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Sample records for flow instability experimental

  1. Experimental study on low pressure flow instability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang Shengyao; Wu Xinxin; Wu Shaorong; Bo Jinhai; Zhang Youjie

    1997-05-01

    The experiment was performed on the test loop (HRTL-5), which simulates the geometry and system design of the 5 MW reactor. The flow behavior for a wide range of inlet subcooling, in which the flow undergoes from single phase to two phase, is described in a natural circulation system at low pressure (p = 0.1, 0.24 MPa). Several kinds of flow instability, e.g. subcooled boiling instability, subcooled boiling induced flashing instability, pure flashing instability as well as flashing coupled density wave instability and high frequency flow oscillation, are investigated. The mechanism of flashing and flashing concerned flow instability, which has never been studied well in this field, is especially interpreted. The experimental results show that, firstly, for a low pressure natural circulation system the two phase flow is unstable in most of inlet subcooling conditions, the two phase stable flow can only be reached at very low inlet subcooling; secondly, at high inlet subcooling the flow instability is dominated by subcooled boiling in the heated section, and at middle inlet subcooling is dominated by void flashing in the adiabatic long riser; thirdly, in two phase stable flow region the condition for boiling out of the core, namely, single phase flow in the heated section, two phase flow in the riser due to vapor flashing, can be realized. The experimental results are very important for the design and accident analysis of the vessel and swimming pool type natural circulation nuclear heating reactor. (7 refs., 10 figs., 1 tab.)

  2. Experimental and numerical investigation on two-phase flow instabilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruspini, Leonardo Carlos

    2013-03-01

    Two-phase flow instabilities are experimentally and numerically studied within this thesis. In particular, the phenomena called Ledinegg instability, density wave oscillations and pressure drop oscillations are investigated. The most important investigations regarding the occurrence of two-phase flow instabilities are reviewed. An extensive description of the main contributions in the experimental and analytical research is presented. In addition, a critical discussion and recommendations for future investigations are presented. A numerical framework using a hp-adaptive method is developed in order to solve the conservation equations modelling general thermo-hydraulic systems. A natural convection problem is analysed numerically in order to test the numerical solver. Moreover, the description of an adaptive strategy to solve thermo-hydraulic problems is presented. In the second part of this dissertation, a homogeneous model is used to study Ledinegg, density wave and pressure drop oscillations phenomena numerically. The dynamic characteristics of the Ledinegg (flow excursion) phenomenon are analysed through the simulation of several transient examples. In addition, density wave instabilities in boiling and condensing systems are investigated. The effects of several parameters, such as the fluid inertia and compressibility volumes, on the stability limits of Ledinegg and density wave instabilities are studied, showing a strong influence of these parameters. Moreover, the phenomenon called pressure drop oscillations is numerically investigated. A discussion of the physical representation of several models is presented with reference to the obtained numerical results. Finally, the influence of different parameters on these phenomena is analysed. In the last part, an experimental investigation of these phenomena is presented. The designing methodology used for the construction of the experimental facility is described. Several simulations and a non

  3. Experimental research on flow instability in vertical narrow annuli

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU Geping; QIU Suizheng; SU Guanghui; JIA Dounan

    2007-01-01

    A narrow annular test section of 1.5mm gap and 1800mm length was designed and manufactured, with good tightness and insulation. Experiments were carried out to investigate characteristics of flow instability of forced-convection in vertical narrow annuli. Using distilled water as work fluid, the experiments were conducted at pressures of 1.0~3.0 MPa, mass flow rates of 3.0~25 kg/h, heating power of 3.0~ 6.5kW and inlet fluid temperature of 20 ℃, 40 ℃ or 60℃. It was found that flow instability occured with fixed inlet condition and heating power when mass flow rate was below a special value. Effects of inlet subcooling, system pressure and mass flow rate on the system behavior were studied and the instability region was given.

  4. Experimental study of natural circulation flow instability in rectangular channels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Tao; Qi, Shi; Song, Mingqiang [North China Electric Power Univ., Beijing (China). School of Nuclear Science and Engineering; Passive Nuclear Safety Technology, Beijing (China). Beijing Key Lab.; Xiao, Zejun [Nuclear, Reactor Thermal Hydraulics Technology, Chengdu (China). CNNC Key Lab.

    2017-05-15

    Experiments of natural circulation flow instability were conducted in rectangular channels with 5 mm and 10 mm wide gaps. Results for different heating powers were obtained. The results showed that the flow will tend to be instable with the growing of heating power. The oscillation period of pressure D-value and volume flow are the same, but their phase positions are opposite. They both can be described by trigonometric functions. The existence of edge position and secondary flow will strengthen the disturbance of fluid flow in rectangle channels, which contributes to heat transfer. The disturbance of bubble and fluid will be strengthened, especially in the saturated boiling section, which make it possible for the mixing flow. The results also showed that the resistance in 5 mm channel is bigger than that in 10 mm channel, it is less likely to form stable natural circulation in the subcooled region.

  5. Experimental study of flow instability and CHF in a natural circulation system with subcooled boiling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, R.C.; Shi, D.Q.; Lu, Z.Q.; Zheng, R.C.; Wang, Y.

    1996-01-01

    Experimental study has been performed to investigate flow instability and critical heat flux (CHF) in a natural circulation system with subcooled boiling. In the experiments three kinds of heated sections were used. Freon-12 was used as the working medium. The experiments show which one of the two phenomena, flow instability and CHF condition, may first occur in the system depends on not only the heat input power to the heated section and the parameters of the working medium, but also the construction of the heated section. The occurrence of the flow instability mainly depends on the total heat input power to the heated section and the CHF condition is mainly caused by the local heat flux of the heated section. In the experiments two kinds of flow instability, flow instability with high frequency and flow instability with low frequency, were found. But they all belong to density wave instability. The influence of the parameters of the working medium on the onset of the flow instability and CHF condition in the system were investigated. The stability boundaries were determined through the experiments. By means of dimensional analysis of integral equations, a common correlation describing the threshold condition of onset of the flow instability was obtained

  6. An experimental investigation of flow instability between two heated parallel channels with supercritical water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xi, Xi; Xiao, Zejun, E-mail: fabulous_2012@sina.com; Yan, Xiao; Li, Yongliang; Huang, Yanping

    2014-10-15

    Highlights: • Flow instability experiment between two heated channels with supercritical water is carried out. • Two kinds of out of phase flow instability are found and instability boundaries under different working conditions are obtained. • Dynamics characteristics of flow instability are analyzed. - Abstract: Super critical water reactor (SCWR) is the generation IV nuclear reactor in the world. Under normal operation, water enters SCWR from cold leg with a temperature of 280 °C and then leaves the core with a temperature of 500 °C. Due to the sharp change of temperature, there is a huge density change in the core, which could result in potential flow instability and the safety of reactor would be threatened consequently. So it is necessary to carry out relevant investigation in this field. An experimental investigation which concerns with out of phase flow instability between two heated parallel channels with supercritical water has been carried out in this paper. Due to two INCONEL 625 pipes with a thickness of 6.5 mm are adopted, more experimental results are attained. To find out the influence of axial power shape on the onset of flow instability, each heated channel is divided into two sections and the heating power of each section can be controlled separately. Finally the instability boundaries are obtained under different inlet temperatures, axial power shapes, total inlet mass flow rates and system pressures. The dynamics characteristics of out of phase oscillation are also analyzed.

  7. Fluid-elastic instability in a confined annular flow: an experimental and analytical approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Porcher, G.; Langre, E. de

    1996-12-31

    Self excitation of slender structures under axial flow have been reported in a large variety of local flow configurations. This paper reports the result of a research program, both experimental and analytical, aimed at the result of the basic phenomena leading to such instabilities. A cylindrical body with a diffuser is put in a confined annular flow of water. A case of flutter is observed and analysed with a classical potential flow method and with a friction based model. Closed-form solutions are proposed and the origin of the flutter instability is discussed. (authors). 25 refs., 6 figs., 5 tabs.

  8. Experimental investigation on flow instability of forced circulation in a vertical mini-rectangular channel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu Zhiting; Tan Sichao; Yuan Hongsheng; Zhuang Nailiang; Chen Hanying

    2015-01-01

    An experimental study was conducted to investigate the flow instability in a vertical mini-rectangular channel with distilled water as the working fluid. The rotational speed of the primary pump is gradually reduced to lower the inlet flow rate until the flow becomes unstable, while maintaining all other thermal parameters unchanged. Three types of instability, characterized by large amplitude oscillation, small amplitude oscillation and flow excursion, were identified from the experimental data. A stability map for the vertical mini-rectangular channel under forced circulation was established based on the Subcooling number and Phase Change number. The oscillation periods were correlated with the fluid transit time and the boiling delay time. A flow pattern map for vertical upward flow in a mini-rectangular channel was applied to confirm the flow patterns during the oscillation. The mechanisms of the three types of instability were obtained by considering several types of flow instabilities and comparing them with the oscillations observed in this work. (author)

  9. Experimental study of static flow instability in subcooled flow boiling in parallel channels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siman-Tov, M.; Felde, D.K.; McDuffee, J.L.; Yoder, G.L.

    1995-01-01

    Experimental data for static flow instability or flow excursion (FE) at conditions applicable to the Advanced Neutron Source Reactor are very limited. A series of FE tests with light water flowing vertically upward was completed covering a local exit heat flux range of 0.7--18 MW/m 2 , exit velocity range of 2.8--28.4 m/s, exit pressure range of 0.117--1.7 MPa, and inlet temperature range of 40-- 50 degrees C. Most of the tests were performed in a ''stiff'' (constant flow) system where the instability threshold was detected through the minimum of the pressure-drop curve. A few tests were also conducted using as ''soft'' (constant pressure drop) a system as possible to secure a true FE phenomenon (actual secondary burnout). True critical heat flux experiments under similar conditions were also conducted using a stiff system. The FE data reported in this study considerably extend the velocity range of data presently available worldwide, most of which were obtained at velocities below 10 m/s. The Saha and Zuber correlation had the best fit with the data out of the three correlations compared. However, a modification was necessary to take into account the demonstrated dependence of the St and Nu numbers on subcooling levels, especially in the low subcooling regime. Comparison of Thermal Hydraulic Test Loop (THTL) data, as well as extensive data from other investigators, led to a proposed modification to the Saha and Zuber correlation for onset of significant void, applied to FE prediction. The mean and standard deviation of the THTL data were 0.95 and 15%, respectively, when comparing the THTL data with the original Saha and Zuber correlation, and 0.93 and 10% when comparing them with the modification. Comparison with the worldwide database showed a mean and standard deviation of 1.37 and 53%, respectively, for the original Saha and Zuber correlation and 1.0 and 27% for the modification

  10. Experimental onset of flow instability testing by Creare, Inc. Book 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coutts, D.A.

    1992-11-01

    Flow excursions can occur during subcooled heated flow if the supply system is not adequate to meet the heated channel pressure demand. Available experimental flow instability (FI) data for ribbed annuli such as used in the SRS production reactors is very limited. Creare Inc. completed a series of FI tests which included two annular geometries; one of these included metallic ribs which separated the annulus into four sub-channels. This report summarizes the results of the onset of flow instability (OFI) testing which was completed by Creare in support of the SRS Reactor Restart Program. A copy of the final test report has been attached and the archival locations for the supporting documentation and electronic test data is also included. The purpose of this report is to: Archive the Creare Program data; inspect the data which has been archived; review the results presented by Creare; and evaluate if the Creare Program data may be used in critical applications

  11. An experimental study of two-phase flow instability on two parallel channel with low steam quality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang Shengyao; Wu shaorong; Bo Jinhai; Yao Meisheng; Han Bing; Zhang Youjie

    1988-01-01

    An experimental result of two-phase flow instability on two parallel channel natural circulation with low steam quality is presented. The comparison of instability in the single channel and that in parallel channel is given. The effect of unequal inlet resistance coefficient and unequal power on the parallel channel instability is described and the behaviour of instability with equal exit steam quality in the two channel is investigated

  12. An experimental study on the flow instabilities and critical heat flux under natural circulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Yun Il

    1993-02-01

    This study has been carried out to investigate the hydrodynamic stabilities of natural circulation and to analyze Critical Heat Flux (CHF) characteristics for the natural and forced circulation. A low pressure experimental loop was constructed, and experiments under various conditions have been performed. In the experiments of the natural circulation, flow oscillations and the average mass flux have been observed. Several parameters such as heat flux, the inlet temperature of test section, friction valve opening and riser length have been varied in order to investigate their effects on the flow stability of the natural circulation system. The results show that the flow instability has strongly dependent on geometric conditions and operating parameters, the inlet temperature and the heat flux of test section. It was found that unstable region for the heat flux and the inlet temperature exists between the single-phase stable region of low heat and low inlet temperature and the two-phase stable region of very high heat flux and high inlet temperature. The CHF data from the natural and forced circulation experiments have been compared each other to identify the effects of the flow instabilities on the CHF for the natural circulation mode. The test conditions were low flow less than 70 kg/m 2 s of water in vertical round tube with diameter of 0.008m at near atmospheric pressure. In this study, no difference in CHF values is observed between natural and fored circulation. Since low flow usually has the oscillation characteristic of relatively low amplitude and high frequency, the effect of the flow instabilities on the CHF seems to be negligible

  13. Experimental observations of flow instabilities and rapid mixing of two dissimilar viscoelastic liquids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiong Yap Gan

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Viscoelastically induced flow instabilities, via a simple planar microchannel, were previously used to produce rapid mixing of two dissimilar polymeric liquids (i.e. at least a hundredfold different in shear viscosity even at a small Reynolds number. The unique advantage of this mixing technology is that viscoelastic liquids are readily found in chemical and biological samples like organic and polymeric liquids, blood and crowded proteins samples; their viscoelastic properties could be exploited. As such, an understanding of the underlying interactions will be important especially in rapid microfluidic mixing involving multiple-stream flow of complex (viscoelastic fluids in biological assays. Here, we use the same planar device to experimentally show that the elasticity ratio (i.e. the ratio of stored elastic energy to be relaxed between two liquids indeed plays a crucial role in the entire flow kinematics and the enhanced mixing. We demonstrate here that the polymer stretching dynamics generated in the upstream converging flow and the polymer relaxation events occurring in the downstream channel are not exclusively responsible for the transverse flow mixing, but the elasticity ratio is also equally important. The role of elasticity ratio for transverse flow instability and the associated enhanced mixing were illustrated based on experimental observations. A new parameter Deratio = Deside / Demain (i.e. the ratio of the Deborah number (De of the sidestream to the mainstream liquids is introduced to correlate the magnitude of energy discontinuity between the two liquids. A new Deratio-Demain operating space diagram was constructed to present the observation of the effects of both elasticity and energy discontinuity in a compact manner, and for a general classification of the states of flow development.

  14. An experimental study on the flow instabilities and critical heat flux under natural circulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Yun II; Chang, Soon Heung

    2004-01-01

    This study has been carried out to investigate the hydrodynamic stabilities and Critical Heat Flux (CHF) characteristics for the natural and forced circulation. A low pressure experimental loop was constructed, and experiments under various conditions have been performed. In the experiments of the natural circulation, flow oscillations has been observed and the average mass flux under flow oscillation have been measured. Several parameters such as heat flux, the inlet temperature of test section, friction valve opening and riser length have been varied in order to investigate their effects on the flow stability of the natural circulation system. And the CHF data from low flow experiments, namely the natural and forced circulation, have been compared with each other to identify the effects of the flow instabilities on the CHF for the natural circulation mode. The test conditions for the CHF experiments were a low flow of less than 70 kg/m 2 s of water in a vertical round tube with diameter of 0.008 m at near atmospheric pressure. (author)

  15. Hydrodynamic Instability and Dynamic Burnout in Natural Circulation Two-Phase Flow. An Experimental and Theoretical Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Becker, Kurt M; Jahnberg, S; Haga, I; Hansson, P T; Mathisen, R P

    1964-09-15

    A theoretical model for predicting the threshold of instability for two phase flow in a natural circulation loop is presented. The model calculates the flow transient caused by a step disturbance of the heat input, and is based upon the conservation laws of mass, momentum and energy in one dimensional form. Empirical correlations are used in the model for estimating the void fractions and the two-phase flow pressure drops. The equations are solved numerically in a finite difference approximation coded for a digital computer. An experimental study of the hydrodynamic instability and dynamic burnout in two-phase flow has been performed in a natural circulation loop in the pressure range from 10 to 70 atg. The test sections were round ducts of 20, 30 and 36 mm inner diameter and 4890 mm heated length. The experimental results showed that within the ranges tested, the stability of the flow increases with increasing pressure and increasing throttling before the test section, but decreases with increasing Inlet subcooling and increasing throttling after the test section. Comparing the natural circulation burnout steam qualities with corresponding forced circulation data shoved that the former data were low by a factor up to 2.5. However, by applying inlet throttling of the flow the burnout values approached and finally coincided with the forced circulation data. The present experimental results as well as data available from other sources have been compared with the stability thresholds obtained with the theoretical model. The comparisons included circular, annular and rod cluster geometries, and the agreement between the experimental and theoretical stability limits was good. Finally the application of the experimental and theoretical results on the assessment of boiling heavy water reactor design is discussed.

  16. Hydrodynamic Instability and Dynamic Burnout in Natural Circulation Two-Phase Flow. An Experimental and Theoretical Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Becker, Kurt M.; Jahnberg, S.; Haga, I.; Hansson, P.T.; Mathisen, R.P.

    1964-09-01

    A theoretical model for predicting the threshold of instability for two phase flow in a natural circulation loop is presented. The model calculates the flow transient caused by a step disturbance of the heat input, and is based upon the conservation laws of mass, momentum and energy in one dimensional form. Empirical correlations are used in the model for estimating the void fractions and the two-phase flow pressure drops. The equations are solved numerically in a finite difference approximation coded for a digital computer. An experimental study of the hydrodynamic instability and dynamic burnout in two-phase flow has been performed in a natural circulation loop in the pressure range from 10 to 70 atg. The test sections were round ducts of 20, 30 and 36 mm inner diameter and 4890 mm heated length. The experimental results showed that within the ranges tested, the stability of the flow increases with increasing pressure and increasing throttling before the test section, but decreases with increasing Inlet subcooling and increasing throttling after the test section. Comparing the natural circulation burnout steam qualities with corresponding forced circulation data shoved that the former data were low by a factor up to 2.5. However, by applying inlet throttling of the flow the burnout values approached and finally coincided with the forced circulation data. The present experimental results as well as data available from other sources have been compared with the stability thresholds obtained with the theoretical model. The comparisons included circular, annular and rod cluster geometries, and the agreement between the experimental and theoretical stability limits was good. Finally the application of the experimental and theoretical results on the assessment of boiling heavy water reactor design is discussed

  17. Experimental Research of Dynamic Instabilities in the Presence of Coiled Wire Inserts on Two-Phase Flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omeroglu, Gokhan; Comakli, Omer; Karagoz, Sendogan; Sahin, Bayram

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study is to experimentally investigate the effect of the coiled wire insertions on dynamic instabilities and to compare the results with the smooth tube for forced convection boiling. The experiments were conducted in a circular tube, and water was used as the working fluid. Two different pitch ratios (H/D = 2.77 and 5.55) of coiled wire with circular cross-sections were utilised. The constant heat flux boundary condition was applied to the outer side of the test tube, and the constant exit restriction was used at the tube outlet. The mass flow rate changed from 110 to 20 g/s in order to obtain a detailed idea about the density wave and pressure drop oscillations, and the range of the inlet temperature was 15–35°C. The changes in pressure drop, inlet temperature, amplitude, and the period with mass flow rate are presented. For each configuration, it is seen that density wave and pressure drop oscillations occur at all inlet temperatures. Analyses show that the decrease in the mass flow rate and inlet temperature causes the amplitude and the period of the density wave and the pressure drop oscillations to decrease separately. PMID:23365547

  18. Experimental investigation of three-dimensional flow instabilities in a rotating lid-driven cavity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Jens Nørkær; Naumov, I.; Mikkelsen, Robert Flemming

    2006-01-01

    liquid. For the first time the onset of three-dimensionality and transition are analysed by combining the high spatial resolution of Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) and the temporal accuracy of Laser Doppler Anemometry (LDA). A detailed mapping of the transition from steady and axisymmetric flow...

  19. An Experimental and analytical study on the bubble-to-slug flow regime transition based on the void wave instability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, Chul Hwa

    1995-02-01

    structures. The transitional process for large bubble case can be explained by the wake model, whereas, for small bubble case, by the bubble coalescence model. It is clarified that the diversity in the wave propagations is closely related to the developing modes of bubble flow structures. And the different features shown in previous works on the void wave propagations could be systematically explained by the present observations. It turns also out that the instability criterion of void waves correctly indicates the appearance of large structures of gas phase. Thus, it is proposed that the spatial attenuation factor, which is introduced to quantify the degree of wave damping, can be used to objectively identify the BSFRT boundary. In the analytical work, generalized form of the wave propagation properties, which are dependent on the wave number, is derived from the linear stability analysis, and from that, the wave damping phenomena could be analytically predicted. It is shown that the analytical model on the wave dispersion, including the wave damping, can predict qualitatively well the experimental observations. The spatial gain factor is proposed to use as an indicator to analytically quantify the degree of spatial damping, and it will be very useful for relating both analytical and experimental data because it is a measurable quantity by experiments. The higher derivatives in the governing equations introduce, in general, a dependency of the wave parameters and the stability condition on the wave number, but the wave number-dependency of the stability condition could be eliminated in the case of long wavelength limit. It is also shown that considering algebraic terms only as momentum source terms and assuming the equal phasic pressure lead to the ill-posed problem. From both the characteristics and linear stability analyses, the relation between the hyperbolicity condition and the stability condition is analytically clarified. The concept of the 'most unstable waves' is

  20. Two-phase flow instabilities in a vertical annular channel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Babelli, I.; Nair, S.; Ishii, M. [Purdue Univ., West Lafayette, IN (United States)

    1995-09-01

    An experimental test facility was built to study two-phase flow instabilities in vertical annular channel with emphasis on downward flow under low pressure and low flow conditions. The specific geometry of the test section is similar to the fuel-target sub-channel of the Savannah River Site (SRS) Mark 22 fuel assembly. Critical Heat Flux (CHF) was observed following flow excursion and flow reversal in the test section. Density wave instability was not recorded in this series of experimental runs. The results of this experimental study show that flow excursion is the dominant instability mode under low flow, low pressure, and down flow conditions. The onset of instability data are plotted on the subcooling-Zuber (phase change) numbers stability plane.

  1. Taylor instability in rhyolite lava flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baum, B. A.; Krantz, W. B.; Fink, J. H.; Dickinson, R. E.

    1989-01-01

    A refined Taylor instability model is developed to describe the surface morphology of rhyolite lava flows. The effect of the downslope flow of the lava on the structures resulting from the Taylor instability mechanism is considered. Squire's (1933) transformation is developed for this flow in order to extend the results to three-dimensional modes. This permits assessing why ridges thought to arise from the Taylor instability mechanism are preferentially oriented transverse to the direction of lava flow. Measured diapir and ridge spacings for the Little and Big Glass Mountain rhyolite flows in northern California are used in conjunction with the model in order to explore the implications of the Taylor instability for flow emplacement. The model suggests additional lava flow features that can be measured in order to test whether the Taylor instability mechanism has influenced the flows surface morphology.

  2. Flow instability and critical heat flux in a ribbed annulus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, B.W.; Dougherty, T.; Fighetti, C.; Kokolis, S.; Reddy, G.D.; McAssey, E.V. Jr.; Coutts, A.

    1993-01-01

    An experimental program has been conducted to determine the onset of flow instability point in a heated annulus which is divided into four sub channels by non-conducting ribs. The onset of flow instability is identified by the minimum point in the pressure drop-velocity curve. Comparison with a ribless annulus show that the presence of ribs increases the minimum point velocity. In addition, data are presented which show that under certain conditions premature CHF can be induced by the ribs

  3. Review on two-phase flow instabilities in narrow spaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tadrist, L.

    2007-01-01

    Instabilities in two-phase flow have been studied since the 1950s. These phenomena may appear in power generation and heat transfer systems where two-phase flow is involved. Because of thermal management in small size systems, micro-fluidics plays an important role. Typical processes must be considered when the channel hydraulic diameter becomes very small. In this paper, a brief review of two-phase flow instabilities encountered in channels having hydraulic diameters greater than 10 mm are presented. The main instability types are discussed according to the existing experimental results and models. The second part of the paper examines two-phase flow instabilities in narrow spaces. Pool and flow boiling cases are considered. Experiments as well as theoretical models existing in the literature are examined. It was found that several experimental works evidenced these instabilities meanwhile only limited theoretical developments exist in the literature. In the last part of the paper an interpretation of the two-phase flow instabilities linked to narrow spaces are presented. This approach is based on characteristic time scales of the two-phase flow and bubble growth in the capillaries

  4. International Conference on Instability and Control of Massively Separated Flows

    CERN Document Server

    Soria, Julio

    2015-01-01

    This book contains the outcome of the international meeting on instability, control and noise generated by massive flow separation that was organized at the Monash Center, in Prato, Italy, September 4-6, 2013. The meeting served as the final review of the EU-FP7 Instability and Control of Massively Separated Flows Marie Curie travel grant and was supported by the European Office of Aerospace Research and Development. Fifty leading specialists from twelve countries reviewed the progress made since the 50s of the last century and discussed modern analysis techniques, advanced experimental flow diagnostics, and recent developments in active flow control techniques from the incompressible to the hypersonic regime. Applications involving massive flow separation and associated instability and noise generation mechanisms of interest to the aeronautical, naval and automotive industries have been addressed from a theoretical, numerical or experimental point of view, making this book a unique source containing the stat...

  5. Nuclear-Coupled Flow Instabilities and Their Effects on Dryout

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    M. Ishii; X. Sunn; S. Kuran

    2004-09-27

    Nuclear-coupled flow/power oscillations in boiling water reactors (BWRs) are investigated experimentally and analytically. A detailed literature survey is performed to identify and classify instabilities in two-phase flow systems. The classification and the identification of the leading physical mechanisms of the two-phase flow instabilities are important to propose appropriate analytical models and scaling criteria for simulation. For the purpose of scaling and the analysis of the nonlinear aspects of the coupled flow/power oscillations, an extensive analytical modeling strategy is developed and used to derive both frequency and time domain analysis tools.

  6. Numerical methods on flow instabilities in steam generator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshikawa, Ryuji; Hamada, Hirotsugu; Ohshima, Hiroyuki; Yanagisawa, Hideki

    2008-06-01

    The phenomenon of two-phase flow instability is important for the design and operation of many industrial systems and equipment, such as steam generators. The designer's job is to predict the threshold of flow instability in order to design around it or compensate for it. So it is essential to understand the physical phenomena governing such instability and to develop computational tools to model the dynamics of boiling systems. In Japan Atomic Energy Agency, investigations on heat transfer characteristics of steam generator are being performed for the development of Sodium-cooled Fast Breeder Reactor. As one part of the research work, the evaluations of two-phase flow instability in the steam generator are being carried out experimentally and numerically. In this report, the numerical methods were studied for two-phase flow instability analysis in steam generator. For numerical simulation purpose, the special algorithm to calculate inlet flow rate iteratively with inlet pressure and outlet pressure as boundary conditions for the density-wave instability analysis was established. There was no need to solve property derivatives and large matrices, so the spurious numerical instabilities caused by discontinuous property derivatives at boiling boundaries were avoided. Large time-step was possible. The flow instability in single heat transfer tube was successfully simulated with homogeneous equilibrium model by using the present algorithm. Then the drift-flux model including the effects of subcooled boiling and two phase slip was adopted to improve the accuracy. The computer code was developed after selecting the correlations of drift velocity and distribution parameter. The capability of drift flux model together with the present algorithm for simulating density-wave instability in single tube was confirmed. (author)

  7. Inertioelastic Flow Instability at a Stagnation Point

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burshtein, Noa; Zografos, Konstantinos; Shen, Amy Q.; Poole, Robert J.; Haward, Simon J.

    2017-10-01

    A number of important industrial applications exploit the ability of small quantities of high molecular weight polymer to suppress instabilities that arise in the equivalent flow of Newtonian fluids, a particular example being turbulent drag reduction. However, it can be extremely difficult to probe exactly how the polymer acts to, e.g., modify the streamwise near-wall eddies in a fully turbulent flow. Using a novel cross-slot flow configuration, we exploit a flow instability in order to create and study a single steady-state streamwise vortex. By quantitative experiment, we show how the addition of small quantities (parts per million) of a flexible polymer to a Newtonian solvent dramatically affects both the onset conditions for this instability and the subsequent growth of the axial vorticity. Complementary numerical simulations with a finitely extensible nonlinear elastic dumbbell model show that these modifications are due to the growth of polymeric stress within specific regions of the flow domain. Our data fill a significant gap in the literature between the previously reported purely inertial and purely elastic flow regimes and provide a link between the two by showing how the instability mode is transformed as the fluid elasticity is varied. Our results and novel methods are relevant to understanding the mechanisms underlying industrial uses of weakly elastic fluids and also to understanding inertioelastic instabilities in more confined flows through channels with intersections and stagnation points.

  8. Numerical modeling of flow boiling instabilities using TRACE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kommer, Eric M.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • TRACE was used to realistically model boiling instabilities in single and parallel channel configurations. • Model parameters were chosen to exactly mimic other author’s work in order to provide for direct comparison of results. • Flow stability maps generated by the model show unstable flow at operating points similar to other authors. • The method of adjudicating when a flow is “unstable” is critical in this type of numerical study. - Abstract: Dynamic flow instabilities in two-phase systems are a vitally important area of study due to their effects on a great number of industrial applications, including heat exchangers in nuclear power plants. Several next generation nuclear reactor designs incorporate once through steam generators which will exhibit boiling flow instabilities if not properly designed or when operated outside design limits. A number of numerical thermal hydraulic codes attempt to model instabilities for initial design and for use in accident analysis. TRACE, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission’s newest thermal hydraulic code is used in this study to investigate flow instabilities in both single and dual parallel channel configurations. The model parameters are selected as to replicate other investigators’ experimental and numerical work in order to provide easy comparison. Particular attention is paid to the similarities between analysis using TRACE Version 5.0 and RELAP5/MOD3.3. Comparison of results is accomplished via flow stability maps non-dimensionalized via the phase change and subcooling numbers. Results of this study show that TRACE does indeed model two phase flow instabilities, with the transient response closely mimicking that seen in experimental studies. When compared to flow stability maps generated using RELAP, TRACE shows similar results with differences likely due to the somewhat qualitative criteria used by various authors to determine when the flow is truly unstable

  9. Prediction of flow instability during natural convection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farhadi, Kazem

    2005-01-01

    The occurrence of flow excursion instability during passive heat removal for Tehran Research Reactor (TRR) has been analyzed at low-pressure and low-mass rate of flow conditions without boiling taking place. Pressure drop-flow rate characteristics in the general case are determined upon a developed code for this purpose. The code takes into account variations of different pressure drop components caused by different powers as well as different core inlet temperatures. The analysis revealed the fact that the instability can actually occur in the natural convection mode for a range of powers per fuel plates at a predetermined inlet temperature with fixed geometry of the core. Low mass rate of flow and high sub-cooling are the two important conditions for the occurrence of static instability in the TRR. The calculated results are compared with the existing data in the literature. (author)

  10. Study on flow instabilities in two-phase mixtures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishii, M.

    1976-03-01

    Various mechanisms that can induce flow instabilities in two-phase flow systems are reviewed and their relative importance discussed. In view of their practical importance, the density-wave instabilities have been analyzed in detail based on the one-dimensional two-phase flow formulation. The dynamic response of the system to the inlet flow perturbations has been derived from the model; thus the characteristic equation that predicts the onset of instabilities has been obtained. The effects of various system parameters, such as the heat flux, subcooling, pressure, inlet velocity, inlet orificing, and exit orificing on the stability boundary have been analyzed. In addition to numerical solutions, some simple stability criteria under particular conditions have been obtained. Both results have been compared with various experimental data, and a satisfactory agreement has been demonstrated

  11. Magnetic field dynamos and magnetically triggered flow instabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefani, F.; Albrecht, T.; Arlt, R.; Christen, M.; Gailitis, A.; Gellert, M.; Giesecke, A.; Goepfert, O.; Herault, J.; Kirillov, O. N.; Mamatsashvili, G.; Priede, J.; Rüdiger, G.; Seilmayer, M.; Tilgner, A.; Vogt, T.

    2017-07-01

    The project A2 of the LIMTECH Alliance aimed at a better understanding of those magnetohydrodynamic instabilities that are relevant for the generation and the action of cosmic magnetic fields. These comprise the hydromagnetic dynamo effect and various magnetically triggered flow instabilities, such as the magnetorotational instability and the Tayler instability. The project was intended to support the experimental capabilities to become available in the framework of the DREsden Sodium facility for DYNamo and thermohydraulic studies (DRESDYN). An associated starting grant was focused on the dimensioning of a liquid metal experiment on the newly found magnetic destabilization of rotating flows with positive shear. In this survey paper, the main results of these two projects are summarized.

  12. Instability in flow boiling in microchannels

    CERN Document Server

    Saha, Sujoy Kumar

    2016-01-01

    This Brief addresses the phenomena of instability in flow boiling in microchannels occurring in high heat flux electronic cooling. A companion edition in the SpringerBrief Subseries on Thermal Engineering and Applied Science to “Critical Heat Flux in Flow Boiling in Microchannels,” and "Heat Transfer and Pressure Drop in Flow Boiling in Microchannels,"by the same author team, this volume is idea for professionals, researchers, and graduate students concerned with electronic cooling.

  13. Flow and instability in quantum gravity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Douglas, M.R.; Seiberg, N.; Shenker, S.H.

    1990-01-01

    We study the flow from the m=3 multicritical matrix theory, unambiguously defined by Brezin, Marinari and Parisi, to the m=2 pure gravity theory. We find behavior in the flow indicative of a non-perturbative instability in this definition of non-perturbative pure quantum gravity. We expect a similar situation for all m even theories. Other definitions of these theories are briefly discussed. (orig.)

  14. Kelvin-Helmholtz instability in a bounded plasma flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burinskaya, T. M.

    2008-01-01

    Kelvin-Helmholtz instability in a three-layer plane geometry is investigated theoretically. It is shown that, in a three-layer system (in contrast to the traditionally considered case in which instability develops at the boundary between two plasma flows), instability can develop at an arbitrary ratio of the plasma flow velocity to the ion-acoustic velocity. Perturbations with wavelengths on the order of the flow thickness or longer can increase even at a zero temperature. The system can also be unstable against long-wavelength perturbations if the flow velocity at one of the boundaries is lower than the sum of the Alfven velocities in the flow and the ambient plasma. The possibility of applying the results obtained to interpret the experimental data acquired in the framework of the CLUSTER multisatellite project is discussed. It follows from these data that, in many cases, the propagation of an accelerated particle flow in the plasma-sheet boundary layer of the Earth's magnetotail is accompanied by the generation of magnetic field oscillations propagating with a velocity on the order of the local Alfven velocity.

  15. Flow instability and turbulence - ONERA water tunnel visualizations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werle, H.

    The experimental technique used for visualizing laminar-turbulent transition phenomena, developed in previous tests in ONERA's small TH1 water tunnel, has been successfully applied in the new TH2 tunnel. With its very extensive Reynold's number domain (10 to the 4th - 10 to the 6th), this tunnel has shown itself to be well adapted to the study of turbulence and of the flow instabilities related to its appearance.

  16. Topographic instability of flow in a rotating fluid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. I. Patarashvili

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Here are presented the results of experimental and theoretical studies on a stability of zonal geostrophic flows in the rotating layer of the shallow water. In the experiments, a special apparatus by Abastumani Astrophysical Observatory Georgian Academy of Science was used. This apparatus represents a paraboloid of rotation, which can be set in a regulable rotation around the vertical axis. Maximal diameter of the paraboloid is 1.2 m, radius of curvature in the pole is 0.698 m. In the paraboloid, water spreads on walls as a layer uniform on height under the period of rotation 1.677 s. Against a background of the rotating fluid, the zonal flows are formed by the source-sink system. It consists of two concentric circular perforations on the paraboloid bottom (width is 0.3 cm, radiuses are 8.4 and 57.3 cm, respectively; water can be pumped through them with various velocities and in all directions. It has been established that under constant vertical depth of the rotating fluid the zonal flows are stable. There are given the measurements of the radial profiles for the water level and velocity in the stationary regime. It has been found that zonal flows may lose stability under the presence of the radial gradient of full depth formed by a change of angular velocity of paraboloid rotation. An instability origin results in the loss of flow axial symmetry and in the appearance of self-excited oscillations in the zonal flow. At the given angular velocity of rotation, instability is observed only in the definite range of intensities of the source-sink system. The theoretical estimations are performed in the framework of the equations of the shallow water theory, including the terms describing the bottom friction. It has been shown that the instability of zonal flows found experimentally has a topographical nature and is related with non-monotone dependence of the potential vorticity on radius.

  17. Pinch instabilities in Taylor-Couette flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shalybkov, Dima

    2006-01-01

    The linear stability of the dissipative Taylor-Couette flow with an azimuthal magnetic field is considered. Unlike ideal flows, the magnetic field is a fixed function of a radius with two parameters only: a ratio of inner to outer cylinder radii, eta, and a ratio of the magnetic field values on outer and inner cylinders, muB. The magnetic field with 0rotation. The unstable modes are located into some interval of the axial wave numbers for the flow stable without magnetic field. The interval length is zero for a critical Hartmann number and increases with an increasing Hartmann number. The critical Hartmann numbers and length of the unstable axial wave number intervals are the same for every rotation law. There are the critical Hartmann numbers for m=0 sausage and m=1 kink modes only. The sausage mode is the most unstable mode close to Ha=0 point and the kink mode is the most unstable mode close to the critical Hartmann number. The transition from the sausage instability to the kink instability depends on the Prandtl number Pm and this happens close to one-half of the critical Hartmann number for Pm=1 and close to the critical Hartmann number for Pm=10(-5). The critical Hartmann numbers are smaller for kink modes. The flow stability does not depend on magnetic Prandtl numbers for m=0 mode. The same is true for critical Hartmann numbers for both m=0 and m=1 modes. The typical value of the magnetic field destabilizing the liquid metal Taylor-Couette flow is approximately 10(2) G.

  18. Experimental model of bladder instability in rabbits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Balasteghin K.T.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Propose a new experimental model of bladder instability in rabbits after partial bladder obstruction. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Thirty North Folk male rabbits, weighting 1,700 to 2,820 g (mean: 2,162 g were studied. The animals were distributed in 2 experimental groups, formed by 15 rabbits each: Group 1 - clinical control. In this group there was no surgical intervention; Group 2 - bladder outlet obstruction. In this group, after anesthetizing the animal, urethral cannulation with Foley catheter 10F was performed and then an adjustable plastic bracelet was passed around the bladder neck. It was then adjusted in order to not constrict the urethra. The following parameters were studied in M1 - pre-operative period; M2 - 4 weeks post-operatively moments: 1- urine culture; 2- cystometric study; 3- serum creatinine and BUN. RESULTS: Bladder weight was 2.5 times larger in the group with obstruction than in the control group. Cystometric evaluation showed a significant increase in maximal vesical volume in the final moment at Group G2. However, there was no statistically significant difference among the groups studied. There was no statistically significant difference between maximal detrusor pressure and vesical compliance in the different moments or in the studied groups. There was an absence of uninhibited detrusor contractions in all the animals in group 1, and involuntary contractions were detected in 93% of group 2 animals. There was no significant variation in BUN and serum creatinine either among the groups or in the same group. CONCLUSIONS: We observed in the group with obstruction a bladder weight 2.5 higher than normal bladders. We detected involuntary contractions in 93% of the animals in group 2, establishing this experimental model as appropriate to secondary bladder instability and partial bladder outlet obstruction.

  19. The onset of flow instability for a downward flow of a non-boiling heated liquid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Babelli, Ibrahim; Ishii, Mamoru

    1999-01-01

    A procedure for predicting the onset of flow instability (OFI) in downward flows at low-pressure and low-flow conditions without boiling is presented in this paper. It is generally accepted that the onset of significant void in subcooled boiling precedes, and is a precondition to, the occurrence of static flow instability. A detailed analysis of the pressure drop components for a downward flow in a heated channel reveals the possibility of unstable transition from single-phase flow to high-quality two-phase flow, i.e., flow excursion. Low flow rate and high subcooling are the two important conditions for the occurrence of this type of instability. The unstable transition occurs when the resistance to the downward flow caused by local (orifice), frictional, and thermal expansion pressure drops equalizes the driving force of the gravitational pressure drop. The inclusion of the thermal expansion pressure drop is essential to account for this type of transition. Experimental data are yet to be produced to verify the prediction of the present analysis. (author)

  20. Flow vibrations and dynamic instability of heat exchanger tube bundles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Granger, S.; Langre, E. de

    1995-01-01

    This paper presents a review of external-flow-induced vibration of heat exchanger tube bundles. Attention is focused on a dynamic instability, known as ''fluidelastic instability'', which can develop when flow is transverse to the tube axis. The main physical models proposed in the literature are successively reviewed in a critical way. As a consequence, some concepts are clarified, some a priori plausible misinterpretations are rejected and finally, certain basic mechanisms, induced by the flow-structure interaction and responsible for the ultimate onset of fluidelastic instability, are elucidated. Design tools and methods for predictive analysis of industrial cases are then presented. The usual design tool is the ''stability map'', i.e. an empirical correlation which must be interpreted in a conservative way. Of course, when using this approach, the designer must also consider reasonable safety margins. In the area of predictive analysis, the ''unsteady semi-analytical models'' seem to be a promising and efficient methodology. A modern implementation of these ideas mix an original experimental approach for taking fluid dynamic forces into account, together with non-classical numerical methods of mechanical vibration. (authors). 20 refs., 9 figs

  1. Experimental investigation of turbulent mixing by Rayleigh-Taylor instability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Youngs, D.L.

    1992-01-01

    A key feature of compressible turbulent mixing is the generation of vorticity via the ∇px ∇(1/ρ) term. This source of vorticity is also present in incompressible flows involving the mixing of fluids of different density, for example Rayleigh-Taylor unstable flows. This paper gives a summary of an experimental investigation of turbulent mixing at a plane boundary between two fluids, of densities ρ 1 , and ρ 2 . (ρ 1 > ρ 2 ) due to Rayleigh-Taylor instability. The two fluids are near incompressible and mixing occurs when an approximately constant acceleration, g, is applied normal to the interface with direction from fluid 2 to fluid 1. Full details of the experimental programme are given in a set of three reports. Some of the earlier experiments are also described by Read. Previous experimental work and much of the theoretical research has concentrated on studying the growth of the instability from a single wavelength perturbation rather than turbulent mixing. Notable exceptions are published in the Russian literature. A related process, turbulent mixing induced by the passage of shock waves though an interface between fluids of different density is described by Andronov et al. The major purpose of the experiments described here was to study the evolution of the instability from small random perturbations where it is found that large and larger structures appear as time proceeds. A novel technique was used to provide the desired acceleration. The two fluids were enclosed in a rectangular tank, the lighter fluid 2 initially resting on top of the denser fluid 1. One or more rocket motors were then used to drive the tank vertically downwards. The aim of the experimental programme is to provide data for the calibration of a turbulence model used to predict mixing in real situations

  2. Micro-channel convective boiling heat transfer with flow instabilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Consolini, L.; Thome, J.R.

    2009-01-01

    Flow boiling heat transfer in micro-channels has attracted much interest in the past decade, and is currently a strong candidate for high performance compact heat sinks, such as those required in electronics systems, automobile air conditioning units, micro-reactors, fuel cells, etc. Currently the literature presents numerous experimental studies on two-phase heat transfer in micro-channels, providing an extensive database that covers many different fluids and operating conditions. Among the noteworthy elements that have been reported in previous studies, is the sensitivity of micro-channel evaporators to oscillatory two-phase instabilities. These periodic fluctuations in flow and pressure drop either result from the presence of upstream compressibility, or are simply due to the interaction among parallel channels in multi-port systems. An oscillating flow presents singular characteristics that are expected to produce an effect on the local heat transfer mechanisms, and thus on the estimation of the two-phase heat transfer coefficients. The present investigation illustrates results for flow boiling of refrigerants R-134a, R-236fa, and R-245fa in a 510 μm circular micro-channel, exposed to various degrees of oscillatory compressible volume instabilities. The data describe the main features of the fluctuations in the temperatures of the heated wall and fluid, and draw attention to the differences in the measured unstable time-averaged heat transfer coefficients with respect to those for stable flow boiling. (author)

  3. Micro-channel convective boiling heat transfer with flow instabilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Consolini, L.; Thome, J.R. [Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne (Switzerland). Lab. de Transfert de Chaleur et de Masse], e-mail: lorenzo.consolini@epfl.ch, e-mail: john.thome@epfl.ch

    2009-07-01

    Flow boiling heat transfer in micro-channels has attracted much interest in the past decade, and is currently a strong candidate for high performance compact heat sinks, such as those required in electronics systems, automobile air conditioning units, micro-reactors, fuel cells, etc. Currently the literature presents numerous experimental studies on two-phase heat transfer in micro-channels, providing an extensive database that covers many different fluids and operating conditions. Among the noteworthy elements that have been reported in previous studies, is the sensitivity of micro-channel evaporators to oscillatory two-phase instabilities. These periodic fluctuations in flow and pressure drop either result from the presence of upstream compressibility, or are simply due to the interaction among parallel channels in multi-port systems. An oscillating flow presents singular characteristics that are expected to produce an effect on the local heat transfer mechanisms, and thus on the estimation of the two-phase heat transfer coefficients. The present investigation illustrates results for flow boiling of refrigerants R-134a, R-236fa, and R-245fa in a 510 {mu}m circular micro-channel, exposed to various degrees of oscillatory compressible volume instabilities. The data describe the main features of the fluctuations in the temperatures of the heated wall and fluid, and draw attention to the differences in the measured unstable time-averaged heat transfer coefficients with respect to those for stable flow boiling. (author)

  4. Two-phase flow instability and propagation of disturbances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yadigaroglu, G.

    1984-01-01

    Various mechanisms of static and dynamic macroinstabilities, appearing in two-phase flows, have been considered. Types of instabilities, conditioned by the form of hydraulic characteristics of the channel and density waves are analyzed in detail. Problems of instabilities in nuclear reactor circuits, in particular problems of instabilities, conditioned by water and steam mixing and vapour condensation, and problems of steam generator operation instability are discussed

  5. Investigation on two-phase flow instability in steam generator of integrated nuclear reactor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1996-01-01

    In the pressure range of 3-18MPa,high pressure steam-water two-phase flow density wave instability in vertical upward parallel pipes with inner diameter of 12mm is studied experimentally.The oscillation curves of two-phase flow instability and the effects of several parameters on the oscillation threshold of the system are obtained.Based on the small pertubation linearization method and the stability principles of automatic control system,a mathematical model is developed to predict the characteristics of density wave instability threshold.The predictions of the model are in good agreement with the experimental results.

  6. Static flow instability in subcooled flow boiling in parallel channels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siman-Tov, M.; Felde, D.K.; McDuffee, J.L.; Yoder, G.L. Jr.

    1995-01-01

    A series of tests for static flow instability or flow excursion (FE) at conditions applicable to the proposed Advanced Neutron Source reactor was completed in parallel rectangular channels configuration with light water flowing vertically upward at very high velocities. True critical heat flux experiments under similar conditions were also conducted. The FE data reported in this study considerably extend the velocity range of data presently available worldwide. Out of the three correlations compared, the Saha and Zuber correlation had the best fit with the data. However, a modification was necessary to take into account the demonstrated dependence of the Stanton (St) and Nusselt (Nu) numbers on subcooling levels, especially in the low subcooling regime

  7. Airfoil flow instabilities induced by background flow oscillations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Selerowicz, W.C.; Szumowski, A.P. [Technical Univ. Warsaw (Poland)

    2002-04-01

    The effect of background flow oscillations on transonic airfoil (NACA 0012) flow was investigated experimentally. The oscillations were generated by means of a rotating plate placed downstream of the airfoil. Owing to oscillating chocking of the flow caused by the plate, the airfoil flow periodically accelerated and decelerated. This led to strong variations in the surface pressure and the airfoil loading. The results are presented for two angles of attack, {alpha}=4 and {alpha}=8.5 , which correspond to the attached and separated steady airfoil flows, respectively. (orig.)

  8. Numerical investigation of flow instability in parallel channels with supercritical water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shitsi, Edward; Debrah, Seth Kofi; Agbodemegbe, Vincent Yao; Ampomah-Amoako, Emmanuel

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: •Supercritical flow instability in parallel channels is investigated. •Flow dynamics and heat transfer characteristics are analyzed. •Mass flow rate, pressure, heating power, and axial power shape have significant effects on flow instability. •Numerical results are validated with experimental results. -- Abstract: SCWR is one of the selected Gen IV reactors purposely for electricity generation in the near future. It is a promising technology with higher efficiency compared to current LWRs but without the challenges of heat transfer and its associated flow instability. Supercritical flow instability is mainly caused by sharp change in the coolant properties around the pseudo-critical point of the working fluid and research into this phenomenon is needed to address concerns of flow instability at supercritical pressures. Flow instability in parallel channels at supercritical pressures is investigated in this paper using a three dimensional (3D) numerical tool (STAR-CCM+). The dynamics characteristics such as amplitude and period of out-of-phase inlet mass flow oscillation at the heated channel inlet, and heat transfer characteristic such as maximum outlet temperature of the heated channel outlet temperature oscillation are discussed. Influences of system parameters such as axial power shape, pressure, mass flow rate, and gravity are discussed based on the obtained mass flow and temperature oscillations. The results show that the system parameters have significant effect on the amplitude of the mass flow oscillation and maximum temperature of the heated outlet temperature oscillation but have little effect on the period of the mass flow oscillation. The amplitude of mass flow oscillation and maximum temperature of the heated channel outlet temperature oscillation increase with heating power. The numerical results when compared to experiment data show that the 3D numerical tool (STAR-CCM+) could capture dynamics and heat transfer characteristics of

  9. Linear predictions of supercritical flow instability in two parallel channels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shah, M.

    2008-01-01

    A steady state linear code that can predict thermo-hydraulic instability boundaries in a two parallel channel system under supercritical conditions has been developed. Linear and non-linear solutions of the instability boundary in a two parallel channel system are also compared. The effect of gravity on the instability boundary in a two parallel channel system, by changing the orientation of the system flow from horizontal flow to vertical up-flow and vertical down-flow has been analyzed. Vertical up-flow is found to be more unstable than horizontal flow and vertical down flow is found to be the most unstable configuration. The type of instability present in each flow-orientation of a parallel channel system has been checked and the density wave oscillation type is observed in horizontal flow and vertical up-flow, while the static type of instability is observed in a vertical down-flow for the cases studied here. The parameters affecting the instability boundary, such as the heating power, inlet temperature, inlet and outlet K-factors are varied to assess their effects. This study is important for the design of future Generation IV nuclear reactors in which supercritical light water is proposed as the primary coolant. (author)

  10. Study of surface and bulk instabilities in MHD duct flow with imitation of insulator coating imperfections

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu Zengyu [Southwestern Institute of Physics, P.O. Box 432, Chengdu, Sichuan 610041 (China)]. E-mail: xuzy@swip.ac.cn; Pan Chuanjie [Southwestern Institute of Physics, P.O. Box 432, Chengdu, Sichuan 610041 (China); Wei Wenhao [Southwestern Institute of Physics, P.O. Box 432, Chengdu, Sichuan 610041 (China); Kang Weishan [Southwestern Institute of Physics, P.O. Box 432, Chengdu, Sichuan 610041 (China)

    2006-02-15

    MHD phenomena in a duct flow were studied experimentally by using copper electrodes inserted into the wall of a perfectly insulated duct. The electrodes were connected using a copper wire to imitate different insulator coating imperfection conditions. The experimental results show instabilities of electric potential at the wall (surface instabilities) as well as instabilities in the pressure and velocity (bulk instabilities). The instabilities are strongly dependent on the scale of the copper wire. Three different cases were studied (at the same flow regimes, but with different electrode connections), where the potential at the duct wall is smaller, equal to or higher than the product of duct diameter 2a and transverse magnetic field B and average velocity V . MHD pressure drop {delta}P also exhibits significant changes.

  11. Temporal flow instability for Magnus-Robins effect at high rotation rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sengupta, T. K.; Kasliwal, A.; de, S.; Nair, M.

    2003-06-01

    The lift and drag coefficients of a circular cylinder, translating and spinning at a supercritical rate is studied theoretically to explain the experimentally observed violation of maximum mean lift coefficient principle, that was proposed heuristically by Prandtl on the basis of inviscid flow model. It is also noted experimentally that flow past a rotating and translating cylinder experiences temporal instability-a fact not corroborated by any theoretical studies so far. In the present paper we report very accurate solution of Navier-Stokes equation that displays the above-mentioned instability and the violation of the maximum limit. The calculated lift coefficient exceeds the limit of /4π, instantaneously as well as in time-averaged sense. The main purpose of the present paper is to explain the observed temporal instability sequence in terms of a new theory of instability based on full Navier-Stokes equation that does not require making any assumption about the flow field, unlike other stability theories.

  12. Experimental study of the longitudinal instability for beam transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reiser, M.; Wang, J.G.; Guo, W.M.; Wang, D.X.

    1990-01-01

    Theoretical model for beam longitudinal instability in a transport pipe with general wall impedance is considered. The result shows that a capacitive wall tends to stabilize the beam. The experimental study of the instability for a pure resistive-wall is presented, including the design parameters, setup and components for the experiment. 6 refs., 3 figs

  13. Studies of thermal-hydrodynamic flow instability, (3)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuoki, Akira

    1978-01-01

    In the flow system in which large density change occurs midway, sometimes steady flow cannot be maintained according to the conditions, and pulsating flow or the scamper of flow occurs. This phenomenon is called flow instability, and is noticed as one of the causes to obstruct the normal operation in boilers, BWRs and the steam generators for FBRs with parallel evaporating tube system. In the pulsating instability, there are density wave oscillation and pressure wave oscillation. The author has studied the density wave oscillation occurring in the steam generators for FBRs and in this paper, the role played by two-phase flow regarding the occurrence of flow instability, and the effect of the existence of interphase slip on the role played by two-phase flow are reported. The theoretical analysis and the results of the analysis taking a steam generator heated with sodium as the example are described. Regarding flow stability, two-phase flow part generates the variation of weight velocity with different phase in steam single phase part, accepting enthalpy variation in water single phase part. In this action, the effect of interphase slip was observed, and the variation of reverse phase is apt to occur in slip flow as compared with homogeneous flow. Accordingly, flow instability is apt to occur in slip flow. (Kako, I.)

  14. Instabilities and vortex dynamics in shear flow of magnetized plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tajima, T.; Horton, W.; Morrison, P.J.; Schutkeker, J.; Kamimura, T.; Mima, K.; Abe, Y.

    1990-03-01

    Gradient-driven instabilities and the subsequent nonlinear evolution of generated vortices in sheared E x B flows are investigated for magnetized plasmas with and without gravity (magnetic curvature) and magnetic shear by using theory and implicit particle simulations. In the linear eigenmode analysis, the instabilities considered are the Kelvin-Helmholtz (K-H) instability and the resistive interchange instability. The presence of the shear flow can stabilize these instabilities. The dynamics of the K-H instability and the vortex dynamics can be uniformly described by the initial flow pattern with a vorticity localization parameter ε. The observed growth of the K-H modes is exponential in time for linearly unstable modes, secular for marginal mode, and absent until driven nonlinearly for linearly stable modes. The distance between two vortex centers experiences rapid merging while the angle θ between the axis of vortices and the external shear flow increases. These vortices proceed toward their overall coalescence, while shedding small-scale vortices and waves. The main features of vortex dynamics of the nonlinear coalescence and the tilt or the rotational instabilities of vortices are shown to be given by using a low dimension Hamiltonian representation for interacting vortex cores in the shear flow. 24 refs., 19 figs., 1 tab

  15. Experimental investigation of bubble plume structure instability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marco Simiano; Robert Zboray; Francois de Cachard [Thermal-Hydraulics Laboratory, Paul Scherrer Institut, 5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland); Djamel Lakehal; George Yadigaroglu [Institute of Energy Technology, Swiss Federal Institute of Technology, ETH-Zentrum/CLT, 8092 Zurich (Switzerland)

    2005-07-01

    Full text of publication follows: The hydrodynamic properties of a 3D bubble plume in a large water pool are investigated experimentally. Bubble plumes are present in various industrial processes, including chemical plants, stirred reactors, and nuclear power plants, e.g. in BWR suppression pools. In these applications, the main issue is to predict the currents induced by the bubbles in the liquid phase, and to determine the consequent mixing. Bubble plumes, especially large and unconfined ones, present strong 3D effects and a superposition of different characteristic length scales. Thus, they represent relevant test cases for assessment and verification of 3D models in thermal-hydraulic codes. Bubble plumes are often unsteady, with fluctuations in size and shape of the bubble swarm, and global movements of the plume. In this case, local time-averaged data are not sufficient to characterize the flow. Additional information regarding changes in plume shape and position is required. The effect of scale on the 3D flow structure and stability being complex, there was a need to conduct studies in a fairly large facility, closer to industrial applications. Air bubble plumes, up to 30 cm in base diameter and 2 m in height were extensively studied in a 2 m diameter water pool. Homogeneously sized bubbles were obtained using a particular injector. The main hydrodynamic parameters. i.e., gas and liquid velocities, void fraction, bubble shape and size, plume shape and position, were determined experimentally. Photographic and image processing techniques were used to characterize the bubble shape, and double-tip optical probes to measure bubble size and void fraction. Electromagnetic probes measured the recirculation velocity in the pool. Simultaneous two-phase flow particle image velocimetry (STPFPIV) in a vertical plane containing the vessel axis provided instantaneous velocity fields for both phases and therefore the relative velocity field. Video recording using two CCD

  16. Rolie-Poly fluid flowing through constrictions: Two distinct instabilities

    KAUST Repository

    Reis, T.; Wilson, H.J.

    2013-01-01

    Elastic instabilities of entangled polymer melts are common in industrial processes but the physics responsible is not well understood. We present a numerical linear stability study of a molecular based constitutive model which grants us physical insight into the underlying mechanics involved. Two constriction flows are considered - one shear dominated, the other extension dominated - and two distinct instabilities are found. The influence of the molecular structure and the behaviour of the polymer dynamics are investigated and in both cases chain relaxation and orientation play a crucial role. This suggests a molecular-based physical interpretation of the underlying mechanisms responsible for flow instabilities. © 2013 Elsevier B.V.

  17. Rolie-Poly fluid flowing through constrictions: Two distinct instabilities

    KAUST Repository

    Reis, T.

    2013-05-01

    Elastic instabilities of entangled polymer melts are common in industrial processes but the physics responsible is not well understood. We present a numerical linear stability study of a molecular based constitutive model which grants us physical insight into the underlying mechanics involved. Two constriction flows are considered - one shear dominated, the other extension dominated - and two distinct instabilities are found. The influence of the molecular structure and the behaviour of the polymer dynamics are investigated and in both cases chain relaxation and orientation play a crucial role. This suggests a molecular-based physical interpretation of the underlying mechanisms responsible for flow instabilities. © 2013 Elsevier B.V.

  18. Two-phase flow instabilities in a silicon microchannels heat sink

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bogojevic, D.; Sefiane, K.; Walton, A.J.; Lin, H.; Cummins, G.

    2009-01-01

    Two-phase flow instabilities are highly undesirable in microchannels-based heat sinks as they can lead to temperature oscillations with high amplitudes, premature critical heat flux and mechanical vibrations. This work is an experimental study of boiling instabilities in a microchannel silicon heat sink with 40 parallel rectangular microchannels, having a length of 15 mm and a hydraulic diameter of 194 μm. A series of experiments have been carried out to investigate pressure and temperature oscillations during the flow boiling instabilities under uniform heating, using water as a cooling liquid. Thin nickel film thermometers, integrated on the back side of a heat sink with microchannels, were used in order to obtain a better insight related to temperature fluctuations caused by two-phase flow instabilities. Flow regime maps are presented for two inlet water temperatures, showing stable and unstable flow regimes. It was observed that boiling leads to asymmetrical flow distribution within microchannels that result in high temperature non-uniformity and the simultaneously existence of different flow regimes along the transverse direction. Two types of two-phase flow instabilities with appreciable pressure and temperature fluctuations were observed, that depended on the heat to mass flux ratio and inlet water temperature. These were high amplitude/low frequency and low amplitude/high frequency instabilities. High speed camera imaging, performed simultaneously with pressure and temperature measurements, showed that inlet/outlet pressure and the temperature fluctuations existed due to alternation between liquid/two-phase/vapour flows. It was also determined that the inlet water subcooling condition affects the magnitudes of the temperature oscillations in two-phase flow instabilities and flow distribution within the microchannels.

  19. Flow-Induced Instabilities in Pump-Turbines in China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhigang Zuo

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The stability of pump-turbines is of great importance to the operation of pumped storage power (PSP stations. Both hydraulic instabilities and operational instabilities have been reported in PSP stations in China. In order to provide a reference to the engineers and scientists working on pump-turbines, this paper summarizes the hydraulic instabilities and performance characteristics that promote the operational instabilities encountered in pump-turbine operations in China. Definitions, analytical methods, numerical and experimental studies, and main results are clarified. Precautions and countermeasures are also provided based on a literature review. The gaps between present studies and the need for engineering practice are pointed out.

  20. A study on the instability criterion for the stratified flow in horizontal pipe at cocurrent flow conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sung, Chang Kyung [Korea Electric Power Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1997-12-31

    This paper presents a theoretical approach of the instability criterion from stratified to nonstratified flow in horizontal pipe at cocurrent flow conditions. The new theoretical instability criterion for the stratified and nonstratified flow transition in horizontal pipe has been developed by hyperbolic equations in two-phase flow. Critical flow condition criterion and onset of slugging at cocurrent flow condition correspond to zero and imaginary characteristics which occur when the hyperbolicity of a stratified two-phase flow is broken, respectively. Through comparison between results predicted by the present flow is broken, respectively. Through comparison between results predicted by the present theory and the Kukita et al. [1] experimental data of pipes, it is shown that they are in good agreement with data. 4 refs., 2 figs. (Author)

  1. A study on the instability criterion for the stratified flow in horizontal pipe at cocurrent flow conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sung, Chang Kyung [Korea Electric Power Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1998-12-31

    This paper presents a theoretical approach of the instability criterion from stratified to nonstratified flow in horizontal pipe at cocurrent flow conditions. The new theoretical instability criterion for the stratified and nonstratified flow transition in horizontal pipe has been developed by hyperbolic equations in two-phase flow. Critical flow condition criterion and onset of slugging at cocurrent flow condition correspond to zero and imaginary characteristics which occur when the hyperbolicity of a stratified two-phase flow is broken, respectively. Through comparison between results predicted by the present flow is broken, respectively. Through comparison between results predicted by the present theory and the Kukita et al. [1] experimental data of pipes, it is shown that they are in good agreement with data. 4 refs., 2 figs. (Author)

  2. Two-phase flow instability in a liquid nitrogen heat exchanger, 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kondoh, Tetsuya; Fukuda, Kenji; Hasegawa, Shu; Yamada, Hidetomo; Ryu, Hiroyuki.

    1988-01-01

    Experimental and analytical investigations are conducted on flow instability in a vertically installed liquid nitrogen shell and tube type heat exchanger. The experiments are carried out by making use of water steam as a secondary fluid and it is observed that flow instability occurs in the range of small inlet flow rate. Mode analysis of the flow instability oscillation reveals that there exists a fundamental mode and its higher harmonics up to the fourth. As the period of the fundamental mode is nearly equal to the transit time for a fluid particle to travel through the heated tube, it is suggested that this flow instability is of the density wave type. It is shown that the amount of exchanged heat, as well as the pressure drop, decrease when unstable flow oscillation occurs. An analysis of the static heat transfer and pressure drop characteristics can simulate the experimental results in the stable region. Linear stability analysis is also carried out to yield the stability map as well as the period of flow oscillation, which proved to agree with the experimental data qualitatively. (author)

  3. Using particle tracking to measure flow instabilities in an undergraduate laboratory experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelley, Douglas H.; Ouellette, Nicholas T.

    2011-03-01

    Much of the drama and complexity of fluid flow occurs because its governing equations lack unique solutions. The observed behavior depends on the stability of the multitude of solutions, which can change with the experimental parameters. Instabilities cause sudden global shifts in behavior. We have developed a low-cost experiment to study a classical fluid instability. By using an electromagnetic technique, students drive Kolmogorov flow in a thin fluid layer and measure it quantitatively with a webcam. They extract positions and velocities from movies of the flow using Lagrangian particle tracking and compare their measurements to several theoretical predictions, including the effect of the drive current, the spatial structure of the flow, and the parameters at which instability occurs. The experiment can be tailored to undergraduates at any level or to graduate students by appropriate emphasis on the physical phenomena and the sophisticated mathematics that govern them.

