERN Document Server

    Andreasen, Mogens Myrup; Cash, Philip

    2015-01-01

    Maximising reader insights into the theory, models, methods and fundamental reasoning of design, this book addresses design activities in industrial settings, as well as the actors involved. This approach offers readers a new understanding of design activities and related functions, properties and dispositions. Presenting a ‘design mindset’ that seeks to empower students, researchers, and practitioners alike, it features a strong focus on how designers create new concepts to be developed into products, and how they generate new business and satisfy human needs.   Employing a multi-faceted perspective, the book supplies the reader with a comprehensive worldview of design in the form of a proposed model that will empower their activities as student, researcher or practitioner. We draw the reader into the core role of design conceptualisation for society, for the development of industry, for users and buyers of products, and for citizens in relation to public systems. The book also features original con...

  12. Conceptual model innovation management: market orientation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L.Ya. Maljuta

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The article highlights issues that determine the beginning of the innovation process. Determined that until recently in Ukraine at all levels of innovation management (regional, sectoral, institutional dominated grocery orientation innovation that focus on production innovation and found that the transition to a market economy, the restructuring of production and complexity of social needs led to the strengthening of the consumer. It is proved that innovation itself – not the ultimate goal, but only a means of satisfying consumer needs. It proved that changing production conditions, complications of social needs and the need to improve the competitiveness of innovations require finding new forms of innovation. In this regard, proposed to allocate such basic scheme (model of innovation in small businesses, individual entrepreneurs, venture capital firms, eksplerents, patients, violents and commutants, spin-offs and spin-out company, network (or shell company and a network of small businesses.

  13. Conceptual model elaboration for the safety assessment of phosphogypsum use in sanitary landfills

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cota, Stela D.; Braga, Leticia T.P.; Jacomino, Vanusa F., E-mail: sdsc@cdtn.b, E-mail: letsteixeira@gmail.co, E-mail: vmfj@cdtn.b [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)

    2009-07-01

    Phosphogypsum is a by-product of the phosphatic fertilizer production from the beneficiation of phosphate minerals (apatites). Produced in large quantities throughout the world and stored temporally in stacks, the final destination of this product is nowadays a subject of investigation. Due to the presence of radionuclides ({sup 226}Ra, {sup 232}Th and {sup 40}K, mainly), possible applications for the phosphogypsum must be verified for radiological safety. The goal of this paper was to elaborate a representative water flow conceptual model of a sanitary landfill for the safety assessment of the impact of using phosphogypsum as a cover material. For this, the ground water flow in variably saturated conditions and solute transport model HYDRUS-2D has been used for simulating the impact in the saturated zone of potential radionuclides leaching. The conceptual model was developed by collecting and analyzing the data from environmental license documentation of municipal sanitary landfills located on the State of Minas Gerais, Brazil. In order to fulfill the requirements of HDRUS-2D model in terms of the necessary parameters, the physical characteristics and typical configuration of the landfills, as well as the hydrogeological parameters of soils and aquifers related to the local of placement of the landfills, were taken in account for the formulation of the conceptual model. (author)

  14. Preliminary Thermal Hydraulic Analyses of the Conceptual Core Models with Tubular Type Fuel Assemblies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chae, Hee Taek; Park, Jong Hark; Park, Cheol

    2006-11-15

    A new research reactor (AHR, Advanced HANARO Reactor) based on the HANARO has being conceptually developed for the future needs of research reactors. A tubular type fuel was considered as one of the fuel options of the AHR. A tubular type fuel assembly has several curved fuel plates arranged with a constant small gap to build up cooling channels, which is very similar to an annulus pipe with many layers. This report presents the preliminary analysis of thermal hydraulic characteristics and safety margins for three conceptual core models using tubular fuel assemblies. Four design criteria, which are the fuel temperature, ONB (Onset of Nucleate Boiling) margin, minimum DNBR (Departure from Nucleate Boiling Ratio) and OFIR (Onset of Flow Instability Ratio), were investigated along with various core flow velocities in the normal operating conditions. And the primary coolant flow rate based a conceptual core model was suggested as a design information for the process design of the primary cooling system. The computational fluid dynamics analysis was also carried out to evaluate the coolant velocity distributions between tubular channels and the pressure drop characteristics of the tubular fuel assembly.

  15. TOWARD COLLECTIVE INTELLIGENCE OF ONLINE COMMUNITIES: A PRIMITIVE CONCEPTUAL MODEL

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shuangling LUO; Haoxiang XIA; Taketoshi YOSHIDA; Zhongtuo WANG

    2009-01-01

    Inspired by the ideas of Swarm Intelligence and the "global brain", a concept of "community intelligence" is suggested in the present paper, reflecting that some "intelligent" features may emerge in a Web-mediated online community from interactions and knowledge-transmissions between the community members. This possible research field of community intelligence is then examined under the backgrounds of "community" and "intelligence" researches. Furthermore, a conceptual model of community intelligence is developed from two views. From the structural view, the community intelligent system is modeled as a knowledge supernetwork that is comprised of triple interwoven networks of the media network, the human network, and the knowledge network. Furthermore, based on a dyad of knowledge in two forms of "knowing" and "knoware", the dynamic view describes the basic mechanics of the formation and evolution of "community intelligence". A few relevant research issues are shortly discussed on the basis of the proposed conceptual model.

  16. Conceptual Commitments of the LIDA Model of Cognition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franklin, Stan; Strain, Steve; McCall, Ryan; Baars, Bernard

    2013-06-01

    Significant debate on fundamental issues remains in the subfields of cognitive science, including perception, memory, attention, action selection, learning, and others. Psychology, neuroscience, and artificial intelligence each contribute alternative and sometimes conflicting perspectives on the supervening problem of artificial general intelligence (AGI). Current efforts toward a broad-based, systems-level model of minds cannot await theoretical convergence in each of the relevant subfields. Such work therefore requires the formulation of tentative hypotheses, based on current knowledge, that serve to connect cognitive functions into a theoretical framework for the study of the mind. We term such hypotheses "conceptual commitments" and describe the hypotheses underlying one such model, the Learning Intelligent Distribution Agent (LIDA) Model. Our intention is to initiate a discussion among AGI researchers about which conceptual commitments are essential, or particularly useful, toward creating AGI agents.

  17. A simple conceptual model of abrupt glacial climate events

    CERN Document Server

    Braun, H; Christl, M; Chialvo, D R

    2008-01-01

    Here we use a very simple conceptual model in an attempt to reduce essential parts of the complex nonlinearity of abrupt glacial climate changes (the so-called Dansgaard-Oeschger events) to a few simple principles, namely (i) a threshold process, (ii) an overshooting in the stability of the system and (iii) a millennial-scale relaxation. By comparison with a so-called Earth system model of intermediate complexity (CLIMBER-2), in which the events represent oscillations between two climate states corresponding to two fundamentally different modes of deep-water formation in the North Atlantic, we demonstrate that the conceptual model captures fundamental aspects of the nonlinearity of the events in that model. We use the conceptual model in order to reproduce and reanalyse nonlinear resonance mechanisms that were already suggested in order to explain the characteristic time scale of Dansgaard-Oeschger events. In doing so we identify a new form of stochastic resonance (i.e. an overshooting stochastic resonance) a...

  18. Investigating conceptual models for physical property couplings in solid solution models of cement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benbow, Steven; Watson, Claire; Savage, David [Quintesssa Ltd., Henley-on-Thames (United Kingdom)

    2005-11-15

    The long-term behaviour of cementitious engineered barriers is an important process to consider when modelling the migration of radionuclides from a geological repository for nuclear waste. The modelling of cement is complicated by the fact that the cement is dominated by the behaviour of calcium silicate hydrate (CSH) gel which is a complex solid exhibiting incongruent dissolution behaviour. In this report, we have demonstrated the implementation of a solid-solution CSH gel model within a geochemical transport modelling framework using the Raiden computer code to investigate cement/concrete-groundwater interactions. The modelling conducted here shows that it is possible to couple various conceptual models for the evolution of physical properties of concrete with a solid solution model for cement degradation in a fully coupled geochemical transport model to describe the interaction of cement/concrete engineered barriers with groundwater. The results show that changes to the conceptual models and flow rates can give rise to very different evolutions. Most simulations were carried out at a reduced 'experimental' scale rather than full repository scale. The work has shown the possibility to investigate also the changing physical properties of degrading cement. To further develop the model more emphasis is needed on kinetics and the detailed development of a nearly clogged pore space. Modelling of the full repository scale could be another way forward to understand the behaviour of degrading concrete. A general conclusion is that the combined effects of chemical evolution and physical degradation should be analysed in performance assessments of cementitious repositories. Moreover, the project results will be used as one basis in coming reviews of SKB's safety assessments of repositories for spent fuel and low-and intermediate level waste.

  19. Hydrogeologic setting and conceptual hydrologic model of the Spring Creek basin, Centre County, Pennsylvania

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fulton, John W.; Koerkle, Edward H.; McAuley, Steven D.; Hoffman, Scott A.; Zarr, Linda F.

    2005-01-01

    The Spring Creek Basin, Centre County, Pa., is experiencing some of the most rapid growth and development within the Commonwealth. This trend has resulted in land-use changes and increased water use, which will affect the quantity and quality of stormwater runoff, surface water, ground water, and aquatic resources within the basin. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with the ClearWater Conservancy (CWC), Spring Creek Watershed Community (SCWC), and Spring Creek Watershed Commission (SCWCm), has developed a Watershed Plan (Plan) to assist decision makers in water-resources planning. One element of the Plan is to provide a summary of the basin characteristics and a conceptual model that incorporates the hydrogeologic characteristics of the basin. The report presents hydrogeologic data for the basin and presents a conceptual model that can be used as the basis for simulating surface-water and ground-water flow within the basin. Basin characteristics; sources of data referenced in this text; physical characteristics such as climate, physiography, topography, and land use; hydrogeologic characteristics; and water-quality characteristics are discussed. A conceptual model is a simplified description of the physical components and interaction of the surface- and ground-water systems. The purpose for constructing a conceptual model is to simplify the problem and to organize the available data so that the system can be analyzed accurately. Simplification is necessary, because a complete accounting of a system, such as Spring Creek, is not possible. The data and the conceptual model could be used in development of a fully coupled numerical model that dynamically links surface water, ground water, and land-use changes. The model could be used by decision makers to manage water resources within the basin and as a prototype that is transferable to other watersheds.

  20. Promoting Conceptual Coherence in Quantum Learning through Computational Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hee-Sun

    2012-02-01

    In order to explain phenomena at the quantum level, scientists use multiple representations in verbal, pictorial, mathematical, and computational forms. Conceptual coherence among these multiple representations is used as an analytical framework to describe student learning trajectories in quantum physics. A series of internet-based curriculum modules are designed to address topics in quantum mechanics, semiconductor physics, and nano-scale engineering applications. In these modules, students are engaged in inquiry-based activities situated in a highly interactive computational modeling environment. This study was conducted in an introductory level solid state physics course. Based on in-depth interviews with 13 students, methods for identifying conceptual coherence as a function of students' level of understanding are presented. Pre-post test comparisons of 20 students in the course indicate a statistically significant improvement in students' conceptual coherence of understanding quantum phenomena before and after the course, Effect Size = 1.29 SD. Additional analyses indicate that students who responded to the modules more coherently improved their conceptual coherence to a greater extent than those who did less to the modules after controlling for their course grades.

  1. Addressing Student Misconceptions Concerning Electron Flow in Aqueous Solutions with Instruction Including Computer Animations and Conceptual Change Strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanger, Michael J.; Greenbowe, Thomas J.

    2000-01-01

    Investigates the effects of both computer animations of microscopic chemical processes occurring in a galvanic cell and conceptual-change instruction based on chemical demonstrations on students' conceptions of current flow in electrolyte solutions. Finds that conceptual change instruction was effective at dispelling student misconceptions but…

  2. Addressing Student Misconceptions Concerning Electron Flow in Aqueous Solutions with Instruction Including Computer Animations and Conceptual Change Strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanger, Michael J.; Greenbowe, Thomas J.

    2000-01-01

    Investigates the effects of both computer animations of microscopic chemical processes occurring in a galvanic cell and conceptual-change instruction based on chemical demonstrations on students' conceptions of current flow in electrolyte solutions. Finds that conceptual change instruction was effective at dispelling student misconceptions but…

  3. Conceptual Model of Artifacts for Design Science Research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bækgaard, Lars

    2015-01-01

    We present a conceptual model of design science research artifacts. The model views an artifact at three levels. At the artifact level a selected artifact is viewed as a combination of material and immaterial aspects and a set of representations hereof. At the design level the selected artifact...... is viewed through its design in terms of descriptions, models, prototypes etc. At the knowledge level the selected artifact is viewed through ontologies, categories and various types of relevant knowledge. The model is based on description...

  4. Conceptual Model of Artifacts for Design Science Research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bækgaard, Lars

    2015-01-01

    We present a conceptual model of design science research artifacts. The model views an artifact at three levels. At the artifact level a selected artifact is viewed as a combination of material and immaterial aspects and a set of representations hereof. At the design level the selected artifact...... is viewed through its design in terms of descriptions, models, prototypes etc. At the knowledge level the selected artifact is viewed through ontologies, categories and various types of relevant knowledge. The model is based on description...

  5. Scientific and conceptual flaws of coercive treatment models in addiction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uusitalo, Susanne; van der Eijk, Yvette

    2016-01-01

    In conceptual debates on addiction, neurobiological research has been used to support the idea that addicted drug users lack control over their addiction-related actions. In some interpretations, this has led to coercive treatment models, in which, the purpose is to 'restore' control. However, neurobiological studies that go beyond what is typically presented in conceptual debates paint a different story. In particular, they indicate that though addiction has neurobiological manifestations that make the addictive behaviour difficult to control, it is possible for individuals to reverse these manifestations through their own efforts. Thus, addicted individuals should not be considered incapable of making choices voluntarily, simply on the basis that addiction has neurobiological manifestations, and coercive treatment models of addiction should be reconsidered in this respect.

  6. Creation of Sustainable Leadership Development: Conceptual Model Validation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Judita Peterlin

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Conceptual paper addresses the research question: How can leadershipdevelopment be managed within organizations? Our proposed answeris presented in the form of conceptual model of sustainable leadershipdevelopment, based on the theory of multiple intelligences by HowardGardner and applied to leadership through appreciative inquiry, meaningthat leaders possess multiple intelligences which differentiate intheir individual profiles and are able to develop a wide span of intelligencesduring their life span. The main developmental and analyticalmethod that enables the sustainable leadership development throughmultiple intelligences is action learning where as expected results of theappreciative process participants are creative seekers of positive learningopportunities in active learning environment. Sustainable leadershipdevelopment model proposes a new creative way in providing forthe process and content of leadership development that has sustainabilityas its core component.

  7. Aircraft conceptual design modelling incorporating reliability and maintainability predictions

    OpenAIRE

    Vaziry-Zanjany , Mohammad Ali (F)

    1996-01-01

    A computer assisted conceptual aircraft design program has been developed (CACAD). It has an optimisation capability, with extensive break-down in maintenance costs. CACAD's aim is to optimise the size, and configurations of turbofan-powered transport aircraft. A methodology was developed to enhance the reliability of current aircraft systems, and was applied to avionics systems. R&M models of thermal management were developed and linked with avionics failure rate and its ma...

  8. Motivation to Improve Work through Learning: A Conceptual Model

    OpenAIRE

    Kueh Hua Ng; Rusli Ahmad

    2014-01-01

    This study aims to enhance our current understanding of the transfer of training by proposing a conceptual model that supports the mediating role of motivation to improve work through learning about the relationship between social support and the transfer of training. The examination of motivation to improve work through motivation to improve work through a learning construct offers a holistic view pertaining to a learner's profile in a workplace setting, which emphasizes learning for the imp...

  9. Traffic flow modeling: a Genealogy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Wageningen-Kessels, F.L.M.; Hoogendoorn, S.P.; Vuik, C.; Van Lint, J.W.C.

    2014-01-01

    80 years ago, Bruce Greenshields presented the first traffic flow model at the Annual Meeting of the Highway Research Board. Since then, many models and simulation tools have been developed. We show a model tree with four families of traffic flow models, all descending from Greenshields' model. The

  10. Conceptual Model of Climate Change Impacts at LANL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dewart, Jean Marie [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-05-17

    Goal 9 of the LANL FY15 Site Sustainability Plan (LANL 2014a) addresses Climate Change Adaptation. As part of Goal 9, the plan reviews many of the individual programs the Laboratory has initiated over the past 20 years to address climate change impacts to LANL (e.g. Wildland Fire Management Plan, Forest Management Plan, etc.). However, at that time, LANL did not yet have a comprehensive approach to climate change adaptation. To fill this gap, the FY15 Work Plan for the LANL Long Term Strategy for Environmental Stewardship and Sustainability (LANL 2015) included a goal of (1) establishing a comprehensive conceptual model of climate change impacts at LANL and (2) establishing specific climate change indices to measure climate change and impacts at Los Alamos. Establishing a conceptual model of climate change impacts will demonstrate that the Laboratory is addressing climate change impacts in a comprehensive manner. This paper fulfills the requirement of goal 1. The establishment of specific indices of climate change at Los Alamos (goal 2), will improve our ability to determine climate change vulnerabilities and assess risk. Future work will include prioritizing risks, evaluating options/technologies/costs, and where appropriate, taking actions. To develop a comprehensive conceptual model of climate change impacts, we selected the framework provided in the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Climate Resilience Toolkit (http://toolkit.climate.gov/).

  11. HESS Opinions "Topography driven conceptual modelling (FLEX-Topo"

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. H. G. Savenije

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Heterogeneity and complexity of hydrological processes offer substantial challenges to the hydrological modeller. Some hydrologists try to tackle this problem by introducing more and more detail in their models, or by setting-up more and more complicated models starting from basic principles at the smallest possible level. As we know, this reductionist approach leads to ever higher levels of equifinality and predictive uncertainty. On the other hand, simple, lumped and parsimonious models may be too simple to be realistic or representative of the dominant hydrological processes. In this commentary, a new model approach is proposed that tries to find the middle way between complex distributed and simple lumped modelling approaches. Here we try to find the right level of simplification while avoiding over-simplification. Paraphrasing Einstein, the maxim is: make a model as simple as possible, but not simpler than that. The approach presented is process based, but not physically based in the traditional sense. Instead, it is based on a conceptual representation of the dominant physical processes in certain key elements of the landscape. The essence of the approach is that the model structure is made dependent on a limited number of landscape classes in which the topography is the main driver, but which can include geological, geomorphological or land-use classification. These classes are then represented by lumped conceptual models that act in parallel. The advantage of this approach over a fully distributed conceptualisation is that it retains maximum simplicity while taking into account observable landscape characteristics.

  12. What is recovery? A conceptual model and explication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobson, N; Greenley, D

    2001-04-01

    This paper describes a conceptual model of recovery from mental illness developed to aid the state of Wisconsin in moving toward its goal of developing a "recovery-oriented" mental health system. In the model, recovery refers to both internal conditions experienced by persons who describe themselves as being in recovery--hope, healing, empowerment, and connection--and external conditions that facilitate recovery--implementation of the principle of human rights, a positive culture of healing, and recovery-oriented services. The aim of the model is to link the abstract concepts that define recovery with specific strategies that systems, agencies, and individuals can use to facilitate it.

  13. IMM: a multisystem memory model for conceptual learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saleh, Mai Sabry

    2014-01-01

    Concepts of learning and memory are closely related, and the terms often describe the same processes. Conceptual learning is known to be the process of developing abstract rules or mental constructs based on sensory experience. The Integrated Model of Mind (IMM), introduced in the present work, is a theoretical multisystem memory model that describes how concepts are formed. The IMM in its design arranges memory systems after their function in an integrated and harmonized sequence. It provides answers to some limitations of Tulving's serial-parallel-independent (SPI) model and suggests a new assumption with respect to mental representation and image schema construction through the process of encoding.

  14. Conceptual Model of IT Infrastructure Capability and Its Empirical Justification

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    QI Xianfeng; LAN Boxiong; GUO Zhenwei

    2008-01-01

    Increasing importance has been attached to the value of information technology (IT) infrastructure in today's organizations. The development of efficacious IT infrastructure capability enhances business performance and brings sustainable competitive advantage. This study analyzed the IT infrastructure capability in a holistic way and then presented a concept model of IT capability. IT infrastructure capability was categorized into sharing capability, service capability, and flexibility. This study then empirically tested the model using a set of survey data collected from 145 firms. Three factors emerge from the factor analysis as IT flexibility, IT service capability, and IT sharing capability, which agree with those in the conceptual model built in this study.

  15. Conceptual Model of Quantities, Units, Dimensions, and Values

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rouquette, Nicolas F.; DeKoenig, Hans-Peter; Burkhart, Roger; Espinoza, Huascar

    2011-01-01

    JPL collaborated with experts from industry and other organizations to develop a conceptual model of quantities, units, dimensions, and values based on the current work of the ISO 80000 committee revising the International System of Units & Quantities based on the International Vocabulary of Metrology (VIM). By providing support for ISO 80000 in SysML via the International Vocabulary of Metrology (VIM), this conceptual model provides, for the first time, a standard-based approach for addressing issues of unit coherence and dimensional analysis into the practice of systems engineering with SysML-based tools. This conceptual model provides support for two kinds of analyses specified in the International Vocabulary of Metrology (VIM): coherence of units as well as of systems of units, and dimension analysis of systems of quantities. To provide a solid and stable foundation, the model for defining quantities, units, dimensions, and values in SysML is explicitly based on the concepts defined in VIM. At the same time, the model library is designed in such a way that extensions to the ISQ (International System of Quantities) and SI Units (Systeme International d Unites) can be represented, as well as any alternative systems of quantities and units. The model library can be used to support SysML user models in various ways. A simple approach is to define and document libraries of reusable systems of units and quantities for reuse across multiple projects, and to link units and quantity kinds from these libraries to Unit and QuantityKind stereotypes defined in SysML user models.

  16. Keeping it simple: a conceptual model of DOC dynamics in a subarctic alpine catchment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lessels, J. S.; Tetzlaff, D.; Carey, S. K.; Soulsby, C.

    2013-12-01

    Understanding hydrological processes in subarctic alpine catchments characterised with discontinuous permafrost is important in order to understand carbon exports. Subarctic catchments have large storages of carbon in organic and permafrost soils. Active layer depth is one of the largest controlling factors of the release of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) due to its control on runoff pathways. Therefore, any change of this depth will affect the amount of DOC mobilised from these catchments. Simple low parameterised conceptual models offer the ability to characterise hydrological processes and linked DOC dynamics without introducing many of the uncertainties linked to high parameterised models. Lumped models can also be used to identify sources of DOC within catchments. Here, we investigate hydrological sources, flow pathways and consequently DOC dynamics in the Granger Basin, Canada, a subarctic alpine catchment using data collected from 2001 to 2008. The catchment is distinguished by aspect dependant discontinuous permafrost and seasonal frost, compounded further by differences in soil and vegetation types. Applying a simple low parameterised conceptual model allowed identification of the dominant flow paths of the main hydrological response units. The results showed that it was necessary to include active layer dynamics combined with aspect to represent the hydrological and DOC dynamics. The model provides information on the effect of climatic conditions on DOC releases. By identifying the key flow paths and relating these to spring freshet DOC exports over multiple years it is possible to gain an insight of the how climatic changes might affect hydrological processes within subarctic catchments.

  17. Flow Element Models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heiselberg, Per; Nielsen, Peter V.

    Air distribution in ventilated rooms is a flow process that can be divided into different elements such as supply air jets, exhaust flows, thermal plumes, boundary layer flows, infiltration and gravity currents. These flow elements are isolated volumes where the air movement is controlled...... by a restricted number of parameters, and the air movement is fairly independent of the general flow in the enclosure. In many practical situations, the most convenient· method is to design the air distribution system using flow element theory....

  18. HESS Opinions "Topography driven conceptual modelling (FLEX-Topo"

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. H. G. Savenije

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Heterogeneity and complexity of hydrological processes offer substantial challenges to the hydrological modeller. Some hydrologists try to tackle this problem by introducing more and more detail in their models, or by setting-up more and more complicated models starting from basic principles at the smallest possible level. As we know, this reductionist approach leads to ever higher levels of equifinality and predictive uncertainty. On the other hand, simple, lumped and parsimonious models may be too simple to be realistic or representative of the dominant hydrological processes. In this commentary, a new approach is proposed that tries to find the middle way between complex distributed and simple lumped modelling approaches. Here we try to find the right level of simplification while avoiding over-simplification. Paraphrasing Einstein, the maxim is: make a model as simple as possible, but not simpler than that. The approach presented is process based, but not physically based in the traditional sense. Instead, it is based on a conceptual representation of the dominant physical processes in certain key elements of the landscape. The essence of the approach is that the model structure is made dependent on a limited number of landscape classes in which the topography is the main driver, but which can include geological, geomorphological or land-use classification. These classes are then represented by lumped conceptual models that act in parallel. The advantage of this approach over a fully distributed conceptualisation is that it retains maximum simplicity while taking into account observable landscape characteristics.

  19. Conceptual model for the design of product systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John J. Cardozo Vásquez

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Based on the concepts of personalization, differentiation and variability, product systems are characterized and the conditions for their design are explored. In the analysis of literature,17 variables related to the design of product systems were identified, and used to develop a conceptual model. In order to validate this finding, a survey was applied to 57 experts in the field of design. By means of a factor analysis, variables are reduced and the underlying conceptual relationships are identified. As a result of the validation, three factors are identified: structure, coherence and order, which contain the variables that determine the attributes of the product systems. These findings support the conclusion that the origin of the design process of these systems is based on the analysis of consumers and the multiple uses given and experiences obtained from these products. Study boundaries are established and future research possibilities are outlined.

  20. Design Oriented Structural Modeling for Airplane Conceptual Design Optimization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Livne, Eli

    1999-01-01

    The main goal for research conducted with the support of this grant was to develop design oriented structural optimization methods for the conceptual design of airplanes. Traditionally in conceptual design airframe weight is estimated based on statistical equations developed over years of fitting airplane weight data in data bases of similar existing air- planes. Utilization of such regression equations for the design of new airplanes can be justified only if the new air-planes use structural technology similar to the technology on the airplanes in those weight data bases. If any new structural technology is to be pursued or any new unconventional configurations designed the statistical weight equations cannot be used. In such cases any structural weight estimation must be based on rigorous "physics based" structural analysis and optimization of the airframes under consideration. Work under this grant progressed to explore airframe design-oriented structural optimization techniques along two lines of research: methods based on "fast" design oriented finite element technology and methods based on equivalent plate / equivalent shell models of airframes, in which the vehicle is modelled as an assembly of plate and shell components, each simulating a lifting surface or nacelle / fuselage pieces. Since response to changes in geometry are essential in conceptual design of airplanes, as well as the capability to optimize the shape itself, research supported by this grant sought to develop efficient techniques for parametrization of airplane shape and sensitivity analysis with respect to shape design variables. Towards the end of the grant period a prototype automated structural analysis code designed to work with the NASA Aircraft Synthesis conceptual design code ACS= was delivered to NASA Ames.

  1. Conceptual Modeling in the Time of the Revolution: Part II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mylopoulos, John

    Conceptual Modeling was a marginal research topic at the very fringes of Computer Science in the 60s and 70s, when the discipline was dominated by topics focusing on programs, systems and hardware architectures. Over the years, however, the field has moved to centre stage and has come to claim a central role both in Computer Science research and practice in diverse areas, such as Software Engineering, Databases, Information Systems, the Semantic Web, Business Process Management, Service-Oriented Computing, Multi-Agent Systems, Knowledge Management, and more. The transformation was greatly aided by the adoption of standards in modeling languages (e.g., UML), and model-based methodologies (e.g., Model-Driven Architectures) by the Object Management Group (OMG) and other standards organizations. We briefly review the history of the field over the past 40 years, focusing on the evolution of key ideas. We then note some open challenges and report on-going research, covering topics such as the representation of variability in conceptual models, capturing model intentions, and models of laws.

  2. Calibration of a conceptual rainfall-runoff model for flood frequency estimation by continuous simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamb, Robert

    1999-10-01

    An approach is described to the calibration of a conceptual rainfall-runoff model, the Probability Distributed Model (PDM), for estimating flood frequencies at gauged sites by continuous flow simulation. A first step was the estimation of routing store parameters by recession curve analysis. Uniform random sampling was then used to search for parameter sets that produced simulations achieving the best fit to observed, hourly flow data over a 2-year period. Goodness of fit was expressed in terms of four objective functions designed to give different degrees of weight to peaks in flow. Flood frequency results were improved, if necessary, by manual adjustment of parameters, with reference to peaks extracted from the entire hourly flow record. Although the primary aim was to reproduce observed peaks, consideration was also given to finding parameter sets capable of generating a realistic overall characterization of the flow regime. Examples are shown where the calibrated model generated simulations that reproduced well the magnitude and frequency distribution of peak flows. Factors affecting the acceptability of these simulations are discussed. For an example catchment, a sensitivity analysis shows that there may be more than one set of parameter values well suited to the simulation of peak flows.

  3. A Conceptual Model of eLearning Adoption

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muneer Abbad

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Internet-based learning systems are being used in many universities and firms but their adoption requires a solid understanding of the user acceptance processes. The technology acceptance model (TAM has been used to test the acceptance of various technologies and software within an e-learning context. This research aims to discuss the main factors of a successful e-learning adoption by students. A conceptual research framework of e-learning adoption is proposed based on the TAM model.

  4. Ecohydrologic Response of a Wetland Indicator Species to Climate Change and Streamflow Regulation: A Conceptual Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, E. M.; Gorelick, S.

    2015-12-01

    The Peace-Athabasca Delta ("Delta") in northeastern Alberta, Canada, is a UNESCO World Heritage Site and a Ramsar Wetland of International Importance. Delta ecohydrology is expected to respond rapidly to upstream water demand and climate change, with earlier spring meltwater, decreased springtime peak flow, and a decline in springtime ice-jam flooding. We focus on changes in the population and distribution of muskrat (Ondatra zibethicus), an ecohydrologic indicator species. We present a conceptual model linking hydrology and muskrat ecology. Our conceptual model links seven modules representing (1) upstream water demand, (2) streamflow and snowmelt, (3) floods, (4) the water balance of floodplain lakes, (5) muskrat habitat suitability, (6) wetland vegetation, and (7) muskrat population dynamics predicted using an agent-based model. Our goal is to evaluate the effects of different climate change and upstream water demand scenarios on the abundance and distribution of Delta muskrat, from present-2100. Moving from the current conceptual model to a predictive quantitative model, we will rely on abundant existing data and Traditional Ecological Knowledge of muskrat and hydrology in the Delta.

  5. Conceptual design and quantification of phosphorus flows and balances at the country scale: The case of France

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senthilkumar, Kalimuthu; Nesme, Thomas; Mollier, Alain; Pellerin, Sylvain

    2012-06-01

    Global biogeochemical cycles have been deeply modified by human activities in recent decades. But detailed studies analyzing the influence of current economic and social organizations on global biogeochemical cycles within a system perspective are still required. Country level offers a relevant scale for assessing nutrient management and identifying key driving forces and possible leaks in the nutrient cycle. Conceptual modeling helps to quantify nutrient flows within the country and we developed such an approach for France. France is a typical Western European country with intensive agriculture, trade and an affluent diet, all of which may increase internal and external P flows. Phosphorus (P) was taken as a case study because phosphate rock is a non-renewable resource which future availability is becoming increasingly bleak. A conceptual model of major P flows at the country scale was designed. France was divided into agriculture, industry, domestic, import and export sectors, and each of these sectors was further divided into compartments. A total of 25 internal and eight external P flows were identified and quantified on a yearly basis for a period of 16 years (from 1990 to 2006) in order to understand long-term P flows. All the P flows were quantified using the substance flow analysis principle. The results showed that the industrial sector remained the largest contributor to P flows in France, followed by the agriculture and domestic sectors. Soil P balance was positive. However, a positive P balance of 18 kg P ha-1 in 1990 was reduced to 4 kg P ha-1 in 2006, mainly due to the reduced application of inorganic P fertilizer. The overall country scale P balance was positive, whereas half of this additional P was lost to the environment mainly through the landfilling of municipal and industrial waste, disposal of treated wastewater from which P was partially removed, and P losses from agricultural soils though erosion and leaching. Consequences for global P

  6. Stochastic power flow modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1980-06-01

    The stochastic nature of customer demand and equipment failure on large interconnected electric power networks has produced a keen interest in the accurate modeling and analysis of the effects of probabilistic behavior on steady state power system operation. The principle avenue of approach has been to obtain a solution to the steady state network flow equations which adhere both to Kirchhoff's Laws and probabilistic laws, using either combinatorial or functional approximation techniques. Clearly the need of the present is to develop sound techniques for producing meaningful data to serve as input. This research has addressed this end and serves to bridge the gap between electric demand modeling, equipment failure analysis, etc., and the area of algorithm development. Therefore, the scope of this work lies squarely on developing an efficient means of producing sensible input information in the form of probability distributions for the many types of solution algorithms that have been developed. Two major areas of development are described in detail: a decomposition of stochastic processes which gives hope of stationarity, ergodicity, and perhaps even normality; and a powerful surrogate probability approach using proportions of time which allows the calculation of joint events from one dimensional probability spaces.

  7. Turbomachinery Flows Modeled

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamczyk, John J.

    1997-01-01

    Last year, researchers at the NASA Lewis Research Center used the average passage code APNASA to complete the largest three-dimensional simulation of a multistage axial flow compressor to date. Consisting of 29 blade rows, the configuration is typical of those found in aeroengines today. The simulation, which was executed on the High Performance Computing and Communications (HPCC) Program IBM SP2 parallel computer located at the NASA Ames Research Center, took nearly 90 hr to complete. Since the completion of this activity, a fine-grain, parallel version of APNASA has been written by a team of researchers from General Electric, NASA Lewis, and NYMA. Timing studies performed on the SP2 have shown that, with eight processors assigned to each blade row, the simulation time is reduced by a factor of six. For this configuration, the simulation time would be 15 hr. The reduction in computing time indicates that an overnight turnaround of a multistage configuration simulation is feasible. In addition, average passage forms of two-equation turbulence models were formulated. These models are currently being incorporated into APNASA.

  8. A Conceptual Model for Engagement of the Online Learner

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorraine M. Angelino

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Engagement of the online learner is one approach to reduce attrition rates. Attrition rates for classes taught through distance education are 10 – 20% higher than classes taught in a face-to-face setting. This paper introduces a Model for Engagement and provides strategies to engage the online learner. The Model depicts various opportunities where student-instructor, student-student, student-content, and student-community engagement can occur. The Model is divided into four strategic areas: (a recruitment, (b coursework, (c post coursework, and (d alumni. The theoretical framework for the model is Tinto‟s student integration model. The conceptual design of the model is based on engagement practices from an online Health Care Management (HCMT certificate program at a university in South Carolina.

  9. Multimorbidity: conceptual basis, epidemiological models and measurement challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Niño, Julián Alfredo; Bustos-Vázquez, Eduardo

    2016-06-03

    The growing number of patients with complex clinical profiles related to chronic diseases has contributed to the increasingly widespread use of the term 'multimorbidity'. A suitable measurement of this condition is essential to epidemiological studies considering that it represents a challenge for the clinical management of patients as well as for health systems and epidemiological investigations. In this context, the present essay reviews the conceptual proposals behind the measurement of multimorbidity including the epidemiological and methodological challenges it involves. We discuss classical definitions of comorbidity, how they differ from the concept of multimorbidity, and their roles in epidemiological studies. The various conceptual models that contribute to the operational definitions and strategies to measure this variable are also presented. The discussion enabled us to identify a significant gap between the modern conceptual development of multimorbidity and the operational definitions. This gap exists despite the theoretical developments that have occurred in the classical concept of comorbidity to arrive to the modern and multidimensional conception of multimorbidty. Measurement strategies, however, have not kept pace with this advance. Therefore, new methodological proposals need to be developed in order to obtain information regarding the actual impact on individuals' health and its implications for public health.

