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Sample records for flow assisted corrosion

  1. Modelling hydrodynamic parameters to predict flow assisted corrosion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poulson, B.; Greenwell, B.; Chexal, B.; Horowitz, J.

    1992-01-01

    During the past 15 years, flow assisted corrosion has been a worldwide problem in the power generating industry. The phenomena is complex and depends on environment, material composition, and hydrodynamic factors. Recently, modeling of flow assisted corrosion has become a subject of great importance. A key part of this effort is modeling the hydrodynamic aspects of this issue. This paper examines which hydrodynamic parameter should be used to correlate the occurrence and rate of flow assisted corrosion with physically meaningful parameters, discusses ways of measuring the relevant hydrodynamic parameter, and describes how the hydrodynamic data is incorporated into the predictive model

  2. Experiments and models of general corrosion and flow-assisted corrosion of materials in nuclear reactor environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, William Gordon

    Corrosion and material degradation issues are of concern to all industries. However, the nuclear power industry must conform to more stringent construction, fabrication and operational guidelines due to the perceived additional risk of operating with radioactive components. Thus corrosion and material integrity are of considerable concern for the operators of nuclear power plants and the bodies that govern their operations. In order to keep corrosion low and maintain adequate material integrity, knowledge of the processes that govern the material's breakdown and failure in a given environment are essential. The work presented here details the current understanding of the general corrosion of stainless steel and carbon steel in nuclear reactor primary heat transport systems (PHTS) and examines the mechanisms and possible mitigation techniques for flow-assisted corrosion (FAC) in CANDU outlet feeder pipes. Mechanistic models have been developed based on first principles and a 'solution-pores' mechanism of metal corrosion. The models predict corrosion rates and material transport in the PHTS of a pressurized water reactor (PWR) and the influence of electrochemistry on the corrosion and flow-assisted corrosion of carbon steel in the CANDU outlet feeders. In-situ probes, based on an electrical resistance technique, were developed to measure the real-time corrosion rate of reactor materials in high-temperature water. The probes were used to evaluate the effects of coolant pH and flow on FAC of carbon steel as well as demonstrate of the use of titanium dioxide as a coolant additive to mitigated FAC in CANDU outlet feeder pipes.

  3. Flow-assisted corrosion of steel and the influence of Cr and Cu additions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cubicciotti, D.

    1988-01-01

    Flow-assisted corrosion (FAC) of steel feedwater lines occurs by dissolution of the surface oxide layer on the steel. The solubility of iron in water under FAC conditions is discussed through the use of potential-pH diagrams (Pourbaix diagrams). Alloying additions of chromium and copper both decrease FAC. An assessment is presented that Cr additions decrease FAC by forming a mixed oxide with iron instead of a pure iron oxide. The solubility of iron from the mixed oxide is smaller than for pure iron oxide and leads to a smaller FAC rate. The stable form of copper under FAC conditions is not the mixed iron-copper oxide but metallic copper, which may act in the underlying steel surface to impede FAC. (orig.)

  4. A mechanistic model for predicting flow-assisted and general corrosion of carbon steel in reactor primary coolants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lister, D. [University of New Brunswick, Fredericton, NB (Canada). Dept. of Chemical Engineering; Lang, L.C. [Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd., Chalk River Lab., ON (Canada)

