WorldWideScience

Sample records for flow cell studies

  1. Fuel cells flows study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Riva, R.; Bador, B.; Marchand, M.; Lebaigue, O.

    1999-01-01

    Fuel cells are energy converters, which directly and continuously produce electricity from paired oxidation reduction-reactions: In most cases, the reactants are oxygen and hydrogen with water as residue. There are several types of fuel cells using various electrolytes and working at different temperatures. Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cells are, in particular, studied in the GESTEAU facility. PEMFC performance is chiefly limited by two thermal-hydraulic phenomena: the drying of membranes and the flooding of gas distributors. Up to now, work has been focused on water flooding of gas channels. This has showed the influence of flow type on the electrical behaviour of the cells and the results obtained have led to proposals for new duct geometries. (authors)

  2. Microfluidic flow cells for studies of electrochemical reactions

    OpenAIRE

    Møinichen, Christine

    2012-01-01

    In this project the main goal was to establish a routine for making a microfluidic flow cell (MFFC) using soft lithography methods, and test the flow cell with different electrolytes, sulphuric acid and a ruthenium red-ox couple, and eventually use the established routine to make a microfluidic fuel cell and test it. A routine was established using the negative photoresist ma-N405. The photoresist was overdeveloped to make sure an undercut profile was reached, which proved to be necessary for...

  3. Experimental study and comparison of various designs of gas flow fields to PEM fuel cells and cell stack performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong eLiu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, a significant number of experimental tests to PEM fuel cells were conducted to investigate the effect of gas flow fields on fuel cell performance. Graphite plates with various flow field or flow channel designs, from literature survey and also novel designs by the authors, were used for the PEM fuel cell assembly. The fabricated fuel cells all have an effective membrane area of 23.5 cm2. The results showed that the serpentine flow channel design is still favorable, giving the best single fuel cell performance amongst all the studied flow channel designs. A novel symmetric serpentine flow field was proposed for relatively large size fuel cell application. Four fuel cell stacks each including four cells were assembled using different designs of serpentine flow channels. The output power performances of fuel cell stacks were compared and the novel symmetric serpentine flow field design is recommended for its very good performance.

  4. Three-dimensional numerical study on cell performance and transport phenomena of PEM fuel cells with conventional flow fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jang, Jer-Huan [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Northern Taiwan Institute of Science and Technology, Beitou, Taipei 11202 (China); Yan, Wei-Mon; Li, Hung-Yi; Tsai, Wei-Che [Department of Mechatronic Engineering, Huafan University, Shih-Ting, Taipei 22305 (China)

    2008-01-15

    In this paper, a three-dimensional numerical model of the proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs) with conventional flow field designs (parallel flow field, Z-type flow field, and serpentine flow field) has been established to investigate the performance and transport phenomena in the PEMFCs. The influences of the flow field designs on the fuel utilization, the water removal, and the cell performance of the PEMFC are studied. The distributions of velocity, oxygen mass fraction, current density, liquid water, and pressure with the convention flow fields are presented. For the conventional flow fields, the cell performance can be enhanced by adding the corner number, increasing the flow channel length, and decreasing the flow channel number. The cell performance of the serpentine flow field is the best, followed by the Z-type flow field and then the parallel flow field. (author)

  5. Laminar flow in radial flow cell with small aspect ratios: Numerical and experimental study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Detry, J. G.; Deroanne, C.; Sindic, M.

    2009-01-01

    Studies on the effect of wall shear stress on soil and biofilm attachment and removal from a surface are one of the many applications of radial axisymmetrical flow. The particular nature of this flow allows taking advantage of a wide range of wall shear Stress applied at the analyzed surface...... in a single experiment. This type of experiments provides a critical radius up to which soil removal occurs. Good models are, however, still needed to convert the experimental data into critical wall shear stress. Analytical models are already available for creeping flow but Computational Fluid Dynamics must...... be applied for experiments performed at higher Reynolds numbers. The present study is a numerical analysis of the radial axisymmetrical flow for aspect ratios of 0.125, 0.25, 0.5 and 1 with inlet pipe Reynolds numbers varying from 0 to 2000, aiming at computing the wall shear stress distribution at any...

  6. Application of two-phase flow for cooling of hybrid microchannel PV cells: A comparative study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valeh-e-Sheyda, Peyvand; Rahimi, Masoud; Karimi, Ebrahim; Asadi, Masomeh

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► Showing cooling potential of gas–liquid two-phase flow in microchannels for PV cell. ► Introducing the concept of using slug flow in microchannels for cooling of PV cells. ► In single-phase flow, increasing the liquid flow rate enhances the PV power. ► Showing that in two-phase flow the output power related the fluid flow regime. ► By coupling PV and microchannel an increase up to 38% in output power was observed. - Abstract: This paper reports the experimental data from performance of two-phase flows in a small hybrid microchannel solar cell. Using air and water as two-phase fluid, the experiments were conducted at indoor condition in an array of rectangular microchannels with a hydraulic diameter of 0.667 mm. The gas superficial velocity ranges were between 0 and 3.27 m s −1 while liquid flow rate was 0.04 m s −1 . The performance analysis of the PV cell at slug and transitional slug/annular flow regimes are the focus of this study. The influence of two-phase working fluid on PV cell cooling was compared with single-phase. In addition, the great potential of slug flow for heat removal enhancement in PV/T panel was investigated. The obtained data showed the proposed hybrid system could substantially increases the output power of PV solar cells

  7. Feasibility study of red blood cell debulking by magnetic field-flow fractionation with step-programmed flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Lee R; Williams, P Stephen; Nehl, Franziska; Abe, Koji; Chalmers, Jeffrey J; Zborowski, Maciej

    2014-02-01

    Emerging applications of rare cell separation and analysis, such as separation of mature red blood cells from hematopoietic cell cultures, require efficient methods of red blood cell (RBC) debulking. We have tested the feasibility of magnetic RBC separation as an alternative to centrifugal separation using an approach based on the mechanism of magnetic field-flow fractionation (MgFFF). A specially designed permanent magnet assembly generated a quadrupole field having a maximum field of 1.68 T at the magnet pole tips, zero field at the aperture axis, and a nearly constant radial field gradient of 1.75 T/mm (with a negligible angular component) inside a cylindrical aperture of 1.9 mm (diameter) and 76 mm (length). The cell samples included high-spin hemoglobin RBCs obtained by chemical conversion of hemoglobin to methemoglobin (met RBC) or by exposure to anoxic conditions (deoxy RBC), low-spin hemoglobin obtained by exposure of RBC suspension to ambient air (oxy RBC), and mixtures of deoxy RBC and cells from a KG-1a white blood cell (WBC) line. The observation that met RBCs did not elute from the channel at the lower flow rate of 0.05 mL/min applied for 15 min but quickly eluted at the subsequent higher flow rate of 2.0 mL/min was in agreement with FFF theory. The well-defined experimental conditions (precise field and flow characteristics) and a well-established FFF theory verified by studies with model cell systems provided us with a strong basis for making predictions about potential practical applications of the magnetic RBC separation.

  8. Study of Paclitaxel-Treated HeLa Cells by Differential Electrical Impedance Flow Cytometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirkegaard, Julie; Clausen, Casper Hyttel; Rodriguez-Trujíllo, Romén

    2014-01-01

    This work describes the electrical investigation of paclitaxel-treated HeLa cells using a custom-made microfluidic biosensor for whole cell analysis in continuous flow. We apply the method of differential electrical impedance spectroscopy to treated HeLa cells in order to elucidate the changes...... in electrical properties compared with non-treated cells. We found that our microfluidic system was able to distinguish between treated and non-treated cells. Furthermore, we utilize a model for electrical impedance spectroscopy in order to perform a theoretical study to clarify our results. This study focuses...... on investigating the changes in the electrical properties of the cell membrane caused by the effect of paclitaxel. We observe good agreement between the model and the obtained results. This establishes the proof-of-concept for the application in cell drug therapy....

  9. Methods for studying biofilm formation: flow cells and confocal laser scanning microscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tolker-Nielsen, Tim; Sternberg, Claus

    2014-01-01

    In this chapter methods for growing and analyzing biofilms under hydrodynamic conditions in flow cells are described. Use of flow cells allows for direct microscopic investigation of biofilm formation. The flow in these chambers is essentially laminar, which means that the biofilms can be grown...... under highly controlled conditions, and that perturbations such as addition of antibiotics or change of the growth medium can be done efficiently at a defined time point. The protocol includes construction of the flow cell and the bubble trap, assembly and sterilization of the flow cell system...

  10. Numerical study of cell performance and local transport phenomena in PEM fuel cells with various flow channel area ratios

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Xiao-Dong [Department of Thermal Engineering, School of Mechanical Engineering, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing 100083 (China); Duan, Yuan-Yuan [Key Laboratory of Thermal Science and Power Engineering of MOE, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Yan, Wei-Mon [Department of Mechatronic Engineering, Huafan University, Shih-Ting 22305 (China)

    2007-10-11

    Three-dimensional models of proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs) with parallel and interdigitated flow channel designs were developed including the effects of liquid water formation on the reactant gas transport. The models were used to investigate the effects of the flow channel area ratio and the cathode flow rate on the cell performance and local transport characteristics. The results reveal that at high operating voltages, the cell performance is independent of the flow channel designs and operating parameters, while at low operating voltages, both significantly affect cell performance. For the parallel flow channel design, as the flow channel area ratio increases the cell performance improves because fuel is transported into the diffusion layer and the catalyst layer mainly by diffusion. A larger flow channel area ratio increases the contact area between the fuel and the diffusion layer, which allows more fuel to directly diffuse into the porous layers to participate in the electrochemical reaction which enhances the reaction rates. For the interdigitated flow channel design, the baffle forces more fuel to enter the cell and participate in the electrochemical reaction, so the flow channel area ratio has less effect. Forced convection not only increases the fuel transport rates but also enhances the liquid water removal, thus interdigitated flow channel design has higher performance than the parallel flow channel design. The optimal performance for the interdigitated flow channel design occurs for a flow channel area ratio of 0.4. The cell performance also improves as the cathode flow rate increases. The effects of the flow channel area ratio and the cathode flow rate on cell performance are analyzed based on the local current densities, oxygen flow rates and liquid water concentrations inside the cell. (author)

  11. Kinetic study of the hydrogen electrode reaction on a porous material in a flow cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Montero, M.A; Marozi, C.A; Gennero de Chialvo, M.R; Chialvo, A.C

    2005-01-01

    The present work deals with the determination of the electrocatalytic activity of porous electrodes.This problem cannot be appropriately treated with the conventional methods because the reaction is not uniform in the whole electrodic surface.Therefore, it is proposed the evaluation of the variation of the equilibrium polarization resistance with pH.As the current - potential dependences are obtained around the equilibrium condition, current values are very low, gaseous evolution is negligible and the ohmic effects can be avoided through a suitable electrolyte solution.In this context a simple model of a porous electrode was developed, consisting in a tubular electrode operating with a laminar flow of electrolyte, where the mass transfer processes towards and/or from the electrode surface are clearly defined as a function of the mean flow rate of the electrolyte.This method was applied to the study of the hydrogen electrode reaction.The experimental determinations were carried out in a flow cell with a platinum tubular electrode and a regulation of the electrolyte flow saturated with hydrogen gas.The apparent polarization resistance was calculated at different flow rate and pH.The application of the flow model together with a kinetic formalism corresponding to the Volmer - Heyrovsky - Tafel mechanism allowed the evaluation of the intrinsic electrocatalytic activity

  12. A flow-through hydrothermal cell for in situ neutron diffraction studies of phase transformations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Neill, Brian; Tenailleau, Christophe; Nogthai, Yung; Studer, Andrew; Brugger, Joel; Pring, Allan

    2006-01-01

    A flow-through hydrothermal cell for the in situ neutron diffraction study of crystallisation and phase transitions has been developed. It can be used for kinetic studies on materials that exhibit structural transformations under hydrothermal conditions. It is specifically designed for use on the medium-resolution powder diffractometer (MRPD) at ANSTO, Lucas Heights, Sydney. But it is planned to adapt the design for the Polaris beamline at ISIS and the new high-intensity powder diffractometer (Wombat) at the new Australian reactor Opal. The cell will operate in a flow-through mode over the temperature range from 25-300 deg. C and up to pressures of 100 bar. The first results of a successful transformation of pentlandite (Fe,Ni) 9 S 8 to violarite (Fe,Ni) 3 S 4 under mild conditions (pH∼4) at 120 deg. C and 3 bar using in situ neutron diffraction measurements are presented

  13. A microfluidic flow-cell for the study of the ultrafast dynamics of biological systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chauvet, Adrien, E-mail: adrien.chauvet@epfl.ch; Chergui, Majed [Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne (EPFL), Laboratoire de Spectroscopie Ultrarapide, ISIC, Faculté des Sciences de Base, Station 6, 1015 Lausanne (Switzerland); Tibiletti, Tania; Caffarri, Stefano [Aix Marseille Université, CNRS, CEA, UMR 7265 Biologie Végétale et Microbiologie Environnementales, 13009 Marseille (France)

    2014-10-01

    The study of biochemical dynamics by ultrafast spectroscopic methods is often restricted by the limited amount of liquid sample available, while the high repetition rate of light sources can induce photodamage. In order to overcome these limitations, we designed a high flux, sub-ml, capillary flow-cell. While the 0.1 mm thin window of the 0.5 mm cross-section capillary ensures an optimal temporal resolution and a steady beam deviation, the cell-pump generates flows up to ~0.35 ml/s that are suitable to pump laser repetition rates up to ~14 kHz, assuming a focal spot-diameter of 100 μm. In addition, a decantation chamber efficiently removes bubbles and allows, via septum, for the addition of chemicals while preserving the closed atmosphere. The minimal useable amount of sample is ~250 μl.

  14. Development and Application of a Flow Reactor Cell for Studies of Surface Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Algrim, L. B.; Pagonis, D.; Price, D.; Day, D. A.; De Gouw, J. A.; Jimenez, J. L.; Ziemann, P. J.

    2017-12-01

    We have designed, constructed, characterized, and employed a flow reactor cell that can be used to investigate the interaction of gaseous species such as volatile organic compounds (VOCs), oxidants, acids, and water vapor with authentic and model surfaces that are present in indoor and outdoor environments. The 3.9 L rectangular cell is made of FEP-coated aluminum and has one open face that can be sealed to the surface of interest. An internal plunger is raised (lowered) to expose (cover) the surface while various probe chemicals are added to the flow. To date we have exposed painted surfaces to O3, OH radicals (made from reaction of O3 with tetramethylethene and from photolysis of methyl nitrate/NO mixtures), and NO3 radicals (made from thermal decomposition N2O5) and analyzed the emitted oxidation products with a proton transfer reaction mass spectrometer (PTR-MS) and chemical ionization mass spectrometer (CIMS) equipped with an iodide reagent ion source. Further studies have included the reaction of oxidants with surfaces coated with organic films such as squalene and polyethylene glycol, as well as uptake of ketones and acids from the gas-phase to painted surfaces. The cell was also recently deployed at the University of Colorado-Boulder Art Museum during spring of 2017 to investigate the oxidation products released from the museum walls and floors. Results from all of these studies will be presented.

  15. Flow cytogenetic studies in chromosomes and whole cells for the detection of clastogenic effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Otto, F.J.; Oldiges, H.

    1980-01-01

    Flow cytometric measurements of the chromosomal DNA content have been used to develop a screening method for the detection of chemically- or physically-induced cytogenetic damage. The reproducibility of this flow cytogenetic assay was shown in a series of subcultures of a Chinese hamster cell clone. The accuracy and sensitivity was tested in cultures treated with chemical mutagens and x-rays. The clastogenic effectiveness was quantified and the dose-effect relationship was established by the increase of the coefficient of variation of the peak of the largest chromosome type in the flow histograms. Since structural chromosome aberrations cause an unequal division of the DNA at mitosis, it is expected that clastogenic effects can be detected also in whole cells of growing populations as an increased dispersion of the cellular DNA content. In order to test this feature, high resolution flow cytometric measurements were performed in x-irradiated hamster cells in vitro and mouse bone marrow cells in vivo

  16. A flow-through hydrothermal cell for in situ neutron diffraction studies of phase transformations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O' Neill, Brian [School of Chemical Engineering, The University of Adelaide, South Australia 5005 (Australia); Tenailleau, Christophe [Department of Mineralogy, South Australian Museum, North Terrace, Adelaide, South Australia 5000 (Australia); Nogthai, Yung [School of Chemical Engineering, The University of Adelaide, South Australia 5005 (Australia); Studer, Andrew [Bragg Institute, ANSTO, PMB 1 Menai, New South Wales 2234 (Australia); Brugger, Joel [Department of Mineralogy, South Australian Museum, North Terrace, Adelaide, South Australia 5000 (Australia): Department of Geology and Geophysics, The University of Adelaide, North Terrace, Adelaide, South Australia 5005 (Australia); Pring, Allan [Department of Mineralogy, South Australian Museum, North Terrace, Adelaide, South Australia 5000 (Australia): Department of Geology and Geophysics, The University of Adelaide, North Terrace, Adelaide, South Australia 5005 (Australia)]. E-mail: pring.allan@saugov.sa.gov.au

    2006-11-15

    A flow-through hydrothermal cell for the in situ neutron diffraction study of crystallisation and phase transitions has been developed. It can be used for kinetic studies on materials that exhibit structural transformations under hydrothermal conditions. It is specifically designed for use on the medium-resolution powder diffractometer (MRPD) at ANSTO, Lucas Heights, Sydney. But it is planned to adapt the design for the Polaris beamline at ISIS and the new high-intensity powder diffractometer (Wombat) at the new Australian reactor Opal. The cell will operate in a flow-through mode over the temperature range from 25-300 deg. C and up to pressures of 100 bar. The first results of a successful transformation of pentlandite (Fe,Ni){sub 9}S{sub 8} to violarite (Fe,Ni){sub 3}S{sub 4} under mild conditions (pH{approx}4) at 120 deg. C and 3 bar using in situ neutron diffraction measurements are presented.

  17. Flow-system analysis of exfoliated pulmonary cells: results of initial characterization studies in hamsters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steinkamp, J.A.; Hansen, K.M.; Wilson, J.S.; Salzman, G.C.

    1976-01-01

    This paper summarizes results of preliminary experiments to develop cytological and biochemical indicators for estimating damage to respiratory cells in test animals exposed by inhalation to toxic agents associated with nonnuclear energy production, the specific goal being the application of advanced multiparameter flow-systems technologies to the detection of early atypical cellular changes in lung epithelium. Normal Syrian hamster lung cell samples composed of histiocytes, leukocytes, macrophages, ciliated columnar cells, and epithelial cells were stained with fluorescent dyes specific for different biochemical parameters and were analyzed in liquid suspension as they flowed through a chamber intersecting a laser beam of exciting light. Multiple sensors measured the total or two-color fluorescence and light scatter on a cell-by-cell basis. Cellular parameters proportional to optical measurements (i.e., cell size, DNA content, total protein, nonspecific esterase activity, nuclear and cytoplasmic diameters) were displayed as frequency distribution histograms. Lung cell samples were also separated according to various cytological parameters and identified microscopically. The basic operating features of the methodology are discussed briefly, along with specific examples of preliminary results illustrating the initial characterization of exfoliated pulmonary cells from normal hamsters. As the flow technology is adapted further to the analysis of respiratory cells, measurements of changes in physical and biochemical properties as a function of exposure to toxic agents will be performed.

  18. CFD study of liquid-cooled heat sinks with microchannel flow field configurations for electronics, fuel cells, and concentrated solar cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramos-Alvarado, Bladimir; Li Peiwen; Liu Hong; Hernandez-Guerrero, Abel

    2011-01-01

    A study of the heat transfer performance of liquid-cooled heat sinks with conventional and novel micro-channel flow field configurations for application in electronic devices, fuel cells, and concentrated solar cells is presented in this paper. The analyses were based on computations using the CFD software ANSYS FLUENT. The flow regime in heat sinks is constrained to laminar flow in the study. Details of the heat transfer performance, particularly, the uniformity of temperature distribution on the heating surface, as well as the pressure losses and pumping power in the operation of the studied heat sinks were obtained. Comparisons of the flow distribution uniformity in multiple flow channels, temperature uniformity on heating surfaces, and pumping power consumption of heat sinks with novel flow field configurations and conventional flow field configurations were conducted. It was concluded that the novel flow field configurations studied in this work exhibit appreciable benefits for application in heat sinks. - Highlights: → We present novel designs of flow channel configurations in liquid cooled heat sinks. → The flow and heat transfer in heat sinks were simulated using CFD tool. → The temperature and pressure loss in novel and conventional heat sinks were studied. → Figure of merit of heat sinks in different flow channel configurations was presented. → The heat sinks having our novel design of flow channel configurations are excellent.

  19. A flow cell for in situ synchrotron x-ray diffraction studies of scale formation under Bayer processing conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webster, Nathan A. S.; Madsen, Ian C.; Loan, Melissa J.; Scarlett, Nicola V. Y.; Wallwork, Kia S.

    2009-08-01

    The design, construction, and commissioning of a stainless steel flow cell for in situ synchrotron x-ray diffraction studies of scale formation under Bayer processing conditions is described. The use of the cell is demonstrated by a study of Al(OH)3 scale formation on a mild steel substrate from synthetic Bayer liquor at 70 °C. The cell design allows for interchangeable parts and substrates and would be suitable for the study of scale formation in other industrial processes.

  20. The study of sheath flow dark zone phenomenon in dynamic individual cells scattering measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lu; Zhao, Hong; Wang, Xiaopin; Zhang, Weiguang

    2008-09-01

    Dynamic cells scattering is one of the most efficient approaches exploring in measurements of cells size, morphology and growth states. This technique can be widely applied in real-time detection for pharmaceutical industry, food industry, liquor industry and other biological fields. A novel method named dynamic individual cells scattering measurement is designed in this paper, which can make cells pass through quartz glass measurement zone one by one with sheath flow driving force. During the experiments, an obvious phenomenon has been found which is called sheath flow dark zone phenomenon (SFDZ). Under the influence of SFDZ, sheath flow forming detection becomes very difficult. In this paper, the causes giving rise to SFDZ have been analyzed. And an improved method is put forward, in which the orifice inside the measurement zone is set as an optical system. Then the illuminating system is redesigned. In this way, almost all the illuminating light can enter orifice so that the total reflection energy decreases substantially. A comparison experiments have been done, which proves the efficiency of this redesigned optical system and its sound effects on SFDZ avoiding.

  1. Flow Cell Design for Effective Biosensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pike, Douglas J.; Kapur, Nikil; Millner, Paul A.; Stewart, Douglas I.

    2013-01-01

    The efficiency of three different biosensor flow cells is reported. All three flow cells featured a central channel that expands in the vicinity of the sensing element to provide the same diameter active region, but the rate of channel expansion and contraction varied between the designs. For each cell the rate at which the analyte concentration in the sensor chamber responds to a change in the influent analyte concentration was determined numerically using a finite element model and experimentally using a flow-fluorescence technique. Reduced flow cell efficiency with increasing flow rates was observed for all three designs and was related to the increased importance of diffusion relative to advection, with efficiency being limited by the development of regions of recirculating flow (eddies). However, the onset of eddy development occurred at higher flow rates for the design with the most gradual channel expansion, producing a considerably more efficient flow cell across the range of flow rates considered in this study. It is recommended that biosensor flow cells be designed to minimize the tendency towards, and be operated under conditions that prevent the development of flow recirculation. PMID:23344373

  2. Flow cytometry total cell counts : A field study assessing microbiological water quality and growth in unchlorinated drinking water distribution systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liu, G.; Van der Mark, E.J.; Verberk, J.Q.; Van Dijk, J.C.

    2013-01-01

    e objective of this study was to evaluate the application of flow cytometry total cell counts (TCCs) as a parameter to assess microbial growth in drinking water distribution systems and to determine the relationships between different parameters describing the biostability of treated water. A

  3. Responses of Cells to Flow in Vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shigehiro Hashimoto

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The response of cells to a flow has been studied in vitro. The response of cells was examined in two types of flow channels: a circumnutating flow in a donut-shaped open channel in a culture dish, and a one-way flow in a parallelepiped rhombus flow channel. Variation was made on the material of the parallelepiped channel to study on adhesion of cells to the plates: glass and polydimethylsiloxane. Behavior of cells on the plate was observed under a flow of a medium with an inverted phase-contrast-microscope. The shear stress on the plate is calculated with an estimated parabolic distribution of the velocity between the parallel plates. The adhesion of cells was evaluated with the cumulated shear, which is a product of the shear stress and the exposure time. The experimental results show that cells are responsive to the flow, which governs orientation, exfoliation, and differentiation. The response depends on the kinds of cells: endothelial cells orient along the stream line, although myocytes orient perpendicular to the stream line. The adhesion depends on the combination between scaffold and cell: myocytes are more adhesive to glass than cartilage cells, and fibroblasts are more adhesive to oxygenated polydimethylsiloxane than glass.

  4. A high precision gas flow cell for performing in situ neutron studies of local atomic structure in catalytic materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olds, Daniel; Page, Katharine; Paecklar, Arnold; Peterson, Peter F; Liu, Jue; Rucker, Gerald; Ruiz-Rodriguez, Mariano; Olsen, Michael; Pawel, Michelle; Overbury, Steven H; Neilson, James R

    2017-03-01

    Gas-solid interfaces enable a multitude of industrial processes, including heterogeneous catalysis; however, there are few methods available for studying the structure of this interface under operating conditions. Here, we present a new sample environment for interrogating materials under gas-flow conditions using time-of-flight neutron scattering under both constant and pulse probe gas flow. Outlined are descriptions of the gas flow cell and a commissioning example using the adsorption of N 2 by Ca-exchanged zeolite-X (Na 78-2x Ca x Al 78 Si 144 O 384 ,x ≈ 38). We demonstrate sensitivities to lattice contraction and N 2 adsorption sites in the structure, with both static gas loading and gas flow. A steady-state isotope transient kinetic analysis of N 2 adsorption measured simultaneously with mass spectrometry is also demonstrated. In the experiment, the gas flow through a plugged-flow gas-solid contactor is switched between N215 and N214 isotopes at a temperature of 300 K and a constant pressure of 1 atm; the gas flow and mass spectrum are correlated with the structure factor determined from event-based neutron total scattering. Available flow conditions, sample considerations, and future applications are discussed.

  5. A high precision gas flow cell for performing in situ neutron studies of local atomic structure in catalytic materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olds, Daniel; Page, Katharine; Paecklar, Arnold; Peterson, Peter F.; Liu, Jue; Rucker, Gerald; Ruiz-Rodriguez, Mariano; Olsen, Michael; Pawel, Michelle; Overbury, Steven H.; Neilson, James R.

    2017-03-01

    Gas-solid interfaces enable a multitude of industrial processes, including heterogeneous catalysis; however, there are few methods available for studying the structure of this interface under operating conditions. Here, we present a new sample environment for interrogating materials under gas-flow conditions using time-of-flight neutron scattering under both constant and pulse probe gas flow. Outlined are descriptions of the gas flow cell and a commissioning example using the adsorption of N2 by Ca-exchanged zeolite-X (Na78-2xCaxAl78Si144O384,x ≈ 38). We demonstrate sensitivities to lattice contraction and N2 adsorption sites in the structure, with both static gas loading and gas flow. A steady-state isotope transient kinetic analysis of N2 adsorption measured simultaneously with mass spectrometry is also demonstrated. In the experiment, the gas flow through a plugged-flow gas-solid contactor is switched between 15N2 and 14N2 isotopes at a temperature of 300 K and a constant pressure of 1 atm; the gas flow and mass spectrum are correlated with the structure factor determined from event-based neutron total scattering. Available flow conditions, sample considerations, and future applications are discussed.

  6. Flow cytometric studies of the survival of cytochalasin-induced polyploidy in Chinese hamster ovary cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Court, J B; Burn, C; Moore, J L

    1990-05-01

    A method has been developed to estimate the post-irradiation survival of cytochalasin B-induced polyploidization of adherent Chinese hamster ovary cell using the flow cytometer. After exposure to radiation, surviving cells are allowed to become polyploid in the presence of cytochalasin, and are detached using trypsin, fixed by the addition of glutaraldehyde and stained using mithramycin. DNA content distributions are polymodal, and the absolute number of cells per culture in any given ploidy class is estimated by reference to a non-fluorescent bead internal standard, detected using forward scatter. Post-irradiation survival is defined as the ability to reach a given DNA content, and is reduced exponentially with dose. A bioassay to determine optimum cytochalasin concentrations can be derived from the relative size of the 2C (G0/G1) peak in the DNA content distribution. At culture densities greater than about 8 x 10(4) cell/cm2 the relative number of cells reaching at least 16C is reduced, but this inhibition is partially reversible by an increase in the medium glucose concentration, but not by the use of cytochalasin D or dihydro B.

  7. Optimization of mass of plastic scintillator film for flow-cell based tritium monitoring: a Monte Carlo study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roy, Arup Singha; Palani Selvam, T.; Raman, Anand; Raja, V.; Chaudhury, Probal

    2014-01-01

    Over the years, various types of tritium-in-air monitors have been designed and developed based on different principles. Ionization chamber, proportional counter and scintillation detector systems are few among them. A plastic scintillator based, flow-cell type online tritium-in-air monitoring system was developed for online monitoring of tritium in air. The value of the scintillator mass inside the cell-volume, which maximizes the response of the detector system, should be obtained to get maximum efficiency. The present study is aimed to optimize the amount of mass of the plastic scintillator film for the flow-cell based tritium monitoring instrument so that maximum efficiency is achieved. The Monte Carlo based EGSnrc code system has been used for this purpose

  8. A flow cytometry technique to study intracellular signals NF-κB and STAT3 in peripheral blood mononuclear cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chavarin Patricia

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cytokines have essential roles on intercellular communications and are effective in using a variety of intracellular pathways. Among this multitude of signalling pathways, the NF-κB (nuclear factor kappaB and STAT (signal transducer and activator of transcription families are among the most frequently investigated because of their importance. Indeed, they have important role in innate and adaptive immunity. Current techniques to study NF-κB and STAT rely on specific ELISAs, Western Blots and – most recently described – flow cytometry; so far, investigation of such signalling pathways are most commonly performed on homogeneous cells after purification. Results The present investigation aimed at developing a flow cytometry technique to study transcription factors in various cellular types such as mixtures of B-cells, T-lymphocytes and monocytes/macrophages stimulated in steady state conditions (in other words, as peripheral blood mononuclear cells. To achieve this goal, a two step procedure was carried out; the first one consisted of stimulating PBMCs with IL1β, sCD40L and/or IL10 in such a manner that optimal stimulus was found for each cell subset (and subsequent signal transduction, therefore screened by specific ELISA; the second step consisted of assessing confirmation and fine delineation of technical conditions by specific Western-Blotting for either NF-κB or STAT products. We then went on to sensitize the detection technique for mixed cells using 4 color flow cytometry. Conclusion In response to IL1β, or IL10, the levels of phosphorylated NF-κB and STAT3 – respectively – increased significantly for all the studied cell types. In contrast, B-cells and monocytes/macrophages – but, interestingly, not T-lymphocytes (in the context of PBMCs – responded significantly to sCD40L by increasing phosphorylated NF-κB.

  9. Experimental study of the flow pattern around a bubble confined in a microfluidic Hele-Shaw cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsoumpas, Yannis; Fajolles, Christophe; Malloggi, Florent

    2017-11-01

    The flow field around a bubble moving with respect to a surrounding liquid in a Hele-Shaw cell can usually be characterized by a recirculating flow, which is typically attributed to a Marangoni effect due to surface tension gradients generated by a non-uniform distribution of surfactants (or temperature) along the liquid-gas interface. In the present study, we try to visualize such a flow employing 3D micro-particle tracking velocimetry. We perform experiments on an immobile flattened air bubble that is surrounded by a flow of aqueous solution of surfactant (SDS), in a microfluidic chamber described in the work of Sungyon Lee et al.. The suspending fluid is seeded with spherical micro-particles, with those captured by the recirculating flow orbiting in a three-dimensional trajectory in the vicinity of the liquid-air interface. We address the effect of velocity of the surrounding fluid, surfactant concentration and bubble radius on the recirculating flow pattern. The case of a liquid-liquid interface, with a hexadecane drop as the dispersed phase, is also discussed. The authors would like to acknowledge the financial support of Enhanced Eurotalents program (an FP7 Marie Skłodowska-Curie COFUND program) & ANR (ANR-13-BS09-0011).

  10. Novel thermosyphon driven hydrothermal flow-through cell for in situ and time resolved neutron diffraction studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xia, Fang; Qian, Gujie; Etschmann, Barbara; University of Adelaide, South Australia, Australia; University of Adelaide, South Australia, Australia; Studer, Andrew; Olsen, Scott

    2009-01-01

    Full text: A flow-through cell for hydrothermal phase transformation studies by in situ and time-resolved neutron diffraction has been designed and constructed. The cell has a large internal volume of 320 m L and can work at up to 300 degree Centigrade under autogeneous vapour pressures (-85 bar). The fluid flow is driven by thermosyphon which is realized by the proper design of temperature difference around the closed loop[1,2). The main body of the cell is made of stainless steel (316 type), but the sample compartment is constructed from non-scattering Ti/Zr alloy. We have successfully commissioned the cell on Australia's new high intensity powder diffractometer WOMBAT in ANSTO, using a simple transformation reaction from leucite (KAISi 2 O 6 ) to analcime (NaAISi 2 O 6H2O ) and then back from analcime to leucite. The demonstration proved that the cell is an excellent tool for probing hydrothermal phase transformations. By collecting diffraction data every 5 min, it was clearly seen that leucite was progressively transformed to analcime in a NaCI solution, and the produced analcime was progressively transformed back to leucite in a K 2 CO 3 solution.

  11. The study of flow and proton exchange interactions in the cylindrical solid oxide fuel cell

    CERN Document Server

    Saievar-Iranizad, E

    2002-01-01

    The solid oxide fuel cell operates at high temperature of about 1000 deg C. In this temperature, some known materials such as Ni, ... which is abundant in the nature, can be used as a catalyst in the electrodes. The electrolytes of such cell solid oxide fuel cell can be made through non-porous solid ceramics such as Zircon's (ZrO sub 2). It can be stabilized using a doped Yttrium oxide. The importance of Yttria-stabilised Zirconia at high temperature belongs to the transport of oxygen ions through the electrolyte. Oxygen using in the hot cathode side causes a considerable reduction in the concentration of oxygen molecules. The oxygen ions exchange through the electrolyte relates to the molecular oxygen concentration gradient between the anode and cathode. Applying fuels such as hydrogen or natural gas in the anode and its chemical reaction with oxygen ions transfer from cathode through the electrolyte, produce electricity, water and heat. To study the ion exchange and its interaction into solid oxide fuel cel...

  12. The effect of hypnosis on pain and peripheral blood flow in sickle-cell disease: a pilot study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatt, Ravi R; Martin, Sarah R; Evans, Subhadra; Lung, Kirsten; Coates, Thomas D; Zeltzer, Lonnie K; Tsao, Jennie C

    2017-01-01

    Background Vaso-occlusive pain crises (VOCs) are the “hallmark” of sickle-cell disease (SCD) and can lead to sympathetic nervous system dysfunction. Increased sympathetic nervous system activation during VOCs and/or pain can result in vasoconstriction, which may increase the risk for subsequent VOCs and pain. Hypnosis is a neuromodulatory intervention that may attenuate vascular and pain responsiveness. Due to the lack of laboratory-controlled pain studies in patients with SCD and healthy controls, the specific effects of hypnosis on acute pain-associated vascular responses are unknown. The current study assessed the effects of hypnosis on peripheral blood flow, pain threshold, tolerance, and intensity in adults with and without SCD. Subjects and methods Fourteen patients with SCD and 14 healthy controls were included. Participants underwent three laboratory pain tasks before and during a 30-minute hypnosis session. Peripheral blood flow, pain threshold, tolerance, and intensity before and during hypnosis were examined. Results A single 30-minute hypnosis session decreased pain intensity by a moderate amount in patients with SCD. Pain threshold and tolerance increased following hypnosis in the control group, but not in patients with SCD. Patients with SCD exhibited lower baseline peripheral blood flow and a greater increase in blood flow following hypnosis than controls. Conclusion Given that peripheral vasoconstriction plays a role in the development of VOC, current findings provide support for further laboratory and clinical investigations of the effects of cognitive–behavioral neuromodulatory interventions on pain responses and peripheral vascular flow in patients with SCD. Current results suggest that hypnosis may increase peripheral vasodilation during both the anticipation and experience of pain in patients with SCD. These findings indicate a need for further examination of the effects of hypnosis on pain and vascular responses utilizing a randomized

  13. A numerical study of the gas-liquid, two-phase flow maldistribution in the anode of a high pressure PEM water electrolysis cell

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Anders Christian; Rømer, Carsten; Kær, Søren Knudsen

    2016-01-01

    In this work, the use of a circular-planar, interdigitated flow field for the anode of a high pressure proton exchange membrane (PEM) water electrolysis cell is investigated in a numerical study. While PEM fuel cells have separated flow fields for reactant transport and coolant, it is possible......-phase flow model for establishing the effect of geometry and a two-phase flow model for studying the effect of dispersed gas bubbles. Both models account for turbulence and heat transport. By means of the developed models, it is elucidated that the circular-planar shape of the interdigitated flow field...... causes maldistribution, if land areas of equal width are applied. Moreover, below a water stoichiometry of 350, and at a current density of 1 A/cm2, flow and temperature maldistribution is adversely affected by the presence of the gas phase; particularly gas hold-up near outlet channels can cause...

  14. Micromodel foam flow study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chambers, K.T.; Radke, C.J.

    1990-10-01

    Foams are often utilized as part of enhanced oil recovery techniques. This report presents the results of a micromodel foam flow study. Micromodels are valuable tools in uncovering capillary phenomena responsible for lamellae generation and coalescence during foam flow in porous media. Among the mechanisms observed are snap-off, weeping-flow breakup, and lamella division and leave behind. Coalescence mechanisms include dynamic capillary-pressure-induced lamella drainage and gas diffusion. These phenomena are sensitive to the mode of injection, the local capillary environment, and the geometry of the pore structure. An important consideration in presenting a tractable model of foam flow behavior is the ability to identify the pore-level mechanisms having the greatest impact on foam texture. The predominant mechanisms will vary depending upon the application for foam as an enhanced oil recovery (EOR) fluid. Both simultaneous gas and surfactant injection and surfactant alternating with gas injection (SAG) have been used to create foam for mobility control in EOR projects. The model developed is based on simultaneous gas and surfactant injection during steady-state conditions into a Berea sandstone core. The lamellae generation and coalescence mechanisms included in this model are snap-off, lamella division, and dynamic capillary-pressure-induced lamella drainage. This simplified steady-state model serves as a foundation for developing more complete rate expressions and for extending the population balance to handle transient foam flow behavior. 70 refs., 30 figs.

  15. Flow cytometric applications of tumor biology: prospects and pitfalls. [Applications in study of spontaneous dog tumors and in drug and radiation effects on cultured V79 cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raju, M.R.; Johnson, T.S.; Tokita, N.; Gillette, E.L.

    1979-01-01

    A brief review of cytometry instrumentation and its potential applications in tumor biology is presented using our recent data. Age-distribution measurements of cells from spontaneous dog tumors and cultured cells after exposure to x rays, alpha particles, or adriamycin are shown. The data show that DNA fluorescence measurements have application in the study of cell kinetics after either radiation or drug treatment. Extensive and careful experimentation is needed to utilize the sophisticated developments in flow cytometry instrumentation.

  16. Fluorescent multiplex cell flow systems and methods

    KAUST Repository

    Merzaban, Jasmeen

    2017-06-01

    Systems and methods are provided for simultaneously assaying cell adhesion or cell rolling for multiple cell specimens. One embodiment provides a system for assaying adhesion or cell rolling of multiple cell specimens that includes a confocal imaging system containing a parallel plate flow chamber, a pump in fluid communication with the parallel plate flow chamber via a flow chamber inlet line and a cell suspension in fluid communication with the parallel plate flow chamber via a flow chamber outlet line. The system also includes a laser scanning system in electronic communication with the confocal imaging system, and a computer in communication with the confocal imaging system and laser scanning system. In certain embodiments, the laser scanning system emits multiple electromagnetic wavelengths simultaneously it cause multiple fluorescent labels having different excitation wavelength maximums to fluoresce. The system can simultaneously capture real-time fluorescence images from at least seven cell specimens in the parallel plate flow chamber.

  17. Feasibility Studies of Vortex Flow Impact On the Proliferation of Algae in Hydrogen Production for Fuel Cell Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miskon, Azizi; A/L Thanakodi, Suresh; Shiema Moh Nazar, Nazatul; Kit Chong, Marcus Wai; Sobri Takriff, Mohd; Fakir Kamarudin, Kamrul; Aziz Norzali, Abdul; Nooraya Mohd Tawil, Siti

    2016-11-01

    The instability of crude oil price in global market as well as the sensitivity towards green energy increases, more research works being carried out to find alternative energy replacing the depleting of fossil fuels. Photobiological hydrogen production system using algae is one of the promising alternative energy source. However, the yield of hydrogen utilizing the current photobioreactor (PBR) is still low for commercial application due to restricted light penetration into the deeper regions of the reactor. Therefore, this paper studies the feasibility of vortex flow impact utilizing magnetic stirring in hydrogen production for fuel cell applications. For comparison of results, a magnetic stirrer is placed under a PBR of algae to stir the algae to obtain an even distribution of sunlight to the algae while the controlled PBR of algae kept in static. The produced hydrogen level was measured using hydrogen sensor circuit and the data collected were communicated to laptop using Arduino Uno. The results showed more cell counts and hydrogen produced in the PBR under the influence of magnetic stirring compared to static PBR by an average of 8 percent in 4 days.

  18. A flow cell for the study of gas-solid reactions via in situ powder X-ray diffraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scarlett, Nicola V. Y.; Hewish, Damien; Pattel, Rachel; Webster, Nathan A. S.

    2017-10-01

    This paper describes the development and testing of a novel capillary flow cell for use in in situ powder X-ray diffraction experiments. It is designed such that it achieves 200° of rotation of the capillary whilst still allowing the flow of gas through the sample and the monitoring of off gas via mass spectrometry, gas chromatography, or other such analytical techniques. This high degree of rotation provides more uniform heating of the sample than can be achieved in static cells or those with lower rotational ranges and consequently also improves particle statistics. The increased uniformity of heating provides more accurate temperature calibration of the experimental setup as well. The cell is designed to be held in a standard goniometer head and is therefore suitable for use in many laboratory and synchrotron instruments.

  19. A flexible gas flow reaction cell for in situ x-ray absorption spectroscopy studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kroner, Anna B., E-mail: anna.kroner@diamond.ac.uk; Gilbert, Martin; Duller, Graham; Cahill, Leo; Leicester, Peter; Woolliscroft, Richard; Shotton, Elizabeth J. [Diamond Light Source Ltd., Diamond House, Harwell Science and Innovation Campus, Chilton, Oxfordshire, OX110DE (United Kingdom); Mohammed, Khaled M. H. [UK Catalysis Hub, Research Complex at Harwell, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Chilton, Oxfordshire, OX110FA (United Kingdom); School of Chemistry, University of Southampton, Southampton, SO17 1BJ (United Kingdom)

    2016-07-27

    A capillary-based sample environment with hot air blower and integrated gas system was developed at Diamond to conduct X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) studies of materials under time-resolved, in situ conditions. The use of a hot air blower, operating in the temperature range of 298-1173 K, allows introduction of other techniques e.g. X-ray diffraction (XRD), Raman spectroscopy for combined techniques studies. The flexibility to use either quartz or Kapton capillaries allows users to perform XAS measurement at energies as low as 5600 eV. To demonstrate performance, time-resolved, in situ XAS results of Rh catalysts during the process of activation (Rh K-edge, Ce L{sub 3}-edge and Cr K-edge) and the study of mixed oxide membrane (La{sub 0.6}Sr{sub 0.4}Co{sub 0.2}Fe{sub 0.8}O{sub 3−δ}) under various partial oxygen pressure conditions are described.

  20. Fuel cell with internal flow control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haltiner, Jr., Karl J.; Venkiteswaran, Arun [Karnataka, IN

    2012-06-12

    A fuel cell stack is provided with a plurality of fuel cell cassettes where each fuel cell cassette has a fuel cell with an anode and cathode. The fuel cell stack includes an anode supply chimney for supplying fuel to the anode of each fuel cell cassette, an anode return chimney for removing anode exhaust from the anode of each fuel cell cassette, a cathode supply chimney for supplying oxidant to the cathode of each fuel cell cassette, and a cathode return chimney for removing cathode exhaust from the cathode of each fuel cell cassette. A first fuel cell cassette includes a flow control member disposed between the anode supply chimney and the anode return chimney or between the cathode supply chimney and the cathode return chimney such that the flow control member provides a flow restriction different from at least one other fuel cell cassettes.

  1. Flow Cytometry Total Cell Counts: A Field Study Assessing Microbiological Water Quality and Growth in Unchlorinated Drinking Water Distribution Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Liu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to evaluate the application of flow cytometry total cell counts (TCCs as a parameter to assess microbial growth in drinking water distribution systems and to determine the relationships between different parameters describing the biostability of treated water. A one-year sampling program was carried out in two distribution systems in The Netherlands. Results demonstrated that, in both systems, the biomass differences measured by ATP were not significant. TCC differences were also not significant in treatment plant 1, but decreased slightly in treatment plant 2. TCC values were found to be higher at temperatures above 15°C than at temperatures below 15°C. The correlation study of parameters describing biostability found no relationship among TCC, heterotrophic plate counts, and Aeromonas. Also no relationship was found between TCC and ATP. Some correlation was found between the subgroup of high nucleic acid content bacteria and ATP (R2=0.63. Overall, the results demonstrated that TCC is a valuable parameter to assess the drinking water biological quality and regrowth; it can directly and sensitively quantify biomass, detect small changes, and can be used to determine the subgroup of active HNA bacteria that are related to ATP.

  2. Flow Cytometry Total Cell Counts: A Field Study Assessing Microbiological Water Quality and Growth in Unchlorinated Drinking Water Distribution Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, G.; Van der Mark, E. J.; Verberk, J. Q. J. C.; Van Dijk, J. C.

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the application of flow cytometry total cell counts (TCCs) as a parameter to assess microbial growth in drinking water distribution systems and to determine the relationships between different parameters describing the biostability of treated water. A one-year sampling program was carried out in two distribution systems in The Netherlands. Results demonstrated that, in both systems, the biomass differences measured by ATP were not significant. TCC differences were also not significant in treatment plant 1, but decreased slightly in treatment plant 2. TCC values were found to be higher at temperatures above 15°C than at temperatures below 15°C. The correlation study of parameters describing biostability found no relationship among TCC, heterotrophic plate counts, and Aeromonas. Also no relationship was found between TCC and ATP. Some correlation was found between the subgroup of high nucleic acid content bacteria and ATP (R 2 = 0.63). Overall, the results demonstrated that TCC is a valuable parameter to assess the drinking water biological quality and regrowth; it can directly and sensitively quantify biomass, detect small changes, and can be used to determine the subgroup of active HNA bacteria that are related to ATP. PMID:23819117

  3. Study on ammonium and organics removal combined with electricity generation in a continuous flow microbial fuel cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shuxin; Li, Lan; Li, Huiqiang; Wang, Hui; Yang, Ping

    2017-11-01

    A continuous microbial fuel cell system was constructed treating ammonium/organics rich wastewater. Operational performance of MFC system, mechanisms of ammonium removal, effect of ammonium on organics removal and energy output, C and N balance of anode chamber and microbial community analysis of anode chamber were studied. It was concluded that 0.0914kg/m 3 d NH 4 + -N and 5.739kg/m 3 d COD were removed from anode chamber and simultaneous nitrification and denitrification (SND) occurred in cathode chamber resulting in COD, TN removal rate of 88.53%, 71.35% respectively. Excess ammonium affected energy output and the MFC system reached maximum energy output of 816.8mV and 62.94mW/m 3 . In anode chamber, Spirochaetes bacterium sp., Methanobacterium formicicum sp. was predominant in bacteria, archaea communities respectively which contributed to wastewater treatment and electricity generation. This study showed the potential for practical application of continuous flow MFC system treating ammonium/organics rich wastewater and achieving electricity generation simultaneously. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Powder flow in an automated uniaxial tester and an annular shear cell: a study of pharmaceutical excipients and analytical data comparison.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuentz, Martin; Schirg, Peter

    2013-09-01

    An automated version of uniaxial powder flow testing has recently been developed and there is a need for experimental data from pharmaceutical powders. To compare the novel testing method with an annular shear cell using different pharmaceutical excipients. A particular aim was to gain an improved understanding of potential differences in the obtained flow results. Nine excipients were studied with both flow testers at different consolidation levels. Unconfined yield strengths were determined at similar major consolidation stresses. Finally, an anisotropic stress factor was calculated and the fractal character of the powders was assessed by means of image analysis in a rotating drum. Data correlated generally well; however, the unconfined yield strength from uniaxial testing resulted mostly in lower values compared to annular shear cell testing. Differences were specific for the given excipients and mannitol demonstrated the highest discrepancy of measured flow parameters. The differences were first discussed by considering wall friction, anisotropy of forces, brittleness as well as the fractal nature of the powder surface. This heterogeneity of the powder as well as the anisotropy of forces was also found to be important for the relative flow index. The automated uniaxial method demonstrated faster and more reproducible flow testing as compared to an annular shear cell. Therefore, the new method has a high potential in pharmaceutics for example in the quality-control of powders.

  5. Study of self-consistent particle flows in a plasma blob with particle-in-cell simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hasegawa, Hiroki, E-mail: hasegawa.hiroki@nifs.ac.jp; Ishiguro, Seiji [Department of Helical Plasma Research, National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki 509-5292 (Japan); Department of Fusion Science, SOKENDAI (The Graduate University for Advanced Studies), Toki 509-5292 (Japan)

    2015-10-15

    The self-consistent particle flows in a filamentary coherent structure along the magnetic field line in scrape-off layer (SOL) plasma (plasma blob) have been investigated by means of a three-dimensional electrostatic particle-in-cell simulation code. The presence of the spiral current system composed of the diamagnetic and parallel currents in a blob is confirmed by the particle simulation without any assumed sheath boundary models. Furthermore, the observation of the electron and ion parallel velocity distributions in a blob shows that those distributions are far from Maxwellian due to modification with the sheath formation and that the electron temperature on the higher potential side in a blob is higher than that on the lower potential side. Also, it is found that the ions on the higher potential side are accelerated more intensively along the magnetic field line than those on the lower potential side near the edge. This study indicates that particle simulations are able to provide an exact current closure to analysis of blob dynamics and will bring more accurate prediction of plasma transport in the SOL without any empirical assumptions.

  6. Flow assurance study

    OpenAIRE

    Böser, W.; Belfroid, S.P.C.

    2013-01-01

    Generally large scale carbon capture projects require pipeline systems for the transporting of the CO2 from its point of capture to the storage site. The article will give information on the proposed operational management system. This has to work for all process situations, ranging from steady flow at varying injection conditions and flow rates, to start-up and shutdown procedures and also for emergency shutdown at the platform. In all these operational situations the phase behaviour of CO2 ...

  7. Electrochemical study of multi-electrode microbial fuel cells under fed-batch and continuous flow conditions

    KAUST Repository

    Ren, Lijiao

    2014-07-01

    Power production of four hydraulically connected microbial fuel cells (MFCs) was compared with the reactors operated using individual electrical circuits (individual), and when four anodes were wired together and connected to four cathodes all wired together (combined), in fed-batch or continuous flow conditions. Power production under these different conditions could not be made based on a single resistance, but instead required polarization tests to assess individual performance relative to the combined MFCs. Based on the power curves, power produced by the combined MFCs (2.12 ± 0.03 mW, 200 ω) was the same as the summed power (2.13 mW, 50 ω) produced by the four individual reactors in fed-batch mode. With continuous flow through the four MFCs, the maximum power (0.59 ± 0.01 mW) produced by the combined MFCs was slightly lower than the summed maximum power of the four individual reactors (0.68 ± 0.02 mW). There was a small parasitic current flow from adjacent anodes and cathodes, but overall performance was relatively unaffected. These findings demonstrate that optimal power production by reactors hydraulically and electrically connected can be predicted from performance by individual reactors. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Flow assurance study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Böser, W.; Belfroid, S.P.C.

    2013-01-01

    Generally large scale carbon capture projects require pipeline systems for the transporting of the CO2 from its point of capture to the storage site. The article will give information on the proposed operational management system. This has to work for all process situations, ranging from steady flow

  9. On-line study of growth kinetics of single hyphae of Aspergillus oryzae in a flow-through cell

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Torben; Spohr, Anders Bendsen; Nielsen, Jens Bredal

    1999-01-01

    Using image analysis the growth kinetics of the single hyphae of the filamentous fungus Aspergillus oryzae has been determined on-line in a flow-through cell at different glucose concentrations in the range from 26 mg L-1 to 20 g L-1. The tip extension rate of the individual hyphae can be described...... with saturation type kinetics with respect to the length of the hyphae. The maximum tip extension rate is constant for all hyphae measured at the same glucose concentration, whereas the saturation constant for the hyphae varies significantly between the hyphae even within the same hyphal element. When apical...... branching occurs, it is observed that the tip extension rate decreases temporarily. The number of branches formed on a hypha is proportional to the length of the hypha that exceeds a certain minimum length required to support the growth of a new branch. The observed kinetics has been used to simulate...

  10. Cytofluocompteur: an instrument for in flow analysis and sorting of biological cells. Contribution to its study and its realization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pharassopoulos, Antonis

    1980-01-01

    Principle: A solution of cells stained with fluorescent dyes, passes through a small orifice (diam. 50 μm) full of physiological saline. Cells modify the electric resistance of the orifice proportionally to their volume. They then intersect a laser beam focused to a 1-3 μm width. The fluorescence emitted by the cells is proportional to the quantity of the absorbed fluorescent dye. The stream carrying the cells is finally divided in uniform droplets. Those containing cells corresponding to selected criteria are electrically charged and then deflected by a constant electric field. Our contribution has essentially concerned: - the study on the creation of the optimum conditions for cell volume measurement including amplification and electronic signal processing; - the study and realization of the pressurized fluid supply and control system; - the study and experiments on droplet formation and their deflection; - the study and the realization of an electronic device for signal visualisation. In conclusion, first results on volume and fluorescence distributions of chicken erythrocytes and comparison with other devices and methods, are presented. (author) [fr

  11. Hierarchical Bayesian mixture modelling for antigen-specific T-cell subtyping in combinatorially encoded flow cytometry studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lin, Lin; Chan, Cliburn; Hadrup, Sine R

    2013-01-01

    in the ability to characterize variation in immune responses involving larger numbers of functionally differentiated cell subtypes. We describe novel classes of Markov chain Monte Carlo methods for model fitting that exploit distributed GPU (graphics processing unit) implementation. We discuss issues of cellular...... subtype identification in this novel, general model framework, and provide a detailed example using simulated data. We then describe application to a data set from an experimental study of antigen-specific T-cell subtyping using combinatorially encoded assays in human blood samples. Summary comments...

  12. Geophysical Fluid Flow Cell (GFFC) Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-01-01

    These simulations of atmospheric flow use the same experimental parameters but started with slightly different initial conditions in the model. The simulations were part of data analysis for the Geophysical Fluid Flow Cell (GFFC), a planet in a test tube apparatus flown on Spacelab to mimic the atmospheres on gas giant planets and stars. (Credit: Dr. Tim Miller of Global Hydrology and Climate Center at the Marshall Space Flight Center)

  13. Partitioning of red blood cell aggregates in bifurcating microscale flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaliviotis, E.; Sherwood, J. M.; Balabani, S.

    2017-03-01

    Microvascular flows are often considered to be free of red blood cell aggregates, however, recent studies have demonstrated that aggregates are present throughout the microvasculature, affecting cell distribution and blood perfusion. This work reports on the spatial distribution of red blood cell aggregates in a T-shaped bifurcation on the scale of a large microvessel. Non-aggregating and aggregating human red blood cell suspensions were studied for a range of flow splits in the daughter branches of the bifurcation. Aggregate sizes were determined using image processing. The mean aggregate size was marginally increased in the daughter branches for a range of flow rates, mainly due to the lower shear conditions and the close cell and aggregate proximity therein. A counterintuitive decrease in the mean aggregate size was apparent in the lower flow rate branches. This was attributed to the existence of regions depleted by aggregates of certain sizes in the parent branch, and to the change in the exact flow split location in the T-junction with flow ratio. The findings of the present investigation may have significant implications for microvascular flows and may help explain why the effects of physiological RBC aggregation are not deleterious in terms of in vivo vascular resistance.

  14. On-line study of fungal morphology during submerged growth in a small flow-through cell

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Spohr, Anders Bendsen; Dam Mikkelsen, C.; Carlsen, Morten

    1998-01-01

    A flow-through cell is designed to measure the growth kinetics of hyphae of Aspergillus oryzae grown submerged in a well controlled environment. The different stages of the growth process are characterized, from the spore to the fully developed hyphal element with up to 60 branches and a total...... is determined. After about 10 h growth at a glucose concentration of 250 mg L-1, 6-7 branches have been set, and both the total hyphal length l(t) and the number of tips increase exponentially with time. The specific growth rate of the hyphae is 0.33 h(-1) while the average rate of the extension of the growing...... tips approaches 55 mu m h(-1). The growth kinetics for all the branches on the main hypha have also been found. The main hypha and all the branches grow at a rate which can be modeled by saturation kinetics with respect to the branch length and with nearly equal final tip speeds (160 mu m h(-1...

  15. Immunophenotypic Characterization of Human Bone Marrow Mast Cells. A Flow Cytometric Study of Normal and Pathological Bone Marrow Samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Escribano

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available The goal of the present paper was to define the immunophenotype of bone marrow mast cells (BMMC from healthy controls and patients with hematologic malignancies (HM based on the use of multiple stainings with monoclonal antibodies analyzed by flow cytometry. Our results show that BMMC from both groups of individuals display a similar but heterogenous immunophenotype. The overall numbers of BMMC are higher in the HM group of individuals (p = 0.08. Three patterns of antigen expression were detected: (1 markers constantly positive in all cases analyzed (CD9, CD29, CD33, CD43, CD44, CD49d, CD49e, CD51, CD71, CD117, and FcεRI, (2 antigens that were constantly negative (CD1a, CD2, CD3, CD5, CD6, CD11a, CD14, CD15, CD16, CD19, CD20, CD21, CD23, CD25, CD30, CD34, CD38, CD41a, CD42b, CD65, CD66b, HLA-DR, and CD138, and (3 markers that were positive in a variable proportion of cases – CD11b (50%, CD11c (77%, CD13 (40%, CD18 (20%, CD22 (68%, CD35 (27%, CD40 (67%, CD54 (88% and CD61 (40%. In addition, BMMC from all cases explored were CD45+, and this antigen was expressed at an intensity similar to that of mature granulocytes.

  16. Study of the Flow Temperature and Ring Design Influence on the Response of a New Reduced-Size Calorimetric Cell for Nuclear Heating Quantification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volte, A.; Reynard-Carette, C.; Brun, J.; De Vita, C.; Carette, M.; Fiorido, T.; Lyoussi, A.; Fourmentel, D.; Villard, J.-F.; Guimbal, P.

    2018-01-01

    This paper concerns experimental studies of different designs of a new compact calorimetric cell under laboratory conditions. This kind of cell is used for the measurement of the nuclear heating rate inside Material Testing Reactors thanks to differential calorimetry. The results, obtained by applying an operating protocol corresponding to a preliminary out-of-pile calibration step, are presented for three designs. The influence of the horizontal-fin design is shown on the calibration curve and the sensor sensitivity. The influence of the external fluid flow temperature is given for the quarter design. The different responses of the calorimetric cell are explained by taken into account a 1D analytical thermal model coupling thermal conductive and radiative transfers.

  17. Ciliary neurotrophic factor induces genes associated with inflammation and gliosis in the retina: a gene profiling study of flow-sorted, Müller cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Xue

    Full Text Available Ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF, a member of the interleukin-6 cytokine family, has been implicated in the development, differentiation and survival of retinal neurons. The mechanisms of CNTF action as well as its cellular targets in the retina are poorly understood. It has been postulated that some of the biological effects of CNTF are mediated through its action via retinal glial cells; however, molecular changes in retinal glia induced by CNTF have not been elucidated. We have, therefore, examined gene expression dynamics of purified Müller (glial cells exposed to CNTF in vivo.Müller cells were flow-sorted from mgfap-egfp transgenic mice one or three days after intravitreal injection of CNTF. Microarray analysis using RNA from purified Müller cells showed differential expression of almost 1,000 transcripts with two- to seventeen-fold change in response to CNTF. A comparison of transcriptional profiles from Müller cells at one or three days after CNTF treatment showed an increase in the number of transcribed genes as well as a change in the expression pattern. Ingenuity Pathway Analysis showed that the differentially regulated genes belong to distinct functional types such as cytokines, growth factors, G-protein coupled receptors, transporters and ion channels. Interestingly, many genes induced by CNTF were also highly expressed in reactive Müller cells from mice with inherited or experimentally induced retinal degeneration. Further analysis of gene profiles revealed 20-30% overlap in the transcription pattern among Müller cells, astrocytes and the RPE.Our studies provide novel molecular insights into biological functions of Müller glial cells in mediating cytokine response. We suggest that CNTF remodels the gene expression profile of Müller cells leading to induction of networks associated with transcription, cell cycle regulation and inflammatory response. CNTF also appears to function as an inducer of gliosis in the retina.

  18. Ciliary neurotrophic factor induces genes associated with inflammation and gliosis in the retina: a gene profiling study of flow-sorted, Müller cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Wei; Cojocaru, Radu I; Dudley, V Joseph; Brooks, Matthew; Swaroop, Anand; Sarthy, Vijay P

    2011-01-01

    Ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF), a member of the interleukin-6 cytokine family, has been implicated in the development, differentiation and survival of retinal neurons. The mechanisms of CNTF action as well as its cellular targets in the retina are poorly understood. It has been postulated that some of the biological effects of CNTF are mediated through its action via retinal glial cells; however, molecular changes in retinal glia induced by CNTF have not been elucidated. We have, therefore, examined gene expression dynamics of purified Müller (glial) cells exposed to CNTF in vivo. Müller cells were flow-sorted from mgfap-egfp transgenic mice one or three days after intravitreal injection of CNTF. Microarray analysis using RNA from purified Müller cells showed differential expression of almost 1,000 transcripts with two- to seventeen-fold change in response to CNTF. A comparison of transcriptional profiles from Müller cells at one or three days after CNTF treatment showed an increase in the number of transcribed genes as well as a change in the expression pattern. Ingenuity Pathway Analysis showed that the differentially regulated genes belong to distinct functional types such as cytokines, growth factors, G-protein coupled receptors, transporters and ion channels. Interestingly, many genes induced by CNTF were also highly expressed in reactive Müller cells from mice with inherited or experimentally induced retinal degeneration. Further analysis of gene profiles revealed 20-30% overlap in the transcription pattern among Müller cells, astrocytes and the RPE. Our studies provide novel molecular insights into biological functions of Müller glial cells in mediating cytokine response. We suggest that CNTF remodels the gene expression profile of Müller cells leading to induction of networks associated with transcription, cell cycle regulation and inflammatory response. CNTF also appears to function as an inducer of gliosis in the retina.

  19. Separation of cancer cells using vortical microfluidic flows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haddadi, Hamed; Naghsh-Nilchi, Hamed; Di Carlo, Dino

    2018-01-01

    Label-free separation of viable cancer cells using vortical microfluidic flows has been introduced as a feasible cell collection method in oncological studies. Besides the clinical importance, the physics of particle interactions with the vortex that forms in a wall-confined geometry of a microchannel is a relatively new area of fluid dynamics. In our previous work [Haddadi and Di Carlo, J. Fluid. Mech. 811 , 436-467 (2017)], we have introduced distinct aspects of inertial flow of dilute suspensions over cavities in a microchannel such as breakdown of the separatrix and formation of stable limit cycle orbits for finite size polystyrene particles. In this work, we extend our experiments to address the engineering-physics of cancer cell entrapment in microfluidic cavities. We begin by studying the effects of the channel width and device height on the morphology of the vortex, which has not been discussed in our previous work. The stable limit cycle orbits of finite size cancer cells are then presented. We demonstrate effects of the separatrix breakdown and the limit cycle formation on the operation of the cancer cell separation platform. By studying the flow of dilute cell suspensions over the cavities, we further develop the notion of the cavity capacity and the relative rate of cell accumulation as optimization criteria which connect the device geometry with the flow. Finally, we discuss the proper placement of multiple cavities inside a microchannel for improved cell entrapment.

  20. Towards optical cell transfection inside a micro flow cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breunig, H. G.; Uchugonova, A.; König, K.

    2014-03-01

    For optical transfection, cells are shortly subjected to intense, focused laser radiation which leads to a temporary opening in the cell membrane. Although the method is very efficient and ensures high cell viability, the targeting of single cells with laser pulses is a tedious and slow approach. We present first measurements aiming at an experimental setup which is suitable for high throughput and automated optical cell transfection. In our setup, cells flow through a micro flow cell where they are spatially confined. The laser radiation is focused into the cell in a way that an elongated focal region is realized. This makes the time consuming aiming of the laser beam at individual cells unnecessary and opens the possibility to develop a completely automated system. The elongated laser focal region is realized by a quasi-Bessel beam which is generated by an axicon lens setup and continuously scanned from side to side of the cell. We present test measurements of the newly employed setup and discuss its suitability to be fully integrated into a flow cell sequencing system.

  1. Multi-reflection photometric flow cell for use in flow injection analysis of estuarine waters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ellis, Peter S.; Lyddy-Meaney, Amanda J.; Worsfold, Paul J.; McKelvie, Ian D.

