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Sample records for flow distortion experiment

  1. Inlet flow distortion in turbomachinery. I - Comparison of theory and experiment in a transonic fan stage. II - A parameter study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seidel, B. S.; Matwey, M. D.; Adamczyk, J. J.

    1980-01-01

    In the present paper, a semi-actuator-disk theory is reviewed that was developed previously for the distorted inflow to a single-stage axial-flow compressor. Flow distortion occurs far upstream; it may be a distortion in stagnation temperature, stagnation pressure, or both. Losses, quasi-steady deviation angles, and reference incidence correlations are included in the analysis, and both subsonic and transonic relative Mach numbers are considered. The theory is compared with measurements made in a transonic fan stage, and a parameter study is carried out to determine the influence of solidity on the attenuation of distortions in stagnation pressure and stagnation temperature.

  2. Inlet flow distortion in turbomachinery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seidel, B. S.; Matwey, M. D.; Adamczyk, J. J.

    1980-01-01

    A single stage axial compressor with distorted inflow is studied. The inflow distortion occurs far upstream and may be a distortion in stagnation temperature, stagnation pressure or both. The blade rows are modeled as semi-actuator disks. Losses, quasi-steady deviation angles, and reference incidence correlations are included in the analysis. Both subsonic and transonic relative Mach numbers are considered. A parameter study is made to determine the influence of such variables as Mach number and swirl angle on the attenuation of the distortion.

  3. Flow distortion on boom mounted cup anemometers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindelöw, Per Jonas Petter; Friis Pedersen, Troels; Gottschall, Julia

    In this report we investigate on wind direction dependent errors in the measurement of the horizontal wind speed by boom mounted cup anemometers. The boom mounting on the studied lattice tower is performed according to IEC standard design rules, yet, larger deviations than predicted by flow models...... are observed. The errors on the measurements are likely caused by an underestimation of the flow distortions around the tower. In this paper an experimental method for deriving a correction formula and an in-field calibration is suggested. The method is based on measurements with two cup anemometers mounted...... in the measurement of wind turbine power performance, wind resource assessment and for providing purposeful in-field comparisons between different sensors, e.g. lidar anemometers. With the proposed method, direction dependent errors can be extracted and the mast flow distortion effect on the wind measurements...

  4. Flow distortion on boom mounted cup anemometers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lindeloew-Marsden, P.; Pedersen, Troels F.; Gottschall, J.; Vesth, A.; Paulsen, R.W.U.; Courtney, M.S.

    2010-08-15

    In this report we investigate on wind direction dependent errors in the measurement of the horizontal wind speed by boom mounted cup anemometers. The boom mounting on the studied lattice tower is performed according to IEC standard design rules, yet, larger deviations than predicted by flow models are observed. The errors on the measurements are likely caused by an underestimation of the flow distortions around the tower. In this paper an experimental method for deriving a correction formula and an in-field calibration is suggested. The method is based on measurements with two cup anemometers mounted with booms at the same height but pointing in 60 deg. different directions. In the examined case of a 1.9 m wide equilateral triangular lattice tower with booms protruding 4.1 m at 80 m height the measurement errors are observed to reach up to +- 2 %. Errors of this magnitude are severely problematic in the measurement of wind turbine power performance, wind resource assessment and for providing purposeful in-field comparisons between different sensors, e.g. lidar anemometers. With the proposed method, direction dependent errors can be extracted and the mast flow distortion effect on the wind measurements corrected to an uncertainty estimated to better than 0.5%. This level of uncertainty is probably acceptable for the above mentioned applications. (author)

  5. Wave front distortion based fluid flow imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iffa, Emishaw; Heidrich, Wolfgang

    2013-03-01

    In this paper, a transparent flow surface reconstruction based on wave front distortion is investigated. A camera lens is used to focus the image formed by the micro-lens array to the camera imaging plane. The irradiance of the captured image is transformed to frequency spectrum and then the x and y spatial components are separated. A rigid spatial translation followed by low pass filtering yields a single frequency component of the image intensity. Index of refraction is estimated from the inverse Fourier transform of the spatial frequency spectrum of the irradiance. The proposed method is evaluated with synthetic data of a randomly generated index of refraction value and used to visualize a fuel injection volumetric data.

  6. Optical wavefront distortion due to supersonic flow fields

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN ZhiQiang; FU Song

    2009-01-01

    The optical wavefront distortion caused by a supersonic flow field around a half model of blunt nose cone was studied in a wind tunnel. A Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor was used to measure the dis-totted optical wavefront. Interesting optical parameters including the peak variation (PV), root of mean square (RMS) and Strehl ratio were obtained under different test conditions during the experiment. During the establishing process of the flow field in the wind tunnel test section, the wavefront shape was unstable. However after the flow field reached the steady flow state, the wavefront shape kept sta-ble, and the relative error of wavefront aberration was found small. The Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor developed was proved to be credible in measuring quantitatively the optical phase change of light traveling through the flow field around model window.

  7. Flow distortion at a dense forest edge

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dellwik, Ebba; Bingöl, Ferhat; Mann, Jakob

    2014-01-01

    The flow near tall forest edges is complex, yet poorly described. A field experiment using two meteorological masts equipped with sonic anemometers and a horizontally staring lidar was performed upwind and downwind of the interface between an open flat farmland and a tall (hc = 24 m) beech forest......, relative to the measurements upwind of the edge. The lidar data taken at several positions between the masts at 1.25hc show that the minimum wind speed occurred just upwind of the edge. At the 1.25hc level, at the forest mast, the momentum flux (\\documentclass....... Data obtained during near‐neutral conditions are presented for the wind direction towards the forest. Results from a high leaf area index period are compared with those from a low leaf area index period. For both periods, the wind speed increased above the forest and decreased within the forest...

  8. Groundwater Flow Field Distortion by Monitoring Wells and Passive Flux Meters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verreydt, G; Bronders, J; Van Keer, I; Diels, L; Vanderauwera, P

    2015-01-01

    Due to differences in hydraulic conductivity and effects of well construction geometry, groundwater lateral flow through a monitoring well typically differs from groundwater flow in the surrounding aquifer. These differences must be well understood in order to apply passive measuring techniques, such as passive flux meters (PFMs) used for the measurement of groundwater and contaminant mass fluxes. To understand these differences, lab flow tank experiments were performed to evaluate the influences of the well screen, the surrounding filter pack and the presence of a PFM on the natural groundwater flux through a monitoring well. The results were compared with analytical calculations of flow field distortion based on the potential theory of Drost et al. (1968). Measured well flow field distortion factors were found to be lower than calculated flow field distortion factors, while measured PFM flow field distortion factors were comparable to the calculated ones. However, this latter is not the case for all conditions. The slotted geometry of the well screen seems to make a correct analytical calculation challenging for conditions where flow field deviation occurs, because the potential theory assumes a uniform flow field. Finally, plots of the functional relationships of the distortion of the flow field with the hydraulic conductivities of the filter screen, surrounding filter pack and corresponding radii make it possible to design well construction to optimally function during PFM applications.

  9. Investigations on an Axial Flow Fan Stage subjected to Circumferential Inlet Flow Distortion and Swirl

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    M.Govardhan; K.Viswanath

    1997-01-01

    The combined effects of swirl and circumferential inlet flow distortion on the flow field of an axial flow fan stage are reported in this paper,The study involves measurements at the inlet of the rotor and exit of the rotor and stator atdesign and off design flow conditions.The study indicated that at the design flow condition,swirl had caused deterioration of the performance in addition to that caused by distortion.Pressure rise imparted in the distortion zone is hogher than in the free zone.The attenuation of distortion is high in the presence of swirl.

  10. Experiments of effects of inlet-air distortion on aerodynamic performance in transonic compressor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Mao-yi; YUAN Wei; LU Ya-jun; SONG Xi-zhen; LU Li-peng

    2013-01-01

    The inlet-air distortion which was caused by high angle-of-attack flight was simulated by plugboard.Experiments were conducted on a transonic axial-flow compressor's rotor at 98% rotating speed.The flow field characteristics and mechanism of performance degradation were analyzed in detail.The compressor inlet was divided into four sectors at circumference under inlet-air distortion.They were undistorted sector,transition sector A where the rotor was rotating into the distortion sector,distorted sector and transition sector B where the rotor was rotating out of the distortion sector.The experimental results show that compared with undistorted sector,there is a subsonic flow in transition sector A,so the pressure ratio is decreased by a large margin in this sector.However,the shock wave is enhanced in distortion sector and transition sector B,and thus the pressure ratio increases in these sectors.Because of the different works at circumference,the phase angle of total pressure changes 90° when the inlet total pressure distortion passes through compressor rotor.In addition,the frequency and amplitude of disturbances in front of the rotor strengthenes under inlet distortion,so the unstable flow would take place in advance.In addition,the position of stall inception is in one of the transition sectors.

  11. Wavefront shaping for imaging-based flow velocity measurements through distortions using a Fresnel guide star.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koukourakis, Nektarios; Fregin, Bob; König, Jörg; Büttner, Lars; Czarske, Jürgen W

    2016-09-19

    Imaging-based flow measurement techniques, like particle image velocimetry (PIV), are vulnerable to time-varying distortions like refractive index inhomogeneities or fluctuating phase boundaries. Such distortions strongly increase the velocity error, as the position assignment of the tracer particles and the decrease of image contrast exhibit significant uncertainties. We demonstrate that wavefront shaping based on spatially distributed guide stars has the potential to significantly reduce the measurement uncertainty. Proof of concept experiments show an improvement by more than one order of magnitude. Possible applications for the wavefront shaping PIV range from measurements in jets and film flows to biomedical applications.

  12. Mapping flow distortion on oceanographic platforms using computational fluid dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. O'Sullivan

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Wind speed measurements over the ocean on ships or buoys are affected by flow distortion from the platform and by the anemometer itself. This can lead to errors in direct measurements and the derived parametrisations. Here we computational fluid dynamics (CFD to simulate the errors in wind speed measurements caused by flow distortion on the RV Celtic Explorer. Numerical measurements were obtained from the finite-volume CFD code OpenFOAM, which was used to simulate the velocity fields. This was done over a range of orientations in the test domain from −60 to +60° in increments of 10°. The simulation was also set up for a range of velocities, ranging from 5 to 25 m s−1 in increments of 0.5 m s−1. The numerical analysis showed close agreement to experimental measurements.

  13. Identification and control of harmonic distortions report on Furnas experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mantuano Filho, Salvatore; Medeiros, Jose Roberto de; Bezerra, Luiz Roberto; Oliveira, Denise Borges de; Praca, Antonio Augusto Souza; Paiva Fontes, Marco Antonio de; Marques, Luiz Carlos Borges C. [FURNAS, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    1994-12-31

    This paper describes FURNAS experience on identification and control of harmonic distortions obtained from conservation of system operation and research for solutions. Special attention is paid to the harmonic overload observed at Ibiuna substation, the receiving end of the FURNAS HVDC transmission of the Itaipu 50 Hz energy, and the solutions that have been adopted. Methods of measurement and digital simulation have been developed and successfully tested so far. The present stage of those methods will be described. Not less important is the need for a specific legislation on harmonic distortion as explained in this paper. (author) 6 refs., 2 figs.

  14. Evaluation of Probe-Induced Flow Distortion of Campbell CSAT3 Sonic Anemometers by Numerical Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huq, Sadiq; De Roo, Frederik; Foken, Thomas; Mauder, Matthias

    2017-06-01

    The Campbell CSAT3 sonic anemometer is one of the most popular instruments for turbulence measurements in basic micrometeorological research and ecological applications. While measurement uncertainty has been characterized by field experiments and wind-tunnel studies in the past, there are conflicting estimates, which motivated us to conduct a numerical experiment using large-eddy simulation to evaluate the probe-induced flow distortion of the CSAT3 anemometer under controlled conditions, and with exact knowledge of the undisturbed flow. As opposed to wind-tunnel studies, we imposed oscillations in both the vertical and horizontal velocity components at the distinct frequencies and amplitudes found in typical turbulence spectra in the surface layer. The resulting flow-distortion errors for the standard deviations of the vertical velocity component range from 3 to 7%, and from 1 to 3% for the horizontal velocity component, depending on the azimuth angle. The magnitude of these errors is almost independent of the frequency of wind speed fluctuations, provided the amplitude is typical for surface-layer turbulence. A comparison of the corrections for transducer shadowing proposed by both Kaimal et al. (Proc Dyn Flow Conf, 551-565, 1978) and Horst et al. (Boundary-Layer Meteorol 155:371-395, 2015) show that both methods compensate for a larger part of the observed error, but do not sufficiently account for the azimuth dependency. Further numerical simulations could be conducted in the future to characterize the flow distortion induced by other existing types of sonic anemometers for the purposes of optimizing their geometry.

  15. Influence of SPS casing treatment on axial flow compressor subjected to radial pressure distortion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fanyu Li

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The present work is about the stall margin enhancement ability of a kind of stall precursor-suppressed (SPS casing treatment when fan/compressor suffers from a radial total pressure inlet distortion. Experimental researches are conducted on a low-speed compressor with and without SPS casing treatment under radial distorted inlet flow of different levels as well as uniform inlet flow. The distorted flow fields of different levels are generated by annular distortion flow generators of different heights. The characteristic curves under these conditions are measured and analyzed. The results show that the radial inlet distortion could cause a stall margin loss from 2% to 30% under different distorted levels. The SPS casing treatment could remedy this stall margin loss under small distortion level and only partly make up the stall margin loss caused by distortion in large level without leading to perceptible additional efficiency loss and obvious change of characteristic curves. The pre-stall behavior of the compressor is investigated to reveal the mechanism of this stall margin improvement ability of the SPS casing treatment. The results do show that this casing treatment delays the occurrence of rotating stall by weakening the pressure perturbations and suppressing the nonlinear amplification of the stall precursor waves in the compression system.

  16. Parameterization of temperature and spectral distortions in future CMB experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pitrou, Cyril; Stebbins, Albert

    2014-10-15

    CMB spectral distortions are induced by Compton collisions with electrons. We review the various schemes to characterize the anisotropic CMB with a non-Planckian spectrum. We advocate using logarithmically averaged temperature moments as the preferred language to describe these spectral distortions, both for theoretical modeling and observations. Numerical modeling is simpler, the moments are frame-independent, and in terms of scattering the mode truncation is exact.

  17. Controlled Flow Distortion in an Offset Diffuser using Hybrid Trapped Vorticity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burrows, T. J.; Vukasinovic, B.; Glezer, A.

    2016-11-01

    Trapped vorticity concentration engendered by deliberate modification of the internal surface of an offset diffuser is coupled with a spanwise array of surface-integrated fluidic-oscillating jets for hybrid flow control of streamwise vorticity concentrations that dominate the base flow and give rise to flow distortions at the engine inlet. The local and global characteristics of the diffuser flow in the absence and presence of the actuation are investigated at Mach numbers up to M = 0.7, using surface oil-flow visualization and pressure distributions, and particle image velocimetry. It is shown that two sources of streamwise vorticity dominate the base flow distortion, namely, corner and a central pair of counter-rotating vortices. The present investigations demonstrate that the actuation affects the topology, strength and scale of the trapped vorticity and thereby its coupling to and interaction with the counter rotating streamwise vortices, where the central vortex pair becomes fully suppressed. As a result, the actuation significantly alters the evolution of the flow within the diffuser, and leads to significant suppression of pressure distortion at the engine inlet (by about 80%) at actuation level that is less than 0.7% of the diffuser's mass flow rate. These findings indicate the utility of hybrid trapped vorticity actuation for mitigating adverse effects of secondary vorticity concentrations formed by local separation and corner flows. Supported by ONR.

  18. Geophysical fluid flow experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broome, B. G.; Fichtl, G.; Fowlis, W.

    1979-01-01

    The essential fluid flow processes associated with the solar and Jovian atmospheres will be examined in a laboratory experiment scheduled for performance on Spacelab Missions One and Three. The experimental instrumentation required to generate and to record convective fluid flow is described. Details of the optical system configuration, the lens design, and the optical coatings are described. Measurement of thermal gradient fields by schlieren techniques and measurement of fluid flow velocity fields by photochromic dye tracers is achieved with a common optical system which utilizes photographic film for data recording. Generation of the photochromic dye tracers is described, and data annotation of experimental parameters on the film record is discussed.

  19. Numerical Investigation of Inlet Distortion on an Axial Flow Compressor Rotor with Circumferential Groove Casing Treatment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Huang Jian; Wu Hu

    2008-01-01

    On the base of an assumed steady inlet circumferential total pressure distortion, three-dimensional time-dependent numerical simulations are conducted on an axial flow subsonic compressor rotor. The performances and flow fields of a compressor rotor, either casing treated or untreated, are investigated in detail either with or without inlet pressure distortion. Results show that the circumferential groove casing treatment can expand the operating range of the compressor rotor either with or without inlet pressure distortion at the expense of a drop in peak isentropic efficiency. The casing treatment is capable of weakening or even removing the tip leakage vortex effectively either with or without inlet distortion. In clean inlet circumstances, the enhancement and forward movement of tip leakage vortex cause the untreated compressor rotor to stall. By contrast, with circumferential groove casing, the serious flow separation on the suction surface leads to aerodynamic stalling eventually. In the presence of inlet pressure distortion, the blade loading changes from passage to passage as the distorted inflow sector is traversed. Similar to the clean inlet circumstances, with a smooth wall casing, the enhancement and forward movement of tip leakage vortex are still the main factors which lead to the compressor rotor stalling eventu-ally. When the rotor works under near stall conditions, the blockage resulting from the tip leakage vortex in all the passages is very seri-ous. Especially in several passages, flow-spillage is observed. Compared to the clean inlet circumstances, circumferential groove casing treatment can also eliminate the low energy zone in the outer end wall region effectively.

  20. Optimization of the axial compressor flow passage to reduce the circumferential distortion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popov, G.; Kolmakova, D.; Shklovets, A.; Ermakov, A.

    2015-08-01

    This work is motivated by the necessity to reduce the effects of the flow circumferential distortion in the flow passage of the aircraft gas turbine engine (GTE). In previous research, the authors have proposed the approaches to decrease of the flow circumferential distortion arising from the mid-support racks of GTE compressor and having a negative impact on the blade rows, located upstream. In particular, the idea of introducing the circumferentially non-uniform blade pitch and profile stagger angle of guide vanes located in front of the support was contributed in order to redistribute the flow and decrease the dynamic stresses in the rotor wheel of the same stage. During the research presented in this paper, another principal of reduction of the flow circumferential distortion was chosen. Firstly, the variants of upgrading the existing support racks were found. Secondly, the new design of support was offered. Both the first and the second version of the support design variation took into account the availability of technological and structural limitations associated with the location of oil pipes, springs and others elements in the support racks. Investigations of modified design showed that the support with altered racks provides a reduction of dynamic stresses by 20% at resonance with the most dangerous harmonic, and the new design of support can give the decrease of 30%.

  1. Analysis by design of experiments of distortion potentials in drawn and induction hardened wire

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandre da Silva Rocha

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available In this investigation a DoE (Design of Experiments analysis of distortion for a typical manufacturing process of pre-straightened, cold drawn and induction hardened AISI 1045 cylindrical steel bars was carried out. A careful characterization of the material, including residual stress states and geometrical changes, was done for the different manufacturing steps. In order to identify effects and correlations on distortion behavior, the investigated variables included the drawing process itself with two different drawing angles, a stress relief treatment, which was applied to one part of the samples, and, finally, induction hardening with two different case depths. Main and statistically significant effects on the distortion of the induction hardened samples were found to be in this order, the drawing angle, the stress relief treatment and the induction hardening depth. It was also found that the distortion potentials are transmitted from the drawing process to further manufacturing steps and, consequently, from one production site to the next.

  2. Redistribution of an inlet temperature distortion in an axial flow turbine stage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, T. L.; Sharma, O. P.; Joslyn, H. D.; Dring, R. P.

    1986-06-01

    The results of an experimental program aimed at determining the extent of the redistribution of an inlet temperature distortion in an axial flow turbine stage are presented. The program was conducted in a large-scale, low speed, single stage turbine where air, seeded with CO2 was introduced at one circumferential location upstream of the inlet guide vane. The migration of the seeded air through the turbine was determined by sensing CO2 concentration inside the stage. A temperature distortion was introduced by heating the seeded air. The CO2 concentration contours measured downstream of the vane showed little change with heating, indicating that the vane flowfield was relatively unaffected by the introduction of the temperature distortion. However, the CO2 contours observed on the rotor airfoil surfaces for the case with inlet heating indicated segregation of hot and cold gas, with the higher temperature gas migrating to the pressure side and the lower temperature gas migrating to the suction side. Significant increases in rotor secondary flow were also observed.

  3. Influences of flow loss and inlet distortions from radial inlets on the performances of centrifugal compressor stages

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Feng Hui; Mao, Yi Jun [School of Energy and Power Engineering, Xi' an Jiaotong University, Xi' an (China); Tan, Ji Jian [Dept. of Research and Development, Shenyang Blower Works Group Co., Ltd., Shenyang (China)

    2016-11-15

    Radial inlets are typical upstream components of multistage centrifugal compressors. Unlike axial inlets, radial inlets generate additional flow loss and introduce flow distortions at impeller inlets. Such distortions negatively affect the aerodynamic performance of compressor stages. In this study, industrial centrifugal compressor stages with different radial inlets are investigated via numerical simulations. Two reference models were built, simulated, and compared with each original compressor stage to analyze the respective and coupling influences of flow loss and inlet distortions caused by radial inlets on the performances of the compressor stage and downstream components. Flow loss and inlet distortions are validated as the main factors through which radial inlets negatively affect compressor performance. Results indicate that flow loss inside radial inlets decreases the performance of the whole compressor stage but exerts minimal effect on downstream components. By contrast, inlet distortions induced by radial inlets negatively influence the performance of the whole compressor stage and exert significant effects on downstream components. Therefore, when optimizing radial inlets, the reduction of inlet distortions might be more effective than the reduction of flow loss. This research provides references and suggestions for the design and improvement of radial inlets.

  4. TOWARD MORE REALISTIC ANALYTIC MODELS OF THE HELIOTAIL: INCORPORATING MAGNETIC FLATTENING VIA DISTORTION FLOWS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kleimann, Jens; Fichtner, Horst [Ruhr-Universität Bochum, Fakultät für Physik und Astronomie, Institut für Theoretische Physik IV, Bochum (Germany); Röken, Christian [Universität Regensburg, Fakultät für Mathematik, Regensburg (Germany); Heerikhuisen, Jacob, E-mail: jk@tp4.rub.de, E-mail: hf@tp4.rub.de, E-mail: christian.roeken@mathematik.uni-regensburg.de, E-mail: jacob.heerikhuisen@uah.edu [Department of Space Science and Center for Space Plasma and Aeronomic Research, University of Alabama in Huntsville, Huntsville, AL 35899 (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Both physical arguments and simulations of the global heliosphere indicate that the tailward heliopause is flattened considerably in the direction perpendicular to both the incoming flow and the large-scale interstellar magnetic field. Despite this fact, all of the existing global analytical models of the outer heliosheath's magnetic field assume a circular cross section of the heliotail. To eliminate this inconsistency, we introduce a mathematical procedure by which any analytically or numerically given magnetic field can be deformed in such a way that the cross sections along the heliotail axis attain freely prescribed, spatially dependent values for their total area and aspect ratio. The distorting transformation of this method honors both the solenoidality condition and the stationary induction equation with respect to an accompanying flow field, provided that both constraints were already satisfied for the original magnetic and flow fields prior to the transformation. In order to obtain realistic values for the above parameters, we present the first quantitative analysis of the heliotail's overall distortion as seen in state-of-the-art three-dimensional hybrid MHD–kinetic simulations.

  5. A Nonideal Flow Experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez-Velasco, Juan Ramon; Elorriaga, Javier Bilbao

    1984-01-01

    Considers the deviation from the ideal flows of both a backmix tank and a backmix tank followed by a flow vessel. Background information, apparatus used, and experimental procedures are provided. Typical results are also provided and discussed. (JN)

  6. Optimizing the Physical Implementation of an Eddy-covariance System to Minimize Flow Distortion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durden, D.; Zulueta, R. C.; Durden, N. P.; Metzger, S.; Luo, H.; Duvall, B.

    2015-12-01

    The eddy-covariance technique is widely applied to observe the exchange of energy and scalars between the earth's surface and its atmosphere. In practice, fast (≥10 Hz) sonic anemometry and enclosed infrared gas spectroscopy are used to determine fluctuations in the 3-D wind vector and trace gas concentrations, respectively. Here, two contradicting requirements need to be fulfilled: (i) the sonic anemometer and trace gas analyzer should sample the same air volume, while (ii) the presence of the gas analyzer should not affect the wind field measured by the 3-D sonic anemometer. To determine the optimal positioning of these instruments with respect to each other, a trade-off study was performed. Theoretical formulations were used to determine a range of positions between the sonic anemometer and the gas analyzer that minimize the sum of (i) decorrelation error and (ii) wind blocking error. Subsequently, the blocking error induced by the presence of the gas sampling system was experimentally tested for a range of wind directions to verify the model-predicted placement: In a controlled environment the sonic anemometer was placed in the directed flow from a fan outfitted with a large shroud, with and without the presence of the enclosed gas analyzer and its sampling system. Blocking errors were enhanced by up to 10% for wind directions deviating ≥130° from frontal, when the flow was coming from the side where the enclosed gas analyzer was mounted. Consequently, we suggest a lateral position of the enclosed gas analyzer towards the aerodynamic wake of the tower, as data from this direction is likely affected by tower-induced flow distortion already. Ultimately, this physical implementation of the sonic anemometer and enclosed gas analyzer resulted in decorrelation and blocking errors ≤5% for ≥70% of all wind directions. These findings informed the design of the National Ecological Observatory Network's (NEON) eddy-covariance system, which is currently being

  7. The Role of Tip Leakage Flow in Triggering Rotating Stall of a Low Speed Compressor under Inlet Distortion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jingxuan Zhang; Feng Lin; Jingyi Chen; Chaoqun Nie

    2009-01-01

    The stall behavior in a single-stage low-speed axial compressor under rotating inlet distortion (RID) is investi-gated in the first half of this paper. The tests demonstrate that the tip leakage flow (TLF) plays an important rolein triggering rotating stall. The tracking of the spike-like disturbances caused by the spillage of TLV indicates that most of such spike-like disturbances will be smeared by non-distorted sector and the growth of the spike-like dis-turbances actually relate closely to how and how often the path of the propagating disturbances come across the path of the rotating distorted sector. In the second half of this paper, micro air injections are applied to test the ef-fect behavior of TLF on stall inception. Contrasts to without micro air injections, the spike-like disturbances are much fewer, so the possibilities that spike-like disturbances may trigger rotating stall are fewer too. As a result, the compressor gets a lower mass flow rate at stall for both co-rotating inlet distortion and counter-rotating inlet distortion.

  8. Approximating rate-distortion graphs of individual data: Experiments in lossy compression and denoising

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S. de Rooij; P.M.B. Vitányi

    2012-01-01

    Classical rate-distortion theory requires specifying a source distribution. Instead, we analyze rate-distortion properties of individual objects using the recently developed algorithmic rate-distortion theory. The latter is based on the noncomputable notion of Kolmogorov complexity. To apply the the

  9. Effects of inlet distortion on the development of secondary flows in a subsonic axial inlet compressor rotor. Ph.D. Thesis - Toledo Univ., OH

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owen, Albert K.

    1991-01-01

    Detailed flow measurements were taken inside an isolated axial compressor rotor operating subsonically near peak efficiency. Laser anemometer measurements were made with two inlet velocity profiles. One profile consisted of an unmodified baseline flow, and the second profile was distorted by placing axisymmetric screens on the hub and shroud well upstream of the rotor. A primary flow is defined in the rotor and deviations from this primary flow for each inlet flow condition identified. A comparison between the two flow deviations is made to assess the development of a passage vortex due to the distortion of the inlet flow. A comparison of experimental results with computational predictions from a Navier-Stokes solver showed good agreement between predicted and measured flow. Measured results indicate that a distorted inlet profile has minimal effect on the development of the flow in the rotor passage and the resulting passage vortex.

  10. Three-dimensional unsteady flow and forces in centrifugal impellers with circumferential distortion of the outlet static pressure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fatsis, A.; Pierret, S.; Braembussche, R. van den [von Karman Inst. for Fluid Dynamics, Rhode-St.-Genese (Belgium). Turbomachinery Dept.

    1997-01-01

    This paper describes the numerical investigation of the centrifugal impeller response to downstream static pressure distortions imposed by volutes at off-design operations. An unsteady three-dimensional Euler solver with nonreflecting upstream and downstream boundary conditions and phase-lagged periodicity conditions is used for this purpose. The mechanisms governing the unsteady flow field are analyzed. A parametric study shows the influence of the acoustic Strouhal number on the amplitude of the flow perturbations. Radial forces calculated on backward leaned and radial ending centrifugal impellers show nonnegligible influence of the impeller geometry.

  11. Design of Multiphase Flow Experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Urkedal, Hege

    1998-12-31

    This thesis proposes an experimental design procedure for multiphase experiments. The two-phase functions can be determined using data from a single experiment, while the three-phase relative permeabilities must be determined using data from multiple experiments. Various three-phase experimental designs have been investigated and the accuracy with which the flow functions may be determined using the corresponding data have been computed. Analytical sensitivity coefficients were developed from two-phase to three-phase flow. Sensitivity coefficients are the derivative of the model output with respect to the model parameters. They are obtained by a direct method that takes advantage of the fact that the model equations are solved using the Newton-Raphson method, and some of the results from this solution can be used directly when solving the sensitivity equation. Numerical derivatives are avoided, which improves accuracy. The thesis uses an inverse methodology for determination of two- and three-phase relative permeability and capillary pressure functions. The main work has been the development of analytical sensitivity coefficients for two-and three-phase flow. This technical contribution has improved the accuracy both in parameter estimation and accuracy assessment of the estimates and reduced the computer time requirements. The proposed experimental design is also dependent on accurate sensitivity coefficients to give the right guidelines for how two- and three-phase experiments should be conducted. Following the proposed experimental design, three-phase relative permeability and capillary pressure functions have been estimated when multiple sets of experimental data have been reconciled by simulations. 74 refs., 69 figs., 18 tabs.

  12. Natural Laminar Flow Flight Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steers, L. L.

    1981-01-01

    A supercritical airfoil section was designed with favorable pressure gradients on both the upper and lower surfaces. Wind tunnel tests were conducted in the Langley 8 Foot Transonic Pressure Tunnel. The outer wing panels of the F-111 TACT airplane were modified to incorporate partial span test gloves having the natural laminar, flow profile. Instrumentation was installed to provide surface pressure data as well as to determine transition location and boundary layer characteristics. The flight experiment encompassed 19 flights conducted with and without transition fixed at several locations for wing leading edge sweep angles which varied from 10 to 26 at Mach numbers from 0.80 to 0.85 and altitudes of 7620 meters and 9144 meters. Preliminary results indicate that a large portion of the test chord experienced laminar flow.

  13. Anchoring Distortions Coupled with Plane Couette & Poiseuille Flows of Nematic Polymers in Viscous Solvents: Morphology in Molecular Orientation, Stress & Flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-03-01

    COUETTE & POISEUILLE FLOWS OF NEMATIC POLYMERS IN VISCOUS SOLVENTS: MORPHOLOGY IN MOLECULAR ORIENTATION, STRESS & FLOW Hong Zhou...viscoelastic stresses, and flow feedback. Pre- vious studies in plane Couette & Poiseuille flow (with the exception of [7]) have focused on the coupling between...with Plane Couette & Poiseuille Flows of Nematic Polymers in Viscous Solvents: Morphology in Molecular Orientation, Stress & Flow 5a. CONTRACT

  14. Optimizing the Experience of Flow for Adults with Aphasia: A Focus on Environmental Factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sather, Thomas W.; Howe, Tami; Nelson, Nickola Wolf; Lagerwey, Mary

    2017-01-01

    Flow has been described as positive experiences of intense concentration, distorted time passage, and a loss of self-consciousness that result from matching task difficulty to a person's skill level. It has been studied in many different populations and has been associated with a number of positive outcomes, including improved life satisfaction…

  15. Contamination and Distortion of Steady Flow Field Induced by Discrete Frequency in Aircraft Gas Turbines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-05-16

    Ranque - Hilsch ( vortex tube ) effect." 5. List of Professional Personnel Associated with the Research The recipient of advanced degrees awarded in...SUB. GR. AIRCRAFT ENGINES RANQUE - HILSCH EFFECT i UNSTEADY FLOW ENERGY SEPARATION IN FLOW(KARMAN VORTEX STREET ORGAINIZED REYNOLDS STRESSES 19. ABSTRACT...turbomachinery. Specific objectives are twofold: Task (A). To complete the investigation of the Ranque - Hilsch effect con- ducted under AFOSR Contract

  16. Development of a three-dimensional correction method for optical distortion of flow field inside a liquid droplet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gim, Yeonghyeon; Ko, Han Seo

    2016-04-15

    In this Letter, a three-dimensional (3D) optical correction method, which was verified by simulation, was developed to reconstruct droplet-based flow fields. In the simulation, a synthetic phantom was reconstructed using a simultaneous multiplicative algebraic reconstruction technique with three detectors positioned at the synthetic object (represented by the phantom), with offset angles of 30° relative to each other. Additionally, a projection matrix was developed using the ray tracing method. If the phantom is in liquid, the image of the phantom can be distorted since the light passes through a convex liquid-vapor interface. Because of the optical distortion effect, the projection matrix used to reconstruct a 3D field should be supplemented by the revision ray, instead of the original projection ray. The revision ray can be obtained from the refraction ray occurring on the surface of the liquid. As a result, the error on the reconstruction field of the phantom could be reduced using the developed optical correction method. In addition, the developed optical method was applied to a Taylor cone which was caused by the high voltage between the droplet and the substrate.

  17. Fluid Flow Experiment for Undergraduate Laboratory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilimpochapornkul, Viroj; Obot, Nsima T.

    1986-01-01

    The undergraduate fluid mechanics laboratory at Clarkson University consists of three experiments: mixing; drag measurements; and fluid flow and pressure drop measurements. The latter experiment is described, considering equipment needed, procedures used, and typical results obtained. (JN)

  18. Numerical experiments for turbulent flows

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Příhoda Jaromír

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the work is to explore the possibilities of modelling transonic flows in the internal and external aerodynamics. Several configurations were analyzed and calculations were performed using both inviscid and viscous models of flow. Viscous turbulent flows have been simulated using either zero equation algebraic Baldwin-Lomax model and two equation k—ω model in its basic version and improved TNT variant. The numerical solution was obtained using Lax-Wendroff scheme in the MacCormack form on structured non-ortogonal grids. Artificial dissipation was added to improve the numerical stability. Achieved results are compared with experimental data.

  19. The role of flow experience in cyber-game addiction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, Ting-Jui; Ting, Chih-Chen

    2003-12-01

    Consumer habit, an important key to repetitive consumption, is an interesting yet puzzling phenomenon. Sometimes this consumption becomes obsessive--consumers will continue to act a certain way even when they feel it is not in their best interests. However, not all consumers develop such addictions. This study uses cyber-game addiction syndrome as an analogue to trace the possible causes of consumer addiction. Results from structure equation modeling show that repetition of favorite activities has a moderate effect upon addiction, which is in line with the assertion of rational addiction theory. However, flow experience--the emotional state embracing perceptional distortion and enjoyment--shows a much stronger impact on addiction. This suggests that consumers who have experienced flow are more likely to be addicted.

  20. Pump-induced wavefront distortion in prototypical NIF/LMJ amplifiers-modeling and comparison with experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Erlandson, A; Jancaitis, K; LeTouze, G; Marshall, C; Rotter, M; Seznec, S; Zapata, L

    1998-09-01

    In large-aperture laser amplifiers such as those envisioned for the National Ignition Facility (NIF) and Laser Megajoules (LMJ) lasers, the geometry is such that the front and back faces of the laser slab are heated unevenly by the pump process. This uneven heating results in a mechanical deformation of the laser slab and consequent internal stresses. The deformation and stresses, along with a temperature-dependent refractive index variation, result in phase variations across the laser beam (so-called pump-induced wavefront distortions). These phase variations lead to beam steering which may affect frequency conversion as well as energy-on-target. We have developed a model which allows us to estimate the pump-induced wavefront distortion for a given amplifier configuration as well as the spatially-resolved depolarization. The model is compared with experiments taken in our amplifier development laboratory, AMPLAB

  1. Numerical experiments modelling turbulent flows

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trefilík Jiří

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The work aims at investigation of the possibilities of modelling transonic flows mainly in external aerodynamics. New results are presented and compared with reference data and previously achieved results. For the turbulent flow simulations two modifications of the basic k – ω model are employed: SST and TNT. The numerical solution was achieved by using the MacCormack scheme on structured non-ortogonal grids. Artificial dissipation was added to improve the numerical stability.

  2. A study on vortex flow control of inlet distortion in the re-engined 727-100 center inlet duct using computational fluid dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Bernhard H.; Huang, Pao S.; Paschal, William A.; Cavatorta, Enrico

    1992-01-01

    Computational fluid dynamics was used to investigate the management of inlet distortion by the introduction of discrete vorticity sources at selected locations in the inlet for the purpose of controlling secondary flow. These sources of vorticity were introduced by means of vortex generators. A series of design observations were made concerning the importance of various vortex generator design parameters in minimizing engine face circumferential distortion. The study showed that vortex strength, generator scale, and secondary flow field structure have a complicated and interrelated influence on the engine face distortion, over and above the initial geometry and arrangement of the generators. The installed vortex generator performance was found to be a function of three categories of variables: the inflow conditions, the aerodynamic characteristics associated with the inlet duct, and the design parameters related to the geometry, arrangement, and placement of the vortex generators within the outlet duct itself.

  3. A study on vortex flow control on inlet distortion in the re-engined 727-100 center inlet duct using computational fluid dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Bernhard H.; Huang, Pao S.; Paschal, William A.; Cavatorta, Enrico

    1992-01-01

    Computational fluid dynamics was used to investigate the management of inlet distortion by the introduction of discrete vorticity sources at selected locations in the inlet for the purpose of controlling secondary flow. These sources of vorticity were introduced by means of vortex generators. A series of design observations were made concerning the importance of various vortex generator design parameters in minimizing engine face circumferential distortion. The study showed that vortex strength, generator scale, and secondary flow field structure have a complicated and interrelated influence on the engine face distortion, over and above the initial geometry and arrangement of the generators. The installed vortex generator performance was found to be a function of three categories of variables: the inflow conditions, the aerodynamic characteristics associated with the inlet duct, and the design parameters related to the geometry, arrangement, and placement of the vortex generators within the outlet duct itself.

  4. Supersonic Plasma Flow Control Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-12-01

    to liquid metals , for example, the conductivities of typical plasma and electrolyte flows are relatively low. Ref. 14 cites the conductivity of...heating is the dominant effect. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Supersonic, plasma , MHD , boundary-layer 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 19a. NAME OF RESPONSIBLE...horns in operation on Mach 5 wind tunnel with a plasma discharge. 31 Figure 17 Front view of a 100 mA DC discharge generated with upstream pointing

  5. Flow Results of Experiment 117

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, Donald W. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    1976-05-25

    Experiment 117, performed on two separate days, was primarily a seismic fracture orientation experiment. On Wednesday, March 3, The fracture intersecting EE-1 was reinflated for the first time using a Western pump--a total of 9170 gallons was pumped into EE-1 fracture was again inflated and then extended while pumping a total of 31, 140 gallons into EE-1, again using a Western pump. For Friday's experiment, GT-2 was shut in during the pumping phase, and then vented over the weekend with EE-1 shut in.

  6. Sulphur hexaflouride: low energy (e,2e) experiments and molecular three-body distorted wave theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nixon, Kate L.; Murray, Andrew J.; Chaluvadi, H.; Ning, C. G.; Colgan, James; Madison, Don H.

    2016-10-01

    Experimental and theoretical triple differential ionisation cross-sections (TDCSs) are presented for the highest occupied molecular orbital of sulphur hexafluoride. These measurements were performed in the low energy regime, with outgoing electron energies ranging from 5 to 40 eV in a coplanar geometry, and with energies of 10 and 20 eV in a perpendicular geometry. Complementary theoretical predictions of the TDCS were calculated using the molecular three-body distorted wave formalism. Calculations were performed using a proper average over molecular orientations as well as the orientation-averaged molecular orbital approximation. This more sophisticated model was found to be in closer agreement with the experimental data, however neither model accurately predicts the TDCS over all geometries and energies.

  7. Detection of mammographically occult architectural distortion on digital breast tomosynthesis screening: initial clinical experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Partyka, Luke; Lourenco, Ana P; Mainiero, Martha B

    2014-07-01

    Digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) has been shown to improve the sensitivity of screening mammography. DBT may have the most potential impact in cases of subtle mammographic findings such as architectural distortion (AD). The objective of our study was to determine whether DBT provides better visualization of AD than digital mammography (DM) and whether sensitivity for cancer detection is increased by the addition of DBT as it relates to cases of mammographically occult AD. Retrospective review of BI-RADS category 0 reports from 9982 screening DM examinations with adjunct DBT were searched for the term "architectural distortion" and were reviewed in consensus by three radiologists. ADs were classified by whether they were seen better on DM or DBT, were seen equally well on both, or were occult on either modality. The electronic medical record was reviewed to identify additional imaging studies, biopsy results, and surgical excision pathology results. Review identified 26 cases of AD, 19 (73%) of which were seen only on the DBT images. Of the remaining seven ADs, six were seen better on DBT than DM. On diagnostic workup, nine lesions were assigned to BI-RADS category 4 or 5. Surgical pathology revealed two invasive carcinomas, two ductal carcinoma in situ lesions, three radial scars, and two lesions showing atypia. The cancer detection rate of DBT in mammographically occult AD was 21% (4/19). The positive predictive value of biopsy was 44%. DBT provides better visualization of AD than DM and identifies a subset of ADs that are occult on DM. Identification of additional ADs on DBT increases the cancer detection rate.

  8. Flowing dusty plasma experiments: generation of flow and measurement techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaiswal, S.; Bandyopadhyay, P.; Sen, A.

    2016-12-01

    A variety of experimental techniques for the generation of subsonic/supersonic dust fluid flows and means of measuring such flow velocities are presented. The experiments have been carried out in a \\Pi -shaped dusty plasma experimental device with micron size kaolin/melamine formaldehyde particles embedded in a background of argon plasma created by a direct current glow discharge. A stationary dust cloud is formed over the cathode region by precisely balancing the pumping speed and gas flow rate. A flow of dust particles/fluid is generated by additional gas injection from a single or dual locations or by altering the dust confining potential. The flow velocity is then estimated by three different techniques, namely, by super particle identification code, particle image velocimetry analysis and the excitation of dust acoustic waves. The results obtained from these three different techniques along with their merits and demerits are discussed. An estimation of the neutral drag force responsible for the generation as well as the attenuation of the dust fluid flow is made. These techniques can be usefully employed in laboratory devices to investigate linear and non-linear collective excitations in a flowing dusty plasma.

  9. Flow cell system for miscible displacement experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoo, S.H.; Kirkham, D.

    1971-02-01

    The use of a continuous graphic recording system for flow-component measurement in miscible displacement experiments is described. This system measures and continuously records radioactive tracer concentrations of effluents of miscible displacement columns. The recordings are needed breakthrough curves. The use of the system obviates fraction collectors.

  10. Flowing dusty plasma experiments: Generation of flow and measurement techniques

    CERN Document Server

    Jaiswal, S; Sen, A

    2016-01-01

    A variety of experimental techniques for the generation of subsonic/supersonic dust fluid flows and means of measuring such flow velocities are presented. The experiments have been carried out in a $\\Pi-$shaped Dusty Plasma Experimental (DPEx) device with micron size kaolin/Melamine Formaldehyde (MF) particles embedded in a background of Argon plasma created by a direct current (DC) glow discharge. A stationary dust cloud is formed over the cathode region by precisely balancing the pumping speed and gas flow rate. A flow of dust particles/fluid is generated by additional gas injection from a single or dual locations or by altering the dust confining potential. The flow velocity is then estimated by three different techniques, namely, by super Particle Identification (sPIT) code, Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) analysis and the excitation of Dust Acoustic Waves (DAWs). The results obtained from these three different techniques along with their merits and demerits are discussed. An estimation of the neutral dr...

  11. Modeling variability in porescale multiphase flow experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ling, Bowen; Bao, Jie; Oostrom, Mart; Battiato, Ilenia; Tartakovsky, Alexandre M.

    2017-07-01

    Microfluidic devices and porescale numerical models are commonly used to study multiphase flow in biological, geological, and engineered porous materials. In this work, we perform a set of drainage and imbibition experiments in six identical microfluidic cells to study the reproducibility of multiphase flow experiments. We observe significant variations in the experimental results, which are smaller during the drainage stage and larger during the imbibition stage. We demonstrate that these variations are due to sub-porescale geometry differences in microcells (because of manufacturing defects) and variations in the boundary condition (i.e.,fluctuations in the injection rate inherent to syringe pumps). Computational simulations are conducted using commercial software STAR-CCM+, both with constant and randomly varying injection rate. Stochastic simulations are able to capture variability in the experiments associated with the varying pump injection rate.

  12. Modeling variability in porescale multiphase flow experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ling, Bowen; Bao, Jie; Oostrom, Mart; Battiato, Ilenia; Tartakovsky, Alexandre M.

    2017-07-01

    Microfluidic devices and porescale numerical models are commonly used to study multiphase flow in biological, geological, and engineered porous materials. In this work, we perform a set of drainage and imbibition experiments in six identical microfluidic cells to study the reproducibility of multiphase flow experiments. We observe significant variations in the experimental results, which are smaller during the drainage stage and larger during the imbibition stage. We demonstrate that these variations are due to sub-porescale geometry differences in microcells (because of manufacturing defects) and variations in the boundary condition (i.e., fluctuations in the injection rate inherent to syringe pumps). Computational simulations are conducted using commercial software STAR-CCM+, both with constant and randomly varying injection rates. Stochastic simulations are able to capture variability in the experiments associated with the varying pump injection rate.

  13. The clinical utility of reduced-distortion readout-segmented echo-planar imaging in the head and neck region: initial experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koyasu, Sho; Iima, Mami; Umeoka, Shigeaki; Morisawa, Nobuko; Togashi, Kaori [Kyoto University, Department of Diagnostic Imaging and Nuclear Medicine, Graduate School of Medicine, Sakyo-Ku, Kyoto (Japan); Porter, David A. [Siemens AG, MED MR PLM AW Neurology, Allee am Roethelheimpark 2, Erlangen (Germany); Ito, Juichi [Kyoto University, Department of Otolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, Graduate School of Medicine, Sakyo-Ku, Kyoto (Japan); Le Bihan, Denis [Kyoto University, Human Brain Research Center, Graduate School of Medicine, Sakyo-Ku, Kyoto (Japan); Neurospin, CEA-Saclay Center, Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex (France)

    2014-12-15

    To evaluate whether readout-segmented echo-planar imaging (RS-EPI) diffusion weighted image (DWI) can diminish image distortion in the head and neck area, compared with single-shot (SS)-EPI DWI. We conducted phantom and patient studies using 3 T magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with a 16-channel coil. For the phantom study, we evaluated distortion and signal homogeneity in gel phantoms. For the patient study, 29 consecutive patients with clinically suspicious parotid lesions were prospectively enrolled. RS-EPI and SS-EPI DWI were evaluated by two independent readers for identification of organ/lesion and distortion, using semiquantitative scales and quantitative scores. Apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) values and contrast-noise ratios of parotid tumours (if present; n = 15) were also compared. The phantom experiments showed that RS-EPI provided less distorted and more homogeneous ADC maps than SS-EPI. In the patient study, RS-EPI was found to provide significantly less distortion in almost all organs/lesions (p < 0.05), according to both semiquantitative scales and quantitative scores. There was no significant difference in ADC values and contrast-noise ratios between the two DWI techniques. The distortion in DWI was significantly reduced with RS-EPI in both phantom and patient studies. The RS-EPI technique provided more homogenous images than SS-EPI, and can potentially offer higher image quality in the head and neck area. (orig.)

  14. Spherical Parameterization Balancing Angle and Area Distortions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadeem, Saad; Su, Zhengyu; Zeng, Wei; Kaufman, Arie; Gu, Xianfeng

    2017-06-01

    This work presents a novel framework for spherical mesh parameterization. An efficient angle-preserving spherical parameterization algorithm is introduced, which is based on dynamic Yamabe flow and the conformal welding method with solid theoretic foundation. An area-preserving spherical parameterization is also discussed, which is based on discrete optimal mass transport theory. Furthermore, a spherical parameterization algorithm, which is based on the polar decomposition method, balancing angle distortion and area distortion is presented. The algorithms are tested on 3D geometric data and the experiments demonstrate the efficiency and efficacy of the proposed methods.

  15. Smoke Point in Co-flow Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urban, David L.; Sunderland, Peter B.; Yuan, Zeng-Guang

    2009-01-01

    The Smoke Point In Co-flow Experiment (SPICE) determines the point at which gas-jet flames (similar to a butane-lighter flame) begin to emit soot (dark carbonaceous particulate formed inside the flame) in microgravity. Studying a soot emitting flame is important in understanding the ability of fires to spread and in control of soot in practical combustion systems space. Previous experiments show that soot dominates the heat emitted from flames in normal gravity and microgravity fires. Control of this heat emission is critical for prevention of the spread of fires on Earth and in space for the design of efficient combustion systems (jet engines and power generation boilers). The onset of soot emission from small gas jet flames (similar to a butane-lighter flame) will be studied to provide a database that can be used to assess the interaction between fuel chemistry and flow conditions on soot formation. These results will be used to support combustion theories and to assess fire behavior in microgravity. The Smoke Point In Co-flow Experiment (SPICE) will lead to a o improved design of practical combustors through improved control of soot formation; o improved understanding of and ability to predict heat release, soot production and emission in microgravity fires; o improved flammability criteria for selection of materials for use in the next generation of spacecraft. The Smoke Point In Co-flow Experiment (SPICE) will continue the study of fundamental phenomena related to understanding the mechanisms controlling the stability and extinction of jet diffusion flames begun with the Laminar Soot Processes (LSP) on STS-94. SPICE will stabilize an enclosed laminar flame in a co-flowing oxidizer, measure the overall flame shape to validate the theoretical and numerical predictions, measure the flame stabilization heights, and measure the temperature field to verify flame structure predictions. SPICE will determine the laminar smoke point properties of non-buoyant jet

  16. Filamentary ion flow theory and experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Lattarulo, Francesco

    2014-01-01

    Presents all-new laboratory-tested theory for calculating more accurate ionized electric fields to aid in designing high-voltage devices and its components Understanding and accurately calculating corona originated electric fields are important issues for scientists who are involved in electromagnetic and electrostatic studies. High-voltage dc lines and equipment, in particular, can generate ion flows that can give rise to environmental inconveniences. Filamentary Ion Flow: Theory and Experiments provides interdisciplinary theoretical arguments to attain a final model for computational elect

  17. Density Estimations in Laboratory Debris Flow Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Queiroz de Oliveira, Gustavo; Kulisch, Helmut; Malcherek, Andreas; Fischer, Jan-Thomas; Pudasaini, Shiva P.

    2016-04-01

    Bulk density and its variation is an important physical quantity to estimate the solid-liquid fractions in two-phase debris flows. Here we present mass and flow depth measurements for experiments performed in a large-scale laboratory set up. Once the mixture is released and it moves down the inclined channel, measurements allow us to determine the bulk density evolution throughout the debris flow. Flow depths are determined by ultrasonic pulse reflection, and the mass is measured with a total normal force sensor. The data were obtained at 50 Hz. The initial two phase material was composed of 350 kg debris with water content of 40%. A very fine pebble with mean particle diameter of 3 mm, particle density of 2760 kg/m³ and bulk density of 1400 kg/m³ in dry condition was chosen as the solid material. Measurements reveal that the debris bulk density remains high from the head to the middle of the debris body whereas it drops substantially at the tail. This indicates lower water content at the tail, compared to the head and the middle portion of the debris body. This means that the solid and fluid fractions are varying strongly in a non-linear manner along the flow path, and from the head to the tail of the debris mass. Importantly, this spatial-temporal density variation plays a crucial role in determining the impact forces associated with the dynamics of the flow. Our setup allows for investigating different two phase material compositions, including large fluid fractions, with high resolutions. The considered experimental set up may enable us to transfer the observed phenomena to natural large-scale events. Furthermore, the measurement data allows evaluating results of numerical two-phase mass flow simulations. These experiments are parts of the project avaflow.org that intends to develop a GIS-based open source computational tool to describe wide spectrum of rapid geophysical mass flows, including avalanches and real two-phase debris flows down complex natural

  18. The Response of a Low Speed Compressor on Rotating Inlet Distortion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chaoqun NIE; Jingxuan ZHANG; Zhiting TONG; Hongwu ZHANG

    2006-01-01

    In multi-spool engines,the downstream compressor experiences a rotating inlet distortion if rotating stall occurs in upstream compressor,which may induce the instability of the whole compressor.In this paper,the compressor dynamic behavior is the major focus.The experiment was carried out on a single-stage low-speed axial-flow compressor.A rotating distortion generator equipped with different distortion sector(s) was designed to produce different rotating inlet distortion clockwise or counterclockwise with up to 100% of the compressor design speed.The distortion sector can be installed single or in some combination such as four sectors together.Three types of distortion sector/combination are used in the research work,which are single 30 degree sector,four 30 degree sectors and single 120 degree sector.It is found that the total pressure loss caused by rotating sector(s) increases when the distortion speed rises.For co-rotating distortions,all the three types of inlet distortion exhibited a peak in stall margin degradation when the distortion speed corresponded to roughly 50% of rotor speed.The two-dimensional numerical simulations of the compressor flow field clearly show the propagation of the disturbances trigged by the distortion sector(s).

  19. Turbulent flows and intermittency in laboratory experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anselmet, F.; Antonia, R. A.; Danaila, L.

    2001-10-01

    In turbulent flows, the transfer of energy from large to small scales is strongly intermittent, in contradiction with Kolmogorov's (Dokl. Akad. Nauk. SSSR 30 (1941) 299; hereafter K41) assumptions. The statistical properties associated with these energy transfer fluctuations at a given scale r have been widely studied theoretically, experimentally and numerically over the last 30 years or so. Such fluctuations are also encountered in various Planetary and Space Science domains. The present paper presents a review of laboratory experiments which clearly display the fractal nature of the (spatial or temporal) energy distribution at scale r, the departures from the K41 predictions being generally quantified through high-order moments of velocity increments.

  20. SITMILARITY LAW FOR HYDRAULIC DISTORTED MODEL

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    Newton's general similarity criterion was applied to the distorted model. The results for the similarities of gravity force, drag force and pressure force are identical with those derived from relevant differential equations of fluid flow. And the selected limits of the distorted ratio were studied and the simulation of roughness coefficient of distorted model was conducted by means of hydraulic test.

  1. Gas-Flow Switch Recovery Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-06-01

    of laminated Plexiglas. The upper wall of the spark gap flow channel could be pivoted to adjust the minimum separation of the nozzle, which will... flow channel. PiVOT " Fig. 3. Fig. 4. Cross section of spark gap flow channel showing location of electrodes and pressure orifices. r-------~5~cm...flow in the spark gap . Flow conditions were essentially determined by the choice of air supply pressure in the wind tunnel plenum which was located

  2. Experiments on supersonic turbulent flow development in a square duct

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gessner, F. B.; Ferguson, S. D.; Lo, C. H.

    1986-01-01

    The nature of supersonic, turbulent, adiabatic-wall flow in a square duct is investigated experimentally over a development length of x/D between 0 and 20 for a uniform flow, Mach 3.9 condition at the duct inlet. Initial discussion centers on the duct configuration itself, which was designed specifically to minimize wave effects and nozzle-induced distortion in the flow. Total pressure contours and local skin friction coefficient distributions are presented which show that the flow develops in a manner similar to that observed for the incompressible case. In particular, undulations exist in total pressure contours within the cross plane and in transverse skin friction coefficient distributions, which are indicative of the presence of a well-defined secondary flow superimposed upon the primary flow. The results are analyzed to show that local law-of-the-wall behavior extends well into the corner region, which implies that wall functions conventionally applied in two-equation type turbulence models, when suitably defined for compressible flow, may also be applied to supersonic streamwise corner flows.

  3. Flow boiling in microgap channels experiment, visualization and analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Alam, Tamanna; Jin, Li-Wen

    2013-01-01

    Flow Boiling in Microgap Channels: Experiment, Visualization and Analysis presents an up-to-date summary of the details of the confined to unconfined flow boiling transition criteria, flow boiling heat transfer and pressure drop characteristics, instability characteristics, two phase flow pattern and flow regime map and the parametric study of microgap dimension. Advantages of flow boiling in microgaps over microchannels are also highlighted. The objective of this Brief is to obtain a better fundamental understanding of the flow boiling processes, compare the performance between microgap and c

  4. Algebraic Lens Distortion Model Estimation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Alvarez

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available A very important property of the usual pinhole model for camera projection is that 3D lines in the scene are projected to 2D lines. Unfortunately, wide-angle lenses (specially low-cost lenses may introduce a strong barrel distortion, which makes the usual pinhole model fail. Lens distortion models try to correct such distortion. We propose an algebraic approach to the estimation of the lens distortion parameters based on the rectification of lines in the image. Using the proposed method, the lens distortion parameters are obtained by minimizing a 4 total-degree polynomial in several variables. We perform numerical experiments using calibration patterns and real scenes to show the performance of the proposed method.

  5. Sediment transport in nonlinear skewed oscillatory flows: Transkew experiments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Silva, P.A.; Abreu, T.; A, D. van der; Sancho, F.; Ruessink, B.G.; Werf, J. van der; Ribberink, J.S.

    2011-01-01

    New experiments under sheet flow conditions were conducted in an oscillating water tunnel to study the effects of flow acceleration on sand transport. The simulated hydrodynamic conditions considered flow patterns that drive cross-shore sediment transport in the nearshore zone: the wave nonlineariti

  6. Speech distortion measure based on auditory properties

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Guo; HU Xiulin; ZHANG Yunyu; ZHU Yaoting

    2000-01-01

    The Perceptual Spectrum Distortion (PSD), based on auditory properties of human being, is presented to measure speech distortion. The PSD measure calculates the speech distortion distance by simulating the auditory properties of human being and converting short-time speech power spectrum to auditory perceptual spectrum. Preliminary simulative experiments in comparison with the Itakura measure have been done. The results show that the PSD measure is a perferable speech distortion measure and more consistent with subjective assessment of speech quality.

  7. Therapeutic experiences of community gardens: putting flow in its place.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitt, Hannah

    2014-05-01

    This paper develops the concept of therapeutic place experiences by considering the role of activity. Research of community gardening finds that particular tasks are therapeutic and exhibit the characteristics of flow, but those who lack influence over their community gardening are less likely to benefit from flow as their sense of control is reduced. The notion of emplaced flow is proposed to locate individual experiences amongst socio-spatial factors which limit self-determinacy and therefore affect wellbeing. Emplacing flow prompts critical reflection on who is excluded from therapeutic place experiences, and whether sites offering momentary escape have an enduring impact on wellbeing.

  8. FLOW TESTING AND ANALYSIS OF THE FSP-1 EXPERIMENT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hawkes, Grant L.; Jones, Warren F.; Marcum, Wade; Weiss, Aaron; Howard, Trevor

    2017-06-01

    The U.S. High Performance Research Reactor Conversions fuel development team is focused on developing and qualifying the uranium-molybdenum (U-Mo) alloy monolithic fuel to support conversion of domestic research reactors to low enriched uranium. Several previous irradiations have demonstrated the favorable behavior of the monolithic fuel. The Full Scale Plate 1 (FSP-1) fuel plate experiment will be irradiated in the northeast (NE) flux trap of the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR). This fueled experiment contains six aluminum-clad fuel plates consisting of monolithic U-Mo fuel meat. Flow testing experimentation and hydraulic analysis have been performed on the FSP-1 experiment to be irradiated in the ATR at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). A flow test experiment mockup of the FSP-1 experiment was completed at Oregon State University. Results of several flow test experiments are compared with analyses. This paper reports and shows hydraulic analyses are nearly identical to the flow test results. A water velocity of 14.0 meters per second is targeted between the fuel plates. Comparisons between FSP-1 measurements and this target will be discussed. This flow rate dominates the flow characteristics of the experiment and model. Separate branch flows have minimal effect on the overall experiment. A square flow orifice was placed to control the flowrate through the experiment. Four different orifices were tested. A flow versus delta P curve for each orifice is reported herein. Fuel plates with depleted uranium in the fuel meat zone were used in one of the flow tests. This test was performed to evaluate flow test vibration with actual fuel meat densities and reported herein. Fuel plate deformation tests were also performed and reported.

  9. Interfacial instability of turbulent two-phase stratified flow: Multi-equation turbulent modelling with rapid distortion

    CERN Document Server

    Náraigh, L Ó; Matar, O; Zaki, T

    2009-01-01

    We investigate the linear stability of a flat interface that separates a liquid layer from a fully-developed turbulent gas flow. In this context, linear-stability analysis involves the study of the dynamics of a small-amplitude wave on the interface, and we develop a model that describes wave-induced perturbation turbulent stresses (PTS). We demonstrate the effect of the PTS on the stability properties of the system in two cases: for a laminar thin film, and for deep-water waves. In the first case, we find that the PTS have little effect on the growth rate of the waves, although they do affect the structure of the perturbation velocities. In the second case, the PTS enhance the maximum growth rate, although the overall shape of the dispersion curve is unchanged. Again, the PTS modify the structure of the velocity field, especially at longer wavelengths. Finally, we demonstrate a kind of parameter tuning that enables the production of the thin-film (slow) waves in a deep-water setting.

  10. Analysis of Brown camera distortion model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowakowski, Artur; Skarbek, Władysław

    2013-10-01

    Contemporary image acquisition devices introduce optical distortion into image. It results in pixel displacement and therefore needs to be compensated for many computer vision applications. The distortion is usually modeled by the Brown distortion model, which parameters can be included in camera calibration task. In this paper we describe original model, its dependencies and analyze orthogonality with regard to radius for its decentering distortion component. We also report experiments with camera calibration algorithm included in OpenCV library, especially a stability of distortion parameters estimation is evaluated.

  11. Experiment on the Effect of Sediment Concentration on Flow Structure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    The paper studies on the sediment-laden flow by using MicroADV.Laboratory calibration has been conducted to determine the relationship between backscattered signal strength and sediment concentration. Based on the experimental data,the interactions between sediment and fluid in open channel flow are investi- gated.The experiment shows that there exist inner relation between sediment concentration and turbulence, and the relationship is distinctry related to the diameter of particle as well as the flow co...

