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Sample records for flow bwr pwr

  1. ABB advanced BWR and PWR fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Junkrans, S.; Helmersson, S.; Andersson, S.

    1999-01-01

    Fuel designed and fabricated by ABB is now operating in 40 PWRs and BWRs in Europe, the United States and Korea. An excellent fuel reliability track record has been established. High burnups are proven for both BWR and PWR. Thermal margin improving features and advanced burnable absorber concepts enable the utilities to adopt demanding duty cycles to meet new economic objectives. In particular we note the excellent reliability record of ABB PWR fuel equipped with Guardian TM debris filter, proven to meet the -6 rod-cycles fuel failure goal, and the out-standing operating record of the SVEA 10x10 BWR fuel, where ABB is the only vendor to date with multi batch experience to high burnup. ABB is dedicated to maintain high fuel reliability as well as continually improve and develop a broad line of BWR and PWR products. ABB's development and fuel follow-up activities are performed in close co-operation with its customers. (orig.)

  2. Secondary systems of PWR and BWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schindler, N.

    1981-01-01

    The secondary systems of a nuclear power plant comprises the steam, condensate and feedwater cycle, the steam plant auxiliary or ancillary systems and the cooling water systems. The presentation gives a general review about the main systems which show a high similarity of PWR and BWR plants. (orig./RW)

  3. Experimental investigation of the enthalpy- and mass flow-distribution in 16-rod clusters with BWR-PWR-geometries and conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herkenrath, H.; Hufschmidt, W.; Jung, U.; Weckermann, F.

    1981-01-01

    The enthalpy- and mass-flow-distribution at the outlet of two different 16-rod cluster test sections with uniform heating in axial and radial direction under steady state conditions has been measured for the first time by simultaneous sampling of 5 from 6 present characteristic subchannels in the bundle using the isokinetic technique and analysing the outlet quantities by a calorimetic method. The test-sections are provided with typical geometrical configurations for BWR s (70 bars; test section PELCO-S) and PWR s (160 bars; test-section EUROP). The latter has also been tested under BWR conditions (70 bars) to study the influence of geometry and pressure. The results showed the abnormal behaviour of the corner subchannel under BWR typical conditions (70 bars) which could not be found for PWR conditions (160 bars) and which is only an effect of pressure and not of geometry. The analysis of the experimental data confirms the usefullness of the subchannel sampling technique for the better understanding of the complex thermohydraulic phenomena under two-phase flow conditions in multirod bundles. Calculations of subchannel resistance coefficients for both types of spacers under one-phase flow conditions have been made with a special sub-structure method which showed a rather high local value of the corner subchannel. With the local drag coefficents the total resistance of the spacer has been evaluated and agreed well with measured values under adiabatic conditions. The measured subchannel data permit a direct valuation and examination of respective computer codes in a fundamental manner which are, however, not subject of this report

  4. CECP, Decommissioning Costs for PWR and BWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bierschbach, M.C.

    1997-01-01

    1 - Description of program or function: The Cost Estimating Computer Program CECP, designed for use on an IBM personal computer or equivalent, was developed for estimating the cost of decommissioning boiling water reactor (BWR) and light-water reactor (PWR) power stations to the point of license termination. 2 - Method of solution: Cost estimates include component, piping, and equipment removal costs; packaging costs; decontamination costs; transportation costs; burial volume and costs; and manpower staffing costs. Using equipment and consumables costs and inventory data supplied by the user, CECP calculates unit cost factors and then combines these factors with transportation and burial cost algorithms to produce a complete report of decommissioning costs. In addition to costs, CECP also calculates person-hours, crew-hours, and exposure person-hours associated with decommissioning. 3 - Restrictions on the complexity of the problem: The program is designed for a specific waste charge structure. The waste cost data structure cannot handle intermediate waste handlers or changes in the charge rate structures. The decommissioning of a reactor can be divided into 5 periods. 200 different items for special equipment costs are possible. The maximum amount for each special equipment item is 99,999,999$. You can support data for 10 buildings, 100 components each; ESTS1071/01: There are 65 components for 28 systems available to specify the contaminated systems costs (BWR). ESTS1071/02: There are 75 components for 25 systems available to specify the contaminated systems costs (PWR)

  5. Evaluation of PWR and BWR pin cell benchmark results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pijlgroms, B.J.; Gruppelaar, H.; Janssen, A.J.; Hoogenboom, J.E.; Leege, P.F.A. de; Voet, J. van der; Verhagen, F.C.M.

    1991-12-01

    Benchmark results of the Dutch PINK working group on PWR and BWR pin cell calculational benchmark as defined by EPRI are presented and evaluated. The observed discrepancies are problem dependent: a part of the results is satisfactory, some other results require further analysis. A brief overview is given of the different code packages used in this analysis. (author). 14 refs., 9 figs., 30 tabs

  6. Evaluation of PWR and BWR pin cell benchmark results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pijlgroms, B.J.; Gruppelaar, H.; Janssen, A.J. (Netherlands Energy Research Foundation (ECN), Petten (Netherlands)); Hoogenboom, J.E.; Leege, P.F.A. de (Interuniversitair Reactor Inst., Delft (Netherlands)); Voet, J. van der (Gemeenschappelijke Kernenergiecentrale Nederland NV, Dodewaard (Netherlands)); Verhagen, F.C.M. (Keuring van Electrotechnische Materialen NV, Arnhem (Netherlands))

    1991-12-01

    Benchmark results of the Dutch PINK working group on PWR and BWR pin cell calculational benchmark as defined by EPRI are presented and evaluated. The observed discrepancies are problem dependent: a part of the results is satisfactory, some other results require further analysis. A brief overview is given of the different code packages used in this analysis. (author). 14 refs., 9 figs., 30 tabs.

  7. Decay ratio studies in BWR and PWR using wavelet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ciftcioglu, Oe.

    1996-10-01

    The on-line stability of BWR and PWR is studied using the neutron noise signals as the fluctuations reflect the dynamic characteristics of the reactor. Using appropriate signal modeling for time domain analysis of noise signals, the stability parameters can be directly obtained from the system impulse response. Here in particular for BWR, an important stability parameter is the decay ratio (DR) of the impulse response. The time series analysis involves the autoregressive modeling of the neutron detector signal. The DR determination is strongly effected by the low frequency behaviour since the transfer function characteristic tends to be a third order system rather than a second order system for a BWR. In a PWR low frequency behaviour is modified by the Boron concentration. As a result of these phenomena there are difficulties in the consistent determination of the DR oscillations. The enhancement of the consistency of this DR estimation is obtained by wavelet transform using actual power plant data from BWR and PWR. A comparative study of the Restimation with and without wavelets are presented. (orig.)

  8. Summary on experimental methods for statistical transient analysis of two-phase gas-liquid flow. [BWR, PWR, and LMFBR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Delhaye, J M; Jones, Jr, O C

    1976-06-01

    Much work has been done in the study of two-phase gas-liquid flows. Although it has been recognized superficially that such flows are not homogeneous in general, little attention has been paid to the inherent discreteness of the two-phase systems. Only relatively recently have fluctuating characteristics of two-phase flows been studied in detail. As a result, new experimental devices and techniques have been developed for use in measuring quantities previously ignored. This report reviews and summarizes most of these methods in an effort to emphasize the importance of the fluctuating nature of these flows and as a guide to further research in this field.

  9. Determination of mass flow rate and quality distributions between the subchannels of a heated bundle. [BWR; PWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bayoumi, M.; Charlot, R.; Ricque, R.

    1976-05-01

    For analyzing, correlating and extrapolating experimental burn-out results obtained with LWR rod bundles, it is necessary to know the distributions of mass flow rate and quality between the subchannels. A description is presented of an experimental study in progress at the CEN-Grenoble for determining and adjusting the laws of mixing in the FLICA Code which is used to predict these distributions. The experiments are performed on the FRENESIE loop with Freon 12. The test section, in vertical position, consists of a four rod bundle in a channel with square section. The heat flux is axially uniform. The flow of each subchannel can be sampled in ''isokinetic conditions,'' at the end of the heating length. Thermodynamic quality and mass flow rate of the samplings are measured in steady state conditions by using respectively a calorimeter and a turbine flow meter. The test facility is described and experimental data are presented and discussed.

  10. Condensate polishing guidelines for PWR and BWR plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robbins, P.; Crinigan, P.; Graham, B.; Kohlmann, R.; Crosby, C.; Seager, J.; Bosold, R.; Gillen, J.; Kristensen, J.; McKeen, A.; Jones, V.; Sawochka, S.; Siegwarth, D.; Keeling, D.; Polidoroff, T.; Morgan, D.; Rickertsen, D.; Dyson, A.; Mills, W.; Coleman, L.

    1993-03-01

    Under EPRI sponsorship, an industry committee, similar in form and operation to other guideline committees, was created to develop Condensate Polishing Guidelines for both PWR and BWR systems. The committee reviewed the available utility and water treatment industry experience on system design and performance and incorporated operational and state-of-the-art information into document. These guidelines help utilities to optimize present condensate polisher designs as well as be a resource for retrofits or new construction. These guidelines present information that has not previously been presented in any consensus industry document. The committee generated guidelines that cover both deep bed and powdered resin systems as an integral part of the chemistry of PWR and BWR plants. The guidelines are separated into sections that deal with the basis for condensate polishing, system design, resin design and application, data management and performance and management responsibilities

  11. Evaluation of PWR and BWR pin cell benchmark results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pilgroms, B.J.; Gruppelaar, H.; Janssen, A.J. (Netherlands Energy Research Foundation (ECN), Petten (Netherlands)); Hoogenboom, J.E.; Leege, P.F.A. de (Interuniversitair Reactor Inst., Delft (Netherlands)); Voet, J. van der (Gemeenschappelijke Kernenergiecentrale Nederland NV, Dodewaard (Netherlands)); Verhagen, F.C.M. (Keuring van Electrotechnische Materialen NV, Arnhem (Netherlands))

    1991-12-01

    Benchmark results of the Dutch PINK working group on the PWR and BWR pin cell calculational benchmark as defined by EPRI are presented and evaluated. The observed discrepancies are problem dependent: a part of the results is satisfactory, some other results require further analysis. A brief overview is given of the different code packages used in this analysis. (author). 14 refs.; 9 figs.; 30 tabs.

  12. BWR and PWR chemistry operating experience and perspectives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fruzzetti, K.; Garcia, S.; Lynch, N.; Reid, R.

    2014-01-01

    It is well recognized that proper control of water chemistry plays a critical role in ensuring the safe and reliable operation of Boiling Water Reactors (BWRs) and Pressurized Water Reactors (PWRs). State-of-the-art water chemistry programs reduce general and localized corrosion of reactor coolant system, steam cycle equipment, and fuel cladding materials; ensure continued integrity of cycle components; and reduce radiation fields. Once a particular nuclear plant component has been installed or plant system constructed, proper water chemistry provides a global tool to mitigate materials degradation problems, thereby reducing the need for costly repairs or replacements. Recognizing the importance of proper chemistry control and the value in understanding the relationship between chemistry guidance and actual operating experience, EPRI continues to collect, monitor, and evaluate operating data from BWRs and PWRs around the world. More than 900 cycles of valuable BWR and PWR operating chemistry data has been collected, including online, startup and shutdown chemistry data over more than 10 years (> 20 years for BWRs). This paper will provide an overview of current trends in BWR and PWR chemistry, focusing on plants in the U.S.. Important chemistry parameters will be highlighted and discussed in the context of the EPRI Water Chemistry Guidelines requirements (i.e., those parameters considered to be of key importance as related to the major goals identified in the EPRI Guidelines: materials integrity; fuel integrity; and minimizing plant radiation fields). Perspectives will be provided in light of recent industry initiatives and changes in the EPRI BWR and PWR Water Chemistry Guidelines. (author)

  13. Siemens Nuclear Power Corporation experience with BWR and PWR fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reparaz, A.; Smith, M.H.; Stephens, L.G.

    1992-01-01

    The large data base of fuel performance parameters available to Siemens Nuclear Power Corporation (SNP), and the excellent track record of innovation and fuel reliability accumulated over the last twenty-three years, allows SNP to have a clear insight on the characteristics of future developments in the area of fuel design. Following is a description of some of SNP's recent design innovations to prevent failures and to extend burnup capabilities. A goal paramount to the design and manufacture of BWR and PWR fuel is that of zero defects from any case during its operation in the reactor. Progress has already been made in achieving this goal. This paper summarized the cumulative failure rate of SNP fuel rod through January 1992

  14. PWR and BWR spent fuel assembly gamma spectra measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vaccaro, S. [European Commission, DG Energy, Directorate EURATOM Safeguards Luxembourg (Luxembourg); Tobin, S.J.; Favalli, A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM (United States); Grogan, B. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge (United States); Jansson, P. [Uppsala University, Uppsala (Sweden); Liljenfeldt, H. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge (United States); Mozin, V. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA (United States); Hu, J. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge (United States); Schwalbach, P. [European Commission, DG Energy, Directorate EURATOM Safeguards Luxembourg (Luxembourg); Sjöland, A. [Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Company (SKB) (Sweden); Trellue, H.; Vo, D. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-10-11

    A project to research the application of nondestructive assay (NDA) to spent fuel assemblies is underway. The research team comprises the European Atomic Energy Community (EURATOM), embodied by the European Commission, DG Energy, Directorate EURATOM Safeguards; the Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Company (SKB); two universities; and several United States national laboratories. The Next Generation of Safeguards Initiative–Spent Fuel project team is working to achieve the following technical goals more easily and efficiently than in the past using nondestructive assay measurements of spent fuel assemblies: (1) verify the initial enrichment, burnup, and cooling time of facility declaration; (2) detect the diversion or replacement of pins, (3) estimate the plutonium mass, (4) estimate the decay heat, and (5) determine the reactivity of spent fuel assemblies. This study focuses on spectrally resolved gamma-ray measurements performed on a diverse set of 50 assemblies [25 pressurized water reactor (PWR) assemblies and 25 boiling water reactor (BWR) assemblies]; these same 50 assemblies will be measured with neutron-based NDA instruments and a full-length calorimeter. Given that encapsulation/repository and dry storage safeguards are the primarily intended applications, the analysis focused on the dominant gamma-ray lines of {sup 137}Cs, {sup 154}Eu, and {sup 134}Cs because these isotopes will be the primary gamma-ray emitters during the time frames of interest to these applications. This study addresses the impact on the measured passive gamma-ray signals due to the following factors: burnup, initial enrichment, cooling time, assembly type (eight different PWR and six different BWR fuel designs), presence of gadolinium rods, and anomalies in operating history. To compare the measured results with theory, a limited number of ORIGEN-ARP simulations were performed.

  15. THALES, Thermohydraulic LOCA Analysis of BWR and PWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    ABE, Kiyoharu

    1990-01-01

    reactor coolant system, combustible gas burning, atmosphere- structure heat transfer, ventilation, containment spray cooling, etc. After the molten core penetrates the reactor bottom head, steam generation, concrete disintegration and noncondensable gas generation are calculated in the reactor cavity or the pedestal. 2 - Method of solution: Each of the THALES member codes first establishes the steady state conditions after reading input data. Then iterative time-dependent calculation is continued, taking account of various phenomena and events and their interactions which will occur in the course of a postulated severe accident. The transient calculations are iterated by the physical times specified by input. Generally the RCS thermal hydraulic analysis with the THALES-PM or THALES-BM code is first carried out and its results are transferred to the following containment analysis with the THALES-CV code. Then both results are transferred to a code for analyzing fission product release and transport behavior. Automatic data transfer is possible in the case the JAERI's ART code is used for fission product behavior analysis. In overall thermal hydraulic analysis, a new method is adopted aiming at sufficiently accurate estimation of mixture levels in the reactor coolant system and the containment in a reasonable computer time. The heat transfer calculation in the core is carried out based on the backward method. 3 - Restrictions on the complexity of the problem: Restrictions relating to storage allocation are: (1) Maximum number of radial regions in the core : 10; (2) Maximum number of axial increments in the fuel rods : 50; (3) Maximum number of loops in the PWR primary system : 4; (4) Maximum number of volumes in the PWR primary system : 11; (5) Number of BWR recirculation loops: 2 (fixed); (6) Number of volumes in the BWR reactor coolant system : 7 (fixed); (7) Maximum number of compartments in the containment : 10. There is another restriction, which relates to time step

  16. Beta and gamma dose calculations for PWR and BWR containments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    King, D.B.

    1989-07-01

    Analyses of gamma and beta dose in selected regions in PWR and BWR containment buildings have been performed for a range of fission product releases from selected severe accidents. The objective of this study was to determine the radiation dose that safety-related equipment could experience during the selected severe accident sequences. The resulting dose calculations demonstrate the extent to which design basis accident qualified equipment could also be qualified for the severe accident environments. Surry was chosen as the representative PWR plant while Peach Bottom was selected to represent BWRs. Battelle Columbus Laboratory performed the source term release analyses. The AB epsilon scenario (an intermediate to large LOCA with failure to recover onsite or offsite electrical power) was selected as the base case Surry accident, and the AE scenario (a large break LOCA with one initiating event and a combination of failures in two emergency cooling systems) was selected as the base case Peach Bottom accident. Radionuclide release was bounded for both scenarios by including spray operation and arrested sequences as variations of the base scenarios. Sandia National Laboratories used the source terms to calculate dose to selected containment regions. Scenarios with sprays operational resulted in a total dose comparable to that (2.20 x 10 8 rads) used in current equipment qualification testing. The base case scenarios resulted in some calculated doses roughly an order of magnitude above the current 2.20 x 10 8 rad equipment qualification test region. 8 refs., 23 figs., 12 tabs

  17. The development of emergency core cooling systems in the PWR, BWR, and HWR Candu type of nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mursid Djokolelono.

    1976-01-01

    Emergency core cooling systems in the PWR, BWR, and HWR-Candu type of nuclear power plant are reviewed. In PWR and BWR the emergency cooling can be catagorized as active high pressure, active low pressure, and a passive one. The PWR uses components of the shutdown cooling system: whereas the BWR uses components of pressure suppression contaiment. HWR Candu also uses the shutdown cooling system similar to the PWR except some details coming out from moderator coolant separation and expensive cost of heavy water. (author)

  18. AREVA solutions to licensing challenges in PWR and BWR reload and safety analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Curca-Tivig, Florin [AREVA GmbH, Erlangen (Germany)

    2016-05-15

    Regulatory requirements for reload and safety analyses are evolving: new safety criteria, request for enlarged qualification databases, statistical applications, uncertainty propagation.. In order to address these challenges and access more predictable licensing processes, AVERA is implementing consistent code and methodology suites for PWR and BWR core design and safety analysis, based on first principles modeling and extremely broad verification and validation data base. Thanks to the high computational power increase in the last decades methods' development and application now include new capabilities. An overview of the main AREVA codes and methods developments is given covering PWR and BWR applications in different licensing environments.

  19. Identification of dose-reduction techniques for BWR and PWR repetitive high-dose jobs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dionne, B.J.; Baum, J.W.

    1984-01-01

    As a result of concern about the apparent increase in collective radiation dose to workers at nuclear power plants, this project will provide information to industry in preplanning for radiation protection during maintenance operations. This study identifies Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) and Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) repetitive jobs, and respective collective dose trends and dose reduction techniques. 3 references, 2 tables

  20. Pressurized Water Reactors (PWR) and Boiling Water Reactors (BWR) are compared

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greneche, D.

    2014-01-01

    This article compares the 2 types of light water reactors that are used to produce electricity: the Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) and the Boiling Water Reactor (BWR). Historically the BWR concept was developed after the PWR concept. Today 80% of light water reactors operating in the world are of PWR-type. This comparison is comprehensive and detailed. First the main technical features are reviewed and compared: reactor architecture, core and fuel design, reactivity control, reactor vessel, cooling systems and reactor containment. Secondly, various aspects concerning reactor operations like reactor control, fuel management, maintenance, inspections, radiation protection, waste generation and reactor reliability are presented and compared for both reactors. As for the issue of safety, it is highlighted that the accidental situations are too different for the 2 reactors to be compared. The main features of reactor safety are explained for both reactors

  1. ORCOST-2, PWR, BWR, HTGR, Fossil Fuel Power Plant Cost and Economics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuller, L.C.; Myers, M.L.

    1975-01-01

    1 - Description of problem or function: ORCOST2 estimates the cost of electrical energy production from single-unit steam-electric power plants. Capital costs and operating and maintenance costs are calculated using base cost models which are included in the program for each of the following types of plants: PWR, BWR, HTGR, coal, oil, and gas. The user may select one of several input/output options for calculation of capital cost, operating and maintenance cost, levelized energy costs, fixed charge rate, annual cash flows, cumulative cash flows, and cumulative discounted cash flows. Options include the input of capital cost and/or fixed charge rate to override the normal calculations. Transmission and distribution costs are not included. Fuel costs must be input by the user. 2 - Method of solution: The code follows the guidelines of AEC Report NUS-531. A base capital-cost model and a base operating- and maintenance-cost model are selected and adjusted for desired size, location, date, etc. Costs are discounted to the year of first commercial operation and levelized to provide annual cost of electric power generation. 3 - Restrictions on the complexity of the problem: The capital cost models are of doubtful validity outside the 500 to 1500 MW(e) range

  2. Control in fabrication of PWR and BWR type reactor fuel elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gorskij, V.V.

    1981-01-01

    Both destructive and non-destructive testing methods now in use in fabrication of BWR and PWR type reactor fuel elements at foreign plants are reviewed. Technological procedures applied in fabrication of fuel elements and fuel assemblies are described. Major attention is paid to radiographic, ultrasonic, metallographic, visual and autoclavic testings. A correspondence of the methods applied to the ASTM standards is discussed. The most part of the countries are concluded the apply similar testing methods enabling one to reliably evaluate the quality of primary materials and fabricated fuel elements and thus meeting the demands to contemporary PWR and BWR type reactor fuel elements. Practically all fuel element and pipe fabrication plants in Western Europe, Asia and America use the ASTM standards as the basis for the quality contr [ru

  3. A probabilistic analysis of PWR and BWR fuel rod performance using the code CASINO-SLEUTH

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bull, A.J.

    1987-01-01

    This paper presents a brief description of the Monte Carlo and response surface techniques used in the code, and a probabilistic analysis of fuel rod performance in PWR and BWR applications. The analysis shows that fission gas release predictions are very sensitive to changes in certain of the code's inputs, identifies the most dominant input parameters and compares their effects in the two cases. (orig./HP)

  4. Product Evaluation Task Force Phase Two report for BWR/PWR dissolver wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Francis, A.J.

    1990-01-01

    It has been proposed that all Intermediate Level Wastes arising at Sellafield should be encapsulated prior to ultimate disposal. The Product Evaluation Task Force (PETF) was set up to investigate possible encapsulants and to produce an adequate data base to justify the preferred matrices. This report details the work carried out, under Phase 2 of the Product Evaluation Task Force programme, on BWR/PWR Dissolver Wastes. Three possible types of encapsulants for BWR/PWR Dissolver Wastes:- Inorganic cements, Polymer cements and Polymers are evaluated using the Kepner Tregoe decision analysis technique. This technique provides a methodology for scoring and ranking alternative options and evaluating any risks associated with an option. The analysis shows that for all four stages of waste management operations ie Storage, Transport, handling and emplacement, Disposal and Process, cement matrices are considerably superior to other potential matrices. A matrix, consisting of three parts Blast Furnace Slag (BFS) to one part Ordinary Portland Cement (OPC), is recommended for Phase 3 studies on BWR/PWR Dissolver Wastes. (author)

  5. Siemens Nuclear Power Corporation methods development for BWR/PWR reactor licensing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pruitt, D.W.

    1992-01-01

    This presentation addresses the Siemens Nuclear Power Corporation (SNP) perspective on the primary forces driving methods development in the nuclear industry. These forces are fuel design, computational environment and industry requirement evolution. The first segment of the discussion presents the SNP experience base. SNP develops, manufactures and licenses both BWR and PWR reload fuel. A review of this experience base highlights the accelerating rate at which new fuel designs are being introduced into the nuclear industry. The application of advanced BWR lattice geometries provides an example of fuel design trends. The second aspect of the presentation is the rapid evolution of the computing environment. The final subject in the presentation is the impact of industry requirements on code or methods development

  6. Observations of crud deposits, corrosion and erosion of BWR and PWR fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bairiot, H.

    1983-01-01

    The BWR experience is limited to one reactor but the PWR experience covers a wide range of successive generations of power plants (7 in total). The systems are described and their water chemistry briefly commented. Some R and D performed on the effects of the operating regimes (steady state and transients) are summarized. Observations made by pool-side inspections and postirradiation examinations of fuel are outlined concerning water chemistry effects (crud deposits and corrosion) and ''mechanical'' coolant-cladding interaction (chip deposits and baffle jetting). (author)

  7. Application of tearing modulus stability concepts to nuclear piping. Final report. [PWR; BWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cotter, K.H.; Chang, H.Y.; Zahoor, A.

    1982-02-01

    The recently developed tearing modulus stability concept was successfully applied to several boiling water reactor (BWR) and pressurized water reactor (PWR) piping systems. Circumferentially oriented through-the-thickness cracks were postulated at numerous locations in each system. For each location, the simplified tearing stability methods developed in USNRC Report NUREG/CR-0838 were used to determine crack stability. The J-T diagram was used to present the results of the computations. The piping systems considered included Type 304 stainless steel as well as A106 carbon steel materials. These systems were analyzed using the piping analysis computer code MINK.

  8. PWR and BWR light water reactor systems in the USA and their fuel cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crawford, W.D.

    1977-01-01

    Light water reactor operating experience in the USA can be considered to date from the choice of the pressurized water reactor (PWR) for use in the naval reactor program and the subsequent construction and operation of the nuclear power plant at Shippingport, Pennsylvania in 1957. The development of the boiling water reactor (BWR) in 1954 and its selection for the plant at Dresden, Illinois in 1959 established this concept as the other major reactor type in the US nuclear power program. The subsequent growth profile is presented, leading to 31 PWR's and 23 BWR's currently in operation as well as to plants in the planning and construction phase. A significant operating record has been accumulated concerning the availability of each of these reactor types as determined by: (1) outage for refueling, (2) component reliability, (3) maintenance requirements, and (4) retrofitting required by government regulation. In addition, the use and performance of BWR's and PWR's in meeting system load requirements is discussed. The growing concern regarding possible terrorist activities and other potential threats has resulted in systems and procedures designed to assure effective safeguards at nuclear power installations. Safeguards measures currently in place are described. Environmental effects of operating plants are subject to both radiological and non-radiological monitoring to verify that results are within the limits established in the licensing process. The operating results achieved and the types of modifications that have been required of operating plants by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission are reviewed. The PWR and BWR Fuel Cycle is examined in terms of: (1) fuel burnup experience and prospects for improvement, (2) the status and outlook for natural uranium resources, (3) enrichment capacity, (4) reprocessing and recycle, and the interrelationships among the latter three factors. High level waste management currently involving on-site storage of spent fuel is discussed

  9. Critical discharge of initially subcooled water through slits. [PWR; BWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amos, C N; Schrock, V E

    1983-09-01

    This report describes an experimental investigation into the critical flow of initially subcooled water through rectangular slits. The study of such flows is relevant to the prediction of leak flow rates from cracks in piping, or pressure vessels, which contain sufficient enthalpy that vaporization will occur if they are allowed to expand to the ambient pressure. Two new analytical models, which allow for the generation of a metastable liquid phase, are developed. Experimental results are compared with the predictions of both these new models and with a Fanno Homogeneous Equilibrium Model.

  10. First interim examination of defected BWR and PWR rods tested in unlimited air at 2290C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Einziger, R.E.; Cook, J.A.

    1983-01-01

    A five-year whole rod test was initiated to investigate the long-term stability of spent fuel rods under a variety of possible dry storage conditions. Both PWR and BWR rods were included in the test. The first interim examination was conducted after three months of testing to determine if there was any degradation in those defected rods stored in an unlimited air atmosphere. Visual observations, diametral measurements and radiographic smears were used to assess the degree of cladding deformation and particulate dispersal. The PWR rod showed no measurable change from the pre-test condition. The two original artificial defects had not changed in appearance and there was no diametral growth of the cladding. One of the defects in BWR rod showed significant deformation. There was approximately 10% cladding strain at the defect site and a small axial crack had formed. The fuel in the defect did not appear to be friable. The second defect showed no visible change and no cladding strain. Following examination, the test was continued at 230 0 C. Another interim examination is planned during the summer of 1983. This paper discusses the details and meaning of the data from the first interim examination

  11. Lightweight submersed 'Walking' NDE manipulators for PWR and BWR vessel weld inspection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saernmark, Ivan; Lenz, Herbert

    2008-01-01

    Three new manipulators developed by WesDyne TRC in Sweden have under the year 2007 performed three very successful inspections in the PWR reactor Ringhals 3 and the BWR reactors Ringhals 1 and Oskarshamn 1. The manipulator systems can be used to perform inspection of circumferential and vertical welds on the reactor pressure vessel, the core shroud, core shroud support in BWR reactors or vessel and core barrel welds in PWR reactors. Most other flat or curved surfaces can be inspected using the new concept through relatively simple mechanical reconfigurations of system modules. The first inspection was performed on the R3 PWR core barrel in June 2007 with a very good result. This Manipulator is designed for access in very narrow gaps and for the type of core barrels with a shield covering the whole area of the perimeter. The manipulator is attached to the inspection area by means of a new unique suction cup system. The current manipulators consist of a curved horizontal beam, with radius similar to the reactor vessel, and a straight vertical beam, forming a T-shaped structure. By alternating the application of suction cup pairs on the horizontal beam and the vertical beam and by driving the scanning motors, the manipulator performs an incremental translational movement upwards/downwards or from side to side. The principles of this system give a well defined and stable platform for global and local positioning accuracy. A combination of advanced sensor solutions provides accurate position information in the absence of other physical reference objects. The system is controlled by the new WesDyne TRC Motor Control Panel and software, the MCP is specifically designed for remote control of submersed manipulators using techniques for cable reduction

  12. Lightweight submersed 'Walking' NDE manipulators for PWR and BWR vessel weld inspection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saernmark, Ivan; Lenz, Herbert [WesDyne TRC AB, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2008-04-15

    Three new manipulators developed by WesDyne TRC in Sweden have under the year 2007 performed three very successful inspections in the PWR reactor Ringhals 3 and the BWR reactors Ringhals 1 and Oskarshamn 1. The manipulator systems can be used to perform inspection of circumferential and vertical welds on the reactor pressure vessel, the core shroud, core shroud support in BWR reactors or vessel and core barrel welds in PWR reactors. Most other flat or curved surfaces can be inspected using the new concept through relatively simple mechanical reconfigurations of system modules. The first inspection was performed on the R3 PWR core barrel in June 2007 with a very good result. This Manipulator is designed for access in very narrow gaps and for the type of core barrels with a shield covering the whole area of the perimeter. The manipulator is attached to the inspection area by means of a new unique suction cup system. The current manipulators consist of a curved horizontal beam, with radius similar to the reactor vessel, and a straight vertical beam, forming a T-shaped structure. By alternating the application of suction cup pairs on the horizontal beam and the vertical beam and by driving the scanning motors, the manipulator performs an incremental translational movement upwards/downwards or from side to side. The principles of this system give a well defined and stable platform for global and local positioning accuracy. A combination of advanced sensor solutions provides accurate position information in the absence of other physical reference objects. The system is controlled by the new WesDyne TRC Motor Control Panel and software, the MCP is specifically designed for remote control of submersed manipulators using techniques for cable reduction.

  13. A direct comparison of MELCOR 1.8.3 and MAAP4 results for several PWR ampersand BWR accident sequences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leonard, M.T.; Ashbaugh, S.G.; Cole, R.K.; Bergeron, K.D.; Nagashima, K.

    1996-01-01

    This paper presents a comparison of calculations of severe accident progression for several postulated accident sequences for representative Pressurized Water Reactors (PWR) and Boiling Water Reactors (BWR) nuclear power plants performed with the MELCOR 1.8.3 and the MAAP4 computer codes. The PWR system examined in this study is a 1100 MWe system similar in design to a Westinghouse 3-loop plant with a large dry containment; the BWR is a 1100 MWe system similar in design to General Electric BWR/4 with a Mark I containment. A total of nine accident sequences were studied with both codes. Results of these calculations are compared to identify major differences in the timing of key events in the calculated accident progression or other important aspects of severe accident behavior, and to identify specific sources of the observed differences

  14. THERMIT, 3-D Thermo-Hydraulics of BWR and PWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kazimi, M.S.; Kao, S.P.; Kelly, J.E.

    1984-01-01

    1 - Description of program or function: THERMIT2, the most recent release of THERMIT, is intended for thermal-hydraulic analysis of both boiling and pressurized water reactor cores. It solves the three-dimensional, two-fluid equations describing the two-phase flow and heat transfer dynamics in rectangular coordinates. The two-fluid model uses separate partial differential equations expressing conservation of mass, momentum, and energy for each fluid. THERMIT2 offers the choice of either pressure or velocity boundary conditions at the top and bottom of the core. THERMIT2 includes a two-phase turbulent mixing model which provides subchannel analysis capability. THERMIT2 also solves the radial heat conduction equations for fuel pin temperatures, and calculates the heat flux from fuel pin to coolant with appropriate heat transfer models described by a boiling curve. 2 - Method of solution: By expressing the exchange of mass, momentum, and energy between the fluids with physically-based mathematical models, the relative motion and thermal non-equilibrium between the fluids can exist

  15. Composition and Distribution of Tramp Uranium Contamination on BWR and PWR Fuel Rods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schienbein, Marcel; Zeh, Peter; Hurtado, Antonio; Rosskamp, Matthias; Mailand, Irene; Bolz, Michael

    2012-09-01

    In a joint research project of VGB and AREVA NP GmbH the behaviour of alpha nuclides in nuclear power plants with light water reactors has been investigated. Understanding the source and the behaviour of alpha nuclides is of big importance for planning radiation protection measures for outages and upcoming dismantling projects. Previous publications have shown the correlation between plant specific alpha contamination of the core and the so called 'tramp fuel' or 'tramp uranium' level which is linked to the defect history of fuel assemblies and accordingly the amount of previously washed out fuel from defective fuel rods. The methodology of tramp fuel estimation is based on fission product concentrations in reactor coolant but also needs a good knowledge of tramp fuel composition and in-core distribution on the outer surface of fuel rods itself. Sampling campaigns of CRUD deposits of irradiated fuel assemblies in different NPPs were performed. CRUD analyses including nuclide specific alpha analysis have shown systematic differences between BWR and PWR plants. Those data combined with literature results of fuel pellet investigations led to model improvements showing that a main part of fission products is caused by fission of Pu-239 an activation product of U-238. CRUD investigations also gave a better picture of the in-core composition and distribution of the tramp uranium contamination. It was shown that the tramp uranium distribution in PWR plants is time dependent. Even new fuel assemblies will be notably contaminated after only one cycle of operation. For PWR applies the following logic: the higher the local power the higher the contamination. With increasing burnup the local rod power usually decreases leading to decreasing tramp uranium contamination on the fuel rod surface. This is not applicable for tramp uranium contamination in BWR. CRUD contamination (including the tramp fuel deposits) is much more fixed and is constantly increasing

  16. General model for Pc-based simulation of PWR and BWR plant components

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ratemi, W M; Abomustafa, A M [Faculty of enginnering, alfateh univerity Tripoli, (Libyan Arab Jamahiriya)

    1995-10-01

    In this paper, we present a basic mathematical model derived from physical principles to suit the simulation of PWR-components such as pressurizer, intact steam generator, ruptured steam generator, and the reactor component of a BWR-plant. In our development, we produced an NMMS-package for nuclear modular modelling simulation. Such package is installed on a personal computer and it is designed to be user friendly through color graphics windows interfacing. The package works under three environments, namely, pre-processor, simulation, and post-processor. Our analysis of results using cross graphing technique for steam generator tube rupture (SGTR) accident, yielded a new proposal for on-line monitoring of control strategy of SGTR-accident for nuclear or conventional power plant. 4 figs.

  17. Revised uranium--plutonium cycle PWR and BWR models for the ORIGEN computer code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Croff, A.G.; Bjerke, M.A.; Morrison, G.W.; Petrie, L.M.

    1978-09-01

    Reactor physics calculations and literature searches have been conducted, leading to the creation of revised enriched-uranium and enriched-uranium/mixed-oxide-fueled PWR and BWR reactor models for the ORIGEN computer code. These ORIGEN reactor models are based on cross sections that have been taken directly from the reactor physics codes and eliminate the need to make adjustments in uncorrected cross sections in order to obtain correct depletion results. Revised values of the ORIGEN flux parameters THERM, RES, and FAST were calculated along with new parameters related to the activation of fuel-assembly structural materials not located in the active fuel zone. Recommended fuel and structural material masses and compositions are presented. A summary of the new ORIGEN reactor models is given

  18. BWR water chemistry guidelines and PWR primary water chemistry guidelines in Japan – Purpose and technical background

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kawamura, Hirotaka, E-mail: kawamuh@criepi.denken.or.jp [Central Research Institute of Electric Power Industry (Japan); Hirano, Hideo [Central Research Institute of Electric Power Industry (Japan); Katsumura, Yousuke [University of Tokyo (Japan); Uchida, Shunsuke [Tohoku University (Japan); Mizuno, Takayuki [Mie University (Japan); Kitajima, Hideaki; Tsuzuki, Yasuo [Japan Nuclear Safety Institute (Japan); Terachi, Takumi [Institute of Nuclear Safety System, Inc. (Japan); Nagase, Makoto; Usui, Naoshi [Hitachi-GE Nuclear Energy, Ltd. (Japan); Takagi, Junichi; Urata, Hidehiro [Toshiba Corporation (Japan); Shoda, Yasuhiko; Nishimura, Takao [Mitsubishi Heavy Industry, Ltd. (Japan)

    2016-12-01

    Highlights: • Framework of BWR/PWR water chemistry Guidelines in Japan are presented. • Guideline necessity, definitions, philosophy and technical background are mentioned. • Some guideline settings for control parameters and recommendations are explaines. • Chemistry strategy is also mentioned. - Abstract: After 40 years of light water reactor (LWR) operations in Japan, the sustainable development of water chemistry technologies has aimed to ensure the highest coolant system component integrity and fuel reliability performance for maintaining LWRs in the world; additionally, it aimed to achieve an excellent dose rate reduction. Although reasonable control and diagnostic parameters are utilized by each boiling water reactor (BWR) and pressurized water reactor (PWR) owner, it is recognized that specific values are not shared among everyone involved. To ensure the reliability of BWR and PWR operation and maintenance, relevant members of the Atomic Energy Society of Japan (AESJ) decided to establish guidelines for water chemistry. The Japanese BWR and PWR water chemistry guidelines provide strategies to improve material and fuel reliability performance as well as to reduce dosing rates. The guidelines also provide reasonable “control values”, “diagnostic values” and “action levels” for multiple parameters, and they stipulate responses when these levels are exceeded. Specifically, “conditioning parameters” are adopted in the Japanese PWR primary water chemistry guidelines. Good practices for operational conditions are also discussed with reference to long-term experience. This paper presents the purpose, technical background and framework of the preliminary water chemistry guidelines for Japanese BWRs and PWRs. It is expected that the guidelines will be helpful as an introduction to achieve safety and reliability during operations.

  19. Comparison of the long-time corrosion behavior of certain Zr alloys in PWR, BWR, and laboratory tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garzarolli, F.; Broy, Y.; Busch, R.A.

    1996-01-01

    Laboratory corrosion tests have always been an important tool for Zr alloy development and optimization. However, it must be known whether a test is representative for the application in-reactor. To shed more light on this question, coupons of several Zr alloys were exposed under isothermal conditions in BWR and PWR type environments. For evaluation of the in-PWR tests and for comparison of out-of-pile and in-pile tests, the different temperatures and times were normalized to a temperature-independent normalized time by assuming an activation temperature (Q/R) of 14,200 K. Comparison of in-PWR and out-of-pile corrosion behavior of Zircaloy shows that corrosion deviates to higher values in PWR if a weight gain of about 50 mg/dm 2 is exceeded. In the case of the Zr2.5Nb alloy, a slight deviation of corrosion as compared to laboratory results starts in PWR only above a weight gain of 100 mg/dm 2 . In BWR, corrosion of Zircaloy is enhanced early in time if compared with out-of-pile. Zr2.5Nb exhibits higher corrosion results in BWR than Zircaloy-4. Alloying chemistry and material condition affect corrosion of Zr alloys. However, several of the material parameters have shown a different ranking in the different environments. Nevertheless, several material parameters influencing in-reactor corrosion like the second phase particle (SPP) size of in-PWR behavior as the Sn and Fe content can be optimized by out-of-pile corrosion tests

  20. Assessment of management alternatives for LWR wastes. Volume 3. Description of German scenarios for PWR and BWR wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santraille, S.

    1993-01-01

    This report deals with the description of a management route for PWR waste relying to a certain extent on German practices in this particular area. This description, which aims at providing input data for subsequent cost evaluation, includes all management steps which are usually implemented for solid, liquid and gaseous wastes from their production up to the interim storage of the final waste products. This study is part of an overall theoretical exercise aimed at evaluating a selection of management routes for PWR and BWR wastes based on economical and radiological criteria

  1. Treatment of core components from nuclear power plants with PWR and BWR reactors - 16043

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Viermann, Joerg; Friske, Andreas; Radzuweit, Joerg

    2009-01-01

    During operation of a Nuclear Power Plant components inside the RPV get irradiated. Irradiation has an effect on physical properties of these components. Some components have to be replaced after certain neutron doses or respectively after a certain operating time of the plant. Such components are for instance water channels and control rods from Boiling Water Reactors (BWR) or control elements, poisoning elements and flow restrictors from Pressurized Water Reactors (PWR). Most of these components are stored in the fuel pool for a certain time after replacement. Then they have to be packaged for further treatment or for disposal. More than 25 years ago GNS developed a system for disposal of irradiated core components which was based on a waste container suitable for transport, storage and disposal of Intermediate Level Waste (ILW), the so-called MOSAIK R cask. The MOSAIK R family of casks is subject of a separate presentation at the ICEM 09 conference. Besides the MOSAIK R cask the treatment system developed by GNS comprised underwater shears to cut the components to size as well as different types of equipment to handle the components, the shears and the MOSAIK R casks in the fuel pool. Over a decade of experience it showed that this system although effective needed improvement for BWR plants where many water channels and control rods had to be replaced after a certain operating time. Because of the large numbers of components the time period needed to cut the components in the pool had a too big influence on other operational work like rearranging of fuel assemblies in the pool. The system was therefore further developed and again a suitable cask was the heart of the solution. GNS developed the type MOSAIK R 80 T, a cask that is capable to ship the unsegmented components with a length of approx. 4.5 m from the Power plants to an external treatment centre. This treatment centre consisting of a hot cell installation with a scrap shear, super-compactor and a heavy

  2. Stakes and Solutions for current and up-coming Licensing Challenges in PWR and BWR Reload and Safety Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Curca-Tiving, F.; Opel, S.

    2014-07-01

    Regulatory requirements for reloads and safety analyses are evolving: New safety criteria, requests for enlarged qualification databases, statistical applications, uncertainty propagation... In order to address these challenges and access more predictable licensing processes, AREVA implements a consistent code and methodology suite for PWR and BWR core design and safety analysis, based on a first principles modeling with an extremely broad international verification and validation data base. (Author)

  3. Solution of a benchmark set problems for BWR and PWR reactors with UO2 and MOX fuels using CASMO-4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martinez F, M.A.; Valle G, E. del; Alonso V, G.

    2007-01-01

    In this work some of the results for a group of benchmark problems of light water reactors that allow to study the physics of the fuels of these reactors are presented. These benchmark problems were proposed by Akio Yamamoto and collaborators in 2002 and they include two fuel types; uranium dioxide (UO 2 ) and mixed oxides (MOX). The range of problems that its cover embraces three different configurations: unitary cell for a fuel bar, fuel assemble of PWR and fuel assemble of BWR what allows to carry out an understanding analysis of the problems related with the fuel performance of new generation in light water reactors with high burnt. Also these benchmark problems help to understand the fuel administration in core of a BWR like of a PWR. The calculations were carried out with CMS (of their initials in English Core Management Software), particularly with CASMO-4 that is a code designed to carry out analysis of fuels burnt of fuel bars cells as well as fuel assemblies as much for PWR as for BWR and that it is part in turn of the CMS code. (Author)

  4. HORIZONTAL LIFTING OF 5 DHLW/DOE LONG, 12-PWR LONG AND 24-BWR WASTE PACKAGES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    V. de la Brosse

    2001-01-01

    The objective of this calculation was to determine the structural response of a 12-Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) Long, a 24-Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) and a 5-Defense High Level Waste/Department of Energy (DHLW/DOE)--Long spent nuclear fuel waste packages lifted in a horizontal position. The scope of this calculation was limited to reporting the calculation results in terms of maximum stress intensities in the trunnion collar sleeves. In addition, the maximum stress intensities in the inner and outer shells of the waste packages were presented for illustrative purposes. The information provided by the sketches (Attachments I, II and III) is that of the potential design of the types of waste packages considered in this calculation, and all obtained results are valid for these designs only. This calculation is associated with the waste package design and was performed by the Waste Package Design Section in accordance with the ''Technical work plan for: Waste Package Design Description for LA'' (Ref. 7). AP-3.12Q, Calculations (Ref. 13), was used to perform the calculation and develop the document

  5. Containment venting sliding pressure venting process for PWR and BWR plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eckardt, B.

    1991-01-01

    In order to reduce the residual risk associated with hypothetical severe nuclear accidents, nuclear power plants in Germany as well as in certain other European countries have been or will be backfitted with a system for filtered containment venting. During venting system process design, particular importance is attached to the requirements regarding, for example, high aerosol loading capability, provision for decay heat removal from the scrubber unit, the aerosol spectrum to be retained and entirely passive functioning of the scrubber unit. The aerosol spectrum relevant for process design and testing varies depending on aerosol concentrations, the time at which venting is commenced and whether there is an upstream wetwell, etc. Because of this the Reactor Safety Commission in Germany has specified that SnO 2 with a mass mean diameter of approximately 0.5 μm should be used as an enveloping test aerosol. To meet the above-mentioned requirements, a combined venturi scrubber system was developed which comprises a venturi section and a filter demister section and is operated in the sliding pressure mode. This scrubber system was tested using a full-scale model and has now been installed in 14 PWR and BWR plants in Germany and Finland

  6. Comparative analysis of station blackout accident progression in typical PWR, BWR, and PHWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Soo Young; Ahn, Kwang Il

    2012-01-01

    Since the crisis at the Fukushima plants, severe accident progression during a station blackout accident in nuclear power plants is recognized as a very important area for accident management and emergency planning. The purpose of this study is to investigate the comparative characteristics of anticipated severe accident progression among the three typical types of nuclear reactors. A station blackout scenario, where all off-site power is lost and the diesel generators fail, is simulated as an initiating event of a severe accident sequence. In this study a comparative analysis was performed for typical pressurized water reactor (PWR), boiling water reactor (BWR), and pressurized heavy water reactor (PHWR). The study includes the summarization of design differences that would impact severe accident progressions, thermal hydraulic/severe accident phenomenological analysis during a station blackout initiated-severe accident; and an investigation of the core damage process, both within the reactor vessel before it fails and in the containment afterwards, and the resultant impact on the containment.

  7. ASTM standards associated with PWR and BWR power plant licensing, operation and surveillance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McElroy, W.N.; McElroy, R.J.; Gold, R.; Lippincott, E.P.; Lowe, A.L. Jr.

    1994-01-01

    This paper considers ASTM Standards that are available, under revision, and are being considered in support of Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) and Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) Nuclear Power Plant (NPP) licensing, regulation, operation, surveillance and life attainment. The current activities of ASTM Committee E10 and its Subcommittees E10.02 and current activities of ASTM Committee E10 and its Subcommittees E10.02 and E10.05 and their Task Groups (TG) are described. A very important aspect of these efforts is the preparation, revision, and balloting of standards identified in the ASTM E706 Standard on Master Matrix for Light Water Reactor (LWR) Pressure Vessel (PV) Surveillance Standards. The current version (E706-87) of the Master Matrix identifies 21 ASTM LWR physics-dosimetry-metallurgy standards for Reactor Pressure Vessel (RPV) and Support Structure (SS) surveillance programs, whereas, for the next revision 34 standards are identified. The need for national and international coordination of Standards Technology Development, Transfer and Training (STDTT) is considered in this and other Symposium papers that address specific standards related physics-dosimetry-metallurgy issues. 69 refs

  8. Thermohydraulic analysis of BWR and PWR spent fuel assemblies contained within square canisters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wiles, L.E.; McCann, R.A.

    1981-09-01

    This report presents the results of several thermohydraulic simulations of spent fuel assembly/canister configurations performed in support of a program investigating the feasibility of storing spent nuclear fuel assemblies in canisters that would be stored in an air environment. Eleven thermohydraulic simulations were performed. Five simulations were performed using a single BWR fuel assembly/canister design. The various cases were defined by changing the canister spacing and the heat generation rate of the fuel assembly. For each simulation a steady-state thermohydraulic solution was achieved for the region inside the canister. Similarly, six simulations were performed for a single PWR fuel assembly/canister design. The square fuel rod arrays were contained in square canisters which would permit closer packing of the canisters in a storage facility. However, closer packing of the canisters would result in higher fuel temperatures which would possibly have an adverse impact on fuel integrity. Thus, the most important aspect of the analysis was to define the peak fuel assembly temperatures for each case. These results are presented along with various temperature profiles, heat flux distributions, and air velocity profiles within the canister. 48 figures, 4 tables

  9. PWR and BWR light water reactor systems in the USA and their fuel cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crawford, W.D.

    1977-01-01

    Light water reactor operating experience in the USA can be considered to date from the choice of the PWR for use in the naval reactor programme and the subsequent construction and operation of the nuclear power plant at Shippingport in 1957. The development of the BWR in 1954 and its selection for the plant at Dresden in 1959 established this concept as the other major reactor type in the US nuclear power programme. The subsequent growth profile is presented. A significant operating record has been accumulated concerning the availability of each of these reactor types. In addition, the use and performance of BWRs and PWRs in meeting system load requirements is discussed. The growing concern regarding possible terrorist activities and other potential threats has resulted in systems and procedures designed to ensure effective safeguards at nuclear power installations; current measures are described. Environmental effects of operating plants are subject to both radiological and non-radiological monitoring. The operating results achieved and the types of modifications that have been required of operating plants by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission are reviewed. Both fuel cycles are examined in terms of: fuel burnup experience and prospects for improvement; natural uranium resources; enrichment capacity; reprocessing and recycle; and the interrelationships among the latter three factors. High-level waste management currently involving on-site storage of spent fuel is discussed in terms of available capacity and plans for expansion. The US electric utility industry viewpoint regarding an ultimate programme for waste management is outlined. Finally, the current economics and future cost trends of nuclear power plants are evaluated. (author)

  10. Effect of yield strength on stress corrosion crack propagation under PWR and BWR environments of hardened stainless steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castano, M.L.; Garcia, M.S.; Diego, G. de; Gomez-Briceno, D. [CIEMAT, Nuclear Fission Department, Structural Materials Program, Avda. Complutense 22, 28040 Madrid (Spain)

    2004-07-01

    Core components of light water reactor (LWR), mainly made of austenitic stainless steels (SS), subjected to stress and exposed to relatively high fast neutron flux may suffer a cracking process termed as Irradiation Assisted Stress Corrosion Cracking (IASCC). Neutron radiation leads to critical modifications in material characteristics, which can modify their stress corrosion cracking (SCC) response. Current knowledge highlights three fundamental factors, induced by radiation, as primary contributors to IASCC of core materials: Radiation Induced Segregation (RIS) at grain boundaries, Radiation Hardening and Radiolysis. Most of the existing literature on IASCC is focussed on the influence of RIS, mainly chromium depletion, which can promote IASCC in oxidizing environments, such a Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) under normal water chemistry. However, in non-oxidizing environments, such as primary water of Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) or BWR hydrogen water chemistry, the role played by chromium depletion at grain boundary on IASCC behaviour of highly irradiated material is irrelevant. One important issue with limited study is the effect of radiation induced hardening. The role of hardening on IASCC is became stronger considered, especially for environments where other factors, like micro-chemistry, have no significant influence. To formulate the mechanism of IASCC, a well-established method is to isolate and quantify the effect of individual parameters. The use of unirradiated material and the simulation of the irradiation effects is a procedure used with success for evaluating the influence of irradiation effects. Radiation hardening can be simulated by mechanical deformation and, although some differences exist in the types of defects produced, it is believed that the study of the SCC behaviour of unirradiated materials with different hardening levels would contribute to the understanding of IASCC mechanism. In order to evaluate the influence of hardening on the

  11. Uncertainty and sensitivity analysis in the neutronic parameters generation for BWR and PWR coupled thermal-hydraulic–neutronic simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ánchel, F.; Barrachina, T.; Miró, R.; Verdú, G.; Juanas, J.; Macián-Juan, R.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Best-estimate codes are affected by the uncertainty in the methods and the models. ► Influence of the uncertainty in the macroscopic cross-sections in a BWR and PWR RIA accidents analysis. ► The fast diffusion coefficient, the scattering cross section and both fission cross sections are the most influential factors. ► The absorption cross sections very little influence. ► Using a normal pdf the results are more “conservative” comparing the power peak reached with uncertainty quantified with a uniform pdf. - Abstract: The Best Estimate analysis consists of a coupled thermal-hydraulic and neutronic description of the nuclear system's behavior; uncertainties from both aspects should be included and jointly propagated. This paper presents a study of the influence of the uncertainty in the macroscopic neutronic information that describes a three-dimensional core model on the most relevant results of the simulation of a Reactivity Induced Accident (RIA). The analyses of a BWR-RIA and a PWR-RIA have been carried out with a three-dimensional thermal-hydraulic and neutronic model for the coupled system TRACE-PARCS and RELAP-PARCS. The cross section information has been generated by the SIMTAB methodology based on the joint use of CASMO-SIMULATE. The statistically based methodology performs a Monte-Carlo kind of sampling of the uncertainty in the macroscopic cross sections. The size of the sampling is determined by the characteristics of the tolerance intervals by applying the Noether–Wilks formulas. A number of simulations equal to the sample size have been carried out in which the cross sections used by PARCS are directly modified with uncertainty, and non-parametric statistical methods are applied to the resulting sample of the values of the output variables to determine their intervals of tolerance.

  12. Flow rate control systems for coolants for BWR type reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Igarashi, Yoko; Kato, Naoyoshi.

    1981-01-01

    Purpose: To increase spontaneous recycling flow rate of coolants in BWR type reactors when the water level in the reactor decreases, by communicating a downcomer with a lower plenum. Constitution: An opening is provided to the back plate disposed at the lower end of a reactor core shroud for communicating a downcomer with a lower plenum, and an ON-OFF valve actuated by an operation rod is provided to the opening. When abnormal water level or pressure in the reactor is detected by a level metal or pressure meter, the operation rod is driven to open the ON-OFF valve, whereby coolants fed from a jet pump partially flows through the opening to increase the spontaneous recycling flow rate of the coolants. This can increase the spontaneous recycling flow rate of the coolants upon spontaneous recycling operation, thereby maintaining the reactor safety and the fuel soundness. (Moriyama, K.)

  13. Correlating activity incorporation with properties of oxide films formed on material samples exposed to BWR and PWR coolants in Finnish nuclear power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bojinov, M.; Kinnunen, P.; Laitinen, T.; Maekelae, K.; Saario, T.; Sirkiae, P. [VTT Industrial Systems, Espoo (Finland); Buddas, T.; Halin, M.; Kvarnstroem, R.; Tompuri, K. [Fortum Power and Heat Oy, Loviisa Power Plant, Loviisa (Finland); Helin, M.; Muttilainen, E.; Reinvall, A. [Teollisuuden Voima Oy, Olkiluoto (Finland)

    2002-07-01

    The extent of activity incorporation on primary circuit surfaces in nuclear power plants is connected to the chemical composition of the coolant, to the corrosion behaviour of the material surfaces and to the structure and properties of oxide films formed on circuit surfaces due to corrosion. Possible changes in operational conditions may induce changes in the structure of the oxide films and thus in the rate of activity incorporation. To predict these changes, experimental correlations between water chemistry, oxide films and activity incorporation, as well as mechanistic understanding of the related phenomena need to be established. In order to do this, flow-through cells with material samples and facilities for high-temperature water chemistry monitoring have been installed at Olkiluoto unit 1 (BWR) and Loviisa unit 1 (PWR) in spring 2000. The cells are being used for two major purposes: To observe the changes in the structure and activity levels of oxide films formed on material samples exposed to the primary coolant. Correlating these observations with the abundant chemical and radiochemical data on coolant composition, dose rates etc. collected routinely by the plant, as well as with high-temperature water chemistry monitoring data such as the corrosion potentials of relevant material samples, the redox potential and the high-temperature conductivity of the primary coolant. We describe in this paper the scope of the work, give examples of the observations made and summarize the results on oxide films that have been obtained during one full fuel cycle at both plants. (authors)

  14. Radiation dose rates from commercial PWR and BWR spent fuel elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Willingham, C.E.

    1981-10-01

    Data on measurements of gamma dose rates from commercial reactor spent fuel were collected, and documented calculated gamma dose rates were reviewed. As part of this study, the gamma dose rate from spent fuel was estimated, using computational techniques similar to previous investigations into this problem. Comparison of the measured and calculated dose rates provided a recommended dose rate in air versus distance curve for PWR spent fuel

  15. Layout of the primary circuit with its components for PWR and BWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meyer, P.J.

    1981-01-01

    The light water-moderated and cooled pressurized water reactors and boiling water reactors constitute the basis of economic utilization of nuclear energy all over the world. Pressurized water reactors up to capacities of 3,800 MWth are those most used for power generation. However, their potential capacities exceed 3,800 MWth, so that already in the near future PWR are conseivable which readily generate 1,500 to 2,000 MWe. The main problem for starting the next generation of PWRs are of safety measure and licensing questions. Interesting applications of the PWRs are nuclear district heating, generation of process steam of desalination plants, steam injection into the ground for oil production or chemical factories. A new generation of natural circulation boiling water reactors with a capacity of 200 to 400 MW will be used for development of small industrial areas or for countries without an integral grid system. The natural circulation boiling water reactor will be subject of a separate lecture. Due to the fact of the majority of the PWR all over the world this lecture will discuss mainly PWR design aspects. (orig./RW)

  16. Transient performance of flow in circuits of PWR type reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirdes, V.R.; Carajilescov, P.

    1988-09-01

    Generally, PWR's are designed with several primary loops, each one provided with a pump to circulate the coolant through the core. If one or more of these pumps fail, there would be a decrease in reactor flow rate which could cause coolant phase change in the core and components overheating. The present work establishes a simulation model for pump failure in PWR's and the SARDAN-FLOW computes code was developed, considering any combination of such failures. Based on the data of Angra I, several accident and operational transient conditions were simulated. (author) [pt

  17. Transient performance of flow in PWR reactor circuits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirdes, V.R.T.R.; Carajilescov, P.

    1988-12-01

    Generally, PWR's are designed with several primary loops, each one provided with a pump to circulate the coolant through the core. If one or more of these pumps fail, there would be a decrease in reactor flow rate which cause coolant phase change in the core and components overheating. The present work establishes a simulation model for pump failure in PWR's and the SARDAN-FLOW computes code was developed, considering any combination of such failures. Based on the data of Angra I, several accident and operational transient conditions were simulated. (author) [pt

  18. Experimental and numerical investigations of BWR fuel bundle inlet flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoashi, E; Morooka, S; Ishitori, T; Komita, H; Endo, T; Honda, H; Yamamoto, T; Kato, T; Kawamura, S

    2009-01-01

    We have been studying the mechanism of the flow pattern near the fuel bundle inlet of BWR using both flow visualization test and computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulation. In the visualization test, both single- and multi-bundle test sections were used. The former test section includes only a corner orifice facing two support beams and the latter simulates 16 bundles surrounded by four beams. An observation window is set on the side of the walls imitating the support beams upstream of the orifices in both test sections. In the CFD simulation, as well as the visualization test, the single-bundle model is composed of one bundle with a corner orifice and the multi-bundle model is a 1/4 cut of the test section that includes 4 bundles with the following four orifices: a corner orifice facing the corner of the two neighboring support beams, a center orifice at the opposite side from the corner orifice, and two side orifices. Twin-vortices were observed just upstream of the corner orifice in the multi-bundle test as well as the single-bundle test. A single-vortex and a vortex filament were observed at the side orifice inlet and no vortex was observed at the center orifice. These flow patterns were also predicted in the CFD simulation using Reynolds Stress Model as a turbulent model and the results were in good agreement with the test results mentioned above. (author)

  19. Potential for containment leak paths through electrical penetration assemblies under severe accident conditions. [PWR; BWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sebrell, W.

    1983-07-01

    The leakage behavior of containments beyond design conditions and knowledge of failure modes is required for evaluation of mitigation strategies for severe accidents, risk studies, emergency preparedness planning, and siting. These studies are directed towards assessing the risk and consequences of severe accidents. An accident sequence analysis conducted on a Boiling Water Reactor (BWR), Mark I (MK I), indicated very high temperatures in the dry-well region, which is the location of the majority of electrical penetration assemblies. Because of the high temperatures, it was postulated in the ORNL study that the sealants would fail and all the electrical penetration assemblies would leak before structural failure would occur. Since other containments had similar electrical penetration assemblies, it was concluded that all containments would experience the same type of failure. The results of this study, however, show that this conclusion does not hold for PWRs because in the worst accident sequence, the long time containment gases stabilize to 350/sup 0/F. BWRs, on the other hand, do experience high dry-well temperatures and have a higher potential for leakage.