  10. Regional knowledge economy development indicative planning system conceptual model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Davidovna Vaisman

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The subject of the research is the processes of Russian knowledge economy development, its progress on the regional level is taken as a theme, which determined the purpose of research: development of the regional knowledge economy development indicative planning method conceptual model. The methodological base of the research is the knowledge economy concept and supply and demand theory, the methods of comparative and system analysis and theoretical modeling; common generalization and classification methods and regression models are used in the work. As a result, we managed to create the regional knowledge economy development indicative planning method conceptual model, which includes the choice of the types of indicative plans and the justification for the complex of indicators according to the stated requirements to this complex. The model of supply and demand for knowledge dependency from the knowledge cost, allowing to determine the acceptable range for the indicators proceeding from the demand and supply levels and their interrelation, is developed. The obtained results may be used by the regional government authorities while planning the regional innovative development and consulting companies while making the proposals for this development

  11. Conceptual Change Texts in Chemistry Teaching: A Study on the Particle Model of Matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beerenwinkel, Anne; Parchmann, Ilka; Grasel, Cornelia

    2011-01-01

    This study explores the effect of a conceptual change text on students' awareness of common misconceptions on the particle model of matter. The conceptual change text was designed based on principles of text comprehensibility, of conceptual change instruction and of instructional approaches how to introduce the particle model. It was evaluated in…

  12. Combined Estimation of Hydrogeologic Conceptual Model and Parameter Uncertainty

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meyer, Philip D.; Ye, Ming; Neuman, Shlomo P.; Cantrell, Kirk J.

    2004-03-01

    The objective of the research described in this report is the development and application of a methodology for comprehensively assessing the hydrogeologic uncertainties involved in dose assessment, including uncertainties associated with conceptual models, parameters, and scenarios. This report describes and applies a statistical method to quantitatively estimate the combined uncertainty in model predictions arising from conceptual model and parameter uncertainties. The method relies on model averaging to combine the predictions of a set of alternative models. Implementation is driven by the available data. When there is minimal site-specific data the method can be carried out with prior parameter estimates based on generic data and subjective prior model probabilities. For sites with observations of system behavior (and optionally data characterizing model parameters), the method uses model calibration to update the prior parameter estimates and model probabilities based on the correspondence between model predictions and site observations. The set of model alternatives can contain both simplified and complex models, with the requirement that all models be based on the same set of data. The method was applied to the geostatistical modeling of air permeability at a fractured rock site. Seven alternative variogram models of log air permeability were considered to represent data from single-hole pneumatic injection tests in six boreholes at the site. Unbiased maximum likelihood estimates of variogram and drift parameters were obtained for each model. Standard information criteria provided an ambiguous ranking of the models, which would not justify selecting one of them and discarding all others as is commonly done in practice. Instead, some of the models were eliminated based on their negligibly small updated probabilities and the rest were used to project the measured log permeabilities by kriging onto a rock volume containing the six boreholes. These four

  13. Regionalization parameters of conceptual rainfall-runoff model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osuch, M.

    2003-04-01

    Main goal of this study was to develop techniques for the a priori estimation parameters of hydrological model. Conceptual hydrological model CLIRUN was applied to around 50 catchment in Poland. The size of catchments range from 1 000 to 100 000 km2. The model was calibrated for a number of gauged catchments with different catchment characteristics. The parameters of model were related to different climatic and physical catchment characteristics (topography, land use, vegetation and soil type). The relationships were tested by comparing observed and simulated runoff series from the gauged catchment that were not used in the calibration. The model performance using regional parameters was promising for most of the calibration and validation catchments.

  14. Calibration of Conceptual Rainfall-Runoff Models Using Global Optimization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chao Zhang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Parameter optimization for the conceptual rainfall-runoff (CRR model has always been the difficult problem in hydrology since watershed hydrological model is high-dimensional and nonlinear with multimodal and nonconvex response surface and its parameters are obviously related and complementary. In the research presented here, the shuffled complex evolution (SCE-UA global optimization method was used to calibrate the Xinanjiang (XAJ model. We defined the ideal data and applied the method to observed data. Our results show that, in the case of ideal data, the data length did not affect the parameter optimization for the hydrological model. If the objective function was selected appropriately, the proposed method found the true parameter values. In the case of observed data, we applied the technique to different lengths of data (1, 2, and 3 years and compared the results with ideal data. We found that errors in the data and model structure lead to significant uncertainties in the parameter optimization.

  15. A CONCEPTUAL MODEL FOR EFFECTIVE DISTANCE LEARNING IN HIGHER A CONCEPTUAL MODEL FOR EFFECTIVE DISTANCE LEARNING IN HIGHER A CONCEPTUAL MODEL FOR EFFECTIVE DISTANCE LEARNING IN HIGHER EDUCATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehran FARAJOLLAHI

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available The present research aims at presenting a conceptual model for effective distance learning in higher education. Findings of this research shows that an understanding of the technological capabilities and learning theories especially constructive theory and independent learning theory and communicative and interaction theory in Distance learning is an efficient factor in the planning of effective Distance learning in higher education. Considering the theoretical foundations of the present research, in the effective distance learning model, the learner is situated at the center of learning environment. For this purpose, the learner needs to be ready for successful learning and the teacher has to be ready to design the teaching- learning activities when they initially enter the environment. In the present model, group and individual active teaching-learning approach, timely feedback, using IT and eight types of interactions have been designed with respect to theoretical foundations and current university missions. From among the issues emphasized in this model, one can refer to the Initial, Formative and Summative evaluations. In an effective distance learning environment, evaluation should be part of the learning process and the feedback resulting from it should be used to improve learning. For validating the specified features, the opinions of Distance learning experts in Payame Noor, Shiraz, Science and Technology and Amirkabir Universities have been used which verified a high percentage of the statistical sample of the above mentioned features.

  16. A conceptual model of psychological contracts in construction projects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yongjian Ke

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The strategic importance of relationship style contracting is recognised in the construction industry. Both public and private sector clients are stipulating more integrated and collaborative forms of procurement. Despite relationship and integrated contractual arrangement being available for some time, it is clear that construction firms have been slow to adopt them. Hence it is timely to examine how social exchanges, via unwritten agreement and behaviours, are being nurtured in construction projects. This paper adopted the concept of Psychological Contracts (PC to describe unwritten agreement and behaviours. A conceptual model of the PC is developed and validated using the results from a questionnaire survey administered to construction professionals in Australia. The results uncovered the relationships that existed amongst relational conditions and relational benefits, the PC and the partners’ satisfaction. The results show that all the hypotheses in the conceptual model of the PC are supported, suggesting the PC model is important and may have an effect on project performance and relationship quality among contracting parties. A validated model of the PC in construction was then developed based on the correlations among each component. The managerial implications are that past relationships and relationship characteristics should be taken into account in the selection of procurement partners and the promise of future resources, support and tangible relational outcomes are also vital. It is important for contracting parties to pay attention to unwritten agreements (the PC and behaviours when managing construction projects.

  17. Penetration Testing Professional Ethics: a conceptual model and taxonomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Justin Pierce

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available In an environment where commercial software is continually patched to correct security flaws, penetration testing can provide organisations with a realistic assessment of their security posture. Penetration testing uses the same principles as criminal hackers to penetrate corporate networks and thereby verify the presence of software vulnerabilities. Network administrators can use the results of a penetration test to correct flaws and improve overall security. The use of hacking techniques, however, raises several ethical questions that centre on the integrity of the tester to maintain professional distance and uphold the profession. This paper discusses the ethics of penetration testing and presents our conceptual model and revised taxonomy.

  18. A Framework for Conceptual Modeling of Geographic Data Quality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Friis-Christensen, Anders; Christensen, J.V.; Jensen, Christian Søndergaard

    2004-01-01

    Sustained advances in wireless communications, geo-positioning, and consumer electronics pave the way to a kind of location-based service that relies on the tracking of the continuously changing positions of an entire population of service users. This type of service is characterized by large...... determined by how "good" the data is, as different applications of geographic data require different qualities of the data are met. Such qualities concern the object level as well as the attribute level of the data. This paper presents a systematic and integrated approach to the conceptual modeling...

  19. Conceptual modelling approach of mechanical products based on functional surface

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    A modelling framework based on functional surface is presented to support conceptual design of mechanical products. The framework organizes product information in an abstract and multilevel manner. It consists of two mapping processes: function decomposition process and form reconstitution process. The steady mapping relationship from function to form (function-functional surface-form) is realized by taking functional surface as the middle layer. It farthest reduces the possibilities of combinatorial explosion that can occur during function decomposition and form reconstitution. Finally, CAD tools are developed and an auto-bender machine is applied to demonstrate the proposed approach.

  20. Conceptual Development af a 3D Product Configuration Model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skauge, Jørn

    2006-01-01

    Paper. This project deals with 3D product configuration of a digital building element which has been developed as a prototype in cooperation between a product manufacturer and a research institution in Denmark. The project falls within the concept of product modelling which is more and more used...... in the development of IT-systems that support the procedures in companies and in the building industry. In other words, it is a knowledge-based system that helps companies in their daily work. The aim of the project has been to develop and examine conceptual ideas about 3D modelling configurator used in the company......’s production of steel fire sliding doors. The development of the 3D digital model is based on practical rather than theoretical research. The result of the research is a prototype digital 3D model to be presented live....

  1. Current Practice in Measuring the Quality of Conceptual Models:Challenges and Research%Current Practice in Measuring the Quality of Conceptual Models:Challenges and Research

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Lei; WU Yu-feng; LI Xiao-jun

    2012-01-01

    How to measure the quality of conceptual models is an important issue in the IS field and related research. This paper conducts a review of research in measuring conceptual model quality and identifies the major theoretical and practical issues that need to be addressed in future studies. We review current classification frameworks for conceptual model quality and practice of measuring conceptual model quality. Based on the review, challenges for studies of measuring the quality of conceptual models are proposed and these challenges are also research points which should be strengthened in future studies.

  2. A conceptual model for local content development in petroleum industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abolfazl Kazzazi

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available A novel concept, local content, in oil industry is gradually emerging. Local content should be defined in terms of value addition in local country (by local staff, local materials, local services and facilities rather than in terms of ownership of the company performing the value added activities. Many oil exporting countries have taken a positive approach toward local content development to maximize the benefits from oil and gas extraction. The purpose of this study is to develop a conceptual model for local content development in petroleum industry. Local content can generally be defined in terms of the ownership and/ or location of the enterprises involved in production and/ or the value-added in the production process. Local content promotion will have to vary significantly between countries, depending on the current status of their economic, political and social development. This model is useful for state governments to consider all aspects and factors affecting local content development generally. Local content development outcomes are economic growth, industrial growth and spillover effects. The paper begins with examining the factors accommodated in literature believed to influence the local content promotion. Based on our review, the conceptual model derived includes key factors of local content that evaluate local content development, and examine interrelations between local policies, local infrastructure, local environment, and local capability.

  3. Conceptual model of the Great Basin carbonate and alluvial aquifer system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heilweil, Victor M.; Brooks, Lynette E.

    2011-01-01

    A conceptual model of the Great Basin carbonate and alluvial aquifer system (GBCAAS) was developed by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) for a regional assessment of groundwater availability as part of a national water census. The study area is an expansion of a previous USGS Regional Aquifer Systems Analysis (RASA) study conducted during the 1980s and 1990s of the carbonate-rock province of the Great Basin. The geographic extent of the study area is 110,000 mi2, predominantly in eastern Nevada and western Utah, and includes 165 hydrographic areas (HAs) and 17 regional groundwater flow systems.

  4. A conceptual glacio-hydrological model for high mountainous catchments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Schaefli

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available In high mountainous catchments, the spatial precipitation and therefore the overall water balance is generally difficult to estimate. The present paper describes the structure and calibration of a semi-lumped conceptual glacio-hydrological model for the joint simulation of daily discharge and annual glacier mass balance that represents a better integrator of the water balance. The model has been developed for climate change impact studies and has therefore a parsimonious structure; it requires three input times series – precipitation, temperature and potential evapotranspiration – and has 7 parameters to calibrate. A multi-signal approach considering daily discharge and – if available – annual glacier mass balance has been developed for the calibration of these parameters. The model has been calibrated for three different catchments in the Swiss Alps having glaciation rates between 37% and 52%. It simulates well the observed daily discharge, the hydrological regime and some basic glaciological features, such as the annual mass balance.

  5. A CONCEPTUAL FRAMEWORK FOR SUSTAINABLE POULTRY SUPPLY CHAIN MODEL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad SHAMSUDDOHA

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Now a day, sustainable supply chain is the crucially considerable matter for future focused industries. As a result, attention in supply chain management has increasingly amplified since the 1980s when firms discovered its benefits of mutual relationships within and beyond their own organization. This is why, concern researchers are trying hard to develop new theory or model which might help the corporate sector for achieving sustainability in their supply chains. This kind of reflection can be seen by the number of papers published and in particular by journal since 1980. The objectives of this paper are twofold. First, it offers a literature review on sustainable supply chain management taking papers published in last three decades. Second, it offers a conceptual sustainable supply chain process model in light of triple bottom line theory. The model has been developed by taking in-depth interview of an entrepreneur from a Poultry case industry in Bangladesh.

  6. Absorptive Capacity of Information Technology and Its Conceptual Model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    BI Xinhua; YU Cuiling

    2008-01-01

    In order to examine the problem of how to improve the use of information technology (IT) in enterprises, this paper makes an exploration from the perspective of organizational absorptive capacity. We propose the concept of IT absorptive capacity from an organizational level. A dynamic process model is developed to further analyze IT absorption. IT absorptive capacity of this process is embodied as six forms: identification, adoption, adaptation, acceptance, infusion, and knowledge management. By means of questionnaire surveys of 76 Chinese enterprises, the main factors that favor or disable the capacity of each stage are discovered. Using the method of system dynamics, a conceptual model of IT absorptive capacity is developed to analyze the action mechanism of the factors in detail. The model indicates that the critical factors are embodied in the aspect of management. Furthermore, it demonstrates that IT absorption is a spiral process, during which IT absorptive capacity evolves dynamically and, consequently, promotes IT use.

  7. Updated Conceptual Model for the 300 Area Uranium Groundwater Plume

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zachara, John M.; Freshley, Mark D.; Last, George V.; Peterson, Robert E.; Bjornstad, Bruce N.

    2012-11-01

    The 300 Area uranium groundwater plume in the 300-FF-5 Operable Unit is residual from past discharge of nuclear fuel fabrication wastes to a number of liquid (and solid) disposal sites. The source zones in the disposal sites were remediated by excavation and backfilled to grade, but sorbed uranium remains in deeper, unexcavated vadose zone sediments. In spite of source term removal, the groundwater plume has shown remarkable persistence, with concentrations exceeding the drinking water standard over an area of approximately 1 km2. The plume resides within a coupled vadose zone, groundwater, river zone system of immense complexity and scale. Interactions between geologic structure, the hydrologic system driven by the Columbia River, groundwater-river exchange points, and the geochemistry of uranium contribute to persistence of the plume. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) recently completed a Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study (RI/FS) to document characterization of the 300 Area uranium plume and plan for beginning to implement proposed remedial actions. As part of the RI/FS document, a conceptual model was developed that integrates knowledge of the hydrogeologic and geochemical properties of the 300 Area and controlling processes to yield an understanding of how the system behaves and the variables that control it. Recent results from the Hanford Integrated Field Research Challenge site and the Subsurface Biogeochemistry Scientific Focus Area Project funded by the DOE Office of Science were used to update the conceptual model and provide an assessment of key factors controlling plume persistence.

  8. Conceptualizing Peatlands in a Physically-Based Spatially Distributed Hydrologic Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Downer, Charles; Wahl, Mark

    2017-04-01

    In as part of a research effort focused on climate change effects on permafrost near Fairbanks, Alaska, it became apparent that peat soils, overlain by thick sphagnum moss, had a considerable effect on the overall hydrology. Peatlands represent a confounding mixture of vegetation, soils, and water that present challenges for conceptualizing and parametrizing hydrologic models. We employed the Gridded Surface Subsurface Hydrologic Analysis Model (GSSHA) in our analysis of the Caribou Poker Creek Experimental Watershed (CPCRW). GSSHA is a physically-based, spatially distributed, watershed model developed by the U.S. Army to simulate important streamflow-generating processes (Downer and Ogden, 2004). The model enables simulation of surface water and groundwater interactions, as well as soil temperature and frozen ground effects on subsurface water movement. The test site is a 104 km2 basin located in the Yukon-Tanana Uplands of the Northern Plateaus Physiographic Province centered on 65˚10' N latitude and 147˚30' W longitude. The area lies above the Chattanika River floodplain and is characterized by rounded hilltops with gentle slopes and alluvium-floored valleys having minimal relief (Wahrhaftig, 1965) underlain by a mica shist of the Birch Creek formation (Rieger et al., 1972). The region has a cold continental climate characterized by short warm summers and long cold winters. Observed stream flows indicated significant groundwater contribution with sustained base flows even during dry periods. A site visit exposed the presence of surface water flows indicating a mixed basin that would require both surface and subsurface simulation capability to properly capture the response. Soils in the watershed are predominately silt loam underlain by shallow fractured bedrock. Throughout much of the basin, a thick layer of live sphagnum moss and fine peat covers the ground surface. A restrictive layer of permafrost is found on north facing slopes. The combination of thick

  9. UZ Flow Models and Submodels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Y. Wu

    2004-11-01

    The purpose of this report is to document the unsaturated zone (UZ) flow models and submodels, as well as the flow fields that have been generated using the UZ flow model(s) of Yucca Mountain, Nevada. In this report, the term ''UZ model'' refers to the UZ flow model and the several submodels, which include tracer transport, temperature or ambient geothermal, pneumatic or gas flow, and geochemistry (chloride, calcite, and strontium) submodels. The term UZ flow model refers to the three-dimensional models used for calibration and simulation of UZ flow fields. This work was planned in the ''Technical Work Plan (TWP) for: Unsaturated Zone Flow Analysis and Model Report Integration'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169654], Section 1.2.7). The table of included Features, Events, and Processes (FEPs), Table 6.2-11, is different from the list of included FEPs assigned to this report in the ''Technical Work Plan for: Unsaturated Zone Flow Analysis and Model Report Integration'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169654], Table 2.1.5-1), as discussed in Section 6.2.6. The UZ model has revised, updated, and enhanced the previous UZ model (BSC 2001 [DIRS 158726]) by incorporating the repository design with new grids, recalibration of property sets, and more comprehensive validation effort. The flow fields describe fracture-fracture, matrix-matrix, and fracture-matrix liquid flow rates, and their spatial distributions as well as moisture conditions in the UZ system. These three-dimensional UZ flow fields are used directly by Total System Performance Assessment (TSPA). The model and submodels evaluate important hydrogeologic processes in the UZ as well as geochemistry and geothermal conditions. These provide the necessary framework to test hypotheses of flow and transport at different scales, and predict flow and transport behavior under a variety of climatic conditions. In addition, the limitations of the UZ model are discussed in Section 8.11.

  10. A Marine Traffic Flow Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsz Leung Yip

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available A model is developed for studying marine traffic flow through classical traffic flow theories, which can provide us with a better understanding of the phenomenon of traffic flow of ships. On one hand, marine traffic has its special features and is fundamentally different from highway, air and pedestrian traffic. The existing traffic models cannot be simply extended to marine traffic without addressing marine traffic features. On the other hand, existing literature on marine traffic focuses on one ship or two ships but does not address the issues in marine traffic flow.

  11. Flow Over a Model Submarine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiménez, Juan; Smits, Alexander

    2003-11-01

    Experimental investigation over a DARPA SUBOFF submarine model (SUBOFF Model) was performed using flow visualization and Digital Particle Image Velocimetry (DPIV). The model has an axisymmetric body with sail and fins, and it was supported by a streamlined strut that was formed by the extension of the sail appendage. The range of flow conditions studied correspond to a Reynolds numbers based on model length, Re_L, of about 10^5. Velocity vector fields, turbulence intensities, vorticity fields, and flow visualization in the vicinity of the junction flows are presented. In the vicinity of the control surface and sail hull junctions, the presence of streamwise vortices in the form of horseshoe or necklace vortices locally dominates the flow. The effects of unsteady motions about an axis passing through the sail are also investigated to understand the evolution of the unsteady wake.

  12. A conceptual model for translating omic data into clinical action

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timothy M Herr

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Genomic, proteomic, epigenomic, and other "omic" data have the potential to enable precision medicine, also commonly referred to as personalized medicine. The volume and complexity of omic data are rapidly overwhelming human cognitive capacity, requiring innovative approaches to translate such data into patient care. Here, we outline a conceptual model for the application of omic data in the clinical context, called "the omic funnel." This model parallels the classic "Data, Information, Knowledge, Wisdom pyramid" and adds context for how to move between each successive layer. Its goal is to allow informaticians, researchers, and clinicians to approach the problem of translating omic data from bench to bedside, by using discrete steps with clearly defined needs. Such an approach can facilitate the development of modular and interoperable software that can bring precision medicine into widespread practice.

  13. Integrated Methods for Site Characterization and Conceptual Model Development for a Contaminated Fractured-Bedrock Aquifer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, C. D.; Kastrinos, J. R.; Haeni, F. P.

    2005-12-01

    A multi-disciplined and team-based approach was used to integrate geophysical, hydrologic, and chemical data to characterize lithology, fractures, and hydraulic properties of fractured crystalline bedrock and to determine the nature and extent of ground-water contamination from a landfill and former chemical-waste disposal pits at the University of Connecticut. Detection of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in domestic bedrock wells in the mid-1980s led to this investigation, in which a team comprised of hydrologists, engineers, geophysicists, geologists, chemists, toxicologists, and community-involvement personnel collected, analyzed, and evaluated data; developed and refined a conceptual model of the ground-water flow and contaminant distribution at the site; and evaluated alternatives and implemented a final remediation plan. The characterization phase began in 1999 and the remediation phase is currently ongoing. An integrated and iterative approach of using multiple methods in phases was important for corroborating the interpretation of individual methods and essential for guiding the design and implementation of additional testing at the site. The use of geophysical data early in the investigation allowed the study team to obtain detailed subsurface information using a minimum of boreholes. Surface geophysical methods were used to target potential discharge of contaminants from the landfill for further investigation. Borehole geophysical methods were used to investigate the anomalies identified by surface geophysical methods, the location and orientation of fractures that intersect and surround each well, the direction and magnitude of ambient flow in the wells, and the transmissive fractures that could provide pathways for contaminant migration. Borehole geophysical and hydraulic data were used to design discrete-zone monitoring systems for the collection of hydraulic head and chemical data and to prevent cross contamination through the boreholes. The results

  14. Application of Stochastic Fracture Network with Numerical Fluid Flow Simulations to Groundwater Flow Modeling in Fractured Rocks

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    The continuum approach in fluid flow modeling is generally applied to porous geological media,but has limitel applicability to fractured rocks. With the presence of a discrete fracture network relatively sparsely distributed in the matrix, it may be difficult or erroneous to use a porous medium fluid flow model with continuum assumptions to describe the fluid flow in fractured rocks at small or even large field scales. A discrete fracture fluid flow approach incorporating a stochastic fracture network with numerical fluid flow simulations could have the capability of capturing fluid flow behaviors such as inhomogeneity and anisotropy while reflecting the changes of hydraulic features at different scales.Moreover, this approach can be implemented to estimate the size of the representative elementary volume (REV) in order to find out the scales at which a porous medium flow model could be applied, and then to determine the hydraulic conductivity tensor for fractured rocks. The following topics are focused on in this study: (a) conceptual discrete fracture fluid flow modeling incorporating a stochastic fracture network with numerical flow simulations; (b) estimation of REVand hydraulic conductivity tensor for fractured rocks utilizing a stochastic fracture network with numerical fluid flow simulations; (c) investigation of the effect of fracture orientation and density on the hydraulic conductivity and REV by implementing a stochastic fracture network with numerical fluid flow simulations, and (d) fluid flow conceptual models accounting for major and minor fractures in the 2-D or 3-D flow fields incorporating a stochastic fracture network with numerical fluid flow simulations.``

  15. [Active ageing and success: A brief history of conceptual models].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petretto, Donatella Rita; Pili, Roberto; Gaviano, Luca; Matos López, Cristina; Zuddas, Carlo

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to analyse and describe different conceptual models of successful ageing, active and healthy ageing developed in Europe and in America in the 20° century, starting from Rowe and Kahn's original model (1987, 1997). A narrative review was conducted on the literature on successful ageing. Our review included definition of successful ageing from European and American scholars. Models were found that aimed to describe indexes of active and healthy ageing, models devoted to describe processes involved in successful ageing, and additional views that emphasise subjective and objective perception of successful ageing. A description is also given of critiques on previous models and remedies according to Martin et al. (2014) and strategies for successful ageing according to Jeste and Depp (2014). The need is discussed for the enhancement of Rowe and Kahn's model and other models with a more inclusive, universal description of ageing, incorporating scientific evidence regarding active ageing. Copyright © 2015 SEGG. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  16. Modeling Size Polydisperse Granular Flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lueptow, Richard M.; Schlick, Conor P.; Isner, Austin B.; Umbanhowar, Paul B.; Ottino, Julio M.

    2014-11-01

    Modeling size segregation of granular materials has important applications in many industrial processes and geophysical phenomena. We have developed a continuum model for granular multi- and polydisperse size segregation based on flow kinematics, which we obtain from discrete element method (DEM) simulations. The segregation depends on dimensionless control parameters that are functions of flow rate, particle sizes, collisional diffusion coefficient, shear rate, and flowing layer depth. To test the theoretical approach, we model segregation in tri-disperse quasi-2D heap flow and log-normally distributed polydisperse quasi-2D chute flow. In both cases, the segregated particle size distributions match results from full-scale DEM simulations and experiments. While the theory was applied to size segregation in steady quasi-2D flows here, the approach can be readily generalized to include additional drivers of segregation such as density and shape as well as other geometries where the flow field can be characterized including rotating tumbler flow and three-dimensional bounded heap flow. Funded by The Dow Chemical Company and NSF Grant CMMI-1000469.

  17. A conceptual model to improve performance in virtual teams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shopee Dube

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: The vast improvement in communication technologies and sophisticated project management tools, methods and techniques has allowed geographically and culturally diverse groups to operate and function in a virtual environment. To succeed in this virtual environment where time and space are becoming increasingly irrelevant, organisations must define new ways of implementing initiatives. This virtual environment phenomenon has brought about the formation of virtual project teams that allow organisations to harness the skills and knowhow of the best resources, irrespective of their location.Objectives: The aim of this article was to investigate performance criteria and develop a conceptual model which can be applied to enhance the success of virtual project teams. There are no clear guidelines of the performance criteria in managing virtual project teams.Method: A qualitative research methodology was used in this article. The purpose of content analysis was to explore the literature to understand the concept of performance in virtual project teams and to summarise the findings of the literature reviewed.Results: The research identified a set of performance criteria for the virtual project teams as follows: leadership, trust, communication, team cooperation, reliability, motivation, comfort and social interaction. These were used to conceptualise the model.Conclusion: The conceptual model can be used in a holistic way to determine the overall performance of the virtual project team, but each factor can be analysed individually to determine the impact on the overall performance. The knowledge of performance criteria for virtual project teams could aid project managers in enhancing the success of these teams and taking a different approach to better manage and coordinate them.

  18. Possibilistic uncertainty analysis of a conceptual model of snowmelt runoff

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. P. Jacquin

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available This study presents the analysis of predictive uncertainty of a conceptual type snowmelt runoff model. The method applied uses possibilistic rather than probabilistic calculus for the evaluation of predictive uncertainty. Possibility theory is an information theory meant to model uncertainties caused by imprecise or incomplete knowledge about a real system rather than by randomness. A snow dominated catchment in the Chilean Andes is used as case study. Predictive uncertainty arising from parameter uncertainties of the watershed model is assessed. Model performance is evaluated according to several criteria, in order to define the possibility distribution of the model representations. The likelihood of the simulated glacier mass balance and snow cover are used for further assessing model credibility. Possibility distributions of the discharge estimates and prediction uncertainty bounds are subsequently derived. The results of the study indicate that the use of additional information allows a reduction of predictive uncertainty. In particular, the assessment of the simulated glacier mass balance and snow cover helps to reduce the width of the uncertainty bounds without a significant increment in the number of unbounded observations.

  19. Two conceptual models of displacement transfer and examples

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GUAN; Shuwei; WANG; Xin; YANG; Shufeng; HE; Dengfa; ZHAO; W

    2005-01-01

    This paper presents two conceptual models of displacement transfer, reverse symmetry model and infinitely equal division model, based on the fault-bend folding theory. If the fault shape is held constant in the trend, then the distribution of slip magnitude, geometry of imbricate structures and its axial surface map all display reverse symmetry on the process of displacement transfer, as called reverse symmetry model in this paper. However, if the ramp height of thrust fault decreases gradually along its strike, the displacement is postulated to be equally and infinitely divided to every thrust that is formed subsequently, this kinematic process is described using infinitely equal division model. In both models, displacement transfer is characterized by the regular changes of imbricate thrusting in the trend. Geometric analysis indicates that the displacement transfer grads can be estimated using the tangent of deflective angle of hinterland structures. Displacement transfer is often responsible for the distortion and branching of the surface anticlines, especially in the region where the multi-level detachment structures is developed. We also present some examples from the frontal structures of the Southern Tianshan fold-and-thrust belt, Xinjiang, China. Displacement transfer between deep imbricate thrusts in the middle segment of Qiulitag anticline zone causes the Kuqatawu and Southern Qiulitag deep anticlines left-lateral echelon. The region, where these two deep anticlines overlap, is characterized by duplex structures, and extends about 18 km. The shallow anticline is migrated southward displaying obvious "S" form in this area.

  20. Modeling of curvilinear suspension flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Jeffrey F.; Boulay, Fabienne

    1996-11-01

    The curvilinear parallel-plate and cone-and-plate rheometric flows of monodisperse noncolloidal suspensions have been modeled. Although nonuniform in shear rate, dotγ, the parallel-plate flow has been shown experimentally(A. W. Chow, S. W. Sinton, J. H. Iwayima & T. S. Stephens 1994 Phys. Fluids) 6, 2561. not to exhibit particle migration, contrary to predictions of prior suspension-flow modeling. Predictions of nonuniform particle volume fraction, φ, by the suspension-balance model(P. R. Nott & J. F. Brady 1994 J. Fluid Mech.) 275, 157. for parallel-plate and cone-and-plate flow without normal stress differences are presented. The ``nonmigration'' in parallel-plate flow may be attributed to bulk suspension normal stress differences: assuming the bulk stress has the form Σ ~ η dotγ Q(φ) with η the fluid viscosity, nonmigration is predicted for parallel-plate flow provided that Q_33 = (1/2) Q_11 at the bulk φ of interest, with 1 the flow direction and 3 the vorticity direction. Extending the model to include normal stress differences satisfying this requirement, a range of migration behavior is predicted for the cone-and-plate flow depending upon the ratio Q_11/Q_22.

  1. Climate stability and sensitivity in some simple conceptual models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bates, J. Ray [University College Dublin, Meteorology and Climate Centre, School of Mathematical Sciences, Dublin (Ireland)

    2012-02-15

    A theoretical investigation of climate stability and sensitivity is carried out using three simple linearized models based on the top-of-the-atmosphere energy budget. The simplest is the zero-dimensional model (ZDM) commonly used as a conceptual basis for climate sensitivity and feedback studies. The others are two-zone models with tropics and extratropics of equal area; in the first of these (Model A), the dynamical heat transport (DHT) between the zones is implicit, in the second (Model B) it is explicitly parameterized. It is found that the stability and sensitivity properties of the ZDM and Model A are very similar, both depending only on the global-mean radiative response coefficient and the global-mean forcing. The corresponding properties of Model B are more complex, depending asymmetrically on the separate tropical and extratropical values of these quantities, as well as on the DHT coefficient. Adopting Model B as a benchmark, conditions are found under which the validity of the ZDM and Model A as climate sensitivity models holds. It is shown that parameter ranges of physical interest exist for which such validity may not hold. The 2 x CO{sub 2} sensitivities of the simple models are studied and compared. Possible implications of the results for sensitivities derived from GCMs and palaeoclimate data are suggested. Sensitivities for more general scenarios that include negative forcing in the tropics (due to aerosols, inadvertent or geoengineered) are also studied. Some unexpected outcomes are found in this case. These include the possibility of a negative global-mean temperature response to a positive global-mean forcing, and vice versa. (orig.)

  2. Conceptual Models in Health Informatics Research: A Literature Review and Suggestions for Development

    OpenAIRE

    Gray, Kathleen; Sockolow, Paulina

    2016-01-01

    Background Contributing to health informatics research means using conceptual models that are integrative and explain the research in terms of the two broad domains of health science and information science. However, it can be hard for novice health informatics researchers to find exemplars and guidelines in working with integrative conceptual models. Objectives The aim of this paper is to support the use of integrative conceptual models in research on information and communication technologi...

  3. Recruiting Transcultural Qualitative Research Participants: A Conceptual Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Phyllis Eide

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Working with diverse populations poses many challenges to the qualitative researcher who is a member of the dominant culture. Traditional methods of recruitment and selection (such as flyers and advertisements are often unproductive, leading to missed contributions from potential participants who were not recruited and researcher frustration. In this article, the authors explore recruitment issues related to the concept of personal knowing based on experiences with Aboriginal Hawai'ian and Micronesian populations, wherein knowing and being known are crucial to successful recruitment of participants. They present a conceptual model that incorporates key concepts of knowing the other, cultural context, and trust to guide other qualitative transcultural researchers. They also describe challenges, implications, and concrete suggestions for recruitment of participants.

  4. Ecological risk assessment conceptual model formulation for nonindigenous species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landis, Wayne G

    2004-08-01

    This article addresses the application of ecological risk assessment at the regional scale to the prediction of impacts due to invasive or nonindigenous species (NIS). The first section describes risk assessment, the decision-making process, and introduces regional risk assessment. A general conceptual model for the risk assessment of NIS is then presented based upon the regional risk assessment approach. Two diverse examples of the application of this approach are presented. The first example is based upon the dynamics of introduced plasmids into bacteria populations. The second example is the application risk assessment approach to the invasion of a coastal marine site of Cherry Point, Washington, USA by the European green crab. The lessons learned from the two examples demonstrate that assessment of the risks of invasion of NIS will have to incorporate not only the characteristics of the invasive species, but also the other stresses and impacts affecting the region of interest.

  5. Conceptual model and map of financial exploitation of older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conrad, Kendon J; Iris, Madelyn; Ridings, John W; Fairman, Kimberly P; Rosen, Abby; Wilber, Kathleen H

    2011-10-01

    This article describes the processes and outcomes of three-dimensional concept mapping to conceptualize financial exploitation of older adults. Statements were generated from a literature review and by local and national panels consisting of 16 experts in the field of financial exploitation. These statements were sorted and rated using Concept Systems software, which grouped the statements into clusters and depicted them as a map. Statements were grouped into six clusters, and ranked by the experts as follows in descending severity: (a) theft and scams, (b) financial victimization, (c) financial entitlement, (d) coercion, (e) signs of possible financial exploitation, and (f) money management difficulties. The hierarchical model can be used to identify elder financial exploitation and differentiate it from related but distinct areas of victimization. The severity hierarchy may be used to develop measures that will enable more precise screening for triage of clients into appropriate interventions.

  6. CONCEPTUAL MODEL OF CONSUMERS TRUST TO ONLINE SHOPS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Dubovyk

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available In the article the conceptual model of the major factors that influence consumers trust in online shop: reliability of online store, reliable information system for making purchases online, factors of ethic interactiveness (security, third-party certification, internet-marketing communications of online-shop and other factors – that is divided enterprises of trade and consumers (demographic variables, psychological perception of internet-marketing communications, experience of purchase of commodities are in the Internet. The degree of individual customer trust propensity which reflects the personality traits, culture and previous experience. An implement signs of consumer confidence due to site elements online shop – graphic design, structured design, design of content, design harmonized with perception of target audience.

  7. Possibilistic uncertainty analysis of a conceptual model of snowmelt runoff

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. P. Jacquin

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available This study presents the analysis of predictive uncertainty of a conceptual type snowmelt runoff model. The method applied uses possibilistic rather than probabilistic calculus for the evaluation of predictive uncertainty. Possibility theory is an information theory meant to model uncertainties caused by imprecise or incomplete knowledge about a real system rather than by randomness. A snow dominated catchment in the Chilean Andes is used as case study. Predictive uncertainty arising from parameter uncertainties of the watershed model is assessed. Model performance is evaluated according to several criteria, in order to define the possibility distribution of the parameter vector. The plausibility of the simulated glacier mass balance and snow cover are used for further constraining the model representations. Possibility distributions of the discharge estimates and prediction uncertainty bounds are subsequently derived. The results of the study indicate that the use of additional information allows a reduction of predictive uncertainty. In particular, the assessment of the simulated glacier mass balance and snow cover helps to reduce the width of the uncertainty bounds without a significant increment in the number of unbounded observations.

  8. Base Flow Model Validation Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The program focuses on turbulence modeling enhancements for predicting high-speed rocket base flows. A key component of the effort is the collection of high-fidelity...