  12. Experiments on the transition from stratified to slug flow in multiphase pipe flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kristiansen, Olav

    2004-12-01

    Severe slugging is reported from some field operations, where an increase in the production rate leads to a transition from steady stratified flow to slug flow in the pipeline. The slugs can be longer than anticipated for hydrodynamic slugging and the flow transients can then be a limitation for the production capacity. The objective was to perform a study on the flow pattern transition from stratified to slug flow. A particular point of interest was the possible occurrence of metastable flow and large initial slugs at elevated pressures. New data have been acquired in an experimental investigation of the transition from stratified to slug flow in horizontal and near-horizontal pipes at atmospheric and pressurised conditions. The experiments were performed with two-phase gas liquid and three-phase gas-liquid-liquid flows. Two flow facilities were used the NTNU Multiphase Flow Laboratory (short flow loop) and the SINTEF Multi-phase Flow Laboratory (long flow loop). Hold-up and pressure drop were measured, and flow patterns were determined visually and by evaluation of hold-up time traces. The following parameters were varied: 1) Inlet flow condition by variation of inlet pipe inclination. 2) System pressure (gas density). 3) Test section inclination (horizontal and near-horizontal). 4) Water cut. 5) Gas and liquid flow rates. 6) Pipe length. Slug flow or stratified flow was introduced upstream to promote either early or delayed transition to slug flow in the test section. A time series analysis was performed on the hold-up time traces, and average and distribution slug characteristics are reported, e.g. slug frequency, bubble propagation velocity, slug fraction, slug length, and growth rate. The results have been compared with steady state model predictions. The work consists of the following parts. 1) An initial study was performed at atmospheric air-water conditions in a short pipe. 2) Experiments at atmospheric and elevated pressures were performed in the medium

  13. Experiments on Transitional Subaqueous Density Flows and Resulting Sediment Deposits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnaal, Z. D.; Parker, G.

    2016-12-01

    Much remains unknown regarding the sedimentary deposits of submarine gravity flows. Flows with large concentrations of suspended sediment may transition from a more turbulent to a more coherent flow type. Such transitional flows may be produced when turbulence becomes suppressed due to entrainment of cohesive sediment or from flow deceleration. Argillaceous sandstones and linked turbidite-debrites are types of submarine sediment deposits in a category known as hybrid event beds, and are interpreted to be emplaced by transitional regime flows (Talling, 2007; Davis, 2009; Haughton, 2009; Hodgson, 2009; Sumner, 2009; Baas, 2011; Lee, 2013; and Talling, 2013). Here we report on the physical modelling of such transitional flows. The sediment consists of mixtures of non-cohesive silica flour with a median grain size of 30 microns and kaolin clay with a median size of 4 microns. These sediments were mixed in ratios including 100%, 70%, 60%, 50%, 30% and 0% kaolin. Total volume concentration of the input slurry varied from 0.01 to 0.2, allowing coverage of wide range of transitional flow types. The flow passed over a 4.9-m-long bed with a slope of 7 degrees, and continued another 4.9 m over a horizontal bed before exiting the tank. Measurements of flow velocity profiles, flow concentrations, deposit geometry, and deposit grain-size distributions were conducted. The results of experiments help us to better understand the rheology, and to determine the structure and patterns of deposits including argillaceous sandstones.

  14. Simultaneous measurement of aero-optical distortion and turbulent structure in a heated boundary layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saxton-Fox, Theresa; McKeon, Beverley; Smith, Adam; Gordeyev, Stanislav

    2014-11-01

    This study examines the relationship between turbulent structures and the aero-optical distortion of a laser beam passing through a turbulent boundary layer. Previous studies by Smith et al. (AIAA, 2014--2491) have found a bulk convection velocity of 0 . 8U∞ for aero-optical distortion in turbulent boundary layers, motivating a comparison of the distortion with the outer boundary layer. In this study, a turbulent boundary layer is developed over a flat plate with a moderately-heated section of length 25 δ . Density variation in the thermal boundary layer leads to aero-optical distortion, which is measured with a Malley probe (Smith et al., AIAA, 2013--3133). Simultaneously, 2D PIV measurements are recorded in a wall-normal, streamwise plane centered on the Malley probe location. Experiments are run at Reθ = 2100 and at a Mach number of 0.03, with the heated wall 10 to 20°C above the free stream temperature. Correlations and conditional averages are carried out between Malley probe distortion angles and flow features in the PIV vector fields. Aero-optical distortion in this study will be compared to distortion in higher Mach number flows studied by Gordeyev et al. (J. Fluid Mech., 2014), with the aim of extending conclusions into compressible flows. This research is made possible by the Department of Defense through the National Defense & Engineering Graduate Fellowship (NDSEG) Program and by the Air Force Office of Scientific Research Grant # FA9550-12-1-0060.

  15. Steady State of Pedestrian Flow in Bottleneck Experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Liao, Weichen; Seyfried, Armin; Chraibi, Mohcine; Drzycimski, Kevin; Zheng, Xiaoping; Zhao, Ying

    2015-01-01

    Experiments with pedestrians could depend strongly on initial conditions. Comparisons of the results of such experiments require to distinguish carefully between transient state and steady state. In this work, a feasible algorithm - Cumulative Sum Control Chart - is proposed and improved to automatically detect steady states from density and speed time series of bottleneck experiments. The threshold of the detection parameter in the algorithm is calibrated using an autoregressive model. Comparing the detected steady states with previous manually selected ones, the modified algorithm gives more reproducible results. For the applications, three groups of bottleneck experiments are analysed and the steady states are detected. The study about pedestrian flow shows that the difference between the flows in all states and in steady state mainly depends on the ratio of pedestrian number to bottleneck width. When the ratio is higher than a critical value (approximately 115 persons/m), the flow in all states is almost ...

  16. Goals and Status of the NASA Juncture Flow Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rumsey, Christopher L.; Morrison, Joseph H.

    2016-01-01

    The NASA Juncture Flow experiment is a new effort whose focus is attaining validation data in the juncture region of a wing-body configuration. The experiment is designed specifically for the purpose of CFD validation. Current turbulence models routinely employed by Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes CFD are inconsistent in their prediction of corner flow separation in aircraft juncture regions, so experimental data in the near-wall region of such a configuration will be useful both for assessment as well as for turbulence model improvement. This paper summarizes the Juncture Flow effort to date, including preliminary risk-reduction experiments already conducted and planned future experiments. The requirements and challenges associated with conducting a quality validation test are discussed.

  17. Flow Experience in Teams: The Role of Shared Leadership.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aubé, Caroline; Rousseau, Vincent; Brunelle, Eric

    2017-02-02

    The present study tests a multilevel mediation model concerning the effect of shared leadership on team members' flow experience. Specifically, we investigate the mediating role of teamwork behaviors in the relationships between 2 complementary indicators of shared leadership (i.e., density and centralization) and flow. Based on a multisource approach, we collected data through observation and survey of 111 project teams (521 individuals) made up of university students participating in a project management simulation. The results show that density and centralization have both an additive effect and an interaction effect on teamwork behaviors, such that the relationship between density and teamwork behaviors is stronger when centralization is low. In addition, teamwork behaviors play a mediating role in the relationship between shared leadership and flow. Overall, the findings highlight the importance of promoting team-based shared leadership in organizations to favor the flow experience. (PsycINFO Database Record

  18. Microrelief-Controlled Overland Flow Generation: Laboratory and Field Experiments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuefeng Chu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Surface microrelief affects overland flow generation and the related hydrologic processes. However, such influences vary depending on other factors such as rainfall characteristics, soil properties, and initial soil moisture conditions. Thus, in-depth research is needed to better understand and evaluate the combined effects of these factors on overland flow dynamics. The objective of this experimental study was to examine how surface microrelief, in conjunction with the factors of rainfall, soil, and initial moisture conditions, impacts overland flow generation and runoff processes in both laboratory and field settings. A series of overland flow experiments were conducted for rough and smooth surfaces that represented distinct microtopographic characteristics and the experimental data were analyzed and compared. Across different soil types and initial moisture conditions, both laboratory and field experiments demonstrated that a rough soil surface experienced a delayed initiation of runoff and featured a stepwise threshold flow pattern due to the microrelief-controlled puddle filling-spilling-merging dynamics. It was found from the field experiments that a smooth plot surface was more responsive to rainfall variations especially during an initial rainfall event. However, enhanced capability of overland flow generation and faster puddle connectivity of a rough field plot occurred during the subsequent rain events.

  19. On integrating large eddy simulation and laboratory turbulent flow experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grinstein, Fernando F

    2009-07-28

    Critical issues involved in large eddy simulation (LES) experiments relate to the treatment of unresolved subgrid scale flow features and required initial and boundary condition supergrid scale modelling. The inherently intrusive nature of both LES and laboratory experiments is noted in this context. Flow characterization issues becomes very challenging ones in validation and computational laboratory studies, where potential sources of discrepancies between predictions and measurements need to be clearly evaluated and controlled. A special focus of the discussion is devoted to turbulent initial condition issues.

  20. Scaling and design of landslide and debris-flow experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iverson, Richard M.

    2015-01-01

    Scaling plays a crucial role in designing experiments aimed at understanding the behavior of landslides, debris flows, and other geomorphic phenomena involving grain-fluid mixtures. Scaling can be addressed by using dimensional analysis or – more rigorously – by normalizing differential equations that describe the evolving dynamics of the system. Both of these approaches show that, relative to full-scale natural events, miniaturized landslides and debris flows exhibit disproportionately large effects of viscous shear resistance and cohesion as well as disproportionately small effects of excess pore-fluid pressure that is generated by debris dilation or contraction. This behavioral divergence grows in proportion to H3, where H is the thickness of a moving mass. Therefore, to maximize geomorphological relevance, experiments with wet landslides and debris flows must be conducted at the largest feasible scales. Another important consideration is that, unlike stream flows, landslides and debris flows accelerate from statically balanced initial states. Thus, no characteristic macroscopic velocity exists to guide experiment scaling and design. On the other hand, macroscopic gravity-driven motion of landslides and debris flows evolves over a characteristic time scale (L/g)1/2, where g is the magnitude of gravitational acceleration and L is the characteristic length of the moving mass. Grain-scale stress generation within the mass occurs on a shorter time scale, H/(gL)1/2, which is inversely proportional to the depth-averaged material shear rate. A separation of these two time scales exists if the criterion H/L landslide and debris-flow behavior but cannot be used to study macroscopic landslide or debris-flow dynamics.

  1. An Air Jet Distortion Generation System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Sivapragasam

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available An air jet distortion generation system is developed to simulate the distorted flow field ahead of gas turbine engines in ground test facility. The flow field of a system of four jets arranged circumferentially and issuing into a confined counterflow was studied experimentally and numerically. The total pressure distortion parameters were evaluated at the Aerodynamic Interface Plane (AIP for several values of mass flow ratios. Since the total pressure loss distribution at the AIP is characteristically “V” shaped, the number of jets was increased to obtain total pressure distributions as required for gas turbine engine testing. With this understanding, a methodology has been developed to generate a target total pressure distortion pattern at the AIP. Turbulent flow computations are used to iteratively progress towards the target distribution. This methodology was demonstrated for a distortion flow pattern typical of use in gas turbine engine testing using twenty jets, which is a smaller number than reported in the literature. The procedure converges with a root-mean-square error of 3.836% and is able to reproduce the target pattern and other distortion parameters.

  2. Neural contributions to flow experience during video game playing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klasen, Martin; Weber, René; Kircher, Tilo T J; Mathiak, Krystyna A; Mathiak, Klaus

    2012-04-01

    Video games are an exciting part of new media. Although game play has been intensively studied, the underlying neurobiology is still poorly understood. Flow theory is a well-established model developed to describe subjective game experience. In 13 healthy male subjects, we acquired fMRI data during free play of a video game and analyzed brain activity based on the game content. In accordance with flow theory, we extracted the following factors from the game content: (i) balance between ability and challenge; (ii) concentration and focus; (iii) direct feedback of action results; (iv) clear goals; and (v) control over the situation/activity. We suggest that flow is characterized by specific neural activation patterns and that the latter can be assessed-at least partially-by content factors contributing to the emergence of flow. Each of the content factors was characterized by specific and distinguishable brain activation patterns, encompassing reward-related midbrain structures, as well as cognitive and sensorimotor networks. The activation of sensory and motor networks in the conjunction analyses underpinned the central role of simulation for flow experience. Flow factors can be validated with functional brain imaging which can improve the understanding of human emotions and motivational processes during media entertainment.

  3. Total sleep deprivation decreases flow experience and mood status

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaida K

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Kosuke Kaida, Kazuhisa NikiHuman Technology Research Institute, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology, Ibaraki, JapanBackground: The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of sleep deprivation on flow experience.Methods: Sixteen healthy male volunteers of mean age 21.4±1.59 (21–24 years participated in two experimental conditions, ie, sleep-deprivation and normal sleep. In the sleep-deprived condition, participants stayed awake at home for 36 hours (from 8 am until 10 pm the next day beginning on the day prior to an experimental day. In both conditions, participants carried out a simple reaction time (psychomotor vigilance task and responded to a questionnaire measuring flow experience and mood status.Results: Flow experience was reduced after one night of total sleep deprivation. Sleep loss also decreased positive mood, increased negative mood, and decreased psychomotor performance.Conclusion: Sleep deprivation has a strong impact on mental and behavioral states associated with the maintenance of flow, namely subjective well-being.Keywords: sleep deprivation, sleepiness, flow, mood, vigilance

  4. The Role of Design-of-Experiments in Managing Flow in Compact Air Vehicle Inlets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Bernhard H.; Miller, Daniel N.; Gridley, Marvin C.; Agrell, Johan

    2003-01-01

    It is the purpose of this study to demonstrate the viability and economy of Design-of-Experiments methodologies to arrive at microscale secondary flow control array designs that maintain optimal inlet performance over a wide range of the mission variables and to explore how these statistical methods provide a better understanding of the management of flow in compact air vehicle inlets. These statistical design concepts were used to investigate the robustness properties of low unit strength micro-effector arrays. Low unit strength micro-effectors are micro-vanes set at very low angles-of-incidence with very long chord lengths. They were designed to influence the near wall inlet flow over an extended streamwise distance, and their advantage lies in low total pressure loss and high effectiveness in managing engine face distortion. The term robustness is used in this paper in the same sense as it is used in the industrial problem solving community. It refers to minimizing the effects of the hard-to-control factors that influence the development of a product or process. In Robustness Engineering, the effects of the hard-to-control factors are often called noise , and the hard-to-control factors themselves are referred to as the environmental variables or sometimes as the Taguchi noise variables. Hence Robust Optimization refers to minimizing the effects of the environmental or noise variables on the development (design) of a product or process. In the management of flow in compact inlets, the environmental or noise variables can be identified with the mission variables. Therefore this paper formulates a statistical design methodology that minimizes the impact of variations in the mission variables on inlet performance and demonstrates that these statistical design concepts can lead to simpler inlet flow management systems.

  5. Capillary channel flow experiments aboard the International Space Station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conrath, M.; Canfield, P. J.; Bronowicki, P. M.; Dreyer, M. E.; Weislogel, M. M.; Grah, A.

    2013-12-01

    In the near-weightless environment of orbiting spacecraft capillary forces dominate interfacial flow phenomena over unearthly large length scales. In current experiments aboard the International Space Station, partially open channels are being investigated to determine critical flow rate-limiting conditions above which the free surface collapses ingesting bubbles. Without the natural passive phase separating qualities of buoyancy, such ingested bubbles can in turn wreak havoc on the fluid transport systems of spacecraft. The flow channels under investigation represent geometric families of conduits with applications to liquid propellant acquisition, thermal fluids circulation, and water processing for life support. Present and near future experiments focus on transient phenomena and conduit asymmetries allowing capillary forces to replace the role of gravity to perform passive phase separations. Terrestrial applications are noted where enhanced transport via direct liquid-gas contact is desired.

  6. Capillary channel flow experiments aboard the International Space Station.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conrath, M; Canfield, P J; Bronowicki, P M; Dreyer, M E; Weislogel, M M; Grah, A

    2013-12-01

    In the near-weightless environment of orbiting spacecraft capillary forces dominate interfacial flow phenomena over unearthly large length scales. In current experiments aboard the International Space Station, partially open channels are being investigated to determine critical flow rate-limiting conditions above which the free surface collapses ingesting bubbles. Without the natural passive phase separating qualities of buoyancy, such ingested bubbles can in turn wreak havoc on the fluid transport systems of spacecraft. The flow channels under investigation represent geometric families of conduits with applications to liquid propellant acquisition, thermal fluids circulation, and water processing for life support. Present and near future experiments focus on transient phenomena and conduit asymmetries allowing capillary forces to replace the role of gravity to perform passive phase separations. Terrestrial applications are noted where enhanced transport via direct liquid-gas contact is desired.

  7. Erosion and basal forces in granular flow experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanvitale, Nicoletta; Bowman, Elisabeth

    2016-04-01

    Extreme mass wasting avalanche events such as rock, snow and ice avalanches, debris flows, and pyroclastic flows are among the most hazardous geological phenomena. These events driven by gravity, can travel for long distance and high speed, increasing their volumes as they can entertain material along their path. The erosion of material and its entrainment can greatly affect the overall dynamics of transportation, either enhancing or impeding the avalanche mobility depending on flow dynamics and characteristics of the substrate. However, the mechanisms and processes acting at the base as they travel over deformable or erodible substrates are still poor understood. Experiments, simulations and field measurements indicate that large fluctuations can occur in basal forces and stresses, which may be the result of non-uniform load transfer within the mass, and rolling, bouncing and sliding of the particles along the bed. In dense granular materials, force distributions can propagate through filamentary chain structures that carry a large fraction of the forces within the system. Photoelastic experiments on two-dimensional, monodisperse, gravity-driven flows have shown that force chains can transmit high localized forces to the boundary of dense granular flows. Here we describe the preliminary setup and results of 2D experiments on polydisperse granular flows of photoelastic disks down a small flume designed to acquire the forces exerted at the boundaries of the flow and to analyze their effects on an erodible bed. The intended outcome of this research is to provide better information on the complex mechanism of erosion and its effects on avalanche behaviour.

  8. OPTIMIZATION OF PROCESS PARAMETERS TO MINIMIZE ANGULAR DISTORTION IN GAS TUNGSTEN ARC WELDED STAINLESS STEEL 202 GRADE PLATES USING PARTICLE SWARM OPTIMIZATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. SUDHAKARAN

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a study on optimization of process parameters using particle swarm optimization to minimize angular distortion in 202 grade stainless steel gas tungsten arc welded plates. Angular distortion is a major problem and most pronounced among different types of distortion in butt welded plates. The process control parameters chosen for the study are welding gun angle, welding speed, plate length, welding current and gas flow rate. The experiments were conducted using design of experiments technique with five factor five level central composite rotatable design with full replication technique. A mathematical model was developed correlating the process parameters with angular distortion. A source code was developed in MATLAB 7.6 to do the optimization. The optimal process parameters gave a value of 0.0305° for angular distortion which demonstrates the accuracy of the model developed. The results indicate that the optimized values for the process parameters are capable of producing weld with minimum distortion.

  9. Thermal distortion test facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stapp, James L.

    1995-02-01

    The thermal distortion test facility (TDTF) at Phillips Laboratory provides precise measurements of the distortion of mirrors that occurs when their surfaces are heated. The TDTF has been used for several years to evaluate mirrors being developed for high-power lasers. The facility has recently undergone some significant upgrades to improve the accuracy with which mirrors can be heated and the resulting distortion measured. The facility and its associated instrumentation are discussed.

  10. Optimal Design of Passive Flow Control for a Boundary-Layer-Ingesting Offset Inlet Using Design-of-Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allan, Brian G.; Owens, Lewis R., Jr.; Lin, John C.

    2006-01-01

    This research will investigate the use of Design-of-Experiments (DOE) in the development of an optimal passive flow control vane design for a boundary-layer-ingesting (BLI) offset inlet in transonic flow. This inlet flow control is designed to minimize the engine fan face distortion levels and first five Fourier harmonic half amplitudes while maximizing the inlet pressure recovery. Numerical simulations of the BLI inlet are computed using the Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) flow solver, OVERFLOW, developed at NASA. These simulations are used to generate the numerical experiments for the DOE response surface model. In this investigation, two DOE optimizations were performed using a D-Optimal Response Surface model. The first DOE optimization was performed using four design factors which were vane height and angles-of-attack for two groups of vanes. One group of vanes was placed at the bottom of the inlet and a second group symmetrically on the sides. The DOE design was performed for a BLI inlet with a free-stream Mach number of 0.85 and a Reynolds number of 2 million, based on the length of the fan face diameter, matching an experimental wind tunnel BLI inlet test. The first DOE optimization required a fifth order model having 173 numerical simulation experiments and was able to reduce the DC60 baseline distortion from 64% down to 4.4%, while holding the pressure recovery constant. A second DOE optimization was performed holding the vanes heights at a constant value from the first DOE optimization with the two vane angles-of-attack as design factors. This DOE only required a second order model fit with 15 numerical simulation experiments and reduced DC60 to 3.5% with small decreases in the fourth and fifth harmonic amplitudes. The second optimal vane design was tested at the NASA Langley 0.3-Meter Transonic Cryogenic Tunnel in a BLI inlet experiment. The experimental results showed a 80% reduction of DPCPavg, the circumferential distortion level at the engine

  11. DSMC Simulations of Hypersonic Flows and Comparison With Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moss, James N.; Bird, Graeme A.; Markelov, Gennady N.

    2004-01-01

    This paper presents computational results obtained with the direct simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) method for several biconic test cases in which shock interactions and flow separation-reattachment are key features of the flow. Recent ground-based experiments have been performed for several biconic configurations, and surface heating rate and pressure measurements have been proposed for code validation studies. The present focus is to expand on the current validating activities for a relatively new DSMC code called DS2V that Bird (second author) has developed. Comparisons with experiments and other computations help clarify the agreement currently being achieved between computations and experiments and to identify the range of measurement variability of the proposed validation data when benchmarked with respect to the current computations. For the test cases with significant vibrational nonequilibrium, the effect of the vibrational energy surface accommodation on heating and other quantities is demonstrated.

  12. CFD Analysis in Advance of the NASA Juncture Flow Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, H. C.; Pulliam, T. H.; Neuhart, D. H.; Kegerise, M. A.

    2017-01-01

    NASA through its Transformational Tools and Technologies Project (TTT) under the Advanced Air Vehicle Program, is supporting a substantial effort to investigate the formation and origin of separation bubbles found on wing-body juncture zones. The flow behavior in these regions is highly complex, difficult to measure experimentally, and challenging to model numerically. Multiple wing configurations were designed and evaluated using Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD), and a series of wind tunnel risk reduction tests were performed to further down-select the candidates for the final experiment. This paper documents the CFD analysis done in conjunction with the 6 percent scale risk reduction experiment performed in NASA Langley's 14- by 22-Foot Subsonic Tunnel. The combined CFD and wind tunnel results ultimately helped the Juncture Flow committee select the wing configurations for the final experiment.

  13. Water flow experiments and analyses on the cross-flow type mercury target model with the flow guide plates

    CERN Document Server

    Haga, K; Kaminaga, M; Hino, R

    2001-01-01

    A mercury target is used in the spallation neutron source driven by a high-intensity proton accelerator. In this study, the effectiveness of the cross-flow type mercury target structure was evaluated experimentally and analytically. Prior to the experiment, the mercury flow field and the temperature distribution in the target container were analyzed assuming a proton beam energy and power of 1.5 GeV and 5 MW, respectively, and the feasibility of the cross-flow type target was evaluated. Then the average water flow velocity field in the target mock-up model, which was fabricated from Plexiglass for a water experiment, was measured at room temperature using the PIV technique. Water flow analyses were conducted and the analytical results were compared with the experimental results. The experimental results showed that the cross-flow could be realized in most of the proton beam path area and the analytical result of the water flow velocity field showed good correspondence to the experimental results in the case w...

  14. Groundwater flow through a natural fracture. Flow experiments and numerical modelling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larsson, Erik [Chalmers Univ. of Technology, Goeteborg (Sweden). Dept of Geology

    1997-09-01

    Groundwater flow and transport play an important role not only for groundwater exploration but also in environmental engineering problems. This report considers how the hydraulic properties of fractures in crystalline rock depend on the fracture aperture geometry. Different numerical models are discussed and a FDM computer code for two- and three- dimensional flow-modelling has been developed. Different relations between the cells in the model are tested and compared with results in the literature. A laboratory experimental work has been done to carry out flow experiments and aperture measurements on the same specimen of a natural fracture. The drilled core sample had fractures parallel to the core axis and was placed inside a biaxial cell during the experiments. The water pressure gradient and the compression stress were varied during the experiments and also a tracer test was done. After the flow experiments, the aperture distribution for a certain compression was measured by injecting an epoxy resin into the fracture. The thickness of the resin layer was then studied in saw cut sections of the sample. The results from the experiments were used to validate numerical and analytical models, based on aperture distribution, for flow and transport simulations. In the disturbed zone around a drift both water and air are present in the fractures. The gas will go to the most wide part of the fracture because the capillarity and the conductivity decrease. The dependence of the effective conductivity on the variance of the conductivity and the effect of extinction of highly conductive cells has also been studied. A discussion of how gas in fractures around a drift can cause a skin effect is modelled and an example is given of what a saturation depending on the magnitude of the flow causes. 25 refs, 17 tabs, 43 figs.

  15. Distortion Control during Welding

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Akbari Pazooki, A.M.

    2014-01-01

    The local material expansion and contraction involved in welding result in permanent deformations or instability i.e., welding distortion. Considerable efforts have been made in controlling welding distortion prior to, during or after welding. Thermal Tensioning (TT) describes a group of in-situ met

  16. Debris-flow initiation experiments using diverse hydrologic triggers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reid, Mark E.; LaHusen, Richard G.; Iverson, Richard M.

    1997-01-01

    Controlled debris-flow initiation experiments focused on three hydrologic conditions that can trigger slope failure: localized ground-water inflow; prolonged moderate-intensity rainfall; and high-intensity rainfall. Detailed monitoring of slope hydrology and deformation provided exceptionally complete data on conditions preceding and accompanying slope failure and debris-flow mobilization. Ground-water inflow and high-intensity sprinkling led to abrupt, complete failure whereas moderate-intensity sprinkling led to retrogressive, block-by-block failure. Failure during ground-water inflow and during moderate-intensity sprinkling occurred with a rising water table and positive pore pressures. Failure during high-intensity sprinkling occurred without widespread positive pore pressures. In all three cases, pore pressures in most locations increased dramatically (within 2-3 seconds) during failure. In some places, pressures in unsaturated materials rapidly 'flashed' from zero to elevated positive values. Transiently elevated pore pressures and partially liquefied soil enhanced debris-flow mobilization.

  17. 进口导流叶排角度对轴流压气机总压畸变的影响%Numerical Simulation on the Effect of Inlet Guide Vanes on An Axial Flow Compressor under Total Pressure Distortion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李成龙; 李军; 强晓明; 李凡玉; 罗志煌

    2013-01-01

    Based on three-dimensional Euler equation,a model of a certain three-stages compressor is estab-lished and calculated by adopting a method of body force.This paper mainly analyzes the effect of inlet guide vanes (IGV)on inlet distortion and the relation between IGV's angle and total pressure distortion in operation at the designed rotating speed.The result shows that IGV can improve the flow field and reduce the distortion parameter.The distortion range and the intensity are respectively reduced by 21.4% and 10.2% at the three stage rotor entrance.IGV has a favorable ability of rectification and anti-distortion. With the rise of IGV's angle,the distortion intensity gets lower,but it will come to increase while the IGV's angle reaches a certain value.Meanwhile,IGV will do the best with 45°.%对某三级轴流压气机,利用三维欧拉方程建立模型,采用体积力法进行计算仿真。研究分析 IGV(进口导流叶排)对压气机进气畸变的影响,以及设计转速状态下改善畸变效果最好的IGV 角度。计算结果表明:IGV 可以有效改善流场品质,使压气机各截面的畸变参数都有所减小,例如三级转子进口的畸变角度降低了21.4%,畸变强度降低了10.2%;IGV 起到了很好的整流作用,表现出了显著的减小畸变程度的能力;随着 IGV 角度的增加,畸变强度随之降低,当IGV 角度达到临界值后畸变强度反而开始增大;设计转速下,IGV 临界角度为45°左右,在此角度下改善畸变的效果最好。

  18. Dynamic Inlet Distortion Prediction with a Combined Computational Fluid Dynamics and Distortion Synthesis Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norby, W. P.; Ladd, J. A.; Yuhas, A. J.

    1996-01-01

    A procedure has been developed for predicting peak dynamic inlet distortion. This procedure combines Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) and distortion synthesis analysis to obtain a prediction of peak dynamic distortion intensity and the associated instantaneous total pressure pattern. A prediction of the steady state total pressure pattern at the Aerodynamic Interface Plane is first obtained using an appropriate CFD flow solver. A corresponding inlet turbulence pattern is obtained from the CFD solution via a correlation linking root mean square (RMS) inlet turbulence to a formulation of several CFD parameters representative of flow turbulence intensity. This correlation was derived using flight data obtained from the NASA High Alpha Research Vehicle flight test program and several CFD solutions at conditions matching the flight test data. A distortion synthesis analysis is then performed on the predicted steady state total pressure and RMS turbulence patterns to yield a predicted value of dynamic distortion intensity and the associated instantaneous total pressure pattern.

  19. EXPERIMENTS OF THREE-DIMENSIONAL FLOW STRUCTURE IN BRAIDED RIVERS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUA Zu-lin; GU Li; CHU Ke-jian

    2009-01-01

    The braided river is a typical river pattern in nature, but there is a paucity of comprehensive data set describing the three-dimensional flow field in the braided river. A physical model experiment was used to study the flow characteristics in the typical braided river with a mid-bar between two anabranches. In the experiment, two kinds of mid-bar with the ratios of its length to maximal width of 3 and 5 were considered. Moreover, the mid-bar could be moved to adjust the width of two anabranches. The detailed measurements of velocity were conducted using an acoustic Doppler velocimeter over a grid defined throughout the whole braided river region, including the bifurcation, two anabranches and the confluence. In two kinds of mid-bar braided models, a separation zone was observed in the anabranch of the model in which the ratio of length to maximal width of mid-bar is 3, however the separation zone was not found in another model in which the ratio is 5. In addition, the opposite secondary cells were observed at the bend apex of anabranch in two models, and different longitudinal velocity distributions in the entrance region of anabranch account for this opposite flow structure. Finally, turbulent kinetic energy were shown and compared in different situations. The high turbulence occurs at the place with strong shear, especially at the boundary of the separation zone and the high velocity passing flow.

  20. Viewing inside Pyroclastic Flows - Large-scale Experiments on hot pyroclast-gas mixture flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breard, E. C.; Lube, G.; Cronin, S. J.; Jones, J.

    2014-12-01

    Pyroclastic density currents are the largest threat from volcanoes. Direct observations of natural flows are persistently prevented because of their violence and remain limited to broad estimates of bulk flow behaviour. The Pyroclastic Flow Generator - a large-scale experimental facility to synthesize hot gas-particle mixture flows scaled to pyroclastic flows and surges - allows investigating the physical processes behind PDC behaviour in safety. The ability to simulate natural eruption conditions and to view and measure inside the hot flows allows deriving validation and calibration data sets for existing numerical models, and to improve the constitutive relationships necessary for their effective use as powerful tools in hazard assessment. We here report on a systematic series of large-scale experiments on up to 30 ms-1 fast, 2-4.5 m thick, 20-35 m long flows of natural pyroclastic material and gas. We will show high-speed movies and non-invasive sensor data that detail the internal structure of the analogue pyroclastic flows. The experimental PDCs are synthesized by the controlled 'eruption column collapse' of variably diluted suspensions into an instrumented channel. Experiments show four flow phases: mixture acceleration and dilution during free fall; impact and lateral blasting; PDC runout; and co-ignimbrite cloud formation. The fully turbulent flows reach Reynolds number up to 107 and depositional facies similar to natural deposits. In the PDC runout phase, the shear flows develop a four-partite structure from top to base: a fully turbulent, strongly density-stratified ash cloud with average particle concentrations <<1vol%; a transient, turbulent dense suspension region with particle concentrations between 1 and 10 vol%; a non-turbulent, aerated and highly mobile dense underflows with particle concentrations between 40 and 50 vol%; and a vertically aggrading bed of static material. We characterise these regions and the exchanges of energy and momentum

  1. Rheology of dense granular chute flow: simulations to experiments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bharathraj S

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Granular chute flow simulations reveal an interesting transition from a random disordered structure to an ordered one with hexagonally ordered sheets of spherical particles, when the base roughness is modulated. Two types of base roughness are considered. The first is a fixed base, where glued spherical particles form the base, and the base roughness is varied by changing the ratio of diameters of the base and flowing particles. In the second sinusoidal base, a smooth wall with sinusoidal height variation is used; the amplitude and wavelength of the base modulation determine the base roughness. The transition is studied as a function of these roughness parameters. For the fixed base, there is a critical base particle diameter below which ordered states are observed. For the sinusoidal base, the critical amplitude increases linearly with the wavelength at lower wavelengths, reaches a maximum depending on the height of the flowing layer, and then decreases as the wavelength is further increased. There is flow for angles of inclination from 15 ° ≤ θ ≤ 25 ° for the ordered state and 20 ° ≤ θ ≤ 25 ° for the disordered state. Flow confinement by sidewalls also influences the rheology of the system and we see that the ordering is induced by the sidewalls as well. Experiments on chute flow at low angles indicate the presence of two types of rheology depending on the system height. A transition is observed from an erodible base configuration, where a dead zone at the bottom supports a free surface reposing at the top, to a Bagnold rheology with considerable slip at the bottom.

  2. Numerical simulation of the hydrodynamic instability experiments and flow mixing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    Based on the numerical methods of volume of fluid (VOF) and piecewise parabolic method (PPM) and parallel circumstance of Message Passing Interface (MPI),a parallel multi-viscosity-fluid hydrodynamic code MVPPM (Multi-Viscosity-Fluid Piecewise Parabolic Method) is developed and performed to study the hydrodynamic instability and flow mixing. Firstly,the MVPPM code is verified and validated by simulating three instability cases:The first one is a Riemann problem of viscous flow on the shock tube; the second one is the hydrodynamic instability and mixing of gaseous flows under re-shocks; the third one is a half height experiment of interfacial instability,which is conducted on the AWE’s shock tube. By comparing the numerical results with experimental data,good agreement is achieved. Then the MVPPM code is applied to simulate the two cases of the interfacial instabilities of jelly models acceler-ated by explosion products of a gaseous explosive mixture (GEM),which are adopted in our experi-ments. The first is implosive dynamic interfacial instability of cylindrical symmetry and mixing. The evolving process of inner and outer interfaces,and the late distribution of mixing mass caused by Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) instability in the center of different radius are given. The second is jelly layer ex-periment which is initialized with one periodic perturbation with different amplitude and wave length. It reveals the complex processes of evolution of interface,and presents the displacement of front face of jelly layer,bubble head and top of spike relative to initial equilibrium position vs. time. The numerical results are in excellent agreement with that experimental images,and show that the amplitude of initial perturbations affects the evolvement of fluid mixing zone (FMZ) growth rate extremely,especially at late times.

  3. Universal Sampling Rate Distortion

    OpenAIRE

    Boda, Vinay Praneeth; Narayan, Prakash

    2017-01-01

    We examine the coordinated and universal rate-efficient sampling of a subset of correlated discrete memoryless sources followed by lossy compression of the sampled sources. The goal is to reconstruct a predesignated subset of sources within a specified level of distortion. The combined sampling mechanism and rate distortion code are universal in that they are devised to perform robustly without exact knowledge of the underlying joint probability distribution of the sources. In Bayesian as wel...

  4. Spherical Redshift Distortions

    OpenAIRE

    1995-01-01

    Peculiar velocities induce apparent line of sight displacements of galaxies in redshift space, distorting the pattern of clustering in the radial versus transverse directions. On large scales, the amplitude of the distortion yields a measure of the dimensionless linear growth rate $\\beta \\approx \\Omega^{0.6}/b$, where $\\Omega$ is the cosmological density and $b$ the linear bias factor. To make the maximum statistical use of the data in a wide angle redshift survey, and for the greatest accura...

  5. Modeling Experiment of Break of Debris-Flow Dam

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHENG Zunlan; GENG Xueyong; DANG Chao; LIU Jingjing

    2007-01-01

    Glaciers are extensively developed in the southwest of Tibet and the moraines are widely distributed with large depth. Large-scale debris flows are often reported which blocked rivers and formed dams. In this paper, seven large debris flows in four valleys are discussed, among which five dams developed. 13 sets of experiments have been conducted in laboratory to simulate the formation and failure of the dam. Finally, a model of dam failure is proposed and a formula is established to calculate the flood discharge:Q = kbhhk/T (B)/LG0.41, where bk is the outlet width of the dam atthe original water level, ht the erosive depth, T the time fromoverflow to final state of failure, the average width of lake; L thelength of the lake, and G the total potential energy of the water inthe lake.

  6. Model validation for karst flow using sandbox experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, M.; Pacheco Castro, R. B.; Tao, X.; Zhao, J.

    2015-12-01

    The study of flow in karst is complex due of the high heterogeneity of the porous media. Several approaches have been proposed in the literature to study overcome the natural complexity of karst. Some of those methods are the single continuum, double continuum and the discrete network of conduits coupled with the single continuum. Several mathematical and computing models are available in the literature for each approach. In this study one computer model has been selected for each category to validate its usefulness to model flow in karst using a sandbox experiment. The models chosen are: Modflow 2005, Modflow CFPV1 and Modflow CFPV2. A sandbox experiment was implemented in such way that all the parameters required for each model can be measured. The sandbox experiment was repeated several times under different conditions. The model validation will be carried out by comparing the results of the model simulation and the real data. This model validation will allows ud to compare the accuracy of each model and the applicability in Karst. Also we will be able to evaluate if the results of the complex models improve a lot compared to the simple models specially because some models require complex parameters that are difficult to measure in the real world.

  7. Numerical simulation of the hydrodynamic instability experiments and flow mixing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    BAI JingSong; WANG Tao; LI Ping; ZOU LiYong; LIU CangLi

    2009-01-01

    Based on the numerical methods of volume of fluid (VOF) and piecewise parabolic method (PPM) and parallel circumstance of Message Passing Interface (MPI), a parallel multi-viscosity-fluid hydrodynamic code MVPPM (Multi-Viscosity-Fluid Piecewise Parabolic Method) is developed and performed to study the hydrodynamic instability and flow mixing. Firstly, the MVPPM code is verified and validated by simulating three instability cases: The first one is a Riemann problem of viscous flow on the shock tube;the second one is the hydrodynamic instability and mixing of gaseous flows under re-shocks; the third one is a half height experiment of interfacial instability, which is conducted on the AWE's shock tube. By comparing the numerical results with experimental data, good agreement is achieved. Then the MVPPM code is applied to simulate the two cases of the interfacial instabilities of jelly models accelerated by explosion products of a gaseous explosive mixture (GEM), which are adopted in our experiments. The first is implosive dynamic interfacial instability of cylindrical symmetry and mixing. The evolving process of inner and outer interfaces, and the late distribution of mixing mass caused by Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) instability in the center of different radius are given. The second is jelly layer experiment which is initialized with one periodic perturbation with different amplitude and wave length. It reveals the complex processes of evolution of interface, and presents the displacement of front face of jelly layer, bubble head and top of spike relative to initial equilibrium position vs. time. The numerical results are in excellent agreement with that experimental images, and show that the amplitude of initial perturbations affects the evolvement of fluid mixing zone (FMZ) growth rate extremely, especially at late times.

  8. Using data assimilation in laboratory experiments of geophysical flows

    CERN Document Server

    Galmiche, M; Thivolle-Cazat, E; Verron, J; Galmiche, Martin; Sommeria, Joel; Thivolle-Cazat, Emmanuelle; Verron, Jacques

    2003-01-01

    Data assimilation is used in numerical simulations of laboratory experiments in a stratified, rotating fluid. The experiments are performed on the large Coriolis turntable (Grenoble, France), which achieves a high degree of similarity with the ocean, and the simulations are performed with a two-layer shallow water model. Since the flow is measured with a high level of precision and resolution, a detailed analysis of a forecasting system is feasible. Such a task is much more difficult to undertake at the oceanic scale because of the paucity of observations and problems of accuracy and data sampling. This opens the way to an experimental test bed for operational oceanography. To illustrate this, some results on the baroclinic instability of a two-layer vortex are presented.

  9. Gas flow within Martian soil: experiments on granular Knudsen compressors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koester, Marc; Kelling, Thorben; Teiser, Jens; Wurm, Gerhard

    2017-09-01

    Thermal creep efficiently transports gas through Martian soil. To quantify the Martian soil pump we carried out laboratory analog experiments with illuminated granular media at low ambient pressure. We used samples of 1 μm to 5 μm SiO2 (quartz), basalt with a broad size distribution between 63 μm and 125 μm, and JSC-Mars 1A with a size fraction from 125 μm to 250 μm. The mean ambient pressure was varied between 50 Pa and 9000 Pa. Illumination was varied between 100 W/m2 and 6700 W/m2. The experiments confirm strong directed gas flows within granular and dusty soil and local sub-soil pressure variations. We find that Martian soil pumps can be described with existing models of thermal creep for capillaries, using the average grain size and light flux related temperatures.

  10. JET ENGINE INLET DISTORTION SCREEN AND DESCRIPTOR EVALUATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiří Pečinka

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Total pressure distortion is one of the three basic flow distortions (total pressure, total temperature and swirl distortion that might appear at the inlet of a gas turbine engine (GTE during operation. Different numerical parameters are used for assessing the total pressure distortion intensity and extent. These summary descriptors are based on the distribution of total pressure in the aerodynamic interface plane. There are two descriptors largely spread around the world, however, three or four others are still in use and can be found in current references. The staff at the University of Defence decided to compare the most common descriptors using basic flow distortion patterns in order to select the most appropriate descriptor for future department research. The most common descriptors were identified based on their prevalence in widely accessible publications. The construction and use of these descriptors are reviewed in the paper. Subsequently, they are applied to radial, angular, and combined distortion patterns of different intensities and with varied mass flow rates. The tests were performed on a specially designed test bench using an electrically driven standalone industrial centrifugal compressor, sucking air through the inlet of a TJ100 small turbojet engine. Distortion screens were placed into the inlet channel to create the desired total pressure distortions. Of the three basic distortions, only the total pressure distortion descriptors were evaluated. However, both total and static pressures were collected using a multi probe rotational measurement system.

  11. Straight line feature based image distortion correction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang Haofeng; Zhao Chunxia; Lu Jianfeng; Tang Zhenmin; Yang Jingyu

    2008-01-01

    An image distortion correction method is proposed, which uses the straight line features. Many parallel lines of different direction from different images were extracted, and then were used to optimize the distortion parameters by nonlinear least square. The thought of step by step was added when the optimization method working. 3D world coordi-nation is not need to know, and the method is easy to implement. The experiment result shows its high accuracy.

  12. Perceptual and Conceptual Distortions of Implicit Hand Maps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew R. Longo

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Recent studies have revealed that human position sense relies on a massively distorted representation of hand size and shape. By comparing the judged location of landmarks on an occluded hand, Longo and Haggard (2010 constructed implicit perceptual maps of represented hand structure, showing large underestimation of finger length and overestimation of hand width. Here, we investigated the contribution of two potential sources of distortions to such effects: perceptual distortions reflecting spatial warping of the representation of bodily tissue itself, perhaps reflecting distortions of somatotopic cortical maps, and conceptual distortions reflecting mistaken beliefs about the locations of different landmarks within the body. In Experiment 1 we compared distorted hand maps to a task in which participants explicitly judged the location of their knuckles in a hand silhouette. The results revealed the conceptual distortions are responsible for at least part of the underestimation of finger length, but cannot explain overestimation of hand width. Experiment 2 compared distortions of the participant’s own hand based on position sense with a prosthetic hand based on visual memory. Underestimation of finger length was found for both hands, providing further evidence that it reflects a conceptual distortion. In contrast, overestimation of hand width was specific to representation of the participant’s own hand, confirming it reflects a perceptual distortion. Together, these results suggest that distorted body representations do not reflect a single underlying cause. Rather, both perceptual and conceptual distortions contribute to the overall configuration of the hand representation.

  13. Experiments on the flow past long circular cylinders in a shear flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kappler, M. [Universitaet Karlsruhe, Institut fuer Hydromechanik, Karlsruhe (Germany); Helmut-Schmidt-Universitaet, Universitaet der Bundeswehr Hamburg (Germany); Rodi, W. [Universitaet Karlsruhe, Institut fuer Hydromechanik, Karlsruhe (Germany); Szepessy, S. [Alfa Laval, Tumba (Sweden); Badran, O. [Al-Balqa' Applied University, FET, Amman (Jordan)

    2005-03-01

    This paper describes an experimental investigation of the flow past circular cylinders, with the mean flow perpendicular to the cylinder axis, at conditions that yield a strong three-dimensional behaviour. The experiments were carried out in the subcritical regime. Long cylinders with end plates were subjected to shear flow with a linear velocity profile in the spanwise direction generated by means of a curved gauze. It was concluded that spanwise cellular structures of vortex shedding emerged in the wake, more clearly for some boundary conditions than others. These structures are characterised by a portion of spanwise length, a cell, having constant shedding frequency over a time average, which implies that there were no vortex dislocations inside that cell during that time. These features were studied using flow visualisation and hot-film anemometry. Spectra of the local shedding frequency are shown, revealing the effect of the shear parameter {beta}(=0.02 and 0.04) and aspect ratio L/D(=20.6 and 8) on the stability and geometry of the cells at several Reynolds numbers in the range of 3.13 x 10{sup 3}{<=}Re{sub m}{<=}1.25 x 10{sup 4}. (orig.)

  14. Millimeter-Gap Magnetically Insulated Transmission Line Power Flow Experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hutsel, Brian Thomas [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Stoltzfus, Brian S. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Fowler, William E. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); LeChien, Keith R. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Mazarakis, Michael G. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Moore, James K. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Mulville, Thomas D. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Savage, Mark E. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Stygar, William A. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); McKenney, John L. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Jones, Peter A. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); MacRunnels, Diego J. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Long, Finis W. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Porter, John L. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2014-09-01

    An experiment platform has been designed to study vacuum power flow in magnetically insulated transmission lines (MITLs). The platform was driven by the 400-GW Mykonos-V accelerator. The experiments conducted quantify the current loss in a millimeter-gap MITL with respect to vacuum conditions in the MITL for two different gap distances, 1.0 and 1.3 mm. The current loss for each gap was measured for three different vacuum pump down times. As a ride along experiment, multiple shots were conducted with each set of hardware to determine if there was a conditioning effect to increase current delivery on subsequent shots. The experiment results revealed large differences in performance for the 1.0 and 1.3 mm gaps. The 1.0 mm gap resulted in current loss of 40%-60% of peak current. The 1.3 mm gap resulted in current losses of less than 5% of peak current. Classical MITL models that neglect plasma expansion predict that there should be zero current loss, after magnetic insulation is established, for both of these gaps. The experiments result s indicate that the vacuum pressure or pump down time did not have a significant effect on the measured current loss at vacuum pressures between 1e-4 and 1e-5 Torr. Additionally, there was not repeatable evidence of a conditioning effect that reduced current loss for subsequent full-energy shots on a given set of hardware. It should be noted that the experiments conducted likely did not have large loss contributions due to ion emission from the anode due to the relatively small current densi-ties (25-40 kA/cm) in the MITL that limited the anode temperature rise due to ohmic heating. The results and conclusions from these experiments may have limited applicability to MITLs of high current density (>400 kA/cm) used in the convolute and load region of the Z which experience temperature increases of >400° C and generate ion emission from anode surfaces.

  15. determination of determination of total harmonic distortion

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    eobe

    Harmonic Distortion (THD) of the Distribution lines in the 33kV distri .... guidelines based on industrial distribution system design. IEEE 519-1992 defines ..... studies and also reviewed issues related to the concept. The results of power flow and ...

  16. Distortion dependent intersystem crossing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stephansen, Anne Boutrup; Sølling, Theis Ivan

    2017-01-01

    The competition between ultrafast intersystem crossing and internal conversion in benzene, toluene, and p-xylene is investigated with time-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy and quantum chemical calculations. By exciting to S2 out-of-plane symmetry breaking, distortions are activated at early ti...

  17. Magneto--Coriolis waves in a spherical Couette flow experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Schmitt, Denys; La Rizza, Patrick; Nataf, Henri-Claude

    2016-01-01

    The dynamics of fluctuations in a fast rotating spherical Couette flow experiment in the presence of a strong dipolar magnetic field is investigated in detail, through a thorough analysis of the experimental data as well as a numerical study. Fluctuations within the conducting fluid (liquid sodium) are characterized by the presence of several oscillation modes, identified as magneto-Coriolis (MC) modes, with definite symmetry and azimuthal number. A numerical simulation provides eigensolutions which exhibit oscillation frequencies and magnetic signature comparable to the observation. The main characteristics of these hydromagnetic modes is that the magnetic contribution has a fundamental influence on the dynamical properties through the Lorentz forces, although its importance remains weak in an energetical point of view. Another specificity is that the Lorentz forces are confined near the inner sphere where the dipolar magnetic field is the strongest, while the Coriolis forces are concentrated in the outer fl...

  18. Development and Capabilities of ISS Flow Boiling and Condensation Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nahra, Henry; Hasan, Mohammad; Balasubramaniam, R.; Patania, Michelle; Hall, Nancy; Wagner, James; Mackey, Jeffrey; Frankenfield, Bruce; Hauser, Daniel; Harpster, George; hide

    2015-01-01

    An experimental facility to perform flow boiling and condensation experiments in long duration microgravity environment is being designed for operation on the International Space Station (ISS). This work describes the design of the subsystems of the FBCE including the Fluid subsystem modules, data acquisition, controls, and diagnostics. Subsystems and components are designed within the constraints of the ISS Fluid Integrated Rack in terms of power availability, cooling capability, mass and volume, and most importantly the safety requirements. In this work we present the results of ground-based performance testing of the FBCE subsystem modules and test module which consist of the two condensation modules and the flow boiling module. During this testing, we evaluated the pressure drop profile across different components of the fluid subsystem, heater performance, on-orbit degassing subsystem, heat loss from different modules and components, and performance of the test modules. These results will be used in the refinement of the flight system design and build-up of the FBCE which is manifested for flight in late 2017-early 2018.

  19. Clone flow analysis for a theory inspired Neutrino Experiment planning

    CERN Document Server

    Donini, A; Rigolin, S

    2004-01-01

    The presence of several clone solutions in the simultaneous measurement of ($\\theta_{13},\\delta$) has been widely discussed in literature. In this letter we write the analytical formulae of the clones location in the ($\\theta_{13},\\delta$) plane as a function of the physical input pair ($\\bar\\theta_{13},\\bar\\delta$). We show how the clones move with changing $\\bar\\theta_{13}$. The "clone flow" can be significantly different if computed (naively) from the oscillation probabilities or (exactly) from the probabilities integrated over the neutrino flux and cross-section. Using our complete computation we compare the clone flow of a set of possible future neutrino experiments: the CERN SuperBeam, BetaBeam and Neutrino Factory proposals. We show that the combination of these specific BetaBeam and SuperBeam does not help in solving the degeneracies. On the contrary, the combination of one of them with the Neutrino Factory Golden and Silver channel can be used, from a theoretical point of view, to solve completely th...

  20. The Constrained Vapor Bubble Experiment - Interfacial Flow Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kundan, Akshay; Wayner, Peter C., Jr.; Plawsky, Joel L.

    2015-01-01

    Internal heat transfer coefficient of the CVB correlated to the presence of the interfacial flow region. Competition between capillary and Marangoni flow caused Flooding and not a Dry-out region. Interfacial flow region growth is arrested at higher power inputs. 1D heat model confirms the presence of interfacial flow region. 1D heat model confirms the arresting phenomena of interfacial flow region Visual observations are essential to understanding.

  1. Measuring Flow Experience in an Immersive Virtual Environment for Collaborative Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Schaik, P.; Martin, S.; Vallance, M.

    2012-01-01

    In contexts other than immersive virtual environments, theoretical and empirical work has identified flow experience as a major factor in learning and human-computer interaction. Flow is defined as a "holistic sensation that people feel when they act with total involvement". We applied the concept of flow to modeling the experience of…

  2. Development of Flow Boiling and Condensation Experiment on the International Space Station- Normal and Low Gravity Flow Boiling Experiment Development and Test Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nahra, Henry K.; Hall, Nancy R.; Hasan, Mohammad M.; Wagner, James D.; May, Rochelle L.; Mackey, Jeffrey R.; Kolacz, John S.; Butcher, Robert L.; Frankenfield, Bruce J.; Mudawar, Issam; hide

    2013-01-01

    Flow boiling and condensation have been identified as two key mechanisms for heat transport that are vital for achieving weight and volume reduction as well as performance enhancement in future space systems. Since inertia driven flows are demanding on power usage, lower flows are desirable. However, in microgravity, lower flows are dominated by forces other than inertia (like the capillary force). It is of paramount interest to investigate limits of low flows beyond which the flow is inertial enough to be gravity independent. One of the objectives of the Flow Boiling and Condensation Flight Experiment sets to investigate these limits for flow boiling and condensation. A two-phase flow loop consisting of a Flow Boiling Module and two Condensation Modules has been developed to experimentally study flow boiling condensation heat transfer in the reduced gravity environment provided by the reduced gravity platform. This effort supports the development of a flow boiling and condensation facility for the International Space Station (ISS). The closed loop test facility is designed to deliver the test fluid, FC-72 to the inlet of any one of the test modules at specified thermodynamic and flow conditions. The zero-g-aircraft tests will provide subcooled and saturated flow boiling critical heat flux and flow condensation heat transfer data over wide range of flow velocities. Additionally, these tests will verify the performance of all gravity sensitive components, such as evaporator, condenser and accumulator associated with the two-phase flow loop. We will present in this paper the breadboard development and testing results which consist of detailed performance evaluation of the heater and condenser combination in reduced and normal gravity. We will also present the design of the reduced gravity aircraft rack and the results of the ground flow boiling heat transfer testing performed with the Flow Boiling Module that is designed to investigate flow boiling heat transfer and

  3. Computing Welding Distortion: Comparison of Different Industrially Applicable Methods

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tikhomirov, D.; Rietman, B.; Kose, K.; Makkink, M.

    2005-01-01

    Welding distortion is one of the major concerns of the industrial joining practice. In order to obtain optimal welding parameters many experiments have to be carried out. Numerical simulation enables a virtual examination of the welding distortion without performing expensive experiments. In this co

  4. Computing Welding Distortion: Comparison of Different Industrially Applicable Methods

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tikhomirov, D.; Rietman, Bert; Kose, K.; Makkink, M.

    2005-01-01

    Welding distortion is one of the major concerns of the industrial joining practice. In order to obtain optimal welding parameters many experiments have to be carried out. Numerical simulation enables a virtual examination of the welding distortion without performing expensive experiments. In this

  5. Barotropic flow over bottom topography— experiments and nonlinear theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfeffer, Richard L.; Kung, Robin; Ding, Wen; Li, Guo-Qing

    1993-10-01

    Barotropic flow over finite amplitude two-wave bottom topography is investigated both experimentally and theoretically over a broad parameter range. In the experiments, the fluid is contained in a vertically oriented, rotating circular cylindrical annulus. It is forced into motion relative to the annulus by a differentially rotating, rigid, radially sloping lid in contact with the top surface of the fluid. The radial depth variation associated with the slope of the lid, and an equal and opposite slope of the bottom boundary, simulates the effect of the variation of the Coriolis parameter with latitude (β) in planetary atmospheres and in the ocean. The dimensionless parameters which control the fluid behavior are the Rossby number (ɛ), the Ekman number (E), the β parameter, the aspect ratio (δ), the ratio of the mean radius to the gap width (α) and the ratio of the topographic height to the mean fluid depth (η). The Rossby and Ekman numbers are varied over an order of magnitude by conducting experiments at different rotation rates of the annulus. Velocity measurements using photographs of tracer particles suspended in the fluid reveal the existence of a stationary, topographically forced wave superimposed on an azimuthal mean current. With successively larger rotation rates (i.e. lower ɛ and E) the wave amplitude increases and then levels off, the phase displacement of the wave upstream of the topography increases and the azimuthal mean velocity decreases and then levels off. Linear quasigeostophic theory accounts qualitatively, but not quantitatively, for the phase displacement, predicts the wave amplitude poorly and provides no basis for predicting the zonal mean velocity. Accordingly, we have solved the nonlinear, steady-state, quasigeostrophic barotrophic vorticity equation with both Ekman layer and internal dissipation using a spectral colocation method with Fourier representation in the azimuthal direction and Chebyshev polynomial representation in the

  6. Animal Experiments of the Helical Flow Total Artificial Heart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abe, Yusuke; Isoyama, Takashi; Saito, Itsuro; Inoue, Yusuke; Ishii, Kohei; Sato, Masami; Hara, Shintaro; Yurimoto, Terumi; Li, Xinyang; Murakami, Haruka; Ariyoshi, Koki; Kawase, Yukino; Ono, Toshiya; Fukazawa, Kyoko; Ishihara, Kazuhiko

    2015-08-01

    Severe cardiac failure patients require a total artificial heart (TAH) to save life. To realize a TAH that can fit a body of small stature and has high performance, high durability, good anatomical fitting, good blood compatibility, and physiological control, we have been developing the helical flow TAH (HFTAH) with two helical flow pumps with hydrodynamic levitation impeller. Animal experiments of the HFTAH were conducted to perform in vivo studies. The HFTAH was implanted in 13 adult female goats weighing 45.0-64.0 kg. After surgery, neither anti-coagulant nor anti-platelet medication was given systemically. The HFTAH was usually driven with a quasi-pulsatile mode. The 1/R control or ΔP control was applied to control the circulation. The ΔP control is a new method using simplified equation of the 1/R control. The HFTAH could be implanted in all goats with good anatomical fitting. Two goats survived for a long time (100 and 68 days). Major causes of termination were device failure and surgical complications. In the device failure, trouble with hydrodynamic bearing was conspicuous. In the two long-term survived goats, experiments were terminated with bearing instability that was probably caused by the suction effect. In these goats, hemolysis occurred on postoperative day 88 and 44, which was considered to be relevant to the bearing trouble. Thrombus was found at the broken right bearing of the 100-day survived goat. However, antithrombogenicity of the pump is expected to be good unless bearing trouble occurs. In two long-term survived goats, the 1/R control or ΔP control worked appropriately to prevent the elevation of right atrial pressure. In both goats, hemodynamic parameters changed with the condition of the animals, liver and kidney functions remained almost normal except when recovering from surgery and during hemolysis, and total protein recovered 2 weeks after surgery. Although instability of the hydrodynamic bearing should be improved, performance of

  7. A helically distorted MHD flux rope model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theobald, Michael L.; Montgomery, David

    1990-01-01

    A flux rope model is proposed which has a variable degree of helical distortion from axisymmetry. The basis for this suggestion is a series of numerical and analytical investigations of magnetohydrodynamic states which result when an axial electric current is directed down on dc magnetic field. The helically distorted states involve a flow velocity and seem to be favored because of their lower rate of energy dissipation. Emphasis is on the magnetometer and particle energy analyzer traces that might be characteristic of such flux ropes. It is shown that even a fractionally small helical distortion may considerably alter the traces in minimum-variance coordinates. In short, what may be fairly common MHD processes can render a flux rope almost unrecognizable under standard diagnostics, even if the departures from axisymmetry are not great.

  8. Machining distortion prediction of aerospace monolithic components

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yun-bo BI; Qun-lin CHENG; Hui-yue DONG; Ying-lin KE

    2009-01-01

    To predict the distortion of aerospace monolithic components.a model is established to simulate the numerical control (NC)milling process using 3D finite element method(FEM).In this model,the cutting layer is simplified firstly.Then,the models of cutting force and cutting temperature are established to gain the cutting loads,which are applied to the mesh model of the part.Finally,a prototype of machining simulation environment is developed to simulate the milling process of a spar.Key factors influencing the distortion,such as initial residual stress,cutting loads,fixture layout,cutting sequence,and tool path are considered all together.The total distortion of the spar is predicted and an experiment is conducted to validate the numerical results.It is found that the maximum discrepancy between the simulation results and experiment values is 19.0%

  9. Mean flow stability analysis of oscillating jet experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Oberleithner, Kilian; Soria, Julio

    2014-01-01

    Linear stability analysis is applied to the mean flow of an oscillating round jet with the aim to investigate the robustness and accuracy of mean flow stability wave models. The jet's axisymmetric mode is excited at the nozzle lip through a sinusoidal modulation of the flow rate at amplitudes ranging from 0.1 % to 100 %. The instantaneous flow field is measured via particle image velocimetry and decomposed into a mean and periodic part utilizing proper orthogonal decomposition. Local linear stability analysis is applied to the measured mean flow adopting a weakly nonparallel flow approach. The resulting global perturbation field is carefully compared to the measurements in terms of spatial growth rate, phase velocity, and phase and amplitude distribution. It is shown that the stability wave model accurately predicts the excited flow oscillations during their entire growth phase and during a large part of their decay phase. The stability wave model applies over a wide range of forcing amplitudes, showing no pr...

  10. Designing a Hybrid Laminar-Flow Control Experiment: The CFD-Experiment Connection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Streett, C. L.

    2003-01-01

    The NASA/Boeing hybrid laminar flow control (HLFC) experiment, designed during 1993-1994 and conducted in the NASA LaRC 8-foot Transonic Pressure Tunnel in 1995, utilized computational fluid dynamics and numerical simulation of complex fluid mechanics to an unprecedented extent for the design of the test article and measurement equipment. CFD was used in: the design of the test wing, which was carried from definition of desired disturbance growth characteristics, through to the final airfoil shape that would produce those growth characteristics; the design of the suction-surface perforation pattern that produced enhanced crossflow-disturbance growth: and in the design of the hot-wire traverse system that produced minimal influence on measured disturbance growth. These and other aspects of the design of the test are discussed, after the historical and technical context of the experiment is described.

  11. Plasticity and Awareness of Bodily Distortion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariella Pazzaglia

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Knowledge of the body is filtered by perceptual information, recalibrated through predominantly innate stored information, and neurally mediated by direct sensory motor information. Despite multiple sources, the immediate prediction, construction, and evaluation of one’s body are distorted. The origins of such distortions are unclear. In this review, we consider three possible sources of awareness that inform body distortion. First, the precision in the body metric may be based on the sight and positioning sense of a particular body segment. This view provides information on the dual nature of body representation, the reliability of a conscious body image, and implicit alterations in the metrics and positional correspondence of body parts. Second, body awareness may reflect an innate organizational experience of unity and continuity in the brain, with no strong isomorphism to body morphology. Third, body awareness may be based on efferent/afferent neural signals, suggesting that major body distortions may result from changes in neural sensorimotor experiences. All these views can be supported empirically, suggesting that body awareness is synthesized from multimodal integration and the temporal constancy of multiple body representations. For each of these views, we briefly discuss abnormalities and therapeutic strategies for correcting the bodily distortions in various clinical disorders.