  20. Effect of high burn-up and MOX fuel on reprocessing, vitrification and disposal of PWR and BWR spent fuels based on accurate burn-up calculation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshikawa, T.; Iwasaki, T.; Wada, K. [Tohoku Univ., Graduate School of Engineering, Dept. of Quantum Science and Energy Engineering, Sendai 980-8579 (Japan); Suyama, K. [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Shirakata-Shirane 2-4, Naka-gun, Ibaraki-ken 319-1195 (Japan)

    2006-07-01

    To examine the procedures of the reprocessing, the vitrification and the geologic disposal, precise burn-up calculation for high burn-up and MOX fuels has been performed for not only PWR but also BWR by using SWAT and SWAT2 codes which are the integrated bum-up calculation code systems combined with the bum-up calculation code, ORIGEN2, and the transport calculation code, SRAC (the collision probability method) or MVP (the continuous energy Monte Carlo method), respectively. The calculation results shows that all of the evaluated items (heat generation and concentrations of Mo and Pt) largely increase and those significantly effect to the current procedures of the vitrification and the geologic disposal. The calculation result by SWAT2 confirms that the bundle calculation is required for BWR to be discussed about those effects in details, especially for the MOX fuel. (authors)

  1. Generalized Thermohydraulics Module GENFLO for Combining With the PWR Core Melting Model, BWR Recriticality Neutronics Model and Fuel Performance Model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miettinen, Jaakko; Hamalainen, Anitta; Pekkarinen, Esko

    2002-01-01

    Thermal hydraulic simulation capability for accident conditions is needed at present in VTT in several programs. Traditional thermal hydraulic models are too heavy for simulation in the analysis tasks, where the main emphasis is the rapid neutron dynamics or the core melting. The GENFLO thermal hydraulic model has been developed at VTT for special applications in the combined codes. The basic field equations in GENFLO are for the phase mass, the mixture momentum and phase energy conservation equations. The phase separation is solved with the drift flux model. The basic variables to be solved are the pressure, void fraction, mixture velocity, gas enthalpy, liquid enthalpy, and concentration of non-condensable gas fractions. The validation of the thermohydraulic solution alone includes large break LOCA reflooding experiments and in specific for the severe accident conditions QUENCH tests. In the recriticality analysis the core neutronics is simulated with a two-dimensional transient neutronics code TWODIM. The recriticality with one rapid prompt peak is expected during a severe accident scenario, where the control rods have been melted and ECCS reflooding is started after the depressurization. The GENFLO module simulates the BWR thermohydraulics in this application. The core melting module has been developed for the real time operator training by using the APROS engineering simulators. The core heatup, oxidation, metal and fuel pellet relocation and corium pool formation into the lower plenum are calculated. In this application the GENFLO model simulates the PWR vessel thermohydraulics. In the fuel performance analysis the fuel rod transient behavior is simulated with the FRAPTRAN code. GENFLO simulates the subchannel around a single fuel rod and delivers the heat transfer on the cladding surface for the FRAPTRAN. The transient boundary conditions for the subchannel are transmitted from the system code for operational transient, loss of coolant accidents and

  2. The development of flow test technology for PWR fuel assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chung, Moon Ki; Cha, Chong Hee; Chung, Chang Hwan; Chun, Se Young; Song, Chul Hwa; Chung, Heung Joon; Won, Soon Yeun; Cho, Yeong Rho; Kim, Bok Deuk

    1988-05-01

    KAERI has an extensive program to develope PWR fuel assembly. In relation to the program, development of flow test technology is needed to evaluate the thermal hydraulic compactibility and mechanical integrity of domestically fabricated nuclear fuels. A high-pressure and high-temperature flow test facility was designed to test domestically fabricated fuel assembly. The test section of the facility has capacity of a 6x6 full length PWR fuel assembly. A flow test rig was designed and installed at Cold Test Loop to carry out model experiments with 5x5 rod assembly under atmosphere pressure to get information about the characteristics of pressure loss of spacer grids and velocity distribution in the subchannels. LDV measuring technology was established using TSI's Laser Dopper Velocimeter 9100-3 System

  3. BWR [boiling-water reactor] and PWR [pressurized-water reactor] off-normal event descriptions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-11-01

    This document chronicles a total of 87 reactor event descriptions for use by operator licensing examiners in the construction of simulator scenarios. Events are organized into four categories: (1) boiling-water reactor abnormal events; (2) boiling-water reactor emergency events; (3) pressurized-water reactor abnormal events; and (4) pressurized-water reactor emergency events. Each event described includes a cover sheet and a progression of operator actions flow chart. The cover sheet contains the following general information: initial plant state, sequence initiator, important plant parameters, major plant systems affected, tolerance ranges, final plant state, and competencies tested. The progression of operator actions flow chart depicts, in a flow chart manner, the representative sequence(s) of expected immediate and subsequent candidate actions, including communications, that can be observed during the event. These descriptions are intended to provide examiners with a reliable, performance-based source of information from which to design simulator scenarios that will provide a valid test of the candidates' ability to safely and competently perform all licensed duties and responsibilities

  4. Interface tracking simulations of bubbly flows in PWR relevant geometries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fang, Jun, E-mail: jfang3@ncsu.edu [Department of Nuclear Engineering, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 27695 (United States); Rasquin, Michel, E-mail: michel.rasquin@colorado.edu [Aerospace Engineering Department, University of Colorado, Boulder, CO 80309 (United States); Bolotnov, Igor A., E-mail: igor_bolotnov@ncsu.edu [Department of Nuclear Engineering, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 27695 (United States)

    2017-02-15

    Highlights: • Simulations were performed for turbulent bubbly flows in PWR subchannel geometry. • Liquid turbulence is fully resolved by direct numerical simulation approach. • Bubble behavior is captured using level-set interface tracking method. • Time-averaged single- and two-phase turbulent flow statistical quantities are obtained. - Abstract: The advances in high performance computing (HPC) have allowed direct numerical simulation (DNS) approach coupled with interface tracking methods (ITM) to perform high fidelity simulations of turbulent bubbly flows in various complex geometries. In this work, we have chosen the geometry of the pressurized water reactor (PWR) core subchannel to perform a set of interface tracking simulations (ITS) with fully resolved liquid turbulence. The presented research utilizes a massively parallel finite-element based code, PHASTA, for the subchannel geometry simulations of bubbly flow turbulence. The main objective for this research is to demonstrate the ITS capabilities in gaining new insight into bubble/turbulence interactions and assisting the development of improved closure laws for multiphase computational fluid dynamics (M-CFD). Both single- and two-phase turbulent flows were studied within a single PWR subchannel. The analysis of numerical results includes the mean gas and liquid velocity profiles, void fraction distribution and turbulent kinetic energy profiles. Two sets of flow rates and bubble sizes were used in the simulations. The chosen flow rates corresponded to the Reynolds numbers of 29,079 and 80,775 based on channel hydraulic diameter (D{sub h}) and mean velocity. The finite element unstructured grids utilized for these simulations include 53.8 million and 1.11 billion elements, respectively. This has allowed to fully resolve all the turbulence scales and the deformable interfaces of individual bubbles. For the two-phase flow simulations, a 1% bubble volume fraction was used which resulted in 17 bubbles in

  5. Upper internals of PWR with coolant flow separator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chevereau, G.; Heuze, A.

    1989-01-01

    The upper internals for a PWR has a collecting volume for the coolant merging from the core and an apparatus for separating the flow of coolant. This apparatus has a guide for the control rods, a lower plate perforated to allow the coolant through from the core, an upper plate also perforated to allow the coolant through to the collecting volume and a peripheral binding ring joining the two plates. Each guide comprises an envelope without holes and joined perceptibly tight to the plates [fr

  6. Computational fluid dynamics modeling of two-phase flow in a BWR fuel assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andrey Ioilev; Maskhud Samigulin; Vasily Ustinenko; Simon Lo; Adrian Tentner

    2005-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: The goal of this project is to develop an advanced Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) computer code (CFD-BWR) that allows the detailed analysis of the two-phase flow and heat transfer phenomena in a Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) fuel bundle under various operating conditions. This code will include more fundamental physical models than the current generation of sub-channel codes and advanced numerical algorithms for improved computational accuracy, robustness, and speed. It is highly desirable to understand the detailed two-phase flow phenomena inside a BWR fuel bundle. These phenomena include coolant phase changes and multiple flow regimes which directly influence the coolant interaction with fuel assembly and, ultimately, the reactor performance. Traditionally, the best analysis tools for the analysis of two-phase flow phenomena inside the BWR fuel assembly have been the sub-channel codes. However, the resolution of these codes is still too coarse for analyzing the detailed intra-assembly flow patterns, such as flow around a spacer element. Recent progress in Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD), coupled with the rapidly increasing computational power of massively parallel computers, shows promising potential for the fine-mesh, detailed simulation of fuel assembly two-phase flow phenomena. However, the phenomenological models available in the commercial CFD programs are not as advanced as those currently being used in the sub-channel codes used in the nuclear industry. In particular, there are no models currently available which are able to reliably predict the nature of the flow regimes, and use the appropriate sub-models for those flow regimes. The CFD-BWR code is being developed as a customized module built on the foundation of the commercial CFD Code STAR-CD which provides general two-phase flow modeling capabilities. The paper describes the model development strategy which has been adopted by the development team for the

  7. Signal analysis of acoustic and flow-induced vibrations of BWR main steam line

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Espinosa-Paredes, G., E-mail: gepe@xanum.uam.mx [División de Ciencias Básicas e Ingeniería, Universidad Autónoma Metropolitana-Iztapalapa, México, D.F. 09340 (Mexico); Prieto-Guerrero, A. [División de Ciencias Básicas e Ingeniería, Universidad Autónoma Metropolitana-Iztapalapa, México, D.F. 09340 (Mexico); Núñez-Carrera, A. [Comisión Nacional de Seguridad Nuclear y Salvaguardias, Doctor Barragán 779, Col. Narvarte, México, D.F. 03020 (Mexico); Vázquez-Rodríguez, A. [División de Ciencias Básicas e Ingeniería, Universidad Autónoma Metropolitana-Iztapalapa, México, D.F. 09340 (Mexico); Centeno-Pérez, J. [Instituto Politécnico Nacional, Escuela Superior de Física y Matemáticas Unidad Profesional “Adolfo López Mateos”, Av. IPN, s/n, México, D.F. 07738 (Mexico); Espinosa-Martínez, E.-G. [Departamento de Sistemas Energéticos, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, México, D.F. 04510 (Mexico); and others

    2016-05-15

    Highlights: • Acoustic and flow-induced vibrations of BWR are analyzed. • BWR performance after extended power uprate is considered. • Effect of acoustic side branches (ASB) is analyzed. • The ASB represents a reduction in the acoustic loads to the steam dryer. • Methodology developed for simultaneous analyzing the signals in the MSL. - Abstract: The aim of this work is the signal analysis of acoustic waves due to phenomenon known as singing in Safety Relief Valves (SRV) of the main steam lines (MSL) in a typical BWR5. The acoustic resonance in SRV standpipes and fluctuating pressure is propagated from SRV to the dryer through the MSL. The signals are analyzed with a novel method based on the Multivariate Empirical Mode Decomposition (M-EMD). The M-EMD algorithm has the potential to find common oscillatory modes (IMF) within multivariate data. Based on this fact, we implement the M-EMD technique to find the oscillatory mode in BWR considering the measurements obtained collected by the strain gauges located around the MSL. These IMF, analyzed simultaneously in time, allow obtaining an estimation of the effects of the multiple-SRV in the MSL. Two scenarios are analyzed: the first is the signal obtained before the installation of the acoustic dampers (ASB), and the second, the signal obtained after installation. The results show the effectiveness of the ASB to damp the strong resonances when the steam flow increases, which represents an important reduction in the acoustic loads to the steam dryer.

  8. Signal analysis of acoustic and flow-induced vibrations of BWR main steam line

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Espinosa-Paredes, G.; Prieto-Guerrero, A.; Núñez-Carrera, A.; Vázquez-Rodríguez, A.; Centeno-Pérez, J.; Espinosa-Martínez, E.-G.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Acoustic and flow-induced vibrations of BWR are analyzed. • BWR performance after extended power uprate is considered. • Effect of acoustic side branches (ASB) is analyzed. • The ASB represents a reduction in the acoustic loads to the steam dryer. • Methodology developed for simultaneous analyzing the signals in the MSL. - Abstract: The aim of this work is the signal analysis of acoustic waves due to phenomenon known as singing in Safety Relief Valves (SRV) of the main steam lines (MSL) in a typical BWR5. The acoustic resonance in SRV standpipes and fluctuating pressure is propagated from SRV to the dryer through the MSL. The signals are analyzed with a novel method based on the Multivariate Empirical Mode Decomposition (M-EMD). The M-EMD algorithm has the potential to find common oscillatory modes (IMF) within multivariate data. Based on this fact, we implement the M-EMD technique to find the oscillatory mode in BWR considering the measurements obtained collected by the strain gauges located around the MSL. These IMF, analyzed simultaneously in time, allow obtaining an estimation of the effects of the multiple-SRV in the MSL. Two scenarios are analyzed: the first is the signal obtained before the installation of the acoustic dampers (ASB), and the second, the signal obtained after installation. The results show the effectiveness of the ASB to damp the strong resonances when the steam flow increases, which represents an important reduction in the acoustic loads to the steam dryer.

  9. Effects of cold working ratio and stress intensity factor on intergranular stress corrosion cracking susceptibility of non-sensitized austenitic stainless steels in simulated BWR and PWR primary water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yaguchi, Seiji; Yonezawa, Toshio

    2012-01-01

    To evaluate the effects of cold working ratio, stress intensity factor and water chemistry on an IGSCC susceptibility of non-sensitized austenitic stainless steel, constant displacement DCB specimens were applied to SCC tests in simulated BWR and PWR primary water for the three types of austenitic stainless steels, Types 316L, 347 and 321. IGSCC was observed on the test specimens in simulated BWR and PWR primary water. The observed IGSCC was categorized into the following two types. The one is that the IGSCC observed on the same plane of the pre-fatigue crack plane, and the other is that the IGSCC observed on a plane perpendicular to the pre-fatigue crack plane. The later IGSCC fractured plane is parallel to the rolling plane of a cold rolled material. Two types of IGSCC fractured planes were changed according to the combination of the testing conditions (cold working ratio, stress intensity factor and simulated water). It seems to suggest that the most susceptible plane due to fabrication process of materials might play a significant role of IGSCC for non-sensitized cold worked austenitic stainless steels, especially, in simulated PWR primary water. Based upon evaluating on the reference crack growth rate (R-CGR) of the test specimens, the R-CGR seems to be mainly affected by cold working ratio. In case of simulated PWR primary water, it seems that the effect of metallurgical aspects dominates IGSCC susceptibility. (author)

  10. Prediction of droplet deposition around BWR fuel spacer by FEM flow analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamamoto, Yasushi; Morooka, Shinichi

    1997-01-01

    The critical power of the BWR fuel assembly has been remarkably increased. That increase mainly depends on the improvement of the spacer which keeps fixed gaps between fuel rods. So far, these improvements have been carried out on the basis of what developers consider to be appropriate and the results of mockup tests of the BWR fuel assembly. However, continued reliance on these approaches for the development of a higher performance fuel assembly will prove time-consuming and costly. Therefore, it is hoped that the spacer effects for the critical power can be investigated by computer simulation, and it is significantly important to develop the critical power prediction method. Direct calculation of the two-phase flow in a BWR fuel channel s still difficult. Accordingly, a new method for predicting the critical power was proposed. Our method consists of CFD (computer fluid dynamics) code based on the single-phase flow analysis method and the subchannel analysis code. To verify our method, the critical power predictions for various spacer geometries were performed. The predicted results of the critical power were compared with the experimental data. The result of the comparison showed a good agreement and the applicability of our method for various spacer geometries. (author)

  11. Equipment for nondestructive testing of the PWR and BWR spept fUel elements and assemblies in the NPP storage pools

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gorskij, V.V.

    1983-01-01

    Design features are considered of units for nondestructive testing of spent fUel elements and fuel assemblies (FA) in the storage pools of NPP with the PWR and BWR reactors. Units for remote viewing control of fuel element cans and FA, for direct measurements of their geometrical dimensions, for FA leak-testing, fuel element can nondestructive testing and gamma scanning, for measuring gaseous fission product pressure and fuel element free volume are described along with units for complex checking of fuel element and FA parameters. The units for nondestructive testing of spent fuel elements and EA are shown to differ both in their designs and a number of checked parameters of fuel elements and FA. The remote viewing and those for measuring the basic FA parameters are most generally employed. Units for complex testing of multiple fuel element parameters, designed in the last few years, are intended for operation with FA disassembled partially or fully and are characteristic of a high degree of computer measuring automation both for the process control and data processing

  12. Intermediate flow mixing nonsupport grid for BWR fuel assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taleyarkhan, R.P.

    1987-01-01

    An intermediate flow mixing nonsupport grid is described for use in a nuclear reactor fuel assembly containing an array of elongated fuel rods. The grid comprises: (a) interleaved inner straps arranged in an egg-crate configuration to define inner cell openings for receiving respective ones of the fuel rods. The inner straps have outer terminal end portions; (b) an outer peripheral strap attached to the respective terminal end portions of the inner straps to define perimeter cell openings for receiving other ones of the fuel rods. The inner straps and outer strap together have opposite upstream and downstream sides; (c) a first group of mixing vanes disposed at the downstream side and being attached on portions of the outer strap and on respective portions of the inner straps. Together with the outer strap portions, they define the perimeter cell openings. Each of the mixing vanes of the first group extend generally in a downstream direction and inwardly toward the perimeter cell openings for deflecting coolant flowing; and (d) a second group of mixing vanes disposed at the downstream side and being attached on other portions of the inner straps. Together with the respective portions, they define the inner cell openings. Each of the mixing vanes of the second group extend generally in a downstream direction and inwardly toward the inner cell openings for deflecting coolant flowing therethrough; (e) the mixing vanes of the second group are substantially smaller in size than the mixing vanes of the first group so as to generate substantially less turbulence in the portions of the coolant flowing through the inner cell openings than in the portions of the coolant flowing through the perimeter cell openings

  13. Non-local two phase flow momentum transport in S BWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Espinosa P, G.; Salinas M, L.; Vazquez R, A.

    2015-09-01

    The non-local momentum transport equations derived in this work contain new terms related with non-local transport effects due to accumulation, convection, diffusion and transport properties for two-phase flow. For instance, they can be applied in the boundary between a two-phase flow and a solid phase, or in the boundary of the transition region of two-phase flows where the local volume averaging equations fail. The S BWR was considered to study the non-local effects on the two-phase flow thermal-hydraulic core performance in steady-state, and the results were compared with the classical local averaging volume conservation equations. (Author)

  14. Non-local two phase flow momentum transport in S BWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Espinosa P, G.; Salinas M, L.; Vazquez R, A., E-mail: gepe@xanum.uam.mx [Universidad Autonoma Metropolitana, Unidad Iztapalapa, Area de Ingenieria en Recursos Energeticos, Apdo. Postal 55-535, 09340 Ciudad de Mexico (Mexico)

    2015-09-15

    The non-local momentum transport equations derived in this work contain new terms related with non-local transport effects due to accumulation, convection, diffusion and transport properties for two-phase flow. For instance, they can be applied in the boundary between a two-phase flow and a solid phase, or in the boundary of the transition region of two-phase flows where the local volume averaging equations fail. The S BWR was considered to study the non-local effects on the two-phase flow thermal-hydraulic core performance in steady-state, and the results were compared with the classical local averaging volume conservation equations. (Author)

  15. Kohonen mapping of the crack growth under fatigue loading conditions of stainless steels in BWR environments and of nickel alloys in PWR environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Urquidi-Macdonald, Mirna

    2008-01-01

    In this study, crack growth rate data under fatigue loading conditions generated by Argonne National Laboratories and published in 2006 were analyzed [O.K. Chopra, B. Alexandreanu, E.E. Gruber, R.S. Daum, W.J. Shack, Argonne National Laboratory, NUREG CR 6891-series ANL 04/20, Crack Growth Rates of Austenitic Stainless Steel Weld Heat Affected Zone in BWR Environments, January, 2006; B. Alexandreanu, O.K. Chopra, H.M. Chung, E.E. Gruber, W.K. Soppet, R.W. Strain, W.J. Shack, Environmentally Assisted Cracking in Light Water Reactors, vol. 34 in the NUREG/CR-4667 series annual report of Argonne National Laboratory program studies for Calendar (Annual Report 2003). Manuscript Completed: May 2005, Date Published: May 2006], and reported by DoE [B. Alexandreanu, O.K. Chopra, W.J. Shack, S. Crane, H.J. Gonzalez, NRC, Crack Growth Rates and Metallographic Examinations of Alloy 600 and Alloy 82/182 from Field Components and Laboratory Materials Tested in PWR Environments, NUREG/CR-6964, May 2008]. The data collected were measured on austenitic stainless steels in BWR (boiling water reactor) environments and on nickel alloys in PWR (pressurized water reactor) environments. The data collected contained information on material composition, temperature, conductivity of the environment, oxygen concentration, irradiated sample information, weld information, electrochemical potential, load ratio, rise time, hydrogen concentration, hold time, down time, maximum stress intensity factor (K max ), stress intensity range (ΔK max ), crack length, and crack growth rates (CGR). Each position on that Kohonen map is called a cell. A Kohonen map clusters vectors of information by 'similarities.' Vectors of information were formed using the metal composition, followed by the environmental conditions used in each experiments, and finally followed by the crack growth rate (CGR) measured when a sample of pre-cracked metal is set in an environment and the sample is cyclically loaded

  16. Recycling flow rate control device in BWR type reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujiwara, Tadashi; Koda, Yasushi

    1988-01-01

    Purpose: To reduce the recycling pump speed if the pressure variation width and the variation ratio in the nuclear reactor exceed predetermined values, to thereby avoid the shutdown of the plant. Constitution: There has been proposed a method of monitoring the neutron flux increase thereby avoiding unnecessary plant shutdown, but it involves a problems of reactor scram depending on the state of the plant and the set values. In view of the above, in the plant using internal pumps put under the thyristor control and having high response to recycling flow rate, the reactor pressure is monitored and the speed of the internal pump is rapidly reduced when the pressure variation width and variation ratio exceed predetermined values to reduce the reactor power and avoid the plant shutdown. This can reduce the possibility of unnecessary power reduction due to neutron flux noises or the possibility of plant shutdown under low power conditions. Further, since the reactor operation can be continued without stopping the recycling pump, the operation upon recovery can be made rapid. (Horiuchi, T.)

  17. RELAP4/MOD5: a computer program for transient thermal-hydraulic analysis of nuclear reactors and related systems. User's manual. Volume I. RELAP4/MOD5 description. [PWR and BWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1976-09-01

    RELAP4 is a computer program written in FORTRAN IV for the digital computer analysis of nuclear reactors and related systems. It is primarily applied in the study of system transient response to postulated perturbations such as coolant loop rupture, circulation pump failure, power excursions, etc. The program was written to be used for water-cooled (PWR and BWR) reactors and can be used for scale models such as LOFT and SEMISCALE. Additional versatility extends its usefulness to related applications, such as ice condenser and containment subcompartment analysis. Specific options are available for reflood (FLOOD) analysis and for the NRC Evaluation Model.

  18. Coolant flow monitoring in a PWR core using noise analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kostic, Lj.

    1992-01-01

    Experimental investigations of the neutron and temperature noise field have been performed in the 1350 MW PWR nuclear power plant. Evaluation in the low frequency range, where both feedback effects and different thermohydraulics phenomena are dominant, succeeded in measuring the coolant velocity. This is important for determination and localization of essential deviations and possible anomalies. (author)

  19. Development of a BWR core burn-up calculation code COREBN-BWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morimoto, Yuichi; Okumura, Keisuke

    1992-05-01

    In order to evaluate core performances of BWR type reactors, the three dimensional core burnup calculation code COREBN-BWR and the fuel management code HIST-BWR have been developed. In analyses of BWR type reactors, thermal hydraulics calculations must be coupled with neutronics calculations to evaluate core performances, because steam void distribution changes according to the change of the power distribution. By installing new functions as follows to the three dimensional core burnup code COREBN2 developed in JAERI for PWR type reactor analyses, the code system becomes to be applicable to burnup analyses of BWR type reactors. (1) Macroscopic cross section calculation function taking into account of coolant void distribution. (2) Thermal hydraulics calculation function to evaluate core flow split, coolant void distribution and thermal margin. (3) Burnup calculation function under the Haling strategy. (4) Fuel management function to incorporate the thermal hydraulics information. This report consists of the general description, calculational models, input data requirements and their explanations, detailed information on usage and sample input. (author)

  20. Dissolution experiments of commercial PWR (52 MWd/kgU) and BWR (53 MWd/kgU) spent nuclear fuel cladded segments in bicarbonate water under oxidizing conditions. Experimental determination of matrix and instant release fraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Robles, E.; Serrano-Purroy, D.; Sureda, R.; Casas, I.; de Pablo, J.

    2015-10-01

    The denominated instant release fraction (IRF) is considered in performance assessment (PA) exercises to govern the dose that could arise from the repository. A conservative definition of IRF comprises the total inventory of radionuclides located in the gap, fractures, and the grain boundaries and, if present, in the high burn-up structure (HBS). The values calculated from this theoretical approach correspond to an upper limit that likely does not correspond to what it will be expected to be instantaneously released in the real system. Trying to ascertain this IRF from an experimental point of view, static leaching experiments have been carried out with two commercial UO2 spent nuclear fuels (SNF): one from a pressurized water reactor (PWR), labelled PWR, with an average burn-up (BU) of 52 MWd/kgU and fission gas release (FGR) of 23.1%, and one from a boiling water reactor (BWR), labelled BWR, with an average BU of and 53 MWd/kgU and FGR of 3.9%. One sample of each SNF, consisting of fuel and cladding, has been leached in bicarbonate water during one year under oxidizing conditions at room temperature (25 ± 5)°C. The behaviour of the concentration measured in solution can be divided in two according to the release rate. All radionuclides presented an initial release rate that after some days levels down to a slower second one, which remains constant until the end of the experiment. Cumulative fraction of inventory in aqueous phase (FIAPc) values has been calculated. Results show faster release in the case of the PWR SNF. In both cases Np, Pu, Am, Cm, Y, Tc, La and Nd dissolve congruently with U, while dissolution of Zr, Ru and Rh is slower. Rb, Sr, Cs and Mo, dissolve faster than U. The IRF of Cs at 10 and 200 days has been calculated, being (3.10 ± 0.62) and (3.66 ± 0.73) for PWR fuel, and (0.35 ± 0.07) and (0.51 ± 0.10) for BWR fuel.

  1. Two-phase flow phenomena in broken recirculation line of BWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kato, Masami; Arai, Kenji; Narabayashi, Tadashi; Amano, Osamu.

    1986-01-01

    When a primary recirculation line of BWR is ruptured, a primary recirculation pump may be subjected to very high velocity two-phase flow and its speed may be accelerated by this flow. It is important for safety evaluation to estimate the pump behavior during blowdown. There are two problems involved in analyzing this behavior. One problem concerns the pump characteristics under two-phase flow. The other involves the two-phase conditions at the pump inlet. If the rupture occurs at a suction side of the pump, choking is considered to occur at a broken jet pump nozzle. Then, a void fraction becomes larger downstream from the jet pump nozzle and volumetric flow through the pump will be very high. However, there is little experimental data available on two-phase flow downstream from a choking plane. Blowdown tests were performed using a simulated broken recirculation line and measured data were analyzed by TRAC-PlA. Analytical results agreed with measured data. (author)

  2. Measurement of two-phase flow variables in a BWR by analysis of in-core neutron detector noise signals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stekelenburg, A.J.C.; Hagen, T.H.J.J. van der

    1996-01-01

    In this paper, the state of the art of the measurement of two-phase flow variables in a boiling water reactor (BWR) by analysis of in-core neutron detector noise signals is given. It is concluded that the neutronic processes involved in neutron noise are quite well understood, but that little is known about the density fluctuations in two-phase flow which are the main cause of the neutron noise. For this reason, the neutron noise measurements, like the well known two-detector velocity measurements, are still difficult to interpret. By analyzing neutron noise measurements in a natural circulation cooled BWR, it is illustrated that, once a theory on the density fluctuations is developed, two-phase flow can be monitored with a single in-core detector. (author). 70 refs, 4 figs

  3. Flow with boiling in four-cusp channels simulating damaged core in PWR type reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Esteves, M.M.

    1985-01-01

    The study of subcooled nucleate flow boiling in non-circular channels is of great importance to engineering applications in particular to Nuclear Engineering. In the present work, an experimental apparatus, consisting basically of a refrigeration system, running on refrigerant-12, has been developed. Preliminary tests were made with a circular tube. The main objective has been to analyse subcooled flow boiling in four-cusp channels simulating the flow conditions in a PWR core degraded by accident. Correlations were developed for the forced convection film coefficient for both single-phase and subcooled flow boiling. The incipience of boiling in such geometry has also been studied. (author) [pt

  4. Method and apparatus for monitoring two-phase flow. [PWR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheppard, J.D.; Tong, L.S.

    1975-12-19

    A method and apparatus for monitoring two-phase flow is provided that is particularly related to the monitoring of transient two-phase (liquid-vapor) flow rates such as may occur during a pressurized water reactor core blow-down. The present invention essentially comprises the use of flanged wire screens or similar devices, such as perforated plates, to produce certain desirable effects in the flow regime for monitoring purposes. One desirable effect is a measurable and reproducible pressure drop across the screen. The pressure drop can be characterized for various known flow rates and then used to monitor nonhomogeneous flow regimes. Another useful effect of the use of screens or plates in nonhomogeneous flow is that such apparatus tends to create a uniformly dispersed flow regime in the immediate downstream vicinity. This is a desirable effect because it usually increases the accuracy of flow rate measurements determined by conventional methods.

  5. Flow-induced vibration characteristics of the BWR/5-201 jet pump

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    LaCroix, L.V.

    1982-09-01

    A General Electric boiling water reactor BWR/5-201 jet pump was tested for flow-induced vibration (FIV) characteristics in the Large Steam Water Test Facility at Moss Landing, CA, during the period June-July 1978. High level periodic FIV were observed at reactor operating conditions (1027 psia, 532 0 F and prototypical flow rates) for the specific single jet pump assembly tested. High level FIV of similar amplitude and character have been shown capable of damaging jet pump components and associated support hardware if allowed to continue unchecked. High level FIV were effectively suppressed in two special cases tested: (1) lateral load (>500 lb) at the mixer to diffuser slip joint; and (2) a labyrinth seal (5 small, circumferential grooves) on the mixer at the slip joint. Stability criteria for the particular jet pump tested were developed from test data. A cause-effect relationship between the dynamic pressure within the slip joint and the jet pump vibration was established

  6. Evaluation of PWR and BWR assembly benchmark calculations. Status report of EPRI computational benchmark results, performed in the framework of the Netherlands` PINK programme (Joint project of ECN, IRI, KEMA and GKN)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gruppelaar, H. [Netherlands Energy Research Foundation (ECN), Petten (Netherlands); Klippel, H.T. [Netherlands Energy Research Foundation (ECN), Petten (Netherlands); Kloosterman, J.L. [Netherlands Energy Research Foundation (ECN), Petten (Netherlands); Hoogenboom, J.E. [Technische Univ. Delft (Netherlands). Interfacultair Reactor Instituut; Leege, P.F.A. de [Technische Univ. Delft (Netherlands). Interfacultair Reactor Instituut; Verhagen, F.C.M. [Keuring van Electrotechnische Materialen NV, Arnhem (Netherlands); Bruggink, J.C. [Gemeenschappelijke Kernenergiecentrale Nederland N.V., Dodewaard (Netherlands)

    1993-11-01

    Benchmark results of the Dutch PINK working group on calculational benchmarks on single pin cell and multipin assemblies as defined by EPRI are presented and evaluated. First a short update of methods used by the various institutes involved is given as well as an update of the status with respect to previous performed pin-cell calculations. Problems detected in previous pin-cell calculations are inspected more closely. Detailed discussion of results of multipin assembly calculations is given. The assembly consists of 9 pins in a multicell square lattice in which the central pin is filled differently, i.e. a Gd pin for the BWR assembly and a control rod/guide tube for the PWR assembly. The results for pin cells showed a rather good overall agreement between the four participants although BWR pins with high void fraction turned out to be difficult to calculate. With respect to burnup calculations good overall agreement for the reactivity swing was obtained, provided that a fine time grid is used. (orig.)

  7. Evaluation of PWR and BWR assembly benchmark calculations. Status report of EPRI computational benchmark results, performed in the framework of the Netherlands' PINK programme (Joint project of ECN, IRI, KEMA and GKN)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gruppelaar, H.; Klippel, H.T.; Kloosterman, J.L.; Hoogenboom, J.E.; Bruggink, J.C.

    1993-11-01

    Benchmark results of the Dutch PINK working group on calculational benchmarks on single pin cell and multipin assemblies as defined by EPRI are presented and evaluated. First a short update of methods used by the various institutes involved is given as well as an update of the status with respect to previous performed pin-cell calculations. Problems detected in previous pin-cell calculations are inspected more closely. Detailed discussion of results of multipin assembly calculations is given. The assembly consists of 9 pins in a multicell square lattice in which the central pin is filled differently, i.e. a Gd pin for the BWR assembly and a control rod/guide tube for the PWR assembly. The results for pin cells showed a rather good overall agreement between the four participants although BWR pins with high void fraction turned out to be difficult to calculate. With respect to burnup calculations good overall agreement for the reactivity swing was obtained, provided that a fine time grid is used. (orig.)

  8. Computational fluid dynamics modeling of two-phase flow in a BWR fuel assembly. Final CRADA Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tentner, A.

    2009-01-01

    A direct numerical simulation capability for two-phase flows with heat transfer in complex geometries can considerably reduce the hardware development cycle, facilitate the optimization and reduce the costs of testing of various industrial facilities, such as nuclear power plants, steam generators, steam condensers, liquid cooling systems, heat exchangers, distillers, and boilers. Specifically, the phenomena occurring in a two-phase coolant flow in a BWR (Boiling Water Reactor) fuel assembly include coolant phase changes and multiple flow regimes which directly influence the coolant interaction with fuel assembly and, ultimately, the reactor performance. Traditionally, the best analysis tools for this purpose of two-phase flow phenomena inside the BWR fuel assembly have been the sub-channel codes. However, the resolution of these codes is too coarse for analyzing the detailed intra-assembly flow patterns, such as flow around a spacer element. Advanced CFD (Computational Fluid Dynamics) codes provide a potential for detailed 3D simulations of coolant flow inside a fuel assembly, including flow around a spacer element using more fundamental physical models of flow regimes and phase interactions than sub-channel codes. Such models can extend the code applicability to a wider range of situations, which is highly important for increasing the efficiency and to prevent accidents.

  9. Measurement of flow rate in the third loop of PWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gao Shufan.

    1986-01-01

    The range of flow rate was 14000-50000 m 3 /h. The diameter of main tube was 2.6 m. A special made pitot set was placed on the main tube in order to accurately measure the flow rate. A cross slideway and a guide devicc were used to prevent the pitot vibration. Method of equal annular area was used in the measurement. The error was less than 4.2%. A pitot cylinder flowmeter was set also on the main tube to supervise the total flow rate of the third loop

  10. Development of a methodology of analysis of instabilities in BWR reactors; Desarrollo de una metodologia de analisis de inestabilidades en reactores PWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia-Fenoll, M.; Abarca, A.; Barrachina, T.; Miro, R.; Verdu, G.

    2012-07-01

    This paper presents a methodology of analysis of the reactors instabilities of BWR type. This methodology covers of modal analysis of the point operation techniques of signal analysis and simulation of transients, through 3D Coupled RELAP5/PARCSv2.7 code.

  11. Operation of pumps in two-phase steam-water flow. [PWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grison, P; Lauro, J F [Electricite de France, 78 - Chatou

    1978-01-01

    Determining the two-phase flow (critical or not) through a pump is an esential element for a complete description of loss of coolant accident in a PWR reactor. This article descibes the theoretical and experimental research being done on this subject in France. The model of the pump is first described and its behaviour is examined in different possible cases, particularly that of critical flow. The analysis of the behaviour of the pump is then used to define the experimental conditions for the tests. Two test loops, EVA and EPOPEE, were built. The experimental results are then compared with the theoretical forecasts.

  12. ASCOT-1, Thermohydraulics of Axisymmetric PWR Core with Homogeneous Flow During LOCA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-01-01

    1 - Nature of the physical problem solved: ASCOT-1 is used to analyze the thermo-hydraulic behaviour in a PWR core during a loss-of-coolant accident. 2 - Method of solution: The core is assumed to be axisymmetric two-dimensional and the conservation laws are solved by the method of characteristics. For the temperature response of fuel in the annular regions into which the core is divided, the heat conduction equations are solved by an explicit method with averaged flow conditions. 3 - Restrictions on the complexity of the problem: Axisymmetric two-dimensional homogeneous flows

  13. VOF Simulations of Countercurrent Gas-Liquid Flow in a PWR Hot Leg

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michio Murase

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available In order to evaluate flow patterns and CCFL (countercurrent flow limitation characteristics in a PWR hot leg under reflux condensation, numerical simulations have been done using a two-fluid model and a VOF (volume of fluid method implemented in the CFD software, FLUENT6.3.26. The two-fluid model gave good agreement with CCFL data under low pressure conditions but did not give good results under high pressure steam-water conditions. On the other hand, the VOF method gave good agreement with CCFL data for tests with a rectangular channel but did not give good results for calculations in a circular channel. Therefore, in this paper, the computational grid and schemes were improved in the VOF method, numerical simulations were done for steam-water flows at 1.5 MPa under PWR full-scale conditions with the diameter of 0.75 m, and the calculated results were compared with the UPTF data at 1.5 MPa. As a result, the calculated flow pattern was found to be similar to the flow pattern observed in small-scale air-water tests, and the calculated CCFL characteristics agreed well with the UPTF data at 1.5 MPa except in the region of a large steam volumetric flux.

  14. Evaluations of the CCFL and critical flow models in TRACE for PWR LBLOCA analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Jung-Hua; Lin, Hao Tzu [National Tsing Hua Univ., HsinChu, Taiwan (China). Dept. of Engineering and System Science; Wang, Jong-Rong [Atomic Energy Council, Taoyuan County, Taiwan (China). Inst. of Nuclear Energy Research; Shih, Chunkuan [National Tsing Hua Univ., HsinChu, Taiwan (China). Inst. of Nuclear Engineering and Science

    2012-12-15

    This study aims to develop the Maanshan Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) analysis model by using the TRACE (TRAC/RELAP Advanced Computational Engine) code. By analyzing the Large Break Loss of Coolant Accident (LBLOCA) sequence, the results are compared with the Maanshan Final Safety Analysis Report (FSAR) data. The critical flow and Counter Current Flow Limitation (CCFL) play an important role in the overall performance of TRACE LBLOCA prediction. Therefore, the sensitivity study on the discharge coefficients of critical flow model and CCFL modeling among different regions are also discussed. The current conclusions show that modeling CCFL in downcomer has more significant impact on the peak cladding temperature than modeling CCFL in hot-legs does. No CCFL phenomena occurred in the pressurizer surge line. The best value for the multipliers of critical flow model would be 0.5 and the TRACE could consistently predict the break flow rate in the LBLOCA analysis as shown in FSAR. (orig.)

  15. Flow induced vibrations in a PWR piping system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seligmann, D.; Guillou, J.

    1995-11-01

    During a recurring bench test of an operating system, high amplitude vibrations have been observed on a safety piping system of a nuclear power plant. Due to the source of the pumps, these vibrations lead to wear damage and it is therefore necessary to estimate the life time of the piping system. This paper describes the methodology used to study the dynamic behaviour and to analyze the damage of a piping system submitted to internal flow. Starting from an experimental modal analysis of the piping system when not i service, we analyse the main parameters of the mechanical behaviour. Following this analysis, we obtain a mechanical model fitting the first experimental modes. On this basis, we build a vibro-acoustical model. This model takes into account the influence of the acoustical pipe length, both above and below the mechanical part, the modelling of acoustical components, the speed of sound. We did not experimentally characterize the pumps. Therefore, we use a numerical model in order to simulate the behaviour of the pumps. This model is based on the theory of the transfer matrix and takes into account the geometric and the hydraulic characteristics of the pump.The modelling of both sources (suction and discharge) connected to the pump is formed by contributions from a source corresponding to the turbulent noise at low frequency, a source at blade passage frequency. This model has been experimentally validated in a laboratory. The final results of the modelling of the complete piping system are in a complete accord with experimental measurements. (author). 3 refs., 7 figs

  16. Bidimensional analysis of thermal stratification flow in the surge line of a PWR pressurizer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moreira, M.L.; Botelho, D.A.

    1994-11-01

    A numerical model is developed in order to understand the coolant thermal stratification and to develop a capability of predicting the failure of reactor components caused by this phenomenon. A period of this phenomenon in the surge line of a PWR reactor is simulated in two dimensions using the TURBO computer program. The flow cylindrical geometry is represented in 2 D by the space between two parallel plates, and the separation of the plates is estimated using similarity (the equivalence in the pressure drop). The results are compared to experimental data and to analogous results obtained from the COMMIX-1 C code (3 D). (author). 13 refs, 9 figs, 1 tab

  17. BWR core response to fluctuations in coolant flow and pressure, with implications on noise diagnosis and stability monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blomstrand, J.H.; Andersson, S.A.

    1982-01-01

    Reactor dynamic tests, utilizing sinuosidal oscillations in pressure and recirculation flow, have been conducted in operating BWRs in Sweden and Finland. Test data recorded, as well as recordings of process noise, have been analyzed in terms of dynamic core properties. The results obtained show good qualitative agreement with model predictions of BWR core dynamics. Model studies can often support interpretation of dynamic information obtained from operating plants. Comparisons between model studies, dynamic tests and process noise may also provide improved understanding of test results and noise patterns; in this way it can be demonstrated that some neutron flux noise is caused by noise in coolant flow and steam flow. From reactor test data nd noise recordings, core stability parameters have been evaluated by a number of methods. These have been found to provide essentially the same results. The cores investigated were found to be very stable under normal operating conditions. In special operating points, outside the normal operating range, higher decay ratios may occur. The experience indicates that for BWR cores, operated at decay ratios above quarter damping, the stability parameters may be identified from the oscillatory behavior of the autocorrelation in the time domain of the neutron flux noise

  18. Study and analysis for the flow-induced vibration of the core barrel of a PWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yao Weida; Shi Guolin; Jiang Nanyan

    1989-01-01

    The resemblance criteria are derived and a test model is designed by applying the flow-soild coupling theory. After having completed the model analysis of the pressurized water reactor (PWR) core barrel in an 1:10 model, the dynamic characteristics are obtained. In an 1:5 reactor model with a hydraulic closed loop, the hydraulic vibration tests of the core barrel are performed, and the relations between the flow rate and the flow-induced pulse pressure on core barrel, acceleration and strain signals have been measured. The corresponding responses and a group of computational equations for hydraulic vibration are derived from these two experiments. The computational hydraulic vibration responses for core barrel in Qinshan Nuclear Power Plant are in good agreement with the test results, and it shows that the core barrel is safe within its lifetime of 30 years

  19. Experimental investigation of the enthalpy and mass flow distribution between subchannels in a BWR cluster geometry (PELCO-S)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herkenrath, H.; Hufschmidt, W.

    1979-01-01

    Experiments based on the subchannel isokinetic technique have been carried out at the JRC of the European Community at Ispra, using a purposely designed 16-rod test section, simulating in a rather accurate way a typical BWR geometry. The adopted system allows the simultaneous determination of mass flow and enthalpy, at the end of the bundle active length, in four characteristic subchannels of the 16-rod lattice. The results show some pronounced flow and enthalpy variations within the bundle, not accurately taken into account by current subchannel codes, such as COBRA-3C. In particular low values both in mass flow and enthalpy have been found in corner subchannel, in disagreement with code predictions, but confirming previous General Electric experiments carried out in a 9-rod test section. This report deals only with the experimental procedure and the results

  20. Reentrainment of droplet from grid spacer in mist flow portion of LOCA reflood of PWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, S.L.; Cho, S.K.; Sheen, H.J.

    1983-01-01

    An investigation is made on the influence of a quenched grid spacer on the greatly enhanced heat transfer from heated fuel rods during the mist flow phase of emergency reflood of loss of coolant accident (LOCA) of a pressurized water reactor (PWR). The situation for the case of a dry grid spacer before its quenching has not been covered in this study. The experimental technique used is a relatively simple optical scheme which combines the reference-mode laser-Doppler anemometry making use of the scattering of a light beam from a droplet. The results reveal that the large droplets in the mist flow, which are intercepted by the grid spacer, are responsible for the creation of a large number of smaller droplets. These small droplets, due to their large surface area to mass ratios, can serve as superb evaporative cooling agents to heat transfer downstream of the grid spacer

  1. Experimental study of single- and two-phase flow fields around PWR steam generator tube support plates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bates, J.M.; Stewart, C.W.

    1979-08-01

    Laser-Doppler anemometry (LDA) was used to measure local mean axial velocities and turbulence intnsities at selected locations within a study model dimensionally protypic of an existing PWR steam generator design. The model tube bundle with support plate was installed in a special flow housing that formed part of an isothermal recirculating water flow loop. Flow conditions for this experiment were intended to simulate only typical single-phase flow velocities and were not an attempt to completely model actual steam generator, boiling, two-phase flow conditions. The measurements were performed in water at approximately 85 0 F with test section average velocities of approximately 0.55 and 1.1 fps. These conditions corresponded to Reynolds numbers of approximately 7,000 and approximately 14,000, respectively. Normalized velocity and turbulence intensity ratios are graphically reported. Additional qualitative, photographic investigations of air-water two-phase flows in a PWR steam generator study model were also performed

  2. Comparative calculations on selected two-phase flow phenomena using major PWR system codes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-01-01

    In 1988 a comparative study on important features and models in six major best estimate thermal hydraulic codes for PWR systems was implemented (Comparison of thermal hydraulic safety codes for PWR Graham, Trotman, London, EUR 11522). It was a limitation of that study that the source codes themselves were not available but the comparison had to be based on the available documentation. In the present study, the source codes were available and the capability of four system codes to predict complex two-phase flow phenomena has been assessed. Two areas of investigation were selected: (a) pressurized spray phenomena; (b) boil-up phenomena in rod bundles. As regards the first area, experimental data obtained in 1972 on the Neptunus Facility (Delft University of Technology) were compared with the results of the calculations using Athlet, Cathare, Relap 5 and TRAC-PT1 and, concerning the second area, the results of two experimental facilities obtained in 1980 and 1985 on Thetis (UKEA) and Pericles (CEA-Grenoble) were considered

  3. Simulation of the flow obstruction of a jet pump in a BWR reactor with the code RELAP/SCDAPSIM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cardenas V, J.; Filio L, C.

    2016-09-01

    This work simulates the flow obstruction of a jet pump in one of the recirculation loops of a nuclear power plant with a reactor of type BWR at 100% of operating power, in order to analyze the behavior of the total flow of the refrigerant passing through the reactor core, the total flow in each recirculation loop of the reactor, together with the 10 jet pumps of each loop. The behavior of the power and the reactivity insertion due to the change of the refrigerant flow pattern is also analyzed. The simulation was carried out using the RELAP/SCDAPSIM version 3.5 code, using a reactor model with 10 jet pumps in each recirculation loop and a core consisting of 6 radial zones and 25 axial zones. The scenario postulates the flow obstruction in a jet pump in a recirculation loop A when the reactor operates at 100% rated power, causing a change in the total flow of refrigerant in the reactor core, leading to a decrease in power. Once the reactor conditions are established to its new power, the operator tries to recover the nominal power using the flow control valve of the recirculation loop A, opening stepwise as a strategy to safely recover the reactor power. In this analysis is assumed that the intention of the nuclear plant operator is to maintain the operation of the reactor during the established cycle. (Author)

  4. 5 X 5 rod bundle flow field measurements downstream a PWR spacer grid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castro, Higor F.P.; Silva, Vitor V A.; Santos, André A.C.; Veloso, Maria A.F., E-mail: higorfabiano@gmail.com, E-mail: mdora@nuclear.ufmg.br, E-mail: vitors@cdtn.br, E-mail: aacs@cdtn.br [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)

    2017-07-01

    The spacer grids are structures present in nuclear fuel assembly of Pressurized Water Reactors (PWR). They play an important structural role and also assist in heat removal through the assembly by promoting increased turbulence of the flow. Understanding the flow dynamics downstream the spacer grid is paramount for fuel element design and analysis. This paper presents water flow velocity profiles measurements downstream a spacer grid in a 5 x 5 rod bundle test rig with the objective of highlighting important fluid dynamic behavior near the grid and supplying data for CFD simulation validation. These velocity profiles were obtained at two different heights downstream the spacer grid using a LDV (Laser Doppler Velocimetry) through the top of test rig. The turbulence intensities and patterns of the swirl and cross flow were evaluated. The tests were conducted for Reynolds numbers ranging from 1.8 x 10{sup 4} to 5.4 x 10{sup 4}. This experimental research was carried out in thermo-hydraulics laboratory of Nuclear Technology Development Center – CDTN. Results show great repeatability and low uncertainties (< 1.24 %). Details of the flow field show how the mixture and turbulence induced by the spacer grid quickly decays downstream the spacer grid. It is shown that the developed methodology can supply high resolution low uncertainty results that can be used for validation of CFD simulations. (author)

  5. 5 X 5 rod bundle flow field measurements downstream a PWR spacer grid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castro, Higor F.P.; Silva, Vitor V A.; Santos, André A.C.; Veloso, Maria A.F.

    2017-01-01

    The spacer grids are structures present in nuclear fuel assembly of Pressurized Water Reactors (PWR). They play an important structural role and also assist in heat removal through the assembly by promoting increased turbulence of the flow. Understanding the flow dynamics downstream the spacer grid is paramount for fuel element design and analysis. This paper presents water flow velocity profiles measurements downstream a spacer grid in a 5 x 5 rod bundle test rig with the objective of highlighting important fluid dynamic behavior near the grid and supplying data for CFD simulation validation. These velocity profiles were obtained at two different heights downstream the spacer grid using a LDV (Laser Doppler Velocimetry) through the top of test rig. The turbulence intensities and patterns of the swirl and cross flow were evaluated. The tests were conducted for Reynolds numbers ranging from 1.8 x 10"4 to 5.4 x 10"4. This experimental research was carried out in thermo-hydraulics laboratory of Nuclear Technology Development Center – CDTN. Results show great repeatability and low uncertainties (< 1.24 %). Details of the flow field show how the mixture and turbulence induced by the spacer grid quickly decays downstream the spacer grid. It is shown that the developed methodology can supply high resolution low uncertainty results that can be used for validation of CFD simulations. (author)

  6. Representing Operational Knowledge of PWR Plant by Using Multilevel Flow Modelling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Xinxin; Lind, Morten; Jørgensen, Sten Bay

    2014-01-01

    situation and support operational decisions. This paper will provide a general MFM model of the primary side in a standard Westinghouse Pressurized Water Reactor ( PWR ) system including sub - systems of Reactor Coolant System, Rod Control System, Chemical and Volume Control System, emergency heat removal......The aim of this paper is to explore the capability of representing operational knowledge by using Multilevel Flow Modelling ( MFM ) methodology. The paper demonstrate s how the operational knowledge can be inserted into the MFM models and be used to evaluate the plant state, identify the current...... systems. And the sub - systems’ functions will be decomposed into sub - models according to different operational situations. An operational model will be developed based on the operating procedure by using MFM symbols and this model can be used to implement coordination rules for organize the utilizati...

  7. UPTF experiment: Effect of full-scale geometry on countercurrent flow behaviour in PWR downcomer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liebert, J.; Weiss, P.

    1989-01-01

    Four separate effects tests (13 runs) have been performed at UPTF - a 1:1 scale test facility - to investigate the thermal-hydraulic phenomena in the full-scale downcomer of a PWR during end-of-blowdown, refill and reflood phases. Special attention has been paid to the effects of geometry - cold leg arrangement - and ECC-water subcooling on downcomer countercurrent flow and ECC bypass behaviour. A synopsis of the most significant events and a comparison of countercurrent flow limitation (CCFL) data from UPTF and 1/5 scale test facility of Creare are given. The CCFL results of UPTF are compared to data predicted by an empirical correlation developed at Creare, based on the modified dimensionless Wallis parameter J * . A significant effect of cold leg arrangement on CCFL was observed leading to strongly heterogeneous flow condition in the downcomer. CCFL in front of cold leg 1 adjacent to the broken loop exists even for very low steam flow rates. Therefore the benefit of strong water subcooling is not as much as expected. The existing flooding correlation of Creare predicts the full-scale downcomer CCFL insufficiently. New flooding correlations are required to describe the CCFL process adequately. (orig.)

  8. Sample problem calculations related to two-phase flow transients in a PWR relief-piping network

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shin, Y.W.; Wiedermann, A.H.

    1981-03-01

    Two sample problems related with the fast transients of water/steam flow in the relief line of a PWR pressurizer were calculated with a network-flow analysis computer code STAC (System Transient-Flow Analysis Code). The sample problems were supplied by EPRI and are designed to test computer codes or computational methods to determine whether they have the basic capability to handle the important flow features present in a typical relief line of a PWR pressurizer. It was found necessary to implement into the STAC code a number of additional boundary conditions in order to calculate the sample problems. This includes the dynamics of the fluid interface that is treated as a moving boundary. This report describes the methodologies adopted for handling the newly implemented boundary conditions and the computational results of the two sample problems. In order to demonstrate the accuracies achieved in the STAC code results, analytical solutions are also obtained and used as a basis for comparison

  9. LES analysis of the flow in a simplified PWR assembly with mixing grid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bieder, Ulrich; Fauchet, Gauthier; Falk, Francois

    2014-01-01

    The flow in fuel assemblies of Pressurized Water Reactors (PWR) with mixing grids has been analysed with Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) by numerous authors. The comparisons between calculation and experiment are mostly focused on the flow in the near wake of the mixing grid, i.e. on the flow in the first 5 to 10 hydraulic diameters (dh) downstream of the grid. In the study presented here, the comparison between the measurements in the AGATE facility (5 * 5 tube bundle) and Trio-U calculations is done for the whole distance between two successive mixing grids that is up to about 50 d h downstream of the grid. The AGATE experiments have originally not been designed for CFD validation but to characterize different types of mixing grids. Nevertheless, the quality of the experimental data allows the quantitative comparison between measurement and calculation. The conclusions of the comparison are summarized below: Linear turbulent viscosity models seem to work rather well as long as the cross flow velocity in the rod gaps is advection controlled, that is directly downstream of the mixing grid, Further downstream, when the cross flow velocity is reduced and anisotropic turbulence becomes a more and more important mixing phenomena, linear viscosity models can fail, The mixing grid affects the cross flow velocity up to the successive grid. The flow in fuel assemblies is never similar to that in undisturbed rod bundles. The test section of the AGATE facility has been discretized on 300 million control volumes by using a staggered grid approach on tetrahedral meshes. 20 days of CPU on 4600 cores of the High Performance Computer (HPC) cluster CURIE of the Centre de Calcul, Recherche et Technologie (CCRT) were necessary to converge the statistics of the turbulent fluctuations, completely converge the mean velocity and incompletely converge the RMS of the turbulent fluctuations. (authors)

  10. Advanced numerical methods for three dimensional two-phase flow calculations in PWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toumi, I.; Gallo, D.; Royer, E.

    1997-01-01

    This paper is devoted to new numerical methods developed for three dimensional two-phase flow calculations. These methods are finite volume numerical methods. They are based on an extension of Roe's approximate Riemann solver to define convective fluxes versus mean cell quantities. To go forward in time, a linearized conservative implicit integrating step is used, together with a Newton iterative method. We also present here some improvements performed to obtain a fully implicit solution method that provides fast running steady state calculations. This kind of numerical method, which is widely used for fluid dynamic calculations, is proved to be very efficient for the numerical solution to two-phase flow problems. This numerical method has been implemented for the three dimensional thermal-hydraulic code FLICA-4 which is mainly dedicated to core thermal-hydraulic transient and steady-state analysis. Hereafter, we will also find some results obtained for the EPR reactor running in a steady-state at 60% of nominal power with 3 pumps out of 4, and a thermal-hydraulic core analysis for a 1300 MW PWR at low flow steam-line-break conditions. (author)

  11. SCORE-EVET: a computer code for the multidimensional transient thermal-hydraulic analysis of nuclear fuel rod arrays. [BWR; PWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benedetti, R. L.; Lords, L. V.; Kiser, D. M.

    1978-02-01

    The SCORE-EVET code was developed to study multidimensional transient fluid flow in nuclear reactor fuel rod arrays. The conservation equations used were derived by volume averaging the transient compressible three-dimensional local continuum equations in Cartesian coordinates. No assumptions associated with subchannel flow have been incorporated into the derivation of the conservation equations. In addition to the three-dimensional fluid flow equations, the SCORE-EVET code ocntains: (a) a one-dimensional steady state solution scheme to initialize the flow field, (b) steady state and transient fuel rod conduction models, and (c) comprehensive correlation packages to describe fluid-to-fuel rod interfacial energy and momentum exchange. Velocity and pressure boundary conditions can be specified as a function of time and space to model reactor transient conditions such as a hypothesized loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA) or flow blockage.

  12. Large bundle BWR test CORA-18: Test results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hagen, S.; Hofmann, P.; Noack, V.; Sepold, L.; Schanz, G.; Schumacher, G.

    1998-04-01

    The CORA out-of-pile experiments are part of the international Severe Fuel Damage (SFD) Program. They were performed to provide information on the damage progression of Light Water Reactor (LWR) fuel elements in Loss-of-coolant Accidents in the temperature range 1200 C to 2400 C. CORA-18 was the large BWR bundle test corresponding to the PWR test CORA-7. It should investigate if there exists an influence of the BWR bundle size on the fuel damage behaviour. Therefore, the standard-type BWR CORA bundle with 18 fuel rod simulators was replaced by a large bundle with two additional surrounding rows of 30 rods (48 rods total). Power input and steam flow were increased proportionally to the number of fuel rod simulators to give the same initial heat-up rate of about 1 K/s as in the smaller bundles. Emphasis was put on the initial phase of the damage progression. More information on the chemical composition of initial and intermediate interaction products and their relocation behaviour should be obtained. Therefore, power and steam input were terminated after the onset of the temperature escalation. (orig.) [de

  13. Characterization of Factors affecting IASCC of PWR Core Internals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Sung Woo; Hwang, Seong Sik; Kim, Won Sam [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-09-15

    A lot works have been performed on IASCC in BWR. Recent efforts have been devoted to investigate IASCC in PWR, but the mechanism in PWR is not fully understood yet as compared with that in BWR due to a lack of data from laboratories and fields. Therefore it is strongly needed to review and analyse recent researches of IASCC in both BWR and PWR for establishing a proactive management technology for IASCC of core internals in Korean PWRs. This work is aimed to review mainly recent technical reports on IASCC of stainless steels for core internals in PWR. For comparison, the works on IASCC in BWR were also reviewed and briefly introduced in this report.

  14. Measurement of local flow pattern in boiling R12 simulating PWR conditions with multiple optical probes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garnier, J.

    1998-01-01

    For a comprehensive approach of boiling crisis phenomenon in order to get more reliable predictions of critical heat flux in PWR core, a flow pattern study is under progress at CEA GRENOBLE (in a joint program with Electricite de France: EdF). The first aim is to get experimental results on flow structure in the range of thermal hydraulic parameters involved in the core of a PWR (pressure up to 16 MPa, heat flux about 1 MW/m 2 , mass velocity up to 5000 kg/s/m 2 . As critical heat flux is a local phenomenon and is the result of the flow development, the data has to be measured from the beginning of boiling until boiling crisis, and from the bulk flow until the boundary layer close to the heating walls. Therefore, these results will be useful in modeling not only boiling crisis phenomenon but also condensation in subcooled boiling, coalescence, splitting up, mass and energy transfers at interfaces, and so on. In a first step, the test section is a vertical tube 19.2 mm internal diameter with an axial uniform heat flux over a 3.5m length. The study is performed on the DEBORA loop with Freon 12 as coolant fluid. We assume that basic boiling phenomena (and the knowledge we get about them) only depend on the fluid properties by means of dimensionless parameters but not on the fluid itself. In a first part, we briefly recall that interfacial detection is the most important parameter of a flow pattern study. Therefore, the use of probes able to measure the Phase Indicator Function (P.I.F.) is necessary. A first study of flow conditions shows that the flow pattern is essentially a bubbly one with vapor particles of low diameter (about 300 clm) and high velocity (up to 7 m/s). These criteria induce that a multiple optical probe is the most appropriate tool provided we improve the technology. We detail the way to obtain probes able to detect small particles at high velocity. Each fiber is stretched to get a tip of 10 Clm with the cladding kept on 50 μm length which defines

  15. Calculation of sample problems related to two-phase flow blowdown transients in pressure relief piping of a PWR pressurizer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shin, Y.W.; Wiedermann, A.H.

    1984-02-01

    A method was published, based on the integral method of characteristics, by which the junction and boundary conditions needed in computation of a flow in a piping network can be accurately formulated. The method for the junction and boundary conditions formulation together with the two-step Lax-Wendroff scheme are used in a computer program; the program in turn, is used here in calculating sample problems related to the blowdown transient of a two-phase flow in the piping network downstream of a PWR pressurizer. Independent, nearly exact analytical solutions also are obtained for the sample problems. Comparison of the results obtained by the hybrid numerical technique with the analytical solutions showed generally good agreement. The good numerical accuracy shown by the results of our scheme suggest that the hybrid numerical technique is suitable for both benchmark and design calculations of PWR pressurizer blowdown transients

  16. Application of the Synthesis method to the calculations of neutron flow in 3D in the enveloping of a BWR reactor with the DORT code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xolocostli M, J.V.; Gomez T, A.M.; Palacios H, J.C.

    2006-01-01

    The surveillance program of the vessel materials of a BWR reactor requires the determination of the neutron flux in 3D in the core enveloping. To carry out these calculations of the neutron flux, the Regulatory Guide 1.190 of the NRC recommends the use of the following codes: MCNP, TORT and DORT. In the case of using the DORT code, the one which solves the transport equation in discreet coordinates and in two dimensions (xy, rθ, and rz), the regulatory guide in reference, requires to make an approach of the flow in three dimensions by means of the call Synthesis Method. It is denominated like this due to that a flow representation in 3D is achieved 'combining' or 'synthesizing' the calculated flows by DORT in rθ, rz and r. In this work the application of the Synthesis Method it is presented, according to the Regulatory Guide 1.190, to determine the 3D flows in a BWR reactor. To achieve the above mentioned it was implemented the Synthesis Method in a computer program developed in the ININ to which is denominated SYNTHESIS. This program applies the synthesis method, and is 'coupled' with the DORT code to determine by this way the neutronic fluxes in 3D on the enveloping of a BWR reactor. (Author)

  17. Experimental investigation of stratified two-phase flows in the hot leg of a PWR for CFD validation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vallee, Christophe; Lucas, Dirk [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (HZDR) e.V., Dresden (Germany). Inst. of Fluid Dynamics; Tomiyama, Akio [Kobe Univ. (Japan). Graduate School of Engineering; Murase, Michio [Institute of Nuclear Safety System Inc. (INSS), Fukui (Japan)

    2012-07-01

    Stratified two-phase flows were investigated in two different models of the hot leg of a pressurised water reactor (PWR) in order to provide experimental data for the development and validation of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) codes. Therefore, the local flow structure was visualised with a high-speed video camera. Moreover, one test section was designed with a rectangular cross-section to achieve optimum observation conditions. The phenomenon of counter-current flow limitation (CCFL) was investigated, which may affect the reflux condenser cooling mode in some accident scenarios. (orig.)

  18. Measurement and modeling of two-phase flow parameters in scaled 8 Multiplication-Sign 8 BWR rod bundle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, X.; Schlegel, J.P.; Liu, Y.; Paranjape, S.; Hibiki, T. [School of Nuclear Engineering, Purdue University, 400 Central Dr., West Lafayette, IN 47907-2017 (United States); Ishii, M., E-mail: ishii@purdue.edu [School of Nuclear Engineering, Purdue University, 400 Central Dr., West Lafayette, IN 47907-2017 (United States)

    2012-04-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Grid spacers have a significant but not well understood effect on flow behavior and development. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Two different length scales are present in rod bundles, which must be accounted for in modeling. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer An easy-to-implement empirical model has been developed for the two-phase friction multiplier. - Abstract: The behavior of reactor systems is predicted using advanced computational codes in order to determine the safety characteristics of the system during various accidents and to determine the performance characteristics of the reactor. These codes generally utilize the two-fluid model for predictions of two-phase flows, as this model is the most accurate and detailed model which is currently practical for predicting large-scale systems. One of the weaknesses of this approach however is the need to develop constitutive models for various quantities. Of specific interest are the models used in the prediction of void fraction and pressure drop across the rod bundle due to their importance in new Natural Circulation Boiling Water Reactor (NCBWR) designs, where these quantities determine the coolant flow rate through the core. To verify the performance of these models and expand the existing experimental database, data has been collected in an 8 Multiplication-Sign 8 rod bundle which is carefully scaled from actual BWR geometry and includes grid spacers to maintain rod spacing. While these spacer grids are 'generic', their inclusion does provide valuable data for analysis of the effect of grid spacers on the flow. In addition to pressure drop measurements the area-averaged void fraction has been measured by impedance void meters and local conductivity probes have been used to measure the local void fraction and interfacial area concentration in the bundle subchannels. Experimental conditions covered a wide range of flow rates and void fractions up to 80%.

  19. Test Facility Construction for Flow Visualization on Mixing Flow inside Subchannels of PWR Rod Bundle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Seok; Jeon, Byong-Guk; Youn, Young-Jung; Choi, Hae-Seob; Euh, Dong-Jin [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    Flow inside rod bundles has a similarity with flow in porous media. To ensure thermal performance of a nuclear reactor, detailed information of the heat transfer and turbulent mixing flow phenomena taking place within the subchannels is required. The subchannel analysis is one of the key thermal-hydraulic calculations in the safety analysis of the nuclear reactor core. At present, subchannel computer codes are employed to simulate fuel elements of nuclear reactor cores and predict the performance of cores under normal operating and hypothetical accident conditions. The ability of these subchannels codes to predict both the flow and enthalpy distribution in fuel assemblies is very important in the design of nuclear reactors. Recently, according to the modern tend of the safety analysis for the nuclear reactor, a new component scale analysis code, named CUPID, and has been developed in KAERI. The CUPID code is based on a two-fluid and three-field model, and both the open and porous media approaches are incorporated. The PRIUS experiment has addressed many key topics related to flow behaviour in a rod bundle. These issues are related to the flow conditions inside a nuclear fuel element during normal operation of the plant or in accident scenarios. From the second half of 2016, flow visualization will be performed by using a high speed camera and image analysis technique, from which detailed information for the two-dimensional movement of single phase flow is quantified.

  20. Development and Assessment of CFD Models Including a Supplemental Program Code for Analyzing Buoyancy-Driven Flows Through BWR Fuel Assemblies in SFP Complete LOCA Scenarios

    Science.gov (United States)

    Artnak, Edward Joseph, III

    This work seeks to illustrate the potential benefits afforded by implementing aspects of fluid dynamics, especially the latest computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modeling approach, through numerical experimentation and the traditional discipline of physical experimentation to improve the calibration of the severe reactor accident analysis code, MELCOR, in one of several spent fuel pool (SFP) complete loss-ofcoolant accident (LOCA) scenarios. While the scope of experimental work performed by Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) extends well beyond that which is reasonably addressed by our allotted resources and computational time in accordance with initial project allocations to complete the report, these simulated case trials produced a significant array of supplementary high-fidelity solutions and hydraulic flow-field data in support of SNL research objectives. Results contained herein show FLUENT CFD model representations of a 9x9 BWR fuel assembly in conditions corresponding to a complete loss-of-coolant accident scenario. In addition to the CFD model developments, a MATLAB based controlvolume model was constructed to independently assess the 9x9 BWR fuel assembly under similar accident scenarios. The data produced from this work show that FLUENT CFD models are capable of resolving complex flow fields within a BWR fuel assembly in the realm of buoyancy-induced mass flow rates and that characteristic hydraulic parameters from such CFD simulations (or physical experiments) are reasonably employed in corresponding constitutive correlations for developing simplified numerical models of comparable solution accuracy.