    2002-07-01

    Flow-assisted corrosion (FAC) of carbon steel in high-temperature lithiated water can be described with a model that invokes dissolution of the protective oxide film and erosion of oxide particles that are loosened as a result. General corrosion under coolant conditions where oxide is not dissolved is described as well. In the model, the electrochemistry of magnetite dissolution and precipitation and the effect of particle size on solubility move the dependence on film thickness of the diffusion processes (and therefore the corrosion rate) away from reciprocal. Particle erosion under dissolving conditions is treated stochastically and depends upon the fluid shear stress at the surface. The corrosion rate dependence on coolant flow under FAC conditions then becomes somewhat less than that arising purely from fluid shear (proportional to the velocity squared). Under non-dissolving conditions, particle erosion occurs infrequently and general corrosion is almost unaffected by flow For application to a CANDU primary circuit and its feeders, the model was bench-marked against the outlet feeder S08 removed from the Point Lepreau reactor, which furnished one value of film thickness and one of corrosion rate for a computed average coolant velocity. Several constants and parameters in the model had to be assumed or were optimised, since values for them were not available. These uncertainties are no doubt responsible for the rather high values of potential that evolved as steps in the computation. The model predicts film thickness development and corrosion rate for the whole range of coolant velocities in outlet feeders very well. In particular, the detailed modelling of FAC in the complex geometry of one outlet feeder (F11) is in good agreement with measurements. When the particle erosion computations are inserted in the balance equations for the circuit, realistic values of crud level are obtained. The model also predicts low corrosion rates and thick oxide films for inlet

  5. A mechanistic model for predicting flow-assisted and general corrosion of carbon steel in reactor primary coolants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lister, D.

    2002-01-01

    Flow-assisted corrosion (FAC) of carbon steel in high-temperature lithiated water can be described with a model that invokes dissolution of the protective oxide film and erosion of oxide particles that are loosened as a result. General corrosion under coolant conditions where oxide is not dissolved is described as well. In the model, the electrochemistry of magnetite dissolution and precipitation and the effect of particle size on solubility move the dependence on film thickness of the diffusion processes (and therefore the corrosion rate) away from reciprocal. Particle erosion under dissolving conditions is treated stochastically and depends upon the fluid shear stress at the surface. The corrosion rate dependence on coolant flow under FAC conditions then becomes somewhat less than that arising purely from fluid shear (proportional to the velocity squared). Under non-dissolving conditions, particle erosion occurs infrequently and general corrosion is almost unaffected by flow For application to a CANDU primary circuit and its feeders, the model was bench-marked against the outlet feeder S08 removed from the Point Lepreau reactor, which furnished one value of film thickness and one of corrosion rate for a computed average coolant velocity. Several constants and parameters in the model had to be assumed or were optimised, since values for them were not available. These uncertainties are no doubt responsible for the rather high values of potential that evolved as steps in the computation. The model predicts film thickness development and corrosion rate for the whole range of coolant velocities in outlet feeders very well. In particular, the detailed modelling of FAC in the complex geometry of one outlet feeder (F11) is in good agreement with measurements. When the particle erosion computations are inserted in the balance equations for the circuit, realistic values of crud level are obtained. The model also predicts low corrosion rates and thick oxide films for inlet

  6. Effect of a nano-sized TiC particle addition on the flow-assisted corrosion resistance of SA 106B carbon steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jin-Ju; Park, Eun-Kwang; Lee, Gyoung-Ja; Rhee, Chang-Kyu; Lee, Min-Ku

    2017-09-01

    Carbon steel with dispersed nano-sized TiC ceramic particles was fabricated by the ex-situ introduction of the particles into the melt, with the flow-assisted corrosion (FAC) resistance then investigated in the presence and absence of TiC nanoparticles using a once-through type of FAC loop test. From the potentiodynamic polarization curves, the current density at any given anodic potential was decreased and the open-circuit potential was increased by the addition of TiC nanoparticles. In addition, when the nano-sized TiC particles were added, the FAC rate was 1.38 times lower than that of carbon steel without TiC nanoparticles, indicating an improvement of the FAC resistance due to the homogeneous distribution of the TiC reinforcing nanoparticles.