  12. COUNTERCURRENT FLOW LIMITATION EXPERIMENTS AND MODELING FOR IMPROVED REACTOR SAFETY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vierow, Karen

    2008-09-26

    This project is investigating countercurrent flow and “flooding” phenomena in light water reactor systems to improve reactor safety of current and future reactors. To better understand the occurrence of flooding in the surge line geometry of a PWR, two experimental programs were performed. In the first, a test facility with an acrylic test section provided visual data on flooding for air-water systems in large diameter tubes. This test section also allowed for development of techniques to form an annular liquid film along the inner surface of the “surge line” and other techniques which would be difficult to verify in an opaque test section. Based on experiences in the air-water testing and the improved understanding of flooding phenomena, two series of tests were conducted in a large-diameter, stainless steel test section. Air-water test results and steam-water test results were directly compared to note the effect of condensation. Results indicate that, as for smaller diameter tubes, the flooding phenomena is predominantly driven by the hydrodynamics. Tests with the test sections inclined were attempted but the annular film was easily disrupted. A theoretical model for steam venting from inclined tubes is proposed herein and validated against air-water data. Empirical correlations were proposed for air-water and steam-water data. Methods for developing analytical models of the air-water and steam-water systems are discussed, as is the applicability of the current data to the surge line conditions. This report documents the project results from July 1, 2005 through June 30, 2008.

  13. Semi-brittle flow of granitoid fault rocks in experiments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pec, Matej; Stünitz, Holger; Heilbronner, Renée; Drury, Martyn

    2016-01-01

    Field studies and seismic data show that semi-brittle flow of fault rocks probably is the dominant deformation mechanism at the base of the seismogenic zone at the so-called frictional-viscous transition. To understand the physical and chemical processes accommodating semi-brittle flow, we have perf

  14. Flow Monitoring Experiences at the Ethernet-Layer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hofstede, Rick; Drago, Idilio; Sperotto, Anna; Pras, Aiko; Lehnert, Ralf

    2011-01-01

    Flow monitoring is a scalable technology for providing summaries of network activity. Being deployed at the IP-layer, it uses fixed flow definitions, based on fields of the IP-layer and higher layers. Since several backbone network operators are considering the deployment of (Carrier) Ethernet in th

  15. Soil pipe flow tracer experiments: 1. Connectivity and transport characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Much debate has occurred in catchment hydrology regarding the connectivity of flow paths from upslope areas to catchment outlets. This study was conducted in two catchments, one with three upper branches, in a loess soil with a fragipan that fosters lateral flow and exhibits an extensive distributio...

  16. EXPERIMENT STUDY ON SEDIMENT INCIPIENCE IN BACKWARD- FACING STEP FLOW

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Chun-rong; Huhe Aode; TAO Long-bin

    2007-01-01

    Flow over a backward-facing step was studied to investigate the effect of large-scale vortex structures on sediment incipience. The transient flow velocity field at the downstream of the backward-facing step was obtained using the technique of Particle Tracking Velocimetry (PTV). The optical amplification technique was employed to measure the instantaneous flow velocities near the bed and the instantaneous bed shear stress was given. The experimental observations revealed a new insight into the oscillation of the large-scale structure and the three-dimensional characteristics of the flow. In particular, very high turbulence intensity, instantaneous horizontal velocity near the bed and the bed shear stress near the reattachment point were observed. The sediment incipient probability obtained from the sequent images of sediment particles near the bed indicates that the critical instantaneous shear stress of the sediment incipience is independent of flow conditions.

  17. Dynamic Dazzle Distorts Speed Perception.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joanna R Hall

    Full Text Available Static high contrast ('dazzle' patterns, such as zigzags, have been shown to reduce the perceived speed of an object. It has not escaped our notice that this effect has possible military applications and here we report a series of experiments on humans, designed to establish whether dynamic dazzle patterns can cause distortions of perceived speed sufficient to provide effective defence in the field, and the extent to which these effects are robust to a battery of manipulations. Dynamic stripe patterns moving in the same direction as the target are found to increase the perceived speed of that target, whilst dynamic stripes moving in the opposite direction to the target reduce the perceived speed. We establish the optimum position for such dazzle patches; confirm that reduced contrast and the addition of colour do not affect the performance of the dynamic dazzle, and finally, using the CO2 challenge, show that the effect is robust to stressful conditions.

  18. CMB spectral distortion constraints on thermal inflation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Kihyun; Hong, Sungwook E.; Stewart, Ewan D.; Zoe, Heeseung

    2017-08-01

    Thermal inflation is a second epoch of exponential expansion at typical energy scales V1/4 ~ 106 ~ 8 GeV. If the usual primordial inflation is followed by thermal inflation, the primordial power spectrum is only modestly redshifted on large scales, but strongly suppressed on scales smaller than the horizon size at the beginning of thermal inflation, k > kb = ab Hb. We calculate the spectral distortion of the cosmic microwave background generated by the dissipation of acoustic waves in this context. For kb ll 103 Mpc-1, thermal inflation results in a large suppression of the μ-distortion amplitude, predicting that it falls well below the standard value of μ simeq 2× 10-8. Thus, future spectral distortion experiments, similar to PIXIE, can place new limits on the thermal inflation scenario, constraining kb gtrsim 103 Mpc-1 if μ simeq 2× 10-8 were found.

  19. Perceptual Depth Quality in Distorted Stereoscopic Images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jiheng; Wang, Shiqi; Ma, Kede; Wang, Zhou

    2017-03-01

    Subjective and objective measurement of the perceptual quality of depth information in symmetrically and asymmetrically distorted stereoscopic images is a fundamentally important issue in stereoscopic 3D imaging that has not been deeply investigated. Here, we first carry out a subjective test following the traditional absolute category rating protocol widely used in general image quality assessment research. We find this approach problematic, because monocular cues and the spatial quality of images have strong impact on the depth quality scores given by subjects, making it difficult to single out the actual contributions of stereoscopic cues in depth perception. To overcome this problem, we carry out a novel subjective study where depth effect is synthesized at different depth levels before various types and levels of symmetric and asymmetric distortions are applied. Instead of following the traditional approach, we ask subjects to identify and label depth polarizations, and a depth perception difficulty index (DPDI) is developed based on the percentage of correct and incorrect subject judgements. We find this approach highly effective at quantifying depth perception induced by stereo cues and observe a number of interesting effects regarding image content dependency, distortion-type dependence, and the impact of symmetric versus asymmetric distortions. Furthermore, we propose a novel computational model for DPDI prediction. Our results show that the proposed model, without explicitly identifying image distortion types, leads to highly promising DPDI prediction performance. We believe that these are useful steps toward building a comprehensive understanding on 3D quality-of-experience of stereoscopic images.

  20. Rare gas flow structuration in plasma jet experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert, E.; Sarron, V.; Darny, T.; Riès, D.; Dozias, S.; Fontane, J.; Joly, L.; Pouvesle, J.-M.

    2014-02-01

    Modifications of rare gas flow by plasma generated with a plasma gun (PG) are evidenced through simultaneous time-resolved ICCD imaging and schlieren visualization. The geometrical features of the capillary inside which plasma propagates before in-air expansion, the pulse repetition rate and the presence of a metallic target are playing a key role on the rare gas flow at the outlet of the capillary when the plasma is switched on. In addition to the previously reported upstream offset of the laminar to turbulent transition, we document the reverse action leading to the generation of long plumes at moderate gas flow rates together with the channeling of helium flow under various discharge conditions. For higher gas flow rates, in the l min-1 range, time-resolved diagnostics performed during the first tens of ms after the PG is turned on, evidence that the plasma plume does not start expanding in a laminar neutral gas flow. Instead, plasma ignition leads to a gradual laminar-like flow build-up inside which the plasma plume is generated. The impact of such phenomena for gas delivery on targets mimicking biological samples is emphasized, as well as their consequences on the production and diagnostics of reactive species.

  1. A corrected method of distorted printed circuit board image

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qiao Nao-Sheng; Ye Yu-Tang; Huang Yong-Lin

    2011-01-01

    This paper proposes a corrected method of distorted image based on adaptive control. First, the adaptive control relationship of pixel point positions between distorted image and its corrected image is given by using polynomial fitting,thus control point pairs between the distorted image and its corrected image are found. Secondly, the value of both image distortion centre and polynomial coefficient is obtained with least square method, thus the relationship of each control point pairs is deduced. In the course of distortion image processing, the gray value of the corrected image is changed into integer with bilinear interpolation. Finally, the experiments are performed to correct two distorted printed circuit board images. The results are perfect and the mean square errors of residual error are tiny.

  2. Which spectral distortions does $\\Lambda$CDM actually predict?

    CERN Document Server

    Chluba, Jens

    2016-01-01

    Ever refined cosmological measurements have established the $\\Lambda$CDM concordance model, with the key cosmological parameters being determined to percent-level precision today. This allows us to make explicit predictions for the spectral distortions of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) created by various processes occurring in the early Universe. Here, we summarize all guaranteed CMB distortions and assess their total uncertainty within $\\Lambda$CDM. We also compare simple methods for approximating them, highlighting some of the subtle aspects when it comes to interpreting future distortion measurements. Under simplified assumptions, we briefly study how well a PIXIE-like experiment may measure the main distortion parameters (i.e., $\\mu$ and $y$). Next generation CMB spectrometers are expected to detect the distortion caused by reionization and structure formation at extremely high significance. They will also be able to constrain the small-scale power spectrum through the associated $\\mu$-distortion, ...

  3. Improving Organizational Citizenship Behavior based on Flow Experience

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Alecxandrina Deaconu; Catalina Radu; Alexandra Mihaela Popescu

    2016-01-01

    Building on previous research on Organizational Citizenship Behavior (OCB) and its influence on the performance of SMEs, this article intends to expand the investigation area to the concept of Flow and its relationship with OCB...

  4. Clearance gap flow: simulations by discontinuous Galerkin method and experiments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prausová Helena

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Compressible viscous fluid flow in a narrow gap formed by two parallel plates in distance of 2 mm is investigated numerically and experimentally. Pneumatic and optical methods were used to obtain distribution of static to stagnation pressure ratio along the channel axis and interferograms including the free outflow behind the channel. Modern developing discontinuous Galerkin finite element method is implemented for numerical simulation of the fluid flow. The goal to make progress in knowledge of compressible viscous fluid flow characteristic phenomena in minichannels is satisfied by finding a suitable approach to this problem. Laminar, turbulent and transitional flow regime is examined and a good agreement of experimental and numerical results is achieved using γ − Reθt transition model.

  5. Clearance gap flow: simulations by discontinuous Galerkin method and experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prausová, Helena; Bublík, Ondřej; Vimmr, Jan; Luxa, Martin; Hála, Jindřich

    2015-05-01

    Compressible viscous fluid flow in a narrow gap formed by two parallel plates in distance of 2 mm is investigated numerically and experimentally. Pneumatic and optical methods were used to obtain distribution of static to stagnation pressure ratio along the channel axis and interferograms including the free outflow behind the channel. Modern developing discontinuous Galerkin finite element method is implemented for numerical simulation of the fluid flow. The goal to make progress in knowledge of compressible viscous fluid flow characteristic phenomena in minichannels is satisfied by finding a suitable approach to this problem. Laminar, turbulent and transitional flow regime is examined and a good agreement of experimental and numerical results is achieved using γ - Reθt transition model.

  6. The Role of Flow Experience and CAD Tools in Facilitating Creative Behaviours for Architecture Design Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawoud, Husameddin M.; Al-Samarraie, Hosam; Zaqout, Fahed

    2015-01-01

    This study examined the role of flow experience in intellectual activity with an emphasis on the relationship between flow experience and creative behaviour in design using CAD. The study used confluence and psychometric approaches because of their unique abilities to depict a clear image of creative behaviour. A cross-sectional study…

  7. The Role of Flow Experience and CAD Tools in Facilitating Creative Behaviours for Architecture Design Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawoud, Husameddin M.; Al-Samarraie, Hosam; Zaqout, Fahed

    2015-01-01

    This study examined the role of flow experience in intellectual activity with an emphasis on the relationship between flow experience and creative behaviour in design using CAD. The study used confluence and psychometric approaches because of their unique abilities to depict a clear image of creative behaviour. A cross-sectional study…

  8. An Examination of Game-Based Learning from Theories of Flow Experience and Cognitive Load

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Chih-Hung; Chu, Chih-Ming; Liu, Hsiang-Hsuan; Yang, Shun-Bo; Chen, Wei-Hsuan

    2013-01-01

    This study aims to discuss whether game-based learning with the integration of games and digital learning could enhance not only the flow experience in learning but achieve the same flow experience in pure games. In addition, the authors discovered that whether the game-based learning could make learners to reveal higher cognitive load. The…

  9. An Examination of Game-Based Learning from Theories of Flow Experience and Cognitive Load

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Chih-Hung; Chu, Chih-Ming; Liu, Hsiang-Hsuan; Yang, Shun-Bo; Chen, Wei-Hsuan

    2013-01-01

    This study aims to discuss whether game-based learning with the integration of games and digital learning could enhance not only the flow experience in learning but achieve the same flow experience in pure games. In addition, the authors discovered that whether the game-based learning could make learners to reveal higher cognitive load. The…

  10. Distorted Fingerprint Verification System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Divya KARTHIKAESHWARAN

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Fingerprint verification is one of the most reliable personal identification methods. Fingerprint matching is affected by non-linear distortion introduced in fingerprint impression during the image acquisition process. This non-linear deformation changes both the position and orientation of minutiae. The proposed system operates in three stages: alignment based fingerprint matching, fuzzy clustering and classifier framework. First, an enhanced input fingerprint image has been aligned with the template fingerprint image and matching score is computed. To improve the performance of the system, a fuzzy clustering based on distance and density has been used to cluster the feature set obtained from the fingerprint matcher. Finally a classifier framework has been developed and found that cost sensitive classifier produces better results. The system has been evaluated on fingerprint database and the experimental result shows that system produces a verification rate of 96%. This system plays an important role in forensic and civilian applications.

  11. Balanced Steady State Free Precession for Arterial Spin Labeling MRI: Initial Experience for Blood Flow Mapping in Human Brain, Retina, and Kidney

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Sung-Hong; Wang, Danny J.J.; Duong, Timothy Q.

    2013-01-01

    We implemented pseudo-continuous ASL (pCASL) with 2D and 3D balanced steady state free precession (bSSFP) readout for mapping blood flow in the human brain, retina, and kidney, free of distortion and signal dropout, which are typically observed in the most commonly used echo-planar imaging acquisition. High resolution functional brain imaging in the human visual cortex was feasible with 3D bSSFP pCASL. Blood flow of the human retina could be imaged with pCASL and bSSFP in conjunction with a phase cycling approach to suppress the banding artifacts associated with bSSFP. Furthermore, bSSFP based pCASL enabled us to map renal blood flow within a single breath hold. Control and test-retest experiments suggested that the measured blood flow values in retina and kidney were reliable. Because there is no specific imaging tool for mapping human retina blood flow and the standard contrast agent technique for mapping renal blood flow can cause problems for patients with kidney dysfunction, bSSFP based pCASL may provide a useful tool for the diagnosis of retinal and renal diseases and can complement existing imaging techniques. PMID:23664680

  12. Using thermal tracers to estimate flow velocities of shallow flows: laboratory and field experiments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lima Rui L.P. de

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Accurate measurement of shallow flows is important for hydraulics, hydrology and water resources management. The objective of this paper is to discuss a technique for shallow flow and overland flow velocity estimation that uses infrared thermography. Laboratory flumes and different bare, vegetated and paved field surfaces were used to test the technique. Results show that shallow flow surface velocities estimated using thermal tracers and infrared technology are similar to estimates obtained using the Acoustic Doppler Velocimeter; similar results were also obtained for overland flow velocity estimates using thermography, here comparing with the dye tracer technique. The thermographic approach revealed some potential as a flow visualization technique, and leaves space for future studies and research.

  13. Long Term Stability of Coriolis Flow Meters: DESY experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boeckmann, T.; Bozhko, Y.; Escherich, K.; Petersen, B.; Putselyk, S.; Schnautz, T.; Sellmann, D.; Zhirnov, A.

    2017-02-01

    The measurement of coolant flow is important operational parameter for reliable operation of cryogenic system with superconducting magnets or cavities as well as for the system diagnostics in case of non-steady-state operation, e.g. during cool-down/warm-up or other transients. Proper flowmeter is chosen according to the different parameters, e.g. turn-down, operating temperature range, leak-tightness, pressure losses, long-term stability, etc. For helium cryogenics, the Venturi tube or Orifice, as well as Coriolis flow meters are often applied. For the present time, the orifices are usually used due to their simplicity and low costs, however, low turn-down range, large pressure drop, restriction of flow area, susceptibility to thermoacoustic oscillations limit their useful operation range. Operational characteristics of Venturi tubes is substantially improved in comparison to orifices, however, relative high costs and susceptibility to thermoacoustic oscillations still limit their application to special cases. The Coriolis flow meters do not have typical drawbacks of Venturi tube and orifices, however long-term stability over many years was not demonstrated yet. This paper describes the long-term behaviour of Coriolis flow meters after many years of operation at AMTF and XMTS facilities.

  14. Distorted Turbulent Flow in a Shear Layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-03-01

    The prediction of broadband noise from wind turbines , Journal of Sound and Vibration 118(2), (1987) 217-239 13. Majumder S and Peake N, 1998, Noise...introduced by Amiet[5] and used by Glegg et al [12] for wind turbines . This approach only applies when the blade passing frequency is very much less than the...K A, and Morton, M A, 2013, The Kevlar-Walled Anechoic Wind Tunnel, Journal of Sound and Vibration , http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/ j.jsv.2013.02.043i

  15. Plasma Flows within the Context of Biasing Experiments

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    M. Tendler

    2004-01-01

    The understanding and reduction of turbulent transport in magnetic confinement devices is not only an academic task, but also the matter of practical interest, since high confinement is chosen as the regime for ITER and possible future reactors it reduces both the size and the cost. Since the pioneering work on CCT a lot of work has been devoted to the effect of electric field biasing carried out on many tokamaks, which in general leads to a strongly varying radial electric fields as a function of radius and a resulting sheared E ×B flow, giving rise to improved confinement properties.The issue of plasma flows is utterly fundamental for understanding of tokamaks aimed at the achievement of fusion energy. This appears in the well known neoclassical theory as the most accomplished and self-consistent basis for understanding of fusion plasmas. It pertains to the novel concept of "zonal flows" emerging from the recent development of gyro-kinetic transport codes. The poloidal and toroidal flows are also crucial for the concept of the electric field shear suppression of plasma turbulence in tokamaks. Yet, this timely and topical issue has remained largely unaddressed experimentally because of great difficulties of measuring flows in plasmas.Recently, the team of scientists from all over the world developed innovative configuration of probes yielding the flow velocity locally. This timely and topical diagnostics has been successfully applied on many tokamaks ranging from the huge JET through medium TEXTOR to a small CASTOR due to the excellent collaboration and coordination between research teams. Results caused large interest of fusion community born out by numerous invited talks delivered at the major international meetings.

  16. Intercooler flow path for gas turbines: CFD design and experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Agrawal, A.K.; Gollahalli, S.R.; Carter, F.L. [Univ. of Oklahoma, Norman, OK (United States)] [and others

    1995-10-01

    The Advanced Turbine Systems (ATS) program was created by the U.S. Department of Energy to develop ultra-high efficiency, environmentally superior, and cost competitive gas turbine systems for generating electricity. Intercooling or cooling of air between compressor stages is a feature under consideration in advanced cycles for the ATS. Intercooling entails cooling of air between the low pressure (LP) and high pressure (BP) compressor sections of the gas turbine. Lower air temperature entering the HP compressor decreases the air volume flow rate and hence, the compression work. Intercooling also lowers temperature at the HP discharge, thus allowing for more effective use of cooling air in the hot gas flow path. The thermodynamic analyses of gas turbine cycles with modifications such as intercooling, recuperating, and reheating have shown that intercooling is important to achieving high efficiency gas turbines. The gas turbine industry has considerable interest in adopting intercooling to advanced gas turbines of different capacities. This observation is reinforced by the US Navys Intercooled-Recuperative (ICR) gas turbine development program to power the surface ships. In an intercooler system, the air exiting the LP compressor must be decelerated to provide the necessary residence time in the heat exchanger. The cooler air must subsequently be accelerated towards the inlet of the HP compressor. The circumferential flow nonuniformities inevitably introduced by the heat exchanger, if not isolated, could lead to rotating stall in the compressors, and reduce the overall system performance and efficiency. Also, the pressure losses in the intercooler flow path adversely affect the system efficiency and hence, must be minimized. Thus, implementing intercooling requires fluid dynamically efficient flow path with minimum flow nonuniformities and consequent pressure losses.

  17. Improving Organizational Citizenship Behavior based on Flow Experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alecxandrina Deaconu

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Building on previous research on Organizational Citizenship Behavior (OCB and its influence on the performance of SMEs, this article intends to expand the investigation area to the concept of Flow and its relationship with OCB. In this paper we performed an analysis of the two theoretical constructs, we highlighted similarities and complementarities and we formulated arguments supporting the need to implement strategies that promote a state of flow. Our study points out that through these strategies, employees are encouraged to perform an extra role, beyond their formal duties, which generates an increase of OCB and favorable conditions for sustainable development.

  18. PIV Measurements of flow downstream of polyurethane heart valve prosthesis for artificial heart: steady flow experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, J.K.; Sung, J.Y. [Seoul National University Graduate School, Seoul (Korea); Chang, J.K.; Yoo, J.Y.; Min, B.G. [Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea)

    1999-12-01

    Hemodynamic performance of a polyurethane heart valve prosthesis was evaluated in comparison with that of Bjork-Shiley Monostrut mechanical valve in steady flow representing the systolic peak flow phase. Pressure losses through the valves were obtained from the streamwise pressure distributions downstream of the valves. Unsteady and turbulent flow field distal to the heart valve prostheses were investigated using PIV(Particle Image Velocimetry) which can measure the full-field velocity instantaneously and noninvasively. By examining the velocity and Reynolds shear stress fields downstream of the polyurethane heart valve, it is known that there is a large recirculation region near the valve and high shear stress regions exist at the interface between strong axial jet flows along the wall and vortical flows in the central area. The possibilities of vascular complications, such as the thrombus formation and red blood cell damage, could be predicted from the overall view of the velocity and stress fields. (author). 22 refs., 9 figs., 1 tab.

  19. Reactive flow simulations: one-to-one comparison with experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinningland, Jan Ludvig; Neuville, Amelie; Pedersen, Janne; Jettestuen, Espen; Dysthe, Dag Kristian; Hiorth, Aksel

    2014-05-01

    Direct in-situ observations of structural changes in the pore space of porous rocks during reactive flow provide valuable insights into the pore scale mechanisms that govern mineral growth, changes in wetting properties and increased oil recovery. We present simulations of single-phase reactive flow in micrometer sized channels in a calcite (CaCO3) crystal and compare mineralogical and geometrical changes in the numerical results to experimental in-situ observations made with the same flow geometry and reactive fluids. This enables a rigorous test of the numerical model and a method for determining kinetic rate constants that will be used in simulations of reactive flow in chalk geometries. The numerical model is a lattice Boltzmann model (LBM) that moves a set of chemical basis species through the pore space by advection and diffusion. A chemical solver with general kinetic expressions is coupled to the LBM via mass fluxes at the solid-fluid interface. The mineralogy of the solid is described by scalar fields, each representing a mineral phase. The rate of dissolution or precipitation of a mineral depends on the local chemical disequilibrium and on a kinetic rate constant specific to each mineral.

  20. Association of cognitive judgment and shyness with frequency and quality of flow experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hirao K

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Kazuki Hirao, Ryuji Kobayashi, Kenji YabuwakiDepartment of Occupational Therapy, School of Health Science and Social Welfare, Kibi International University, Takahashi City, Okayama, JapanObjective: To determine the association of cognitive judgment and shyness with frequency and quality of flow experience.Design and methods: This was a cross-sectional survey of the relationship between psychological tendency and frequency and quality of flow experience in 68 college students, undertaken in Hiroshima, Japan. The predictors were Shyness Scale scores, measure of ambiguity tolerance scores, and Life Orientation Test scores, and the outcome was the frequency and quality of flow experience.Results: The results of the binary logistic regression analysis indicated that only the measure of ambiguity tolerance (P = 0.02, odds ratio = 1.06, and 95% confidence interval = 1.01–1.11 was a predictor of the quality of flow experience, and only the Shyness Scale (P = 0.007, odds ratio = 0.95, and 95% confidence interval = 0.91–0.98 was a predictor of the frequency of flow experience.Conclusion: The findings suggest that ambiguity tolerance and shyness are associated with the frequency and quality of the flow experience.Keywords: Flow experience, positive psychology, shyness, ambiguity tolerance, life orientation

  1. Analysis Of Overlay Distortion Patterns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armitage, John D.; Kirk, Joseph P.

    1988-01-01

    A comprehensive geometrical approach is presented for the least-squares analysis of overlay distortion patterns into useful, physically meaningful systematic distortion subpatterns and an essentially non-systematic residue. A scheme of generally useful distortion sub-patterns is presented in graphic and algorithmic form; some of these sub-patterns are additions to those already in widespread use. A graphic and geometric approach is emphasized rather than an algebraic or statistical approach, and an example illustrates the value in utilizing the pattern-detecting ability of the eye-brain system. The conditions are described under which different distortion sub-patterns may interact, possibly leading to misleading or erroneous conclusions about the types and amounts of different distortions present. Examples of typical interaction situations are given, and recommendations are made for analytic procedures to avoid misinterpretation. It is noted that the lower-order distortion patterns preserve straight-line linearity, but that higher-order distortion may result in straight lines becoming curved. The principle of least-squares analysis is outlined and a simple polynomial data-fitting example is used to illustrate the method. Algorithms are presented for least-squares distortion analysis of overlay patterns, and an APL2 program is given to show how this may easily be implemented on a digital computer. The appendix extends the treatment to cases where small-angle approximation is not permissible.

  2. Patterned turbulence in liquid metal flow: computational reconstruction of the Hartmann experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krasnov, Dmitry; Thess, André; Boeck, Thomas; Zhao, Yurong; Zikanov, Oleg

    2013-02-22

    We present results of a numerical analysis of Hartmann's historical experiments on flows of mercury in pipes and ducts under the influence of magnetic fields. The computed critical parameters for the laminar-turbulent transition as well as the friction coefficients are in excellent agreement with Hartmann's data. The simulations provide a first detailed view of the flow structures that are experimentally inaccessible. Novel flow regimes with localized turbulent spots near the sidewalls parallel to the magnetic field and otherwise laminar flow are discovered. We finally suggest how these predictions can be tested in a transparent fluid using optical flow measurement.

  3. SIMULATION AND EXPERIMENT OF BUBBLY FLOW INSIDE THROTTLING GROOVE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FU Xin; DU Xuewen; ZOU Jun; YANG Huayong; JI Hong

    2007-01-01

    The relationship between pressure distribution and cavitation (noise) inside throttling groove is investigated by numerical simulation and experimental method. A valve pocket with several transducers is performed to detect the pressure distributions inside the valve chamber, and the results fit quite well with the computational fluid dynamics(CFD) analysis. High-speed imaging techniques are employed to investigate the cavitation mechanisms, in particular bubble inception and cluster formation near the throttling groove. A spectrum analyzer is used to measure the sound pressure level of noise generated by the bubble flow. It is found that the pressure distributions inside the groove are sensitive to the valve port configuration and back pressure. The pressure distribution determines the bubble size and number passing through the valve grooves and the sound pressure level of noise induced by collapsing bubbles. The inlet pressure mainly affects the saturation degree of bubbly flow inside the groove and the intensity of sound pressure level accordingly.

  4. Fluid mechanics experiments in oscillatory flow. Volume 1: Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seume, J.; Friedman, G.; Simon, T. W.

    1992-01-01

    Results of a fluid mechanics measurement program in oscillating flow within a circular duct are presented. The program began with a survey of transition behavior over a range of oscillation frequency and magnitude and continued with a detailed study at a single operating point. Such measurements were made in support of Stirling engine development. Values of three dimensionless parameters, Re(sub max), Re(sub w), and A(sub R), embody the velocity amplitude, frequency of oscillation and mean fluid displacement of the cycle, respectively. Measurements were first made over a range of these parameters which included operating points of all Stirling engines. Next, a case was studied with values of these parameters that are representative of the heat exchanger tubes in the heater section of NASA's Stirling cycle Space Power Research Engine (SPRE). Measurements were taken of the axial and radial components of ensemble-averaged velocity and rms-velocity fluctuation and the dominant Reynolds shear stress, at various radial positions for each of four axial stations. In each run, transition from laminar to turbulent flow, and its reverse, were identified and sufficient data was gathered to propose the transition mechanism. Models of laminar and turbulent boundary layers were used to process the data into wall coordinates and to evaluate skin friction coefficients. Such data aids in validating computational models and is useful in comparing oscillatory flow characteristics to those of fully-developed steady flow. Data were taken with a contoured entry to each end of the test section and with flush square inlets so that the effects of test section inlet geometry on transition and turbulence are documented. Volume 1 contains the text of the report including figures and supporting appendices. Volume 2 contains data reduction program listings and tabulated data (including its graphical presentation).

  5. Extraction of coherent structures in a rotating turbulent flow experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Ruppert-Felsot, J E; Sharon, E; Swinney, H L; Ruppert-Felsot, Jori E.; Praud, Olivier; Sharon, Eran; Swinney, Harry L.

    2004-01-01

    The discrete wavelet packet transform (DWPT) and discrete wavelet transform (DWT) are used to extract and study the dynamics of coherent structures in a turbulent rotating fluid. Three-dimensional (3D) turbulence is generated by strong pumping through tubes at the bottom of a rotating tank (48.4 cm high, 39.4 cm diameter). This flow evolves toward two-dimensional (2D) turbulence with increasing height in the tank. Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) measurements on the quasi-2D flow reveal many long-lived coherent vortices with a wide range of sizes. The vorticity fields exhibit vortex birth, merger, scattering, and destruction. We separate the flow into a low-entropy ``coherent'' and a high-entropy ``incoherent'' component by thresholding the coefficients of the DWPT and DWT of the vorticity fields. Similar thresholdings using the Fourier transform and JPEG compression together with the Okubo-Weiss criterion are also tested for comparison. We find that the DWPT and DWT yield similar results and are much more ef...

  6. Experiments and simulations of flow noise inside a cylinder aligned with the flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elboth, Thomas; Andreassen, Øyvind; Reif, Bjørn Anders

    2008-11-01

    This work uses Lighthill's acoustic analogy to investigate noise generated by a turbulent boundary layer surrounding a cylinder aligned with the flow direction. Based on a DNS of channel flow with a Reynolds number Reτ=180, both the direct and the acoustic pressure fluctuations (self-noise) from the turbulent boundary layer surrounding the cylinder are computed. The computational domain is surrounded by a Perfectly Matched Layer (PML) absorbing boundary conditions. The result from the simulation is compared with noise data recorded on a purpose built experimental seismic streamer towed in the ocean. We do this to gain knowledge about how turbulent flow noise in a ``towed'' cylinder behaves and to compare the turbulent flow noise with other sources of noise found in towed sonar arrays, commonly used for maritime surveillance and geophysical exploration. Based on both simulations and measurements we present spectral estimates of the acoustic field and estimates of the spatial coherence ``distance'' of the noise.

  7. An Exploration of Transition Experiences Shaping Student Veteran Life Flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregg, Brian Tuan

    2016-01-01

    Educational institutions offer transformative opportunities for veterans transitioning from military service. Veteran-specific cultural supports in educational environments offer participation in occupations and development of skills needed to complete educational goals. However, veterans experience complex life circumstances atypical from…

  8. Intuitional experiment and numerical analysis of flow characteristics affected by flow accelerated corrosion in elbow pipe system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Hyung Joon [School of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Seoul National University, Gwanak-gu, Seoul 151-744 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Kyung Hoon, E-mail: kimkh@khu.ac.kr [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Kyung Hee University, Seochun 1, Yongin, Gyeonggi 446-701 (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-05-15

    Highlights: • Wall-thinning erosion of pipelines in plants leads to fatal accidents unexpectedly. • Flow Acceleration Corrosion (FAC) is a main reason of wall-thinning. • For industrial safety, it is necessary to verify the tendency of FAC. • We focused on local wall thinning by FAC with intuitional visualization experiment and numerical analysis in elbow pipe.

  9. MICROGRAVITY EXPERIMENTS OF TWO-PHASE FLOW PATTERNS ABOARD MIR SPACE STATION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵建福; 解京昌; 林海; 胡文瑞; A.V. Ivanov; A.Yu. Belyaev

    2001-01-01

    A first experimental study on two-phase flow patterns at a long-term,steady microgravity condition was conducted on board the Russian Space Station "MIR" in August 1999. Carbogal and air are used as the liquid and the gas phase,respectively. Bubble, slug, slug-annular transitional, and annular flows are observed.A new region of annular flow with lower liquid superficial velocity is discovered,and the region of the slug-annular transitionalfiow is wider than that observed by experiments on board the parabolic aircraft. The main patterns are bubble, slug annular transitional and annular flows based on the experiments on board MIR space station. Some influences on the two-phase flow patterns in the present experiments are discussed.

  10. Distorted representation in visual tourism research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Martin Trandberg

    2016-01-01

    Tourism research has recently been informed by non-representational theories to highlight the socio-material, embodied and heterogeneous composition of tourist experiences. These advances have contributed to further reflexivity and called for novel ways to animate representations. On this backgro......Tourism research has recently been informed by non-representational theories to highlight the socio-material, embodied and heterogeneous composition of tourist experiences. These advances have contributed to further reflexivity and called for novel ways to animate representations....... On this background, this paper develops the notion ‘distorted representation’ to illustrate that blurred and obscure photos can in fact be intelligible and sensible in understanding tourism. Through an exploration of the overwhelmed and unintended practices of visual fieldwork, distorted representation illustrates...

  11. Optimization of Process Parameters to Minimize Angular Distortion in Gas Tungsten Arc Welded Stainless Steel 202 Grade Plates Using Genetic Algorithms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sudhakaran .R,

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a study on optimization of process parameters using genetic algorithm to minimize angular distortion in 202 grade stainless steel gas tungsten arc welded plates. Angular distortion is a major problem and most pronounced among different types of distortion in butt welded plates. The extent of distortion depends onthe welding process control parameters. The important process control parameters chosen for study are gun angle (θ, welding speed (V, plate length (L, welding current (I and gas flow rate (Q. The experiments are conducted based on five factor five level central composite rotatable designs with full replication technique. A mathematical model was developed correlating the process parameters and the angular distortion. The developed model is checked for the adequacy based on ANOVA analysis and accuracy of prediction by confirmatory test. The optimization of process parameters was done using genetic algorithms (GA. A source code was developed using C language to do the optimization. The optimal process parameters gave a value of 0.000379° for angular distortion which demonstrates the accuracy and effectiveness of the model presented and program developed. The obtained results indicate that the optimized parameters are capable of producing weld with minimum distortion.

  12. Fluid mechanics experiments in oscillatory flow. Volume 2: Tabulated data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seume, J.; Friedman, G.; Simon, T. W.

    1992-01-01

    Results of a fluid mechanics measurement program in oscillating flow within a circular duct are presented. The program began with a survey of transition behavior over a range of oscillation frequency and magnitude and continued with a detailed study at a single operating point. Such measurements were made in support of Stirling engine development. Values of three dimensionless parameters, Re sub max, Re sub w, and A sub R, embody the velocity amplitude, frequency of oscillation, and mean fluid displacement of the cycle, respectively. Measurements were first made over a range of these parameters that are representative of the heat exchanger tubes in the heater section of NASA's Stirling cycle Space Power Research Engine (SPRE). Measurements were taken of the axial and radial components of ensemble-averaged velocity and rms velocity fluctuation and the dominant Reynolds shear stress, at various radial positions for each of four axial stations. In each run, transition from laminar to turbulent flow, and its reverse, were identified and sufficient data was gathered to propose the transition mechanism. Volume 2 contains data reduction program listings and tabulated data (including its graphics).

  13. MEMORY DISTORTIONS IN THE RESEARCH OF EMOTIONS

    OpenAIRE

    Ana Genc

    2015-01-01

    The memories of one’s life, or autobiographical memories, are transitory dynamic mental constructions. The human memory is both solid and fragile. We own durable and lasting traces of many events, but also we can forget other events just moments after they occured. Our memories of past experiences are never exact reproductions of the original, initial events. Besides the memory biases that are related to details about past happenings, distortions are also present in the remembering of emotion...

  14. Multichannel readout ASIC design flow for high energy physics and cosmic rays experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voronin, A.; Malankin, E.

    2016-02-01

    In the large-scale high energy physics and astrophysics experiments multi-channel readout application specific integrated circuits (ASICs) are widely used. The ASICs for such experiments are complicated systems, which usually include both analog and digital building blocks. The complexity and large number of channels in such ASICs require the proper methodological approach to their design. The paper represents the mixed-signal design flow of the ASICs for high energy physics and cosmic rays experiments. This flow was successfully embedded to the development of the read-out ASIC prototype for the muon chambers of the CBM experiment. The approach was approved in UMC CMOS MMRF 180 nm process. The design flow enable to analyse the mixed-signal system operation on the different levels: functional, behavioural, schematic and post layout including parasitic elements. The proposed design flow allows reducing the simulation period and eliminating the functionality mismatches on the very early stage of the design.

  15. Investigating Flow Experience and Scientific Practices during a Mobile Serious Educational Game

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bressler, Denise M.; Bodzin, Alec M.

    2016-01-01

    Mobile serious educational games (SEGs) show promise for promoting scientific practices and high engagement. Researchers have quantified this engagement according to flow theory. This study investigated whether a mobile SEG promotes flow experience and scientific practices with eighth-grade urban students. Students playing the game (n = 59) were…

  16. Flow and bathymetry in sharp open-channel bends: Experiments and predictions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zeng, J.; Constantinescu, G.; Blanckaert, K.; Weber, L.

    2008-01-01

    This paper focuses on experiments and simulations conducted in very sharp open-channel bends with flat and equilibrium bathymetry, corresponding to the initial and final phases of the erosion and deposition processes, respectively. The study of flow in curved open bends is relevant for flow in natur

  17. The Relationship of Motivation and Flow Experience to Academic Procrastination in University Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Eunju

    2005-01-01

    In this article, the author examined the relationships of motivation and flow experience to academic procrastination in 262 Korean undergraduate students who completed a questionnaire on procrastination, flow, and motivation. The results indicated that high procrastination was associated with lack of self-determined motivation and low incidence of…

  18. Investigating Flow Experience and Scientific Practices during a Mobile Serious Educational Game

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bressler, Denise M.; Bodzin, Alec M.

    2016-01-01

    Mobile serious educational games (SEGs) show promise for promoting scientific practices and high engagement. Researchers have quantified this engagement according to flow theory. This study investigated whether a mobile SEG promotes flow experience and scientific practices with eighth-grade urban students. Students playing the game (n = 59) were…

  19. A Stopped-Flow Kinetics Experiment for the Physical Chemistry Laboratory Using Noncorrosive Reagents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prigodich, Richard V.

    2014-01-01

    Stopped-flow kinetics techniques are important to the study of rapid chemical and biochemical reactions. Incorporation of a stopped-flow kinetics experiment into the physical chemistry laboratory curriculum would therefore be an instructive addition. However, the usual reactions studied in such exercises employ a corrosive reagent that can over…

  20. A Stopped-Flow Kinetics Experiment for the Physical Chemistry Laboratory Using Noncorrosive Reagents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prigodich, Richard V.

    2014-01-01

    Stopped-flow kinetics techniques are important to the study of rapid chemical and biochemical reactions. Incorporation of a stopped-flow kinetics experiment into the physical chemistry laboratory curriculum would therefore be an instructive addition. However, the usual reactions studied in such exercises employ a corrosive reagent that can over…

  1. Mercury flow experiments. 4th report Measurements of erosion rate caused by mercury flow

    CERN Document Server

    Kinoshita, H; Hino, R; Kaminaga, M

    2002-01-01

    The Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI) and the High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK) are promoting a construction plan of the Material-Life Science Facility, which is consisted of a Muon Science Facility and a Neutron Scattering Facility, in order to open up the new science fields. The Neutron Scattering Facility will be utilized for advanced fields of Material and Life science using high intensity neutron generated by the spallation reaction of a 1 MW pulsed proton beam and mercury target. Design of the spallation mercury target system aims to obtain high neutron performance with high reliability and safety. Since the target system is using mercury as the target material and contains large amount of radioactive spallation products, it is necessary to estimate reliability for strength of instruments in a mercury flow system during lifetime of the facility. Piping and components in the mercury flow system would be damaged by erosion with mercury flow, since these components will be we...

  2. Modeling Kinetics of Distortion in Porous Bi-layered Structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tadesse Molla, Tesfaye; Frandsen, Henrik Lund; Bjørk, Rasmus;

    2013-01-01

    Shape distortions during constrained sintering experiment of bi-layer porous and dense cerium gadolinium oxide (CGO) structures have been modeled. Technologies like solid oxide fuel cells require co-firing thin layers with different green densities, which often exhibit differential shrinkage...... because of different sintering rates of the materials resulting in undesired distortions of the component. An analytical model based on the continuum theory of sintering has been developed to describe the kinetics of densification and distortion in the sintering processes. A new approach is used...... to extract the material parameters controlling shape distortion through optimizing the model to experimental data of free shrinkage strains. The significant influence of weight of the sample (gravity) on the kinetics of distortion is taken in to consideration. The modeling predictions indicate good agreement...

  3. Flow experience in game based learning – a systematic literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arttu Perttula

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The entertaining elements implemented in a serious game are key factors in determining whether a player will be engaged in a play-learn process and able to achieve the desired learning outcomes. Thus, optimization of subjective playing experience is a crucial part of a game design process. Flow theory can be adopted for measuring user experience and analyzing the quality of serious game designs. In addition, flow seems to have a positive influence on performance enhancement, learning and engagement. The focus of this review is especially on examining the meaning of flow in the context of serious games as well as exploring the relationship between flow and learning, factors that influence occurrence of flow and how flow is operationalized. The review revealed that there are mainly conceptual considerations about flow in serious games, but no robust empirical evidence about the meaning of flow. This is in line with other studies. We argue that research on flow should focus on the specific aspects related to the very nature of serious games that combine enjoyment and learning. Furthermore, new methods to measure flow and analyse the data need to be developed and studied.

  4. Dual arc penning ion source gas flow experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hudson, E.D.; Lord, R.S.; Mallory, M.L.; Antaya, T.A.

    1984-01-01

    Support gas, when added directly to an arc or admitted to an auxiliary chamber of a two-arc chamber ion source, increases the beam intensity for multicharged ions such as /sup 16/O/sup 5 +/. To clarify the mechanism of this intensity increase, gas flow rates from the auxiliary chamber to the main chamber have been measured by using the ORIC cyclotron as a mass spectrometer. The results show that only about three percent of the gas admitted to the auxiliary chamber reaches the main chamber. One can then infer that the improved operation probably results from the stabilizing effect of heating the common cathodes with the auxiliary arc and/or the more favorable distribution of the support gas to the part of the main arc close to the cathodes.

  5. First Experiments with the Simulation of Particulate Flows

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uhlmann, M.

    2003-07-01

    Several variants of a Eulerian-Lagrangian method for the simulation of particulate flows are implemented in a finite-difference framework. All methods have in common that they represent the presence of the solid fraction by means of artificial volume forces in the momentum equation of the fluid phase. Thereby, explicit griddling of the moving particles is avoided and a fixed grid can be used. The computations show that the direct forcing method (Kin et a/., 2001) is not adequate for a our purposes due to large oscillations in the hydro-dynamical forces. The immersed method of Pekin (2002) does provide accurate predictions of particle motion,however at the cost of a small time step. (Author) 33 refs.

  6. The distorted tropane of scopoline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Écija, Patricia; Cocinero, Emilio J; Lesarri, Alberto; Basterretxea, Francisco J; Fernández, José A; Castaño, Fernando

    2013-06-24

    The structural isomerization of scopine into scopoline (oscine) has been observed in a supersonic jet expansion using microwave spectroscopy. The rotational spectrum evidences a single structure in the gas phase, providing a first description of the (three-ring) structurally distorted tropane in scopoline. The absence of rotational signatures of any scopine conformation suggests a practically quantitative isomerization at the vaporization temperatures of the experiment (ca. 90 °C). The determined rotational parameters of scopoline reveal the structural consequences of the intramolecular cyclation of scopine, which breaks the original epoxy group and creates a new ether bridge and a 7β-hydroxytropane configuration. The hydroxy group further stabilizes the molecule by an O-H⋅⋅⋅N intramolecular hydrogen bond, which, in turn, forces the N-methyl group to the less stable axial form. Supporting ab initio (MP2) and DFT (B3LYP, M06-2X) calculations are included. Copyright © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  7. Relationships between Flow Experience, Life Meaningfulness and Subjective Well-being in Music Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Sedlár

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The study examines relationships between flow experience in musical activities, life meaningfulness and subjective well – being. Life meaningfulness belongs to eudaimonic good life, subjective well–being belongs to hedonic good life and flow seems to be combination of both approaches. It is supposed that flow experience in musical activity and life meaningfulness should have positive impact on subjective well –being. The research sample consisted of 96 university music students (37 males, 59 females from the Music and Dance Faculty, Academy of Performing Arts in Bratislava, Slovakia. Dispositional Flow Scale–2, which measures nine dimension of flow, was used for measuring frequency o f flow experience. Life Meaningfulness Scale, which measures three dimensions of life meaningfulness, was used for measuring meaningfulness of life. Positive and Negative Affect Schedule measured affective components of subjective well–being, and Satisfaction with Life Scale measured cognitive component of subjective well–being. Categorization revealed that the most favourite performing musical activities are creative musical activities, such as reproduction and production, during which music students relatively often experience flow. The results of correlation analysis showed that total scores of flow experience, life meaningfulness and components of subjective well–being, significantly correlate each other. Aspects of flow, clear goals and autotelic experience are positively related to cognitive and motivational dimension of life meaningfulness and also to positive affectivity. Loss of self–consciousness and autotelic experience are positively related to emotional dimension of life meaningfulness. Challenge–skill balance, action–awareness merging, clear goals, concentration on task at hand, sense of control and autotelic experience are negatively related to negative affectivity. Challenge–skill balance and autotelic experience are related to

  8. Relationships between Flow Experience, Life Meaningfulness and Subjective Well-being in Music Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Sedlár

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The study examines relationships between flow experience in musical activities, life meaningfulness and subjective well-being. Life meaningfulness belongs to eudaimonic good life, subjective well-being belongs to hedonic good life and flow seems to be combination of both approaches. It is supposed that flow experience in musical activity and life meaningfulness should have positive impact on subjective well-being. The research sample consisted of 96 university music students (37 males, 59 females from the Music and Dance Faculty, Academy of Performing Arts in Bratislava, Slovakia. Dispositional Flow Scale-2, which measures nine dimension of flow, was used for measuring frequency of flow experience. Life Meaningfulness Scale, which measures three dimensions of life meaningfulness, was used for measuring meaningfulness of life. Positive and Negative Affect Schedule measured affective components of subjective well-being, and Satisfaction with Life Scale measured cognitive component of subjective well-being. Categorization revealed that the most favourite performing musical activities are creative musical activities, such as reproduction and production, during which music students relatively often experience flow. The results of correlation analysis showed that total scores of flow experience, life meaningfulness and components of subjective well-being, significantly correlate each other. Aspects of flow, clear goals and autotelic experience are positively related to cognitive and motivational dimension of life meaningfulness and also to positive affectivity. Loss of self-consciousness and autotelic experience are positively related to emotional dimension of life meaningfulness. Challenge-skill balance, action-awareness merging, clear goals, concentration on task at hand, sense of control and autotelic experience are negatively related to negative affectivity. Challenge-skill balance and autotelic experience are related to satisfaction with life

  9. Preferential flow paths and heat pipes: Results from laboratory experiments on heat-driven flow in natural and artificial rock fractures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kneafsey, T.J.; Pruess, K. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States). Earth Sciences Div.

    1997-06-01

    Water flow in fractures under the conditions of partial saturation and thermal drive may lead to fast flow along preferential localized pathways and heat pipe conditions. Water flowing in fast pathways may ultimately contact waste packages at Yucca Mountain and transport radionuclides to the accessible environment. Sixteen experiments were conducted to visualize liquid flow in glass fracture models, a transparent epoxy fracture replica, and a rock/replica fracture assembly. Spatially resolved thermal monitoring was performed in seven of these experiments to evaluate heat-pipe formation. Depending on the fracture apertures and flow conditions, various flow regimes were observed including continuous rivulet flow for high flow rates, intermittent rivulet flow and drop flow for intermediate flow rates, and film flow for low flow rates and wide apertures. These flow regimes were present in both fracture models and in the replica of a natural fracture. Heat-pipe conditions indicated by low thermal gradients were observed in five experiments. Conditions conducive to heat-pipe formation include an evaporation zone, condensation zone, adequate space for vapor and liquid to travel, and appropriate fluid driving forces. In one of the two experiments where heat pipe conditions were not observed, adequate space for liquid-vapor counterflow was not provided. Heat pipe conditions were not established in the other, because liquid flow was inadequate to compensate for imbibition and the quantity of heat contained within the rock.

  10. Boundary-layer turbulence in experiments of quasi-Keplerian flows

    CERN Document Server

    Lopez, Jose M

    2016-01-01

    Most flows in nature and engineering are turbulent because of their large velocities and spatial scales. Laboratory experiments of rotating quasi-Keplerian flows, for which the angular velocity decreases radially but the angular momentum increases, are however laminar at Reynolds numbers exceeding one million. This is in apparent contradiction to direct numerical simulations showing that in these experiments turbulence transition is triggered by the axial boundaries. We here show numerically that as the Reynolds number increases turbulence becomes progressively confined to the boundary layers and the flow in the bulk fully relaminarizes. Our findings support that hydrodynamic turbulence cannot drive accretion in astrophysical disks.

  11. Triangulation in Random Refractive Distortions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alterman, Marina; Schechner, Yoav Y; Swirski, Yohay

    2017-03-01

    Random refraction occurs in turbulence and through a wavy water-air interface. It creates distortion that changes in space, time and with viewpoint. Localizing objects in three dimensions (3D) despite this random distortion is important to some predators and also to submariners avoiding the salient use of periscopes. We take a multiview approach to this task. Refracted distortion statistics induce a probabilistic relation between any pixel location and a line of sight in space. Measurements of an object's random projection from multiple views and times lead to a likelihood function of the object's 3D location. The likelihood leads to estimates of the 3D location and its uncertainty. Furthermore, multiview images acquired simultaneously in a wide stereo baseline have uncorrelated distortions. This helps reduce the acquisition time needed for localization. The method is demonstrated in stereoscopic video sequences, both in a lab and a swimming pool.

  12. Skills-demands compatibility as a determinant of flow experience in an inductive reasoning task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiefele, Ulrich; Raabe, Andreas

    2011-10-01

    The skills-demands fit hypothesis of flow theory was examined. Based on the earlier finding that high demands in a game situation do not reduce the experience of flow, a cognitive task paradigm was used. The effect of skills-demands compatibility on the experience of flow but not of other, similar psychological states (i.e., concentration, negative and positive activation) was also investigated. Participants were 89 undergraduate students who worked on a number of inductive reasoning tasks in four successive trials with or without skills-demands compatibility. The results clearly supported the skills-demands fit hypothesis; concentration and activation were affected only by the tasks' difficulty. Inductive reasoning tasks are a useful tool for the experimental analysis of flow, and skills-demands compatibility is a significant and powerful condition of flow, but not of other, similar psychological states.

  13. Simulation Experiments of Reacting Two-Phase Flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-04-06

    Simulation Experiments 16 2.8 Lord’s Work Done in the 1960’s 17 2.9 Investigations Performed by Wilkins and Carros in the 1960’s 19 2.10 Statement of Work 20...the fundamental research work described here. A gas gun facility, based on the studies of Lord (21 and Wilkins and Carros [3] was built at EMI-AFB...show that the calculations of Lord [2] are in error (see Section 4.). ’i 3-X: 2.9 Investigations Performed by Wilkins and Carros inthe 196o’s- Wilkins

  14. Flow experiences in everyday classes of Spanish college students: the fit between challenge and skill

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jordi Escartin

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available This study is concerned with the flow state as a high intrinsic motivation experience. Following Csikszenmihalyi´s theoretical model (1990, we analyze in which contents within the social psychology subject, students experience more flow. Participants were Spanish college students from a general course on Social Psychology. They completed a diary study during 12 master classes through the academic semester. The results showed that students experienced different states of consciousness in different sessions: relaxation, apathy, flow and anxiety, respectively. These findings provide new insight into the relationship between an academic subject and students, facilitating the creation of new and innovative strategies for learning. The ultimate goal is to modify and improve the dynamics and learning activities for the teaching course, increasing the experience of flow in class (and reducing the levels of anxiety, apathy or relaxation.

  15. Assessing uncertainties in remotely sensed lava flow emplacement - results from an indoor analog experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pick, Leonie; Zakšek, Klemen; Lombardo, Valerio; Hort, Matthias

    2016-04-01

    Infrared satellite images are an easily accessible data source for monitoring the radiant power (RP) emitted from lava flows during effusive eruptions in close to real time. Although not necessary for RP estimations, lava temperature is a crucial parameter in the determination of the flow's convected heat. In conjunction with the flow's spatial extent it assists the identification of potentially threatened areas and thereby the overall lava inundation hazard assessment. The accurate determination of the flow's size and temperature is however afflicted with uncertainty as the lava occupies only a small fraction (wire temperatures corresponding to barely glowing (experiment 1), glowing (experiment 2) and strongly glowing (experiment 3) was confirmed. The deviation of the hotspot's pixel fraction yielded by the Dual-Band method from the theoretically calculated one was found to be within the expected limits given that the hotspot is larger than about 3 % of the pixel area, a resolution boundary most remotely sensed volcanic hotspots fall below.

  16. Optimal Experience and Personal Growth: Flow and the Consolidation of Place Identity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marino Bonaiuto

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available This study examined the relationship between flow experience and place identity, based on eudaimonistic identity theory which prioritizes self-defining activities as important ones for an individual’s identification of his/her goals, values, beliefs, and interests corresponding to one’s own identity development or enhancement. The study is also based on flow theory, according to which some salient features of an activity experience are important for happiness and well-being. Questionnaire surveys on Italian and Greek residents focused on their perceived flow and place identity in relation to their own specific local place experiences. The overall findings revealed that flow experience occurring in one's own preferred place is widely reported as resulting from a range of self-defining activities irrespective of gender or age, and it is positively and significantly associated with one's own place identity. Such findings provide the first quantitative evidence about the link between flow experienced during meaningfully located self-definining activities and identity experienced at the place level, similarly to the corresponding personal and social levels that had been previously already empirically tested. Results are also discussed in terms of their implications for eudaimonistic identity theory's understanding and enriching, especially by its generalization from the traditional personal identity level up to the place identity one. More generally, this study has implications for maintaining or enhancing one’s own place identity, and therefore people-place relations, by means of facilitating a person's flow experience within psychologically meaningful places.

  17. STUDY ON SIMILARITY LAWS OF A DISTORTED RIVER MODEL WITH A MOVABLE BED

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    In this study, by considering the scale ratio related to thespecific gravity of the submerged bed material,and introducing a degree of distortion, n the similarity laws for a distorted river model with a movable bed were derived under the conditions that the values of dual dimensionless parameters in a regime-criterion diagram for the bars are the same in a model as they are in a prototype, and that a resistance law such as the Manning-Strickler-type formula is to be valid for a model and a prototype. The usefulness of the similarity laws derived in this study was verified by comparing the bed forms from the distroted model experiments with the bed forms from the 1/50-scale undistorted model experiments, which were performed by the Hokkaido Development Bureau (H. D.B. ), Japan, to examine the tentative plan for the improvement of a low-flow channel in the Chubetsu River, which is a tributary of the Ishikari River. It is considered that the distorted model experiments to be valid with either sand or lightweight bed material.

  18. Social Groups and Pedestrian Crowds: Experiment on Dyads in a Counter Flow Scenario

    CERN Document Server

    Gorrini, Andrea; Feliciani, Claudio; Zhao, Pengfei; Nishinari, Katsuhiro; Bandini, Stefania

    2016-01-01

    The calibration and validation of pedestrian simulations require the acquisition of empirical evidences of human behaviour. The current work presents the results of an experiment focused on the potentially combined effect of counter flow and grouping on pedestrian dynamics. In particular, we focused on: (i) four different configurations of flow ratio (the rate between the minor flow and the total flow in bidirectional scenarios); (ii) dyads, as the most frequently observed and basic social groups of crowds. Results showed that the increase of flow ratio negatively impacted the speed of pedestrians. Dyads walked significantly slower than singletons, due to the difficulty in movement coordination among group members (proxemics) in case of counter flow. The collected results represent an useful contribution towards the validation of pedestrian simulations.

  19. Dynamics of a distorted diamond chain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikeska, H.-J.; Luckmann, C.

    2008-02-01

    We present results on the dynamics of the distorted diamond chain, S=1/2 dimers alternating with single spins 1/2 and exchange couplings J1 and J3 in between. The dynamics in the spin fluid (SF) and tetramer-dimer (TD) phases is investigated numerically by exact diagonalization for up to 24 spins. Representative excitation spectra are presented both for zero magnetic field and in the 1/3 plateau phase and the relevant parameters are determined across the phase diagram. The behavior across the SF-TD phase transition line is discussed for the specific heat and for excitation spectra. The relevance of the distorted diamond chain model for the Cu3(CO3)2(OH)2 (azurite) material is discussed with particular emphasis on inelastic neutron scattering experiments; the recent suggestion of one possibly ferromagnetic coupling constant is not confirmed.

  20. Flow Experience as a Quality Measure in Evaluating Physically Activating Collaborative Serious Games

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristian J. M. Kiili

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The measurement of the subjective playing experience is important part of the game development process. The enjoyment level that a serious game offers is a key factor in determining whether a player will be engaged in the gameplay and achieve the objectives of the game. In this paper we report the results of a game design process in which two prototypes of a collaborative exergame were studied. The main aim of the paper is to explore to what extend the measurement of flow experience can facilitate the game evaluation and design process. Alltogether 102 junior high school students participated in two user experience studies and played collaborative exergames designed to teach soft skills. Playing experience was measured with a flow questionnaire, playing behavior was observed and some of the players were interviewed. The results showed that flow experience can be used to evaluate the overall quality of the gameplay and it provides a structured approach to consider the quality of the game. However, flow does not provide detailed information about the shortages of the game and thus complementary methods is needed to identify the causes. The results also indicated that flow experience was independent of gender that supports its use in quality measurement.

  1. Mitigation of Engine Inlet Distortion Through Adjoint-Based Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ordaz, Irian; Rallabhandi, Sriram; Nielsen, Eric J.; Diskin, Boris

    2017-01-01

    The adjoint-based design capability in FUN3D is extended to allow efficient gradient- based optimization and design of concepts with highly integrated aero-propulsive systems. A circumferential distortion calculation, along with the derivatives needed to perform adjoint-based design, have been implemented in FUN3D. This newly implemented distortion calculation can be used not only for design but also to drive the existing mesh adaptation process and reduce the error associated with the fan distortion calculation. The design capability is demonstrated by the shape optimization of an in-house aircraft concept equipped with an aft fuselage propulsor. The optimization objective is the minimization of flow distortion at the aerodynamic interface plane of this aft fuselage propulsor.

  2. Operation of static series compensator under distorted utility conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Awad, H.; Nelsen, H.; Blaabjerg, Frede

    2005-01-01

    in the case of distorted grid voltage. Furthermore, a selective harmonic compensation strategy is applied to filter out the grid harmonics. The operation of the SSC under distorted utility conditions and voltage dips is discussed. The validity of the proposed controller is verified by experiments, carried out...... on a 10-kV SSC laboratory setup. Experimental results have shown the ability of the SSC to mitigate voltage dips and harmonics. It is also shown that the proposed controller has improved the transient performance of the SSC even under distorted utility conditions....

  3. Debris-flow Dynamics Inferred From Aggregated Results of 28 Large-scale Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iverson, R. M.; Logan, M.; Lahusen, R. G.; Berti, M.

    2008-12-01

    Key features of debris-flow dynamics are revealed by identifying reproducible trends in data collected during 28 large-scale experiments with closely controlled initial and boundary conditions. In each experiment, 10 m3 of water-saturated sediment consisting mostly of sand and gravel discharges abruptly from behind a vertical headgate, descends a ~90 m concrete flume inclined 31 degrees, and forms a deposit on a nearly horizontal runout surface. The experiments are grouped into three sets of 8 to 11 replicates distinguished by differing mud contents (1% vs. 7% by dry weight) and basal boundary roughnesses (1 mm vs. 20 mm characteristic amplitude). Aggregation of sensor data from each set of replicates reveals universal patterns, as well as variances, in evolution of flow velocities, depths, basal normal stresses, and basal pore pressures. The patterns show that debris flows consistently develop blunt, coarse-grained, high-friction flow fronts pushed from behind by nearly liquefied, finer-grained debris. This flow architecture yields lobate deposits bounded by coarse-grained snouts and lateral levees. The aggregated data also show that imposed differences in basal boundary conditions and debris compositions produce systematic -- and sometimes surprising -- differences in flow dynamics and deposits. For example, flows on rough beds run out further than flows on smooth beds, despite the fact that flows on smooth beds attain greater velocities. This counterintuitive behavior results from enhanced grain-size segregation in the presence of a rough bed; segregation accentuates development of lateral levees that channelize flow and retard depletion of downstream momentum by lateral spreading. Another consistent finding is that flows with significant mud content are more mobile (attain greater velocities and runouts) than flows lacking much mud. This behavior is evident despite the fact that mud measurably increases the viscosity and yield strength of the fluid component

  4. The relationship between self-disgust, guilt, and flow experience among Japanese undergraduates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hirao K

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Kazuki Hirao, Ryuji Kobayashi Department of Occupational Therapy, School of Health Science and Social Welfare, Kibi International University, Okayama, Japan Purpose: To determine the relationship between self-disgust, guilt, and flow experience. Methods: A cross-sectional survey was conducted in a convenience sample of 142 Kibi International University students (mean age, 20.09 ± 1.24 years; 85 males and 57 females. Each participant was evaluated using the Flow Experience Checklist, Self-Disgust Scale, and Situational Guilt Inventory. Correlation analysis was used to describe the strength and direction of the relationship between variables. We employed Pearson's partial correlations, adjusted for age and sex, using dummy variables (female = 0, male = 1. Results: Analysis of the relationship between the frequency of flow experience and the Self-Disgust Scale scores showed a statistically significant negative correlation, whereas the duration of the activity and the Situational Guilt Inventory score showed a significant positive correlation. The quality of flow experience and the Situational Guilt Inventory score showed a significant positive correlation. Conclusion: These findings suggest that flow experience could be helpful for those who need treatment to reduce negative emotions. Keywords: negative emotion, mental health, positive psychology

  5. Reduction of Large-scale Turbulence and Optimization of Flows in the Madison Dynamo Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, N. Z.

