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Sample records for flow augments reactivity

  1. Upscaling of reactive flows

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kumar, K.

    2012-01-01

    The thesis deals with the upscaling of reactive flows in complex geometry. The reactions which may include deposition or dissolution take place at a part of the boundary and depending on the size of the reaction domain, the changes in the pore structure that are due to the deposition process may or

  2. Flow interaction of diffuser augmented wind turbines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Göltenbott, U.; Ohya, Y.; Yoshida, S.; Jamieson, P.

    2016-09-01

    Up-scaling of wind turbines has been a major trend in order to reduce the cost of energy generation from the wind. Recent studies however show that for a given technology, the cost always rises with upscaling, notably due to the increased mass of the system. To reach capacities beyond 10 MW, multi-rotor systems (MRS) have promising advantages. On the other hand, diffuser augmented wind turbines (DAWTs) can significantly increase the performance of the rotor. Up to now, diffuser augmentation has only been applied to single small wind turbines. In the present research, DAWTs are used in a multi-rotor system. In wind tunnel experiments, the aerodynamics of two and three DAWTs, spaced in close vicinity in the same plane normal to a uniform flow, have been analysed. Power increases of up to 5% and 9% for the two and three rotor configurations are respectively achieved in comparison to a stand-alone turbine. The physical dynamics of the flows are analysed on the basis of the results obtained with a stand-alone turbine.

  3. Modeling and simulation of reactive flows

    CERN Document Server

    Bortoli, De AL; Pereira, Felipe

    2015-01-01

    Modelling and Simulation of Reactive Flows presents information on modeling and how to numerically solve reactive flows. The book offers a distinctive approach that combines diffusion flames and geochemical flow problems, providing users with a comprehensive resource that bridges the gap for scientists, engineers, and the industry. Specifically, the book looks at the basic concepts related to reaction rates, chemical kinetics, and the development of reduced kinetic mechanisms. It considers the most common methods used in practical situations, along with equations for reactive flows, and va

  4. PDF methods for turbulent reactive flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Andrew T.

    1995-01-01

    Viewgraphs are presented on computation of turbulent combustion, governing equations, closure problem, PDF modeling of turbulent reactive flows, validation cases, current projects, and collaboration with industry and technology transfer.

  5. Generalized Riemann problem for reactive flows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ben-Artzi, M.

    1989-01-01

    A generalized Riemann problem is introduced for the equations of reactive non-viscous compressible flow in one space dimension. Initial data are assumed to be linearly distributed on both sides of a jump discontinuity. The resolution of the singularity is studied and the first-order variation (in time) of flow variables is given in exact form. copyright 1989 Academic Press, Inc

  6. Mean Flow Augmented Acoustics in Rocket Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischbach, Sean R.

    2014-01-01

    Oscillatory motion in solid rocket motors and liquid engines has long been a subject of concern. Many rockets display violent fluctuations in pressure, velocity, and temperature originating from the complex interactions between the combustion process and gas dynamics. The customary approach to modeling acoustic waves inside a rocket chamber is to apply the classical inhomogeneous wave equation to the combustion gas. The assumption of a linear, non-dissipative wave in a quiescent fluid remains valid while the acoustic amplitudes are small and local gas velocities stay below Mach 0.2. The converging section of a rocket nozzle, where gradients in pressure, density, and velocity become large, is a notable region where this approach is not applicable. The expulsion of unsteady energy through the nozzle of a rocket is identified as the predominate source of acoustic damping for most rocket systems. An accurate model of the acoustic behavior within this region where acoustic modes are influenced by the presence of a steady mean flow is required for reliable stability predictions. Recently, an approach to address nozzle damping with mean flow effects was implemented by French [1]. This new approach extends the work originated by Sigman and Zinn [2] by solving the acoustic velocity potential equation (AVPE) formulated by perturbing the Euler equations [3]. The acoustic velocity potential (psi) describing the acoustic wave motion in the presence of an inhomogeneous steady high-speed flow is defined by, (del squared)(psi) - (lambda/c)(exp 2)(psi) - M(dot)[M(dot)(del)(del(psi))] - 2(lambda(M/c) + (M(dot)del(M))(dot)del(psi)-2(lambda)(psi)[M(dot)del(1/c)]=0 (1) with M as the Mach vector, c as the speed of sound, and lambda as the complex eigenvalue. French apply the finite volume method to solve the steady flow field within the combustion chamber and nozzle with inviscid walls. The complex eigenvalues and eigenvector are determined with the use of the ARPACK eigensolver. The

  7. Aerodynamic structures and processes in rotationally augmented flow fields

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schreck, S.J.; Sørensen, Niels N.; Robinson, M.C.

    2007-01-01

    . Experimental measurements consisted of surface pressure data statistics used to infer sectional boundary layer state and to quantify normal force levels. Computed predictions included high-resolution boundary layer topologies and detailed above-surface flow field structures. This synergy was exploited...... to reliably identify and track pertinent features in the rotating blade boundary layer topology as they evolved in response to varying wind speed. Subsequently, boundary layer state was linked to above-surface flow field structure and used to deduce mechanisms; underlying augmented aerodynamic force...

  8. Augmentation of forced flow boiling heat transfer by introducing air flow into subcooled water flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koizumi, Y.; Ohtake, H.; Yuasa, T.; Matsushita, N.

    2001-01-01

    The effect of air injection into a subcooled water flow on boiling heat transfer and a critical heat flux (CHF) was examined experimentally. Experiments were conducted in the range of subcooling of 50 K, a superficial velocity of water and air Ul = 0.17 ∼ 3.4 and Ug = 0 ∼ 15 m/s, respectively. A test heat transfer surface was a 5 mm wide, 40 mm long and 0.5 mm thick stainless steel sheet embedded on the bottom wall of a 10 mm high and 20 mm wide rectangular flow channel. Nine times enhancement of the heat transfer coefficient in the non-boiling region was attained at the most by introducing an air flow into a water single-phase flow. The heat transfer improvement was prominent when the water flow rate was low and the air introduction was large. The present results of the non-boiling heat transfer were well correlated with the Lockhart-Martinelli parameter X tt ; h TP /h L0 = 5.0(1/ X tt ) 0.5 . The air introduction has some effect on the augmentation of heat transfer in the boiling region, however, the two-phase flow effect was little and the boiling was dominant in the fully developed boiling region. The CHF was improved a little by the air introduction in the high water flow region. However, that was rather greatly reduced in the low flow region. Even so, the general trend by the air introduction was that qCHF increased as the air introduction was increased. The heat transfer augmentation in the non-boiling region was attained by less power increase than that in the case that only the water flow rate was increased. From the aspect of the power consumption and the heat transfer enhancement, the small air introduction in the low water flow rate region seemed more profitable, although the air introduction in the high water flow rate region and also the large air introduction were still effective in the augmentation of the heat transfer in the non-boiling region. (author)

  9. Ankle brachial index, C-reactive protein, and central augmentation index to identify individuals with severe atherosclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eldrup, Nikolaj; Sillesen, Henrik; Prescott, Eva

    2006-01-01

    We examined the ability of ankle brachial index, C-reactive protein and central augmentation index to identify individuals in the general population with severe atherosclerosis, diagnosed as those with ischaemic cardiovascular disease.......We examined the ability of ankle brachial index, C-reactive protein and central augmentation index to identify individuals in the general population with severe atherosclerosis, diagnosed as those with ischaemic cardiovascular disease....

  10. Carbohydrate Mimetic Peptides Augment Carbohydrate-Reactive Immune Responses in the Absence of Immune Pathology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hennings, Leah; Artaud, Cecile; Jousheghany, Fariba; Monzavi-Karbassi, Behjatolah; Pashov, Anastas; Kieber-Emmons, Thomas, E-mail: tke@uams.edu [Winthrop P. Rockefeller Cancer Institute and Department of Pathology, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Little Rock, AR 72205 (United States)

    2011-11-11

    Among the most challenging of clinical targets for cancer immunotherapy are Tumor Associated Carbohydrate Antigens (TACAs). To augment immune responses to TACA we are developing carbohydrate mimetic peptides (CMPs) that are sufficiently potent to activate broad-spectrum anti-tumor reactivity. However, the activation of immune responses against terminal mono- and disaccharide constituents of TACA raises concerns regarding the balance between “tumor destruction” and “tissue damage”, as mono- and disaccharides are also expressed on normal tissue. To support the development of CMPs for clinical trial testing, we demonstrate in preclinical safety assessment studies in mice that vaccination with CMPs can enhance responses to TACAs without mediating tissue damage to normal cells expressing TACA. BALB/c mice were immunized with CMPs that mimic TACAs reactive with Griffonia simplicifolia lectin 1 (GS-I), and tissue reactivity of serum antibodies were compared with the tissue staining profile of GS-I. Tissues from CMP immunized mice were analyzed using hematoxylin and eosin stain, and Luxol-fast blue staining for myelination. Western blots of membranes from murine mammary 4T1 cells, syngeneic with BALB/c mice, were also compared using GS-I, immunized serum antibodies, and naive serum antibodies. CMP immunization enhanced glycan reactivities with no evidence of pathological autoimmunity in any immunized mice demonstrating that tissue damage is not an inevitable consequence of TACA reactive responses.

  11. Carbohydrate Mimetic Peptides Augment Carbohydrate-Reactive Immune Responses in the Absence of Immune Pathology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hennings, Leah; Artaud, Cecile; Jousheghany, Fariba; Monzavi-Karbassi, Behjatolah; Pashov, Anastas; Kieber-Emmons, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    Among the most challenging of clinical targets for cancer immunotherapy are Tumor Associated Carbohydrate Antigens (TACAs). To augment immune responses to TACA we are developing carbohydrate mimetic peptides (CMPs) that are sufficiently potent to activate broad-spectrum anti-tumor reactivity. However, the activation of immune responses against terminal mono- and disaccharide constituents of TACA raises concerns regarding the balance between “tumor destruction” and “tissue damage”, as mono- and disaccharides are also expressed on normal tissue. To support the development of CMPs for clinical trial testing, we demonstrate in preclinical safety assessment studies in mice that vaccination with CMPs can enhance responses to TACAs without mediating tissue damage to normal cells expressing TACA. BALB/c mice were immunized with CMPs that mimic TACAs reactive with Griffonia simplicifolia lectin 1 (GS-I), and tissue reactivity of serum antibodies were compared with the tissue staining profile of GS-I. Tissues from CMP immunized mice were analyzed using hematoxylin and eosin stain, and Luxol-fast blue staining for myelination. Western blots of membranes from murine mammary 4T1 cells, syngeneic with BALB/c mice, were also compared using GS-I, immunized serum antibodies, and naive serum antibodies. CMP immunization enhanced glycan reactivities with no evidence of pathological autoimmunity in any immunized mice demonstrating that tissue damage is not an inevitable consequence of TACA reactive responses

  12. Augmented Lagrangian for shallow viscoplastic flow with topography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ionescu, Ioan R.

    2013-06-01

    In this paper we have developed a robust numerical algorithm for the visco-plastic Saint-Venant model with topography. For the time discretization an implicit (backward) Euler scheme was used. To solve the resulting nonlinear equations, a four steps iterative algorithm was proposed. To handle the non-differentiability of the plastic terms an iterative decomposition-coordination formulation coupled with the augmented Lagrangian method was adopted. The proposed algorithm is consistent, i.e. if the convergence is achieved then the iterative solution satisfies the nonlinear system at each time iteration. The equations for the velocity field are discretized using the finite element method, while a discontinuous Galerkin method, with an upwind choice of the flux, is adopted for solving the hyperbolic equations that describe the evolution of the thickness. The algorithm permits to solve alternatively, at each iteration, the equations for the velocity field and for the thickness. The iterative decomposition coordination formulation coupled with the augmented Lagrangian method works very well and no instabilities are present. The proposed algorithm has a very good convergence rate, with the exception of large Reynolds numbers (Re≫1000), not involved in the applications concerned by the shallow viscoplastic model. The discontinuous Galerkin technique assure the mass conservation of the shallow system. The model has the exact C-property for a plane bottom and an asymptotic C-property for a general topography. Some boundary value problems were selected to analyze the robustness of the numerical algorithm and the predictive capabilities of the mechanical model. The comparison with an exact rigid flow solution illustrates the accuracy of the numerical scheme in handling the non-differentiability of the plastic terms. The influence of the mesh and of the time step are investigated for the flow of a Bingham fluid in a talweg. The role of the material cohesion in stopping a

  13. 6th International Workshop on Model Reduction in Reactive Flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-01-01

    reduction in reacting flow . Registration DateRegistration TypeFirst Name Middle NameLast Name Affiliation US State /Canadian ProvinceState/Province/R gion...Report: 6th International Workshop on Model Reduction in Reactive Flow The views, opinions and/or findings contained in this report are those of the...Agreement Number: W911NF-17-1-0121 Organization: Princeton University Title: 6th International Workshop on Model Reduction in Reactive Flow Report Term

  14. Modeling of flow and reactive transport in IPARS

    KAUST Repository

    Wheeler, Mary Fanett; Sun, Shuyu; Thomas, Sunil G.

    2012-01-01

    In this work, we describe a number of efficient and locally conservative methods for subsurface flow and reactive transport that have been or are currently being implemented in the IPARS (Integrated Parallel and Accurate Reservoir Simulator

  15. Hot gas flow cell for optical measurements on reactive gases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grosch, Helge; Fateev, Alexander; Nielsen, Karsten Lindorff

    2013-01-01

    A new design is presented for a gas flow cell for reactive gases at high temperatures. The design features three heated sections that are separated by flow windows. This design avoids the contact of reactive gases with the material of the exchangeable optical windows. A gas cell with this design ......-resolution measurements are presented for the absorption cross-section of sulfur dioxide (SO2) in the UV range up to 773 K (500 degrees C)...

  16. On Variable Reverse Power Flow-Part I: Active-Reactive Optimal Power Flow with Reactive Power of Wind Stations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aouss Gabash

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available It has recently been shown that using battery storage systems (BSSs to provide reactive power provision in a medium-voltage (MV active distribution network (ADN with embedded wind stations (WSs can lead to a huge amount of reverse power to an upstream transmission network (TN. However, unity power factors (PFs of WSs were assumed in those studies to analyze the potential of BSSs. Therefore, in this paper (Part-I, we aim to further explore the pure reactive power potential of WSs (i.e., without BSSs by investigating the issue of variable reverse power flow under different limits on PFs in an electricity market model. The main contributions of this work are summarized as follows: (1 Introducing the reactive power capability of WSs in the optimization model of the active-reactive optimal power flow (A-R-OPF and highlighting the benefits/impacts under different limits on PFs. (2 Investigating the impacts of different agreements for variable reverse power flow on the operation of an ADN under different demand scenarios. (3 Derivation of the function of reactive energy losses in the grid with an equivalent-π circuit and comparing its value with active energy losses. (4 Balancing the energy curtailment of wind generation, active-reactive energy losses in the grid and active-reactive energy import-export by a meter-based method. In Part-II, the potential of the developed model is studied through analyzing an electricity market model and a 41-bus network with different locations of WSs.

  17. Modeling of flow and reactive transport in IPARS

    KAUST Repository

    Wheeler, Mary Fanett

    2012-03-11

    In this work, we describe a number of efficient and locally conservative methods for subsurface flow and reactive transport that have been or are currently being implemented in the IPARS (Integrated Parallel and Accurate Reservoir Simulator). For flow problems, we consider discontinuous Galerkin (DG) methods and mortar mixed finite element methods. For transport problems, we employ discontinuous Galerkin methods and Godunov-mixed methods. For efficient treatment of reactive transport simulations, we present a number of state-of-the-art dynamic mesh adaptation strategies and implementations. Operator splitting approaches and iterative coupling techniques are also discussed. Finally, numerical examples are provided to illustrate the capability of IPARS to treat general biogeochemistry as well as the effectivity of mesh adaptations with DG for transport. © 2012 Bentham Science Publishers. All rights reserved.

  18. Augmentative effect of pulsatility on the wall shear stress in tube flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakata, M; Tatsumi, E; Tsukiya, T; Taenaka, Y; Nishimura, T; Nishinaka, T; Takano, H; Masuzawa, T; Ohba, K

    1999-08-01

    Wall shear stress (WSS) has been considered to play an important role in the physiological and metabolic functions of the vascular endothelial cells. We investigated the effects of the pulse rate and the maximum flow rate on the WSS to clarify the influence of pulsatility. Water was perfused in a 1/2 inch transparent straight cylinder with a nonpulsatile centrifugal pump and a pulsatile pneumatic ventricular assist device (VAD). In nonpulsatile flow (NF), the flow rate was changed 1 to 6 L/min by 1 L/min increments to obtain standard values of WSS at each flow rate. In pulsatile flow (PF), the pulse rate was controlled at 40, 60, and 80 bpm, and the maximum flow rate was varied from 3.3 to 12.0 L/min while the mean flow rate was kept at 3 L/min. The WSS was estimated from the velocity profile at measuring points using the laser illuminated fluorescence method. In NF, the WSS was 12.0 dyne/cm2 at 3 L/min and 33.0 dyne/cm2 at 6 L/min. In PF, the pulse rate change with the same mean, and the maximum flow rate did not affect WSS. On the other hand, the increase in the maximum flow rate at the constant mean flow rate of 3 L/min augmented the mean WSS from 13.1 to 32.9 dyne/cm2. We concluded that the maximum flow rate exerted a substantial augmentative effect on WSS, and the maximum flow rate was a dominant factor of pulsatility in this effect.

  19. Dissociative recombination in reactive flows related to planetary atmospheric entries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bultel Arnaud

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The Dissociative Recombination (DR processes play a significant role in plasma chemistry. This article illustrates this role from the modeling point of view in the case of reactive flows related to atmospheric entry plasmas. Two situations are investigated, for which the studied plasma is nitrogen. The first configuration corresponds to the relaxation process behind a strong shock wave moving at high Mach number in a shock tube, the second one to the recombination taking place in an expanding plasma flowing in a diverging nozzle. In both cases, the collisional-radiative model CoRaM-N2, involving N2, N, N2+, N+ and electrons, is implemented in an Eulerian 1D code able to compute the aerodynamic fields; calculations are performed in standard conditions. We show that, according to the rate coefficients used for the DR processes, the population density of the charged species especially N2+ is strongly modified only for the post-shock flow.

  20. Predictive model for convective flows induced by surface reactivity contrast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidson, Scott M.; Lammertink, Rob G. H.; Mani, Ali

    2018-05-01

    Concentration gradients in a fluid adjacent to a reactive surface due to contrast in surface reactivity generate convective flows. These flows result from contributions by electro- and diffusio-osmotic phenomena. In this study, we have analyzed reactive patterns that release and consume protons, analogous to bimetallic catalytic conversion of peroxide. Similar systems have typically been studied using either scaling analysis to predict trends or costly numerical simulation. Here, we present a simple analytical model, bridging the gap in quantitative understanding between scaling relations and simulations, to predict the induced potentials and consequent velocities in such systems without the use of any fitting parameters. Our model is tested against direct numerical solutions to the coupled Poisson, Nernst-Planck, and Stokes equations. Predicted slip velocities from the model and simulations agree to within a factor of ≈2 over a multiple order-of-magnitude change in the input parameters. Our analysis can be used to predict enhancement of mass transport and the resulting impact on overall catalytic conversion, and is also applicable to predicting the speed of catalytic nanomotors.

  1. Stability Analysis of Reactive Multiphase Slug Flows in Microchannels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alejandro A. Munera Parra

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Conducting multiphase reactions in micro-reactors is a promising strategy for intensifying chemical and biochemical processes. A major unresolved challenge is to exploit the considerable benefits offered by micro-scale operation for industrial scale throughputs by numbering-up whilst retaining the underlying advantageous flow characteristics of the single channel system in multiple parallel channels. Fabrication and installation tolerances in the individual micro-channels result in different pressure losses and, thus, a fluid maldistribution. In this work, an additional source of maldistribution, namely the flow multiplicities, which can arise in a multiphase reactive or extractive flow in otherwise identical micro-channels, was investigated. A detailed experimental and theoretical analysis of the flow stability with and without reaction for both gas-liquid and liquid-liquid slug flow has been developed. The model has been validated using the extraction of acetic acid from n-heptane with the ionic liquid 1-Ethyl-3-methylimidazolium ethyl sulfate. The results clearly demonstrate that the coupling between flow structure, the extent of reaction/extraction and pressure drop can result in multiple operating states, thus, necessitating an active measurement and control concept to ensure uniform behavior and optimal performance.

  2. An efficient unstructured WENO method for supersonic reactive flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Wen-Geng; Zheng, Hong-Wei; Liu, Feng-Jun; Shi, Xiao-Tian; Gao, Jun; Hu, Ning; Lv, Meng; Chen, Si-Cong; Zhao, Hong-Da

    2018-03-01

    An efficient high-order numerical method for supersonic reactive flows is proposed in this article. The reactive source term and convection term are solved separately by splitting scheme. In the reaction step, an adaptive time-step method is presented, which can improve the efficiency greatly. In the convection step, a third-order accurate weighted essentially non-oscillatory (WENO) method is adopted to reconstruct the solution in the unstructured grids. Numerical results show that our new method can capture the correct propagation speed of the detonation wave exactly even in coarse grids, while high order accuracy can be achieved in the smooth region. In addition, the proposed adaptive splitting method can reduce the computational cost greatly compared with the traditional splitting method.

  3. An evaluation of the effectiveness of flow augmentation in the Snake River, 1991-1995. Phase 1: Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giorgi, A.E.; Schlecte, J.W.

    1997-07-01

    The purpose of this evaluation was to estimate the volume and shape of flow augmentation water delivered in the Snake Basin during the years 1991 through 1995, and to assess the biological consequences to ESA-listed salmon stocks in that drainage. HDR Engineering, Inc. calculated flow augmentation estimates and compared their values to those reported by agencies in the Northwest. BioAnalysts, Inc. conducted the biological evaluation

  4. Pressure sensitivity of flow oscillations in postocclusive reactive skin hyperemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strucl, M; Peterec, D; Finderle, Z; Maver, J

    1994-05-01

    Skin blood flow was monitored using a laser-Doppler (LD) flowmeter in 21 healthy volunteers after an occlusion of the digital arteries. The peripheral vascular bed was exposed to occlusion ischemia of varying duration (1, 4, or 8 min) and to a change in digital arterial pressure produced by different positions of the arm above heart level to characterize the pattern of LD flow oscillations in postocclusive reactive hyperemia (PRH) and to elucidate the relevance of metabolic and myogenic mechanisms in governing its fundamental frequency. The descending part of the hyperemic flow was characterized by the appearance of conspicuous periodic oscillations with a mean fundamental frequency of 7.2 +/- 1.5 cycles/min (SD, n = 9), as assessed by a Fourier transform frequency analysis of 50-s sections of flow. The mean respiratory frequency during the periods of flow frequency analysis was 17.0 +/- 2.2 (SD, n = 9), and the PRH oscillations remained during apnea in all tested subjects. The area under the maximum flow curve increased significantly with prolongation of the occlusion (paired t test, P blood pressure in the digital arteries, which suggests the predominant role of a metabolic component in this part of the PRH response. In contrast, the fundamental frequency of PRH oscillations exhibited a significant decrease with a reduction in the estimated digital arterial pressure (linear regression, b = 0.08, P < 0.001; n = 12), but did not change with the prolongation of arterial occlusion despite a significant increase in mean LD flow (paired t test, P < 0.001; n = 9).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  5. Modeling dynamic stall on wind turbine blades under rotationally augmented flow fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guntur, S. [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Schreck, S. [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Sorensen, N. N. [Technical Univ. of Denmark, Lyngby (Denmark); Bergami, L. [Technical Univ. of Denmark, Lyngby (Denmark)

    2015-04-22

    It is well known that airfoils under unsteady flow conditions with a periodically varying angle of attack exhibit aerodynamic characteristics different from those under steady flow conditions, a phenomenon commonly known as dynamic stall. It is also well known that the steady aerodynamic characteristics of airfoils in the inboard region of a rotating blade differ from those under steady two-dimensional (2D) flow conditions, a phenomenon commonly known as rotational augmentation. This paper presents an investigation of these two phenomena together in the inboard parts of wind turbine blades. This analysis is carried out using data from three sources: (1) the National Renewable Energy Laboratory’s Unsteady Aerodynamics Experiment Phase VI experimental data, including constant as well as continuously pitching blade conditions during axial operation, (2) data from unsteady Delayed Detached Eddy Simulations (DDES) carried out using the Technical University of Denmark’s in-house flow solver Ellipsys3D, and (3) data from a simplified model based on the blade element momentum method with a dynamic stall subroutine that uses rotationally augmented steady-state polars obtained from steady Phase VI experimental sequences, instead of the traditional 2D nonrotating data. The aim of this work is twofold. First, the blade loads estimated by the DDES simulations are compared to three select cases of the N sequence experimental data, which serves as a validation of the DDES method. Results show reasonable agreement between the two data in two out of three cases studied. Second, the dynamic time series of the lift and the moment polars obtained from the experiments are compared to those from the dynamic stall subroutine that uses the rotationally augmented steady polars. This allowed the differences between the stall phenomenon on the inboard parts of harmonically pitching blades on a rotating wind turbine and the classic dynamic stall representation in 2D flow to be

  6. Augmentation of Muscle Blood Flow by Ultrasound Cavitation Is Mediated by ATP and Purinergic Signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belcik, J Todd; Davidson, Brian P; Xie, Aris; Wu, Melinda D; Yadava, Mrinal; Qi, Yue; Liang, Sherry; Chon, Chae Ryung; Ammi, Azzdine Y; Field, Joshua; Harmann, Leanne; Chilian, William M; Linden, Joel; Lindner, Jonathan R

    2017-03-28

    Augmentation of tissue blood flow by therapeutic ultrasound is thought to rely on convective shear. Microbubble contrast agents that undergo ultrasound-mediated cavitation markedly amplify these effects. We hypothesized that purinergic signaling is responsible for shear-dependent increases in muscle perfusion during therapeutic cavitation. Unilateral exposure of the proximal hindlimb of mice (with or without ischemia produced by iliac ligation) to therapeutic ultrasound (1.3 MHz, mechanical index 1.3) was performed for 10 minutes after intravenous injection of 2×10 8 lipid microbubbles. Microvascular perfusion was evaluated by low-power contrast ultrasound perfusion imaging. In vivo muscle ATP release and in vitro ATP release from endothelial cells or erythrocytes were assessed by a luciferin-luciferase assay. Purinergic signaling pathways were assessed by studying interventions that (1) accelerated ATP degradation; (2) inhibited P2Y receptors, adenosine receptors, or K ATP channels; or (3) inhibited downstream signaling pathways involving endothelial nitric oxide synthase or prostanoid production (indomethacin). Augmentation in muscle perfusion by ultrasound cavitation was assessed in a proof-of-concept clinical trial in 12 subjects with stable sickle cell disease. Therapeutic ultrasound cavitation increased muscle perfusion by 7-fold in normal mice, reversed tissue ischemia for up to 24 hours in the murine model of peripheral artery disease, and doubled muscle perfusion in patients with sickle cell disease. Augmentation in flow extended well beyond the region of ultrasound exposure. Ultrasound cavitation produced an ≈40-fold focal and sustained increase in ATP, the source of which included both endothelial cells and erythrocytes. Inhibitory studies indicated that ATP was a critical mediator of flow augmentation that acts primarily through either P2Y receptors or adenosine produced by ectonucleotidase activity. Combined indomethacin and inhibition of

  7. Augmented Lagrangian Method and Compressible Visco-plastic Flows: Applications to Shallow Dense Avalanches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bresch, D.; Fernández-Nieto, E. D.; Ionescu, I. R.; Vigneaux, P.

    In this paper we propose a well-balanced finite volume/augmented Lagrangian method for compressible visco-plastic models focusing on a compressible Bingham type system with applications to dense avalanches. For the sake of completeness we also present a method showing that such a system may be derived for a shallow flow of a rigid-viscoplastic incompressible fluid, namely for incompressible Bingham type fluid with free surface. When the fluid is relatively shallow and spreads slowly, lubrication-style asymptotic approximations can be used to build reduced models for the spreading dynamics, see for instance [N.J. Balmforth et al., J. Fluid Mech (2002)]. When the motion is a little bit quicker, shallow water theory for non-Newtonian flows may be applied, for instance assuming a Navier type boundary condition at the bottom. We start from the variational inequality for an incompressible Bingham fluid and derive a shallow water type system. In the case where Bingham number and viscosity are set to zero we obtain the classical Shallow Water or Saint-Venant equations obtained for instance in [J.F. Gerbeau, B. Perthame, DCDS (2001)]. For numerical purposes, we focus on the one-dimensional in space model: We study associated static solutions with sufficient conditions that relate the slope of the bottom with the Bingham number and domain dimensions. We also propose a well-balanced finite volume/augmented Lagrangian method. It combines well-balanced finite volume schemes for spatial discretization with the augmented Lagrangian method to treat the associated optimization problem. Finally, we present various numerical tests.

  8. Modeling dynamic stall on wind turbine blades under rotationally augmented flow fields

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guntur, Srinivas; Sørensen, Niels N.; Schreck, Scott

    2016-01-01

    a reduced order dynamic stall model that uses rotationally augmented steady-state polars obtained from steady Phase VI experimental sequences, instead of the traditional two-dimensional, non-rotating data. The aim of this work is twofold. First, the blade loads estimated by the DDES simulations are compared...... Experiment Phase VI experimental data, including constant as well as continuously pitching blade conditions during axial operation; (2) data from unsteady delayed detached eddy simulations (DDES) carried out using the Technical University of Denmark’s in-house flow solver Ellipsys3D; and (3) data from...... with those from the dynamic stall model. This allowed the differences between the stall phenomenon on the inboard parts of harmonically pitching blades on a rotating wind turbine and the classic dynamic stall representation in two-dimensional flow to be investigated. Results indicated a good qualitative...

  9. Anxiety-induced plasma norepinephrine augmentation increases reactive oxygen species formation by monocytes in essential hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasunari, Kenichi; Matsui, Tokuzo; Maeda, Kensaku; Nakamura, Munehiro; Watanabe, Takanori; Kiriike, Nobuo

    2006-06-01

    An association between anxiety and depression and increased blood pressure (BP) and cardiovascular disease risk has not been firmly established. We examined the hypothesis that anxiety and depression lead to increased plasma catecholamines and to production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) by mononuclear cells (MNC) in hypertensive individuals. We also studied the role of BP in this effect. In Protocol 1, a cross-sectional study was performed in 146 hypertensive patients to evaluate whether anxiety and depression affect BP and ROS formation by MNC through increasing plasma catecholamines. In Protocol 2, a 6-month randomized controlled trial using a subtherapeutic dose of the alpha(1)-adrenergic receptor antagonist doxazosin (1 mg/day) versus placebo in 86 patients with essential hypertension was performed to determine whether the increase in ROS formation by MNC was independent of BP. In Protocol 1, a significant relationship was observed between the following: trait anxiety and plasma norepinephrine (r = 0.32, P anxiety may increase plasma norepinephrine and increase ROS formation by MNC independent of BP in hypertensive patients.

  10. Brachial Artery Flow-mediated Dilation Following Exercise with Augmented Oscillatory and Retrograde Shear Rate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johnson Blair D

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Acute doses of elevated retrograde shear rate (SR appear to be detrimental to endothelial function in resting humans. However, retrograde shear increases during moderate intensity exercise which also enhances post-exercise endothelial function. Since SR patterns differ with the modality of exercise, it is important to determine if augmented retrograde SR during exercise influences post-exercise endothelial function. This study tested the hypothesis that (1 increased doses of retrograde SR in the brachial artery during lower body supine cycle ergometer exercise would attenuate post-exercise flow-mediated dilation (FMD in a dose-dependent manner, and (2 antioxidant vitamin C supplementation would prevent the attenuated post-exercise FMD response. Methods Twelve men participated in four randomized exercise sessions (90 W for 20 minutes on separate days. During three of the sessions, one arm was subjected to increased oscillatory and retrograde SR using three different forearm cuff pressures (20, 40, 60 mmHg (contralateral arm served as the control and subjects ingested placebo capsules prior to exercise. A fourth session with 60 mmHg cuff pressure was performed with 1 g of vitamin C ingested prior to the session. Results Post-exercise FMD following the placebo conditions were lower in the cuffed arm versus the control arm (arm main effect: P P > 0.05. Following vitamin C treatment, post-exercise FMD in the cuffed and control arm increased from baseline (P P > 0.05. Conclusions These results indicate that augmented oscillatory and retrograde SR in non-working limbs during lower body exercise attenuates post-exercise FMD without an evident dose–response in the range of cuff pressures evaluated. Vitamin C supplementation prevented the attenuation of FMD following exercise with augmented oscillatory and retrograde SR suggesting that oxidative stress contributes to the adverse effects of oscillatory and

  11. CONCHAS-SPRAY, Reactive Flows with Fuel Sprays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cloutman, L.D.; Dukowicz, J.K.; Ramshaw, J.D.; Amsden, A.A.

    2001-01-01

    Description of program or function: CONCHAS-SPRAY solves the equations of transient, multicomponent, chemically reactive fluid dynamics, together with those for the dynamics of an evaporating liquid spray. The program was developed with applications to internal combustion engines in mind. The formulation is spatially two-dimensional, and encompasses both planar and axisymmetric geometries. In the latter case, the flow is permitted to swirl about the axis of symmetry. CONCHAS-SPRAY is a time-marching, finite- difference program that uses a partially implicit numerical scheme. Spatial differences are formed with respect to a generalized two- dimensional mesh of arbitrary quadrilaterals whose corner locations are specified functions of time. This feature allows a Lagrangian, Eulerian, or mixed description, and is particularly useful for representing curved or moving boundary surfaces. Arbitrary numbers of species and chemical reactions are allowed. The latter are subdivided into kinetic and equilibrium reactions, which are treated by different algorithms. A turbulent law-of-the-wall boundary layer option is provided. CONCHAS-SPRAY calls a number of LANL system subroutines to display graphic or numerical information on microfiche. These routines are not included, but are described in the reference report. Several routines called from LINPACK and SLATEC1.0 are included

  12. Continuous flow chemistry: a discovery tool for new chemical reactivity patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartwig, Jan; Metternich, Jan B; Nikbin, Nikzad; Kirschning, Andreas; Ley, Steven V

    2014-06-14

    Continuous flow chemistry as a process intensification tool is well known. However, its ability to enable chemists to perform reactions which are not possible in batch is less well studied or understood. Here we present an example, where a new reactivity pattern and extended reaction scope has been achieved by transferring a reaction from batch mode to flow. This new reactivity can be explained by suppressing back mixing and precise control of temperature in a flow reactor set up.

  13. Continuous flow chemistry: a discovery tool for new chemical reactivity patterns

    OpenAIRE

    Hartwig, Jan; Metternich, Jan B.; Nikbin, Nikzad; Kirschning, Andreas; Ley, Steven V.

    2014-01-01

    Continuous flow chemistry as a process intensification tool is well known. However, its ability to enable chemists to perform reactions which are not possible in batch is less well studied or understood. Here we present an example, where a new reactivity pattern and extended reaction scope has been achieved by transferring a reaction from batch mode to flow. This new reactivity can be explained by suppressing back mixing and precise control of temperature in a flow reactor set up.

  14. A Mixed Methods Assessment of Students' Flow Experiences during a Mobile Augmented Reality Science Game

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bressler, D. M.; Bodzin, A. M.

    2013-01-01

    Current studies have reported that secondary students are highly engaged while playing mobile augmented reality (AR) learning games. Some researchers have posited that players' engagement may indicate a flow experience, but no research results have confirmed this hypothesis with vision-based AR learning games. This study investigated factors…

  15. Acetazolamide-augmented dynamic BOLD (aczBOLD imaging for assessing cerebrovascular reactivity in chronic steno-occlusive disease of the anterior circulation: An initial experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junjie Wu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to measure cerebrovascular reactivity (CVR in chronic steno-occlusive disease using a novel approach that couples BOLD imaging with acetazolamide (ACZ vasoreactivity (aczBOLD, to evaluate dynamic effects of ACZ on BOLD and to establish the relationship between aczBOLD and dynamic susceptibility contrast (DSC perfusion MRI. Eighteen patients with unilateral chronic steno-occlusive disease of the anterior circulation underwent a 20-min aczBOLD imaging protocol, with ACZ infusion starting at 5 min of scan initiation. AczBOLD reactivity was calculated on a voxel-by-voxel basis to generate CVR maps for subsequent quantitative analyses. Reduced CVR was observed in the diseased vs. the normal hemisphere both by qualitative and quantitative assessment (gray matter (GM: 4.13% ± 1.16% vs. 4.90% ± 0.98%, P = 0.002; white matter (WM: 2.83% ± 1.23% vs. 3.50% ± 0.94%, P = 0.005. In all cases BOLD signal began increasing immediately following ACZ infusion, approaching a plateau at ~8.5 min after infusion, with the tissue volume of reduced augmentation increasing progressively with time, peaking at 2.60 min (time range above 95% of the maximum value: 0–4.43 min for the GM and 1.80 min (time range above 95% of the maximum value: 1.40–3.53 min for the WM. In the diseased hemisphere, aczBOLD CVR significantly correlated with baseline DSC time-to-maximum of the residue function (Tmax (P = 0.008 for the WM and normalized cerebral blood flow (P = 0.003 for the GM, and P = 0.001 for the WM. AczBOLD provides a novel, safe, easily implementable approach to CVR measurement in the routine clinical environments. Further studies can establish quantitative thresholds from aczBOLD towards identification of patients at heightened risk of recurrent ischemia and cognitive decline.

  16. An iterative method for controlling reactive power flow in boundary transformers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trigo, Angel L.; Martinez, Jose L.; Riquelme, Jesus; Romero, Esther [Department of Electrical Engineering, University of Seville (Spain)

    2011-02-15

    This paper presents an operational tool designed to help the system operator to control the reactive power flow in transmission-subtransmission boundary transformers. The main objective is to determine the minimum number of control actions necessary to ensure that reactive power flows in transmission/subtransmission transformers remain within limits. The proposed iterative procedure combines the use of a linear programming problem and a load flow tool. The linear programming assumes a linear behaviour between dependent and control variables around an operating point, modelled with sensitivities. Experimental results regarding IEEE systems are provided comparing the performance of the proposed approach with that of a conventional optimal power flow. (author)

  17. APPLICATION OF MODIFIED POWER FLOW TRACING METHOD FOR REACTIVE POWER PRICING IN PRACTICAL UTILITY SYSTEM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. SUSITHRA

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Competitive trend towards restructuring and unbundling of transmission services has resulted in the need to discover the impact of a particular generator to load. This paper initially presents the analysis of three different reactive power valuation methods namely, Modified Ybus , Virtual flow approach and modified power flow tracing to compute the reactive power output from a particular generator to particular load. Among these methods, the modified power flow electricity tracing method is identified as the best method to trace the reactive power contribution from various reactive power sources to loads, transmission line, etc. Also this proposed method breakdown the total reactive power loss in a transmission line into components to be allocated to individual loads. Secondly, based on this Method a novel allocation method for reactive power service for practical system is proposed. Hence, this method can be useful in providing additional insight into power system operation and can be used to modify existing tariffs of charging for reactive power transmission loss and reactive power transmission services. Simulation and comparison results are shown by taking WSCC 9 and IEEE 30 bus system as test system.

  18. A heuristic technique to determine corrective control actions for reactive power flows

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trigo, Angel L.; Martinez, Jose L.; Riquelme, Jesus; Romero, Esther [Department of Electrical Engineering, University of Sevilla (Spain)

    2011-01-15

    This paper presents a sensitivity-based heuristic tool designed to help the system operator in the reactive power flow control problem. The objective of the proposed technique is to determine control actions to ensure that reactive power flows in transmission-subtransmission boundary transformers remain within specified limits, satisfying the new regulatory constraints imposed in most of deregulated markets. With this new constraint the utilities want to guarantee that the utility is able to satisfy its own reactive power requirements, avoiding reactive power flows through long distances in order to reduce the well known disadvantages that reactive power circulation has in the system. A 5-bus tutorial system is used to present the proposed algorithm. The results of the application of the proposed technique to the IEEE 118 buses system and to a regional subtransmission network of the South of Spain are reported and analyzed. In this last actual case, the aim is to maintain reactive power flows in transmission/distribution transformers between those limits set by the Spanish Regulation. A comparison between the proposed tool and a conventional OPF is discussed. (author)

  19. Light Water Breeder Reactor (LWBR) flow coefficient of reactivity: (LWBR Development Program)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sarber, W.K.; Stout, J.W.; Atherton, R.

    1987-06-01

    This report discusses the results of an experimental program to measure and categorize the causes for increases in the magnitude of the LWBR flow coefficient of reactivity at 10,932 EFPH from previously measured near zero values to a value of about 6 x 10 -4 Δ rho for a flow decrease from 100 to 80% of full flow. Reactor protection analyses confirmed that existing protection systems were adequate for continued operation. Subsequently, the flow coefficient decreased in magnitude to approximately 2.25 x 10 -4 Δ rho at 20,000 EFPH and remained about constant through the remainder of core life, 29,047 EFPH. The increase in flow coefficient of reactivity is attributed to a flow-force dependent change in the effective core diameter such that an increase in core flow decreased the core diameter, resulting in an increase in fuel-to-water ratio and a consequent decrease in the reactivity of this relatively undermoderated core. This report discusses why the increased flow coefficient did not occur until after 10,932 EFPH and why the magnitude of flow coefficient reduced with continued core operation

  20. Strategies for measuring flows of reactive nitrogen at the landscape scale

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Theobald, M.R.; Akkal, N.; Bienkowski, J.

    2011-01-01

    Within a rural landscape there are flows of reactive nitrogen (Nr) through and between the soil, vegetation, atmosphere and hydrological systems as well as transfer as a result of agricultural activities. Measurements of these flows and transfers have generally been limited to individual media (e.......g., hydrological flows) or the interface between two media (e.g., exchange between the soil and the atmosphere). However, the study of flows of Nr at the landscape scale requires a more integrated approach that combines measurement techniques to quantify the flows from one medium to the next. This paper discusses...

  1. Exploring the interaction between flows and composition in reactive distillation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Estrada-Villagrana, A.D.; Bogle, I. David L.; Cisneros, Eduardo Salvador P.

    1999-01-01

    In this paper a new equilibrium approach is used to simulate the closed loop behaviour of the MTBE production process to study the interactions between flows and composition. This will facilitate the application of the existing methods for analysis of distillation systems. Results show that the o......In this paper a new equilibrium approach is used to simulate the closed loop behaviour of the MTBE production process to study the interactions between flows and composition. This will facilitate the application of the existing methods for analysis of distillation systems. Results show...

  2. Thermal ignition in a reactive variable viscosity Poiseuille flow ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In this paper, we investigate the thermal ignition in a strongly exothermic reaction of a variable viscosity combustible material flowing through a channel with isothermal walls under Arrhenius kinetics, neglecting the consumption of the material. Analytical solutions are constructed for the governing nonlinear boundary-value ...

  3. Vortices generation in the reactive flow on the evaporative surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Cha Ryeom; Lee, Chang Jin [Konkuk University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-02-15

    Vortices generation and flow dynamics are investigated by a numerical calculation with LES methodology on the evaporative surface including chemical reactions. For simplicity, fuel is radially injected from the surface in order to decouple pyrolysis of solid fuel from the governing equation and consideration of heat transfer balance. Nevertheless its simple treatment of chemical reactions and fuel pyrolysis, numerical results captured very fundamental understandings in terms of averaged temperature, velocity profile, and mixture fraction distribution. Results showed that a well-defined turbulent velocity profile at the inlet becomes twisted and highly wrinkled in the downstream reaching the maximum velocity at far above the surface, where the flame is located. And the thickness of boundary layer increases in the downstream due to the enhanced interaction of axial flow and mass injection from the surface. Also, chemical reaction appears highly active and partially concentrated along the plane where flow condition is in stoichiometric. In particular, flame front locates at the surface where mixture fraction Z equals to 0.07. Flame front severely wrinkles in the downstream by the interaction with turbulences in the flow. Partial reactions on the flame front contribute to produce hot spots periodically in the downstream attaining the max temperature at the center of each spot. This may take the role of additional unsteady heat generations and pressure perturbations in the downstream. Future study will focus on the evolution of hot spots and pressure perturbations in the post chamber of lab scale hybrid rocket motors.

  4. Reactive Gas Solids Flow in Circulating Fluidised Beds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjertager, Bjørn Helge; Solberg, Tron; Hansen, Kim Granly

    2005-01-01

    Progress in modelling and simulation of flow processes in gas/particle systems carried out at the authors? research group are presented. Emphasis is given to computational fluid dynamics (CFD) models that use the multi-dimensional multi fluid techniques. Turbulence modelling strategies for gas...

  5. The augmentation of heat transfer in a pipe flow using a swirling perforated twisted (SPT) tape insert

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Shahrokh; Oishe, Sadia Noon; Rahman, Md. Lutfor

    2017-12-01

    The purpose of this research work is to increase the heat transfer coefficient by operating the heat exchangers at smaller revolution per minute. This signifies an achievement of reduction of pressure drop corresponding to less operating cost. This study has used two types of SPT tape insert to observe the various heat transfer coefficient, heat transfer rate and heat transfer augmentation efficiency. One tape was fully twisted and another tape was partially twisted. The shape of the SPT tape creates turbulence effect. The turbulence flow (swirl flow) generated by SPT tape promotes greater mixing and high heat transfer coefficients. An arrangement scheme has been developed for the experimental investigation. For remarking the rate of change of heat transfer, temperature has been measured numerically through the temperature sensors with various flow rates and RPM. The volume flow rate was varied from 10.3448276 LPM to 21.045574 LPM and the rotation of the perforated twisted tape was varied from 50 RPM to 400 RPM. Finally the research study demonstrates the effectiveness of the results of the proposed approaches. It is observed that the suggested method of heat transfer augmentations is much more effective than existing methods, since it results in an increase in heat transfer area and also an increase in the heat transfer coefficient and reduction of cost in the industrial sectors.

  6. Effect of 3-D moderator flow configurations on the reactivity of CANDU nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zadeh, Foad Mehdi; Etienne, Stephane; Chambon, Richard; Marleau, Guy; Teyssedou, Alberto

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • 3-D CFD simulations of CANDU-6 moderator flows are presented. • A thermal-hydraulic code using thermal physical fluid properties is used. • The numerical approach and convergence is validated against available data. • Flow configurations are correlated using Richardson’s number. • The interaction between moderator temperatures with reactivity is determined. - Abstract: The reactivity of nuclear reactors can be affected by thermal conditions prevailing within the moderator. In CANDU reactors, the moderator and the coolant are mechanically separated but not necessarily thermally isolated. Hence, any variation of moderator flow properties may change the reactivity. Until now, nuclear reactor calculations have been performed by assuming uniform moderator flow temperature distribution. However, CFD simulations have predicted large time dependent flow fluctuations taking place inside the calandria, which can bring about local temperature variations that can exceed 50 °C. This paper presents robust CANDU 3-D CFD moderator simulations coupled to neutronic calculations. The proposed methodology makes it possible to study not only different moderator flow configurations but also their effects on the reactor reactivity coefficient.

  7. Reactive Flow Control of Delta Wing Vortex (Postprint)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-08-01

    wing aircraft. A substantial amount of research has been dedicated to the control of aerodynamic flows using both passive and active control mechanisms...Passive vortex control devices such as vortex generators and winglets attach to the wing and require no energy input. Passive vortex control...leading edges is also effective for changing the aerodynamic characteristics of delta wings [2] [3]. Gutmark and Guillot [5] proposed controlling

  8. Application of Newton's optimal power flow in voltage/reactive power control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bjelogrlic, M.; Babic, B.S. (Electric Power Board of Serbia, Belgrade (YU)); Calovic, M.S. (Dept. of Electrical Engineering, University of Belgrade, Belgrade (YU)); Ristanovic, P. (Institute Nikola Tesla, Belgrade (YU))

    1990-11-01

    This paper considers an application of Newton's optimal power flow to the solution of the secondary voltage/reactive power control in transmission networks. An efficient computer program based on the latest achievements in the sparse matrix/vector techniques has been developed for this purpose. It is characterized by good robustness, accuracy and speed. A combined objective function appropriate for various system load levels with suitable constraints, for treatment of the power system security and economy is also proposed. For the real-time voltage/reactive power control, a suboptimal power flow procedure has been derived by using the reduced set of control variables. This procedure is based on the sensitivity theory applied to the determination of zones for the secondary voltage/reactive power control and corresponding reduced set of regulating sources, whose reactive outputs represent control variables in the optimal power flow program. As a result, the optimal power flow program output becomes a schedule to be used by operators in the process of the real-time voltage/reactive power control in both normal and emergency operating states.

  9. Tangential stretching rate (TSR) analysis of non premixed reactive flows

    KAUST Repository

    Valorani, Mauro

    2016-10-16

    We discuss how the Tangential stretching rate (TSR) analysis, originally developed and tested for spatially homogeneous systems (batch reactors), is extended to spatially non homogeneous systems. To illustrate the effectiveness of the TSR diagnostics, we study the ignition transient in a non premixed, reaction–diffusion model in the mixture fraction space, whose dependent variables are temperature and mixture composition. The reactive mixture considered is syngas/air. A detailed H2/CO mechanism with 12 species and 33 chemical reactions is employed. We will discuss two cases, one involving only kinetics as a model of front propagation purely driven by spontaneous ignition, the other as a model of deflagration wave involving kinetics/diffusion coupling. We explore different aspects of the system dynamics such as the relative role of diffusion and kinetics, the evolution of kinetic eigenvalues, and of the tangential stretching rates computed by accounting for the combined action of diffusion and kinetics as well for kinetics only. We propose criteria based on the TSR concept which allow to identify the most ignitable conditions and to discriminate between spontaneous ignition and deflagration front.

  10. A fast method for optimal reactive power flow solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sadasivam, G; Khan, M A [Anna Univ., Madras (IN). Coll. of Engineering

    1990-01-01

    A fast successive linear programming (SLP) method for minimizing transmission losses and improving the voltage profile is proposed. The method uses the same compactly stored, factorized constant matrices in all the LP steps, both for power flow solution and for constructing the LP model. The inherent oscillatory convergence of SLP methods is overcome by proper selection of initial step sizes and their gradual reduction. Detailed studies on three systems, including a 109-bus system, reveal the fast and reliable convergence property of the method. (author).

  11. Experimental and numerical investigation of reactive shock-accelerated flows

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bonazza, Riccardo [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States). Dept. of Engineering Physics

    2016-12-20

    The main goal of this program was to establish a qualitative and quantitative connection, based on the appropriate dimensionless parameters and scaling laws, between shock-induced distortion of astrophysical plasma density clumps and their earthbound analog in a shock tube. These objectives were pursued by carrying out laboratory experiments and numerical simulations to study the evolution of two gas bubbles accelerated by planar shock waves and compare the results to available astrophysical observations. The experiments were carried out in an vertical, downward-firing shock tube, 9.2 m long, with square internal cross section (25×25 cm2). Specific goals were to quantify the effect of the shock strength (Mach number, M) and the density contrast between the bubble gas and its surroundings (usually quantified by the Atwood number, i.e. the dimensionless density difference between the two gases) upon some of the most important flow features (e.g. macroscopic properties; turbulence and mixing rates). The computational component of the work performed through this program was aimed at (a) studying the physics of multi-phase compressible flows in the context of astrophysics plasmas and (b) providing a computational connection between laboratory experiments and the astrophysical application of shock-bubble interactions. Throughout the study, we used the FLASH4.2 code to run hydrodynamical and magnetohydrodynamical simulations of shock bubble interactions on an adaptive mesh.

  12. Experimental and numerical investigation of reactive shock-accelerated flows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonazza, Riccardo

    2016-01-01

    The main goal of this program was to establish a qualitative and quantitative connection, based on the appropriate dimensionless parameters and scaling laws, between shock-induced distortion of astrophysical plasma density clumps and their earthbound analog in a shock tube. These objectives were pursued by carrying out laboratory experiments and numerical simulations to study the evolution of two gas bubbles accelerated by planar shock waves and compare the results to available astrophysical observations. The experiments were carried out in an vertical, downward-firing shock tube, 9.2 m long, with square internal cross section (25x25 cm"2). Specific goals were to quantify the effect of the shock strength (Mach number, M) and the density contrast between the bubble gas and its surroundings (usually quantified by the Atwood number, i.e. the dimensionless density difference between the two gases) upon some of the most important flow features (e.g. macroscopic properties; turbulence and mixing rates). The computational component of the work performed through this program was aimed at (a) studying the physics of multi-phase compressible flows in the context of astrophysics plasmas and (b) providing a computational connection between laboratory experiments and the astrophysical application of shock-bubble interactions. Throughout the study, we used the FLASH4.2 code to run hydrodynamical and magnetohydrodynamical simulations of shock bubble interactions on an adaptive mesh.

  13. Isothermal and Reactive Turbulent Jets in Cross-Flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutmark, Ephraim; Bush, Scott; Ibrahim, Irene

    2004-11-01

    Jets in cross flow have numerous applications including vertical/short takeoff/landing (V/STOL) aircraft, cooling jets for gas turbine blades and combustion air supply inlets in gas turbine engine. The properties exhibited by these jets are dictated by complex three dimensional turbulence structures which form due to the interaction of the jet with the freestream. The isothermal tests are conducted in a wind tunnel measuring the characteristics of air jets injected perpendicular into an otherwise undisturbed air stream. Different nozzle exit geometries of the air jets were tested including circular, triangular and elongated configurations. Jets are injected in single and paired combinations with other jets to measure the effect of mutual interaction on the parameters mentioned. Quantitative velocity fields are obtained using PIV. The data obtained allows the extraction of flow parameters such as jet structure, penetration and mixing. The reacting tests include separate and combined jets of fuel/air mixture utilized to explore the stabilization of combustion at various operating conditions. Different geometrical configurations of transverse jets are tested to determine the shape and combination of jets that will optimize the jets ability to successfully stabilize a flame.

  14. Adaptive discontinuous Galerkin methods for non-linear reactive flows

    CERN Document Server

    Uzunca, Murat

    2016-01-01

    The focus of this monograph is the development of space-time adaptive methods to solve the convection/reaction dominated non-stationary semi-linear advection diffusion reaction (ADR) equations with internal/boundary layers in an accurate and efficient way. After introducing the ADR equations and discontinuous Galerkin discretization, robust residual-based a posteriori error estimators in space and time are derived. The elliptic reconstruction technique is then utilized to derive the a posteriori error bounds for the fully discrete system and to obtain optimal orders of convergence. As coupled surface and subsurface flow over large space and time scales is described by (ADR) equation the methods described in this book are of high importance in many areas of Geosciences including oil and gas recovery, groundwater contamination and sustainable use of groundwater resources, storing greenhouse gases or radioactive waste in the subsurface.

  15. Modeling turbulence structure. Chemical kinetics interaction in turbulent reactive flows

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Magnussen, B F [The Norwegian Univ. of Science and Technology, Trondheim (Norway)

    1998-12-31

    The challenge of the mathematical modelling is to transfer basic physical knowledge into a mathematical formulation such that this knowledge can be utilized in computational simulation of practical problems. The combustion phenomena can be subdivided into a large set of interconnected phenomena like flow, turbulence, thermodynamics, chemical kinetics, radiation, extinction, ignition etc. Combustion in one application differs from combustion in another area by the relative importance of the various phenomena. The difference in fuel, geometry and operational conditions often causes the differences. The computer offers the opportunity to treat the individual phenomena and their interactions by models with wide operational domains. The relative magnitude of the various phenomena therefore becomes the consequence of operational conditions and geometry and need not to be specified on the basis of experience for the given problem. In mathematical modelling of turbulent combustion, one of the big challenges is how to treat the interaction between the chemical reactions and the fluid flow i.e. the turbulence. Different scientists adhere to different concepts like the laminar flamelet approach, the pdf approach of the Eddy Dissipation Concept. Each of these approaches offers different opportunities and problems. All these models are based on a sound physical basis, however none of these have general validity in taking into consideration all detail of the physical chemical interaction. The merits of the models can only be judged by their ability to reproduce physical reality and consequences of operational and geometric conditions in a combustion system. The presentation demonstrates and discusses the development of a coherent combustion technology for energy conversion and safety based on the Eddy Dissipation Concept by Magnussen. (author) 30 refs.

  16. Modeling turbulence structure. Chemical kinetics interaction in turbulent reactive flows

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Magnussen, B.F. [The Norwegian Univ. of Science and Technology, Trondheim (Norway)

    1997-12-31

    The challenge of the mathematical modelling is to transfer basic physical knowledge into a mathematical formulation such that this knowledge can be utilized in computational simulation of practical problems. The combustion phenomena can be subdivided into a large set of interconnected phenomena like flow, turbulence, thermodynamics, chemical kinetics, radiation, extinction, ignition etc. Combustion in one application differs from combustion in another area by the relative importance of the various phenomena. The difference in fuel, geometry and operational conditions often causes the differences. The computer offers the opportunity to treat the individual phenomena and their interactions by models with wide operational domains. The relative magnitude of the various phenomena therefore becomes the consequence of operational conditions and geometry and need not to be specified on the basis of experience for the given problem. In mathematical modelling of turbulent combustion, one of the big challenges is how to treat the interaction between the chemical reactions and the fluid flow i.e. the turbulence. Different scientists adhere to different concepts like the laminar flamelet approach, the pdf approach of the Eddy Dissipation Concept. Each of these approaches offers different opportunities and problems. All these models are based on a sound physical basis, however none of these have general validity in taking into consideration all detail of the physical chemical interaction. The merits of the models can only be judged by their ability to reproduce physical reality and consequences of operational and geometric conditions in a combustion system. The presentation demonstrates and discusses the development of a coherent combustion technology for energy conversion and safety based on the Eddy Dissipation Concept by Magnussen. (author) 30 refs.

  17. Effect of Anisotropy Structure on Plume Entropy and Reactive Mixing in Helical Flows

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ye, Yu; Chiogna, Gabriele; Lu, Chunhui

    2018-01-01

    Plume dilution and reactive mixing can be considerably enhanced by helical flows occurring in three-dimensional anisotropic porous media. In this study, we perform conservative and reactive transport simulations considering different anisotropy structures of a single inclusion with the objective...... of exploring the effect of the inclusion’s geometry and orientation on the patterns of twisted streamlines and on the overall dilution and reaction of solute plumes. We analyzed 100 different scenarios by varying key parameters such as the angle of the anisotropic structures with respect to the average flow...... velocity, the spacing between alternated heterogeneous zones of coarse and fine materials, the permeability contrast between such matrices, and the magnitude of the seepage velocity. Entropy conservation equations and entropy-based metrics for both conservative and reactive species were adopted to quantify...

  18. Augmentation of forced-convection heat transfer by applying electric fields to disturb flow near a wall

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nariai, H.; Ishiguro, H.; Nagata, S.; Yabe, A.

    1991-01-01

    This paper reports on the augmentation effect of electrohydrodynamically (EHD) induced flow disturbance on forced-convection heat transfer in a channel that was experimentally investigated in order to determine the applicability of the enhanced heat transfer into a low- pressure drop heat exchanger, such as a high-performance oil cooler. The investigation is mainly based on the study carried out on the unique point where the flow is disturbed actively and controllably by applying electric fields between the wall and array of wire electrodes installed near the wall along the main stream. The liquid mixture of refrigerant R113 (96 wt %) and ethanol (4 wt %), called Fronsorubu AE, was selected as a working fluid. Heat transfer was found to be promoted intensely in the turbulent flow as well as in the laminar flow, up to a factor of about twenty-three in the case of laminar flow. It is noteworthy that the rate of increase in heat transfer coefficient is larger compared to that in the pressure drop. From a measurement of velocities by a laser Doppler velocimeter, it was made clear that the electrohydrodynamically induced flow disturbance brings about large heat transfer coefficients

  19. The reactive solid-gas flow of a fluidized bed for UO2 conversion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Juanico, L.E.