  1. Dissolution experiments of commercial PWR (52 MWd/kgU) and BWR (53 MWd/kgU) spent nuclear fuel cladded segments in bicarbonate water under oxidizing conditions. Experimental determination of matrix and instant release fraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    González-Robles, E., E-mail: ernesto.gonzalez-robles@kit.edu [CTM Centre Tecnològic, Plaça de la Ciència 2, 08243 Manresa (Spain); Serrano-Purroy, D. [European Commission - EC, Joint Research Centre (JRC), Institute for Transuranium Elements - ITU, Postfach 2340, D-76125 Karlsruhe (Germany); Sureda, R. [CTM Centre Tecnològic, Plaça de la Ciència 2, 08243 Manresa (Spain); Casas, I. [Chemical Engineering Department, Universitat Politècnica de Catalunya, Av. Diagonal 647, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Pablo, J. de [CTM Centre Tecnològic, Plaça de la Ciència 2, 08243 Manresa (Spain); Chemical Engineering Department, Universitat Politècnica de Catalunya, Av. Diagonal 647, 08028 Barcelona (Spain)

    2015-10-15

    The denominated instant release fraction (IRF) is considered in performance assessment (PA) exercises to govern the dose that could arise from the repository. A conservative definition of IRF comprises the total inventory of radionuclides located in the gap, fractures, and the grain boundaries and, if present, in the high burn-up structure (HBS). The values calculated from this theoretical approach correspond to an upper limit that likely does not correspond to what it will be expected to be instantaneously released in the real system. Trying to ascertain this IRF from an experimental point of view, static leaching experiments have been carried out with two commercial UO{sub 2} spent nuclear fuels (SNF): one from a pressurized water reactor (PWR), labelled PWR, with an average burn-up (BU) of 52 MWd/kgU and fission gas release (FGR) of 23.1%, and one from a boiling water reactor (BWR), labelled BWR, with an average BU of and 53 MWd/kgU and FGR of 3.9%. One sample of each SNF, consisting of fuel and cladding, has been leached in bicarbonate water during one year under oxidizing conditions at room temperature (25 ± 5)°C. The behaviour of the concentration measured in solution can be divided in two according to the release rate. All radionuclides presented an initial release rate that after some days levels down to a slower second one, which remains constant until the end of the experiment. Cumulative fraction of inventory in aqueous phase (FIAP{sub c}) values has been calculated. Results show faster release in the case of the PWR SNF. In both cases Np, Pu, Am, Cm, Y, Tc, La and Nd dissolve congruently with U, while dissolution of Zr, Ru and Rh is slower. Rb, Sr, Cs and Mo, dissolve faster than U. The IRF of Cs at 10 and 200 days has been calculated, being (3.10 ± 0.62) and (3.66 ± 0.73) for PWR fuel, and (0.35 ± 0.07) and (0.51 ± 0.10) for BWR fuel.

  2. BWR fuel assembly bottom nozzle with one-way coolant flow valve

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taleyarkhan, R.P.

    1987-01-01

    In a nuclear reactor having a flow of coolant/moderator fluid therein, at least one fuel assembly installed in the fluid flow, the fuel assembly is described comprising in combination: a bundle of elongated fuel rods disposed in side-by-side relationship so as to form an array of spaced fuel rods; an outer tubular flow channel surrounding the fuel rods so as to direct the flow of coolant/moderator fluid along the fuel rods; bottom and top nozzles mounted at opposite ends of the flow channel and having an inlet and outlet respectively for allowing entry and exit of the flow of coolant/moderator fluid into and from the flow channel and along the fuel rods therein; and a coolant flow direction control device operatively disposed in the bottom nozzle so as to open the inlet thereof to the flow of coolant/moderator fluid in an inflow direction into the flow channel through the bottom nozzle inlet but close the inlet to the flow of coolant/moderator fluid from the flow channel through the bottom nozzle inlet upon reversal of coolant/moderator fluid flow from the inflow direction

  3. Simulation of the flow obstruction of a jet pump in a BWR reactor with the code RELAP/SCDAPSIM; Simulacion de la obstruccion de flujo de una bomba jet en un reactor BWR con el codigo RELAP/SCDAPSIM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cardenas V, J.; Filio L, C., E-mail: jaime.cardenas@cnsns.gob.mx [Comision Nacional de Seguridad Nuclear y Salvaguardias, Dr. Jose M. Barragan 779, Col. Narvarte, 03020 Ciudad de Mexico (Mexico)

    2016-09-15

    This work simulates the flow obstruction of a jet pump in one of the recirculation loops of a nuclear power plant with a reactor of type BWR at 100% of operating power, in order to analyze the behavior of the total flow of the refrigerant passing through the reactor core, the total flow in each recirculation loop of the reactor, together with the 10 jet pumps of each loop. The behavior of the power and the reactivity insertion due to the change of the refrigerant flow pattern is also analyzed. The simulation was carried out using the RELAP/SCDAPSIM version 3.5 code, using a reactor model with 10 jet pumps in each recirculation loop and a core consisting of 6 radial zones and 25 axial zones. The scenario postulates the flow obstruction in a jet pump in a recirculation loop A when the reactor operates at 100% rated power, causing a change in the total flow of refrigerant in the reactor core, leading to a decrease in power. Once the reactor conditions are established to its new power, the operator tries to recover the nominal power using the flow control valve of the recirculation loop A, opening stepwise as a strategy to safely recover the reactor power. In this analysis is assumed that the intention of the nuclear plant operator is to maintain the operation of the reactor during the established cycle. (Author)

  4. Trend of field data on pipe wall thinning for BWR power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hakii, Junichi; Hiranuma, Naoki; Hidaka, Akitaka

    2009-01-01

    Strongly motivated by every stakeholder not to repeat Mihama Nuclear Power Station pipe rupture accident in August 2004, JSME Main Committee on Codes and Standards on Power Generation Facilities immediately launched a special task force to develop Rules on Pipe Wall Thinning Management for BWR, PWR and fossil Power Plants respectively. The authors describes the process of the development of Rules for BWR Power Plans from the view point of collections and analysis of fields data of pipe wall thinning. Through its activities, the authors confirmed the existing findings, like the effect of Oxygen injection, turbulence and dependence on coolant temperature, derived from series of laboratory-scaled experiments in FAC and coolant velocities effects in LDI. Further based upon the said proven findings with field data, they explain the adequacy of major concept of the rule such as separate treatment of FAC (Flow Accelerated Corrosion) and LDI (Liquid Droplet Impingement). (author)

  5. Flow resistance of orifices and spacers of BWR thermal-hydraulic and neutronic coupling loop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iguchi, Tadashi; Asaka, Hideaki; Nakamura, Hideo

    2002-03-01

    Authors are performing THYNC experiments to study thermal-hydraulic instability under neutronic and thermal-hydraulic coupling. In THYNC experiments, the orifices are installed at the exit of the test section and the spacers are installed in the test section, in order to properly simulate in-core thermal-hydraulics in the reactor core. It is necessary to know the flow resistance of the orifices and spacers for the analysis of THYNC experimental results. Consequently, authors measured the flow resistance of orifice and spacer under single-phase and two-phase flows. Using the experimental results, authors investigated the dependency of the flow resistances on the parameters, such as pressure, mass flux, an geometries. Furthermore, authors investigated the applicability of the basic two-phase flow models, for example the separate flow model, to the two-phase flow multiplier. As the result of the investigation on the single-phase flow experiment, it was found (1) that the effects of pressure and mass flux flow resistance are described by a function of Reynolds number, and (2) that flow resistances of the orifice and the spacer are calculated with the previous prediction methods. However, it was necessary to introduce an empirical coefficient, since it was difficult to predict accurately the flow resistance only with the previous prediction method due to the complicated geometry dependency, for example a flow area blockage ratio. On the other hand, according to the investigation on two-phase flow experiment, the followings were found. (1) Relation between the two-phase flow multiplier and the quality is regarded to be linear under pressure of 2MPa - 7MPa. The relation is dependent on pressure and geometry, and is little dependent on mass flux. (2) Relation between the two-phase flow multiplier and void fraction is little dependent on pressure, mass flux, and geometry under pressure of 0.2MPa - 7MPa and void fraction less than 0.6. The relation is less dependent on

  6. PWR FLECHT SEASET 21-rod bundle flow blockage task. Task plan report. FLECHT SEASET Program report No. 5

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hochreiter, L.E.; Basel, R.A.; Dennis, R.J.; Lee, N.; Massie, H.W. Jr.; Loftus, M.J.; Rosal, E.R.; Valkovic, M.M.

    1980-10-01

    This report presents a descriptive plan of tests for the 21-Rod Bundle Flow Blockage Task of the Full-Length Emergency Cooling Heat Transfer Separate Effects and Systems Effects Test Program (FLECHT SEASET). This task will consist of forced and gravity reflooding tests utilizing electrical heater rods to simulate PWR nuclear core fuel rod arrays. All tests will be performed with a cosine axial power profile. These tests are planned to be used to determine effects of various flow blockage configurations (shapes and distributions) on reflooding behavior, to aid in development/assessment of computational models in predicting reflooding behavior of flow blockage configurations, and to screen flow blockage configurations for future 161-rod flow blockage bundle tests

  7. Optimal estimate of the coolant flow in the assemblies of a BWR of natural circulation in real time; Estimacion optima del flujo de refrigerante en los ensambles de un BWR de circulacion natural en tiempo real

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valle H, J.; Morales S, J. B. [UNAM, Facultad de Ingenieria, Division de Estudios de Posgrado, Laboratorio de Analisis de Ingenieria de Reactores Nucleares, Paseo Cuauhnahuac 8532, Col. Progreso, 62550 Jiutepec, Morelos (Mexico); Espinosa P, G., E-mail: julfi_jg@yahoo.com.mx [Universidad Autonoma Metropolitana, Unidad Iztapalapa, Av. San Rafael Atlixco 186, Col. Vicentina, 09340 Mexico D. F. (Mexico)

    2012-10-15

    The present work exposes the design and the implementation of an advanced controller that allows estimating the coolant flow in the fuel assemblies of a BWR reactor of natural circulation in real time. To be able to reduce the penalizations that are established in the calculations of the operation limits due to the magnitude of the uncertainties in the coolant flows of a natural circulation reactor, is the objective of this research. In this work the construction of the optimal controller that allows estimating the coolant flows in a fuel channels group of the reactor is shown, as well as the operation of this applied to a reduced order model that simulates the dynamics of a natural circulation reactor. The controller design required of an estimator of the valuation variables not directly of the plant and of the estimates use of the local distributions of the coolant flow. The controller construction of the estimator was based mathematically in the filter Kalman whose algorithm allows to be carried out an advanced control of the system. To prove the estimator operation was development a simplified model that reproduces the basic dynamics of the flowing coolant in the reactor, which works as observer of the system, this model is coupled by means of the estimator controller to a detail model of the plant. The results are presented by means of graphics of the interest variables and the estimate flow, and they are documented in the chart that is presented at the end of this article. (Author)

  8. Seismic risk assessment of a BWR: status report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chuang, T.Y.; Bernreuter, D.L.; Wells, J.E.; Johnson, J.J.

    1985-02-01

    The seismic risk methodology developed in the US NRC Seismic Safety Margins Research Program (SSMRP) was demonstrated by its application to the Zion nuclear power plant, a pressurized water reactor (PWR). A detailed model of Zion, including systems analysis models (initiating events, event trees, and fault trees), SSI and structure models, and piping models was developed and analyzed. The SSMRP methodology can equally be applied to a boiling water reactor (BWR). To demonstrate its applicability, to identify fundamental differences in seismic risk between a PWR and a BWR, and to provide a basis of comparison of seismic risk between a PWR and a BWR when analyzed with comparable methodology and assumptions, a seismic risk analysis is being performed on the LaSalle County Station nuclear power plant

  9. Simulation of corrosion product activity in ion- exchanger of PWR under acceleration of corrosion and flow rate perturbations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mirza, N.M.; Mirza, S.M.; Rafique, M.

    2005-01-01

    In this paper computer code developed earlier by the authors (CPAIR-P) has been employed to compute corrosion product activity in PWRs for flow rate perturbations. The values of radioactivity in ion exchanger of Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) under normal and flow rate perturbation conditions have been calculated. For linearly accelerating corrosion rates, activity saturates for removal rate of 600 cm/sup 3// s in primary coolant of PWR. A higher removal rate of 750 cm/sup 3// s was selected for which the saturation value is sufficiently low (0. 28 micro Ci/cm/sup 3/). Simulation results shows that the Fe/sup 59/ Na/sup 24/, Mo/sup 99/, Mn/sup 56/ reaches saturation values with in about 700 hours of reactor operation. However, Co/sup 58/ and Co/sup 60/ keep on accumulating and do not saturate with in 2000 hours of these simulation time. When flow rate is decreased by 10% of rated flow rate after 500 hours of reactor operation, a dip in activity is seen, which reaches to the value of 0.00138 micro Ci cm/sup -3/ then again it begins to rise and reaches saturation value of 0.00147 cm/sup 3//s. (author)

  10. A PWR reactor downcomer modification for reduction of ECC bypass flow during LOCA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Popov, N.; Bosevski, T.

    1986-01-01

    The ECC bypass phenomenon in the PWR reactor down-comer, which delays the reactor vessel refilling, after cold leg large break LOCA accident, has been subject of analysis in this paper. In the paper, a particular construction modification of the reactor down-comer has been suggested by inserting vertical ribs, aimed to intensify the reactor ECC refilling following the LOCA accident, and to advance the thermal-hydraulics safety of post-accidental cooling of the PWR reactors. To verify the effectiveness of the suggested down-comer construction modification, some properly selected results, obtained by corresponding verified mathematical model, have been presented in this paper. (author)

  11. Analysis of resonance oscillation of the neutron flow in a BWR-core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Storm, J.

    1987-09-01

    This is a thesis which has been made within the institution of automatic control in Lund. Two programs, 'Blackie' and 'Test' have been written in Fortran. These two programs are to be used for the evaluation of ASEA-ATOMs resonance test in different nuclear reactors. In these tests the condition of the reactor becomes more and more unstable because the coolant flow decreases at the same time as the power gradually increases. This leads to resonance in the neutron flow. This flow is measured by detectors placed in different parts of the reactor core. 'Blackie' receives and stores the values sampled by the detectors. The same program also carries out a Fourier analysis. Amplitudes and phase angles from the different oscillations are calculated. These results are then used as inputs for 'Test'. 'Test' is a plotting program. It draws the reactor and plots arrows where the detectors are situated. The size and direction of the arrows are measurements of the amplitudes and phase angles of the neutron flow oscillations. From these arrow diagrams you can come to conclusions about the oscillations in the neutron flow and how the affect the reactor. (author)

  12. Next generation PWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Toshihiko; Fukuda, Toshihiko; Usui, Shuji

    2001-01-01

    Development of LWR for power generation in Japan has been intended to upgrade its reliability, safety, operability, maintenance and economy as well as to increase its capacity in order, since nuclear power generation for commercial use was begun on 1970, to steadily increase its generation power. And, in Japan, ABWR (advanced BWR) of the most promising LWR in the world, was already used actually and APWR (advanced PWR) with the largest output in the world is also at a step of its actual use. And, development of the APWR in Japan was begun on 1980s, and is at a step of plan on construction of its first machine at early of this century. However, by large change of social affairs, economy of nuclear power generation is extremely required, to be positioned at an APWR improved development reactor promoted by collaboration of five PWR generation companies and the Mitsubishi Electric Co., Ltd. Therefore, on its development, investigation on effect of change in social affairs on nuclear power stations was at first carried out, to establish a design requirement for the next generation PWR. Here were described on outline, reactor core design, safety concept, and safety evaluation of APWR+ and development of an innovative PWR. (G.K.)

  13. Assessment of some interfacial shear correlations in a model of ECC bypass flow in PWR reactor downcomer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Popov, N.K.; Rohatgi, U.S.

    1987-01-01

    The bypass/refill process in the PWR reactor downcomer, following a large rupture of a cold leg coolant supply pipe, is a complicated thermo-hydraulic two-phase flow phenomenon. Mathematical modeling of such phenomena is always accompanied with a difficult task of selection of suitable constitutive correlations. In a typically hydrodynamic phenomenon, like ECC refill process of the reactor lower plenum is considered, the phasic interfacial friction is the most influential constitutive correlation. Therefore, assessment of the well-known widely-used interfacial friction constitutive correlations in the model of ECC bypass/refill process, is the subject of this paper

  14. Radiation streaming in power reactors. [PWR; BWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lahti, G.P.; Lee, R.R.; Courtney, J.C. (eds.)

    1979-02-01

    Separate abstracts are included for each of the 14 papers given at a special session on Radiation Streaming in Power Reactors held on November 15 at the American Nuclear Society 1978 Winter Meeting in Washington, D.C. The papers describe the methods of calculation, the engineering of shields, and the measurement of radiation environments within the containments of light water power reactors. Comparisons of measured and calculated data are used to determine the accuracy of computer predictions of the radiation environment. Specific computational and measurement techniques are described and evaluated. Emphasis is on radiation streaming in the annular region between the reactor vesel and the primary shield and its resultant environment within the primary containment.

  15. Experimental investigation of stratified two-phase flows in the hot leg of a PWR for CFD validation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vallee, Christophe; Lucas, Dirk [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (HZDR) e.V., Dresden (Germany). Inst. of Fluid Dynamics; Tomiyama, Akio [Kobe Univ (Japan). Graduate School of Engineering; Murase, Michio [Institute of Nuclear Safety System, Inc. (INSS), Fukui (Japan)

    2012-12-15

    Stratified 2-phase flows were investigated in 2 different models of the hot leg of a pressurised water reactor (PWR) in order to provide experimental data for the development and validation of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) codes. Therefore, the local flow structure was visualised with a high-speed video camera. Moreover, one test section was designed with a rectangular cross-section to achieve optimal observation conditions. The phenomenon of counter-current flow limitation (CCFL) was investigated, which may affect the reflux condenser cooling mode in some accident scenarios. The experiments were conducted with air and water at room temperature and maximum pressures of 3 bar as well as with steam and saturated water at boundary conditions of up to 50 bar and 264 C. The measured CCFL characteristics were compared with similar experimental data and correlations available in the literature. This shows that the channel height is the characteristic length to be used in the Wallis parameter for channels with rectangular cross-sections. Furthermore, the experimental results confirm that the Wallis similarity is appropriate to scale CCFL in the hot leg of a PWR over a wide range of pressure and temperature conditions. Finally, an image processing algorithm was developed to recognise the stratified interface in the camera frames. Subsequently, the interfacial structure along the hot leg was visualised by the representation of the probability distribution of the water level. (orig.)

  16. FIX-II/2032, BWR Pump Trip Experiment 2032, Simulation Mass Flow and Power Transients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-01-01

    1 - Description of test facility: In the FIX-II pump trip experiments, mass flow and power transients were simulated subsequent to a total loss of power to the recirculation pumps in an internal pump boiling water reactor. The aim was to determine the initial power limit to give dryout in the fuel bundle for the specified transient. In addition, the peak cladding temperature was measured and the rewetting was studied. 2 - Description of test: Pump trip experiment 2032 was a part of test group 2, i.e. the mass flow transient was to simulate the pump coast down with a pump inertia of 11.3 kg.m -2 . The initial power in the 36-rod bundle was 4.44 MW which gave dryout after 1.4 s from the start of the flow transient. A maximum rod cladding temperature of 457 degrees C was measured. Rewetting was obtained after 7.6 s. 3 - Experimental limitations or shortcomings: No ECCS injection systems

  17. Prediction of liquid film dryout in two-phase annular-mist flow in a uniformly heated narrow tube development of analytical method under BWR conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Utsuno, Hideaki; Kaminaga, Fumito

    1998-01-01

    A method was developed based on the conservation lows to predict critical heat flux (CHF) causing liquid film dryout in two-phase annular-mist flow in a uniformly heated narrow tube under BWR conditions. The applicable range of the method is within the pressure of 3-9 MPa, mass flux of 500-2,000 kg/m 2 ·s, heat flux of 0.33-2.0 MW/m 2 and boiling length-to-tube diameter ratio of 200-800. The two-phase annular-mist flow was modeled with the three-fluid streams with liquid film, entrained droplets and gas flow. Governing equations of the method are mass continuity and energy conservation on the three-fluid streams. Constitutive equations on the mass transfer which consist of the entrainment fraction at equilibrium and the mass transfer coefficient were newly proposed in this study. Confirmation of the present method were performed in comparison with the available film flow measurements and various CHF data from experiments in uniformly heated narrow tubes under high pressure steam-water conditions. In the heat flux range (q'' 2 ) practical for a BWR, agreement of the present method with CHF data was obtained as, (Averaged ratio) ± (Standard deviation) = 0.984 ± 0.077, which was shown to be the same or better agreement than the widely-used CHF correlations. (author)

  18. Experimental studies of the effect of functional spacers to annular flow in subchannels of a BWR fuel element

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Damsohn, M., E-mail: damsohn@lke.mavt.ethz.c [ETH Zurich, Department of Mechanical and Process Engineering, Sonneggstrasse 3, 8092 Zuerich (Switzerland); Prasser, H.-M. [ETH Zurich, Department of Mechanical and Process Engineering, Sonneggstrasse 3, 8092 Zuerich (Switzerland)

    2010-10-15

    For the prediction of dryout in fuel elements of boiling water reactors, the dynamic behavior of the water film covering the fuel rod has to be understood. This paper provides high resolved experimental data of the liquid film and gives insight into the dynamic film behavior. The experiments of this work were conducted in a vertical channel representing a pair of neighboring subchannels of a BWR fuel rod bundle. Air and water at ambient pressure and temperature are used as model fluids, creating an annular flow in the test section. The influence of different functional spacer shapes on the liquid film has been studied. The heart of the instrumentation is a liquid film sensor (LFS), which measures the film thickness distribution around a half cylinder with a matrix of 64 x 16 measuring points with a time resolution of 10,000 frames per second and a spatial resolution of 2 mm x 2 mm. The high resolution allows for a visualization of the dynamic liquid film as a movie animation. Principals of the dynamic behavior of the liquid film are observed. The time-averaged film thickness distributions show that the spacers structure the liquid film significantly. The gaseous phase is accelerated due to the cross-section blockage caused by the spacer. This leads to a local thinning of the liquid film downstream of the spacer. Two statistical evaluation methods are presented to determine different dynamic wave properties: The wave velocity as function of the wave height, the traveling path of the waves and the location of wave separation and merge events. The first evaluation method shows that big waves move generally faster than small waves. The analysis further shows wave acceleration in close proximity of the spacer with subsequent deceleration further downstream. Analyzing the wave as a two-dimensional entity it can be seen that the wave paths are clearly structured by the spacer and hence do not travel circumferentially around the fuel rod. Wave separation and merge has a

  19. Experimental studies of the effect of functional spacers to annular flow in subchannels of a BWR fuel element

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Damsohn, M.; Prasser, H.-M.

    2010-01-01

    For the prediction of dryout in fuel elements of boiling water reactors, the dynamic behavior of the water film covering the fuel rod has to be understood. This paper provides high resolved experimental data of the liquid film and gives insight into the dynamic film behavior. The experiments of this work were conducted in a vertical channel representing a pair of neighboring subchannels of a BWR fuel rod bundle. Air and water at ambient pressure and temperature are used as model fluids, creating an annular flow in the test section. The influence of different functional spacer shapes on the liquid film has been studied. The heart of the instrumentation is a liquid film sensor (LFS), which measures the film thickness distribution around a half cylinder with a matrix of 64 x 16 measuring points with a time resolution of 10,000 frames per second and a spatial resolution of 2 mm x 2 mm. The high resolution allows for a visualization of the dynamic liquid film as a movie animation. Principals of the dynamic behavior of the liquid film are observed. The time-averaged film thickness distributions show that the spacers structure the liquid film significantly. The gaseous phase is accelerated due to the cross-section blockage caused by the spacer. This leads to a local thinning of the liquid film downstream of the spacer. Two statistical evaluation methods are presented to determine different dynamic wave properties: The wave velocity as function of the wave height, the traveling path of the waves and the location of wave separation and merge events. The first evaluation method shows that big waves move generally faster than small waves. The analysis further shows wave acceleration in close proximity of the spacer with subsequent deceleration further downstream. Analyzing the wave as a two-dimensional entity it can be seen that the wave paths are clearly structured by the spacer and hence do not travel circumferentially around the fuel rod. Wave separation and merge has a

  20. Implementation of a phenomenological DNB prediction model based on macroscale boiling flow processes in PWR fuel bundles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohitpour, Maryam; Jahanfarnia, Gholamreza; Shams, Mehrzad

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • A numerical framework was developed to mechanistically predict DNB in PWR bundles. • The DNB evaluation module was incorporated into the two-phase flow solver module. • Three-dimensional two-fluid model was the basis of two-phase flow solver module. • Liquid sublayer dryout model was adapted as CHF-triggering mechanism in DNB module. • Ability of DNB modeling approach was studied based on PSBT DNB tests in rod bundle. - Abstract: In this study, a numerical framework, comprising of a two-phase flow subchannel solver module and a Departure from Nucleate Boiling (DNB) evaluation module, was developed to mechanistically predict DNB in rod bundles of Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR). In this regard, the liquid sublayer dryout model was adapted as the Critical Heat Flux (CHF) triggering mechanism to reduce the dependency of the model on empirical correlations in the DNB evaluation module. To predict local flow boiling processes, a three-dimensional two-fluid formalism coupled with heat conduction was selected as the basic tool for the development of the two-phase flow subchannel analysis solver. Evaluation of the DNB modeling approach was performed against OECD/NRC NUPEC PWR Bundle tests (PSBT Benchmark) which supplied an extensive database for the development of truly mechanistic and consistent models for boiling transition and CHF. The results of the analyses demonstrated the need for additional assessment of the subcooled boiling model and the bulk condensation model implemented in the two-phase flow solver module. The proposed model slightly under-predicts the DNB power in comparison with the ones obtained from steady-state benchmark measurements. However, this prediction is acceptable compared with other codes. Another point about the DNB prediction model is that it has a conservative behavior. Examination of the axial and radial position of the first detected DNB using code-to-code comparisons on the basis of PSBT data indicated that the our

  1. Three dimensional calculations of the primary coolant flow in a 900 MW PWR vessel. Numerical simulation of the accurate RCP start-up flow rate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, A.; Alvarez, D.; Cases, F.; Stelletta, S.

    1997-06-01

    This report explains the last results about the mixing in the 900 MW PWR vessels. The accurate fluid flow transient, induced by the RCP starting-up, is represented. In a first time, we present the Thermalhydraulic Finite Element Code N3S used for the 3D numerical computations. After that, results obtained for one reactor operation case are given. This case is dealing with the transient mixing of a clear plug in the vessel when one primary pump starts-up. A comparison made between two injection modes; a steady state fluid flow conditions or the accurate RCP transient fluid flow conditions. The results giving the local minimum of concentration and the time response of the mean concentration at the core inlet are compared. The results show the real importance of the unsteadiness characteristics of the fluid flow transport of the clear water plug. (author)

  2. Critical heat flux correlation analysis for PWR reactors with low mass flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carajilescov, Pedro

    1996-01-01

    The major limit in the thermalhydraulic design of water cooled reactors consists in the occurrence of critical heat flux, which is verified by correlation of large range of validity. In the present work, the major design correlations were analyzed, through comparisons with experimental data, for utilization in PWR with low mass flux in the core. The results show that the EPRI correlation, with modifications, gives conservative results, from the safety point of view, with lower data spreading, being the most indicated for the reactor thermal design. (author)

  3. Burnup credit feasibility for BWR spent fuel shipments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Broadhead, B.L.

    1990-01-01

    Considerable interest in the allowance of reactivity credit for the exposure history of power reactor fuel currently exists. This ''burnup credit'' issue has the potential to greatly reduce risk and cost when applied to the design and certification of spent of fuel casks used for transportation and storage. Analyses 1 have shown the feasibility estimated the risk and economic incentives for allowing burnup credit in pressurized water reactor (PWR) spent fuel shipping cask applications. This paper summarizes the extension of the previous PWR feasibility assessments to boiling water reactor (BWR) fuel. As with the PWR analysis, the purpose was not verification of burnup credit (see ref. 2 for ongoing work in this area) but a reasonable assessment of the feasibility and potential gains from its use in BWR applications. This feasibility analysis aims to apply simple methods that adequately characterize the time-dependent isotopic compositions of typical BWR fuel. An initial analysis objective was to identify a simple and reliable method for characterizing BWR spent fuel. The method includes characterization of a typical pin-cell spectrum, using a one-dimensional (1-D) model of a BWR assembly. The calculated spectrum allows burnup-dependent few-group material constants to be generated. Point depletion methods were then used to obtain the time-varying characteristics of the fuel. These simple methods were validated, where practical, with multidimensional methods. 6 refs., 1 tab

  4. Three dimensional calculations of the primary coolant flow in a 900 MW PWR vessel. Steady state and transients computations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, A.; Alvarez, D.; Cases, F.

    1996-03-01

    The paper explains the chronological account and the first results obtained in the R and D program on the mixing in the 900 MW PWR vessels. After the presentation of the plant type simulated, we define the numerical tool, the (Finite Element Modelling) FEM N3S code. Two results are presented with a comparison with the experiment results issued of the BORA BORA mock up. The first case is dealing with the isothermal steady state mixing in the vessel with the three loops mass flow rate balanced. This case identified as a validation of our numerical tool shows a good agreement. The second case is dealing with the transient mixing of a clear plug in the vessel when one primary pump starts-up. We compare the numerical and experiment results giving the mean boron concentration at the core inlet for several clear water plugs. The results show again a good agreement. (authors). 12 refs., 10 figs., 1 tab

  5. High fidelity analysis of BWR fuel assembly with COBRA-TF/PARCS and trace codes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abarca, A.; Miro, R.; Barrachina, T.; Verdu, G.; Soler, A.

    2013-01-01

    The growing importance of detailed reactor core and fuel assembly description for light water reactors (LWRs) as well as the sub-channel safety analysis requires high fidelity models and coupled neutronic/thermalhydraulic codes. Hand in hand with advances in the computer technology, the nuclear safety analysis is beginning to use a more detailed thermal hydraulics and neutronics. Previously, a PWR core and a 16 by 16 fuel assembly models were developed to test and validate our COBRA-TF/PARCS v2.7 (CTF/PARCS) coupled code. In this work, a comparison of the modeling and simulation advantages and disadvantages of modern 10 by 10 BWR fuel assembly with CTF/PARCS and TRACE codes has been done. The objective of the comparison is making known the main advantages of using the sub-channel codes to perform high resolution nuclear safety analysis. The sub-channel codes, like CTF, permits obtain accurate predictions, in two flow regime, of the thermalhydraulic parameters important to safety with high local resolution. The modeled BWR fuel assembly has 91 fuel rods (81 full length and 10 partial length fuel rods) and a big square central water rod. This assembly has been modeled with high level of detail with CTF code and using the BWR modeling parameters provided by TRACE. The same neutronic PARCS's model has been used for the simulation with both codes. To compare the codes a coupled steady state has be performed. (author)

  6. BWR 90: The ABB advanced BWR design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haukeland, S.; Ivung, B.; Pedersen, T.

    1999-01-01

    ABB has two evolutionary advanced fight water reactors available today - the BWR 90 boiling water reactor and the System 80+ pressurised water reactor. The BWR 90 is based on the design, construction, commissioning and operation of the BWR 75 plants. The operation experience of the six plants of this advanced design has been very good. The average annual energy availability is above 90%, and the total power generation costs have been low. In the development of BWR 90 specific changes were introduced to the reference design, to adapt to technological progress, new safety requirements and to achieve cost savings. The thermal power rating of BWR 90 is 3800 MWth (providing a nominal 1374 MWe net), slightly higher dim that of the reference plant ABB Atom has taken advantage of margins gained using a new generation of its SVEA fuel to attain this power rating without major design modifications. The BWR 90 design was completed and offered to the TVO utility in Finland in 1991, as one of the contenders for the fifth Finnish nuclear power plant project. Thus, the design is available today for deployment in new plant projects. Utility views were incorporated through co-operation with the Finnish utility TVO, owner and operator of the two Olkiluoto plants of BWR 75 design. A review against the European Utility Requirement (EUR) set of requirements has been performed, since the design, in 1997, was selected by the EUR Steering Committee to be the first BWR to be evaluated against the EUR documents. The work is scheduled for completion in 1998. It will be the subject of an 'EUR Volume 3 Subset for BWR 90' document. ABB is continuing its BWR development work with the 'evolutionary' design BWR 90+. The primary design goal is to develop the BWR as a competitive option for the anticipated revival of the market for new nuclear plants beyond the turn of the century, as well as feeding ideas and inputs to the continuous modernisation efforts at operating plants. The development is

  7. Bidimensional analysis of thermal stratification flow in the surge line of a PWR pressurizer; Analise bidimensional da estratificacao termica do escoamento na linha de surto do pressurizador de um PWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moreira, M L; Botelho, D A

    1994-11-01

    A numerical model is developed in order to understand the coolant thermal stratification and to develop a capability of predicting the failure of reactor components caused by this phenomenon. A period of this phenomenon in the surge line of a PWR reactor is simulated in two dimensions using the TURBO computer program. The flow cylindrical geometry is represented in 2 D by the space between two parallel plates, and the separation of the plates is estimated using similarity (the equivalence in the pressure drop). The results are compared to experimental data and to analogous results obtained from the COMMIX-1 C code (3 D). (author). 13 refs, 9 figs, 1 tab.

  8. UPTF/TEST10B/RUN081, Steam/Water Flow Phenomena Reflood PWR Cold Leg Break LOCA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-01-01

    1 - Description of test facility: The Upper Plenum Test Facility (UPTF) is a geometrical full-scale simulation of the primary system of the four-loop 1300 MWe Siemens/KWU pressurized water reactor (PWR) at Grafenrheinfeld. The test vessel, upper plenum and its internals, downcomer, primary loops, pressurizer and surge line are replicas of the reference plant. The core, coolant pumps, steam generators and containment of a PWR are replaced by simulators which simulate the boundary and initial conditions during end-of-blowdown, refill and reflood phase following a loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA) with a hot or cold leg break. The break size and location can be simulated in the broken loop. The emergency core coolant (ECC) injection systems at the UPTF are designed to simulate the various ECC injection modes, such as hot leg, upper plenum, cold leg, downcomer or combined hot and cold leg injection of different ECC systems of German and US/Japan PWRs. Moreover, eight vent valves are mounted in the core barrel above the hot leg nozzle elevation for simulation of ABB and B and W PWRs. The UPTF primary system is divided into the investigation and simulation areas. The investigation areas, which are the exact replicas of a GPWR, consist of the upper plenum with internals, hot legs, cold legs and downcomer. The realistic thermal-hydraulic behavior in the investigation areas is assured by appropriate initial and boundary conditions of the area interface. The boundary conditions are realized by above mentioned simulators, the setup and the operation of which are based on small-scale data and mathematical models. The simulation areas include core simulator, steam generator simulators, pump simulators and containment simulator. The steam production and entrainment in a real core during a LOCA are simulated by steam and water injection through the core simulator. 2 - Description of test: Investigation of steam/water flow phenomena at the upper tie plate and in the upper plenum and

  9. Detailed pressure drop measurements in single-and two-phase adiabatic air-water turbulent flows in realistic BWR fuel assembly geometry with spacer grids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caraghiaur, Diana; Frid, Wiktor; Tillmark, Nils

    2004-01-01

    In recent years, advance numerical simulation tools based on CFD methods have been increasingly used in various multi-phase flow applications. One of these is two-phase flow in fuel assemblies of Boiling Water Reactors. The important and often missing aspect of this development is validation of CFD codes against proper experimental data. The purpose of the current paper is to present detailed pressure measurements over a spacer grid in low pressure adiabatic single- and bubbly two-phase flow, which will be used to further develop a CFD code for BWR fuel bundle analysis. The experiments have been carried out in a n asymmetric 24-rod sub-bundle, representing one quarter of a Westinghouse SVEA-96 nuclear reactor fuel assembly. Single-phase flow measurements have been performed at superficial velocities between 0.90-4.50 m/s and in the two-phase flow, which was simulated by air-water mixture, measurements have been performed at void fractions ranging from 4 to 12% and liquid superficial velocity of 4.50 m/s. In order to increase the number of measuring points, five pressure taps were drilled in one of the rods, which was easily moved vertically by a traversing system, covering most of the points in axial direction. Any of the rods in the bundle could be substitute by the pressure sensing rod and the measurements were made for five pressure taps facing-angles. A detailed pressure distribution comparison between single- and two-phase flows for different sub-channel positions and different flow conditions was performed over one of the spacers. In addition, single-phase pressure drop measurements in the upper part of the test section comprising two spacer grids have been carried out. (author)

  10. Simulation of single-phase rod bundle flow. Comparison between CFD-code ESTET, PWR core code THYC and experimental results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mur, J.; Larrauri, D.

    1998-07-01

    Computer simulation of flow in configurations close to pressurized water reactor (PWR) geometry is of great interest for Electricite de France (EDF). Although simulation of the flow through a whole PWR core with an all purpose CFD-code is not yet achievable, such a tool cna be quite useful to perform numerical experiments in order to try and improve the modeling introduced in computer codes devoted to reactor core thermal-hydraulic analysis. Further to simulation in small bare rod bundle configurations, the present study is focused on the simulation, with CFD-code ESTET and PWR core code THYC, of the flow in the experimental configuration VATICAN-1. ESTET simulation results are compared on the one hand to local velocity and concentration measurements, on the other hand with subchannel averaged values calculated by THYC. As far as the comparison with measurements is concerned, ESTET results are quite satisfactory relatively to available experimental data and their uncertainties. The effect of spacer grids and the prediction of the evolution of an unbalanced velocity profile seem to be correctly treated. As far as the comparison with THYC subchannel averaged values is concerned, the difficulty of a direct comparison between subchannel averaged and local values is pointed out. ESTET calculated local values are close to experimental local values. ESTET subchannel averaged values are also close to THYC calculation results. Thus, THYC results are satisfactory whereas their direct comparison to local measurements could show some disagreement. (author)

  11. Verification and validation of a numeric procedure for flow simulation of a 2x2 PWR rod bundle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santos, Andre A.C.; Barros Filho, Jose Afonso; Navarro, Moyses A.

    2011-01-01

    Before Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) can be considered as a reliable tool for the analysis of flow through rod bundles there is a need to establish the credibility of the numerical results. Procedures must be defined to evaluate the error and uncertainty due to aspects such as mesh refinement, turbulence model, wall treatment and appropriate definition of boundary conditions. These procedures are referred to as Verification and Validation (V and V) processes. In 2009 a standard was published by the American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) establishing detailed procedures for V and V of CFD simulations. This paper presents a V and V evaluation of a numerical methodology applied to the simulation of a PWR rod bundle segment with a split vane spacer grid based on ASMEs standard. In this study six progressively refined meshes were generated to evaluate the numerical uncertainty through the verification procedure. Experimental and analytical results available in the literature were used in this study for validation purpose. The results show that the ASME verification procedure can give highly variable predictions of uncertainty depending on the mesh triplet used for the evaluation. However, the procedure can give good insight towards optimization of the mesh size and overall result quality. Although the experimental results used for the validation were not ideal, through the validation procedure the deficiencies and strengths of the presented modeling could be detected and reasonably evaluated. Even though it is difficult to obtain reliable estimates of the uncertainty of flow quantities in the turbulent flow, this study shows that the V and V process is a necessary step in a CFD analysis of a spacer grid design. (author)

  12. LES analysis of the flow in a simplified PWR assembly with mixing grid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bieder, Ulrich; Falk, Francois

    2014-06-01

    The flow in fuel assemblies of PWRs with mixing grids has been analyzed with CFD calculations by numerous authors. The comparisons between calculation and experiment are focused on the flow in the near wake of the mixing grid, i.e. on the flow in the first 10 to 20 hydraulic diameters (dh) downstream of the grid. In the study presented here, the comparison between the measurements in the AGATE facility (5x5 tube bundle) and TrioU calculations is done for the whole distance between two successive mixing grids that is up to 0.6m downstream of the grid. The AGATE experiments have originally not been designed for CFD validation but to characterize different types of mixing grids. Nevertheless, the quality of the experimental data allows the quantitative comparison between measurement and calculation. The conclusions of the comparison are summarized below: Linear turbulent viscosity models seem to work rather well as long as the cross flow velocity in the rod gaps is advection controlled, that is directly downstream of the mixing grid, Further downstream, when the cross flow velocity is reduced and isotropic turbulence becomes a more and more important mixing phenomena, linear viscosity models will fail, The mixing grid affects the cross flow velocity up to the successive grid at a distance of about 50dh. The flow in fuel assemblies is never similar to that in undisturbed rod bundles. The test section of the AGATE facility has been discretized on 300 million control volumes by using a staggered grid approach on tetrahedral meshes. 20 days of CPU on 4600 nodes of the HPC machine CURIE of the CCRT was necessary to calculate the statistics of the turbulent flow, in particular the mean velocity and the RMS of the turbulent fluctuations.

  13. LES analysis of the flow in a simplified PWR assembly with mixing grid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bieder, U.; Falk, F.

    2013-01-01

    The flow in fuel assemblies of PWRs with mixing grids has been analyzed with CFD calculations by numerous authors. The comparisons between calculation and experiment are focused on the flow in the near wake of the mixing grid, i.e. on the flow in the first 10 to 20 hydraulic diameters (d h ) downstream of the grid. In the study presented here, the comparison between the measurements in the AGATE facility (5*5 tube bundle) and Trio U calculations is done for the whole distance between two successive mixing grids that is up to 0.6 m downstream of the grid. The AGATE experiments have originally not been designed for CFD validation but to characterize different types of mixing grids. Nevertheless, the quality of the experimental data allows the quantitative comparison between measurement and calculation. The conclusions of the comparison are summarized below. First, the linear turbulent viscosity models seem to work rather well as long as the cross flow velocity in the rod gaps is advection controlled, that is directly downstream of the mixing grid. Secondly, further downstream, when the cross flow velocity is reduced and isotropic turbulence becomes a more and more important mixing phenomena, linear viscosity models will fail. Thirdly, the mixing grid affects the cross flow velocity up to the successive grid at a distance of about 50 d h . The flow in fuel assemblies is never similar to that in undisturbed rod bundles. The test section of the AGATE facility has been discretized on 300 million control volumes by using a staggered grid approach on tetrahedral meshes. 20 days of CPU on 4600 nodes of the HPC machine CURIE of the CCRT (Computer Center for Research and Technology - France) was necessary to calculate the statistics of the turbulent flow, in particular the mean velocity and the RMS of the turbulent fluctuations. (authors)

  14. Alternative cooling water flow path for RHR heat exchanger and its effect on containment response during extended station blackout for Chinshan BWR-4 plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yuann, Yng-Ruey, E-mail: ryyuann@iner.gov.tw

    2016-04-15

    Highlights: • Motivating alternative RHR heat exchanger tube-side flow path and determining required capacity. • Calculate NSSS and containment response during 24-h SBO for Chinshan BWR-4 plant. • RETRAN and GOTHIC models are developed for NSSS and containment, respectively. • Safety relief valve blowdown flow and energy to drywell are generated by RETRAN. • Analyses are performed with and without reactor depressurization, respectively. - Abstract: The extended Station Blackout (SBO) of 24 h has been analyzed with respect to the containment response, in particular the suppression pool temperature response, for the Chinshan BWR-4 plant of MARK-I containment. The Chinshan plant, owned by Taiwan Power Company, has twin units with rated core thermal power of 1840 MW each. The analysis is aimed at determining the required alternative cooling water flow capacity for the residual heat removal (RHR) heat exchanger when its tube-side sea water cooling flow path is blocked, due to some reason such as earthquake or tsunami, and is switched to the alternative raw water source. Energy will be dissipated to the suppression pool through safety relief valves (SRVs) of the main steam lines during SBO. The RETRAN model is used to calculate the Nuclear Steam Supply System (NSSS) response and generate the SRV blowdown conditions, including SRV pressure, enthalpy, and mass flow rate. These conditions are then used as the time-dependent boundary conditions for the GOTHIC code to calculate the containment pressure and temperature response. The shaft seals of the two recirculation pumps are conservatively assumed to fail due to loss of seal cooling and a total leakage flow rate of 36 gpm to the drywell is included in the GOTHIC model. Based on the given SRV blowdown conditions, the GOTHIC containment calculation is performed several times, through the adjustment of the heat transfer rate of the RHR heat exchanger, until the criterion that the maximum suppression pool temperature

  15. BWR reactor water cleanup system flexible wedge gate isolation valve qualification and high energy flow interruption test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DeWall, K.G.; Steele, R. Jr.

    1989-10-01

    This report presents the results of research performed to develop technical insights for the NRC effort regarding Generic Issue 87, ''Failure of HPCI Steam Line Without Isolation.'' Volume III of this report contains the data and findings from the original research performed to assess the qualification of the valves and reported in EGG-SSRE-7387, ''Qualification of Valve Assemblies in High Energy BWR Systems Penetrating Containment.'' We present the original work here to complete the documentation trail. The recommendations contained in Volume III of this report resulted in the test program described in Volume I and II. The research began with a survey to characterize the population of normally open containment isolation valves in those process lines that connect to the primary system and penetrate containment. The qualification methodology used by the various manufacturers identified in the survey is reviewed and deficiencies in that methodology are identified. Recommendations for expanding the qualification of valve assemblies for high energy pipe break conditions are presented. 11 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs

  16. Study of coolant flow distribution within the PWR type reactor vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eberle, L.M.M.

    1983-01-01

    The thermohydraulic design of a pressurized water reactor requires the determination of the coolant flow distributions within the reactor vessel, particulary at the core inlet. In this work it is proposed the study of this flow, using potencial flow theory governed by Laplace's equation, nabla 2 φ = O. The solution of the potential field is obtained by the finite element method, which simplifies considerably the treatment of complex geometrical configurations. The equation is solved by the finite element computer code ANSYS, developed and licensed for structural and thermal analysis by using the analogy between steady state heat transfer equation without heat generation, nabla 2 T=O, and Laplace's equation of the velocity potential. The proposed method has been applied to a commercial reactor, and the results are consistent with the available experimental data. (author) [pt

  17. Study and analysis on the flow induced vibration of the core barrel of PWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yao Weida; Shi Guolin; Jiang Nanyan; Peng YongYong; Zhang Huijun; Wang Yufen; Xie Yongcheng; Guo Chunhua; Shen Qinping

    1989-01-01

    The deduction of the resemblance criterion and the design of the test model by applying flow-solid coupling theory are described. The model analysis of a core barrel both in the air and stationary water were performed in a 1:10 model, thus obtaining the dynamic characteristic. In a 1:5 reactor model with a hydraulic closed loop, the inner structure and support were modeled for performing hydraulic closed loop, the inner structure and support were modeled for performing hydraulic vibration test of the core barrel. The flow induced pulse pressure of the core barrel and corresponding response were obtained by using miniature pressure capsule, strain gauge and accelerometer. Power spectrum, correlation functions, transfer function and amplitudes under different flow velocities were calculated. The hydraulic vibration test shows that the core barrel will be in safety during its 30-year life time

  18. Calculation of local flow conditions in the lower core of a PWR with code-Saturne

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fournier, Y.

    2003-01-01

    In order to better understand the stresses to which fuel rods are subjected, we need to improve our knowledge of the fluid flow inside the core. A code specialized for calculations in tube bundles is used to calculate the flow inside the whole of the core, with a resolution at the assembly level. Still, it is necessary to obtain realistic entry conditions, and these depend on the flow in the downcomer and lower plenum. Also, the flow in the first stages of the core features 4 incoming jets per assembly, and requires a resolution much finer than that used for the whole core calculation. A series of calculations are thus run with our incompressible Navier-Stokes solver, Code-Saturne, using a classical Ranse turbulence model. The first calculations involve a detailed geometry, including part of the cold legs, downcomer, lower plenum, and lower core of a pressurized water reactor. The level of detail includes most obstacles below the core. The lower core plate, being pierced with close to 800 holes, cannot be realistically represented within a practical mesh size, so that a head loss model is used. The lower core itself requiring even more detail is also represented with head losses. We make full use of Code-Saturne's non conforming mesh possibilities to represent a complex geometry, being careful to retain a good mesh quality. Starting just under the lower core, the mesh is aligned with fuel rod assemblies, so that different types of assemblies can be represented through different head loss coefficients. These calculations yield steady-state or near steady-state results, which are compared to experimental data, and should be sufficient to yield realistic entry conditions for full core calculations at assembly width resolution, and beyond those mechanical strain calculations. We are also interested in more detailed flow conditions and fluctuations in the lower core area, so as to better quantify vibrational input. This requires a much higher resolution, which we limit

  19. Measurement of flow phenomena in the vicinity of a PWR tie plate geometry. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, R.S.L.; Srinivasan, J.; Cho, S.K.; Wang, J.L.

    1981-01-01

    The flow of an air-water droplet dispersion in a simulated 3D test section in the reflood portion of LOCA is studied. For this purpose, a new scheme of Laser-Doppler Anemometry for the simultaneous measurement of size and velocity of large-size (0.5mm-6mm) droplets has been developed and utilized. In terms of droplet reentrainment from the tie-plate, three flow regimes have been identified, depending on the velocity level of the flow; the dome formation stage, the oscillating dome stage and the wall film breaking up stage. Detailed measurements have been made in these regimes to obtain the local droplet sizes, droplet velocity distribution, air velocity distributions and momentum flux of both incoming and outgoing dispersion through the tie-plate. It has been observed that the size distribution of the reentrained droplets depends mainly on the flow regimes and is essentially independent of that of the incoming dispersion below the tie-plate. These reentrained droplets are found to be mostly in the neighborhood of 1mm in size and their trajectories on leaving the tie-plate essentially oriented close to the vertical direction. Also the momentum flux of outgoing dispersion differs from that of the incoming dispersion. The measuring technique, the experimental set-up, on-line data acquisition system and the results of the measurements are reported

  20. Prediction of localized flow velocities and turbulence in a PWR steam generator: Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stuhmiller, J.H.

    1988-05-01

    The Steam Generator Project Office (SGPO) of the Steam Generator Owners Group and Electric Power Research Institute has developed a methodology for prediction of steam generator tube buffeting and associated material wear. Turbulent buffeting of steam generator tubes causes low amplitude vibratory response which results in fretting wear at support locations. Concerns raised at the Zion Nuclear Power Plant regarding the useful life of their steam generators prompted this study, in which the SGPO methodology is applied to analysis of the Westinghouse Model 51 steam generator. The specific intent of this project was to calculate turbulent buffeting forces within the tube bank of an operating Model 51 steam generator as a first step in the overall SGPO tube vibration and wear prediction strategy. Attention is focused on flow in the vicinity of anti-vibration bars (U-bend region) and on the flow that leaves the downcomer to impact against peripheral tubes. Other projects utilized the buffeting forces calculated here to determine tube vibratory response, tube-support plate impact statistics, and material wear rates. Besides successfully calculating hydraulic buffeting loads within the tube bank, the present project has enhanced the SGPO methodology and has identified hitherto unnoticed flow phenomena that occur in the steam generator. Experiments have also been carried out to validate numerical computations of the steam generator flow field

  1. An analytical model for the prediction of fluid-elastic forces in a rod bundle subjected to axial flow: theory, experimental validation and application to PWR fuel assemblies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beaud, F.

    1997-01-01

    A model predicting the fluid-elastic forces in a bundle of circular cylinders subjected to axial flow is presented in this paper. Whereas previously published models were limited to circular flow channel, the present one allows to take a rectangular flow external boundary into account. For that purpose, an original approach is derived from the standard method of images. This model will eventually be used to predict the fluid-structure coupling between the flow of primary coolant and a fuel assemblies in PWR nuclear reactors. It is indeed of major importance since the flow is shown to induce quite high damping and could therefore mitigate the incidence of an external load like a seismic excitation on the dynamics of the assemblies. The proposed model is validated on two cases from the literature but still needs further comparisons with the experiments being currently carried out on the EDF set-up. The flow has been shown to induce an approximate 12% damping on a PWR fuel assembly, at nominal reactor conditions. The possible grid effect on the fluid-structure coupling has been neglected so far but will soon be investigated at EDF. (author)

  2. BWR type reactor core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tatemichi, Shin-ichiro.

    1981-01-01

    Purpose: To eliminate the variation in the power distribution of a BWR type reactor core in the axial direction even if the flow rate is increased or decreased by providing a difference in the void coefficient between the upper part and the lower parts of the reactor core, and increasing the void coefficient at the lower part of the reactor core. Constitution: The void coefficient of the lower region from the center to the lower part along the axial direction of a nuclear fuel assembly is increased to decrease the dependence on the flow rate of the axial power distribution of the nuclear fuel assembly. That is, a water/fuel ratio is varied, the water in non-boiled region is increased or the neutron spectrum is varied so as to vary the void coefficient. In order to exemplify it, the rate of the internal pellets of the fuel rod of the nuclear fuel assembly or the shape of the channel box is varied. Accordingly, the power does not considerably vary even if the flow rate is altered since the power is varied in the power operation. (Yoshihara, H.)

  3. The BWR Stability Issue

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    D'Auria, F.

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to supply general information about Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) stability. The main concerned topics are: phenomenological aspects, experimental database, modelling features and capabilities, numerical models, three-dimensional modelling, BWR system performance during stability, stability monitoring and licensing aspects.

  4. CFD analysis of the flow in the near wake of a generic PWR mixing grid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bieder, Ulrich; Falk, François; Fauchet, Gauthier

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • The flow in a 5 × 5 rod bundle with mixing grid is analyzed experimentally and with CFD. • LES and RANS (k–ε) calculations are performed. • The parallelism of the Trio-U code was tested with a strong scaling method. • Close downstream of the grid, k–ε and LES give similar results and fit well the experiment. - Abstract: The flow in fuel assemblies of PWRs with mixing grids has been analyzed with CFD calculations by numerous authors. The comparison between calculation and experiment has often shown an insensitivity of the calculated cross flow velocity on the turbulence modeling. The study presented here was carried out to confirm this result. The comparison between measurements in the AGATE facility (5 × 5 tube bundle) and Trio-U calculations with a linear eddy viscosity turbulence model (k–ε) and Large Eddy Simulations (LES) is presented. The AGATE experiments have originally not been designed for CFD validation but to characterize different types of mixing grids. Nevertheless, the quality of the experimental data allows the quantitative comparison between measurement and calculation. The test section of the AGATE facility has been discretized for the LES calculation on 300 million control volumes by using a staggered grid approach on tetrahedral meshes. 20 days of CPU on 4600 cores of the HPC machine CURIE of the TGCC was necessary to calculate the statistics of the turbulent flow, in particular the mean velocity and the RMS of the turbulent fluctuations. The parallelism of Trio-U was tested up to 10,000 processor cores using strong scaling and has shown a good efficiency up to about 6000 cores, i.e., 40,000 control volumes per core. For various distances from the mixing grid, calculated horizontal profiles of the cross flow velocity and of the axial velocity are compared to measurements. It seems that the flow patterns directly downstream of the grid are insensitive to the used turbulence model. Inertia forces related to the

  5. Development of alternative materials for BWR fuel springs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uruma, Y.; Osato, T.; Yamazaki, K.

    2002-01-01

    Major sources of radioactivity introduced into reactor water of BWR were estimated fuel crud and in-core materials (especially, fuel springs). Fuel springs are used for fixation of fuel cladding tubes with spacer grid. Those are small parts (total length is only within 25 mm) and so many numbers are loaded simultaneously and then total surfaces area are calculated up to about 200 m 2 . Fuel springs are located under high radiation field and high oxidative environment. Conventional fuel spring is made of alloy-X750 which is one of nickel-based alloy and is reported to show relatively higher corrosion release rate. 58 Co and 60 Co will be released directly into reactor water from intensely radio-activated fuel springs surface and increase radioactivity concentrations in primary coolant. Corrosion release control from fuel springs is an important technical item and a development of alternative material instead of alloy-X750 for fuel spring is a key subject to achieve ultra low man-rem exposure BWR plant. In present work, alloy-X718 which started usage for PWR fuel springs and stainless steel type 316L which has many mechanical property data are picked up for alternative materials and compared their corrosion behaviors with conventional material. Corrosion experiment was conducted under vapor-water two phases flow which is simulated fuel cladding surface boiling condition. After exposure, corrosion film formed under corrosion test was analyzed in detail and corrosion film amount and corrosion release amount are estimated among three materials. (authors)

  6. Boron dilution transients during natural circulation flow in PWR-Experiments and CFD simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoehne, Thomas [Forschungszentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (FZD)-Institute of Safety Research, P.O. Box 510119, D-01314 Dresden (Germany)], E-mail: T.Hoehne@fzd.de; Kliem, Soeren; Rohde, Ulrich; Weiss, Frank-Peter [Forschungszentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (FZD)-Institute of Safety Research, P.O. Box 510119, D-01314 Dresden (Germany)

    2008-08-15

    Coolant mixing in the cold leg, downcomer and the lower plenum of pressurized water reactors is an important phenomenon mitigating the reactivity insertion into the core. Therefore, mixing of the de-borated slugs with the ambient coolant in the reactor pressure vessel was investigated at the four loops 1:5 scaled Rossendorf coolant mixing model (ROCOM) mixing test facility. In particular thermal hydraulics analyses have shown, that weakly borated condensate can accumulate in the pump loop seal of those loops, which do not receive a safety injection. After refilling of the primary circuit, natural circulation in the stagnant loops can re-establish simultaneously and the de-borated slugs are shifted towards the reactor pressure vessel (RPV). In the ROCOM experiments, the length of the flow ramp and the initial density difference between the slugs and the ambient coolant was varied. From the test matrix experiments with 0 resp. 2% density difference between the de-borated slugs and the ambient coolant were used to validate the CFD software ANSYS CFX. To model the effects of turbulence on the mean flow a higher order Reynolds stress turbulence model was employed and a mesh consisting of 6.4 million hybrid elements was utilized. Only the experiments and CFD calculations with modeled density differences show stratification in the downcomer. Depending on the degree of density differences the less dense slugs flow around the core barrel at the top of the downcomer. At the opposite side, the lower borated coolant is entrained by the colder safety injection water and transported to the core. The validation proves that ANSYS CFX is able to simulate appropriately the flow field and mixing effects of coolant with different densities.

  7. Problems of two-phase flows in water cooled and moderated reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Syu, Yu.

    1984-01-01

    Heat exchange in two-phase flows of coolant in loss of coolant accidents in PWR and BWR reactors has been investigated. Three main stages of accident history are considered: blowdown, reflooding using emergency core cooling system and rewetting. Factors, determining the rate of coolant leakage and the rate of temperature increase in fuel cladding during blowdown, processes of vapour during reflooding and liquid priming by vapour during rewetting, are discussed

  8. Compact modular BWR (CM-BWR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fennern, Larry; Boardman, Charles; Carroll, Douglas G.; Hida, Takahiko

    2003-01-01

    A preliminary assessment has shown that a small 350 MWe BWR reactor can be placed within a close fitting steel containment vessel that is 7.1 meters inside diameter. This allows the technology and manufacturing capability currently used to fabricate large ABWR reactor vessels to be used to provide a factory fabricated containment vessel for a 350 MWe BWR. When a close fitted steel containment is combined with a passive closed loop isolation condenser system and a natural circulating reactor system that contains a large water inventory, primary system leaks cannot uncover the core. This eliminates many of the safety systems needed in response to a LOCA that are common to large, conventional plant designs including. Emergency Core Flooding, Automatic Depressurization System, Active Residual Heat Removal, Safety Related Auxiliary Cooling, Safety Related Diesel Generators, Hydrogen Re-Combiners, Ex-vessel Core Retention and Cooling. By fabricating the containment in a factory and eliminating most of the conventional safety systems, the construction schedule is shortened and the capital cost reduced to levels that would not otherwise be possible for a relatively small modular BWR. This makes the CM-BWR a candidate for applications where smaller incremental power additions are desired relative to a large ALWR or where the local infrastructure is not able to accommodate a conventional ALWR plant rated at 1350 MWe or more. This paper presents a preliminary design description of a Compact Modular BWR (CM-BWR) whose design features dramatically reduce the size and cost of the reactor building and associated safety systems. (author)

  9. Thermal-hydraulic analysis of PWR core including intermediate flow mixers with the THYC code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mur, J.; Meignin, J.C.

    1997-07-01

    Departure from nucleate boiling (DNB) is one of the major limiting factors of pressurized water reactors (PWRs). Safety requires that occurrence of DNB should be precluded under normal or incidental operating conditions. The thermal-hydraulic THYC code developed by EDF is described. The code is devoted to heat and mass transfer in nuclear components. Critical Heat Flux (CHF) is predicted from local thermal-hydraulic parameters such as pressure, mass flow rate, and quality. A three stage methodology to evaluate thermal margins in order to perform standard core design is described. (K.A.)

  10. Thermal-hydraulic analysis of PWR core including intermediate flow mixers with the THYC code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mur, J. [Electricite de France (EDF), 78 - Chatou (France); Meignin, J.C. [Electricite de France (EDF), 69 - Villeurbanne (France)

    1997-07-01

    Departure from nucleate boiling (DNB) is one of the major limiting factors of pressurized water reactors (PWRs). Safety requires that occurrence of DNB should be precluded under normal or incidental operating conditions. The thermal-hydraulic THYC code developed by EDF is described. The code is devoted to heat and mass transfer in nuclear components. Critical Heat Flux (CHF) is predicted from local thermal-hydraulic parameters such as pressure, mass flow rate, and quality. A three stage methodology to evaluate thermal margins in order to perform standard core design is described. (K.A.) 8 refs.

  11. An experimental and analytical study of fluid flow and critical heat flux in PWR fuel elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bowditch, F.H.; Mogford, D.J.

    1987-02-01

    This report describes experiments that have been carried out at the Winfrith Establishment of the United Kingdom Atomic Energy Authority to determine the critical heat flux characteristics of pressurized water reactor fuel elements over an unusually wide range of coolant flow conditions that are relevant to both normal and fault conditions of reactor operation. The experiments were carried out in the TITAN loop using an electrically heated bundle of 25 rods of 9.5 mm diameter on a 12.7 mm pitch fitted with plain grids in order to provide a generic base for code validation. The fully tabulated experimental data for critical heat flux, pressure drop and sub-channel mixing are encompassed by ranges of pressure between 20 and 160 Bar, coolant flow between 150 and 3600 Kg/m 2 s, and coolant inlet temperature between 150 and 320 0 C. The results of the experiments are compared with predicted data based upon several established critical heat flux correlations. It is concluded that the extrapolation of some correlations to conditions beyond their intended range of application can lead to dangerous over estimates of critical heat flux, but the Winfrith WSC-2 and the EPRI NP-2609 correlations perform well over the whole data range and correlate all data with RMS errors of 9% and 6% respectively. (author)

  12. Illustration interface of accident progression in PWR by quick inference based on multilevel flow models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshikawa, H.; Ouyang, J.; Niwa, Y.

    2006-01-01

    In this paper, a new accident inference method is proposed by using a goal and function oriented modeling method called Multilevel Flow Model focusing on explaining the causal-consequence relations and the objective of automatic action in the accident of nuclear power plant. Users can easily grasp how the various plant parameters will behave and how the various safety facilities will be activated sequentially to cope with the accident until the nuclear power plants are settled into safety state, i.e., shutdown state. The applicability of the developed method was validated by the conduction of internet-based 'view' experiment to the voluntary respondents, and in the future, further elaboration of interface design and the further introduction of instruction contents will be developed to make it become the usable CAI system. (authors)

  13. K-TIF: a two-fluid computer program for downcomer flow dynamics. [PWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amsden, A.A.; Harlow, F.H.

    1977-10-01

    The K-TIF computer program has been developed for numerical solution of the time-varying dynamics of steam and water in a pressurized water reactor downcomer. The current status of physical and mathematical modeling is presented in detail. The report also contains a complete description of the numerical solution technique, a full description and listing of the computer program, instructions for its use, with a sample printout for a specific test problem. A series of calculations, performed with no change in the modeling parameters, shows consistent agreement with the experimental trends over a wide range of conditions, which gives confidence to the calculations as a basis for investigating the complicated physics of steam-water flows in the downcomer.

  14. Analysis of the behavior of irradiated BWR fuel rod in storage dry conditions; Analisis del comportamiento de una barra combustible irradiada BWR en condiciones de almacenamiento en seco

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Munoz, A.; Montes, D.; Ruiz-Hervias, J.; Munoz-Reja, C.