    2003-01-01

    A multi-reflection flow cell suitable for flow analysis is described. Light from an LED is directed through an optical fibre into a silver coated capillary through a sidewall aperture, and emerges through a similar aperture 10 mm along the capillary after undergoing an estimated 19 reflections. This process provides a sensitivity enhancement of approximately 2.5 compared with a conventional z-cell of the same nominal path length. This enhancement is due to both the increased optical path length achieved by multiple reflection of the light beam through the sample, and minimization of physical dispersion by the use of a short, small internal diameter capillary as the flow cell. The optical design of this flow cell also minimizes the Schlieren effect. Optical and hydrodynamic characteristics of this multi-reflection cell have been evaluated using a series of bromothymol blue dye studies. Application of the flow cell to the determination of reactive phosphorus in estuarine waters with wide variation in salinity and refractive index is also described

  2. Comparison of Numerical and Experimental Studies for Flow-Field Optimization Based on Under-Rib Convection in Polymer Electrolyte Membrane Fuel Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nguyen Duy Vinh

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The flow-field design based on under-rib convection plays an important role in enhancing the performance of polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs because it ensures the uniform distribution of the reacting gas and the facilitation of water. This research focused on developing suitable configurations of the anode and cathode bipolar plates to enhance the fuel cell performance based on under-rib convection. The work here evaluated the effects of flow-field designs, including a serpentine flow field with sub channel and by pass and a conventional serpentine flow-field on single-cell performance. Both the experiment and computer simulation indicated that the serpentine flow field with sub channel and by pass (SFFSB configuration enables more effective utilization of the electrocatalysts since it improves reactant transformation rate from the channel to the catalyst layer, thereby dramatically improving the fuel cell performance. The simulation and experimental results indicated that the power densities are increased by up to 16.74% and 18.21%, respectively, when applying suitable flow-field configurations to the anode and cathode bipolar plates. The findings in this are the foundation for enhancing efficient PEMFCs based on flow field design.

  3. Red blood cell in simple shear flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chien, Wei; Hew, Yayu; Chen, Yeng-Long

    2013-03-01

    The dynamics of red blood cells (RBC) in blood flow is critical for oxygen transport, and it also influences inflammation (white blood cells), thrombosis (platelets), and circulatory tumor migration. The physical properties of a RBC can be captured by modeling RBC as lipid membrane linked to a cytoskeletal spectrin network that encapsulates cytoplasm rich in hemoglobin, with bi-concave equilibrium shape. Depending on the shear force, RBC elasticity, membrane viscosity, and cytoplasm viscosity, RBC can undergo tumbling, tank-treading, or oscillatory motion. We investigate the dynamic state diagram of RBC in shear and pressure-driven flow using a combined immersed boundary-lattice Boltzmann method with a multi-scale RBC model that accurately captures the experimentally established RBC force-deformation relation. It is found that the tumbling (TU) to tank-treading (TT) transition occurs as shear rate increases for cytoplasm/outer fluid viscosity ratio smaller than 0.67. The TU frequency is found to be half of the TT frequency, in agreement with experiment observations. Larger viscosity ratios lead to the disappearance of stable TT phase and unstable complex dynamics, including the oscillation of the symmetry axis of the bi-concave shape perpendicular to the flow direction. The dependence on RBC bending rigidity, shear modulus, the order of membrane spectrin network and fluid field in the unstable region will also be discussed.

  4. Flow rate dependency of critical wall shear stress in a radial-flow cell

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Detry, J.G.; Jensen, Bo Boye Busk; Sindic, M.

    2009-01-01

    In the present work, a radial-flow cell was used to study the removal of starch particle aggregates from several solid substrates (glass, stainless steel, polystyrene and PTFE) in order to determine the critical wall shear stress value for each case. The particle aggregates were formed by aspersion...

  5. Toward harmonized phenotyping of human myeloid-derived suppressor cells by flow cytometry: results from an interim study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandruzzato, Susanna; Brandau, Sven; Britten, Cedrik M; Bronte, Vincenzo; Damuzzo, Vera; Gouttefangeas, Cécile; Maurer, Dominik; Ottensmeier, Christian; van der Burg, Sjoerd H; Welters, Marij J P; Walter, Steffen

    2016-02-01

    There is an increasing interest for monitoring circulating myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) in cancer patients, but there are also divergences in their phenotypic definition. To overcome this obstacle, the Cancer Immunoguiding Program under the umbrella of the Association of Cancer Immunotherapy is coordinating a proficiency panel program that aims at harmonizing MDSC phenotyping. After a consultation period, a two-stage approach was designed to harmonize MDSC phenotype. In the first step, an international consortium of 23 laboratories immunophenotyped 10 putative MDSC subsets on pretested, peripheral blood mononuclear cells of healthy donors to assess the level of concordance and define robust marker combinations for the identification of circulating MDSCs. At this stage, no mandatory requirements to standardize reagents or protocols were introduced. Data analysis revealed a small intra-laboratory, but very high inter-laboratory variance for all MDSC subsets, especially for the granulocytic subsets. In particular, the use of a dead-cell marker altered significantly the reported percentage of granulocytic MDSCs, confirming that these cells are especially sensitive to cryopreservation and/or thawing. Importantly, the gating strategy was heterogeneous and associated with high inter-center variance. Overall, our results document the high variability in MDSC phenotyping in the multicenter setting if no harmonization/standardization measures are applied. Although the observed variability depended on a number of identified parameters, the main parameter associated with variation was the gating strategy. Based on these findings, we propose further efforts to harmonize marker combinations and gating parameters to identify strategies for a robust enumeration of MDSC subsets.

  6. Redox flow cell energy storage systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thaller, L. H.

    1979-01-01

    NASA-Redox systems are electrochemical storage devices that use two fully soluble Redox couples, anode and cathode fluids, as active electrode materials separated by a highly selective ion exchange membrane. The reactants are contained in large storage tanks and pumped through a stack of Redox flow cells where the electrochemical reactions (reduction and oxidation) take place at porous carbon felt electrodes. A string or stack of these power producing cells is connected in series in a bipolar manner. Redox energy storage systems promise to be inexpensive and possess many features that provide for flexible design, long life, high reliability and minimal operation and maintenance costs. These features include independent sizing of power and storage capacity requirements and inclusion within the cell stack of a cell that monitors the state of charge of the system as a whole, and a rebalance cell which permits continuous correction to be made for minor side reactions that would tend to result in the anode fluid and cathode fluids becoming electrochemically out of balance. These system features are described and discussed.

  7. Studying leukocyte recruitment under flow conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parsons, Sean A; Jurzinsky, Christophe; Cuvelier, Susan L; Patel, Kamala D

    2013-01-01

    Leukocyte recruitment from the vasculature occurs under conditions of haemodynamic shear stress. The parallel plate flow chamber apparatus is an in vitro system that is widely used to study leukocyte recruitment under shear conditions. The flow chamber is a versatile tool for examining adhesive interactions, as it can be used to study a variety of adhesive substrates, ranging from monolayers of primary cells to isolated adhesion molecules, and a variety of adhesive particles, ranging from leukocytes in whole blood to antibody-coated latex beads. We describe here methods for studying leukocyte recruitment to cytokine-stimulated, transfected or transduced endothelial cells using both whole blood and isolated leukocyte suspensions. These methods enable multiple parameters to be measured, including the total number of recruited leukocytes, the percentage of leukocytes that are rolling or firmly adherent, and the percentage of leukocytes that have transmigrated. Although these methods are described for interactions between leukocytes and endothelial cells, they are broadly applicable to the study of interactions between many combinations of adhesive substrates and adhesive particles.

  8. Experimental investigation two phase flow in direct methanol fuel cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mat, M. D.; Kaplan, Y.; Celik, S.; Oeztural, A.

    2007-01-01

    Direct methanol fuel cells (DMFC) have received many attentions specifically for portable electronic applications since it utilize methanol which is in liquid form in atmospheric condition and high energy density of the methanol. Thus it eliminates the storage problem of hydrogen. It also eliminates humidification requirement of polymeric membrane which is a problem in PEM fuel cells. Some electronic companies introduced DMFC prototypes for portable electronic applications. Presence of carbon dioxide gases due to electrochemical reactions in anode makes the problem a two phase problem. A two phase flow may occur at cathode specifically at high current densities due to the excess water. Presence of gas phase in anode region and liquid phase in cathode region prevents diffusion of fuel and oxygen to the reaction sites thus reduces the performance of the system. Uncontrolled pressure buildup in anode region increases methanol crossover through membrane and adversely effect the performance. Two phase flow in both anode and cathode region is very effective in the performance of DMYC system and a detailed understanding of two phase flow for high performance DMFC systems. Although there are many theoretical and experimental studies available on the DMFC systems in the literature, only few studies consider problem as a two-phase flow problem. In this study, an experimental set up is developed and species distributions on system are measured with a gas chromatograph. System performance characteristics (V-I curves) is measured depending on the process parameters (temperature, fuel ad oxidant flow rates, methanol concentration etc)

  9. Method of detaching adherent cells for flow cytometry

    KAUST Repository

    Kaur, Mandeep

    2015-12-24

    In one aspect, a method for detaching adherent cells can include adding a cell lifting solution to the media including a sample of adherent cells and incubating the sample of adherent cells with the cell lifting solution. No scraping or pipetting is needed to facilitate cell detachment. The method do not require inactivation of cell lifting solution and no washing of detaching cells is required to remove cell lifting solution. Detached cells can be stained with dye in the presence of cell lifting solution and are further analyzed using flow cytometer. The method has been tested using 6 different cell lines, 4 different assays, two different plate formats (96 and 384 well plates) and two different flow cytometry instruments. The method is simple to perform, less time consuming, with no cell loss and makes high throughput flow cytometry on adherent cells a reality.

  10. Flow field bipolar plates in a proton exchange membrane fuel cell: Analysis & modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kahraman, Huseyin; Orhan, Mehmet F.

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Covers a comprehensive review of available flow field channel configurations. • Examines the main design considerations and limitations for a flow field network. • Explores the common materials and material properties used for flow field plates. • Presents a case study of step-by-step modeling for an optimum flow field design. - Abstract: This study investigates flow fields and flow field plates (bipolar plates) in proton exchange membrane fuel cells. In this regard, the main design considerations and limitations for a flow field network have been examined, along with a comprehensive review of currently available flow field channel configurations. Also, the common materials and material properties used for flow field plates have been explored. Furthermore, a case study of step-by-step modeling for an optimum flow field design has been presented in-details. Finally, a parametric study has been conducted with respect to many design and performance parameters in a flow field plate.

  11. Predicting dynamics and rheology of blood flow: A comparative study of multiscale and low-dimensional models of red blood cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Wenxiao; Fedosov, Dmitry A.; Caswell, Bruce; Karniadakis, George Em

    2011-01-01

    We compare the predictive capability of two mathematical models for red blood cells (RBCs) focusing on blood flow in capillaries and arterioles. Both RBC models as well as their corresponding blood flows are based on the dissipative particle dynamics (DPD) method, a coarse-grained molecular dynamics approach. The first model employs a multiscale description of the RBC (MS-RBC), with its membrane represented by hundreds or even thousands of DPD-particles connected by springs into a triangular network in combination with out-of-plane elastic bending resistance. Extra dissipation within the network accounts for membrane viscosity, while the characteristic biconcave RBC shape is achieved by imposition of constraints for constant membrane area and constant cell volume. The second model is based on a low-dimensional description (LD-RBC) constructed as a closed torus-like ring of only 10 large DPD colloidal particles. They are connected into a ring by worm-like chain (WLC) springs combined with bending resistance. The LD-RBC model can be fitted to represent the entire range of nonlinear elastic deformations as measured by optical-tweezers for healthy and for infected RBCs in malaria. MS-RBCs suspensions model the dynamics and rheology of blood flow accurately for any vessel size but this approach is computationally expensive for vessel diameters above 100 microns. Surprisingly, the much more economical suspensions of LD-RBCs also capture the blood flow dynamics and rheology accurately except for small-size vessels comparable to RBC diameter. In particular, the LD-RBC suspensions are shown to properly capture the experimental data for the apparent viscosity of blood and its cell-free layer (CFL) in tube flow. Taken together, these findings suggest a hierarchical approach in modeling blood flow in the arterial tree, whereby the MS-RBC model should be employed for capillaries and arterioles below 100 microns, the LD-RBC model for arterioles, and the continuum description for

  12. Flow Cells for Scalable Energy Conversion and Storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mukundan, Rangachary [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-10-26

    This project is a response to current flow systems that are V-aqueous and not cost effective. It will hopefully enable high energy/ power density flow cells through rational materials and system design.

  13. Comparative release studies on suppositories using the basket, paddle, dialysis tubing and flow-through cell methods I. Acetaminophen in a lipophilic base suppository.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hori, Seiichi; Kawada, Tsubasa; Kogure, Sanae; Yabu, Shinako; Mori, Kenji; Akimoto, Masayuki

    2017-02-01

    The release characteristics of lipophilic suppositories containing acetaminophen (AAP) were examined using four types of dissolution methods: the basket, paddle, dialysis tubing (DT) and flow-through cell (FTC) methods. The suitability of each apparatus for quality control in AAP compounded suppositories was evaluated using statistical procedures. More than 80% of the drug was released over 60 min in all the release methods studied, with the exception of the basket method. Reproducible and faster release was achieved using the paddle method at 100 and 200 rpm, whereas poor release occurred with the basket method. The mean dissolution time (MDT), maximum dissolved quantity of AAP at the end of the sampling time (Q) and dissolution efficiency (DE) were calculated by model-independent methods. The FTC method with a single chamber used in this study was also appreciable for AAP suppositories (Q of 100%, MDT of 71-91 min and DE of 75-80%). The DT apparatus is considered similar to the FTC apparatus from a quality control perspective for judging the release properties of lipophilic base suppositories containing AAP. However, even the single chamber FTC used in this study has potential as an in vitro drug release test for suppositories. The comparative dissolution method is expected to become one of the valuable tools for selecting an adequate dissolution test.

  14. An alternative pathway for signal flow from rod photoreceptors to ganglion cells in mammalian retina.

    OpenAIRE

    DeVries, S H; Baylor, D A

    1995-01-01

    Rod signals in the mammalian retina are thought to reach ganglion cells over the circuit rod-->rod depolarizing bipolar cell-->AII amacrine cell-->cone bipolar cells-->ganglion cells. A possible alternative pathway involves gap junctions linking the rods and cones, the circuit being rod-->cone-->cone bipolar cells-->ganglion cells. It is not clear whether this second pathway indeed relays rod signals to ganglion cells. We studied signal flow in the isolated rabbit retina with a multielectrode...

  15. Flow Cytometry Analysis of Cell Cycle and Specific Cell Synchronization with Butyrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Cong-Jun

    2017-01-01

    Synchronized cells have been invaluable in many kinds of cell cycle and cell proliferation studies. Butyrate induces cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in MDBK cells. We explore the possibility of using butyrate-blocked cells to obtain synchronized cells and we characterize the properties of butyrate-induced cell cycle arrest. The site of growth inhibition and cell cycle arrest was analyzed using 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine (BrdU) incorporation and flow cytometry analyses. Exposure of MDBK cells to 10 mM butyrate caused growth inhibition and cell cycle arrest in a reversible manner. Butyrate affected the cell cycle at a specific point both immediately after mitosis and at a very early stage of the G1 phase. After release from butyrate arrest, MDBK cells underwent synchronous cycles of DNA synthesis and transited through the S phase. It takes at least 8 h for butyrate-induced G1-synchronized cells to begin the progression into the S phase. One cycle of cell division for MDBK cells is about 20 h. By combining BrdU incorporation and DNA content analysis, not only can the overlapping of different cell populations be eliminated, but the frequency and nature of individual cells that have synthesized DNA can be determined.

  16. Enhanced treatment of Fischer-Tropsch wastewater using up-flow anaerobic sludge blanket system coupled with micro-electrolysis cell: A pilot scale study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Dexin; Han, Yuxing; Han, Hongjun; Li, Kun; Xu, Chunyan

    2017-08-01

    The coupling of micro-electrolysis cell (MEC) with an up-flow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) system in pilot scale was established for enhanced treatment of Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) wastewater. The lowest influent pH (4.99±0.10) and reduced alkali addition were accomplished under the assistance of anaerobic effluent recycling of 200% (stage 5). Simultaneously, the optimum COD removal efficiency (93.5±1.6%) and methane production (2.01±0.13m 3 /m 3 ·d) at the lower hydraulic retention time (HRT) were achieved in this stage. In addition, the dissolved iron from MEC could significantly increase the protein content of tightly bound extracellular polymeric substances (TB-EPS), which was beneficial to formation of stable granules. Furthermore, the high-throughput 16S rRNA gene pyrosequencing in this study further confirmed that Geobacter species could utilize iron oxides particles as electron conduit to perform the direct interspecies electron transfer (DIET) with Methanothrix, finally facilitating the syntrophic degradation of propionic acid and butyric acid and contributing completely methane production. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Chaotic Dynamics of Red Blood Cells in a Sinusoidal Flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dupire, Jules; Abkarian, Manouk; Viallat, Annie

    2010-04-01

    We show that the motion of individual red blood cells in an oscillating moderate shear flow is described by a nonlinear system of three coupled oscillators. Our experiments reveal that the cell tank treads and tumbles either in a stable way with synchronized cell inclination, membrane rotation and hydrodynamic oscillations, or in an irregular way, very sensitively to initial conditions. By adapting our model described previously, we determine the theoretical diagram for the red cell motion in a sinusoidal flow close to physiological shear stresses and flow variation frequencies and reveal large domains of chaotic motions. Finally, fitting our observations allows a characterization of cell viscosity and membrane elasticity.

  18. Rapid flow-induced responses in endothelial cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stamatas, G. N.; McIntire, L. V.

    2001-01-01

    Endothelial cells alter their morphology, growth rate, and metabolism in response to fluid shear stress. To study rapid flow-induced responses in the 3D endothelial cell morphology and calcium distribution, coupled fluorescence microscopy with optical sectioning, digital imaging, and numerical deconvolution techniques have been utilized. Results demonstrate that within the first minutes of flow application nuclear calcium is increasing. In the same time frame whole cell height and nuclear height are reduced by about 1 microm. Whole cell height changes may facilitate reduction of shear stress gradients on the luminal surface, whereas nuclear structural changes may be important for modulating endothelial growth rate and metabolism. To study the role of the cytoskeleton in these responses, endothelial cells have been treated with specific disrupters (acrylamide, cytochalasin D, and colchicine) of each of the cytoskeleton elements (intermediate filaments, microfilaments, and microtubules, respectively). None of these compounds had any effect on the shear-induced calcium response. Cytochalasin D and acrylamide did not affect the shear-induced nuclear morphology changes. Colchicine, however, completely abrogated the response, indicating that microtubules may be implicated in force transmission from the plasma membrane to the nucleus. A pedagogical model based on tensegrity theory principles is presented that is consistent with the results on the 3D endothelial morphology.

  19. Studies on best dose of X-ray for Hep-2 cells by using FTIR, UV-vis absorption spectroscopy and flow cytometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Renming; Tang, Weiyue; Kang, Yipu; Si, Minzhen

    2009-08-15

    We report here the use of Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), ultraviolet-visible (UV-vis) absorption spectroscopy, and flow cytometry (FCM) to analysis the best dose of X-ray for human laryngeal squamous cell carcinoma cell lines (Hep-2). Our analysis indicates specific FTIR and UV-vis spectral differences between X-irradiated and normal Hep-2 cells. In addition, striking spectral differences are seen in FTIR spectra in the ratios at 2925/2958 and 1654/1542 cm(-1). These two ratios of the X-irradiated cells for 8 Gy dose group with value of 1.07+/-0.025 and 1.184+/-0.013, respectively, were more notable (mean+/-S.D., n=5, PUV-vis absorption spectra analysis shows X-ray irradiation disturbed the metabolism of phenylalanine and tyrosine intracellular, maybe, which was caused by cell cycle arrest. Spectroscopy analysis suggests 8 Gy is a better dose of X-ray for lowering the canceration degree of Hep-2 cells. Moreover, FCM analysis shows the apoptosis of X-irradiated cells depended on the radiation dose to some extent, but it was not linear. The total apoptosis ratio with value of (20.793+/-1.133)% (P<0.01, n=5) for the 12 Gy dose group was the maximum, however, the maximum apoptosis ratio per Gray (total apoptosis ratio/radiation dose) was the cells of the 2 Gy dose group with value of (4.887+/-0.211)% (P<0.05, n=5). Our data suggest that Hep-2 cells are given 2 Gy radiation of X-ray once a time, 8 Gy per week (accumulatively), the effect for lowering the canceration degree and restraining the proliferation of Hep-2 cells will be better.

  20. Merging Mixture Components for Cell Population Identification in Flow Cytometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Greg Finak

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a framework for the identification of cell subpopulations in flow cytometry data based on merging mixture components using the flowClust methodology. We show that the cluster merging algorithm under our framework improves model fit and provides a better estimate of the number of distinct cell subpopulations than either Gaussian mixture models or flowClust, especially for complicated flow cytometry data distributions. Our framework allows the automated selection of the number of distinct cell subpopulations and we are able to identify cases where the algorithm fails, thus making it suitable for application in a high throughput FCM analysis pipeline. Furthermore, we demonstrate a method for summarizing complex merged cell subpopulations in a simple manner that integrates with the existing flowClust framework and enables downstream data analysis. We demonstrate the performance of our framework on simulated and real FCM data. The software is available in the flowMerge package through the Bioconductor project.

  1. Flow cytometry and monoclonal antibodies identify normal liver cell populations antigenically related to oval cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agelli, M; Halay, E D

    1995-01-01

    Oval cells, a non-parenchymal cell population induced to rapidly proliferate in animals treated with carcinogens, are thought to be related to the hypothesized liver stem cells. In normal liver there are poorly defined cells antigenically related to oval cells. These oval cell antigen positive (OCAP) cells present in normal animals are thought to include hepatocyte and bile duct cell precursors. To isolate them, we modified the existing protocols designed for oval cells and used it on normal neonatal rat livers. Using flow cytometry, the percentage of normal liver OCAP-cells varied with the monoclonal antibody (MoAb) to the different oval cell membrane markers used: 12% (MoAb 18.2), 23% (MoAb 270.38), 27% (MoAb 18.11), 31% (MoAb 18.13), and 37% (MoAb 374.3). Macrophages consisted 10% of the cells (MoAb MCA 275); hepatocytes were essentially absent ( < 1%, MoAb 236.4). Our results demonstrate that is possible to obtain significant numbers of normal cells antigenically related to oval cells and that using different MoAbs, different cell populations can be sorted for use in experimental studies testing liver progenitor cell hypothesis.

  2. Low stoichiometry operation of a proton exchange membrane fuel cell employing the interdigitated flow field

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berning, Torsten; Kær, Søren Knudsen

    2012-01-01

    A multiphase fuel cell model based on computational fluid dynamics is used to investigate the possibility of operating a proton exchange membrane fuel cell at low stoichiometric flow ratios (ξ < 1.5) employing the interdigitated flow field design and using completely dry inlet gases. A case study...

  3. In situ spatiotemporal mapping of flow fields around seeded stem cells at the subcellular length scale.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min Jae Song

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available A major hurdle to understanding and exploiting interactions between the stem cell and its environment is the lack of a tool for precise delivery of mechanical cues concomitant to observing sub-cellular adaptation of structure. These studies demonstrate the use of microscale particle image velocimetry (μ-PIV for in situ spatiotemporal mapping of flow fields around mesenchymal stem cells, i.e. murine embryonic multipotent cell line C3H10T1/2, at the subcellular length scale, providing a tool for real time observation and analysis of stem cell adaptation to the prevailing mechanical milieu. In the absence of cells, computational fluid dynamics (CFD predicts flow regimes within 12% of μ-PIV measures, achieving the technical specifications of the chamber and the flow rates necessary to deliver target shear stresses at a particular height from the base of the flow chamber. However, our μ-PIV studies show that the presence of cells per se as well as the density at which cells are seeded significantly influences local flow fields. Furthermore, for any given cell or cell seeding density, flow regimes vary significantly along the vertical profile of the cell. Hence, the mechanical milieu of the stem cell exposed to shape changing shear stresses, induced by fluid drag, varies with respect to proximity of surrounding cells as well as with respect to apical height. The current study addresses a previously unmet need to predict and observe both flow regimes as well as mechanoadaptation of cells in flow chambers designed to deliver precisely controlled mechanical signals to live cells. An understanding of interactions and adaptation in response to forces at the interface between the surface of the cell and its immediate local environment may be key for de novo engineering of functional tissues from stem cell templates as well as for unraveling the mechanisms underlying multiscale development, growth and adaptation of organisms.

  4. The Analysis of Cell Cycle, Proliferation, and Asymmetric Cell Division by Imaging Flow Cytometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filby, Andrew; Day, William; Purewal, Sukhveer; Martinez-Martin, Nuria

    2016-01-01

    Measuring cellular DNA content by conventional flow cytometry (CFC) and fluorescent DNA-binding dyes is a highly robust method for analysing cell cycle distributions within heterogeneous populations. However, any conclusions drawn from single-parameter DNA analysis alone can often be confounded by the asynchronous nature of cell proliferation. We have shown that by combining fluorescent DNA stains with proliferation tracking dyes and antigenic staining for mitotic cells one can elucidate the division history and cell cycle position of any cell within an asynchronously dividing population. Furthermore if one applies this panel to an imaging flow cytometry (IFC) system then the spatial information allows resolution of the four main mitotic phases and the ability to study molecular distributions within these populations. We have employed such an approach to study the prevalence of asymmetric cell division (ACD) within activated immune cells by measuring the distribution of key fate determining molecules across the plane of cytokinesis in a high-throughput, objective, and internally controlled manner. Moreover the ability to perform high-resolution, temporal dissection of the cell division process lends itself perfectly to investigating the influence chemotherapeutic agents exert on the proliferative capacity of transformed cell lines. Here we describe the method in detail and its application to both ACD and general cell cycle analysis.

  5. Comparative in vitro dissolution study of carbamazepine immediate-release products using the USP paddles method and the flow-through cell system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medina, José Raúl; Salazar, Dulce Karina; Hurtado, Marcela; Cortés, Alma Rosa; Domínguez-Ramírez, Adriana Miriam

    2013-01-01

    Dissolution profiles of four carbamazepine immediate-release generic products (200 mg tablets) and the reference product Tegretol® were evaluated using the USP paddles method and an alternative method with the flow-through cell system, USP Apparatus 4. Under official conditions all products met the Q specification, dissolution profiles of generic products were similar to the dissolution profile of the reference product (f2 > 50) and model-independent parameters showed non significant differences to the reference product except mean dissolution time for product A (p < 0.05). On the other hand, when the flow-through cell system was used, none of the products met the pharmacopeial specification at 15 min and product A did not reach dissolution criteria at 60 min, dissolution profiles of all generic products were not similar to the reference product profile (f2 < 50) and all model-independent parameters showed significant differences compared to the reference product (p < 0.05). Weibull’s model was more useful for adjusting the dissolution data of all products in both USP apparatuses and Td values showed significant differences compared to the reference product (p < 0.05) when USP Apparatus 4 was used. These results indicate that the proposed method, using the flow-through cell system, is more discriminative in evaluating both, rate and extent of carbamazepine dissolution process from immediate-release generic products. PMID:24648826

  6. Flow cytometry detection of planktonic cells with polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons sorbed to cell surfaces

    KAUST Repository

    Cerezo, Maria I.

    2017-02-17

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons are very important components of oil pollution. These pollutants tend to sorb to cell surfaces, exerting toxic effects on organisms. Our study developed a flow cytometric method for the detection of PAHs sorbed to phytoplankton by exploiting their spectral characteristics. We discriminated between cells with PAHs from cells free of PAHs. Clear discrimination was observed with flow cytometer provided with 375 or 405nm lasers in addition to the standard 488nm laser necessary to identify phytoplankton. Using this method, we measured the relationship between the percentages of phytoplankton organisms with PAHs, with the decrease in the growth rate. Moreover, the development of this method could be extended to facilitate the study of PAHs impact on cell cultures from a large variety of organisms.

  7. Evaluation of cytotoxicity of aqueous extract of Graviola leaves on squamous cell carcinoma cell-25 cell lines by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-Yl -2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay and determination of percentage of cell inhibition at G2M phase of cell cycle by flow cytometry: An in vitro study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Visveswaraiah Paranjyothi Magadi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Malignancies constitute a wide variety of disorders having high mortality and morbidity rates. Current protocols for management include surgical intervention, chemotherapy, and radiation which possess numerous adverse effects. Many phytochemicals are available with anticancer properties similar to anticancer drugs. Major benefit of these compounds is apparent lack of toxicity to normal tissues. Graviola (botanical name: Annona Muricata contain bioactive compound “annonaceous acetogenins” known for anticancer activity on cancer cell lines. Aims: To determine cytotoxicity of Graviola and percentage cell inhibition at G2M phase of cell cycle. Settings and Design: The cytotoxicity of aqueous extract of Graviola leaves on squamous cell carcinoma (SCC-25 cell lines at various concentrations evaluated using 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-Yl-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT assay. The percentage of SCC-25 cell inhibition at G2M phase of cell cycle determined using flow cytometry. Methods: Graviola Leaves, American Type Culture Collection SCC-25 cell lines were procured from Skanda Laboratories, Bengaluru. The cytotoxicity of aqueous extract of Graviola on SCC-25 cells at various concentrations evaluated using MTT assay. The percentage of SCC-25 cell inhibition at G2M phase of cell cycle determined using flow cytometry. Statistical Analysis: Statistical analysis was done using one-way ANOVA. Results: MTT assay showed statistically significant (P < 0.001 dose-dependent inhibition of SCC-25 cell lines by Graviola with IC50 value of 12.42 μg/ml. Flow cytometry revealed that Graviola at 25 and 50 g/ml arrested 53.39% and 52.09% cells in G2M phase of cell cycle respectively, which was statistically significant. Conclusion: Graviola showed significant cytotoxic activity and percentage of cell inhibition at G2M phase cell cycle against SCC-25 cell lines.

  8. Evaluation of cytotoxicity of aqueous extract of Graviola leaves on squamous cell carcinoma cell-25 cell lines by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-Yl) -2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay and determination of percentage of cell inhibition at G2M phase of cell cycle by flow cytometry: An in vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magadi, Visveswaraiah Paranjyothi; Ravi, Venkatadasappa; Arpitha, Anantharaju; Litha; Kumaraswamy, Kikkerilakshminarayana; Manjunath, Krishnappa

    2015-01-01

    Malignancies constitute a wide variety of disorders having high mortality and morbidity rates. Current protocols for management include surgical intervention, chemotherapy, and radiation which possess numerous adverse effects. Many phytochemicals are available with anticancer properties similar to anticancer drugs. Major benefit of these compounds is apparent lack of toxicity to normal tissues. Graviola (botanical name: Annona Muricata) contain bioactive compound "annonaceous acetogenins" known for anticancer activity on cancer cell lines. To determine cytotoxicity of Graviola and percentage cell inhibition at G2M phase of cell cycle. The cytotoxicity of aqueous extract of Graviola leaves on squamous cell carcinoma (SCC-25) cell lines at various concentrations evaluated using 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-Yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay. The percentage of SCC-25 cell inhibition at G2M phase of cell cycle determined using flow cytometry. Graviola Leaves, American Type Culture Collection SCC-25 cell lines were procured from Skanda Laboratories, Bengaluru. The cytotoxicity of aqueous extract of Graviola on SCC-25 cells at various concentrations evaluated using MTT assay. The percentage of SCC-25 cell inhibition at G2M phase of cell cycle determined using flow cytometry. Statistical analysis was done using one-way ANOVA. MTT assay showed statistically significant (P < 0.001) dose-dependent inhibition of SCC-25 cell lines by Graviola with IC50 value of 12.42 μg/ml. Flow cytometry revealed that Graviola at 25 and 50 g/ml arrested 53.39% and 52.09% cells in G2M phase of cell cycle respectively, which was statistically significant. Graviola showed significant cytotoxic activity and percentage of cell inhibition at G2M phase cell cycle against SCC-25 cell lines.

  9. In vitro toxicological nanoparticle studies under flow exposure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sambale, Franziska, E-mail: sambale@iftc.uni-hannover.de; Stahl, Frank; Bahnemann, Detlef; Scheper, Thomas [Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz University Hanover, Institute for Technical Chemistry (Germany)

    2015-07-15

    The use of nanoparticles is becoming increasingly common in industry and everyday objects. Thus, extensive risk management concerning the potential health risk of nanoparticles is important. Currently, in vitro nanoparticle testing is mainly performed under static culture conditions without any shear stress. However, shear stress is an important biomechanical parameter. Therefore, in this study, a defined physiological flow to different mammalian cell lines such as A549 cells and NIH-3T3 cells has been applied. The effects of zinc oxide and titanium dioxide nanoparticles (TiO{sub 2}-NP), respectively, were investigated under both static and dynamic conditions. Cell viability, cell morphology, and adhesion were proven and compared to the static cell culture. Flow exposure had an impact on the cellular morphology of the cells. NIH-3T3 cells were elongated in the direction of flow and A549 cells exhibited vesicles inside the cells. Zinc oxide nanoparticles reduced the cell viability in the static and in the dynamic culture; however, the dynamic cultures were more sensitive. In the static culture and in the dynamic culture, TiO{sub 2}-NP did not affect cell viability. In conclusion, dynamic culture conditions are important for further in vitro investigations and provide more relevant results than static culture conditions.

  10. Computational fluid dynamics simulations of single-phase flow in a filter-press flow reactor having a stack of three cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sandoval, Miguel A.; Fuentes, Rosalba; Walsh, Frank C.; Nava, José L.; Ponce de León, Carlos

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Computational fluid dynamic simulations in a filter-press stack of three cells. • The fluid velocity was different in each cell due to local turbulence. • The upper cell link pipe of the filter press cell acts as a fluid mixer. • The fluid behaviour tends towards a continuous mixing flow pattern. • Close agreement between simulations and experimental data was achieved. - Abstract: Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations were carried out for single-phase flow in a pre-pilot filter press flow reactor with a stack of three cells. Velocity profiles and streamlines were obtained by solving the Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) equations with a standard k − ε turbulence model. The flow behaviour shows the appearance of jet flow at the entrance to each cell. At lengths from 12 to 15 cm along the cells channels, a plug flow pattern is developed at all mean linear flow rates studied here, 1.2 ≤ u ≤ 2.1 cm s −1 . The magnitude of the velocity profiles in each cell was different, due to the turbulence generated by the change of flow direction in the last fluid manifold. Residence time distribution (RTD) simulations indicated that the fluid behaviour tends towards a continuous mixing flow pattern, owing to flow at the output of each cell across the upper cell link pipe, which acts as a mixer. Close agreement between simulations and experimental RTD was obtained.

  11. Experimental study on low pressure flow instability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang Shengyao; Wu Xinxin; Wu Shaorong; Bo Jinhai; Zhang Youjie

    1997-05-01

    The experiment was performed on the test loop (HRTL-5), which simulates the geometry and system design of the 5 MW reactor. The flow behavior for a wide range of inlet subcooling, in which the flow undergoes from single phase to two phase, is described in a natural circulation system at low pressure (p = 0.1, 0.24 MPa). Several kinds of flow instability, e.g. subcooled boiling instability, subcooled boiling induced flashing instability, pure flashing instability as well as flashing coupled density wave instability and high frequency flow oscillation, are investigated. The mechanism of flashing and flashing concerned flow instability, which has never been studied well in this field, is especially interpreted. The experimental results show that, firstly, for a low pressure natural circulation system the two phase flow is unstable in most of inlet subcooling conditions, the two phase stable flow can only be reached at very low inlet subcooling; secondly, at high inlet subcooling the flow instability is dominated by subcooled boiling in the heated section, and at middle inlet subcooling is dominated by void flashing in the adiabatic long riser; thirdly, in two phase stable flow region the condition for boiling out of the core, namely, single phase flow in the heated section, two phase flow in the riser due to vapor flashing, can be realized. The experimental results are very important for the design and accident analysis of the vessel and swimming pool type natural circulation nuclear heating reactor. (7 refs., 10 figs., 1 tab.)

  12. An Improved Ghost-cell Immersed Boundary Method for Compressible Inviscid Flow Simulations

    KAUST Repository

    Chi, Cheng

    2015-05-01

    This study presents an improved ghost-cell immersed boundary approach to represent a solid body in compressible flow simulations. In contrast to the commonly used approaches, in the present work ghost cells are mirrored through the boundary described using a level-set method to farther image points, incorporating a higher-order extra/interpolation scheme for the ghost cell values. In addition, a shock sensor is in- troduced to deal with image points near the discontinuities in the flow field. Adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) is used to improve the representation of the geometry efficiently. The improved ghost-cell method is validated against five test cases: (a) double Mach reflections on a ramp, (b) supersonic flows in a wind tunnel with a forward- facing step, (c) supersonic flows over a circular cylinder, (d) smooth Prandtl-Meyer expansion flows, and (e) steady shock-induced combustion over a wedge. It is demonstrated that the improved ghost-cell method can reach the accuracy of second order in L1 norm and higher than first order in L∞ norm. Direct comparisons against the cut-cell method demonstrate that the improved ghost-cell method is almost equally accurate with better efficiency for boundary representation in high-fidelity compressible flow simulations. Implementation of the improved ghost-cell method in reacting Euler flows further validates its general applicability for compressible flow simulations.

  13. Polymer electrolyte fuel cells: flow field for efficient air operation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buechi, F.N.; Tsukada, A.; Haas, O.; Scherer, G.G. [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland)

    1997-06-01

    A new flow field was designed for a polymer electrolyte fuel cell stack with an active area of 200 cm{sup 2} for operation at low air stoichiometry and low air over pressure. Optimum of gas flow and channel dimensions were calculated based on the required pressure drop in the fluid. Single cells and a bi-cell stack with the new flow field show an improved current/voltage characteristic when operated at low air stoichiometries as compared to that of the previous non optimized design. (author) 4 figs., 3 refs.

  14. Flow assurance studies for CO2 transport

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veltin, J.; Belfroid, S.P.C.

    2013-01-01

    In order to compensate for the relative lack of experience of the CCTS community, Flow Assurance studies of new CO2 pipelines and networks are a very important step toward reliable operation. This report details a typical approach for Flow Assurance study of CO2 transport pipeline. Considerations to

  15. Single-Cell Phosphospecific Flow Cytometric Analysis of Canine and Murine Adipose-Derived Stem Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harumichi Itoh

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to demonstrate single-cell phosphospecific flow cytometric analysis of canine and murine adipose-derived stem/stromal cells (ADSCs. ADSCs were obtained from clinically healthy laboratory beagles and C57BL/6 mice. Cell differentiation into adipocytes, osteocytes, and chondrocytes was observed for the cultured canine ADSCs (cADSCs and murine ADSCs (mADSCs to determine their multipotency. We also performed single-cell phosphospecific flow cytometric analysis related to cell differentiation and stemness. Cultured cADSCs and mADSCs exhibited the potential to differentiate into adipocytes, osteocytes, and chondrocytes. In addition, single-cell phosphospecific flow cytometric analysis revealed similar β-catenin and Akt phosphorylation between mADSCs and cADSCs. On the other hand, it showed the phosphorylation of different Stat proteins. It was determined that cADSCs and mADSCs show the potential to differentiate into adipocytes, osteocytes, and chondrocytes. Furthermore, a difference in protein phosphorylation between undifferentiated cADSCs and mADSCs was identified.

  16. Detection of circulating immune complexes by Raji cell assay: comparison of flow cytometric and radiometric methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kingsmore, S.F.; Crockard, A.D.; Fay, A.C.; McNeill, T.A.; Roberts, S.D.; Thompson, J.M.

    1988-01-01

    Several flow cytometric methods for the measurement of circulating immune complexes (CIC) have recently become available. We report a Raji cell flow cytometric assay (FCMA) that uses aggregated human globulin (AHG) as primary calibrator. Technical advantages of the Raji cell flow cytometric assay are discussed, and its clinical usefulness is evaluated in a method comparison study with the widely used Raji cell immunoradiometric assay. FCMA is more precise and has greater analytic sensitivity for AHG. Diagnostic sensitivity by the flow cytometric method is superior in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), rheumatoid arthritis, and vasculitis patients: however, diagnostic specificity is similar for both assays, but the reference interval of FCMA is narrower. Significant correlations were found between CIC levels obtained with both methods in SLE, rheumatoid arthritis, and vasculitis patients and in longitudinal studies of two patients with cerebral SLE. The Raji cell FCMA is recommended for measurement of CIC levels to clinical laboratories with access to a flow cytometer

  17. Detection of circulating immune complexes by Raji cell assay: comparison of flow cytometric and radiometric methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kingsmore, S.F.; Crockard, A.D.; Fay, A.C.; McNeill, T.A.; Roberts, S.D.; Thompson, J.M.

    1988-01-01

    Several flow cytometric methods for the measurement of circulating immune complexes (CIC) have recently become available. We report a Raji cell flow cytometric assay (FCMA) that uses aggregated human globulin (AHG) as primary calibrator. Technical advantages of the Raji cell flow cytometric assay are discussed, and its clinical usefulness is evaluated in a method comparison study with the widely used Raji cell immunoradiometric assay. FCMA is more precise and has greater analytic sensitivity for AHG. Diagnostic sensitivity by the flow cytometric method is superior in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), rheumatoid arthritis, and vasculitis patients: however, diagnostic specificity is similar for both assays, but the reference interval of FCMA is narrower. Significant correlations were found between CIC levels obtained with both methods in SLE, rheumatoid arthritis, and vasculitis patients and in longitudinal studies of two patients with cerebral SLE. The Raji cell FCMA is recommended for measurement of CIC levels to clinical laboratories with access to a flow cytometer.

  18. Dynamic Flow Impacts Cell-Particle Interactions: Sedimentation and Particle Shape Effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Björnmalm, Mattias; Faria, Matthew; Chen, Xi; Cui, Jiwei; Caruso, Frank

    2016-10-17

    The interaction of engineered particles with biological systems determines their performance in biomedical applications. Although standard static cell cultures remain the norm for in vitro studies, modern models mimicking aspects of the dynamic in vivo environment have been developed. Herein, we investigate fundamental cell-particle interactions under dynamic flow conditions using a simple and self-contained device together with standard multiwell cell culture plates. We engineer two particle systems and evaluate their cell interactions under dynamic flow, and we compare the results to standard static cell cultures. We find substantial differences between static and dynamic flow conditions and attribute these to particle shape and sedimentation effects. These results demonstrate how standard static assays can be complemented by dynamic flow assays for a more comprehensive understanding of fundamental cell-particle interactions.

  19. Experimental and numerical studies of two-phase microfluidic flows

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Mbanjwa, MB

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Flow of immiscible fluids is important in microfluidics for applications such as generation of emulsions and vesicles, drug delivery capsules, cell encapsulation and chemical reactions. The behaviour of these flows differs from large scale flows...

  20. Cerebral blood flow in sickle cell cerebrovascular disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huttenlocher, P.R.; Moohr, J.W.; Johns, L.; Brown, F.D.

    1984-01-01

    Cerebral blood flow (CBF) has been studied by the xenon-133 ( 133 Xe) inhalation method in 16 children with suspected sickle cell cerebrovascular disease. Abnormalities consisting of decreases in total, hemispheral, or regional CBF were found in 17 of 26 studies. Eleven studies performed immediately after stroke, transient ischemic attack, or depression of state of alertness showed abnormalities. In addition to confirming regional cerebrovascular insufficiency in children with stroke due to major cerebral artery occlusion, the method detected diffuse decrease in CBF in children with stupor, coma, and seizures who had normal angiographic findings. In contrast, six of seven studies obtained after exchange transfusion or during maintenance on hypertransfusion therapy showed normal findings. The difference between results in patients with acute neurologic disturbances and those receiving transfusion therapy was statistically significant (P less than .005). The data indicate that the 133 Xe method reliably demonstrates cerebrovascular impairment in sickle cell disease. They also suggest that CBF changes in patients with sickle cell disease can be reversed by exchange transfusion and by hypertransfusion therapy. The 133 Xe CBF method may be useful for following up children with sickle cell disease who are at high risk for recurrent stroke

  1. Local transport phenomena and cell performance of PEM fuel cells with various serpentine flow field designs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Xiao-Dong [Department of Thermal Engineering, School of Mechanical Engineering, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing 100083 (China); Duan, Yuan-Yuan [Key Laboratory for Thermal Science and Power Engineering of Ministry of Education, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Yan, Wei-Mon [Department of Mechatronic Engineering, Huafan University, Taipei 22305 (China); Peng, Xiao-Feng [Laboratory of Phase Change and Interfacial Transport Phenomena, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China)

    2008-01-03

    The flow field design in bipolar plates is very important for improving reactant utilization and liquid water removal in proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs). A three-dimensional model was used to analyze the effect of the design parameters in the bipolar plates, including the number of flow channel bends, number of serpentine flow channels and the flow channel width ratio, on the cell performance of miniature PEMFCs with the serpentine flow field. The effect of the liquid water formation on the porosities of the porous layers was also taken into account in the model while the complex two-phase flow was neglected. The predictions show that (1) for the single serpentine flow field, the cell performance improves as the number of flow channel bends increases; (2) the single serpentine flow field has better performance than the double and triple serpentine flow fields; (3) the cell performance only improves slowly as the flow channel width increases. The effects of these design parameters on the cell performance were evaluated based on the local oxygen mass flow rates and liquid water distributions in the cells. Analysis of the pressure drops showed that for these miniature PEMFCs, the energy losses due to the pressure drops can be neglected because they are far less than the cell output power. (author)

  2. Reactor Flow and Pressure Drop Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keyes, R. E.

    1969-07-15

    A study was made to determine the flow rates and pressure drops for all primary system flow paths through the FTR. The main data and results are in tables, diagrams and curves. The results are intended to provide a common basis for evaluation of parametric changes in the system.

  3. Modeling two-phase flow in PEM fuel cell channels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Yun; Basu, Suman; Wang, Chao-Yang [Electrochemical Engine Center (ECEC), and Department of Mechanical and Nuclear Engineering, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States)

    2008-05-01

    This paper is concerned with the simultaneous flow of liquid water and gaseous reactants in mini-channels of a proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cell. Envisaging the mini-channels as structured and ordered porous media, we develop a continuum model of two-phase channel flow based on two-phase Darcy's law and the M{sup 2} formalism, which allow estimate of the parameters key to fuel cell operation such as overall pressure drop and liquid saturation profiles along the axial flow direction. Analytical solutions of liquid water saturation and species concentrations along the channel are derived to explore the dependences of these physical variables vital to cell performance on operating parameters such as flow stoichiometric ratio and relative humility. The two-phase channel model is further implemented for three-dimensional numerical simulations of two-phase, multi-component transport in a single fuel-cell channel. Three issues critical to optimizing channel design and mitigating channel flooding in PEM fuel cells are fully discussed: liquid water buildup towards the fuel cell outlet, saturation spike in the vicinity of flow cross-sectional heterogeneity, and two-phase pressure drop. Both the two-phase model and analytical solutions presented in this paper may be applicable to more general two-phase flow phenomena through mini- and micro-channels. (author)

  4. Flow field measurements in the cell culture unit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Stephen; Wilder, Mike; Dimanlig, Arsenio; Jagger, Justin; Searby, Nancy

    2002-01-01

    The cell culture unit (CCU) is being designed to support cell growth for long-duration life science experiments on the International Space Station (ISS). The CCU is a perfused loop system that provides a fluid environment for controlled cell growth experiments within cell specimen chambers (CSCs), and is intended to accommodate diverse cell specimen types. Many of the functional requirements depend on the fluid flow field within the CSC (e.g., feeding and gas management). A design goal of the CCU is to match, within experimental limits, all environmental conditions, other than the effects of gravity on the cells, whether the hardware is in microgravity ( micro g), normal Earth gravity, or up to 2g on the ISS centrifuge. In order to achieve this goal, two steps are being taken. The first step is to characterize the environmental conditions of current 1g cell biology experiments being performed in laboratories using ground-based hardware. The second step is to ensure that the design of the CCU allows the fluid flow conditions found in 1g to be replicated from microgravity up to 2g. The techniques that are being used to take these steps include flow visualization, particle image velocimetry (PIV), and computational fluid dynamics (CFD). Flow visualization using the injection of dye has been used to gain a global perspective of the characteristics of the CSC flow field. To characterize laboratory cell culture conditions, PIV is being used to determine the flow field parameters of cell suspension cultures grown in Erlenmeyer flasks on orbital shakers. These measured parameters will be compared to PIV measurements in the CSCs to ensure that the flow field that cells encounter in CSCs is within the bounds determined for typical laboratory experiments. Using CFD, a detailed simulation is being developed to predict the flow field within the CSC for a wide variety of flow conditions, including microgravity environments. Results from all these measurements and analyses of the

  5. Contribution to the study of recirculating flows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grand, Dominique

    1975-01-01

    The technology of the integrated primary circuit of French LMFBR type reactors involves many difficulties relating to heat transfer and hydraulics of the sodium masses inside the reactor. The work reported was a basic research supporting said reactor type development. Recirculating flows were studied inside a rectangular cavity, in the presence of body forces. Results given were obtained from numerical simulation, experimental investigation and a formal theoretical analysis. Solutions were obtained using the numerical integration of the conservation equation for a planar isothermal laminar flow driven by a mobile wall. The turbulent flow was experimentally investigated, the fluid being then driven through a mixing layer in common with a channel flow. Local velocity measurements in isothermal flow were effected using a laser-anemometer. In the occurrence of heat transfer, the temperature field only was scanned; complementary data were also obtained from color Schlieren vizualisation. A theoretical study of the flow was done at high Reynolds number. The flow inside the cavity was then separated in two parts: an external part (the non-viscous core) located at the center of the cavity and an internal part, the shear region, about the walls. An inclusive solution connecting both parts was developed in the framework of the laminar flow; results obtained are in good agreement with the numerical data. (author) [fr

  6. Fluid flow plate for decreased density of fuel cell assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitale, Nicholas G.

    1999-01-01

    A fluid flow plate includes first and second outward faces. Each of the outward faces has a flow channel thereon for carrying respective fluid. At least one of the fluids serves as reactant fluid for a fuel cell of a fuel cell assembly. One or more pockets are formed between the first and second outward faces for decreasing density of the fluid flow plate. A given flow channel can include one or more end sections and an intermediate section. An interposed member can be positioned between the outward faces at an interface between an intermediate section, of one of the outward faces, and an end section, of that outward face. The interposed member can serve to isolate the reactant fluid from the opposing outward face. The intermediate section(s) of flow channel(s) on an outward face are preferably formed as a folded expanse.

  7. Orientation of Cells Cultured in Vortex Flow with Swinging Plate in Vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shigehiro Hashimoto

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available An effect of flow on cell culture has been studied in vitro. A silicone disk was placed in the center of culture dish of 52 mm internal diameter to make a doughnut-shaped canal. The dish was placed on a tilted plate, which rotates to make a vortex flow around the silicone disk with a swing motion. Variations were made on the diameter (20 mm, 30 mm, and 40 mm of the silicone disk and the rotational speed (2.1 rad/sec, 5.2 rad/sec of the swinging plate, which tilts with 0.1 rad from the horizontal plane. Five kinds of cells were cultured in the vortex flow of Dulbecco’s Modified Eagle’s Medium for seven days: C2C12 (mouse myoblast, L6 (rat skeletal muscle cell, A7r5 (rat aortic smooth muscle cell, CS-2P2-C75 (primary normal porcine aortic endothelial cell, and L929 (mouse fibroblast. The experiments show the following results. The orientation of cells depends on flow and on kinds of cells. A7r5 and CS-2P2-C75 line along the streamline of the flow. C2C12 and L6 adhere along the direction of the flow in the first stage, and tilt to the perpendicular direction to the flow differentiating to myotubes with fusion in the second stage.

  8. Determinants of resting cerebral blood flow in sickle cell disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bush, Adam M.; Borzage, Matthew T.; Choi, Soyoung; Václavů, Lena; Tamrazi, Benita; Nederveen, Aart J.; Coates, Thomas D.; Wood, John C.

    2016-01-01

    Stroke is common in children with sickle cell disease and results from an imbalance in oxygen supply and demand. Cerebral blood flow (CBF) is increased in patients with sickle cell disease to compensate for their anemia, but adequacy of their oxygen delivery has not been systematically demonstrated.

  9. Flow Electrolysis Cells for the Synthetic Organic Chemistry Laboratory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pletcher, Derek; Green, Robert A; Brown, Richard C D

    2017-09-18

    Electrosynthesis has much to offer to the synthetic organic chemist. But in order to be widely accepted as a routine procedure in an organic synthesis laboratory, electrosynthesis needs to be presented in a much more user-friendly way. The literature is largely based on electrolysis in a glass beaker or H-cells that often give poor performance for synthesis with a very slow rate of conversion and, often, low selectivity and reproducibility. Flow cells can lead to much improved performance. Electrolysis is participating in the trend toward continuous flow synthesis, and this has led to a number of innovations in flow cell design that make possible selective syntheses with high conversion of reactant to product with a single passage of the reactant solution through the cell. In addition, the needs of the synthetic organic chemist can often be met by flow cells operating with recycle of the reactant solution. These cells give a high rate of product formation while the reactant concentration is high, but they perform best at low conversion. Both approaches are considered in this review and the important features of each cell design are discussed. Throughout, the application of the cell designs is illustrated with syntheses that have been reported.

  10. Mechanical stimulation of bone cells using fluid flow

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huesa, C.; Bakker, A.D.

    2012-01-01

    This chapter describes several methods suitable for mechanically stimulating monolayers of bone cells by fluid shear stress (FSS) in vitro. Fluid flow is generated by pumping culture medium through two parallel plates, one of which contains a monolayer of cells. Methods for measuring nitric oxide

  11. Flow assurance studies for CO2 transport

    OpenAIRE

    Veltin, J.; Belfroid, S.P.C.

    2013-01-01

    In order to compensate for the relative lack of experience of the CCTS community, Flow Assurance studies of new CO2 pipelines and networks are a very important step toward reliable operation. This report details a typical approach for Flow Assurance study of CO2 transport pipeline. Considerations to take during the design of a pipeline are highlighted, with an emphasis on operability of the system. The steady state aspects of a pipeline operation are first addressed, putting some highlight in...

  12. Comparison of plateletpheresis on three continuous flow cell separators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tendulkar Anita

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Platelet concentrate (PC remains one of the most important support measures in thrombocytopenic patients. An efficient cell separator is a prerequisite for an optimally functioning apheresis setup. Donor blood count may undergo a temporary reduction after the procedure. Aim: The aim was to find the extent of reduction in donor blood count (hemoglobin, hematocrit, white blood cell, and platelet after plateletpheresis and to evaluate the cell separator for collection efficiency, processing time, and leukoreduction. Study Design and Methods: Two hundred and thirty seven procedures performed on the Amicus (N = 121, Fenwal CS-3000 Plus (N = 50 and Cobe spectra (N = 66 in a one year period were evaluated. The procedures performed on the continuous flow centrifugation (CFC cell separators and donor blood counts (pre and post donation done were included in the study. Results: The percent reduction in hemoglobin (HB, hematocrit (HCT, white blood cell (WBC and platelet count ((PLT ct was 2.9, 3.1, 9, 30.7 (Mean, N = 237 respectively after the procedure. The post donation PLT ct reduced to < 100x109/L (range 80-100 in five donors (N = 5/237, Amicus. The pre donation PLT ct in them was 150-200x109/L. Collection efficiency (percent of Amicus (79.3 was better as compared to the other two machines (CS: 62.5, Cobe: 57.5. PC collected on Cobe spectra had < 1x106 WBC. The donor pre donation PLT levels had a positive correlation to the product PLT yield (r = 0.30, P = 0.000. Conclusion: Monitoring donor blood counts helps to avoid pheresis induced adverse events. A cautious approach is necessary in donors whose pre donation PLT ct is 150-200x109/L. The main variable in PLT yield is donor PLT ct (pre donation. High collection efficiency is a direct measure of an optimally functioning cell separator.

  13. Numerical study of the bubbly flow regime in micro-channel flow boiling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhuvankar, Pramod; Dabiri, Sadegh

    2017-11-01

    Two-phase flow accompanied by boiling in micro-channel heat sinks is an effective means for heat removal from computer chips. We present a numerical study of flow boiling in micro-channels with conjugate heat transfer with a focus on the bubbly flow regime. The bubbles are assumed to nucleate at a pre-determined location and frequency. The Navier Stokes equations are solved using a single fluid formulation with the Front tracking method. Phase change is implemented using the deficit in heat flux across the bubble interface. The analytical solution for bubble growth in a superheated liquid is used as a benchmark to validate the mentioned numerical method. Water and FC-72 are studied as the operating fluids in a micro-channel made of Copper with a focus on hotspot mitigation. The micro-channel of cross-section 231 μm × 1000 μm , is used to study the effects of vertical up-flow, vertical down-flow and horizontal flow of the mentioned fluids on the heat transfer coefficients. A simple film model accounting for mass and energy conservation is applied wherever the bubble approaches closer than a cell width to the wall. The results of the simulation are compared with existing experimental data for bubble growth rates and heat transfer coefficients.

  14. Measuring Actin Flow in 3D Cell Protrusions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, Chi-Li; Digman, Michelle A.; Gratton, Enrico

    2013-01-01

    Actin dynamics is important in determining cell shape, tension, and migration. Methods such as fluorescent speckle microscopy and spatial temporal image correlation spectroscopy have been used to capture high-resolution actin turnover dynamics within cells in two dimensions. However, these methods are not directly applicable in 3D due to lower resolution and poor contrast. Here, we propose to capture actin flow in 3D with high spatial-temporal resolution by combining nanoscale precise imaging by rapid beam oscillation and fluctuation spectroscopy techniques. To measure the actin flow along cell protrusions in cell expressing actin-eGFP cultured in a type I collagen matrix, the laser was orbited around the protrusion and its trajectory was modulated in a clover-shaped pattern perpendicularly to the protrusion. Orbits were also alternated at two positions closely spaced along the protrusion axis. The pair cross-correlation function was applied to the fluorescence fluctuation from these two positions to capture the flow of actin. Measurements done on nonmoving cellular protrusion tips showed no pair-correlation at two orbital positions indicating a lack of flow of F-actin bundles. However, in some protrusions, the pair-correlation approach revealed directional flow of F-actin bundles near the protrusion surface with flow rates in the range of ∼1 μm/min, comparable to results in two dimensions using fluorescent speckle microscopy. Furthermore, we found that the actin flow rate is related to the distance to the protrusion tip. We also observed collagen deformation by concomitantly detecting collagen fibers with reflectance detection during these actin motions. The implementation of the nanoscale precise imaging by rapid beam oscillation method with a cloverleaf-shaped trajectory in conjunction with the pair cross-correlation function method provides a quantitative way of capturing dynamic flows and organization of proteins during cell migration in 3D in conditions of

  15. Detection of circulating breast cancer cells using photoacoustic flow cytometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharyya, Kiran

    According to the American Cancer Society, more than 200,000 new cases of breast cancer are expected to be diagnosed this year. Moreover, about 40,000 women died from breast cancer last year alone. As breast cancer progresses in an individual, it can transform from a localized state to a metastatic one with multiple tumors distributed through the body, not necessarily contained within the breast. Metastasis is the spread of cancer through the body by circulating tumor cells (CTCs) which can be found in the blood and lymph of the diagnosed patient. Diagnosis of a metastatic state by the discovery of a secondary tumor can often come too late and hence, significantly reduce the patient's chance of survival. There is a current need for a CTC detection method which would diagnose metastasis before the secondary tumor occurs or reaches a size resolvable by current imaging systems. Since earlier detection would improve prognosis, this study proposes a method of labeling of breast cancer cells for detection with a photoacoustic flow cytometry system as a model for CTC detection in human blood. Gold nanoparticles and fluorescent polystyrene nanoparticles are proposed as contrast agents for T47D, the breast cancer cell line of choice. The labeling, photoacoustic detection limit, and sensitivity are first characterized and then applied to a study to show detection from human blood.

  16. Detection of bacteriophage-infected cells of Lactococcus lactis using flow cytometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Michelsen, Ole; Cuesta-Dominguez, Álvaro; Albrektsen, Bjarne

    2007-01-01

    Bacteriophage infection in dairy fermentation constitutes a serious problem worldwide. We have studied bacteriophage infection in Lactococcus lactis by using the flow cytometer. The first effect of the infection of the bacterium is a change from cells in chains toward single cells. We interpret...... describe a new method for detection of phage infection in Lactococcus lactis dairy cultures. The method is based on flow cytometric detection of cells with low-density cell walls. The method allows fast and early detection of phage-infected bacteria, independently of which phage has infected the culture...

  17. A novel GuttaFlow sealer supports cell survival and attachment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Accardo, Chelsea; Himel, Van T; Lallier, Thomas E

    2014-02-01

    The purpose of this in vitro study was to compare the biocompatibility of a novel formulation of a silicone-based endodontic sealer GuttaFlow 2 (GF2; Coltène/Whaledent, Langenau, Germany) with the original (GFO) and fast-set (GFF) formulations of GuttaFlow and with an epoxy resin sealer, AHPlus Jet (AH+J; Dentsply, York, PA). Sealers were set into 3 × 5.5 mm discs. Cell culture media was used to extract leachable products at 24 hours and 1, 2, and 4 weeks. Primary human periodontal ligament fibroblasts were incubated with sealer elutes for 24 hours and evaluated using the 3-(4, 5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2, 5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay and the calcein AM assay. Cell attachment was evaluated on set sealer that was either rinsed or unrinsed with cell media for 1 week. Statistical analysis was performed using the Student t test. Both calcein and 3-(4, 5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2, 5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assays revealed that periodontal ligament cell viability was reduced on AH+J at 1, 2, and 4 weeks compared with all GuttaFlow sealers. There were no differences in cell viability between the GuttaFlow samples, and all displayed high rates of cell survival at all time periods. After 2 hours, cell attachment to the rinsed GFO and GFF samples exceeded the control, and at 24 hours cell attachment on all GuttaFlow samples exceeded the control. AH+J sealers supported significantly less cell attachment when compared with all GuttaFlow sealers. Cell attachment to set sealers showed better cell attachment when rinsed compared with unrinsed. GuttaFlow sealers were more biocompatible than AHJ in vitro. The novel GF2 displayed comparable biocompatibility with GFF and GFO. Copyright © 2014 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. An improved ghost-cell immersed boundary method for compressible flow simulations

    KAUST Repository

    Chi, Cheng

    2016-05-20

    This study presents an improved ghost-cell immersed boundary approach to represent a solid body in compressible flow simulations. In contrast to the commonly used approaches, in the present work ghost cells are mirrored through the boundary described using a level-set method to farther image points, incorporating a higher-order extra/interpolation scheme for the ghost cell values. A sensor is introduced to deal with image points near the discontinuities in the flow field. Adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) is used to improve the representation of the geometry efficiently in the Cartesian grid system. The improved ghost-cell method is validated against four test cases: (a) double Mach reflections on a ramp, (b) smooth Prandtl-Meyer expansion flows, (c) supersonic flows in a wind tunnel with a forward-facing step, and (d) supersonic flows over a circular cylinder. It is demonstrated that the improved ghost-cell method can reach the accuracy of second order in L1 norm and higher than first order in L∞ norm. Direct comparisons against the cut-cell method demonstrate that the improved ghost-cell method is almost equally accurate with better efficiency for boundary representation in high-fidelity compressible flow simulations. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  19. Activity of ethanol-stressed Oenococcus oeni cells: a flow cytometric approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Silveira, da M.G.; Abee, T.

    2009-01-01

    Aims: To study the effect of ethanol on Oenococcus oeni activity at the single cell level. Methods and Results: The active extrusion of the fluorescent probe carboxy fluorescein (cF) was used to assess the metabolic activity of ethanol-stressed O. oeni cells. Subsequent flow cytometric analysis

  20. Optical Flow Cell for Measuring Size, Velocity and Composition of Flowing Droplets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sammer-ul Hassan

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Here an optical flow cell with two light paths is reported that can accurately quantify the size and velocity of droplets flowing through a microchannel. The flow cell can measure the time taken for droplets to pass between and through two conjoined light paths, and thereby is capable of measuring the velocities (0.2–5.45 mm/s and sizes of droplets (length > 0.8 mm. The composition of the droplet can also be accurately quantified via optical absorption measurements. The device has a small footprint and uses low-powered, low-cost components, which make it ideally suited for use in field-deployable and portable analytical devices.

  1. Experimental study of unsteady thermally stratified flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Sang Jun; Chung, Myung Kyoon

    1985-01-01

    Unsteady thermally stratified flow caused by two-dimensional surface discharge of warm water into a oblong channel was investigated. Experimental study was focused on the rapidly developing thermal diffusion at small Richardson number. The basic objectives were to study the interfacial mixing between a flowing layer of warm water and an underlying body of cold water and to accumulate experimental data to test computational turbulence models. Mean velocity field measurements were carried out by using NMR-CT(Nuclear Magnetic Resonance-Computerized Tomography). It detects quantitative flow image of any desired section in any direction of flow in short time. Results show that at small Richardson number warm layer rapidly penetrates into the cold layer because of strong turbulent mixing and instability between the two layers. It is found that the transfer of heat across the interface is more vigorous than that of momentum. It is also proved that the NMR-CT technique is a very valuable tool to measure unsteady three dimensional flow field. (Author)

  2. Measurement of bubble shape and size in bubbly flow structure for stagnant and pulsating liquid flow using an undivided electrochlorination cell and Telecentric Direct Image Method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Nikolaj; Stroe, Rodica-Elisabeta; Hedensted, Lau

    2016-01-01

    This study presents the measurement of shape and diameter of bubbles in different regions of the bubbly flow structure at the cathode for stagnant and pulsating liquid flow in a single undivided electrochlorination cell. The cell is filled with a dilute sodium chloride electrolyte solution...... is supported by an increase in fraction of total gas volume constituted by large bubbles. For pulsating liquid flow the mean bubble diameter is observed to remain constant around 35 μm when moving across the bubbly flow structure, which likewise is supported by the fraction of total gas volume investigations...

  3. A radio-high-performance liquid chromatography dual-flow cell gamma-detection system for on-line radiochemical purity and labeling efficiency determination

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindegren, S; Jensen, H; Jacobsson, L

    2014-01-01

    In this study, a method of determining radiochemical yield and radiochemical purity using radio-HPLC detection employing a dual-flow-cell system is evaluated. The dual-flow cell, consisting of a reference cell and an analytical cell, was constructed from two PEEK capillary coils to fit into the w......In this study, a method of determining radiochemical yield and radiochemical purity using radio-HPLC detection employing a dual-flow-cell system is evaluated. The dual-flow cell, consisting of a reference cell and an analytical cell, was constructed from two PEEK capillary coils to fit...