    2011-10-01

    The Madison Dynamo Experiment seeks to observe a magnetic field grow at the expense of kinetic energy in a flow of liquid sodium. The enormous Reynolds numbers of the experiment and its two vortex geometry creates strong turbulence, which in turn leads to transport of magnetic flux consistent with an increase of the effective resistivity. The increased effective resistivity implies that faster flows are required for the dynamo to operate. Three major results from the experiment will be reported in this talk. 1) A new probe technique has been developed for measuring both the fluctuating velocity and magnetic fields which has allowed a direct measurement of the turbulent EMF from . 2) The scale of the largest eddies in the experiment has been reduced by an equatorial baffle on the vessel boundary. This modification of the flow at the boundary results in strong field generation and amplification by the mean velocity of the flow, and the role of turbulence in generating currents is reduced. The motor power required to drive a given flow speed is reduced by 20%, the effective Rm, as measured by the toroidal windup of the field(omega effect), increased by a factor of ~2.4, and the turbulent EMF (previously measured to be as large as the induction by the mean flow) is eliminated. These results all indicate that the equatorial baffle has eliminated the largest-scale eddies in the flow. 3) Flow optimization is now possible by adjusting the pitch of vanes installed on the vessel wall. An analysis of the kinematic prediction for dynamo excitation reveals that the threshold for excitation is quite sensitive to the helical pitch of the flow. Computational fluid dynamics simulations of the flow showed that by adjusting the angle of the vanes on the vessel wall (which control the helical pitch of the flow) we should be able to minimize the critical velocity at which the dynamo onset occurs. Experiments are now underway to exploit this new capability in tailoring the large

  6. Reduced-gravity two-phase flow experiments in the NASA KC-135

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuta, Judith M.; Michener, Thomas E.; Best, Frederick R.; Kachnik, Leo J.

    1988-01-01

    An adequate understanding is sought of flow and heat transfer behavior in reduced and zero gravity conditions. Microgravity thermal-hydraulic analysis capabilities were developed for application to space nuclear power systems. A series of reduced gravity two phase flow experiments using the NASA KC-135 were performed. The objective was to supply basic thermal hydraulic information that could be used in development of analytical tools for design of space power systems. The experiments are described. Two main conclusions were drawn. First, the tests demonstrate that the KC-135 is a suitable test environment for obtaining two phase flow and heat transfer data in reduced gravity conditions. Second, the behavior of two phase flow in low gravity is sufficiently different from that obtained in 1 g to warrant intensive investigation of the phenomenon if adequate analytical tools are to be developed for microgravity conditions.

  7. Flow dynamics and magnetic induction in the von-Karman plasma experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Plihon, Nicolas; Palermo, Francesco; Morales, Jorge A; Bos, Wouter; Godeferd, Fabien S; Bourgoin, Mickaël; Pinton, Jean-François; Moulin, M; Aanesland, Ane

    2014-01-01

    The von-Karman plasma experiment is a novel versatile experimental device designed to explore the dynamics of basic magnetic induction processes and the dynamics of flows driven in weakly magnetized plasmas. A high-density plasma column (10^16 - 10^19 particles.m^-3) is created by two radio-frequency plasma sources located at each end of a 1 m long linear device. Flows are driven through JxB azimuthal torques created from independently controlled emissive cathodes. The device has been designed such that magnetic induction processes and turbulent plasma dynamics can be studied from a variety of time-averaged axisymmetric flows in a cylinder. MHD simulations implementing volume-penalization support the experimental development to design the most efficient flow-driving schemes and understand the flow dynamics. Preliminary experimental results show that a rotating motion of up to nearly 1 km/s is controlled by the JxB azimuthal torque.

  8. The flow structure of pyroclastic density currents: evidence from particle models and large-scale experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dellino, Pierfrancesco; Büttner, Ralf; Dioguardi, Fabio; Doronzo, Domenico Maria; La Volpe, Luigi; Mele, Daniela; Sonder, Ingo; Sulpizio, Roberto; Zimanowski, Bernd

    2010-05-01

    Pyroclastic flows are ground hugging, hot, gas-particle flows. They represent the most hazardous events of explosive volcanism, one striking example being the famous historical eruption of Pompeii (AD 79) at Vesuvius. Much of our knowledge on the mechanics of pyroclastic flows comes from theoretical models and numerical simulations. Valuable data are also stored in the geological record of past eruptions, i.e. the particles contained in pyroclastic deposits, but they are rarely used for quantifying the destructive potential of pyroclastic flows. In this paper, by means of experiments, we validate a model that is based on data from pyroclastic deposits. It allows the reconstruction of the current's fluid-dynamic behaviour. We show that our model results in likely values of dynamic pressure and particle volumetric concentration, and allows quantifying the hazard potential of pyroclastic flows.

  9. Changes in flow experience among occupational therapy students: a 1-year longitudinal study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazuki Hirao

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The purpose of this 1-year longitudinal study is to investigate the change in flow experience among occupational therapy students (OTS. Methods: In December 2012, we prospectively recruited 97 OTS from the Department of Occupational Therapy, Kibi International University. To assess flow experience in daily life, we used the Flow Experience Checklist. Results: The dataset included 87 OTS, of which 75 participated in the assessment at 1 year (follow-up rate, 86.2%. The mean age at baseline of 45 male and 30 female OTS was 19.59±1.1 years (range, 18 to 24 years. A comparison of the ‘frequency of flow experience’ showed significant differences between baseline values and those after 1 year (December 2013 among male OTS (P<0.05. Conclusion: The present results indicate that, for male OTS, the frequency of flow was significantly reduced after 1 year compared with baseline values. This finding suggests the need for further education to increase the frequency of flow among male OTS.

  10. The experience of flow and subjective well-being of music students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara Smolej Fritz

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available In the present study we were interested in the concept of flow – an optimal psychical state which is connected with high achievement and positive experiences. It was supposed that experiencing flow during different musical activities (e. g., rehearsals, solo performance, performance with the orchestra should be related to subjective well being, common in life. Eighty-four students of the Academy ofMusic (28 male and 56 female completed the Positive Affect Negative Affect Schedule (PANAS, the Satisfaction with Life Scale (SWLS and the Dispositional Flow Scale (DFS-2, which measures nine dimensions of flow. Results confirmed that several aspects of flow are positively related to measures of subjective well being. Clear goals, challenge-skill balance, concentration on the task, and autotelicexperience are important predictors of positive affect, explaining 36% of its variance, challenge-skill balance is an important predictor for negative affect, explaining 26% of its variance, and clear goals is an important predictor for satisfaction with life, explaining 8% of its variance. We conclude that experiencing flow is more related to emotional than cognitive aspects of subjective well being, which is not surprising, since flow is an extremely emotional experience.

  11. An Improved Distortion Operator for Insurance Risks

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GAO Jian-wei; QIU Wan-hua

    2002-01-01

    This paper reviews the distortion function approach developed in the actuarial literature for insurance risks. The main aim of this paper is to derive an extensive distortion operator, and to propose a new premium principle based on this extensive distortion operator. Furthermore, the non-robustness of general distortion operator is also discussed. Examples are provided using Bernoulli, Pareto, Lognormal and Gamma distribution assumptions.

  12. Cryogenic holographic distortion testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michel, David G.

    1994-06-01

    Hughes cryogenic holographic test facility allows for the rapid characterization of optical components and mechanical structures at elevated and reduced temperatures. The facility consists of a 1.6 meter diameter thermal vacuum chamber, vibration isolated experiment test platform, and a holographic camera assembly. Temperatures as low as 12 Kelvin and as high as 350 Kelvin have been demonstrated. Complex aspheric mirrors are tested without the need for auxiliary null lenses and may be tested in either the polished or unpolished state. Structural elements such as optical benches, solar array panels, and spacecraft antennas have been tested. Types of materials tested include beryllium, silicon carbide, aluminum, graphite epoxy, silicon/aluminum matrix material and injection molded plastics. Sizes have ranged from 7 cm X 15 cm to 825 cm X 1125 cm and have weighed as little as 0.2 Kg and as much as 130 Kg. Surface figure changes as little as (lambda) /10 peak-to-valley ((lambda) equals .514 micrometers ) are routinely measured.

  13. Impact of flow velocity on biochemical processes – a laboratory experiment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Boisson

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Understanding and predicting hydraulic and chemical properties of natural environments are current crucial challenges. It requires considering hydraulic, chemical and biological processes and evaluating how hydrodynamic properties impact on biochemical reactions. In this context, an original laboratory experiment to study the impact of flow velocity on biochemical reactions along a one-dimensional flow streamline has been developed. Based on the example of nitrate reduction, nitrate-rich water passes through plastic tubes at several flow velocities (from 6.2 to 35 mm min−1, while nitrate concentration at the tube outlet is monitored for more than 500 h. This experimental setup allows assessing the biologically controlled reaction between a mobile electron acceptor (nitrate and an electron donor (carbon coming from an immobile phase (tube that produces carbon during its degradation by microorganisms. It results in observing a dynamic of the nitrate transformation associated with biofilm development which is flow-velocity dependent. It is proposed that the main behaviors of the reaction rates are related to phases of biofilm development through a simple analytical model including assimilation. Experiment results and their interpretation demonstrate a significant impact of flow velocity on reaction performance and stability and highlight the relevance of dynamic experiments over static experiments for understanding biogeochemical processes.

  14. Innovative Liner Concepts: Experiments and Impedance Modeling of Liners Including the Effect of Bias Flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Jeff; Betts, Juan Fernando; Fuller, Chris

    2000-01-01

    The study of normal impedance of perforated plate acoustic liners including the effect of bias flow was studied. Two impedance models were developed by modeling the internal flows of perforate orifices as infinite tubes with the inclusion of end corrections to handle finite length effects. These models assumed incompressible and compressible flows, respectively, between the far field and the perforate orifice. The incompressible model was used to predict impedance results for perforated plates with percent open areas ranging from 5% to 15%. The predicted resistance results showed better agreement with experiments for the higher percent open area samples. The agreement also tended to deteriorate as bias flow was increased. For perforated plates with percent open areas ranging from 1% to 5%, the compressible model was used to predict impedance results. The model predictions were closer to the experimental resistance results for the 2% to 3% open area samples. The predictions tended to deteriorate as bias flow was increased. The reactance results were well predicted by the models for the higher percent open area, but deteriorated as the percent open area was lowered (5%) and bias flow was increased. A fit was done on the incompressible model to the experimental database. The fit was performed using an optimization routine that found the optimal set of multiplication coefficients to the non-dimensional groups that minimized the least squares slope error between predictions and experiments. The result of the fit indicated that terms not associated with bias flow required a greater degree of correction than the terms associated with the bias flow. This model improved agreement with experiments by nearly 15% for the low percent open area (5%) samples when compared to the unfitted model. The fitted model and the unfitted model performed equally well for the higher percent open area (10% and 15%).

  15. Optimal Experience and Personal Growth: Flow and the Consolidation of Place Identity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonaiuto, Marino; Mao, Yanhui; Roberts, Scott; Psalti, Anastasia; Ariccio, Silvia; Ganucci Cancellieri, Uberta; Csikszentmihalyi, Mihaly

    2016-01-01

    This study examined the relationship between flow experience and place identity, based on eudaimonistic identity theory (EIT) which prioritizes self-defining activities as important for an individual’s identification of his/her goals, values, beliefs, and interests corresponding to one’s own identity development or enhancement. This study focuses on place identity, the identity’s features relating to a person’s relation with her/his place. The study is also based on flow theory, according to which some salient features of an activity experience are important for happiness and well-being. Questionnaire surveys on Italian and Greek residents focused on their perceived flow and place identity in relation to their own specific local place experiences. The overall findings revealed that flow experience occurring in one’s own preferred place is widely reported as resulting from a range of self-defining activities, irrespective of gender or age, and it is positively and significantly associated with one’s own place identity. Such findings provide the first quantitative evidence about the link between flow experienced during meaningfully located self-defining activities and identity experienced at the place level, similarly to the corresponding personal and social levels that had been previously already empirically tested. Results are also discussed in terms of their implications for EIT’s understanding and enrichment, especially by its generalization from the traditional, personal identity level up to that of place identity. More generally, this study has implications for maintaining or enhancing one’s own place identity, and therefore people–place relations, by means of facilitating a person’s flow experience within psychologically meaningful places. PMID:27872600

  16. The NASA Juncture Flow Experiment: Goals, Progress, and Preliminary Testing (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rumsey, Christopher L.; Neuhart, Danny H.; Kegerise, Michael A.

    2016-01-01

    NASA has been working toward designing and conducting a juncture flow experiment on a wing-body aircraft configuration. The experiment is planned to provide validation-quality data for CFD that focuses on the onset and progression of a separation bubble near the wing-body juncture trailing edge region. This paper describes the goals and purpose of the experiment. Although currently considered unreliable, preliminary CFD analyses of several different configurations are shown. These configurations have been subsequently tested in a series of "risk-reduction" wind tunnel tests, in order to help down-select to a final configuration that will attain the desired flow behavior. The risk-reduction testing at the higher Reynolds number has not yet been completed (at the time of this writing), but some results from one of the low-Reynolds-number experiments are shown.

  17. Laboratory setup and results of experiments on two-dimensional multiphase flow in porous media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McBride, J.F. (ed.) (Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (USA)); Graham, D.N. (ed.); Schiegg, H.O. (SIMULTEC Ltd., Meilen/Zurich (Switzerland))

    1990-10-01

    In the event of an accidental release into earth's subsurface of an immiscible organic liquid, such as a petroleum hydrocarbon or chlorinated organic solvent, the spatial and temporal distribution of the organic liquid is of great interest when considering efforts to prevent groundwater contamination or restore contaminated groundwater. An accurate prediction of immiscible organic liquid migration requires the incorporation of relevant physical principles in models of multiphase flow in porous media; these physical principles must be determined from physical experiments. This report presents a series of such experiments performed during the 1970s at the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology (ETH) in Zurich, Switzerland. The experiments were designed to study the transient, two-dimensional displacement of three immiscible fluids in a porous medium. This experimental study appears to be the most detailed published to date. The data obtained from these experiments are suitable for the validation and test calibration of multiphase flow codes. 73 refs., 140 figs.

  18. MATHEMATICAL SIMULATION OF WELDING DISTORTIONS IN THIN PLATES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Afshin Kheidari Monfared

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Welding is a crucial manufacturing process and widely used for manufacturing various products including ships, automobiles, trains and bridges. Welding distortions often occur in welded structures of thin plates due to relatively low stiffness and result in their warpage during assembly process and high manufacturing cost. Therefore, prediction and reduction of welding distortions are important in order to improve quality of welded structures. Welding distortion during the assembly process is caused not only by local shrinkage due to rapid heating and cooling. 3-D thermo-elastic-plastic finite element method (FEM has been used to simulate single-bead-on-plate welding with 1 mm thickness. Experiments have been carried out to prove the simulated results. Comparison of the experimental results and FEM simulation results has confirmed that the proposed method efficiently  predicts level of  welding distortions while making single-bead-on-plate welding with 1 mm thickness.

  19. Visual feedback distortion in a robotic environment for hand rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brewer, Bambi Roberts; Klatzky, Roberta; Matsuoka, Yoky

    2008-04-15

    Robotic therapy offers a means of enhancing rehabilitation for individuals with chronic stroke or traumatic brain injury. The present research targets members of this population who demonstrate learned nonuse, a tendency to use affected limbs below the level of the individual's true capability. These individuals may not strive for difficult goals in therapy, which ultimately hampers their progress and the outcome of rehabilitation. Our research uses a paradigm called visual feedback distortion in which the visual feedback corresponding to force or distance is gradually changed by an imperceptible amount to encourage improved performance. Our first set of experiments was designed to assess the limits of imperceptible distortion for visual feedback concerning the force exerted or the distance moved by the index finger. A second set of experiments used these limits to gradually distort visual feedback in order to manipulate a subject's force or distance response. Based on this work, we designed a paradigm applying visual feedback distortion to the rehabilitation of individuals with chronic stroke and traumatic brain injury. Initial tests are reported for two subjects who participated in a six-week rehabilitation protocol. Each patient followed visual feedback distortion to levels of performance above that predicted by her performance during an initial assessment. Both patients showed functional improvements after participating in the study. Visual feedback distortion may provide a way to help a patient move beyond his or her self-assessed "best" performance, improving the outcome of robotic rehabilitation.

  20. Volterra Series Based Distortion Effect

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Agerkvist, Finn T.

    2010-01-01

    A large part of the characteristic sound of the electric guitar comes from nonlinearities in the signal path. Such nonlinearities may come from the input- or output-stage of the amplier, which is often equipped with vacuum tubes or a dedicated distortion pedal. In this paper the Volterra series e...

  1. The thermal distortion of continuous-casting billet molds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samarasekera, I. V.; Anderson, D. L.; Brimacombe, J. K.

    1982-03-01

    Preliminary mathematical analyses involving plate bending theory and two-dimensional elastic calculations have revealed that the dominant component contributing to the distortion of continuous-casting billet molds is thermal expansion in the transverse directions. A three-dimensional, elasto-plastic, finite-element analysis of the mold wall has then shown that localized yielding initiates in a region close to the meniscus. The plastic flow is a result of the high thermal stresses induced by the geometric restraint to bending coupled with the locally high temperatures. The resultant distortion profile of the mold down the centerline of a face exhibits a maximum outward bulge of 0.1 to 0.3 mm, which is bounded above by a region of negative taper (1˜2 pct/m) and below by a region of positive taper (˜0.4 pct/m). Measurements of mold wall movement in an operating billet caster using linear displacement transducers compare favorably with model predictions, except in the meniscus region. Case studies of several industrial billet molds have shown that lowering the meniscus level with respect to the location of constraints, or modifying the method of support of the mold tube within its housing so as to reduce the restraint to thermal expansion in the meniscus region, may minimize the extent of permanent distortion. Also, wall thickness can have a significant effect on thermal distortion. Increasing wall thickness results in an increase in both peak wall temperatures and thermal gradients. The former increases the local distortion while the latter causes higher thermal stress levels and possibly permanent distortion. Of the casting variables that can be manipulated to major advantage, cooling water flow rate is the most important. Increasing the water velocity reduces mold wall temperatures, as well as both the total and permanent distortion of the wall.

  2. Biomat flow: fluorescent dye field experiments, pore-scale modeling of flow and transport properties, and field-scale flow models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerke, K.; Sidle, R. C.; Mallants, D.; Vasilyev, R.; Karsanina, M.; Skvortsova, E. B.; Korost, D. V.

    2013-12-01

    Recent studies highlight the important role that the upper litter layer in forest soils (biomat) plays in hillslope and catchment runoff generation. This biomat layer is a very loose material with high porosity and organic content. Direct sampling is usually problematic due to limited layer thickness. Conventional laboratory measurements can mobilize solids or even cause structure failure of the sample thus making measurements unreliable. It is also difficult to assess local variation in soil properties and transition zones using these methods; thus, they may not be applicable to biomat studies. However, if the physics of flow through this layer needs to be quantified and incorporated into a model, a detailed study of hydraulic properties is necessary. Herein we show the significance of biomat flow by staining experiments in the field, study its structure and transition to mineral soil layer using X-ray micro-tomography, assess hydraulic properties and structure differences using a pore-scale modeling approach, and, finally, use conventional variably-saturated flow modeling based on Richards equation to simulate flow in the hillslope. Using staining tracers we show that biomat flow in forested hillslopes can extend long distances (lateral displacement was about 1.2 times larger than for subsurface lateral flow) before infiltration occurs into deeper layers. The three-dimensional structure of an undisturbed sample (4 x 3 x 2.5 cm) of both biomat and deeper consolidated soil was obtained using an X-ray micro-tomography device with a resolution of 15 um. Local hydraulic properties (e.g., permeability and water retention curve) for numerous layers (e.g., transition zones, biomat, mineral soil) were calculated using Stokes flow FDM solution and pore-network modeling. Anisotropy, structure differences, and property fluctuations of different layers were quantified using local porosity analysis and correlation functions. Current results support the hypothesis that small

  3. Initial Clinical Experience: Symmetric-Tip Dialysis Catheter with Helical Flow Characteristics Improves Patient Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Timothy W I; Redmond, Jonas W; Mantell, Mark P; Nadolski, Gregory J; Mondschein, Jeffrey I; Dowd, Michael F; Dagli, Mandeep S; Sudheendra, Deepak; Shlansky-Goldberg, Richard D; Cohen, Raphael D

    2015-10-01

    To report preliminary clinical experience with a new symmetric-tip dialysis catheter compared with a conventional split-tip catheter. Over a 5-month period, patients requiring a tunneled catheter for hemodialysis or undergoing exchange of a dysfunctional dialysis catheter at a tertiary academic medical center were retrospectively analyzed. Patients underwent placement of a VectorFlow or Ash Split Cath catheter at the discretion of the inserting interventional radiologist. Patient demographics, catheter patency, mean blood flow rate, and arterial and venous pressures were compared according to catheter type. Catheter failure was analyzed based on clinical and anatomic variables by using a multivariate Cox proportional-hazards model. A total of 33 VectorFlow and 46 Ash Split Cath catheters were placed. Patients in the VectorFlow group had significantly higher body mass index (P = .013) and Charlson Comorbidity Index (P = .049), as well as more non-internal jugular vein placements. At 120 days, 89% of VectorFlow catheters remained functional, compared with 45% of Ash Split Cath catheters (P = .046). The VectorFlow catheter was associated with 16% lower arterial pressures during dialysis (P = .009); mean blood flow rate was equivalent. On multivariate analysis, the risk of catheter failure was 13.3 times higher in the Ash Split Cath group compared with the VectorFlow group (P = .004). Left-sided catheters were also predictive of catheter failure (relative risk = 5.5; P = .02). The VectorFlow catheter was associated with a significant increase in intervention-free catheter patency compared with the Ash Split Cath catheter, with equivalent flow at lower arterial pressures during dialysis. Copyright © 2015 SIR. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Hydraulic Transport Across Hydrophilic and Hydrophobic Nanopores: Flow Experiments with Water and n-Hexane

    CERN Document Server

    Gruener, Simon; Greulich, Stefanie; Busch, Mark; Huber, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    We experimentally explore pressure-driven flow of water and n-hexane across nanoporous silica (Vycor glass monoliths with 7 or 10 nm pore diameters, respectively) as a function of temperature and surface functionalization (native and silanized glass surfaces). Hydraulic flow rates are measured by applying hydrostatic pressures via inert gases (argon and helium, pressurized up to 70 bar) on the upstream side in a capacitor-based membrane permeability setup. For the native, hydrophilic silica walls, the measured hydraulic permeabilities can be quantitatively accounted for by bulk fluidity provided we assume a sticking boundary layer, i.e. a negative velocity slip length of molecular dimensions. The thickness of this boundary layer is discussed with regard to previous capillarity-driven flow experiments (spontaneous imbibition) and with regard to velocity slippage at the pore walls resulting from dissolved gas. Water flow across the silanized, hydrophobic nanopores is blocked up to a hydrostatic pressure of at l...

  5. Investigating Flow Experience and Scientific Practices During a Mobile Serious Educational Game

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bressler, Denise M.; Bodzin, Alec M.

    2016-10-01

    Mobile serious educational games (SEGs) show promise for promoting scientific practices and high engagement. Researchers have quantified this engagement according to flow theory. This study investigated whether a mobile SEG promotes flow experience and scientific practices with eighth-grade urban students. Students playing the game ( n = 59) were compared with students in a business-as-usual control activity ( n = 120). In both scenarios, students worked in small teams. Data measures included an open-ended instrument designed to measure scientific practices, a self-report flow survey, and classroom observations. The game players had significantly higher levels of flow and scientific practices compared to the control group. Observations revealed that game teams received less whole-class instruction and review compared to the control teams. Game teachers had primarily a guide-on-the-side role when facilitating the game, while control teachers predominantly used didactic instruction when facilitating the control activity. Implications for these findings are discussed.

  6. Experiment and Simulation of Turbulent Flow in Local Scour around a Spur Dyke

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hao ZHANG; Hajime NAKAGAWA; Kenji KAWAIKE; Yasuyuki BABA

    2009-01-01

    The turbulent flow in the local scour hole around a single non-submerged spur dyke is investigated with both experimental and numerical methods.The experiments are conducted under clear-water scour regime with an impermeable spur dyke.The scour geometry and flow velocities are measured in details with a high-resolution laser displacement meter,electro-magnetic velocimetries and PIV (Particle image velocimetry).A 3D non-linear κ-ε model is developed to simulate the complex local flow field around the scour area.The numerical model is formulated using FVM (Finite volume method) on a collocated unstructured mesh,capable of resolving complex geometries and boundaries.It is found that the simulation results are reasonably consistent with those of the experimental measurements.Based on the study results,the nature of the flow structrue around a spur dyke with local scour hole is analyzed.

  7. Embedded-LES and experiment of turbulent boundary layer flow around a floor-mounted cube

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Nina Gall; Koss, Holger; Bennetsen, Jens Chr.

    An Embedded LES approach is used to numerically simulate fluctuating surface pressures on a floor-mounted cube in a turbulent boundary layer flow and compared to wind tunnel experiments. The computation were performed with the CFD software ANSYS FLUENT at a Reynolds number at cube height of Reh = 1...

  8. Empirical study on flow experience in China tourism e-commerce market

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianling Wang

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: While tourism e-commerce develops rapidly in China, these channels are truly new to both web providers and web consumers, understanding the nature of these media attaches greater importance. This study investigates the mediation effects of flow experience on the relationship between motivation and behavior intention in tourism e-commerce.Design/methodology/approach: Based on the technology acceptance model, an empirical study is designed to test this relationship.we estimated the measurement model with 13 manifest indicators and 4 latent constructs by CFA to assess the reliability and validity of the construct measures, then tested hypotheses by OLS regression and a formal three-step mediation procedure.Findings: Overall, the results reveal that trust is incorporated in motivation and play it’s role together with other motivations; telepresence and concentration are confirmed in flow experience, and both partially mediated the relationship.Research limitations/implications: This study demonstrates that to improve consumers’ usage adoption, marketers should pay much attention to not only consumers’ motivation but also the areas such as flow experience.Originality/value: This study takes flow experience as a new perspective to explore china tourism e-commerce, estimates its measurement and tests its roles between motivation and behavior intention.

  9. Fifth Graders' Flow Experience in a Digital Game-Based Science Learning Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Meixun

    2012-01-01

    This mixed methods study examined the flow experience of 5th graders in the CRYSTAL ISLAND game-based science learning environment. Participants were 73 5th graders from a suburban public school in the southeastern US. Quantitative data about students' science content learning and attitudes towards science was collected via pre-and post…

  10. Intermediate-Scale Laboratory Experiments of Subsurface Flow and Transport Resulting from Tank Leaks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oostrom, Martinus; Wietsma, Thomas W.

    2014-09-30

    Washington River Protection Solutions contracted with Pacific Northwest National Laboratory to conduct laboratory experiments and supporting numerical simulations to improve the understanding of water flow and contaminant transport in the subsurface between waste tanks and ancillary facilities at Waste Management Area C. The work scope included two separate sets of experiments: •Small flow cell experiments to investigate the occurrence of potential unstable fingering resulting from leaks and the limitations of the STOMP (Subsurface Transport Over Multiple Phases) simulator to predict flow patterns and solute transport behavior under these conditions. Unstable infiltration may, under certain conditions, create vertically elongated fingers potentially transporting contaminants rapidly through the unsaturated zone to groundwater. The types of leak that may create deeply penetrating fingers include slow release, long duration leaks in relatively permeable porous media. Such leaks may have occurred below waste tanks at the Hanford Site. •Large flow experiments to investigate the behavior of two types of tank leaks in a simple layered system mimicking the Waste Management Area C. The investigated leaks include a relatively large leak with a short duration from a tank and a long duration leak with a relatively small leakage rate from a cascade line.

  11. High School Physical Education: What Contributes to the Experience of Flow?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stormoen, Sidsel; Urke, Helga Bjørnøy; Tjomsland, Hege Eikeland; Wold, Bente; Diseth, Åge

    2016-01-01

    This study seeks to identify factors that promote positive experiences in high school physical education (PE). The study combines elements of Self-determination Theory (SDT) with the theory of "flow". Special attention is given to gender differences. The study sample consisted of 167 Norwegian senior high school students (78 females and…

  12. Foam Flow Experiments. I. Estimation of the Bubble generation-Coalescence Function

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thorat, R.R.; Bruining, H.

    2016-01-01

    Gas injection leads to foam formation in porous media in the presence of surfactant solutions, which is used for flow diversion and enhanced oil recovery. We present here laboratory experiments of co-injecting nitrogen and sodium C14−16 alpha olefin sulfonate with two concentrations: 20× the critica

  13. Flow among Music Teachers and Their Students: The Crossover of Peak Experiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakker, Arnold B.

    2005-01-01

    This study among 178 music teachers and 605 students from 16 different music schools examined the peak experience of flow (Csikszentmihalyi, 1990). On the basis of the literature, it is hypothesized that job resources, including autonomy, performance feedback, social support, and supervisory coaching have a positive influence on the balance…

  14. New experiment in Plane Poiseuille flow with zero mean advection velocity: observation of stationary turbulent spots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klotz, Lukasz; Lemoult, Gregoire; Wesfreid, Jose Eduardo

    2015-11-01

    We describe a new experimental set-up which allows us to study the sub-critical transition to turbulence in a two dimensional shear flow (including plane Couette, plane Couette-Poiseuille and plane Poiseuille flows). Our facility is an extension of a classical plane Couette experiment, in which one uses a single closed loop of plastic belt to generate the opposite sign velocity at each wall of the test section. However, in our case, we use two independent closed loops of plastic belt, one at each wall of the test section. The speed of these belts may be controlled separately. That enables to set two different velocities (in value and direction) as a boundary conditions at each of two test section's walls. In addition the pressure gradient in streamwise direction can be controlled. In particular, the plane Poiseuille flow with zero mean advection velocity can be created. We characterize by PIV the basic flow for different configurations. For a plane Poiseuille flows as base flow, we were able to observe for the first time the nearly stationary turbulent spots in this flow, with structures of characteristic wavelength ~ the distance between the two plates.

  15. Granular and particle-laden flows: from laboratory experiments to field observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delannay, R.; Valance, A.; Mangeney, A.; Roche, O.; Richard, P.

    2017-02-01

    This review article provides an overview of dry granular flows and particle fluid mixtures, including experimental and numerical modeling at the laboratory scale, large scale hydrodynamics approaches and field observations. Over the past ten years, the theoretical and numerical approaches have made such significant progress that they are capable of providing qualitative and quantitative estimates of particle concentration and particle velocity profiles in steady and fully developed particulate flows. The next step which is currently developed is the extension of these approaches to unsteady and inhomogeneous flow configurations relevant to most of geophysical flows. We also emphasize that the up-scaling from laboratory experiments to large scale geophysical flows still poses some theoretical physical challenges. For example, the reduction of the dissipation that is responsible for the unexpected long run-out of large scale granular avalanches is not observed at the laboratory scale and its physical origin is still a matter of debate. However, we believe that the theoretical approaches have reached a mature state and that it is now reasonable to tackle complex particulate flows that incorporate more and more degrees of complexity of natural flows.

  16. Non-Darcian flow experiments of shear-thinning fluids through rough-walled rock fractures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez de Castro, Antonio; Radilla, Giovanni

    2016-11-01

    Understanding non-Darcian flow of shear-thinning fluids through rough-walled rock fractures is of vital importance in a number of industrial applications such as hydrogeology or petroleum engineering. Different laws are available to express the deviations from linear Darcy law due to inertial pressure losses. In particular, Darcy's law is often extended through addition of quadratic and cubic terms weighted by two inertial coefficients depending on the strength of the inertia regime. The relations between the effective shear viscosity of the fluid and the apparent viscosity in porous media when inertial deviations are negligible were extensively studied in the past. However, only recent numerical works have investigated the superposition of both inertial and shear-thinning effects, finding that the same inertial coefficients obtained for non-Darcian Newtonian flow applied in the case of shear-thinning fluids. The objective of this work is to experimentally validate these results, extending their applicability to the case of rough-walled rock fractures. To do so, flow experiments with aqueous polymer solutions have been conducted using replicas of natural fractures, and the effects of polymer concentration, which determine the shear rheology of the injected fluid, have been evaluated. Our findings show that the experimental pressure loss-flow rate data for inertial flow of shear-thinning fluids can be successfully predicted from the empirical parameters obtained during non-Darcian Newtonian flow and Darcian shear-thinning flow in a given porous medium.

  17. TPC track distortions IV: post tenebras lux

    CERN Document Server

    Ammosov, V; Boyko, I; Chelkov, G; Dedovitch, D; Dydak, F; Elagin, A; Gostkin, M; Guskov, A; Koreshev, V; Krumshtein, Z; Nefedov, Y; Nikolaev, K; Wotschack, J; Zhemchugov, A

    2007-01-01

    We present a comprehensive discussion and summary of static and dynamic track distortions in the HARP TPC in terms of physical origin, mathematical modelling and correction algorithms. `Static' distortions are constant with time, while `dynamic' distortions are distortions that occur only during the 400 ms long accelerator spill. The measurement of dynamic distortions, their mathematical modelling and the correction algorithms build on our understanding of static distortions. In the course of corroborating the validity of our static distortion corrections, their reliability and precision was further improved. Dynamic TPC distortions originate dominantly from the `stalactite' effect: a column of positive-ion charge starts growing at the begin of the accelerator spill, and continues growing with nearly constant velocity out from the sense-wire plane into the active TPC volume. However, the `stalactite' effect is not able to describe the distortions that are present already at the start of the spill and which ha...

  18. Word Recognition for Temporally and Spectrally Distorted Materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smith, Sherri L.; Pichora-Fuller, Margaret Kathleen; Wilson, Richard H.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: The purpose of Experiment 1 was to measure word recognition in younger adults with normal hearing when speech or babble was temporally or spectrally distorted. In Experiment 2, older listeners with near-normal hearing and with hearing loss (for pure tones) were tested to evaluate...... their susceptibility to changes in speech level and distortion types. The results across groups and listening conditions were compared to assess the extent to which the effects of the distortions on word recognition resembled the effects of age-related differences in auditory processing or pure-tone hearing loss...... were evaluated in four conditions using the Words-in-Noise test in combinations of unaltered or jittered speech and unaltered or jittered babble. In Experiment 2, word recognition in quiet and in babble was measured in 72 older adults with near-normal hearing and 72 older adults with hearing loss...

  19. Changes in air flow patterns using surfactants and thickeners during air sparging: bench-scale experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Juyoung; Kim, Heonki; Annable, Michael D

    2015-01-01

    Air injected into an aquifer during air sparging normally flows upward according to the pressure gradients and buoyancy, and the direction of air flow depends on the natural hydrogeologic setting. In this study, a new method for controlling air flow paths in the saturated zone during air sparging processes is presented. Two hydrodynamic parameters, viscosity and surface tension of the aqueous phase in the aquifer, were altered using appropriate water-soluble reagents distributed before initiating air sparging. Increased viscosity retarded the travel velocity of the air front during air sparging by modifying the viscosity ratio. Using a one-dimensional column packed with water-saturated sand, the velocity of air intrusion into the saturated region under a constant pressure gradient was inversely proportional to the viscosity of the aqueous solution. The air flow direction, and thus the air flux distribution was measured using gaseous flux meters placed at the sand surface during air sparging experiments using both two-, and three-dimensional physical models. Air flow was found to be influenced by the presence of an aqueous patch of high viscosity or suppressed surface tension in the aquifer. Air flow was selective through the low-surface tension (46.5 dyn/cm) region, whereas an aqueous patch of high viscosity (2.77 cP) was as an effective air flow barrier. Formation of a low-surface tension region in the target contaminated zone in the aquifer, before the air sparging process is inaugurated, may induce air flow through the target zone maximizing the contaminant removal efficiency of the injected air. In contrast, a region with high viscosity in the air sparging influence zone may minimize air flow through the region prohibiting the region from de-saturating.

  20. Characterizing soil preferential flow using iodine--starch staining experiments and the active region model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sheng, Feng; Wang, Kang; Zhang, Renduo; Liu, Hui-Hai

    2009-03-01

    Thirteen iodine-starch staining experiments with different boundary conditions and measurement scales were conducted at two sites to study preferential flow processes in natural unsaturated soils. Digital imaging analyses were implemented to obtain the corresponding preferential flow patterns. The test results are used to evaluate a recently proposed active region model in terms of its usefulness and robustness for characterizing unsaturated flow processes at field scale. Test results provide useful insights into flow patterns in unsaturated soils. They show that flow pattern depends on the top boundary condition. As the total infiltrating-water depth increased form 20 mm to 80 mm for the 100 x 100 cm{sup 2} plots, the corresponding flow pattern changed from few preferential flow paths associated with a relatively small degree of stained coverage and a small infiltration depth, to a pattern characterized by a higher stained coverage and a larger infiltration depth, and to (finally) a relatively homogeneous flow pattern with few unstained area and a much larger infiltration depth. Test results also show that the preferential flow pattern became generally more heterogeneous and complex for a larger measurement scale (or size of infiltration plot). These observations support the general idea behind the active region model that preferential flow pattern in unsaturated soils are dynamic and depend on water flow conditions. Further analyses of the test results indicate that the active-region model is able to capture the major features of the observed flow pattern at the scale of interest, and the determined parameter values do not significantly depend on the test conditions (initial water content and total amount of infiltrating water) for a given test site. This supports the validity of the active region model that considers that parameter to be a property of the corresponding unsaturated soil. Results also show that some intrinsic relation seems to exist between active

  1. Coherence Imaging Measurements of Impurity Flow in the Compact Toroidal Hybrid Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ennis, D. A.; Hartwell, G. J.; Johnson, C. A.; Maurer, D. A.; Allen, S. L.; Meyer, W. H.; Samuell, C. M.

    2016-10-01

    Measurements of impurity ion emissivity and velocity in the Compact Toroidal Hybrid (CTH) experiment are achieved with a new optical coherence imaging diagnostic. The Coherence Imaging Spectroscopy (CIS) technique measures the spectral coherence of an emission line with an imaging interferometer of fixed delay. CIS has a number of advantages when compared to dispersive Doppler spectroscopy, including higher throughput and the capability to provide 2D spectral images, making it ideal for investigating the non-axisymmetric geometry of CTH plasmas. Furthermore, detailed measurements of the ion flow structure provided by CIS combined with predictive computational models could also provide spatially resolved images of complex flow structures, such as those associated with an island divertor. First CIS measurements of CTH plasmas reveal strong signals for C III (465 nm), He II (468 nm) and C II (513 nm) emission. Preliminary analysis of C III interferograms indicate a net toroidal flow on the order of 10 km/s during the time of peak current. Bench tests using Zn and Cd light sources reveal that the temperature of the instrument must be actively controlled to within 0.01°C to limit phase drift of the interferometer resulting in artificially measured flow. Results from this diagnostic will aid in characterizing the ion flow in planned island divertor and MHD mode-locking experiments. Work supported by USDoE Grant DE-FG02-00ER54610.

  2. Nonlinear stability of cylindrical shells subjected to axial flow: Theory and experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karagiozis, K. N.; Païdoussis, M. P.; Amabili, M.; Misra, A. K.

    2008-01-01

    This paper, is concerned with the nonlinear dynamics and stability of thin circular cylindrical shells clamped at both ends and subjected to axial fluid flow. In particular, it describes the development of a nonlinear theoretical model and presents theoretical results displaying the nonlinear behaviour of the clamped shell subjected to flowing fluid. The theoretical model employs the Donnell nonlinear shallow shell equations to describe the geometrically nonlinear structure. The clamped beam eigenfunctions are used to describe the axial variations of the shell deformation, automatically satisfying the boundary conditions and the circumferential continuity condition exactly. The fluid is assumed to be incompressible and inviscid, and the fluid-structure interaction is described by linear potential flow theory. The partial differential equation of motion is discretized using the Galerkin method and the final set of ordinary differential equations are integrated numerically using a pseudo-arclength continuation and collocation techniques and the Gear backward differentiation formula. A theoretical model for shells with simply supported ends is presented as well. Experiments are also described for (i) elastomer shells subjected to annular (external) air-flow and (ii) aluminium and plastic shells with internal water flow. The experimental results along with the theoretical ones indicate loss of stability by divergence with a subcritical nonlinear behaviour. Finally, theory and experiments are compared, showing good qualitative and reasonable quantitative agreement.

  3. Experiments on a Steady Low Reynolds Number Airfoil in a Shear Flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, David; Naguib, Ahmed; Koochesfahani, Manoochehr

    2016-11-01

    The aerodynamics of steady airfoils in uniform flow have received considerably more attention than that of an airfoil operating in a non-uniform flow. Inviscid theory by Tsien (1943) shows that an airfoil experiences a decrease in the zero lift angle of attack for a shear flow with uniform clockwise vorticity. The current work utilizes a shaped honeycomb technique to create a velocity profile with a large region of uniform shear in a water tunnel. Direct force measurements are implemented and validated using experiments on a circular cylinder and NACA 0012 in a uniform cross-flow. Results for a NACA 0012 airfoil with a chord Reynolds number of 1.2 ×104 in a non-uniform approach flow are compared to concurrent CFD calculations (presented in a companion talk) showing an increase in the zero lift angle of attack; in contradiction with inviscid theory. The effect of shear on the mean lift coefficient over a wide range of angles of attack is also explored. This work was supported by AFOSR Award Number FA9550-15-1-0224.

  4. Experiments on densely-loaded non-Newtonian slurries in laminar and turbulent pipe flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Joel T.; Mannheimer, Richard J.; Grimley, Terrence A.; Morrow, Thomas B.

    1989-06-01

    An experimental description of the flow structure of non-Newtonian slurries in the laminar, transitional, and fully-developed turbulent pipe flow regimes was the primary objective of this research. Experiments were conducted in a large-scale pipe slurry flow facility with an inside diameter of 51 mm (2 inches). Approximately, 550 liters (145 gal) of slurry were necessary in the operation of the loop. Detailed velocity profile measurements by a two-color, two-component laser Doppler anemometer (LDA) were accomplished in a transparent test section with an optically transparent slurry. These velocity measurements were apparently the first ever reported for a non-Newtonian slurry with a yield value. The transparent slurry was formulated for these experiments from silica with a particle size of one to two microns, mineral oil, and Stoddard solvent. From linear regression analysis of concentric-cylinder viscometer data, the slurry exhibited yield-power-law behavior with a yield stress of 100 dynes/cm(sup 2), and an exponent of 0.630 for a solids concentration of 5.65 percent by weight. Good agreement was attained with rheological data derived from the pressure drop data in the flow loop under laminar flow conditions. The rheological properties of the transparent slurry were similar to many industrial slurries, including coal slurries, which have a yield value.

  5. Investigating Lava Properties using Experiments, Video Analysis, Infrared Thermometry and Numerical Flow Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lev, E.; Spiegelman, M.; Karson, J.; Wysocki, R.

    2012-12-01

    The thermal and mechanical properties of lava provide primary controls on lava flow behavior and are critical parameters in flow simulations. However, these properties are difficult to measure at field conditions or correctly extrapolate from the scale of small-size samples. We address this challenge by conducting controlled experiments using lab-made, meter scale basaltic lava flows and carefully monitoring their cooling and deformation using high spatial and temporal resolution video and infrared cameras. Our experimental setup is part of the Syracuse University Lava Project (\\url{http://lavaproject.syr.edu}) and includes a large furnace capable of melting up to 450 kg of basalt at temperatures well above the basalt liquidus. The lava is poured onto tilted planes or channels made of sand, steel, clay or gravel, to produce meters-long flows. This experimental setup is probably the only facility that allows such large scale controlled lava flows made of natural basaltic material. We record the motion of the lava using a high-resolution video camera placed directly above the flows, and the temperature using forward-looking infrared (FLIR) cameras and thermocouples. After the experiments, we analyze the images for lava deformation and cooling behavior. We compare the observations with numerical forward-models to constrain the thermal and rheological parameters and laws which best describe the lava. For the video analysis, we employ the technique of differential optical flow, which uses the time-variations of the spatial gradients of the image intensity to estimate velocity between consecutive frames. An important benefit for using optical flow, compared with other velocimetry methods, is that it outputs a spatially coherent flow field rather than point measurements. We demonstrate that the optical flow results agree with other measures of the flow velocity, and estimate the error due to noise and time-variability to be under 30 percent of the measured velocity. Our

  6. DEVELOPING AND PROPOSING A CONCEPTUAL MODEL OF THE FLOW EXPERIENCE DURING ONLINE INFORMATION SEARCH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lazoc Alina

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Information search is an essential part of the consumer`s decision making process. The online medium offers new opportunities and challenges for information search activities (in and outside the marketing context. We are interested in the way human information experiences and behaviors are affected by this. Very often online games and social web activities are perceived as challenging, engaging and enjoyable, while online information search is far below this evaluation. Our research proposal implies that using the online medium for information search may provoke enjoyable experiences through the flow state, which may in turn positively influence an individual`s exploratory information behavior and encourage his/her pro-active market behavior. The present study sets out to improve the understanding of the online medium`s impact on human`s exploratory behavior. We hypothesize that the inclusion of the online flow experience in our research model will better explain exploratory information search behaviors. A 11-component conceptual framework is proposed to explain the manifestations of flow, its personal and technological determinants and its behavioral consequence in the context of online information search. Our research has the primary purpose to present an integrated online flow model. Its secondary objective is to stimulate extended research in the area of informational behaviors in the digital age. The paper is organized in three sections. In the first section we briefly report the analysis results of the most relevant online flow theory literature and, drawing on it, we are trying to identify variables and relationships among these. In the second part we propose a research model and use prior flow models to specify a range of testable hypothesis. Drawing on the conceptual model developed, the last section of our study presents the final conclusions and proposes further steps in evaluating the model`s validity. Future research directions

  7. ELABORATING A MEASUREMENT INSTRUMENT FOR THE FLOW EXPERIENCE DURING ONLINE INFORMATION SEARCH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caraivan Luiza

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Flow is a construct imported in marketing research from social sciences in order to examine consumer behavior in the online medium. The construct describes a state of deep involvement in a challenging activity, most frequently characterized by high levels of enjoyment, control and concentration. Researchers found that the degree to which online experience is challenging can be defined, measured, and related well to important marketing variables. As shown by our extensive literature review, flow measurements include antecedents, dimensions and consequences of flow. The present paper represents a detailed description of the construct`s operationalization in the context of online information search. In this respect, our main goal is to produce a basic instrument to evaluate the flow experience of online search, in order to capitalize on the premises of an interactive, complex informational medium – the World Wide Web – and on the consequence of an exploratory informational behavior of users. The instrument is conceived to offer a primal possibility to collect data. The composition, source and significance of the 11 scales used to measure the multiple factors of the flow experience during online search are detailed in this study with the aim to ensure the compliance with scientific rigors and to facilitate correct reports of data related to the reliability and validity of measurements. For further research, we propose factor analysis to test the resulted instrument and to ensure that the measures employed are psychometrically sound. Factor analysis refers to a wide range of statistic techniques used to represent a set of variables in concordance with a reduced number of hypothetical variables called factors. Factorial analysis is used to solve two types of problems: reducing the number of variables to increase data processing speed and identifying hidden patterns in the existent data relations. However, we expect our scales to perform

  8. Mobile Watermarking against Geometrical Distortions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Zhang

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Mobile watermarking robust to geometrical distortions is still a great challenge. In mobile watermarking, efficient computation is necessary because mobile devices have very limited resources due to power consumption. In this paper, we propose a low-complexity geometrically resilient watermarking approach based on the optimal tradeoff circular harmonic function (OTCHF correlation filter and the minimum average correlation energy Mellin radial harmonic (MACE-MRH correlation filter. By the rotation, translation and scale tolerance properties of the two kinds of filter, the proposed watermark detector can be robust to geometrical attacks. The embedded watermark is weighted by a perceptual mask which matches very well with the properties of the human visual system. Before correlation, a whitening process is utilized to improve watermark detection reliability. Experimental results demonstrate that the proposed watermarking approach is computationally efficient and robust to geometrical distortions.

  9. Diagnosing perceptual distortion present in group stereoscopic viewing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burton, Melissa; Pollock, Brice; Kelly, Jonathan W.; Gilbert, Stephen; Winer, Eliot; de la Cruz, Julio

    2012-03-01

    Stereoscopic displays are an increasingly prevalent tool for experiencing virtual environments, and the inclusion of stereo has the potential to improve distance perception within the virtual environment. When multiple users simultaneously view the same stereoscopic display, only one user experiences the projectively correct view of the virtual environment, and all other users view the same stereoscopic images while standing at locations displaced from the center of projection (CoP). This study was designed to evaluate the perceptual distortions caused by displacement from the CoP when viewing virtual objects in the context of a virtual scene containing stereo depth cues. Judgments of angles were distorted after leftward and rightward displacement from the CoP. Judgments of object depth were distorted after forward and backward displacement from the CoP. However, perceptual distortions of angle and depth were smaller than predicted by a ray-intersection model based on stereo viewing geometry. Furthermore, perceptual distortions were asymmetric, leading to different patterns of distortion depending on the direction of displacement. This asymmetry also conflicts with the predictions of the ray-intersection model. The presence of monocular depth cues might account for departures from model predictions.

  10. Hydrodynamic Experiments for a Flow Distribution of a 61-pin Wire-wrapped Rod Bundle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, S. K.; Euh, D. J.; Choi, H. S.; Kim, H. M.; Ko, Y. J.; Lee, D. W.; Lee, H. Y.; Choi, S. R. [KAERI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-05-15

    Fuel assembly of the SFR (Sodium-cooled Fast breeder Reactor) type reactor generally has wire spacers which are wrapped around each fuel pin helically in axial direction. The configuration of a helical wire spacer guarantees the fuel rods integrity by providing the bundle rigidity, proper spacing between rods and promoting coolant mixing between subchannels. It is important to understand the flow characteristics in such a triangular array wire wrapped rod bundle in a hexagonal duct. The experimental work has been undertaken to quantify the friction and mixing parameters which characterize the flow distribution in subchannels for the KAERI's own bundle geometric configuration. This work presents the hydrodynamic experimental results for the flow distribution and the pressure drop in subchannels of a 61-pin wire wrapped rod bundle which has been fabricated considering the hydraulic similarity of the reference reactor. Hydrodynamic experiments for a 61-pin wire wrapped test assembly has been performed to provide the data of a flow distribution and pressure losses in subchannels for verifying the analysis capability of subchannel analysis codes for a KAERI's own prototype SFR reactor. Three type of sampling probes have been specially designed to conserve the shape of the flow area for each type of subchannels. All 126 subchannels have been measured to identify the characteristics of the flow distribution in a 37-pin rod assembly. Pressure drops at the interior and the edge subchannels have been also measured to recognize the friction losses of each type of subchannels.

  11. Vibration response of a pipe subjected to two-phase flow: Analytical formulations and experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ortiz-Vidal, L. Enrique, E-mail: leortiz@sc.usp.br [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Sao Carlos School of Engineering, University of Sao Paulo (USP), Av., Trabalhador São-carlense, 400, 13566-970 São Carlos, SP (Brazil); Mureithi, Njuki W., E-mail: njuki.mureithi@polymtl.ca [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Polytechnique Montreal, Département de Géniemécanique 2900, H3T 1J7 Montreal, QC (Canada); Rodriguez, Oscar M.H., E-mail: oscarmhr@sc.usp.br [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Sao Carlos School of Engineering, University of Sao Paulo (USP), Av., Trabalhador São-carlense, 400, 13566-970 São Carlos, SP (Brazil)

    2017-03-15

    Highlights: • Analytical formulations for two-phase flow-induced vibration (2-FIV) are presented. • Standard deviation of acceleration pipe response is a function of the square of shear velocity. • Peak frequency is correlated to hydrodynamic mass and consequently to void fraction. • Dynamic pipe response increases with increasing mixture velocity and void fraction. • Hydrodynamic mass in 2-FIV in horizontal pipe is proportional to mixture density. - Abstract: This paper treats the two-phase flow-induced vibration in pipes. A broad range of two-phase flow conditions, including bubbly, dispersed and slug flow, were tested in a clamped-clamped straight horizontal pipe. The vibration response of both transversal directions for two span lengths was measured. From experimental results, an in-depth discussion on the nature of the flow excitation and flow-parameters influence is presented. The hydrodynamic mass parameter is also studied. Experimental results suggest that it is proportional to mixture density. On the other hand, two analytical formulations were developed and tested against experimental results. One formulation predicts the quadratic trend between standard deviation of acceleration and shear velocity found in experiments. The other formulation indicates that the peak-frequency of vibration response depends strongly on void fraction. It provides accurate predictions of peak-frequency, predicting 97.6% of the data within ±10% error bands.

  12. Collective Flow and Azimuthally Differential Pion Femtoscopy with the ALICE Experiment at the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Loggins, Vera

    2014-04-15

    Since 2009, the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN) has been conducting experiments in $pp$, Pb-Pb, as well as $p$-Pb collisions with the center of mass energy ranging $\\sqrt{{s}_{NN}}=0.9-5.05$~TeV. In this thesis, both, estimates of background correlations in anisotropic flow, $v_1-v_5$, measurements in Pb-Pb collisions at $\\sqrt{{s}_{NN}}=2.76$~TeV, and azimuthally differential pion femtoscopy of Pb-Pb collisions are reported. Two particle azimuthal correlations are statistically the most precise method of measuring anisotropic flow. The main drawback of this method is its sensitivity to the non-flow correlations, which unlike real flow, do not have geometrical origin. Non-flow contribution can be estimated from two particle azimuthal correlations using $pp$ data. Measurements of the non-flow contribution using the uQ method and Scalar Product (SP) method are reported for $pp$ collisions at $\\sqrt{{s}_{NN}}=2.76$~TeV and $\\sqrt{{s}_{NN}}=7$~TeV for the first ...

  13. Flow rate dictates permeability enhancement during fluid pressure oscillations in laboratory experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Candela, Thibault; Brodsky, Emily E.; Marone, Chris; Elsworth, Derek

    2015-04-01

    Seismic waves have been observed to increase the permeability in fractured aquifers. A detailed, predictive understanding of the process has been hampered by a lack of constraint on the primary physical controls. What aspect of the oscillatory forcing is most important in determining the magnitude of the permeability enhancement? Here we present laboratory results showing that flow rate is the primary control on permeability increases in the laboratory. We fractured Berea sandstone samples under triaxial stresses of tens of megapascals and applied dynamic fluid stresses via pore pressure oscillations. In each experiment, we varied either the amplitude or the frequency of the pressure changes. Amplitude and frequency each separately correlated with the resultant permeability increase. More importantly, the permeability changes correlate with the flow rate in each configuration, regardless of whether flow rate variations were driven by varying amplitude or frequency. We also track the permeability evolution during a single set of oscillations by measuring the phase lags (time delays) of successive oscillations. Interpreting the responses with a poroelastic model shows that 80% of the permeability enhancement is reached during the first oscillation and the final permeability enhancement scales exponentially with the imposed change in flow rate integrated over the rock volume. The establishment of flow rate as the primary control on permeability enhancement from seismic waves opens the door to quantitative studies of earthquake-hydrogeological coupling. The result also suggests that reservoir permeability could be engineered by imposing dynamic stresses and changes in flow rate.

  14. Analogue experiments of salt flow and pillow growth due to basement faulting and differential loading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warsitzka, M.; Kley, J.; Kukowski, N.

    2015-01-01

    Salt flow in sedimentary basins is mainly driven by differential loading and can be described by the concept of hydraulic head. A hydraulic head in the salt layer can be imposed by vertically displacing the salt layer (elevation head) or the weight of overburden sediments (pressure head). Basement faulting in salt-bearing extensional basins is widely acknowledged as a potential trigger for hydraulic heads and the growth of salt structures. In this study, scaled analogue experiments were designed to examine the kinematics of salt flow during the early evolution of a salt structure triggered by basement extension. In order to distinguish flow patterns driven by elevation head or by pressure head, we applied a short pulse of basement extension, which was followed by a long-lasting phase of sedimentation. During the experiments viscous silicone putty simulated ductile rock salt, and a PVC-beads/quartz-sand mixture was used to simulate a brittle supra-salt layer. In order to derive 2-D incremental displacement and strain patterns, the analogue experiments were monitored using an optical image correlation system (particle imaging velocimetry). By varying layer thicknesses and extension rates, the influence of these parameters on the kinematics of salt flow were tested. Model results reveal that significant flow can be triggered in the viscous layer by small-offset basement faulting. During basement extension downward flow occurs in the viscous layer above the basement fault tip. In contrast, upward flow takes place during post-extensional sediment accumulation. Flow patterns in the viscous material are characterized by channelized Poiseuille-type flow, which is associated with subsidence in regions of "salt" expulsion and surface uplift in regions of inflation of the viscous material. Inflation of the viscous material eventually leads to the formation of pillow structures adjacent to the basement faults (primary pillows). The subsidence of peripheral sinks adjacent to

  15. Ubiquitous log odds: a common representation of probability and frequency distortion in perception, action and cognition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hang eZhang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In decision from experience, the source of probability information affects how probability is distorted in the decision task. Understanding how and why probability is distorted is a key issue in understanding the peculiar character of experience-based decision. We consider how probability information is used not just in decision making but also in a wide variety of cognitive, perceptual and motor tasks. Very similar patterns of distortion of probability/frequency information have been found in visual frequency estimation, frequency estimation based on memory, signal detection theory, and in the use of probability information in decision-making under risk and uncertainty. We show that distortion of probability in all cases is well captured as linear transformations of the log odds of frequency and/or probability, a model with a slope parameter and an intercept parameter. We then consider how task and experience influence these two parameters and the resulting distortion of probability. We review how the probability distortions change in systematic ways with task and report three experiments on frequency distortion where the distortions change systematically in the same task. We found that the slope of frequency distortions decreases with the sample size, which is echoed by findings in decision from experience. We review previous models of the representation of uncertainty and find that none can account for the empirical findings.

  16. Ubiquitous Log Odds: A Common Representation of Probability and Frequency Distortion in Perception, Action, and Cognition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hang; Maloney, Laurence T.

    2012-01-01

    In decision from experience, the source of probability information affects how probability is distorted in the decision task. Understanding how and why probability is distorted is a key issue in understanding the peculiar character of experience-based decision. We consider how probability information is used not just in decision-making but also in a wide variety of cognitive, perceptual, and motor tasks. Very similar patterns of distortion of probability/frequency information have been found in visual frequency estimation, frequency estimation based on memory, signal detection theory, and in the use of probability information in decision-making under risk and uncertainty. We show that distortion of probability in all cases is well captured as linear transformations of the log odds of frequency and/or probability, a model with a slope parameter, and an intercept parameter. We then consider how task and experience influence these two parameters and the resulting distortion of probability. We review how the probability distortions change in systematic ways with task and report three experiments on frequency distortion where the distortions change systematically in the same task. We found that the slope of frequency distortions decreases with the sample size, which is echoed by findings in decision from experience. We review previous models of the representation of uncertainty and find that none can account for the empirical findings. PMID:22294978

  17. Pulsar Pair Cascades in a Distorted Magnetic Dipole Field

    CERN Document Server

    Harding, Alice K

    2010-01-01

    We investigate the effect of a distorted neutron star dipole magnetic field on pulsar pair cascade multiplicity and pair death lines. Using a simple model for a distorted dipole field that produces an offset polar cap, we derive the accelerating electric field above the polar cap in space charge limited flow. We find that even a modest azimuthally asymmetric distortion can significantly increase the accelerating electric field on one side of the polar cap and, combined with a smaller field line radius of curvature, leads to larger pair multiplicity. The death line for producing pairs by curvature radiation moves downward in the P-Pdot diagram, allowing high pair multiplicities in a larger percentage of the radio pulsar population. These results could have important implications for the radio pulsar population, high energy pulsed emission and the pulsar contribution to cosmic ray positrons.

  18. Flow Experience During Attentional Training Improves Cognitive Functions in Patients with Traumatic Brain Injury: An Exploratory Case Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazuki Yoshida

    2014-12-01

    Conclusion: The results for Patient A suggested that the flow task was more effective than general OT for improving attention deficits. Moreover, the results for Patient B suggested that the flow task was more effective than the control task. Attention training inducing flow experience may thus facilitate improvement of attention.

  19. Short-range dynamics and prediction of mesoscale flow patterns in the MISTRAL field experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weber, R.O.; Kaufmann, P.; Talkner, P. [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland)

    1997-06-01

    In a limited area of about 50 km by 50 km with complex topography, wind measurements on a dense network were performed during the MISTRAL field experiment in 1991-1992. From these data the characteristic wind fields were identified by an automated classification method. The dynamics of the resulting twelve typical regional flow patterns is studied. It is discussed how transitions between the flow patterns take place and how well the transition probabilities can be described in the framework of a Markov model. Guided by this discussion, a variety of prediction models were tested which allow a short-term forecast of the flow pattern type. It is found that a prediction model which uses forecast information from the synoptic scale has the best forecast skill. (author) 2 figs., 7 refs.

  20. Experiment and Lattice Boltzmann numerical study on nanofluids flow in a micromodel as porous medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meghdadi Isfahani, A. H.; Afrand, Masoud

    2017-10-01

    Al2O3 nanofluids flow has been studied in etched glass micromodel which is idealization of porous media by using a pseudo 2D Lattice Boltzmann Method (LBM). The predictions were compared with experimental results. Pressure drop / flow rate relations have been measured for pure water and Al2O3 nanofluids. Because the size of Al2O3 nanoparticles is tiny enough to permit through the pore throats of the micromodel, blockage does not occur and the permeability is independent of the nanofluid volume fraction. Therefore, the nanofluid behaves as a single phase fluid, and a single phase LBM is able to simulate the results of this experiment. Although the flow in micromodels is 3D, we showed that 2D LBM can be used provided an effective viscous drag force, representing the effect of the third dimension, is considered. Good qualitative and quantitative agreement is seen between the numerical and experimental results.

  1. Long-lasting Science Returns from the Apollo Heat Flow Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagihara, S.; Taylor, P. T.; Williams, D. R.; Zacny, K.; Hedlund, M.; Nakamura, Y.