  4. A review of investigations on flow instabilities in natural circulation boiling loops

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonella V Durga Prasad; Manmohan Pandey; Manjeet S Kalra

    2005-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: Steam generation systems are subjected to flow instabilities due to parametric fluctuations, inlet conditions etc., which may result in mechanical vibrations of components (called flow induced vibrations) and system control problems. Analysis of these instabilities in natural circulation boiling loops is very important for the safety of nuclear reactors and other boiling systems. This paper presents the state of the art in this area by reviewing over 100 contributions made in the past 30 years. A large number of experimental and numerical investigations have been conducted to study and understand the conditions for inception of flow instabilities, parametric effects of instabilities, and the system behavior under such conditions. Work done on instabilities due to channel thermal-hydraulics as well as neutronics-thermohydraulics coupling has been reviewed. Different methods of analysis used by researchers and results obtained by them have been discussed. Various numerical techniques adopted and computer codes developed have also been discussed. The knowledge obtained from the investigations made in the past three decades has been summarized to present the state of the art of the understanding of flow instabilities. (authors)

  5. On mill flow rate and fineness control in cement grinding circuits: instability and delayed measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lepore, R.; Boulvin, M.; Renotte, C.; Remy, M.

    1999-01-01

    A control structure for the mill flow rate and the product fineness is designed, with the feed flow rate and the classifier characteristic as the manipulated variables. Experimental results from a plant highlight the instability of the grinding circuit. A model previously developed by the authors stresses the major influence of the classifier nonlinearities onto this instability. A cascade control structure has been designed and implemented on site. The measurements of the product fineness, sensitive to material grindability fluctuations, are randomly time-delayed. The control structure uses a fineness estimator based on an adaptive scheme and a time delay compensator. (author)

  6. Study on parallel-channel asymmetry in supercritical flow instability experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xiong Ting; Yu Junchong; Yan Xiao; Huang Yanping; Xiao Zejun; Huang Shanfang

    2013-01-01

    Due to the urgent need for experimental study on supercritical water flow instability, the parallel-channel asymmetry which determines the feasibility of such experiments was studied with the experimental and numerical results in parallel dual channel. The evolution of flow rates in the experiments was analyzed, and the steady-state characteristics as well as transient characteristics of the system were obtained by self-developed numerical code. The results show that the asymmetry of the parallel dual channel would reduce the feasibility of experiments. The asymmetry of flow rates is aroused by geometrical asymmetry. Due to the property variation characteristics of supercritical water, the flow rate asymmetry is enlarged while rising beyond the pseudo critical point. The extent of flow rate asymmetry is affected by the bulk temperature and total flow rate; therefore the experimental feasibility can be enhanced by reducing the total flow rate. (authors)

  7. Flow instability in laminar jet flames driven by alternating current electric fields

    KAUST Repository

    Kim, Gyeong Taek

    2016-10-13

    The effect of electric fields on the instability of laminar nonpremixed jet flames was investigated experimentally by applying the alternating current (AC) to a jet nozzle. We aimed to elucidate the origin of the occurrence of twin-lifted jet flames in laminar jet flow configurations, which occurred when AC electric fields were applied. The results indicated that a twin-lifted jet flame originated from cold jet instability, caused by interactions between negative ions in the jet flow via electron attachment as O +e→O when AC electric fields were applied. This was confirmed by conducting systematic, parametric experiment, which included changing gaseous component in jets and applying different polarity of direct current (DC) to the nozzle. Using two deflection plates installed in parallel with the jet stream, we found that only negative DC on the nozzle could charge oxygen molecules negatively. Meanwhile, the cold jet instability occurred only for oxygen-containing jets. A shedding frequency of jet stream due to AC driven instability showed a good correlation with applied AC frequency exhibiting a frequency doubling. However, for the applied AC frequencies over 80Hz, the jet did not respond to the AC, indicating an existence of a minimum flow induction time in a dynamic response of negative ions to external AC fields. Detailed regime of the instability in terms of jet velocity, AC voltage and frequency was presented and discussed. Hypothesized mechanism to explain the instability was also proposed.

  8. Simplified numerical model for predicting onset of flow instability in parallel heated channels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noura Rassoul; El-Khider Si-Ahmed; Tewfik Hamidouche; Anis Bousbia-Salah

    2005-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: Flow instabilities are undesirable phenomena in heated channels since change in flow rate affects the local heat transfer characteristics and may results in premature burnout. For instance, two-phase flow excursion (Ledinegg) instability in boiling channels is of great concern in the design and operation of numerous practical systems especially the MTR fuel type Research Reactors. For heated parallel channels, the negative-sloped segment of the pressure drop-flow rate characteristics (demand curve) of a boiling channel becomes negative. Such instability can lead to significant reduction in channel flow, thereby causing premature burnout of the heated channel before the CHF point. Furthermore, as a consequence of this flow decrease, different types of flow instabilities that may appear can also induce (density wave) flow oscillations of constant amplitude or diverging amplitude. The present work focuses on a numerical simulation of pressure drop in forced convection boiling in vertical narrow and parallel uniformly heated channels. The objective is to determine the point of Onset of flow instability by varying input flow rate without any consideration to density wave oscillations. By the way, the axial void distribution is provided. The numerical model is based on the finite difference method which transform the partial differential conservation equations of Mass, Momentum and Energy, in algebraic equations. Closure relationships as the drift flux model and other constitutive equations are considered to determine the channel pressure drop under steady state boiling conditions. The model validation is performed by confronting the calculations with the Oak Ridge National Laboratory Thermal Hydraulic Test Loop (THTL) experimental data set. Further verification of this model is performed by code-to code verification using the results of RELAP5/Mod 3.2 code. (authors)

  9. Assessment of Flow Instability in Passive Auxiliary Feedwater System (PAFS) Using RELAP5

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeon, Seong-Su; Hong, Soon-Joon [FNC Tech., Yongin (Korea, Republic of); Cheon, Jong; Kim, Han-Gon [KHNP, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    In this study, the occurrence possibility of both instabilities in PAFS is assessed with the best-estimate thermal hydraulic code, RELAP5. From the RELAP5 code analysis, the Ledinegg instability might not occur in PAFS. The DWO might occur in PAFS but the effect of the oscillation on the heat removal capacity of PAFS was not large. Therefore, it is concluded that PAFS is safe in terms of flow instabilities. Since PAFS is two-phase flow system, flow instabilities may occur. Flow instabilities may cause the severe deterioration of heat removal capability of PAFS due to the reduction of the condensate flow. For the reliable operation of PAFS, it is required to assess the flow instabilities in PAFS. The Ledinegg-type instability and the Density Wave Oscillation (DWO) are the representative static flow instability and the dynamic flow instability, respectively.

  10. Modeling and control of compressor flow instabilities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Willems, F.P.T.; Jager, de A.G.

    1999-01-01

    Compressors are widely used for the pressurization of fluids. Applications involve air compression for use in aircraft engines and pressurization and transportation of gas in the process and chemical industries. The article focuses on two commonly used types of continuous flow compressors: the axial

  11. Instabilities in rapid directional solidification under weak flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowal, Katarzyna N.; Davis, Stephen H.; Voorhees, Peter W.

    2017-12-01

    We examine a rapidly solidifying binary alloy under directional solidification with nonequilibrium interfacial thermodynamics viz. the segregation coefficient and the liquidus slope are speed dependent and attachment-kinetic effects are present. Both of these effects alone give rise to (steady) cellular instabilities, mode S , and a pulsatile instability, mode P . We examine how weak imposed boundary-layer flow of magnitude |V | affects these instabilities. For small |V | , mode S becomes a traveling and the flow stabilizes (destabilizes) the interface for small (large) surface energies. For small |V | , mode P has a critical wave number that shifts from zero to nonzero giving spatial structure. The flow promotes this instability and the frequencies of the complex conjugate pairs each increase (decrease) with flow for large (small) wave numbers. These results are obtained by regular perturbation theory in powers of V far from the point where the neutral curves cross, but requires a modified expansion in powers of V1 /3 near the crossing. A uniform composite expansion is then obtained valid for all small |V | .

  12. An Instability in Stratified Taylor-Couette Flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swinney, Harry

    2015-11-01

    In the late 1950s Russell Donnelly began conducting experiments at the University of Chicago on flow between concentric rotating cylinders, and his experiments together with complementary theory by his collaborator S. Chandrasekhar did much to rekindle interest in the flow instability discovered and studied by G.I. Taylor (1923). The present study concerns an instability in a concentric cylinder system containing a fluid with an axial density gradient. In 2005 Dubrulle et al. suggested that a `stratorotational instability' (SRI) in this system could provide insight into instability and angular momentum transport in astrophysical accretion disks. In 2007 the stratorotational instability was observed in experiments by Le Bars and Le Gal. We have conducted an experiment on the SRI in a concentric cylinder system (radius ratio η = 0 . 876) with buoyancy frequency N / 2 π = 0.25, 0.50, or 0.75 Hz. For N = 0.75 Hz we observe the SRI onset to occur for Ωouter /Ωinner > η , contrary to the prediction of Shalybkov and Rüdiger. Research conducted with Bruce Rodenborn and Ruy Ibanez.

  13. Instability of water-ice interface under turbulent flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izumi, Norihiro; Naito, Kensuke; Yokokawa, Miwa

    2015-04-01

    It is known that plane water-ice interface becomes unstable to evolve into a train of waves. The underside of ice formed on the water surface of rivers are often observed to be covered with ice ripples. Relatively steep channels which discharge melting water from glaciers are characterized by beds covered with a series of steps. Though the flowing agent inducing instability is not water but gas including water vapor, a similar train of steps have been recently observed on the Polar Ice Caps on Mars (Spiral Troughs). They are expected to be caused by the instability of water-ice interface induced by flowing fluid on ice. There have been some studies on this instability in terms of linear stability analysis. Recently, Caporeale and Ridolfi (2012) have proposed a complete linear stability analysis in the case of laminar flow, and found that plane water-ice interface is unstable in the range of sufficiently large Reynolds numbers, and that the important parameters are the Reynolds number, the slope angle, and the water surface temperature. However, the flow inducing instability on water-ice interface in the field should be in the turbulent regime. Extension of the analysis to the case of fully developed turbulent flow with larger Reynolds numbers is needed. We have performed a linear stability analysis on the instability of water-ice interface under turbulent flow conditions with the use of the Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes equations with the mixing length turbulent model, the continuity equation of flow, the diffusion/dispersion equation of heat, and the Stefan equation. In order to reproduce the accurate velocity distribution and the heat transfer in the vicinity of smooth walls with the use of the mixing length model, it is important to take into account of the rapid decrease in the mixing length in the viscous sublayer. We employ the Driest model (1956) to the formulation. In addition, as the thermal boundary condition at the water surface, we describe the

  14. Nonlinear Thermal Instability in Compressible Viscous Flows Without Heat Conductivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Fei

    2018-04-01

    We investigate the thermal instability of a smooth equilibrium state, in which the density function satisfies Schwarzschild's (instability) condition, to a compressible heat-conducting viscous flow without heat conductivity in the presence of a uniform gravitational field in a three-dimensional bounded domain. We show that the equilibrium state is linearly unstable by a modified variational method. Then, based on the constructed linearly unstable solutions and a local well-posedness result of classical solutions to the original nonlinear problem, we further construct the initial data of linearly unstable solutions to be the one of the original nonlinear problem, and establish an appropriate energy estimate of Gronwall-type. With the help of the established energy estimate, we finally show that the equilibrium state is nonlinearly unstable in the sense of Hadamard by a careful bootstrap instability argument.

  15. Technical and QA plan: Boiling behavior during flow instability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coutts, D.A.

    1991-01-01

    The coolant flow in a nuclear reactor core under normal operating conditions is kept as a subcooled liquid. This coolant is evenly distributed throughout the multiple flow channels with a uniform pressure profile across each coolant flow channel. If the coolant flow is reduced, the flow through individual channels will also decrease. A decrease in coolant flow will result in higher coolant temperatures if the heat flux is not reduced. When flow is significantly decreased, localized boiling may occur. This localized boiling can restrict coolant flow and the ability to transfer heat out of the reactor system. The maximum operating power for the reactor may be limited by how the coolant system reacts to a flow instability. One of the methods to assure safe operation during a reducing flow transient, is to operate at a power level below that necessary to initiate a flow excursion. Several correlations have been used to predict the conditions which will proceed a flow excursion. These correlations rely on the steady state behavior of the coolant and are based on steady-state testing. There are two significant points which this project will try to identify. The first is when vapor first forms on the channel surface. This might be designated as the Nucleate Vapor Transition. (Steady state equivalent is ONB). The second is when the vapor formation rate is large enough to lead to flow instability and thermal excursion. This point might be designated as the Significant Vapor Transition. (Steady state equivalent is OSV). A correlation will be developed to relate established steady state relations with the behavior of transient systems

  16. Shear flow stabilization of the hydromagnetic Rayleigh-Taylor instability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roderick, N.F.; Shumlak, U.; Douglas, M.; Peterkin, R.E. Jr.; Ruden, E.

    1997-01-01

    Numerical simulations have indicated that shear flow may help stabilize the hydromagnetic Rayleigh-Taylor instability in imploding plasma z-pinches. A simple extension to a model presented in Chandrasekhar has been developed to study the linear stability of incompressible plasma subjected to both a shear flow and acceleration. The model has been used to investigate the stability plasma implosion schemes using externally imposed velocity shear which develops from the plasma flow itself. Specific parameters were chosen to represent plasma implosions driven by the Saturn and PBFA-Z, pulsed power generators at Sandia National Laboratories. Results indicate a high shear is necessary to stabilize the z-pinch implosions studied

  17. Rayleigh-Taylor and Richtmyer-Meshkov instability induced flow, turbulence, and mixing. I

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Ye

    2017-12-01

    Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) and Richtmyer-Meshkov (RM) instabilities play an important role in a wide range of engineering, geophysical, and astrophysical flows. They represent a triggering event that, in many cases, leads to large-scale turbulent mixing. Much effort has been expended over the past 140 years, beginning with the seminal work of Lord Rayleigh, to predict the evolution of the instabilities and of the instability-induced mixing layers. The objective of Part I of this review is to provide the basic properties of the flow, turbulence, and mixing induced by RT, RM, and Kelvin-Helmholtz (KH) instabilities. Historical efforts to study these instabilities are briefly reviewed, and the significance of these instabilities is discussed for a variety of flows, particularly for astrophysical flows and for the case of inertial confinement fusion. Early experimental efforts are described, and analytical attempts to model the linear, and nonlinear regimes of these mixing layers are examined. These analytical efforts include models for both single-mode and multi-mode initial conditions, as well as multi-scale models to describe the evolution. Comparisons of these models and theories to experimental and simulation studies are then presented. Next, attention is paid to the issue of the influence of stabilizing mechanisms (e.g., viscosity, surface tension, and diffuse interface) on the evolution of these instabilities, as well as the limitations and successes of numerical methods. Efforts to study these instabilities and mixing layers using group-theoretic ideas, as well as more formal notions of turbulence cascade processes during the later stages of the induced mixing layers, are inspected. A key element of the review is the discussion of the late-time self-similar scaling for the RT and RM growth factors, α and θ. These parameters are influenced by the initial conditions and much of the observed variation can be explained by this. In some cases, these instabilities

  18. Experimental study of unsteady thermally stratified flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Sang Jun; Chung, Myung Kyoon

    1985-01-01

    Unsteady thermally stratified flow caused by two-dimensional surface discharge of warm water into a oblong channel was investigated. Experimental study was focused on the rapidly developing thermal diffusion at small Richardson number. The basic objectives were to study the interfacial mixing between a flowing layer of warm water and an underlying body of cold water and to accumulate experimental data to test computational turbulence models. Mean velocity field measurements were carried out by using NMR-CT(Nuclear Magnetic Resonance-Computerized Tomography). It detects quantitative flow image of any desired section in any direction of flow in short time. Results show that at small Richardson number warm layer rapidly penetrates into the cold layer because of strong turbulent mixing and instability between the two layers. It is found that the transfer of heat across the interface is more vigorous than that of momentum. It is also proved that the NMR-CT technique is a very valuable tool to measure unsteady three dimensional flow field. (Author)

  19. Stability and instability of hydromagnetic Taylor-Couette flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rüdiger, Günther; Gellert, Marcus; Hollerbach, Rainer; Schultz, Manfred; Stefani, Frank

    2018-04-01

    Decades ago S. Lundquist, S. Chandrasekhar, P. H. Roberts and R. J. Tayler first posed questions about the stability of Taylor-Couette flows of conducting material under the influence of large-scale magnetic fields. These and many new questions can now be answered numerically where the nonlinear simulations even provide the instability-induced values of several transport coefficients. The cylindrical containers are axially unbounded and penetrated by magnetic background fields with axial and/or azimuthal components. The influence of the magnetic Prandtl number Pm on the onset of the instabilities is shown to be substantial. The potential flow subject to axial fields becomes unstable against axisymmetric perturbations for a certain supercritical value of the averaged Reynolds number Rm bar =√{ Re ṡ Rm } (with Re the Reynolds number of rotation, Rm its magnetic Reynolds number). Rotation profiles as flat as the quasi-Keplerian rotation law scale similarly but only for Pm ≫ 1 while for Pm ≪ 1 the instability instead sets in for supercritical Rm at an optimal value of the magnetic field. Among the considered instabilities of azimuthal fields, those of the Chandrasekhar-type, where the background field and the background flow have identical radial profiles, are particularly interesting. They are unstable against nonaxisymmetric perturbations if at least one of the diffusivities is non-zero. For Pm ≪ 1 the onset of the instability scales with Re while it scales with Rm bar for Pm ≫ 1. Even superrotation can be destabilized by azimuthal and current-free magnetic fields; this recently discovered nonaxisymmetric instability is of a double-diffusive character, thus excluding Pm = 1. It scales with Re for Pm → 0 and with Rm for Pm → ∞. The presented results allow the construction of several new experiments with liquid metals as the conducting fluid. Some of them are described here and their results will be discussed together with relevant diversifications of

  20. Experimental investigation of cavity flows

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loeland, Tore

    1999-12-31

    This thesis uses LDV (Laser Doppler Velocimetry), PIV (Particle Image Velocimetry) and Laser Sheet flow Visualisation to study flow inside three different cavity configurations. For sloping cavities, the vortex structure inside the cavities is found to depend upon the flow direction past the cavity. The shape of the downstream corner is a key factor in destroying the boundary layer flow entering the cavity. The experimental results agree well with numerical simulations of the same geometrical configurations. The results of the investigations are used to find the influence of the cavity flow on the accuracy of the ultrasonic flowmeter. A method to compensate for the cavity velocities is suggested. It is found that the relative deviation caused by the cavity velocities depend linearly on the pipe flow. It appears that the flow inside the cavities should not be neglected as done in the draft for the ISO technical report on ultrasonic flowmeters. 58 refs., 147 figs., 2 tabs.

  1. Experimental investigation of cavity flows

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loeland, Tore

    1998-12-31

    This thesis uses LDV (Laser Doppler Velocimetry), PIV (Particle Image Velocimetry) and Laser Sheet flow Visualisation to study flow inside three different cavity configurations. For sloping cavities, the vortex structure inside the cavities is found to depend upon the flow direction past the cavity. The shape of the downstream corner is a key factor in destroying the boundary layer flow entering the cavity. The experimental results agree well with numerical simulations of the same geometrical configurations. The results of the investigations are used to find the influence of the cavity flow on the accuracy of the ultrasonic flowmeter. A method to compensate for the cavity velocities is suggested. It is found that the relative deviation caused by the cavity velocities depend linearly on the pipe flow. It appears that the flow inside the cavities should not be neglected as done in the draft for the ISO technical report on ultrasonic flowmeters. 58 refs., 147 figs., 2 tabs.

  2. Analytical study of flow instability behaviour in a boiling two-phase natural circulation loop under low quality conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nayak, A.K.; Kumar, N.; Vijayan, P.K.; Saha, D.; Sinha, R.K.

    2002-01-01

    Analytical investigations have been carried out to study the flow instability behaviour in a boiling two-phase natural circulation loop under low quality conditions. For this purpose, the computer code TINFLO-S has been developed. The code solves the conservation equations of mass, momentum and energy and equation of state for homogeneous equilibrium twophase flow using linear analytical technique. The results of the code have been validated with the experimental data of the loop for both the steady state and stability. The study reveals that the stability behaviour of low quality flow oscillations is different from that of the high quality flow oscillations. The instability reduces with increase in power and throttling at the inlet of the heater. The instability first increases and then reduces with increase in pressure at any subcooling. The effects of diameter of riser pipe, heater and the height of the riser on this instability are also investigated. (orig.) [de

  3. Computational and experimental studies of hydrodynamic instabilities and turbulent mixing (Review of NVIIEF efforts)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andronov, V.A.; Zhidov, I.G.; Meskov, E.E.; Nevmerzhitskii, N.V.; Nikiforov, V.V.; Razin, A.N.; Rogatchev, V.G.; Tolshmyakov, A.I.; Yanilkin, Yu.V.

    1995-02-01

    This report describes an extensive program of investigations conducted at Arzamas-16 in Russia over the past several decades. The focus of the work is on material interface instability and the mixing of two materials. Part 1 of the report discusses analytical and computational studies of hydrodynamic instabilities and turbulent mixing. The EGAK codes are described and results are illustrated for several types of unstable flow. Semiempirical turbulence transport equations are derived for the mixing of two materials, and their capabilities are illustrated for several examples. Part 2 discusses the experimental studies that have been performed to investigate instabilities and turbulent mixing. Shock-tube and jelly techniques are described in considerable detail. Results are presented for many circumstances and configurations

  4. Potential Flow Model for Compressible Stratified Rayleigh-Taylor Instability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rydquist, Grant; Reckinger, Scott; Owkes, Mark; Wieland, Scott

    2017-11-01

    The Rayleigh-Taylor Instability (RTI) is an instability that occurs when a heavy fluid lies on top of a lighter fluid in a gravitational field, or a gravity-like acceleration. It occurs in many fluid flows of a highly compressive nature. In this study potential flow analysis (PFA) is used to model the early stages of RTI growth for compressible fluids. In the localized region near the bubble tip, the effects of vorticity are negligible, so PFA is applicable, as opposed to later stages where the induced velocity due to vortices generated from the growth of the instability dominate the flow. The incompressible PFA is extended for compressibility effects by applying the growth rate and the associated perturbation spatial decay from compressible linear stability theory. The PFA model predicts theoretical values for a bubble terminal velocity for single-mode compressible RTI, dependent upon the Atwood (A) and Mach (M) numbers, which is a parameter that measures both the strength of the stratification and intrinsic compressibility. The theoretical bubble terminal velocities are compared against numerical simulations. The PFA model correctly predicts the M dependence at high A, but the model must be further extended to include additional physics to capture the behavior at low A. Undergraduate Scholars Program - Montana State University.

  5. Analysis of flow instability in steam turbine control valves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pluviose, M.

    1981-01-01

    With the sponsorship of Electricite de France and the French steam turbine manufacturers, the Gas Turbine Laboratory of CETIM has started a research about the unsteady phenomena of flow in control valves of steam turbines. The existence of unsteady embossment in the valve cone at rise has been as certained, and a conventional computing procedure has been applied to locate the shock waves in the valve. These shock waves may suddenly arise at some valve lifts and give way to fluttering. Valve geometries attenuating instability of flow and increasing therefore the reliability of such equipment are proposed [fr

  6. Experimental investigation of the turbine instability of a pump-turbine during synchronization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guggenberger, M; Senn, F; Schiffer, J; Jaberg, H; Gentner, C; Sallaberger, M; Widmer, C

    2014-01-01

    Although the technology of pump-turbines is generally well known the operation is still affected by flow phenomena that are quite complex and not fully understood. One of these phenomena is the S-shape instability which occurs in turbine mode at low load operation, close to runaway conditions. The instability results in an S-shape of the turbine characteristics and complicates the synchronization of the machine. Numerical investigations performed in the past indicated that the occurrence of turbine instabilities is connected with the appearance of rotor-stator interactions, and backflow regions in the vane less space between guide vane and impeller. This paper presents the results and conclusions of experimental investigations of pump-turbine instabilities carried out to find a practical explanation for the flow phenomena responsible for the appearance of the S-shaped characteristics. In the scope of a joint research project with Andritz Hydro, the Institute for Hydraulic Fluidmachinery at Graz University of Technology optimized an existing 4-quadrant test rig for an experimental investigation at off design conditions featuring the possibility for adjusting stable operation of instabilities. All the experimental investigations were based on IEC60193-standard using a pump turbine model provided by Andritz Hydro AG. In addition to the standard measurements of flow rate, head and efficiency the interaction between model and its hydraulic environment were analysed by dynamic pressure sensors. Additional pressure sensors integrated in the guide vane apparatus were used to investigate pressure distributions in the model. Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) allowed the measurement of the velocity field in the vane less space between impeller and guide vanes and in the environment of two single guide vanes. The experimental investigations were focused on operation points in the S-shape region of the characteristics. For each operation point 190 double images for 20 rotor

  7. Instability of a cantilevered flexible plate in viscous channel flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balint, T. S.; Lucey, A. D.

    2005-10-01

    The stability of a flexible cantilevered plate in viscous channel flow is studied as a representation of the dynamics of the human upper airway. The focus is on instability mechanisms of the soft palate (flexible plate) that cause airway blockage during sleep. We solve the Navier Stokes equations for flow with Reynolds numbers up to 1500 fully coupled with the dynamics of the plate motion solved using finite-differences. The study is 2-D and based upon linearized plate mechanics. When both upper and lower airways are open, the plate is found to lose its stability through a flutter mechanism and a critical Reynolds number exists. When one airway is closed, the plate principally loses its stability through a divergence mechanism and a critical flow speed exists. However, below the divergence-onset flow speed, flutter can exist for low levels of structural damping in the flexible plate. Our results serve to extend understanding of flow-induced instability of cantilevered flexible plates and will ultimately improve the diagnosis and treatment of upper-airway disorders.

  8. Non-linear time series analysis on flow instability of natural circulation under rolling motion condition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Wenchao; Tan, Sichao; Gao, Puzhen; Wang, Zhanwei; Zhang, Liansheng; Zhang, Hong

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Natural circulation flow instabilities in rolling motion are studied. • The method of non-linear time series analysis is used. • Non-linear evolution characteristic of flow instability is analyzed. • Irregular complex flow oscillations are chaotic oscillations. • The effect of rolling parameter on the threshold of chaotic oscillation is studied. - Abstract: Non-linear characteristics of natural circulation flow instabilities under rolling motion conditions were studied by the method of non-linear time series analysis. Experimental flow time series of different dimensionless power and rolling parameters were analyzed based on phase space reconstruction theory. Attractors which were reconstructed in phase space and the geometric invariants, including correlation dimension, Kolmogorov entropy and largest Lyapunov exponent, were determined. Non-linear characteristics of natural circulation flow instabilities under rolling motion conditions was studied based on the results of the geometric invariant analysis. The results indicated that the values of the geometric invariants first increase and then decrease as dimensionless power increases which indicated the non-linear characteristics of the system first enhance and then weaken. The irregular complex flow oscillation is typical chaotic oscillation because the value of geometric invariants is at maximum. The threshold of chaotic oscillation becomes larger as the rolling frequency or rolling amplitude becomes big. The main influencing factors that influence the non-linear characteristics of the natural circulation system under rolling motion are thermal driving force, flow resistance and the additional forces caused by rolling motion. The non-linear characteristics of the natural circulation system under rolling motion changes caused by the change of the feedback and coupling degree among these influencing factors when the dimensionless power or rolling parameters changes

  9. Pattern formation and three-dimensional instability in rotating flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen, Erik A.; Aubry, Nadine; Sorensen, Jens N.

    1997-03-01

    A fluid flow enclosed in a cylindrical container where fluid motion is created by the rotation of one end wall as a centrifugal fan is studied. Direct numerical simulations and spatio-temporal analysis have been performed in the early transition scenario, which includes a steady-unsteady transition and a breakdown of axisymmetric to three-dimensional flow behavior. In the early unsteady regime of the flow, the central vortex undergoes a vertical beating motion, accompanied by axisymmetric spikes formation on the edge of the breakdown bubble. As traveling waves, the spikes move along the central vortex core toward the rotating end-wall. As the Reynolds number is increased further, the flow undergoes a three-dimensional instability. The influence of the latter on the previous patterns is studied.

  10. Comprehensive experimental and numerical analysis of instability phenomena in pump turbines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gentner, Ch; Sallaberger, M; Widmer, Ch; Bobach, B-J; Jaberg, H; Schiffer, J; Senn, F; Guggenberger, M

    2014-01-01

    The changes in the electricity market have led to changed requirements for the operation of pump turbines. Utilities need to change fast and frequently between pumping and generating modes and increasingly want to operate at off-design conditions for extended periods. Operation of the units in instable areas of the machine characteristic is not acceptable and may lead to self-excited vibration of the hydraulic system. In turbine operation of pump turbines unstable behaviour can occur at low load off-design operation close to runaway conditions (S-shape of the turbine characteristic). This type of instability may impede the synchronization of the machine in turbine mode and thus increase start-up and switch over times. A pronounced S-shaped instability can also lead to significant drop of discharge in the event of load rejection. Low pressure on the suction side and in the tail-race tunnel could cause dangerous separation of the water column. Understanding the flow features that lead to the instable behaviour of pump turbines is a prerequisite to the design of machines that can fulfil the growing requirements relating to operational flexibility. Flow simulation in these instability zones is demanding due to the complex and highly unsteady flow patterns. Only unsteady simulation methods are able to reproduce the governing physical effects in these operating regions. ANDRITZ HYDRO has been investigating the stability behaviour of pump turbines in turbine operation in cooperation with several universities using simulation and measurements. In order to validate the results of flow simulation of unstable operating points, the Graz University of Technology (Austria) performed detailed experimental investigations. Within the scope of a long term research project, the operating characteristics of several pump turbine runners have been measured and flow patterns in the pump turbine at speed no load and runaway have been examined by 2D Laser particle image velocimetry (PIV

  11. Modeling and analysis of hydrodynamic instabilities in two-phase flow using two-fluid model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou, J.; Podowski, M.Z.

    2001-01-01

    Because of the practical importance of two-phase flow instabilities, especially in boiling water nuclear reactor technology, substantial efforts have been made to date to understand the physical phenomena governing such instabilities and to develop computational tools to model the dynamics of marginally-stable/unstable boiling systems. The purpose of this paper is to present an integrated methodology for the analysis of flow-induced instabilities in boiling channels and systems. The major novel aspects of the proposed approach are: (a) it is based on the combined frequency-domain and time-domain methods, the former used to quantify stability margins and to determine the onset of instability conditions, the latter to study the nonlinear system response outside the stability boundaries identified using the nearly-exact results of the frequency-domain analysis; (b) the two-fluid model of two-phase flow has been used for the first time to analytically derive the boiling channel transfer functions for the parallel-channel and channel-to-channel instability modes. In this way, the major characteristics of a boiling system, including the onset-of-instability conditions, can be readily evaluated by using the qualitative frequency-domain approach, whereas the explicit time-domain integration is performed, if necessary, only for the operating conditions that have already been identified as unstable. Both methods use the same physical two-fluid model that, in one case, is linearized and used to derive a rigorous analytical solution in the complex domain, and, in the other case, is solved numerically using an algorithm developed especially for this purpose. The results using both methods have been compared against each other and extensively tested. The testing and validation of the new model included comparisons of the predicted steady-state distributions of major parameters and of the transient channel response against experimental data

  12. Ballooning instabilities in tokamaks with sheared toroidal flows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waelbroeck, F.L.; Chen, L.

    1990-11-01

    The stability of ballooning modes in the presence of sheared toroidal flows is investigated. The eigenmodes are shown to be related by a Fourier transformation to the non-exponentially growing Floquet solutions found by Cooper. It is further shown that the problem cannot be reduced further than to a two dimensional partial differential equation. Next, the generalized ballooning equation is solved analytically for a circular tokamak equilibrium with sonic flows, but with a small rotation shear compared to the sound speed. With this ordering, the centrifugal forces are comparable to the pressure gradient forces driving the instability, but coupling of the mode with the sound wave is avoided. A new stability criterion is derived which explicitly demonstrates that flow shear is stabilizing at constant centrifugal force gradient. 34 refs

  13. An Experimental Study of Roughness-Induced Instabilities in a Supersonic Boundary Layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kegerise, Michael A.; King, Rudolph A.; Choudhari, Meelan; Li, Fei; Norris, Andrew

    2014-01-01

    Progress on an experimental study of laminar-to-turbulent transition induced by an isolated roughness element in a supersonic laminar boundary layer is reported in this paper. Here, the primary focus is on the effects of roughness planform shape on the instability and transition characteristics. Four different roughness planform shapes were considered (a diamond, a circle, a right triangle, and a 45 degree fence) and the height and width of each one was held fixed so that a consistent frontal area was presented to the oncoming boundary layer. The nominal roughness Reynolds number was 462 and the ratio of the roughness height to the boundary layer thickness was 0.48. Detailed flow- field surveys in the wake of each geometry were performed via hot-wire anemometry. High- and low-speed streaks were observed in the wake of each roughness geometry, and the modified mean flow associated with these streak structures was found to support a single dominant convective instability mode. For the symmetric planform shapes - the diamond and circular planforms - the instability characteristics (mode shapes, growth rates, and frequencies) were found to be similar. For the asymmetric planform shapes - the right-triangle and 45 degree fence planforms - the mode shapes were asymmetrically distributed about the roughness-wake centerline. The instability growth rates for the asymmetric planforms were lower than those for the symmetric planforms and therefore, transition onset was delayed relative to the symmetric planforms.

  14. Experimental Investigation of Aerodynamic Instability of Iced Bridge Cable Sections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koss, Holger; Lund, Mia Schou Møller

    2013-01-01

    The accretion of ice on structural bridge cables changes the aerodynamic conditions of the surface and influences hence the acting wind load process. Full-scale monitoring indicates that light precipitation at moderate low temperatures between zero and -5°C may lead to large amplitude vibrations...... of bridge cables under wind action. This paper describes the experimental simulation of ice accretion on a real bridge cable sheet HDPE tube segment (diameter 160mm) and its effect on the aerodynamic load. Furthermore, aerodynamic instability will be estimated with quasi-steady theory using the determined...

  15. Inverted annular flow experimental study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Jarlais, G.; Ishii, M.

    1985-04-01

    Steady-state inverted annular flow of Freon 113 in up flow was established in a transparent test section. Using a special inlet configuration consisting of long aspect-ratio liquid nozzles coaxially centered within a heated quartz tube, idealized inverted annular flow initial geometry (cylindrical liquid core surrounded by coaxial annulus of gas) could be established. Inlet liquid and gas flowrates, liquid subcooling, and gas density (using various gas species) were measured and varied systematically. The hydrodynamic behavior of the liquid core, and the subsequent downstream break-up of this core into slugs, ligaments and/or droplets of various sizes, was observed. In general, for low inlet liquid velocities it was observed that after the initial formation of roll waves on the liquid core surface, an agitated region of high surface area, with attendant high momentum and energy transfers, occurs. This agitated region appears to propagate downsteam in a quasi-periodic pattern. Increased inlet liquid flow rates, and high gas annulus flow rates tend to diminish the significance of this agitated region. Observed inverted annular flow (and subsequent downstream flow pattern) hydrodynamic behavior is reported, and comparisons are drawn to data generated by previous experimenters studying post-CHF flow

  16. Flow Regime Destabilizing Effect on Fluid elastic Instability of Tube Array Preferentially Flexible to the Flow Direction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Kanghee; Shin, Changhwan [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Olala, Stephen; Mureithi, Njuki [BWC/AECL/NSERC Chair of Fluid-Structure Interaction, Ecole Polytechnique, Montreal (Canada)

    2015-05-15

    U bend region of operating SG is excited by the inclined cross flow due to the gradual change of hydraulic resistance force. The effect of tube array's flexibility direction on FEI is investigated by Khalvatti for rotated triangular tube in single phase (air) cross flow. He showed that FEI strongly depend on the flexibility angle. Reducing bundle flexibility to the flow direction ranging from 90 (out-of-flow direction) to 0 (in-flow direction) degree has a nonlinearly-varying stabilizing effect. Joly studies the same problem under high void fraction in two phase cross flow over 70 % to 90 %. With the Joly's experimental work, there is oddly low-valued Conner's constant in case of higher degree of angle of attack. This gives the motivation to our experimental study for fluid elastic instability of tube array in two phase cross flow. As the flow rate goes up, tube response was measured for each steady state flow condition by the strain gauge. Damping, peak frequency, and the critical velocity were estimated from the response spectrum. It seems that the flow regime for high void fraction can destabilize tube array with preferential flexibility over 60 degree. Because an intermittent flow is inherently unstable compared to the uniform bubbly flow, thus out-of-flow motion of tubes can be more fragile to the unstably rising intermittent flow. From the visual inspection, lateral tube motion seems to block the flow path periodically. Enlarged bubble in an intermittent flow regime can be squeezed-up at the flow gap between tubes.

  17. Transitional inertialess instabilities in driven multilayer channel flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papaefthymiou, Evangelos; Papageorgiou, Demetrios

    2016-11-01

    We study the nonlinear stability of viscous, immiscible multilayer flows in channels driven both by a pressure gradient and/or gravity in a slightly inclined channel. Three fluid phases are present with two internal interfaces. Novel weakly nonlinear models of coupled evolution equations are derived and we concentrate on inertialess flows with stably stratified fluids, with and without surface tension. These are 2 × 2 systems of second-order semilinear parabolic PDEs that can exhibit inertialess instabilities due to resonances between the interfaces - mathematically this is manifested by a transition from hyperbolic to elliptic behavior of the nonlinear flux functions. We consider flows that are linearly stable (i.e the nonlinear fluxes are hyperbolic initially) and use the theory of nonlinear systems of conservation laws to obtain a criterion (which can be verified easily) that can predict nonlinear stability or instability (i.e. nonlinear fluxes encounter ellipticity as they evolve spatiotemporally) at large times. In the former case the solution decays asymptotically to its base state, and in the latter nonlinear traveling waves emerge. EPSRC Grant Numbers EP/K041134 and EP/L020564.

  18. The Effect of Fin Pitch on Fluid Elastic Instability of Tube Arrays Subjected to Cross Flow of Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desai, Sandeep Rangrao; Pavitran, Sampat

    2018-02-01

    Failure of tubes in shell and tube exchangers is attributed to flow induced vibrations of such tubes. There are different excitations mechanisms due to which flow induced vibration occurs and among such mechanisms, fluid elastic instability is the most prominent one as it causes the most violent vibrations and may lead to rapid tube failures within short time. Fluid elastic instability is the fluid-structure interaction phenomenon which occurs when energy input by the fluid force exceeds energy expended in damping. This point is referred as instability threshold and corresponding velocity is referred as critical velocity. Once flow velocity exceeds critical flow velocity, the vibration amplitude increases very rapidly with flow velocity. An experimental program is carried out to determine the critical velocity at instability for plain and finned tube arrays subjected to cross flow of water. The tube array geometry is parallel triangular with cantilever end condition and pitch ratios considered are 2.6 and 2.1. The objective of research is to determine the effect of increase in pitch ratio on instability threshold for plain tube arrays and to assess the effect of addition of fins as well as increase in fin density on instability threshold for finned tube arrays. Plain tube array with two different pitch ratios; 2.1 and 2.6 and finned tube arrays with same pitch ratio; 2.6 but with two different fin pitches; such as fine (10 fpi) and coarse (4 fpi) are considered for the experimentation. Connors' equation that relates critical velocity at instability to different parameters, on which instability depends, has been used as the basis for analysis and the concept of effective diameter is used for the present investigation. The modal parameters are first suitably modified using natural frequency reduction setup that is already designed and developed to reduce natural frequency and hence to achieve experimental simulation of fluid elastic instability within the limited

  19. Analysis of density wave instability in counter-flow steam generators using STEAMFREQ-X

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chan, K.C.; Yadigaroglu, G.

    1986-01-01

    The STEAMFREQ-X computer model was developed to provide a more comprehensive modeling of the different phenomena that are important to stability analysis of counter-flow steam generators. It uses a frequency-domain analysis and considers heat-flux/flow coupling between the primary and secondary fluids in space and time. Predictions by STEAMFREQ-X were compared with data from both a multi-channel liquid-sodium heated steam generator and a set of single pipe test data. Predicted outlet steam qualities at instability thresholds were within 15% of experimental data for all test points. (orig.)

  20. Instabilities in the flow past localized magnetic fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beltran, Alberto; Cuevas, Sergio; Smolentsev, Sergey

    2007-01-01

    The flow in a shallow layer of an electrically conducting fluid past a localized magnetic field is analyzed numerically. The field occupies only a small fraction of the total flow domain and resemblances the magnetic field created by a permanent magnet located close to the fluid layer. Two different physical cases are considered. In the first one, the fluid layer is free from externally injected electric currents, therefore, only induced currents are present. In the second case, an external electric current is injected to the fluid layer, transversally to the main flow direction. It is shown that the Lorentz force created by the interaction of the electric currents with the non-uniform magnetic field acts as an obstacle for the flow and creates different flow patterns similar to those observed in the flow past bluff bodies. A quasi-two-dimensional model that takes into account the existence of the bottom wall through a linear Hartmann-Rayleigh friction term is considered. When inertial and magnetic forces are strong enough, the wake formed behind the zone of high magnetic field is destabilized and a periodic vortex shedding similar to the classical von Karman street is found. The effect of Hartmann-Rayleigh friction in the emergence of the instability is analyzed

  1. Analysis of the Onset of Flow Instability in rectangular heated channel using drift flux model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Hadjen, H.; Balistrou, M.; Hamidouche, T.; Bousbia-Salah, A.

    2005-01-01

    Two-phase flow excursion (Ledinegg) instability in boiling channels is of great concern in the design and operation of numerous practical systems especially in Research Reactors. Such instability can lead to significant reduction in channel flow, thereby causing premature burnout of the heated channel before the CHF point. The present work focuses on a simulation of pressure drop in forced convection boiling in vertical narrow and parallel uniformly heated channels. The objective is to determine the point of Onset of Flow Instability (OFI) by varying input flow rate. The axial void distribution is also provided. The numerical model is based on the finite difference method which transforms the partial differential conservation equation of mass, momentum and energy, in algebraic equations. Closure relationships based upon the drift flux model and other constitutive equations are considered to determine the channel pressure drop under steady state boiling conditions. The model validation is performed by confronting the calculations with the Oak Ridge National Laboratory thermal Hydraulic Test Loop (THTL) experimental data set. Further verification of this model is performed by code- to code verification using the results of RELAP5/Mod 3.2 code. (author)

  2. Experimental studies of instabilities in radially imploding plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oona, H.; Bowers, R.L.; Peterson, D.L.; Findley, C.; Cohrane, J.C.; Ladish, J.S.

    1992-01-01

    In this paper we present experimental data from two experiments that show the initation and growth of the instabilities and compare them to a two dimensional radiational magnetohydrodynamic (RMHD) computation. High-speed cameras (Imacons) were used to observe the implosion as the plasma converges and stagnates on axis. Computer-image enhancement was used to determine the periodicity and amplitude of the initial perturbations. In the two experimental cases, the 5-cm-radius implosion foils had mass of 4.2 and 12.6 milligrams. The data show that the larger mass evolves into a more uniform implosion. Also, we determine the implosion velocity and the growth rate of a selected perturbation

  3. Critical heat flux and flow instability in an advanced light water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dae-Hyun Hwang; Kyong-Won Seo; Chung-Chan Lee; Sung-Kyun Zee

    2005-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: An advanced light water reactor concept has been continuously studied in KAERI with an output in the range of about 60 to 300 MW th . The reactor is purposed to be utilized as an energy source for seawater desalination as well as small scale power generation. In order to achieve the intrinsic safety and enhanced operational flexibility, some specific design considerations such as low power density and soluble boron free operation have been incorporated in the multiple-parallel-channel type reactor core. The low power density can be achieved by adopting fuel assemblies with tightly spaced non-square lattice rod array. The allowable core operating region should be primarily limited by the two design parameters; the critical heat flux(CHF) and the flow instabilities in the multiple parallel fuel assembly channels. The characteristics of CHF and flow instability have been investigated through experimental and analytical works. The CHF prediction model was established on the basis of experimental data obtained from 19-rod test bundles. The CHF experiments have been conducted for various test bundles with different heated lengths, uniform and non-uniform radial and axial power distributions, water and Freon as the working fluids, and different number of unheated rods. The parametric ranges of CHF experiments covers the pressure from 6 to 18 MPa, the mass flux from 150 to 2000 kg/m 2 /s, and the inlet subcooling from 10 to 120 deg. C. The flow instabilities due to density wave oscillations were investigated by conducting experiments with two parallel channels under the pressure ranges from 6 to 16 MPa. The parametric behavior of flow instability was examined for the test sections with different lengths of adiabatic risers, different axial power shapes, different inlet restrictions, and different channel cross sections. The stability boundary was experimentally determined by increasing channel inlet temperature or reducing the flow rate

  4. Experimental investigation of the dissolution of fractures. From early stage instability to phase diagram

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osselin, Florian; Budek, Agnieszka; Cybulski, Olgierd; Kondratiuk, Pawel; Garstecki, Piotr; Szymczak, Piotr

    2016-04-01

    Dissolution of natural rocks is a fundamental geological process and a key part of landscape formation and weathering processes. Moreover, in current hot topics like Carbon Capture and Storage or Enhanced Oil Recovery, mastering dissolution of the host rock is fundamental for the efficiency and the security of the operation. The basic principles of dissolution are well-known and the theory of the reactive infiltration instability has been extensively studied. However, the experimental aspect has proved very challenging because of the strong dependence of the outcome with pore network, chemical composition, flow rate... In this study we are trying to tackle this issue by using a very simple and efficient device consisting of a chip of pure gypsum inserted between two polycarbonate plates and subjected to a constant flow rate of pure water. Thanks to this device, we are able to control all parameters such as flow rate, fracture aperture, roughness of the walls... but also to observe in situ the progression of the dissolution thanks to the transparency of the polycarbonate which is impossible with 3D rocks. We have been using this experimental set-up to explore and investigate all aspects of the dissolution in a fracture, such as initial instability and phase diagram of different dissolution patterns, and to compare it with theory and simulations, yielding very good agreement and interesting feedbacks on the coupling between flow and chemistry in geological media

  5. On the Flow Instabilities and Turbulent Kinetic Energy of Large-Scale Francis Hydroturbine Model at Low Flow Rate Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen-Tao Su

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper is to make a better understanding of the flow instabilities and turbulent kinetic energy (TKE features in a large-scale Francis hydroturbine model. The flow instability with aspect of pressure oscillation and pressure-velocity correlation was investigated using large eddy simulation (LES method along with two-phase cavitation model. The numerical simulation procedures were validated by the existing experimental result, and further the TKE evolution was analyzed in a curvilinear coordinates. By monitoring the fluctuating pressure and velocities in the vanes’ wake region, the local pressure and velocity variations were proven to have a phase difference approaching π/2, with a reasonable cross-correlation coefficient. Also the simultaneous evolution of pressure fluctuations at the opposite locations possessed a clear phase difference of π, indicating the stresses variations on the runner induced by pressure oscillation were in an odd number of nodal diameter. Considering the TKE generation, the streamwise velocity component us′2 contributed the most to the TKE, and thus the normal stress production term and shear stress production term imparted more instability to the flow than other production terms.

  6. An Experimental Study of the Turbulent Development of Rayleigh-Taylor and Richtmyer-Meshkov Instabilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacobs, Jeffrey W.

    2006-01-01

    The objective of this three-year research program is to study the development of turbulence in Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) and Richtmyer-Meshkov (RM) instabilities. Incompressible RT and RM instabilities are studied in an apparatus in which a box containing two unequal density liquids is accelerated on a linear rail system either impulsively (by bouncing it off of a spring) to produce RM instability, or at a constant downward rate (using a weight and pulley system) to produce RT instability. These experiments are distinguished from others in the field in that they are initialized with well defined, measurable initial perturbations and are well visualized utilizing planar laser induced fluorescence imaging. New experiments are proposed aimed at generating fully turbulent RM and RT instabilities and quantifying the turbulent development once fully turbulent flows are achieved. The proposed experiments focus on the development and the subsequent application of techniques to accelerate the production of fully turbulent instabilities and the quantification of the turbulent instabilities once they are achieved. The proposed tasks include: the development of RM and RT experiments utilizing fluid combinations having larger density ratios than those previously used; the development of RM experiments with larger acceleration impulse than that previously used; and the investigation of the multi-mode and three-dimensional instabilities by the development of new techniques for generating short wavelength initial perturbations. Progress towards fulfilling these goals is currently well on track. Recent results have been obtained on experiments that utilize Faraday resonance for the production of a nearly single-mode three-dimensional perturbation with a short enough wavelength to yield a self-similar instability at late-times. Last year we reported that we can reliably generate Faraday internal waves on the interface in our experimental apparatus by oscillating the tank containing the

  7. Mind the gap: a flow instability controlled by particle-surface distance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Driscoll, Michelle; Delmotte, Blaise; Youssef, Mena; Sacanna, Stefano; Donev, Aleksandar; Chaikin, Paul

    2016-11-01

    Does a rotating particle always spin in place? Not if that particle is near a surface: rolling leads to translational motion, as well as very strong flows around the particle, even quite far away. These large advective flows strongly couple the motion of neighboring particles, giving rise to strong collective effects in groups of rolling particles. Using a model experimental system, weakly magnetic colloids driven by a rotating magnetic field, we observe that driving a compact group of microrollers leads to a new kind of flow instability. First, an initially uniformly-distributed strip of particles evolves into a shock structure, and then it becomes unstable, emitting fingers with a well-defined wavelength. Using 3D large-scale simulations in tandem with our experiments, we find that the instability wavelength is controlled not by the driving torque or the fluid viscosity, but a geometric parameter: the microroller's distance above the container floor. Furthermore, we find that the instability dynamics can be reproduced using only one ingredient: hydrodynamic interactions near a no-slip boundary.

  8. Experimental study on thermo-hydraulic instability on reduced-moderation natural circulation BWR concept

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watanabe, Noriyuki; Subki, M.H.; Kikura, Hiroshige; Aritomi, Masanori

    2003-01-01

    Reduced-moderation natural circulation BWR has been promoted to solve the recent challenges in BWR nuclear power technology problems as one of advanced small and medium-sized reactors equipped with the passive safety features in conformity with the natural law. However, the elimination of recirculation pumps and a high-density core due to the increase of conversion ratio could cause various thermo-hydraulic instabilities especially during the start-up stage. The occurrences of the thermo-hydraulic instabilities are not desirable and it is one of the main challenges in establishing reduced-moderation natural circulation BWR as a commercial reactor. The purpose of this present study is to experimentally investigate the driving mechanism of the thermo-hydraulic instabilities and the effect of system pressure on the unstable flow patterns. Hence, as the fundamental research for this study, a natural circulation loop that carries boiling fluid with parallel boiling channel has been constructed. Channel gap that has been set at 2 mm in order to simulate reduced-moderation reactor core. Pressure ranges of 0.1 up to 0.7 MPa, input heat flux range of 0 ou to 577 kW/m 2 , and inlet subcooling temperatures of 5, 10, and 15 K respectively, are imposed in the experiments. This experiment clarifies that changes in unstable flow patterns with increase in heat flux can be classified into two in response to system pressure range. In case of atmospheric pressure, unstable flow patters has been classified in beyond order, (1) in-phase geysering, (2) transition oscillation combined with both features of in-phase geysering and natural circulation oscillation, (3) natural circulation oscillation induced by hydrostatic head fluctuation, (4) density wave oscillation, and finally (5) stable boiling two-phase flow. On the other hand, in the system pressure range from 0.2 to 0.7 MPa, unstable patters have been dramatically changed in the following order (1) out-of-phase geysering, (2

  9. Dynamics and Instabilities of Free Surface and Vortex Flows

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tophøj, Laust Emil Hjerrild

    2012-01-01

    This PhD thesis consists of two main parts. The first part describes the dynamics of an ideal fluid on a stationary free surface of a given shape. It turns out that one can formulate a set of self-contained equations of momentum conservation for the tangential flow, with no reference to the flow ......)]. Finally, an experimental work on elastic collisions of wet spheres is briefly discussed....

  10. STANDING SHOCK INSTABILITY IN ADVECTION-DOMINATED ACCRETION FLOWS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Le, Truong [Department of Physics, Astronomy and Geology, Berry College, Mount Berry, GA 30149 (United States); Wood, Kent S.; Wolff, Michael T. [High Energy Space Environment Branch, Space Science Division, Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375 (United States); Becker, Peter A. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, George Mason University, Fairfax, VA 22030 (United States); Putney, Joy, E-mail: tle@berry.edu [Department of Physics and Engineering, Washington and Lee University, Lexington, VA 24450 (United States)

    2016-03-10

    Depending on the values of the energy and angular momentum per unit mass in the gas supplied at large radii, inviscid advection-dominated accretion flows can display velocity profiles with either preshock deceleration or preshock acceleration. Nakayama has shown that these two types of flow configurations are expected to have different stability properties. By employing the Chevalier and Imamura linearization method and the Nakayama instability boundary conditions, we discover that there are regions of parameter space where disks/shocks with outflows can be stable or unstable. In regions of instability, we find that preshock deceleration is always unstable to the zeroth mode with zero frequency of oscillation, but is always stable to the fundamental mode and overtones. Furthermore, we also find that preshock acceleration is always unstable to the zeroth mode and that the fundamental mode and overtones become increasingly less stable as the shock location moves away from the horizon when the disk half-height expands above ∼12 gravitational radii at the shock radius. In regions of stability, we demonstrate the zeroth mode to be stable for the velocity profiles that exhibit preshock acceleration and deceleration. Moreover, for models that are linearly unstable, our model suggests the possible existence of quasi-periodic oscillations (QPOs) with ratios 2:3 and 3:5. These ratios are believed to occur in stellar and supermassive black hole candidates, for example, in GRS 1915+105 and Sgr A*, respectively. We expect that similar QPO ratios also exist in regions of stable shocks.

  11. Investigation of flow asymmetry and instability in the liquid mercury target of the Spallation Neutron Source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pointer, D.; Ruggles, A.; Wendel, M.; Crye, J.

    2000-01-01

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) will utilize a liquid mercury target placed in the path of a high-energy proton beam to produce neutrons for research activities. As the high-energy protons interact with the mercury target, the majority of the beam energy is converted to thermal energy. The liquid mercury must provide sufficient heat transfer to maintain the temperature of the target structure within the thermal limits of the structural materials. Therefore, the behavior of the liquid mercury flow must be characterized in sufficient detail to ensure accurate evaluation of heat transfer in the mercury target. A combination of experimental and computational methods is utilized to characterize the flow in these preliminary analyses. Preliminary studies of the liquid mercury flow in the SNS target indicate that the flow in the exit channel may exhibit multiple recirculation zones, flow asymmetries, and possibly large-scale flow instabilities. While these studies are not conclusive, they serve to focus the efforts of subsequent CFD modeling and experimental programs to better characterize the flow patterns in the SNS mercury target

  12. Instability of automotive air conditioning system with a variable displacement compressor. Part 1. Experimental investigation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tian, Changqing; Dou, Chunpeng; Yang, Xinjiang; Li, Xianting [Department of Building Science, School of Architecture, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (People' s Republic of China)

    2005-11-01

    A test system is built first in order to investigate the instability of the automotive air conditioning (AAC) system with a variable displacement compressor (VDC), and hunting phenomena caused by the large external disturbance in the AAC system with a VDC and a thermal expansion valve, and in the AAC system with a VDC and a fixed-area throttling device are investigated experimentally in part 1 of this paper. The experimental results indicate that there also exist the hunting phenomena in the AAC system with a fixed-area throttling device. The system stability is found to be dependent on the direction of the external disturbance, and the system is apt to cause hunting when the condensing pressure decreases excessively since it may cause two-phase state at the throttling device inlet and make a large disturbance to the system. The piston stroke length will oscillate only when the oscillation amplitudes of forces acting on the wobble plate are great enough, otherwise the piston stroke length will be kept invariable, and then the system instability rule is also suitable for the AAC system with a fixed displacement compressor. From the experimental results, it is concluded that the two-phase flow at the throttling device inlet or at the evaporator outlet is the necessary condition but not sufficient condition for system hunting. Finally, a new concept, conservative stable region, is proposed based on the experimental results and theoretical analysis. (author)

  13. Investigation of two-phase flow instability under SMART-P core conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hwang, Dae Hyun; Lee, Chung Chan

    2005-01-01

    An integral-type advanced light water reactor, named SMART-P, is being continuously studied at KAERI. The reactor core consists of hundreds of closed-channel type fuel assemblies with vertical upward flows. The upper and lower parts of the fuel assembly channels are connected to the common heads. The constant pressure drop imposed on the channel is responsible for the occurrence of density wave oscillations under local boiling and/or natural circulation conditions. The fuel assembly channel with oscillatory flow is highly susceptible to experience the CHF which may cause the fuel failure due to a sudden increase of the cladding temperature. Thus, prevention of the flow instability is an important criterion for the SMART-P core design. Experimental and analytical studies have been conducted in order to investigate the onset of flow instability (OFI) under SMART core conditions. The parallel channel oscillations were observed in a high pressure water-loop test facility. A linear stability analysis model in the frequency-domain was developed for the prediction of the marginal stability boundary (MSB) in the parallel boiling channels

  14. Flow instability tests for a particle bed reactor nuclear thermal rocket fuel element

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawrence, Timothy J.

    1993-05-01

    Recent analyses have focused on the flow stability characteristics of a particle bed reactor (PBR). These laminar flow instabilities may exist in reactors with parallel paths and are caused by the heating of the gas at low Reynolds numbers. This phenomena can be described as follows: several parallel channels are connected at the plenum regions and are stabilized by some inlet temperature and pressure; a perturbation in one channel causes the temperature to rise and increases the gas viscosity and reduces the gas density; the pressure drop is fixed by the plenum regions, therefore, the mass flow rate in the channel would decrease; the decrease in flow reduces the ability to remove the energy added and the temperature increases; and finally, this process could continue until the fuel element fails. Several analyses based on different methods have derived similar curves to show that these instabilities may exist at low Reynolds numbers and high phi's ((Tfinal Tinitial)/Tinitial). These analyses need to be experimentally verified.

  15. Analysis of flow distribution instability in parallel thin rectangular multi-channel system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xia, G.L. [School of Nuclear Science and Technology, Xi’an Jiaotong University, Xi’an City 710049 (China); Fundamental Science on Nuclear Safety and Simulation Technology Laboratory, Harbin Engineering University, Harbin City 150001 (China); Su, G.H., E-mail: ghsu@mail.xjtu.edu.cn [School of Nuclear Science and Technology, Xi’an Jiaotong University, Xi’an City 710049 (China); Peng, M.J. [Fundamental Science on Nuclear Safety and Simulation Technology Laboratory, Harbin Engineering University, Harbin City 150001 (China)

    2016-08-15

    Highlights: • Flow distribution instability in parallel thin rectangular multi-channel system is studied using RELAP5 codes. • Flow excursion may bring parallel heating channel into the density wave oscillations region. • Flow distribution instability is more likely to happen at low power/flow ratio conditions. • The increase of channel number will not affect the flow distribution instability boundary. • Asymmetry inlet throttling and heating will make system more unstable. - Abstract: The flow distribution instability in parallel thin rectangular multi-channel system has been researched in the present study. The research model of parallel channel system is established by using RELAP5/MOD3.4 codes. The transient process of flow distribution instability is studied at imposed inlet mass flow rate and imposed pressure drop conditions. The influence of heating power, mass flow rate, system pressure and channel number on flow distribution instability are analyzed. Furthermore, the flow distribution instability of parallel two-channel system under asymmetric inlet throttling and heating power is studied. The results show that, if multi-channel system operates at the negative slope region of channel ΔP–G curve, small disturbance in pressure drop will lead to flow redistribution between parallel channels. Flow excursion may bring the operating point of heating channel into the density-wave oscillations region, this will result in out-phase or in-phase flow oscillations. Flow distribution instability is more likely to happen at low power/flow ratio conditions, the stability of parallel channel system increases with system pressure, the channel number has a little effect on system stability, but the asymmetry inlet throttling or heating power will make the system more unstable.

  16. Two-component HLMC-gas flow instability and inhomogeneity phenomena in open-pool reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sergey I Shcherbakov

    2005-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: Consideration is being given to two-component gas-liquid flows with inhomogeneous gas content. The inhomogeneity of gas content over flow space can be caused by local mixing of gas and liquid, gas injection, gas-containing liquid jet penetration into the bulk of liquid without gas. The paper presents the computational results obtained using the direct non-stationary calculation with the TURBO-FLOW computer code. The results refer to flows near the liquid level, flows in downcomer gaps, collectors, elements with varying geometry (jet outlet into space, flow turn) for the pool-type reactors and experimental models. The following processes have been shown and discussed: formation of new liquid levels, entrainment of gas from the level, change in density composition of gas, flow stratification, effect of gas emergence rate and density convection on flow pattern. At gas phase transfer by liquid, two phenomena governing this transfer proceed: gas slip in liquid and density convection of non-uniformly aerated liquid. In horizontal flows, a vertical stratification of gas content always occurs. If the flow changes its direction to an upward one (collector at core inlet), the gas content maximum would be observed in channels nearest to the inlet. At the liquid level, the processes of gas separation from liquid and gas entrainment take place. The separation is a self-sustained process due to circulations arising near the level. The rate of gas entrainment is proportional to the rate of overflow and inversely proportional to the height of liquid level. At the downcomer region in case of its expansion, there occurs the instability of flow resulting in formation of liquid level and falling jet. The level is lower the more the gas content at inlet. The accumulation of gas occurs at sharp turns, encumbered regions (tube bundle), at all regions with upper (ceiling) constraints of flow. The flow instability being often observed in gas-liquid flows

  17. The Effect of Acoustic Forcing on Instabilities and Breakdown in Swept-Wing Flow over a Backward-Facing Step

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eppink, Jenna L.; Shishkov, Olga; Wlezien, Richard W.; King, Rudolph A.; Choudhari, Meelan

    2016-01-01

    Instability interaction and breakdown were experimentally investigated in the flow over a swept backward-facing step. Acoustic forcing was used to excite the Tollmien-Schlichting (TS) instability and to acquire phase-locked results. The phase-averaged results illustrate the complex nature of the interaction between the TS and stationary cross flow instabilities. The weak stationary cross flow disturbance causes a distortion of the TS wavefront. The breakdown process is characterized by large positive and negative spikes in velocity. The positive spikes occur near the same time and location as the positive part of the TS wave. Higher-order spectral analysis was used to further investigate the nonlinear interactions between the TS instability and the traveling cross flow disturbances. The results reveal that a likely cause for the generation of the spikes corresponds to nonlinear interactions between the TS, traveling cross flow, and stationary cross flow disturbances. The spikes begin at low amplitudes of the unsteady and steady disturbances (2-4% U (sub e) (i.e. boundary layer edge velocity)) but can achieve very large amplitudes (20-30 percent U (sub e) (i.e. boundary layer edge velocity)) that initiate an early, though highly intermittent, breakdown to turbulence.

  18. Characterization of energy flow and instability development in two-dimensional simulations of hollow z pinches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peterson, D.L.; Bowers, R.L.; McLenithan, K.D.; Deeney, C.; Chandler, G.A.; Spielman, R.B.; Matzen, M.K.; Roderick, N.F.

    1998-01-01

    A two-dimensional (2-D) Eulerian Radiation-Magnetohydrodynamic (RMHD) code has been used to simulate imploding z pinches for three experiments fielded on the Los Alamos Pegasus II capacitor bank [J. C. Cochrane et al., Dense Z-Pinches, Third International Conference, London, United Kingdom 1993 (American Institute of Physics, New York, 1994), p. 381] and the Sandia Saturn accelerator [R. B. Spielman et al., Dense Z-Pinches, Second International Conference, Laguna Beach, 1989 (American Institute of Physics, New York, 1989), p. 3] and Z accelerator [R. B. Spielman et al., Phys. Plasmas 5, 2105 (1998)]. These simulations match the experimental results closely and illustrate how the code results may be used to track the flow of energy in the simulation and account for the amount of total radiated energy. The differences between the calculated radiated energy and power in 2-D simulations and those from zero-dimensional (0-D) and one-dimensional (1-D) Lagrangian simulations (which typically underpredict the total radiated energy and overpredict power) are due to the radially extended nature of the plasma shell, an effect which arises from the presence of magnetically driven Rayleigh endash Taylor instabilities. The magnetic Rayleigh endash Taylor instabilities differ substantially from hydrodynamically driven instabilities and typical measures of instability development such as e-folding times and mixing layer thickness are inapplicable or of limited value. A new measure of global instability development is introduced, tied to the imploding plasma mass, termed open-quotes fractional involved mass.close quotes Examples of this quantity are shown for the three experiments along with a discussion of the applicability of this measure. copyright 1998 American Institute of Physics

  19. Experimental investigation of supercavitating flows

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Byoung-Kwon Ahn

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available When the object is traveling in the water at tremendously high speeds, the cavity forms and grows up at a fore part of the object called cavitator, and the object is eventually enveloped by vaporized water, supercavitation. As a result, the only part of the object in direct contact with the water is the cavitator, so skin-friction drag is significantly reduced. This is why recently supercavitating objects have been interested in many applicable fields. In this study we are focused out attention on supercavitating flows around various shapes of two and three dimensional cavitators. First, general features of supercavitation are examined by analyzing results obtained by the previously developed numerical method. Second, experimental observations are carried out at a cavitation tunnel at the Chungnam National University (CNU CT, and supercavity dimensions are scrutinized.