  4. Effects of Red Blood Cell Aggregation on the Apparent Viscosity of Blood Flow in Tubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hitt, Darren L.; Lowe, Mary L.

    1996-11-01

    In arterioles and venules (20-200μ diameter), the low shear rates enable red blood cells to form aggregate structures of varying sizes and morphology. The size and distribution of the aggregates affect the flow impedance within a microvascular network; this effect may be characterized by an "apparent viscosity". In this study, we measure the apparent viscosity of blood flow in 50μ glass tubes as a function of shear rate and red blood cell volume fraction (hematocrit); for a fixed tube geometry and an imposed flow rate, the viscosity is determined by measuring the pressure drop across the tube. To correlate the apparent viscosity with the size and spatial distribution of the aggregates in the flow, video images of the flow are recorded and analyzed using power spectral techniques. Pig blood and sheep blood are used as the models for aggregating and non-aggregating blood, respectively. Supported by NSF PFF Award CTS-9253633

  5. Interstitial Fluid Flow: The Mechanical Environment of Cells and Foundation of Meridians

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Yao

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Using information from the deep dissection, microobservation, and measurement of acupoints in the upper and lower limbs of the human body, we developed a three-dimensional porous medium model to simulate the flow field using FLUENT software and to study the shear stress on the surface of interstitial cells (mast cells caused by interstitial fluid flow. The numerical simulation results show the following: (i the parallel nature of capillaries will lead to directional interstitial fluid flow, which may explain the long interstitial tissue channels or meridians observed in some experiments; (ii when the distribution of capillaries is staggered, increases in the velocity alternate, and the velocity tends to be uniform, which is beneficial for substance exchange; (iii interstitial fluid flow induces a shear stress, with magnitude of several Pa, on interstitial cell membranes, which will activate cells and lead to a biological response; (iv capillary and interstitial parameters, such as capillary density, blood pressure, capillary permeability, interstitial pressure, and interstitial porosity, affect the shear stress on cell surfaces. The numerical simulation results suggest that in vivo interstitial fluid flow constitutes the mechanical environment of cells and plays a key role in guiding cell activities, which may explain the meridian phenomena and the acupuncture effects observed in experiments.

  6. A Noninvasive Approach to Determine Viscoelastic Properties of an Individual Adherent Cell under Fluid Flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Jun; Baik, Andrew D.; Lu, X. Lucas; Hillman, Elizabeth M. C.; Zhuang, Zhuo; Dong, Cheng; Guo, X. Edward

    2014-01-01

    Mechanical properties of cells play an important role in their interaction with the extracellular matrix as well as the mechanotransduction process. Several in vitro techniques have been developed to determine the mechanical properties of cells, but none of them can measure the viscoelastic properties of an individual adherent cell in fluid flow non-invasively. In this study, techniques of fluid-structure interaction (FSI) finite element method and quasi-3-dimensional (quasi-3D) cell microscopy were innovatively applied to the frequently used flow chamber experiment, where an adherent cell was subjected to fluid flow. A new non-invasive approach, with cells at close to physiological conditions, was established to determine the viscoelastic properties of individual cells. The results showed an instantaneous modulus of osteocytes of 0.49±0.11 kPa, an equilibrium modulus of 0.31±0.044 kPa, and an apparent viscosity coefficient of 4.07±1.23 kPa·s. This new quantitative approach not only provides an excellent means to measure cell mechanical properties, but also may help to elucidate the mechanotransduction mechanisms for a variety of cells under fluid flow stimulation. PMID:24581798

  7. VOF modelling of gas–liquid flow in PEM water electrolysis cell micro-channels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lafmejani, Saeed Sadeghi; Olesen, Anders Christian; Kær, Søren Knudsen

    2017-01-01

    In this study, the gaseliquid flow through an interdigitated anode flow field of a PEM water electrolysis cell (PEMEC) is analysed using a three-dimensional, transient, computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model. To account for two-phase flow, the volume of fluid (VOF) method in ANSYS Fluent 17...... of the gaseliquid flow in a transparent micro-channel, are qualitative compared against the simulation results. The experimental observations confirm the models prediction of long Taylor bubbles with small bubbles in between. From the simulation results, further intriguing details of the flow are revealed. From...... the bottom to the top of the outgoing channel, the film thickness gradually increases from zero to 200 mm. This increase in the film thickness is due to the particular superficial velocity field that develops in an interdigitated flow. Here both the superficial velocities change along the length...

  8. Quantitative analysis of cell migration using optical flow.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katica Boric

    Full Text Available Neural crest cells exhibit dramatic migration behaviors as they populate their distant targets. Using a line of zebrafish expressing green fluorescent protein (sox10:EGFP in neural crest cells we developed an assay to analyze and quantify cell migration as a population, and use it here to characterize in detail the subtle defects in cell migration caused by ethanol exposure during early development. The challenge was to quantify changes in the in vivo migration of all Sox10:EGFP expressing cells in the visual field of time-lapse movies. To perform this analysis we used an Optical Flow algorithm for motion detection and combined the analysis with a fit to an affine transformation. Through this analysis we detected and quantified significant differences in the cell migrations of Sox10:EGFP positive cranial neural crest populations in ethanol treated versus untreated embryos. Specifically, treatment affected migration by increasing the left-right asymmetry of the migrating cells and by altering the direction of cell movements. Thus, by applying this novel computational analysis, we were able to quantify the movements of populations of cells, allowing us to detect subtle changes in cell behaviors. Because cranial neural crest cells contribute to the formation of the frontal mass these subtle differences may underlie commonly observed facial asymmetries in normal human populations.

  9. Separation of platelets from other blood cells in continuous-flow by dielectrophoresis field-flow-fractionation

    OpenAIRE

    Piacentini, Niccolò; Mernier, Guillaume; Tornay, Raphaël; Renaud, Philippe

    2011-01-01

    We present a microfluidic device capable of separating platelets from other blood cells in continuous flow using dielectrophoresis field-flow-fractionation. The use of hydrodynamic focusing in combination with the application of a dielectrophoretic force allows the separation of platelets from red blood cells due to their size difference. The theoretical cell trajectory has been calculated by numerical simulations of the electrical field and flow speed, and is in agreement with the experiment...

  10. Fluid flow releases fibroblast growth factor-2 from human aortic smooth muscle cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhoads, D. N.; Eskin, S. G.; McIntire, L. V.

    2000-01-01

    This study tested the hypothesis that fluid shear stress regulates the release of fibroblast growth factor (FGF)-2 from human aortic smooth muscle cells. FGF-2 is a potent mitogen that is involved in the response to vascular injury and is expressed in a wide variety of cell types. FGF-2 is found in the cytoplasm of cells and outside cells, where it associates with extracellular proteoglycans. To test the hypothesis that shear stress regulates FGF-2 release, cells were exposed to flow, and FGF-2 amounts were measured from the conditioned medium, pericellular fraction (extracted by heparin treatment), and cell lysate. Results from the present study show that after 15 minutes of shear stress at 25 dyne/cm(2) in a parallel-plate flow system, a small but significant fraction (17%) of the total FGF-2 was released from human aortic smooth muscle cells. FGF-2 levels in the circulating medium increased 10-fold over medium from static controls (PFlow cytometry detected a 50% increase in mean fluorescence of cells exposed to 25 dyne/cm(2) versus control cells. This indicates that the observed FGF-2 release from human aortic smooth muscle cells is likely due to transient membrane disruption on initiation of flow.

  11. Detection, isolation, and capture of circulating breast cancer cells with photoacoustic flow cytometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharyya, Kiran; Njoroge, Martin; Goldschmidt, Benjamin S.; Gaffigan, Brian; Rood, Kyle; Viator, John A.

    2013-03-01

    According to the CDC, breast cancer is the most common cancer and the second leading cause of cancer related deaths among women. Metastasis, or the presence of secondary tumors caused by the spread of cancer cells via the circulatory or lymphatic systems, significantly worsens the prognosis of any breast cancer patient. In this study, a technique is developed to detect circulating breast cancer cells in human blood using a photoacoustic flow cytometry method. A Q-switched laser with a 5 ns pulse at 532 nm is used to interrogate thousands of cells with one pulse as they flow through the beam path. Cells which are pigmented, either naturally or artificially, emit an ultrasound wave as a result of the photoacoustic (PA) effect. Breast cancer cells are targeted with chromophores through immunochemistry in order to provide pigment. After which, the device is calibrated to demonstrate a single-cell detection limit. Cultured breast cancer cells are added to whole blood to reach a biologically relevant concentration of about 25-45 breast cancer cells per 1 mL of blood. An in vitro photoacoustic flow cytometer is used to detect and isolate these cells followed by capture with the use of a micromanipulator. This method can not only be used to determine the disease state of the patient and the response to therapy, it can also be used for genetic testing and in vitro drug trials since the circulating cell can be captured and studied.

  12. JNK2 promotes endothelial cell alignment under flow.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cornelia Hahn

    Full Text Available Endothelial cells in straight, unbranched segments of arteries elongate and align in the direction of flow, a feature which is highly correlated with reduced atherosclerosis in these regions. The mitogen-activated protein kinase c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK is activated by flow and is linked to inflammatory gene expression and apoptosis. We previously showed that JNK activation by flow is mediated by integrins and is observed in cells plated on fibronectin but not on collagen or basement membrane proteins. We now show thatJNK2 activation in response to laminar shear stress is biphasic, with an early peak and a later peak. Activated JNK localizes to focal adhesions at the ends of actin stress fibers, correlates with integrin activation and requires integrin binding to the extracellular matrix. Reducing JNK2 activation by siRNA inhibits alignment in response to shear stress. Cells on collagen, where JNK activity is low, align slowly. These data show that an inflammatory pathway facilitates adaptation to laminar flow, thereby revealing an unexpected connection between adaptation and inflammatory pathways.

  13. Single-cell phospho-protein analysis by flow cytometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulz, Kenneth R; Danna, Erika A; Krutzik, Peter O; Nolan, Garry P

    2012-02-01

    This protocol describes methods for monitoring intracellular phosphorylation-dependent signaling events on a single-cell basis. This approach measures cell signaling by treating cells with exogenous stimuli, fixing cells with formaldehyde, permeabilizing with methanol, and then staining with phospho-specific antibodies. Thus, cell signaling states can be determined as a measure of how cells interact with their environment. This method has applications in clinical research as well as mechanistic studies of basic biology. In clinical research, diagnostic or drug efficacy information can be retrieved by discovering how a disease affects the ability of cells to respond to growth factors. Basic scientists can use this technique to analyze signaling events in cell lines and human or murine primary cells, including rare populations, like B1 cells or stem cells. This technique has broad applications bringing standard biochemical analysis into primary cells in order to garner valuable information about signaling events in physiologic settings. © 2012 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  14. Radioisotope tracers in industrial flow studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Easey, J.F.

    1987-01-01

    The scope of radioisotope tracer work carried out by ANSTO has involved most sectors of Australian industry including iron and steel coal, chemical, petrochemical, natural gas, metallurgical, mineral, power generation, liquified air plant, as well as port authorities, water and sewerage instrumentalities, and environmental agencies. A major class of such studies concerns itself with flow and wear studies involving industrial equipment. Some examples are discussed which illustrate the utility of radioisotope tracer techniques in these applications

  15. Modeling of Flow in Nuclear Reactor Fuel Cell Outlet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    František URBAN

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Safe and effective load of nuclear reactor fuel cells demands qualitative and quantitative analysis of relations between coolant temperature in fuel cell outlet temperature measured by thermocouple and middle temperature of coolant in thermocouple plane position. In laboratory at Insitute of thermal power engineering of the Slovak University of Technology in Bratislava was installed an experimental physical fuel cell model of VVER 440 nuclear power plant with V 213 nuclear reactors. Objective of measurements on physical model was temperature and velocity profiles analysis in the fuel cell outlet. In this paper the measured temperature and velocity profiles are compared with the results of CFD simulation of fuel cell physical model coolant flow.

  16. Flow and Pressure Distribution in Fuel Cell Manifolds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lebæk, Jesper; Bang, Mads; Kær, Søren Knudsen

    2010-01-01

    The manifold is an essential part of the fuel cell stack. Evidently, evenly distributed reactants are a prerequisite for an efficient fuel cell stack. In this study, the cathode manifold ability to distribute air to the cells of a 70 cell stack is investigated experimentally. By means of 20...

  17. Conjugate Heat Transfer Study in Hypersonic Flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahoo, Niranjan; Kulkarni, Vinayak; Peetala, Ravi Kumar

    2018-04-01

    Coupled and decoupled conjugate heat transfer (CHT) studies are carried out to imitate experimental studies for heat transfer measurement in hypersonic flow regime. The finite volume based solvers are used for analyzing the heat interaction between fluid and solid domains. Temperature and surface heat flux signals are predicted by both coupled and decoupled CHT analysis techniques for hypersonic Mach numbers. These two methodologies are also used to study the effect of different wall materials on surface parameters. Effectiveness of these CHT solvers has been verified for the inverse problem of wall heat flux recovery using various techniques reported in the literature. Both coupled and decoupled CHT techniques are seen to be equally useful for prediction of local temperature and heat flux signals prior to the experiments in hypersonic flows.

  18. Rapid automation of a cell-based assay using a modular approach: case study of a flow-based Varicella Zoster Virus infectivity assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joelsson, Daniel; Gates, Irina V; Pacchione, Diana; Wang, Christopher J; Bennett, Philip S; Zhang, Yuhua; McMackin, Jennifer; Frey, Tina; Brodbeck, Kristin C; Baxter, Heather; Barmat, Scott L; Benetti, Luca; Bodmer, Jean-Luc

    2010-06-01

    Vaccine manufacturing requires constant analytical monitoring to ensure reliable quality and a consistent safety profile of the final product. Concentration and bioactivity of active components of the vaccine are key attributes routinely evaluated throughout the manufacturing cycle and for product release and dosage. In the case of live attenuated virus vaccines, bioactivity is traditionally measured in vitro by infection of susceptible cells with the vaccine followed by quantification of virus replication, cytopathology or expression of viral markers. These assays are typically multi-day procedures that require trained technicians and constant attention. Considering the need for high volumes of testing, automation and streamlining of these assays is highly desirable. In this study, the automation and streamlining of a complex infectivity assay for Varicella Zoster Virus (VZV) containing test articles is presented. The automation procedure was completed using existing liquid handling infrastructure in a modular fashion, limiting custom-designed elements to a minimum to facilitate transposition. In addition, cellular senescence data provided an optimal population doubling range for long term, reliable assay operation at high throughput. The results presented in this study demonstrate a successful automation paradigm resulting in an eightfold increase in throughput while maintaining assay performance characteristics comparable to the original assay. Copyright 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Analysis on the design and property of flow field plates of innovative direct methanol fuel cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Ho; Kao, Mu-Jung; Chen, Chih-Hao; Kuo, Chin-Guo; Lee, Kuang-Ying

    2014-10-01

    The paper uses technology of lithography process to etch flow fields on single side of a printed circuit board (PCB), and combines flow field plate with collector plate to make innovative anode flow field plates and cathode flow field plates required in direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC), and meanwhile makes membrane electrode assembly (MEA) and methanol fuel plate. The flow field plates are designed to be in the form of serpentine flow field. The paper measured the assembled DMFC to achieve the overall efficiency of DMFC under the conditions of different screw torques and different concentration, flow rate and temperature of methanol. Experimental results show that when the flow field width of flow field plate is 1 mm, the screw torque is 16 kgf/cm, and the concentration, flow rate and temperature of methanol-water are 1 M, 180 ml/h and 50 degrees C respectively, the prepared DMFC can have better power density of 5.5 mW/cm2, 5.4 mW/cm2, 11.2 mW/cm2 and 11.8 mW/cm2. Besides, the volume of the DMFC designed and assembled by the study is smaller than the generally existing DMFC by 40%.

  20. Detection and capture of breast cancer cells with photoacoustic flow cytometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharyya, Kiran; Goldschmidt, Benjamin S.; Viator, John A.

    2016-08-01

    According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, breast cancer is the most common cancer and the second leading cause of cancer related deaths among women. Metastasis-the presence of secondary tumors caused by the spread of cancer cells via the circulatory or lymphatic systems-significantly worsens the prognosis of any breast cancer patient. A technique is developed to detect circulating breast cancer cells in human blood using a photoacoustic flow cytometry method. A Q-switched laser is used to interrogate thousands of blood cells with one pulse as they flow through the beam path. Cells that are optically absorbing, either naturally or artificially, emit an ultrasound wave as a result of the photoacoustic (PA) effect. Breast cancer cells are targeted with chromophores through immunochemistry in order to enhance optical absorption. After which, the PA cytometry device is calibrated to demonstrate the ability to detect single cells. Cultured breast cancer cells are added to whole blood to reach a biologically relevant concentration of about 25 to 45 breast cancer cells per 1 mL of blood. An in vitro PA flow cytometer is used to detect and isolate these cells followed by capture with the use of a micromanipulator. This method can not only be used to determine the disease state of the patient and the response to therapy but also it can be used for genetic testing and in vitro drug trials since the circulating cell can be captured and studied.

  1. Detection and capture of breast cancer cells with photoacoustic flow cytometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharyya, Kiran; Goldschmidt, Benjamin S.; Viator, John A.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, breast cancer is the most common cancer and the second leading cause of cancer related deaths among women. Metastasis—the presence of secondary tumors caused by the spread of cancer cells via the circulatory or lymphatic systems—significantly worsens the prognosis of any breast cancer patient. A technique is developed to detect circulating breast cancer cells in human blood using a photoacoustic flow cytometry method. A Q-switched laser is used to interrogate thousands of blood cells with one pulse as they flow through the beam path. Cells that are optically absorbing, either naturally or artificially, emit an ultrasound wave as a result of the photoacoustic (PA) effect. Breast cancer cells are targeted with chromophores through immunochemistry in order to enhance optical absorption. After which, the PA cytometry device is calibrated to demonstrate the ability to detect single cells. Cultured breast cancer cells are added to whole blood to reach a biologically relevant concentration of about 25 to 45 breast cancer cells per 1 mL of blood. An in vitro PA flow cytometer is used to detect and isolate these cells followed by capture with the use of a micromanipulator. This method can not only be used to determine the disease state of the patient and the response to therapy but also it can be used for genetic testing and in vitro drug trials since the circulating cell can be captured and studied. PMID:27580367

  2. Separation of cancer cells from white blood cells by pinched flow fractionation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Marie Pødenphant; Ashley, Neil; Koprowska, Kamila

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, the microfluidic size-separation technique pinched flow fractionation (PFF) is used to separate cancer cells from white blood cells (WBCs). The cells are separated at efficiencies above 90% for both cell types. Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) are found in the blood of cancer patients...... and can form new tumors. CTCs are rare cells in blood, but they are important for the understanding of metastasis. There is therefore a high interest in developing a method for the enrichment of CTCs from blood samples, which also enables further analysis of the separated cells. The separation...

  3. Experimental Study of Flow Through Carotid Aneurysms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masoomi, Faezeh; Mejia-Alvarez, Ricardo

    2017-11-01

    There is evidence that traditional endovascular techniques like coiling are not effective for treatment of wide-neck cerebral aneurysms. Flow Diverter Stents (FDS) have emerged as promising devices for treating complex aneurysms since they enable treatment of aneurysms that were considered untreatable before. Recent studies suggest a number of associated risks with FDS, including in-stent thrombosis, perianeurysmal edema, delayed hemorrhage, and perforator occlusions. Chong et al. simulated hemodynamic behavior using patient-specific data. From their study, it is possible to infer that the standard deviation of energy loss could be a good predictor for intervention success. The aim of this study is to investigate the flow in models of cerebral aneurysms before and after FDS insertion using PIV. These models will be based on actual clinical studies and will be fabricated with advanced additive manufacturing techniques. These data will then be used to explore flow parameters that could inform the likelihood of post-intervention aneurysm rupture, and help determine FDS designs that better suit any particular patient before its procedure.

  4. Cerebral blood flow mapping in children with sickle cell disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Numaguchi, Y.; Humbert, J.R.; Robinson, A.E.; Lindstrom, W.W.; Gruenauer, L.M.

    1988-01-01

    A cerebral blood flow mapping system was applied to the evaluation of cerebral blood flow (CBF) in 21 patients with sickle cell cerebrovascular disease, by means of a Picker xenon computed tomographic (CT) scanner. Results indicate that (1) xenon CT is a safe and reliable procedure in children with cerebrovascular diseases; (2) CBF in the gray matter of children seems to be higher than in previously reported data obtained with use of isotopes; and (3) regional CBF can be altered significantly by changing the size of the region of interest (ROI). The term regional CBF probably has to be carefully defined in xenon CT flow mapping. Correlation with anatomy by means of CT or magnetic resonance imaging and comparison with the ROI of the contralateral side and/or adjacent sections is important

  5. Study of argon-oxygen flowing afterglow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazánková, V.; Trunec, D.; Navrátil, Z.; Raud, J.; Krčma, F.

    2016-06-01

    The reaction kinetics in argon-oxygen flowing afterglow (post-discharge) was studied using NO titration and optical emission spectroscopy. The flowing DC post-discharge in argon-oxygen mixture was created in a quartz tube at the total gas pressure of 1000 Pa and discharge power of 90 W. The O(3P) atom concentration was determined by NO titration at different places along the flow tube. The optical emission spectra were also measured along the flow tube. Argon spectral lines, oxygen lines at 777 nm and 844.6 nm and atmospheric A-band of {{\\text{O}}2} were identified in the spectra. Rotational temperature of {{\\text{O}}2} was determined from the oxygen atmospheric A-band and also the outer wall temperature of the flow tube was measured by a thermocouple and by an IR thermometer. A zero-dimensional kinetic model for the reactions in the afterglow was developed. This model allows the time dependencies of particle concentrations and of gas temperature to be calculated. The wall recombination probability for O(3P) atoms {γ\\text{O≤ft(\\text{P}\\right)}}=≤ft(1.63+/- 0.06\\right)× {{10}-3} and wall deactivation probability for {{\\text{O}}2} (b {{}1}Σ\\text{g}+ ) molecules {γ{{\\text{O}2}≤ft(\\text{b}\\right)}}=≤ft(1.7+/- 0.1\\right)× {{10}-3} were determined from the fit of model results to experimental data. Sensitivity analysis was applied for the analysis of kinetic model in order to reveal the most important reactions in the model. The calculated gas temperature increases in the afterglow and then decreases at later afterglow times after reaching the maximum. This behavior is in good agreement with the spatial rotational temperature dependence. A similar trend was also observed at outer wall temperature measurement.

  6. A numerical study of unstable Hele-Shaw flow

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Erik Bent; Rasmussen, Henning

    1999-01-01

    A numerical procedure which is based on an integral equation for the normal velocity at the interface is developed for the unstable flow with surface tension in a Hele-Shaw cell. The procedure has been validated by comparing solutions obtained by it with published results. It has also been applie...... to a study of the effect of small changes in the initial data on the later profiles and it was found that even very small differences can lead to large differences in the profiles at later times. (C) 1999 Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved.......A numerical procedure which is based on an integral equation for the normal velocity at the interface is developed for the unstable flow with surface tension in a Hele-Shaw cell. The procedure has been validated by comparing solutions obtained by it with published results. It has also been applied...

  7. Quantitative analysis of gold and carbon nanoparticles in mammalian cells by flow cytometry light scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Gang [Nanjing University, State Key Laboratory of Pharmaceutical Biotechnology, School of Life Sciences (China); Liu, Naicheng; Wang, Zhenheng [Nanjing University, Department of Orthopedics, Jinling Hospital, School of Medicine (China); Shi, Tongguo; Gan, Jingjing; Wang, Zhenzhen; Zhang, Junfeng, E-mail: jfzhang@nju.edu.cn [Nanjing University, State Key Laboratory of Pharmaceutical Biotechnology, School of Life Sciences (China)

    2017-02-15

    Nanoparticle-based applications for diagnostics and therapeutics have been extensively studied. These applications require a profound understanding of the fate of nanoparticles (NPs) in cellular environments. However, until now, few analytical methods are available and most of them rely on fluorescent properties or special elements of NPs; therefore, for NPs without observable optical properties or special elements, the existing methods are hardly applicable. In this study, we introduce a flow cytometry light scattering (FCLS)-based approach that quantifies in situ NPs accurately in mammalian cells. Continuous cells of heterogeneous human epithelial colorectal adenocarcinoma (Caco-2 cells), mouse peritoneal macrophages (MPM), and human adenocarcinomic alveolar basal epithelia (A549 cells) were cultured with NPs with certain concentrations and size. The intensity of the flow cytometric side scattered light, which indicates the quantity of NPs in the cells, was analyzed. The result shows an accurate size- and dose-dependent uptake of Au NPs (5, 30, 250 nm) in Caco-2 cells. The size- and dose- dependence of Au NPs (5, 30, 250 nm) and carbon NPs (50, 500 nm) in cells was validated by transmission electron microscope (TEM). This paper demonstrates the great potential of flow cytometry light scattering in the quantitative study of the size and dose effect on in situ metallic or non-metallic NPs in mammalian cells.

  8. Intracardiac flow patterns studied by cine MR flow imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Underwood, S.R.; Firmin, D.N.; Klipstein, R.H.; Rees, R.S.O.; Longmore, D.B.

    1986-01-01

    Velocity mapping by means of cine-MR imaging allows accurate measurement of velocity and flow within the cardiovascular system. A cine display and color coding simplify interpretation. The author have used the technique in a variety of patients to illustrate its potential. Velocity mapping in coronary artery by pass grafts in six patients provided a measure of graft function. Coronary artery velocities were measured in three subjects. Flow was measured through defects in the atrial septum, the ventricular septum, and a Gerbode defect. Velocity was reduced distal to coarctation of the aorta and was increased at the level of a partial venous occlusion by thrombosis. In a patient with isomerism, velocity mapping in the central vessels aided interpretation. Cine-MR imaging velocity mapping combined with conventional imaging yields important functional information on the cardiovascular system

  9. Convection flow study within a horizontal fluid layer under the action of gas flow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kreta Aleksei

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Experimental investigation of convective processes within horizontal evaporating liquid layer under shear–stress of gas flow is presented. It is found the structures of the convection, which move in opposite direction relative to each other. First convective structure moves in reverse direction with the flow of gas, and the second convective structure moves towards the gas flow. Convection flow within the liquid layer is registered with help of PIV technique. Average evaporation flow rate of Ethanol liquid layer under Air gas flow is measured. Influence of the gas velocity, at a constant temperature of 20 °C, on the evaporation flow rate has been studied.

  10. Flow immunocytochemistry of marker expression in cells from body cavity fluids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishan, Awtar; Ganjei-Azar, Parvin; Hamelik, Ronald; Sharma, Deepti; Reis, Isildinha; Nadji, Mehrdad

    2010-02-01

    Diagnostic cytology based on the examination of cells from body cavity fluids misses approximately 50% of patients with a proven malignancy. In an earlier study, we used immunohistochemical detection of epithelial membrane antigen expression with flow cytometric detection of DNA aneuploidy to reduce the number of false negatives. In the present study, we have combined DNA flow cytometry with flow cytometric detection of marker expression to analyze cells from body cavity fluids. Seventy-nine specimens of ascites and pleural fluids were analyzed by diagnostic cytology, DNA flow cytometry, and for the expression of the following markers: Ber-EP4, progesterone (PR), MUC4, and thyroid transcription factor-1 (TTF-1). DNA index of equal to or greater than 1.2 was seen in 33/79 (41.7%) of the samples. Statistical analysis of 79 samples in which data from cytology, DNA aneuploidy, and expression of at least one of the markers was available showed that by combining data from positive marker expression with that of aneuploidy, the sensitivity was increased from 58.5 to 100%. In contrast, out of the 38 samples designated as non-malignant by diagnostic cytology, nine had aneuploid DNA content and 16 of the diploid samples had a positive marker expression. Specificity was reduced from 74.7 to 31.6% due to the presence of aneuploidy and marker expression in these samples. ALDH1(pos)/CD44(pos)/CD24(neg) expression has been reported to be associated with human breast tumor stem cells. Some of our samples had cells with this phenotype. Flow cytometry offers the advantage of rapid multiparametric analysis of DNA aneuploidy and marker expression in cells from body cavity fluids based on the analysis of a large number of cells without observer bias. By further developing the use of specific markers and aneuploidy, it may be possible to refine flow cytometric analysis for rapid detection of malignant cells in body cavity fluids.

  11. DEVELOPMENT AND USE OF A PARALLEL-PLATE FLOW CHAMBER FOR STUDYING CELLULAR ADHESION TO SOLID-SURFACES

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    VANKOOTEN, TG; SCHAKENRAAD, JM; VANDERMEI, HC; BUSSCHER, HJ

    A parallel-plate flow chamber is developed in order to study cellular adhesion phenomena. An image analysis system is used to observe individual cells exposed to flow in situ and to determine area, perimeter, and shape of these cells as a function of time and shear stress. With this flow system the

  12. Numerical Studies of Homogenization under a Fast Cellular Flow

    KAUST Repository

    Iyer, Gautam

    2012-09-13

    We consider a two dimensional particle diffusing in the presence of a fast cellular flow confined to a finite domain. If the flow amplitude A is held fixed and the number of cells L 2 →∞, then the problem homogenizes; this has been well studied. Also well studied is the limit when L is fixed and A→∞. In this case the solution averages along stream lines. The double limit as both the flow amplitude A→∞and the number of cells L 2 →∞was recently studied [G. Iyer et al., preprint, arXiv:1108.0074]; one observes a sharp transition between the homogenization and averaging regimes occurring at A = L 2. This paper numerically studies a few theoretically unresolved aspects of this problem when both A and L are large that were left open in [G. Iyer et al., preprint, arXiv:1108.0074] using the numerical method devised in [G. A. Pavliotis, A. M. Stewart, and K. C. Zygalakis, J. Comput. Phys., 228 (2009), pp. 1030-1055]. Our treatment of the numerical method uses recent developments in the theory of modified equations for numerical integrators of stochastic differential equations [K. C. Zygalakis, SIAM J. Sci. Comput., 33 (2001), pp. 102-130]. © 2012 Society for Industrial and Applied Mathematics.

  13. Counter-flow elutriation of clinical peripheral blood mononuclear cell concentrates for the production of dendritic and T cell therapies

    OpenAIRE

    Stroncek, David F; Fellowes, Vicki; Pham, Chauha; Khuu, Hanh; Fowler, Daniel H; Wood, Lauren V; Sabatino, Marianna

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) concentrates collected by apheresis are frequently used as starting material for cellular therapies, but the cell of interest must often be isolated prior to initiating manufacturing. Study design and methods The results of enriching 59 clinical PBMC concentrates for monocytes or lymphocytes from patients with solid tumors or multiple myeloma using a commercial closed system semi-automated counter-flow elutriation instrument (Elutra, Teru...

  14. Flow Cytometric Analysis of T, B, and NK Cells Antigens in Patients with Mycosis Fungoides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serkan Yazıcı

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We retrospectively analyzed the clinicopathological correlation and prognostic value of cell surface antigens expressed by peripheral blood mononuclear cells in patients with mycosis fungoides (MF. 121 consecutive MF patients were included in this study. All patients had peripheral blood flow cytometry as part of their first visit. TNMB and histopathological staging of the cases were retrospectively performed in accordance with International Society for Cutaneous Lymphomas/European Organization of Research and Treatment of Cancer (ISCL/EORTC criteria at the time of flow cytometry sampling. To determine prognostic value of cell surface antigens, cases were divided into two groups as stable and progressive disease. 17 flow cytometric analyses of 17 parapsoriasis (PP and 11 analyses of 11 benign erythrodermic patients were included as control groups. Fluorescent labeled monoclonal antibodies were used to detect cell surface antigens: T cells (CD3+, CD4+, CD8+, TCRαβ+, TCRγδ+, CD7+, CD4+CD7+, CD4+CD7−, and CD71+, B cells (HLA-DR+, CD19+, and HLA-DR+CD19+, NKT cells (CD3+CD16+CD56+, and NK cells (CD3−CD16+CD56+. The mean value of all cell surface antigens was not statistically significant between parapsoriasis and MF groups. Along with an increase in cases of MF stage statistically significant difference was found between the mean values of cell surface antigens. Flow cytometric analysis of peripheral blood cell surface antigens in patients with mycosis fungoides may contribute to predicting disease stage and progression.

  15. Flow virometry as a tool to study viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamora, J Lizbeth Reyes; Aguilar, Hector C

    2018-02-01

    In the last few decades, flow cytometry has redefined the field of biology, exponentially enhancing our understanding of cells, immunology, and microbiology. Flow cytometry recently gave birth to flow virometry, a new way to detect, analyze, and characterize single viral particles. Detection of viruses by flow cytometry is possible due to improvements in current flow cytometers, calibration, and tuning methods. We summarize the recent birth and novel uses of flow virometry and the progressive evolution of this tool to advance the field of virology. We also discuss the various flow virometry methods used to identify and analyze viruses. We briefly summarize other applications of flow virometry, including: virus detection, quantification, population discrimination, and viral particles' antigenic properties. Finally, we summarize how viral sorting will allow further progress of flow virometry to relate viral surface characteristics to infectivity properties. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Improved Flow-Field Structures for Direct Methanol Fuel Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gurau, Bogdan [Nuvant Systems Inc., Crown Point, IN (United States)

    2013-05-31

    The direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC) is ideal if high energy-density liquid fuels are required. Liquid fuels have advantages over compressed hydrogen including higher energy density and ease of handling. Although state-of-the-art DMFCs exhibit manageable degradation rates, excessive fuel crossover diminishes system energy and power density. Although use of dilute methanol mitigates crossover, the concomitant lowering of the gross fuel energy density (GFED) demands a complex balance-of-plant (BOP) that includes higher flow rates, external exhaust recirculation, etc. An alternative approach is redesign of the fuel delivery system to accommodate concentrated methanol. NuVant Systems Inc. (NuVant) will maximize the GFED by design and assembly of a DMFC that uses near neat methanol. The approach is to tune the diffusion of highly concentrated methanol (to the anode catalytic layer) to the back-diffusion of water formed at the cathode (i.e. in situ generation of dilute methanol at the anode layer). Crossover will be minimized without compromising the GFED by innovative integration of the anode flow-field and the diffusion layer. The integrated flow-field-diffusion-layers (IFDLs) will widen the current and potential DMFC operating ranges and enable the use of cathodes optimized for hydrogen-air fuel cells.

  17. Effect of Flow on Cultured Cell at Micro-Pattern of Ridge Lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haruka Hino

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available A flow channel with a micro-pattern of ridge lines of a scaffold has been designed to study quantitatively the effect of flow on an oriented cell in vitro. The lines of parallel micro ridges (0.001 mm height, 0.003 mm width, and 0.003 mm interval are made by the lithography technique on the lower surface of the channel as the scaffold to make orientation of each cell. Variation is made about the angle between the longitudinal direction of the ridge line and the direction of the flow: zero, 0.79 and 1.6 rad. The suspension of C2C12 (mouse myoblast cell line was injected to the channel, and incubated for two hours on the micro ridges before the flow test for four hours. The flow rate of 3/hour is controlled by a syringe pump to make variation of the wall shear stress of < 3 Pa. The action of each cell adhered on the micro pattern was analyzed at the time lapse images. The experimental results show that both the migration and the deformation of each myoblast along the micro ridge are restricted by the wall shear stress higher than 3 Pa.

  18. A study of grout flow pattern analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, S. Y.; Hyun, S.

    2013-01-01

    A new disposal unit, designated as Salt Disposal Unit no. 6 (SDU6), is being designed for support of site accelerated closure goals and salt nuclear waste projections identified in the new Liquid Waste System plan. The unit is cylindrical disposal vault of 380 ft diameter and 43 ft in height, and it has about 30 million gallons of capacity. Primary objective was to develop the computational model and to perform the evaluations for the flow patterns of grout material in SDU6 as function of elevation of grout discharge port, and slurry rheology. A Bingham plastic model was basically used to represent the grout flow behavior. A two-phase modeling approach was taken to achieve the objective. This approach assumes that the air-grout interface determines the shape of the accumulation mound. The results of this study were used to develop the design guidelines for the discharge ports of the Saltstone feed materials in the SDU6 facility. The focusing areas of the modeling study are to estimate the domain size of the grout materials radially spread on the facility floor under the baseline modeling conditions, to perform the sensitivity analysis with respect to the baseline design and operating conditions such as elevation of discharge port, discharge pipe diameter, and grout properties, and to determine the changes in grout density as it is related to grout drop height. An axi-symmetric two-phase modeling method was used for computational efficiency. Based on the nominal design and operating conditions, a transient computational approach was taken to compute flow fields mainly driven by pumping inertia and natural gravity. Detailed solution methodology and analysis results are discussed here

  19. Double fluorescent flow cytometric assessment of bacterial internalization and binding by epithelial cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Boer, E. C.; Bevers, R. F.; Kurth, K. H.; Schamhart, D. H.

    1996-01-01

    This study describes a new flow cytometric method for assessment of phagocytosis of specific bacteria (bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) and Escherichia coli) by bladder epithelial cells. The internalization assay consisted of labeling bacteria chemically with fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC).

  20. Peclet number analysis of cross-flow in porous gas diffusion layer of polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell (PEMFC).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suresh, P V; Jayanti, Sreenivas

    2016-10-01

    Adoption of hydrogen economy by means of using hydrogen fuel cells is one possible solution for energy crisis and climate change issues. Polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) fuel cell, which is an important type of fuel cells, suffers from the problem of water management. Cross-flow is induced in some flow field designs to enhance the water removal. The presence of cross-flow in the serpentine and interdigitated flow fields makes them more effective in proper distribution of the reactants on the reaction layer and evacuation of water from the reaction layer than diffusion-based conventional parallel flow fields. However, too much of cross-flow leads to flow maldistribution in the channels, higher pressure drop, and membrane dehydration. In this study, an attempt has been made to quantify the amount of cross-flow required for effective distribution of reactants and removal of water in the gas diffusion layer. Unit cells containing two adjacent channels with gas diffusion layer (GDL) and catalyst layer at the bottom have been considered for the parallel, interdigitated, and serpentine flow patterns. Computational fluid dynamics-based simulations are carried out to study the reactant transport in under-the-rib area with cross-flow in the GDL. A new criterion based on the Peclet number is presented as a quantitative measure of cross-flow in the GDL. The study shows that a cross-flow Peclet number of the order of 2 is required for effective removal of water from the GDL. Estimates show that this much of cross-flow is not usually produced in the U-bends of Serpentine flow fields, making these areas prone to flooding.

  1. New high temperature gas flow cell developed at ISIS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haynes, R.; Norberg, S. T.; Eriksson, S. G.; Chowdhury, M. A. H.; Goodway, C. M.; Howells, G. D.; Kirichek, O.; Hull, S.

    2010-11-01

    A flow-through quartz gas cell, together with a gas flow control and monitoring system, has been designed and constructed at ISIS. This equipment allows neutron powder diffraction data to be collected on samples at temperatures up to around 1300 K when exposed to user chosen mixtures of O2, Ar, CO2, and CO. By exploiting the sensitivity of neutrons to the presence of light atoms such as oxygen, it is possible to probe the crystal structure of oxide materials as a function of oxygen partial pressures down to log10p(O2) of about -20. The resultant structural information can then be correlated with the bulk properties of the materials, whose research and technological interests lie in fields such as energy production, storage materials, catalysis, and earth science.

  2. New high temperature gas flow cell developed at ISIS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haynes, R; Norberg, S T; Eriksson, S G; Chowdhury, M A H; Goodway, C M; Howells, G D; Kirichek, O; Hull, S

    2010-01-01

    A flow-through quartz gas cell, together with a gas flow control and monitoring system, has been designed and constructed at ISIS. This equipment allows neutron powder diffraction data to be collected on samples at temperatures up to around 1300 K when exposed to user chosen mixtures of O 2 , Ar, CO 2 , and CO. By exploiting the sensitivity of neutrons to the presence of light atoms such as oxygen, it is possible to probe the crystal structure of oxide materials as a function of oxygen partial pressures down to log 10 p(O 2 ) of about -20. The resultant structural information can then be correlated with the bulk properties of the materials, whose research and technological interests lie in fields such as energy production, storage materials, catalysis, and earth science.

  3. Experimental and numerical investigations of fluid flow for optimized in vitro stem cell loading in xenografts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ott Robert

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available In dentofacial surgery, augmentation procedures employing xenografts have become a reliable treatment. Recent studies, however, have shown significant enhance-ments of the in vivo bone tissue augmentation using mesenchymal stem cells loaded into bone grafts. We conducted experimental and numerical investigations in flow perfusion systems to determine flow conditions which allow for homogenous stem cell distribution in BioOss Block (Geistlich Pharma AG, Switzerland xenografts. Pressure gradient-velocity characteristics and flow distributions were investigated experimentally and numerically at steady state flow conditions with Reynolds numbers (Re ranging from 0.01 ≤ Re ≤ 0.40. Distilled water at 20°C with a dynamic viscosity of 1.002 mPa.s and a density of 998 kg/m3 was used. The geometry utilized in three-dimensional computa-tional fluid dynamics (CFD simulation was obtained by means of micro-computed tomography (μCT. Results of CFD analysis are in good accordance with experimental data. The comparison of the pressure gradient-velocity characteris-tics for experimental and numerical data yields a relative error of 3.6%. According to Darcy’s law for creeping fluid flow the experimentally determined permeability is 2.55.10-9 m2. Moreover, numerical flow distribution analysis shows an increasingly heterogenic streamline distribution for increasing Reynolds numbers. Experimentally validated CFD simulations introduced in this study provide a tool to assess optimal flow conditions for a homogenous stem cell distribution in perfusion flow systems.

  4. Micro Flow Cytometer Chip Integrated with Micro-Pumps/Micro-Valves for Multi-Wavelength Cell Counting and Sorting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Chen-Min; Hsiung, Suz-Kai; Lee, Gwo-Bin

    2007-05-01

    Flow cytometry is a popular technique for counting and sorting of individual cells. This study presents a new chip-based flow cytometer capable of cell injection, counting and switching in an automatic format. The new microfluidic system is also capable of multi-wavelength detection of fluorescence-labeled cells by integrating multiple buried optical fibers within the chip. Instead of using large-scale syringe pumps, this study integrates micro-pumps and micro-valves to automate the entire cell injection and sorting process. By using pneumatic serpentine-shape (S-shape) micro-pumps to drive sample and sheath flows, the developed chip can generate hydrodynamic focusing to allow cells to pass detection regions in sequence. Two pairs of optical fibers are buried and aligned with the microchannels, which can transmit laser light sources with different wavelengths and can collect induced fluorescence signals. The cells labeled with different fluorescent dyes can be excited by the corresponding light source at different wavelengths. The fluorescence signals are then collected by avalanche photodiode (APD) sensors. Finally, a flow switching device composed of three pneumatic micro-valves is used for cell sorting function. Experimental data show that the developed flow cytometer can distinguish specific cells with different dye-labeling from mixed cell samples in one single process. The target cell samples can be also switched into appropriate outlet channels utilizing the proposed microvalve device. The developed microfluidic system is promising for miniature cell-based biomedical applications.

  5. Electrochemical and flow characterization of a direct methanol fuel cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, G. Q.; Wang, C. Y.

    Two-phase phenomena, i.e. bubble flow in the anode and water flooding in the cathode, are critical to design of high-performance direct methanol fuel cells (DMFC). A 5 cm 2 transparent DMFC has been developed to visualize these phenomena in situ. Two types of membrane-electrode assembly (MEA) based on Nafion ® 112 were used to investigate effects of backing pore structure and wettability on cell polarization characteristics and two-phase flow dynamics. One employed carbon paper backing material and the other carbon cloth. Experiments were performed under conditions of various methanol feed concentrations. The transparent fuel cell was shown to reach a peak power of 93 mW/cm 2 at 0.3 V, using Toray carbon-paper based MEA under 2 M methanol solution preheated at 85 °C. For the hydrophobic carbon paper backing, it was observed that CO 2 bubbles nucleate at certain locations and form large and discrete bubble slugs in the channel. For the hydrophilic carbon cloth backing, it was shown that bubbles are produced more uniformly and of smaller size. It is thus shown that the anode backing layer of uniform pore size and more hydrophilicity is preferred for gas management in the anode. Flow visualization of water flooding on the cathode side of DMFC has also been carried out. It is shown that liquid droplets appear more easily on the surface of carbon paper due to its reduced hydrophobicity at elevated temperature. For the single-side ELAT carbon cloth, liquid droplets tend to form in the corner between the current collecting rib and GDL since ELAT is highly hydrophobic and the rib (stainless steel) surface is hydrophilic.

  6. The effect of blood cell count on coronary flow in patients with coronary slow flow phenomenon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soylu, Korhan; Gulel, Okan; Yucel, Huriye; Yuksel, Serkan; Aksan, Gokhan; Soylu, Ayşegül İdil; Demircan, Sabri; Yılmaz, Ozcan; Sahin, Mahmut

    2014-09-01

    The coronary slow flow phenomenon (CSFP) is a coronary artery disease with a benign course, but its pathological mechanisms are not yet fully understood.The purpose of this controlled study was to investigate the cellular content of blood in patients diagnosed with CSFP and the relationship of this with coronary flow rates. Selective coronary angiographies of 3368 patients were analyzed to assess Thrombolysis in Myocardial Infarction (TIMI) frame count (TFC) values. Seventy eight of them had CSFP, and their demographic and laboratory findings were compared with 61 patients with normal coronary flow. Patients' demographic characteristics were similar in both groups. Mean corrected TFC (cTFC) values were significantly elevated in CSFP patients (p<0.001). Furthermore, hematocrit and hemoglobin values, and eosinophil and basophil counts of the CSFP patients were significantly elevated compared to the values obtained in the control group (p=0.005, p=0.047, p=0.001 and p=0.002, respectively). The increase observed in hematocrit and eosinophil levels showed significant correlations with increased TFC values (r=0.288 and r=0.217, respectively). Significant changes have been observed in the cellular composition of blood in patients diagnosed with CSFP as compared to the patients with normal coronary blood flow. The increases in hematocrit levels and in the eosinophil and basophil counts may have direct or indirect effects on the rate of coronary blood flow.

  7. Quantitative assessment of limb blood flow using Tc-99m labeled red blood cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Itoh, Kazuo; Shougase, Takashi; Kawamura, Naoyuki; Tsukamoto, Eriko; Nakada, Kunihiro; Sakuma, Makoto; Furudate, Masayori

    1987-01-01

    A quantitative assessment of limb blood flow using a non-diffusible radioindicator, Tc-99m labeled red blood cells, was reported. This was an application of venous occlusion plethysmography using radionuclide which was originally proposed by M. Fukuoka et al. The peripheral blood flow (mean ± s.e.) of 30 legs in a normal control group was 1.87 ± 0.08 ml/100 ml/min. In heart diseases (46 legs), it was 1.49 ± 0.13 ml/100 ml/min. The limb blood flow between a control group and heart diseases was statistically significant (p < 0.01) in the t-test. The peripheral blood flow at rest between diseased legs and normal legs in occlusive arterial disorders was also statistically significant (p < 0.01) in a paired t-test. RAVOP was done after the completion of objective studies such as radionuclide angiography or ventriculography. Technique and calculation of a blood flow were very easy and simple. RAVOP study which was originally proposed by Fukuoka et al. was reappraised to be hopeful for quantitative measurement of limb blood flow as a non-invasive technique using Tc-99m labeled red blood cells. (author)

  8. An assessment of the energetic flows in a commercial PEM fuel-cell system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jovan, Vladimir; Perne, Matija; Petrovcic, Janko

    2010-01-01

    Some primary issues have not yet been fully investigated on the way towards the commercialization of fuel-cell-based systems (FCS), e.g., their actual efficiency, reliability, safety, degradation, maintainability, etc. This article deals with an estimation of the real energetic flows and the corresponding electrical efficiency of a commercial proton-exchange-membrane fuel-cell hydrogen-fed generator set (PEMFCS). The fuel-cell power system considered here is planned to be the source of both electrical and thermal energy in a mobile dwelling container unit with in-built fuel-cell-based cogeneration system, and for the design of a cogeneration unit the actual amount of disposable energy from the PEMFC unit should be estimated. The assessment of the actual energetic flows, the disposable energy and the consequent electrical efficiency of the case-study PEMFCS is carried out using commercial technical data for the PEMFCS.

  9. Proteomic analysis of barley cell nuclei purified by flow sorting

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Petrovská, Beáta; Jeřábková, Hana; Chamrád, I.; Vrána, Jan; Lenobel, R.; Uřinovská, J.; Šebela, M.; Doležel, Jaroslav

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 143, 1-3 (2014), s. 78-86 ISSN 1424-8581 R&D Projects: GA ČR GBP501/12/G090; GA ČR(CZ) GA14-28443S; GA MŠk(CZ) LO1204 Institutional support: RVO:61389030 Keywords : Cell cycle * Chromatin * Flow cytometry Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 1.561, year: 2014 http://gateway.isiknowledge.com/gateway/Gateway.cgi?GWVersion=2&SrcAuth=Alerting&SrcApp=Alerting&DestApp=MEDLINE&DestLinkType=FullRecord&UT=25059295

  10. Modeling of proton exchange membrane fuel cell with variable distance gas flow in anode and cathode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohd Shahbudin Masdar; Wan Ramli Wan Daud; Kamaruzzaman Sopian; Jaafar Sahari

    2006-01-01

    A number of fundamental studies have been directed towards increasing our understanding of PEM fuel cell and their performance. Mathematical modeling is one of the way and very essential component in the development of this fuel cell. Model validation is presented, the validated model is then used to investigate the behavior of mole fraction of gases, current density, and the performances of stack using polarization curve depending on distance gases flow in channel. The model incorporates a complete cell with both the membrane electrode assembly (MEA) and the serpentine gas distributor channel. Finally, the parametric studies in single stack design are illustrated

  11. Structures, Compositions, and Activities of Live Shewanella Biofilms Formed on Graphite Electrodes in Electrochemical Flow Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitayama, Miho; Koga, Ryota; Kasai, Takuya; Kouzuma, Atsushi; Watanabe, Kazuya

    2017-09-01

    An electrochemical flow cell equipped with a graphite working electrode (WE) at the bottom was inoculated with Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 expressing an anaerobic fluorescent protein, and biofilm formation on the WE was observed over time during current generation at WE potentials of +0.4 and 0 V (versus standard hydrogen electrodes), under electrolyte-flow conditions. Electrochemical analyses suggested the presence of unique electron-transfer mechanisms in the +0.4-V biofilm. Microscopic analyses revealed that, in contrast to aerobic biofilms, current-generating biofilm (at +0.4 V) was thin and flat (∼10 μm in thickness), and cells were evenly and densely distributed in the biofilm. In contrast, cells were unevenly distributed in biofilm formed at 0 V. In situ fluorescence staining and biofilm recovery experiments showed that the amounts of extracellular polysaccharides (EPSs) in the +0.4-V biofilm were much smaller than those in the aerobic and 0-V biofilms, suggesting that Shewanella cells suppress the production of EPSs at +0.4 V under flow conditions. We suggest that Shewanella cells perceive electrode potentials and modulate the structure and composition of biofilms to efficiently transfer electrons to electrodes. IMPORTANCE A promising application of microbial fuel cells (MFCs) is to save energy in wastewater treatment. Since current is generated in these MFCs by biofilm microbes under horizontal flows of wastewater, it is important to understand the mechanisms for biofilm formation and current generation under water-flow conditions. Although massive work has been done to analyze the molecular mechanisms for current generation by model exoelectrogenic bacteria, such as Shewanella oneidensis , limited information is available regarding the formation of current-generating biofilms over time under water-flow conditions. The present study developed electrochemical flow cells and used them to examine the electrochemical and structural features of current

  12. Modeling two-phase flow in three-dimensional complex flow-fields of proton exchange membrane fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jinyong; Luo, Gang; Wang, Chao-Yang

    2017-10-01

    3D fine-mesh flow-fields recently developed by Toyota Mirai improved water management and mass transport in proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cell stacks, suggesting their potential value for robust and high-power PEM fuel cell stack performance. In such complex flow-fields, Forchheimer's inertial effect is dominant at high current density. In this work, a two-phase flow model of 3D complex flow-fields of PEMFCs is developed by accounting for Forchheimer's inertial effect, for the first time, to elucidate the underlying mechanism of liquid water behavior and mass transport inside 3D complex flow-fields and their adjacent gas diffusion layers (GDL). It is found that Forchheimer's inertial effect enhances liquid water removal from flow-fields and adds additional flow resistance around baffles, which improves interfacial liquid water and mass transport. As a result, substantial improvements in high current density cell performance and operational stability are expected in PEMFCs with 3D complex flow-fields, compared to PEMFCs with conventional flow-fields. Higher current density operation required to further reduce PEMFC stack cost per kW in the future will necessitate optimizing complex flow-field designs using the present model, in order to efficiently remove a large amount of product water and hence minimize the mass transport voltage loss.

  13. A modular segmented-flow platform for 3D cell cultivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemke, Karen; Förster, Tobias; Römer, Robert; Quade, Mandy; Wiedemeier, Stefan; Grodrian, Andreas; Gastrock, Gunter

    2015-07-10

    In vitro 3D cell cultivation is promised to equate tissue in vivo more realistically than 2D cell cultivation corresponding to cell-cell and cell-matrix interactions. Therefore, a scalable 3D cultivation platform was developed. This platform, called pipe-based bioreactors (pbb), is based on the segmented-flow technology: aqueous droplets are embedded in a water-immiscible carrier fluid. The droplet volumes range from 60 nL to 20 μL and are used as bioreactors lined up in a tubing like pearls on a string. The modular automated platform basically consists of several modules like a fluid management for a high throughput droplet generation for self-assembly or scaffold-based 3D cell cultivation, a storage module for incubation and storage, and an analysis module for monitoring cell aggregation and proliferation basing on microscopy or photometry. In this report, the self-assembly of murine embryonic stem cells (mESCs) to uniformly sized embryoid bodies (EBs), the cell proliferation, the cell viability as well as the influence on the cell differentiation to cardiomyocytes are described. The integration of a dosage module for medium exchange or agent addition will enable pbb as long-term 3D cell cultivation system for studying stem cell differentiation, e.g. cardiac myogenesis or for diagnostic and therapeutic testing in personalized medicine. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Case study on ground water flow (8)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-02-01

    The report comprises research activities made in fiscal year 1997 under the contract of Japan Nuclear Fuel Cycle Development Center and the main items are: (1) Evaluation of water permeability through discontinuous hard bedrock in deep strata in relevant with underground disposal of radioactive wastes, (2) Three dimensional analysis of permeated water in bedrock, including flow analysis in T ono district using neuro-network and modification of Evaporation Logging System, (3) Development of hydraulic tests and necessary equipment applicable to measurements of complex dielectric constants of contaminated soils using FUDR-V method, this giving information on soil component materials, (4) Investigation methods and modeling of hydraulics in deep strata, (5) Geological study of ground water using environmental isotopes such as {sup 14}C, {sup 36}Cl and {sup 4}He, particularly measurement of ages of ground water using an accelerator-mass spectrometer, and (6) Re-submerging phenomena affecting the long-term geological stability. (S. Ohno)

  15. Case study on ground water flow (8)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-02-01

    The report comprises research activities made in fiscal year 1997 under the contract of Japan Nuclear Fuel Cycle Development Center and the main items are: (1) Evaluation of water permeability through discontinuous hard bedrock in deep strata in relevant with underground disposal of radioactive wastes, (2) Three dimensional analysis of permeated water in bedrock, including flow analysis in T ono district using neuro-network and modification of Evaporation Logging System, (3) Development of hydraulic tests and necessary equipment applicable to measurements of complex dielectric constants of contaminated soils using FUDR-V method, this giving information on soil component materials, (4) Investigation methods and modeling of hydraulics in deep strata, (5) Geological study of ground water using environmental isotopes such as 14 C, 36 Cl and 4 He, particularly measurement of ages of ground water using an accelerator-mass spectrometer, and (6) Re-submerging phenomena affecting the long-term geological stability. (S. Ohno)

  16. Flow Cytometry Analysis of Peripheral Blood B Cell Distribution of Patients with Multiple Sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vuslat Yılmaz

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Multiple sclerosis (MS is a central nervous system (CNS disease characterized by autoimmune inflammation and neurodegeneration. Damage to the CNS is thought to be mediated predominantly by activated pro-inflammatory T cells and antibody secreting B cells. Strong evidence of B cell functions in MS pathogenesis has come from trials of B cell- depleting treatment. In this study, the peripheral blood frequencies of B cell subsets were measured using flow cytometry in patients to determine the disease-specific B cell differences that might be associated with the evolution to progressive forms of MS. Materials and Methods: Peripheral blood mononuclear cells were separated from patients and healthy controls [relapsing-remitting MS (RRMS and secondary progressive MS (SPMS]. Cells were stained with anti-human monoclonal antibodies (CD19-APC, CD27-FITC, IgD-APC/Cy7, CD138-PE, CD24-PerCP and CD38-Alexa fluor 700, and analyzed using flow cytometry Results: There were no significant differences between the MS group and healthy controls by means of peripheral blood frequencies of B cells, immature, naïve, classic memory, plasma, plasmablasts, and regulatory B cells. Only higher naïve B cell frequency tendency was determined in patients with RRMS as compared with patients with SPMS and healthy controls. Conclusion: Peripheral blood B cell subset measurements are not likely to be used as a biomarker for prediction of disease progression. Although B cells have a well-known pathogenic significance, B cell population alterations do not occur during the progression of the disease

  17. 3D-printed and CNC milled flow-cells for chemiluminescence detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spilstead, Kara B; Learey, Jessica J; Doeven, Egan H; Barbante, Gregory J; Mohr, Stephan; Barnett, Neil W; Terry, Jessica M; Hall, Robynne M; Francis, Paul S

    2014-08-01

    Herein we explore modern fabrication techniques for the development of chemiluminescence detection flow-cells with features not attainable using the traditional coiled tubing approach. This includes the first 3D-printed chemiluminescence flow-cells, and a milled flow-cell designed to split the analyte stream into two separate detection zones within the same polymer chip. The flow-cells are compared to conventional detection systems using flow injection analysis (FIA) and high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), with the fast chemiluminescence reactions of an acidic potassium permanganate reagent with morphine and a series of adrenergic phenolic amines. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Studies of fluid instabilities in flows of lava and debris

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fink, J.H.

    1987-01-01

    At least two instabilities have been identified and utilized in lava flow studies: surface folding and gravity instability. Both lead to the development of regularly spaced structures on the surfaces of lava flows. The geometry of surface folds have been used to estimate the rheology of lava flows on other planets. One investigation's analysis assumed that lava flows have a temperature-dependent Newtonian rheology, and that the lava's viscosity decreased exponentially inward from the upper surface. The author reviews studies by other investigators on the analysis of surface folding, the analysis of Taylor instability in lava flows, and the effect of surface folding on debris flows

  19. RhizoFlowCell system reveals early effects of micropollutants on aquatic plant rhizosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mynampati, Kalyan Chakravarthy; Lee, Yong Jian; Wijdeveld, Arjan; Reuben, Sheela; Samavedham, Lakshminarayanan; Kjelleberg, Staffan; Swarup, Sanjay

    2015-01-01

    In aquatic systems, one of the non-destructive ways to quantify toxicity of contaminants to plants is to monitor changes in root exudation patterns. In aquatic conditions, monitoring and quantifying such changes are currently challenging because of dilution of root exudates in water phase and lack of suitable instrumentation to measure them. Exposure to pollutants would not only change the plant exudation, but also affect the microbial communities that surround the root zone, thereby changing the metabolic profiles of the rhizosphere. This study aims at developing a device, the RhizoFlowCell, which can quantify metabolic response of plants, as well as changes in the microbial communities, to give an estimate of the stress to which the rhizosphere is exposed. The usefulness of RhizoFlowCell is demonstrated using naphthalene as a test pollutant. Results show that RhizoFlowCell system is useful in quantifying the dynamic metabolic response of aquatic rhizosphere to determine ecosystem health. - A novel RhizoFlowCell system is designed to facilitate non-destructive in situ sampling for biochemical profiling and imaging of the rhizosphere exposed to pollutants in aquatic systems.

  20. Use of Multicolor Flow Cytometry for Isolation of Specific Cell Populations Deriving from Differentiated Human Embryonic Stem Cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mengarelli, Isabella; Fryga, Andrew; Barberi, Tiziano

    2016-01-01

    Flow Cytometry-Sorting (FCM-Sorting) is a technique commonly used to identify and isolate specific types of cells from a heterogeneous population of live cells. Here we describe a multicolor flow cytometry technique that uses five distinct cell surface antigens to isolate four live populations with

  1. Measuring cell cycle progression kinetics with metabolic labeling and flow cytometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleisig, Helen; Wong, Judy

    2012-05-22

    Precise control of the initiation and subsequent progression through the various phases of the cell cycle are of paramount importance in proliferating cells. Cell cycle division is an integral part of growth and reproduction and deregulation of key cell cycle components have been implicated in the precipitating events of carcinogenesis. Molecular agents in anti-cancer therapies frequently target biological pathways responsible for the regulation and coordination of cell cycle division. Although cell cycle kinetics tend to vary according to cell type, the distribution of cells amongst the four stages of the cell cycle is rather consistent within a particular cell line due to the consistent pattern of mitogen and growth factor expression. Genotoxic events and other cellular stressors can result in a temporary block of cell cycle progression, resulting in arrest or a temporary pause in a particular cell cycle phase to allow for instigation of the appropriate response mechanism. The ability to experimentally observe the behavior of a cell population with reference to their cell cycle progression stage is an important advance in cell biology. Common procedures such as mitotic shake off, differential centrifugation or flow cytometry-based sorting are used to isolate cells at specific stages of the cell cycle. These fractionated, cell cycle phase-enriched populations are then subjected to experimental treatments. Yield, purity and viability of the separated fractions can often be compromised using these physical separation methods. As well, the time lapse between separation of the cell populations and the start of experimental treatment, whereby the fractionated cells can progress from the selected cell cycle stage, can pose significant challenges in the successful implementation and interpretation of these experiments. Other approaches to study cell cycle stages include the use of chemicals to synchronize cells. Treatment of cells with chemical inhibitors of key

  2. Phospho-specific flow cytometry identifies aberrant signaling in indolent B-cell lymphoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Blix Egil S

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Knowledge about signaling pathways in malignant cells may provide prognostic and diagnostic information in addition to identify potential molecular targets for therapy. B-cell receptor (BCR and co-receptor CD40 signaling is essential for normal B cells, and there is increasing evidence that signaling via BCR and CD40 plays an important role in the pathogenesis of B-cell lymphoma. The aim of this study was to investigate basal and induced signaling in lymphoma B cells and infiltrating T cells in single-cell suspensions of biopsies from small cell lymphocytic lymphoma/chronic lymphocytic leukemia (SLL/CLL and marginal zone lymphoma (MZL patients. Methods Samples from untreated SLL/CLL and MZL patients were examined for basal and activation induced signaling by phospho-specific flow cytometry. A panel of 9 stimulation conditions targeting B and T cells, including crosslinking of the B cell receptor (BCR, CD40 ligand and interleukins in combination with 12 matching phospho-protein readouts was used to study signaling. Results Malignant B cells from SLL/CLL patients had higher basal levels of phosphorylated (p-SFKs, p-PLCγ, p-ERK, p-p38, p-p65 (NF-κB, p-STAT5 and p-STAT6, compared to healthy donor B cells. In contrast, anti-BCR induced signaling was highly impaired in SLL/CLL and MZL B cells as determined by low p-SFK, p-SYK and p-PLCγ levels. Impaired anti-BCR-induced p-PLCγ was associated with reduced surface expression of IgM and CD79b. Similarly, CD40L-induced p-ERK and p-p38 were also significantly reduced in lymphoma B cells, whereas p-p65 (NF-κB was equal to that of normal B cells. In contrast, IL-2, IL-7 and IL-15 induced p-STAT5 in tumor-infiltrating T cells were not different from normal T cells. Conclusions BCR signaling and CD40L-induced p-p38 was suppressed in malignant B cells from SLL/CLL and MZL patients. Single-cell phospho-specific flow cytometry for detection of basal as well as activation

  3. An imaging flow cytometry method to assess ricin trafficking in A549 human lung epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenner, Dominic; Chong, Damien; Walker, Nicola; Green, A Christopher

    2018-02-01

    The endocytosis and trafficking of ricin in mammalian cells is an important area of research for those producing ricin anti-toxins and other ricin therapeutics. Ricin trafficking is usually observed by fluorescence microscopy techniques. This gives good resolution and leads to a detailed understanding of the internal movement of ricin within cells. However, microscopy techniques are often hampered by complex analysis and quantification techniques, and the inability to look at ricin trafficking in large populations of cells. In these studies we have directly labelled ricin and assessed if its trafficking can be observed using Imaging Flow Cytometry (IFC) both to the cytoplasmic region of cells and specifically to the Golgi apparatus. Using IDEAS® data analysis software the specific fluorescence location of the ricin within the cells was analysed. Then, using cytoplasmic masking techniques to quantify the number of cells with endocytosed cytoplasmic ricin or cells with Golgi-associated ricin, kinetic endocytosis curves were generated. Here we present, to the authors' knowledge, the first example of using imaging flow cytometry for evaluating the subcellular transport of protein cargo, using the trafficking of ricin toxin in lung cells as a model. Crown Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Evaluation of cell proliferative activity after irradiation using immunohistochemical approach and flow cytometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tamada, Takashi (Okayama Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine)

    1992-06-01

    To evaluate a proliferative activity of post-irradiated malignant cells, we studied the kinetics of HeLa cells using immunohistochemical approach and flow cytometry. HeLa cells were stained with two proliferation-associated monoclonal antibodies, Ki-67 and anti-DNA polymerase {alpha} antibody. Nucleoli of non-irradiated cells were granularly stained with Ki-67. After irradiation, only the center of nuclei was diffusely stained with Ki-67. One hundred forty-four hours after low-dose irradiation, the staining patterns became the same as the control. On the other hand, after high-dose irradiation, the center of nuclei was weakly stained. DNA polymerase {alpha} was diffusely labelled with nuclei of the control. It was located around the border of nuclei of low-dose irradiated cells like a ring. But after high-dose irradiation, it was granularly distributed in the periphery of nuclei. FITC conjugated Ki-67/PI two parameter analysis was done by a single laser flow cytometer. Twenty-four hours after irradiation, DNA-histograms showed the accumulation to G{sub 2}/M phase and the increase of DNA content of G{sub 2}/M cells, as exposure dose was increased. Two parameter analysis showed the increase of FITC uptake of G{sub 2}/M phase as dose increased. These changes of flow cytometry were remarkably observed after 24 hours' incubation. It was shown that the difference of Ki-67 antigen and DNA polymerase {alpha} appearance depended on the irradiation dose. These findings suggest that immunohistochemical staining with Ki-67 or anti-DNA polymerase {alpha} antibody and flow cytometry using Ki-67 are available to evaluate cell damages after irradiation. (author).