  9. A conceptual ecosystem model of microbial communities in enhanced biological phosphorus removal plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, Per Halkjaer; Mielczarek, Artur Tomasz; Kragelund, Caroline; Nielsen, Jeppe Lund; Saunders, Aaron Marc; Kong, Yunhong; Hansen, Aviaja Anna; Vollertsen, Jes

    2010-09-01

    The microbial populations in 25 full-scale activated sludge wastewater treatment plants with enhanced biological phosphorus removal (EBPR plants) have been intensively studied over several years. Most of the important bacterial groups involved in nitrification, denitrification, biological P removal, fermentation, and hydrolysis have been identified and quantified using quantitative culture-independent molecular methods. Surprisingly, a limited number of core species was present in all plants, constituting on average approx. 80% of the entire communities in the plants, showing that the microbial populations in EBPR plants are rather similar and not very diverse, as sometimes suggested. By focusing on these organisms it is possible to make a comprehensive ecosystem model, where many important aspects in relation to microbial ecosystems and wastewater treatment can be investigated. We have reviewed the current knowledge about these microorganisms with focus on key ecophysiological factors and combined this into a conceptual ecosystem model for EBPR plants. It includes the major pathways of carbon flow with specific organic substances, the dominant populations involved in the transformations, interspecies interactions, and the key factors controlling their presence and activity. We believe that the EBPR process is a perfect model system for studies of microbial ecology in water engineering systems and that this conceptual model can be used for proposing and testing theories based on microbial ecosystem theories, for the development of new and improved quantitative ecosystem models and is beneficial for future design and management of wastewater treatment systems. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Bayesian Assessment of the Uncertainties of Estimates of a Conceptual Rainfall-Runoff Model Parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, F. E. O. E.; Naghettini, M. D. C.; Fernandes, W.

    2014-12-01

    This paper evaluated the uncertainties associated with the estimation of the parameters of a conceptual rainfall-runoff model, through the use of Bayesian inference techniques by Monte Carlo simulation. The Pará River sub-basin, located in the upper São Francisco river basin, in southeastern Brazil, was selected for developing the studies. In this paper, we used the Rio Grande conceptual hydrologic model (EHR/UFMG, 2001) and the Markov Chain Monte Carlo simulation method named DREAM (VRUGT, 2008a). Two probabilistic models for the residues were analyzed: (i) the classic [Normal likelihood - r ≈ N (0, σ²)]; and (ii) a generalized likelihood (SCHOUPS & VRUGT, 2010), in which it is assumed that the differences between observed and simulated flows are correlated, non-stationary, and distributed as a Skew Exponential Power density. The assumptions made for both models were checked to ensure that the estimation of uncertainties in the parameters was not biased. The results showed that the Bayesian approach proved to be adequate to the proposed objectives, enabling and reinforcing the importance of assessing the uncertainties associated with hydrological modeling.

  11. Numerical experiments modelling turbulent flows

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trefilík Jiří

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The work aims at investigation of the possibilities of modelling transonic flows mainly in external aerodynamics. New results are presented and compared with reference data and previously achieved results. For the turbulent flow simulations two modifications of the basic k – ω model are employed: SST and TNT. The numerical solution was achieved by using the MacCormack scheme on structured non-ortogonal grids. Artificial dissipation was added to improve the numerical stability.

  12. Assessment of private hospital portals: A conceptual model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehdi Alipour-Hafezi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Hospital portals, as the first virtual entry, play an important role in connecting people with hospital and also presenting hospital virtual services. The main purpose of this article was to suggest a conceptual model to improve Tehran private hospital portals. The suggested model can be used by all the health portals that are in the same circumstances and all the health portals which are in progress. Method: This is a practical research, using evaluative survey research method. Research population includes all the private hospital portals in Tehran, 34 portals, and ten top international hospital portals. Data gathering tool used in this research was a researcher-made checklist including 14 criteria and 77 sub-criteria with their weight score. In fact, objective observation with the mentioned checklist was used to gather information. Descriptive statistics were used to analyze the data and tables and graphs were used to present the organized data. Also, data were analyzed using independent t-test. Conceptual modeling technique was used to design the model and demonstration method was used to evaluate the proposed model. In this regard, SPSS statistical software was used to perform the tests. Results:The comparative study between the two groups of portals, TPH and WTH, in the 14 main criteria showed that the value of t-test in contact information criteria was 0.862, portal page specification was -1.378, page design criteria -1.527, updating pages -0.322, general information and access roads -3.161, public services -7.302, patient services -4.154, patient data -8.703, research and education -9.155, public relationship -3.009, page technical specifications -4.726, telemedicine -7.488, pharmaceutical services -6.183, and financial services -2.782. Finally, the findings demonstrated that Tehran private hospital portals in criterion of contact information were favorable; page design criteria were relatively favorable; page technical

  13. Modelling in Primary School: Constructing Conceptual Models and Making Sense of Fractions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahbari, Juhaina Awawdeh; Peled, Irit

    2017-01-01

    This article describes sixth-grade students' engagement in two model-eliciting activities offering students the opportunity to construct mathematical models. The findings show that students utilized their knowledge of fractions including conceptual and procedural knowledge in constructing mathematical models for the given situations. Some students…

  14. Computational modeling of concrete flow

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roussel, Nicolas; Geiker, Mette Rica; Dufour, Frederic

    2007-01-01

    This paper provides a general overview of the present status regarding computational modeling of the flow of fresh concrete. The computational modeling techniques that can be found in the literature may be divided into three main families: single fluid simulations, numerical modeling of discrete...

  15. Impact of the calibration period on the conceptual rainfall-runoff model parameter estimates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todorovic, Andrijana; Plavsic, Jasna

    2015-04-01

    A conceptual rainfall-runoff model is defined by its structure and parameters, which are commonly inferred through model calibration. Parameter estimates depend on objective function(s), optimisation method, and calibration period. Model calibration over different periods may result in dissimilar parameter estimates, while model efficiency decreases outside calibration period. Problem of model (parameter) transferability, which conditions reliability of hydrologic simulations, has been investigated for decades. In this paper, dependence of the parameter estimates and model performance on calibration period is analysed. The main question that is addressed is: are there any changes in optimised parameters and model efficiency that can be linked to the changes in hydrologic or meteorological variables (flow, precipitation and temperature)? Conceptual, semi-distributed HBV-light model is calibrated over five-year periods shifted by a year (sliding time windows). Length of the calibration periods is selected to enable identification of all parameters. One water year of model warm-up precedes every simulation, which starts with the beginning of a water year. The model is calibrated using the built-in GAP optimisation algorithm. The objective function used for calibration is composed of Nash-Sutcliffe coefficient for flows and logarithms of flows, and volumetric error, all of which participate in the composite objective function with approximately equal weights. Same prior parameter ranges are used in all simulations. The model is calibrated against flows observed at the Slovac stream gauge on the Kolubara River in Serbia (records from 1954 to 2013). There are no trends in precipitation nor in flows, however, there is a statistically significant increasing trend in temperatures at this catchment. Parameter variability across the calibration periods is quantified in terms of standard deviations of normalised parameters, enabling detection of the most variable parameters

  16. BIM-enabled Conceptual Modelling and Representation of Building Circulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin Kook Lee

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes how a building information modelling (BIM-based approach for building circulation enables us to change the process of building design in terms of its computational representation and processes, focusing on the conceptual modelling and representation of circulation within buildings. BIM has been designed for use by several BIM authoring tools, in particular with the widely known interoperable industry foundation classes (IFCs, which follow an object-oriented data modelling methodology. Advances in BIM authoring tools, using space objects and their relations defined in an IFC’s schema, have made it possible to model, visualize and analyse circulation within buildings prior to their construction. Agent-based circulation has long been an interdisciplinary topic of research across several areas, including design computing, computer science, architectural morphology, human behaviour and environmental psychology. Such conventional approaches to building circulation are centred on navigational knowledge about built environments, and represent specific circulation paths and regulations. This paper, however, places emphasis on the use of ‘space objects’ in BIM-enabled design processes rather than on circulation agents, the latter of which are not defined in the IFCs’ schemas. By introducing and reviewing some associated research and projects, this paper also surveys how such a circulation representation is applicable to the analysis of building circulation-related rules.

  17. Vulnerability Assessment Models to Drought: Toward a Conceptual Framework

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kiumars Zarafshani

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Drought is regarded as a slow-onset natural disaster that causes inevitable damage to water resources and to farm life. Currently, crisis management is the basis of drought mitigation plans, however, thus far studies indicate that effective drought management strategies are based on risk management. As a primary tool in mitigating the impact of drought, vulnerability assessment can be used as a benchmark in drought mitigation plans and to enhance farmers’ ability to cope with drought. Moreover, literature pertaining to drought has focused extensively on its impact, only awarding limited attention to vulnerability assessment as a tool. Therefore, the main purpose of this paper is to develop a conceptual framework for designing a vulnerability model in order to assess farmers’ level of vulnerability before, during and after the onset of drought. Use of this developed drought vulnerability model would aid disaster relief workers by enhancing the adaptive capacity of farmers when facing the impacts of drought. The paper starts with the definition of vulnerability and outlines different frameworks on vulnerability developed thus far. It then identifies various approaches of vulnerability assessment and finally offers the most appropriate model. The paper concludes that the introduced model can guide drought mitigation programs in countries that are impacted the most by drought.

  18. Elements of a flexible approach for conceptual hydrological modeling: 1. Motivation and theoretical development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fenicia, F.; Kavetski, D.; Savenije, H.H.G.

    2011-01-01

    This paper introduces a flexible framework for conceptual hydrological modeling, with two related objectives: (1) generalize and systematize the currently fragmented field of conceptual models and (2) provide a robust platform for understanding and modeling hydrological systems. In contrast to curre

  19. Hydrochemical tracers in the middle Rio Grande Basin, USA: 1. Conceptualization of groundwater flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plummer, L. Niel; Bexfield, Laura M.; Anderholm, Scott K.; Sanford, Ward E.; Busenberg, Eurybiades

    Chemical and isotopic data for groundwater from throughout the Middle Rio Grande Basin, central New Mexico, USA, were used to identify and map groundwater flow from 12 sources of water to the basin, evaluate radiocarbon ages, and refine the conceptual model of the Santa Fe Group aquifer system. Hydrochemical zones, representing groundwater flow over thousands to tens of thousands of years, can be traced over large distances through the primarily siliciclastic aquifer system. The locations of the hydrochemical zones mostly reflect the ``modern'' predevelopment hydraulic-head distribution, but are inconsistent with a trough in predevelopment water levels in the west-central part of the basin, indicating that this trough is a transient rather than a long-term feature of the aquifer system. Radiocarbon ages adjusted for geochemical reactions, mixing, and evapotranspiration/dilution processes in the aquifer system were nearly identical to the unadjusted radiocarbon ages, and ranged from modern to more than 30 ka. Age gradients from piezometer nests ranged from 0.1 to 2 year cm-1 and indicate a recharge rate of about 3 cm year-1 for recharge along the eastern mountain front and infiltration from the Rio Grande near Albuquerque. There has been appreciably less recharge along the eastern mountain front north and south of Albuquerque. Des données sur les éléments chimiques et les isotopes présents dans l'eau souterraine prélevée à divers endroits dans le bassin moyen du Rio Grande, au centre du Nouveau-Mexique (É-U), ont permis de déterminer l'existence et l'étendue de douze sources d'eau régionales dans le bassin, d'évaluer les âges radiocarbones et de raffiner le modèle conceptuel du système aquifère du groupe de Santa Fe. Des zones hydro-chimiques qui représentent l'écoulement de l'eau souterraine depuis des dizaines de milliers d'années peuvent être suivies sur de longues distances à travers l'aquifère principalement siliclastique. La position des

  20. GIS-based Conceptual Database Model for Planetary Geoscientific Mapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Gasselt, Stephan; Nass, Andrea; Neukum, Gerhard

    2010-05-01

    We here report on the conceptual design of a geodatabase model as part of a larger-scaled GIS-based system composed of several applications, templates and database backend which supports conducting combined geological as well as geomorphological mapping of planetary surfaces and which simplifies the process of maintaining data and map products. Performing geological and/or geomorphological stand-alone or systematic mapping of planetary surfaces supported by modern GIS environments involves several tasks to be performed before the actual mapping process can be carried out. Such tasks deal with setting up a working environment by querying and defining raster data from a variety of planetary missions to be used and processed, importing auxiliary data, defining projection parameters for one or more map layer(s) and each raster/vector dataset, importing processed data, and defining a variety of vector shape geometries and attributes for mapping in terms of geometry type, representation symbology and attribute domains in a consistent way. In order to allow consistent mapping approaches and subsequent homogenisation success, a mapper makes use of pre-defined model schemas (templates) and definitions allowing to import mapping representation and styles as well as a backbone geo-database to immediately start working and making use of the provided infrastructure. The conceptual geo-database design developed far involves the design of the main object and data layers and consists of objects, object types, their relationships and additionally the formulation of integrity conditions on a level which is in principle independent of the exact implementation and its environment. Furthermore, the data layer containing attribute domains has been implemented. The conceptual design has been crafted using ESRI's ArcGIS File Geodatabase environment but it can be exported to any other GDBMS. The overall layout consists of several main elements or entity groups composed of relations

  1. Description and evaluation of a mechanistically based conceptual model for spall

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hansen, F.D.; Knowles, M.K.; Thompson, T.W. [and others

    1997-08-01

    A mechanistically based model for a possible spall event at the WIPP site is developed and evaluated in this report. Release of waste material to the surface during an inadvertent borehole intrusion is possible if future states of the repository include high gas pressure and waste material consisting of fine particulates having low mechanical strength. The conceptual model incorporates the physics of wellbore hydraulics coupled to transient gas flow to the intrusion borehole, and mechanical response of the waste. Degraded waste properties using of the model. The evaluations include both numerical and analytical implementations of the conceptual model. A tensile failure criterion is assumed appropriate for calculation of volumes of waste experiencing fragmentation. Calculations show that for repository gas pressures less than 12 MPa, no tensile failure occurs. Minimal volumes of material experience failure below gas pressure of 14 MPa. Repository conditions dictate that the probability of gas pressures exceeding 14 MPa is approximately 1%. For these conditions, a maximum failed volume of 0.25 m{sup 3} is calculated.

  2. Conceptual model for transport processes in the Culebra Dolomite Member, Rustler Formation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holt, R.M. [Holt Hydrogeology, Placitas, NM (United States)

    1997-08-01

    The Culebra Dolomite Member of the Rustler Formation represents a possible pathway for contaminants from the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant underground repository to the accessible environment. The geologic character of the Culebra is consistent with a double-porosity, multiple-rate model for transport in which the medium is conceptualized as consisting of advective porosity, where solutes are carried by the groundwater flow, and fracture-bounded zones of diffusive porosity, where solutes move through slow advection or diffusion. As the advective travel length or travel time increases, the nature of transport within a double-porosity medium changes. This behavior is important for chemical sorption, because the specific surface area per unit mass of the diffusive porosity is much greater than in the advective porosity. Culebra transport experiments conducted at two different length scales show behavior consistent with a multiple-rate, double-porosity conceptual model for Culebra transport. Tracer tests conducted on intact core samples from the Culebra show no evidence of significant diffusion, suggesting that at the core scale the Culebra can be modeled as a single-porosity medium where only the advective porosity participates in transport. Field tracer tests conducted in the Culebra show strong double-porosity behavior that is best explained using a multiple-rate model.

  3. Conceptual framework for model-based analysis of residence time distribution in twin-screw granulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Ashish; Vercruysse, Jurgen; Vanhoorne, Valérie; Toiviainen, Maunu; Panouillot, Pierre-Emmanuel; Juuti, Mikko; Vervaet, Chris; Remon, Jean Paul; Gernaey, Krist V; De Beer, Thomas; Nopens, Ingmar

    2015-04-25

    Twin-screw granulation is a promising continuous alternative for traditional batchwise wet granulation processes. The twin-screw granulator (TSG) screws consist of transport and kneading element modules. Therefore, the granulation to a large extent is governed by the residence time distribution within each module where different granulation rate processes dominate over others. Currently, experimental data is used to determine the residence time distributions. In this study, a conceptual model based on classical chemical engineering methods is proposed to better understand and simulate the residence time distribution in a TSG. The experimental data were compared with the proposed most suitable conceptual model to estimate the parameters of the model and to analyse and predict the effects of changes in number of kneading discs and their stagger angle, screw speed and powder feed rate on residence time. The study established that the kneading block in the screw configuration acts as a plug-flow zone inside the granulator. Furthermore, it was found that a balance between the throughput force and conveying rate is required to obtain a good axial mixing inside the twin-screw granulator. Although the granulation behaviour is different for other excipients, the experimental data collection and modelling methods applied in this study are generic and can be adapted to other excipients.

  4. Simulation modelling of fynbos ecosystems: Systems analysis and conceptual models

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Kruger, FJ

    1985-03-01

    Full Text Available This report outlines progress with the development of computer based dynamic simulation models for ecosystems in the fynbos biome. The models are planned to run on a portable desktop computer with 500 kbytes of memory, extended BASIC language...

  5. The influence of conceptual model uncertainty on management decisions for a groundwater-dependent ecosystem in karst

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gondwe, Bibi R. N.; Merediz-Alonso, Gonzalo; Bauer-Gottwein, Peter

    2011-03-01

    SummaryGroundwater management in karst is often based on limited hydrologic understanding of the aquifer. The geologic heterogeneities controlling the water flow are often insufficiently mapped. As karst aquifers are very vulnerable to pollution, groundwater protection and land use management are crucial to preserve water resources and maintain ecosystem services. Multiple Model Simulation highlights the impact of model structure uncertainty on management decisions using several plausible conceptual models. Multiple Model Simulation was used for this purpose on the Yucatan Peninsula, which is one of the world's largest karstic aquifers. The aquifer is the only available fresh water source for human users and ecosystems on the Peninsula. One of Mexico's largest protected areas, the groundwater-dependent Sian Ka'an Biosphere Reserve (5280 km 2) is fed by the aquifer's thin freshwater lens. Increasing groundwater abstractions and pollution threatens the fresh water resource, and consequently the ecosystem integrity of both Sian Ka'an and the adjacent coastal environment. Seven different catchment-scale conceptual models were implemented in a distributed hydrological modelling approach. Equivalent porous medium conceptualizations with uniform and heterogeneous distributions of hydraulic conductivities were used. The models demonstrated that Sian Ka'an's wetlands are indeed groundwater-fed. The water quantities in the wetlands and the flooding dynamics are determined by the larger groundwater catchment. The overall water balance for the model domain showed that recharge constitutes 4400 ± 700 million m 3/year. Of this, 4-12% exits as overland flow, and 88-96% exits as groundwater flow. Net groundwater outflow from the model domain to the north via the Holbox fracture zone appears as an important cross-basin transfer between regions of the Peninsula. Probability maps of Sian Ka'an's catchment were obtained through automatic calibration and stochastic modelling

  6. Aerodynamic Modeling of Transonic Aircraft Using Vortex Lattice Coupled with Transonic Small Disturbance for Conceptual Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaparro, Daniel; Fujiwara, Gustavo E. C.; Ting, Eric; Nguyen, Nhan

    2016-01-01

    The need to rapidly scan large design spaces during conceptual design calls for computationally inexpensive tools such as the vortex lattice method (VLM). Although some VLM tools, such as Vorview have been extended to model fully-supersonic flow, VLM solutions are typically limited to inviscid, subcritical flow regimes. Many transport aircraft operate at transonic speeds, which limits the applicability of VLM for such applications. This paper presents a novel approach to correct three-dimensional VLM through coupling of two-dimensional transonic small disturbance (TSD) solutions along the span of an aircraft wing in order to accurately predict transonic aerodynamic loading and wave drag for transport aircraft. The approach is extended to predict flow separation and capture the attenuation of aerodynamic forces due to boundary layer viscosity by coupling the TSD solver with an integral boundary layer (IBL) model. The modeling framework is applied to the NASA General Transport Model (GTM) integrated with a novel control surface known as the Variable Camber Continuous Trailing Edge Flap (VCCTEF).

  7. A conceptual model of daily water balance following partial clearing from forest to pasture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. A. Bari

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available A simple conceptual water balance model representing the streamflow generation processes on a daily time step following land use change is presented. The model consists of five stores: (i Dry, Wet and Subsurface Stores for vertical and lateral water flow, (ii a transient Stream zone Store (iii a saturated Goundwater Store. The soil moisture balance in the top soil Dry and Wet Stores are the most important components of the model and characterize the dynamically varying saturated areas responsible for surface runoff, interflow and deep percolation. The Subsurface Store describes the unsaturated soil moisture balance, extraction of percolated water by vegetation and groundwater recharge. The Groundwater Store controls the baseflow to stream (if any and the groundwater contribution to the stream zone saturated areas. The daily model was developed following a downward approach by analysing data from Ernies (control and Lemon (53% cleared catchments in Western Australia and elaborating a monthly model. The daily model performed very well in simulating daily flow generation processes for both catchments. Most of the model parameters were incorporated a priori from catchment attributes such as surface slope, soil depth, porosity, stream length and initial groundwater depth, and some were calibrated by matching the observed and predicted hydrographs. The predicted groundwater depth, and streamflow volumes across all time steps from daily to monthly to annual were in close agreement with observations for both catchments.

  8. Towards methodical modelling: Differences between the structure and output dynamics of multiple conceptual models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knoben, Wouter; Woods, Ross; Freer, Jim

    2016-04-01

    Conceptual hydrologic models consist of a certain arrangement of spatial and temporal dynamics consisting of stores, fluxes and transformation functions, depending on the modeller's choices and intended use. They have the advantages of being computationally efficient, being relatively easy model structures to reconfigure and having relatively low input data demands. This makes them well-suited for large-scale and large-sample hydrology, where appropriately representing the dominant hydrologic functions of a catchment is a main concern. Given these requirements, the number of parameters in the model cannot be too high, to avoid equifinality and identifiability issues. This limits the number and level of complexity of dominant hydrologic processes the model can represent. Specific purposes and places thus require a specific model and this has led to an abundance of conceptual hydrologic models. No structured overview of these models exists and there is no clear method to select appropriate model structures for different catchments. This study is a first step towards creating an overview of the elements that make up conceptual models, which may later assist a modeller in finding an appropriate model structure for a given catchment. To this end, this study brings together over 30 past and present conceptual models. The reviewed model structures are simply different configurations of three basic model elements (stores, fluxes and transformation functions), depending on the hydrologic processes the models are intended to represent. Differences also exist in the inner workings of the stores, fluxes and transformations, i.e. the mathematical formulations that describe each model element's intended behaviour. We investigate the hypothesis that different model structures can produce similar behavioural simulations. This can clarify the overview of model elements by grouping elements which are similar, which can improve model structure selection.

  9. A Conceptual Model of Service Customization and Its Implementation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Su-Bin Shen; Guan-Qun Gu; Shun-Yi Zhang

    2004-01-01

    With the development of Internet and next generation networks in telecommunications, more and more new services are required to be introduced into networks. Introducing new services into traditional network is always associated with standardizing new protocols. The progress of protocol standardization usually takes several years, which cannot meet the increasing demands of the applications in Internet and next generation networks.Service customization in network systems may be one possible solution to cope with this problem. Based on the principle that network service is provided by interactions among protocol entities, this paper proposes a conceptual model of service customization (SECUM) by separating the service logic from protocol interactive logic within existing network architecture. The theory of Communicating Sequential Processes (CSP) is used to formalize the SECUM in order to locate exactly the service logic and to define precisely the SECUM. For validating the SECUM's usability in practical network systems, this paper also proposes an implementation model for SECUM: a component-based protocol implementation model (CPIM). CPIM discomposes protocol entity into application component, service component, message component and communication component. Service component associates application component with message component. Users or network managers can customize network services by configuring service component. The paper shows respectively the applications of SECUM and CPIM by proposing a customizable IP service model based on SECUM and describing an implementation of Session Initiation Protocol (SIP) based on CPIM. Compared with the existing service-customization techniques,SECUM is a service customization model internal to network system and may provide more powerful capabilities of service customization.

  10. Developing a conceptual model for selecting and evaluating online markets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sadegh Feizollahi

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available There are many evidences, which emphasis on the benefits of using new technologies of information and communication in international business and many believe that E-Commerce can help satisfy customer explicit and implicit requirements. Internet shopping is a concept developed after the introduction of electronic commerce. Information technology (IT and its applications, specifically in the realm of the internet and e-mail promoted the development of e-commerce in terms of advertising, motivating and information. However, with the development of new technologies, credit and financial exchange on the internet websites were constructed so to facilitate e-commerce. The proposed study sends a total of 200 questionnaires to the target group (teachers - students - professionals - managers of commercial web sites and it manages to collect 130 questionnaires for final evaluation. Cronbach's alpha test is used for measuring reliability and to evaluate the validity of measurement instruments (questionnaires, and to assure construct validity, confirmatory factor analysis is employed. In addition, in order to analyze the research questions based on the path analysis method and to determine markets selection models, a regular technique is implemented. In the present study, after examining different aspects of e-commerce, we provide a conceptual model for selecting and evaluating online marketing in Iran. These findings provide a consistent, targeted and holistic framework for the development of the Internet market in the country.

  11. OPEN NETWORK OF FORMAL CORPORATIVE KNOWLEDGE: A CONCEPTUAL MODEL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Savchenko A. P.

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Within emerging knowledge economy, the current issue is efficient use and reproduction of knowledge in socio-economic systems. One of the promising approaches to the creation of working knowledge management system is based on the open ontological knowledge network. The knowledge network is the model of the process of knowledge sharing, implemented in the virtual space, which inherits the advantages of this process and removes some of its shortcomings. Ontology is a basic component of the conceptual model of the knowledge network; it describes a system of knowledge and defines the structure of data storage in the network. The hierarchy of ontologies involves three levels: metaontology, basic and subject-specific ontology. The ontology use solves two tasks: providing a tool for semantic markup of information resources and disclosing the structure of the information storage for the user. The second task is especially important to ensure an efficient search in large data arrays. The technology of construction of open network includes a set of principles and tools for filling and updating of the domain ontology, fast semantic markup and retrieval of information resources taking into account their semantic links

  12. A Hydrological Model To Bridge The Gap Between Conceptual and Physically Based Approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lempert, M.; Ostrowski, M.; Blöschl, G.

    In the last decade it has become evident that models are needed to account for more realistic physical assumptions and for improved data availability and computational facilities. In general it seems to be a dominant objective to better account for nonlin- earity and for less uncertain parameter identification. This allows its application also to ungaged catchments. To account for these objectives and for improved computa- tional boundary conditions a new model has been developed, tested and validated at Darmstadt University of Technology. The model is a quasi non linear model, it uses GIS provided data and includes physically based (not physical) model parameters, quite readily available from digitally stored information. Surface runoff determined after physically based non linear soil moisture modelling is routed with the kinematic cascade approach according to digital elevation grid models while sub-surface flow is routed through linear conceptual modules. The model uses generally accepted param- eters for soil moisture modelling including vegetation canopy such as total porosity, field cvapacity, wilting point, hydraulic conductivities and leaf area index and canopy coverage. The model has been successfully applied to several test sites and catchments at local, micro and lower macro scales. It is the objective of the paper to - explain the background of model development - briefly explain algorithms - discuss model parameter identification - present case study results

  13. Officer Accessions Flow Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-31

    18]) General Charles Campbell noted that , although…. “the Army has a system for organizing, staffing, equipping, training, deploying, sustaining...Harrell, Charles , Ghosh, Biman K., & Bowden Jr.,Royce O. 2004. Simulation Using ProModel. Second edition. McGraw Hill, New York. [22] Klimas, J...RUNS: A Senior Leader Reference Handbook. U.S. Army War College, Carlisle, PA. [24] McNeill , Dan K. 2005 (August). Army Force Generation

  14. Field studies at the Apache Leap Research Site in support of alternative conceptual models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woodhouse, E.G.; Davidson, G.R.; Theis, C. [eds.] [and others

    1997-08-01

    This is a final technical report for a project of the U.S Nuclear Regulatory Commission (sponsored contract NRC-04-090-51) with the University of Arizona. The contract was an optional extension that was initiated on July 21, 1994 and that expired on May 31, 1995. The project manager was Thomas J. Nicholson, Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research. The objectives of this contract were to examine hypotheses and conceptual models concerning unsaturated flow and transport through fractured rock, and to design and execute confirmatory field and laboratory experiments to test these hypotheses and conceptual models at the Apache Leap Research Site near Superior, Arizona. The results discussed here are products of specific tasks that address a broad spectrum of issues related to flow and transport through fractures. Each chapter in this final report summarizes research related to a specific set of objectives and can be read and interpreted as a separate entity. The tasks include detection and characterization of historical rapid fluid flow through fractured rock and the relationship to perched water systems using environmental isotopic tracers of {sup 3}H and {sup 14}C, fluid- and rock-derived {sup 2343}U/{sup 238}U measurements, and geophysical data. The water balance in a small watershed at the ALRS demonstrates the methods of acounting for ET, and estimating the quantity of water available for infiltration through fracture networks. Grain density measurements were made for core-sized samples using a newly designed gas pycnometer. The distribution and magnitude of air permeability measurements have been measured in a three-dimensional setting; the subsequent geostatistical analysis is presented. Electronic versions of the data presented here are available from authors; more detailed discussions and analyses are available in technical publications referenced herein, or soon to appear in the professional literature.

  15. Addressing Conceptual Model Uncertainty in the Evaluation of Model Prediction Errors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrera, J.; Pool, M.

    2014-12-01

    Model predictions are uncertain because of errors in model parameters, future forcing terms, and model concepts. The latter remain the largest and most difficult to assess source of uncertainty in long term model predictions. We first review existing methods to evaluate conceptual model uncertainty. We argue that they are highly sensitive to the ingenuity of the modeler, in the sense that they rely on the modeler's ability to propose alternative model concepts. Worse, we find that the standard practice of stochastic methods leads to poor, potentially biased and often too optimistic, estimation of actual model errors. This is bad news because stochastic methods are purported to properly represent uncertainty. We contend that the problem does not lie on the stochastic approach itself, but on the way it is applied. Specifically, stochastic inversion methodologies, which demand quantitative information, tend to ignore geological understanding, which is conceptually rich. We illustrate some of these problems with the application to Mar del Plata aquifer, where extensive data are available for nearly a century. Geologically based models, where spatial variability is handled through zonation, yield calibration fits similar to geostatiscally based models, but much better predictions. In fact, the appearance of the stochastic T fields is similar to the geologically based models only in areas with high density of data. We take this finding to illustrate the ability of stochastic models to accommodate many data, but also, ironically, their inability to address conceptual model uncertainty. In fact, stochastic model realizations tend to be too close to the "most likely" one (i.e., they do not really realize the full conceptualuncertainty). The second part of the presentation is devoted to argue that acknowledging model uncertainty may lead to qualitatively different decisions than just working with "most likely" model predictions. Therefore, efforts should concentrate on

  16. Using formal concept analysis for the verification of process-data matrices in conceptual domain models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Poelmans, J.; Dedene, G.; Snoeck, M.; Viaene, S.; Fox, R.; Golubski, W.

    2010-01-01

    One of the first steps in a software engineering process is the elaboration of the conceptual domain model. In this paper, we investigate how Formal Concept Analysis can be used to formally underpin the construction of a conceptual domain model. In particular, we demonstrate that intuitive verificat

  17. The Value of Conceptual Models in Coping with Complexity and Interdisciplinarity in Environmental Sciences Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fortuin, Karen P. J.; van Koppen, C. S. A.; Leemans, Rik

    2011-01-01

    Conceptual models are useful for facing the challenges of environmental sciences curriculum and course developers and students. These challenges are inherent to the interdisciplinary and problem-oriented character of environmental sciences curricula. In this article, we review the merits of conceptual models in facing these challenges. These…

  18. Three Roles of Conceptual Models in Information System Design and Use

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wieringa, Roelf J.; Falkenberg, Eckhard D.; Lindgreen, Paul

    1989-01-01

    This paper attempts to draw together results from information systems research, linguistic theory, and methodology in order to present a unified framework in which to understand conceptual models. Three different roles of conceptual models (CM's) in the design and use of information systems (IS's)

  19. Decision Making in the Practical Domain: A Model of Practical Conceptual Change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feldman, Allan

    2000-01-01

    Considers teaching as an activity in which teachers deliberate in the practical domain to decide on actions and goals. Argues that because practical reasoning is similar to scientific reasoning, a model of practical conceptual change can be developed that is analogous to the conceptual change model. Examines two case studies of teachers using the…

  20. A note on the translation of conceptual data models into description logics: disjointness and covering assumptions

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Casini, G

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available possibilities for conceptual data modeling. It also raises the question of how existing conceptual models using ER, UML or ORM could be translated into Description Logics (DLs), a family of logics that have proved to be particularly appropriate for formalizing...

  1. The Value of Conceptual Models in Coping with Complexity and Interdisciplinarity in Environmental Sciences Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fortuin, Karen P. J.; van Koppen, C. S. A.; Leemans, Rik

    2011-01-01

    Conceptual models are useful for facing the challenges of environmental sciences curriculum and course developers and students. These challenges are inherent to the interdisciplinary and problem-oriented character of environmental sciences curricula. In this article, we review the merits of conceptual models in facing these challenges. These…

  2. A conceptual framework for shear flow-induced erosion of soft cohesive sediment beds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winterwerp, J. C.; van Kesteren, W. G. M.; van Prooijen, B.; Jacobs, W.

    2012-10-01

    This paper proposes a conceptual framework for erosion of cohesive sediment beds. We focus on cohesive beds, distinguishing between floc erosion, surface erosion, and mass erosion. By (our) definition, surface erosion is a drained soil mechanical process, whereas mass erosion occurs under undrained conditions. The eroding shear stress is modeled through a probability density function. This yields a continuous description of floc erosion and surface erosion as a function of mean bed shear stress. Furthermore, we assume a distribution for the bed strength. The mean values of the bed strength are derived from soil mechanical theory, assuming that the surface erosion rate is limited by the swelling rate from the undrained shear strength in the bed to its drained value at its surface. The rate of erosion then relates to the undrained shear strength of the soil, and its consolidation (swelling) coefficient. The critical shear stress for erosion is slightly larger than the true cohesion of the bed, i.e., the drained strength, and follows a power law relation with the plasticity index. The conceptual framework proposed herein has been validated against a limited number of experimental data, and has a series of advantages above other methods of direct measuring erodibility, as it is inexpensive and can be used to attain space-covering information on the sediment bed. Moreover, the use of bulk soil mechanical parameters accounts implicitly for the effects of organic material, though the role of, e.g., macrophytobenthos mats and/or bioturbation is difficult to capture a priori.

  3. Hydrogeologic framework, hydrology, and refined conceptual model of groundwater flow for Coastal Plain aquifers at the Standard Chlorine of Delaware, Inc. Superfund Site, New Castle County, Delaware, 2005-12

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brayton, Michael J.; Cruz, Roberto M.; Myers, Luke; Degnan, James R.; Raffensperger, Jeff P.

    2015-01-01

    From 1966 to 2002, activities at the Standard Chlorine of Delaware chemical facility in New Castle County, Delaware resulted in the contamination of groundwater, soils, and wetland sediment. In 2005, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in partnership with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Region 3, and the Delaware Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Control began a multi-year investigation of the hydrogeologic framework and hydrology of the confined aquifer system. The goals of the ongoing study at the site (the Potomac Aquifer Study) are to determine the hydraulic connection between the Columbia and Potomac aquifers, determine the direction of groundwater flow in the Potomac aquifer, and identify factors affecting the fate of contaminated groundwater. This report describes progress made towards these goals based on available data collected through September 2012.

  4. The Architectural Information Map: Semantic modeling in conceptual architectural design

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tunçer, E.B.

    2009-01-01

    This research focuses on the acquisition, representation, sharing and reuse of design information and knowledge in the conceptual phase of architectural design, and targets the creation of situated digital environments where communities of architectural practice communicate and collaborate using thi

  5. The Architectural Information Map: Semantic modeling in conceptual architectural design

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tunçer, E.B.

    2009-01-01

    This research focuses on the acquisition, representation, sharing and reuse of design information and knowledge in the conceptual phase of architectural design, and targets the creation of situated digital environments where communities of architectural practice communicate and collaborate using

  6. How Iranian women conceptualize mental health: an explanatory model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arash Mirabzadeh

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available In Iran, more than 25% of women suffer from mental disorders. Mental disorders and subclinical problems are associated with socioeconomic problem. At the community level, mental health promotion can reduce social damage. The aim of this study as a part of community based mental health promotion intervention was to explore how mental health in Iranian women is viewed.According to a qualitative method in 2012, participants were selected by purposeful sampling from married women 18 to 65 years who are residents in Tehran. Fifteen in depth individual interviews were conducted with regard to the concept of mental health, causal pathway and help-seeking behavior according to explanatory model.Mental health was perceived as the same of emotional well-being. It conceptualized not only lack of mental disorder but also sense of satisfaction and healthy functioning. According to participant's view, the causal pathway of mental health problems were classified to individual, familial and social factors. Physical and behavioral problems were related to individual factor, Lack of marital adjustment was one of the most important issues in familial item and in social factor, cultural context and socio-economic problems were extracted. In help seeking process, all of the participants believed that the religion has important effect in mental health.Marital adjustment is an important stage in process of mental health in women.