    2014-07-01

    In order to complete previous studies of creep on PWR sheath material, developed a joint experimental program by CSN, ENRESA and ENUSA about BWR (Zircaloy-2) sheath material. This program consisted in creep tests and then on the material under creep, compression testing diametral obtaining the permissible displacement of the sheath to break. (Author)

  15. The JAERI code system for evaluation of BWR ECCS performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kohsaka, Atsuo; Akimoto, Masayuki; Asahi, Yoshiro; Abe, Kiyoharu; Muramatsu, Ken; Araya, Fumimasa; Sato, Kazuo

    1982-12-01

    Development of respective computer code system of BWR and PWR for evaluation of ECCS has been conducted since 1973 considering the differences of the reactor cooling system, core structure and ECCS. The first version of the BWR code system, of which developmental work started earlier than that of the PWR, has been completed. The BWR code system is designed to provide computational tools to analyze all phases of LOCAs and to evaluate the performance of the ECCS including an ''Evaluation Model (EM)'' feature in compliance with the requirements of the current Japanese Evaluation Guideline of ECCS. The BWR code system could be used for licensing purpose, i.e. for ECCS performance evaluation or audit calculations to cross-examine the methods and results of applicants or vendors. The BWR code system presented in this report comprises several computer codes, each of which analyzes a particular phase of a LOCA or a system blowdown depending on a range of LOCAs, i.e. large and small breaks in a variety of locations in the reactor system. The system includes ALARM-B1, HYDY-B1 and THYDE-B1 for analysis of the system blowdown for various break sizes, THYDE-B-REFLOOD for analysis of the reflood phase and SCORCH-B2 for the calculation of the fuel assembl hot plane temperature. When the multiple codes are used to analyze a broad range of LOCA as stated above, it is very important to evaluate the adequacy and consistency between the codes used to cover an entire break spectrum. The system consistency together with the system performance are discussed for a large commercial BWR. (author)

  16. Power oscillations in BWR reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Espinosa P, G.

    2002-01-01

    One of the main problems in the operation of BWR type reactors is the instability in power that these could present. One type of oscillations and that is the objective of this work is the named density wave, which is attributed to the thermohydraulic processes that take place in the reactor core. From the beginnings of the development of BWR reactors, the stability of these has been an important aspect in their design, due to its possible consequences on the fuel integrity. The reactor core operates in two phase flow conditions and it is observed that under certain power and flow conditions, power instabilities appear. Studying this type of phenomena is complex, due to that a reactor core is constituted approximately by 27,000 fuel bars with different distributions of power and flow. The phenomena that cause the instability in BWR reactors continue being matter of scientific study. In the literature mainly in nuclear subject, it can be observed that exist different methods and approximations for studying this type of phenomena, nevertheless, their results are focused to establish safety limits in the reactor operation, instead of studying in depth of the knowledge about. Also in this line sense of the reactor data analysis, the oscillations characteristic frequencies are obtained for trying to establish if the power is growing or decreasing. In addition to that before mentioned in this paper it is presented a rigorous study applying the volumetric average method, for obtaining the vacuum waves propagation velocities and its possible connection with the power oscillations. (Author)

  17. CFD analysis for the hydrogen transport in the primary contention of a BWR using the codes OpenFOAM and Gas-Flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jimenez P, D. A.

    2014-01-01

    limited number of semi-empirical data, and instead, mathematical relationships are used taking into account the various physical phenomena as well the interactions that occur among them, such as heat transfer between the fluid and the solid walls condensation of water vapor on the walls, the turbulent effects in areas of restricted passage, etc. Taking into account these advantages, this study presents a qualitative and quantitative comparison between the CFD codes OpenFOAM and Gas-Flow related to the transport phenomena of Hydrogen and other gases in the primary containment of a BWR reactor. Gas-Flow is a code of commercial license that is well validated, developed in Germany to analyze the transport of gases in nuclear reactor containments. On the other hand, OpenFOAM is an open source CFD code offering several solvers for different phenomena assessments, in this work, the reacting Foam solver is used because it has a strong similarity to the intended application of Hydrogen transport. In this thesis the results obtained using the reacting Foam solver of OpenFOAM for the calculation of transport of Hydrogen are compared with the results of the Gas-Flow code in order to assess if it is feasible to use the open source code OpenFOAM in the case of Hydrogen transport in primary containment of a BWR reactor. Some differences in the qualitative and quantitative results from both codes were found, the differences (with a maximum error rate of 4%) in the quantitative results were found are small and are considered more than acceptable for this type of analysis, moreover, these differences are mainly attributed to the transport models used, mainly because OpenFOAM uses a homogeneous mixture model and Gas-Flow a heterogeneous one. Implementing appropriate solvers in codes like OpenFOAM has the goal to develop own tools that are applicable to the transport of Hydrogen in the primary containment of a BWR reactor and thus, to gain some independence while not relying on commercial

  18. Hydraulic modeling and simulation of a System Division of Essential Service Water in a BWR plant with Flow master

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vegazo Juzgado, L.; Rodriguez Garcia, G. M.; Mota Coloma, M.

    2012-01-01

    At the conclusion of the project can say that Flow master is a simulation tool that allows you to create your model from a library of components and obtain useful results from the point of view of the operation, engineering and maintenance. Compared to previous software from the point of view of use, can comment that Flow master is a tool which has an intuitive and user-friendly interaction between the user and the program thus facilitating the modeling of the system and definition of the components of same.

  19. Parallel channel effects under BWR LOCA conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, H.; Hatamiya, S.; Murase, M.

    1988-01-01

    Due to parallel channel effects, different flow patterns such as liquid down-flow and gas up-flow appear simultaneously in fuel bundles of a BWR core during postulated LOCAs. Applying the parallel channel effects to the fuel bundle, water drain tubes with a restricted bottom end have been developed in order to mitigate counter-current flow limiting and to increase the falling water flow rate at the upper tie plate. The upper tie plate with water drain tubes is an especially effective means of increasing the safety margin of a reactor with narrow gaps between fuel rods and high steam velocity at the upper tie plate. The characteristics of the water drain tubes have been experimentally investigated using a small-scaled steam-water system simulating a BWR core. Then, their effect on the fuel cladding temperature was evaluated using the LOCA analysis program SAFER. (orig.)

  20. Seismic risk assessment of a BWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wells, J.E.; Bernreuter, D.L.; Chen, J.C.; Lappa, D.A.; Chuang, T.Y.; Murray, R.C.; Johnson, J.J.

    1987-01-01

    The simplified seismic risk methodology developed in the USNRC Seismic Safety Margins Research Program (SSMRP) was demonstrated by its application to the Zion nuclear power plant (PWR). The simplified seismic risk methodology was developed to reduce the costs associated with a seismic risk analysis while providing adequate results. A detailed model of Zion, including systems analysis models (initiating events, event trees, and fault trees), SSI and structure models, and piping models, was developed and used in assessing the seismic risk of the Zion nuclear power plant (FSAR). The simplified seismic risk methodology was applied to the LaSalle County Station nuclear power plant, a BWR; to further demonstrate its applicability, and if possible, to provide a basis for comparing the seismic risk from PWRs and BWRs. (orig./HP)

  1. 3. Workshop for IAEA ICSP on Integral PWR Design Natural Circulation Flow Stability and Thermo-hydraulic Coupling of Containment and Primary System during Accidents. Presentations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2012-04-01

    Most advanced nuclear power plant designs adopted several kinds of passive systems. Natural circulation is used as a key driving force for many passive systems and even for core heat removal during normal operation such as NuScale, CAREM, ESBWR and Indian AHWR designs. Simulation of natural circulation phenomena is very challenging since the driving force of it is weak compared to forced circulation and involves a coupling between primary system and containment for integral type reactor. The IAEA ICSP (International Collaborative Standard Problem) on 'Integral PWR Design Natural Circulation Flow Stability and Thermo-hydraulic Coupling of Containment and Primary System during Accidents' was proposed within the CRP on 'Natural Circulation Phenomena, Modelling, and Reliability of Passive Systems that utilize Natural Circulation'. Oregon State University (OSU) of USA offered to host this ICSP. This ICSP plans to conduct the following experiments and blind/open simulations with system codes: 1. Quasi-steady state operation with different core power levels: Conduct quasi-steady state operation with step-wise increase of core power level in order to observe single phase natural circulation flow according to power level. The experimental facility and operating conditions for an integral PWR will be used. 2. Thermo-hydraulic Coupling between Primary system and Containment: Conduct a loss of feedwater transient with subsequent ADS blowdown and long term cooling to determine the progression of a loss of feedwater transient by natural circulation through primary and containment systems. These tests would examine the blowdown phase as well as the long term cooling using sump natural circulation by coupling the primary to containment systems. This data could be used for the evaluation of system codes to determine if they model specific phenomena in an accurate manner. OSU completed planned two ICSP tests in July 2011 and real initial and boundary conditions measured from the

  2. ROX PWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akie, H.; Yamashita, T.; Shirasu, N.; Takano, H.; Anoda, Y.; Kimura, H.

    1999-01-01

    For an efficient burnup of excess plutonium from nuclear reactors spent fuels and dismantled warheads, plutonium rock-like oxide(ROX) fuel has been investigated. The ROX fuel is expected to provide high Pu transmutation capability, irradiation stability and chemical and geological stability. While, a zirconia-based ROX(Zr-ROX)-fueled PWR core has some problems of Doppler reactivity coefficient and power peaking factor. For the improvement of these characteristics, two approaches were considered: the additives such as UO 2 , ThO 2 and Er 2 O 3 , and a heterogeneous core with Zr-ROX and UO 2 assemblies. As a result, the additives UO 2 + Er 2 O 3 are found to sufficiently improve the reactivity coefficients and accident behavior, and to flatten power distribution. On the other hand, in the 1/3Zr-ROX + 2/3UO 2 heterogeneous core, further reduction of power peaking seems necessary. (author)

  3. Development of advanced BWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toyota, Masatoshi

    1982-01-01

    The Japanese technology and domestic production of BWR type nuclear power plants have been established through the experiences in the construction and operation of BWRs in addition to the technical agreement with the General Electric Co. In early days, the plants experienced some trouble such as stress corrosion cracking and some inconvenience in the operation and maintenance. The government, electric power companies and BWR manufacturers have endeavored to standardize and improve the design of LWRs for the purpose of improving the safety, reliability and the rate of operation and reducing the radiation exposure dose of plant workers. The first and second stages of the standardization and improvement of LWRs have been completed. Five manufacturers of BWRs in the world have continued the conceptual design of a new version of BWR power plants. It was concluded that this is the most desirable version of BWR nuclear power stations, but the technical and economic evaluation must be made before the commercial application. Six electric power companies and three manufacturers of BWRs in Japan set up the organization to develop the technology in cooperation. The internal pump system, the new control rod drive mechanism and others are the main features. (Kako, I.)

  4. BWR stability analysis at Brookhaven National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wulff, W.; Cheng, H.S.; Mallen, A.N.; Rohatgi, U.S.

    1991-01-01

    Following the unexpected, but safely terminated, power and flow oscillations in the LaSalle-2 Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) on March 9, 1988, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) Offices of Nuclear Reactor Regulation (NRR) and of Analysis and Evaluation of Operational Data (AEOD) requested that the Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research (RES) carry out BWR stability analyses, centered around fourteen specific questions. Ten of the fourteen questions address BWR stability issues in general and are dealt with in this paper. The other four questions address local, out-of-phase oscillations and matters of instrumentation; they fall outside the scope of the work reported here. It was the purpose of the work documented in this report to answer ten of the fourteen NRC-stipulated questions. Nine questions are answered by analyzing the LaSalle-2 instability and related BWR transients with the BNL Engineering Plant Analyzer (EPA) and by performing an uncertainty assessment of the EPA predictions. The tenth question is answered on the basis of first principles. The ten answers are summarized

  5. Conceptual design of simplified PWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tabata, Hiroaki

    1996-01-01

    The limited availability for location of nuclear power plant in Japan makes plants with higher power ratings more desirable. Having no intention of constructing medium-sized plants as a next generation standard plant, Japanese utilities are interested in applying passive technologies to large ones. So, Japanese utilities have studied large passive plants based on AP600 and SBWR as alternative future LWRs. In a joint effort to develop a new generation nuclear power plant which is more friendly to operator and maintenance personnel and is economically competitive with alternative sources of power generation, JAPC and Japanese Utilities started the study to modify AP600 and SBWR, in order to accommodate the Japanese requirements. During a six year program up to 1994, basic concepts for 1000 MWe class Simplified PWR (SPWR) and Simplified BWR (SBWR) were developed, though there still remain several areas to be improved. These studies have now stepped into the phase of reducing construction cost and searching for maximum power rating that can be attained by reasonably practical technology. These results also suggest that it is hopeful to develop a large 3-loop passive plant (∼1200 MWe). Since Korea mainly deals with PWR, this paper summarizes SPWR study. The SPWR is jointly studied by JAPC, Japanese PWR Utilities, EdF, WH and Mitsubishi Heavy Industry. Using the AP-600 reference design as a basis, we enlarged the plant size to 3-loops and added engineering features to conform with Japanese practice and Utilities' preference. The SPWR program definitively confirmed the feasibility of a passive plant with an NSSS rating about 1000 MWe and 3 loops. (J.P.N.)

  6. Numerical simulations of counter-current two-phase flow experiments in a PWR hot leg model using an interfacial area density model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoehne, Thomas, E-mail: t.hoehne@hzdr.de [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (HZDR), Institute of Safety Research, P.O. Box 510 119, D-01314 Dresden (Germany); Deendarlianto,; Lucas, Dirk [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (HZDR), Institute of Safety Research, P.O. Box 510 119, D-01314 Dresden (Germany)

    2011-10-15

    In order to improve the understanding of counter-current two-phase flows and to validate new physical models, CFD simulations of 1/3rd scale model of the hot leg of a German Konvoi PWR with rectangular cross section was performed. Selected counter-current flow limitation (CCFL) experiments at the Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (HZDR) were calculated with ANSYS CFX 12.1 using the multi-fluid Euler-Euler modeling approach. The transient calculations were carried out using a gas/liquid inhomogeneous multiphase flow model coupled with a k-{omega} turbulence model for each phase. In the simulation, the surface drag was approached by a new correlation inside the Algebraic Interfacial Area Density (AIAD) model. The AIAD model allows the detection of the morphological form of the two phase flow and the corresponding switching via a blending function of each correlation from one object pair to another. As a result this model can distinguish between bubbles, droplets and the free surface using the local liquid phase volume fraction value. A comparison with the high-speed video observations shows a good qualitative agreement. The results indicated that quantitative agreement of the CCFL characteristics between calculation and experimental data was obtained. The goal is to provide an easy usable AIAD framework for all Code users, with the possibility of the implementation of their own correlations.

  7. Numerical simulations of counter-current two-phase flow experiments in a PWR hot leg model using an interfacial area density model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hohne, T.; Deendarlianto; Vallee, C.; Lucas, D.; Beyer, M., E-mail: t.hoehne@hzdr.de [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (HZDR), Inst. of Safety Research, Dresden (Germany)

    2011-07-01

    In order to improve the understanding of counter-current two-phase flows and to validate new physical models, CFD simulations of 1/3rd scale model of the hot leg of a German Konvoi PWR with rectangular cross section was performed. Selected counter-current flow limitation (CCFL) experiments at the Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden- Rossendorf (HZDR) were calculated with ANSYS CFX 12.1 using the multi-fluid Euler-Euler modeling approach. The transient calculations were carried out using a gas/liquid inhomogeneous multiphase flow model coupled with a SST turbulence model for each phase. In the simulation, the surface drag was approached by a new correlation inside the Algebraic Interfacial Area Density (AIAD) model. The AIAD model allows the detection of the morphological form of the two phase flow and the corresponding switching via a blending function of each correlation from one object pair to another. As a result this model can distinguish between bubbles, droplets and the free surface using the local liquid phase volume fraction value. A comparison with the high-speed video observations shows a good qualitative agreement. The results indicated that quantitative agreement of the CCFL characteristics between calculation and experimental data was obtained. The goal is to provide an easy usable AIAD framework for all ANSYS CFX users, with the possibility of the implementation of their own correlations. (author)

  8. Simulation of decreasing reactor power level with BWR simulator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suwoto; Zuhair; Rivai, Abu Khalid

    2002-01-01

    Study on characteristic of BWR using Desktop PC Based Simulator Program was analysed. This simulator is more efficient and cheaper for analyzing of characteristic and dynamic respond than full scope simulator for decreasing power level of BW. Dynamic responses of BWR reactor was investigated during the power level reduction from 100% FP (Full Power) which is 3926 MWth to 0% FP with 25% steps and 1 % FP/sec rate. The overall results for core flow rate, reactor steam flow, feed-water flow and turbine-generator power show tendency proportional to reduction of reactor power. This results show that reactor power control in BWR could be done by control of re-circulation flow that alter the density of water used as coolant and moderator. Decreasing the re-circulation flow rate will decrease void density which has negative reactivity and also affect the position of control rods

  9. Eulerian fluid-structure analysis of BWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McMaster, W.H.

    1979-05-01

    A fluid-structure-interaction algorithm is developed for the analysis of the dynamic response of a BWR pressure-suppression pool and containment structure. The method is incorporated into a two-dimensional semi-implicit Eulerian hydrodynamics code, PELE-IC, for the solution of incompressible flow coupled to flexible structures. The fluid, structure, and coupling algorithms have been verified by calculation of solved problems from the literature and by comparison with air and steam blowdown experiments

  10. PREDICTIVE METHODS FOR STABILITY MARGIN IN BWR

    OpenAIRE

    MELARA SAN ROMÁN, JOSÉ

    2016-01-01

    [EN] Power and flow oscillations in a BWR are very undesirable. One of the major concerns is to ensure, during power oscillations, compliance with GDC 10 and 12. GDC 10 requires that the reactor core be designed with appropriate margin to assure that specified acceptable fuel design limits will not be exceeded during any condition of normal operation, including the effects of anticipated operational occurrences. GDC 12 requires assurance that power oscillations which can result in conditions ...

  11. CFD analysis for the hydrogen transport in the primary contention of a BWR using the codes OpenFOAM and Gas-Flow; Analisis CFD para el transporte de hidrogeno en la contencion primaria de un reactor BWR usando los codigos OpenFOAM y GasFlow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jimenez P, D. A.

    2014-07-01

    using a limited number of semi-empirical data, and instead, mathematical relationships are used taking into account the various physical phenomena as well the interactions that occur among them, such as heat transfer between the fluid and the solid walls condensation of water vapor on the walls, the turbulent effects in areas of restricted passage, etc. Taking into account these advantages, this study presents a qualitative and quantitative comparison between the CFD codes OpenFOAM and Gas-Flow related to the transport phenomena of Hydrogen and other gases in the primary containment of a BWR reactor. Gas-Flow is a code of commercial license that is well validated, developed in Germany to analyze the transport of gases in nuclear reactor containments. On the other hand, OpenFOAM is an open source CFD code offering several solvers for different phenomena assessments, in this work, the reacting Foam solver is used because it has a strong similarity to the intended application of Hydrogen transport. In this thesis the results obtained using the reacting Foam solver of OpenFOAM for the calculation of transport of Hydrogen are compared with the results of the Gas-Flow code in order to assess if it is feasible to use the open source code OpenFOAM in the case of Hydrogen transport in primary containment of a BWR reactor. Some differences in the qualitative and quantitative results from both codes were found, the differences (with a maximum error rate of 4%) in the quantitative results were found are small and are considered more than acceptable for this type of analysis, moreover, these differences are mainly attributed to the transport models used, mainly because OpenFOAM uses a homogeneous mixture model and Gas-Flow a heterogeneous one. Implementing appropriate solvers in codes like OpenFOAM has the goal to develop own tools that are applicable to the transport of Hydrogen in the primary containment of a BWR reactor and thus, to gain some independence while not relying on

  12. ROX PWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akie, H.; Yamashita, T.; Shirasu, N.; Takano, H.; Anoda, Y.; Kimura, H. [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    1999-12-01

    For an efficient burnup of excess plutonium from nuclear reactors spent fuels and dismantled warheads, plutonium rock-like oxide(ROX) fuel has been investigated. The ROX fuel is expected to provide high Pu transmutation capability, irradiation stability and chemical and geological stability. While, a zirconia-based ROX(Zr-ROX)-fueled PWR core has some problems of Doppler reactivity coefficient and power peaking factor. For the improvement of these characteristics, two approaches were considered: the additives such as UO{sub 2}, ThO{sub 2} and Er{sub 2}O{sub 3}, and a heterogeneous core with Zr-ROX and UO{sub 2} assemblies. As a result, the additives UO{sub 2}+ Er{sub 2}O{sub 3} are found to sufficiently improve the reactivity coefficients and accident behavior, and to flatten power distribution. On the other hand, in the 1/3Zr-ROX + 2/3UO{sub 2} heterogeneous core, further reduction of power peaking seems necessary. (author)

  13. BWR stability analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valtonen, K.

    1990-01-01

    The objective of this study has been to examine TVO-I oscillation incident, which occured in February 22.1987 and to find out safety implications of oscillations in ATWS incidents. Calculations have been performed with RAMONA-3B and TRAB codes. RAMONA-3B is a BWR transient analysis code with three-dimencional neutron kinetics and nonequilibrium, nonhomogeneous thermal hydraulics. TRAB code is a one-dimencional BWR transient code which uses methods similar to RAMONA-3B. The results have shown that both codes are capable of analyzing of the oscillation incidents. Both out-of-phase and in-phase oscillations are possible. If the reactor scram fails (ATWS) during oscillations the severe fuel failures are always possible and the reactor core may exceed the prompt criticality

  14. TRAC-BWR development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weaver, W.L.; Rouhani, S.Z.

    1983-01-01

    The TRAC-BD1/MOD1 code containing many new or improved models has been assembled and is undergoing developmental assessment and testing and should be available shortly. The preparation of the manual for this code version is underway and should be available to the USNRC and their designated contractors by April of 1984. Finally work is currently underway on a fast running version of TRAC-BWR which will contain a one-dimensional neutron kinetics model

  15. Neutron Collar Evolution and Fresh PWR Assembly Measurements with a New Fast Neutron Passive Collar

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Menlove, Howard Olsen [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Geist, William H. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Root, Margaret A. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Rael, Carlos D. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Belian, Anthony P. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-11-02

    The passive neutron collar approach removes the effect of poison rods when using a 1mm Gd liner. This project sets out to solve the following challenges: BWR fuel assemblies have less mass and less neutron multiplication than PWR; and effective removal of cosmic ray spallation neutron bursts needed via QC tests.

  16. BWR AXIAL PROFILE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huffer, J.

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this calculation is to develop axial profiles for estimating the axial variation in burnup of a boiling water reactor (BWR) assembly spent nuclear fuel (SNF) given the average burnup of an assembly. A discharged fuel assembly typically exhibits higher burnup in the center and lower burnup at the ends of the assembly. Criticality safety analyses taking credit for SNF burnup must account for axially varying burnup relative to calculations based on uniformly distributed assembly average burnup due to the under-burned tips. Thus, accounting for axially varying burnup in criticality analyses is also referred to as accounting for the ''end effect'' reactivity. The magnitude of the reactivity change due to ''end effect'' is dependent on the initial assembly enrichment, the assembly average burnup, and the particular axial profile characterizing the burnup distribution. The set of bounding axial profiles should incorporate multiple BWR core designs and provide statistical confidence (95 percent confidence that 95 percent of the population is bound by the profile) that end nodes are conservatively represented. The profiles should also conserve the overall burnup of the fuel assembly. More background on BWR axial profiles is provided in Attachment I

  17. Experience of Areva in fuel services for PWR and BWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morales, I.

    2015-01-01

    AREVA being an integrated supplier of fuel assemblies has included in its strategy to develop services and solutions to customers who desire to improve the performance and safety of their fuel. These services go beyond the simple 'after sale' services that can be expected from a fuel supplier: The portfolio of AREVA includes a wide variety of services, from scientific calculations to fuel handling services in a nuclear power plant. AREVA is committed to collaborate and to propose best-in-class solutions that really make the difference for the customer, based on 40 years of Fuel design and manufacturing experience. (Author)

  18. Planning guidance for nuclear-power-plant decontamination. [PWR; BWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Munson, L.F.; Divine, J.R.; Martin, J.B.

    1983-06-01

    Direct and indirect costs of decontamination are considered in the benefit-cost analysis. A generic form of the benefit-cost ratio is evaluated in monetary and nonmonetary terms, and values of dollar per man-rem are cited. Federal and state agencies that may have jurisiction over various aspects of decontamination and waste disposal activities are identified. Methods of decontamination, their general effectiveness, and the advantages and disadvantages of each are outlined. Dilute or concentrated chemical solutions are usually used in-situ to dissolve the contamination layer and a thin layer of the underlying substrate. Electrochemical techniques are generally limited to components but show high decontamination effectiveness with uniform corrosion. Mechanical agents are particularly appropriate for certain out-of-system surfaces and disassembled parts. These processes are catagorized and specific concerns are discussed. The treatment, storage, and disposal or discharge or discharge of liquid, gaseous, and solid wastes generated during the decontamination process are discussed. Radioactive and other hazardous chemical wastes are considered. The monitoring, treatment, and control of radioactive and nonradioactive effluents, from both routine operations and possible accidents, are discussed. Protecting the health and safety of personnel onsite during decontamination is of prime importance and should be considered in each facet of the decontamination process. The radiation protection philosophy of reducing exposure to levels as low as reasonably achievable should be stressed. These issues are discussed.

  19. Failure frequencies and probabilities applicable to BWR and PWR piping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bush, S.H.; Chockie, A.D.

    1996-03-01

    This report deals with failure probabilities and failure frequencies of nuclear plant piping and the failure frequencies of flanges and bellows. Piping failure probabilities are derived from Piping Reliability Analysis Including Seismic Events (PRAISE) computer code calculations based on fatigue and intergranular stress corrosion as failure mechanisms. Values for both failure probabilities and failure frequencies are cited from several sources to yield a better evaluation of the spread in mean and median values as well as the widths of the uncertainty bands. A general conclusion is that the numbers from WASH-1400 often used in PRAs are unduly conservative. Failure frequencies for both leaks and large breaks tend to be higher than would be calculated using the failure probabilities, primarily because the frequencies are based on a relatively small number of operating years. Also, failure probabilities are substantially lower because of the probability distributions used in PRAISE calculations. A general conclusion is that large LOCA probability values calculated using PRAISE will be quite small, on the order of less than 1E-8 per year (<1E-8/year). The values in this report should be recognized as having inherent limitations and should be considered as estimates and not absolute values. 24 refs 24 refs

  20. Further developments of PWR and BWR fuel elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sofer, G.A.; Busselman, G.J.; Federico, L.J.

    1988-01-01

    The performance, safety, and economy of nuclear power plants in inluenced very decisively by the quality of their fuel elements. This is why quality assurance in fuel fabrication has been a factor of great importance from the outset. Operating experince and more stringent performance requirements have resulted in a continuous process of further development of fuel elements, which has been reflected also in lower and lower failure rates and increasingly higher burn-ups. Next to further development also innovation has been an important factor contributing to the present high quality level of fuel elements, which also has allowed fuel cycle costs to be decreased quite considerably. (orig.) [de

  1. Spent fuel data base: commercial light water reactors. [PWR; BWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hauf, M.J.; Kniazewycz, B.G.

    1979-12-01

    As a consequence of this country's non-proliferation policy, the reprocessing of spent nuclear fuel has been delayed indefinitely. This has resulted in spent light water reactor (LWR) fuel being considered as a potential waste form for disposal. Since the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) is currently developing methodologies for use in the regulation of the management and disposal of high-level and transuranic wastes, a comprehensive data base describing LWR fuel technology must be compiled. This document provides that technology baseline and, as such, will support the development of those evaluation standards and criteria applicable to spent nuclear fuel.

  2. Stress-corrosion cracking in BWR and PWR piping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weeks, R.W.

    1983-07-01

    Intergranular stress-corrosion cracking of weld-sensitized wrought stainless steel piping has been an increasingly ubiquitous and expensive problem in boiling-water reactors over the last decade. In recent months, numerous cracks have been found, even in large-diameter lines. A number of potential remedies have been developed. These are directed at providing more resistant materials, reducing weld-induced stresses, or improving the water chemistry. The potential remedies are discussed, along with the capabilities of ultrasonic testing to find and size the cracks and related safety issues. The problem has been much less severe to date in pressurized-water reactors, reflecting the use of different materials and much lower coolant oxygen levels

  3. Safety functions and component classification for BWR, PWR and PTR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-01-01

    The Safety Guide forms part of the IAEA programme, referred to as the NUSS programme (Nuclear Safety Standards), for establishing Codes of Practice and Safety Guides relating to thermal neutron power plants. The present Safety Guide has the following chapters: safety functions, ranking of safety functions, assignment of safety class requirements. Design requirements for structural integrity of boundaries of fluid-retaining components are also discussed

  4. Fuel thermal conductivity (FTHCON). Status report. [PWR; BWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hagrman, D. L.

    1979-02-01

    An improvement of the fuel thermal conductivity subcode is described which is part of the fuel rod behavior modeling task performed at EG and G Idaho, Inc. The original version was published in the Materials Properties (MATPRO) Handbook, Section A-2 (Fuel Thermal Conductivity). The improved version incorporates data which were not included in the previous work and omits some previously used data which are believed to come from cracked specimens. The models for the effect of porosity on thermal conductivity and for the electronic contribution to thermal coductivity have been completely revised in order to place these models on a more mechanistic basis. As a result of modeling improvements the standard error of the model with respect to its data base has been significantly reduced.

  5. Theory and control calculations. Application to BWR and PWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Velarde, G.; Guerra, J.

    1972-01-01

    A theoretical method to extend the applicability of P 1 approximation to strong absorbers is given. Tables of effective diffusion parameters for slab and cylindrical geometry as well as a summary of expressions for obtaining the extrapolation length in cases of interest, are included. (Author) 21 refs

  6. Steam generators in PWR's

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Michel, R.

    1974-01-01

    The steam generator of the PWR operates according to the principle of natural circulation. It consists of a U-shaped tube bundle whose free ends are welded to a bottom plate. The tube bundle is surrounded by a cylinder jacket which has slots closely above the bottom or tube plate. The feed water mixed with boiling water enters the tube bundle through these slots. Because of its buoyancy, the steam-water mixture flows upwards. Below the tube plate there are chambers for distributing and collecting pressurized water separated by means of a partition wall. By omitting some tubes, a free alloy is created so that the tubes in the center get sufficient water, too. By asymmetrical arrangement of the partition wall it is further possible to limit the tube alloy only to the inlet side for pressurized water. The flow over the tube plate is thus improved on the inlet side. (DG) [de

  7. Image-Processing-Based Study of the Interfacial Behavior of the Countercurrent Gas-Liquid Two-Phase Flow in a Hot Leg of a PWR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gustavo A. Montoya

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The interfacial behavior during countercurrent two-phase flow of air-water and steam-water in a model of a PWR hot leg was studied quantitatively using digital image processing of a subsequent recorded video images of the experimental series obtained from the TOPFLOW facility, Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf e.V. (HZDR, Dresden, Germany. The developed image processing technique provides the transient data of water level inside the hot leg channel up to flooding condition. In this technique, the filters such as median and Gaussian were used to eliminate the drops and the bubbles from the interface and the wall of the test section. A Statistical treatment (average, standard deviation, and probability distribution function (PDF of the obtained water level data was carried out also to identify the flow behaviors. The obtained data are characterized by a high resolution in space and time, which makes them suitable for the development and validation of CFD-grade closure models, for example, for two-fluid model. This information is essential also for the development of mechanistic modeling on the relating phenomenon. It was clarified that the local water level at the crest of the hydraulic jump is strongly affected by the liquid properties.

  8. Investigation of BWR stability in Forsmark 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oguma, R.; Reisch, F.; Bergdahl, B.G.; Lorenzen, J.; Aakerhielm, F.; Kellner, S.

    1988-01-01

    A series of noise measurements have been conducted at the Forsmark-2 reactor during its start-up operation after the revision in 1987. The main purpose was to investigate the BWR stability problem based on noise analysis, i.e. the problem of resonant power oscillation with frequency of about 0.5 Hz, which tends to arise at high power and low core flow condition. The noise analysis was performed to estimate the noise source which gives rise to the power oscillation, to evaluate the stability condition of the Forsmark-2 reactor in terms of the decay ratio (DR), as well as to investigate a safety related problem in connection with the BWR stability. The results indicate that the power oscillation is due to dynamic coupling between the neutron kinetics and thermal-hydraulics via void reactivity feedback. The DR reached as high as ≅ 0.7 at 63% of the rated power and 4100 kg/s of the total core flow. An investigation was made for the noise recording which represents a strong pressure oscillation with a peak frequency at 0.33 Hz. The result suggests that such pressure oscillation, if the peak frequency coincided with that of the resonant power oscillation, might become a cause of scram. The present noise analysis indicates the importance of a BWR on-line surveillance system with functions like stability condition monitoring and control system diagnosis. (orig.)

  9. BWR mechanics and materials technology update

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kiss, E.

    1983-01-01

    This paper discusses technical results obtained from a variety of important programs underway at General Electric's Nuclear Engineering Division. The principal objective of these programs is to qualify and improve BWR product related technologies that fall broadly under the disciplines of Applied Mechanics and Materials Engineering. The paper identifies and deals with current technical issues that are of general importance to the LWR industry albeit the specific focus is directed to the development and qualification of analytical predictive methods and criteria, and improved materials for use in the design of the BWR. In this paper, specific results and accomplishments are summarized to provide a braod perspective of technology advances. Results are presented in sections which discuss: dynamic analysis and modeling; fatigue and fracture evaluation; materials engineering advances; and flow induced vibration. (orig.)

  10. Hydraulic modeling and simulation of a System Division of Essential Service Water in a BWR plant with Flow master; Modelo hidraulico y simulacion de una division del Sistema de Agua de Servicio Esencial de una central BWR con Flowmaster

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vegazo Juzgado, L.; Rodriguez Garcia, G. M.; Mota Coloma, M.

    2012-07-01

    At the conclusion of the project can say that Flow master is a simulation tool that allows you to create your model from a library of components and obtain useful results from the point of view of the operation, engineering and maintenance. Compared to previous software from the point of view of use, can comment that Flow master is a tool which has an intuitive and user-friendly interaction between the user and the program thus facilitating the modeling of the system and definition of the components of same.

  11. Study of the spatial dependence of neutronic flow oscillations caused by fluctuations thermohydraulics at the entrance of the core of a reactor PWR; Estudio de la dependencia espacial de las oscilaciones de flujo neutronico causadas por flucturaciones termohidraulicas a la entrada del nucleo de un reactor PWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bermejo, J. A.; Lopez, A.; Ortego, A.

    2014-07-01

    It presents a theoretical study on spatial dependence of flow oscillations neutronic caused by thermal hydraulics fluctuations at the entrance of the core of a PWR reactor. To simulate, with SIMULATE code - 3K different fluctuations thermohydraulics at the entrance to the core and the spatial dependence of the oscillations and is analyzed neutronic flow obtained at locations of neutron detectors. the work It is part of the r and d program initiated in CNAT to investigate the phenomenon of the noise neutronic. (Author)

  12. EPRI BWR Water Chemistry Guidelines Revision

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia, Susan E.; Giannelli, Joseph F.

    2014-01-01

    BWRVIP-190: BWR Water Chemistry Guidelines – 2008 Revision has been revised. The revision committee consisted of U.S. and non-U.S. utilities (members of the BWR Vessel and Internals Protection (BWRVIP) Mitigation Committee), reactor system manufacturers, fuel suppliers, and EPRI and industry experts. The revised document, BWRVIP-190 Revision 1, was completely reformatted into two volumes, with a simplified presentation of water chemistry control, diagnostic and good practice parameters in Volume 1 and the technical bases in Volume 2, to facilitate use. The revision was developed in parallel and in coordination with preparation of the Fuel Reliability Guidelines Revision 1: BWR Fuel Cladding Crud and Corrosion. Guidance is included for plants operating under normal water chemistry (NWC), moderate hydrogen water chemistry (HWC-M), and noble metal application (GE-Hitachi NobleChem™) plus hydrogen injection. Volume 1 includes significant changes to BWR feedwater and reactor water chemistry control parameters to provide increased assurance of intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) mitigation of reactor materials and fuel reliability during all plant conditions, including cold shutdown (≤200°F (93°C)), startup/hot standby (>200°F (93°C) and ≤ 10%) and power operation (>10% power). Action Level values for chloride and sulfate have been tightened to minimize environmentally assisted cracking (EAC) of all wetted surfaces, including those not protected by hydrogen injection, with or without noble metals. Chemistry control guidance has been enhanced to minimize shutdown radiation fields by clarifying targets for depleted zinc oxide (DZO) injection while meeting requirements for fuel reliability. Improved tabular presentations of parameter values explicitly indicate levels at which actions are to be taken and required sampling frequencies. Volume 2 provides the technical bases for BWR water chemistry control for control of EAC, flow accelerated corrosion

  13. Recycling systems for BWR type reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takagi, Akio; Yamamoto, Fumiaki; Fukumoto, Ryuji.

    1986-01-01

    Purpose: To stabilize the coolant flowing characteristics and reactor core reactivity. Constitution: The recycling system in a BWR type reactor comprises a recycling pump disposed to the outside of a reactor pressure vessel, a ring header connected to the recycling pump through main pipe ways, and a plurality of pipes branched from and connected with the ring header and connected to a plurality of jet pumps within the pressure vessel. Then, by making the diameter for the pipeways of each of the branched pipes different from each other, the effective cross-sectional area is varied to thereby average the coolant flow rate supplied to each of the jet pumps. (Seki, T.)

  14. BWR internals life assurance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herrera, M.L.; Stancavage, P.P.

    1988-01-01

    Boiling water reactor (BWR) internal components play an important role in power plant life extension. Many important internals were not designed for easy removal and changes in material properties and local environmental effects due to high radiation makes stress corrosion cracking more likely and more difficult to correct. Over the past several years, operating experience has shown that inspection, monitoring and refurbishment can be accomplished for internal structures with existing technology. In addition, mitigation techniques which address the causes of degradation are available to assure that life extension targets can be met. This paper describes the many considerations and aspects when evaluating life extension for reactor vessel internals

  15. Analysis of multi-dimensional and countercurrent effects in a BWR loss-of-coolant accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shiralkar, B.S.; Dix, G.E.; Alamgir, M.

    1989-01-01

    The presence of parallel enclosed channels in a BWR provides opportunities for multiple flow regimes in co-current and countercurrent flow under Loss-of-Coolant Accident (LOCA) conditions. To address and understand these phenomena, an integrated experimental and analytical study has been conducted. The primary experimental facility was the Steam Sector Test Facility (SSTF) which simulated a full scale 30deg sector of a BWR/6 reactor vessel. Both steady-state separate effects tests and integral transients with vessel blowdown and refill were performed. The present of multi-dimensional and parallel channel effects was found to be very beneficial to BWR LOCA performance. The best estimate TRAC-BWR computer code was extended as part of this study by incorporation of a phenomenological upper plenum mixing model. TRAC-BWR was applied to the analysis of these full scale experiments. Excellent predictions of phenomena and experimental trends were achieved. (orig.)

  16. Analysis of multidimensional and countercurrent effects in a BWR loss-of-coolant accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shiralkar, B.S.; Dix, G.E.; Alamgir, M.

    1991-01-01

    The presence of parallel enclosed channels in a boiling water reactor (BWR) provides opportunities for multiple flow regimes in cocurrent and countercurrent flow under loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA) conditions. To address and understand these phenomena, an integrated experimental and analytical study has been conducted. The primary experimental facility was the steam sector test facility (SSFT), which simulated a full scale 30deg sector of a BWR/6 reactor vessel. Both steady-state separate effects tests an integral transients with vessel vlowdown and refill were performed. The presence of multidimensional and parallel-channel effects was found to be very beneficial to BWR LOCA performance. The best estimate TRAC-BWR computer code was extended as part of this study by incorporation of a phenomenological upper plenum mixing model. TRAC-BWR was applied to the analysis of these full scale experiments. Excellent predictions of phenomena and experimental trends were achieved. (orig.)

  17. BWR alloy 182 stress Corrosion Cracking Experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horn, R.M.; Hickling, J.

    2002-01-01

    Modern Boiling Water Reactors (BWR) have successfully operated for more than three decades. Over that time frame, different materials issues have continued to arise, leading to comprehensive efforts to understand the root cause while concurrently developing different mitigation strategies to address near-term, continued operation, as well as provide long-term paths to extended plant life. These activities have led to methods to inspect components to quantify the extent of degradation, appropriate methods of analysis to quantify structural margin, repair designs (or strategies to replace the component function) and improved materials for current and future application. The primary materials issue has been the occurrence of stress corrosion cracking (SCC). While this phenomenon has been primarily associated with austenitic stainless steel, it has also been found in nickel-base weldments used to join piping and reactor internal components to the reactor pressure vessel consistent with fabrication practices throughout the nuclear industry. The objective of this paper is to focus on the history and learning gained regarding Alloy 182 weld metal. The paper will discuss the chronology of weld metal cracking in piping components as well as in reactor internal components. The BWR industry has pro-actively developed inspection processes and procedures that have been successfully used to interrogate different locations for the existence of cracking. The recognition of the potential for cracking has also led to extensive studies to understand cracking behavior. Among other things, work has been performed to characterize crack growth rates in both oxygenated and hydrogenated environments. The latter may also be relevant to PWR systems. These data, along with the understanding of stress corrosion cracking processes, have led to extensive implementation of appropriate mitigation measures. (authors)

  18. BWR condensate filtration studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilson, J.A.; Pasricha, A.; Rekart, T.E.

    1993-09-01

    Poor removal of particulate corrosion products (especially iron) from condensate is one of the major problems in BWR systems. The presence of activated corrosion products creates ''hot spots'' and increases piping dose rates. Also, fuel efficiency is reduced and the risk of fuel failure is increased by the deposit of corrosion products on the fuel. Because of these concerns, current EPRI guidelines call for a maximum of 2 ppb of iron in the reactor feedwater with a level of 0.5 ppb being especially desirable. It has become clear that conventional deep bed resins are incapable of meeting these levels. While installation of prefilter systems is an option, it would be more economical for plants with naked deep beds to find an improved bead resin for use in existing systems. BWR condensate filtration technologies are being tested on a condensate side stream at Hope Creek Nuclear Generating Station. After two years of testing, hollow fiber filters (HFF) and fiber matrix filters (FMF), and low crosslink cation resin, all provide acceptable results. The results are presented for pressure drop, filtration efficiency, and water quality measurements. The costs are compared for backwashable non-precoat HFF and FMF. Results are also presented for full deep bed vessel tests of the low crosslink cation resin

  19. BWR type nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamamoto, Toru.

    1987-01-01

    Purpose: To obtain reactor core characteristics with less changes in the excess reactivity due to fuel burnup even when the operation period varies. Constitution: In a BWR type reactor where fuel assemblies containing fuel rods incorporated with burnable poisons are arranged, the fuel assemblies are grouped into first fuel assemblies and second fuel assemblies. Then, the number of fuel rods incorporated with burnable poisons within the first fuel assemblies is made greater than that of the second fuel rods, while the concentration of the burnable poisons in the fuel rods incorporated with the burnable poisons in the first fuel assemblies is made lower than that of the fuel rods incorporated with the burnable poisons in the second fuel assemblies. In the BWR type reactor constituted in this way, the reactor core characteristics can be improved by changing the ratio between the first fuel assemblies and the second fuel assemblies charged to the reactor core, thereby decreasing the changes in the burnup of the excess reactivity. (Kamimura, M.)

  20. BWR zinc addition Sourcebook

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia, Susan E.; Giannelli, Joseph F.; Jarvis, Alfred J.

    2014-01-01

    Boiling Water Reactors (BWRs) have been injecting zinc into the primary coolant via the reactor feedwater system for over 25 years for the purpose of controlling primary system radiation fields. The BWR zinc injection process has evolved since the initial application at the Hope Creek Nuclear Station in 1986. Key transitions were from the original natural zinc oxide (NZO) to depleted zinc oxide (DZO), and from active zinc injection of a powdered zinc oxide slurry (pumped systems) to passive injection systems (zinc pellet beds). Zinc addition has continued through various chemistry regimes changes, from normal water chemistry (NWC) to hydrogen water chemistry (HWC) and HWC with noble metals (NobleChem™) for mitigation of intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) of reactor internals and primary system piping. While past reports published by the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) document specific industry experience related to these topics, the Zinc Sourcebook was prepared to consolidate all of the experience gained over the past 25 years. The Zinc Sourcebook will benefit experienced BWR Chemistry, Operations, Radiation Protection and Engineering personnel as well as new people entering the nuclear power industry. While all North American BWRs implement feedwater zinc injection, a number of other BWRs do not inject zinc. This Sourcebook will also be a valuable resource to plants considering the benefits of zinc addition process implementation, and to gain insights on industry experience related to zinc process control and best practices. This paper presents some of the highlights from the Sourcebook. (author)

  1. BWR 90 and BWR 90+: Two advanced BWR design generations from ABB

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haukeland, S.; Ivung, B.; Pedersen, T.

    1999-01-01

    ABB has two evolutionary advanced light water reactors available today - the BWR 90 boiling water reactor and the System 80+ pressurised water reactor. The BWR 90 is based on the design, construction, commissioning and operation of the BWR 75 plants. The operation experience of the six plants of this advanced design has been very good. The average annual energy availability is above 90%, and total power generation costs have been low. When developing the BWR 90 specific changes were introduced to a reference design, to adapt to technological progress, new safety requirements and to achieve cost savings. The thermal power rating of BWR 90 is 3800 MWth (providing a nominal 1374 MWe net), slightly higher than that of the reference plant ABB Atom has taken advantage of margins gained using a new generation of its SVEA fuel to attain this power rating without major design modifications. The BWR 90 design was completed and offered to the TVO utility in Finland in 1991, as one of the contenders for the fifth Finnish nuclear power plant project. Hence, the design is available today for deployment in new plant projects. Utility views were incorporated through co-operation with the Finnish utility TVO, owner and operator of the two Olkiluoto plants of BWR 75 design. A review against the European Utility Requirement (EUR) set of requirements has been performed, since the design, in 1997, was selected by the EUR Steering Committee to be the first BWR to be evaluated against the EUR documents. The review work was completed in 1998. It will be the subject of an 'EUR Volume 3 Subset for BWR 90' document. ABB is continuing its BWR development work with an 'evolutionary' design called BWR 90+, which aims at developing the BWR as a competitive option for the anticipated revival of the market for new nuclear plants beyond the turn of the century, as well as feeding ideas and inputs to the continuous modernisation efforts at operating plants. The development is performed by ABB Atom

  2. Maturity of the PWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bacher, P.; Rapin, M.; Aboudarham, L.; Bitsch, D.

    1983-03-01

    Figures illustrating the predominant position of the PWR system are presented. The question is whether on the basis of these figures the PWR can be considered to have reached maturity. The following analysis, based on the French program experience, is an attempt to pinpoint those areas in which industrial maturity of the PWR has been attained, and in which areas a certain evolution can still be expected to take place

  3. BWR fuel performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baily, W.E.; Armijo, J.S.; Jacobson, J.; Proebstle, R.A.

    1979-01-01

    The General Electric experience base on BWR fuel includes over 29,000 fuel assemblies which contain 1,600,000 fuel rods. Over the last five years, design, process and operating changes have been introduced which have had major effects in improving fuel performance. Monitoring this fuel performance in BWRs has been accomplished through cooperative programs between GE and utilities. Activities such as plant fission product monitoring, fuel sipping and fuel and channel surveillance programs have jointly contributed to the value of this extensive experience base. The systematic evaluation of this data has established well-defined fuel performance trends which provide the assurance and confidence in fuel reliability that only actual operating experience can provide

  4. BWR type reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yano, Ryoichi; Sato, Takashi; Osaki, Masahiko; Hirayama, Fumio; Watabe, Atsushi.

    1980-01-01

    Purpose: To effectively eliminate radioactive substances released upon loss of coolant accidents in BWR type reactors. Constitution: A high pressure gas jetting device having a plurality of small aperture nozzles is provided above a spray nozzle, that is, at the top of a dry well. The jetting device is connected to a vacuum breaker provided in a pressure suppression chamber. Upon loss of coolant accident, coolants are sprayed from the spray nozzle and air or nitrogen is jetted from the gas jetting device as well. Then, the gases in the dry well are disturbed, whereby radioactive iodine at high concentration liable to be accumulated in the dry well is forced downwardly, dissolved in the spray water and eliminated. (Ikeda, J.)

  5. A simplified spatial model for BWR stability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berman, Y.; Lederer, Y.; Meron, E.

    2012-01-01

    A spatial reduced order model for the study of BWR stability, based on the phenomenological model of March-Leuba et al., is presented. As one dimensional spatial dependence of the neutron flux, fuel temperature and void fraction is introduced, it is possible to describe both global and regional oscillations of the reactor power. Both linear stability analysis and numerical analysis were applied in order to describe the parameters which govern the model stability. The results were found qualitatively similar to past results. Doppler reactivity feedback was found essential for the explanation of the different regions of the flow-power stability map. (authors)

  6. Contribution to the modelling of flows and heat transfers during the reflooding phase of a PWR core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Colas, D.

    1984-01-01

    This thesis contributes to modelise thermohydraulic phenomena occuring in a pressurized water nuclear reactor core during the reflood phase of a LOCA. The reference accident and phenomena occuring during reflooding are described as well as flow regime and heat transfer proposed models. With these models, we developed a code to compute fluid conditions and fuel rods temperatures in a reactor core chanel. In order to test this code, results of computation are compared with experiments (FLECHT Skewed Tests) and a conclusion is drawn [fr

  7. Performance assessment of the commercial CFD software for the prediction of the PWR internal flow - Corrected version

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Gong Hee; Bang, Young Seok; Woo, Sweng Woong; Cheong, Ae Ju; Kim, Do Hyeong; Kang, Min Ku

    2013-01-01

    As the computer hardware technology develops the license applicants for nuclear power plant use the commercial CFD software with the aim of reducing the excessive conservatism associated with using simplified and conservative analysis tools. Even if some of CFD software developers and its users think that a state of the art CFD software can be used to solve reasonably at least the single-phase nuclear reactor safety problems there is still the limitations and the uncertainties in the calculation result. From a regulatory perspective, Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety (KINS) has been presently conducting the performance assessment of the commercial CFD software for the nuclear reactor safety problems. In this study, in order to examine the prediction performance of the commercial CFD software with the porous model in the analysis of the scale-down APR+ (Advanced Power Reactor Plus) internal flow, simulation was conducted with the on-board numerical models in ANSYS CFX R.14 and FLUENT R.14. It was concluded that depending on the CFD software the internal flow distribution of the scale-down APR+ was locally some-what different. Although there was a limitation in estimating the prediction performance of the commercial CFD software due to the limited number of the measured data, CFXR.14 showed the more reasonable predicted results in comparison with FLUENT R.14. Meanwhile, due to the difference of discretization methodology, FLUENT R.14 required more computational memory than CFX R.14 for the same grid system. Therefore the CFD software suitable to the available computational resource should be selected for the massive parallel computation. (authors)

  8. Level controlling system in BWR type reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joge, Toshio; Higashigawa, Yuichi; Oomori, Takashi.

    1981-01-01

    Purpose: To reasonably attain fully automatic water level control in the core of BWR type nuclear power plants. Constitution: A feedwater flow regulation valve for reactor operation and a feedwater flow regulation valve for starting are provided at the outlet of a motor-driven feedwater pump in a feedwater system, and these valves are controlled by a feedwater flow rate controller. While on the other hand, a damp valve for reactor clean up system is controlled either in ''computer'' mode or in ''manual'' mode selected by a master switch, that is, controlled from a computer or the ON-OFF switch of the master switch by way of a valve control analog memory and a turn-over switch. In this way, the water level in the nuclear reactor can be controlled in a fully automatic manner reasonably at the starting up and shutdown of the plant to thereby provide man power saving. (Seki, T.)

  9. Evaluation method of corrosive conditions in cooling systems of nuclear power plants by combined analyses of flow dynamics and corrosion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uchida, Shunsuke [Nuclear Power Engineering Corporation (NUPEC), Tokyo (Japan); Atomic Energy Society of Japan (AESJ) (Japan). Research Committee on Water Chemistry Standard; Naitoh, Masanori [Nuclear Power Engineering Corporation (NUPEC), Tokyo (Japan); Atomic Energy Society of Japan (AESJ) (Japan). Computational Science and Engineering Div.; Uehara, Yasushi; Okada, Hidetoshi [Nuclear Power Engineering Corporation (NUPEC), Tokyo (Japan); Hotta, Koji [ITOCHU Techno-Solutions Corporation (Japan); Ichikawa, Ryoko [Mizuho Information and Research Inst., Inc. (Japan); Koshizuka, Seiichi [Tokyo Univ. (Japan)

    2007-03-15

    Problems in major components and structural materials in nuclear power plants have often been caused by flow induced vibration, corrosion and their overlapping effects. In order to establish safe and reliable plant operation, it is necessary to predict future problems for structural materials based on combined analyses of flow dynamics and corrosion and to mitigate them before they become serious issues for plant operation. The analysis models are divided into two types. 1. Prediction models for future problems with structural materials: Distributions of oxidant concentrations along flow paths are obtained by solving water radiolysis reactions in the boiling water reactor (BWR) primary cooling water and hydrazine-oxygen reactions in the pressurized water reactor (PWR) secondary cooling water. Then, the electrochemical corrosion potential (ECP) at the point of interest is also obtained by the mixed potential model using oxidant concentration. Higher ECP enhances the possibility of intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) in the BWR primary system, while lower ECP enhances flow accelerated corrosion (FAC) in the PWR secondary system. 2. Evaluation models of wall thinning caused by flow accelerated corrosion: The degree of wall thinning is evaluated at a location with a higher possibility of FAC occurrence, and lifetime is estimated for preventive maintenance. General features of models are reviewed in this paper and the prediction models for oxidant concentrations are briefly introduced. (orig.)

  10. Evaluation method of corrosive conditions in cooling systems of nuclear power plants by combined analyses of flow dynamics and corrosion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uchida, Shunsuke; Hotta, Koji; Ichikawa, Ryoko; Koshizuka, Seiichi

    2007-01-01

    Problems in major components and structural materials in nuclear power plants have often been caused by flow induced vibration, corrosion and their overlapping effects. In order to establish safe and reliable plant operation, it is necessary to predict future problems for structural materials based on combined analyses of flow dynamics and corrosion and to mitigate them before they become serious issues for plant operation. The analysis models are divided into two types. 1. Prediction models for future problems with structural materials: Distributions of oxidant concentrations along flow paths are obtained by solving water radiolysis reactions in the boiling water reactor (BWR) primary cooling water and hydrazine-oxygen reactions in the pressurized water reactor (PWR) secondary cooling water. Then, the electrochemical corrosion potential (ECP) at the point of interest is also obtained by the mixed potential model using oxidant concentration. Higher ECP enhances the possibility of intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) in the BWR primary system, while lower ECP enhances flow accelerated corrosion (FAC) in the PWR secondary system. 2. Evaluation models of wall thinning caused by flow accelerated corrosion: The degree of wall thinning is evaluated at a location with a higher possibility of FAC occurrence, and lifetime is estimated for preventive maintenance. General features of models are reviewed in this paper and the prediction models for oxidant concentrations are briefly introduced. (orig.)

  11. BWR-stability investigation at Forsmark 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bergdahl, B.G.; Reisch, F.; Oguma, R.; Lorenzen, J.; Aakerhielm, F.

    1988-01-01

    A series of noise measurements have been conducted at Forsmark 1 during start-up operation after the revision summer '87. The main purpose was to investigate BWR-stability problems, i.e. resonant power oscillations of 0.5 Hz around 65% power and 4100 kg/s core flow, which tend to arise at high power and low core flow conditions. The analysis was performed to estimate the noise source which gives rise to the oscillation, to evaluate the measure of stability, i.e. the Decay Ratio (Dr) as well as to investigate other safety related problems. The result indicates that the oscillation is due to the dynamic coupling between the neutron kinetics and thermal hydraulics via void reactivity feedback. The Dr ranged between values of 0.7 and > 0.9, instead of expected 0.6 (Dr=1 is defined as instability). These high values imply that the core cannot suppress oscillations fast enough and a small perturbation can cause scram. Further it was found that the entire core is oscillating in phase (LPRM's) with varying strength where any connection to the consequences of different fuel (8x8, 9x9) being present simultaneously cannot be excluded. This report elucidates the importance of an on-line BWR-stability surveillance system with functions like stability condition monitoring and control system diagnosis. (orig.)

  12. BWR type reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watanabe, Shoichi

    1986-01-01

    Purpose: To enable to remove water not by way of mechanical operation in a reactor core and improve the fuel economy in BWR type reactors. Constitution: A hollow water removing rod of a cross-like profile made of material having a smaller neutron absorption cross section than the moderator is disposed to the water gap for each of unit structures composed of four fuel assemblies, and water is charged and discharged to and from the water removing rod. Water is removed from the water removing rod to decrease the moderators in the water gap to carry out neutron spectrum shift operation from the initial to the medium stage of reactor core cycles. At the final stage of the cycle, airs in the water removing rod are extracted and the moderator is introduced. The moderator is filled and the criticality is maintained with the accumulated nuclear fission materials. The neutron spectrum shift operation can be attained by eliminating hydrothermodynamic instability and using a water removing rod of a simple structure. (Horiuchi, T.)

  13. BWR emergency procedure guidelines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Post, J.S.; Karner, E.F.; Stratman, R.A.

    1984-01-01

    This chapter describes plans for dealing with reactor accidents developed by the Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) Owners' Group in response to post-Three Mile Island US NRC requirements. The devised Emergency Procedure Guidelines (EPGs), applicable to all BWRs, are symptom-based rather than event-based. According to the EPGs, the operator does not need to identify what event is occurring in the plant in order to decide what action to take, but need only observe the symptoms (values and trends of key control parameters) which exist and take appropriate action to control these symptoms. The original objective was to provide reactor operator guidance in responding to a small break loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA), but subsequent revisions have included other types of reactor accidents. Topics considered include the reactor pressure vessel (RPV) control guideline, the primary containment control guideline, the secondary containment control guideline, the radioactivity release control guideline, multiple failures vs. the design basis, safe limits vs. technical specifications, the technical status, licensing, and implementation. The EPGs are based upon maintaining both adequate core cooling and primary containment integrity

  14. BWR type reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okano, Shigeru.

    1992-01-01

    In a BWR type reactor, control rod drives are disposed in the upper portion of a reactor pressure vessel, and a control rod guide tube is disposed in adjacent with a gas/liquid separator at a same height, as well as a steam separator is disposed in the control rod guide tube. The length of a connection rod can be shortened by so much as the control rod guide tube and the gas/liquid separator overlapping with each other. Since the control rod guide tube and the gas/liquid separator are at the same height, the number of the gas/liquid separators to be disposed is decreased and, accordingly, even if the steam separation performance by the gas/liquid separator is lowered, it can be compensated by the steam separator of the control rod guide tube. In view of the above, since the direction of emergent insertion of the control rod is not against gravitational force but it is downward direction utilizing the gravitational force, reliability for the emergent insertion of the control rod can be further improved. Further, the length of the connection rod can be minimized, thereby enabling to lower the height of the reactor pressure vessel. The construction cost for the nuclear power plant can be reduced. (N.H.)

  15. High burnup (41 - 61 GWd/tU) BWR fuel behavior under reactivity initiated accident conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakamura, Takehiko; Kusagaya, Kazuyuki; Yoshinaga, Makio; Uetsuka, Hiroshi [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    2001-12-01

    High burnup boiling water reactor (BWR) fuel was pulse irradiated in the Nuclear Safety Research Reactor (NSRR) to investigate fuel behavior under cold startup reactivity initiated accident (RIA) conditions. Temperature, deformation, failure, and fission gas release behavior under the simulated RIA condition was studied in the tests. Fuel failure due to pellet-cladding mechanical interaction (PCMI) did not occur in the tests with typical domestic BWR fuel at burnups up to 56 GWd/tU, because they had limited cladding embrittlement due to hydrogen absorption of about 100 ppm or less. However, the cladding failure occurred in tests with fuel at a burnup of 61 GWd/tU, in which the peak hydrogen content in the cladding was above 150 ppm. This type of failure was observed for the first time in BWR fuels. The cladding failure occurred at fuel enthalpies of 260 to 360 J/g (62 to 86 cal/g), which were higher than the PCMI failure thresholds decided by the Japanese Nuclear Safety Commission. From post-test examinations of the failed fuel, it was found that the crack in the BWR cladding progressed in a manner different from the one in PWR cladding failed in earlier tests, owing to its more randomly oriented hydride distribution. Because of these differences, the BWR fuel was judged to have failed at hydrogen contents lower than those of the PWR fuel. Comparison of the test results with code calculations revealed that the PCMI failure was caused by thermal expansion of pellets, rather than by the fission gas expansion in the pellets. The gas expansion, however, was found to cause large cladding hoop deformation later after the cladding temperature escalated. (author)

  16. High Fidelity BWR Fuel Simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, Su Jong [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2016-08-01

    This report describes the Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors (CASL) work conducted for completion of the Thermal Hydraulics Methods (THM) Level 3 milestone THM.CFD.P13.03: High Fidelity BWR Fuel Simulation. High fidelity computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulation for Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) was conducted to investigate the applicability and robustness performance of BWR closures. As a preliminary study, a CFD model with simplified Ferrule spacer grid geometry of NUPEC BWR Full-size Fine-mesh Bundle Test (BFBT) benchmark has been implemented. Performance of multiphase segregated solver with baseline boiling closures has been evaluated. Although the mean values of void fraction and exit quality of CFD result for BFBT case 4101-61 agreed with experimental data, the local void distribution was not predicted accurately. The mesh quality was one of the critical factors to obtain converged result. The stability and robustness of the simulation was mainly affected by the mesh quality, combination of BWR closure models. In addition, the CFD modeling of fully-detailed spacer grid geometry with mixing vane is necessary for improving the accuracy of CFD simulation.

  17. Application of TRAC-BD1/MOD1 to a BWR/4 feedwater control failure ATWS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rouhani, S.Z.; Giles, M.M.; Mohr, C.M. Jr.; Weaver, W.L. III.

    1984-01-01

    This paper begins with a short description of the Transient Reactor Analysis Code for Boiling Water Reactors (TRAC-BWR), briefly mentioning some of its main features such as specific BWR models and input structure. Next, an input model of a BWR/4 is described, and, the assumptions used in performing an analysis of the loss of a feedwater controller without scram are listed. The important features of the calculated trends in flows, pressure, reactivity, and power are shown graphically and commented in the text. A comparison of some of the main predicted trends with the calculated results from a similar study by General Electric is also presented

  18. Thermohydraulic calculations of PWR primary circuits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Botelho, D.A.

    1984-01-01

    Some mathematical and numerical models from Retran computer codes aiming to simulate reactor transients, are presented. The equations used for calculating one-dimensional flow are integrated using mathematical methods from Flash code, with steam code to correlate the variables from thermodynamic state. The algorithm obtained was used for calculating a PWR reactor. (E.G.) [pt

  19. Characteristics of fluctuating pressure generated in BWR main steam lines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, Shiro; Okuyama, Keita; Tamura, Akinori

    2009-01-01

    The BWR-3 steam dryer in the Quad Cities Unit 2 Nuclear Power Plant was damaged by high cycle fatigue due to acoustic-induced vibration. The dryer failure was as attributed to flow-induced acoustic resonance at the stub pipes of safety relief valves (SRVs) in the main steam lines (MSLs). The acoustic resonance was considered to be generated by interaction between the sound field and an unstable shear layer across the closed side branches with SRV stub pipes. We have started a research program on BWR dryers to develop their loading evaluation methods. Moreover, it has been necessary to evaluate the dryer integrity of BWR-5 plants which are the main type of BWR in Japan. In the present study, we used 1/10-scale BWR tests and analyses to investigate the flow-induced acoustic resonance and acoustic characteristics in MSLs. The test apparatus consisted of a steam dryer, a steam dome and 4 MSLs with 20 SRV stub pipes. A finite element method (FEM) was applied for the calculation of three-dimensional wave equations in acoustic analysis. We demonstrated that remarkable fluctuating pressures occurred in high and low frequency regions. High frequency fluctuating pressures was generated by the flow-induced acoustic resonance in the SRV stub pipes. Low frequency fluctuating pressure was generated in an MSL with the dead leg. The frequency of the latter almost coincided with the natural frequency of the MSL with the dead leg. The amplitude of the fluctuating pressures in the multiple stub pipes became more intense because of interaction between them compared with that in the single stub pipe. Acoustic analysis results showed that the multiple stub pipes caused several natural frequencies in the vicinity of the natural frequency of the single stub pipe and several modes of the standing wave in the MSLs. (author)

  20. Deboration in nuclear stations of the PWR type

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-01-01

    Reactivity control in nuclear power stations of the PWR type is realised with boric acid. A method to concentrate boric acid without an evaporator has been studied. A flow-sheet with reverse osmosis is proposed. (author)

  1. A Non-Linear Digital Computer Model Requiring Short Computation Time for Studies Concerning the Hydrodynamics of the BWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reisch, F; Vayssier, G

    1969-05-15

    This non-linear model serves as one of the blocks in a series of codes to study the transient behaviour of BWR or PWR type reactors. This program is intended to be the hydrodynamic part of the BWR core representation or the hydrodynamic part of the PWR heat exchanger secondary side representation. The equations have been prepared for the CSMP digital simulation language. By using the most suitable integration routine available, the ratio of simulation time to real time is about one on an IBM 360/75 digital computer. Use of the slightly different language DSL/40 on an IBM 7044 computer takes about four times longer. The code has been tested against the Eindhoven loop with satisfactory agreement.