    1991-01-01

    The reactive solid-gas flow of a fluidized bed for UO 2 conversion was modeled. The sedimentation-reaction process was treated using the drift-flux equations. Also, the associated pressure transient due to the reaction gas release was analyzed. An experiment was carried out to compare the results, and pressure transient was numerically simulated, reaching interesting conclusions. (Author) [es

  20. Effects of intermittent theta burst stimulation on cerebral blood flow and cerebral vasomotor reactivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pichiorri, Floriana; Vicenzini, Edoardo; Gilio, Francesca; Giacomelli, Elena; Frasca, Vittorio; Cambieri, Chiara; Ceccanti, Marco; Di Piero, Vittorio; Inghilleri, Maurizio

    2012-08-01

    To determine whether intermittent theta burst stimulation influences cerebral hemodynamics, we investigated changes induced by intermittent theta burst stimulation on the middle cerebral artery cerebral blood flow velocity and vasomotor reactivity to carbon dioxide (CO(2)) in healthy participants. The middle cerebral artery flow velocity and vasomotor reactivity were monitored by continuous transcranial Doppler sonography. Changes in cortical excitability were tested by transcranial magnetic stimulation. In 11 healthy participants, before and immediately after delivering intermittent theta burst stimulation, we tested cortical excitability measured by the resting motor threshold and motor evoked potential amplitude over the stimulated hemisphere and vasomotor reactivity to CO(2) bilaterally. The blood flow velocity was monitored in both middle cerebral arteries throughout the experimental session. In a separate session, we tested the effects of sham stimulation under the same experimental conditions. Whereas the resting motor threshold remained unchanged before and after stimulation, motor evoked potential amplitudes increased significantly (P = .04). During and after stimulation, middle cerebral artery blood flow velocities also remained bilaterally unchanged, whereas vasomotor reactivity to CO(2) increased bilaterally (P = .04). The sham stimulation left all variables unchanged. The expected intermittent theta burst stimulation-induced changes in cortical excitability were not accompanied by changes in cerebral blood flow velocities; however, the bilateral increased vasomotor reactivity suggests that intermittent theta burst stimulation influences the cerebral microcirculation, possibly involving subcortical structures. These findings provide useful information on hemodynamic phenomena accompanying intermittent theta burst stimulation, which should be considered in research aimed at developing this noninvasive, low-intensity stimulation technique for safe

  1. Hybrid Multiscale Finite Volume method for multiresolution simulations of flow and reactive transport in porous media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barajas-Solano, D. A.; Tartakovsky, A. M.

    2017-12-01

    We present a multiresolution method for the numerical simulation of flow and reactive transport in porous, heterogeneous media, based on the hybrid Multiscale Finite Volume (h-MsFV) algorithm. The h-MsFV algorithm allows us to couple high-resolution (fine scale) flow and transport models with lower resolution (coarse) models to locally refine both spatial resolution and transport models. The fine scale problem is decomposed into various "local'' problems solved independently in parallel and coordinated via a "global'' problem. This global problem is then coupled with the coarse model to strictly ensure domain-wide coarse-scale mass conservation. The proposed method provides an alternative to adaptive mesh refinement (AMR), due to its capacity to rapidly refine spatial resolution beyond what's possible with state-of-the-art AMR techniques, and the capability to locally swap transport models. We illustrate our method by applying it to groundwater flow and reactive transport of multiple species.

  2. Unifying principles of irreversibility minimization for efficiency maximization in steady-flow chemically-reactive engines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramakrishnan, Sankaran; Edwards, Christopher F.

    2014-01-01

    Systems research has led to the conception and development of various steady-flow, chemically-reactive, engine cycles for stationary power generation and propulsion. However, the question that remains unanswered is: What is the maximum-efficiency steady-flow chemically-reactive engine architecture permitted by physics? On the one hand the search for higher-efficiency cycles continues, often involving newer processes and devices (fuel cells, carbon separation, etc.); on the other hand the design parameters for existing cycles are continually optimized in response to improvements in device engineering. In this paper we establish that any variation in engine architecture—parametric change or process-sequence change—contributes to an efficiency increase via one of only two possible ways to minimize total irreversibility. These two principles help us unify our understanding from a large number of parametric analyses and cycle-optimization studies for any steady-flow chemically-reactive engine, and set a framework to systematically identify maximum-efficiency engine architectures. - Highlights: • A unified thermodynamic model to study chemically-reactive engine architectures is developed. • All parametric analyses of efficiency are unified by two irreversibility-minimization principles. • Variations in internal energy transfers yield a net work increase that is greater than engine irreversibility reduced. • Variations in external energy transfers yield a net work increase that is lesser than engine irreversibility reduced

  3. Vascular O-GlcNAcylation augments reactivity to constrictor stimuli by prolonging phosphorylated levels of the myosin light chain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lima, V.V. [Instituto de Ciências Biológicas e da Saúde, Universidade Federal de Mato Grosso, Barra do Garças, MT (Brazil); Lobato, N.S.; Filgueira, F.P. [Curso de Medicina, Setor de Fisiologia Humana, Universidade Federal de Goiás, Jataí, GO (Brazil); Webb, R.C. [Department of Physiology, Georgia Regents University, Augusta, GA (United States); Tostes, R.C. [Departamento de Farmacologia, Faculdade de Medicina de Ribeirão Preto, Universidade de São Paulo, Ribeirão Preto, SP (Brazil); Giachini, F.R. [Instituto de Ciências Biológicas e da Saúde, Universidade Federal de Mato Grosso, Barra do Garças, MT (Brazil)

    2014-08-15

    O-GlcNAcylation is a modification that alters the function of numerous proteins. We hypothesized that augmented O-GlcNAcylation levels enhance myosin light chain kinase (MLCK) and reduce myosin light chain phosphatase (MLCP) activity, leading to increased vascular contractile responsiveness. The vascular responses were measured by isometric force displacement. Thoracic aorta and vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) from rats were incubated with vehicle or with PugNAc, which increases O-GlcNAcylation. In addition, we determined whether proteins that play an important role in the regulation of MLCK and MLCP activity are directly affected by O-GlcNAcylation. PugNAc enhanced phenylephrine (PE) responses in rat aortas (maximal effect, 14.2±2 vs 7.9±1 mN for vehicle, n=7). Treatment with an MLCP inhibitor (calyculin A) augmented vascular responses to PE (13.4±2 mN) and abolished the differences in PE-response between the groups. The effect of PugNAc was not observed when vessels were preincubated with ML-9, an MLCK inhibitor (7.3±2 vs 7.5±2 mN for vehicle, n=5). Furthermore, our data showed that differences in the PE-induced contractile response between the groups were abolished by the activator of AMP-activated protein kinase (AICAR; 6.1±2 vs 7.4±2 mN for vehicle, n=5). PugNAc increased phosphorylation of myosin phosphatase target subunit 1 (MYPT-1) and protein kinase C-potentiated inhibitor protein of 17 kDa (CPI-17), which are involved in RhoA/Rho-kinase-mediated inhibition of myosin phosphatase activity. PugNAc incubation produced a time-dependent increase in vascular phosphorylation of myosin light chain and decreased phosphorylation levels of AMP-activated protein kinase, which decreased the affinity of MLCK for Ca{sup 2+}/calmodulin. Our data suggest that proteins that play an important role in the regulation of MLCK and MLCP activity are directly affected by O-GlcNAcylation, favoring vascular contraction.

  4. Flow Control Research at NASA Langley in Support of High-Lift Augmentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sellers, William L., III; Jones, Gregory S.; Moore, Mark D.

    2002-01-01

    The paper describes the efforts at NASA Langley to apply active and passive flow control techniques for improved high-lift systems, and advanced vehicle concepts utilizing powered high-lift techniques. The development of simplified high-lift systems utilizing active flow control is shown to provide significant weight and drag reduction benefits based on system studies. Active flow control that focuses on separation, and the development of advanced circulation control wings (CCW) utilizing unsteady excitation techniques will be discussed. The advanced CCW airfoils can provide multifunctional controls throughout the flight envelope. Computational and experimental data are shown to illustrate the benefits and issues with implementation of the technology.

  5. High Pressure Combustion Experimental Facility(HPCEF) for Studies on Combustion in Reactive Flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-12-13

    SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 1. REPORT DATE (DD-MM-YYYY) 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 12. DISTRIBUTION AVAILIBILITY STATEMENT 6...Report: High Pressure Combustion Experimental Facility (HPCEF) for Studies on Combustion in Reactive Flows The views, opinions and/or findings... contained in this report are those of the author(s) and should not contrued as an official Department of the Army position, policy or decision, unless so

  6. Comparison of reactivity in a flow reactor and a single cylinder engine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Natelson, Robert H.; Johnson, Rodney O.; Kurman, Matthew S.; Cernansky, Nicholas P.; Miller, David L. [Department of Mechanical Engineering and Mechanics, Drexel University, 3141 Chestnut Street, Philadelphia, PA 19104-2875 (United States)

    2010-10-15

    The relative reactivity of 2:1:1 and 1:1:1 mixtures of n-decane:n-butylcyclohexane:n-butylbenzene and an average sample of JP-8 were evaluated in a single cylinder engine and compared to results obtained in a pressurized flow reactor. At compression ratios of 14:1, 15:1, and 16:1, inlet temperature of 500 K, inlet pressure of 0.1 MPa, equivalence ratio of 0.23, and engine speed of 800 RPM, the autoignition delay times were, from shortest to longest, the 2:1:1, followed by the 1:1:1, and then the JP-8. This order corresponded with recent results in a pressurized flow reactor, where the preignition oxidation chemistry was monitored at temperatures of 600-800 K, 0.8 MPa pressure, and an equivalence ratio of 0.30, and where the preignition reactivity from highest to lowest was the 2:1:1, followed by the 1:1:1, and the JP-8. This shows that the relative reactivity at low temperatures in the flow reactor tracks the autoignition tendencies in the engine for these particular fuels. (author) the computed experimental error. (author)

  7. Adapting HYDRUS-1D to Simulate Overland Flow and Reactive Transport During Sheet Flow Deviations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, J.; Bradford, S. A.; Simunek, J.; Hartmann, A.

    2017-12-01

    The HYDRUS-1D code is a popular numerical model for solving the Richards equation for variably-saturated water flow and solute transport in porous media. This code was adapted to solve rather than the Richards equation for subsurface flow the diffusion wave equation for overland flow at the soil surface. The numerical results obtained by the new model produced an excellent agreement with the analytical solution of the kinematic wave equation. Model tests demonstrated its applicability to simulate the transport and fate of many different solutes, such as non-adsorbing tracers, nutrients, pesticides, and microbes. However, the diffusion wave or kinematic wave equations describe surface runoff as sheet flow with a uniform depth and velocity across the slope. In reality, overland water flow and transport processes are rarely uniform. Local soil topography, vegetation, and spatial soil heterogeneity control directions and magnitudes of water fluxes, and strongly influence runoff characteristics. There is increasing evidence that variations in soil surface characteristics influence the distribution of overland flow and transport of pollutants. These spatially varying surface characteristics are likely to generate non-equilibrium flow and transport processes. HYDRUS-1D includes a hierarchical series of models of increasing complexity to account for both physical equilibrium and non-equilibrium, e.g., dual-porosity and dual-permeability models, up to a dual-permeability model with immobile water. The same conceptualization as used for the subsurface was implemented to simulate non-equilibrium overland flow and transport at the soil surface. The developed model improves our ability to describe non-equilibrium overland flow and transport processes and to improves our understanding of factors that cause this behavior. The HYDRUS-1D overland flow and transport model was additionally also extended to simulate soil erosion. The HYDRUS-1D Soil Erosion Model has been verified by

  8. Core dynamics analysis for reactivity insertion and loss of coolant flow tests using the HTTR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takamatsu, Kuniyoshi; Nakagawa, Shigeaki; Takeda, Tetsuaki

    2007-01-01

    The High Temperature engineering Test Reactor (HTTR) is a graphite-moderated and a gas-cooled reactor with a thermal power of 30 MW and a reactor outlet coolant temperature of 950degC (SAITO, 1994). Safety demonstration tests using the HTTR are in progress to verify its inherent safety features and improve the safety technology and design methodology for High-Temperature Gas-cooled Reactors (HTGRs) (TACHIBANA 2002) (NAKAGAWA 2004). The reactivity insertion test is one of the safety demonstration tests for the HTTR. This test simulates the rapid increase in the reactor power by withdrawing the control rod without operating the reactor power control system. In addition, the loss of coolant flow tests has been conducted to simulate the rapid decrease in the reactor power by tripping one, two or all out of three gas circulators. The experimental results have revealed the inherent safety features of HTGRs, such as the negative reactivity feedback effect. The numerical analysis code, which was named ACCORD (TAKAMATSU 2006), was developed to analyze the reactor dynamics including the flow behavior in the HTTR core. We used a conventional method, namely, a one-dimensional flow channel model and reactor kinetics model with a single temperature coefficient, taking into account the temperature changes in the core. However, a slight difference between the analytical and experimental results was observed. Therefore, we have modified this code to use a model with four parallel channels and twenty temperature coefficients in the core. Furthermore, we added another analytical model of the core for calculating the heat conduction between the fuel channels and the core in the case of the loss of coolant flow tests. This paper describes the validation results for the newly developed code using the experimental results of the reactivity insertion test as well as the loss of coolant flow tests by tripping one or two out of three gas circulators. Finally, the pre-analytical result of

  9. On-chip determination of C-reactive protein using magnetic particles in continuous flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phurimsak, Chayakom; Tarn, Mark D; Peyman, Sally A; Greenman, John; Pamme, Nicole

    2014-11-04

    We demonstrate the application of a multilaminar flow platform, in which functionalized magnetic particles are deflected through alternating laminar flow streams of reagents and washing solutions via an external magnet, for the rapid detection of the inflammatory biomarker, C-reactive protein (CRP). The two-step sandwich immunoassay was accomplished in less than 60 s, a vast improvement on the 80-300 min time frame required for enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA) and the 50 min necessary for off-chip magnetic particle-based assays. The combination of continuous flow and a stationary magnet enables a degree of autonomy in the system, while a detection limit of 0.87 μg mL(-1) makes it suitable for the determination of CRP concentrations in clinical diagnostics. Its applicability was further proven by assaying real human serum samples and comparing those results to values obtained using standard ELISA tests.

  10. THC-MP: High performance numerical simulation of reactive transport and multiphase flow in porous media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Xiaohui; Li, Weishan; Tian, Hailong; Li, Hongliang; Xu, Haixiao; Xu, Tianfu

    2015-07-01

    The numerical simulation of multiphase flow and reactive transport in the porous media on complex subsurface problem is a computationally intensive application. To meet the increasingly computational requirements, this paper presents a parallel computing method and architecture. Derived from TOUGHREACT that is a well-established code for simulating subsurface multi-phase flow and reactive transport problems, we developed a high performance computing THC-MP based on massive parallel computer, which extends greatly on the computational capability for the original code. The domain decomposition method was applied to the coupled numerical computing procedure in the THC-MP. We designed the distributed data structure, implemented the data initialization and exchange between the computing nodes and the core solving module using the hybrid parallel iterative and direct solver. Numerical accuracy of the THC-MP was verified through a CO2 injection-induced reactive transport problem by comparing the results obtained from the parallel computing and sequential computing (original code). Execution efficiency and code scalability were examined through field scale carbon sequestration applications on the multicore cluster. The results demonstrate successfully the enhanced performance using the THC-MP on parallel computing facilities.

  11. The relationship between fractional flow reserve, platelet reactivity and platelet leukocyte complexes in stable coronary artery disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sels, J.W.E.M.; Rutten, B.; Holten, van T.C.; Hillaert, M.A.K.; Waltenberger, J.; Pijls, N.H.J.; Pasterkamp, G.; Groot, de P.G.; Roest, M.

    2013-01-01

    Background: The presence of stenoses that significantly impair blood flow and cause myocardial ischemia negatively affects prognosis of patients with stable coronary artery disease. Altered platelet reactivity has been associated with impaired prognosis of stable coronary artery disease. Platelets

  12. Effects of Building‒roof Cooling on Flow and Distribution of Reactive Pollutants in street canyons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, S. J.; Choi, W.; Kim, J.; Jeong, J. H.

    2016-12-01

    The effects of building‒roof cooling on flow and dispersion of reactive pollutants were investigated in the framework of flow dynamics and chemistry using a coupled CFD‒chemistry model. For this, flow characteristics were analyzed first in street canyons in the presence of building‒roof cooling. A portal vortex was generated in street canyon, producing dominant reverse and outward flows near the ground in all the cases. The building‒roof cooling increased horizontal wind speeds at the building roof and strengthened the downward motion near the downwind building in the street canyon, resultantly intensifying street canyon vortex strength. The flow affected the distribution of primary and secondary pollutants. Concentrations of primary pollutants such as NOx, VOC and CO was high near the upwind building because the reverse flows were dominant at street level, making this area the downwind region of emission sources. Concentration of secondary pollutant such as O3 was lower than the background near the ground, where NOX concentrations were high. Building‒roof cooling decreased the concentration of primary pollutants in contrasted to those under non‒cooling conditions. In contrast, building‒roof cooling increased O3 by reducing NO concentrations in urban street canyon compared to concentrations under non‒cooling conditions.

  13. Thermal chemical-mechanical reactive flow model of shock initiation in solid explosives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nicholls, A.L. III; Tarver, C.M.

    1998-01-01

    The three dimensional Arbitrary Lagrange Eulerian hydrodynamic computer code ALE3D with fully coupled thermal-chemical-mechanical material models provides the framework for the development of a physically realistic model of shock initiation and detonation of solid explosives. The processes of hot spot formation during shock compression, subsequent ignition of reaction or failure to react, growth of reaction in individual hot spots, and coalescence of reacting hot spots during the transition to detonation can now be modeled using Arrhenius chemical kinetic rate laws and heat transfer to propagate the reactive flow. This paper discusses the growth rates of reacting hot spots in HMX and TATB and their coalescence during shock to detonation transition. Hot spot deflagration rates are found to be fast enough to consume explosive particles less than 10 mm in diameter during typical shock duration times, but larger particles must fragment and create more reactive surface area in order to be rapidly consumed

  14. Numerical simulation of two-phase multicomponent flow with reactive transport in porous media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vostrikov, Viatcheslav

    2014-01-01

    The subject of this thesis is the numerical simulation of water-gas flow in the subsurface together with chemical reactions. The subject has applications to various situations in environmental modeling, though we are mainly concerned with CO 2 storage in deep saline aquifers. In Carbon Capture and Storage studies, CO 2 is first captured from its sources of origin, transport in liquefied form and injected as gas under high pressure in deep saline aquifers. Numerical simulation is an essential tool to make sure that gaseous CO 2 will remain trapped for several hundreds or thousands of years. Several trapping mechanisms can be brought to bear to achieve this goal. Of particular interest in this thesis are solubility trapping (whereby gaseous CO 2 dissolves in the brine as it moves upward) and, on a longer term, mineral trapping (which causes CO 2 to react with the surrounding rock to form minerals such as calcite). Thus, understanding how CO 2 reacts chemically becomes an important issue for its long term fate. The thesis is composed of four chapters. The first chapter is an introduction to multicomponent two-phase flow in porous media, with or without chemical reactions. It presents a review of the existing literature, and gives an outline of the whole thesis. Chapter 2 presents a quantitative discussion of the physical and chemical phenomena involved, and of their mathematical modeling. The model we use is that of two-phase two-component flow in porous media, coupled to reactive transport. This model leads to a large set of partial differential equations, coupled to algebraic equations, describing the evolution of the concentration of each species at each grid point. A direct solution of this problem (a fully coupled solution) is possible, but presents many difficulties form the numerical point of view. Moreover, it makes it difficult to reuse codes already written, and validated, to simulate the simpler phenomena of (uncoupled) two-phase flow and reactive transport

  15. Power and power-to-flow reactivity transfer functions in EBR-II [Experimental Breeder Reactor II] fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grimm, K.N.; Meneghetti, D.

    1989-01-01

    Reactivity transfer functions are important in determining the reactivity history during a power transient. Overall nodal transfer functions have been calculated for different subassembly types in the Experimental Breeder Reactor II (EBR-II). Steady-state calculations for temperature changes and, hence, reactivities for power changes have been separated into power and power-to-flow-dependent terms. Axial nodal transfer functions separated into power and power-to-flow-dependent components are reported in this paper for a typical EBR-II fuel pin. This provides an improved understanding of the time dependence of these components in transient situations

  16. Cerebral blood flow, oxidative metabolism and cerebrovascular carbon dioxide reactivity in patients with acute bacterial meningitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Kirsten; Strauss, Gitte Irene; Thomsen, Gerda

    2002-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The optimal arterial carbon dioxide tension (P(a)CO(2)) in patients with acute bacterial meningitis (ABM) is unknown and controversial. The objective of this study was to measure global cerebral blood flow (CBF), cerebrovascular CO(2) reactivity (CO(2)R), and cerebral metabolic rates...... and hyperventilation with single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) (14 patients) and/or the Kety-Schmidt technique (KS) (11 patients and all controls). In KS studies, CMR was measured by multiplying the arterial to jugular venous concentration difference (a-v D) by CBF. RESULTS: CBF did not differ...

  17. Tethered by Self-Generated Flow: Mucus String Augmented Feeding Current Generation in Larval Oysters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, H.; Wheeler, J.; Anderson, E.

    2016-02-01

    Marine zooplankton live in a nutritionally dilute environment. To survive, they must process an enormous volume of water relative to their own body volume for food. To achieve this, many zooplankters including copepods, invertebrate larvae, and protists create a feeding current to concentrate and transport food items to their food gathering structures. To enhance the efficiency of the feeding current, these zooplankters often rely on certain "tethering" mechanisms to retard their translational motion for producing a strong feeding current. The tethering force may include excess weight due to gravity, force from attachment to solid surfaces, and drag experienced by strategically placed morphological structures. Larval oysters are known from previous studies to release mucus strings during feeding, presumably for supplying a tethering force to enhance their feeding-current efficiency. But the underlying mechanism is unclear. In this study, we used a high-speed microscale imaging system (HSMIS) to observe the behavior of freely swimming and feeding larval oysters. We also used HSMIS to measure larval imposed feeding currents via a micro-particle image velocimetry (µPIV) technique. HSMIS allows observations along a vertically oriented focal plane in a relatively large water vessel with unprecedented spatial and temporal resolutions. Our high-speed videos show that a feeding larval oyster continuously released a long mucus string into its feeding current that flows downward; the feeding current subsequently dragged the mucus string downward. Analysis of our µPIV data combined with a hydrodynamic model further suggests that the drag force experienced by the mucus string in the feeding current contributes significantly to the tethering force required to generate the feeding current. Thus, mucus strings in larval oysters act as "anchors" in larval self-generated flow to actively tether the feeding larvae.

  18. Effects of chewing rate and reactive hyperemia on blood flow in denture-supporting mucosa during simulated chewing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogino, Takamichi; Ueda, Takayuki; Ogami, Koichiro; Koike, Takashi; Sakurai, Kaoru

    2017-01-01

    We examined how chewing rate and the extent of reactive hyperemia affect the blood flow in denture-supporting mucosa during chewing. The left palatal mucosa was loaded under conditions of simulated chewing or simulated clenching for 30s, and the blood flow during loading was recorded. We compared the relative blood flow during loading under conditions that recreated different chewing rates by combining duration of chewing cycle (DCC) and occlusal time (OT): fast chewing group, typical chewing group, slow chewing group and clenching group. The relationship between relative blood flow during simulated chewing and the extent of reactive hyperemia was also analyzed. When comparing the different chewing rate, the relative blood flow was highest in fast chewing rate, followed by typical chewing rate and slow chewing rate. Accordingly, we suggest that fast chewing increases the blood flow more than typical chewing or slow chewing. There was a significant correlation between the amount of blood flow during simulated chewing and the extent of reactive hyperemia. Within the limitations of this study, we concluded that slow chewing induced less blood flow than typical or fast chewing in denture-supporting mucosa and that people with less reactive hyperemia had less blood flow in denture-supporting mucosa during chewing. Copyright © 2016 Japan Prosthodontic Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Reactive flow analysis with fluorine thermal dissociation in a FLUOREX flame reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohtsuka, Masaya; Tagawa, Hisato; Sasahira, Akira; Hoshino, Kuniyoshi; Kawamura, Fumio; Homma, Shunji; Amano, Osamu

    2004-01-01

    A reactive flow analysis method for flame reactors of the FLUOREX (Hybrid Process of Fluoride Volatility and Solvent Extraction) method was been developed. Transport equations for UO 2 /PuO 2 mixed particles were formulated in the Lagrangian framework and several fluid/particles interactions were modeled using mass, momentum and energy exchanges through surface chemical reactions, forces and heat transfers. The coal combustion model was modified without devolatilization and the char burnout model was replaced by the UO 2 /PuO 2 fluorination model. Overall reaction rates were calculated using the combined model of the surface reaction rate and the diffusion rate of F2 and F. Fluid flows were modeled through incompressible flows using the k-ε turbulent model in the Euler framework. A cylindrical flame reactor (φ 80 mm x 500mm was analyzed where 99%UO 2 +1%PuO 2 mixed particles were injected with Ar and 5% excess F 2 flow. The average particle diameter was 4 μm and the flow rate was 300 g/h. The fluorination reaction of PuO 2 was limited through fluorine molecular reaction but was accelerated due to fluorine thermal dissociation. The simulated corresponded to the experimental result in that both UO 2 and PuO 2 were almost completely fluorinated. (author)

  20. Shock loading and reactive flow modeling studies of void induced AP/AL/HTPB propellant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, P. J.; Lindfors, A. J.

    1998-07-01

    The unreactive Hugoniot of a class 1.3 propellant has been investigated by shock compression experiments. The results are analyzed in terms of an ignition and growth reactive flow model using the DYNA2D hydrocode. The calculated shock ignition parameters of the model show a linear dependence on measured void volume which appears to reproduce the observed gauge records well. Shock waves were generated by impact in a 75 mm single stage powder gun. Manganin and PVDF pressure gauges provided pressure-time histories to 140 kbar. The propellants were of similar formulation differing only in AP particle size and the addition of a burn rate modifer (Fe2O3) from that of previous investigations. Results show neglible effect of AP particle size on shock response in contrast to the addition of Fe2O3 which appears to `stiffen' the unreactive Hugoniot and enhances significantly the reactive rates under shock. The unreactive Hugoniot, within experimental error, compares favorably to the solid AP Hugoniot. Shock experiments were performed on propellant samples strained to induce insitu voids. The material state was quantified by uniaxial tension dialatometry. The experimental records show a direct correlation between void volume (0 to 1.7%) and chemical reactivity behind the shock front. These results are discussed in terms of `hot spot' ignition resulting from the shock collapse of the voids.

  1. A parametric transfer function methodology for analyzing reactive transport in nonuniform flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Jian; Cirpka, Olaf A; Fienen, Michael N; Wu, Wei-min; Mehlhorn, Tonia L; Carley, Jack; Jardine, Philip M; Criddle, Craig S; Kitanidis, Peter K

    2006-02-01

    We analyze reactive transport during in-situ bioremediation in a nonuniform flow field, involving multiple extraction and injection wells, by the method of transfer functions. Gamma distributions are used as parametric models of the transfer functions. Apparent parameters of classical transport models may be estimated from those of the gamma distributions by matching temporal moments. We demonstrate the method by application to measured data taken at a field experiment on bioremediation conducted in a multiple-well system in Oak Ridge, TN. Breakthrough curves (BTCs) of a conservative tracer (bromide) and a reactive compound (ethanol) are measured at multi-level sampling (MLS) wells and in extraction wells. The BTCs of both compounds are jointly analyzed to estimate the first-order degradation rate of ethanol. To quantify the tracer loss, we compare the approaches of using a scaling factor and a first-order decay term. Results show that by including a scaling factor both gamma distributions and inverse-Gaussian distributions (transfer functions according to the advection-dispersion equation) are suitable to approximate the transfer functions and estimate the reactive rate coefficients for both MLS and extraction wells. However, using a first-order decay term for tracer loss fails to describe the BTCs at the extraction well, which is affected by the nonuniform distribution of travel paths.

  2. Unsteady Flow of Reactive Viscous, Heat Generating/Absorbing Fluid with Soret and Variable Thermal Conductivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. J. Uwanta

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This study investigates the unsteady natural convection and mass transfer flow of viscous reactive, heat generating/absorbing fluid in a vertical channel formed by two infinite parallel porous plates having temperature dependent thermal conductivity. The motion of the fluid is induced due to natural convection caused by the reactive property as well as the heat generating/absorbing nature of the fluid. The solutions for unsteady state temperature, concentration, and velocity fields are obtained using semi-implicit finite difference schemes. Perturbation techniques are used to get steady state expressions of velocity, concentration, temperature, skin friction, Nusselt number, and Sherwood number. The effects of various flow parameters such as suction/injection (γ, heat source/sinks (S, Soret number (Sr, variable thermal conductivity δ, Frank-Kamenetskii parameter λ, Prandtl number (Pr, and nondimensional time t on the dynamics are analyzed. The skin friction, heat transfer coefficients, and Sherwood number are graphically presented for a range of values of the said parameters.

  3. Numerical Simulation of Reactive Flows in Overexpanded Supersonic Nozzle with Film Cooling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed Sellam

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Reignition phenomena occurring in a supersonic nozzle flow may present a crucial safety issue for rocket propulsion systems. These phenomena concern mainly rocket engines which use H2 gas (GH2 in the film cooling device, particularly when the nozzle operates under over expanded flow conditions at sea level or at low altitudes. Consequently, the induced wall thermal loads can lead to the nozzle geometry alteration, which in turn, leads to the appearance of strong side loads that may be detrimental to the rocket engine structural integrity. It is therefore necessary to understand both aerodynamic and chemical mechanisms that are at the origin of these processes. This paper is a numerical contribution which reports results from CFD analysis carried out for supersonic reactive flows in a planar nozzle cooled with GH2 film. Like the experimental observations, CFD simulations showed their ability to highlight these phenomena for the same nozzle flow conditions. Induced thermal load are also analyzed in terms of cooling efficiency and the results already give an idea on their magnitude. It was also shown that slightly increasing the film injection pressure can avoid the reignition phenomena by moving the separation shock towards the nozzle exit section.

  4. Specific features of the flow structure in a reactive type turbine stage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chernikov, V. A.; Semakina, E. Yu.

    2017-04-01

    The results of experimental studies of the gas dynamics for a reactive type turbine stage are presented. The objective of the studies is the measurement of the 3D flow fields in reference cross sections, experimental determination of the stage characteristics, and analysis of the flow structure for detecting the sources of kinetic energy losses. The integral characteristics of the studied stage are obtained by averaging the results of traversing the 3D flow over the area of the reference cross sections before and behind the stage. The averaging is performed using the conservation equations for mass, total energy flux, angular momentum with respect to the axis z of the turbine, entropy flow, and the radial projection of the momentum flux equation. The flow parameter distributions along the channel height behind the stage are obtained in the same way. More thorough analysis of the flow structure is performed after interpolation of the experimentally measured point parameter values and 3D flow velocities behind the stage. The obtained continuous velocity distributions in the absolute and relative coordinate systems are presented in the form of vector fields. The coordinates of the centers and the vectors of secondary vortices are determined using the results of point measurements of velocity vectors in the cross section behind the turbine stage and their subsequent interpolation. The approach to analysis of experimental data on aerodynamics of the turbine stage applied in this study allows one to find the detailed space structure of the working medium flow, including secondary coherent vortices at the root and peripheral regions of the air-gas part of the stage. The measured 3D flow parameter fields and their interpolation, on the one hand, point to possible sources of increased power losses, and, on the other hand, may serve as the basis for detailed testing of CFD models of the flow using both integral and local characteristics. The comparison of the numerical and

  5. Localized reactive flow in carbonate rocks: Core-flood experiments and network simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Haoyue; Bernabé, Yves; Mok, Ulrich; Evans, Brian

    2016-11-01

    We conducted four core-flood experiments on samples of a micritic, reef limestone from Abu Dhabi under conditions of constant flow rate. The pore fluid was water in equilibrium with CO2, which, because of its lowered pH, is chemically reactive with the limestone. Flow rates were between 0.03 and 0.1 mL/min. The difference between up and downstream pore pressures dropped to final values ≪1 MPa over periods of 3-18 h. Scanning electron microscope and microtomography imaging of the starting material showed that the limestone is mostly calcite and lacks connected macroporosity and that the prevailing pores are few microns large. During each experiment, a wormhole formed by localized dissolution, an observation consistent with the decreases in pressure head between the up and downstream reservoirs. Moreover, we numerically modeled the changes in permeability during the experiments. We devised a network approach that separated the pore space into competing subnetworks of pipes. Thus, the problem was framed as a competition of flow of the reactive fluid among the adversary subnetworks. The precondition for localization within certain time is that the leading subnetwork rapidly becomes more transmissible than its competitors. This novel model successfully simulated features of the shape of the wormhole as it grew from few to about 100 µm, matched the pressure history patterns, and yielded the correct order of magnitude of the breakthrough time. Finally, we systematically studied the impact of changing the statistical parameters of the subnetworks. Larger mean radius and spatial correlation of the leading subnetwork led to faster localization.

  6. Variably Saturated Flow and Multicomponent Biogeochemical Reactive Transport Modeling of a Uranium Bioremediation Field Experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yabusaki, Steven B.; Fang, Yilin; Williams, Kenneth H.; Murray, Christopher J.; Ward, Anderson L.; Dayvault, Richard; Waichler, Scott R.; Newcomer, Darrell R.; Spane, Frank A.; Long, Philip E.

    2011-01-01

    Field experiments at a former uranium mill tailings site have identified the potential for stimulating indigenous bacteria to catalyze the conversion of aqueous uranium in the +6 oxidation state to immobile solid-associated uranium in the +4 oxidation state. This effectively removes uranium from solution resulting in groundwater concentrations below actionable standards. Three-dimensional, coupled variably-saturated flow and biogeochemical reactive transport modeling of a 2008 in situ uranium bioremediation field experiment is used to better understand the interplay of transport rates and biogeochemical reaction rates that determine the location and magnitude of key reaction products. A comprehensive reaction network, developed largely through previous 1-D modeling studies, was used to simulate the impacts on uranium behavior of pulsed acetate amendment, seasonal water table variation, spatially-variable physical (hydraulic conductivity, porosity) and geochemical (reactive surface area) material properties. A principal challenge is the mechanistic representation of biologically-mediated terminal electron acceptor process (TEAP) reactions whose products significantly alter geochemical controls on uranium mobility through increases in pH, alkalinity, exchangeable cations, and highly reactive reduction products. In general, these simulations of the 2008 Big Rusty acetate biostimulation field experiment in Rifle, Colorado confirmed previously identified behaviors including (1) initial dominance by iron reducing bacteria that concomitantly reduce aqueous U(VI), (2) sulfate reducing bacteria that become dominant after ∼30 days and outcompete iron reducers for the acetate electron donor, (3) continuing iron-reducer activity and U(VI) bioreduction during dominantly sulfate reducing conditions, and (4) lower apparent U(VI) removal from groundwater during dominantly sulfate reducing conditions. New knowledge on simultaneously active metal and sulfate reducers has been

  7. On the thermal stability for a model reactive flow with viscous dissipation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okoya, S.S.

    2006-12-01

    We study the thermal stability of a reactive flow of a third-grade fluid with viscous heating and chemical reaction between two horizontal flat plates, where the top is moving with a uniform speed and the bottom plate is fixed in the presence of an imposed pressure gradient. This study is a natural continuation of earlier work on rectilinear shear flows. The governing equations are non-dimensionalized and the resulting system of equations are not coupled. An approximate explicit solution is found for the flow velocity using homotopy - perturbation technique and the range of validity is determined. After the velocity is known, the heat transport may be analyzed. It is found that the temperature solution depends on the non-Newtonian material parameter of the fluid, Λ, viscous heating parameter, Γ, and an exponent, m. Attention is focused upon the disappearance of criticality of the solution set {β, δ, θ max } for various values of Λ, Γ and m, and the numerical computations are presented graphically to show salient features of the solution set. (author)

  8. RICE: a computer program for multicomponent chemically reactive flows at all speeds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rivard, W.C.; Farmer, O.A.; Butler, T.D.

    1974-11-01

    The fluid dynamics of chemically reactive mixtures are calculated at arbitrary flow speeds with the RICE program. The dynamics are governed by the two-dimensional, time-dependent Navier-Stokes equations together with the species transport equations and the mass-action rate equations for the chemical reactions. The mass and momentum equations for the mixture are solved implicitly by the ICE technique. The equations for total energy and species transport are solved explicitly while the chemical rate equations are solved implicitly with a time step that may be a submultiple of the hydrodynamic time step. Application is made to continuous wave HF chemical lasers to compute the supersonic mixing and chemical reactions that take place in the lasing cavity. (U.S.)

  9. Reactive flow modeling of initial density effect on divergence JB-9014 detonation driving

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Xin; Huang, Kuibang; Zheng, Miao

    2016-06-01

    A serious of experiments were designed and the results were represented in this paper, in which 2mm thickness cooper shells were impacted by explosives named JB-9014 with different densities, and the surface velocities of the OFHC shells were measured. The comparison of experimental data shows the free surface velocity of the OFHC shell increase with the IHE density. Numerical modeling, which occupied phenomenological reactive flow rate model using the two-dimensional Lagrange hydrodynamic code, were carried out to simulate the above experiments, and empirical adjustments on detonation velocity and pressure and Pier Tang's adjustments on EOS of detonation products were both introduced in our numerical simulation work. The computational results agree well with that of experiments, and the numerical results with original parameters of products and the adjusted ones of JB-9014 could describe the density effect distinctly.

  10. Improved Reactive Flow Modeling of the LX-17 Double Shock Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rehagen, Thomas J.; Vitello, Peter

    2017-06-01

    Over driven double shock experiments provide a measurement of the properties of the reaction product states of the insensitive high explosive LX-17 (92.5% TATB and 7.5% Kel-F by weight). These experiments used two flyer materials mounted on the end of a projectile to send an initial shock through the LX-17, followed by a second shock of a higher magnitude into the detonation products. In the experiments, the explosive was initially driven by the flyer plate to pressures above the Chapman-Jouguet state. The particle velocity history was recorded by Photonic Doppler Velocimetry (PDV) probes pointing at an aluminum foil coated LiF window. The PDV data shows a sharp initial shock and decay, followed by a rounded second shock. Here, the experimental results are compared to 2D and 3D Cheetah reactive flow modeling. Our default Cheetah reactive flow model fails to accurately reproduce the decay of the first shock or the curvature or strength of the second shock. A new model is proposed in which the carbon condensate produced in the reaction zone is controlled by a kinetic rate. This allows the carbon condensate to be initially out of chemical equilibrium with the product gas. This new model reproduces the initial detonation peak and decay, and matches the curvature of the second shock, however, it still over-predicts the strength of the second shock. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract No. DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  11. Characteristics of flow and reactive pollutant dispersion in urban street canyons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Soo-Jin; Kim, Jae-Jin; Kim, Minjoong J.; Park, Rokjin J.; Cheong, Hyeong-Bin

    2015-05-01

    In this study, the effects of aspect ratio defined as the ratio of building height to street width on the dispersion of reactive pollutants in street canyons were investigated using a coupled CFD-chemistry model. Flow characteristics for different aspect ratios were analyzed first. For each aspect ratio, six emission scenarios with different VOC-NOX ratios were considered. One vortex was generated when the aspect ratio was less than 1.6 (shallow street canyon). When the aspect ratio was greater than 1.6 (deep street canyon), two vortices were formed in the street canyons. Comparing to previous studies on two-dimensional street canyons, the vortex center is slanted toward the upwind building and reverse and downward flows are dominant in street canyons. Near the street bottom, there is a marked difference in flow pattern between in shallow and deep street canyons. Near the street bottom, reverse and downward flows are dominant in shallow street canyon and flow convergence exists near the center of the deep street canyons, which induces a large difference in the NOX and O3 dispersion patterns in the street canyons. NOX concentrations are high near the street bottom and decreases with height. The O3 concentrations are low at high NO concentrations near the street bottom because of NO titration. At a low VOC-NOX ratio, the NO concentrations are sufficiently high to destroy large amount of O3 by titration, resulting in an O3 concentration in the street canyon much lower than the background concentration. At high VOC-NOX ratios, a small amount of O3 is destroyed by NO titration in the lower layer of the street canyons. However, in the upper layer, O3 is formed through the photolysis of NO2 by VOC degradation reactions. As the aspect ratio increases, NOX (O3) concentrations averaged over the street canyons decrease (increase) in the shallow street canyons. This is because outward flow becomes strong and NOX flux toward the outsides of the street canyons increases

  12. Augmented postcard

    OpenAIRE

    Bernik , Aleš

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this thesis is the examination of augmented reality technology, which allows us mixing real and virtual elements. Augmented reality is a relatively new technology which is becoming more widespread, thanks to a fairly reasonable price of smart phones. Here we presents the types of augmented reality, the necessary technology and their advantages and disadvantages, its current use in applications, and software for building augmented reality applications. The thesis is mainly focuse...

  13. Image-based modeling of flow and reactive transport in porous media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Chao-Zhong; Hoang, Tuong; Verhoosel, Clemens V.; Harald van Brummelen, E.; Wijshoff, Herman M. A.

    2017-04-01

    Due to the availability of powerful computational resources and high-resolution acquisition of material structures, image-based modeling has become an important tool in studying pore-scale flow and transport processes in porous media [Scheibe et al., 2015]. It is also playing an important role in the upscaling study for developing macroscale porous media models. Usually, the pore structure of a porous medium is directly discretized by the voxels obtained from visualization techniques (e.g. micro CT scanning), which can avoid the complex generation of computational mesh. However, this discretization may considerably overestimate the interfacial areas between solid walls and pore spaces. As a result, it could impact the numerical predictions of reactive transport and immiscible two-phase flow. In this work, two types of image-based models are used to study single-phase flow and reactive transport in a porous medium of sintered glass beads. One model is from a well-established voxel-based simulation tool. The other is based on the mixed isogeometric finite cell method [Hoang et al., 2016], which has been implemented in the open source Nutils (http://www.nutils.org). The finite cell method can be used in combination with isogeometric analysis to enable the higher-order discretization of problems on complex volumetric domains. A particularly interesting application of this immersed simulation technique is image-based analysis, where the geometry is smoothly approximated by segmentation of a B-spline level set approximation of scan data [Verhoosel et al., 2015]. Through a number of case studies by the two models, we will show the advantages and disadvantages of each model in modeling single-phase flow and reactive transport in porous media. Particularly, we will highlight the importance of preserving high-resolution interfaces between solid walls and pore spaces in image-based modeling of porous media. References Hoang, T., C. V. Verhoosel, F. Auricchio, E. H. van

  14. PFLOTRAN: Reactive Flow & Transport Code for Use on Laptops to Leadership-Class Supercomputers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hammond, Glenn E.; Lichtner, Peter C.; Lu, Chuan; Mills, Richard T.

    2012-04-18

    PFLOTRAN, a next-generation reactive flow and transport code for modeling subsurface processes, has been designed from the ground up to run efficiently on machines ranging from leadership-class supercomputers to laptops. Based on an object-oriented design, the code is easily extensible to incorporate additional processes. It can interface seamlessly with Fortran 9X, C and C++ codes. Domain decomposition parallelism is employed, with the PETSc parallel framework used to manage parallel solvers, data structures and communication. Features of the code include a modular input file, implementation of high-performance I/O using parallel HDF5, ability to perform multiple realization simulations with multiple processors per realization in a seamless manner, and multiple modes for multiphase flow and multicomponent geochemical transport. Chemical reactions currently implemented in the code include homogeneous aqueous complexing reactions and heterogeneous mineral precipitation/dissolution, ion exchange, surface complexation and a multirate kinetic sorption model. PFLOTRAN has demonstrated petascale performance using 2{sup 17} processor cores with over 2 billion degrees of freedom. Accomplishments achieved to date include applications to the Hanford 300 Area and modeling CO{sub 2} sequestration in deep geologic formations.

  15. New chemical-DSMC method in numerical simulation of axisymmetric rarefied reactive flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakeri, Ramin; Kamali Moghadam, Ramin; Mani, Mahmoud

    2017-04-01

    The modified quantum kinetic (MQK) chemical reaction model introduced by Zakeri et al. is developed for applicable cases in axisymmetric reactive rarefied gas flows using the direct simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) method. Although, the MQK chemical model uses some modifications in the quantum kinetic (QK) method, it also employs the general soft sphere collision model and Stockmayer potential function to properly select the collision pairs in the DSMC algorithm and capture both the attraction and repulsion intermolecular forces in rarefied gas flows. For assessment of the presented model in the simulation of more complex and applicable reacting flows, first, the air dissociation is studied in a single cell for equilibrium and non-equilibrium conditions. The MQK results agree well with the analytical and experimental data and they accurately predict the characteristics of the rarefied flowfield with chemical reaction. To investigate accuracy of the MQK chemical model in the simulation of the axisymmetric flow, air dissociation is also assessed in an axial hypersonic flow around two geometries, the sphere as a benchmark case and the blunt body (STS-2) as an applicable test case. The computed results including the transient, rotational and vibrational temperatures, species concentration in the stagnation line, and also the heat flux and pressure coefficient on the surface are compared with those of the other chemical methods like the QK and total collision energy (TCE) models and available analytical and experimental data. Generally, the MQK chemical model properly simulates the chemical reactions and predicts flowfield characteristics more accurate rather than the typical QK model. Although in some cases, results of the MQK approaches match with those of the TCE method, the main point is that the MQK does not need any experimental data or unrealistic assumption of specular boundary condition as used in the TCE method. Another advantage of the MQK model is the

  16. Flow and nutrient dynamics in a subterranean estuary (Waquoit Bay, MA, USA) : Field data and reactive transport modeling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spiteri, C.; Slomp, C.P.; Charette, M.A.; Tuncay, K.; Meile, C.

    2008-01-01

    A two-dimensional (2D) reactive transport model is used to investigate the controls on nutrient (NO3-, NH4+, PO4) dynamics in a coastal aquifer. The model couples density-dependent flow to a reaction network which includes oxic degradation of organic matter, denitrification, iron oxide reduction,

  17. Hybrid finite-volume/transported PDF method for the simulation of turbulent reactive flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raman, Venkatramanan

    A novel computational scheme is formulated for simulating turbulent reactive flows in complex geometries with detailed chemical kinetics. A Probability Density Function (PDF) based method that handles the scalar transport equation is coupled with an existing Finite Volume (FV) Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) flow solver. The PDF formulation leads to closed chemical source terms and facilitates the use of detailed chemical mechanisms without approximations. The particle-based PDF scheme is modified to handle complex geometries and grid structures. Grid-independent particle evolution schemes that scale linearly with the problem size are implemented in the Monte-Carlo PDF solver. A novel algorithm, in situ adaptive tabulation (ISAT) is employed to ensure tractability of complex chemistry involving a multitude of species. Several non-reacting test cases are performed to ascertain the efficiency and accuracy of the method. Simulation results from a turbulent jet-diffusion flame case are compared against experimental data. The effect of micromixing model, turbulence model and reaction scheme on flame predictions are discussed extensively. Finally, the method is used to analyze the Dow Chlorination Reactor. Detailed kinetics involving 37 species and 158 reactions as well as a reduced form with 16 species and 21 reactions are used. The effect of inlet configuration on reactor behavior and product distribution is analyzed. Plant-scale reactors exhibit quenching phenomena that cannot be reproduced by conventional simulation methods. The FV-PDF method predicts quenching accurately and provides insight into the dynamics of the reactor near extinction. The accuracy of the fractional time-stepping technique in discussed in the context of apparent multiple-steady states observed in a non-premixed feed configuration of the chlorination reactor.

  18. Real rock-microfluidic flow cell: A test bed for real-time in situ analysis of flow, transport, and reaction in a subsurface reactive transport environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Rajveer; Sivaguru, Mayandi; Fried, Glenn A; Fouke, Bruce W; Sanford, Robert A; Carrera, Martin; Werth, Charles J

    2017-09-01

    Physical, chemical, and biological interactions between groundwater and sedimentary rock directly control the fundamental subsurface properties such as porosity, permeability, and flow. This is true for a variety of subsurface scenarios, ranging from shallow groundwater aquifers to deeply buried hydrocarbon reservoirs. Microfluidic flow cells are now commonly being used to study these processes at the pore scale in simplified pore structures meant to mimic subsurface reservoirs. However, these micromodels are typically fabricated from glass, silicon, or polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS), and are therefore incapable of replicating the geochemical reactivity and complex three-dimensional pore networks present in subsurface lithologies. To address these limitations, we developed a new microfluidic experimental test bed, herein called the Real Rock-Microfluidic Flow Cell (RR-MFC). A porous 500μm-thick real rock sample of the Clair Group sandstone from a subsurface hydrocarbon reservoir of the North Sea was prepared and mounted inside a PDMS microfluidic channel, creating a dynamic flow-through experimental platform for real-time tracking of subsurface reactive transport. Transmitted and reflected microscopy, cathodoluminescence microscopy, Raman spectroscopy, and confocal laser microscopy techniques were used to (1) determine the mineralogy, geochemistry, and pore networks within the sandstone inserted in the RR-MFC, (2) analyze non-reactive tracer breakthrough in two- and (depth-limited) three-dimensions, and (3) characterize multiphase flow. The RR-MFC is the first microfluidic experimental platform that allows direct visualization of flow and transport in the pore space of a real subsurface reservoir rock sample, and holds potential to advance our understandings of reactive transport and other subsurface processes relevant to pollutant transport and cleanup in groundwater, as well as energy recovery. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Reactive oxygen species inactivation improves pancreatic capillary blood flow in caerulein-induced pancreatitis in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meirelles Jr. Roberto Ferreira

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: Reactive oxygen species (ROS inactivation was studied to determine alterations in the pancreatic capillary blood flow (PCBF during caerulein-induced pancreatitis in rats. METHODS: A laser-Doppler flowmeter to measure PCBF and N-t-Butyl-Phenylnitrone (PBN compound to inactivate ROS were used. Forty rats were divided in groups: 1 control; 2 caerulein; 3 PBN; 4 caerulein+PBN. Serum biochemistry and histopathological analyses were performed. RESULTS: PCBF measured a mean of 109.08 ± 14.54%, 68.24 ± 10.47%, 102.18 ± 10.23% and 87.73 ± 18.72% in groups 1, 2, 3 and 4, respectively. PCBF in groups 2 and 4 decreased 31.75 ± 16.79% and 12.26 ± 15.24%, respectively. Serum amylase was 1323.70 ± 239.10 U/l, 2184.60 ± 700.46 U/l, 1379.80 ± 265.72 U/l and 1622.10 ± 314.60 U/l in groups 1, 2, 3 and 4, respectively. There was a significant difference in the PCBF and serum amylase when compared groups 2 and 4. Cytoplasmatic vacuolation was present in groups 2 and 4. Otherwise, no qualitative changes were seen. CONCLUSION: ROS inactivation improves PCBF and minimizes the serum amylase increase during caerulein-induced pancreatitis. ROS effect may be one of the leading causative events in this model of acute pancreatitis.

  20. Reactive flow modeling of small scale detonation failure experiments for a baseline non-ideal explosive

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kittell, David E.; Cummock, Nick R.; Son, Steven F. [School of Mechanical Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907 (United States)

    2016-08-14

    Small scale characterization experiments using only 1–5 g of a baseline ammonium nitrate plus fuel oil (ANFO) explosive are discussed and simulated using an ignition and growth reactive flow model. There exists a strong need for the small scale characterization of non-ideal explosives in order to adequately survey the wide parameter space in sample composition, density, and microstructure of these materials. However, it is largely unknown in the scientific community whether any useful or meaningful result may be obtained from detonation failure, and whether a minimum sample size or level of confinement exists for the experiments. In this work, it is shown that the parameters of an ignition and growth rate law may be calibrated using the small scale data, which is obtained from a 35 GHz microwave interferometer. Calibration is feasible when the samples are heavily confined and overdriven; this conclusion is supported with detailed simulation output, including pressure and reaction contours inside the ANFO samples. The resulting shock wave velocity is most likely a combined chemical-mechanical response, and simulations of these experiments require an accurate unreacted equation of state (EOS) in addition to the calibrated reaction rate. Other experiments are proposed to gain further insight into the detonation failure data, as well as to help discriminate between the role of the EOS and reaction rate in predicting the measured outcome.

  1. Rapid detection of defects in fuel-cell electrodes using infrared reactive-flow-through technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Prodip K.; Weber, Adam Z.; Bender, Guido; Manak, Austin; Bittinat, Daniel; Herring, Andrew M.; Ulsh, Michael

    2014-09-01

    As fuel cells become more prominent, new manufacturing and production methods will need to be developed to deal efficiently and effectively with increased demand. One necessary component of this industrial growth is the accurate measurement of the variability in the manufacturing process. In this study, we present a diagnostic system that combines infrared thermography with a reactive-flow-through technique to detect catalyst-loading defects in fuel-cell gas-diffusion electrodes accurately with high spatial and temporal resolutions. Experimental results are compared with model predictions of thermal response with good agreement. Data analysis, operating-condition impacts, and detection limits are explored using both experiments and simulation. Overall, the results demonstrate the potential of this technique to measure defects on the millimeter length scale with temporal resolutions appropriate for use on a web-line. Thus we present the first development stage of a next-generation non-destructive diagnostic tool, which may be amenable to eventual use on roll-to-roll manufacturing lines.

  2. Dual-Quantum-Dots-Labeled Lateral Flow Strip Rapidly Quantifies Procalcitonin and C-reactive Protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, XiaoPing; Huang, YunYe; Lin, ZhongShi; Xu, Liang; Yu, Hao

    2016-03-01

    In the article, a dual-quantum-dots-labeled (dual-QDs-labeled) lateral flow strip (LFS) method was developed for the simultaneous and rapid quantitative detection of procalcitonin (PCT) and C-reactive protein (CRP) in the blood. Two QD-antibody conjugates with different fluorescence emission spectra were produced and sprayed on the LFS to capture PCT and CRP in the blood. Furthermore, a double antibody sandwich method for PCT and, meanwhile, a competitive inhibition method for CRP were employed in the LFS. For PCT and CRP in serum assayed by the dual-QDs-labeled LFS, their detection sensitivities reached 0.1 and 1 ng/mL, respectively, and their linear quantitative detection ranges were from 0.3 to 200 ng/mL and from 50 to 250 μg/mL, respectively. There was little evidence that the PCT and CRP assays would be interfered with each other. The correlations for testing CRP and PCT in clinical samples were 99.75 and 97.02 %, respectively, between the dual-QDs-labeled LFS we developed and commercial methods. The rapid quantification of PCT and CRP on dual-QDs-labeled LFS is of great clinical value to distinguish inflammation, bacterial infection, or viral infection and to provide guidance for the use of antibiotics or other medicines.

  3. Numerical Tools for Multicomponent, Multiphase, Reactive Processes: Flow of CO{sub 2} in Porous Medium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khattri, Sanjay Kumar

    2006-07-01

    The thesis is concerned with numerically simulating multicomponent, multiphase, reactive transport in heterogeneous porous medium. Such processes are ubiquitous, for example, deposition of green house gases, flow of hydrocarbons and groundwater remediation. Understanding such processes is important from social and economic point of view. For the success of geological sequestration, an accurate estimation of migration patterns of green-house gases is essential. Due to an ever increasing computer power, computational mathematics has become an important tool for predicting dynamics of porous media fluids. Numerical and mathematical modelling of processes in a domain requires grid generation in the domain, discretization of the continuum equations on the generated grid, solution of the formed linear or nonlinear system of discrete equations and finally visualization of the results. The thesis is composed of three chapters and eight papers. Chapter 2 presents two techniques for generating structured quadrilateral and hexahedral meshes. These techniques are called algebraic and elliptic methods. Algebraic techniques are by far the most simple and computationally efficient method for grid generation. Transfinite interpolation operators are a kind of algebraic grid generation technique. In this chapter, many transfinite interpolation operators for grid generation are derived from 1D projection operators. In this chapter, some important properties of hexahedral elements are also mentioned. These properties are useful in discretization of partial differential equations on hexahedral mesh, improving quality of the hexahedral mesh, mesh generation and visualization. Chapter 3 is about CO{sub 2} flow in porous media. In this chapter, we present the mathematical models and their discretization for capturing major physical processes associated with CO{sub 2} deposition in geological formations. Some important simulations of practical applications in 2D and 3D are presented

  4. Numerical Tools for Multicomponent, Multiphase, Reactive Processes: Flow of CO{sub 2} in Porous Medium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khattri, Sanjay Kumar

    2006-07-01

    The thesis is concerned with numerically simulating multicomponent, multiphase, reactive transport in heterogeneous porous medium. Such processes are ubiquitous, for example, deposition of green house gases, flow of hydrocarbons and groundwater remediation. Understanding such processes is important from social and economic point of view. For the success of geological sequestration, an accurate estimation of migration patterns of green-house gases is essential. Due to an ever increasing computer power, computational mathematics has become an important tool for predicting dynamics of porous media fluids. Numerical and mathematical modelling of processes in a domain requires grid generation in the domain, discretization of the continuum equations on the generated grid, solution of the formed linear or nonlinear system of discrete equations and finally visualization of the results. The thesis is composed of three chapters and eight papers. Chapter 2 presents two techniques for generating structured quadrilateral and hexahedral meshes. These techniques are called algebraic and elliptic methods. Algebraic techniques are by far the most simple and computationally efficient method for grid generation. Transfinite interpolation operators are a kind of algebraic grid generation technique. In this chapter, many transfinite interpolation operators for grid generation are derived from 1D projection operators. In this chapter, some important properties of hexahedral elements are also mentioned. These properties are useful in discretization of partial differential equations on hexahedral mesh, improving quality of the hexahedral mesh, mesh generation and visualization. Chapter 3 is about CO{sub 2} flow in porous media. In this chapter, we present the mathematical models and their discretization for capturing major physical processes associated with CO{sub 2} deposition in geological formations. Some important simulations of practical applications in 2D and 3D are presented

  5. Observation by flow 1H NMR and dimerization kinetics and products of reactive ortho-quinodimethanes and benzocyclobutadiene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fischer, D.

    1990-01-01

    The reactive o-quinodimethanes, 1,2-dimethylene-1,2-dihydronaphthalene (9) and o-xylylene (1) were observed by flow 1 H NMR spectroscopy at room temperature. The 1 H NMR spectrum of 9 was obtained in the absence of precursor and dimers. However, the 1 H NMR spectrum of the more reactive 1, generated in a similar manner from [o-((trimethylsilyl)methyl)benzyl]trimethylammonium iodide (5.) could be obtained only in the presence of its stable [4 + 2] and [4 + 4] dimers. The dimerization kinetics of 3-methyl- (5'), 3,6-dimethyl- (11), 3-isopropyl- (12), and 3,6-diisoproply-1,2-xylylene (13) in acetonitrile (CH 3 CN) were studied by stopped-flow UV-visible spectroscopy. Fluoride ion induced 1,2-elimination from 2-elimination from 2-trimethylsilylbenzocyclobutenyl-1 mesylate (26) was used to generate the reactive molecule benzocyclobutadiene (1') in CD 3 CN, which was observed by flow 1 H NMR spectroscopy at room temperature. The 1 H NMR spectrum (in CD 3 CN) of 1,2-dimethylene-1,2-dihydrothiophene (1 double-prime), obtained by fluoride ion induced 1,4-elimination from 3-(trimethylammoniummethyl)-2-(trimethylsilylmethyl)thiophene iodine was observed by flow 1 H NMR spectroscopy at room temperature. The dimerization rate of 1 double-prime in CH 3 CN, generated in the same manner, was measured by UV-visible spectroscopy. 166 refs., 7 figs., 7 tabs

  6. AUGMENTED REALITY

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skov, Kirsten; Bahn, Anne Louise

    2017-01-01

    Projektets grundlæggende idé er udvikling af visuel, æstetisk læring med Augmented Reality, hvor intentionen er at bidrage med konkrete undersøgelser og udforskning af begrebet Augmented Reality – herunder koblingen mellem det analoge og digitale i forhold til læring, multimodalitet og it...