    2012-12-01

    The Apollo astronauts deployed geothermal heat flow instruments at landing sites 15 and 17 as part of the Apollo Lunar Surface Experiments Packages (ALSEP) in July 1971 and December 1972, respectively. These instruments continuously transmitted data to the Earth until September 1977. Four decades later, the data from the two Apollo sites remain the only set of in-situ heat flow measurements obtained on an extra-terrestrial body. Researchers continue to extract additional knowledge from this dataset by utilizing new analytical techniques and by synthesizing it with data from more recent lunar orbital missions such as the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter. In addition, lessons learned from the Apollo experiments help contemporary researchers in designing heat flow instruments for future missions to the Moon and other planetary bodies. For example, the data from both Apollo sites showed gradual warming trends in the subsurface from 1971 to 1977. The cause of this warming has been debated in recent years. It may have resulted from fluctuation in insolation associated with the 18.6-year-cycle precession of the Moon, or sudden changes in surface thermal environment/properties resulting from the installation of the instruments and the astronauts' activities. These types of re-analyses of the Apollo data have lead a panel of scientists to recommend that a heat flow probe carried on a future lunar mission reach 3 m into the subsurface, ~0.6 m deeper than the depths reached by the Apollo 17 experiment. This presentation describes the authors' current efforts for (1) restoring a part of the Apollo heat flow data that were left unprocessed by the original investigators and (2) designing a compact heat flow instrument for future robotic missions to the Moon. First, at the conclusion of the ALSEP program in 1977, heat flow data obtained at the two Apollo sites after December 1974 were left unprocessed and not properly archived through NASA. In the following decades, heat flow data

  2. Kinematic dynamo simulations of von K\\'arm\\'an flows: application to the VKS experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Pinter, A; Daviaud, F; Leorat, J

    2011-01-01

    The VKS experiment has evidenced dynamo action in a highly turbulent liquid sodium von K\\'arm\\'an flow [R. Monchaux et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. {\\bf 98}, 044502 (2007)]. However, the existence and the onset of a dynamo happen to depend on the exact experimental configuration. By performing kinematic dynamo simulations on real flows, we study their influence on dynamo action, in particular the sense of rotation and the presence of an annulus in the shear layer plane. The 3 components of the mean velocity fields are measured in a water prototype for different VKS configurations through Stereoscopic Particle Imaging Velocimetry. Experimental data are then processed in order to use them in a periodic cylindrical kinematic code. Even if the kinematic predicted mode appears to be different from the experimental saturated one, the results concerning the existence of a dynamo and the thresholds are in qualitative agreement, showing the importance of the flow characteristics.

  3. An experiment-based comparative investigation of correlations for microtube gas flow

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    K Tang; J L Huang; T Jin; M X Wu

    2015-04-01

    An experimental system was built to measure the gas (nitrogen and helium) flow characteristics in circular microchannels with diameters of 50, 20 and 5 m. The Reynolds number of the flow was controlled in the large range of 15 to 2550. The highest Mach number could reach a magnitude of 0.625 and the highest Knudsen number was over 0.021. Four available empirical correlations were comparatively studied, in terms of the influence from compressibility and rarefaction. The accuracy of each correlation was investigated, and qualitative explanations were given according to the essence of fluid dynamics. The compressibility is found to be the dominant parameter in the experiments carried out. The results obtained by gas flow in holey optical fibres are helpful for the design of micro-scale pulse tube cryocoolers.

  4. A viscoplastic lubrication model for entrainment by avalanches and debris flows, and comparison with experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bates, Belinda; Ancey, Christophe

    2015-04-01

    Recently, experiments were designed and carried out examining how a viscoplastic avalanche begins to entrain a shallow layer of identical fluid lying in its path, much like a snow avalanche or mud flow which suddenly encounters an entrainable layer, described as a yield stress material. This represents a simplified problem, investigated in order to gain some physical insight into entrainment by avalanches. These experiments serve as a test for mathematical models of entraining gravity currents. Two classes of entrainment behaviour were observed: either the avalanche ``glided'' out over the entrainable bed, immediately shearing it in the downstream direction and progressively incorporating fluid down to the rigid base, or the avalanche seemed to ``roll'' out onto the entrainable bed, with strong motion in the slope-normal direction in the bed after yield. This difference in behaviour was dictated by the magnitude of the flume's slope. For the steeper flows studied (20 and 24 degrees), entrainment was principally in the former class, whereas for shallower slope angle (12 and 16 degrees) entrainment more closely resembled the latter type. This would suggest that there is a competition between the normal and shear stresses exerted on the bed, with bed-yield and entrainment occurring when these stresses exceed a critical value. An interesting phenomenon that was observed in all cases was a sort of buckling of the bed, downstream of the avalanche front. This was far more significant in the flows down shallower slopes, and regular waves were created in the bed with wavelength dependent on the flow depth. Based on theoretical comparisons with non-entraining Herschel Bulkley flows, the physics of entraining flows are investigated numerically for shallow viscoplastic gravity currents on different slopes. The predictions are compared with the experimental values for velocity field and surface height. The model was successful in reproducing velocities of the correct order, but

  5. Performance of a Low Speed Axial Compressor Rotor Blade Row under Different Inlet Distortions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Taghavi Zenouz

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Responses of an axial compressor isolated rotor blade row to various inlet distortions have been investigated utilizing computational fluid dynamic technique. Distortions have been imposed by five screens of different geometries, but with the same blockage ratio. These screens were embedded upstream of the rotor blade row. Flow fields are simulated in detail for compressor design point and near stall conditions. Performance curves for distorted cases are extracted and compared to the undisturbed case. Flow simulations and consequent performance characteristics show that the worst cases belong to non-symmetric blockages, i.e., those of partial circumferential configurations. These cases produce the largest wakes which can disturb the flow, considerably. Superior performances correspond to the inner and outer continuous circumferential distortion screens. Since, they produce no significant disturbances to the main flow in comparison to the non-symmetric screens.

  6. Development of the Two Phase Flow Separator Experiment for a Reduced Gravity Aircraft Flight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golliher, Eric; Gotti, Daniel; Owens, Jay; Gilkey, Kelly; Pham, Nang; Stehno, Philip

    2016-01-01

    The recent hardware development and testing of a reduced gravity aircraft flight experiment has provided valuable insights for the future design of the Two Phase Flow Separator Experiment (TPFSE). The TPFSE is scheduled to fly within the Fluids Integration Rack (FIR) aboard the International Space Station (ISS) in 2020. The TPFSE studies the operational limits of gas and liquid separation of passive cyclonic separators. A passive cyclonic separator utilizes only the inertia of the incoming flow to accomplish the liquid-gas separation. Efficient phase separation is critical for environmental control and life support systems, such as recovery of clean water from bioreactors, for long duration human spaceflight missions. The final low gravity aircraft flight took place in December 2015 aboard NASA's C9 airplane.

  7. Hydrogen/Oxygen Reactions at High Pressures and Intermediate Temperatures: Flow Reactor Experiments and Kinetic Modeling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hashemi, Hamid; Christensen, Jakob Munkholt; Glarborg, Peter

    A series of experimental and numerical investigations into hydrogen oxidation at high pressures and intermediate temperatures has been conducted. The experiments were carried out in a high pressure laminar flow reactor at 50 bar pressure and a temperature range of 600–900 K. The equivalence ratio......, ignition occurs at the temperature of 775–800 K. In general, the present model provides a good agreement with the measurements in the flow reactor and with recent data on laminar burning velocity and ignition delay time.......A series of experimental and numerical investigations into hydrogen oxidation at high pressures and intermediate temperatures has been conducted. The experiments were carried out in a high pressure laminar flow reactor at 50 bar pressure and a temperature range of 600–900 K. The equivalence ratio......, the mechanism is used to simulate published data on ignition delay time and laminar burning velocity of hydrogen. The flow reactor results show that at reducing, stoichiometric, and oxidizing conditions, conversion starts at temperatures of 750–775 K, 800–825 K, and 800–825 K, respectively. In oxygen atmosphere...

  8. Experiment on smooth, circular cylinders in cross-flow in the critical Reynolds number regime

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miau, J.J.; Tsai, H.W.; Lin, Y.J.; Tu, J.K.; Fang, C.H.; Chen, M.C. [National Cheng Kung University, Department of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Tainan (China)

    2011-10-15

    Experiments were conducted for 2D circular cylinders at Reynolds numbers in the range of 1.73 x 10{sup 5}-5.86 x 10{sup 5}. In the experiment, two circular cylinder models made of acrylic and stainless steel, respectively, were employed, which have similar dimensions but different surface roughness. Particular attention was paid to the unsteady flow behaviors inferred by the signals obtained from the pressure taps on the cylinder models and by a hot-wire probe in the near-wake region. At Reynolds numbers pertaining to the initial transition from the subcritical to the critical regimes, pronounced pressure fluctuations were measured on the surfaces of both cylinder models, which were attributed to the excursion of unsteady flow separation over a large circumferential region. At the Reynolds numbers almost reaching the one-bubble state, it was noted that the development of separation bubble might switch from one side to the other with time. Wavelet analysis of the pressure signals measured simultaneously at {theta} = {+-}90 further revealed that when no separation bubble was developed, the instantaneous vortex-shedding frequencies could be clearly resolved, about 0.2, in terms of the Strouhal number. The results of oil-film flow visualization on the stainless steel cylinder of the one-bubble and two-bubble states showed that the flow reattachment region downstream of a separation bubble appeared not uniform along the span of the model. Thus, the three dimensionality was quite evident. (orig.)

  9. Air purification in a reverse-flow reactor: Model simulations vs. experiments

    OpenAIRE

    Beld, van de, L.; Westerterp, K.R.

    1996-01-01

    The behavior of a reverse-flow reactor was studied for the purification of polluted air by catalytic combustion. A heterogeneous one-dimensional model was extended with a heat balance for the reactor wall. An overall heat transport term is included to account for the small heat losses in radial direction. The calculations are compared to experimental data without using fit parameters. The agreement between simulations and experiments is generally good. Discrepancies can be explained mainly by...

  10. Optimal experience and optimal identity: A multinational study of the associations between flow and social identity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanhui eMao

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Eudaimonistic identity theory posits a link between activity and identity, where a self-defining activity promotes the strength of a person’s identity. An activity engaged in with high enjoyment, full involvement, and high concentration can facilitate the subjective experience of flow. In the present paper, we hypothesised in accordance with the theory of psychological selection that beyond the promotion of individual development and complexity at the personal level, the relationship between flow and identity at the social level is also positive through participation in self-defining activities. Three different samples (i.e., American, Chinese, and Spanish filled in measures for flow and social identity, with reference to four previously self-reported activities, characterized by four different combinations of skills (low versus high and challenges (low versus high. Findings indicated that flow was positively associated with social identity across each of the above samples, regardless of participants’ gender and age. The results have implications for increasing social identity via participation in self-defining group activities that could facilitate flow.

  11. Optimal Experience and Optimal Identity: A Multinational Study of the Associations Between Flow and Social Identity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Yanhui; Roberts, Scott; Pagliaro, Stefano; Csikszentmihalyi, Mihaly; Bonaiuto, Marino

    2016-01-01

    Eudaimonistic identity theory posits a link between activity and identity, where a self-defining activity promotes the strength of a person's identity. An activity engaged in with high enjoyment, full involvement, and high concentration can facilitate the subjective experience of flow. In the present paper, we hypothesized in accordance with the theory of psychological selection that beyond the promotion of individual development and complexity at the personal level, the relationship between flow and identity at the social level is also positive through participation in self-defining activities. Three different samples (i.e., American, Chinese, and Spanish) filled in measures for flow and social identity, with reference to four previously self-reported activities, characterized by four different combinations of skills (low vs. high) and challenges (low vs. high). Findings indicated that flow was positively associated with social identity across each of the above samples, regardless of participants' gender and age. The results have implications for increasing social identity via participation in self-defining group activities that could facilitate flow.

  12. Investigation of Groundwater Flow Variations near a Recharge Pond with Repeat Deliberate Tracer Experiments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jordan F Clark

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Determining hydraulic connections and travel times between recharge facilities and production wells has become increasingly important for permitting and operating managed aquifer recharge (MAR sites, a water supply strategy that transfers surface water into aquifers for storage and later extraction. This knowledge is critical for examining water quality changes and assessing the potential for future contamination. Deliberate tracer experiments are the best method for determining travel times and identifying preferential flow paths between recharge sites over the time scales of weeks to a few years. This paper compares the results of two deliberate tracer experiments at Kraemer Basin, Orange County, CA, USA. Results from the first experiment, which was conducted in October 1998, showed that a region of highly transmissive sedimentary material extends down gradient from the basin for more than 3 km [1]. Mean groundwater velocities were determined to be approximately 2 km/year in this region based on the arrival time of the tracer center of mass. A second experiment was initiated in January 2008 to determine if travel times from this basin to monitoring and production wells changed during the past decade in response to new recharge conditions. Results indicate that flow near Kraemer Basin was stable, and travel times to most wells determined during both experiments agree within the experimental uncertainty.

  13. Stability of quasi-Keplerian Shear Flow in a Laboratory Experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schartman, Ethan; Ji, Hantao; Burin, Michael J.; Goodman, Jeremy

    2012-06-19

    Subcritical transition to turbulence has been proposed as a source of turbulent viscosity required for the associated angular momentum transport for fast accretion in Keplerian disks. Previously cited laboratory experiments in supporting this hypothesis were performed either in a di erent type of flow than Keplerian or without quantitative measurements of angular momentum transport and mean flow profile, and all of them appear to su er from Ekman e ects, secondary flows induced by nonoptimal axial boundary conditions. Such Ekman e ects are expected to be absent from astronomical disks, which probably have stress-free vertical boundaries unless strongly magnetized. Aims. To quantify angular momentum transport due to subcritical hydrodynamic turbulence, if exists, in a quasi-Keplerian flow with minimized Ekman e ects. Methods.We perform a local measurement of the azimuthal-radial component of the Reynolds stress tensor in a novel laboratory apparatus where Ekman e ects are minimized by flexible control of axial boundary conditions. Results.We find significant Ekman e ects on angular momentum transport due to nonoptimal axial boundary conditions in quasi-Keplerian flows. With the optimal control of Ekman e ects, no statistically meaningful angular momentum transport is detected in such flows at Reynolds number up to two millions. Conclusions. Either a subcritical transition does not occur, or, if a subcritical transition does occur, the associated radial transport of angular momentum in optimized quasi-Keplerian laboratory flows is too small to directly support the hypothesis that subcritical hydrodynamic turbulence is responsible for accretion in astrophysical disks. Possible limitations in applying laboratory results to astrophysical disks due to experimental geometry are discussed.

  14. Stability of quasi-Keplerian Shear Flow in a Laboratory Experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schartman, Ethan; Ji, Hantao; Burin, Michael J.; Goodman, Jeremy

    2012-06-19

    Subcritical transition to turbulence has been proposed as a source of turbulent viscosity required for the associated angular momentum transport for fast accretion in Keplerian disks. Previously cited laboratory experiments in supporting this hypothesis were performed either in a di erent type of flow than Keplerian or without quantitative measurements of angular momentum transport and mean flow profile, and all of them appear to su er from Ekman e ects, secondary flows induced by nonoptimal axial boundary conditions. Such Ekman e ects are expected to be absent from astronomical disks, which probably have stress-free vertical boundaries unless strongly magnetized. Aims. To quantify angular momentum transport due to subcritical hydrodynamic turbulence, if exists, in a quasi-Keplerian flow with minimized Ekman e ects. Methods.We perform a local measurement of the azimuthal-radial component of the Reynolds stress tensor in a novel laboratory apparatus where Ekman e ects are minimized by flexible control of axial boundary conditions. Results.We find significant Ekman e ects on angular momentum transport due to nonoptimal axial boundary conditions in quasi-Keplerian flows. With the optimal control of Ekman e ects, no statistically meaningful angular momentum transport is detected in such flows at Reynolds number up to two millions. Conclusions. Either a subcritical transition does not occur, or, if a subcritical transition does occur, the associated radial transport of angular momentum in optimized quasi-Keplerian laboratory flows is too small to directly support the hypothesis that subcritical hydrodynamic turbulence is responsible for accretion in astrophysical disks. Possible limitations in applying laboratory results to astrophysical disks due to experimental geometry are discussed.

  15. Prediction of Part Distortion in Die Casting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    R. Allen Miller

    2005-03-30

    The die casting process is one of the net shape manufacturing techniques and is widely used to produce high production castings with tight tolerances for many industries. An understanding of the stress distribution and the deformation pattern of parts produced by die casting will result in less deviation from the part design specification, a better die design and eventually more productivity and cost savings. This report presents methods that can be used to simulate the die casting process in order to predict the deformation and stresses in the produced part and assesses the degree to which distortion modeling is practical for die casting at the current time. A coupled thermal-mechanical finite elements model was used to simulate the die casting process. The simulation models the effect of thermal and mechanical interaction between the casting and the die. It also includes the temperature dependant material properties of the casting. Based on a designed experiment, a sensitivity analysis was conducted on the model to investigate the effect of key factors. These factors include the casting material model, material properties and thermal interaction between casting and dies. To verify the casting distortion predictions, it was compared against the measured dimensions of produced parts. The comparison included dimensions along and across the parting plane and the flatness of one surface.

  16. A Minimal Solution to Radial Distortion Autocalibration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kukelova, Zuzana; Pajdla, Tomas

    2011-12-01

    Simultaneous estimation of radial distortion, epipolar geometry, and relative camera pose can be formulated as a minimal problem and solved from a minimal number of image points. Finding the solution to this problem leads to solving a system of algebraic equations. In this paper, we provide two different solutions to the problem of estimating radial distortion and epipolar geometry from eight point correspondences in two images. Unlike previous algorithms which were able to solve the problem from nine correspondences only, we enforce the determinant of the fundamental matrix be zero. This leads to a system of eight quadratic and one cubic equation in nine variables. We first simplify this system by eliminating six of these variables and then solve the system by two alternative techniques. The first one is based on the Gröbner basis method and the second one on the polynomial eigenvalue computation. We demonstrate that our solutions are efficient, robust, and practical by experiments on synthetic and real data.

  17. Reflood experiments in rod bundles with flow blockages due to clad ballooning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moon, S.K.; Kim, J.; Kim, K.; Kim, B.J.; Park, J.K.; Youn, Y.J.; Choi, H.S.; Song, C.H. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-07-15

    Clad ballooning and the resulting partial flow blockage are one of the major thermal-hydraulic concerns associated with the coolability of partially blocked cores during a loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA). Several in-pile tests have shown that fuel relocation causes a local power accumulation and a high thermal coupling between the clad and fuel debris in the ballooned regions. However, previous experiments in the 1980s did not take into account the fuel relocation phenomena and resulting local power increase in the ballooned regions. The present paper presents the results of systematic investigations on the coolability of rod bundles with flow blockages. The experiments were mainly performed in 5 x 5 rod bundles, 2 x 2 rod bundles and other test facilities. The experiments include a reflood heat transfer, single-phase convective heat transfer, flow redistributions phenomena, and droplet break-up behavior. The effects of the fuel relocation and resulting local power increase were investigated using a 5 x 5 rod bundle. The fuel relocation phenomena increase the peak cladding temperature.

  18. Science with CMB spectral distortions

    CERN Document Server

    Chluba, Jens

    2014-01-01

    The measurements of COBE/FIRAS have shown that the CMB spectrum is extremely close to a perfect blackbody. There are, however, a number of processes in the early Universe that should create spectral distortions at a level which is within reach of present day technology. In this talk, I will give a brief overview of recent theoretical and experimental developments, explaining why future measurements of the CMB spectrum will open up an unexplored window to early-universe and particle physics with possible non-standard surprises but also several guaranteed signals awaiting us.

  19. Harmonic Distortion in CMOS Current Mirrors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bruun, Erik

    1998-01-01

    One of the origins of harmonic distortion in CMOS current mirrors is the inevitable mismatch between the MOS transistors involved. In this paper we examine both single current mirrors and complementary class AB current mirrors and develop an analytical model for the mismatch induced harmonic...... distortion. This analytical model is verified through simulations and is used for a discussion of the impact of mismatch on harmonic distortion properties of CMOS current mirrors. It is found that distortion levels somewhat below 1% can be attained by carefully matching the mirror transistors but ultra low...... distortion is not achievable with CMOS current mirrors...

  20. Signal processing and statistical descriptive reanalysis of steady state chute-flow experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    truong, hoan; eckert, nicolas; keylock, chris; naaim, mohamed; bellot, hervé

    2014-05-01

    An accurate knowledge of snow rheology is needed for the mitigation against avalanche hazard. Indeed snow avalanches have a significant impact on the livelihoods and economies of alpine communities. To do so, 60 small-scale in-situ flow experiments were performed with various slopes, temperatures and flow depths. The investigation of these data previously seemed to show the dense flow of dry snow may be composed of two layers; a sheared basal layer made of single snow grains and a less sheared upper layer made of large aggregates. These outcomes were mainly based on the mean velocity profile of the flow and on interpretation in terms of rheological behavior of granular materials and snow microstructure [Pierre G. Rognon et al., 2007]. Here, the main objective remains the same, but the rheological and physical viewpoints are put aside to extract as much information contained in the data as possible various using signal processing methods and descriptive statistics methods as the maximum overlap discrete wavelet transform (MODWT), transfer entropy (TE) and maximum cross-correlation (MCC). Specifically, we aim at the improving the velocity estimations as function of the depth particularly the velocity fluctuations around the mean profile to better document the behavior of dense dry snow flows during a steady and uniform chute regime. The data are composed of pairs of voltage signals (right and left), which makes that the velocity is known indirectly only. The MCC method is classically used to determine the time lag between both signals. Previously, the MCC method that showed the mean velocity profile may be fitted by a simple bilinear function [Pierre G. Rognon et al., 2007], but no interesting temporal dynamics could be highlighted. Hence, a new process method was developed to provide velocity series with much better temporal resolution. The process is mainly made of a MODWT-based denoising method and the choice of window size for correlation. The results prove to be

  1. The relationship between personality traits, flow-experience and different aspects of practice behavior of amateur vocal students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katharina eHeller

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Most of the existing studies on musical practice are concerned with instrumentalists only. Since singers are seldom considered in research, the present study is based on an online-sample of amateur vocal students (N = 120; 92 female, 28 male. The study investigated the correlations between personality traits, flow-experience and several aspects of practice characteristics. Personality was represented by the three personality dimensions extraversion, neuroticism and psychoticism, assessed by Eysenck’s Personality Profiler as well as the trait form of the Positive and Negative Affect Schedule. ‘Flow-experience’, ‘self-congruence’ and ‘fear of losing control over concentration’, assessed by the Practice Flow Inventory, served as variables for flow-experience. The practice motivation was measured by the Practice Motivation Questionnaire in four categories (‘self’, ‘group’, ‘audience’, ‘teacher’. In addition, the Practice Behavior Questionnaire was used to provide an insight into the practice situation and behavior of singing students. The results show significant correlations: Participants with high extraversion-scores experience significantly more flow than less extraverted persons, whereas lesser flow-experience seems to be related to high neuroticism-scores. Nevertheless, there is no influence in flow-experience concerning singing style (‘classical’ or ‘popular’. The longer the practicing time, the more likely students are to achieve flow-experience. However, older singers tend to have less flow-experience. Consequently, singers seem to differ in their personality and practice behavior compared to other musicians. Most of the findings show that having control over one’s instrument is decisive for achieving a performance of high quality, especially for singers. On the other hand, certainty in handling an instrument is essential to arouse a flow-feeling. However, flow-experience seems to be common mainly with

  2. Influences of Sediment Viscosity and Bed Slope on Transport and Deposition Characteristics of Debris flow in Flume Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eu, Song; Li, Qiwen; Lee, Eunjai; Im, Sangjun

    2017-04-01

    Debris flow is a rapid flow of soil-water mixture along a confined channel. Implementing mitigation structures against debris flow, such as debris flow barrier or flexible net, is the widely used mitigation strategy to prevent the debris flow hazard. To design those structures enough to endure debris flow events, accurate estimation of flow behavior and hazardous area of debris flow is necessary. In this study, we conducted the small-scale flume experiments to analyze flow behavior and corresponding deposit characteristics according to the slope conditions of flume and viscosity of sediment mixture. In terms of flow characteristics of debris mixtures, there was a positive correlation between flow velocity and flume inclination while slower velocity was observed in higher viscosity of mixture. Results of flow depth, however, showed no significant difference along variation of flume angles and mixture viscosity. The deposit characteristics, including runout length and spreading width, showed a positive correlation with approaching flow velocity. The larger runout length and deposit width were observed in higher flow velocity, and runout length was more sensitive to the change of flow velocity compared to spreading width. (This study was carried out with the support of ´R&D Program for Forestry Technology (Project No. S211316L020110)´ provided by Korea Forest Service.)

  3. Restoration of the Apollo 15 Heat Flow Experiment Data from 1975 to 1977

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagihara, S.; Nakamura, Y.; Taylor, P. T.; Williams, D. R.; Kiefer, W. S.

    2017-01-01

    The Apollo 15 Heat Flow Experiment (HFE) was conducted from July 1971 through January 1977. Two heat flow probes were deployed roughly 8.5 meters apart. Probe 1 and Probe 2 penetrated to 1.4-meters and 1-meter depths into the lunar regolith, respectively. Temperatures at different depths and the surface were logged with 7.25-minute intervals and transmitted to Earth. At the conclusion of the experiment, only data obtained from July 1971 through December 1974 were processed and archived at the National Space Science Data Center (NSSDC) by the principal investigator of the experiment, Marcus Langseth of Columbia University. Langseth died in 1997. It is not known what happened to the HFE data tapes he used. Current researchers have strong interests in re-examining the HFE data for the full duration of the experiment. We have recovered and processed large portions of the Apollo 15 HFE data from 1975 through 1977 by assembling data and metadata from various sources.

  4. Multiple scattering expansion with distortion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tandy, P. C.; Thaler, R. M.

    1980-12-01

    A multiple scattering description of elastic scattering is formulated in terms of impulsive scatterings from single target nucleons and pairs of target nucleons. In this description, distortion effects on the projectile from the residual medium are also described by multiple scattering in terms of the same single and pair amplitudes. At the level of single scattering, this procedure yields the first order optical potential result of Kerman, McManus, and Thaler. When scattering from both single nucleons and pairs of nucleons is included, the method leads to a one-body integral equation which requires the physical projectile-nucleon and projectile-pair transition amplitudes as input. This input is similar, but not exactly equivalent to that required by the spectator expansion for the optical potential truncated at second order. A principal advantage of the present formulation is that there need be no explicit dependence upon the projection operator Q which projects off the target ground state. This feature introduces a scaling which appears to be a direct extension of the first order Kerman, McManus, and Thaler type of scaling. We follow up suggestions arising in the foregoing to show that the exact optical potential to second order in the spectator expansion can also be cast into a form having no explicit dependence upon Q, and requiring physical projectile-nucleon and projectile-pair transition amplitudes as input. NUCLEAR REACTIONS Multiple scattering from single nucleons, pairs of nucleons in nucleus. Distortion from residual medium. Optical potential. spectator expansion.

  5. Biological motion distorts size perception

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veto, Peter; Einhäuser, Wolfgang; Troje, Nikolaus F.

    2017-02-01

    Visual illusions explore the limits of sensory processing and provide an ideal testbed to study perception. Size illusions - stimuli whose size is consistently misperceived - do not only result from sensory cues, but can also be induced by cognitive factors, such as social status. Here we investigate, whether the ecological relevance of biological motion can also distort perceived size. We asked observers to judge the size of point-light walkers (PLWs), configurations of dots whose movements induce the perception of human movement, and visually matched control stimuli (inverted PLWs). We find that upright PLWs are consistently judged as larger than inverted PLWs, while static point-light figures do not elicit the same effect. We also show the phenomenon using an indirect paradigm: observers judged the relative size of a disc that followed an inverted PLW larger than a disc following an upright PLW. We interpret this as a contrast effect: The upright PLW is perceived larger and thus the subsequent disc is judged smaller. Together, these results demonstrate that ecologically relevant biological-motion stimuli are perceived larger than visually matched control stimuli. Our findings present a novel case of illusory size perception, where ecological importance leads to a distorted perception of size.

  6. Biological motion distorts size perception

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veto, Peter; Einhäuser, Wolfgang; Troje, Nikolaus F.

    2017-01-01

    Visual illusions explore the limits of sensory processing and provide an ideal testbed to study perception. Size illusions – stimuli whose size is consistently misperceived – do not only result from sensory cues, but can also be induced by cognitive factors, such as social status. Here we investigate, whether the ecological relevance of biological motion can also distort perceived size. We asked observers to judge the size of point-light walkers (PLWs), configurations of dots whose movements induce the perception of human movement, and visually matched control stimuli (inverted PLWs). We find that upright PLWs are consistently judged as larger than inverted PLWs, while static point-light figures do not elicit the same effect. We also show the phenomenon using an indirect paradigm: observers judged the relative size of a disc that followed an inverted PLW larger than a disc following an upright PLW. We interpret this as a contrast effect: The upright PLW is perceived larger and thus the subsequent disc is judged smaller. Together, these results demonstrate that ecologically relevant biological-motion stimuli are perceived larger than visually matched control stimuli. Our findings present a novel case of illusory size perception, where ecological importance leads to a distorted perception of size. PMID:28205639

  7. Prefrontal hemodynamic responses and the degree of flow experience among occupational therapy students during their performance of a cognitive task

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazuki Hirao

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Although flow experience is positively associated with motivation to learn, the biological basis of flow experience is poorly understood. Accumulation of evidence on the underlying brain mechanisms related to flow is necessary for a deeper understanding of the motivation to learn. The purpose of this study is to investigate the relationship between flow experience and brain function using near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS during the performance of a cognitive task. Methods: Sixty right-handed occupational therapy (OT students participated in this study. These students performed a verbal fluency test (VFT while 2-channel NIRS was used to assess changes in oxygenated hemoglobin concentration (oxygenated hemoglobin [oxy-Hb] in the prefrontal cortex. Soon after that, the OT students answered the flow questionnaire (FQ to assess the degree of flow experience during the VFT. Results: Average oxy-Hb in the prefrontal cortex had a significant negative correlation with the satisfaction scores on the FQ. Conclusion: Satisfaction during the flow experience correlated with prefrontal hemodynamic suppression. This finding may assist in understanding motivation to learn and related flow experience.

  8. Digital image processing for the rectification of television camera distortions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rindfleisch, T. C.

    1971-01-01

    All television systems introduce distortions into the imagery they record which influence the results of quantitative photometric and geometric measurements. Digital computer techniques provide a powerful approach to the calibration and rectification of these systematic effects. Nonlinear as well as linear problems can be attacked with flexibility and precision. Methods which have been developed and applied for the removal of structured system noises and the correction of photometric, geometric, and resolution distortions in vidicon systems are briefly described. Examples are given of results derived primarily from the Mariner Mars 1969 television experiment.

  9. Lens distortion calibration by explicit straight-line to distorted-line geometric mapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xianghai; Kofman, Jonathan

    2004-10-01

    Medium and wide-angle off-shelf cameras are often used in computer-vision applications despite their large lens distortion. Algorithms to correct for radial and tangential distortion are available; however, they often use non-linear optimization search methods that rely on carefully chosen starting points. This paper presents a method to correct for both radial symmetric lens distortion and decentering lens distortion using an iterative geometric approach to find the distortion center, and a closed-form solution for all other distortion parameters. The method is based on deriving an equivalent radial symmetric distortion model that accounts for both radial and tangential distortion. The technique uses the simple geometric relationship between a straight line and its distorted counterpart under this distortion model. The distortion calibration involves firstly determining the axis of symmetry of several distorted lines. The intersection of these axes is then computed and considered as the point of best radial symmetry (PBRS). The inclinations of the axes of symmetry of the distorted lines are then used in a closed-form solution to determine the distortion coefficients. One advantage of this approach is that higher-order coefficients can be included as needed, with their computation still achieved in closed form. The simplicity of the lens distortion calibration technique has been demonstrated in a simulation using synthetic images.

  10. Flume experiments on wind induced flow in static water bodies in the presence of protruding vegetation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Tirtha; Muste, Marian; Katul, Gabriel

    2015-02-01

    The problem of wind-induced flow in inland waters is drawing significant research attention given its relevance to a plethora of applications in wetlands including treatment designs, pollution reduction, and biogeochemical cycling. The present work addresses the role of wind induced turbulence and waves within an otherwise static water body in the presence of rigid and flexible emergent vegetation through flume experimentation and time series analysis. Because no prior example of Particle Imaging Velocimetry (PIV) experiments involving air-water and flexible oscillating components have been found in the literature, a spectral analysis framework is needed and proposed here to guide the analysis involving noise, wave and turbulence separation. The experiments reveal that wave and turbulence effects are simultaneously produced at the air-water interface and the nature of their coexistence is found to vary with different flow parameters including water level, mean wind speed, vegetation density and its flexibility. For deep water levels, signature of fine-scaled inertial turbulence is found at deeper layers of the water system. The wave action appears stronger close to the air-water interface and damped by the turbulence deeper inside the water system. As expected, wave action is found to be dominated in a certain frequency range driven by the wind forcing, while it is also diffused to lower frequencies by means of (wind-induced) oscillations in vegetation. Regarding the mean water velocity, existence of a counter-current flow and its switching to fully forward flow in the direction of the wind under certain combinations of flow parameters were studied. The relative importance of wave and turbulence to the overall energy, degree of anisotropy in the turbulent energy components, and turbulent momentum transport at different depths from the air-water interface and flow combinations were then quantified. The flume experiments reported here differ from previous laboratory

  11. The Effects of Autonomy-Supportive and Controlling Teaching Behaviour in Biology Lessons with Primary and Secondary Experiences on Students' Intrinsic Motivation and Flow-Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofferber, Natalia; Basten, Melanie; Großmann, Nadine; Wilde, Matthias

    2016-01-01

    Self-Determination Theory and Flow Theory propose that perceived autonomy fosters the positive qualities of motivation and flow-experience. Autonomy-support can help to maintain students' motivation in very interesting learning activities and may lead to an increase in the positive qualities of motivation in less interesting learning activities.…

  12. Calculation of flow distribution in large radius ratio stages of axial flow turbines and comparison of theory and experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herzog, J.

    1974-01-01

    A method of calculating stage parameters and flow distribution of axial turbines is described. The governing equations apply to space between the blade rows and are based on the assumption of rotationally symmetrical, compressible, adiabatic flow conditions. Results are presented for stage design and flow analysis calculations. Theoretical results from the calculation system are compared with experimental data from low pressure steam turbine tests.

  13. Laboratory Experiments of Sand Ripples with Bimodal Size Distributions Under Asymmetric Oscillatory Flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calantoni, J.; Landry, B. J.

    2010-12-01

    The dynamics of sand ripples are vital to understanding numerous coastal processes such as sediment transport, wave attenuation, boundary layer development, and seafloor acoustic properties. Though significant laboratory research has been conducted to elucidate oscillatory flow morphodynamics under various constant and transient forcing conditions, the majority of the previous experiments were conducted only for beds with unimodal size distributions of sediment. Recent oscillatory flow experiments as well as past laboratory observations in uniform flows suggest that the presence of heterogeneous size sand compositions may significantly impact ripple morphology, resulting in a variety of observable effects (e.g., sediment sorting, bed armoring, and altered transport rates). Experimental work was conducted in a small oscillatory flow tunnel at the Sediment Dynamics Laboratory at the Naval Research Laboratory, Stennis Space Center. Three different monochromatic oscillatory forcings having velocity asymmetry were used to study sand ripple dynamics over five bimodal and two unimodal sediment beds. The seven different mixtures were composed using two unimodal sands of different colors (blue/white) and median grain diameters (d=0.31 mm / d=0.65 mm) combined into various mixtures by mass (i.e., 0/100; 10/90; 25/75; 50/50; 75/25; 90/10; and 100/0 which denotes mass percentage of blue/white sand, respectively, within each mixture). High-definition video of the sediment bed profile was acquired in conjunction with sediment trap measurements to resolve differences in ripple geometries, migration and evolution rates due to the different sediment mixtures and flow conditions. Observational findings clearly illustrate sediment stratification within ripple crests and the depth of the active mixing layer in addition to supporting sediment sorting in previous research on symmetric oscillatory flows in which the larger grains collect on top of ripple crests and smaller grains in the

  14. Mapping the omega-effect in the DTS magnetized spherical Couette flow experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Nataf, Henri-Claude

    2012-01-01

    The DTS experiment is a spherical Couette flow experiment with an imposed dipolar magnetic field. Liquid sodium is used as a working fluid. In a series of measurement campaigns, we have obtained data on the mean axisymmetric velocity, the mean induced magnetic field and electric potentials. All these quantities are coupled through the induction equation. In particular, a strong omega-effect is produced by differential rotation within the fluid shell, inducing a significant azimuthal magnetic field. Taking advantage of the simple spherical geometry of the experiment, I expand the azimuthal and meridional fields into Legendre polynomials and derive the expressions that permit to relate all measurements to the radial functions of the velocity field for each harmonic degree. For small magnetic Reynolds numbers Rm the relations are linear, and the toroidal and poloidal equations decouple. Selecting a set of measurements for a given rotation frequency of the inner sphere (Rm = 9.4), I invert simultaneously the velo...

  15. Driving Flows in Laboratory Astrophysical Plasma Jets: The Mochi.LabJet Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carroll, Evan G.

    Mochi.Labjet is a new experiment at the University of Washington developed to investigate the interaction of shear flows in plasma jets with boundary conditions similar to an accretion disc system. This thesis details the engineering design and first plasmas of the Mochi.Labjet experiment. The experiment required construction of a new three electrode plasma gun with azimuthal symmetric gas injection, two optically-isolated pulsed power supplies for generating and sustaining plasma, and one optically-isolated pulsed power supply for generating a background magnetic field. Optical isolation is achieved with four custom circuits: the TTL-optical transmitter, optical-TTL receiver, optical-relay, and optical-tachometer circuits. First plasmas, during the commissioning phase of the apparatus, show evidence of flared jet structures with significant azimuthal symmetry.

  16. A virtual experiment on the effect of canopy and forest floor interception on subsurface flow behaviour

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerrits, A. M. J.; Hopp, L.; McDonnell, J. J.; Savenije, H. H. G.; Pfister, L.

    2009-04-01

    From several field experiments we know that the soil moisture distribution is highly heterogeneous on a hillslope, and also lateral subsurface flow appears to develop irregular flow paths along its way downslope. However, knowledge is still lacking on which processes are causing this spatial distribution. One of the possible explanations could be interception. First of all, interception prevents a part of the rainfall to infiltrate in the unsaturated zone, which is immediately fed back to the atmosphere. This fast feedback is highly dependent on the vegetation density, and causes a spread in the distribution of the net rainfall. On the other hand, it appears that vegetation can also funnel rain water, causing hot spots of high infiltration. Finally, interception delays precipitation. Only after the interception storage has been filled, water can find its way down through several storages. To investigate the influence of interception on subsurface flow processes, detailed experimental data is required. Because this data is often not available and new or additional field campaigns are very labour intensive, a virtual experiment can be a helpful tool. A virtual experiment is a numerical experiment driven by collective field intelligence. It provides a learning tool to investigate the effect of separated processes in a complex system. We apply the concept of virtual modelling to investigate the effects of interception on subsurface flow processes. It will enable us to separate the effect of ‘no interception', ‘canopy interception only', and ‘both canopy and forest floor interception'. Furthermore, we shall explore if there occurs a change in flow paths patterns when we use lumped or distributed input data. We use the topography characteristics of the Panola hillslope (Georgia, USA). On this hillslope intensive trench and soil moisture measurements have been carried out. Since there are no detailed interception measurements at Panola, we use interception data from

  17. Hydraulic transport across hydrophilic and hydrophobic nanopores: Flow experiments with water and n-hexane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruener, Simon; Wallacher, Dirk; Greulich, Stefanie; Busch, Mark; Huber, Patrick

    2016-01-01

    We experimentally explore pressure-driven flow of water and n-hexane across nanoporous silica (Vycor glass monoliths with 7- or 10-nm pore diameters, respectively) as a function of temperature and surface functionalization (native and silanized glass surfaces). Hydraulic flow rates are measured by applying hydrostatic pressures via inert gases (argon and helium, pressurized up to 70 bar) on the upstream side in a capacitor-based membrane permeability setup. For the native, hydrophilic silica walls, the measured hydraulic permeabilities can be quantitatively accounted for by bulk fluidity provided we assume a sticking boundary layer, i.e., a negative velocity slip length of molecular dimensions. The thickness of this boundary layer is discussed with regard to previous capillarity-driven flow experiments (spontaneous imbibition) and with regard to velocity slippage at the pore walls resulting from dissolved gas. Water flow across the silanized, hydrophobic nanopores is blocked up to a hydrostatic pressure of at least 70 bar. The absence of a sticking boundary layer quantitatively accounts for an enhanced n-hexane permeability in the hydrophobic compared to the hydrophilic nanopores.

  18. Experiments on Heat Transfer in a Thin Liquid Film Flowing Over a Rotating Disk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sankaran, Subramanian (Technical Monitor); Ozar, B.; Cetegen, B. M.; Faghri, A.

    2004-01-01

    An experimental study of heat transfer into a thin liquid film on a rotating heated disk is described. Deionized water was introduced at the center of a heated. horizontal disk with a constant film thickness and uniform radial velocity. Radial distribution of the disk surface temperatures was measured using a thermocouple/slip ring arrangement. Experiments were performed for a range of liquid flow rates between 3.01pm and 15.01pm. The angular speed of the disk was varied from 0 rpm to 500 rpm. The local heat transfer coefficient was determined based on the heat flux supplied to the disk and the temperature difference between the measured disk surface temperature and the liquid entrance temperature onto the disk. The local heat transfer coefficient was seen to increase with increasing flow rate as well as increasing angular velocity of the disk. Effect of rotation on heat transfer was largest for the lower liquid flow rates with the effect gradually decreasing with increasing liquid flow rates. Semi-empirical correlations are presented in this study for the local and average Nusselt numbers.

  19. Simulation experiments for hot-leg U-bend two-phase flow phenomena

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ishii, M.; Hsu, J.T.; Tucholke, D.; Lambert, G.; Kataoka, I.

    1986-01-01

    In order to study the two-phase natural circulation and flow termination during a small break loss of coolant accident in LWR, simulation experiments have been performed. Based on the two-phase flow scaling criteria developed under this program, an adiabatic hot leg U-bend simulation loop using nitrogen gas and water and a Freon 113 boiling and condensation loop were built. The nitrogen-water system has been used to isolate key hydrodynamic phenomena from heat transfer problems, whereas the Freon loop has been used to study the effect of phase changes and fluid properties. Various tests were carried out to establish the basic mechanism of the flow termination and reestablishment as well as to obtain essential information on scale effects of parameters such as the loop frictional resistance, thermal center, U-bend curvature and inlet geometry. In addition to the above experimental study, a preliminary modeling study has been carried out for two-phase flow in a large vertical pipe at relatively low gas fluxes typical of natural circulation conditions.

  20. PIV experiments in rough-wall, laminar-to-turbulent, oscillatory boundary-layer flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mujal-Colilles, Anna; Mier, Jose M.; Christensen, Kenneth T.; Bateman, Allen; Garcia, Marcelo H.

    2014-01-01

    Exploratory measurements of oscillatory boundary layers were conducted over a smooth and two different rough beds spanning the laminar, transitional and turbulent flow regimes using a multi-camera 2D-PIV system in a small oscillatory-flow tunnel (Admiraal et al. in J Hydraul Res 44(4):437-450, 2006). Results show how the phase lag between bed shear stress and free-stream velocity is better defined when the integral of the momentum equation is used to estimate the bed shear stress. Observed differences in bed shear stress and phase lag between bed shear stress and free-stream velocity are highly sensitive to the definition of the bed position ( y = b). The underestimation of turbulent stresses close to the wall is found to explain such differences when using the addition of Reynolds and viscous stresses to define both the bed shear stress and the phase lag. Regardless of the flow regime, in all experiments, boundary-layer thickness reached its maximum value at a phase near the flow reversal at the wall. Friction factors in smooth walls are better estimated using a theoretical equation first proposed by Batchelor (An introduction to fluid dynamics. Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, 1967) while the more recent empirical predictor of Pedocchi and Garcia (J Hydraul Res 47(4):438-444, 2009a) was found to be appropriate for estimating friction coefficients in the laminar-to-turbulent transition regime.

  1. Experiments on densely-loaded non-Newtonian slurries in laminar and turbulent pipe flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, J. T.; Mannheimer, R. J.; Grimley, T. A.; Morrow, T. B.

    1988-05-01

    An experimental description of the flow structure of non-Newtonian slurries in the laminar, transitional, and full turbulent pipe flow regimes is the primary objective of this research. Measurements include rheological characterization of the fluid and local fluid velocity measurements with a Laser Doppler Velocimeter (LDV). Optical access to the flow is gained through a test section and model slurry which are both transparent. The model slurry is formulated from silica gel particles and hydrocarbon liquid mixture whose indices of refraction are matched so that light is not scattered from the particles. Experiments are being conducted in a large-scale pipe slurry. Flow measurements including turbulence quantities such as Reynolds stress were measured with a two-component two-color LDV. The present research indicates that non-Newtonian slurries are possible with concentrations of a few percent by weight of small particles whose sizes are two microns or less. A non-Newtonian slurry from small particles could maintain large particles (one millimeter size) at high concentrations in suspension almost indefinitely. Such a slurry would prevent particle fallout and its associated problems.

  2. A feeling of flow: exploring junior scientists' experiences with dictation of scientific articles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spanager, Lene; Danielsen, Anne Kjaergaard; Pommergaard, Hans-Christian; Burcharth, Jakob; Rosenberg, Jacob

    2013-08-10

    Science involves publishing results, but many scientists do not master this. We introduced dictation as a method of producing a manuscript draft, participating in writing teams and attending a writing retreat to junior scientists in our department. This study aimed to explore the scientists' experiences with this process. Four focus group interviews were conducted and comprised all participating scientists (n = 14). Each transcript was transcribed verbatim and coded independently by two interviewers. The coding structure was discussed until consensus and from this the emergent themes were identified. Participants were 7 PhD students, 5 scholarship students and 2 clinical research nurses. Three main themes were identified: 'Preparing and then letting go' indicated that dictating worked best when properly prepared. 'The big dictation machine' described benefits of writing teams when junior scientists got feedback on both content and structure of their papers. 'Barriers to and drivers for participation' described flow-like states that participants experienced during the dictation. Motivation and a high level of preparation were pivotal to be able to dictate a full article in one day. The descriptions of flow-like states seemed analogous to the theoretical model of flow which is interesting, as flow is usually deemed a state reserved to skilled experts. Our findings suggest that other academic groups might benefit from using the concept including dictation of manuscripts to encourage participants' confidence in their writing skills.

  3. Flow and transport at the Las Cruces trench site: Experiment IIb

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vinson, J.; Hills, R.G. [New Mexico State Univ., Las Cruces, NM (United States); Wierenga, P.J.; Young, M.H. [Arizona Univ., Tucson, AZ (United States). Dept. of Soil and Water Science

    1997-07-01

    The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) has been directed by Congress in the Low Level Waste Policy Act of 1980 to develop regulatory guidance and assist the individual states and compacts in siting and assessing future low level radioactive waste (LLW) disposal facilities. Three water flow and solute transport experiments were performed as part of a comprehensive field trench study near Las Cruces, New Mexico to test deterministic and stochastic models of vadose zone flow and transport. This report presents partial results from the third experiment (experiment IIb). Experiments IIa and b were conducted on the North side of the trench, on a plot 1.22 m wide by 12 m long, perpendicular to the trench. The area was drip irrigated during two time periods with water containing a variety of tracers. The advance of the water front during the two irrigation episodes was measured with tensiometers and neutron probes. Solute front positions were determined from soil solution sampling through suction samplers and from disturbed sampling. The results from experiment IIb show predominantly downward water movement through the layered unsaturated soil, as evidenced from neutron probe data and gravimetric sampling. Tritium plumes were only half as deep and half as wide as the water plumes at 310 days after the beginning of experiment IIb. Chromium, applied as Cr(VI), moved a readily as, and similar to tritium, but there was a loss of mass due to reduction of Cr(VI) to Cr(III). Chloride and nitrate, initially present at high concentrations in the soil solution, were displaced by the low concentration irrigation water, resulting in chloride and nitrate concentration distributions that looked like negative images of the tritium distributions. The extensive data presented should serve well as a data base for model testing.

  4. Detection of architectural distortion in mammograms using phase portraits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayres, Fabio J.; Rangayyan, Rangaraj M.

    2004-05-01

    Architectural distortion is a subtle abnormality in mammograms, and a source of overlooking errors by radiologists. Computer-aided diagnosis (CAD) techniques can improve the performance of radiologists in detecting masses and calcifications; however, most CAD systems have not been designed to detect architectural distortion. We present a new method to detect and localize architectural distortion by analyzing the oriented texture in mammograms. A bank of Gabor filters is used to obtain the orientation field of the given mammogram. The orientation field is filtered and downsampled, to reduce noise and also to reduce the computational effort required by the subsequent methods. The downsampled orientation field is analyzed to produce three phase portrait maps: node, saddle, and spiral. The node map is linearly filtered, thresholded, and morphologically filtered to detect architectural distortion. The method was tested with 18 mammograms containing architectural distortion. In a preliminary experiment, a sensitivity of 88% was obtained at 15 false positives per image. Several possibilities for the improvement of the technique are being explored. A qualitative analysis of the performance of the method with stellate lesions indicates potential for enhancement of the technique.

  5. Experiments and simulations of particle flows in a magnetized dust torus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reichenstein, T.; Wilms, J.; Greiner, F.; Piel, A. [IEAP, Christian-Albrechts-Universitaet, Kiel (Germany); Melzer, A. [Institut fuer Physik, Universitaet Greifswald (Germany)

    2012-11-15

    An overview is given of the confinement and dynamical phenomena observed in experiments and simulations of magnetized dust tori. Due to the presence of gravity, a strongly inhomogeneous velocity field is found along the circumference of the torus. The simulations show that the dust flow, which is unsheared and nearly incompressible, exhibits a distinct shell structure, which can be understood by rapid frictional cooling and strong Coulomb coupling. At lower frictional damping, the symmetry of the flow can be spontaneously broken, leading to a region of strong velocity shear and excitation of Kelvin-Helmholtz instabilities. New experimental evidence of counterflows is found (copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  6. Flow situations during everyday practice in a medical hospital ward. Results from a study based on experience sampling method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ejlertsson Göran

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Nursing is a constant balance between strain and stimulation and work and health research with a positive reference point has been recommended. A health-promoting circumstance for subjective experience is flow, which is a psychological state, when individuals concurrently experience happiness, motivation and cognitive efficiency. Flow situations can be identified through individuals' estimates of perceived challenge and skills. There is, to the best of our knowledge, no published study of flow among health care staff. The aim of this study was to identify flow-situations and study work-related activities and individual factors associated with flow situations, during everyday practice at a medical emergency ward in Sweden, in order to increase the knowledge on salutogenic health-promoting factors. Methods The respondents consisted of 17 assistant nurses and 14 registered nurses, who randomly and repeatedly answered a small questionnaire, through an experience sampling method, during everyday nursing practice. The study resulted in 497 observations. Flow situations were defined as an exact match between a high challenge and skill estimation and logistic regression models were used to study different variables association to flow situations. Results The health care staff spent most of its working time in individual nursing care and administrative and communicative duties. The assistant nurses were more often occupied in individual nursing care, while the registered nurses were more involved in medical care and administrative and communicative duties. The study resulted in 11.5% observations of flow situations but the relative number of flow situations varied between none to 55% among the participants. Flow situations were positively related to medical care activities and individual cognitive resources. Taking a break was also positively associated with flow situations among the assistant nurses. Conclusions The result showed

  7. Intermittent burst dynamics in porous media: experiments on slow drainage flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moura, Marcel; Jørgen Måløy, Knut; Toussaint, Renaud

    2017-04-01

    The intermittent burst dynamics during the slow drainage of an artificial quasi-2D porous medium is studied experimentally. We have verified a theoretically predicted scaling for the burst size distribution which was previously accessible only via numerical simulations. We show that this system satisfies a set of conditions known to be true for critical systems, such as intermittent activity with bursts extending over several time and length scales, self-similar macroscopic fractal structure and a scaling behavior for the power spectrum associated with pressure fluctuations during the flow. The observation of a 1/f scaling region in the power spectra is new for porous media flows and, for specific boundary conditions, we notice the occurrence of a transition from 1/f to 1/f2 scaling. An analytically integrable mathematical framework was employed to explain this behavior. References: [1] M. Moura, K. J. Måløy and R. Toussaint, Critical behavior in porous media flow, arXiv preprint (2016). [2] M. Moura, E.-A. Fiorentino, K. J. Måløy, G. Schäfer and R. Toussaint, Impact of sample geometry on the measurement of pressure-saturation curves: Experiments and simulations, Water Resour. Res., 51, 8900 (2015). [3] M. Cieplak and M. O. Robbins, Influence of contact angle on quasistatic fluid invasion of porous media, Phys. Rev. B, 41, 11508 (1990). [4] M. Moura, Burst dynamics in quasi-2D disordered systems: experiments on porous media two-phase flows, PhD thesis, University of Oslo (2016).

  8. Laboratory experiments investigating magnetic field production via the Weibel instability in interpenetrating plasma flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huntington, Channing; Fiuza, Frederico; Ross, James Steven; Zylstra, Alex; Pollock, Brad; Drake, R. Paul; Froula, Dustin; Gregori, Gianluca; Kugland, Nathan; Kuranz, Carolyn; Levy, Matthew; Li, Chikang; Meinecke, Jena; Petrasso, Richard; Remington, Bruce; Ryutov, Dmitri; Sakawa, Youichi; Spitkovsky, Anatoly; Takabe, Hideke; Turnbull, David; Park, Hye-Sook

    2015-08-01

    Astrophysical collisionless shocks are often associated with the presence of strong magnetic fields in a plasma flow. The magnetic fields required for shock formation may either be initially present, for example in supernova remnants or young galaxies, or they may be self-generated in systems such as gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). In the case of GRB outflows, the intense magnetic fields are greater than those seeded by the GRB progenitor or produced by misaligned density and temperature gradients in the plasma flow (the Biermann-battery effect). The Weibel instability is one candidate mechanism for the generation of sufficiently strong fields to create a collisionless shock. Despite their crucial role in astrophysical systems, observation of the magnetic fields produced by Weibel instabilities in experiments has been challenging. Using a proton probe to directly image electromagnetic fields, we present evidence of Weibel-generated magnetic fields that grow in opposing, initially unmagnetized plasma flows from laser-driven laboratory experiments. Three-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations reveal that the instability efficiently extracts energy from the plasma flows, and that the self-generated magnetic energy reaches a few percent of the total energy in the system. This result demonstrates an experimental platform suitable for the investigation of a wide range of astrophysical phenomena, including collisionless shock formation in supernova remnants, large-scale magnetic field amplification, and the radiation signature from gamma-ray bursts.This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  9. Welding Distortion Control of Thin A1 Alloy Plate by Static Thermal Tensioning

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    The mechanism and effectiveness of welding distortion mitigation by static thermal tensioning were investigated by both finite element analysis and experiments. It shows that preset thermal tensioning can reduce longitudinal plastic compression remained in the weld and its adjacent zone significantly, so decrease the longitudinal residual stress and the susceptibility to welding distortion.

  10. Analogue experiments of salt flow and pillow growth due basement faulting and differential loading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warsitzka, M.; Kley, J.; Kukowski, N.

    2014-07-01

    Basement faulting is widely acknowledged as a potential trigger for salt flow and the growth of salt structures in salt-bearing extensional basins. In this study, dynamically scaled analogue experiments were designed to examine the evolution of salt pillows and the kinematics of salt flow due to a short pulse of basement faulting and a long-lasting phase of successive sedimentation. Experiments performed in the framework of this study consist of viscous silicone putty to simulate ductile rock salt, and a PVC-beads-quartz sand mixture representing a brittle supra-salt layer. In order to derive 2-D incremental displacement and strain patterns, the analogue experiments were monitored by an optical image correlation system (Particle Imaging Velocimetry). By varying layer thicknesses and extension rates, the influence of these parameters on the kinematics of salt flow were tested. Model results reveal that significant strain is triggered in the viscous layer by minor basement faulting. During basement extension downward flow occurs in the viscous layer above the basement fault tip. In contrast, upward flow takes place during post-extensional sedimentation. Lateral redistribution of the viscous material during post-extensional sedimentation is associated with subsidence above the footwall block and uplift adjacent to the basement faults leading to the formation of pillow structures (primary pillows). Decoupled cover faulting and the subsidence of peripheral sinks adjacent to the primary pillow causes the formation of additional pillow structures at large distance from the basement fault (secondary pillows). Experimental results demonstrate that the development of salt pillows can be triggered by basement extension, but requires a phase of tectonic quiescence. The potential for pillow growth and the displacement rate in the viscous layer increase with increasing thickness of the viscous layer and increasing extension rate, but decrease with increasing thickness of the

  11. Localized reactive flow in carbonate rocks: Core-flood experiments and network simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Haoyue; Bernabé, Yves; Mok, Ulrich; Evans, Brian

    2016-11-01

    We conducted four core-flood experiments on samples of a micritic, reef limestone from Abu Dhabi under conditions of constant flow rate. The pore fluid was water in equilibrium with CO2, which, because of its lowered pH, is chemically reactive with the limestone. Flow rates were between 0.03 and 0.1 mL/min. The difference between up and downstream pore pressures dropped to final values ≪1 MPa over periods of 3-18 h. Scanning electron microscope and microtomography imaging of the starting material showed that the limestone is mostly calcite and lacks connected macroporosity and that the prevailing pores are few microns large. During each experiment, a wormhole formed by localized dissolution, an observation consistent with the decreases in pressure head between the up and downstream reservoirs. Moreover, we numerically modeled the changes in permeability during the experiments. We devised a network approach that separated the pore space into competing subnetworks of pipes. Thus, the problem was framed as a competition of flow of the reactive fluid among the adversary subnetworks. The precondition for localization within certain time is that the leading subnetwork rapidly becomes more transmissible than its competitors. This novel model successfully simulated features of the shape of the wormhole as it grew from few to about 100 µm, matched the pressure history patterns, and yielded the correct order of magnitude of the breakthrough time. Finally, we systematically studied the impact of changing the statistical parameters of the subnetworks. Larger mean radius and spatial correlation of the leading subnetwork led to faster localization.

  12. Experiments and Simulations of Fluid Flow in Heterogeneous Reservoir Models - Emphasis on Impacts from Crossbeds and Fractures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boerresen, Knut Arne

    1996-12-31

    Hydrocarbon recovery from subsurface reservoirs has become increasingly dependent on advanced recovery techniques that require improved understanding of the physics of fluid flow within and across geological units including small-scale heterogeneities and fractures. In this thesis, impacts from heterogeneities on local fluid flow are studied experimentally by means of imaging techniques to visualize fluid flow in two dimensions during flooding of larger reservoir models. Part 1 reflects the multi-disciplinary collaboration, by briefly introducing the relevant geology, the literature on experiments on fluid flow in bedded structures, and outlining the applied numerical simulator and imaging techniques applied to visualize fluid flow. The second part contains a synopsis of displacement experiments in naturally laminated sandstones and in crossbed laboratory models, and of the impact from incipient shear fractures on oil recovery. The detailed results obtained from the experiments and simulations are described in six papers, all included. 215 refs., 108 figs., 16 tabs.

  13. Microscopic distorted wave theory of inelastic scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Picklesimer, A.; Tandy, P. C.; Thaler, R. M.

    1982-03-01

    An exact microscopic distorted wave theory of inelastic scattering is formulated which contains the physical picture usually associated with distorted wave approximations without the usual redundancy. This formulation encompasses the inelastic scattering of two fragments, elementary or composite (both with or without the full complexity of interfragment Pauli symmetries). The fact that these considerations need not be based upon elementary potential interactions is an indication of the generality of the approach and supports its applicability to inelastic meson scattering. The theory also maintains a description of inelastic scattering which is a natural extension of the description of elastic scattering and it provides a general basis for obtaining truncation models with an explicit distorted wave structure. The distorted wave impulse approximation is presented as an example of a particular truncation/approximation encompassed by this theory and the nature of the distorted waves is explicated. NUCLEAR REACTIONS Distorted wave theory, inelastic scattering, multiple scattering, spectator expansion, Pauli exclusion principle, composite particles, unitarity structure.

  14. Characterization of granular flows from seismic signal: insights from laboratory experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farin, M.; Mangeney, A.; Toussaint, R.; de Rosny, J.

    2015-12-01

    Landslides, rock avalanche and debris flows represent a major natural hazard in steep landscapes. Recent studies showed that the seismic signal generated by these events can provide quantitative information on their location and amplitude. However, owing to the lack of visual observations, the dynamics of gravitational events is still not well understood. A burning challenge is to establish relations between the characteristics of the landslide (volume, speed, runout distance,...) and that of the emitted seismic signal (maximum amplitude, seismic energy, frequencies,...) Laboratory experiments of granular columns collapse are conducted on an inclined plane. The seismic signal generated by the collapse is recorded by piezoelectric accelerometers sensitive in a wide frequency range (1 Hz - 56 kHz). The granular column is constituted with steel beads of same diameter, between 1 mm and 3 mm that are initially contained in a cylinder. The column collapses when the cylinder is removed. A layer of steel beads is glued on the surface of the plane to provide basal roughness. For horizontal granular flows, we show that it is possible to distinguish the phases of acceleration and deceleration of the flow in the emitted seismic signal. Indeed, the signal envelope is symmetrical with respect to its maximum, separating the acceleration from the deceleration. When the slope angle increases, we observe that the signal envelope looses its symmetry: it stays unchanged during the acceleration but it is significantly extended during the deceleration. In addition, we propose a semi-empirical scaling law to describe the increase of the elastic energy radiated by a granular flow when the slope angle increases. The fit of this law with the seismic data allows us to retrieve the friction angle of the granular material, which is a crucial rheological parameter. Finally, we show that the ratio of the radiated elastic energy over the potential energy lost of granular flows, i.e. their seismic

  15. Sheet-like and plume-like thermal flow in a spherical convection experiment performed under microgravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breuer, D.; Futterer, B.; Plesa, A.; Krebs, A.; Zaussinger, F.; Egbers, C.