  5. Double channel electrode flow cell application to the study of HO2- production on Mn xCo3-xO4 (0 ≤ x ≤ 1) spinel films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rios, E.; Reyes, H.; Ortiz, J.; Gautier, J.L.

    2005-01-01

    We conducted a study on the electroreduction of O 2 in alkaline solution at room temperature on pure thin oxide electrodes of composition Mn x Co 3-x O 4 (0 ≤ x ≤ 1) using the double channel electrode flow cell (DCEFC). The oxides were prepared at 150 deg. C and deposited by spray pyrolysis onto titanium substrates. The oxygen reduction reaction (orr) occurs through 'interactive' and 'parallel' pathways, and the ratio of O 2 molecules reduced to OH - ions with respect to those reduced to HO 2 - ions depends on the oxide stoichiometry and on the applied overpotential. The formation of HO 2 - increases when the manganese concentration increases. The results obtained for the orr show that the number of electrons transferred per O 2 molecule decreases from 3 to 2 and the ratio k 1 /k 2 (the rate constants for direct reduction to OH - and indirect reduction to HO 2 - ) increases, respectively, in the overpotential studied range (-0.05 to -0.6 V). The Mn 3+ ions placed in the B-sites of the spinel structure seem to be the active centres, where hydrogen peroxide is formed

  6. Study on the flow reduction of forced flow superconducting magnet and its stable operation condition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sugimoto, Makoto [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Naka, Ibaraki (Japan). Naka Fusion Research Establishment

    2001-03-01

    cryogenic pump and not obtain in the design phase. For the estimation in design phase, evaluation equations of the flow reduction based on the helium expansion model were developed. The flow reduction by AC losses is predictable by helium expansion model even in the design phase on which the conductor friction and pump performances are not obtained. The phenomenon of flow reduction of the forced flow coil has been applied for coil quench detection and has been developed by Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI). It is named the 'fluid method' and essential technology for quench detection of large scale forced flow superconducting coil as fusion magnets and superconducting magnetic energy storage (SMES) coil. In the fluid method, the inlet flow reduction is caused by Joule heating on the normal zone of superconducting coil. The fluid method has no electric noise in its detection. This is an advantage for pulsed operation in comparison with other electrical quench detection systems. There are no quantitative considerations between the inlet flow reduction and Joule heating on the coil in previous studies. The flow reduction for the quench detection has been determined by the operation experience of forced flow superconducting coil. The evaluation method for the flow reduction for the quench detection was developed. The energy consumption in the coil by Joule heating was defined from the inlet flow reduction. It means the quench detection duration from the normal initiation is available. And it makes the protection of the superconducting coil more reliable. It is a new idea on the study of flow reduction and applicable not only fusion magnet but also all of forced flow superconducting coils like a SMES coil. (author)

  7. Rapid release of active tissue factor from human arterial smooth muscle cells under flow conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stampfuss, Jan-Julius; Censarek, Petra; Fischer, Jens W; Schrör, Karsten; Weber, Artur-Aron

    2006-05-01

    Circulating tissue factor (TF) is an important determinant of coronary thrombosis. Among other cell types, such as monocytes, vascular smooth muscle cells (SMCs) are capable of releasing TF. When studied under static conditions, SMCs do release TF, but this process is slow and, thus, cannot explain the elevated levels of circulating TF, as observed in patients with acute coronary syndromes. The present study demonstrates that cultured human mammary artery SMCs very rapidly (minutes) release active, microparticle-bound TF when exposed to flow conditions. There was a clear log-linear correlation between the shear rate (range 10 s(-1) to 1500 s(-1)) and the procoagulant activity of SMC perfusates. Flow-dependent release of TF was transient (10 minutes) and did not measurably reduce cell surface TF content. Interestingly, a time-dependent (t(1/2) 30 minutes) re-exposure of releasable TF was detected after a no-flow period. These data demonstrate that SMCs may become a pathophysiologically relevant source of TF that can be rapidly released into the circulation in situations in which endothelial damage occurs and SMCs come into a close contact with the flowing blood.

  8. Identifying Cell Populations in Flow Cytometry Data Using Phenotypic Signatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pouyan, Maziyar Baran; Nourani, Mehrdad

    2017-01-01

    Single-cell flow cytometry is a technology that measures the expression of several cellular markers simultaneously for a large number of cells. Identification of homogeneous cell populations, currently done by manual biaxial gating, is highly subjective and time consuming. To overcome the shortcomings of manual gating, automatic algorithms have been proposed. However, the performance of these methods highly depends on the shape of populations and the dimension of the data. In this paper, we have developed a time-efficient method that accurately identifies cellular populations. This is done based on a novel technique that estimates the initial number of clusters in high dimension and identifies the final clusters by merging clusters using their phenotypic signatures in low dimension. The proposed method is called SigClust. We have applied SigClust to four public datasets and compared it with five well known methods in the field. The results are promising and indicate higher performance and accuracy compared to similar approaches reported in literature.

  9. The art and science of flow control - case studies using flow visualization methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvi, F. S.; Cattafesta, L. N., III

    2010-04-01

    Active flow control (AFC) has been the focus of significant research in the last decade. This is mainly due to the potentially substantial benefits it affords. AFC applications range from the subsonic to the supersonic (and beyond) regime for both internal and external flows. These applications are wide and varied, such as controlling flow transition and separation over various external components of the aircraft to active management of separation and flow distortion in engine components and over turbine and compressor blades. High-speed AFC applications include control of flow oscillations in cavity flows, supersonic jet screech, impinging jets, and jet-noise control. In this paper we review some of our recent applications of AFC through a number of case studies that illustrate the typical benefits as well as limitations of present AFC methods. The case studies include subsonic and supersonic canonical flowfields such as separation control over airfoils, control of supersonic cavity flows and impinging jets. In addition, properties of zero-net mass-flux (ZNMF) actuators are also discussed as they represent one of the most widely studied actuators used for AFC. In keeping with the theme of this special issue, the flowfield properties and their response to actuation are examined through the use of various qualitative and quantitative flow visualization methods, such as smoke, shadowgraph, schlieren, planar-laser scattering, and Particle image velocimetry (PIV). The results presented here clearly illustrate the merits of using flow visualization to gain significant insight into the flow and its response to AFC.

  10. Motion of cells sedimenting on a solid surface in a laminar shear flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tissot, O; Pierres, A; Foa, C; Delaage, M; Bongrand, P

    1992-01-01

    Cell adhesion often occurs under dynamic conditions, as in flowing blood. A quantitative understanding of this process requires accurate knowledge of the topographical relationships between the cell membrane and potentially adhesive surfaces. This report describes an experimental study made on both the translational and rotational velocities of leukocytes sedimenting of a flat surface under laminar shear flow. The main conclusions are as follows: (a) Cells move close to the wall with constant velocity for several tens of seconds. (b) The numerical values of translational and rotational velocities are inconsistent with Goldman's model of a neutrally buoyant sphere in a laminar shear flow, unless a drag force corresponding to contact friction between cells and the chamber floor is added. The phenomenological friction coefficient was 7.4 millinewton.s/m. (c) Using a modified Goldman's theory, the width of the gap separating cells (6 microns radius) from the chamber floor was estimated at 1.4 micron. (d) It is shown that a high value of the cell-to-substrate gap may be accounted for by the presence of cell surface protrusions of a few micrometer length, in accordance with electron microscope observations performed on the same cell population. (e) In association with previously reported data (Tissot, O., C. Foa, C. Capo, H. Brailly, M. Delaage, and P. Bongrand. 1991. Biocolloids and Biosurfaces. In press), these results are consistent with the possibility that cell-substrate attachment be initiated by the formation of a single molecular bond, which might be considered as the rate limiting step.

  11. Numerical study on flow rate limitation of open capillary channel flow through a wedge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ting-Ting Zhang

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The flow characteristics of slender-column flow in wedge-shaped channel under microgravity condition are investigated in this work. The one-dimensional theoretical model is applied to predict the critical flow rate and surface contour of stable flow. However, the one-dimensional model overestimates the critical flow rate for not considering the extra pressure loss. Then, we develop a three-dimensional simulation method with OpenFOAM, a computational fluid dynamics tool, to simulate various phenomena in wedge channels with different lengths. The numerical results are verified with the capillary channel flow experimental data on the International Space Station. We find that the three-dimensional simulation perfectly predicts the critical flow rates and surface contours under various flow conditions. Meanwhile, the general behaviors in subcritical, critical, and supercritical flow are studied in three-dimensional simulation considering variations of flow rate and open channel length. The numerical techniques for three-dimensional simulation is validated for a wide range of configurations and is hopeful to provide valuable guidance for capillary channel flow experiment and efficient liquid management in space.

  12. Modeling and simulation of PEM fuel cell's flow channels using CFD techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cunha, Edgar F.; Andrade, Alexandre B.; Robalinho, Eric; Bejarano, Martha L.M.; Linardi, Marcelo [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)]. E-mails: efcunha@ipen.br; abodart@ipen.br; eric@ipen.br; mmora@ipen.br; mlinardi@ipen.br; Cekinski, Efraim [Instituto de Pesquisas Tecnologicas (IPT-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)]. E-mail: cekinski@ipt.br

    2007-07-01

    Fuel cells are one of the most important devices to obtain electrical energy from hydrogen. The Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cell (PEMFC) consists of two important parts: the Membrane Electrode Assembly (MEA), where the reactions occur, and the flow field plates. The plates have many functions in a fuel cell: distribute reactant gases (hydrogen and air or oxygen), conduct electrical current, remove heat and water from the electrodes and make the cell robust. The cost of the bipolar plates corresponds up to 45% of the total stack costs. The Computational Fluid Dynamic (CFD) is a very useful tool to simulate hydrogen and oxygen gases flow channels, to reduce the costs of bipolar plates production and to optimize mass transport. Two types of flow channels were studied. The first type was a commercial plate by ELECTROCELL and the other was entirely projected at Programa de Celula a Combustivel (IPEN/CNEN-SP) and the experimental data were compared with modelling results. Optimum values for each set of variables were obtained and the models verification was carried out in order to show the feasibility of this technique to improve fuel cell efficiency. (author)

  13. Internalisation of polymeric nanosensors in mesenchymal stem cells: analysis by flow cytometry and confocal microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coupland, Paul G; Fisher, Karen A; Jones, D Rhodri E; Aylott, Jonathan W

    2008-09-10

    The aim of this study was to demonstrate that flow cytometry and confocal microscopy could be applied in a complementary manner to analyse the internalisation of polymeric nanosensors in mesenchymal stem cells (MSC). The two techniques are able to provide en masse data analysis of nanosensors from large cell populations and detailed images of intracellular nanosensor localisation, respectively. The polyacrylamide nanosensors used in this investigation had been modified to contain free amine groups which were subsequently conjugated to Tat peptide, which acted as a delivery vector for nanosensor internalisation. Flow cytometry was used to confirm the health of MSC culture and assess the impact of nanosensor internalisation. MSC were characterised using fluorescently tagged CD cell surface markers that were also used to show that nanosensor internalisation did not negatively impact on MSC culture. Additionally it was shown that flow cytometry can be used to measure fluorophores located both on the cell surface and internalised within the cell. Complementary data was obtained using confocal microscopy to confirm nanosensor internalisation within MSC.

  14. Numerical study of MHD supersonic flow control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryakhovskiy, A. I.; Schmidt, A. A.

    2017-11-01

    Supersonic MHD flow around a blunted body with a constant external magnetic field has been simulated for a number of geometries as well as a range of the flow parameters. Solvers based on Balbas-Tadmor MHD schemes and HLLC-Roe Godunov-type method have been developed within the OpenFOAM framework. The stability of the solution varies depending on the intensity of magnetic interaction The obtained solutions show the potential of MHD flow control and provide insights into for the development of the flow control system. The analysis of the results proves the applicability of numerical schemes, that are being used in the solvers. A number of ways to improve both the mathematical model of the process and the developed solvers are proposed.

  15. Dissipative particle dynamics simulations of deformation and aggregation of healthy and diseased red blood cells in a tube flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ye, Ting; Phan-Thien, Nhan, E-mail: Nhan@nus.edu.sg; Khoo, Boo Cheong; Lim, Chwee Teck [Department of Mechanical Engineering, National University of Singapore, Singapore 119260 (Singapore)

    2014-11-15

    In this paper, we report simulation results assessing the deformation and aggregation of mixed healthy and malaria-infected red blood cells (RBCs) in a tube flow. A three dimensional particle model based on Dissipative Particle Dynamics (DPD) is developed to predict the tube flow containing interacting cells. The cells are also modelled by DPD, with a Morse potential to characterize the cell-cell interaction. As validation tests, a single RBC in a tube flow and two RBCs in a static flow are simulated to examine the cell deformation and intercellular interaction, respectively. The study of two cells, one healthy and the other malaria-infected RBCs in a tube flow demonstrates that the malaria-infected RBC (in the leading position along flow direction) has different effects on the healthy RBC (in the trailing position) at the different stage of parasite development or at the different capillary number. With parasitic development, the malaria-infected RBC gradually loses its deformability, and in turn the corresponding trailing healthy RBC also deforms less due to the intercellular interaction. With increasing capillary number, both the healthy and malaria-infected RBCs are likely to undergo an axisymmetric motion. The minimum intercellular distance becomes small enough so that rouleaux is easily formed, i.e., the healthy and malaria-infected RBCs are difficultly disaggregated.

  16. A Study of Flow in Entrepreneurs

    OpenAIRE

    Woodruff, Timothy James

    2015-01-01

    What is the experience of flow like in Entrepreneurs? This work defines the concept of an entrepreneur, discusses that concept in regards to creativity, and accesses the impact Flow has on entrepreneurial behaviour. Within entrepreneurship theory and cognitive theories of creativity extensive research has been performed. However, the experience of entrepreneurship itself has had no such treatment. Most authors recognise the role that creativity plays in entrepreneurship, and, within that clai...

  17. Theoretical study and numerical simulation of secondary flow in channels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fort, J.; Halama, J.; Hrusova, M.; Kozel, K. [Technical Univ. Prague (Czech Republic). Dept. of Technical Mathematics; Skvor, M. [Ceska Akademie Ved, Prague (Czech Republic). Inst. of Thermomechanics

    1999-12-01

    Presented work deals with flow in a 3D curved channel of constant curvature and constant rectangular cross-section. Properties of typical secondary flow structures are theoretically studied. Some cases of subsonic flow were simulated numerically by two different finite volume methods. Numerical results are compared with experimental data. (orig.)

  18. Theoretical study and numerical simulation of secondary flow in channels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fort, J.; Halama, J.; Hrusova, M.; Kozel, K. (Technical Univ. Prague (Czech Republic). Dept. of Technical Mathematics); Skvor, M. (Ceska Akademie Ved, Prague (Czech Republic). Inst. of Thermomechanics)

    1999-01-01

    Presented work deals with flow in a 3D curved channel of constant curvature and constant rectangular cross-section. Properties of typical secondary flow structures are theoretically studied. Some cases of subsonic flow were simulated numerically by two different finite volume methods. Numerical results are compared with experimental data. (orig.)

  19. The Fabrication of Flow Field Plates for Direct Methanol Fuel Cell Using Lithography and Radio Frequency Sputtering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Ho; Kao, Mu-Jung; Chen, Chih-Hao; Cho, Kun-Ching; Hsu, Chun-Yao; Chen, Zhi-Lun

    2015-08-01

    This study uses lithography to etch flow fields on a single side of a printed circuit board (PCB) and combines a flow field plate with a collector plate to make innovative anode flow field plates and cathode flow field plates for a direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC). TiO2 thin film is also sputtered on the anode flow field plate using radio frequency (RF) sputtering. The experimental results show that the prepared DMFC has a better maximum power density of 11.928 mW/cm2. Furthermore, when a TiO2 thin film is sputtered on the flow field plate of the assembled DMFC, the maximum power density is 14.426 mW/cm2, which is actually 21% more than that for a DMFC with no TiO2 thin film coated on the flow field plate.

  20. An Imaging Flow Cytometry-based approach to analyse the fission yeast cell cycle in fixed cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patterson, James O; Swaffer, Matthew; Filby, Andrew

    2015-07-01

    Fission yeast (Schizosaccharomyces pombe) is an excellent model organism for studying eukaryotic cell division because many of the underlying principles and key regulators of cell cycle biology are conserved from yeast to humans. As such it can be employed as tool for understanding complex human diseases that arise from dis-regulation in cell cycle controls, including cancers. Conventional Flow Cytometry (CFC) is a high-throughput, multi-parameter, fluorescence-based single cell analysis technology. It is widely used for studying the mammalian cell cycle both in the context of the normal and disease states by measuring changes in DNA content during the transition through G1, S and G2/M using fluorescent DNA-binding dyes. Unfortunately analysis of the fission yeast cell cycle by CFC is not straightforward because, unlike mammalian cells, cytokinesis occurs after S-phase meaning that bi-nucleated G1 cells have the same DNA content as mono-nucleated G2 cells and cannot be distinguished using total integrated fluorescence (pulse area). It has been elegantly shown that the width of the DNA pulse can be used to distinguish G2 cells with a single 2C foci versus G1 cells with two 1C foci, however the accuracy of this measurement is dependent on the orientation of the cell as it traverses the laser beam. To this end we sought to improve the accuracy of the fission yeast cell cycle analysis and have developed an Imaging Flow Cytometry (IFC)-based method that is able to preserve the high throughput, objective analysis afforded by CFC in combination with the spatial and morphometric information provide by microscopy. We have been able to derive an analysis framework for subdividing the yeast cell cycle that is based on intensiometric and morphometric measurements and is thus robust against orientation-based miss-classification. In addition we can employ image-based metrics to define populations of septated/bi-nucleated cells and measure cellular dimensions. To our knowledge

  1. Flowing together : a longitudinal study of collective efficacy and collective flow among workgroups.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Salanova, Marisa; Rodríguez-Sánchez, Alma M.; Schaufeli, Wilmar B.; Cifre, Eva

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study is to extend the Channel Model of Flow (Csikszentmihalyi, 1975, 1990) at the collective level (workgroups) by including collective efficacy beliefs as a predictor of collective flow based on the Social Cognitive Theory (Bandura, 1997, 2001). A two-wave longitudinal lab study

  2. Flow maldistribution in the anode of a polymer electrolyte membrane electrolysis cell employing interdigitated channels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Anders Christian; Kær, Søren Knudsen

    2014-01-01

    In this work a macroscopic, steady-state, three-dimensional, computational fluid dynamics model of the anode of a high-pressure polymer electrolyte membrane electrolysis cell (PEMEC) is presented. The developed model is used for studying the effect of employing an interdigitated, planar-circular ......In this work a macroscopic, steady-state, three-dimensional, computational fluid dynamics model of the anode of a high-pressure polymer electrolyte membrane electrolysis cell (PEMEC) is presented. The developed model is used for studying the effect of employing an interdigitated, planar....... While interdigitated channels have been examined for planar-square cells in detail, less is known for planar-circular cells. To examine the extent of flow maldistribution, a base case is defined and a parameter variation is conducted relative to it. In the study, the following parameters are examined...

  3. Calcium regulates the cell-to-cell water flow pathway in maize roots during variable water conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yan; Liu, Xiaofang; Wang, Weifeng; Zhang, Suiqi; Xu, Bingcheng

    2012-09-01

    Soil water shortages can decrease root hydraulic conductivity and affect Ca uptake and movement through the plant. In this study, the effects of extra Ca(2+) applied in nutrient solution on the hydraulic properties of the whole roots (Lp(r)) and cortical cells (Lp(cell)) of maize (Zea mays L.) subjected to variable water conditions were investigated. Under well-watered conditions, extra Ca(2+) significantly increased the root Ca content, total root length, and lateral root number; however, it reduced the root cortical cell volume, Lp(r), and Lp(cell). Hg(2+) inhibition experiments suggested that extra Ca(2+) could reduce the contribution of the cell-to-cell water flow pathway. Osmotic stress (10% PEG6000) significantly decreased the cortical cell volume, Lp(r), and Lp(cell) in the control plants, but smaller decreases were observed in the extra Ca(2+) plants. The Hg(2+) treatment reduced the Lp(r) larger in the extra Ca(2+) plants (74.6%) than in the control plants (53.2%), suggesting a higher contribution of the cell-to-cell pathway. The larger Hg(2+) inhibition of the Lp(cell) in the extra Ca(2+) roots (67.2%) when compared to the controls (56.4%) indicated that extra Ca(2+) can mitigate the inhibition of aquaporin expression and/or activity levels via osmotic stress. After 2 d of rehydration, the extra Ca(2+) helped the Lp(r) and Lp(cell) to recover almost completely, but these properties only partially recovered in the control plants. In conclusion, extra Ca(2+) may adjust the contribution of cell-to-cell pathway by regulating the expression and/or activity levels of AQPs according to water availability; this regulation may weaken negative effects and optimize water use. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  4. Dynamics of polymers in elongational flow studied by the neutron spin-echo technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rheinstaedter, Maikel C.; Sattler, Rainer; Haeussler, Wolfgang; Wagner, Christian

    2010-01-01

    The nanoscale fluctuation dynamics of semidilute high molecular weight polymer solutions of polyethylenoxide (PEO) in D 2 O under non-equilibrium flow conditions were studied by the neutron spin-echo technique. The sample cell was in contraction flow geometry and provided a pressure driven flow with a high elongational component that stretched the polymers most efficiently. Neutron scattering experiments in dilute polymer solutions are challenging because of the low polymer concentration and corresponding small quasi-elastic signals. A relaxation process with relaxation times of about 10 ps was observed, which shows anisotropic dynamics with applied flow.

  5. Detection of Intracellular Factor VIII Protein in Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells by Flow Cytometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gouri Shankar Pandey

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Flow cytometry is widely used in cancer research for diagnosis, detection of minimal residual disease, as well as immune monitoring and profiling following immunotherapy. Detection of specific host proteins for diagnosis predominantly uses quantitative PCR and western blotting assays. In this study, we optimized a flow cytometry-based detection assay for Factor VIII protein in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs. An indirect intracellular staining (ICS method was standardized using monoclonal antibodies to different domains of human Factor VIII protein. The FVIII protein expression level was estimated by calculating the mean and median fluorescence intensities (MFI values for each monoclonal antibody. ICS staining of transiently transfected cell lines supported the method's specificity. Intracellular FVIII protein expression was also detected by the monoclonal antibodies used in the study in PBMCs of five blood donors. In summary, our data suggest that intracellular FVIII detection in PBMCs of hemophilia A patients can be a rapid and reliable method to detect intracellular FVIII levels.

  6. Cell-scale dynamic recycling and cortical flow of the actin–myosin cytoskeleton for rapid cell migration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shigehiko Yumura

    2012-11-01

    Actin and myosin II play major roles in cell migration. Whereas pseudopod extension by actin polymerization has been intensively researched, less attention has been paid to how the rest of the actin cytoskeleton such as the actin cortex contributes to cell migration. In this study, cortical actin and myosin II filaments were simultaneously observed in migrating Dictyostelium cells under total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy. The cortical actin and myosin II filaments remained stationary with respect to the substratum as the cells advanced. However, fluorescence recovery after photobleaching experiments and direct observation of filaments showed that they rapidly turned over. When the cells were detached from the substratum, the actin and myosin filaments displayed a vigorous retrograde flow. Thus, when the cells migrate on the substratum, the cortical cytoskeleton firmly holds the substratum to generate the motive force instead. The present studies also demonstrate how myosin II localizes to the rear region of the migrating cells. The observed dynamic turnover of actin and myosin II filaments contributes to the recycling of their subunits across the whole cell and enables rapid reorganization of the cytoskeleton.

  7. The Relative Humidity Effect Of The Reactants Flows Into The Cell To Increase PEM Fuel Cell Performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mulyazmi

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Design of the Proton Exchange Membrane (PEM fuel cell system is still developed and improved to achieve performance and efficiency optimal. Improvement of PEM fuel cell performance can be achieved by knowing the effect of system parameters based on thermodynamics on voltage and current density. Many parameters affect the performance of PEM fuel cell, one of which is the relative humidity of the reactants that flow in on the anode and cathode sides. The results of this study show that the increase in relative humidity value on the cathode side (RHC causes a significant increase in current density value when compared to the increase of relative humidity value on the anode side (RHA. The performance of single cells with high values is found in RHC is from 70% to 90%. The maximum current density generated at RHA is 70% and RHC is 90% with PEM operating temperature of 363 K and pressure of 1 atm

  8. Experimental study of flow through compressor Cascade

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satyam Panchal

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this research work is to study the behaviour of flow at the inlet, within the blade passage and at the exit of a compressor cascade. For this purpose, a cascade with six numbers of aerofoil blades was designed and constructed. The cascade was fitted on the cascade test tunnel. Out of six blades two were instrumented for measuring the pressure distribution on the pressure and suction surface. The blades had a parabolic camber line, with a maximum camber position at 40% of the chord from the leading edge of the blade. The profile of the blade was C4, height of the blade was 160 mm, chord length was 80 mm, camber angle was 45° and stagger angle was 30°. Similarly, the length of the cascade was 300 mm, span was 160 mm, pitch was 60 mm, the actual chord of the cascade was 80 mm, the axial chord of the cascade was 70 mm, the stagger angle of the cascade was 30° and the pitch-chord ratio was 0.75. The data was taken and analyzed at −500% of the axial chord before the cascade, −25% of the axial chord before the leading edge, 25%, 50%, 75% and 150% of the axial chord from the leading edge of the blade. The readings were taken from the cascade wall to the mid span position along the pitch wise direction. The angle of incidence was also changed during the experiment and varied from i=−50°, −30°, −10° to 5°.

  9. Photoacoustic-fluorescence in vitro flow cytometry for quantification of absorption, scattering and fluorescence properties of the cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nedosekin, D. A.; Sarimollaoglu, M.; Foster, S.; Galanzha, E. I.; Zharov, V. P.

    2013-03-01

    Fluorescence flow cytometry is a well-established analytical tool that provides quantification of multiple biological parameters of cells at molecular levels, including their functional states, morphology, composition, proliferation, and protein expression. However, only the fluorescence and scattering parameters of the cells or labels are available for detection. Cell pigmentation, presence of non-fluorescent dyes or nanoparticles cannot be reliably quantified. Herewith, we present a novel photoacoustic (PA) flow cytometry design for simple integration of absorbance measurements into schematics of conventional in vitro flow cytometers. The integrated system allow simultaneous measurements of light absorbance, scattering and of multicolor fluorescence from single cells in the flow at rates up to 2 m/s. We compared various combinations of excitation laser sources for multicolor detection, including simultaneous excitation of PA and fluorescence using a single 500 kHz pulsed nanosecond laser. Multichannel detection scheme allows simultaneous detection of up to 8 labels, including 4 fluorescent tags and 4 PA colors. In vitro PA-fluorescence flow cytometer was used for studies of nanoparticles uptake and for the analysis of cell line pigmentation, including genetically encoded melanin expression in breast cancer cell line. We demonstrate that this system can be used for direct nanotoxicity studies with simultaneous quantification of nanoparticles content and assessment of cell viability using a conventional fluorescent apoptosis assays.

  10. Flow cytometric immunophenotyping of adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma using CD3 gating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yokote, Taiji; Akioka, Toshikazu; Oka, Satoko; Hara, Satoshi; Kobayashi, Kichinosuke; Nakajima, Hideto; Yamano, Takeshi; Ikemoto, Toshiyuki; Shimizu, Akira; Tsuji, Motomu; Hanafusa, Toshiaki

    2005-08-01

    Adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATLL) is a lymphoproliferative neoplasm of helper T lymphocytes caused by human T-cell leukemia virus type-1 (HTLV-1). The disease was first described in Kyushu, in southwestern Japan, and most frequently occurs in endemic areas, such as Japan, the Caribbean basin, West Africa, Brazil, and northern Iran. ATLL is essentially a disease of adults, characterized clinically by generalized lymphadenopathy, hepatosplenomegaly, skin lesions, and hypercalcemia. The prognosis of most patients is quite poor, with a median survival time of only 13 months, even if multiagent combination chemotherapy is given. In the present study, flow cytometric immunophenotyping with CD3 gating was performed on 30 samples from 26 patients who had been given a diagnosis of ATLL. The records of these patients also were reviewed retrospectively. In 14 of the 30 samples, an abnormal CD3(low) T-cell population was distinguishable from the normal T-cell populations by flow cytometric analysis. Herein we report a novel strategy for flow cytometric immunophenotyping of ATLL facilitated by CD3(low) gating.

  11. Hydrodynamic forces on a wall-bound leukocyte due to interactions with flowing red cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isfahani, Amir H. G.; Freund, Jonathan B.

    2011-11-01

    As part of both healthy and pathologically physiological mechanisms sphere-like white blood cells (leukocytes) adhere to the walls of small blood vessels. We use quantitative numerical simulations to compare the forces from flowing red blood cells on a wall-adhered leukocyte to a homogenized model of blood at the same flow conditions. We model the highly flexible red blood cells using a fast O (N log N) boundary integral formulation. These elastic membranes deform substantially but strongly resist surface dilatation. They enclose a higher than plasma viscosity hemoglobin solution. The no-slip condition is enforced on the stationary leukocyte as well as the vessel walls. Vessel diameters of 10 to 20 microns are studied. Different hematocrits, leukocyte shapes, and flow conditions are examined. In vessels comparable to the size of the cells, we show that the particulate character of blood significantly affects the magnitude of the forces that the leukocyte experiences, transiently increasing it well above the homogenized-blood prediction: for example, for a tube hematocrit of 25 % and a spherical protrusion with a diameter 0.75 that of the tube, the average forces are increased by about 40 % and the local forces by more than 100 % relative to those expected for a blood model homogenized by its effective viscosity.

  12. Pressure-driven occlusive flow of a confined red blood cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savin, Thierry; Bandi, M M; Mahadevan, L

    2016-01-14

    When red blood cells (RBCs) move through narrow capillaries in the microcirculation, they deform as they flow. In pathophysiological processes such as sickle cell disease and malaria, RBC motion and flow are severely restricted. To understand this threshold of occlusion, we use a combination of experiment and theory to study the motion of a single swollen RBC through a narrow glass capillary of varying inner diameter. By tracking the movement of the squeezed cell as it is driven by a controlled pressure drop, we measure the RBC velocity as a function of the pressure gradient as well as the local capillary diameter, and find that the effective blood viscosity in this regime increases with both decreasing RBC velocity and tube radius by following a power-law that depends upon the length of the confined cell. Our observations are consistent with a simple elasto-hydrodynamic model and highlight the role of lateral confinement in the occluded pressure-driven slow flow of soft confined objects.

  13. Stem cells and fluid flow drive cyst formation in an invertebrate excretory organ.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thi-Kim Vu, Hanh; Rink, Jochen C; McKinney, Sean A; McClain, Melainia; Lakshmanaperumal, Naharajan; Alexander, Richard; Sánchez Alvarado, Alejandro

    2015-06-09

    Cystic kidney diseases (CKDs) affect millions of people worldwide. The defining pathological features are fluid-filled cysts developing from nephric tubules due to defective flow sensing, cell proliferation and differentiation. The underlying molecular mechanisms, however, remain poorly understood, and the derived excretory systems of established invertebrate models (Caenorhabditis elegans and Drosophila melanogaster) are unsuitable to model CKDs. Systematic structure/function comparisons revealed that the combination of ultrafiltration and flow-associated filtrate modification that is central to CKD etiology is remarkably conserved between the planarian excretory system and the vertebrate nephron. Consistently, both RNA-mediated genetic interference (RNAi) of planarian orthologues of human CKD genes and inhibition of tubule flow led to tubular cystogenesis that share many features with vertebrate CKDs, suggesting deep mechanistic conservation. Our results demonstrate a common evolutionary origin of animal excretory systems and establish planarians as a novel and experimentally accessible invertebrate model for the study of human kidney pathologies.

  14. Effects of flow-induced shear stress on limbal epithelial stem cell growth and enrichment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yun Gyeong Kang

    Full Text Available The roles of limbal epithelial stem cells (LESCs are widely recognized, but for these cells to be utilized in basic research and potential clinical applications, researchers must be able to efficiently isolate them and subsequently maintain their stemness in vitro. We aimed to develop a biomimetic environment for LESCs involving cells from their in vivo niche and the principle of flow-induced shear stress, and to subsequently demonstrate the potential of this novel paradigm. LESCs, together with neighboring cells, were isolated from the minced limbal tissues of rabbits. At days 8 and 9 of culture, the cells were exposed to a steady flow or intermittent flow for 2 h per day in a custom-designed bioreactor. The responses of LESCs and epithelial cells were assessed at days 12 and 14. LESCs and epithelial cells responded to both types of flow. Proliferation of LESCs, as assessed using a BrdU assay, was increased to a greater extent under steady flow conditions. Holoclones were found under intermittent flow, indicating that differentiation into transient amplifying cells had occurred. Immunofluorescent staining of Bmi-1 suggested that steady flow has a positive effect on the maintenance of stemness. This finding was confirmed by real-time PCR. Notch-1 and p63 were more sensitive to intermittent flow, but this effect was transient. K3 and K12 expression, indicative of differentiation of LESCs into epithelial cells, was induced by flow and lasted longer under intermittent flow conditions. In summary, culture of LESCs in a bioreactor under a steady flow paradigm, rather than one of intermittent flow, is beneficial for both increasing proliferation and maintaining stemness. Conversely, intermittent flow appears to induce differentiation of LESCs. This novel experimental method introduces micro-mechanical stimuli to traditional culture techniques, and has potential for regulating the proliferation and differentiation of LESCs in vitro, thereby

  15. Effects of flow-induced shear stress on limbal epithelial stem cell growth and enrichment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Yun Gyeong; Shin, Ji Won; Park, So Hee; Oh, Min-Jae; Park, Hyo Soon; Shin, Jung-Woog; Kim, Su-Hyang

    2014-01-01

    The roles of limbal epithelial stem cells (LESCs) are widely recognized, but for these cells to be utilized in basic research and potential clinical applications, researchers must be able to efficiently isolate them and subsequently maintain their stemness in vitro. We aimed to develop a biomimetic environment for LESCs involving cells from their in vivo niche and the principle of flow-induced shear stress, and to subsequently demonstrate the potential of this novel paradigm. LESCs, together with neighboring cells, were isolated from the minced limbal tissues of rabbits. At days 8 and 9 of culture, the cells were exposed to a steady flow or intermittent flow for 2 h per day in a custom-designed bioreactor. The responses of LESCs and epithelial cells were assessed at days 12 and 14. LESCs and epithelial cells responded to both types of flow. Proliferation of LESCs, as assessed using a BrdU assay, was increased to a greater extent under steady flow conditions. Holoclones were found under intermittent flow, indicating that differentiation into transient amplifying cells had occurred. Immunofluorescent staining of Bmi-1 suggested that steady flow has a positive effect on the maintenance of stemness. This finding was confirmed by real-time PCR. Notch-1 and p63 were more sensitive to intermittent flow, but this effect was transient. K3 and K12 expression, indicative of differentiation of LESCs into epithelial cells, was induced by flow and lasted longer under intermittent flow conditions. In summary, culture of LESCs in a bioreactor under a steady flow paradigm, rather than one of intermittent flow, is beneficial for both increasing proliferation and maintaining stemness. Conversely, intermittent flow appears to induce differentiation of LESCs. This novel experimental method introduces micro-mechanical stimuli to traditional culture techniques, and has potential for regulating the proliferation and differentiation of LESCs in vitro, thereby facilitating research in this

  16. Glycocalyx Degradation Induces a Proinflammatory Phenotype and Increased Leukocyte Adhesion in Cultured Endothelial Cells under Flow.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karli K McDonald

    Full Text Available Leukocyte adhesion to the endothelium is an early step in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. Effective adhesion requires the binding of leukocytes to their cognate receptors on the surface of endothelial cells. The glycocalyx covers the surface of endothelial cells and is important in the mechanotransduction of shear stress. This study aimed to identify the molecular mechanisms underlying the role of the glycocalyx in leukocyte adhesion under flow. We performed experiments using 3-D cell culture models, exposing human abdominal aortic endothelial cells to steady laminar shear stress (10 dynes/cm2 for 24 hours. We found that with the enzymatic degradation of the glycocalyx, endothelial cells developed a proinflammatory phenotype when exposed to uniform steady shear stress leading to an increase in leukocyte adhesion. Our results show an up-regulation of ICAM-1 with degradation compared to non-degraded controls (3-fold increase, p<0.05 and we attribute this effect to a de-regulation in NF-κB activity in response to flow. These results suggest that the glycocalyx is not solely a physical barrier to adhesion but rather plays an important role in governing the phenotype of endothelial cells, a key determinant in leukocyte adhesion. We provide evidence for how the destabilization of this structure may be an early and defining feature in the initiation of atherosclerosis.

  17. Localized Modeling of Biochemical and Flow Interactions during Cancer Cell Adhesion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julie Behr

    Full Text Available This work focuses on one component of a larger research effort to develop a simulation tool to model populations of flowing cells. Specifically, in this study a local model of the biochemical interactions between circulating melanoma tumor cells (TC and substrate adherent polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMN is developed. This model provides realistic three-dimensional distributions of bond formation and attendant attraction and repulsion forces that are consistent with the time dependent Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD framework of the full system model which accounts local pressure, shear and repulsion forces. The resulting full dynamics model enables exploration of TC adhesion to adherent PMNs, which is a known participating mechanism in melanoma cell metastasis. The model defines the adhesion molecules present on the TC and PMN cell surfaces, and calculates their interactions as the melanoma cell flows past the PMN. Biochemical rates of reactions between individual molecules are determined based on their local properties. The melanoma cell in the model expresses ICAM-1 molecules on its surface, and the PMN expresses the β-2 integrins LFA-1 and Mac-1. In this work the PMN is fixed to the substrate and is assumed fully rigid and of a prescribed shear-rate dependent shape obtained from micro-PIV experiments. The melanoma cell is transported with full six-degrees-of-freedom dynamics. Adhesion models, which represent the ability of molecules to bond and adhere the cells to each other, and repulsion models, which represent the various physical mechanisms of cellular repulsion, are incorporated with the CFD solver. All models are general enough to allow for future extensions, including arbitrary adhesion molecule types, and the ability to redefine the values of parameters to represent various cell types. The model presented in this study will be part of a clinical tool for development of personalized medical treatment programs.

  18. Localized Modeling of Biochemical and Flow Interactions during Cancer Cell Adhesion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behr, Julie; Gaskin, Byron; Fu, Changliang; Dong, Cheng; Kunz, Robert

    2015-01-01

    This work focuses on one component of a larger research effort to develop a simulation tool to model populations of flowing cells. Specifically, in this study a local model of the biochemical interactions between circulating melanoma tumor cells (TC) and substrate adherent polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMN) is developed. This model provides realistic three-dimensional distributions of bond formation and attendant attraction and repulsion forces that are consistent with the time dependent Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) framework of the full system model which accounts local pressure, shear and repulsion forces. The resulting full dynamics model enables exploration of TC adhesion to adherent PMNs, which is a known participating mechanism in melanoma cell metastasis. The model defines the adhesion molecules present on the TC and PMN cell surfaces, and calculates their interactions as the melanoma cell flows past the PMN. Biochemical rates of reactions between individual molecules are determined based on their local properties. The melanoma cell in the model expresses ICAM-1 molecules on its surface, and the PMN expresses the β-2 integrins LFA-1 and Mac-1. In this work the PMN is fixed to the substrate and is assumed fully rigid and of a prescribed shear-rate dependent shape obtained from micro-PIV experiments. The melanoma cell is transported with full six-degrees-of-freedom dynamics. Adhesion models, which represent the ability of molecules to bond and adhere the cells to each other, and repulsion models, which represent the various physical mechanisms of cellular repulsion, are incorporated with the CFD solver. All models are general enough to allow for future extensions, including arbitrary adhesion molecule types, and the ability to redefine the values of parameters to represent various cell types. The model presented in this study will be part of a clinical tool for development of personalized medical treatment programs.

  19. Effects of Flowing RBCs on Adhesion of a Circulating Tumor Cell in Microvessels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, L.L.; Liu, Y.; Chen, S.; Fu, B.M.

    2016-01-01

    Adhesion of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) to the microvessel wall largely depends on the blood hydrodynamic conditions, one of which is the blood viscosity. Since blood is a non-Newtonian fluid, whose viscosity increases with hematocrit, in the microvessels at low shear rate. In this study, the effects of hematocrit, vessel size, flow rate and red blood cells (RBCs) aggregation on adhesion of a CTC in the microvessels were numerically investigated using dissipative particle dynamics. The membrane of cells was represented by a spring-based network connected by elastic springs to characterize its deformation. RBCs aggregation was modelled by a Morse potential function based on depletion-mediated assumption and the adhesion of the CTC to the vessel wall was achieved by the interactions between receptors and ligands at the CTC and those at the endothelial cells forming the vessel wall. The results demonstrated that in the microvessel of 15μm diameter, the CTC has an increasing probability of adhesion with the hematocrit due to a growing wall-directed force, resulting in a larger number of receptor-ligand bonds formed on the cell surface. However, with the increase in microvessel size, an enhanced lift force at higher hematocrit detaches the initial adherent CTC quickly. If the microvessel is comparable to the CTC in diameter, CTC adhesion is independent of Hct. In addition, the velocity of CTC is larger than the average blood flow velocity in smaller microvessels and the relative velocity of CTC decreases with the increase in microvessel size. An increased blood flow resistance in the presence of CTC was also found. Moreover, it was found that the large deformation induced by high flow rate and the presence of aggregation promote the adhesion of CTC. PMID:27738841

  20. A flow cytometric method for characterization of circulating cell-derived microparticles in plasma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morten Hjuler Nielsen

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Background and aim: Previous studies on circulating microparticles (MPs indicate that the majority of MPs are of a size below the detection limit of most standard flow cytometers. The objective of the present study was to establish a method to analyze MP subpopulations above the threshold of detection of a new generation BD FACSAria™ III digital flow cytometer. Methods: We analyzed MP subpopulations in plasma from 24 healthy individuals (9 males and 15 females. MPs were identified according to their size (<1.0-µm, by Lactadherin-FITC labelling, and by exposure of cell-specific markers. The sensitivity of the flow cytometer was tested against that of a previous-generation instrument FC500. Reproducibility of the FACSAria and our set-up was investigated, and the percentage of phosphatidylserine (PS exposing MPs binding Lactadherin was determined. Results: By using a flow cytometric approach we identified and quantitated MPs derived from platelets, monocytes, erythrocytes and endothelial cells. In addition, levels of tissue factor-positive MPs were determined. The FACSAria demonstrated improved sensitivity and increased MP detection range compared to the FC500 instrument. The reproducibility of PS+PMP and PS+MP measurements was 11.7 and 23.2%, respectively. When expressed as a percentage of total MPs, the PS-positive MP population represented 15.1±5.5%, and PS-positive MPs were significantly increased in men. Conclusion: We have established a method to measure MPs above the detection limit of a new generation flow cytometer and derived from a number of cell-types in a healthy population of men and women.

  1. Development of a flow method for the determination of phosphate in estuarine and freshwaters-Comparison of flow cells in spectrophotometric sequential injection analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mesquita, Raquel B.R. [CBQF/Escola Superior de Biotecnologia, Universidade Catolica Portuguesa, R. Dr. Antonio Bernardino de Almeida, 4200-072 Porto (Portugal); Laboratory of Hydrobiology, Institute of Biomedical Sciences Abel Salazar (ICBAS) and Institute of Marine Research (CIIMAR), Universidade do Porto, Lg. Abel Salazar 2, 4099-003 Porto (Portugal); Ferreira, M. Teresa S.O.B. [CBQF/Escola Superior de Biotecnologia, Universidade Catolica Portuguesa, R. Dr. Antonio Bernardino de Almeida, 4200-072 Porto (Portugal); Toth, Ildiko V. [REQUIMTE, Departamento de Quimica, Faculdade de Farmacia, Universidade de Porto, Rua Anibal Cunha, 164, 4050-047 Porto (Portugal); Bordalo, Adriano A. [Laboratory of Hydrobiology, Institute of Biomedical Sciences Abel Salazar (ICBAS) and Institute of Marine Research (CIIMAR), Universidade do Porto, Lg. Abel Salazar 2, 4099-003 Porto (Portugal); McKelvie, Ian D. [School of Chemistry, University of Melbourne, Victoria 3010 (Australia); Rangel, Antonio O.S.S., E-mail: aorangel@esb.ucp.pt [CBQF/Escola Superior de Biotecnologia, Universidade Catolica Portuguesa, R. Dr. Antonio Bernardino de Almeida, 4200-072 Porto (Portugal)

    2011-09-02

    Highlights: {yields} Sequential injection determination of phosphate in estuarine and freshwaters. {yields} Alternative spectrophotometric flow cells are compared. {yields} Minimization of schlieren effect was assessed. {yields} Proposed method can cope with wide salinity ranges. {yields} Multi-reflective cell shows clear advantages. - Abstract: A sequential injection system with dual analytical line was developed and applied in the comparison of two different detection systems viz; a conventional spectrophotometer with a commercial flow cell, and a multi-reflective flow cell coupled with a photometric detector under the same experimental conditions. The study was based on the spectrophotometric determination of phosphate using the molybdenum-blue chemistry. The two alternative flow cells were compared in terms of their response to variation of sample salinity, susceptibility to interferences and to refractive index changes. The developed method was applied to the determination of phosphate in natural waters (estuarine, river, well and ground waters). The achieved detection limit (0.007 {mu}M PO{sub 4}{sup 3-}) is consistent with the requirement of the target water samples, and a wide quantification range (0.024-9.5 {mu}M) was achieved using both detection systems.

  2. Development of a flow method for the determination of phosphate in estuarine and freshwaters-Comparison of flow cells in spectrophotometric sequential injection analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mesquita, Raquel B.R.; Ferreira, M. Teresa S.O.B.; Toth, Ildiko V.; Bordalo, Adriano A.; McKelvie, Ian D.; Rangel, Antonio O.S.S.

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → Sequential injection determination of phosphate in estuarine and freshwaters. → Alternative spectrophotometric flow cells are compared. → Minimization of schlieren effect was assessed. → Proposed method can cope with wide salinity ranges. → Multi-reflective cell shows clear advantages. - Abstract: A sequential injection system with dual analytical line was developed and applied in the comparison of two different detection systems viz; a conventional spectrophotometer with a commercial flow cell, and a multi-reflective flow cell coupled with a photometric detector under the same experimental conditions. The study was based on the spectrophotometric determination of phosphate using the molybdenum-blue chemistry. The two alternative flow cells were compared in terms of their response to variation of sample salinity, susceptibility to interferences and to refractive index changes. The developed method was applied to the determination of phosphate in natural waters (estuarine, river, well and ground waters). The achieved detection limit (0.007 μM PO 4 3- ) is consistent with the requirement of the target water samples, and a wide quantification range (0.024-9.5 μM) was achieved using both detection systems.

  3. Flow manipulation and cell immobilization for biochemical applications using thermally responsive fluids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haraksingh Thilsted, Anil; Bazargan, Vahid; Piggott, Nina; Measday, Vivien; Stoeber, Boris

    2012-01-01

    A flow redirection and single cell immobilization method in a microfluidic chip is presented. Microheaters generated localized heating and induced poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) phase transition, creating a hydrogel that blocked a channel or immobilized a single cell. The heaters were activated in sets to redirect flow and exchange the fluid in which an immobilized cell was immersed. A yeast cell was immobilized in hydrogel and a 4',6-diamidino-2-phenylindole (DAPI) fluorescent stain was introduced using flow redirection. DAPI diffused through the hydrogel and fluorescently labelled the yeast DNA, demonstrating in situ single cell biochemistry by means of immobilization and fluid exchange.

  4. New Method to Disaggregate and Analyze Single Isolated Helminthes Cells Using Flow Cytometry: Proof of Concept

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen Nava-Castro

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In parasitology, particularly in helminthes studies, several methods have been used to look for the expression of specific molecules, such as RT-PCR, western blot, 2D-electrophoresis, and microscopy, among others. However, these methods require homogenization of the whole helminth parasite, preventing evaluation of individual cells or specific cell types in a given parasite tissue or organ. Also, the extremely high interaction between helminthes and host cells (particularly immune cells is an important point to be considered. It is really hard to obtain fresh parasites without host cell contamination. Then, it becomes crucial to determine that the analyzed proteins are exclusively from parasitic origin, and not a consequence of host cell contamination. Flow cytometry is a fluorescence-based technique used to evaluate the expression of extra-and intracellular proteins in different type cells, including protozoan parasites. It also allows the isolation and recovery of single-cell populations. Here, we describe a method to isolate and obtain purified helminthes cells.

  5. Characterizing dynamic hysteresis and fractal statistics of chaotic two-phase flow and application to fuel cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burkholder, Michael B.; Litster, Shawn, E-mail: litster@andrew.cmu.edu [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15213 (United States)

    2016-05-15

    In this study, we analyze the stability of two-phase flow regimes and their transitions using chaotic and fractal statistics, and we report new measurements of dynamic two-phase pressure drop hysteresis that is related to flow regime stability and channel water content. Two-phase flow dynamics are relevant to a variety of real-world systems, and quantifying transient two-phase flow phenomena is important for efficient design. We recorded two-phase (air and water) pressure drops and flow images in a microchannel under both steady and transient conditions. Using Lyapunov exponents and Hurst exponents to characterize the steady-state pressure fluctuations, we develop a new, measurable regime identification criteria based on the dynamic stability of the two-phase pressure signal. We also applied a new experimental technique by continuously cycling the air flow rate to study dynamic hysteresis in two-phase pressure drops, which is separate from steady-state hysteresis and can be used to understand two-phase flow development time scales. Using recorded images of the two-phase flow, we show that the capacitive dynamic hysteresis is related to channel water content and flow regime stability. The mixed-wettability microchannel and in-channel water introduction used in this study simulate a polymer electrolyte fuel cell cathode air flow channel.

  6. Numerical and Experimental Study of Pump Sump Flows

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei-Liang Chuang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The present study analyzes pump sump flows with various discharges and gate submergence. Investigations using a three-dimensional large eddy simulation model and an acoustic Doppler velocimeter are performed. Flow patterns and velocity profiles in the approaching flow are shown to describe the flow features caused by various discharges and gate submergence. The variation of a large-scale spanwise vortex behind a sluice gate is examined and discussed. The suction effect on approaching flow near the pipe column is examined using numerical modeling. To gain more understanding of the vortices variation, a comparison between time-averaged and instantaneous flow patterns is numerically conducted. Additionally, swirl angle, a widely used index for evaluating pump efficiency, is experimentally and numerically examined under various flow conditions. The results indicate that the pump becomes less efficient with increasing discharge and gate submergence. The fluctuation of the free surface over the pump sump is also discussed.

  7. Wind flow around a church - Case study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamińska-Gadomska, Paulina; Lipecki, Tomasz; Podgórski, Jerzy

    2018-01-01

    The paper presents results of CFD analysis performed to check the influence of wind action on a bell tower of a church. The geometry of the structure is quite complex therefore it is very hard to calculate wind load basing only on codes recommendations. The modelled geometry contains whole structure of the church including the bell tower. Results presented in this paper are focused on co-called "Venturi-effect" represented by the flow around the bell tower. CFD simulations were performed for two inflow wind directions of opposite senses. This led to two cases of converging and diverging walls of the bell tower in relation to the wind flow direction. Such analysis was performed to check if the wind speed increases between the walls of the bell tower.

  8. Regional blood flow studies with radioisotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holman, B.L.; McNiel, B.J.; Adelstein, S.J.

    1975-01-01

    The methodological approaches to blood flow analysis include (1) diffusible indicator methods, (2) clearance techniques and (3) nondiffusible indicator methods. In each case, accurate measurements of blood flow can be obtained by developing mathematical models which relate the time-dependent observation derived from following the fate of a radiotracer as a function of time to the physiological process itself. Application of these models to biological systems involves constraints and necessitates compromises which may affect the validity of the measurements. Nevertheless, when these techniques are carefully applied and adequately validated, they have provided critical physiological information about such organ systems as the brain and kidney and promise to provide diagnostic information in patients with suspected coronary and peripheral vascular disease

  9. Laser flow microphotometry for rapid analysis and sorting of mammalian cells. [X and gamma radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mullaney, P.F.; Steinkamp, J.A.; Crissman, H.A.; Cram, L.S.; Crowell, J.M.; Salzman, G.C.; Martin, J.C.; Price, B.

    1976-01-01

    Quantitative precision measurements can be made of the optical properties of individual mammalian cells using flow microphotometry. Suspended cells pass through a special flow chamber where they are lined up for exposure to blue light from an argon-ion laser. As each cell crosses the laser beam, it produces one or more optical pulses of a duration equal to cell transit time across the beam. These pulses are detected, amplified, and analyzed using the techniques of gamma ray spectroscopy. Quantitative DNA distributions made it possible to distinguish tumor cells from normal cells as well as to assay for radiation effects on tumor cells subjected to x and gamma radiation. (HLW)

  10. Bone tissue engineering using human mesenchymal stem cells: effects of scaffold material and medium flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meinel, Lorenz; Karageorgiou, Vassilis; Fajardo, Robert; Snyder, Brian; Shinde-Patil, Vivek; Zichner, Ludwig; Kaplan, David; Langer, Robert; Vunjak-Novakovic, Gordana

    2004-01-01

    We report studies of bone tissue engineering using human mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), a protein substrate (film or scaffold; fast degrading unmodified collagen, or slowly degrading cross-linked collagen and silk), and a bioreactor (static culture, spinner flask, or perfused cartridge). MSCs were isolated from human bone marrow, characterized for the expression of cell surface markers and the ability to undergo chondrogenesis and osteogenesis in vitro, and cultured for 5 weeks. MSCs were positive for CD105/endoglin, and had a potential for chondrogenic and osteogenic differentiation. In static culture, calcium deposition was similar for MSC grown on collagen scaffolds and films. Under medium flow, MSC on collagen scaffolds deposited more calcium and had a higher alcaline phosphatase (AP) activity than MSC on collagen films. The amounts of DNA were markedly higher in constructs based on slowly degrading (modified collagen and silk) scaffolds than on fast degrading (unmodified collagen) scaffolds. In spinner flasks, medium flow around constructs resulted in the formation of bone rods within the peripheral region, that were interconnected and perpendicular to the construct surface, whereas in perfused constructs, individual bone rods oriented in the direction of fluid flow formed throughout the construct volume. These results suggest that osteogenesis in cultured MSC can be modulated by scaffold properties and flow environment.

  11. Factors Released from Endothelial Cells Exposed to Flow Impact Adhesion, Proliferation, and Fate Choice in the Adult Neural Stem Cell Lineage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumont, Courtney M; Piselli, Jennifer M; Kazi, Nadeem; Bowman, Evan; Li, Guoyun; Linhardt, Robert J; Temple, Sally; Dai, Guohao; Thompson, Deanna M

    2017-08-15

    The microvasculature within the neural stem cell (NSC) niche promotes self-renewal and regulates lineage progression. Previous work identified endothelial-produced soluble factors as key regulators of neural progenitor cell (NPC) fate and proliferation; however, endothelial cells (ECs) are sensitive to local hemodynamics, and the effect of this key physiological process has not been defined. In this study, we evaluated adult mouse NPC response to soluble factors isolated from static or dynamic (flow) EC cultures. Endothelial factors generated under dynamic conditions significantly increased neuronal differentiation, while those released under static conditions stimulated oligodendrocyte differentiation. Flow increases EC release of neurogenic factors and of heparin sulfate glycosaminoglycans that increase their bioactivity, likely underlying the enhanced neuronal differentiation. Additionally, endothelial factors, especially from static conditions, promoted adherent growth. Together, our data suggest that blood flow may impact proliferation, adhesion, and the neuron-glial fate choice of adult NPCs, with implications for diseases and aging that reduce flow.

  12. Circulating tumor cells: clinically relevant molecular access based on a novel CTC flow cell.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessamine P Winer-Jones

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Contemporary cancer diagnostics are becoming increasing reliant upon sophisticated new molecular methods for analyzing genetic information. Limiting the scope of these new technologies is the lack of adequate solid tumor tissue samples. Patients may present with tumors that are not accessible to biopsy or adequate for longitudinal monitoring. One attractive alternate source is cancer cells in the peripheral blood. These rare circulating tumor cells (CTC require enrichment and isolation before molecular analysis can be performed. Current CTC platforms lack either the throughput or reliability to use in a clinical setting or they provide CTC samples at purities that restrict molecular access by limiting the molecular tools available. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Recent advances in magetophoresis and microfluidics have been employed to produce an automated platform called LiquidBiopsy®. This platform uses high throughput sheath flow microfluidics for the positive selection of CTC populations. Furthermore the platform quantitatively isolates cells useful for molecular methods such as detection of mutations. CTC recovery was characterized and validated with an accuracy (<20% error and a precision (CV<25% down to at least 9 CTC/ml. Using anti-EpCAM antibodies as the capture agent, the platform recovers 78% of MCF7 cells within the linear range. Non specific recovery of background cells is independent of target cell density and averages 55 cells/mL. 10% purity can be achieved with as low as 6 CTCs/mL and better than 1% purity can be achieved with 1 CTC/mL. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The LiquidBiopsy platform is an automated validated platform that provides high throughput molecular access to the CTC population. It can be validated and integrated into the lab flow enabling CTC enumeration as well as recovery of consistently high purity samples for molecular analysis such as quantitative PCR and Next Generation Sequencing. This tool opens

  13. A flow-through cell with integrated coulometric pH actuator

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bohm, S.; Olthuis, Wouter; Bergveld, Piet

    1998-01-01

    A flow-through cell with integrated coulometric actuator capable of controlling the pH of a flowing liquid is presented. The cell, consisting of a rectangular channel with a noble metal actuator electrode deposited on the bottom, enables the titration of a moving liquid without the need for pumps

  14. Differentiation of HL-60 promyelocytic leukemia cells monitored by flow cytometric measurement of nitro blue tetrazolium (NBT) reduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blair, O C; Carbone, R; Sartorelli, A C

    1985-01-01

    Reduction of nitro blue tetrazolium (NBT) to insoluble blue formazan granules occurs during the stimulus-induced respiratory burst of mature granulocytes and is routinely used as an indicator of the extent of granulocytic differentiation of HL-60 acute promyelocytic leukemia cells. In the present study, the differentiation of HL-60 leukemia cells induced by dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO) or retinoic acid was monitored by flow cytometric (FCM) measurement of forward and 90 degree light scatter of NBT treated cells. Two-parameter correlated analysis permitted a distinction between cells with increased forward and decreased 90 degree light scatter (NBT-), and cells with decreased forward and increased 90 degree light scatter (NBT+). Fixation of NBT treated cells with 1% paraformaldehyde facilitated flow cytometric analysis, and allowed differences in NBT reduction to be quantitated. DMSO-induced cells expressed an all-or-none reduction of NBT to formazan, compared with retinoic acid treated cells that exhibited a graded response. Three parameter flow cytometric analysis of HL-60 leukemia cells stained with propidium iodide in combination with NBT allowed the determination of the cell cycle distribution of NBT-treated cells.

  15. CELL RESPIRATION STUDIES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daland, Geneva A.; Isaacs, Raphael

    1927-01-01

    1. The oxygen consumption of blood of normal individuals, when the hemoglobin is saturated with oxygen, is practically zero within the limits of experimental error of the microspirometer used. 2. The oxygen consumed in a microspirometer by the blood of patients with chronic myelogenous leucemia with a high white blood cell count, and of one with leucocytosis from sepsis, was proportional to the number of adult polymorphonuclear neutrophils in the blood. 3. No correlation could be made between the rate of oxygen absorption and the total number of white blood cells in the blood, or the total number of immature cells, or the number of red blood cells, or the amount of oxyhemoglobin. 4. The blood of patients with chronic myelogenous leucemia continued to use oxygen in the microspirometer longer than that of normal individuals, and the hemoglobin, in the leucemic bloods, became desaturated even though exposed to air. 5. In blood in which the bulk. of the cells were immature and the mature cells few, the oxygen consumption was lower than in blood in which the mature cells predominated. The rate of oxygen consumption of the immature cells was relatively low as compared to the mature. 6. The slower rate of oxygen absorption by the immature leucocytes in chronic myelogenous leucemia as compared to the mature cells, places them, in accord with Warburg's reports, in the class of the malignant tissues in this respect rather than in the group of young or embryonic cells. PMID:19869329

  16. Analysis of cell flow and cell loss following X-irradiation using sequential investigation of the total number of cells in the various parts of the cell cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skog, S.; Tribukait, B.

    1985-01-01

    The cell flow and cell loss of an in vivo growing Ehrlich ascites tumour were calculated by sequential estimation of changes in total number of cells in the cell cycle compartments. Normal growth was compared with the grossly disturbed cell flow evident after a 5 Gy X-irradiation. The doubling time of normal, exponentially growing cells was 24 hr. The generation time was 21 hr and the potential doubling time was 21 hr. Thus, the growth fraction was 1.0 and the cell loss rate about 0.5%/hr. Following irradiation, a transiently increased relative outflow rate from all cell cycle compartments was found at about 3 and 40 hr, and from S phase at 24 hr after irradiation. Increase in cell loss as well as non-viable cells was observed at 24 hr after irradiation at the time of release of the irradiation-induced G 2 blockage. The experiments show the applicability and limitations of cell flow and cell loss calculations by sequential analysis of the total number of cells in the various parts of the cell cycle. (author)

  17. Milking procedures, milk flow curves and somatic cell count in dairy cows

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Zanini

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Recent availability of electronic mobile milk flow meters allows to study in details milk flow patterns during milking. A normal milk flow profile is characterized by an incline phase, with increasing milk flow, a plateau phase, with steady milk flow, and a decline phase. In these phases milk flow is influenced by many factors: genetic characteristics of the cows, regulation of milking machine and milking routine.

  18. Experimental and spectroscopic study of flow actuation phenomena using DC discharge at a Mach 3 flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, J.; Narayanaswamy, V.; Raja, L.; Clemens, N.

    2006-10-01

    A study of flow actuation phenomena of DC discharge will be presented. An array of pin-like electrodes is flush mounted on a co-planar ceramic actuator that is inserted in the test section. The different discharge structures -- diffuse, constricted, and mixed mode -- are observed in the presence of a flow. A discernable actuation, as visualized by schlieren imaging, is achieved by diffuse discharge, whereas the constricted discharge does not show detectable flow perturbation at the same current. The flow actuation in the form of an induced oblique shock occurs within one frame of laser schlieren imaging at 4.5 kHz. Rotational (gas) and vibrational temperatures are measured by fitting spectra of N2 and N2+ bands near 365-395 nm. Electronic temperatures are measured using Boltzmann plot of Fe (I) lines. Gas temperatures of diffuse discharges drop from ˜1500 K to ˜500 K in the presence of a flow while vibrational and electronic temperatures remain almost the same at ˜3000 K and ˜1.25 eV, respectively. Gas temperatures of constricted discharge are found to be similar with diffuse discharge whereas only diffuse discharge shows an actuation. An examination of spatial extent of the plasma reveals that the diffuse discharge occupies a larger region of the flow than the constricted discharge. This indicates that the flow actuation is dependent on flow dilatation which is governed by temperature rise as well as the spatial extent over which the temperature rise is observed.

  19. A key inactivation factor of HeLa cell viability by a plasma flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Takehiko; Yokoyama, Mayo; Johkura, Kohei

    2011-09-01

    Recently, a plasma flow has been applied to medical treatment using effects of various kinds of stimuli such as chemical species, charged particles, heat, light, shock wave and electric fields. Among them, the chemical species are known to cause an inactivation of cell viability. However, the mechanisms and key factors of this event are not yet clear. In this study, we focused on the effect of H2O2 in plasma-treated culture medium because it is generated in the culture medium and it is also chemically stable compared with free radicals generated by the plasma flow. To elucidate the significance of H2O2, we assessed the differences in the effects of plasma-treated medium and H2O2-added medium against inactivation of HeLa cell viability. These two media showed comparable effects on HeLa cells in terms of the survival ratios, morphological features of damage processes, permeations of H2O2 into the cells, response to H2O2 decomposition by catalase and comprehensive gene expression. The results supported that among chemical species generated in a plasma-treated culture medium, H2O2 is one of the main factors responsible for inactivation of HeLa cell viability.

  20. A key inactivation factor of HeLa cell viability by a plasma flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sato, Takehiko; Yokoyama, Mayo [Institute of Fluid Science, Tohoku University, 2-1-1 Katahira, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan); Johkura, Kohei, E-mail: sato@ifs.tohoku.ac.jp [Department of Histology and Embryology, Shinshu University School of Medicine, 3-1-1 Asahi, Matsumoto 390-8621 (Japan)

    2011-09-21

    Recently, a plasma flow has been applied to medical treatment using effects of various kinds of stimuli such as chemical species, charged particles, heat, light, shock wave and electric fields. Among them, the chemical species are known to cause an inactivation of cell viability. However, the mechanisms and key factors of this event are not yet clear. In this study, we focused on the effect of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} in plasma-treated culture medium because it is generated in the culture medium and it is also chemically stable compared with free radicals generated by the plasma flow. To elucidate the significance of H{sub 2}O{sub 2}, we assessed the differences in the effects of plasma-treated medium and H{sub 2}O{sub 2}-added medium against inactivation of HeLa cell viability. These two media showed comparable effects on HeLa cells in terms of the survival ratios, morphological features of damage processes, permeations of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} into the cells, response to H{sub 2}O{sub 2} decomposition by catalase and comprehensive gene expression. The results supported that among chemical species generated in a plasma-treated culture medium, H{sub 2}O{sub 2} is one of the main factors responsible for inactivation of HeLa cell viability. (fast track communication)

  1. A Study of Laminar Backward-Facing Step Flow

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Davidson, Lars; Nielsen, Peter V.