  7. Subsurface Transport Over Reactive Multiphases (STORM): A Parallel, Coupled, Nonisothermal Multiphase Flow, Reactive Transport, and Porous Medium Alteration Simulator, Version 3.0

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bacon, Diana H.; White, Mark D.; McGrail, B PETER

    2004-01-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy must approve a performance assessment (PA) to support the design, construction, approval, and closure of disposal facilities for immobilized low-activity waste (ILAW) currently stored in underground tanks at Hanford, Washington. A critical component of the PA is to provide quantitative estimates of radionuclide release rates from the engineered portion of the disposal facilities. Computer simulations are essential for this purpose because impacts on groundwater resources must be projected to periods of 10,000 years and longer. The computer code selected for simulating the radionuclide release rates is the Subsurface Transport Over Reactive Multiphases (STORM) simulator. The STORM simulator solves coupled conservation equations for component mass and energy that describe subsurface flow over aqueous and gas phases through variably saturated geologic media. The resulting flow fields are used to sequentially solve conservation equations for reactive aqueous phase transport through variably saturated geologic media. These conservation equations for component mass, energy, and solute mass are partial differential equations that mathematically describe flow and transport through porous media. The STORM simulator solves the governing-conservation equations and constitutive functions using numerical techniques for nonlinear systems. The partial differential equations governing thermal and fluid flow processes are solved by the integral volume finite difference method. These governing equations are solved simultaneously using Newton-Raphson iteration. The partial differential equations governing reactive solute transport are solved using either an operator split technique where geochemical reactions and solute transport are solved separately, or a fully coupled technique where these equations are solved simultaneously. The STORM simulator is written in the FORTRAN 77 language, following American National Standards Institute (ANSI) standards

  8. KIVA3, Transient Multicomponent 2-D and 3-D Reactive Flows with Fuel Sprays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amsden, A.A.

    2001-01-01

    1 - Description of program or function: KIVA3VRELEASE2 is a computer program for the numerical calculation of transient, two and three-dimensional, chemically reactive flows with sprays. It is a newer version of the earlier KIVA3 (1993) that has now been extended to model vertical of canted valves in the cylinder head of a gasoline or diesel engine. KIVA3, in turn, was based on the earlier KIVA2 (1989) and uses the same numerical solution procedure and solves the same sort of equations. KIVA3VRELEASE2 uses a block-structured mesh with connectivity defined through indirect addressing. The departure from a single rectangular structure in logical space allows complex geometries to be modeled with significantly greater efficiency because large regions of deactivated cells are no longer necessary. Cell-face boundary conditions permit greater flexibility and simplification in the application of boundary conditions. KIVA3VRELEASE2 contains a number of significant changes. New features enhance the robustness, efficiency, and usefulness of the overall program for engine modeling. Automatic restart of the cycle with a reduced time-step in case of iteration limit or temperature overflow will reduce code crashes. A new option provides automatic deactivation of a port region when it is closed from the cylinder and reactivation when it communicates with the cylinder. Corrections in the code improve accuracy; extensions to the particle-based liquid wall film model makes the model more complete and a spli injection option has been added. A new subroutine monitors the liquid and gaseous fuel phases and energy balance data and emissions are monitored and printed. New features have been added to the grid generator K3PREP and the graphics post processor, K3POST. 2 - Method of solution: KIVA3VRELEASE2 solves the unsteady equations of motion of a turbulent, chemically reactive mixture of ideal gases, coupled to the equations for a single-component vaporizing fuel spray. The gas

  9. A Generalized Hybrid Multiscale Modeling Approach for Flow and Reactive Transport in Porous Media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, X.; Meng, X.; Tang, Y. H.; Guo, Z.; Karniadakis, G. E.

    2017-12-01

    Using emerging understanding of biological and environmental processes at fundamental scales to advance predictions of the larger system behavior requires the development of multiscale approaches, and there is strong interest in coupling models at different scales together in a hybrid multiscale simulation framework. A limited number of hybrid multiscale simulation methods have been developed for subsurface applications, mostly using application-specific approaches for model coupling. The proposed generalized hybrid multiscale approach is designed with minimal intrusiveness to the at-scale simulators (pre-selected) and provides a set of lightweight C++ scripts to manage a complex multiscale workflow utilizing a concurrent coupling approach. The workflow includes at-scale simulators (using the lattice-Boltzmann method, LBM, at the pore and Darcy scale, respectively), scripts for boundary treatment (coupling and kriging), and a multiscale universal interface (MUI) for data exchange. The current study aims to apply the generalized hybrid multiscale modeling approach to couple pore- and Darcy-scale models for flow and mixing-controlled reaction with precipitation/dissolution in heterogeneous porous media. The model domain is packed heterogeneously that the mixing front geometry is more complex and not known a priori. To address those challenges, the generalized hybrid multiscale modeling approach is further developed to 1) adaptively define the locations of pore-scale subdomains, 2) provide a suite of physical boundary coupling schemes and 3) consider the dynamic change of the pore structures due to mineral precipitation/dissolution. The results are validated and evaluated by comparing with single-scale simulations in terms of velocities, reactive concentrations and computing cost.

  10. Open-Source Development of the Petascale Reactive Flow and Transport Code PFLOTRAN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammond, G. E.; Andre, B.; Bisht, G.; Johnson, T.; Karra, S.; Lichtner, P. C.; Mills, R. T.

    2013-12-01

    Open-source software development has become increasingly popular in recent years. Open-source encourages collaborative and transparent software development and promotes unlimited free redistribution of source code to the public. Open-source development is good for science as it reveals implementation details that are critical to scientific reproducibility, but generally excluded from journal publications. In addition, research funds that would have been spent on licensing fees can be redirected to code development that benefits more scientists. In 2006, the developers of PFLOTRAN open-sourced their code under the U.S. Department of Energy SciDAC-II program. Since that time, the code has gained popularity among code developers and users from around the world seeking to employ PFLOTRAN to simulate thermal, hydraulic, mechanical and biogeochemical processes in the Earth's surface/subsurface environment. PFLOTRAN is a massively-parallel subsurface reactive multiphase flow and transport simulator designed from the ground up to run efficiently on computing platforms ranging from the laptop to leadership-class supercomputers, all from a single code base. The code employs domain decomposition for parallelism and is founded upon the well-established and open-source parallel PETSc and HDF5 frameworks. PFLOTRAN leverages modern Fortran (i.e. Fortran 2003-2008) in its extensible object-oriented design. The use of this progressive, yet domain-friendly programming language has greatly facilitated collaboration in the code's software development. Over the past year, PFLOTRAN's top-level data structures were refactored as Fortran classes (i.e. extendible derived types) to improve the flexibility of the code, ease the addition of new process models, and enable coupling to external simulators. For instance, PFLOTRAN has been coupled to the parallel electrical resistivity tomography code E4D to enable hydrogeophysical inversion while the same code base can be used as a third

  11. Core2D. A code for non-isothermal water flow and reactive solute transport. Users manual version 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samper, J.; Juncosa, R.; Delgado, J.; Montenegro, L.

    2000-01-01

    Understanding natural groundwater quality patterns, quantifying groundwater pollution and assessing the effects of waste disposal, require modeling tools accounting for water flow, and transport of heat and dissolved species as well as their complex interactions with solid and gases phases. This report contains the users manual of CORE ''2D Version V.2.0, a COde for modeling water flow (saturated and unsaturated), heat transport and multicomponent Reactive solute transport under both local chemical equilibrium and kinetic conditions. it is an updated and improved version of CORE-LE-2D V0 (Samper et al., 1988) which in turns is an extended version of TRANQUI, a previous reactive transport code (ENRESA, 1995). All these codes were developed within the context of Research Projects funded by ENRESA and the European Commission. (Author)

  12. Core 2D. A code for non-isothermal water flow and reactive solute transport. Users manual version 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Samper, J; Juncosa, R; Delgado, J; Montenegro, L [Universidad de A Coruna (Spain)

    2000-07-01

    Understanding natural groundwater quality patterns, quantifying groundwater pollution and assessing the effects of waste disposal, require modeling tools accounting for water flow, and transport of heat and dissolved species as well as their complex interactions with solid and gases phases. This report contains the users manual of CORE ''2D Version V.2.0, a COde for modeling water flow (saturated and unsaturated), heat transport and multicomponent Reactive solute transport under both local chemical equilibrium and kinetic conditions. it is an updated and improved version of CORE-LE-2D V0 (Samper et al., 1988) which in turns is an extended version of TRANQUI, a previous reactive transport code (ENRESA, 1995). All these codes were developed within the context of Research Projects funded by ENRESA and the European Commission. (Author)

  13. Core 2D. A code for non-isothermal water flow and reactive solute transport. Users manual version 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Samper, J.; Juncosa, R.; Delgado, J.; Montenegro, L. [Universidad de A Coruna (Spain)

    2000-07-01

    Understanding natural groundwater quality patterns, quantifying groundwater pollution and assessing the effects of waste disposal, require modeling tools accounting for water flow, and transport of heat and dissolved species as well as their complex interactions with solid and gases phases. This report contains the users manual of CORE ''2D Version V.2.0, a COde for modeling water flow (saturated and unsaturated), heat transport and multicomponent Reactive solute transport under both local chemical equilibrium and kinetic conditions. it is an updated and improved version of CORE-LE-2D V0 (Samper et al., 1988) which in turns is an extended version of TRANQUI, a previous reactive transport code (ENRESA, 1995). All these codes were developed within the context of Research Projects funded by ENRESA and the European Commission. (Author)

  14. Optimized Reactive Power Flow of DFIG Power Converters for Better Reliability Performance Considering Grid Codes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhou, Dao; Blaabjerg, Frede; Lau, Mogens

    2015-01-01

    . In order to fulfill the modern grid codes, over-excited reactive power injection will further reduce the lifetime of the rotor-side converter. In this paper, the additional stress of the power semiconductor due to the reactive power injection is firstly evaluated in terms of modulation index...

  15. Breast Augmentation

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1974-04-13

    Apr 13, 1974 ... Complications encountered after breast augmentation are dealt with in .... in Phisohex or other suitable preparation for a few days before surgery ... In all cases, the prosthesis causes a fibrous tissue capsule to form around it.

  16. Chin augmentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... or bigger compared to the nose. The best candidates for chin augmentation are people with weak or ... www.urac.org). URAC's accreditation program is an independent audit to verify that A.D.A.M. ...

  17. Successive reactive liquid flow episodes in a layered intrusion (Unit 9, Rum Eastern Layered Intrusion, Scotland)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leuthold, Julien; Blundy, Jon; Holness, Marian

    2014-05-01

    We will present a detailed microstructural and geochemical study of reactive liquid flow in Unit 9 of the Rum Eastern Layered Intrusion. In the study region, Unit 9 comprises an underlying lens-like body of peridotite overlain by a sequence of troctolite and gabbro (termed allivalite), with some local and minor anorthosite. The troctolite is separated from the overlying gabbro by a distinct, sub-horizontal, undulose horizon (the major wavy horizon). Higher in the stratigraphy is another, similar, horizon (the minor wavy horizon) that separates relatively clinopyroxene-poor gabbro from an overlying gabbro. To the north of the peridotite lens, both troctolite and gabbro grade into poikilitic gabbro. Clinopyroxene habit in the allivalite varies from thin rims around olivine in troctolite, to equigranular crystals in gabbro, to oikocrysts in the poikilitic gabbro. The poikilitic gabbros contain multiple generations of clinopyroxene, with Cr-rich (~1.1 wt.% Cr2O3), anhedral cores with moderate REE concentrations (core1) overgrown by an anhedral REE-depleted second generation with moderate Cr (~0.7 wt.% Cr2O3) (core2). These composite cores are rimmed by Cr-poor (~0.2 wt.% Cr2O3) and REE-poor to moderate clinopyroxene. We interpret these microstructures as a consequence of two separate episodes of partial melting triggered by the intrusion of hot olivine-phyric picrite to form the discontinuous lenses that comprise the Unit 9 peridotite. Loss of clinopyroxene-saturated partial melt from the lower part of the allivalite immediately following the early stages of sill intrusion resulted in the formation of clinopyroxene-poor gabbro. The spatial extent of clinopyroxene loss is marked by the minor wavy horizon. A further partial melting event stripped out almost all clinopyroxene from the lowest allivalite, to form a troctolite, with the major wavy horizon marking the extent of melting during this second episode. The poikilitic gabbro formed from clinopyroxene-saturated melt

  18. A Numerical Study on Characteristics of Flow and Reactive Pollutant Dispersion in Step‒up Street Canyons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, E. R.; Kim, J.

    2014-12-01

    For decades, many metro‒ and/or mega‒cities have grown and densities of population and building have increased. Because pollutants released from sources near ground surface such as vehicles are not easy to escape from street canyons which are spaces between buildings standing along streets pedestrians, drivers and residents are likely to be exposed to high concentrations of hazardous pollutants. Therefore, it is important to understand characteristics of flow and pollutant dispersion in street canyons. In this study, step‒up street canyons with higher downwind buildings are considered for understanding flow and reactive pollutants' dispersion characteristics there as a basic step to understand the characteristics in wider urban areas. This study used a CFD model coupled to a chemistry module. Detailed flow and air pollutant concentration are analyzed in step‒up street canyons with different upwind building heights.

  19. Multiphase, multicomponent simulations and experiments of reactive flow, relevant for combining geologic CO2 sequestration with geothermal energy capture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saar, Martin O.

    2011-11-01

    Understanding the fluid dynamics of supercritical carbon dioxide (CO2) in brine- filled porous media is important for predictions of CO2 flow and brine displacement during geologic CO2 sequestration and during geothermal energy capture using sequestered CO2 as the subsurface heat extraction fluid. We investigate multiphase fluid flow in porous media employing particle image velocimetry experiments and lattice-Boltzmann fluid flow simulations at the pore scale. In particular, we are interested in the motion of a drop (representing a CO2 bubble) through an orifice in a plate, representing a simplified porous medium. In addition, we study single-phase/multicomponent reactive transport experimentally by injecting water with dissolved CO2 into rocks/sediments typically considered for CO2 sequestration to investigate how resultant fluid-mineral reactions modify permeability fields. Finally, we investigate numerically subsurface CO2 and heat transport at the geologic formation scale.

  20. Augmented reality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrik Pucer

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Today we can obtain in a simple and rapid way most of the information that we need. Devices, such as personal computers and mobile phones, enable access to information in different formats (written, pictorial, audio or video whenever and wherever. Daily we use and encounter information that can be seen as virtual objects or objects that are part of the virtual world of computers. Everyone, at least once, wanted to bring these virtual objects from the virtual world of computers into real environments and thus mix virtual and real worlds. In such a mixed reality, real and virtual objects coexist in the same environment. The reality, where users watch and use the real environment upgraded with virtual objects is called augmented reality. In this article we describe the main properties of augmented reality. In addition to the basic properties that define a reality as augmented reality, we present the various building elements (possible hardware and software that provide an insight into such a reality and practical applications of augmented reality. The applications are divided into three groups depending on the information and functions that augmented reality offers, such as help, guide and simulator.

  1. Contaminant transport at a waste residue deposit: 1. Inverse flow and non-reactive transport modelling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sonnenborg, Torben Obel; Engesgaard, Peter Knudegaard; Rosbjerg, Dan

    1996-01-01

    An application of an inverse flow and transport model to a contaminated aquifer is presented. The objective of the study is to identify physical and nonreactive flow and transport parameters through an optimization approach. The approach can be classified as a statistical procedure, where a flow...... to steady state versus transient flow conditions and to the amount of hydraulic and solute data used is investigated. The flow parameters, transmissivity and leakage factor, are estimated simultaneously with the transport parameters: source strength, porosity, and longitudinal dispersivity. This paper...

  2. 2D and 3D CFD modelling of a reactive turbulent flow in a double shell supercritical water oxidation reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moussiere, S.; Roubaud, A.; Fournel, B.; Joussot-Dubien, C.; Boutin, O.; Guichardon, P.

    2012-01-01

    In order to design and define appropriate dimensions for a supercritical oxidation reactor, a comparative 2D and 3D simulation of the fluid dynamics and heat transfer during an oxidation process has been performed. The solver used is a commercial code, Fluent 6.2 (R). The turbulent flow field in the reactor, created by the stirrer, is taken into account with a k-omega model and a swirl imposed to the fluid. In the 3D case the rotation of the stirrer can be modelled using the sliding mesh model and the moving reference frame model. This work allows comparing 2D and 3D velocity and heat transfer calculations. The predicted values (mainly species concentrations and temperature profiles) are of the same order in both cases. The reactivity of the system is taken into account with a classical Eddy Dissipation Concept combustion model. Comparisons with experimental temperature measurements validate the ability of the CFD modelling to simulate the supercritical water oxidation reactive medium. Results indicate that the flow can be considered as plug flow-like and that heat transfer is strongly enhanced by the stirring. (authors)

  3. Subsurface Transport Over Reactive Multiphases (STORM): A general, coupled, nonisothermal multiphase flow, reactive transport, and porous medium alteration simulator, Version 2 user's guide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bacon, D.H.; White, M.D.; McGrail, B.P.

    2000-01-01

    The Hanford Site, in southeastern Washington State, has been used extensively to produce nuclear materials for the US strategic defense arsenal by the Department of Energy (DOE) and its predecessors, the US Atomic Energy Commission and the US Energy Research and Development Administration. A large inventory of radioactive and mixed waste has accumulated in 177 buried single- and double shell tanks. Liquid waste recovered from the tanks will be pretreated to separate the low-activity fraction from the high-level and transuranic wastes. Vitrification is the leading option for immobilization of these wastes, expected to produce approximately 550,000 metric tons of Low Activity Waste (LAW) glass. This total tonnage, based on nominal Na 2 O oxide loading of 20% by weight, is destined for disposal in a near-surface facility. Before disposal of the immobilized waste can proceed, the DOE must approve a performance assessment, a document that described the impacts, if any, of the disposal facility on public health and environmental resources. Studies have shown that release rates of radionuclides from the glass waste form by reaction with water determine the impacts of the disposal action more than any other independent parameter. This report describes the latest accomplishments in the development of a computational tool, Subsurface Transport Over Reactive Multiphases (STORM), Version 2, a general, coupled non-isothermal multiphase flow and reactive transport simulator. The underlying mathematics in STORM describe the rate of change of the solute concentrations of pore water in a variably saturated, non-isothermal porous medium, and the alteration of waste forms, packaging materials, backfill, and host rocks

  4. Red blood cells augment transport of reactive metabolites of monocrotaline from liver to lung in isolated and tandem liver and lung preparations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pan, L.C.; Lame, M.W.; Morin, D.; Wilson, D.W.; Segall, H.J. (Department of Veterinary Pharmacology, University of California, Davis (United States))

    1991-09-01

    Monocrotaline (MCT) is a pyrrolizidine alkaloid that causes pulmonary hypertension in rats by mechanisms which remain largely unknown. MCT is thought to be activated in the liver to a reactive intermediate that is transported to the lung where it causes endothelial injury. The authors previous pharmacokinetic work demonstrated significant sequestration of radioactivity in red blood cells (RBCs) of rats treated with (14C)MCT. To determine whether this RBC sequestration might be important in the transport of reactive MCT metabolites, they compared the effect of inclusion of RBCs in the perfusion buffer on the extent of covalent binding of (14C)MCT to rat lungs in tandem liver-lung preparations. The potential effect of RBCs in stabilizing reactive intermediates was evaluated by preperfusion of isolated liver preparations with (14C)MCT with and without RBCs, separation and washing of the RBC fraction, and subsequent (90 min later) perfusion of washed RBCs or buffer alone in isolated perfused lungs. Covalent binding to lung tissues was determined by exhaustive methanol/chloroform extractions of unbound label from homogenized lung tissue followed by scintillation counting of residual 14C. Covalent binding was expressed as picomole MCT molecular weight equivalents/mg protein. Comparison of the relative capability of these isolated organ preparations for conversion of MCT to polar metabolites was done by extraction and HPLC analysis of perfusate at the end of the experiment. Isolated livers converted 65-85% of MCT to polar metabolites compared with less than 5% conversion in the isolated lungs. Inclusion of RBCs in the buffer of tandem lung liver preparations perfused with 400 microM (14C)MCT increased the covalent binding to the lung from 97 {plus minus} 25 (buffer alone) to 182 {plus minus} 36 (buffer + RBC) pmol/mg protein.

  5. Red blood cells augment transport of reactive metabolites of monocrotaline from liver to lung in isolated and tandem liver and lung preparations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pan, L.C.; Lame, M.W.; Morin, D.; Wilson, D.W.; Segall, H.J.

    1991-01-01

    Monocrotaline (MCT) is a pyrrolizidine alkaloid that causes pulmonary hypertension in rats by mechanisms which remain largely unknown. MCT is thought to be activated in the liver to a reactive intermediate that is transported to the lung where it causes endothelial injury. The authors previous pharmacokinetic work demonstrated significant sequestration of radioactivity in red blood cells (RBCs) of rats treated with [14C]MCT. To determine whether this RBC sequestration might be important in the transport of reactive MCT metabolites, they compared the effect of inclusion of RBCs in the perfusion buffer on the extent of covalent binding of [14C]MCT to rat lungs in tandem liver-lung preparations. The potential effect of RBCs in stabilizing reactive intermediates was evaluated by preperfusion of isolated liver preparations with [14C]MCT with and without RBCs, separation and washing of the RBC fraction, and subsequent (90 min later) perfusion of washed RBCs or buffer alone in isolated perfused lungs. Covalent binding to lung tissues was determined by exhaustive methanol/chloroform extractions of unbound label from homogenized lung tissue followed by scintillation counting of residual 14C. Covalent binding was expressed as picomole MCT molecular weight equivalents/mg protein. Comparison of the relative capability of these isolated organ preparations for conversion of MCT to polar metabolites was done by extraction and HPLC analysis of perfusate at the end of the experiment. Isolated livers converted 65-85% of MCT to polar metabolites compared with less than 5% conversion in the isolated lungs. Inclusion of RBCs in the buffer of tandem lung liver preparations perfused with 400 microM [14C]MCT increased the covalent binding to the lung from 97 ± 25 (buffer alone) to 182 ± 36 (buffer + RBC) pmol/mg protein

  6. Augmented Reality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjærgaard, Hanne Wacher; Kjeldsen, Lars Peter Bech; Rahn, Annette

    2015-01-01

    This chapter describes the use of iPad-facilitated application of augmented reality in the teaching of highly complex anatomical and physiological subjects in the training of nurses at undergraduate level. The general aim of the project is to investigate the potentials of this application in terms...... of making the complex content and context of these subjects more approachable to the students through the visualization made possible through the use of this technology. A case study is described in this chapter. Issues and factors required for the sustainable use of the mobile-facilitated application...... of augmented reality are discussed....

  7. Hall effects on unsteady MHD reactive flow of second grade fluid through porous medium in a rotating parallel plate channel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishna, M. Veera; Swarnalathamma, B. V.

    2017-07-01

    We considered the transient MHD flow of a reactive second grade fluid through porous medium between two infinitely long horizontal parallel plates when one of the plate is set into uniform accelerated motion in the presence of a uniform transverse magnetic field under Arrhenius reaction rate. The governing equations are solved by Laplace transform technique. The effects of the pertinent parameters on the velocity, temperature are discussed in detail. The shear stress and Nusselt number at the plates are also obtained analytically and computationally discussed with reference to governing parameters.

  8. Electrical modulation of the sympathetic nervous system in order to augment cerebral blood flow : a protocol for an experimental study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ter Laan, Mark; van Dijk, J. Marc C.; Staal, Michiel J.; Elting, Jan-Willem J.

    2011-01-01

    Introduction: Cerebral blood flow (CBF) is regulated by several mechanisms. Neurogenic control has been a matter of debate, even though several publications reported the effects of changes in sympathetic tone on CBF. Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation and spinal-cord stimulation have been

  9. A study on rotational augmentation using CFD analysis of flow in the inboard region of the MEXICO rotor blades

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guntur, Srinivas; Sørensen, Niels N.

    2015-01-01

    This work presents an analysis of data from existing as well as new full-rotor computational fluid dynamics computations on the MEXICO rotor, with focus on the flow around the inboard parts of the blades. The boundary layer separation characteristics on the airfoil sections in the inboard parts...

  10. Augmented Reality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Birgitte Lund; Brandt, Harald; Radmer, Ole

    2017-01-01

    Artiklen præsenterer resultater fra pilotafprøvning i 7.-klasses fysik/kemi og biologi af to Augmented Reality (AR)-apps til naturfagsundervisning. Muligheder og udfordringer ved lærerens stilladsering af elevernes undersøgende samtale og modelleringskompetence er undersøgt med interview...

  11. Reactive flow simulations in complex geometries with high-performance supercomputing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rehm, W.; Gerndt, M.; Jahn, W.; Vogelsang, R.; Binninger, B.; Herrmann, M.; Olivier, H.; Weber, M.

    2000-01-01

    In this paper, we report on a modern field code cluster consisting of state-of-the-art reactive Navier-Stokes- and reactive Euler solvers that has been developed on vector- and parallel supercomputers at the research center Juelich. This field code cluster is used for hydrogen safety analyses of technical systems, for example, in the field of nuclear reactor safety and conventional hydrogen demonstration plants with fuel cells. Emphasis is put on the assessment of combustion loads, which could result from slow, fast or rapid flames, including transition from deflagration to detonation. As a sample of proof tests, the special tools have been tested for specific tasks, based on the comparison of experimental and numerical results, which are in reasonable agreement. (author)

  12. Fringe-controlled biodegradation under dynamic conditions: Quasi 2-D flow-through experiments and reactive-transport modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckert, Dominik; Kürzinger, Petra; Bauer, Robert; Griebler, Christian; Cirpka, Olaf A.

    2015-01-01

    Biodegradation in contaminated aquifers has been shown to be most pronounced at the fringe of contaminant plumes, where mixing of contaminated water and ambient groundwater, containing dissolved electron acceptors, stimulates microbial activity. While physical mixing of contaminant and electron acceptor by transverse dispersion has been shown to be the major bottleneck for biodegradation in steady-state plumes, so far little is known on the effect of flow and transport dynamics (caused, e.g., by a seasonally fluctuating groundwater table) on biodegradation in these systems. Towards this end we performed experiments in quasi-two-dimensional flow-through microcosms on aerobic toluene degradation by Pseudomonas putida F1. Plume dynamics were simulated by vertical alteration of the toluene plume position and experimental results were analyzed by reactive-transport modeling. We found that, even after disappearance of the toluene plume for two weeks, the majority of microorganisms stayed attached to the sediment and regained their full biodegradation potential within two days after reappearance of the toluene plume. Our results underline that besides microbial growth, also maintenance and dormancy are important processes that affect biodegradation performance under transient environmental conditions and therefore deserve increased consideration in future reactive-transport modeling.

  13. TOUGHREACT Version 2.0: A simulator for subsurface reactive transport under non-isothermal multiphase flow conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, T.; Spycher, N.; Sonnenthal, E.; Zhang, G.; Zheng, L.; Pruess, K.

    2010-08-01

    TOUGHREACT is a numerical simulation program for chemically reactive non-isothermal flows of multiphase fluids in porous and fractured media, and was developed by introducing reactive chemistry into the multiphase fluid and heat flow simulator TOUGH2 V2. The first version of TOUGHREACT was released to the public through the U.S. Department of Energy's Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC) in August 2004. It is among the most frequently requested of ESTSC's codes. The code has been widely used for studies in CO{sub 2} geological sequestration, nuclear waste isolation, geothermal energy development, environmental remediation, and increasingly for petroleum applications. Over the past several years, many new capabilities have been developed, which were incorporated into Version 2 of TOUGHREACT. Major additions and improvements in Version 2 are discussed here, and two application examples are presented: (1) long-term fate of injected CO{sub 2} in a storage reservoir and (2) biogeochemical cycling of metals in mining-impacted lake sediments.

  14. A Model to Couple Flow, Thermal and Reactive Chemical Transport, and Geo-mechanics in Variably Saturated Media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeh, G. T.; Tsai, C. H.

    2015-12-01

    This paper presents the development of a THMC (thermal-hydrology-mechanics-chemistry) process model in variably saturated media. The governing equations for variably saturated flow and reactive chemical transport are obtained based on the mass conservation principle of species transport supplemented with Darcy's law, constraint of species concentration, equation of states, and constitutive law of K-S-P (Conductivity-Degree of Saturation-Capillary Pressure). The thermal transport equation is obtained based on the conservation of energy. The geo-mechanic displacement is obtained based on the assumption of equilibrium. Conventionally, these equations have been implicitly coupled via the calculations of secondary variables based on primary variables. The mechanisms of coupling have not been obvious. In this paper, governing equations are explicitly coupled for all primary variables. The coupling is accomplished via the storage coefficients, transporting velocities, and conduction-dispersion-diffusion coefficient tensor; one set each for every primary variable. With this new system of equations, the coupling mechanisms become clear. Physical interpretations of every term in the coupled equations will be discussed. Examples will be employed to demonstrate the intuition and superiority of these explicit coupling approaches. Keywords: Variably Saturated Flow, Thermal Transport, Geo-mechanics, Reactive Transport.

  15. Fringe-controlled biodegradation under dynamic conditions: quasi 2-D flow-through experiments and reactive-transport modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckert, Dominik; Kürzinger, Petra; Bauer, Robert; Griebler, Christian; Cirpka, Olaf A

    2015-01-01

    Biodegradation in contaminated aquifers has been shown to be most pronounced at the fringe of contaminant plumes, where mixing of contaminated water and ambient groundwater, containing dissolved electron acceptors, stimulates microbial activity. While physical mixing of contaminant and electron acceptor by transverse dispersion has been shown to be the major bottleneck for biodegradation in steady-state plumes, so far little is known on the effect of flow and transport dynamics (caused, e.g., by a seasonally fluctuating groundwater table) on biodegradation in these systems. Towards this end we performed experiments in quasi-two-dimensional flow-through microcosms on aerobic toluene degradation by Pseudomonas putida F1. Plume dynamics were simulated by vertical alteration of the toluene plume position and experimental results were analyzed by reactive-transport modeling. We found that, even after disappearance of the toluene plume for two weeks, the majority of microorganisms stayed attached to the sediment and regained their full biodegradation potential within two days after reappearance of the toluene plume. Our results underline that besides microbial growth, also maintenance and dormancy are important processes that affect biodegradation performance under transient environmental conditions and therefore deserve increased consideration in future reactive-transport modeling. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Large-eddy simulations of the non-reactive flow in the Sydney swirl burner

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yang, Yang; Kær, Søren Knudsen

    2012-01-01

    results. In medium swirling case, there are two reverse-flow regions with a collar-like structure between them. The existence of strong unsteady structure, precessing vortex core, was proven. Coherent structures are detached from the instantaneous field. Q-criterion was used to visualize vorticity field...... with distinct clear structure of vortice tubes. Dominating spatial–temporal structures contained in different cross sections were extracted using proper orthogonal decomposition. In high swirling case, there is only one long reverse-flow region. In this paper, we proved the capability of a commercial CFD...... package in predicting complex flow field and presented the potential of large eddy simulation in understanding dynamics....

  17. Second Law Analysis for a Variable Viscosity Reactive Couette Flow under Arrhenius Kinetics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. S. Kobo

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This study investigates the inherent irreversibility associated with the Couette flow of a reacting variable viscosity combustible material under Arrhenius kinetics. The nonlinear equations of momentum and energy governing the flow system are solved both analytically using a perturbation method and numerically using the standard Newton Raphson shooting method along with a fourth-order Runge Kutta integration algorithm to obtain the velocity and temperature distributions which essentially expedite to obtain expressions for volumetric entropy generation numbers, irreversibility distribution ratio, and the Bejan number in the flow field.

  18. Augmented reality

    OpenAIRE

    Jecha, Jakub

    2011-01-01

    This thesis is focused on a technology called Augmented reality, especially on its use in marketing. The main objective of the thesis is to define why this technology is a suitable tool for marketing and to assess its use in real conditions. This is achieved by defining specific devices and use cases of this technology in practice, whereas evaluation of its use in real enviroment is based on statistics. The contribution of the thesis is objective evaluation of this technology and provision of...

  19. Numerical solution of chemically reactive non-Newtonian fluid flow: Dual stratification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rehman, Khalil Ur; Malik, M. Y.; Khan, Abid Ali; Zehra, Iffat; Zahri, Mostafa; Tahir, M.

    2017-12-01

    We have found that only a few attempts are available in the literature relatively to the tangent hyperbolic fluid flow induced by stretching cylindrical surfaces. In particular, temperature and concentration stratification effects have not been investigated until now with respect to the tangent hyperbolic fluid model. Therefore, we have considered the tangent hyperbolic fluid flow induced by an acutely inclined cylindrical surface in the presence of both temperature and concentration stratification effects. To be more specific, the fluid flow is attained with the no slip condition, which implies that the bulk motion of the fluid particles is the same as the stretching velocity of a cylindrical surface. Additionally, the flow field situation is manifested with heat generation, mixed convection and chemical reaction effects. The flow partial differential equations give a complete description of the present problem. Therefore, to trace out the solution, a set of suitable transformations is introduced to convert these equations into ordinary differential equations. In addition, a self-coded computational algorithm is executed to inspect the numerical solution of these reduced equations. The effect logs of the involved parameters are provided graphically. Furthermore, the variations of the physical quantities are examined and given with the aid of tables. It is observed that the fluid temperature is a decreasing function of the thermal stratification parameter and a similar trend is noticed for the concentration via the solutal stratification parameter.

  20. Double stratification effects in chemically reactive squeezed Sutterby fluid flow with thermal radiation and mixed convection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, S.; Farooq, M.; Javed, M.; Anjum, Aisha

    2018-03-01

    A current analysis is carried out to study theoretically the mixed convection characteristics in squeezing flow of Sutterby fluid in squeezed channel. The constitutive equation of Sutterby model is utilized to characterize the rheology of squeezing phenomenon. Flow characteristics are explored with dual stratification. In flowing fluid which contains heat and mass transport, the first order chemical reaction and radiative heat flux affect the transport phenomenon. The systems of non-linear governing equations have been modulating which then solved by mean of convergent approach (Homotopy Analysis Method). The graphs are reported and illustrated for emerging parameters. Through graphical explanations, drag force, rate of heat and mass transport are conversed for different pertinent parameters. It is found that heat and mass transport rate decays with dominant double stratified parameters and chemical reaction parameter. The present two-dimensional examination is applicable in some of the engineering processes and industrial fluid mechanics.

  1. Traffic flow impacts of adaptive cruise control deactivation and (Re)activation with cooperative driver behavior

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klunder, G.; Li, M.; Minderhoud, M.

    2009-01-01

    In 2006 in the Netherlands, a field operational test was carried out to study the effect of adaptive cruise control (ACC) and lane departure warning on driver behavior and traffic flow in real traffic. To estimate the effect for larger penetration rates, simulations were needed. For a reliable

  2. Coupled processes of fluid flow, solute transport, and geochemical reactions in reactive barriers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jeongkon; Schwartz, Franklin W.; Xu, Tianfu; Choi, Heechul, and Kim, In S.

    2004-01-02

    A complex pattern of coupling between fluid flow and mass transport develops when heterogeneous reactions occur. For instance, dissolution and precipitation reactions can change a porous medium's physical properties, such as pore geometry and thus permeability. These changes influence fluid flow, which in turn impacts the composition of dissolved constituents and the solid phases, and the rate and direction of advective transport. Two-dimensional modeling studies using TOUGHREACT were conducted to investigate the coupling between flow and transport developed as a consequence of differences in density, dissolution precipitation, and medium heterogeneity. The model includes equilibrium reactions for aqueous species, kinetic reactions between the solid phases and aqueous constituents, and full coupling of porosity and permeability changes resulting from precipitation and dissolution reactions in porous media. In addition, a new permeability relationship is implemented in TOUGHREACT to examine the effects of geochemical reactions and density difference on plume migration in porous media. Generally, the evolutions in the concentrations of the aqueous phase are intimately related to the reaction-front dynamics. Plugging of the medium contributed to significant transients in patterns of flow and mass transport.

  3. Double stratification effects in chemically reactive squeezed Sutterby fluid flow with thermal radiation and mixed convection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Ahmad

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available A current analysis is carried out to study theoretically the mixed convection characteristics in squeezing flow of Sutterby fluid in squeezed channel. The constitutive equation of Sutterby model is utilized to characterize the rheology of squeezing phenomenon. Flow characteristics are explored with dual stratification. In flowing fluid which contains heat and mass transport, the first order chemical reaction and radiative heat flux affect the transport phenomenon. The systems of non-linear governing equations have been modulating which then solved by mean of convergent approach (Homotopy Analysis Method. The graphs are reported and illustrated for emerging parameters. Through graphical explanations, drag force, rate of heat and mass transport are conversed for different pertinent parameters. It is found that heat and mass transport rate decays with dominant double stratified parameters and chemical reaction parameter. The present two-dimensional examination is applicable in some of the engineering processes and industrial fluid mechanics. Keywords: Squeezing flow, Sutterby fluid model, Mixed convection, Double stratification, Thermal radiation, Chemical reaction

  4. Large-eddy simulations of the non-reactive flow in the Sydney swirl burner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Yang; Kær, Søren Knudsen

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Rational mesh and grid system for LES are discussed. ► Validated results are provided and discrepancy of mean radial velocity component is discussed. ► Flow structures are identified using vorticity field. ► We performed POD on cross sections to assist in understanding of coherent structures. - Abstract: This paper presents a numerical investigation using large-eddy simulation. Two isothermal cases from the Sydney swirling flame database with different swirl numbers were tested. Rational grid system and mesh details were presented firstly. Validations showed overall good agreement in time averaged results. In medium swirling case, there are two reverse-flow regions with a collar-like structure between them. The existence of strong unsteady structure, precessing vortex core, was proven. Coherent structures are detached from the instantaneous field. Q-criterion was used to visualize vorticity field with distinct clear structure of vortice tubes. Dominating spatial–temporal structures contained in different cross sections were extracted using proper orthogonal decomposition. In high swirling case, there is only one long reverse-flow region. In this paper, we proved the capability of a commercial CFD package in predicting complex flow field and presented the potential of large eddy simulation in understanding dynamics.

  5. Studies on flow induced vibration of reactivity devices of 700 MWe Indian PHWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prabhakaran, K.M., E-mail: kmprabha@yahoo.com [Reactor Safety Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400 085 (India); Goyal, P.; Dutta, Anu; Bhasin, V.; Vaze, K.K.; Ghosh, A.K. [Reactor Safety Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400 085 (India); Pillai, Ajith V.; Mathew, Jimmy [Nuclear Power Corporation of India Ltd., Mumbai 400 094 (India)

    2012-03-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer FIV studies on internals of heavy water filled calandria of 700 MWe Indian PHWR is presented. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This includes CFD and structural dynamic analysis to predict the dynamic behavior of component lying inside calandria. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Results of these calculations as well as conclusions from this investigation are presented. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer It is established that FIV is not a concern in the present design of calandria internals. - Abstract: Component failures due to excessive flow-induced vibration are still affecting the performance and reliability of nuclear power stations. Tube failures due to fretting-wear in nuclear steam generators, and vibration related damage of reactor internals are of particular concern. In the Indian nuclear industry, flow induced vibrations are assessed early in the design process and the results are incorporated in the design procedures. In this paper the details of flow induced vibration studies on internals like liquid zone control unit and poison injection units of heavy water filled calandria of 700 MWe Indian pressurized heavy water reactor is given. This includes computational fluid dynamics studies from which the velocities are extracted for the components lying inside the calandria. With these velocities as input, further studies are performed to predict the dynamic behavior of these components. Results of these calculations as well as conclusions derived from this investigation are presented. Based on the studies it has been established that flow induced vibration is not a concern in the present design of 700 MWe calandria internals.

  6. Mobile Collaborative Augmented Reality: The Augmented Stroll

    OpenAIRE

    Renevier , Philippe; Nigay , Laurence

    2001-01-01

    International audience; The paper focuses on Augmented Reality systems in which interaction with the real world is augmented by the computer, the task being performed in the real world. We first define what mobile AR systems, collaborative AR systems and finally mobile and collaborative AR systems are. We then present the augmented stroll and its software design as one example of a mobile and collaborative AR system. The augmented stroll is applied to Archaeology in the MAGIC (Mobile Augmente...

  7. Delayed complications after flow-diverter stenting: reactive in-stent stenosis and creeping stents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, José E; Gomori, John Moshe; Moscovici, Samuel; Leker, Ronen R; Itshayek, Eyal

    2014-07-01

    We assessed the frequency and severity of changes in stent configuration and location after the treatment of intracranial aneurysms, and patterns of in-stent stenosis. We retrospectively reviewed data for consecutive aneurysm patients managed with endovascular implantation of flow-diverter stents (Silk Flow Diverter [Balt Extrusion, Montmorency, France] and Pipeline Embolization Device [ev3/Coviden, Minneapolis, MN, USA]) from October 2011 to July 2012. Routine 2, 6, 9-12, and 16-20 month follow-up angiograms were compared, with a focus on changes in stent configuration and location from immediately after deployment to angiographic follow-up, and the incidence and development of in-stent stenosis. Thirty-four patients with 42 aneurysms met inclusion criteria. The Silk device was implanted in 16 patients (47%, single device in 15), the Pipeline device in 18 (53%, single device in 16). On first follow-up angiography, in-stent stenosis was observed in 38% of Silk devices and 39% of Pipeline devices. In-stent stenosis was asymptomatic in 12 of 13 patients. One woman presented with transient ischemic attacks and required stent angioplasty due to end tapering and mild, diffuse in-stent stenosis. Configuration and location changes, including stent creeping and end tapering were seen in 2/16 patients (13%) with Silk devices, and 0/18 patients with Pipeline devices. We describe stent creeping and end tapering as unusual findings with the potential for delayed clinical complications. In-stent stenosis, with a unique behavior, is a frequent angiographic finding observed after flow-diverter stent implant. The stenosis is usually asymptomatic; however, close clinical and angiographic monitoring is mandatory for individualized management. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Cerebral blood flow and carbon dioxide reactivity in children with bacterial meningitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ashwal, S.; Stringer, W.; Tomasi, L.; Schneider, S.; Thompson, J.; Perkin, R.

    1990-01-01

    We examined total and regional cerebral blood flow (CBF) by stable xenon computed tomography in 20 seriously ill children with acute bacterial meningitis to determine whether CBF was reduced and to examine the changes in CBF during hyperventilation. In 13 children, total CBF was normal (62 +/- 20 ml/min/100 gm) but marked local variability of flow was seen. In five other children, total CBF was significantly reduced (26 +/- 10 ml/min/100 gm; p less than 0.05), with flow reduced more in white matter (8 +/- 5 ml/min/100 gm) than in gray matter (30 +/- 15 ml/min/100 gm). Autoregulation of CBF appeared to be present in these 18 children within a range of mean arterial blood pressure from 56 to 102 mm Hg. In the remaining two infants, brain dead within the first 24 hours, total flow was uniformly absent, averaging 3 +/- 3 ml/min/100 gm. In seven children, CBF was determined at two carbon dioxide tension (PCO2) levels: 40 (+/- 3) mm Hg and 29 (+/- 3) mm Hg. In six children, total CBF decreased 33%, from 52 (+/- 25) to 35 (+/- 15) ml/min/100 gm; the mean percentage of change in CBF per millimeter of mercury of PCO2 was 3.0%. Regional variability of perfusion to changes in PCO2 was marked in all six children. The percentage of change in CBF per millimeter of mercury of PCO2 was similar in frontal gray matter (3.1%) but higher in white matter (4.5%). In the seventh patient a paradoxical response was observed; total and regional CBF increased 25% after hyperventilation. Our findings demonstrate that (1) CBF in children with bacterial meningitis may be substantially decreased globally, with even more variability noted regionally, (2) autoregulation of CBF is preserved, (3) CBF/CO2 responsitivity varies among patients and in different regions of the brain in the same patient, and (4) hyperventilation can reduce CBF below ischemic thresholds

  9. Flow of chemically reactive magneto Cross nanoliquid with temperature-dependent conductivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayat, Tasawar; Ullah, Ikram; Waqas, Muhammad; Alsaedi, Ahmed

    2018-05-01

    Influence of temperature-dependent thermal conductivity on MHD flow of Cross nanoliquid bounded by a stretched sheet is explored. The combined feature of Brownian motion and thermophoresis in nanoliquid modeling is retained. In addition, the attributes of zero mass flux at sheet are imposed. First-order chemical reaction is retained. The resulting problems are numerically computed. Plots and tabulated values are presented and examined. It is figured out that larger thermophoretic diffusion and thermal conductivity significantly rise the thermal field, whereas opposite situation is seen for heat transfer rate.

  10. Reactive turbulent flow CFD study in supercritical water oxidation process: application to a stirred double shell reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moussiere, S.

    2006-12-01

    Supercritical water oxidation is an innovative process to treat organic liquid waste which uses supercritical water properties to mix efficiency the oxidant and the organic compounds. The reactor is a stirred double shell reactor. In the step of adaptation to nuclear constraints, the computational fluid dynamic modeling is a good tool to know required temperature field in the reactor for safety analysis. Firstly, the CFD modeling of tubular reactor confirms the hypothesis of an incompressible fluid and the use of k-w turbulence model to represent the hydrodynamic. Moreover, the EDC model is as efficiency as the kinetic to compute the reaction rate in this reactor. Secondly, the study of turbulent flow in the double shell reactor confirms the use of 2D axisymmetric geometry instead of 3D geometry to compute heat transfer. Moreover, this study reports that water-air mixing is not in single phase. The reactive turbulent flow is well represented by EDC model after adaptation of initial conditions. The reaction rate in supercritical water oxidation reactor is mainly controlled by the mixing. (author)

  11. Recent CFD Simulations of turbulent reactive flows with supercomputing for hydrogen safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rehm, W.

    2001-01-01

    This paper describes the R and D work performed within the scope of joint project activities concerning the numerical simulation of reacting flow in complex geometries. The aim is the refinement of numerical methods used in computational fluid dynamics (CFD) by introducing high-performance computations (HPC) to analyse explosion processes in technical systems in more detail. Application examples concern conventional and nuclear energy systems, especially the safety aspects of future hydrogen technology. The project work is mainly focused on the modelling of the accident-related behaviour of hydrogen in safety enclosures regarding the distribution and combustion of burnable gas mixtures, ranging from slow to fast or even rapid flames. For fire and explosion protection, special models and criteria are being developed for the assessment of adequate safety measures to control deflagration-to-detonation transition (DDT) processes. Therefore, the physical mixing concept with dilution and inertization media is studied and recommended. (orig.) [de

  12. High-order multi-implicit spectral deferred correction methods for problems of reactive flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bourlioux, Anne; Layton, Anita T.; Minion, Michael L.

    2003-01-01

    Models for reacting flow are typically based on advection-diffusion-reaction (A-D-R) partial differential equations. Many practical cases correspond to situations where the relevant time scales associated with each of the three sub-processes can be widely different, leading to disparate time-step requirements for robust and accurate time-integration. In particular, interesting regimes in combustion correspond to systems in which diffusion and reaction are much faster processes than advection. The numerical strategy introduced in this paper is a general procedure to account for this time-scale disparity. The proposed methods are high-order multi-implicit generalizations of spectral deferred correction methods (MISDC methods), constructed for the temporal integration of A-D-R equations. Spectral deferred correction methods compute a high-order approximation to the solution of a differential equation by using a simple, low-order numerical method to solve a series of correction equations, each of which increases the order of accuracy of the approximation. The key feature of MISDC methods is their flexibility in handling several sub-processes implicitly but independently, while avoiding the splitting errors present in traditional operator-splitting methods and also allowing for different time steps for each process. The stability, accuracy, and efficiency of MISDC methods are first analyzed using a linear model problem and the results are compared to semi-implicit spectral deferred correction methods. Furthermore, numerical tests on simplified reacting flows demonstrate the expected convergence rates for MISDC methods of orders three, four, and five. The gain in efficiency by independently controlling the sub-process time steps is illustrated for nonlinear problems, where reaction and diffusion are much stiffer than advection. Although the paper focuses on this specific time-scales ordering, the generalization to any ordering combination is straightforward

  13. SPECT study of cerebral blood flow reactivity after acetazolamide in patients with transient ischemic attacks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chollet, F.; Celsis, P.; Clanet, M.; Guiraud-Chaumeil, B.; Rascol, A.; Marc-Vergnes, J.P.

    1989-01-01

    We investigated 15 patients with one or more transient ischemic attacks (TIAs) in the internal carotid artery territory within the month following the most recent TIA. Cerebral blood flow (CBF) was measured by single-photon emission computed tomography, using intravenous xenon-133 before and after injection of 1 g acetazolamide. Six patients had severe carotid stenosis or occlusion; the other nine patients had no significant carotid lesions. Twenty age-matched volunteers free of neurologic symptoms or history were used as controls. Mean CBF in the sylvian region was not significantly different between patients and controls. Seven patients exhibited a focal hypoperfusion at rest in the symptomatic hemisphere, and their hypoperfused areas were hyporeactive after administration of acetazolamide. Seven other patients exhibited hyporeactive areas after acetazolamide administration while their CBF tomograms at rest were normal. Thus, CBF abnormalities were detected in 14 of the 15 patients. Our findings suggest that CBF measured early after acetazolamide administration could be useful to confirm the clinical diagnosis of TIA. In the nine patients with no significant lesion of the internal carotid artery, the areas of hypoperfusion were small and were probably related to the focal ischemic event. In the six patients with severe lesions of the internal carotid artery, abnormalities were of variable size and intensity but were often large and pronounced. The discrepancy between these two subgroups of patients could be ascribed to the hemodynamic influence of the internal carotid artery lesions. Moreover, our findings may provide some insight into the pathophysiology of TIAs

  14. SPLOSH III. A code for calculating reactivity and flow transients in CSGHWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Halsall, M.J.; Course, A.F.; Sidell, J.

    1979-09-01

    SPLOSH is a time dependent, one dimensional, finite difference (in time and space) coupled neutron kinetics and thermal hydraulics code for studying pressurised faults and control transients in water reactor systems. An axial single channel model with equally spaced mesh intervals is used to represent the neutronics of the reactor core. A radial finite difference model is used for heat conduction through the fuel pin, gas gap and can. Appropriate convective, boiling or post-dryout heat transfer correlations are used at the can-coolant interface. The hydraulics model includes the important features of the SGHWR primary loop including 'slave' channels in parallel with the 'mean' channel. Standard mass, energy and momentum equations are solved explicitly. Circuit features modelled include pumps, spray cooling and the SGHWR steam drum. Perturbations to almost any feature of the circuit model may be specified by the user although blowdown calculations resulting in critical or reversed flows are not permitted. Automatic reactor trips may be defined and the ensuing actions of moderator dumping and rod firing can be specified. (UK)

  15. Large Eddy Simulations of Two-phase Turbulent Reactive Flows in IC Engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banaeizadeh, Araz; Schock, Harold; Jaberi, Farhad

    2008-11-01

    The two-phase filtered mass density function (FMDF) subgrid-scale (SGS) model is used for large-eddy simulation (LES) of turbulent spray combustion in internal combustion (IC) engines. The LES/FMDF is implemented via an efficient, hybrid numerical method. In this method, the filtered compressible Navier-Stokes equations in curvilinear coordinate systems are solved with a generalized, high-order, multi-block, compact differencing scheme. The spray and the FMDF are implemented with Lagrangian methods. The reliability and the consistency of the numerical methods are established for different IC engines and the complex interactions among mean and turbulent velocity fields, fuel droplets and combustion are shown to be well captured with the LES/FMDF. In both spark-ignition/direct-injection and diesel engines, the droplet size and velocity distributions are found to be modified by the unsteady, vortical motions generated by the incoming air during the intake stroke. In turn, the droplets are found to change the in-cylinder flow structure. In the spark-ignition engine, flame propagation is similar to the experiment. In the diesel engine, the maximum evaporated fuel concentration is near the cylinder wall where the flame starts, which is again consistent with the experiment.

  16. Experimental and theoretical investigations of shock-induced flow of reactive porous media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baer, M.R.; Graham, R.A.; Anderson, M.U. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Sheffield, S.A.; Gustavsen, R.L. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)

    1996-11-01

    In this work, the microscale processes of consolidation, deformation and reaction features of shocked porous materials are studied. Time- resolve particle velocities and stress fields associated with dispersive compaction waves are measured in gas-gun experiments. In these tests, a thin porous layer of HMX is shock-loaded at varied levels. At high impact, significant reaction is triggered by the rapid material distortion during compaction. In parallel modeling studies, continuum mixture theory is applied to describe the behavior of averaged wave-fields in heterogeneous media. One-dimensional simulations of gas-gun experiments demonstrate that the wave features and interactions with viscoelastic materials in the gauge package are well described by mixture theory, including reflected wave behavior and conditions where significant reaction is initiated. Numerical simulations of impact on a collection of discrete HMX `crystals` are also presented using shock physics analysis. Three-dimensional simulations indicate that rapid distortion occurs at material contact points; the nature of the dispersive fields includes large amplitude fluctuations of stress with wavelengths of several particle diameters. Localization of energy causes `hot-spots` due to shock focusing and plastic work as material flows into interstitial regions. These numerical experiments demonstrate that `hot-spots` are strongly influenced by multiple crystal interactions. This mesoscale study provides new insights into micromechanical behavior of heterogeneous energetic materials.

  17. ARLearn: augmented reality meets augmented virtuality

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ternier, Stefaan; Klemke, Roland; Kalz, Marco; Van Ulzen, Patricia; Specht, Marcus

    2012-01-01

    Ternier, S., Klemke, R., Kalz, M., Van Ulzen, P., & Specht, M. (2012). ARLearn: augmented reality meets augmented virtuality [Special issue]. Journal of Universal Computer Science - Technology for learning across physical and virtual spaces, 18(15), 2143-2164.

  18. Flow Cytometric Analysis of Leishmania Reactive CD4+/CD8+ Lymphocyte Proliferation in Cutaneous Leishmaniasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H Keshavarz

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Determination of the division history of T cells in vitro is helpful in the study of effector mechanisms against infections. Technique described here uses the intracellular fluorescent label carboxyfluorescein diacetate succinimidyl ester (CFSE to monitor the proliferation. Methods: In a cross sectional study, blood samples were collected from 7 volunteers with history of cutaneous leishmania­sis (CL and one healthy control from endemic areas in Isfahan province who referred to the Center for Research and Training in Skin Diseases and Leprosy (CRTSDL, then CD4+/CD8+ lymphocytes and CD14+ monocytes were isolated from peri­pheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC using mAbs and magnetic nanoparticles. CFSE labeled CD4+ or CD8+ lympho­cytes cultured with autologous monocytes in the presence of PHA, SLA, live Leishmania major or as control with­out sti­mulation. Cells were harvested after 7 days and were analyzed using flow cytometry. Results: Five consecutive divisions were monitored separately. Stimulation of CD4+ or CD8+ lymphocytes from CL sub­jects with SLA showed a significant difference in proliferation comparing with unstimulated cells (P< 0.05. The signifi­cant difference in the percentages of CD4+ cells stimulated with SLA was revealed at different divisions for each subject. In CD8+ lymphocyte, significant stronger stimulation of SLA was evident later in the proliferation process. The mean number of divisions in both CD4+/CD8+ lymphocytes stimulated with SLA was significantly greater than when stimulated with live L. major (P=0.007 / P=0.012, respectively Conclusion: The percentage of divided cells might be calculated separately in each division. The cells remained active following CFSE staining and there is possibility of functional analysis simultaneously.

  19. Understanding Fluid Flow during Tectonic Reactivation: An Example from the Flamborough Head Chalk Outcrop (UK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. Faÿ-Gomord

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Flamborough Head chalks are located at the extremities of E-W and N-S trending fault systems along the Yorkshire coast (UK. Rock deformation is expressed in Selwicks Bay where a normal fault is exposed along with a high density of calcite veins. The fault mineralization is tested using geochemistry. Crosscutting relationships are used to differentiate between three vein generations: a network of parallel veins that are oriented perpendicular to stratigraphy (Group I, hydraulic breccia with typical jigsaw puzzle structure (Group II, and a third generation of calcite veins crosscutting the two previous generations (Group III. Geochemical analyses revealed that all three generations possess the same chemical signature and must reflect successive pulses from the same mineralizing fluid source. Strontium isotope analyses showed that the veins have elevated 87Sr/86Sr ratios, that is, up to 7.110, while ratios of the chalk matrix equal 7.707. The latter value is in agreement with the signature of Late Cretaceous seawater. Consequently, the source of the fluid is external, reflecting an open system. The radiogenic Sr-isotope ratios, combined with low iron concentration, suggest that fluids migrated through sandy deposits. Fluid inclusion salinities range from 0 to 12 eq. wt% NaCl equiv. with a dominance of very low salinity inclusions, reflecting a meteoric signal. This leads to a model where meteoric fluids stored in an underlying confined sandstone aquifer were remobilized. The wide range of salinities could result from mixing of the meteoric fluid with some more saline fluids present in the rock sequence or from the dissolution of salts in the subsurface. In addition to the understanding of the local paragenetic evolution of the veining in Flamborough Head chalks, this study offers an insight into the way how fluid flows and mineralizes along fault zones.

  20. Fluid flow and reactive transport around potential nuclear waste emplacement tunnels at Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spycher, N.F.; Sonnenthal, E.L.; Apps, J.A.

    2002-01-01

    The evolution of fluid chemistry and mineral alteration around a potential waste emplacement tunnel (drift) is evaluated using numerical modeling. The model considers the flow of water, gas, and heat, plus reactions between minerals, CO 2 gas, and aqueous species, and porosity permeability-capillary pressure coupling for a dual permeability (fractures and matrix) medium. Two possible operating temperature modes are investigated: a ''high-temperature'' case with temperatures exceeding the boiling point of water for several hundred years, and a ''loW--temperature'' case with temperatures remaining below boiling for the entire life of the repository. In both cases, possible seepage waters are characterized by dilute to moderate salinities and mildly alkaline pH values. These trends in fluid composition and mineral alteration are controlled by various coupled mechanisms. For example, upon heating and boiling, CO 2 exsolution from pore waters raises pH and causes calcite precipitation. In condensation zones, this CO 2 redissolves, resulting in a decrease in pH that causes calcite dissolution and enhances feldspar alteration to clays. Heat also enhances dissolution of wallrock minerals leading to elevated silica concentrations. Amorphous silica precipitates through evaporative concentration caused by boiling in the high-temperature case, but does not precipitate in the loW--temperature case. Some alteration of feldspars to clays and zeolites is predicted in the high-temperature case. In both cases, calcite precipitates when percolating waters are heated near the drift. The predicted porosity decrease around drifts in the high-temperature case (several percent of the fracture volume) is larger by at least one order of magnitude than in the low temperature case. Although there are important differences between the two investigated temperature modes in the predicted evolution of fluid compositions and mineral alteration around drifts, these differences are small relative to

  1. Dual continuum models of fully coupled non-isothermal multiphase flow and reactive transport in porous media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zheng, L.; Samper, J.