  2. BWR Services maintenance training program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cox, J.H.; Chittenden, W.F.

    1979-01-01

    BWR Services has implemented a five-phase program to increase plant availability and capacity factor in operating BWR's. One phase of this program is establishing a maintenance training program on NSSS equipment; the scope encompasses maintenance on both mechanical equipment and electrical control and instrumentation equipment. The program utilizes actual product line equipment for practical Hands-on training. A total of 23 formal courses will be in place by the end of 1979. The General Electric Company is making a multimillion dollar investment in facilities to support this training. These facilities are described

  3. The PWR cores management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barral, J.C.; Rippert, D.; Johner, J.

    2000-01-01

    During the meeting of the 25 january 2000, organized by the SFEN, scientists and plant operators in the domain of the PWR debated on the PWR cores management. The five first papers propose general and economic information on the PWR and also the fast neutron reactors chains in the electric power market: statistics on the electric power industry, nuclear plant unit management, the ITER project and the future of the thermonuclear fusion, the treasurer's and chairman's reports. A second part offers more technical papers concerning the PWR cores management: performance and optimization, in service load planning, the cores management in the other countries, impacts on the research and development programs. (A.L.B.)

  4. Facility of BWR type nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kubo, Mitsuji

    1998-01-01

    A condensate filtering device for cleaning condensate flown from a low pressure turbine and a condensate desalting device are connected by way of a condensate pipeline. Control rod drives (CRD) are disposed to the lower portion of BWR. A CRD pump and one end of a CRD feedwater pipeline are connected in series to the upstream of CRD. The other end of the CRD feedwater pipeline is connected to a CRD water taking pipeline branched from the condensate pipeline. Water is taken to the CRD from downstream of the condensate filtering device and upstream of a connecting portion between a low pressure heater drain pipeline and the condensate pipeline. Flow of impurities leached out of the condensate desalting device to the reactor can be suppressed, and rising of temperature of CRD water by the low pressure heater drain water is prevented. In addition, flowing of dissolved oxygen to the CRD system can be suppressed. (I.N.)

  5. TRAB - A transient analysis program for BWR. Part 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raety, H.; Rajamaeki, M.

    1991-05-01

    TRAB is a transient analysis code for BWRs developed at the Technical Research Centre of Finland. It models the phenomena in the interior of the BWR pressure vessel and in related subsystems. The core model of TRAB can be used separately for LWR modelling. For PWR modelling the core model of TRAB is connected to circuit model SMABRE to form the SMATRA code. This report is a user's manual and documents the structure, contents and preparation of input for TRAB. The structure of TRAB input is very flexible, featuring input groups and subgroups identified with keywords and given in any order as well as data items in free format, freely mixed with explanatory texts. Users interface of the code can be used for modelling within input: through normal input it is possible to create new submodels. These may be functional or tabulated dependencies of the code variables, different types of delays, or ordinary linear differential equations

  6. Influence of local regulations on TN dual purpose BWR casks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samson, P.; Neider, T.

    1999-01-01

    Transnucleaire (Paris, France) and Transnuclear, Inc. (Hawthorne, New York, United Sates) have both developed Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) spent fuel casks for storage and transport purposes. The products are supplied in Europe by Transnucleaire and in the United States by Transnuclear, Inc. Now the TN Group is working on a design for Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) spent fuel assemblies: the TN 52 L cask is designed for transport and storage is Switzerland, the TN 68 cask is designed for transport and storage in the United States. For storage purpose, national regulatory requirements have to be met: each country has specific demands and criteria. As a consequence, differences between the TN 52 L design and the TN 68 design for rather similar contents appear in several fields: the design work, the licensing process, the manufacturing and the operational life. (author)

  7. Assessment of the Prony's method for BWR stability analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ortiz-Villafuerte, Javier; Castillo-Duran, Rogelio; Palacios-Hernandez, Javier C.

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → This paper describes a method to determine the degree of stability of a BWR. → Performance comparison between Prony's and common AR techniques is presented. → Benchmark data and actual BWR transient data are used for comparison. → DR and f results are presented and discussed. → The Prony's method is shown to be a robust technique for BWR stability. - Abstract: It is known that Boiling Water Reactors are susceptible to present power oscillations in regions of high power and low coolant flow, in the power-flow operational map. It is possible to fall in one of such instability regions during reactor startup, since both power and coolant flow are being increased but not proportionally. One other possibility for falling into those areas is the occurrence of a trip of recirculation pumps. Stability monitoring in such cases can be difficult, because the amount or quality of power signal data required for calculation of the stability key parameters may not be enough to provide reliable results in an adequate time range. In this work, the Prony's Method is presented as one complementary alternative to determine the degree of stability of a BWR, through time series data. This analysis method can provide information about decay ratio and oscillation frequency from power signals obtained during transient events. However, so far not many applications in Boiling Water Reactors operation have been reported and supported to establish the scope of using such analysis for actual transient events. This work presents first a comparison of decay ratio and frequency oscillation results obtained by Prony's method and those results obtained by the participants of the Forsmark 1 and 2 Boiling Water Reactor Stability Benchmark using diverse techniques. Then, a comparison of decay ratio and frequency oscillation results is performed for four real BWR transient event data, using Prony's method and two other techniques based on an autoregressive modeling. The four

  8. Analysis of radiological consequences in a typical BWR with a mark-II containment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Funayama, Kyoko; Kajimoto, Mitsuhiro

    2003-01-01

    INS/NUPEC in Japan has been carrying out the Level 3 PSA program. In the program, the MACCS2 code has been extensively applied to analyze radiological consequences for typical BWR and PWR plants in Japan. The present study deals with analysis of effects of the AMs, which were implemented by industries, on radiological consequence for a typical BWR with a Mark-II containment. In the present study, source terms and their frequencies of source terms were used based on results of Level 2 PSA taking into account AM countermeasures. Radiological consequences were presented with dose risks (Sv/ry), which were multiplied doses (Sv) by containment damage frequencies (/ry), and timing of radionuclides release to the environment. The results of the present study indicated that the dose risks became negligible in most cases taking AM countermeasures and evacuations. (author)

  9. BWR stability using a reducing dynamical model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ballestrin Bolea, J. M.; Blazquez Martinez, J. B.

    1990-01-01

    BWR stability can be treated with reduced order dynamical models. When the parameters of the model came from dynamical models. When the parameters of the model came from experimental data, the predictions are accurate. In this work an alternative derivation for the void fraction equation is made, but remarking the physical structure of the parameters. As the poles of power/reactivity transfer function are related with the parameters, the measurement of the poles by other techniques such as noise analysis will lead to the parameters, but the system of equations is non-linear. Simple parametric calculation of decay ratio are performed, showing why BWRs become unstable when they are operated at low flow and high power. (Author)

  10. BWR stability using a reduced dynamical model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ballestrin Bolea, J.M.; Blazquez, J.B.

    1990-01-01

    BWR stability can be treated with reduced order dynamical models. When the parameters of the model came from experimental data, the predictions are accurate. In this work an alternative derivation for the void fraction equation is made, but remarking the physical struct-ure of the parameters. As the poles of power/reactivity transfer function are related with the parameters, the measurement of the poles by other techniques such as noise analysis will lead to the parameters, but the system of equations in non-linear. Simple parametric calculat-ion of decay ratio are performed, showing why BWRs become unstable when they are operated at low flow and high power. (Author). 7 refs

  11. Thermohydraulic stability coupled to the neutronic in a BWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calleros M, G.; Zapata Y, M.; Gomez H, R.A.; Mendez M, A.; Castlllo D, R.

    2006-01-01

    In a BWR type reactor the phenomenon of the nuclear fission is presented, in which are liberated in stochastic form neutrons, originating that the population of the same ones varies in statistic form around a mean value. This variation will cause that when the neutron flow impacts on the neutron detectors, its are had as a result neutron flow signals with fluctuations around an average value. In this article it is shown that it conforms it lapses the time, this variations in the neutron flow (and therefore, in the flow signal due only to the fission), they presented oscillations inside a stable range, which won't be divergent. Considering that the BWR is characterized because boiling phenomena are presented, which affect the moderation of the neutrons, additional variations will be had in the signal coming from the neutron detectors, with relationship to the fission itself, which will be influenced by the feedback of the moderator's reactivity and of the temperature of the fuel pellet. Also, as the BWR it has coupled control systems to maintain the coolant level one and of the thermal power of the reactor, for each control action it was affected the neutron population. This means that the reactor could end up straying of a stable state condition. By it previously described, the study of the thermohydraulic stability coupled to the neutronic is complex. In this work it is shown the phenomenology, the mathematical models and the theoretical behavior associated to the stability of the BWR type reactor; the variables that affect it are identified, the models that reproduce the behavior of the thermohydraulic stability coupled to the neutronic, the way to maintain stable the reactor and the instrumentation that can settle to detect and to suppress uncertainties is described. In particular, is make reference to the evolution of the methods to maintain the stability of the reactor and the detection system and suppression of uncertainties implemented in the Laguna Verde

  12. 14C Behaviour in PWR coolant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sims, Howard; Dickinson Shirley; Garbett, Keith

    2012-09-01

    Although 14 C is produced in relatively small amounts in PWR coolant, it is important to know its fate, for example whether it is released by gaseous discharge, removed by absorption on ion exchange (IX) resins or deposited on the fuel pin surfaces. 14 C can exist in a range of possible chemical forms: inorganic carbon compounds (probably mainly CO 2 ), elemental carbon, and organic compounds such as hydrocarbons. This paper presents results from a preliminary survey of the possible reactions of 14 C in PWR coolant. The main conclusions of the study are: - A combination of thermal and radiolytic reactions controls the chemistry of 14 C in reactor coolant. A simple chemical kinetic model predicts that CH 3 OH would be the initial product from radiolytic reactions of 14 C following its formation from 17 O. CH 3 OH is predicted to arise as a result of reactions of OH . with CH 4 and CH 3 , and it persists because there is no known radiation chemical reduction mechanism. - Thermodynamic considerations show that CH 3 OH can be thermally reduced to CH 4 in PWR conditions, although formation of CO 2 from small organics is the most thermodynamically favourable outcome. Such reactions could be catalysed on active nickel surfaces in the primary circuit. - Limited plant data would suggest that CH 4 is the dominant form in PWR and CO 2 in BWR. This implies that radiation chemistry may be important in determining the speciation. - Addition of acetate does not affect the amount of 14 C formed, but the addition of large amounts of stable carbon would lead to a large range of additional products, some of which would be expected to deposit on fuel pin surfaces as high molecular weight hydrocarbons. However, the subsequent thermal decomposition reactions of these products are not known. - Acetate addition may represent a small input of 12 C compared with organic material released from CVCS resins, although the importance of this may depend on whether that is predominantly soluble

  13. Metallurgical factors that contribute to cracking in BWR piping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weeks, J.R.

    1975-01-01

    During the fall of 1974 and early winter of 1975, cracks have been discovered in the 4 in. bypass lines of several Boiling Water Reactors (BWR's) in the United States. Further, similar cracks were discovered at two BWR's in Japan during the same period. More recently, cracks have been discovered in the core spray piping and in a furnace-sensitized ''safe end'' and adjacent ''dutchman'' at the Dresden Nuclear Power Station, Unit No. 2. Although inspections at all other U.S. BWR's have not disclosed further instances of cracking in core spray piping, leaking cracks have been found in the core spray piping of two BWR's overseas. Metallurgical examinations of these cracks are not yet complete. The following observations have been made to date. All cracks (except those in the furnace-sensitized safe end and dutchman) occurred in seamless type 304 stainless steel piping or in elbows fabricated from such piping, in the outer heat affected zone of either field or shop welds, in lines isolated from the main primary coolant flow during full power operation, except for the not yet examined cracks in the Monticello bypass lines. The cracks are exclusively intergranular, and occur in metal that has been lightly sensitized by the welding process, with only intermittent grain boundary carbides. They developed in the areas of peak axial residual stresses from welding rather than in the most heavily sensitized areas. No fatigue striations have been found on the fracture surfaces. The evidence received to date strongly indicates that these cracks were caused by intergranular stress corrosion of weld-sensitized stainless steel by BWR water containing greater than 0.2 ppM oxygen. The possible role of fatigue or alternating stresses in this corrosion is not clear. Further, not all the cracks detected to date necessarily have occurred by the same mechanism

  14. BWR fuel clad behaviour following LOCA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chaudhry, S.M.; Vyas, K.N.; Dinesh Babu, R.

    1996-01-01

    Flow and pressure through the fuel coolant channel reduce rapidly following a loss of coolant accident. Due to stored energy and decay heat, fuel and cladding temperatures rise rapidly. Increase in clad temperature causes deterioration of mechanical properties of clad material. This coupled with increase of pressure inside the cladding due to accumulation of fission gases and de-pressurization of coolant causes the cladding to balloon. This phenomenon is important as it can reduce or completely block the flow passages in a fuel assembly causing reduction of emergency coolant flow. Behaviour of a BWR clad is analyzed in a design basis LOCA. Fuel and clad temperatures following a LOCA are calculated. Fission gas release and pressure is estimated using well established models. An elasto-plastic analysis of clad tube is carried out to determine plastic strains and corresponding deformations using finite-element technique. Analysis of neighbouring pins gives an estimate of flow areas available for emergency coolant flow. (author). 7 refs, 6 figs, 3 tabs

  15. Method of operating BWR type reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sekimizu, Koichi

    1980-01-01

    Purpose: To enable reactor control depending on any demanded loads by performing control by the insertion of control rods in addition to the control by the regulation of the flow rate of the reactor core water at high power operation of a BWR type reactor. Method: The power is reduced at high power operation by decreasing the flow rate of reactor core water from the starting time for the power reduction and the flow rate is maintained after the time at which it reaches the minimum allowable flow rate. Then, the control rod is started to insert from the above time point to reduce the power to an aimed level. Thus, the insufficiency in the reactivity due to the increase in the xenon concentration can be compensated by the withdrawal of the control rods and the excess reactivity due to the decrease in the xenon concentration can be compensated by the insertion of the control rods, whereby the reactor power can be controlled depending on any demanded loads without deviating from the upper or lower limit for the flow rate of the reactor core water. (Moriyama, K.)

  16. Thermohydraulic stability coupled to the neutronic in a BWR; Estabilidad termohidraulica acoplada a la neutronica en un BWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Calleros M, G.; Zapata Y, M.; Gomez H, R.A.; Mendez M, A. [Comision Federal de Electricidad, Central Nucleoelectrica de Laguna Verde, Carretera Cardel-Nautla Km. 42.5, Mpio. Alto Lucero, Veracruz (Mexico); Castlllo D, R. [ININ, Carretera Mexico-Toluca Km 36.5, La Marquesa, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)]. e-mail: gcm9acpp@cfe.gob.mx

    2006-07-01

    In a BWR type reactor the phenomenon of the nuclear fission is presented, in which are liberated in stochastic form neutrons, originating that the population of the same ones varies in statistic form around a mean value. This variation will cause that when the neutron flow impacts on the neutron detectors, its are had as a result neutron flow signals with fluctuations around an average value. In this article it is shown that it conforms it lapses the time, this variations in the neutron flow (and therefore, in the flow signal due only to the fission), they presented oscillations inside a stable range, which won't be divergent. Considering that the BWR is characterized because boiling phenomena are presented, which affect the moderation of the neutrons, additional variations will be had in the signal coming from the neutron detectors, with relationship to the fission itself, which will be influenced by the feedback of the moderator's reactivity and of the temperature of the fuel pellet. Also, as the BWR it has coupled control systems to maintain the coolant level one and of the thermal power of the reactor, for each control action it was affected the neutron population. This means that the reactor could end up straying of a stable state condition. By it previously described, the study of the thermohydraulic stability coupled to the neutronic is complex. In this work it is shown the phenomenology, the mathematical models and the theoretical behavior associated to the stability of the BWR type reactor; the variables that affect it are identified, the models that reproduce the behavior of the thermohydraulic stability coupled to the neutronic, the way to maintain stable the reactor and the instrumentation that can settle to detect and to suppress uncertainties is described. In particular, is make reference to the evolution of the methods to maintain the stability of the reactor and the detection system and suppression of uncertainties implemented in the

  17. Feasibility of using gadolinium as a burnable poison in PWR cores. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rothleder, B.M.

    1981-02-01

    As an alternative to the use of lumped burnable absorbers in PWR cores, distributed burnable absorbers are being considered for generic application. These burnable absorbers take the form of Gd 2 O 3 mixed with UO 2 in selected fuel rods (as is currently done in BWR cores). The work discussed herein concerns a three-dimensional feasibility study of the use of such distributed burnable absorbers in PWR cores. This study of distributed burnable absorbers was performed for the first cycle of a typical current design PWR using the following steps: analysis of a generic reference core design; determination of gadolinium assembly designs; determination of a generic gadolinium core design; evaluation of feasibility by examining selected parameters; and redesign of the generic gadolinium core, using axial zoning

  18. Improvement for BWR operator training

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsuchiya, Toshio; Masuda, Hisao; Isono, Tomoyuki; Noji, Kunio; Togo, Toshiki

    1989-01-01

    BWR Operator Training Center Corporation (BTC) was established in April 1971 for the purpose of training the operators from all BWR utilities in Japan. Since April 1974, more than 2600 operators and 1000 shift teams have been trained with the full-scope simulators in BTC up to the end of March 1988. To get the satisfactory results of the training, BTC has been making every effort to improve the facilities, the training materials, the instruction methods and the curricula. In this paper, such a series of recent improvements in the instruction methods and the curricula are presented that are effective to expand the knowledge and to improve the skills of middle or senior class operators. (author)

  19. Analysis of the uniform augmentation of the flow through the nucleus in the searching process of the patterns of objective control bars in a BWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Montes, J.L.; Ortiz, J.J.; Perusquia, R.

    2004-01-01

    The search of the patterns of control bars (PBCs) in a power reactor of boiling water, requires to investigate a very wide space of solutions, in principle they are had of the order of 3 x 10 152 possible configurations to establish the PBC in a point given before reaching the end of the cycle. This situation suggests to define those restrictions and conditions initial appropriately so that the search converges toward the desirable results. Presently work the results of the search of patterns of bars based on different flow scenarios through the nucleus are presented. The Cycle 10 is analysed (C10) of the Unit One of the Nuclear Power station Laguna Verde (CNLV), which presents an interesting mixture of diverse designs of control bars used in operation to power. The search of the patterns of bars of objective control is carried out applying the GACRP program which is based on the calculation technique known as genetic algorithms. (Author)

  20. Model for transient simulation in a PWR steam circuit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mello, L.A. de.

    1982-11-01

    A computer code (SURF) was developed and used to simulate pressure losses along the tubes of the main steam circuit of a PWR nuclear power plant, and the steam flow through relief and safety valves when pressure reactors its thresholds values. A thermodynamic model of turbines (high and low pressure), and its associated components are simulated too. The SURF computer code was coupled to the GEVAP computer code, complementing the simulation of a PWR nuclear power plant main steam circuit. (Author) [pt

  1. IVA2 - a computer code for modelling of transient 3D-three phase three component flows using three velocity fields in cylindrical geometry with arbitrary internals including nuclear reactor PWR/BWR-core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kolev, N.I.

    1986-06-01

    This report contains a formal code description (description of the input data, contents of the COMMON blocks, functions of the IVA2/001 routines). In addition the nonformal description of the current IVA2/001 constitutive package and the reactor core model are given. (orig.) [de

  2. Synergistic failure of BWR internals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ware, A. G.; Chang, T.Y.

    1999-01-01

    Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) core shrouds and other reactor internals important to safety are experiencing intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC). The United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission has followed the problem, and as part of its investigations, contracted with the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory to conduct a risk assessment. The overall project objective is to assess the potential consequences and risks associated with the failure of IGSCC-susceptible BWR vessel internals, with specific consideration given to potential cascading and common mode effects. An initial phase has been completed in which background material was gathered and evaluated, and potential accident sequences were identified. A second phase is underway to perform a simplified, quantitative probabilistic risk assessment on a representative high-power BWR/4. Results of the initial study conducted on the jet pumps show that any cascading failures would not result in a significant increase in the core damage frequency. The methodology is currently being extended to other major reactor internals components

  3. BWR control blade replacement strategies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kennard, M W [Stoller Nuclear Fuel, NAC International, Pleasantville, NY (United States); Harbottle, J E [Stoller Nuclear Fuel, NAC International, Thornbury, Bristol (United Kingdom)

    2000-02-01

    The reactivity control elements in a BWR, the control blades, perform three significant functions: provide shutdown margin during normal and accident operating conditions; provide overall core reactivity control; and provide axial power shaping control. As such, the blades are exposed to the core's neutron flux, resulting in irradiation of blade structural and absorber materials. Since the absorber depletes with time (if B{sub 4}C is used, it also swells) and the structural components undergo various degradation mechanisms (e.g., embrittlement, corrosion), the blades have limits on their operational lifetimes. Consequently, BWR utilities have implemented strategies that aim to maximize blade lifetimes while balancing operational costs, such as extending a refuelling outage to shuffle high exposure blades. This paper examines the blade replacement strategies used by BWR utilities operating in US, Europe and Asia by assembling information related to: the utility's specific blade replacement strategy; the impact the newer blade designs and changes in core operating mode were having on those strategies; the mechanical and nuclear limits that determined those strategies; the methods employed to ensure that lifetime limits were not exceeded during operation; and blade designs used (current and replacement blades). (author)

  4. BWR control blade replacement strategies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kennard, M.W.; Harbottle, J.E.

    2000-01-01

    The reactivity control elements in a BWR, the control blades, perform three significant functions: provide shutdown margin during normal and accident operating conditions; provide overall core reactivity control; and provide axial power shaping control. As such, the blades are exposed to the core's neutron flux, resulting in irradiation of blade structural and absorber materials. Since the absorber depletes with time (if B 4 C is used, it also swells) and the structural components undergo various degradation mechanisms (e.g., embrittlement, corrosion), the blades have limits on their operational lifetimes. Consequently, BWR utilities have implemented strategies that aim to maximize blade lifetimes while balancing operational costs, such as extending a refuelling outage to shuffle high exposure blades. This paper examines the blade replacement strategies used by BWR utilities operating in US, Europe and Asia by assembling information related to: the utility's specific blade replacement strategy; the impact the newer blade designs and changes in core operating mode were having on those strategies; the mechanical and nuclear limits that determined those strategies; the methods employed to ensure that lifetime limits were not exceeded during operation; and blade designs used (current and replacement blades). (author)

  5. Development of next BWR plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moriya, Kumiaki; Tanikawa, Naoshi; Kinoshita, Shoichiro; Utena, Shunsuke

    1995-01-01

    It is expected that BWR power generation will be main nuclear power generation for long period hereafter, and in the ABWRs being constructed at present, the safety, reliability, operation performance, economical efficiency and so on are further heightend as compared with conventional BWRs. On the other hand, in order to cope with future social change, the move to develop the next reactor type following ABWRs was begun already by the cooperation of electirc power companies and plant manufacturers. Hitachi Ltd. has advanced eagerly the development of new light water reactors. Also the objective of BWR power generation hereafter is to heighten the safety, reliability, operation performance and economical efficiency, and the development has been advanced, aiming at bearing the main roles of nuclear power generation. At present, ABWRs are under construction as No. 6 and 7 plants in Kashiwazaki Kariwa Nuclear Power Station, Tokyo Electric Power Co., Inc. In order to let ABWRs take root, the further improvement of economy by the standardization, the rationalization by revising the specification and the improvement of machinery and equipment is necessary. As the needs of the development of next generation BWRs, the increase of power output, the heightening of safety and economical efficiency are discussed. The concept of the next generation BWR plant aiming at the start of operation around 2010 is shown. (K.I.)

  6. Development of next BWR plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moriya, Kumiaki; Tanikawa, Naoshi; Kinoshita, Shoichiro; Utena, Shunsuke [Hitachi Ltd., Ibaraki (Japan). Hitachi Works

    1995-04-01

    It is expected that BWR power generation will be main nuclear power generation for long period hereafter, and in the ABWRs being constructed at present, the safety, reliability, operation performance, economical efficiency and so on are further heightend as compared with conventional BWRs. On the other hand, in order to cope with future social change, the move to develop the next reactor type following ABWRs was begun already by the cooperation of electirc power companies and plant manufacturers. Hitachi Ltd. has advanced eagerly the development of new light water reactors. Also the objective of BWR power generation hereafter is to heighten the safety, reliability, operation performance and economical efficiency, and the development has been advanced, aiming at bearing the main roles of nuclear power generation. At present, ABWRs are under construction as No. 6 and 7 plants in Kashiwazaki Kariwa Nuclear Power Station, Tokyo Electric Power Co., Inc. In order to let ABWRs take root, the further improvement of economy by the standardization, the rationalization by revising the specification and the improvement of machinery and equipment is necessary. As the needs of the development of next generation BWRs, the increase of power output, the heightening of safety and economical efficiency are discussed. The concept of the next generation BWR plant aiming at the start of operation around 2010 is shown. (K.I.).

  7. Power control system in BWR type reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishizawa, Yasuo.

    1980-01-01

    Purpose: To control the reactor power so that the power distribution can satisfy the limiting conditions, by regulating the reactor core flow rate while monitoring the power distribution in the reactor core of a BWR type reactor. Constitution: A power distribution monitor determines the power distribution for the entire reactor core based on the data for neutron flux, reactor core thermal power, reactor core flow rate and control rod pattern from the reactor and calculates the linear power density distribution. A power up ratio computing device computes the current linear power density increase ratio. An aimed power up ratio is determined by converting the electrical power up ratio transferred from a load demand input device into the reactor core thermal power up ratio. The present reactor core thermal power up ratio is subtracted from the limiting power up ratio and the difference is sent to an operation amount indicator and the reactor core flow rate is changed in a reactor core flow rate regulator, by which the reactor power is controlled. (Moriyama, K.)

  8. Feedwater control system in BWR type reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanji, Jun-ichi; Oomori, Takashi.

    1980-01-01

    Purpose: To improve the water level control performance in BWR type reactor by regulating the water level set to the reactor depending on the rate of change in the recycling amount of coolant to thereby control the fluctuations in the water level resulted in the reactor within an aimed range even upon significant fluctuations in the recycling flow rate. Constitution: The recycling flow rate of coolant in the reactor is detected and the rate of its change with time is computed to form a rate of change signal. The rate of change signal is inputted to a reactor level setter to amend the actual reactor water level demand signal and regulate the water level set to the reactor water depending on the rate of change in the recycling flow rate. Such a regulation method for the set water level enables to control the water level fluctuation resulted in the reactor within the aimed range even upon the significant fluctuation in the recycling flow rate and improve the water level control performance of the reactor, whereby the operationability for the reactor is improved to enhance the operation rate. (Moriyama, K.)

  9. PWR core design calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trkov, A.; Ravnik, M.; Zeleznik, N.

    1992-01-01

    Functional description of the programme package Cord-2 for PWR core design calculations is presented. Programme package is briefly described. Use of the package and calculational procedures for typical core design problems are treated. Comparison of main results with experimental values is presented as part of the verification process. (author) [sl

  10. BWR type reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kikuchi, Osamu.

    1985-01-01

    Purpose: To prevent cavitations in a recycling pump, as well as improve the safety and a reliability of a pressure vessel. Constitution: A feedwater pipeway is connected to the route between the pressure vessel and the recycling pipe and feedwater from the feedwater pipeway is directly introduced to the recycling pump. The temperature of water flowing into the recycling pump is lowered by the feedwater from the feedwater pipeway to prevent the cavitations. (Yoshino, Y.)

  11. Prediction of BWR performance under the influence of Isolation Condenser-using RAMONA-4 code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, H.J.; Cheng, H.S.; Rohatgi, U.S.

    1992-01-01

    The purpose of the Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) Isolation Condenser (IC) is to passively control the reactor pressure by removing heat from the system. This type of control is expected to reduce the frequency of opening and closing of the Safety Relief Valves (SRV). A comparative analysis is done for a BWR operating with and without the influence of an IC under Main Steam Isolation Valve (MSIV) closure. A regular BWR, with forced flow and high thermal power, has been considered for analysis. In addition, the effect of ICs on the BWR performance is studied for natural convection flow at lower power and modified riser geometry. The IC is coupled to the steam dome for the steam inlet flow and the Reactor Pressure Vessel (RPV) near the feed water entrance for the condensate return flow. Transient calculations are performed using prescribed pressure set points for the SRVs and given time settings for MSIV closure. The effect of the IC on the forced flow is to reduce the rate of pressure rise and thereby decrease the cycling frequency ofthe SRVS. This is the primary objective of any operating IC in a BWR (e.g. Oyster Creek). The response of the reactor thermal and fission power, steam flow rate, collapsed liquid level, and core average void fraction are found to agree with the trend of pressure. The variations in the case of an active IC can be closely related to the creation of a time lag and changes in the cycling frequency of the SRVS. An analysis for natural convection flow in a BWR indicates that the effect of an IC on its transient performance is similar to that for the forced convection system. In this case, the MSIV closure, has resulted in a lower peak pressure due to the magnitude of reduced power. However, the effect of reduced cycling frequency of the SRV due to the IC, and the time lag between the events, are comparable to that for forced convection

  12. Initiation model for intergranular stress corrosion cracking in BWR pipes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hishida, Mamoru; Kawakubo, Takashi; Nakagawa, Yuji; Arii, Mitsuru.

    1981-01-01

    Discussions were made on the keys of intergranular stress corrosion cracking of austenitic stainless steel in high-temperature water in laboratories and stress corrosion cracking incidents in operating plants. Based on these discussions, a model was set up of intergranular stress corrosion cracking initiation in BWR pipes. Regarding the model, it was presumed that the intergranular stress corrosion cracking initiates during start up periods whenever heat-affected zones in welded pipes are highly sensitized and suffer dynamic strain in transient water containing dissolved oxygen. A series of BWR start up simulation tests were made by using a flowing autoclave system with slow strain rate test equipment. Validity of the model was confirmed through the test results. (author)

  13. Study on thermal performance and margins of BWR fuel elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stosic, Zoran

    1999-01-01

    This paper contributes to developing a methodology of predicting and analyzing thermal performance and margins of Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) fuel assemblies under conditions of reaching high quality Boiling Crisis and subsequent post-dryout thermal hydraulics causing temperature excursion of fuel cladding. Operational margins against dryout and potential for increasing fuel performance with appropriate benefits are discussed. The philosophy of modeling with its special topics are demonstrated on the HECHAN (HEated CHannel ANalyzer) model as the state-of-art for thermal-hydraulics analysis of BWR fuel assemblies in pre- and post-dryout two-phase flow regimes. The scope of further work either being or has to be performed concerning implementation of new physical aspects, including domain extension of HECHAN model applications to the Pressurized Water Reactors (PWRs), is discussed. Finally, a comprehensive overview of the literature dealing with development of the model is given. (author)

  14. A scaling study of the natural circulation flow of the ex-vessel core catcher cooling system of a 1400MW PWR for designing a scale-down test facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rhee, Bo. W.; Ha, K. S.; Park, R. J.; Song, J. H.

    2012-01-01

    A scaling study on the steady state natural circulation flow along the flow path of the ex-vessel core catcher cooling system of 1400MWe PWR is described. The scaling criteria for reproducing the same thermalhydraulic characteristics of the natural circulation flow as the prototype core catcher cooling system in the scale-down test facility is derived and the resulting natural circulation flow characteristics of the prototype and scale-down facility analyzed and compared. The purpose of this study is to apply the similarity law to the prototype EU-APR1400 core catcher cooling system and the model test facility of this prototype system and derive a relationship between the heating channel characteristics and the down-comer piping characteristics so as to determine the down-comer pipe size and the orifice size of the model test facility. As the geometry and the heating wall heat flux of the heating channel of the model test facility will be the same as those of the prototype core catcher cooling system except the width of the heating channel is reduced, the axial distribution of the coolant quality (or void fraction) is expected to resemble each other between the prototype and model facility. Thus using this fact, the down-comer piping design characteristics of the model facility can be determined from the relationship derived from the similarity law

  15. Behavior of small-sized BWR fuel under reactivity initiated accident conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yanagisawa, Kazuaki; Fujishiro, Toshio; Horiki, Oichiro; Chen Dianshan; Takeuchi, Kiyoshi.

    1992-01-01

    The present work was performed on this small-sized BWR fuel, where Zr liner and rod prepressurization were taken as experimental parameters. Experiment was done under simulated reactivity initiated accident (RIA) conditions at Nuclear Safety Research Reactor (NSRR) belonged to Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI). Major remarks obtained are as follows: (1) Three different types of the fuel rods consisted of (a) Zr lined/pressurized (0.65MPa), (b) Zr lined/non-pressurized and (c) non-Zr lined/pressurized (o.65MPa) were used, respectively. Failure thresholds of these were not less than that (260 cal/g·fuel) described in Japanese RIA Licensing Guideline. Small-sized BWR and conventional 8 x 8 BWR fuels were considered to be in almost the same level in failure threshold. Failure modes of the three were (a) cladding melt/brittle, (b) cladding melt/brittle and (c) rupture by large ballooning, respectively. (2) The magnitude of pressure pulse at fuel fragmentation was also studied by lined/pressurized and non-lined/pressurized fuels. Above the energy deposition of 370 cal/g·fuel, mechanical energy (or pressure) was found to be released from these fragmented fuels. No measurable difference was, however, observed between the tested fuels and NSRR standard (and conventional 8 x 8 BWR) fuels. (3) It is worthy of mentioning that Zr liner tended to prevent the cladding from large ballooning. Non-lined/pressurized fuel tended to cause wrinkle deformation at cladding. Hence, cladding external was notched much by the wrinkles. (4) Time to fuel failure measured from the tested BWR fuels (pressurization < 0.6MPA) was longer than that measured from PWR fuels (pressurization < 3.2MPa). The magnitude of the former was of the order of 3 ∼ 6s, while that of the latter was < 1s. (J.P.N.)

  16. BWR Steam Dryer Alternating Stress Assessment Procedures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morante, R. J. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Hambric, S. A. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Ziada, S. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2016-12-01

    This report presents an overview of Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) steam dryer design; the fatigue cracking failures that occurred at the Quad Cities (QC) plants and their root causes; a history of BWR Extended Power Uprates (EPUs) in the USA; and a discussion of steam dryer modifications/replacements, alternating stress mechanisms on steam dryers, and structural integrity evaluations (static and alternating stress).

  17. Development of a model of a NSSS of the PWR reactor with thermo-hydraulic code GOTHIC; Desarrollo de un modelo del NSSS de un reactor PWR con el codigo termo-hidraulico GOTHIC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gomez Garcia-Torano, I.; Jimenez, G.

    2013-07-01

    The Thermo-hydraulic code GOTHIC is often used in the nuclear industry for licensing transient analysis inside containment of generation II (PWR, BWR) plants as Gen III and III + (AP1000, ESBWR, APWR). After entering the mass and energy released to the containment, previously calculated by other codes (basis, TRACE), GOTHIC allows to calculate in detail the evolution of basic parameters in the containment.

  18. Development of a model of a NSSS of the PWR reactor with thermo-hydraulic code GOTHIC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gomez Garcia-Torano, I.; Jimenez, G.

    2013-01-01

    The Thermo-hydraulic code GOTHIC is often used in the nuclear industry for licensing transient analysis inside containment of generation II (PWR, BWR) plants as Gen III and III + (AP1000, ESBWR, APWR). After entering the mass and energy released to the containment, previously calculated by other codes (basis, TRACE), GOTHIC allows to calculate in detail the evolution of basic parameters in the containment.

  19. Measurements and analysis of neutron and gamma noise in BWR's

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dam, H. van; Kleiss, E.B.J.

    1985-01-01

    Neutron and gamma sensitive collectrons (self-powered detectors) have been designed for incore noise measurements in BWRs. A so-called twin-type has been developed for measurements of two-phase flow characteristics and detailed axial velocity distributions. Construction aspects of the twin detectors are discussed. An analysis is presented of the response of both detector types to incore parametric fluctuations. This analysis is based on detector response functions which provide an insight into the 'field of view' of the two types. The results are supported by experimental verifications; it is shown that incore gamma detectors provide useful additional information about two-phase flow in a BWR. (author)

  20. ZZ BWRSB-RINGHALS1, Stability Benchmark Data from BWR RINGHALS-1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-01-01

    Description of program or function: The purpose of this benchmark is to enable code developers to test their codes and also to validate the predictive capability of their respective codes and models for BWR stability analysis. Emphasis is put on the modelling of flow dynamics of the reactor core and in-vessel flow loop wit detailed neutronic and thermodynamic feedback. The secondary systems as well as the control and production systems will be neglected. Data provided comes from measurements in beginning of cycle (BOC) 14, 15, 16 and 17 and middle of cycle (MOC) 16 in the Swedish BWR reactor Ringhals 1. For these measurements complete data sets are given

  1. Computer aided information system for a PWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vaidian, T.A.; Karmakar, G.; Rajagopal, R.; Shankar, V.; Patil, R.K.

    1994-01-01

    The computer aided information system (CAIS) is designed with a view to improve the performance of the operator. CAIS assists the plant operator in an advisory and support role, thereby reducing the workload level and potential human errors. The CAIS as explained here has been designed for a PWR type KLT- 40 used in Floating Nuclear Power Stations (FNPS). However the underlying philosophy evolved in designing the CAIS can be suitably adopted for other type of nuclear power plants too (BWR, PHWR). Operator information is divided into three broad categories: a) continuously available information b) automatically available information and c) on demand information. Two in number touch screens are provided on the main control panel. One is earmarked for continuously available information and the other is dedicated for automatically available information. Both the screens can be used at the operator's discretion for on-demand information. Automatically available information screen overrides the on-demand information screens. In addition to the above, CAIS has the features of event sequence recording, disturbance recording and information documentation. CAIS design ensures that the operator is not overburdened with excess and unnecessary information, but at the same time adequate and well formatted information is available. (author). 5 refs., 4 figs

  2. Scaling studies - PWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sonneck, G.

    1983-05-01

    A RELAP 4/MOD 6 study was made based on the blowdown phase of the intermediate break experiment LOFT L5-1. The method was to set up a base model and to vary parametrically some areas where it is known or suspected that LOFT differs from a commercial PWR. The aim was not to simulate LOFT or a PWR exactly but to understand the influence of the following parameters on the thermohydraulic behaviour of the system and the clad temperature: stored heat in the downcomer (LOFT has rather large filler blocks in this part of the pressure vessel); bypass between downcomer and upper plenum; and core length. The results show that LOFT is prototypical for all calculated blowdowns. As the clad temperatures decrease with decreasing stored energy in the downcomer, increased bypass and increased core length, LOFT results seem to be realistic as long as realistic bypass sizes are considered; they are conservative in the two other areas. (author)

  3. CFD Analysis of Random Turbulent Flow Load in Steam Generator of APR1400 Under Normal Operation Condition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lim, Sang Gyu; You, Sung Chang; Kim, Han Gon

    2011-01-01

    Regulatory guide 1.20 revision 3 of the Nuclear Regulatory Committee (NRC) modifies guidance for vibration assessments of reactor internals and steam generator internals. The new guidance requires applicants to provide a preliminary analysis and evaluation of the design and performance of a facility, including the safety margins of during normal operation and transient conditions anticipated during the life of the facility. Especially, revision 3 require rigorous assessments of adverse flow effects in the steam dryer cased by flow-excited acoustic and structural resonances such as the abnormality from power-uprated BWR cases. For two nearly identical nuclear power plants, the steam system of one BWR plant experienced failure of steam dryers and the main steam system components when steam flow was increased by 16 percent for extended power uprate (EPU). The mechanisms of those failures have revealed that a small adverse flow changing from the prototype condition induced severe flow-excited acoustic and structural resonances, leading to structural failures. In accordance with the historical background, therefore, potential adverse flow effects should be evaluated rigorously for steam generator internals in both BWR and Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR). The Advanced Power Reactor 1400 (APR1400), an evolutionary light water reactor, increased the power by 7.7 percent from the design of the 'Valid Prototype', System80+. Thus, reliable evaluations of potential adverse flow effects on the steam generator of APR1400 are necessary according to the regulatory guide. This paper is part of the computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analysis results for evaluation of the adverse flow effect for the steam generator internals of APR1400, including a series of sensitivity analyses to enhance the reliability of CFD analysis and an estimation the effect of flow loads on the internals of the steam generator under normal operation conditions

  4. BWR reactor management system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Makino, Kakuji; Kawamura, Atsuo; Yoshioka, Ritsuo; Neda, Toshikatsu.

    1979-01-01

    It is necessary to grasp the delicate state of operation in reactor cores in view of the control of burn-up and power output at the time of the operation management of BWRs. Enormous labor has been required for the collection, processing and evaluation of the data. It is desirable to obtain the safer, more efficient and faster method of operation control by predicting the states in cores including the change of xenon and reflecting them to operation plans as well as by tracing with high accuracy the past burn-up history for a long period. At present, the on-line evaluation of the states in cores is carried out with the process computers attached to respective units, but the amount of data required for core operation management of high degree far exceeds their capacity. From such viewpoints, the research and development on the reactor management system were carried out. The data processing concerning core operation management is performed with newly installed computers utilizing the data from existing process computers, and the operation of reactor cores, the qualitative improvement of management works, labor saving, and fast, efficient operation control are feasible with it. This system was installed in an actual plant in October, 1977. The composition of the system, the prediction of the change in local output distribution accompanying control rod operation, the prediction of the change in the states in cores due to the flow rate of coolant, and the function of collecting plant data are explained. (Kako, I.)

  5. Tritium in liquid phase in a BWR-5 like Laguna Verde; Tritio en fase liquida en un BWR-5 como Laguna Verde

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tijerina S, F.; Vargas A, A.; Cardenas J, J., E-mail: francisco.tijerina@cfe.gob.mx [Comision Federal de Electricidad, Central Nucleoelectrica Laguna Verde, Subgerencia de Ingenieria, Carretera Veracruz-Medellin Km 7.5, Veracruz (Mexico)

    2011-11-15

    In boiling water reactors (BWR), the tritium (H{sub 3}) takes place mainly as a result of ternary fissions in the nuclear reactors, of those which 75% are in gaseous form and 25% in liquid form. In the liquid phase, the tritium is transported to the pipes of the primary coolant toward condensed tanks or tanks of drainage excesses of radioactive equipment, located in external areas of a BWR, as well as to the processes of radioactive wastes to be able to be directed to the liquid effluents. For that reason, is necessary to know the possible routes of the transport and processes of the tritium in a BWR to control this radioisotope in the site of the event of leaks in equipment s and buried pipes, avoiding that emigrates toward underground flowing and an impact to the environment and to the people in general. (Author)

  6. Plutonium recycling in PWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Youinou, G.; Girieud, R.; Guigon, B.

    2000-01-01

    Two concepts of 100% MOX PWR cores are presented. They are designed such as to minimize the consequences of the introduction of Pu on the core control. The first one has a high moderation ratio and the second one utilizes an enriched uranium support. The important design parameters as well as their capabilities to multi recycle Pu are discussed. We conclude with the potential interest of the two concepts. (author)

  7. The integrated PWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gautier, G.M.

    2002-01-01

    This document presents the integrated reactors concepts by a presentation of four reactors: PIUS, SIR, IRIS and CAREM. The core conception, the operating, the safety, the economical aspects and the possible users are detailed. From the performance of the classical integrated PWR, the necessity of new innovative fuels utilization, the research of a simplified design to make easier the safety and the KWh cost decrease, a new integrated reactor is presented: SCAR 600. (A.L.B.)

  8. Reactor control system. PWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-01-01

    At present, 23 units of PWR type reactors have been operated in Japan since the start of Mihama Unit 1 operation in 1970 and various improvements have been made to upgrade operability of power stations as well as reliability and safety of power plants. As the share of nuclear power increases, further improvements of operating performance such as load following capability will be requested for power stations with more reliable and safer operation. This article outlined the reactor control system of PWR type reactors and described the control performance of power plants realized with those systems. The PWR control system is characterized that the turbine power is automatic or manually controlled with request of the electric power system and then the nuclear power is followingly controlled with the change of core reactivity. The system mainly consists of reactor automatic control system (control rod control system), pressurizer pressure control system, pressurizer water level control system, steam generator water level control system and turbine bypass control system. (T. Tanaka)

  9. AGR v PWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Green, D.

    1986-01-01

    When the Central Electricity Generating Board (CEGB) invited tenders and placed a contract for the Advanced Gas Cooled Reactor (AGR) at Dungeness B in 1965 -preferring it to the Pressurised Water Reactor (PWR) -the AGR was lamentably ill developed. The effects of the decision were widely felt, for it took the British nuclear industry off the light water reactor highway of world reactor business and up and idiosyncratic private highway of its own, excluding it altogether from any material export business in the two decades which followed. Yet although the UK may have made wrong decisions in rejecting the PWR in 1965, that does not mean that it can necessarily now either correct them, or redeem their consequence, by reversing the choice in 1985. In the 20 years since 1965 the whole world economic and energy picture has been transformed and the national picture with it. Picking up the PWR now could prove as big a disaster as rejecting it may have been in 1965. (author)

  10. Water chemistry in PWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abe, Kenji

    1987-01-01

    This article outlines major features and basic concept of the secondary system of PWR's and water properties control measures adopted in recent PWR plants. The secondary system of a PWR consists of a condenser cooling pipe (aluminum-brass, titanium, or stainless steel), low-pressure make-up water heating pipe (aluminum-brass or stainless steel), high-ressure make-up water heating pipe (cupro-nickel or stainless steel), steam generator heat-transfer pipe (Inconel 600 or 690), and bleed/drain pipe (carbon steel, low alloy steel or stainless steel). Other major pipes and equipment are made of carbon steel or stainless steel. Major troubles likely to be caused by water in the secondary system include reduction in wall thickness of the heat-transfer pipe, stress corrosion cracking in the heat-transfer pipe, and denting. All of these are caused by local corrosion due to concentration of purities contained in water. For controlling the water properties in the secondary system, it is necessary to prevent impurities from entering the system, to remove impurities and corrosion products from the system, and to prevent corrosion of apparatus making up the system. Measures widely adopted for controlling the formation of IGA include the addition of boric acid for decreasing the concentration of free alkali and high hydrazine operation for providing a highly reducing atmospere. (Nogami, K.)

  11. PWR: 10 years after and perspectives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-01-01

    These proceedings of the SFEN days on PWR (Ten years after and perspectives) comprise 13 conferences bearing on: - From the occurential approach to the state approach - Evolution of calculating tools - Human factors and safety - Reactor safety in the PWR 2000 - The PWR and the electrical power grid load follow - Fuel aspect of PWR management - PWR chemistry evolution - Balance of radiation protection - PWR modifications balance and influence on reactor operation - Design and maintenance of reactor components: 4 conferences [fr

  12. BWR stability using a reducing dynamical model; Estabilidad de un BWR con un modelo dinamico reducido

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ballestrin Bolea, J M; Blazquez Martinez, J B

    1990-07-01

    BWR stability can be treated with reduced order dynamical models. When the parameters of the model came from dynamical models. When the parameters of the model came from experimental data, the predictions are accurate. In this work an alternative derivation for the void fraction equation is made, but remarking the physical structure of the parameters. As the poles of power/reactivity transfer function are related with the parameters, the measurement of the poles by other techniques such as noise analysis will lead to the parameters, but the system of equations is non-linear. Simple parametric calculation of decay ratio are performed, showing why BWRs become unstable when they are operated at low flow and high power. (Author)

  13. Materials performance in operating PWR steam generators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weeks, J.R.

    1975-01-01

    The Inconel-600 tubing in operating PWR steam generators has developed leaks due to intergranular stress corrosion cracking or a general wastage attack, originating from the secondary side of the tubing. Corrosion has been limited to those areas of the steam generators where limited coolant circulation and high heat flux have caused impurities to concentrate. Wastage or pitting attack has always been associated with local concentration of sodium hydrogen phosphates, whereas stress corrosion has been associated with local concentration of sodium or potassium hydroxides. The only instance of stress corrosion originating from the primary side occurred on cold-worked tubing when hydrogen was not added to getter oxygen, and LiOH was not added to raise the pH of the primary coolant. All PWR manufacturers are now recommending that the phosphate treatment of the secondary coolant be abandoned in favor of an all-volatile treatment. Experience in operating plants has shown, however, that removal of phosphate-rich sludge deposits is difficult, and that further wastage and/or intergranular stress corrosion may develop; the residual sodium phosphates gradually convert by reaction with corrosion product hydroxides to sodium hydroxide, which remains concentrated in the limited flow areas. Improvements in circulation patterns have been achieved by inserting flow baffles in some PWR steam generators. Inservice monitoring by eddy current techniques is useful for detecting corrosion-induced defects in the tubing, but irreproducibility in field examinations can lead to uncertainties interpreting the results. (U.S.)

  14. BWR water chemistry impurity studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ljungberg, L.G.; Korhonen, S.; Renstroem, K.; Hofling, C.G.; Rebensdorff, B.

    1990-03-01

    Laboratory studies were made on the effect of water impurities on environmental cracking in simulated BWR water of stainless steel, low alloy steel and nickel-base alloys. Constant elongation rate tensile (CERT) tests were run in simulated normal water chemistry (NWC), hydrogen water chemistry (HWC), or start-up environment. Sulfate, chloride and copper with chloride added to the water at levels of a fraction of a ppM were found to be extremely deleterious to all kinds of materials except Type 316 NG. Other detrimental impurities were fluoride, silica and some organic acids, although acetic acid was beneficial. Nitrate and carbon dioxide were fairly inoccuous. Corrosion fatigue and constant load tests on compact tension specimens were run in simulated normal BWR water chemistry (NWC) or hydrogen water chemistry (HWC), without impurities or with added sulfate or carbon dioxide. For sensitized Type 304 SS in NWC, 0.1 ppM sulfate increased crack propagation rates in constant load tests by up to a factor of 100, and in fatigue tests up to a factor of 10. Also, cracking in Type 316 nuclear grade SS and Alloy 600 was enhanced, but to a smaller degree. Carbon dioxide was less detrimental than sulfate. 3 figs., 4 tabs

  15. BWR core melt progression phenomena: Experimental analyses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ott, L.J.

    1992-01-01

    In the BWR Core Melt in Progression Phenomena Program, experimental results concerning severe fuel damage and core melt progression in BWR core geometry are used to evaluate existing models of the governing phenomena. These include control blade eutectic liquefaction and the subsequent relocation and attack on the channel box structure; oxidation heating and hydrogen generation; Zircaloy melting and relocation; and the continuing oxidation of zirconium with metallic blockage formation. Integral data have been obtained from the BWR DF-4 experiment in the ACRR and from BWR tests in the German CORA exreactor fuel-damage test facility. Additional integral data will be obtained from new CORA BWR test, the full-length FLHT-6 BWR test in the NRU test reactor, and the new program of exreactor experiments at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) on metallic melt relocation and blockage formation. an essential part of this activity is interpretation and use of the results of the BWR tests. The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has developed experiment-specific models for analysis of the BWR experiments; to date, these models have permitted far more precise analyses of the conditions in these experiments than has previously been available. These analyses have provided a basis for more accurate interpretation of the phenomena that the experiments are intended to investigate. The results of posttest analyses of BWR experiments are discussed and significant findings from these analyses are explained. The ORNL control blade/canister models with materials interaction, relocation and blockage models are currently being implemented in SCDAP/RELAP5 as an optional structural component

  16. SCORPIO-BWR: status and future plans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Porsmyr, Jan; Bodal, Terje; Beere, William H.

    2004-01-01

    Full text: During the years from 2000 to 2003 a joint project has been performed by IFE, Halden and TEPCO Systems Corporation, Japan, to develop a core monitoring system for BWRs based on the their existing core monitoring system TiARA and the SCORPIO framework. It has been emphasised to develop a reliable, flexible, adaptable and user-friendly system, which is easy to maintain. Therefore, a rather general framework (SCORPIO Framework) has been used which facilitates easy software modifications as well as adding/ replacing physics modules. The software modules is integrated in the SCORPIO framework using the Software Bus as the communication tool and with the Picasso UIMS tool for MMI. The SCORPIO-BWR version is developed on a Windows-PC platform. The SCORPIO-BWR version provides all functions, which are necessary for all analyses and operations performed on a BWR plant and comprises functions for on-line core monitoring, predictive analysis and core management with interfaces to plant instrumentation and physics codes. Functions for system initialisation and maintenance are also included. A SCORPIO-BWR version adapted for ABWR was installed in TEPSYS facilities in Tokyo in January 2003, where the final acceptance tests were carried out and accepted. The ABWR version of the system is now in the verification and validation phase. In the period from April 2003 until March 2004 a project for realizing an offline-version of SCORPIO-BWR system, which supports the offline tasks of BWR in-core fuel management for ABWR and BWR-5 type of reactors, was developed. The offline-version of the SCORPIO-BWR system for ABWR and BWR-5 type of reactors was installed at TEPSYS in March 2003, where the final acceptance tests were carried out and accepted. Plans for the next version of this system is to study the possibility of adapting SCORPIO-BWR to work with 'mobile technology'. This means that it should be possible to access and display information from the SCORPIO-BWR system on a

  17. SCORPIO-BWR: status and future plans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Porsmyr, Jan; Bodal, Terje; Beere, William H. (and others)

    2004-07-01

    Full text: During the years from 2000 to 2003 a joint project has been performed by IFE, Halden and TEPCO Systems Corporation, Japan, to develop a core monitoring system for BWRs based on the their existing core monitoring system TiARA and the SCORPIO framework. It has been emphasised to develop a reliable, flexible, adaptable and user-friendly system, which is easy to maintain. Therefore, a rather general framework (SCORPIO Framework) has been used which facilitates easy software modifications as well as adding/ replacing physics modules. The software modules is integrated in the SCORPIO framework using the Software Bus as the communication tool and with the Picasso UIMS tool for MMI. The SCORPIO-BWR version is developed on a Windows-PC platform. The SCORPIO-BWR version provides all functions, which are necessary for all analyses and operations performed on a BWR plant and comprises functions for on-line core monitoring, predictive analysis and core management with interfaces to plant instrumentation and physics codes. Functions for system initialisation and maintenance are also included. A SCORPIO-BWR version adapted for ABWR was installed in TEPSYS facilities in Tokyo in January 2003, where the final acceptance tests were carried out and accepted. The ABWR version of the system is now in the verification and validation phase. In the period from April 2003 until March 2004 a project for realizing an offline-version of SCORPIO-BWR system, which supports the offline tasks of BWR in-core fuel management for ABWR and BWR-5 type of reactors, was developed. The offline-version of the SCORPIO-BWR system for ABWR and BWR-5 type of reactors was installed at TEPSYS in March 2003, where the final acceptance tests were carried out and accepted. Plans for the next version of this system is to study the possibility of adapting SCORPIO-BWR to work with 'mobile technology'. This means that it should be possible to access and display information from the SCORPIO-BWR

  18. Advances in BWR water chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia, Susan E.; Giannelli, Joseph F.; Jarvis, Mary L.

    2012-09-01

    This paper reviews recent advances in Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) water chemistry control with examples of plant experiences at U.S. designed BWRs. Water chemistry advances provide some of the most effective methods for mitigating materials degradation, reducing fuel performance concerns and lowering radiation fields. Mitigation of stress corrosion cracking (SCC) of materials remains a high priority and improved techniques that have been demonstrated in BWRs will be reviewed, specifically hydrogen injection combined with noble metal chemical addition (NMCA) and the newer on-line noble metal application process (OLNC). Hydrogen injection performance, an important part of SCC mitigation, will also be reviewed for the BWR fleet, highlighting system improvements that have enabled earlier injection of hydrogen including the potential for hydrogen injection during plant startup. Water chemistry has been significantly improved by the application of pre-filtration and optimized use of ion exchange resins in the CP (condensate polishing) and reactor water cleanup (RWCU) systems. EPRI has monitored and supported water treatment improvements to meet water chemistry goals as outlined in the EPRI BWR Water Chemistry Guidelines, particularly those for SCC mitigation of reactor internals and piping, minimization of fuel risk due to corrosion and crud deposits and chemistry control for radiation field reduction. In recent years, a significant reduction has occurred in feedwater corrosion product input, particularly iron. A large percentage of plants are now reporting <0.1 ppb feedwater iron. The impacts to plant operation and chemistry of lower feedwater iron will be explored. Depleted zinc addition is widely practiced across the fleet and the enhanced focus on radiation reduction continues to emphasize the importance of controlling radiation source term. In addition, shutdown chemistry control is necessary to avoid excessive release of activated corrosion products from fuel

  19. French PWR safety philosophy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conte, M.

    1986-05-01

    Increasing knowledge and lessons learned from starting and operating experience of French nuclear power plants, completed by the experience learned from the operation of foreign reactors, has contributed to the improvement of French PWR design and safety philosophy. Based on a deterministic approach, the French safety analysis was progressively completed by a probabilistic approach, each of them having possibilities and limits. As a consequence of the global risk objective set in 1977 for nuclear reactors, safety analysis was extended to the evaluation of events more complex than the conventional ones, and later to the evaluation of the feasibility of the offsite emergency plans in case of severe accidents

  20. PWR decontamination feasibility study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silliman, P.L.

    1978-12-18

    The decontamination work which has been accomplished is reviewed and it is concluded that it is worthwhile to investigate further four methods for decontamination for future demonstration. These are: dilute chemical; single stage strong chemical; redox processes; and redox/chemical in combination. Laboratory work is recommended to define the agents and processes for demonstration and to determine the effect of the solvents on PWR materials. The feasibility of Indian Point 1 for decontamination demonstrations is discussed, and it is shown that the system components of Indian Point 1 are well suited for use in demonstrations.

  1. PWR decontamination feasibility study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silliman, P.L.

    1978-01-01

    The decontamination work which has been accomplished is reviewed and it is concluded that it is worthwhile to investigate further four methods for decontamination for future demonstration. These are: dilute chemical; single stage strong chemical; redox processes; and redox/chemical in combination. Laboratory work is recommended to define the agents and processes for demonstration and to determine the effect of the solvents on PWR materials. The feasibility of Indian Point 1 for decontamination demonstrations is discussed, and it is shown that the system components of Indian Point 1 are well suited for use in demonstrations

  2. PWR core design calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trkov, A; Ravnik, M; Zeleznik, N [Inst. Jozef Stefan, Ljubljana (Slovenia)

    1992-07-01

    Functional description of the programme package Cord-2 for PWR core design calculations is presented. Programme package is briefly described. Use of the package and calculational procedures for typical core design problems are treated. Comparison of main results with experimental values is presented as part of the verification process. (author) [Slovenian] Opisali smo programski paket CORD-2, ki se uporablja pri projektnih izracunih sredice pri upravljanju tlacnovodnega reaktorja. Prikazana je uporaba paketa in racunskih postopkov za tipicne probleme, ki nastopajo pri projektiranju sredice. Primerjava glavnih rezultatov z eksperimentalnimi vrednostmi je predstavljena kot del preveritvenega procesa. (author)

  3. BWR Assembly Optimization for Minor Actinide Recycling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    G. Ivan Maldonado; John M. Christenson; J.P. Renier; T.F. Marcille; J. Casal

    2010-03-22

    The Primary objective of the proposed project is to apply and extend the latest advancements in LWR fuel management optimization to the design of advanced boiling water reactor (BWR) fuel assemblies specifically for the recycling of minor actinides (MAs).

  4. BWR type nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsumoto, Kosuke.

    1991-01-01

    In a BWR type nuclear power plant in which reactor water in a reactor pressure vessel can be drained to a waste processing system by way of reactor recycling pipeways and remaining heat removal system pipeways, a pressurized air supply device is disposed for supplying air for pressurizing reactor water to the inside of the reactor pressure vessel by way of an upper head. With such a constitution, since the pressurized air sent from the pressurized air supply device above the reactor pressure vessel for the reactor water discharging pressure upon draining, the water draining pressure is increased compared with a conventional case and, accordingly, the amount of drained water is not reduced even in the latter half of draining. Accordingly, the draining efficiency can be improved and only a relatively short period of time is required till the completion of the draining, which can improve safety and save labors. (T.M.)

  5. Time-dependent coolant velocity measurements in an operating BWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luebbesmeyer, D.; Crowe, R.D.

    1980-01-01

    A method to measure time-dependent fluid velocities in BWR-bundle elements by noise analysis of the incore-neutron-detector signals is shown. Two application examples of the new method are given. The time behaviour of the fluid velocity in the bundle element during a scheduled power excursion of the plant. The change of power was performed by changing the coolant flow through the core The apparent change of the fluid velocity due to thermal elongation of the helix-drive of the TIP-system. A simplified mathematical model was derived for this elongation to use as a reference to check the validity of the new method. (author)

  6. The noise analysis and the BWR operation map

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blazquez, J.; Ballestrin, J.

    1996-01-01

    An analytical expression for the Decay Ratio is obtained: DR = exp(-bW / P 1/2 ). The physics behind is also explained. It applies to a commercial BWR Operation Map, on the vicinity of the power instability. This functional form seems fitting to the structure of the Operation map. The power P and the coolant flow are measured straightforward; the Decay Ratio is obtained by neutron noise analysis techniques. The parameter b, depending on the void reactivity coefficient, is then calculated on line during the Reactor Operation. New DR value is now predicted for each new displacement on the Map, so unexpected instability events are more likely avoided. (authors)

  7. Coretran/Vipre assembly critical power assessment against Nupec BWR experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aounallah, Y. [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland)

    2001-07-01

    This study has been performed, in the framework of the STARS project, to assess CORETRAN-01/VIPRE-02 code capability to predict critical heat flux conditions for BWR fuel assemblies. The assessment is based on comparisons of the code results with the NUPEC steady-state critical power measurements on full-scale assemblies tested under a range of flow conditions. Two assembly types were considered, the standard BWR 8 x 8 and the so-called ''high-burnup'' assembly, similar to GE-10. Code modelling options that have a significant impact on the results have been identified, along with code limitations. (author)

  8. Coretran/Vipre assembly critical power assessment against Nupec BWR experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aounallah, Y.

    2001-01-01

    This study has been performed, in the framework of the STARS project, to assess CORETRAN-01/VIPRE-02 code capability to predict critical heat flux conditions for BWR fuel assemblies. The assessment is based on comparisons of the code results with the NUPEC steady-state critical power measurements on full-scale assemblies tested under a range of flow conditions. Two assembly types were considered, the standard BWR 8 x 8 and the so-called ''high-burnup'' assembly, similar to GE-10. Code modelling options that have a significant impact on the results have been identified, along with code limitations. (author)

  9. Experience of Areva in fuel services for PWR and BWR; Experiencia de Areva en servicios de combustible para PWR y BWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morales, I.

    2015-07-01

    AREVA being an integrated supplier of fuel assemblies has included in its strategy to develop services and solutions to customers who desire to improve the performance and safety of their fuel. These services go beyond the simple 'after sale' services that can be expected from a fuel supplier: The portfolio of AREVA includes a wide variety of services, from scientific calculations to fuel handling services in a nuclear power plant. AREVA is committed to collaborate and to propose best-in-class solutions that really make the difference for the customer, based on 40 years of Fuel design and manufacturing experience. (Author)

  10. Theory and control calculations. Application to BWR and PWR; Teoria y calculo de elementos de control, Aplicacion a PWR y BWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Velarde, G; Guerra, J

    1972-07-01

    A theoretical method to extend the applicability of P{sub 1} approximation to strong absorbers is given. Tables of effective diffusion parameters for slab and cylindrical geometry as well as a summary of expressions for obtaining the extrapolation length in cases of interest, are included. (Author) 21 refs.

  11. Tritium in liquid phase in a BWR-5 like Laguna Verde

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tijerina S, F.; Vargas A, A.; Cardenas J, J.

    2011-11-01

    In boiling water reactors (BWR), the tritium (H 3 ) takes place mainly as a result of ternary fissions in the nuclear reactors, of those which 75% are in gaseous form and 25% in liquid form. In the liquid phase, the tritium is transported to the pipes of the primary coolant toward condensed tanks or tanks of drainage excesses of radioactive equipment, located in external areas of a BWR, as well as to the processes of radioactive wastes to be able to be directed to the liquid effluents. For that reason, is necessary to know the possible routes of the transport and processes of the tritium in a BWR to control this radioisotope in the site of the event of leaks in equipment s and buried pipes, avoiding that emigrates toward underground flowing and an impact to the environment and to the people in general. (Author)

  12. TRAB, a transient analysis program for BWR. Part 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rajamaeki, Markku.