    The laminar flow for a backwards facing step is studied. This work was initially part of the work presented in. In that work low-Reynolds number effects was studied, and the plan was also to include laminar flow. However, it turned out that when the numerical predictions of the laminar flow (Re......= 118) was compared to the experiments of Restivo , we found a large discrepancy. We believe that there is something wrong in that experimental investigation. To support that conclusion, we present in this report prediction of other backward facing flow configurations, where we show that our predictions...

  2. Two problems in multiphase biological flows: Blood flow and particulate transport in microvascular network, and pseudopod-driven motility of amoeboid cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagchi, Prosenjit

    2016-11-01

    In this talk, two problems in multiphase biological flows will be discussed. The first is the direct numerical simulation of whole blood and drug particulates in microvascular networks. Blood in microcirculation behaves as a dense suspension of heterogeneous cells. The erythrocytes are extremely deformable, while inactivated platelets and leukocytes are nearly rigid. A significant progress has been made in recent years in modeling blood as a dense cellular suspension. However, many of these studies considered the blood flow in simple geometry, e.g., straight tubes of uniform cross-section. In contrast, the architecture of a microvascular network is very complex with bifurcating, merging and winding vessels, posing a further challenge to numerical modeling. We have developed an immersed-boundary-based method that can consider blood cell flow in physiologically realistic and complex microvascular network. In addition to addressing many physiological issues related to network hemodynamics, this tool can be used to optimize the transport properties of drug particulates for effective organ-specific delivery. Our second problem is pseudopod-driven motility as often observed in metastatic cancer cells and other amoeboid cells. We have developed a multiscale hydrodynamic model to simulate such motility. We study the effect of cell stiffness on motility as the former has been considered as a biomarker for metastatic potential. Funded by the National Science Foundation.

  3. COMPUTATIONAL STUDY OF THE UNSTEADY FLOW STRUCTURES AROUND TWO VEHICLES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    TUTUNEA Dragos

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available In this paper an experimental method for the investigations of flow structures encountered by automobiles was performed on two different vehicles. Currently are two methods to measure the drag, the first is to simulate the air flow with computational fluid dynamics and the second is to use a wind tunnel. Two cars were modeled to observe and track the flow structure around the bodies. This computational research will be used as an inexpensive experimental method to study the phenomenon of air flow in automotive industry.

  4. Dual excitation multi-fluorescence flow cytometry for detailed analyses of viability and apoptotic cell transition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G Mazzini

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available The discrimination of live/dead cells as well as the detection of apoptosis is a frequent need in many areas of experimental biology. Cell proliferation is linked to apoptosis and controlled by several genes. During the cell life, specific events can stimulate proliferation while others may trigger the apoptotic pathway. Very few methods (i.e. TUNEL are now available for studies aimed at correlation between apoptosis and proliferation. Therefore, there is interest in developing new methodological approaches that are able to correlate apoptosis to the cell cycle phases. Recently new approaches have been proposed to detect and enumerate apoptotic cells by flow cytometry. Among these, the most established and applied are those based on the cell membrane modifications induced in the early phases of the apoptotic process. The dye pair Hoechst 33342 (HO and Propidium Iodide (PI, thanks to their peculiar characteristics to be respectively permeable and impermeable to the intact cell membrane, seems to be very useful. Unfortunately the spectral interaction of these dyes generates a consistent “energy transfer” from HO to PI. The co-presence of the dyes in a nucleus results in a modification in the intensity of both the emitted fluorescences. In order to designate the damaged cells (red fluorescence to the specific cell cycle phases (blue fluorescence, we have tested different staining protocols aimed to minimize the interference of these dyes as much as possible. In cell culture models, we are able to detect serum-starved apoptotic cells as well as to designate their exact location in the cell cycle phases using a very low PI concentration. Using a Partec PAS flow cytometer equipped with HBO lamp and argon ion laser, a double UV/blue excitation has been performed. This analytical approach is able to discriminate live blue cells from the damaged (blue-red ones even at 0.05 ?g/mL PI. The same instrumental setting allows performing other multi

  5. Flow dynamics of dacite lava flow - AMS, microstructure and porosity case study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Závada, Prokop; Kusbach, Vladimír; Machek, Matěj; Staněk, Martin; Špičák, Aleš

    2017-04-01

    Pyroclastic flows derived from flow frontal collapse of highly viscous "block lavas" formed by andesite or dacite belong to the most serious volcano-related hazards for surrounding populations. The threat results from abrupt transition of lava flow from ductile flow to gravitational failure of the front, which exposes their overpressurized interior and triggers devastating pyroclastic flows. The goal of the study is to quantify the microfabrics and dynamic porosity in a lava flow to constrain the cavitation process (development and coalescence of dynamic porosity). Pleistocene dacite flow body situated on the slope of Middle Sister Volcano (OR, USA) was studied by means of field-based structural analysis, anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility (AMS), microstructural analysis and mercury injection porosimetry (MIP). The 500 m exposure of the flow is associated with a vertical feeding dyke at the beginning of the flow, 40 m upslope. The flow shows occasional layers, 5-15 cm thick, marked by evenly spaced and up to 10 cm long, lenticular to sigmoidal cracks often developed in the vicinity of the clasts/phenocrysts. These cracks frequently dip against the slope of the flow and show 15-50° difference with the layering. At the feeding dyke, highly oblate magnetic fabric shows subvertical foliations with horizontal lineations oriented parallel to the dyke walls. Middle part of the flow revealed highly prolate fabrics with subhorizontal magnetic foliations and lineations parallel to the flow direction. At the downslope limit of the flow, magnetic foliations are perpendicular to the flow direction. The dynamic porosity was studied in detail on larger sample from the central part of the flow. The sample contains three layers with different density of porosity and average crack length. All the cracks were oriented about 45° to the layer boundaries and alignment of the groundmass crystals. MIP data revealed total connected porosities between 11 and 15 %. Throat

  6. Novel Strategy for Phenotypic Characterization of Human B Lymphocytes from Precursors to Effector Cells by Flow Cytometry.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovanna Clavarino

    Full Text Available A precise identification and phenotypic characterization of human B-cell subsets is of crucial importance in both basic research and medicine. In the literature, flow cytometry studies for the phenotypic characterization of B-lymphocytes are mainly focused on the description of a particular cell stage, or of specific cell stages observed in a single type of sample. In the present work, we propose a backbone of 6 antibodies (CD38, CD27, CD10, CD19, CD5 and CD45 and an efficient gating strategy to identify, in a single analysis tube, a large number of B-cell subsets covering the whole B-cell differentiation from precursors to memory and plasma cells. Furthermore, by adding two antibodies in an 8-color combination, our approach allows the analysis of the modulation of any cell surface marker of interest along B-cell differentiation. We thus developed a panel of seven 8-colour antibody combinations to phenotypically characterize B-cell subpopulations in bone marrow, peripheral blood, lymph node and cord blood samples. Beyond qualitative information provided by biparametric representations, we also quantified antigen expression on each of the identified B-cell subsets and we proposed a series of informative curves showing the modulation of seventeen cell surface markers along B-cell differentiation. Our approach by flow cytometry provides an efficient tool to obtain quantitative data on B-cell surface markers expression with a relative easy-to-handle technique that can be applied in routine explorations.

  7. Performance Characteristics of a PEM Fuel Cell with Parallel Flow Channels at Different Cathode Relative Humidity Levels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sang Soon Hwang

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available In fuel cells flow configuration and operating conditions such as cell temperature, humidity at each electrode and stoichiometric number are very crucial for improving performance. Too many flow channels could enhance the performance but result in high parasite loss. Therefore a trade-off between pressure drop and efficiency of a fuel cell should be considered for optimum design. This work focused on numerical simulation of the effects of operating conditions, especially cathode humidity, with simple micro parallel flow channels. It is known that the humidity at the cathode flow channel becomes very important for enhancing the ion conductivity of polymer membrane because fully humidified condition was normally set at anode. To investigate the effect of humidity on the performance of a fuel cell, in this study humidification was set to 100% at the anode flow channel and was changed by 0–100% at the cathode flow channel. Results showed that the maximum power density could be obtained under 60% humidified condition at the cathode where oxygen concentration was moderately high while maintaining high ion conductivity at a membrane.

  8. Removal of organic carbon and nitrogen in a membraneless flow-through microbial electrolysis cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussain, Abid; Lebrun, Frédérique Matteau; Tartakovsky, Boris

    2017-07-01

    This study evaluated performance of an upflow membraneless microbial electrolysis cell (MEC) with flow-through electrodes for wastewater treatment. First, methane production and COD removal were evaluated in continuous flow experiments carried out using synthetic and municipal wastewater. A 29-75% increase in methane production was observed under bioelectrochemical conditions as compared to an anaerobic control. Next, simultaneous removal of COD and nitrogen was studied under microaerobic conditions created by continuous air injection to the anodic compartment of the MEC. While the presence of oxygen decreased Coulombic efficiency due to aerobic degradation of COD, enhanced ammonium removal with near zero nitrite and nitrate effluent concentrations was observed. Evidence of direct ammonium oxidation at the anode as well as nitrite and nitrate reduction at the cathode was obtained by comparing performances of MECs operated under anaerobic and microaerobic conditions with the control reactor operated at zero applied voltage. Crown Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Study and modelling of liquid metal turbulent flows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pimont, Vincent

    1983-01-01

    In this research thesis, the author first reports the study of equations of a turbulent flow with heat transfer: transport equations of 2. order moments related to different fluctuations, influence of a change of referential. He analyses the structure of a non isothermal turbulent flow of liquid metal: study of the turbulent heat flow and of liquid metal temperature fluctuations, study of characteristic scales for such a flow, principle of assessment of orders of magnitude. He presents the modelling of transport equations of moments related to temperature fluctuation, and of transport equations at high Reynolds number. He finally reports the application of the developed model to the wall area of a non isothermal turbulent flow of liquid metal [fr

  10. REVIEW Interpretation and value of MR CSF flow studies for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    the indications and technique, and also discusses interpretation of the information provided. Indications for CSF flow studies in paediatrics. There is good reason to demonstrate CSF flow dynamics routinely in children undergoing MRI because their evolving and maturing brain creates a changing volume of CSF in relation ...

  11. A flow cytometric method for characterization of circulating cell-derived microparticles in plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, Morten Hjuler; Beck-Nielsen, Henning; Andersen, Morten Nørgaard; Handberg, Aase

    2014-01-01

    Previous studies on circulating microparticles (MPs) indicate that the majority of MPs are of a size below the detection limit of most standard flow cytometers. The objective of the present study was to establish a method to analyze MP subpopulations above the threshold of detection of a new generation BD FACSAria™ III digital flow cytometer. We analyzed MP subpopulations in plasma from 24 healthy individuals (9 males and 15 females). MPs were identified according to their size (derived from platelets, monocytes, erythrocytes and endothelial cells. In addition, levels of tissue factor-positive MPs were determined. The FACSAria demonstrated improved sensitivity and increased MP detection range compared to the FC500 instrument. The reproducibility of PS+PMP and PS+MP measurements was 11.7 and 23.2%, respectively. When expressed as a percentage of total MPs, the PS-positive MP population represented 15.1±5.5%, and PS-positive MPs were significantly increased in men. We have established a method to measure MPs above the detection limit of a new generation flow cytometer and derived from a number of cell-types in a healthy population of men and women.

  12. Contribution to the study of rotating disc induced MHD flows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herve, P.

    1983-01-01

    Influence of a magnetic field on electroconductor viscous fluid flow generated by disks in rotation is studied here. Flow in rectilinear conduct is first studied, together with velocity, force and current line repartition. Then a case more general is dealt with a toroidal conduct with disk drive. The influence of electric conductivity and of the thickness of the mobile disk are detailed. Couple study leads to think to a transmission by fluid variable by magnetic field variations. At last, a radial flow with a source in the middle of it is studied with a disk rotation. Analysis of velocity and pressure evolution shows a pump effect [fr

  13. An experimental investigation of pressurized planar solid oxide fuel cells using two different flow distributors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, H. W.; Huang, C. M.; Shy, S. S.

    2014-03-01

    A high-pressure high-temperature dual-chamber facility is established for electrochemical impedance measurements of pressurized solid oxide fuel cells (PSOFC) to explain why and how the cell performance is increased with increasing pressure (p). By comparing two sets of nearly identical single-cell stacks except using different flow distributors with different degrees of flow uniformity at 850 °C over a range of p varying from 0.1 MPa to 0.5 MPa, we found that the better flow uniformity in flow distributors is, the better the cell performance is, and such performance enhancement is increased with increasing p. This finding is explained by impedance spectra and their associated equivalent circuit models, showing the coupling impact of flow uniformity and pressure elevation to the decrease of ohmic and polarization resistances. These results should be useful to the development of PSOFC integrating with micro gas turbines for future stationary power generation.

  14. An Experimental Study of Oil / Water Flow in Horizontal Pipes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elseth, Geir

    2001-07-01

    The purpose of this thesis is to study the behaviour of the simultaneous flow of oil and water in horizontal pipes. In this connection, two test facilities are used. Both facilities have horizontal test sections with inner pipe diameters equal to 2 inches. The largest facility, called the model oil facility, has reservoirs of 1 m{sub 3} of each medium enabling flow rates as high as 30 m{sub 3}/h, which corresponds to mixture velocities as high as 3.35 m/s. The flow rates of oil and water can be varied individually producing different flow patterns according to variations in mixture velocity and input water cut. Two main classes of flows are seen, stratified and dispersed. In this facility, the main focus has been on stratified flows. Pressure drops and local phase fractions are measured for a large number of flow conditions. Among the instruments used are differential pressure transmitters and a traversing gamma densitometer, respectively. The flow patterns that appear are classified in flow pattern maps as functions of either mixture velocity and water cut or superficial velocities. From these experiments a smaller number of stratified flows are selected for studies of velocity and turbulence. A laser Doppler anemometer (LDA) is applied for these measurements in a transparent part of the test section. To be able to produce accurate measurements a partial refractive index matching procedure is used. The other facility, called the matched refractive index facility, has a 0.2 m{sub 3} reservoir enabling mainly dispersed flows. Mixture velocities range from 0.75 m/s to 3 m/s. The fluids in this facility are carefully selected to match the refractive index of the transparent part of the test section. A full refractive index matching procedure is carried out producing excellent optical conditions for velocity and turbulence studies by LDA. In addition, pressure drops and local phase fractions are measured. (author)

  15. Evolution of the scattering properties of phytoplankton cells from flow cytometry measurements.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William Moutier

    Full Text Available After the exponential growth phase, variability in the scattering efficiency of phytoplankton cells over their complete life cycle is not well characterised. Bulk measurements are impacted by senescent cells and detritrus. Thus the analysis of the evolution of the optical properties thanks to their morphological and/or intra-cellular variations remains poorly studied. Using the Cytosense flow cytometer (CytoBuoy b.v., NL, the temporal course of the forward and sideward efficiencies of two phytoplankton species (Thalassiosira pseudonana and Chlamydomonas concordia were analyzed during a complete life-cycle. These two species differ considerably from a morphological point of view. Over the whole experiment, the forward and sideward efficiencies of Thalassiosira pseudonana were, on average, respectively 2.2 and 1.6 times higher than the efficiencies of Chlamydomonas concordia. Large intra-species variability of the efficiencies were observed over the life cycle of the considered species. It highlights the importance of considering the optical properties of phytoplankton cells as a function of the population growth stage of the considered species. Furthermore, flow cytometry measurements were combined with radiative transfer simulations and biogeochemical and optical measurements. Results showed that the real refractive index of the chloroplast is a key parameter driving the sideward signal and that a simplistic two-layered model (cytoplasm-chloroplast seems particularly appropriate to represent the phytoplankton cells.

  16. Retrospective Analysis of T and B Cells Flow-Cross Matches in Renal Transplant Recipients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lakshmi Kiran C

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Complement-mediated cytotoxic antibodies in conventional cross match, often result in misappropriation of true positives and borderline positives which are detrimental to allograft survival. Flow cross matches (FCXM are sensitive to capture even non comple-ment fixing cytotoxic antibodies. This retrospective study evaluates the utility of FCXM in effectively predicting acute allograft rejection. A total of 17 cases were processed for FCXM (T and B cell of whom seven had no rejection episodes, while the remaining 11 had acute rejection despite negative cross match and panel reacting antibodies being ne-gative (less than 20%. The sensitivity and specificity of the FCXM outcome demons-trated that positive B-cell FCXM has potential to be a good tool in pre-transplant scree-ning. The current analysis proposes the possible utility of B-cell positive FCXM as a more sensitive parameter in predicting acute allograft rejection prior to transplantation.

  17. Satellite cell number and cell cycle kinetics in response to acute myotrauma in humans: immunohistochemistry versus flow cytometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKay, Bryon R; Toth, Kyle G; Tarnopolsky, Mark A; Parise, Gianni

    2010-01-01

    In humans, muscle satellite cell (SC) enumeration is an important measurement used to determine the myogenic response to various stimuli. To date, the standard practice for enumeration is immunohistochemistry (IHC) using antibodies against common SC markers (Pax7, NCAM). Flow cytometry (FC) analysis may provide a more rapid and quantitative determination of changes in the SC pool with potential for additional analysis not easily achievable with standard IHC. In this study, FC analysis revealed that the number of Pax7+ cells per milligram isolated from ∼50 mg of fresh tissue increased 36% 24 h after exercise-induced muscle injury (300 unilateral maximal eccentric contractions). IHC analysis of Pax7 and neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM) appeared to sufficiently and similarly represent the expansion of SCs after injury (28–36% increase). IHC and FC data illustrated that Pax7 was the most widely expressed SC marker in muscle cross-sections and represented the majority of positive cells, while NCAM was expressed to a lesser degree. Moreover, FC and IHC demonstrated a similar percentage change 24 h after injury (36% increase, Pax7; 28% increase, NCAM). FC analysis of isolated SCs revealed that the number of Pax7+ cells per milligram in G2/M phase of the cell cycle increased 202% 24 h after injury. Number of cells per milligram in G0/G1 and cells in S-phase increased 32% and 59% respectively. Here we illustrate the use of FC as a method for enumerating SC number on a per milligram tissue basis, providing a more easily understandable relation to muscle mass (vs. percentage of myonuclei or per myofibre). Although IHC is a powerful tool for SC analysis, FC is a fast, reliable and effective method for SC quantification as well as a more informative method for cell cycle kinetics of the SC population in humans. PMID:20624792

  18. Study of flow patterns in fume hood enclosures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pathanjali, C.; Rahman, M.M.

    1996-01-01

    A three-dimensional model for flow inside a fume hood enclosure was developed and numerical computations were carried out to explore the flow pattern and possible path of contaminant transport under different operating conditions of the hood. Equations for the conservation of mass and momentum were solved for different flow rate and opening conditions in the hood. The face velocity was maintained constant at its rated value of 0.4 m/s. The flow was assumed to enter through the front window opening (positive x-direction) and leave the cupboard through an opening on the top of the hood (positive z-direction). The flow was assumed to be fully turbulent. The κ-var-epsilon model was used for the prediction of turbulence. The flow pattern for different sash openings were studied. The flow patterns around an object located at the bottom of the hood was studied for different locations of the object. In addition, the effect of a person standing in front of the hood on the flow pattern was investigated. It was found that air entering the hood proceeds directly to the back wall, impinges it and turns upward toward the top wall and exits through the outlet. The flow finds its way around any object forming a recirculating region at its trailing surface. With an increase in the sash opening, the velocity becomes higher and the fluid traces the path to the outlet more quickly. The volume occupied by recirculating flow decreases with increase in sash opening. The computed flow patterns will be very useful to design experiments with optimum sash opening providing adequate disposal of contaminants with minimum use of conditioned air from inside the room

  19. In-vitro study on haemodiluted blood flow in a sinusoidal microstenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, M J; Ji, H-S; Lee, S J

    2010-01-01

    In-vitro experiments were carried out to investigate the haemodynamic and haemorheological behaviours of haemodiluted blood flow through a microstenosis using a micro-particle image velocimetry (PIV) technique. The micro-PIV system employed in this study consisted of a two-head neodymium:yttrium-aluminium-garnet (Nd:YAG) laser, a cooled charge-coupled device camera, and a delay generator. To simulate blood flow in a stenosed vascular vessel, a polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) microchannel with a sinusoidal throat of 80 per cent severity was employed. The width and depth of the microchannel were 100 microm and 50 microm, respectively. To compare the flow characteristics in the microstenosis, the same experiments were repeated in a straight microchannel under the same flow conditions. Using a syringe pump, human blood with 5 per cent haematocrit was supplied into the microstenosis channel. The flow characteristics and transport of blood cells through the microstenosis were investigated with various flowrates. The mean velocity fields were nearly symmetric with respect to the channel centreline. In the contraction section, the oncoming blood flow was accelerated rapidly, and the maximum velocity at the throat was almost 4.99 times faster than that of the straight microchannel without stenosis. In the diffusion section, the blood cells show rolling, deformation, twisting, and tumbling motion due to the flow-choking characteristics at the stenotic region. The results from this study will provide useful basic data for comparison with those obtained by clinical researchers.

  20. Development of Bubble Driven Flow CFD Model Applied for Aluminium Smelting Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y.Q. Feng

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the development of a computational fluid dynamics (CFD model for the study of bubble driven bath flow in aluminium reduction cells. For validation purposes, the model development was conducted using a full scale air -water model of part of an aluminium reduction cell as a test-bed. The bubble induced turbulence has been modelled by either modifying bubble induced turbulence viscosity directly or by modifying bubble induced turbulence kinetic energy in a standard k- ε turbulence model. The relative performance of the two modelling approaches has been examined through comparison with experimental data taken under similar conditions using Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV. Detailed comparison has been conducted by point-wise comparison of liquid velocities to quantify the level of agreement between CFD simulation and PIV measurement. Both models can capture the key flow patterns determined by PIV measurement, while the modified turbulence kinetic energy model gives better agreement with flow patterns in the gap between anode and cathode.

  1. Evaluation of CD307a expression patterns during normal B-cell maturation and in B-cell malignancies by flow cytometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auat, Mariangeles; Cardoso, Chandra Chiappin; Santos-Pirath, Iris Mattos; Rudolf-Oliveira, Renata Cristina Messores; Matiollo, Camila; Lange, Bárbara Gil; da Silva, Jessica Pires; Dametto, Gisele Cristina; Pirolli, Mayara Marin; Colombo, Maria Daniela Holthausen Perico; Santos-Silva, Maria Claudia

    2018-02-24

    Flow cytometric immunophenotyping is deemed a fundamental tool for the diagnosis of B-cell neoplasms. Currently, the investigation of novel immunophenotypic markers has gained importance, as they can assist in the precise subclassification of B-cell malignancies by flow cytometry. Therefore, the purpose of the present study was to evaluate the expression of CD307a during normal B-cell maturation and in B-cell malignancies as well as to investigate its potential role in the differential diagnosis of these entities. CD307a expression was assessed by flow cytometry in normal precursor and mature B cells and in 115 samples collected from patients diagnosed with precursor and mature B-cell neoplasms. CD307a expression was compared between neoplastic and normal B cells. B-acute lymphoblastic leukemia cases exhibited minimal expression of CD307a, displaying a similar expression pattern to that of normal B-cell precursors. Mantle cell lymphoma (MCL) cases showed the lowest levels of CD307a among mature B-cell neoplasms. CD307a expression was statistically lower in MCL cases than in chronic B lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) and marginal zone lymphoma (MZL) cases. No statistical differences were observed between CD307a expression in neoplastic and normal plasma cells. These results indicate that the assessment of CD307a expression by flow cytometry could be helpful to distinguish CLL from MCL, and the latter from MZL. Although these results are not entirely conclusive, they provide a basis for further studies in a larger cohort of patients. © 2018 International Clinical Cytometry Society. © 2018 International Clinical Cytometry Society.

  2. An Integrated Workflow To Assess Technical and Biological Variability of Cell Population Frequencies in Human Peripheral Blood by Flow Cytometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burel, Julie G; Qian, Yu; Lindestam Arlehamn, Cecilia; Weiskopf, Daniela; Zapardiel-Gonzalo, Jose; Taplitz, Randy; Gilman, Robert H; Saito, Mayuko; de Silva, Aruna D; Vijayanand, Pandurangan; Scheuermann, Richard H; Sette, Alessandro; Peters, Bjoern

    2017-02-15

    In the context of large-scale human system immunology studies, controlling for technical and biological variability is crucial to ensure that experimental data support research conclusions. In this study, we report on a universal workflow to evaluate both technical and biological variation in multiparameter flow cytometry, applied to the development of a 10-color panel to identify all major cell populations and T cell subsets in cryopreserved PBMC. Replicate runs from a control donation and comparison of different gating strategies assessed the technical variability associated with each cell population and permitted the calculation of a quality control score. Applying our panel to a large collection of PBMC samples, we found that most cell populations showed low intraindividual variability over time. In contrast, certain subpopulations such as CD56 T cells and Temra CD4 T cells were associated with high interindividual variability. Age but not gender had a significant effect on the frequency of several populations, with a drastic decrease in naive T cells observed in older donors. Ethnicity also influenced a significant proportion of immune cell population frequencies, emphasizing the need to account for these covariates in immune profiling studies. We also exemplify the usefulness of our workflow by identifying a novel cell-subset signature of latent tuberculosis infection. Thus, our study provides a universal workflow to establish and evaluate any flow cytometry panel in systems immunology studies. Copyright © 2017 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  3. Flow field design for high-pressure PEM electrolysis cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Anders Christian; Kær, Søren Knudsen

    -water distributes. Water not only serves a reactant, it also aids in cooling due to its high specific heat capacity. The movement of liquid water at the anode is difficult to model, since it is highly coupled to the formation of gas bubbles. To capture the complex two-phase flow behaviour that takes place within...... micro-channels and porous media, our research group has developed an Euler-Euler model in the computational fluid dynamics modelling framework of ANSYS CFX. In addition to two-phase flow, the model accounts for turbulence, species transport in the gas phase, heat transport in all three phases (i.......e. solid, gas and liquid), as well as charge transport of electrons and ions. Our recent improvements have focused on the models ability to account for phase change and electrochemistry as well as the modelling of two-phase flow regimes. For comparison, an interdigitated and parallel channel flow field...

  4. Construção e avaliação de célula de fluxo para estudo da tensão interfacial dinâmica da interface fluxo líquido - sólido por despolarização da fluorescência Development of a flow cell to study dynamic interfacial tension of solid-liquid flow by fluorescence depolarization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martha T. P. O. Castro

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available A simple low-cost flow cell was developed, built and optimized in order to observe dynamic interfacial tension of continuous flow systems. Distinct materials can be used in one of the cell walls in order to observe the intermolecular forces between the flowing liquid and the chemical constitution of the walls. The fluorescence depolarization was evaluated using Rhodamine B as fluorescent probe seeded in ethylene glycol. The effects of the positioning angles on the data acquired across the cell are reported. The reproducibility of the data was evaluated with a spectrometer assembled in-house and the relative standard deviation was below 3%.

  5. Analytical Study of Unsteady Nested Groundwater Flow Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong Niu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Two analytical solutions using segregation variable method to calculate the hydraulic head under steady and unsteady flow conditions based on Tóth’s classical model were developed. The impacts of anisotropy ratio, hydraulic conductivity (K, and specific yield (μs on the flow patterns were analyzed. It was found that the area of the equal velocity region increases and the penetrating depth of the flow system decreases at steady state with anisotropy ratio increases, which is defined as ε=Kx/Kz. In addition, stagnant zones can be found in the flow field where the streamlines have opposite directions. These stagnant zones move toward the surface as the horizontal hydraulic conductivity increases. The results of the study on transient flow indicate that a relative increase in hydraulic conductivity produces a positive impact on hydraulic head and a relative enhancement in specific yield produces a negative effect on hydraulic head at early times.

  6. Disruption of TGF-β signaling in smooth muscle cell prevents flow-induced vascular remodeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gao, Fu [Department of Vascular Surgery, Peking University People’s Hospital, Beijing (China); Chambon, Pierre [Institut de Génétique et de Biologie Moléculaire et Cellulaire (CNRS UMR7104, INSERM U596, ULP, Collége de France) and Institut Clinique de la Souris, ILLKIRCH, Strasbourg (France); Tellides, George [Department of Surgery, Interdepartmental Program in Vascular Biology and Therapeutics, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT (United States); Kong, Wei [Department of Physiology and Pathophysiology, Basic Medical College of Peking University, Beijing (China); Zhang, Xiaoming, E-mail: rmygxgwk@163.com [Department of Vascular Surgery, Peking University People’s Hospital, Beijing (China); Li, Wei [Department of Vascular Surgery, Peking University People’s Hospital, Beijing (China)

    2014-11-07

    Highlights: • TGF-β signaling in SMC contributes to the flow-induced vascular remodeling. • Disruption of TGF-β signaling in SMC can prevent this process. • Targeting SM-specific Tgfbr2 could be a novel therapeutic strategy for vascular remodeling. - Abstract: Transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) signaling has been prominently implicated in the pathogenesis of vascular remodeling, especially the initiation and progression of flow-induced vascular remodeling. Smooth muscle cells (SMCs) are the principal resident cells in arterial wall and are critical for arterial remodeling. However, the role of TGF-β signaling in SMC for flow-induced vascular remodeling remains unknown. Therefore, the goal of our study was to determine the effect of TGF-β pathway in SMC for vascular remodeling, by using a genetical smooth muscle-specific (SM-specific) TGF-β type II receptor (Tgfbr2) deletion mice model. Mice deficient in the expression of Tgfbr2 (MyhCre.Tgfbr2{sup f/f}) and their corresponding wild-type background mice (MyhCre.Tgfbr2{sup WT/WT}) underwent partial ligation of left common carotid artery for 1, 2, or 4 weeks. Then the carotid arteries were harvested and indicated that the disruption of Tgfbr2 in SMC provided prominent inhibition of vascular remodeling. And the thickening of carotid media, proliferation of SMC, infiltration of macrophage, and expression of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) were all significantly attenuated in Tgfbr2 disruption mice. Our study demonstrated, for the first time, that the TGF-β signaling in SMC plays an essential role in flow-induced vascular remodeling and disruption can prevent this process.

  7. Blood flow velocity in migraine attacks - a transcranial Doppler study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zwetsloot, C.P.; Caekebeke, J.F.V.; Jansen, J.C.; Odink, J.; Ferrari, M.D.

    1991-01-01

    A pulsed Doppler device was used to measure blood flow velocities in the common carotid artery, the extracranial part of the internal carotid artery, the external carotid artery, the middle cerebral artery, and the anterior cerebral artery in 31 migraneurs without aura (n=27) and with aura (n=4), both during and ouside an attack. The aims were to compare blood flow velocity during and between migraine attacks and to study asymmetries of the blood flow velocity. Compared with blood flow velocity values obtained in the attack-free interval, blood flow velocity was lower during attacks without aura in both common carotid arteries, but not in the other extra- and intracranial vessels which were examined. However, during attacks of migraine with aura, blood flow velocity tended to be lower in all examined vessels. There were no asymmetries of the blood flow velocity. It is suggested that during migraine attacks without aura there is a dissociation in blood flow regulation in the common carotid and middle cerebral arteries. 20 refs., 2 tabs

  8. Analytical study of flow phenomena in SSME turnaround duct geometries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mclallin, K. L.

    1985-01-01

    The SSME fuel turbopump hot gas manifold was identified as a source of loss and flow distortion which significantly affects the performance and durability of both the drive turbine and the LOX injector area of the main combustion chamber. Two current SSME geometries were studied, the full power level (FPL) and the first manned orbital flight (FMOF) configuration. The effects of turnaround duct geometry on flow losses and distortions, by varying wall curvature and flow area variation in the 180 deg turnaround region were examined. The effects of the duct inlet flow phenomena such as the radial distortion of the inlet flow and inlet swirl level on turnaround duct performance were also investigated. It is shown that of the two current geometries, the FMOF configuration had lower pressure losses and generated less flow distortion, but had a small flow separation bubble at the 180 deg turnaround exit. It is found that by optimizing wall curvature and flow diffusion in the turnaround, improved duct performance can be achieved.

  9. Flow cytometry approach for studying the interaction between ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Flow cytometry approach for studying the interaction between Bacillus mojavensis and Alternaria alternata. Asma Milet, Noreddine Kacem Chaouche, Laid Dehimat, Asma Ait Kaki, Mounira Kara Ali, Philippe Thonart ...

  10. Experimental Study of Blood Laminar Flow Through a Stented Artery

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Benard, N

    2001-01-01

    .... That is why, to study the flow disturbances through a stented section, we built an in vitro model reproducing the struts shapes of a marketed endoprothesis, The experimental artery, is composed...

  11. A tapered serpentine flow field for the anode of micro direct methanol fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yufeng; Zhang, Peng; Yuan, Zhenyu; He, Hong; Zhao, Youran; Liu, Xiaowei

    2011-03-01

    We develop a self-breathing micro direct methanol fuel cell (μDMFC) characterized by a new anode structure with tapered single serpentine flow fields to improve cell performance. Compared with the conventional single serpentine flow field, this new design enhances the methanol mass transport efficiency and the exhaust resultant (CO2) rate due to the increasing pressure difference between adjacent flow channels. The μDMFCs with two single serpentine flow fields are fabricated using silicon-based micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEMS) technologies and are tested at room temperature. The experimental results reveal that the new tapered single serpentine flow field exhibits a significantly higher peak power density than that of the conventional flow field, demonstrating a substantial increase of 17.9% in mass transport coefficients.

  12. Detection of male reproductive abnormalities by flow cytometry measurements of testicular and ejaculated germ cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evenson, D.P.; Higgins, P.J.; Melamed, M.R.

    1984-01-01

    Flow cytometry of developing and mature sperm from humans and animals with pathological conditions or those exposed to testicular function modifying agents can provide rapidly acquired data that are statistically sound due to the large numbers of randomly measured cells. Of more importance, however, is the fact that the authors can acquire information on factors such as chromatin structure that cannot be practically obtained in any other manner. This approach, coupled with classical techniques in reproductive biology, including electron microscopy, will provide a powerful methodology to study the response of animals to agents that modify testicular function

  13. Zebrafish swimming in the flow: a particle image velocimetry study

    OpenAIRE

    Mwaffo, Violet; Zhang, Peng; Romero Cruz, Sebastián; Porfiri, Maurizio

    2017-01-01

    Zebrafish is emerging as a species of choice for the study of a number of biomechanics problems, including balance development, schooling, and neuromuscular transmission. The precise quantification of the flow physics around swimming zebrafish is critical toward a mechanistic understanding of the complex swimming style of this fresh-water species. Although previous studies have elucidated the vortical structures in the wake of zebrafish swimming in placid water, the flow physics of zebrafish ...

  14. Intermediate regime and a phase diagram of red blood cell dynamics in a linear flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levant, Michael; Steinberg, Victor

    2016-12-01

    In this paper we investigate the in vitro dynamics of a single rabbit red blood cell (RBC) in a planar linear flow as a function of a shear stress σ and the dynamic viscosity of outer fluid ηo. A linear flow is a generalization of previous studies dynamics of soft objects including RBC in shear flow and is realized in the experiment in a microfluidic four-roll mill device. We verify that the RBC stable orientation dynamics is found in the experiment being the in-shear-plane orientation and the RBC dynamics is characterized by observed three RBC dynamical states, namely tumbling (TU), intermediate (INT), and swinging (SW) [or tank-treading (TT)] on a single RBC. The main results of these studies are the following. (i) We completely characterize the RBC dynamical states and reconstruct their phase diagram in the case of the RBC in-shear-plane orientation in a planar linear flow and find it in a good agreement with that obtained in early experiments in a shear flow for human RBCs. (ii) The value of the critical shear stress σc of the TU-TT(SW) transition surprisingly coincides with that found in early experiments in spite of a significant difference in the degree of RBC shape deformations in both the SW and INT states. (iii) We describe the INT regime, which is stationary, characterized by strong RBC shape deformations and observed in a wide range of the shear stresses. We argue that our observations cast doubts on the main claim of the recent numerical simulations that the only RBC spheroidal stress-free shape is capable to explain the early experimental data. Finally, we suggest that the amplitude dependence of both θ and the shape deformation parameter D on σ can be used as the quantitative criterion to determine the RBC stress-free shape.

  15. Dissociation of mono- and co-culture spheroids into single cells for subsequent flow cytometric analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grässer, Ute; Bubel, Monika; Sossong, Daniela; Oberringer, Martin; Pohlemann, Tim; Metzger, Wolfgang

    2018-03-01

    Spheroids are considered to reflect the natural organization of cells better than 2D cell cultures, but their analysis by flow cytometry requires dissociation into single cells. We established protocols for dissociation of mono- and co-culture spheroids consisting of human fibroblasts and human endothelial cells. Cell recovery rate and viability after dissociation were evaluated with hemocytometer and by flow cytometry. The diameter of cells and the amount of cell aggregates were quantified by Casy ® -technology and the cellular composition was analyzed by flow cytometry. Optimal dissociation conditions with low cell aggregation were determined by size, cultivation time and cellular composition of the spheroids. Smaller spheroids (10,000 cells) could be dissociated with Accutase ® , whereas larger spheroids (50,000 cells) required more stringent dissociation conditions. The size of the cells decreased with increasing cultivation time. Cell recovery rate was dependent upon cellular composition and spheroid size. The highest cell recovery rate was found for co-culture spheroids. The highest cell viability was detected for dissociated fibroblast spheroids. A quantitative analysis of the cellular composition of dissociated co-culture spheroids was possible. Spheroids can be successfully dissociated into singular cells for subsequent flow cytometric analysis. Dissociation conditions as well as cell recovery rate and cell viability depend on size, cultivation time and cellular composition of the spheroids. The observed decrease in cell size in spheroids over time might be responsible for the well-known time-dependent decrease in spheroid size. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  16. Deterministic Capture of Individual Circulating Tumor Cells Using a Flow-Restricted Microfluidic Trap Array

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yousang Yoon

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Circulating tumor cells (CTCs are regarded as a strong biomarker which includes clinically valuable information. However, CTCs are very rare and require precise separation and detection for effective clinical applications. Furthermore, downstream analysis has become necessary to identify the distinct sub-population of CTCs that causes metastasis. Here, we report a flow-restricted microfluidic trap array capable of deterministic single-cell capture of CTCs. The extent of flow restriction, correlating with the device geometry, was then optimized using a highly invasive breast cancer cell line (LM2 MDA-MB-231 to achieve 97% capture efficiency with a single-cell capture rate of 99%. Single-cell capture of CTCs from mice with full-blown metastasis was also demonstrated. The single-CTC capturing ability of the flow-restricted trap array not only showed cell enumerating ability but also high prospects for application in future automated downstream analysis.

  17. Experimental investigations on liquid water removal from the gas diffusion layer by reactant flow in a PEM fuel cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiao, Kui; Li, Xianguo [Department of Mechanical and Mechatronics Engineering, University of Waterloo, 200 University Avenue West, Waterloo, Ontario (Canada); Park, Jaewan [Department of Mechanical and Aeronautical Engineering, University of California, Davis One Shields Ave., Davis, CA 95616 (United States)

    2010-09-15

    The cross flow from channel to channel through gas diffusion layer (GDL) under the land could play an important role for water removal in proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cells. In this study, characteristics of liquid water removal from GDL have been investigated experimentally, through measuring unsteady pressure drop in a cell which has the GDL initially wet with liquid water. The thickness of GDL is carefully controlled by inserting various thicknesses of metal shims between the plates. It has been found that severe compression of GDL could result in excessive pressure drop from channel inlet to channel outlet. Removing liquid water from GDL by cross flow is difficult for GDL with high compression levels and for low inlet air flow rates. However, effective water removal can still be achieved at high compression levels of GDL if the inlet air flow rate is high. Based on different compressed GDL thicknesses, different GDL porosities and permeabilities were calculated and their effects on the characteristics of liquid water removal from GDL were evaluated. Visualization of liquid water transport has been conducted by using transparent flow channel, and liquid water removal from GDL under the land was observed for all the tested inlet air flow rates, which confirms that cross flow is practically effective to remove the liquid water accumulated in GDL under the land area. (author)

  18. Radionuclide blood cell survival studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bentley, S.A.; Miller, D.T.

    1986-01-01

    Platelet and red cell survival studies are reviewed. The use of 51 Cr and di-isopropylfluoridate labelled with tritium or 32 P is discussed for red cell survival study and 51 Cr and 111 In-oxine are considered as platelet labels. (UK)

  19. Optimization of a new flow design for solid oxide cells using computational fluid dynamics modelling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Duhn, Jakob Dragsbæk; Jensen, Anker Degn; Wedel, Stig

    2016-01-01

    Design of a gas distributor to distribute gas flow into parallel channels for Solid Oxide Cells (SOC) is optimized, with respect to flow distribution, using Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) modelling. The CFD model is based on a 3d geometric model and the optimized structural parameters include...

  20. Comparison of Flow-Through Cell and Paddle Methods for Testing ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    HP

    Purpose: To evaluate the usefulness of the flow-through cell apparatus for testing commercial vaginal tablets containing poorly water-soluble clotrimazole. Methods: The effect of experimental conditions (type of dissolution medium, flow rate and positioning of the tablet) on the dissolution profile of clotrimazole were ...

  1. Experimental studies of occupation times in turbulent flows

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mann, J.; Ott, Søren; Pécseli, H.L.

    2003-01-01

    as the difference between entrance and exit times of surrounding particles convected through the sphere by the turbulent motions. Simple, and seemingly universal, scaling laws are obtained for the probability density of the occupation times in terms of the basic properties for the turbulent flow and the geometry......The motion of passively convected particles in turbulent flows is studied experimentally in approximately homogeneous and isotropic turbulent flows, generated in water by two moving grids. The simultaneous trajectories of many small passively convected, neutrally buoyant, polystyrene particles...

  2. Non-Flow-Through Fuel Cell System Test Results and Demonstration on the SCARAB Rover

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheidegger, Brianne, T.; Burke, Kenneth A.; Jakupca, Ian J.

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes the results of the demonstration of a non-flow-through PEM fuel cell as part of a power system on the SCARAB rover. A 16-cell non-flow-through fuel cell stack from Infinity Fuel Cell and Hydrogen, Inc. was incorporated into a power system designed to act as a range extender by providing power to the rover s hotel loads. This work represents the first attempt at a ground demonstration of this new technology aboard a mobile test platform. Development and demonstration were supported by the Office of the Chief Technologist s Space Power Systems Project and the Advanced Exploration System Modular Power Systems Project.

  3. The Design and Construction of Flow-through Hydrothermal Cells for in situ Neutron Diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pring, A.; Tenailleau, C.; Wang, H.; Brugger, J.; Ngothai, Yung; ONeill, B.

    2005-01-01

    Full text: A flow-through hydrothermal cell for the in-situ neutron diffraction study of hydrothermal crystallisation and phase transitions has been developed. It can be used for kinetic studies on materials that exhibit structural transformations under hydrothermal conditions. New fundamental knowledge on the mechanisms of phase transitions can thus be determined. It is specifically designed for the use on the Medium Resolution Powder Diffractometer at ANSTO, Lucas Heights, Sydney. But it is planned to adapt the design for the new High intensity powder diffractometer (Wombat) at the new Australian reactor Opal. The equipment has been initially created for the low temperature transformation study of Fe-Ni sulfide minerals. The design and use of the flow-through hydrothermal cell from 25 to 120degC are described. The first results of a successful transformation of pentlandite to violarite under mild conditions (pH 4) at 120degC and 3 bars using in-situ neutron diffraction measurements are presented. (authors)

  4. The Design and Construction of Flow-through Hydrothermal Cells for in situ Neutron Diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pring, A.; Tenailleau, C.; Wang, H.; Brugger, J.; Ngothai, Yung; ONeill, B.

    2005-01-01

    Full text: A flow-through hydrothermal cell for the in-situ neutron diffraction study of hydrothermal crystallisation and phase transitions has been developed. It can be used for kinetic studies on materials that exhibit structural transformations under hydrothermal conditions. New fundamental knowledge on the mechanisms of phase transitions can thus be determined. It is specifically designed for the use on the Medium Resolution Powder Diffractometer at ANSTO, Lucas Heights, Sydney. But it is planned to adapt the design for the new High intensity powder diffractometer (Wombat) at the new Australian reactor Opal. The equipment has been initially created for the low temperature transformation study of Fe-Ni sulfide minerals. The design and use of the flow-through hydrothermal cell from 25 to 120 deg C are described. The first results of a successful transformation of pentlandite to violarite under mild conditions (pH 4) at 120 deg C and 3 bars using in-situ neutron diffraction measurements are presented. (authors)

  5. Finite element analysis of turbulent flow in fast reactor fuel subassembly elementary flow cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muehlbauer, P.

    1987-03-01

    The method is described of calculating fully developed longitudinal steady-state turbulent flow of an incompressible fluid through an infinite bundle of parallel smooth rods, based on the finite element method and one-equation turbulence model. Theoretical calculation results are compared with experimental results. (author). 5 figs., 3 refs

  6. Enhanced heat transfer with corrugated flow channel in anode side of direct methanol fuel cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heidary, H.; Abbassi, A.; Kermani, M.J.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • Effect of corrugated flow channel on the heat exchange of DMFC is studied. • Corrugated boundary (except rectangular type) increase heat transfer up to 90%. • Average heat transfer in rectangular-corrugated boundary is less than straight one. • In Re > 60, wavy shape boundary has highest heat transfer. • In Re < 60, triangular shape boundary has highest heat transfer. - Abstract: In this paper, heat transfer and flow field analysis in anode side of direct methanol fuel cells (DMFCs) is numerically studied. To enhance the heat exchange between bottom cold wall and core flow, bottom wall of fluid delivery channel is considered as corrugated boundary instead of straight (flat) one. Four different shapes of corrugated boundary are recommended here: rectangular shape, trapezoidal shape, triangular shape and wavy (sinusoidal) shape. The top wall of the channel (catalyst layer boundary) is taken as hot boundary, because reaction occurs in catalyst layer and the bottom wall of the channel is considered as cold boundary due to coolant existence. The governing equations are numerically solved in the domain by the control volume approach based on the SIMPLE technique (1972). A wide spectrum of numerical studies is performed over a range of various shape boundaries, Reynolds number, triangle block number, and the triangle block amplitude. The performed parametric studies show that corrugated channel with trapezoidal, triangular and wavy shape enhances the heat exchange up to 90%. With these boundaries, cooling purpose of reacting flow in anode side of DMFCs would be better than straight one. Also, from the analogy between the heat and mass transfer problems, it is expected that the consumption of reacting species within the catalyst layer of DMFCs enhance. The present work provides helpful guidelines to the bipolar plate manufacturers of DMFCs to considerably enhance heat transfer and performance of the anode side of DMFC

  7. Study of magnetized accretion flow with cooling processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Kuldeep; Chattopadhyay, Indranil

    2018-02-01

    We have studied shock in magnetized accretion flow/funnel flow in case of neutron star with bremsstrahlung cooling and cyclotron cooling. All accretion solutions terminate with a shock close to the neutron star surface, but at some regions of the parameter space, it also harbours a second shock away from the star surface. We have found that cyclotron cooling is necessary for correct accretion solutions which match the surface boundary conditions.

  8. Multiparameter Flow Cytometric Assays to Quantify Effector and Regulatory T-Cell Function in Multiple Sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinha, Sushmita; Crawford, Michael P; Ortega, Sterling B; Karandikar, Nitin J

    2015-01-01

    The immune system plays a major pathological and regulatory role in multiple sclerosis (MS) and, therefore, is a focus of extensive research. Animal models of MS have been crucial in understanding the pathological processes in MS and developing certain treatments, however, all crucial aspects of the human disease may not be appropriately modeled. With the exception of detecting oligoclonal bands and IgG synthesis in cerebrospinal fluids of MS patients, there has not been major progress in the development of immunologic tests that can be used for diagnosis of MS. Further, due to the lack of validated immune assays, routine monitoring of the immune system following therapy initiation is not a part of standard patient care in MS. This is critical since immunomodulatory therapies used for MS treatment are not benign and, more importantly, there is a considerable variation in clinical responses in MS patients initiating such therapies. Flow cytometry is a powerful tool that can be used for studying both the phenotype and function of immune cells. The studies described here will demonstrate how flow cytometry can be used to apply current knowledge about the MS immune system to develop a diagnostic laboratory test for the immunologic monitoring of this disease. Importantly, we will also show that the multiparameter flow cytometry based assay developed by us can also be implemented for the immunologic evaluation of therapeutic success in MS patients.

  9. Design of a Single-Cell Positioning Controller Using Electroosmotic Flow and Image Processing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jhong-Yin Chen

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the current research was not only to provide a fast and automatic positioning platform for single cells, but also improved biomolecular manipulation techniques. In this study, an automatic platform for cell positioning using electroosmotic flow and image processing technology was designed. The platform was developed using a PCI image acquisition interface card for capturing images from a microscope and then transferring them to a computer using human-machine interface software. This software was designed by the Laboratory Virtual Instrument Engineering Workbench, a graphical language for finding cell positions and viewing the driving trace, and the fuzzy logic method for controlling the voltage or time of an electric field. After experiments on real human leukemic cells (U-937, the success of the cell positioning rate achieved by controlling the voltage factor reaches 100% within 5 s. A greater precision is obtained when controlling the time factor, whereby the success rate reaches 100% within 28 s. Advantages in both high speed and high precision are attained if these two voltage and time control methods are combined. The control speed with the combined method is about 5.18 times greater than that achieved by the time method, and the control precision with the combined method is more than five times greater than that achieved by the voltage method.

  10. Flow cytometric quantification of radiation responses of murine peritoneal cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tokita, N.; Raju, M.R.

    1982-01-01

    Methods have been developed to distinguish subpopulations of murine peritoneal cells, and these were applied to the measurement of early changes in peritoneal cells after irradiation. The ratio of the two major subpopulations in the peritoneal fluid, lymphocytes and macrophages, was measured rapidly by means of cell volume distribution analysis as well as by hypotonic propidium iodide (PI) staining. After irradiation, dose and time dependent changes were noted in the cell volume distributions: a rapid loss of peritoneal lymphocytes, and an increase in the mean cell volume of macrophages. The hypotonic PI staining characteristics of the peritoneal cells showed two or three distinctive G 1 peaks. The ratio of the areas of these peaks was also found to be dependent of the radiation dose and the time after irradiation. These results demonstrate that these two parameters may be used to monitor changes induced by irradiation (biological dosimetry), and to sort different peritoneal subpopulations

  11. Quantitative assessment of limb blood flow using Tc-99m labeled red blood cells. Radionuclide venous occlusion plethysmography (RAVOP)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Itoh, Kazuo; Shougase, Takashi; Kawamura, Naoyuki; Tsukamoto, Eriko; Nakada, Kunihiro; Sakuma, Makoto; Furudate, Masayori

    1987-10-01

    A quantitative assessment of limb blood flow using a non-diffusible radioindicator, Tc-99m labeled red blood cells, was reported. This was an application of venous occlusion plethysmography using radionuclide which was originally proposed by M. Fukuoka et al. The peripheral blood flow (mean +- s.e.) of 30 legs in a normal control group was 1.87 +- 0.08 ml/100 ml/min. In heart diseases (46 legs), it was 1.49 +- 0.13 ml/100 ml/min. The limb blood flow between a control group and heart diseases was statistically significant (p < 0.01) in the t-test. The peripheral blood flow at rest between diseased legs and normal legs in occlusive arterial disorders was also statistically significant (p < 0.01) in a paired t-test. RAVOP was done after the completion of objective studies such as radionuclide angiography or ventriculography. Technique and calculation of a blood flow were very easy and simple. RAVOP study which was originally proposed by Fukuoka et al. was reappraised to be hopeful for quantitative measurement of limb blood flow as a non-invasive technique using Tc-99m labeled red blood cells.

  12. Flow regulation in coronary vascular tree: a model study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xinzhou Xie

    Full Text Available Coronary blood flow can always be matched to the metabolic demand of the myocardium due to the regulation of vasoactive segments. Myocardial compressive forces play an important role in determining coronary blood flow but its impact on flow regulation is still unknown. The purpose of this study was to develop a coronary specified flow regulation model, which can integrate myocardial compressive forces and other identified regulation factors, to further investigate the coronary blood flow regulation behavior.A theoretical coronary flow regulation model including the myogenic, shear-dependent and metabolic responses was developed. Myocardial compressive forces were included in the modified wall tension model. Shear-dependent response was estimated by using the experimental data from coronary circulation. Capillary density and basal oxygen consumption were specified to corresponding to those in coronary circulation. Zero flow pressure was also modeled by using a simplified capillary model.Pressure-flow relations predicted by the proposed model are consistent with previous experimental data. The predicted diameter changes in small arteries are in good agreement with experiment observations in adenosine infusion and inhibition of NO synthesis conditions. Results demonstrate that the myocardial compressive forces acting on the vessel wall would extend the auto-regulatory range by decreasing the myogenic tone at the given perfusion pressure.Myocardial compressive forces had great impact on coronary auto-regulation effect. The proposed model was proved to be consistent with experiment observations and can be employed to investigate the coronary blood flow regulation effect in physiological and pathophysiological conditions.

  13. Flow

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knoop, Hans Henrik

    2006-01-01

    FLOW. Orden i hovedet på den fede måde Oplevelsesmæssigt er flow-tilstanden kendetegnet ved at man er fuldstændig involveret, fokuseret og koncentreret; at man oplever stor indre klarhed ved at vide hvad der skal gøres, og i hvilket omfang det lykkes; at man ved at det er muligt at løse opgaven...

  14. Affinity flow fractionation of cells via transient interactions with asymmetric molecular patterns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bose, Suman; Singh, Rishi; Hanewich-Hollatz, Mikhail; Shen, Chong; Lee, Chia-Hua; Dorfman, David M.; Karp, Jeffrey M.; Karnik, Rohit

    2013-07-01

    Flow fractionation of cells using physical fields to achieve lateral displacement finds wide applications, but its extension to surface molecule-specific separation requires labeling. Here we demonstrate affinity flow fractionation (AFF) where weak, short-range interactions with asymmetric molecular patterns laterally displace cells in a continuous, label-free process. We show that AFF can directly draw neutrophils out of a continuously flowing stream of blood with an unprecedented 400,000-fold depletion of red blood cells, with the sorted cells being highly viable, unactivated, and functionally intact. The lack of background erythrocytes enabled the use of AFF for direct enumeration of neutrophils by a downstream detector, which could distinguish the activation state of neutrophils in blood. The compatibility of AFF with capillary microfluidics and its ability to directly separate cells with high purity and minimal sample preparation will facilitate the design of simple and portable devices for point-of-care diagnostics and quick, cost-effective laboratory analysis.

  15. Affinity flow fractionation of cells via transient interactions with asymmetric molecular patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bose, Suman; Singh, Rishi; Hanewich-Hollatz, Mikhail; Shen, Chong; Lee, Chia-Hua; Dorfman, David M; Karp, Jeffrey M; Karnik, Rohit

    2013-01-01

    Flow fractionation of cells using physical fields to achieve lateral displacement finds wide applications, but its extension to surface molecule-specific separation requires labeling. Here we demonstrate affinity flow fractionation (AFF) where weak, short-range interactions with asymmetric molecular patterns laterally displace cells in a continuous, label-free process. We show that AFF can directly draw neutrophils out of a continuously flowing stream of blood with an unprecedented 400,000-fold depletion of red blood cells, with the sorted cells being highly viable, unactivated, and functionally intact. The lack of background erythrocytes enabled the use of AFF for direct enumeration of neutrophils by a downstream detector, which could distinguish the activation state of neutrophils in blood. The compatibility of AFF with capillary microfluidics and its ability to directly separate cells with high purity and minimal sample preparation will facilitate the design of simple and portable devices for point-of-care diagnostics and quick, cost-effective laboratory analysis.

  16. Low-level atmospheric flows studied by pulsed Doppler lidar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banta, Robert M.; Olivier, Lisa D.; Hardesty, R. Michael

    1992-01-01

    A pulsed Doppler radar gains a tremendous advantage in studying atmospheric flows when it has the ability to scan. The Wave Propagation Laboratory (WPL) has been operating a scanning, 10.59 micron CO2 system for over 10 years. Recently, the WPL lidar has been a featured instrument in several investigations of mesoscale wind fields in the lowest 3-4 km of the atmosphere. These include four experiments: a study of the initiation and growth of the sea breeze off the coast of California, a study of the snake column of a prescribed forest fire, a study of the nighttime flow over the complex terrain near Rocky Flats, Colorado as it affects the dispersion of atmospheric contaminants, and a study of the wind flow in the Grand Canyon. We have analyzed much data from these experiments, and we have found that the lidar provides new insight into the structure of these flows. Many of these studies took place in rugged or mountainous terrain, thus using one of the major benefits of the lidar: the narrow, 90 microrad beam of the lidar makes it an ideal instrument for studying flow close to topography.

  17. Real rock-microfluidic flow cell: A test bed for real-time in situ analysis of flow, transport, and reaction in a subsurface reactive transport environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Rajveer; Sivaguru, Mayandi; Fried, Glenn A; Fouke, Bruce W; Sanford, Robert A; Carrera, Martin; Werth, Charles J

    2017-09-01

    Physical, chemical, and biological interactions between groundwater and sedimentary rock directly control the fundamental subsurface properties such as porosity, permeability, and flow. This is true for a variety of subsurface scenarios, ranging from shallow groundwater aquifers to deeply buried hydrocarbon reservoirs. Microfluidic flow cells are now commonly being used to study these processes at the pore scale in simplified pore structures meant to mimic subsurface reservoirs. However, these micromodels are typically fabricated from glass, silicon, or polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS), and are therefore incapable of replicating the geochemical reactivity and complex three-dimensional pore networks present in subsurface lithologies. To address these limitations, we developed a new microfluidic experimental test bed, herein called the Real Rock-Microfluidic Flow Cell (RR-MFC). A porous 500μm-thick real rock sample of the Clair Group sandstone from a subsurface hydrocarbon reservoir of the North Sea was prepared and mounted inside a PDMS microfluidic channel, creating a dynamic flow-through experimental platform for real-time tracking of subsurface reactive transport. Transmitted and reflected microscopy, cathodoluminescence microscopy, Raman spectroscopy, and confocal laser microscopy techniques were used to (1) determine the mineralogy, geochemistry, and pore networks within the sandstone inserted in the RR-MFC, (2) analyze non-reactive tracer breakthrough in two- and (depth-limited) three-dimensions, and (3) characterize multiphase flow. The RR-MFC is the first microfluidic experimental platform that allows direct visualization of flow and transport in the pore space of a real subsurface reservoir rock sample, and holds potential to advance our understandings of reactive transport and other subsurface processes relevant to pollutant transport and cleanup in groundwater, as well as energy recovery. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Rapid Detection of γ-H2AX by Flow Cytometry in Cultured Mammalian Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Firsanov, Denis; Solovjeva, Liudmila; Lublinskaya, Olga; Zenin, Valeriy; Kudryavtsev, Igor; Serebryakova, Maria; Svetlova, Maria

    2017-01-01

    Methods commonly used for detection of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) and analysis of cell death are generally time-consuming, and, therefore, any improvements in these techniques are important for researchers and clinicians. At present, flow cytometry is the most rapid method for detection of DSBs and cell viability. In this chapter, we provide our experience and methodological modification of flow cytometry protocol for the detection of γ-H2AX, a well-known marker of DSBs, in fixed mammalian fibroblasts. The modifications permit a reduction in the time required for DSB detection by flow cytometry.

  19. Capture of circulating tumor cells using photoacoustic flowmetry and two phase flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brien, Christine M; Rood, Kyle D; Bhattacharyya, Kiran; DeSouza, Thiago; Sengupta, Shramik; Gupta, Sagar K; Mosley, Jeffrey D; Goldschmidt, Benjamin S; Sharma, Nikhilesh; Viator, John A

    2012-06-01

    Melanoma is the deadliest form of skin cancer, yet current diagnostic methods are unable to detect early onset of metastatic disease. Patients must wait until macroscopic secondary tumors form before malignancy can be diagnosed and treatment prescribed. Detection of cells that have broken off the original tumor and travel through the blood or lymph system can provide data for diagnosing and monitoring metastatic disease. By irradiating enriched blood samples spiked with cultured melanoma cells with nanosecond duration laser light, we induced photoacoustic responses in the pigmented cells. Thus, we can detect and enumerate melanoma cells in blood samples to demonstrate a paradigm for a photoacoustic flow cytometer. Furthermore, we capture the melanoma cells using microfluidic two phase flow, a technique that separates a continuous flow into alternating microslugs of air and blood cell suspension. Each slug of blood cells is tested for the presence of melanoma. Slugs that are positive for melanoma, indicated by photoacoustic waves, are separated from the cytometer for further purification and isolation of the melanoma cell. In this paper, we evaluate the two phase photoacoustic flow cytometer for its ability to detect and capture metastatic melanoma cells in blood.

  20. A theoretical computerized study for the electrical conductivity of arterial pulsatile blood flow by an elastic tube model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Hua; Zhu, Yong; Qin, Kai-Rong

    2016-12-01

    The electrical conductivity of pulsatile blood flow in arteries is an important factor for the application of the electrical impedance measurement system in clinical settings. The electrical conductivity of pulsatile blood flow depends not only on blood-flow-induced red blood cell (RBC) orientation and deformation but also on artery wall motion. Numerous studies have investigated the conductivity of pulsatile blood based on a rigid tube model, in which the effects of wall motion on blood conductivity are not considered. In this study, integrating Ling and Atabek's local flow theory and Maxwell-Fricke theory, we develop an elastic tube model to explore the effects of wall motion as well as blood flow velocity on blood conductivity. The simulation results suggest that wall motion, rather than blood flow velocity, is the primary factor that affects the conductivity of flowing blood in arteries. Copyright © 2016 IPEM. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Systematic study of source mask optimization and verification flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben, Yu; Latypov, Azat; Chua, Gek Soon; Zou, Yi

    2012-06-01

    Source mask optimization (SMO) emerged as powerful resolution enhancement technique (RET) for advanced technology nodes. However, there is a plethora of flow and verification metrics in the field, confounding the end user of the technique. Systemic study of different flows and the possible unification thereof is missing. This contribution is intended to reveal the pros and cons of different SMO approaches and verification metrics, understand the commonality and difference, and provide a generic guideline for RET selection via SMO. The paper discusses 3 different type of variations commonly arise in SMO, namely pattern preparation & selection, availability of relevant OPC recipe for freeform source and finally the metrics used in source verification. Several pattern selection algorithms are compared and advantages of systematic pattern selection algorithms are discussed. In the absence of a full resist model for SMO, alternative SMO flow without full resist model is reviewed. Preferred verification flow with quality metrics of DOF and MEEF is examined.

  2. NATO Advanced Study Institute on Molecular Physics and Hypersonic Flows

    CERN Document Server

    1996-01-01

    Molecular Physics and Hypersonic Flows bridges the gap between the fluid dynamics and molecular physics communities, emphasizing the role played by elementary processes in hypersonic flows. In particular, the work is primarily dedicated to filling the gap between microscopic and macroscopic treatments of the source terms to be inserted in the fluid dynamics codes. The first part of the book describes the molecular dynamics of elementary processes both in the gas phase and in the interaction with surfaces by using quantum mechanical and phenomenological approaches. A second group of contributions describes thermodynamics and transport properties of air components, with special attention to the transport of internal energy. A series of papers is devoted to the experimental and theoretical study of the flow of partially ionized gases. Subsequent contributions treat modern computational techniques for 3-D hypersonic flow. Non-equilibrium vibrational kinetics are then described, together with the coupling of vibra...

  3. Lattice Boltzmann modeling of transport phenomena in fuel cells and flow batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Ao; Shyy, Wei; Zhao, Tianshou

    2017-06-01

    Fuel cells and flow batteries are promising technologies to address climate change and air pollution problems. An understanding of the complex multiscale and multiphysics transport phenomena occurring in these electrochemical systems requires powerful numerical tools. Over the past decades, the lattice Boltzmann (LB) method has attracted broad interest in the computational fluid dynamics and the numerical heat transfer communities, primarily due to its kinetic nature making it appropriate for modeling complex multiphase transport phenomena. More importantly, the LB method fits well with parallel computing due to its locality feature, which is required for large-scale engineering applications. In this article, we review the LB method for gas-liquid two-phase flows, coupled fluid flow and mass transport in porous media, and particulate flows. Examples of applications are provided in fuel cells and flow batteries. Further developments of the LB method are also outlined.