  7. Nonlinear effects in a conceptual multilayer cloud model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    U. Wacker

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available As conceptual model for a cloud a system is considered which is open for condensate mass transport and subject to internal processes such as cloud microphysical transformation and vertical condensate transport. The effects of microphysical processes are represented in parameterized form and the system is divided into two layers to account for the vertical structure. The evolution is mathematically described in terms of four coupled nonlinear ODEs; the prognostic variables are the mass concentrations of cloud water as well as precipitation condensate in each of the layers. In the absence of vertical velocity the evolution in the lower layer is triggered by the evolution in the upper layer. In the presence of an upwind, the dynamics in both layers is mutually coupled. Depending on the chosen parameter values up to four steady states are found. When varying the parameter upwind velocity, three regimes are distinguished: For week upwind the long-term evolution is steered by the external sources; for stronger upwind the cloud condensate is blown out of the cloud in the final state and does not contribute to formation of precipitation; for intermediate upwind multiple steady state solution branches arise which characterize the transition between those two regimes.

  8. Theory analysis of the Dental Hygiene Human Needs Conceptual Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacDonald, L; Bowen, D M

    2016-11-09

    Theories provide a structural knowing about concept relationships, practice intricacies, and intuitions and thus shape the distinct body of the profession. Capturing ways of knowing and being is essential to any professions' practice, education and research. This process defines the phenomenon of the profession - its existence or experience. Theory evaluation is a systematic criterion-based assessment of a specific theory. This study presents a theory analysis of the Dental Hygiene Human Needs Conceptual Model (DH HNCM). Using the Walker and Avant Theory Analysis, a seven-step process, the DH HNCM, was analysed and evaluated for its meaningfulness and contribution to dental hygiene. The steps include the following: (i) investigate the origins; (ii) examine relationships of the theory's concepts; (iii) assess the logic of the theory's structure; (iv) consider the usefulness to practice; (v) judge the generalizability; (vi) evaluate the parsimony; and (vii) appraise the testability of the theory. Human needs theory in nursing and Maslow's Hierarchy of Need Theory prompted this theory's development. The DH HNCM depicts four concepts based on the paradigm concepts of the profession: client, health/oral health, environment and dental hygiene actions, and includes validated eleven human needs that evolved overtime to eight. It is logical, simplistic, allows scientific predictions and testing, and provides a unique lens for the dental hygiene practitioner. With this model, dental hygienists have entered practice, knowing they enable clients to meet their human needs. For the DH HNCM, theory analysis affirmed that the model is reasonable and insightful and adds to the dental hygiene professions' epistemology and ontology. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Initial Conceptualization and Application of the Alaska Thermokarst Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolton, W. R.; Lara, M. J.; Genet, H.; Romanovsky, V. E.; McGuire, A. D.

    2015-12-01

    Thermokarst topography forms whenever ice-rich permafrost thaws and the ground subsides due to the volume loss when ground ice transitions to water. The Alaska Thermokarst Model (ATM) is a large-scale, state-and-transition model designed to simulate transitions between landscape units affected by thermokarst disturbance. The ATM uses a frame-based methodology to track transitions and proportion of cohorts within a 1-km2 grid cell. In the arctic tundra environment, the ATM tracks thermokarst-related transitions among wetland tundra, graminoid tundra, shrub tundra, and thermokarst lakes. In the boreal forest environment, the ATM tracks transitions among forested permafrost plateau, thermokarst lakes, collapse scar fens and bogs. The transition from one cohort to another due to thermokarst processes can take place if thaw reaches ice-rich ground layers either due to pulse disturbance (i.e. large precipitation event or fires), or due to gradual active layer deepening that eventually results in penetration of the protective layer. The protective layer buffers the ice-rich soils from the land surface and is critical to determine how susceptible an area is to thermokarst degradation. The rate of terrain transition in our model is determined by a set of rules that are based upon the ice-content of the soil, the drainage efficiency (or the ability of the landscape to store or transport water), the cumulative probability of thermokarst initiation, distance from rivers, lake dynamics (increasing, decreasing, or stable), and other factors. Tundra types are allowed to transition from one type to another (for example, wetland tundra to graminoid tundra) under favorable climatic conditions. In this study, we present our conceptualization and initial simulation results from in the arctic (the Barrow Peninsula) and boreal (the Tanana Flats) regions of Alaska.

  10. Conceptual Model As The Tool For Managing Bank Services Quality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kornelija Severović

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Quality has become basic factor of economic efficiency and basic principle of business activities of successful organizations. Its consequence is revolution on the area of quality that has comprised all kinds of products and services and so the bank services as well. To understand the present and future needs of clients and to know how to fulfill and try to exceed their expectations is the task of each efficient economy. Therefore, the banks in the developed economies try to re-orientate organizationally, technologically and informatically their business activities placing the client in the core of this business activity. Significant indicators of quality services that banks offer is measured by the waiting time of clients for the offer of the desirable service and the number of clients who give up to enter the bank due to the long waiting queues. Dissatisfied client is the worst work result and business activity of banks. Following the stated, the great effort is made to improve service qualities, which means professionalism and communication of personnel with whom the clients come in contact, and giving punctual and clear information and short waiting period of standing in the lines. The aim of this work is to present and describe the functioning of bank system under the conditions of establishing quality in offering services to clients and to recognize basic guidelines for quality increase in the work of sub branches. Since the banking is very dynamic and complex system, the conceptual model is carried out for the purpose of optimization of the stated quality parameters for the bank business activity; this model, in further research, will serve for the development of simulation model.

  11. Testing alternative conceptual models of seawater intrusion in a coastal aquifer using computer simulation, southern California, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishikawa, T.

    1997-01-01

    Two alternative conceptual models of the physical processes controlling seawater intrusion in a coastal basin in California, USA, were tested to identify a likely principal pathway for seawater intrusion. The conceptual models were tested by using a two-dimensional, finite-element groundwater flow and transport model. This pathway was identified by the conceptual model that best replicated the historical data. The numerical model was applied in cross section to a submarine canyon that is a main avenue for seawater to enter the aquifer system underlying the study area. Both models are characterized by a heterogeneous, layered, water-bearing aquifer. However, the first model is characterized by flat-lying aquifer layers and by a high value of hydraulic conductivity in the basal aquifer layer, which is thought to be a principal conduit for seawater intrusion. The second model is characterized by offshore folding, which was modeled as a very nearshore outcrop, thereby providing a shorter path for seawater to intrude. General conclusions are that: 1) the aquifer system is best modeled as a flat, heterogeneous, layered system; 2) relatively thin basal layers with relatively high values of hydraulic conductivity are the principal pathways for seawater intrusion; and 3) continuous clay layers of low hydraulic conductivity play an important role in controlling the movement of seawater.

  12. Conceptual hydrogeological model of volcanic Easter Island (Chile) after chemical and isotopic surveys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrera, Christian; Custodio, Emilio

    2008-11-01

    Most human activities and hydrogeological information on small young volcanic islands are near the coastal area. There are almost no hydrological data from inland areas, where permanent springs and/or boreholes may be rare or nonexistent. A major concern is the excessive salinity of near-the-coast wells. Obtaining a conceptual hydrogeological model is crucial for groundwater resources development and management. Surveys of water seepages and rain for chemical and environmental isotope contents may provide information on the whole island groundwater flow conditions, in spite of remaining geological and hydrogeological uncertainties. New data from Easter Island (Isla de Pascua), in the Pacific Ocean, are considered. Whether Easter Island has a central low permeability volcanic “core” sustaining an elevated water table remains unknown. Average recharge is estimated at 300-400 mm/year, with a low salinity of 15-50 mg/L Cl. There is an apron of highly permeable volcanics that extends to the coast. The salinity of near-the-coast wells, >1,000 mg/L Cl, is marine in origin. This is the result of a thick mixing zone of island groundwater and encroached seawater, locally enhanced by upconings below pumping wells. This conceptual model explains what is observed, in the absence of inland boreholes and springs.

  13. Conceptual model for regional radionuclide transport from a basalt repository site. Final draft, technical memorandum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walton, W.C.; Voorhees, M.L.; Prickett, T.A.

    1980-05-23

    This technical memorandum was prepared to: (1) describe a typical basalt radionuclide repository site, (2) describe geologic and hydrologic processes associated with regional radionuclide transport in basalts, (3) define the parameters required to model regional radionuclide transport from a basalt repository site, and (4) develop a ''conceptual model'' of radionuclide transport from a basalt repository site. In a general hydrological sense, basalts may be described as layered sequences of aquifers and aquitards. The Columbia River Basalt, centered near the semi-arid Pasco Basin, is considered by many to be typical basalt repository host rock. Detailed description of the flow system including flow velocities with high-low hydraulic conductivity sequences are not possible with existing data. However, according to theory, waste-transport routes are ultimately towards the Columbia River and the lengths of flow paths from the repository to the biosphere may be relatively short. There are many physical, chemical, thermal, and nuclear processes with associated parameters that together determine the possible pattern of radionuclide migration in basalts and surrounding formations. Brief process descriptions and associated parameter lists are provided. Emphasis has been placed on the use of the distribution coefficient in simulating ion exchange. The use of the distribution coefficient approach is limited because it takes into account only relatively fast mass transfer processes. In general, knowledge of hydrogeochemical processes is primitive.

  14. Conceptual model for regional radionuclide transport from a basalt repository site. Final draft, technical memorandum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walton, W.C.; Voorhees, M.L.; Prickett, T.A.

    1980-05-23

    This technical memorandum was prepared to: (1) describe a typical basalt radionuclide repository site, (2) describe geologic and hydrologic processes associated with regional radionuclide transport in basalts, (3) define the parameters required to model regional radionuclide transport from a basalt repository site, and (4) develop a ''conceptual model'' of radionuclide transport from a basalt repository site. In a general hydrological sense, basalts may be described as layered sequences of aquifers and aquitards. The Columbia River Basalt, centered near the semi-arid Pasco Basin, is considered by many to be typical basalt repository host rock. Detailed description of the flow system including flow velocities with high-low hydraulic conductivity sequences are not possible with existing data. However, according to theory, waste-transport routes are ultimately towards the Columbia River and the lengths of flow paths from the repository to the biosphere may be relatively short. There are many physical, chemical, thermal, and nuclear processes with associated parameters that together determine the possible pattern of radionuclide migration in basalts and surrounding formations. Brief process descriptions and associated parameter lists are provided. Emphasis has been placed on the use of the distribution coefficient in simulating ion exchange. The use of the distribution coefficient approach is limited because it takes into account only relatively fast mass transfer processes. In general, knowledge of hydrogeochemical processes is primitive.

  15. Conceptual Frameworks and Research Models on Resilience in Leadership

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janet Ledesma

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this article was to discuss conceptual frameworks and research models on resilience theory. The constructs of resilience, the history of resilience theory, models of resilience, variables of resilience, career resilience, and organizational resilience will be examined and discussed as they relate to leadership development. The literature demonstrates that there is a direct relationship between the stress of the leader’s job and his or her ability to maintain resilience in the face of prolonged contact with adversity. This article discusses resilience theory as it relates to leadership development. The concept associated with resilience, which includes thriving and hardiness, is explored with the belief that resilient leaders are invaluable to the sustainability of an organization. In addition, the constructs of resilience and the history of resilience studies in the field of psychiatry, developmental psychopathy, human development, medicine, epidemiology, and the social sciences are examined. Survival, recovery, and thriving are concepts associated with resilience and describe the stage at which a person may be during or after facing adversity. The concept of “thriving” refers to a person’s ability to go beyond his or her original level of functioning and to grow and function despite repeated exposure to stressful experiences. The literature suggests a number of variables that characterize resilience and thriving. These variables include positive self-esteem, hardiness, strong coping skills, a sense of coherence, self-efficacy, optimism, strong social resources, adaptability, risk-taking, low fear of failure, determination, perseverance, and a high tolerance of uncertainty. These are reviewed in this article. The findings in this article suggest that those who develop leaders need to create safe environments to help emerging and existing leaders thrive as individuals and as organizational leaders in the area of resilience

  16. ITE CHARACTERIZATION TO SUPPORT CONCEPTUAL MODEL DEVELOPMENT FOR SUBSURFACE RADIONUCLIDE TRANSPORT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Remediation of radionuclide contaminants in ground water often begins with the development of conceptual and analytical models that guide our understanding of the processes controlling radionuclide transport. The reliability of these models is often predicated on the collection o...

  17. A Conceptual and UML models of procurement process for simulation framework

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdessamad Douraid

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a set of conceptual and UML models that can be used to construct a simulation framework of procurement process. Whereas the good control of this process is crucial as well it composes an interesting ratio of costs along the whole chain. For this purpose, we took into account the information and the material flows of the upstream supply chain that linking the manufacturer and its suppliers. Our contribution is to make a reusable and a modular pattern of procurement process, which is able to be configured and used for several manufacturer industries. In order to benchmark the different scenarios of each configuration and to furnish a decision aids tool, for the sake of the decision makers to obtain the right choices.

  18. Analyzing runoff processes through conceptual hydrological modelling in the Upper Blue Nile basin, Ethiopia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Dessie

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Understanding runoff processes in a basin is of paramount importance for the effective planning and management of water resources, in particular in data scarce regions of the Upper Blue Nile. Hydrological models representing the underlying hydrological processes can predict river discharges from ungauged catchments and allow for an understanding of the rainfall–runoff processes in those catchments. In this paper, such a conceptual process-based hydrological model is developed and applied to the upper Gumara and Gilgel Abay catchments (both located within the Upper Blue Nile basin, the Lake Tana sub-basin to study the runoff mechanisms and rainfall–runoff processes in the basin. Topography is considered as a proxy for the variability of most of the catchment characteristics. We divided the catchments into different runoff production areas using topographic criteria. Impermeable surfaces (rock outcrops and hard soil pans, common in the Upper Blue Nile basin were considered separately in the conceptual model. Based on model results, it can be inferred that about 65% of the runoff appears in the form of interflow in the Gumara study catchment, and baseflow constitutes the larger proportion of runoff (44–48% in the Gilgel Abay catchment. Direct runoff represents a smaller fraction of the runoff in both catchments (18–19% for the Gumara, and 20% for the Gilgel Abay and most of this direct runoff is generated through infiltration excess runoff mechanism from the impermeable rocks or hard soil pans. The study reveals that the hillslopes are recharge areas (sources of interflow and deep percolation and direct runoff as saturated excess flow prevails from the flat slope areas. Overall, the model study suggests that identifying the catchments into different runoff production areas based on topography and including the impermeable rocky areas separately in the modeling process mimics well the rainfall–runoff process in the Upper Blue Nile basin

  19. A Scoping Review: Conceptualizations and Pedagogical Models of Learning in Nursing Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poikela, Paula; Teräs, Marianne

    2015-01-01

    Simulations have been implemented globally in nursing education for years with diverse conceptual foundations. The aim of this scoping review is to examine the literature regarding the conceptualizations of learning and pedagogical models in nursing simulations. A scoping review of peer-reviewed articles published between 2000 and 2013 was…

  20. Applying a Cognitive-Affective Model of Conceptual Change to Professional Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebert, Ellen K.; Crippen, Kent J.

    2010-01-01

    This study evaluated Gregoire's (2003) Cognitive-Affective Conceptual Change model (CAMCC) for predicting and assessing conceptual change in science teachers engaged in a long-term professional development project set in a large school district in the southwestern United States. A multiple case study method with data from three teacher…

  1. Implementing Clickers to Assist Learning in Science Lectures: The Clicker-Assisted Conceptual Change Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yi-Chun; Liu, Tzu-Chien; Chu, Ching-Chi

    2011-01-01

    The purposes of this study were twofold. The first aim was to design and develop a clicker-based instructional model known as "Clicker-Assisted Conceptual Change" (CACC), based on the cognitive conflict approach for conceptual change, to help students to learn scientific concepts. The second aim was to determine the beneficial effects of…

  2. Regionalized rainfall-runoff model to estimate low flow indices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Florine; Folton, Nathalie; Oudin, Ludovic

    2016-04-01

    Estimating low flow indices is of paramount importance to manage water resources and risk assessments. These indices are derived from river discharges which are measured at gauged stations. However, the lack of observations at ungauged sites bring the necessity of developing methods to estimate these low flow indices from observed discharges in neighboring catchments and from catchment characteristics. Different estimation methods exist. Regression or geostatistical methods performed on the low flow indices are the most common types of methods. Another less common method consists in regionalizing rainfall-runoff model parameters, from catchment characteristics or by spatial proximity, to estimate low flow indices from simulated hydrographs. Irstea developed GR2M-LoiEau, a conceptual monthly rainfall-runoff model, combined with a regionalized model of snow storage and melt. GR2M-LoiEau relies on only two parameters, which are regionalized and mapped throughout France. This model allows to cartography monthly reference low flow indices. The inputs data come from SAFRAN, the distributed mesoscale atmospheric analysis system, which provides daily solid and liquid precipitation and temperature data from everywhere in the French territory. To exploit fully these data and to estimate daily low flow indices, a new version of GR-LoiEau has been developed at a daily time step. The aim of this work is to develop and regionalize a GR-LoiEau model that can provide any daily, monthly or annual estimations of low flow indices, yet keeping only a few parameters, which is a major advantage to regionalize them. This work includes two parts. On the one hand, a daily conceptual rainfall-runoff model is developed with only three parameters in order to simulate daily and monthly low flow indices, mean annual runoff and seasonality. On the other hand, different regionalization methods, based on spatial proximity and similarity, are tested to estimate the model parameters and to simulate

  3. Distributed hydrological models: comparison between TOPKAPI, a physically based model and TETIS, a conceptually based model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortiz, E.; Guna, V.

    2009-04-01

    The present work aims to carry out a comparison between two distributed hydrological models, the TOPKAPI (Ciarapica and Todini, 1998; Todini and Ciarapica, 2001) and TETIS (Vélez, J. J.; Vélez J. I. and Francés, F, 2002) models, obtaining the hydrological solution computed on the basis of the same storm events. The first model is physically based and the second one is conceptually based. The analysis was performed on the 21,4 km2 Goodwin Creek watershed, located in Panola County, Mississippi. This watershed extensively monitored by the Agricultural Research Service (ARS) National Sediment Laboratory (NSL) has been chosen because it offers a complete database compiling precipitation (16 rain gauges), runoff (6 discharge stations) and GIS data. Three storm events were chosen to evaluate the performance of the two models: the first one was chosen to calibrate the models, and the other two to validate them. Both models performed a satisfactory hydrological response both in calibration and validation events. While for the TOPKAPI model it wasn't a real calibration, due to its really good performance with parameters modal values derived of watershed characteristics, for the TETIS model it has been necessary to perform a previous automatic calibration. This calibration was carried out using the data provided by the observed hydrograph, in order to adjust the modeĺs 9 correction factors. Keywords: TETIS, TOPKAPI, distributed models, hydrological response, ungauged basins.

  4. Assessing the relative importance of parameter and forcing uncertainty and their interactions in conceptual hydrological model simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mockler, E. M.; Chun, K. P.; Sapriza-Azuri, G.; Bruen, M.; Wheater, H. S.

    2016-11-01

    Predictions of river flow dynamics provide vital information for many aspects of water management including water resource planning, climate adaptation, and flood and drought assessments. Many of the subjective choices that modellers make including model and criteria selection can have a significant impact on the magnitude and distribution of the output uncertainty. Hydrological modellers are tasked with understanding and minimising the uncertainty surrounding streamflow predictions before communicating the overall uncertainty to decision makers. Parameter uncertainty in conceptual rainfall-runoff models has been widely investigated, and model structural uncertainty and forcing data have been receiving increasing attention. This study aimed to assess uncertainties in streamflow predictions due to forcing data and the identification of behavioural parameter sets in 31 Irish catchments. By combining stochastic rainfall ensembles and multiple parameter sets for three conceptual rainfall-runoff models, an analysis of variance model was used to decompose the total uncertainty in streamflow simulations into contributions from (i) forcing data, (ii) identification of model parameters and (iii) interactions between the two. The analysis illustrates that, for our subjective choices, hydrological model selection had a greater contribution to overall uncertainty, while performance criteria selection influenced the relative intra-annual uncertainties in streamflow predictions. Uncertainties in streamflow predictions due to the method of determining parameters were relatively lower for wetter catchments, and more evenly distributed throughout the year when the Nash-Sutcliffe Efficiency of logarithmic values of flow (lnNSE) was the evaluation criterion.

  5. MARKET ENTRY STRATEGIES TO EMERGING MARKETS: A CONCEPTUAL MODEL OF TURNKEY PROJECT DEVELOPMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bistra Vassileva

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The main purpose of the paper is to analyse the international market entry strategies in the light of globalisation processes and to propose a conceptual model of turnkey projects as market entry mode. The specific research objectives are as follows: 1. to develop an integrated framework of the turnkey marketing process as a conceptual model; 2. to analyse BRICS countries as potential host countries for turnkey projects implementation; 3. to assess potential implications of proposed conceptual model for global market entry decisions.

  6. Conceptual Models of the Individual Public Service Provider

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Lotte Bøgh; Bhatti, Yosef; Petersen, Ole Helby

    Individual public service providers’ motivation can be conceptualized as either extrinsic, autonomous or prosocial, and the question is how we can best theoretically understand this complexity without losing too much coherence and parsimony. Drawing on Allison’s approach (1969), three perspectives...

  7. Collective (Team) Learning Process Models: A Conceptual Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knapp, Randall

    2010-01-01

    Teams have become a key resource for learning and accomplishing work in organizations. The development of collective learning in specific contexts is not well understood, yet has become critical to organizational success. The purpose of this conceptual review is to inform human resource development (HRD) practice about specific team behaviors and…

  8. Introducing a New Lexicographical Model: AlphaConceptual+ (and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In Section 5 a case for language-independent alpha- conceptual+ ... speakers of Luganda (Lewis et al. ... speech recognition (ASR), being able to spell remains a requirement to access ... In an electronic product there is also room for more and ... "Ask anybody for a definition of the word dictionary and the term alphabet.

  9. Using Multilevel Modeling in Language Assessment Research: A Conceptual Introduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barkaoui, Khaled

    2013-01-01

    This article critiques traditional single-level statistical approaches (e.g., multiple regression analysis) to examining relationships between language test scores and variables in the assessment setting. It highlights the conceptual, methodological, and statistical problems associated with these techniques in dealing with multilevel or nested…

  10. The Levels of Conceptual Interoperability Model: Applying Systems Engineering Principles to M&S

    CERN Document Server

    WANG, Wenguang; WANG, Weiping

    2009-01-01

    This paper describes the use of the Levels of Conceptual Interoperability Model (LCIM) as a framework for conceptual modeling and its descriptive and prescriptive uses. LCIM is applied to show its potential and shortcomings in the current simulation interoperability approaches, in particular the High Level Architecture (HLA) and Base Object Models (BOM). It emphasizes the need to apply rigorous engineering methods and principles and replace ad-hoc approaches.

  11. Conceptual Model for Radionuclide Release from the Engineered Barrier Systems (EBS) at Yucca Mountain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamdan, L. K.; Walton, J.; Woocay, A.

    2008-12-01

    Over time, nuclear waste packages at Yucca Mountain repository are likely to fail gradually or in stages, due to general or localized corrosion. Rock fall and other physical (or chemical) disturbances will lead to different general corrosion rates and different times of penetration. In the long run, the waste package is likely to evolve into a combination of failure locations mixed with relicts of intact Alloy-22 (or other waste package materials). Release of radionuclides (mostly by dissolution in water) from the waste packages is one of the most important factors determining the performance of the proposed Yucca Mountain repository. In this paper we develop a conceptual model of radionuclide release from the EBS. In this system, residual heat release in the waste, in conjunction with the capillary effect, is anticipated to set up flow systems in the relict protected areas, where liquid water flows into the protected area toward the warmest region, and vapor flows outward away from the warmest region - effectively preventing release and sometimes sequestering radionuclides in the relict sheltered areas (dead ends). We derive a dimensionless group that specifies the condition for the internal heat driven flow system, and estimates the minimum size of the covered areas required to sequester radionuclides and prevent release. Over time, the minimum area required for protection slowly increases while general corrosion decreases the average size of relict areas. Convolution of the two processes suggests that radionuclide release from the flow-through system of partially failed waste packages will be gradual and long delayed (100,000 - 1,000,000 years), even in the case of early penetration by localized corrosion.

  12. Stochastic modeling of a lava-flow aquifer system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cronkite-Ratcliff, Collin; Phelps, Geoffrey A.

    2014-01-01

    This report describes preliminary three-dimensional geostatistical modeling of a lava-flow aquifer system using a multiple-point geostatistical model. The purpose of this study is to provide a proof-of-concept for this modeling approach. An example of the method is demonstrated using a subset of borehole geologic data and aquifer test data from a portion of the Calico Hills Formation, a lava-flow aquifer system that partially underlies Pahute Mesa, Nevada. Groundwater movement in this aquifer system is assumed to be controlled by the spatial distribution of two geologic units—rhyolite lava flows and zeolitized tuffs. The configuration of subsurface lava flows and tuffs is largely unknown because of limited data. The spatial configuration of the lava flows and tuffs is modeled by using a multiple-point geostatistical simulation algorithm that generates a large number of alternative realizations, each honoring the available geologic data and drawn from a geologic conceptual model of the lava-flow aquifer system as represented by a training image. In order to demonstrate how results from the geostatistical model could be analyzed in terms of available hydrologic data, a numerical simulation of part of an aquifer test was applied to the realizations of the geostatistical model.

  13. Online traffic flow model applying dynamic flow-density relation

    CERN Document Server

    Kim, Y

    2002-01-01

    This dissertation describes a new approach of the online traffic flow modelling based on the hydrodynamic traffic flow model and an online process to adapt the flow-density relation dynamically. The new modelling approach was tested based on the real traffic situations in various homogeneous motorway sections and a motorway section with ramps and gave encouraging simulation results. This work is composed of two parts: first the analysis of traffic flow characteristics and second the development of a new online traffic flow model applying these characteristics. For homogeneous motorway sections traffic flow is classified into six different traffic states with different characteristics. Delimitation criteria were developed to separate these states. The hysteresis phenomena were analysed during the transitions between these traffic states. The traffic states and the transitions are represented on a states diagram with the flow axis and the density axis. For motorway sections with ramps the complicated traffic fl...

  14. Experimental Evidence of the Superiority of the Prevalence Model of Conceptual Change over the Classical Models and Repetition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potvin, Patrice; Sauriol, Érik; Riopel, Martin

    2015-01-01

    This quasi-experimental study investigated the effects on 558 grades five and six students of three different teaching conditions: the "classical" model of conceptual change (for which cognitive conflict is considered as a precondition to the transformation of knowledge), the "prevalence" model of conceptual change (in which…

  15. Conceptual geologic model and native state model of the Roosevelt Hot Springs hydrothermal system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Faulder, D.D.

    1991-01-01

    A conceptual geologic model of the Roosevelt Hot Springs hydrothermal system was developed by a review of the available literature. The hydrothermal system consists of a meteoric recharge area in the Mineral Mountains, fluid circulation paths to depth, a heat source, and an outflow plume. A conceptual model based on the available data can be simulated in the native state using parameters that fall within observed ranges. The model temperatures, recharge rates, and fluid travel times are sensitive to the permeability in the Mineral Mountains. The simulation results suggests the presence of a magma chamber at depth as the likely heat source. A two-dimensional study of the hydrothermal system can be used to establish boundary conditions for further study of the geothermal reservoir. 33 refs., 9 figs.

  16. Development of conceptual groundwater flow model for Pali Area ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    use

    be accelerated due to climate change (Mall et al., 2006). Groundwater ... experiencing groundwater pollution problem due to rapid industrialization ... LITERATURE REVIEW ... the impact of a proposed action on existing conditions of ..... Water Air. Soil Pollut., 128: 369-389. Gurunadha Rao VVS, Thangarajan M (1999).

  17. CONCEPTUAL MODEL OF MARKETING STRATEGIC PLANNING SPECIFIC TO PUBLIC ORGANIZATIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ionescu Florin Tudor

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available In public services, the political component of the marketing environment has a major importance, as all decisions adopted within central administration influence both the objectives and measures implemented by units of local government and other public service providers. Any discontinuity in the activity of such entities might result in neglecting the real needs of citizens and slowing the reform process in the public sector. Therefore, all initiatives of public organizations must have a unitary goal and integrate harmoniously within a single process. A tool from the management-marketing literature that both contributes to this purpose and leads to an increased customer satisfaction and organizational performance is strategic marketing planning. This paper presents, firstly, requirements and particularities of this process in the public sector, focusing on the need for bottom-up planning, meaning from the functional levels of public service organizations, to the corporate level, where strategic decisions are taken. To achieve this goal, there should be included in the planning process the clients and other audiences, which can provide useful information about the services they want, the quality or the accessibility thereof, and news about the services they need in the future. There are also mentioned the factors that can influence the quality of strategic marketing planning in public services domain: the importance of marketing within the organization, marketing knowledge of employees in marketing departments and/or of management personnel, the efficiency of activities within the organization, and the manager’s marketing vision. In the final part of the paper there are presented the stages of the conceptual model of strategic marketing planning in public services field: (1 accepting the idea of bottom-up planning, (2 avoid or eliminate discrepancies between measures taken at high levels and executions carried out at operational

  18. Turbulence-resolving, two-phase flow simulations of wave-supported gravity flows: A conceptual study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozdemir, Celalettin Emre

    2016-12-01

    Discoveries over the last three decades have shown that wave-supported gravity flows (WSGFs) are among the participating physical processes that carry substantial amount of fine sediments across low-gradient shelves. Therefore, understanding the full range of mechanisms responsible for such gravity flows is likely to shed light on the dynamics of subaqueous delta and clinoform development. As wave-induced boundary layer turbulence is the major agent to suspend sediments in WSGFs, the scale of WSGFs in the water column is also bounded by the wave-induced boundary layer thickness which is on the order of decimeters. Therefore, in order to explore the details of participating physical mechanisms, especially that due to turbulence-sediment interaction, highly resolved and accurate numerical models or measurements in the laboratory and the field are required. In this study, the dynamics of WSGFs is investigated by using turbulence-resolving, two-phase flow simulations that utilize Direct Numerical Simulations (DNS). The effect of variable sediment loading, slope, and wave orbital velocity is investigated via 21 simulations.

  19. A conceptual model of channel choice : measuring online and offline shopping value perceptions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Broekhuizen, Thijs L.J.; Jager, Wander

    2004-01-01

    This study tries to understand how consumers evaluate channels for their purchasing. Specifically, it develops a conceptual model that addresses consumer value perceptions of using the Internet versus the traditional (physical) channel. Previous research showed that perceptions of price, product

  20. A Conceptual Model of Relationships among Constructivist Learning Environment Perceptions, Epistemological Beliefs, and Learning Approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozkal, Kudret; Tekkaya, Ceren; Cakiroglu, Jale; Sungur, Semra

    2009-01-01

    This study proposed a conceptual model of relationships among constructivist learning environment perception variables (Personal Relevance, Uncertainty, Critical Voice, Shared Control, and Student Negotiation), scientific epistemological belief variables (fixed and tentative), and learning approach. It was proposed that learning environment…

  1. The 8 Learning Events Model: a Pedagogic Conceptual Tool Supporting Diversification of Learning Methods

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verpoorten, Dominique; Poumay, M; Leclercq, D

    2006-01-01

    Please, cite this publication as: Verpoorten, D., Poumay, M., & Leclercq, D. (2006). The 8 Learning Events Model: a Pedagogic Conceptual Tool Supporting Diversification of Learning Methods. Proceedings of International Workshop in Learning Networks for Lifelong Competence Development, TENCompetence

  2. Environmental Cleanup Best Management Practices: Effective Use of the Project Life Cycle Conceptual Site Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    This fact sheet is the first in a series of documents that address conceptual site models (CSMs). This fact sheet summarizes how environmental practitioners can use CSMs to achieve, communicate, and maintain stakeholder consensus.

  3. Stochastic models for turbulent reacting flows

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kerstein, A. [Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA (United States)

    1993-12-01

    The goal of this program is to develop and apply stochastic models of various processes occurring within turbulent reacting flows in order to identify the fundamental mechanisms governing these flows, to support experimental studies of these flows, and to further the development of comprehensive turbulent reacting flow models.

  4. A CONCEPTUAL TRAJECTORY MULTIDIMENSIONAL MODEL: AN APPLICATION TO PUBLIC TRANSPORTATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    FRANCISCO MORENO

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Actualmente, gracias a tecnologías como los sistemas de posicionamiento global y dispositivos móviles provistos de sensores, se puede recopilar una gran cantidad de datos sobre objetos móviles, e.g., datos relacionados con la trayectoria seguida por estos objetos. Por otra parte, las Bodegas de Datos (BDs, usualmente modeladas mediante una vista multidimensional de los datos, son bases de datos especializadas para ayudar en la toma de decisiones. Desafortunadamente, las BDs convencionales ofrecen poco soporte para la gestión de trayectorias. Aunque existen algunas propuestas que tratan con BDs de trayectorias, ninguna de ellas se enfoca en su modelamiento conceptual multidimensional. En este artículo se extiende un modelo conceptual multidimensional espacial donde se incorporan las trayectorias como conceptos de primera clase. Con el fi n de mostrar la conveniencia de la propuesta, se presenta un ejemplo relacionado con transporte público.

  5. Constraining performance assessment models with tracer test results: a comparison between two conceptual models

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKenna, Sean A.; Selroos, Jan-Olof

    Tracer tests are conducted to ascertain solute transport parameters of a single rock feature over a 5-m transport pathway. Two different conceptualizations of double-porosity solute transport provide estimates of the tracer breakthrough curves. One of the conceptualizations (single-rate) employs a single effective diffusion coefficient in a matrix with infinite penetration depth. However, the tracer retention between different flow paths can vary as the ratio of flow-wetted surface to flow rate differs between the path lines. The other conceptualization (multirate) employs a continuous distribution of multiple diffusion rate coefficients in a matrix with variable, yet finite, capacity. Application of these two models with the parameters estimated on the tracer test breakthrough curves produces transport results that differ by orders of magnitude in peak concentration and time to peak concentration at the performance assessment (PA) time and length scales (100,000 years and 1,000 m). These differences are examined by calculating the time limits for the diffusive capacity to act as an infinite medium. These limits are compared across both conceptual models and also against characteristic times for diffusion at both the tracer test and PA scales. Additionally, the differences between the models are examined by re-estimating parameters for the multirate model from the traditional double-porosity model results at the PA scale. Results indicate that for each model the amount of the diffusive capacity that acts as an infinite medium over the specified time scale explains the differences between the model results and that tracer tests alone cannot provide reliable estimates of transport parameters for the PA scale. Results of Monte Carlo runs of the transport models with varying travel times and path lengths show consistent results between models and suggest that the variation in flow-wetted surface to flow rate along path lines is insignificant relative to variability in

  6. From the Conceptual Change Model to the Productive Ecological Koinos Model: Learning that transcends

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gelpi-Rodriguez, Phaedra

    This investigation presents the analysis of a model of teaching science called the Conceptual Change Model. This model stimulates students to identify their own and alternate science concepts, and to confront these concepts with dynamic situations that will incite a conceptual change and promote their ability to master and understand the conceptual systems that serve as foundations for scientific knowledge. During a previous research made by this investigator on the Conceptual Change Model, a proposal for a new teaching model came up which she called the Productive Ecological Koinos Model. This model incorporates, among other things, the teacher's reflection and inner thoughts about the concepts taught and the learning experiences achieved in concurrence with students. Using action research, an exploration and analysis was done that focused upon how students and teachers modified their perspective of science while testing the Productive Ecological Koinos Model during the teaching-learning processes that took place in a microbiology course. The action research design allows the researcher to analyze these points from the experiential perspective, while also allowing the researcher to participate in the study. The study employed qualitative research techniques such as reflective diaries, personal profiles of participants, document analysis, audio tape recordings and transcriptions. All of these techniques are accepted within action research (Elliot, 1991). The Wolcott Model was the data analysis method used in the research. The description, analysis and interpretation carried out allowed for the examination of the various components of the Productive Ecological Koinos Model with students and teachers as to the scientific terms virus and contagion, and their experiences during the learning process within and outside the classroom. From the analysis of the Model a modification cropped up which places emphasis on conscious introspection on the learning process. This new

  7. Development of a hydrogeological conceptual wetland model in the data-scarce north-eastern region of Kilombero Valley, Tanzania

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burghof, Sonja; Gabiri, Geofrey; Stumpp, Christine; Chesnaux, Romain; Reichert, Barbara

    2017-08-01

    Understanding groundwater/surface-water interactions in wetlands is crucial because wetlands provide not only a high potential for agricultural production, but also sensitive and valuable ecosystems. This is especially true for the Kilombero floodplain wetland in Tanzania, which represents a data-scarce region in terms of hydrological and hydrogeological data. A comprehensive approach combining hydrogeological with tracer-based assessments was conducted, in order to develop a conceptual hydrogeological wetland model of the area around the city of Ifakara in the north-eastern region of Kilombero catchment. Within the study site, a heterogeneous porous aquifer, with a range of hydraulic conductivities, is underlain by a fractured-rock aquifer. Groundwater chemistry is mainly influenced by silicate weathering and depends on groundwater residence times related to the hydraulic conductivities of the porous aquifer. Groundwater flows from the hillside to the river during most of the year. While floodwater close to the river is mainly derived from overbank flow of the river, floodwater at a greater distance from the river mainly originates from precipitation and groundwater discharge. Evaporation effects in floodwater increase with increasing distance from the river. In general, the contribution of flood and stream water to groundwater recharge is negligible. In terms of an intensification of agricultural activities in the wetland, several conclusions can be drawn from the conceptual model. Results of this study are valuable as a base for further research related to groundwater/surface-water interactions and the conceptual model can be used in the future to set up numerical flow and transport models.