  20. Experimental investigation of the Richtmyer-Meshkov instability.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weber, Christopher R. (University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI)

    2011-09-01

    The Richtmyer-Meshkov instability (RMI) is experimentally investigated using several different initial conditions and with a range of diagnostics. First, a broadband initial condition is created using a shear layer between helium+acetone and argon. The post-shocked turbulent mixing is investigated using planar laser induced fluorescence (PLIF). The signature of turbulent mixing is present in the appearance of an inertial range in the mole fraction energy spectrum and the isotropy of the late-time dissipation structures. The distribution of the mole fraction values does not appear to transition to a homogeneous mixture, and it is possible that this effect may be slow to develop for the RMI. Second, the influence of the RMI on the kinetic energy spectrum is investigated using particle image velocimetry (PIV). The influence of the perturbation is visible relatively far from the interface when compared to the energy spectrum of an initially flat interface. Closer to the perturbation, an increase in the energy spectrum with time is observed and is possibly due to a cascade of energy from the large length scales of the perturbation. Finally, the single mode perturbation growth rate is measured after reshock using a new high speed imaging technique. This technique produced highly time-resolved interface position measurements. Simultaneous measurements at the spike and bubble location are used to compute a perturbation growth rate history. The growth rates from several experiments are compared to a new reshock growth rate model.

  1. Experimental study on ablative stabilization of Rayleigh-Taylor instability of laser-irradiated targets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shigemori, Keisuke; Sakaiya, Tatsuhiko; Otani, Kazuto; Fujioka, Shinsuke; Nakai, Mitsuo; Azechi, Hiroshi; Shiraga, Hiroyuki; Tamari, Yohei; Okuno, Kazuki; Sunahara, Atsushi; Nagatomo, Hideo; Murakami, Masakatsu; Nishihara, Katsunobu; Izawa, Yasukazu

    2004-09-01

    Hydrodynamic instabilities are key issues of the physics of inertial confinement fusion (ICF) targets. Among the instabilities, Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) instability is the most important because it gives the largest growth factor in the ICF targets. Perturbations on the laser irradiated surface grow exponentially, but the growth rate is reduced by ablation flow. The growth rate γ is written as Takabe-Betti formula: γ = [kg/(1+kL)]1/2-βkm/pa, where k is wave number of the perturbation, g is acceleration, L is density scale-length, β is a coefficient, m is mass ablation rate per unit surface, and ρa is density at the ablation front. We experimentally measured all the parameters in the formula for polystyrene (CH) targets. Experiments were done on the HIPER laser facility at Institute of Laser Engineering, Osaka University. We found that the β value in the formula is ~ 1.7, which is in good agreements with the theoretical prediction, whereas the β for certain perturbation wavelengths are larger than the prediction. This disagreement between the experiment and the theory is mainly due to the deformation of the cutoff surface, which is created by non-uniform ablation flow from the ablation surface. We also found that high-Z doped plastic targets have multiablation structure, which can reduce the RT growth rate. When a low-Z target with high-Z dopant is irradiated by laser, radiation due to the high-Z dopant creates secondary ablation front deep inside the target. Since, the secondary ablation front is ablated by x-rays, the mass ablation rate is larger than the laser-irradiated ablation surface, that is, further reduction of the RT growth is expected. We measured the RT growth rate of Br-doped polystyrene targets. The experimental results indicate that of the CHBr targets show significantly small growth rate, which is very good news for the design of the ICF targets.

  2. Experimental study of parametric instabilities and anomalous heating in plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Batanov, G.M.; Rabinovich, M.S.

    1975-01-01

    Over the last few years the study of the dissipation of electromagnetic wave energy in a hot plasma has become perhaps one of the main problems of high-temperature plasma physics and controlled thermonuclear fusion. The focus of attention is on the processes by which electromagnetic energy is transformed into potential plasma waves and the processes involving relaxation of the latter. In this paper the authors summarize the experimental research into these processes conducted at the Lebedev Physics Institute over the 10 cm wave band. In the case of an isotropic plasma the authors recorded non-linear generation of Langmuir noise, the energy density of which was found to be comparable, in order of magnitude, with that of a pump wave. They detected the generation of fast-electron streams, the non-stationary character of the latter with respect to time, and non-linear transmissivity of the plasma layer. In the case of a magnetoactive plasma they studied the parametric excitation of oscillations at the upper hybrid frequency during its resonance with the first overtone of the pump wave. Excitation of plasma noise was found to be accompanied by a flux of fast-electrons, in the energy spectrum of which separate groups were detected. It was also found that the effective collision frequency increased by 1-3 orders, compared to the pari-collision frequency. In the region of magnetic waves close to the electron cyclotron resonance the authors observed forced Mandel'shtam-Brillouin scattering and kinetic instability of the plasma. It was found that the excitation of ionic Langmuir noise preceded ''anomalous absorption'' of waves and ''anomalous heating'' of electrons. The authors further consider the possibility of an experimental study of anomalous heating in plasma in the region of the lower hybrid frequencies, using the Institute's L-2 stellarator. (author)

  3. Experimental Observation of a Current-Driven Instability in a Neutral Electron-Positron Beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warwick, J.; Dzelzainis, T.; Dieckmann, M. E.; Schumaker, W.; Doria, D.; Romagnani, L.; Poder, K.; Cole, J. M.; Alejo, A.; Yeung, M.; Krushelnick, K.; Mangles, S. P. D.; Najmudin, Z.; Reville, B.; Samarin, G. M.; Symes, D. D.; Thomas, A. G. R.; Borghesi, M.; Sarri, G.

    2017-11-01

    We report on the first experimental observation of a current-driven instability developing in a quasineutral matter-antimatter beam. Strong magnetic fields (≥1 T ) are measured, via means of a proton radiography technique, after the propagation of a neutral electron-positron beam through a background electron-ion plasma. The experimentally determined equipartition parameter of ɛB≈10-3 is typical of values inferred from models of astrophysical gamma-ray bursts, in which the relativistic flows are also expected to be pair dominated. The data, supported by particle-in-cell simulations and simple analytical estimates, indicate that these magnetic fields persist in the background plasma for thousands of inverse plasma frequencies. The existence of such long-lived magnetic fields can be related to analog astrophysical systems, such as those prevalent in lepton-dominated jets.

  4. Experimental Observation of a Current-Driven Instability in a Neutral Electron-Positron Beam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warwick, J; Dzelzainis, T; Dieckmann, M E; Schumaker, W; Doria, D; Romagnani, L; Poder, K; Cole, J M; Alejo, A; Yeung, M; Krushelnick, K; Mangles, S P D; Najmudin, Z; Reville, B; Samarin, G M; Symes, D D; Thomas, A G R; Borghesi, M; Sarri, G

    2017-11-03

    We report on the first experimental observation of a current-driven instability developing in a quasineutral matter-antimatter beam. Strong magnetic fields (≥1  T) are measured, via means of a proton radiography technique, after the propagation of a neutral electron-positron beam through a background electron-ion plasma. The experimentally determined equipartition parameter of ε_{B}≈10^{-3} is typical of values inferred from models of astrophysical gamma-ray bursts, in which the relativistic flows are also expected to be pair dominated. The data, supported by particle-in-cell simulations and simple analytical estimates, indicate that these magnetic fields persist in the background plasma for thousands of inverse plasma frequencies. The existence of such long-lived magnetic fields can be related to analog astrophysical systems, such as those prevalent in lepton-dominated jets.

  5. Computational and Experimental Investigation of Liquid Propellant Rocket Combustion Instability

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Combustion instability has been a problem faced by rocket engine developers since the 1940s. The complicated phenomena has been highly unpredictable, causing engine...

  6. Hydrodynamic instabilities in the developing region of an axially rotating pipe flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miranda-Barea, A; Fabrellas-García, C; Parras, L; Pino, C del, E-mail: cpino@uma.es [Universidad de Málaga, Escuela Técnica Superior de Ingeniería Industrial, Ampliación Campus de Teatinos, 29071, Málaga, España (Spain)

    2015-06-15

    We conduct experiments in a rotating Hagen–Poiseuille flow (RHPF) through flow visualizations when the flow becomes convectively and absolutely unstable at low-to-moderate Reynolds numbers, Re. We characterize periodic patterns at a very high swirl parameter, L, when the flow overcomes the absolutely unstable region. These non-steady helical filaments wrapped around the axis appear in the developing region of the pipe. Experimentally, we compute the onset of these oscillations in the (L, Re)-plane finding that the rotation rate decreases as the Reynolds number increases in the process of achieving the time-dependent state. Additionally, we report information regarding frequencies and wavelengths that appear downstream of the rotating pipe for convectively and absolutely unstable flows, even for very high swirl parameters at which the flow becomes time-dependent in the developing region. We do not observe variations in the trends of these parameters, so these hydrodynamic instabilities in the developing region do not affect the unstable travelling waves downstream of the pipe. (paper)

  7. Damping and fluidelastic instability in two-phase cross-flow heat exchanger tube arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moran, Joaquin E.

    An experimental study was conducted to investigate damping and fluidelastic instability in tube arrays subjected to two-phase cross-flow. The purpose of this research was to improve our understanding of these phenomena and how they are affected by void fraction and flow regime. The model tube bundle had 10 cantilevered tubes in a parallel-triangular configuration, with a pitch ratio of 1.49. The two-phase flow loop used in this research utilized Refrigerant 11 as the working fluid, which better models steam-water than air-water mixtures in terms of vapour-liquid mass ratio as well as permitting phase changes due to pressure fluctuations. The void fraction was measured using a gamma densitometer, introducing an improvement over the Homogeneous Equilibrium Model (HEM) in terms of void fraction, density and velocity predictions. Three different damping measurement methodologies were implemented and compared in order to obtain a more reliable damping estimate. The methods were the traditionally used half-power bandwidth, the logarithmic decrement and an exponential fitting to the tube decay response. The decay trace was obtained by "plucking" the monitored tube from outside the test section using a novel technique, in which a pair of electromagnets changed their polarity at the natural frequency of the tube to produce resonance. The experiments showed that the half-power bandwidth produces higher damping values than the other two methods. The primary difference between the methods is caused by tube frequency shifting, triggered by fluctuations in the added mass and coupling between the tubes, which depend on void fraction and flow regime. The exponential fitting proved to be the more consistent and reliable approach to estimating damping. In order to examine the relationship between the damping ratio and mass flux, the former was plotted as a function of void fraction and pitch mass flux in an iso-contour plot. The results showed that damping is not independent of mass

  8. Investigation on thermo-acoustic instability dynamic characteristics of hydrocarbon fuel flowing in scramjet cooling channel based on wavelet entropy method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zan, Hao; Li, Haowei; Jiang, Yuguang; Wu, Meng; Zhou, Weixing; Bao, Wen

    2018-06-01

    As part of our efforts to find ways and means to further improve the regenerative cooling technology in scramjet, the experiments of thermo-acoustic instability dynamic characteristics of hydrocarbon fuel flowing have been conducted in horizontal circular tubes at different conditions. The experimental results indicate that there is a developing process from thermo-acoustic stability to instability. In order to have a deep understanding on the developing process of thermo-acoustic instability, the method of Multi-scale Shannon Wavelet Entropy (MSWE) based on Wavelet Transform Correlation Filter (WTCF) and Multi-Scale Shannon Entropy (MSE) is adopted in this paper. The results demonstrate that the developing process of thermo-acoustic instability from noise and weak signals is well detected by MSWE method and the differences among the stability, the developing process and the instability can be identified. These properties render the method particularly powerful for warning thermo-acoustic instability of hydrocarbon fuel flowing in scramjet cooling channels. The mass flow rate and the inlet pressure will make an influence on the developing process of the thermo-acoustic instability. The investigation on thermo-acoustic instability dynamic characteristics at supercritical pressure based on wavelet entropy method offers guidance on the control of scramjet fuel supply, which can secure stable fuel flowing in regenerative cooling system.

  9. Experimental investigation of tearing-instability phenomena for structural materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vassilaros, M.G.; Gudas, J.P.; Joyce, J.A.

    1982-04-01

    Objective was to extend the range of tearing instability validation experiments utilizing the compact specimen to include high toughness alloys. J-Integral tests of ASTM A106; ASTM A516, Grade 70; ASTM A533B; HY-80; and HY-130 steels were performed in a variably compliant screw-driven test machine. Results were analyzed with respect to the materials J/sub I/-R curves and various models of T/sub applied/ for the compact specimen. Tearing instability theory was validated for these high toughness materials. For the cases of highly curved J/sub I/-R curves, it was shown that the actual value of T/sub material/ at the point of instability should be employed rather than the average of T/sub material/ value. The T/sub applied/ analysis of Paris and coworkers applied to the compact specimen appears to be nonconservative in predicting the point of instability; whereas, the T/sub applied/ analysis of Ernst and coworkers appears to be accurate, but requires precision beyond that displayed in this program. The generalized Paris analysis applied to the compact specimen and evaluated at maximum load was most consistent in predicting instability. 16 figures, 3 tables

  10. Experimental investigation of tearing-instability phenomena for structural materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vassilaros, M.G.; Gudas, J.P.; Joyce, J.A.

    1982-08-01

    The objective of this investigation was to extend the range of tearing-instability validation experiments utilizing the compact specimen to include high-toughness alloys. J-Integral tests of ASTM A106; ASTM A516, Grade 70; ASTM A533B; HY-80; and HY-130 steels were performed in a variably compliant screw-driven test machine. Results were analyzed with respect to the materials J/sub I/-R curves and various models of T/sub applied/ for the compact specimen. Tearing instability theory was validated for these high-toughess materials. For the cases of highly curved J/sub I/-R curves, it was shown that the actual value of T/sub material/ at the point of instability should be employed rather than the average T/sub material/ value. The T/sub applied/ analysis of Paris and coworkers applied to the compact specimen appears to be nonconservative in predicting the point of instability; whereas, the T/sub applied/ analysis of Ernst and coworkers appears to be accurate, but requires precision beyond that displayed in this program. The generalized Paris analysis applied to the compact specimen and evaluated at maximum load was most consistent in predicting instability. 16 figures, 3 tables

  11. An experimental study of the connection between the hydrodynamic and phase-transition descriptions of the Couette-Taylor instability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berland, T.; Joessang, T.; Feder, J.

    1986-04-01

    The laser doppler velocimetry technique has been used to measure the radial flow velocity in the Taylor vortex flow at several Taylor numbers close to and above the critical value. The first four harmonics of the flow field have been analyzed using a model described by Davey. The analysis demonstrates that the amplitude of the first harmonic of the super-critical flow field can be regarded as the ''order parameter'' of the transition from the laminar Couette flow to the Taylor vortex flow. This transition is described by a generalized Landau theory for classical second order mean-field phase transitions. The analysis of the results of carefully performed experiments not only confirms the findings of earlier experimental work, but in addition all the significant parameters of the full Davey model for this hydrodynamic instability are determied

  12. Direct Numerical Simulation of Fingering Instabilities in Coating Flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eres, Murat H.; Schwartz, Leonard W.

    1998-11-01

    We consider stability and finger formation in free surface flows. Gravity driven downhill drainage and temperature gradient driven climbing flows are two examples of such problems. The former situation occurs when a mound of viscous liquid on a vertical wall is allowed to flow. Constant surface shear stress due to temperature gradients (Marangoni stress) can initiate the latter problem. The evolution equations are derived using the lubrication approximation. We also include the effects of finite-contact angles in the evolution equations using a disjoining pressure model. Evolution equations for both problems are solved using an efficient alternating-direction-implicit method. For both problems a one-dimensional base state is established, that is steady in a moving reference frame. This base state is unstable to transverse perturbations. The transverse wavenumbers for the most rapidly growing modes are found through direct numerical solution of the nonlinear evolution equations, and are compared with published experimental results. For a range of finite equilibrium contact angles, the fingers can grow without limit leading to semi-finite steady fingers in a moving coordinate system. A computer generated movie of the nonlinear simulation results, for several sets of input parameters, will be shown.

  13. Tertiary instability of zonal flows within the Wigner-Moyal formulation of drift turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Hongxuan; Ruiz, D. E.; Dodin, I. Y.

    2017-10-01

    The stability of zonal flows (ZFs) is analyzed within the generalized-Hasegawa-Mima model. The necessary and sufficient condition for a ZF instability, which is also known as the tertiary instability, is identified. The qualitative physics behind the tertiary instability is explained using the recently developed Wigner-Moyal formulation and the corresponding wave kinetic equation (WKE) in the geometrical-optics (GO) limit. By analyzing the drifton phase space trajectories, we find that the corrections proposed in Ref. to the WKE are critical for capturing the spatial scales characteristic for the tertiary instability. That said, we also find that this instability itself cannot be adequately described within a GO formulation in principle. Using the Wigner-Moyal equations, which capture diffraction, we analytically derive the tertiary-instability growth rate and compare it with numerical simulations. The research was sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy.

  14. Scaling Relations for Viscous and Gravitational Flow Instabilities in Multiphase Multicomponent Compressible Flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moortgat, J.; Amooie, M. A.; Soltanian, M. R.

    2016-12-01

    Problems in hydrogeology and hydrocarbon reservoirs generally involve the transport of solutes in a single solvent phase (e.g., contaminants or dissolved injection gas), or the flow of multiple phases that may or may not exchange mass (e.g., brine, NAPL, oil, gas). Often, flow is viscously and gravitationally unstable due to mobility and density contrasts within a phase or between phases. Such instabilities have been studied in detail for single-phase incompressible fluids and for two-phase immiscible flow, but to a lesser extent for multiphase multicomponent compressible flow. The latter is the subject of this presentation. Robust phase stability analyses and phase split calculations, based on equations of state, determine the mass exchange between phases and the resulting phase behavior, i.e., phase densities, viscosities, and volumes. Higher-order finite element methods and fine grids are used to capture the small-scale onset of flow instabilities. A full matrix of composition dependent coefficients is considered for each Fickian diffusive phase flux. Formation heterogeneity can have a profound impact and is represented by realistic geostatistical models. Qualitatively, fingering in multiphase compositional flow is different from single-phase problems because 1) phase mobilities depend on rock wettability through relative permeabilities, and 2) the initial density and viscosity ratios between phases may change due to species transfer. To quantify mixing rates in different flow regimes and for varying degrees of miscibility and medium heterogeneities, we define the spatial variance, scalar dissipation rate, dilution index, skewness, and kurtosis of the molar density of introduced species. Molar densities, unlike compositions, include compressibility effects. The temporal evolution of these measures shows that, while transport at the small-scale (cm) is described by the classical advection-diffusion-dispersion relations, scaling at the macro-scale (> 10 m) shows

  15. Magnetorotational and Parker instabilities in magnetized plasma Dean flow as applied to centrifugally confined plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang Yimin; Hassam, A.B.

    2003-01-01

    The ideal magnetohydrodynamics stability of a Dean flow plasma supported against centrifugal forces by an axial magnetic field is studied. Only axisymmetric perturbations are allowed for simplicity. Two distinct but coupled destabilization mechanisms are present: flow shear (magnetorotational instability) and magnetic buoyancy (Parker instability). It is shown that the flow shear alone is likely insufficient to destabilize the plasma, but the magnetic buoyancy instability could occur. For a high Mach number (M S ), high Alfven Mach number (M A ) system with M S M A > or approx. πR/a (R/a is the aspect ratio), the Parker instability is unstable for long axial wavelength modes. Implications for the centrifugal confinement approach to magnetic fusion are also discussed

  16. Linear stability analysis of flow instabilities with a nodalized reduced order model in heated channel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paul, Subhanker; Singh, Suneet

    2015-01-01

    The prime objective of the presented work is to develop a Nodalized Reduced Order Model (NROM) to carry linear stability analysis of flow instabilities in a two-phase flow system. The model is developed by dividing the single phase and two-phase region of a uniformly heated channel into N number of nodes followed by time dependent spatial linear approximations for single phase enthalpy and two-phase quality between the consecutive nodes. Moving boundary scheme has been adopted in the model, where all the node boundaries vary with time due to the variation of boiling boundary inside the heated channel. Using a state space approach, the instability thresholds are delineated by stability maps plotted in parameter planes of phase change number (N pch ) and subcooling number (N sub ). The prime feature of the present model is that, though the model equations are simpler due to presence of linear-linear approximations for single phase enthalpy and two-phase quality, yet the results are in good agreement with the existing models (Karve [33]; Dokhane [34]) where the model equations run for several pages and experimental data (Solberg [41]). Unlike the existing ROMs, different two-phase friction factor multiplier correlations have been incorporated in the model. The applicability of various two-phase friction factor multipliers and their effects on stability behaviour have been depicted by carrying a comparative study. It is also observed that the Friedel model for friction factor calculations produces the most accurate results with respect to the available experimental data. (authors)

  17. Experimental and theoretical studies of buoyant-thermo capillary flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Favre, E.; Blumenfeld, L.; Soubbaramayer

    1996-01-01

    In the AVLIS process, uranium metal is evaporated using a high power electron gun. We have prior discussed the power balance equation in the electron beam evaporation process and pointed out, among the loss terms, the importance of the power loss due to the convective flow in the molten pool driven by buoyancy and thermo capillarity. An empirical formula has been derived from model experiments with cerium, to estimate the latter power loss and that formula can be used practically in engineering calculations. In order to complete the empirical approach, a more fundamental research program of theoretical and experimental studies have been carried out in Cea-France, with the objective of understanding the basic phenomena (heat transport, flow instabilities, turbulence, etc.) occurring in a convective flow in a liquid layer locally heated on its free surface

  18. Surface Tension Driven Instability in the Regime of Stokes Flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Zhenwei; Bowick, Mark; Xing, Xiangjun

    2010-03-01

    A cylinder of liquid inside another liquid is unstable towards droplet formation. This instability is driven by minimization of surface tension energy and was analyzed first by [1,2] and then by [3]. We revisit this problem in the limit of small Laplace number, where the inertial of liquids can be completely ignored. The stream function is found to obey biharmonic equation, and its analytic solutions are found. We rederive Tomotika's main results, and also obtain many new analytic results about the velocity fields. We also apply our formalism to study the recent experiment on toroidal liquid droplet[4]. Our framework shall have many applications in micro-fluidics. [1] L.Rayleigh, On The Instability of A Cylinder of Viscous Liquid Under Capillary Force, Scientific Papers, Cambridge, Vol.III, 1902. [2] L.Rayleigh, On The Instability of Cylindrical Fluid Surfaces, Scientific Papers, Cambridge, Vol.III, 1902. [3] S.Tomotika, On the Instability of a Cylindrical Thread of a Viscous Liquid surround by Another Viscous Fluid, Proceedings of the Royal Society of London. Series A, Mathematical and Physical Sciences, Volume 150, Issue 870, pp. 322-337. [4] E.Pairam and A.Fern'andez-Nieves, Generation and Stability of Toroidal Droplets in a Viscous Liquid, Physical Review Letters 102, 234501 (2009).

  19. Experimental Observations on a Low Strain Counter-Flow Diffusion Flame: Flow and Bouyancy Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutula, J. A.; Torero, J. L.; Ezekoye, O. A.

    1999-01-01

    Diffusion flames are of great interest in fire safety and many industrial processes. The counter-flow configuration provides a constant strain flow, and therefore is ideal to study the structure of diffusion flames. Most studies have concentrated on the high velocity, high strain limit, since buoyantly induced instabilities will disintegrate the planar flame as the velocity decreases. Only recently, experimental studies in microgravity conditions have begun to explore the low strain regimes. Numerical work has shown the coupling between gas phase reaction rates, soot reaction rates, and radiation. For these programs, size, geometry and experimental conditions have been chosen to keep the flame unaffected by the physical boundaries. When the physical boundaries can not be considered infinitely far from the reaction zone discrepancies arise. A computational study that includes boundary effects and accounts for the deviations occurring when the major potential flow assumptions are relaxed was presented by Borlik et al. This development properly incorporates all heat loss terms and shows the possibility of extinction in the low strain regime. A major constraint of studying the low strain regime is buoyancy. Buoyant instabilities have been shown to have a significant effect on the nature of reactants and heat transport, and can introduce instabilities on the flow that result in phenomena such as flickering or fingering. The counter-flow configuration has been shown to provide a flame with no symmetry disrupting instabilities for inlet velocities greater than 50 mm/s. As the velocity approaches this limit, the characteristic length of the experiment has to be reduced to a few millimetres so as to keep the Rayleigh number (Ra(sub L) = (Beta)(g(sub 0))(L(exp 3) del T)/(alpha(v))) below 2000. In this work, a rectangular counter-flow burner was used to study a two-dimensional counter-flow diffusion flame. Flow visualisation and Particle Image Velocimetry served to describe

  20. Fluid elastic instability analysis of 1/6th experimental model of PFBR main vessel cooling circuit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jalaldeen, S.; Ravi, R.; Chellapandi, P.; Bhoje, S.B.

    1993-01-01

    In reactor assembly of Prototype Fast Breeder Reactor (PFBR), the main vessel (MV) temperature is kept below creep range i.e. less than 427 deg C by way of diverting a small fraction of core flow from the cold pool and sent through the passage between main vessel and an outer cylindrical baffle to cool the vessel. The sodium coning from this, is collected by another inner baffle and then returned to cold pool again. This system is termed as MV cooling circuit. The outer and inner baffles form feeding and restitution collectors respectively. The sodium from the feeding collector flows over the outer baffle and falls through a height of about 0.5 m before impacting on the free surface of sodium in the restitution collector. The fall of sodium may become a source of vibration of the baffles. Such vibrations have been already noted in case of SPX-I during its commissioning stage. For PFBR, the theoretical analysis was done to assess the fluid-elastic instability risks and stability charts were obtained. By this, it was concluded that the operating point (flow rate and fall height) lies within the stable zone. In order to confirm the above analysis results, a series of experiments were proposed. One preliminary experiment on 1/16 th model of MV cooling circuit has been completed. This model has also been analysed theoretically for the fluid- elastic instability, the theoretical analysis involves 2 stage computations. In the first stage, free vibration analysis with fluid structure interaction (FSI) effect for experimental model has been done using INCA (CASTEM 1985) code and all the mode shapes including sloshing are extracted. In the second stage the instability analysis is performed with the free vibration results from INCA. For the instability computations, a code WEIR has been written based on Aita's instability criteria [Aita.S. 1986

  1. Theoretical and Experimental Studies of Magneto-Rayleigh-Taylor Instabilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lau, Yue Ying; Gilgenbach, Ronald

    2013-01-01

    Magneto-Rayleigh-Taylor instability (MRT) is important to magnetized target fusion, wire-array z-pinches, and equation-of-state studies using flyer plates or isentropic compression. It is also important to the study of the crab nebula. The investigators performed MRT experiments on thin foils, driven by the mega-ampere linear transformer driver (LTD) facility completed in their laboratory. This is the first 1-MA LTD in the USA. Initial experiments on the seeding of MRT were performed. Also completed was an analytic study of MRT for a finite plasma slab with arbitrary magnetic fields tangential to the interfaces. The effects of magnetic shear and feedthrough were analyzed

  2. Theoretical and Experimental Studies of Magneto-Rayleigh-Taylor Instabilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lau, Yue Ying [University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Gilgenbach, Ronald [University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)

    2013-07-07

    Magneto-Rayleigh-Taylor instability (MRT) is important to magnetized target fusion, wire-array z-pinches, and equation-of-state studies using flyer plates or isentropic compression. It is also important to the study of the crab nebula. The investigators performed MRT experiments on thin foils, driven by the mega-ampere linear transformer driver (LTD) facility completed in their laboratory. This is the first 1-MA LTD in the USA. Initial experiments on the seeding of MRT were performed. Also completed was an analytic study of MRT for a finite plasma slab with arbitrary magnetic fields tangential to the interfaces. The effects of magnetic shear and feedthrough were analyzed.

  3. Experimental investigation of a cavitating backward-facing step flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maurice, G; Djeridi, H; Barre, S

    2014-01-01

    The present study is the first part of global experimental work which is intended to produce a refined database of liquid and vapor phases and to improve CFD modeling of turbulent cavitating flows which can occur in rocket engine turbo-pump inducers. The purpose of the present experimental study is to get a better understanding of the dynamics of the liquid phase in a cavitating backward facing step flow and provide a refined database for the physical analysis of interaction between turbulence and cavitation. The backward facing step flow provides us a well-known test case to compare vortex dynamics and a realistic industrial configuration such as backflow in turbo machinery. Experiments were conducted in the hydrodynamic tunnel of CREMHyG at Grenoble,which was especially designed to study cavitating shear flows at high Reynolds numbers. To highlight the liquid phase topology and dynamics such as large vortex structures, free shear layer instability, reattachment wall interaction and reverse flow, the flow is characterized by Laser Induced Fluoresence Particles Image Velocimetry (PIV-LIF) measurements techniques and by Laser Doppler Velocimetry (LDV) techniques using spectral analysis to characterize the vortex shedding dynamics. The liquid phase was analyzed at different cavitation levels corresponding to 1% to 45% of void ratio range inside the shear layer, recirculation area and reattachment zone. The mean and fluctuating liquid velocities are clearly modified by the vapor phase and the scale of the vortical structures tends to be smaller inducing a destructuration of turbulence by cavitation

  4. Long-wavelength instability of periodic flows and whistler waves in electron magnetohydrodynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lakhin, V.P.; Levchenko, V.D.

    2003-01-01

    Stability analysis of periodic flows and whistlers with respect to long-wavelength perturbations within the framework of dissipative electron magnetohydrodynamics (EMHD) based on two-scale asymptotic expansion technique is presented. Several types of flows are considered: two-dimensional Kolmogorov-like flow, helical flow, and anisotropic helical flow. It is shown hat the destabilizing effect on the long-wavelength perturbations is due to either the negative resistivity effect related to flow anisotropy or α-like effect to its micro helicity. The criteria of the corresponding instabilities are obtained. Numerical simulations of EMHD equations with the initial conditions corresponding to two types of periodic flows are presented. (author)

  5. Modeling analyses of two-phase flow instabilities for straight and helical tubes in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dong, Ruiting; Niu, Fenglei; Zhou, Yuan; Yu, Yu; Guo, Zhangpeng

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Two-phase flow instabilities in straight and helical tubes were studied. • The effects of system pressure, mass flux, inlet subcooling on DWO were studied. • The simulation results are consistent with the experimental results. • The RELAP5 results are consistent with frequency domain method results. - Abstract: The effects of system pressure, mass flux and inlet subcooling on two-phase flow instability for the test section consisted of two heated straight channels or two helical channels are studied by means of RELAP5/MOD3.3 and multi-variable frequency domain control theory. The experimental data in two straight channels are used to verify the RELAP5 and multi-variable frequency domain control theory results. The thermal hydraulic behaviors and parametric effects are simulated and compared with the experimental data. The RELAP5 results show that the flow stability increases with the system pressure, mass velocity, and inlet subcooling at high subcoolings. The frequency domain theory presents the same results as those given by the time domain theory (RELAP5). The effects of system pressure, mass velocity and inlet subcooling are simulated to find the difference between the straight and the helical tube flows. The RELAP5 and the multi-variable frequency domain control theory are used in modeling and simulating density wave oscillation to study their advantages and disadvantages in straight and helical tubes.

  6. Modeling analyses of two-phase flow instabilities for straight and helical tubes in nuclear power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dong, Ruiting [Beijing Key Laboratory of Passive Nuclear Power Safety and Technology, North China Electric Power University, Beijing 102206 (China); Niu, Fenglei, E-mail: niufenglei@ncepu.edu.cn [Beijing Key Laboratory of Passive Nuclear Power Safety and Technology, North China Electric Power University, Beijing 102206 (China); Zhou, Yuan [School of Nuclear Science and Engineering, Shanghai Jiaotong University, Shanghai 200240 (China); Yu, Yu; Guo, Zhangpeng [Beijing Key Laboratory of Passive Nuclear Power Safety and Technology, North China Electric Power University, Beijing 102206 (China)

    2016-10-15

    Highlights: • Two-phase flow instabilities in straight and helical tubes were studied. • The effects of system pressure, mass flux, inlet subcooling on DWO were studied. • The simulation results are consistent with the experimental results. • The RELAP5 results are consistent with frequency domain method results. - Abstract: The effects of system pressure, mass flux and inlet subcooling on two-phase flow instability for the test section consisted of two heated straight channels or two helical channels are studied by means of RELAP5/MOD3.3 and multi-variable frequency domain control theory. The experimental data in two straight channels are used to verify the RELAP5 and multi-variable frequency domain control theory results. The thermal hydraulic behaviors and parametric effects are simulated and compared with the experimental data. The RELAP5 results show that the flow stability increases with the system pressure, mass velocity, and inlet subcooling at high subcoolings. The frequency domain theory presents the same results as those given by the time domain theory (RELAP5). The effects of system pressure, mass velocity and inlet subcooling are simulated to find the difference between the straight and the helical tube flows. The RELAP5 and the multi-variable frequency domain control theory are used in modeling and simulating density wave oscillation to study their advantages and disadvantages in straight and helical tubes.

  7. Rotating polygon instability of a swirling free surface flow

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tophøj, Laust Emil Hjerrild; Bohr, Tomas; Mougel, J.

    2013-01-01

    We explain the rotating polygon instability on a swirling fluid surface [G. H. Vatistas, J. Fluid Mech. 217, 241 (1990)JFLSA70022-1120 and Jansson et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 96, 174502 (2006)PRLTAO0031-9007] in terms of resonant interactions between gravity waves on the outer part of the surface...... behavior near the corners), and indeed we show that we can obtain the polygons transiently by violently stirring liquid nitrogen in a hot container....

  8. Oscillatory and electrohydrodynamic instabilities in flow over a ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    of fluid flow past flexible surfaces is qualitatively different from the flow over rigid .... work. Oscillatory flows are unsteady, and it is important to precisely define the ..... from 5 to 16, though there is less variation in the critical stress for a steady ...

  9. Collisional Rayleigh-Taylor instability and shear-flow in equatorial Spread-F plasma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Chakrabarti

    2003-05-01

    Full Text Available Collisional Rayleigh-Taylor (RT instability is considered in the bottom side of the equatorial F-region. By a novel nonmodal calculation it is shown that for an applied shear flow in equilibrium, the growth of the instability is considerably reduced. Finite but small amounts of diffusion enhances the stabilization process. The results may be relevant to the observations of long-lived irregularities at the bottom-side of the F-layer.Key words. Ionosphere (ionospheric irregularities, equatorial ionosphere, plasma waves and instabilities

  10. Local instabilities in magnetized rotational flows: A short-wavelength approach

    OpenAIRE

    Kirillov, Oleg N.; Stefani, Frank; Fukumoto, Yasuhide

    2014-01-01

    We perform a local stability analysis of rotational flows in the presence of a constant vertical magnetic field and an azimuthal magnetic field with a general radial dependence. Employing the short-wavelength approximation we develop a unified framework for the investigation of the standard, the helical, and the azimuthal version of the magnetorotational instability, as well as of current-driven kink-type instabilities. Considering the viscous and resistive setup, our main focus is on the cas...

  11. Effects of magnetic field, sheared flow and ablative velocity on the Rayleigh-Taylor instability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, D.; Zhang, W.L.; Wu, Z.W.

    2005-01-01

    It is found that magnetic field has a stabilization effect whereas the sheared flow has a destabilization effect on the RT instability in the presence of sharp interface. RT instability only occurs in the long wave region and can be completely suppressed if the stabilizing effect of magnetic field dominates. The RT instability increases with wave number and flow shear, and acts much like a Kelvin-Helmholtz instability when destabilizing effect of sheared flow dominates. It is shown that both of ablation velocity and magnetic filed have stabilization effect on RT instability in the presence of continued interface. The stabilization effect of magnetic field takes place for whole waveband and becomes more significant for the short wavelength. The RT instability can be completely suppressed by the cooperated effect of magnetic field and ablation velocity so that the ICF target shell may be unnecessary to be accelerated to very high speed. The growth rate decreases as the density scale length increases. The stabilization effect of magnetic field is more significant for the short density scale length. (author)

  12. Studies of thermal-hydrodynamic flow instability, 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuoki, Akira

    1977-01-01

    For reliable prediction of flow stability in sodium-heated steam generators, a dynamic model was proposed for boiling flow oscillation in parallel channel systems, and an analysis code was developed. The model contains a description of a sodium flow exchanging heat with a water flow in counter-current fashion. The code was applied to three representative flow systems whose heating conditions differed from each other, whereby their flow stabilities were compared with a focus on the effects of heating condition. Eigenvalues and flow impedances of the oscillation determined for each system reveal that: (1) Two fundamental systems for the steam generator, parallel tube system in an evaporator and steam generator modules arranged in parallel, have different stabilities under low frequency oscillation. (2) Existing analysis model conditioned on constant heat flux gives different results on stability from those of either steam generator model under low frequency oscillation. (auth.)

  13. An experimental platform for generating Richtmyer-Meshkov instabilities on Z.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harding, Eric; Martin, Matthew

    2013-04-01

    The Richtmyer-Meshkov (RM) instability results when a shock wave crosses a rippled interface between two different materials. The shock deposited vorticity causes the ripples to grow into long spikes. Ultimately this process encourages mixing in many warm dense matter and plasma flows of interest. However, generating pure RM instabilities from initially solid targets is difficult because longlived, steady shocks are required. As a result only a few relevant experiments exist, and current theoretical understanding is limited. Here we propose using a flyer-plate driven target to generate RM instabilities with the Z machine. The target consists of a Be impact layer with sinusoidal perturbations and is followed by a low-density carbon foam. Simulation results show that the RM instability grows for 60 ns before release waves reach the perturbation. This long drive time makes Z uniquely suited for generating the high-quality data that is needed by the community.

  14. Experimental Study of Flow in a Bifurcation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fresconi, Frank; Prasad, Ajay

    2003-11-01

    An instability known as the Dean vortex occurs in curved pipes with a longitudinal pressure gradient. A similar effect is manifest in the flow in a converging or diverging bifurcation, such as those found in the human respiratory airways. The goal of this study is to characterize secondary flows in a bifurcation. Particle image velocimetry (PIV) and laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) experiments were performed in a clear, plastic model. Results show the strength and migration of secondary vortices. Primary velocity features are also presented along with dispersion patterns from dye visualization. Unsteadiness, associated with a hairpin vortex, was also found at higher Re. This work can be used to assess the dispersion of particles in the lung. Medical delivery systems and pollution effect studies would profit from such an understanding.

  15. A numerical study of boiling flow instability of a reactor thermosyphon system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nayak, A.K.; Lathouwers, D.; Hagen, T.H.J.J. van der; Schrauwen, Frans; Molenaar, Peter; Rogers, Andrew

    2006-01-01

    A numerical study has been carried out to investigate the boiling flow instability of a reactor thermosyphon system. The numerical model solves the conservation equations of mass, momentum and energy applicable to a two-fluid and three-field steam-water system using a finite difference technique. The computer code MONA was used for this purpose. The code was applied to the thermosyphon system of an EO (ethylene oxide) chemical reactor in which the heat released by a catalytic reaction is carried by boiling water under natural circulation conditions. The steady-state characteristics of the reactor thermosyphon system were predicted using the MONA code and conventional two-phase flow models in order to understand the model applicability for this type of thermosyphon system. The two-fluid model was found to predict the flow closest to the measured value of the plant. The stability behaviour of the thermosyphon system was investigated for a wide range of operating conditions. The effects of power, subcooling, riser length and riser diameter on the boiling flow instability were determined. The system was found to be unstable at higher power conditions which is typical for a Type II instability. However, with an increase in riser diameter, oscillations at low power were observed as well. These are classified as Type I instabilities. Stability maps were predicted for both Type I and Type II instabilities. Methods of improving the stability of the system are discussed

  16. A numerical study of boiling flow instability of a reactor thermosyphon system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nayak, A.K.; Lathouwers, D.; Hagen, T.H.J.J. van der [Interfaculty Reactor Institute, Delft University of Technology, Mekelweg 15, 2629 JB Delft (Netherlands); Schrauwen, Frans; Molenaar, Peter; Rogers, Andrew [Shell Research and Technology Centre, Badhuisweg 3, 1031 CM Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2006-04-01

    A numerical study has been carried out to investigate the boiling flow instability of a reactor thermosyphon system. The numerical model solves the conservation equations of mass, momentum and energy applicable to a two-fluid and three-field steam-water system using a finite difference technique. The computer code MONA was used for this purpose. The code was applied to the thermosyphon system of an EO (ethylene oxide) chemical reactor in which the heat released by a catalytic reaction is carried by boiling water under natural circulation conditions. The steady-state characteristics of the reactor thermosyphon system were predicted using the MONA code and conventional two-phase flow models in order to understand the model applicability for this type of thermosyphon system. The two-fluid model was found to predict the flow closest to the measured value of the plant. The stability behaviour of the thermosyphon system was investigated for a wide range of operating conditions. The effects of power, subcooling, riser length and riser diameter on the boiling flow instability were determined. The system was found to be unstable at higher power conditions which is typical for a Type II instability. However, with an increase in riser diameter, oscillations at low power were observed as well. These are classified as Type I instabilities. Stability maps were predicted for both Type I and Type II instabilities. Methods of improving the stability of the system are discussed. [Author].

  17. Modeling of flow-dominated MHD instabilities at WiPPAL using NIMROD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flanagan, K.; McCollam, K. J.; Milhone, J.; Mirnov, V. V.; Nornberg, M. D.; Peterson, E. E.; Siller, R.; Forest, C. B.

    2017-10-01

    Using the NIMROD (non-ideal MHD with rotation - open discussion) code developed at UW-Madison, we model two different flow scenarios to study the onset of MHD instabilities in flow-dominated plasmas in the Big Red Ball (BRB) and the Plasma Couette Experiment (PCX). Both flows rely on volumetric current drive, where a large current is drawn through the plasma across a weak magnetic field, injecting J × B torque across the whole volume. The first scenario uses a vertical applied magnetic field and a mostly radial injected current to create Couette-like flows which may excite the magnetorotational instability (MRI). In the other scenario, a quadrupolar field is applied to create counter-rotating von Karman-like flow that demonstrates a dynamo-like instability. For both scenarios, the differences between Hall and MHD Ohm's laws are explored. The implementation of BRB geometry in NIMROD, details of the observed flows, and instability results are shown. This work was funded by DoE and NSF.

  18. Multi-scale-nonlinear interactions among micro-turbulence, double tearing instability and zonal flows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishizawa, A.; Nakajima, N.

    2007-01-01

    Micro-turbulence and macro-magnetohydrodynamic (macro-MHD) instabilities can appear in plasma at the same time and interact with each other in a plasma confinement. The multi-scale-nonlinear interaction among micro-turbulence, double tearing instability and zonal flow is investigated by numerically solving a reduced set of two-fluid equations. It is found that the double tearing instability, which is a macro-MHD instability, appears in an equilibrium formed by a balance between micro-turbulence and zonal flow when the double tearing mode is unstable. The roles of the nonlinear and linear terms of the equations in driving the zonal flow and coherent convective cell flow of the double tearing mode are examined. The Reynolds stress drives zonal flow and coherent convective cell flow, while the ion diamagnetic term and Maxwell stress oppose the Reynolds stress drive. When the double tearing mode grows, linear terms in the equations are dominant and they effectively release the free energy of the equilibrium current gradient

  19. Stratified flow instability and slug formation leading to condensation-induced water hammer in a horizontal refrigerant pipe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samuel Martin, C.

    2005-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: An experimental apparatus was designed for the purpose of investigating the phenomenon of condensation-induced water hammer in an ammonia refrigeration system. Water hammer was initiated by introducing warm ammonia gas over static subcooled ammonia liquid placed in a horizontal 146.3 mm diameter carbon steel pipe 6.0 m in length. By means of fast response piezoelectric pressure transducers and a high speed data acquisition system rapid dynamic pressures were recorded whenever a shock event occurred. Moreover, by means of top-mounted diaphragm pressure transducers the speed of liquid slugs propagating along the pipe was determined. The occurrence of condensation induced water hammer depended upon three major variables; namely, (1) initial liquid depth, (2) liquid temperature, and (3) mass flow rate of warm gas. For given liquid depth and temperature, once the warm gas threshold conditions were exceeded shocks occurred with greater magnitude as the mass flow rate of gas input was increased. With adequate subcooling condensation-induced water hammer occurred for initial liquid depths ranging from 25% to 95% of internal pipe diameter. The threshold mass flow rate of warm gas necessary to initiate water hammer was greater as the initial liquid depth was lowered. Based upon experimental results obtained from four pressure transducers located on the top of the test pipe conditions corresponding to bridging were ascertained. For various initial liquid depths the onset of instability from stratified flow to bridging was correlated with the Taitel-Dukler instability criterion. (author)

  20. Bedforms formed by experimental supercritical density flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naruse, Hajime; Izumi, Norihiro; Yokokawa, Miwa; Muto, Tetsuji

    2014-05-01

    This study reveals characteristics and formative conditions of bedforms produced by saline density flows in supercritical flow conditions, especially focusing on the mechanism of the formation of plane bed. The motion of sediment particles forming bedforms was resolved by high-speed cameras (1/1000 frame/seconds). Experimental density flows were produced by mixtures of salt water (1.01-1.04 in density) and plastic particles (1.5 in specific density, 140 or 240 mm in diameter). Salt water and plastic particles are analogue materials of muddy water and sand particles in turbidity currents respectively. Acrylic flume (4.0 m long, 2.0 cm wide and 0.5 m deep) was submerged in an experimental tank (6.0 m long, 1.8 m wide and 1.2 m deep) that was filled by clear water. Features of bedforms were observed when the bed state in the flume reached equilibrium condition. The experimental conditions range 1.5-4.2 in densimetric Froude number and 0.2-0.8 in Shields dimensionless stress. We report the two major discoveries as a result of the flume experiments: (1) Plane bed under Froude-supercritical flows and (2) Geometrical characteristics of cyclic steps formed by density flows. (1) Plane bed was formed under the condition of supercritical flow regime. In previous studies, plane bed has been known to be formed by subcritical unidirectional flows (ca. 0.8 in Froude number). However, this study implies that plane bed can also be formed by supercritical conditions with high Shields dimensionless stress (>0.4) and very high Froude number (> 4.0). This discovery may suggest that previous estimations of paleo-hydraulic conditions of parallel lamination in turbidites should be reconsidered. The previous experimental studies and data from high-speed camera suggest that the region of plane bed formation coincides with the region of the sheet flow developments. The particle transport in sheet flow (thick bedload layer) induces transform of profile of flow shear stress, which may be

  1. Models for short-wave instability in inviscid shear flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimshaw, Roger

    1999-11-01

    The generation of instability in an invsicid fluid occurs by a resonance between two wave modes, where here the resonance occurs by a coincidence of phase speeds for a finite, non-zero wavenumber. We show that in the weakly nonlinear limit, the appropriate model consists of two coupled equations for the envelopes of the wave modes, in which the nonlinear terms are balanced with low-order cross-coupling linear dispersive terms rather than the more familiar high-order terms which arise in the nonlinear Schrodinger equation, for instance. We will show that this system may either contain gap solitons as solutions in the linearly stable case, or wave breakdown in the linearly unstable case. In this latter circumstance, the system either exhibits wave collapse in finite time, or disintegration into fine-scale structures.

  2. Fluidelastic instability of a flexible tube in a rigid normal square array subjected to uniform two-phase cross-flows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Axisa, F.; Villard, B.; Antunes, J.

    1989-01-01

    During the last decade several researchers, investigated fluidelastic instability in tube arrays by restricting the problem to a single degree of freedom system. This is a very attractive idea because of obvious theoretical and experimental simplifications. Nevertheless, it has still to be clarified how far such results can be applied to fully flexible arrays. This paper is presenting a few experimental data obtained on a rigid normal square array subjected to uniform air-water cross flows, at various homogeneous void fractions α H from O to 1. Fluidelastic instability was clearly observed in air and in water. However instability was progressively vanishing in two-phase flow, when α H was increased. Such a result is contrasting with those obtained on fully flexible arrays

  3. Study of flow instability in a centrifugal fan based on energy gradient theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xiao, Meina; Dou, Hua-Shu; Ma, Xiaoyang; Xiao, Qing; Chen, Yongning; He, Haijiang; Ye, Xinxue

    2016-01-01

    Flow instability in a centrifugal fan was studied using energy gradient theory. Numerical simulation was performed for the three dimensional turbulent flow field in a centrifugal fan. The flow is governed by the three-dimensional incompressible Navier-Stokes equations coupled with the RNG k-ε turbulent model. The finite volume method was used to discretize the governing equations and the Semiimplicit method for pressure linked equation (SIMPLE) algorithm is employed to iterate the system of the equations. The interior flow field in the centrifugal fan and the distribution of the energy gradient function K are obtained at different flow rates. According to the energy gradient method, the area with larger value of K is the place where the flow loses stability easier. The results show that instability is easier to generate in the regions of impeller outlet and volute tongue. The air flow near the hub is more stable than that near the shroud. That is due to the influences of variations of the velocity and the inlet angle along the axial direction. With the decrease of the flow rate, instability zone in a blade channel moves to the impeller inlet from the outlet and the unstable regions in different channels develop in opposite direction to the rotation of impeller

  4. Instability characteristics of fluidelastic instability of tube rows in crossflow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, S.S.; Jendrzejczyk, J.A.

    1986-04-01

    An experimental study is reported to investigate the jump phenomenon in critical flow velocities for tube rows with different pitch-to-diameter ratios and the excited and intrinsic instabilities for a tube row with a pitch-to-diameter ratio of 1.75. The experimental data provide additional insights into the instability phenomena of tube arrays in crossflow. 9 refs., 10 figs

  5. New linear theory of hydrodynamic instability of the Hagen-Poiseuille flow and the blood swirling flows formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergey G. Chefranov

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Aims This paper deals with solving of a century-old paradox of linear stability for the Hagen-Poiseuille flow. A new mechanism of dissipative hydrodynamic instability has been established herein, and a basis for the forming of helical structural organization of bloodstream and respective energy effectiveness of the cardiovascular system functioning has been defined by the authors. Materials and methods Theory of hydrodynamic instability, Galerkin’s approximation. Results A new condition Re > Reth-min ≈ 124 of linear (exponential instability of the Hagen-Poisseuille (HP flow with respect to extremely small by magnitude axially-symmetric disturbances of the tangential component of the velocity field is obtained. The disturbances necessarily shall have quasi-periodic longitudinal variability along the pipe axis that corresponds to the observed data. Conclusion We show that the obtained estimate of value of Reth-min corresponds to the condition of independence of the main result (on the linear instability of the HP flow when Re > Reth-min from the procedure of averaging used in the Galerkin approximation. Thus, we obtain the possible natural mechanism for the blood swirling flows formations observed in the aorta and the large blood vessels.

  6. Impact of drag reducing polymers on the onset of instability in a pipe with reverse flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shashank, H. J.; Sreenivas, K. R.

    2014-11-01

    The objective of this study is to understand the mechanism by which drag reducing polymer (DRP) additives modify turbulent flow, so as to reduce turbulent drag. Reverse flow in a pipe occurs when the fluid close to the wall moves in an opposite direction to that of the core fluid. Reverse flow is established by using a piston-cylinder mechanism, the programmed motion of which imparts a known impulse to the fluid. When the piston is stopped at the end of the stroke, fluid inertia makes the core of the flow to continue in the same direction. In order to conserve mass, reverse flow is established close to the wall. An inflection point is thus formed, leading to flow instability above a critical Reynolds number. Dye and streak flow visualization experiments are performed to highlight the impact of DRP additives (polyethylene oxide, PEO, dissolved in water). The time of onset of the instability and the wavelength of the observed instability are studied in systems with and without DRP additives. This study will provide further insight into the phenomenon of turbulent polymer drag reduction.

  7. Instability of shallow open channel flow with lateral velocity gradients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lima, A C; Izumi, N, E-mail: adriano@eng.hokudai.ac.jp, E-mail: nizumi@eng.hokudai.ac.jp [River and Watershed Engineering Laboratory, Hokkaido University, Sapporo, 060-8628 (Japan)

    2011-12-22

    The turbulent flow in a wide rectangular open channel partially covered with vegetation is studied using linear stability analysis. In the base state normal flow condition, the water depth is constant and the transverse velocity vanishes, while there is a lateral gradient in the streamwise velocity with an inflexion point at the boundary between the vegetated zone and the main channel. The Reynolds stress is expressed by introducing the eddy viscosity, which is obtained from assuming a logarithmic distribution of the velocity near the bed. Perturbation expansions are introduced to the streamwise and transverse velocities, as well as to the water depth. The system of governing equations was solved in order to determine the maximum growth rate of the perturbations as a function of parameters which describe physical characteristics of the channel and the flow.

  8. Shear flow instability in a partially-ionized plasma sheath around a fast-moving vehicle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sotnikov, V. I.; Mudaliar, S.; Genoni, T. C.; Rose, D. V.; Oliver, B. V.; Mehlhorn, T. A.

    2011-01-01

    The stability of ion acoustic waves in a sheared-flow, partially-ionized compressible plasma sheath around a fast-moving vehicle in the upper atmosphere, is described and evaluated for different flow profiles. In a compressible plasma with shear flow, instability occurs for any velocity profile, not just for profiles with an inflection point. A second-order differential equation for the electrostatic potential of excited ion acoustic waves in the presence of electron and ion collisions with neutrals is derived and solved numerically using a shooting method with boundary conditions appropriate for a finite thickness sheath in contact with the vehicle. We consider three different velocity flow profiles and find that in all cases that neutral collisions can completely suppress the instability.

  9. Simulation techniques for spatially evolving instabilities in compressible flow over a flat plate

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wasistho, B.; Geurts, Bernardus J.; Kuerten, Johannes G.M.

    1997-01-01

    In this paper we present numerical techniques suitable for a direct numerical simulation in the spatial setting. We demonstrate the application to the simulation of compressible flat plate flow instabilities. We compare second and fourth order accurate spatial discretization schemes in combination

  10. Hybrid simulations of current-carrying instabilities in Z-pinch plasmas with sheared axial flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sotnikov, Vladimir I.; Makhin, Volodymyr; Bauer, Bruno S.; Hellinger, Petr; Travnicek, Pavel; Fiala, Vladimir; Leboeuf, Jean-Noel

    2002-01-01

    The development of instabilities in z-pinch plasmas has been studied with three-dimensional (3D) hybrid simulations. Plasma equilibria without and with sheared axial flow have been considered. Results from the linear phase of the hybrid simulations compare well with linear Hall magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) calculations for sausage modes. The hybrid simulations show that sheared axial flow has a stabilizing effect on the development of both sausage and kink modes

  11. Experimental Flow Characterization of a Flow Diverting Device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sparrow, Eph; Chow, Ricky; Campbell, Gary; Divani, Afshin; Sheng, Jian

    2012-11-01

    Flow diverters, such as the Pipeline Embolization Device, are a new class of endovascular devices for the treatment of intracranial aneurysms. While clinical studies have demonstrated safety and efficacy, their impact on intra-aneurysmal flow is not confirmed experimentally. As such, optimization of the flow diversion behavior is not currently possible. A quasi-3D PIV technique was developed and applied in various glass models at Re = 275 and 550 to determine the changes to flow characteristics due to the deployment of a flow diverter across the aneurysm neck. Outcomes such as mean velocity, wall shear stress, and others metrics will be presented. Glass models with varying radii of curvature and aneurysm locations will be examined. Experiments were performed in a fully index-matched flow facility using ~10 μm diameter polystyrene particles doped with Rhodium 6G dye. The particles were illuminated with a 532nm laser sheet and observed with a CCD camera and a 592nm +/-43 nm bandpass filter. A quasi 3D flow field was reconstructed from multiple orthogonal planes (spaced 0.4mm apart) encompassing the entire glass model. Wall stresses were evaluated from the near-wall flow viscous stresses.

  12. Instability of flow of liquid film over a heated surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sha, W.T.

    1994-01-01

    Fundamental concepts and basic equations of a flowing thin liquid film cooling a heated surfaced by its vaporization and the effect of dry patches were treated. Stable film flow prior to the appearance of dry patches on the heated surface is maintained by a balance of various forces due to surface tension, shear stress, heat and mass transfer, and gravity. Film splitting at a critical film thickness produces dry patches due to perturbation by waves on a perfect surface, and often by surface imperfection and uneven heating. This work is primarily motivated by the design of next-generation nuclear reactors, which employ many novel passive heat-removal systems via natural circulation. These systems are design to prevent damage to the reactor core and containment without action by the reactor operators during or after a design basis accident such as a loss of coolant accident (LOCA) or a main steam-line break (MSLB) accident

  13. Viscous Potential Flow Analysis of Electroaerodynamic Instability of a Liquid Sheet Sprayed with an Air Stream

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mukesh Kumar Awasthi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The instability of a thin sheet of viscous and dielectric liquid moving in the same direction as an air stream in the presence of a uniform horizontal electric field has been carried out using viscous potential flow theory. It is observed that aerodynamic-enhanced instability occurs if the Weber number is much less than a critical value related to the ratio of the air and liquid stream velocities, viscosity ratio of two fluids, the electric field, and the dielectric constant values. Liquid viscosity has stabilizing effect in the stability analysis, while air viscosity has destabilizing effect.

  14. Response of a laminar premixed flame to flow oscillations: A kinematic model and thermoacoustic instability results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fleifil, M.; Annaswamy, A.M.; Ghoneim, A.F. [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology, Cambridge, MA (United States); Ghoneim, Z.A. [Ain Shams Univ., Abassia (Egypt)

    1996-09-01

    Combustion instability is a resonance phenomenon that arises due to the coupling between the system acoustics and the unsteady heat release. The constructive feedback between the two processes, which is known to occur as a certain phase relationship between the pressure and the unsteady heat release rate is satisfied, depends on many parameters among which is the acoustic mode, the flame holder characteristics, and the dominant burning pattern. In this paper, the authors construct an analytical model to describe the dynamic response of a laminar premixed flame stabilized on the rim of a tube to velocity oscillation. They consider uniform and nonuniform velocity perturbations superimposed on a pipe flow velocity profile. The model results show that the magnitude of heat release perturbation and its phase with respect to the dynamic perturbation dependent primarily on the flame Strohal number, representing the ratio of the dominant frequency times the tube radius to the laminar burning velocity. In terms of this number, high-frequency perturbations pass through the flame while low frequencies lead to a strong response. The phase with respect to the velocity perturbation behaves in the opposite way. Results of this model are shown to agree with experimental observations and to be useful in determining how the combustion excited model is selected among all the acoustic unstable modes. The model is then used to obtain a time-domain differential equation describing the relationship between the velocity perturbation and the heat release response over the entire frequency range.

  15. Experimental study of the Richtmyer-Meshkov instability induced by a Mach 3 shock wave

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    BP Puranik; JG Oakley; MH Anderson; R Bonaazza

    2003-01-01

    OAK-B135 An experimental investigation of a shock-induced interfacial instability (Richtmyer-Meshkov instability) is undertaken in an effort to study temporal evolution of interfacial perturbations in the late stages of development. The experiments are performed in a vertical shock tube with a square cross-section. A membraneless interface is prepared by retracting a sinusoidally shaped metal plate initially separating carbon dioxide from air, with both gases initially at atmospheric pressure. With carbon dioxide above the plate, the Rayleigh-Taylor instability commences as the plate is retracted and the amplitude of the initial sinusoidal perturbation imposed on the interface begins to grow. The interface is accelerated by a strong shock wave (M=3.08) while its shape is still sinusoidal and before the Kelvin-Helmhotz instability distorts it into the well known mushroom-like structures; its initial amplitude to wavelength ratio is large enough that the interface evolution enters its nonlinear stage very shortly after shock acceleration. The pre-shock evolution of the interface due to the Rayleigh-Taylor instability and the post-shock evolution of the interface due to the Richtmyer-Meshkov instability are visualized using planar Mie scattering. The pre-shock evolution of the interface is carried out in an independent set of experiments. The initial conditions for the Richtmyer-Meshkov experiment are determined from the pre-shock Rayleigh-Taylor growth. One image of the post-shock interface is obtained per experiment and image sequences, showing the post-shock evolution of the interface, are constructed from several experiments. The growth rate of the perturbation amplitude is measured and compared with two recent analytical models of the Richtmyer-Meshkov instability

  16. Surfactants and the Rayleigh-Taylor instability of Couette type flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frenkel, A. L.; Halpern, D.; Schweiger, A. S.

    2011-11-01

    We study the Rayleigh-Taylor instability of slow Couette- type flows in the presence of insoluble surfactants. It is known that with zero gravity, the surfactant makes the flow unstable to longwave disturbances in certain regions of the parameter space; while in other parametric regions, it reinforces the flow stability (Frenkel and Halpern 2002). Here, we show that in the latter parametric sectors, and when the (gravity) Bond number Bo is below a certain threshold value, the Rayleigh-Taylor instability is completely stabilized for a finite interval of Ma, the (surfactant) Marangoni number: MaL Ma2. For Ma Ma2, and also for MaL Ma2 as functions of the Bond number. We note that (for an interval of the Bond number) there are two distinct criticalities with nonzero (and distinct) critical wavenumbers.

  17. The role of density discontinuity in the inviscid instability of two-phase parallel flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behzad, M.; Ashgriz, N.

    2014-02-01

    We re-examine the inviscid instability of two-phase parallel flows with piecewise linear velocity profiles. Although such configuration has been theoretically investigated, we employ the concept of waves resonance to physically interpret the instability mechanism as well as the essential role of density discontinuity in the flow. Upon performing linear stability analysis, we demonstrate the existence of neutrally stable "density" and "density-vorticity" waves which are emerged due to the density jump in the flow, in addition to the well-known vorticity waves. Such waves are capable of resonating with each other to form unstable modes in the flow. Although unstable modes in this study are classified as the "shear instability" type, we demonstrate that they are not necessarily of the Rayleigh type. The results also show that the density can have both stabilizing and destabilizing effects on the flow stability. We verify that the difference in the resonating pair of neutral waves leads to such distinct behavior of the density variation.

  18. Flow instability in laminar jet flames driven by alternating current electric fields

    KAUST Repository

    Kim, Gyeong Taek; Park, Daegeun; Cha, Min; Park, Jeong; Chung, Suk-Ho

    2016-01-01

    The effect of electric fields on the instability of laminar nonpremixed jet flames was investigated experimentally by applying the alternating current (AC) to a jet nozzle. We aimed to elucidate the origin of the occurrence of twin-lifted jet flames

  19. Experimental observations of MHD instabilities in the high-beta tokamak Torus-II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Machida, M.

    1982-01-01

    The CO 2 laser scattering and interferometry diagnostics have been used to study the MHD instabilities in the high-beta tokamak Torus-II. Detailed measurements of the density and density fluctuation profiles have been performed. In order to measure density fluctuations with wavelengths longer than 2 cm, an interferometric like, phase matching technique has been developed. The toroidal and poloidal mode numbers have been measured using a double-beam, two-position technique. Working at high-beta values, average β greater than or equal to 10%, we have found parameters where the growing instabilities are created or suppressed. The plasma lifetime for both cases is seen to be about the same and the loss of the plasma appears to be caused by the decay in the external fields. The growing instability parameters are within the MHD regime, and it only grows at the outer edge of the plasma. This is in agreement with the theoretical Ballooning mode instability. The frequency and mode number measurements also agree with the Kinetic theory description of Ballooning modes. The comparison with possible other modes, such as Tearing and Drift instabilities, is performed and the Ballooning growth rate is shown to be the best fit to the experimental values

  20. Can Hall effect trigger Kelvin-Helmholtz instability in sub-Alfvénic flows?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandey, B. P.

    2018-05-01

    In the Hall magnetohydrodynamics, the onset condition of the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability is solely determined by the Hall effect and is independent of the nature of shear flows. In addition, the physical mechanism behind the super- and sub-Alfvénic flows becoming unstable is quite different: the high-frequency right circularly polarized whistler becomes unstable in the super-Alfvénic flows whereas low-frequency, left circularly polarized ion-cyclotron wave becomes unstable in the presence of sub-Alfvénic shear flows. The growth rate of the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability in the super-Alfvénic case is higher than the corresponding ideal magnetohydrodynamic rate. In the sub-Alfvénic case, the Hall effect opens up a new, hitherto inaccessible (to the magnetohydrodynamics) channel through which the partially or fully ionized fluid can become Kelvin-Helmholtz unstable. The instability growth rate in this case is smaller than the super-Alfvénic case owing to the smaller free shear energy content of the flow. When the Hall term is somewhat smaller than the advection term in the induction equation, the Hall effect is also responsible for the appearance of a new overstable mode whose growth rate is smaller than the purely growing Kelvin-Helmholtz mode. On the other hand, when the Hall diffusion dominates the advection term, the growth rate of the instability depends only on the Alfvén -Mach number and is independent of the Hall diffusion coefficient. Further, the growth rate in this case linearly increases with the Alfvén frequency with smaller slope for sub-Alfvénic flows.

  1. Local parametric instability near elliptic points in vortex flows under shear deformation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koshel, Konstantin V., E-mail: kvkoshel@poi.dvo.ru [Pacific Oceanological Institute, FEB RAS, 43, Baltiyskaya Street, Vladivostok 690041 (Russian Federation); Institute of Applied Mathematics, FEB RAS, 7, Radio Street, Vladivostok 690022 (Russian Federation); Far Eastern Federal University, 8, Sukhanova Street, Vladivostok 690950 (Russian Federation); Ryzhov, Eugene A., E-mail: ryzhovea@gmail.com [Pacific Oceanological Institute, FEB RAS, 43, Baltiyskaya Street, Vladivostok 690041 (Russian Federation)

    2016-08-15

    The dynamics of two point vortices embedded in an oscillatory external flow consisted of shear and rotational components is addressed. The region associated with steady-state elliptic points of the vortex motion is established to experience local parametric instability. The instability forces the point vortices with initial positions corresponding to the steady-state elliptic points to move in spiral-like divergent trajectories. This divergent motion continues until the nonlinear effects suppress their motion near the region associated with the steady-state separatrices. The local parametric instability is then demonstrated not to contribute considerably to enhancing the size of the chaotic motion regions. Instead, the size of the chaotic motion region mostly depends on overlaps of the nonlinear resonances emerging in the perturbed system.