  4. Spaceflight bioreactor studies of cells and tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freed, Lisa E; Vunjak-Novakovic, Gordana

    2002-01-01

    Studies of the fundamental role of gravity in the development and function of biological organisms are a central component of the human exploration of space. Microgravity affects numerous physical phenomena relevant to biological research, including the hydrostatic pressure in fluid filled vesicles, sedimentation of organelles, and buoyancy-driven convection of flow and heat. These physical phenomena can in turn directly and indirectly affect cellular morphology, metabolism, locomotion, secretion of extracellular matrix and soluble signals, and assembly into functional tissues. Studies aimed at distinguishing specific effects of gravity on biological systems require the ability to: (i) control and systematically vary gravity, e.g. by utilizing the microgravity environment of space in conjunction with an in-flight centrifuge; and (ii) maintain constant all other factors in the immediate environment, including in particular concentrations and exchange rates of biochemical species and hydrodynamic shear. The latter criteria imply the need for gravity-independent mechanisms to provide for mass transport between the cells and their environment. Available flight hardware has largely determined the experimental design and scientific objectives of spaceflight cell and tissue culture studies carried out to date. Simple culture vessels have yielded important quantitative data, and helped establish in vitro models of cell locomotion, growth and differentiation in various mammalian cell types including embryonic lung cells [6], lymphocytes [2,8], and renal cells [7,31]. Studies done using bacterial cells established the first correlations between gravity-dependent factors such as cell settling velocity and diffusional distance and the respective cell responses [12]. The development of advanced bioreactors for microgravity cell and tissue culture and for tissue engineering has benefited both research areas and provided relevant in vitro model systems for studies of astronaut

  5. Numerical simulations of carbon monoxide poisoning in high temperature proton exchange membrane fuel cells with various flow channel designs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiao, Kui; Zhou, Yibo; Du, Qing; Yin, Yan; Yu, Shuhai; Li, Xianguo

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► Simulations of CO poisoning in HT-PEMFC with different flow channels are conducted. ► Parallel and serpentine designs result in least and most CO effects, respectively. ► General CO distributions in CLs are similar with different flow channel designs. - Abstract: The performance of high temperature proton exchange membrane fuel cell (HT-PEMFC) is significantly affected by the carbon monoxide (CO) in hydrogen fuel, and the flow channel design may influence the CO poisoning characteristics by changing the reactant flow. In this study, three-dimensional non-isothermal simulations are carried out to investigate the comprehensive flow channel design and CO poisoning effects on the performance of HT-PEMFCs. The numerical results show that when pure hydrogen is supplied, the interdigitated design produces the highest power output, the power output with serpentine design is higher than the two parallel designs, and the parallel-Z and parallel-U designs have similar power outputs. The performance degradation caused by CO poisoning is the least significant with parallel flow channel design, but the most significant with serpentine and interdigitated designs because the cross flow through the electrode is stronger. At low cell voltages (high current densities), the highest power outputs are with interdigitated and parallel flow channel designs at low and high CO fractions in the supplied hydrogen, respectively. The general distributions of absorbed hydrogen and CO coverage fractions in anode catalyst layer (CL) are similar for the different flow channel designs. The hydrogen coverage fraction is higher under the channel than under the land, and is also higher on the gas diffusion layer (GDL) side than on the membrane side; and the CO coverage distribution is opposite to the hydrogen coverage distribution

  6. Continuous enrichment of circulating tumor cells using a microfluidic lateral flow filtration chip.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sung-Woo; Hyun, Kyung-A; Kim, Seung-Il; Kang, Ji-Yoon; Jung, Hyo-Il

    2015-01-16

    The isolation and characterization of circulating tumor cells (CTC) is of great importance in cancer diagnosis and prognosis. Highly sensitive detection of CTCs can be very difficult because they are extremely rare (i.e., 1-5 CTCs per 10(9) erythrocytes) in blood. Recently, various devices have been developed that exploit biochemical (affinity-based) and physical (size or density) methods. Antibody-based isolation has its own limitations, as the expression level of the epitopes for an antibody varies due to the heterogeneity of cancer cells. Harsh conditions associated with physical methods can cause the deformation and damage of CTCs during the isolation process. Here, we propose a microfluidic lateral flow filtration (μ-LaFF) chip in which lateral flow was combined with vertical flow into the filter to capture the CTCs gently. The CTCs experienced weak shear flow owing to the lateral flow and traveled alongside the filter channel until finally being captured. The vertical flow in the filter held the captured cells tightly and served as an exit for uncaptured hematological cells (white and red blood cells). From our μ-LaFF chip we obtained a high capture efficiency (95%) and purity (99%), minimizing any damage to the CTCs. Our μ-LaFF technology is expected to be useful in the diagnosis and prognosis of various cancers. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Asymmetrical flow field-flow fractionation with on-line detection for drug transfer studies: a feasibility study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hinna, A.; Steiniger, F.; Hupfeld, S.

    2014-01-01

    Knowledge about drug retention within colloidal carriers is of uppermost importance particularly if drug targeting is anticipated. The aim of the present study was to evaluate asymmetrical flow field-flow fractionation (AF4) with on-line UV/VIS drug quantification for its suitability to determine......-line absorbance measurements was found feasible for the chosen model drug, but careful (re-) evaluation of turbidity effects is crucial for other drug and carrier combinations....

  8. The influence of venous blood flow on the retinal ganglion cell complex in patients with primary open angle glaucoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. I. Kurysheva

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To study the influence of venous blood flow on the ganglion cell complex (GCC in patients with preperimetric and perimetric open angle glaucoma.Methods: 74 patients were included in the research. 59 eyes and 62 eyes were diagnosed with preperimetric and perimetric open angle glaucoma respectively. The mean age was 56.5±10.5 years. 22 (12 female and 10 male healthy individuals constituted the control group. The ganglion cell complex and retinal nerve fibre layer were evaluated with the help of optical coherence tomography (RTVue-100 OCT, Optovue, Inc., Fremont, CA. Ocular blood flow was measured by Color Doppler Imaging (multifunctional VOLUSON 730 ProSystem. The statistical analysis included correlation between GCC and RNFL thickness in both glaucoma groups.Results: The results showed a statistically significant reduction of venous blood flow velocity in both glaucoma groups compared to the control group. No difference in venous blood flow parameters between two glaucoma groups was found, except resistance index, which was higher in perimetric group in comparison to preperimetric group. A correlation was also obtained between venous blood flow parameters and GCC and RNFL thickness in both glaucoma groups.Conclusion: Early GCC damage in glaucoma might occur due to venous blood flow reduction. This fact may be of great value in understanding glaucoma pathogenesis and search for novel treatment options.

  9. Study of two-phase critical flows through small breaches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chalant, Jean Marc; Willocx, Marc

    1981-06-01

    The first part of this academic document reports experimental works performed for the design and realisation of an installation (DALIDA) aimed at the study of critical flow rates through a hole. As this experimental study had to be given up for practical reasons, the authors focused on the theoretical study of this phenomenon. Based on a model proposed by Lackme for critical flows in long tubes, the authors developed a model which could be applied to the case of a tube ended by a hole. Numerical results have been obtained which are still to be experimentally confirmed [fr

  10. Contribution to the study of unsteady condensation in transonic flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Collignan, B.; Laali, A.R.

    1993-12-01

    The aim of this thesis is the study of transonic steam flows with condensation, especially at high pressure. This study includes a numerical part an experimental one. The modelling has consisted of introducing a spontaneous condensation model in a one-dimensional Euler code using steam-water thermodynamic tables. Calculations, performed with this code, are in good agreement with experimental results at low pressure. The experimental study has been undertaken on a high pressure experimental loop installed at the Bugey nuclear power plant. We have studied steam flows in nozzles. The results obtained show that a partial heterogeneous condensation occurs in these flows. This proportion is stronger if the expansion rate of the flow is low and if the inlet pressure is high. However, a correction factor is obtained for high pressure nucleation rate model from experimental results. No unsteady condensation has been observed for flows between 15 bars and 50 bars with the steam available at Bugey power plant. (authors). figs., 71 refs., 6 annexes

  11. A new modified-serpentine flow field for application in high temperature polymer electrolyte fuel cell

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Singdeo, Debanand; Dey, Tapobrata; Gaikwad, Shrihari

    2017-01-01

    Flow field design for the distribution of reactants and products on the electrode surface plays an important role in the overall performance of the fuel cell. It acts as a crucial factor when the laboratory scale fuel cell is scaled up for commercial applications. In the present work, a novel flo...

  12. Miniaturized cavity ring-down detection in a liquid flow cell

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bahnev, B.; van der Sneppen, L.; Wiskerke, A.E.; Ariese, F.; Gooijer, C.; Ubachs, W.M.G.

    2005-01-01

    A novel method for applying cavity ring-down spectroscopy in the liquid phase, compatible with LC analyses, is presented. The core of the setup is a home-built cavity ring-down flow cell (cell volume 12 μL) that is constructed using a silicon rubber spacer, which is clamped leak-tight between two

  13. Water flow induced transport of Pseudomonas fluorescens cells through soil columns as affected by inoculant treatment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hekman, W.E.; Heijnen, C.E.; Trevors, J.T.; Elsas, van J.D.

    1994-01-01

    Water flow induced transport of Pseudomonas fluorescens cells through soil columns was measured as affected by the inoculant treatment. Bacterial cells were introduced into the topsoil of columns, either encapsulated in alginate beads of different types or mixed with bentonite clay in concentrations

  14. Detection of alloreactive T cells by flow cytometry : A new test compared with limiting dilution assay

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Haan, A; van der Gun, [No Value; van der Bij, W; de Leij, LFMH; Prop, J

    2002-01-01

    Background. Frequencies of alloreactive T cells determined by limiting dilution assays (LDA) may not adequately reflect the donor-reactive immune status in transplant recipients. To reevaluate LDA frequencies, we developed a flow cytometry test for direct determination of alloreactive T-cell

  15. Effects of Chronic Blood-Flow Restriction Exercise on Skeletal Muscle Size and Myogenic Satellite Cell Expression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aagaard, Per; Jacobsen, Mikkel; Jensen, Kasper Y.

    2016-01-01

    of continued sports activity, resulting in visible hypertrophy of his left leg. AIM: To study the effect of chronic blood-flow restricted (BFR) exercise conditions on skeletal muscle size and myogenic satellite cell (SC) expression in an arterio-venous shunt patient. METHODS: Muscle biopsies were obtained from......-regulation in myogenic satellite cell activity within all stages of the cell cycle, which was accompanied by substantial muscle hypertrophy. Specifically, muscle fiber cross-sectional area (40%) and myonuclei number (15%) were elevated in the affected leg, together with an elevated myonuclear domain (20%). This single......-case study confirms previous result from our Lab demonstrating that blood-flow restricted muscle exercise leads to a marked activation of myogenic SCs, upregulated myonuclei number and marked myofiber hypertrophy....

  16. Development of a flow cytometric assay to quantify lymphocyte adhesion to cytokine-stimulated human endothelial and biliary epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korlipara, L V; Leon, M P; Rix, D A; Douglas, M S; Gibbs, P; Bassendine, M F; Kirby, J A

    1996-05-27

    The adhesive interaction between T lymphocytes and parenchymal cells is of importance for many processes of the cellular immune response. This adhesion is regulated by the activation status of the T cell and by cytokines in the microenvironment which can alter adhesion molecule expression by endothelial and epithelial cells. In this study results from an isotopic adhesion assay were compared with those from a flow cytometric assay in order to determine which was most appropriate for the investigation of lymphocyte adhesion to human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) and intrahepatic biliary epithelial cells (HIBEC). Treatment of both these cell types with the proinflammatory cytokines interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) or tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) significantly upregulated expression of intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1). Treatment with TNF-alpha also induced endothelial cells to express vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1). The isotopic assay demonstrated increased adhesion of lymphoblasts to HUVEC which had been stimulated with cytokines for 15 h but failed to detect major changes in adhesion following 72 h of cytokine treatment of HUVEC or HIBEC. However, the flow cytometric assay reproducibly demonstrated increased adhesion following cytokine treatment for both these time periods; these increases corresponded with the changes in adhesion molecule expression by cytokine-stimulated HUVEC and HIBEC targets. The differences in apparent adhesion measured by the two assays after cytokine stimulation for 72 h may be explained by cytokine-induced changes in the morphology and confluency of cultured cells. Results of the isotopic assay are proportional to the total number of lymphoid cells bound by the cultured target cells and will be distorted by changes in effective target cell area. The flow cytometric assay measures the mean number of lymphoid cells bound by each target cell and is independent of the total binding area. It is concluded

  17. Using a Microfluidic-Microelectric Device to Directly Separate Serum/Blood Cells from a Continuous Whole Bloodstream Flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ming-Wen; Jeng, Kuo-Shyang; Yu, Ming-Che; Su, Jui-Chih

    2012-03-01

    To make the rapid separation of serum/blood cells possible in a whole bloodstream flow without centrifugation and Pasteur pipette suction, the first step is to use a microchannel to transport the whole bloodstream into a microdevice. Subsequently, the resulting serum/blood cell is separated from the whole bloodstream by applying other technologies. Creating the serum makes this subsequent separation possible. To perform the actual separation, a microchannel with multiple symmetric curvilinear microelectrodes has been designed on a glass substrate and fabricated with micro-electromechanical system technology. The blood cells can be observed clearly by black-field microscopy imaging. A local dielectrophoretic (DEP) force, obtained from nonuniform electric fields, was used for manipulating and separating the blood cells from a continuous whole bloodstream. The experimental studies show that the blood cells incur a local dielectrophoretic field when they are suspended in a continuous flow (v = 0.02-0.1 cm/s) and exposed to AC fields at a frequency of 200 kHz. Using this device, the symmetric curvilinear microelectrodes provide a local dielectrophoretic field that is sufficiently strong for separating nearby blood cells and purifying the serum in a continuous whole bloodstream flow.

  18. Development of a micro flow-through cell for high field NMR spectroscopy.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alam, Todd Michael; McIntyre, Sarah K.

    2011-05-01

    A highly transportable micro flow-through detection cell for nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy has been designed, fabricated and tested. This flow-through cell allows for the direct coupling between liquid chromatography (LC) and gel permeation chromatography (GPC) resulting in the possibility of hyphenated LC-NMR and GPC-NMR. The advantage of the present flow cell design is that it is independent and unconnected to the detection probe electronics, is compatible with existing commercial high resolution NMR probes, and as such can be easily implemented at any NMR facility. Two different volumes were fabricated corresponding to between {approx}3.8 and 10 {micro}L detection volume. Examples of the performance of the cell on different NMR instruments, and using different NMR detection probes were demonstrated.

  19. Experimental studies on the flow through soft tubes and channels

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    studies were designed to examine whether the compliance of dolphin skins could cause either transition delay, that is, an increase in the Reynolds number for laminar-turbulent transition or a reduction in the turbulence intensities. The first experimental studies on internal flows through conduits bounded by soft walls was.

  20. Experimental study of bubbly flow using image processing techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fu, Yucheng, E-mail: ycfu@vt.edu; Liu, Yang, E-mail: liu130@vt.edu

    2016-12-15

    This paper presents an experimental study of bubbly flows at relatively high void fractions using an advanced image processing method. Bubble overlapping is a common problem in such flows and the past studies often treat the overlapping bubbles as a whole, which introduces considerable measurement uncertainties. In this study, a hybrid method combining intersection point detection and watershed segmentation is used to separate the overlapping bubbles. In order to reconstruct bubbles from separated segments, a systematic procedure is developed which can preserve more features captured in the raw image compared to the simple ellipse fitting method. The distributions of void fraction, interfacial area concentration, number density and velocity are obtained from the extracted bubble information. High-speed images of air-water bubbly flows are acquired and processed for eight test runs conducted in a 30 mm × 10 mm rectangular channel. The developed image processing scheme can effectively separate overlapping bubbles and the results compare well with the measurements by the gas flow meter and double-sensor conductivity probe. The development of flows in transverse and mainstream directions are analyzed and compared with the prediction made by the one-dimensional interfacial area transport equation (IATE) and the bubble number density transport equation.

  1. Flow cytometric assessment of chicken T cell-mediated immune responses after Newcastle disease virus vaccination and challenge

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dalgaard, T. S.; Norup, L. R.; Pedersen, A.R.

    2010-01-01

    . Despite a delayed NDV-specific antibody response to vaccination, L133 appeared to be better protected than L130 in the subsequent infection challenge as determined by the presence of viral genomes. Peripheral blood was analyzed by flow cytometry and responses in vaccinated/challenged birds were studied...... by 5-color immunophenotyping as well as by measuring the proliferative capacity of NDV-specific T cells after recall stimulation. Immunophenotyping identified L133 as having a significantly lower CD4/CD8 ratio and a lower frequency of γδ T cells than L130 in the peripheral T cell compartment...

  2. Flow-induced endothelial cell alignment requires the RhoGEF Trio as a scaffold protein to polarize active Rac1 distribution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kroon, Jeffrey; Heemskerk, Niels; Kalsbeek, Martin J T; de Waard, Vivian; van Rijssel, Jos; van Buul, Jaap D

    2017-07-01

    Endothelial cells line the lumen of the vessel wall and are exposed to flow. In linear parts of the vessel, the endothelial cells experience laminar flow, resulting in endothelial cell alignment in the direction of flow, thereby protecting the vessel wall from inflammation and permeability. In order for endothelial cells to align, they undergo rapid remodeling of the actin cytoskeleton by local activation of the small GTPase Rac1. However, it is not clear whether sustained and local activation of Rac1 is required for long-term flow-induced cell alignment. Using a FRET-based DORA Rac1 biosensor, we show that local Rac1 activity remains for 12 h upon long-term flow. Silencing studies show that the RhoGEF Trio is crucial for keeping active Rac1 at the downstream side of the cell and, as a result, for long-term flow-induced cell alignment. Surprisingly, Trio appears to be not involved in flow-induced activation of Rac1. Our data show that flow induces Rac1 activity at the downstream side of the cell in a Trio-dependent manner and that Trio functions as a scaffold protein rather than a functional GEF under long-term flow conditions. © 2017 Kroon et al. This article is distributed by The American Society for Cell Biology under license from the author(s). Two months after publication it is available to the public under an Attribution–Noncommercial–Share Alike 3.0 Unported Creative Commons License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0).

  3. Flow fraction in charged rectangular microchannel to optimally design hydrodynamic filtration chip for cell sorting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chun, Myung-Suk; Jeong, Sohyun; Kim, Jae Hun; Lee, Tae Seok

    2015-11-01

    Among the passive separations, hydrodynamic filtration (HDF) can perform the fractionation of cells or particles by selective extraction of streamlines controlled by the flow fraction at each branch. Only the stream near the sidewall enters the branches as the focusing, with the amount of fluid leaving the main channel being determined by the flow distribution related to the hydraulic flow resistances. Its understanding is important, but in-depth consideration has not been treated until now. The virtual boundary of the fluid layer should be first specified, and the parabolic velocity profile starts to form from the steady state flow with high Péclet numbers. We computed the 3-dimensional flow profile at the rectangular cross-section with any aspect ratios, by considering electrokinetic transport coupled with the Poisson-Boltzmann and Navier-Stokes equations. The chip was designed with the parameters rigorously determined by the complete analysis of laminar flow for flow fraction and complicated networks of main and multi-branched channels for cell sorting into the finite number of subpopulations. For potential applications to the precise sorting, our designed microfluidic chip can be validated by applying model cells consisting of heterogeneous subpopulations. Supported by the KIST Institutional Program (No. 2E25382).

  4. An automated method for dynamic red blood cell aggregate detection in microfluidic flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehri, R; Niazi, E; Mavriplis, C; Fenech, M

    2018-01-31

    Red blood cell (RBC) aggregation is a unique phenomenon that occurs when red blood cells are subjected to low shear rates. Little is known about the sizes, shapes and behaviour of aggregates flowing in healthy humans. However, excessive aggregation has been shown to be an indication of pathological conditions. Therefore, characterizing RBC aggregates is important to medical research. The objective of this study was to develop a reliable technique based on image processing to assess and characterize human RBC aggregation subjected to controlled and measurable shear rates in a two-fluid flow microfluidic shearing system. Images of RBC suspensions at [Formula: see text], [Formula: see text] and [Formula: see text] entrained by a phosphate buffered saline solution in a PDMS microchannel were captured with a high speed camera. An algorithm for processing the RBC aggregate images is presented and validated (1) on a sample of known diameter hollow glass microspheres and (2) by comparing RBC aggregate size results with those of an ImageJ image processing technique and those obtained by manual detection by two independent researchers. The proposed image processing algorithm provides a very good agreement with the manufacturer data for the glass microspheres. It also performs well on the RBC suspension images, with errors of 2-4 [Formula: see text] with respect to the manual results. The proposed automated method for RBC aggregate detection is found to be reliable and fairly accurate and will serve researchers and, perhaps in the future, clinicians to assess healthy and pathological RBC aggregation under flowing conditions.

  5. A small-scale flow alkaline fuel cell for on-site production of hydrogen peroxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brillas, Enric; Alcaide, Francisco; Cabot, Pere-Lluis

    2002-01-01

    The behavior of a small-scale flow alkaline fuel cell (AFC) built-up for on-site production of HO 2 - using commercial gas-diffusion electrodes has been studied. It produces a spontaneous current due to the oxidation of H 2 to H 2 O at the H 2 -diffusion anode and the reduction of O 2 to HO 2 - at the O 2 -diffusion cathode, while a fresh 1.0-6.0 mol dm -3 KOH electrolyte at 15.0-45.0 deg. C is injected through it. Under circulation of HO 2 - +KOH solutions in open circuit, the flow AFC behaves as a two-electron reversible system. When it is shorted with an external load (R ext ), steady cell voltage-current density curves are found. The use of O 2 /N 2 mixtures to fed the cathode causes a loss of its performance, being required to supply pure O 2 to yield a maximum HO 2 - electrogeneration. The current density and HO 2 - productivity increase with raising OH - concentration, temperature and pressure of O 2 fed. At R ext =0.10 Ω, a current efficiency close to 100% is obtained, and current densities >100 mA cm -2 are achieved for 1.0 mol dm -3 KOH at 45.0 deg. C and for higher KOH concentrations at 25.0 deg. C. The flow AFC can work under optimum conditions up to 6.0 mol dm -3 KOH and 45.0 deg. C for possible industrial applications

  6. Improved flow cytometric assessment reveals distinct microvesicle (cell-derived microparticle signatures in joint diseases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bence György

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Microvesicles (MVs, earlier referred to as microparticles, represent a major type of extracellular vesicles currently considered as novel biomarkers in various clinical settings such as autoimmune disorders. However, the analysis of MVs in body fluids has not been fully standardized yet, and there are numerous pitfalls that hinder the correct assessment of these structures. METHODS: In this study, we analyzed synovial fluid (SF samples of patients with osteoarthritis (OA, rheumatoid arthritis (RA and juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA. To assess factors that may confound MV detection in joint diseases, we used electron microscopy (EM, Nanoparticle Tracking Analysis (NTA and mass spectrometry (MS. For flow cytometry, a method commonly used for phenotyping and enumeration of MVs, we combined recent advances in the field, and used a novel approach of differential detergent lysis for the exclusion of MV-mimicking non-vesicular signals. RESULTS: EM and NTA showed that substantial amounts of particles other than MVs were present in SF samples. Beyond known MV-associated proteins, MS analysis also revealed abundant plasma- and immune complex-related proteins in MV preparations. Applying improved flow cytometric analysis, we demonstrate for the first time that CD3(+ and CD8(+ T-cell derived SF MVs are highly elevated in patients with RA compared to OA patients (p=0.027 and p=0.009, respectively, after Bonferroni corrections. In JIA, we identified reduced numbers of B cell-derived MVs (p=0.009, after Bonferroni correction. CONCLUSIONS: Our results suggest that improved flow cytometric assessment of MVs facilitates the detection of previously unrecognized disease-associated vesicular signatures.

  7. Substance flow analysis in Finland - Four case studies on N and P flows

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Antikainen, R.

    2007-07-01

    Nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) are essential elements for all living organisms. However, in excess, they contribute to such environmental problems as aquatic and terrestrial eutrophication (N, P), acidification (N), global warming (N), groundwater pollution (N), depletion of stratospheric ozone (N), formulation of tropospheric ozone (N) and poor urban air quality (N). Globally, human action has multiplied the volume of N and P cycling since the onset of industrialization. Themultiplication is a result of intensified agriculture, increased energy consumption and population growth. Industrial ecology (IE) is a discipline, in which human interaction with the ecosystems is investigated using a systems analytical approach. The main idea behind IE is that industrial systems resemble ecosystems, and, like them, industrial systems can then be described using material, energy and information flows and stocks. Industrial systems are dependent on the resources provided by the biosphere, and these two cannot be separated from each other. When studying substance flows, the aims of the research from the viewpoint of IE can be, for instance, to elucidate the ways how the cycles of a certain substance could be more closed and how the flows of a certain substance could be decreased per unit of production (= dematerialization). IE uses analytical research tools such as material and substance flow analysis (MFA, SFA), energy flow analysis (EFA), life cycle assessment (LCA) and material input per service unit (MIPS). In Finland, N and P are studied widely in different ecosystems and environmental emissions. A holistic picture comparing different societal systems is, however, lacking. In this thesis, flows of N and P were examined in Finland using SFA in the following four subsystems: (I) forest industry and use of wood fuels, II) food production and consumption, III) energy, and IV) municipal waste. A detailed analysis at the end of the 1990s was performed. Furthermore, historical

  8. Theoretical and Empirical Studies of the Basic Structure of Turbulent Shear Flows, Including Separated Flows and Effects of Wall Curvature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-01-31

    instability leading to longitudinal roll cells called Taylor-Gortler cells is responsible for the increase of mean surface stress and heat flux. The flow...that provides a guar- antee against taking data in some range of the test-parameter hyperspace where uncertainties aggregate to high values. As Prof

  9. Classification of biological cells using a sound wave based flow cytometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strohm, Eric M.; Gnyawali, Vaskar; Van De Vondervoort, Mia; Daghighi, Yasaman; Tsai, Scott S. H.; Kolios, Michael C.

    2016-03-01

    A flow cytometer that uses sound waves to determine the size of biological cells is presented. In this system, a microfluidic device made of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) was developed to hydrodynamically flow focus cells in a single file through a target area. Integrated into the microfluidic device was an ultrasound transducer with a 375 MHz center frequency, aligned opposite the transducer was a pulsed 532 nm laser focused into the device by a 10x objective. Each passing cell was insonfied with a high frequency ultrasound pulse, and irradiated with the laser. The resulting ultrasound and photoacoustic waves from each cell were analyzed using signal processing methods, where features in the power spectra were compared to theoretical models to calculate the cell size. Two cell lines with different size distributions were used to test the system: acute myeloid leukemia cells (AML) and melanoma cells. Over 200 cells were measured using this system. The average calculated diameter of the AML cells was 10.4 +/- 2.5 μm using ultrasound, and 11.4 +/- 2.3 μm using photoacoustics. The average diameter of the melanoma cells was 16.2 +/- 2.9 μm using ultrasound, and 18.9 +/- 3.5 μm using photoacoustics. The cell sizes calculated using ultrasound and photoacoustic methods agreed with measurements using a Coulter Counter, where the AML cells were 9.8 +/- 1.8 μm and the melanoma cells were 16.0 +/- 2.5 μm. These results demonstrate a high speed method of assessing cell size using sound waves, which is an alternative method to traditional flow cytometry techniques.

  10. Confocal backscattering-based detection of leukemic cells in flowing blood samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greiner, Cherry; Hunter, Martin; Rius, Francisca; Huang, Peter; Georgakoudi, Irene

    2011-10-01

    The prognostic value of assessing minimal residual disease (MRD) in leukemia has been established with advancements in flow cytometry and PCR. Nonetheless, these techniques are limited by high equipment costs, complex, and costly cell processing and the need for highly trained personnel. Here, we demonstrate the potential of exploiting differences in the relative intensities of backscattered light at three wavelengths to detect the presence of leukemic cells in samples containing varying mixtures of white blood cells (WBCs) and leukemic cells flowing through microfluidic channels. Using 405, 488, and 633 nm illumination, we identify distinct light scattering intensity distributions for Nalm-6 leukemic cells, normal mononuclear (PBMC) and polymorphonuclear (PMN) white blood cells and red blood cells. We exploit these differences to develop cell classification algorithms, whose performance is evaluated based on simultaneous acquisition of light scattering and fluorescence flow cytometry data. When this algorithm is used prospectively for the analysis of samples consisting of mixtures of PBMCs and leukemic cells, we achieve an average specificity and sensitivity of leukemic cell detection of 99.6 and 45.2%, respectively. When we consider samples that include leukemic cells along with PMNs and PBMCs, which can be acquired using a simple red blood cell lysis step following venipuncture, the specificity and sensitivity of the approach decreases to 91.6 and 39.5%, respectively. On the basis of the performance of these algorithms, we estimate that 42 or 71 μL of blood would be adequate to confirm the presence of leukemia at an 80% power level in samples containing 0.01% leukemia to either PBMCs or PBMCs and PMNs, respectively. Therefore, light scattering-based flow cytometry in a microfluidic platform could provide a low cost, highly portable, minimally invasive approach for detection and monitoring of leukemic patients. This could offer significant improvements

  11. Microfluidic Study of Foams Flow for Enhanced Oil Recovery (EOR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Quennouz N.

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we report an experimental study of foam flow in different channel geometries using microfluidic devices in the framework of Enhanced Oil Recovery (EOR. Two different processes of foam formation are studied. The first corresponds to co-injection of gas and water through a cross junction which gives rise to a monodisperse foam. The second one corresponds to the fragmentation of large bubbles by a porous media, a foam formation process simulating multiphase flows in rocks. The foam formation is completely controlled and characterized varying both the water and gas pressure applied. We also use a microdevice with two permeabilities that permits to highlight the diversion of the continuous phase in the low permeability channels. The observations are important for a better understanding of the implied phenomena in EOR as well as to determine pertinent data to feed flow simulators.

  12. Getting into the flow: Red cells go on a roll, two-component vesicles swing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viallat, Annie; Dupire, Jules; Khelloufi, Kamel; Al Halifa, Al Hair; Adhesion and Inflammation Team

    2013-11-01

    Red blood cells are soft capsules. Under shear flow, their two known motions were ``tumbling'' and ``swinging-tank treading,'' depending on cell mechanics and flow conditions. We reveal new wobbling regimes, among which the ``rolling'' regime, where red cells move as wheels on a road. We show, by coupling two video-microscopy approaches providing multi-directional cell pictures that the orientation of cells flipping into the flow is determined by the shear rate. Rolling permits to avoid energetically costly cellular deformations and is a true signature of the cytoskeleton elasticity. We highlight two transient dynamics: an intermittent regime during the ``tank-treading-to-flipping'' transition and a Frisbee-like ``spinning'' regime during the ``rolling-to-tank-treading'' transition. We find that the biconcave red cell shape is very stable under moderate shear stresses, and we interpret this result in terms of shape memory and elastic buckling. Finally, we generate lipid vesicles with a shape memory by using two lipids with different bending rigidities. These vesicles swing in shear flow similarly to red blood cells but their non-axisymmetric stress-free shape changes the periodicity of the motion and induces specific features.

  13. Sex-sorting sperm using flow cytometry/cell sorting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garner, Duane L; Evans, K Michael; Seidel, George E

    2013-01-01

    The sex of mammalian offspring can be predetermined by flow sorting relatively pure living populations of X- and Y-chromosome-bearing sperm. This method is based on precise staining of the DNA of sperm with the nucleic acid-specific fluorophore, Hoechst 33342, to differentiate between the subpopulations of X- and Y-sperm. The fluorescently stained sperm are then sex-sorted using a specialized high speed sorter, MoFlo(®) SX XDP, and collected into biologically supportive media prior to reconcentration and cryopreservation in numbers adequate for use with artificial insemination for some species or for in vitro fertilization. Sperm sorting can provide subpopulations of X- or Y-bearing bovine sperm at rates in the 8,000 sperm/s range while maintaining; a purity of 90% such that it has been applied to cattle on a commercial basis. The sex of offspring has been predetermined in a wide variety of mammalian species including cattle, swine, horses, sheep, goats, dogs, cats, deer, elk, dolphins, water buffalo as well as in humans using flow cytometric sorting of X- and Y-sperm.

  14. Particle and Blood Cell Dynamics in Oscillatory Flows Final Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Restrepo, Juan M.

    2008-01-01

    Our aim has been to uncover fundamental aspects of the suspension and dislodgement of particles in wall-bounded oscillatory flows, in flows characterized by Reynolds numbers encompassing the situation found in rivers and near shores (and perhaps in some industrial processes). Our research tools are computational and our coverage of parameter space fairly broad. Computational means circumvent many complications that make the measurement of the dynamics of particles in a laboratory setting an impractical task, especially on the broad range of parameter space we plan to report upon. The impact of this work on the geophysical problem of sedimentation is boosted considerably by the fact that the proposed calculations can be considered ab-initio, in the sense that little to no modeling is done in generating dynamics of the particles and of the moving fluid: we use a three-dimensional Navier Stokes solver along with straightforward boundary conditions. Hence, to the extent that Navier Stokes is a model for an ideal incompressible isotropic Newtonian fluid, the calculations yield benchmark values for such things as the drag, buoyancy, and lift of particles, in a highly controlled environment. Our approach will be to make measurements of the lift, drag, and buoyancy of particles, by considering progressively more complex physical configurations and physics.

  15. Experimental study of vortex breakdown in a cylindrical, swirling flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens, J. L.; Celik, Z. Z.; Cantwell, B. J.; Lopez, J. M.

    1996-01-01

    The stability of a steady, vortical flow in a cylindrical container with one rotating endwall has been experimentally examined to gain insight into the process of vortex breakdowwn. The dynamics of the flow are governed by the Reynolds number (Re) and the aspect ratio of the cylinder. Re is given by Omega R(sup 2)/nu, where Omega is the speed of rotation of the endwall, R is the cylinder radius, and nu is the kinematic viscosity of the fluid filling the cylinder. The aspect ratio is H/R, where H is the height of the cylinder. Numerical simulation studies disagree whether or not the steady breakdown is stable beyond a critical Reynolds number, Re(sub c). Previous experimental researches have considered the steady and unsteady flows near Re(sub c), but have not explored the stability of the steady breakdown structures beyond this value. In this investigation, laser induced fluorescence was utilized to observe both steady and unsteady vortex breakdown at a fixed H/R of 2.5 with Re varying around Re(sub c). When the Re of a steady flow was slowly increased beyond Re(sub c), the breakdown structure remained steady even though unsteadiness was possible. In addition, a number of hysteresis events involving the oscillation periods of the unsteady flow were noted. The results show that both steady and unsteady vortex breakdown occur for a limited range of Re above Re(sub c). Also, with increasing Re, complex flow transformations take place that alter the period at which the unsteady flow oscillates.

  16. Cyclic flow shop scheduling problem with two-machine cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bożejko Wojciech

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available In the paper a variant of cyclic production with setups and two-machine cell is considered. One of the stages of the problem solving consists of assigning each operation to the machine on which it will be carried out. The total number of such assignments is exponential. We propose a polynomial time algorithm finding the optimal operations to machines assignment.

  17. Mechanisms of eosinophil adhesion to endothelial cells under flow conditions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ulfman, L.H.

    2002-01-01

    Eosinophils play an important role in allergic inflammatory diseases such as allergic asthma. Infiltrates of these cells are present in the interstitium and the lumen of the bronchi of asthmatic patients. Eosinophils must pass the endothelium to enter this site of inflammation. A widely accepted

  18. Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Saccharomyces cerevisiae Biofilm in Flow Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weiss Nielsen, Martin; Sternberg, Claus; Molin, Søren

    2011-01-01

    Many microbial cells have the ability to form sessile microbial communities defined as biofilms that have altered physiological and pathological properties compared to free living microorganisms. Biofilms in nature are often difficult to investigate and reside under poorly defined conditions(1). ...

  19. Shape Recovery of Elastic Red Blood Cells from Shear Flow Induced Deformation in Three Dimensions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Yan; Gounley, John

    2015-11-01

    Red blood cells undergo substantial shape changes in vivo. Modeled as an elastic capsule, the shape recovery of a three dimensional biconcave capsule from shear flow is studied for different preferred elastic and bending configuration. The fluid-structure interaction is modeled using the multiple-relaxation time lattice Boltzmann (LBM) and immersed boundary (IBM) methods. Based on the studies of the limited shape memory observed in three dimensions, the shape recovery is caused by the preferred elastic configuration, at least when paired with a constant spontaneous curvature. For these capsules, the incompleteness of the shape recovery observed precludes any conjecture about whether a single or multiple phase(s) are necessary to describe the recovery process. Longer simulations and a more stable methodology will be necessary. Y. Peng acknowledges support from Old Dominion University Research Foundation Grant #503921 and National Science Foundation Grant DMS-1319078.

  20. Flow-cytometric measurement of CD4-8- T cells bearing T-cell receptor αβ chains, 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kusunoki, Yoichiro; Hirai, Yuko; Kyoizumi, Seishi; Akiyama, Mitoshi.

    1992-09-01

    In this study we detected rare, possibly abnormal, T cells bearing CD3 surface antigen and T-cell receptor (TCR) αβ chains but lacking both CD4 and CD8 antigens (viz., TCRαβ + CD4 - 8 - cells, as determined by flow cytometry). The TCRαβ + CD4 - 8 - T cells were detected at a mean frequency of 0.63 ± 0.35 % (mean ± standard deviation) in peripheral blood TCRαβ + cells of 119 normal persons. Two unusual cases besides the 119 normal persons showed extremely elevated frequencies of TCRαβ + CD4 - 8 - T cells, viz., approximately 5 % to 10 % and 14 % to 19 % in whole TCRαβ + cells. Both individuals were males who were otherwise physiologically quite normal with no history of severe illness, and these high frequencies were also observed in blood samples collected 2 or 8 years prior to the current measurements. The TCRαβ + CD4 - 8 - T cells of the two individuals were found to express mature T-cell markers such as CD2,3, and 5 antigens, as well as natural killer (NK) cell markers, viz., CD11b, 16, 56, and 57 antigens, when peripheral blood lymphocytes were subjected to three-color flow cytometry. Lectin-dependent or redirected antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicities were observed for both freshly sorted TCRαβ + CD4 - 8 - cells and in vitro established clones. Nevertheless, NK-like activity was not detected. Further, Southern blot analysis of TCRβ and γ genes revealed identical rearrangement patterns for all the TCRαβ + CD4 - 8 - clones established in vitro. These results suggest that the TCRαβ + CD4 - 8 - T cells from these two mean exhibit unique characteristics and proliferate clonally in vivo. (author)

  1. Flow cytometric bacterial cell counts challenge conventional heterotrophic plate counts for routine microbiological drinking water monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Nevel, S; Koetzsch, S; Proctor, C R; Besmer, M D; Prest, E I; Vrouwenvelder, J S; Knezev, A; Boon, N; Hammes, F

    2017-04-15

    Drinking water utilities and researchers continue to rely on the century-old heterotrophic plate counts (HPC) method for routine assessment of general microbiological water quality. Bacterial cell counting with flow cytometry (FCM) is one of a number of alternative methods that challenge this status quo and provide an opportunity for improved water quality monitoring. After more than a decade of application in drinking water research, FCM methodology is optimised and established for routine application, supported by a considerable amount of data from multiple full-scale studies. Bacterial cell concentrations obtained by FCM enable quantification of the entire bacterial community instead of the minute fraction of cultivable bacteria detected with HPC (typically water samples per day, depending on the laboratory and selected staining procedure(s). Moreover, many studies have shown FCM total (TCC) and intact (ICC) cell concentrations to be reliable and robust process variables, responsive to changes in the bacterial abundance and relevant for characterising and monitoring drinking water treatment and distribution systems. The purpose of this critical review is to initiate a constructive discussion on whether FCM could replace HPC in routine water quality monitoring. We argue that FCM provides a faster, more descriptive and more representative quantification of bacterial abundance in drinking water. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. DPD simulation on the dynamics of a healthy and infected red blood cell in flow through a constricted channel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoque, Sazid Zamal; Anand, D. Vijay; Patnaik, B. S. V.

    2017-11-01

    The state of the red blood cell (either healthy or infected RBC) will influence its deformation dynamics. Since the pathological condition related to RBC, primarily originates from a single cell infection, therefore, it is important to relate the deformation dynamics to the mechanical properties (such as, bending rigidity and membrane elasticity). In the present study, numerical simulation of a healthy and malaria infected RBC in a constricted channel is analyzed. The flow simulations are carried out using finite sized dissipative particle dynamics (FDPD) method in conjunction with a discrete model that represents the membrane of the RBC. The numerical equivalent of optical tweezers test is validated against the experimental studies. Two different types of constrictions, viz., a converging-diverging type tapered channel and a stenosed microchannel are considered for the simulation. The effect of degree of constriction and the flow rate effect on the RBC is investigated. It was observed that, as the flow rate decreases, the infected RBC completely blocks the micro vessel. The transit time for infected cell drastically increases compared to healthy RBC. Our simulations indicate that, there is a critical flow rate below which infected RBC cannot pass through the micro capillary.

  3. A fundamental study of a variable critical nozzle flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jea Hyung; Kim, Heuy Dong; Park, Kyung Am

    2003-01-01

    The mass flow rate of gas flow through critical nozzle depends on the nozzle supply conditions and the cross-sectional area at the nozzle throat. In order that the critical nozzle can be operated at a wide range of supply conditions, the nozzle throat diameter should be controlled to change the flow passage area. This can be achieved by means of a variable critical nozzle. In the present study, both experimental and computational works are performed to develop variable critical nozzle. A cone-cylinder with a diameter of d is inserted into conventional critical nozzle. It can move both upstream and downstream, thereby changing the cross-sectional area of the nozzle throat. Computational work using the axisymmetric, compressible Navier-Stokes equations is carried out to simulate the variable critical nozzle flow. An experiment is performed to measure the mass flow rate through variable critical nozzle. The present computational results are in close agreement with measured ones. The boundary layer displacement and momentum thickness are given as a function of Reynolds number. An empirical equation is obtained to predict the discharge coefficient of variable critical nozzle

  4. Influence study of flow separation on the nozzle vibration response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geng Li

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available In the present paper, the vibration response difference of the upper stage nozzle with higher expansion ratio between ground and altitude simulation hot-firing test is analyzed. It indicates that the acceleration response of the nozzle under ground hot-firing test is much higher than that of the altitude condition. In order to find the essential reason, the experimental and numerical simulation studies of the flow separation are developed by using the test engine nozzle. The experimental data show that the nozzle internal flow occurred flow separation and the divergence cone internal wall pressure pulsation increased significantly downstream from the separation location. The numerical simulation and experimental results indicate that the increase of internal wall pressure and turbulence pulsating pressure are the substantial reason of vibration response increasing aggravatingly during the ground firing test.

  5. Hydrodynamics of adiabatic inverted annular flow: an experimental study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Jarlais, G.; Ishii, M.

    1983-01-01

    For low-quality film boiling in tubes or rod bundles, the flow pattern may consist of a liquid jet-like core surrounded by a vapor annulus, i.e., inverted annular flow. The stability, shape, and break-up mechanisms of this liquid core must be understood in order to model correctly this regime and to develop appropriate interfacial transfer correlations. This paper reports on a study in which inverted annular flow was simulated in an adiabatic system. Turbulent water jets, issuing downward from long-aspect nozzles were enclosed within cocurrent gas annuli. Jet-core diameter and velocity, and gas-annulus diameter, velocity, and species were varied, yielding liquid Reynolds numbers up to 33,000, void fractions from 0.29 to 0.95, and relative velocities from near zero to over 80 m/s. Jet-core break-up lengths and secondarily, core break-up mechanisms, were observed visually, using strobe lighting

  6. Acoustics advances study of sea floor hydrothermal flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rona, Peter A.; Jackson, Darrell R.; Bemis, Karen G.; Jones, Christopher D.; Mitsuzawa, Kyohiko; Palmer, David R.; Silver, Deborah

    Sub-sea floor hydrothermal convection systems discharge as plumes from point sources and as seepage from the ocean bottom. The plumes originate as clear, 150-400°C solutions that vent from mineralized chimneys; precipitate dissolved metals as particles to form black or white smokers as they turbulently mix with ambient seawater; and buoyantly rise hundreds of meters to a level of neutral density where they spread laterally. The seepage discharges from networks of fractures at the rock-water interface as clear, diffuse flow, with lower temperatures, metal contents, and buoyancy than the smokers. The diffuse flow may be entrained upward into plumes, or laterally by prevailing currents in discrete layers within tens of meters of the sea floor. The role of these flow regimes in dispersing heat, chemicals, and biological material into the ocean from sub-sea floor hydrothermal convection systems is being studied on a global scale.

  7. Experimental and theoretical studies of buoyant-thermo capillary flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Favre, E.; Blumenfeld, L.; Soubbaramayer

    1996-01-01

    In the AVLIS process, uranium metal is evaporated using a high power electron gun. We have prior discussed the power balance equation in the electron beam evaporation process and pointed out, among the loss terms, the importance of the power loss due to the convective flow in the molten pool driven by buoyancy and thermo capillarity. An empirical formula has been derived from model experiments with cerium, to estimate the latter power loss and that formula can be used practically in engineering calculations. In order to complete the empirical approach, a more fundamental research program of theoretical and experimental studies have been carried out in Cea-France, with the objective of understanding the basic phenomena (heat transport, flow instabilities, turbulence, etc.) occurring in a convective flow in a liquid layer locally heated on its free surface

  8. Study of the flow development of polymer solutions through capillaries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perez-Gonzalez, J.; De Vargas, L.; Tejero, M.

    1991-01-01

    Flow experiments through capillaries with semirigid and rigid polymers in aqueous solutions were carried out in order to study the dependence of the flow development on the molecular conformation and the length to diameter ratio (L/D), of the capillary at relatively low shear rates. It was found that the apparent viscosity has a strong dependence upon the ratio L/D for a given shear rate, although an asymptotic value is reached. This dependence was reflected in the non-linearity of Bagley's plots. The asymptotic value was attained at lower L/D values for semirigid molecules than for rigid ones, showing the influence of the molecular conformation on the flow field development due to the different modes of relaxation for each type of molecule. (Author)

  9. A comparative study of the flow enhancing properties of bentonite ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A comparative study of granule flow enhancing property of bentonite, magnesium stearate, talc and microcrystalline cellulose (MCC) was undertaken. Bentonite was processed into fine powder. A 10 %w/w of starch granules was prepared and separated into different sizes (˂180, 180-500, 500-710 and 710-850 μm).

  10. Interpretation and value of MR CSF flow studies for paediatric ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... technique and interpretation, using image examples. Indications for CSF flow studies in children include assessment and functionality of shunt treatment in patients with hydrocephalus; hydrocephalus associated with achondroplasia; Chiari I malformation; confirmation of aqueductal stenosis; and determining patency of a ...

  11. Comparative exploration of multidimensional flow cytometry software: a model approach evaluating T cell polyfunctional behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spear, Timothy T; Nishimura, Michael I; Simms, Patricia E

    2017-08-01

    Advancement in flow cytometry reagents and instrumentation has allowed for simultaneous analysis of large numbers of lineage/functional immune cell markers. Highly complex datasets generated by polychromatic flow cytometry require proper analytical software to answer investigators' questions. A problem among many investigators and flow cytometry Shared Resource Laboratories (SRLs), including our own, is a lack of access to a flow cytometry-knowledgeable bioinformatics team, making it difficult to learn and choose appropriate analysis tool(s). Here, we comparatively assess various multidimensional flow cytometry software packages for their ability to answer a specific biologic question and provide graphical representation output suitable for publication, as well as their ease of use and cost. We assessed polyfunctional potential of TCR-transduced T cells, serving as a model evaluation, using multidimensional flow cytometry to analyze 6 intracellular cytokines and degranulation on a per-cell basis. Analysis of 7 parameters resulted in 128 possible combinations of positivity/negativity, far too complex for basic flow cytometry software to analyze fully. Various software packages were used, analysis methods used in each described, and representative output displayed. Of the tools investigated, automated classification of cellular expression by nonlinear stochastic embedding (ACCENSE) and coupled analysis in Pestle/simplified presentation of incredibly complex evaluations (SPICE) provided the most user-friendly manipulations and readable output, evaluating effects of altered antigen-specific stimulation on T cell polyfunctionality. This detailed approach may serve as a model for other investigators/SRLs in selecting the most appropriate software to analyze complex flow cytometry datasets. Further development and awareness of available tools will help guide proper data analysis to answer difficult biologic questions arising from incredibly complex datasets. © Society

  12. Identification of residual leukemic cells by flow cytometry in childhood B-cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia - Verification of leukemic state by flow-sorting and molecular/cytogenetic methods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Obro, Nina Friesgaard; Ryder, Lars Peter; Madsen, Hans Ole

    2012-01-01

    Reduction in minimal residual disease, measured by real-time quantitative PCR or flow cytometry, predicts prognosis in childhood B-cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia. We explored whether cells reported as minimal residual disease by flow cytometry represent the malignant clone harboring...... immunophenotype and antigen modulation) that highlight important methodological pitfalls. These findings demonstrate that with sufficient experience, flow cytometry is reliable for minimal residual disease monitoring in B-cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia, although rare cases require supplementary PCR...

  13. Flow cytometric analysis of expression of interleukin-2 receptor beta chain (p70-75) on various leukemic cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoshino, S.; Oshimi, K.; Tsudo, M.; Miyasaka, M.; Teramura, M.; Masuda, M.; Motoji, T.; Mizoguchi, H.

    1990-01-01

    We analyzed the expression of the interleukin-2 receptor (IL-2R) beta chain (p70-75) on various leukemic cells from 44 patients by flow cytometric analysis using the IL-2R beta chain-specific monoclonal antibody, designated Mik-beta 1. Flow cytometric analysis demonstrated the expression of the IL-2R beta chain on granular lymphocytes (GLs) from all eight patients with granular lymphocyte proliferative disorders (GLPDs), on adult T-cell leukemia (ATL) cells from all three patients with ATL, and on T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) cells from one of three patients with T-ALL. Although GLs from all the GLPD patients expressed the IL-2R beta chain alone and not the IL-2R alpha chain (Tac-antigen: p55), ATL and T-ALL cells expressing the beta chain coexpressed the alpha chain. In two of seven patients with common ALL (cALL) and in both patients with B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia, the leukemic cells expressed the alpha chain alone. Neither the alpha chain nor the beta chain was expressed on leukemic cells from the remaining 28 patients, including all 18 patients with acute nonlymphocytic leukemia, five of seven patients with cALL, all three patients with multiple myeloma, and two of three patients with T-ALL. These results indicate that three different forms of IL-2R chain expression exist on leukemic cells: the alpha chain alone; the beta chain alone; and both the alpha and beta chains. To examine whether the results obtained by flow cytometric analysis actually reflect functional aspects of the expressed IL-2Rs, we studied the specific binding of 125I-labeled IL-2 (125I-IL-2) to leukemic cells in 18 of the 44 patients. In addition, we performed 125I-IL-2 crosslinking studies in seven patients. The results of IL-2R expression of both 125I-IL-2 binding assay and crosslinking studies were in agreement with those obtained by flow cytometric analysis

  14. A comparative CFD study on the hemodynamics of flow through an idealized symmetric and asymmetric stenosed arteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prashantha, B.; Anish, S.

    2017-04-01

    The aim of the present study is to numerically evaluate the hemodynamic factors which affect the formation of atherosclerosis and plaque rupture in the human artery. An increase of atherosclerosis in the artery causes geometry changes, which results in hemodynamic changes such as flow separation, reattachment and adhesion of new cells (chemotactic) in the artery. Hence, geometry plays an important role in the determining the nature of hemodynamic patterns. Influence of stenosis in the non-bifurcating artery, under pulsatile flow condition has been studied on an idealized geometry. Analysis of flow through symmetric and asymmetric stenosis in the artery revealed the significance of oscillating shear index (OSI), flow separation, low wall shear stress (WSS) zones and secondary flow patterns on plaque formation. The observed characteristic of flow in the post-stenotic region highlight the importance of plaque eccentricity on the formation of secondary stenosis on the arterial wall.

  15. Hot gas flow cell for optical measurements on reactive gases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grosch, Helge; Fateev, Alexander; Nielsen, Karsten Lindorff

    2013-01-01

    was validated for high resolution measurements at temperatures of up to 800 K (527 degrees C) in the ultraviolet (UV) and infrared (IR) regions (190-20 000 nm). Verification of the gas temperature in the cell is provided by a thermocouple and emission/transmission measurements in the IR and UV regions. High......-resolution measurements are presented for the absorption cross-section of sulfur dioxide (SO2) in the UV range up to 773 K (500 degrees C)...

  16. Synergy of photoacoustic and fluorescence flow cytometry of circulating cells with negative and positive contrasts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nedosekin, Dmitry A.; Sarimollaoglu, Mustafa; Galanzha, Ekaterina I.; Sawant, Rupa; Torchilin, Vladimir P.; Verkhusha, Vladislav V.; Ma, Jie; Frank, Markus H.; Biris, Alexandru S.; Zharov, Vladimir P.

    2012-01-01

    In vivo photoacoustic (PA) and fluorescence flow cytometry were previously applied separately using pulsed and continuous wave lasers respectively, and positive contrast detection mode only. This paper introduces a real-time integration of both techniques with positive and negative contrast modes using only pulsed lasers. Various applications of this new tool are summarized, including detection of liposomes loaded with Alexa-660 dye, red blood cells labeled with Indocyanine Green, B16F10 melanoma cells co-expressing melanin and green fluorescent protein (GFP), C8161-GFP melanoma cells targeted by magnetic nanoparticles, MTLn3 adenocarcinoma cells expressing novel near-infrared iRFP protein, and quantum dot-carbon nanotube conjugates. Negative contrast flow cytometry provided label-free detection of low absorbing or weakly fluorescent cells in blood absorption and autofluorescence background, respectively. The use of pulsed laser for time-resolved discrimination of objects with long fluorescence lifetime (e.g., quantum dots) from shorter autofluorescence background (e.g., blood plasma) is also highlighted in this paper. The supplementary nature of PA and fluorescence detection increased the versatility of the integrated method for simultaneous detection of probes and cells having various absorbing and fluorescent properties, and provided verification of PA data using a more established fluorescence based technique. The principles of integrated photoacoustic and fluorescence flow cytometry using positive contrast for detection of strongly absorbing and fluorescent cells and negative contrast for detection of weakly absorbing and fluorescent cells in blood absorption and autofluorescence background, respectively. PMID:22903924

  17. Integrating a dual-silicon photoelectrochemical cell into a redox flow battery for unassisted photocharging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liao, Shichao; Zong, Xu; Seger, Brian

    2016-01-01

    Solar rechargeable flow cells (SRFCs) provide an attractive approach for in situ capture and storage of intermittent solar energy via photoelectrochemical regeneration of discharged redox species for electricity generation. However, overall SFRC performance is restricted by inefficient photoelect......Solar rechargeable flow cells (SRFCs) provide an attractive approach for in situ capture and storage of intermittent solar energy via photoelectrochemical regeneration of discharged redox species for electricity generation. However, overall SFRC performance is restricted by inefficient...... photoelectrochemical reactions. Here we report an efficient SRFC based on a dual-silicon photoelectrochemical cell and a quinone/bromine redox flow battery for in situ solar energy conversion and storage. Using narrow bandgap silicon for efficient photon collection and fast redox couples for rapid interface charge...

  18. Bedrock refractive-flow cells: A passive treatment analog to funnel-and-gate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dick, V.; Edwards, D.

    1997-01-01

    Funnel-and-gate technology provides a mechanism to passively treat groundwater contaminant plumes, but depends on placement of a sufficient barrier (open-quotes funnelclose quotes) in the plume flow path to channel the plume to a pass-through treatment zone (open-quotes gateclose quotes). Conventional barrier technologies limit funnel-and-gate deployment to unconsolidated overburden applications. A method has been developed which allows similar passive treatment to be applied to bedrock plumes. Rather than use barriers as the funnel, the method uses engineered bedrock zones, installed via precision blasting or other means, to refract groundwater flow along a preferred path to treatment (gate). The method requires orienting the refractive cell based on the Tangent Law and extending refractive cell limbs down gradient of the gate to disperse head and control flow. A typical Refractive-Flow cell may be open-quotes Yclose quotesshaped, with each limb 3-10 ft [1-3 m] wide and several tens to a few hundred feet [10 - 100 m] in length. Treatment takes place at the center of the X. MODFLOW modeling has been used to successfully simulate desired flow. Engineered blasting has been used at full scale application to create bedrock rubble zones for active collection/flow control for several years. The method provides a previously unavailable method to passively treat contaminated groundwater in bedrock at low cost

  19. Two-dimensional model of flows and interface instability in aluminum reduction cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zikanov, Oleg; Sun, Haijun; Ziegler, Donald

    2003-11-01

    We derive a two-dimensional model for the melt flows and interface instability in aluminum reduction cells. The model is based on the de St. Venant shallow water equations and incorporates the essential features of the system such as the magnetohydrodynamic instability mechanism and nonlinear coupling between the flows and interfacial waves. The model is applied to verify a recently proposed theory that explains the instability through the interaction between perturbations of horizontal electric currents in the aluminum layer and the imposed vertical magnetic field. We investigate the role of other factors, in particular, background melt flows and magnetic field perturbations.

  20. Diagnosis of Plasma Cell Dyscrasias and Monitoring of Minimal Residual Disease by Multiparametric Flow Cytometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soh, Kah Teong; Tario, Joseph D.; Wallace, Paul K.

    2018-01-01

    Synopsis Plasma cell dyscrasia (PCD) is a heterogeneous disease which has seen a tremendous change in outcomes due to improved therapies. Over the last few decades, multiparametric flow cytometry has played an important role in the detection and monitoring of PCDs. Flow cytometry is a high sensitivity assay for early detection of minimal residual disease (MRD) that correlates well with progression-free survival and overall survival. Before flow cytometry can be effectively implemented in the clinical setting sample preparation, panel configuration, analysis, and gating strategies must be optimized to ensure accurate results. Current consensus methods and reporting guidelines for MRD testing are discussed. PMID:29128071

  1. Ratiometric analysis of fura red by flow cytometry: a technique for monitoring intracellular calcium flux in primary cell subsets.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emily R Wendt

    Full Text Available Calcium flux is a rapid and sensitive measure of cell activation whose utility could be enhanced with better techniques for data extraction. We describe a technique to monitor calcium flux by flow cytometry, measuring Fura Red calcium dye by ratiometric analysis. This technique has several advantages: 1 using a single calcium dye provides an additional channel for surface marker characterization, 2 allows robust detection of calcium flux by minority cell populations within a heterogeneous population of primary T cells and monocytes 3 can measure total calcium flux and additionally, the proportion of responding cells, 4 can be applied to studying the effects of drug treatment, simultaneously stimulating and monitoring untreated and drug treated cells. Using chemokine receptor activation as an example, we highlight the utility of this assay, demonstrating that only cells expressing a specific chemokine receptor are activated by cognate chemokine ligand. Furthermore, we describe a technique for simultaneously stimulating and monitoring calcium flux in vehicle and drug treated cells, demonstrating the effects of the Gαi inhibitor, pertussis toxin (PTX, on chemokine stimulated calcium flux. The described real time calcium flux assay provides a robust platform for characterizing cell activation within primary cells, and offers a more accurate technique for studying the effect of drug treatment on receptor activation in a heterogeneous population of primary cells.

  2. Molecular pathways of early CD105-positive erythroid cells as compared with CD34-positive common precursor cells by flow cytometric cell-sorting and gene expression profiling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Machherndl-Spandl, S; Suessner, S; Danzer, M; Proell, J; Gabriel, C; Lauf, J; Sylie, R; Klein, H-U; Béné, M C; Weltermann, A; Bettelheim, P

    2013-01-01

    Special attention has recently been drawn to the molecular network of different genes that are responsible for the development of erythroid cells. The aim of the present study was to establish in detail the immunophenotype of early erythroid cells and to compare the gene expression profile of freshly isolated early erythroid precursors with that of the CD34-positive (CD34 + ) compartment. Multiparameter flow cytometric analyses of human bone marrow mononuclear cell fractions (n=20) defined three distinct early erythroid stages. The gene expression profile of sorted early erythroid cells was analyzed by Affymetrix array technology. For 4524 genes, a differential regulation was found in CD105-positive erythroid cells as compared with the CD34 + progenitor compartment (2362 upregulated genes). A highly significant difference was observed in the expression level of genes involved in transcription, heme synthesis, iron and mitochondrial metabolism and transforming growth factor-β signaling. A comparison with recently published data showed over 1000 genes that as yet have not been reported to be upregulated in the early erythroid lineage. The gene expression level within distinct pathways could be illustrated directly by applying the Ingenuity software program. The results of gene expression analyses can be seen at the Gene Expression Omnibus repository

  3. Flow Reactor for studying Physicochemical and aging properties of SOA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babar, Z. B.

    2016-12-01

    Secondary organic aerosols (SOA) have importance in environmental processes such as affecting earth's radiative balance and cloud formation processes. For studying SOA formation large scale environmental batch reactors and laboratory scale flow reactors have been used. In this study application of flow reactor to study physicochemical properties of SOA is also investigated after its characterization. The flow reactor is of cylindrical design (ID 15 cm x L 70 cm) equipped with UV lamps. It is coupled with various instruments such as scanning mobility particle sizer, NOx analyzer, ozone analyzer, VOC analyzer, hygrometer, and temperature sensors for gas and particle phase measurements. OH radicals were generated by custom build ozone generator and relative humidity. The following characterizations were performed: (1) residence time distribution (RTD) measurements, (2) RH and temperature control, (3) OH radical exposure range (atmospheric aging time), (4) gas phase oxidation of SOA precursors such as α-pinene by OH radical. The flow reactor yielded narrow RTDs. In particular, RH and temperature can be controlled effectively between 0-60% and 22-43oC, respectively. OH radical exposure ranges from 6.49x1010 to 3.68x1011 molecules/cm3s (0.49 to 4.91 days). Our initial efforts on OH radical generation using hydrogen peroxide and its quantification by using flourescenet technique will be also be presented.

  4. Surfactant functionalization induces robust, differential adhesion of tumor cells and blood cells to charged nanotube-coated biomaterials under flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Michael J; Castellanos, Carlos A; King, Michael R

    2015-07-01

    The metastatic spread of cancer cells from the primary tumor to distant sites leads to a poor prognosis in cancers originating from multiple organs. Increasing evidence has linked selectin-based adhesion between circulating tumor cells (CTCs) and endothelial cells of the microvasculature to metastatic dissemination, in a manner similar to leukocyte adhesion during inflammation. Functionalized biomaterial surfaces hold promise as a diagnostic tool to separate CTCs and potentially treat metastasis, utilizing antibody and selectin-mediated interactions for cell capture under flow. However, capture at high purity levels is challenged by the fact that CTCs and leukocytes both possess selectin ligands. Here, a straightforward technique to functionalize and alter the charge of naturally occurring halloysite nanotubes using surfactants is reported to induce robust, differential adhesion of tumor cells and blood cells to nanotube-coated surfaces under flow. Negatively charged sodium dodecanoate-functionalized nanotubes simultaneously enhanced tumor cell capture while negating leukocyte adhesion, both in the presence and absence of adhesion proteins, and can be utilized to isolate circulating tumor cells regardless of biomarker expression. Conversely, diminishing nanotube charge via functionalization with decyltrimethylammonium bromide both abolished tumor cell capture while promoting leukocyte adhesion. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Experimental study of static flow instability in subcooled flow boiling in parallel channels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siman-Tov, M.; Felde, D.K.; McDuffee, J.L.; Yoder, G.L.

    1995-01-01

    Experimental data for static flow instability or flow excursion (FE) at conditions applicable to the Advanced Neutron Source Reactor are very limited. A series of FE tests with light water flowing vertically upward was completed covering a local exit heat flux range of 0.7--18 MW/m 2 , exit velocity range of 2.8--28.4 m/s, exit pressure range of 0.117--1.7 MPa, and inlet temperature range of 40-- 50 degrees C. Most of the tests were performed in a ''stiff'' (constant flow) system where the instability threshold was detected through the minimum of the pressure-drop curve. A few tests were also conducted using as ''soft'' (constant pressure drop) a system as possible to secure a true FE phenomenon (actual secondary burnout). True critical heat flux experiments under similar conditions were also conducted using a stiff system. The FE data reported in this study considerably extend the velocity range of data presently available worldwide, most of which were obtained at velocities below 10 m/s. The Saha and Zuber correlation had the best fit with the data out of the three correlations compared. However, a modification was necessary to take into account the demonstrated dependence of the St and Nu numbers on subcooling levels, especially in the low subcooling regime. Comparison of Thermal Hydraulic Test Loop (THTL) data, as well as extensive data from other investigators, led to a proposed modification to the Saha and Zuber correlation for onset of significant void, applied to FE prediction. The mean and standard deviation of the THTL data were 0.95 and 15%, respectively, when comparing the THTL data with the original Saha and Zuber correlation, and 0.93 and 10% when comparing them with the modification. Comparison with the worldwide database showed a mean and standard deviation of 1.37 and 53%, respectively, for the original Saha and Zuber correlation and 1.0 and 27% for the modification

  6. RNAi in Drosophila S2 cells as a tool for studying cell cycle progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bettencourt-Dias, Mónica; Goshima, Gohta

    2009-01-01

    Genetic studies on model organisms, particularly yeasts and Drosophila melanogaster, have proven powerful in identifying the cell cycle machinery and its regulatory mechanisms. In more recent years RNAi has been used in a variety of genome-wide screens and single molecule studies to elucidate the mechanisms of cell cycle progression. In Drosophila cultured cells, RNAi is extremely simple, and a strong effect can be observed by adding the dsRNA to the cultured cells, with few complications of off-target effects. Functions in cell cycle progression can be followed by a variety of assays. One of the advantages of these cells is that they allow high-resolution spatiotemporal observations to be made by microscopy, with no particular complexity in terms of media and temperature. Here we discuss protocols for RNAi in Drosophila S2 culture cells, followed by the study of mitotic progression, through immunocytochemistry, live imaging, and flow cytometry analysis.

  7. Paired single cell co-culture microenvironments isolated by two-phase flow with continuous nutrient renewal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yu-Chih; Cheng, Yu-Heng; Kim, Hong Sun; Ingram, Patrick N; Nor, Jacques E; Yoon, Euisik

    2014-08-21

    Cancer-stromal cell interactions are a critical process in tumorigenesis. Conventional dish-based assays, which simply mix two cell types, have limitations in three aspects: 1) limited control of the cell microenvironment; 2) inability to study cell behavior in a single-cell manner; and 3) have difficulties in characterizing single cell behavior within a highly heterogeneous cell population (e.g. tumor). An innovative use of microfluidic technology is for improving the spatial resolution for single cell assays. However, it is challenging to isolate the paired interacting cells while maintaining nutrient renewal. In this work, two-phase flow was used as a simple isolation method, separating the microenvironment of each individual chamber. As nutrients in an isolated chamber are consumed by cells, media exchange is required. To connect the cell culture chamber to the media exchange layer, we demonstrated a 3D microsystem integration technique using vertical connections fabricated by deep reactive-ion etching (DRIE). Compared to previous approaches, the presented process allows area reduction of vertical connections by an order of magnitude, enabling compact 3D integration. A semi-permeable membrane was sandwiched between the cell culture layer and the media exchange layer. The selectivity of the semi-permeable membrane results in the retention of the signaling proteins within the chamber while allowing free diffusion of nutrients (e.g., glucose and amino acids). Thus, paracrine signals are accumulated inside the chamber without cross-talk between cells in other chambers. Utilizing these innovations, we co-cultured UM-SCC-1 (head and neck squamous cell carcinoma) cells and endothelial cells to simulate tumor proliferation enhancement in the vascular endothelial niche.