    1980-03-01

    TRAB is a transient analysis program for BWR. The present report describes its principles. The program has been developed from TRAWA-program. It models the interior of the pressure vessel and related subsystems of BWR viz. reactor core, recirculation loop including the upper part of the vessel, recirculation pumps, incoming and outgoing flow systems, and control and protection systems. Concerning core phenomena and all flow channel hydraulics the submodels are one-dimensional of main features. The geometry is very flexible. The program has been made particularly to simulate various reactivity transients, but it is applicable more generally to reactor incidents and accidents in which no flow reversal or no emptying of the circuit must occur below the water level. The program is extensively supplied by input and output capabilities. The user can act upon the simulation of a transient by defining external disturbances, scheduled timevariations for any system variable, by modeling new subsystems, which are representable with ordinary linear differential equations, and by defining relations of functional form between system variables. The run of the program can be saved and restarted. (author)

  13. Experimental characterisation of the interfacial structure during counter-current flow limitation in a model of the hot leg of a PWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vallee, C., E-mail: c.vallee@hzdr.de [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (HZDR), Inst. of Safety Research, Dresden (Germany); Nariai, T.; Futatsugi, T.; Tomiyama, A., E-mail: nariai@cfrg.scitec.kobe-u.ac.jp, E-mail: futatsugi@cfrg.scitec.kobe-u.ac.jp, E-mail: tomiyama@mech.kobe-u.ac.jp [Kobe Univ., Graduate School of Engineering, Kobe (Japan); Lucas, D., E-mail: d.lucas@hzdr.de [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (HZDR), Inst. of Safety Research, Dresden (Germany); Murase, M., E-mail: murase@inss.co.jp [Inst. of Nuclear Safety System, Inc. (INSS), Fukui (Japan)

    2011-07-01

    In order to investigate the two-phase flow behaviour during counter-current flow limitation in the hot leg of a pressurised water reactor, dedicated experiments were performed in a scaled down model of Kobe University. The structure of the interface was observed from the side of the channel test section using a high-speed video camera. An algorithm was developed to recognise the stratified interface in the camera frames after background subtraction. The evolution of the water level along the hot leg is analysed in function of the liquid and gas flow rates. (author)

  14. Flow transients experiments with refrigerant-12

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Celata, G.P.; D'Annibale, F.; Farello, G.E.; Setaro, T.

    1986-01-01

    Flow transients have been investigated in a wide range of thermal-hydraulics situations with Refrigerannt-12. Six pressures (including the reference to PWR and BWR characteristic liquid to vapour densities ratios), several periods of the flowrate transients coastdown during the simulated flow decays, and different specific mass flowrate have been studied emploiyng a circular duct test section (Dsub(i)=7,5 mm). Two heated lengths of the test section have been considered (L = 2300 and 1180 mm). Experimental data have shown the complete inadequacy of steady-state critical heat flux correlations in predicting the onset of boiling crisis during fast flow transients (half-flow decay time, tsub(h)lt5.0-6.0 s). The flow transient does not show dependence, in terms of DNB conditions ,upon the length of the test section: the ratio between transient and steady-state critical mass flowrate is not dependent on the tested geometry. The time interval from the start of the flowrate transient to the onset of DNB (time to crisis), has been experimentally determined for all the runs. Data analysis for a better theoretical prediction of the phenomenon has been accomplished, and a design correlation for DNB conditons and time to crisis prediction has been proposed

  15. Analysis of WWER-440 and PWR RPV welds surveillance data to compare irradiation damage evolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Debarberis, L. [Joint Research Centre of the European Commission, Institute for Energy, P.O. Box 2, 1755 ZG Petten (Netherlands)]. E-mail: luigi.debarberis@cec.eu.int; Acosta, B. [Joint Research Centre of the European Commission, Institute for Energy, P.O. Box 2, 1755 ZG Petten (Netherlands)]. E-mail: beatriz.acosta-iborra@jrc.nl; Zeman, A. [Joint Research Centre of the European Commission, Institute for Energy, P.O. Box 2, 1755 ZG Petten (Netherlands); Sevini, F. [Joint Research Centre of the European Commission, Institute for Energy, P.O. Box 2, 1755 ZG Petten (Netherlands); Ballesteros, A. [Tecnatom, Avd. Montes de Oca 1, San Sebasitan de los Reyes, E-28709 Madrid (Spain); Kryukov, A. [Russian Research Centre Kurchatov Institute, Kurchatov Square 1, 123182 Moscow (Russian Federation); Gillemot, F. [AEKI Atomic Research Institute, Konkoly Thege M. ut 29-33, 1121 Budapest (Hungary); Brumovsky, M. [NRI, Nuclear Research Institute, Husinec-Rez 130, 25068 Rez (Czech Republic)

    2006-04-15

    It is known that for Russian-type and Western water reactor pressure vessel steels there is a similar degradation in mechanical properties during equivalent neutron irradiation. Available surveillance results from WWER and PWR vessels are used in this article to compare irradiation damage evolution for the different reactor pressure vessel welds. The analysis is done through the semi-mechanistic model for radiation embrittlement developed by JRC-IE. Consistency analysis with BWR vessel materials and model alloys has also been performed within this study. Globally the two families of studied materials follow similar trends regarding the evolution of irradiation damage. Moreover in the high fluence range typical of operation of WWER the radiation stability of these vessels is greater than the foreseen one for PWR.

  16. Safety considerations of PWR's

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arnold, W.H. Jr.

    1977-01-01

    The safety of the central station pressurized water reactor is well established and substantiated by its excellent operating record. Operating data from 55 reactors of this type have established a record of safe operating history unparalleled by any modern large scale industry. The 186 plants under construction require a continuing commitment to maintain this outstanding record. The safety of the PWR has been further verified by the recently completed Reactor Safety Study (''Rasmussen'' Report). Not only has this study confirmed the exceptionally low risk associated with PWR operation, it has also introduced a valuable new tool in the decision making process. PWR designs, utilizing the philosophy of defense in depth, provide the bases for evaluating margins of safety. The design of the reactor coolant system, the containment system, emergency core cooling system and other related systems and components provide substantial margins of safety under both normal and postulated accident conditions even considering simultaneous effects of earthquakes and other environmental phenomena. Margins of safety in the assessment of various postulated accident conditions, with emphasis on the postulated loss of reactor coolant accident (LOCA), have been evaluated in depth as exemplified by the comprehensive ECCS rulemaking hearings followed by imposition of very conservative Nuclear Regulatory Commission requirements. When evaluated on an engineering best estimate approach, the significant margins to safety for a LOCA become more apparent. Extensive test programs have also substantiated margins to safety limits. These programs have included both separate effects and systems tests. Component testing has also been performed to substantiate performance levels under adverse combinations of environmental stress. The importance of utilizing past experience and of optimizing the deployment of incremental resources is self evident. Recent safety concerns have included specific areas such

  17. PWR secondary water chemistry guidelines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bell, M.J.; Blomgren, J.C.; Fackelmann, J.M.

    1982-10-01

    Steam generators in pressurized water reactor (PWR) nuclear power plants have experienced tubing degradation by a variety of corrosion-related mechanisms which depend directly on secondary water chemistry. As a result of this experience, the Steam Generator Owners Group and EPRI have sponsored a major program to provide solutions to PWR steam generator problems. This report, PWR Secondary Water Chemistry Guidelines, in addition to presenting justification for water chemistry control parameters, discusses available analytical methods, data management and surveillance, and the management philosophy required to successfully implement the guidelines

  18. Boiling transition phenomenon in BWR fuel assemblies effect of fuel spacer shape on critical power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamamoto, Yasushi; Morooka, Shin-ichi; Mitsutake, Toru; Yokobori, Seiichi; Kimura, Jiro.

    1996-01-01

    A thorough understanding of the thermal-hydraulic phenomena near fuel spacer is necessary for the accurate prediction of the critical power of BWR fuel assemblies, and is thus essential for effective developments of a new BWR fuel assembly. The main purpose of this study is to develop an accurate method for predicting the effect of spacer shapes on critical power. Tests have been conducted under actual BWR operating conditions, using an annulus flow channel consisting of a heated rod and circular-tube channel, and BWR simulated 4x4 rod bundles with heater rods unheated just upsteam of spacer. The effect of spacer shapes on critical power was predicted analytically based on the droplet deposition rate estimation. The droplet deposition rate for different spacer shapes was calculated using a single-phase flow model. The prediction results were compared with the test results for the annulus flow channel using ring-type spacers. Analytical results of critical power agreed with measured critical power from point of the effects of changes in the rod-spacer clearance and the spacer thickness on critical power. (author)

  19. Upgrading of PWR plant simulators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wada, Tomonori; Sasaki, Kazunori; Nakaishi, Hirokazu.

    1989-01-01

    For the education and training of operators in electric power plants, simulators have been employed, and it is well known that their effect is great. There are operation training simulators which simulate the dynamic characteristics of plants and all the machinery and equipment that operators handle, and train the procedure of restoration at the time of abnormality in plants, education simulators which can analyze the dynamic characteristics of plants efficiently in a short time, and offer information by visualizing phenomena with three-dimensional display and others so as to be easily understandable, and forecast simulators which do the analysis forecasting plant behavior at the time of abnormality in plants, and investigate the necessity of the guide for operation procedure and the countermeasures at the time of emergency. In this explanation, the upgrading of operation training simulators which have been put already in training is discussed. The constitution of simulator system and the instructor function, the outline of PWR plant simulation models comprising thermal flow model, pump model, leak model and so on, the techniques of increasing simulator speed, and the example of analysis using the NUPAC code are reported. (K.I.)

  20. Experimental Characterisation of the Interfacial Structure during Counter-Current Flow Limitation in a Model of the Hot Leg of a PWR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christophe Vallée

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to investigate the two-phase flow behaviour during counter-current flow limitation in the hot leg of a pressurised water reactor, dedicated experiments were performed in a scaled down model of Kobe University. The experiments were performed with air and water at atmospheric pressure and room temperature. At high flow rates, CCFL occurs and the discharge of water to the reactor pressure vessel simulator is limited by the formation of slugs carrying liquid back to the steam generator. The structure of the interface was observed from the side of the channel test section using a high-speed video camera. An algorithm was developed to recognise the stratified interface in the camera frames after background subtraction. This method allows extracting the water level at any position in the image as well as performing further statistical treatments. The evolution of the interfacial structure along the horizontal part of the hot leg is shown by the visualisation of the probability distribution of the water level and analysed in function of the liquid and gas flow rates. The data achieved are useful for the analysis of the flow conditions as well as for the validation of modelling approaches like computational fluid dynamics.

  1. Coolant degassing device for PWR type reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kita, Kaoru; Takezawa, Kazuaki; Minemoto, Masaki.

    1982-01-01

    Purpose: To efficiently decrease the rare gas concentration in primary coolants, as well as shorten the degassing time required for the periodical inspection in the waste gas processing system of a PWR type reactor. Constitution: Usual degassing method by supplying hydrogen or nitrogen to a volume control tank is replaced with a method of utilizing a degassing tower (method of flowing down processing liquid into the filled tower from above while uprising streams from the bottom of the tower thereby degassing the gases dissolved in the liquid into the steams). The degassing tower is combined with a hydrogen separator or hydrogen recombiner to constitute a waste gas processing system. (Ikeda, J.)

  2. Advancing PWR fuel to meet customer needs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kramer, F W

    1987-03-01

    Since the introduction of the Optimized Fuel Assembly (OFA) for PWRs in the late 1970s, Westinghouse has continued to work with the utility customers to identify the greatest needs for further advance in fuel performance and reliability. The major customer requirements include longer fuel cycle at lower costs, increased fuel discharge burn-up, enhanced operating flexibility, all accompanied by even greater reliability. In response to these needs, Westinghouse developed Vantage 5 PWR fuel. To optimize reactor operations, Vantage 5 fuel features distinct advantages: integral fuel burnable absorbers, axial and radial blankets, intermediate flow mixers, a removable top nozzle, and assembly modifications to accommodate increased discharge burn-up.

  3. PWR burnable absorber evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cacciapouti, R.J.; Weader, R.J.; Malone, J.P.

    1995-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to evaluate the relative neurotic efficiency and fuel cycle cost benefits of PWR burnable absorbers. Establishment of reference low-leakage equilibrium in-core fuel management plans for 12-, 18- and 24-month cycles. Review of the fuel management impact of the integral fuel burnable absorber (IFBA), erbium and gadolinium. Calculation of the U 3 O 8 , UF 6 , SWU, fuel fabrication, and burnable absorber requirements for the defined fuel management plans. Estimation of fuel cycle costs of each fuel management plan at spot market and long-term market fuel prices. Estimation of the comparative savings of the different burnable absorbers in dollar equivalent per kgU of fabricated fuel. (author)

  4. PWR systems transient analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kennedy, M.F.; Peeler, G.B.; Abramson, P.B.

    1985-01-01

    Analysis of transients in pressurized water reactor (PWR) systems involves the assessment of the response of the total plant, including primary and secondary coolant systems, steam piping and turbine (possibly including the complete feedwater train), and various control and safety systems. Transient analysis is performed as part of the plant safety analysis to insure the adequacy of the reactor design and operating procedures and to verify the applicable plant emergency guidelines. Event sequences which must be examined are developed by considering possible failures or maloperations of plant components. These vary in severity (and calculational difficulty) from a series of normal operational transients, such as minor load changes, reactor trips, valve and pump malfunctions, up to the double-ended guillotine rupture of a primary reactor coolant system pipe known as a Large Break Loss of Coolant Accident (LBLOCA). The focus of this paper is the analysis of all those transients and accidents except loss of coolant accidents

  5. PWR degraded core analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gittus, J.H.

    1982-04-01

    A review is presented of the various phenomena involved in degraded core accidents and the ensuing transport of fission products from the fuel to the primary circuit and the containment. The dominant accident sequences found in the PWR risk studies published to date are briefly described. Then chapters deal with the following topics: the condition and behaviour of water reactor fuel during normal operation and at the commencement of degraded core accidents; the generation of hydrogen from the Zircaloy-steam and the steel-steam reactions; the way in which the core deforms and finally melts following loss of coolant; debris relocation analysis; containment integrity; fission product behaviour during a degraded core accident. (U.K.)

  6. Simplified compact containment BWR plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heki, H.; Nakamaru, M.; Tsutagawa, M.; Hiraiwa, K.; Arai, K.; Hida, T.

    2004-01-01

    The reactor concept considered in this paper has a small power output, a compact containment and a simplified BWR configuration with comprehensive safety features. The Compact Containment Boiling Water Reactor (CCR), which is being developed with matured BWR technologies together with innovative systems/components, is expected to prove attractive in the world energy markets due to its flexibility in regard to both energy demands and site conditions, its high potential for reducing investment risk and its safety features facilitating public acceptance. The flexibility is achieved by CCR's small power output of 300 MWe class and capability of long operating cycle (refueling intervals). CCR is expected to be attractive from view point of investment due to its simplification/innovation in design such as natural circulation core cooling with the bottom located short core, internal upper entry control rod drives (CRDs) with ring-type dryers and simplified ECCS system with high pressure containment concept. The natural circulation core eliminates recirculation pumps and the maintenance of such pumps. The internal upper entry CRDs reduce the height of the reactor vessel (RPV) and consequently reduce the height of the primary containment vessel (PCV). The safety features mainly consist of large water inventory above the core without large penetration below the top of the core, passive cooling system by isolation condenser (IC), passive auto catalytic recombiner and in-vessel retention (IVR) capability. The large inventory increases the system response time in the case of design-base accidents, including loss of coolant accidents. The IC suppresses PCV pressure by steam condensation without any AC power. The recombiner decreases hydrogen concentration in the PCV in the case of a severe accident. Cooling the molten core inside the RPV if the core should be damaged by loss of core coolability could attain the IVR. The feasibility of CCR safety system has been confirmed by LOCA

  7. Evaluation of flow accelerated corrosion by coupled analysis of corrosion and flow dynamics (2), flow dynamics calculations for determining mixing factors and mass transfer coefficients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uehara, Yasushi; Uchida, Shunsuke; Naitoh, Masanori; Okada, Hidetoshi; Koshizuka, Seiichi

    2009-01-01

    In order to predict and mitigate flow accelerated corrosion (FAC) of carbon steel piping in PWR and BWR secondary systems, computer program packages for evaluating FAC have been developed by coupling one through three dimensional (1-3D) computational flow dynamics (CFD) models and corrosion models. To evaluate corrosive conditions, e.g., oxygen concentration and electrochemical corrosion potential (ECP) along the flow path, flow pattern and temperature in each elemental volume were obtained with 1D computational flow dynamics (CFD) codes. Precise flow turbulence and mass transfer coefficients at the structure surface were calculated with 3D CFD codes to determine wall thinning rates. One of the engineering options is application of k-ε calculation as a 3D CFD code, which has limitation of detail evaluation of flow distribution at very surface of large scale piping. A combination of k-ε calculation and wall function was proposed to evaluate precise distribution of mass transfer coefficients with reasonable CPU volume and computing time and, at the same time, reasonable accuracy. (author)

  8. The latest full-scale PWR simulator in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishimuru, Y.; Tagi, H.; Nakabayashi, T.

    2004-01-01

    The latest MHI Full-scale Simulator has an excellent system configuration, in both flexibility and extendability, and has highly sophisticated performance in PWR simulation by the adoption of CANAC-II and PRETTY codes. It also has an instructive character to display the plant's internal status, such as RCS condition, through animation. Further, the simulation has been verified to meet a functional examination at model plant, and with a scale model test result in a two-phase flow event, after evaluation for its accuracy. Thus, the Simulator can be devoted to a sophisticated and broad training course on PWR operation. (author)

  9. A detailed BWR recirculation loop model for RELAP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Araiza-Martínez, Enrique, E-mail: enrique.araiza@inin.gob.mx; Ortiz-Villafuerte, Javier, E-mail: javier.ortiz@inin.gob.mx; Castillo-Durán, Rogelio, E-mail: rogelio.castillo@inin.gob.mx

    2017-01-15

    Highlights: • A new detailed BWR recirculation loop model was developed for RELAP. • All jet pumps, risers, manifold, suction and control valves, and recirculation pump are modeled. • Model is tested against data from partial blockage of two jet pumps. • For practical applications, simulation results showed good agreement with available data. - Abstract: A new detailed geometric model of the whole recirculation loop of a BWR has been developed for the code RELAP. This detailed model includes the 10 jet pumps, 5 risers, manifold, suction and control valves, and the recirculation pump, per recirculation loop. The model is tested against data from an event of partial blockage at the entrance nozzle of one jet pump in both recirculation loops. For practical applications, simulation results showed good agreement with data. Then, values of parameters considered as figure of merit (reactor power, dome pressure, core flow, among others) for this event are compared against those from the common 1 jet pump per loop model. The results show that new detailed model led to a closer prediction of the reported power change. The detailed recirculation loop model can provide more reliable boundary condition data to a CFD models for studies of, for example, flow induced vibration, wear, and crack initiation.

  10. Improvement for BWR operator training

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurisu, Takanori; Takahashi, Yoshitaka; Harada, Mitsuhiro; Takahashi, Iwao.

    1988-01-01

    BWR Operator Training Center was founded in April, 1971, and in April, 1974, training was begun, since then, 13 years elapsed. During this period, the curriculum and training facilities were strengthened to meet the training needs, and the new training techniques from different viewpoint were developed, thus the improvement of training has been done. In this report, a number of the training techniques which have been developed and adopted recently, and are effective for the improvement of the knowledge and skill of operators are described. Recently Japanese nuclear power stations have been operated at stable high capacity factor, accordingly the chance of experiencing the occurrence of abnormality and the usual start and stop of plants decreased, and the training of operators using simulators becomes more important. The basic concept on training is explained. In the standard training course and the short period fundamental course, the development of the guide for reviewing lessons, the utilization of VTRs and the development of the techniques for diagnosing individual degree of learning were carried out. The problems, the points of improvement and the results of these are reported. (Kako, I.)

  11. Fundamentals of boiling water reactor (BWR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bozzola, S.

    1982-01-01

    These lectures on fundamentals of BWR reactor physics are a synthesis of known and established concepts. These lectures are intended to be a comprehensive (even though descriptive in nature) presentation, which would give the basis for a fair understanding of power operation, fuel cycle and safety aspects of the boiling water reactor. The fundamentals of BWR reactor physics are oriented to design and operation. In the first lecture general description of BWR is presented, with emphasis on the reactor physics aspects. A survey of methods applied in fuel and core design and operation is presented in the second lecture in order to indicate the main features of the calculational tools. The third and fourth lectures are devoted to review of BWR design bases, reactivity requirements, reactivity and power control, fuel loading patterns. Moreover, operating limits are reviewed, as the actual limits during power operation and constraints for reactor physics analyses (design and operation). The basic elements of core management are also presented. The constraints on control rod movements during the achieving of criticality and low power operation are illustrated in the fifth lecture. Some considerations on plant transient analyses are also presented in the fifth lecture, in order to show the impact between core and fuel performance and plant/system performance. The last (sixth) lecture is devoted to the open vessel testing during the startup of a commercial BWR. A control rod calibration is also illustrated. (author)

  12. ATWS: a reappraisal, part II, evaluation of societal risks due to reactor protection systems failure. Vol. 3. Pwr risk analysis. Phase report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lellouche, G.S.

    1976-08-01

    This document is the third volume of part 2 in a series of studies which will examine the basis for the problem of Anticipated Transients Without Scram (ATWS). The purpose of part 2 is an evaluation of societal risks due to RPS failure based on more current data and methodology than used in WASH-1270. This volume examines and documents the potential contribution to societal risk due to ATWS in the PWR. Volumes 1 and 2 described a similar analysis for the BWR

  13. Fabrication of PWR fuel assembly and CANDU fuel bundle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, G.S.; Suh, K.S.; Chang, H.I.; Chung, S.H.

    1980-01-01

    For the project of localization of nuclear fuel fabrication, the R and D to establish the fabrication technology of CANDU fuel bundle as well as PWR fuel assembly was carried out. The suitable boss height and the prober Beryllium coating thickness to get good brazing condition of appendage were studied in the fabrication process of CANDU fuel rod. Basic Studies on CANLUB coating method also were performed. Problems in each fabrication process step and process flow between steps were reviewed and modified. The welding conditions for top and bottom nozzles, guide tube, seal and thimble screw pin were established in the fabrication processes of PWR fuel assembly. Additionally, some researches for a part of PWR grid brazing problems are also carried out

  14. Valve testing for UK PWR safety applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    George, P.T.; Bryant, S.

    1989-01-01

    Extensive testing and development has been done by the Central Electricity Generating Board (CEGB) to support the design, construction and operation of Sizewell B, the UK's first PWR. A Blowdown Rig for the Assessment of Valve Operability - (BRAVO) has been constructed at the CEGB Marchwood Engineering Laboratory to reproduce PWR Pressurizer fluid conditions for the full scale testing of Pressurizer Relief System (PRS) valves. A full size tandem pair of Pilot Operated Safety Relief Valves (POSRVs) is being tested under the full range of pressurizer fluid conditions. Tests to date have produced important data on the performance of the valve in its Cold Overpressure protection mode of operation and on methods for the in-service testing of the valve. Also, a full size pressurizer safety valve has been tested under full PRS fluid conditions to develop a methodology for the pre-service testing of the Sizewell valves. Further work will be carried out to develop procedures for the in-service testing of the valve. In the Main Steam Safety Valve test program carried out at the Siemens-KWU Test Facilities, a single MSSV from three potential suppliers was tested under full secondary system conditions. The test results have been analyzed and are reflected in the CEGB's arrangements for the pre-service and in-service testing of the Sizewell MSSVs. Valves required to interrupt pipebreak flow must be qualified for this duty by testing or a combination of testing and analysis. To obtain guidance on the performance of such tests gate and globe valves have been subjected to simulated pipebreaks under PWR primary circuit conditions. In the light of problems encountered with gate valve closure under these conditions, further tests are currently being carried out on the BRAVO facility on a gate valve, in preparation for the full scale flow interruption qualification testing of the Sizewell main steam isolation valve

  15. BWR Refill-Reflood Program. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Myers, L.L.

    1983-09-01

    The BWR Refill-Reflood Program is part of the continuing Loss of Coolant Accident (LOCA) research in the United States which is jointly sponsored by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission, the Electric Power Research Institute, and the General Electric Company. The current program expanded the focus of this research to include full scale experimental evaluations of multidimensional and multichannel effects during system refill. The program has also made major contributions to the BWR version of the Transient Reactor Analysis Code (TRAC) which has been developed cooperatively with the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) for application to BWR transients. A summary description of the complete program is provided including the principal findings and main conclusions of the program. The results of the program have shown that multidimensional and parallel channel effects have the potential to significantly improve the system response over that observed in single channel tests

  16. Interpretation of incore noise measurements in BWR's

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dam, H. van

    1983-01-01

    A survey is given of the main incentives for power reactor noise research, and the differences and similarities of noise in power and zero power systems are shown. After a short outline of historical developments the basic characteristics of the adjoint method in reactor noise theory are dealt with. The detector adjoint functions describe the transfer functions between spatially distributed noise sources and a (neutron or gamma) detector. In particular, the spatial dependence of these functions explains the 'local' and 'global' effects in BWR noise measurements. By including thermal hydraulic feedback effects in the adjoint analysis, it is shown that the common idea of a dominant global effect at low frequencies, which should result in point kinetic behaviour, is erroneous. The same analysis provides a method for nonperturbing on-line measurements on a BWR in The Netherlands. In the final part of the paper some ideas are given for further research in the field of BWR noise. (author)

  17. Effect of water chemistry improvement on flow accelerated corrosion in light-water nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugino, Wataru; Ohira, Taku; Nagata, Nobuaki; Abe, Ayumi; Takiguchi, Hideki

    2009-01-01

    Flow Accelerated Corrosion (FAC) of Carbon Steel (CS) piping has been one of main issues in Light-Water Nuclear Reactor (LWRs). Wall thinning of CS piping due to FAC increases potential risk of pipe rupture and cost for inspection and replacement of damaged pipes. In particular, corrosion products generated by FAC of CS piping brought steam generator (SG) tube corrosion and degradation of thermal performance, when it intruded and accumulated in secondary side of PWR. To preserve SG integrity by suppressing the corrosion of CS, High-AVT chemistry (Feedwater pH9.8±0.2) has been adopted to Tsuruga-2 (1160 MWe PWR, commercial operation in 1987) in July 2005 instead of conventional Low-AVT chemistry (Feedwater pH 9.3). By the High-AVT adoption, the accumulation rate of iron in SG was reduced to one-quarter of that under conventional Low-AVT. As a result, a tendency to degradation of the SG thermal efficiency was improved. On the other hand, it was clarified that High-AVT is ineffective against Flow Accelerated Corrosion (FAC) at the region where the flow turbulence is much larger. By contrast, wall thinning of CS feed water pipes due to FAC has been successfully controlled by oxygen treatment (OT) for long time in BWRs. Because Magnetite film formed on CS surface under AVT chemistry has higher solubility and porosity in comparison with Hematite film, which is formed under OT. In this paper, behavior of the FAC under various pH and dissolved oxygen concentration are discussed based on the actual wall thinning rate of BWR and PWR plant and experimental results by FAC test-loop. And, it is clarified that the FAC is suppressed even under extremely low DO concentration such as 2ppb under AVT condition in PWR. Based on this result, we propose the oxygenated water chemistry (OWC) for PWR secondary system which can mitigate the FAC of CS piping without any adverse effect for the SG integrity. Furthermore, the applicability and effectiveness of this concept developed for FAC

  18. A study on thimble plug removal for PWR plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Dong Soo; Lee, Chang Sup; Lee, Jae Yong; Jun, Hwang Yong [Korea Electric Power Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1997-12-31

    The thermal-hydraulic effects of removing the RCC guide thimble plugs are evaluated for 8 Westinghouse type PWR plants in Korea as a part of feasibility study: core outlet loss coefficient, thimble bypass flow, and best estimate flow. It is resulted that the best estimate thimble bypass flow increases about by 2% and the best estimate flow increases approximately by 1.2%. The resulting DNBR penalties can be covered with the current DNBR margin. Accident analyses are also investigated that the dropped rod transient is shown to be limiting and relatively sensitive to bypass flow variation. 8 refs., 5 tabs. (Author)

  19. A study on thimble plug removal for PWR plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Dong Soo; Lee, Chang Sup; Lee, Jae Yong; Jun, Hwang Yong [Korea Electric Power Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1998-12-31

    The thermal-hydraulic effects of removing the RCC guide thimble plugs are evaluated for 8 Westinghouse type PWR plants in Korea as a part of feasibility study: core outlet loss coefficient, thimble bypass flow, and best estimate flow. It is resulted that the best estimate thimble bypass flow increases about by 2% and the best estimate flow increases approximately by 1.2%. The resulting DNBR penalties can be covered with the current DNBR margin. Accident analyses are also investigated that the dropped rod transient is shown to be limiting and relatively sensitive to bypass flow variation. 8 refs., 5 tabs. (Author)

  20. BWR radiation exposure--experience and projection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Falk, C.F.; Wilkinson, C.D.; Hollander, W.R.

    1979-01-01

    The BWR/6 Mark III radiation exposures are projected to be about half of those of current average operating experience of 725 man-rem. These projections are said to be realistic and based on current achievements and not on promises of future development. The several BWRs operating with low primary system radiation levels are positive evidence that radiation sources can be reduced. Improvements have been made in reducing the maintenance times for the BWR/6, and further improvements can be made by further attention to cost-effective plant arrangement and layout during detail design to improve accessibility and maintainability of each system and component

  1. General Electric's training program for BWR chemists

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osborn, R.N.; Lim, W.

    1981-01-01

    This paper describes the development and implementation of the General Electric boiling water reactor chemistry training program from 1959 to the present. The original intention of this program was to provide practical hands on type training in radiochemistry to BWR chemistry supervisors with fossil station experience. This emphasis on radiochemistry has not changed through the years, but the training has expanded to include the high purity water chemistry of the BWR and has been modified to include new commission requirements, engineering developments and advanced instrumentation. Student and instructor qualifications are discussed and a description of the spin off courses for chemistry technicians and refresher training is presented

  2. BWR plant analyzer development at BNL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheng, H.S.; Wulff, W.; Mallen, A.N.; Lekach, S.V.; Stritar, A.; Cerbone, R.J.

    1985-01-01

    Advanced technology for high-speed interactive nuclear power plant simulations is of great value for timely resolution of safety issues, for plant monitoring, and for computer-aided emergency responses to an accident. Presented is the methodology employed at BNL to develop a BWR plant analyzer capable of simulating severe plant transients at much faster than real-time process speeds. Five modeling principles are established and a criterion is given for selecting numerical procedures and efficient computers to achieve the very high simulation speeds. Typical results are shown to demonstrate the modeling fidelity of the BWR plant analyzer

  3. The BWR Hybrid 4 control rod

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gross, H.; Fuchs, H.P.; Lippert, H.J.; Dambietz, W.

    1988-01-01

    The service life of BWR control rods designed in the past has been unsatisfactory. The main reason was irradiation assisted stress corrosion cracking of B 4 C rods caused by external swelling of the B 4 C powder. By this reason KWU developed an improved BWR control rod (Hybrid 4 control rod) with extended service life and increased control rod worth. It also allows the procedure for replacing and rearranging fuel assemblies to be considerably simplified. A complete set of Hydbrid 4 control rods is expected to last throughout the service life of a plant (assumption: ca. 40 years) if an appropriate control rod reshuffling management program is used. (orig.)

  4. Improvement for BWR operator training, 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noji, Kunio; Toeda, Susumu; Saito, Genhachi; Suzuki, Koichi

    1990-01-01

    BWR Operator Training Center Corporation (BTC) is conducting training for BWR plant operators using Full-scope Simulators. There are several courses for individual operators and one training course for shift crew (Family Training Course) in BTC. Family Training is carried out by all members of the operating shift-crew. BTC has made efforts to improve the Family Training in order to acquire more effective training results and contribute to up-grade team performance of all crews. This paper describes some items of our efforts towards Family Training improvement. (author)

  5. Panorama of the BWR reactors - Evolution of the concept

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Novotny, C.; Uhrig, E. [AREVA NP GmbH, Safety Engineering Department - PEPS-G (Germany)

    2012-01-15

    Nowadays, a fleet of more than 50 boiling water reactors (BWR) are in operation in the world. This article gives a short overview on the developments of nuclear power plants of the BWR type, with a focus on the European builds. It describes the technical bases from the early designs in the fifties, sketches the innovations of the sixties and seventies in the types BWR 69 and 72 (Baulinie 69 and 72) and gives an outlook of a possible next generation BWR. A promising approach in recent BWR developments is the the combination of passive safety systems with established design basis

  6. French PWR Safety Philosophy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conte, M. M.

    1986-01-01

    The first 900 MWe units, built under the American Westinghouse licence and with reference to the U. S. regulation, were followed by 28 standardized units, C P1 and C P2 series. Increasing knowledge and lessons learned from starting and operating experience of French nuclear power plants, completed by the experience learned from the operation of foreign reactors, has contributed to the improvement of French PWR design and safety philosophy. As early as 1976, this experience was taken into account by French Safety organisms to discuss, with Electricite de France, the safety options for the planned 1300 MWe units, P4 and P4 series. In 1983, the new reactor scheduled, Ni4 series 1400 MWe, is a totally French design which satisfies the French regulations and other French standards and codes. Based on a deterministic approach, the French safety analysis was progressively completed by a probabilistic approach each of them having possibilities and limits. Increasing knowledge and lessons learned from operating experience have contributed to the French safety philosophy improvement. The methodology now applied to safety evaluation develops a new facet of the in depth defense concept by taking highly unlikely events into consideration, by developing the search of safety consistency of the design, and by completing the deterministic approach by the probabilistic one

  7. Modeling of the thermo-mechanical behaviour of the PWR fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mailhe, P.

    2014-01-01

    This article reviews the various physical phenomena that take place in an irradiated fuel rod and presents the development of the thermo-mechanical codes able to simulate them. Though technically simple the fuel rod is the place where appear 4 types of process: thermal, gas behaviour, mechanical and corrosion that combine involving 5 elements: the fuel pellet, the fuel clad, the fuel-clad gap, the inside volume and the coolant. For instance the pellet is the place where the following mechanical processes took place: thermal dilatation, elastic deformation, creep deformation, densification, solid swelling, gaseous swelling and cracking. The first industrial code simulating the behaviour of the fuel rod was COCCINEL, it was developed by AREVA teams from the American PAD code that was included in the Westinghouse license. Today the GALILEO code has replaced the COPERNIC code that was developed in the beginning of the 2000 years. GALILEO is a synthesis of the state of the art of the different models used in the codes validated for PWR and BWR. GALILEO has been validated on more than 1500 fuel rods concerning PWR, BWR and specific reactors like Siloe, Osiris, HFR, Halden, Studsvik, BR2/3,...) and also for extended burn-ups. (A.C.)

  8. Pre-study of dynamic loads on the internals caused by a large pipe break in a BWR; Foerstudie av stroemningsinducerade laster paa interndelar vid brott i huvudcirkulationskretsarna i BWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marcinkiewicz, Jerzy; Lindgren, Anders [Det Norske Veritas Nuclear Technology AB, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2002-12-01

    Det Norske Veritas Nuclear Technology has performed a literature study of dynamic load on a BWR (Boiling Water Reactor) internals caused by a large pipe break. The goal of the study was to improve the knowledge about the physics of phenomena occurring in the RPV (Reactor Pressure Vessel) after pipe break in the main circulation system and also to make a review of calculation methods, models and computer programs including their capabilities when calculating the dynamic loads. The report presents description of relevant parts of a BWR, initial and boundary conditions, and phenomena determining the loads - rapid depressurization and propagation of pressure wave (including none-equilibrium). Furthermore, the report generally describes possible methodologies for calculating the dynamic loads on internals after the pipe break and the experiences from calculations the dynamic loads with different methods (computer programs) including comparisons with experimental data. Fluid-Structure Interaction methodology and its importance for calculation of dynamic loads on reactor internals is discussed based on experimental data. A very intensive research program for studying and calculating the dynamic loads on internals after pipe breaks has been performed in USA and Germany during the seventies and the eighties. Several computer programs have been developed and a number of large-scale experiments have been performed to calibrate the calculation methods. In spite of the fact that all experiments were performed for PWR several experiences should be valid also for BWR. These experiences, connected mainly to capabilities of computer programs calculating dynamic loads, are discussed in the report.

  9. Evaluation of thermal margin during BWR neutron flux oscillation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takeuchi, Yutaka; Takigawa, Yukio; Chuman, Kazuto; Ebata, Shigeo

    1992-01-01

    Fuel integrity is very important, from the view point of nuclear power plant safety. Recently, neutron flux oscillations were observed at several BWR plants. The present paper describes the evaluations of the thermal margin during BWR neutron flux oscillations, using a three-dimensional transient code. The thermal margin is evaluated as MCPR (minimum critical power ratio). The LaSalle-2 event was simulated and the MCPR during the event was evaluated. It was a core-wide oscillation, at which a large neutron flux oscillation amplitude was observed. The results indicate that the MCPR had a sufficient margin with regard to the design limit. A regional oscillation mode, which is different from a core-wide oscillation, was simulated and the MCPR response was compared with that for the LaSalle-2 event. The MCPR decrement is greater in the regional oscillation, than in the core wide -oscillation, because of the sensitivity difference in a flow-to-power gain. A study was carried out about regional oscillation detectability, from the MCPR response view point. Even in a hypothetically severe case, the regional oscillation is detectable by LPRM signals. (author)

  10. Studies of fragileness in steels of vessels of BWR reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robles, E.F.; Balcazar, M.; Alpizar, A.M.; Calderon, B.E.

    2003-01-01

    The structural materials with those that are manufactured the pressure vessels of the BWR reactors, suffer degradation in its mechanical properties mainly to the damage taken place by the fast neutrons (E > 1 MeV) coming from the reactor core. Its are experimentally studied those mechanisms of neutron damage in this material type, by means of the irradiation of steel vessel in experimental reactors to age them quickly. Alternatively it is simulated the neutron damage by means of irradiation of steel with heavy ions. In this work those are shown first results of the damage induced by irradiation from a similar steel to the vessel of a BWR reactor. The irradiation was carried out with fast neutrons (E > 1 MeV, fluence of 1.45 x 10 18 n/cm 2 ) in the TRIGA MARK lll reactor and separately with Ni +3 ions in a Tandetrom accelerator, E = 4.8 MeV and range of the ionic flow of 0.1 to 53 iones/A 2 . (Author)

  11. BWR series pump recirculation system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dillmann, C.W.

    1992-01-01

    This patent describes a recirculation system for driving reactor coolant water contained in an annular downcomer defined between a boiling water reactor vessel and a reactor core spaced radially inwardly therefrom. It comprises a plurality of circumferentially spaced second pumps disposed in the downcomer, each including an inlet for receiving from the downcomer a portion of the coolant water as pump inlet flow, and an outlet for discharging the pump inlet flow pressurized in the second pump as pump outlet flow; and means for increasing pressure of the pump inlet flow at the pump inlet including a first pump disposed in series flow with the second pump for first receiving the pump inlet flow from the downcomer and discharging to the second pump inlet flow pressurized in the first pump

  12. Assessment of boiling transition analysis code against data from NUPEC BWR full-size fine-mesh bundle tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Utsuno, Hideaki; Ishida, Naoyuki; Masuhara, Yasuhiro; Kasahara, Fumio

    2004-01-01

    Transient BT analysis code TCAPE based on mechanistic methods coupled with subchannel analysis has been developed for the evaluation on fuel integrity under abnormal operations in BWR. TCAPE consisted mainly of the drift-flux model, the cross-flow model, the film model and the heat transfer model. Assessment of TCAPE has been performed against data from BWR full-size fine-mesh bundle tests (BFBT), which consisted of two major parts: the void distribution measurement and the critical power measurement. Code and data comparison was made for void distributions with varying number of unheated rods in simulated actual fuel assembly. Prediction of steady-state critical power was compared with the measurement on full-scale bundle under a range of BWR operational conditions. Although the cross-sectional averaged void fraction was underestimated when it became lower, the accuracy was obtained that the averaged ratio 0.910 and its standard deviation 0.076. The prediction of steady-state critical power agreed well with the data in the range of BWR operations, where the prediction accuracy was obtained that the averaged ratio 0.997 and its standard deviation 0.043. These results demonstrated that TCAPE is well capable to predict two-phase flow distribution and liquid film dryout phenomena occurring in BWR rod bundles. Part of NUPEC BFBT database will be made available for an international benchmark exercise. The code assessment shall be continued against the OECD/NRC benchmark based on BFBT database. (author)

  13. Heat transfer effect of an extended surface in downward-facing subcooled flow boiling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khan, Abdul R., E-mail: khan@vis.t.u-tokyo.ac.jp [Department of Nuclear Engineering and Management, School of Engineering, The University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan); Erkan, Nejdet, E-mail: erkan@vis.t.u-tokyo.ac.jp [Nuclear Professional School, School of Engineering, The University of Tokyo, 2-22 Shirakata, Tokai-mura, Ibaraki, 319-1188 (Japan); Okamoto, Koji, E-mail: okamoto@n.t.u-tokyo.ac.jp [Nuclear Professional School, School of Engineering, The University of Tokyo, 2-22 Shirakata, Tokai-mura, Ibaraki, 319-1188 (Japan)

    2015-12-15

    Highlights: • Compare downward-facing flow boiling results from bare and extended surfaces. • Upstream and downstream temperatures were measured on the extended surface. • Downstream temperatures exceed upstream temperatures for all flow rates. • Bubble accumulation occurs downstream on extended surface. • Extended surface heat transfer lower than bare surface as flow rate reduced. - Abstract: New BWR containment designs are considering cavity flooding as an accident management strategy. Unlike the PWR, the BWR has many Control Rod Guide Tube (CRGT) penetrations in the lower head. During a severe accident scenario with core melt in the lower plenum along with cavity flooding, the penetrations may affect the heat transfer on the ex-vessel surface and disrupt fluid flow during the boiling process. A small-scale experiment was performed to investigate the issues existing in downward-facing boiling phenomenon with an extended surface. The results were compared with a bare (flat) surface. The mass flux of 244 kg/m{sup 2} s, 215 kg/m{sup 2} s, and 177 kg/m{sup 2} s were applied in this study. CHF conditions were observed only for the 177 kg/m{sup 2} s case. The boiling curves for both types of surfaces and all flow rates were obtained. The boiling curves for the highest flow rate showed lower surface temperatures for the extended surface experiments when compared to the bare surface. The downstream location on the extended surface yielded the highest surface temperatures as the flow rate was reduced. The bubble accumulation and low velocity in the wake produced by flow around the extended surface was believed to have caused the elevated temperatures in the downstream location. Although an extended surface may enhance the overall heat transfer, a reduction in the local heat transfer was observed in the current experiments.

  14. Investigation of 3H and 14C inventory and distribution in spent BWR fuel rods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bleier, A.; Beuerle, M.; Neeb, K.H.

    1984-10-01

    In order to obtain reliable data for fuel reprocessing and waste disposal, the T and C-14 inventory, distribution and behaviour was investigated on a typical LWR fuel rod discharged from a BWR plant. The results showed that 50 ± 5% of the T generated in the fuel is present in the cladding after reactor operation. The remainder of the T stays with the fuel. Related to the reactor power the total T inventory corresponds to a T production rate of 19 000 Ci/GW e . a. The C-14 built up in the fuel represents approximately 60% of the C-14 inventory of the BWR fuel rod. The remaining part of C-14 (about 40%) experimentally determined by this analysis for the first time is generated in the cladding. From the total C-14 inventory a C-14 production rate of 17,5 Ci/GW e . a can be calculated. The fill gas contains only negligible fractions of both nuclides. The results obtained in this program are generally in good agreement with the data of theoretical estimates and with results of earlier investigations on PWR fuel rods. (orig.) [de

  15. Studies of fragileness in steels of vessels of BWR reactors; Estudios de fragilizacion en aceros de vasija de reactores BWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robles, E.F.; Balcazar, M.; Alpizar, A.M.; Calderon, B.E. [ININ, 52045 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)

    2003-07-01

    The structural materials with those that are manufactured the pressure vessels of the BWR reactors, suffer degradation in its mechanical properties mainly to the damage taken place by the fast neutrons (E > 1 MeV) coming from the reactor core. Its are experimentally studied those mechanisms of neutron damage in this material type, by means of the irradiation of steel vessel in experimental reactors to age them quickly. Alternatively it is simulated the neutron damage by means of irradiation of steel with heavy ions. In this work those are shown first results of the damage induced by irradiation from a similar steel to the vessel of a BWR reactor. The irradiation was carried out with fast neutrons (E > 1 MeV, fluence of 1.45 x 10{sup 18} n/cm{sup 2}) in the TRIGA MARK lll reactor and separately with Ni{sup +3} ions in a Tandetrom accelerator, E = 4.8 MeV and range of the ionic flow of 0.1 to 53 iones/A{sup 2}. (Author)

  16. Moderator temperature coefficient in BWR core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naito, Yoshitaka

    1977-01-01

    Temperature dependences of infinite multiplication factor k sub(infinity) and neutron leakage from the core must be examined for estimation of moderator temperature coefficient. Temperature dependence on k sub(infinity) has been investigated by many researchers, however, the dependence on neutron leakage of a BWR with cruciformed control rods has hardly been done. Because there are difficulties and necessity on calculations of three space dimensional and multi-energy groups neutron distribution in a BWR core. In this study, moderator temperature coefficients of JPDR-II (BWR) core were obtained by calculation with DIFFUSION-ACE, which is newly developed three-dimensional multi-group computer code. The results were compared with experimental data measured from 20 to 275 0 C of the moderator temperature and the good agreement was obtained between calculation and measurement. In order to evaluate neutron leakage from the core, the other two calculations were carried out, adjusting criticality by uniform absorption rate and by material buckling. The former underestimated neutron leakage and the latter overestimated it. Discussion on the results shows that in order to estimate the temperature coefficient of BWR, neutron leakage must be evaluated precisely, therefore the calculation at actual pattern of control rods is necessary. (auth.)

  17. BWR vessel and internals project (BWRVIP)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bilanin, W.J.; Dyle, R.L.

    1996-01-01

    Recent Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) inspections indicate that Intergranular Stress Corrosion Cracking (IGSCC) is a significant technical issue for some BWR internals. IN response, the Boiling Water Reactor Vessel and Internals Project (BWRVIP) was formed by an associated of domestic and international utilities which own and operate BWRs. The project is identifying or developing generic, cost-effective strategies for managing degradation of reactor internals from which each utility can select the alternative most appropriate for their plant. The Electric Power Research Institute manages the technical program, implementing the utility defined programs. The BWRVIP is organized into four technical tasks: Assessment, Inspection, Repair and Mitigation. An Integration task coordinates the work. The goal of the Assessment task is to develop methodologies for evaluation of vessel and internal components in support of decisions for operation, inspection, mitigation or repair. The goal of the Inspection task is to develop and assess effective and predictable inspection techniques which can be used to determine the condition of BWR vessel and internals that are potentially susceptible to service-related SCC degradation. The goal of the Repair task is to assure the availability of cost-effective repair/replacement alternatives. The goal of the Mitigation task is to develop and demonstrate countermeasures for SCC degradation. This paper summarizes the BWRVIP approach for addressing BWR internals SCC degradation and illustrates how utilities are utilizing BWRVIP products to successfully manage the effect of SCC on core shrouds

  18. Delivering high performance BWR fuel reliably

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schardt, J.F.

    1998-01-01

    Utilities are under intense pressure to reduce their production costs in order to compete in the increasingly deregulated marketplace. They need fuel, which can deliver high performance to meet demanding operating strategies. GE's latest BWR fuel design, GE14, provides that high performance capability. GE's product introduction process assures that this performance will be delivered reliably, with little risk to the utility. (author)

  19. Assessment of two BWR accident management strategies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hodge, S.A.; Petek, M.

    1991-01-01

    Candidate mitigative strategies for management of in-vessel events during the late phase (after core degradation has occurred) of postulated BWR severe accidents were considered at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) during 1990. The identification of new strategies was subject to the constraint that they should, to the maximum extent possible, make use of the existing equipment and water resources of the BWR facilities and not require major equipment modifications or additions. As a result of this effort, two of these candidate strategies were recommended for additional assessment. The first is a strategy for containment flooding to maintain the core and structural debris within the reactor vessel in the event that vessel injection cannot be restored to terminate a severe accident sequence. The second strategy pertains to the opposite case, for which vessel injection would be restored after control blade melting had begun; its purpose is to provide an injection source of borated water at the concentration necessary to preclude criticality upon recovering a damaged BWR core. Assessments of these two strategies have been performed during 1991 under the auspices of the Detailed Assessment of BWR In-Vessel Strategies Program. This paper provides a discussion of the motivation for and purpose of these strategies and the potential for their success. 33 refs., 9 figs

  20. Measurement of gas-liquid two-phase flow around horizontal tube bundle using SF6-water. Simulating high-pressure high-temperature gas-liquid two-phase flow of PWR/SG secondary coolant side at normal pressure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishikawa, Atsushi; Imai, Ryoj; Tanaka, Takahiro

    2014-01-01

    In order to improve prediction accuracy of analysis code used for design and development of industrial products, technology had been developed to create and evaluate constitutive equation incorporated in analysis code. The experimental facility for PWR/SG U tubes part was manufactured to measure local void fraction and gas-liquid interfacial velocity with forming gas-liquid upward two-phase flow simulating high-pressure high-temperature secondary coolant (water-steam) rising vertically around horizontal tube bundle. The experimental facility could reproduce flow field having gas-liquid density ratio equivalent to real system with no heating using SF6 (Sulfur Hexafluoride) gas at normal temperature and pressure less than 1 MPa, because gas-liquid density ratio, surface tension and gas-liquid viscosity ratio were important parameters to determine state of gas-liquid two-phase flow and gas-liquid density ratio was most influential. Void fraction was measured by two different methods of bi-optical probe and conductivity type probe. Test results of gas-liquid interfacial velocity vs. apparent velocity were in good agreement with existing empirical equation within 10% error, which could confirm integrity of experimental facility and appropriateness of measuring method so as to set up original constitutive equation in the future. (T. Tanaka)

  1. Sizewell 'B' PWR reference design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-04-01

    The reference design for a PWR power station to be constructed as Sizewell 'B' is presented in 3 volumes containing 14 chapters and in a volume of drawings. The report describes the proposed design and provides the basis upon which the safety case and the Pre-Construction Safety Report have been prepared. The station is based on a 3425MWt Westinghouse PWR providing steam to two turbine generators each of 600 MW. The layout and many of the systems are based on the SNUPPS design for Callaway which has been chosen as the US reference plant for the project. (U.K.)

  2. Data assimilation and PWR primary measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mercier, Thibaud

    2015-01-01

    A Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) Reactor Coolant System (RCS) is a highly complex physical process: heterogeneous power, flow and temperature distributions are difficult to be accurately measured, since instrumentations are limited in number, thus leading to the relevant safety and protection margins. EDF R and D is seeking to assess the potential benefits of applying Data Assimilation to a PWR's RCS (Reactor Coolant System) measurements, in order to improve the estimators for parameters of a reactor's operating setpoint, i.e. improving accuracy and reducing uncertainties and biases of measured RCS parameters. In this thesis, we define a 0D semi-empirical model for RCS, satisfying the description level usually chosen by plant operators, and construct a Monte-Carlo Method (inspired from Ensemble Methods) in order to use this model with Data Assimilation tools. We apply this method on simulated data in order to assess the reduction of uncertainties on key parameters: results are beyond expectations, however strong hypothesis are required, implying a careful preprocessing of input data. (author)

  3. Advanced high conversion PWR: preliminary analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Golfier, H.; Bellanger, V.; Bergeron, A.; Dolci, F.; Gastaldi, B.; Koberl, O.; Mignot, G.; Thevenot, C.

    2007-01-01

    In this paper, physical aspects of a HCPWR (High Conversion Light Water Reactor), which is an innovative PWR fuelled with mixed oxide and having a higher conversion ratio due to a lower moderation ratio. Moderation ratios lower than unity are considered which has led to low moderation PWR fuel assembly designs. The objectives of this parametric study are to define a feasibility area with regard to the following neutronic aspects: moderation ratio, Pu loading, reactor spectrum, irradiation time, and neutronic coefficients. Important thermohydraulic parameters are the pressure drop, the critical heat flux, the maximum temperature in the fuel rod and the pumping power. The thermohydraulic analysis shows that a range of moderation ratios from 0.8 to 1.2 is technically possible. A compromise between improved fuel utilization and research and development effort has been found for the moderation ration of about 1. The parametric study shows that there are 2 ranges of interest for the moderation ratio: -) moderation ratio between 0.8 and 1.2 with reduced fissile heights (> 3 m), hexagonal arrangement fuel assembly and square arrangement fuel assembly are possible; and -) moderation between 0.6 and 0.7 with a modification of the reactor operating conditions (reduction of the primary flow and of the thermal power), the fuel rods could be arranged inside a hexagonal fuel rod assembly. (A.C.)

  4. Predictive uncertainty reduction in coupled neutron-kinetics/thermal hydraulics modeling of the BWR-TT2 benchmark

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Badea, Aurelian F., E-mail: aurelian.badea@kit.edu [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Vincenz-Prießnitz-Str. 3, 76131 Karlsruhe (Germany); Cacuci, Dan G. [Center for Nuclear Science and Energy/Dept. of ME, University of South Carolina, 300 Main Street, Columbia, SC 29208 (United States)

    2017-03-15

    Highlights: • BWR Turbine Trip 2 (BWR-TT2) benchmark. • Substantial (up to 50%) reduction of uncertainties in the predicted transient power. • 6660 uncertain model parameters were calibrated. - Abstract: By applying a comprehensive predictive modeling methodology, this work demonstrates a substantial (up to 50%) reduction of uncertainties in the predicted total transient power in the BWR Turbine Trip 2 (BWR-TT2) benchmark while calibrating the numerical simulation of this benchmark, comprising 6090 macroscopic cross sections, and 570 thermal-hydraulics parameters involved in modeling the phase-slip correlation, transient outlet pressure, and total mass flow. The BWR-TT2 benchmark is based on an experiment that was carried out in 1977 in the NPP Peach Bottom 2, involving the closure of the turbine stop valve which caused a pressure wave that propagated with attenuation into the reactor core. The condensation of the steam in the reactor core caused by the pressure increase led to a positive reactivity insertion. The subsequent rise of power was limited by the feedback and the insertion of the control rods. The BWR-TT2 benchmark was modeled with the three-dimensional reactor physics code system DYN3D, by coupling neutron kinetics with two-phase thermal-hydraulics. All 6660 DYN3D model parameters were calibrated by applying a predictive modeling methodology that combines experimental and computational information to produce optimally predicted best-estimate results with reduced predicted uncertainties. Simultaneously, the predictive modeling methodology yields optimally predicted values for the BWR total transient power while reducing significantly the accompanying predicted standard deviations.

  5. Predictive uncertainty reduction in coupled neutron-kinetics/thermal hydraulics modeling of the BWR-TT2 benchmark

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Badea, Aurelian F.; Cacuci, Dan G.

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • BWR Turbine Trip 2 (BWR-TT2) benchmark. • Substantial (up to 50%) reduction of uncertainties in the predicted transient power. • 6660 uncertain model parameters were calibrated. - Abstract: By applying a comprehensive predictive modeling methodology, this work demonstrates a substantial (up to 50%) reduction of uncertainties in the predicted total transient power in the BWR Turbine Trip 2 (BWR-TT2) benchmark while calibrating the numerical simulation of this benchmark, comprising 6090 macroscopic cross sections, and 570 thermal-hydraulics parameters involved in modeling the phase-slip correlation, transient outlet pressure, and total mass flow. The BWR-TT2 benchmark is based on an experiment that was carried out in 1977 in the NPP Peach Bottom 2, involving the closure of the turbine stop valve which caused a pressure wave that propagated with attenuation into the reactor core. The condensation of the steam in the reactor core caused by the pressure increase led to a positive reactivity insertion. The subsequent rise of power was limited by the feedback and the insertion of the control rods. The BWR-TT2 benchmark was modeled with the three-dimensional reactor physics code system DYN3D, by coupling neutron kinetics with two-phase thermal-hydraulics. All 6660 DYN3D model parameters were calibrated by applying a predictive modeling methodology that combines experimental and computational information to produce optimally predicted best-estimate results with reduced predicted uncertainties. Simultaneously, the predictive modeling methodology yields optimally predicted values for the BWR total transient power while reducing significantly the accompanying predicted standard deviations.

  6. Effect of hardening on the crack growth rate of austenitic stainless steels in primary PWR conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castano, M.L.; Garcia, M.S.; Diego, G. de; Gomez-Briceno, D.; Francia, L.

    2002-01-01

    Intergranular cracking of non-sensitized materials, found in light water reactor (LWR) components exposed to neutron radiation, has been attributed to Irradiation Assisted Stress Corrosion Cracking (IASCC). Cracking of baffle former bolts, fabricated of AISI-316L and AISI-347, have been reported in some Europeans and US PWR plants. Examinations of removed bolts indicate the intergranular cracking characteristics can be associated with IASCC phenomena. Neutron radiation produce critical modifications of the microstructure and microchemical of stainless steels such hardening due to irradiation and Radiation Induce Segregation (RIS) at grain boundaries, among others. Chromium depletion at grain boundary due to RIS seems to justify the intergranular cracking of irradiated materials, both in plant and in lab tests, at high electrochemical corrosion potential (BWR-NWC environments), but it is not enough to explain cracking at low corrosion potential (BWR-HWC and PWR environments). In these latter conditions, hardening is considered a possible additional mechanism to explain the behavior of irradiated material. Radiation Hardening can be simulated in non irradiated material by mechanical deformation. Although some differences exists in the types of defects produced by radiation and mechanical deformation, it is accepted that the study of the stress corrosion behavior of unirradiated austenitic steels with different hardening levels would contribute to the understanding of IASCC mechanism. In order to evaluate the influence of hardening on the stress corrosion susceptibility of austenitic steels, crack growth rate tests with 316L and 347 stainless steels with nominal yield strengths from 500 to 900 MPa, produced by cold work are being carried out at 340 deg C in PWR conditions. Preliminary results indicate that crack propagation was obtained in the 316Lss and 347ss cold worked, even with a yield strength of 550 MPa. (authors)

  7. Experiments on natural circulation during PWR severe accidents and their analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sehgal, B.R.; Stewart, W.A.; Sha, W.T.

    1988-01-01

    Buoyancy-induced natural circulation flows will occur during the early-part of PWR high pressure accident scenarios. These flows affect several key parameters; in particular, the course of such accidents will most probably change due to local failures occurring in the primary coolant system (CS) before substantial core degradation. Natural circulation flow patterns were measured in a one-seventh scale PWR PCS facility at Westinghouse RandD laboratories. The measured flow and temperature distributions are report in this paper. The experiments were analyzed with the COMMIX code and good agreement was obtained between data and calculations. 10 refs., 8 figs., 2 tabs

  8. Investigations on the thermal-hydraulics of a natural circulation cooled BWR fuel assembly

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kok, H.V.; Hagen, T.H.J.J. van der; Mudde, R.F. [Delft Univ. of Technology (Netherlands)

    1995-09-01

    A scaled natural circulation loop facility has been built after the Dodewaard Boiling Water Reactor, which is the only operating natural circulation cooled BWR in the world. The loop comprises one fuel assembly, a riser with a downcomer and a condenser with a cooling system. Freon-12 is used as a scaling liquid. This paper reports on the first measurements done with this facility. Quantities like the circulation flow, carry-under and the void-fraction have been measured as a function of power, pressure, liquid level, riser length, condensate temperature and friction factors. The behavior of the circulation flow can be understood by considering the driving force. Special attention has been paid to the carry-under, which has been shown to have a very important impact on the dynamics of a natural circulation cooled BWR.

  9. CFD predictions of standby liquid control system mixing in lower plenum of a BWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boyd, Christopher; Skarda, Raymond

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Computational fluid dynamics analysis of BWR lower plenum. • Mixing and stratification of the standby liquid control system injection. • Scoping study highlights the expected flow paths and limitations of experiments. - Abstract: During an anticipated transient without scram (ATWS) scenario in certain boiling water reactor (BWR) systems, a standby liquid control system (SLCS) is used to inject a sodium pentaborate solution into the reactor system in order to quickly shut down (scram) the reactor without the use of the control rods. Some BWR designs utilize a SLCS that injects through a set of nozzles on a vertical pipe in the peripheral region of the lower plenum of the reactor vessel. During the scenario, system water levels are reduced and natural circulation flow rates down through the jet pump nozzles and up into the core are a small fraction of the rated system flow. It is during this period that the SLCS flows are considered. This work outlines some initial scoping studies completed by the staff at the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). An attempt at benchmarking the computational fluid dynamics (CFD) approach using a set of available test data from a small facility is outlined. Due to our lack of information related to specific details of the facility geometry along with the limited data available from the test, the benchmark exercise produced only a qualitative basis for selecting turbulence models and mesh density. A CFD model simulating a full-scale reactor system is developed for the lower plenum of a representative BWR/4 design and SLCS flows and mixing are studied under a range of flow conditions. The full-scale BWR simulation builds upon the lessons learned from the benchmark exercise. One challenge for this work is the large size of the domain and the relatively small size of the geometric details such as flow passages and gaps. The geometry is simplified to make meshing feasible by eliminating some of the small features. The

  10. Physical protection of nuclear facilities. Quarterly progress report, July--September 1978. [PWR; BWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chapman, L.D. (ed.)

    1979-01-01

    Major activities during the fourth quarter of FY78 included (1) the vital area analysis of operational reactors and characterization of the Standardized Nuclear Unit Power Plant System (SNUPPS), (2) the algorithm development of a new pathfinding computer code, (3) the completion of contractor-supported work for the component generic data base, (4) the refinement of tests related to human parameters modeling, and (5) the addition of improvements to and demonstration of the Safeguards Automated Facility Evaluation (SAFE), Safeguards Network Analysis Procedure (SNAP), and Fixed-Site Neutralization Model (FSNM) methodologies.

  11. Damping test results for straight sections of 3-inch and 8-inch unpressurized pipes. [PWR; BWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ware, A.G.; Thinnes, G.L.

    1984-04-01

    EG and G Idaho is assisting the Nuclear Regulatory Commission and the Pressure Vessel Research Committee in supporting a final position on revised damping values for structural analyses of nuclear piping systems. As part of this program, a series of vibrational tests on unpressurized 3-in. and 8-in. Schedule 40 carbon steel piping was conducted to determine the changes in structural damping due to various parametric effects. The 33-ft straight sections of piping were supported at the ends. Additionally, intermediate supports comprising spring, rod, and constant-force hangers, as well as a sway brace and snubbers, were used. Excitation was provided by low-force-level hammer impacts, a hydraulic shaker, and a 50-ton overhead crane for snapback testing. Data was recorded using acceleration, strain, and displacement time histories. This report presents test results showing the effect of stress level and type of supports on structural damping in piping.

  12. PWR and BWR anticipated and abnormal plant transient research sponsored by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beckner, W.D.; Sullivan, L.H.

    1984-01-01

    This chapter reviews the regulatory activities of the US NRC since the realization that anticipated transients with multiple failures (including operator actions) are the major contributors to risk from reactor operations and that the low probability design basis accidents (DBA) are relatively small contributors to risk. The Three Mile Island-2 accident demonstrated that anticipated transients, combined with multiple equipment and/or operator failures, can result in significant core damage. Topics considered include research in direct response to Three Mile Island-2, research in response to specific safety issues, and research to improve the overall understanding of transients (experimental facilities, computer codes). It is concluded that the US NRC has made significant progress in improving its ability to analyze and evaluate abnormal and anticipated transients

  13. Within AREVA, FRAMATOME ANP and its worldwide experience with PWR and BWR fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watteau, Michel; Esteve, Bernard; Giese, Ulrich; Matheson, John

    2002-01-01

    Faced with obvious energy procurement security needs and the increasing concern about global warming, many countries are making a lucid analysis of their energy situation and reconsidering the multiple assets of nuclear energy. After the European Commission's Green Paper evaluation which was endorsed by the European Parliament, the United States gave a strong signal to the whole world by deciding to extent the operating life time of its existing NPPs and by envisioning the construction of new ones. In Asia, here in Korea, and in Japan, the People's Republic of China, Taiwan, large-scale nuclear power plant programs are being pursued. It was in this context, with the aim of ever-greater competitiveness, that the AREVA group was conceived. The aim is for all our skills to have a higher profile on the international markets, so that we are in a stronger position to develop a leadership in our two main high tech sectors of interconnect - electronics and nuclear. In the nuclear sector, the pooling of the Cogema and Framatome ANP forces is enabling AREVA to offer a comprehensive service package ranging from uranium mining to decommissioning, encompassing the design and construction of plants and their fuel; AREVA's experience is grounded in unequalled know-how. Further, with the CEA, a multidisciplinary research organization in charge of anticipating the emerging technologies, as a close partner, AREVA has a unique strategic vision. With this set-up, AREVA has the financial resources it needs to forge the alliances necessary for its development, so that it can best confront international competition and meet the requirements of its customers world-wide

  14. Facility for processing the condensates from nuclear power plants (BWR and PWR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lucker, Georges.