  2. Experimental Study of Cavitation in Laminar Flow

    OpenAIRE

    Croci , Kilian; Ravelet , Florent; ROBINET , Jean-Christophe; Danlos , Amélie

    2017-01-01

    An experimental setup has been especially developed in order to observe cavitation in laminar flows. Experiments have been carried out with a silicon oil of viscosity υ = 100cSt passing through a Venturi-type geometry with 18°/8° convergent/divergent angles respectively. The range of Reynolds numbers at the inlet section is between 350 and 1000. Two dynamic regimes are identified. They are characterized by two critical Reynolds numbers, induced by major hydrodynamic changes in the flow, in ad...

  3. The mitigation effect of sheared axial flow on the rayleigh-taylor instability in Z-pinch plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Yang

    2005-01-01

    A magnetohydrodynamic formulation is derived to investigate the mitigation effects of the sheared axial flow on the Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) instability in Z-pinch plasma. The dispersion relation of the compressible model is given. The mitigation effects of sheared axial flow on the Rayleigh-Taylor instability of Z-pinch plasma in the compressible and incompressible models are compared respectively, and the effect of compressible on the instability of system with sheared axial flow is discussed. It is found that, compressibility effects can stabilize the Rayleigh-Taylor/Kelvin-Helmholtz (RT/KH) instability, and this allows the sheared axial flow mitigate the RT instability far more effectively. The authors also find that, at the early stage of the implosion, if the temperature of the plasma is not very high, the compressible model is much more suitable to describing the state of system than the incompressible one. (author)

  4. Analysis of two-phase flow instability in vertical boiling channels I: development of a linear model for the inlet velocity perturbation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hwang, D.H.; Yoo, Y.J.; Kim, K.K.

    1998-08-01

    A linear model, named ALFS, is developed for the analysis of two-phase flow instabilities caused by density wave oscillation and flow excursion in a vertical boiling channel with constant pressure drop conditions. The ALFS code can take into account the effect of the phase velocity difference and the thermally non-equilibrium phenomena, and the neutral boundary of the two-phase flow instability was analyzed by D-partition method. Three representative two-phase flow models ( i.e. HEM, DEM, and DNEM) were examined to investigate the effects on the stability analysis. As the results, it reveals that HEM shows the most conservative prediction of heat flux at the onset of flow instability. three linear models, Ishiis DEM, Sahas DNEM, and ALFS model, were applied to Sahas experimental data of density wave oscillation, and as the result, the mean and standard deviation of the predicted-to-measured heat flux at the onset of instability were calculated as 0.93/0.162, 0.79/0.112, and 0.95/0.143, respectively. For the long test section, however, ALFS model tends to predict the heat fluxes about 30 % lower than the measured values. (author). 14 refs

  5. Gravitational Instabilities associated with volcanic clouds: new insights from experimental investigations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scollo, Simona; Bonadonna, Costanza; Manzella, Irene

    2016-04-01

    Gravitational instabilities are often observed at the bottom of volcanic plumes and clouds generating fingers that propagate downward enhancing sedimentation of fine ash. Regardless of their potential influence on tephra dispersal and deposition, their dynamics is not completely understood, undermining the accuracy of volcanic ash transport and dispersal models. Here we present new laboratory experiments that investigate the effects of particle size, composition and concentration on finger dynamics and generation. The experimental set-up consists of a Plexiglas tank of 50 x 30.3 x 7.5 cm equipped with a removable banner for the partition of two separate layers. The lower partition is a solution of water and sugar and is therefore characterized by a higher density than the upper partition which is filled with water and particles. The upper layer is quiescent (unmixed experiments), or continually mixed using a rotary stirrer (mixed experiments). After removing the horizontal barrier that separates the two fluids, particles are illuminated with a 2W Nd-YAG laser named RayPower 2000 and filmed with a HD camera (1920x1080 pixels). Images are analysed by the Dynamic Studio Software (DANTEC) that is a tool for the acquisition and analysis of velocity and related properties of particles inside the fluids. Each particle that follows the flow and scatters light captured by the camera is analysed based on velocity vectors. Experiments are carried out in order to evaluate the main features of fingers (number, width and speed) as a function of particle type, size and initial concentration. Particles include Glass Beads (GB) with diameter 180 μm. Three initial particle concentrations in the upper layer were employed: 3 g/l, 4 g/l and 5 g/l. Results show that the number and the speed of fingers increases with particle concentration and the speed increases with particles size while it is independent on particle types. Finally, experiments point out that development of instability

  6. Axial slit wall effect on the flow instability and heat transfer in rotating concentric cylinders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Dong; Chao, Chang Qing; Wang, Ying Ze; Zhu, Fang Neng [School of Energy and Power Engineering, Jiangsu University, Zhenjiang (China); Kim, Hyoung Bum [School of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Gyeongsang National University, Jinju (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-12-15

    The slit wall effect on the flow instability and heat transfer characteristics in Taylor-Couette flow was numerically studied by changing the rotating Reynolds number and applying the negative temperature gradient. The concentric cylinders with slit wall are seen in many rotating machineries. Six different models with the slit number 0, 6, 9, 12, 15 and 18 were investigated in this study. The results show the axial slit wall enhances the Taylor vortex flow and suppresses the azimuthal variation of wavy Taylor vortex flow. When negative temperature gradient exists, the results show that the heat transfer augmentation appears from laminar Taylor vortex to turbulent Taylor flow regime. The heat transfer enhancement become stronger as increasing the Reynolds number and slit number. The larger slit number model also accelerates the flow transition regardless of the negative temperature gradient or isothermal condition.

  7. Axial slit wall effect on the flow instability and heat transfer in rotating concentric cylinders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Dong; Chao, Chang Qing; Wang, Ying Ze; Zhu, Fang Neng; Kim, Hyoung Bum

    2016-01-01

    The slit wall effect on the flow instability and heat transfer characteristics in Taylor-Couette flow was numerically studied by changing the rotating Reynolds number and applying the negative temperature gradient. The concentric cylinders with slit wall are seen in many rotating machineries. Six different models with the slit number 0, 6, 9, 12, 15 and 18 were investigated in this study. The results show the axial slit wall enhances the Taylor vortex flow and suppresses the azimuthal variation of wavy Taylor vortex flow. When negative temperature gradient exists, the results show that the heat transfer augmentation appears from laminar Taylor vortex to turbulent Taylor flow regime. The heat transfer enhancement become stronger as increasing the Reynolds number and slit number. The larger slit number model also accelerates the flow transition regardless of the negative temperature gradient or isothermal condition

  8. Fluid-Elastic Instability Tests on Parallel Triangular Tube Bundles with Different Mass Ratio Values under Increasing and Decreasing Flow Velocities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xu Zhang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available To study the effects of increasing and decreasing flow velocities on the fluid-elastic instability of tube bundles, the responses of an elastically mounted tube in a rigid parallel triangular tube bundle with a pitch-to-diameter ratio of 1.67 were tested in a water tunnel subjected to crossflow. Aluminum and stainless steel tubes were tested, respectively. In the in-line and transverse directions, the amplitudes, power spectrum density functions, response frequencies, added mass coefficients, and other results were obtained and compared. Results show that the nonlinear hysteresis phenomenon occurred in both tube bundle vibrations. When the flow velocity is decreasing, the tubes which have been in the state of fluid-elastic instability can keep on this state for a certain flow velocity range. During this process, the response frequencies of the tubes will decrease. Furthermore, the response frequencies of the aluminum tube can decrease much more than those of the stainless steel tube. The fluid-elastic instability constants fitted for these experiments were obtained from experimental data. A deeper insight into the fluid-elastic instability of tube bundles was also obtained by synthesizing the results. This study is beneficial for designing and operating equipment with tube bundles inside, as well as for further research on the fluid-elastic instability of tube bundles.

  9. Critical heat flux concerns during the flow instability phase of a DEGB LOCA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shadday, M.A. Jr.

    1990-08-01

    Arguments are presented that support the proposal that a separate burnout risk analysis, for the Flow Instability (FI) phase of a LOCA, not be required for reactor restart. With expected reactor power limits, flow instability will occur before critical heat flux (CHF). Since FI power limits preclude the occurrence of flow instability in a bounding accident, a DEGB LOCA, the risk of CHF and attendant burnout is negligible. A review of RDAP data revealed that in the past reactor assemblies operated at flow and power conditions similar to those expected in a LOCA without burnout occurring. This is strong bounding empirical evidence, without the scaling concerns of laboratory experiments. A bounding analysis of the influences of assembly non-idealities on CHF, power tilts, and channel eccentricity, is included. The margin between operating heat fluxes, during the postulated LOCA, and CHF was quantified by scoping calculations. Based on measured azimuthal power variations, the local heat flux would have to be more than 20 standard deviations above the calculated mean heat flux for CHF to occur

  10. Magnetohydrodynamic Kelvin-Helmholtz instabilities in astrophysics. 3. Hydrodynamic flows with shear layers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferraro, A [Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, Turin (Italy). Lab. di Cosmo-Geofisica; Max-Planck-Institut fuer Extraterrestrische Physik, Garching (Germany, F.R.)); Massaglia, S [Turin Univ. (Italy). Ist. di Fisica; Trussoni, E [Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, Turin (Italy). Lab. di Cosmo-Geofisica

    1982-03-01

    In this paper a discussion is presented on Kelvin-Helmholtz instabilities in pressure-confined two-dimensional flows (slabs) delimited by boundary layers with velocity and density gradients. It is found that the fastest growing modes in supersonic flows are produced by perturbations reflecting at the boundaries and have wavelengths of the order of the slab width; this peak of instability is even more evident than in the case of vortex-sheet cylindrical flows, discussed in a previous paper. From a comparison of the results for the two-dimensional slab and three-dimensional cylinder it is concluded that a two-dimensional treatment provides an adequate description of instabilities in fluid flows. In this analogy, symmetric and antisymmetric modes in the slab correspond to pinching and helical modes in the cylinder. In the final section a comparison is attempted of the results obtained with morphologies in collimated jets in extragalactic radio sources; general characteristics appear to be classifiable in terms of scale-lengths of the velocity and density gradients in the boundary layers.

  11. Localized modelling and feedback control of linear instabilities in 2-D wall bounded shear flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tol, Henry; Kotsonis, Marios; de Visser, Coen

    2016-11-01

    A new approach is presented for control of instabilities in 2-D wall bounded shear flows described by the linearized Navier-Stokes equations (LNSE). The control design accounts both for spatially localized actuators/sensors and the dominant perturbation dynamics in an optimal control framework. An inflow disturbance model is proposed for streamwise instabilities that drive laminar-turbulent transition. The perturbation modes that contribute to the transition process can be selected and are included in the control design. A reduced order model is derived from the LNSE that captures the input-output behavior and the dominant perturbation dynamics. This model is used to design an optimal controller for suppressing the instability growth. A 2-D channel flow and a 2-D boundary layer flow over a flat plate are considered as application cases. Disturbances are generated upstream of the control domain and the resulting flow perturbations are estimated/controlled using wall shear measurements and localized unsteady blowing and suction at the wall. It will be shown that the controller is able to cancel the perturbations and is robust to unmodelled disturbances.

  12. Power Disturbances Close to Hydrodynamic Instability in Natural Circulation Two-Phase Flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mathisen, R.P.; Eklind, O.

    1967-07-01

    In certain boiling reactor designs high positive void coefficients could exist and under certain circumstances cause instability. Control systems may therefore be desired. In such a controlled reactor there could remain superimposed low frequency power oscillations of some magnitude. The object of the current experiments in SKALVAN was to examine whether or not such slow oscillations could influence the hydrodynamic stability limit of the individual boiling channels. While operating the loop close to the threshold of hydrodynamic instability, the power was pulsed in the boiling channel. The pulse widths had a lower limit of 0.65 sec due to the contactor time constant. The square wave power oscillation amplitude ΔQ/Q was 12.2 %, and the interval T between the pulses was varied in the range 0 0 /T 0 was the mass flow oscillation period. The corresponding mass flow oscillations remained damped for all disturbance periods which were examined. With minimum test section inlet restrictions the power level at instability was much lower than that at burnout conditions. At higher restrictions these phenomena occurred at approximately equivalent power levels. The experiments with minimum inlet restrictions were also performed beyond the instability threshold. In this case it was possible to exceed the nominal burnout point temporarily by 5 per cent or more for periods of the order of magnitude 1 second. Even now the boiling channel conditions were not so severely affected that the burnout detectors tripped, and the power disturbances caused low frequency modulated wave trains

  13. Slope instability in complex 3D topography promoted by convergent 3D groundwater flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reid, M. E.; Brien, D. L.

    2012-12-01

    Slope instability in complex topography is generally controlled by the interaction between gravitationally induced stresses, 3D strengths, and 3D pore-fluid pressure fields produced by flowing groundwater. As an example of this complexity, coastal bluffs sculpted by landsliding commonly exhibit a progression of undulating headlands and re-entrants. In this landscape, stresses differ between headlands and re-entrants and 3D groundwater flow varies from vertical rainfall infiltration to lateral groundwater flow on lower permeability layers with subsequent discharge at the curved bluff faces. In plan view, groundwater flow converges in the re-entrant regions. To investigate relative slope instability induced by undulating topography, we couple the USGS 3D limit-equilibrium slope-stability model, SCOOPS, with the USGS 3D groundwater flow model, MODFLOW. By rapidly analyzing the stability of millions of potential failures, the SCOOPS model can determine relative slope stability throughout the 3D domain underlying a digital elevation model (DEM), and it can utilize both fully 3D distributions of pore-water pressure and material strength. The two models are linked by first computing a groundwater-flow field in MODFLOW, and then computing stability in SCOOPS using the pore-pressure field derived from groundwater flow. Using these two models, our analyses of 60m high coastal bluffs in Seattle, Washington showed augmented instability in topographic re-entrants given recharge from a rainy season. Here, increased recharge led to elevated perched water tables with enhanced effects in the re-entrants owing to convergence of groundwater flow. Stability in these areas was reduced about 80% compared to equivalent dry conditions. To further isolate these effects, we examined groundwater flow and stability in hypothetical landscapes composed of uniform and equally spaced, oscillating headlands and re-entrants with differing amplitudes. The landscapes had a constant slope for both

  14. Modelling of void formation in the subcooled boiling regime in the ATHLET code to simulate flow instability for research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hainoun, A.

    1996-01-01

    The ATHLET thermohydraulic code was developed at the Gesellschaft fuer Anlagen- und Reaktorsicherheit (GRS, Society for Plant and Reactor Safety) to analyse leaks and transients for power reactors. In order to extend the code's range of application to the safety analysis of research reactors, a model was implemented permitting a description of the thermodynamic non-equilibrium effects in the subcooled boiling regime. The aim of the extension is, on one hand, to cover the thermohydraulic instability which is particularly characteristic of research reactors owing to their high power densities and low system pressures and, on the other hand, to provide a consideration of the influence of the steam formed in this boiling regime on the neutron balance. The model developed takes into consideration the competing evaporation and condensation effects in the subcooled boiling regime. It describes the bubble production rate at the superheated heating surfaces as well as the subsequent condensation of the bubbles in the subcooled core flow. The installed model is validated by the recalculation of two extensive series of experiments. In the first series the McMaster experiments on axial void distribution in the subcooled boiling regime are recalculated. The recalculation shows that the extended programme is capable of calculating the axial void distribution in the subcooled boiling regime with good agreement with the data. The second series deals with KFA experiments on thermohydraulic instability (flow excursion) in the subcooled boiling regime, comprising a broad parameter range of heat flow density, inlet temperature and channel width. Recalculation of this experimental series shows that the programme extension ensures simulation of thermohydraulic instability. (orig.)

  15. An experimental study on two-phase flow pattern in low pressure natural circulation system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu Shaorong; Han Bing; Zhou Lei; Zhang Youjie; Jiang Shengyao; Wu Xinxin

    1991-10-01

    An experimental study on two-phase flow pattern in the riser of low pressure natural circulation system was performed. The local differential pressure signal was analysed for flow pattern. It is considered that Sr f·d/v can be used to distinguish different flow patterns and it has clear and definite physical meaning. Flow patterns at different inlet temperature with different system pressures (1.5 MPa, 0.24 MPa and 0.1 MPa) are described. It is considered that the flow pattern is only bubble flow without flow pattern change during the period of low quality density-wave instability at 1.5 MPa. There is no density-wave oscillation in the system, when flow pattern is in bubble-intermittent transition area. The effect of flash vaporization on stability at low pressure is discussed

  16. Influence of Equilibrium Perpendicular Shear Flow on Peeling-ballooning Instabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xi, P. W.; Xu, X. Q.

    2011-10-01

    The influence of perpendicular ExB shear flow on peeling-ballooning instabilities is investigated with BOUT++ code. In our simulation, a set of reduced MHD equations are solved for a very unstable equilibrium and a marginal unstable equilibrium in shifted-circular tokamak geometry. For ideal MHD cases without diamagnetic terms and resistivity, we find that flow shear shows dramatic stabilizing effect on peeling-ballooning modes and the stabilizing degree increases with mode number. When the flow shear is large enough, we find the curvature of growth rate verse mode number has the same shape like that for the case with only diamagnetic term, and this implies that diamagnetic term and the shear flow have the same mechanism acting on peeling-ballooning instabilities. The role of Kelvin-Helmholtz term is also investigated and we find it is destabilizing and the effect depends on both flow shear and mode number. For cases with both diamagnetic term and the applied shear flow, modes with intermediate mode number are strongest stabilized while high n and low n mode keep unstable. Based on these results, an ELM trigger sketch is proposed. Performed for USDoE by LLNL Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  17. Kelvin-Helmholtz instability for a bounded plasma flow in a longitudinal magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burinskaya, T. M.; Shevelev, M. M.; Rauch, J.-L.

    2011-01-01

    Kelvin-Helmholtz MHD instability in a plane three-layer plasma is investigated. A general dispersion relation for the case of arbitrarily orientated magnetic fields and flow velocities in the layers is derived, and its solutions for a bounded plasma flow in a longitudinal magnetic field are studied numerically. Analysis of Kelvin-Helmholtz instability for different ion acoustic velocities shows that perturbations with wavelengths on the order of or longer than the flow thickness can grow in an arbitrary direction even at a zero temperature. Oscillations excited at small angles with respect to the magnetic field exist in a limited range of wavenumbers even without allowance for the finite width of the transition region between the flow and the ambient plasma. It is shown that, in a low-temperature plasma, solutions resulting in kink-like deformations of the plasma flow grow at a higher rate than those resulting in quasi-symmetric (sausage-like) deformations. The transverse structure of oscillatory-damped eigenmodes in a low-temperature plasma is analyzed. The results obtained are used to explain mechanisms for the excitation of ultra-low-frequency long-wavelength oscillations propagating along the magnetic field in the plasma sheet boundary layer of the Earth’s magnetotail penetrated by fast plasma flows.

  18. Multi-resolution Delta-plus-SPH with tensile instability control: Towards high Reynolds number flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, P. N.; Colagrossi, A.; Marrone, S.; Antuono, M.; Zhang, A. M.

    2018-03-01

    It is well known that the use of SPH models in simulating flow at high Reynolds numbers is limited because of the tensile instability inception in the fluid region characterized by high vorticity and negative pressure. In order to overcome this issue, the δ+-SPH scheme is modified by implementing a Tensile Instability Control (TIC). The latter consists of switching the momentum equation to a non-conservative formulation in the unstable flow regions. The loss of conservation properties is shown to induce small errors, provided that the particle distribution is regular. The latter condition can be ensured thanks to the implementation of a Particle Shifting Technique (PST). The novel variant of the δ+-SPH is proved to be effective in preventing the onset of tensile instability. Several challenging benchmark tests involving flows past bodies at large Reynolds numbers have been used. Within this a simulation characterized by a deforming foil that resembles a fish-like swimming body is used as a practical application of the δ+-SPH model in biological fluid mechanics.

  19. The Experimental Study of Rayleigh-Taylor Instability using a Linear Induction Motor Accelerator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamashita, Nicholas; Jacobs, Jeffrey

    2009-11-01

    The experiments to be presented utilize an incompressible system of two stratified miscible liquids of different densities that are accelerated in order to produce the Rayleigh-Taylor instability. Three liquid combinations are used: isopropyl alcohol with water, a calcium nitrate solution or a lithium polytungstate solution, giving Atwood numbers of 0.11, 0.22 and 0.57, respectively. The acceleration required to drive the instability is produced by two high-speed linear induction motors mounted to an 8 m tall drop tower. The motors are mounted in parallel and have an effective acceleration length of 1.7 m and are each capable of producing 15 kN of thrust. The liquid system is contained within a square acrylic tank with inside dimensions 76 x76x184 mm. The tank is mounted to an aluminum plate, which is driven by the motors to create constant accelerations in the range of 1-20 g's, though the potential exists for higher accelerations. Also attached to the plate are a high-speed camera and an LED backlight to provide continuous video of the instability. In addition, an accelerometer is used to provide acceleration measurements during each experiment. Experimental image sequences will be presented which show the development of a random three-dimensional instability from an unforced initial perturbation. Measurements of the mixing zone width will be compared with traditional growth models.

  20. Magnetohydrodynamic simulation of kink instability and plasma flow during sustainment of a coaxial gun spheromak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kanki, Takashi; Nagata, Masayoshi; Kagei, Yasuhiro

    2010-01-01

    Kink instability and the subsequent plasma flow during the sustainment of a coaxial gun spheromak are investigated by three-dimensional nonlinear magnetohydrodynamic simulations. Analysis of the parallel current density λ profile in the central open column revealed that the n = 1 mode structure plays an important role in the relaxation and current drive. The toroidal flow (v t ≈ 37 km/s) is driven by magnetic reconnection occurring as a result of the helical kink distortion of the central open column during repetitive plasmoid ejection and merging. (author)

  1. Time-delayed feedback technique for suppressing instabilities in time-periodic flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaabani-Ardali, Léopold; Sipp, Denis; Lesshafft, Lutz

    2017-11-01

    A numerical method is presented that allows to compute time-periodic flow states, even in the presence of hydrodynamic instabilities. The method is based on filtering nonharmonic components by way of delayed feedback control, as introduced by Pyragas [Phys. Lett. A 170, 421 (1992), 10.1016/0375-9601(92)90745-8]. Its use in flow problems is demonstrated here for the case of a periodically forced laminar jet, subject to a subharmonic instability that gives rise to vortex pairing. The optimal choice of the filter gain, which is a free parameter in the stabilization procedure, is investigated in the context of a low-dimensional model problem, and it is shown that this model predicts well the filter performance in the high-dimensional flow system. Vortex pairing in the jet is efficiently suppressed, so that the unstable periodic flow state in response to harmonic forcing is accurately retrieved. The procedure is straightforward to implement inside any standard flow solver. Memory requirements for the delayed feedback control can be significantly reduced by means of time interpolation between checkpoints. Finally, the method is extended for the treatment of periodic problems where the frequency is not known a priori. This procedure is demonstrated for a three-dimensional cubic lid-driven cavity in supercritical conditions.

  2. Development of a Program for Predicting Flow Instability in a Once-through Sodium-Heated Steam Generator (III)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Eui Kwang; Yoon, Jung; Kim, Jong Bum; Jeong, Jiyoung [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    Two-phase flow systems can be subjected to several types of instability problems. Density-wave oscillation is the most common and important type of instability in boiling channels. Such instability gives difficulties in predictions of system performance and system control, and component failure due to thermal fatigue. A computer program developed for predicting two-phase flow instability in a steam generator heated by liquid sodium was presented in the previous works. Limit cycle was predicted even in a fixed node system. The amplitude of inlet flow rate is larger than that of outlet flow rate. The amplitude of phase change location oscillation within boiling-to-vapor boundary node is larger than that of liquid-to-boiling boundary node. Sodium and steam temperature are invariant at tube exit.

  3. Experimental research of flow servo-valve

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takosoglu Jakub

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Positional control of pneumatic drives is particularly important in pneumatic systems. Some methods of positioning pneumatic cylinders for changeover and tracking control are known. Choking method is the most development-oriented and has the greatest potential. An optimal and effective method, particularly when applied to pneumatic drives, has been searched for a long time. Sophisticated control systems with algorithms utilizing artificial intelligence methods are designed therefor. In order to design the control algorithm, knowledge about real parameters of servo-valves used in control systems of electro-pneumatic servo-drives is required. The paper presents the experimental research of flow servo-valve.

  4. Experimental research of flow servo-valve

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takosoglu, Jakub

    Positional control of pneumatic drives is particularly important in pneumatic systems. Some methods of positioning pneumatic cylinders for changeover and tracking control are known. Choking method is the most development-oriented and has the greatest potential. An optimal and effective method, particularly when applied to pneumatic drives, has been searched for a long time. Sophisticated control systems with algorithms utilizing artificial intelligence methods are designed therefor. In order to design the control algorithm, knowledge about real parameters of servo-valves used in control systems of electro-pneumatic servo-drives is required. The paper presents the experimental research of flow servo-valve.

  5. Nonlinear vortex structures and Rayleigh instability condition in shear flow plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haque, Q.; Saleem, H.; Mirza, A.M.

    2009-01-01

    Full text: It is shown that the shear flow produced by externally applied electric field can unstable the drift waves. Due to shear flow, the Rayleigh instability condition is modified, which is obtained for both electron-ion and electron-positron-ion plasmas. These shear flow driven drift waves can be responsible for large amplitude electrostatic fluctuations in tokamak edges. In the nonlinear regime, the stationary structures may appear in electron-positron-ion plasmas similar to electron-ion plasmas. The nonlinear vortex structures like counter rotating dipole vortices and vortex chains can be formed with the aid of special type of shear flows. The positrons can be used as a probe in laboratory plasmas, which make it a multi-component plasma. The presence of positrons in electron-ion plasma system can affect the speed and amplitude of the nonlinear vortex structures. This investigation can have application in both laboratory and astrophysical plasmas. (author)

  6. Numerical analysis of flow instability in the water wall of a supercritical CFB boiler with annular furnace

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Beibei; Yang, Dong; Xie, Haiyan; Nie, Xin; Liu, Wanyu

    2016-08-01

    In order to expand the study on flow instability of supercritical circulating fluidized bed (CFB) boiler, a new numerical computational model considering the heat storage of the tube wall metal was presented in this paper. The lumped parameter method was proposed for wall temperature calculation and the single channel model was adopted for the analysis of flow instability. Based on the time-domain method, a new numerical computational program suitable for the analysis of flow instability in the water wall of supercritical CFB boiler with annular furnace was established. To verify the code, calculation results were respectively compared with data of commercial software. According to the comparisons, the new code was proved to be reasonable and accurate for practical engineering application in analysis of flow instability. Based on the new program, the flow instability of supercritical CFB boiler with annular furnace was simulated by time-domain method. When 1.2 times heat load disturbance was applied on the loop, results showed that the inlet flow rate, outlet flow rate and wall temperature fluctuated with time eventually remained at constant values, suggesting that the hydrodynamic flow was stable. The results also showed that in the case of considering the heat storage, the flow in the water wall is easier to return to stable state than without considering heat storage.

  7. Fluid-elastic Instability of Helical Tubes Subjected to Single-Phase External Flow and Two-Phase Internal Flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jong Chull Jo; Myung Jo Jhung; Woong Sik Kim; Hho Jung Kim

    2004-01-01

    This study investigates the fluid-elastic instability characteristics of steam generator helical type tubes in operating nuclear power plants. The thermal-hydraulic conditions of both tube side and shell side flow fields are predicted by a general purpose computational fluid dynamics code employing the finite volume element modeling. To get the natural frequency, corresponding mode shape and participation factor, modal analyses are performed for helical type tubes with various conditions. Investigated are the effects of the helix angle, the number of supports and the status of the inner fluid on the modal, and fluid-elastic instability characteristics of the tubes, which are expressed in terms of the natural frequency, corresponding mode shape, and stability ratio. (authors)

  8. Experimental study of external kink instabilities in the Columbia High Beta Tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ivers, T.H.

    1991-01-01

    The generation of power through controlled thermonuclear fusion reactions in a magnetically confined plasma holds promise as a means of supplying mankind's future energy needs. The device most technologically advanced in pursuit of this goal is the tokamak, a machine in which a current-carrying toroidal plasma is thermally isolated from its surroundings by a strong magnetic field. To be viable, the tokamak reactor must produce a sufficiently large amount of power relative to that needed to sustain the fusion reactions. Plasma instabilities may severely limit this possibility. In this work, I describe experimental measurements of the magnetic structure of large-scale, rapidly-growing instabilities that occur in a tokamak when the current or pressure of the plasma exceeds a critical value relative to the magnetic field, and I compare these measurements with theoretical predictions

  9. Prominence Bubble Shear Flows and the Coupled Kelvin-Helmholtz — Rayleigh-Taylor Instability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berger, Thomas; Hillier, Andrew

    2017-08-01

    Prominence bubbles are large arched structures that rise from below into quiescent prominences, often growing to heights on the order of 10 Mm before going unstable and generating plume upflows. While there is general agreement that emerging flux below pre-existing prominences causes the structures, there is lack of agreement on the nature of the bubbles and the cause of the instability flows. One hypothesis is that the bubbles contain coronal temperature plasma and rise into the prominence above due to both magnetic and thermal buoyancy, eventually breaking down via a magnetic Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) instability to release hot plasma and magnetic flux and helicity into the overlying coronal flux rope. Another posits that the bubbles are actually just “arcades” in the prominence indicating a magnetic separator line between the bipole and the prominence fields with the observed upflows and downflows caused by reconnection along the separator. We analyze Hinode/SOT, SDO/AIA, and IRIS observations of prominence bubbles, focusing on characteristics of the bubble boundary layers that may discriminate between the two hypotheses. We find speeds on the order of 10 km/s in prominence plasma downflows and lateral shear flows along the bubble boundary. Inflows to the boundary gradually increase the thickness and brightness of the layer until plasma drains from there, apparently around the dome-like bubble domain. In one case, shear flow across the bubble boundary develops Kelvin-Helmholtz (KH) vortices that we use to infer flow speeds in the low-density bubble on the order of 100 km/sec. IRIS spectra indicate that plasma flows on the bubble boundary at transition region temperatures achieve Doppler speeds on the order of 50 km/s, consistent with this inference. Combined magnetic KH-RT instability analysis leads to flux density estimates of 10 G with a field angle of 30° to the prominence, consistent with vector magnetic field measurements. In contrast, we find no evidence

  10. Experimental investigation on premature occurrence of critical heat flux under oscillatory flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vishnoi, A.K.; Dasgupta, A.; Chandraker, D.K.; Nayak, A.K.; Rama Rao, A.; Hegde, Nandan D.

    2016-01-01

    Two-phase natural circulation loops have extensive applications in nuclear and process industries. One of the major concerns with natural circulation is the occurrence of the various types of flow instabilities, which can cause premature boiling crisis due to flow and power oscillations. In this work, experimental investigation on CHF under oscillatory flow was carried out in a facility named CHF and Instability Loop (CHIL). CHIL is a simple rectangular loop having a 10.5 mm ID and 1.1 m long test section. The flow through the test section is controlled by a canned motor pump using a Variable Frequency Drive (VFD). The effect of frequency and amplitude of flow oscillation on occurrence of premature CHF has been investigated for this facility using a transient computer code COPCOS (Code for Prediction of CHF under Oscillating flow and power condition). The code incorporates conduction equation of the fuel and coolant energy equation. For CHF prediction, CHF look-up table developed by Groeneveld is used. Full paper covers description of the facility, experimental procedure, experimental results and data analysis using COPCOS. (author)

  11. Improved Design of PECS to reduce Flow Instability for EU-APR1400

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hwang, Do Hyun; Lee, Keunsung

    2014-01-01

    For EU-APR1400, PECS (Passive Ex-vessel corium retaining and Cooling System), so-called core catcher, was adopted to keep the integrity of basemat in containment by preventing MCCI (Molten Core Concrete Interaction) through retaining core debris and cooling corium outside the reactor vessel. In this paper, the improved design of PECS is presented to increase coolability by reducing flow instability in the region of cooling channel. In this paper, flow instability analysis was carried out using CFD code to find out the most improved design of PECS, which is to increase coolability by reducing bubble entrainment in the region of cooling channel. The reduction of bubble entrainment in the downcomer facilitates higher mass flow rates in the downcomer. Among presented four designed for the downcomer of PECS, the superstep design shows the highest mass flow rate and the lowest gas holdup in the downcomer as well as in the cooling channel. Compared with the existing design, the elimination of the horizontal part and the addition of an extra space above the vertical entrance to the downcomer seem to help the separation of the vapor

  12. Experimental study of flow induced vibration of the planar fuel assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Jinhua; Bo Hanliang; Jiang Shengyao; Jia Haijun; Zheng Wenxiang; Min Gang; Qu Xinxing

    2005-01-01

    The paper studied the flow-induced vibration of the planar fuel assembly under scour of coolant through experiments, the study includes: the characteristics of the inherent vibration, the response to the flow-induced vibration in rating condition and the confirmation of the critical flow velocity's scope of the flow flexible instability. The velocity distributions in different flow channels formed by fuel plates in the assembly were measured, and the velocity distribution in the same flow channel was also measured. The experimental conclusions includes: the inherent vibration frequency of the planar fuel assembly is different for a little in each direction. The damp ratio corresponding to the assembly each rank's inherent frequency is small, and the damp ratio decreased with the increase of the corresponding inherent frequency. The velocity in different flow channels decreased from outside to inside, and the velocity in the middle channel was the least; the velocity in the same channel decreased from inside to outside, and the velocity in the middle position was the most. The vibration swing of the fuel assembly was small at rating condition, and the vibration swing of the fuel plates was larger than side plates. The vibration of the fuel assembly increased with the increase of the velocity, the vibration of the middle fuel plate were larger than the border fuel plate, and the vibration of the border fuel plate was larger than the side plate. The large scale vibration of the flow flexible instability didn't occur in the velocity scope of 0-18.8 m/s in the experiment, so the critical flow velocity of the flow flexible instability was not in the flow velocity scope of the experiment. (authors)

  13. Power Disturbances Close to Hydrodynamic Instability in Natural Circulation Two-Phase Flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mathisen, R P; Eklind, O

    1967-07-15

    In certain boiling reactor designs high positive void coefficients could exist and under certain circumstances cause instability. Control systems may therefore be desired. In such a controlled reactor there could remain superimposed low frequency power oscillations of some magnitude. The object of the current experiments in SKALVAN was to examine whether or not such slow oscillations could influence the hydrodynamic stability limit of the individual boiling channels. While operating the loop close to the threshold of hydrodynamic instability, the power was pulsed in the boiling channel. The pulse widths had a lower limit of 0.65 sec due to the contactor time constant. The square wave power oscillation amplitude {delta}Q/Q was 12.2 %, and the interval T between the pulses was varied in the range 0 < T{sub 0}/T < 0. 5 where T{sub 0} was the mass flow oscillation period. The corresponding mass flow oscillations remained damped for all disturbance periods which were examined. With minimum test section inlet restrictions the power level at instability was much lower than that at burnout conditions. At higher restrictions these phenomena occurred at approximately equivalent power levels. The experiments with minimum inlet restrictions were also performed beyond the instability threshold. In this case it was possible to exceed the nominal burnout point temporarily by 5 per cent or more for periods of the order of magnitude 1 second. Even now the boiling channel conditions were not so severely affected that the burnout detectors tripped, and the power disturbances caused low frequency modulated wave trains.

  14. Nonlinear saturation of the slab ITG instability and zonal flow generation with fully kinetic ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miecnikowski, Matthew T.; Sturdevant, Benjamin J.; Chen, Yang; Parker, Scott E.

    2018-05-01

    Fully kinetic turbulence models are of interest for their potential to validate or replace gyrokinetic models in plasma regimes where the gyrokinetic expansion parameters are marginal. Here, we demonstrate fully kinetic ion capability by simulating the growth and nonlinear saturation of the ion-temperature-gradient instability in shearless slab geometry assuming adiabatic electrons and including zonal flow dynamics. The ion trajectories are integrated using the Lorentz force, and the cyclotron motion is fully resolved. Linear growth and nonlinear saturation characteristics show excellent agreement with analogous gyrokinetic simulations across a wide range of parameters. The fully kinetic simulation accurately reproduces the nonlinearly generated zonal flow. This work demonstrates nonlinear capability, resolution of weak gradient drive, and zonal flow physics, which are critical aspects of modeling plasma turbulence with full ion dynamics.

  15. Flow velocity calculation to avoid instability in a typical research reactor core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliveira, Carlos Alberto de; Mattar Neto, Miguel

    2011-01-01

    Flow velocity through a research reactor core composed by MTR-type fuel elements is investigated. Core cooling capacity must be available at the same time that fuel-plate collapse must be avoided. Fuel plates do not rupture during plate collapse, but their lateral deflections can close flow channels and lead to plate over-heating. The critical flow velocity is a speed at which the plates collapse by static instability type failure. In this paper, critical velocity and coolant velocity are evaluated for a typical MTR-type flat plate fuel element. Miller's method is used for prediction of critical velocity. The coolant velocity is limited to 2/3 of the critical velocity, that is a currently used criterion. Fuel plate characteristics are based on the open pool Australian light water reactor. (author)

  16. Physics of Transitional Shear Flows Instability and Laminar–Turbulent Transition in Incompressible Near-Wall Shear Layers

    CERN Document Server

    Boiko, Andrey V; Grek, Genrih R; Kozlov, Victor V

    2012-01-01

    Starting from fundamentals of classical stability theory, an overview is given of the transition phenomena in subsonic, wall-bounded shear flows. At first, the consideration focuses on elementary small-amplitude velocity perturbations of laminar shear layers, i.e. instability waves, in the simplest canonical configurations of a plane channel flow and a flat-plate boundary layer. Then the linear stability problem is expanded to include the effects of pressure gradients, flow curvature, boundary-layer separation, wall compliance, etc. related to applications. Beyond the amplification of instability waves is the non-modal growth of local stationary and non-stationary shear flow perturbations which are discussed as well. The volume continues with the key aspect of the transition process, that is, receptivity of convectively unstable shear layers to external perturbations, summarizing main paths of the excitation of laminar flow disturbances. The remainder of the book addresses the instability phenomena found at l...

  17. Shear Flow Instabilities and Droplet Size Effects on Aerosol Jet Printing Resolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Guang; Gu, Yuan; Hines, Daniel; Das, Siddhartha; LaboratoryPhysical Science Collaboration; Soft Matter, Interfaces, Energy Laboratory Collaboration

    2017-11-01

    Aerosol Jet printing (AJP) is an additive technology utilizing aerodynamic focusing to produce fine feature down to 10 micrometers that can be used in the manufacture of wearable electronics and biosensors. The main concern of the current technology is related to unstable printing resolution, which is usually assessed by effective line width, edge smoothness, overspray and connectivity. In this work, we perform a 3D CFD model to study the aerodynamic instabilities induced by the annular shear flow (sheath gas flow or ShGF) trapped with the aerosol jet (carried gas flow or CGF) with ink droplets. Extensive experiments on line morphology have shown that by increasing ShGF, one can first obtain thinner line width, and then massive overspray is witnessed at very large ShGF/ CGF ratio. Besides the fact that shear-layer instabilities usually trigger eddy currents at comparatively low Reynolds number 600, the tolerance of deposition components assembling will also propagate large offsets of the deposited feather. We also carried out detailed analysis on droplet size and deposition range on the printing resolution. This study is intended to come up with a solution on controlling the operating parameters for finer printed features, and offer an improvement strategy on next generation.

  18. Experimental Investigation of Flow Condensation in Microgravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hyoungsoon; Park, Ilchung; Konishi, Christopher; Mudawar, Issam; May, Rochelle I.; Juergens, Jeffery R.; Wagner, James D.; Hall, Nancy R.; Nahra, Henry K.; Hasan, Mohammed M.; hide

    2013-01-01

    Future manned missions to Mars are expected to greatly increase the space vehicle's size, weight, and heat dissipation requirements. An effective means to reducing both size and weight is to replace single-phase thermal management systems with two-phase counterparts that capitalize upon both latent and sensible heat of the coolant rather than sensible heat alone. This shift is expected to yield orders of magnitude enhancements in flow boiling and condensation heat transfer coefficients. A major challenge to this shift is a lack of reliable tools for accurate prediction of two-phase pressure drop and heat transfer coefficient in reduced gravity. Developing such tools will require a sophisticated experimental facility to enable investigators to perform both flow boiling and condensation experiments in microgravity in pursuit of reliable databases. This study will discuss the development of the Flow Boiling and Condensation Experiment (FBCE) for the International Space Station (ISS), which was initiated in 2012 in collaboration between Purdue University and NASA Glenn Research Center. This facility was recently tested in parabolic flight to acquire condensation data for FC-72 in microgravity, aided by high-speed video analysis of interfacial structure of the condensation film. The condensation is achieved by rejecting heat to a counter flow of water, and experiments were performed at different mass velocities of FC-72 and water and different FC-72 inlet qualities. It is shown that the film flow varies from smooth-laminar to wavy-laminar and ultimately turbulent with increasing FC-72 mass velocity. The heat transfer coefficient is highest near the inlet of the condensation tube, where the film is thinnest, and decreases monotonically along the tube, except for high FC-72 mass velocities, where the heat transfer coefficient is enhanced downstream. This enhancement is attributed to both turbulence and increased interfacial waviness. One-ge correlations are shown to

  19. Tests of a numerical algorithm for the linear instability study of flows on a sphere

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perez Garcia, Ismael; Skiba, Yuri N [Univerisidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Mexico, D.F. (Mexico)

    2001-04-01

    A numerical algorithm for the normal mode instability of a steady nondivergent flow on a rotating sphere is developed. The algorithm accuracy is tested with zonal solutions of the nonlinear barotropic vorticity equation (Legendre polynomials, zonal Rossby-Harwitz waves and monopole modons). [Spanish] Ha sido desarrollado un algoritmo numerico para estudiar la inestabilidad lineal de un flujo estacionario no divergente en una esfera en rotacion. La precision del algoritmo se prueba con soluciones zonales de la ecuacion no lineal de vorticidad barotropica (polinomios de Legendre, ondas zonales Rossby-Harwitz y modones monopolares).

  20. Electronic Instability at High Flux-Flow Velocities in High-Tc Superconducting Films

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Doettinger, S. G.; Huebener, R. P.; Gerdemann, R.

    1994-01-01

    At high flux-flow velocities in type-II superconductors the nonequilibrium distribution of the quasiparticles leads to an electronic instability and an aburpt switching into a state with higher electric resistivity, as predicted by Larkin and Ovchinnikow (LO). We report the first obervation...... of this effect in a high-temperature superconductor, namely in epitaxial c-axis oriented films of YBa(2)Cu3O(7)-(delta). Using the LO therory, we have extracted from out results the inelastic quasiparticle scattering rare tau(in)(-1), which strongly decreases with decreasing temperature below T-c...

  1. On the instability of convective flow in cylinder and possible secondary regimes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bekezhanova, V B; Andreev, V K, E-mail: bekezhanova@mail.ru, E-mail: andr@icm.krasn.ru [Institute of Computational Modelling SB RAS, Akademgorodok, 50/44, Krasnoyarsk, Institute of Mathematics and Fundamental Informatics, Siberian Federal University, Svobodny, 79, Krasnoyarsk, 660041 (Russian Federation)

    2014-08-01

    A new exact solution of equations of free convection is constructed in the framework of the Oberbeck–Boussinesq approximation. The solution contains an independent parameter and describes the flow of a viscous heat-conducting liquid in the vertical cylinder with large radius. Complex rheology and radiative heating are taken into account. The considered problem reduces to the operator equation with strongly nonlinear operator. The solvability of the operator problem is proved. The iterative procedure for finding the free parameter is suggested. Three different classes of solution are obtained with the help of the procedure. The linear stability of all classes of solutions is studied numerically. Critical thermal mode is isolated. Evolution of oscillatory mode depending on Prandtl number is investigated. It is shown that under small Prandtl numbers oscillatory modes decay. If Prandtl numbers are not small a new instability type appears. This instability is connected with growing thermal disturbances. Another instability mechanism is discovered in the short waves domain. In this case the crisis is attributed to growing hydrodynamical disturbances. Secondary regimes arising in the hydrodynamical mechanism of the stability loss are calculated. (paper)

  2. Experiments and theory in non-linear thermal transport, heat flow instabilities and plasma jet formation in inertial confinement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haines, M.G.; Bond, D.J.; Chuaqui, H.H.

    1983-01-01

    The paper reports experimental and theoretical contributions to the understanding of non-linear heat flow and the phenomenon of jet-like filamentary structures in inertial-confinement fusion. When lateral heat flow is minimized, through applying more carefully a radially symmetric irradiation at 1.05 and 0.53 μm on a spherical target, it is found that a heat flux in excess of 10% of the free-streaming limit is consistent with simulations and experimental measurements with particle and X-ray diagnostics. A similar result has been found in a scaled experiment in a plasma of electron density 4x10 16 cm - 3 when the condition Tsub(e) approx.=Tsub(i) is satisfied. These results are in marked contrast to earlier assertions, mainly from plane-target measurements, that the flux limiter is 3%, but in agreement with theoretical calculations of steady non-linear heat flow using a discrete-ordinate method. Thus, no anomalous inhibition of heat flow is found, consistent with theoretical predictions that ion-acoustic turbulence is of no importance in dense (n>=10 21 cm - 3 , T approx.= 1 keV) plasmas. However, in the low-density scaled experiment, under conditions where Tsub(e)>>Tsub(i) is found that ion-acoustic turbulence is present, and the flux limiter is 4%. By using shadowgraphic and schlieren techniques with an optical diagnostic probe, fine-scale jet-like structures have been observed on a scale-length of approx. 10 μm on spherical targets. They occur even outside the laser-irradiated region, and are not connected with irregularities in the laser beam; they are more pronounced with higher-Z materials and with shorter-wavelength lasers, and have megagauss magnetic fields associated with them. Electromagnetic instabilities driven by heat flow are the probable cause of the jets, and of the three known modes the thermal instability, enhanced by radiation loss, agrees more closely with the experiments than the Weibel and thermomagnetic modes, since the latter only occur

  3. Linear and nonlinear instability in vertical counter-current laminar gas-liquid flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Patrick; Ó Náraigh, Lennon; Lucquiaud, Mathieu; Valluri, Prashant

    2016-04-01

    We consider the genesis and dynamics of interfacial instability in vertical gas-liquid flows, using as a model the two-dimensional channel flow of a thin falling film sheared by counter-current gas. The methodology is linear stability theory (Orr-Sommerfeld analysis) together with direct numerical simulation of the two-phase flow in the case of nonlinear disturbances. We investigate the influence of two main flow parameters on the interfacial dynamics, namely the film thickness and pressure drop applied to drive the gas stream. To make contact with existing studies in the literature, the effect of various density contrasts is also examined. Energy budget analyses based on the Orr-Sommerfeld theory reveal various coexisting unstable modes (interfacial, shear, internal) in the case of high density contrasts, which results in mode coalescence and mode competition, but only one dynamically relevant unstable interfacial mode for low density contrast. A study of absolute and convective instability for low density contrast shows that the system is absolutely unstable for all but two narrow regions of the investigated parameter space. Direct numerical simulations of the same system (low density contrast) show that linear theory holds up remarkably well upon the onset of large-amplitude waves as well as the existence of weakly nonlinear waves. For high density contrasts, corresponding more closely to an air-water-type system, linear stability theory is also successful at determining the most-dominant features in the interfacial wave dynamics at early-to-intermediate times. Nevertheless, the short waves selected by the linear theory undergo secondary instability and the wave train is no longer regular but rather exhibits chaotic motion. The same linear stability theory predicts when the direction of travel of the waves changes — from downwards to upwards. We outline the practical implications of this change in terms of loading and flooding. The change in direction of the

  4. Linear and nonlinear instability in vertical counter-current laminar gas-liquid flows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmidt, Patrick; Lucquiaud, Mathieu; Valluri, Prashant; Ó Náraigh, Lennon

    2016-01-01

    We consider the genesis and dynamics of interfacial instability in vertical gas-liquid flows, using as a model the two-dimensional channel flow of a thin falling film sheared by counter-current gas. The methodology is linear stability theory (Orr-Sommerfeld analysis) together with direct numerical simulation of the two-phase flow in the case of nonlinear disturbances. We investigate the influence of two main flow parameters on the interfacial dynamics, namely the film thickness and pressure drop applied to drive the gas stream. To make contact with existing studies in the literature, the effect of various density contrasts is also examined. Energy budget analyses based on the Orr-Sommerfeld theory reveal various coexisting unstable modes (interfacial, shear, internal) in the case of high density contrasts, which results in mode coalescence and mode competition, but only one dynamically relevant unstable interfacial mode for low density contrast. A study of absolute and convective instability for low density contrast shows that the system is absolutely unstable for all but two narrow regions of the investigated parameter space. Direct numerical simulations of the same system (low density contrast) show that linear theory holds up remarkably well upon the onset of large-amplitude waves as well as the existence of weakly nonlinear waves. For high density contrasts, corresponding more closely to an air-water-type system, linear stability theory is also successful at determining the most-dominant features in the interfacial wave dynamics at early-to-intermediate times. Nevertheless, the short waves selected by the linear theory undergo secondary instability and the wave train is no longer regular but rather exhibits chaotic motion. The same linear stability theory predicts when the direction of travel of the waves changes — from downwards to upwards. We outline the practical implications of this change in terms of loading and flooding. The change in direction of the

  5. Experimental study on dynamic stabilization of the MHD instability in pinch plasmas surrounded by a conducting shell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamamoto, Shunji; Ishii, Shozo; Kawamoto, Shigeshi; Hayashi, Izumi

    1981-01-01

    Experimental study on the dynamic stabilization of MHD instability with a pinch plasma generator was done, and the results were compared with the theoretical works. The previous results of theoretical analysis showed that a conducting shell worked effectively for the dynamic stabilization of MHD instability. The present experiment was carried out with a linear plasma generator which consisted of a discharge tube, a coil and a conducting shell. The macroscopic behavior of plasma was observed with an image converter camera, and the phenomena due to the instability was measured by a magnetic probe. A sine-cosine coil was employed for the observation of the growth of instability. The following results were obtained. When the frequency of RF current for dynamic stabilization was larger than the growth rate of instability, the experimental results were in agreement with the theoretical ones. The effect of a conducting shell was clearly seen. For the helical instability of short wave length, the dynamic stabilization was easily obtained even without a conducting shell. The self-reversal phenomena due to the helical instability of short wave length was suppressed by the RF current along the axis of a discharge tube. (Kato, T.)

  6. An investigation of two-phase flow instability using wavelet signal extraction technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shang Zhi; Yang Ruichang; Cao Xuewu; Yang Yanhua

    2004-01-01

    When the oscillation periods of the instability of two-phase flow are sought with traditional methods of signal analysis, generally the Fourier transform must be employed and then the oscillation periods will be gotten at the location of the local maximum amplitude of frequency transform. However, Fourier transform will be difficult to clearly analyze the unsteady signals especially when the signals include many peaks and the noise interference is not generated by white noise in many areas of practical engineering like the oscillation of the instability of two-phase flow. The most effective solving method for the difficulty of Fourier transform is to analyze the signals directly in time domain. Wavelet analysis is able to search out the periods from time domain directly. It also has more excellent local characteristics than Fourier analysis in the both of time and frequency domains. In this paper, not only is a direct detecting method of the oscillation periods successfully applied based on the wavelet signal extraction techniques, but also the oscillation of density wave type of TYPE I is found as a kind of oscillations with a high-frequency harmonization

  7. Fluid elastic instability tests on an array of tubes preferentially flexible in the flow direction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mureithi, N.W.; Zhang, C.; Pettigrew, M.J.

    2004-01-01

    The present work is motivated by the observation that, in the presence of flat bar supports (AVBs), U-tubes in steam generators and heat exchangers are not positively restrained in the in-plane direction. The stability behavior of a rotated triangular array is investigated in detail in the work presented here. Tubes within the array are flexible only in the flow direction. Tests are conducted with a fully flexible array, a single flexible tube, and a finite number of flexible tubes at several locations within the otherwise rigid array. In all cases tube flexibility is purely in the flow direction. The fully flexible array is shown to undergo fluid-elastic instability. Despite the unidirectional flexibility constraint, the critical instability velocity is of the same order of magnitude when compared with previous tests on an unconstrained fully flexible array. A single flexible tube, on the other hand, is found to be stable. Results of tests on partially flexible array configurations are also presented. (authors)

  8. Two-dimensional PIC simulations of ion beam instabilities in Supernova-driven plasma flows

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dieckmann, M E; Shukla, P K [Institut fuer Theoretische Physik IV, Ruhr-Universitaet Bochum, D-44780 Bochum (Germany); Meli, A; Mastichiadis, A [Department of Physics, National University of Athens, Panepistimiopolis, Zografos 15783 (Greece); Drury, L O C [Dublin Institute for Advanced Studies, Dublin 2 (Ireland)], E-mail: markd@tp4.rub.de

    2008-06-15

    Supernova remnant blast shells can reach the flow speed v{sub s} = 0.1c and shocks form at its front. Instabilities driven by shock-reflected ion beams heat the plasma in the foreshock, which may inject particles into diffusive acceleration. The ion beams can have the speed v{sub b} {approx} v{sub s}. For v{sub b} << v{sub s} the Buneman or upper-hybrid instabilities dominate, while for v{sub b} >> v{sub s} the filamentation and mixed modes grow faster. Here the relevant waves for v{sub b} {approx} v{sub s} are examined and how they interact nonlinearly with the particles. The collision of two plasma clouds at the speed v{sub s} is modelled with particle-in-cell simulations, which convect with them magnetic fields oriented perpendicular to their flow velocity vector. One simulation models equally dense clouds and the other one uses a density ratio of 2. Both simulations show upper-hybrid waves that are planar over large spatial intervals and that accelerate electrons to {approx}10 keV. The symmetric collision yields only short oscillatory wave pulses, while the asymmetric collision also produces large-scale electric fields, probably through a magnetic pressure gradient. The large-scale fields destroy the electron phase space holes and they accelerate the ions, which facilitates the formation of a precursor shock.

  9. The linearized pressure Poisson equation for global instability analysis of incompressible flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theofilis, Vassilis

    2017-12-01

    The linearized pressure Poisson equation (LPPE) is used in two and three spatial dimensions in the respective matrix-forming solution of the BiGlobal and TriGlobal eigenvalue problem in primitive variables on collocated grids. It provides a disturbance pressure boundary condition which is compatible with the recovery of perturbation velocity components that satisfy exactly the linearized continuity equation. The LPPE is employed to analyze instability in wall-bounded flows and in the prototype open Blasius boundary layer flow. In the closed flows, excellent agreement is shown between results of the LPPE and those of global linear instability analyses based on the time-stepping nektar++, Semtex and nek5000 codes, as well as with those obtained from the FreeFEM++ matrix-forming code. In the flat plate boundary layer, solutions extracted from the two-dimensional LPPE eigenvector at constant streamwise locations are found to be in very good agreement with profiles delivered by the NOLOT/PSE space marching code. Benchmark eigenvalue data are provided in all flows analyzed. The performance of the LPPE is seen to be superior to that of the commonly used pressure compatibility (PC) boundary condition: at any given resolution, the discrete part of the LPPE eigenspectrum contains converged and not converged, but physically correct, eigenvalues. By contrast, the PC boundary closure delivers some of the LPPE eigenvalues and, in addition, physically wrong eigenmodes. It is concluded that the LPPE should be used in place of the PC pressure boundary closure, when BiGlobal or TriGlobal eigenvalue problems are solved in primitive variables by the matrix-forming approach on collocated grids.

  10. Instability modes on a solid-body-rotation flow in a finite-length pipe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Chunjuan; Liu, Feng; Rusak, Zvi; Wang, Shixiao

    2017-09-01

    Numerical solutions of the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations are obtained to study the time evolution of both axisymmetric and three-dimensional perturbations to a base solid-body-rotation flow in a finite-length pipe with non-periodic boundary conditions imposed at the pipe inlet and outlet. It is found that for a given Reynolds number there exists a critical swirl number beyond which the initial perturbations grow, in contrast to the solid-body rotation flow in an infinitely-long pipe or a finite-length pipe with periodic inlet and exit boundary conditions for which the classical Kelvin analysis and Rayleigh stability criterion affirm neutrally stable for all levels of swirl. This paper uncovers for the first time the detailed evolution of the perturbations in both the axisymmetric and three-dimensional situations. The computations reveal a linear growth stage of the perturbations with a constant growth rate after a brief initial period of decay of the imposed initial perturbations. The fastest growing axisymmetric and three-dimensional instability modes and the associated growth rates are identified numerically for the first time. The computations show that the critical swirl number increases and the growth rate of instability decreases at the same swirl number with decreasing Reynolds number. The growth rate of the axisymmetric mode at high Reynolds number agrees well with previous stability theory for inviscid flow. More importantly, three-dimensional simulations uncover that the most unstable mode is the spiral type m = 1 mode, which appears at a lower critical swirl number than that for the onset of the axisymmetric mode. This spiral mode grows faster than the unstable axisymmetric mode at the same swirl. Moreover, the computations reveal that after the linear growing stage of the perturbation the flow continues to evolve nonlinearly to a saturated axisymmetric vortex breakdown state.

  11. Instability modes on a solid-body-rotation flow in a finite-length pipe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chunjuan Feng

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Numerical solutions of the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations are obtained to study the time evolution of both axisymmetric and three-dimensional perturbations to a base solid-body-rotation flow in a finite-length pipe with non-periodic boundary conditions imposed at the pipe inlet and outlet. It is found that for a given Reynolds number there exists a critical swirl number beyond which the initial perturbations grow, in contrast to the solid-body rotation flow in an infinitely-long pipe or a finite-length pipe with periodic inlet and exit boundary conditions for which the classical Kelvin analysis and Rayleigh stability criterion affirm neutrally stable for all levels of swirl. This paper uncovers for the first time the detailed evolution of the perturbations in both the axisymmetric and three-dimensional situations. The computations reveal a linear growth stage of the perturbations with a constant growth rate after a brief initial period of decay of the imposed initial perturbations. The fastest growing axisymmetric and three-dimensional instability modes and the associated growth rates are identified numerically for the first time. The computations show that the critical swirl number increases and the growth rate of instability decreases at the same swirl number with decreasing Reynolds number. The growth rate of the axisymmetric mode at high Reynolds number agrees well with previous stability theory for inviscid flow. More importantly, three-dimensional simulations uncover that the most unstable mode is the spiral type m = 1 mode, which appears at a lower critical swirl number than that for the onset of the axisymmetric mode. This spiral mode grows faster than the unstable axisymmetric mode at the same swirl. Moreover, the computations reveal that after the linear growing stage of the perturbation the flow continues to evolve nonlinearly to a saturated axisymmetric vortex breakdown state.

  12. Linear analysis of sheared flow stabilization of global magnetohydrodynamic instabilities based on the Hall fluid model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sotnikov, V.I.; Paraschiv, I.; Makhin, V.; Bauer, B.S.; Leboeuf, J.N.; Dawson, J.M.

    2002-01-01

    A systematic study of the linear stage of sheared flow stabilization of Z-pinch plasmas based on the Hall fluid model with equilibrium that contains sheared flow and an axial magnetic field is presented. In the study we begin with the derivation of a general set of equations that permits the evaluation of the combined effect of sheared flow and axial magnetic field on the development of the azimuthal mode number m=0 sausage and m=1 kink magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) instabilities, with the Hall term included in the model. The incorporation of sheared flow, axial magnetic field, and the Hall term allows the Z-pinch system to be taken away from the region in parameter space where ideal MHD is applicable to a regime where nonideal effects tend to govern stability. The problem is then treated numerically by following the linear development in time of an initial perturbation. The numerical results for linear growth rates as a function of axial sheared flow, an axial magnetic field, and the Hall term are reported

  13. Magnetohydrodynamic Kelvin-Helmholtz instabilities in astrophysics. 1. Relativistic flows-plane boundary layer in vortex sheet approximation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferrari, A; Trussoni, E; Zaninetti, L [Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, Turin (Italy). Lab. di Cosmo-Geofisica; Turin Univ. (Italy). Ist. di Fisica)

    1980-11-01

    In this paper some unsolved problems of the linear MHD Kelvin-Helmholtz instability are re-examined, starting from the analysis of relativistic (and non-relativistic) flows in the approximation of a plane vortex sheet, for the contact layer between the fluids in relative motion. Results are discussed for a range of physical parameters in specific connection with application to models of jets in extragalactic radio sources. Other physical aspects of the instability will be considered in forthcoming papers.

  14. Experimental investigation on flow behavior during start-up of a heating reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang Shengyao; Wu Xinxin; Zhang Youjie

    1997-09-01

    An experimental simulation study on the transition from pressurized to boiling operation of a low-temperature, natural circulation nuclear heating reactor (5 MW) developed by INET of Tsinghua University is presented. The experiment was performed on the test loop (HRTL-5), which simulates the geometry and system design of the 5 MW reactor. The manifestation of different kinds of two-phase flow instabilities, namely geyser instability, flashing instability and low-steam quality density wave instability on the transition from pressurized to boiling operation is described. The mechanism of flashing instability, which has never been studied well on this field, is especially interpreted. It is suggested that the start-up process, from initial condition to boiling operation condition, should consist of three steps: (1) increasing of initial pressure by means of a noncondensable gas (N 2 ), which is a very effective method to eliminate geyser instability and flashing instability at lower pressure. (2)start-up of the reactor at this pressurized condition with a constant heat flux under the limited value of q = 0.15 MW·m -2 , which controls the exit temperature of the heated section below the one of net vapor generation, the low steam quality density wave oscillation can be avoided. (3) transition to a lower pressure, boiling operation. The method of transition with low-heat flux and low-inlet subcooling is proposed: at pressurized operation condition, by reducing the heat flux to its lowest level, releasing the noncondensable gas and increasing the heat flux gradually (dq/dt -2 ·min -1 ), during which the low-steam quality density wave oscillation can be prevented from occurring, then the boiling operation condition can be achieved through adjusting the heat flux and inlet subcooling to their designed value. A stable transition from pressurized to boiling operation of the 5 MW reactor is achieved by careful selection of the thermohydraulic parameters. (7 refs., 7 figs., 1

  15. Dynamic Transitions and Baroclinic Instability for 3D Continuously Stratified Boussinesq Flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Şengül, Taylan; Wang, Shouhong

    2018-02-01

    The main objective of this article is to study the nonlinear stability and dynamic transitions of the basic (zonal) shear flows for the three-dimensional continuously stratified rotating Boussinesq model. The model equations are fundamental equations in geophysical fluid dynamics, and dynamics associated with their basic zonal shear flows play a crucial role in understanding many important geophysical fluid dynamical processes, such as the meridional overturning oceanic circulation and the geophysical baroclinic instability. In this paper, first we derive a threshold for the energy stability of the basic shear flow, and obtain a criterion for local nonlinear stability in terms of the critical horizontal wavenumbers and the system parameters such as the Froude number, the Rossby number, the Prandtl number and the strength of the shear flow. Next, we demonstrate that the system always undergoes a dynamic transition from the basic shear flow to either a spatiotemporal oscillatory pattern or circle of steady states, as the shear strength of the basic flow crosses a critical threshold. Also, we show that the dynamic transition can be either continuous or catastrophic, and is dictated by the sign of a transition number, fully characterizing the nonlinear interactions of different modes. Both the critical shear strength and the transition number are functions of the system parameters. A systematic numerical method is carried out to explore transition in different flow parameter regimes. In particular, our numerical investigations show the existence of a hypersurface which separates the parameter space into regions where the basic shear flow is stable and unstable. Numerical investigations also yield that the selection of horizontal wave indices is determined only by the aspect ratio of the box. We find that the system admits only critical eigenmodes with roll patterns aligned with the x-axis. Furthermore, numerically we encountered continuous transitions to multiple

  16. Flow cytometry: design, development and experimental validation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seigneur, Alain

    1987-01-01

    The flow cytometry techniques allow the analysis and sorting of living biologic cells at rates above five to ten thousand events per second. After a short review, we present in this report the design and development of a 'high-tech' apparatus intended for research laboratories and the experimental results. The first part deals with the physical principles allowing morphologic and functional analysis of cells or cellular components. The measured parameters are as follows: electrical resistance pulse sizing, light scattering and fluorescence. Hydrodynamic centering is used, and in the same way, the division of a water-stream into droplets leading to electrostatic sorting of particles. The second part deals with the apparatus designed by the 'Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique' (C.E.A.) and industrialised by 'ODAM' (ATC 3000). The last part of this thesis work is the performance evaluations of this cyto-meter. The difference between the two size measurement methods are analyzed: electrical resistance pulse sizing versus small-angle light scattering. By an original optics design, high sensitivity has been reached in the fluorescence measurement: the equivalent noise corresponds to six hundred fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) molecules. The sorting performances have also been analyzed and the cell viability proven. (author) [fr

  17. Study on flow instability for feasibility of a thin liquid film first wall

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okino, Fumito, E-mail: fumito.okino@iae.kyoto-u.ac.jp [Kyoto University Graduate School of Energy Science, Gokasho Uji, Kyoto (Japan); Kasada, Ryuta; Konishi, Satoshi [Kyoto University Institute of Advanced Energy, Gokasho Uji, Kyoto (Japan)

    2014-10-15

    Highlights: • We propose a probability of an instability wave growth on a liquid metal first wall. • Evaporated gas by the high energy flux is predicted to agitate this instability wave. • Liquid Pb-17Li with a velocity 10 m/s, the ambient gas must be below 6.2 × 10{sup 3} Pa. • This pressure corresponds to 1600 K and it is attainable under a fusion energy flux. • This probability is not yet verified so the full verifications are to be performed. - Abstract: This study proposes a probability of the evaporated gas that agitates a growing instability wave in a thin liquid film first wall. The liquid first wall was considered to be in vacuum and the effect of the ambient gas was neglected but the evaporated gas by the high energy fluxes is a probable cause of unstable wave agitation. The criterion is approximately expressed by the density ratio (Q{sub 2}) and the Weber number (We) as Q{sub 2} × We{sup 0.5} ≈ 5 × 10{sup −4}. Performed indirect experimental supported this criterion. For a case study of liquid Pb-17Li film with a velocity of 10 m/s, the evaporated gas pressure must be below 6.2 × 10{sup 3} Pa to maintain stable conditions. By recent study, this pressure is generated at 1600 K temperature and it is believed to be attainable by the energy fluxes on the first wall. This result is so far not confirmed so the full verification by experimental is to be performed.