  8. The microchannel flow model under shear stress and higher frequencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Kevin J

    2017-02-24

    The microchannel flow model provides a framework for considering the effect of the vascular bed on the time domain and frequency domain response of soft tissues. The derivation originates with a single small fluid filled vessel in an elastic medium under uniaxial compression. A fractal branching vasculature is also assumed to be present in the tissue under consideration. This short technical note considers two closely related issues. First, the response of the element under compression or shear as a function of the orientation of the fluid-filled vessel is considered. Second, the transition from quasistatic (Poiseuille's Law) to dynamic (Womersley equations) fluid flow is examined to better predict the evolution of behavior at higher frequencies. These considerations expand the conceptual framework of the microchannel flow model, particularly the range and limits of validity.

  9. The microchannel flow model under shear stress and higher frequencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, K. J.

    2017-04-01

    The microchannel flow model provides a framework for considering the effect of the vascular bed on the time domain and frequency domain response of soft tissues. The derivation originates with a single small fluid-filled vessel in an elastic medium under uniaxial compression. A fractal branching vasculature is also assumed to be present in the tissue under consideration. This note considers two closely related issues. First, the response of the element under compression or shear as a function of the orientation of the fluid-filled vessel is considered. Second, the transition from quasistatic (Poiseuille’s Law) to dynamic (Womersley equations) fluid flow is examined to better predict the evolution of behavior at higher frequencies. These considerations expand the conceptual framework of the microchannel flow model, particularly the range and limits of validity.

  10. ASSETS MANAGEMENT - A CONCEPTUAL MODEL DECOMPOSING VALUE FOR THE CUSTOMER AND A QUANTITATIVE MODEL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susana Nicola

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we describe de application of a modeling framework, the so-called Conceptual Model Decomposing Value for the Customer (CMDVC, in a Footwear Industry case study, to ascertain the usefulness of this approach. The value networks were used to identify the participants, both tangible and intangible deliverables/endogenous and exogenous assets, and the analysis of their interactions as the indication for an adequate value proposition. The quantitative model of benefits and sacrifices, using the Fuzzy AHP method, enables the discussion of how the CMDVC can be applied and used in the enterprise environment and provided new relevant relations between perceived benefits (PBs.

  11. Organizational intellectual capital and the role of the nurse manager: A proposed conceptual model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, Jason H; Von Ah, Diane; Broome, Marion E

    2017-04-19

    Nurse managers must leverage both the human capital and social capital of the teams they lead in order to produce quality outcomes. Little is known about the relationship between human capital and social capital and how these concepts may work together to produce organizational outcomes through leadership of nurses. The purpose of this article was to explore the concepts of human capital and social capital as they relate to nursing leadership in health care organizations. Specific aims included (a) to synthesize the literature related to human capital and social capital in leadership, (b) to refine the conceptual definitions of human capital and social capital with associated conceptual antecedents and consequences, and (c) to propose a synthesized conceptual model guiding further empirical research of social capital and human capital in nursing leadership. A systematic integrative review of leadership literature using criteria informed by Whittemore and Knafl (2005) was completed. CINAHL Plus with Full Text, Academic Search Premier, Business Source Premier, Health Business FullTEXT, MEDLINE, and PsychINFO databases were searched for the years 1995 to 2016 using terms "human capital," "social capital," and "management." Analysis of conceptual definitions, theoretical and conceptual models, antecedents and consequences, propositions or hypotheses, and empirical support for 37 articles fitting review criteria resulted in the synthesis of the proposed Gilbert Conceptual Model of Organizational Intellectual Capital. The Gilbert Conceptual Model of Organizational Intellectual Capital advances the propositions of human capital theory and social capital theory and is the first model to conceptualize the direct and moderating effects that nurse leaders have on the human capital and social capital of the teams they lead. This model provides a framework for further empirical study and may have implications for practice, organizational policy, and education related to nursing

  12. A Conceptual Model for Analysing Management Development in the UK Hospitality Industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Sandra

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents a conceptual, contingent model of management development. It explains the nature of the UK hospitality industry and its potential influence on MD practices, prior to exploring dimensions and relationships in the model. The embryonic model is presented as a model that can enhance our understanding of the complexities of the…

  13. National Identity: Conceptual models, discourses and political change

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harder, Peter

    2014-01-01

    in Harder (2010), however, both the analytic stance of critical discourse analysis (based on the hermeneutics of suspicion), and the cognitivist stance of Lakoff (2008) are too narrow: The understanding of political language requires a wider framework of social cognitive linguistics. Essential features......Cognitive Linguistics has demonstrated the applicability of a conceptual approach to the understanding of political issues, cf. Lakoff (2008) and many others. From a different perspective, critical discourse analysis has approached political concepts with a focus on issues involving potentially...

  14. Development of numerical Grids for UZ Flow and Transport Modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    P. Dobson

    2004-08-31

    This report describes the methods used to develop numerical grids of the unsaturated hydrogeologic system beneath Yucca Mountain, Nevada. Numerical grid generation is an integral part of the development of the unsaturated zone (UZ) flow and transport model, a complex, three-dimensional (3-D) model of Yucca Mountain. This revision contains changes made to improve the clarity of the description of grid generation. The numerical grids, developed using current geologic, hydrogeologic, and mineralogic data, provide the necessary framework to: (1) develop calibrated hydrogeologic property sets and flow fields, (2) test conceptual hypotheses of flow and transport, and (3) predict flow and transport behavior under a variety of climatic and thermal-loading conditions. The technical scope, content, and management for the current revision of this report are described in the planning document ''Technical Work Plan for: Unsaturated Zone Flow Analysis and Model Report Integration'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169654], Section 2). Grids generated and documented in this report supersede those documented in Revision 00 of this report, ''Development of Numerical Grids for UZ Flow and Transport Modeling'' (BSC 2001 [DIRS 159356]). The grids presented in this report are the same as those developed in Revision 01 (BSC 2003 [DIRS 160109]); however, the documentation of the development of the grids in Revision 02 has been updated to address technical inconsistencies and achieve greater transparency, readability, and traceability. The constraints, assumptions, and limitations associated with this report are discussed in the appropriate sections that follow.

  15. A CONCEPTUAL MODEL TO UNDERSTAND THE EFFECTS OF PERCEPTION ON THE CONTINUANCE INTENTION IN FACEBOOK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shih-Chih Chen

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Recently, the social networking applications expand rapidly and attract a lot of users in a short time period. This study attempts to develop a conceptual model to understand the continuance intention in the context of social networking. The conceptual model integrates the post-acceptance model of information system continuance with perceived ease-of-use and perceived usefulness proposed by Bhattacherjee (2001a and Davis (1989, respectively. In the proposed model, continuance intention is influenced by the relationship quality and information system quality. Additionally, nine propositions are developed based the proposed model and literature review. Finally, conclusions, managerial implications, and future direction of research are also provided.

  16. The nocturnal low-level jet in theWest African Sahel from observations, analyses, and conceptual models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bessardon, Geoffrey; Brooks, Barbara; Marsham, John; Ross, Andrew

    2017-04-01

    There is a strong diurnal cycle in the West African monsoon (WAM) and the nocturnal low-level jet (NLLJ) is a key component of the nocturnal monsoon flow, transporting heat, moisture, and aerosols. Shear beneath the NLLJ has been linked to cloud formation and daytime mixing of NLLJ momentum to the surface is a key process for dust uplift. This study presents a comparison between observations from the WestnAfrican Sahel, reanalyses and two conceptual models of the NLLJ inertial oscillation. Past studies have identified inertial oscillations as the main cause of NLLJs at midlatitudes, but this study provides a novel quantitative test of conceptual models for the NLLJ at a monsoonal latitude. A comparison of 18 cases observed during the African Monsoon Multidisciplinary Analysis (AMMA) shows that an inertial oscillation is the main mechanism behind the NLLJ in the summertime Sahel. The inclusion of friction is essential for a realistic jet evolution. A simple conceptual model with friction captures the NLLJ strength, but gives too rapid rotation, likely due to the assumption of a constant equilibrium wind, when there are significant changes in geostrophic wind overnight. Reanalyses give a realistic rotation rate, but too weak NLLJ, with too strong winds at low-levels, due to too much mixing. This leads to substantial biases in reanalysed moisture transport.

  17. A new conceptual model for damage zone evolution with fault growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Joussineau, G.; Aydin, A.

    2006-12-01

    Faults may either impede or enhance fluid flow in the subsurface, which is relevant to a number of economic issues (hydrocarbon migration and entrapment, formation and distribution of mineral deposits) and environmental problems (movement of contaminants). Fault zones typically comprise a low-permeability core made up of intensely deformed fault rock and a high-permeability damage zone defined by fault-related fractures. The geometry, petrophysical properties and continuity of both the fault core and the damage zone have an important influence on the mechanical properties of the fault systems and on subsurface fluid flow. Information about fault components from remote seismic methods is limited and is available only for large faults (slip larger than 20-100m). It is therefore essential to characterize faults and associated damage zones in field analogues, and to develop conceptual models of how faults and related structures form and evolve. Here we present such an attempt to better understand the evolution of fault damage zones in the Jurassic Aztec Sandstone of the Valley of Fire State Park (SE Nevada). We document the formation and evolution of the damage zone associated with strike-slip faults through detailed field studies of faults of increasing slip magnitudes. The faults initiate as sheared joints with discontinuous pockets of damage zone located at fault tips and fault surface irregularities. With increasing slip (slip >5m), the damage zone becomes longer and wider by progressive fracture infilling, and is organized into two distinct components with different geometrical and statistical characteristics. The first component of the damage zone is the inner damage zone, directly flanking the fault core, with a relatively high fracture frequency and a thickness that scales with the amount of fault slip. Parts of this inner zone are integrated into the fault core by the development of the fault rock, contributing to the core's progressive widening. The second

  18. CHOReOS perspective on the Future Internet and initial conceptual model (D1.2)

    OpenAIRE

    Autili, Marco; Di Ruscio, Davide; Salle, Amleto Di; Georgantas, Nikolaos; Hachem, Sara; Issamy, Valérie; Parathyras, Athanasios; Trimintzios, Lefteris; Silingas, Darius; Lockerbie, James; Maiden, Neil; Ben Hamida, Amira; Bertolino, Antonia; De Angelis, Guglielmo; Polini, Andrea

    2011-01-01

    The D1.2 deliverable outlines the CHOReOS perspective on the Future Internet and its conceptualization. In particular, the deliverable focuses on: - Definition of the Future Internet and related Future Internet of Services and (Smart) Things, as considered within CHOReOS, further stressing the many dimensions underpinning the Ultra-Large Scale of the Future Internet; - Definition of the initial conceptual model of the CHOReOS Service-Oriented Architecture (SOA) for the Future Internet, identi...

  19. Hybrid models for hydrological forecasting: integration of data-driven and conceptual modelling techniques

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Corzo Perez, G.A.

    2009-01-01

    This book presents the investigation of different architectures of integrating hydrological knowledge and models with data-driven models for the purpose of hydrological flow forecasting. The models resulting from such integration are referred to as hybrid models. The book addresses the following top

  20. Hybrid models for hydrological forecasting: Integration of data-driven and conceptual modelling techniques

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Corzo Perez, G.A.

    2009-01-01

    This book presents the investigation of different architectures of integrating hydrological knowledge and models with data-driven models for the purpose of hydrological flow forecasting. The models resulting from such integration are referred to as hybrid models. The book addresses the following top

  1. Hybrid models for hydrological forecasting: integration of data-driven and conceptual modelling techniques

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Corzo Perez, G.A.

    2009-01-01

    This book presents the investigation of different architectures of integrating hydrological knowledge and models with data-driven models for the purpose of hydrological flow forecasting. The models resulting from such integration are referred to as hybrid models. The book addresses the following

  2. Hybrid models for hydrological forecasting: Integration of data-driven and conceptual modelling techniques

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Corzo Perez, G.A.

    2009-01-01

    This book presents the investigation of different architectures of integrating hydrological knowledge and models with data-driven models for the purpose of hydrological flow forecasting. The models resulting from such integration are referred to as hybrid models. The book addresses the following

  3. Computational modelling of SCC flow

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Geiker, Mette Rica; Thrane, Lars Nyholm; Szabo, Peter

    2005-01-01

    To benefit from the full potential of self-compacting concrete (SCC) prediction tools are needed for the form filling of SCC. Such tools should take into account the properties of the concrete, the shape and size of the structural element, the position of rebars, and the casting technique. Exampl...... of computational models for the time dependent flow behavior are given, and advantages and disadvantages of discrete particle and single fluid models are briefly described.......To benefit from the full potential of self-compacting concrete (SCC) prediction tools are needed for the form filling of SCC. Such tools should take into account the properties of the concrete, the shape and size of the structural element, the position of rebars, and the casting technique. Examples...

  4. Combining Different Conceptual Change Methods within 5E Model: A Sample Teaching Design of "Cell" Concept and its Organelles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urey, Mustafa; Calik, Muammer

    2008-01-01

    Since students' misconceptions are not completely remedied by means of only one conceptual change method, the authors assume that using different conceptual methods embedded within the 5E model will not only be more effective in enhancing students' conceptual understanding, but also may eliminate all students' misconceptions. The aim of this study…

  5. A beginner's guide to writing the nursing conceptual model-based theoretical rationale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gigliotti, Eileen; Manister, Nancy N

    2012-10-01

    Writing the theoretical rationale for a study can be a daunting prospect for novice researchers. Nursing's conceptual models provide excellent frameworks for placement of study variables, but moving from the very abstract concepts of the nursing model to the less abstract concepts of the study variables is difficult. Similar to the five-paragraph essay used by writing teachers to assist beginning writers to construct a logical thesis, the authors of this column present guidelines that beginners can follow to construct their theoretical rationale. This guide can be used with any nursing conceptual model but Neuman's model was chosen here as the exemplar.

  6. Fracture Analysis of the Ribeirao Preto Basalts, SP: Application for Developing a Conceptual Hydrogeological Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amélia João Fernandes

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The study of the physical geology and geochemistry of the Ribeirão Preto basalts was part of a hydrogeologicalresearch, which aimed to investigate the recharge of the Guarani Aquifer System (SAG through the basalts of the SerraGeral Aquifer (ASG, a project shortly named FRATASG. In addition to the hydrogeological research, a detailed geologicalinvestigation was conducted to develop a conceptual model of groundwater fl ow in complex aquifers, as is the case ofthe fractured basalts of the ASG. Therefore, this study included a thorough structural survey and analysis of horizontaland subvertical fractures, which resulted in the identifi cation of four tectonic events. It was concluded that the verticalgroundwater flow is important up to 10 m in depth and, secondarily, up to 25 m. Horizontal fl ow, more evident up to thedepth of 50 m, predominates and occurs along sub-horizontal fractures, which occur mainly at the contact between basalts2 and 3 and in its vicinity. Because the great majority of subvertical fractures do not propagate into the vesicular layers,which occur at the basalt contacts, it is suggested that these layers act as regional hydraulic barriers, and greatly hamperthe recharge of the SAG through the ASG. As a consequence, groundwater flow in the basalt stack is of stratabound type,as it occurs mainly along the basalt contacts. Based on diagnostic features of the fl ow, it is proposed in this study that the vertical flow,which crosses the basalt stack reaching the SAG, is local and probably occurs along NE structures.

  7. Elements of a flexible approach for conceptual hydrological modeling: 2. Application and experimental insights

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kavetski, D.; Fenicia, F.

    2011-01-01

    In this article's companion paper, flexible approaches for conceptual hydrological modeling at the catchment scale were motivated, and the SUPERFLEX framework, based on generic model components, was introduced. In this article, the SUPERFLEX framework and the “fixed structure” GR4H model (an hourly

  8. Moving from Victim to Survivor of Cultural Violence: A Conceptual Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salazar, Carmen F.; Casto, Challon

    2008-01-01

    The authors propose the Moving From Victim to Survivor of Cultural Violence model, using the stages of D. W. Sue and D. Sue's (1999) Racial/Cultural Identity Development model. This conceptual model describes the process of first overcoming internalized sexism, domestic abuse, sexual harassment, rape, and other forms of oppression and then healing…

  9. THE POLITICAL INSTITUTIONAL DETERMINANTS OF LAND-USE CHANGE AND SPRAWL: A CONCEPTUAL MODEL

    OpenAIRE

    Clark, Anthony S.

    2010-01-01

    This paper proposes a conceptual land-use change model that includes a framework for analyzing the political institutional determinants of land-use change. The model is used to explain several previous empirical findings and to generate testable hypotheses. The government bias for sprawl is addressed in the context of the model.

  10. Conceptual compression for pattern recognition in 3D model output

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prudden, Rachel; Robinson, Niall; Arribas, Alberto

    2017-04-01

    The problem of data compression is closely related to the idea of comprehension. If you understand a scene at a qualitative level, this should enable you to make reasonable predictions about its contents, meaning that less extra information is needed to encode it precisely. These ideas have already been applied in the field of image compression; see for example the work on conceptual compression by Google DeepMind. Applying similar methods to multidimensional atmospheric data could have significant benefits. Beyond reducing storage demands, the ability to recognise complex features would make it far easier to interpret and search large volumes of meteorological data. Our poster will present some early work in this area.

  11. Cellular automata models for synchronized traffic flow

    CERN Document Server

    Jiang Rui

    2003-01-01

    This paper presents a new cellular automata model for describing synchronized traffic flow. The fundamental diagrams, the spacetime plots and the 1 min average data have been analysed in detail. It is shown that the model can describe the outflow from the jams, the light synchronized flow as well as heavy synchronized flow with average speed greater than approximately 24 km h sup - sup 1. As for the synchronized flow with speed lower than 24 km h sup - sup 1 , it is unstable and will evolve into the coexistence of jams, free flow and light synchronized flow. This is consistent with the empirical findings (Kerner B S 1998 Phys. Rev. Lett. 81 3797).

  12. Conceptual framework for model-based analysis of residence time distribution in twin-screw granulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kumar, Ashish; Vercruysse, Jurgen; Vanhoorne, Valerie

    2015-01-01

    within each module where different granulation rate processes dominate over others. Currently, experimental data is used to determine the residence time distributions. In this study, a conceptual model based on classical chemical engineering methods is proposed to better understand and simulate...... the residence time distribution in a TSG. The experimental data were compared with the proposed most suitable conceptual model to estimate the parameters of the model and to analyse and predict the effects of changes in number of kneading discs and their stagger angle, screw speed and powder feed rate...

  13. Periodic Orbits for a Discontinuous Vector Field Arising from a Conceptual Model of Glacial Cycles

    CERN Document Server

    Walsh, James; Hahn, Jonathan; McGehee, Richard

    2015-01-01

    Conceptual climate models provide an approach to understanding climate processes through a mathematical analysis of an approximation to reality. Recently, these models have also provided interesting examples of nonsmooth dynamical systems. Here we discuss a conceptual model of glacial cycles consisting of a system of three ordinary differential equations defining a discontinuous vector field. We show that this system has a large periodic orbit crossing the discontinuity boundary. This orbit can be interpreted as an intrinsic cycling of the Earth's climate giving rise to alternating glaciations and deglaciations.

  14. Development of a Conceptual Chum Salmon Emergence Model for Ives Island

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murray, Christopher J.; Geist, David R.; Arntzen, Evan V.; Bott, Yi-Ju; Nabelek, Marc A.

    2011-02-09

    The objective of the study described herein was to develop a conceptual model of chum salmon emergence that was based on empirical water temperature of the riverbed and river in specific locations where chum salmon spawn in the Ives Island area. The conceptual model was developed using water temperature data that have been collected in the past and are currently being collected in the Ives Island area. The model will be useful to system operators who need to estimate the complete distribution of chum salmon emergence (first emergence through final emergence) in order to balance chum salmon redd protection and power system operation.

  15. Hydrogeological conceptual model for Guarani Aquifer System: A tool for management; Modelo hidrogeologico conceptual del Sistema Acuifero Guarani (SAG): una herramienta para la gestion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gastmans, D.; Veroslavsky, G.; Kiang Cahng, H.; Caetano-Chang, M. R.; Nogueira Pressinotti, M. M.

    2012-11-01

    The Guarani aquifer system (GAS) extends beneath the territories of Argentina, Brazil, Paraguay and Uruguay and thus represents a typical example of a transboundary aquifer. The GAS is an important source of drinking water for the population living within its area. Because of differences in the legal norms concerning water resources in these four countries, an urgently required legal framework for the shared management of the groundwater is currently being drawn up. Within this context, the conceptual regional hydrogeological model should be used as an important tool to delineate shared actions, particularly in regions where the groundwater flow is transboundary. The GAS is considered to be a continuous aquifer made up of Mesozoic continental clastic sedimentary rocks that occur in the Parana and Chacoparanense sedimentary basins, and is bounded at its base by a Permo-Eotriassic regional unconformity and at the top by lower-Cretaceous basaltic lava. The groundwater flow shows a regional trend from N to S along the main axis of these basins. With regard to the major tectonic structures of these sedimentary basins, various main hydrodynamic domains can be distinguished, such as the Ponta Grossa arch and the Asuncion-Rio Grande dorsal. Regional recharge areas are primarily located in the eastern and northern outcrop areas, whilst the western end of the GAS, the Mato Grosso do Sul, contains zones of local recharge and regional discharge. Transboundary flow is observed in areas confined to the national borders of the four countries. Nevertheless, due to the groundwater residence times in the GAS special management actions are called for to prevent over-exploitation, particularly in the confined zones of the aquifer. (Author)

  16. Grammatical Conversion of Descriptive Narrative - an application of discourse analysis in conceptual modelling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruce Calway

    1996-05-01

    Full Text Available Fact-oriented conceptual modelling begins with the search for facts about a universe of discourse (UoD. These facts may be obtained from many sources, including information systems reports, tables, manuals and descriptive narrative both verbal and written. This paper presents some initial findings that support the use of discourse analysis techniques as an approach to developing elementary fact based sentences for information systems conceptual schema development from written text. Although this discussion paper only considers the NIAM (fact-oriented conceptual schema modelling method, the IS087 report from which the research case study is taken describes other conceptual methods for which the research contained in this paper could be applicable (e.g. Entity Relationship analysis. The case study could be modelled exactly in the form in which the text is initially found, but grammatical analysis focuses consideration on alternative, potentially better, expressions of a sentence, a theme which is described and demonstrated. As a result of having applied grammatical sentence simplification with co-ordinate clause splitting, each sentence could be expressed as a complete, finite, independent collection of declarative simple statements. The outcome from the application of the techniques described provides at a minimum a discourse analysis of descriptive narrative which will have retained its meaning and contextual integrity while at the same time providing a simplified and independent clause representation for input to the fact-oriented conceptual schema modelling procedure.

  17. Conceptual and numerical modeling of the Guaraní Aquifer System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Rodríguez

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available In large aquifers relevant for their considerable size, regional groundwater modeling remains challenging given geologic complexity and data scarcity in space and time. The Guaraní Aquifer System is the largest transboundary aquifer in South America. It contains an enormous volume of water, however, it is not well known being difficult to assess the impact of exploitation currently used to supply over 25 million inhabitants. This is a sensitive issue because the aquifer is shared by four countries. Moreover, an integrated groundwater model, and therefore, a global water balance were not available. In this work, a transient regional scale model for the entire aquifer based upon five simplified, equally plausible conceptual models represented by different hydraulic conductivity parametrizations, is used to analyze the flow system and water balance components. Combining an increasing number of hydraulic conductivity zones and an appropriate set of boundary conditions, the hypothesis of a continuous sedimentary unit yielded errors within the calibration target in a regional sense. The magnitude of the water budget terms resulted very similar for all parametrizations. Recharge and stream/aquifer fluxes were the dominant components representing, on average, 84.2% of total inflows and 61.4% of total outflows, respectively. However, leakage was small compared to stream discharges of main rivers. For instance, the simulated average leakage for the Uruguay river was 8 m3 s−1 while the observed absolute minimum discharge was 382 m3 s−1. Streams located in heavily pumped regions switched from a gaining condition on early years to a losing condition over time. Water is discharged through the aquifer boundaries, except at the eastern boundary. On average, pumping represented 16.2% of inflows while aquifer storage experienced a small overall increment. The model water balance indicates that the current rate of

  18. A speed-flow relationship model of highway traffic flow

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Wei; LI Wei; REN Gang

    2005-01-01

    In the view that the generally used speed-flow relationship model is insufficient in the traffic analysis under over-saturated conditions, this paper first establishes the theoretical models of speed flow relationship for each highway class based upon a large number of traffic data collected from the field. Then by analyzing the traffic flow dissipation mechanism under peak hour over-saturated traffic conditions, the speed flow relationship model structures for each highway class are reviewed under different traffic load conditions. Through curve-fitting of large numbers of observed data, functional equations of general speed-flow relationship models for each highway class under any traffic load conditions are established. The practical model parameters for each highway class under different design speeds are also put forward. This model is successful in solving the speed-forecasting problem of the traffic flow under peak hour over-saturated conditions. This provides the theoretical bases for the development of projects related to highway network planning, economic analysis, etc.

  19. A toy terrestrial carbon flow model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parton, William J.; Running, Steven W.; Walker, Brian

    1992-01-01

    A generalized carbon flow model for the major terrestrial ecosystems of the world is reported. The model is a simplification of the Century model and the Forest-Biogeochemical model. Topics covered include plant production, decomposition and nutrient cycling, biomes, the utility of the carbon flow model for predicting carbon dynamics under global change, and possible applications to state-and-transition models and environmentally driven global vegetation models.

  20. Conceptual Model of Offshore Wind Environmental Risk Evaluation System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, Richard M.; Copping, Andrea E.; Van Cleve, Frances B.; Unwin, Stephen D.; Hamilton, Erin L.

    2010-06-01

    In this report we describe the development of the Environmental Risk Evaluation System (ERES), a risk-informed analytical process for estimating the environmental risks associated with the construction and operation of offshore wind energy generation projects. The development of ERES for offshore wind is closely allied to a concurrent process undertaken to examine environmental effects of marine and hydrokinetic (MHK) energy generation, although specific risk-relevant attributes will differ between the MHK and offshore wind domains. During FY10, a conceptual design of ERES for offshore wind will be developed. The offshore wind ERES mockup described in this report will provide a preview of the functionality of a fully developed risk evaluation system that will use risk assessment techniques to determine priority stressors on aquatic organisms and environments from specific technology aspects, identify key uncertainties underlying high-risk issues, compile a wide-range of data types in an innovative and flexible data organizing scheme, and inform planning and decision processes with a transparent and technically robust decision-support tool. A fully functional version of ERES for offshore wind will be developed in a subsequent phase of the project.

  1. Conceptual geoinformation model of natural hazards risk assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulygin, Valerii

    2016-04-01

    Natural hazards are the major threat to safe interactions between nature and society. The assessment of the natural hazards impacts and their consequences is important in spatial planning and resource management. Today there is a challenge to advance our understanding of how socio-economical and climate changes will affect the frequency and magnitude of hydro-meteorological hazards and associated risks. However, the impacts from different types of natural hazards on various marine and coastal economic activities are not of the same type. In this study, the conceptual geomodel of risk assessment is presented to highlight the differentiation by the type of economic activities in extreme events risk assessment. The marine and coastal ecosystems are considered as the objects of management, on the one hand, and as the place of natural hazards' origin, on the other hand. One of the key elements in describing of such systems is the spatial characterization of their components. Assessment of ecosystem state is based on ecosystem indicators (indexes). They are used to identify the changes in time. The scenario approach is utilized to account for the spatio-temporal dynamics and uncertainty factors. Two types of scenarios are considered: scenarios of using ecosystem services by economic activities and scenarios of extreme events and related hazards. The reported study was funded by RFBR, according to the research project No. 16-35-60043 mol_a_dk.

  2. A Conceptual Framework for Improving Critical Care Patient Flow and Bed Use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Elisa F.

    2015-01-01

    Rationale: High demand for intensive care unit (ICU) services and limited bed availability have prompted hospitals to address capacity planning challenges. Simulation modeling can examine ICU bed assignment policies, accounting for patient acuity, to reduce ICU admission delays. Objectives: To provide a framework for data-driven modeling of ICU patient flow, identify key measurable outcomes, and present illustrative analysis demonstrating the impact of various bed allocation scenarios on outcomes. Methods: A description of key inputs for constructing a queuing model was outlined, and an illustrative simulation model was developed to reflect current triage protocol within the medical ICU and step-down unit (SDU) at a single tertiary-care hospital. Patient acuity, arrival rate, and unit length of stay, consisting of a “service time” and “time to transfer,” were estimated from 12 months of retrospective data (n = 2,710 adult patients) for 36 ICU and 15 SDU staffed beds. Patient priority was based on acuity and whether the patient originated in the emergency department. The model simulated the following hypothetical scenarios: (1) varied ICU/SDU sizes, (2) reserved ICU beds as a triage strategy, (3) lower targets for time to transfer out of the ICU, and (4) ICU expansion by up to four beds. Outcomes included ICU admission wait times and unit occupancy. Measurements and Main Results: With current bed allocation, simulated wait time averaged 1.13 (SD, 1.39) hours. Reallocating all SDU beds as ICU decreased overall wait times by 7.2% to 1.06 (SD, 1.39) hours and increased bed occupancy from 80 to 84%. Reserving the last available bed for acute patients reduced wait times for acute patients from 0.84 (SD, 1.12) to 0.31 (SD, 0.30) hours, but tripled subacute patients’ wait times from 1.39 (SD, 1.81) to 4.27 (SD, 5.44) hours. Setting transfer times to wards for all ICU/SDU patients to 1 hour decreased wait times for incoming ICU patients, comparable to building

  3. A Conceptual Framework for Improving Critical Care Patient Flow and Bed Use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathews, Kusum S; Long, Elisa F

    2015-06-01

    High demand for intensive care unit (ICU) services and limited bed availability have prompted hospitals to address capacity planning challenges. Simulation modeling can examine ICU bed assignment policies, accounting for patient acuity, to reduce ICU admission delays. To provide a framework for data-driven modeling of ICU patient flow, identify key measurable outcomes, and present illustrative analysis demonstrating the impact of various bed allocation scenarios on outcomes. A description of key inputs for constructing a queuing model was outlined, and an illustrative simulation model was developed to reflect current triage protocol within the medical ICU and step-down unit (SDU) at a single tertiary-care hospital. Patient acuity, arrival rate, and unit length of stay, consisting of a "service time" and "time to transfer," were estimated from 12 months of retrospective data (n = 2,710 adult patients) for 36 ICU and 15 SDU staffed beds. Patient priority was based on acuity and whether the patient originated in the emergency department. The model simulated the following hypothetical scenarios: (1) varied ICU/SDU sizes, (2) reserved ICU beds as a triage strategy, (3) lower targets for time to transfer out of the ICU, and (4) ICU expansion by up to four beds. Outcomes included ICU admission wait times and unit occupancy. With current bed allocation, simulated wait time averaged 1.13 (SD, 1.39) hours. Reallocating all SDU beds as ICU decreased overall wait times by 7.2% to 1.06 (SD, 1.39) hours and increased bed occupancy from 80 to 84%. Reserving the last available bed for acute patients reduced wait times for acute patients from 0.84 (SD, 1.12) to 0.31 (SD, 0.30) hours, but tripled subacute patients' wait times from 1.39 (SD, 1.81) to 4.27 (SD, 5.44) hours. Setting transfer times to wards for all ICU/SDU patients to 1 hour decreased wait times for incoming ICU patients, comparable to building one to two additional ICU beds. Hospital queuing and simulation modeling

  4. Conceptual Model of Iodine Behavior in the Subsurface at the Hanford Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Truex, Michael J. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Lee, Brady D. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Johnson, Christian D. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Qafoku, Nikolla P. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Last, George V. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Lee, Michelle H. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Kaplan, Daniel I. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2015-09-01

    The fate and transport of 129I in the environment and potential remediation technologies are currently being studied as part of environmental remediation activities at the Hanford Site. A conceptual model describing the nature and extent of subsurface contamination, factors that control plume behavior, and factors relevant to potential remediation processes is needed to support environmental remedy decisions. Because 129I is an uncommon contaminant, relevant remediation experience and scientific literature are limited. Thus, the conceptual model also needs to both describe known contaminant and biogeochemical process information and to identify aspects about which additional information needed to effectively support remedy decisions. this document summarizes the conceptual model of iodine behavior relevant to iodine in the subsurface environment at the Hanford site.

  5. Conceptual design of an integrated technology model for carbon policy assessment.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Backus, George A.; Dimotakes, Paul E. (NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA)

    2011-01-01

    This report describes the conceptual design of a technology choice model for understanding strategies to reduce carbon intensity in the electricity sector. The report considers the major modeling issues affecting technology policy assessment and defines an implementable model construct. Further, the report delineates the basis causal structure of such a model and attempts to establish the technical/algorithmic viability of pursuing model development along with the associated analyses.

  6. Using multi-objective optimisation to integrate alpine regions in groundwater flow models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Rojanschi

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Within the research project GLOWA Danube, a groundwater flow model was developed for the Upper Danube basin. This paper reports on a preliminary study to include the alpine part of the catchment in the model. A conceptual model structure was implemented and tested using multi-objective optimisation analysis. The performance of the model and the identifiability of the parameters were studied. A possible over-parameterisation of the model was also tested using principal component analysis.

  7. Mental Models of the Earth: A Study of Conceptual Change in Childhood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vosniadou, Stella; Brewer, William F.

    1992-01-01

    The development of conceptual knowledge about the earth among 60 elementary school students in grades 1, 3, and 5 was studied through questions about its shape. In the process of knowledge acquisition, children appear to modify their initial models to make them more consistent with the culturally accepted model. (SLD)

  8. The Conceptualization of the Mathematical Modelling Process in Technology-Aided Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hidiroglu, Çaglar Naci; Güzel, Esra Bukova

    2017-01-01

    The aim of the study is to conceptualize the technology-aided mathematical modelling process in the frame of cognitive modelling perspective. The grounded theory approach was adopted in the study. The research was conducted with seven groups consisting of nineteen prospective mathematics teachers. The data were collected from the video records of…

  9. A Conceptual Model of Intrapreneurship in the Iranian Agricultural Extension Organization: Implications for HRD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karimi, Asef; Malekmohamadi, Iraj; Daryani, Mahmoud Ahmadpour; Rezvanfar, Ahmad

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: This study seeks to build a conceptual model of agricultural extension intrapreneurship that discusses the concept and phenomenon of intrapreneurship as well as its prerequisites and outcomes. The proposed model is intended to depict the main factors that affect the phenomena of intrapreneurship within the agricultural extension…

  10. Panel discussion : Education on conceptual modelling for simulation - challenging the art

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Zee, D.J.; Kotiadis, Kathy; Tako, Antuela A.; Pidd, Mike; Balci, Osman; Tolk, Andreas; Elder, Mark; Johansson, B; Jain, S; MontoyaTorres, J; Hugan, J; Yucesan, E

    2010-01-01

    This panel seeks to initiate a discussion within the modeling and simulation community about the way we teach conceptual modeling for simulation with the view of bringing about improvements. The challenge addressed is how to educate and equip the novice analyst to become a professional rather than

  11. Can Bayesian Belief Networks help tackling conceptual model uncertainties in contaminated site risk assessment?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Troldborg, Mads; Thomsen, Nanna Isbak; McKnight, Ursula S.;

    models that are effective for integrating quantitative and qualitative information, and thus can strengthen decisions when empirical data are lacking. The developed BBN combines data from desk studies and initial site investigations with expert opinion to assess which of the conceptual models are more...... help inform future investigations at a contaminated site....