    2005-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: Double porosity, double permeability and dual continuum models (DCM) are widely used for modeling preferential water flow and mass transport in unsaturated and fractured media. Here we present a DCM of fully coupled non-isothermal multiphase flow and reactive transport model for the FEBEX compacted bentonite, a material which exhibits a double porosity behavior.. FEBEX (Full-scale Engineered Barrier EXperiment) is a demonstration and research project dealing with the bentonite engineered barrier designed for sealing and containment of a high level radioactive waste repository. Our DCM considers inter-aggregate macro-pores, and intra-aggregate and interlayer micro-pores. Two types of DCMs are tested: the dual continuum connected matrix (DCCM) and the dual continuum dis connected matrix (DCDM). Liquid flow in macro-pores is described with a mass conservation equation accounting for Darcian flow, chemical and thermal osmosis. In DCCM, water flux in micropores is calculated with a modified Darcy's law by adding a chemical osmosis term. A simple mass balance equation is used for DCDM which contains a storage and a water exchange term for water in micropores. A mixed type of water exchange term is adopted which includes a second order term accounting for water transfer due to the difference in liquid pressure and a first order term accounting for the gradient in chemical osmosis pressure. Equations of mass conservation for liquid, gas and heat in macro-pores and liquid mass conservation in micropores are solved by using a Newton-Raphson method. Two transport equations with a coupling interaction term are used to describe solute transport in macro- and micro-pores. The coupling term contains a first order diffusion term and a convection term (solute exchange due to water exchange). Transport equations as well as chemical reactions in the two domains are solved by means of a sequential iteration method. All these feature have been

  2. Flow and nutrient dynamics in a subterranean estuary (Waquoit Bay, MA, USA): Field data and reactive transport modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spiteri, Claudette; Slomp, Caroline P.; Charette, Matthew A.; Tuncay, Kagan; Meile, Christof

    2008-07-01

    A two-dimensional (2D) reactive transport model is used to investigate the controls on nutrient ( NO3-, NH4+, PO 4) dynamics in a coastal aquifer. The model couples density-dependent flow to a reaction network which includes oxic degradation of organic matter, denitrification, iron oxide reduction, nitrification, Fe 2+ oxidation and sorption of PO 4 onto iron oxides. Porewater measurements from a well transect at Waquoit Bay, MA, USA indicate the presence of a reducing plume with high Fe 2+, NH4+, DOC (dissolved organic carbon) and PO 4 concentrations overlying a more oxidizing NO3--rich plume. These two plumes travel nearly conservatively until they start to overlap in the intertidal coastal sediments prior to discharge into the bay. In this zone, the aeration of the surface beach sediments drives nitrification and allows the precipitation of iron oxide, which leads to the removal of PO 4 through sorption. Model simulations suggest that removal of NO3- through denitrification is inhibited by the limited overlap between the two freshwater plumes, as well as by the refractory nature of terrestrial DOC. Submarine groundwater discharge is a significant source of NO3- to the bay.

  3. PFLOTRAN User Manual: A Massively Parallel Reactive Flow and Transport Model for Describing Surface and Subsurface Processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lichtner, Peter C. [OFM Research, Redmond, WA (United States); Hammond, Glenn E. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Lu, Chuan [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Karra, Satish [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Bisht, Gautam [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Andre, Benjamin [National Center for Atmospheric Research, Boulder, CO (United States); Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Mills, Richard [Intel Corporation, Portland, OR (United States); Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Kumar, Jitendra [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2015-01-20

    PFLOTRAN solves a system of generally nonlinear partial differential equations describing multi-phase, multicomponent and multiscale reactive flow and transport in porous materials. The code is designed to run on massively parallel computing architectures as well as workstations and laptops (e.g. Hammond et al., 2011). Parallelization is achieved through domain decomposition using the PETSc (Portable Extensible Toolkit for Scientific Computation) libraries for the parallelization framework (Balay et al., 1997). PFLOTRAN has been developed from the ground up for parallel scalability and has been run on up to 218 processor cores with problem sizes up to 2 billion degrees of freedom. Written in object oriented Fortran 90, the code requires the latest compilers compatible with Fortran 2003. At the time of this writing this requires gcc 4.7.x, Intel 12.1.x and PGC compilers. As a requirement of running problems with a large number of degrees of freedom, PFLOTRAN allows reading input data that is too large to fit into memory allotted to a single processor core. The current limitation to the problem size PFLOTRAN can handle is the limitation of the HDF5 file format used for parallel IO to 32 bit integers. Noting that 232 = 4; 294; 967; 296, this gives an estimate of the maximum problem size that can be currently run with PFLOTRAN. Hopefully this limitation will be remedied in the near future.

  4. Simulating Hydrologic Flow and Reactive Transport with PFLOTRAN and PETSc on Emerging Fine-Grained Parallel Computer Architectures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mills, R. T.; Rupp, K.; Smith, B. F.; Brown, J.; Knepley, M.; Zhang, H.; Adams, M.; Hammond, G. E.

    2017-12-01

    As the high-performance computing community pushes towards the exascale horizon, power and heat considerations have driven the increasing importance and prevalence of fine-grained parallelism in new computer architectures. High-performance computing centers have become increasingly reliant on GPGPU accelerators and "manycore" processors such as the Intel Xeon Phi line, and 512-bit SIMD registers have even been introduced in the latest generation of Intel's mainstream Xeon server processors. The high degree of fine-grained parallelism and more complicated memory hierarchy considerations of such "manycore" processors present several challenges to existing scientific software. Here, we consider how the massively parallel, open-source hydrologic flow and reactive transport code PFLOTRAN - and the underlying Portable, Extensible Toolkit for Scientific Computation (PETSc) library on which it is built - can best take advantage of such architectures. We will discuss some key features of these novel architectures and our code optimizations and algorithmic developments targeted at them, and present experiences drawn from working with a wide range of PFLOTRAN benchmark problems on these architectures.

  5. Flow cytometric analysis of immunoglobulin heavy chain expression in B-cell lymphoma and reactive lymphoid hyperplasia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grier, David D; Al-Quran, Samer Z; Cardona, Diana M; Li, Ying; Braylan, Raul C

    2012-01-01

    The diagnosis of B-cell lymphoma (BCL) is often dependent on the detection of clonal immunoglobulin (Ig) light chain expression. In some BCLs, the determination of clonality based on Ig light chain restriction may be difficult. The aim of our study was to assess the utility of flow cytometric analysis of surface Ig heavy chain (HC) expression in lymphoid tissues in distinguishing lymphoid hyperplasias from BCLs, and also differentiating various BCL subtypes. HC expression on B-cells varied among different types of hyperplasias. In follicular hyperplasia, IgM and IgD expression was high in mantle cells while germinal center cells showed poor HC expression. In other hyperplasias, B cell compartments were blurred but generally showed high IgD and IgM expression. Compared to hyperplasias, BCLs varied in IgM expression. Small lymphocytic lymphomas had lower IgM expression than mantle cell lymphomas. Of importance, IgD expression was significantly lower in BCLs than in hyperplasias, a finding that can be useful in differentiating lymphoma from reactive processes. PMID:22400070

  6. KIVA-hpFE: Predictive turublent reactive and multiphase flow in engines : Science Supporting Mission of the Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carrington, David Bradley [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Waters, Jiajia [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-09-26

    Research and development of KIVA-hpFE for turbulent reactive and multiphase flow particularly as related to engine modeling program has relevance to National energy security and climate change. Climate change is a source problem, and energy national security is consumption of petroleum products problem. Accurately predicting engine processes leads to, lower greenhouse gas (GHG) emission, where engines in the transportation sector currently account for 26% of the U.S. GHG emissions. Less dependence on petroleum products leads to greater energy security. By Environmental Protection Agency standards, some vehicles are now reaching 42 to the 50 mpg mark. These are conventional gasoline engines. Continued investment and research into new technical innovations, the potential exists to save more than 4 million barrels of oil per day or approximately $200 to $400 million per day. This would be a significant decrease in emission and use of petroleum and a very large economic stimulus too! It is estimated with further advancements in combustion, the current emissions can be reduced up to 40%. Enabling better understanding of fuel injection and fuel-air mixing, thermodynamic combustion losses, and combustion/emission formation processes enhances our ability to help solve both problems. To provide adequate capability for accurately simulating these processes, minimize time and labor for development of engine technology, are the goals of our KIVA development program.

  7. Implicit and explicit schemes for mass consistency preservation in hybrid particle/finite-volume algorithms for turbulent reactive flows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Popov, Pavel P.; Pope, Stephen B.

    2014-01-01

    This work addresses the issue of particle mass consistency in Large Eddy Simulation/Probability Density Function (LES/PDF) methods for turbulent reactive flows. Numerical schemes for the implicit and explicit enforcement of particle mass consistency (PMC) are introduced, and their performance is examined in a representative LES/PDF application, namely the Sandia–Sydney Bluff-Body flame HM1. A new combination of interpolation schemes for velocity and scalar fields is found to better satisfy PMC than multilinear and fourth-order Lagrangian interpolation. A second-order accurate time-stepping scheme for stochastic differential equations (SDE) is found to improve PMC relative to Euler time stepping, which is the first time that a second-order scheme is found to be beneficial, when compared to a first-order scheme, in an LES/PDF application. An explicit corrective velocity scheme for PMC enforcement is introduced, and its parameters optimized to enforce a specified PMC criterion with minimal corrective velocity magnitudes

  8. The utility of flow cytometry in differentiating NK/T cell lymphoma from indolent and reactive NK cell proliferations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Mel, Sanjay; Li, Jenny Bei; Abid, Muhammad Bilal; Tang, Tiffany; Tay, Hui Ming; Ting, Wen Chang; Poon, Li Mei; Chung, Tae Hoon; Mow, Benjamin; Tso, Allison; Ong, Kiat Hoe; Chng, Wee Joo; Liu, Te Chih

    2018-01-01

    The WHO defines three categories of NK cell malignancies; extra nodal NK/T cell lymphoma (NKTCL), aggressive NK cell leukemia, and the provisional entity chronic lymphoproliferative disorder of NK cells (CLPD-NK). Although the flow cytometric (FC) phenotype of CLPD-NK has been described, studies on FC phenotype of NKTCL are limited. To the best of our knowledge ours is the first study to compare the phenotype of NKTCL, CLPD-NK, reactive NK lymphocytosis (RNKL), and normal NK cells using eight color (8C) FC. Specimens analyzed using the Euroflow8C NK Lymphoproliferative Disorder (NKLPD) panel between 2011 and 2014 were identified from our database. All samples were analyzed on the FACSCantoII cytometer. NK cells were identified as CD45+, smCD3-, CD19-, CD56+ and normal T-cells served as internal controls. The majority of NKTCL were CD56 bright, CD16 dim, CD57-, and CD94+. CLPD-NK and RNKL were predominantly CD56+ or dim with positive expression of CD16 and CD57 and weak CD94 expression. Antigen based statistical analyses showed robust division of samples along the NKTCL/normal CD56 bright NK cell and CLPD-NK/RNKL/normal CD56 positive NK cell groups. It was concluded that FC can reliably distinguish NKTCL from CLPD-NK, normal NK cells of CD56+ phenotype, and RNKL. It was proposed that the typical phenotype for NKTCL is: CD56 bright, CD16 dim with positive CD2, CD7, CD94, HLADR, CD25, CD26, and absent CD57. This resembles the phenotype of the CD56 bright immunoregulatory subset of NK cells which we therefore hypothesize is the cell of origin of NKTCL. © 2017 International Clinical Cytometry Society. © 2017 International Clinical Cytometry Society.

  9. Cerebral Blood Flow and Transcranial Doppler Sonography Measurements of CO(2)-Reactivity in Acute Traumatic Brain Injured Patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reinstrup, Peter; Ryding, Erik Hilmer; Asgeirsson, Bogi

    2013-01-01

    measurements and cerebrovascular reactivity to hypocapnia were simultaneously evaluated in 27 patients with acute TBI. Measurements were performed preoperatively during controlled normocapnia and hypocapnia in patients scheduled for hematoma evacuation under general anesthesia. MAIN FINDING AND CONCLUSION...

  10. Simulation of reactive polydisperse sprays strongly coupled to unsteady flows in solid rocket motors: Efficient strategy using Eulerian Multi-Fluid methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sibra, A.; Dupays, J.; Murrone, A.; Laurent, F.; Massot, M.

    2017-06-01

    In this paper, we tackle the issue of the accurate simulation of evaporating and reactive polydisperse sprays strongly coupled to unsteady gaseous flows. In solid propulsion, aluminum particles are included in the propellant to improve the global performances but the distributed combustion of these droplets in the chamber is suspected to be a driving mechanism of hydrodynamic and acoustic instabilities. The faithful prediction of two-phase interactions is a determining step for future solid rocket motor optimization. When looking at saving computational ressources as required for industrial applications, performing reliable simulations of two-phase flow instabilities appears as a challenge for both modeling and scientific computing. The size polydispersity, which conditions the droplet dynamics, is a key parameter that has to be accounted for. For moderately dense sprays, a kinetic approach based on a statistical point of view is particularly appropriate. The spray is described by a number density function and its evolution follows a Williams-Boltzmann transport equation. To solve it, we use Eulerian Multi-Fluid methods, based on a continuous discretization of the size phase space into sections, which offer an accurate treatment of the polydispersion. The objective of this paper is threefold: first to derive a new Two Size Moment Multi-Fluid model that is able to tackle evaporating polydisperse sprays at low cost while accurately describing the main driving mechanisms, second to develop a dedicated evaporation scheme to treat simultaneously mass, moment and energy exchanges with the gas and between the sections. Finally, to design a time splitting operator strategy respecting both reactive two-phase flow physics and cost/accuracy ratio required for industrial computations. Using a research code, we provide 0D validations of the new scheme before assessing the splitting technique's ability on a reference two-phase flow acoustic case. Implemented in the industrial

  11. Multi-objective optimal reactive power dispatch to maximize power system social welfare in the presence of generalized unified power flow controller

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suresh Chintalapudi Venkata

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available In this paper a novel non-linear optimization problem is formulated to maximize the social welfare in restructured environment with generalized unified power flow controller (GUPFC. This paper presents a methodology to optimally allocate the reactive power by minimizing voltage deviation at load buses and total transmission power losses so as to maximize the social welfare. The conventional active power generation cost function is modified by combining costs of reactive power generated by the generators, shunt capacitors and total power losses to it. The formulated objectives are optimized individually and simultaneously as multi-objective optimization problem, while satisfying equality, in-equality, practical and device operational constraints. A new optimization method, based on two stage initialization and random distribution processes is proposed to test the effectiveness of the proposed approach on IEEE-30 bus system, and the detailed analysis is carried out.

  12. The development of high performance numerical simulation code for transient groundwater flow and reactive solute transport problems based on local discontinuous Galerkin method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Shunichi; Motoshima, Takayuki; Naemura, Yumi; Kubo, Shin; Kanie, Shunji

    2009-01-01

    The authors develop a numerical code based on Local Discontinuous Galerkin Method for transient groundwater flow and reactive solute transport problems in order to make it possible to do three dimensional performance assessment on radioactive waste repositories at the earliest stage possible. Local discontinuous Galerkin Method is one of mixed finite element methods which are more accurate ones than standard finite element methods. In this paper, the developed numerical code is applied to several problems which are provided analytical solutions in order to examine its accuracy and flexibility. The results of the simulations show the new code gives highly accurate numeric solutions. (author)

  13. Digital integrated control of a Mach 2.5 mixed-compression supersonic inlet and an augmented mixed-flow turbofan engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batterton, P. G.; Arpasi, D. J.; Baumbick, R. J.

    1974-01-01

    A digitally implemented integrated inlet-engine control system was designed and tested on a mixed-compression, axisymmetric, Mach 2.5, supersonic inlet with 45 percent internal supersonic area contraction and a TF30-P-3 augmented turbofan engine. The control matched engine airflow to available inlet airflow. By monitoring inlet terminal shock position and over-board bypass door command, the control adjusted engine speed so that in steady state, the shock would be at the desired location and the overboard bypass doors would be closed. During engine-induced transients, such as augmentor light-off and cutoff, the inlet operating point was momentarily changed to a more supercritical point to minimize unstarts. The digital control also provided automatic inlet restart. A variable inlet throat bleed control, based on throat Mach number, provided additional inlet stability margin.

  14. Magnetohydrodynamic Augmented Propulsion Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Litchford, Ron J.; Cole, John; Lineberry, John; Chapman, Jim; Schmidt, Harold; Cook, Stephen (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    that an MHD accelerator can be an effective augmentation system for increasing engine exhaust velocity. More specifically, the experiment is intended to show that electromagnetic effects are effective at producing flow acceleration whereas electrothermal effects do not cause unacceptable heating of the working fluid. The MHD accelerator was designed as an externally diagonalized segmented Faraday channel, which will be inserted into an existing 2-tesla electromagnet. This allows the external power to be connected through two terminals thereby minimizing the complexity and cost associated with powering each segment independently. The design of the accelerator and other components in the flow path has been completed and fabrication activities are underway. This paper provides a full description of MAPX including performance analysis, design, and test plans, and current status.

  15. Transmission and fluorescence X-ray absorption spectroscopy cell/flow reactor for powder samples under vacuum or in reactive atmospheres

    KAUST Repository

    Hoffman, A. S.; Debefve, L. M.; Bendjeriou-Sedjerari, Anissa; Ould-Chikh, Samy; Bare, Simon R.; Basset, Jean-Marie; Gates, B. C.

    2016-01-01

    X-ray absorption spectroscopy is an element-specific technique for probing the local atomic-scale environment around an absorber atom. It is widely used to investigate the structures of liquids and solids, being especially valuable for characterization of solid-supported catalysts. Reported cell designs are limited in capabilities—to fluorescence or transmission and to static or flowing atmospheres, or to vacuum. Our goal was to design a robust and widely applicable cell for catalyst characterizations under all these conditions—to allow tracking of changes during genesis and during operation, both under vacuum and in reactive atmospheres. Herein, we report the design of such a cell and a demonstration of its operation both with a sample under dynamic vacuum and in the presence of gases flowing at temperatures up to 300 °C, showing data obtained with both fluorescence and transmission detection. The cell allows more flexibility in catalyst characterization than any reported.

  16. Transmission and fluorescence X-ray absorption spectroscopy cell/flow reactor for powder samples under vacuum or in reactive atmospheres

    KAUST Repository

    Hoffman, A. S.

    2016-07-26

    X-ray absorption spectroscopy is an element-specific technique for probing the local atomic-scale environment around an absorber atom. It is widely used to investigate the structures of liquids and solids, being especially valuable for characterization of solid-supported catalysts. Reported cell designs are limited in capabilities—to fluorescence or transmission and to static or flowing atmospheres, or to vacuum. Our goal was to design a robust and widely applicable cell for catalyst characterizations under all these conditions—to allow tracking of changes during genesis and during operation, both under vacuum and in reactive atmospheres. Herein, we report the design of such a cell and a demonstration of its operation both with a sample under dynamic vacuum and in the presence of gases flowing at temperatures up to 300 °C, showing data obtained with both fluorescence and transmission detection. The cell allows more flexibility in catalyst characterization than any reported.

  17. Secondary Breast Augmentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Mitchell H; Somogyi, Ron B; Aggarwal, Shagun

    2016-07-01

    After studying this article, the participant should be able to: 1. Assess common clinical problems in the secondary breast augmentation patient. 2. Describe a treatment plan to correct the most common complications of breast augmentation. 3. Provide surgical and nonsurgical options for managing complications of breast augmentation. 4. Decrease the incidence of future complications through accurate assessment, preoperative planning, and precise surgical technique. Breast augmentation has been increasing steadily in popularity over the past three decades. Many of these patients present with secondary problems or complications following their primary breast augmentation. Two of the most common complications are capsular contracture and implant malposition. Familiarity and comfort with the assessment and management of these complications is necessary for all plastic surgeons. An up-to-date understanding of current devices and techniques may decrease the need to manage future complications from the current cohort of breast augmentation patients.

  18. Blood flow responses to mild-intensity exercise in ectopic vs. orthotopic prostate tumors; dependence upon host tissue hemodynamics and vascular reactivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Emmanuel; Becker, Veronika G C; McCullough, Danielle J; Stabley, John N; Gittemeier, Elizabeth M; Opoku-Acheampong, Alexander B; Sieman, Dietmar W; Behnke, Bradley J

    2016-07-01

    Given the critical role of tumor O2 delivery in patient prognosis and the rise in preclinical exercise oncology studies, we investigated tumor and host tissue blood flow at rest and during exercise as well as vascular reactivity using a rat prostate cancer model grown in two transplantation sites. In male COP/CrCrl rats, blood flow (via radiolabeled microspheres) to prostate tumors [R3327-MatLyLu cells injected in the left flank (ectopic) or ventral prostate (orthotopic)] and host tissue was measured at rest and during a bout of mild-intensity exercise. α-Adrenergic vasoconstriction to norepinephrine (NE: 10(-9) to 10(-4) M) was determined in arterioles perforating the tumors and host tissue. To determine host tissue exercise hyperemia in healthy tissue, a sham-operated group was included. Blood flow was lower at rest and during exercise in ectopic tumors and host tissue (subcutaneous adipose) vs. the orthotopic tumor and host tissue (prostate). During exercise, blood flow to the ectopic tumor significantly decreased by 25 ± 5% (SE), whereas flow to the orthotopic tumor increased by 181 ± 30%. Maximal vasoconstriction to NE was not different between arterioles from either tumor location. However, there was a significantly higher peak vasoconstriction to NE in subcutaneous adipose arterioles (92 ± 7%) vs. prostate arterioles (55 ± 7%). Establishment of the tumor did not alter host tissue blood flow from either location at rest or during exercise. These data demonstrate that blood flow in tumors is dependent on host tissue hemodynamics and that the location of the tumor may critically affect how exercise impacts the tumor microenvironment and treatment outcomes. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  19. Mobile Augmented Reality Applications

    OpenAIRE

    Prochazka, David; Stencl, Michael; Popelka, Ondrej; Stastny, Jiri

    2011-01-01

    Augmented reality have undergone considerable improvement in past years. Many special techniques and hardware devices were developed, but the crucial breakthrough came with the spread of intelligent mobile phones. This enabled mass spread of augmented reality applications. However mobile devices have limited hardware capabilities, which narrows down the methods usable for scene analysis. In this article we propose an augmented reality application which is using cloud computing to enable using...

  20. Relation of Long-term Exposure to Air Pollution to Brachial Artery Flow-Mediated Dilation and Reactive Hyperemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilker, Elissa H.; Ljungman, Petter L.; Rice, Mary B.; Kloog, Itai; Schwartz, Joel; Gold, Diane R.; Koutrakis, Petros; Vita, Joseph A.; Mitchell, Gary F.; Vasan, Ramachandran S.; Benjamin, Emelia J.; Hamburg, Naomi M.; Mittleman, Murray A.

    2014-01-01

    Long-term exposure to ambient air pollution has been associated with cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Impaired vascular responses may in part explain these findings, but the association of such long-term exposure with measures of both conduit artery and microvascular function have not been widely reported. We evaluated the association between residential proximity to a major roadway (primary or secondary highway) and spatially resolved average fine particulate matter (PM2.5) and baseline brachial artery diameter and mean flow velocity, flow mediated dilation % and hyperemic flow velocity, in the Framingham Offspring and Third Generation Cohorts. We examined 5,112 participants (2,731 (53%) women, mean age 49±14 years). Spatially resolved average PM2.5 was associated with lower flow mediated dilation% and hyperemic flow velocity. An interquartile range difference in PM2.5 (1.99 μg/m3) was associated with −0.16% (95%CI: −0.27%, −0.05%) lower FMD% and −0.72 (95%CI: −1.38, −0.06) cm/s lower hyperemic flow velocity %. Residential proximity to a major roadway was negatively associated with flow mediated dilation %. Compared to living ≥400 m away, living <50 m from a major roadway was associated with 0.32% lower flow mediated dilation (95% confidence interval (CI): −0.58%, −0.06%), but results for hyperemic flow velocity had wide confidence intervals −0.68 cm/s (95%CI: −2.29, 0.93). In conclusion, residential proximity to a major roadway and higher levels of spatially resolved estimates of PM2.5 at participant residences are associated with impaired conduit artery and microvascular function in this large community-based cohort of middle-aged and elderly adults. PMID:24793676

  1. Cerebral blood flow and CO2 reactivity in transient ischemic attacks: comparison between TIAs due to the ICA occlusion and ICA mild stenosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsuda, Y.; Kimura, K.; Yoneda, S.; Etani, H.; Asai, T.; Nakamura, M.; Abe, H.

    1983-01-01

    Hemispheric mean cerebral blood flow (CBF), together with its CO2 reactivity in response to hyperventilation, was investigated in 18 patients with transient ischemic attacks (TIAs) by intraarterial 133Xe injection method in a subacute-chronic stage of the clinical course. In 8 patients, the lesion responsible for symptoms was regarded as unilateral internal carotid artery (ICA) occlusion, and in 10 patients, it was regarded as unilateral ICA mild stenosis (less than 50% stenosis in diameter). Resting flow values were significantly decreased in the affected hemisphere of TIA due to the ICA occlusion as compared with the unaffected hemisphere of the same patient, regarded as the relative control. It was not decreased in the affected hemisphere of TIA due to the ICA mild stenosis as compared with the control. With respect to the responsiveness of CBF to changes in PaCO2, it was preserved in both TIAs, due to the ICA occlusion and ICA mild stenosis. Vasoparalysis was not observed in either types of TIAs in the subacute-chronic stage. However, in the relationship of blood pressure and CO2 reactivity, expressed as delta CBF(%)/delta PaCO2, pressure-dependent CO2 reactivity as a group was observed with significance in 8 cases of TIA due to the ICA occlusion, while no such relationship was noted in 10 cases of TIA due to the ICA mild stenosis. Moreover, clinical features were different between TIAs due to the ICA occlusion and ICA mild stenosis, i.e., more typical, repeatable TIA (6.3 +/- 3.7 times) with shorter duration (less than 30 minutes) was observed in TIAs due to the ICA mild stenosis, while more prolonged, less repeatable TIA (2.4 +/- 1.4 times) was observed in TIAs due to fixed obstruction of the ICA. From these observations, two different possible mechanisms as to the pathogenesis of TIA might be expected

  2. Simultaneous resolution of reactive radioactive decay, non-isothermal flow, and migration with application to the performance assessment for HLW repositories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Juncosa, R.; Delgado, J.; Font, I.

    2010-01-01

    Radioactive decay is an important subject to take into account when studying the thermo-hydro-dynamic behavior of the buffer clay material used in the containment of radioactive waste. The modern concepts for the multibarrier design of a repository of high level waste in deep geologic formations consider that once canisters have failed, the buffer clay material must ensure the retention and/or delay of radionuclides within the time framework given in the assessment studies. Within the clay buffer, different chemical species are retarded/fixed according to several physicochemical processes (ion exchange, surface complexation, precipitation, matrix diffusion,..) but typical approaches do not consider the eventuality that radioactive species change their chemical nature (i.e. phase) thereby affecting their reactive behavior. The radioactive decay of an element takes place independently of the phase (aqueous, solid or gaseous) to which it belongs. This means that, in terms of radionuclide fixation, some geochemical processes will be effective scavengers (for instance mineral precipitation of crystal growth) while others will not (for instance ion exchange and/or sorption). In this contribution we present a reactive radioactive decay model of any number of chemical components including those that belong to decay series. The model, which is named FLOW-DECAY, also takes into account flow and isotopic migration and it has been applied considering a hypothetical model scenario provided by the project ENRESA 2000 and direct comparison with the results generated by the probabilistic code GoldSim. Results indicate that FLOW-DECAY may simulate the decay processes in a similar way that GoldSim, being the differences related to factors associated to code architecture. (orig.)

  3. Confronting an Augmented Reality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munnerley, Danny; Bacon, Matt; Wilson, Anna; Steele, James; Hedberg, John; Fitzgerald, Robert

    2012-01-01

    How can educators make use of augmented reality technologies and practices to enhance learning and why would we want to embrace such technologies anyway? How can an augmented reality help a learner confront, interpret and ultimately comprehend reality itself ? In this article, we seek to initiate a discussion that focuses on these questions, and…

  4. Augmented Reality on Android

    OpenAIRE

    Chunghan Li; Chang-Shyh Peng; Daisy F. Sang

    2013-01-01

    Augmented Reality is an application which combines a live view of real-world environment and computer-generated images. This paper studies and demonstrates an efficient Augmented Reality development in the mobile Android environment with the native Java language and Android SDK. Major components include Barcode Reader, File Loader, Marker Detector, Transform Matrix Generator, and a cloud database.

  5. Framing the performance of heat absorption/generation and thermal radiation in chemically reactive Darcy-Forchheimer flow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Hayat

    Full Text Available The present work aims to report the consequences of heterogeneous-homogeneous reactions in Darcy-Forchheimer flow of Casson material bounded by a nonlinear stretching sheet of variable thickness. Nonlinear stretched surface with variable thickness is the main agent for MHD Darcy-Forchheimer flow. Impact of thermal radiation and non-uniform heat absorption/generation are also considered. Flow in porous space is characterized by Darcy-Forchheimer flow. It is assumed that the homogeneous process in ambient fluid is governed by first order kinetics and the heterogeneous process on the wall surface is given by isothermal cubic autocatalator kinetics. The governing nonlinear ordinary differential equations are solved numerically. Effects of physical variables such as thickness, Hartman number, inertia and porous, radiation, Casson, heat absorption/generation and homogeneous-heterogeneous reactions are investigated. The variations of drag force (skin friction and heat transfer rate (Nusselt numberfor different interesting variables are plotted and discussed. Keywords: Casson fluid, Variable sheet thickness, Darcy-Forchheimer flow, Homogeneous-heterogeneous reactions, Heat generation/absorption, Thermal radiation

  6. A novel deep reactive ion etched (DRIE) glass micro-model for two-phase flow experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karadimitriou, N K; Joekar-Niasar, V; Hassanizadeh, S M; Kleingeld, P J; Pyrak-Nolte, L J

    2012-09-21

    In the last few decades, micro-models have become popular experimental tools for two-phase flow studies. In this work, the design and fabrication of an innovative, elongated, glass-etched micro-model with dimensions of 5 × 35 mm(2) and constant depth of 43 microns is described. This is the first time that a micro-model with such depth and dimensions has been etched in glass by using a dry etching technique. The micro-model was visualized by a novel setup that allowed us to monitor and record the distribution of fluids throughout the length of the micro-model continuously. Quasi-static drainage experiments were conducted in order to obtain equilibrium data points that relate capillary pressure to phase saturation. By measuring the flow rate of water through the flow network for known pressure gradients, the intrinsic permeability of the micro-model's flow network was also calculated. The experimental results were used to calibrate a pore-network model and test its validity. Finally, we show that glass-etched micro-models can be valuable tools in single and/or multi-phase flow studies and their applications.

  7. A novel Deep Reactive Ion Etched (DRIE) glass micro-model for two-phase flow experiments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Karadimitriou, N.K.; Joekar-Niasar, V.; Hassanizadeh, S.M.; Kleingeld, P.J.; Pyrak-Nolte, L.J.

    2012-01-01

    In the last few decades, micro-models have become popular experimental tools for two-phase flow studies. In this work, the design and fabrication of an innovative, elongated, glass-etched micromodel with dimensions of 5 6 35 mm2 and constant depth of 43 microns is described. This is the

  8. Coronary flow and reactivity, but not arrhythmia vulnerability, are affected by cardioplegia during cardiopulmonary bypass in piglets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liuba, Petru; Johansson, Sune; Pesonen, Erkki

    2013-01-01

    Background: Surgery under cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) is still associated with significant cardiovascular morbidity in both pediatric and adult patients but the mechanisms are not fully understood. Abnormalities in coronary flow and function have been suggested to play an important role. Prior...

  9. Augmented reality: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berryman, Donna R

    2012-01-01

    Augmented reality is a technology that overlays digital information on objects or places in the real world for the purpose of enhancing the user experience. It is not virtual reality, that is, the technology that creates a totally digital or computer created environment. Augmented reality, with its ability to combine reality and digital information, is being studied and implemented in medicine, marketing, museums, fashion, and numerous other areas. This article presents an overview of augmented reality, discussing what it is, how it works, its current implementations, and its potential impact on libraries.

  10. Pharmacological enhancement of leg and muscle microvascular blood flow does not augment anabolic responses in skeletal muscle of young men under fed conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Bethan E; Atherton, Philip J; Varadhan, Krishna; Wilkinson, Daniel J; Limb, Marie; Selby, Anna L; Rennie, Michael J; Smith, Kenneth; Williams, John P

    2014-01-15

    Skeletal muscle anabolism associated with postprandial plasma aminoacidemia and insulinemia is contingent upon amino acids (AA) and insulin crossing the microcirculation-myocyte interface. In this study, we hypothesized that increasing muscle microvascular blood volume (flow) would enhance fed-state anabolic responses in muscle protein turnover. We studied 10 young men (23.2 ± 2.1 yr) under postabsorptive and fed [iv Glamin (∼10 g AA), glucose ∼7.5 mmol/l] conditions. Methacholine was infused into the femoral artery of one leg to determine, via bilateral comparison, the effects of feeding alone vs. feeding plus pharmacological vasodilation. We measured leg blood flow (LBF; femoral artery) by Doppler ultrasound, muscle microvascular blood volume (MBV) by contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS), muscle protein synthesis (MPS) and breakdown (MPB; a-v balance modeling), and net protein balance (NPB) using [1,2-(13)C2]leucine and [(2)H5]phenylalanine tracers via gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Indexes of anabolic signaling/endothelial activation (e.g., Akt/mTORC1/NOS) were assessed using immunoblotting techniques. Under fed conditions, LBF (+12 ± 5%, P anabolism.

  11. Augment-type two stage accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogino, Mutsuo; Azuma, Kingo.

    1995-01-01

    When a flying body accelerated by a gas gun at a first stage enters into an augment rail passing through an introduction tube, an ignition capacitor for initial plasmas is turned ON to apply a voltage between the augment rails. Subsequently, the accelerating gas present behind the flying body is formed into plasmas by a laser, to flow electric current from one of the inner augment rails → plasma armature → the other of the inner augment rails, and additionally accelerate the flying body by Lorentz force formed in this case. Since the plasmas are maintained in a state of higher density than the plasmas obtained by using all of the augment rails, the ignition capacitor for initial plasmas in switched to a power source. As a result, it is possible to flow the maximum current before the plasmas expand, and a large accelerating force and a high magnetic flux density are attained, to improve acceleration performance of the flying body. (N.H.)

  12. Colloid Genesis/Transport and Flow Pathway Alterations Resulting From Interactions of Reactive Waste Solutions and Hanford Vadose Zone Sediments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wan, Jiamin; Tokunaga, Tetsu K.

    2001-01-01

    Leakage of underground tanks containing high-level nuclear waste solutions has been identified at various DOE facilities. The Hanford Site is one the main facilities of concern, with about 2,300 to 3,400 m3 of leaked waste liquids. Radionuclides and other contaminants have been found in elevated concentrations in the vadose zone and groundwater underneath single shell tank farms. We do not currently know the mechanisms responsible for the unexpected deep migration of some contaminants through the vadose zone, and such understanding is urgently needed for planning remediation. Due to the extreme chemical conditions of the tank waste solutions (very high pH, aluminum concentration, and ionic strength), interactions between the highly reactive waste solutions and sediments underneath the tanks can result in dissolution of primary minerals of the sediments and precipitation of secondary phases including colloidal particles. Contaminants can sorb onto and/or co-precipitate with the secondary phases. Therefore transport of strongly associated contaminants on mobile colloids can be substantially greater than without colloids. The overall objective of this research is to improve our understanding on the effects of interactions between the tank waste solution and sediments on deep contaminant migration under Hanford Site conditions. This objective will be achieved through the following four tasks: (1) colloid generation and transport studies, (2) studies on sediment permeability and chemical composition alterations, (3) quantifying associations of contaminants with secondary colloids, and (4) studies on the combined effects of the aforementioned processes on deep contaminant migration

  13. Double shock experiments and reactive flow modeling on LX-17 to understand the reacted equation of state

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vandersall, Kevin S; Garcia, Frank; Fried, Laurence E; Tarver, Craig M

    2014-01-01

    Experimental data from measurements of the reacted state of an energetic material are desired to incorporate reacted states in modeling by computer codes. In a case such as LX-17 (92.5% TATB and 7.5% Kel-F by weight), where the time dependent kinetics of reaction is still not fully understood and the reacted state may evolve over time, this information becomes even more vital. Experiments were performed to measure the reacted state of LX-17 using a double shock method involving the use of two flyer materials (with known properties) mounted on the projectile that send an initial shock through the material close to or above the Chapman-Jouguet (CJ) state followed by a second shock at a higher magnitude into the detonated material. By measuring the parameters of the first and second shock waves, information on the reacted state can be obtained. The LX-17 detonation reaction zone profiles plus the arrival times and amplitudes of reflected shocks in LX-17 detonation reaction products were measured using Photonic Doppler Velocimetry (PDV) probes and an aluminum foil coated LiF window. A discussion of this work will include the experimental parameters, velocimetry profiles, data interpretation, reactive CHEETAH and Ignition and Growth modeling, as well as detail on possible future experiments.

  14. Augmented Reality, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Augmented Reality systems come with many benefits derived by co-locating information with a user's environment through the use of one or more output modalities such...

  15. Chin augmentation - slideshow

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/presentations/100009.htm Chin augmentation - series—Normal anatomy To use the sharing features ... Bethesda, MD 20894 U.S. Department of Health and Human Services National Institutes of Health Page last updated: ...

  16. Augmenting Clozapine With Sertindole

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jimmi; Emborg, Charlotte; Gydesen, Susanne

    2012-01-01

    Clozapine augmentation with antipsychotic drugs is widely used despite sparse evidence supporting this strategy. Sertindole is a nonsedating atypical antipsychotic drug with low affinity for cholinergic receptors, which makes it potentially suitable for augmentation of clozapine. The study design...... glucose, lipids, and electrocardiogram. Clozapine augmentation with sertindole was not superior to placebo regarding total score or subscale score of the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale, Clinical Global Impression, World Health Organization Quality of Life Brief, or Drug Attitude Inventory....... No increased adverse effects compared with placebo were found. Four patients randomized to sertindole experienced a significant worsening of psychosis, and 2 of them required psychiatric admission. Metabolic parameters were unchanged during the study, but augmentation of clozapine with sertindole...

  17. Breast augmentation - slideshow

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/presentations/100205.htm Breast augmentation - series—Normal anatomy To use the sharing features ... Bethesda, MD 20894 U.S. Department of Health and Human Services National Institutes of Health Page last updated: ...

  18. Augmented reality in neurosurgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tagaytayan, Raniel; Kelemen, Arpad; Sik-Lanyi, Cecilia

    2018-04-01

    Neurosurgery is a medical specialty that relies heavily on imaging. The use of computed tomography and magnetic resonance images during preoperative planning and intraoperative surgical navigation is vital to the success of the surgery and positive patient outcome. Augmented reality application in neurosurgery has the potential to revolutionize and change the way neurosurgeons plan and perform surgical procedures in the future. Augmented reality technology is currently commercially available for neurosurgery for simulation and training. However, the use of augmented reality in the clinical setting is still in its infancy. Researchers are now testing augmented reality system prototypes to determine and address the barriers and limitations of the technology before it can be widely accepted and used in the clinical setting.

  19. Exploration Augmentation Module Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Exploration Augmentation Module (EAM) project goal is to design and deliver a flight module that is to be deployed to Earth-Lunar Distant Retrograde Orbit (DRO)....

  20. Modeling Chemically Reactive Flow of Sutterby Nanofluid by a Rotating Disk in Presence of Heat Generation/Absorption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayat, T.; Ahmad, Salman; Ijaz Khan, M.; Alsaedi, A.

    2018-05-01

    In this article we investigate the flow of Sutterby liquid due to rotating stretchable disk. Mass and heat transport are analyzed through Brownian diffusion and thermophoresis. Further the effects of magnetic field, chemical reaction and heat source are also accounted. We employ transformation procedure to obtain a system of nonlinear ODE’s. This system is numerically solved by Built-in-Shooting method. Impacts of different involved parameter on velocity, temperature and concentration are described. Velocity, concentration and temperature gradients are numerically computed. Obtained results show that velocity is reduced through material parameter. Temperature and concentration are enhanced with thermophoresis parameter.

  1. Numerical modeling and investigation of two-phase reactive flow in a high-low pressure chambers system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheng, Cheng; Zhang, Xiaobing

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • A novel two-dimensional two-phase flow model is established for the high-low pressure chambers system. • A strong packing of particles is observed at the projectile base and will cause the pressure to rise faster. • Different length–diameter ratios can affect the flow behavior through the vent-holes obviously. • The muzzle velocity decreases with the length–diameter ratio of the high-pressure chamber. - Abstract: A high-low pressure chambers system is proposed to meet the demands of low launch acceleration for informative equipment in many special fields such as Aeronautics, Astronautics and Weaponry. A two-dimensional two-phase flow numerical model is established to describe the complex physical process based on a modified two-fluid theory, which takes into account gas production, interphase drag, intergranular stress, and heat transfer between two phases. In order to reduce the computational cost, the parameters in the high-pressure chamber at the instant the vent-holes open are calculated by the zero-dimensional model as the initial conditions for the two-phase flow simulation in the high-low pressure chambers system. The simulation results reveal good agreement with the experiments and the launch acceleration of a projectile can be improved by this system. The propellant particles can be tracked clearly in both chambers and a strong packing of particles at the base of projectile will cause the pressure to rise faster than at other areas both in the axis and radial directions. The length–diameter ratio of the high-pressure chamber (a typical multi-dimensional parameter) is investigated. Different length–diameter ratios can affect the maximum pressure drop and the loss of total pressure impulse through the vent-hole, then the muzzle velocity and the launch acceleration of projectiles can be influenced directly. This article puts forward a new prediction tool for the understanding and design of transient processes in high-low pressure

  2. Blood flow and vascular reactivity during attacks of classic migraine--limitations of the Xe-133 intraarterial technique

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skyhøj Olsen, T; Lassen, N A

    1989-01-01

    . The Xenon-133 intraarterial injection technique was used to measure CBF. In this study, based in part on previously published data, methodological limitations, in particular caused by scattered radiation (Compton scatter), are critically analysed. Based on this analysis and the results of the CBF studies...... it is concluded: During CM attacks CBF appears to decrease focally in the posterior part of the brain to a level around 20 ml/100 g/min which is consistent with a mild degree of ischemia. Changes of CBF in focal low flow areas are difficult to evaluate accurately with the Xe-133 technique. In most cases true CBF...

  3. Marketing and Augmented Reality

    OpenAIRE

    Zelený, Martin

    2010-01-01

    The main goal of this diploma thesis is to identify the usage of augmented reality in contemporary marketing practice and the expectations of marketers for the future use. This will be achieved by conducting a quantitative and qualitative research among existing creative and advertising companies. Secondary goal is introducing the concept of augmented reality from the theoretical point of view and also description of potential utilization based on known examples. The tools for the practical p...

  4. INFORMATION VIA AUGMENTED

    OpenAIRE

    Tetteh, Sampson

    2015-01-01

    The vast majority of mobile technology today has developed over the past dec-ades. The thirst for information and communication has brought about high data transfer speed on modern mobile handset devices. This makes it possible for Augmented Reality to be used on mobile phones. Vaasa University of Applied Science, Technobothnia science resource center and Lumivaara Museum saw the importance of information and decided to embark on a pilot project where Augmented Reality will not be only us...

  5. Analysis of the uniform augmentation of the flow through the nucleus in the searching process of the patterns of objective control bars in a BWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Montes, J.L.; Ortiz, J.J.; Perusquia, R.

    2004-01-01

    The search of the patterns of control bars (PBCs) in a power reactor of boiling water, requires to investigate a very wide space of solutions, in principle they are had of the order of 3 x 10 152 possible configurations to establish the PBC in a point given before reaching the end of the cycle. This situation suggests to define those restrictions and conditions initial appropriately so that the search converges toward the desirable results. Presently work the results of the search of patterns of bars based on different flow scenarios through the nucleus are presented. The Cycle 10 is analysed (C10) of the Unit One of the Nuclear Power station Laguna Verde (CNLV), which presents an interesting mixture of diverse designs of control bars used in operation to power. The search of the patterns of bars of objective control is carried out applying the GACRP program which is based on the calculation technique known as genetic algorithms. (Author)

  6. Confronting an augmented reality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Hedberg

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available How can educators make use of augmented reality technologies and practices to enhance learning and why would we want to embrace such technologies anyway? How can an augmented reality help a learner confront, interpret and ultimately comprehend reality itself? In this article, we seek to initiate a discussion that focuses on these questions, and suggest that they be used as drivers for research into effective educational applications of augmented reality. We discuss how multi-modal, sensorial augmentation of reality links to existing theories of education and learning, focusing on ideas of cognitive dissonance and the confrontation of new realities implied by exposure to new and varied perspectives. We also discuss connections with broader debates brought on by the social and cultural changes wrought by the increased digitalisation of our lives, especially the concept of the extended mind. Rather than offer a prescription for augmentation, our intention is to throw open debate and to provoke deep thinking about what interacting with and creating an augmented reality might mean for both teacher and learner.

  7. Coupled multiphase reactive flow and mineral dissolution-precipitation kinetics: Examples of long-term CO2 sequestration in Utsira Sand, Norway and Mt. Simon Formation, Midwest USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Y.; Zhang, G.; Lu, P.; Hu, B.; Zhu, C.

    2017-12-01

    The extent of CO2 mineralization after CO2 injection into deep saline aquifers is a result of the complex coupling of multiphase fluid flow, mass transport, and brine-mineral reactions. The effects of dissolution rate laws and groundwater flow on the long-term fate of CO2 have been seriously overlooked. To investigate these effects, we conducted multiphase (CO2 and brine) coupled reactive transport modeling of CO2 storage in two sandy formations (Utsira Sand, Norway1,2 and Mt. Simon formation, USA 3) using ToughReact and simulated a series of scenarios. The results indicated that: (1) Different dissolution rate laws for feldspars can significantly affect the amount of CO2 mineralization. Increased feldspar dissolution will promote CO2 mineral trapping through the coupling between feldspar dissolution and carbonate mineral precipitation at raised pH. The predicted amount of CO2 mineral trapping when using the principle of detailed balancing-based rate law for feldspar dissolution is about twice as much as that when using sigmoidal rate laws in the literature. (2) Mineral trapping is twice as much when regional groundwater flow is taken into consideration in long-term simulations (e.g., 10,000 years) whereas most modeling studies neglected the regional groundwater flow back and effectively simulated a batch reactor process. Under the influence of regional groundwater flow, the fresh brine from upstream continuously dissolves CO2 at the tail of CO2 plume, generating a large acidified area where large amount of CO2 mineralization takes place. The upstream replenishment of groundwater results in ˜22% mineral trapping at year 10,000, compared to ˜4% when this effect is ignored. Refs: 1Zhang, G., Lu, P., Wei, X., Zhu, C. (2016). Impacts of Mineral Reaction Kinetics and Regional Groundwater Flow on Long-Term CO2 Fate at Sleipner. Energy & Fuels, 30(5), 4159-4180. 2Zhu, C., Zhang, G., Lu, P., Meng, L., Ji, X. (2015). Benchmark modeling of the Sleipner CO2 plume

  8. Control-Volume Analysis Of Thrust-Augmenting Ejectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drummond, Colin K.

    1990-01-01

    New method of analysis of transient flow in thrust-augmenting ejector based on control-volume formulation of governing equations. Considered as potential elements of propulsion subsystems of short-takeoff/vertical-landing airplanes.

  9. Effect of various nitrogen flow ratios on the optical properties of (Hf:N-DLC films prepared by reactive magnetron sputtering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meng Qi

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Hf and N co-doped diamond-like carbon [(Hf:N-DLC] films were deposited on 316L stainless steel and glass substrates through reactive magnetron sputtering of hafnium and carbon targets at various nitrogen flow ratios (R=N2/[N2+CH4+Ar]. The effects of chemical composition and crystal structure on the optical properties of the (Hf:N-DLC films were studied. The obtained films consist of uniform HfN nanocrystallines embedded into the DLC matrix. The size of the graphite clusters with sp2 bonds (La and the ID/IG ratio increase to 2.47 nm and 3.37, respectively, with increasing R. The optical band gap of the films decreases from 2.01 eV to 1.84 eV with increasing R. This finding is consistent with the trends of structural transformations and could be related to the increase in the density of π-bonds due to nitrogen incorporation. This paper reports the influence of nitrogen flow ratio on the correlation among the chemical composition, crystal structure, and optical properties of (Hf:N-DLC films.

  10. A numerical analysis for non-linear radiation in MHD flow around a cylindrical surface with chemically reactive species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Junaid Ahmad; Mustafa, M.

    2018-03-01

    Boundary layer flow around a stretchable rough cylinder is modeled by taking into account boundary slip and transverse magnetic field effects. The main concern is to resolve heat/mass transfer problem considering non-linear radiative heat transfer and temperature/concentration jump aspects. Using conventional similarity approach, the equations of motion and heat transfer are converted into a boundary value problem whose solution is computed by shooting method for broad range of slip coefficients. The proposed numerical scheme appears to improve as the strengths of magnetic field and slip coefficients are enhanced. Axial velocity and temperature are considerably influenced by a parameter M which is inversely proportional to the radius of cylinder. A significant change in temperature profile is depicted for growing wall to ambient temperature ratio. Relevant physical quantities such as wall shear stress, local Nusselt number and local Sherwood number are elucidated in detail.

  11. Impairment of skin blood flow during post-occlusive reactive hyperhemy assessed by laser Doppler flowmetry correlates with renal resistive index.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coulon, P; Constans, J; Gosse, P

    2012-01-01

    We lack non-invasive tools for evaluating the coronary and renal microcirculations. Since cutaneous Doppler laser exploration has evidenced impaired cutaneous microvascular responses in coronary artery disease and in impaired renal function, we wanted to find out if there was a link between the impairments in the cutaneous and renal microcirculations. To specify the significance of the rise in the renal resistive index (RI), which is still unclear, we also sought relations between RI and arterial stiffness. We conducted a cross-sectional controlled study in a heterogeneous population including hypertensive patients of various ages with or without a history of cardiovascular disease along with a healthy control group. The cutaneous microcirculation was evaluated by laser Doppler flowmetry of the post-occlusive reactive hyperhemy (PORH) and of the hyperhemy to heat. The renal microcirculation was evaluated by measurement of the RI. Arterial stiffness was evaluated from an ambulatory measurement of the corrected QKD(100-60) interval. We included 22 hypertensives and 11 controls of mean age 60.6 vs 40.8 years. In this population, there was a correlation between RI and basal zero to peak flow variation (BZ-PF) (r=-0.42; P=0.02) and a correlation between RI and rest flow to peak flow variation (RF-PF) (r=-0.44; P=0.01). There was also a significant correlation between RI and the corrected QKD(100-60) (r=-0.47; P=0.01). The significant correlation between PORH parameters and RI indicates that the functional modifications of the renal and cutaneous microcirculations tend to evolve in parallel during ageing or hypertension. The relation between RI and arterial stiffness shows that RI is a compound index of both renal microvascular impairment and the deterioration of macrovascular mechanics.

  12. Chemically reactive and naturally convective high speed MHD fluid flow through an oscillatory vertical porous plate with heat and radiation absorption effect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.M. Arifuzzaman

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper concerns with the modelling of an unsteady natural convective and higher order chemically reactive magnetohydrodynamics (MHD fluid flow with the effect of heat and radiation absorption. The flow is generated through a vertical oscillating porous plate. Boundary layer approximations is carried out to establish a flow model which represents the time dependent momentum, energy and diffusion balance equations. Before being solved numerically, the governing partial differential equations (PDEs were transformed into a set of nonlinear ordinary differential equation (ODEs by using non-similar technique. A very efficient numerical approach solves the obtained nonlinear coupled ODEs so called Explicit Finite Difference Method (EFDM. An algorithm is implemented in Compaq Visual Fortran 6.6a as a solving tool. In addition, the stability and convergence analysis (SCA is examined and shown explicitly. The advantages of SCA is its optimizes the accuracy of system parameters such as Prandtl number (Pr and Schmidt number (Sc.The velocity, temperature and concentration fields in the boundary layer region are studied in detail and the outcomes are shown in graphically with the influence of various pertinent parameters such as Grashof number (Gr, modified Grashof number (Gr, magnetic parameter (M, Darcy number (Da,Prandtl number (Pr, Schmidt number (Sc, radiation (R, heat sink (Q,radiation absorption (Q1, Eckert number (Ec, Dufour number (Du,Soret number (Sr, Schmidt number (Sc, reaction index (P and chemical reaction (Kr. Furthermore, the effect of skin friction coefficient (Cf, Nusselt number (Nu and Sherwood number (Sh are also examined graphically. Keywords: MHD, Oscillating porous plate, Radiation absorption, High order chemical reaction, EFDM

  13. A novel ion transport membrane reactor for fundamental investigations of oxygen permeation and oxy-combustion under reactive flow conditions

    KAUST Repository

    Kirchen, Patrick

    2013-01-01

    Ion transport membrane (ITM) reactors present an attractive technology for combined air separation and fuel conversion in applications such as syngas production, oxidative coupling or oxy-combustion, with the promise of lower capital and operating costs, as well higher product selectivities than traditional technologies. The oxygen permeation rate through a given ITM is defined by the membrane temperature and oxygen chemical potential difference across it. Both of these parameters can be strongly influenced by thermochemical reactions occurring in the vicinity of the membrane, though in the literature they are often characterized in terms of the well mixed product stream at the reactor exit. This work presents the development of a novel ITM reactor for the fundamental investigation of the coupling between fuel conversion and oxygen permeation under well defined fluid dynamic and thermodynamic conditions, including provisions for spatially resolved, in-situ investigations. A planar, finite gap stagnation flow reactor with optical and probe access to the reaction zone is used to facilitate in-situ measurements and cross-validation with detailed numerical simulations. Using this novel reactor, baseline measurements are presented to elucidate the impact of the sweep gas fuel (CH4) fraction on the oxygen permeation and fuel conversion. In addition, the difference between well-mixed gas compositions measured at the reactor outlet and those measured in the vicinity of the membrane surface are discussed, demonstrating the unique utility of the reactor. © 2012 The Combustion Institute. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. A numerical analysis for non-linear radiation in MHD flow around a cylindrical surface with chemically reactive species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junaid Ahmad Khan

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Boundary layer flow around a stretchable rough cylinder is modeled by taking into account boundary slip and transverse magnetic field effects. The main concern is to resolve heat/mass transfer problem considering non-linear radiative heat transfer and temperature/concentration jump aspects. Using conventional similarity approach, the equations of motion and heat transfer are converted into a boundary value problem whose solution is computed by shooting method for broad range of slip coefficients. The proposed numerical scheme appears to improve as the strengths of magnetic field and slip coefficients are enhanced. Axial velocity and temperature are considerably influenced by a parameter M which is inversely proportional to the radius of cylinder. A significant change in temperature profile is depicted for growing wall to ambient temperature ratio. Relevant physical quantities such as wall shear stress, local Nusselt number and local Sherwood number are elucidated in detail. Keywords: Stretchable boundary, Thermal radiation, Chemical reaction, Mathematical modeling, Non-linear differential system, Mass transfer

  15. Using laboratory flow experiments and reactive chemical transport modeling for designing waterflooding of the Agua Fria Reservoir, Poza Rica-Altamira Field, Mexico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Birkle, P.; Pruess, K.; Xu, T.; Figueroa, R.A. Hernandez; Lopez, M. Diaz; Lopez, E. Contreras

    2008-10-01

    Waterflooding for enhanced oil recovery requires that injected waters must be chemically compatible with connate reservoir waters, in order to avoid mineral dissolution-and-precipitation cycles that could seriously degrade formation permeability and injectivity. Formation plugging is a concern especially in reservoirs with a large content of carbonates, such as calcite and dolomite, as such minerals typically react rapidly with an aqueous phase, and have strongly temperature-dependent solubility. Clay swelling can also pose problems. During a preliminary waterflooding pilot project, the Poza Rica-Altamira oil field, bordering the Gulf coast in the eastern part of Mexico, experienced injectivity loss after five months of reinjection of formation waters into well AF-847 in 1999. Acidizing with HCl restored injectivity. We report on laboratory experiments and reactive chemistry modeling studies that were undertaken in preparation for long-term waterflooding at Agua Frma. Using analogous core plugs obtained from the same reservoir interval, laboratory coreflood experiments were conducted to examine sensitivity of mineral dissolution and precipitation effects to water composition. Native reservoir water, chemically altered waters, and distilled water were used, and temporal changes in core permeability, mineral abundances and aqueous concentrations of solutes were monitored. The experiments were simulated with the multi-phase, nonisothermal reactive transport code TOUGHREACT, and reasonable to good agreement was obtained for changes in solute concentrations. Clay swelling caused an additional impact on permeability behavior during coreflood experiments, whereas the modeled permeability depends exclusively on chemical processes. TOUGHREACT was then used for reservoir-scale simulation of injecting ambient-temperature water (30 C, 86 F) into a reservoir with initial temperature of 80 C (176 F). Untreated native reservoir water was found to cause serious porosity and

  16. Handling Occlusions for Robust Augmented Reality Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maidi Madjid

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In Augmented Reality applications, the human perception is enhanced with computer-generated graphics. These graphics must be exactly registered to real objects in the scene and this requires an effective Augmented Reality system to track the user's viewpoint. In this paper, a robust tracking algorithm based on coded fiducials is presented. Square targets are identified and pose parameters are computed using a hybrid approach based on a direct method combined with the Kalman filter. An important factor for providing a robust Augmented Reality system is the correct handling of targets occlusions by real scene elements. To overcome tracking failure due to occlusions, we extend our method using an optical flow approach to track visible points and maintain virtual graphics overlaying when targets are not identified. Our proposed real-time algorithm is tested with different camera viewpoints under various image conditions and shows to be accurate and robust.

  17. Augmented marked graphs

    CERN Document Server

    Cheung, King Sing

    2014-01-01

    Petri nets are a formal and theoretically rich model for the modelling and analysis of systems. A subclass of Petri nets, augmented marked graphs possess a structure that is especially desirable for the modelling and analysis of systems with concurrent processes and shared resources.This monograph consists of three parts: Part I provides the conceptual background for readers who have no prior knowledge on Petri nets; Part II elaborates the theory of augmented marked graphs; finally, Part III discusses the application to system integration. The book is suitable as a first self-contained volume

  18. Augmented reality som wearable

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buhl, Mie; Rahn, Annette

    2015-01-01

    Artiklen omhandler design og implementering af Augmented Reality (AR) i form af en wearable i sygeplejerskeuddannelsens anatomiundervisning, mere specifikt undervisning i lungeanatomi og respiration, med fokus på potentialer for visuel læring. Projektet undersøger, hvordan en udviklet AR-applikat......Artiklen omhandler design og implementering af Augmented Reality (AR) i form af en wearable i sygeplejerskeuddannelsens anatomiundervisning, mere specifikt undervisning i lungeanatomi og respiration, med fokus på potentialer for visuel læring. Projektet undersøger, hvordan en udviklet AR...

  19. Prototyping Augmented Reality

    CERN Document Server

    Mullen, Tony

    2011-01-01

    Learn to create augmented reality apps using Processing open-source programming language Augmented reality (AR) is used all over, and you may not even realize it. Smartphones overlay data onto live camera views to show homes for sale, restaurants, or historical sites. American football broadcasts use AR to show the invisible first-down line on the field to TV viewers. Nike and Budweiser, among others, have used AR in ads. Now, you can learn to create AR prototypes using 3D data, Processing open-source programming language, and other languages. This unique book is an easy-to-follow guide on how

  20. Simulation of variable-density flow and transport of reactive and nonreactive solutes during a tracer test at Cape Cod, Massachusetts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hubao; Schwartz, Frank W.; Wood, Warren W.; Garabedian, S.P.; LeBlanc, D.R.