  18. Experimental studies of occupation times in turbulent flows

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mann, J.; Ott, Søren; Pécseli, H.L.

    2003-01-01

    The motion of passively convected particles in turbulent flows is studied experimentally in approximately homogeneous and isotropic turbulent flows, generated in water by two moving grids. The simultaneous trajectories of many small passively convected, neutrally buoyant, polystyrene particles...

  19. experimental investigation of flow pattern around repelling

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A. Mahdieh NajafAbadi and M. M. Bateni

    2017-09-01

    Sep 1, 2017 ... FLOW-3D® software used to simulate flow pattern. The simulation was .... separated into separation zone, shear layer, vortices zone, end point of vorticity zone and primary flow zone. In the figure, b1 and b2 denote ... closer to the wall for the attractive spur dike. For case of the repelling spur dike, transverse.

  20. Two-phase flow instability and bifurcation analysis of inclined multiple uniformly heated channels - 15107

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mishra, A.M.; Paul, S.; Singh, S.; Panday, V.

    2015-01-01

    In this paper the two-phase flow instability analysis of multiple heated channels with various inclinations is studied. In addition, the bifurcation analysis is also carried out to capture the nonlinear dynamics of the system and to identify the regions in parameter space for which subcritical and supercritical bifurcations exist. In order to carry out the analysis, the system is mathematically represented by nonlinear Partial Differential Equation (PDE) for mass, momentum and energy in single as well as two-phase region. Then converted into Ordinary Differential Equation (ODE) using weighted residual method. Also, coupling equation is being used under the assumption that pressure drop in each channel is the same and the total mass flow rate is equal to sum of the individual mass flow rates. The homogeneous equilibrium model is used for the analysis. Stability Map is obtained in terms of phase change number (Npch) and Subcooling Number (Nsb) by solving a set of nonlinear, coupled algebraic equations obtained at equilibrium using Newton Raphson Method. MATLAB Code is verified by comparing it with results obtained by Matcont (Open source software) under same parametric values. Numerical simulations of the time-dependent, nonlinear ODEs are carried out for selected points in the operating parameter space to obtain the actual damped and growing oscillations in the channel inlet flow velocity which confirms the stability region across the stability map. Generalized Hopf (GH) points are observed for different inclinations, they are also points for subcritical and supercritical bifurcations. (authors)

  1. Experimental investigation of a coherent flute instability using a heavy ion beam probe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glowienka, J.C.; Jennings, W.C.; Hickok, R.L.

    1988-01-01

    A coherent, low-frequency instability found in a cylindrical, hollow cathode arc plasma has been investigated by using a heavy ion beam probe (HIBP). The energy density of the plasma was high enough to render it inaccessible to Langmuir probes, but the HIBP was able to provide measurements throughout the plasma cross section. The data clearly show that azimuthal symmetry does not exist. Radial profiles of steady-state density and space potential and of simultaneous n, phi amplitude and phase were obtained to allow detailed comparison between theory and experiment. Predictions from a cylindrically symmetric, small-perturbation theoretical model provide reasonably conclusive identification of the instability as a Kelvin--Helmholtz flute driven by and localized in a region of fluid shear. The most serious discrepancy was with regard to the oscillation frequency, which was consistently predicted to be three to four times lower than that observed experimentally. The reason for the discrepancy is not understood, but it is probably related to inadequacies in the theory caused by assumptions of azimuthal symmetry and of small linear perturbations

  2. Experimental measurement of fluid force coefficients for helical tube arrays in air cross flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shen Shifang; Liu Reilan

    1993-01-01

    A helical coil steam generator is extensively used in the High Temperature Gas Cooled Reactor (HTGCR) and Sodium Cooled Reactor (SCR) nuclear power stations because of its compact structure, good heat-exchange, and small volume. The experimental model is established by the structure parameter of 200MW HTGCR. The fluid elastic instability of helical tube arrays in air cross flow is studied in this experiment, and the fluid force coefficients of helical tube arrays having the same notational direction of two adjacent layers in air cross flow are obtained. As compared to the fluid force coefficients of cylinder tube arrays, the fluid force coefficients of helical tube arrays are smaller in the low velocity area, and greater in the high velocity area. The experimental results help the study of the dynamic characteristics of helical tube arrays in air cross flow

  3. Experimental design and instability analysis of coaxial electrospray process for microencapsulation of drugs and imaging agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Si, Ting; Zhang, Leilei; Li, Guangbin; Roberts, Cynthia J; Yin, Xiezhen; Xu, Ronald

    2013-07-01

    Recent developments in multimodal imaging and image-guided therapy requires multilayered microparticles that encapsulate several imaging and therapeutic agents in the same carrier. However, commonly used microencapsulation processes have multiple limitations such as low encapsulation efficiency and loss of bioactivity for the encapsulated biological cargos. To overcome these limitations, we have carried out both experimental and theoretical studies on coaxial electrospray of multilayered microparticles. On the experimental side, an improved coaxial electrospray setup has been developed. A customized coaxial needle assembly combined with two ring electrodes has been used to enhance the stability of the cone and widen the process parameter range of the stable cone-jet mode. With this assembly, we have obtained poly(lactide-co-glycolide) microparticles with fine morphology and uniform size distribution. On the theoretical side, an instability analysis of the coaxial electrified jet has been performed based on the experimental parameters. The effects of process parameters on the formation of different unstable modes have been studied. The reported experimental and theoretical research represents a significant step toward quantitative control and optimization of the coaxial electrospray process for microencapsulation of multiple drugs and imaging agents in multimodal imaging and image-guided therapy.

  4. Instability, Turbulence, and Enhanced Transport in Collisionless Black-Hole Accretion Flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunz, Matthew

    Many astrophysical plasmas are so hot and diffuse that the collisional mean free path is larger than the system size. Perhaps the best examples of such systems are lowluminosity accretion flows onto black holes such as Sgr A* at the center of our own Galaxy, or M87 in the Virgo cluster. To date, theoretical models of these accretion flows are based on magnetohydrodynamics (MHD), a collisional fluid theory, sometimes (but rarely) extended with non-MHD features such as anisotropic (i.e. magnetic-field-aligned) viscosity and thermal conduction. While these extensions have been recognized as crucial, they require ad hoc assumptions about the role of microscopic kinetic instabilities (namely, firehose and mirror) in regulating the transport properties. These assumptions strongly affect the outcome of the calculations, and yet they have never been tested using more fundamental (i.e. kinetic) models. This proposal outlines a comprehensive first-principles study of the plasma physics of collisionless accretion flows using both analytic and state-of-the-art numerical models. The latter will utilize a new hybrid-kinetic particle-in-cell code, Pegasus, developed by the PI and Co-I specifically to study this problem. A comprehensive kinetic study of the 3D saturation of the magnetorotational instability in a collisionless plasma will be performed, in order to understand the interplay between turbulence, transport, and Larmor-scale kinetic instabilities such as firehose and mirror. Whether such instabilities alter the macroscopic saturated state, for example by limiting the transport of angular momentum by anisotropic pressure, will be addressed. Using these results, an appropriate "fluid" closure will be developed that can capture the multi-scale effects of plasma kinetics on magnetorotational turbulence, for use by the astrophysics community in building evolutionary models of accretion disks. The PI has already successfully performed the first three-dimensional kinetic

  5. Coherent instabilities of proton beams in accelerators and storage rings - experimental results, diagnosis and cures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schnell, W.

    1977-01-01

    The author discusses diagnosis and cure of proton beam instabilities in accelerators and storage rings. Coasting beams and bunched beams are treated separately and both transverse and longitudinal instabilities are considered. (B.D.)

  6. Experimental observation of pulsating instability under acoustic field in downward-propagating flames at large Lewis number

    KAUST Repository

    Yoon, Sung Hwan

    2017-10-12

    According to previous theory, pulsating propagation in a premixed flame only appears when the reduced Lewis number, β(Le-1), is larger than a critical value (Sivashinsky criterion: 4(1 +3) ≈ 11), where β represents the Zel\\'dovich number (for general premixed flames, β ≈ 10), which requires Lewis number Le > 2.1. However, few experimental observation have been reported because the critical reduced Lewis number for the onset of pulsating instability is beyond what can be reached in experiments. Furthermore, the coupling with the unavoidable hydrodynamic instability limits the observation of pure pulsating instabilities in flames. Here, we describe a novel method to observe the pulsating instability. We utilize a thermoacoustic field caused by interaction between heat release and acoustic pressure fluctuations of the downward-propagating premixed flames in a tube to enhance conductive heat loss at the tube wall and radiative heat loss at the open end of the tube due to extended flame residence time by diminished flame surface area, i.e., flat flame. The thermoacoustic field allowed pure observation of the pulsating motion since the primary acoustic force suppressed the intrinsic hydrodynamic instability resulting from thermal expansion. By employing this method, we have provided new experimental observations of the pulsating instability for premixed flames. The Lewis number (i.e., Le ≈ 1.86) was less than the critical value suggested previously.

  7. Experimental and Numerical Investigation of Thermoacoustic Sources Related to High-Frequency Instabilities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mathieu Zellhuber

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Flame dynamics related to high-frequency instabilities in gas turbine combustors are investigated using experimental observations and numerical simulations. Two different combustor types are studied, a premix swirl combustor (experiment and a generic reheat combustor (simulation. In both cases, a very similar dynamic behaviour of the reaction zone is observed, with the appearance of transverse displacement and coherent flame wrinkling. From these observations, a model for the thermoacoustic feedback linked to transverse modes is proposed. The model splits heat release rate fluctuations into distinct contributions that are related to flame displacement and variations of the mass burning rate. The decomposition procedure is applied on the numerical data and successfully verified by comparing a reconstructed Rayleigh index with the directly computed value. It thus allows to quantify the relative importance of various feedback mechanisms for a given setup.

  8. Experimental study of the reversible behavior of modulational instability in optical fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Simaeys, Gaetan; Emplit, Philippe; Haelterman, Marc

    2002-03-01

    We report what is to our knowledge the first clear-cut experimental evidence of the reversibility of modulational instability in dispersive Kerr media. It was possible to perform this experiment with standard telecommunication fiber because we used a specially designed 550-ps square-pulse laser source based on the two-wavelength configuration of a nonlinear optical loop mirror. Our observations demonstrate that reversibility is due to well-balanced and synchronous energy transfer among a significant number of spectral wave components. These results provide what we believe is the first evidence, in the field of nonlinear optics, of the universal Fermi-Pasta-Ulam recurrence phenomenon that has been predicted for a large number of conservative nonlinear systems, including those described by a nonlinear Schrödinger equation that is relevant to the context of the present study.

  9. Potential flow model for the hydromagnetic Rayleigh--Taylor instability in cylindrical plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hwang, C.S.; Roderick, N.F.

    1987-01-01

    A potential flow model has been developed to study the linear behavior of the hydromagnetic equivalent of the Rayleigh--Taylor instability in imploding cylindrical plasmas. Ordinary differential equations are obtained for both (r,z) and (r,θ) disturbances. The model allows the study of the dynamic effects of the moving plasma on the development of the instability. The perturbation equations separate into a geometric part associated with the motion of the interface and a nongeometric part associated with the stability of the interface. In both planes the geometric part shows growth of perturbations for imploding plasmas. The surface is also unstable in both planes for plasmas being imploded by magnetic fields. Analytic solutions are obtained for constant acceleration. These show that the short wavelength perturbations that are most damaging in the (r,z) plane are not affected by the motion of the interface. In the (r,θ) plane the growth of longer wavelength disturbances is affected by the interface motion

  10. Comparison of analytic models of instability of rarefied gas flow in a channel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aksenova, Olga A. [St.-Petersburg State University, Department of Mathematics and Mechanics, 198504, Universitetskiy pr., 28, Peterhof, St.-Petersburg (Russian Federation); Khalidov, Iskander A. [St.-Petersburg State Polytechnic University, Department of Mathematics and Mechanics, 195251, Polytechnicheskaya ul., 29, St.-Petersburg (Russian Federation)

    2014-12-09

    Numerical and analytical results are compared concerning the limit properties of the trajectories, attractors and bifurcations of rarefied gas flows in channels. The cascade of bifurcations obtained in our previous analytical and numerical investigations is simulated numerically for different scattering functions V generalizing the ray-diffuse reflection of gas particles from the surface. The main purpose of numerical simulation by Monte Carlo method is the investigation of the properties of different analytic nonlinear dynamic systems corresponding to rarefied gas flow in a channel. The results are compared as well for the models suggested originally by R. N. Miroshin, as for the approximations considered for the first time or for studied in our subsequent papers. Analytical solutions we obtained earlier for the ray reflection which means only one determined velocity of scattered from the walls gas atoms, generally different from the specular reflection. The nonlinear iterative equation describing a rarefied gas flow in a long channel becomes unstable in some regions of corresponding parameters of V (it means the sensitivity to boundary conditions). The values of the parameters are found from analytical approximations in these regions. Numerical results show that the chaotic behavior of the nonlinear dynamic system corresponds to strange attractors and distinguishes clearly from Maxwellian distribution and from the equilibrium on the whole. In the regions of instability (as the dimension of the attractor increases) the search for a corresponding state requires a lot more computation time and a lot of data (the amount of data required increases exponentially with embedding dimension). Therefore the main complication in the computation is reducing as well the computing time as the amount of data to find a suitably close solution. To reduce the computing time our analytical results are applied. Flow conditions satisfying the requirements to the experiment are

  11. Whirling modes and parametric instabilities in the discrete Sine-Gordon equation: Experimental tests in Josephson rings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watanabe, S.; Strogatz, S.H.; van der Zant, H.S.J.; Orlando, T.P.

    1995-01-01

    We analyze the damped driven discrete sine-Gordon equation. For underdamped, highly discrete systems, we show that whirling periodic solutions undergo parametric instabilities at certain drive strengths. The theory predicts novel resonant steps in the current-voltage characteristics of discrete Josephson rings, occurring in the return path of the subgap region. We have observed these steps experimentally in a ring of 8 underdamped junctions. An unusual prediction, verified experimentally, is that such steps occur even if there are no vortices in the ring. Numerical simulations indicate that complex spatiotemporal behavior occurs past the onset of instability

  12. Plastic flow instability and multiple necking of Ti-6Al-4V during superplastic flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arieli, A.; Rosen, A.

    1976-01-01

    Stress-strain curves obtained at constant crosshead velocity tensile tests of Ti--6Al--4V sheets at different temperatures show different behavior. The flow stress does not decrease continuously, suggesting that necking occurs at various locations along the gauge length. Metallography showed regions of small, diffused necks. It is suggested that the superplasticity is related to the resistance to neck growth rather than the resistance to neck formation, and that neck formation/growth is controlled by the mutual action of strain hardening and strain rate sensitivity

  13. The Weakly Nonlinear Magnetorotational Instability in a Global, Cylindrical Taylor–Couette Flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clark, S. E. [Department of Astronomy, Columbia University, New York, NY 10027 (United States); Oishi, Jeffrey S., E-mail: seclark@astro.columbia.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Bates College, Lewiston, ME 04240 (United States)

    2017-05-20

    We conduct a global, weakly nonlinear analysis of the magnetorotational instability (MRI) in a Taylor–Couette flow. This is a multiscale, perturbative treatment of the nonideal, axisymmetric MRI near threshold, subject to realistic radial boundary conditions and cylindrical geometry. We analyze both the standard MRI, initialized by a constant vertical background magnetic field, and the helical MRI, with an azimuthal background field component. This is the first weakly nonlinear analysis of the MRI in a global Taylor–Couette geometry, as well as the first weakly nonlinear analysis of the helical MRI. We find that the evolution of the amplitude of the standard MRI is described by a real Ginzburg–Landau equation (GLE), whereas the amplitude of the helical MRI takes the form of a complex GLE. This suggests that the saturated state of the helical MRI may itself be unstable on long spatial and temporal scales.

  14. A probabilistic method for determining effluent temperature limits for flow instability for SRS reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hardy, B.J.; White, A.M.

    1990-06-01

    This manual describes the uncertainty analysis used to determine the effluent temperature limits for a Mark 22 charge in the Savannah River Site production reactors. The postulated accident scenario is a DEGB/LOCA resulting from a coolant pipe break at the plenum inlet accompanied by the safety rod failure described in the previous chapter. The analysis described in this manual is used to calculate the limits for the flow instability phase of the accident. For this phase of the accident, the limits criterion is that the Stanton number does not exceed 0.00455 [1]. The limits are determined for a specified 84% probability that the Stanton number will not exceed 0.00455 in any assembly in the core.

  15. A probabilistic method for determining effluent temperature limits for flow instability for SRS reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hardy, B.J.; White, A.M.

    1990-06-01

    This manual describes the uncertainty analysis used to determine the effluent temperature limits for a Mark 22 charge in the Savannah River Site production reactors. The postulated accident scenario is a DEGB/LOCA resulting from a coolant pipe break at the plenum inlet accompanied by the safety rod failure described in the previous chapter. The analysis described in this manual is used to calculate the limits for the flow instability phase of the accident. For this phase of the accident, the limits criterion is that the Stanton number does not exceed 0.00455 [1]. The limits are determined for a specified 84% probability that the Stanton number will not exceed 0.00455 in any assembly in the core

  16. Theoretical investigations on two-phase flow instability in parallel channels under axial non-uniform heating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu, Xiaodong; Wu, Yingwei; Zhou, Linglan; Tian, Wenxi; Su, Guanghui; Qiu, Suizheng; Zhang, Hong

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • We developed a model based on homogeneous flow model to analyze two-phase flow instability in parallel channels. • The influence of axial non-uniform heating on the system stability has been investigated. • Influences of various factors on system instability under cosine heat flux have been studied. • The system under top-peaked heat flux is the most stable system. - Abstract: Two-phase flow instability in parallel channels heated by axial non-uniform heat flux has been theoretically studied in this paper. The system control equations of parallel channels were established based on the homogeneous flow model in two-phase region. Semi-implicit finite-difference scheme and staggered mesh method were used to discretize the equations, and the difference equations were solved by chasing method. Cosine, bottom-peaked and top-peaked heat fluxes were used to study the influence of non-uniform heating on two-phase flow instability of the parallel channels system. The marginal stability boundaries (MSB) of parallel channels and three-dimensional instability spaces (or instability reefs) under different heat flux conditions have been obtained. Compared with axial uniform heating, axial non-uniform heating will affect the system stability. Cosine and bottom-peaked heat fluxes can destabilize the system stability in high inlet subcooling region, while the opposite effect can be found in low inlet subcooling region. However, top-peaked heat flux can enhance the system stability in the whole region. In addition, for cosine heat flux, increasing the system pressure or inlet resistance coefficient can strengthen the system stability, and increasing the heating power will destabilize the system stability. The influence of inlet subcooling number on the system stability is multi-valued under cosine heat flux

  17. Experimental study of fluid flow in the entrance of a sinusoidal channel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oviedo-Tolentino, F.; Romero-Mendez, R.; Hernandez-Guerrero, A.; Giron-Palomares, B.

    2008-01-01

    An experimental flow visualization study of the entrance section of channels formed with sinusoidal plates was made. The experiments were conducted in a water tunnel and a laser illuminated particle tracking was used as the technique of flow visualization. The geometric parameters of the plates were maintained constant while the distance between plates, phase angle, and the Reynolds number were varied during the experiments. The flow regimes that were found in the experiments are steady, unsteady and significantly-mixed flows. Instabilities of the flow first appear near the exit of the channel, and move closer to the inlet waves as the Reynolds number grows, but in the first wave from inlet the flow is always steady. The results show that, for all other parameters fixed, the Reynolds number at which unsteady flow first appears grows with the distance between plates. The phase angle that best promotes unsteady flow depends on the average distance between plates: for certain average distance between plates, there is a phase angle that best disturbs the flow. For the set of parameters used in this experiment, a channel with eight waves is sufficiently long and the flow features presented in the first eight waves of a longer channel will be similar to what was observed here

  18. Aerodynamic forces and galloping instability for a skewed elliptical cylinder in a flow at the critical Reynolds number

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma, Wenyong [Wind Engineering Research Center, Shijiazhuang Tiedao University, Shijiazhuang, Hebei 050043 (China); Liu, Qingkuan; Liu, Xiaobing [The Key Laboratory for Health Monitoring and Control of Large Structures, Hebei province, 050043 (China); Du, Xiaoqing, E-mail: ma@stdu.edu.cn, E-mail: dxq@shu.edu.cn [Department of Civil Engineering, Shanghai University, Shanghai, 200072 (China)

    2017-08-15

    The mechanism of large-amplitude aeroelastic vibrations of cylindrical bodies in the critical Reynolds number range are still unclear. This study concerns the aerodynamic forces acting on elliptical cylinders and the induced galloping instability resulting from skew flows (i.e., the direction of the flow is angled 0°–45° with respect to the central axis of the cylinder) for Reynolds numbers in the range of 37–235 k. The effects of the critical Reynolds number and the skew angle on the aerodynamic forces and the galloping instability are investigated with pressure wind tunnel tests. In all of the cases investigated in the present study, a sharp decrease in the lift coefficient with increasing angle of attack and a reduction in the drag coefficient at the critical Reynolds number could be responsible for the galloping instability. Variations in the torque coefficient leads to a torsional aerodynamic instability at the critical Reynolds number. Furthermore, the skew flow cause a critical flow state at lower Reynolds numbers. One possible reason for this behavior is that the longer effective cross section allows the flow to reattach. (paper)

  19. Study of flow instabilities in double-channel natural circulation boiling systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Durga Prasad, Gonella V.; Pandey, Manmohan; Pradhan, Santosh K.; Gupta, Satish K.

    2008-01-01

    Natural circulation boiling systems consisting of parallel channels can undergo different types of oscillations (in-phase or out-of-phase) depending on the geometric parameters and operating conditions. Disturbances in one channel affect the flow in other channels, which triggers thermal-hydraulic oscillations. In the present work, the modes of oscillation under different operating conditions and channel-to-channel interaction during power fluctuations and on-power refueling in a double-channel natural circulation boiling system are investigated. The system is modeled using a lumped parameter mathematical model and RELAP5/MOD3.4. Parametric studies are carried out for an equal-power double-channel system, at different operating conditions, with both the models, and the results are compared. Instabilities, non-linear oscillations, and effects of recirculation loop dynamics and geometric parameters on the mode of oscillations, are studied using the lumped model. The two channels oscillate out-of-phase in Type-I region, but in Type-II region, both the modes of oscillation are observed under different conditions. Channel-to-channel interaction and on-power refueling studies are carried out using the RELAP model. At high powers, disturbances in one channel significantly affect the stability of the other channel. During on-power refueling, a near-stagnation condition or low-velocity reverse flow can occur, the possibility of reverse flow being higher at lower pressures

  20. Experimental study of turbulent flows through pipe bends

    OpenAIRE

    Kalpakli, Athanasia

    2012-01-01

    This thesis deals with turbulent flows in 90 degree curved pipes of circular cross-section. The flow cases investigated experimentally are turbulent flow with and without an additional motion, swirling or pulsating, superposed on the primary flow. The aim is to investigate these complex flows in detail both in terms of statistical quantities as well as vortical structures that are apparent when curvature is present. Such a flow field can contain strong secondary flow in a plane normal to the ...

  1. Experimental and theoretical study on density wave instability in low quality natural circulation loop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jia, Hai Jun [Tsinghua Univ., Beijing, BJ (China); Song, Jin Ho [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1997-07-01

    A series of thermal-hydraulic experimental research has been performed at INET of Beijing University in two full scale test loops, HRTL-5 and HRTL-200 simulating the HR-5 and HR-200 district heating reactors. The homogeneous equilibrium flow model and the drift flux model are employed to analyze the flow in the HRTL-200 test loop. The frequency domain linear stability analysis program LINTAB has been developed based on the homogeneous equilibrium results from HRTL-200 test facility have been used to validate the LINTAB code. Analysis results using LINTAB showed a good agreement with the test results. (author). 20 refs., 24 figs.

  2. Experimental and theoretical study on density wave instability in low quality natural circulation loop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jia, Hai Jun; Song, Jin Ho

    1997-07-01

    A series of thermal-hydraulic experimental research has been performed at INET of Beijing University in two full scale test loops, HRTL-5 and HRTL-200 simulating the HR-5 and HR-200 district heating reactors. The homogeneous equilibrium flow model and the drift flux model are employed to analyze the flow in the HRTL-200 test loop. The frequency domain linear stability analysis program LINTAB has been developed based on the homogeneous equilibrium results from HRTL-200 test facility have been used to validate the LINTAB code. Analysis results using LINTAB showed a good agreement with the test results. (author). 20 refs., 24 figs

  3. Quasi-two-dimensional nonlinear evolution of helical magnetorotational instability in a magnetized Taylor-Couette flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mamatsashvili, G.; Stefani, F.; Guseva, A.; Avila, M.

    2018-01-01

    Magnetorotational instability (MRI) is one of the fundamental processes in astrophysics, driving angular momentum transport and mass accretion in a wide variety of cosmic objects. Despite much theoretical/numerical and experimental efforts over the last decades, its saturation mechanism and amplitude, which sets the angular momentum transport rate, remains not well understood, especially in the limit of high resistivity, or small magnetic Prandtl numbers typical to interiors (dead zones) of protoplanetary disks, liquid cores of planets and liquid metals in laboratory. Using direct numerical simulations, in this paper we investigate the nonlinear development and saturation properties of the helical magnetorotational instability (HMRI)—a relative of the standard MRI—in a magnetized Taylor-Couette flow at very low magnetic Prandtl number (correspondingly at low magnetic Reynolds number) relevant to liquid metals. For simplicity, the ratio of azimuthal field to axial field is kept fixed. From the linear theory of HMRI, it is known that the Elsasser number, or interaction parameter determines its growth rate and plays a special role in the dynamics. We show that this parameter is also important in the nonlinear problem. By increasing its value, a sudden transition from weakly nonlinear, where the system is slightly above the linear stability threshold, to strongly nonlinear, or turbulent regime occurs. We calculate the azimuthal and axial energy spectra corresponding to these two regimes and show that they differ qualitatively. Remarkably, the nonlinear state remains in all cases nearly axisymmetric suggesting that this HMRI-driven turbulence is quasi two-dimensional in nature. Although the contribution of non-axisymmetric modes increases moderately with the Elsasser number, their total energy remains much smaller than that of the axisymmetric ones.

  4. An experimental investigation of turbulent flow heat transfer through ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    An experimental investigation has been carried out to study the turbulent flow heat transfer and to determine the pressure drop characteristics of air, flowing through a tube with insert. An insert of special geometry is used inside the tube. The test section is electrically heated, and air is allowed to flow as the working fluid ...

  5. Base flow and exhaust plume interaction. Part 1 : Experimental study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schoones, M.M.J.; Bannink, W.J.

    1998-01-01

    An experimental study of the flow field along an axi-symmetric body with a single operating exhaust nozzle has been performed in the scope of an investigation on base flow-jet plume interactions. The structure of under-expanded jets in a co-flowing supersonic free stream was described using

  6. On Electromagnetic Modulation of Flow Instabilities, Mixing and Heat Transfer in Conducting and Magnetized Fluids

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kenjeres, S.

    2016-01-01

    In the present paper we give a concise review of some recent highlights of our research dealing with electromagnetic control of flow, mixing and heat transfer of electrically conductive or magnetized fluids. We apply a combination of state-of-art numerical (DNS and LES) and experimental (PIV and

  7. An experimental description of the flow in a centrifugal compressor from alternate stall to surge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moënne-Loccoz, V.; Trébinjac, I.; Benichou, E.; Goguey, S.; Paoletti, B.; Laucher, P.

    2017-08-01

    The present paper gives the experimental results obtained in a centrifugal compressor stage designed and built by SAFRAN Helicopter Engines. The compressor is composed of inlet guide vanes, a backswept splittered unshrouded impeller, a splittered vaned radial diffuser and axial outlet guide vanes. Previous numerical simulations revealed a particular S-shape pressure rise characteristic at partial rotation speed and predicted an alternate flow pattern in the vaned radial diffuser at low mass flow rate. This alternate flow pattern involves two adjacent vane passages. One passage exhibits very low momentum and a low pressure recovery, whereas the adjacent passage has very high momentum in the passage inlet and diffuses efficiently. Experimental measurements confirm the S-shape of the pressure rise characteristic even if the stability limit experimentally occurs at higher mass flow than numerically predicted. At low mass flow the alternate stall pattern is confirmed thanks to the data obtained by high-frequency pressure sensors. As the compressor is throttled the path to instability has been registered and a first scenario of the surge inception is given. The compressor first experiences a steady alternate stall in the diffuser. As the mass flow decreases, the alternate stall amplifies and triggers the mild surge in the vaned diffuser. An unsteady behavior results from the interaction of the alternate stall and the mild surge. Finally, when the pressure gradient becomes too strong, the alternate stall blows away and the compressor enters into deep surge.

  8. Investigation on the liquid water droplet instability in a simulated flow channel of PEM fuel cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ha, Tae Hun; Kim, Bok Yung; Kim, Han Sang; Min, Kyoung Doug

    2008-01-01

    To investigate the characteristics of water droplets on the gas diffusion layer from both top-view and side-view of the flow channel, a rig test apparatus was designed and fabricated with prism attached plate. This experimental device was used to simulate the growth of a single liquid water droplet and its transport process with various air flow velocity and channel height. Not only dry condition but also fully humidified condition was also simulated by using a water absorbing sponge. The detachment height of the water droplet with dry and wet conditions was measured and analyzed. It was found that the droplet tends towards becoming unstable by decreased channel height, increased flow velocity or making a gas diffusion layer (GDL) dryer. Also, peculiar behavior of the water droplet in the channel was presented like attachment to hydrophilic wall or sudden breaking of droplet in case of fully hydrated condition. The simplified force balance model matches with experimental data as well

  9. Effect of the boundary layer thickness on the hydrodynamic instabilities of coaxial atomization under harmonic flow rate and swirl ratio fluctuations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jorajuria, Corentin; Machicoane, Nathanael; Osuna, Rodrigo; Aliseda, Alberto

    2017-11-01

    Break-up of a liquid jet by a high speed coaxial gas jet is a frequently-used configuration to generate a high quality spray. Despite its extended use in engineering and natural processes, the instabilities that control the liquid droplet size and their spatio-temporal distribution in the spray are not completely understood. We present an experimental measurements of the near field in a canonical coaxial gas-liquid atomizer. The liquid Reynolds number is constant at 103, while the gas jet Reynolds number is varied from 104-106. The liquid injection rate and the swirl ratio are harmonically modulated to understand the effect of unsteadiness on the interfacial instability that triggers primary break-up. The gas velocity is measured using a combination of hot-wire anemometry and 3D PIV, resolving the gas boundary layer and the three-dimensionality of the flow, particularly in the cases with swirl. The development of the hydrodynamic instabilities on the liquid-gas interface is quantified using high speed visualizations at the exit of the nozzle and related to the frequency and growth rates predicted by stability analysis of this boundary layer flow. The resulting droplet size distribution is measured at the end of the break-up process via Particle Phase Doppler Anemometry and compared to stability analysis predictions statistics.

  10. Lateral movements in Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities due to frontiers. Experimental study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binda, L.; Fernández, D.; El Hasi, C.; Zalts, A.; D'Onofrio, A.

    2018-01-01

    Lateral movements of the fingers in Rayleigh-Taylor hydrodynamic instabilities at the interface between two fluids are studied. We show that transverse movements appear when a physical boundary is present; these phenomena have not been explained until now. The boundary prevents one of the fluids from crossing it. Such frontiers can be buoyancy driven as, for example, the frontier to the passage of a less dense solution through a denser solution or when different aggregation states coexist (liquid and gaseous phases). An experimental study of the lateral movement velocity of the fingers was performed for different Rayleigh numbers (Ra), and when oscillations were detected, their amplitudes were studied. Liquid-liquid (L-L) and gas-liquid (G-L) systems were analysed. Aqueous HCl and Bromocresol Green (sodium salt, NaBCG) solutions were used in L-L experiments, and CO2 (gas) and aqueous NaOH, NaHCO3, and CaCl2 solutions were employed for the G-L studies. We observed that the lateral movement of the fingers and finger collapses near the interface are more notorious when Ra increases. The consequences of this, for each experience, are a decrease in the number of fingers and an increase in the velocity of the lateral finger movement close to the interface as time evolves. We found that the amplitude of the oscillations did not vary significantly within the considered Ra range. These results have an important implication when determining the wave number of instabilities in an evolving system. The wave number could be strongly diminished if there is a boundary.

  11. Settling-driven gravitational instabilities associated with volcanic clouds: new insights from experimental investigations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scollo, Simona; Bonadonna, Costanza; Manzella, Irene

    2017-06-01

    Downward propagating instabilities are often observed at the bottom of volcanic plumes and clouds. These instabilities generate fingers that enhance the sedimentation of fine ash. Despite their potential influence on tephra dispersal and deposition, their dynamics is not entirely understood, undermining the accuracy of volcanic ash transport and dispersal models. Here, we present new laboratory experiments that investigate the effects of particle size, composition and concentration on finger generation and dynamics. The experimental set-up consists of a Plexiglas tank equipped with a removable plastic sheet that separates two different layers. The lower layer is a solution of water and sugar, initially denser than the upper layer, which consists of water and particles. Particles in the experiments include glass beads as well as andesitic, rhyolitic and basaltic volcanic ash. During the experiments, we removed the horizontal plastic sheet separating the two fluids. Particles were illuminated with a laser and filmed with a HD camera; particle image velocimetry (PIV) is used to analyse finger dynamics. Results show that both the number and the downward advance speed of fingers increase with particle concentration in the upper layer, while finger speed increases with particle size but is independent of particle composition. An increase in particle concentration and turbulence is estimated to take place inside the fingers, which could promote aggregation in subaerial fallout events. Finally, finger number, finger speed and particle concentration were observed to decrease with time after the formation of fingers. A similar pattern could occur in volcanic clouds when the mass supply from the eruptive vent is reduced. Observed evolution of the experiments through time also indicates that there must be a threshold of fine ash concentration and mass eruption rate below which fingers do not form; this is also confirmed by field observations.

  12. Experimental techniques for measuring Rayleigh-Taylor instability in inertial confinement fusion (ICF)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smalyuk, V A

    2012-06-07

    Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) instability is one of the major concerns in inertial confinement fusion (ICF) because it amplifies target modulations in both acceleration and deceleration phases of implosion, which leads to shell disruption and performance degradation of imploding targets. This article reviews experimental results of the RT growth experiments performed on OMEGA laser system, where targets were driven directly with laser light. RT instability was studied in the linear and nonlinear regimes. The experiments were performed in acceleration phase, using planar and spherical targets, and in deceleration phase of spherical implosions, using spherical shells. Initial target modulations consisted of 2-D pre-imposed modulations, and 2-D and 3-D modulations imprinted on targets by the non-uniformities in laser drive. In planar geometry, the nonlinear regime was studied using 3-D modulations with broadband spectra near nonlinear saturation levels. In acceleration-phase, the measured modulation Fourier spectra and nonlinear growth velocities are in good agreement with those predicted by Haan's model [Haan S W 1989 Phys. Rev. A 39 5812]. In a real-space analysis, the bubble merger was quantified by a self-similar evolution of bubble size distributions [Oron D et al 2001 Phys. Plasmas 8, 2883]. The 3-D, inner-surface modulations were measured to grow throughout the deceleration phase of spherical implosions. RT growth rates are very sensitive to the drive conditions, therefore they can be used to test and validate drive physics in hydrodynamic codes used to design ICF implosions. Measured growth rates of pre-imposed 2-D target modulations below nonlinear saturation levels were used to validate non-local thermal electron transport model in laser-driven experiments.

  13. Scaled Experimental Modeling of VHTR Plenum Flows

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    ICONE 15

    2007-04-01

    Abstract The Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) is the leading candidate for the Next Generation Nuclear Power (NGNP) Project in the U.S. which has the goal of demonstrating the production of emissions free electricity and hydrogen by 2015. Various scaled heated gas and water flow facilities were investigated for modeling VHTR upper and lower plenum flows during the decay heat portion of a pressurized conduction-cooldown scenario and for modeling thermal mixing and stratification (“thermal striping”) in the lower plenum during normal operation. It was concluded, based on phenomena scaling and instrumentation and other practical considerations, that a heated water flow scale model facility is preferable to a heated gas flow facility and to unheated facilities which use fluids with ranges of density to simulate the density effect of heating. For a heated water flow lower plenum model, both the Richardson numbers and Reynolds numbers may be approximately matched for conduction-cooldown natural circulation conditions. Thermal mixing during normal operation may be simulated but at lower, but still fully turbulent, Reynolds numbers than in the prototype. Natural circulation flows in the upper plenum may also be simulated in a separate heated water flow facility that uses the same plumbing as the lower plenum model. However, Reynolds number scaling distortions will occur at matching Richardson numbers due primarily to the necessity of using a reduced number of channels connected to the plenum than in the prototype (which has approximately 11,000 core channels connected to the upper plenum) in an otherwise geometrically scaled model. Experiments conducted in either or both facilities will meet the objectives of providing benchmark data for the validation of codes proposed for NGNP designs and safety studies, as well as providing a better understanding of the complex flow phenomena in the plenums.

  14. Linear and nonlinear development of m=0 instability in a diffuse Bennett Z-pinch equilibrium with sheared axial flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paraschiv, I.; Bauer, B. S.; Lindemuth, I. R.; Makhin, V.

    2010-01-01

    The effect of sheared axial flow on the Z-pinch sausage instability has been examined with two-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic simulations. Diffuse Bennett equilibria in the presence of axial flows with parabolic and linear radial profiles have been considered, and a detailed study of the linear and nonlinear development of small perturbations from these equilibria has been performed. The consequences of both single-wavelength and random-seed perturbations were calculated. It was found that sheared flows changed the internal m=0 mode development by reducing the linear growth rates, decreasing the saturation amplitude, and modifying the instability spectrum. High spatial frequency modes were stabilized to small amplitudes and only long wavelengths continued to grow. Full stability was obtained for supersonic plasma flows.

  15. Experimental studies of renal blood flow by digitized functional angiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buersch, J.H.; Ochs, C.; Hahne, H.J.; Heintzen, P.H.

    1985-01-01

    New techniques of digital image processing have been experimentally tested for the assessment of renal blood flow. The underlying principle in functional angiography is the extraction of flow parameters. Basically, density-time variations of the contrast medium are analayzed from to each picture element of a 256x256 matrix. The real-time acquisition rate of images was 25/sec. For the calculation of angiographic flow a PDP 11/40 computer was used to interactively perform a time dependent segmentation of the renal arteries and the aorta. Subsequently, volume flow was calculated in relative units for the specific vascular segments under study. 15 control angiograms were made in 5 animals with cardiac output ranging between 0.8 to 2.2l/min. Unilateral renal blood flow was calculated as 24+-3.4% of pre-renal aortic flow without systematic side differences. Reproducibility from repeated flow measurements showed an SD of +-1.8% of the individual pre-renal aortic flow. Renal flow was also measured in 3 animals with an experimentally created 50% flow reduction of the left kidney. Angiographic flow in the left renal artery dropped to 12+-2% of pre-renal flow. The present experimental data suggest that digital angiography has sufficient diagnostic capabilities for the detection of abnormal renal blood flow. The technique may serve as a useful diagnostic adjunct to conventional angiography and has the potential of assisting in the evaluation of renal vascular hypertension. (orig.) [de

  16. Taylor-Goertler instabilities of Tollmien-Schlichting waves and other flows governed by the interactive boundary-layer equations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Philip; Bennett, James

    1986-01-01

    The Taylor-Goertler vortex instability equations are formulated for steady and unsteady interacting boundary-layer flows. The effective Goertler number is shown to be a function of the wall shape in the boundary layer and the possibility of both steady and unsteady Taylor-Goertler modes exists. As an example the steady flow in a symmetrically constricted channel is considered and it is shown that unstable Goertler vortices exist before the boundary layers at the wall develop the Goldstein singularity discussed by Smith and Daniels (1981). As an example of an unsteady spatially varying basic state, it is considered the instability of high-frequency large-amplitude two- and three-dimensional Tollmien-Schlichting waves in a curved channel. It is shown that they are unstable in the first 'Stokes-layer stage' of the hierarchy of nonlinear states discussed by Smith and Burggraf (1985). This instability of Tollmien-Schlichting waves in an internal flow can occur in the presence of either convex or concave curvature. Some discussion of this instability in external flows is given.

  17. The influence of the friction coefficients, the power and the flowrate on the two-phase flow instabilities in natural circulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kerris, A.M.

    1987-04-01

    A study of non-linear effects of a two phases flow instabilities has been done using theoretical and experimental models. The experimental model is based on a boiling channel placed in a water loop of natural convection. Studies of stability, with introduction of fluctuations over different parameters, have been achieved using the two models. The results of the experimental model agree with those of the theoretical model. It was found that the head loss coefficients K I and K E of the inlet and outlet channel respectively, had an influence over the stability of the system. An increase in the former produces an increase in the stability while an increase in the latter has the effect of increasing the instability. In the experiment, oscillations of the flow rate were observed. Two types of oscillations were noticed: (1) small oscillations called pressure drop oscillations, (2) large oscillations called density wave oscillations. A study of the variation of these two types of oscillations with power and the coefficient K I and K E had been achieved. It was found that pressure drop oscillations disappeared with the increase of power and the density waves oscillations increased with the increase of power

  18. Instability of a binary liquid film flowing down a slippery heated plate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellaban, E.; Pascal, J. P.; D'Alessio, S. J. D.

    2017-09-01

    In this paper, we study the stability of a binary liquid film flowing down a heated slippery inclined surface. It is assumed that the heating induces concentration differences in the liquid mixture (Soret effect), which together with the differences in temperature affects the surface tension. A mathematical model is constructed by coupling the Navier-Stokes equations governing the flow with equations for the concentration and temperature. A Navier slip condition is applied at the liquid-solid interface. We carry out a linear stability analysis in order to obtain the critical conditions for the onset of instability. We use a Chebyshev spectral collocation method to obtain numerical solutions to the resulting Orr-Sommerfeld-type equations. We also obtain an asymptotic solution that yields an expression for the state of neutral stability of long perturbations as a function of the parameters controlling the problem. A weighted residual approximation is employed to derive a reduced model that is used to analyse the nonlinear effects. Good agreement between the linear stability analysis and nonlinear simulations provided by the weighted residual model is found.

  19. Experimental studies of rotating exchange flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabe, B.; Smeed, D. A.; Dalziel, S. B.; Lane-Serff, G. F.

    2007-02-01

    Ocean basins are connected by straits and passages, geometrically limiting important heat and salt exchanges which in turn influence the global thermohaline circulation and climate. Such exchange can be modeled in an idealized way by taking into consideration the density-driven two-layer flow along a strait under the influence of rotation. We use a laboratory model of a lock exchange between two reservoirs of different density through a flat-bottom channel with a horizontal narrows, set up on two different platforms: a 1 m diameter turntable, where density interface position was measured by dye attenuation, and the 14 m diameter turntable at Coriolis/LEGI (Grenoble, France), where correlation imaging velocimetry, a particle imaging technique, allowed us to obtain for the first time detailed measurements of the velocity fields in these flows. The influence of rotation is studied by varying a parameter, Bu, a type of Burger number given by the ratio of the Rossby radius to the channel width at the narrows. In addition, a two-layer version of the Miami Isopycnic Coordinate Model (MICOM) is used, to study the cases with low Burger number. Results from experiments by Dalziel [1988. Two-layer hydraulics: maximal exchange flows. Ph.D. Thesis, Department of Applied Mathematics and Theoretical Physics, University of Cambridge, see also people/sd103/papers/1988/Thesis_Dalziel.pdf>] are also included for comparison. Time-mean exchange fluxes for any Bu are in close agreement with the inviscid zero-potential vorticity theory of Dalziel [1990. Rotating two-layer sill flows. In: Pratt, L.J. (Ed.), The Physical Oceanography of Sea Straits. Kluwer Academic, Dordrecht, pp. 343-371] and Whitehead et al. [1974. Rotating hydraulics of strait and sill flows. Geophysical Fluid Dynamics 6, 101-125], who found that fluxes for Bu>1 mainly vary with channel width, similar to non-rotating flow, but for Bu1 a steady, two-layer flow was observed that persisted across the channel at the narrows

  20. Experimental observations of granular debris flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghilardi, P.

    2003-04-01

    Various tests are run using two different laboratory flumes with rectangular cross section and transparent walls. The grains used in a single experiment have an almost constant grain sizes; mean diameter ranges from 5 mm to 20 mm. In each test various measurements are taken: hydrograms, velocity distribution near the transparent walls and on the free surface, average flow concentration. Concentration values are measured taking samples. Velocity distributions are obtained from movies recorded by high speed video cameras capable of 350 frames per second; flow rates and depth hydrograms are computed from the same velocity distributions. A gate is installed at the beginning of one of the flumes; this gate slides normally to the bed and opens very quickly, reproducing a dam-break. Several tests are run using this device, varying channel slope, sediment concentration, initial mixture thickness before the gate. Velocity distribution in the flume is almost constant from left to right, except for the flow sections near the front. The observed discharges and velocities are less than those given by a classic dam break formula, and depend on sediment concentration. The other flume is fed by a mixture with constant discharge and concentration, and is mainly used for measuring velocity distributions when the flow is uniform, with both rigid and granular bed, and to study erosion/deposition processes near debris flow dams or other mitigation devices. The equilibrium slope of the granular bed is very close to that given by the classical equilibrium formulas for debris flow. Different deposition processes are observed depending on mixture concentration and channel geometry.

  1. Experimental Tests of Particle Flow Calorimetry

    CERN Document Server

    Sefkow, Felix; Kawagoe, Kiyotomo; Pöschl, Roman; Repond, José

    2016-01-01

    Precision physics at future colliders requires highly granular calorimeters to support the Particle Flow Approach for event reconstruction. This article presents a review of about 10 - 15 years of R\\&D, mainly conducted within the CALICE collaboration, for this novel type of detector. The performance of large scale prototypes in beam tests validate the technical concept of particle flow calorimeters. The comparison of test beam data with simulation, of e.g.\\ hadronic showers, supports full detector studies and gives deeper insight into the structure of hadronic cascades than was possible previously.

  2. Experimental tests of particle flow calorimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sefkow, Felix; White, Andy; Kawagoe, Kiyotomo; Poeschl, Roman; Repond, Jose

    2015-07-01

    Precision physics at future colliders requires highly granular calorimeters to support the Particle Flow Approach for event reconstruction. This article presents a review of about 10-15 years of R and D, mainly conducted within the CALICE collaboration, for this novel type of detector. The performance of large scale prototypes in beam tests validate the technical concept of particle flow calorimeters. The comparison of test beam data with simulation, of e.g. hadronic showers, supports full detector studies and gives deeper insight into the structure of hadronic cascades than was possible previously.

  3. Experimental study of the characteristics of the flow in the first rows of tube banks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olinto, Claudio R.; Indrusiak, Maria Luiza S.; Endres, Luiz Augusto M.; Moeller, Sergio V.

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents the experimental study of the flow instabilities in the first rows of tube banks. The study is performed using hot wire anemometry technique in an aerodynamic channel as well as flow visualizations in a water channel. In the wind channel three tube banks with square arrangement and pitch to diameter ratios P/D = 1.26, 1.4 and 1.6 were studied. The Reynolds number range for the velocities measurements, computed with the tube diameter and the flow velocity in the narrow gap between tubes was 7 x 10 4 -8 x 10 4 . Continuous and discrete wavelets were applied to decompose the velocity results, thus allowing the analysis of phenomena in time-frequency domain. Visualizations in a water channel complemented the analysis of the hot wire results. For this purpose, dye was injected in the flow in the water channel with a tube bank with P/D = 1.26. The range of the Reynolds number of the experiments was 3 x 10 4 -4 x 10 4 . The main results show the presence of instabilities, generated after the second row of the tube bank, which propagates to the interior of the bank. In the resulting flow, the three orthogonal components are equally significant. The three-dimensional behavior of the flow is responsible for a mass redistribution inside the bank that leads to velocity values not expected for the studied geometry, according to the known literature. The resulting flow process can be interpreted as a secondary flow which is characteristic of tube banks.

  4. Instability-induced ordering, universal unfolding and the role of gravity in granular Couette flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alam, Meheboob; Arakeri, V. H.; Nott, P. R.; Goddard, J. D.; Herrmann, H. J.

    2005-01-01

    Linear stability theory and bifurcation analysis are used to investigate the role of gravity in shear-band formation in granular Couette flow, considering a kinetic-theory rheological model. We show that the only possible state, at low shear rates, corresponds to a "plug" near the bottom wall, in which the particles are densely packed and the shear rate is close to zero, and a uniformly sheared dilute region above it. The origin of such plugged states is shown to be tied to the spontaneous symmetry-breaking instabilities of the gravity-free uniform shear flow, leading to the formation of ordered bands of alternating dilute and dense regions in the transverse direction, via an infinite hierarchy of pitchfork bifurcations. Gravity plays the role of an "imperfection", thus destroying the "perfect" bifurcation structure of uniform shear. The present bifurcation problem admits universal unfolding of pitchfork bifurcations which subsequently leads to the formation of a sequence of a countably infinite number of "isolas", with the solution structures being a modulated version of their gravity-free counterpart. While the solution with a plug near the bottom wall looks remarkably similar to the shear-banding phenomenon in dense slow granular Couette flows, a "floating" plug near the top wall is also a solution of these equations at high shear rates. A two-dimensional linear stability analysis suggests that these floating plugged states are unstable to long-wave travelling disturbances.The unique solution having a bottom plug can also be unstable to long waves, but remains stable at sufficiently low shear rates. The implications and realizability of the present results are discussed in the light of shear-cell experiments under "microgravity" conditions.

  5. Stationary solution of the Rayleigh-Taylor instability for spatially periodic flows: questions of uniqueness, dimensionality, and universality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abarzhi, S.I.

    1996-01-01

    The stationary solutions of the Rayleigh-Taylor instability for spatially periodic flows with general symmetry are investigated here for the first time. The existence of a set of stationary solutions is established. The question of its dimensionality in function space is resolved on the basis of an analysis of the symmetry of the initial perturbation. The interrelationship between the dimensionality of the solution set and the symmetry of the flow is found. The dimensionality of the solution set is established for flows invariant with respect to one of five symmorphic two-dimensional groups. The nonuniversal character of the set of stationary solutions of the Rayleigh-Taylor instability is demonstrated. For flows in a tube, on the contrary, universality of the solution set, along with its independence of the symmetry of the initial perturbation, is assumed. The problem of the free boundary in the Rayleigh-Taylor instability is solved in the first two approximations, and their convergence is investigated. The dependence of the velocity and Fourier harmonics on the parameters of the problem is found. Possible symmetry violations of the flow are analyzed. Limits to previously studied cases are investigated, and their accuracy is established. Questions of the stability of the solutions obtained and the possibility of a physically correct statement of the problem are discussed

  6. Complex networks from experimental horizontal oil–water flows: Community structure detection versus flow pattern discrimination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gao, Zhong-Ke; Fang, Peng-Cheng; Ding, Mei-Shuang; Yang, Dan; Jin, Ning-De

    2015-01-01

    We propose a complex network-based method to distinguish complex patterns arising from experimental horizontal oil–water two-phase flow. We first use the adaptive optimal kernel time–frequency representation (AOK TFR) to characterize flow pattern behaviors from the energy and frequency point of view. Then, we infer two-phase flow complex networks from experimental measurements and detect the community structures associated with flow patterns. The results suggest that the community detection in two-phase flow complex network allows objectively discriminating complex horizontal oil–water flow patterns, especially for the segregated and dispersed flow patterns, a task that existing method based on AOK TFR fails to work. - Highlights: • We combine time–frequency analysis and complex network to identify flow patterns. • We explore the transitional flow behaviors in terms of betweenness centrality. • Our analysis provides a novel way for recognizing complex flow patterns. • Broader applicability of our method is demonstrated and articulated

  7. Experimental Study of Flow Through Carotid Aneurysms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masoomi, Faezeh; Mejia-Alvarez, Ricardo

    2017-11-01

    There is evidence that traditional endovascular techniques like coiling are not effective for treatment of wide-neck cerebral aneurysms. Flow Diverter Stents (FDS) have emerged as promising devices for treating complex aneurysms since they enable treatment of aneurysms that were considered untreatable before. Recent studies suggest a number of associated risks with FDS, including in-stent thrombosis, perianeurysmal edema, delayed hemorrhage, and perforator occlusions. Chong et al. simulated hemodynamic behavior using patient-specific data. From their study, it is possible to infer that the standard deviation of energy loss could be a good predictor for intervention success. The aim of this study is to investigate the flow in models of cerebral aneurysms before and after FDS insertion using PIV. These models will be based on actual clinical studies and will be fabricated with advanced additive manufacturing techniques. These data will then be used to explore flow parameters that could inform the likelihood of post-intervention aneurysm rupture, and help determine FDS designs that better suit any particular patient before its procedure.

  8. Numerical simulation of cross-flow-induced fluidelastic vibration of tube arrays and comparison with experimental results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eisinger, F.L.; Rao, M.S.M.; Steininger, D.A.; Haslinger, K.H.

    1995-01-01

    Tube arrays exposed to air, gas or liquid cross-flow can vibrate due to vortex-shedding, turbulence, or fluidelastic instability. The major emphasis of this paper is on the phenomenon of fluidelastic instability (or fluidelastic vibration). A numerical model is applied to the simulation of fluidelastic vibration of representative tubes in a tube bundle, based on S. S. Chen's unsteady flow theory. The results are validated against published data based on linear cases. The model is then applied to a nonlinear structure of a U-bend tube bundle with clearances at supports, and the computed results compared to those obtained by experimental testing. The numerical studies were performed using the ABAQUS-EPGEN finite element code using a special subroutine incorporating fluidelastic forces. It is shown that the results of both the linear and nonlinear modeling are in good agreement with experimental data

  9. Experimental Setup For Study of Drop Deformation In Air Flow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Basalaev Sergey

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Experimental study for study of deformation of drops in air flow is considered. Experimental setup includes a module for obtaining the drops, an air flow system and measuring system. Module for formation of drops is in the form of vertically arranged dropper with capillary with the possibility of formation of fixed drops. Air flow supply system comprises an air pump coupled conduit through a regulating valve with a cylindrical pipe, installed coaxially with dropper. The measuring system includes the video camera located with possibility of visualization of drop and the Pitot gage for measurement of flow rate of air located in the output section of branch pipe. This experimental setup allows to provide reliable and informative results of the investigation of deformation of drops in the air flow.

  10. Modified ocean circulation, albedo instability and ice-flow instability. Risks of non-linear climate change

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ham, J. van; Beer, R.J. van; Builtjes, P.J.H.; Roemer, M.G.M. [TNO Inst. of Environmental Sciences, Delft (Netherlands); Koennen, G.P. [KNMI, Royal Netherlands Meteorological Inst., de Bilt (Netherlands); Oerlemans, J. [Utrecht Univ. (Netherlands). Inst. for Meteorological and Atmospheric Research

    1995-12-31

    In this presentation part of an investigation is described into risks for climate change which are presently not adequately covered in General Circulation Models. In the concept of climate change as a result of the enhanced greenhouse effect it is generally assumed that the radiative forcings from increased concentrations of greenhouse gases (GHG) will result in a proportional or quasilinear global warming. Though correlations of this kind are known from palaeoclimate research, the variability of the climate seems to prevent the direct proof of a causal relation between recent greenhouse gas concentrations and temperature observations. In order to resolve the issue the use of General Circulation Models (GCMs), though still inadequate at present, is indispensable. Around the world some 10 leading GCMs exist which have been the subject of evaluation and intercomparison in a number of studies. Their results are regularly assessed in the IPCC process. A discussion on their performance in simulating present or past climates and the causes of their weak points shows that the depiction of clouds is a major weakness of GCMs. A second element which is virtually absent in GCMs are the feedbacks from natural biogeochemical cycles. These cycles are influenced by man in a number of ways. GCMs have a limited performance in simulating regional effects on climate. Moreover, albedo instability, in part due to its interaction with cloudiness, is only roughly represented. Apparently, not all relevant processes have been included in the GCMs. That situation constitutes a risk, since it cannot be ruled out that a missing process could cause or trigger a non-linear climate change. In the study non-linear climate change is connected with those processes which could provide feedbacks with a risk for non-monotonous or discontinuous behaviour of the climate system, or which are unpredictable or could cause rapid transitions

  11. Modified ocean circulation, albedo instability and ice-flow instability. Risks of non-linear climate change

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ham, J van; Beer, R.J. van; Builtjes, P J.H.; Roemer, M G.M. [TNO Inst. of Environmental Sciences, Delft (Netherlands); Koennen, G P [KNMI, Royal Netherlands Meteorological Inst., de Bilt (Netherlands); Oerlemans, J [Utrecht Univ. (Netherlands). Inst. for Meteorological and Atmospheric Research

    1996-12-31

    In this presentation part of an investigation is described into risks for climate change which are presently not adequately covered in General Circulation Models. In the concept of climate change as a result of the enhanced greenhouse effect it is generally assumed that the radiative forcings from increased concentrations of greenhouse gases (GHG) will result in a proportional or quasilinear global warming. Though correlations of this kind are known from palaeoclimate research, the variability of the climate seems to prevent the direct proof of a causal relation between recent greenhouse gas concentrations and temperature observations. In order to resolve the issue the use of General Circulation Models (GCMs), though still inadequate at present, is indispensable. Around the world some 10 leading GCMs exist which have been the subject of evaluation and intercomparison in a number of studies. Their results are regularly assessed in the IPCC process. A discussion on their performance in simulating present or past climates and the causes of their weak points shows that the depiction of clouds is a major weakness of GCMs. A second element which is virtually absent in GCMs are the feedbacks from natural biogeochemical cycles. These cycles are influenced by man in a number of ways. GCMs have a limited performance in simulating regional effects on climate. Moreover, albedo instability, in part due to its interaction with cloudiness, is only roughly represented. Apparently, not all relevant processes have been included in the GCMs. That situation constitutes a risk, since it cannot be ruled out that a missing process could cause or trigger a non-linear climate change. In the study non-linear climate change is connected with those processes which could provide feedbacks with a risk for non-monotonous or discontinuous behaviour of the climate system, or which are unpredictable or could cause rapid transitions

  12. Flow past an axially aligned spinning cylinder: Experimental Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlucci, Pasquale; Buckley, Liam; Mehmedagic, Igbal; Carlucci, Donald; Thangam, Siva

    2017-11-01

    Experimental investigation of flow past a spinning cylinder is presented in the context of its application and relevance to flow past projectiles. A subsonic wind tunnel is used to perform experiments on the flow past a spinning cylinder that is mounted on a forward sting and oriented such that its axis of rotation is aligned with the mean flow. The experiments cover a Reynolds number of range of up to 45000 and rotation numbers of up to 2 (based on cylinder diameter). Time-averaged mean flow and turbulence profiles in the wake flow are presented with and without spin along with comparison to published experimental data. Funded in part by the U. S. Army ARDEC, Picatinny Arsenal, NJ.

  13. Regional blood flow in experimental myositis ossificans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hierton, C.

    1983-01-01

    In a recent model for heterotopic bone formation, muscular oedema, swelling and necrosis is seen in the quadriceps muscle of rabbit hind limbs immobilized for at least 2 weeks when, from the second week, the immobilized limb is subjected to dayly forcible mobilization lasting about 5 min. According to this model, heterotopic calcification develops gradually from the second week of forcible mobilization and is located in the vastus intermedius region. Between the fourth and fifth week of immobilization and forcible mobilization, heterotopic bone formation is seen in virtually all cases. The histological findings are similar to those in human ectopic bone formation. In the present investigation the labelled microsphere technique was used to study the regional blood flow effects in the early development of myositis ossificans with this model. The results are quite different from those reported by other investigators on immobilization alone and point to a causal relation between regional blood flow and forcible mobilization of the immobilized rabbit hind limp. Prostaglandins as mediators between the traumatic inflammation, a part of the circulatory effects observed and the induction of a new bone is suggested. (author)

  14. Physical interpretation of geysering phenomena and periodic boiling instability at low flows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duffey, R.B.; Rohatgi, U.S.

    1996-01-01

    Over 30 years ago, Griffith showed that unstable and periodic initial boiling occurred in stagnant liquids in heated pipes coupled to a cooler or condensing plenum volume. This was called ''geysering'', and is a similar phenomenon to the rapid nucleation and voiding observed in tubes filled with superheated liquid. It is also called ''bumping'' when non-uniformly heated water or a chemical suddenly boils in laboratory glassware. In engineering, the stability and predictability has importance to the onset of bulk boiling in a natural and forced circulation loops. The latest available data show the observed stability and periodicity of the onset of boiling flow when there is a plenum, multiple heated channels, and a sustained subcooling in a circulating loop. We examine the available data, both old and new, and develop a new theory to illustrate the simple physics causing the observed periodicity of the flow. We examine the validity of the theory by comparison to all the geysering data, and develop a useful and simple correlation. We illustrate the equivalence of the onset of geysering to the onset of static instability in subcooled boiling. We also derive the stability boundary for geysering, utilizing turbulent transport analysis to determine the effects of pressure and other key parameters. This new result explains the greater stability region observed at higher pressures. The paper builds on the 30 years of quite independent thermal hydraulic work that is still fresh and useful today. We discuss the physical interpretation of geysering onset with a consistent theory, and show where refinements would be useful to the data correlations

  15. Experimental study on flow pattern transitions for inclined two-phase flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwak, Nam Yee; Lee, Jae Young [Handong Univ., Pohang (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Man Woong [Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-07-01

    In this paper, experimental data on flow pattern transition of inclination angles from 0-90 are presented. A test section is constructed 2 mm long and I.D 1inch using transparent material. The test section is supported by aluminum frame that can be placed with any arbitrary inclined angles. The air-water two-phase flow is observed at room temperature and atmospheric condition using both high speed camera and void impedance meter. The signal is sampled with sampling rate 1kHz and is analyzed under fully-developed condition. Based on experimental data, flow pattern maps are made for various inclination angles. As increasing the inclination angels from 0 to 90, the flow pattern transitions on the plane jg-jf are changed, such as stratified flow to plug flow or slug flow or plug flow to bubbly flow. The transition lines between pattern regimes are moved or sometimes disappeared due to its inclined angle.

  16. Surfactant induced flows in thin liquid films : an experimental study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sinz, D.K.N.

    2012-01-01

    The topic of the experimental work summarized in my thesis is the flow in thin liquid films induced by non-uniformly distributed surfactants. The flow dynamics as a consequence of the deposition of a droplet of an insoluble surfactant onto a thin liquid film covering a solid substrate where

  17. Theory, simulation, and experimental studies of zonal flows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hahm, T. S.; Burrell, K.H.; Lin, Z.; Nazikian, R.; Synakowski, E.J.

    2000-01-01

    The authors report on current theoretical understanding of the characteristics of self-generated zonal flows as observed in nonlinear gyrokinetic simulations of toroidal ITG turbulence [Science 281, 1835 (1998)], and discuss various possibilities for experimental measurements of signature of zonal flows

  18. Asymptotic behavior of the mixed mass in Rayleigh–Taylor and Richtmyer–Meshkov instability induced flows

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Ye; Cabot, William H. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); Thornber, Ben [The University of Sydney, School of Aerospace, Mechanical and Mechatronic Engineering, New South Wales 2006, Sydney (Australia)

    2016-05-15

    Rayleigh–Taylor instability (RTI) and Richtmyer–Meshkov instability (RMI) are serious practical issues in inertial confinement fusion research, and also have relevance to many cases of astrophysical fluid dynamics. So far, much of the attention has been paid to the late-time scaling of the mixed width, which is used as a surrogate to how well the fluids have been mixed. Yet, the actual amount of mixed mass could be viewed as a more direct indicator on the evolution of the mixing layers due to hydrodynamic instabilities. Despite its importance, there is no systematic study as yet on the scaling of the mixed mass for either the RTI or the RMI induced flow. In this article, the normalized mixed mass (Ψ) is introduced for measuring the efficiency of the mixed mass. Six large numerical simulation databases have been employed: the RTI cases with heavy-to-light fluid density ratios of 1.5, 3, and 9; the single shock RMI cases with density ratios of 3 and 20; and a reshock RMI case with density ratio of 3. Using simulated flow fields, the normalized mixed mass Ψ is shown to be more sensitive in discriminating the variation with Atwood number for the RTI flows. Moreover, Ψ is demonstrated to provide more consistent results for both the RTI and RMI flows when compared with the traditional mixedness parameters, Ξ and Θ.