    1975-01-01

    A plant for the processing of the condensates from boiling water or pressurized water nuclear power plants is presented. A series of couples of units for the processing of the condensates through mixed beds of ion exchange resins simultaneously ensures the filtration and demineralization of the condensates. When the resins are saturated, each mixed bed is transferred into a unit of regeneration of said resins. Each processing unit is a sphere made of a stainless material, and provided with a plurality of air and water pipes allowing the admission and evacuation of the various elements to be successively controlled [fr

  15. Workshop on data-acquisition and -display systems: directions after TMI. [PWR; BWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1980-11-01

    The accident at Three Mile Island Unit-2 raised questions as to the adequacy of data acquisition and display systems in commercial nuclear power plants. A series of recommendations have developed from the various groups that have analyzed the accident in order to improve the oprator's overview of the plant safety conditions and to facilitate information transfer to technical support centers in emergency situations. This report is the result of an NSAC-sponsored workshop, where the various recommendations and emerging regulatory requirements were reviewed in an attempt to provide an integrated basis for their implementation.

  16. Aging assessment of Westinghouse PWR and General Electric BWR containment isolation functions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, B.S.; Travis, R.; Grove, E.; DiBiasio, A.

    1996-03-01

    A study was performed to assess the effects of aging on the Containment Isolation (CI) functions of Westinghouse Pressurized Water Reactors and General Electric Boiling Water Reactors. This study is part of the Nuclear Plant Aging Research (NPAR) program, sponsored by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The objectives of this program are to provide an understanding of the aging process and how it affects plant safety so that it can be properly managed. This is one of a number of studies performed under the NPAR program which provide a technical basis for the identification and evaluation of degradation caused by age. Failure data from two national databases, Nuclear Plant Reliability Data System (NPRDS) and Licensee Event Reports (LERs), as well as plant specific data were reviewed and analyzed to understand the effects of aging on the CI functions. This study provided information on the effects of aging on component failure frequency, failure modes, and failure causes. Current inspection, surveillance, and monitoring practices were also reviewed.

  17. Aging assessment of Westinghouse PWR and General Electric BWR containment isolation functions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, B.S.; Travis, R.; Grove, E.; DiBiasio, A.

    1996-03-01

    A study was performed to assess the effects of aging on the Containment Isolation (CI) functions of Westinghouse Pressurized Water Reactors and General Electric Boiling Water Reactors. This study is part of the Nuclear Plant Aging Research (NPAR) program, sponsored by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The objectives of this program are to provide an understanding of the aging process and how it affects plant safety so that it can be properly managed. This is one of a number of studies performed under the NPAR program which provide a technical basis for the identification and evaluation of degradation caused by age. Failure data from two national databases, Nuclear Plant Reliability Data System (NPRDS) and Licensee Event Reports (LERs), as well as plant specific data were reviewed and analyzed to understand the effects of aging on the CI functions. This study provided information on the effects of aging on component failure frequency, failure modes, and failure causes. Current inspection, surveillance, and monitoring practices were also reviewed

  18. Source terms: an investigation of uncertainties, magnitudes, and recommendations for research. [PWR; BWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Levine, S.; Kaiser, G. D.; Arcieri, W. C.; Firstenberg, H.; Fulford, P. J.; Lam, P. S.; Ritzman, R. L.; Schmidt, E. R.

    1982-03-01

    The purpose of this document is to assess the state of knowledge and expert opinions that exist about fission product source terms from potential nuclear power plant accidents. This is so that recommendations can be made for research and analyses which have the potential to reduce the uncertainties in these estimated source terms and to derive improved methods for predicting their magnitudes. The main reasons for writing this report are to indicate the major uncertainties involved in defining realistic source terms that could arise from severe reactor accidents, to determine which factors would have the most significant impact on public risks and emergency planning, and to suggest research and analyses that could result in the reduction of these uncertainties. Source terms used in the conventional consequence calculations in the licensing process are not explicitly addressed.

  19. ZOCO-6, Temperature Transients in BWR and PWR Containment During LOCA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brosche, D.

    1974-01-01

    1 - Nature of physical problem solved: ZOCO-VI is a multi-node computer code which calculates the time and space dependent pressure distribution in containments of water-cooled nuclear power reactors following a loss-of-coolant accident. It should be used primarily for the short term behaviour but can also be used for the long term behaviour. 2 - Method of solution: Using the equations of the mass balances for steam, water and air, and the energy and volume balances, for each pressure node, four or six (non-thermodynamic equilibrium) ordinary non-linear differential equations for the time dependent variations of the temperature and the masses of steam, water and air are obtained. The solution of the system of differential equations will be performed using the integration and iteration procedure DIFSYS. 3 - Restrictions on the complexity of the problem: The quantity of the pressure nodes is only limited by the computer capacity and the computing time

  20. Definition of loss-of-coolant accident radiation source. [PWR; BWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1978-02-01

    Meaningful qualification testing of nuclear reactor components requires a knowledge of the radiation fields expected in a loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA). The overall objective of this program is to define the LOCA source terms and compare these with the output of various simulators employed for radiation qualification testing. The basis for comparison will be the energy deposition in a model reactor component. The results of the calculations are presented and some interpretation of the results given. The energy release rates and spectra were validated by comparison with other calculations using different codes since experimental data appropriate to these calculations do not exist.

  1. BWR NSSS design basis documentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vij, R.S.; Bates, R.E.

    2004-01-01

    programs that GE has participated in and describes the different options and approaches that have been used by various utilities in their design basis programs. Some of these variations deal with the scope and depth of coverage of the information, while others are related to the process (how the work is done). Both of these topics can have a significant effect on the program cost. Some insight into these effects is provided. The final section of the paper presents a set of lessons learned and a recommendation for an optimum approach to a design basis information program. The lessons learned reflect the knowledge that GE has gained by participating in design basis programs with nineteen domestic and international BWR owner/operators. The optimum approach described in this paper is GE's attempt to define a set of information and a work process for a utility/GE NSSS Design Basis Information program that will maximize the cost effectiveness of the program for the utility. (author)

  2. Cobra-TF simulation of BWR bundle dry out experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frepoli, C.; Ireland, A.; Hochreiter, L.; Ivanov, K. [Penn State Univ., Dept. of Mechanical and Nuclear Engineering, University Park, PA (United States); Velten, R. [Siemens Nuclear Power GmbH, Erlangen (Germany)

    2001-07-01

    The COBRA-TF computer code uses a two-fluid, three-field and three-dimensional formulation to model a two-phase flow field in a specific geometry. The liquid phase is divided in a continuous liquid field and a separate dispersed field, which is used to describe the entrained liquid drops. For each space dimension, the code solves three momentum equations, three mass conservation equations and two energy conservation equations. Entrainment and depositions models are implemented into the code to model the mass transfer between the two liquid fields. This study presents the results obtained with COBRA-TF for the simulation of the Siemens 9-9Q BWR Bundle Dryout experiments. The model includes 20 channels and 34 axial nodes in the heated section. The predicted critical power and dryout location is compared with the measured values. An assessment of the code entrainment and de-entrainment models is presented. (authors)

  3. PWR AXIAL BURNUP PROFILE ANALYSIS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    J.M. Acaglione

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of this activity is to develop a representative ''limiting'' axial burnup profile for pressurized water reactors (PWRs), which would encompass the isotopic axial variations caused by different assembly irradiation histories, and produce conservative isotopics with respect to criticality. The effect that the low burnup regions near the ends of spent fuel have on system reactivity is termed the ''end-effect''. This calculation will quantify the end-effects associated with Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) fuel assemblies emplaced in a hypothetical 21 PWR waste package. The scope of this calculation covers an initial enrichment range of 3.0 through 5.0 wt% U-235 and a burnup range of 10 through 50 GWd/MTU. This activity supports the validation of the process for ensuring conservative generation of spent fuel isotopics with respect to criticality safety applications, and the use of burnup credit for commercial spent nuclear fuel. The intended use of these results will be in the development of PWR waste package loading curves, and applications involving burnup credit. Limitations of this evaluation are that the limiting profiles are only confirmed for use with the B andW 15 x 15 fuel assembly design. However, this assembly design is considered bounding of all other typical commercial PWR fuel assembly designs. This calculation is subject to the Quality Assurance Requirements and Description (QARD) because this activity supports investigations of items or barriers on the Q-list (YMP 2001)

  4. Analysis of natural circulation BWR dynamics with stochastic and deterministic methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    VanderHagen, T.H.; Van Dam, H.; Hoogenboom, J.E.; Kleiss, E.B.J.; Nissen, W.H.M.; Oosterkamp, W.J.

    1986-01-01

    Reactor kinetic, thermal hydraulic and total plant stability of a natural convection cooled BWR was studied using noise analysis and by evaluation of process responses to control rod steps and to steamflow control valve steps. An estimate of the fuel thermal time constant and an impression of the recirculation flow response to power variations was obtained. A sophisticated noise analysis method resulted in more insight into the fluctuations of the coolant velocity

  5. Advanced accumulator for PWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ichimura, Taiki; Chikahata, Hideyuki

    1997-01-01

    Advanced accumulators have been incorporated into the APWR design in order to simplify the safety system configuration and to improve reliability. The advanced accumulators refill the reactor vessel with a large discharge flow rate in a large LOCA, then switch to a small flow rate to continue safety injection for core reflooding. The functions of the conventional accumulator and the low head safety injection pump are integrated into this advanced accumulator. Injection performance tests simulating LOCA conditions and visualization tests for new designs have been carried out. This paper describes the APWR ECCS configuration, the advanced accumulator design and some of the injection performance and visualization test results. It was verified that the flow resistance of the advanced accumulator is independent of the model scale. The similarity law and performance data of the advanced accumulator for applying APWR was established. (author)

  6. Crud deposition modeling on BWR fuel rods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kucuk, Aylin; Cheng, Bo; Potts, Gerald A.; Shiralkar, Bharat; Morgan, Dave; Epperson, Kenny; Gose, Garry

    2014-01-01

    Deposition of boiling water reactor (BWR) system corrosion products (crud) on operating fuel rods has resulted in performance-limiting conditions in a number of plants. The operational impact of performance-limiting conditions involving crud deposition can be detrimental to a BWR operator, resulting in unplanned or increased frequency of fuel inspections, fuel failure and associated radiological consequences, operational restrictions including core power derate and/or forced shutdowns to remove failed fuel, premature discharge of individual bundles or entire reloads, and/or undesirable core design restrictions. To facilitate improved management of crud-related fuel performance risks, EPRI has developed the CORAL (Crud DepOsition Risk Assessment ModeL) tool. This paper presents a summary of the CORAL elements and benchmarking results. Applications of CORAL as a tool for fuel performance risk assessment are also discussed. (author)

  7. BWR radiation buildup control with ionic zinc

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marble, W.J.; Wood, C.J.; Leighty, C.E.; Green, T.A.

    1986-01-01

    In 1983 a hypothesis was disclosed which suggested that the presence of ionic zinc in the reactor water of the BWR could reduce radiation buildup. This hypothesis was developed from correlations of plant data, and subsequently, from laboratory experiments which demonstrated clearly that ionic zinc inhibits the corrosion of stainless steel. The benefits of zinc addition have been measured at the Vallecitos Nuclear Center under and EPRI/GE project. Experimentation and analyses have been performed to evaluate the impact of intentional zinc addition on the IGSCC characteristics of primary system materials and on the performance of the nuclear fuel. It has been concluded that no negative effects are expected. The author conclude that the intentional addition of ionic zinc to the BWR reactor water at a concentration of approximately 10 ppb will provide major benefits in controlling the Co-60 buildup on primary system stainless steel surfaces. The intentional addition of zinc is now a qualified technique for use in BWRs

  8. Probable variations of a passive safety containment for a 1700 MWe class PWR with passive safety systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, Takashi; Fujiki, Yasunobu; Oikawa, Hirohide; Ofstun, Richard P.

    2009-01-01

    The paper presents probable variations of a passive safety containment for a PWR. The passive safety containment is named Mark P containment tentatively. It is a pressure suppression type containment for a large scale PWR with a BWR type passive containment cooling system (PCCS). More than 3-day grace period can be achieved even for a 1700 MWe class large scale PWR owing to the PCCS. The containment is a reinforced concrete containment vessel (RCCV). The design pressure of the RCCV can be low owing to the suppression pool (S/P) and no prestressed tendon is necessary. It is a single barrier CV that can withstand a large airplane crash by itself. This simple configuration results in good economy and short construction term. The BWR type passive safety systems also include the Passive Cooling and Depressurization System (PCDS). The PCDS has 3-day grace period for the SBO induced by a giant earthquake and can practically eliminate the residual risk of a giant earthquake beyond the design basis earthquake of Ss. It also has a safety function to automatically depressurize the primary system at accidents such as SGTR and eliminate the need for operator actions. It is a large 1700 MWe passive safety PWR that has more than 3-day grace period for extremely severe natural disasters including a giant earthquake, a mega hurricane, tsunami and so on; no containment failure at a SA establishing a no evacuation plant; protection for a large airplane crash with the RCCV single barrier; good economy and short construction term. (author)

  9. Methyl Iodide Decomposition at BWR Conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pop, Mike; Bell, Merl

    2012-09-01

    Based on favourable results from short-term testing of methanol addition to an operating BWR plant, AREVA has performed numerous studies in support of necessary Engineering and Plant Safety Evaluations prior to extended injection of methanol. The current paper presents data from a study intended to provide further understanding of the decomposition of methyl iodide as it affects the assessment of methyl iodide formation with the application of methanol at BWR Plants. This paper describes the results of the decomposition testing under UV-C light at laboratory conditions and its effect on the subject methyl iodide production evaluation. The study as to the formation and decomposition of methyl iodide as it is effected by methanol addition is one phase of a larger AREVA effort to provide a generic plant Safety Evaluation prior to long-term methanol injection to an operating BWR. Other testing phases have investigated the compatibility of methanol with fuel construction materials, plant structural materials, plant consumable materials (i.e. elastomers and coatings), and ion exchange resins. Methyl iodide is known to be very unstable, typically preserved with copper metal or other stabilizing materials when produced and stored. It is even more unstable when exposed to light, heat, radiation, and water. Additionally, it is known that methyl iodide will decompose radiolytically, and that this effect may be simulated using ultra-violet radiation (UV-C) [2]. In the tests described in this paper, the use of a UV-C light source provides activation energy for the formation of methyl iodide. Thus is similar to the effect expected from Cherenkov radiation present in a reactor core after shutdown. Based on the testing described in this paper, it is concluded that injection of methanol at concentrations below 2.5 ppm in BWR applications to mitigate IGSCC of internals is inconsequential to the accident conditions postulated in the FSAR as they are related to methyl iodide formation

  10. Delivering high performance BWR fuel reliably

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schardt, J.F. [GE Nuclear Energy, Wilmington, NC (United States)

    1998-07-01

    Utilities are under intense pressure to reduce their production costs in order to compete in the increasingly deregulated marketplace. They need fuel, which can deliver high performance to meet demanding operating strategies. GE's latest BWR fuel design, GE14, provides that high performance capability. GE's product introduction process assures that this performance will be delivered reliably, with little risk to the utility. (author)

  11. The HAMBO BWR simulator of HAMMLAB

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karlsson, Tommy; Jokstad, Haakon; Meyer, Brita D.; Nihlwing, Christer; Norrman, Sixten; Puska, Eija Karita; Raussi, Pekka; Tiihonen, Olli

    2001-02-01

    Modernisation of control rooms of the nuclear power plants has been a major issue in Sweden and Finland the last few years, and this will continue in the years to come. As an aid in the process of introducing new technology into the control rooms, the benefit of having an experimental simulator where proto typing of solutions can be performed, has been emphasised by many plants. With this as a basis, the BWR plants in Sweden and Finland decided to fund, in co-operation with the Halden Project, an experimental BWR simulator based on the Forsmark 3 plant in Sweden. The BWR simulator development project was initiated in January 1998. VTT Energy in Finland developed the simulator models with the aid of their APROS tool, while the operator interface was developed by the Halden Project. The simulator was thoroughly tested by experienced HRP personnel and professional Forsmark 3 operators, and accepted by the BWR utilities in June 2000. The acceptance tests consisted of 19 well-defined transients, as well as the running of the simulator from full power down to cold shutdown and back up again with the use of plant procedures. This report describes the HAMBO simulator, with its simulator models, the operator interface, and the underlying hardware and software infrastructure. The tools used for developing the simulator, APROS, Picasso-3 and the Integration Platform, are also briefly described. The acceptance tests are described, and examples of the results are presented, to illustrate the level of validation of the simulator. The report concludes with an indication of the short-term usage of the simulator. (Author)

  12. BWR level estimation using Kalman Filtering approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garner, G.; Divakaruni, S.M.; Meyer, J.E.

    1986-01-01

    Work is in progress on development of a system for Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) vessel level validation and failure detection. The levels validated include the liquid level both inside and outside the core shroud. This work is a major part of a larger effort to develop a complete system for BWR signal validation. The demonstration plant is the Oyster Creek BWR. Liquid level inside the core shroud is not directly measured during full power operation. This level must be validated using measurements of other quantities and analytic models. Given the available sensors, analytic models for level that are based on mass and energy balances can contain open integrators. When such a model is driven by noisy measurements, the model predicted level will deviate from the true level over time. To validate the level properly and to avoid false alarms, the open integrator must be stabilized. In addition, plant parameters will change slowly with time. The respective model must either account for these plant changes or be insensitive to them to avoid false alarms and maintain sensitivity to true failures of level instrumentation. Problems are addressed here by combining the extended Kalman Filter and Parity Space Decision/Estimator. The open integrator is stabilized by integrating from the validated estimate at the beginning of each sampling interval, rather than from the model predicted value. The model is adapted to slow plant/sensor changes by updating model parameters on-line

  13. Utility experience with BWR-PSMS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bond, G.R.

    1986-01-01

    The BWR Power Shape Monitoring System (BWR-PSMS) has proven to be an effective and versatile tool for core monitoring. GPU Nuclear Corporation's (GPUN) Oyster Creek plant has been involved in the PSMS development since its inception, having been selected by EPRI as the initial demonstration site. Beginning with Cycle 10, Oyster Creek has been applying the BWR-PSMS as the primary core monitoring tool. Although the system has been in operation at Oyster Creek for the past several cycles, this is the first time the PSMS was used to monitor compliance to the plant technical specifications, to guide adherence to vendore fuel maneuvering recommendations and to develop data for certain performance records such as fuel burnup, isotopic accounting, etc. This paper will discuss the bases for the decision to apply PSMS as the fundamental core monitoring system, the experience in implementing the PSMS in this mode, activities currently underway or planned related to PSMS, and potential future extensions and applications of PSMS at Oyster Creek

  14. Economic analysis of hydride fueled BWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ganda, F.; Shuffler, C.; Greenspan, E.; Todreas, N.

    2009-01-01

    The economic implications of designing BWR cores with hydride fuels instead of conventional oxide fuels are analyzed. The economic analysis methodology adopted is based on the lifetime levelized cost of electricity (COE). Bracketing values (1970 and 3010 $/kWe) are used for the overnight construction costs and for the power scaling factors (0.4 and 0.8) that correlate between a change in the capital cost to a change in the power level. It is concluded that a newly constructed BWR reactor could substantially benefit from the use of 10 x 10 hydride fuel bundles instead of 10 x 10 oxide fuel bundles design presently in use. The cost saving would depend on the core pressure drop constraint that can be implemented in newly constructed BWRs - it is between 2% and 3% for a core pressure drop constraint as of the reference BWR, between 9% and 15% for a 50% higher core pressure drop, and between 12% and 21% higher for close to 100% core pressure. The attainable cost reduction was found insensitive to the specific construction cost but strongly dependent on the power scaling factor. The cost advantage of hydride fuelled cores as compared to that of the oxide reference core depends only weakly on the uranium and SWU prices, on the 'per volume base' fabrication cost of hydride fuels, and on the discount rate used. To be economically competitive, the uranium enrichment required for the hydride fuelled core needs to be around 10%.

  15. Assessment of two BWR accident management strategies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hodge, S.A.; Petek, M.

    1994-01-01

    Candidate mitigative strategies for the management of in-vessel events during the late phase (after-core degradation has occurred) of postulated boiling water reactor (BWR) severe accidents were considered at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) during 1990. The identification of new strategies was subject to the constraint that they should, to the maximum extent possible, make use of the existing equipment and water resources of the BWR facilities, and not require major equipment modifications or additions. As a result of this effort, two of these candidate strategies were recommended for further assessment. The first was a strategy for containment flooding to maintain the core and structural debris within the reactor vessel in the event that vessel injection cannot be restored to terminate a severe accident sequence. The second strategy pertained to the opposite case, for which vessel injection would be restored after control blade melting had begun; its purpose was to provide an injection source of borated water at the concentration necessary to preclude criticality upon recovering a damaged BWR core. Assessments of these two strategies were performed during 1991 and this paper provides a discussion of the motivation for and purpose of these strategies, and the potential for their success. ((orig.))

  16. Scaling and uncertainty in BWR instability problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Di Auria, F.; Pellicoro, V.

    1995-01-01

    This paper deals with a critical review of activities, performed at the DCMN of Pisa University, in relation to the thermo-hydraulic oscillations in two-phase systems. Stability analyses, including model development and achievement of experimental data, are generally performed for BWRs in order to achieve the following objectives: to reach a common understanding in relation to the predictive capabilities of system codes and to the influence of various parameters on the instability; to establish a data base for the qualification of the analytical tools already or becoming available; to set-up qualified tools (code/models + nodalization + user assumption) suitable for predicting the unstable behaviour of the nuclear plants of interest (current BWR, SBWR, ABWR and RBMK). These considerations have been the basis for the following researches: 1) proposal of the Boiling Instability Program (BIP) (1) 2) evaluation of stability tests in PIPER-ONE apparatus (2) 3) coupled thermal-hydraulic and neutronic instabilities in the LaSalle-2 BWR plant (3) 4) participation to the NEA-OECD BWR Benchmark (4) The RELAP/MOD2 and RELAP5/MOD3 codes have been used. (author)

  17. BWR recirculation pump diagnostic expert system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chiang, S.C.; Morimoto, C.N.; Torres, M.R.

    2004-01-01

    At General Electric (GE), an on-line expert system to support maintenance decisions for BWR recirculation pumps for nuclear power plants has been developed. This diagnostic expert system is an interactive on-line system that furnishes diagnostic information concerning BWR recirculation pump operational problems. It effectively provides the recirculation pump diagnostic expertise in the plant control room continuously 24 hours a day. The expert system is interfaced to an on-line monitoring system, which uses existing plant sensors to acquire non-safety related data in real time. The expert system correlates and evaluates process data and vibration data by applying expert rules to determine the condition of a BWR recirculation pump system by applying knowledge based rules. Any diagnosis will be automatically displayed, indicating which pump may have a problem, the category of the problem, and the degree of concern expressed by the validity index and color hierarchy. The rules incorporate the expert knowledge from various technical sources such as plant experience, engineering principles, and published reports. These rules are installed in IF-THEN formats and the resulting truth values are also expressed in fuzzy terms and a certainty factor called a validity index. This GE Recirculation Pump Expert System uses industry-standard software, hardware, and network access to provide flexible interfaces with other possible data acquisition systems. Gensym G2 Real-Time Expert System is used for the expert shell and provides the graphical user interface, knowledge base, and inference engine capabilities. (author)

  18. Interpretation of incore noise measurements in BWR's

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dam, H. van

    1982-01-01

    A survey is given of the main incentives for power reactor noise research and the differences and similarities of noise in power and zero power systems are touched on. The basic characteristics of the adjoint method in reactor noise theory are treated. The detector adjoint functions describe the transfer functions between spatially distributed noise sources and a (neutron or gamma) detector. In particular, the spatial dependence of these functions explains the 'local' and 'global' effects in BWR noise measurements. By including thermal hydraulic feedback effects in the adjoint analysis, it is shown that the common idea of a dominant global effect at low frequencies which should result in point kinetic behaviour, is erroneous. The same analysis provides a method for nonperturbing on-line measurement of the reactor transfer function, which is demonstrated by results from measurements on a BWR in the Netherlands. In the final part of the paper some ideas are given for further research in the field of BWR noise. (author)

  19. Benchmarking Computational Fluid Dynamics for Application to PWR Fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, L.D. III; Conner, M.E.; Liu, B.; Dzodzo, B.; Paramonov, D.V.; Beasley, D.E.; Langford, H.M.; Holloway, M.V.

    2002-01-01

    The present study demonstrates a process used to develop confidence in Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) as a tool to investigate flow and temperature distributions in a PWR fuel bundle. The velocity and temperature fields produced by a mixing spacer grid of a PWR fuel assembly are quite complex. Before using CFD to evaluate these flow fields, a rigorous benchmarking effort should be performed to ensure that reasonable results are obtained. Westinghouse has developed a method to quantitatively benchmark CFD tools against data at conditions representative of the PWR. Several measurements in a 5 x 5 rod bundle were performed. Lateral flow-field testing employed visualization techniques and Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV). Heat transfer testing involved measurements of the single-phase heat transfer coefficient downstream of the spacer grid. These test results were used to compare with CFD predictions. Among the parameters optimized in the CFD models based on this comparison with data include computational mesh, turbulence model, and boundary conditions. As an outcome of this effort, a methodology was developed for CFD modeling that provides confidence in the numerical results. (authors)

  20. PWR-to-PWR fuel cycle model using dry process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iqbal, M.; Jeong, Chang Joon; Rho, Gyu Hong

    2002-03-01

    PWR-to-PWR fuel cycle model has been developed to recycle the spent fuel using the dry fabrication process. Two types of fuels were considered; first fuel was based on low initial enrichment with low discharge burnup and second one was based on more initial enrichment with high discharge burnup in PWR. For recycling calculations, the HELIOS code was used, in which all of the available fission products were considered. The decay of 10 years was applied for reuse of the spent fuel. Sensitivity analysis for the fresh feed material enrichment has also been carried out. If enrichment of the mixing material is increased the saving of uranium reserves would be decreased. The uranium saving of low burned fuel increased from 4.2% to 7.4% in fifth recycling step for 5 wt% to 19.00wt% mixing material enrichment. While for high burned fuel, there was no uranium saving, which implies that higher uranium enrichment required than 5 wt%. For mixing of 15 wt% enriched fuel, the required mixing is about 21.0% and 37.0% of total fuel volume for low and high burned fuel, respectively. With multiple recycling, reductions in waste for low and high burned fuel became 80% and 60%, for first recycling, respectively. In this way, waste can be reduced more and the cost of the waste disposal reduction can provide the economic balance

  1. BWR Refill-Reflood Program, Task 4.7 - model development: TRAC-BWR component models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheung, Y.K.; Parameswaran, V.; Shaug, J.C.

    1983-09-01

    TRAC (Transient Reactor Analysis Code) is a computer code for best-estimate analysis for the thermal hydraulic conditions in a reactor system. The development and assessment of the BWR component models developed under the Refill/Reflood Program that are necessary to structure a BWR-version of TRAC are described in this report. These component models are the jet pump, steam separator, steam dryer, two-phase level tracking model, and upper-plenum mixing model. These models have been implemented into TRAC-B02. Also a single-channel option has been developed for individual fuel-channel analysis following a system-response calculation

  2. Analysis of the uniform augmentation of the flow through the nucleus in the searching process of the patterns of objective control bars in a BWR; Analisis del aumento uniforme del caudal a traves del nucleo en el proceso de busqueda de los patrones de barras de control objetivo en un BWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Montes, J.L.; Ortiz, J.J.; Perusquia, R. [ININ, Carretera Mexico-Toluca Km. 36.5, 52045 Estado de Mexico (Mexico)]. e-mail: jlmt@nuclear.inin.mx

    2004-07-01

    The search of the patterns of control bars (PBCs) in a power reactor of boiling water, requires to investigate a very wide space of solutions, in principle they are had of the order of 3 x 10{sup 152} possible configurations to establish the PBC in a point given before reaching the end of the cycle. This situation suggests to define those restrictions and conditions initial appropriately so that the search converges toward the desirable results. Presently work the results of the search of patterns of bars based on different flow scenarios through the nucleus are presented. The Cycle 10 is analysed (C10) of the Unit One of the Nuclear Power station Laguna Verde (CNLV), which presents an interesting mixture of diverse designs of control bars used in operation to power. The search of the patterns of bars of objective control is carried out applying the GACRP program which is based on the calculation technique known as genetic algorithms. (Author)

  3. Comparison of the CORA-12, 13, 17 experiments and B4 effect on the flooding behavior of BWR bundles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hagen, S.; Sepold, L.; Wallenfels, K.P.; Hofmann, P.; Noack, V.; Schanz, G.; Schumacher, G.

    1995-01-01

    The CORA quench experiments 12, 13 (PWR) and 17 (BWR) are in agreement with LOFT 2 and TMI: Flooding of hot Zircaloy clad fuel rods does not result in an immediate cooldown of the bundle, but produces remarkable temporary temperature increase, connected to a strong peak in hydrogen production. The PWR tests CORA 12 and CORA 13 are of the same geometrical arrangement and test conduct, with the exception of the shorter time between power shutdown and quench initiation for CORA 13. A higher temperature of the bundle at start of quenching was the consequence. BWR test CORA 17 - with B 4 C absorber and additional Zircaloy channel box walls - was in respect to the delay-time between power shutdown and start of quenching similar to test CORA 12. All tests showed during the quench phase the temporary temperature increase, correlated to a hydrogen peak. The CORA 17 test resulted immediately after quenching in a modest increase for 20 s and changed then in a steep increase, resulting in the highest temperature and hydrogen peaks of the three tests. CORA 17 also showed a temperature increase in the lower part of the bundle, in contrast to CORA 12 and CORA 13 with temperature increase only in the upper half of the bundle. We interpret this earlier starting and stronger reaction due to the influence of the boron carbide, the absorber material of the BWR test. B 4 C has an exothermic reaction rate 4 to 9 times larger than Zry and produces 5 to 6,6 times more hydrogen. Probably the hot remained columns of B 4 C (seen in the non-quench test CORA 16) react early in the quench process with the increased upcoming steam. The bundle temperature raised by this reaction increases the reaction rate (exponential dependency) of the remaining metallic Zry. Due to the larger amount of Zry in the BWR bundle (channel box walls) and the smaller steam input during the heatup phase (2 g/s instead of 6 g/s) more metallic Zry can have survived oxidation during the heatup phase. (orig./HP)

  4. Vibration behavior of PWR reactor internals Model experiments and analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Assedo, R.; Dubourg, M.; Livolant, M.; Epstein, A.

    1975-01-01

    In the late 1971, the CEA and FRAMATOME decided to undertake a comprehensive joint program of studying the vibration behavior of PWR internals of the 900 MWe, 50 cycle, 3 loop reactor series being built by FRAMATOME in France. The PWR reactor internals are submitted to several sources of excitation during normal operation. Two main sources of excitation may effect the internals behavior: the large flow turbulences which could generate various instabilities such as: vortex shedding: the pump pressure fluctuations which could generate acoustic noise in the circuit at frequencies corresponding to shaft speed frequencies or blade passing frequencies, and their respective harmonics. The flow induced vibrations are of complex nature and the approach selected, for this comprehensive program, is semi-empirical and based on both theoretical analysis and experiments on a reduced scale model and full scale internals. The experimental support of this program consists of: the SAFRAN test loop which consists of an hydroelastic similitude of a 1/8 scale model of a PWR; harmonic vibration tests in air performed on full scale reactor internals in the manufacturing shop; the GENNEVILLIERS facilities which is a full flow test facility of primary pump; the measurements carried out during start up on the Tihange reactor. This program will be completed in April 1975. The results of this program, the originality of which consists of studying separately the effects of random excitations and acoustic noises, on the internals behavior, and by establishing a comparison between experiments and analysis, will bring a major contribution for explaining the complex vibration phenomena occurring in a PWR

  5. Study on thermal-hydraulics during a PWR reflood phase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iguchi, Tadashi [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    1998-10-01

    In-core thermal-hydraulics during a PWR reflood phase following a large-break LOCA are quite unique in comparison with two-phase flow which has been studied widely in previous researches, because the geometry of the flow path is complicated (bundle geometry) and water is at extremely low superficial velocity and almost under stagnant condition. Hence, some phenomena realized during a PWR reflood phase are not understood enough and appropriate analytical models have not been developed, although they are important in a viewpoint of reactor safety evaluation. Therefore, author investigated some phenomena specified as important issues for quantitative prediction, i.e. (1) void fraction in a bundle during a PWR reflood phase, (2) effect of radial core power profile on reflood behavior, (3) effect of combined emergency core coolant injection on reflood behavior, and (4) the core separation into two thermal-hydraulically different regions and the in-core flow circulation behavior observed during a combined injection PWR reflood phase. Further, author made analytical models for these specified issues, and succeeded to predict reflood behaviors at representative types of PWRs, i.e.cold leg injection PWRs and Combined injection PWRs, in good accuracy. Above results were incorporated into REFLA code which is developed at JAERI, and they improved accuracy in prediction and enlarged applicability of the code. In the present study, models were intended to be utilized in a practical use, and hence these models are simplified ones. However, physical understanding on the specified issues in the present study is basic and principal for reflood behavior, and then it is considered to be used in a future advanced code development and improvement. (author). 110 refs.

  6. PWR plant construction in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tamura, Toshifumi

    2002-01-01

    The construction methods based on the experiences on the Nuclear Island, which is a critical path in the total construction schedule, have been studied and reconsidered in order to construct by more reliable and economical method. So various improved construction method are being applied and the duration of construction is being reduced continuously. So various improved construction method are being applied and the duration of construction is being reduced continuously. In this paper, the history of construction of twenty-three (23) PWR Plant, the actual construction methods and schedule of Ohi-3/4, to which the many improved methods were applied during their construction, are introduced mainly with the improved points for previously constructed plants. And also the situation of construction method for the next PWR Plant is simply explained

  7. Analysis of BWR out-of-phase instabilities in the frequency domain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farawila, Y.M.; Pruitt, D.W.; Kreuter, D.

    1992-01-01

    During startup or because of an inadvertent recirculation pump trip, a boiling water reactor (BWR) may operate at relatively low flow and high power conditions. At these conditions, a BWR is susceptible to coupled flow and power oscillations that could result in undesirable reactor scram unless appropriate countermeasures are taken. This contribution to analytical methods has been developed to address in part a general industrywide and regulatory concern about BWR stability initiated by the LaSalle 2 instability event in March 1988. This work is designed to extend the capability of the one-dimensional parallel channel frequency domain code STAIF to predict the regional oscillation decay ratio. The basic theory follows that developed by March-Leuba and Blakeman, where the oscillation mechanism is identified as the excitation of a subcritical neutronic mode with a constant core pressure drop boundary condition. The improvements to the basic theory include applying the theory to one-dimensional neutronics instead of point kinetics and taking account of the actual three-dimensional harmonic flux distribution

  8. Effect of the inlet throttling on the thermal-hydraulic instability of the natural circulation BWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Furuya, Masahiro; Inada, Fumio; Yoneda, Kimitoshi

    1997-01-01

    Although it is well-established that inlet restriction has a stabilizing for forced circulation BWR, the effect of inlet on the thermal-hydraulic stability of natural circulation BWR remains unknown since increasing inlet restriction affect thermal-hydraulic stability due to reduction of the recirculation flow rate. Therefore experiments have been conducted to investigate the effect of inlet restriction on the thermal-hydraulic stability. A test facility used in this experiments was designed and constructed to have non-dimensional values which are nearly equal to those of natural circulation BWR. Experimental results showed that driving force of the natural circulation was described as a function of heat flux and inlet subcooling independent of inlet restriction. Stability maps in reference to the channel inlet subcooling, heat flux were presented for various inlet restriction which were carried out by an analysis based on the homogeneous flow various using this function. Instability region during the inlet subcooling shifted to the higher inlet subcooling with increasing inlet restriction and became larger with increasing heat flux. (author)

  9. Experimental study on reduced moderation BWR with Advanced Recycle System (BARS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hiraiwa, K.; Yoshioka, K.; Yamamoto, Y.; Akiba, M.; Yamaoka, M.; Abe, N.; Mimatsu, J.

    2004-01-01

    Experimental study has been done for reduced-moderation spectrum boiling water reactor named BARS (BWR with Advanced Recycle System). The critical assembly experiment for triangular tight uranium lattice has been done in TOSHIBA critical assembly (NCA). Experimental method based on modified conversion ratio was adopted to evaluate the void reactivity effect. Void fraction was simulated by formed polystyrene in this experiment. The measured void coefficient for tight uranium lattice agreed with calculation. The thermal hydraulic test study has been done to study the coolability of BARS lattice. Visual test and high-pressure thermal hydraulic test have been done as the thermal hydraulic test. Visual test has indicated the flow behavior for BARS lattice is same as that of current BWR. The high-pressure thermal hydraulic test has indicated the applicability of modified Arai's correlation to the BARS lattice. (authors)

  10. Corrosion of PWR steam generators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garnsey, R.

    1979-01-01

    Some designs of pressurized water reactor (PWR) steam generators have experienced a variety of corrosion problems which include stress corrosion cracking, tube thinning, pitting, fatigue, erosion-corrosion and support plate corrosion resulting in 'denting'. Large international research programmes have been mounted to investigate the phenomena. The operational experience is reviewed and mechanisms which have been proposed to explain the corrosion damage are presented. The implications for design development and for boiler and feedwater control are discussed. (author)

  11. PWR system reliability improvement activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshikawa, Yuichiro

    1985-01-01

    In Japan lacking in energy resources, it is our basic energy policy to accelerate the development program of nuclear power, thereby reducing our dependence. As referred to in the foregoing, every effort has been exerted on our part to improve the PWR system reliability by dint of the so-called 'HOMEMADE' TQC activities, which is our brain-child as a result of applying to the energy industry the quality control philosophy developed in the field of manufacturing industry

  12. Thermochemistry in BWR. An overview of applications of program codes and databases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hermansson, H-P.; Becker, R.

    2010-01-01

    The Swedish work on thermodynamics of metal-water systems relevant to BWR conditions has been ongoing since the 70ies, and at present time a compilation and adaptation of codes and thermodynamic databases are in progress. In the previous work, basic thermodynamic data were compiled for parts of the system Fe-Cr-Ni-Co-Zn-S-H 2 O at 25-300 °C. Since some thermodynamic information necessary for temperature extrapolations of data up to 300 °C was not published in the earlier works, these data have now been partially recalculated. This applies especially to the parameters of the HKF-model, which are used to extrapolate the thermodynamic data for ionic and neutral aqua species from 25 °C to BWR temperatures. Using the completed data, e.g. the change in standard Gibbs energy (ΔG 0 ) and the equilibrium constant (log K) can be calculated for further applications at BWR/LWR conditions. In addition a computer program is currently being developed at Studsvik for the calculation of equilibrium conductivity in high temperature water. The program is intended for PWR applications, but can also be applied to BWR environment. Data as described above will be added to the database of this program. It will be relatively easy to further develop the program e.g. to calculate Pourbaix diagrams, and these graphs could then be calculated at any temperature. This means that there will be no limitation to the temperatures and total concentrations (usually 10 -6 to 10 -8 mol/kg) as reported in earlier work. It is also easy to add a function generating ΔG 0 and log K values at selected temperatures. One of the fundamentals for this work was also to overview and collect publicly available thermodynamic program codes and databases of relevance for BWR conditions found in open sources. The focus has been on finding already done compilations and reviews, and some 40 codes and 15 databases were found. Codes and data-bases are often integrated and such a package is often developed for

  13. Valuation of power oscillations in a BWR after control rod banks withdrawal events

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Costa, A. L.; Pereira, C.; Da Silva, C. A. M.; Veloso, M. A. F.

    2009-01-01

    The out-of-phase mode of oscillation is a very challenging type of instability occurring in BWR (Boiling Water Reactor) and its study is relevant because of the safety implications related to the capability to promptly detect any such inadvertent occurrence by in-core neutron detectors, thus triggering the necessary countermeasures in terms of selected rod insertion or even reactor shutdown. In this work, control rod banks (CRB) withdrawal transient was considered to study the power instability occurring in a BWR. To simulate this transient, the control rod banks were continuously removed from the BWR core in different cases. The simulation resulted in a very large increase of power. To perform the instability simulations, the RELAP5/MOD3.3 thermal hydraulic system code was coupled with the PARCS/2.4 3D neutron kinetic code. Data from a real BWR, the Peach Bottom, have been used as reference conditions and reactor parameters. The trend of the mass flow rate, pressure, coolant temperature and the void fraction to four thermal hydraulic channels symmetrically located in the core with respect to the core centre, were taken. It appears that the velocity of the rod bank withdrawal is a very important aspect for reactor stability. The slowest CRB withdrawal (180 s) did not cause power perturbation while the fast removal (20 s) triggered a slow power oscillation that little by little amplified to reach levels of more 100% of the initial power after about 210 s. The investigation of the related thermo hydraulic parameters showed that the mass flow rate, the void fraction and also the coolant temperature began to oscillate at approximately the same time interval

  14. PWR secondary water chemistry guidelines: Revision 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lurie, S.; Bucci, G.; Johnson, L.; King, M.; Lamanna, L.; Morgan, E.; Bates, J.; Burns, R.; Eaker, R.; Ward, G.; Linnenbom, V.; Millet, P.; Paine, J.P.; Wood, C.J.; Gatten, T.; Meatheany, D.; Seager, J.; Thompson, R.; Brobst, G.; Connor, W.; Lewis, G.; Shirmer, R.; Gillen, J.; Kerns, M.; Jones, V.; Lappegaard, S.; Sawochka, S.; Smith, F.; Spires, D.; Pagan, S.; Gardner, J.; Polidoroff, T.; Lambert, S.; Dahl, B.; Hundley, F.; Miller, B.; Andersson, P.; Briden, D.; Fellers, B.; Harvey, S.; Polchow, J.; Rootham, M.; Fredrichs, T.; Flint, W.

    1993-05-01

    An effective, state-of-the art secondary water chemistry control program is essential to maximize the availability and operating life of major PWR components. Furthermore, the costs related to maintaining secondary water chemistry will likely be less than the repair or replacement of steam generators or large turbine rotors, with resulting outages taken into account. The revised PWR secondary water chemistry guidelines in this report represent the latest field and laboratory data on steam generator corrosion phenomena. This document supersedes Interim PWR Secondary Water Chemistry Recommendations for IGA/SCC Control (EPRI report TR-101230) as well as PWR Secondary Water Chemistry Guidelines--Revision 2 (NP-6239)

  15. Kuosheng BWR/6 containment safety analysis with gothic code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin Ansheng; Wang Jongrong; Yuann Rueyyng; Shih Chunkuan

    2011-01-01

    Kuosheng Nuclear Power Plant in Taiwan is a GE-designed twin-unit BWR/6 plant, each unit rated at 2894 MWt. In this study, we presented the calculated results of the containment pressure and temperature responses after the main steam line break accident, which is the design basis for the containment system. During the simulation, a power of SPU range (105.1%) was used and a model of the Mark III type containment was built using the containment thermal-hydraulic program GOTHIC. The simulation consists of short and long-term responses. The drywell pressure and temperature responses which display the maximum values in the early state of the LOCA were investigated in the short-term response; the primary containment pressure and temperature responses in the long-term response. The blowdown flow was provided by FSAR and used as boundary conditions in the short-term model; in the long-term model, the blowdown flow was calculated using a GOTHIC built-in homogeneous equilibrium model. In the long-term analysis, a simplifier RPV model was employed to calculate the blowdown flow. Finally, the calculated results, similar to the FSAR results, indicate the GOTHIC code has the capability to simulate the pressure/temperature response of Mark III containment to the main steam line break LOCA. (author)

  16. Strategies of operation cycles in BWR type reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Molina, D.; Sendino, F.

    1996-01-01

    The article analyzes the operation cycles in BWR type reactors. The cycle size of operation is the consequence on the optimization process of the costs with the technical characteristics of nuclear fuel and the characteristics of demand and production. The authors analyze the cases of Garona NP and Cofrentes NP, both with BWR reactors. (Author)

  17. GPE-BWR and the containment venting and filtering issue

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palomo, J.; Santiago, J. de

    1988-01-01

    The Spanish Boiling Water Reactor Owner's Group (GPE-BWR) is formed by three utilities, owning four units: Santa Maria de Garona (46 MWe, BWR3, Mark I containment), Cofrentes (975 MWe, BWR6, Mark III containment) and Valdecaballeros (2x975 MWe, BWR6, Mark III containment) - all of the reactors having been supplied by General Electric. One of the GPE-BWR's several committees is the Safety and Licensing Committee, which follows up the evolution of severe accident topics and particularly the containment venting and filtering issue. In September 1987, the Consejo de Seguridad Nuclear (CSN), the Spanish Regulatory Body, asked the GPE-BWR to define its position on the installation of a containment venting system. The GPE-BWR created a Working Group which presented a Report on Containment Venting to the CSN in January 1987 gathered from: the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC); some US utilities; and several European countries, especially France, Germany and Sweden. CSN's review of the containment venting Report and the Action Plan proposed by the GPE-BWR finished in April 1988. The conclusion of the Report and the proposed Action Plan take into account the US NRC's identified open items on severe accidents and the R and D programs scheduled to close these items

  18. BWR Full Integral Simulation Test (FIST) Phase II test results and TRAC-BWR model qualification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sutherland, W.A.; Alamgir, M.; Findlay, J.A.; Hwang, W.S.

    1985-10-01

    Eight matrix tests were conducted in the FIST Phase I. These tests investigated the large break, small break and steamline break LOCA's, as well as natural circulation and power transients. There are nine tests in Phase II of the FIST program. They include the following LOCA tests: BWR/6 LPCI line break, BWR/6 intermediate size recirculation break, and a BWR/4 large break. Steady state natural circulation tests with feedwater makeup performed at high and low pressure, and at high pressure with HPCS makeup, are included. Simulation of a transient without rod insertion, and with controlled depressurization, was performed. Also included is a simulation of the Peach Bottom turbine trip test. The final two tests simulated a failure to maintain water level during a postulated accident. A FIST program objective is to assess the TRAC code by comparisons with test data. Two post-test predictions made with TRACB04 are compared with Phase II test data in this report. These are for the BWR/6 LPCI line break LOCA, and the Peach Bottom turbine trip test simulation

  19. Effect of zinc injection on BWR fuel cladding corrosion. Pt. 1. Study on an accelerated corrosion condition to evaluate corrosion resistance of zircaloy-2 fuel cladding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawamura, Hirotaka; Kanbe, Hiromu; Furuya, Masahiro

    2002-01-01

    Japanese BWR utilities have a plan to apply zinc injection to the primary coolant in order to reduce radioactivity accumulation on the structure. Prior to applying the zinc injection to BWR plants, it is necessary to evaluate the effect of zinc injection on corrosion resistance of fuel cladding. The objective of this report was to examine the accelerated corrosion condition for evaluation of BWR fuel cladding corrosion resistance under non-irradiated conditions, as the first step of a zinc injection evaluation study. A heat transfer corrosion test facility, in which a two phase flow condition could be achieved, was designed and constructed. The effects of heat flux, void fraction and solution temperature on BWR fuel cladding corrosion resistance were quantitatively investigated. The main findings were as follows. (1) In situ measurements using high speed camera and a void sensor together with one dimensional two phase flow analysis results showed that a two phase flow simulated BWR core condition can be obtained in the corrosion test facility. (2) The heat transfer corrosion test results showed that the thickness of the zirconium oxide layer increased with increasing solution temperature and was independent of heat flux and void fraction. The corrosion accelerating factor was about 2.5 times in the case of a temperature increase from 288degC to 350degC. (author)

  20. Liquid films and droplet deposition in a BWR fuel element

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Damsohn, M.

    2011-01-01

    In the upper part of boiling water reactors (BWR) the flow regime is dominated by a steam-water droplet flow with liquid films on the nuclear fuel rod, the so called (wispy) annular flow regime. The film thickness and liquid flow rate distribution around the fuel rod play an important role especially in regard to so called dryout, which is the main phenomenon limiting the thermal power of a fuel assembly. The deposition of droplets in the liquid film is important, because this process sustains the liquid film and delays dryout. Functional spacers with different vane shapes have been used in recent decades to enhance droplet deposition and thus create more favorable conditions for heat removal. In this thesis the behavior of liquid films and droplet deposition in the annular flow regime in BWR bundles is addressed by experiments in an adiabatic flow at nearly ambient pressure. The experimental setup consists of a vertical channel with the cross-section resembling a pair of neighboring subchannels of a fuel rod bundle. Within this double subchannel an annular flow is established with a gas-water mixture. The impact of functional spacers on the annular flow behavior is studied closely. Parameter variations comprise gas and liquid flow rates, gas density and spacer shape. The setup is instrumented with a newly developed liquid film sensor that measures the electrical conductance between electrodes flush to the wall with high temporal and spatial resolution. Advanced post-processing methods are used to investigate the dynamic behavior of liquid films and droplet deposition. The topic is also assessed numerically by means of single-phase Reynolds-Averaged-Navier-Stokes CFD simulations of the flow in the gas core. For this the commercial code STAR-CCM+ is used coupled with additional models for the liquid film distribution and droplet motion. The results of the experiments show that the liquid film is quite evenly distributed around the circumference of the fuel rods. The

  1. Prevention of organic iodide formation in BWR's

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karjunen, T.; Laitinen, T.; Piippo, J.; Sirkiae, P.

    1996-01-01

    During an accident, many different forms of iodine may emerge. Organic iodides, such as methyl iodide and ethyl iodide, are relatively volatile, and thus their appearance leads to increased concentration of gaseous iodine. Since organic iodides are also relatively immune to most accident mitigation measures, such as sprays and filters, they can affect the accident source term significantly even when only a small portion of iodine is in organic form. Formation of organic iodides may not be limited by the amount of organic substances available. Excessive amounts of methane can be produced, for example, during oxidation of boron carbide, which is used in BWR's as a neutron absorber material. Another important source is cable insulation. In a BWR, a large quantity of cables is placed below the pressure vessel. Thus a large quantity of pyrolyse gases will be produced, should the vessel fail. Organic iodides can be formed as a result of many different reactions, but at least in certain conditions the main reaction takes place between an organic radical produced by radiolysis and elemental iodine. A necessary requirement for prevention of organic iodide production is therefore that the pH in the containment water pools is kept high enough to eliminate formation of elemental iodine. In a typical BWR the suppression pool water is usually unbuffered. As a result, the pH may be dominated by chemicals introduced during an accident. If no system for adding basic chemicals is operable, the main factor affecting pool water pH may be hydrochloric acid released during cable degradation. Should this occur, the conditions could be very favorable for production of elemental iodine and, consequently, formation of organic iodides. Although high pH is necessary for iodine retention, it could have also adverse effects. High pH may, for example, accelerate corrosion of containment materials and alter the characteristics of the solid corrosion products. (author) 6 figs., 1 tab., 13 refs

  2. Level 2 PRA for a German BWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sassen, F.; Rapp, W.; Tietsch, W.; Roess, P.

    2007-01-01

    A concept for a Level 2 Probabilistic Risk Assessment (L2 PRA) for a German Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) has been developed taking into account the role of L2 PRA within the German regulatory landscape. According to this concept, a plant specific evaluation of the severe accident phenomenology as well as analyses of the accident progression for the severe accident scenarios has been performed. Furthermore a plant specific MELCOR 1.8.6 model has been developed and special MELCOR source term calculations have been performed for the different release paths. This paper will present examples from the different areas described above. (author)

  3. Maintenance of BWR control rod drive mechanisms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greene, R.H.

    1991-01-01

    Control rod drive mechanism (CRDM) replacement and rebuilding is one of the highest dose, most physically demanding, and complicated maintenance activities routinely accomplished by BWR utilities. A recent industry workshop sponsored by the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, which dealt with the effects of CRDM aging, revealed enhancements in maintenance techniques and tooling which have reduced ALARA, improved worker comfort and productivity, and have provided revised guidelines for CRDM changeout selection. Highlights of this workshop and ongoing research on CRDM aging are presented in this paper

  4. Construction of PWR nuclear cross sections for transient calculations. Test of the ANTI program against TWODIM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thorlaksen, B.

    1981-05-01

    Nuclear cross sections for fuel assemblies of the more recent Westinghouse designs, representing two different PWR reactor cores, are calculated as functions of average fuel temperature, moderator density, and moderator poison concentration. The cross-section functions are verified by referring to Westinghouse power-shape calculations and other analysis. Computations on the side reflector resulted in significantly higher albedo values than used previously for BWR's in similar nodal codes. This led to an investigation of the influence of the internodal coupling coefficients on the power shape. It is concluded that the calculated power shape is strongly dependent, on the choise of coupling coefficients. However, it is shown that ''the correct'' set of coupling coefficients depends mostly on the nodal configuration, and that it is fairly independent of the power condition. (author)

  5. CFD Simulation of rigid venting of the containment of a BWR-5 Mark-II reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galindo G, I. F.; Vazquez B, A. K.; Velazquez E, L.; Tijerina S, F.; Tapia M, R.

    2016-09-01

    In conditions of prolonged loss of external energy or a severe accident, venting to the atmosphere is an alternative to prevent overpressure and release of fission products from the primary containment of a nuclear reactor. Due to the importance of flow determination through rigid vents, a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model is proposed to verify the capacity of rigid vents in the primary containment of a boiling water reactor (BWR) under different operating conditions (pressure, temperature and compositions of the fluids). The model predicts and provides detailed information on variables such as mass flow and velocity of the venting gases. In the proposed model the primary containment gas is vented to the atmosphere via rigid vents (pipes) from the dry and wet pit. Is assumed that the container is pressurized because is in a defined scenario, and at one point the venting is open and the gas released into the atmosphere. The objective is to characterize the flow and validate the CFD model for the overpressure conditions that occur in an accident such as a LOCA, Sbo, etc. The model is implemented with Ansys-Fluent general-purpose CFD software based on the geometry of the venting ducts of the containment of a BWR. The model is developed three-dimensional and resolves at steady state for compressible flow and includes the effects of the turbulence represented by the Reynolds stress model. The CFD results are compared with the values of a one-dimensional and isentropic model for compressible flow. The relative similarity of results leads to the conclusion that the proposed CFD model can help to predict the rigid venting capacity of the containment of a BWR, however more information is required for full validation of the proposed model. (Author)

  6. Exxon Nuclear WREM-based NJP-BWR ECCS evaluation model and example application to the Oyster Creek Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krysinski, T.L.; Bjornard, T.A.; Steves, L.H.

    1975-01-01

    A proposed integrated ECCS model for non-jet pump boiling water reactors is presented, using the RELAP4-EM/BLOWDOWN and RELAP4-EM/SMALL BREAK portions of the Exxon Nuclear WREM-based Generic PWR Evaluation Model coupled with the ENC NJP-BWR Fuel Heatup Model. The results of the application of the proposed model to Oyster Creek are summarized. The results of the break size sensitivity study using the proposed model for the Oyster Creek Plant are presented. The application of the above results yielded the MAPLHGR curves. Included are a description of the proposed non-jet pump boiling water reaction evaluation model, justification of its conformance with TOCFR50, Appendix K, the adopted Oyster Creek plant model, and results of the analysis and sensitivity studies. (auth)

  7. Summary of PWR leak detection studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, J.H.; Elia, F.A. Jr.

    1986-01-01

    Thermal-hydraulic analysis can be used to determine the location and magnitude of leaks inside and location of leaks outside a pressurized water reactor (PWR) containment as required by plant technical specifications. The major advantage of this detection method is that it minimizes radiation exposure of maintenance personnel because most of the leak detection process is performed from the control room outside containment. Plant-specific analyses are utilized to predict change in parameters such as local dew point temperature, relative humidity, dry bulb temperature, and flow rate to sump for various leak rates and enthalpies. These parameter responses are then programmed into the plant computer and instrumentation is provided for area monitoring. The actual inputs are continuously monitored and compared to the predicted plant responses to identify the leak location and quantify the leak. This study concludes that a system that monitors dew point (or relative humidity) and dry bulb temperature changes together with the flow rate to the sump will provide the capability to both locate and quantify a leak inside a containment, while a system that monitors dew point temperature (or relative humidity) changes will provide the capability to locate a leak outside a containment

  8. Calculation device for fuel power history in BWR type reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakagami, Masaharu.

    1980-01-01

    Purpose: To enable calculations for power history and various variants of power change in the power history of fuels in a BWR type reactor or the like. Constitution: The outputs of the process computation for the nuclear reactor by a process computer are stored and the reactor core power distribution is judged from the calculated values for the reactor core power distribution based on the stored data. Data such as for thermal power, core flow rate, control rod position and power distribution are recorded where the changes in the power distribution exceed a predetermined amount, and data such as for thermal power and core flow rate are recorded where the changes are within the level of the predetermined amount, as effective data excluding unnecessary data. Accordingly, the recorded data are taken out as required and the fuel power history and the various variants in the fuel power are calculated and determined in a calculation device for fuel power history and variants for fuel power fluctuation. (Furukawa, Y.)

  9. Thermal hydraulic analysis of BWR containment venting system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baburajan, P.K.; Sharma, Prashant; Paul, U.K.; Gaikwad, Avinash

    2015-01-01

    Installation of additional containment filtered venting system (CFVS) is necessary to depressurize the containment to maintain its mechanical integrity due to over pressurization during severe accident condition. A typical venting system for BWR is modelled using RELAP5 and analysed to investigate the effect of various thermal hydraulic parameters on the operational parameters of the venting system. The venting system consists of piping from the containment to the scrubber tank and exit line from the scrubber tank. The scrubber tank is partially filled with water to enable the scrubbing action to remove the particulate radionuclides from the incoming containment air. The pipe line from the containment is connected to the venturi inlet and the throat of the venturi is open to the scrubber tank water inventory at designed submergence level. The exit of the venturi is open to scrubber tank water. Filters are used in the upper air space of the scrubber tank as mist separator before venting out the air into the atmosphere through the exit vent line. The effect of thermal hydraulic parameters such as inlet fluid temperature, inlet steam content and venturi submergence in the scrubber tank on the venting flow rate, exit steam content, scrubber tank inventory, overflow line and siphon breaker flow rate is analysed. Results show that inlet steam content and the venturi nozzle submergence influence the venting system parameters. (author)

  10. Two-loop feed water control system in BWR plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Omori, Takashi; Watanabe, Takao; Hirose, Masao.

    1982-01-01

    In the process of the start-up and shutdown of BWR plants, the operation of changing over feed pumps corresponding to plant output is performed. Therefore, it is necessary to develop the automatic changeover system for feed pumps, which minimizes the variation of water level in reactors and is easy to operate. The three-element control system with the water level in reactors, the flow rate of main steam and the flow rate of feed water as the input is mainly applied, but long time is required for the changeover of feed pumps. The two-loop feed control system can control simultaneously two pumps being changed over, therefore it is suitable to the automatic changeover control system for feed pumps. Also it is excellent for the control of the recirculating valves of feed pumps. The control characteristics of the two-loop feed water control system against the external disturbance which causes the variation of water level in reactors were examined. The results of analysis by simulation are reported. The features of the two-loop feed water control system, the method of simulation and the evaluation of the two-loop feed water control system are described. Its connection with a digital feed water recirculation control system is expected. (Kako, I.)

  11. Design of a mixed recharge with MOX assemblies of greater relation of moderation for a BWR reactor; Diseno de una recarga mixta con ensambles MOX de mayor relacion de moderacion para un reactor BWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramirez S, J.R.; Alonso V, G.; Palacios H, J. [ININ, Carretera Mexico-Toluca Km. 36.5, 52045 Estado de Mexico (Mexico)]. e-mail: jrrs@nuclear.inin.mx

    2004-07-01

    The study of the fuel of mixed oxides of uranium and plutonium (MOX) it has been topic of investigation in many countries of the world and those are even discussed in many places the benefits of reprocessing the spent fuel to extract the plutonium created during the irradiation of the fuel in the nuclear power reactors. At the moment those reactors that have been loaded partially with MOX fuel, are mainly of the type PWR where a mature technology has been achieved in some countries like they are France, Belgium and England, however the experience with reactors of the type BWR is more limited and it is continued studying the best way to introduce this type of fuel in BWRs, one of the main problems to introduce MOX in reactors BWR is the neutronic design of the same one, existing different concepts to introduce the plutonium in the assemblies of fuel and one of them is the one of increasing the relationship of moderation of the assemble. In this work a MOX fuel assemble design is presented and the obtained results so far in the ININ. These results indicate that the investigated concept has some exploitable advantages in the use of the MOX fuel. (Author)

  12. Phenomenology of BWR fuel assembly degradation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurata, Masaki; Barrachin, Marc; Haste, Tim; Steinbrueck, Martin

    2018-03-01

    Severe accidents occurred at the Fukushima-Daiichi Nuclear Power Station (FDNPS) which required an immediate re-examination of fuel degradation phenomenology. The present paper reviews the updated knowledge on the phenomenology of the fuel degradation, focusing mainly on the BWR fuel assembly degradation at the macroscopic scale and that of the individual interactions at the meso-scale. Oxidation of boron carbide (B4C) control rods potentially generates far larger amounts of heat and hydrogen under BWR accident conditions. All integral tests with B4C control rods or control blades have shown early failure, liquefaction, relocation and oxidation of B4C starting at temperatures around 1250 °C, well below the significant interaction temperatures of UO2-Zry. These interactions or reactions potentially influence the progress of fuel degradation in the early phase. The steam-starved conditions, which are being discussed as a likely scenario at the FDNPS accident, highly influence the individual interactions and potentially lead the fuel degradation in non-prototypical directions. The detailed phenomenology of individual interactions and their influence on the transient and on the late phase of the severe accidents are also discussed.

  13. BWR normal water chemistry guidelines: 1986 revision

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-09-01

    Boiling water reactors (BWRs) have experienced stress corrosion cracking in the reactor cooling system piping resulting in adverse impacts on plant availability and personnel radiation exposure. The BWR Owners Group and EPRI have sponsored a major research and development program to provide remedies for this stress corrosion cracking problem. This work shows that the likelihood of cracking depends on the plant's water chemistry performance (environment) as well as on material condition and stress level. Plant experience and other research demonstrate that water quality also affects fuel performance and radiation field buildup in BWRs. This report,''BWR Normal Water Chemistry Guidelines: 1986 Revision,'' presents suggested generic water chemistry specifications, justifies the proposed water chemistry limits, suggests responses to out-of-specification water chemistry, discusses available chemical analysis methods as well as data management and surveillance schemes, and details the management philosophy required to successfully implement a water chemistry control program. An appendix contains recommendations for water quality of auxiliary systems. 73 refs., 20 figs., 9 tabs

  14. BWR Assembly Optimization for Minor Actinide Recycling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maldonado, G. Ivan; Christenson, John M.; Renier, J.P.; Marcille, T.F.; Casal, J.

    2010-01-01

    The Primary objective of the proposed project is to apply and extend the latest advancements in LWR fuel management optimization to the design of advanced boiling water reactor (BWR) fuel assemblies specifically for the recycling of minor actinides (MAs). A top-level objective of the Advanced Fuel Cycle Systems Analysis program element of the DOE NERI program is to investigate spent fuel treatment and recycling options for current light water reactors (LWRs). Accordingly, this project targets to expand the traditional scope of nuclear fuel management optimization into the following two complementary specific objectives: (1) To develop a direct coupling between the pin-by-pin within-bundle loading control variables and core-wide (bundle-by-bundle) optimization objectives, (2) to extend the methodology developed to explicitly encompass control variables, objectives, and constraints designed to maximize minor actinide incineration in BWR bundles and cycles. The first specific objective is projected to 'uncover' dormant thermal margin made available by employing additional degrees of freedom within the optimization process, while the addition of minor actinides is expected to 'consume' some of the uncovered thermal margin. Therefore, a key underlying goal of this project is to effectively invest some of the uncovered thermal margin into achieving the primary objective.

  15. Recent BWR fuel management reactor physics advances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crowther, R.L.; Congdon, S.P.; Crawford, B.W.; Kang, C.M.; Martin, C.L.; Reese, A.P.; Savoia, P.J.; Specker, S.R.; Welchly, R.

    1982-01-01

    Improvements in BWR fuel management have been under development to reduce uranium and separative work (SWU) requirements and reduce fuel cycle costs, while also maintaining maximal capacity factors and high fuel reliability. Improved reactor physics methods are playing an increasingly important role in making such advances feasible. The improved design, process computer and analysis methods both increase knowledge of the thermal margins which are available to implement fuel management advance, and improve the capability to reliably and efficiently analyze and design for fuel management advances. Gamma scan measurements of the power distributions of advanced fuel assembly and advanced reactor core designs, and improved in-core instruments also are important contributors to improving 3-d predictive methods and to increasing thermal margins. This paper is an overview of the recent advances in BWR reactor physics fuel management methods, coupled with fuel management and core design advances. The reactor physics measurements which are required to confirm the predictions of performance fo fuel management advances also are summarized

  16. A BWR licensing experience in the USA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Powers, J.; Ogura, C.; Arai, K.; Thomas, S.; Mookhoek, B.