  12. Introductory Biology Students' Conceptual Models and Explanations of the Origin of Variation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bray Speth, Elena; Shaw, Neil; Momsen, Jennifer; Reinagel, Adam; Le, Paul; Taqieddin, Ranya; Long, Tammy

    2014-01-01

    Mutation is the key molecular mechanism generating phenotypic variation, which is the basis for evolution. In an introductory biology course, we used a model-based pedagogy that enabled students to integrate their understanding of genetics and evolution within multiple case studies. We used student-generated conceptual models to assess…

  13. The Role of Model Building in Problem Solving and Conceptual Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Chwee Beng; Jonassen, David; Teo, Timothy

    2011-01-01

    This study examines the effects of the activity of building systems models for school-based problems on problem solving and on conceptual change in elementary science classes. During a unit on the water cycle in an Asian elementary school, students constructed systems models of the water cycle. We found that representing ill-structured problems as…

  14. Promoting the Development of a Conceptual Change Model of Science Instruction in Prospective Secondary Biology Teachers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yip, Din Yan

    2001-01-01

    Reports on a study of the impact of an initial teacher education program on the development of a conceptual change model of instruction in prospective biology teachers. Analyzes the performance of prospective teachers in teaching practices and achievement in the skills related to the instructional model. (Contains 22 references.) (Author/YDS)

  15. Conceptual Incoherence as a Result of the Use of Multiple Historical Models in School Textbooks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gericke, Niklas M.; Hagberg, Mariana

    2010-01-01

    This paper explores the occurrence of conceptual incoherence in upper secondary school textbooks resulting from the use of multiple historical models. Swedish biology and chemistry textbooks, as well as a selection of books from English speaking countries, were examined. The purpose of the study was to identify which models are used to represent…

  16. A Conceptual Model of Medical Student Well-Being: Promoting Resilience and Preventing Burnout

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunn, Laura B.; Iglewicz, Alana; Moutier, Christine

    2008-01-01

    Objective: This article proposes and illustrates a conceptual model of medical student well-being. Method: The authors reviewed the literature on medical student stress, coping, and well-being and developed a model of medical student coping termed the "coping reservoir." Results: The reservoir can be replenished or drained by various aspects of…

  17. Multi-model groundwater-management optimization: reconciling disparate conceptual models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timani, Bassel; Peralta, Richard

    2015-09-01

    Disagreement among policymakers often involves policy issues and differences between the decision makers' implicit utility functions. Significant disagreement can also exist concerning conceptual models of the physical system. Disagreement on the validity of a single simulation model delays discussion on policy issues and prevents the adoption of consensus management strategies. For such a contentious situation, the proposed multi-conceptual model optimization (MCMO) can help stakeholders reach a compromise strategy. MCMO computes mathematically optimal strategies that simultaneously satisfy analogous constraints and bounds in multiple numerical models that differ in boundary conditions, hydrogeologic stratigraphy, and discretization. Shadow prices and trade-offs guide the process of refining the first MCMO-developed `multi-model strategy into a realistic compromise management strategy. By employing automated cycling, MCMO is practical for linear and nonlinear aquifer systems. In this reconnaissance study, MCMO application to the multilayer Cache Valley (Utah and Idaho, USA) river-aquifer system employs two simulation models with analogous background conditions but different vertical discretization and boundary conditions. The objective is to maximize additional safe pumping (beyond current pumping), subject to constraints on groundwater head and seepage from the aquifer to surface waters. MCMO application reveals that in order to protect the local ecosystem, increased groundwater pumping can satisfy only 40 % of projected water demand increase. To explore the possibility of increasing that pumping while protecting the ecosystem, MCMO clearly identifies localities requiring additional field data. MCMO is applicable to other areas and optimization problems than used here. Steps to prepare comparable sub-models for MCMO use are area-dependent.

  18. Assessing inter-city ecological and economic relations: An emergy-based conceptual model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shaoqing; Chen, Bin

    2011-03-01

    Inter-city relation, though of great importance in the context of an increasingly globalized society, has rarely been addressed quantitatively compared to the structure and function within the city due to the difficulties when acquiring and disposing the relational data between cities. In this study, we presented a conceptual model for quantifying the inter-city relation in ecological and economic contexts based on emergy analysis, which is recognized as a promising approach to evaluating various city flows on a common basis. Emergy diagram of an urban system was constructed explicitly, and the related relational data indices were selected from the ecological and economic aspects, respectively, to form two indicator systems for emergy analysis, incorporating the transfer of labor, material and currency, etc. After that, the inter-city interaction intensity and sustainability were formulated to identify the sustainable conditions between the two cities, and hopefully, it could reveal potential complementarity or competition between the cities over time. With the introduction of emergy analysis, this study may provide a new way to quantify city interaction.

  19. Assessing inter-city ecological and economic relations: An emergy-based conceptual model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shaoqing CHEN; Bin CHEN

    2011-01-01

    Inter-city relation, though of great importance in the context of an increasingly globalized society, has rarely been addressed quantitatively compared to the structure and function within the city due to the difficulties when acquiring and disposing the relational data between cities. In this study, we presented a conceptual model for quantifying the inter-city relation in ecological and economic contexts based on emergy analysis, which is recognized as a promising approach to evaluating various city flows on a common basis. Emergy diagram of an urban system was constructed explicitly, and the related relational data indices were selected from the ecological and economic aspects, respectively, to form two indicator systems for emergy analysis, incorporating the transfer of labor, material and currency, etc. After that, the inter-city interaction intensity and sustainability were formulated to identify the sustainable conditions between the two cities,and hopefully, it could reveal potential complementarity or competition between the cities over time. With the introduction of emergy analysis, this study may provide a new way to quantify city interaction.

  20. Computer-based Creativity Enhanced Conceptual Design Model for Non-routine Design of Mechanical Systems

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Yutong; WANG Yuxin; DUFFY Alex H B

    2014-01-01

    Computer-based conceptual design for routine design has made great strides, yet non-routine design has not been given due attention, and it is still poorly automated. Considering that the function-behavior-structure(FBS) model is widely used for modeling the conceptual design process, a computer-based creativity enhanced conceptual design model(CECD) for non-routine design of mechanical systems is presented. In the model, the leaf functions in the FBS model are decomposed into and represented with fine-grain basic operation actions(BOA), and the corresponding BOA set in the function domain is then constructed. Choosing building blocks from the database, and expressing their multiple functions with BOAs, the BOA set in the structure domain is formed. Through rule-based dynamic partition of the BOA set in the function domain, many variants of regenerated functional schemes are generated. For enhancing the capability to introduce new design variables into the conceptual design process, and dig out more innovative physical structure schemes, the indirect function-structure matching strategy based on reconstructing the combined structure schemes is adopted. By adjusting the tightness of the partition rules and the granularity of the divided BOA subsets, and making full use of the main function and secondary functions of each basic structure in the process of reconstructing of the physical structures, new design variables and variants are introduced into the physical structure scheme reconstructing process, and a great number of simpler physical structure schemes to accomplish the overall function organically are figured out. The creativity enhanced conceptual design model presented has a dominant capability in introducing new deign variables in function domain and digging out simpler physical structures to accomplish the overall function, therefore it can be utilized to solve non-routine conceptual design problem.

  1. Computer-based creativity enhanced conceptual design model for non-routine design of mechanical systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yutong; Wang, Yuxin; Duffy, Alex H. B.

    2014-11-01

    Computer-based conceptual design for routine design has made great strides, yet non-routine design has not been given due attention, and it is still poorly automated. Considering that the function-behavior-structure(FBS) model is widely used for modeling the conceptual design process, a computer-based creativity enhanced conceptual design model(CECD) for non-routine design of mechanical systems is presented. In the model, the leaf functions in the FBS model are decomposed into and represented with fine-grain basic operation actions(BOA), and the corresponding BOA set in the function domain is then constructed. Choosing building blocks from the database, and expressing their multiple functions with BOAs, the BOA set in the structure domain is formed. Through rule-based dynamic partition of the BOA set in the function domain, many variants of regenerated functional schemes are generated. For enhancing the capability to introduce new design variables into the conceptual design process, and dig out more innovative physical structure schemes, the indirect function-structure matching strategy based on reconstructing the combined structure schemes is adopted. By adjusting the tightness of the partition rules and the granularity of the divided BOA subsets, and making full use of the main function and secondary functions of each basic structure in the process of reconstructing of the physical structures, new design variables and variants are introduced into the physical structure scheme reconstructing process, and a great number of simpler physical structure schemes to accomplish the overall function organically are figured out. The creativity enhanced conceptual design model presented has a dominant capability in introducing new deign variables in function domain and digging out simpler physical structures to accomplish the overall function, therefore it can be utilized to solve non-routine conceptual design problem.

  2. A cognitive model of second-year organic chemistry students' conceptualizations of mental molecular rotation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briggs, Michael W.

    The goal of this research was to answer the question, "What is a plausible explanation (model) of the cognitive structure and processes that facilitate mental molecular rotation?". This work used phenomenographic methodology and techniques of interview and think-aloud protocol. Constructivism was the theoretical framework. At the outset of the research, I designed nine tasks to obtain participant articulations of conceptualizations of mental molecular rotations. Articulations from five second-year organic chemistry students attending a Midwestern research university became the research data. Analysis produced four emerging themes along two axes: visualization representation and modeling cognition. These two axes formed a mental space, which was modeled by structure and processes that facilitated mental molecular rotation. A theoretical cognitive model of mental molecular rotation was based on the work of two researchers: Robbie Case and Richard Lesh. Lesh's "mental model" is composed of cognitive elements and operations, which are distributed over heeded local and global cognitive sub-models whereas Case deals with unheeded central conceptual structures. The models and structures interact to produce new knowledge and facilitate the use of existing knowledge. Two predictions of the theory of mental molecular rotation were elaborated. Students without a set of operations in a central conceptual structure will not be able to mentally rotate molecules. This is true even if a set of components, other than "operation", is constructed. The artifacts of mental molecular rotation can be used to determine the state of construction of the central conceptual structure responsible for mental molecular rotation.

  3. Site-Scale Saturated Zone Flow Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    G. Zyvoloski

    2003-12-17

    The purpose of this model report is to document the components of the site-scale saturated-zone flow model at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, in accordance with administrative procedure (AP)-SIII.lOQ, ''Models''. This report provides validation and confidence in the flow model that was developed for site recommendation (SR) and will be used to provide flow fields in support of the Total Systems Performance Assessment (TSPA) for the License Application. The output from this report provides the flow model used in the ''Site-Scale Saturated Zone Transport'', MDL-NBS-HS-000010 Rev 01 (BSC 2003 [162419]). The Site-Scale Saturated Zone Transport model then provides output to the SZ Transport Abstraction Model (BSC 2003 [164870]). In particular, the output from the SZ site-scale flow model is used to simulate the groundwater flow pathways and radionuclide transport to the accessible environment for use in the TSPA calculations. Since the development and calibration of the saturated-zone flow model, more data have been gathered for use in model validation and confidence building, including new water-level data from Nye County wells, single- and multiple-well hydraulic testing data, and new hydrochemistry data. In addition, a new hydrogeologic framework model (HFM), which incorporates Nye County wells lithology, also provides geologic data for corroboration and confidence in the flow model. The intended use of this work is to provide a flow model that generates flow fields to simulate radionuclide transport in saturated porous rock and alluvium under natural or forced gradient flow conditions. The flow model simulations are completed using the three-dimensional (3-D), finite-element, flow, heat, and transport computer code, FEHM Version (V) 2.20 (software tracking number (STN): 10086-2.20-00; LANL 2003 [161725]). Concurrently, process-level transport model and methodology for calculating radionuclide transport in the saturated zone at Yucca

  4. Modeling interregional freight flow by distribution systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Davydenko, I.; Tavasszy, L.A.; Blois, C.J. de

    2013-01-01

    Distribution Centers with a warehousing function have an important influence on the flow of goods from production to consumption, generating substantial goods flow and vehicle movements. This paper extends the classical 4-step freight modeling framework with a logistics chain model, explicitly model

  5. Career Flow: A Hope-Centered Model of Career Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niles, Spencer G.

    2011-01-01

    In this article, the author describes an innovative approach for conceptualizing and managing career development tasks in the 21st century. Theoretical foundations and key concepts related to career flow theory are discussed.

  6. Modelling of the Czochralski flow

    OpenAIRE

    Jan Franc

    1998-01-01

    The Czochralski method of the industrial production of a silicon single crystal consists of pulling up the single crystal from the silicon melt. The flow of the melt during the production is called the Czochralski flow. The mathematical description of the flow consists of a coupled system of six P.D.E. in cylindrical coordinates containing Navier-Stokes equations (with the stream function), heat convection-conduction equations, convection-diffusion equation for oxygen impurity and an equation...

  7. Overland flow : interfacing models with measurements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Loon, van E.E.

    2002-01-01

    Index words: overland flow, catchment scale, system identification, ensemble simulations.This study presents new techniques to identify scale-dependent overland flow models and use these for ensemble-based predictions. The techniques are developed on the basis of overland flow, rain, discharge, soil

  8. Literature Review of Enterprise Systems Research Using Institutional Theory: Towards a Conceptual Model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svejvig, Per

    This paper sets out to examine the use of institutional theory as a conceptually rich lens to study social issues of enterprise systems (ES) research. More precisely, the purpose is to categorize current ES research using institutional theory to develop a conceptual model that advances ES research....... Key institutional features are presented such as isomorphism, rationalized myths, bridging macro and micro structures, and institutional logics and their implications for ES research are discussed. Through a literature review of 180 articles, of which 18 papers are selected, we build a conceptual...... model which advocates for multi-level and multi-theory approaches, and applies newer institutional aspects such as institutional logics. The findings show that institutional theory in ES research is in its infancy and adopts mainly traditional institutional aspects like isomorphism...

  9. A conceptual data model and modelling language for fields and agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Bakker, Merijn; de Jong, Kor; Schmitz, Oliver; Karssenberg, Derek

    2016-04-01

    Modelling is essential in order to understand environmental systems. Environmental systems are heterogeneous because they consist of fields and agents. Fields have a value defined everywhere at all times, for example surface elevation and temperature. Agents are bounded in space and time and have a value only within their bounds, for example biomass of a tree crown or the speed of a car. Many phenomena have properties of both fields and agents. Although many systems contain both fields and agents and integration of these concepts would be required for modelling, existing modelling frameworks concentrate on either agent-based or field-based modelling and are often low-level programming frameworks. A concept is lacking that integrates fields and agents in a way that is easy to use for modelers who are not software engineers. To address this issue, we develop a conceptual data model that represents fields and agents uniformly. We then show how the data model can be used in a high-level modelling language. The data model represents fields and agents in space-time. Also relations and networks can be represented using the same concepts. Using the conceptual data model we can represent static and mobile agents that may have spatial and temporal variation within their extent. The concepts we use are phenomenon, property set, item, property, domain and value. The phenomenon is the thing that is modelled, which can be any real world thing, for example trees. A phenomenon usually consists of several items, e.g. single trees. The domain is the spatiotemporal location and/or extent for which the items in the phenomenon are defined. Multiple different domains can coexist for a given phenomenon. For example a domain describing the extent of the trees and a domain describing the stem locations. The same goes for the property, which is an attribute of the thing that is being modeled. A property has a value, which is possibly discretized, for example the biomass over the tree crown

  10. On the Performance of Alternate Conceptual Ecohydrological Models for Streamflow Prediction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naseem, Bushra; Ajami, Hoori; Cordery, Ian; Sharma, Ashish

    2016-04-01

    A merging of a lumped conceptual hydrological model with two conceptual dynamic vegetation models is presented to assess the performance of these models for simultaneous simulations of streamflow and leaf area index (LAI). Two conceptual dynamic vegetation models with differing representation of ecological processes are merged with a lumped conceptual hydrological model (HYMOD) to predict catchment scale streamflow and LAI. The merged RR-LAI-I model computes relative leaf biomass based on transpiration rates while the RR-LAI-II model computes above ground green and dead biomass based on net primary productivity and water use efficiency in response to soil moisture dynamics. To assess the performance of these models, daily discharge and 8-day MODIS LAI product for 27 catchments of 90 - 1600km2 in size located in the Murray - Darling Basin in Australia are used. Our results illustrate that when single-objective optimisation was focussed on maximizing the objective function for streamflow or LAI, the other un-calibrated predicted outcome (LAI if streamflow is the focus) was consistently compromised. Thus, single-objective optimization cannot take into account the essence of all processes in the conceptual ecohydrological models. However, multi-objective optimisation showed great strength for streamflow and LAI predictions. Both response outputs were better simulated by RR-LAI-II than RR-LAI-I due to better representation of physical processes such as net primary productivity (NPP) in RR-LAI-II. Our results highlight that simultaneous calibration of streamflow and LAI using a multi-objective algorithm proves to be an attractive tool for improved streamflow predictions.

  11. A Conceptual DFT Approach Towards Developing New QSTR Models

    CERN Document Server

    Chattaraj, P K; Giri, S; Mukherjee, S; Roy, D R; Subramanian, V; Van Damme, S

    2007-01-01

    Quantitative-structure-toxicity-relationship (QSTR) models are developed for predicting the toxicity (pIGC50) of 252 aliphatic compounds on Tetrahymena pyriformis. The single parameter models with a simple molecular descriptor, the number of atoms in the molecule, provide unbelievable results. Better QSTR models with two parameters result when global electrophilicity is used as the second descriptor. In order to tackle both charge- and frontier-controlled reactions the importance of the local electro (nucleo) philicities and atomic charges is also analyzed. Best possible three parameter QSTR models are prescribed.

  12. Reservoir Stochastic Modeling Constrained by Quantitative Geological Conceptual Patterns

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    This paper discusses the principles of geologic constraints on reservoir stochastic modeling. By using the system science theory, two kinds of uncertainties, including random uncertainty and fuzzy uncertainty, are recognized. In order to improve the precision of stochastic modeling and reduce the uncertainty in realization, the fuzzy uncertainty should be stressed, and the "geological genesis-controlled modeling" is conducted under the guidance of a quantitative geological pattern. An example of the Pingqiao horizontal-well division of the Ansai Oilfield in the Ordos Basin is taken to expound the method of stochastic modeling.

  13. A Conceptual Tour About the Standard Cosmological Model

    CERN Document Server

    Maroto, A L; Maroto, Antonio L.; Ramirez, Juan

    2004-01-01

    With the beginning of the XXIst century, a physical model of our Universe, usually called the Standard Cosmological Model (SCM), is reaching an important level of consolidation, based on accurate astrophysical data and also on theoretical developments. In this paper we review the interplay between the basic concepts and observations underlying this model. The SCM is a complex and beautiful building, recieving inputs from many branches of physics. Major topics reviewed are: General Relativity and the cosmological constant, the Cosmological Principle and Friedmann-Robertson-Walker-Lemaitre models, Hubble diagrams and dark energy, large scale structure and dark matter, the cosmic microwave background, Big Bang nucleosynthesis, and inflation.

  14. An independent verification and validation of the Future Theater Level Model conceptual model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hartley, D.S. III; Kruse, K.L.; Martellaro, A.J.; Packard, S.L.; Thomas, B. Jr.; Turley, V.K.

    1994-08-01

    This report describes the methodology and results of independent verification and validation performed on a combat model in its design stage. The combat model is the Future Theater Level Model (FTLM), under development by The Joint Staff/J-8. J-8 has undertaken its development to provide an analysis tool that addresses the uncertainties of combat more directly than previous models and yields more rapid study results. The methodology adopted for this verification and validation consisted of document analyses. Included were detailed examination of the FTLM design documents (at all stages of development), the FTLM Mission Needs Statement, and selected documentation for other theater level combat models. These documents were compared to assess the FTLM as to its design stage, its purpose as an analytical combat model, and its capabilities as specified in the Mission Needs Statement. The conceptual design passed those tests. The recommendations included specific modifications as well as a recommendation for continued development. The methodology is significant because independent verification and validation have not been previously reported as being performed on a combat model in its design stage. The results are significant because The Joint Staff/J-8 will be using the recommendations from this study in determining whether to proceed with develop of the model.

  15. Science for informed decision: A 3D unified conceptual model of the Milk River Transboundary Aquifer (Alberta-Montana)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivera, A.; Pétré, M.

    2013-12-01

    of the Milk River Aquifer has been built. This model follows the natural limits of the aquifer and is not interrupted by the USCanada border. The conceptual model covers many aspects such as the hydrostratigraphic 3D model, the groundwater flow, the recharge and discharge areas, the hydrogeological parameters, the pumping and observation wells, and the transboundary aspects. This model covers circa 55 000 km2. The study area is limited to the North/Northeast and Southeast by gas fields. This unified conceptual model will form the basis for a future 3D numerical hydrogeological model of groundwater flow in the Milk River Aquifer across the Canada-US border.

  16. Numerical modeling of fluidic flow meters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choudhury, D.; Patel, B. R.

    1992-05-01

    The transient fluid flow in fluidic flow meters has been modeled using Creare.x's flow modeling computer program FLUENT/BFC that solves the Navier-Stokes equations in general curvilinear coordinates. The numerical predictions of fluid flow in a fluidic flow meter have been compared with the available experimental results for a particular design, termed the PC-4 design. Overall flow structures such as main jet bending, and primary and secondary vortices predicted by FLUENT/BFC are in excellent agreement with flow visualization results. The oscillation frequencies of the PC-4 design have been predicted for a range of flow rates encompassing laminar and turbulent flow and the results are in good agreement with experiments. The details of the flow field predictions reveal that an important factor that determines the onset of oscillations in the fluidic flow meter is the feedback jet momentum relative to the main jet momentum. The insights provided by the analysis of the PC-4 fluidic flow meter design have led to an improved design. The improved design has sustained oscillations at lower flow rates compared with the PC-4 design and has a larger rangeability.

  17. Conceptual Modeling of Events as Information Objects and Change Agents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bækgaard, Lars

    as a totality of an information object and a change agent. When an event is modeled as an information object it is comparable to an entity that exists only at a specific point in time. It has attributes and can be used for querying and specification of constraints. When an event is modeled as a change agent...

  18. A conceptual model for culture change evaluation in nursing homes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartmann, Christine W; Snow, A Lynn; Allen, Rebecca S; Parmelee, Patricia A; Palmer, Jennifer A; Berlowitz, Dan

    2013-01-01

    This article describes the development and particulars of a new, comprehensive model of nursing home culture change, the Nursing Home Integrated Model for Producing and Assessing Cultural Transformation (Nursing Home IMPACT). This model is structured into four categories, "meta constructs," "care practices," "workplace practices," and "environment of care," with multiple domains under each. It includes detailed, triangulated assessment methods capturing various stakeholder perspectives for each of the model's domains. It is hoped that this model will serve two functions: first, to help practitioners guide improvements in resident care by identifying particular areas in which culture change is having positive effects, as well as areas that could benefit from modification; and second, to emphasize the importance in culture change of the innumerable perspectives of residents, family members, staff, management, and leadership. Published by Mosby, Inc.

  19. Entanglement of Conceptual Entities in Quantum Model Theory (QMod)

    CERN Document Server

    Aerts, Diederik

    2012-01-01

    We have recently elaborated 'Quantum Model Theory' (QMod) to model situations where the quantum effects of contextuality, interference, superposition, entanglement and emergence, appear without the entities giving rise to these situations having necessarily to be of microscopic nature. We have shown that QMod models without introducing linearity for the set of the states. In this paper we prove that QMod, although not using linearity for the state space, provides a method of identification for entangled states and an intuitive explanation for their occurrence. We illustrate this method for entanglement identification with concrete examples.

  20. Review of the dWind Model Conceptual Results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baring-Gould, Ian; Gleason, Michael; Preus, Robert; Sigrin, Ben

    2015-09-16

    This presentation provides an overview of the dWind model, including its purpose, background, and current status. Baring-Gould presented this material as part of the September 2015 WINDExchange webinar.

  1. Empirical modelling for the conceptual design and use of products

    OpenAIRE

    Roe, Chris P.; Beynon, Meurig; Fischer, Carlos N

    2001-01-01

    The process of designing an engineering product usually involves only superficial interaction on the part of the user during the design. This often leads to the product being unsuitable for its target comnmnity. In this paper, we describe an approach called Empirical Modelling that emphasises interaction and experiment throughout the construction of a model that we believe has benefits in respect of usability. We use a case study in digital watch design to illustrate our approach and our ideas.

  2. A conceptual model for SMEs mechatronics supply chain.

    OpenAIRE

    Tounsi, Jihène; Boissiere, Julien; Habchi, Georges

    2010-01-01

    17; International audience; Nowadays, in order to meet the demands of the global dynamic market and eliminate its disturbances, the supply chain and its integration across different organizations has become a competitive business advantage along the production processes. In particular, the mechatronic industry is very sensitive to these requirements. Our research deals with modelling the supply chain in order to manage and implement a simulation platform. Basically, we develop a modelling sol...

  3. Modelling of the Czochralski flow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Franc

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available The Czochralski method of the industrial production of a silicon single crystal consists of pulling up the single crystal from the silicon melt. The flow of the melt during the production is called the Czochralski flow. The mathematical description of the flow consists of a coupled system of six P.D.E. in cylindrical coordinates containing Navier-Stokes equations (with the stream function, heat convection-conduction equations, convection-diffusion equation for oxygen impurity and an equation describing magnetic field effect.

  4. A New Model to Facilitate Individualized Case Conceptualization and Treatment of Social Phobia: An Examination and Reaction to Moscovitch's Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heimberg, Richard G.

    2009-01-01

    Moscovitch's (2009) model of social phobia is put forth as an integration and extension of previous cognitive-behavioral models. The author asserts that his approach overcomes a number of shortcomings of previous models and will serve to better guide case conceptualization, treatment planning, and intervention implementation for clients with…

  5. Technology, Demographic Characteristics and E-Learning Acceptance: A Conceptual Model Based on Extended Technology Acceptance Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarhini, Ali; Elyas, Tariq; Akour, Mohammad Ali; Al-Salti, Zahran

    2016-01-01

    The main aim of this paper is to develop an amalgamated conceptual model of technology acceptance that explains how individual, social, cultural and organizational factors affect the students' acceptance and usage behaviour of the Web-based learning systems. More specifically, the proposed model extends the Technology Acceptance Model (TAM) to…

  6. Hydrogeologic Framework Model for the Saturated Zone Site Scale flow and Transport Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    T. Miller

    2004-11-15

    The purpose of this report is to document the 19-unit, hydrogeologic framework model (19-layer version, output of this report) (HFM-19) with regard to input data, modeling methods, assumptions, uncertainties, limitations, and validation of the model results in accordance with AP-SIII.10Q, Models. The HFM-19 is developed as a conceptual model of the geometric extent of the hydrogeologic units at Yucca Mountain and is intended specifically for use in the development of the ''Saturated Zone Site-Scale Flow Model'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 170037]). Primary inputs to this model report include the GFM 3.1 (DTN: MO9901MWDGFM31.000 [DIRS 103769]), borehole lithologic logs, geologic maps, geologic cross sections, water level data, topographic information, and geophysical data as discussed in Section 4.1. Figure 1-1 shows the information flow among all of the saturated zone (SZ) reports and the relationship of this conceptual model in that flow. The HFM-19 is a three-dimensional (3-D) representation of the hydrogeologic units surrounding the location of the Yucca Mountain geologic repository for spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste. The HFM-19 represents the hydrogeologic setting for the Yucca Mountain area that covers about 1,350 km2 and includes a saturated thickness of about 2.75 km. The boundaries of the conceptual model were primarily chosen to be coincident with grid cells in the Death Valley regional groundwater flow model (DTN: GS960808312144.003 [DIRS 105121]) such that the base of the site-scale SZ flow model is consistent with the base of the regional model (2,750 meters below a smoothed version of the potentiometric surface), encompasses the exploratory boreholes, and provides a framework over the area of interest for groundwater flow and radionuclide transport modeling. In depth, the model domain extends from land surface to the base of the regional groundwater flow model (D'Agnese et al. 1997 [DIRS 100131], p 2). For the site

  7. An Update on the Conceptual-Production Systems Model of Apraxia: Evidence from Stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stamenova, Vessela; Black, Sandra E.; Roy, Eric A.

    2012-01-01

    Limb apraxia is a neurological disorder characterized by an inability to pantomime and/or imitate gestures. It is more commonly observed after left hemisphere damage (LHD), but has also been reported after right hemisphere damage (RHD). The Conceptual-Production Systems model (Roy, 1996) suggests that three systems are involved in the control of…

  8. Long-Term Conceptual Retrieval by College Biology Majors Following Model-Based Instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dauer, Joseph T.; Long, Tammy M.

    2015-01-01

    One of the goals of college-level introductory biology is to establish a foundation of knowledge and skills that can be built upon throughout a biology curriculum. In a reformed introductory biology course, we used iterative model construction as a pedagogical tool to promote students' understanding about conceptual connections, particularly those…

  9. Search for a New Conceptual Bookkeeping Model : Different Levels of Abstraction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sweere, A.M.J.; van Groenendaal, W.J.H.

    1999-01-01

    Nowadays, every bookkeeping system used in practice is automated. Most bookkeeping software and integrated information systems are based on databases. In this paper, we develop a new conceptual bookkeeping model which is not based on manual techniques, but which is applicable in a database

  10. Conceptual Design Model of Instructional Interfaces: Courseware for Inclusive Education System (IID4C) Distance Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tosho, Abdulrauf; Mutalib, Ariffin Abdul; Abdul-Salam, Sobihatun Nur

    2016-01-01

    This paper describes an ongoing study related to a conceptual design model, which is specific to instructional interface design to enhance courseware usage. It was found that most of the existing courseware applications focus on the needs of certain target with most of the courseware offer too little to inclusive learners. In addition, the use of…

  11. Pattern of students' conceptual change on magnetic field based on students' mental models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamid, Rimba; Widodo, Ari; Sopandi, Wahyu

    2017-05-01

    Students understanding about natural phenomena can be identified by analyzing their mental model. Changes in students' mental model are good indicator of students' conceptual change. This research aims at identifying students' conceptual change by analyzing changes in students' mental model. Participants of the study were twenty five elementary school students. Data were collected through throughout the lessons (prior to the lessons, during the lessons and after the lessons) based on students' written responses and individual interviews. Lessons were designed to facilitate students' conceptual change by allowing students to work in groups of students who have the similar ideas. Therefore, lessons were students-directed. Changes of students' ideas in every stage of the lessons were identified and analyzed. The results showed that there are three patterns of students' mental models, namely type of scientific (44%), analogous to everyday life (52%), and intuitive (4%). Further analyses of the pattern of their conceptual change identifies four different patterns, i.e. consistently correct (20%), consistently incomplete (16%), changing from incorrect to incomplete (8%), changing from incomplete to complete (32%), changing from complete to incorrect (4%), and changing from incorrect to complete (4%). This study suggest that the process of learning science does not move in a linear and progressive ways, rather they move in random and may move backward and forward.

  12. College Men's Meanings of Masculinities and Contextual Influences: Toward a Conceptual Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Frank, III

    2010-01-01

    Based on a grounded theory study involving 68 male undergraduates, a conceptual model of the meanings college men ascribe to masculinities is proposed in this article. The participants equated masculinities with "being respected," "being confident and self-assured," "assuming responsibility," and "embodying physical prowess." Contextual factors…

  13. Guiding Teachers in the Process of ICT Integration: Analysis of Three Conceptual Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qiyun

    2009-01-01

    The rapid development of emerging technologies has resulted in the availability of a number of information and communication technologies (ICT) tools. Teachers must have the competency to choose and integrate proper tools into teaching and learning. Over the years, a number of conceptual models have been developed to guide the process of ICT…

  14. An Update on the Conceptual-Production Systems Model of Apraxia: Evidence from Stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stamenova, Vessela; Black, Sandra E.; Roy, Eric A.

    2012-01-01

    Limb apraxia is a neurological disorder characterized by an inability to pantomime and/or imitate gestures. It is more commonly observed after left hemisphere damage (LHD), but has also been reported after right hemisphere damage (RHD). The Conceptual-Production Systems model (Roy, 1996) suggests that three systems are involved in the control of…

  15. A conceptual model for judging the truthfulness of a young child's allegation of sexual abuse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Young, Mary

    1986-10-01

    Because of the increased number of allegations of sexual abuse made by young children and the often severe legal penalties given to adult perpetrators, there is reason for concern about false or mistaken accusations. This paper develops a conceptual model for judging the truthfulness of such allegations by a young child.

  16. College Men's Meanings of Masculinities and Contextual Influences: Toward a Conceptual Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Frank, III

    2010-01-01

    Based on a grounded theory study involving 68 male undergraduates, a conceptual model of the meanings college men ascribe to masculinities is proposed in this article. The participants equated masculinities with "being respected," "being confident and self-assured," "assuming responsibility," and "embodying physical prowess." Contextual factors…

  17. The ISO Edi Conceptual Model Activity and Its Relationship to OSI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fincher, Judith A.

    1990-01-01

    The edi conceptual model is being developed to define common structures, services, and processes that syntax-specific standards like X12 and EDIFACT could adopt. Open Systems Interconnection (OSI) is of interest to edi because of its potential to help enable global interoperability across Electronic Data Interchange (EDI) functional groups. A…

  18. A conceptual model of channel choice : measuring online and offline shopping value perceptions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Broekhuizen, Thijs L.J.; Jager, Wander

    2004-01-01

    This study tries to understand how consumers evaluate channels for their purchasing. Specifically, it develops a conceptual model that addresses consumer value perceptions of using the Internet versus the traditional (physical) channel. Previous research showed that perceptions of price, product qua

  19. A Conceptual Model for Teaching Critical Thinking in a Knowledge Economy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chadwick, Clifton

    2011-01-01

    Critical thinking, viewed as rational and analytic thinking, is crucial for participation in a knowledge economy and society. This article provides a brief presentation of the importance of teaching critical thinking in a knowledge economy; suggests a conceptual model for teaching thinking; examines research on the historical role of teachers in…

  20. A conceptual model of channel choice : measuring online and offline shopping value perceptions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Broekhuizen, Thijs L.J.; Jager, Wander

    2004-01-01

    This study tries to understand how consumers evaluate channels for their purchasing. Specifically, it develops a conceptual model that addresses consumer value perceptions of using the Internet versus the traditional (physical) channel. Previous research showed that perceptions of price, product qua

  1. Purpose and Pedagogy: A Conceptual Model for an ePortfolio

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buyarski, Catherine A.; Aaron, Robert W.; Hansen, Michele J.; Hollingsworth, Cynthia D.; Johnson, Charles A.; Kahn, Susan; Landis, Cynthia M.; Pedersen, Joan S.; Powell, Amy A.

    2015-01-01

    This conceptual model emerged from the need to balance multiple purposes and perspectives associated with developing an ePortfolio designed to promote student development and success. A comprehensive review of literature from various disciplines, theoretical frameworks, and scholarship, including self-authorship, reflection, ePortfolio pedagogy,…

  2. A Conceptual/Cross-cultural Model for Teaching Anthropology in the Elementary School.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dynneson, Thomas L.

    A conceptual/cross-cultural model, developed to help elementary teachers cope with the problems of initiating cultural, ethnic, or anthropology studies, is presented in five sections. (1) A brief description of the structure and methodology of anthropology defines in outline form the fields of cultural and social anthropology, physical…

  3. Exploring Conceptual Models for Community Engagement at Higher Education Institutions in South Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bender, Gerda

    2008-01-01

    A critical conceptual analysis of the South African Higher Education context reflects the lack of a structural and functional framework for the conceptualisation of community engagement (CE) in higher education. The purpose of this article is to explore a framework and model for the conceptualisation of CE for a better understanding of community…

  4. Assessment of entrepreneurship pedagogy on entrepreneurship knowledge and entrepreneurial human capital asset: A conceptual model

    OpenAIRE

    Chidimma Odira Okeke; David Gun Fie Yong

    2016-01-01

    This study is an effort to propose a conceptual model to measure the impact assessment of entrepreneurship pedagogic. It delineates entrepreneurship education pedagogic into four dimensions and opined specific level for each dimension. Reviewing the entrepreneurship education programme, assessment of entrepreneurship pedagogic evaluates the structure that influence growth mindset development through embedded heuristic strategies, thus, the impact on entrepreneurship knowledge and entrepreneur...

  5. A Conceptual Framework for SAHRA Integrated Multi-resolution Modeling in the Rio Grande Basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Y.; Gupta, H.; Springer, E.; Wagener, T.; Brookshire, D.; Duffy, C.