    2013-12-01

    In mantle dynamics research, experiments, usually performed in rectangular geometries in Earth-based laboratories, have the character of ';exploring new physics and testing theories' [1]. In this work, we introduce our spherical geometry experiments on electro-hydrodynamical driven Rayleigh-Benard convection that have been performed for both temperature-independent (`GeoFlow I'), and temperature-dependent fluid viscosity properties (`GeoFlow II') with a measured viscosity contrast up to 1.5. To set up a self-gravitating force field, we use a high voltage potential between the inner and outer boundaries and a dielectric insulating liquid and perform the experiment under microgravity conditions at the ISS [2, 3]. Further, numerical simulations in 3D spherical geometry have been used to reproduce the results obtained in the `GeoFlow' experiments. For flow visualisation, we use Wollaston prism shearing interferometry which is an optical method producing fringe pattern images. Flow pattern differ between our two experiments (Fig. 1). In `GeoFlow I', we see a sheet-like thermal flow. In this case convection patterns have been successfully reproduced by 3D numerical simulations using two different and independently developed codes. In contrast, in `GeoFlow II' we obtain plume-like structures. Interestingly, numerical simulations do not yield this type of solution for the low viscosity contrast realised in the experiment. However, using a viscosity contrast of two orders of magnitude or higher, we can reproduce the patterns obtained in the `GeoFlow II' experiment, from which we conclude that non-linear effects shift the effective viscosity ratio [4]. References [1] A. Davaille and A. Limare (2009). In: Schubert, G., Bercovici, D. (Eds.), Treatise on Geophysics - Mantle Dynamics. [2] B. Futterer, C. Egbers, N. Dahley, S. Koch, L. Jehring (2010). Acta Astronautica 66, 193-100. [3] B. Futterer, N. Dahley, S. Koch, N. Scurtu, C. Egbers (2012). Acta Astronautica 71, 11-19. [4

  16. Sheet-like and plume-like thermal flow in a spherical convection experiment with high viscosity contrast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Futterer, Birgit; Zaussinger, Florian; Plesa, Ana-Catalina; Krebs, Andreas; Egbers, Christoph; Breuer, Doris

    2013-04-01

    We introduce our spherical experiments on electro-hydrodynamical driven Rayleigh-Bénard convection that have been performed either with temperature-independent properties of the fluid, called 'GeoFlow I', or with temperature-dependent properties, called 'GeoFlow II'. To set up a self-gravitating force field with radial directed buoyancy, we use a high voltage potential between the inner and outer boundaries and a dielectric insulating liquid and perform the experiment in the microgravity conditions of the ISS [1, 2]. We further run numerical simulations in a 3D spherical geometry to reproduce the results obtained in the GeoFlow experiments. In the experiment the used optical method for flow visualization as delivered by the Optical Diagnostics Module ODM of the Fluid Science Laboratory, is the so called Wollaston-Prism shearing interferometry WSI, which produces fringe pattern images. For the numerical simulations we compute from the temperature field a fringe pattern of convection to compare it then to the experiment data. In this work, we present the flow imaging techniques and their numerical analogues, which were used to compare experimental results with numerical solutions. An important finding is the difference in the flow pattern between our two experiments. We see a sheet-like thermal flow, if the physical properties of the fluid are not varying with temperature - a result from 'GeoFlow I'. In this case the convection patterns have been successfully reproduced by 3D numerical simulations using both the RESPECT [3] and GAIA [4] codes. If we use a liquid with varying (electro-hydrodynamic) volume expansion and temperature-dependent viscosity (GeoFlow II), for which the viscosity contrast measured in the experiment is 2, the structures change significantly and are plume-like. This result is not expected, since the viscosity contrast seems to be too small for this type of solution according to numerical simulations. However, using a viscosity contrast of two

  17. Cognitive Distortions, Humor Styles, and Depression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katerina Rnic

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Cognitive distortions are negative biases in thinking that are theorized to represent vulnerability factors for depression and dysphoria. Despite the emphasis placed on cognitive distortions in the context of cognitive behavioural theory and practice, a paucity of research has examined the mechanisms through which they impact depressive symptomatology. Both adaptive and maladaptive styles of humor represent coping strategies that may mediate the relation between cognitive distortions and depressive symptoms. The current study examined the correlations between the frequency and impact of cognitive distortions across both social and achievement-related contexts and types of humor. Cognitive distortions were associated with reduced use of adaptive Affiliative and Self-Enhancing humor styles and increased use of maladaptive Aggressive and Self-Defeating humor. Reduced use of Self-Enhancing humor mediated the relationship between most types of cognitive distortions and depressed mood, indicating that distorted negative thinking may interfere with an individual’s ability to adopt a humorous and cheerful outlook on life (i.e., use Self-Enhancing humor as a way of regulating emotions and coping with stress, thereby resulting in elevated depressive symptoms. Similarly, Self-Defeating humor mediated the association of the social impact of cognitive distortions with depression, such that this humor style may be used as a coping strategy for dealing with distorted thinking that ultimately backfires and results in increased dysphoria.

  18. Cognitive Distortions, Humor Styles, and Depression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rnic, Katerina; Dozois, David J. A.; Martin, Rod A.

    2016-01-01

    Cognitive distortions are negative biases in thinking that are theorized to represent vulnerability factors for depression and dysphoria. Despite the emphasis placed on cognitive distortions in the context of cognitive behavioural theory and practice, a paucity of research has examined the mechanisms through which they impact depressive symptomatology. Both adaptive and maladaptive styles of humor represent coping strategies that may mediate the relation between cognitive distortions and depressive symptoms. The current study examined the correlations between the frequency and impact of cognitive distortions across both social and achievement-related contexts and types of humor. Cognitive distortions were associated with reduced use of adaptive Affiliative and Self-Enhancing humor styles and increased use of maladaptive Aggressive and Self-Defeating humor. Reduced use of Self-Enhancing humor mediated the relationship between most types of cognitive distortions and depressed mood, indicating that distorted negative thinking may interfere with an individual’s ability to adopt a humorous and cheerful outlook on life (i.e., use Self-Enhancing humor) as a way of regulating emotions and coping with stress, thereby resulting in elevated depressive symptoms. Similarly, Self-Defeating humor mediated the association of the social impact of cognitive distortions with depression, such that this humor style may be used as a coping strategy for dealing with distorted thinking that ultimately backfires and results in increased dysphoria. PMID:27547253

  19. Numerical Modeling of Flow Control in a Boundary-Layer-Ingesting Offset Inlet Diffuser at Transonic Mach Numbers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allan Brian G.; Owens, Lewis, R.

    2006-01-01

    This paper will investigate the validation of a NASA developed, Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) flow solver, OVERFLOW, for a boundary-layer-ingesting (BLI) offset (S-shaped) inlet in transonic flow with passive and active flow control devices as well as the baseline case. Numerical simulations are compared to wind tunnel results of a BLI inlet conducted at the NASA Langley 0.3-Meter Transonic Cryogenic Tunnel. Comparisons of inlet flow distortion, pressure recovery, and inlet wall pressures are performed. The numerical simulations are compared to the BLI inlet data at a freestream Mach number of 0.85 and a Reynolds number of approximately 2 million based on the length of the fan-face diameter. The numerical simulations with and without wind tunnel walls are performed, quantifying effects of the tunnel walls on the BLI inlet flow measurements. The wind tunnel test evaluated several different combinations of jet locations and mass flow rates as well as a vortex generator (VG) vane case. The numerical simulations will be performed on a single jet configuration for varying actuator mass flow rates at a fix inlet mass flow condition. Validation of the numerical simulations for the VG vane case will also be performed for varying inlet mass flow rates. Overall, the numerical simulations were able to predict the baseline circumferential flow distortion, DPCPavg, very well for comparisons made within the designed operating range of the BLI inlet. However the CFD simulations did predict a total pressure recovery that was 0.01 lower than the experiment. Numerical simulations of the baseline inlet flow also showed good agreement with the experimental inlet centerline surface pressures. The vane case showed that the CFD predicted the correct trends in the circumferential distortion for varying inlet mass flow but had a distortion level that was nearly twice as large as the experiment. Comparison to circumferential distortion measurements for a 15 deg clocked 40 probe

  20. Laboratory experiments on current flow between stationary and moving electrodes in magnetoplasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stenzel, Reiner L.; Urrutia, J. M.

    1990-01-01

    Laboratory experiments were performed in order to investigate the basic physics of current flow between tethered electrodes in magnetoplasmas. The major findings are summarized. The experiments are performed in an effectively very large laboratory plasma in which not only the nonlinear current collection is addressed but also the propagation and spread of currents, the formation of current wings by moving electrodes, the current closure, and radiation from transmission lines. The laboratory plasma consists of a pulsed dc discharge whose Maxwellian afterglow provides a quiescent, current-free uniform background plasma. Electrodes consisting of collectors and electron emitters are inserted into the plasma and a pulsed voltage is applied between two floating electrodes via insulated transmission lines. Besides the applied current in the wire, the total current density in the plasma is obtained from space and time resolved magnetic probe measurements via Maxwell's law. Langmuir probes yield the plasma parameters.

  1. Affective Ludology, Flow and Immersion in a First- Person Shooter: Measurement of Player Experience

    CERN Document Server

    Nacke, Lennart E

    2010-01-01

    Gameplay research about experiential phenomena is a challenging undertaking, given the variety of experiences that gamers encounter when playing and which currently do not have a formal taxonomy, such as flow, immersion, boredom, and fun. These informal terms require a scientific explanation. Ludologists also acknowledge the need to understand cognition, emotion, and goal- oriented behavior of players from a psychological perspective by establishing rigorous methodologies. This paper builds upon and extends prior work in an area for which we would like to coin the term "affective ludology." The area is concerned with the affective measurement of player-game interaction. The experimental study reported here investigated different traits of gameplay experience using subjective (i.e., questionnaires) and objective (i.e., psychophysiological) measures. Participants played three Half-Life 2 game level design modifications while measures such as electromyography (EMG), electrodermal activity (EDA) were taken and qu...

  2. Experiment research on two-stage dry-fed entrained flow coal gasifier

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    The process flow and the main devices of a new two-stage dry-fed coal gasification pilot plant with a throughout of 36 t/d are introduced in this paper. For comparison with the traditional one-stage gasifiers, the influences of the coal feed ratio between two stages on the performance of the gasifier are detailedly studied by a series of experiments. The results reveal that the two-stage gasification decreases the temperature of the syngas at the outlet of the gasifier, simplifies the gasification process, and reduces the size of the syngas cooler. Moreover, the cold gas efficiency of the gasifier can be improved by using the two-stage gasification. In our experiments, the efficiency is about 3%-6% higher than the existing one-stage gasifiers.

  3. Variably saturated flow and multicomponent biogeochemical reactive transport modeling of a uranium bioremediation field experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yabusaki, Steven B; Fang, Yilin; Williams, Kenneth H; Murray, Christopher J; Ward, Andy L; Dayvault, Richard D; Waichler, Scott R; Newcomer, Darrell R; Spane, Frank A; Long, Philip E

    2011-11-01

    Three-dimensional, coupled variably saturated flow and biogeochemical reactive transport modeling of a 2008 in situ uranium bioremediation field experiment is used to better understand the interplay of transport and biogeochemical reactions controlling uranium behavior under pulsed acetate amendment, seasonal water table variation, spatially variable physical (hydraulic conductivity, porosity) and geochemical (reactive surface area) material properties. While the simulation of the 2008 Big Rusty acetate biostimulation field experiment in Rifle, Colorado was generally consistent with behaviors identified in previous field experiments at the Rifle IFRC site, the additional process and property detail provided several new insights. A principal conclusion from this work is that uranium bioreduction is most effective when acetate, in excess of the sulfate-reducing bacteria demand, is available to the metal-reducing bacteria. The inclusion of an initially small population of slow growing sulfate-reducing bacteria identified in proteomic analyses led to an additional source of Fe(II) from the dissolution of Fe(III) minerals promoted by biogenic sulfide. The falling water table during the experiment significantly reduced the saturated thickness of the aquifer and resulted in reactants and products, as well as unmitigated uranium, in the newly unsaturated vadose zone. High permeability sandy gravel structures resulted in locally high flow rates in the vicinity of injection wells that increased acetate dilution. In downgradient locations, these structures created preferential flow paths for acetate delivery that enhanced local zones of TEAP reactivity and subsidiary reactions. Conversely, smaller transport rates associated with the lower permeability lithofacies (e.g., fine) and vadose zone were shown to limit acetate access and reaction. Once accessed by acetate, however, these same zones limited subsequent acetate dilution and provided longer residence times that resulted

  4. Experiments performed with bubbly flow in vertical pipes at different flow conditions covering the transition region: simulation by coupling Eulerian, Lagrangian and 3D random walks models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz-Cobo, José; Chiva, Sergio; El Aziz Essa, Mohamed; Mendes, Santos

    2012-08-01

    Two phase flow experiments with different superficial velocities of gas and water were performed in a vertical upward isothermal cocurrent air-water flow column with conditions ranging from bubbly flow, with very low void fraction, to transition flow with some cap and slug bubbles and void fractions around 25%. The superficial velocities of the liquid and the gas phases were varied from 0.5 to 3 m/s and from 0 to 0.6 m/s, respectively. Also to check the effect of changing the surface tension on the previous experiments small amounts of 1-butanol were added to the water. These amounts range from 9 to 75 ppm and change the surface tension. This study is interesting because in real cases the surface tension of the water diminishes with temperature, and with this kind of experiments we can study indirectly the effect of changing the temperature on the void fraction distribution. The following axial and radial distributions were measured in all these experiments: void fraction, interfacial area concentration, interfacial velocity, Sauter mean diameter and turbulence intensity. The range of values of the gas superficial velocities in these experiments covered the range from bubbly flow to the transition to cap/slug flow. Also with transition flow conditions we distinguish two groups of bubbles in the experiments, the small spherical bubbles and the cap/slug bubbles. Special interest was devoted to the transition region from bubbly to cap/slug flow; the goal was to understand the physical phenomena that take place during this transition A set of numerical simulations of some of these experiments for bubbly flow conditions has been performed by coupling a Lagrangian code, that tracks the three dimensional motion of the individual bubbles in cylindrical coordinates inside the field of the carrier liquid, to an Eulerian model that computes the magnitudes of continuous phase and to a 3D random walk model that takes on account the fluctuation in the velocity field of the

  5. A soil flowing characteristics monitoring method in planetary drilling and coring verification experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Junyue; Quan, Qiquan; Jiang, Shengyuan; Chen, Chongbin; Yuan, Fengpei; Deng, Zongquan

    2017-03-01

    Some type of piercing into the subsurface formation is required in future planetary explorations to enhance the understanding of early stars' geological evolution and the origin of life. Compared with other technical methods, drilling & coring, only utilizing the compound locomotion of rotation and penetration, can sample the subsurface soil relatively efficient and convenient. However, given the uncertain mechanical properties of planetary soil, drilling state signals should be monitored online to improve the robustness of drilling system and avoid potential drilling faults. Since the flowing characteristics of interacted soil, such as removal volume, coring height, removal velocity and accumulation angle, directly reveal the drilling conditions, they are enhancing resources to comprehend the sampling phenomenon and can be used to help control the drill tool. This paper proposed a novel soil flowing characteristics (SFC) monitoring method by applying an industrial camera to record the flowing characteristics of removed cuttings and by utilizing an ultrasonic sensor into the hollow auger to monitor the sampled core. Experiments in one typical lunar regolith simulant indicate that the monitored SFC accurately reflects the interaction between the drill tool and soil.

  6. The formation and migration of sand ripples in closed conduits: experiments with turbulent water flows

    CERN Document Server

    Florez, Jorge Eduar Cardona

    2016-01-01

    The transport of solid particles by a fluid flow is frequently found in nature and industry. Some examples are the transport of sand in rivers and hydrocarbon pipelines. When the shear stresses exerted by a fluid flow on a granular bed remain moderate, some grains are set in motion without fluidizing the bed; the moving grains form a layer, known as bed load, that moves while maintaining contact with the fixed part of the bed. Under bed load conditions, the granular bed may become unstable, generating ripples and dunes. Sand ripples are commonly observed in closed conduits and pipes such as in petroleum pipelines, sewer systems, and dredging lines. Although of importance for many scientific domains and industrial applications, the formation of ripples in closed conduits is not well understood, and the problem is still open. This paper presents an experimental study on the formation and migration of sand ripples under a turbulent closed-conduit flow and bed-load conditions. In our experiments, fully-developed ...

  7. Cometary ion flow variations at comet P/Halley as observed by the Giotto IMS experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kettmann, G.; Ip, W.H.; Rosenbauer, H.; Schwenn, R. (Max-Planck-Institut fuer Aeronomie, Katlenburg-Lindau (DE)); Balsiger, H.; Meier, A. (Bern Univ. (CH). Physikalisches Inst.); Goldstein, B.E. (California Inst. of Techn., Pasadena CA (US). Jet Propulsion Lab.); Shelley, E.G. (Lockheed Palo Alto Research Lab., CA (US))

    1990-03-01

    Using the combined data sets from the angle analyzer (AA) and the mass analyser (MA) of the Giotto IMS-HIS experiment, we have derived the three-dimensional plasma flow properties of cometary ions for masses {ge} 12 AMU. At cometocentric distances larger than 1.3 x 10{sup 5} km, the cometary ion temperature is very high (kT >{approx} 100 eV), and derivations of the flow parameters are uncertain. After crossing the magnetic pile-up boundary (MPB) at 23 : 30 SCET (Spacecraft Event Time), the ion temperature becomes lower (kT >{approx} 50 eV), and the flow speed can be evaluated to decrease gradually from {approx} 20-25 km s{sup -1} to {approx} 17 km s{sup -1} until 23 : 41 SCET (9 x 10{sup 4} km) at which point an abrupt drop to a value of {approx} 13 km s{sup -1} occurs. This velocity discontinuity coincides with the appearance of a cold ion population (kT {approx} 10 eV) mostly in the ram direction of the spacecraft. Around 23 : 49 SCET (5.5 x 10{sup 4} km), another velocity decrease occurs simultaneously with the disappearance of the hot ion component and an intensification of the colder one. These features are in agreement with the theoretical model of charge exchange loss of the hot cometary ions.

  8. Transition to turbulence in stratified shear flow: experiments in an inclined square duct

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Colin; Linden, Paul

    2013-11-01

    We describe laboratory experiments of countercurrent stratified shear flow in an inclined square duct. To achieve this, a long water tank was partitioned into regions of higher and lower density saltwater that are connected by an inclined square duct. The flow regime was characterized to be turbulent, intermittent, Holmboe or laminar as a function of the duct inclination, θ, and the density difference, Δρ , between the two reservoirs. The density difference and duct angle were systematically varied and a phase plane of flow regime was developed. The transition between the interrmittent regime and turbulence was experimentally determined to occur at θΔρ ~= 20 [degrees kg m-3]. This critical combination of parameters fits into the buoyancy-compensated Reynolds number scaling proposed by Brethouwer et al. (J. Fluid Mech., 2007). The turbulent interfacial thickness was found to be a function of the inclination angle, which can be predicted using the buoyancy lengthscale from Waite and Bartello (J. Fluid Mech., 2004) and others. Furthermore, we measured the density profiles at multiple points along the duct, and using these profiles, we modeled the entrainment at the interface. Support provided by the Winston Churchill Foundation of the United States.

  9. Multiphase flow and multicomponent reactive transport model of the ventilation experiment in Opalinus clay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zheng, L.; Samper, J.; Montenegro, L.; Major, J.C.

    2008-10-15

    During the construction and operational phases of a high-level radioactive waste (HLW) repository constructed in a clay formation, ventilation of underground drifts will cause desaturation and oxidation of the rock. The Ventilation Experiment (VE) was performed in a 1.3 m diameter unlined horizontal microtunnel on Opalinus clay at Mont Terri underground research laboratory in Switzerland to evaluate the impact of desaturation on rock properties. A multiphase flow and reactive transport model of VE is presented here. The model accounts for liquid, vapor and air flow, evaporation/condensation and multicomponent reactive solute transport with kinetic dissolution of pyrite and siderite and local-equilibrium dissolution/precipitation of calcite, ferrihydrite, dolomite, gypsum and quartz. Model results reproduce measured vapor flow, liquid pressure and hydrochemical data and capture the trends of measured relative humidities, although such data are slightly overestimated near the rock interface due to uncertainties in the turbulence factor. Rock desaturation allows oxygen to diffuse into the rock and triggers pyrite oxidation, dissolution of calcite and siderite, precipitation of ferrihydrite, dolomite and gypsum and cation exchange. pH in the unsaturated rock varies from 7.8 to 8 and is buffered by calcite. Computed changes in the porosity and the permeability of Opalinus clay in the unsaturated zone caused by oxidation and mineral dissolution/precipitation are smaller than 5%. Therefore, rock properties are not expected to be affected significantly by ventilation of underground drifts during construction and operational phases of a HLW repository in clay.

  10. CMB all-scale blackbody distortions induced by linearizing temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Notari, Alessio; Quartin, Miguel

    2016-08-01

    Cosmic microwave background (CMB) experiments, such as WMAP and Planck, measure intensity anisotropies and build maps using a linearized formula for relating them to the temperature blackbody fluctuations. However, this procedure also generates a signal in the maps in the form of y -type distortions which is degenerate with the thermal Sunyaev Zel'dovich (tSZ) effect. These are small effects that arise at second order in the temperature fluctuations not from primordial physics but from such a limitation of the map-making procedure. They constitute a contaminant for measurements of our peculiar velocity, the tSZ and primordial y -distortions. They can nevertheless be well modeled and accounted for. We show that the distortions arise from a leakage of the CMB dipole into the y -channel which couples to all multipoles, mostly affecting the range ℓ≲400 . This should be visible in Planck's y -maps with an estimated signal-to-noise ratio of about 12. We note however that such frequency-dependent terms carry no new information on the nature of the CMB dipole. This implies that the real significance of Planck's Doppler coupling measurements is actually lower than reported by the collaboration. Finally, we quantify the level of contamination in tSZ and primordial y -type distortions and show that it is above the sensitivity of proposed next-generation CMB experiments.

  11. Laboratory astrophysical collisionless shock experiments with interpenetrating plasma flows on Omega and NIF

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, James; Park, H.-S.; Huntington, C.; Ryutov, D.; Drake, R. P.; Froula, D.; Gregori, G.; Levy, M.; Lamb, D.; Fiuza, F.; Petrasso, R.; Li, C.; Zylastra, A.; Rinderknecht, H.; Sakawa, Y.; Spitkovsky, A.

    2015-11-01

    Shock formation from high-Mach number plasma flows is observed in many astrophysical objects such as supernova remnants and gamma ray bursts. These are collisionless shocks as the ion-ion collision mean free path is much larger than the system size. It is believed that seed magnetic fields can be generated on a cosmologically fast timescale via the Weibel instability when such environments are initially unmagnetized. Here we present laboratory experiments using high-power lasers whose ultimate goal is to investigate the dynamics of collisionless shock formation in two interpenetrating plasma streams. Particle-in-cell numerical simulations have confirmed that the strength and structure of the generated magnetic field are consistent with the Weibel mediated electromagnetic nature and that the inferred magnetization level could be as high as ~ 1%. This paper will review recent experimental results from various laser facilities as well as the simulation results and the theoretical understanding of these observations. Taken together, these results imply that electromagnetic instabilities can be significant in both inertial fusion and astrophysical conditions. We will present results from initial NIF experiments, where we observe the neutrons and x-rays generated from the hot plasmas at the center of weakly collisional, counterstreaming flows. Prepared by LLNL under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  12. Fish navigation of large dams emerges from their modulation of flow field experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodwin, R Andrew; Politano, Marcela; Garvin, Justin W; Nestler, John M; Hay, Duncan; Anderson, James J; Weber, Larry J; Dimperio, Eric; Smith, David L; Timko, Mark

    2014-04-08

    Navigating obstacles is innate to fish in rivers, but fragmentation of the world's rivers by more than 50,000 large dams threatens many of the fish migrations these waterways support. One limitation to mitigating the impacts of dams on fish is that we have a poor understanding of why some fish enter routes engineered for their safe travel around the dam but others pass through more dangerous routes. To understand fish movement through hydropower dam environments, we combine a computational fluid dynamics model of the flow field at a dam and a behavioral model in which simulated fish adjust swim orientation and speed to modulate their experience to water acceleration and pressure (depth). We fit the model to data on the passage of juvenile Pacific salmonids (Oncorhynchus spp.) at seven dams in the Columbia/Snake River system. Our findings from reproducing observed fish movement and passage patterns across 47 flow field conditions sampled over 14 y emphasize the role of experience and perception in the decision making of animals that can inform opportunities and limitations in living resources management and engineering design.

  13. Aerodynamic distortion propagation calculation in application of high-speed target detection by laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Yonghui; Sun, Huayan; Zhao, Yanzhong; Chen, Jianbiao

    2015-10-01

    Active laser detection technique has a broad application prospect in antimissile and air defense, however the aerodynamic flow field around the planes and missiles cause serious distortion effect on the detecting laser beams. There are many computational fluid dynamics(CFD) codes that can predict the air density distribution and also the density fluctuations of the flow field, it's necessary for physical optics to be used to predict the distortion properties after propagation through the complex process. Aiming at the physical process of laser propagation in "Cat-eye" lenses and aerodynamic flow field for twice, distortion propagation calculation method is researched in this paper. In the minds of dividing the whole process into two parts, and tread the aero-optical optical path difference as a phase distortion, the incidence and reflection process are calculated using Collins formula and angular spectrum diffraction theory respectively. In addition, turbulent performance of the aerodynamic flow field is estimated according to the electromagnetic propagation theory through a random medium, the rms optical path difference and Strehl ratio of the turbulent optical distortion are obtained. Finally, Computational fluid mechanics and aero-optical distortion properties of the detecting laser beams are calculated with the hemisphere-on-cylinder turret as an example, calculation results are showed and analysed.

  14. Improving Control of Microbially-Induced Mineral Precipitation in Flow Systems - Experiments and Modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerlach, R.; Phillips, A. J.; Lauchnor, E.; Ebigbo, A.; Connolly, J.; Mitchell, A. C.; Helmig, R.; Cunningham, A. B.; Spangler, L.

    2012-12-01

    Batch and flow experiments at atmospheric and geologic CO2 storage-relevant pressures in our laboratories have demonstrated the ability of microbial biofilms and biofilm produced calcium carbonate precipitates to decrease the permeability of natural and artificial porous media as well as improve the stability of unconsolidated porous media. Two overarching challenges in effectively implementing microbially induced calcium carbonate precipitation (MICP) are controlling (1) the spatial and temporal distribution of the formed precipitates and (2) the inactivation of microbes during the calcium carbonate precipitation process. Failure to control either one of those could result in injection well plugging or the necessity to implement costly cell-reinjection or -resuscitation strategies. Our recent work has focused on optimizing strategies for MICP in small (capillaries and micromodels), small columns (1 to 2.5 cm diameter, up to 5 cm in length), meso- (2 ft columns and 4 cm x 8 cm 2-d reactors) and large-scale (75 cm diameter, 38 cm high sandstone radial flow) systems. Results of these experiments have been modelled using two different approaches. (1) a microscale phase-field approach and (2) a large scale volume averaging approach. Close interaction between experimenters and modellers have resulted in improved injection strategies and the models are currently being used as experimental design tools. This presentation will focus on our recent efforts that combined 2 ft column experimentation with Darcy-scale modelling to calibrate and validate a model before utilizing the model for the optimization of biomineralization strategies in radial flow demonstrations in meso-scale sand stone cores at ambient and high pressures. Schematic pore-scale representation of MICP model

  15. Flow Data for Solute Transport Modeling from Tracer Experiments in a Stream Not Continuously Gaining Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bencala, K. E.; Kimball, B. A.; Gooseff, M. N.

    2007-12-01

    In-stream tracer experiments are a well-established method for determining flow data to be incorporated in solute transport modeling. For a gaining stream, this method is implemented to provide spatial flow data at scales of minutes and tens of meters without physical disturbance to the flow of water, the streambed, or biota. Of importance for solute transport modeling, solute inflow loading along the stream can be estimated with this spatial data. The tracer information can also be interpreted to characterize hyporheic exchange time-scales for a stream with hyporheic exchange flowpaths (HEFs) that are short relative to the distance over which the stream gains water. The interpretation of tracer data becomes uncertain for a stream that is not gaining water continuously over intended study reach. We demonstrate, with straight-forward mass-balances, uncertainties for solute loading which arise in the analysis of streams locally losing water while predominantly gaining water (and solutes) over a larger scale. With field data from Mineral Creek (Silverton, Colorado) we illustrate the further uncertainty distinguishing HEFs from (locally) losing segments of the stream. Comparison of bromide tracer with ambient sulfate concentrations suggests that subsurface inflows and outflows, concurrent with likely HEFs, occur in a hydrogeochemical setting of multiple, dispersed and mixed, sources of water along a 64 m sub-reach of the predominately gaining, but locally losing, stream. To compute stream-reach mass-balances (the simplest of water quality models) there is a need to quantitatively define the character and source of contaminants entering streams from ground-water pathways, as well as the potential for changes in water chemistry and contaminant concentrations along flow paths crossing the sediment-water interface. Identification of inflow solute mass requires quantifying water gain, loss, and hyporheic exchange in addition to concentration.

  16. Observations of capillary barriers and preferential flow in layered snow during cold laboratory experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avanzi, Francesco; Hirashima, Hiroyuki; Yamaguchi, Satoru; Katsushima, Takafumi; De Michele, Carlo

    2016-09-01

    Data of liquid water flow around a capillary barrier in snow are still limited. To gain insight into this process, we carried out observations of dyed water infiltration in layered snow at 0 °C during cold laboratory experiments. We considered three different finer-over-coarser textures and three different water input rates. By means of visual inspection, horizontal sectioning, and measurements of liquid water content (LWC), capillary barriers and associated preferential flow were characterized. The flow dynamics of each sample were also simulated solving the Richards equation within the 1-D multi-layer physically based snow cover model SNOWPACK. Results revealed that capillary barriers and preferential flow are relevant processes ruling the speed of water infiltration in stratified snow. Both are marked by a high degree of spatial variability at centimeter scale and complex 3-D patterns. During unsteady percolation of water, observed peaks in bulk volumetric LWC at the interface reached ˜ 33-36 vol % when the upper layer was composed by fine snow (grain size smaller than 0.5 mm). However, LWC might locally be greater due to the observed heterogeneity in the process. Spatial variability in water transmission increases with grain size, whereas we did not observe a systematic dependency on water input rate for samples containing fine snow. The comparison between observed and simulated LWC profiles revealed that the implementation of the Richards equation reproduces the existence of a capillary barrier for all observed cases and yields a good agreement with observed peaks in LWC at the interface between layers.

  17. Reactive flow modeling of small scale detonation failure experiments for a baseline non-ideal explosive

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kittell, David E.; Cummock, Nick R.; Son, Steven F.

    2016-08-01

    Small scale characterization experiments using only 1-5 g of a baseline ammonium nitrate plus fuel oil (ANFO) explosive are discussed and simulated using an ignition and growth reactive flow model. There exists a strong need for the small scale characterization of non-ideal explosives in order to adequately survey the wide parameter space in sample composition, density, and microstructure of these materials. However, it is largely unknown in the scientific community whether any useful or meaningful result may be obtained from detonation failure, and whether a minimum sample size or level of confinement exists for the experiments. In this work, it is shown that the parameters of an ignition and growth rate law may be calibrated using the small scale data, which is obtained from a 35 GHz microwave interferometer. Calibration is feasible when the samples are heavily confined and overdriven; this conclusion is supported with detailed simulation output, including pressure and reaction contours inside the ANFO samples. The resulting shock wave velocity is most likely a combined chemical-mechanical response, and simulations of these experiments require an accurate unreacted equation of state (EOS) in addition to the calibrated reaction rate. Other experiments are proposed to gain further insight into the detonation failure data, as well as to help discriminate between the role of the EOS and reaction rate in predicting the measured outcome.

  18. The Quadratic Gaussian Rate-Distortion Function for Source Uncorrelated Distortions

    CERN Document Server

    Derpich, Milan S; Goodwin, Graham C

    2008-01-01

    We characterize the rate-distortion function for zero-mean stationary Gaussian sources under the MSE fidelity criterion and subject to the additional constraint that the distortion is uncorrelated to the input. The solution is given by two equations coupled through a single scalar parameter. This has a structure similar to the well known water-filling solution obtained without the uncorrelated distortion restriction. Our results fully characterize the unique statistics of the optimal distortion. We also show that, for all positive distortions, the minimum achievable rate subject to the uncorrelation constraint is strictly larger than that given by the un-constrained rate-distortion function. This gap increases with the distortion and tends to infinity and zero, respectively, as the distortion tends to zero and infinity.

  19. General stereoscopic distortion rectification due to arbitrary viewer motion in binocular stereoscopic display

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qun; Schonfeld, Dan

    2014-03-01

    Background: In binocular stereoscopic display, stereoscopic distortions due to viewer motion, such as depth distortion, shear distortion, and rotation distortion, result in misperception of the stereo content and reduce visual comfort dramat­ ically. In the past, perceived depth distortion has been thoroughly addressed, and shear distortion has been investigated within the context of multi-view display to accommodate motion parallax. However, the impact of rotation distortion has barely been studied. Therefore, no technique is available to address stereoscopic distortions due to general viewer motion. Objective: To preserve an undistorted 3D perception from a fixed viewpoint irrespective of viewing position. Method: We propose a unified system and method that rectifies stereoscopic distortion due to general affine viewer motion and delivers a fixed perspective of the 3D scene without distortion irrespective of viewer motion. The system assumes eye tracking of the viewer and pixel-wisely adjusts the display location of the stereo pair based on tracked viewer eye location. Results: For demonstration purpose, we implement our method on controlling perceived depth in binocular stereoscopic display of red and cyan anaglyph 3D. The user first perceives the designed perspective of the 3D scene at the reference position. The user then moves to 6 different positions with various distances and angles relative to the screen. At all positions, the users report to perceive a much more consistent stereo content with the adjusted displays and at the same time, experience improved visual comfort. Novelty: We address stereoscopic distortions with a goal to maintain a fixed perspective of the stereo scene, and propose a unified solution that simultaneously rectifies the stereoscopic distortions resulted from arbitrary viewer motion.

  20. Traversable wormholes in distorted gravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garattini, Remo

    2015-07-01

    In this paper, we consider the effects of distorted gravity on the traversability of the wormholes. In particular, we consider configurations which are sustained by their own gravitational quantum fluctuations. The Ultraviolet divergences appearing to one loop are taken under control with the help of a Noncommutative geometry representation and gravity's rainbow. In this context, it will be shown that for every framework, the self-sustained equation will produce a Wheeler wormhole, namely a wormhole of Planckian size. This means that, from the point of view of traversability, the wormhole will be traversable in principle, but not in practice. For this purpose, in the context of gravity's rainbow we have considered different proposals of rainbow's functions to see if the smallness of the wormhole is dependent on the chosen form of the rainbow's function. Unfortunately, we discover that this is not the case and we suggest that the self-sustained equation can be improved to see if the wormhole radius can be enlarged or not. Some consequences on topology change are discussed.

  1. Traversable Wormholes in Distorted Gravity

    CERN Document Server

    Garattini, Remo

    2015-01-01

    We consider the effects of Distorted Gravity on the traversability of the wormholes. In particular, we consider configurations which are sustained by their own gravitational quantum fluctuations. The Ultra-Violet divergences appearing to one loop are taken under control with the help of a Noncommutative geometry representation and Gravity's Rainbow. In this context, it will be shown that for every framework, the self-sustained equation will produce a Wheeler wormhole, namely a wormhole of Planckian size. This means that, from the point of view of traversability, the wormhole will be traversable in principle, but not in practice. To this purpose, in the context of Gravity's Rainbow we have considered different proposals of rainbow's functions to see if the smallness of the wormhole is dependent on the chosen form of the rainbow's function. Unfortunately, we discover that this is not the case and we suggest that the self-sustained equation can be improved to see if the wormhole radius can be enlarged or not. So...

  2. The Relationship Between Personality Traits, Flow-Experience, and Different Aspects of Practice Behavior of Amateur Vocal Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heller, Katharina; Bullerjahn, Claudia; von Georgi, Richard

    2015-01-01

    Most of the existing studies on musical practice are concerned with instrumentalists only. Since singers are seldom considered in research, the present study is based on an online-sample of amateur vocal students (N = 120; 92 female, 28 male). The study investigated the correlations between personality traits, flow-experience and several aspects of practice characteristics. Personality was represented by the three personality dimensions extraversion, neuroticism and psychoticism, assessed by Eysenck’s Personality Profiler as well as the trait form of the Positive and Negative Affect Schedule. ‘Flow-experience,’ ‘self-congruence’ and ‘fear of losing control over concentration,’ assessed by the Practice Flow Inventory, served as variables for flow-experience. The practice motivation was measured by the Practice Motivation Questionnaire in four categories (‘self,’ ‘group,’ ‘audience,’ ‘teacher’). In addition, the Practice Behavior Questionnaire was used to provide an insight into the practice situation and behavior of singing students. The results show significant correlations: participants with high extraversion-scores experience significantly more flow than less extraverted persons, whereas lesser flow-experience seems to be related to high neuroticism-scores. Nevertheless, there is no influence in flow-experience concerning singing style (‘classical’ or ‘popular’). The longer the practicing time, the more likely students are to achieve flow-experience. However, older singers tend to have less flow-experience. Consequently, singers seem to differ in their personality and practice behavior compared to other musicians. Most of the findings show that having control over one’s instrument is decisive for achieving a performance of high quality, especially for singers. On the other hand, certainty in handling an instrument is essential to arouse a flow-feeling. However, flow-experience seems to be common mainly with amateur singers

  3. Self-Compassion and Interpersonal Cognitive Distortions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akin, Ahmet

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to examine the relationships between self-compassion and interpersonal cognitive distortions. Participants were 338 university students. In this study, the Self-compassion Scale and the Interpersonal Cognitive Distortions Scale were used. The relationships between self-compassion and interpersonal cognitive distortions…

  4. Long-term flow-through column experiments and their relevance to natural granitoid weathering rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Arthur F.; Schulz, Marjorie S.; Lawrence, Corey R.; Vivit, Davison V.; Stonestrom, David A.

    2017-01-01

    Four pairs of fresh and partly-weathered granitoids, obtained from well-characterized watersheds—Merced River, CA, USA; Panola, GA, USA; Loch Vale, CO, USA, and Rio Icacos, Puerto Rico—were reacted in columns under ambient laboratory conditions for 13.8 yrs, the longest running experimental weathering study to date. Low total column mass losses (Fe-oxyhydroxide precipitation. Surface areas returned to within factors of 2 to 3 of their original values after dithionite extraction. Miscible displacement experiments indicated homogeneous plug flow with negligible immobile water, commonly cited for column experiments. Fresh granitoid effluent solute concentrations initially declined rapidly, followed by much slower decreases over the next decade. Weathered granitoid effluent concentrations increased modestly over the same time period, indicating losses of natural Fe-oxide and/or clay coatings and the increased exposure of primary mineral surfaces. Corresponding (fresh and weathered) elemental effluent concentrations trended toward convergence during the last decade of reaction. NETPATH/PHREEQC code simulations indicated non-stoichiometric dissolution involving Ca release from disseminated calcite and excess K release from interlayer biotite. Effluent 87Sr/85Sr ratios reflected a progressive weathering sequence beginning and ending with 87Sr/85Sr values of plagioclase with an additional calcite input and a radiogenic biotite excursion proportional to the granitoid ages.Effluents became thermodynamically saturated with goethite and gibbsite, slightly under-saturated with kaolinite and strongly under-saturated with plagioclase, consistent with kinetically-limited weathering in which solutes such as Na varied with column flow rates. Effluent Na concentrations showed no clear trend with time during the last decade of reaction (fresh granitoids) or increased slowly with time (weathered granitoids). Analysis of cumulative Na release indicated that plagioclase dissolution

  5. Experiment of Flow Regime Map and Local Condensing Heat Transfer Coefficients Inside Three Dimensional Inner Microfin Tubes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YangDu; MingDaoXin

    1999-01-01

    This paper developed a new type of three dimensional inner microfin tube,The experimental results of the flow patterns for the horizontal condensation inside these tubes are reported in the paper,The flow patterns for the hirizontal condensation inside the new made tubes are divided into annular flow stratified flow and intermittent flow within the test conditions.The experiments of the local heat transfer coefficients for the different flow patterns have been systematically caried out ,The experiments of the local heat transfer coefficients changing with the vapor dryness fraction have also been carried out.As compared with the heat transfer coefficients of the two dimensional inner microfin tubes,those of the three dimensional inner microfin tubes increase 47-127% for the annular flow region,38-183% for the stratified flow and 15-75%,for the intermittent flow,respectively.The enhancement factor of the local heat transfer coefficients is from 1\\8-6\\9 for the vapor dryness fraction from 0.05 to 1.

  6. Long-term flow-through column experiments and their relevance to natural granitoid weathering rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Art F.; Schulz, Marjorie S.; Lawrence, Corey R.; Vivit, Davison V.; Stonestrom, David A.

    2017-04-01

    Four pairs of fresh and partly-weathered granitoids, obtained from well-characterized watersheds-Merced River, CA, USA; Panola, GA, USA; Loch Vale, CO, USA, and Rio Icacos, Puerto Rico-were reacted in columns under ambient laboratory conditions for 13.8 yrs, the longest running experimental weathering study to date. Low total column mass losses (convergence during the last decade of reaction. NETPATH/PHREEQC code simulations indicated non-stoichiometric dissolution involving Ca release from disseminated calcite and excess K release from interlayer biotite. Effluent 87Sr/85Sr ratios reflected a progressive weathering sequence beginning and ending with 87Sr/85Sr values of plagioclase with an additional calcite input and a radiogenic biotite excursion proportional to the granitoid ages. Effluents became thermodynamically saturated with goethite and gibbsite, slightly under-saturated with kaolinite and strongly under-saturated with plagioclase, consistent with kinetically-limited weathering in which solutes such as Na varied with column flow rates. Effluent Na concentrations showed no clear trend with time during the last decade of reaction (fresh granitoids) or increased slowly with time (weathered granitoids). Analysis of cumulative Na release indicated that plagioclase dissolution achieved steady state in 3 of the 4 fresh granitoids during the last decade of reaction. Surface-area normalized plagioclase dissolution rates exhibited a narrow range (0.95-1.26 10-13 moles m-2 s-1), in spite of significant stoichiometric differences (An0.21 to An0.50). Rates were an order of magnitude slower than previously reported in shorter duration experiments but generally 2-3 orders of magnitude faster than corresponding natural analogs. CrunchFlow simulations indicated that more than a hundredfold decrease in column flow rates would be required to produce near-saturation reaction affinities that would start to slow plagioclase weathering to real-world levels. Extending simulations

  7. Microscopic distorted wave theory of inelastic scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Picklesimer, A.; Tandy, P.C.; Thaler, R.M.

    1982-03-01

    An exact microscopic distorted wave theory of inelastic scattering is formulated which contains the physical picture usually associated with distorted wave approximations without the usual redundancy. This formulation encompasses the inelastic scattering of two fragments, elementary or composit (both with or without the full complexity of interfragment Pauli symmetries). The fact that these considerations need not be based upon elementary potential interactions is an indication of the generality of the approach and supports its applicability to inelastic meson scattering. This theory also maintains a description of inelastic scattering which is a natural extension of the description of elastic scattering and it provides a general basis for obtaining truncation models with an explicit distorted wave structure. This distorted wave impulse approximation is presented as an example of a particular truncation/approximation encompassed by this theory and the nature of the distorted waves is explicated.

  8. Hybrid distortion function for JPEG steganography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zichi; Zhang, Xinpeng; Yin, Zhaoxia

    2016-09-01

    A hybrid distortion function for JPEG steganography exploiting block fluctuation and quantization steps is proposed. To resist multidomain steganalysis, both spatial domain and discrete cosine transformation (DCT) domain are involved in the proposed distortion function. In spatial domain, a distortion value is allotted for each 8×8 block according to block fluctuation. In DCT domain, quantization steps are employed to allot distortion values for DCT coefficients in a block. The two elements, block distortion and quantization steps, are combined together to measure the embedding risk. By employing the syndrome trellis coding to embed secret data, the embedding changes are constrained in complex regions, where modifications are hard to be detected. When compared to current state-of-the-art steganographic methods for JPEG images, the proposed method presents less detectable artifacts.

  9. TPC track distortions III: fiat lux

    CERN Document Server

    Boyko, I; Dydak, F; Elagin, A; Gostkin, M; Guskov, A; Koreshev, V; Nefedov, Y; Nikolaev, K; Veenhof, R; Wotschack, J; Zhemchugov, A

    2005-01-01

    We present a comprehensive overview and final summary of all four types of static track distortions seen in the HARP TPC, in terms of physical origins, mathematical modelling, and correction algorithms. 'Static'™ distortions are defined as not depending on the event time within the 400 ms long accelerator spill. Calculated static distortions are compared with measurements from cosmic-muon tracks. We characterize track distortions by the r phi residuals of cluster positions with respect to the transverse projection of a helical trajectory constrained by hits in the RPC overlap regions. This method provides a fixed TPC-external reference system (by contrast to the co-moving coordinate system associated with a fit) which solely permits to identify individually, and measure quantitatively, the static TPC track distortions arising from (i) the inhomogeneity of the solenoidal magnetic field, (ii) the inhomogeneity of the electric field from the high-voltage mismatch between the inner and outer TPC field cages, (...

  10. Histopathology Image Analysis in Two Long-Term Animal Experiments with Helical Flow Total Artificial Heart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wotke, Jiri; Homolka, Pavel; Vasku, Jaromír; Dobsak, Petr; Palanova, Petra; Mrkvicova, Veronika; Konecny, Petr; Soska, Vladimir; Pohanka, Michal; Novakova, Marie; Yurimoto, Terumi; Saito, Itsuro; Inoue, Yusuke; Isoyama, Takashi; Abe, Yusuke

    2016-12-01

    Histopathological analysis can provide important information in long-term experiments with total artificial heart (TAH). Recently, a new type of blood pump, the helical flow total artificial heart (HF-TAH) was developed. This study aimed to investigate the changes in selected vital organs in animal experiments with implanted HF-TAH. Samples from lung, liver, and kidneys from two female goats (No. 1301 and No. 1304) with implanted HF-TAH were analyzed. Tissue samples were fixed in 10% formaldehyde and 4 µm thick transverse sections were stained with hematoxylin-eosin (HE). Additional staining was done for detection of connective tissue (Masson-Goldner stain) and for detection of iron (hemosiderin) deposits (Perls stain). Sections were scanned at 100× and 500× magnification with a light microscope. Experiment no. 1301 survived 100 days (cause of termination was heavy damage of the right pump); experimental goat no.1304 survived 68 days and was sacrificed due to severe right hydrodynamic bearing malfunction. Histopathological analysis of liver samples proved signs of chronic venostasis with limited focal necrotic zones. Dilated tubules, proteinaceous material in tubular lumen, and hemosiderin deposits were detected in kidney samples. Contamination of the organs by embolized micro-particles was suspected at the autopsy after discovery of visible damage (scratches) of the pump impeller surface (made from titanium alloy) in both experiments. Sporadic deposits of foreign micro-particles (presumably titanium) were observed in most of the analyzed parenchymal organs. However, the described deposits were not in direct connection with inflammatory reactions in the analyzed tissues. Histopathological analysis showed the presence of minimal contamination of the lung, kidney, and liver tissue samples by foreign material (titanium very likely). The analysis showed only limited pathological changes, especially in liver and kidneys, which might be attributed to the influence of

  11. Scattering integral equations for distorted transition operators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kowalski, K.L.; Siciliano, E.R.; Thaler, R.M.

    1978-11-01

    Methods for embedding phenomenological distorted-wave techniques for rearrangement and inelastic scattering within well-defined theories of multiparticle scattering are developed. The essential point of contact between the two approaches is in the definition and choice of distorting potential. It is shown that the concept of a channel coupling scheme allows a comparative freedom of choice for these potentials; if they are connected operators, such as optical potentials, then it is possible to obtain connected-kernel equations for the distorted transition operators. The latter are introduced in the course of exploiting the two-potential formula for the full transition operator and have the property that their matrix elements with respect to distorted waves are the physical scattering amplitudes. It is found that the distorted counterparts of the Kouri, Levin, and Tobocman and the Bencze-Redish integral equations maintain their connected-kernel and minimally coupled properties. These equations can be used to derive other integral equations with the same properties for the distorted-wave operators which consist of the product of the distorted transition operators and the wave operators corresponding to distorted waves. These simplifications are not realized for arbitrary channel coupling schemes. In order to deal with the general situation an alternative approach employing a subtraction technique which involves projections on the bound two-cluster channel states is introduced. When the distorting potentials are essentially the optical potentials in the entrance and exit channels a set of multichannel two-particle Lippmann-Schwinger integral equations for the two-cluster distorted-wave transition operators are obtained. Input into these two-particle integral equations involves the solution of a modified N-particle equation. Approximations to the latter are discussed in the particular cases of the Kouri, Levin, and Tobocman and Bencze-Redish channel coupling schemes.

  12. Bayesian redshift-space distortions correction from galaxy redshift surveys

    CERN Document Server

    Kitaura, Francisco-Shu; Angulo, Raul E; Chuang, Chia-Hsun; Rodriguez-Torres, Sergio; Monteagudo, Carlos Hernandez; Prada, Francisco; Yepes, Gustavo

    2015-01-01

    We present a Bayesian reconstruction method which maps a galaxy distribution from redshift-space to real-space inferring the distances of the individual galaxies. The method is based on sampling density fields assuming a lognormal prior with a likelihood given by the negative binomial distribution function modelling stochastic bias. We assume a deterministic bias given by a power law relating the dark matter density field to the expected halo or galaxy field. Coherent redshift-space distortions are corrected in a Gibbs-sampling procedure by moving the galaxies from redshift-space to real-space according to the peculiar motions derived from the recovered density field using linear theory with the option to include tidal field corrections from second order Lagrangian perturbation theory. The virialised distortions are corrected by sampling candidate real-space positions (being in the neighbourhood of the observations along the line of sight), which are compatible with the bulk flow corrected redshift-space posi...

  13. Image Quality Assessment Based on Local Linear Information and Distortion-Specific Compensation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hanli; Fu, Jie; Lin, Weisi; Hu, Sudeng; Kuo, C-C Jay; Zuo, Lingxuan

    2016-12-14

    Image Quality Assessment (IQA) is a fundamental yet constantly developing task for computer vision and image processing. Most IQA evaluation mechanisms are based on the pertinence of subjective and objective estimation. Each image distortion type has its own property correlated with human perception. However, this intrinsic property may not be fully exploited by existing IQA methods. In this paper, we make two main contributions to the IQA field. First, a novel IQA method is developed based on a local linear model that examines the distortion between the reference and the distorted images for better alignment with human visual experience. Second, a distortion-specific compensation strategy is proposed to offset the negative effect on IQA modeling caused by different image distortion types. These score offsets are learned from several known distortion types. Furthermore, for an image with an unknown distortion type, a Convolutional Neural Network (CNN) based method is proposed to compute the score offset automatically. Finally, an integrated IQA metric is proposed by combining the aforementioned two ideas. Extensive experiments are performed to verify the proposed IQA metric, which demonstrate that the local linear model is useful in human perception modeling, especially for individual image distortion, and the overall IQA method outperforms several state-of-the-art IQA approaches.

  14. Numerical simulations of the flow with the prescribed displacement of the airfoil and comparison with experiment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vlček V.

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The work is devoted to comparing measured data with the results of numerical simulations. As mathematical model was used mathematical model whitout turbulence for incompressible flow In the experiment was observed the behavior of designed NACA0015 airfoil in airflow. For the numerical solution was used OpenFOAM computational package, this is open-source software based on finite volume method. In the numerical solution is prescribed displacement of the airfoil, which corresponds to the experiment. The velocity at a point close to the airfoil surface is compared with the experimental data obtained from interferographic measurements of the velocity field. Numerical solution is computed on a 3D mesh composed of about 1 million ortogonal hexahedron elements. The time step is limited by the Courant number. Parallel computations are run on supercomputers of the CIV at Technical University in Prague (HAL and FOX and on a computer cluster of the Faculty of Mechatronics of Liberec (HYDRA. Run time is fixed at five periods, the results from the fifth periods and average value for all periods are then be compared with experiment.

  15. h-Refinement for simple corner balance scheme of SN transport equation on distorted meshes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Rong; Yuan, Guangwei

    2016-11-01

    The transport sweep algorithm is a common method for solving discrete ordinate transport equation, but it breaks down once a concave cell appears in spatial meshes. To deal with this issue a local h-refinement for simple corner balance (SCB) scheme of SN transport equation on arbitrary quadrilateral meshes is presented in this paper by using a new subcell partition. It follows that a hybrid mesh with both triangle and quadrilateral cells is generated, and the geometric quality of these cells improves, especially it is ensured that all cells become convex. Combining with the original SCB scheme, an adaptive transfer algorithm based on the hybrid mesh is constructed. Numerical experiments are presented to verify the utility and accuracy of the new algorithm, especially for some application problems such as radiation transport coupled with Lagrangian hydrodynamic flow. The results show that it performs well on extremely distorted meshes with concave cells, on which the original SCB scheme does not work.

  16. PCA-Based Speech Enhancement for Distorted Speech Recognition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tetsuya Takiguchi

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available We investigated a robust speech feature extraction method using kernel PCA (Principal Component Analysis for distorted speech recognition. Kernel PCA has been suggested for various image processing tasks requiring an image model, such as denoising, where a noise-free image is constructed from a noisy input image. Much research for robust speech feature extraction has been done, but it remains difficult to completely remove additive or convolution noise (distortion. The most commonly used noise-removal techniques are based on the spectraldomain operation, and then for speech recognition, the MFCC (Mel Frequency Cepstral Coefficient is computed, where DCT (Discrete Cosine Transform is applied to the mel-scale filter bank output. This paper describes a new PCA-based speech enhancement algorithm using kernel PCA instead of DCT, where the main speech element is projected onto low-order features, while the noise or distortion element is projected onto high-order features. Its effectiveness is confirmed by word recognition experiments on distorted speech.

  17. Epipolar Rectification with Minimum Perspective Distortion for Oblique Images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jianchen; Guo, Bingxuan; Jiang, Wanshou; Gong, Weishu; Xiao, Xiongwu

    2016-01-01

    Epipolar rectification is of great importance for 3D modeling by using UAV (Unmanned Aerial Vehicle) images; however, the existing methods seldom consider the perspective distortion relative to surface planes. Therefore, an algorithm for the rectification of oblique images is proposed and implemented in detail. The basic principle is to minimize the rectified images’ perspective distortion relative to the reference planes. First, this minimization problem is formulated as a cost function that is constructed by the tangent value of angle deformation; second, it provides a great deal of flexibility on using different reference planes, such as roofs and the façades of buildings, to generate rectified images. Furthermore, a reasonable scale is acquired according to the dihedral angle between the rectified image plane and the original image plane. The low-quality regions of oblique images are cropped out according to the distortion size. Experimental results revealed that the proposed rectification method can result in improved matching precision (Semi-global dense matching). The matching precision is increased by about 30% for roofs and increased by just 1% for façades, while the façades are not parallel to the baseline. In another designed experiment, the selected façades are parallel to the baseline, the matching precision has a great improvement for façades, by an average of 22%. This fully proves our proposed algorithm that elimination of perspective distortion on rectified images can significantly improve the accuracy of dense matching. PMID:27827991

  18. Control of Inflow Distortion in a Scarf Inlet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerhold, Carl H.; Clark, Lorenzo R.; Biedron, Robert T.

    2002-01-01

    The scarf inlet has the potential to reduce aircraft inlet noise radiation to the ground by reflecting it into the space above the engine. Without forward motion of the engine, the non-symmetry of the inlet causes inflow distortion which generates noise that is greater than the noise reduction of the scarf. However, acoustic evaluations of aircraft engines are often done on static test stands. A method to reduce inflow distortion by boundary layer suction is proposed and evaluated using a model of a high bypass ratio engine located in an anechoic chamber. The design goal of the flow control system is to make the inflow to the inlet circumferentially uniform and to eliminate reversed flow. This minimizes the inflow distortion and allows for acoustic evaluation of the scarf inlet on a static test stand. The inlet boundary layer suction effectiveness is evaluated both by aerodynamic and by acoustic measurements. Although the design goal is not met, the control system is found to have a beneficial effect on the engine operation, reducing blade stall and speed variation. This is quantified by two acoustic benefits, reduction both of the variability of tone noise and of the low frequency wideband noise due to the inflow distortion. It is felt that a compromise in the manufacture of the control hardware contributes to the inability of the control system to perform as expected from the analysis. The control system with sufficient authority is felt to have the potential to permit reliable acoustic testing in a static configuration of engines with non-symmetric inlets. Because the control system can improve operation of the engine, it may also have the potential to reduce noise and vibration and enhance engine longevity during low speed ground operations in the terminal area.

  19. Flow Control in a Transonic Diffuser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gartner, Jeremy; Amitay, Michael

    2014-11-01

    In some airplanes such as fighter jets and UAV, short inlet ducts replace the more conventional ducts due to their shorter length. However, these ducts are associated with low length-to-diameter ratio and low aspect ratio and, thus, experience massive separation and the presence of secondary flow structures. These flow phenomena are undesirable as they lead to pressure losses and distortion at the Aerodynamic Interface Plane (AIP), where the engine face is located. It causes the engine to perform with a lower efficiency as it would with a straight duct diffuser. Different flow control techniques were studied on the short inlet duct, with the goal to reattach the flow and minimize the distortions at the AIP. Due to the complex interaction between the separation and the secondary flow structures, the necessity to understand the flow mechanisms, and how to control them at a more fundamental level, a new transonic diffuser with an upper ramp and a straight floor was designed and built. The objective of this project is to explore the effectiveness of different flow control techniques in a high subsonic (up to Mach 0.8) diffuser, so that the quasi two-dimensional separation and the formation of secondary flow structure can be isolated using a canonical flow field. Supported by Northrop Grumman.

  20. Semi-analytical model of cross-borehole flow experiments for fractured medium characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roubinet, D.; Irving, J.; Day-Lewis, F. D.

    2014-12-01

    The study of fractured rocks is extremely important in a wide variety of research fields where the fractures and faults can represent either rapid access to some resource of interest or potential pathways for the migration of contaminants in the subsurface. Identification of their presence and determination of their properties are critical and challenging tasks that have led to numerous fracture characterization methods. Among these methods, cross-borehole flowmeter analysis aims to evaluate fracture connections and hydraulic properties from vertical-flow-velocity measurements conducted in one or more observation boreholes under forced hydraulic conditions. Previous studies have demonstrated that analysis of these data can provide important information on fracture connectivity, transmissivity, and storativity. Estimating these properties requires the development of analytical and/or numerical modeling tools that are well adapted to the complexity of the problem. Quantitative analysis of cross-borehole flowmeter experiments, in particular, requires modeling formulations that: (i) can be adapted to a variety of fracture and experimental configurations; (ii) can take into account interactions between the boreholes because their radii of influence may overlap; and (iii) can be readily cast into an inversion framework that allows for not only the estimation of fracture hydraulic properties, but also an assessment of estimation error. To this end, we present a new semi-analytical formulation for cross-borehole flow in fractured media that links transient vertical-flow velocities measured in one or a series of observation wells during hydraulic forcing to the transmissivity and storativity of the fractures intersected by these wells. Our model addresses the above needs and provides a flexible and computationally efficient semi-analytical framework having strong potential for future adaptation to more complex configurations. The proposed modeling approach is demonstrated

  1. Research of the rapid pressure-strain correlation model in the rapid distortion limit

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Even though a number of rapid pressure-strain models have been suggested and successfully tested for different flow situations by various authors,the model proposals still exhibit some apparent deficiencies when subjected to the flows with rapid distortion. From Mansour’s relatively straightforward rapid distortion analysis,if an initially anisotropic flow undergoes a purely rapid rotation,the anisotropy measures will exhibit the behavior of the damped oscillations. Within the current framework of modeling the rapid pressure-strain correlation,i.e.,the models based on the assumption that the M-tensor for the rapid pressure-strain term is expand-able in the Reynolds-stress anisotropy tensor alone,all the model predictions fail to give the damped oscillations in the turbulence anisotropy. In the case of initially isotropic turbulence subjected to rapid distortion,Sj?gren and Johansson showed that all the existing rapid pressure-strain models would deliver the identical path in the anisotropy-invariant map for both homogeneous plane strain and shear flows. The rapid distortion analysis shows two distinct curves reflecting different flow physics. In this work,we try to present a possible way to create a system that can overcome these deficiencies with the aid of the rapid distortion theory (RDT).

  2. Investigations of the Effects of Distortion on Trajectory of Diesel Particulate Matter (PM)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahai, Hamid; Ehsan Shamloo Team

    2011-11-01

    Exposures to diesel PM within urban areas have resulted in elevated respiratory illnesses and risk of premature cardiac death. The present investigation is part of our continuous efforts to understand the relationship between diesel exhausts concentrations and local urban aerodynamics, in metropolitan areas where significant diesel vehicle activities are present. Wind tunnel experiments and field tests were performed to understand the effects of distortion caused by building structures on trajectory of the diesel PM, emitted from diesel engine exhausts in cross flows. Our previous similar investigations without distortion have shown a linear decay in PM concentration with a 10 percent slope. However, when the structures were present, PM concentration increased significantly up to 1d upstream of the object, before it decreases due to the blockage effect. A mathematical correlation based on experimental data has been proposed to estimate the concentration of the diesel PM with respect to the wind velocity at different distances upstream of the objects. This study was supported with a grant from METRANS research program.

  3. Degenerate two-phase incompressible flow problems III: Perturbation analysis and numerical experiments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhangxin Chen

    1999-12-01

    Full Text Available This is the third paper of a three-part series where we develop and analyze a finite element approximation for a degenerate elliptic-parabolic partial differential system which describes the flow of two incompressible, immiscible fluids in porous media. The approximation uses a mixed finite element method for the pressure equation and a Galerkin finite element method for the saturation equation. It is based on a regularization of the saturation equation. In the first paper cite{RckA} we analyzed the regularized differential system and presented numerical results. In the second paper cite{RckB} we obtained error estimates. In the present paper we describe a perturbation analysis for the saturation equation and numerical experiments for complementing this analysis.

  4. Precipitation and Hydrology Experiment Counter-Flow Spectrometer and Impactor Field Campaign Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poellot, Michael [University of North Dakota

    2016-03-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)’s Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility Aerial Facility (ARM AAF) counter-flow spectrometer and impactor (CSI) probe was flown on the University of North Dakota Cessna Citation research aircraft during the Integrated Precipitation and Hydrology Experiment (IPHEX). The field campaign took place during May and June of 2014 over North Carolina and its coastal waters as part of a National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Global Precipitation Measurement validation campaign. The CSI was added to the Citation instrument suite to support the involvement of Jay Mace through the NASA Advanced Composition Explorer (ACE) satellite program and flights of the NASA ER-2 aircraft, which is a civilian version of the Air Force’s U2-S reconnaissance platform. The ACE program funded extra ER-2 flights to focus on clouds that are weakly precipitating, which are also of interest to the Atmospheric System Research program sponsored by DOE.

  5. Chemical kinetic modeling of a methane opposed flow diffusion flame and comparison to experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marinov, N.M., Pitz, W.J.; Westbrook, C.K. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Vincitore, A.M.; Senka, S.M. [Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Lutz, A.E. [Sandia National Labs., Livermore, CA (United States)

    1998-01-01

    The chemical structure of an opposed flow, methane diffusion flame is studied using a chemical kinetic model and the results are compared to experimental measurements. The chemical kinetic paths leading to aromatics and polycyclic aromatics hydrocarbons (PAHs) in the diffusion flame are identified. These paths all involve resonantly stabilized radicals which include propargyl, allyl, cyclopentadienyl, and benzyl radicals. The modeling results show reasonable agreement with the experimental measurements for the large hydrocarbon aliphatic compounds, aromatics, and PAHs. the benzene was predicted to be formed primarily by the reaction sequence of Allyl plus Propargyl equals Fulvene plus H plus H followed by fulvene isomerization to benzene. Naphthalene was modeled using the reaction of benzyl with propargyl, while the combination of cyclopentadienyl radicals were shown to be a minor contributor in the diffusion flame. The agreement between the model and experiment for the four-ring PAHs was poor.