  8. Lower Transcranial Doppler Flow Velocities in Sickle Cell Anemia Patients on Hydroxyurea: Myth or Fact.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moeen, Sawsan M; Thabet, Ahmad F; Hasan, Hosam A; Saleh, Medhat A

    2018-01-01

    Transcranial Doppler (TCD) detects stroke risk in patients with sickle cell anemia (SCA). Hydroxyurea therapy has the ability to induce increased levels of fetal hemoglobin in sickle cells thus decreasing tendency for red cell sickling. This study aimed to evaluate TCD findings in SCA patients on hydroxyurea and correlate the time-averaged mean velocity (TAMV) with their hematological parameters. Forty SCA patients of both sexes, aged 16-22 years with no history of stroke were screened with TCD for an elevated TAMV, divided into: Group T (20 patients on blood transfusion); and Group H (20 patients on daily hydroxyurea). For all, full medical history, clinical examination, hemoglobin, hematocrit, leukocytes, platelets, fetal hemoglobin and sickling test, in addition TCD to describe the pattern of cerebral blood flow abnormalities were done. TAMV in all cerebral arteries were significantly higher in Group T than Group H, the highest TAMV (147.5 ± 57.09 cm/s) was found in the right middle cerebral artery and correlated negatively with hematocrit in Groups H ( P  Hydroxyurea therapy may lower TCD velocities and prevent the risk of primary stroke in SCA patients.

  9. Effect of decreasing electrical resistance in Characeae cell membranes caused by the flow of alternating current

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edward Śpiewla

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available By means of the techniques of external electrodes and microelectrodes, it was found that evanescent flow of an alternating current through plasmalemma of Characeae cells neutralises oscillatory change in their electrical resistance and reversibly diminishes its value. This effect is particularly significant in the case of "high resistance cells", but it weakens with increasing temperature. The value of the estimated activation energy indicates that, after flow of the alternating current through the membrane, a rapid increase in the conductivity may be caused by an increase in conductivity of potassium channels. This result seems to support the hypothesis of electroconformational feedback.

  10. Zebrafish swimming in the flow: a particle image velocimetry study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Violet Mwaffo

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Zebrafish is emerging as a species of choice for the study of a number of biomechanics problems, including balance development, schooling, and neuromuscular transmission. The precise quantification of the flow physics around swimming zebrafish is critical toward a mechanistic understanding of the complex swimming style of this fresh-water species. Although previous studies have elucidated the vortical structures in the wake of zebrafish swimming in placid water, the flow physics of zebrafish swimming against a water current remains unexplored. In an effort to illuminate zebrafish swimming in a dynamic environment reminiscent of its natural habitat, we experimentally investigated the locomotion and hydrodynamics of a single zebrafish swimming in a miniature water tunnel using particle image velocimetry. Our results on zebrafish locomotion detail the role of flow speed on tail beat undulations, heading direction, and swimming speed. Our findings on zebrafish hydrodynamics offer a precise quantification of vortex shedding during zebrafish swimming and demonstrate that locomotory patterns play a central role on the flow physics. This knowledge may help clarify the evolutionary advantage of burst and cruise swimming movements in zebrafish.

  11. A Study of Coaxial Rotor Performance and Flow Field Characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-22

    1950 (Ref. 8) in the full-scale wind tunnel at NASA Langley Research Center. The coaxial rotor consisted of two 20-in diameter rotors , with two blades...C., “ Wind - tunnel studies of the perfor- mance of multirotor configurations,” NACA TN- 3236, Au- gust 1954. 17Kim, H. W. and Brown, R. E...A Study of Coaxial Rotor Performance and Flow Field Characteristics Natasha L. Barbely Aerospace Engineer NASA Ames Research Center Moffett Field

  12. The effect of prostanoids on hepatic bile flow in dogs with normal liver and bile duct cell hyperplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solomon, H; Contis, J; Li, A P; Kaminski, D L

    1996-04-01

    Bile flow rates and composition are subject to a wide variety of neural, endocrine and paracrine influences. The effects of these multiple factors may be different in the diseased liver compared to the response produced in the normal liver. As prostanoids may have a therapeutic role in liver disease it was intended to evaluate the effects of two principal therapeutic prostanoids, prostaglandin E2 and prostacyclin, on bile flow in dogs with a normal liver and in dogs with hepatotoxin-induced liver injury. Initially, in awake animals with chronic biliary and gastric fistulas the bile flow response to prostaglandin E2 and prostacyclin was evaluated and compared to the response produced by bile salt infusion alone and to that produced by the standard choleretic hormones, secretin and glucagon. The animals were then fed alpha-naphthylisothiocyanate (ANIT) and the studies repeated. ANIT is a hepatoxin that produces bile duct cell hyperplasia which was confirmed in dogs by demonstrating that ANIT increased [3H]thymidine incorporation by isolated canine bile duct cells. In normal dogs, the prostanoids, secretin, and glucagon increased hepatic bile flow. 10 days of ANIT feeding produced a hypercholeresis. While secretin was able to stimulate the hyperplastic biliary epithelium and increase bile flow over values produced by the hyperplastic biliary epithelium alone, neither prostaglandin E2, prostacyclin, or glucagon appeared to stimulate the hyperplastic biliary epithelium. As ANIT produced evidence of cholestasis and hepatocellular damage, only secretin would seem to have a potential therapeutic role in increasing bile flow in cholestatic liver disorders associated with bile duct cell hyperplasia.

  13. Fundamental Study of Material Flow in Friction Stir Welds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, Anthony P.

    1999-01-01

    The presented research project consists of two major parts. First, the material flow in solid-state, friction stir, butt-welds as been investigated using a marker insert technique. Changes in material flow due to welding parameter as well as tool geometry variations have been examined for different materials. The method provides a semi-quantitative, three-dimensional view of the material transport in the welded zone. Second, a FSW process model has been developed. The fully coupled model is based on fluid mechanics; the solid-state material transport during welding is treated as a laminar, viscous flow of a non-Newtonian fluid past a rotating circular cylinder. The heat necessary for the material softening is generated by deformation of the material. As a first step, a two-dimensional model, which contains only the pin of the FSW tool, has been created to test the suitability of the modeling approach and to perform parametric studies of the boundary conditions. The material flow visualization experiments agree very well with the predicted flow field. Accordingly, material within the pin diameter is transported only in the rotation direction around the pin. Due to the simplifying assumptions inherent in the 2-D model, other experimental data such as forces on the pin, torque, and weld energy cannot be directly used for validation. However, the 2-D model predicts the same trends as shown in the experiments. The model also predicts a deviation from the "normal" material flow at certain combinations of welding parameters, suggesting a possible mechanism for the occurrence of some typical FSW defects. The next step has been the development of a three-dimensional process model. The simplified FSW tool has been designed as a flat shoulder rotating on the top of the workpiece and a rotating, cylindrical pin, which extends throughout the total height of the flow domain. The thermal boundary conditions at the tool and at the contact area to the backing plate have been varied

  14. Discrimination of bromodeoxyuridine labelled and unlabelled mitotic cells in flow cytometric bromodeoxyuridine/DNA analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, P O; Larsen, J K; Christensen, I J

    1994-01-01

    Bromodeoxyuridine (BrdUrd) labelled and unlabelled mitotic cells, respectively, can be discriminated from interphase cells using a new method, based on immunocytochemical staining of BrdUrd and flow cytometric four-parameter analysis of DNA content, BrdUrd incorporation, and forward and orthogonal...... light scatter. The method was optimized using the human leukemia cell lines HL-60 and K-562. Samples of 10(5) ethanol-fixed cells were treated with pepsin/HCl and stained as a nuclear suspension with anti-BrdUrd antibody, FITC-conjugated secondary antibody, and propidium iodide. Labelled mitoses could...

  15. Isolation of circulating tumor cells using photoacoustic flowmetry and two phase flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brien, Christine M.; Rood, Kyle D.; Gupta, Sagar K.; Mosley, Jeffrey D.; Goldschmidt, Benjamin S.; Sharma, Nikhilesh; Sengupta, Shramik; Viator, John A.

    2011-03-01

    Melanoma is the deadliest form of skin cancer, yet current diagnostic methods are inadequately sensitive. Patients must wait until secondary tumors form before malignancy can be diagnosed and treatment prescribed. Detection of cells that have broken off the original tumor and flow through the blood or lymph system can provide data for diagnosing and monitoring cancer. Our group utilizes the photoacoustic effect to detect metastatic melanoma cells, which contain the pigmented granule melanin. As a rapid laser pulse irradiates melanoma, the melanin undergoes thermo-elastic expansion and ultimately creates a photoacoustic wave. Thus, melanoma patient's blood samples can be enriched, leaving the melanoma in a white blood cell (WBC) suspension. Irradiated melanoma cells produce photoacoustic waves, which are detected with a piezoelectric transducer, while the optically transparent WBCs create no signals. Here we report an isolation scheme utilizing two-phase flow to separate detected melanoma from the suspension. By introducing two immiscible fluids through a t-junction into one flow path, the analytes are compartmentalized. Therefore, the slug in which the melanoma cell is located can be identified and extracted from the system. Two-phase immiscible flow is a label free technique, and could be used for other types of pathological analytes.

  16. Laminar shear flow increases hydrogen sulfide and activates a nitric oxide producing signaling cascade in endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Bin; Chen, Chang-Ting; Chen, Chi-Shia; Wang, Yun-Ming; Hsieh, Hsyue-Jen; Wang, Danny Ling

    2015-09-04

    Laminar shear flow triggers a signaling cascade that maintains the integrity of endothelial cells (ECs). Hydrogen sulfide (H2S), a new gasotransmitter is regarded as an upstream regulator of nitric oxide (NO). Whether the H2S-generating enzymes are correlated to the enzymes involved in NO production under shear flow conditions remains unclear as yet. In the present study, the cultured ECs were subjected to a constant shear flow (12 dyn/cm(2)) in a parallel flow chamber system. We investigated the expression of three key enzymes for H2S biosynthesis, cystathionine-γ-lyase (CSE), cystathionine-β-synthase (CBS), and 3-mercapto-sulfurtransferase (3-MST). Shear flow markedly increased the level of 3-MST. Shear flow enhanced the production of H2S was determined by NBD-SCN reagent that can bind to cysteine/homocystein. Exogenous treatment of NaHS that can release gaseous H2S, ECs showed an increase of phosphorylation in Akt(S473), ERK(T202/Y204) and eNOS(S1177). This indicated that H2S can trigger the NO-production signaling cascade. Silencing of CSE, CBS and 3-MST genes by siRNA separately attenuated the phosphorylation levels of Akt(S473) and eNOS(S1177) under shear flow conditions. The particular mode of shear flow increased H2S production. The interplay between H2S and NO-generating enzymes were discussed in the present study. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. A flow cytometric assay to quantify invasion of red blood cells by rodent Plasmodium parasites in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lelliott, Patrick M; Lampkin, Shelley; McMorran, Brendan J; Foote, Simon J; Burgio, Gaetan

    2014-03-17

    Malaria treatments are becoming less effective due to the rapid spread of drug resistant parasites. Increased understanding of the host/parasite interaction is crucial in order to develop treatments that will be less prone to resistance. Parasite invasion of the red blood cell (RBC) is a critical aspect of the parasite life cycle and is, therefore, a promising target for the development of malaria treatments. Assays for analysing parasite invasion in vitro have been developed, but no equivalent assays exist for in vivo studies. This article describes a novel flow cytometric in vivo parasite invasion assay. Experiments were conducted with mice infected with erythrocytic stages of Plasmodium chabaudi adami strain DS. Exogenously labelled blood cells were transfused into infected mice at schizogony, and collected blood samples stained and analysed using flow cytometry to specifically detect and measure proportions of labelled RBC containing newly invaded parasites. A combination of antibodies (CD45 and CD71) and fluorescent dyes, Hoechst (DNA) and JC-1 (mitochondrial membrane potential), were used to differentiate parasitized RBCs from uninfected cells, RBCs containing Howell-Jolly bodies, leukocytes and RBC progenitors. Blood cells were treated ex vivo with proteases to examine the effects on in vivo parasite invasion. The staining and flow cytometry analysis method was accurate in determining the parasitaemia down to 0.013% with the limit of detection at 0.007%. Transfused labelled blood supported normal rates of parasite invasion. Protease-treated red cells resulted in 35% decrease in the rate of parasite invasion within 30 minutes of introduction into the bloodstream of infected mice. The invasion assay presented here is a versatile method for the study of in vivo red cell invasion efficiency of Plasmodium parasites in mice, and allows direct comparison of invasion in red cells derived from two different populations. The method also serves as an accurate

  18. Particle-in-Cell Modeling of Magnetized Argon Plasma Flow Through Small Mechanical Apertures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adam B. Sefkow and Samuel A. Cohen

    2009-04-09

    Motivated by observations of supersonic argon-ion flow generated by linear helicon-heated plasma devices, a three-dimensional particle-in-cell (PIC) code is used to study whether stationary electrostatic layers form near mechanical apertures intersecting the flow of magnetized plasma. By self-consistently evaluating the temporal evolution of the plasma in the vicinity of the aperture, the PIC simulations characterize the roles of the imposed aperture and applied magnetic field on ion acceleration. The PIC model includes ionization of a background neutral-argon population by thermal and superthermal electrons, the latter found upstream of the aperture. Near the aperture, a transition from a collisional to a collisionless regime occurs. Perturbations of density and potential, with mm wavelengths and consistent with ion acoustic waves, propagate axially. An ion acceleration region of length ~ 200-300 λD,e forms at the location of the aperture and is found to be an electrostatic double layer, with axially-separated regions of net positive and negative charge. Reducing the aperture diameter or increasing its length increases the double layer strength.

  19. Power flow studies in HVAC and HVDC transmission lines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oyedokun, D.T.; Folly, K.A. [Cape Town Univ. (South Africa). Dept. of Electrical Engineering

    2008-07-01

    Flexible AC transmission system (FACTS) devices, additional high voltage AC (HVAC) lines, and additional HVDC transmission lines can all be used to increase the capacity of transmission infrastructure. In this paper, 3 case studies were presented to evaluate the different technologies. Power flow analyses were conducted in order to determine the most feasible method of increasing capacity. A 35 per cent increase in load demand was considered in relation to changes in power flow, rotor angle, loading, and reactive power compensation. The study showed that DC limits were reduced at the rectifier substation, and more power was routed via the HVAC line while less power was routed via the HVDC line. A comparison of the case studies showed that using an HVAC transmission line in parallel with an additional HVAC line was the most suitable method of increasing transmission infrastructure. Transmission losses for the double circuit HVAC lines were approximately 60 MW. 13 refs., 6 tabs., 6 figs.

  20. Measurement of separase proteolytic activity in single living cells by a fluorogenic flow cytometry assay.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wiltrud Haaß

    Full Text Available ESPL1/Separase, an endopeptidase, is required for centrosome duplication and separation of sister-chromatides in anaphase of mitosis. Overexpression and deregulated proteolytic activity of Separase as frequently observed in human cancers is associated with the occurrence of supernumerary centrosomes, chromosomal missegregation and aneuploidy. Recently, we have hypothesized that increased Separase proteolytic activity in a small subpopulation of tumor cells may serve as driver of tumor heterogeneity and clonal evolution in chronic myeloid leukemia (CML. Currently, there is no quantitative assay to measure Separase activity levels in single cells. Therefore, we have designed a flow cytometry-based assay that utilizes a Cy5- and rhodamine 110 (Rh110-biconjugated Rad21 cleavage site peptide ([Cy5-D-R-E-I-M-R]2-Rh110 as smart probe and intracellular substrate for detection of Separase enzyme activity in living cells. As measured by Cy5 fluorescence the cellular uptake of the fluorogenic peptide was fast and reached saturation after 210 min of incubation in human histiocytic lymphoma U937 cells. Separase activity was recorded as the intensity of Rh110 fluorescence released after intracellular peptide cleavage providing a linear signal gain within a 90-180 min time slot. Compared to conventional cell extract-based methods the flow cytometric assay delivers equivalent results but is more reliable, bypasses the problem of vague loading controls and unspecific proteolysis associated with whole cell extracts. Especially suited for the investigaton of blood- and bone marrow-derived hematopoietic cells the flow cytometric Separase assay allows generation of Separase activity profiles that tell about the number of Separase positive cells within a sample i.e. cells that currently progress through mitosis and about the range of intercellular variation in Separase activity levels within a cell population. The assay was used to quantify Separase proteolytic

  1. Flow cytometric analysis of apoptosis in cryoconserved chicken primordial germ cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawicka, Dorota; Chojnacka-Puchta, Luiza; Zielinski, Marcin; Plucienniczak, Grazyna; Plucienniczak, Andrzej; Bednarczyk, Marek

    2015-03-01

    Our research aimed to compare the effects of four cryoprotectants and four slow freezing programs on the viability and apoptosis of primordial germ cells (PGCs) in vitro. PGCs were collected from chicken embryonic blood at Hamburger and Hamilton (HH) stages 14-16 and purified by Percoll density gradient centrifugation and then subjected to cryopreservation. We applied microscopy to determine the survival of PGCs after trypan blue staining and flow cytometry to examine apoptosis and viability after annexin V kit staining. We also examined the functionality of cryopreserved PGCs in vivo. Significant differences in viability of PGCs determined via microscopy and flow cytometry were observed. The most unfavorable combination for slow freezing PGCs was program 3 and MIX H (10% DMSO and 5% glycerol in Hank's solution supplemented with 10% FBS) as the cryoprotectant (48.43 and 15.37% live and early apoptotic PGCs, respectively). The highest average percentage of live PGCs (93.1%) and the lowest percentage of early apoptotic PGCs (6.5%) were achieved by slow freezing PGCs in the presence of DMSO F (10% DMSO in FBS) via program 1. Therefore, this method was chosen for the in vivo test. Cryopreserved (group 1) and freshly isolated (group 2) PGCs were transfectedwith a pEGFP-N1 plasmid, cultured under antibiotic selection, and then injected into 3-day-old embryos. After 5 days of incubation, we identified the EGFP marker gene in the gonads of 40 and 45% of recipients in groups 1 and 2, respectively. This is the first study to apply flow cytometry to examine the apoptosis and viability of cryopreserved PGCs. The in vitro and in vivo findings showed that the developed PGC cryoconservation method, depending on slow freezing at the rate of 2°C/min (program 1) in the presence of 10% DMSO F, is an improvement over previous cryoconservation methods and may be a useful tool for the ex situ strategy of poultry biodiversity preservation.

  2. Mass transport aspects of polymer electrolyte fuel cells under two-phase flow conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kramer, D.

    2007-03-15

    This well-illustrated, comprehensive dissertation by Dr. Ing. Denis Kramer takes an in-depth look at polymer electrolyte fuel cells (PEFC) and the possibilities for their application. First of all, the operating principles of polymer electrolyte fuel cells are described and discussed, whereby thermodynamics aspects and loss mechanisms are examined. The mass transport diagnostics made with respect to the function of the cells are discussed. Field flow geometry, gas diffusion layers and, amongst other things, liquid distribution, the influence of flow direction and the low-frequency behaviour of air-fed PEFCs are discussed. Direct methanol fuel cells are examined, as are the materials chosen. The documentation includes comprehensive mathematical and graphical representations of the mechanisms involved.

  3. Laboratory study of orographic cloud-like flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Kanwar Nain; Sreenivas, K. R.

    2013-11-01

    Clouds are one of the major sources of uncertainty in climate prediction, listed in ``the most urgent scientific problems requiring attention'' IPCC. Also, convective clouds are of utmost importance to study the dynamics of tropical meteorology and therefore, play a key role in understanding monsoons. The present work is to study the dynamics of orographic clouds. Parameterization of these clouds will help in forecasting the precipitation accurately. Also, one could validate laboratory results from our study by actually measuring cloud development along a sloping terrain. In this context a planar buoyant turbulent wall jet is considered as an appropriate low order fluid-dynamical model for studying the turbulence and entrainment in orographic-clouds. Flow is volumetrically heated to mimic the latent heat release due to condensation in an actual cloud. This is the first step in studying the entrainment dynamics of the evolving orographic cloud. We are going to present some results on the cloud development using techniques that allows us to construct a 3-dimensional flow field at each instance and its development over the time. By combining velocity field from PIV and flow volume from PLIF at successive instances, we estimate the entrainment coefficient. Since the life-cycle of a cloud is determined by the entrainment of ambient air, these results could be extremely helpful in understanding the dynamics of the clouds. Detailed results will be presented at the conference.

  4. CFD Study of NACA 0018 Airfoil with Flow Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eggert, Christopher A.; Rumsey, Christopher L.

    2017-01-01

    The abilities of two different Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes codes to predict the effects of an active flow control device are evaluated. The flow control device consists of a blowing slot located on the upper surface of an NACA 0018 airfoil, near the leading edge. A second blowing slot present on the airfoil near mid-chord is not evaluated here. Experimental results from a wind tunnel test show that a slot blowing with high momentum coefficient will increase the lift of the airfoil (compared to no blowing) and delay flow separation. A slot with low momentum coefficient will decrease the lift and induce separation even at low angles of attack. Two codes, CFL3D and FUN3D, are used in two-dimensional computations along with several different turbulence models. Two of these produced reasonable results for this flow, when run fully turbulent. A more advanced transition model failed to predict reasonable results, but warrants further study using different inputs. Including inviscid upper and lower tunnel walls in the simulations was found to be important in obtaining pressure distributions and lift coefficients that best matched experimental data. A limited number of three-dimensional computations were also performed.

  5. Disturbed flow mediated modulation of shear forces on endothelial plane: A proposed model for studying endothelium around atherosclerotic plaques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balaguru, Uma Maheswari; Sundaresan, Lakshmikirupa; Manivannan, Jeganathan; Majunathan, Reji; Mani, Krishnapriya; Swaminathan, Akila; Venkatesan, Saravanakumar; Kasiviswanathan, Dharanibalan; Chatterjee, Suvro

    2016-06-01

    Disturbed fluid flow or modulated shear stress is associated with vascular conditions such as atherosclerosis, thrombosis, and aneurysm. In vitro simulation of the fluid flow around the plaque micro-environment remains a challenging approach. Currently available models have limitations such as complications in protocols, high cost, incompetence of co-culture and not being suitable for massive expression studies. Hence, the present study aimed to develop a simple, versatile model based on Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) simulation. Current observations of CFD have shown the regions of modulated shear stress by the disturbed fluid flow. To execute and validate the model in real sense, cell morphology, cytoskeletal arrangement, cell death, reactive oxygen species (ROS) profile, nitric oxide production and disturbed flow markers under the above condition were assessed. Endothelium at disturbed flow region which had been exposed to low shear stress and swirling flow pattern showed morphological and expression similarities with the pathological disturbed flow environment reported previously. Altogether, the proposed model can serve as a platform to simulate the real time micro-environment of disturbed flow associated with eccentric plaque shapes and the possibilities of studying its downstream events.

  6. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells analysis in microfluidic flow by coherent imaging tools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dannhauser, David; Rossi, Domenico; Memmolo, Pasquale; Causa, Filippo; Finizio, Andrea; Ferraro, Pietro; Netti, Paolo A.

    2017-06-01

    Cell of human blood stream are divided into two groups: Red Blood Cells (RBC) and White Blood Cells (WBC). RBC have a peculiar biconcave disk shape and they are responsible for the delivering of O2 and CO2 through the body. WBC are a more widespread class of cell ensuring immunity against pathogens. They can be divided in two main classes: granulocyte cells and A-granulocyte cells. Neutrophils, basophils and eosinophils belong to the granulocyte cell class, while lymphocytes and monocytes belong to A-granulocyte. Both in RBC and WBC, the intrinsic physical properties of a cell are indicators of cell condition and, furthermore, of the overall human body state. Thus, the accurate comprehension of the physiological structure of WBCs is fundamental to recognize diseases. Here we show the possibility to simple and straightforwardly characterize the physical properties of individual RBC and mononuclear WBC in a microfluidic context, using a wide angle light scattering apparatus and a corresponding theoretical simulation of Optical Signature (OS). A non-Newtonian polymer alignment solution for cell is used to ensure an individual cell alignment in the microfluidic flow, thus permitting a precise investigation. Additionally, Quantitative Phase Imaging (QPI) holographic measurements are performed to estimate cell morphometric features, such as their refractive index. We analyzed more than 200 WBCs and 100 RBCs of three different probands. Results showed distinct cell populations according to their measured dimensions and shape, which can be associated to the presence of RBC, lymphocytes and monocytes.

  7. Numerical Analysis of Hydrodynamic Flow in Microfluidic Biochip for Single-Cell Trapping Application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amelia Ahmad Khalili

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Single-cell analysis has become the interest of a wide range of biological and biomedical engineering research. It could provide precise information on individual cells, leading to important knowledge regarding human diseases. To perform single-cell analysis, it is crucial to isolate the individual cells before further manipulation is carried out. Recently, microfluidic biochips have been widely used for cell trapping and single cell analysis, such as mechanical and electrical detection. This work focuses on developing a finite element simulation model of single-cell trapping system for any types of cells or particles based on the hydrodynamic flow resistance (Rh manipulations in the main channel and trap channel to achieve successful trapping. Analysis is carried out using finite element ABAQUS-FEA™ software. A guideline to design and optimize single-cell trapping model is proposed and the example of a thorough optimization analysis is carried out using a yeast cell model. The results show the finite element model is able to trap a single cell inside the fluidic environment. Fluid’s velocity profile and streamline plots for successful and unsuccessful single yeast cell trapping are presented according to the hydrodynamic concept. The single-cell trapping model can be a significant important guideline in designing a new chip for biomedical applications.

  8. Cell and nuclear enlargement of SW480 cells induced by a plant lignan, arctigenin: evaluation of cellular DNA content using fluorescence microscopy and flow cytometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Kyungsu; Lee, Hee Ju; Yoo, Ji-Hye; Jho, Eun Hye; Kim, Chul Young; Kim, Minkyun; Nho, Chu Won

    2011-08-01

    Arctigenin is a natural plant lignan previously shown to induce G(2)/M arrest in SW480 human colon cancer cells as well as AGS human gastric cancer cells, suggesting its use as a possible cancer chemopreventive agent. Changes in cell and nuclear size often correlate with the functionality of cancer-treating agents. Here, we report that arctigenin induces cell and nuclear enlargement of SW480 cells. Arctigenin clearly induced the formation of giant nuclear shapes in SW480, as demonstrated by fluorescence microscopic observation and quantitative determination of nuclear size. Cell and nuclear size were further assessed by flow cytometric analysis of light scattering and fluorescence pulse width after propidium iodide staining. FSC-H and FL2-W values (parameters referring to cell and nuclear size, respectively) significantly increased after arctigenin treatment; the mean values of FSC-H and FL2-W in arctigenin-treated SW480 cells were 572.6 and 275.1, respectively, whereas those of control cells were 482.0 and 220.7, respectively. Our approach may provide insights into the mechanism behind phytochemical-induced cell and nuclear enlargement as well as functional studies on cancer-treating agents.

  9. Ligament flow during drop-on-demand inkjet printing of bioink containing living cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Mengyun; Krishnamoorthy, Srikumar; Song, Hongtao; Zhang, Zhengyi; Xu, Changxue

    2017-03-01

    Organ printing utilizes tissue spheroids or filaments as building blocks to fabricate three-dimensional (3D) functional tissues and organs based on a layer-by-layer manufacturing mechanism. These fabricated tissues and organs are envisioned as alternatives to replace the damaged human tissues and organs, which is emerging as a promising solution to solve the organ donor shortage problem being faced all over the world. Inkjetting, one of the key technologies in organ printing, has been widely developed because of its moderate fabrication cost, good process controllability, and scale-up potentials. There are several key steps towards inkjet-based organ printing: generation of droplets from bioink, fabrication of 3D cellular structures, and post-printing tissue fusion and maturation. The droplet formation process is the first step, affecting the overall feasibility of the envisioned organ printing technology. This paper focuses on the ligament flow of the droplet formation process during inkjet printing of bioink containing living cells and its corresponding effect on post-printing cell viability and cell distribution. It is found that (1) two types of ligament flow are observed: at 30 V (Type I), the ligament flow has two different directions at the locations near the nozzle orifice and the forming droplet; at 60 V (Type II), the ligament flow directions are the same at both locations; (2) compared to Type II, fewer cells are ejected into the primary droplets in Type I, because some cells move back into the nozzle driven by the ligament flow in the positive z direction; and (3) cell viability in both Type I and Type II is around 90% without a significant difference. The resulting knowledge will benefit precise control of printing dynamics during inkjet printing of viscoelastic bioink for 3D biofabrication applications.

  10. Evaluation of flow cytometric immunophenotyping and DNA analysis for detection of malignant cells in serosal cavity fluids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sayed, Douaa M; el-Attar, Madiha M; Hussein, Aliaa A R Mohamed

    2009-07-01

    The serosal cavities are frequent sites of tumor metastasis. The distinction between carcinoma cells, inflammatory cells, and reactive or malignant mesothelial cells can be difficult in cytology. Multicolor flow cytometry (FCM) provides the opportunity to evaluate multiple antigens simultaneously, making it possible to characterize various cell populations. In this study, we aimed to assess the diagnostic accuracy of FCM immunophenotyping and DNA in comparison with serum tumor markers and classic cytology for detection of malignant cells in pleural and ascitic fluids. One hundred and nineteen samples of body cavity fluids were analyzed. Immunophenotyping was performed by four-color immunofluorescent staining using monoclonal antibodies against Ber-EP4, cytokeratin, CD3, and CD45. The DNA analysis by FCM was also performed. In addition, serum CA19-9, CEA, AFP, and CA125 were analyzed. Ber-EP4 marker had the highest sensitivity (73%) and specificity (95.5%) in the detection of carcinoma cells in serous fluid and correlated with cytology in most of cases (73%). The mean of DI differed statistically in patients with malignant effusions than in benign one. DI showed no difference in fluids due to infiltration of malignant epithelial cells or hematopoietic malignancy or due to hepatocellular carcinoma developing in cirrhotic liver. Thus, flow cytometry appears to aid not only in the detection of malignant cells but also in the characterization of cell type. On the other hand, although DNA ploidy examination had better sensitivity; it had no advantage over conventional cytopathological examination in identification of malignant cells. 2009 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  11. A novel rapid and reproducible flow cytometric method for optimization of transfection efficiency in cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Homann, Stefanie; Hofmann, Christian; Gorin, Aleksandr M; Nguyen, Huy Cong Xuan; Huynh, Diana; Hamid, Phillip; Maithel, Neil; Yacoubian, Vahe; Mu, Wenli; Kossyvakis, Athanasios; Sen Roy, Shubhendu; Yang, Otto Orlean; Kelesidis, Theodoros

    2017-01-01

    Transfection is one of the most frequently used techniques in molecular biology that is also applicable for gene therapy studies in humans. One of the biggest challenges to investigate the protein function and interaction in gene therapy studies is to have reliable monospecific detection reagents, particularly antibodies, for all human gene products. Thus, a reliable method that can optimize transfection efficiency based on not only expression of the target protein of interest but also the uptake of the nucleic acid plasmid, can be an important tool in molecular biology. Here, we present a simple, rapid and robust flow cytometric method that can be used as a tool to optimize transfection efficiency at the single cell level while overcoming limitations of prior established methods that quantify transfection efficiency. By using optimized ratios of transfection reagent and a nucleic acid (DNA or RNA) vector directly labeled with a fluorochrome, this method can be used as a tool to simultaneously quantify cellular toxicity of different transfection reagents, the amount of nucleic acid plasmid that cells have taken up during transfection as well as the amount of the encoded expressed protein. Finally, we demonstrate that this method is reproducible, can be standardized and can reliably and rapidly quantify transfection efficiency, reducing assay costs and increasing throughput while increasing data robustness.

  12. A Flow Cytometric Analysis of Vitreous Inflammatory Cells in Patients with Proliferative Diabetic Retinopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mojca Urbančič

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to investigate inflammatory cells in vitreous from patients with proliferative diabetic retinopathy (PDR using flow cytometric analysis. Twenty-eight patients with PDR requiring vitrectomy because of macular traction or tractional retinal detachment were enrolled in the study (n=28, and 6 patients with macular hole (MH formed the control group. Samples of vitreous and peripheral venous blood were obtained at the beginning of vitrectomy. T lymphocytes were found in vitreous from patients with PDR, and CD4/CD8 ratio was higher in vitreous (median 4.3 compared to blood (median 1.9; P=0.003. No B lymphocytes were detected in vitreous. The percentage of histiocytes/macrophages was significantly higher in vitreous (median 62.1 in comparison with blood (median 5.5; P<0.0001. No lymphocytes were detected in vitreous of the control group. There were more T lymphocytes in vitreous from patients with active PDR. No association between cells in the vitreous and visual acuity improvement after surgery was found. In conclusion, T lymphocytes are found in vitreous from patients with PDR and reflect the activity of PDR but do not seem to predict visual prognosis. Higher CD4/CD8 ratio in vitreous compared to blood from patients with PDR is consistent with local inflammatory response in PDR.

  13. Opto-fluidics based microscopy and flow cytometry on a cell phone for blood analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Hongying; Ozcan, Aydogan

    2015-01-01

    Blood analysis is one of the most important clinical tests for medical diagnosis. Flow cytometry and optical microscopy are widely used techniques to perform blood analysis and therefore cost-effective translation of these technologies to resource limited settings is critical for various global health as well as telemedicine applications. In this chapter, we review our recent progress on the integration of imaging flow cytometry and fluorescent microscopy on a cell phone using compact, light-weight and cost-effective opto-fluidic attachments integrated onto the camera module of a smartphone. In our cell-phone based opto-fluidic imaging cytometry design, fluorescently labeled cells are delivered into the imaging area using a disposable micro-fluidic chip that is positioned above the existing camera unit of the cell phone. Battery powered light-emitting diodes (LEDs) are butt-coupled to the sides of this micro-fluidic chip without any lenses, which effectively acts as a multimode slab waveguide, where the excitation light is guided to excite the fluorescent targets within the micro-fluidic chip. Since the excitation light propagates perpendicular to the detection path, an inexpensive plastic absorption filter is able to reject most of the scattered light and create a decent dark-field background for fluorescent imaging. With this excitation geometry, the cell-phone camera can record fluorescent movies of the particles/cells as they are flowing through the microchannel. The digital frames of these fluorescent movies are then rapidly processed to quantify the count and the density of the labeled particles/cells within the solution under test. With a similar opto-fluidic design, we have recently demonstrated imaging and automated counting of stationary blood cells (e.g., labeled white blood cells or unlabeled red blood cells) loaded within a disposable cell counting chamber. We tested the performance of this cell-phone based imaging cytometry and blood analysis platform

  14. NATO Advanced Study Institute on Buoyant Convection in Geophysical Flows

    CERN Document Server

    Fedorovich, E; Viegas, D; Wyngaard, J

    1998-01-01

    Studies of convection in geophysical flows constitute an advanced and rapidly developing area of research that is relevant to problems of the natural environment. During the last decade, significant progress has been achieved in the field as a result of both experimental studies and numerical modelling. This led to the principal revision of the widely held view on buoyancy-driven turbulent flows comprising an organised mean component with superimposed chaotic turbulence. An intermediate type of motion, represented by coherent structures, has been found to play a key role in geophysical boundary layers and in larger scale atmospheric and hydrospheric circulations driven by buoyant forcing. New aspects of the interaction between convective motions and rotation have recently been discovered and investigated. Extensive experimental data have also been collected on the role of convection in cloud dynamics and microphysics. New theoretical concepts and approaches have been outlined regarding scaling and parameteriz...

  15. Interstitial flow promotes vascular fibroblast, myofibroblast, and smooth muscle cell motility in 3-D collagen I via upregulation of MMP-1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Zhong-Dong; Ji, Xin-Ying; Qazi, Henry

    2009-01-01

    Neointima formation often occurs in regions where the endothelium has been damaged and the transmural interstitial flow is elevated. Vascular smooth muscle cells (SMCs) and fibroblasts/myofibroblasts (FBs/MFBs) contribute to intimal thickening by migrating from the media and adventitia into the site of injury. In this study, for the first time, the direct effects of interstitial flow on SMC and FB/MFB migration were investigated in an in vitro three-dimensional system. Collagen I gels were used to mimic three-dimensional extracellular matrix (ECM) for rat aortic SMCs and FBs/MFBs. Exposure to interstitial flow induced by 1 cmH2O pressure differential (shear stress, ∼0.05 dyn/cm2; flow velocity, ∼0.5 μm/s; and Darcy permeability, ∼10−11 cm2) substantially enhanced cell motility. Matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) inhibitor (GM-6001) abolished flow-induced migration augmentation, which suggested that the enhanced motility was MMP dependent. The upregulation of MMP-1 played a critical role for the flow-enhanced motility, which was further confirmed by silencing MMP-1 gene expression. Longer exposures to higher flows suppressed the number of migrated cells, although MMP-1 gene expression remained high. This suppression was a result of both flow-induced tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-1 upregulation and increased apoptotic and necrotic cell death. Interstitial flow did not affect MMP-2 gene expression or activity in the collagen I gel for any cell type. Our findings shed light on the mechanism by which vascular SMCs and FBs/MFBs contribute to intimal thickening in regions of vascular injury where interstitial flow is elevated. PMID:19465549

  16. A study of multi-phase flow through the cathode side of an interdigitated flow field using a multi-fluid model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berning, Torsten; Odgaard, Madeleine; Kær, Søren Knudsen

    2010-01-01

    This work presents a study of multi-phase flow through the cathode side of a polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell employing an interdigitated flow field plate. A previously published model has been extended in order to account for phase change kinetics, and a comparison between the interdigitated....... The additional compressor work due to the increased pressure loss will only slightly increase, and this may be offset by operating at lower stoichiometries as the interdigitated design is less mass transfer controlled, which means that the overall efficiency of the interdigitated arrangement will be higher...

  17. Concomitant differentiation of a population of mouse embryonic stem cells into neuron-like cells and Schwann cell-like cells in a slow-flow microfluidic device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramamurthy, Poornapriya; White, Joshua B.; Park, Joong Yull; Hume, Richard I.; Ebisu, Fumi; Mendez, Flor; Takayama, Shuichi; Barald, Kate F

    2016-01-01

    Background To send meaningful information to the brain, an inner ear cochlear implant (CI) must become closely coupled to as large and healthy a population of remaining Spiral Ganglion Neurons (SGN) as possible. Inner ear gangliogenesis depends on macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF), a directionally attractant neurotrophic cytokine made by both Schwann and supporting cells (Bank et al., 2012). MIF-induced mouse embryonic stem cell (mESC)-derived “neurons” could potentially substitute for lost or damaged SGN. mESC-derived “Schwann cells” produce MIF as do all Schwann cells (Huang et al., 2002; Roth et al., 2007, 2008) and could attract SGN to “ cell coated” implant. Results Neuron- and Schwann cell-like cells were produced from a common population of mESC in an ultra-slow flow microfluidic device. As the populations interacted; “neurons” grew over the “Schwann cell” lawn and early events in myelination were documented. Blocking MIF on the Schwann cell side greatly reduced directional neurite outgrowth. MIF-expressing “Schwann cells” were used to “coat” a CI: mouse SGN and MIF-induced “neurons” grew directionally to the CI and to a wild type but not MIF-knock out Organ of Corti explant. Conclusions Two novel stem cell-based approaches for treating the problem of sensorineural hearing loss are described. PMID:27761977

  18. Identification of material flow systems: Extensions and case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gleiss, A; Matyus, T; Bauer, G; Deistler, M; Glenck, E; Lampert, C

    1998-01-01

    The paper consists of two main parts. The first part is concerned with different aspects of mathematical modeling of material flow systems for the linear static case. The problems considered are the description of the model class, data reconciliation, identification of subsystems and the analysis of system properties relevant e.g. for simulation. In the second part an application of the modeling tools proposed in the first part to a study on the metabolism of phosphorus in an Austrian region is given.

  19. STUDY OF THE AIR FLOWS AROUND AN AIRPLANE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diaconescu Olivian

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available This material presents a stage of the designing of an airplane capable to work with low capacity engines of 2.5 and 4 cmc namely the simulation of the air flow around the fuselage and the wings. The study proves the correctness of the choice made in the wing’s positioning and of the horizontal stabilizer of the airplane’s axis,for the chosen airplane type namely acrobat.

  20. Design of flow-field patterns for proton exchange membrane fuel cell application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosli, M.I.; Wan Ramli Wan Daud; Kamaruzzaman Sopian; Jaafar Sahari

    2006-01-01

    Fuel cells are electrochemical devices that produce electricity at high efficiency without combustion. Fuel cells are emerging as viable candidates as power sources in many applications, including road vehicles, small-scale power stations, and possibly even portable electronics. This paper addresses the design of flow-field patterns for proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC). The PEMFC is a low-temperature fuel cell, in which a proton conductive polymer membrane is used as the electrolyte. In PEMFC, flow-field pattern is one important thing that effects the performance of PEMFC. This paper present three types of flow-field pattern that will be consider to be testing using CFD analysis and by experimental. The design look detail on to their shape and dimension to get the best pattern in term of more active electrode area compare to electrode area that will be used. Another advantage and disadvantage for these three type of flow-field patterns from literature also compared in this paper

  1. Modelling multiphase flow inside the porous media of a polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berning, Torsten; Kær, Søren Knudsen

    2011-01-01

    Transport processes inside polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells (PEMFC’s) are highly complex and involve convective and diffusive multiphase, multispecies flow through porous media along with heat and mass transfer and electrochemical reactions in conjunction with water transport through...... emerge and be entrained into the gas stream....

  2. Fractal basin boundaries generated by basin cells and the geometry of mixing chaotic flows

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nusse, HE; Yorke, JA

    2000-01-01

    Experiments and computations indicate that mixing in chaotic flows generates certain coherent spatial structures. Lf a two-dimensional basin has a basin cell (a trappings region whose boundary consists of pieces of the stable and unstable manifold of some periodic orbit) then the basin consists of a

  3. A comparative study of the morphology of flow and spin coated P3HT:PCBM films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapa, Jose; Karim, Alamgir

    2013-03-01

    Polymer solar cells are attractive due to the possibility of using cheaper materials and processing techniques for mass production of solar panels. Previous methods of fabricating polymer solar cells are suitable in laboratory conditions but are not scalable for industrial production. In this study, thin films of the photoactive blend of poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT) and fullerene derivative [6,6]-phenyl-C61-butyric acid methyl ester (PCBM) were prepared by flow coating, which is suitable for industrial manufacturing of solar cells. P3HT:PCBM blends were cast from different solvents, and the morphology of flow coated and spin coated films was compared. The surface morphology and optical properties of P3HT:PCBM films were characterized with optical microscopy, AFM, and UV-vis absorption spectroscopy. The degree of P3HT order was higher in flow coated films, as compared to spin coated films. Films flow coated using chloroform solutions had a higher thermal stability and an enhanced degree of phase separation as compared to spin coated films. Flow coated films from chlorobenzene solutions had a lower thermal stability and a smaller length scale of phase separation. This study demonstrates that flow coating is a suitable alternative technique for fabricating polymer solar cells. Work supported by U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, under Contract DE- AC02-98CH10886

  4. A Study on the Uncertainty of Flow-Induced Vibration in a Cross Flow over Staggered Tubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Ji-Su; Park, Jong-Woon [Dongguk univ, Gyeong Ju (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Hyeon-Kyeong [HanNam University, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-05-15

    Cross-flow in many support columns of very high temperature reactor (VHTR) lower plenum would have FIV issues under high speed flow jetting from the core. For a group of multiple circular cylinders subjected to a cross-flow, three types of potential vibration mechanisms may exist: (1) Vortex-induced vibration (VIV), (2) Fluid-elastic vibration (FEV) and (3) Turbulence-induced vibration (TIV). Kevalahan studied the free vibration of circular cylinders in a tightly packed periodic square inline array of cylinders. Pandey et al. studied the flue gas flow distribution in the Low Temperature Super Heater (LTSH) tube bundles situated in second pass of a utility boiler and the phenomenon of flow induced vibration. Nakamura et al. studied flow instability of cylinder arrays resembling U-bend tubes in steam generators. The FIV evaluation is usually performed with computational fluid dynamic (CFD) analysis to obtain unknown frequency of oscillation of the multiple objects under turbulent flow and thus the uncertainty residing in the turbulence model used should be quantified. In this paper, potential FIV uncertainty arising from the turbulence phenomena are evaluated for a typical cross flow through staggered tube bundles resembling the VHTR lower plenum support columns. Flow induced vibration (FIV) is one of the important mechanical and fatigue issues in nuclear systems. Especially, cross-flow in many support structures of VHTR lower plenum would have FIV issues under highly turbulent jet flows from the core. The results show that the effect of turbulence parameters on FIV is not negligible and the uncertainty is 5 to 10%. Present method can be applied to future FIV evaluations of nuclear systems. More extensive studies on flow induced vibration in a plant scale by using more rigorous computational methods are under way.

  5. Culturing pancreatic islets in microfluidic flow enhances morphology of the associated endothelial cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krishana S Sankar

    Full Text Available Pancreatic islets are heavily vascularized in vivo with each insulin secreting beta-cell associated with at least one endothelial cell (EC. This structure is maintained immediately post-isolation; however, in culture the ECs slowly deteriorate, losing density and branched morphology. We postulate that this deterioration occurs in the absence of blood flow due to limited diffusion of media inside the tissue. To improve exchange of media inside the tissue, we created a microfluidic device to culture islets in a range of flow-rates. Culturing the islets from C57BL6 mice in this device with media flowing between 1 and 7 ml/24 hr resulted in twice the EC-density and -connected length compared to classically cultured islets. Media containing fluorescent dextran reached the center of islets in the device in a flow-rate-dependant manner consistent with improved penetration. We also observed deterioration of EC morphology using serum free media that was rescued by addition of bovine serum albumin, a known anti-apoptotic signal with limited diffusion in tissue. We further examined the effect of flow on beta-cells showing dampened glucose-stimulated Ca(2+-response from cells at the periphery of the islet where fluid shear-stress is greatest. However, we observed normal two-photon NAD(PH response and insulin secretion from the remainder of the islet. These data reveal the deterioration of islet EC-morphology is in part due to restricted diffusion of serum albumin within the tissue. These data further reveal microfluidic devices as unique platforms to optimize islet culture by introducing intercellular flow to overcome the restricted diffusion of media components.

  6. Evidence for P-Glycoprotein Involvement in Cell Volume Regulation Using Coulter Sizing in Flow Cytometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer Pasquier

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The regulation of cell volume is an essential function that is coupled to a variety of physiological processes such as receptor recycling, excitability and contraction, cell proliferation, migration, and programmed cell death. Under stress, cells undergo emergency swelling and respond to such a phenomenon with a regulatory volume decrease (RVD where they release cellular ions, and other osmolytes as well as a concomitant loss of water. The link between P-glycoprotein, a transmembrane transporter, and cell volume regulation is controversial, and changes in cells volume are measured using microscopy or electrophysiology. For instance, by using the patch-clamp method, our team demonstrated that chloride currents activated in the RVD were more intense and rapid in a breast cancer cell line overexpressing the P-glycoprotein (P-gp. The Cell Lab Quanta SC is a flow cytometry system that simultaneously measures electronic volume, side scatter and three fluorescent colors; altogether this provides unsurpassed population resolution and accurate cell counting. Therefore, here we propose a novel method to follow cellular volume. By using the Coulter-type channel of the cytometer Cell Lab Quanta SC MPL (multi-platform loading, we demonstrated a role for the P-gp during different osmotic treatments, but also a differential activity of the P-gp through the cell cycle. Altogether, our data strongly suggests a role of P-gp in cell volume regulation.

  7. Calculating Study of the Turbine at Last Stage Flow Field in the Small Volume Flow Condition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiang Tieliu

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Based on basic equation and boundary layer theory of pneumodynamics, the thesis conducts numerical modeling and theoretical analysis on the last stage of turbine characteristics at a small volume flow by using FLUENT, gives an emphasized analysis on the position of first occurrence of backflow and its expansion direction and comes up with flow structure of the turbine flow field at last stage in the small volume flow condition. In connection with specific experiments, it puts forward the flow model of backflow occurring in the last stage field and the solution to the model. The flow field at last stage for a 100MW turbine in the small volume flow condition that is calculated by using the model is basically in conformity to the actual result.

  8. Study of the action of a phosphonate additive on steel scale deposit and corrosion in the hydrodynamic conditions of a channel flow cell; Etude de l'action d'un additif phosphone sur l'entartrage et sur la corrosion de l'acier dans les conditions hydrodynamiques d'une cellule a canal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia, C.

    2000-10-17

    In cooling systems, an improved control of scale deposit and corrosion processes is a major challenge and an realistic evaluation tool for water treatments is of the utmost economic importance. In this study, a channel flow cell was used to allow in-situ electrochemical measurements in well defined electrolyte tube flowing conditions. An expression of the mass transfer towards the electrode was established where the diffusion-limited current is a function of Re{sup 1/3} in the laminar regime and was verified experimentally using the redox couples Fe[CN]{sub 6}{sup 4-}/ Fe[CN]{sub 6}{sup 3-} and O{sub 2}/OH{sup -}. This hydrodynamically controlled experimental device was developed to investigate scale deposit processes and to evaluate scale inhibitor efficiency using a electrochemical quartz crystal microbalance. Experiments were performed on three different waters, at various flow rates and temperatures. The efficiency of a well known phosphonate (HEDP) was tested at different concentrations and an optimum concentration could be established (0.7 mg dm{sup -3}). The effect of additive injection during the scale formation as well as the influence of flow rate on the inhibiting efficiency were evaluated. The anti-scale additive was shown to be more effective in the turbulent regime. HEDP has shown a strong effect on inhibiting crystal growth and that affected the morphology of CaCO{sub 3} crystals. The HEDP effect on protecting carbon steel against corrosion was also studied in mineral water containing Ca{sup 2+} ions. It was found that anti-corrosion effect of HEDP is enhanced by the presence of calcium in solution and that is due to the formation of an HEDP-Ca{sup 2+} complex, which adsorbs onto the metallic surface and protects it from dissolution. (author)

  9. Flow induced vibration studies on PFBR control plug components

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prakash, V., E-mail: prakash@igcar.gov.in [Fast Reactor Technology Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam, Tamilnadu (India); Kumar, P. Anup; Anandaraj, M.; Thirumalai, M.; Anandbabu, C.; Rajan, K.K. [Fast Reactor Technology Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam, Tamilnadu (India)

    2012-09-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Flow induced vibration studies on Prototype Fast Breeder Reactor control plug model carried out. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Velocity similitude was followed for the study. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Frequencies and amplitude of vibrations of various control plug components measured. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Overall values of vibration are well within permissible limits. - Abstract: The construction of Prototype Fast Breeder Reactor (PFBR), a 500 MWe liquid sodium cooled reactor, is in progress at Kalpakkam in India. Control plug (CP) is located right above the core subassemblies in the hot pool. Control plug is an important component as many of the critical reactor parameters are sensed and controlled by the components housed in the control plug assembly. In PFBR primary circuit, components are basically thin walled, slender shells with diameter to thickness ratio ranging from 100 to 650. These components are prone to flow induced vibrations. The existence of free liquid (sodium) surfaces, which is the source of sloshing phenomenon and the operation of primary sodium pump in the primary pool are other potential sources of vibration of reactor components. Control plug is a hollow cylindrical shell structure and provides passages and support for 12 absorber rod drive mechanisms (ARDM) which consists of 9 control and safety rods and 3 diverse safety rods, 210 thermo wells to measure the sodium temperature at the exit of various fuel subassemblies, three failed fuel localization modules (FFLM) and acoustic detectors. It consists of a core cover plate (CCP), which forms the bottom end, two intermediate supports plate, i.e. lower stay plate (LSP) and upper stay plate (USP) and an outer shell. The CCP is located at a distance of 1.3 m from the core top. With such a gap, there will be long free hanging length of the thermocouple sleeves, Delayed neutron detector (DND) sampling tubes and ARDM shroud tubes and hence they are

  10. Local Nusselt number enhancement during gas-liquid Taylor bubble flow in a square mini-channel: An experimental study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Majumder, Abhik; Mehta, Balkrishna; Khandekar, Sameer

    2013-01-01

    Taylor bubble flow takes place when two immiscible fluids (liquid-liquid or gas-liquid) flow inside a tube of capillary dimensions within specific range of volume flow ratios. In the slug flows where gas and liquid are two different phases, liquid slugs are separated by elongated Taylor bubbles. This singular flow pattern is observed in many engineering mini-/micro-scale devices like pulsating heat pipes, gas-liquid-solid monolithic reactors, micro-two-phase heat exchangers, digital micro-fluidics, micro-scale mass transfer process, fuel cells, etc. The unique and complex flow characteristics require understanding on local, as well as global, spatio-temporal scales. In the present work, the axial stream-wise profile of the fluid and wall temperature for air-water (i) isolated single Taylor bubble and, (ii) a train of Taylor bubbles, in a horizontal square channel of size 3.3 mm x 3.3 mm x 350 mm, heated from the bottom (heated length = 175 mm), with the other three sides kept insulated, are reported at different gas volume flow ratios. The primary aim is to study the enhancement of heat transfer due to the Taylor bubble train flow, in comparison with thermally developing single-phase flows. Intrusion of a bubble in the liquid flow drastically changes the local temperature profiles. The axial distribution of time-averaged local Nusselt number (Nu z ) shows that Taylor bubble train regime increases the transport of heat up to 1.2-1.6 times more as compared with laminar single-phase liquid flow. In addition, for a given liquid flow Reynolds number, the heat transfer enhancement is a function of the geometrical parameters of the unit cell, i.e., the length of adjacent gas bubble and water plug. (authors)

  11. Flow rate calibration. III. The use of stabilized biostandards to calibrate the flow rate and calculate absolute CD4+ T-cell counts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Clare L; Whitby, Liam; Granger, Viv; Storie, Ian; Reilly, John T; Barnett, David

    2006-05-01

    We have previously reported a flow rate calibration method for the determination of absolute CD4(+) T-lymphocyte counts that removes the need for the addition of latex beads to each sample. However, a limitation with this approach is that a calibration factor (CF) needs to be applied to adjust for differences in viscosity between latex bead suspensions and biological specimens. We have also demonstrated the value of using stabilized whole blood samples in external quality assessment (EQA) studies; such samples have a stable absolute lymphocyte count for over 1 year, at 4 degrees C. It was successfully demonstrated that this material can be used as a flow rate biocalibration (FRB) material for use as a flow cytometric control to provide a sample with a known CD4(+) T-lymphocyte count. Such material has advantages over latex bead technology as it can act as a full process control as well as having the same matrix and viscosity characteristics as the test material, thus removing the need for a CF. In this study, we have analyzed 268 consecutive normal, abnormal, and HIV(+) samples using FRB, incorporating the PanLeucoGating approach and compared this to the MultiSet method, defined as the predicate. Percentage similarity statistics revealed the following: 0-3,000 CD4(+) cells/mul mean percentage difference (MPD; bias) 1.2%, 95% CI of 5.6-8%; 0-200 CD4(+) cells/microl MPD of 1.25%, 95% CI of 11.63-14.13%; 201-500 CD4(+) cells/microl MPD of 1%, 95% CI of 4.6-6.6%. This study demonstrates that stabilized whole blood can be used for FRB. It has the advantage of being a full process control, in addition to costing less than latex beads with highly comparable results. As bench top flow cytometers are extremely stable, this is a low cost and robust alternative to bead based methods for generating absolute CD4 counts. Copyright 2006 International Society for Analytical Cytology.

  12. In situ diagnostic of two-phase flow phenomena in polymer electrolyte fuel cells by neutron imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Jianbo; Kramer, Denis; Shimoi, Ryoichi; Ono, Yoshitaka; Lehmann, Eberhard; Wokaun, Alexander; Shinohara, Kazuhiko; Scherer, Guenther G.

    2006-01-01

    The formation of liquid water in operating polymer electrolyte fuel cells (PEFC) of industrial and laboratory size has been investigated by in situ neutron imaging. The influence of the materials chosen for the structural components of the cell on droplet formation and transport in flow fields and on liquid formation in gas diffusion layers has been studied. The changing of the cathodic gas diffusion layer material allowed the relationship between materials, liquid accumulation, and electrochemical performance to be examined. It has been shown that material choice has considerable bearing on the presence of liquid inside the porous structures and the electrochemical characteristics. A simplified quasi one-dimensional cell with an active area of 25 cm 2 was used for materials comparison, and the results were related to technically relevant operating conditions - where inhomogeneities have to be considered - by subsequent examination of cells with an active area of 100 cm 2

  13. Flow cytometric measurement of the metabolism of benzo[a]pyrene by mouse liver cells in culture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bartholomew, J.C.; Wade, C.G.; Dougherty, K.K.

    1984-01-01

    The metabolism of benzo[a]pyrene in individual cells was monitored by flow cytometry. The measurements are based on the alterations that occur in the fluorescence emission spectrum of benzo[a]pyrene when it is converted to various metabolites. Using present instrumentation the technique could easily detect 1x10 6 molecules per cells of benzo[a]pyrene and 1x10 7 molecules per cell of the diol epoxide. The analysis of C3H IOT 1/2 mouse fibroblasts growing in culture indicated that there was heterogeneity in the conversion of the parent compound into diol epoxide derivatives suggesting that some variation in sensitivity to transformation by benzo[a]pyrene may be due to differences in cellular metabolism. The technique allows sensitive detection of metabolites in viable cells, and provides a new approach to the study of factors that influence both metabolism and transformation. (orig.)

  14. Experimental study of effect of stenosis geometry on flow parameters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veselý Ondřej

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A stenosis is a narrowing in a tubular organ or structure. In medicine, vessel stenosis poses health risks for people. In this work, experimental investigations of pressure loss coefficient for varying stenosis eccentricity and shape were performed. Five models of different geometry were studied; all models were stenosis of 75 % area reduction. The flow conditions approximate physiological flow. The measuring range of Reynolds number was from 130 to 2730, measured values of pressure loss coefficient were from 12 to 20. The steady experimental results indicated that static pressure loss coefficient is affected by the shape of stenosis, but it was affected more significantly by the eccentricity. Visualization experiments have been performed in Polycarbonate models.

  15. A study of supersonic mixing flow field with ramp injector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamane, Yoshiyuki; Sawaguchi, Seiichi; Ando, Yasunori; Aso, Shigeru; Fukuda, Masahiro

    1994-06-01

    The purposes of the present paper are to investigate the structure of supersonic mixing flow field in ram/scramjet combustor and to develop the CFD code which will be used for the design of the combustor. One type of parallel injection method with ramp injector has been studied numerically and experimentally. The patterns of shock waves obtained by numerical simulations agreed with experimental results in schlieren photograph. Comparisons of static pressure distributions on the wall surface showed good agreement qualitatively. Numerical results captured the structures of flow field clearly, which were generating process of a pair of streamwise vortices and vortical roll-up of the jet. Oblique shocks made injectant gas lift off from wall surface, as found in calculations and experiments. According to these results, it could be said that the CFD code used in this study was useful for investigation of fuel-air mixing in supersonic flow field with parallel injection. From the numerical results, it was confirmed that the streamwise vortices generated by ramp injector and interaction between mixing field and oblique shocks were key factors for enhancement of fuel-air mixing in ram/scramjet combustor.

  16. Hierarchical modeling for rare event detection and cell subset alignment across flow cytometry samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cron, Andrew; Gouttefangeas, Cécile; Frelinger, Jacob; Lin, Lin; Singh, Satwinder K; Britten, Cedrik M; Welters, Marij J P; van der Burg, Sjoerd H; West, Mike; Chan, Cliburn

    2013-01-01

    Flow cytometry is the prototypical assay for multi-parameter single cell analysis, and is essential in vaccine and biomarker research for the enumeration of antigen-specific lymphocytes that are often found in extremely low frequencies (0.1% or less). Standard analysis of flow cytometry data relies on visual identification of cell subsets by experts, a process that is subjective and often difficult to reproduce. An alternative and more objective approach is the use of statistical models to identify cell subsets of interest in an automated fashion. Two specific challenges for automated analysis are to detect extremely low frequency event subsets without biasing the estimate by pre-processing enrichment, and the ability to align cell subsets across multiple data samples for comparative analysis. In this manuscript, we develop hierarchical modeling extensions to the Dirichlet Process Gaussian Mixture Model (DPGMM) approach we have previously described for cell subset identification, and show that the hierarchical DPGMM (HDPGMM) naturally generates an aligned data model that captures both commonalities and variations across multiple samples. HDPGMM also increases the sensitivity to extremely low frequency events by sharing information across multiple samples analyzed simultaneously. We validate the accuracy and reproducibility of HDPGMM estimates of antigen-specific T cells on clinically relevant reference peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) samples with known frequencies of antigen-specific T cells. These cell samples take advantage of retrovirally TCR-transduced T cells spiked into autologous PBMC samples to give a defined number of antigen-specific T cells detectable by HLA-peptide multimer binding. We provide open source software that can take advantage of both multiple processors and GPU-acceleration to perform the numerically-demanding computations. We show that hierarchical modeling is a useful probabilistic approach that can provide a consistent labeling

  17. Hierarchical modeling for rare event detection and cell subset alignment across flow cytometry samples.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew Cron

    Full Text Available Flow cytometry is the prototypical assay for multi-parameter single cell analysis, and is essential in vaccine and biomarker research for the enumeration of antigen-specific lymphocytes that are often found in extremely low frequencies (0.1% or less. Standard analysis of flow cytometry data relies on visual identification of cell subsets by experts, a process that is subjective and often difficult to reproduce. An alternative and more objective approach is the use of statistical models to identify cell subsets of interest in an automated fashion. Two specific challenges for automated analysis are to detect extremely low frequency event subsets without biasing the estimate by pre-processing enrichment, and the ability to align cell subsets across multiple data samples for comparative analysis. In this manuscript, we develop hierarchical modeling extensions to the Dirichlet Process Gaussian Mixture Model (DPGMM approach we have previously described for cell subset identification, and show that the hierarchical DPGMM (HDPGMM naturally generates an aligned data model that captures both commonalities and variations across multiple samples. HDPGMM also increases the sensitivity to extremely low frequency events by sharing information across multiple samples analyzed simultaneously. We validate the accuracy and reproducibility of HDPGMM estimates of antigen-specific T cells on clinically relevant reference peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC samples with known frequencies of antigen-specific T cells. These cell samples take advantage of retrovirally TCR-transduced T cells spiked into autologous PBMC samples to give a defined number of antigen-specific T cells detectable by HLA-peptide multimer binding. We provide open source software that can take advantage of both multiple processors and GPU-acceleration to perform the numerically-demanding computations. We show that hierarchical modeling is a useful probabilistic approach that can provide a

  18. Rapid detection of defects in fuel-cell electrodes using infrared reactive-flow-through technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Prodip K.; Weber, Adam Z.; Bender, Guido; Manak, Austin; Bittinat, Daniel; Herring, Andrew M.; Ulsh, Michael

    2014-09-01

    As fuel cells become more prominent, new manufacturing and production methods will need to be developed to deal efficiently and effectively with increased demand. One necessary component of this industrial growth is the accurate measurement of the variability in the manufacturing process. In this study, we present a diagnostic system that combines infrared thermography with a reactive-flow-through technique to detect catalyst-loading defects in fuel-cell gas-diffusion electrodes accurately with high spatial and temporal resolutions. Experimental results are compared with model predictions of thermal response with good agreement. Data analysis, operating-condition impacts, and detection limits are explored using both experiments and simulation. Overall, the results demonstrate the potential of this technique to measure defects on the millimeter length scale with temporal resolutions appropriate for use on a web-line. Thus we present the first development stage of a next-generation non-destructive diagnostic tool, which may be amenable to eventual use on roll-to-roll manufacturing lines.

  19. A flow injection analysis system with encapsulated high-density Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells for rapid determination of biochemical oxygen demand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Kyo Seong; Choo, Kwang Ho; Chang, Ho Nam; Park, Joong Kon

    2009-05-01

    The biochemical oxygen demand (BOD) determination was studied using a novel flow injection analysis (FIA) system with encapsulated Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells and an oxygen electrode and was compared with conventional 5-day BOD tests. S. cerevisiae cells were packed in a calcium alginate capsule at a dry cell weight of 250 g/l of capsule core. The level of dissolved oxygen (DO) was reduced due to the enhanced respiratory activity of the microbial cells when the injected nutrient passed through the bioreactor. The decrease in DO (DeltaDO) was intensified with the amount of microbial cells packed in the bioreactor. However, the specific DeltaDO decreased as the amount of cells loaded in the bioreactor increased. The DeltaDO value was dependent on the pH and temperature of the mobile phase and reached its maximum value at 35 degrees C and pH 7-8. Also, DeltaDO became larger at longer response times as the flow rate of the mobile phase decreased. The measurement of DeltaDO was repeated more than six times consecutively using a 20-ppm standard glucose and glutamic acid solution, which confirmed the reproducibility with a standard deviation of 0.95%. A strong linear correlation between DeltaDO and BOD was also observed. The 5-day BOD values of actual water and wastewater samples were in accordance with the BOD values obtained by this FIA method using encapsulated S. cerevisiae cells. Unlike the cell-immobilized bead system, there was no contamination of the bioreactor resulting from any leak of yeast cells from the sensor capsules during BOD measurements.

  20. Application of image flow cytometry for the characterization of red blood cell morphology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinto, Ruben N.; Sebastian, Joseph A.; Parsons, Michael; Chang, Tim C.; Acker, Jason P.; Kolios, Michael C.

    2017-02-01

    Red blood cells (RBCs) stored in hypothermic environments for the purpose of transfusion have been documented to undergo structural and functional changes over time. One sign of the so-called RBC storage lesion is irreversible damage to the cell membrane. Consequently, RBCs undergo a morphological transformation from regular, deformable biconcave discocytes to rigid spheroechinocytes. The spherically shaped RBCs lack the deformability to efficiently enter microvasculature, thereby reducing the capacity of RBCs to oxygenate tissue. Blood banks currently rely on microscope techniques that include fixing, staining and cell counting in order to morphologically characterize RBC samples; these methods are labor intensive and highly subjective. This study presents a novel, high-throughput RBC morphology characterization technique using image flow cytometry (IFC). An image segmentation template was developed to process 100,000 images acquired from the IFC system and output the relative spheroechinocyte percentage. The technique was applied on samples extracted from two blood bags to monitor the morphological changes of the RBCs during in vitro hypothermic storage. The study found that, for a given sample of RBCs, the IFC method was twice as fast in data acquisition, and analyzed 250-350 times more RBCs than the conventional method. Over the lifespan of the blood bags, the mean spheroechinocyte population increased by 37%. Future work will focus on expanding the template to segregate RBC images into more subpopulations for the validation of the IFC method against conventional techniques; the expanded template will aid in establishing quantitative links between spheroechinocyte increase and other RBC storage lesion characteristics.