  19. Fluid-elastic instability in tube arrays subjected to air-water and steam-water cross-flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitra, D.; Dhir, V. K.; Catton, I.

    2009-10-01

    Flow induced vibrations in heat exchanger tubes have led to numerous accidents and economic losses in the past. Efforts have been made to systematically study the cause of these vibrations and develop remedial design criteria for their avoidance. In this research, experiments were systematically carried out with air-water and steam-water cross-flow over horizontal tubes. A normal square tube array of pitch-to-diameter ratio of 1.4 was used in the experiments. The tubes were suspended from piano wires and strain gauges were used to measure the vibrations. Tubes made of aluminum; stainless steel and brass were systematically tested by maintaining approximately the same stiffness in the tube-wire systems. Instability was clearly seen in single phase and two-phase flow and the critical flow velocity was found to be proportional to tube mass. The present study shows that fully flexible arrays become unstable at a lower flow velocity when compared to a single flexible tube surrounded by rigid tubes. It is also found that tubes are more stable in steam-water flow as compared to air-water flow. Nucleate boiling on the tube surface is also found to have a stabilizing effect on fluid-elastic instability.

  20. Classical and ablative Richtmyer-Meshkov instability and other ICF-relevant plasma flows diagnosed with monochromatic x-ray imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aglitskiy, Y; Metzler, N; Karasik, M; Velikovich, A L; Zalesak, S T; Schmitt, A J; Serlin, V; Weaver, J; Obenschain, S P; Gardner, J H

    2008-01-01

    In inertial confinement fusion (ICF) and high-energy density physics (HEDP), the most important manifestations of the hydrodynamic instabilities and other mixing processes involve lateral motion of the accelerated plasmas. In order to understand the experimental observations and to advance the numerical simulation codes to the point of predictive capability, it is critically important to accurately diagnose the motion of the dense plasma mass. The most advanced diagnostic technique recently developed for this purpose is the monochromatic x-ray imaging that combines large field of view with high contrast, high spatial resolution and large throughput, ensuring high temporal resolution at large magnification. Its application made it possible for the experimentalists to observe for the first time important hydrodynamic effects that trigger compressible turbulent mixing in laser targets, such as ablative Richtmyer-Meshkov (RM) instability, feedout, interaction of an RM-unstable interface with shock and rarefaction waves. It also helped to substantially improve the accuracy of diagnosing many other important plasma flows, ranging from laser-produced jets to electromagnetically driven wires in a Z-pinch, and to test various methods suggested for mitigation of the Rayleigh-Taylor instability. We will review the results obtained with the aid of this technique in ICF-HEDP studies at the Naval Research Laboratory and the prospects of its future applications.

  1. Numerical and Experimental Study of Pump Sump Flows

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei-Liang Chuang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The present study analyzes pump sump flows with various discharges and gate submergence. Investigations using a three-dimensional large eddy simulation model and an acoustic Doppler velocimeter are performed. Flow patterns and velocity profiles in the approaching flow are shown to describe the flow features caused by various discharges and gate submergence. The variation of a large-scale spanwise vortex behind a sluice gate is examined and discussed. The suction effect on approaching flow near the pipe column is examined using numerical modeling. To gain more understanding of the vortices variation, a comparison between time-averaged and instantaneous flow patterns is numerically conducted. Additionally, swirl angle, a widely used index for evaluating pump efficiency, is experimentally and numerically examined under various flow conditions. The results indicate that the pump becomes less efficient with increasing discharge and gate submergence. The fluctuation of the free surface over the pump sump is also discussed.

  2. Experimental Investigation of Hypersonic Flow and Plasma Aerodynamic Actuation Interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun Quan; Cheng Bangqin; Li Yinghong; Cui Wei; Yu Yonggui; Jie Junhun

    2013-01-01

    For hypersonic flow, it was found that the most effective plasma actuator is derived from an electromagnetic perturbation. An experimental study was performed between hypersonic flow and plasma aerodynamic actuation interaction in a hypersonic shock tunnel, in which a Mach number of 7 was reached. The plasma discharging characteristic was acquired in static flows. In a hypersonic flow, the flow field can affect the plasma discharging characteristics. DC discharging without magnetic force is unstable, and the discharge channel cannot be maintained. When there is a magnetic field, the energy consumption of the plasma source is approximately three to four times larger than that without a magnetic field, and at the same time plasma discharge can also affect the hypersonic flow field. Through schlieren pictures and pressure measurement, it was found that plasma discharging could induce shockwaves and change the total pressure and wall pressure of the flow field

  3. Experimental modeling of swirl flows in power plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shtork, S. I.; Litvinov, I. V.; Gesheva, E. S.; Tsoy, M. A.; Skripkin, S. G.

    2018-03-01

    The article presents an overview of the methods and approaches to experimental modeling of various thermal and hydropower units - furnaces of pulverized coal boilers and flow-through elements of hydro turbines. The presented modeling approaches based on a combination of experimentation and rapid prototyping of working parts may be useful in optimizing energy equipment to improve safety and efficiency of industrial energy systems.

  4. Experimental evidences of modulational instability of Langmuir waves excited by an electron beam in a plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karfidov, D.M.; Alves, M.V.; Prado, F. do; Ueda, M.

    1993-01-01

    The results obtained in a beam plasma interaction experiment are reported. The experiment and the wave energy growth and saturation are governed by kinetic effects. The estimation of the maximum wave energy due to the warm beam quasi-linear diffusion process gives W r ≥ (κ o λ D ) 2 , indicating that the modulational instability can be the responsible mechanism for the suppression of the beam plasma instability observed in the experiment. (author)

  5. Disproportionate entrance length in superfluid flows and the puzzle of counterflow instabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertolaccini, J.; Lévêque, E.; Roche, P.-E.

    2017-12-01

    Systematic simulations of the two-fluid model of superfluid helium (He-II) encompassing the Hall-Vinen-Bekharevich-Khalatnikov (HVBK) mutual coupling have been performed in two-dimensional pipe counterflows between 1.3 and 1.96 K. The numerical scheme relies on the lattice Boltzmann method. A Boussinesq-like hypothesis is introduced to omit temperature variations along the pipe. In return, the thermomechanical forcings of the normal and superfuid components are fueled by a pressure term related to their mass-density variations under an approximation of weak compressibility. This modeling framework reproduces the essential features of a thermally driven counterflow. A generalized definition of the entrance length is introduced to suitably compare entry effects (of different nature) at opposite ends of the pipe. This definition is related to the excess of pressure loss with respect to the developed Poiseuille-flow solution. At the heated end of the pipe, it is found that the entrance length for the normal fluid follows a classical law and increases linearly with the Reynolds number. At the cooled end, the entrance length for the superfluid is enhanced as compared to the normal fluid by up to one order of magnitude. At this end, the normal fluid flows into the cooling bath of He-II and produces large-scale superfluid vortical motions in the bath that partly re-enter the pipe along its sidewalls before being damped by mutual friction. In the superfluid entry region, the resulting frictional coupling in the superfluid boundary layer distorts the velocity profiles toward tail flattening for the normal fluid and tail raising for the superfluid. Eventually, a simple analytical model of entry effects allows us to re-examine the long-debated thresholds of T 1 and T 2 instabilities in superfluid counterflows. Inconsistencies in the T 1 thresholds reported since the 1960s disappear if an aspect-ratio criterion based on our modeling is used to discard data sets with the

  6. Experimental study of the influence of flow passage subtle variation on mixed-flow pump performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bing, Hao; Cao, Shuliang

    2014-05-01

    In the mixed-flow pump design, the shape of the flow passage can directly affect the flow capacity and the internal flow, thus influencing hydraulic performance, cavitation performance and operation stability of the mixed-flow pump. However, there is currently a lack of experimental research on the influence mechanism. Therefore, in order to analyze the effects of subtle variations of the flow passage on the mixed-flow pump performance, the frustum cone surface of the end part of inlet contraction flow passage of the mixed-flow pump is processed into a cylindrical surface and a test rig is built to carry out the hydraulic performance experiment. In this experiment, parameters, such as the head, the efficiency, and the shaft power, are measured, and the pressure fluctuation and the noise signal are also collected. The research results suggest that after processing the inlet flow passage, the head of the mixed-flow pump significantly goes down; the best efficiency of the mixed-flow pump drops by approximately 1.5%, the efficiency decreases more significantly under the large flow rate; the shaft power slightly increases under the large flow rate, slightly decreases under the small flow rate. In addition, the pressure fluctuation amplitudes on both the impeller inlet and the diffuser outlet increase significantly with more drastic pressure fluctuations and significantly lower stability of the internal flow of the mixed-flow pump. At the same time, the noise dramatically increases. Overall speaking, the subtle variation of the inlet flow passage leads to a significant change of the mixed-flow pump performance, thus suggesting a special attention to the optimization of flow passage. This paper investigates the influence of the flow passage variation on the mixed-flow pump performance by experiment, which will benefit the optimal design of the flow passage of the mixed-flow pump.

  7. Role of the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability in the evolution of magnetized relativistic sheared plasma flows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamlin, Nathaniel D; Newman, William I

    2013-04-01

    We explore, via analytical and numerical methods, the Kelvin-Helmholtz (KH) instability in relativistic magnetized plasmas, with applications to astrophysical jets. We solve the single-fluid relativistic magnetohydrodynamic (RMHD) equations in conservative form using a scheme which is fourth order in space and time. To recover the primitive RMHD variables, we use a highly accurate, rapidly convergent algorithm which improves upon such schemes as the Newton-Raphson method. Although the exact RMHD equations are marginally stable, numerical discretization renders them unstable. We include numerical viscosity to restore numerical stability. In relativistic flows, diffusion can lead to a mathematical anomaly associated with frame transformations. However, in our KH studies, we remain in the rest frame of the system, and therefore do not encounter this anomaly. We use a two-dimensional slab geometry with periodic boundary conditions in both directions. The initial unperturbed velocity peaks along the central axis and vanishes asymptotically at the transverse boundaries. Remaining unperturbed quantities are uniform, with a flow-aligned unperturbed magnetic field. The early evolution in the nonlinear regime corresponds to the formation of counter-rotating vortices, connected by filaments, which persist in the absence of a magnetic field. A magnetic field inhibits the vortices through a series of stages, namely, field amplification, vortex disruption, turbulent breakdown, and an approach to a flow-aligned equilibrium configuration. Similar stages have been discussed in MHD literature. We examine how and to what extent these stages manifest in RMHD for a set of representative field strengths. To characterize field strength, we define a relativistic extension of the Alfvénic Mach number M(A). We observe close complementarity between flow and magnetic field behavior. Weaker fields exhibit more vortex rotation, magnetic reconnection, jet broadening, and intermediate turbulence

  8. Experimental study on flow pattern and heat transfer of inverted annular flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takenaka, Nobuyuki; Akagawa, Koji; Fujii, Terushige; Nishida, Koji

    1990-01-01

    Experimental results are presented on flow pattern and heat transfer in the regions from inverted annular flow to dispersed flow in a vertical tube using freon R-113 as a working fluid at atmospheric pressure to discuss the correspondence between them. Axial distributions of heat transfer coefficient are measured and flow patterns are observed. The heat transfer characteristics are divided into three regions and a heat transfer characteristics map is proposed. The flow pattern changes from inverted annular flow (IAF) to dispersed flow (DF) through inverted slug flow (ISF) for lower inlet velocities and through agitated inverted annular flow (AIAF) for higher inlet velocities. A flow pattern map is obtained which corresponds well with the heat transfer characteristic map. (orig.)

  9. Experimental measurements of the cavitating flow after horizontal water entry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nguyen, Thang Tat; Thai, Nguyen Quang; Phuong, Truong Thi [Institute of Mechanics (IMECH), Vietnam Academy of Science and Technology (VAST), 264—Doi Can, Ba Dinh, Hanoi (Viet Nam); Hai, Duong Ngoc, E-mail: ntthang@imech.vast.vn, E-mail: dnhai@vast.vn, E-mail: nqthai@imech.vast.vn, E-mail: ttphuong@imech.vast.vn [Graduate University of Science and Technology (GUST), VAST, 18—Hoang Quoc Viet, Cau Giay, Hanoi (Viet Nam)

    2017-10-15

    Water-entry cavitating flow is of considerable importance in underwater high-speed applications. That is because of the drag-reduction effect that concerns the presence of a cavity around moving objects. Though the study of the flow has long been carried out, little data are documented in literature so far. Besides, currently, in the case of unsteady flow, experimental measurements of some flow parameters such as the cavity pressure still encounter difficulties. Hence continuing research efforts are of important significance. The objective of this study is to investigate experimentally the unsteady cavitating flow after the horizontal water entry of projectiles. An experimental apparatus has been developed. Qualitative and quantitative optical visualizations of the flow have been carried out by using high-speed videography. Digital image processing has been applied to analyzing the recorded flow images. Based on the known correlations between the ellipsoidal super-cavity’s size and the corresponding cavitation number, the cavity pressure has been measured by utilizing the data of image processing. A comparison between the partial- and super-cavitating flow regimes is reported. The received results can be useful for the design of high-speed underwater projectiles. (paper)

  10. Experimental study of flow through compressor Cascade

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satyam Panchal

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this research work is to study the behaviour of flow at the inlet, within the blade passage and at the exit of a compressor cascade. For this purpose, a cascade with six numbers of aerofoil blades was designed and constructed. The cascade was fitted on the cascade test tunnel. Out of six blades two were instrumented for measuring the pressure distribution on the pressure and suction surface. The blades had a parabolic camber line, with a maximum camber position at 40% of the chord from the leading edge of the blade. The profile of the blade was C4, height of the blade was 160 mm, chord length was 80 mm, camber angle was 45° and stagger angle was 30°. Similarly, the length of the cascade was 300 mm, span was 160 mm, pitch was 60 mm, the actual chord of the cascade was 80 mm, the axial chord of the cascade was 70 mm, the stagger angle of the cascade was 30° and the pitch-chord ratio was 0.75. The data was taken and analyzed at −500% of the axial chord before the cascade, −25% of the axial chord before the leading edge, 25%, 50%, 75% and 150% of the axial chord from the leading edge of the blade. The readings were taken from the cascade wall to the mid span position along the pitch wise direction. The angle of incidence was also changed during the experiment and varied from i=−50°, −30°, −10° to 5°.

  11. Experimental Identification of the Kink Instability as a Poloidal Flux Amplification Mechanism for Coaxial Gun Spheromak Formation

    OpenAIRE

    Hsu, S. C.; Bellan, P. M.

    2003-01-01

    The magnetohydrodynamic kink instability is observed and identified experimentally as a poloidal flux amplification mechanism for coaxial gun spheromak formation. Plasmas in this experiment fall into three distinct regimes which depend on the peak gun current to magnetic flux ratio, with (I) low values resulting in a straight plasma column with helical magnetic field, (II) intermediate values leading to kinking of the column axis, and (III) high values leading immediately to a detached plasma...

  12. Fluid-Elastic Instability of U-Tube Bundle in Air-Water Two-Phase Flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chu, In Cheol; Lee, Chang Hee; Yun, Young Jung; Chung, Heung June

    2007-03-01

    Using steam generator U-tube flow-induced vibration test facility, the flow-induced vibration characteristics of U-tube in row 34-44 and line 71-77 were investigated. Air and water at room temperature and near atmospheric pressure were used as working fluids. In the present experiments, followings were evaluated under two-phase cross-flow condition: the fundamental vibration responses and the critical gap velocity for a fluid-elastic instability of U-tubes, the damping ratio and hydrodynamic mass of U-tubes. In addition, the fluid-elastic instability factor, K, was preliminary assessed using Connors' relation. In the case of the U-tubes which are not supported by partial egg-crate in OPR100 steam generator, it has been found that the vibration displacement of those U-tubes are highly possible to exceed the design limit even by a turbulent excitation mechanism. The damping ratio of U-tubes measured in the present experiments was significantly higher than the OPR1000 steam generator design value. The fluid-elastic instability factor of U-tube bundle obtained in the present experiments were preliminary evaluated to be mostly in the range of 6.5-10.5

  13. Experimental research on the structural instability mechanism and the effect of multi-echelon support of deep roadways in a kilometre-deep well.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rui Peng

    Full Text Available We study the structural instability mechanism and effect of a multi-echelon support in very-deep roadways. We conduct a scale model test for analysing the structural failure mechanism and the effect of multi-echelon support of roadways under high horizontal stress. Mechanical bearing structures are classified according to their secondary stress distribution and the strength degradation of the surrounding rock after roadway excavation. A new method is proposed by partitioning the mechanical bearing structure of the surrounding rock into weak, key and main coupling bearing stratums. In the surrounding rock, the main bearing stratum is the plastic reshaping and flowing area. The weak bearing stratum is the peeling layer or the caving part. And the key bearing stratum is the shearing and yielding area. The structural fracture mechanism of roadways is considered in analysing the bearing structure instability of the surrounding rock, and multi-echelon support that considers the structural characteristics of roadway bearings is proposed. Results of the experimental study indicate that horizontal pressure seriously influences the stability of the surrounding rock, as indicated by extension of the weak bearing area and the transfer of the main and key bearing zones. The falling roof, rib spalling, and floor heave indicate the decline of the bearing capacity of surrounding rock, thereby causing roadway structural instability. Multi-echelon support is proposed according to the mechanical bearing structure of the surrounding rock without support. The redesigned support can reduce the scope of the weak bearing area and limit the transfer of the main and key bearing areas. Consequently, kilometre-deep roadway disasters, such as wedge roof caving, floor heave, and rib spalling, can be avoided to a certain degree, and plastic flow in the surrounding rock is relieved. The adverse effect of horizontal stress on the vault, spandrel and arch foot decreases. The

  14. Numerical and Experimental Investigation of Turbulent Transport Control via Shaping of Radial Plasma Flow Profiles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gilmore, Mark Allen

    2017-01-01

    Turbulence, and turbulence-driven transport are ubiquitous in magnetically confined plasmas, where there is an intimate relationship between turbulence, transport, instability driving mechanisms (such as gradients), plasma flows, and flow shear. Though many of the detailed physics of the interrelationship between turbulence, transport, drive mechanisms, and flow remain unclear, there have been many demonstrations that transport and/or turbulence can be suppressed or reduced via manipulations of plasma flow profiles. This is well known in magnetic fusion plasmas [e.g., high confinement mode (H-mode) and internal transport barriers (ITB's)], and has also been demonstrated in laboratory plasmas. However, it may be that the levels of particle transport obtained in such cases [e.g. H-mode, ITB's] are actually lower than is desirable for a practical fusion device. Ideally, one would be able to actively feedback control the turbulent transport, via manipulation of the flow profiles. The purpose of this research was to investigate the feasibility of using both advanced model-based control algorithms, as well as non-model-based algorithms, to control cross-field turbulence-driven particle transport through appropriate manipulation of radial plasma flow profiles. The University of New Mexico was responsible for the experimental portion of the project, while our collaborators at the University of Montana provided plasma transport modeling, and collaborators at Lehigh University developed and explored control methods.

  15. Numerical and Experimental Investigation of Turbulent Transport Control via Shaping of Radial Plasma Flow Profiles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gilmore, Mark Allen [Univ. of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2017-02-05

    Turbulence, and turbulence-driven transport are ubiquitous in magnetically confined plasmas, where there is an intimate relationship between turbulence, transport, instability driving mechanisms (such as gradients), plasma flows, and flow shear. Though many of the detailed physics of the interrelationship between turbulence, transport, drive mechanisms, and flow remain unclear, there have been many demonstrations that transport and/or turbulence can be suppressed or reduced via manipulations of plasma flow profiles. This is well known in magnetic fusion plasmas [e.g., high confinement mode (H-mode) and internal transport barriers (ITB’s)], and has also been demonstrated in laboratory plasmas. However, it may be that the levels of particle transport obtained in such cases [e.g. H-mode, ITB’s] are actually lower than is desirable for a practical fusion device. Ideally, one would be able to actively feedback control the turbulent transport, via manipulation of the flow profiles. The purpose of this research was to investigate the feasibility of using both advanced model-based control algorithms, as well as non-model-based algorithms, to control cross-field turbulence-driven particle transport through appropriate manipulation of radial plasma flow profiles. The University of New Mexico was responsible for the experimental portion of the project, while our collaborators at the University of Montana provided plasma transport modeling, and collaborators at Lehigh University developed and explored control methods.

  16. Modeling of two-phase flow instabilities during startup transients utilizing RAMONA-4B methodology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paniagua, J.; Rohatgi, U.S.; Prasad, V.

    1996-01-01

    RAMONA-4B code is currently under development for simulating thermal hydraulic instabilities that can occur in Boiling Water Reactors (BWRs) and the Simplified Boiling Water Reactor (SBWR). As one of the missions of RAMONA-4B is to simulate SBWR startup transients, where geysering or condensation-induced instability may be encountered, the code needs to be assessed for this application. This paper outlines the results of the assessments of the current version of RAMONA-4B and the modifications necessary for simulating the geysering or condensation-induced instability. The test selected for assessment are the geysering tests performed by Prof Aritomi (1993)

  17. Focal ischaemia caused by instability of cerebrovascular tone during attacks of hemiplegic migraine. A regional cerebral blood flow study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Friberg, L; Olsen, T S; Roland, P E

    1987-01-01

    During the course of hemiplegic migraine in 3 patients, changes in regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) were recorded by the intracarotid 133Xe method and a 254 multidetector camera covering one hemisphere. The rCBF measurements were performed in conjunction with cerebral angiography. During...... the patients developed transient motor and/or sensory deficits and subsequently severe headache. No signs of arterial occlusion were found. In the over and underperfused regions blood flow fluctuated rapidly because of instability of cerebrovascular tone, defined as transient constriction of the smallest...

  18. An Experimental and numerical Study for squeezing flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nathan, Rungun; Lang, Ji; Wu, Qianhong; Vucbmss Team

    2017-11-01

    We report an experimental and numerical study to examine the transient squeezing flow driven by sudden external impacts. The phenomenon is widely observed in industrial applications, e.g. squeeze dampers, or in biological systems, i.e. joints lubrication. However, there is a lack of investigation that captures the transient flow feature during the process. An experimental setup was developed that contains a piston instrumented with a laser displacement sensor and a pressure transducer. The heavy piston was released from rest, creating a fast compaction on the thin fluid gap underneath. The motion of the piston and the fluid pressure build-up was recorded. For this dynamic process, a CFD simulation was performed which shows excellent agreement with the experimental data. Both the numerical and experimental results show that, the squeezing flow starts with the inviscid limit when the viscous fluid effect has no time to appear, and thereafter becomes a developing flow, in which the inviscid core flow region decreases and the viscous wall region increases until the entire fluid gap is filled with viscous fluid flow. The study presented herein, filling the gap in the literature, will have broad impacts in industrial and biomedical applications. This research was supported by the National Science Foundation under Award 1511096, and supported by the Seed Grant from The Villanova Center for the Advancement of Sustainability in Engineering (VCASE).

  19. Experimental investigation of flooding in air-water counter-current flow with a vertical adiabatic multi-rod bundle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chung, Bub Dong; Kim, Hho Jung; Cha, Jong Hee; Cho, Sung Jae; Chun, Moon Hyun

    1991-01-01

    The process of flooding phenomenon in a vertical adiabatic 3 x 3 tube bundle flow channel has been studied experimentally. A series of tests was performed, using three types of tube bundle differing only in the number of spacer grids attached, to investigate the effects of spacer grids and multi-flow channel interactions on the air-water counter-current flow limitations. Experimentally determined flooding points at various water film Reynolds numbers for three different test sections are presented in graphical form and compared with entrainment criterion for co-current flow and instability criteria. In addition, empirical flooding correlations of the Kutateladze type are obtained for each type of test section using liquid penetration data

  20. On Electromagnetic Modulation of Flow Instabilities, Mixing and Heat Transfer in Conducting and Magnetized Fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenjeres, S.

    2016-09-01

    In the present paper we give a concise review of some recent highlights of our research dealing with electromagnetic control of flow, mixing and heat transfer of electrically conductive or magnetized fluids. We apply a combination of state-of-art numerical (DNS and LES) and experimental (PIV and LIF) techniques to provide fundamental insights into the complex phenomena of interactions between imposed (or induced) electromagnetic fields and underlying fluid flow. Our analysis covers an extensive range of working fluids, i.e. weakly- and highly-electrically-conductive, as well as magnetized fluids. These interactions are defined through the presence of different types of body forces acting per volume of fluid. A fully closed system of governing equations containing an extended set of the Navier-Stokes and a simplified set of the Maxwell equations is presented. The four characteristic examples are selected: the electromagnetic control of self-sustained jet oscillations, the electromagnetic enhancement of heat transfer in thermal convection, the wake interactions behind magnetic obstacles and finally, the thermo-magnetic convection in differentially heated cubical enclosure. The comparative assessment between experimental and numerical results is presented. It is concluded that generally good agreement between simulations and experiments is obtained for all cases considered, proving the concept of electromagnetic modulation, which can be used in numerous technological applications.

  1. Nonlinear Rayleigh–Taylor instability of the cylindrical fluid flow with ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2016-07-07

    –Helmholtz instability problems in plane geometry. The linear stability analy- sis of a liquid–vapour interface (liquid as viscous and motionless and vapour as inviscid) moving with a hori- zontal velocity is studied in [5].

  2. The effect of shear flow and the density gradient on the Weibel instability growth rate in the dense plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amininasab, S.; Sadighi-Bonabi, R.; Khodadadi Azadboni, F.

    2018-02-01

    Shear stress effect has been often neglected in calculation of the Weibel instability growth rate in laser-plasma interactions. In the present work, the role of the shear stress in the Weibel instability growth rate in the dense plasma with density gradient is explored. By increasing the density gradient, the shear stress threshold is increasing and the range of the propagation angles of growing modes is limited. Therefore, by increasing steps of the density gradient plasma near the relativistic electron beam-emitting region, the Weibel instability occurs at a higher stress flow. Calculations show that the minimum value of the stress rate threshold for linear polarization is greater than that of circular polarization. The Wiebel instability growth rate for linear polarization is 18.3 times circular polarization. One sees that for increasing stress and density gradient effects, there are smaller maximal growth rates for the range of the propagation angles of growing modes /π 2 propagation angles of growing modes /π 2 < θ m i n < π and /3 π 2 < θ m i n < 2 π in circular polarized plasma.

  3. Secondary instability in drift wave turbulence as a mechanism for avalanche and zonal flow formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diamond, P.H.; Champeaux, S.; Malkov, M.

    2001-01-01

    We report on recent developments in the theory of secondary instability in drift-ITG turbulence. Specifically, we explore secondary instability as a mechanism for avalanche formation. A theory of radially extended streamer cell formation and self-regulation is presented. Aspects of streamer structure and dynamics are used to estimate the variance of the drift-wave induced flux. The relation between streamer cell structures and the avalanche concept is discussed, as are the implications of our results for transport modeling. (author)

  4. Experimental validation of an ultrasonic flowmeter for unsteady flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leontidis, V.; Cuvier, C.; Caignaert, G.; Dupont, P.; Roussette, O.; Fammery, S.; Nivet, P.; Dazin, A.

    2018-04-01

    An ultrasonic flowmeter was developed for further applications in cryogenic conditions and for measuring flow rate fluctuations in the range of 0 to 70 Hz. The prototype was installed in a flow test rig, and was validated experimentally both in steady and unsteady water flow conditions. A Coriolis flowmeter was used for the calibration under steady state conditions, whereas in the unsteady case the validation was done simultaneously against two methods: particle image velocimetry (PIV), and with pressure transducers installed flush on the wall of the pipe. The results show that the developed flowmeter and the proposed methodology can accurately measure the frequency and amplitude of unsteady fluctuations in the experimental range of 0-9 l s-1 of the mean main flow rate and 0-70 Hz of the imposed disturbances.

  5. An Experimental Study of Natural Circulation in a Loop with Parallel Flow Test Sections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mathisen, R.P.; Eklind, O.

    1965-10-01

    The dynamic behaviour of a natural circulation loop parallel round duct channels has been studied. The test sections were both electrically heated and the power distribution was uniform along the 4300 mm heated length of the 20 mm dia. channels. The inter channel interference and the threshold of flow instability were obtained by using a dynamically calibrated flowmeter in each channel. The pressure was 50 bars and the sub-cooling 6 deg C. The main parameters varied, were the flow restrictions in the one-phase and two-phase sections. The instability data were correlated to the resistance coefficients due to these restrictions. Theoretical calculations for parallel channels in natural circulation have been compared with the experimental results. For the conditions determined by the above mentioned magnitudes, the steady-state computations are in excellent agreement with experiment. The transients are also nearly similar, except for the resonance frequency which for the theoretical case is higher by an amount between 0.3 and 0.5 c.p.s

  6. An Experimental Study of Natural Circulation in a Loop with Parallel Flow Test Sections

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mathisen, R P; Eklind, O

    1965-10-15

    The dynamic behaviour of a natural circulation loop parallel round duct channels has been studied. The test sections were both electrically heated and the power distribution was uniform along the 4300 mm heated length of the 20 mm dia. channels. The inter channel interference and the threshold of flow instability were obtained by using a dynamically calibrated flowmeter in each channel. The pressure was 50 bars and the sub-cooling 6 deg C. The main parameters varied, were the flow restrictions in the one-phase and two-phase sections. The instability data were correlated to the resistance coefficients due to these restrictions. Theoretical calculations for parallel channels in natural circulation have been compared with the experimental results. For the conditions determined by the above mentioned magnitudes, the steady-state computations are in excellent agreement with experiment. The transients are also nearly similar, except for the resonance frequency which for the theoretical case is higher by an amount between 0.3 and 0.5 c.p.s.

  7. Experimental research on intraocular aqueous flow by PIV method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Hongyu; Song, Hongfang; Mei, Xi; Li, Lin; Fu, Xineng; Zhang, Mindi; Liu, Zhicheng

    2013-10-21

    Aqueous humor flows regularly from posterior chamber to anterior chamber, and this flow much involves intraocular pressure, the eye tissue nutrition and metabolism. To visualize and measure the intraocular flow regular pattern of aqueous humor. Intraocular flow in the vitro eyeball is driven to simulate the physiological aqueous humor flow, and the flow field is measured by Particle Image Velocimetry(PIV). Fluorescent particle solution of a certain concentration was infused into the root of Posterior Chamber(PC) of vitro rabbit eye to simulate the generation of aqueous and was drained out at a certain hydrostatic pressure from the angle of Anterior Chamber(AC) to represent the drainage of aqueous. PIV method was used to record and calculate the flow on the midsagittal plane of the eyeball. Velocity vector distribution in AC has been obtained, and the distribution shows symmetry feature to some extent. Fluorescent particle solution first fills the PC as it is continuously infused, then surges into AC through the pupil, flows upwards toward the central cornea, reflecting and scattering, and eventually converges along the inner cornea surface towards the outflow points at the periphery of the eyeball. Velocity values around the pupillary margin are within the range of 0.008-0.012 m/s, which are close to theoretical values of 0.0133 m/s, under the driving rate of 100 μl/min. Flow field of aqueous humor can be measured by PIV method, which makes it possible to study the aqueous humor dynamics by experimental method. Our study provides a basis for experimental research on aqueous humor flow; further, it possibly helps to diagnose and treat eye diseases as shear force damage of ocular tissues and destructions on corneal endothelial cells from the point of intraocular flow field.

  8. Experimental investigation on cavitating flow shedding over an axisymmetric blunt body

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Changli; Wang, Guoyu; Huang, Biao

    2015-03-01

    Nowadays, most researchers focus on the cavity shedding mechanisms of unsteady cavitating flows over different objects, such as 2D/3D hydrofoils, venturi-type section, axisymmetric bodies with different headforms, and so on. But few of them pay attention to the differences of cavity shedding modality under different cavitation numbers in unsteady cavitating flows over the same object. In the present study, two kinds of shedding patterns are investigated experimentally. A high speed camera system is used to observe the cavitating flows over an axisymmetric blunt body and the velocity fields are measured by a particle image velocimetry (PIV) technique in a water tunnel for different cavitation conditions. The U-type cavitating vortex shedding is observed in unsteady cavitating flows. When the cavitation number is 0.7, there is a large scale cavity rolling up and shedding, which cause the instability and dramatic fluctuation of the flows, while at cavitation number of 0.6, the detached cavities can be conjunct with the attached part to induce the break-off behavior again at the tail of the attached cavity, as a result, the final shedding is in the form of small scale cavity and keeps a relatively steady flow field. It is also found that the interaction between the re-entrant flow and the attached cavity plays an important role in the unsteady cavity shedding modality. When the attached cavity scale is insufficient to overcome the re-entrant flow, it deserves the large cavity rolling up and shedding just as that at cavitation number of 0.7. Otherwise, the re-entrant flow is defeated by large enough cavity to induce the cavity-combined process and small scale cavity vortexes shedding just as that of the cavitation number of 0.6. This research shows the details of two different cavity shedding modalities which is worthful and meaningful for the further study of unsteady cavitation.

  9. Predicted and experimental steady and unsteady transonic flows about a biconvex airfoil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levy, L. L., Jr.

    1981-01-01

    Results of computer code time dependent solutions of the two dimensional compressible Navier-Stokes equations and the results of independent experiments are compared to verify the Mach number range for instabilities in the transonic flow field about a 14 percent thick biconvex airfoil at an angle of attack of 0 deg and a Reynolds number of 7 million. The experiments were conducted in a transonic, slotted wall wind tunnel. The computer code included an algebraic eddy viscosity turbulence model developed for steady flows, and all computations were made using free flight boundary conditions. All of the features documented experimentally for both steady and unsteady flows were predicted qualitatively; even with the above simplifications, the predictions were, on the whole, in good quantitative agreement with experiment. In particular, predicted time histories of shock wave position, surface pressures, lift, and pitching moment were found to be in very good agreement with experiment for an unsteady flow. Depending upon the free stream Mach number for steady flows, the surface pressure downstream of the shock wave or the shock wave location was not well predicted.

  10. Review of two-phase instabilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Han Ok; Seo, Han Ok; Kang, Hyung Suk; Cho, Bong Hyun; Lee, Doo Jeong

    1997-06-01

    KAERI is carrying out a development of the design for a new type of integral reactors. The once-through helical steam generator is important design features. The study on designs and operating conditions which prevent flow instability should precede the introduction of one-through steam generator. Experiments are currently scheduled to understand two-phase instability, evaluate the effect of each design parameter on the critical point, and determine proper inlet throttling for the prevention of instability. This report covers general two-phase instability with review of existing studies on this topics. The general classification of two phase flow instability and the characteristics of each type of instability are first described. Special attention is paid to BWR core flow instability and once-through steam generator instability. The reactivity feedback and the effect of system parameters are treated mainly for BWR. With relation to once-through steam generators, the characteristics of convective heating and dryout point oscillation are first investigated and then the existing experimental studies are summarized. Finally chapter summarized the proposed correlations for instability boundary conditions. (author). 231 refs., 5 tabs., 47 figs

  11. Experimental overview on flow observables in heavy ion collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mohapatra, Soumya, E-mail: soumya@cern.ch

    2016-12-15

    This paper summarizes the experimental results on flow phenomena that were presented at Quark matter 2015, with a focus on new flow observables and correlations in small systems. The results presented include event-shape selected p{sub T} spectra and v{sub n} measurements, correlations between flow harmonics of different orders, study of factorization breakdown in two-particle correlations, and principal component analysis of two-particle correlations. Recent developments in investigation of collective effects in small collisions systems, namely, p+A, d+A and {sup 3}He + A as well as in pp collisions are also presented.

  12. Experimental investigation of transverse flow estimation using transverse oscillation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Udesen, Jesper; Jensen, Jørgen Arendt

    2003-01-01

    Conventional ultrasound scanners can only display the blood velocity component parallel to the ultrasound beam. Introducing a laterally oscillating field gives signals from which the transverse velocity component can be estimated using 2:1 parallel receive beamformers. To yield the performance...... perpendicular to the ultrasound beam. The velocity profile of the blood is parabolic, and the speed of the blood in the center of the vessel is 1.1 m/s. An extended autocorrelation algorithm is used for velocity estimation for 310 trials, each containing 32 beamformed signals. The velocity can be estimated.......0% and the relative mean standard deviation is found to be 9.8%. With the Compuflow 1000 programmable flow pump a color flow mode image is produced of the experimental setup for a parabolic flow. Also the flow of the human femoralis is reproduced and it is found that the characteristics of the flow can be estimated....

  13. Experimental investigation on a high subsonic compressor cascade flow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Haideng

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available With the aim of deepening the understanding of high-speed compressor cascade flow, this paper reports an experimental study on NACA-65 K48 compressor cascade with high subsonic inlet flow. With the increase of passage pressurizing ability, endwall boundary layer behavior is deteriorated, and the transition zone is extended from suction surface to the endwall as the adverse pressure gradient increases. Cross flow from endwall to midspan, mixing of corner boundary layer and the main stream, and reversal flow on the suction surface are caused by corner separation vortex structures. Passage vortex is the main corner separation vortex. During its movement downstream, the size grows bigger while the rotating direction changes, forming a limiting circle. With higher incidence, corner separation is further deteriorated, leading to higher flow loss. Meanwhile, corner separation structure, flow mixing characteristics and flow loss distribution vary a lot with the change of incidence. Compared with low aspect-ratio model, corner separation of high aspect-ratio model moves away from the endwall and is more sufficiently developed downstream the cascade. Results obtained present details of high-speed compressor cascade flow, which is rare in the relating research fields and is beneficial to mechanism analysis, aerodynamic optimization and flow control design.

  14. Flutter instability of cantilevered carbon nanotubes caused by magnetic fluid flow subjected to a longitudinal magnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadeghi-Goughari, Moslem; Jeon, Soo; Kwon, Hyock-Ju

    2018-04-01

    CNT (Carbon nanotube)-based fluidic systems hold a great potential for emerging medical applications such as drug delivery for cancer therapy. CNTs can be used to deliver anticancer drugs into a target site under a magnetic field guidance. One of the critical issues in designing such systems is how to avoid the vibration induced by the fluid flow, which is undesirable and may even promote the structural instability. The main objective of the present research is to develop a fluid structure interaction (FSI) model to investigate the flutter instability of a cantilevered CNT induced by a magnetic fluid flow under a longitudinal magnetic field. The CNT is assumed to be embedded in a viscoelastic matrix to consider the effect of biological medium around it. To obtain a dynamical model for the system, the Navier-Stokes theory of magnetic-fluid flow is coupled to the Euler-Bernoulli beam model for CNT. The small size effects of the magnetic fluid and CNT are considered through the small scale parameters including Knudsen number (Kn) and the nonlocal parameter. Then, the extended Galerkin's method is applied to solve the FSI governing equations, and to derive the stability diagrams of the system. Results show how the magnetic properties of the fluid flow have an effect on improving the stability of the cantilevered CNT by increasing the flutter velocity.

  15. Experimental and numerical investigations on flashing-induced instabilities in a single channel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marcel, Christian P.; Rohde, M.; Van Der Hagen, T.H.J.J. [Department of Physics of Nuclear Reactors, Delft University of Technology (TUDelft), Delft, 2629 JB (Netherlands)

    2009-11-15

    During the start-up phase, natural circulation BWRs (NC-BWRs) need to be operated at low pressure conditions. Such conditions favor flashing-induced instabilities due to the large hydrostatic pressure drop induced by the tall chimney. Moreover, in novel NC-BWR designs the steam separation is performed in the steam separators which create large pressure drops at the chimney outlet, which effect on stability has not been investigated yet. In this work, flashing-induced oscillations occurring in a tall, bottom heated channel are numerically investigated by using a simple linear model with three regions and an accurate implementation for estimating the water properties. The model is used to investigate flashing-induced instabilities in a channel for different values of the core inlet friction value. The results are compared with experiments obtained by using the CIRCUS facility at the same conditions, showing a good agreement. In addition, the experiments on flashing-induced instabilities are presented in a novel manner allowing visualizing new details of the phenomenon numerical stability investigations on the effect of the friction distribution are also done. It is found that by increasing the total restriction in the channel the system is destabilized. In addition, the chimney outlet restriction has a stronger destabilizing effect than the core inlet restriction. A stable two-phase region is observed prior to the instabilities in the experiments and the numerical simulations which may help to pressurize the vessel of NC-BWRs and thus reducing the effects of flashing instabilities during start-up. (author)

  16. Experimental Investigation of a Helicopter Rotor Hub Flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reich, David

    The rotor hub system is by far the largest contributor to helicopter parasite drag and a barrier to increasing helicopter forward-flight speed and range. Additionally, the hub sheds undesirable vibration- and instability-inducing unsteady flow over the empennage. The challenges associated with rotor hub flows are discussed, including bluff body drag, interactional aerodynamics, and the effect of the turbulent hub wake on the helicopter empennage. This study was conducted in three phases to quantify model-scale rotor hub flows in water tunnels at The Pennsylvania State University Applied research lab. The first phase investigated scaling and component interaction effects on a 1:17 scale rotor hub model in the 12-inch diameter water tunnel. Effects of Reynolds number, advance ratio, and hub geometry configuration on the drag and wake shed from the rotor hub were quantified using load cell measurements and particle-image velocimetry (PIV). The second phase focused on flow visualization and measurement on a rotor hub and rotor hub/pylon geometry in the 12-inch diameter water tunnel. Stereo PIV was conducted in a cross plane downstream of the hub and flow visualization was conducted using oil paint and fluorescent dye. The third phase concentrated on high accuracy load measurement and prediction up to full-scale Reynolds number on a 1:4.25 scale model in the 48-inch diameter water tunnel. Measurements include 6 degree of freedom loads on the hub and two-component laser-Doppler velocimetry in the wake. Finally, results and conclusions are discussed, followed by recommendations for future investigations.

  17. Nonequilibrium chemical instabilities in continuous flow stirred tank reactors: The effect of stirring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horsthemke, W.; Hannon, L.

    1984-01-01

    We present a stochastic model for stirred chemical reactors. In the limiting case of practical interest, i.e., fast stirring, we solve for the characteristic function in steady state and derive expressions for the stationary moments through a perturbation expansion. Moments are explicitly calculated for a generic model of bistable behavior. We find that stirring decreases the area of the bistable region essentially by changing the point of transition from the high reaction rate state to the low reaction rate state. This is in remarkable agreement with the experimental findings of Roux, et al. Our results indicate that stirring should not be considered simply as an ''enhanced diffusion'' process and that nucleation plays only a minor role in transitions between multiple steady states in a continuous flow stirred tank reactor (CSTR)

  18. Steady flow instability in an annulus with deflectors at rotational vibration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kozlov, Nikolai V [Lab. Vibrational Hydromechanics, Perm State-Humanitarian Pedagogical University 24 Sibirskaya av., 614990 Perm (Russian Federation); Pareau, Dominique; Stambouli, Moncef [Lab. Chemical Engineering, CentraleSupélec-Université Paris Saclay, Grande Voie des Vignes, 92295 Châtenay-Malabry (France); Ivantsov, Andrey, E-mail: kozlov.n@icmm.ru [Lab. Computational Hydrodynamics Institute of Continuous Media Mechanics UB RAS1 Acad. Korolev st., 614013 Perm (Russian Federation)

    2016-12-15

    Experimental study and direct numerical simulation of the dynamics of an isothermal low-viscosity fluid are done in a coaxial gap of a cylindrical container making rotational vibrations relative to its axis. On the inner surface of the outer wall of the container, semicircular deflectors are regularly situated, playing the role of flow activators. As a result of vibrations, the activators oscillate tangentially. In the simulation, a 2D configuration is considered, excluding the end-wall effects. In the experiment, a container with a large aspect ratio is used. Steady streaming is generated in the viscous boundary layers on the activators. On each of the latter, beyond the viscous domain, a symmetric vortices pair is formed. The steady streaming in the annulus has an azimuthal periodicity. With an increase in the vibration intensity, a competition between the vortices occurs, as a result of which one of the vortices (let us call it even) approaches the activator and the other one (odd) rolls away and couples with the vortices from the neighbouring pairs. Streamlines of the odd vortices close on each other, forming a cog-wheel shaped flow that encircles the inner wall. Comparison of the experiment and the simulation reveals an agreement at moderate vibration intensity. (paper)

  19. Experimental study of the active control applied to the flow past a backward facing ramp

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hlevca, Dan; Gilliéron, Patrick; Grasso, Francesco

    2018-03-01

    An experimental study of open loop active flow control on a backward facing ramp is presented. The ramp has finite span and a slant angle of 25°. Wind tunnel experiments were performed both for the uncontrolled and the controlled cases where time periodic forcing by pulsed jets is considered. The control system exploits an electro-magnetic valve system to generate pulsed jets with an operating frequency and duty cycle ranging, respectively, between 50 and 250 Hz and between 25 and 60%. A parametric study was carried out for three different freestream velocities and varying the frequency of the pulsed jets and the duty cycle. The control strategy relies on the injection of periodic perturbations before separation at the edge of the slant, considering various combinations of frequencies and duty cycles while keeping constant the blowing time for every Reynolds number, so as to excite the flow with the same jet structure over different actuation cycle extents. The receptivity of the flow to periodic forcing was assessed by characterizing mean and unsteady flow properties, turbulence statistics and flow topology. The study focused on the impact of control on reattachement and showed that the flow locks with excitation frequencies typical of initial Kelvin-Helmholtz instabilities. However, the flow was found to respond to any injected unsteady perturbation locking to the forcing frequencies and the extent of the region where locking occurs was found to be of the order of a few slant heights. A relaxation process was observed and the flow was found to relax past the slant trailing edge toward frequencies close to the natural ones.

  20. Mixing and axial dispersion in Taylor-Couette flow: experimental and numerical study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nemri, M.

    2013-01-01

    Taylor-Couette flows between two concentric cylinders have great potential applications in chemical engineering. They are particularly convenient for two-phase small scale devices enabling solvent extraction operations. An experimental device was designed with this idea in mind. It consists of two concentric cylinders with the inner one rotating and the outer one fixed. Taylor-Couette flows take place in the annular gap between them, and are known to evolve towards turbulence through a sequence of successive instabilities. Macroscopic quantities, such as axial dispersion and mixing index, are extremely sensitive to these flow structures, which may lead to flawed modelling of the coupling between hydrodynamics and mass transfer. This particular point has been studied both experimentally and numerically. The flow and mixing have been characterized by means of flow visualization and simultaneous PIV (Particle Imaging Velocimetry) and PLIF (Planar Laser Induced Fluorescence) measurements. PLIF visualizations showed clear evidences of different transport mechanisms including 'intra-vortex mixing' and 'inter-vortex mixing'. Under WVF and MWVF regimes, intra-vortex mixing is controlled by chaotic advection, due to the 3D nature of the flow, while inter-vortex transport occurs due to the presence of waves between neighboring vortices. The combination of these two mechanisms results in enhanced axial dispersion. We showed that hysteresis may occur between consecutive regimes depending on flow history and this may have a significant effect on mixing for a given Reynolds number. The axial dispersion coefficient Dx evolution along the successive flow states was investigated thanks to dye Residence Time Distribution measurements (RTD) and particle tracking (DNS). Both experimental and numerical results have confirmed the significant effect of the flow structure and history on axial dispersion. Our study confirmed that the commonly used 1-parameter chemical engineering models (e

  1. Numerical and Experimental Study of Electromagnetically Driven Vortical Flows

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kenjeres, S.; Verdoold, J.; Tummers, M.J.; Hanjalic, K.; Kleijn, C.R.

    2009-01-01

    The paper reports on numerical and experimental investigations of electromagnetically driven vortical flows of an electrically conductive fluid in a generic setup. Two different configurations of permanent magnets are considered: a 3-magnet configuration in which the resulting Lorentz force is

  2. Experimental study of water flow in nuclear fuel elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodrigues, Lorena Escriche; Rezende, Hugo Cesar; Mattos, Joao Roberto Loureiro de; Barros Filho, Jose Afonso; Santos, Andre Augusto Campagnole dos

    2013-01-01

    This work aims to develop an experimental methodology for investigating the water flow through rod bundles after spacer grids of nuclear fuel elements of PWR type reactors. Speed profiles, with the device LDV (Laser Doppler Velocimetry), and the pressure drop between two sockets located before and after the spacer grid, using pressure transducers were measured

  3. Analysis of the flow instability among channels of the OTSG in the naval craft NPP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hou, Su-xia; Luo, Ji-jun; Xu, Jun; Liu, Jie-yu [Xi' an Hi-Tech Institute, Shaanxi (China)

    2014-11-15

    The instability occurring of the OTSG (Once-Through Steam Generator) in naval craft nuclear power plants is presented by the multivariable frequency domain theory. As concerning coupling interactions of the OTSG tubing, it is more accurate for analyzing the instability of OTSG compared to the common single variable method. A mathematical model for the system is derived from the fundamental equations by using the perturbation, Laplace-transform and the nodalization techniques. The stable boundary and parameters which influence the stability of the system are evaluated through computer simulation.

  4. Experimental results from a flowing-lithium target

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Annese, C.E.; Schwartz, K.E.

    1982-01-01

    Hydraulic stability of a free surface lithium jet was demonstrated at 260 0 C and from the middle-vacuum region of 0.01 Pa (10 - 4 Torr) up to 124 kPa (18 psia). The jet is formed by flowing lithium at rates to 0.04 m 3 /s (600 GPM) through a precisely defined nozzle which directs the flow along a curved wall where velocities of up to 17 m/s are attained. This nozzle and curved wall configuration form the basis of the Fusion Materials Irradiation Test (FMIT) Facility lithium target. A full-size experimental model of this target is presently under test with flowing lithium in the Experimental Lithium System (ELS). The FMIT is being developed for the Department of Energy by the Westinghouse Hanford Company at the Hanford Engineering Development Laboratory

  5. Experimental study of an ion cyclotron instability in a magnetic well confined plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brossier, P.

    1969-01-01

    This report is a contribution to the study of microinstabilities in macroscopically stable plasmas, in the low-β limit. Ion cyclotron instabilities, with k || = 0, have been numerically studied in detail; the computation of the density thresholds and growth rates of the different harmonics showed the relative role played by the following energy sources: density gradient, perpendicular distribution function and cold plasma component. This theoretical model has been compared with the results of a detailed study (density thresholds, wave structure, frequency spectrum, wavelengths, growth rate, amplitude of the electric field) of the instability observed in the DECA II device. This comparison gave a good agreement which shows the destabilising role played by the cold plasma component on a hot plasma with a loss cone distribution function. (author) [fr

  6. Experimental study of linear and nonlinear regimes of density-driven instabilities induced by CO2 dissolution in water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Outeda, R.; D'Onofrio, A.; El Hasi, C.; Zalts, A.

    2014-01-01

    Density driven instabilities produced by CO 2 (gas) dissolution in water containing a color indicator were studied in a Hele Shaw cell. The images were analyzed and instability patterns were characterized by mixing zone temporal evolution, dispersion curves, and the growth rate for different CO 2 pressures and different color indicator concentrations. The results obtained from an exhaustive analysis of experimental data show that this system has a different behaviour in the linear regime of the instabilities (when the growth rate has a linear dependence with time), from the nonlinear regime at longer times. At short times using a color indicator to see the evolution of the pattern, the images show that the effects of both the color indicator and CO 2 pressure are of the same order of magnitude: The growth rates are similar and the wave numbers are in the same range (0–30 cm −1 ) when the system is unstable. Although in the linear regime the dynamics is affected similarly by the presence of the indicator and CO 2 pressure, in the nonlinear regime, the influence of the latter is clearly more pronounced than the effects of the color indicator

  7. An Experimental Setup to Measure the Minimum Trigger Energy for Magneto-Thermal Instability in Nb$_{3}$Sn Strands

    CERN Document Server

    Takala, E; Bremer, J; Balle, C; Bottura, L; Rossi, L

    2012-01-01

    Magneto-thermal instability may affect high critical current density Nb$_{3}$Sn superconducting strands that can quench even though the transport current is low compared to the critical current with important implications in the design of next generation superconducting magnets. The instability is initiated by a small perturbation energy which is considerably lower than the Minimum Quench Energy (MQE). At CERN, a new experimental setup was developed to measure the smallest perturbation energy (Minimum Trigger Energy, MTE) which is able to trigger the magneto-thermal instability in superconducting Nb$_{3}$Sn-strands. The setup is based on Q-switched laser technology which is able to provide a localized perturbation in nano-second time scale. Using this technique the energy deposition into the strand is well defined and reliable. The laser is located outside the cryostat at room temperature. The beam is guided from room temperature on to the superconducting strand by using a UV-enhanced fused silica fibre. The ...

  8. Experimental studies on flow-induced vibration to support steam generator design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pettigrew, M.J.; Gorman, D.J.

    1977-06-01

    Vibration experiments were done on small tube bundles of triangular and square lattice configurations in both liquid and two-phase (air-water) cross-flow. The effects of flow velocity, simulated steam quality, lattice orientation, tube location and tube frequency were explored. Tube response to random flow turbulence excitation and fluidelastic instability were observed in both liquid and two-phase cross-flow. Fluidelastic instability criteria and random forcing function characterizations are derived from this work. This information may be used in the vibration analysis of shell-and-tube heat exchanger components. (author)

  9. Experimental Studies of the Electrothermal and Magneto-Rayleigh Taylor Instabilities on Thin Metal Foil Ablations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steiner, Adam; Yager-Elorriaga, David; Patel, Sonal; Jordan, Nicholas; Gilgenbach, Ronald; Lau, Y. Y.

    2015-11-01

    The electrothermal instability (ETI) and magneto-Rayleigh Taylor instability (MRT) are important in the implosion of metallic liners, such as magnetized liner implosion fusion (MagLIF). The MAIZE linear transformer driver (LTD) at the University of Michigan generates 200 ns risetime-current pulses of 500 to 600 kA into Al foil liners to study plasma instabilities and implosion dynamics, most recently MRT growth on imploding cylindrical liners. A full circuit model of MAIZE, along with I-V measurements, yields time-resolved load inductance. This has enabled measurements of an effective current-carrying radius to determine implosion velocity and plasma-vacuum interface acceleration. Measurements are also compared to implosion data from 4-time-frame laser shadowgraphy. Improved resolution measurements on the laser shadowgraph system have been used to examine the liner interface early in the shot to examine surface perturbations resulting from ETI for various seeding conditions. Fourier analysis examines the growth rates of wavelength bands of these structures to examine the transition from ETI to MRT. This work was supported by the U.S. DoE through award DE-SC0012328. S.G. Patel is supported by Sandia National Labs. D.A. Yager is supported by NSF fellowship grant DGE 1256260.

  10. An experimental study of the effect of a pilot flame on technically pre-mixed, self-excited combustion instabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Meara, Bridget C.

    Combustion instabilities are a problem facing the gas turbine industry in the operation of lean, pre-mixed combustors. Secondary flames known as "pilot flames" are a common passive control strategy for eliminating combustion instabilities in industrial gas turbines, but the underlying mechanisms responsible for the pilot flame's stabilizing effect are not well understood. This dissertation presents an experimental study of a pilot flame in a single-nozzle, swirl-stabilized, variable length atmospheric combustion test facility and the effect of the pilot on combustion instabilities. A variable length combustor tuned the acoustics of the system to excite instabilities over a range of operating conditions without a pilot flame. The inlet velocity was varied from 25 -- 50 m/s and the equivalence ratio was varied from 0.525 -- 0.65. This range of operating conditions was determined by the operating range of the combustion test facility. Stability at each operating condition and combustor length was characterized by measurements of pressure oscillations in the combustor. The effect of the pilot flame on the magnitude and frequency of combustor stability was then investigated. The mechanisms responsible for the pilot flame effect were studied using chemiluminescence flame images of both stable and unstable flames. Stable flame structure was investigated using stable flame images of CH* chemiluminescence emission. The effect of the pilot on stable flame metrics such as flame length, flame angle, and flame width was investigated. In addition, a new flame metric, flame base distance, was defined to characterize the effect of the pilot flame on stable flame anchoring of the flame base to the centerbody. The effect of the pilot flame on flame base anchoring was investigated because the improved stability with a pilot flame is usually attributed to improved flame anchoring through the recirculation of hot products from the pilot to the main flame base. Chemiluminescence images

  11. Stratification of bubbly horizontal flows: modeling and experimental validation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bottin, M.

    2010-01-01

    Hot films and optical probes enabled the acquisition of measurements in bubbly flows at 5, 20 and 40 diameters from the inlet of the vein on the METERO facility which test section is a horizontal circular pipe of 100 mm inner diameter. The distribution of the different phases, the existence of coalescence and sedimentation mechanisms, the influence of the liquid and gas flow rates, the radial and axial evolutions are analyzed thanks to fast camera videos and numerous and varied experimental results (void fraction, bubbles sizes, interfacial area, mean and fluctuating velocities and turbulent kinetic energy of the liquid phase). Some models, based on the idea that the flow reaches an equilibrium state sufficiently far from the inlet of the pipe, were developed to simulate mean interfacial area and turbulent kinetic energy transports in bubbly flows. (author)

  12. To the theory of the Pierce instability of neutralized electron flows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ignatov, A.M.; Rukhadze, A.A.

    1984-01-01

    The Pierce instability of a nonrelativistic electron beam in an exernal fi inite magnetic field is investigated. Analytical expressions for a critical electron density in limiting cases of strong or weak magnetic field have been fo ound. The critical electron density is shown to increase with a decrease in the magnetic field strength

  13. OTSGI--a program analysing two-phase flow instabilities in helical tubes of once-through steam generator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shi Shaoping; Zhou Fangde; Wang Maohua

    1998-01-01

    The author has studied the two-phases flow instabilities of the helical tubes of once-through steam generator. Using liner-frequency-domain analytical method, the authors have derived out a mathematical model and designed the program. In this model, the authors also have considered the thermal dynamic characteristics of the tube's wall. The program is used to calculate the threshold of the stability and the influences of some factors, such as entrance throttling coefficient, system pressure, entrance supercooling degree, et al. The outcomes are compared with other studies

  14. Experimental investigation two phase flow in direct methanol fuel cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mat, M. D.; Kaplan, Y.; Celik, S.; Oeztural, A.

    2007-01-01

    Direct methanol fuel cells (DMFC) have received many attentions specifically for portable electronic applications since it utilize methanol which is in liquid form in atmospheric condition and high energy density of the methanol. Thus it eliminates the storage problem of hydrogen. It also eliminates humidification requirement of polymeric membrane which is a problem in PEM fuel cells. Some electronic companies introduced DMFC prototypes for portable electronic applications. Presence of carbon dioxide gases due to electrochemical reactions in anode makes the problem a two phase problem. A two phase flow may occur at cathode specifically at high current densities due to the excess water. Presence of gas phase in anode region and liquid phase in cathode region prevents diffusion of fuel and oxygen to the reaction sites thus reduces the performance of the system. Uncontrolled pressure buildup in anode region increases methanol crossover through membrane and adversely effect the performance. Two phase flow in both anode and cathode region is very effective in the performance of DMYC system and a detailed understanding of two phase flow for high performance DMFC systems. Although there are many theoretical and experimental studies available on the DMFC systems in the literature, only few studies consider problem as a two-phase flow problem. In this study, an experimental set up is developed and species distributions on system are measured with a gas chromatograph. System performance characteristics (V-I curves) is measured depending on the process parameters (temperature, fuel ad oxidant flow rates, methanol concentration etc)

  15. Fluidelastic instability of a tube bundle preferentially flexible in the flow direction to simulate u-bend in-plane vibration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pettigrew, M.; Violette, R.; Mureithi, N.

    2006-01-01

    Almost all the available data about fluidelastic instability of heat exchanger tube bundles concerns tubes that are axisymetrically flexible. In those cases, the instability is found to be mostly in the direction transverse to the flow. Thus, the direction parallel to the flow has raised less concern in terms of bundle stability. However, the flat bar supports used in steam generators for preventing U-tubes vibration may not be as effective in the in-plane direction as in the out-of-plane direction. The possibility that fluidelastic instability can develop in the flow direction must then be assessed. In the present work, tests were done to study the fluidelastic instability of a cluster of seven tubes much more flexible in the flow direction than in the lift direction. The array configuration is rotated triangular with a pitch to diameter ratio of 1.5. The array was subjected to two-phase (air-water) cross flow. Well-defined fluidelastic instabilities were observed albeit at somewhat higher flow velocities than for axisymetrically flexible tubes. This so far unknown phenomenon may be of concern if some supports become ineffective in the in-plane direction. (author)

  16. Thermo-kinetic instabilities in model reactors. Examples in experimental tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavadera, Marco Lubrano; Sorrentino, Giancarlo; Sabia, Pino; de Joannon, Mara; Cavaliere, Antonio; Ragucci, Raffaele

    2017-11-01

    The use of advanced combustion technologies (such as MILD, LTC, etc.) is among the most promising methods to reduce emission of pollutants. For such technologies, working temperatures are enough low to boost the formation of several classes of pollutants, such as NOx and soot. To access this temperature range, a significant dilution as well as preheating of reactants is required. Such conditions are usually achieved by a strong recirculation of exhaust gases that simultaneously dilute and pre-heat the fresh reactants. These peculiar operative conditions also imply strong fuel flexibility, thus allowing the use of low calorific value (LCV) energy carriers with high efficiency. However, the intersection of low combustion temperatures and highly diluted mixtures with intense pre-heating alters the evolution of the combustion process with respect to traditional flames, leading to features such as the susceptibility to oscillations, which are undesirable during combustion. Therefore, an effective use of advanced combustion technologies requires a thorough analysis of the combustion kinetic characteristics in order to identify optimal operating conditions and control strategies with high efficiency and low pollutant emissions. The present work experimentally and numerically characterized the ignition and oxidation processes of methane and propane, highly diluted in nitrogen, at atmospheric pressure, in a Plug Flow Reactor and a Perfectly Stirred Reactor under a wide range of operating conditions involving temperatures, mixture compositions and dilution levels. The attention was focused particularly on the chemistry of oscillatory phenomena and multistage ignitions. The global behavior of these systems can be qualitatively and partially quantitatively modeled using the detailed kinetic models available in the literature. Results suggested that, for diluted conditions and lower adiabatic flame temperatures, the competition among several pathways, i.e. intermediate- and

  17. Experimental study of the initial conditions of the Rayleigh-Taylor instability at the ablation front in inertial confinement fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delorme, Barthelemy

    2015-01-01

    Numerous designs and experiments in the domain of Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) show that, in both direct and indirect drive approaches, one of the main limitations to reach the ignition is the Rayleigh-Taylor instability (RTI). It may lead to shell disruption and performance degradation of spherically imploding targets. Thus, the understanding and the control of the initial conditions of the RTI is of crucial importance for the ICF program. In this thesis, we present an experimental and theoretical study of the initial conditions of the ablative RTI in direct drive, by means of two experimental campaigns performed on the OMEGA laser facility (LLE, Rochester). The first campaign consisted in studying the laser-imprinted ablative Richtmyer-Meshkov instability (RMI) which starts at the beginning of the interaction and seeds the ablative RTI. We set up an experimental configuration that allowed to measure for the first time the temporal evolution of the laser-imprinted ablative RMI. The experimental results have been interpreted by a theoretical model and numerical simulations performed with the hydrodynamic code CHIC. We show that the best way to control the ablative RMI is to reduce the laser intensity inhomogeneities. This can be achieved with targets covered by a layer of a low density foam. Thus, in the second campaign, we studied for the first time the effect of underdense foams on the growth of the ablative RTI. A layer of low density foam was placed in front of a plastic foil, and the perturbation was imprinted by an intensity modulated laser beam. Experimental data are presented: backscattered laser energy, target dynamic obtained by side-on self emission measurement, and face-on radiographs showing the effect of the foams on the target areal density modulations. These data were interpreted using the CHIC code and the laser-plasma interaction code PARAX. We show that the foams noticeably reduce the amplitude of the laser intensity inhomogeneities and the

  18. Experimental study on the rheological behaviour of debris flow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Scotto di Santolo

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available A model able to describe all the processes involved in a debris flow can be very complex owing to the sudden changing of the material that turns from solid into liquid state. The two phases of the phenomenon are analysed separately referring to soil mechanics procedures with regard to the trigger phase, and to an equivalent fluid for the post-failure phase. The present paper is devoted to show the experimental results carried out to evaluate the behaviour assumed by a pyroclastic-derived soil during the flow. A traditional fluid tool has been utilized: a standard rotational rheometer equipped with two different geometries. The soils tested belong to deposits that cover the slopes of the Campania region, Italy, often affected by debris flows. The influence of solid concentration Cv and grain size distribution was tested: the soils were destructurated, sieved and mixed with water starting from the in situ porosity. All material mixtures showed a non-Newtonian fluid behaviour with a yield stress τy that increases with a solid volumetric concentration and decreases for an increase of sand fraction. The experimental data were fitted with standard model for fluids. A simple relation between Cv and τy was obtained. The yield stress seems to be a key parameter for describing and predicting the post-failure behaviour of debris flows. These results suggest that in the field a small change in solid fraction, due to rainfall, will cause a slight decrease of the static yield stress, readily inducing a rapid flow which will stop only when the dynamic yield stress is reached, namely on a much smoother slope. This can explain the in situ observed post-failure behaviour of debris flows, which are able to flow over very long distances even on smooth slopes.

  19. Experimental study of vortex breakdown in a cylindrical, swirling flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens, J. L.; Celik, Z. Z.; Cantwell, B. J.; Lopez, J. M.