    2004-12-01

    The sustainable management of water resources in a river basin requires an integrated analysis of the social, economic, environmental and institutional dimensions of the problem. Numerical models are commonly used for integration of these dimensions and for communication of the analysis results to stakeholders and policy makers. The National Science Foundation Science and Technology Center for Sustainability of semi-Arid Hydrology and Riparian Areas (SAHRA) has been developing integrated multi-resolution models to assess impacts of climate variability and land use change on water resources in the Rio Grande Basin. These models not only couple natural systems such as surface and ground waters, but will also include engineering, economic and social components that may be involved in water resources decision-making processes. This presentation will describe the conceptual framework being developed by SAHRA to guide and focus the multiple modeling efforts and to assist the modeling team in planning, data collection and interpretation, communication, evaluation, etc. One of the major components of this conceptual framework is a Conceptual Site Model (CSM), which describes the basin and its environment based on existing knowledge and identifies what additional information must be collected to develop technically sound models at various resolutions. The initial CSM is based on analyses of basin profile information that has been collected, including a physical profile (e.g., topographic and vegetative features), a man-made facility profile (e.g., dams, diversions, and pumping stations), and a land use and ecological profile (e.g., demographics, natural habitats, and endangered species). Based on the initial CSM, a Conceptual Physical Model (CPM) is developed to guide and evaluate the selection of a model code (or numerical model) for each resolution to conduct simulations and predictions. A CPM identifies, conceptually, all the physical processes and engineering and socio

  6. Nutrient supply and mercury dynamics in marine ecosystems: a conceptual model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Driscoll, Charles T; Chen, Celia Y; Hammerschmidt, Chad R; Mason, Robert P; Gilmour, Cynthia C; Sunderland, Elsie M; Greenfield, Ben K; Buckman, Kate L; Lamborg, Carl H

    2012-11-01

    There is increasing interest and concern over the impacts of mercury (Hg) inputs to marine ecosystems. One of the challenges in assessing these effects is that the cycling and trophic transfer of Hg are strongly linked to other contaminants and disturbances. In addition to Hg, a major problem facing coastal waters is the impacts of elevated nutrient, particularly nitrogen (N), inputs. Increases in nutrient loading alter coastal ecosystems in ways that should change the transport, transformations and fate of Hg, including increases in fixation of organic carbon and deposition to sediments, decreases in the redox status of sediments and changes in fish habitat. In this paper we present a conceptual model which suggests that increases in loading of reactive N to marine ecosystems might alter Hg dynamics, decreasing bioavailabilty and trophic transfer. This conceptual model is most applicable to coastal waters, but may also be relevant to the pelagic ocean. We present information from case studies that both support and challenge this conceptual model, including marine observations across a nutrient gradient; results of a nutrient-trophic transfer Hg model for pelagic and coastal ecosystems; observations of Hg species, and nutrients from coastal sediments in the northeastern U.S.; and an analysis of fish Hg concentrations in estuaries under different nutrient loadings. These case studies suggest that changes in nutrient loading can impact Hg dynamics in coastal and open ocean ecosystems. Unfortunately none of the case studies is comprehensive; each only addresses a portion of the conceptual model and has limitations. Nevertheless, our conceptual model has important management implications. Many estuaries near developed areas are impaired due to elevated nutrient inputs. Widespread efforts are underway to control N loading and restore coastal ecosystem function. An unintended consequence of nutrient control measures could be to exacerbate problems associated with Hg

  7. Adaptive Work Strategy for Evaluating a Conceptual Site Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dietrich, P.; Utom, A. U.; Werban, U.

    2015-12-01

    A comprehensive, diagnostic, procedural and adaptive scheme involving a combination of geophysical and direct push methods was developed and applied in the Wurmlingen study site situated within the region of Baden-Württemberg (southwest Germany). The goal of the study was to test the applicability of electrical resistivity method in imaging resistivity contrasts, and mapping the depth to and lateral extent of field-scale subsurface structures and existence of flow paths that may control concentration gradients of groundwater solution contents. Based on a relatively fast and cost-effective areal mapping with vertical electrical sounding technique, a northwest-southeast trending stream-channel-like depression (low apparent resistivity feature) through a Pleistocene aquifer was detected. For a more detailed characterization, we implemented electrical resistivity tomography method followed by direct push (DP) technologies. Beside the use of DP for verification of structures identified by geophysical tools, we used it for multi-level groundwater sampling. Results from groundwater chemistry indicate zones of steep nitrate concentration gradients associated with the feature.

  8. Microgravity two-phase flow regime modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, D.; Best, F.R.; Faget, N.

    1987-01-01

    A flow pattern or flow regime is the characteristics spatial distribution of the phases of fluid in a duct. Since heat transfer and pressure drop are dependent on the characteristic distribution of the phases, it is necessary to describe flow patterns in an appropriate manner so that a hydrodynamic or heat transfer theory applicable to that pattern can be chosen. The objective of the present analysis is to create a flow regime map based on physical modeling of vapor/liquid interaction phenomena in a microgravity environment. In the present work, four basic flow patterns are defined: dispersed flow, stratified flow, slug flow, and annular flow. Fluid properties, liquid and vapor flow rates, and pipe size were chosen as the principal parameters. It is assumed that a transition from one flow pattern to another will occur when there is a change in the dominant force which controls that flow pattern. The forces considered in this modeling are surface tension force, both force, inertial force, friction, and turbulent fluctuations.

  9. Assessment of entrepreneurship pedagogy on entrepreneurship knowledge and entrepreneurial human capital asset: A conceptual model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chidimma Odira Okeke

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available This study is an effort to propose a conceptual model to measure the impact assessment of entrepreneurship pedagogic. It delineates entrepreneurship education pedagogic into four dimensions and opined specific level for each dimension. Reviewing the entrepreneurship education programme, assessment of entrepreneurship pedagogic evaluates the structure that influence growth mindset development through embedded heuristic strategies, thus, the impact on entrepreneurship knowledge and entrepreneurial capital asset context is proposed. Affirming Fayolle, Gailly, and Lassa-Clerc conceptual affinity that entrepreneurship education share with learning theories and entrepreneurship pedagogical content knowledge were conceptualized to suggest some practical realism guidelines of what insightful philosophy of teaching entrepreneurship need to achieve. With direct synthesis of relevant literature, propositions relating to entrepreneurship pedagogic structure along with the institutional connectedness and associated dimensions of entrepreneurship pedagogic assessment outcome were postulated. Also, the paper proposes the need for further assessment of specific forms of pedagogic impact on entrepreneurial human capital asset.

  10. Conceptual hierarchical modeling to describe wetland plant community organization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Little, A.M.; Guntenspergen, G.R.; Allen, T.F.H.

    2010-01-01

    Using multivariate analysis, we created a hierarchical modeling process that describes how differently-scaled environmental factors interact to affect wetland-scale plant community organization in a system of small, isolated wetlands on Mount Desert Island, Maine. We followed the procedure: 1) delineate wetland groups using cluster analysis, 2) identify differently scaled environmental gradients using non-metric multidimensional scaling, 3) order gradient hierarchical levels according to spatiotem-poral scale of fluctuation, and 4) assemble hierarchical model using group relationships with ordination axes and post-hoc tests of environmental differences. Using this process, we determined 1) large wetland size and poor surface water chemistry led to the development of shrub fen wetland vegetation, 2) Sphagnum and water chemistry differences affected fen vs. marsh / sedge meadows status within small wetlands, and 3) small-scale hydrologic differences explained transitions between forested vs. non-forested and marsh vs. sedge meadow vegetation. This hierarchical modeling process can help explain how upper level contextual processes constrain biotic community response to lower-level environmental changes. It creates models with more nuanced spatiotemporal complexity than classification and regression tree procedures. Using this process, wetland scientists will be able to generate more generalizable theories of plant community organization, and useful management models. ?? Society of Wetland Scientists 2009.

  11. Average-passage flow model development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamczyk, John J.; Celestina, Mark L.; Beach, Tim A.; Kirtley, Kevin; Barnett, Mark

    1989-01-01

    A 3-D model was developed for simulating multistage turbomachinery flows using supercomputers. This average passage flow model described the time averaged flow field within a typical passage of a bladed wheel within a multistage configuration. To date, a number of inviscid simulations were executed to assess the resolution capabilities of the model. Recently, the viscous terms associated with the average passage model were incorporated into the inviscid computer code along with an algebraic turbulence model. A simulation of a stage-and-one-half, low speed turbine was executed. The results of this simulation, including a comparison with experimental data, is discussed.

  12. Modeling interregional freight flow by distribution systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Davydenko, I.; Tavasszy, L.A.; Blois, C.J. de

    2013-01-01

    Distribution Centers with a warehousing function have an important influence on the flow of goods from production to consumption, generating substantial goods flow and vehicle movements. This paper extends the classical 4-step freight modeling framework with a logistics chain model, explicitly

  13. A CONCEPTUAL MULTIDIMENSIONAL MODEL FOR ASSESSING SMART SUSTAINABLE CITIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sukaina Al-Nasrawi

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The concept of Smart Sustainable Cities (SSC is gaining increasing attention by the countries around the globe, particularly in response to potential future environmental challenges and increased proportion of populations living in cities. Several countries claim to have implemented or in the process of implementing SSCs, and there are many models that can be used to measure how 'smart' the initiatives and cities are. This paper critically evaluates the main models to measure city smartness and identifies deficiencies, namely that they are not sensitive to the needs, resources, priorities and wider context for individual cities. The paper suggests a multidimensional methodological model that assists in evaluating the smartness level of a city while being sensitive to its context. It provides further contribution by combining sustainable and smart attributes of a city

  14. The Historical Evolution of Theories and Conceptual Models for Nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawkins, Joellen W.

    The development of nursing models can be traced to the inception of nursing as a profession. Florence Nightingale laid the foundation for current nursing practice and differentiated nursing from medicine. The late 19th and early 20th centuries contributed a number of important nurse theorists, better known for other contributions to the neophyte…

  15. Animation Model to Conceptualize ATP Generation: A Mitochondrial Oxidative Phosphorylation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jena, Ananta Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Adenosine triphosphate (ATP) is the molecular unit of intracellular energy and it is the product of oxidative phosphorylation of cellular respiration uses in cellular processes. The study explores the growth of the misconception levels amongst the learners and evaluates the effectiveness of animation model over traditional methods. The data…

  16. Public–private partnership conceptual framework and models for the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper presents public–private partnership (PPP) framework models for funding and financing of water services ... capital markets to finance water infrastructure, particularly local bond markets ...... for the provision of water services infrastructure assets to be ... of water use charges and/or tariffs (pricing), regulatory impact.

  17. The Theoretical Foundation for Intercultural Business Communication: A Conceptual Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varner, Iris I.

    2000-01-01

    Develops a theoretical framework for intercultural business communication which sets it apart from intercultural communication and international business. Presents a model that discusses the intercultural, business, and communication strategies that are part of intercultural business communication. Examines how past articles in the field fit into…

  18. Integrating O/S models during conceptual design, part 3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebeling, Charles E.

    1994-12-01

    Space vehicles, such as the Space Shuttle, require intensive ground support prior to, during, and after each mission. Maintenance is a significant part of that ground support. All space vehicles require scheduled maintenance to ensure operability and performance. In addition, components of any vehicle are not one-hundred percent reliable so they exhibit random failures. Once detected, a failure initiates unscheduled maintenance on the vehicle. Maintenance decreases the number of missions which can be completed by keeping vehicles out of service so that the time between the completion of one mission and the start of the next is increased. Maintenance also requires resources such as people, facilities, tooling, and spare parts. Assessing the mission capability and resource requirements of any new space vehicle, in addition to performance specification, is necessary to predict the life cycle cost and success of the vehicle. Maintenance and logistics support has been modeled by computer simulation to estimate mission capability and resource requirements for evaluation of proposed space vehicles. The simulation was written with Simulation Language for Alternative Modeling II (SLAM II) for execution on a personal computer. For either one or a fleet of space vehicles, the model simulates the preflight maintenance checks, the mission and return to earth, and the post flight maintenance in preparation to be sent back into space. THe model enables prediction of the number of missions possible and vehicle turn-time (the time between completion of one mission and the start of the next) given estimated values for component reliability and maintainability. The model also facilitates study of the manpower and vehicle requirements for the proposed vehicle to meet its desired mission rate. This is the 3rd part of a 3 part technical report.

  19. INEEL Subregional Conceptual Model Report; Volume 1 - Summary of Existing Knowledge of Natural and Anthropogenic Influences Governing Subsurface Contaminant Transport in the INEEL Subregion of the Eastern Snake River Plain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wichlacz, Paul Louis; Orr, Brennan

    2002-08-01

    The National Research Council has defined a conceptual model as ''an evolving hypothesis identifying the important features, processes, and events controlling fluid flow and contaminant transport of consequence at a specific field site in the context of a recognized problem''. Presently, several subregional conceptual models are under development at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). Additionally, facility-specific conceptual models have been described as part of INEEL environmental restoration activities. Compilation of these models is required to develop a comprehensive conceptual model that can be used to strategically plan for future groundwater research activities at the INEEL. Conceptual models of groundwater flow and contaminant transport at the INEEL include the description of the geologic framework, matrix hydraulic properties, and inflows and outflows. They also include definitions of the contaminant source term and contaminant transport mechanisms. The geologic framework of the INEEL subregion is described by the geometry of the system, stratigraphic units within the system, and structural features that affect groundwater flow and contaminant transport. These elements define geohydrologic units that make up the Snake River Plain Aquifer (SRPA). The United States Geological Survey (USGS) conceptual model encompasses approximately 1,920 mi2 of the eastern Snake River Plain. The Waste Area Group (WAG)-10 model includes the USGS area and additional areas to the northeast and southeast. Both conceptual models are bounded to the northwest by the Pioneer Mountains, Lost River Range, and Lemhi Mountains. They are bounded to the southeast by groundwater flow paths determined from aquifer water-level contours. The upgradient extent of the USGS model is a water-level contour that includes the northeastern boundary of the INEEL. The WAG-10 model includes more of the Mud Lake area to utilize previous estimates of

  20. INEEL Subregional Conceptual Model Report; Volume 1 - Summary of Existing Knowledge of Natural and Anthropogenic Influences Governing Subsurface Contaminant Transport in the INEEL Subregion of the Eastern Snake River Plain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wichlacz, Paul Louis; Orr, Brennan

    2002-08-01

    The National Research Council has defined a conceptual model as ''an evolving hypothesis identifying the important features, processes, and events controlling fluid flow and contaminant transport of consequence at a specific field site in the context of a recognized problem''. Presently, several subregional conceptual models are under development at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). Additionally, facility-specific conceptual models have been described as part of INEEL environmental restoration activities. Compilation of these models is required to develop a comprehensive conceptual model that can be used to strategically plan for future groundwater research activities at the INEEL. Conceptual models of groundwater flow and contaminant transport at the INEEL include the description of the geologic framework, matrix hydraulic properties, and inflows and outflows. They also include definitions of the contaminant source term and contaminant transport mechanisms. The geologic framework of the INEEL subregion is described by the geometry of the system, stratigraphic units within the system, and structural features that affect groundwater flow and contaminant transport. These elements define geohydrologic units that make up the Snake River Plain Aquifer (SRPA). The United States Geological Survey (USGS) conceptual model encompasses approximately 1,920 mi2 of the eastern Snake River Plain. The Waste Area Group (WAG)-10 model includes the USGS area and additional areas to the northeast and southeast. Both conceptual models are bounded to the northwest by the Pioneer Mountains, Lost River Range, and Lemhi Mountains. They are bounded to the southeast by groundwater flow paths determined from aquifer water-level contours. The upgradient extent of the USGS model is a water-level contour that includes the northeastern boundary of the INEEL. The WAG-10 model includes more of the Mud Lake area to utilize previous estimates of

  1. Managing the Marine Environment, Conceptual Models and Assessment Considerations for the European Marine Strategy Framework Directive

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher John Smith

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Conceptual models summarize, visualize and explain actual or predicted situations and how they might be tackled. In recent years, Pressure-State-Response (P-S-R frameworks have been central to conceptualizing marine ecosystem issues and then translating those to stakeholders, environmental managers and researchers. Society is concerned about the risks to the natural and human system posed by those Pressures (thus needing risk assessment and then needs to act to minimize or compensate those risks (as risk management. This research relates this to the DPSIR (Drivers-Pressure-State(change-Impact-Response hierarchical framework using standardized terminology/definitions and lists of impacting Activities and Pressures affecting ecosystem components, incorporating the European Marine Strategy Framework Directive (MSFD legal decision components. This uses the example of fishing activity and the pressure of trawling from abrasion on the seabed and its effects on particular components. The mechanisms of Pressure acting on State changes are highlighted here as an additional refinement to DPSIR. The approach moves from conceptual models to actual assessments including: assessment methodologies (interactive matrices, ecosystem modeling, Bayesian Belief Networks, Bow-tie approach, some assessment tools data availability, confidence, scaling, cumulative effects and multiple simultaneous Pressures, which more often occur in multi-use and multi-user areas. In defining and describing the DPSIR Conceptual Framework we consider its use in re-world ecosystems affected by multiple pressures or multiple mechanisms of single pressures, and show how it facilitates management and assessment issues with particular relevance to the MSFD.

  2. Approximate Model for Turbulent Stagnation Point Flow.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dechant, Lawrence [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Here we derive an approximate turbulent self-similar model for a class of favorable pressure gradient wedge-like flows, focusing on the stagnation point limit. While the self-similar model provides a useful gross flow field estimate this approach must be combined with a near wall model is to determine skin friction and by Reynolds analogy the heat transfer coefficient. The combined approach is developed in detail for the stagnation point flow problem where turbulent skin friction and Nusselt number results are obtained. Comparison to the classical Van Driest (1958) result suggests overall reasonable agreement. Though the model is only valid near the stagnation region of cylinders and spheres it nonetheless provides a reasonable model for overall cylinder and sphere heat transfer. The enhancement effect of free stream turbulence upon the laminar flow is used to derive a similar expression which is valid for turbulent flow. Examination of free stream enhanced laminar flow suggests that the rather than enhancement of a laminar flow behavior free stream disturbance results in early transition to turbulent stagnation point behavior. Excellent agreement is shown between enhanced laminar flow and turbulent flow behavior for high levels, e.g. 5% of free stream turbulence. Finally the blunt body turbulent stagnation results are shown to provide realistic heat transfer results for turbulent jet impingement problems.

  3. Well-being in schools: a conceptual model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konu, Anne; Rimpelä, Matti

    2002-03-01

    Health and well-being have mostly been separated from other aspects of school life. Health services and health education have been available for school-aged children in Western societies for a long time. Recently, more comprehensive school health programmes have been developed, e.g. the WHO 'health promoting school' and 'coordinated school health programme' in the USA. They focus on how to implement health promotion and health education in school. However, a theoretically grounded model based on the sociological concept of well-being is needed for planning and evaluation of school development programmes. The School Well-being Model is based on Allardt's sociological theory of welfare and assesses well-being as an entity in school setting. Well-being is connected with teaching and education, and with learning and achievements. Indicators of well-being are divided into four categories: school conditions (having), social relationships (loving), means for self-fulfilment (being) and health status. 'Means for self-fulfilment' encompasses possibilities for each pupil to study according to his/her own resources and capabilities. 'Health status' is seen through pupils' symptoms, diseases and illnesses. Each well-being category contains several aspects of pupils' life in school. The model takes into account the important impact of pupils' homes and the surrounding community. Compared with others, The School Well-being Model's main differences are the use of the well-being concept, the definition of health and the subcategory means for self-fulfilment. Making the outline of the well-being concept facilitates the development of theoretically grounded subjective and objective well-being indicators.

  4. Elements of a flexible approach for conceptual hydrological modeling: 1. Motivation and theoretical development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fenicia, Fabrizio; Kavetski, Dmitri; Savenije, Hubert H. G.

    2011-11-01

    This paper introduces a flexible framework for conceptual hydrological modeling, with two related objectives: (1) generalize and systematize the currently fragmented field of conceptual models and (2) provide a robust platform for understanding and modeling hydrological systems. In contrast to currently dominant "fixed" model applications, the flexible framework proposed here allows the hydrologist to hypothesize, build, and test different model structures using combinations of generic components. This is particularly useful for conceptual modeling at the catchment scale, where limitations in process understanding and data availability remain major research and operational challenges. The formulation of the model architecture and individual components to represent distinct aspects of catchment-scale function, such as storage, release, and transmission of water, is discussed. Several numerical strategies for implementing the model equations within a computationally robust framework are also presented. In the companion paper, the potential of the flexible framework is examined with respect to supporting more systematic and stringent hypothesis testing, for characterizing catchment diversity, and, more generally, for aiding progress toward more unified hydrological theory at the catchment scale.

  5. Relativism and views in a conceptual data base model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kreps, P.

    1980-04-01

    In a core schema that attempted to faithfully represent the inter-connectedness of the real world, each class role would need to be made explicit, naming its respectively associated classes and mappings. From each role a characteristic family of derived views can be inferred. In practice, this program need not be fully carried out as there are always connections in the real world which we choose not to model. But it is interesting to imagine an information system that behaved as if all (or at least all obvious) possible views had been automatically defined. It appears that humans have a system for doing some such automatic schema transformation in our natural semantic model of the world. As we constantly shift perspectives we seem always to be able to readily call up whatever role is appropriate for any given object in (mental) view. The work described falls in an area that is just on the edge of currently developing DB technologies. It is motivated by a desire to achieve systems that are more natural, more intelligent, and which better complement and support our own intellectual activity in the management and modelling of complex environments. There are, of course, many issues involved here which are far from the arena of cognitive science (especially the more purely technical issues of physical system implementation.) But there are many aspects of the interface toward which these efforts are aimed which remain open questions that AI and cognitive science in general can help to clarify.

  6. Evidence-based ergonomics: a model and conceptual structure proposal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silveira, Dierci Marcio

    2012-01-01

    In Human Factors and Ergonomics Science (HFES), it is difficult to identify what is the best approach to tackle the workplace and systems design problems which needs to be solved, and it has been also advocated as transdisciplinary and multidisciplinary the issue of "How to solve the human factors and ergonomics problems that are identified?". The proposition on this study is to combine the theoretical approach for Sustainability Science, the Taxonomy of the Human Factors and Ergonomics (HFE) discipline and the framework for Evidence-Based Medicine in an attempt to be applied in Human Factors and Ergonomics. Applications of ontologies are known in the field of medical research and computer science. By scrutinizing the key requirements for the HFES structuring of knowledge, it was designed a reference model, First, it was identified the important requirements for HFES Concept structuring, as regarded by Meister. Second, it was developed an evidence-based ergonomics framework as a reference model composed of six levels based on these requirements. Third, it was devised a mapping tool using linguistic resources to translate human work, systems environment and the complexities inherent to their hierarchical relationships to support future development at Level 2 of the reference model and for meeting the two major challenges for HFES, namely, identifying what problems should be addressed in HFE as an Autonomous Science itself and proposing solutions by integrating concepts and methods applied in HFES for those problems.

  7. Data Relationships: Towards a Conceptual Model of Scientific Data Catalogs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hourcle, J. A.

    2008-12-01

    As the amount of data, types of processing and storage formats increase, the total number of record permutations increase dramatically. The result is an overwhelming number of records that make identifying the best data object to answer a user's needs more difficult. The issue is further complicated as each archive's data catalog may be designed around different concepts - - anything from individual files to be served, series of similarly generated and processed data, or something entirely different. Catalogs may not only be flat tables, but may be structured as multiple tables with each table being a different data series, or a normalized structure of the individual data files. Merging federated search results from archives with different catalog designs can create situations where the data object of interest is difficult to find due to an overwhelming number of seemingly similar or entirely unwanted records. We present a reference model for discussing data catalogs and the complex relationships between similar data objects. We show how the model can be used to improve scientist's ability to quickly identify the best data object for their purposes and discuss technical issues required to use this model in a federated system.

  8. The Effects of Common Knowledge Construction Model Sequence of Lessons on Science Achievement and Relational Conceptual Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebenezer, Jazlin; Chacko, Sheela; Kaya, Osman Nafiz; Koya, Satya Kiran; Ebenezer, Devairakkam Luke

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of the Common Knowledge Construction Model (CKCM) lesson sequence, an intervention based both in conceptual change theory and in Phenomenography, a subset of conceptual change theory. A mixed approach was used to investigate whether this model had a significant effect on 7th grade students'…

  9. Simulation of cylindrical flow to a well using the U.S. Geological Survey Modular Finite-Difference Ground-Water Flow Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reilly, Thomas E.; Harbaugh, Arlen W.

    1993-01-01

    Cylindrical (axisymmetric) flow to a well is an important specialized topic of ground-water hydraulics and has been applied by many investigators to determine aquifer properties and determine heads and flows in the vicinity of the well. A recent modification to the U.S. Geological Survey Modular Three-Dimensional Finite-Difference Ground-Water Flow Model provides the opportunity to simulate axisymmetric flow to a well. The theory involves the conceptualization of a system of concentric shells that are capable of reproducing the large variations in gradient in the vicinity of the well by decreasing their area in the direction of the well. The computer program presented serves as a preprocessor to the U.S. Geological Survey model by creating the input data file needed to implement the axisymmetric conceptualization. Data input requirements to this preprocessor are described, and a comparison with a known analytical solution indicates that the model functions appropriately.

  10. Groundwater flow modelling under ice sheet conditions. Scoping calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jaquet, O.; Namar, R. (In2Earth Modelling Ltd (Switzerland)); Jansson, P. (Dept. of Physical Geography and Quaternary Geology, Stockholm Univ., Stockholm (Sweden))

    2010-10-15

    program DarcyTools in order to evaluate the current conceptual model for groundwater flow under ice sheet conditions, as well as to provide some guidance to the field investigations. For this first modelling phase, coupled processes are not considered for the modelling of the groundwater flow system under ice sheet conditions; e.g. density driven flow, thermal and geomechanical effects as well as coupling with a dynamical ice sheet model shall be investigated in the next phase

  11. Analytical models for complex swirling flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borissov, A.; Hussain, V.

    1996-11-01

    We develops a new class of analytical solutions of the Navier-Stokes equations for swirling flows, and suggests ways to predict and control such flows occurring in various technological applications. We view momentum accumulation on the axis as a key feature of swirling flows and consider vortex-sink flows on curved axisymmetric surfaces with an axial flow. We show that these solutions model swirling flows in a cylindrical can, whirlpools, tornadoes, and cosmic swirling jets. The singularity of these solutions on the flow axis is removed by matching them with near-axis Schlichting and Long's swirling jets. The matched solutions model flows with very complex patterns, consisting of up to seven separation regions with recirculatory 'bubbles' and vortex rings. We apply the matched solutions for computing flows in the Ranque-Hilsch tube, in the meniscus of electrosprays, in vortex breakdown, and in an industrial vortex burner. The simple analytical solutions allow a clear understanding of how different control parameters affect the flow and guide selection of optimal parameter values for desired flow features. These solutions permit extension to other problems (such as heat transfer and chemical reaction) and have the potential of being significantly useful for further detailed investigation by direct or large-eddy numerical simulations as well as laboratory experimentation.

  12. Modeling and simulation of reactive flows

    CERN Document Server

    Bortoli, De AL; Pereira, Felipe

    2015-01-01

    Modelling and Simulation of Reactive Flows presents information on modeling and how to numerically solve reactive flows. The book offers a distinctive approach that combines diffusion flames and geochemical flow problems, providing users with a comprehensive resource that bridges the gap for scientists, engineers, and the industry. Specifically, the book looks at the basic concepts related to reaction rates, chemical kinetics, and the development of reduced kinetic mechanisms. It considers the most common methods used in practical situations, along with equations for reactive flows, and va

  13. Alluvium-Buttressed Landslides: Conceptual Model and Examples from California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, P. L.; Cotton, W. R., Sr.; Shires, P. O.

    2016-12-01

    Large, deep-seated landslides typically occur in hillside settings without any natural buttressing, and many of these landslides have relatively low factors of safety (FS), the ratio of driving to resisting forces. However, where deep-seated landslides failed millennia ago into valleys that subsequently experienced alluvial aggradation, a natural buttress of alluvium may be deposited over the landslide toe, increasing the FS of these landslides. The eustatic model for alluvial buttressing of Quaternary landslides involves failure of slopes during sea level low stand at or near the late Pleistocene last glacial maximum (LGM, approximately 20 ka). Following LGM, mean sea level rose by over 120m to its present elevation. This rise in base level resulted in deposition of alluvial sediment in coastal valleys that had been v-shaped and downcutting prior to and during LGM. These valleys now have broad, low gradient floors formed by alluvial sediment, and the thick alluvial strata filling these valleys cover the toes of late Pleistocene landslides. In this study, three examples of large, deep-seated Pleistocene landslides that are buttressed by alluvium are presented. The McCracken Hill Landslide in Orange County and the Potrero Canyon Landslide Complex in Monterey County are located approximately 1.5 and 6 km, respectively, from the modern Pacific shore and closely fit the eustatic model of alluvial buttressing. At Knights Valley, in the upper Russian River watershed of eastern Sonoma County, a deep-seated alluvium-buttressed landslide is located approximately 65 km from the modern shore (measured along the Russian River and its tributary stream). The alluvium in Knights Valley may have ponded due to late Quaternary tectonic uplift of hills west of the valley. Streams that cross these hills are incised into bedrock downstream from Knights Valley and approaching the Russian River. Thus, the Knights Valley example (of an alluvium-buttressed landslide) demonstrates a rare

  14. Technologies for conceptual modelling and intelligent query formulation

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Alberts, R

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available modelling and intelligent query formulation R ALBERTS1, K BRITZ1, A GERBER1, K HALLAND1,2, T MEYER1, L PRETORIUS1,2 (1) Knowledge Systems Group, Meraka Institute, CSIR, Pretoria, Gauteng, South Africa (2) School of Computing, University of South... this problem still more pressing: in this case an excess of information can be equivalent to an absence of information It is therefore necessary to use tools that organise data into intelligible and easily-accessible structures and return answers...

  15. Midwifery models: students' conceptualization of a midwifery philosophy in clay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Deborah S

    2007-01-01

    Formulating a professional and personal philosophy statement assists nurses and midwives in clarifying focus and direction. It also facilitates grounding of the nursing and midwifery professions or professionals by enabling the identification of both shared beliefs and unique elements. The purpose of this activity was to assist beginning student nurse-midwives (SNMs) in exploring the intersection of their own and the profession's philosophy. Through the creation of a clay representation of their philosophical model, eight SNMs expressed their midwifery philosophies at the beginning of their clinical sequence by sculpting them in clay and then described their sculptures and how they exemplified their philosophies.

  16. Revisiting the destination image construct through a conceptual model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nelson Matos

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available In a highly complex and dynamic sector like tourism, the current economic crisis brings to destination managers not only challenges but also opportunities. The image destinations promote to the market is a key element in the tourist decision-making process when choosing a tourism destination. This paper’s purpose is, therefore, to review and explore the destination image construct and its implications for the destination, and also to present a model of destination image based on previous studies. Implications for creating, enhancing and implementing the correct marketing programs for tourism destinations are provided.

  17. Employee commitment and motivation: a conceptual analysis and integrative model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myer, John P; Becker, Thomas E; Vandenberghe, Christian

    2004-12-01

    Theorists and researchers interested in employee commitment and motivation have not made optimal use of each other's work. Commitment researchers seldom address the motivational processes through which commitment affects behavior, and motivation researchers have not recognized important distinctions in the forms, foci, and bases of commitment. To encourage greater cross-fertilization, the authors present an integrative framework in which commitment is presented as one of several energizing forces for motivated behavior. E. A. Locke's (1997) model of the work motivation process and J. P. Meyer and L. Herscovitch's (2001) model of workplace commitments serve as the foundation for the development of this new framework. To facilitate the merger, a new concept, goal regulation, is derived from self-determination theory (E. L. Deci & R. M. Ryan, 1985) and regulatory focus theory (E. I. Higgins, 1997). By including goal regulation, it is acknowledged that motivated behavior can be accompanied by different mindsets that have particularly important implications for the explanation and prediction of discretionary work behavior.

  18. Apparel shopping behaviour – Part 2: Conceptual theoretical model, market segments, profiles and implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Du Preez

    2003-10-01

    Full Text Available This article is based on the conceptual theoretical model developed in Part 1 of this series of articles. The objective of this research is to identify female apparel consumer market segments on the basis of differentiating lifestyles, shopping orientation, cultural consciousness, store patronage and demographics. These profiles are discussed in full and the implications thereof for retailers, marketers and researchers are highlighted. A new conceptual model is proposed and recommendations are made for further research. Opsomming Hierdie artikel word gebaseer op die konseptuele teoretiese model wat reeds in Deel 1 van hierdie artikelreeks ontwikkel is. Die doel van hierdie navorsing is om marksegmente van vroue klere-kopers te identifiseer na aanleiding van hulle lewenstyle, kooporiëntasie, kulturele bewustheid, winkelvoorkeurgedrag en demografie. Hierdie profiele word volledig beskryf en die implikasies van die verskillende profiele vir kleinhandelaars, bemarkers en navorsers word uitgelig. ’n Nuwe konseptuele model word voorgestel en aanbevelings vir verdere navorsing word gemaak.

  19. Periodic orbits for a discontinuous vector field arising from a conceptual model of glacial cycles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, James; Widiasih, Esther; Hahn, Jonathan; McGehee, Richard

    2016-06-01

    Conceptual climate models provide an approach to understanding climate processes through a mathematical analysis of an approximation to reality. Recently, these models have also provided interesting examples of nonsmooth dynamical systems. Here we develop a new conceptual model of glacial cycles consisting of a system of three ordinary differential equations defining a discontinuous vector field. Our model provides a dynamical systems framework for a mechanism previously shown to play a crucial role in glacial cycle patterns, namely, an increased ice sheet ablation rate during deglaciations. We use ad hoc singular perturbation techniques to prove the existence of a large periodic orbit crossing the discontinuity boundary, provided the ice sheet edge moves sufficiently slowly relative to changes in the snow line and temperature. Numerical explorations reveal the periodic orbit exists when the time constant for the ice sheet edge has more moderate values.

  20. A year 2003 conceptual model for the U.S. telecommunications infrastructure.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cox, Roger Gary; Reinert, Rhonda K.

    2003-12-01

    To model the telecommunications infrastructure and its role and robustness to shocks, we must characterize the business and engineering of telecommunications systems in the year 2003 and beyond. By analogy to environmental systems modeling, we seek to develop a 'conceptual model' for telecommunications. Here, the conceptual model is a list of high-level assumptions consistent with the economic and engineering architectures of telecommunications suppliers and customers, both today and in the near future. We describe the present engineering architectures of the most popular service offerings, and describe the supplier markets in some detail. We also develop a characterization of the customer base for telecommunications services and project its likely response to disruptions in service, base-lining such conjectures against observed behaviors during 9/11.

  1. CONCEPTUAL MODEL OF FINANCIAL INDEXES FOR INFORMATIVE SYSTEM IN NAPS OF UKRAINE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alla V. Kilchenko

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available The actual task of modern information society forming is a construction and introduction of the information systems in educational management. The article contains the analysis of subject domain of the informative system in the National Academy of Pedagogical Sciences of Ukraine, description of financial documents and facilities for automations of their treatment in the integrated environment of Windows SharePoint Services – Microsoft Word. The conceptual model of information is presented, it is shown, as on its basis facilities of automation of work are built with financial documents. The CRT forms of document life cycle are resulted in the information system: conceptual model of information, logical model of data, physical model of data, template, a document, eventual document with the automatic filling of indexes of financial documents.

  2. Some problems with social cognition models: a pragmatic and conceptual analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogden, Jane

    2003-07-01

    Empirical articles published between 1997 and 2001 from 4 health psychology journals that tested or applied 1 or more social cognition models (theory of reasoned action, theory of planned behavior, health belief model, and protection motivation theory; N = 47) were scrutinized for their pragmatic and conceptual basis. In terms of their pragmatic basis, these 4 models were useful for guiding research. The analysis of their conceptual basis was less positive. First, these models do not enable the generation of hypotheses because their constructs are unspecific; they therefore cannot be tested. Second, they focus on analytic truths rather than synthetic ones, and the conclusions resulting from their application are often true by definition rather than by observation. Finally, they may create and change both cognitions and behavior rather than describe them.

  3. A RHEOLOGICAL MODEL FOR POLYMER MELTS WITH INTERNAL STRUCTURE IN FLOW FIELDS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chi-Xing Zhou

    1999-01-01

    Conceptually, an imagined conformation ellipsoid is supposed to represent the shape of a polymer chain for polymer melts in flow fields and to be equivalent to the volume element in a mathematical sense in continuum mechanics. A power law dependence of shear modulus of polymer melts on detC, referred to as envelope volume, is proposed. Based on those assumptions and the non-linear relation of shear modulus, a phenomenological viscoelastic model is derived. The model is tested in simple shear flow, simple elongational flow, oscillatory shear flow, and relaxation process after flow suddenly stopped. The results show that the model works well to predict the change of internal structure and viscoelastic performance of polymer melts in flow fields.