  6. Some experiences with flow measurement in bulb turbines using the differential pressure method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamkowski, A.; Lewandowski, M.

    2012-11-01

    The paper presents selected experiences of authors resulting from the optimization tests carried out for double-regulated bulb turbines using method based on measurement of differential pressure between two points properly located at the turbine flow system. These tests do not require measurement of absolute values of discharge, so this method can be applied without calibration to determine the relative values of discharge. This allows to determine the optimal setting of runner blades and wicket gates opening rates in order to maximize the use of the available hydropower potential at relatively low cost. The paper presents the effects that can be expected in some cases using such method - which is very advantageous as due to low costs.

  7. Tracer experiment results during the Long-Term Flow Test of the Fenton Hill reservoir

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodrigues, N.E.V. (CSM Associates, Rosemanowes, Penryn, Cornwall (United Kingdom)); Robinson, B.A.; Counce, D.A. (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States))

    1993-01-01

    Three chemical tracer experiments and one extended injection of fluid low in concentration of dissolved species have been carried out during the Long Term Flow Test (LTFT) of the Fenton Hill Hot Dry Rock (HDR) reservoir. The tracer tests,results illustrate the dynamic nature of the flow system, with more fluid traveling through longer residence time paths as heat is extracted. The total fracture volumes calculated from these tests allow us to determine the fate of unrecovered injection fluid, examine the pressure-dependence of fracture volume, and, through a comparison to the hydraulic performance, postulate a model for the nature of the pressure drops through the system. The Fresh Water Flush (FWF) test showed that while no dissolved specie behavior is truly conservative (no sources or sinks), several breakthrough curves are well explained with a pore fluid displacement model. Other dissolved components are clearly influenced by dissolution or precipitation reactions. Finally, the transient response of the chemistry during the FWF to an increase in production well pressure showed that some fractures connected to the production well preferentially open when pressure is raised.

  8. Data Analysis for the NASA/Boeing Hybrid Laminar Flow Control Crossflow Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eppink, Jenna L.; Wlezien, Richard

    2011-01-01

    The Hybrid-Laminar Flow Control (HLFC) Crossflow Experiment, completed in 1995. generated a large database of boundary layer stability and transition data that was only partially analyzed before data analysis was abruptly ended in the late 1990's. Renewed interest in laminar flow technologies prompted additional data analysis, to integrate all data, including some post-test roughness and porosity measurements. The objective is to gain new insights into the effects of suction on boundary layer stability. A number of challenges were encountered during the data analysis, and their solutions are discussed in detail. They include the effect of the probe vibration, the effect of the time-varying surface temperature on traveling crossflow instabilities, and the effect of the stationary crossflow modes on the approximation of wall location. Despite the low turbulence intensity of the wind tunnel (0.01 to 0.02%), traveling crosflow disturbances were present in the data, in some cases at amplitudes up to 1% of the freestream velocity. However, the data suggests that transition was dominated by stationary crossflow. Traveling crossflow results and stationary data in the presence of suction are compared with linear parabolized stability equations results as a way of testing the quality of the results.

  9. The Universal Aspect Ratio of Vortices in Rotating Stratifi?ed Flows: Experiments and Observations

    CERN Document Server

    Aubert, Oriane; Gal, Patrice Le; Marcus, Philip S

    2012-01-01

    We validate a new law for the aspect ratio $\\alpha = H/L$ of vortices in a rotating, stratified flow, where $H$ and $L$ are the vertical half-height and horizontal length scale of the vortices. The aspect ratio depends not only on the Coriolis parameter f and buoyancy (or Brunt-Vaisala) frequency $\\bar{N}$ of the background flow, but also on the buoyancy frequency $N_c$ within the vortex and on the Rossby number $Ro$ of the vortex such that $\\alpha = f \\sqrt{[Ro (1 + Ro)/(N_c^2- \\bar{N}^2)]}$. This law for $\\alpha$ is obeyed precisely by the exact equilibrium solution of the inviscid Boussinesq equations that we show to be a useful model of our laboratory vortices. The law is valid for both cyclones and anticyclones. Our anticyclones are generated by injecting fluid into a rotating tank filled with linearly-stratified salt water. The vortices are far from the top and bottom boundaries of the tank, so there is no Ekman circulation. In one set of experiments, the vortices viscously decay, but as they do, they c...

  10. Rheology of wet granular materials in shear flow: experiments and discrete simulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Badetti Michel

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The behaviour of wet granular media in shear flow is characterized by the dependence of apparent friction μ* and solid fraction ΦS on the reduced pressure P* and the inertia number I. Reduced pressure, P*= σ22a2/F0, compares the applied normal stress σ22 on grains of diameter a to the tensile strength of contact F0 (proportional to the surface tension Γ of the liquid and the beads diameter. A specifically modified rotational rheometer is used to characterize the response of model wet granular material (beads with diameter of submillimetric range to applied shear rate γ under controlled normal stress σ22. Discrete Element Method (DEM simulations in 3D are carried out in parallel and numerical results are compared with experimental ones. As P* is reduced, an increase of the apparent friction coefficient μ*=σ12/σ22, measured in the critical state and in slow flows with inertial effects is observed. While the agreement between experiments and simulations is good for dry materials as well as for wet materials in the quasistatic limit (I→0, some differences appear at finite I, for which some possible origins are discussed.

  11. Experimental dead-time distortions of poisson processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faraci, G.; Pennisi, A. R.

    1983-07-01

    In order to check the distortions, introduced by a non-extended dead time on the Poisson statistics, accurate experiments have been made in single channel counting. At a given measuring time, the dependence on the choice of the time origin and on the width of the dead time has been verified. An excellent agreement has been found between the theoretical expressions and the experimental curves.

  12. Experimental dead-time distortions of Poisson processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Faraci, G.; Pennisi, A.R. (Catania Univ. (Italy). Ist. di Fisica; Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, Catania (Italy). Gruppo Nazionale di Struttura della Materia)

    1983-07-01

    In order to check the distortions, introduced by a non-extended dead time on the Poisson statistics, accurate experiments have been made in single channel counting. At a given measuring time, the dependence on the choice of the time origin and on the width of the dead time has been verified. An excellent agreement has been found between the theoretical expressions and the experimental curves.

  13. Spectral distortions of the CMB dipole

    CERN Document Server

    Balashev, S A; Chluba, J; Ivanchik, A V; Varshalovich, D A

    2015-01-01

    We consider the distortions of the CMB dipole anisotropy related to the primordial recombination radiation (PRR) and primordial $y$- and $\\mu$-distortions. The signals arise due to our motion relative to the CMB restframe and appear as a frequency-dependent distortion of the CMB temperature dipole. To leading order, the expected relative distortion of CMB dipole does not depend on the particular observation directions and reaches the level of $10^{-6}$ for the PRR- and $\\mu$-distortions and $10^{-5}$ for the $y$-distortion in the frequency range 1 $-$ 700 GHz. The temperature differences arising from the dipole anisotropy of the relic CMB distortions depend on observation directions. For mutually opposite directions, collinear to the CMB dipole axis, the temperature differences because of the PRR- and $\\mu$-dipole anisotropy attain values $\\Delta T\\simeq 10\\,$nK in the considered range. The temperature difference arising from the $y$-dipole anisotropy may reach values up to $1\\,\\mu$K. The key features of the ...

  14. Flow Generated by an Aerated Rushton Impeller: Two-phase PIV Experiments and Numerical Simulations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Deen, Niels G.; Solberg, Tron; Hjertager, H.

    2002-01-01

    A two-camera PIV technique was used to obtain angle resolved velocity and turbulence data of the flow in a lab-scale stirred tank, equipped with a Rushton turbine. Two cases were investigated: a single-phase flow and a gas-liquid flow. In the former case, the classical radial jet flow pattern accomp

  15. Flow generated by an aerated rushton impeller: two-phase PIV experiments and numerical simulations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Deen, N.G.; Solberg, Tron; Hjertager, H.

    2002-01-01

    A two-camera PIV technique was used to obtain angle resolved velocity and turbulence data of the flow in a lab-scale stirred tank, equipped with a Rushton turbine. Two cases were investigated: a single-phase flow and a gas-liquid flow. In the former case, the classical radial jet flow pattern accomp

  16. Two-phase flow experiments on Counter-Current Flow Limitation in a model of the hot leg of a pressurized water reactor (2015 test series)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beyer, Matthias; Lucas, Dirk; Pietruske, Heiko; Szalinski, Lutz

    2016-12-15

    Counter-Current Flow Limitation (CCFL) is of importance for PWR safety analyses in several accident scenarios connected with loss of coolant. Basing on the experiences obtained during a first series of hot leg tests now new experiments on counter-current flow limitation were conducted in the TOPFLOW pressure vessel. The test series comprises air-water tests at 1 and 2 bar as well as steam-water tests at 10, 25 and 50 bar. During the experiments the flow structure was observed along the hot leg model using a high-speed camera and web-cams. In addition pressure was measured at several positions along the horizontal part and the water levels in the reactor-simulator and steam-generator-simulator tanks were determined. This report documents the experimental setup including the description of operational and special measuring techniques, the experimental procedure and the data obtained. From these data flooding curves were obtained basing on the Wallis parameter. The results show a slight shift of the curves in dependency of the pressure. In addition a slight decrease of the slope was found with increasing pressure. Additional investigations concern the effects of hysteresis and the frequencies of liquid slugs. The latter ones show a dependency on pressure and the mass flow rate of the injected water. The data are available for CFD-model development and validation.

  17. The impact of slab dip variations, gaps and rollback on mantle wedge flow: insights from fluids experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacDougall, Julia G.; Kincaid, Chris; Szwaja, Sara; Fischer, Karen M.

    2014-05-01

    Observed seismic anisotropy and geochemical anomalies indicate the presence of 3-D flow around and above subducting slabs. To investigate how slab geometry and velocity affect mantle flow, we conducted a set of experiments using a subduction apparatus in a fluid-filled tank. Our models comprise two independently adjustable, continuous belts to represent discrete sections of subducting slabs that kinematically drive flow in the surrounding glucose syrup that represents the upper mantle. We analyse how slab dip (ranging from 30° to 80°), slab dip difference between slab segments (ranging from 20° to 50°), rates of subduction (4-8 cm yr-1) and slab/trench rollback (0-3 cm yr-1) affect mantle flow. Whiskers were used to approximate mineral alignment induced by the flow, as well as to predict directions of seismic anisotropy. We find that dip variations between slab segments generate 3-D flow in the mantle wedge, where the path lines of trenchward moving mantle material above the slab are deflected towards the slab segment with the shallower dip. The degree of path line deflection increases as the difference in slab dip between the segments increases, and, for a fixed dip difference, as slab dip decreases. In cases of slab rollback and large slab dip differences, we observe intrusion of subslab material through the gap and into the wedge. Flow through the gap remains largely horizontal before eventual downward entrainment. Whisker alignment in the wedge flow is largely trench-normal, except near the lateral edges of the slab where toroidal flow dominates. In addition, whisker azimuths located above the slab gap deviate most strongly from trench-normal orientations when slab rollback does not occur. Such flow field complexities are likely sufficient to affect deep melt production and shallow melt delivery. However, none of the experiments produced flow fields that explain the trench-parallel shear wave splitting fast directions observed over broad arc and backarc

  18. U.S. experience with hydrazine and flow-accelerated corrosion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Merilo, M.; Munson, D.; Horowitz, J.S. [EPRI US (United States); Bouchacourt, M. [EDF France (France)

    2002-07-01

    Flow-accelerated corrosion (FAC) has been studied intensely for the last 30 years. In most regards, the parametric behavior of FAC has been well understood since the eighties. However, recent experience showing the impact of hydrazine has challenged this understanding. Until the early 1990's, hydrazine levels at most U.S. PWRs had been low, typically around 20 ppb. Since the mid 1990's the U.S. trend has been to increase hydrazine concentration (> 100 ppb) to provide further protection the steam generators tubes from stress corrosion cracking. In the last five years, high concentrations of hydrazine have been shown in the laboratory to affect the rate of FAC. These experiments have demonstrated this effect although there remains considerable scatter in the data supporting this conclusion. It is believed that the impact of hydrazine is due to the change in the oxidizing-reducing potential of the solution, but there is no generally accepted theory to completely describe its behavior. Recently, plant experience has begun to support the laboratory data that high hydrazine does increase the rate of FAC. It should be noted that there are several factors affecting the rate of FAC. Since most plants have changed their water chemistry in recent years, it has been difficult to ''back-out'' the influence of hydrazine. But now, plant experience has clearly shown the impact of high hydrazine especially in the high temperature portions of the feedwater piping. This has been seen at two PWRs, discussed below, and perhaps at several others. This accelerated thinning of the feedwater piping is especially significant since feedwater piping is particularly expensive to inspect and to replace. In addition to the experience with piping, there has also been degradation reported in steam generators, particularly at Gravelines in France, possibly linked to high hydrazine. In order to deal with this issue, the EPRI computer program CHECWORKS was modified in

  19. Distortional Modes of Thin-Walled Beams

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jönsson, Jeppe; Andreassen, Michael Joachim

    2009-01-01

    The classic thin-walled beam theory for open and closed cross-sections can be generalized by including distortional displacement modes. The introduction of additional displacement modes leads to coupled differential equations, which seems to have prohibited the use of exact shape functions...... in the modelling of coupled torsion and distortion. However, if the distortional displacement modes are chosen as those which decouple the differential equations as in non proportionally damped modal dynamic analysis then it may be possible to use exact shape functions and perform analysis on a reduced problem...

  20. Testing for Distortions in Performance Measures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sloof, Randolph; Van Praag, Mirjam

    Distorted performance measures in compensation contracts elicit suboptimal behavioral responses that may even prove to be dysfunctional (gaming). This paper applies the empirical test developed by Courty and Marschke (2008) to detect whether the widely used class of Residual Income based...... performance measures —such as Economic Value Added (EVA)— is distorted, leading to unintended agent behavior. The paper uses a difference-in-differences approach to account for changes in economic circumstances and the self-selection of firms using EVA. Our findings indicate that EVA is a distorted...... performance measure that elicits the gaming response....

  1. Testing for Distortions in Performance Measures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sloof, Randolph; Van Praag, Mirjam

    2015-01-01

    used class of residual income-based performance measures-such as economic value added (EVA)-is distorted, leading to unintended agent behavior. The paper uses a difference-in-differences approach to account for changes in economic circumstances and the self-selection of firms using EVA. Our findings......Distorted performance measures in compensation contracts elicit suboptimal behavioral responses that may even prove to be dysfunctional (gaming). This paper applies the empirical test developed by Courty and Marschke (Review of Economics and Statistics, 90, 428-441) to detect whether the widely...... indicate that EVA is a distorted performance measure that elicits the gaming response....

  2. Lattice distortion in disordered antiferromagnetic XY models

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Peng-Fei; Cao Hai-Jing

    2012-01-01

    The behavior of lattice distortion in spin 1/2 antiferromagnetic XY models with random magnetic modulation is investigated with the consideration of spin-phonon coupling in the adiabatic limit.It is found that lattice distortion relies on the strength of the random modulation.For strong or weak enough spin-phonon couplings,the average lattice distortion may decrease or increase as the random modulation is strengthened.This may be the result of competition between the random magnetic modulation and the spin-phonon coupling.

  3. Numerical modeling of first experiments on PbLi MHD flows in a rectangular duct with foam-based SiC flow channel insert

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smolentsev, S., E-mail: sergey@fusion.ucla.edu [University of California, Los Angeles (United States); Courtessole, C.; Abdou, M.; Sharafat, S. [University of California, Los Angeles (United States); Sahu, S. [Institute of Plasma Research (India); Sketchley, T. [University of California, Los Angeles (United States)

    2016-10-15

    Highlights: • Numerical studies were performed as a pre-experimental analysis to the experiment on MHD PbLi flows in a rectangular duct with a flow channel insert (FCI). • Dynamic testing of foam-based SiC foam-based CVD coated FCI has been performed using MaPLE facility at UCLA. • Two physical models were proposed to explain the experimental results and 3D and 2D computations performed using COMSOL, HIMAG and UCLA codes. • The obtained results suggest that more work on FCI development, fabrication and testing has to be done to assure good hermetic properties before the implementation in a fusion device. - Abstract: A flow channel insert (FCI) is the key element of the DCLL blanket concept. The FCI serves as electrical and thermal insulator to reduce the MHD pressure drop and to decouple the temperature-limited ferritic structure from the flowing hot lead-lithium (PbLi) alloy. The main focus of the paper is on numerical computations to simulate MHD flows in the first experiments on PbLi flows in a stainless steel rectangular duct with a foam-based silicon carbide (SiC) FCI. A single uninterrupted long-term (∼6500 h) test has recently been performed on a CVD coated FCI sample in the flowing PbLi in a magnetic field up to 1.5 T at the PbLi temperature of 300 °C using the MaPLE loop at UCLA. An unexpectedly high MHD pressure drop measured in this experiment suggests that a PbLi ingress into the FCI occurred in the course of the experiment, resulting in degradation of electroinsulating FCI properties. The ingress through the protective CVD layer was further confirmed by the post-experimental microscopic analysis of the FCI. The numerical modeling included 2D and 3D computations using HIMAG, COMSOL and a UCLA research code to address important flow features associated with the FCI finite length, fringing magnetic field, rounded FCI corners and also to predict changes in the MHD pressure drop in the unwanted event of a PbLi ingress. Two physical

  4. Assessing the sensitivity of information distortion to four potential influences in studies of risky choice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seth A. Miller

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The emergence of a leading alternative during the course of a decision is known to bias the evaluation of new information in a manner that favors that alternative. We report 3 studies that address the sensitivity of predecisional information distortion and its effects in hypothetical risky decisions with regard to 4 potential influences: choice domain, repeated choice, memory requirements, and intermediate progress questions. In Experiment 1 (N = 515, the magnitude of information distortion was similar in 5 choice domains (varied between participants involving monetary gambles, song downloads, frequent-flyer miles, political decisions, or medical decisions. Information distortion mediated the relationship between our manipulation of initial preferences and participants' final choices, with the magnitude of the indirect effect being roughly similar across domains. These results replicate and extend previous findings. Additionally, distortion decreased significantly over 4 similar decision problems (within participants, but remained significant in the fourth problem. In Experiment 2 (N = 214, information distortion increased significantly when previously viewed information remained available, apparently because reiterating that information strengthened emerging preferences. In Experiment 3 (N = 223, the removal of intermediate progress questions that measure information distortion and emerging preferences did not significantly affect final choices, again replicating previous results. We conclude that predecisional information distortion is a relatively stable and robust phenomenon that deserves a prominent role in descriptive theories of choice.

  5. A gaming approach to learning medical microbiology: students' experiences of flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beylefeld, Adriana A; Struwig, Magdalena C

    2007-11-01

    There is a growing awareness in medical education of general skills(1) required for lifelong learning. Such skills are best achieved when students experience positive affective states while they are learning, as put forth by the Csikszentmihalyian theory of flow. This study describes how a quiz-type board game was used in the School of Medicine of the Faculty of Health Sciences at the University of the Free State to address students' negativity towards medical microbiology. The study population consisted of third-year medical students who had recently completed the Infections module of the undergraduate Learning Programme for Professional Medicine. Data gathered by means of two questionnaire surveys and direct observation showed that the game impacted positively on students' perceptions of and attitudes towards medical microbiology as a subject. A high perceived probability of the game contributing to the acquisition of general skills was recorded, since the experience of positive affect during the process of informal learning went hand-in-hand with heightened team effort and spontaneous communication. This article may be of value to health educators who wish to supplement formal teaching with informal learning so as to enhance not only the recall of factual knowledge, but also the advancement of general skills.

  6. An Experimenting Field Approach for the Numerical Solution of Multiphase Flow in Porous Media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salama, Amgad; Sun, Shuyu; Bao, Kai

    2016-03-01

    In this work, we apply the experimenting pressure field technique to the problem of the flow of two or more immiscible phases in porous media. In this technique, a set of predefined pressure fields are introduced to the governing partial differential equations. This implies that the velocity vector field and the divergence at each cell of the solution mesh can be determined. However, since none of these fields is the true pressure field entailed by the boundary conditions and/or the source terms, the divergence at each cell will not be the correct one. Rather the residue which is the difference between the true divergence and the calculated one is obtained. These fields are designed such that these residuals are used to construct the matrix of coefficients of the pressure equation and the right-hand side. The experimenting pressure fields are generated in the solver routine and are fed to the different routines, which may be called physics routines, which return to the solver the elements of the matrix of coefficients. Therefore, this methodology separates the solver routines from the physics routines and therefore results in simpler, easy to construct, maintain, and update algorithms.

  7. Polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) Material Test Results for the Capillary Flow Experiments (CFE)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lerch, Bradley A.; Thesken, John C.; Bunnell, Charles T.

    2007-01-01

    In support of the Capillary Flow Experiments (CFE) program, several polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) flight vessels were constructed. Some vessels used a multipiece design, which was chemically welded together. Due to questions regarding the effects of the experiment fluid (silicone oil) on the weld integrity, a series of tests were conducted to provide evidence of the adequacy of the current vessel design. Tensile tests were conducted on PMMA samples that were both in the as-received condition, and also aged in air or oil for up to 8 weeks. Both welded and unwelded samples were examined. Fracture of the joints was studied using notched tensile specimens and Brazilian disk tests. Results showed that aging had no effect on tensile properties. While the welded samples were weaker than the base parent material, the weld strength was found to be further degraded by bubbles in the weld zone. Finally a fracture analysis using the worst-case fracture conditions of the vessel was performed, and the vessel design was found to have a factor of three safety margin.

  8. Using xRage to Model Heat Flow for Experiments to Measure Opacities in HED Plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elgin, L.; Vandervort, R.; Keiter, P.; Drake, R. P.; Mussack, K.; Orban, C.

    2015-11-01

    We are developing a NIF proposal to measure opacities of C, N and O at temperatures and densities relevant to the base of the solar convection zone. Our proposed experiments would provide the first opacity measurements for these elements within this HED regime. A critical feature of our experimental platform is a super-sonic radiation front propagating within the targets. Under these conditions, density remains constant across the radiation front for a couple nanoseconds, enabling a window during which the opacities of the hot and cold target may be measured simultaneously. Afterwards, hydrodynamic effects create temperature and density gradients, which would obfuscate analysis of opacity data. We are using xRage to simulate heat flow within our targets in order to estimate the time scale over which temperature and density gradients evolve. These simulations will better inform our target design and diagnostic requirements. If successful, our experiments could yield the data necessary to validate existing opacity models or provide physical insights to inform the development of new opacity models. Accurate opacity models are essential to the understanding of radiation transport within HED systems, with applications ranging from astrophysics to ICF. U.S. Department of Energy, through the NNSA-DS and SC-OFES Joint Program in High-Energy-Density Laboratory Plasmas, grant #DE-NA0001840. Los Alamos National Laboratory, LA-UR-15-25490.

  9. ROLE OF FCA WELDING PROCESS PARAMETERS ON BEAD PROFILE, ANGULAR AND BOWING DISTORTION OF FERRITIC STAINLESS STEEL SHEETS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    VENKATESAN M. V.

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper discusses the influence of flux cored arc welding (FCAW process parameters such as welding current, travel speed, voltage and CO2 shielding gas flow rate on bead profile, bowing distortion and angular distortion of 409 M ferritic stainless steel sheets of 2 mm thickness. The bowing and angular distortions of the welded plates were measured using a simple device called profile tracer and Vernier bevel protractor respectively. The study revealed that the FCAW process parameters have significant effect on bead profile, and distortion. The relationship between bead profile and distortions were analyzed. Most favorable process parameters that give uniform bead profile and minimum distortion for the weld are recommended for fabrication.

  10. Visualization Experiments of a Specific Fuel Flow Through Quartz-glass Tubes Under both Sub-and Supercritical Conditions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DENG Hongwu; ZHANG Chunben; XU Guoqiang; TAO Zhi; ZHU Kun; WANG Yingjie

    2012-01-01

    The present work is a visualization study of a typical kerosene (RP-3) flowing through vertical and horizontal quartz-glass tubes under both sub- and supercritical conditions by a high speed camera.The experiments are accomplished at temperatures of 300-730 K under pressures from 0.107-5 MPa.Six distinctive two-phase flow patterns are observed in upward flow and the critical point of RP-3 is identified as critical pressure pc=2.33 MPa and critical temperature Tc=645.04 K and it is found that when the fluid pressure exceeds 2.33 MPa the flow can be considered as a single phase flow.The critical opalescence phenomenon of RP-3 is observed when the temperature is between 643.16 K and 648.61 K and the pressure is between 2.308 MPa and 2.366 MPa.The region filled by the critical opalescence in the upward flow is clearly larger than that in the downward flow due to the interaction between the buoyancy force and fluid inertia.Morecover,obvious layered flow phenomenon is observed in horizontal flow under supercritical pressures due to the differences of gravity and density.

  11. Another look at distortions of the Cosmic Microwave Background spectrum

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Zotti, G.; Negrello, M.; Castex, G.; Lapi, A.; Bonato, M.

    2016-03-01

    We review aspects of Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) spectral distortions which do not appear to have been fully explored in the literature. In particular, implications of recent evidences of heating of the intergalactic medium (IGM) by feedback from active galactic nuclei are investigated. Taking also into account the IGM heating associated to structure formation, we argue that values of the y parameter of several × 10-6, i.e. a factor of a few below the COBE/FIRAS upper limit, are to be expected. The Compton scattering by the re-ionized plasma also re-processes primordial distortions, adding a y-type contribution. Hence no pure Bose-Einstein-like distortions are to be expected. An assessment of Galactic and extragalactic foregrounds, taking into account the latest results from the Planck satellite as well as the contributions from the strong CII and CO lines from star-forming galaxies, demonstrates that a foreground subtraction accurate enough to fully exploit the PIXIE sensitivity will be extremely challenging. Motivated by this fact we also discuss methods to detect spectral distortions not requiring absolute measurements and show that accurate determinations of the frequency spectrum of the CMB dipole amplitude may substantially improve over COBE/FIRAS limits on distortion parameters. Such improvements may be at reach of next generation CMB anisotropy experiments. The estimated amplitude of the Cosmic Infrared Background (CIB) dipole might be detectable by careful analyses of Planck maps at the highest frequencies. Thus Planck might provide interesting constraints on the CIB intensity, currently known with a simeq 30% uncertainty.

  12. Numerical Simulation of Steady and Pulsatile Flow Through Vascular Stenoses and Comparisons with Experiments Using Phase Contrast Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behrens, Geoffrey; Agarwal, Ramesh; Moghaddam, Abbas N.; Choi, Eric T.; Amini, Amir A.

    2003-11-01

    A commercially available numerical flow solver "FLUENT" is employed in simulation of blood flow through vascular stenoses. Fluid properties are set to match those of the blood mimicking fluid used in flow phantom experiments at the Washington University School of Medicine. Computational results are compared for steady flow through axisymmetric and three-dimensional phantoms modeling mild to severe stenonses with the data collected using Phase Contrast Magnetic Resonance Imaging (PC-MRI) technique by colleagues in the CVIA laboratory at Washington University School of Medicine. Computations are also performed for pulsatile flow through vascular stenoses. Comparisons of PC-MRI and FLUENT output data show qualitative agreement in streamline patterns and good quantitative agreement for pressure drop across the stenoses.

  13. High Magnetic Shear Gain in a Liquid Sodium Stable Couette Flow Experiment; A Prelude to an alpha-Omega Dynamo

    CERN Document Server

    Colgate, Stirling A; Pariev, Vladimir; Finn, John; Beckley, Howard; Si, Jiahe; Martinic, Joe; Westpfahl, David; Slutz, James; Westrom, Cebastian; Klein, Brianna; Schendel, Paul; Scharle, Cletus; McKinney, Travis; Ginanni, Rocky; Bentley, Ian; Mickey, Timothy

    2010-01-01

    The $\\Omega$-phase of the liquid sodium $\\alpha$-$\\Omega$ dynamo experiment at NMIMT in cooperation with LANL has successfully demonstrated the production of a high toroidal field, $B_{\\phi} \\simeq 8\\times B_r$ from the radial component of an applied poloidal magnetic field, $B_r$. This enhanced toroidal field is produced by rotational shear in stable Couette flow within liquid sodium at $Rm \\simeq 120$. The small turbulence in stable Taylor-Couette flow is caused by Ekman flow where $ (\\delta v/v)^2 \\sim 10^{-3} $. This high $\\Omega$-gain in low turbulence flow contrasts with a smaller $\\Omega$-gain in higher turbulence, Helmholtz-unstable shear flows. This result supports the ansatz that large scale astrophysical magnetic fields are created within semi-coherent large scale motions in which turbulence plays only a smaller diffusive role that enables magnetic flux linkage.

  14. Water Tank Experiments on Stratified Flow over Double Mountain-Shaped Obstacles at High-Reynolds Number

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivana Stiperski

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In this article, we present an overview of the HyIV-CNRS-SecORo (Hydralab IV-CNRS-Secondary Orography and Rotors Experiments laboratory experiments carried out in the CNRM (Centre National de Recherches Météorologiques large stratified water flume. The experiments were designed to systematically study the influence of double obstacles on stably stratified flow. The experimental set-up consists of a two-layer flow in the water tank, with a lower neutral and an upper stable layer separated by a sharp density discontinuity. This type of layering over terrain is known to be conducive to a variety of possible responses in the atmosphere, from hydraulic jumps to lee waves and highly turbulent rotors. In each experiment, obstacles were towed through the tank at a constant speed. The towing speed and the size of the tank allowed high Reynolds-number flow similar to the atmosphere. Here, we present the experimental design, together with an overview of laboratory experiments conducted and their results. We develop a regime diagram for flow over single and double obstacles and examine the parameter space where the secondary obstacle has the largest influence on the flow. Trapped lee waves, rotors, hydraulic jumps, lee-wave interference and flushing of the valley atmosphere are successfully reproduced in the stratified water tank. Obstacle height and ridge separation distance are shown to control lee-wave interference. Results, however, differ partially from previous findings on the flow over double ridges reported in the literature due to the presence of nonlinearities and possible differences in the boundary layer structure. The secondary obstacle also influences the transition between different flow regimes and makes trapped lee waves possible for higher Froude numbers than expected for an isolated obstacle.

  15. The Second Las Cruces Trench Experiment: Experimental Results and Two-Dimensional Flow Predictions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hills, R. G.; Wierenga, P. J.; Hudson, D. B.; Kirkland, M. R.

    1991-10-01

    As part of a comprehensive field study designed to provide data to test stochastic and deterministic models of water flow and contaminant transport in the vadose zone, several trench experiments were performed in the semiarid region of southern New Mexico. The first trench experiment is discussed by Wierenga et al. (this issue). During the second trench experiment, a 1.2 m wide by 12 m long area on the north side of and parallel to a 26.4 m long by 4.8 m wide by 6m deep trench was irrigated with water containing tracers using a carefully controlled drip irrigation system. The irrigated area was heavily instrumented with tensiometers and neutron probe access tubes to monitor water movement, and with suction samplers to monitor solute transport. Water containing tritium and bromide was. applied during the first 11.5 days of the study. Thereafter, water was applied without tracers for an additional 64 days. Both water movement and tracer movement were monitored in the subsoil during infiltration and redistribution. The experimental results indicate that water and bromide moved fairly uniformly during infiltration and the bromide moved ahead of the tritium due to anion exclusion during redistribution. Comparisons between measurements and predictions made with a two-dimensional model show qualitative agreement for two of the three water content measurement planes. Model predictions of tritium and bromide transport were not as satisfactory. Measurements of both tritium and bromide show localized areas of high relative concentrations and a large downward motion of bromide relative to tritium during redistribution. While the simple deterministic model does show larger downward motions for bromide than for tritium during redistribution, it does not predict the high concentrations of solute observed during infiltration, nor can it predict the heterogeneous behavior observed for tritium during infiltration and for bromide during redistribution.

  16. Experiments on the influence of low frequency sound on the acoustic resonances in a corrugated flow pipe

    CERN Document Server

    Kristiansen, Ulf R; Pinhède, Cédric; Amielh, Muriel

    2010-01-01

    It is well known that an air flow in a corrugated pipe might excite the longitudinal acoustic modes of the pipe. In this letter is reported experiments where a low frequency, oscillating flow with velocity magnitudes of the same order as the air flow has been added. Depending on the oscillation strength, it might silence the pipe or move the resonances to higher harmonics. It is also shown that a low frequency oscillation by itself might excite a higher frequency acoustic resonance of the pipe.

  17. Properties of the distorted Kerr black hole

    CERN Document Server

    Abdolrahimi, Shohreh; Nedkova, Petya; Tzounis, Christos

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the properties of the ergoregion and the location of the curvature singularities for the Kerr black hole distorted by the gravitational field of external sources. The particular cases of quadrupole and octupole distortion are studied in detail. We also investigate the scalar curvature invariants of the horizon and compare their behaviour with the case of the isolated Kerr black hole. In a certain region of the parameter space the ergoregion consists of a compact region encompassing the horizon and a disconnected part extending to infinity. The curvature singularities in the domain of outer communication, when they exist, are always located on the boundary of the ergoregion. We present arguments that they do not lie on the compact ergosurface. For quadrupole distortion the compact ergoregion size is negatively correlated with the horizon angular momentum when the external sources are varied. For octupole distortion infinitely many ergoregion configurations can exist for a certain horizon angular...

  18. Perceived Coding Distortion Assessment for Streaming Video

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fuzheng Yang

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available For applications involving video streaming, full decoding is usually not acceptable for quality assessment. To address the inherent challenges, an efficient method for coding distortion assessment is proposed in this paper. Building on empirical analysis, the proposed method employs a linear model to assess the coding distortion using the quantization scale. Furthermore, the characteristics of the human visual system are exploited by taking into account the spatial and temporal masking. To estimate the required spatial and temporal complexities in absence of sufficient information, a rate-distortion model is theoretically derived to formulate their relationship with the coding bit-rate. Extensive experimental results have demonstrated the effectiveness of the proposed method for quality assessment with respect to perceived coding distortion.

  19. Molecular structure and centrifugal distortion in methylthioethyne

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Engelsen, D. den

    1969-01-01

    The investigation of the microwave spectra of five isotopic species of methylthioethyne, HCCSCH3 enabled a fairly reliable calculation to be made of bond lengths and angles. The centrifugal distortion parameters are related to molecular vibrations.

  20. Coulomb Distortion in the Inelastic Regime

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patricia Solvignon, Dave Gaskell, John Arrington

    2009-09-01

    The Coulomb distortion effects have been for a long time neglected in deep inelastic scattering for the good reason that the incident energies were very high. But for energies in the range of earlier data from SLAC or at JLab, the Coulomb distortion could have the potential consequence of affecting the A-dependence of the EMC effect and of the longitudinal to transverse virtual photon absorption cross section ratio $R(x,Q^2)$.

  1. Domestic Distortions and the Deindustrialization Hypothesis

    OpenAIRE

    Paul Krugman

    1996-01-01

    It is widely believed that U.S. trade deficits have displaced workers from highly paid manufacturing jobs into less well-paid service employment, contributing to declining incomes for the nation as a whole. Although proponents of this view do not usually think of it this way, this analysis falls squarely into the `domestic distortions' framework pioneered by Jagdish Bhagwati. This paper models the deindustrialization hypothesis explicitly as a domestic distortions issue, and shows that while ...

  2. Welding distortion of aluminium structural members

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goglio, L. [Politecnico di Torino (Italy). Dept. of Mech.; Gugliotta, A. [Politecnico di Torino (Italy). Dept. of Mech.; Pasquino, D. [Politecnico di Torino (Italy). Dept. of Mech.

    1996-12-31

    The paper deals with the angular distortion induced in aluminium tubular beams during welding to prepare T junctions. The research, based on experimental measurements, makes use of statistical methods to identify the parameters (beam section, weld length, welding direction, etc.) that influence the angular change. The results are discussed also considering a model known from the literature. It is found that the distortion is generally low and can be minimized by a proper welding process. (orig.)

  3. Advanced Machining Toolpath for Low Distortion

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-02-28

    modeling software packages. Efforts in Production Module consisted of setting up an analysis of cutting forces across the fatigue coupon toolpath and...in the distortion modeling software focused on simulating final part distortion due to the initial bulk stress in the aluminum stock material. TWS...process. In each plot, the red force trace is the original toolpath and the green force trace is the optimized toolpath. In both toolpaths, cutting

  4. Harmonic distortion in microwave photonic filters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rius, Manuel; Mora, José; Bolea, Mario; Capmany, José

    2012-04-09

    We present a theoretical and experimental analysis of nonlinear microwave photonic filters. Far from the conventional condition of low modulation index commonly used to neglect high-order terms, we have analyzed the harmonic distortion involved in microwave photonic structures with periodic and non-periodic frequency responses. We show that it is possible to design microwave photonic filters with reduced harmonic distortion and high linearity even under large signal operation.

  5. CMB distortions from superconducting cosmic strings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tashiro, Hiroyuki; Sabancilar, Eray; Vachaspati, Tanmay

    2012-05-01

    We reconsider the effect of electromagnetic radiation from superconducting strings on cosmic microwave background μ and y distortions and derive present (COBE-FIRAS) and future (PIXIE) constraints on the string tension, μs, and electric current, I. We show that absence of distortions of the cosmic microwave background in PIXIE will impose strong constraints on μs and I, leaving the possibility of light strings (Gμs≲10-18) or relatively weak currents (I≲10TeV).

  6. Ripples and Dunes in Directionally Varying Flows--Three Decades of Experiments, Theory, and Modeling (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubin, D. M.

    2013-12-01

    The morphology and dynamics of ripples and dunes have received considerable study for the past half-century, but most studies have focused on only the small subset of flows that are convenient to study in a lab: using flumes with flows that are constant in direction or wave tanks with flows that reverse by 180°. Many natural flows are free to change in direction by other angles (seasonal or daily cycles in wind direction; reversing wave-generated flows combined with alongshore currents; reversing tidal currents in curved channels; unsteady separated flows). A handful of studies have addressed a broader set of such flows using specialized lab setups (rotating beds in unidirectional flows; oscillating or pulsed beds in static or flowing water; unsteady flows that arise in channel expansions or topographic depressions). Other studies have applied theory or modeling (usually incorporating simplified relations between topography, flow, and sediment transport) to bedform morphology and orientation. The studies that have addressed this broader variety of natural flows have found that compared to the relatively sinuous barchanoid morphology of ripples and dunes in unidirectional flows, bedforms in bi-directional flows can have relatively long straight crests (wave ripples or linear dunes); and multi-directional flows have been shown to produce brick- or tile-pattern ripples under interfering waves, star dunes in deserts, and polygonal dunes within craters on Mars. The topic receiving most study in directionally varying flows is bedform orientation in bi-directional flows. A number of lab, field, theoretical, and modeling studies have found that bedforms arise with the orientation subject to maximum gross-normal transport, but some recent results suggest other orientations are possible where a bed is only partially covered in sand.

  7. Development of Methods for Obtaining Position Image and Chemical Binding Information from Flow Experiments of Porous Media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haugan, Are

    1998-12-01

    Existing oil reservoirs might be more fully exploited if the properties of the flow of oil and water in porous media were better known. In laboratory experiments it is important to collect as much information as possible to make a descriptive model of the system, including position imaging and chemical binding information. This thesis develops nuclear methods for obtaining position image and chemical binding information from flow experiments of porous media. A combined positron emission tomography and single photon emission computed tomography system to obtain position images, and a time-differential perturbed angular correlation system to obtain chemical binding information, have been built and thoroughly tested. 68 refs., 123 figs., 14 tabs.

  8. Flow around a Complex Building: Comparisons between Experiments and a Reynolds-Averaged Navier Stokes Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calhoun, Ronald; Gouveia, Frank; Shinn, Joseph; Chan, Stevens; Stevens, Dave; Lee, Robert; Leone, John

    2004-05-01

    An experiment investigating flow around a single complex building was performed in 2000. Sonic anemometers were placed around the building, and two-dimensional wind velocities were recorded. An energy-budget and wind-measuring station was located upstream to provide stability and inflow conditions. In general, the sonic anemometers were located in a horizontal plane around the building at a height of 2.6 m above the ground. However, at the upwind wind station, two levels of the wind were measured. The resulting database can be sampled to produce mean wind fields associated with specific wind directions such as 210°, 225°, and 240°. The data are available generally and should be useful for testing computational fluid dynamical models for flow around a building. An in-house Reynolds-averaged Navier Stokes approach was used to compare with the mean wind fields for the predominant wind directions. The numerical model assumed neutral flow and included effects from a complex array of trees in the vicinity of the building. Two kinds of comparisons are presented: 1) direct experimental versus modeled vector comparisons and 2) a numerical metric approach that focuses on wind magnitude and direction errors. The numerical evaluation generally corroborates the vector-to-vector inspection, showing reasonable agreement for the mean wind fields around the building. However, regions with special challenges for the model were identified. In particular, recirculation regions were especially difficult for the model to capture correctly. In the 240° case, there is a tendency for the model to exaggerate the turning effect in the wind caused by the effect of the building. Two different kinds of simulations were performed: 1) predictive calculations with a reasonable but not high-fidelity representation of the building's architectural complexity and 2) postexperiment calculations in which a large number of architectural features were well represented. Although qualitative evidence

  9. Low distortion laser welding of cylindrical components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kittel, Sonja

    2011-02-01

    Automotive components are for the most part cylindrical and thus the weld seams are of radial shape. Radial weld seams are usually produced by starting at a point on the component's surface rotating the component resulting in an overlap zone at the start/end of the weld. In this research, it is shown that the component's distortion strongly depends on the overlap of weld start and end. A correlation between overlap zone and distortion is verified by an experimental study. In order to reduce distortion generated by the overlap zone a special optics is used which allows shaping the laser beam into a ring shape which is then focused on the cylindrical surface and produces a radial ring weld seam simultaneously by one laser pulse. In doing this, the overlap zone is eliminated and distortion can be reduced. Radial weld seams are applied on precision samples and distortion is measured after welding. The distortion of the precision samples is measured by a tactile measuring method and a comparison of the results of welding with the ring optics to reference welds is done.

  10. Field investigation of preferential fissure flow paths with hydrochemical analysis of small-scale sprinkling experiments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Krzeminska, D.M.; Bogaard, T.A.; Debieche, T.-H.; Cervi, F.; Marc, V.; Malet, J.-P.

    2014-01-01

    The unsaturated zone largely controls groundwater recharge by buffering precipitation while at the same time providing preferential flow paths for infiltration. The importance of preferential flow on landslide hydrology is recognised in the literature; however, its monitoring and quantification

  11. Flow Boiling and Condensation Experiment (FBCE) for the International Space Station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mudawar, Issam; Hasan, Mohammad M.; Kharangate, Chirag; O'Neill, Lucas; Konishi, Chris; Nahra, Henry; Hall, Nancy; Balasubramaniam, R.; Mackey, Jeffrey

    2015-01-01

    The proposed research aims to develop an integrated two-phase flow boiling/condensation facility for the International Space Station (ISS) to serve as primary platform for obtaining two-phase flow and heat transfer data in microgravity.

  12. Development Of An Experiment For Measuring Flow Phenomena Occurring In A Lower Plenum For VHTR CFD Assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D. M. McEligot; K.G. Condie; G. E. Mc Creery; H. M. Mc Ilroy

    2005-09-01

    The objective of the present report is to document the design of our first experiment to measure generic flow phenomena expected to occur in the lower plenum of a typical prismatic VHTR (Very High Temperature Reactor) concept. In the process, fabrication sketches are provided for the use of CFD (computational fluid dynamics) analysts wishing to employ the data for assessment of their proposed codes. The general approach of the project is to develop new benchmark experiments for assessment in parallel with CFD and coupled CFD/systems code calculations for the same geometry. One aspect of the complex flow in a prismatic VHTR is being addressed: flow and thermal mixing in the lower plenum ("hot streaking" issue). Current prismatic VHTR concepts were examined to identify their proposed flow conditions and geometries over the range from normal operation to decay heat removal in a pressurized cooldown. Approximate analyses were applied to determine key non-dimensional parameters and their magnitudes over this operating range. The flow in the lower plenum can locally be considered to be a situation of multiple jets into a confined crossflow -- with obstructions. Flow is expected to be turbulent with momentum-dominated turbulent jets entering; buoyancy influences are estimated to be negligible in normal full power operation. Experiments are needed for the combined features of the lower plenum flows. Missing from the typical jet experiments available are interactions with nearby circular posts and with vertical posts in the vicinity of vertical walls - with near stagnant surroundings at one extreme and significant crossflow at the other.

  13. Changes and Challenges in the Flow of International Human Capital: China's Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Su-Yan

    2010-01-01

    This article tracks the changes in the directions of the international flow of Chinese human capital between the 1870s and 2000s. Although many studies on international academic flow adopt the pull-and-push approach, this article argues that the direction of human capital flow is not determined solely by an individual's choice when faced with a…

  14. Soil pipe flow tracer experiments: 2. Application of a transient storage zone model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soil pipes, defined here as discrete preferential flow paths generally parallel to the slope, are important subsurface flow pathways that play a role in many soil erosion phenomena. However, limited research has been performed on quantifying and characterizing their flow and transport characteristic...

  15. Effects of debris flow composition on runout, depositional mechanisms, and deposit morphology in laboratory experiments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Haas, Tjalling; Braat, Lisanne; Leuven, Jasper R F W; Lokhorst, Ivar R.; Kleinhans, Maarten G.

    2015-01-01

    Predicting debris flow runout is of major importance for hazard mitigation. Apart from topography and volume, runout distance and area depends on debris flow composition and rheology, but how is poorly understood. We experimentally investigated effects of composition on debris flow runout, depositio

  16. Morphodynamics and sedimentary structures of bedforms under supercritical-flow conditions: new insights from flume experiments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cartigny, M.J.B.; Ventra, D.; Postma, G.; Berg, J.H. van den

    2012-01-01

    Particulate density currents, such as pyroclastic flows and turbidity currents, are prone to flow in a supercritical state, due to their small density difference in relation to the ambient fluid. Facies deposited in supercritical-flow conditions are therefore likely to be common, yet their recogniti

  17. Experiments and sensitivity analyses for heat transfer in a meter-scale regularly fractured granite model with water flow

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wei LU; Yan-yong XIANG

    2012-01-01

    Experiments of saturated water flow and heat transfer were conducted for a meter-scale model of regularly fractured granite.The fractured rock model (height 1502.5 mm,width 904 mm,and thickness 300 mm),embedded with two vertical and two horizontal fractures of pre-set apertures,was constructed using 18 pieces of intact granite.The granite was taken from a site currently being investigated for a high-level nuclear waste repository in China.The experiments involved different heat source temperatures and vertical water fluxes in the embedded fractures either open or filled with sand.A finite difference scheme and computer code for calculation of water flow and heat transfer in regularly fractured rocks was developed,verified against both the experimental data and calculations from the TOUGH2 code,and employed for parametric sensitivity analyses.The experiments revealed that,among other things,the temperature distribution was influenced by water flow in the fractures,especially the water flow in the vertical fracture adjacent to the heat source,and that the heat conduction between the neighboring rock blocks in the model with sand-filled fractures was enhanced by the sand,with larger range of influence of the heat source and longer time for approaching asymptotic steady-state than those of the model with open fractures.The temperatures from the experiments were in general slightly smaller than those from the numerical calculations,probably due to the fact that a certain amount of outward heat transfer at the model perimeter was unavoidable in the experiments.The parametric sensitivity analyses indicated that the temperature distribution was highly sensitive to water flow in the fractures,and the water temperature in the vertical fracture adjacent to the heat source was rather insensitive to water flow in other fractures.

  18. Two-phase flow experiments in a model of the hot leg of a pressurised water reactor. Technical report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seidel, Tobias; Vallee, Christophe; Lucas, Dirk; Beyer, Matthias; Deendarlianto

    2011-09-15

    In order to investigate the two-phase flow behaviour in a complex reactor-typical geometry and to supply suitable data for CFD code validation, a model of the hot leg of a pressurised water reactor was built at FZD. The hot leg model is operated in the pressure chamber of the TOPFLOW test facility, which is used to perform high-pressure experiments under pressure equilibrium with the inside atmosphere of the chamber. This technique makes it possible to visualise the two-phase flow through large windows, also at reactor-typical pressure levels. In order to optimise the optical observation possibilities, the test section was designed with a rectangular cross-section. Experiments were performed with air and water at 1.5 and 3.0 bar at room temperature as well as with steam and water at 15, 30 and 50 bar and the corresponding saturation temperature (i.e. up to 264 C). The total of 194 runs are divided into 4 types of experiments covering stationary co-current flow, counter-current flow, flow without water circulation and transient counter-current flow limitation (CCFL) experiments. This report provides a detailed documentation of the experiments including information on the experimental setup, experimental procedure, test matrix and on the calibration of the measuring devices. The available data is described and data sheets were arranged for each experiment in order to give an overview of the most important parameters. For the cocurrent flow experiments, water level histograms were arranged and used to characterise the flow in the hot leg. In fact, the form of the probability distribution was found to be sensitive to the boundary conditions and, therefore, is useful for the CFD comparison. Furthermore, the flooding characteristics of the hot leg model plotted in terms of the classical Wallis parameter or Kutateladze number were found to fail to properly correlate the data of the air/water and steam/water series. Therefore, a modified Wallis parameter is proposed, which

  19. Laboratory flow experiments for visualizing carbon dioxide-induced, density-driven brine convection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kneafsey, T.; Pruess, K.

    2009-09-01

    Injection of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) into saline aquifers confined by low-permeability cap rock will result in a layer of CO{sub 2} overlying the brine. Dissolution of CO{sub 2} into the brine increases the brine density, resulting in an unstable situation in which more-dense brine overlies less-dense brine. This gravitational instability could give rise to density-driven convection of the fluid, which is a favorable process of practical interest for CO{sub 2} storage security because it accelerates the transfer of buoyant CO{sub 2} into the aqueous phase, where it is no longer subject to an upward buoyant drive. Laboratory flow visualization tests in transparent Hele-Shaw cells have been performed to elucidate the processes and rates of this CO{sub 2} solute-driven convection (CSC). Upon introduction of CO{sub 2} into the system, a layer of CO{sub 2}-laden brine forms at the CO{sub 2}-water interface. Subsequently, small convective fingers form, which coalesce, broaden, and penetrate into the test cell. Images and time-series data of finger lengths and wavelengths are presented. Observed CO{sub 2} uptake of the convection system indicates that the CO{sub 2} dissolution rate is approximately constant for each test and is far greater than expected for a diffusion-only scenario. Numerical simulations of our system show good agreement with the experiments for onset time of convection and advancement of convective fingers. There are differences as well, the most prominent being the absence of cell-scale convection in the numerical simulations. This cell-scale convection observed in the experiments is probably initiated by a small temperature gradient induced by the cell illumination.

  20. Effect of Distortion Ratio on Local Scour Under Tidal Currents and Waves

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    窦希萍; 董凤舞

    2004-01-01

    Five generalized physical models of different distortion ratios were built according to DOU Guo-ren' s similarity theory of total sediment transport modeling for estuarine and coastal regions. Experiments on local scour in front of groins were made under the actions of tidal currents and waves with clear and sediment entraining water. The scour depths under different dynamic actions are compared. The effect of the distortion ratio on the depth of scour hole is discussed. A relationship between scour depths for distorted and undistorted models is given.

  1. Turbulent magnetic Prandtl numbers obtained with MHD Taylor-Couette flow experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Gellert, M

    2008-01-01

    The stability problem of MHD Taylor-Couette flows with toroidal magnetic fields is considered in dependence on the magnetic Prandtl number. Only the most uniform (but not current-free) field with B\\_in = B\\_out has been considered. For high enough Hartmann numbers the toroidal field is always unstable. Rigid rotation, however, stabilizes the magnetic (kink-)instability. The axial current which drives the instability is reduced by the electromotive force induced by the instability itself. Numerical simulations are presented to probe this effect as a possibility to measure the turbulent conductivity in a laboratory. It is shown numerically that in a sodium experiment (without rotation) an eddy diffusivity 4 times the molecular diffusivity appears resulting in a potential difference of ~34 mV/m. If the cylinders are rotating then also the eddy viscosity can be measured. Nonlinear simulations of the instability lead to a turbulent magnetic Prandtl number of 2.1 for a molecular magnetic Prandtl number of 0.01. The...

  2. Hypersonic Engine Leading Edge Experiments in a High Heat Flux, Supersonic Flow Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gladden, Herbert J.; Melis, Matthew E.

    1994-01-01

    A major concern in advancing the state-of-the-art technologies for hypersonic vehicles is the development of an aeropropulsion system capable of withstanding the sustained high thermal loads expected during hypersonic flight. Three aerothermal load related concerns are the boundary layer transition from laminar to turbulent flow, articulating panel seals in high temperature environments, and strut (or cowl) leading edges with shock-on-shock interactions. A multidisciplinary approach is required to address these technical concerns. A hydrogen/oxygen rocket engine heat source has been developed at the NASA Lewis Research Center as one element in a series of facilities at national laboratories designed to experimentally evaluate the heat transfer and structural response of the strut (or cowl) leading edge. A recent experimental program conducted in this facility is discussed and related to cooling technology capability. The specific objective of the experiment discussed is to evaluate the erosion and oxidation characteristics of a coating on a cowl leading edge (or strut leading edge) in a supersonic, high heat flux environment. Heat transfer analyses of a similar leading edge concept cooled with gaseous hydrogen is included to demonstrate the complexity of the problem resulting from plastic deformation of the structures. Macro-photographic data from a coated leading edge model show progressive degradation over several thermal cycles at aerothermal conditions representative of high Mach number flight.

  3. Density- and viscosity-stratified gravity currents: Insight from laboratory experiments and implications for submarine flow deposits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amy, L. A.; Peakall, J.; Talling, P. J.

    2005-08-01

    Vertical stratification of particle concentration is a common if not ubiquitous feature of submarine particulate gravity flows. To investigate the control of stratification on current behaviour, analogue stratified flows were studied using laboratory experiments. Stratified density currents were generated by releasing two-layer glycerol solutions into a tank of water. Flows were sustained for periods of tens of seconds and their velocity and concentration measured. In a set of experiments the strength of the initial density and viscosity stratification was increased by progressively varying the lower-layer concentration, CL. Two types of current were observed indicating two regimes of behaviour. Currents with a faster-moving high-concentration basal region that outran the upper layer were produced if CL < 75%. Above this critical value of CL, currents were formed with a relatively slow, high-concentration base that lagged behind the flow front. The observed transition in behaviour is interpreted to indicate a change from inertia- to viscosity-dominated flow with increasing concentration. The reduction in lower-layer velocity at high concentrations is explained by enhanced drag at low Reynolds numbers. Results show that vertical stratification produces longitudinal stratification in the currents. Furthermore, different vertical and temporal velocity and concentration profiles characterise the observed flow types. Implications for the deposit character of particle-laden currents are discussed and illustrated using examples from ancient turbidite systems.

  4. Shaking of pyroclastic cones and the formation of granular flows on their flanks: Results from laboratory experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cagnoli, B.; Romano, G. P.; Ventura, G.

    2015-11-01

    We have carried out laboratory experiments to study the generation of granular flows on the slopes of pyroclastic cones that are experiencing volcanic tremor or tectonic earthquakes. These experiments are inspired by the occurrence of granular flows on the flanks of Mount Vesuvius during its 1944 eruption. Our laboratory model consists of sand cones built around a vibrating tube which represents a volcanic conduit with erupting magma inside. A video camera allows the study of the granular flow inception, movement and deposition. Although the collapse of the entire cone is obtained at a specific resonance frequency, single granular flows can be generated by all the vibration frequencies (1-16 Hz) and all the vibration amplitudes (0.5-1.5 mm) that our experimental apparatus has allowed us to adopt. We believe that this is due to the fact that the energy threshold to trigger the flows is small in value. Therefore, if this is true in nature as well, shaken pyroclastic cones are always potentially dangerous because they can easily generate flows that can strike the surrounding areas.

  5. Insight from Laboratory Experiments on the Generation of Granular Flows on the Flanks of Vibrated Pyroclastic Cones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cagnoli, B.; Romano, G. P.; Ventura, G.

    2015-12-01

    We have carried out laboratory experiments to study the generation of granular flows on the slopes of pyroclastic cones that are experiencing volcanic tremor or tectonic earthquakes. These experiments are inspired by the occurrence of granular flows on the flanks of Mount Vesuvius during its 1944 eruption. Our laboratory model consists of sand cones built around a vibrating tube which represents a volcanic conduit with erupting magma inside. A video camera allows the study of the granular flow inception, movement and deposition. Although the collapse of the entire cone is obtained at a specific resonance frequency, individual granular flows can be generated by all the vibration frequencies and all the vibration amplitudes that our experimental apparatus has allowed us to adopt. We believe that this is due to the fact that the energy threshold to generate the flows is small in value. Therefore, if this is true in nature as well, shaken pyroclastic cones are always potentially dangerous because they can easily generate flows that can strike the surrounding areas.

  6. Numerical study on the influence mechanism of inlet distortion on the stall margin in a transonic axial rotor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Juan; Lin, Feng; Chen, Jingyi; Morris, Scott C.; Nie, Chaoqun

    2012-06-01

    A numerical study is conducted to investigate the influence of inlet flow condition on tip leakage flow (TLF) and stall margin in a transonic axial rotor. A commercial software package FLUENT, is used in the simulation. The rotor investigated in this paper is ND_TAC rotor, which is the rotor of one-stage transonic compressor in the University of Notre Dame. Three varied inlet flow conditions are simulated. The inlet boundary condition with hub distortion provides higher axial velocity for the incoming flow near tip region than that for the clean inflow, while the incoming main flow possesses lower axial velocity near the tip region at tip distortion inlet boundary condition. Among the total pressure ratio curves for the three inlet flow conditions, it is found that the hub distorted inlet boundary condition improves the stall margin, while the tip distorted inlet boundary condition deteriorates compressor stability. The axial location of interface between tip leakage flow (TLF) and incoming main flow (MF) in the tip gap and the axial momentum ratio of TLF to MF are further examined. It is demonstrated that the axial momentum balance is the mechanism for interface movement. The hub distorted inflow could decrease the axial momentum ratio, suppress the movement of the interface between TLF and MF towards blade leading edge plane and thus enhance compressor stability.

  7. Large eddy simulation and wind tunnel experiment of turbulent boundary-layer flow around a floor-mounted cube

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Nina Gall; Koss, Holger; Bennetsen, Jens Chr.

    2014-01-01

    experiments. The computations were performed with the commercial CFD software ANSYS FLUENT at a Reynolds number at the cube height of Reh = 1.3x105. The object was to evaluate the numerically generated flow upstream and around the cube and the accuracy of the timeaveraged surface pressure on the cube...

  8. A Mixed Methods Assessment of Students' Flow Experiences during a Mobile Augmented Reality Science Game

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bressler, D. M.; Bodzin, A. M.

    2013-01-01

    Current studies have reported that secondary students are highly engaged while playing mobile augmented reality (AR) learning games. Some researchers have posited that players' engagement may indicate a flow experience, but no research results have confirmed this hypothesis with vision-based AR learning games. This study investigated factors…

  9. Exploring the Role of Flow Experience, Learning Performance and Potential Behavior Clusters in Elementary Students' Game-Based Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, Ya-Hui; Lin, Yi-Chun; Hou, Huei-Tse

    2016-01-01

    Well-designed game-based learning can provide students with an innovative environment that may enhance students' motivation and engagement in learning and thus improve their learning performance. The purpose of this study was to examine the relationships among elementary school students' flow experience and learning performances. We also…

  10. Using Educational Games and Simulation Software in a Computer Science Course: Learning Achievements and Student Flow Experiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Tsung-Yu

    2016-01-01

    This study investigates how educational games impact on students' academic performance and multimedia flow experiences in a computer science course. A curriculum consists of five basic learning units, that is, the stack, queue, sort, tree traversal, and binary search tree, was conducted for 110 university students during one semester. Two groups…

  11. Using Educational Games and Simulation Software in a Computer Science Course: Learning Achievements and Student Flow Experiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Tsung-Yu

    2016-01-01

    This study investigates how educational games impact on students' academic performance and multimedia flow experiences in a computer science course. A curriculum consists of five basic learning units, that is, the stack, queue, sort, tree traversal, and binary search tree, was conducted for 110 university students during one semester. Two groups…

  12. Neural basis of distorted self-face recognition in social anxiety disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min-Kyeong Kim

    2016-01-01

    Conclusion: Patients with SAD have a positive point of view of their own face and experience self-relevance for the attractively transformed self-faces. This distorted cognition may be based on dysfunctions in the frontal and inferior parietal regions. The abnormal engagement of the fronto-parietal attentional network during processing face stimuli in non-social situations may be linked to distorted self-recognition in SAD.

  13. Simulation of laser-driven, ablated plasma flows in collisionless shock experiments on OMEGA and the NIF

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grosskopf, M. J.; Drake, R. P.; Kuranz, C. C.; Rutter, E. M.; Ross, J. S.; Kugland, N. L.; Plechaty, C.; Remington, B. A.; Spitkovsky, A.; Gargate, L.; Gregori, G.; Bell, A.; Murphy, C. D.; Meinecke, J.; Reville, B.; Sakawa, Y.; Kuramitsu, Y.; Takabe, H.; Froula, D. H.; Fiksel, G.; Miniati, F.; Koenig, M.; Ravasio, A.; Liang, E.; Fu, W.; Woolsey, N.; Park, H.-S.

    2013-03-01

    Experiments investigating the physics of interpenetrating, collisionless, ablated plasma flows have become an important area of research in the high-energy-density field. In order to evaluate the feasibility of designing experiments that will generate a collisionless shock mediated by the Weibel instability on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) laser, computer simulations using the Center for Radiative Shock Hydrodynamics (CRASH) radiation-hydrodynamics model have been carried out. This paper reports assessment of whether the experiment can reach the required scale size while maintaining the low interflow collisionality necessary for the collisionless shock to form. Comparison of simulation results with data from Omega experiments shows the ability of the CRASH code to model these ablated systems. The combined results indicate that experiments on the NIF are capable of reaching the regimes necessary for the formation of a collisionless shock in a laboratory experiment.

  14. The Thermal Distortion of a Funnel Mold

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hibbeler, Lance C.; Thomas, Brian G.; Schimmel, Ronald C.; Abbel, Gert

    2012-10-01

    This article investigates the thermal distortion of a funnel mold for continuous casting of thin slabs and explores the implications on taper and solidification of the steel shell. The three-dimensional mold temperatures are calculated using shell-mold heat flux and cooling water profiles that were calibrated with plant measurements. The thermal stresses and distorted shape of the mold are calculated with a detailed finite-element model of a symmetric fourth of the entire mold and waterbox assembly, and they are validated with plant thermocouple data and measurements of the wear of the narrow-face copper mold plates. The narrow-face mold distorts into the typical parabolic arc, and the wide face distorts into a "W" shape owing to the large variation in bolt stiffnesses. The thermal expansion of the wide face works against the applied narrow-face taper and funnel effects, so the effect of thermal distortion must be considered to accurately predict the ideal mold taper.