    1996-01-01

    The stability of a steady, vortical flow in a cylindrical container with one rotating endwall has been experimentally examined to gain insight into the process of vortex breakdowwn. The dynamics of the flow are governed by the Reynolds number (Re) and the aspect ratio of the cylinder. Re is given by Omega R(sup 2)/nu, where Omega is the speed of rotation of the endwall, R is the cylinder radius, and nu is the kinematic viscosity of the fluid filling the cylinder. The aspect ratio is H/R, where H is the height of the cylinder. Numerical simulation studies disagree whether or not the steady breakdown is stable beyond a critical Reynolds number, Re(sub c). Previous experimental researches have considered the steady and unsteady flows near Re(sub c), but have not explored the stability of the steady breakdown structures beyond this value. In this investigation, laser induced fluorescence was utilized to observe both steady and unsteady vortex breakdown at a fixed H/R of 2.5 with Re varying around Re(sub c). When the Re of a steady flow was slowly increased beyond Re(sub c), the breakdown structure remained steady even though unsteadiness was possible. In addition, a number of hysteresis events involving the oscillation periods of the unsteady flow were noted. The results show that both steady and unsteady vortex breakdown occur for a limited range of Re above Re(sub c). Also, with increasing Re, complex flow transformations take place that alter the period at which the unsteady flow oscillates.

  20. Experimental observation of the stratified electrothermal instability on aluminum with thickness greater than a skin depth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutchinson, T. M.; Awe, T. J.; Bauer, B. S.; Yates, K. C.; Yu, E. P.; Yelton, W. G.; Fuelling, S.

    2018-05-01

    A direct observation of the stratified electrothermal instability on the surface of thick metal is reported. Aluminum rods coated with 70 μ m Parylene-N were driven to 1 MA in 100 ns , with the metal thicker than the skin depth. The dielectric coating suppressed plasma formation, enabling persistent observation of discrete azimuthally correlated stratified thermal perturbations perpendicular to the current whose wave numbers, k , grew exponentially with rate γ (k ) =0.06 n s-1-(0.4 n s-1μ m2ra d-2 ) k2 in ˜1 g /c m3 , ˜7000 K aluminum.

  1. Experimental Observation of the Stratified Electrothermal Instability on Aluminum with Thickness Greater than a Skin Depth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hutchinson, Trevor M. [Univ. of Nevada, Reno, NV (United States); Hutchinson, Trevor M. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Awe, Thomas James [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Bauer, Bruno S. [Univ. of Nevada, Reno, NV (United States); Yates, Kevin [Univ. of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM (United States); Yu, Edmund p. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Yelton, William G. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Fuelling, Stephan [Univ. of Nevada, Reno, NV (United States)

    2017-07-01

    The first direct observation of the stratified electrothermal instability on the surface of thick metal is reported. Aluminum rods coated with 70 μm Parylene-N were driven to 1 MA in approximately 100 ns, with the metal thicker than the skin depth. The dielectric coating suppressed plasma formation, enabling persistent observation of discrete azimuthally-correlated stratified structures perpendicular to the current. Strata amplitudes grow rapidly, while their Fourier spectrum shifts toward longer wavelength. Assuming blackbody emission, radiometric calculations indicate strata are temperature perturbations that grow exponentially with rate γ = 0.04 ns -1 in 3000- 10,000 K aluminum.

  2. Experimental determination of sorption in fractured flow systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmerman, Mitchell D.; Bennett, Philip C.; Sharp, John M.; Choi, Wan-Joo

    2002-09-01

    Fracture "skins" are alteration zones on fracture surfaces created by a variety of biological, chemical, and physical processes. Skins increase surface area, where sorption occurs, compared to the unaltered rock matrix. This study examines the sorption of organic solutes on altered fracture surfaces in an experimental fracture-flow apparatus. Fracture skins containing abundant metal oxides, clays, and organic material from the Breathitt Formation (Kentucky, USA) were collected in a manner such that skin surface integrity was maintained. The samples were reassembled in the lab in a flow-through apparatus that simulated ˜2.7 m of a linear fracture "conduit." A dual-tracer injection scheme was utilized with the sorbing or reactive tracer compared to a non-reactive tracer (chloride) injected simultaneously. Sorption was assessed from the ratio of the first temporal moments of the breakthrough curves and from the loss of reactive tracer mass and evaluated as a function of flow velocity and solute type. The breakthrough curves suggest dual-flow regimes in the fracture with both sorbing and non-sorbing flow fields. Significant sorption occurs for the reactive components, and sorption increased with decreasing flow rate and decreasing compound solubility. Based on moment analysis, however, there was little retardation of the center of solute mass. These data suggest that non-equilibrium sorption processes dominate and that slow desorption and boundary layer diffusion cause extensive tailing in the breakthrough curves.

  3. Computational Optimization of a Natural Laminar Flow Experimental Wing Glove

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartshom, Fletcher

    2012-01-01

    Computational optimization of a natural laminar flow experimental wing glove that is mounted on a business jet is presented and discussed. The process of designing a laminar flow wing glove starts with creating a two-dimensional optimized airfoil and then lofting it into a three-dimensional wing glove section. The airfoil design process does not consider the three dimensional flow effects such as cross flow due wing sweep as well as engine and body interference. Therefore, once an initial glove geometry is created from the airfoil, the three dimensional wing glove has to be optimized to ensure that the desired extent of laminar flow is maintained over the entire glove. TRANAIR, a non-linear full potential solver with a coupled boundary layer code was used as the main tool in the design and optimization process of the three-dimensional glove shape. The optimization process uses the Class-Shape-Transformation method to perturb the geometry with geometric constraints that allow for a 2-in clearance from the main wing. The three-dimensional glove shape was optimized with the objective of having a spanwise uniform pressure distribution that matches the optimized two-dimensional pressure distribution as closely as possible. Results show that with the appropriate inputs, the optimizer is able to match the two dimensional pressure distributions practically across the entire span of the wing glove. This allows for the experiment to have a much higher probability of having a large extent of natural laminar flow in flight.

  4. Magnetic viscosity by localized shear flow instability in magnetized accretion disks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsumoto, R.; Tajima, T.

    1995-01-01

    Differentially rotating disks are subject to the axisymmetric instability for perfectly conducting plasma in the presence of poloidal magnetic fields. For nonaxisymmetric perturbations, the authors find localized unstable eigenmodes whose eigenfunction is confined between two Alfven singularities at ω d = ± ω A , where ω d is the Doppler-shifted wave frequency, and ω A = k parallel v A is the Alfven frequency. The radial width of the unstable eigenfunction is Δx ∼ ω A /(Ak y ), where A is the Oort's constant, and k y is the azimuthal wave number. The growth rate of the fundamental mode is larger for smaller value of k y /k z . The maximum growth rate when k y /k z ∼ 0.1 is ∼ 0.2Ω for the Keplerian disk with local angular velocity Ω. It is found that the purely growing mode disappears when k y /k z > 0.12. In a perfectly conducting disk, the instability grows even when the seed magnetic field is infinitesimal. Inclusion of the resistivity, however, leads to the appearance of an instability threshold. When the resistivity η depends on the instability-induced turbulent magnetic fields δB as η([δB 2 ]), the marginal stability condition self-consistently determines the α parameter of the angular momentum transport due to the magnetic stress. For fully ionized disks, the magnetic viscosity parameter α B is between 0.001 and 1. The authors' three-dimensional MHD simulation confirms these unstable eigenmodes. It also shows that the α parameter observed in simulation is between 0.01 and 1, in agreement with theory. The observationally required smaller α in the quiescent phase of accretion disks in dwarf novae may be explained by the decreased ionization due to the temperature drop

  5. Confined granular flow in silos experimental and numerical investigations

    CERN Document Server

    Tejchman, Jacek

    2013-01-01

      During confined flow of bulk solids in silos some characteristic phenomena can be created, such as: —         sudden and significant increase of wall stresses, —         different flow patterns, —         formation and propagation of wall and interior shear zones, —         fluctuation of pressures and, —         strong autogenous dynamic effects. These phenomena have not been described or explained in detail yet. The main intention of the experimental and theoretical research presented in this book is to explain the above mentioned phenomena in granular bulk solids and to describe them with numerical FE models verified by experimental results.

  6. Interfacial Instability in Two-Phase Flow: Manipulating Coalescence and Condensation

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Two-phase flow under microgravity conditions presents a number of technical challenges ( and ). Life support and habitation depend on systems that use two-phase flow...

  7. Absolute and convective instabilities of a film flow down a vertical fiber subjected to a radial electric field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Rong; Chen, Xue; Ding, Zijing

    2018-01-01

    We consider the motion of a gravity-driven flow down a vertical fiber subjected to a radial electric field. This flow exhibits rich dynamics including the formation of droplets, or beads, driven by a Rayleigh-Plateau mechanism modified by the presence of gravity as well as the Maxwell stress at the interface. A spatiotemporal stability analysis is performed to investigate the effect of electric field on the absolute-convective instability (AI-CI) characteristics. We performed a numerical simulation on the nonlinear evolution of the film to examine the transition from CI to AI regime. The numerical results are in excellent agreement with the spatiotemporal stability analysis. The blowup behavior of nonlinear simulation predicts the formation of touchdown singularity of the interface due to the effect of electric field. We try to connect the blowup behavior with the AI-CI characteristics. It is found that the singularities mainly occur in the AI regime. The results indicate that the film may have a tendency to form very sharp tips due to the enhancement of the absolute instability induced by the electric field. We perform a theoretical analysis to study the behaviors of the singularities. The results show that there exists a self-similarity between the temporal and spatial distances from the singularities.

  8. Simulation and experimental study of resin flow in fibre fabrics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Fei; Yan, Shilin; Li, Yongjing

    2017-06-01

    Liquid Composite Moulding (LCM) is gradually becoming the most competitive manufacturing technology for producing large composite parts with complex geometry with high quality and low cost. These parts include those for airplanes, wind turbine blades and automobile components. Fibre fabrics in liquid composite moulding can be considered as dual-scale porous media. In different gap scales, an unsaturated flow is produced during the mould filling process. This particular flow behaviour deviates from the traditional Darcy’s law, which is used to calculate the filling pressure and will cause errors. According to sink theory, the unsaturated flow characteristics of this dual-scale porous media were studied in this paper, and a FEM solution program was developed. The results showed that the pressure curves against the position which simulated by sink functions were departure from the position of traditional theory. In addition, the simulation results of partially-saturated region were consistent with the experimental data.

  9. Experimental Validation of the LHC Helium Relief System Flow Modeling

    CERN Document Server

    Fydrych, J; Riddone, G

    2006-01-01

    In case of simultaneous resistive transitions in a whole sector of magnets in the Large Hadron Collider, the helium would be vented from the cold masses to a dedicated recovery system. During the discharge the cold helium will eventually enter a pipe at room temperature. During the first period of the flow the helium will be heated intensely due to the pipe heat capacity. To study the changes of the helium thermodynamic and flow parameters we have simulated numerically the most critical flow cases. To verify and validate numerical results, a dedicated laboratory test rig representing the helium relief system has been designed and commissioned. Both numerical and experimental results allow us to determine the distributions of the helium parameters along the pipes as well as mechanical strains and stresses.

  10. Experimental control of natural perturbations in channel flow

    OpenAIRE

    Juillet , Fabien; Mckeon , J.; Schmid , Peter J.

    2014-01-01

    International audience; A combined approach using system identification and feed-forward control design has been applied to experimental laminar channel flow in an effort to reduce the naturally occurring disturbance level. A simple blowing/suction strategy was capable of reducing the standard deviation of the measured sensor signal by 45 %, which markedly exceeds previously obtained results under comparable conditions. A comparable reduction could be verified over a significant streamwise ex...

  11. Characterising Dynamic Instability in High Water-Cut Oil-Water Flows Using High-Resolution Microwave Sensor Signals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Weixin; Jin, Ningde; Han, Yunfeng; Ma, Jing

    2018-06-01

    In the present study, multi-scale entropy algorithm was used to characterise the complex flow phenomena of turbulent droplets in high water-cut oil-water two-phase flow. First, we compared multi-scale weighted permutation entropy (MWPE), multi-scale approximate entropy (MAE), multi-scale sample entropy (MSE) and multi-scale complexity measure (MCM) for typical nonlinear systems. The results show that MWPE presents satisfied variability with scale and anti-noise ability. Accordingly, we conducted an experiment of vertical upward oil-water two-phase flow with high water-cut and collected the signals of a high-resolution microwave resonant sensor, based on which two indexes, the entropy rate and mean value of MWPE, were extracted. Besides, the effects of total flow rate and water-cut on these two indexes were analysed. Our researches show that MWPE is an effective method to uncover the dynamic instability of oil-water two-phase flow with high water-cut.

  12. Thermo-hydraulic instability of natural circulation BWRs at low pressure star-up. Experimental estimation of instability region with test facility considering scaling law

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inada, F.; Furuya, M.; Yasuo, A.; Tabata, H.; Yoshioka, Y.; Kim, H.T.

    1995-01-01

    In natural circulation BWRs developed for advanced light water reactors with simplified passive safety systems, thermo-hydraulic stability should be confirmed especially at low pressure start-up. In this paper, nondimensional parameters to estimate the hydrodynamic stability to reactors at low pressure start-up were obtained by transformation of the basic equations of drift-flux model in the two-phase region into nondimensional form. A test facility based on these parameters was then constructed. The height of the test facility is 70% of SBWR and many nondimensional test facility parameters are almost the same as those of the reactor. Reactor stability was estimated experimentally. Stability maps below 0.5MPa were obtained on the heat flux - channel inlet subcooling place. It was found that there were two stability boundaries, between which the flow became unstable. Flow was stable in the high and low channel inlet subcooling regions. Typical conditions of SBWR at low pressure start-up were noted in the high channel inlet subcooling stable region. The heat flux at typical SBWR start-up was about one fifth that of the stability boundary. Though some nondimensional parameters of the test facility did not exactly agree with those of SBWR, it was suggested that the flow in SBWR was stable below 0.5MPa because of the large margin. (author)

  13. Experimental investigation of a two-phase nozzle flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kedziur, F.; John, H.; Loeffel, R.; Reimann, J.

    1980-07-01

    Stationary two-phase flow experiments with a convergent nozzle are performed. The experimental results are appropriate to validate advanced computer codes, which are applied to the blowdown-phase of a loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA). The steam-water experiments present a broad variety of initial conditions: the pressure varies between 2 and 13 MPa, the void fraction between 0 (subcooled) and about 80%, a great number of critical as well as subcritical experiments with different flow pattern is investigated. Additional air-water experiments serve for the separation of phase transition effects. The transient acceleration of the fluid in the LOCA-case is simulated by a local acceleration in the experiment. The layout of the nozzle and the applied measurement technique allow for a separate testing of blowdown-relevant, physical models and the determination of empirical model parameters, respectively. The measured quantities are essentially the mass flow rate, quality, axial pressure and temperature profiles as well as axial and radial density/void profiles obtained by a γ-ray absorption device. Moreover, impedance probes and a pitot probe are used. Observed phenomena like a flow contraction, radial pressure and void profiles as well as the appearance of two chocking locations are described, because their examination is rather instructive about the refinement of a program. The experimental facilities as well as the data of 36 characteristic experiments are documented. (orig.) [de

  14. Direct Experimental Evidence of Hole Trapping in Negative Bias Temperature Instability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ji Xiao-Li; Liao Yi-Ming; Yan Feng; Shi Yi; Zhang Guan; Guo Qiang

    2011-01-01

    Negative bias temperature instability (NBTI) in ultrathin-plasma-nitrided-oxide (PNO) based p-type metal-oxide-semiconductor field effect transistors (pMOSFETs) is investigated at temperatures ranging from 220K to 470K. It is found that the threshold voltage V T degradation below 290 K is dominated by the hole trapping process. Further studies unambiguously show that this process is unnecessarily related to nitrogen but the incorporation of nitrogen in the gate dielectric increases the probability of hole trapping in the NBTI process as it introduces extra trap states located in the upper half of the Si band gap. The possible hole trapping mechanism in NBTI stressed PNO pMOSFETs is suggested by taking account of oxygen and nitrogen related trap centers. (condensed matter: electronic structure, electrical, magnetic, and optical properties)

  15. Experimental and numerical study of plastic shear instability under high-speed loading conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sokovikov, Mikhail; Chudinov, Vasiliy; Bilalov, Dmitry; Oborin, Vladimir; Uvarov, Sergey; Plekhov, Oleg; Terekhina, Alena; Naimark, Oleg

    2014-01-01

    The behavior of specimens dynamically loaded during the split Hopkinson (Kolsky) bar tests in a regime close to simple shear conditions was studied. The lateral surface of the specimens was investigated in a real-time mode with the aid of a high-speed infra-red camera CEDIP Silver 450M. The temperature field distribution obtained at different time made it possible to trace the evolution of plastic strain localization. The process of target perforation involving plug formation and ejection was examined using a high-speed infra-red camera and a VISAR velocity measurement system. The microstructure of tested specimens was analyzed using an optical interferometer-profilometer and a scanning electron microscope. The development of plastic shear instability regions has been simulated numerically

  16. Experimental study of bubbly flow using image processing techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fu, Yucheng, E-mail: ycfu@vt.edu; Liu, Yang, E-mail: liu130@vt.edu

    2016-12-15

    This paper presents an experimental study of bubbly flows at relatively high void fractions using an advanced image processing method. Bubble overlapping is a common problem in such flows and the past studies often treat the overlapping bubbles as a whole, which introduces considerable measurement uncertainties. In this study, a hybrid method combining intersection point detection and watershed segmentation is used to separate the overlapping bubbles. In order to reconstruct bubbles from separated segments, a systematic procedure is developed which can preserve more features captured in the raw image compared to the simple ellipse fitting method. The distributions of void fraction, interfacial area concentration, number density and velocity are obtained from the extracted bubble information. High-speed images of air-water bubbly flows are acquired and processed for eight test runs conducted in a 30 mm × 10 mm rectangular channel. The developed image processing scheme can effectively separate overlapping bubbles and the results compare well with the measurements by the gas flow meter and double-sensor conductivity probe. The development of flows in transverse and mainstream directions are analyzed and compared with the prediction made by the one-dimensional interfacial area transport equation (IATE) and the bubble number density transport equation.

  17. Taming Instabilities in Plasma Discharges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klinger, T.; Krahnstover, N. O.; Mausbach, T.; Piel, A.

    2000-01-01

    Recent experimental work on taming instabilities in plasma discharges is discussed. Instead of suppressing instabilities, it is desired to achieve control over their dynamics, done by perturbing appropriately the current flow in the external circuit of the discharge. Different discrete and continuous feedback as well as open-loop control schemes are applied. Chaotic oscillations in plasma diodes are controlled using the OGY discrete feedback scheme. This is demonstrated both in experiment and computer simulation. Weakly developed ionization wave turbulence is tamed by continuous feedback control. Open-loop control of stochastic fluctuations - stochastic resonance - is demonstrated in a thermionic plasma diode. (author)

  18. Direct Numerical Simulation and Experimental Validation of Hypersonic Boundary-Layer Receptivity and Instability

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Zhong, Xiaolin

    2007-01-01

    .... During the three-year period, we have conducted extensive DNS studies on the receptivity of hypersonic boundary layer flows over a sharp wedge, a flat plate, a blunt cone, and the FRESH aeroshell...

  19. Non-Newtonian Hele-Shaw Flow and the Saffman-Taylor Instability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kondic, L.; Shelley, M.J.; Palffy-Muhoray, P.

    1998-01-01

    We explore the Saffman-Taylor instability of a gas bubble expanding into a shear thinning liquid in a radial Hele-Shaw cell. Using Darcy close-quote s law generalized for non-Newtonian fluids, we perform simulations of the full dynamical problem. The simulations show that shear thinning significantly influences the developing interfacial patterns. Shear thinning can suppress tip splitting, and produce fingers which oscillate during growth and shed side branches. Emergent length scales show reasonable agreement with a general linear stability analysis. copyright 1998 The American Physical Society

  20. Magnetohydrodynamic Kelvin-Helmholtz instabilities in astrophysics. 4. Single shear layer in MHD flows

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferrari, A [Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, Turin (Italy). Lab. di Cosmo-Geofisica; Turin Univ. (Italy). Ist. di Fisica Generale); Trussoni, E [Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, Turin (Italy). Lab. di Cosmo-Geofisica; Max-Planck-Institut fuer Physik und Astrophysik, Garching (Germany, F.R.). Inst. fuer Extraterrestrische Physik)

    1983-11-01

    In this further paper on the physics of Kelvin-Helmholtz instabilities the case in which the fluids in relative motion are magnetized and separated by a shear layer is investigated. The present study points out, with respect to previous treatments, that different velocity profiles affect perturbations of short wavelength (as compared to the scale of the shear). Another new result is in the destabilizing effect, even in the subsonic regime, of the magnetic field on modes neutrally stable in the vortex sheet approximation. Such a behaviour is analogous to that found in the fluid case for Mach numbers >approx. = to 2. Possible astrophysical implications are also discussed.

  1. Influence of equilibrium shear flow on peeling-ballooning instability and edge localized mode crash

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xi, P. W.; Xu, X. Q.; Wang, X. G.; Xia, T. Y.

    2012-01-01

    The E × B shear flow plays a dual role on peeling-ballooning modes and their subsequently triggered edge localized mode (ELM) crashes. On one hand, the flow shear can stabilize high-n modes and twist the mode in the poloidal direction, constraining the mode's radial extent and reducing the size of the corresponding ELM. On the other hand, the shear flow also introduces the Kelvin-Helmholtz drive, which can destabilize peeling-ballooning modes. The overall effect of equilibrium shear flow on peeling-ballooning modes and ELM crashes depends on the competition between these two effects. When the flow shear is either small or very large, it can reduce ELM size. However, for moderate values of flow shear, the destabilizing effect from the Kelvin-Helmholtz term is dominant and leads to larger ELM crashes.

  2. Fluisd elastic instability and fretting-wear characteristics of steam generator helical tubes subjected to single-phase external flow and two-phase internal flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jo, Jong Chull; Jhung, Myung Jo; Kim, Woong Sik; Kim, Hho Jung

    2004-01-01

    This study investigates the fluid elastic instability characteristics of steam generator (SG) helical type tubes and the safety assessment of the potential for fretting-wear damages caused by foreign object in operating nuclear power plants. The thermal-hydraulic conditions of both tube side and shell side flow fields are predicted by a general purpose computational fluid dynamics code employing the finite volume element modeling. To get the natural frequency, corresponding mode shape and participation factor, modal analyses are performed for helical type tubes with various conditions. Special emphases are on the effects of coil diameter and the number of turns on the modal and instability characteristics of tubes, which are expressed in terms of the natural frequency, corresponding mode shape and stability ratio. Also, the wear rate of helical type tube caused by foreign object is calculated using the Archard formula and the remaining life of the tube is predicted, and discussed in this study is the effect of the flow velocity and vibration of the tube on the remaining life of the tube. In addition, addressed is the effect of the external pressure on the vibration and fretting wear characteristics of the tube

  3. Role of parallel flow curvature on the mitigation of Rayleigh-Taylor instability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sarmah, D.; Sen, S.; Cairns, R.A.

    2001-01-01

    The effect of a radially varying parallel equilibrium flow on the stability of the Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) mode is studied analytically in the presence of a sheared magnetic field. It is shown that the parallel flow curvature can completely stabilize the RT mode. The flow curvature also has a robust effect on the radial structure of the mode. Possible implications of these theoretical findings to recent experiments are also discussed

  4. The onset of flows and instabilities in a thermosyphon with parallel loops

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zvirin, Y.

    1986-01-01

    A theoretical study is presented for the stability of various steady flows in a thermosyphon with multiple vertical channels. The main interest is in the onset of motion from a rest state or in a stagnant branch, therefore laminar flow is considered and a one-dimensional model is used to describe the flow and temperature fields. The steady state solutions include a state of no flow (rest) in the whole system and two basic flow configurations: a single loop between two channels while the others are stagnant and a symmetric flow. For a three-channel system the latter consists of an upward velocity in one branch and downward velocities in the other two. The mirror image of these basic flows are also steady state solutions. A critical modified number is found to be the stability margin for the onset of motion from a rest state in the entire system. This result was obtained both by a study of the steady state solution and by the stability analysis. The steady flow with a stagnant loop is always unstable while the symmetric flow solution in the system considered here is always stable. (orig./HP)

  5. Baroclinic instability of a symmetric, rotating, stratified flow: a study of the nonlinear stabilisation mechanisms in the presence of viscosity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Mantovani

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the analysis of symmetric circulations of a rotating baroclinic flow, forced by a steady thermal wind and dissipated by Laplacian friction. The analysis is performed with numerical time-integration. Symmetric flows, vertically bound by horizontal walls and subject to either periodic or vertical wall lateral boundary conditions, are investigated in the region of parameter-space where unstable small amplitude modes evolve into stable stationary nonlinear solutions. The distribution of solutions in parameter-space is analysed up to the threshold of chaotic behaviour and the physical nature of the nonlinear interaction operating on the finite amplitude unstable modes is investigated. In particular, analysis of time-dependent energy-conversions allows understanding of the physical mechanisms operating from the initial phase of linear instability to the finite amplitude stable state. Vertical shear of the basic flow is shown to play a direct role in injecting energy into symmetric flow since the stage of linear growth. Dissipation proves essential not only in limiting the energy of linearly unstable modes, but also in selecting their dominant space-scales in the finite amplitude stage.

  6. Comparison of Experimental Surface and Flow Field Measurements to Computational Results of the Juncture Flow Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roozeboom, Nettie H.; Lee, Henry C.; Simurda, Laura J.; Zilliac, Gregory G.; Pulliam, Thomas H.

    2016-01-01

    Wing-body juncture flow fields on commercial aircraft configurations are challenging to compute accurately. The NASA Advanced Air Vehicle Program's juncture flow committee is designing an experiment to provide data to improve Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) modeling in the juncture flow region. Preliminary design of the model was done using CFD, yet CFD tends to over-predict the separation in the juncture flow region. Risk reduction wind tunnel tests were requisitioned by the committee to obtain a better understanding of the flow characteristics of the designed models. NASA Ames Research Center's Fluid Mechanics Lab performed one of the risk reduction tests. The results of one case, accompanied by CFD simulations, are presented in this paper. Experimental results suggest the wall mounted wind tunnel model produces a thicker boundary layer on the fuselage than the CFD predictions, resulting in a larger wing horseshoe vortex suppressing the side of body separation in the juncture flow region. Compared to experimental results, CFD predicts a thinner boundary layer on the fuselage generates a weaker wing horseshoe vortex resulting in a larger side of body separation.

  7. Role of viscoelasticity in instability in plane shear flow over a ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    lence in boundary layer flow over deformable surfaces as found by pioneering experiments of ... supports a viscous fluid layer of thickness around 300 μm to 1000 μm in a parallel-plate rheome- ter. ... applications are viscoelastic. ... In the absence of inertia, the Newtonian fluid flow over a flat rigid surface is always stable,.

  8. Experimental investigation of flow and slip transition in nanochannels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhigang; Li, Long; Mo, Jingwen

    2014-11-01

    Flow slip in nanochannels is sought in many applications, such as sea water desalination and molecular separation, because it can enhance fluid transport, which is essential in nanofluidic systems. Previous findings about the slip length for simple fluids at the nanoscale appear to be controversial. Some experiments and simulations showed that the slip length is independent of shear rate, which agrees with the prediction of classic slip theories. However, there is increasing work showing that slip length is shear rate dependent. In this work, we experimentally investigate the Poiseuille flows in nanochannels. It is found that the flow rate undergoes a transition between two linear regimes as the shear rate is varied. The transition indicates that the non-slip boundary condition is valid at low shear rate. When the shear rate is larger than a critical value, slip takes place and the slip length increases linearly with increasing shear rate before approaching a constant value. The results reported in this work can help advance the understanding of flow slip in nanochannels. This work was supported by the Research Grants Council of the Hong Kong Special Administrative Region under Grant Nos. 615710 and 615312. J. Mo was partially supported by the Postgraduate Scholarship through the Energy Program at HKUST.

  9. Experimental investigation of fundamental processes in mining induced fracturing and rock instability.

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Napier, JAL

    2002-03-01

    Full Text Available The main themes of the project GAP601b have been experimental investigations of creep effects, further underground observations of time-dependent behaviour, investigation of scale effects and rock mass stability and studies of the interaction...

  10. Experimental test of the electromagnetic ion cyclotron instability within the earth's magnetosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mauk, B.H.; McPherron, R.L.

    1980-01-01

    The ATS-6 geostationary satellite has observed many examples of propagating, electromagnetic Alfven/ion cyclotron waves in both plasma particle and magnetic field data. These waves have been viewed predominantly near the afternoon and dusk regions of the earth's magnetosphere with normalized frequencies (ω/Ω/sub H/ + ) ranging between 0.05 and 0.5. Viewed from an average geomagnetic latitude of +10 0 , the waves have only been observed to propagate northward, suggesting that they are generated within the equatorial or minimum BETA regions. Two wave events have been chosen for detailed analysis. Both events appeared coincidentally with the encounter of cool plasma populations (5 eV) which joined the hot populations already present (10--40 keV). These coincidences suggest the popular, yet largely untested, electromagnetic ion cyclotron instability as the wave generation mechanism. As a test of this hypothesis, ion cyclotron amplification profiles are obtained by evaluating the linear growth rate integrals under the measured, anisotropic hot ion distributions. The measured frequencies for both of the chosen events are in good agreement with the quite restricted values which correspond to the peaks of the amplification profiles. As a result of magnetic field inhomogeneities, the interactions remain within the linear regime

  11. Experimental study on fundamental performance of reverse flow diverters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fan Yanfang; Xu Cong; Jing Shan

    2008-01-01

    The Reverse Flow Diverter (RFD) is one of the key components affecting the liquid-delivered efficiency. The effects of inflow structure, outflow structure, area ratio and suction gap on the performance of RFDs were studied in this paper. It can be found experimentally that expected entrainment phenomenon can be achieved when the outlet velocity of fluid for RFDs' inflow structure is sufficient. There is less liquid delivered by an RFD with a long receiver than that without a receiver. Because of back-flow caused by vortex separation, oversize area ratio cannot have better entrainment phenomenon and the optimum area ratio is 1.5. When the ratio of suction gap length to inlet diameter of outflow structure is 0.9-1.0, the excellent liquid-delivered efficiency can be obtained. (authors)

  12. Experimental identification of the kink instability as a poloidal flux amplification mechanism for coaxial gun spheromak formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, S C; Bellan, P M

    2003-05-30

    The magnetohydrodynamic kink instability is observed and identified experimentally as a poloidal flux amplification mechanism for coaxial gun spheromak formation. Plasmas in this experiment fall into three distinct regimes which depend on the peak gun current to magnetic flux ratio, with (I) low values resulting in a straight plasma column with helical magnetic field, (II) intermediate values leading to kinking of the column axis, and (III) high values leading immediately to a detached plasma. Onset of column kinking agrees quantitatively with the Kruskal-Shafranov limit, and the kink acts as a dynamo which converts toroidal to poloidal flux. Regime II clearly leads to both poloidal flux amplification and the development of a spheromak configuration.

  13. Experimental identification of the kink instability as a poloidal flux amplification mechanism for coaxial gun spheromak formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hsu, S.C.; Bellan, P.M.

    2003-01-01

    The magnetohydrodynamic kink instability is observed and identified experimentally as a poloidal flux amplification mechanism for coaxial gun spheromak formation. Plasmas in this experiment fall into three distinct regimes which depend on the peak gun current to magnetic flux ratio, with (I) low values resulting in a straight plasma column with helical magnetic field, (II) intermediate values leading to kinking of the column axis, and (III) high values leading immediately to a detached plasma. Onset of column kinking agrees quantitatively with the Kruskal-Shafranov limit, and the kink acts as a dynamo which converts toroidal to poloidal flux. Regime II clearly leads to both poloidal flux amplification and the development of a spheromak configuration

  14. Effect of Variable Viscosity on Vortex Instability of Non-Darcy Mixed Convection Boundary Layer Flow Adjacent to a Nonisothermal Horizontal Surface in a Porous Medium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. M. Elaiw

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We study the effect of variable viscosity on the flow and vortex instability for non-Darcy mixed convection boundary layer flow on a nonisothermal horizontal plat surface in a saturated porous medium. The variation of viscosity is expressed as an exponential function of temperature. The analysis of the disturbance flow is based on linear stability theory. The base flow equations and the resulting eigenvalue problem are solved using finite difference schemes. It is found that the variable viscosity effect enhances the heat transfer rate and destabilizes the flow for liquid heating, while the opposite trend is true for gas heating.

  15. Instability of a Lamellar Phase under Shear Flow: Formation of Multilamellar Vesicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Courbin, L.; Delville, J. P.; Rouch, J.; Panizza, P.

    2002-09-01

    The formation of closed-compact multilamellar vesicles (referred to in the literature as the ``onion texture'') obtained upon shearing lamellar phases is studied using small-angle light scattering and cross-polarized microscopy. By varying the shear rate γ ˙, the gap cell D, and the smectic distance d, we show that: (i)the formation of this structure occurs homogeneously in the cell at a well-defined wave vector qi, via a strain-controlled process, and (ii)the value of qi varies as (dγ ˙/D)1/3. These results strongly suggest that formation of multilamellar vesicles may be monitored by an undulation (buckling) instability of the membranes, as expected from theory.

  16. Regulation of liquid metal coolant flow rate in experimental loops

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kozlov, F.A.; Laptev, G.I.

    1987-01-01

    The possibility to use the VRT-2, RPA-T and R 133 analog temperature regulators for the automated regulation of liquid metal flow rate in the experimental loops for investigations on sodium and sodium-potassium alloy technology is considered. The RPA-T device is shown to be the most convenient one; it is characterized by the following parameters: measuring modulus transfer coefficient is 500; the range of regulating modulus proportionality factor variation - 0.3 - 50; the range of the regulating modulus intergrating time constant variation - 5 - 500 s

  17. Dynamics and Instabilities of Vortex Pairs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leweke, Thomas; Le Dizès, Stéphane; Williamson, Charles H. K.

    2016-01-01

    This article reviews the characteristics and behavior of counter-rotating and corotating vortex pairs, which are seemingly simple flow configurations yet immensely rich in phenomena. Since the reviews in this journal by Widnall (1975) and Spalart (1998) , who studied the fundamental structure and dynamics of vortices and airplane trailing vortices, respectively, there have been many analytical, computational, and experimental studies of vortex pair flows. We discuss two-dimensional dynamics, including the merging of same-sign vortices and the interaction with the mutually induced strain, as well as three-dimensional displacement and core instabilities resulting from this interaction. Flows subject to combined instabilities are also considered, in particular the impingement of opposite-sign vortices on a ground plane. We emphasize the physical mechanisms responsible for the flow phenomena and clearly present the key results that are useful to the reader for predicting the dynamics and instabilities of parallel vortices.

  18. Electrostatic instabilities and nonlinear structures of low-frequency waves in nonuniform electron-positron-ion plasmas with shear flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mirza, Arshad M.; Hasan, Asma; Azeem, M.; Saleem, H.

    2003-01-01

    It is found that the low-frequency ion acoustic and electrostatic drift waves can become unstable in uniform electron-ion and electron-positron-ion plasmas due to the ion shear flow. In a collisional plasma a drift-dissipative instability can also take place. In the presence of collisions the temporal behavior of nonlinear drift-dissipative mode can be represented in the form of well-known Lorenz and Stenflo type equations that admit chaotic trajectories. On the other hand, a quasi-stationary solution of the mode coupling equations can be represented in the form of monopolar vortex. The results of the present investigation can be helpful in understanding electrostatic turbulence and wave phenomena in laboratory and astrophysical plasmas

  19. Predicting the onset of dynamic instability of a cylindrical plate under axial flow conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marcum, W.R., E-mail: marcumw@engr.orst.edu [Oregon State University, Department of Nuclear Engineering and Radiation Health Physics, 116 Radiation Center, Corvallis, OR 97330 (United States); Woods, B.G. [Oregon State University, Department of Nuclear Engineering and Radiation Health Physics, 116 Radiation Center, Corvallis, OR 97330 (United States)

    2012-09-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A semi-numerical flow induced vibration model is developed of a cylindrical plate. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Test case results are presented and agree well with previous studies data. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The model identifies a relationship between forces and the plate natural frequency. - Abstract: The dynamic mechanical stability of a single cylindrical plate under flow conditions is considered herein. Numerous plate-type research reactors such as the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) located at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) comprise fuel elements which contain arrays of concentrically aligned cylindrical plates. Several of these reactors are licensed to operate at extreme heat fluxes; as a corollary their hydraulic designs require large flow rates sufficient to remove this heat. These flow rates may reach superficial velocities upwards of 15 m/s through individual flow channels. Given that fuel plates typically found in such research reactors are relatively long ({approx}1.2573 m), wide ({approx}0.1397 m), and extremely thin ({approx}0.00127 m) concern is drawn toward the susceptibility of flow induced vibration (FIV). In an attempt to gain a more comprehensive understanding toward the dynamic mechanical limit of stability of cylindrical plates, a FIV model was developed using semi-numerical methods. The FIV model was developed in two separate modules; a plate stability module, and a flow module. These modules were then coupled together to produce a FIV model. In this study, a set of test cases are presented on the plate stability module under free vibration conditions, comparing well against known available information from previous studies. Results are similarly presented on the flow module and compared against a RELAP5-3D model. Lastly, results of these coupled modules are presented and discussion is given toward the relationship between plate natural frequency, geometry, and plate membrane pressures.

  20. Experimental investigation of the mutual interference flow of two circular cylinders by flow visualization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yokoi, Yoshifumi; Vitkovičová, Rut

    In order to understand the aspect of the mutual interference flow from two circular cylinders, the visual observation experiment was performed by use a water flow apparatus. The purpose of this study is accumulation of the basic image data for comparing with numerical computation or previous experimental results. In this report, the intervals of two circular cylinders were varied, the visualization experiment was performed, and the vortex shedding characteristics and the flow pattern in each case were investigated. The cylinder setting conditions were seven kinds (the position of the rear-side circular cylinder is changed). The cylinder diameter ratios were four kinds (D/d=1.0, 1.67, 2.5 and 5.0). The variation of Reynolds number was three kinds (Re=548.7, 1200 and 2500). The dye oozing streak method was used in this visualization experiment. Although the previous PIV experimental result and present result obtained the same flow feature, the aspect of an interference flow became clear by changing the color of tracer ink.

  1. Experimental investigation of the mutual interference flow of two circular cylinders by flow visualization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yokoi Yoshifumi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to understand the aspect of the mutual interference flow from two circular cylinders, the visual observation experiment was performed by use a water flow apparatus. The purpose of this study is accumulation of the basic image data for comparing with numerical computation or previous experimental results. In this report, the intervals of two circular cylinders were varied, the visualization experiment was performed, and the vortex shedding characteristics and the flow pattern in each case were investigated. The cylinder setting conditions were seven kinds (the position of the rear-side circular cylinder is changed. The cylinder diameter ratios were four kinds (D/d=1.0, 1.67, 2.5 and 5.0. The variation of Reynolds number was three kinds (Re=548.7, 1200 and 2500. The dye oozing streak method was used in this visualization experiment. Although the previous PIV experimental result and present result obtained the same flow feature, the aspect of an interference flow became clear by changing the color of tracer ink.

  2. Vertical Instability in EAST: Comparison of Model Predictions with Experimental Results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qian Jinping; Wan Baonian; Shen Biao; Xiao Bingjia; Sun Youwen; Shi Yuejiang; Lin Shiyao; Li Jiangang; Gong Xianzu

    2008-01-01

    Growth rates of the axisymmetric mode in elongated plasmas in the experimental advanced superconducting tokamak (EAST) are measured with zero feedback gains and then compared with numerically calculated growth rates for the reconstructed shapes. The comparison is made after loss of vertical position control. The open-loop growth rates were scanned with the number of vessel eigenmodes, which up to 20 is enough to make the growth rates settled. The agreement between the growth rates measured experimentally and the growth rates determined numerically is good. The results show that a linear RZIP model is essentially good enough for the vertical position feedback control.

  3. Experimental CFD grade data for stratified two-phase flows

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vallee, Christophe, E-mail: c.vallee@fzd.d [Forschungszentrum Dresden-Rossendorf e.V., Institute of Safety Research, D-01314 Dresden (Germany); Lucas, Dirk; Beyer, Matthias; Pietruske, Heiko; Schuetz, Peter; Carl, Helmar [Forschungszentrum Dresden-Rossendorf e.V., Institute of Safety Research, D-01314 Dresden (Germany)

    2010-09-15

    1:3. The investigations focus on the flow regimes observed in the region of the elbow and of the steam generator inlet chamber, which are equipped with glass side walls. An overview of the experimental methodology and of the acquired data is given. These cover experiments without water circulation, which can be seen as test cases for CFD development, as well as counter-current flow limitation experiments, representing transient validation cases of a typical nuclear reactor safety issue.

  4. Experimental CFD grade data for stratified two-phase flows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vallee, Christophe; Lucas, Dirk; Beyer, Matthias; Pietruske, Heiko; Schuetz, Peter; Carl, Helmar

    2010-01-01

    :3. The investigations focus on the flow regimes observed in the region of the elbow and of the steam generator inlet chamber, which are equipped with glass side walls. An overview of the experimental methodology and of the acquired data is given. These cover experiments without water circulation, which can be seen as test cases for CFD development, as well as counter-current flow limitation experiments, representing transient validation cases of a typical nuclear reactor safety issue.

  5. Numerical analysis of flow in a centrifugal compressor with circumferential grooves: influence of groove location and number on flow instability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, X.; Qin, G.; Ai, Z.; Ji, Y.

    2017-08-01

    As an effective and economic method for flow range enhancement, circumferential groove casing treatment (CGCT) is widely used to increase the stall margin of compressors. Different from traditional grooved casing treatments, in which the grooves are always located over the rotor in both axial and radial compressors, one or several circumferential grooves are located along the shroud side of the diffuser passage in this paper. Numerical investigations were conducted to predict the performance of a low flow rate centrifugal compressor with CGCT in diffuser. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analysis is performed under stage environment in order to find the optimum location of the circumferential casing groove in consideration of stall margin enhancement and efficiency gain at design point, and the impact of groove number to the effect of this grooved casing treatment configuration in enhancing the stall margin of the compressor stage is studied. The results indicate that the centrifugal compressor with circumferential groove in vaned diffuser can obtain obvious improvement in the stall margin with sacrificing design efficiency a little. Efforts were made to study blade level flow mechanisms to determine how the CGCT impacts the compressor’s stall margin (SM) and performance. The flow structures in the passage, the tip gap, and the grooves as well as their mutual interactions were plotted and analysed.

  6. Flow Instabilities and Main Steam Line Vibrations in a Pressurized Water Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henriksson, Mats; Westin, Johan; Granhall, Tord; Andersson, Lars; Bjerke, Lars-Erik

    2002-01-01

    Severe vibrational problems occurred in the main steam system of a PWR nuclear power plant, about 18 months after a steam generator replacement had been carried out. The magnitude of the vibrations reached levels at which the operators had to reduce power in order to stay within the operating limits imposed by the nuclear inspectorate. To solve the problem the following analyses methods were employed: - Testing the influence on vibration level from different modes of plant operation; - Analyses of plant measurement data; - Calculations of: hydraulic behaviour of the system, structural dynamic behaviour of the system, flow at the steam generator outlet. Scale model testing of the steam generator outlet region. Hydraulic flow disturbances in the main steam system were measured using pressure and strain gauges, which made it possible to track individual pressure pulses propagating through the main steam system. Analyses showed that the pressure pulses causing the vibration originated from the vicinity of the steam generator outlet. By using computer codes for network fluid flow analyses the pressure pulses found in the measurement traces could be generated in calculations. Careful studies of the flow at the steam generator outlet region, using model testing in a 1:3 scale model as well as transient 3D CFD calculations, gave clear indications that flow separation occurred at the steam generator outlet nozzle and at the first bend. Finally, by substituting the outlet nozzle for a different design with a multi-port nozzle, the steam line vibration problem has been solved. (authors)

  7. Experimental analysis of thermo-acoustic instabilities in a generic gas turbine combustor by phase-correlated PIV, chemiluminescence, and laser Raman scattering measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arndt, Christoph M.; Severin, Michael; Dem, Claudiu; Stöhr, Michael; Steinberg, Adam M.; Meier, Wolfgang

    2015-04-01

    A gas turbine model combustor for partially premixed swirl flames was equipped with an optical combustion chamber and operated with CH4 and air at atmospheric pressure. The burner consisted of two concentric nozzles for separately controlled air flows and a ring of holes 12 mm upstream of the nozzle exits for fuel injection. The flame described here had a thermal power of 25 kW, a global equivalence ratio of 0.7, and exhibited thermo-acoustic instabilities at a frequency of approximately 400 Hz. The phase-dependent variations in the flame shape and relative heat release rate were determined by OH* chemiluminescence imaging; the flow velocities by stereoscopic particle image velocimetry (PIV); and the major species concentrations, mixture fraction, and temperature by laser Raman scattering. The PIV measurements showed that the flow field performed a "pumping" mode with varying inflow velocities and extent of the inner recirculation zone, triggered by the pressure variations in the combustion chamber. The flow field oscillations were accompanied by variations in the mixture fraction in the inflow region and at the flame root, which in turn were mainly caused by the variations in the CH4 concentration. The mean phase-dependent changes in the fluxes of CH4 and N2 through cross-sectional planes of the combustion chamber at different heights above the nozzle were estimated by combining the PIV and Raman data. The results revealed a periodic variation in the CH4 flux by more than 150 % in relation to the mean value, due to the combined influence of the oscillating flow velocity, density variations, and CH4 concentration. Based on the experimental results, the feedback mechanism of the thermo-acoustic pulsations could be identified as a periodic fluctuation of the equivalence ratio and fuel mass flow together with a convective delay for the transport of fuel from the fuel injector to the flame zone. The combustor and the measured data are well suited for the validation of

  8. Experimental investigation of fluvial dike breaching due to flow overtopping

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Kadi Abderrezzak, K.; Rifai, I.; Erpicum, S.; Archambeau, P.; Violeau, D.; Pirotton, M.; Dewals, B.

    2017-12-01

    The failure of fluvial dikes (levees) often leads to devastating floods that cause loss of life and damages to public infrastructure. Overtopping flows have been recognized as one of the most frequent cause of dike erosion and breaching. Fluvial dike breaching is different from frontal dike (embankments) breaching, because of specific geometry and boundary conditions. The current knowledge on the physical processes underpinning fluvial dike failure due to overtopping remains limited. In addition, there is a lack of a continuous monitoring of the 3D breach formation, limiting the analysis of the key mechanisms governing the breach development and the validation of conceptual or physically-based models. Laboratory tests on breach growth in homogeneous, non-cohesive sandy fluvial dikes due to flow overtopping have been performed. Two experimental setups have been constructed, permitting the investigation of various hydraulic and geometric parameters. Each experimental setup includes a main channel, separated from a floodplain by a dike. A rectangular initial notch is cut in the crest to initiate dike breaching. The breach development is monitored continuously using a specific developed laser profilometry technique. The observations have shown that the breach develops in two stages: first the breach deepens and widens with the breach centerline being gradually shifted toward the downstream side of the main channel. This behavior underlines the influence of the flow momentum component parallel to the dike crest. Second, the dike geometry upstream of the breach stops evolving and the breach widening continues only toward the downstream side of the main channel. The breach evolution has been found strongly affected by the flow conditions (i.e. inflow discharge in the main channel, downstream boundary condition) and floodplain confinement. The findings of this work shed light on key mechanisms of fluvial dike breaching, which differ substantially from those of dam

  9. Structural instability of atmospheric flows under perturbations of the mass balance and effect in transport calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Núñez, M A; Mendoza, R

    2015-01-01

    Several methods to estimate the velocity field of atmospheric flows, have been proposed to the date for applications such as emergency response systems, transport calculations and for budget studies of all kinds. These applications require a wind field that satisfies the conservation of mass but, in general, estimated wind fields do not satisfy exactly the continuity equation. An approach to reduce the effect of using a divergent wind field as input in the transport-diffusion equations, was proposed in the literature. In this work, a linear local analysis of a wind field, is used to show analytically that the perturbation of a large-scale nondivergent flow can yield a divergent flow with a substantially different structure. The effects of these structural changes in transport calculations are illustrated by means of analytic solutions of the transport equation

  10. Development of tearing instability in a current sheet forming by sheared incompressible flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolman, Elizabeth A.; Loureiro, Nuno F.; Uzdensky, Dmitri A.

    2018-02-01

    Sweet-Parker current sheets in high Lundquist number plasmas are unstable to tearing, suggesting they will not form in physical systems. Understanding magnetic reconnection thus requires study of the stability of a current sheet as it forms. Formation can occur due to sheared, sub-Alfvénic incompressible flows which narrow the sheet. Standard tearing theory (Furth et al. Phys. Fluids, vol. 6 (4), 1963, pp. 459-484, Rutherford, Phys. Fluids, vol. 16 (11), 1973, pp. 1903-1908, Coppi et al. Fizika Plazmy, vol. 2, 1976, pp. 961-966) is not immediately applicable to such forming sheets for two reasons: first, because the flow introduces terms not present in the standard calculation; second, because the changing equilibrium introduces time dependence to terms which are constant in the standard calculation, complicating the formulation of an eigenvalue problem. This paper adapts standard tearing mode analysis to confront these challenges. In an initial phase when any perturbations are primarily governed by ideal magnetohydrodynamics, a coordinate transformation reveals that the flow compresses and stretches perturbations. A multiple scale formulation describes how linear tearing mode theory (Furth et al. Phys. Fluids, vol. 6 (4), 1963, pp. 459-484, Coppi et al. Fizika Plazmy, vol. 2, 1976, pp. 961-966) can be applied to an equilibrium changing under flow, showing that the flow affects the separable exponential growth only implicitly, by making the standard scalings time dependent. In the nonlinear Rutherford stage, the coordinate transformation shows that standard theory can be adapted by adding to the stationary rates time dependence and an additional term due to the strengthening equilibrium magnetic field. Overall, this understanding supports the use of flow-free scalings with slight modifications to study tearing in a forming sheet.

  11. Theory of current instability experiments in magnetic Taylor-Couette flows

    OpenAIRE

    Ruediger, G.; Schultz, M.; Shalybkov, D.; Hollerbach, R.

    2006-01-01

    We consider the linear stability of dissipative MHD Taylor-Couette flow with imposed toroidal magnetic fields. The inner and outer cylinders can be either insulating or conducting; the inner one rotates, the outer one is stationary. The magnetic Prandtl number can be as small as 10-5, approaching realistic liquid-metal values. The magnetic field destabilizes the flow, except for radial profiles of B$_\\phi$(R) close to the current-free solution. The profile with B$_{in}$=B$_{out}$ (the most un...

  12. Chaotic non-planar vibrations of the thin elastica. Part I: Experimental observation of planar instability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cusumano, J. P.; Moon, F. C.

    1995-01-01

    In this two-part paper, the results of an investigation into the non-linear dynamics of a flexible cantilevered rod (the elastica) with a thin rectangular cross-section are presented. An experimental examination of the dynamics of the elastica over a broad parameter range forms the core of Part I. In Part II, the experimental work is related to a theoretical study of the mechanics of the elastica, and the study of a two-degree-of-freedom model obtained by modal projection. The experimental system used in this investigation is a rod with clamped-free boundary conditions, forced by sinusoidally displacing the clamped end. Planar periodic motions of the driven elastica are shown to lose stability at distinct resonant wedges, and the resulting motions are shown in general to be non-planar, chaotic, bending-torsion oscillations. Non-planar motions in all resonances exhibit energy cascading and dynamic two-well phenomena, and a family of asymmetric, bending-torsion non-linear modes is discovered. Correlation dimension calculations are used to estimate the number of active degrees of freedom in the system.

  13. Experimental and numerical research on cavitating flows around axisymmetric bodies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haipeng, Wei; Song, Fu; Qin, Wu; Biao, Huang; Guoyu, Wang

    2014-01-01

    We investigated the cavitating flows around different axisymmetric bodies based on experiments and numerical simulation. In the numerical simulation, the multiphase Reynolds averaged Navier Stokes equations (RANS) were solved via the commercial computational fluid dynamics code CFX. The modified k-wSST turbulence model was used along with the transport equation-based cavitation model. In the experiments, a high-speed video technique was used to observe the unsteady cavitating flow patterns, and the dynamic force measurement system was used to measure the hydrodynamics of the axisymmetric bodies under different cavitation conditions. Results are shown for the hemisphere bodies, conical bodies and blunt bodies. Reasonable agreements were obtained between the computational and experimental results. The results show that for the hemispherical body, the cavity consists of quasi-steady transparent region and unsteady foggy water-vapor mixture region, which contains small-scale vortices and is dominated by bubble clusters, causing irregular disturbances at the cavity interfaces. The curvature at the front of the conical body is larger, resulting in that the flow separates at the shoulder of the axisymmetric body. The cavity stretches downstream and reaches to a fixed cavity length and shape. For blunt bodies, the incipient cavitation number is larger than that for the hemispherical body. A large cloud cavity is formed at the shoulder of the blunt body in the cores of vortices in high shear separation regions and the re-entrant jet does not significantly interact with the cavity interface when it moves upstream. As to the dynamic characteristics of unsteady cavitating flows around the axisymmetric bodies, the pulsation frequency for the hemispherical body is larger than that for the blunt body. For the hemispherical body, the pulsation is mainly caused by the high-frequency, small-scale shedding at the rear end of the cavity, while for the blunt body, the main factor for

  14. Theory of current-driven instability experiments in magnetic Taylor-Couette flows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rüdiger, Günther; Schultz, Manfred; Shalybkov, Dima; Hollerbach, Rainer

    2007-11-01

    We consider the linear stability of dissipative magnetic Taylor-Couette flow with imposed toroidal magnetic fields. The inner and outer cylinders can be either insulating or conducting; the inner one rotates, the outer one is stationary. The magnetic Prandtl number can be as small as 10(-5) , approaching realistic liquid-metal values. The magnetic field destabilizes the flow, except for radial profiles of B(phi)(R) close to the current-free solution. The profile with B(in)=B(out) (the most uniform field) is considered in detail. For weak fields the Taylor-Couette flow is stabilized, until for moderately strong fields the m=1 azimuthal mode dramatically destabilizes the flow again so that a maximum value for the critical Reynolds number exists. For sufficiently strong fields (as measured by the Hartmann number) the toroidal field is always unstable, even for the nonrotating case with Re=0 . The electric currents needed to generate the required toroidal fields in laboratory experiments are a few kA if liquid sodium is used, somewhat more if gallium is used. Weaker currents are needed for wider gaps, so a wide-gap apparatus could succeed even with gallium. The critical Reynolds numbers are only somewhat larger than the nonmagnetic values; hence such experiments would work with only modest rotation rates.

  15. Experimental study of the interplay between magmatic rift intrusion and flank instability with application to the 2001 Mount Etna eruption

    KAUST Repository

    Le Corvec, Nicolas; Walter, Thomas R.; Ruch, Joel; Bonforte, Alessandro; Puglisi, Giuseppe

    2014-01-01

    Mount Etna volcano is subject to transient magmatic intrusions and flank movement. The east flank of the edifice, in particular, is moving eastward and is dissected by the Timpe Fault System. The relationship of this eastward motion with intrusions and tectonic fault motion, however, remains poorly constrained. Here we explore this relationship by using analogue experiments that are designed to simulate magmatic rift intrusion, flank movement, and fault activity before, during, and after a magmatic intrusion episode. Using particle image velocimetry allows for a precise temporal and spatial analysis of the development and activity of fault systems. The results show that the occurrence of rift intrusion episodes has a direct effect on fault activity. In such a situation, fault activity may occur or may be hindered, depending on the interplay of fault displacement and flank acceleration in response to dike intrusion. Our results demonstrate that a complex interplay may exist between an active tectonic fault system and magmatically induced flank instability. Episodes of magmatic intrusion change the intensity pattern of horizontal flank displacements and may hinder or activate associated faults. We further compare our results with the GPS data of the Mount Etna 2001 eruption and intrusion. We find that syneruptive displacement rates at the Timpe Fault System have differed from the preeruptive or posteruptive periods, which shows a good agreement of both the experimental and the GPS data. Therefore, understanding the flank instability and flank stability at Mount Etna requires consideration of both tectonic and magmatic forcing. Key Points Analyzing Mount Etna east flank dynamics during the 2001 eruption Good correlation between analogue models and GPS data Understanding the different behavior of faulting before/during/after an eruption © 2014. American Geophysical Union. All Rights Reserved.

  16. Experimental study of the interplay between magmatic rift intrusion and flank instability with application to the 2001 Mount Etna eruption

    KAUST Repository

    Le Corvec, Nicolas

    2014-07-01

    Mount Etna volcano is subject to transient magmatic intrusions and flank movement. The east flank of the edifice, in particular, is moving eastward and is dissected by the Timpe Fault System. The relationship of this eastward motion with intrusions and tectonic fault motion, however, remains poorly constrained. Here we explore this relationship by using analogue experiments that are designed to simulate magmatic rift intrusion, flank movement, and fault activity before, during, and after a magmatic intrusion episode. Using particle image velocimetry allows for a precise temporal and spatial analysis of the development and activity of fault systems. The results show that the occurrence of rift intrusion episodes has a direct effect on fault activity. In such a situation, fault activity may occur or may be hindered, depending on the interplay of fault displacement and flank acceleration in response to dike intrusion. Our results demonstrate that a complex interplay may exist between an active tectonic fault system and magmatically induced flank instability. Episodes of magmatic intrusion change the intensity pattern of horizontal flank displacements and may hinder or activate associated faults. We further compare our results with the GPS data of the Mount Etna 2001 eruption and intrusion. We find that syneruptive displacement rates at the Timpe Fault System have differed from the preeruptive or posteruptive periods, which shows a good agreement of both the experimental and the GPS data. Therefore, understanding the flank instability and flank stability at Mount Etna requires consideration of both tectonic and magmatic forcing. Key Points Analyzing Mount Etna east flank dynamics during the 2001 eruption Good correlation between analogue models and GPS data Understanding the different behavior of faulting before/during/after an eruption © 2014. American Geophysical Union. All Rights Reserved.

  17. High-Order Weno Simulations of Three-Dimensional Reshocked Richtmyer-Meshkov Instability to Late Times: Dynamics, Dependence on Initial Conditions, and Comparisons to Experimental Data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schilling, O; Latini, M

    2010-01-12

    The dynamics of the reshocked multi-mode Richtmyer-Meshkov instability is investigated using 513 x 257{sup 2} three-dimensional ninth-order weighted essentially nonoscillatory shock-capturing simulations. A two-mode initial perturbation with superposed random noise is used to model the Mach 1.5 air/SF{sub 6} Vetter-Sturtevant shock tube experiment. The mass fraction and enstrophy isosurfaces, and density cross-sections are utilized to show the detailed flow structure before, during, and after reshock. It is shown that the mixing layer growth agrees well with the experimentally measured growth rate before and after reshock. The post-reshock growth rate is also in good agreement with the prediction of the Mikaelian model. A parametric study of the sensitivity of the layer growth to the choice of amplitudes of the short and long wavelength initial interfacial perturbation is also presented. Finally, the amplification effects of reshock are quantified using the evolution of the turbulent kinetic energy and turbulent enstrophy spectra, as well as the evolution of the baroclinic enstrophy production, buoyancy production, and shear production terms in the enstrophy and turbulent kinetic transport equations.

  18. A Mechanistic Model of Onset of Flow Instability Due to Mergence of Bubble Layers in a Vertical Narrow Rectangular Channel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Juh Yung; Chang, Soon Heung; Jeong, Yong [KAIST, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-05-15

    The onset of flow instability (OFI) is the one of important boiling phenomena since it may induce the premature critical heat flux (CHF) at the lowest heat flux level due to sudden flow excursion in a single channel of multichannel configuration. Especially prediction of OFI for narrow rectangular channel is very crucial in relevant to thermal-hydraulic design and safety analysis of open pool-type research reactors (RRs) using plate-type fuels. Based on high speed video (HSV) technique, the authors observed and determined that OFI and the minimum premature CHF in a narrow rectangular channel are induced by abrupt pressure drop fluctuation due to the mergence of facing bubble boundary layers (BLs) on opposite boiling surfaces. In this study, new mechanistic OFI model for narrow rectangular channel heated on both sides has been derived, which satisfies with the real triggering phenomena. Force balance approach was used for modeling of the maximum BLT since the quantity is comparable to the bubble departure diameter. From the validation with OFI database, it was shown that the new model fairly well predicts OFI heat flux for wide range of conditions.

  19. Numerical solution of instability phenomenon arising in double phase flow through inclined homogeneous porous media

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ravi Borana

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available In the petroleum reservoir at an early stage the oil is recovered due to existing natural pressure and such type of oil recovery is referred as primary oil recovery. It ends when pressure equilibrium occurs and still large amount of oil remains in the reservoir. Consequently, secondary oil recovery process is employed by injection water into some injection wells to push oil towards the production well. The instability phenomenon arises during secondary oil recovery process. When water is injected into the oil filled region, due to the force of injecting water and difference in viscosities of water and native oil, protuberances occur at the common interface. It gives rise to the shape of fingers (protuberances at common interface. The injected water shoots through inter connected capillaries at very high speed. It appears in the form of irregular trembling fingers, filled with injected water in the native oil field; this is due to the immiscibility of water and oil. The homogeneous porous medium is considered with a small inclination with the horizontal, the basic parameters porosity and permeability remain uniform throughout the porous medium. Based on the mass conservation principle and important Darcy's law under the specific standard relationships and basic assumptions considered, the governing equation yields a non-linear partial differential equation. The Crank–Nicolson finite difference scheme is developed and on implementing the boundary conditions the resulting finite difference scheme is implemented to obtain the numerical results. The numerical results are obtained by generating a MATLAB code for the saturation of water which decreases with the space variable and increases with time. The obtained numerical solution is efficient, accurate, and reliable, matches well with the physical phenomenon.

  20. Magma flow instability and cyclic activity at soufriere hills volcano, montserrat, british west indies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voight; Sparks; Miller; Stewart; Hoblitt; Clarke; Ewart; Aspinall; Baptie; Calder; Cole; Druitt; Hartford; Herd; Jackson; Lejeune; Lockhart; Loughlin; Luckett; Lynch; Norton; Robertson; Watson; Watts; Young

    1999-02-19

    Dome growth at the Soufriere Hills volcano (1996 to 1998) was frequently accompanied by repetitive cycles of earthquakes, ground deformation, degassing, and explosive eruptions. The cycles reflected unsteady conduit flow of volatile-charged magma resulting from gas exsolution, rheological stiffening, and pressurization. The cycles, over hours to days, initiated when degassed stiff magma retarded flow in the upper conduit. Conduit pressure built with gas exsolution, causing shallow seismicity and edifice inflation. Magma and gas were then expelled and the edifice deflated. The repeat time-scale is controlled by magma ascent rates, degassing, and microlite crystallization kinetics. Cyclic behavior allows short-term forecasting of timing, and of eruption style related to explosivity potential.

  1. PSE-3D Instability Analysis and Application to Flow Over an Elliptic Cone

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-04-01

    Talks o 8th IUTAM Laminar Turbulent Transition Symposium, Rio de Janeiro , Brasil, 5-8 September 2014 o AIAA 2012-2679, 6th AIAA Flow Control Conference...Ph.D. Universidad Politecnica de Madrid Calle Ramiro de Maeztu 7 Madrid, 28040 SPAIN EOARD GRANT #FA8655-12-1-2004 Report Date...Universidad Politecnica de Madrid Calle Ramiro de Maeztu 7 Madrid, 28040 SPAIN 8. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION REPORT NUMBER

  2. Experimental study of micro-shock tube flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Jin Ouk; Kim, Gyu Wan; Rasel, Md. Alim Iftakhar [Dept. of Mechanical Engineering, Andong National University, Andong (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Heuy Dong [Fire Research Center, Korea Institute of Civil Engineering and Building Technology, Hwasung (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-03-15

    The flow characteristics in micro shock tube are investigated experimentally. Studies were carried out using a stainless steel micro shock tube. Shock and expansion wave was measured using 8 pressure sensors. The initial pressure ratio was varied from 4.3 to 30.5, and the diameter of tube was also changed from 3 mm to 6 mm. Diaphragm conditions were varied using two types of diaphragms. The results obtained show that the shock strength in the tube becomes stronger for an increase in the initial pressure ratio and diameter of tube. For the thinner diaphragm, the highest shock strength was found among varied diaphragm condition. Shock attenuation was highly influenced by the diameter of tube.

  3. On the Goertler instability in hypersonic flows: Sutherland law fluids and real gas effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Yibin B.; Hall, Philip; Blackaby, Nicholas D.

    1990-01-01

    The Goertler vortex instability mechanism in a hypersonic boundary layer on a curved wall is investigated. The precise roles of the effects of boundary layer growth, wall cooling, and gas dissociation is clarified in the determination of stability properties. It is first assumed that the fluid is an ideal gas with viscosity given by Sutherland's law. It is shown that when the free stream Mach number M is large, the boundary layer divides into two sublayers: a wall layer of O(M sup 3/2) thickness over which the basic state temperature is O(M squared) and a temperature adjustment layer of O(1) thickness over which the basic state temperature decreases monotonically to its free stream value. Goertler vortices which have wavelengths comparable with the boundary layer thickness are referred to as wall modes. It is shown that their downstream evolution is governed by a set of parabolic partial differential equations and that they have the usual features of Goertler vortices in incompressible boundary layers. As the local wavenumber increases, the neutral Goertler number decreases and the center of vortex activity moves towards the temperature adjustment layer. Goertler vortices with wavenumbers of order one or larger must necessarily be trapped in the temperature adjustment layer and it is this mode which is most dangerous. For this mode, it was found that the leading order term in the Goertler number expansion is independent of the wavenumber and is due to the curvature of the basic state. This term is also the asymptotic limit of the neutral Goertler numbers of the wall mode. To determine the higher order corrections terms in the Goertler number expansion, two wall curvature cases are distinguished. Real gas effects were investigated by assuming that the fluid is an ideal dissociating gas. It was found that both gas dissociation and wall cooling are destabilizing for the mode trapped in the temperature adjustment layer, but for the wall mode trapped near the wall the

  4. Experimental study of the hydrodynamic instabilities occurring in boiling-water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fabreca, S.