    1998-01-01

    A multispecies numerical code was developed to simulate flow and mass transport with kinetic adsorption in variable-density flow systems. The two-dimensional code simulated the transport of bromide (Br−), a nonreactive tracer, and lithium (Li+), a reactive tracer, in a large-scale tracer test performed in a sand-and-gravel aquifer at Cape Cod, Massachusetts. A two-fraction kinetic adsorption model was implemented to simulate the interaction of Li+ with the aquifer solids. Initial estimates for some of the transport parameters were obtained from a nonlinear least squares curve-fitting procedure, where the breakthrough curves from column experiments were matched with one-dimensional theoretical models. The numerical code successfully simulated the basic characteristics of the two plumes in the tracer test. At early times the centers of mass of Br− and Li+ sank because the two plumes were closely coupled to the density-driven velocity field. At later times the rate of downward movement in the Br− plume due to gravity slowed significantly because of dilution by dispersion. The downward movement of the Li+ plume was negligible because the two plumes moved in locally different velocity regimes, where Li+ transport was retarded relative to Br−. The maximum extent of downward transport of the Li+ plume was less than that of the Br− plume. This study also found that at early times the downward movement of a plume created by a three-dimensional source could be much more extensive than the case with a two-dimensional source having the same cross-sectional area. The observed shape of the Br− plume at Cape Cod was simulated by adding two layers with different hydraulic conductivities at shallow depth across the region. The large dispersion and asymmetrical shape of the Li+ plume were simulated by including kinetic adsorption-desorption reactions.

  1. Visible-light active thin-film WO3 photocatalyst with controlled high-rate deposition by low-damage reactive-gas-flow sputtering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nobuto Oka

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available A process based on reactive gas flow sputtering (GFS for depositing visible-light active photocatalytic WO3 films at high deposition rates and with high film quality was successfully demonstrated. The deposition rate for this process was over 10 times higher than that achieved by the conventional sputtering process and the process was highly stable. Furthermore, Pt nanoparticle-loaded WO3 films deposited by the GFS process exhibited much higher photocatalytic activity than those deposited by conventional sputtering, where the photocatalytic activity was evaluated by the extent of decomposition of CH3CHO under visible light irradiation. The decomposition time for 60 ppm of CH3CHO was 7.5 times more rapid on the films deposited by the GFS process than on the films deposited by the conventional process. During GFS deposition, there are no high-energy particles bombarding the growing film surface, whereas the bombardment of the surface with high-energy particles is a key feature of conventional sputtering. Hence, the WO3 films deposited by GFS should be of higher quality, with fewer structural defects, which would lead to a decrease in the number of centers for electron-hole recombination and to the efficient use of photogenerated holes for the decomposition of CH3CHO.

  2. Towards Pervasive Augmented Reality: Context-Awareness in Augmented Reality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grubert, Jens; Langlotz, Tobias; Zollmann, Stefanie; Regenbrecht, Holger

    2017-06-01

    Augmented Reality is a technique that enables users to interact with their physical environment through the overlay of digital information. While being researched for decades, more recently, Augmented Reality moved out of the research labs and into the field. While most of the applications are used sporadically and for one particular task only, current and future scenarios will provide a continuous and multi-purpose user experience. Therefore, in this paper, we present the concept of Pervasive Augmented Reality, aiming to provide such an experience by sensing the user's current context and adapting the AR system based on the changing requirements and constraints. We present a taxonomy for Pervasive Augmented Reality and context-aware Augmented Reality, which classifies context sources and context targets relevant for implementing such a context-aware, continuous Augmented Reality experience. We further summarize existing approaches that contribute towards Pervasive Augmented Reality. Based our taxonomy and survey, we identify challenges for future research directions in Pervasive Augmented Reality.

  3. Maxillary Sinus Floor Augmentation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Starch-Jensen, Thomas; Jensen, Janek Dalsgaard

    2017-01-01

    , radiological and histomorphometric outcome as well as complications are presented after maxillary sinus floor augmentation applying the lateral window technique with a graft material, maxillary sinus membrane elevation without a graft material and osteotome-mediated sinus floor elevation with or without...

  4. Augmented Reality og kulturarv

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Mikkel Kirkedahl Lysholm

    2013-01-01

    Museerne står overfor at skulle omfavne den digitale kultur i håndteringen af den store mængde viden, institutionerne repræsenterer. Augmented Reality-systemer forbinder ved hjælp af moderne teknologi det virtuelle med det virkelige, og kan derfor synes som en oplagt anvendelsesmulighed i...

  5. Augmented Reality i naturfagsundervisningen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Radmer, Ole; Surland, Mogens; Nielsen, Birgitte Lund

    Augmented Reality (AR) giver ny mulighed for, at elever kan lave undersøgelser i naturfag med enkel teknologi, hvor animationer og simulationer kobles med det virkelige fænomen. I workshoppen kan I afprøve AR eksempler, udviklet i et internationalt EU projekt. Der vil være noget, der direkte kan...

  6. Collaboration in Augmented Reality

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lukosch, S.; Billinghurst, M.; Alem, L.; Kiyokawa, K.

    2015-01-01

    Augmented Reality (AR) is a technology that allows users to view and interact in real time with virtual images seamlessly superimposed over the real world. AR systems can be used to create unique collaborative experiences. For example, co-located users can see shared 3D virtual objects that they

  7. Capillary Refill using Augmented Reality

    OpenAIRE

    Clausen, Christoffer

    2017-01-01

    Master's thesis in Computer science The opportunities within augmented reality is growing. Augmented reality is a combination of the real and the virtual world in real time, and large companies like Microsoft and Google is now investing heavily in the technology. This thesis presents a solution for simulating a medical test called capillary refill, by using augmented reality. The simulation is performed with an augmented reality headset called HoloLens. The HoloLens will recognise a mark...

  8. AR DOC: Augmented reality documentaries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vistisen, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Augmented Reality Documentaries (AR DOC) er et ’lille’ Shareplay projekt (ansøgte midler augmented reality cross media løsninger, til at skabe engagerende publikumsformidling...... indenfor oplevelsesindustrien. Projektet har genereret ny viden omkring, hvordan fysisk og digital formidling kan understøttes via Augmented Reality som formidlingsformat....

  9. Power flow controller with a fractionally rated back-to-back converter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Divan, Deepakraj M.; Kandula, Rajendra Prasad; Prasai, Anish

    2016-03-08

    A power flow controller with a fractionally rated back-to-back (BTB) converter is provided. The power flow controller provide dynamic control of both active and reactive power of a power system. The power flow controller inserts a voltage with controllable magnitude and phase between two AC sources at the same frequency; thereby effecting control of active and reactive power flows between the two AC sources. A transformer may be augmented with a fractionally rated bi-directional Back to Back (BTB) converter. The fractionally rated BTB converter comprises a transformer side converter (TSC), a direct-current (DC) link, and a line side converter (LSC). By controlling the switches of the BTB converter, the effective phase angle between the two AC source voltages may be regulated, and the amplitude of the voltage inserted by the power flow controller may be adjusted with respect to the AC source voltages.

  10. Transaxillary Endoscopic Breast Augmentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyung-Bo Sim

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The axillary technique is the most popular approach to breast augmentation among Korean women. Transaxillary breast augmentation is now conducted with sharp electrocautery dissection under direct endoscopic vision throughout the entire process. The aims of this method are clear: both a bloodless pocket and a sharp non-traumatic dissection. Round textured or anatomical cohesive gel implants have been used to make predictable well-defined inframammary creases because textured surface implants demonstrated a better stability attributable to tissue adherence compared with smooth surface implants. The axillary endoscopic technique has greatly evolved, and now the surgical results are comparable to those with the inframammary approach. The author feels that this technique is an excellent choice for young patients with an indistinct or absent inframammary fold, who do not want a scar in the aesthetic unit of their chest.

  11. Photoactivation by visible light of CdTe quantum dots for inline generation of reactive oxygen species in an automated multipumping flow system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ribeiro, David S.M.; Frigerio, Christian; Santos, Joao L.M. [Requimte, Department of Chemical Sciences, Laboratory of Applied Chemistry, Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Porto, Rua de Jorge Viterbo Ferreira no. 228, 4050-313 Porto (Portugal); Prior, Joao A.V., E-mail: joaoavp@ff.up.pt [Requimte, Department of Chemical Sciences, Laboratory of Applied Chemistry, Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Porto, Rua de Jorge Viterbo Ferreira no. 228, 4050-313 Porto (Portugal)

    2012-07-20

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer CdTe quantum dots generate free radical species upon exposure to visible radiation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A high power visible LED lamp was used as photoirradiation element. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The laboratory-made LED photocatalytic unit was implemented inline in a MPFS. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Free radical species oxidize luminol producing a strong chemiluminescence emission. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Epinephrine scavenges free radical species quenching chemiluminescence emission. - Abstract: Quantum dots (QD) are semiconductor nanocrystals able to generate free radical species upon exposure to an electromagnetic radiation, usually in the ultraviolet wavelength range. In this work, CdTe QD were used as highly reactive oxygen species (ROS) generators for the control of pharmaceutical formulations containing epinephrine. The developed approach was based on the chemiluminometric monitoring of the quenching effect of epinephrine on the oxidation of luminol by the produced ROS. Due to the relatively low energy band-gap of this chalcogenide a high power visible light emitting diode (LED) lamp was used as photoirradiation element and assembled in a laboratory-made photocatalytic unit. Owing to the very short lifetime of ROS and to ensure both reproducible generation and time-controlled reaction implementation and development, all reactional processes were implemented inline by using an automated multipumping micro-flow system. A linear working range for epinephrine concentration of up to 2.28 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -6} mol L{sup -1} (r = 0.9953; n = 5) was verified. The determination rate was about 79 determinations per hour and the detection limit was about 8.69 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -8} mol L{sup -1}. The results obtained in the analysis of epinephrine pharmaceutical formulations by using the proposed methodology were in good agreement with those furnished by the reference procedure, with

  12. Augmented reality in surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shuhaiber, Jeffrey H

    2004-02-01

    To evaluate the history and current knowledge of computer-augmented reality in the field of surgery and its potential goals in education, surgeon training, and patient treatment. National Library of Medicine's database and additional library searches. Only articles suited to surgical sciences with a well-defined aim of study, methodology, and precise description of outcome were included. Augmented reality is an effective tool in executing surgical procedures requiring low-performance surgical dexterity; it remains a science determined mainly by stereotactic registration and ergonomics. Strong evidence was found that it is an effective teaching tool for training residents. Weaker evidence was found to suggest a significant influence on surgical outcome, both morbidity and mortality. No evidence of cost-effectiveness was found. Augmented reality is a new approach in executing detailed surgical operations. Although its application is in a preliminary stage, further research is needed to evaluate its long-term clinical impact on patients, surgeons, and hospital administrators. Its widespread use and the universal transfer of such technology remains limited until there is a better understanding of registration and ergonomics.

  13. Augmented reality services

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomáš Koubek

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We assume that one of the key reasons is in the difference between a standalone application and a web service. Both architectures have some advantages and disadvantages. The Standalone application (e.g. Nokia/OVI Maps provides the required functionality. From the user point of view, main asset of this “offline” approach is network connectivity independence. However, this kind of applications must be upgraded manually. Moreover, it is hard to get any data about the application usage because it requires additional actions from the user – data are usually acquired through conventional ways, such as email or web forms.The online service such as Google Maps (including its mobile application can offer the same functionality as the offline application. Nevertheless, a permanent connection to provider servers is necessary. This can be taken as a drawback. On the other hand, usage data collection is easier and can be done without the user intervention. The data collection provides a valuable analysis basis of the user habits and needs. This analysis is necessary for design of a complex “user” based solutions such as Google Now.Augmented reality applications are usually based on the first mentioned approach. In this article, we describe our model of augmented reality as a service and compare its features with standalone solutions. Further, other important key aspects for large emergence of augmented reality services in a mainstream market are discussed.

  14. Reactive transport of CO2-rich fluids in simulated wellbore interfaces : Flow-through experiments on the 1–6 m length scale

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wolterbeek, Timotheus K.T.; Peach, Colin J.; Raoof, Amir; Spiers, Christopher J.

    2016-01-01

    Debonding at casing-cement interfaces poses a leakage pathway risk that may compromise well integrity in CO2 storage systems. The present study addresses the effects of long-range, CO2-induced, reactive transport on the conductance of such interfacial pathways. This is done by means of reactive

  15. Reactive power compensator

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Sharkawi, Mohamed A.; Venkata, Subrahmanyam S.; Chen, Mingliang; Andexler, George; Huang, Tony

    1992-01-01

    A system and method for determining and providing reactive power compensation for an inductive load. A reactive power compensator (50,50') monitors the voltage and current flowing through each of three distribution lines (52a, 52b, 52c), which are supplying three-phase power to one or more inductive loads. Using signals indicative of the current on each of these lines when the voltage waveform on the line crosses zero, the reactive power compensator determines a reactive power compensator capacitance that must be connected to the lines to maintain a desired VAR level, power factor, or line voltage. Alternatively, an operator can manually select a specific capacitance for connection to each line, or the capacitance can be selected based on a time schedule. The reactive power compensator produces control signals, which are coupled through optical fibers (102/106) to a switch driver (110, 110') to select specific compensation capacitors (112) for connections to each line. The switch driver develops triggering signals that are supplied to a plurality of series-connected solid state switches (350), which control charge current in one direction in respect to ground for each compensation capacitor. During each cycle, current flows from ground to charge the capacitors as the voltage on the line begins to go negative from its positive peak value. The triggering signals are applied to gate the solid state switches into a conducting state when the potential on the lines and on the capacitors reaches a negative peak value, thereby minimizing both the potential difference and across the charge current through the switches when they begin to conduct. Any harmonic distortion on the potential and current carried by the lines is filtered out from the current and potential signals used by the reactive power compensator so that it does not affect the determination of the required reactive compensation.

  16. Reactive power compensator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El-Sharkawi, Mohamed A. (Renton, WA); Venkata, Subrahmanyam S. (Woodinville, WA); Chen, Mingliang (Kirkland, WA); Andexler, George (Everett, WA); Huang, Tony (Seattle, WA)

    1992-01-01

    A system and method for determining and providing reactive power compensation for an inductive load. A reactive power compensator (50,50') monitors the voltage and current flowing through each of three distribution lines (52a, 52b, 52c), which are supplying three-phase power to one or more inductive loads. Using signals indicative of the current on each of these lines when the voltage waveform on the line crosses zero, the reactive power compensator determines a reactive power compensator capacitance that must be connected to the lines to maintain a desired VAR level, power factor, or line voltage. Alternatively, an operator can manually select a specific capacitance for connection to each line, or the capacitance can be selected based on a time schedule. The reactive power compensator produces control signals, which are coupled through optical fibers (102/106) to a switch driver (110, 110') to select specific compensation capacitors (112) for connections to each line. The switch driver develops triggering signals that are supplied to a plurality of series-connected solid state switches (350), which control charge current in one direction in respect to ground for each compensation capacitor. During each cycle, current flows from ground to charge the capacitors as the voltage on the line begins to go negative from its positive peak value. The triggering signals are applied to gate the solid state switches into a conducting state when the potential on the lines and on the capacitors reaches a negative peak value, thereby minimizing both the potential difference and across the charge current through the switches when they begin to conduct. Any harmonic distortion on the potential and current carried by the lines is filtered out from the current and potential signals used by the reactive power compensator so that it does not affect the determination of the required reactive compensation.

  17. User's Guide of TOUGH2-EGS. A Coupled Geomechanical and Reactive Geochemical Simulator for Fluid and Heat Flow in Enhanced Geothermal Systems Version 1.0

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fakcharoenphol, Perapon [Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO (United States); Xiong, Yi [Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO (United States); Hu, Litang [Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO (United States); Winterfeld, Philip H. [Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO (United States); Xu, Tianfu [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Wu, Yu-Shu [Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO (United States)

    2013-05-01

    TOUGH2-EGS is a numerical simulation program coupling geomechanics and chemical reactions for fluid and heat flows in porous media and fractured reservoirs of enhanced geothermal systems. The simulator includes the fully-coupled geomechanical (THM) module, the fully-coupled geochemical (THC) module, and the sequentially coupled reactive geochemistry (THMC) module. The fully-coupled flow-geomechanics model is developed from the linear elastic theory for the thermo-poro-elastic system and is formulated with the mean normal stress as well as pore pressure and temperature. The chemical reaction is sequentially coupled after solution of flow equations, which provides the flow velocity and phase saturation for the solute transport calculation at each time step. In addition, reservoir rock properties, such as porosity and permeability, are subjected to change due to rock deformation and chemical reactions. The relationships between rock properties and geomechanical and chemical effects from poro-elasticity theories and empirical correlations are incorporated into the simulator. This report provides the user with detailed information on both mathematical models and instructions for using TOUGH2-EGS for THM, THC or THMC simulations. The mathematical models include the fluid and heat flow equations, geomechanical equation, reactive geochemistry equations, and discretization methods. Although TOUGH2-EGS has the capability for simulating fluid and heat flows coupled with both geomechanical and chemical effects, it is up to the users to select the specific coupling process, such as THM, THC, or THMC in a simulation. There are several example problems illustrating the applications of this program. These example problems are described in details and their input data are presented. The results demonstrate that this program can be used for field-scale geothermal reservoir simulation with fluid and heat flow, geomechanical effect, and chemical reaction in porous and fractured media.

  18. AMI: Augmented Michelson Interferometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furió, David; Hachet, Martin; Guillet, Jean-Paul; Bousquet, Bruno; Fleck, Stéphanie; Reuter, Patrick; Canioni, Lionel

    2015-10-01

    Experiments in optics are essential for learning and understanding physical phenomena. The problem with these experiments is that they are generally time consuming for both their construction and their maintenance, potentially dangerous through the use of laser sources, and often expensive due to high technology optical components. We propose to simulate such experiments by way of hybrid systems that exploit both spatial augmented reality and tangible interaction. In particular, we focus on one of the most popular optical experiments: the Michelson interferometer. In our approach, we target a highly interactive system where students are able to interact in real time with the Augmented Michelson Interferometer (AMI) to observe, test hypotheses and then to enhance their comprehension. Compared to a fully digital simulation, we are investigating an approach that benefits from both physical and virtual elements, and where the students experiment by manipulating 3D-printed physical replicas of optical components (e.g. lenses and mirrors). Our objective is twofold. First, we want to ensure that the students will learn with our simulator the same concepts and skills that they learn with traditional methods. Second, we hypothesis that such a system opens new opportunities to teach optics in a way that was not possible before, by manipulating concepts beyond the limits of observable physical phenomena. To reach this goal, we have built a complementary team composed of experts in the field of optics, human-computer interaction, computer graphics, sensors and actuators, and education science.

  19. Psychophysiology of proactive and reactive relational aggression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray-Close, Dianna; Holterman, Leigh Ann; Breslend, Nicole L; Sullivan, Alexandra

    2017-12-01

    This study investigated the joint effects of parasympathetic and sympathetic nervous system reactivity to social and non-social stressors on proactive (i.e., goal-directed, unemotional) and reactive (i.e., emotional, impulsive) functions of relational aggression. Two hundred and forty-seven (M age =18.77years) participants completed a series of stressor tasks while their sympathetic arousal (i.e., skin conductance) and parasympathetic arousal (i.e., respiratory sinus arrhythmia) were assessed. Participants also provided self-reports of their aggressive behavior. In the standardized social stressor only, physiological reactivity was related to aggression, such that respiratory sinus arrhythmia augmentation predicted proactive relational aggression whereas heightened skin conductance reactivity predicted reactive relational aggression. Finally, in the context of low skin conductance reactivity, respiratory sinus arrhythmia augmentation was related to heightened proactive and reactive aggression, whereas respiratory sinus arrhythmia withdrawal was protective. Results suggest that the benefits hypothesized to accompany respiratory sinus arrhythmia withdrawal may only occur among individuals with low "fight or flight" stress responses. Findings extend research on the physiological indicators of aggression to relational aggression, and highlight the importance of assessing functions of aggression, as well as physiological reactivity to multiple stressors. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. RS-Predictor models augmented with SMARTCyp reactivities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zaretzki, Jed; Rydberg, Patrik; Bergeron, Charles

    2012-01-01

    (82.3%) and merged(86.0%). Comprehensive datamining of each substrate set and careful statistical analyses of the predictions made by the different models revealed new insights into molecular features that control metabolic regioselectivity and enable accurate prospective prediction of likely SOMs.......RS-Predictor is a tool for creating pathway-independent, isozyme-specific site of metabolism (SOM) prediction models using any set of known cytochrome P450 substrates and metabolites. Until now, the RS-Predictor method was only trained and validated on CYP 3A4 data, but in the present study we...... report on the versatility the RS-Predictor modeling paradigm by creating and testing regioselectivity models for substrates of the nine most important CYP isozymes. Through curation of source literature, we have assembled 680 substrates distributed among CYPs 1A2, 2A6, 2B6, 2C19, 2C8, 2C9, 2D6, 2E1 and 3...

  1. Augmented Reality for Science Education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brandt, Harald; Nielsen, Birgitte Lund; Georgsen, Marianne

    Augmented reality (AR) holds great promise as a learning tool. So far, however, most research has looked at the technology itself – and AR has been used primarily for commercial purposes. As a learning tool, AR supports an inquiry-based approach to science education with a high level of student...... involvement. The AR-sci-project (Augmented Reality for SCIence education) addresses the issue of applying augmented reality in developing innovative science education and enhancing the quality of science teaching and learning....

  2. Crime Scenes as Augmented Reality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sandvik, Kjetil

    2010-01-01

    Using the concept of augmented reality, this article will investigate how places in various ways have become augmented by means of different mediatization strategies. Augmentation of reality implies an enhancement of the places' emotional character: a certain mood, atmosphere or narrative surplus......, physical damage: they are all readable and interpretable signs. As augmented reality the crime scene carries a narrative which at first is hidden and must be revealed. Due to the process of investigation and the detective's ability to reason and deduce, the crime scene as place is reconstructed as virtual...

  3. Reactive Arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eren Erken

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Reactive arthritis is an acute, sterile, non-suppurative and inflammatory arthropaty which has occured as a result of an infectious processes, mostly after gastrointestinal and genitourinary tract infections. Reiter syndrome is a frequent type of reactive arthritis. Both reactive arthritis and Reiter syndrome belong to the group of seronegative spondyloarthropathies, associated with HLA-B27 positivity and characterized by ongoing inflammation after an infectious episode. The classical triad of Reiter syndrome is defined as arthritis, conjuctivitis and urethritis and is seen only in one third of patients with Reiter syndrome. Recently, seronegative asymmetric arthritis and typical extraarticular involvement are thought to be adequate for the diagnosis. However, there is no established criteria for the diagnosis of reactive arthritis and the number of randomized and controlled studies about the therapy is not enough. [Archives Medical Review Journal 2013; 22(3.000: 283-299

  4. Wave Augmented Diffuser for Centrifugal Compressor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skoch, Gary J. (Inventor); Paxson, Daniel E. (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    A wave augmented diffuser for a centrifugal compressor surrounds the outlet of an impeller that rotates on a drive shaft having an axis of rotation. The impeller brings flow in in an axial direction and imparts kinetic energy to the flow discharging it in radial and tangential directions. The flow is discharged into a plurality of circumferentially disposed wave chambers. The wave chambers are periodically opened and closed by a rotary valve such that the flow through the diffuser is unsteady. The valve includes a plurality of valve openings that are periodically brought into and out of fluid communication with the wave chambers. When the wave chambers are closed, a reflected compression wave moves upstream towards the diffuser bringing the flow into the wave chamber to rest. This action recovers the kinetic energy from the flow and limits any boundary layer growth. The flow is then discharged in an axial direction through an opening in the valve plate when the valve plate is rotated to an open position. The diffuser thus efficiently raises the static pressure of the fluid and discharges an axially directed flow at a radius that is predominantly below the maximum radius of the diffuser.

  5. NASA Communications Augmentation network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omidyar, Guy C.; Butler, Thomas E.; Laios, Straton C.

    1990-01-01

    The NASA Communications (Nascom) Division of the Mission Operations and Data Systems Directorate (MO&DSD) is to undertake a major initiative to develop the Nascom Augmentation (NAUG) network to achieve its long-range service objectives for operational data transport to support the Space Station Freedom Program, the Earth Observing System (EOS), and other projects. The NAUG is the Nascom ground communications network being developed to accommodate the operational traffic of the mid-1990s and beyond. The NAUG network development will be based on the Open Systems Interconnection Reference Model (OSI-RM). This paper describes the NAUG network architecture, subsystems, topology, and services; addresses issues of internetworking the Nascom network with other elements of the Space Station Information System (SSIS); discusses the operations environment. This paper also notes the areas of related research and presents the current conception of how the network will provide broadband services in 1998.

  6. Augmented fish health monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Michak, P.; Rogers, R.; Amos, K.

    1991-05-01

    The Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) initiated the Augmented Fish Health Monitoring project in 1986. This project was a five year interagency project involving fish rearing agencies in the Columbia Basin. Historically, all agencies involved with fish health in the Columbia Basin were conducting various levels of fish health monitoring, pathogen screening and collection. The goals of this project were; to identify, develop and implement a standardized level of fish health methodologies, develop a common data collection and reporting format in the area of artificial production, evaluate and monitor water quality, improve communications between agencies and provide annual evaluation of fish health information for production of healthier smolts. This completion report will contain a project evaluation, review of the goals of the project, evaluation of the specific fish health analyses, an overview of highlights of the project and concluding remarks. 8 refs., 1 fig., 4 tabs

  7. Augmented Virtual Reality Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tully-Hanson, Benjamin

    2015-01-01

    Real time motion tracking hardware has for the most part been cost prohibitive for research to regularly take place until recently. With the release of the Microsoft Kinect in November 2010, researchers now have access to a device that for a few hundred dollars is capable of providing redgreenblue (RGB), depth, and skeleton data. It is also capable of tracking multiple people in real time. For its original intended purposes, i.e. gaming, being used with the Xbox 360 and eventually Xbox One, it performs quite well. However, researchers soon found that although the sensor is versatile, it has limitations in real world applications. I was brought aboard this summer by William Little in the Augmented Virtual Reality (AVR) Lab at Kennedy Space Center to find solutions to these limitations.

  8. Augmented reality system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Chien-Liang; Su, Yu-Zheng; Hung, Min-Wei; Huang, Kuo-Cheng

    2010-08-01

    In recent years, Augmented Reality (AR)[1][2][3] is very popular in universities and research organizations. The AR technology has been widely used in Virtual Reality (VR) fields, such as sophisticated weapons, flight vehicle development, data model visualization, virtual training, entertainment and arts. AR has characteristics to enhance the display output as a real environment with specific user interactive functions or specific object recognitions. It can be use in medical treatment, anatomy training, precision instrument casting, warplane guidance, engineering and distance robot control. AR has a lot of vantages than VR. This system developed combines sensors, software and imaging algorithms to make users feel real, actual and existing. Imaging algorithms include gray level method, image binarization method, and white balance method in order to make accurate image recognition and overcome the effects of light.

  9. Maxillary sinus augmentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A B Tarun Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Placing dental implants in the maxillary posterior region can be both challenging and un-nerving for a regular implant dentist who is not well versed with advanced surgical procedures. It is vital for a general dentist to understand the fundamentals of bone grafting the maxillary sinus if he/she is really committed to providing the best health care for their patients. The dental practice is seeing an increasing group of patients who are living longer, and this group of older baby boomers often has an edentulous posterior maxilla either unilateral or bilateral. When edentulous, the posterior maxilla more likely has diminished bone height, which does not allow for the placement of dental implants without creating additional bone. Through grafting the maxillary sinus, bone of ideal quality can be created (allowing for placement of dental implants, which offer many advantages over other tooth replacement modalities. The sinus graft offers the dental patient a predictable procedure of regenerating lost osseous structure in the posterior maxilla. This offers the patient many advantages for long-term success. If dentists understand these concepts, they can better educate their patients and guide them to have the procedure performed. This article outlines bone grafting of the maxillary sinus for the purpose of placing dental implants. This review will help the readers to understand the intricacies of sinus augmentation. They can relate their patient's condition with the available literature and chalk out the best treatment plan for the patient, especially by using indirect sinus augmentation procedures which are less invasive and highly successful if done using prescribed technique.

  10. Advanced Intellect-Augmentation Techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engelbart, D. C.

    This progress report covers a two-year project which is part of a program that is exploring the value of computer aids in augmenting human intellectual capability. The background and nature of the program, its resources, and the activities it has undertaken are outlined. User experience in applying augmentation tools and techniques to various…

  11. Augmented Reality Comes to Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buesing, Mark; Cook, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Augmented reality (AR) is a technology used on computing devices where processor-generated graphics are rendered over real objects to enhance the sensory experience in real time. In other words, what you are really seeing is augmented by the computer. Many AR games already exist for systems such as Kinect and Nintendo 3DS and mobile apps, such as…

  12. Augmented reality som wearable technology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rahn, Annette

    “How Augmented reality can facilitate learning in visualizing human anatomy “ At this station I demonstrate how Augmented reality can be used to visualize the human lungs in situ and as a wearable technology which establish connection between body, image and technology in education. I will show...

  13. Make peak flow a habit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asthma - make peak flow a habit; Reactive airway disease - peak flow; Bronchial asthma - peak flow ... 2014:chap 55. National Asthma Education and Prevention Program website. How to use a peak flow meter. ...

  14. A Determinate Model of Thrust-Augmenting Ejectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitley, N.; Krothapalli, A.; van Dommelen, L.

    1996-01-01

    A theoretical analysis of the compressible flow through a constant-area jet-engine ejector in which a primary jet mixes with ambient fluid from a uniform free stream is pursued. The problem is reduced to a determinate mathematical one by prescribing the ratios of stagnation properties between the primary and secondary flows. For some selections of properties and parameters more than one solution is possible and the meaning of these solutions is discussed by means of asymptotic expansions. Our results further show that while under stationary conditions the thrust-augmentation ratio assumes a value of 2 in the large area-ratio limit, for a free-stream Mach number greater than 0.6 very little thrust augmentation is left. Due to the assumptions made, the analysis provides idealized values for the thrust-augmentation ratio and the mass flux entrainment factor.

  15. Phenobarbital Augments Hypothermic Neuroprotection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barks, John D.; Liu, Yi-Qing; Shangguan, Yu; Silverstein, Faye S.

    2010-01-01

    Seizures are associated with adverse outcome in infants with hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy. We hypothesized that early administration of the anticonvulsant phenobarbital after cerebral hypoxia-ischemia could enhance the neuroprotective efficacy of delayed-onset hypothermia. We tested this hypothesis in a neonatal rodent model. Seven-day-old rats (n=104) underwent right carotid ligation, followed by 90 min 8%O2 exposure; 15 min later, they received injections of phenobarbital (40 mg/kg) or saline. One or 3h later, all were treated with hypothermia (30°C, 3h). Function and neuropathology were evaluated after 7 days (“early outcomes”) or 1 month (“late outcomes”). Early outcome assessment demonstrated better sensorimotor performance and less cortical damage in phenobarbital-treated groups; there were no differences between groups in which the hypothermia delay was shortened from 3h to 1h. Late outcome assessment confirmed sustained benefits of phenobarbital+hypothermia treatment; sensorimotor performance was better (persistent attenuation of contralateral forepaw placing deficits and absence of contralateral forepaw neglect); neuropathology scores were lower (medians, phenobarbital 2, saline 8.5, pphenobarbital may augment the neuroprotective efficacy of therapeutic hypothermia. PMID:20098339

  16. Understanding augmented reality concepts and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Craig, Alan B

    2013-01-01

    Augmented reality is not a technology. Augmented reality is a medium. Likewise, a book on augmented reality that only addresses the technology that is required to support the medium of augmented reality falls far short of providing the background that is needed to produce, or critically consume augmented reality applications. One reads a book. One watches a movie. One experiences augmented reality. Understanding Augmented Reality addresses the elements that are required to create compelling augmented reality experiences. The technology that supports

  17. The Design of Immersive English Learning Environment Using Augmented Reality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Kuo-Chen; Chen, Cheng-Ting; Cheng, Shein-Yung; Tsai, Chung-Wei

    2016-01-01

    The study uses augmented reality (AR) technology to integrate virtual objects into the real learning environment for language learning. The English AR classroom is constructed using the system prototyping method and evaluated by semi-structured in-depth interviews. According to the flow theory by Csikszenmihalyi in 1975 along with the immersive…

  18. Augmented Mirror: Interactive Augmented Reality System Based on Kinect

    OpenAIRE

    Vera , Lucía; Gimeno , Jesús; Coma , Inmaculada; Fernández , Marcos

    2011-01-01

    Part 1: Long and Short Papers; International audience; In this paper we present a virtual character controlled by an actor in real time, who talks with an audience through an augmented mirror. The application, which integrates video images, the avatar and other virtual objects within an Augmented Reality system, has been implemented using a mixture of technologies: two kinect systems for motion capture, depth map and real images, a gyroscope to detect head movements, and control algorithms to...

  19. A Tariff for Reactive Power

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kueck, John D [ORNL; Kirby, Brendan J [ORNL; Li, Fangxing [ORNL; Tufon, Christopher [Pacific Gas and Electric Company; Isemonger, Alan [California Independent System Operator

    2008-07-01

    Two kinds of power are required to operate an electric power system: real power, measured in watts, and reactive power, measured in volt-amperes reactive or VARs. Reactive power supply is one of a class of power system reliability services collectively known as ancillary services, and is essential for the reliable operation of the bulk power system. Reactive power flows when current leads or lags behind voltage. Typically, the current in a distribution system lags behind voltage because of inductive loads such as motors. Reactive power flow wastes energy and capacity and causes voltage droop. To correct lagging power flow, leading reactive power (current leading voltage) is supplied to bring the current into phase with voltage. When the current is in phase with voltage, there is a reduction in system losses, an increase in system capacity, and a rise in voltage. Reactive power can be supplied from either static or dynamic VAR sources. Static sources are typically transmission and distribution equipment, such as capacitors at substations, and their cost has historically been included in the revenue requirement of the transmission operator (TO), and recovered through cost-of-service rates. By contrast, dynamic sources are typically generators capable of producing variable levels of reactive power by automatically controlling the generator to regulate voltage. Transmission system devices such as synchronous condensers can also provide dynamic reactive power. A class of solid state devices (called flexible AC transmission system devices or FACTs) can provide dynamic reactive power. One specific device has the unfortunate name of static VAR compensator (SVC), where 'static' refers to the solid state nature of the device (it does not include rotating equipment) and not to the production of static reactive power. Dynamic sources at the distribution level, while more costly would be very useful in helping to regulate local voltage. Local voltage regulation would

  20. Effect of nitrogen flow rate on structural, morphological and optical properties of In-rich In{sub x}Al{sub 1−x}N thin films grown by plasma-assisted dual source reactive evaporation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alizadeh, M., E-mail: alizadeh_kozerash@yahoo.com [Low Dimensional Materials Research Centre (LDMRC), Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, University of Malaya, 50603 Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia); Ganesh, V.; Goh, B.T. [Low Dimensional Materials Research Centre (LDMRC), Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, University of Malaya, 50603 Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia); Dee, C.F.; Mohmad, A.R. [Institute of Microengineering and Nanoelectronics (IMEN), Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, Bangi, Selangor (Malaysia); Rahman, S.A., E-mail: saadah@um.edu.my [Low Dimensional Materials Research Centre (LDMRC), Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, University of Malaya, 50603 Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia)

    2016-08-15

    Highlights: • In-rich In{sub x}Al{sub 1−x}N films were grown by Plasma-aided reactive evaporation. • Effect of nitrogen flow rate on the films properties was investigated. • The band gap of the films was varied from 1.17 to 0.90 eV. • By increasing N{sub 2} flow rate the In{sub x}Al{sub 1−x}N films tend to turn into amorphous state. • At higher N{sub 2} flow rate agglomeration of the particles is highly enhanced. - Abstract: In-rich In{sub x}Al{sub 1−x}N thin films were deposited on quartz substrate at various nitrogen flow rates by plasma-assisted dual source reactive evaporation technique. The elemental composition, surface morphology, structural and optical properties of the films were investigated by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM), Raman spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction (XRD), UV–vis spectrophotometer and photoluminescence (PL) measurements. XPS results revealed that the indium composition (x) of the In{sub x}Al{sub 1−x}N films increases from 0.90 to 0.97 as the nitrogen flow rate is increased from 40 to 100 sccm, respectively. FESEM images of the surface and cross-sectional microstructure of the In{sub x}Al{sub 1−x}N films showed that by increasing the N{sub 2} flow rate, the grown particles are highly agglomerated. Raman and XRD results indicated that by increasing nitrogen flow rate the In-rich In{sub x}Al{sub 1−x}N films tend to turn into amorphous state. It was found that band gap energy of the films are in the range of 0.90–1.17 eV which is desirable for the application of full spectra solar cells.

  1. Mersiline mesh in premaxillary augmentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foda, Hossam M T

    2005-01-01

    Premaxillary retrusion may distort the aesthetic appearance of the columella, lip, and nasal tip. This defect is characteristically seen in, but not limited to, patients with cleft lip nasal deformity. This study investigated 60 patients presenting with premaxillary deficiencies in which Mersiline mesh was used to augment the premaxilla. All the cases had surgery using the external rhinoplasty technique. Two methods of augmentation with Mersiline mesh were used: the Mersiline roll technique, for the cases with central symmetric deficiencies, and the Mersiline packing technique, for the cases with asymmetric deficiencies. Premaxillary augmentation with Mersiline mesh proved to be simple technically, easy to perform, and not associated with any complications. Periodic follow-up evaluation for a mean period of 32 months (range, 12-98 months) showed that an adequate degree of premaxillary augmentation was maintained with no clinically detectable resorption of the mesh implant.

  2. The Augmented REality Sandtable (ARES)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-01

    Introduction The US Army Research Laboratory (ARL) Human Sciences Campaign calls out the topic of Virtual /Mixed and Augmented Reality as one of the...type of virtual environment. In virtual reality (VR), the totality of the environment is computer generated. In AR, the real world is augmented by...tangible user interfaces; and the effectiveness of virtual sand tables and similar systems. A market survey was also done to discover the state of

  3. Reactive Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aceto, Luca; Ingolfsdottir, Anna; Larsen, Kim Guldstrand

    A reactive system comprises networks of computing components, achieving their goals through interaction among themselves and their environment. Thus even relatively small systems may exhibit unexpectedly complex behaviours. As moreover reactive systems are often used in safety critical systems......, the need for mathematically based formal methodology is increasingly important. There are many books that look at particular methodologies for such systems. This book offers a more balanced introduction for graduate students and describes the various approaches, their strengths and weaknesses, and when...... they are best used. Milner's CCS and its operational semantics are introduced, together with the notions of behavioural equivalences based on bisimulation techniques and with recursive extensions of Hennessy-Milner logic. In the second part of the book, the presented theories are extended to take timing issues...

  4. Reactive behavior, learning, and anticipation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitehead, Steven D.; Ballard, Dana H.

    1989-01-01

    Reactive systems always act, thinking only long enough to 'look up' the action to execute. Traditional planning systems think a lot, and act only after generating fairly precise plans. Each represents an endpoint on a spectrum. It is argued that primitive forms of reasoning, like anticipation, play an important role in reducing the cost of learning and that the decision to act or think should be based on the uncertainty associated with the utility of executing an action in a particular situation. An architecture for an adaptable reactive system is presented and it is shown how it can be augmented with a simple anticipation mechanism that can substantially reduce the cost and time of learning.

  5. Compression Pad Cavity Heating Augmentation on Orion Heat Shield

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollis, Brian R.

    2011-01-01

    An experimental study has been conducted to assess the effects of compression pad cavities on the aeroheating environment of the Project Orion Crew Exploration Vehicle heat shield. Testing was conducted in Mach 6 and 10 perfect-gas wind tunnels to obtain heating measurements in and around the compression pads cavities using global phosphor thermography. Data were obtained over a wide range of Reynolds numbers that produced laminar, transitional, and turbulent flow within and downstream of the cavities. The effects of cavity dimensions on boundary-layer transition and heating augmentation levels were studied. Correlations were developed for transition onset and for the average cavity-heating augmentation.

  6. Bayesian Alternation During Tactile Augmentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caspar Mathias Goeke

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available A large number of studies suggest that the integration of multisensory signals by humans is well described by Bayesian principles. However, there are very few reports about cue combination between a native and an augmented sense. In particular, we asked the question whether adult participants are able to integrate an augmented sensory cue with existing native sensory information. Hence for the purpose of this study we build a tactile augmentation device. Consequently, we compared different hypotheses of how untrained adult participants combine information from a native and an augmented sense. In a two-interval forced choice (2 IFC task, while subjects were blindfolded and seated on a rotating platform, our sensory augmentation device translated information on whole body yaw rotation to tactile stimulation. Three conditions were realized: tactile stimulation only (augmented condition, rotation only (native condition, and both augmented and native information (bimodal condition. Participants had to choose one out of two consecutive rotations with higher angular rotation. For the analysis, we fitted the participants’ responses with a probit model and calculated the just notable difference (JND. Then we compared several models for predicting bimodal from unimodal responses. An objective Bayesian alternation model yielded a better prediction (χred2 = 1.67 than the Bayesian integration model (χred2= 4.34. Slightly higher accuracy showed a non-Bayesian winner takes all model (χred2= 1.64, which either used only native or only augmented values per subject for prediction. However the performance of the Bayesian alternation model could be substantially improved (χred2= 1.09 utilizing subjective weights obtained by a questionnaire. As a result, the subjective Bayesian alternation model predicted bimodal performance most accurately among all tested models. These results suggest that information from augmented and existing sensory modalities in

  7. Performance of a solar augmented heat pump

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bedinger, A. F. G.; Tomlinson, J. J.; Reid, R. L.; Chaffin, D. J.

    Performance of a residential size solar augmented heat pump is reported for the 1979-1980 heating season. The facility located in Knoxville, Tennessee, has a measured heat load coefficient of 339.5 watt/C (644 BTU/hr- F). The solar augmented heat pump system consists of 7.4 cu m of one inch diameter crushed limestone. The heat pump is a nominal 8.8 KW (2 1/2 ton) high efficiency unit. The system includes electric resistance heaters to give the option of adding thermal energy to the pebble bed storage during utility off-peak periods, thus offering considerable load management capability. A 15 KW electric resistance duct heater is used to add thermal energy to the pebble bin as required during off-peak periods. Hourly thermal performance and on site weather data was taken for the period November 1, 1979, to April 13, 1980. Thermal performance data consists of heat flow summations for all modes of the system, pebble bed temperatures, and space temperature. Weather data consists of dry bulb temperature, dew point temperature, total global insolation (in the plane of the collector), and wind speed and direction. An error analysis was performed and the least accurate of the measurements was determined to be the heat flow at 5%. Solar system thermal performance factor was measured to be 8.77. The heat pump thermal performance factor was 1.64. Total system seasonal performance factor was measured to be 1.66. Using a modified version of TRNSYS, the thermal performance of this system was simulated. When simulation results were compared with data collected onsite, the predicted heat flow and power consumption generally were within experimental accuracy.

  8. Augmented reality for breast imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rancati, Alberto; Angrigiani, Claudio; Nava, Maurizio B; Catanuto, Giuseppe; Rocco, Nicola; Ventrice, Fernando; Dorr, Julio

    2018-02-21

    Augmented reality (AR) enables the superimposition of virtual reality reconstructions onto clinical images of a real patient, in real time. This allows visualization of internal structures through overlying tissues, thereby providing a virtual transparency vision of surgical anatomy. AR has been applied to neurosurgery, which utilizes a relatively fixed space, frames, and bony references; the application of AR facilitates the relationship between virtual and real data. Augmented Breast imaging (ABI) is described. Breast MRI studies for breast implant patients with seroma were performed using a Siemens 3T system with a body coil and a four-channel bilateral phased-array breast coil as the transmitter and receiver, respectively. The contrast agent used was (CA) gadolinium (Gd) injection (0.1 mmol/kg at 2 ml/s) by a programmable power injector. Dicom formated images data from 10 MRI cases of breast implant seroma and 10 MRI cases with T1-2 N0 M0 breast cancer, were imported and transformed into Augmented reality images. Augmented breast imaging (ABI) demonstrated stereoscopic depth perception, focal point convergence, 3D cursor use, and joystick fly-through. Augmented breast imaging (ABI) to the breast can improve clinical outcomes, giving an enhanced view of the structures to work on. It should be further studied to determine its utility in clinical practice.

  9. An experimental test of alternative population augmentation scenarios.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kronenberger, John A; Gerberich, Jill C; Fitzpatrick, Sarah W; Broder, E Dale; Angeloni, Lisa M; Funk, W Chris

    2018-01-19

    Human land use is fragmenting habitats worldwide and inhibiting dispersal among previously connected populations of organisms, often leading to inbreeding depression and reduced evolutionary potential in the face of rapid environmental change. To combat this augmentation of isolated populations with immigrants is sometimes used to facilitate demographic and genetic rescue. Augmentation with immigrants that are genetically and adaptively similar to the target population effectively increases population fitness, but if immigrants are very genetically or adaptively divergent, augmentation can lead to outbreeding depression. Despite well-cited guidelines for the best practice selection of immigrant sources, often only highly divergent populations remain, and experimental tests of these riskier augmentation scenarios are essentially nonexistent. We conducted a mesocosm experiment with Trinidadian guppies (Poecilia reticulata) to test the multigenerational demographic and genetic effects of augmenting 2 target populations with 3 types of divergent immigrants. We found no evidence of demographic rescue, but we did observe genetic rescue in one population. Divergent immigrant treatments tended to maintain greater genetic diversity, abundance, and hybrid fitness than controls that received immigrants from the source used to seed the mesocosms. In the second population, divergent immigrants had a slightly negative effect in one treatment, and the benefits of augmentation were less apparent overall, likely because this population started with higher genetic diversity and a lower reproductive rate that limited genetic admixture. Our results add to a growing consensus that gene flow can increase population fitness even when immigrants are more highly divergent and may help reduce uncertainty about the use of augmentation in conservation. © 2018 Society for Conservation Biology.

  10. Augmented Reality Tower Technology Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reisman, Ronald J.; Brown, David M.

    2009-01-01

    Augmented Reality technology may help improve Air Traffic Control Tower efficiency and safety during low-visibility conditions. This paper presents the assessments of five off-duty controllers who shadow-controlled' with an augmented reality prototype in their own facility. Initial studies indicated unanimous agreement that this technology is potentially beneficial, though the prototype used in the study was not adequate for operational use. Some controllers agreed that augmented reality technology improved situational awareness, had potential to benefit clearance, control, and coordination tasks and duties and could be very useful for acquiring aircraft and weather information, particularly aircraft location, heading, and identification. The strongest objections to the prototype used in this study were directed at aircraft registration errors, unacceptable optical transparency, insufficient display performance in sunlight, inadequate representation of the static environment and insufficient symbology.

  11. Therapeutic options for lip augmentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segall, Lorne; Ellis, David A F

    2007-11-01

    Aesthetic ideals vary with emerging fashion trends and within different cultures. However, over the past few decades, fuller lips have been considered a desirable trait. Many younger patients are presenting for lip augmentation to achieve the sought-after look commonly seen in many fashion magazines. In addition, as individuals age, they lose lip volume, with a thinning of the red lip, some effacement of the vermillion border, and elongation and flattening of the white portion of the lip. Rejuvenation of the lips plays a key role in restoring a more youthful appearance. As a result, lip augmentation appeals to a wide spectrum of patients who present with various different aesthetic goals and expectations. Numerous therapeutic options exist for aesthetic lip augmentation, ranging from temporary and permanent injectable fillers to implants and other surgical techniques.

  12. AUGMENTATION-RELATED BRAIN PLASTICITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovanni eDi Pino

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Today, the anthropomorphism of the tools and the development of neural interfaces require reconsidering the concept of human-tools interaction in the framework of human augmentation. This review analyzes the plastic process that the brain undergoes when it comes into contact with augmenting artificial sensors and effectors and, on the other hand, the changes that the use of external augmenting devices produces in the brain.Hitherto, few studies investigated the neural correlates of augmentation, but clues on it can be borrowed from logically-related paradigms: sensorimotor training, cognitive enhancement, cross-modal plasticity, sensorimotor functional substitution, use and embodiment of tools.Augmentation modifies function and structure of a number of areas, i.e. primary sensory cortices shape their receptive fields to become sensitive to novel inputs. Motor areas adapt the neuroprosthesis representation firing-rate to refine kinematics. As for normal motor outputs, the learning process recruits motor and premotor cortices and the acquisition of proficiency decreases attentional recruitment, focuses the activity on sensorimotor areas and increases the basal ganglia drive on the cortex. Augmentation deeply relies on the frontoparietal network. In particular, premotor cortex is involved in learning the control of an external effector and owns the tool motor representation, while the intraparietal sulcus extracts its visual features. In these areas, multisensory integration neurons enlarge their receptive fields to embody supernumerary limbs. For operating an anthropomorphic neuroprosthesis, the mirror system is required to understand the meaning of the action, the cerebellum for the formation of its internal model and the insula for its interoception. In conclusion, anthropomorphic sensorized devices can provide the critical sensory afferences to evolve the exploitation of tools through their embodiment, reshaping the body representation and the

  13. Application of a radiant heat transfer model to complex industrial reactive flows: combustion chambers, electric arcs; Application d`un modele de transfert radiatif a des ecoulements reactifs industriels complexes: chambres de combustion, arcs electriques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mechitoua, N; Dalsecco, S; Delalondre, C; Simonin, O [Electricite de France (EDF), 78 - Chatou (France). Lab. National d` Hydraulique

    1997-12-31

    The direction of studies and researches (DER) of Electricite de France (EdF) has been involved for several years in a research program on turbulent reactive flows. The objectives of this program concern: the reduction of pollutant emissions from existing fossil-fueled power plants, the study of new production means (fluidized beds), and the promotion of electric power applications in the industry. An important part of this program is devoted to the development and validation of 3-D softwares and to the modeling of physical phenomena. This paper presents some industrial applications (furnaces, boilers, electric arcs) for which radiant heat transfers play an important role and the radiation models used. (J.S.) 8 refs.

  14. Application of a radiant heat transfer model to complex industrial reactive flows: combustion chambers, electric arcs; Application d`un modele de transfert radiatif a des ecoulements reactifs industriels complexes: chambres de combustion, arcs electriques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mechitoua, N.; Dalsecco, S.; Delalondre, C.; Simonin, O. [Electricite de France (EDF), 78 - Chatou (France). Lab. National d`Hydraulique

    1996-12-31

    The direction of studies and researches (DER) of Electricite de France (EdF) has been involved for several years in a research program on turbulent reactive flows. The objectives of this program concern: the reduction of pollutant emissions from existing fossil-fueled power plants, the study of new production means (fluidized beds), and the promotion of electric power applications in the industry. An important part of this program is devoted to the development and validation of 3-D softwares and to the modeling of physical phenomena. This paper presents some industrial applications (furnaces, boilers, electric arcs) for which radiant heat transfers play an important role and the radiation models used. (J.S.) 8 refs.

  15. Superconducting augmented rail gun (SARG)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Homan, C.G.; Cummings, C.E.; Fowler, C.M.

    1986-01-01

    Superconducting augmentation consists of a superconducting coil operating in the persistent mode closely coupled magnetically with a normally conducting rail gun. A theoretical investigation of the effect of this system on a rail gun has shown that two benefits occur. Projectile velocities and launch efficiencies increase significantly depending on the magnetic coupling between the rail and augmentation circuits. Previous work evaluated an idealized system by neglecting energy dissipation effects. In this paper, the authors extend the analysis to include the neglected terms and show improved actual launch efficiencies for the SARG configuration. In this paper, the authors discuss details of projectile design in depth and present preliminary results of rail gun performance

  16. Analysis Of Convective Plane Stagnation Point Chemically Reactive Mhd Flow Past A Vertical Porous Plate With A Convective Boundary Condition In The Presence Of A Uniform Magnetic Field.

    OpenAIRE

    Adeniyan, A.,

    2013-01-01

    The numerical investigation of a stagnation point boundary layer flow , mass and heat transfer of a steady two dimensional , incompressible , viscous electrically conducting, chemically reacting laminar fluid over a vertical convectively heated , electrically neutral flat plate exposed to a transverse uniform magnetic field has been carried out to examine the influence of the simultaneous presence of the effects of a convective boundary condition, chemical reaction, heat transfer and suctio...

  17. Proposal of a numerical modeling of reactive flows in combustion chambers of turbojet engines; Proposition d`une modelisation numerique des ecoulements reactifs dans les foyers de turboreacteurs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ravet, F. [Rouen Univ., 76 - Mont-Saint-Aignan (France)]|[SNECMA, 77 - Moissy-Cramayel (France); Baudoin, Ch.; Schultz, J.L. [SNECMA, 77 - Moissy-Cramayel (France)

    1996-12-31

    Simplifying hypotheses are required when combustion and aerodynamic phenomena are considered simultaneously. In this paper, a turbulent combustion model is proposed, in which the combustion chemistry is reduced to a single reaction. In this way, only two variables are needed to describe the problem and combustion can be characterized by the consumption of one of the two reactive species. In a first step, the instantaneous consumption rate is obtained using the Lagrangian form of the mass fraction equation of the species under consideration, and by considering the equilibrium state only. This state is determined in order to preserve the consistency with results that should be obtained using a complete kinetics scheme. In a second step, the average rate is determined using the instantaneous consumption term and a probabilistic density function. This model was tested on various configurations and in particular on an experimental main chamber and on a reheating chamber. Results indicate that this model could be used to predict temperature levels inside these combustion chambers. Other applications, like the prediction of pollutant species emission can be considered. (J.S.) 12 refs.

  18. Double Shock Experiments Performed at -55°C on LX-17 with Reactive Flow Modeling to Understand the Reacted Equation of State

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dehaven, Martin R.; Vandersall, Kevin S.; Strickland, Shawn L.; Fried, Laurence E.; Tarver, Craig M.

    2017-06-01

    Experiments were performed at -55°C to measure the reacted state of LX-17 (92.5% TATB and 7.5% Kel-F by weight) using a double shock technique using two flyer materials (with known properties) mounted on a projectile that send an initial shock through the material close to the Chapman-Jouguet (CJ) state followed by a second shock at a higher magnitude into the detonated material. Information on the reacted state is obtained by measuring the relative timing and magnitude of the first and second shock waves. The LX-17 detonation reaction zone profiles plus the arrival times and amplitudes of reflected shocks in LX-17 detonation reaction products were measured using Photonic Doppler Velocimetry (PDV) probes and an aluminum foil coated LiF window. A discussion of this work will include a comparison to prior work at ambient temperature, the experimental parameters, velocimetry profiles, data interpretation, reactive CHEETAH and Ignition and Growth modeling, as well as detail on possible future experiments. This work performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  19. A novel automatic flow method with direct-injection photometric detector for determination of dissolved reactive phosphorus in wastewater and freshwater samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koronkiewicz, Stanislawa; Trifescu, Mihaela; Smoczynski, Lech; Ratnaweera, Harsha; Kalinowski, Slawomir

    2018-02-12

    The novel automatic flow system, direct-injection detector (DID) integrated with multi-pumping flow system (MPFS), dedicated for the photometric determination of orthophosphates in wastewater and freshwater samples is for the first time described. All reagents and the sample were injected simultaneously, in counter-current into the reaction-detection chamber by the system of specially selected for this purpose solenoid micro-pumps. The micro-pumps provided good precision and accuracy of the injected volumes. For the determination of orthophosphates, the molybdenum blue method was employed. The developed method can be used to detect orthophosphate in the range 0.1-12 mg L -1 , with the repeatability (RSD) about 2.2% at 4 mg L -1 and a very high injection throughput of 120 injections h -1 . It was possible to achieve a very small consumption of reagents (10 μL of ammonium molybdate and 10 μL of ascorbic acid) and sample (20 μL). The volume of generated waste was only 440 μL per analysis. The method has been successfully applied, giving a good accuracy, to determination of orthophosphates in complex matrix samples: treated wastewater, lake water and reference sample of groundwater. The developed system is compact, small in both size and weight, requires 12 V in supply voltage, which are desirable for truly portable equipment used in routine analysis. The simplicity of the system should result in its greater long-time reliability comparing to other flow methods previously described.

  20. Computer Augmented Learning; A Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kindred, J.

    The report contains a description and summary of computer augmented learning devices and systems. The devices are of two general types programed instruction systems based on the teaching machines pioneered by Pressey and developed by Skinner, and the so-called "docile" systems that permit greater user-direction with the computer under student…

  1. Aplikasi Web Augmented Reality Villa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gede Yudha Prema Pangestu

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Bali is one of the highly developed tourist destination in Indonesia. The arrival of tourists having holiday in Bali led to increase residential needs with complete amenities. The occupancy rate of hotel and villa in Bali is increase significantlly during the long vacation. The emergence of new villa and hotel occupancy raises the level of competition in business, so it needs a correct use good marketing communication strategy in marketing the product in order to attract the attention of consumers. Web Application Augmented Reality Villa can help visualize the residential villa in three-dimensional shapes that look more attractive and practical. The use of brochures as written information and the application of augmented reality technology on the Web Application Augmented Reality Villa aims to develop an application that can provide information about the villa to visitors. Web Application uses Augmented Reality Villa designed by FlarToolkit library. Based on the test results show the application can display 3-dimensional objects by scanning marker villa in a brochure which already contain marker.

  2. Data Augmentation for Plant Classification

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pawara, Pornntiwa; Okafor, Emmanuel; Schomaker, Lambertus; Wiering, Marco

    2017-01-01

    Data augmentation plays a crucial role in increasing the number of training images, which often aids to improve classification performances of deep learning techniques for computer vision problems. In this paper, we employ the deep learning framework and determine the effects of several

  3. Dependence of calculated void reactivity on film-boiling representation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whitlock, J.; Garland, W.

    1992-01-01

    Partial voiding of a fuel channel can lead to complicated neutronic analysis, because of highly nonuniform spatial distributions. An investigation of the distribution dependence of void reactivity in a Canada deuterium uranium (CANDU) lattice, specifically in the regime of film boiling, was done. Although the core is not expected to be critical at the time of sheath dryout, this study augments current knowledge of void reactivity in this type of lattice

  4. Successive reactivation of older structures under variable heat flow conditions evidenced by K-Ar fault gouge dating in Sierra de Ambato, northern Argentine broken foreland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nóbile, Julieta C.; Collo, Gilda; Dávila, Federico M.; Martina, Federico; Wemmer, Klaus

    2015-12-01

    The Argentine broken foreland has been the subject of continuous research to determine the uplift and exhumation history of the region. High-elevation mountains are the result of N-S reverse faults that disrupted a W-E Miocene Andean foreland basin. In the Sierra de Ambato (northern Argentine broken foreland) the reverse faults offset Neogene sedimentary rocks (Aconquija Fm., ˜9 Ma) and affect the basement comprising Paleozoic metamorphic rocks that have been dated at ˜477-470 Ma. In order to establish a chronology of these faults affecting the previous continuous basin we date the formation age of clay minerals associated with fault gouge using the K-Ar dating technique. Clay mineral formation is a fundamental process in the evolution of faults under the brittle regime (history with a minimum age of ˜360 Ma and a last clay minerals forming event at ˜220 Ma. Moreover, given the progression of apparent ages decreasing from coarse to fine size fractions (˜360-311 Ma for 2-1 μm grain size fraction, ˜326-286 Ma for 1-0.2 μm and ˜291-219 Ma of <0.2 μm), we modeled discrete deformation events at ˜417 Ma (ending of the Famatinian cycle), ˜317-326 Ma (end of Gondwanic orogeny), and ˜194-279 Ma (Early Permian - Jurassic deformation). According to our data, the Neogene reactivation would not have affected the K-Ar system neither generated a significant clay minerals crystallization in the fault gouge, although an exhumation of more than 2 Km is recorded in this period from stratigraphic data.