  15. Magnetotelluric distortions directly observed with lightning data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hennessy, Lachlan; Macnae, James

    2017-08-01

    Galvanic distortions complicate magnetotelluric (MT) soundings. In this research, we use lightning network data to identify specific sferics in MT measurements and analyse these events on the basis of the lightning source location. Without source information, identification and removal of galvanic distortion is a fundamentally ill-posed problem, unless data are statistically decomposed into determinable and indeterminable parts. We use realistic assumptions of the earth-ionosphere waveguide propagation velocity to accurately predict the time of arrival, azimuth and amplitude for every significant sferic in our time-series data. For each sferic with large amplitude, we calculate the rotation of the electric field from the measured to the predicted arrival azimuth. This rotation of the electric field is a primary parameter of distortion. Our results demonstrate that a rudimentary model for near-surface galvanic distortion consistently fits observed electric field rotations. When local features rotate regional electric fields, then counter-rotating data to predicted arrival azimuths should correct the directional dependence of static shift. Although we used amplitude thresholds to simplify statistical processing, future developments should incorporate both signal-to-noise improvements and multisite decompositions. Lower amplitude signal may also be useful after the appropriate signal processing for noise reduction. We anticipate our approach will be useful for further work on MT distortion.

  16. Compensating the distortion of micro-speakers in a closed box with consideration of nonlinear mechanical resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Yuxiang; Wang, Min; Lu, Jing; Qiu, Xiaojun

    2017-02-01

    For micro-speakers in a closed box, commonly used nonlinear compensation methods only compensate the distortion caused by the force factor and the stiffness. In this letter, a method to compensate the distortion with consideration of the nonlinear mechanical resistance is proposed based on the feedback linearization criterion. The proposed method is further improved by minimizing the variation of the output power spectrum after compensation. The simulations and experiments show that the total harmonic distortion and the intermodulation distortion of the sound pressure can be reduced significantly with little influence on the sound pressure level.

  17. A Study of A Flow through Small Apertures(2nd Report, Experiments on The Velocity Field)

    OpenAIRE

    福冨, 清; 長谷川, 富市; 中野, 裕二; 鳴海, 敬倫; Hasegawa, Tomiichi; Narumi, Takatsune

    1987-01-01

    The velocity field of an inlet and outlet flow through small orifices was experimentally examined. The velocity along the center line near the orifices was measured with a laser doppler anemometer, stream lines in the whole flow region were photographed, and the following points were clarified : (1) The center line velocities of liquid paraffin agree with the theoretical value of Stokes flow in the region of Reynolds numbers below 10. (2) With distilled water, a diverging angle of the issuing...

  18. Experiments on low Reynolds number turbulent flow through a square duct

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owolabi, Bayode; Poole, Robert; Dennis, David

    2015-11-01

    Previous experimental studies on square duct turbulent flow have focused mainly on high Reynolds numbers for which a turbulence induced eight-vortex secondary flow pattern exists in the cross sectional plane. More recently, Direct Numerical Simulations (DNS) have revealed that the flow field at Reynolds numbers close to transition can be very different; the flow in this marginally turbulent regime alternating between two states characterised by four vortices. In this study, we experimentally investigate the onset criteria for transition to turbulence in square ducts. We also present experimental data on the mean flow properties and turbulence statistics in both marginally and fully turbulent flow at relatively low Reynolds numbers using laser Doppler velocimetry. Results for both flow categories show good agreement with DNS. The switching of the flow field between two flow states at marginally turbulent Reynolds numbers is confirmed by bimodal probability density functions of streamwise velocity at certain distances from the wall as well as joint probability density functions of streamwise and wall normal velocities which feature two peaks.

  19. Flume Experiment on Stream Blockage by the Debris Flow From Tributary

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    Stream blockage by the debris flow from tributary valleys is a common phenomenon in mountainous area,which takes place when large quantities of sediment transported by debris flow reaches a river channel causing its complete or partial blockage.The dam formed by debris flow may causes upstream and downstream flooding,and presents great threat to people and property.Because of the catastrophic influence on people and property,debris-flow dam has attracted many attentions from the researchers and local adm...

  20. Slip flow through a converging microchannel: experiments and 3D simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varade, Vijay; Agrawal, Amit; Pradeep, A. M.

    2015-02-01

    An experimental and 3D numerical study of gaseous slip flow through a converging microchannel is presented in this paper. The measurements reported are with nitrogen gas flowing through the microchannel with convergence angles (4°, 8° and 12°), hydraulic diameters (118, 147 and 177 µm) and lengths (10, 20 and 30 mm). The measurements cover the entire slip flow regime and a part of the continuum and transition regimes (the Knudsen number is between 0.0004 and 0.14); the flow is laminar (the Reynolds number is between 0.5 and 1015). The static pressure drop is measured for various mass flow rates. The overall pressure drop increases with a decrease in the convergence angle and has a relatively large contribution of the viscous component. The numerical solutions of the Navier-Stokes equations with Maxwell’s slip boundary condition explore two different flow behaviors: uniform centerline velocity with linear pressure variation in the initial and the middle part of the microchannel and flow acceleration with nonlinear pressure variation in the last part of the microchannel. The centerline velocity and the wall shear stress increase with a decrease in the convergence angle. The concept of a characteristic length scale for a converging microchannel is also explored. The location of the characteristic length is a function of the Knudsen number and approaches the microchannel outlet with rarefaction. These results on gaseous slip flow through converging microchannels are observed to be considerably different than continuum flow.

  1. Probing correlations of early magnetic fields using $\\mu$-distortion

    CERN Document Server

    Ganc, Jonathan

    2014-01-01

    The damping of a non-uniform magnetic field between the redshifts of about $10^4$ and $10^6$ injects energy into the photon-baryon plasma and causes the CMB to deviate from a perfect blackbody spectrum, producing a so-called $\\mu$-distortion. We can calculate the correlation $\\langle\\mu T\\rangle$ of this distortion with the temperature anisotropy $T$ of the CMB to search for a correlation $\\langle B^2\\zeta\\rangle$ between the magnetic field $B$ and the curvature perturbation $\\zeta$. Since the perturbations which produce the $\\mu$-distortion will be much smaller scale than the relevant density perturbations, the observation of this correlation is sensitive to the squeezed limit of $\\langle B^2\\zeta\\rangle$, which is naturally parameterized by $b_{\\text{NL}}$ (a parameter defined analogously to $f_{\\text{NL}}$). We find that a PIXIE-like CMB experiments has a signal to noise $S/N\\approx 1.0 \\times b_{\\text{NL}} (\\tilde B_\\mu/10\\text{ nG})^2$, where $\\tilde B_\\mu$ is the magnetic field's strength on $\\mu$-disto...

  2. CMB all-scale blackbody distortions induced by linearizing temperature

    CERN Document Server

    Notari, Alessio

    2016-01-01

    Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) experiments, such as WMAP and Planck, measure intensity anisotropies and build maps using a \\emph{linearized} formula for relating them to the temperature blackbody fluctuations. However such a procedure also generates a signal in the maps in the form of y-type distortions, and thus degenerate with the thermal SZ (tSZ) effect. These are small effects that arise at second-order in the temperature fluctuations not from primordial physics but from such a limitation of the map-making procedure. They constitute a contaminant for measurements of: our peculiar velocity, the tSZ and of primordial y-distortions, but they can nevertheless be well-modelled and accounted for. We show that the largest distortions arises at high ell from a leakage of the CMB dipole into the y-channel which couples to all multipoles, but mostly affects the range ell <~ 400. This should be visible in Planck's y-maps with an estimated signal-to-noise ratio of about 9. We note however that such frequency-de...

  3. The influence of slope-angle ratio on the dynamics of granular flows: insights from laboratory experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sulpizio, R.; Castioni, D.; Rodriguez-Sedano, L. A.; Sarocchi, D.; Lucchi, F.

    2016-11-01

    Laboratory experiments on granular flows using natural material were carried out in order to investigate the behaviour of granular flows passing over a break in slope. Sensors in the depositional area recorded the flow kinematics, while video footage permitted reconstruction of the deposit formation, which allowed investigation of the deposit shape as a function of the change in slope. We defined the slope-angle ratio as the proportion between slope angle in the depositional area and that of the channel. When the granular flow encounters the break in slope part of the flow front forms a bouncing clast zone due to elastic impact with the expansion box floor. During this process, part of the kinetic energy of the dense granular flow is transferred to elutriating fine ash, which subsequently forms turbulent ash cloud accompanying the granular flow until it comes to rest. Morphometric analysis of the deposits shows that they are all elliptical, with an almost constant minor axis and a variable major axis. The almost constant value of the minor axis relates to the spreading angle of flow at the end of the channel, which resembles the basal friction angle of the material. The variation of the major axis is interpreted to relate to the effect of competing inertial and frictional forces. This effect also reflects the partitioning of centripetal and tangential velocities, which changes as the flow passes over the break in slope. After normalization, morphometric data provided empirical relationships that highlight the dependence of runout from the product of slope-angle ratio and the difference in height between granular material release and deposit. The empirical relationships were tested against the runouts of hot avalanches formed during the 1944 ad eruption at Vesuvius, with differences among actual and calculated values are between 1.7 and 15 %. Velocity measurements of laboratory granular flows record deceleration paths at different breaks in slope. When normalized

  4. Stress dependent fluid flow in porous rock: experiments and network modelling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flornes, Olav

    2005-07-01

    During the lifetime of a hydrocarbon reservoir, the pore pressure decreases because fluids are drained. Changed pore pressure causes a deformation of the reservoir rock, and the flow channels may be narrowed by the increased weight carried by the rock matrix. Knowledge of how the rocks ability to transport fluids, the permeability, is changed by increased stress can be important for effective reservoir management. In this work, we present experimental results for how permeability changes with applied stress. The materials tested are several different sandstones and one limestone, all having porosities higher than 19 percent. Application of stress is done in a number of different ways. We subject the sample to an isotropic stress, and see how changing this applied stress affects permeability as opposed to changing the pore fluid pressure. This allows for investigating the effective stress law for permeability. Permeability decreased by 10 to 20 percent, when we deformed the materials hydro statically within the elastic regime. For all of our samples, we observed a higher permeability change than predicted by a conventional model for relating porosity and permeability, the Kozeny Carman model. For Red Wildmoor, a sandstone having some clay content, we observed that a change in pore pressure was slightly more important for permeability than a change in the applied stress with the same amount. A sandstone with no clay content, Bad Durckheim, showed the opposite behavior, with applied stress slightly more important than pore pressure. We present a new method for measuring permeability in two directions in the same experiment. We apply different anisotropic stresses, and see if a high stress in one direction causes a difference in permeability changes parallel and perpendicular to maximum stress. We observe that deforming the sample axially, causes a larger decrease in axial permeability than in the radial at low confining pressure. At high confining pressure, the

  5. A Video Watermarking Against Geometrical Distortions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    NIUXiamu; SCHMUCKERMartin; BUSCHChristoph; SUNShenghe

    2003-01-01

    A video watermarking with robustness against frame's geometrical distortions (rotation, aspect ratio, scaling, translation shearing, and bending) is proposed. The watermark information is embedded into pixels along the temporal axis within a Watermark minimum segment (WMS). Since the geometrical distortions operations for every frame along the time axis in a video sequence are the same at a very short interval, the watermark information can be detected from watermarked frames in each WMS subjected to the distortions. Furthermore, adaptive embedding method is proposed for gaining a good quality of the watermarked video. Experimental results show that the proposed technique is robust against common attacks such as rotation, aspect ratio, scaling, translation shearing, and bending of frames, MPEG-2 lossy compression, and color-space conversion.

  6. Expertise and Processing Distorted Structure in Chess

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James eBartlett

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available A classic finding in research on human expertise and knowledge is that of enhanced memory for stimuli in a domain of expertise as compared to either stimuli outside that domain, or within-domain stimuli that have been or degraded or distorted in some way. However, we do not understand how the expert brain processes within-domain stimuli that have been distorted enough to be perceived as impossible or wrong, and yet still are perceived as within the domain (e.g., a face with the eyes, nose and mouth in the wrong positions, or a chessboard with pieces placed randomly on the board. Focusing on the domain of chess, we present new fMRI evidence that when experts view such distorted/within-domain stimuli, they engage an active search for structure – a kind of exploratory chunking – that involves a component of a prefrontal-parietal network linked to consciousness, attention and working memory.

  7. Image Distortion of Optical Coherence Tomography

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    安源; 姚建铨

    2004-01-01

    A kind of image distortion in Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) resulted from average refractive index changes between structures of bio-tissue is discussed for the first time.Analysis is given on following situations:1) Exact refraction index changes between microstructures;2)The gradient of average refractive index change between different tissue layers is parallel to the probe beam;3) The gradient of average refractive index change is vertical to the probe beam.The results show that the image distortion of situation 1) is usually negligible;in situation 2) there is a spread or shrink effect without relative location error; however,in situation 3) there is a significant image error inducing relative location displacement between different structures.Preliminary design to eliminate the distortion is presented,the method of which mainly based on the image classification and pixel array re-arrangement.

  8. An EM algorithm for mapping segregation distortion loci.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Chengsong; Zhang, Yuan-Ming

    2007-11-29

    Chromosomal region that causes distorted segregation ratios is referred to as segregation distortion locus (SDL). The distortion is caused either by differential representation of SDL genotypes in gametes before fertilization or by viability differences of SDL genotypes after fertilization but before genotype scoring. In both cases, observable phenotypes are distorted for marker loci in the chromosomal region close to the SDL. Under the quantitative genetics model for viability selection by proposing a continuous liability controlling the viability of individual, a simplex algorithm has been used to search for the solution in SDL mapping. However, they did not consider the effects of SDL on the construction of linkage maps. We proposed a multipoint maximum-likelihood method to estimate the position and the effects of SDL under the liability model together with both selection coefficients of marker genotypes and recombination fractions. The method was implemented via an expectation and maximization (EM) algorithm. The superiority of the method proposed under the liability model over the previous methods was verified by a series of Monte Carlo simulation experiments, together with a working example derived from the MAPMAKER/QTL software. Our results suggested that the new method can serve as a powerful alternative to existing methods for SDL mapping. Under the liability model, the new method can simultaneously estimate the position and the effects of SDL as well as the recombinant fractions between adjacent markers, and also be used to probe into the genetic mechanism for the bias of uncorrected map distance and to elucidate the relationship between the viability selection and genetic linkage.

  9. An EM algorithm for mapping segregation distortion loci

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Yuan-Ming

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chromosomal region that causes distorted segregation ratios is referred to as segregation distortion locus (SDL. The distortion is caused either by differential representation of SDL genotypes in gametes before fertilization or by viability differences of SDL genotypes after fertilization but before genotype scoring. In both cases, observable phenotypes are distorted for marker loci in the chromosomal region close to the SDL. Under the quantitative genetics model for viability selection by proposing a continuous liability controlling the viability of individual, a simplex algorithm has been used to search for the solution in SDL mapping. However, they did not consider the effects of SDL on the construction of linkage maps. Results We proposed a multipoint maximum-likelihood method to estimate the position and the effects of SDL under the liability model together with both selection coefficients of marker genotypes and recombination fractions. The method was implemented via an expectation and maximization (EM algorithm. The superiority of the method proposed under the liability model over the previous methods was verified by a series of Monte Carlo simulation experiments, together with a working example derived from the MAPMAKER/QTL software. Conclusion Our results suggested that the new method can serve as a powerful alternative to existing methods for SDL mapping. Under the liability model, the new method can simultaneously estimate the position and the effects of SDL as well as the recombinant fractions between adjacent markers, and also be used to probe into the genetic mechanism for the bias of uncorrected map distance and to elucidate the relationship between the viability selection and genetic linkage.

  10. Multiresponse modeling of variably saturated flow and isotope tracer transport for a hillslope experiment at the Landscape Evolution Observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scudeler, Carlotta; Pangle, Luke; Pasetto, Damiano; Niu, Guo-Yue; Volkmann, Till; Paniconi, Claudio; Putti, Mario; Troch, Peter

    2016-10-01

    This paper explores the challenges of model parameterization and process representation when simulating multiple hydrologic responses from a highly controlled unsaturated flow and transport experiment with a physically based model. The experiment, conducted at the Landscape Evolution Observatory (LEO), involved alternate injections of water and deuterium-enriched water into an initially very dry hillslope. The multivariate observations included point measures of water content and tracer concentration in the soil, total storage within the hillslope, and integrated fluxes of water and tracer through the seepage face. The simulations were performed with a three-dimensional finite element model that solves the Richards and advection-dispersion equations. Integrated flow, integrated transport, distributed flow, and distributed transport responses were successively analyzed, with parameterization choices at each step supported by standard model performance metrics. In the first steps of our analysis, where seepage face flow, water storage, and average concentration at the seepage face were the target responses, an adequate match between measured and simulated variables was obtained using a simple parameterization consistent with that from a prior flow-only experiment at LEO. When passing to the distributed responses, it was necessary to introduce complexity to additional soil hydraulic parameters to obtain an adequate match for the point-scale flow response. This also improved the match against point measures of tracer concentration, although model performance here was considerably poorer. This suggests that still greater complexity is needed in the model parameterization, or that there may be gaps in process representation for simulating solute transport phenomena in very dry soils.

  11. On Distortion in Digital Microwave Power Amplifiers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Mozani, Dhamia; Wentzel, Andreas; Heinrich, Wolfgang

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, a first study of distortion in digital power amplifiers (PA) is presented. The work is based on a voltage mode class-S PA with a GaN MMIC for the 900 MHz frequency band. The investigation focuses on the quasi-static amplitude-to-amplitude (AM-AM) and amplitude-to-phase (AM-PM) distortions. Different digital modulation schemes are applied and studied versus output power back-off. This includes two pulse-width modulation (PWM) versions as well as band-pass delta-sigma (BPDS) modulation. The results are verified by measurement data.

  12. Optimal Risk Sharing under Distorted Probabilities

    CERN Document Server

    Ludkovski, M

    2008-01-01

    We study optimal risk sharing among $n$ agents endowed with distortion risk measures. Our model includes market frictions that can either represent linear transaction costs or risk premia charged by a clearing house for the agents. Risk sharing under third-party constraints is also considered. We obtain an explicit formula for Pareto optimal allocations. In particular, we find that a stop-loss or deductible risk sharing is optimal in the case of two agents and several common distortion functions. This extends recent result of Jouini et al. (2006) to the problem with unbounded risks and market frictions.

  13. Satellite Video Stabilization with Geometric Distortion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    WANG Xia

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available There is an exterior orientation difference in each satellite video frame, and the corresponding points have different image locations in adjacent frames images which has geometric distortion. So the projection model, affine model and other classical image stabilization registration model cannot accurately describe the relationship between adjacent frames. This paper proposes a new satellite video image stabilization method with geometric distortion to solve the problem, based on the simulated satellite video, we verify the feasibility and accuracy of proposed satellite video stabilization method.

  14. CMB Distortions from Superconducting Cosmic Strings

    CERN Document Server

    Tashiro, Hiroyuki; Vachaspati, Tanmay

    2012-01-01

    We reconsider the effect of electromagnetic radiation from superconducting strings on cosmic microwave background (CMB) mu- and y-distortions and derive present (COBE-FIRAS) and future (PIXIE) constraints on the string tension, mu_s, and electric current, I. We show that absence of distortions of the CMB in PIXIE will impose strong constraints on mu_s and I, leaving the possibility of light strings (G mu_s < 10^{-18}) or relatively weak currents (I < 10 TeV).

  15. Low distortion transform for reversible watermarking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coltuc, Dinu

    2012-01-01

    This paper proposes a low-distortion transform for prediction-error expansion reversible watermarking. The transform is derived by taking a simple linear predictor and by embedding the expanded prediction error not only into the current pixel but also into its prediction context. The embedding ensures the minimization of the square error introduced by the watermarking. The proposed transform introduces less distortion than the classical prediction-error expansion for complex predictors such as the median edge detector or the gradient-adjusted predictor. Reversible watermarking algorithms based on the proposed transform are analyzed. Experimental results are provided.

  16. Fingering in unsaturated zone flow: a qualitative review with laboratory experiments on heterogeneous systems

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Sililo, OTN

    2000-11-01

    Full Text Available of flow will be greatest where the fine-grained layer is thinnest; (5) surface depressions in an upper fine-grained layer will concentrate flow, with fingers forming below such areas; and (6) in systems where an upper fine-grained layer has macro pores...

  17. EXPERIMENTS ON FLOW AROUND A CYLINDER IN A SCOURED CHANNEL BED

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    I.ISTIARTO; W.H. GRAF

    2001-01-01

    The flow pattern around a cylinder, installed in a scoured channel bed, was experimentally investigated. Detailed measurements of the instantaneous 3D velocities were performed by using an Acoustic Doppler Velocity Profiler (ADVP), from which the profiles of the time-averaged velocities and turbulence stresses were obtained. It is shown that the influence of the cylinder and of the scour hole alters the approach flow; this is essentially confined to the vicinity of the cylinder and to the inside of the scour hole. The horseshoe vortex is measured as a flow reversal inside the scour hole, formed by the downward flow along the cylinder face and the reversed flow at the scour bed.

  18. Experiments on the multi-roll-structure of thermocapillary flow in side-heated thin liquid layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwabe, D.; Cramer, A.; Schneider, J.; Benz, S.; Metzger, J.

    1999-01-01

    The multi-roll-structure (MRS) with convection rolls, all with the same sense of rotation and axes perpendicular to the applied temperature gradient appears in thin layers driven by thermocapillarity prior to time dependent states. Detailed experimental and numerical results are reported. The MRS in large Prandtl-number fluids is dominated by thermocapillarity and separates from the buoyancy driven bulk flow for deep layers. We prepare a microgravity experiment MAGIA to study thermocapillary flow structures without coupling to buoyancy in a 20.0 mm wide annular layer with free surface of variable depth heated by the outer wall and cooled at the inside.

  19. Study of two-phase flows in reduced gravity using ground based experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vasavada, S.; Ishii, M. [Purdue University, School of Nuclear Engineering, West Lafayette, IN (United States); Sun, X. [Ohio State University, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Columbus, OH (United States); Duval, W. [NASA Glenn Research Center, Fluid Physics and Transport Branch, Cleveland, OH (United States)

    2007-07-15

    Experimental studies have been carried out to support the development of a framework of the two-fluid model along with an interfacial area transport equation applicable to reduced gravity two-phase flows. The experimental study simulates the reduced gravity condition in ground based facilities by using two immiscible liquids of similar density namely, water as the continuous phase and Therminol 59 {sup registered} as the dispersed phase. We have acquired a total of eleven data sets in the bubbly flow and bubbly to slug flow transition regimes. These flow conditions have area-averaged void (volume) fractions ranging from 3 to 30% and channel Reynolds number for the continuous phase between 2,900 and 8,800. Flow visualization has been performed and a flow regime map developed which is compared with relevant bubbly to slug flow regime transition criteria. The comparison shows that the transition boundary is well predicted by the criterion based on critical void fraction. The value of the critical void fraction at transition was experimentally determined to be approximately 25%. In addition, important two-phase flow local parameters, including the void fraction, interfacial area concentration, droplet number frequency and droplet velocity, have been acquired at two axial locations using state-of-the-art multi-sensor conductivity probe. The radial profiles and axial development of the two-phase flow parameters show that the coalescence mechanism is enhanced by either increasing the continuous or dispersed phase Reynolds number. Evidence of turbulence induced particle interaction mechanism is highlighted. The data presented in this paper clearly show the marked differences in terms of bubble (droplet) size, phase distribution and phase interaction in two-phase flow between normal and reduced gravity conditions. (orig.)

  20. Contato Improvisação em São Paulo: Flow e Communitas na Experiência Urbana

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Este artigo propõe um diálogo entre antropologia da performance e antropologia urbana, relacionando a experiência da dança contemporânea Contato Improvisação à experiência urbana. Os conceitos teóricos dos estudos urbanos deGeorge Simmel, como a experiência fragmentada na metrópole, ganharão ressonância na antropologia da experiência de Victor Turner.Registros etnográficos e vivências de dez anos de prática desta dança mostram como as experiências de flow e communitasse articulam em meio à me...

  1. A simple experiment to determine the activation energy of the viscous flow of polymer solutions using a glass capillary viscometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohindra, D. R.; Lata, R. A.; Coll, R. K.

    2012-09-01

    A simple viscometry experiment undertaken by an undergraduate polymer class as a research project is described. Viscosity is a measure of a fluid's resistance to flow and is affected by several factors, such as concentration and temperature. In this experiment, the viscosities of polyvinylpyrrolidone solutions (a polymeric material) of different concentrations were prepared in water and measured at various temperatures. The solution viscosity was found to increase gradually with increasing concentration up to ∼5 mass%, with a dramatic increase after this. The calculated viscosity of water at different temperatures was comparable to reported values. The activation energy of viscous flow (Ea) of the different solutions was calculated and followed a similar trend as that for the viscosities of solutions of various concentrations. This experiment allowed students to better understand and explain the behaviour of macromolecules with respect to changing concentration and temperature. Furthermore, students correlated the viscosity and Ea results to understand how an increase in the concentration of a polymer solution resulted in increased entanglement of the polymer chains, consequently leading to an increase in viscosity and an increase in the activation energy of viscous flow. This experiment is safe, low cost, simple and requires only readily available apparatus.

  2. Identifiability of sorption parameters in stirred flow-through reactor experiments and their identification with a Bayesian approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicoulaud-Gouin, V; Garcia-Sanchez, L; Giacalone, M; Attard, J C; Martin-Garin, A; Bois, F Y

    2016-10-01

    This paper addresses the methodological conditions -particularly experimental design and statistical inference- ensuring the identifiability of sorption parameters from breakthrough curves measured during stirred flow-through reactor experiments also known as continuous flow stirred-tank reactor (CSTR) experiments. The equilibrium-kinetic (EK) sorption model was selected as nonequilibrium parameterization embedding the Kd approach. Parameter identifiability was studied formally on the equations governing outlet concentrations. It was also studied numerically on 6 simulated CSTR experiments on a soil with known equilibrium-kinetic sorption parameters. EK sorption parameters can not be identified from a single breakthrough curve of a CSTR experiment, because Kd,1 and k(-) were diagnosed collinear. For pairs of CSTR experiments, Bayesian inference allowed to select the correct models of sorption and error among sorption alternatives. Bayesian inference was conducted with SAMCAT software (Sensitivity Analysis and Markov Chain simulations Applied to Transfer models) which launched the simulations through the embedded simulation engine GNU-MCSim, and automated their configuration and post-processing. Experimental designs consisting in varying flow rates between experiments reaching equilibrium at contamination stage were found optimal, because they simultaneously gave accurate sorption parameters and predictions. Bayesian results were comparable to maximum likehood method but they avoided convergence problems, the marginal likelihood allowed to compare all models, and credible interval gave directly the uncertainty of sorption parameters θ. Although these findings are limited to the specific conditions studied here, in particular the considered sorption model, the chosen parameter values and error structure, they help in the conception and analysis of future CSTR experiments with radionuclides whose kinetic behaviour is suspected.

  3. Packing, alignment and flow of shape-anisotropic grains in a 3D silo experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Börzsönyi, Tamás; Somfai, Ellák; Szabó, Balázs; Wegner, Sandra; Mier, Pascal; Rose, Georg; Stannarius, Ralf

    2016-09-01

    Granular material flowing through bottlenecks, like the openings of silos, tend to clog and thus inhibit further flow. We study this phenomenon in a three-dimensional hopper for spherical and shape-anisotropic particles by means of x-ray tomography. The x-ray tomograms provide information on the bulk of the granular filling, and allows us to determine the particle positions and orientations inside the silo. In addition, it allows us to calculate local packing densities in different parts of the container. We find that in the flowing zone of the silo particles show a preferred orientation and thereby a higher order. Similarly to simple shear flows, the average orientation of the particles is not parallel to the streamlines but encloses a certain angle with it. In most parts of the hopper, the angular distribution of the particles did not reach the one corresponding to stationary shear flow, thus the average orientation angle in the hopper deviates more from the streamlines than in stationary shear flows. In the flowing parts of the silo, shear induced dilation is observed, which is more pronounced for elongated grains than for nearly spherical particles. The clogged state is characterized by a dome, i.e. the geometry of the layer of grains blocking the outflow. The shape of the dome depends on the particle shape.

  4. A dual flowing continuum approach to model denitrification experiments in porous media colonized by biofilms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delay, Frederick; Porel, Gilles; Chatelier, Marion

    2013-07-01

    We present a modeling exercise of solute transport and biodegradation in a coarse porous medium widely colonized by a biofilm phase. Tracer tests in large laboratory columns using both conservative (fluorescein) and biodegradable (nitrate) solutes are simulated by means of a dual flowing continuum approach. The latter clearly distinguishes concentrations in a flowing porous phase from concentrations conveyed in the biofilm. With this conceptual setting, it becomes possible to simulate the sharp front of concentrations at early times and the flat tail of low concentrations at late times observed on the experimental breakthrough curves. Thanks to the separation of flow in two phases at different velocities, dispersion coefficients in both flowing phases keep reasonable values with some physical meaning. This is not the case with simpler models based on a single continuum (eventually concealing dead-ends), for which inferred dispersivity may reach the unphysical value of twice the size of the columns. We also show that the behavior of the dual flowing continuum is mainly controlled by the relative fractions of flow passing in each phase and the rate of mass transfer between phases. These parameters also condition the efficiency of nitrate degradation, the degradation rate in a well-seeded medium being a weakly sensitive parameter. Even though the concept of dual flowing continuum appears promising for simulating transport in complex porous media, its inversion onto experimental data really benefits from attempts with simpler models providing a rough pre-evaluation of parameters such as porosity and mean fluid velocity in the system.

  5. Video documentation of experiments at the USGS debris-flow flume 1992–2006 (amended to include 2007-2013)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Logan, Matthew; Iverson, Richard M.

    2007-01-01

    This set of videos presents about 15 hours of footage documenting the 141 experiments conducted at the USGS debris-flow flume from 1992 to 2012. Owing to improvements in video technology over the years, the quality of footage from recent experiments generally exceeds that from earlier experiments. Use the list below to access the individual videos, which are grouped by year and listed by date and subject matter. When an experiment is selected from the list, multiple video sequences are automatically shown in succession, beginning with a far-field overview and proceeding to close-up views and post-experiment documentation. Interpretations and data from experiments at the USGS debris-flow flume are not provided here but can be found in published reports, many of which are available online at: https://profile.usgs.gov/riverson/ A brief introduction to the flume facility is also available online in USGS Open-File Report 92–483 [http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/usgspubs/ofr/ofr92483].

  6. A Preliminary Study on 1D Numerical Experiment of Water Debris Flow in Gully

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    In order to improve and enhance the numerical modeling methods and its application on debris flow problems,a preliminary study has been proposed in accordance with the corrected water-sediment numerical model on the premise of revised resistance and sediment capacity equations.Firstly,an overview the recent re- search achievements on numerical simulation of debris flow has been conducted,the results shown that a gener- al numerical model for debris flow can not be existed at all because the complex rheol...

  7. Simulation Experiments in Electromagnetic Tomography Well Logging in Two-phase flow

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wu Xiling; Zhao Yanwei

    2006-01-01

    Electromagnetic Computer Tomography (ECT) is a method to probe the interior of an inhomogeneous medium via surface measurement in a non-linear way. Due to the great differences in conductivity and permittivity between oil and water in the well, Electromagnetic Tomography Well Logging (ETWL), a new flow imaging measurement system, is proposed to describe the distribution and movement of oil/water two-phase flow in the well by scanning the detected region and applying a suitable data processing algorithm. The results of the numerical simulation and physical modeling show that the system could provide a clear image of the flow profile.

  8. Experience of application of clamp-on cross-correlation flow meter in nuclear industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gurevich, Y. [Daystar Technology Inc., Ontario (Canada); Ton, V.; Kotenyov, S.; Zhao, C. [Ontario Power Generation, Ontario (Canada); Sharp, B.; Lopez, A. [Advanced Measurements and Analysis Group Inc., Ontario (Canada)

    2010-07-01

    The cross-correlation clamp-on flow meter, CROSSFLOW, developed and manufactured by AMAG, has been used over the world for over 15 years for flow measurements in various systems in nuclear and fossil power plants. Prior that, OPG has used similar technology in Canadian nuclear power plants since 1980-ies. Two recent examples of the application of the clamp-on cross-correlation technology are presented in this paper. In first example OPG meter was used to verify accuracy of ASME nozzles installed in condensate flow lines. In second example AMAG meter was used to measure Diesel Cooling Water (DCW). (author)

  9. Effects of Whistling on Temperature Separation in a Swirling Flow-Field : 1st Report : Experiments

    OpenAIRE

    鈴木, 允; 川橋, 正昭; 吉沢, 敦朋

    1985-01-01

    The total temperature separation of gas is produced by a swirling flow-field in a circular tube. This device is called the vortex-tube or the Ranque-Hilsch tube. When whistling is produced within the swirling flow in the vortex-tube, the tangential velocity distribution in the radial direction is deformed toward the forced vortex type in the whole region. This is caused by the acoustic streaming induced by the whistling. The whistling in the vortex-tube of a counter-flow type is produced by t...

  10. Investigation of Concrete Distortion with Real-time Holographic Method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    In order to find the relationships between the distortion rule of the concrete and its surrounding stress field, a real-time optical holographic setup is used to record the distribution and the variation of the samples, the waveforms of ultrasonic emission stimulated by the micro-cracks are recorded by a transient automatic waveform recorder to determine the time, location and intensity of the actions of micro-cracks. The experiment results are worthy studying. This method provides a useful experimental approach to study the brittleness materials.

  11. Over-exposure effects on the distortion product otoacoustic emission

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reuter, Karen

    , however. In the present study it was investigated, whether Distortion Product OtoAcoustic Emission (DPOAE) parameters exist, which indicate the early stage of a hearing loss. DPOAE was obtained with high frequency resolution, and its characteristic spectral fine structure was analyzed. Data of subjects...... belonging to different groups of age and exposure history were obtained and compared. Controlled sound/ noise exposure experiments were performed to observe changes in DPOAE characteristics. The DPOAE of all tested subjects feature the typical fine structure pattern. The fine structure pattern is highly...

  12. Latency and distortion of electromagnetic trackers for augmented reality systems

    CERN Document Server

    Himberg, Henry

    2014-01-01

    Augmented reality (AR) systems are often used to superimpose virtual objects or information on a scene to improve situational awareness. Delays in the display system or inaccurate registration of objects destroy the sense of immersion a user experiences when using AR systems. AC electromagnetic trackers are ideal for these applications when combined with head orientation prediction to compensate for display system delays. Unfortunately, these trackers do not perform well in environments that contain conductive or ferrous materials due to magnetic field distortion without expensive calibration

  13. A new approach to compensate the geometric distortion in the synthetic aperture ultrasonic imaging system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Xiaonian; Liu, Weixiang; Chen, Siping; Qin, Zhengdi

    2015-01-01

    In the field of ultrasonic imaging technology, the problem of geometric distortion is often encountered, especially in the ultrasonic near-field. In this study, a new approach is proposed to compensate for geometric distortion in the synthetic aperture ultrasonic imaging system. This approach is based on the synthetic aperture ultrasonic holographic B-scan (UHB) imaging system, which is a combination of ultrasonic holography based on the backward propagation principle and the conventional B-scan technique. To solve the geometric distortion problem, the operation of the spatial compression and resampling in the frequency domain are introduced. The main advantage of the approach is that the real holographic value can be calculated without distortion by using the spatial interpolation function after the spatial frequency compression. After the compensation for geometric distortion is performed, the synthetic aperture technique based on the backward propagation principle is then applied in the process of the two-dimensional numerical imaging reconstruction. Both the simulation and measurement experiment show that the approach is promising. The geometric distortion that is dependent on the wave front angle can be effectively compensated. The spatial resolution is practically uniform throughout the depth range and close to the theoretical limit in the experiments.

  14. Determining concentration fields of tracer plumes for layered porous media in flow-tank experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Zhongbo; Schwartz, Franklin W.

    In the laboratory, computer-assisted image analysis provides an accurate and efficient way to monitor tracer experiments. This paper describes the determination of detailed temporal concentration distributions of tracers in a flow-tank experiment by analyzing photographs of plumes of Rhodamine dye through the glass wall of the tank. The methodology developed for this purpose consists of four steps: (1) digitally scanning black and white negatives obtained from photographs of the flow-tank experiment; (2) calibrating and normalizing each digitized image to a standard optical-density scale by determining the relation between the optical density and pixel value for each image; (3) constructing standard curves relating the concentration in an optical density from five experimental runs with predetermined concentrations (2-97mg/L) and (4) converting the optical density to concentration. The spatial distribution of concentration for two photographs was determined by applying these calibration and conversion procedures to all pixels of the digitized images. This approach provides an efficient way to study patterns of plume evolution and transport mechanisms. Résumé Au laboratoire, l'analyse d'images assistée par ordinateur est un moyen précis et efficace pour suivre certaines expériences de traçage. Ce papier présente comment sont déterminées dans le détail les distributions temporelles de la concentration en traceur au cours d'une expérience d'écoulement en réservoir au moyen de l'analyse de photographies de panaches de rhodamine à travers la paroi de verre du réservoir. La méthodologie développée dans cette expérience suit quatre étapes: (1) digitalisation par balayage des négatifs noir et blanc des prises de vue de l'expérience d'écoulement en réservoir (2) calibration et normalisation de chaque image digitalisée par rapport à une échelle étalon de densité optique en déterminant la relation entre la densité optique et la valeur des pixels

  15. Distorted waves in pion- (Kaon-) nucleus reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Siciliano, E.R.; Thaler, R.M.

    1978-10-02

    The difference between the Schroedinger and Klein-Gordon wave functions is calculated for 100--200-MeV pions. The same optical-model potential is used in each case. The differences in the distorted waves so calculated are shown to be significant even though the elastic scattering phase shifts re nearly identical.

  16. Distortion control of conjugacies between quadratic polynomials

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    We use a new type of distortion control of univalent functions to give an alternative proof of Douady-Hubbard’s ray-landing theorem for quadratic Misiurewicz polynomials. The univalent maps arise from Thurston’s iterated algorithm on perturbation of such polynomials.

  17. Rate-distortion theory and human perception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sims, Chris R

    2016-07-01

    The fundamental goal of perception is to aid in the achievement of behavioral objectives. This requires extracting and communicating useful information from noisy and uncertain sensory signals. At the same time, given the complexity of sensory information and the limitations of biological information processing, it is necessary that some information must be lost or discarded in the act of perception. Under these circumstances, what constitutes an 'optimal' perceptual system? This paper describes the mathematical framework of rate-distortion theory as the optimal solution to the problem of minimizing the costs of perceptual error subject to strong constraints on the ability to communicate or transmit information. Rate-distortion theory offers a general and principled theoretical framework for developing computational-level models of human perception (Marr, 1982). Models developed in this framework are capable of producing quantitatively precise explanations for human perceptual performance, while yielding new insights regarding the nature and goals of perception. This paper demonstrates the application of rate-distortion theory to two benchmark domains where capacity limits are especially salient in human perception: discrete categorization of stimuli (also known as absolute identification) and visual working memory. A software package written for the R statistical programming language is described that aids in the development of models based on rate-distortion theory.

  18. A rate distortion approach to protein symmetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace, Rodrick

    2010-08-01

    A spontaneous symmetry breaking argument is applied to the problem of protein folding, via a rate distortion analysis of the relation between genome coding and the final condensation of the protein molten globule that is, in spirit, analogous to Tlusty's (2007) exploration of the evolution of the genetic code. In the 'energy' picture, the average distortion between codon message and final protein structure, under constraints driven by evolutionary selection, serves as a temperature analog, so that low values limit the possible distribution of protein forms, producing the canonical folding funnel. A dual 'developmental' perspective sees the rate distortion function itself as the temperature analog, and permits incorporation of chaperons or toxic exposures as catalysts, driving the system to different possible outcomes or affecting the rate of convergence. The rate distortion function appears constrained by the availability of metabolic free energy, with implications for prebiotic evolution, and a nonequilibrium empirical Onsager treatment provides an adaptable statistical model that can be fitted to data, in the same manner as a regression equation. In sum, mechanistic models of protein folding fail to account for the observed spectrum of protein folding and aggregation disorders, suggesting that a biologically based cognitive paradigm describing folding will be needed for understanding the etiology, prevention, and treatment of these diseases. The developmental formalism introduced here may contribute substantially to such a paradigm.

  19. Solid Waste Market Distortions and Recycling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bartelings, H.; Dellink, R.B.; Ierland, van E.C.

    2006-01-01

    Solid waste management is an important topic in environmental economics, and there is a need for providing better incentives to further optimize the chain of materials and waste. We investigate market distortions caused by flat fee pricing in the solid waste market and we show how flat fee pricing

  20. Modelling the Perceptual Components of Loudspeaker Distortion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Sune L.; Agerkvist, Finn T.; MacDonald, Ewen;

    2016-01-01

    While non-linear distortion in loudspeakers decreases audio quality, the perceptual consequences can vary substantially. This paper investigates the metric Rnonlin [1] which was developed to predict subjective measurements of sound quality in nonlinear systems. The generalisability of the metric...

  1. Solid Waste Market Distortions and Recycling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bartelings, H.; Dellink, R.B.; Ierland, van E.C.

    2006-01-01

    Solid waste management is an important topic in environmental economics, and there is a need for providing better incentives to further optimize the chain of materials and waste. We investigate market distortions caused by flat fee pricing in the solid waste market and we show how flat fee pricing i

  2. Audible Aliasing Distortion in Digital Audio Synthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Schimmel

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with aliasing distortion in digital audio signal synthesis of classic periodic waveforms with infinite Fourier series, for electronic musical instruments. When these waveforms are generated in the digital domain then the aliasing appears due to its unlimited bandwidth. There are several techniques for the synthesis of these signals that have been designed to avoid or reduce the aliasing distortion. However, these techniques have high computing demands. One can say that today's computers have enough computing power to use these methods. However, we have to realize that today’s computer-aided music production requires tens of multi-timbre voices generated simultaneously by software synthesizers and the most of the computing power must be reserved for hard-disc recording subsystem and real-time audio processing of many audio channels with a lot of audio effects. Trivially generated classic analog synthesizer waveforms are therefore still effective for sound synthesis. We cannot avoid the aliasing distortion but spectral components produced by the aliasing can be masked with harmonic components and thus made inaudible if sufficient oversampling ratio is used. This paper deals with the assessment of audible aliasing distortion with the help of a psychoacoustic model of simultaneous masking and compares the computing demands of trivial generation using oversampling with those of other methods.

  3. Heidegger's distortion of dialectics in "Hegel's Concept of Experience"%海德格尔在《黑格尔的经验概念》中对辩证法的扭曲

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邓晓芒

    2009-01-01

    在"黑格尔的经验概念"一文中,海德格尔对黑格尔有五个方面的有意误读:(1)用强行引入的"意志"概念将黑格尔的精神现象学解释为在场的形而上学:(2)将黑格尔的"陈述"、"怀疑之路"等概念解释为现象学还原的程序;(3)将黑格尔的"存在(Sein)"贬为仅仅是指"存在者";(4)将"矛盾"置换为"模棱两可",使黑格尔的辩证运动从主动变为被动;(5)将意识的经验夸大为真正的本体论,无视和的意义.通过分析这样的误读,有助于我们了解海德格尔和黑格尔思想之间的内在联系.%This essay reveals five points in which Heidegger misreads Hegel in "Hegel's Concept of Experience":(1)By forcedly introducing the concept of "will",he interprets Hegel's phenomenology of spirit into Metaphysics of Presence;(2)interprets concepts such as"statement"and"the road of skeptics"as the process of phenomenological reduction;(3)reduces Hegel's Sein to Seiende;(4)replaces"Contradiction"with"Ambiguity"so the active Dialectics become passive;(5)exaggerates conscious experience and puts it into a real ontology,regardless of the significance of Logic and Encyclopedia of Philosophy.By an analysis of this misreading we can find the intemal connection between Heidegger's thought and that of his philosophical forerunner,Hegel.

  4. High magnetic shear gain in a liquid sodium stable Couette flow experiment: a prelude to an α-Ω dynamo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colgate, Stirling A; Beckley, Howard; Si, Jiahe; Martinic, Joe; Westpfahl, David; Slutz, James; Westrom, Cebastian; Klein, Brianna; Schendel, Paul; Scharle, Cletus; McKinney, Travis; Ginanni, Rocky; Bentley, Ian; Mickey, Timothy; Ferrel, Regnar; Li, Hui; Pariev, Vladimir; Finn, John

    2011-04-29

    The Ω phase of the liquid sodium α-Ω dynamo experiment at New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology in cooperation with Los Alamos National Laboratory has demonstrated a high toroidal field B(ϕ) that is ≃8×B(r), where B(r) is the radial component of an applied poloidal magnetic field. This enhanced toroidal field is produced by the rotational shear in stable Couette flow within liquid sodium at a magnetic Reynolds number Rm≃120. Small turbulence in stable Taylor-Couette flow is caused by Ekman flow at the end walls, which causes an estimated turbulence energy fraction of (δv/v)(2)∼10(-3).

  5. Global warming: Design of a flow-through shallow lake mesocosm climate experiment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2005-01-01

    design details, operating characteristics, and background information on a currently operating experimental flow-through mesocosm system that allows investigation of the interactions between simulated climate warming and eutrophication and their impacts on biological structure and ecosystem processes...

  6. Global warming: Design of a flow-through shallow lake mesocosm climate experiment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2005-01-01

    design details, operating characteristics, and background information on a currently operating experimental flow-through mesocosm system that allows investigation of the interactions between simulated climate warming and eutrophication and their impacts on biological structure and ecosystem processes...

  7. Real-time magnetic resonance imaging of deep venous flow during muscular exercise—preliminary experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merboldt, Klaus-Dietmar; Voit, Dirk; Dahm, Johannes; Frahm, Jens

    2016-01-01

    Background The accurate assessment of peripheral venous flow is important for the early diagnosis and treatment of disorders such as deep-vein thrombosis (DVT) which is a major cause of post-thrombotic syndrome or even death due to pulmonary embolism. The aim of this work is to quantitatively determine blood flow in deep veins during rest and muscular exercise using a novel real-time magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) method for velocity-encoded phase-contrast (PC) MRI at high spatiotemporal resolution. Methods Real-time PC MRI of eight healthy volunteers and one patient was performed at 3 Tesla (Prisma fit, Siemens, Erlangen, Germany) using a flexible 16-channel receive coil (Variety, NORAS, Hoechberg, Germany). Acquisitions were based on a highly undersampled radial FLASH sequence with image reconstruction by regularized nonlinear inversion at 0.5×0.5×6 mm3 spatial resolution and 100 ms temporal resolution. Flow was assessed in two cross-sections of the lower leg at the level of the calf muscle and knee using a protocol of 10 s rest, 20 s flexion and extension of the foot, and 10 s rest. Quantitative analyses included through-plane flow in the right posterior tibial, right peroneal and popliteal vein (PC maps) as well as signal intensity changes due to flow and muscle movements (corresponding magnitude images). Results Real-time PC MRI successfully monitored the dynamics of venous flow at high spatiotemporal resolution and clearly demonstrated increased flow in deep veins in response to flexion and extension of the foot. In normal subjects, the maximum velocity (averaged across vessel lumen) during exercise was 9.4±5.7 cm·s−1 for the right peroneal vein, 8.5±4.6 cm·s−1 for the right posterior tibial vein and 17.8±5.8 cm·s−1 for the popliteal vein. The integrated flow volume per exercise (20 s) was 1.9, 1.6 and 50 mL (mean across subjects) for right peroneal, right posterior tibial and popliteal vein, respectively. A patient with DVT presented with

  8. Wind-tunnel experiments of thermally-stratified turbulent boundary layer flow over a wall-mounted 2-D block

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wei; Markfort, Corey; Porté-Agel, Fernando

    2014-05-01

    Turbulent boundary-layer flows over complex topography have been extensively studied in the atmospheric sciences and wind engineering communities. The upwind turbulence level, the atmospheric thermal stability and the shape of the topography as well as surface characteristics play important roles in turbulent transport of momentum and scalar fluxes. However, to the best of our knowledge, atmospheric thermal stability has rarely been taken into account in laboratory simulations, particularly in wind-tunnel experiments. Extension of such studies in thermally-stratified wind tunnels will substantially advance our understanding of thermal stability effects on the physics of flow over complex topography. Additionally, high-resolution experimental data can be used for development of new parameterization of surface fluxes and validation of numerical models such as Large-Eddy Simulation (LES). A series of experiments of neutral and thermally-stratified boundary-layer flows over a wall-mounted 2-D block were conducted at the Saint Anthony Falls Laboratory boundary-layer wind tunnel. The 2-D block, with a width to height ratio of 2:1, occupied the lowest 25% of the turbulent boundary layer. Stable and convective boundary layers were simulated by independently controlling the temperature of air flow, the test section floor, and the wall-mounted block surfaces. Measurements using high-resolution Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV), x-wire/cold-wire anemometry, thermal-couples and surface heat flux sensors were made to quantify the turbulent properties and surface fluxes in distinct macroscopic flow regions, including the separation/recirculation zones, evolving shear layer and the asymptotic far wake. Emphasis will be put on addressing thermal stability effects on the spatial distribution of turbulent kinetic energy (TKE) and turbulent fluxes of momentum and scalar from the near to far wake region. Terms of the TKE budget equation are also inferred from measurements and

  9. Effects of objectifying gaze on female cognitive performance: The role of flow experience and internalization of beauty ideals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guizzo, Francesca; Cadinu, Mara

    2016-11-01

    Although previous research has demonstrated that objectification impairs female cognitive performance, no research to date has investigated the mechanisms underlying such decrement. Therefore, we tested the role of flow experience as one mechanism leading to performance decrement under sexual objectification. Gaze gender was manipulated by having male versus female experimenters take body pictures of female participants (N = 107) who then performed a Sustained Attention to Response Task. As predicted, a moderated mediation model showed that under male versus female gaze, higher internalization of beauty ideals was associated with lower flow, which in turn decreased performance. The implications of these results are discussed in relation to objectification theory and strategies to prevent sexually objectifying experiences.

  10. Role of boundary conditions in helicoidal flow collimation: Consequences for the von Kármán sodium dynamo experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varela, J; Brun, S; Dubrulle, B; Nore, C

    2015-12-01

    We present hydrodynamic and magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations of liquid sodium flow with the PLUTO compressible MHD code to investigate influence of magnetic boundary conditions on the collimation of helicoidal motions. We use a simplified cartesian geometry to represent the flow dynamics in the vicinity of one cavity of a multiblades impeller inspired by those used in the Von-Kármán-sodium (VKS) experiment. We show that the impinging of the large-scale flow upon the impeller generates a coherent helicoidal vortex inside the blades, located at a distance from the upstream blade piloted by the incident angle of the flow. This vortex collimates any existing magnetic field lines leading to an enhancement of the radial magnetic field that is stronger for ferromagnetic than for conducting blades. The induced magnetic field modifies locally the velocity fluctuations, resulting in an enhanced helicity. This process possibly explains why dynamo action is more easily triggered in the VKS experiment when using soft iron impellers.

  11. Simulation of Distortion Generation in a Modern Serpentine Diffuser to Improve Experimental Effectiveness (Preprint)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-16

    converge near top dead center ( TDC ) and form a pair of tightly wound vortices. This roll up was a direct result of the separation region (denoted by the...large bundle of blue streamtraces upstream of the vortices) which created adequate pressure loss to draw the surrounding flow towards TDC . This pressure...instrumentation rakes has been plotted with the CFD results in Figure 3. The total pressure distortion pattern is composed of 4 main flow features. At TDC

  12. Motor skill failure or flow-experience? Functional brain asymmetry and brain connectivity in elite and amateur table tennis players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, Sebastian; Brölz, Ellen; Keune, Philipp M; Wesa, Benjamin; Hautzinger, Martin; Birbaumer, Niels; Strehl, Ute

    2015-02-01

    Functional hemispheric asymmetry is assumed to constitute one underlying neurophysiological mechanism of flow-experience and skilled psycho-motor performance in table tennis athletes. We hypothesized that when initiating motor execution during motor imagery, elite table tennis players show higher right- than left-hemispheric temporal activity and stronger right temporal-premotor than left temporal-premotor theta coherence compared to amateurs. We additionally investigated, whether less pronounced left temporal cortical activity is associated with more world rank points and more flow-experience. To this aim, electroencephalographic data were recorded in 14 experts and 15 amateur table tennis players. Subjects watched videos of an opponent serving a ball and were instructed to imagine themselves responding with a specific table tennis stroke. Alpha asymmetry scores were calculated by subtracting left from right hemispheric 8-13 Hz alpha power. 4-7 Hz theta coherence was calculated between temporal (T3/T4) and premotor (Fz) cortex. Experts showed a significantly stronger shift towards lower relative left-temporal brain activity compared to amateurs and a significantly stronger right temporal-premotor coherence than amateurs. The shift towards lower relative left-temporal brain activity in experts was associated with more flow-experience and lower relative left temporal activity was correlated with more world rank points. The present findings suggest that skilled psycho-motor performance in elite table tennis players reflect less desynchronized brain activity at the left hemisphere and more coherent brain activity between fronto-temporal and premotor oscillations at the right hemisphere. This pattern probably reflect less interference of irrelevant communication of verbal-analytical with motor-control mechanisms which implies flow-experience and predict world rank in experts.

  13. Self-optimisation and model-based design of experiments for developing a C-H activation flow process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Echtermeyer, Alexander; Amar, Yehia; Zakrzewski, Jacek; Lapkin, Alexei

    2017-01-01

    A recently described C(sp(3))-H activation reaction to synthesise aziridines was used as a model reaction to demonstrate the methodology of developing a process model using model-based design of experiments (MBDoE) and self-optimisation approaches in flow. The two approaches are compared in terms of experimental efficiency. The self-optimisation approach required the least number of experiments to reach the specified objectives of cost and product yield, whereas the MBDoE approach enabled a rapid generation of a process model.

  14. Physical Experiments to Investigate the Effects of Street Bottom Heating and Inflow Turbulence on Urban Street-Canyon Flow

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jae-Jin KIM; Jong-Jin BAIK

    2005-01-01

    The effects of street bottom heating and inflow turbulence on urban street-canyon flow are experimentally investigated using a circulating water channel. Three experiments are carried out for a street canyon with a street aspect ratio of 1. Results from each experiment with bottom heating or inflow turbulence are compared with those without bottom heating and appreciable inflow turbulence. It is demonstrated that street bottom heating or inflow turbulence increases the intensity of the canyon vortex. A possible explanation on how street bottom heating or inflow turbulence intensifies the canyon vortex is given from a fluid dynamical viewpoint.

  15. Visualization of microscale phase displacement proceses in retention and outflow experiments: nonuniquensess of unsaturated flow properties

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, Annette Pia; Glass, R.J.; Hollenbeck, K.J.;

    2001-01-01

    Methods to determine unsaturated hydraulic properties can exhibit random and nonunique behavior. We assess the causes for these behaviors by visualizing microscale phase displacement processes that occur during equilibrium retention and transient outflow experiments. For both types of experiments...

  16. Cross-hole tracer experiment reveals rapid fluid flow and low effective porosity in the upper oceanic crust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neira, N. M.; Clark, J. F.; Fisher, A. T.; Wheat, C. G.; Haymon, R. M.; Becker, K.

    2016-09-01

    Numerous field, laboratory, and modeling studies have explored the flows of fluid, heat, and solutes during seafloor hydrothermal circulation, but it has been challenging to determine transport rates and flow directions within natural systems. Here we present results from the first cross-hole tracer experiment in the upper oceanic crust, using four subseafloor borehole observatories equipped with autonomous samplers to track the transport of a dissolved tracer (sulfur hexafluoride, SF6) injected into a ridge-flank hydrothermal system. During the first three years after tracer injection, SF6 was transported both north and south through the basaltic aquifer. The observed tracer transport rate of ∼2-3 m/day is orders of magnitude greater than bulk rates of flow inferred from thermal and chemical observations and calculated with coupled fluid-heat flow simulations. Taken together, these results suggest that the effective porosity of the upper volcanic crust through which much tracer was transported is <1%, with fluid flowing rapidly along a few well-connected channels. This is consistent with the heterogeneous (layered, faulted, and/or fractured) nature of the volcanic upper oceanic crust.

  17. Assessment of wall friction model in multi-dimensional component of MARS with air–water cross flow experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Jin-Hwa [Nuclear Thermal-Hydraulic Engineering Laboratory, Seoul National University, Gwanak 599, Gwanak-ro, Gwanak-gu, Seoul 151-742 (Korea, Republic of); Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, 989-111, Daedeok-daero, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-600 (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Chi-Jin [Nuclear Thermal-Hydraulic Engineering Laboratory, Seoul National University, Gwanak 599, Gwanak-ro, Gwanak-gu, Seoul 151-742 (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Hyoung-Kyu, E-mail: chohk@snu.ac.kr [Nuclear Thermal-Hydraulic Engineering Laboratory, Seoul National University, Gwanak 599, Gwanak-ro, Gwanak-gu, Seoul 151-742 (Korea, Republic of); Euh, Dong-Jin [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, 989-111, Daedeok-daero, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-600 (Korea, Republic of); Park, Goon-Cherl [Nuclear Thermal-Hydraulic Engineering Laboratory, Seoul National University, Gwanak 599, Gwanak-ro, Gwanak-gu, Seoul 151-742 (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-02-15

    Recently, high precision and high accuracy analysis on multi-dimensional thermal hydraulic phenomena in a nuclear power plant has been considered as state-of-the-art issues. System analysis code, MARS, also adopted a multi-dimensional module to simulate them more accurately. Even though it was applied to represent the multi-dimensional phenomena, but implemented models and correlations in that are one-dimensional empirical ones based on one-dimensional pipe experimental results. Prior to the application of the multi-dimensional simulation tools, however, the constitutive models for a two-phase flow need to be carefully validated, such as the wall friction model. Especially, in a Direct Vessel Injection (DVI) system, the injected emergency core coolant (ECC) on the upper part of the downcomer interacts with the lateral steam flow during the reflood phase in the Large-Break Loss-Of-Coolant-Accident (LBLOCA). The interaction between the falling film and lateral steam flow induces a multi-dimensional two-phase flow. The prediction of ECC flow behavior plays a key role in determining the amount of coolant that can be used as core cooling. Therefore, the wall friction model which is implemented to simulate the multi-dimensional phenomena should be assessed by multidimensional experimental results. In this paper, the air–water cross film flow experiments simulating the multi-dimensional phenomenon in upper part of downcomer as a conceptual problem will be introduced. The two-dimensional local liquid film velocity and thickness data were used as benchmark data for code assessment. And then the previous wall friction model of the MARS-MultiD in the annular flow regime was modified. As a result, the modified MARS-MultiD produced improved calculation result than previous one.

  18. Influence of flow velocity and spatial heterogeneity on DNAPL migration in porous media: insights from laboratory experiments and numerical modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Fei; Gao, Yanwei; Sun, Yuanyuan; Shi, Xiaoqing; Xu, Hongxia; Wu, Jichun

    2015-12-01

    Understanding the migration of dense non-aqueous phase liquids (DNAPLs) in complex subsurface systems is important for evaluating contamination source zones and designing remediation schemes after spill events. Six sandbox experiments were performed to explore the individual effect of flow velocity, and the combined effect of flow velocity and layered lenses on a DNAPL (PCE) migration in porous media. DNAPL saturation was measured using a light transmission system, and saturation distribution was quantified by spatial moments. The experimental results show that large flow velocity significantly promotes lateral and vertical migration of the low-viscosity DNAPL, while when layered lenses exist, the infiltration rate decreases and horizontal spread increases. Migration processes were numerically simulated, and the modelling results tested against experimental results. Furthermore, migration of DNAPLs with different viscosities was simulated to explore the combined effects of flow velocity and geological heterogeneity. Simulation results show that enhanced heterogeneity makes low-viscosity DNAPLs migrate along preferential pathways, resulting in irregular DNAPL morphology. Layered lenses combined with heterogeneity complicate the effect of flow velocity on the migration of low-viscosity DNAPLs by changing percolation paths. Results also demonstrate that flow velocity exhibits relatively little influence on the migration of medium/high-viscosity DNAPLs, which is predominantly controlled by viscosity and heterogeneity. Enhanced heterogeneity has a larger effect on migration behavior. Findings indicate that the migration paths and position of the source zone could change significantly, due to the combined effect of groundwater flow velocity and geological heterogeneity; thus, comprehensive hydrogeological investigation is needed to characterize the source zone.

  19. Unravelling connections between river flow and large-scale climate: experiences from Europe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hannah, D. M.; Kingston, D. G.; Lavers, D.; Stagge, J. H.; Tallaksen, L. M.

    2016-12-01

    The United Nations has identified better knowledge of large-scale water cycle processes as essential for socio-economic development and global water-food-energy security. In this context, and given the ever-growing concerns about climate change/ variability and human impacts on hydrology, there is an urgent research need: (a) to quantify space-time variability in regional river flow, and (b) to improve hydroclimatological understanding of climate-flow connections as a basis for identifying current and future water-related issues. In this paper, we draw together studies undertaken at the pan-European scale: (1) to evaluate current methods for assessing space-time dynamics for different streamflow metrics (annual regimes, low flows and high flows) and for linking flow variability to atmospheric drivers (circulation indices, air-masses, gridded climate fields and vapour flux); and (2) to propose a plan for future research connecting streamflow and the atmospheric conditions in Europe and elsewhere. We believe this research makes a useful, unique contribution to the literature through a systematic inter-comparison of different streamflow metrics and atmospheric descriptors. In our findings, we highlight the need to consider appropriate atmospheric descriptors (dependent on the target flow metric and region of interest) and to develop analytical techniques that best characterise connections in the ocean-atmosphere-land surface process chain. We call for the need to consider not only atmospheric interactions, but also the role of the river basin-scale terrestrial hydrological processes in modifying the climate signal response of river flows.

  20. Quality Evaluation and Nonuniform Compression of Geometrically Distorted Images Using the Quadtree Distortion Map

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina Costa

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents an analysis of the effects of lossy compression algorithms applied to images affected by geometrical distortion. It will be shown that the encoding-decoding process results in a nonhomogeneous image degradation in the geometrically corrected image, due to the different amount of information associated to each pixel. A distortion measure named quadtree distortion map (QDM able to quantify this aspect is proposed. Furthermore, QDM is exploited to achieve adaptive compression of geometrically distorted pictures, in order to ensure a uniform quality on the final image. Tests are performed using JPEG and JPEG2000 coding standards in order to quantitatively and qualitatively assess the performance of the proposed method.