    1964-10-01

    The subjects is an experimental out-of pile loop study of the hydrodynamic oscillations occurring in boiling-water reactors. The study was carried out at atmospheric pressure and at pressure of about 8 atmospheres, in channels heated electrically by a constant and uniform specified current. In the test at 8 atmospheres the channel was a round tube of approximately 6 mm interior diameter. At 1 atmosphere a ring-section channel was used, 10 * 20 mm in diameter, with an inner heating tube and an outer tube of pyrex. It was possible to operate with natural convection and also with forced convection with test-channel by-pass. The study consists of 3 parts: 1. Preliminary determination of the laws governing pressure-drop during boiling. 2. Determination of the fronts at which oscillation appears, within a wide range of the parameters involved. 3. A descriptive study of the oscillations and measurement of the periods. The report gives the oscillation fronts with natural and forced convection for various values of the singular pressure drop at the channel inlet and for various riser lengths. The results are presented in non-dimensional form, which is available, in first approximation, for all geometric scales and for all fluids. Besides the following points were observed: - the wall (nature and thickness) can be an important factor ; - oscillation can occur in a horizontal channel. (author) [fr

  5. Manipulation and control of instabilities for surfactant-laden liquid film flowing down an inclined plane using a deformable solid layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomar, Dharmendra S.; Sharma, Gaurav

    2018-01-01

    We analyzed the linear stability of surfactant-laden liquid film with a free surface flowing down an inclined plane under the action of gravity when the inclined plane is coated with a deformable solid layer. For a flow past a rigid incline and in the presence of inertia, the gas-liquid (GL) interface is prone to the free surface instability and the presence of surfactant is known to stabilize the free surface mode when the Marangoni number increases above a critical value. The rigid surface configuration also admits a surfactant induced Marangoni mode which remains stable for film flows with a free surface. This Marangoni mode was observed to become unstable for a surfactant covered film flow past a flexible inclined plane in a creeping flow limit when the wall is made sufficiently deformable. In view of these observations, we investigate the following two aspects. First, what is the effect of inertia on Marangoni mode instability induced by wall deformability? Second, and more importantly, whether it is possible to use a deformable solid coating to obtain stable flow for the surfactant covered film for cases when the Marangoni number is below the critical value required for stabilization of free surface instability. In order to explore the first question, we continued the growth rates for the Marangoni mode from the creeping flow limit to finite Reynolds numbers (Re) and observed that while the increase in Reynolds number has a small stabilizing effect on growth rates, the Marangoni mode still remains unstable for finite Reynolds numbers as long as the wall is sufficiently deformable. The Marangoni mode remains the dominant mode for zero and small Reynolds numbers until the GL mode also becomes unstable with the increase in Re. Thus, for a given set of parameters and beyond a critical Re, there is an exchange of dominant mode of instability from the Marangoni to free surface GL mode. With respect to the second important aspect, our results clearly demonstrate

  6. Direct observation of electrothermal instability structures on intensely Ohmically heated aluminum with current flowing in a surface skin layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awe, Thomas

    2017-10-01

    Implosions on the Z Facility assemble high-energy-density plasmas for radiation effects and ICF experiments, but achievable stagnation pressures and temperatures are degraded by the Magneto-Rayleigh-Taylor (MRT) instability. While the beryllium liners (tubes) used in Magnetized Liner Inertial Fusion (MagLIF) experiments are astonishingly smooth (10 to 50 nm RMS roughness), they also contain distributed micron-scale resistive inclusions, and large MRT amplitudes are observed. Early in the implosion, an electrothermal instability (ETI) may provide a perturbation which greatly exceeds the initial surface roughness of the liner. Resistive inhomogeneities drive nonuniform current density and Joule heating, resulting in locally higher temperature, and thus still higher resistivity. Such unstable temperature and pressure growth produce density perturbations which seed MRT. For MagLIF liners, ETI seeding of MRT has been inferred by evaluating late-time MRT, but a direct observation of ETI is not made. ETI is directly observed on the surface of 1.0-mm-diameter solid Al rods pulsed to 1 MA in 100 ns via high resolution gated optical imaging (2 ns temporal and 3 micron spatial resolution). Aluminum 6061 alloy rods, with micron-scale resistive inclusions, consistently first demonstrate overheating from distinct, 10-micron-scale, sub-eV spots, which 5-10 ns later merge into azimuthally stretched elliptical spots and discrete strata (40-100 microns wide by 10 microns tall). Axial plasma filaments form shortly thereafter. Surface plasma can be suppressed for rods coated with dielectric, enabling extended study of the evolution of stratified ETI structures, and experimental inference of ETI growth rates. This fundamentally new and highly 3-dimensional dataset informs ETI physics, including when the ETI seed of MRT may be initiated.

  7. Experimental observations of natural circulation flow in the NSTF

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lisowski, Darius D., E-mail: dlisowski@anl.gov; Kraus, Adam R.; Bucknor, Matthew D.; Hu, Rui; Farmer, Mitch T.

    2016-09-15

    A 1/2 scale test facility has been constructed at Argonne National Laboratory to study the heat removal performance and natural circulation flow patterns in a Reactor Cavity Cooling System (RCCS). Our test facility, the Natural convection Shutdown heat removal Test Facility (NSTF), supports the broader goal of developing an inherently safe and fully passive ex-vessel decay heat removal for advanced reactor designs. The project, initiated in 2010 to support the Advanced Reactor Technologies (ART), Small Modular Reactor (SMR), and Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) programs, has been conducting experimental operations since early 2014. The following paper provides a summary of some primary design features of the 26-m tall test facility along with a description of the data acquisition suite that guides our experimental practices. Specifics of the distributed fiber optic temperature measurements will be discussed, which introduces an unparalleled level of data density that has never before been implemented in a large scale natural circulation test facility. Results from our test series will then be presented, which provide insight into the thermal hydraulic behavior at steady-state and transient conditions for varying heat flux levels and exhaust chimney configuration states.

  8. Experimental observation of capillary instabilities of two phase flow in a microfluidic T-junction

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Mbanjwa, MB

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available , resulting in the interfacial tension of ? 0.003 N/m. The properties of the fluids are listed in Table 2. Table 2: Physical properties of the fluids at 25 oC. Fluid Density [kg/m3] Viscosity [Pa.s] Water 997 0.00089 Mineral oil 840 0.0258 4....J. Fuerstman, H.A. Stone, G.M. Whitesides, Lab Chip 6,437?446 (2006) 16. J.H. Xu, S.W. Li, J. Tan, Y.J. Wang, G.S. Luo, Microfluid. Nanofluid. 5,711-717 (2008) 17. H.A. Stone, J. Fluid. Mech. 595, 141?161(2008). 18. Tabeling P (2005) Introduction...

  9. Experimental and numerical studies of two-phase microfluidic flows

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Mbanjwa, MB

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Flow of immiscible fluids is important in microfluidics for applications such as generation of emulsions and vesicles, drug delivery capsules, cell encapsulation and chemical reactions. The behaviour of these flows differs from large scale flows...

  10. Instabilities and prediction of the acoustic resonance of flows with wall injection; Instabilites et prevision de l'accrochage acoustique des ecoulements avec injection parietale

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Avalon, G. [Office National d' Etudes et de Recherches Aerospatiales (ONERA), 91 - Palaiseau (France); Casalis, G. [Office National d' Etudes et de Recherches Aerospatiales (ONERA), 91 - Palaiseau (France)

    1998-07-01

    Aero-acoustic coupling that occurs inside solid propellant rocket engines can lead to a longitudinal acoustic mode resonance of the combustion chamber. This phenomenon, which can have various origins, in analyzed using the Vecla test facility and the theory of linear stability of flows. Different comparisons between the hot-wire measurements performed and the theory of stability confirm the presence of intrinsic instabilities for this type of flow. The instability allows to selectively amplify a given range of frequencies which depends on the injection velocity and on the conduit height. The results obtained seem to indicate that when this frequency range does not comprise the longitudinal acoustic mode or the first harmonics, the flow becomes turbulent downstream. (J.S.)

  11. Streaming gravity mode instability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Shui.

    1989-05-01

    In this paper, we study the stability of a current sheet with a sheared flow in a gravitational field which is perpendicular to the magnetic field and plasma flow. This mixing mode caused by a combined role of the sheared flow and gravity is named the streaming gravity mode instability. The conditions of this mode instability are discussed for an ideal four-layer model in the incompressible limit. (author). 5 refs

  12. Flow instability research on steam generator with straight double-walled heat transfer tube for FBR. Pressure drop under high pressure condition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Wei; Tamai, Hidesada; Yoshida, Hiroyuki; Takase, Kazuyuki; Hayafune, Hiroki; Futagami, Satoshi; Kisohara, Naoyuki

    2008-01-01

    For the Steam Generator (SG) with straight double-walled heat transfer tube that used in sodium cooled Faster Breeder Reactor, flow instability is one of the most important items need researching. As the first step of the research, thermal hydraulics experiments were performed under high pressure condition in JAEA with using a straight tube. Pressure drop, heat transfer coefficients and void fraction data were derived. This paper evaluates the pressure drop data with TRAC-BF1 code. The Pffan's correlation for single phase flow and the Martinelli-Nelson's two-phase flow multiplier are found can be well predicted the present pressure drop data under high pressure condition. (author)

  13. Numerical and experimental studies of droplet-gas flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joesang, Aage Ingebret

    2002-07-01

    This thesis considers droplet-gas flow by the use of numerical methods and experimental verification. A commercial vane separator was studied both numerical and by experiment. In addition some efforts are put into the numerical analysis of cyclones. The experimental part contains detailed measurements of the flow field between a pair of vanes in a vane separator and droplet size measurements. LDA (Laser Doppler Anemometry) was used to measure the velocity in two dimensions and corresponding turbulence quantities. The results from the LDA measurements are considered to be of high quality and are compared to numerical results obtained from a CFD (Computational Fluid Dynamics) analysis. The simulation showed good agreement between the numerical and experimental results. Combinations of different turbulence models; the standard k-epsilon model and the Reynold Stress Mode, different schemes; first order and higher order scheme and different near wall treatment of the turbulence; the Law of the wall and the Two-Layer Zonal model were used in the simulations. The Reynold Stress Model together with a higher order scheme performed rather poorly. The recirculation in parts of the separator was overpredicted in this case. For the other cases the overall predictions are satisfactory. PDA (Phase Doppler Anemometry) measurements were used to study the changes in the droplet size distribution through the vane separator. The PDA measurements show that smaller droplets are found at the outlet than present at the inlet. In the literature there exists different mechanisms for explaining the re-entrainment and generation of new droplets. The re-entrainments mechanisms are divided into four groups where droplet-droplet interaction, droplet break-up, splashing of impinging droplet and re-entrainment from the film are defined as the groups of re-entrainment mechanisms. Models for these groups are found in the literature and these models are tested for re-entrainment using the operational

  14. An experimental program for testing the validity of flow and transport models in unsaturated tuff: The Yucca Mountain Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shephard, L.E.; Glass, R.J.; Siegel, M.D.; Tidwell, V.C.

    1990-01-01

    Groundwater flow and contaminant transport through the unsaturated zone are receiving increased attention as options for waste disposal in saturated media continue to be considered as a potential means for resolving the nation's waste management concerns. An experimental program is being developed to test the validity of conceptual flow and transport models that are being formulated to predict the long-term performance at Yucca Mountain. This program is in the developmental stage and will continue to evolve as information is acquired and knowledge is improved with reference to flow and transport in unsaturated fractured media. The general approach for directing the validation effort entails identifying those processes which may cause the site to fail relative to imposed regulatory requirements, evaluating the key assumptions underlying the conceptual models used or developed to describe these processes, and developing new conceptual models as needed. Emphasis is currently being placed in four general areas: flow and transport in unsaturated fractures; fracture-matrix interactions; infiltration flow instability; and evaluation of scale effects in heterogeneous fractured media. Preliminary results and plans or each of these areas for both the laboratory and field investigation components will be presented in the manuscript. 1 ref

  15. Study on spectral entropy of two-phase flow density wave instability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Zuoyi

    1992-05-01

    By using mathematic proof, spectral entropy calculations for simple examples and a practical two-phase flow system, it has been proved that under the same stochastic input, the output spectral entropy of a stable linear system is in maximum, while for an unstable linear system, its entropy is in relative lower level. Because the spectral entropy describes the output uncertainty of a system and the second law of thermodynamics rules the direction of natural tendency, the spontaneous process can develop only toward the direction of uncertainty increasing, and the opposite is impossible. It seems that the physical mechanism of the stability of a system can be explained as following: Any deviation from its original state of a stable system will reduce the spectral entropy and violate the natural tendency so that the system will return to original state. On the contrary, the deviation from its original state of an unstable system will increase the spectral entropy that will enhance the deviation and the system will be further away from its original state

  16. Forecasting of flowrate under rolling motion flow instability condition based on on-line sequential extreme learning machine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Hanying; Gao Puzhen; Tan Sichao; Tang Jiguo; Hou Xiaofan; Xu Huiqiang; Wu Xiangcheng

    2015-01-01

    The coupling of multiple thermal-hydraulic parameters can result in complex flow instability in natural circulation system under rolling motion. A real-time thermal-hydraulic condition prediction is helpful to the operation of systems in such condition. A single hidden layer feedforward neural networks algorithm named extreme learning machine (ELM) is considered as suitable method for this application because of its extremely fast training time, good accuracy and simplicity. However, traditional ELM assumes that all the training data are ready before the training process, while the training data is received sequentially in practical forecasting of flowrate. Therefore, this paper proposes a forecasting method for flowrate under rolling motion based on on-line sequential ELM (OS-ELM), which can learn the data one by one or chunk-by-chunk. The experiment results show that the OS-ELM method can achieve a better forecasting performance than basic ELM method and still keep the advantage of fast training and simplicity. (author)

  17. Experimental study for flow regime of downward air-water two-phase flow in a vertical narrow rectangular channel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, T. H.; Yun, B. J.; Jeong, J. H. [Pusan National University, Geunjeong-gu, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-05-15

    Studies were mostly about flow in upward flow in medium size circular tube. Although there are great differences between upward and downward flow, studies on vertical upward flow are much more active than those on vertical downward flow in a channel. In addition, due to the increase of surface forces and friction pressure drop, the pattern of gas-liquid two-phase flow bounded to the gap of inside the rectangular channel is different from that in a tube. The downward flow in a rectangular channel is universally applicable to cool the plate type nuclear fuel in research reactor. The sub-channel of the plate type nuclear fuel is designed with a few millimeters. Downward air-water two-phase flow in vertical rectangular channel was experimentally observed. The depth, width, and length of the rectangular channel is 2.35 mm, 66.7 mm, and 780 mm, respectively. The test section consists of transparent acrylic plates confined within a stainless steel frame. The flow patterns of the downward flow in high liquid velocity appeared to be similar to those observed in previous studies with upward flow. In downward flow, the transition lines for bubbly-slug and slug-churn flow shift to left in the flow regime map constructed with abscissa of the superficial gas velocity and ordinate of the superficial liquid velocity. The flow patterns observed with downward flow at low liquid velocity are different from those with upward flow.

  18. Physically-Based Interactive Flow Visualization Based on Schlieren and Interferometry Experimental Techniques

    KAUST Repository

    Brownlee, C.; Pegoraro, V.; Shankar, S.; McCormick, Patrick S.; Hansen, C. D.

    2011-01-01

    Understanding fluid flow is a difficult problem and of increasing importance as computational fluid dynamics (CFD) produces an abundance of simulation data. Experimental flow analysis has employed techniques such as shadowgraph, interferometry

  19. Experimental research on density wave oscillation of steam-water two-phase flow in parallel inclined internally ribbed pipes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gao Feng; Chen Tingkuan; Luo Yushan; Yin Fei; Liu Weimin

    2005-01-01

    At p=3-10 MPa, G=300-600 kg/(m 2 ·s), Δt sub =30-90 degree C, and q=0-190 kW/m 2 , the experiments on steam-water two-phase flow instabilities have been performed. The test sections are parallel inclined internally ribbed pipes with an outer diameter of φ38.1 mm, a wall thinkness of 7.5 mm, a obliquity of 19.5 and a length more than 15 m length. Based on the experimental results, the effects of pressure, mass velocity, inlet subcooling and asymmetrical heat flux on steam-water two-phase flow density wave oscillation were analyzed. The experimental results showed that the flow system were more stable as pressure increased. As an increase in mass velocity, critical heat flux increased but critical steam quality decreased. Inlet subcooling had a monotone effect on density wave oscillation, when inlet subcooling decreased, critical heat flux decreased. Under a certain working condition, critical heat flux on asymmetrically heating parallel pipes is higher than that on symmetrically heating parallel pipes, that means the system with symmetrically heating parallel pips was more stable. (authors)

  20. Experimental observation of microwave absorption and electron heating due to the two plasmon decay instability and resonance absorption

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rasmussen, D.A.

    1981-01-01

    The interaction of intense microwaves with an inhomogeneous plasma is studied in two experimental devices. In the first device an investigation was made of microwave absorption and electron heating due to the parametric decay of microwaves into electron plasma waves (Two Plasmon Decay instability, TPDI), modeling a process which can occur near the quarter critical surface in laser driven pellets. P-polarized microwave (f = 1.2 GHz, P 0 less than or equal to 12 kW) are applied to an essentially collisionless, inhomogeneous plasma, in an oversized waveguide, in the U.C. Davis Prometheus III device. The initial density scale length near the quarter critical surface is quite long (L/lambda/sub De/ approx. = 3000 or k 0 L approx. = 15). The observed threshold power for the TPDI is quite low (P/sub T/approx. = 0.1 kW or v/sub os//v/sub e/ approx. = 0.1). Near the threshold the decay waves only occur near the quarter critical surface. As the incident power is increased above threshold, the decay waves spread to lower densities, and for P 0 greater than or equal to lkW, (v/sub os//v/sub e/ greater than or equal to 0.3) suprathermal electron heating is strong for high powers (T/sub H/ less than or equal to 12 T/sub e/ for P 0 less than or equal to 8 kW or v/sub os//v/sub e/ less than or equal to 0.9)

  1. Experimental research and numerical simulation on flow resistance of integrated valve

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cai Wei; Bo Hanliang; Qin Benke

    2008-01-01

    The flow resistance of the integrated valve is one of the key parameters for the design of the control rod hydraulic drive system (CRHDS). Experimental research on the improved new integrated valve was performed, and the key data such as pressure difference, volume flow, resistance coefficient and flow coefficient of each flow channel were obtained. With the computational fluid dynamics software CFX, numerical simulation was executed to analyze the effect of Re on the flow resistance. On the basis of experimental and numerical results, fitting empirical formulas of resistance coefficient were obtained, which provide experimental and theoretical foundations for CRHDS's optimized design and theoretical analysis. (authors)

  2. On the Experimental and Theoretical Investigations of Lean Partially Premixed Combustion, Burning Speed, Flame Instability and Plasma Formation of Alternative Fuels at High Temperatures and Pressures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Askari, Omid

    This dissertation investigates the combustion and injection fundamental characteristics of different alternative fuels both experimentally and theoretically. The subjects such as lean partially premixed combustion of methane/hydrogen/air/diluent, methane high pressure direct-injection, thermal plasma formation, thermodynamic properties of hydrocarbon/air mixtures at high temperatures, laminar flames and flame morphology of synthetic gas (syngas) and Gas-to-Liquid (GTL) fuels were extensively studied in this work. These subjects will be summarized in three following paragraphs. The fundamentals of spray and partially premixed combustion characteristics of directly injected methane in a constant volume combustion chamber have been experimentally studied. The injected fuel jet generates turbulence in the vessel and forms a turbulent heterogeneous fuel-air mixture in the vessel, similar to that in a Compressed Natural Gas (CNG) Direct-Injection (DI) engines. The effect of different characteristics parameters such as spark delay time, stratification ratio, turbulence intensity, fuel injection pressure, chamber pressure, chamber temperature, Exhaust Gas recirculation (EGR) addition, hydrogen addition and equivalence ratio on flame propagation and emission concentrations were analyzed. As a part of this work and for the purpose of control and calibration of high pressure injector, spray development and characteristics including spray tip penetration, spray cone angle and overall equivalence ratio were evaluated under a wide range of fuel injection pressures of 30 to 90 atm and different chamber pressures of 1 to 5 atm. Thermodynamic properties of hydrocarbon/air plasma mixtures at ultra-high temperatures must be precisely calculated due to important influence on the flame kernel formation and propagation in combusting flows and spark discharge applications. A new algorithm based on the statistical thermodynamics was developed to calculate the ultra-high temperature plasma

  3. Experimental visualization of temperature fields and study of heat transfer enhancement in oscillatory flow in a grooved channel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herman, C.; Kang, E. [Dept. of Mechanical Engineering, Johns Hopkins Univ., Baltimore, MD (United States)

    2001-01-01

    An experimental study was conducted of incompressible, moderate Reynolds number flow of air over heated rectangular blocks in a two-dimensional, horizontal channel. Holographic interferometry combined with high-speed cinematography was used to visualize the unsteady temperature fields in self- sustained oscillatory flow. Experiments were conducted in the laminar, transitional and turbulent flow regimes for Reynolds numbers in the range from Re = 520 to Re = 6600. Interferometric measurements were obtained in the thermally and fluiddynamically periodically fully developed flow region on the ninth heated block. Flow oscillations were first observed between Re = 1054 and Re = 1318. The period of oscillations, wavelength and propagation speed of the Tollmien-Schlichting waves in the main channel were measured at two characteristic flow velocities, Re = 1580 and Re = 2370. For these Reynolds numbers it was observed that two to three waves span one geometric periodicity length. At Re = 1580 the dominant oscillation frequency was found to be around 26 Hz and at Re = 2370 the frequency distribution formed a band around 125 Hz. Results regarding heat transfer and pressure drop are presented as a function of the Reynolds number, in terms of the block-average Nusselt number and the local Nusselt number as well as the friction factor. Measurements of the local Nusselt number together with visual observations indicate that the lateral mixing caused by flow instabilities is most pronounced along the upstream vertical wall of the heated block in the groove region, and it is accompanied by high heat transfer coefficients. At Reynolds numbers beyond the onset of oscillations the heat transfer in the grooved channel exceeds the performance of the reference geometry, the asymmetrically heated parallel plate channel. (orig.)

  4. Experimental study on an IC engine in-cylinder flow using different steady-state flow benches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. El-Adawy

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available In-cylinder air flow structures are known to strongly impact on the performance and combustion of internal combustion engines (ICE. Therefore the aim of this paper is to experimentally study an IC engine in-cylinder flow under steady-state conditions. Different methods can be used to characterize the in-cylinder flow which are optical engines and laser diagnostics, computational fluid dynamic and steady-state flow bench. Here we are concentrating on two different types of flow benches. The first (Ricardo uses the impulse torque meter method while the other (FEV uses the paddle wheel technique. The experiments were carried out on the same cylinder head and the same pressure difference across the inlet valves of 600 mmH2O in order to compare the results. The experimental results are presented in terms of the measured air flow rate, flow coefficient, discharge coefficient and non-dimensional rig tumble. Moreover, number of modifications were conducted on the FEV flow bench in order to apply particle image velocimetry measurements on the vertical tumble plane, which passing through the middle of the cylinder at different valve lifts. The results show that a reasonably good level of agreement can be achieved between both methods, providing the methods of calculations of the various parameters are consistent. Keywords: In-cylinder flow, Flow bench, Tumble motion, Flow coefficient, Particle image velocimetry

  5. Scales and structures in bubbly flows. Experimental analysis of the flow in bubble columns and in bubbling fluidized beds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groen, J.S.

    2004-01-01

    In this project a detailed experimental analysis was performed of the dynamic flow field in bubbly flows, with the purpose of determining local hydrodynamics and scale effects. Measurements were done in gas-liquid systems (air-water bubble columns) and in gas-solid systems (air-sand bubbing

  6. An Experimental Study of Oil / Water Flow in Horizontal Pipes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elseth, Geir

    2001-07-01

    The purpose of this thesis is to study the behaviour of the simultaneous flow of oil and water in horizontal pipes. In this connection, two test facilities are used. Both facilities have horizontal test sections with inner pipe diameters equal to 2 inches. The largest facility, called the model oil facility, has reservoirs of 1 m{sub 3} of each medium enabling flow rates as high as 30 m{sub 3}/h, which corresponds to mixture velocities as high as 3.35 m/s. The flow rates of oil and water can be varied individually producing different flow patterns according to variations in mixture velocity and input water cut. Two main classes of flows are seen, stratified and dispersed. In this facility, the main focus has been on stratified flows. Pressure drops and local phase fractions are measured for a large number of flow conditions. Among the instruments used are differential pressure transmitters and a traversing gamma densitometer, respectively. The flow patterns that appear are classified in flow pattern maps as functions of either mixture velocity and water cut or superficial velocities. From these experiments a smaller number of stratified flows are selected for studies of velocity and turbulence. A laser Doppler anemometer (LDA) is applied for these measurements in a transparent part of the test section. To be able to produce accurate measurements a partial refractive index matching procedure is used. The other facility, called the matched refractive index facility, has a 0.2 m{sub 3} reservoir enabling mainly dispersed flows. Mixture velocities range from 0.75 m/s to 3 m/s. The fluids in this facility are carefully selected to match the refractive index of the transparent part of the test section. A full refractive index matching procedure is carried out producing excellent optical conditions for velocity and turbulence studies by LDA. In addition, pressure drops and local phase fractions are measured. (author)

  7. A study on the numerical instability of COBRA-series subchannel analysis codes at low-pressure and low-flow conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoo, Y. J.; Hwnag, T. H.; Kim, K. K.; Ji, S. K.

    2001-01-01

    The numerical instability at low-pressure and low-flow conditions has been confirmed to be the common problem of the existing COBRA-series subchannel analysis codes. In addition, the range of operating conditions at which the analyses by the codes are impossible has been evaluated. To evaluate the MATRA's inapplicable range of operating conditions of the SMART core that is to be operated at the low flow condition, i.e. about 30% of the flow of the existing commercial pressurized water reactors at the steady-state condition, the analyses of various operating conditions were performed by using several representative COBRA-series subchannel analysis codes including MATRA. TORC of CE, COBRA3CP of Siemens/KWU, COBRA4I of PNL, and MATRA of KAERI were chosen as the subchannel analysis codes to be evaluated. The various operating conditions used in the CHF tests carried out at the Winfrith Establishment of UKAEA were chosen as the conditions to be analyzed. As the result, the numerical instabilities at low-pressure and low-flow conditions occurred in the analyses by all of the codes. It was revealed that the MATRA code, which numerically more stable thatn the other codes, was not able to analyze the conditions of the pressure not more than 100 bar and the mass velocity not more than 300 kg/sec-m 2 . Hereafter it is required to find out the exact reason for the numerical instability of the existing COBRA-series subchannel analysis codes at low-pressure and low-flow conditions and to devise the new method to get over that numerical problem

  8. experimental investigation of flow pattern around repelling and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A. Mahdieh NajafAbadi and M. M. Bateni

    2017-09-01

    Sep 1, 2017 ... ABSTRACT. Use of T-head spur dikes is one of the common methods to control erosion of riverbanks. Nevertheless, setting spur dikes in the flow direction leads to modification of flow path and local scour in the site of the spur dike. In case of intensification, this can destruct the structure and the riverbank.

  9. Numerical experimentation on convective coolant flow in Ghana ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Numerical experiments on one dimensional convective coolant flow during steady state operation of the Ghana Research Reactor-1 (GHARR-I) were performed to determine the thermal hydraulic parameters of temperature, density and flow rate. The computational domain was the reactor vessel, including the reactor core.

  10. Experimental calibration and validation of sewer/surface flow exchange equations in steady and unsteady flow conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubinato, Matteo; Martins, Ricardo; Kesserwani, Georges; Leandro, Jorge; Djordjević, Slobodan; Shucksmith, James

    2017-09-01

    The linkage between sewer pipe flow and floodplain flow is recognised to induce an important source of uncertainty within two-dimensional (2D) urban flood models. This uncertainty is often attributed to the use of empirical hydraulic formulae (the one-dimensional (1D) weir and orifice steady flow equations) to achieve data-connectivity at the linking interface, which require the determination of discharge coefficients. Because of the paucity of high resolution localised data for this type of flows, the current understanding and quantification of a suitable range for those discharge coefficients is somewhat lacking. To fulfil this gap, this work presents the results acquired from an instrumented physical model designed to study the interaction between a pipe network flow and a floodplain flow. The full range of sewer-to-surface and surface-to-sewer flow conditions at the exchange zone are experimentally analysed in both steady and unsteady flow regimes. Steady state measured discharges are first analysed considering the relationship between the energy heads from the sewer flow and the floodplain flow; these results show that existing weir and orifice formulae are valid for describing the flow exchange for the present physical model, and yield new calibrated discharge coefficients for each of the flow conditions. The measured exchange discharges are also integrated (as a source term) within a 2D numerical flood model (a finite volume solver to the 2D Shallow Water Equations (SWE)), which is shown to reproduce the observed coefficients. This calibrated numerical model is then used to simulate a series of unsteady flow tests reproduced within the experimental facility. Results show that the numerical model overestimated the values of mean surcharge flow rate. This suggests the occurrence of additional head losses in unsteady conditions which are not currently accounted for within flood models calibrated in steady flow conditions.

  11. Beyond Poiseuille: Preservation Fluid Flow in an Experimental Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saurabh Singh

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Poiseuille’s equation describes the relationship between fluid viscosity, pressure, tubing diameter, and flow, yet it is not known if cold organ perfusion systems follow this equation. We investigated these relationships in an ex vivo model and aimed to offer some rationale for equipment selection. Increasing the cannula size from 14 to 20 Fr increased flow rate by a mean (SD of 13 (12%. Marshall’s hyperosmolar citrate was three times less viscous than UW solution, but flows were only 45% faster. Doubling the bag pressure led to a mean (SD flow rate increase of only 19 (13%, not twice the rate. When external pressure devices were used, 100 mmHg of continuous pressure increased flow by a mean (SD of 43 (17% when compared to the same pressure applied initially only. Poiseuille’s equation was not followed; this is most likely due to “slipping” of preservation fluid within the plastic tubing. Cannula size made little difference over the ranges examined; flows are primarily determined by bag pressure and fluid viscosity. External infusor devices require continuous pressurisation to deliver high flow. Future studies examining the impact of perfusion variables on graft outcomes should include detailed equipment descriptions.

  12. Radio frequency emission from high-pressure xenon arcs: A systematic experimental analysis of the underlying near-anode plasma instability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hechtfischer, Ulrich [Philips Lighting, GBU Automotive Lamps, Technology, Philipsstrasse 8, 52068 Aachen (Germany)

    2011-10-01

    High-pressure Xe discharge lamps at DC operation can show unwanted strong RF (radio-frequency) emission to beyond 1 GHz, correlated to a sharp periodic lamp-voltage instability in the near-anode plasma with a pulse repetition rate {epsilon} of 1-10 MHz. The physical origin of the instability is unclear. Here, its existence and pulse rate have been measured as a function of arc current I = 0.2-1.2 A and anode temperature T{sub a} = 1700-3400 K independently, in experimental lamps with pure-tungsten electrodes and a Xe operating pressure around p = 10 MPa. Surprisingly, the instability is not affected by I or current density j but exists if T{sub a} is lower than a threshold value around 2800-2900 K. The pulse rate {epsilon} is simply a rising linear function of the inverse anode temperature 1/T{sub a}, with only a small I-dependent correction. The average anode heat load is slightly lower in the unstable regime and possibly depends on {epsilon}. The results allow a consistent re-interpretation of earlier and present experimental observations and should be both a valuable help in practical lamp engineering and a tight constraint for future theories of this effect.

  13. Experimental Evidence of Helical Flow in Porous Media

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ye, Yu; Chiogna, Gabriele; Cirpka, Olaf A.

    2015-01-01

    Helical flow leads to deformation of solute plumes and enhances transverse mixing in porous media. We present experiments in which macroscopic helical flow is created by arranging different materials to obtain an anisotropic macroscopic permeability tensor with spatially variable orientation....... The resulting helical flow entails twisting streamlines which cause a significant increase in lateral mass exchange and thus a large enhancement of plume dilution (up to 235%) compared to transport in homogenous media. The setup may be used to effectively mix solutes in parallel streams similarly to static...... mixers, but in porous media....

  14. Organic flow assurance, pour point depressant development through experimental design

    OpenAIRE

    Norland, Anne Kristine

    2012-01-01

    Master's thesis in Environmental technology Flow assurance is of great importance in the oil and gas industry, where the main objective is to provide and secure the transport of the well stream fluid from the reservoir to the process facilities. The main challenges in flow assurance are solid depositions in the pipelines, which can lead to reduction in the production, or in worst case completely block the pipelines. Wax deposition is a common problem in the oil industry, especially with...

  15. Experimental Studies of Acoustics in a Spherical Couette Flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gowen, Savannah; Adams, Matthew; Stone, Douglas; Lathrop, Daniel

    2016-11-01

    The Earth, like many other astrophysical bodies, contains turbulent flows of conducting fluid which are able to sustain magnetic field. To investigate the hydromagnetic flow in the Earth's outer core, we have created an experiment which generates flows in liquid sodium. However, measuring these flows remains a challenge because liquid sodium is opaque. One possible solution is the use of acoustic waves. Our group has previously used acoustic wave measurements in air to infer azimuthal velocity profiles, but measurements attempted in liquid sodium remain challenging. In the current experiments we measure acoustic modes and their mode splittings in both air and water in a spherical Couette device. The device is comprised of a hollow 30-cm outer sphere which contains a smaller 10-cm rotating inner sphere to drive flow in the fluid in between. We use water because it has material properties that are similar to those of sodium, but is more convenient and less hazardous. Modes are excited and measured using a speaker and microphones. Measured acoustic modes and their mode splittings correspond well with the predicted frequencies in air. However, water modes are more challenging. Further investigation is needed to understand acoustic measurements in the higher density media.

  16. Hydrodynamics of adiabatic inverted annular flow: an experimental study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Jarlais, G.; Ishii, M.

    1983-01-01

    For low-quality film boiling in tubes or rod bundles, the flow pattern may consist of a liquid jet-like core surrounded by a vapor annulus, i.e., inverted annular flow. The stability, shape, and break-up mechanisms of this liquid core must be understood in order to model correctly this regime and to develop appropriate interfacial transfer correlations. This paper reports on a study in which inverted annular flow was simulated in an adiabatic system. Turbulent water jets, issuing downward from long-aspect nozzles were enclosed within cocurrent gas annuli. Jet-core diameter and velocity, and gas-annulus diameter, velocity, and species were varied, yielding liquid Reynolds numbers up to 33,000, void fractions from 0.29 to 0.95, and relative velocities from near zero to over 80 m/s. Jet-core break-up lengths and secondarily, core break-up mechanisms, were observed visually, using strobe lighting

  17. Field research program for unsaturated flow and transport experimentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tidwell, V.C.; Rautman, C.A.; Glass, R.J.

    1992-01-01

    As part of the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project, a field research program has been developed to refine and validate models for flow and transport through unsaturated fractured rock. Validation of these models within the range of their application for performance assessment requires a more sophisticated understanding of the processes that govern flow and transport within fractured porous media than currently exists. In particular, our research is prioritized according to understanding and modeling processes that, if not accurately incorporated into performance assessment models, would adversely impact the project's ability to evaluate repository performance. For this reason, we have oriented our field program toward enhancing our understanding of scaling processes as they relate to effective media property modeling, as well as to the conceptual modeling of complex flow and transport phenomena

  18. Experimental study of the flow over a backward-facing rounded ramp

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duriez, Thomas; Aider, Jean-Luc; Wesfreid, Jose Eduardo

    2010-11-01

    The backward-facing rounded ramp (BFR) is a very simple geometry leading to boundary layer separation, close to the backward facing step (BFS) flow. The main difference with the BFS flow is that the separation location depends on the incoming flow while it is fixed to the step edge for the BFS flow. Despite the simplicity of the geometry, the flow is complex and the transition process still has to be investigated. In this study we investigate the BFR flow using time-resolved PIV. For Reynolds number ranging between 300 and 12 000 we first study the time averaged properties such as the positions of the separation and reattachment, the recirculation length and the shear layer thickness. The time resolution also gives access to the characteristic frequencies of the time-dependant flow. An appropriate Fourier filtering of the flow field, around each frequency peak in the global spectrum, allows an investigation of each mode in order to extract its wavelength, phase velocity, and spatial distribution. We then sort the spectral content and relate the main frequencies to the most amplified Kelvin-Helmholtz instability mode and its harmonics, the vortex pairing, the low frequency recirculation bubble oscillation and the interactions between all these phenomena.

  19. Simulant-material experimental investigation of flow dynamics in the CRBR Upper-Core Structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilhelm, D.; Starkovich, V.S.; Chapyak, E.J.

    1982-09-01

    The results of a simulant-material experimental investigation of flow dynamics in the Clinch River Breeder Reactor (CRBR) Upper Core Structure are described. The methodology used to design the experimental apparatus and select test conditions is detailed. Numerous comparisons between experimental data and SIMMER-II Code calculations are presented with both advantages and limitations of the SIMMER modeling features identified

  20. Tearing instabilities in turbulence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishizawa, A.; Nakajima, N.

    2009-01-01

    Full text: Effects of micro-turbulence on tearing instabilities are investigated by numerically solving a reduced set of two-fluid equations. Micro-turbulence excites both large-scale and small-scale Fourier modes through energy transfer due to nonlinear mode coupling. The energy transfer to large scale mode does not directly excite tearing instability but it gives an initiation of tearing instability. When tearing instability starts to grow, the excited small scale mode plays an important role. The mixing of magnetic flux by micro-turbulence is the dominant factor of non-ideal MHD effect at the resonant surface and it gives rise to magnetic reconnection which causes tearing instability. Tearing instabilities were investigated against static equilibrium or flowing equilibrium so far. On the other hand, the recent progress of computer power allows us to investigate interactions between turbulence and coherent modes such as tearing instabilities in magnetically confined plasmas by means of direct numerical simulations. In order to investigate effects of turbulence on tearing instabilities we consider a situation that tearing mode is destabilized in a quasi-equilibrium including micro-turbulence. We choose an initial equilibrium that is unstable against kinetic ballooning modes and tearing instabilities. Tearing instabilities are current driven modes and thus they are unstable for large scale Fourier modes. On the other hand kinetic ballooning modes are unstable for poloidal Fourier modes that are characterized by ion Larmor radius. The energy of kinetic ballooning modes spreads over wave number space through nonlinear Fourier mode coupling. We present that micro-turbulence affects tearing instabilities in two different ways by three-dimensional numerical simulation of a reduced set of two-fluid equations. One is caused by energy transfer to large scale modes, the other is caused by energy transfer to small scale modes. The former is the excitation of initial

  1. Hydrodynamic instabilities in astrophysics and ICF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paul Drake, R.

    2005-01-01

    Inertial fusion systems and astrophysical systems both involve hydrodynamic effects, including sources of pressure, shock waves, rarefactions, and plasma flows. In the evolution of such systems, hydrodynamic instabilities naturally evolve. As a result, a fundamental understanding of hydrodynamic instabilities is necessary to understand their behavior. In addition, high-energy-density facilities designed for ICF purposes can be used to provide and experimental basis for understanding astrophysical processes. In this talk. I will discuss the instabilities that appear in astrophysics and ICF from the common perspective of the basic mechanisms at work. Examples will be taken from experiments aimed at ICF, from astrophysical systems, and from experiments using ICF systems to address issues in astrophysics. The high-energy-density research facilities of today can accelerate small but macroscopic amounts of material to velocities above 100 km/s, can heat such material to temperature above 100 eV, can produce pressures far above a million atmospheres (10''12 dybes/cm''2 or 0.1 TPascal), and can do experiments under these conditions that address basic physics issues. This enables on to devise experiments aimed directly at important process such as the Rayleigh Taylor instability at an ablating surface or at an embedded interface that is accelerating, the Richtmeyer Meshkov evolution of shocked interfaces, and the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability of shear flows. The talk will include examples of such phenomena from the laboratory and from astrophysics, and will discuss experiments to study them. (Author)

  2. Experimental Investigation of Turbulent Flames in Hypersonic Flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-01

    the flow direction and (b) typical flame length scales seen in the OH-PLIF image with Mach 4.5 freestream (high turbulence) at P0 = 0.65 bar, T0...flame structures (3 mm) are observed at the upstream location of area 1 where the combustion localization first appears. The typical flame length scale

  3. Experimental Investigation of Pulsatile Flow in Circular Tubes

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Adamec, J.; Nožička, J.; Hanus, D.; Kořenář, Josef

    2001-01-01

    Roč. 17, č. 5 (2001), s. 1133-1136 ISSN 0748-4658 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z2060917 Keywords : pulsatile flow * laminar-turbulent transition * reynolds normal stress Subject RIV: BK - Fluid Dynamics Impact factor: 0.418, year: 2001

  4. Experimental studies on the flow through soft tubes and channels

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Experiments conducted in channels/tubes with height/diameter less than. 1 mm with soft walls made ... two types of flows are very similar, the treatment of the surface is very different. The experimen- tal set-up ...... The qualitative features of the ...

  5. Experimental study of flow patterns near tube support structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rummens, H.E.C.; Turner, C.W.

    1994-07-01

    Extensive blockage of broached support plates in steam generators has occurred at the Bruce A Nuclear Generating Station (NGS), forcing unit derating in 1988 March. Blockage has also been found on the lower broached plates of the Pickering B and Point Lepreau NGSs. Water chemistry and operating conditions are known to influence fouling directly. We suspect that flow patterns also play a role, that these patterns are influenced by the geometry of steam generator (SG) components, and that particularly the broached plate design actively creates an environment favorable to deposition. Experiments are in progress to examine the flow patterns near various tube supports: the broached plate, two types of lattice bars, and the formed bars. Preliminary tests in an air/water loop with 1/2- and 7-tube SG mockups containing the tube supports have been completed. Flow patterns were visualized using injected air bubbles. Local velocities and turbulence levels were measured using a laser technique, which confirmed observations of flow recirculation and stagnation. Axial pressure profiles were measured to determine overall resistance coefficients, and to identify local pressure extremes. Some visualization tests were also carried out on an artificially fouled broached plate. Based on results to date, several deposition mechanisms are proposed: deposition of particles in stagnant regions, deposition of solubles due to flashing in low-pressure regions, and deposition in smaller channels due to steam migration toward larger channels. A qualitative assessment of the tube support designs based on these mechanisms implies that the relative resistances to fouling are: (WORST) broach plate << lattice bars << formed bars (BEST). As the air/water simulation shows only hydraulic flow patterns, further tests will be done in a simple liquid/vapor Freon loop to examine thermal effects. (author). 3 refs., 10 figs

  6. Combustion instability modeling and analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santoro, R.J.; Yang, V.; Santavicca, D.A. [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States); Sheppard, E.J. [Tuskeggee Univ., Tuskegee, AL (United States). Dept. of Aerospace Engineering

    1995-12-31

    It is well known that the two key elements for achieving low emissions and high performance in a gas turbine combustor are to simultaneously establish (1) a lean combustion zone for maintaining low NO{sub x} emissions and (2) rapid mixing for good ignition and flame stability. However, these requirements, when coupled with the short combustor lengths used to limit the residence time for NO formation typical of advanced gas turbine combustors, can lead to problems regarding unburned hydrocarbons (UHC) and carbon monoxide (CO) emissions, as well as the occurrence of combustion instabilities. The concurrent development of suitable analytical and numerical models that are validated with experimental studies is important for achieving this objective. A major benefit of the present research will be to provide for the first time an experimentally verified model of emissions and performance of gas turbine combustors. The present study represents a coordinated effort between industry, government and academia to investigate gas turbine combustion dynamics. Specific study areas include development of advanced diagnostics, definition of controlling phenomena, advancement of analytical and numerical modeling capabilities, and assessment of the current status of our ability to apply these tools to practical gas turbine combustors. The present work involves four tasks which address, respectively, (1) the development of a fiber-optic probe for fuel-air ratio measurements, (2) the study of combustion instability using laser-based diagnostics in a high pressure, high temperature flow reactor, (3) the development of analytical and numerical modeling capabilities for describing combustion instability which will be validated against experimental data, and (4) the preparation of a literature survey and establishment of a data base on practical experience with combustion instability.

  7. Experimental study of linear and nonlinear regimes of density-driven instabilities induced by CO{sub 2} dissolution in water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Outeda, R.; D' Onofrio, A. [Grupo de Medios Porosos, Facultad de Ingeniería, Universidad de Buenos Aires, Paseo Colón 850, C1063ACV Buenos Aires (Argentina); El Hasi, C.; Zalts, A. [Instituto de Ciencias, Universidad Nacional General Sarmiento, J. M. Gutiérrez 1150, B1613GSX, Los Polvorines, Provincia de Buenos Aires (Argentina)

    2014-03-15

    Density driven instabilities produced by CO{sub 2} (gas) dissolution in water containing a color indicator were studied in a Hele Shaw cell. The images were analyzed and instability patterns were characterized by mixing zone temporal evolution, dispersion curves, and the growth rate for different CO{sub 2} pressures and different color indicator concentrations. The results obtained from an exhaustive analysis of experimental data show that this system has a different behaviour in the linear regime of the instabilities (when the growth rate has a linear dependence with time), from the nonlinear regime at longer times. At short times using a color indicator to see the evolution of the pattern, the images show that the effects of both the color indicator and CO{sub 2} pressure are of the same order of magnitude: The growth rates are similar and the wave numbers are in the same range (0–30 cm{sup −1}) when the system is unstable. Although in the linear regime the dynamics is affected similarly by the presence of the indicator and CO{sub 2} pressure, in the nonlinear regime, the influence of the latter is clearly more pronounced than the effects of the color indicator.

  8. Experimental study on effects of double pumps switching on water supply flow rate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Xin; Han Weishi

    2012-01-01

    Flow characteristics in the process of switching one centrifugal pump to the other was investigated experimentally using a closed loop with two centrifugal pumps and two check valves. Characteristics of the check valves responding and the flow rate changing during the process of switching was studied by experimental data analysis. The results show that in the switching process with high and low original flow rate, the restoring time is 26 s and 21 s respectively; the lowest flow rates are 59.4% and 87.2% out of that in normal water supply, and the average deficit of feed water is 20.8% and 7.5% respectively. Compared to double-pump switching with low flow rate, a longer transition time. more intense flow fluctuations and increased water loss are observed with high flow rate, which has significantly effects on the stability of water supply. (authors)

  9. Ecosystem effects of environmental flows: Modelling and experimental floods in a dryland river

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shafroth, P.B.; Wilcox, A.C.; Lytle, D.A.; Hickey, J.T.; Andersen, D.C.; Beauchamp, Vanessa B.; Hautzinger, A.; McMullen, L.E.; Warner, A.

    2010-01-01

    Successful environmental flow prescriptions require an accurate understanding of the linkages among flow events, geomorphic processes and biotic responses. We describe models and results from experimental flow releases associated with an environmental flow program on the Bill Williams River (BWR), Arizona, in arid to semiarid western U.S.A. Two general approaches for improving knowledge and predictions of ecological responses to environmental flows are: (1) coupling physical system models to ecological responses and (2) clarifying empirical relationships between flow and ecological responses through implementation and monitoring of experimental flow releases. We modelled the BWR physical system using: (1) a reservoir operations model to simulate reservoir releases and reservoir water levels and estimate flow through the river system under a range of scenarios, (2) one- and two-dimensional river hydraulics models to estimate stage-discharge relationships at the whole-river and local scales, respectively, and (3) a groundwater model to estimate surface- and groundwater interactions in a large, alluvial valley on the BWR where surface flow is frequently absent. An example of a coupled, hydrology-ecology model is the Ecosystems Function Model, which we used to link a one-dimensional hydraulic model with riparian tree seedling establishment requirements to produce spatially explicit predictions of seedling recruitment locations in a Geographic Information System. We also quantified the effects of small experimental floods on the differential mortality of native and exotic riparian trees, on beaver dam integrity and distribution, and on the dynamics of differentially flow-adapted benthic macroinvertebrate groups. Results of model applications and experimental flow releases are contributing to adaptive flow management on the BWR and to the development of regional environmental flow standards. General themes that emerged from our work include the importance of response

  10. On coupled development of MHD instabilities of Rayleigh-Taylor and Kelvin-Helmholtz types in nonuniform gas-plasmas flows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Likhachev, A P; Medin, S A

    2010-01-01

    The simultaneous development of the MHD instabilities of Raylegh-Taylor and Kelvin-Helmholtz types at the interface between high-conducting plasmoid and surrounding non- or low-conducting gas is considered. The linear stage of the RTI development is studied analytically for incompressible and compressible fluids. The nonlinear stage of the individual development of the RTI and the coupled development of both instabilities has been investigated numerically. The time-dependent two-dimensional numerical model based on the solution of the Euler gasdynamic equations with body momentum and energy sources of MHD origin has been developed and used in calculations. A disturbance introducing in the background flow has been periodic with varied assignment type and wave length. Fundamental difference between the results of linear and nonlinear analysis has been revealed. In particular, the increment of the RTI development at nonlinear stage is one-two order of magnitude less than that predicted by linear theory and rather weakly depends on initial disturbance mode. In linear analysis the coupled development of the RTI and the KHI is determined by simple summing of the two effects in the expression of wave increment, whereas in nonlinear case the mutual influence of the instabilities leads to essential alterations in their development, main of which is the intensive 'layer-by-layer' destruction of the plasmoid surface.

  11. Experimental investigation on flow patterns of RP-3 kerosene under sub-critical and supercritical pressures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ning; Zhou, Jin; Pan, Yu; Wang, Hui

    2014-02-01

    Active cooling with endothermic hydrocarbon fuel is proved to be one of the most promising approaches to solve the thermal problem for hypersonic aircraft such as scramjet. The flow patterns of two-phase flow inside the cooling channels have a great influence on the heat transfer characteristics. In this study, phase transition processes of RP-3 kerosene flowing inside a square quartz-glass tube were experimentally investigated. Three distinct phase transition phenomena (liquid-gas two phase flow under sub-critical pressures, critical opalescence under critical pressure, and corrugation under supercritical pressures) were identified. The conventional flow patterns of liquid-gas two phase flow, namely bubble flow, slug flow, churn flow and annular flow are observed under sub-critical pressures. Dense bubble flow and dispersed flow are recognized when pressure is increased towards the critical pressure whilst slug flow, churn flow and annular flow disappear. Under critical pressure, the opalescence phenomenon is observed. Under supercritical pressures, no conventional phase transition characteristics, such as bubbles are observed. But some kind of corrugation appears when RP-3 transfers from liquid to supercritical. The refraction index variation caused by sharp density gradient near the critical temperature is thought to be responsible for this corrugation.

  12. Flow cytofluorometric monitoring of leukocyte apoptosis in experimental cholera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lotsmanova, Ekaterina Y.; Kravtsov, Alexander L.; Livanova, Ludmila F.; Kobkova, Irina M.; Kuznetsov, Oleg S.; Shchukovskaya, Tatyana N.; Smirnova, Nina I.; Kutyrev, Vladimir V.

    2003-10-01

    Flow cytofluorometric DNA analysis was applied to determine of the relative contents of proliferative (more then 2C DNA per cell) and apoptotic (less then 2C DNA per cell) leukocytes in blood of adult rabbits, challenged with 10,000 times the 50 % effective dose of Vibrio cholerae virulent strain by the RITARD technique. It has been shown that irreversible increase the percentage of cells carrying DNA in the degradation stage brings to disbalance between the genetically controlled cell proliferation and apoptosis that leads to animal death from the cholera infection. Such fatal changes were not observed in challenging of immunized animals that were not died. Thus received data show that the flow cytofluorometric measurements may be used for detection of transgressions in homeostasis during acute infection diseases, for outlet prognosis of the cholera infection.

  13. Analytical, numerical, and experimental simulation of tornado flows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bautin, S.P.; Krutova, I.Yu.; Obukhov, A.G.

    2015-01-01

    It has been proven that this problem with analytic input data near the point under consideration has a unique analytic solution representable in the form of a convergent series. The analysis of the first coefficients of this series has shown that the circular motion of the gas swirling in the positive direction in the Northern Hemisphere and in the negative direction in the Southern Hemisphere arises immediately at the beginning of the radial flow into the cylinder [ru

  14. Experimental and numerical investigations of BWR fuel bundle inlet flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoashi, E; Morooka, S; Ishitori, T; Komita, H; Endo, T; Honda, H; Yamamoto, T; Kato, T; Kawamura, S

    2009-01-01

    We have been studying the mechanism of the flow pattern near the fuel bundle inlet of BWR using both flow visualization test and computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulation. In the visualization test, both single- and multi-bundle test sections were used. The former test section includes only a corner orifice facing two support beams and the latter simulates 16 bundles surrounded by four beams. An observation window is set on the side of the walls imitating the support beams upstream of the orifices in both test sections. In the CFD simulation, as well as the visualization test, the single-bundle model is composed of one bundle with a corner orifice and the multi-bundle model is a 1/4 cut of the test section that includes 4 bundles with the following four orifices: a corner orifice facing the corner of the two neighboring support beams, a center orifice at the opposite side from the corner orifice, and two side orifices. Twin-vortices were observed just upstream of the corner orifice in the multi-bundle test as well as the single-bundle test. A single-vortex and a vortex filament were observed at the side orifice inlet and no vortex was observed at the center orifice. These flow patterns were also predicted in the CFD simulation using Reynolds Stress Model as a turbulent model and the results were in good agreement with the test results mentioned above. (author)

  15. Experimental study on flow past a rotationally oscillating cylinder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Yang-yang; Yin, Chang-shan; Yang, Kang; Zhao, Xi-zeng; Tan, Soon Keat

    2017-08-01

    A series of experiments was carried out to study the flow behaviour behind a rotationally oscillating cylinder at a low Reynolds number (Re=300) placed in a recirculation water channel. A stepper motor was used to rotate the cylinder clockwise- and- counterclockwise about its longitudinal axis at selected frequencies. The particle image velocimetry (PIV) technique was used to capture the flow field behind a rotationally oscillating cylinder. Instantaneous and timeaveraged flow fields such as the vorticity contours, streamline topologies and velocity distributions were analyzed. The effects of four rotation angle and frequency ratios F r ( F r= f n/ f v, the ratio of the forcing frequency f n to the natural vortex shedding frequency f v) on the wake in the lee of a rotationally oscillating cylinder were also examined. The significant wake modification was observed when the cylinder undergoes clockwise-and-counterclockwise motion with amplitude of π, especially in the range of 0.6≤ F r≤1.0.

  16. Observations of current flow to a positively polarized electrode in a quiescent magnetoplasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferreira, J.L.; Urrutia, J.M.; Stenzel, R.L.

    1988-05-01

    This work reports experimental studies on the current flow to an electrode immersed in a quiescent magnetized plasma. The observed intense current driven instabilities during the current flow were found to be related with an anomalous current transport. (author)

  17. Subatmospheric boiling study of the operation of a horizontal thermosyphon reboiler loop: Instability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Agunlejika, Ezekiel O.; Langston, Paul A.; Azzopardi, Barry J.; Hewakandamby, Buddhika N.

    2016-01-01

    Graphical abstract: The highlight of the characteristics of the geysering instability from analysed WMS data. Pictorial view of geysering instability, heat flux 9 kW/m"2 (P_S = 1.14 bar(a)), Static head = 1.265 m, valve setting = 1.0, process side pressure = 0.5 bar(a). - Highlights: • Characteristics of geysering instability in a horizontal thermosyphon reboiler loop is highlighted using Wire Mesh Sensor. • Interconnection between geysering instability and accompanying churn flow is identified. • Effects of stability parameters and pressure drop feedbacks on the loop at low heat fluxes are described. - Abstract: Distillation and chemical processing under vacuum is of immense interest to petroleum and chemical industries due to lower energy costs and improved safety. To tap into these benefits, energy efficient reboilers with lower maintenance costs are required. Here, a horizontal thermosyphon reboiler is investigated at subatmospheric pressures and low heat fluxes. This paper presents detailed experimental data obtained using Wire Mesh Sensor in a gas-liquid flow with heat transfer as well as temperatures, pressures and recirculation rates around the loop. Flow regimes which have been previously identified in other systems were detected. The nature of the instability which underpins the mechanisms involved and conditions aiding instability are reported. Churn flow pattern is persistently detected during instability. The nature of the instability and existence of oscillatory churn flow are interconnected.

  18. Experimental Study on EHD Flow Transition in a Small Scale Wire-plate ESP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Chuan

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The electrohydrodynamic (EHD flow induced by the corona discharge was experimentally investigated in an electrostatic precipitator (ESP. The ESP was a narrow horizontal Plexiglas box (1300 mm×60 mm×60 mm. The electrode set consisted of a single wire discharge electrode and two collecting aluminum plate electrodes. Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV method was used to visualize the EHD flow characteristics inside the ESP seeded with fine oil droplets. The influence of applied voltage (from 8 kV to 10 kV and primary gas flow (0.15 m/s, 0.2 m/s, 0.4 m/s on the EHD flow transition was elucidated through experimental analysis. The formation and transition of typical EHD flows from onset to the fully developed were described and explained. Experimental results showed that the EHD flow patterns change depends on the gas velocity and applied voltage. EHD flow starts with flow streamlines near collecting plates bending towards the wire electrode, forming two void regions. An oscillating jet forming the downstream appeared and moved towards the wire electrode as voltage increased. For higher velocities (≥0.2 m/s, the EHD transition became near wire phenomenon with a jet-like flow structure near the wire, forming a void region behind the wire and expanding as voltage increased. Fully developed EHD secondary flow in the form of counter-rotating vortices appeared upstream with high applied voltage.

  19. Characterization of Flow Dynamics and Reduced-Order Description of Experimental Two-Phase Pipe Flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viggiano, Bianca; SkjæRaasen, Olaf; Tutkun, Murat; Cal, Raul Bayoan

    2017-11-01

    Multiphase pipe flow is investigated using proper orthogonal decomposition for tomographic X-ray data, where holdup, cross sectional phase distributions and phase interface characteristics are obtained. Instantaneous phase fractions of dispersed flow and slug flow are analyzed and a reduced order dynamical description is generated. The dispersed flow displays coherent structures in the first few modes near the horizontal center of the pipe, representing the liquid-liquid interface location while the slug flow case shows coherent structures that correspond to the cyclical formation and breakup of the slug in the first 10 modes. The reconstruction of the fields indicate that main features are observed in the low order dynamical descriptions utilizing less than 1 % of the full order model. POD temporal coefficients a1, a2 and a3 show interdependence for the slug flow case. The coefficients also describe the phase fraction holdup as a function of time for both dispersed and slug flow. These flows are highly applicable to petroleum transport pipelines, hydroelectric power and heat exchanger tubes to name a few. The mathematical representations obtained via proper orthogonal decomposition will deepen the understanding of fundamental multiphase flow characteristics.

  20. Experimental study of water flow in nuclear fuel elements; Estudo experimental do escoamento de agua em elementos combustiveis nucleares

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodrigues, Lorena Escriche, E-mail: ler@cdtn.br [Centro Federal de Educacao Tecnologica de Minas Gerais (CEFET), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); Rezende, Hugo Cesar; Mattos, Joao Roberto Loureiro de; Barros Filho, Jose Afonso; Santos, Andre Augusto Campagnole dos, E-mail: hcr@cdtn.br, E-mail: jrmattos@cdtn.br, E-mail: jabf@cdtn.br, E-mail: aacs@cdtn.br [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)

    2013-07-01

    This work aims to develop an experimental methodology for investigating the water flow through rod bundles after spacer grids of nuclear fuel elements of PWR type reactors. Speed profiles, with the device LDV (Laser Doppler Velocimetry), and the pressure drop between two sockets located before and after the spacer grid, using pressure transducers were measured.

  1. An Experimental-Numerical Study of Small Scale Flow Interaction with Bioluminescent Plankton

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Latz, Michael

    1998-01-01

    Numerical and experimental approaches were used to investigate the effects of quantified flow stimuli on bioluminescence sUmulatidn at the small length and time scales appropriate for individual plankton...

  2. Comparison of calculated and experimental characteristics of MHD flow between a rotaing disk and stationary disks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vasil'ev, S.A.; Dovganchuk, I.I.; Sozinov, Y.A.

    1988-01-01

    The laminar flow of a liquid metal in the clearance between rotating disks is examined in an axial magnetic field. A comparison is made between the experimental and calculated values of the potential difference

  3. Constant-flow ventilation in canine experimental pulmonary emphysema.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hachenberg, T; Wendt, M; Meyer, J; Struckmeier, O; Lawin, P

    1989-07-01

    The efficacy of constant-flow ventilation (CFV) was investigated in eight mongrel dogs before (control-phase) and after development of papain-induced panlobular emphysema (PLE-phase). For CFV, heated, humidified and oxygen-enriched air was continuously delivered via two catheters positioned within each mainstem bronchus at flow rates (V) of 0.33, 0.5 and 0.66 l/s. Data obtained during intermittent positive pressure ventilation (IPPV) served as reference. In the control-phase, Pao2 was lower (P less than or equal to 0.05) and alveolo-arterial O2 difference (P(A-a)O2) was higher (P less than or equal to 0.01) during CFV at all flow rates when compared with IPPV. This may be due to inhomogeneities of intrapulmonary gas distribution and increased ventilation-perfusion (VA/Q) mismatching. Paco2 and V showed a hyperbolic relationship; constant normocapnia (5.3 kPa) was achieved at 0.48 +/- 0.21 l/s (V53). Development of PLE resulted in an increase of functional residual capacity (FRC), residual volume (RV) and static compliance (Cstat) (P less than or equal to 0.05). PaO2 had decreased and P(A-a)O2 had increased (P less than or equal to 0.05), indicating moderate pulmonary dysfunction. Oxygenation during CFV was not significantly different in the PLE-phase when compared with the control-phase. Paco2 and V showed a hyperbolic relationship and V5.3 was even lower than in the control-group (0.42 +/- 0.13 l/s). In dogs with emphysematous lungs CFV maintains sufficient gas exchange. This may be due to preferential ventilation of basal lung units, thereby counterbalancing the effects of impaired lung morphometry and increased airtrapping. Conventional mechanical ventilation is more effective in terms of oxygenation and CO2-elimination.

  4. Enhanced balance associated with coordination training with stochastic resonance stimulation in subjects with functional ankle instability: an experimental trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brown Cathleen N

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Ankle sprains are common injuries that often lead to functional ankle instability (FAI, which is a pathology defined by sensations of instability at the ankle and recurrent ankle sprain injury. Poor postural stability has been associated with FAI, and sports medicine clinicians rehabilitate balance deficits to prevent ankle sprains. Subsensory electrical noise known as stochastic resonance (SR stimulation has been used in conjunction with coordination training to improve dynamic postural instabilities associated with FAI. However, unlike static postural deficits, dynamic impairments have not been indicative of ankle sprain injury. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to examine the effects of coordination training with or without SR stimulation on static postural stability. Improving postural instabilities associated with FAI has implications for increasing ankle joint stability and decreasing recurrent ankle sprains. Methods This study was conducted in a research laboratory. Thirty subjects with FAI were randomly assigned to either a: 1 conventional coordination training group (CCT; 2 SR stimulation coordination training group (SCT; or 3 control group. Training groups performed coordination exercises for six weeks. The SCT group received SR stimulation during training, while the CCT group only performed coordination training. Single leg postural stability was measured after the completion of balance training. Static postural stability was quantified on a force plate using anterior/posterior (A/P and medial/lateral (M/L center-of-pressure velocity (COPvel, M/L COP standard deviation (COPsd, M/L COP maximum excursion (COPmax, and COP area (COParea. Results Treatment effects comparing posttest to pretest COP measures were highest for the SCT group. At posttest, the SCT group had reduced A/P COPvel (2.3 ± 0.4 cm/s vs. 2.7 ± 0.6 cm/s, M/L COPvel (2.6 ± 0.5 cm/s vs. 2.9 ± 0.5 cm/s, M/L COPsd (0.63 ± 0.12 cm vs. 0.73 ± 0

  5. Plasma blob generation due to cooperative elliptic instability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manz, P; Xu, M; Müller, S H; Fedorczak, N; Thakur, S C; Yu, J H; Tynan, G R

    2011-11-04

    Using fast-camera measurements the generation mechanism of plasma blobs is investigated in the linear device CSDX. During the ejection of plasma blobs the plasma is dominated by an m=1 mode, which is a counterrotating vortex pair. These flows are known to be subject to the cooperative elliptic instability, which is characterized by a cooperative disturbance of the vortex cores and results in a three-dimensional breakdown of two-dimensional flows. The first experimental evidence of a cooperative elliptic instability preceding the blob-ejection is provided in terms of the qualitative evolution of the vortex geometries and internal wave patterns.

  6. Experimental and numerical investigation of reactive shock-accelerated flows

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bonazza, Riccardo [Univ. of Wisco