  5. Adaptive multilevel mesh refinement method for the solution of low Mach number reactive flows; Methode adaptative de raffinement local multi-niveaux pour le calcul d'ecoulements reactifs a faible nombre de Mach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Core, X.

    2002-02-01

    The isobar approximation for the system of the balance equations of mass, momentum, energy and chemical species is a suitable approximation to represent low Mach number reactive flows. In this approximation, which neglects acoustics phenomena, the mixture is hydrodynamically incompressible and the thermodynamic effects lead to an uniform compression of the system. We present a novel numerical scheme for this approximation. An incremental projection method, which uses the original form of mass balance equation, discretizes in time the Navier-Stokes equations. Spatial discretization is achieved through a finite volume approach on MAC-type staggered mesh. A higher order de-centered scheme is used to compute the convective fluxes. We associate to this discretization a local mesh refinement method, based on Flux Interface Correction technique. A first application concerns a forced flow with variable density which mimics a combustion problem. The second application is natural convection with first small temperature variations and then beyond the limit of validity of the Boussinesq approximation. Finally, we treat a third application which is a laminar diffusion flame. For each of these test problems, we demonstrate the robustness of the proposed numerical scheme, notably for the density spatial variations. We analyze the gain in accuracy obtained with the local mesh refinement method. (author)

  6. Reactive turbulent flow CFD study in supercritical water oxidation process: application to a stirred double shell reactor; Etude par simulation numerique des ecoulements turbulents reactifs dans les reacteurs d'oxydation hydrothermale: application a un reacteur agite double enveloppe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moussiere, S

    2006-12-15

    Supercritical water oxidation is an innovative process to treat organic liquid waste which uses supercritical water properties to mix efficiency the oxidant and the organic compounds. The reactor is a stirred double shell reactor. In the step of adaptation to nuclear constraints, the computational fluid dynamic modeling is a good tool to know required temperature field in the reactor for safety analysis. Firstly, the CFD modeling of tubular reactor confirms the hypothesis of an incompressible fluid and the use of k-w turbulence model to represent the hydrodynamic. Moreover, the EDC model is as efficiency as the kinetic to compute the reaction rate in this reactor. Secondly, the study of turbulent flow in the double shell reactor confirms the use of 2D axisymmetric geometry instead of 3D geometry to compute heat transfer. Moreover, this study reports that water-air mixing is not in single phase. The reactive turbulent flow is well represented by EDC model after adaptation of initial conditions. The reaction rate in supercritical water oxidation reactor is mainly controlled by the mixing. (author)

  7. Augmented reality and its practical application

    OpenAIRE

    ZÍTKOVÁ, Helena

    2011-01-01

    This thesis combines topic of augmented reality with tourism. For analyzing the state of the use of augmented reality was composed case studies. It was created product, which is called Guide to mobile phone.

  8. SIMULACIÓN DE UN ESCURRIMIENTO REACTIVO AL INTERIOR DE UNA CÁMARA DE COMBUSTIÓN REACTIVE FLUID FLOW SIMULATION INSIDE COMBUSTION CHAMBER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos H Salinas Lira

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available El presente trabajo dice relación con la simulación de gases calientes al interior de una cámara de tubular combustión. Siendo así, se generan mallas en dominios tubulares curvilíneos. La inyección de combustible es realizada a través de un cuerpo esférico posicionado en el eje de simetría de la cámara afectado por un flujo primario axial y un flujo secundario radial. El fluido es considerado Newtoniano incompresible y con propiedades termo físicas constantes, en cuanto el flujo es considerado laminar, modelado a través de la ecuaciones de Navier-Stokes. La formulación de Shvab-Zel'dovich es utilizada para modelar el transporte de energía y especies a través de una variable denominada Potencial de Acoplamiento. El modelo matemático es resuelto numéricamente a través del Método de los Volúmenes Finitos descrito en coordenadas curvilíneas con arreglo co-localizado de variables. Los términos difusivos son representados por diferencias centradas y se usa el esquema WUDS para los términos convectivos. La integración temporal es del tipo implícito. Resultados de campos de velocidades, temperaturas y concentraciones son mostrados y comparados con datos encontrados en la literatura especializada. Se concluye en cuanto a la calidad cualitativa y cuantitativa de los resultados generados y en particular en lo que dice relación con la forma de la llama.The present work is related to the simulation of hot gases inside a tubular combustion chamber. This way, meshes are generated in tubular curvilinear domains. The fuel injection is carried out through a spherical body positioned in the chamber symmetry axis, affected by an axial primary flow and a radial secondary flow. The fluid is considered Newtonian incompressible, with constant thermo physics properties. In regard to the fluid flow, this is considered laminar, modeled through Navier-Stokes Equations. The Shvab-Zel'dovich formulation is used to model energy and species transport

  9. Augmented assessment as a means to augmented reality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergeron, Bryan

    2006-01-01

    Rigorous scientific assessment of educational technologies typically lags behind the availability of the technologies by years because of the lack of validated instruments and benchmarks. Even when the appropriate assessment instruments are available, they may not be applied because of time and monetary constraints. Work in augmented reality, instrumented mannequins, serious gaming, and similar promising educational technologies that haven't undergone timely, rigorous evaluation, highlights the need for assessment methodologies that address the limitations of traditional approaches. The most promising augmented assessment solutions incorporate elements of rapid prototyping used in the software industry, simulation-based assessment techniques modeled after methods used in bioinformatics, and object-oriented analysis methods borrowed from object oriented programming.

  10. Use of Augmented Reality in Education

    OpenAIRE

    Jeřábek, Tomáš

    2014-01-01

    This thesis deals with phenomena of augmented reality in context of didactics. The thesis aims to define augmented reality in conceptual and content area and focuses on augmented reality in the structure of educational tools and identification of its functions and use from the didactical standpoint. The thesis characterizes augmented reality as a specific technological-perceptual concept and establishes a system of perceptual, technological and resulting aspects that reflect important paramet...

  11. Affordances in Mobile Augmented Reality Applications

    OpenAIRE

    Gjøsæter, Tor

    2014-01-01

    This paper explores the affordances of augmented reality content in a mobile augmented reality application. A user study was conducted by performing a multi-camera video recording of seven think aloud sessions. The think aloud sessions consisted of individual users performing tasks, exploring and experiencing a mobile augmented reality (MAR) application we developed for the iOS platform named ARad. We discuss the instrumental affordances we observed when users interacted with augmented realit...

  12. New Augmented Reality Taxonomy: Technologies and Features of Augmented Environment.

    OpenAIRE

    Hugues , Olivier; Fuchs , Philippe; Nannipieri , Olivier

    2011-01-01

    978-1-4614-0063-9; This article has a dual aim: firstly to define augmented reality (AR) en- vironments and secondly, based on our definition, a new taxonomy enabling these environments to be classified. After briefly reviewing existing classifica- tions, we define AR by its purpose, ie. to enable someone to create sensory- motor and cognitive activities in a new space combining the real environment and a virtual environment. Below we present our functional taxonomy of AR environments. We div...

  13. [Augmentation technique on the proximal humerus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scola, A; Gebhard, F; Röderer, G

    2015-09-01

    The treatment of osteoporotic fractures is still a challenge. The advantages of augmentation with respect to primary in vitro stability and the clinical use for the proximal humerus are presented in this article. In this study six paired human humeri were randomized into an augmented and a non-augmented group. Osteosynthesis was performed with a PHILOS plate (Synthes®). In the augmented group the two screws finding purchase in the weakest cancellous bone were augmented. The specimens were tested in a 3-part fracture model in a varus bending test. The augmented PHILOS plates withstood significantly more load cycles until failure. The correlation to bone mineral density (BMD) showed that augmentation could partially compensate for low BMD. The augmentation of the screws in locked plating in a proximal humerus fracture model is effective in improving the primary stability in a cyclic varus bending test. The targeted augmentation of two particular screws in a region of low bone quality within the humeral head was almost as effective as four screws with twice the amount of bone cement. Screw augmentation combined with a knowledge of the local bone quality could be more effective in enhancing the primary stability of a proximal humerus locking plate because the effect of augmentation can be exploited more effectively limiting it to the degree required. The technique of augmentation is simple and can be applied in open and minimally invasive procedures. When the correct procedure is used, complications (cement leakage into the joint) can be avoided.

  14. Augmented Reality for Multi-disciplinary Collaboration

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Xiangyu; Rui,

    2010-01-01

    This chapter presents a framework for multi-disciplinary collaboration. Tangible Augmented Reality has been raised as one of suitable systems for design collaboration. Furthermore, it emphasizes the advantages of Tangible Augmented Reality to illustrate the needs for integrating the Tangible User Interfaces and Augmented Reality Systems.

  15. Arsenic augments the uptake of oxidized LDL by upregulating the expression of lectin-like oxidized LDL receptor in mouse aortic endothelial cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hossain, Ekhtear [Department of Biochemistry, Aichi Medical University School of Medicine, Nagakute, Aichi (Japan); Ota, Akinobu, E-mail: aota@aichi-med-u.ac.jp [Department of Biochemistry, Aichi Medical University School of Medicine, Nagakute, Aichi (Japan); Karnan, Sivasundaram; Damdindorj, Lkhagvasuren [Department of Biochemistry, Aichi Medical University School of Medicine, Nagakute, Aichi (Japan); Takahashi, Miyuki [Department of Biochemistry, Aichi Medical University School of Medicine, Nagakute, Aichi (Japan); Division of Hematology, Department of Internal Medicine, Aichi Medical University School of Medicine, Nagakute, Aichi (Japan); Konishi, Yuko; Konishi, Hiroyuki; Hosokawa, Yoshitaka [Department of Biochemistry, Aichi Medical University School of Medicine, Nagakute, Aichi (Japan)

    2013-12-15

    Although chronic arsenic exposure is a well-known risk factor for cardiovascular diseases, including atherosclerosis, the molecular mechanism underlying arsenic-induced atherosclerosis remains obscure. Therefore, this study aimed to elucidate this molecular mechanism. We examined changes in the mRNA level of the lectin-like oxidized LDL (oxLDL) receptor (LOX-1) in a mouse aortic endothelial cell line, END-D, after sodium arsenite (SA) treatment. SA treatment significantly upregulated LOX-1 mRNA expression; this finding was also verified at the protein expression level. Flow cytometry and fluorescence microscopy analyses showed that the cellular uptake of fluorescence (Dil)-labeled oxLDL was significantly augmented with SA treatment. In addition, an anti-LOX-1 antibody completely abrogated the augmented uptake of Dil-oxLDL. We observed that SA increased the levels of the phosphorylated forms of nuclear factor of kappa light polypeptide gene enhancer in B cells (NF-κB)/p65. SA-induced upregulation of LOX-1 protein expression was clearly prevented by treatment with an antioxidant, N-acetylcysteine (NAC), or an NF-κB inhibitor, caffeic acid phenethylester (CAPE). Furthermore, SA-augmented uptake of Dil-oxLDL was also prevented by treatment with NAC or CAPE. Taken together, our results indicate that arsenic upregulates LOX-1 expression through the reactive oxygen species-mediated NF-κB signaling pathway, followed by augmented cellular oxLDL uptake, thus highlighting a critical role of the aberrant LOX-1 signaling pathway in the pathogenesis of arsenic-induced atherosclerosis. - Highlights: • Sodium arsenite (SA) increases LOX-1 expression in mouse aortic endothelial cells. • SA enhances cellular uptake of oxidized LDL in dose-dependent manner. • SA-induced ROS generation enhances phosphorylation of NF-κB. • SA upregulates LOX-1 expression through ROS-activated NF-κB signaling pathway.

  16. Augmented reality building operations tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brackney, Larry J.

    2014-09-09

    A method (700) for providing an augmented reality operations tool to a mobile client (642) positioned in a building (604). The method (700) includes, with a server (660), receiving (720) from the client (642) an augmented reality request for building system equipment (612) managed by an energy management system (EMS) (620). The method (700) includes transmitting (740) a data request for the equipment (612) to the EMS (620) and receiving (750) building management data (634) for the equipment (612). The method (700) includes generating (760) an overlay (656) with an object created based on the building management data (634), which may be sensor data, diagnostic procedures, or the like. The overlay (656) is configured for concurrent display on a display screen (652) of the client (642) with a real-time image of the building equipment (612). The method (700) includes transmitting (770) the overlay (656) to the client (642).

  17. Augmented Reality 2.0

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmalstieg, Dieter; Langlotz, Tobias; Billinghurst, Mark

    Augmented Reality (AR) was first demonstrated in the 1960s, but only recently have technologies emerged that can be used to easily deploy AR applications to many users. Camera-equipped cell phones with significant processing power and graphics abilities provide an inexpensive and versatile platform for AR applications, while the social networking technology of Web 2.0 provides a large-scale infrastructure for collaboratively producing and distributing geo-referenced AR content. This combination of widely used mobile hardware and Web 2.0 software allows the development of a new type of AR platform that can be used on a global scale. In this paper we describe the Augmented Reality 2.0 concept and present existing work on mobile AR and web technologies that could be used to create AR 2.0 applications.

  18. Augmented Reality in Science Education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Birgitte Lund; Brandt, Harald; Swensen, Hakon

    Augmented reality (AR) holds great promise as a learning tool. However, most extant studies in this field have focused on the technology itself. The poster presents findings from the first stage of the AR-sci project addressing the issue of applying AR for educational purposes. Benefits and chall......Augmented reality (AR) holds great promise as a learning tool. However, most extant studies in this field have focused on the technology itself. The poster presents findings from the first stage of the AR-sci project addressing the issue of applying AR for educational purposes. Benefits...... and challenges related to AR enhancing student learning in science in lower secondary school were identified by expert science teachers, ICT designers and science education researchers from four countries in a Delphi survey. Findings were condensed in a framework to categorize educational AR designs....

  19. The reactivity meter and core reactivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siltanen, P.

    1999-01-01

    This paper discussed in depth the point kinetic equations and the characteristics of the point kinetic reactivity meter, particularly for large negative reactivities. From a given input signal representing the neutron flux seen by a detector, the meter computes a value of reactivity in dollars (ρ/β), based on inverse point kinetics. The prompt jump point of view is emphasised. (Author)

  20. Media-Augmented Exercise Machines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krueger, T.

    2002-01-01

    Cardio-vascular exercise has been used to mitigate the muscle and cardiac atrophy associated with adaptation to micro-gravity environments. Several hours per day may be required. In confined spaces and long duration missions this kind of exercise is inevitably repetitive and rapidly becomes uninteresting. At the same time, there are pressures to accomplish as much as possible given the cost- per-hour for humans occupying orbiting or interplanetary. Media augmentation provides a the means to overlap activities in time by supplementing the exercise with social, recreational, training or collaborative activities and thereby reducing time pressures. In addition, the machine functions as an interface to a wide range of digital environments allowing for spatial variety in an otherwise confined environment. We hypothesize that the adoption of media augmented exercise machines will have a positive effect on psycho-social well-being on long duration missions. By organizing and supplementing exercise machines, data acquisition hardware, computers and displays into an interacting system this proposal increases functionality with limited additional mass. This paper reviews preliminary work on a project to augment exercise equipment in a manner that addresses these issues and at the same time opens possibilities for additional benefits. A testbed augmented exercise machine uses a specialty built cycle trainer as both input to a virtual environment and as an output device from it using spatialized sound, and visual displays, vibration transducers and variable resistance. The resulting interactivity increases a sense of engagement in the exercise, provides a rich experience of the digital environments. Activities in the virtual environment and accompanying physiological and psychological indicators may be correlated to track and evaluate the health of the crew.

  1. Tracking for Outdoor Mobile Augmented Reality: Further development of the Zion Augmented Reality Application

    OpenAIRE

    Strand, Tor Egil Riegels

    2008-01-01

    This report deals with providing tracking to an outdoor mobile augmented reality system and the Zion Augmented Reality Application. ZionARA is meant to display a virtual recreation of a 13th century castle on the site it once stood through an augmented reality Head Mounted Display. Mobile outdoor augmented/mixed reality puts special demands on what kind of equipment is practical. After briefly evaluating the different existing tracking methods, a solution based on GPS and an augmented inertia...

  2. Aesthetic occiput augmentation using methylmethacrylate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Yong Tai

    2015-01-01

    Cranioplasty for only aesthetic reasons has not been commonly performed to date. However, recently there has been a new focus by the public on a more aesthetically pleasing head shape with frequent patient requests for purely aesthetic contouring of the occiput, an important definer of cosmetic head shape. For example, in Asia, where the normal cranial shape is mesocephalic or brachycephalic and often with a planar occiput, requests for its aesthetic correction are increasingly common. Accordingly, the author developed a minimally invasive occiput augmentation using methylmethacrylate. In this study, the indications for aesthetic occiput contouring were planar occiput, left-right asymmetric occiput, and grooved occiput. Under local anesthesia, soft methylmethacrylate is subperiosteally inserted through a small incision (about 5-cm length), manually and precisely contoured in situ through the scalp to the desired occipital shape. All is performed as an outpatient procedure, and a quick recovery is the case. Between March 2007 and October 2013, 959 patients received such aesthetic occiput augmentation. The mean follow-up period was 49 months (range, 3-84 months). Nearly all patients were satisfied with the outcome, and complications were very rare. Only 5 patients (0.5%) needed additional corrective procedures. The author has concluded that aesthetic occiput augmentation using methylmethacrylate yields consistent, predictable, and satisfactory results. Additional long-term follow-up is required for a final conclusion, however.

  3. Facial sculpting and tissue augmentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carruthers, Jean D A; Carruthers, Alastair

    2005-11-01

    Until recently, deep facial sculpting was exclusively the domain of surgical interventions. Recent advances in the available array of dermal and subdermal fillers combined with an esthetic appreciation by both surgeons and nonsurgeons alike of the positive effect of filling the volume-depleted face have led to an expansion in the indications for the use of soft tissue augmenting agents. Subdermal support of the lateral two-thirds of the brow, the nasojugal fold, the malar and buccal fat pads, the lateral lip commissures, and the perioral region, including the pre-jowl sulcus, all restore youthful facial contour and harmony. An important advance in technique is the subdermal rather than the intradermal injection plane. "Instant" facial sculpting giving a brow-lift, cheek-lift, lip expansion, and perioral augmentation is possible using modern soft tissue augmenting agents. The softer, more relaxed appearance contrasts to the somewhat "pulled" appearance of subjects who have had surgical overcorrections. Treatments can be combined with botulinum toxin and other procedures if required. Newer advances in the use of fillers include the use of fillers injected in the subdermal plane for "lunchtime" facial sculpting. Using the modern esthetic filler compounds, which are biodegradable but longer lasting, subjects can have a "rehearsal" treatment or make it ongoing. Some individuals, such as those with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-related lipoatrophy or those who desire to obtain a longer-lasting effect, may elect to use a nonbiodegradable filling agent.

  4. Monitoring the Rapid-Moving Reactivation of Earth Flows by Means of GB-InSAR: The April 2013 Capriglio Landslide (Northern Appennines, Italy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Federica Bardi

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the main results of the GB-InSAR (ground based interferometric synthetic aperture radar monitoring of the Capriglio landslide (Northern Apennines, Emilia Romagna Region, Italy, activated on 6 April 2013. The landslide, triggered by prolonged rainfall, is constituted by two main adjacent enlarging bodies with a roto-translational kinematics. They activated in sequence and subsequently joined into a large earth flow, channelizing downstream of the Bardea Creek, for a total length of about 3600 m. The displacement rate of this combined mass was quite high, so that the landslide toe evolved with velocities of several tens of meters per day (with peaks of 70–80 m/day in the first month, and of several meters per day (with peaks of 13–14 m/day from early May to mid-July 2013. In the crown area, the landslide completely destroyed a 450 m sector of provincial roadway S.P. 101, and its retrogression tendency exposed the villages of Capriglio and Pianestolla, located in the upper watershed area of the Bardea Creek, to great danger. Furthermore, the advancing toe seriously threatened the Antria bridge, representing the “Massese” provincial roadway S.P. 665R transect over the Bardea Creek, the only strategic roadway left able to connect the above-mentioned villages. With the final aim of supporting local authorities in the hazard assessment and risk management during the emergency phase, on 4 May 2013 aerial optical surveys were conducted to accurately map the landslide extension and evolution. Moreover, a GB-InSAR monitoring campaign was started in order to assess displacements of the whole landslide area. The versatility and flexibility of the GB-InSAR sensors allowed acquiring data with two different configurations, designed and set up to continuously retrieve information on the landslide movement rates (both in its upper slow-moving sectors and in its fast-moving toe. The first acquisition mode revealed that the Capriglio and

  5. Reactive dispersive contaminant transport in coastal aquifers: Numerical simulation of a reactive Henry problem

    KAUST Repository

    Nick, H.M.; Raoof, A.; Centler, F.; Thullner, M.; Regnier, P.

    2013-01-01

    The reactive mixing between seawater and terrestrial water in coastal aquifers influences the water quality of submarine groundwater discharge. While these waters come into contact at the seawater groundwater interface by density driven flow

  6. Relational victimization and proactive versus reactive relational aggression: The moderating effects of respiratory sinus arrhythmia and skin conductance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Caitlin R; Abaied, Jamie L

    2015-01-01

    This research examined the moderating effect of the autonomic nervous system (ANS) on the associations between relational victimization and reactive and proactive relational aggression. Both branches of the ANS, the parasympathetic nervous system (indexed by respiratory sinus arrhythmia reactivity; RSA-Reactivity) and the sympathetic nervous system (indexed by skin conductance level reactivity; SCL-Reactivity), were examined. Emerging adults (N = 168) self-reported on relational victimization and proactive and reactive relational aggression; RSA-Reactivity and SCL-Reactivity were assessed in response to a laboratory stressor. Relational victimization predicted heightened reactive relational aggression given RSA augmentation/high SCL-Reactivity (i.e., coactivation) and RSA withdrawal/low SCL-Reactivity (i.e., coinhibition). In addition, relational victimization predicted heightened reactive relational aggression given RSA augmentation/low SCL-Reactivity (i.e., reciprocal parasympathetic activation). This study extends previous research on relational victimization and provides novel evidence that (a) exposure to relational victimization is associated with reactive relational aggression, but not proactive relational aggression, and (b) parasympathetic and sympathetic nervous system reactivity jointly moderate the link between relational victimization and reactive relational aggression. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Facilitating efficient augmentation of transmission networks to connect renewable energy generation: the Australian experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wright, Glen

    2012-01-01

    Australia is heavily dependent on coal for electricity generation. The Renewable Energy Target has spurred growth in the utilization of renewable energy sources, with further growth expected into the future. Australia's strongest renewable energy sources are generally distant from the transmission network in resource ‘basins’. Investment is needed to augment the transmission network to enable delivery of electricity from these sources to consumers. Considerable economies of scale flow from anticipating the connection of numerous generators in an area over time and sizing augmentations accordingly. Following a lengthy rulemaking process, the National Electricity Rules were recently amended by a new rule, designed to facilitate the construction of such efficiently sized augmentations. However, the new rule is more conservative than initially envisaged, making little substantive change to the current frameworks for augmentation and connection. This paper outlines these frameworks and the rulemaking process and identifies the key debates surrounding the rule change are identified. This paper then provides a detailed analysis of the new rule, concluding that it is defective in a number of respects and is unlikely to result in the efficient and timely augmentation of the network needed to unlock the potential of Australia's strongest renewable energy resources. - Highlights: ► Remoteness of renewable energy sources is a barrier to greater renewable energy utilization. ► Significant economies of scale flow from efficiently-sized transmission network augmentation. ► Current frameworks in Australia do not incentivise efficiently-sized network augmentations. ► The lack of property rights in an augmentation is particularly problematic. ► The new Scale Efficient Network Extensions rule is not apt to facilitate efficiently-sized network augmentations.

  8. Augmented reality in intraventricular neuroendoscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finger, T; Schaumann, A; Schulz, M; Thomale, Ulrich-W

    2017-06-01

    Individual planning of the entry point and the use of navigation has become more relevant in intraventricular neuroendoscopy. Navigated neuroendoscopic solutions are continuously improving. We describe experimentally measured accuracy and our first experience with augmented reality-enhanced navigated neuroendoscopy for intraventricular pathologies. Augmented reality-enhanced navigated endoscopy was tested for accuracy in an experimental setting. Therefore, a 3D-printed head model with a right parietal lesion was scanned with a thin-sliced computer tomography. Segmentation of the tumor lesion was performed using Scopis NovaPlan navigation software. An optical reference matrix is used to register the neuroendoscope's geometry and its field of view. The pre-planned ROI and trajectory are superimposed in the endoscopic image. The accuracy of the superimposed contour fitting on endoscopically visualized lesion was acquired by measuring the deviation of both midpoints to one another. The technique was subsequently used in 29 cases with CSF circulation pathologies. Navigation planning included defining the entry points, regions of interests and trajectories, superimposed as augmented reality on the endoscopic video screen during intervention. Patients were evaluated for postoperative imaging, reoperations, and possible complications. The experimental setup revealed a deviation of the ROI's midpoint from the real target by 1.2 ± 0.4 mm. The clinical study included 18 cyst fenestrations, ten biopsies, seven endoscopic third ventriculostomies, six stent placements, and two shunt implantations, being eventually combined in some patients. In cases of cyst fenestrations postoperatively, the cyst volume was significantly reduced in all patients by mean of 47%. In biopsies, the diagnostic yield was 100%. Reoperations during a follow-up period of 11.4 ± 10.2 months were necessary in two cases. Complications included one postoperative hygroma and one insufficient

  9. Webizing mobile augmented reality content

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Sangchul; Ko, Heedong; Yoo, Byounghyun

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a content structure for building mobile augmented reality (AR) applications in HTML5 to achieve a clean separation of the mobile AR content and the application logic for scaling as on the Web. We propose that the content structure contains the physical world as well as virtual assets for mobile AR applications as document object model (DOM) elements and that their behaviour and user interactions are controlled through DOM events by representing objects and places with a uniform resource identifier. Our content structure enables mobile AR applications to be seamlessly developed as normal HTML documents under the current Web eco-system.

  10. Controlling bistability by linear augmentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharma, Pooja Rani; Shrimali, Manish Dev; Prasad, Awadhesh; Feudel, Ulrike

    2013-01-01

    In many bistable oscillating systems only one of the attractors is desired to possessing certain system performance. We present a method to drive a bistable system to a desired target attractor by annihilating the other one. This shift from bistability to monostability is achieved by augmentation of the nonlinear oscillator with a linear control system. For a proper choice of the control function one of the attractors disappears at a critical coupling strength in an control-induced boundary crisis. This transition from bistability to monostability is demonstrated with two paradigmatic examples, the autonomous Chua oscillator and a neuronal system with a periodic input signal.

  11. Indeterminacy and labor augmenting externalities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Odile; Goenka, Aditya

    2002-01-01

    In this two-sector discrete time model of endogenous economic growth intersectoral effects are assumed to be "labor augmenting" We derive necessary and sufficient conditions for local indeterminacy and multiplicity of the balanced growth path in terms of factor intensities in both sectors....... The balanced growth path is unique if the consumption good sector is more capital intensive. However, it can be indeterminate. When the investment good sector is more capital intensive a sufficient condition for indeterminacy is that there exists at least three balanced growth paths....

  12. Using augmented reality to teach and learn biochemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vega Garzón, Juan Carlos; Magrini, Marcio Luiz; Galembeck, Eduardo

    2017-09-01

    Understanding metabolism and metabolic pathways constitutes one of the central aims for students of biological sciences. Learning metabolic pathways should be focused on the understanding of general concepts and core principles. New technologies such Augmented Reality (AR) have shown potential to improve assimilation of biochemistry abstract concepts because students can manipulate 3D molecules in real time. Here we describe an application named Augmented Reality Metabolic Pathways (ARMET), which allowed students to visualize the 3D molecular structure of substrates and products, thus perceiving changes in each molecule. The structural modification of molecules shows students the flow and exchange of compounds and energy through metabolism. © 2017 by The International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, 45(5):417-420, 2017. © 2017 The International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology.

  13. Psychotherapy augmentation through preconscious priming

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francois eBorgeat

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To test the hypothesis that repeated preconscious (masked priming of personalized positive cognitions could augment cognitive change and facilitate achievement of patients’ goals following a therapy.Methods: Twenty social phobic patients (13 women completed a 36 weeks study beginning by 12 weeks of group behavioural therapy. After the therapy, they received 6 weeks of preconscious priming and 6 weeks of a control procedure in a randomized cross-over design. The Priming condition involved listening twice daily with a passive attitude to a recording of individualized formulations of appropriate cognitions and attitudes masked by music. The Control condition involved listening to an indistinguishable recording where the formulations had been replaced by random numbers. Changes in social cognitions were measured by the Social Interaction Self Statements Test (SISST.Results: Patients improved following therapy. The Priming procedure was associated with increased positive cognitions and decreased negative cognitions on the SISST while the Control procedure was not. The Priming procedure induced more cognitive change when applied immediately after the group therapy. Conclusion: An effect of priming was observed on social phobia related cognitions in the expected direction. This self administered addition to a therapy could be seen as an augmentation strategy.

  14. Enhancing tourism with augmented and virtual reality

    OpenAIRE

    Jenny, Sandra

    2017-01-01

    Augmented and virtual reality are on the advance. In the last twelve months, several interesting devices have entered the market. Since tourism is one of the fastest growing economic sectors in the world and has become one of the major players in international commerce, the aim of this thesis was to examine how tourism could be enhanced with augmented and virtual reality. The differences and functional principles of augmented and virtual reality were investigated, general uses were described ...

  15. Interactive Assembly Guide using Augmented Reality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Martin; Andersen, Rasmus Skovgaard; Larsen, Christian Lindequist

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents an Augmented Reality system for aiding a pump assembling process at Grundfos, one of the leading pump producers. Stable pose estimation of the pump is required in order to augment the graphics correctly. This is achieved by matching image edges with synthesized edges from CAD...... norm. A dynamic visualization of the augmented graphics provides the user with guidance. Usability tests show that the accuracy of the system is sufficient for assembling the pump....

  16. Augmented Reality Using JavaScript

    OpenAIRE

    Hailemichael, Aida

    2013-01-01

    The project goal was to provide a mobile application, for a venue called Kulturhuset Karelia which is located in Tammisaari Finland. In this paper, the concept of Augmented Reality technology is briefly discussed along with the mobile application for the venue. The utilisation of JavaScript for creating Augmented reality content for mobile Augmented reality browser is also demonstrated. The application was created by using Architecht API which is Jacvascript library based on the Wikitude...

  17. Augmenting Locomotion in an Anthropomorphic System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Derek Wight

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available A powered orthosis has applications ranging from assisting the elderly to augmenting astronauts. An assistive control scheme is developed that uses the force from a slave actuator to augment the force of a master actuator. This can be used to augment a closed-loop control scheme applied to the master actuator. Initially, actuator augmentation is explored both theoretically and experimentally using a simple mechanical system. The control scheme is then applied to a scale model of human lower limbs on a stationary bicycle to investigate the feasibility of a powered orthosis using pneumatic muscle actuators.

  18. [Cement augmentation on the spine : Biomechanical considerations].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolb, J P; Weiser, L; Kueny, R A; Huber, G; Rueger, J M; Lehmann, W

    2015-09-01

    Vertebral compression fractures are the most common osteoporotic fractures. Since the introduction of vertebroplasty and screw augmentation, the management of osteoporotic fractures has changed significantly. The biomechanical characteristics of the risk of adjacent fractures and novel treatment modalities for osteoporotic vertebral fractures, including pure cement augmentation by vertebroplasty, and cement augmentation of screws for posterior instrumentation, are explored. Eighteen human osteoporotic lumbar spines (L1-5) adjacent to vertebral bodies after vertebroplasty were tested in a servo-hydraulic machine. As augmentation compounds we used standard cement and a modified low-strength cement. Different anchoring pedicle screws were tested with and without cement augmentation in another cohort of human specimens with a simple pull-out test and a fatigue test that better reflects physiological conditions. Cement augmentation in the osteoporotic spine leads to greater biomechanical stability. However, change in vertebral stiffness resulted in alterations with the risk of adjacent fractures. By using a less firm cement compound, the risk of adjacent fractures is significantly reduced. Both screw augmentation techniques resulted in a significant increase in the withdrawal force compared with the group without cement. Augmentation using perforated screws showed the highest stability in the fatigue test. The augmentation of cement leads to a significant change in the biomechanical properties. Differences in the stability of adjacent vertebral bodies increase the risk of adjacent fractures, which could be mitigated by a modified cement compound with reduced strength. Screws that were specifically designed for cement application displayed greatest stability in the fatigue test.

  19. Augmented reality in dentistry: a current perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Ho-Beom; Park, Young-Seok; Han, Jung-Suk

    2018-02-21

    Augmentation reality technology offers virtual information in addition to that of the real environment and thus opens new possibilities in various fields. The medical applications of augmentation reality are generally concentrated on surgery types, including neurosurgery, laparoscopic surgery and plastic surgery. Augmentation reality technology is also widely used in medical education and training. In dentistry, oral and maxillofacial surgery is the primary area of use, where dental implant placement and orthognathic surgery are the most frequent applications. Recent technological advancements are enabling new applications of restorative dentistry, orthodontics and endodontics. This review briefly summarizes the history, definitions, features, and components of augmented reality technology and discusses its applications and future perspectives in dentistry.

  20. INTEGRATIVE AUGMENTATION OF STANDARDIZED MANAGEMENT SYSTEMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stanislav Karapetrovic

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available The development, features and integrating abilities of different international standards related to management systems are discussed. A group of such standards that augment the performance of quality management systems in organizations is specifically focused on. The concept, characteristics and an illustrative example of one augmenting standard, namely ISO 10001, are addressed. Integration of standardized augmenting systems, both by themselves and within the overall management system, is examined. It is argued that, in research and practice alike, integrative augmentation represents the future of standardized quality and other management systems.

  1. Mechanism of transient force augmentation varying with two distinct timescales for interacting vortex rings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Zhidong; Qin, Suyang; Liu, Hong

    2014-01-01

    The dynamics of dual vortex ring flows is studied experimentally and numerically in a model system that consists of a piston-cylinder apparatus. The flows are generated by double identical strokes which have the velocity profile characterized by the sinusoidal function of half the period. By calculating the total wake impulse in two strokes in the experiments, it is found that the average propulsive force increases by 50% in the second stroke for the sufficiently small stroke length, compared with the first stroke. In the numerical simulations, two types of transient force augmentation are revealed, there being the transient force augmentation for the small stroke lengths and the absolute transient force augmentation for the large stroke lengths. The relative transient force augmentation increases to 78% for L/D = 1, while the absolute transient force augmentation for L/D = 4 is twice as much as that for L/D = 1. Further investigation demonstrates that the force augmentation is attributed to the interaction between vortex rings, which induces transport of vortex impulse and more evident fluid entrainment. The critical situation of vortex ring separation is defined and indicated, with vortex spacing falling in a narrow gap when the stroke lengths vary. A new model is proposed concerning the limiting process of impulse, further suggesting that apart from vortex formation timescale, vortex spacing should be interpreted as an independent timescale to reflect the dynamics of vortex interaction.

  2. Jointly Optimize Data Augmentation and Network Training: Adversarial Data Augmentation in Human Pose Estimation

    OpenAIRE

    Peng, Xi; Tang, Zhiqiang; Yang, Fei; Feris, Rogerio; Metaxas, Dimitris

    2018-01-01

    Random data augmentation is a critical technique to avoid overfitting in training deep neural network models. However, data augmentation and network training are usually treated as two isolated processes, limiting the effectiveness of network training. Why not jointly optimize the two? We propose adversarial data augmentation to address this limitation. The main idea is to design an augmentation network (generator) that competes against a target network (discriminator) by generating `hard' au...

  3. How to use your peak flow meter

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... meter - how to use; Asthma - peak flow meter; Reactive airway disease - peak flow meter; Bronchial asthma - peak ... 2014:chap 55. National Asthma Education and Prevention Program website. How to use a peak flow meter. ...

  4. Chemical reactor modeling multiphase reactive flows

    CERN Document Server

    Jakobsen, Hugo A

    2014-01-01

    Chemical Reactor Modeling closes the gap between Chemical Reaction Engineering and Fluid Mechanics.  The second edition consists of two volumes: Volume 1: Fundamentals. Volume 2: Chemical Engineering Applications In volume 1 most of the fundamental theory is presented. A few numerical model simulation application examples are given to elucidate the link between theory and applications. In volume 2 the chemical reactor equipment to be modeled are described. Several engineering models are introduced and discussed. A survey of the frequently used numerical methods, algorithms and schemes is provided. A few practical engineering applications of the modeling tools are presented and discussed. The working principles of several experimental techniques employed in order to get data for model validation are outlined. The monograph is based on lectures regularly taught in the fourth and fifth years graduate courses in transport phenomena and chemical reactor modeling, and in a post graduate course in modern reactor m...

  5. Turbulent mixing in nonreactive and reactive flows

    CERN Document Server

    1975-01-01

    Turbulence, mixing and the mutual interaction of turbulence and chemistry continue to remain perplexing and impregnable in the fron­ tiers of fluid mechanics. The past ten years have brought enormous advances in computers and computational techniques on the one hand and in measurements and data processing on the other. The impact of such capabilities has led to a revolution both in the understanding of the structure of turbulence as well as in the predictive methods for application in technology. The early ideas on turbulence being an array of complicated phenomena and having some form of reasonably strong coherent struc­ ture have become well substantiated in recent experimental work. We are still at the very beginning of understanding all of the aspects of such coherence and of the possibilities of incorporating such structure into the analytical models for even those cases where the thin shear layer approximation may be valid. Nevertheless a distinguished body of "eddy chasers" has come into existence. T...

  6. Reactive Kripke semantics

    CERN Document Server

    Gabbay, Dov M

    2013-01-01

    This text offers an extension to the traditional Kripke semantics for non-classical logics by adding the notion of reactivity. Reactive Kripke models change their accessibility relation as we progress in the evaluation process of formulas in the model. This feature makes the reactive Kripke semantics strictly stronger and more applicable than the traditional one. Here we investigate the properties and axiomatisations of this new and most effective semantics, and we offer a wide landscape of applications of the idea of reactivity. Applied topics include reactive automata, reactive grammars, rea

  7. Rotor Design for Diffuser Augmented Wind Turbines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Søren Hjort

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Diffuser augmented wind turbines (DAWTs can increase mass flow through the rotor substantially, but have often failed to fulfill expectations. We address high-performance diffusers, and investigate the design requirements for a DAWT rotor to efficiently convert the available energy to shaft energy. Several factors can induce wake stall scenarios causing significant energy loss. The causality between these stall mechanisms and earlier DAWT failures is discussed. First, a swirled actuator disk CFD code is validated through comparison with results from a far wake swirl corrected blade-element momentum (BEM model, and horizontal-axis wind turbine (HAWT reference results. Then, power efficiency versus thrust is computed with the swirled actuator disk (AD code for low and high values of tip-speed ratios (TSR, for different centerbodies, and for different spanwise rotor thrust loading distributions. Three different configurations are studied: The bare propeller HAWT, the classical DAWT, and the high-performance multi-element DAWT. In total nearly 400 high-resolution AD runs are generated. These results are presented and discussed. It is concluded that dedicated DAWT rotors can successfully convert the available energy to shaft energy, provided the identified design requirements for swirl and axial loading distributions are satisfied.

  8. Augmented Visual Experience of Simulated Solar Phenomena

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tucker, A. O., IV; Berardino, R. A.; Hahne, D.; Schreurs, B.; Fox, N. J.; Raouafi, N.

    2017-12-01

    The Parker Solar Probe (PSP) mission will explore the Sun's corona, studying solar wind, flares and coronal mass ejections. The effects of these phenomena can impact the technology that we use in ways that are not readily apparent, including affecting satellite communications and power grids. Determining the structure and dynamics of corona magnetic fields, tracing the flow of energy that heats the corona, and exploring dusty plasma near the Sun to understand its influence on solar wind and energetic particle formation requires a suite of sensors on board the PSP spacecraft that are engineered to observe specific phenomena. Using models of these sensors and simulated observational data, we can visualize what the PSP spacecraft will "see" during its multiple passes around the Sun. Augmented reality (AR) technologies enable convenient user access to massive data sets. We are developing an application that allows users to experience environmental data from the point of view of the PSP spacecraft in AR using the Microsoft HoloLens. Observational data, including imagery, magnetism, temperature, and density are visualized in 4D within the user's immediate environment. Our application provides an educational tool for comprehending the complex relationships of observational data, which aids in our understanding of the Sun.

  9. LEARNING ANATOMY WITH AUGMENTED REALITY

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørgaard, Cita; Dyhrberg O'Neill, Lotte; Nielsen, Kurt Gammelgaard

    An Augmented Reality (AR) app for Hololens glasses was developed to help students learn the anatomy of the human body mediastinum. In this research project, we wanted to evaluate whether AR: strengthened the students’ self-efficacy and motivation, helped students to improve learning, and provided...... a questionnaire regarding their self-efficacy and motivation, presence in the virtual room, experiences with Hololens teaching, and how they used the quizzes. In addition, students answered a test with the same 20 questions used in the app and three additional transfer questions new to students. Finally, students......’ scores on the mediastinum questions in the exam 2 month later were collected to examine the long-term memory of content. Internal consistency was estimated for all measures. Correlations between measures were examined with a correlation matrix, and group differences were examined with one-way analysis...

  10. Augmented reality in laser laboratories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quercioli, Franco

    2018-05-01

    Laser safety glasses block visibility of the laser light. This is a big nuisance when a clear view of the beam path is required. A headset made up of a smartphone and a viewer can overcome this problem. The user looks at the image of the real world on the cellphone display, captured by its rear camera. An unimpeded and safe sight of the laser beam is then achieved. If the infrared blocking filter of the smartphone camera is removed, the spectral sensitivity of the CMOS image sensor extends in the near infrared region up to 1100 nm. This substantial improvement widens the usability of the device to many laser systems for industrial and medical applications, which are located in this spectral region. The paper describes this modification of a phone camera to extend its sensitivity beyond the visible and make a true augmented reality laser viewer.

  11. Augmented reality for improved safety

    CERN Multimedia

    Stefania Pandolfi

    2016-01-01

    Sometimes, CERN experts have to operate in low visibility conditions or in the presence of possible hazards. Minimising the duration of the operation and reducing the risk of errors is therefore crucial to ensuring the safety of personnel. The EDUSAFE project integrates different technologies to create a wearable personnel safety system based on augmented reality.    The EDUSAFE integrated safety system uses a camera mounted on the helmet to monitor the working area.  In its everyday operation of machines and facilities, CERN adopts a whole set of measures and safety equipment to ensure the safety of its personnel, including personal wearable safety devices and access control systems. However, sometimes, scheduled and emergency maintenance work needs to be done in zones with potential cryogenic hazards, in the presence of radioactive equipment or simply in demanding conditions where visibility is low and moving around is difficult. The EDUSAFE Marie Curie Innovative&...

  12. Augmented Reality and Mobile Art

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gwilt, Ian

    The combined notions of augmented-reality (AR) and mobile art are based on the amalgamation of a number of enabling technologies including computer imaging, emergent display and tracking systems and the increased computing-power in hand-held devices such as Tablet PCs, smart phones, or personal digital assistants (PDAs) which have been utilized in the making of works of art. There is much published research on the technical aspects of AR and the ongoing work being undertaken in the development of faster more efficient AR systems [1] [2]. In this text I intend to concentrate on how AR and its associated typologies can be applied in the context of new media art practices, with particular reference to its application on hand-held or mobile devices.

  13. LOFT Augmented Operator Capability Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hollenbeck, D.A.; Krantz, E.A.; Hunt, G.L.; Meyer, O.R.

    1980-01-01

    The outline of the LOFT Augmented Operator Capability Program is presented. This program utilizes the LOFT (Loss-of-Fluid Test) reactor facility which is located at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory and the LOFT operational transient experiment series as a test bed for methods of enhancing the reactor operator's capability for safer operation. The design of an Operational Diagnotics and Display System is presented which was backfit to the existing data acquisition computers. Basic color-graphic displays of the process schematic and trend type are presented. In addition, displays were developed and are presented which represent safety state vector information. A task analysis method was applied to LOFT reactor operating procedures to test its usefulness in defining the operator's information needs and workload

  14. Sensory augmentation for the blind

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silke Manuela Kärcher

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Enacted theories of consciousness conjecture that perception and cognition arise from an active experience of the regular relations that are tying together the sensory stimulation of different modalities and associated motor actions. Previous experiments investigated this concept by employing the technique of sensory substitution. Building on these studies, here we test a set of hypotheses derived from this framework and investigate the utility of sensory augmentation in handicapped people. We provide a late blind subject with a new set of sensorimotor laws: A vibro-tactile belt continually signals the direction of magnetic north. The subject completed a set of behavioral tests before and after an extended training period. The tests were complemented by questionnaires and interviews. This newly supplied information improved performance on different time scales. In a pointing task we demonstrate an instant improvement of performance based on the signal provided by the device. Furthermore, the signal was helpful in relevant daily tasks, often complicated for the blind, such as keeping a direction over longer distances or taking shortcuts in familiar environments. A homing task with an additional attentional load demonstrated a significant improvement after training. The subject found the directional information highly expedient for the adjustment of his inner maps of familiar environments and describes an increase in his feeling of security when exploring unfamiliar environments with the belt. The results give evidence for a firm integration of the newly supplied signals into the behavior of this late blind subject with better navigational performance and more courageous behavior in unfamiliar environments. Most importantly, the complementary information provided by the belt lead to a positive emotional impact with enhanced feeling of security. This experimental approach demonstrates the potential of sensory augmentation devices for the help of

  15. Reactive perforating collagenosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yadav Mukesh

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Reactive perforating collagenosis is a rare cutaneous disorder of unknown etiology. We hereby describe a case of acquired reactive perforating collagenosis in a patient of diabetes and chronic renal failure.

  16. An Integrative Introduction to Human Augmentation Science

    OpenAIRE

    Alicea, Bradly

    2018-01-01

    Human Augmentation (HA) spans several technical fields and methodological approaches, including Experimental Psychology, Human-Computer Interaction, Psychophysiology, and Artificial Intelligence. Augmentation involves various strategies for optimizing and controlling cognitive states, which requires an understanding of biological plasticity, dynamic cognitive processes, and models of adaptive systems. As an instructive lesson, we will explore a few HA-related concepts and outstanding issues. ...

  17. Augmented REality Sandtables (ARESs) Impact on Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-07-01

    ARL-CR-0803 ● JULY 2016 US Army Research Laboratory Augmented REality Sandtable’s (ARES’s) Impact on Learning by Tarah N......The use of augmented reality (AR) to supplement training tools, specifically sand tables, can produce highly effective systems at relatively low

  18. Augmented Reality Interfaces for Additive Manufacturing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eiríksson, Eyþór Rúnar; Pedersen, David Bue; Frisvad, Jeppe Revall

    2017-01-01

    This paper explores potential use cases for using augmented reality (AR) as a tool to operate industrial machines. As a baseline we use an additive manufacturing system, more commonly known as a 3D printer. We implement novel augmented interfaces and controls using readily available open source...

  19. Enhancing Education through Mobile Augmented Reality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joan, D. R. Robert

    2015-01-01

    In this article, the author has discussed about the Mobile Augmented Reality and enhancing education through it. The aim of the present study was to give some general information about mobile augmented reality which helps to boost education. Purpose of the current study reveals the mobile networks which are used in the institution campus as well…

  20. Age grouping to optimize augmentation success.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Robert W

    2010-05-01

    This article has described the different age groups that present for noninvasive injectable lip and perioral augmentation, as well as the breakdown of 3 subgroups that present within the 4 general age groups. With the fundamental understanding of these presenting groups and subgroups, the practicing augmenter will be able to better treatment plan and educate the patient on realistic and optimal aesthetic outcomes.

  1. From Augmentation Media to Meme Media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Yuzuru

    Computers as meta media are now evolving from augmentation media vehicles to meme media vehicles. While an augmentation media system provides a seamlessly integrated environment of various tools and documents, meme media system provides further functions to edit and distribute tools and documents. Documents and tools on meme media can easily…

  2. Treating water-reactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lussiez, G.W.

    1993-01-01

    Some compounds and elements, such as lithium hydride, magnesium, sodium, and calcium react violently with water to generate much heat and produce hydrogen. The hydrogen can ignite or even form an explosive mixture with air. Other metals may react rapidly only if they are finely divided. Some of the waste produced at Los Alamos National Laboratory includes these metals that are contaminated with radioactivity. By far the greatest volume of water-reactive waste is lithium hydride contaminated with depleted uranium. Reactivity of the water-reactive wastes is neutralized with an atmosphere of humid nitrogen, which prevents the formation of an explosive mixture of hydrogen and air. When we adjust the temperature of the nitrogen and the humidifier, the nitrogen can be more or less humid, and the rate of reaction can be adjusted and controlled. Los Alamos has investigated the rates of reaction of lithium hydride as a function of the temperature and humidity, and, as anticipated, they in with in temperature and humidity. Los Alamos will investigate other variables. For example, the nitrogen flow will be optimized to conserve nitrogen and yet keep the reaction rates high. Reaction rates will be determined for various forms of lithium waste, from small chips to powder. Bench work will lead to the design of a skid-mounted process for treating wastes. Other water-reactive wastes will also be investigated

  3. Reactivity on the Web

    OpenAIRE

    Bailey, James; Bry, François; Eckert, Michael; Patrânjan, Paula Lavinia

    2005-01-01

    Reactivity, the ability to detect simple and composite events and respond in a timely manner, is an essential requirement in many present-day information systems. With the emergence of new, dynamic Web applications, reactivity on the Web is receiving increasing attention. Reactive Web-based systems need to detect and react not only to simple events but also to complex, real-life situations. This paper introduces XChange, a language for programming reactive behaviour on the Web,...

  4. Aspects of User Experience in Augmented Reality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Jacob Boesen

    in human factors related to Augmented Reality. This is investigated partly as how Augmented Reality applications are used in unsupervised settings, and partly in specific evaluations related to user performance in supervised settings. The thesis starts by introducing Augmented Reality to the reader......, followed by a presentation of the technical areas related to the field, and different human factor areas. As a contribution to the research area, this thesis presents five separate, but sequential, papers within the area of Augmented Reality.......In Augmented Reality applications, the real environment is annotated or enhanced with computer-generated graphics. This is a topic that has been researched in the recent decades, but for many people this is a brand new and never heard of topic. The main focus of this thesis is investigations...

  5. Novel Augmentation Strategies in Major Depression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martiny, Klaus

    2017-01-01

    Hypothesis The hypotheses of all the four included studies share the common idea that it is possible to augment the effect of antidepressant drug treatment by applying different interventions and with each intervention attain a clinically meaningful better effect compared to a control condition...... and randomised to augmentation with either active or placebo matching pindolol tablets. In the PEMF study patients were continued on ongoing medication and randomised to augmentation with active or inactive (sham) 30 minutes daily PEMF treatment on weekdays. In the Chronos study all patients were treated...... The results from the Pindolol study showed that pindolol did not augment the effect of venlafaxine for the whole sample. However, for those patients classified as slow metabolizers, based on their O-desmethylvenlafaxine/venlafaxine ratio (ODV/V), pindolol did augment the antidepressant effect. For patients...

  6. Performance of a self-augmented railgun

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burton, R.L.; Witherspoon, F.D.; Goldstein, S.A.

    1991-01-01

    The accelerating force of a railgun 1/2L'I 2 a can be increased by augmenting the self-induced magnetic field created by the armature current. Augmentation fields can be produced by external current coils or, as is done here, by shorting the railgun muzzle, and using the gun rails as the augmentation coil. Experimental results are presented for a 3.6-m railgun operated in this self-augmented mode, and effective inductance gradients are achieved which are as much as 9.3 times that of the unaugmented gun. A circuit model is presented which explains features of the measured shunt current and voltage. It is concluded that self-augmentation is an effective way to reduce ohmic heating in the armature of a railgun

  7. Monadic Functional Reactive Programming

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.J. van der Ploeg (Atze); C Shan

    2013-01-01

    htmlabstractFunctional Reactive Programming (FRP) is a way to program reactive systems in functional style, eliminating many of the problems that arise from imperative techniques. In this paper, we present an alternative FRP formulation that is based on the notion of a reactive computation: a

  8. Pregnancy Augments VEGF-Stimulated In Vitro Angiogenesis and Vasodilator (NO and H2S) Production in Human Uterine Artery Endothelial Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hong-Hai; Chen, Jennifer C; Sheibani, Lili; Lechuga, Thomas J; Chen, Dong-Bao

    2017-07-01

    Augmented uterine artery (UA) production of vasodilators, including nitric oxide (NO) and hydrogen sulfide (H2S), has been implicated in pregnancy-associated and agonist-stimulated rise in uterine blood flow that is rate-limiting to pregnancy health. Developing a human UA endothelial cell (hUAEC) culture model from main UAs of nonpregnant (NP) and pregnant (P) women for testing a hypothesis that pregnancy augments endothelial NO and H2S production and endothelial reactivity to vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). Main UAs from NP and P women were used for developing hUAEC culture models. Comparisons were made between NP- and P-hUAECs in in vitro angiogenesis, activation of cell signaling, expression of endothelial NO synthase (eNOS) and H2S-producing enzymes cystathionine β-synthase (CBS) and cystathionine γ-lyase, and NO/H2S production upon VEGF stimulation. NP- and P-hUAECs displayed a typical cobblestone-like shape in culture and acetylated low-density lipoprotein uptake, stained positively for endothelial and negatively for smooth muscle markers, maintained key signaling proteins during passage, and had statistically significant greater eNOS and CBS proteins in P- vs NP-hUAECs. Treatment with VEGF stimulated in vitro angiogenesis and eNOS protein and NO production only in P-hUEACs and more robust cell signaling in P- vs NP-hUAECs. VEGF stimulated CBS protein expression, accounting for VEGF-stimulated H2S production in hUAECs. Comparisons between NP- and P-hUAECs reveal that pregnancy augments VEGF-stimulated in vitro angiogenesis and NO/H2S production in hUAECs, showing that the newly established hUAEC model provides a critical in vitro tool for understanding human uterine hemodynamics. Copyright © 2017 Endocrine Society

  9. Reactive dispersive contaminant transport in coastal aquifers: Numerical simulation of a reactive Henry problem

    KAUST Repository

    Nick, H.M.

    2013-02-01

    The reactive mixing between seawater and terrestrial water in coastal aquifers influences the water quality of submarine groundwater discharge. While these waters come into contact at the seawater groundwater interface by density driven flow, their chemical components dilute and react through dispersion. A larger interface and wider mixing zone may provide favorable conditions for the natural attenuation of contaminant plumes. It has been claimed that the extent of this mixing is controlled by both, porous media properties and flow conditions. In this study, the interplay between dispersion and reactive processes in coastal aquifers is investigated by means of numerical experiments. Particularly, the impact of dispersion coefficients, the velocity field induced by density driven flow and chemical component reactivities on reactive transport in such aquifers is studied. To do this, a hybrid finite-element finite-volume method and a reactive simulator are coupled, and model accuracy and applicability are assessed. A simple redox reaction is considered to describe the degradation of a contaminant which requires mixing of the contaminated groundwater and the seawater containing the terminal electron acceptor. The resulting degradation is observed for different scenarios considering different magnitudes of dispersion and chemical reactivity. Three reactive transport regimes are found: reaction controlled, reaction-dispersion controlled and dispersion controlled. Computational results suggest that the chemical components\\' reactivity as well as dispersion coefficients play a significant role on controlling reactive mixing zones and extent of contaminant removal in coastal aquifers. Further, our results confirm that the dilution index is a better alternative to the second central spatial moment of a plume to describe the mixing of reactive solutes in coastal aquifers. © 2012 Elsevier B.V.

  10. Digital reactivity meter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akkus, B.; Anac, H.; Alsan, S.; Erk, S.

    1991-01-01

    Nowadays, various digital methods making use of microcomputers for neutron detector signals and determining the reactivity by numerical calculations are used in reactor control systems in place of classical reactivity meters. In this work, a calculation based on the ''The Time Dependent Transport Equation'' has been developed for determining the reactivity numerically. The reactivity values have been obtained utilizing a computer-based data acquisition and control system and compared with the analog reactivity meter values as well as the values calculated from the ''Inhour Equation''

  11. Method of controlling reactivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tochihara, Hiroshi.

    1982-01-01

    Purpose: To improve the reactivity controlling characteristics by artificially controlling the leakage of neutron from a reactor and providing a controller for controlling the reactivity. Method: A reactor core is divided into several water gaps to increase the leakage of neutron, its reactivity is reduced, a gas-filled control rod or a fuel assembly is inserted into the gap as required, the entire core is coupled in a system to reduce the leakage of the neutron, and the reactivity is increased. The reactor shutdown is conducted by the conventional control rod, and to maintain critical state, boron density varying system is used together. Futher, a control rod drive is used with that similar to the conventional one, thereby enabling fast reactivity variation, and the positive reactivity can be obtained by the insertion, thereby improving the reactivity controlling characteristics. (Yoshihara, H.)

  12. Reactive intermediates in the gas phase generation and monitoring

    CERN Document Server

    Setser, D W

    2013-01-01

    Reactive Intermediates in the Gas Phase: Generation and Monitoring covers methods for reactive intermediates in the gas phase. The book discusses the generation and measurement of atom and radical concentrations in flow systems; the high temperature flow tubes, generation and measurement of refractory species; and the electronically excited long-lived states of atoms and diatomic molecules in flow systems. The text also describes the production and detection of reactive species with lasers in static systems; the production of small positive ions in a mass spectrometer; and the discharge-excite

  13. Digital Augmented Reality Audio Headset

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jussi Rämö

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Augmented reality audio (ARA combines virtual sound sources with the real sonic environment of the user. An ARA system can be realized with a headset containing binaural microphones. Ideally, the ARA headset should be acoustically transparent, that is, it should not cause audible modification to the surrounding sound. A practical implementation of an ARA mixer requires a low-latency headphone reproduction system with additional equalization to compensate for the attenuation and the modified ear canal resonances caused by the headphones. This paper proposes digital IIR filters to realize the required equalization and evaluates a real-time prototype ARA system. Measurements show that the throughput latency of the digital prototype ARA system can be less than 1.4 ms, which is sufficiently small in practice. When the direct and processed sounds are combined in the ear, a comb filtering effect is brought about and appears as notches in the frequency response. The comb filter effect in speech and music signals was studied in a listening test and it was found to be inaudible when the attenuation is 20 dB. Insert ARA headphones have a sufficient attenuation at frequencies above about 1 kHz. The proposed digital ARA system enables several immersive audio applications, such as a virtual audio tourist guide and audio teleconferencing.