  1. Flow cytometric bacterial cell counts challenge conventional heterotrophic plate counts for routine microbiological drinking water monitoring

    KAUST Repository

    Van Nevel, S.

    2017-02-08

    Drinking water utilities and researchers continue to rely on the century-old heterotrophic plate counts (HPC) method for routine assessment of general microbiological water quality. Bacterial cell counting with flow cytometry (FCM) is one of a number of alternative methods that challenge this status quo and provide an opportunity for improved water quality monitoring. After more than a decade of application in drinking water research, FCM methodology is optimised and established for routine application, supported by a considerable amount of data from multiple full-scale studies. Bacterial cell concentrations obtained by FCM enable quantification of the entire bacterial community instead of the minute fraction of cultivable bacteria detected with HPC (typically < 1% of all bacteria). FCM measurements are reproducible with relative standard deviations below 3% and can be available within 15 min of samples arriving in the laboratory. High throughput sample processing and complete automation are feasible and FCM analysis is arguably less expensive than HPC when measuring more than 15 water samples per day, depending on the laboratory and selected staining procedure(s). Moreover, many studies have shown FCM total (TCC) and intact (ICC) cell concentrations to be reliable and robust process variables, responsive to changes in the bacterial abundance and relevant for characterising and monitoring drinking water treatment and distribution systems. The purpose of this critical review is to initiate a constructive discussion on whether FCM could replace HPC in routine water quality monitoring. We argue that FCM provides a faster, more descriptive and more representative quantification of bacterial abundance in drinking water.

  2. A flow-cytometric NK-cytotoxicity assay adapted for use in rat repeated dose toxicity studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marcusson-Staahl, Maritha; Cederbrant, Karin

    2003-01-01

    A recent regulatory document for immunotoxicity testing of new pharmaceutical drugs includes cytotoxic natural killer (NK)-cell function as a required parameter in repeated dose toxicity studies. The classical 51 Cr-release assay is the conventional test for cytotoxicity testing but several drawbacks with this assay has increased the demand for new reliable test systems. Here, we describe the optimisation of a flow-cytometric cytotoxicity assay especially adapted for regulatory rat studies in drug development. The test principle is based on target cell labelling with 5-(6)-carboxy-fluorescein succinimidyl ester (CFSE) and subsequent DNA-labelling with propidium iodide (PI) for identification of target cells with compromised cell membranes. The results are expressed as percentage of dead targets on a cell-to-cell basis. The final format of the assay includes 0.5 ml peripheral blood, 1.25x10 5 effector cells per sample, and collection of 500 target events by flow-cytometry. When NKR-P1+ cells were removed from the effector cell population by magnetic depletion the relative proportion decreased from 6 to 0.08%. The corresponding cytotoxic activity decreased from 68 to 8%. Also, the cytotoxic activity showed a significant and positive correlation with the proportion of NK-cells present in the effector cell suspension. Thus, the cytotoxicity measured is almost exclusively exerted by NK-cells. The current flow-cytometric test benefits from using peripheral blood as a source for effector cells since it will not conflict with the use of spleen for histopathological investigations in repeated dose toxicity studies. Additionally, since only a minimal number of effector cells are required per sample repeated testing of the same animal is enabled

  3. Transcranial Doppler ultrasonography in children with sickle cell anemia: Clinical and laboratory correlates for elevated blood flow velocities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lagunju, IkeOluwa; Sodeinde, Olugbemiro; Brown, Biobele; Akinbami, Felix; Adedokun, Babatunde

    2014-02-01

    Transcranial Doppler (TCD) sonography of major cerebral arteries is now recommended for routine screening for stroke risk in children with sickle cell disease (SCD). We performed TCD studies on children with sickle cell anemia (SCA) seen at the pediatric hematology clinic over a period of 2 years. TCD scans were repeated yearly in children with normal flow velocities and every 3 months in children with elevated velocities. Findings were correlated with clinical variables, hematologic indices, and arterial oxygen saturation. Predictors of elevated velocities were identified by multiple linear regressions. We enrolled 237 children and performed a total of 526 TCD examinations. Highest time-averaged maximum flow velocities were ≥170 cm/s in 72 (30.3%) cases and ≥200 cm/s in 20 (8.4%). Young age, low hematocrit, low hemoglobin, and arterial oxygen desaturation <95% showed significant correlations with presence of increased cerebral flow velocities. Low hematocrit, low hemoglobin concentration, young age, and low arterial oxygen desaturation predicted elevated cerebral blood flow velocities and, invariably, increased stroke risk, in children with SCA. Children who exhibit these features should be given high priority for TCD examination in the setting of limited resources. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Artificial fish skin of self-powered micro-electromechanical systems hair cells for sensing hydrodynamic flow phenomena

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asadnia, Mohsen; Kottapalli, Ajay Giri Prakash; Miao, Jianmin; Warkiani, Majid Ebrahimi; Triantafyllou, Michael S.

    2015-01-01

    Using biological sensors, aquatic animals like fishes are capable of performing impressive behaviours such as super-manoeuvrability, hydrodynamic flow ‘vision’ and object localization with a success unmatched by human-engineered technologies. Inspired by the multiple functionalities of the ubiquitous lateral-line sensors of fishes, we developed flexible and surface-mountable arrays of micro-electromechanical systems (MEMS) artificial hair cell flow sensors. This paper reports the development of the MEMS artificial versions of superficial and canal neuromasts and experimental characterization of their unique flow-sensing roles. Our MEMS flow sensors feature a stereolithographically fabricated polymer hair cell mounted on Pb(Zr0.52Ti0.48)O3 micro-diaphragm with floating bottom electrode. Canal-inspired versions are developed by mounting a polymer canal with pores that guide external flows to the hair cells embedded in the canal. Experimental results conducted employing our MEMS artificial superficial neuromasts (SNs) demonstrated a high sensitivity and very low threshold detection limit of 22 mV/(mm s−1) and 8.2 µm s−1, respectively, for an oscillating dipole stimulus vibrating at 35 Hz. Flexible arrays of such superficial sensors were demonstrated to localize an underwater dipole stimulus. Comparative experimental studies revealed a high-pass filtering nature of the canal encapsulated sensors with a cut-off frequency of 10 Hz and a flat frequency response of artificial SNs. Flexible arrays of self-powered, miniaturized, light-weight, low-cost and robust artificial lateral-line systems could enhance the capabilities of underwater vehicles. PMID:26423435

  5. Intracranial 4D flow magnetic resonance imaging reveals altered haemodynamics in sickle cell disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Václavů, Lena; Baldew, Zelonna A V; Gevers, Sanna; Mutsaerts, Henri J M M; Fijnvandraat, Karin; Cnossen, Marjon H; Majoie, Charles B; Wood, John C; VanBavel, Ed; Biemond, Bart J; van Ooij, Pim; Nederveen, Aart J

    2018-02-01

    Stroke risk in children with sickle cell disease (SCD) is currently assessed with routine transcranial Doppler ultrasound (TCD) measurements of blood velocity in the Circle of Willis (CoW). However, there is currently no biomarker with proven prognostic value in adult patients. Four-dimensional (4D) flow magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) may improve risk profiling based on intracranial haemodynamics. We conducted neurovascular 4D flow MRI and blood sampling in 69 SCD patients [median age 15 years (interquartile range, IQR: 12-50)] and 14 healthy controls [median age 21 years (IQR: 18-43)]. We measured velocity, flow, lumen area and endothelial shear stress (ESS) in the CoW. SCD patients had lower haematocrit and viscosity, and higher velocity, flow and lumen area, with lower ESS compared to healthy controls. We observed significant age-related decline in haemodynamic 4D flow parameters; velocity (Spearman's ρ = -0·36 to -0·61), flow (ρ = -0·26 to -0·52) and ESS (ρ = -0·14 to -0·54) in SCD patients. Further analysis in only adults showed that velocity values were similar in SCD patients compared to healthy controls, but that the additional 4D flow parameters, flow and lumen area, were higher, and ESS lower, in the SCD group. Our data suggest that 4D flow MRI may identify adult patients with an increased stroke risk more accurately than current TCD-based velocity. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Asymmetry of blood flow and cancer cell adhesion in a microchannel with symmetric bifurcation and confluence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishikawa, Takuji; Fujiwara, Hiroki; Matsuki, Noriaki; Yoshimoto, Takefumi; Imai, Yohsuke; Ueno, Hironori; Yamaguchi, Takami

    2011-02-01

    Bifurcations and confluences are very common geometries in biomedical microdevices. Blood flow at microchannel bifurcations has different characteristics from that at confluences because of the multiphase properties of blood. Using a confocal micro-PIV system, we investigated the behaviour of red blood cells (RBCs) and cancer cells in microchannels with geometrically symmetric bifurcations and confluences. The behaviour of RBCs and cancer cells was strongly asymmetric at bifurcations and confluences whilst the trajectories of tracer particles in pure water were almost symmetric. The cell-free layer disappeared on the inner wall of the bifurcation but increased in size on the inner wall of the confluence. Cancer cells frequently adhered to the inner wall of the bifurcation but rarely to other locations. Because the wall surface coating and the wall shear stress were almost symmetric for the bifurcation and the confluence, the result indicates that not only chemical mediation and wall shear stress but also microscale haemodynamics play important roles in the adhesion of cancer cells to the microchannel walls. These results provide the fundamental basis for a better understanding of blood flow and cell adhesion in biomedical microdevices.

  7. New and classical applications of heat flow studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clauser, C.

    2005-12-01

    This special issue of Journal of Geophysics and Engineering is dedicated to a collection of papers which resulted from an international workshop held in Aachen, Germany, on 4-7 October 2004, called 'New and Classical Applications of Heat Flow Studies'. This was the third in a series of topical geothermal workshops arranged by the Geothermal Working Group of the German Geophysical Society (DGG) and was organized by the Institute of Applied Geophysics at RWTH Aachen University under the auspices of the International Heat Flow Commission of the International Association of Seismology and Physics (IASPEI). The meeting was attended by some 60 scientists from 14 countries and three continents. Financial assistance, granted by DGG and IASPEI, allowed us to provide partial support for a total of eight students, young scientists and eminent researchers from eastern Europe and overseas. The convenors of the meeting were Christoph Clauser (Aachen), Thomas Kohl (Zürich) and Makoto Taniguchi (Kyoto). The main local organizers were Volker Rath (scientific programme) and Ute Kreutz (accommodation and financial affairs). The topics addressed in more than 50 oral and poster presentations indicated that today intriguing new applications of heat flow studies have emerged, complementing the classical topics of heat flow mapping and the tectonic implications of heat flow. In classical applications, for instance, thermal signatures of water flow or downward diffusion of variations in the Earth's mean temperature are considered as noise which needs to be corrected prior to further use of the data. In contrast, in several new applications it is exactly the information contained in these signatures which has been extracted and interpreted. For instance, over the past two decades, work on the most prominent of these new applications has been devoted to inverting the variation of the Earth's past mean ground surface temperature (GST). As of today, GST provided by the geothermal method has

  8. A new one-platform flow cytometric method for residual cell counting in platelet concentrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Michael; Spengler, Hans-Peter; Lambrecht, Bernd; Hourfar, Michael K; Seifried, Erhard; Tonn, Torsten

    2009-12-01

    According to German regulations and guidelines, residual red blood cells (rRBCs) and residual white blood cells (rWBCs) must number fewer than 3 x 10(9) cells/unit and 1 x 10(6) cells/unit in platelet concentrates (PCs), respectively. Due to low levels of residual cells in final products, there is still a need for fast, reliable, and sensitive methods of automated detection of these cell types. In Part A, 21 PCs were spiked with predetermined numbers of red blood cells (RBCs) and white blood cells (WBCs). The linearity, precision, and accuracy of the BD Thrombo Count assay (BD Biosciences Europe) were tested and validated according to international guidelines. Finally in Part B, 100 PCs prepared from pooled buffy coats were tested by the BD Thrombo Count assay and compared with other methods, including Nageotte (rWBCs) and Neubauer (rRBCs) counting chambers and the flow cytometric BD LeucoCOUNT (Becton Dickinson) assay (rWBCs). The unspecific background of blank PC samples was fewer than 0.02 cells/microL for WBCs and fewer than 34 cells/microL for RBCs (mean, 21). Linear regression and precision analyses of spiked PC samples were determined for both WBCs (r(2) = 0.992; range, 0.6-6.0 WBCs/microL) and RBCs (r(2) = 0.999; 800-8000 RBCs/microL). No carryover of cells or drift in results was detected in the automated sample acquisition mode. Analysis according to statistical methods of Bland and Altman demonstrated a high correlation between BD Thrombo Count and the Neubauer manual counting chamber. This novel flow cytometric test is a quick and reliable single-tube assay that has been demonstrated as a potential alternative for the existing manual microscopic counting procedures that are both time-consuming and laborious.

  9. A selective procedure for DNA extraction from apoptotic cells applicable for gel electrophoresis and flow cytometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, J; Traganos, F; Darzynkiewicz, Z

    1994-05-01

    In cells undergoing apoptosis (programmed cell death), a fraction of nuclear DNA is fragmented to the size equivalent of DNA in mono- or oligonucleosomes. When such DNA is analyzed by agarose gel electrophoresis it generates the characteristic "ladder" pattern of discontinuous DNA fragments. Such a pattern of DNA degradation generally serves as a marker of the apoptotic mode of cell death. We developed a simple, rapid, and selective procedure for extraction of the degraded, low-molecular-weight DNA from apoptotic cells. The cells are prefixed in 70% ethanol, DNA is extracted with 0.2 M phosphate-citrate buffer at pH 7.8, and the extract is sequentially treated with RNase A and proteinase K and then subjected to electrophoresis. The ladder pattern was detected from DNA extracted from 1-2 x 10(6) HL-60 cells, of which as few as 8% were apoptotic, by flow cytometric criteria, as well as from blood and bone marrow samples from leukemic patients undergoing chemotherapy. The method is rapid and uses nontoxic reagents (no phenol, chloroform, etc.). This approach permits the analysis of DNA extracted from the very same cell population that is subjected to measurements by flow cytometry to estimate DNA ploidy, the cell cycle distribution of nonapoptotic cells, the percentage of apoptotic cells, or other parameters. Furthermore, the cells may be stored in 70% ethanol for at least several weeks before analysis without any significant DNA degradation. Treatment with ethanol also inactivates several pathogens, thereby increasing the safety of sample handling. The method is applicable to clinical samples, which can be fixed in ethanol and then stored and/or safety transported prior to analysis.

  10. Stability of phospholipid vesicles studied by asymmetrical flow field-flow fractionation and capillary electrophoresis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yohannes, Gebrenegus [Laboratory of Analytical Chemistry, Department of Chemistry, P.O. Box 55, FIN-00014 University of Helsinki (Finland); Pystynen, Kati-Henna [Laboratory of Analytical Chemistry, Department of Chemistry, P.O. Box 55, FIN-00014 University of Helsinki (Finland); Riekkola, Marja-Liisa [Laboratory of Analytical Chemistry, Department of Chemistry, P.O. Box 55, FIN-00014 University of Helsinki (Finland); Wiedmer, Susanne K. [Laboratory of Analytical Chemistry, Department of Chemistry, P.O. Box 55, FIN-00014 University of Helsinki (Finland)]. E-mail: susanne.wiedmer@helsinki.fi

    2006-02-23

    The stability of zwitterionic phosphatidylcholine vesicles in the presence of 20 mol% phosphatidyl serine (PS), phosphatidic acid (PA), phosphatidyl inositol (PI), and diacylphosphatidyl glycerol (PG) phospholipid vesicles, and cholesterol or calcium chloride was investigated by asymmetrical flow field-flow fractionation (AsFlFFF). Large unilamellar vesicles (LUV, diameter 100 nm) prepared by extrusion at 25 deg. C were used. Phospholipid vesicles (liposomes) were stored at +4 and -18 deg. C over an extended period of time. Extruded egg yolk phosphatidylcholine (EPC) particle diameters at peak maximum and mean measured by AsFlFFF were 101 {+-} 3 nm and 122 {+-} 5 nm, respectively. No significant change in diameter was observed after storage at +4 deg. C for about 5 months. When the storage period was extended to about 8 months (250 days) larger destabilized aggregates were formed (172 and 215 nm at peak maximum and mean diameters, respectively). When EPC was stored at -18 deg. C, large particles with diameters of 700-800 nm were formed as a result of dehydration, aggregation, and fusion processes. In the presence of calcium chloride, EPC alone did not form large aggregates. Addition of 20 mol% of negatively charged phospholipids (PS, PA, PI, or PG) to 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphatidylcholine (POPC) vesicles increased the electrostatic interactions between calcium ion and the vesicles and large aggregates were formed. In the presence of cholesterol, large aggregates of about 250-350 nm appeared during storage at +4 and -18 deg. C for more than 1 day. The effect of liposome storage temperature on phospholipid coatings applied in capillary electrophoresis (CE) was studied by measuring the electroosmotic flow (EOF). EPC coatings with and without cholesterol, PS, or calcium chloride, prepared from liposomes stored at +25, +4, and -18 deg. C, were studied at 25 deg. C. The performances of the coatings were further evaluated with three uncharged compounds

  11. Assembly and Stacking of Flow-through Enzymatic Bioelectrodes for High Power Glucose Fuel Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abreu, Caroline; Nedellec, Yannig; Gross, Andrew J; Ondel, Olivier; Buret, Francois; Goff, Alan Le; Holzinger, Michael; Cosnier, Serge

    2017-07-19

    Bioelectrocatalytic carbon nanotube based pellets comprising redox enzymes were directly integrated in a newly conceived flow-through fuel cell. Porous electrodes and a separating cellulose membrane were housed in a glucose/oxygen biofuel cell design with inlets and outlets allowing the flow of electrolyte through the entire fuel cell. Different flow setups were tested and the optimized single cell setup, exploiting only 5 mmol L -1 glucose, showed an open circuit voltage (OCV) of 0.663 V and provided 1.03 ± 0.05 mW at 0.34 V. Furthermore, different charge/discharge cycles at 500 Ω and 3 kΩ were applied to optimize long-term stability leading to 3.6 J (1 mW h) of produced electrical energy after 48 h. Under continuous discharge at 6 kΩ, about 0.7 mW h could be produced after a 24 h period. The biofuel cell design further allows a convenient assembly of several glucose biofuel cells in reduced volumes and their connection in parallel or in series. The configuration of two biofuel cells connected in series showed an OCV of 1.35 V and provided 1.82 ± 0.09 mW at 0.675 V, and when connected in parallel, showed an OCV of 0.669 V and provided 1.75 ± 0.09 mW at 0.381 V. The presented design is conceived to stack an unlimited amount of biofuel cells to reach the necessary voltage and power for portable electronic devices without the need for step-up converters or energy managing systems.

  12. Analytical study of solids-gas two phase flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hosaka, Minoru

    1977-01-01

    Fundamental studies were made on the hydrodynamics of solids-gas two-phase suspension flow, in which very small solid particles are mixed in a gas flow to enhance the heat transfer characteristics of gas cooled high temperature reactors. Especially, the pressure drop due to friction and the density distribution of solid particles are theoretically analyzed. The friction pressure drop of two-phase flow was analyzed based on the analytical result of the single-phase friction pressure drop. The calculated values of solid/gas friction factor as a function of solid/gas mass loading are compared with experimental results. Comparisons are made for Various combinations of Reynolds number and particle size. As for the particle density distribution, some factors affecting the non-uniformity of distribution were considered. The minimum of energy dispersion was obtained with the variational principle. The suspension density of particles was obtained as a function of relative distance from wall and was compared with experimental results. It is concluded that the distribution is much affected by the particle size and that the smaller particles are apt to gather near the wall. (Aoki, K.)

  13. A Study on the Flow Characterization in the Reactor Cavity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Ho Jung; Ko, Kwang Jeok; Kim, Sung Hwan; Kim, Min Gyu; Cho, Yeon Ho; Kim, Hyun Min [KEPCO Engineering and Construction Co. Ltd., Deajeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    In this study, the flow characterization of the cooling air in reactor cavity nearby RCPSA has been analyzed by using a 3 dimensional model and the ANSYS CFX software in order to predict the Convective Heat Transfer Coefficient (CHTC) of the RCPSA. The Reactor Cavity is the annular space by the concrete structure, the Reactor Cavity Pool Seal Assembly (RCPSA), which consists of the welded steel and is designed to be installed between the RV and the refueling pool floor, and the Reactor Vessel (RV). For such reason, the RCPSA should be designed to provide the cooling air passage for ventilation to circulate high temperature air passing by the RV during the reactor operation. It means that the RCPSA is influenced by the convection of cooling air and the thermal expansion of the RV. Therefore, the flow characterization at the reactor cavity is one of the factors of the RCPSA design during the reactor operation. The flow distribution of the cooling air in reactor cavity nearby RCPSA has been analyzed using ANSYS CFX software to obtain the CHTC at surface of the RCPSA. 1) The temperature from the RV and the insulation is one of the critical factors for the thermal gradient of the cooling air and the CHTC in the reactor cavity. 2) The rapid change of the CHTC in inner region nearby inner and outer flexure is related to the geometry shape of the RCPSA and velocity of cooling air.

  14. Challenges in the flow measurement engineering study phases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Henne, Liv Marit; Monnet, Jean

    2005-07-01

    Offshore development of marginal Oil and Gas fields can often be economically profitable if they can be tied in to existing platforms. This usually requires execution of comprehensive feasibility studies, which can often be a long and costly process. Close cooperation in a multi discipline engineering team is necessary to assure that all possibilities and aspects of the design task have been evaluated. Integration of a new flow measurement module on an existing installation is often the simplest solution, yielding low total cost as the module can be assembled and fully tested on shore. However on many installations one is required to integrate the new equipment in existing modules. Flow measurement is a crucial element in the development of marginal fields which has to be evaluated, taking into consideration all critical aspects such as: available space, weight, location accessibility, maintenance and integration to existing metering systems. In particular, special attention should be given to the possible use of new flow measurement technologies and principles. (author) (tk)

  15. Experimental study on flow past a rotationally oscillating cylinder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Yang-yang; Yin, Chang-shan; Yang, Kang; Zhao, Xi-zeng; Tan, Soon Keat

    2017-08-01

    A series of experiments was carried out to study the flow behaviour behind a rotationally oscillating cylinder at a low Reynolds number (Re=300) placed in a recirculation water channel. A stepper motor was used to rotate the cylinder clockwise- and- counterclockwise about its longitudinal axis at selected frequencies. The particle image velocimetry (PIV) technique was used to capture the flow field behind a rotationally oscillating cylinder. Instantaneous and timeaveraged flow fields such as the vorticity contours, streamline topologies and velocity distributions were analyzed. The effects of four rotation angle and frequency ratios F r ( F r= f n/ f v, the ratio of the forcing frequency f n to the natural vortex shedding frequency f v) on the wake in the lee of a rotationally oscillating cylinder were also examined. The significant wake modification was observed when the cylinder undergoes clockwise-and-counterclockwise motion with amplitude of π, especially in the range of 0.6≤ F r≤1.0.

  16. Selective particle and cell capture in a continuous flow using micro-vortex acoustic streaming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, David J; Khoo, Bee Luan; Ma, Zhichao; Winkler, Andreas; Weser, Robert; Schmidt, Hagen; Han, Jongyoon; Ai, Ye

    2017-05-16

    Acoustic streaming has emerged as a promising technique for refined microscale manipulation, where strong rotational flow can give rise to particle and cell capture. In contrast to hydrodynamically generated vortices, acoustic streaming is rapidly tunable, highly scalable and requires no external pressure source. Though streaming is typically ignored or minimized in most acoustofluidic systems that utilize other acoustofluidic effects, we maximize the effect of acoustic streaming in a continuous flow using a high-frequency (381 MHz), narrow-beam focused surface acoustic wave. This results in rapid fluid streaming, with velocities orders of magnitude greater than that of the lateral flow, to generate fluid vortices that extend the entire width of a 400 μm wide microfluidic channel. We characterize the forces relevant for vortex formation in a combined streaming/lateral flow system, and use these acoustic streaming vortices to selectively capture 2 μm from a mixed suspension with 1 μm particles and human breast adenocarcinoma cells (MDA-231) from red blood cells.

  17. Adsorption of vitamin K-dependent proteins to live cell membranes measured under flow conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGee, M P; Teuschler, H

    1999-07-01

    Mechanisms mediating initial adsorption of coagulation proteins to live cells were investigated. Adsorption kinetics were examined under varying flow conditions using tracer-dilution techniques in perfused spherical monolayers of cells expressing tissue factor. At biologically relevant time and concentration ranges, rates exceeded by 2-12 fold the theoretical maximum calculated for steady-state diffusion. Rates were correlated with aqueous-phase flux of reactants and were found to be largely independent of the density of reactive sites on the membrane. Average adsorption rate of factor VIIa at 4 etaM and flow velocity of 0.8 etam s(-1) was 5 x 10(7) s(-1) cm(-2). Adsorption rates of homologous coagulation factors IX and X under similar conditions were 5 and 9 x 10(7) s(-1)cm(-2). Results indicate that flow can effectively increase the rate of coagulation factor adsorption to the membrane of live cells. They also imply that factors affecting blood flow velocity and vessel permeability influence the rate of membrane-dependent coagulation reactions.

  18. Investigation of gas flow characteristics in proton exchange membrane fuel cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kwac, Lee Ku; Kim, Hong Gun

    2008-01-01

    An investigation of electrochemical behavior of PEMFC (proton exchange membrane fuel cell) is performed by using a single-phase two-dimensional finite element analysis. Equations of current balance, mass balance, and momentum balance are implemented to simulate the behavior of PEMFC. The analysis results for the co-flow and counterflow mode of gas flow direction are examined in detail in order to compare how the gas flow direction affects quantitatively. The characteristics of internal properties, such as gas velocity distribution, mass fraction of the reactants, fraction of water and current density distribution in PEMFC are illustrated in the electrode and GDL (gas diffusion layer). It is found that the dry reactant gases can be well internally humidified and maintain high performance in the case of the counter-flow mode without external humidification while it is not advantageous for highly humidified or saturated reactant gases. It is also found that the co-flow mode improves the current density distribution with humidified normal condition compared to the counter-flow mode

  19. Biopolymer plugging effect. Laboratory-pressurized pumping flow studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khachatoorian, Robert; Petrisor, Ioana G.; Kwan, Chang-Chin; Yen, Teh Fu [Environmental Engineering Program, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, School of Engineering, University of Southern California, Kap. 210, 3620 S. Vermont Avenue, Los Angeles, CA 90089-2531 (United States)

    2003-05-01

    The use of biopolymers and their producing microorganisms to form a wide range of impervious barriers, as well as for enhancement of oil recovery (EOR) is already well documented. Both of these important applications of biopolymers are based on their plugging characteristics. Flow systems are essential to examine the plugging effect of biopolymers under different conditions, in order to select suitable biopolymers for a particular application. In the present study, the plugging effect of a number of biopolymers, namely xanthan, polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB), guar gum, polyglutamic acid (PGA) and chitosan, has been investigated in a laboratory-pressurized pumping flow system. The present work is also targeted to study the correlation, if any, between biopolymer structure and plugging effect. The experimental system included a horizontally mounted sand-pack column and provided a constant flow, using a transducer and recording the pressure difference. Thus, the permeability ratio could be evaluated for each biopolymer as models in the field. All of the biopolymers studied have shown positive plugging effects by reducing the permeability of sand over the 11-day experimental period. The best plugging effect was obtained for PHB, which can reach more than a billion-fold permeability reduction, followed by chitosan and PGA, with a million-fold reduction of permeability. These biopolymers can be successfully used alone or in combination in field applications for stabilizing underground contamination to stop the plumes of subsurface pollutants, as well as for improving oil recovery from the field. Our results show that the plugging effect is influenced by the structure of biopolymers. This study will lead to a new method for characterizing the biopolymers used for plugging.

  20. Mathematical modeling of a zinc/bromine flow cell and a lithium/thionyl chloride primary cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Evans, T.I.

    1988-01-01

    Three mathematical models are presented, one for the secondary zinc/bromine flow cell and two for the lithium/thionyl chloride primary cell. The objectives in this modeling work are to aid in understanding the physical phenomena affecting cell performance, determine methods of improving cell performance and safety, and reduce the experimental efforts needed to develop these electrochemical systems. The zinc/bromine cell model is the first such model to include a porous layer on the bromine electrode and to predict discharge behavior. The model is used to solve simultaneously the component material balances and the electroneutrality condition for the unknowns, species concentrations and the solution potential. Two models are presented for the lithium/thionyl chloride cell. The first model is a detailed one-dimensional model which is used to solve simultaneously the component material balances, Ohm's law relations, and current balance. The independent design criteria are identified from the model development. The second model presented here is a two-dimensional thermal model for the spirally would configuration of the lithium/thionyl chloride cell. This is the first model to address the effects of the spiral geometry on heat transfer in the cell.

  1. Changes in intracranial venous blood flow and pulsatility in Alzheimer's disease: A 4D flow MRI study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivera-Rivera, Leonardo A; Schubert, Tilman; Turski, Patrick; Johnson, Kevin M; Berman, Sara E; Rowley, Howard A; Carlsson, Cynthia M; Johnson, Sterling C; Wieben, Oliver

    2017-06-01

    Cerebral blood flow, arterial pulsation, and vasomotion may be important indicators of cerebrovascular health in aging and diseases of aging such as Alzheimer's disease. Noninvasive markers that assess these characteristics may be helpful in the study of co-occurrence of these diseases and potential additive and interacting effects. In this study, 4D flow MRI was used to measure intra-cranial flow features with cardiac-gated phase contrast MRI in cranial arteries and veins. Mean blood flow and pulsatility index as well as the transit time of the peak flow from the middle cerebral artery to the superior sagittal sinus were measured in a total of 104 subjects comprising of four groups: (a) subjects with Alzheimer's disease, (b) age-matched controls, (c) subjects with mild cognitive impairment, and (d) a group of late middle-aged with parental history of sporadic Alzheimer's disease. The Alzheimer's disease group exhibited: a significant decrease in mean blood flow in the superior sagittal sinus, transverse sinus, middle cerebral artery, and internal carotid arteries; a significant decrease of the peak and end diastolic blood flow in the middle cerebral artery and superior sagittal sinus; a faster transmission of peak flow from the middle cerebral artery to the superior sagittal sinus and increased pulsatility index along the carotid siphon.

  2. Comparative study of heat transfer and pressure drop during flow boiling and flow condensation in minichannels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mikielewicz Dariusz

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available In the paper a method developed earlier by authors is applied to calculations of pressure drop and heat transfer coefficient for flow boiling and also flow condensation for some recent data collected from literature for such fluids as R404a, R600a, R290, R32,R134a, R1234yf and other. The modification of interface shear stresses between flow boiling and flow condensation in annular flow structure are considered through incorporation of the so called blowing parameter. The shear stress between vapor phase and liquid phase is generally a function of nonisothermal effects. The mechanism of modification of shear stresses at the vapor-liquid interface has been presented in detail. In case of annular flow it contributes to thickening and thinning of the liquid film, which corresponds to condensation and boiling respectively. There is also a different influence of heat flux on the modification of shear stress in the bubbly flow structure, where it affects bubble nucleation. In that case the effect of applied heat flux is considered. As a result a modified form of the two-phase flow multiplier is obtained, in which the nonadiabatic effect is clearly pronounced.

  3. Segmented flow generation by chip reactors for highly parallelized cell cultivation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grodrian, A.; Metze, J.; Henkel, Thomas; Roth, M.; Kohler, Johann M.

    2002-11-01

    Micro system technology offers convenient tools for the production of handling devices for small liquid volumes which can be used in cell cultivation. Here, a modular system for the rapid generation of cell suspension aliquotes is presented. The system is used to produce and analyze high numbers of strongly separated cultural volumes. Selected clones may be retrieved from the system. Therefore, the principle of segmented flow is applies. Portions of aqueous culture medium containing one cell or very small cell ensembles are separated from each other by a nonmiscible liquid like dodecane or mineral oil. In addition, the oil separates the cultivation droplets from the innerside of the walls of chip channels and capillaries. This way, compatibility problems between cell wall surfaces and the chemical character of technical walls are excluded. The separated cultivation droplets are guided by micro flow transportation in different channel and chamber topologies. The whole system has the character of a serially working cell processing system. The aliquot generation can be speeded up to frequencies of about 30 Hz in each micro channel. That means, that about 105 individual cultural volumes can be produced per hour or about 2 million per day.

  4. Flow around a confined cylinder: LES and PIV study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Palkin Egor

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available We study the flow over a cylinder placed between two parallel rigid walls using Large-eddy simulations and Particle Image Velocimetry. The Reynolds number based on the inflow velocity and diameter of the cylinder is 3750 corresponding to the subcritical regime with laminar separation. Three-dimensional visualization shows the presence of the horseshoe vortex system prior to the cylinder. The comparison of time-averaged velocity fields and fluctuations shows good agreement between simulations and experiments. Spectral analysis suggests the presence of low-frequency modulations of the recirculating bubble.

  5. Transverse flow reactor studies of the dynamics of radical reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Macdonald, R.G. [Argonne National Laboratory, IL (United States)

    1993-12-01

    Radical reactions are in important in combustion chemistry; however, little state-specific information is available for these reactions. A new apparatus has been constructed to measure the dynamics of radical reactions. The unique feature of this apparatus is a transverse flow reactor in which an atom or radical of known concentration will be produced by pulsed laser photolysis of an appropriate precursor molecule. The time dependence of individual quantum states or products and/or reactants will be followed by rapid infrared laser absorption spectroscopy. The reaction H + O{sub 2} {yields} OH + O will be studied.

  6. A flow cytometric method for characterization of circulating cell-derived microparticles in plasma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Morten Hjuler; Beck-Nielsen, Henning; Andersen, Morten Nørgaard

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND AIM: Previous studies on circulating microparticles (MPs) indicate that the majority of MPs are of a size below the detection limit of most standard flow cytometers. The objective of the present study was to establish a method to analyze MP subpopulations above the threshold...... of detection of a new generation BD FACSAria™ III digital flow cytometer. METHODS: We analyzed MP subpopulations in plasma from 24 healthy individuals (9 males and 15 females). MPs were identified according to their size (

  7. URANS simulations of separated flow with stall cells over an NREL S826 airfoil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarlak, H.; Nishino, T.; Sørensen, J. N.

    2016-06-01

    A series of wind tunnel measurements and oil flow visualization was recently carried out at the Technical University of Denmark in order to investigate flow characteristics over a 14% thick NREL S826 airfoil at low Reynolds numbers. This paper aims at presenting numerical simulations of the same airfoil using unsteady Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (URANS) approach. Results of the simulations are demonstrated in terms of mean flow velocity, lift and drag, as well as pressure distribution, and validated against available experimental data. The simulations are carried out with a wide computational domain (with a span-to-chord ratio of 5) and it is illustrated that the URANS approach is capable of predicting 3D spanwise structures, known as stall cells.

  8. The Conditions of Flow in Reading: Two Studies of Optimal Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McQuillan, Jeff; Conde, Gisela

    1996-01-01

    Examines conditions under which readers experience intense engagement in a text, termed "optimal experience" or "flow." Reports on two studies examining flow during reading. Concludes that (1) texts for pleasure reading or interest reading provided more flow; (2) fiction was more likely to produce flow than nonfiction; and (3)…

  9. Flow Electrification in Nonaqueous Colloidal Suspensions, studied with Video Microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tolpekin, V.A.; van den Ende, Henricus T.M.; Duits, Michael H.G.; Mellema, J.

    2004-01-01

    Flow electrification in nonaqueous suspensions has been scarcely reported in the literature but can significantly affect colloidal stability and (phase) behavior, perhaps even without being recognized. We have observed it in shear flow experiments on concentrated binary suspensions of hydrophobized

  10. Arterio-venous flow between monochorionic twins determined during intra-uterine transfusion. Nonlinear decay of adult red blood cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gemert, Martin J C van; Wijngaard, Jeroen P H M van den [Laser Centre and Department of Obstetrics, Academic Medical Centre, University of Amsterdam, Meibergdreef 9, 1105 AZ Amsterdam (Netherlands); Pasman, Suzanne A; Vandenbussche, Frank P H A [Division of Fetal Medicine, Department of Obstetrics, Leiden University Medical Centre, Leiden (Netherlands); Lopriore, Enrico [Division of Neonatology, Department of Pediatrics, Leiden University Medical Centre, Leiden (Netherlands)], E-mail: m.j.vangemert@amc.uva.nl

    2008-07-07

    Recently, we derived equations relating the flow of adult red blood cells through a placental arterio-venous anastomosis with intra-uterine and post-natal measured adult hemoglobin concentrations. In this letter, we re-derived the equations, now including a more realistic nonlinear decay of adult red blood cells, and re-evaluated the measurement accuracy of the arterio-venous flow and the lifetime of the red blood cells. (letter to the editor)

  11. Hybrid Graphene-Polyoxometalates Nanofluids as Liquid Electrodes for Dual Energy Storage in Novel Flow Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubal, Deepak P; Rueda-Garcia, Daniel; Marchante, Carlos; Benages, Raul; Gomez-Romero, Pedro

    2018-02-22

    Solid Hybrid materials abound. But flowing versions of them are new actors in the materials science landscape and in particular for energy applications. This paper presents a new way to deliver nanostructured hybrid materials for energy storage, namely, in the form of nanofluids. We present here the first example of a hybrid electroactive nanofluid (HENFs) combining capacitive and faradaic energy storage mechanisms in a single fluid material. This liquid electrode is composed of reduced graphene oxide and polyoxometalates (rGO-POMs) forming a stable nanocomposite for electrochemical energy storage in novel Nanofluid Flow Cells. Two graphene based hybrid materials (rGO-phosphomolybdate, rGO-PMo 12 and rGO-phosphotungstate, rGO-PW 12 ) were synthesized and dispersed with the aid of a surfactant in 1 M H 2 SO 4 aqueous electrolyte to yield highly stable hybrid electroactive nanofluids (HENFs) of low viscosity which were tested in a home-made flow cell under static and continuous flowing conditions. Remarkably, even low concentration rGO-POMs HENFs (0.025 wt%) exhibited high specific capacitances of 273 F/g(rGO-PW 12 ) and 305 F/g(rGO-PMo 12 ) with high specific energy and specific power. Moreover, rGO-POM HENFs show excellent cycling stability (∼95 %) as well as Coulombic efficiency (∼77-79 %) after 2000 cycles. Thus, rGO-POM HENFs effectively behave as real liquid electrodes with excellent properties, demonstrating the possible future application of HENFs for dual energy storage in a new generation of Nanofluid Flow Cells. © 2018 The Chemical Society of Japan & Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. Cell surface profiling using high-throughput flow cytometry: a platform for biomarker discovery and analysis of cellular heterogeneity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Craig A Gedye

    Full Text Available Cell surface proteins have a wide range of biological functions, and are often used as lineage-specific markers. Antibodies that recognize cell surface antigens are widely used as research tools, diagnostic markers, and even therapeutic agents. The ability to obtain broad cell surface protein profiles would thus be of great value in a wide range of fields. There are however currently few available methods for high-throughput analysis of large numbers of cell surface proteins. We describe here a high-throughput flow cytometry (HT-FC platform for rapid analysis of 363 cell surface antigens. Here we demonstrate that HT-FC provides reproducible results, and use the platform to identify cell surface antigens that are influenced by common cell preparation methods. We show that multiple populations within complex samples such as primary tumors can be simultaneously analyzed by co-staining of cells with lineage-specific antibodies, allowing unprecedented depth of analysis of heterogeneous cell populations. Furthermore, standard informatics methods can be used to visualize, cluster and downsample HT-FC data to reveal novel signatures and biomarkers. We show that the cell surface profile provides sufficient molecular information to classify samples from different cancers and tissue types into biologically relevant clusters using unsupervised hierarchical clustering. Finally, we describe the identification of a candidate lineage marker and its subsequent validation. In summary, HT-FC combines the advantages of a high-throughput screen with a detection method that is sensitive, quantitative, highly reproducible, and allows in-depth analysis of heterogeneous samples. The use of commercially available antibodies means that high quality reagents are immediately available for follow-up studies. HT-FC has a wide range of applications, including biomarker discovery, molecular classification of cancers, or identification of novel lineage specific or stem cell

  13. Cell surface profiling using high-throughput flow cytometry: a platform for biomarker discovery and analysis of cellular heterogeneity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gedye, Craig A; Hussain, Ali; Paterson, Joshua; Smrke, Alannah; Saini, Harleen; Sirskyj, Danylo; Pereira, Keira; Lobo, Nazleen; Stewart, Jocelyn; Go, Christopher; Ho, Jenny; Medrano, Mauricio; Hyatt, Elzbieta; Yuan, Julie; Lauriault, Stevan; Meyer, Mona; Kondratyev, Maria; van den Beucken, Twan; Jewett, Michael; Dirks, Peter; Guidos, Cynthia J; Danska, Jayne; Wang, Jean; Wouters, Bradly; Neel, Benjamin; Rottapel, Robert; Ailles, Laurie E

    2014-01-01

    Cell surface proteins have a wide range of biological functions, and are often used as lineage-specific markers. Antibodies that recognize cell surface antigens are widely used as research tools, diagnostic markers, and even therapeutic agents. The ability to obtain broad cell surface protein profiles would thus be of great value in a wide range of fields. There are however currently few available methods for high-throughput analysis of large numbers of cell surface proteins. We describe here a high-throughput flow cytometry (HT-FC) platform for rapid analysis of 363 cell surface antigens. Here we demonstrate that HT-FC provides reproducible results, and use the platform to identify cell surface antigens that are influenced by common cell preparation methods. We show that multiple populations within complex samples such as primary tumors can be simultaneously analyzed by co-staining of cells with lineage-specific antibodies, allowing unprecedented depth of analysis of heterogeneous cell populations. Furthermore, standard informatics methods can be used to visualize, cluster and downsample HT-FC data to reveal novel signatures and biomarkers. We show that the cell surface profile provides sufficient molecular information to classify samples from different cancers and tissue types into biologically relevant clusters using unsupervised hierarchical clustering. Finally, we describe the identification of a candidate lineage marker and its subsequent validation. In summary, HT-FC combines the advantages of a high-throughput screen with a detection method that is sensitive, quantitative, highly reproducible, and allows in-depth analysis of heterogeneous samples. The use of commercially available antibodies means that high quality reagents are immediately available for follow-up studies. HT-FC has a wide range of applications, including biomarker discovery, molecular classification of cancers, or identification of novel lineage specific or stem cell markers.

  14. Modeling study on the flow patterns of gas-liquid flow for fast decarburization during the RH process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yi-hong; Bao, Yan-ping; Wang, Rui; Ma, Li-feng; Liu, Jian-sheng

    2018-02-01

    A water model and a high-speed video camera were utilized in the 300-t RH equipment to study the effect of steel flow patterns in a vacuum chamber on fast decarburization and a superior flow-pattern map was obtained during the practical RH process. There are three flow patterns with different bubbling characteristics and steel surface states in the vacuum chamber: boiling pattern (BP), transition pattern (TP), and wave pattern (WP). The effect of the liquid-steel level and the residence time of the steel in the chamber on flow patterns and decarburization reaction were investigated, respectively. The liquid-steel level significantly affected the flow-pattern transition from BP to WP, and the residence time and reaction area were crucial to evaluate the whole decarburization process rather than the circulation flow rate and mixing time. A superior flow-pattern map during the practical RH process showed that the steel flow pattern changed from BP to TP quickly, and then remained as TP until the end of decarburization.

  15. Influence of beta blockade on gastric acid secretion and changes in gastric mucosal blood flow before and after parietal cell vagotomy in dogs and man

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hovendal, C P; Bech, K; Bekker, C

    1983-01-01

    The aim of the present study was, in paired experiments in dogs, to examine the effect of beta-receptor blockade on gastric acid secretion and mucosal blood flow before and after parietal cell vagotomy (PCV). The secretory response to pentagastrin was reduced after vagotomy. beta-Adrenergic block......The aim of the present study was, in paired experiments in dogs, to examine the effect of beta-receptor blockade on gastric acid secretion and mucosal blood flow before and after parietal cell vagotomy (PCV). The secretory response to pentagastrin was reduced after vagotomy. beta...

  16. Flow visualization study of inverted U-bend two-phase flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishii, M.; Kim, S.B.; Lee, R.

    1986-12-01

    A hot-leg U-bend experiment was performed. The experimental condition simulated the two-phase flow in a B and W primary loop during a small break loss of coolant accident or during some other abnormal transients. The loop design was based on the scaling criteria developed previously and the loop was operated either in a natural circulation mode or in a forced circulation mode using nitrogen gas and water. The two-phase flow regimes at the hot-leg were identified on the basis of visual observation. The phase separation at the top of the inverted U-bend was observed at low gas flow rate. The void fractions were measured using differential pressure transducers and compared with the prediction from the drift-flux model. The natural circulation flow interruption occurred in two different modes, namely, quasi-periodic and semi-permanent modes. This phenomenon is mainly dependent on the difference in the hydrostatic head in the riser and downcomer, and the flow regime at hot-leg. Besides this flow interruption phenomenon, dynamic flow instabilities of considerable amplitudes have been observed

  17. Effect of Surfactants on the Deformation and Detachment of Oil Droplets in a Model Laminar Flow Cell

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fréville V.

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Sugar-based surfactants are increasingly present in the development of eco-friendly detergents due to current regulations and consumer demand. In order to assess the degreasing performance of these new surfactants, the behavior of model oil droplets subjected to the action of a flow of surfactant solutions of different concentrations was studied in a laminar flow cell and related to the physico-chemical properties measured at the liquid/liquid (interfacial tension and solid/liquid/liquid interfaces (contact angle. With the surfactant solutions and the model oils employed in this study, three main behaviors were observed when a critical flow rate was reached: elongation, fragmentation or spontaneous detachment of the droplet. The analysis of the results leads to a correlation between the droplet behavior and the balance of the forces applied on the droplet in its initial position, in particular the gravity force Fg, which tends to move the oil droplet upwards (given the density difference, and the capillary force Fc, which tends to keep the droplet spherical. A state diagram could be established, based on the dimensionless Bond number (Fg/Fc and cosθ, θ being the initial contact angle of the drop on the surface before the establishment of the flow. One can thus predict the droplet behavior as a function of the system initial characteristics. The results allowed the comparison of degreasing performance of the different surfactants used and illustrated the potential of AlkylPolyPentosides (APP for detergent formulations.

  18. Numerical investigation of interfacial mass transport resistance and two-phase flow in PEM fuel cell air channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koz, Mustafa

    Proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs) are efficient and environmentally friendly electrochemical engines. The performance of a PEMFC is adversely affected by oxygen (O2) concentration loss from the air flow channel to the cathode catalyst layer (CL). Oxygen transport resistance at the gas diffusion layer (GDL) and air channel interface is a non-negligible component of the O2 concentration loss. Simplified PEMFC performance models in the available literature incorporate the O2 resistance at the GDL-channel interface as an input parameter. However, this parameter has been taken as a constant so far in the available literature and does not reflect variable PEMFC operating conditions and the effect of two-phase flow in the channels. This study numerically calculates the O2 transport resistance at the GDL-air channel interface and expresses this resistance through the non-dimensional Sherwood number (Sh). Local Sh is investigated in an air channel with multiple droplets and films inside. These water features are represented as solid obstructions and only air flow is simulated. Local variations of Sh in the flow direction are obtained as a function of superficial air velocity, water feature size, and uniform spacing between water features. These variations are expressed with mathematical expressions for the PEMFC performance models to utilize and save computational resources. The resulting mathematical correlations for Sh can be utilized in PEMFC performance models. These models can predict cell performance more accurately with the help of the results of this work. Moreover, PEMFC performance models do not need to use a look-up table since the results were expressed through correlations. Performance models can be kept simplified although their predictions will become more realistic. Since two-phase flow in channels is experienced mostly at lower temperatures, performance optimization at low temperatures can be done easier.

  19. Modelling and Simulation of TCPAR for Power System Flow Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Narimen Lahaçani AOUZELLAG

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the modelling of Thyristor Controlled Phase Angle Regulator ‘TCPAR’ for power flow studies and the role of that modelling in the study of Flexible Alternating Current Transmission Systems ‘FACTS’ for power flow control are discussed. In order to investigate the impact of TCPAR on power systems effectively, it is essential to formulate a correct and appropriate model for it. The TCPAR, thus, makes it possible to increase or decrease the power forwarded in the line where it is inserted in a considerable way, which makes of it an ideal tool for this kind of use. Knowing that the TCPAR does not inject any active power, it offers a good solution with a less consumption. One of the adverse effects of the TCPAR is the voltage drop which it causes in the network although it is not significant. To solve this disadvantage, it is enough to introduce a Static VAR Compensator ‘SVC’ into the electrical network which will compensate the voltages fall and will bring them back to an acceptable level.

  20. Computational wing design studies relating to natural laminar flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waggoner, Edgar G.

    1986-01-01

    Two research studies are described which directly relate to the application of natural laminar flow (NLF) technology to transonic transport-type wing planforms. Each involved using state-of-the-art computational methods to design three-dimensional wing contours which generate significant runs of favorable pressure gradients. The first study supported the Variable Sweep Transition Flight Experiment and involves design of a full-span glove which extends from the leading edge to the spoiler hinge line on the upper surface of an F-14 outer wing panel. A wing was designed computationally for a corporate transport aircraft in the second study. The resulting wing design generated favorable pressure gradients from the leading edge aft to the mid-chord on both upper and lower surfaces at the cruise design point. Detailed descriptions of the computational design approach are presented along with the various constraints imposed on each of the designs.

  1. A numerical study of two-phase Stokes flow in an axisymmetric flow-focusing device

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Mads Jakob; Stone, H.A.; Bruus, Henrik

    2006-01-01

    We present a numerical investigation of the time-dependent dynamics of the creation of gas bubbles in an axisymmetric flow-focusing device. The liquid motion is treated as a Stokes flow, and using a generic framework we implement a second-order time-integration scheme and a free-surface model...... in MATLAB, which interfaces with the finite-element software FEMLAB. We derive scaling laws for the volume of a created bubble and for the gas flow rate, and confirm them numerically. Our results are consistent with existing experimental results by Garstecki et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 94, 164501 (2005...

  2. Potential for broad applications of flow cytometry and fluorescence techniques in microbiological and somatic cell analyses of milk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunasekera, T S; Veal, D A; Attfield, P V

    2003-08-25

    Monitoring the quality and safety of milk requires careful analysis of microbial and somatic cell loading. Our aim was to demonstrate proof of the principle that flow cytometry (FCM), coupled with fluorescence techniques for distinguishing between cell types, could potentially be employed in a wide variety of biological assays relevant to the dairy industry. To this end, we studied raw milk samples and ultraheat-treated milk, into which known numbers of bacteria or mouse cells were inoculated. For bacterial analyses, protein and lipids were removed, whereas only centrifugal lipid clearing was needed for somatic cell analyses. Cleared samples were stained with fluorescent dyes or with bacterial-specific fluorescent-labeled oligonucleotides and analyzed by FCM. A fluoresceinated peptide nucleic acid probe enabled efficient enumeration of bacteria in milk. Dual staining of samples with fluorescent dyes that indicate live (5-cyanol-2,3-ditolyl tetrazolium chloride, CTC or SYTO 9) or damaged cells (oxonol or propidium iodide, PI) enabled determination of viable bacteria in milk. Gram-positive and -negative bacteria were distinguished using hexidium iodide and SYTO 13 in dual staining of cleared milk samples. An FCM-based method gave a good correlation (r=0.88) with total microscopic counts of somatic cells in raw milk. The FCM method also correlated strongly (r=0.98) with the standard Fossomatic method for somatic cell detection. We conclude that FCM, coupled with fluorescence staining techniques, offers potentially diverse and rapid approaches to biological safety and quality testing in the dairy industry. Potential application of flow cytometers to a broad range of assays for milk biological quality should make this instrumentation more attractive and cost effective to the dairy industry and indeed the broader food industry.

  3. Understanding leachate flow in municipal solid waste landfills by combining time-lapse ERT and subsurface flow modelling - Part I: Analysis of infiltration shape on two different waste deposit cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Audebert, M; Clément, R; Moreau, S; Duquennoi, C; Loisel, S; Touze-Foltz, N

    2016-09-01

    Landfill bioreactors are based on an acceleration of in-situ waste biodegradation by performing leachate recirculation. To quantify the water content and to evaluate the leachate injection system, in-situ methods are required to obtain spatially distributed information, usually electrical resistivity tomography (ERT). In a previous study, the MICS (multiple inversions and clustering strategy) methodology was proposed to improve the hydrodynamic interpretation of ERT results by a precise delimitation of the infiltration area. In this study, MICS was applied on two ERT time-lapse data sets recorded on different waste deposit cells in order to compare the hydrodynamic behaviour of leachate flow between the two cells. This comparison is based on an analysis of: (i) the volume of wetted waste assessed by MICS and the wetting rate, (ii) the infiltration shapes and (iii) the pore volume used by the leachate flow. This paper shows that leachate hydrodynamic behaviour is comparable from one waste deposit cell to another with: (i) a high leachate infiltration speed at the beginning of the infiltration, which decreases with time, (ii) a horizontal anisotropy of the leachate infiltration shape and (iii) a very small fraction of the pore volume used by the leachate flow. This hydrodynamic information derived from MICS results can be useful for subsurface flow modelling used to predict leachate flow at the landfill scale. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Study of Plasma Flow Modes in Imploding Nested Arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitrofanov, K. N.; Aleksandrov, V. V.; Gritsuk, A. N.; Branitsky, A. V.; Frolov, I. N.; Grabovski, E. V.; Sasorov, P. V.; Ol'khovskaya, O. G.; Zaitsev, V. I.

    2018-02-01

    Results from experimental studies of implosion of nested wire and fiber arrays at currents of up to 4 MA at the Angara-5-1 facility are presented. Depending on the ratio between the radii of the inner and outer arrays, different modes of the plasma flow in the space between the inner and outer arrays were implemented: the sub-Alfvénic ( V r V A ) modes and a mode with the formation of the transition shock wave (SW) region between the cascades. By varying the material of the outer array (tungsten wires or kapron fibers), it is shown that the plasma flow mode between the inner and outer arrays depends on the ratio between the plasma production rates ṁ in / ṁ out in the inner and outer arrays. The obtained experimental results are compared with the results of one-dimensional MHD simulation of the plasma flow between the arrays. Stable implosion of the inner array plasma was observed in experiments with combined nested arrays consisting of a fiber outer array and a tungsten inner array. The growth rates of magnetic Rayleigh-Taylor (MRT) instability in the inner array plasma at different numbers of fibers in the outer array and different ratios between the radii of the inner and outer arrays are compared. Suppression of MRT instability during the implosion of the inner array plasma results in the formation of a stable compact Z-pinch and generation of a soft X-ray pulse. A possible scenario of interaction between the plasmas of the inner and outer arrays is offered. The stability of the inner array plasma in the stage of final compression depends on the character of interaction of plasma jets from the outer array with the magnetic field of the inner array.

  5. Modeling a Distributed Power Flow Controller with a PEM Fuel Cell for Power Quality Improvement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Chakravorty

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Electrical power demand is increasing at a relatively fast rate over the last years. Because of this increasing demand the power system is becoming very complex. Both electric utilities and end users of electric power are becoming increasingly concerned about power quality. This paper presents a new concept of distributed power flow controller (DPFC, which has been implemented with a proton exchange membrane (PEM fuel cell. In this paper, a PEM fuel cell has been simulated in Simulink/MATLAB and then has been used in the proposed DPFC model. The new proposed DPFC model has been tested on a IEEE 30 bus system.

  6. Avoiding false positive antigen detection by flow cytometry on blood cell derived microparticles: the importance of an appropriate negative control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crompot, Emerence; Van Damme, Michael; Duvillier, Hugues; Pieters, Karlien; Vermeesch, Marjorie; Perez-Morga, David; Meuleman, Nathalie; Mineur, Philippe; Bron, Dominique; Lagneaux, Laurence; Stamatopoulos, Basile

    2015-01-01

    Microparticles (MPs), also called microvesicles (MVs) are plasma membrane-derived fragments with sizes ranging from 0.1 to 1μm. Characterization of these MPs is often performed by flow cytometry but there is no consensus on the appropriate negative control to use that can lead to false positive results. We analyzed MPs from platelets, B-cells, T-cells, NK-cells, monocytes, and chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) B-cells. Cells were purified by positive magnetic-separation and cultured for 48h. Cells and MPs were characterized using the following monoclonal antibodies (CD19,20 for B-cells, CD3,8,5,27 for T-cells, CD16,56 for NK-cells, CD14,11c for monocytes, CD41,61 for platelets). Isolated MPs were stained with annexin-V-FITC and gated between 300nm and 900nm. The latex bead technique was then performed for easy detection of MPs. Samples were analyzed by Transmission (TEM) and Scanning Electron microscopy (SEM). Annexin-V positive events within a gate of 300-900nm were detected and defined as MPs. Our results confirmed that the characteristic antigens CD41/CD61 were found on platelet-derived-MPs validating our technique. However, for MPs derived from other cell types, we were unable to detect any antigen, although they were clearly expressed on the MP-producing cells in the contrary of several data published in the literature. Using the latex bead technique, we confirmed detection of CD41,61. However, the apparent expression of other antigens (already deemed positive in several studies) was determined to be false positive, indicated by negative controls (same labeling was used on MPs from different origins). We observed that mother cell antigens were not always detected on corresponding MPs by direct flow cytometry or latex bead cytometry. Our data highlighted that false positive results could be generated due to antibody aspecificity and that phenotypic characterization of MPs is a difficult field requiring the use of several negative controls.

  7. Phase Diagram and Breathing Dynamics of Red Blood Cell Motion in Shear Flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagchi, Prosenjit; Yazdani, Alireza

    2011-11-01

    We present phase diagrams of red blood cell dynamics in shear flow using three-dimensional numerical simulations. By considering a wide range of shear rate and interior-to-exterior fluid viscosity ratio, it is shown that the cell dynamics is often more complex than the well-known tank-treading, tumbling and swinging motion, and is characterized by an extreme variation of the cell shape. We identify such complex shape dynamics as `breathing' dynamics. During the breathing motion, the cell either completely aligns with the flow direction and the membrane folds inward forming two cusps, or, it undergoes large swinging motion while deep, crater-like dimples periodically emerge and disappear. At lower bending rigidity, the breathing motion occurs over a wider range of shear rates, and is often characterized by the emergence of a quad-concave shape. The effect of the breathing dynamics on the tank-treading-to-tumbling transition is illustrated by detailed phase diagrams which appear to be more complex and richer than those of vesicles. In a remarkable departure from classical theory of nondeformable cells, we find that there exists a critical viscosity ratio below which the transition is dependent on shear rate only. Supported by NSF.

  8. Quantifying autophagy: Measuring LC3 puncta and autolysosome formation in cells using multispectral imaging flow cytometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pugsley, Haley R

    2017-01-01

    The use of multispectral imaging flow cytometry has been gaining popularity due to its quantitative power, high throughput capabilities, multiplexing potential and its ability to acquire images of every cell. Autophagy is a process in which dysfunctional organelles and cellular components that accumulate during growth and differentiation are degraded via the lysosome and recycled. During autophagy, cytoplasmic LC3 is processed and recruited to the autophagosomal membranes; the autophagosome then fuses with the lysosome to form the autolysosome. Therefore, cells undergoing autophagy can be identified by visualizing fluorescently labeled LC3 puncta and/or the co-localization of fluorescently labeled LC3 and lysosomal markers. Multispectral imaging flow cytometry is able to collect imagery of large numbers of cells and assess autophagy in an objective, quantitative, and statistically robust manner. This review will examine the four predominant methods that have been used to measure autophagy via multispectral imaging flow cytometry. Copyright © 2016 The Author. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Probing the cytoadherence of malaria infected red blood cells under flow.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaofeng Xu

    Full Text Available Malaria is one of the most widespread and deadly human parasitic diseases caused by the Plasmodium (P. species with the P. falciparum being the most deadly. The parasites are capable of invading red blood cells (RBCs during infection. At the late stage of parasites' development, the parasites export proteins to the infected RBCs (iRBC membrane and bind to receptors of surface proteins on the endothelial cells that line microvasculature walls. Resulting adhesion of iRBCs to microvasculature is one of the main sources of most complications during malaria infection. Therefore, it is important to develop a versatile and simple experimental method to quantitatively investigate iRBCs cytoadhesion and binding kinetics. Here, we developed an advanced flow based adhesion assay to demonstrate that iRBC's adhesion to endothelial CD36 receptor protein coated channels is a bistable process possessing a hysteresis loop. This finding confirms a recently developed model of cell adhesion which we used to fit our experimental data. We measured the contact area of iRBC under shear flow at different stages of infection using Total Internal Reflection Fluorescence (TIRF, and also adhesion receptor and ligand binding kinetics using Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM. With these parameters, we reproduced in our model the experimentally observed changes in adhesion properties of iRBCs accompanying parasite maturation and investigated the main mechanisms responsible for these changes, which are the contact area during the shear flow as well as the rupture area size.

  10. The Co-axial Flow of Injectable Solid Hydrogels with Encapsulated Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Brandon; Pochan, Darrin; Sathaye, Sameer

    2013-03-01

    Hydrogels are quickly becoming an important biomaterial that can be used for the safe, localized injection of cancer drugs, the injection of stem cells into areas of interest or other biological applications. Our peptides can be self-assembled in a syringe where they form a gel, sheared by injection and, once in the body, immediately reform a localized pocket of stiff gel. My project has been designed around looking at the possibility of having a co-axial strand, in which one gel can surround another. This co-axial flow can be used to change the physical properties of our gel during injection, such as stiffening our gel using hyaluronic acid or encapsulating cells in the gel and surrounding the gel with growth medium or other biological factors. Rheology on hyaluron stiffened gels and cells encapsulated in gels was performed for comparison to the results from co-axial flow. Confocal microscopy was used to examine the coaxial gels after flow and to determine how the co-axial nature of the gels is affected by the concentration of peptide.

  11. Understanding dielectrophoretic trapping of neuronal cells: modelling electric field, electrode-liquid interface and fluid flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heida, T.; Rutten, W.L.C.; Marani, E.

    2002-01-01

    By application of dielectrophoresis neuronal cells can be trapped successfully. Several trapping experiments have been performed using a quadrupole electrode structure at different amplitudes (1, 3, and 5 V pp ) and frequencies (10-50 MHz). Due to the high conductivity of the suspending medium negative dielectrophoretic forces are created. The dielectrophoretic force is determined by the gradient of the electric field. However, the electrode-liquid interfaces are responsible for decreased electric field strengths, and thus decreased field gradients, inside the medium, especially at lower frequencies. Circuit modelling is used to determine the frequency-dependent electric field inside the medium. The creation of an electric field in high conductivity of the medium results in local heating, which in turn induces fluid flow. This flow also drives the neurons and was found to enhance the trapping effect of the dielectrophoretic force. With the use of finite element modelling, this aspect was investigated. The results show that the dielectrophoretic force is dominating just above the substrate. When the upward dielectrophoretic force is large enough to levitate the cells, they may be dragged along with the fluid flow. The result is that more cells may be trapped than expected on the basis of dielectrophoresis alone. (author)

  12. Revelation of Different Nanoparticle-Uptake Behavior in Two Standard Cell Lines NIH/3T3 and A549 by Flow Cytometry and Time-Lapse Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    André Jochums

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The uptake of nanomaterials into different cell types is a central pharmacological issue for the determination of nanotoxicity as well as for the development of drug delivery strategies. Most responses of the cells depend on their intracellular interactions with nanoparticles (NPs. Uptake behavior can be precisely investigated in vitro, with sensitive high throughput methods such as flow cytometry. In this study, we investigated two different standard cell lines, human lung carcinoma (A549 and mouse fibroblast (NIH/3T3 cells, regarding their uptake behavior of titanium dioxide NPs. Cells were incubated with different concentrations of TiO2 NPs and samples were taken at certain time points to compare the uptake kinetics of both cell lines. Samples were analyzed with the help of flow cytometry by studying changes in the side and forward scattering signal. To additionally enable a detection via fluorescence, NPs were labeled with the fluorescent dye fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC and propidium iodide (PI. We found that NIH/3T3 cells take up the studied NPs more efficiently than A549 cells. These findings were supported by time-lapse microscopic imaging of the cells incubated with TiO2 NPs. Our results confirm that the uptake behavior of individual cell types has to be considered before interpreting any results of nanomaterial studies.

  13. Study on flow parameters of fractal porous media in the high-velocity fluid flow regime

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Mei; Xu, Hui; Yang, Chao; Qu, Tailai; Kong, lingxiao; Wu, Shucheng; Zeng, Baoquan; Xu, Haixia

    2017-12-01

    High-velocity fluid flow, which will result in the region of the wellbore or fracture, is generally in the turbulent flow regime and has drawn tremendous attention in petroleum engineering field. Turbulent factor is the key parameter, which is widely used to describe high-velocity flow in porous media. In this work, a theoretical model for turbulent factor in fractal porous media in the high-velocity fluid flow regime is developed. Moreover, a novel analytical expression for the permeability in porous media based on Wu's resistance model is also derived. Then, the analytical Kozeny-Carman constant with no empirical constant is obtained. The predictions of permeability-porosity relation by the current mathematical models have been validated by comparing with available experimental data. Furthermore, the effects of structural parameters of porous media on the curve of velocity and pressure drop are discussed in detail.

  14. Studies on turbulence structure and liquid film behavior in annular two-phase flow flowing in a throat section

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshida, Kenji; Miyabe, Masaya; Matsumoto, Tadayoshi; Kataoka, Isao; Ohmori, Shuichi; Mori, Michitsugu

    2004-01-01

    Experimental studies<