    2015-09-01

    The US-Advanced Boiling Water Reactor (A BWR), certified by the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission (US NRC), is a third generation, evolutionary boiling water reactor design which is the reference for the South Texas Project Units 3 and 4 (STP3-4) Combined License Application (Cola). Nuclear Innovation North America (Nina) is the License Applicant for this new build project, and Toshiba is the selected primary technology contractor. The STP3-4 project has finished the US NRC technical review of the Cola through the final meeting of the Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards (ACRS), and the Final Safety Evaluation Report (FSER) is scheduled to be issued by the US NRC in the middle of 2015. The next steps are to support the Mandatory Hearing process, and voting by the NRC commissioners on the motion to grant the Combined License, which is scheduled beginning of 2016 according to US NRC schedule as of March 30, 2015. This paper summarizes the history and progress of the US-A BWR licensing, including the experiences of the Licensee, Nina, and Toshiba as the Epc team worked through the Code of Federal Regulations Title 10 (10-Cfr) Part 52 process, and provides some perspectives on how the related licensing material would also be of value within a 10-Cfr Part 50, two-step process to minimize schedule and financial risks which could arise from ongoing technical developments and regulatory reviews. (Author)

  17. Hydrogen injection device in BWR type reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takagi, Jun-ichi; Kubo, Koji.

    1988-01-01

    Purpose: To reduce the increasing ratio of main steam system dose rate due to N-16 activity due to excess hydrogen injection in the hydrogen injection operation of BWR type reactors. Constitution: There are provided a hydrogen injection mechanism for injecting hydrogen into primary coolants of a BWR type reactor, and a chemical injection device for injecting chemicals such as methanol, which makes nitrogen radioisotopes resulted in the reactor water upon hydrogen injection non-volatile, into the pressure vessel separately from hydrogen. Injected hydrogen and the chemicals are not reacted in the feedwater system, but the reaction proceeds due to the presence of radioactive rays after the injection into the pressure vessel. Then, hydrogen causes re-combination in the downcomer portion to reduce the dissolved oxygen concentration. Meanwhile, about 70 % of the chemicals is supplied by means of a jet pump directly to the reactor core, thereby converting the chemical form of N-16 in the reactor core more oxidative (non-volatile). (Kawakami, Y.)

  18. LBB application in Swedish BWR design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kornfeldt, H.; Bjoerk, K.O.; Ekstroem, P. [ABB Atom, Vaesteras (Sweden)

    1997-04-01

    The protection against dynamic effects in connection with potential pipe breaks has been implemented in different ways in the development of BWR reactor designs. First-generation plant designs reflect code requirements in effect at that time which means that no piping restraint systems were designed and built into those plants. Modern designs have, in contrast, implemented full protection against damage in connection with postulated pipe breaks, as required in current codes and regulations. Moderns standards and current regulatory demands can be met for the older plants by backfitting pipe whip restraint hardware. This could lead to several practical difficulties as these installations were not anticipated in the original plant design and layout. Meeting the new demands by analysis would in this situation have great advantages. Application of leak-before-break criteria gives an alternative opportunity of meeting modem standards in reactor safety design. Analysis takes into account data specific to BWR primary system operation, actual pipe material properties, piping loads and leak detection capability. Special attention must be given to ensure that the data used reflects actual plant conditions.

  19. A BWR licensing experience in the USA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Powers, J.; Ogura, C. [Toshiba America Nuclear Energy, Charlotte, North Carolina (United States); Arai, K. [Toshiba Corporation, Yokohama, Kanagawa (Japan); Thomas, S.; Mookhoek, B., E-mail: jim.powers@toshiba.com [Nuclear Innovation North America, Lake Jackson, Texas (United States)

    2015-09-15

    The US-Advanced Boiling Water Reactor (A BWR), certified by the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission (US NRC), is a third generation, evolutionary boiling water reactor design which is the reference for the South Texas Project Units 3 and 4 (STP3-4) Combined License Application (Cola). Nuclear Innovation North America (Nina) is the License Applicant for this new build project, and Toshiba is the selected primary technology contractor. The STP3-4 project has finished the US NRC technical review of the Cola through the final meeting of the Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards (ACRS), and the Final Safety Evaluation Report (FSER) is scheduled to be issued by the US NRC in the middle of 2015. The next steps are to support the Mandatory Hearing process, and voting by the NRC commissioners on the motion to grant the Combined License, which is scheduled beginning of 2016 according to US NRC schedule as of March 30, 2015. This paper summarizes the history and progress of the US-A BWR licensing, including the experiences of the Licensee, Nina, and Toshiba as the Epc team worked through the Code of Federal Regulations Title 10 (10-Cfr) Part 52 process, and provides some perspectives on how the related licensing material would also be of value within a 10-Cfr Part 50, two-step process to minimize schedule and financial risks which could arise from ongoing technical developments and regulatory reviews. (Author)

  20. LBB application in Swedish BWR design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kornfeldt, H.; Bjoerk, K.O.; Ekstroem, P.

    1997-01-01

    The protection against dynamic effects in connection with potential pipe breaks has been implemented in different ways in the development of BWR reactor designs. First-generation plant designs reflect code requirements in effect at that time which means that no piping restraint systems were designed and built into those plants. Modern designs have, in contrast, implemented full protection against damage in connection with postulated pipe breaks, as required in current codes and regulations. Moderns standards and current regulatory demands can be met for the older plants by backfitting pipe whip restraint hardware. This could lead to several practical difficulties as these installations were not anticipated in the original plant design and layout. Meeting the new demands by analysis would in this situation have great advantages. Application of leak-before-break criteria gives an alternative opportunity of meeting modem standards in reactor safety design. Analysis takes into account data specific to BWR primary system operation, actual pipe material properties, piping loads and leak detection capability. Special attention must be given to ensure that the data used reflects actual plant conditions

  1. BWR fuel experience with zinc injection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levin, H.A.; Garcia, S.E.

    1995-01-01

    In 1982 a correlation between low primary recirculation system dose rates in BWR's and the presence of ionic zinc in reactor water was identified. The source of the zinc was primarily from Admiralty brass condensers. Plants with brass condensers are called ''natural zinc'' plants. Brass condensers were also a source of copper that was implicated in crude induced localized corrosion (CILC) fuel failures. In 1986 the first BWR intentionally injected zinc for the benefits of dose rate control. Although zinc alone was never implicated in fuel degradation of failures, a comprehensive fuel surveillance program was initiated to monitor fuel performance. Currently there are 14 plants that are injecting zinc. Six of these plants are also on hydrogen water chemistry. This paper describes the effect on both Zircaloy corrosion and the cruding characteristics as a result of these changes in water chemistry. Fuel rod corrosion was found to be independent of the specific water chemistry of the plants. The corrosion behavior was the same with the additions of zinc alone or zinc plus hydrogen and well within the operating experience for fuel without either of these additions. No change was observed in the amounts of crude deposited on the fuel rods, both for the adherent and loosely held deposits. One of the effects of the zinc addition was the trend to form more of the zinc rich iron spinel in the fuel deposits rather than the hematite deposits that are predominantly formed with non additive water chemistry

  2. Preliminary study on characteristics of equilibrium thorium fuel cycle of BWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waris, A.; Kurniadi, R.; Su'ud, Z.; Permana, S.

    2007-01-01

    One of the main objectives behind the transuranium recycling ideas is not merely to utilize natural resource that is uranium much more efficiently, but to reduce the environmental impact of the radio-toxicity of the nuclear spent fuel. Beside uranium resource, there is thorium which has three times abundance compared to that of uranium which can be utilized as nuclear fuel. On top of that thorium is believed to have less radio-toxicity of spent fuel since its produce smaller amount of higher actinides compared to that of uranium. However, the studies on the thorium utilization in nuclear reactor in particular in light water reactors (LWR) are not performed intensively yet. Therefore, the aim of the present study is to evaluate the characteristics of thorium fuel cycle in LWR, especially boiling water reactor (BWR). To conduct the comprehensive investigations we have employed the equilibrium burnup model (1-3). The equilibrium burnup model is an alternative powerful method since its can handle all possible generated nuclides in any nuclear system. Moreover, this method is a simple time independent method. Hence the equilibrium burnup method could be very useful for evaluating and forecasting the characteristics of any nuclear fuel cycle, even the strange one, e.g. all nuclides are confined in the reactor1). We have employed 1368 nuclides in the equilibrium burnup calculation where 129 of them are heavy metals (HMs). This burnup code then is coupled with SRAC cell calculation code by using PIJ module to compose an equilibrium-cell burnup code. For cell calculation, 26 HMs, 66 fission products (FPs) and one pseudo FP have been utilized. The JENDL 3.2 library has been used in this study. References: 1. A. Waris and H. Sekimoto, 'Characteristics of several equilibrium fuel cycles of PWR', J. Nucl. Sci. Technol., 38, p.517-526, 2001 2. A. Waris, H. Sekimoto, and G. Kastchiev, Influence of Moderator-to-Fuel Volume Ratio on Pu and MA Recycling in Equilibrium Fuel Cycles of

  3. Design of a mixed recharge with MOX assemblies of greater relation of moderation for a BWR reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramirez S, J.R.; Alonso V, G.; Palacios H, J.

    2004-01-01

    The study of the fuel of mixed oxides of uranium and plutonium (MOX) it has been topic of investigation in many countries of the world and those are even discussed in many places the benefits of reprocessing the spent fuel to extract the plutonium created during the irradiation of the fuel in the nuclear power reactors. At the moment those reactors that have been loaded partially with MOX fuel, are mainly of the type PWR where a mature technology has been achieved in some countries like they are France, Belgium and England, however the experience with reactors of the type BWR is more limited and it is continued studying the best way to introduce this type of fuel in BWRs, one of the main problems to introduce MOX in reactors BWR is the neutronic design of the same one, existing different concepts to introduce the plutonium in the assemblies of fuel and one of them is the one of increasing the relationship of moderation of the assemble. In this work a MOX fuel assemble design is presented and the obtained results so far in the ININ. These results indicate that the investigated concept has some exploitable advantages in the use of the MOX fuel. (Author)

  4. Surveillance of vibrations in PWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Espefaelt, R.; Lorenzen, J.; Aakerhielm, F.

    1980-07-01

    The core of a PWR - including fuel elements, internal structure, control rods and core support structure inside the pressure vessel - is subjected to forces which can cause vibrations. One sensitive means to detect and analyse such vibrations is by means of the noise from incore and excore neutron detector signals. In this project noise recordings have been made on two occasions in the Ringhals 2 plant and the obtained data been analysed using the Studsvik Noise Analysis Program System (SNAPS). The results have been intepreted and a detailed description of the vibrational status of the core and pressure vessel internals has been produced. On the basis of the obtained results it is proposed that neutron signal noise analysis should be performed at each PWR plant in the beginning, middle and end of each fuel cycle and an analysis be made using the methods developed in the project. It would also provide a contribution to a higher degree of preparedness for diagnostic tasks in case of unexpected and abnormal events. (author)

  5. Development of new irradiation facility for BWR safety research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okada, Yuji; Magome, Hirokatsu; Iida, Kazuhiro; Hanawa, Hiroshi; Ohmi, Masao

    2013-01-01

    In JAEA (Japan Atomic Energy Agency), about the irradiation embrittlement of the reactor pressure vessel and the stress corrosion cracking of reactor core composition apparatus concerning the long-term use of the light water reactor (BWR), in order to check the influence of the temperature, pressure, and water quality, etc on BWR condition. The water environmental control facility which performs irradiation assisted stress corrosion-cracking (IASCC) evaluation under BWR irradiation environment was fabricated in JMTR (Japan Materials Testing Reactor). This report is described the outline of manufacture of the water environmental control facility for doing an irradiation test using the saturation temperature capsule after JMTR re-operation. (author)

  6. Residual stress analysis in BWR pressure vessel attachments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dexter, R.J.; Leung, C.P.; Pont, D.

    1992-06-01

    Residual stresses from welding processes can be the primary driving force for stress corrosion cracking (SCC) in BWR components. Thus, a better understanding of the causes and nature of these residual stresses can help assess and remedy SCC. Numerical welding simulation software, such as SYSWELD, and material property data have been used to quantify residual stresses for application to SCC assessments in BWR components. Furthermore, parametric studies using SYSWELD have revealed which variables significantly affect predicted residual stress. Overall, numerical modeling techniques can be used to evaluate residual stress for SCC assessments of BWR components and to identify and plan future SCC research

  7. Numerical investigations for insulation particle transport phenomena in water flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krepper, E.; Grahn, A.; Alt, S.; Kaestner, W.; Kratzsch, A.; Seeliger, A.

    2005-01-01

    The investigation of insulation debris generation, transport and sedimentation gains importance regarding the reactor safety research for PWR and BWR considering the long term behaviour of emergency core coolant systems during all types of LOCA. The insulation debris released near the break during LOCA consists of a mixture of very different particles concerning size, shape, consistence and other properties. Some fraction of the released insulation debris will be transported into the reactor sump where it may affect emergency core cooling. Open questions of generic interest are e.g. the sedimentation of the insulation debris in a water pool, possible re-suspension, transport in the sump water flow, particle load on strainers and corresponding difference pressure. A joint research project in cooperation with Institute of Process Technology, Process Automation and Measuring Technology (IPM) Zittau deals with the experimental investigation and the development of CFD models for the description of particle transport phenomena in coolant flow. While experiments are performed at the IPM-Zittau, theoretical work is concentrated at Forschungszentrum Rossendorf. In the present paper the basic concepts for CFD modelling are described and first results including feasibility studies are shown. During the ongoing work further results are expected. (author)

  8. Laguna Verde nuclear power plant: an experience to consider in advanced BWR design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuentes Marquez, L.

    2001-01-01

    Laguna Verde is a BWR 5 containment Mark II. Designed by GE, two external re-circulation loops, each of them having two speed re-circulation pump and a flow control valve to define the drive flow and consequently the total core flow an power control by total core flow. Laguna Verde Design and operational experience has shown some insights to be considering in design for advanced BRW reactors in order to improve the potential of nuclear power plants. NSSS and Balance of plant design, codes used to perform nuclear core design, margins derived from engineering judgment, at the time Laguna Verde designed and constructed had conducted to have a plant with an operational license, generating with a very good performance and availability. Nevertheless, some design characteristics and operational experience have shown that potential improvements or areas of opportunity shall be focused in the advanced BWR design. Computer codes used to design the nuclear core have been evolved relatively fast. The computers are faster and powerful than those used during the design process, also instrumentation and control are becoming part of this amazing technical evolution in the industry. The Laguna Verde experience is the subject to share in this paper. (author)

  9. Best-estimate analysis development for BWR systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sutherland, W.A.; Alamgir, M.; Kalra, S.P.; Beckner, W.D.

    1986-01-01

    The Full Integral Simulation Test (FIST) Program is a three pronged approach to the development of best-estimate analysis capability for BWR systems. An experimental program in the FIST BWR system simulator facility extends the LOCA data base and adds operational transients data. An analytical method development program with the BWR-TRAC computer program extends the modeling of BWR specific components and major interfacing systems, and improves numerical techniques to reduce computer running time. A method qualification program tests TRAC-B against experiments run in the FIST facility and extends the results to reactor system applications. With the completion and integration of these three activities, the objective of a best-estimate analysis capability has been achieved. (author)

  10. Boiling water system of nuclear power plants (BWR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martias Nurdin

    1975-01-01

    About 85% of the world electric generators are light water reactors. It shows that LWR is technologically and economically competitive with other generators. The Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) is one of the two systems in the LWR group. The techniques of BWR operation in several countries, especially low and moderate power BWR, are presented. The discussion is made in relation with the interconnection problems of electric installation in developing countries, including Indonesia, where the total electric energy installation is low. The high reliability and great flexibility of the operation of a boiling water reactor for a sufficiently long period are also presented. Component standardization for BWR system is discussed to get a better technological and economical performance for further development. (author)

  11. BWR stability: history and state-of-the-art

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yadigaroglu, George

    2014-01-01

    The paper briefly recalls the historical developments, reviews the important phenomena, the analytical and simulation tools that are used for the analysis of BWR stability focussing on the linear, frequency domain methods

  12. Pressure vessel for a BWR type reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimamoto, Yoshiharu.

    1980-01-01

    Purpose: To prevent the retention of low temperature water and also prevent the thermal fatigue of the pressure vessel by making large the curvature radius of a pressure vessel of a feed water sparger fitting portion and accelerating the mixing of low-temperature water at the feed water sparger base and in-pile hot water. Constitution: The curvature radius of the corner of the feed water sparger fitting portion in a pressure vessel is formed largely. In-pile circulating water infiltrates up to the base portion of the feed water sparger to carry outside low-temperature water at the base part, which is mixed with in-pile hot water. Accordingly, low temperature water does not stay at the base portion of the feed water sparger and generation of thermal fatigue in the pressure vessel can be prevented and the safety of the BWR type reactor can be improved. (Yoshino, Y.)

  13. Development of long operating cycle simplified BWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heki, H.; Nakamaru, M.; Maruya, T.; Hiraiwa, K.; Arai, K.; Narabayash, T.; Aritomi, M.

    2002-01-01

    This paper describes an innovative plant concept for long operating cycle simplified BWR (LSBWR) In this plant concept, 1) Long operating cycle ( 3 to 15 years), 2) Simplified systems and building, 3) Factory fabrication in module are discussed. Designing long operating core is based on medium enriched U-235 with burnable poison. Simplified systems and building are realized by using natural circulation with bottom located core, internal CRD and PCV with passive system and an integrated reactor and turbine building. This LSBWR concept will have make high degree of safety by IVR (In Vessel Retention) capability, large water inventory above the core region and no PCV vent to the environment due to PCCS (Passive Containment Cooling System) and internal vent tank. Integrated building concept could realize highly modular arrangement in hull structure (ship frame structure), ease of seismic isolation capability and high applicability of standardization and factory fabrication. (authors)

  14. BWR plant advanced central control panel PODIA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujii, K.; Hayakawa, H.; Ikeda, Y.; Neda, T.; Suto, O.; Takamiya, S.

    1983-01-01

    BWR plant central control panels have become more and more enlarged and complicated recently due to the magnification of the scale of a plant and the requirement to reinforce safety. So, it is important to make communication between men and the complicated central control panel smooth. Toshiba has developed an advanced central control panel, named PODIA, which uses many computers and color CRTs, and PODIA is now in the stage of application to practical plants. In this article, the writers first touch upon control functions transition in the central control room, the PODIA position concerning the world-wide trend in this technology phase and the human engineering on the design. Then they present concrete design concepts for the control board and computer system which constitute PODIA

  15. Evaluation of internal flooding in a BWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shiu, K.; Papazoglou, I.A.; Sun, Y.H.; Anavim, E.; Ilberg, D.

    1985-01-01

    Flooding inside a nuclear power station is capable of concurrently disabling redundant safety systems. This paper presents the results of a recent review study performed on internally-generated floods inside a boiling water reactor (BWR) reactor building. The study evaluated the flood initiator frequency due to either maintenance or ruptures using Markovian models. A time phased event tree approach was adopted to quantify the core damage frequency based on the flood initiator frequency. It is found in the study that the contribution to the total core damage due to internal flooding events is not insignificant and is comparable to other transient contributors. The findings also indicate that the operator plays an important role in the prevention as well as the mitigation of a flooding event

  16. A BWR Safety and Operability Improvements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sawyer, Craig D.

    1993-01-01

    The A BWR is the culmination of 30 years of design, development and operating experience of BWRs around the world. It represents across the board improvements is safety, operation and maintenance practices (O and M), economics, radiation exposure and rad waste generation. More than ten years and $20m5 went into the design and development of its new features, and it is now under construction in Japan. This paper concentrates on the safety and operability improvements. In the safety area, more than a decade improvement in core damage frequency (CDFR) has been assessed by formal PIRA techniques, with CDFR less than 10 -6 /year. Severe accident mitigation has also been formally addressed in the design. Plant operations were simplified by incorporation of better materials, optimum use of redundancy in mechanical and electrical equipment so that on-line maintenance can be performed, by better arrangements which account for required maintenance practices, and by an advanced control room

  17. Advanced technology for BWR operator training simulator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shibuya, Akira; Fujita, Eimitsu; Nakao, Toshihiko; Nakabaru, Mitsugu; Asaoka, Kouchi.

    1991-01-01

    This paper describes an operator training simulator for BWR nuclear power plants which went into service recently. The simulator is a full scope replica type simulator which faithfully replicates the control room environment of the reference plant with six main control panels and twelve auxiliary ones. In comparison with earlier simulators, the scope of the simulation is significantly extended in both width and depth. The simulation model is also refined in order to include operator training according to sympton-based emergency procedure guidelines to mitigate the results in accident cases. In particular, the core model and the calculational model of the radiation intensity distribution, if radioactive materials were released, are improved. As for simulator control capabilities by which efficient and effective training can be achieved, various advanced designs are adopted allowing easy use of the simulators. (author)

  18. Manufacturing technology and process for BWR fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kato, Shigeru

    1996-01-01

    Following recent advanced technologies, processes and requests of the design changes of BWR fuel, Nuclear Fuel Industries, Ltd. (NFI) has upgraded the manufacturing technology and honed its own skills to complete its brand-new automated facility in Tokai in the latter half of 1980's. The plant uses various forms of automation throughout the manufacturing process: the acceptance of uranium dioxide powder, pelletizing, fuel rod assembling, fuel bundle assembling and shipment. All processes are well computerized and linked together to establish the integrated control system with three levels of Production and Quality Control, Process Control and Process Automation. This multi-level system plays an important role in the quality assurance system which generates the highest quality of fuels and other benefits. (author)

  19. ABB PWR fuel design for high burnup

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nilsson, S.; Jourdain, P.; Limback, M.; Garde, A.M.

    1998-01-01

    Corrosion, hydriding and irradiation induced growth of a based materials are important factors for the high burnup performance of PWR fuel. ABB has developed a number of Zr based alloys to meet the need for fuel that enables operation to elevated burnups. The materials include composition and processing optimised Zircaloy 4 (OPTIN TM ) and Zircaloy 2 (Zircaloy 2P), as well as advanced Zr based alloys with chemical compositions outside the composition specified for Zircaloy. The advanced alloys are either used as Duplex or as single component claddings. The Duplex claddings have an inner component of Zircaloy and an outer layer of Zr with small additions of alloying elements. ABB has furthermore improved the dimensional stability of the fuel assembly by developing stiffer and more bow resistant guide tubes while debris related fuel failures have been eliminated from ABB fuel by introducing the Guardian TM grid. Intermediate flow mixers that improve the thermal hydraulic performance and the dimensional stability of the fuel has also been developed within ABB. (author)

  20. Assessment of two BWR accident management strategies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hodge, S.A.; Petek, M.

    1991-01-01

    A recently completed Oak Ridge effort proposes two management strategies for mitigation of the events that might occur in-vessel after the onset of significant core damage in a BWR severe accident. While the probability of such an accident is low, there may be effective yet inexpensive mitigation measures that could be implemented employing the existing plant equipment and requiring only additions to the plant emergency procedures. In this spirit, accident management strategies have been proposed for use of a borated solution for reactor vessel refill should control blade damage occur during a period of temporary core dryout and for containment flooding to maintain the core debris within the reactor vessel if injection systems cannot be restored. The proposed strategy for poisoning of the water used for vessel reflood should injection systems be restored after control blade damage has occurred has great promise, using only the existing plant equipment but employing a different chemical form for the boron poison. The dominant BWR severe accident sequence is Station Blackout and without means for mechanical stirring or heating of the storage tank, the question of being able to form the poisoned solution under accident conditions becomes of supreme importance. On the other hand, the proposed strategy for drywell flooding to cool the reactor vessel bottom head and prevent the core and structure debris from escaping to the drywell holds less promise. This strategy does, however, have potential for future plant designs in which passive methods might be employed to completely submerge the reactor vessel under severe accident conditions without the need for containment venting

  1. Seismic PRA of a BWR plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishio, Masahide; Fujimoto, Haruo

    2014-01-01

    Since the occurrence of nuclear power plant accidents in the Fukushima Daichi nuclear power station, the regulatory framework on severe accident (SA) has been discussed in Japan. The basic concept is to typify and identify the accident sequences leading to core/primary containment vessel (PCV) damage and to implement SA measures covering internal and external events extensively. As Japan is an earthquake-prone country and earthquakes and tsunami are important natural external events for nuclear safety of nuclear power plants, JNES performed the seismic probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) on a typical nuclear power plant and evaluated the dominant accident sequences leading to core/PCV damage to discuss dominant scenarios of severe accident (SA). The analytical models and the results of level-1 seismic PRA on a 1,100 MWe BWR-5 plant are shown here. Seismic PRA was performed for a typical BWR5 plant. Initiating events with large contribution to core damage frequency are the loss of all AC powers (station blackout) and the large LOCA. The top of dominant accident sequences is the simultaneous occurrence of station blackout and large LOCA. Important components to core damage frequency are electric power supply equipment. It needs to keep in mind that the results are influenced on site geologic characteristic to a greater or lesser. In the process of analysis, issues such as conservative assumptions related to damages of building or structure and success criteria for excessive LOCA are left to be resolved. These issues will be further studied including thermal hydric analysis in the future. (authors)

  2. BWR startup and shutdown activity transport control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia, S.E., E-mail: sgarcia@epri.com [Electric Power Research Inst. (EPRI), Palo Alto, California (United States); Giannelli, J.F.; Jarvis, A.J., E-mail: jgiannelli@finetech.com, E-mail: ajarvis@finetech.com [Finetech, Inc., Parsippany, New Jersey (United States)

    2010-07-01

    This paper summarizes BWR industry experience on good practices for controlling the transport of corrosion product activity during shutdowns, particularly refueling outages, and for startup chemistry control to minimize IGSCC (intergranular stress corrosion cracking). For shutdown, overall goals are to minimize adverse impacts of crud bursts and the time required to remove activated corrosion products from the reactor coolant during the shutdown process prior to refueling, and to assist plants in predicting and controlling radiation exposure during outages. For startup, the overall goals are to highlight conditions during early heatup and startup when sources of reactor coolant oxidants are high, when there is a greater likelihood for chemical excursions associated with refueling outage work activities, and when hydrogen injection is not available to mitigate IGSCC due to system design limitations. BWR water chemistry has changed significantly in recent years with the adoption of hydrogen water chemistry, zinc addition and noble metal chemical applications. These processes have, in some instances, resulted in significant activity increases during shutdown evolutions, which together with reduced time for cleanup because of shorter outages, has consequently increased outage radiation exposure. A review several recent outages shows that adverse effects from these conditions can be minimized, leading to the set of good practice recommendations for shutdown chemistry control. Most plants lose the majority of their hydrogen availability hours during early startup because feedwater hydrogen injection systems were not originally designed to inject hydrogen below 20% power. Hydrogen availability has improved through modifications to inject hydrogen at lower power levels, some near 5%. However, data indicate that IGSCC is accelerated during early startup, when dissolved oxygen and hydrogen peroxide levels are high and reactor coolant temperatures are in the 300 to 400 {sup o

  3. Crud separation from equipment drain of BWR atomic power station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayashi, Masaru; Yamaguchi, Hisashi; Moriya, Yasuhiro; Koshiba, Yukihiko; Ota, Yoshiharu.

    1977-01-01

    In the primary cooling systems of BWR nuclear power stations, radioactive crud is generated and accumulates in reactors and circulating systems, which causes the radiation exposure of workers at the time of the inspection and maintenance of reactors. The chemical composition and grain size distribution of crud differ largely according to the construction of primary systems, the operational conditions of reactors, and the process of operation. The study on the application of nuclear pore membrane filter NPMF to the separation of crud in the waste water from equipment drain systems has been carried out. With the NPMF, clarified filtrate can be obtained without any filter aid, therefore the secondary waste of filter sludge is not generated. When the filter is clogged, the filtration capability can be regenerated by reverse flow washing, and continuous filtration is possible actually because the regeneration takes only short time. The NPMF is the polycarbonate membrane of about 10 μm thick, to which charged particles are irradiated vertically, and the flight tracks are etched with alkali solution, thus the required pore treatment is applied. The basic investigation of waste liquid, the endurance test of actual filters, the filtration test with the pilot apparatus, the demonstration test with an actual equipment, and the design of the actual equipment have been carried out for three years. (Kako, I.)

  4. Development of power change maneuvering method for BWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fukuzaki, Takaharu; Yamada, Naoyuki; Kiguchi, Takashi; Sakurai, Mikio.

    1985-01-01

    A power change maneuvering method for BWR has been proposed to generate an optimal power control maneuver, which realizes the power change operation closest to a power change demand pattern under operating constraints. The method searches for the maneuver as an optimization problem, where the variables are thermal power levels sampled from the demand pattern, the performance index is defined to express the power mismatch between demand and feasible patterns, and the constraints are limit lines on the thermal power-core flow rate map and limits on keeping fuel integrity. The usable feasible direction method is utilized as the optimization algorithm, with newly developed techniques for initial value generation and step length determination, which apply one-dimensional search and inverse-interpolation methods, respectively, to realize the effective search of the optimal solution. Simulation results show that a typical computing time is about 5 min by a general purpose computer and the method has been verified to be practical even for on-line use. (author)

  5. Reactor power control device in BWR power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurosawa, Tsuneo.

    1997-01-01

    The present invention provides a device for controlling reactor power based on a start-up/shut down program in a BWR type reactor, as well as for detecting deviation, if occurs, of the power from the start-up/shut down program, to control a recycling flow rate control system or control rod drive mechanisms. Namely, a power instruction section successively executes the start-up/shut down program and controls the coolant recycling system and the control rod driving mechanisms to control the power. A current state monitoring and calculation section receives a process amount, calculates parameters showing the plant state, compares/monitors them with predetermined values, detecting the deviation, if occurs, of the plant state from the start-up/shut down program, and prevents output of a power increase control signal which leads to power increase. A forecasting and monitoring/calculation section forecasts and calculates the plant state when not yet executed steps of the start-up/shut down program are performed, stops the execution of the start-up/shut down program in the next step in a case of forecasting that the results of the calculation will deviate from the start-up/shut down program. (I.S.)

  6. Identification of the reduced order models of a BWR reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hernandez S, A.

    2004-01-01

    The present work has as objective to analyze the relative stability of a BWR type reactor. It is analyzed that so adaptive it turns out to identify the parameters of a model of reduced order so that this it reproduces a condition of given uncertainty. This will take of a real fact happened in the La Salle plant under certain operation conditions of power and flow of coolant. The parametric identification is carried out by means of an algorithm of recursive least square and an Output Error model (Output Error), measuring the output power of the reactor when the instability is present, and considering that it is produced by a change in the reactivity of the system in the same way that a sign of type step. Also it is carried out an analytic comparison of the relative stability, analyzing two types of answers: the original answer of the uncertainty of the reactor vs. the obtained response identifying the parameters of the model of reduced order, reaching the conclusion that it is very viable to adapt a model of reduced order to study the stability of a reactor, under the only condition to consider that the dynamics of the reactivity is of step type. (Author)

  7. Upgrading BWR training simulators for annual outage operation training

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamakabe, K.; Nakajima, A.; Shiyama, H.; Noji, K.; Okabe, N.; Murata, F.

    2006-01-01

    Based upon the recently developed quality assurance program by the Japanese electric companies, BWR Operator Training Center (BTC) identified the needs to enhance operators' knowledge and skills for operations tasks during annual outage, and started to develop a dedicated operator training course specialized for them. In this paper, we present the total framework of the training course for annual outage operations and the associated typical three functions of our full-scope simulators specially developed and upgraded to conduct the training; namely, (1) Simulation model upgrade for the flow and temperature behavior concerning residual heat removal (RHR) system with shutdown cooling mode, (2) Addition of malfunctions for DC power supply equipment, (3) Simulation model upgrade for water filling operation for reactor pressurization (future development). We have implemented a trial of the training course by using the upgraded 800MW full-scope training simulator with functions (1) and (2) above. As the result of this trial, we are confident that the developed training course is effective for enhancing operators' knowledge and skills for operations tasks during annual outage. (author)

  8. Turbine protecting device in a BWR type nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kasuga, Hajime; Oka, Yoko.

    1984-01-01

    Purpose: To prevent highly humid steams from flowing into the turbine upon abnormal reduction in the reactor water level in order to ensure the turbine soundness, as well as in order to trip the turbine with no undesired effect on the reactor. Constitution: A protection device comprising a judging device and a timer are disposed in a BWR type reactor, in order to control a water level signal from a reactor water level gage. If the reactor water level is reduced during rated power operation, steams are kept to be generated due to decay heat although reactor is scramed. When a signal from the reactor water level detector is inputted to the protection device, a trip signal is outputted by way of a judging device after 15 second by means of the timer, when the main steam check valve is closed to trip the turbine. With this delay of time, abrupt increase in the pressure of the reactor due to sudden shutdown can be prevented. (Nakamoto, H)

  9. Fine numerical modelling of thermohydraulic phenomena in EDF PWR reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boulot, F.

    1993-01-01

    Over the last 20 years, EDF has developed a family of 2D and 3D industrial thermohydraulics software to solve problems encountered in existing PWR power plants and to design new reactors for the future. The equations used in the models are the averaged Navier-Stokes and energy equations. A brief description is given of the four main codes developed for single-phase and two-phase water-steam flows, some of which use finite differences or finite volumes methods, while others make use of finite elements methods. An example of application is given for each code. (author). 4 figs., 4 refs

  10. Natural-circulation-cooling characteristics during PWR accident simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adams, J.P.; McCreery, G.E.; Berta, V.T.

    1983-01-01

    A description of natural circulation cooling characteristics is presented. Data were obtained from several pressurized water reactor accident simulations in the Loss-of-Fluid Test (LOFT) pressurized water reactor (PWR). The reliability of natural circulation cooling, its cooling effectiveness, and the effect of changing system conditions are described. Quantitative comparison of flow rates and time constants with theory for both single- and two-phase fluid conditions were made. It is concluded that natural circulation cooling can be relied on in plant recovery procedures in the absence of forced convection whenever the steam generator heat sink is available

  11. Application of noise analysis to stability determination of a natural circulation cooled BWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hagen, T.H.J.J. van der; Dam, H. van; Hoogenboom, J.E.; Nissen, W.H.M.; Oosterkamp, W.J.

    1988-01-01

    Experiments were performed on the Dodewaard natural circulation cooled BWR at different conditions. The absolute stability was determined by measuring system responses to control rod and steam flow valve steps. Changes in core stability were studied using the signal of an average power range monitor (APRM) in time domain (auto-correlation function and impulse response) and in frequency domain (power spectral density and peaking factor), the outlet void fraction and variations of the incore coolant velocity. It is shown that the reactor is very stable and that cooling by natural circulation improves load following. Stability monitoring can be performed by all mentioned methods but using APRM signals in frequency domain is preferred.

  12. Ranking of input parameters importance for BWR stability based on Ringhals-1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gajev, Ivan; Kozlowski, Tomasz; Xu, Yunlin; Downar, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    Unstable behavior of Boiling Water Reactors (BWRs) is known to occur during operation at certain power and flow conditions. Uncertainty calculations for BWR stability, based on the Wilks' formula, have been already done for the Ringhals-1 benchmark. In this work, these calculations have been used to identify and rank the most important parameters affecting the stability of the Ringhals-1 plant. The ranking has been done in two different ways and a comparison of these two methods has been demonstrated. Results show that the methods provide different, but meaningful evaluations of the ranking. (author)

  13. PWR thermocouple mechanical sealing structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shen Qiuping; He Youguang

    1991-08-01

    The PWR in-core temperature detection device, which is one of measures to insure reactor safety operation, is to monitor and diagnose reactor thermal power output and in-core power distribution. The temperature detection device system uses thermocouples as measuring elements with stainless steel protecting sleeves. The thermocouple has a limited service time and should be replaced after its service time has reached. A new sealing device for the thermocouples of reactor in-core temperature detection system has been developed to facilitate replacement. The structure is complete tight under high temperature and pressure without any leakage and seepage, and easy to be assembled or disassembled in radioactive environment. The device is designed to make it possible to replace the thermocouple one by one if necessary. This is a new, simple and practical structure

  14. PWR standardization: The French experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bacher, P.E.

    1987-01-01

    After a short historical review of the French PWR programme with 45000 MWe in operation and 15000 MWe under construction, the paper first develops the objectives and limits of the standardizatoin policy. Implementation of standardization is described through successive reactor series and feedback of experience, together with its impact on safety and on codes and standards. Present benefits of standardization range from low engineering costs to low backfitting costs, via higher quality, reduction in construction times and start-up schedules and improved training of operators. The future of the French programme into the 1990's is again with an advanced standardized series, the N4-1400 MW plant. There is no doubt that the very positive experience with standardization is relevant to any country trying to achieve self-reliance in the nuclear power field. (author)

  15. Probabilistic study of the rupture of PWR vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dufresne, J.; Lucia, A.C.; Grandemange, J.; Pellissier-Tanon, A.

    1984-01-01

    The method used, is based on understanding of the failure modes and expressing the conventional concepts of fracture mechanics in a probabilistic form: the fatigue crack growth rate, calculated for conditions of cyclic loading, the initiation of unstable crack propagation, and the possibility of crack arrest. The analysis therefore requires the statistical expression of the factors and parameters which appear in the expressions of the law of crack growth and of toughness, and also those which are used in the calculation of the stress intensity factor K 1 . All input data are entered in COVASTOL code in histogram form. This code takes into account the degree of correlation between the flaw size and the Paris' law coefficients. It computes the propagation of a given defect in a given position, and the corresponding failure probability during accidental loading. The present analysis is primarily concerned with defects in welds; under cladding defects have also been considered in order to evaluate their harmfulness. Data were collected from 3 European manufacturers: BREDA (Italy) - FRAMATOME (France) and ROTTERDAM NUCLEAR (Netherlands). A total of 338 meters of PWR and BWR shell were analysed. The main conclusions are presented. Loading of the vessel has been computed for 22 observable and incidental conditions. An overall statistical interpretation of all the available (da/dN) ΔK measurement points has been made for SA 508 and SA 533 steels, using four laws: Paris, Forman, Priddle and Walker. The conclusions drawn from the calculations made with the COVASTOL code from the data compiled on French PWRs operated according to EDF rules, are finally presented [fr

  16. Transient analysis of blowdown thrust force under PWR LOCA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yano, Toshikazu; Miyazaki, Noriyuki; Isozaki, Toshikuni

    1982-10-01

    The analytical results of blowdown characteristics and thrust forces were compared with the experiments, which were performed as pipe whip and jet discharge tests under the PWR LOCA conditions. The blowdown thrust forces obtained by Navier-Stokes momentum equation about a single-phase, homogeneous and separated two-phase flow, assuming critical pressure at the exit if a critical flow condition was satisfied. The following results are obtained. (1) The node-junction method is useful for both the analyses of the blowdown thrust force and of the water hammer phenomena. (2) The Henry-Fauske model for subcooled critical flow is effective for the analysis of the maximum thrust force under the PWR LOCA conditions. The jet thrust parameter of the analysis and experiment is equal to 1.08. (3) The thrust parameter of saturated blowdown has the same one with the value under pressurized condition when the stagnant pressure is chosen as the saturated one. (4) The dominant terms of the blowdown thrust force in the momentum equation are the pressure and momentum terms except that the acceleration term has large contribution only just after the break. (5) The blowdown thrust force in the analysis greatly depends on the selection of the exit pressure. (author)

  17. Development of CFD analysis method based on droplet tracking model for BWR fuel assemblies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Onishi, Yoichi; Minato, Akihiko; Ichikawa, Ryoko; Mashara, Yasuhiro

    2011-01-01

    It is well known that the minimum critical power ratio (MCPR) of the boiling water reactor (BWR) fuel assembly depends on the spacer grid type. Recently, improvement of the critical power is being studied by using a spacer grid with mixing devices attaching various types of flow deflectors. In order to predict the critical power of the improved BWR fuel assembly, we have developed an analysis method based on the consideration of detailed thermal-hydraulic mechanism of annular mist flow regime in the subchannels for an arbitrary spacer type. The proposed method is based on a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model with a droplet tracking model for analyzing the vapor-phase turbulent flow in which droplets are transported in the subchannels of the BWR fuel assembly. We adopted the general-purpose CFD software Advance/FrontFlow/red (AFFr) as the base code, which is a commercial software package created as a part of Japanese national project. AFFr employs a three-dimensional (3D) unstructured grid system for application to complex geometries. First, AFFr was applied to single-phase flows of gas in the present paper. The calculated results were compared with experiments using a round cellular spacer in one subchannel to investigate the influence of the choice of turbulence model. The analyses using the large eddy simulation (LES) and re-normalisation group (RNG) k-ε models were carried out. The results of both the LES and RNG k-ε models show that calculations of velocity distribution and velocity fluctuation distribution in the spacer downstream reproduce the experimental results qualitatively. However, the velocity distribution analyzed by the LES model is better than that by the RNG k-ε model. The velocity fluctuation near the fuel rod, which is important for droplet deposition to the rod, is also simulated well by the LES model. Then, to examine the effect of the spacer shape on the analytical result, the gas flow analyses with the RNG k-ε model were performed

  18. BWR Radiation Assessment and Control Program: assessment and control of BWR radiation fields. Volume 1. Executive summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anstine, L.D.

    1983-05-01

    This report covers work on the BWR Radiation Assessment and Control (BRAC) Program from 1978 to 1982. The major activities during this report period were assessment of the radiation-level trends in BWRs, evaluation of the effects of forward-pumped heater drains on BWR water quality, installation and operation of a corrosion-product deposition loop in an operating BWR, and analyzation of fuel-deposit samples from two BWRs. Radiation fields were found to be controlled by cobalt-60 and to vary from as low as 50 mr/hr to as high as 800 mr/hr on the recirculation-system piping. Detailed information on BWR corrosion films and system deposits is presented in the report. Additionally, the results of an oxygen-injection experiment and recontamination monitoring studies are provided

  19. Analysis of high moderation full MOX BWR core physics experiments BASALA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishii, Kazuya; Ando, Yoshihira; Takada, Naoyuki; Kan, Taro; Sasagawa, Masaru; Kikuchi, Tsukasa; Yamamoto, Toru; Kanda, Ryoji; Umano, Takuya

    2005-01-01

    Nuclear Power Engineering Corporation (NUPEC) has performed conceptual design studies of high moderation full MOX LWR cores that aim for increasing fissile Pu consumption rate and reducing residual Pu in discharged MOX fuel. As part of these studies, NUPEC, French Atomic Energy Commission (CEA) and their industrial partners implemented an experimental program BASALA following MISTRAL. They were devoted to measuring the core physics parameters of such advanced cores. The MISTRAL program consists of one reference UO 2 core, two homogeneous full MOX cores and one full MOX PWR mock-up core that have higher moderation ratio than the conventional lattice. As for MISTRAL, the analysis results have already been reported on April 2003. The BASALA program consists of two high moderation full MOX BWR mock-up cores for operating and cold stand-by conditions. NUPEC has analyzed the experimental results of BASALA with the diffusion and the transport calculations by the SRAC code system and the continuous energy Monte Carlo calculations by the MVP code with the common nuclear data file, JENDL-3.2. The calculation results well reproduce the experimental data approximately within the same range of the experimental uncertainty. The analysis results of MISTRAL and BASALA indicate that these applied analysis methods have the same accuracy for the UO 2 and MOX cores, for the different moderation MOX cores, and for the homogeneous and the mock-up MOX cores. (author)

  20. The comparison of available data on PWR assembly thermal behavior with analytical predictions. Topical report (final)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, J.; Todreas, N.

    1979-02-01

    The comparison of available data with analytical predictions has been illustrated in this report. Since few data on the cross flow are available, a study of parameters in the transverse momentum equation was performed to assess the sensitivity of results to their assumed values. It is confirmed that effects of these parameters on the overall results are not significant under PWR operating conditions. Data on subchannel properties of quality and mass flux were also assessed. From the data comparisons, it is evident that COBRA can successfully predict the PWR normal operating conditions but cannot predict the trend under bulk quality conditions

  1. Babcock and Wilcox advanced PWR development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kulynych, G.E.; Lemon, J.E.

    1986-01-01

    The Babcock and Wilcox 600 MWe PWR design is discussed. Main features of the new B-600 design are improvements in reactor system configuration, glandless coolant pumps, safety features, core design and steam generators

  2. Hydrogen production in a PWR during LOCA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cassette, P.

    1983-12-01

    The purpose of this paper is to provide information on hydrogen generation during LOCA in French 900 MW PWR power plants. The design basis accident is taken into account as well as more severe accidents assuming failure of emergency systems

  3. Identification of the reduced order models of a BWR reactor; Identificacion de modelos de orden reducido de un reactor BWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hernandez S, A. [UNAM, Laboratorio de Analisis de Ingenieria de Reactores Nucleares, DEPFI, Campus Morelos, en IMTA Jiutepec, Morelos (Mexico)]. e-mail: augusto@correo.unam.mx

    2004-07-01

    The present work has as objective to analyze the relative stability of a BWR type reactor. It is analyzed that so adaptive it turns out to identify the parameters of a model of reduced order so that this it reproduces a condition of given uncertainty. This will take of a real fact happened in the La Salle plant under certain operation conditions of power and flow of coolant. The parametric identification is carried out by means of an algorithm of recursive least square and an Output Error model (Output Error), measuring the output power of the reactor when the instability is present, and considering that it is produced by a change in the reactivity of the system in the same way that a sign of type step. Also it is carried out an analytic comparison of the relative stability, analyzing two types of answers: the original answer of the uncertainty of the reactor vs. the obtained response identifying the parameters of the model of reduced order, reaching the conclusion that it is very viable to adapt a model of reduced order to study the stability of a reactor, under the only condition to consider that the dynamics of the reactivity is of step type. (Author)

  4. Application of EASY5 and MMS modules to BWR controller design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carmichael, L.A.; Rayes, L.; Yasutake, T.

    1987-01-01

    The application of EPRI's MMS Library and BCS' EASY5 simulation language to the design of a digital feedwater control system for the Monticello Boiling Water Nuclear Power Plant is discussed. In order to first design and then verify the digital feedwater controller algorithms, a digital simulation model of the Monticello plant was constructed using a combination of custom designed modules, existing MMS two-phase library modules, and standard modules available in the EASY5 library. Details of the process models, namely the BWR nuclear steam supply system, the steamline piping, and the feedwater piping are described in a companion paper. Details of the models for the existing BWR turbine pressure inlet pressure control and recirculation flow control system are described. These models are required to be operational during the transient analysis portion of the feedwater controller design verification, since they interact strongly with the reactor steam flow and water level. The design of the digital feedwater flow control loop is described. Its design is of particular interest because it requires consideration of control loop interaction and is, therefore, a simple example of multivariable non-interacting control design

  5. In-core failure of the instrumented BWR rod by locally induced high coolant temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yanagisawa, Kazuaki

    1985-12-01

    In the BWR type light water loop instrumented in HBWR, a current BWR type fuel rod pre-irradiated up to 5.6 MWd/kgU was power ramped to 50 kW/m. During the ramp, the diameter of the rod was expanded significantly at the bottom end. The behaviour was different from which caused by pellet-cladding interaction (PCI). In the post-irradiation examination, the rod was found to be failed. In this paper, the cause of the failure was studied and obtained the followings. (1) The significant expansion of the rod diameter was attributed to marked oxidation of cladding outer diameter, appeared in the direction of 0 0 -180 0 degree with a shape of nodular. (2) The cladding in the place was softened by high coolant temperature. Coolant pressure, 7MPa intruded the cladding into inside chamfer void at pellet interface. (3) At the place of the significant oxidation, an instrumented transformer was existed and the coolant flow area was very little. The reduction of the coolant flow was enhanced by the bending of the cladding which was caused in pre-irradiation stage. They are considered to be a principal cause of local closure of coolant flow and resultant high temperature in the place. (author)

  6. Behaviour of the reactivity for BWR fuel cells; Comportamiento de la reactividad para celdas de combustible BWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonzalez, J. A.; Alonso, G.; Delfin, A.; Vargas, S. [ININ, Carretera Mexico-Toluca s/n, 52750 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico); Del Valle G, E., E-mail: galonso@inin.gob.mx [IPN, Escuela Superior de Fisica y Matematicas, U. P. Adolfo Lopez Mateos, Col. Lindavista, 07738 Mexico D. F. (Mexico)

    2011-11-15

    In this work the behaviour of the reactivity of a fuel assembly type BWR was studied, the objective is to obtain some expressions that consider the average enrichment of U-235 and the gadolinium concentration like a function of the fuel cells burnt. Also, the applicability of the lineal reactivity model was analyzed for fuel cells type BWR. The analysis was carried out with the CASMO-4 code. (Author)

  7. A comparison of in-vessel behaviors between SFR and PWR under severe accident

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Sanggil; Cho, Cheon Hwey [ACT Co., Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Sang Ji [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    This paper aims to provide an easy guide for experts who know well the severe accident phenomenology of Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) by comparing both reactor design concepts and in vessel behaviors under a postulated severe accident condition. This study only provides a preliminary qualitative comparison based on available literature. The PWR and SFR in-vessel design concepts and their effects under a postulate severe accident are investigated in this paper. Although this work is a preliminary study to compare the in-vessel behaviors for both PWR and SFR, it seems that there is no possibility to lead a significant core damage in the metal fuel SFR concept. In the oxide fuel SFR, there might be a chance to progress to the severe accident initiators such as the energetic reaction, flow blockage and so on.

  8. Numerical simulation of boron injection in a BWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tinoco, Hernan, E-mail: htb@forsmark.vattenfall.s [Forsmarks Kraftgrupp AB, SE-742 03 Osthammar (Sweden); Buchwald, Przemyslaw [Reactor Technology, Royal Institute of Technology, SE-100 44 Stockholm (Sweden); Frid, Wiktor, E-mail: wiktor@reactor.sci.kth.s [Reactor Technology, Royal Institute of Technology, SE-100 44 Stockholm (Sweden)

    2010-02-15

    The present study constitutes a first step to understand the process of boron injection, transport and mixing in a BWR. It consists of transient CFD simulations of boron injection in a model of the downcomer of Forsmark's Unit 3 containing about 6 million elements. The two cases studied are unintentional start of boron injection under normal operation and loss of offsite power with partial ATWS leaving 10% of the core power uncontrolled. The flow conditions of the second case are defined by means of an analysis with RELAP5, assuming boron injection start directly after the first ECCS injection. Recent publications show that meaningful conservative results may be obtained for boron or thermal mixing in PWRs with grids as coarse as that utilized here, provided that higher order discretization schemes are used to minimize numerical diffusion. The obtained results indicate an apparently strong influence of the scenario in the behavior of the injection process. The normal operation simulation shows that virtually all boron solution flows down to the Main Recirculation Pump inlet located directly below the boron inlet nozzle. The loss of offsite power simulation shows initially a spread of the boron solution over the entire sectional area of the lower part of the downcomer filled with colder water. This remaining effect of the ECCS injection lasts until all this water has left the downcomer. Above this region, the boron injection jet develops in a vertical streak, eventually resembling the injection of the normal operation scenario. Due to the initial spread, this boron injection will probably cause larger temporal and spatial concentration variations in the core. In both cases, these variations may cause reactivity transients and fuel damage due to local power escalation. To settle this issue, an analysis using an extended model containing the downcomer, the MRPs and the Lower Plenum will be carried out. Also, the simulation time will be extended to a scale of

  9. Numerical simulation of boron injection in a BWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tinoco, Hernan; Buchwald, Przemyslaw; Frid, Wiktor

    2010-01-01

    The present study constitutes a first step to understand the process of boron injection, transport and mixing in a BWR. It consists of transient CFD simulations of boron injection in a model of the downcomer of Forsmark's Unit 3 containing about 6 million elements. The two cases studied are unintentional start of boron injection under normal operation and loss of offsite power with partial ATWS leaving 10% of the core power uncontrolled. The flow conditions of the second case are defined by means of an analysis with RELAP5, assuming boron injection start directly after the first ECCS injection. Recent publications show that meaningful conservative results may be obtained for boron or thermal mixing in PWRs with grids as coarse as that utilized here, provided that higher order discretization schemes are used to minimize numerical diffusion. The obtained results indicate an apparently strong influence of the scenario in the behavior of the injection process. The normal operation simulation shows that virtually all boron solution flows down to the Main Recirculation Pump inlet located directly below the boron inlet nozzle. The loss of offsite power simulation shows initially a spread of the boron solution over the entire sectional area of the lower part of the downcomer filled with colder water. This remaining effect of the ECCS injection lasts until all this water has left the downcomer. Above this region, the boron injection jet develops in a vertical streak, eventually resembling the injection of the normal operation scenario. Due to the initial spread, this boron injection will probably cause larger temporal and spatial concentration variations in the core. In both cases, these variations may cause reactivity transients and fuel damage due to local power escalation. To settle this issue, an analysis using an extended model containing the downcomer, the MRPs and the Lower Plenum will be carried out. Also, the simulation time will be extended to a scale of several

  10. Advanced Construction of Compact Containment BWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, M.; Maruyama, T.; Mori, H.; Hoshino, K.; Hijioka, Y.; Heki, H.; Nakamaru, M.; Hoshi, T.

    2006-01-01

    The reactor concept considered in this paper has a mid/small power output, a compact containment and a simplified BWR configuration with comprehensive safety features. Compact Containment BWR (CCR) is being developed with matured BWR technologies together with innovative systems/components, will provide attractiveness for the energy market in the world due to its flexibility in energy demands as well as in site conditions, its high potential in reducing investment risk and its safety feature facilitating public acceptance. The flexibility is achieved by CCR's mid/small power output of 400 MWe class and capability of long operating cycle (refueling intervals). The high investment potential is expected from CCR's simplification/innovation in design such as natural circulation core cooling with the bottom located short core, top mounted upper entry control rod drives (CRDs) with ring-type dryers and simplified safety system with high pressure resistible primary containment vessel (PCV) concept. The natural circulation core eliminates recirculation pumps as well as needs for maintenance of such pumps. The top mounted upper entry CRDs enable the bottom located short core in RPV. The safety feature mainly consists of large water inventory above the core without large penetration below the top of the core, passive cooling system by isolation condenser (IC), high pressure resistible PCV and in-vessel retention (IVR) capability. The large inventory increases the system response time in case of design base accidents including loss of coolant accidents. The IC suppresses PCV pressure by steam condensation without any AC power. Cooling the molten core inside the RPV if the core should be damaged by loss of core coolability could attain the IVR. CCR's specific self-standing steel high pressure resistible PCV is designed to contain minimum piping and valves inside with reactor pressure vessel (RPV), only 13 m in diameter and 24 m in height. This compact PCV makes it possible to

  11. Transient two-phase flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hsu, Y.Y.

    1974-01-01

    The following papers related to two-phase flow are summarized: current assumptions made in two-phase flow modeling; two-phase unsteady blowdown from pipes, flow pattern in Laval nozzle and two-phase flow dynamics; dependence of radial heat and momentum diffusion; transient behavior of the liquid film around the expanding gas slug in a vertical tube; flooding phenomena in BWR fuel bundles; and transient effects in bubble two-phase flow. (U.S.)

  12. Development status of compact containment BWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heki, H.; Nakamaru, M.; Mori, H.; Sekiguchi, K.; Kuroki, M.; Arai, K.; Hida, T.

    2005-01-01

    In Japan, increase of nuclear plant unit capacity has been promoted to take advantage of economies of scale while further enhancing safety and reliability. As a result, more than 50 units of nuclear power plants are playing important role in electric power generation. However, the factors, such as stagnant growth in the recent electricity demand, limitation in electricity grid capacity and limited in initial investment avoiding risk, will not be in favor of large plant outputs. The reactor concept considered in this paper has a small power output, a compact containment and a simplified BWR configuration with comprehensive safety features. The Compact Containment Boiling Water Reactor (CCR), which is being developed with matured BWR technologies together with innovative systems/components, will provide attractiveness for the energy market in the world due to its flexibility in energy demands as well as in site conditions, its high potential in reducing investment risk and its safety feature facilitating public acceptance. The flexibility is achieved by CCR's mid/small power output of 400 MWe class and capability of long operating cycle (refueling intervals). The high investment potential is expected from CCR's simplification/innovation in design such as natural circulation core cooling with the bottom located short core, top mounted upper entry control rod drives (CRDs) with ring-type dryers and simplified ECCS system with high pressure resistible primary containment vessel (PCV) concept. The natural circulation core eliminates recirculation pumps as well as needs for maintenance of such pumps. The top mounted upper entry CRDs enable the bottom located short core in RPV. The safety feature mainly consists of large water inventory above the core without large penetration below the top of the core, passive cooling system by isolation condenser (IC), high pressure resistible PCV and in-vessel retention (IVR) capability. The large inventory increases the system response

  13. Status update of the BWR cask simulator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lindgren, Eric R. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Durbin, Samuel G. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-09-01

    The performance of commercial nuclear spent fuel dry storage casks are typically evaluated through detailed numerical analysis of the system's thermal performance. These modeling efforts are performed by the vendor to demonstrate the performance and regulatory compliance and are independently verified by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). Carefully measured data sets generated from testing of full sized casks or smaller cask analogs are widely recognized as vital for validating these models. Numerous studies have been previously conducted. Recent advances in dry storage cask designs have moved the storage location from above ground to below ground and significantly increased the maximum thermal load allowed in a cask in part by increasing the canister helium pressure. Previous cask performance validation testing did not capture these parameters. The purpose of the investigation described in this report is to produce a data set that can be used to test the validity of the assumptions associated with the calculations presently used to determine steady-state cladding temperatures in modern dry casks. These modern cask designs utilize elevated helium pressure in the sealed canister or are intended for subsurface storage. The BWR cask simulator (BCS) has been designed in detail for both the above ground and below ground venting configurations. The pressure vessel representing the canister has been designed, fabricated, and pressure tested for a maximum allowable pressure (MAWP) rating of 24 bar at 400 C. An existing electrically heated but otherwise prototypic BWR Incoloy-clad test assembly is being deployed inside of a representative storage basket and cylindrical pressure vessel that represents the canister. The symmetric single assembly geometry with well-controlled boundary conditions simplifies interpretation of results. Various configurations of outer concentric ducting will be used to mimic conditions for above and below ground storage configurations

  14. An analysis of transients in the PWR downcomer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jovanovic, A.

    1981-01-01

    The paper deals with the problem of determining non-stationary temperature field in the downcomer of a PWR type reactor. For this purpose, an analytical model has been developed. The model covers five components of (PWR - Krsko) downcomer: the core-barrel, floor between the core-barrel and the thermal shield, the thermal shield, flow between the thermal shield and the reactor vessel wall, the reactor vessel wall. The model includes internal heat generation in metal structures. The governing equations of the model have been written in the finite difference explicit form. The system of resulting algebraic equations was solved bu Gauss-Seidel method, using a modular computer code. Several characteristic transients were examined (step and continuous change of fluid temperature at the inlet nozzle). Also, an analysis of main parameters (heat transfer coefficient and flow rate) has been performed. The model is intended to be used as basics for further development of a more realistic model that could be used for practical safety analysis. (author)

  15. Lumped-parameter modeling of PWR downcomer and pressurizer for LOCA conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rohatgi, U.S.; Saha, P.; Dubow, A.A.

    1978-01-01

    Two lumped-parameter models, one for a PWR downcomer and the other for a pressurizer, are presented. The models are based on the transient, nonhomogeneous, drift-flux description of two-phase flow, and are suitable for simulating a hypothetical LOCA condition. Effects of thermal nonequilibrium are incorporated in the downcomer model, whereas the pressurizer model can track the interfaces among various flow regimes. Semiimplicit numerical schemes are used for solution. Encouraging results have been obtained for both the models. (author)

  16. Completion of high-efficiency BWR turbine plant 'Hamaoka unit No. 4'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsuji, Kunio; Hamaura, Norikazu; Shibashita, Naoaki; Kazama, Seiichi

    1995-01-01

    Accompanying the increase of capacity of nuclear power plants in Japan, the plants having heightened economical efficiency, which are supported by the improvement of thermal efficiency and the reduction of dose, are demanded. Hitachi Ltd. has completed No. 4 turbine unit of 1137 MW output in Hamaoka Nuclear Power Station, Chubu Electric Power Co., Inc., which is the largest capacity machine in Japanese BWR plants. In this unit, the moisture separator heater, the steam turbine with high efficiency, and the hollow thread film condensate filter which treats the total flow rate of condensate are used as the reheating type BWR plant for the first time in Japan, and the plan of heightened economy and operation was adopted. It was confirmed by the trial for about 10 months that the planned performance was sufficiently satisfied, and the commercial operation was started in September, 1993. The features of the 1137 MW turbine unit are explained. The turbine is of tandem six-flow exhaust condensation type. Diffuser type low pressure turbine exhaust chambers, butterfly type combination intermediate valve are adopted. The stages with the blades having moisture-separating grooves were corrected. The reliability of the shaft system was improved. The adoption of the moisture separator heater and the application of the hollow thread film type condensate filter are explained. (K.I.)

  17. BWR stability: analysis of cladding temperature for high amplitude oscillations - 146

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pohl, P.; Wehle, F.

    2010-01-01

    Power oscillations associated with density waves in boiling water reactors (BWRs) have been studied widely. Industrial research in this area is active since the invention of the first BWR. Stability measurements have been performed in various plants during commissioning phase but especially the magnitude and divergent nature of the oscillations during the LaSalle Unit 2 nuclear power plant event on March 9, 1988, renewed concern about the state of knowledge on BWR instabilities and possible consequences to fuel rod integrity. The objective of this paper is to present a simplified stability tool, applicable for stability analysis in the non-linear regime, which extends to high amplitude oscillations where inlet reverse flow occurs. In case of high amplitude oscillations a cyclical dryout and rewetting process at the fuel rod may take place, which leads in turn to rapid changes of the heat transfer from the fuel rod to the coolant. The application of this stability tool allows for a conservative determination of the fuel rod cladding temperature in case of high amplitude oscillations during the dryout / re-wet phase. Moreover, it reveals in good agreement to experimental findings the stabilizing effect of the reverse bundle inlet flow, which might be obtained for large oscillation amplitudes. (authors)

  18. Heat transfer and fluid flow in nuclear systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fenech, H.

    1981-01-01

    The present publication is an attempt to provide a bridge between fundamental principles and current design practice. It is intended to serve the need of: engineers, scientists and graduate students active in thermal and hydraulics problems and to those interested to keep abreast of the field. The text is addressed to readers with previous knowledge in heat transfer and fluid flow equvalent to a one year university graduate course in that field. Because of the high degree of specialization covered in the six chapters of the book, individual authors of international reputation and active in their respective area of specialization were selected to contribute their knowledge. Each of the six chapters or sub-chapters are self-contained. They are followed by problem sets to enable the reader to check his level of comprehension of the material presented. The nuclear systems covered in separate chapters include: the pressurized and boiling water reactors (PWR, BWR), the helium cooled high temperature reactors (HTGR and HTR), the breeders helium cooled (GCFR) and sodium cooled (LMFBR). In addition the heat-exchangers and steam generators commonly associated with the above systems are covered in Chapter 6

  19. PWR vessel flaw distribution development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosinski, S.T.; Kennedy, E.L.; Foulds, J.R.; Kinsman, K.M.

    1990-01-01

    This paper reports on PWR pressure vessels which operate under NRC rules and regulatory guides intended to prevent failure of the vessels. Plants failing to meet the operating criteria specified under these rules and regulations are required to analytically demonstrate fitness for service in order to continue operation. The initial flaw size or distribution of initial vessel flaws is a key input to the required vessel integrity analyses. However, the flaw distribution assumed in the development of the NRC Regulations and recommended for the plant specific analyses is potentially over-conservative. This is because the distribution is based on the limited amount of vessel inspection data available at the time the criteria were being developed and does not take full advantage of the more recent and reliable domestic vessel inspection results. The U.S. Department of Energy is funding an effort through Sandia National Laboratories to investigate the possibility of developing a new flaw distribution based on the increased amount and improved reliability of domestic vessel inspection data. Results of Phase I of the program indicate that state-of-the-art NDE systems' capabilities are sufficient for development of a new flaw distribution that could ultimately provide life extension benefits over the presently required operating practice

  20. PWR secondary water chemistry study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pearl, W.L.; Sawochka, S.G.

    1977-02-01

    Several types of corrosion damage are currently chronic problems in PWR recirculating steam generators. One probable cause of damage is a local high concentration of an aggressive chemical even though only trace levels are present in feedwater. A wide variety of trace chemicals can find their way into feedwater, depending on the sources of condenser cooling water and the specific feedwater treatment. In February 1975, Nuclear Water and Waste Technology Corporation (NWT), was contracted to characterize secondary system water chemistry at five operating PWRs. Plants were selected to allow effects of cooling water chemistry and operating history on steam generator corrosion to be evaluated. Calvert Cliffs 1, Prairie Island 1 and 2, Surry 2, and Turkey Point 4 were monitored during the program. Results to date in the following areas are summarized: (1) plant chemistry variations during normal operation, transients, and shutdowns; (2) effects of condenser leakage on steam generator chemistry; (3) corrosion product transport during all phases of operation; (4) analytical prediction of chemistry in local areas from bulk water chemistry measurements; and (5) correlation of corrosion damage to chemistry variation