  14. Augmented reality for personalized nanomedicines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yugyung; Lee, Chi H

    As our understanding of onset and progress of diseases at the genetic and molecular level rapidly progresses, the potential of advanced technologies, such as 3D-printing, Socially-Assistive Robots (SARs) or augmented reality (AR), that are applied to personalized nanomedicines (PNMs) to alleviate pathological conditions, has become more prominent. Among advanced technologies, AR in particular has the greatest potential to address those challenges and facilitate the translation of PNMs into formidable clinical application of personalized therapy. As AR is about to adapt additional new methods, such as speech, voice recognition, eye tracing and motion tracking, to enable interaction with host response or biological systems in 3-D space, a combination of multiple approaches to accommodate varying environmental conditions, such as public noise and atmosphere brightness, will be explored to improve its therapeutic outcomes in clinical applications. For instance, AR glasses still being developed by Facebook or Microsoft will serve as new platform that can provide people with the health information they are interested in or various measures through which they can interact with medical services. This review has addressed the current progress and impact of AR on PNMs and its application to the biomedical field. Special emphasis is placed on the application of AR based PNMs to the treatment strategies against senior care, drug addiction and medication adherence. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  15. Display technologies for augmented reality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Byoungho; Lee, Seungjae; Jang, Changwon; Hong, Jong-Young; Li, Gang

    2018-02-01

    With the virtue of rapid progress in optics, sensors, and computer science, we are witnessing that commercial products or prototypes for augmented reality (AR) are penetrating into the consumer markets. AR is spotlighted as expected to provide much more immersive and realistic experience than ordinary displays. However, there are several barriers to be overcome for successful commercialization of AR. Here, we explore challenging and important topics for AR such as image combiners, enhancement of display performance, and focus cue reproduction. Image combiners are essential to integrate virtual images with real-world. Display performance (e.g. field of view and resolution) is important for more immersive experience and focus cue reproduction may mitigate visual fatigue caused by vergence-accommodation conflict. We also demonstrate emerging technologies to overcome these issues: index-matched anisotropic crystal lens (IMACL), retinal projection displays, and 3D display with focus cues. For image combiners, a novel optical element called IMACL provides relatively wide field of view. Retinal projection displays may enhance field of view and resolution of AR displays. Focus cues could be reconstructed via multi-layer displays and holographic displays. Experimental results of our prototypes are explained.

  16. Wireless Augmented Reality Prototype (WARP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devereaux, A. S.

    1999-01-01

    Initiated in January, 1997, under NASA's Office of Life and Microgravity Sciences and Applications, the Wireless Augmented Reality Prototype (WARP) is a means to leverage recent advances in communications, displays, imaging sensors, biosensors, voice recognition and microelectronics to develop a hands-free, tetherless system capable of real-time personal display and control of computer system resources. Using WARP, an astronaut may efficiently operate and monitor any computer-controllable activity inside or outside the vehicle or station. The WARP concept is a lightweight, unobtrusive heads-up display with a wireless wearable control unit. Connectivity to the external system is achieved through a high-rate radio link from the WARP personal unit to a base station unit installed into any system PC. The radio link has been specially engineered to operate within the high- interference, high-multipath environment of a space shuttle or space station module. Through this virtual terminal, the astronaut will be able to view and manipulate imagery, text or video, using voice commands to control the terminal operations. WARP's hands-free access to computer-based instruction texts, diagrams and checklists replaces juggling manuals and clipboards, and tetherless computer system access allows free motion throughout a cabin while monitoring and operating equipment.

  17. Augmented Reality: Daily Prayers for Preschooler Student

    OpenAIRE

    Hendra Pradibta

    2018-01-01

    Education is one of the aspects that many synthesized with technology. Yet, this is contrary to the fact that where most of the learning materials are still based on text. This research aims to develop an alternative learning media by implementing Augmented Reality Technology for Preschooler students. Augmented Reality (AR) is an application that can combine the virtual object as text, pictures and animation into the real world. Development of Augmented Reality application uses Web Aurasma Ba...

  18. Determination of student opinions in augmented reality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huseyin Bicen

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The rapid development of the new technology has changed classroom teaching methods and tools in a positive way. This study investigated the classroom learning with augmented reality and the impact of student opinions. 97 volunteer undergraduate students took part in this study. Results included data in the form of frequencies, percentages and descriptive statistics. The results show that, with gamification methods, augmented reality content affected students’ opinions in a positive way. When QR codes are used in the classroom, students feel independent from classroom materials and can access various resources. Moreover, students think that, when augmented reality in the classroom is used, education is more enjoyable.

  19. Framework for reactive mass transport

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Mads Mønster; Johannesson, Björn; Geiker, Mette Rica

    2014-01-01

    Reactive transport modeling is applicable for a range of porous materials. Here the modeling framework is focused on cement-based materials, where ion diffusion and migration are described by the Poisson-Nernst-Planck equation system. A two phase vapor/liquid flow model, with a sorption hysteresis...... description is coupled to the system. The mass transport is solved by using the finite element method where the chemical equilibrium is solved explicitly by an operator splitting method. The IPHREEQC library is used as chemical equilibrium solver. The equation system, solved by IPHREEQC, is explained...

  20. Menstrual cycle and skin reactivity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Agner, T; Damm, P; Skouby, S O

    1991-01-01

    The hypothesis was tested that a cyclic variation exists in skin reactivity to irritant stimuli. Twenty-nine healthy women with regular menstrual cycles were challenged with sodium lauryl sulfate as an irritant patch test at day 1 and at days 9 through 11 of the menstrual cycle. The skin response...... to the applied irritant stimulus was evaluated by visual scoring and also quantified by measurements of transepidermal water loss, edema formation, and blood flow in the skin. The skin response to challenge with sodium lauryl sulfate was found to be significantly stronger at day 1 than at days 9 through 11...

  1. Augmenting the Deliberative Method for Ranking Risks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Susel, Irving; Lasley, Trace; Montezemolo, Mark; Piper, Joel

    2016-01-01

    The Department of Homeland Security (DHS) characterized and prioritized the physical cross-border threats and hazards to the nation stemming from terrorism, market-driven illicit flows of people and goods (illegal immigration, narcotics, funds, counterfeits, and weaponry), and other nonmarket concerns (movement of diseases, pests, and invasive species). These threats and hazards pose a wide diversity of consequences with very different combinations of magnitudes and likelihoods, making it very challenging to prioritize them. This article presents the approach that was used at DHS to arrive at a consensus regarding the threats and hazards that stand out from the rest based on the overall risk they pose. Due to time constraints for the decision analysis, it was not feasible to apply multiattribute methodologies like multiattribute utility theory or the analytic hierarchy process. Using a holistic approach was considered, such as the deliberative method for ranking risks first published in this journal. However, an ordinal ranking alone does not indicate relative or absolute magnitude differences among the risks. Therefore, the use of the deliberative method for ranking risks is not sufficient for deciding whether there is a material difference between the top-ranked and bottom-ranked risks, let alone deciding what the stand-out risks are. To address this limitation of ordinal rankings, the deliberative method for ranking risks was augmented by adding an additional step to transform the ordinal ranking into a ratio scale ranking. This additional step enabled the selection of stand-out risks to help prioritize further analysis. © 2015 Society for Risk Analysis.

  2. Applied Augmented Reality for High Precision Maintenance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dever, Clark

    Augmented Reality had a major consumer breakthrough this year with Pokemon Go. The underlying technologies that made that app a success with gamers can be applied to improve the efficiency and efficacy of workers. This session will explore some of the use cases for augmented reality in an industrial environment. In doing so, the environmental impacts and human factors that must be considered will be explored. Additionally, the sensors, algorithms, and visualization techniques used to realize augmented reality will be discussed. The benefits of augmented reality solutions in industrial environments include automated data recording, improved quality assurance, reduction in training costs and improved mean-time-to-resolution. As technology continues to follow Moore's law, more applications will become feasible as performance-per-dollar increases across all system components.

  3. Augmented Reality Simulations on Handheld Computers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Squire, Kurt; Klopfer, Eric

    2007-01-01

    Advancements in handheld computing, particularly its portability, social interactivity, context sensitivity, connectivity, and individuality, open new opportunities for immersive learning environments. This article articulates the pedagogical potential of augmented reality simulations in environmental engineering education by immersing students in…

  4. Affordances in Mobile Augmented Reality Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tor Gjøsæter

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper explores the affordances of augmented reality content in a mobile augmented reality application. A user study was conducted by performing a multi-camera video recording of seven think aloud sessions. The think aloud sessions consisted of individual users performing tasks, exploring and experiencing a mobile augmented reality (MAR application we developed for the iOS platform named ARad. We discuss the instrumental affordances we observed when users interacted with augmented reality content, as well as more complex affordances rising from conventions from media content, AR and the traditional WIMP paradigm. We find that remediation of traditional newspaper content through the MAR medium can provide engaging, pleasing and exciting user experiences. However, the some of the content still suffers from being shoveled onto the MAR platform without adapting it properly. Finally, we discuss what content was most successfully mediated to the user and how the content impacts the user experience.

  5. Muzzle shunt augmentation of conventional railguns

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parker, J.V.

    1991-01-01

    This paper reports on augmentation which is a technique for reducing the armature current and hence the armature power dissipation in a plasma armature railgun. In spite of the advantages, no large augmented railguns have been built, primarily due to the mechanical and electrical complexity introduced by the extra conductors required. it is possible to achieve some of the benefits of augmentation in a conventional railgun by diverting a fraction φ of the input current through a shunt path at the muzzle of the railgun. In particular, the relation between force and armature current is the same as that obtained in an n-turn, series-connected augmented railgun with n = 1/(1 - φ). The price of this simplification is a reduction in electrical efficiency and some additional complexity in the external electrical system

  6. Augmenting the Web through Open Hypermedia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bouvin, N.O.

    2003-01-01

    Based on an overview of Web augmentation and detailing the three basic approaches to extend the hypermedia functionality of the Web, the author presents a general open hypermedia framework (the Arakne framework) to augment the Web. The aim is to provide users with the ability to link, annotate, a......, and otherwise structure Web pages, as they see fit. The paper further discusses the possibilities of the concept through the description of various experiments performed with an implementation of the framework, the Arakne Environment......Based on an overview of Web augmentation and detailing the three basic approaches to extend the hypermedia functionality of the Web, the author presents a general open hypermedia framework (the Arakne framework) to augment the Web. The aim is to provide users with the ability to link, annotate...

  7. Global Navigation Satellite System and Augmentation

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    aircraft-based augmentation system (ABAS). ... segment, the ground segment (or) control segment and the user segment ... control station (MCS), and ground antennas. ... repeatability, multipath rejection, size, profile, and environmental.

  8. Improved diffuser for augmenting a wind turbine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foreman, K.M.; Gilbert, B.L.

    A diffuser for augmenting a wind turbine having means for energizing the boundary layer at several locations along the diffuser walls is improved by the addition of a short collar extending radially outward from the outlet of the diffuser.

  9. Fiber Optic Augmented Reality System (FOARS)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Innovation: Fiber Optics Augmented Reality System. This system in form of a mobile app interacts real time with the actual FOSS(Fiber Optics Sensing System) data and...

  10. Multithreaded hybrid feature tracking for markerless augmented reality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Taehee; Höllerer, Tobias

    2009-01-01

    We describe a novel markerless camera tracking approach and user interaction methodology for augmented reality (AR) on unprepared tabletop environments. We propose a real-time system architecture that combines two types of feature tracking. Distinctive image features of the scene are detected and tracked frame-to-frame by computing optical flow. In order to achieve real-time performance, multiple operations are processed in a synchronized multi-threaded manner: capturing a video frame, tracking features using optical flow, detecting distinctive invariant features, and rendering an output frame. We also introduce user interaction methodology for establishing a global coordinate system and for placing virtual objects in the AR environment by tracking a user's outstretched hand and estimating a camera pose relative to it. We evaluate the speed and accuracy of our hybrid feature tracking approach, and demonstrate a proof-of-concept application for enabling AR in unprepared tabletop environments, using bare hands for interaction.

  11. Aging augments renal vasoconstrictor response to orthostatic stress in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Christine M; Monahan, Kevin D; Drew, Rachel C

    2015-12-15

    The ability of the human body to maintain arterial blood pressure (BP) during orthostatic stress is determined by several reflex neural mechanisms. Renal vasoconstriction progressively increases during graded elevations in lower body negative pressure (LBNP). This sympathetically mediated response redistributes blood flow to the systemic circulation to maintain BP. However, how healthy aging affects the renal vasoconstrictor response to LBNP is unknown. Therefore, 10 young (25 ± 1 yr; means ± SE) and 10 older (66 ± 2 yr) subjects underwent graded LBNP (-15 and -30 mmHg) while beat-to-beat renal blood flow velocity (RBFV; Doppler ultrasound), arterial BP (Finometer), and heart rate (HR; electrocardiogram) were recorded. Renal vascular resistance (RVR), an index of renal vasoconstriction, was calculated as mean BP/RBFV. All baseline cardiovascular variables were similar between groups, except diastolic BP was higher in older subjects (P aging augments the renal vasoconstrictor response to orthostatic stress in humans. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  12. Thrust augmentation for a small turbojet engine

    OpenAIRE

    Hackaday, Gary L.

    1999-01-01

    Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited A Sophia J450 (nine pounds of thrust) gas turbine engine was used first to examine the thrust augmentation generated using an ejector shroud. Experimental results obtained with and without the ejector were compared with performance predicted using an engine code and a one-dimensional ejector analysis. The engine code was revised to incorporate a radial turbine and the correct compressor map. Thrust augmentation of 3-10% was measured an...

  13. Dermal fillers for facial soft tissue augmentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dastoor, Sarosh F; Misch, Carl E; Wang, Hom-Lay

    2007-01-01

    Nowadays, patients are demanding not only enhancement to their dental (micro) esthetics, but also their overall facial (macro) esthetics. Soft tissue augmentation via dermal filling agents may be used to correct facial defects such as wrinkles caused by age, gravity, and trauma; thin lips; asymmetrical facial appearances; buccal fold depressions; and others. This article will review the pathogenesis of facial wrinkles, history, techniques, materials, complications, and clinical controversies regarding dermal fillers for soft tissue augmentation.

  14. Breaking the Barriers to True Augmented Reality

    OpenAIRE

    Sandor, Christian; Fuchs, Martin; Cassinelli, Alvaro; Li, Hao; Newcombe, Richard; Yamamoto, Goshiro; Feiner, Steven

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, Augmented Reality (AR) and Virtual Reality (VR) have gained considerable commercial traction, with Facebook acquiring Oculus VR for \\$2 billion, Magic Leap attracting more than \\$500 million of funding, and Microsoft announcing their HoloLens head-worn computer. Where is humanity headed: a brave new dystopia-or a paradise come true? In this article, we present discussions, which started at the symposium "Making Augmented Reality Real", held at Nara Institute of Science and Te...

  15. Integrating Hypermedia Techniques with Augmented Reality Environments

    OpenAIRE

    Sinclair, Patrick

    2004-01-01

    Augmented Reality systems, which overlay virtual information over the real world, can benefit greatly from the techniques established by the Open Hypermedia research field. Storing information and links separately from a document can be advantageous for augmented reality applications and can enable the adaption of content to suit users’ preferences. This thesis explores how Open Hypermedia systems might be used as the information systems behind AR environments. This provides benefits to augme...

  16. Reactive Programming in Java

    CERN Document Server

    CERN. Geneva

    2017-01-01

    Reactive Programming in gaining a lot of excitement. Many libraries, tools, and frameworks are beginning to make use of reactive libraries. Besides, applications dealing with big data or high frequency data can benefit from this programming paradigm. Come to this presentation to learn about what reactive programming is, what kind of problems it solves, how it solves them. We will take an example oriented approach to learning the programming model and the abstraction.

  17. Augmented reality implementation methods in mainstream applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Procházka

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Augmented reality has became an useful tool in many areas from space exploration to military applications. Although used theoretical principles are well known for almost a decade, the augmented reality is almost exclusively used in high budget solutions with a special hardware. However, in last few years we could see rising popularity of many projects focused on deployment of the augmented reality on dif­ferent mobile devices. Our article is aimed on developers who consider development of an augmented reality application for the mainstream market. Such developers will be forced to keep the application price, therefore also the development price, at reasonable level. Usage of existing image processing software library could bring a significant cut-down of the development costs. In the theoretical part of the article is presented an overview of the augmented reality application structure. Further, an approach for selection appropriate library as well as the review of the existing software libraries focused in this area is described. The last part of the article out­lines our implementation of key parts of the augmented reality application using the OpenCV library.

  18. Empirical evaluation of augmented prototyping effectiveness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomáš Koubek

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Augmented reality is a scientific field well known for more than twenty years. Although there is a huge number of projects that present promising results, the real usage of augmented reality applications for fulfilling common tasks is almost negligible. We believe that one of the principal reasons is insufficient usability of these applications. The situation is analogous to the desktop, mobile or cloud application development or even to the web pages design. The first phase of a technology adoption is the exploration of its potential. As soon as the technical problems are overcome and the technology is widely accepted, the usability is a principal issue. The usability is utmost important also from the business point of view. The cost of augmented reality implementation into the production process is substantial, therefore, the usability that is directly responsible for the implemented solution effectiveness must be appropriately tested. Consequently, the benefit of the implemented solution can be measured.This article briefly outlines common techniques used for usability evaluation. Discussed techniques were designed especially for evaluation of desktop applications, mobile solutions and web pages. In spite of this drawback, their application on augmented reality products is usually possible. Further, a review of existing augmented reality project evaluations is presented.Based on this review, a usability evaluation method for our augmented prototyping application is proposed. This method must overcome the fact that the design is a creative process. Therefore, it is not possible to take into account common criteria such as time consumption.

  19. The HART I augmented electric gun facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fikse, D.A.; Ciesar, J.A.; Wehrli, H.A.; Rimersma, H.; Docherty, E.F.; Pipich, C.W.

    1991-01-01

    This paper reports on an augmented electric gun system that has been commissioned. This system, called HART I (Hypervelocity Augmented Railgun Test), is built around a double augmented rail arrangement with a 1.27-cm square bore. It is powered by the SUVAC II 5.6-MJ distributed capacitor power supply. This arrangement allows operation in a simple, series augmented, or transaugmented gun system configuration. The objective of this facility is to perform materials research augmentation studies, and armature development in the 10-km/s regime. Armature masses of 2 to 4 g will be accelerated in a 4-m long barrel. Baseline bore materials will begin with conventional G9/GlidCop systems and then move into pyrolytic boron nitride/refractory materials. Hybrids, plasma, and ablation stabilized armature systems are planned. The gun system is instrumented with plasma and rail B probes for inbore velocity measurements. In addition, breech and muzzle voltages, currents, and external velocities are measured. The HART I system is currently performing hypervelocity experiments to verify the augmentation models

  20. BN600 reactivity definition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zheltyshev, V.; Ivanov, A.

    2000-01-01

    Since 1980, the fast BN600 reactor with sodium coolant has been operated at Beloyarsk Nuclear Power Plant. The periodic monitoring of the reactivity modifications should be implemented in compliance with the standards and regulations applied in nuclear power engineering. The reactivity measurements are carried out in order to confirm the basic neutronic features of a BN600 reactor. The reactivity measurements are aimed to justify that nuclear safety is provided in course of the in-reactor installation of the experimental core components. Two reactivity meters are to be used on BN600 operation: 1. Digital on-line reactivity calculated under stationary reactor operation on power (approximation of the point-wise kinetics is applied). 2. Second reactivity meter used to define the reactor control rod operating components efficiency under reactor startup and take account of the changing efficiency of the sensor, however, this is more time-consumptive than the on-line reactivity meter. The application of two reactivity meters allows for the monitoring of the reactor reactivity under every operating mode. (authors)

  1. Evaluation of bituminized waste reactivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Camaro, S.; Moulinier, D.

    2000-01-01

    The bituminization process has been used for conditioning low and medium level (LML) radioactive waste, particularly to immobilize coprecipitation slurries and evaporation concentrates generated by effluent treatment. The process consists in mixing bitumen matrix with inactive soluble and slightly soluble salts added to insolubilize the radionuclides or resulting from the neutralization of acid effluents. This operation is performed at a sufficient temperature - depending on waste composition and bitumen grade to ensure the flow of the resulting mixture into metal containers. Exothermicity due to salts/salts or salts/bitumen reactions depending on the type of waste can be induced during or after the mixing step. This could produce an additional heat emission that the drum must be able to release to avoid a potentially incidental pattern with ignition risk, explaining why the CEA has been involved in evaluating the thermal reactivity of bituminized waste and its repercussions on the bituminization process. Given the difficulty of discriminating each exothermal reaction, the characterization of a global reactivity appears as a further precautionary measure, in addition to the definition of a working safety margin. The CEA has accordingly developed studies on this aspect. The article discusses the experimental methodology developed for the determination of the global reactivity. (authors)

  2. Pay-as-bid based reactive power market

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amjady, N.; Rabiee, A.; Shayanfar, H.A.

    2010-01-01

    In energy market clearing, the offers are stacked in increasing order and the offer that intersects demand curve, determines the market clearing price (MCP). In reactive power market, the location of reactive power compensator is so important. A low cost reactive producer may not essentially be favorable if it is far from the consumer. Likewise, a high cost local reactive compensator at a heavily loaded demand center of network could be inevitably an alternative required to produce reactive power to maintain the integrity of power system. Given the background, this paper presents a day-ahead reactive power market based on pay-as-bid (PAB) mechanism. Generators expected payment function (EPF) is used to construct a bidding framework. Then, total payment function (TPF) of generators is used as the objective function of optimal power flow (OPF) problem to clear the PAB based market. The CIGRE-32 bus test system is used to examine the effectiveness of the proposed reactive power market.

  3. Pay-as-bid based reactive power market

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amjady, N. [Department of Electrical Engineering, Semnan University, Semnan (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Rabiee, A., E-mail: Rabiee@iust.ac.i [Center of Excellence for Power System Automation and Operation, Department of Electrical Engineering, Iran University of Science and Technology, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Shayanfar, H.A. [Center of Excellence for Power System Automation and Operation, Department of Electrical Engineering, Iran University of Science and Technology, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2010-02-15

    In energy market clearing, the offers are stacked in increasing order and the offer that intersects demand curve, determines the market clearing price (MCP). In reactive power market, the location of reactive power compensator is so important. A low cost reactive producer may not essentially be favorable if it is far from the consumer. Likewise, a high cost local reactive compensator at a heavily loaded demand center of network could be inevitably an alternative required to produce reactive power to maintain the integrity of power system. Given the background, this paper presents a day-ahead reactive power market based on pay-as-bid (PAB) mechanism. Generators expected payment function (EPF) is used to construct a bidding framework. Then, total payment function (TPF) of generators is used as the objective function of optimal power flow (OPF) problem to clear the PAB based market. The CIGRE-32 bus test system is used to examine the effectiveness of the proposed reactive power market.

  4. Heating Augmentation Due to Compression Pad Cavities on the Project Orion CEV Heat Shield

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollis, Brian R.

    2009-01-01

    An experimental study has been conducted to assess the effects of compression pad cavities on the aeroheating environment of the Project Orion CEV heat-shield. Testing was conducted in Mach 6 and Mach 10 perfect-gas wind tunnels to obtain heating measurements in and around the compression pads cavities using global phosphor thermography. Data were obtained over a wide range of Reynolds numbers that produced laminar, transitional, and turbulent flow within and downstream of the cavities. The effects of cavity dimensions on boundary-layer transition and heating augmentation levels were studied. Correlations were developed for transition onset and for the average cavity-heating augmentation.

  5. Augmenting digital displays with computation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jing

    As we inevitably step deeper and deeper into a world connected via the Internet, more and more information will be exchanged digitally. Displays are the interface between digital information and each individual. Naturally, one fundamental goal of displays is to reproduce information as realistically as possible since humans still care a lot about what happens in the real world. Human eyes are the receiving end of such information exchange; therefore it is impossible to study displays without studying the human visual system. In fact, the design of displays is rather closely coupled with what human eyes are capable of perceiving. For example, we are less interested in building displays that emit light in the invisible spectrum. This dissertation explores how we can augment displays with computation, which takes both display hardware and the human visual system into consideration. Four novel projects on display technologies are included in this dissertation: First, we propose a software-based approach to driving multiview autostereoscopic displays. Our display algorithm can dynamically assign views to hardware display zones based on multiple observers' current head positions, substantially reducing crosstalk and stereo inversion. Second, we present a dense projector array that creates a seamless 3D viewing experience for multiple viewers. We smoothly interpolate the set of viewer heights and distances on a per-vertex basis across the arrays field of view, reducing image distortion, crosstalk, and artifacts from tracking errors. Third, we propose a method for high dynamic range display calibration that takes into account the variation of the chrominance error over luminance. We propose a data structure for enabling efficient representation and querying of the calibration function, which also allows user-guided balancing between memory consumption and the amount of computation. Fourth, we present user studies that demonstrate that the ˜ 60 Hz critical flicker fusion

  6. A theoretical framework for modeling dilution enhancement of non-reactive solutes in heterogeneous porous media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Barros, F P J; Fiori, A; Boso, F; Bellin, A

    2015-01-01

    Spatial heterogeneity of the hydraulic properties of geological porous formations leads to erratically shaped solute clouds, thus increasing the edge area of the solute body and augmenting the dilution rate. In this study, we provide a theoretical framework to quantify dilution of a non-reactive solute within a steady state flow as affected by the spatial variability of the hydraulic conductivity. Embracing the Lagrangian concentration framework, we obtain explicit semi-analytical expressions for the dilution index as a function of the structural parameters of the random hydraulic conductivity field, under the assumptions of uniform-in-the-average flow, small injection source and weak-to-mild heterogeneity. Results show how the dilution enhancement of the solute cloud is strongly dependent on both the statistical anisotropy ratio and the heterogeneity level of the porous medium. The explicit semi-analytical solution also captures the temporal evolution of the dilution rate; for the early- and late-time limits, the proposed solution recovers previous results from the literature, while at intermediate times it reflects the increasing interplay between large-scale advection and local-scale dispersion. The performance of the theoretical framework is verified with high resolution numerical results and successfully tested against the Cape Cod field data. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Electrospinning of reactive mesogens

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yao, J.; Picot, O.T.; Hughes-Brittain, N.F.; Bastiaansen, C.W.M.; Peijs, T.

    2016-01-01

    The reinforcement potential of reactive liquid crystals or reactive mesogens (RMs) in electrospun fibers was investigated through the blending of two types of RMs (RM257 and RM82) with two types of thermoplastics; polyamide 6 (PA6) and poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA). Polymer/RM blends were

  8. Augmented Fotonovelas: A Visual Methodology for Community Engaged Research

    OpenAIRE

    Hidalgo, LeighAnna Grace

    2014-01-01

    Augmented Fotonovelas draw upon the aesthetic of traditional fotonovelas, but incorporate new technologies--such as video interviews, interactive mapping, smart phone technology, and Augmented Reality (AR). Augmented Fotonovelas also make the most of the classic form, utilizing photographs, text, and bubble captions. Through this methodology, new and old come together to produce Augmented Scholarship. I define Augmented Scholarship as knowledge production bridging the gap between communities ...

  9. ARSC: Augmented Reality Student Card--An Augmented Reality Solution for the Education Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Sayed, Neven A. M.; Zayed, Hala H.; Sharawy, Mohamed I.

    2011-01-01

    Augmented Reality (AR) is the technology of adding virtual objects to real scenes through enabling the addition of missing information in real life. As the lack of resources is a problem that can be solved through AR, this paper presents and explains the usage of AR technology we introduce Augmented Reality Student Card (ARSC) as an application of…

  10. Augmented “Ouch!”. : How to create intersubjective augmented objects into which we can bump

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liberati, Nicola

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this work is to provide the elements to design an intersubjective augmented reality in order to make the augmented objects part of our everyday world. This work will analyse intersubjectivity from a phenomenological point of view using the works by Husserl and Schutz. Thanks to these two

  11. Augmented reality and ubiquitous computing : The hidden potentialities of augmented reality

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liberati, Nicola

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this paper was to highlight the augmented reality’s potentialities, depicting its main characteristics and focusing attention on what its goal should be in order to have a new technology completely different from those that already exist. From a technological point of view, augmented

  12. Development of Augmented Spark Impinging Igniter System for Methane Engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, William M.; Osborne, Robin J.; Greene, Sandra E.

    2017-01-01

    The Lunar Cargo Transportation and Landing by Soft Touchdown (Lunar CATALYST) program is establishing multiple no-funds-exchanged Space Act Agreement (SAA) partnerships with U.S. private sector entities. The purpose of this program is to encourage the development of robotic lunar landers that can be integrated with U.S. commercial launch capabilities to deliver payloads to the lunar surface. NASA can share technology and expertise under the SAA for the benefit of the CATALYST partners. MSFC seeking to vacuum test Augmented Spark Impinging (ASI) igniter with methane and new exciter units to support CATALYST partners and NASA programs. ASI has previously been used/tested successfully at sea-level, with both O2/CH4 and O2/H2 propellants. Conventional ignition exciter systems historically experienced corona discharge issues in vacuum. Often utilized purging or atmospheric sealing on high voltage lead to remedy. Compact systems developed since PCAD could eliminate the high-voltage lead and directly couple the exciter to the spark igniter. MSFC developed Augmented Spark Impinging (ASI) igniter. Successfully used in several sea-level test programs. Plasma-assisted design. Portion of ox flow is used to generate hot plasma. Impinging flows downstream of plasma. Additional fuel flow down torch tube sleeve for cooling near stoichiometric torch flame. Testing done at NASA GRC Altitude Combustion Stand (ACS) facility 2000-lbf class facility with altitude simulation up to around 100,000 ft. (0.2 psia [10 Torr]) via nitrogen driven ejectors. Propellant conditioning systems can provide temperature control of LOX/CH4 up to test article.

  13. Potential costs of breast augmentation mammaplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitt, William P; Eichhorn, Mitchell G; Ford, Ronald D

    2016-01-01

    Augmentation mammaplasty is one of the most common surgical procedures performed by plastic surgeons. The aim of this study was to estimate the cost of the initial procedure and its subsequent complications, as well as project the cost of Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-recommended surveillance imaging. The potential costs to the individual patient and society were calculated. Local plastic surgeons provided billing data for the initial primary silicone augmentation and reoperative procedures. Complication rates used for the cost analysis were obtained from the Allergen Core study on silicone implants. Imaging surveillance costs were considered in the estimations. The average baseline initial cost of silicone augmentation mammaplasty was calculated at $6335. The average total cost of primary breast augmentation over the first decade for an individual patient, including complications requiring reoperation and other ancillary costs, was calculated at $8226. Each decade thereafter cost an additional $1891. Costs may exceed $15,000 over an averaged lifetime, and the recommended implant surveillance could cost an additional $33,750. The potential cost of a breast augmentation, which includes the costs of complications and imaging, is significantly higher than the initial cost of the procedure. Level III, economic and decision analysis study. Copyright © 2015 British Association of Plastic, Reconstructive and Aesthetic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Augmented Reality: Daily Prayers for Preschooler Student

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hendra Pradibta

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Education is one of the aspects that many synthesized with technology. Yet, this is contrary to the fact that where most of the learning materials are still based on text. This research aims to develop an alternative learning media by implementing Augmented Reality Technology for Preschooler students. Augmented Reality (AR is an application that can combine the virtual object as text, pictures and animation into the real world. Development of Augmented Reality application uses Web Aurasma Based Studio, with learning materials of daily prayer for preschool student. The development of the characters and the animations were using Adobe Illustrator and Adobe After Effects. The results of the study showed that technology Augmented Reality can be used as an alternative learning media especially in the learning process in Preschool Al Furqon. This is because the content Augmented Reality in the form of animation can gives more understanding and attention for preschool student to follow the learning process

  15. The effects of weekly augmentation therapy in patients with PiZZ α1-antitrypsin deficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schmid ST

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available ST Schmid,1 J Koepke,1 M Dresel,1 A Hattesohl,1 E Frenzel,2 J Perez,3 DA Lomas,4 E Miranda,5 T Greulich,1 S Noeske,1 M Wencker,6 H Teschler,6 C Vogelmeier,1 S Janciauskiene,2,* AR Koczulla1,*1Department of Internal Medicine, Division for Pulmonary Diseases, University Hospital Marburg, Marburg, Germany; 2Department of Respiratory Medicine, Hannover Medical School, Hannover, Germany; 3Department of Cellular Biology, University of Malaga, Malaga, Spain; 4Department of Medicine, Cambridge Institute for Medical Research, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, United Kingdom; 5Department of Biology and Biotechnology, Istituto Pasteur – Fondazione Cenci Bolognetti, Sapienza University of Rome, Rome, Italy; 6Department of Pneumology, West German Lung Clinic, Essen University Hospital, Essen, Germany*These authors contributed equally to this workBackground: The major concept behind augmentation therapy with human α1-antitrypsin (AAT is to raise the levels of AAT in patients with protease inhibitor phenotype ZZ (Glu342Lys-inherited AAT deficiency and to protect lung tissues from proteolysis and progression of emphysema.Objective: To evaluate the short-term effects of augmentation therapy (Prolastin® on plasma levels of AAT, C-reactive protein, and chemokines/cytokines.Materials and methods: Serum and exhaled breath condensate were collected from individuals with protease inhibitor phenotype ZZ AAT deficiency-related emphysema (n = 12 on the first, third, and seventh day after the infusion of intravenous Prolastin. Concentrations of total and polymeric AAT, interleukin-8 (IL-8, monocyte chemotactic protein-1, IL-6, tumor necrosis factor-α, vascular endothelial growth factor, and C-reactive protein were determined. Blood neutrophils and primary epithelial cells were also exposed to Prolastin (1 mg/mL.Results: There were significant fluctuations in serum (but not in exhaled breath condensate levels of AAT polymers, IL-8, monocyte chemotactic protein-1, IL

  16. Flow Injection Analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Elo Harald

    1998-01-01

    Learning objectives:* To provide an introduction to automated assays* To describe the basic principles of FIA * To demonstrate the capabilities of FIA in relation to batch assays and conventional continuous flow systems* To show that FIA allows one to augment existing analytical techniques* To sh...... how FIA offers novel analytical procedures which are not feasible by conventional means* To hightlight the potentials of FIA in selected practical assays...

  17. Augmentation of peristaltic microflows through electro-osmotic mechanisms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chakraborty, Suman

    2006-01-01

    The present work aims to theoretically establish that the employment of an axial electric field can substantially augment the rate of microfluidic transport occurring in peristaltic microtubes. For theoretical analysis, shape evolution of the tube is taken to be arbitrary, except for the fact that the characteristic wavelength is assumed to be significantly greater than the average radius of cross section. First, expressions for the velocity profile within the tube are derived and are subsequently utilized to obtain variations in the net flow rate across the same, as a function of the pertinent system parameters. Subsequently, the modes of interaction between the electro-osmotic and peristaltic mechanisms are established through the variations in the time-averaged flow rates for zero pressure rise and the pressure rise for zero time-averaged flow rates, as expressed in terms of the occlusion number, characteristic electro-osmotic velocity and the peristaltic wave speed. From the simulation predictions, it is suggested that a judicious combination of peristalsis and an axial electrokinetic body force can drastically enhance the time-averaged flow rate, provided that the occlusion number is relatively small

  18. Comparison of the hydrogeology and water quality of a ground-water augmented lake with two non-augmented lakes in northwest Hillsborough County, Florida

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metz, Patricia A.; Sacks, Laura A.

    2002-01-01

    The hydrologic effects associated with augmenting a lake with ground water from the Upper Floridan aquifer were examined in northwest Hillsborough County, Florida, from June 1996 through May 1999. The hydrogeology, ground-water flow patterns, water budgets, and water-quality characteristics were compared between a lake that has been augmented for more than 30 years (Round Lake) and two nearby nonaugmented lakes (Dosson Lake and Halfmoon Lake). Compared to the other study lakes, Round Lake is in a more leakage-dominated hydrogeologic setting. The intermediate confining unit is thin or highly breached, which increases the potential for vertical ground-water flow. Round Lake has the least amount of soft, organic lake-bottom sediments and the lake bottom has been dredged deeper and more extensively than the other study lakes, which could allow more leakage from the lake bottom. The area around Round Lake has experienced more sinkhole activity than the other study lakes. During this study, three sinkholes developed around the perimeter of the lake, which may have further disrupted the intermediate confining unit.Ground-water flow patterns around Round Lake were considerably different than the nonaugmented lakes. For most of the study, groundwater augmentation artificially raised the level of Round Lake to about 2 to 3 feet higher than the adjacent water table. As a result, lake water recharged the surficial aquifer around the entire lake perimeter, except during very wet periods when ground-water inflow occurred around part of the lake perimeter. The non-augmented lakes typically had areas of ground-water inflow and areas of lake leakage around their perimeter, and during wet periods, ground-water inflow occurred around the entire lake perimeter. Therefore, the area potentially contributing ground water to the non-augmented lakes is much larger than for augmented Round Lake. Vertical head loss within the surficial aquifer was greater at Round Lake than the other study

  19. Orthobiologics in the augmentation of osteoporotic fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, J Tracy; Nicolaou, Daemeon A

    2015-02-01

    Many orthobiologic adjuvants are available and widely utilized for general skeletal restoration. Their use for the specific task of osteoporotic fracture augmentation is less well recognized. Common conductive materials are reviewed for their value in this patient population including the large group of allograft adjuvants categorically known as the demineralized bone matrices (DBMs). Another large group of alloplastic materials is also examined-the calcium phosphate and sulfate ceramics. Both of these materials, when used for the proper indications, demonstrate efficacy for these patients. The inductive properties of bone morphogenic proteins (BMPs) and platelet concentrates show no clear advantages for this group of patients. Systemic agents including bisphosphonates, receptor activator of nuclear factor κβ ligand (RANKL) inhibitors, and parathyroid hormone augmentation all demonstrate positive effects with this fracture cohort. Newer modalities, such as trace ion bioceramic augmentation, are also reviewed for their positive effects on osteoporotic fracture healing.

  20. Cognitive Cost of Using Augmented Reality Displays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumeister, James; Ssin, Seung Youb; ElSayed, Neven A M; Dorrian, Jillian; Webb, David P; Walsh, James A; Simon, Timothy M; Irlitti, Andrew; Smith, Ross T; Kohler, Mark; Thomas, Bruce H

    2017-11-01

    This paper presents the results of two cognitive load studies comparing three augmented reality display technologies: spatial augmented reality, the optical see-through Microsoft HoloLens, and the video see-through Samsung Gear VR. In particular, the two experiments focused on isolating the cognitive load cost of receiving instructions for a button-pressing procedural task. The studies employed a self-assessment cognitive load methodology, as well as an additional dual-task cognitive load methodology. The results showed that spatial augmented reality led to increased performance and reduced cognitive load. Additionally, it was discovered that a limited field of view can introduce increased cognitive load requirements. The findings suggest that some of the inherent restrictions of head-mounted displays materialize as increased user cognitive load.

  1. Augmented reality-assisted skull base surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabrilo, I; Sarrafzadeh, A; Bijlenga, P; Landis, B N; Schaller, K

    2014-12-01

    Neuronavigation is widely considered as a valuable tool during skull base surgery. Advances in neuronavigation technology, with the integration of augmented reality, present advantages over traditional point-based neuronavigation. However, this development has not yet made its way into routine surgical practice, possibly due to a lack of acquaintance with these systems. In this report, we illustrate the usefulness and easy application of augmented reality-based neuronavigation through a case example of a patient with a clivus chordoma. We also demonstrate how augmented reality can help throughout all phases of a skull base procedure, from the verification of neuronavigation accuracy to intraoperative image-guidance. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  2. Novel Augmentation Strategies in Major Depression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martiny, Klaus

    2017-01-01

    open psychiatric wards. Only a few patients were re-cruited through advertisements (in the PEMF and Chronos studies). Inclusion criteria Inclusion criteria were major depression according to the DSM-IV, including a depressive episode as part of a bipolar disorder. For the PEMF study, treatment...... The results from the Pindolol study showed that pindolol did not augment the effect of venlafaxine for the whole sample. However, for those patients classified as slow metabolizers, based on their O-desmethylvenlafaxine/venlafaxine ratio (ODV/V), pindolol did augment the antidepressant effect. For patients...... classified as fast metabolizers, pindolol worsened the outcome. This interaction between ODV/V ratio and treatment group was statistically significant (p = 0.01). Results from the PEMF study The results from the PEMF Study showed that treatment with active versus sham PEMF augmented the effect of the ongoing...

  3. Pemanfaatan Augmented Reality Pada Permainan Othello

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rendy Layman Aguston

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Perkembangan teknologi telah mengubah cara pengerjaan suatu pekerjaan dari cara konvensional menjadi cara yang lebih praktis. Dengan hadirnya teknologi Augmented Reality, cara bermain yang menggunakan pion dan membalikkan pion musuh secara manual menjadi lebih mudah dalam memainkan permainan selain juga dapat berinteraksi langsung. Pembuatan permainan Othello menggunakan program Unity dengan framework Vuforia untuk mewujudkan Augmented Reality pada permainan Othello. Untuk menerapkan Augmented Reality dengan baik, dibutuhkan papan permainan sebagai image target yang sesuai dengan kriteria, jenis kamera yang digunakan, jarak kamera terhadap papan permainan, intensitas cahaya yang ditangkap kamera, serta tingkat sensitivitas tombol virtual. Pada permainan Othello ini tersedia fitur komputer yang menggunakan algoritma Alpha Beta Pruning dengan 3 level kedalaman yang menggunakan perhitungan fungsi evaluasi berupa mobility, potential mobility dan penguasaan corner yang menghasilkan kemenangan mencapai 73,33% dari 15 kali uji coba terhadap aplikasi Othello serupa dan 78,34% dari 37 kali uji coba terhadap user.

  4. Fail-safe reactivity compensation method for a nuclear reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nygaard, Erik T.; Angelo, Peter L.; Aase, Scott B.

    2018-01-23

    The present invention relates generally to the field of compensation methods for nuclear reactors and, in particular to a method for fail-safe reactivity compensation in solution-type nuclear reactors. In one embodiment, the fail-safe reactivity compensation method of the present invention augments other control methods for a nuclear reactor. In still another embodiment, the fail-safe reactivity compensation method of the present invention permits one to control a nuclear reaction in a nuclear reactor through a method that does not rely on moving components into or out of a reactor core, nor does the method of the present invention rely on the constant repositioning of control rods within a nuclear reactor in order to maintain a critical state.

  5. Heating Augmentation for Short Hypersonic Protuberances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazaheri, Ali R.; Wood, William A.

    2008-01-01

    Computational aeroheating analyses of the Space Shuttle Orbiter plug repair models are validated against data collected in the Calspan University of Buffalo Research Center (CUBRC) 48 inch shock tunnel. The comparison shows that the average difference between computed heat transfer results and the data is about 9.5%. Using CFD and Wind Tunnel (WT) data, an empirical correlation for estimating heating augmentation on short hypersonic protuberances (k/delta less than 0.3) is proposed. This proposed correlation is compared with several computed flight simulation cases and good agreement is achieved. Accordingly, this correlation is proposed for further investigation on other short hypersonic protuberances for estimating heating augmentation.

  6. Medical imaging and augmented reality. Proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dohi, Takeyoshi; Sakuma, Ichiro; Liao, Hongen

    2008-01-01

    This book constitutes the refereed proceedings of the 4th International Workshop on Medical Imaging and Augmented Reality, MIAR 2008, held in Tokyo, Japan, in August 2008. The 44 revised full papers presented together with 3 invited papers were carefully reviewed and selected from 90 submissions. The papers are organized in topical sections on surgical planning and simulation, medical image computing, image analysis, shape modeling and morphometry, image-guided robotics, image-guided intervention, interventional imaging, image registration, augmented reality, and image segmentation. (orig.)

  7. Augmented Reality for Maintenance and Repair (ARMAR)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-08-01

    implementations by leveraging more robust vision algorithms or by using fiducials. 57 Fi gu re 2 3. A ug m en te d co nt ro ls st at e di ag ra m 58...34 Proceedings of the IEEE Conference on Virtual Reality (VR 󈧇), Washington, DC, 2003, p. 199. [18] W. Friedrich , "ARVIKA-Augmented Reality for...and ACM International Symposium on Mixed and Augmented Reality (ISMAR 󈧊), Santa Barbara , CA, 2006, pp. 105-108. [33] S. G. Rao, S. J. Schmugge

  8. The augmentation algorithm and molecular phylogenetic trees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmquist, R.

    1978-01-01

    Moore's (1977) augmentation procedure is discussed, and it is concluded that the procedure is valid for obtaining estimates of the total number of fixed nucleotide substitutions both theoretically and in practice, for both simulated and real data, and in agreement, for experimentally dense data sets, with stochastic estimates of the divergence, provided the restrictions on codon mutability resulting from natural selection are explicitly allowed for. Tateno and Nei's (1978) critique that the augmentation procedure has a systematic bias toward overestimation of the total number of nucleotide replacements is disputed, and a data analysis suggests that ancestral sequences inferred by the method of parsimony contain a large number of incorrectly assigned nucleotides.

  9. Introducing Augmented Reality in Cultural Heritage Studies

    OpenAIRE

    Villarejo, Luis; González-Reverté, Francesc; Miralbell, Oriol; Gomis, Joan Miquel

    2014-01-01

    Augmented Reality is a technology that allows overlaid digital content into our view of the real world through the camera of a Smartphone or a tablet. Video, audio, 2D and 3D images, web and text are just some examples of the type of content that can be overlaid on our perception of the real world. This content can be associated with real world elements by means of geolocation or image recognition. Such technology has great engagement potential and is used in many fields to augment the users’...

  10. Towards Wearable Gaze Supported Augmented Cognition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Toshiaki Kurauchi, Andrew; Hitoshi Morimoto, Carlos; Mardanbeigi, Diako

    Augmented cognition applications must deal with the problem of how to exhibit information in an orderly, understandable, and timely fashion. Though context have been suggested to control the kind, amount, and timing of the information delivered, we argue that gaze can be a fundamental tool...... by the wearable computing community to develop a gaze supported augmented cognition application with three interaction modes. The application provides information of the person being looked at. The continuous mode updates information every time the user looks at a different face. The key activated discrete mode...

  11. Medical imaging and augmented reality. Proceedings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dohi, Takeyoshi [Tokyo Univ. (Japan). Dept. of Mechano-Informatics; Sakuma, Ichiro [Tokyo Univ. (Japan). Dept. of Precision Engineering; Liao, Hongen (eds.) [Tokyo Univ. (Japan). Dept. of Bioengineering

    2008-07-01

    This book constitutes the refereed proceedings of the 4th International Workshop on Medical Imaging and Augmented Reality, MIAR 2008, held in Tokyo, Japan, in August 2008. The 44 revised full papers presented together with 3 invited papers were carefully reviewed and selected from 90 submissions. The papers are organized in topical sections on surgical planning and simulation, medical image computing, image analysis, shape modeling and morphometry, image-guided robotics, image-guided intervention, interventional imaging, image registration, augmented reality, and image segmentation. (orig.)

  12. Digital reactivity meter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang Zongbing

    1996-02-01

    The importance and the usual methods of reactivity measurement in a nuclear reactor are presented. Emphasis is put upon the calculation principle, software and hardware components, main specifications, application, as well as the features of the digital reactivity meter. The test results of operation in various reactors shown that the meter possess the following features: high accuracy, short response time, low output noise, high resolution, wide measuring range, simple and flexible to operate, high stability and reliability. In addition, the reactivity meter can save the measuring data automatically and have a perfect capability of self-verifying. It not only meet the requirement of the reactivity measurement in nuclear power plant, but also can be applied to various types of reactors. (1 tab.)

  13. Stress Reactivity in Insomnia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gehrman, Philip R; Hall, Martica; Barilla, Holly; Buysse, Daniel; Perlis, Michael; Gooneratne, Nalaka; Ross, Richard J

    2016-01-01

    This study examined whether individuals with primary insomnia (PI) are more reactive to stress than good sleepers (GS). PI and GS (n = 20 per group), matched on gender and age, completed three nights of polysomnography. On the stress night, participants received a mild electric shock and were told they could receive additional shocks during the night. Saliva samples were obtained for analysis of cortisol and alpha amylase along with self-report and visual analog scales (VAS). There was very little evidence of increased stress on the stress night, compared to the baseline night. There was also no evidence of greater stress reactivity in the PI group for any sleep or for salivary measures. In the GS group, stress reactivity measured by VAS scales was positively associated with an increase in sleep latency in the experimental night on exploratory analyses. Individuals with PI did not show greater stress reactivity compared to GS.

  14. Structure, Reactivity and Dynamics

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Understanding structure, reactivity and dynamics is the core issue in chemical ... functional theory (DFT) calculations, molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, light- ... between water and protein oxygen atoms, the superionic conductors which ...

  15. Taskable Reactive Agent Communities

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Myers, Karen

    2002-01-01

    The focus of Taskable Reactive Agent Communities (TRAC) project was to develop mixed-initiative technology to enable humans to supervise and manage teams of agents as they perform tasks in dynamic environments...

  16. Reactive sputter deposition

    CERN Document Server

    Mahieu, Stijn

    2008-01-01

    In this valuable work, all aspects of the reactive magnetron sputtering process, from the discharge up to the resulting thin film growth, are described in detail, allowing the reader to understand the complete process. Hence, this book gives necessary information for those who want to start with reactive magnetron sputtering, understand and investigate the technique, control their sputtering process and tune their existing process, obtaining the desired thin films.

  17. Changes in Peak Airflow Measurement During Maximal Cough After Vocal Fold Augmentation in Patients With Glottic Insufficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dion, Gregory R; Achlatis, Efstratios; Teng, Stephanie; Fang, Yixin; Persky, Michael; Branski, Ryan C; Amin, Milan R

    2017-11-01

    Compromised cough effectiveness is correlated with dysphagia and aspiration. Glottic insufficiency likely yields decreased cough strength and effectiveness. Although vocal fold augmentation favorably affects voice and likely improves cough strength, few data exist to support this hypothesis. To assess whether vocal fold augmentation improves peak airflow measurements during maximal-effort cough following augmentation. This case series study was conducted in a tertiary, academic laryngology clinic. Participants included 14 consecutive individuals with glottic insufficiency due to vocal fold paralysis, which was diagnosed via videostrobolaryngoscopy as a component of routine clinical examination. All participants who chose to proceed with augmentation were considered for the study whether office-based or operative augmentation was planned. Postaugmentation data were collected only at the first follow-up visit, which was targeted for 14 days after augmentation but varied on the basis of participant availability. Data were collected from June 5, 2014, to October 1, 2015. Data analysis took place between October 2, 2015, and March 3, 2017. Peak airflow during maximal volitional cough was quantified before and after vocal fold augmentation. Participants performed maximal coughs, and peak expiratory flow during the maximal cough was captured according to American Thoracic Society guidelines. Among the 14 participants (7 men and 7 women), the mean (SD) age was 62 (18) years. Three types of injectable material were used for vocal fold augmentation: carboxymethylcellulose in 5 patients, hyaluronic acid in 5, and calcium hydroxylapatite in 4. Following augmentation, cough strength increased in 11 participants and decreased cough strength was observed in 3. Peak airflow measurements during maximal cough varied from a decrease of 40 L/min to an increase of 150 L/min following augmentation. When preaugmentation and postaugmentation peak airflow measurements were compared, the

  18. Gas-Generator Augmented Expander Cycle Rocket Engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greene, William D. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    An augmented expander cycle rocket engine includes first and second turbopumps for respectively pumping fuel and oxidizer. A gas-generator receives a first portion of fuel output from the first turbopump and a first portion of oxidizer output from the second turbopump to ignite and discharge heated gas. A heat exchanger close-coupled to the gas-generator receives in a first conduit the discharged heated gas, and transfers heat to an adjacent second conduit carrying fuel exiting the cooling passages of a primary combustion chamber. Heat is transferred to the fuel passing through the cooling passages. The heated fuel enters the second conduit of the heat exchanger to absorb more heat from the first conduit, and then flows to drive a turbine of one or both of the turbopumps. The arrangement prevents the turbopumps exposure to combusted gas that could freeze in the turbomachinery and cause catastrophic failure upon attempted engine restart.

  19. Temporal Coherence Strategies for Augmented Reality Labeling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Jacob Boesen; Tatzgern, Markus; Madsen, Claus B.

    2016-01-01

    Temporal coherence of annotations is an important factor in augmented reality user interfaces and for information visualization. In this paper, we empirically evaluate four different techniques for annotation. Based on these findings, we follow up with subjective evaluations in a second experiment...

  20. Design Principles for Augmented Reality Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunleavy, Matt

    2014-01-01

    Augmented reality is an emerging technology that utilizes mobile, context-aware devices (e.g., smartphones, tablets) that enable participants to interact with digital information embedded within the physical environment. This overview of design principles focuses on specific strategies that instructional designers can use to develop AR learning…

  1. The Educational Possibilities of Augmented Reality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabero, Julio; Barroso, Julio

    2016-01-01

    A large number of emergent technologies have been acquiring a strong impulse in recent years. One of these emergent technologies is Augmented Reality (RA), which will surely have a high level of penetration into all our educational centers, including universities, in the next 3 to 5 years, as a number of different reports have already highlighted.…

  2. Personalized augmented reality for anatomy education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Meng; Fallavollita, Pascal; Seelbach, Ina; Von Der Heide, Anna Maria; Euler, Ekkehard; Waschke, Jens; Navab, Nassir

    2016-05-01

    Anatomy education is a challenging but vital element in forming future medical professionals. In this work, a personalized and interactive augmented reality system is developed to facilitate education. This system behaves as a "magic mirror" which allows personalized in-situ visualization of anatomy on the user's body. Real-time volume visualization of a CT dataset creates the illusion that the user can look inside their body. The system comprises a RGB-D sensor as a real-time tracking device to detect the user moving in front of a display. In addition, the magic mirror system shows text information, medical images, and 3D models of organs that the user can interact with. Through the participation of 7 clinicians and 72 students, two user studies were designed to respectively assess the precision and acceptability of the magic mirror system for education. The results of the first study demonstrated that the average precision of the augmented reality overlay on the user body was 0.96 cm, while the results of the second study indicate 86.1% approval for the educational value of the magic mirror, and 91.7% approval for the augmented reality capability of displaying organs in three dimensions. The usefulness of this unique type of personalized augmented reality technology has been demonstrated in this paper. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Determination of Student Opinions in Augmented Reality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bicen, Huseyin; Bal, Erkan

    2016-01-01

    The rapid development of the new technology has changed classroom teaching methods and tools in a positive way. This study investigated the classroom learning with augmented reality and the impact of student opinions. 97 volunteer undergraduate students took part in this study. Results included data in the form of frequencies, percentages and…

  4. Intelligent Augmented Reality Training for Motherboard Assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westerfield, Giles; Mitrovic, Antonija; Billinghurst, Mark

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the combination of Augmented Reality (AR) with Intelligent Tutoring Systems (ITS) to assist with training for manual assembly tasks. Our approach combines AR graphics with adaptive guidance from the ITS to provide a more effective learning experience. We have developed a modular software framework for intelligent AR training…

  5. Augmentation of board games using smartphones

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kulsinskas, Arturas; Balan, Catalin; Egede Bukdahl, Nicholas

    2015-01-01

    This paper contains details about research into the effect of digital augmentation on social presence in board games. A case study of the board game Tobago was performed during the project and a prototype application for smartphones was developed in order to compare the players’ social presence...

  6. Augmented reality for Android application development

    CERN Document Server

    Grubert, Jens

    2013-01-01

    A step-by-step tutorial-based guide aimed at giving you hands-on practical experience to develop AR applications for Android.Augmented Reality for Android Application Development is for Android mobile application developers who are familiar with Android Development Tools and deployment, JMonkeyEngine, and the Vuforia SDK.

  7. CARE: Creating Augmented Reality in Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latif, Farzana

    2012-01-01

    This paper explores how Augmented Reality using mobile phones can enhance teaching and learning in education. It specifically examines its application in two cases, where it is identified that the agility of mobile devices and the ability to overlay context specific resources offers opportunities to enhance learning that would not otherwise exist.…

  8. Aloqa and layar augmented reality feeds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ternier, Stefaan

    2010-01-01

    Aloqa is a service that proactively notifies the user of Point Of Interests (POIs). It runs on iPhone, blackberry and android. With this tool you can easily get directions to events, places, buildings or other places of interests. Layar builds on the same principle, but has a browser that augments

  9. Facial skeletal augmentation using hydroxyapatite cement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shindo, M L; Costantino, P D; Friedman, C D; Chow, L C

    1993-02-01

    This study investigates the use of a new calcium phosphate cement, which sets to solid, microporous hydroxyapatite, for facial bone augmentation. In six dogs, the supraorbital ridges were augmented bilaterally with this hydroxyapatite cement. On one side, the hydroxyapatite cement was placed directly onto the bone within a subperiosteal pocket. On the opposite side, the cement was contained within a collagen membrane tubule and then inserted into a subperiosteal pocket. The use of collagen tubules facilitated easy, precise placement of the cement. All implants maintained their original augmented height throughout the duration of the study. They were well tolerated without extrusion or migration, and there was no significant sustained inflammatory response. Histologic studies, performed at 3, 6, and 9 months revealed that when the cement was placed directly onto bone, progressive replacement of the implant by bone (osseointegration of the hydroxyapatite with the underlying bone) without a loss of volume was observed. In contrast, when the cement-collagen tubule combination was inserted, primarily a fibrous union was noted. Despite such fibrous union, the hydroxyapatite-collagen implant solidly bonded to the underlying bone, and no implant resorption was observed. Hydroxyapatite cement can be used successfully for the experimental augmentation of the craniofacial skeleton and may be applicable for such uses in humans.

  10. (Re-)Examination of Multimodal Augmented Reality

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rosa, N.E.; Werkhoven, P.J.; Hürst, W.O.

    2016-01-01

    The majority of augmented reality (AR) research has been concerned with visual perception, however the move towards multimodality is imminent. At the same time, there is no clear vision of what multimodal AR is. The purpose of this position paper is to consider possible ways of examining AR other

  11. Accurate overlaying for mobile augmented reality

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pasman, W; van der Schaaf, A; Lagendijk, RL; Jansen, F.W.

    1999-01-01

    Mobile augmented reality requires accurate alignment of virtual information with objects visible in the real world. We describe a system for mobile communications to be developed to meet these strict alignment criteria using a combination of computer vision. inertial tracking and low-latency

  12. Alveolar ridge augmentation by osteoinduction in rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pinholt, E M; Bang, G; Haanaes, H R

    1990-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate bone substitutes for alveolar ridge augmentation by osteoinduction. Allogenic, demineralized, and lyophilized dentin and bone was tested for osteoinductive properties in order to establish an experimental model for further studies. Implantations were perf...

  13. Augmentative Communication Services in the Schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blackstone, Sarah W.

    1989-01-01

    The article considers current issues concerning service delivery systems and practices concerning augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) services in U.S. schools. Concerns in AAC program development are noted and service delivery models (center-based, community-based, or collaborative) are compared. (DB)

  14. Augmented Reality in Sports: Today and Tomorrow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zafer BOZYER

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The rapid change experienced in the field of Information Technologies makes the informati cs more tangible in daily life. Today, it became possible to encounter with the informatics applications almost all the disciplines. As a matter of course, many informatics applications are put into the practice regarding the sports discipline. Because of the condition that the power of information processing has increased and the studies on wearable technol ogies in addition to the expert system design, augmented reality (AR has become a topic which gains imp ortance in the field of sports. There are many studies that are conducted with the aim of increasing the efficiency of physical activities done in many sports branches, ensuring a more fair management of competitions and providing the opportunity for spectators to watch the competitions in a more comfortable and efficient way. In this study; the information about the current augmented reality practices th at are used in various sports branches has been given and the mobile and interactive augmented reality practices which are possible to be seen in future have been mentioned. In addition, there is an augmented reality practice which is designed with the aim of ensuring that the shoots of sports people who are interested in archery, are more stable and of ensuring that the trainings and exercises are more efficient by stating to the sports people whether he or she is in the right position for shoot which is c alled as T shape seen at the time of releasing the arrow.