  4. Surficial extent and conceptual model of hydrothermal system at Mount Rainier, Washington

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank, David

    1995-04-01

    A once massive hydrothermal system was disgorged from the summit of Mount Rainier in a highly destructive manner about 5000 years ago. Today, hydrothermal processes are depositing clayey alteration products that have the potential to reset the stage for similar events in the future. Areas of active hydrothermal alteration occur in three representative settings: (1) An extensive area (greater than 12,000 m 2) of heated ground and slightly acidic boiling-point fumaroles at 76-82 °C at East and West Craters on the volcano's summit, where alteration products include smectite, halloysite and disordered kaolinite, cristobalite, tridymite, opal, alunite, gibbsite, and calcite. (2) A small area (less than 500 m 2) of heated ground and sub-boiling-point fumaroles at 55-60 °C on the upper flank at Disappointment Cleaver with smectite alteration and chalcedony, tridymite, and opal-A encrustations. Similar areas probably occur at Willis Wall, Sunset Amphitheater, and the South Tahoma and Kautz headwalls. (3) Sulfate- and carbon dioxide-enriched thermal springs at 9-24 °C on the lower flank of the volcano in valley walls beside the Winthrop and Paradise Glaciers, where calcite, opal-A, and gypsum are being deposited. In addition, chloride- and carbon dioxide-enriched thermal springs issue from thin sediments that overlie Tertiary rocks at, or somewhat beyond, the base of the volcanic edifice in valley bottoms of the Nisqually and Ohanapecosh Rivers. Maximum spring temperatures of 19-25 °C and 38-50 °C, respectively, and extensive travertine deposits have developed in these more distant localities. The heat flow, distribution of thermal activity, and nature of alteration minerals and fluids suggest a conceptual model of a narrow, central hydrothermal system within Mount Rainier, with steam-heated snowmelt at the summit craters and localized leakage of steam-heated fluids within 2 km of the summit. The lateral extent of the hydrothermal system is marked by discharge of

  5. A conceptual model for barrier free facilities planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bittencourt, R S; de M Guimarães, L B

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents the proposal of a model for planning a barrier free industrial facilities, considering the demands that inclusion requires, ranging from outside the factory (social environment), to the needs of the production system and the workstation. Along with literature review, the demands were identified in a shoe manufacturer that employs people with disabilities, and organized taxonomically in agreement with the structure for planning facilities. The results show that the problems are not primarily related to eliminating architectural barriers and factors aimed at preventing risks to people's health and safety but, rather, are related to the company's cultural environment, because the main hazards are managerial. In special cases, it is suggested there is a need to adjust those parts of tasks that the worker cannot do, or even to re-schedule work so as to make it possible for employees with disabilities to perform their tasks.

  6. Flow in a model turbine stator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buggeln, R. C.; Shamroth, S. J.; Briley, W. R.

    1985-10-01

    In view of the complex nature of the flowfield in the hot section of gas turbine engines, the need to predict heat transfer and flow losses, the possible appearance of separation and strong secondary flows, etc., the present effort is focusing upon a Navier-Stokes approach to the three dimensional turbine stator problem. The advantages of a full Navier-Stokes approach are clear since when combined with a suitable turbulence model these equations represent the flow and heat transfer physics. In particular, the Navier-Stokes equations accurately represent possible separated regions and regions of significant secondary flow. In addition, the Navier-Stokes approach allows representation of the entire flow field by a single set of equations, thus avoiding problems associated with representing different regions of the flow by different equations and then matching flow regions.

  7. NUMERICAL MODEL FOR FLOW MOTION WITH VEGETATION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Jian-tao; SU Xiao-hui

    2008-01-01

    A set of governing equations for turbulent flows in vegetated area were derived with the assumption that vegetation is of straight and rigid cylinder. The effect of vegetation on flow motion was represented by additional inertial and drag forces. The new model was validated by available experimental data for open channel flows passing through vegetated areas with different vegetation size, density and distribution. Numerical results are in good agreement with the experimental data. Finally, the flow around a supposed isolated vegetated pile was simulated and the effects of vegetation density on the wake flow were discussed. It is found that the presence of vegetation, even at a very low density, has the pronounced influence on the dissipation of flow energy, both inside the vegetation domain and outside it in the wake flow region.

  8. Facilitating Corporate Entrepreneurship in Public Sector Higher Education Institutions: A Conceptual Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javed Nayyar Malik

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper develops a conceptual model of public sector corporate entrepreneurship for the state government higher education institutions. The proposed model is intended to depict the main antecedents that relate to corporate entrepreneurship within the public sector higher education institution  and the impact of corporate entrepreneurship on public sector HEI’s performance, as well as factors influencing its continuous performance.

  9. Conceptual Model Development for Sea Turtle Nesting Habitat: Support for USACE Navigation Projects

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-08-01

    Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. ERDC TN-DOER-R23 August 2015 Conceptual Model Development for Sea Turtle Nesting...value range schemes to include in a spatially explicit ecological model for sea turtle nesting habitat. INTRODUCTION: Much of the Atlantic and Gulf...of Mexico coastlines are designated as critical habitat for loggerhead sea turtle (Caretta caretta) conservation. The terrestrial critical habitat

  10. Regression modeling of ground-water flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooley, R.L.; Naff, R.L.

    1985-01-01

    Nonlinear multiple regression methods are developed to model and analyze groundwater flow systems. Complete descriptions of regression methodology as applied to groundwater flow models allow scientists and engineers engaged in flow modeling to apply the methods to a wide range of problems. Organization of the text proceeds from an introduction that discusses the general topic of groundwater flow modeling, to a review of basic statistics necessary to properly apply regression techniques, and then to the main topic: exposition and use of linear and nonlinear regression to model groundwater flow. Statistical procedures are given to analyze and use the regression models. A number of exercises and answers are included to exercise the student on nearly all the methods that are presented for modeling and statistical analysis. Three computer programs implement the more complex methods. These three are a general two-dimensional, steady-state regression model for flow in an anisotropic, heterogeneous porous medium, a program to calculate a measure of model nonlinearity with respect to the regression parameters, and a program to analyze model errors in computed dependent variables such as hydraulic head. (USGS)

  11. Dynamic modelling of packaging material flow systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsiliyannis, Christos A

    2005-04-01

    A dynamic model has been developed for reused and recycled packaging material flows. It allows a rigorous description of the flows and stocks during the transition to new targets imposed by legislation, product demand variations or even by variations in consumer discard behaviour. Given the annual reuse and recycle frequency and packaging lifetime, the model determines all packaging flows (e.g., consumption and reuse) and variables through which environmental policy is formulated, such as recycling, waste and reuse rates and it identifies the minimum number of variables to be surveyed for complete packaging flow monitoring. Simulation of the transition to the new flow conditions is given for flows of packaging materials in Greece, based on 1995--1998 field inventory and statistical data.

  12. Modeling process flow using diagrams

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kemper, B.; de Mast, J.; Mandjes, M.

    2010-01-01

    In the practice of process improvement, tools such as the flowchart, the value-stream map (VSM), and a variety of ad hoc variants of such diagrams are commonly used. The purpose of this paper is to present a clear, precise, and consistent framework for the use of such flow diagrams in process

  13. Modeling process flow using diagrams

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kemper, B.; de Mast, J.; Mandjes, M.

    2010-01-01

    In the practice of process improvement, tools such as the flowchart, the value-stream map (VSM), and a variety of ad hoc variants of such diagrams are commonly used. The purpose of this paper is to present a clear, precise, and consistent framework for the use of such flow diagrams in process improv

  14. Inferring tidal wetland stability from channel sediment fluxes: observations and a conceptual model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganju, Neil K.; Nidzieko, Nicholas J.; Kirwan, Matthew L.

    2013-01-01

    Anthropogenic and climatic forces have modified the geomorphology of tidal wetlands over a range of timescales. Changes in land use, sediment supply, river flow, storminess, and sea level alter the layout of tidal channels, intertidal flats, and marsh plains; these elements define wetland complexes. Diagnostically, measurements of net sediment fluxes through tidal channels are high-temporal resolution, spatially integrated quantities that indicate (1) whether a complex is stable over seasonal timescales and (2) what mechanisms are leading to that state. We estimated sediment fluxes through tidal channels draining wetland complexes on the Blackwater and Transquaking Rivers, Maryland, USA. While the Blackwater complex has experienced decades of degradation and been largely converted to open water, the Transquaking complex has persisted as an expansive, vegetated marsh. The measured net export at the Blackwater complex (1.0 kg/s or 0.56 kg/m2/yr over the landward marsh area) was caused by northwesterly winds, which exported water and sediment on the subtidal timescale; tidally forced net fluxes were weak and precluded landward transport of suspended sediment from potential seaward sources. Though wind forcing also exported sediment at the Transquaking complex, strong tidal forcing and proximity to a turbidity maximum led to an import of sediment (0.031 kg/s or 0.70 kg/m2/yr). This resulted in a spatially averaged accretion of 3.9 mm/yr, equaling the regional relative sea level rise. Our results suggest that in areas where seaward sediment supply is dominant, seaward wetlands may be more capable of withstanding sea level rise over the short term than landward wetlands. We propose a conceptual model to determine a complex's tendency toward stability or instability based on sediment source, wetland channel location, and transport mechanisms. Wetlands with a reliable portfolio of sources and transport mechanisms appear better suited to offset natural and

  15. Managing the bank service encounter: A conceptual model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. K. Govender

    1999-06-01

    Full Text Available In financial services marketing, especially among banks, there are a limited number of chances to impress the customer, since the services are becoming more automated. Since personal interactions with customers are becoming less numerous, customers are expecting higher quality contacts and more individual treatment. This paper proposes a service encounter management model which may impact on the customers service experience. By matching service employees with customers, the effects of certain human resources strategies may be ascertained through the customers perception of the employee service quality and the overall service quality. Opsomming Daar is 'n beperkte geleenthede om die finansiele dienste klient, veral die in banke, te beindruk, aangesien dienste al meer ge-outomatiseer raak. Seinde persoonlike kontak met kliente al minder word, verwag kliente hoer gehalte kontak en meer individuele behandeling. Hierdie artikel stel 'n bestuursmodel vir diensontmoetings voor wat 'n impak op kliente se dienservarings mag he. Deur dienswerknemers met kliente te verbind kan bepaalde menslike hulpbronstrategie-effekte vasgestel word, deur middel van kliente se persepsie van werknemer-diensgehalte en algemene diensgehalte.

  16. Community Elder Mistreatment Intervention With Capable Older Adults: Toward a Conceptual Practice Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burnes, David

    2016-02-12

    Community-based elder mistreatment response programs (EMRP), such as adult protective services, that are responsible for directly addressing elder abuse and neglect are under increasing pressure with greater reporting/referrals nationwide. Our knowledge and understanding of effective response interventions represents a major gap in the EM literature. At the center of this gap is a lack of theory or conceptual models to help guide EMRP research and practice. This article develops a conceptual practice model for community-based EMRPs that work directly with cognitively intact EM victims. Anchored by core EMRP values of voluntariness, self-determination, and least restrictive path, the practice model is guided by an overarching postmodern, constructivist, eco-systemic practice paradigm that accepts multiple, individually constructed mistreatment realities and solutions. Harm-reduction, client-centered, and multidisciplinary practice models are described toward a common EMRP goal to reduce the risk of continued mistreatment. Finally, the model focuses on client-practitioner relationship-oriented practice skills such as engagement and therapeutic alliance to elicit individual mistreatment realities and client-centered solutions. The practice model helps fill a conceptual gap in the EM intervention literature and carries implications for EMRP training, research, and practice. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Gerontological Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  17. The EBM-DPSER conceptual model: integrating ecosystem services into the DPSIR framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelble, Christopher R; Loomis, Dave K; Lovelace, Susan; Nuttle, William K; Ortner, Peter B; Fletcher, Pamela; Cook, Geoffrey S; Lorenz, Jerry J; Boyer, Joseph N

    2013-01-01

    There is a pressing need to integrate biophysical and human dimensions science to better inform holistic ecosystem management supporting the transition from single species or single-sector management to multi-sector ecosystem-based management. Ecosystem-based management should focus upon ecosystem services, since they reflect societal goals, values, desires, and benefits. The inclusion of ecosystem services into holistic management strategies improves management by better capturing the diversity of positive and negative human-natural interactions and making explicit the benefits to society. To facilitate this inclusion, we propose a conceptual model that merges the broadly applied Driver, Pressure, State, Impact, and Response (DPSIR) conceptual model with ecosystem services yielding a Driver, Pressure, State, Ecosystem service, and Response (EBM-DPSER) conceptual model. The impact module in traditional DPSIR models focuses attention upon negative anthropomorphic impacts on the ecosystem; by replacing impacts with ecosystem services the EBM-DPSER model incorporates not only negative, but also positive changes in the ecosystem. Responses occur as a result of changes in ecosystem services and include inter alia management actions directed at proactively altering human population or individual behavior and infrastructure to meet societal goals. The EBM-DPSER conceptual model was applied to the Florida Keys and Dry Tortugas marine ecosystem as a case study to illustrate how it can inform management decisions. This case study captures our system-level understanding and results in a more holistic representation of ecosystem and human society interactions, thus improving our ability to identify trade-offs. The EBM-DPSER model should be a useful operational tool for implementing EBM, in that it fully integrates our knowledge of all ecosystem components while focusing management attention upon those aspects of the ecosystem most important to human society and does so within

  18. The EBM-DPSER Conceptual Model: Integrating Ecosystem Services into the DPSIR Framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelble, Christopher R.; Loomis, Dave K.; Lovelace, Susan; Nuttle, William K.; Ortner, Peter B.; Fletcher, Pamela; Cook, Geoffrey S.; Lorenz, Jerry J.; Boyer, Joseph N.

    2013-01-01

    There is a pressing need to integrate biophysical and human dimensions science to better inform holistic ecosystem management supporting the transition from single species or single-sector management to multi-sector ecosystem-based management. Ecosystem-based management should focus upon ecosystem services, since they reflect societal goals, values, desires, and benefits. The inclusion of ecosystem services into holistic management strategies improves management by better capturing the diversity of positive and negative human-natural interactions and making explicit the benefits to society. To facilitate this inclusion, we propose a conceptual model that merges the broadly applied Driver, Pressure, State, Impact, and Response (DPSIR) conceptual model with ecosystem services yielding a Driver, Pressure, State, Ecosystem service, and Response (EBM-DPSER) conceptual model. The impact module in traditional DPSIR models focuses attention upon negative anthropomorphic impacts on the ecosystem; by replacing impacts with ecosystem services the EBM-DPSER model incorporates not only negative, but also positive changes in the ecosystem. Responses occur as a result of changes in ecosystem services and include inter alia management actions directed at proactively altering human population or individual behavior and infrastructure to meet societal goals. The EBM-DPSER conceptual model was applied to the Florida Keys and Dry Tortugas marine ecosystem as a case study to illustrate how it can inform management decisions. This case study captures our system-level understanding and results in a more holistic representation of ecosystem and human society interactions, thus improving our ability to identify trade-offs. The EBM-DPSER model should be a useful operational tool for implementing EBM, in that it fully integrates our knowledge of all ecosystem components while focusing management attention upon those aspects of the ecosystem most important to human society and does so within

  19. Modelling Canopy Flows over Complex Terrain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grant, Eleanor R.; Ross, Andrew N.; Gardiner, Barry A.

    2016-06-01

    Recent studies of flow over forested hills have been motivated by a number of important applications including understanding CO_2 and other gaseous fluxes over forests in complex terrain, predicting wind damage to trees, and modelling wind energy potential at forested sites. Current modelling studies have focussed almost exclusively on highly idealized, and usually fully forested, hills. Here, we present model results for a site on the Isle of Arran, Scotland with complex terrain and heterogeneous forest canopy. The model uses an explicit representation of the canopy and a 1.5-order turbulence closure for flow within and above the canopy. The validity of the closure scheme is assessed using turbulence data from a field experiment before comparing predictions of the full model with field observations. For near-neutral stability, the results compare well with the observations, showing that such a relatively simple canopy model can accurately reproduce the flow patterns observed over complex terrain and realistic, variable forest cover, while at the same time remaining computationally feasible for real case studies. The model allows closer examination of the flow separation observed over complex forested terrain. Comparisons with model simulations using a roughness length parametrization show significant differences, particularly with respect to flow separation, highlighting the need to explicitly model the forest canopy if detailed predictions of near-surface flow around forests are required.

  20. Modelling Canopy Flows over Complex Terrain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grant, Eleanor R.; Ross, Andrew N.; Gardiner, Barry A.

    2016-12-01

    Recent studies of flow over forested hills have been motivated by a number of important applications including understanding CO_2 and other gaseous fluxes over forests in complex terrain, predicting wind damage to trees, and modelling wind energy potential at forested sites. Current modelling studies have focussed almost exclusively on highly idealized, and usually fully forested, hills. Here, we present model results for a site on the Isle of Arran, Scotland with complex terrain and heterogeneous forest canopy. The model uses an explicit representation of the canopy and a 1.5-order turbulence closure for flow within and above the canopy. The validity of the closure scheme is assessed using turbulence data from a field experiment before comparing predictions of the full model with field observations. For near-neutral stability, the results compare well with the observations, showing that such a relatively simple canopy model can accurately reproduce the flow patterns observed over complex terrain and realistic, variable forest cover, while at the same time remaining computationally feasible for real case studies. The model allows closer examination of the flow separation observed over complex forested terrain. Comparisons with model simulations using a roughness length parametrization show significant differences, particularly with respect to flow separation, highlighting the need to explicitly model the forest canopy if detailed predictions of near-surface flow around forests are required.

  1. Incorporating groundwater flow into the WEPP model

    Science.gov (United States)

    William Elliot; Erin Brooks; Tim Link; Sue Miller

    2010-01-01

    The water erosion prediction project (WEPP) model is a physically-based hydrology and erosion model. In recent years, the hydrology prediction within the model has been improved for forest watershed modeling by incorporating shallow lateral flow into watershed runoff prediction. This has greatly improved WEPP's hydrologic performance on small watersheds with...

  2. Soil Moisture Data Assimilation in Soil Water Flow Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pachepsky, Y. A.; Guber, A.; Jacques, D.; Pan, F.; van Genuchten, M.; Cady, R. E.; Nicholson, T. J.

    2010-12-01

    Soil water flow modeling has multiple applications. This modeling is based on simplifications stemming from both conceptual uncertainty and lack of detailed knowledge about parameters. Modern soil moisture sensors can provide detailed information about changes in soil water content in time and with depth. This information can be used for data assimilation in soil water flow modeling. The ensemble Kalman filter appears to be an appropriate method for that. Earlier we demonstrated ensemble simulations of soil water flow by using sets of pedotransfer functions (empirical relationships between soil hydraulic properties and soil basic properties, such as particle size distribution, bulk density, organic carbon content, etc.). The objective of this work was to apply the data assimilation with the ensemble Kalman filter to soil water flow modeling, using soil water content monitoring with TDR probes and an ensemble of soil water flow models parameterized with different pedotransfer functions. Experiments were carried out at the Bekkevoort site, Belgium. Sixty time domain reflectometry (TDR) probes with two rods) were installed along the trench in loamy soil at 12 locations with 50-cm horizontal spacing at five depths (15, 35, 55, 75, and 95 cm). Water content and weather parameters were monitored for one year with 15 min frequency. Soil water flow was simulated using the HYDRUS6 software. Mean daily means of water contents at the observation depths were the measurements used in data assimilation. Eighteen pedotransfer functions for water retention and one for hydraulic conductivity were applied to generate ensembles to evaluate the uncertainty in simulation results, whereas the replicated measurements at each of measurement depths were used to characterize the uncertainty in data. Data assimilation appeared to be very efficient. Even assimilating measurements at a single depth provided substantial improvement in simulations at other observation depths. Results on

  3. Groundwater modelling in decision support: reflections on a unified conceptual framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doherty, John; Simmons, Craig T.

    2013-11-01

    Groundwater models are commonly used as basis for environmental decision-making. There has been discussion and debate in recent times regarding the issue of model simplicity and complexity. This paper contributes to this ongoing discourse. The selection of an appropriate level of model structural and parameterization complexity is not a simple matter. Although the metrics on which such selection should be based are simple, there are many competing, and often unquantifiable, considerations which must be taken into account as these metrics are applied. A unified conceptual framework is introduced and described which is intended to underpin groundwater modelling in decision support with a direct focus on matters regarding model simplicity and complexity.

  4. Analysis of Cortical Flow Models In Vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benink, Hélène A.; Mandato, Craig A.; Bement, William M.

    2000-01-01

    Cortical flow, the directed movement of cortical F-actin and cortical organelles, is a basic cellular motility process. Microtubules are thought to somehow direct cortical flow, but whether they do so by stimulating or inhibiting contraction of the cortical actin cytoskeleton is the subject of debate. Treatment of Xenopus oocytes with phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) triggers cortical flow toward the animal pole of the oocyte; this flow is suppressed by microtubules. To determine how this suppression occurs and whether it can control the direction of cortical flow, oocytes were subjected to localized manipulation of either the contractile stimulus (PMA) or microtubules. Localized PMA application resulted in redirection of cortical flow toward the site of application, as judged by movement of cortical pigment granules, cortical F-actin, and cortical myosin-2A. Such redirected flow was accelerated by microtubule depolymerization, showing that the suppression of cortical flow by microtubules is independent of the direction of flow. Direct observation of cortical F-actin by time-lapse confocal analysis in combination with photobleaching showed that cortical flow is driven by contraction of the cortical F-actin network and that microtubules suppress this contraction. The oocyte germinal vesicle serves as a microtubule organizing center in Xenopus oocytes; experimental displacement of the germinal vesicle toward the animal pole resulted in localized flow away from the animal pole. The results show that 1) cortical flow is directed toward areas of localized contraction of the cortical F-actin cytoskeleton; 2) microtubules suppress cortical flow by inhibiting contraction of the cortical F-actin cytoskeleton; and 3) localized, microtubule-dependent suppression of actomyosin-based contraction can control the direction of cortical flow. We discuss these findings in light of current models of cortical flow. PMID:10930453

  5. Simulation and modeling of turbulent flows

    CERN Document Server

    Gatski, Thomas B; Lumley, John L

    1996-01-01

    This book provides students and researchers in fluid engineering with an up-to-date overview of turbulent flow research in the areas of simulation and modeling. A key element of the book is the systematic, rational development of turbulence closure models and related aspects of modern turbulent flow theory and prediction. Starting with a review of the spectral dynamics of homogenous and inhomogeneous turbulent flows, succeeding chapters deal with numerical simulation techniques, renormalization group methods and turbulent closure modeling. Each chapter is authored by recognized leaders in their respective fields, and each provides a thorough and cohesive treatment of the subject.

  6. Conceptual model of iCAL4LA: Proposing the components using comparative analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Siti Zulaiha; Mutalib, Ariffin Abdul

    2016-08-01

    This paper discusses an on-going study that initiates an initial process in determining the common components for a conceptual model of interactive computer-assisted learning that is specifically designed for low achieving children. This group of children needs a specific learning support that can be used as an alternative learning material in their learning environment. In order to develop the conceptual model, this study extracts the common components from 15 strongly justified computer assisted learning studies. A comparative analysis has been conducted to determine the most appropriate components by using a set of specific indication classification to prioritize the applicability. The results of the extraction process reveal 17 common components for consideration. Later, based on scientific justifications, 16 of them were selected as the proposed components for the model.

  7. [Application analysis of Nursing Care Systematization according to Horta's Conceptual Model].

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Cunha, Sandra Maria Botelho; Barros, Alba Lúcia Botura Leite

    2005-01-01

    This study has as purpose to analyse the implementation of the Nursing Care Systematization in a private hospital in medical surgical units. Results evidenced that the Horta's Conceptual Model was present only in part of nursing hystory instrument, that the remaining phases of nursing process were not inter-related and that there was a lack of coherence of the prescribed actions in relation to the patient's health condition. From the results of the study it can be concluded that the model used for Nursing Care Systematization is eclectic, not obeying therefore, only to Horta's conceptual model; the totality of the data had not been collected in some phases of the nursing process; there is no correlation of the phases in the majority of analyzed patient records; diagnostic and planning phases do not comprise the phases of the nursing process as proposed by Horta.

  8. TOWARDS A CONCEPTUAL FRAMEWORK OF ISLAMIC LEADERSHIP SUCCESSOR'S ATTRIBUTES MODEL AND GOOD GOVERNANCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naji Zuhair Alsarhi

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this paper is to propose a conceptual model that explains the relationship between Islamic leadership successionpersonalityattributes and good governance. The paper sources information from an extensive search of literature to design a conceptual model of Islamic leadership succession (personal attributes & governmental characteristics of Succession and good governance. The model will provide an integration of relationships that will add valuable insights into improved leadership succession theory in the related literature. The paper may assist particularly policy makers and strategists to focus on new possibilities of leadership successors attributes that will lead to improved governance as well as government performance in the world in general, and the Palestine community, in particular.

  9. Simple models for shear flow transition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barkley, Dwight

    2011-11-01

    I will discuss recent developments in modeling transitional shear flows with simple two-variable models. Both pipe flow and plane Couette flow are considered. The essential insight is that most large-scale features of these shear flows can be traced to a change from excitability to bistability in the local dynamics. Models are presented in two variables, turbulence intensity and mean shear. A PDE model of pipe flow captures the essence of the puff-slug transition as a change from excitability to bistability. Extended models with turbulence as deterministic transient chaos or multiplicative noise reproduce almost all large-scale features of transitional pipe flow. In particular they capture metastable localized puffs, puff splitting, slugs, localized edge states, a continuous transition to sustained turbulence via spatiotemporal intermittency (directed percolation), and a subsequent increase in turbulence fraction towards uniform, featureless turbulence. A model that additionally takes into account the symmetries of plane Couette flow reproduces localized turbulence and periodic turbulent-laminar bands.

  10. Conceptual Incoherence as a Result of the use of Multiple Historical Models in School Textbooks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gericke, Niklas M.; Hagberg, Mariana

    2010-08-01

    This paper explores the occurrence of conceptual incoherence in upper secondary school textbooks resulting from the use of multiple historical models. Swedish biology and chemistry textbooks, as well as a selection of books from English speaking countries, were examined. The purpose of the study was to identify which models are used to represent the phenomenon of gene function in textbooks and to investigate how these models relate to historical scientific models and subject matter contexts. Models constructed for specific use in textbooks were identified using concept mapping. The data were further analyzed by content analysis. The study shows that several different historical models are used in parallel in textbooks to describe gene function. Certain historical models were used more often then others and the most recent scientific views were rarely referred to in the textbooks. Hybrid models were used frequently, i.e. most of the models in the textbooks consisted of a number of components of several historical models. Since the various historical models were developed as part of different scientific frameworks, hybrid models exhibit conceptual incoherence, which may be a source of confusion for students. Furthermore, the use of different historical models was linked to particular subject contexts in the textbooks studied. The results from Swedish and international textbooks were similar, indicating the general applicability of our conclusions.

  11. Survey and conceptual flow sheets for coal conversion plant handling-preparation and ash/slag removal operations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zapp, F.C.; Thomas, O.W.; Silverman, M.D.; Dyslin, D.A.; Holmes, J.M.

    1980-03-01

    This study was undertaken at the request of the Fossil Fuel Processing Division of the Department of Energy. The report includes a compilation of conceptual flow sheets, including major equipment lists, and the results of an availability survey of potential suppliers of equipment associated with the coal and ash/slag operations that will be required by future large coal conversion plant complexes. Conversion plant flow sheet operations and related equipment requirements were based on two representative bituminous coals - Pittsburgh and Kentucky No. 9 - and on nine coal conversion processes. It appears that almost all coal handling and preparation and ash/slag removal equipment covered by this survey, with the exception of some coal comminution equipment, either is on hand or can readily be fabricated to meet coal conversion plant capacity requirements of up to 50,000 short tons per day. Equipment capable of handling even larger capacities can be developed. This approach appears to be unjustified, however, because in many cases a reasonable or optimum number of trains of equipment must be considered when designing a conversion plant complex. The actual number of trains of equipment selected will be influenced by the total requied capacity of the complex, the minimum on-line capacity that can be tolerated in case of equipment failure, reliability of specific equipment types, and the number of reactors and related feed injection stations needed for the specific conversion process.

  12. A General Thermal Equilibrium Discharge Flow Model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO; Min-fu; ZHANG; Dong-xu; LV; Yu-feng

    2015-01-01

    In isentropic and thermal equilibrium assumptions,a discharge flow model was derived,which unified the rules of normal temperature water discharge,high temperature and high pressure water discharge,two-phase critical flow,saturated steam and superheated steam critical

  13. Modeling Rotating Turbulent Flows with the Body Force Potential Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharya, Amitabh; Perot, Blair

    2000-11-01

    Like a Reynolds Stress Transport equation model, the turbulent potential model has an explicit Coriolis acceleration term that appears in the model that accounts for rotation effects. In this work the additional secondary effects that system rotation has on the dissipation rate, return-to-isotropy, and fast pressure strain terms are also included in the model. The resulting model is tested in the context of rotating isotropic turbulence, rotating homogeneous shear flow, rotating channel flow, and swirling pipe flow. Many of the model changes are applicable to Reynolds stress transport equation models. All model modifications are frame indifferent.

  14. Supercontinents, mantle dynamics and plate tectonics: A perspective based on conceptual vs. numerical models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Masaki; Santosh, M.

    2011-03-01

    The periodic assembly and dispersal of supercontinents through the history of the Earth had considerable impact on mantle dynamics and surface processes. Here we synthesize some of the conceptual models on supercontinent amalgamation and disruption and combine it with recent information from numerical studies to provide a unified approach in understanding Wilson Cycle and supercontinent cycle. Plate tectonic models predict that superdownwelling along multiple subduction zones might provide an effective mechanism to pull together dispersed continental fragments into a closely packed assembly. The recycled subducted material that accumulates at the mantle transition zone and sinks down into the core-mantle boundary (CMB) provides the potential fuel for the generation of plumes and superplumes which ultimately fragment the supercontinent. Geological evidence related to the disruption of two major supercontinents (Columbia and Gondwana) attest to the involvement of plumes. The re-assembly of dispersed continental fragments after the breakup of a supercontinent occurs through complex processes involving 'introversion', 'extroversion' or a combination of both, with the closure of the intervening ocean occurring through Pacific-type or Atlantic-type processes. The timescales of the assembly and dispersion of supercontinents have varied through the Earth history, and appear to be closely linked with the processes and duration of superplume genesis. The widely held view that the volume of continental crust has increased over time has been challenged in recent works and current models propose that plate tectonics creates and destroys Earth's continental crust with more crust being destroyed than created. The creation-destruction balance changes over a supercontinent cycle, with a higher crustal growth through magmatic influx during supercontinent break-up as compared to the tectonic erosion and sediment-trapped subduction in convergent margins associated with supercontinent

  15. The Role of Computer Modeling in Enhancing Students' Conceptual Understanding of Physics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Ornek

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to investigate how the use of the computer simulations program VPython facilitated students’ conceptual understanding of fundamental physical principles and in constructing new knowledge of physics. We focused on students in a calculus-based introductory physics course, based on the Matter and Interactions curriculum of Chabay & Sherwood (2002 at a large state engineering and science university in the USA. A major emphasis of this course was on computer modeling by using VPython to write pro¬grams simulating physical systems. We conducted multiple student interviews, as well as an open-ended exit survey, to find out student views on how creating their own simulations to enhanced-conceptual understanding of physics and in constructing new knowledge of phys¬ics. The results varied in relation to the phases when the interviews were conducted. At the beginning of the course, students viewed the simulation program as a burden. However, dur¬ing the course, students stated that it promoted their knowledge and better conceptual understanding of physical phenomena. We deduce that VPython computer simulations can improve students’ conceptual understanding of fundamental physical concepts and promote construction of new knowledge in physics, once they overcome the initial learning curve associated with the VPython software package.

  16. Preparing for the Complexities of Teaching: Modeling Conceptual Thinking in Post-Observation Conferences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jane K. Harvey

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available http://dx.doi.org/10.5007/2175-8026.2015v68n1p91 In order for teacher educators to prepare teachers for complexities of language teaching, their nature needs to be understood. Vygotskian sociocultural theory ofers a useful framework for construing such complexities. Vygotsky distinguished between everyday and scientiic concepts, and saw the interaction of the two as conceptual thinking, the basis for higher order cognitive skills. Johnson (2009 frames learning to teach as the development of conceptual thinking and considers the nature of the dialogue in teacher education activities as crucial to this development. Drawing on longitudinal data from a semester-long case study of the dialogic interactions between a teacher and teacher educator, this study illustrates how the teacher educator modeled conceptual thinking in her language. We propose a taxonomy of conceptualizations about language teaching that may help teacher educators be more purposeful in designing activities for and interacting with novice teachers.

  17. A Conceptual Space Logic

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nilsson, Jørgen Fischer

    1999-01-01

    Conceptual spaces have been proposed as topological or geometric means for establishing conceptual structures and models. This paper, after briey reviewing conceptual spaces, focusses on the relationship between conceptual spaces and logical concept languages with operations for combining concepts...... to form concepts. Speci cally is introduced an algebraic concept logic, for which conceptual spaces are installed as semantic domain as replacement for, or enrichment of, the traditional....

  18. Combined Estimation of Hydrogeologic Conceptual Model, Parameter, and Scenario Uncertainty with Application to Uranium Transport at the Hanford Site 300 Area

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meyer, Philip D.; Ye, Ming; Rockhold, Mark L.; Neuman, Shlomo P.; Cantrell, Kirk J.

    2007-07-30

    This report to the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) describes the development and application of a methodology to systematically and quantitatively assess predictive uncertainty in groundwater flow and transport modeling that considers the combined impact of hydrogeologic uncertainties associated with the conceptual-mathematical basis of a model, model parameters, and the scenario to which the model is applied. The methodology is based on a n extension of a Maximum Likelihood implementation of Bayesian Model Averaging. Model uncertainty is represented by postulating a discrete set of alternative conceptual models for a site with associated prior model probabilities that reflect a belief about the relative plausibility of each model based on its apparent consistency with available knowledge and data. Posterior model probabilities are computed and parameter uncertainty is estimated by calibrating each model to observed system behavior; prior parameter estimates are optionally included. Scenario uncertainty is represented as a discrete set of alternative future conditions affecting boundary conditions, source/sink terms, or other aspects of the models, with associated prior scenario probabilities. A joint assessment of uncertainty results from combining model predictions computed under each scenario using as weight the posterior model and prior scenario probabilities. The uncertainty methodology was applied to modeling of groundwater flow and uranium transport at the Hanford Site 300 Area. Eight alternative models representing uncertainty in the hydrogeologic and geochemical properties as well as the temporal variability were considered. Two scenarios represent alternative future behavior of the Columbia River adjacent to the site were considered. The scenario alternatives were implemented in the models through the boundary conditions. Results demonstrate the feasibility of applying a comprehensive uncertainty assessment to large-scale, detailed groundwater flow

  19. Viscoelastic flow simulations in model porous media

    Science.gov (United States)

    De, S.; Kuipers, J. A. M.; Peters, E. A. J. F.; Padding, J. T.

    2017-05-01

    We investigate the flow of unsteadfy three-dimensional viscoelastic fluid through an array of symmetric and asymmetric sets of cylinders constituting a model porous medium. The simulations are performed using a finite-volume methodology with a staggered grid. The solid-fluid interfaces of the porous structure are modeled using a second-order immersed boundary method [S. De et al., J. Non-Newtonian Fluid Mech. 232, 67 (2016), 10.1016/j.jnnfm.2016.04.002]. A finitely extensible nonlinear elastic constitutive model with Peterlin closure is used to model the viscoelastic part. By means of periodic boundary conditions, we model the flow behavior for a Newtonian as well as a viscoelastic fluid through successive contractions and expansions. We observe the presence of counterrotating vortices in the dead ends of our geometry. The simulations provide detailed insight into how flow structure, viscoelastic stresses, and viscoelastic work change with increasing Deborah number De. We observe completely different flow structures and different distributions of the viscoelastic work at high De in the symmetric and asymmetric configurations, even though they have the exact same porosity. Moreover, we find that even for the symmetric contraction-expansion flow, most energy dissipation is occurring in shear-dominated regions of the flow domain, not in extensional-flow-dominated regions.

  20. Computational modelling flow and transport

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stelling, G.S.; Booij, N.

    1999-01-01

    Lecture notes CT wa4340. Derivation of equations using balance principles; numerical treatment of ordinary differential equations; time dependent partial differential equations; the strucure of a computer model:DUFLO; usage of numerical models.