  15. Location-Based Learning through Augmented Reality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, Te-Lien; Chanlin, Lih-Juan

    2014-01-01

    A context-aware and mixed-reality exploring tool cannot only effectively provide an information-rich environment to users, but also allows them to quickly utilize useful resources and enhance environment awareness. This study integrates Augmented Reality (AR) technology into smartphones to create a stimulating learning experience at a university…

  16. Volumetric, dashboard-mounted augmented display

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kessler, David; Grabowski, Christopher

    2017-11-01

    The optical design of a compact volumetric display for drivers is presented. The system displays a true volume image with realistic physical depth cues, such as focal accommodation, parallax and convergence. A large eyebox is achieved with a pupil expander. The windshield is used as the augmented reality combiner. A freeform windshield corrector is placed at the dashboard.

  17. Get Real: Augmented Reality for the Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Rebecca; DeBay, Dennis

    2012-01-01

    Kids love augmented reality (AR) simulations because they are like real-life video games. AR simulations allow students to learn content while collaborating face to face and interacting with a multimedia-enhanced version of the world around them. Although the technology may seem advanced, AR software makes it easy to develop content-based…

  18. Understanding the Conics through Augmented Reality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salinas, Patricia; Pulido, Ricardo

    2017-01-01

    This paper discusses the production of a digital environment to foster the learning of conics through augmented reality. The name conic refers to curves obtained by the intersection of a plane with a right circular conical surface. The environment gives students the opportunity to interact with the cone and the plane as virtual objects in real…

  19. Augment clinical measurement using a constraint-based esophageal model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kou, Wenjun; Acharya, Shashank; Kahrilas, Peter; Patankar, Neelesh; Pandolfino, John

    2017-11-01

    Quantifying the mechanical properties of the esophageal wall is crucial to understanding impairments of trans-esophageal flow characteristic of several esophageal diseases. However, these data are unavailable owing to technological limitations of current clinical diagnostic instruments that instead display esophageal luminal cross sectional area based on intraluminal impedance change. In this work, we developed an esophageal model to predict bolus flow and the wall property based on clinical measurements. The model used the constraint-based immersed-boundary method developed previously by our group. Specifically, we first approximate the time-dependent wall geometry based on impedance planimetry data on luminal cross sectional area. We then fed these along with pressure data into the model and computed wall tension based on simulated pressure and flow fields, and the material property based on the strain-stress relationship. As examples, we applied this model to augment FLIP (Functional Luminal Imaging Probe) measurements in three clinical cases: a normal subject, achalasia, and eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE). Our findings suggest that the wall stiffness was greatest in the EoE case, followed by the achalasia case, and then the normal. This is supported by NIH Grant R01 DK56033 and R01 DK079902.

  20. Gas-Phase Reactivity of Microsolvated Anions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Ditte Linde

    the gas-phase α-effect. The experimental studies are performed by means of the flowing after glow selected ion flow tube technique, and these are supplemented by electronic structure calculations. The α-nucleophile employed is the microsolvated hydrogen peroxide anion whose reactivity is compared......Gas-phase studies of ion-molecule reactions shed light on the intrinsic factors that govern reactivity; and even solvent effects can be examined in the gasphase environment by employing microsolvated ions. An area that has received considerable attention with regard to the interplay between...... to that of a series of microsolvated oxygen centered anions. The association of the nucleophiles with a single water or methanol molecule allows the α-effect to be observed in the SN2 reaction with methyl chloride; this effect was not apparent in the reactions of the unsolvated anions. The results suggest...

  1. The role of imaging in pediatric bladder augmentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Breen, Micheal; Chow, Jeanne S. [Boston Children' s Hospital, Department of Radiology, Boston, MA (United States); Phelps, Andrew [UCSF Benioff Children' s Hospital San Francisco, Department of Radiology and Biomedical Imaging, San Francisco, CA (United States); Estrada, Carlos [Boston Children' s Hospital, Department of Urology, Boston, MA (United States)

    2015-09-15

    Bladder augmentation (also called augmentation cystoplasty) refers to a number of surgical methods that increase the capacity and compliance of the urinary bladder. Imaging has an important role in the postoperative evaluation of bladder augmentation. The most common augmentation procedures utilize enteric segments to augment the bladder. The various types of bladder augmentation have characteristic appearances on different imaging modalities. Spontaneous bladder perforation is a complication that is seen in both early and late post-operative periods and it is one of the most important complications for radiologists to be aware of as it is life-threatening. We review the indications for bladder augmentation in children, the surgical techniques employed, the normal postoperative appearances on imaging studies and the role of imaging complications of bladder augmentation including delayed spontaneous bladder rupture, which is life-threatening. (orig.)

  2. Digital reactivity meter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Copie, M.; Valantic, B.

    1978-01-01

    Digital reactivity meters (DRM) are mostly used as measuring instruments, e.g. for calibration of control rods, and there are only a few cases of their incorporation into the control systems of the reactors. To move in this direction there is more development work needed. First of all, fast algorithms are needed for inverse kinetics equations to relieve the computer for more important tasks of reactor model solving in real time. The next problem, currently under investigation, is the incorporation of the reactor thermal-hydraulic model into the DRM so that it can be used in the power range. Such an extension of DHM allows presentation not only of the instantaneous reactivity of the system, but also the inserted reactivity can be estimated from the temperature reactivity feed-backs. One of the applications of this concept is the anomalous digital reactivity monitor (ADRN) as part of the reactor protection system. As a solution of the first problem, a fast algorithm for solving the inverse kinetics equations has been implemented in the off-line program RODCAL on CDC 1700 computer and tested for its accuracy by performing different control rod calibrations on the reactor TRIGA

  3. Alternative realities : from augmented reality to mobile mixed reality

    OpenAIRE

    Claydon, Mark

    2015-01-01

    This thesis provides an overview of (mobile) augmented and mixed reality by clarifying the different concepts of reality, briefly covering the technology behind mobile augmented and mixed reality systems, conducting a concise survey of existing and emerging mobile augmented and mixed reality applications and devices. Based on the previous analysis and the survey, this work will next attempt to assess what mobile augmented and mixed reality could make possible, and what related applications an...

  4. Reactive wetting by liquid sodium on thin Au platin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawaguchi, Munemichi; Hamada, Hirotsugu

    2014-01-01

    For practical use of an under-sodium viewer, the behavior of sodium wetting is investigated by modeling the reactive and non-reactive wetting of metallic-plated steels by liquid sodium to simulate sodium wetting. The non-reactive wetting simulation results showed good agreement with Tanner's law, in which the time dependencies of the droplet radius and contact angle are expressed as R N ∝ t 1/10 and θ∝ t -3/10 , respectively; therefore, the model was considered suitable for the simulation. To simulate reactive wetting, the model of fluid flow induced by the interfacial reaction was incorporated into the simulation of non-reactive wetting. The reactive wetting simulation results, such as the behavior of the precursor liquid film and central droplet, showed good agreement with sodium wetting experiments using thin Au plating at 250°C. An important result of the reactive wetting simulation is that the gradient of the reaction energy at the interface appeared on the new interface around the triple line, and that fluid flow was induced. This interfacial reactivity during sodium wetting of thin Au plating was enhanced by the reaction of sodium and nickel oxide through pinholes in the plating. (author)

  5. An introduction to reactive power compensation for wind farms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nigim, K.A.; Cairo Univ., Giza; Zobaa, A.F.; El Amin, I.

    2005-01-01

    The paper summarises the refereed contributions of seven articles reviewed for publication in the IJETP - Special Issue on 'Reactive compensation for wind farms'. The main goal of the special issue is to provide a forum to exchange information on the reactive power compensation requirements for wind farms and introducing possible price mechanisms for today's deregulated power industry. Uncompensated reactive power causes stress on the hosting utility grid as well as added expenses, which create in difficulties for power purchasing agreements from independent wind energy producers. Wind power producers need to comply with the hosting utility grid interconnection standards, e.g., voltage and frequency, as well as to provide controllable active and reactive sources of power. Active power supply is mainly dependent on the potential of wind power produced and the turbine design. Reactive power demand on the other hand depends on the conversion devices and the recovered power quantity fed to the grid. Static Var Compensators (SVC), Unified Power Quality Conditioners (UPQC), Unified Power Flow Controllers (UPFC), and the Distributed Static Synchronous Compensators (DSTATCOM) are all new emerging devices aimed at regulating the reactive power requirements. The excellent controllability of these devices has paved the way to flexible and dynamic controllers that are capable of regulating the flow of active and reactive power components. These devices are now suggested for the control of the reactive power requirement of wind generators. Studies have demonstrated acceptable voltage stabilisation results. This has increased the penetration level of wind power into existing distribution networks in many countries. (Author)

  6. Assessing reactivation of the Pourewa Landslide Zone, Auckland, New Zealand, using Structure-from-Motion, LiDAR, and geophysics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brook, Martin; Liu, Shanshan; Richards, Nick; Bevan, David; Prebble, Warwick

    2017-04-01

    Landslides pose significant risks to communities and infrastructure particularly in urban areas, and mitigating these risks relies on understanding landslide triggering processes that may cause reactivation. Previous work has shown that landslides are often complex, multiphase processes where gradual deterioration of shear strength within the subsurface precedes slope failure and the appearance of surface morphological features. Here, we combine a suite of remote sensing and direct invasive testing techniques to assess reactivation of the Pourewa Landslide Zone (PLZ), located in Auckland, New Zealand. The PLZ is located on the inner wall of the north-eastern flank of the Orakei volcano, 4 km east of Auckland CBD. The landslide zone occupies slopes above the east bank of the tidal Pourewa Creek, which lies within a residential area. Four landslides are located within the PLZ (from west to east): Ngapipi Road Landslide, Kepa Road Landslide, St Josephs Landslide, and Pourewa Landslide. Inward collapse of the crater walls since the initial eruption (>85 ka) has enlarged the crater to c. 1000 m diameter, with some slopes prone to ongoing mass movements. Indeed, reactivation during the 20th century led to the realignment of Kepa Road, and surface cracking of roads in the vicinity is ongoing. LiDAR imagery was used to develop high resolution geomorphological maps, and this data was compared with more recent Structure-from-Motion (SfM) photogrammetry, obtained from an unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV). The digital surface models and derived cross-sections developed from these data allow both the initial failure, and subsequent reactivations to be assessed in detail. Geophysical surveys included Electromagnetic Induction (EMI), augmented by information relating to lithological, moisture and strength variation with depth, allowing initial interpretation of zones likely to be prone to reactivation. Ongoing slope deformation includes shallow, retrogressive failure on the upper

  7. Initial Model of Social Acceptability for Human Augmentation Technologies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eghtebas, Chloe; Pay, Yun Suen; Väänänen, Kaisa; Pfeiffer, Ties; Meyer, Joachim; Lukosch, S.G.

    2017-01-01

    Academia and industry engage in major efforts to develop technologies for augmenting human senses and activities. Many of these technologies, such as augmented reality (AR) and virtual reality (VR) head mounted displays (HMD), haptic augmentation systems, and exoskeletons can be applied in numerous

  8. Augmented reality: dé nieuwe dimensie in de sport?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Slender, Hans

    2010-01-01

    Volgens trendwatcher Justien Marseille de trend van 2010: augmented reality. Augmented reality is een techniek om met de computer gemaakte beelden toe te voegen aan de realiteit. Het Nederlandse Layar (layar.com) presenteerde zich vorig jaar vol trots als een unieke augmented reality browser, met

  9. A Study of Chemically Reactive Species and Thermal Radiation Effects on an Unsteady MHD Free Convection Flow Through a Porous Medium Past a Flat Plate with Ramped Wall Temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pandit K. K.

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available An investigation of the effects of a chemical reaction and thermal radiation on unsteady MHD free convection heat and mass transfer flow of an electrically conducting, viscous, incompressible fluid past a vertical infinite flat plate embedded in a porous medium is carried out. The flow is induced by a general time-dependent movement of the vertical plate, and the cases of ramped temperature and isothermal plates are studied. An exact solution of the governing equations is obtained in closed form by the Laplace Transform technique. Some applications of practical interest for different types of plate motions are discussed. The numerical values of fluid velocity, temperature and species concentration are displayed graphically whereas the numerical values of skin friction, Nusselt number and Sherwood number are presented in a tabular form for various values of pertinent flow parameters for both ramped temperature and isothermal plates.

  10. A Study of Chemically Reactive Species and Thermal Radiation Effects on an Unsteady MHD Free Convection Flow Through a Porous Medium Past a Flat Plate with Ramped Wall Temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandit, K. K.; Sarma, D.; Singh, S. I.

    2017-12-01

    An investigation of the effects of a chemical reaction and thermal radiation on unsteady MHD free convection heat and mass transfer flow of an electrically conducting, viscous, incompressible fluid past a vertical infinite flat plate embedded in a porous medium is carried out. The flow is induced by a general time-dependent movement of the vertical plate, and the cases of ramped temperature and isothermal plates are studied. An exact solution of the governing equations is obtained in closed form by the Laplace Transform technique. Some applications of practical interest for different types of plate motions are discussed. The numerical values of fluid velocity, temperature and species concentration are displayed graphically whereas the numerical values of skin friction, Nusselt number and Sherwood number are presented in a tabular form for various values of pertinent flow parameters for both ramped temperature and isothermal plates.

  11. Dynamic augmentation restores anterior tibial translation in ACL suture repair: a biomechanical comparison of non-, static and dynamic augmentation techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoogeslag, Roy A G; Brouwer, Reinoud W; Huis In 't Veld, Rianne; Stephen, Joanna M; Amis, Andrew A

    2018-02-03

    There is a lack of objective evidence investigating how previous non-augmented ACL suture repair techniques and contemporary augmentation techniques in ACL suture repair restrain anterior tibial translation (ATT) across the arc of flexion, and after cyclic loading of the knee. The purpose of this work was to test the null hypotheses that there would be no statistically significant difference in ATT after non-, static- and dynamic-augmented ACL suture repair, and they will not restore ATT to normal values across the arc of flexion of the knee after cyclic loading. Eleven human cadaveric knees were mounted in a test rig, and knee kinematics from 0° to 90° of flexion were recorded by use of an optical tracking system. Measurements were recorded without load and with 89-N tibial anterior force. The knees were tested in the following states: ACL-intact, ACL-deficient, non-augmented suture repair, static tape augmentation and dynamic augmentation after 10 and 300 loading cycles. Only static tape augmentation and dynamic augmentation restored ATT to values similar to the ACL-intact state directly postoperation, and maintained this after cyclic loading. However, contrary to dynamic augmentation, the ATT after static tape augmentation failed to remain statistically less than for the ACL-deficient state after cyclic loading. Moreover, after cyclic loading, ATT was significantly less with dynamic augmentation when compared to static tape augmentation. In contrast to non-augmented ACL suture repair and static tape augmentation, only dynamic augmentation resulted in restoration of ATT values similar to the ACL-intact knee and decreased ATT values when compared to the ACL-deficient knee immediately post-operation and also after cyclic loading, across the arc of flexion, thus allowing the null hypotheses to be rejected. This may assist healing of the ruptured ACL. Therefore, this study would support further clinical evaluation of dynamic augmentation of ACL repair.

  12. Hypoxia-induced pulmonary arterial hypertension augments lung injury and airway reactivity caused by ozone exposure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zychowski, Katherine E.; Lucas, Selita N.; Sanchez, Bethany; Herbert, Guy; Campen, Matthew J., E-mail: mcampen@salud.unm.edu

    2016-08-15

    Ozone (O{sub 3})-related cardiorespiratory effects are a growing public health concern. Ground level O{sub 3} can exacerbate pre-existing respiratory conditions; however, research regarding therapeutic interventions to reduce O{sub 3}-induced lung injury is limited. In patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, hypoxia-associated pulmonary hypertension (HPH) is a frequent comorbidity that is difficult to treat clinically, yet associated with increased mortality and frequency of exacerbations. In this study, we hypothesized that established HPH would confer vulnerability to acute O{sub 3} pulmonary toxicity. Additionally, we tested whether improvement of pulmonary endothelial barrier integrity via rho-kinase inhibition could mitigate pulmonary inflammation and injury. To determine if O{sub 3} exacerbated HPH, male C57BL/6 mice were subject to either 3 weeks continuous normoxia (20.9% O{sub 2}) or hypoxia (10.0% O{sub 2}), followed by a 4-h exposure to either 1 ppm O{sub 3} or filtered air (FA). As an additional experimental intervention fasudil (20 mg/kg) was administered intraperitoneally prior to and after O{sub 3} exposures. As expected, hypoxia significantly increased right ventricular pressure and hypertrophy. O{sub 3} exposure in normoxic mice caused lung inflammation but not injury, as indicated by increased cellularity and edema in the lung. However, in hypoxic mice, O{sub 3} exposure led to increased inflammation and edema, along with a profound increase in airway hyperresponsiveness to methacholine. Fasudil administration resulted in reduced O{sub 3}-induced lung injury via the enhancement of pulmonary endothelial barrier integrity. These results indicate that increased pulmonary vascular pressure may enhance lung injury, inflammation and edema when exposed to pollutants, and that enhancement of pulmonary endothelial barrier integrity may alleviate such vulnerability. - Highlights: • Environmental exposures can exacerbate chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). • It is unknown if comorbid pulmonary hypertension may influence such effects in COPD patients. • Pulmonary hypertension in a mouse model significantly exacerbated ozone-induced lung injury. • Adverse ozone outcomes were largely attenuated by a rho kinase inhibitor, fasudil. • Therapeutic benefit from rho kinase inhibition may be related to endothelial barrier integrity.

  13. Hypoxia-induced pulmonary arterial hypertension augments lung injury and airway reactivity caused by ozone exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zychowski, Katherine E.; Lucas, Selita N.; Sanchez, Bethany; Herbert, Guy; Campen, Matthew J.

    2016-01-01

    Ozone (O 3 )-related cardiorespiratory effects are a growing public health concern. Ground level O 3 can exacerbate pre-existing respiratory conditions; however, research regarding therapeutic interventions to reduce O 3 -induced lung injury is limited. In patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, hypoxia-associated pulmonary hypertension (HPH) is a frequent comorbidity that is difficult to treat clinically, yet associated with increased mortality and frequency of exacerbations. In this study, we hypothesized that established HPH would confer vulnerability to acute O 3 pulmonary toxicity. Additionally, we tested whether improvement of pulmonary endothelial barrier integrity via rho-kinase inhibition could mitigate pulmonary inflammation and injury. To determine if O 3 exacerbated HPH, male C57BL/6 mice were subject to either 3 weeks continuous normoxia (20.9% O 2 ) or hypoxia (10.0% O 2 ), followed by a 4-h exposure to either 1 ppm O 3 or filtered air (FA). As an additional experimental intervention fasudil (20 mg/kg) was administered intraperitoneally prior to and after O 3 exposures. As expected, hypoxia significantly increased right ventricular pressure and hypertrophy. O 3 exposure in normoxic mice caused lung inflammation but not injury, as indicated by increased cellularity and edema in the lung. However, in hypoxic mice, O 3 exposure led to increased inflammation and edema, along with a profound increase in airway hyperresponsiveness to methacholine. Fasudil administration resulted in reduced O 3 -induced lung injury via the enhancement of pulmonary endothelial barrier integrity. These results indicate that increased pulmonary vascular pressure may enhance lung injury, inflammation and edema when exposed to pollutants, and that enhancement of pulmonary endothelial barrier integrity may alleviate such vulnerability. - Highlights: • Environmental exposures can exacerbate chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). • It is unknown if comorbid pulmonary hypertension may influence such effects in COPD patients. • Pulmonary hypertension in a mouse model significantly exacerbated ozone-induced lung injury. • Adverse ozone outcomes were largely attenuated by a rho kinase inhibitor, fasudil. • Therapeutic benefit from rho kinase inhibition may be related to endothelial barrier integrity.

  14. Augmenting Probabilistic Risk Assesment with Malevolent Initiators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, Curtis; Schwieder, David

    2011-01-01

    As commonly practiced, the use of probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) in nuclear power plants only considers accident initiators such as natural hazards, equipment failures, and human error. Malevolent initiators are ignored in PRA, but are considered the domain of physical security, which uses vulnerability assessment based on an officially specified threat (design basis threat). This paper explores the implications of augmenting and extending existing PRA models by considering new and modified scenarios resulting from malevolent initiators. Teaming the augmented PRA models with conventional vulnerability assessments can cost-effectively enhance security of a nuclear power plant. This methodology is useful for operating plants, as well as in the design of new plants. For the methodology, we have proposed an approach that builds on and extends the practice of PRA for nuclear power plants for security-related issues. Rather than only considering 'random' failures, we demonstrated a framework that is able to represent and model malevolent initiating events and associated plant impacts.

  15. Interactive learning environments in augmented reality technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafał Wojciechowski

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the problem of creation of learning environments based on augmented reality (AR is considered. The concept of AR is presented as a tool for safe and cheap experimental learning. In AR learning environments students may acquire knowledge by personally carrying out experiments on virtual objects by manipulating real objects located in real environments. In the paper, a new approach to creation of interactive educational scenarios, called Augmented Reality Interactive Scenario Modeling (ARISM, is mentioned. In this approach, the process of building learning environments is divided into three stages, each of them performed by users with different technical and domain knowledge. The ARISM approach enables teachers who are not computer science experts to create AR learning environments adapted to the needs of their students.

  16. Camera Based Navigation System with Augmented Reality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Marcu

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays smart mobile devices have enough processing power, memory, storage and always connected wireless communication bandwidth that makes them available for any type of application. Augmented reality (AR proposes a new type of applications that tries to enhance the real world by superimposing or combining virtual objects or computer generated information with it. In this paper we present a camera based navigation system with augmented reality integration. The proposed system aims to the following: the user points the camera of the smartphone towards a point of interest, like a building or any other place, and the application searches for relevant information about that specific place and superimposes the data over the video feed on the display. When the user moves the camera away, changing its orientation, the data changes as well, in real-time, with the proper information about the place that is now in the camera view.

  17. Survey on Urban Warfare Augmented Reality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiong You

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Urban warfare has become one of the main forms of modern combat in the twenty-first century. The main reason why urban warfare results in hundreds of casualties is that the situational information of the combatant is insufficient. Accessing information via an Augmented Reality system can elevate combatants’ situational awareness to effectively improve the efficiency of decision-making and reduce the injuries. This paper begins with the concept of Urban Warfare Augmented Reality (UWAR and illuminates the objectives of developing UWAR, i.e., transparent battlefield, intuitional perception and natural interaction. Real-time outdoor registration, information presentation and natural interaction are presented as key technologies of a practical UWAR system. Then, the history and current research state of these technologies are summarized and their future developments are highlighted from three perspectives, i.e., (1 Better integration with Geographic Information System and Virtual Geographic Environment; (2 More intelligent software; (3 More powerful hardware.

  18. Heat transfer augmentation for high heat flux removal in rib-roughened narrow channels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Islam, M.S.; Hino, Ryutaro; Haga, Katsuhiro; Sudo, Yukio; Monde, Masanori.

    1997-03-01

    Heat transfer augmentation in narrow rectangular channels in a target system is a very important method to remove high heat flux up to 12 MW/m 2 generated at target plates of a high-intensity proton accelerator of 1.5 GeV and 1 mA with a proton beam power of 1.5 MW. In this report, heat transfer coefficients and friction factors in narrow rectangular channels with one-sided rib-roughened surface were evaluated for fully developed flows in the range of the Reynolds number from 6,000 to 1,00,000; the rib pitch-to-height ratios (p/k) were 10,20 and 30; the rib height-to-equivalent diameter ratios (k/De) were 0.025, 0.03 and 0.1 by means of previous existing experimental correlations. The rib-roughened surface augmented heat transfer coefficients approximately 4 times higher than the smooth surface at Re=10,000, p/k=10 and k/De=0.1; friction factors increase around 22 times higher. In this case, higher heat flux up to 12 MW/m 2 could be removed from the rib-roughened surface without flow boiling which induces flow instability; but pressure drop reaches about 1.8 MPa. Correlations obtained by air-flow experiments have showed lower heat transfer performance with the water-flow conditions. The experimental apparatus was proposed for further investigation on heat transfer augmentation in very narrow channels under water-flow conditions. This report presents the evaluation results and an outline of the test apparatus. (author)

  19. MARCS: Mobile Augmented Reality for Cybersecurity

    OpenAIRE

    Mattina, Brendan Casey

    2017-01-01

    Network analysts have long used two-dimensional security visualizations to make sense of network data. As networks grow larger and more complex, two-dimensional visualizations become more convoluted, potentially compromising user situational awareness of cyber threats. To combat this problem, augmented reality (AR) can be employed to visualize data within a cyber-physical context to restore user perception and improve comprehension; thereby, enhancing cyber situational awareness. Multiple gen...

  20. Facade Proposals for Urban Augmented Reality

    OpenAIRE

    Fond , Antoine; Berger , Marie-Odile; Simon , Gilles

    2017-01-01

    International audience; We introduce a novel object proposals method specific to building facades. We define new image cues that measure typical facadecharacteristics such as semantic, symmetry and repetitions. They are combined to generate a few facade candidates in urban environments fast. We show that our method outperforms state-of-the-art object proposals techniques for this task on the 1000 images of the Zurich Building Database. We demonstrate the interest of this procedure for augment...

  1. Lifelong Augmentation of Multimodal Streaming Autobiographical Memories

    OpenAIRE

    Petit, Maxime; Fischer, Tobias; Demiris, Yiannis

    2016-01-01

    Robot systems that interact with humans over extended periods of time will benefit from storing and recalling large amounts of accumulated sensorimotor and interaction data. We provide a principled framework for the cumulative organisation of streaming autobiographical data so that data can be continuously processed and augmented as the processing and reasoning abilities of the agent develop and further interactions with humans take place. As an example, we show how a kinematic structure lear...

  2. Augmented reality to training spatial skills

    OpenAIRE

    Martin-Gutierrez, Jorge; Contero, Manuel; Alcañiz Raya, Mariano Luis

    2015-01-01

    La Laguna University has been offering courses for the development of spatial skills since 2004. Each year since that time spatial ability of engineering students has been measured before and after the courses to check progress after each training session. We have developed a spatial skills training course based on augmented reality and graphic engineering contents, and designed the AR_Dehaes tool, which is based on its own library the uses computer vision techniques for incorporating vis...

  3. Augmentation Mammaplasty Using Implants: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susumu Takayanagi

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available One of the techniques for augmentation mammaplasty is the procedure using implants. Even though this technique has been used for many years, there are still several controversial issues to be discussed and overcome for patient safety. In this review article, capsular contracture, leak or rupture of the implants, possible systemic disease, relation with breast cancer, and recent problems with Poly Implant Prothese implants are described and discussed.

  4. Augmentation Mammaplasty Using Implants: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susumu Takayanagi

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available One of the techniques for augmentation mammaplasty is the procedure using implants. Eventhough this technique has been used for many years, there are still several controversial issuesto be discussed and overcome for patient safety. In this review article, capsular contracture,leak or rupture of the implants, possible systemic disease, relation with breast cancer, andrecent problems with Poly Implant Prothese implants are described and discussed.

  5. CIRSE Guidelines on Percutaneous Vertebral Augmentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsoumakidou, Georgia, E-mail: gtsoumakidou@yahoo.com; Too, Chow Wei, E-mail: spyder55@gmail.com; Koch, Guillaume, E-mail: guillaume.koch@gmail.com; Caudrelier, Jean, E-mail: jean.caudrelier@chru-strasbourg.fr; Cazzato, Roberto Luigi, E-mail: gigicazzato@hotmail.it; Garnon, Julien, E-mail: juliengarnon@gmail.com; Gangi, Afshin, E-mail: gangi@unistra.fr [Strasbourg University Hospital, Interventional Radiology Department (France)

    2017-03-15

    Vertebral compression fracture (VCF) is an important cause of severe debilitating back pain, adversely affecting quality of life, physical function, psychosocial performance, mental health and survival. Different vertebral augmentation procedures (VAPs) are used in order to consolidate the VCFs, relief pain,and whenever posible achieve vertebral body height restoration. In the present review we give the indications, contraindications, safety profile and outcomes of the existing percutaneous VAPs.

  6. Autologous Fat Injection for Augmented Mammoplasty

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoon, Eul Sik; Seo, Bo Kyoung; Yi, Ann; Cho, Kyu Ran

    2008-01-01

    Autologous fat injection is one of the methods utilized for augmented mammoplasty methods. In this surgical procedure, the fat for transfer is obtained from the donor site of the patient's own body by liposuction and the fat is then injected into the breast. We report here cases of three patients who underwent autologous fat injection. Two of the patients had palpable masses that were present after surgery. The serial imaging findings and surgical method of autologous fat transfer are demonstrated

  7. Medical imaging and augmented reality. Proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Guang-Zhong; Jiang Tianzi; Shen Dinggang; Gu Lixu; Yang Jie

    2006-01-01

    This book constitutes the refereed proceedings of the Third International Workshop on Medical Imaging and Augmented Reality, MIAR 2006, held in Shanghai, China, in August 2006. The 45 revised full papers presented together with 4 invited papers were carefully reviewed and selected from 87 submissions. The papers are organized in topical sections on shape modeling and morphometry, patient specific modeling and quantification, surgical simulation and skills assessment, surgical guidance and navigation, image registration, PET image reconstruction, and image segmentation. (orig.)

  8. Multiple Kernel Learning with Data Augmentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-11-22

    JMLR: Workshop and Conference Proceedings 63:49–64, 2016 ACML 2016 Multiple Kernel Learning with Data Augmentation Khanh Nguyen nkhanh@deakin.edu.au...University, Australia Editors: Robert J. Durrant and Kee-Eung Kim Abstract The motivations of multiple kernel learning (MKL) approach are to increase... kernel expres- siveness capacity and to avoid the expensive grid search over a wide spectrum of kernels . A large amount of work has been proposed to

  9. Developing augmented reality solutions through user involvement

    OpenAIRE

    Siltanen, Sanni

    2015-01-01

    Augmented reality (AR) technology merges digital information into the real world. It is an effective visualization method; AR enhances user's spatial perception skills and helps to understand spatial dimensions and relationships. It is beneficial for many professional application areas such as assembly, maintenance and repair. AR visualization helps to concretize building and construction projects and interior design plans – also for non-technically oriented people, who might otherwise have d...

  10. Spring 5 & reactive streams

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva; Clozel, Brian

    2017-01-01

    Spring is a framework widely used by the world-wide Java community, and it is also extensively used at CERN. The accelerator control system is constituted of 10 million lines of Java code, spread across more than 1000 projects (jars) developed by 160 software engineers. Around half of this (all server-side Java code) is based on the Spring framework. Warning: the speakers will assume that people attending the seminar are familiar with Java and Spring’s basic concepts. Spring 5.0 and Spring Boot 2.0 updates (45 min) This talk will cover the big ticket items in the 5.0 release of Spring (including Kotlin support, @Nullable and JDK9) and provide an update on Spring Boot 2.0, which is scheduled for the end of the year. Reactive Spring (1h) Spring Framework 5.0 has been released - and it now supports reactive applications in the Spring ecosystem. During this presentation, we'll talk about the reactive foundations of Spring Framework with the Reactor project and the reactive streams specification. We'll al...

  11. Reactivity of nitriles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kukushkin, Yu.N.

    1987-01-01

    Reactivity of coordination nitriles in transition metal (Ru, Mo, W, Zr, Hf) complexes, namely: transformation of nitriles of the first coordination sphere into N-acyl-substituted amides, amidines, nitrile interaction; with water, alkalines, alcoholes, hydrogen, azide and cyanide ions is considered. Introduction of acetonitrile molecule to uranium (4)-carbon double bond is discussed

  12. Clojure reactive programming

    CERN Document Server

    Borges, Leonardo

    2015-01-01

    If you are a Clojure developer who is interested in using Reactive Programming to build asynchronous and concurrent applications, this book is for you. Knowledge of Clojure and Leiningen is required. Basic understanding of ClojureScript will be helpful for the web chapters, although it is not strictly necessary.

  13. A Universal Reactive Machine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Henrik Reif; Mørk, Simon; Sørensen, Morten U.

    1997-01-01

    Turing showed the existence of a model universal for the set of Turing machines in the sense that given an encoding of any Turing machine asinput the universal Turing machine simulates it. We introduce the concept of universality for reactive systems and construct a CCS processuniversal...

  14. Chemical Reactivity Test (CRT)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zaka, F. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2016-12-13

    The Chemical Reactivity Test (CRT) is used to determine the thermal stability of High Explosives (HEs) and chemical compatibility between (HEs) and alien materials. The CRT is one of the small-scale safety tests performed on HE at the High Explosives Applications Facility (HEAF).

  15. Reactive power compensating system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, Timothy J. (Redondo Beach, CA); El-Sharkawi, Mohamed A. (Renton, WA); Venkata, Subrahmanyam S. (Seattle, WA)

    1987-01-01

    The reactive power of an induction machine is compensated by providing fixed capacitors on each phase line for the minimum compensation required, sensing the current on one line at the time its voltage crosses zero to determine the actual compensation required for each phase, and selecting switched capacitors on each line to provide the balance of the compensation required.

  16. Reactive Power Compensating System.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, Timothy J.; El-Sharkawi, Mohamed A.; Venkata, Subrahmanyam S.

    1985-01-04

    The circuit was designed for the specific application of wind-driven induction generators. It has great potential for application in any situation where a varying reactive power load is present, such as with induction motors or generators, or for transmission network compensation.

  17. The iodine reactivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-01-01

    The iodine is an important element because it has long life isotopes (such as iodine 129) and a great mobility in natural media. Iodine presents a complex chemistry because of its volatility and its strong redox reactivity. The S.E.C.R. works to better understand the reactivity of this element in different natural, industrial or biological environments. It plays a part in thermochemical sites as a possible way of hydrogen formation. This seminar gives some aspects relative to the chemical reactivity of iodine, since its thermochemistry in the I/S cycles to produce hydrogen to its reactivity in the natural medium and its potential radiological impact. This document includes 4 presentations transparencies) dealing with: the 129 I cycle rejected in the low radioactive gaseous and liquid effluents of the La Hague reprocessing plant (C. Frechou); a bibliographic review of iodine retention in soils (F. Bazer-Bachi); the hydrogen production and the iodine/sulfur thermochemical cycle (role of iodine in the process); and the direct characterization by electro-spray ionization mass spectroscopy of iodine fixation by fulvic acids (P. Reiller, B. Amekraz, C. Moulin, V. Moulin)

  18. IMPLEMENTATION OF AERONAUTICAL LOCAL SATELLITE AUGMENTATION SYSTEM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stojce Ilcev

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract. This paper introduces development and implementation of new Local Satellite AugmentationSystem as an integration component of the Regional Satellite Augmentation System (RSAS employingcurrent and new Satellite Communications, Navigation and Surveillance (CNS for improvement of the AirTraffic Control (ATC and Air Traffic Management (ATM and for enhancement safety systems includingtransport security and control of flights in all stages, airport approaching, landing, departures and allmovements over airport surface areas. The current first generation of the Global Navigation Satellite SystemGNSS-1 applications are represented by fundamental military solutions for Position, Velocity and Time ofthe satellite navigation and determination systems such as the US GPS and Russian GLONASS (Former-USSR requirements, respectively. The establishment of Aeronautical CNS is also discussed as a part ofGlobal Satellite Augmentation Systems of GPS and GLONASS systems integrated with existing and futureRSAS and LSAS in airports areas. Specific influence and factors related to the Comparison of the Currentand New Aeronautical CNS System including the Integration of RSAS and GNSS solutions are discussedand packet of facts is determined to maximize the new satellite Automatic Dependent Surveillance System(ADSS and Special Effects of the RSAS Networks. The possible future integration of RSAS and GNSS andthe common proposal of the satellite Surface Movement Guidance and Control are presented in thechangeless ways as of importance for future enfacements of ATC and ATM for any hypothetical airportinfrastructure.Keywords: ADSS, ATC, ATM, CNS, GSAS, LRAS, RSAS, SMGC, Special Effects of RSAS.

  19. Labor Augmentation with Oxytocin Decreases Glutathione Level

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naomi Schneid-Kofman

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To compare oxidative stress following spontaneous vaginal delivery with that induced by Oxytocin augmented delivery. Methods. 98 women recruited prior to labor. 57 delivered spontaneously, while 41 received Oxytocin for augmentation of labor. Complicated deliveries and high-risk pregnancies were excluded. Informed consent was documented. Arterial cord blood gases, levels of Hematocrit, Hemoglobin, and Bilirubin were studied. Glutathione (GSH concentration was measured by a spectroscopic method. Plasma and red blood cell (RBC levels of Malondialdehyde indicated lipid peroxidation. RBC uptake of phenol red denoted cell penetrability. SPSS data analysis was used. Results. Cord blood GSH was significantly lower in the Oxytocin group (2.3±0.55 mM versus 2.55±0.55 mM, =.01. No differences were found in plasma or RBC levels of MDA or in uptake of Phenol red between the groups. Conclusion. Lower GSH levels following Oxytocin augmentation indicate an oxidative stress, though selected measures of oxidative stress demonstrate no cell damage.

  20. A Mobile Augmented Reality Emulator for Android

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donald Munro

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Augmented Reality (AR provides a fusion of the real and virtual worlds by superimposing virtual objects on real world scenery. The implementation of AR on mobile devices is known as Mobile Augmented Reality (MAR. MAR is in its infancy and MAR development software is in the process of maturing. Dating back to the origin of Computer Science as an independent field, software development tools have been an integral part of the process of software creation. MAR, being a relatively new technology, is still lacking such related software development tools. With the rapid progression of mobile devices, the development of MAR applications fusing advanced Computer Vision techniques with mobile device sensors have become increasingly feasible. However, testing and debugging of MAR applications present a new challenge in that they require the developer be at the location that is being augmented at some point during the development process. In this research study, a MAR recorder application was developed as well as emulation class libraries for Android devices that allows the recording and off-site playback of video, location and motion sensor data. The research objective was to provide a software emulator which provides debugging, testing and prototyping capabilities for a MAR application including the ability to emulate the combination of computer vision with locational and motion sensors using previously recorded data. The emulator was evaluated using different mobile technologies. The results indicate that this research could assist developers of MAR applications to implement applications more rapidly, without being at the location.

  1. Augmented spaces, a look beyond advertising

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oana Andreea Căplescu

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available From billboards to urban screens and now to media facades, the augmentation of our cities has expanded, changing social behaviours and public space consumption. Smart buildings are being developed and, much like the smartphones, these hybrids are not only in sci-fi movies anymore. One of the main promoters of media facades and media architecture has been the advertising industry. But artists and designers showed the potential of different approaches, experimenting with digitally augmented spaces both indoors and outdoors. Going beyond the commercial aspect of being an advertising and branding tool, these hybrids offer a variety of uses. Questions of how and where we use them and how they can improve our life quality are discussed here emphasizing that we developed a media behaviour, adjusting our relation to the physical and information environments. I examine some of the most notable experiments outside of the advertising sphere, offering a base for future development of augmented spaces and opening the discussion over the language of new media architecture.

  2. Application results for an augmented video tracker

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierce, Bill

    1991-08-01

    The Relay Mirror Experiment (RME) is a research program to determine the pointing accuracy and stability levels achieved when a laser beam is reflected by the RME satellite from one ground station to another. This paper reports the results of using a video tracker augmented with a quad cell signal to improve the RME ground station tracking system performance. The video tracker controls a mirror to acquire the RME satellite, and provides a robust low bandwidth tracking loop to remove line of sight (LOS) jitter. The high-passed, high-gain quad cell signal is added to the low bandwidth, low-gain video tracker signal to increase the effective tracking loop bandwidth, and significantly improves LOS disturbance rejection. The quad cell augmented video tracking system is analyzed, and the math model for the tracker is developed. A MATLAB model is then developed from this, and performance as a function of bandwidth and disturbances is given. Improvements in performance due to the addition of the video tracker and the augmentation with the quad cell are provided. Actual satellite test results are then presented and compared with the simulated results.

  3. Centers of Excellence Contribution to Knowledge Augmentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mignone, O.

    2016-01-01

    Full text: Knowledge management is a key need of the nuclear industry to cope with the knowledge limited augmentation and the risks of knowledge loss due to a number of reasons, such as: staff attrition, organizational changes, upgraded technologies, new projects implementation, and the nuclear power evolution in recent years (i.e., post-Fukushima upgrades). This document describes the contribution of nuclear centers of excellence to knowledge augmentation. The effective implementation of nuclear centers of excellence is a key success factor for the knowledge management programme of nuclear organizations. This document, is based on a real example of operating organization approach in launching such initiative for staff knowledge augmentation and performance improvement. Eventually, any type of organizations in the nuclear sector could apply the proposed technique to reach better knowledge usage. The nuclear centers of excellence are a key knowledge management initiative for the learning organizations that are caring about organizational intellectual capital and striving for performance improvement. The nuclear centers of excellence can be realized as a forum to exchange ideas, knowledge, information, experiences; to collect lessons learned; and to identify areas for improvement where further organizational competence building is needed. Usual realization of this initiative is going through an active staff involvement in knowledge sharing in a form of different technical communities of practice focusing on specific knowledge domains. (author

  4. Soft tissue augmentation 2006: filler fantasy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Arnold William

    2006-01-01

    As an increasing number of patients seek esthetic improvement through minimally invasive procedures, interest in soft tissue augmentation and filling agents is at an all-time high. One reason for this interest is the availability of botulinum toxin type A, which works superbly in the upper face. The rejuvenation of the upper face has created much interest in injectable filling agents and implant techniques that work equally well in the restoration of the lower face. One of the central tenets of soft tissue augmentation is the concept of the three-dimensional face. The youthful face has a soft, full appearance, as opposed to the flat, pulled, two-dimensional look often achieved by more traditional surgical approaches. Injectable filling agents can augment and even at times, replace pulling. Additionally, with the lip as the focal center of the lower face, subtle lip enhancement is here to stay, and is in fact, the number one indication for injectable fillers. Moreover, minimally invasive soft tissue augmentation offers cosmetic enhancement without the cost and recovery time associated with more invasive procedures. As more and more physicians take interest in minimally invasive surgery, courses in cosmetic surgery techniques are becoming increasingly popular at the medical meetings of many specialties. Today, physicians have a much larger armamentarium of techniques and materials with which to improve facial contours, ameliorate wrinkles, and provide esthetic rejuvenation to the face. For a substance or device to be amenable for soft tissue augmentation in the medical community, it must meet certain criteria. It must have both a high "use" potential, producing cosmetically pleasing results with a minimum undesirable reactions, and have a low abuse potential in that widespread or incorrect or indiscriminate use would not result in significant morbidity. It must be nonteratogenic, noncarcinogenic, and nonmigratory. In addition, the agent must provide predictable

  5. Multiobjective clearing of reactive power market in deregulated power systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rabiee, A.; Shayanfar, H.; Amjady, N.

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents a day-ahead reactive power market which is cleared in the form of multiobjective context. Total payment function (TPF) of generators, representing the payment paid to the generators for their reactive power compensation, is considered as the main objective function of reactive power market. Besides that, voltage security margin, overload index, and also voltage drop index are the other objective functions of the optimal power flow (OPF) problem to clear the reactive power market. A Multiobjective Mathematical Programming (MMP) formulation is implemented to solve the problem of reactive power market clearing using a fuzzy approach to choose the best compromise solution according to the specific preference among various non-dominated (pareto optimal) solutions. The effectiveness of the proposed method is examined based on the IEEE 24-bus reliability test system (IEEE 24-bus RTS). (author)

  6. Augmentation of sensory-evoked hemodynamic response in an early Alzheimer's disease mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jinho; Jeong, Yong

    2013-01-01

    Based on enlarged blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) responses in cognitively normal subjects at risk for Alzheimer's disease (AD), compensatory neuronal hyperactivation has been proposed as an early marker for diagnosis of AD. The BOLD response results from neurovascular coupling, i.e., hemodynamic response induced by neuronal activity. However, there has been no evidence of task-induced increases in hemodynamic response in animal models of AD. Here, we observed an augmented hemodynamic response pattern in a transgenic AβPP(SWE)/PS1ΔE9 mouse model of AD using three in vivo imaging methods: intrinsic optical signal imaging, multi-photon laser scanning microscopy, and laser Doppler flowmetry. Sensory stimulation resulted in augmented and prolonged hemodynamic responses in transgenic mice evidenced by changes in total, oxygenated, and deoxygenated hemoglobin concentration. This difference between transgenic and wild-type mice was significant at 7 months of age when amyloid plaques and cerebral amyloid angiopathy had developed but not at younger or older ages. Correspondingly, sensory stimulation-induced pial arteriole diameter was also augmented and prolonged in transgenic mice at 7 months of age. Cerebral blood flow response in transgenic mice was augmented but not prolonged. These results are consistent with the existence of BOLD signal hyperactivation in non-demented AD-risk human subjects, supporting its potential use as an early diagnostic marker of AD.

  7. Regenerate augmentation with bone marrow concentrate after traumatic bone loss

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Gessmann

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Distraction osteogenesis after post-traumatic segmental bone loss of the tibia is a complex and time-consuming procedure that is often complicated due to prolonged consolidation or complete insufficiency of the regenerate. The aim of this feasibility study was to investigate the potential of bone marrow aspiration concentrate (BMAC for percutaneous regenerate augmentation to accelerate bony consolidation of the regenerate. Eight patients (age 22-64 with an average posttraumatic bone defect of 82.4 mm and concomitant risk factors (nicotine abuse, soft-tissue defects, obesity and/or circulatory disorders were treated with a modified Ilizarov external frame using an intramedullary cable transportation system. At the end of the distraction phase, each patient was treated with a percutaneously injection of autologous BMAC into the centre of the regenerate. The concentration factor was analysed using flow cytometry. The mean follow up after frame removal was 10 (4-15 months. With a mean healing index (HI of 36.9 d/cm, bony consolidation of the regenerate was achieved in all eight cases. The mean concentration factor of the bone marrow aspirate was 4.6 (SD 1.23. No further operations concerning the regenerate were needed and no adverse effects were observed with the BMAC procedure. This procedure can be used for augmentation of the regenerate in cases of segmental bone transport. Further studies with a larger number of patients and control groups are needed to evaluate a possible higher success rate and accelerating effects on regenerate healing.

  8. Geoelectrical signatures of reactive mixing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, U.; Bandopadhyay, A.; Jougnot, D.; Le Borgne, T.; Meheust, Y.

    2017-12-01

    Characterizing the effects of fluid mixing on geochemical reactions in the subsurface is of paramount importance owing to their pivotal role in processes such as contaminant migration or aquifer remediation, to name a few [1]. Large velocity gradients in the porous media are expected to lead to enhanced diffusive mixing accompanied by augmented reaction rates [2]. Despite its importance, accurate monitoring of such processes still remains an open challenge, mainly due to the opacity of the medium and to the lack of access to it. However, in recent years, geophysical methods based on electrical conductivity and polarization have come up as a promising tool for mapping and monitoring such reactions in the subsurface. In this regard, one of the main challenges is to properly characterize the multiple sources of electrical signals and in particular isolate the influence of reactive mixing on the electrical conductivity from those of other sources [3]. In this work, we explore the coupling between fluid mixing, reaction and charge migration in porous media to evaluate the potential of obtaining a spatially-resolved measurement of local reaction rates in the subsurface from electrical measurements. To this end, we employ a lamellar description of the mixing interface [4] with novel semi-analytical upscaling techniques to quantify changes in electrical conductivity induced by chemical reactions across mixing fronts. The changes in electrical conductivity are strongly dependent on the concentration of ionic species as well as on the polarization of the pore (water) solution around the grains, which in turn are controlled by local reaction rates and, consequently, by the local velocity gradients. Hence, our results essentially suggest that local variations in the electrical conductivity may be quantitatively related to the mixing and reaction dynamics, and thus be used as a measurement tool to characterize these dynamics. References 1. M. Dentz, T. Le Borgne, A. Englert

  9. Immune reactivities against gums.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vojdani, Aristo; Vojdani, Charlene

    2015-01-01

    Different kinds of gums from various sources enjoy an extremely broad range of commercial and industrial use, from food and pharmaceuticals to printing and adhesives. Although generally recognized as safe by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA), gums have a history of association with sensitive or allergic reactions. In addition, studies have shown that gums have a structural, molecular similarity to a number of common foods. A possibility exists for cross-reactivity. Due to the widespread use of gums in almost every aspect of modern life, the overall goal of the current investigation was to determine the degree of immune reactivity to various gum antigens in the sera of individuals representing the general population. The study was a randomized, controlled trial. 288 sera purchased from a commercial source. The sera was screened for immunoglobulin G (IgG) and immunoglobulin E (IgE) antibodies against extracts of mastic gum, carrageenan, xantham gum, guar gum, gum tragacanth, locust bean gum, and β-glucan, using indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) testing. For each gum antigen, inhibition testing was performed on the 4 sera that showed the highest IgG and IgE immune reactivity against the different gums used in the study. Inhibition testing on these same sera for sesame albumin, lentil, corn, rice, pineapple, peanut, pea protein, shrimp, or kidney bean was used to determine the cross-reactivity of these foods with the gum. Of the 288 samples, 4.2%-27% of the specimens showed a significant elevation in IgG antibodies against various gums. Only 4 of 288, or 1.4%, showed a simultaneous elevation of the IgG antibody against all 7 gum extracts. For the IgE antibody, 15.6%-29.1% of the specimens showed an elevation against the various gums. A significant percentage of the specimens, 12.8%, simultaneously produced IgE antibodies against all 7 tested extracts. Overall, the percentage of elevation in IgE antibodies against different gum extracts, with

  10. What makes ecological systems reactive?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snyder, Robin E

    2010-06-01

    Although perturbations from a stable equilibrium must ultimately vanish, they can grow initially, and the maximum initial growth rate is called reactivity. Reactivity thus identifies systems that may undergo transient population surges or drops in response to perturbations; however, we lack biological and mathematical intuition about what makes a system reactive. This paper presents upper and lower bounds on reactivity for an arbitrary linearized model, explores their strictness, and discusses their biological implications. I find that less stable systems (i.e. systems with long transients) have a smaller possible range of reactivities for which no perturbations grow. Systems with more species have a higher capacity to be reactive, assuming species interactions do not weaken too rapidly as the number of species increases. Finally, I find that in discrete time, reactivity is determined largely by mean interaction strength and neither discrete nor continuous time reactivity are sensitive to food web topology. 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. MVA power flow and loss analysis for electricity market

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, Z.Q.; Chen, G.Z.

    2001-01-01

    MVA power-flow and loss analysis is the basis for allocating the fixed costs and power losses under electricity-market deregulation. It is pointed out that the decomposition allocation of active and reactive power losses is not reasonable. The theory of active and reactive loss allocation and branch-power-flow decomposition has been proposed. Various contributory factors have been deduced. These contributory factors include the contribution factors of the active and reactive generation power, load-power-to-branch flows, the contribution factors of active and reactive generation power to active and reactive load power, the contribution factors of active and reactive load power to generation power, and the contribution factors of active and reactive load power and active and reactive generation power to line power losses. The detailed calculation results are presented and analysed, demonstrating that the theory presented provides a good charging algorithm for all the market participants. (Author)

  12. Bearing for the reactivation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santamaria Alexandra

    2003-01-01

    Ecopetrol undertook an aggressive plan to reactivate the activities of seismic that allows fulfilling the goals proposed for this year (2003). Although the production registered a descent of 9%, the financial results throw utilities for $1.1 trillion pesos to the closing of September and contributions in bonuses for $1.2 trillions. The author also refers to the general balance, to the finances, raw production, taxes and transfers

  13. Adaptive Monocular Visual-Inertial SLAM for Real-Time Augmented Reality Applications in Mobile Devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piao, Jin-Chun; Kim, Shin-Dug

    2017-11-07

    Simultaneous localization and mapping (SLAM) is emerging as a prominent issue in computer vision and next-generation core technology for robots, autonomous navigation and augmented reality. In augmented reality applications, fast camera pose estimation and true scale are important. In this paper, we present an adaptive monocular visual-inertial SLAM method for real-time augmented reality applications in mobile devices. First, the SLAM system is implemented based on the visual-inertial odometry method that combines data from a mobile device camera and inertial measurement unit sensor. Second, we present an optical-flow-based fast visual odometry method for real-time camera pose estimation. Finally, an adaptive monocular visual-inertial SLAM is implemented by presenting an adaptive execution module that dynamically selects visual-inertial odometry or optical-flow-based fast visual odometry. Experimental results show that the average translation root-mean-square error of keyframe trajectory is approximately 0.0617 m with the EuRoC dataset. The average tracking time is reduced by 7.8%, 12.9%, and 18.8% when different level-set adaptive policies are applied. Moreover, we conducted experiments with real mobile device sensors, and the results demonstrate the effectiveness of performance improvement using the proposed method.

  14. Adaptive Monocular Visual–Inertial SLAM for Real-Time Augmented Reality Applications in Mobile Devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin-Chun Piao

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Simultaneous localization and mapping (SLAM is emerging as a prominent issue in computer vision and next-generation core technology for robots, autonomous navigation and augmented reality. In augmented reality applications, fast camera pose estimation and true scale are important. In this paper, we present an adaptive monocular visual–inertial SLAM method for real-time augmented reality applications in mobile devices. First, the SLAM system is implemented based on the visual–inertial odometry method that combines data from a mobile device camera and inertial measurement unit sensor. Second, we present an optical-flow-based fast visual odometry method for real-time camera pose estimation. Finally, an adaptive monocular visual–inertial SLAM is implemented by presenting an adaptive execution module that dynamically selects visual–inertial odometry or optical-flow-based fast visual odometry. Experimental results show that the average translation root-mean-square error of keyframe trajectory is approximately 0.0617 m with the EuRoC dataset. The average tracking time is reduced by 7.8%, 12.9%, and 18.8% when different level-set adaptive policies are applied. Moreover, we conducted experiments with real mobile device sensors, and the results demonstrate the effectiveness of performance improvement using the proposed method.

  15. Adaptive Monocular Visual–Inertial SLAM for Real-Time Augmented Reality Applications in Mobile Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piao, Jin-Chun; Kim, Shin-Dug

    2017-01-01

    Simultaneous localization and mapping (SLAM) is emerging as a prominent issue in computer vision and next-generation core technology for robots, autonomous navigation and augmented reality. In augmented reality applications, fast camera pose estimation and true scale are important. In this paper, we present an adaptive monocular visual–inertial SLAM method for real-time augmented reality applications in mobile devices. First, the SLAM system is implemented based on the visual–inertial odometry method that combines data from a mobile device camera and inertial measurement unit sensor. Second, we present an optical-flow-based fast visual odometry method for real-time camera pose estimation. Finally, an adaptive monocular visual–inertial SLAM is implemented by presenting an adaptive execution module that dynamically selects visual–inertial odometry or optical-flow-based fast visual odometry. Experimental results show that the average translation root-mean-square error of keyframe trajectory is approximately 0.0617 m with the EuRoC dataset. The average tracking time is reduced by 7.8%, 12.9%, and 18.8% when different level-set adaptive policies are applied. Moreover, we conducted experiments with real mobile device sensors, and the results demonstrate the effectiveness of performance improvement using the proposed method. PMID:29112143

  16. Repeated vertebral augmentation for new vertebral compression fractures of postvertebral augmentation patients: a nationwide cohort study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liang CL

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Cheng-Loong Liang,1 Hao-Kwan Wang,1 Fei-Kai Syu,2 Kuo-Wei Wang,1 Kang Lu,1 Po-Chou Liliang1 1Department of Neurosurgery, E-Da Hospital, I-Shou University, Kaohsiung City, Taiwan; 2Department of Pharmacy, China Medical University Hospital, Taichung City, Taiwan Purpose: Postvertebral augmentation vertebral compression fractures are common; repeated vertebral augmentation is usually performed for prompt pain relief. This study aimed to evaluate the incidence and risk factors of repeat vertebral augmentation.Methods: We performed a retrospective, nationwide, population-based longitudinal observation study, using the National Health Insurance Research Database (NHIRD of Taiwan. All patients who received vertebral augmentation for vertebral compression fractures were evaluated. The collected data included patient characteristics (demographics, comorbidities, and medication exposure and repeat vertebral augmentation. Kaplan–Meier and stratified Cox proportional hazard regressions were performed for analyses.Results: The overall incidence of repeat vertebral augmentation was 11.3% during the follow-up until 2010. Patients with the following characteristics were at greater risk for repeat vertebral augmentation: female sex (AOR=1.24; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.10–2.36, advanced age (AOR=1.60; 95% CI: 1.32–2.08, diabetes mellitus (AOR=4.31; 95% CI: 4.05–5.88, cerebrovascular disease (AOR=4.09; 95% CI: 3.44–5.76, dementia (AOR=1.97; 95% CI: 1.69–2.33, blindness or low vision (AOR=3.72; 95% CI: 2.32–3.95, hypertension (AOR=2.58; 95% CI: 2.35–3.47, and hyperlipidemia (AOR=2.09; 95% CI: 1.67–2.22. Patients taking calcium/ vitamin D (AOR=2.98; 95% CI: 1.83–3.93, bisphosphonates (AOR=2.11; 95% CI: 1.26–2.61, or calcitonin (AOR=4.59; 95% CI: 3.40–5.77 were less likely to undergo repeat vertebral augmentation; however, those taking steroids (AOR=7.28; 95% CI: 6.32–8.08, acetaminophen (AOR=3.54; 95% CI: 2.75–4.83, or nonsteroidal

  17. Augmented Reality Edugame Senjata Tradisional Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Endah Sudarmilah

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Senjata tradisional merupakan sebuah produk yang berkaitan erat dengan budaya suatu masyarakat. Selain berfungsi sebagai senjata, senjata tradisional telah menjadi identitas suatu bangsa yang membantu memperkaya khasanah budaya nusantara. Pendidikan di Indonesia berpedoman pada kurikulum baru yang disebut kurikulum 2013. Salah satu materi kurikulum mengarahkan siswa untuk belajar tentang senjata tradisional bentuk senjata tradisional. Berdasarkan pada masalah yang timbul dari kurikulum 2013, peneliti menyiapkan metode pembelajaran dengan menggabungkan Augmented Reality (AR dengan permainan edukasi berbasis adventure game dalam menyajikan materi keanekaragaman budaya Indonesia, terutama untuk senjata tradisional sehingga siswa memiliki semangat dalam belajar tentang keanekaragaman budaya Indonesia khusunya senjata.

  18. Electromagnetic acceleration studies with augmented rails

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maruo, T.; Fujioka, K.; Nagaoka, K.; Okamoto, A.; Ikuta, K.; Nemoto, K.

    1991-01-01

    A comparative study of electromagnetic acceleration in the rail-type accelerators with two kinds of rail geometry was carried out experimentally. The accelerators were energized by 200kJ capacitor bank and the weight of loaded projectiles was about 1.3 grams with 10mm x 10mm square bore. The attained velocity was 4.3km/s in the augmented accelerator, while it was 3.8km/s in the classical device. In this paper these differences in attained velocity are briefly discussed. A theoretical understanding of the rail erosion is also described

  19. Terrain Simplification Research in Augmented Scene Modeling

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    environment. As one of the most important tasks in augmented scene modeling, terrain simplification research has gained more and more attention. In this paper, we mainly focus on point selection problem in terrain simplification using triangulated irregular network. Based on the analysis and comparison of traditional importance measures for each input point, we put forward a new importance measure based on local entropy. The results demonstrate that the local entropy criterion has a better performance than any traditional methods. In addition, it can effectively conquer the "short-sight" problem associated with the traditional methods.

  20. A Survey on Applications of Augmented Reality

    OpenAIRE

    Andrea Sanna; Federico Manuri

    2016-01-01

    The term Augmented Reality (AR) refers to a set of technologies and devices able to enhance and improve human perception, thus bridging the gap between real and virtual space. Physical and artificial objects are mixed together in a hybrid space where the user can move without constraints. This mediated reality is spread in our everyday life: work, study, training, relaxation, time spent traveling are just some of the moments in which you can use AR applications.This paper aims to provide an o...