  7. Development of Flow Accelerated Corrosion Reduction Technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heo, Min Bum; Choi, Won Yeol; Lee, Jong Chan; Lim, Dong Seok; Kwon, Byung Il; Ku, Hee Kwon; Kim, Jong Uk [FNC Tech, Yongin (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    Development of flow accelerated corrosion reduction technology is necessary for prevent this kind of accidents. This study deals with development of flow accelerated corrosion reduction technology through platinum injection and developed of flow accelerated corrosion reduction technology by imitating water chemical condition in PWR secondary system in practice. In addition, in order to get reliability of water chemical simulator in PWR secondary system, analyzed and compared with test result through CFD analysis. This study composed test device that can simulate water chemical environment in PWR secondary system, in order to develop flow accelerated corrosion reduction , and evaluated the ratio of corrosion in water chemical environment in PWR secondary system. In conclusion, corrosion ratio of low alloy steel material that includes more Cr and Mo was lower. And the results were confirmed to be the maximum corrosion rate in the case that replicate the 90 elbow. Additionally, inserted Pt nano particle for developing flow accelerated corrosion rate reduction technology, the test results, it was confirmed for about 80% of the flow accelerated corrosion rate reduction than before input.

  8. Stress-Assisted Corrosion in Boiler Tubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Preet M Singh; Steven J Pawel

    2006-05-27

    A number of industrial boilers, including in the pulp and paper industry, needed to replace their lower furnace tubes or decommission many recovery boilers due to stress-assisted corrosion (SAC) on the waterside of boiler tubes. More than half of the power and recovery boilers that have been inspected reveal SAC damage, which portends significant energy and economic impacts. The goal of this project was to clarify the mechanism of stress-assisted corrosion (SAC) of boiler tubes for the purpose of determining key parameters in its mitigation and control. To accomplish this in-situ strain measurements on boiler tubes were made. Boiler water environment was simulated in the laboratory and effects of water chemistry on SAC initiation and growth were evaluated in terms of industrial operations. Results from this project have shown that the dissolved oxygen is single most important factor in SAC initiation on carbon steel samples. Control of dissolved oxygen can be used to mitigate SAC in industrial boilers. Results have also shown that sharp corrosion fatigue and bulbous SAC cracks have similar mechanism but the morphology is different due to availability of oxygen during boiler shutdown conditions. Results are described in the final technical report.

  9. Effective flow-accelerated corrosion programs in nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Esselman, Thomas C.; McBrine, William J.

    2004-01-01

    Piping Flow-Accelerated Corrosion Programs in nuclear power generation facilities are classically comprised of the selection of inspection locations with the assistance of a predictive methodology such as the Electric Power Research Institute computer codes CHECMATE or CHECWORKS, performing inspections, conducting structural evaluations on the inspected components, and implementing the appropriate sample expansion and corrective actions. Performing such a sequence of steps can be effective in identifying thinned components and implementing appropriate short term and long term actions necessary to resolve flow-accelerated corrosion related problems. A maximally effective flow-accelerated corrosion (FAC) program requires an understanding of many programmatic details. These include the procedural control of the program, effective use of historical information, managing the activities performed during a limited duration outage, allocating resources based on risk allocation, having an acute awareness of how the plant is operated, investigating components removed from the plant, and several others. This paper will describe such details and methods that will lead to a flow-accelerated corrosion program that effectively minimizes the risk of failure due to flow-accelerated corrosion and provide full and complete documentation of the program. (author)

  10. The management of the flow assisted corrosion on the nuclear power plants of the fleet of EDF: a strategy of commitment for the control of the ageing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trevin, S.; Moutrille, M.P.; Caylar, P.; Delacoux, D.; Gipon, E.; Mellin, N.; Qiu, G.; Alos Ramos, O.; Tarabay, J.; Mansour, C.

    2015-01-01

    Flow accelerated corrosion (FAC) is very effective for nuclear power plants. This generalized corrosion can lead to the rupture of pipes. EDF has developed during these 20 last years the software called BRT-CICERO for the surveillance of the secondary piping system of its Pressurized Water Reactors (PWRs). This software enables the operator to calculate the FAC wear rates taking into account all the influencing parameters such as: pipe isometrics, chromium content of the steel, chemical conditioning and operating parameters of the secondary circuit (temperature, pressure, etc.). This is a major tool for the operators to organize the maintenance and to plan the inspections. In the framework of the French pressure vessel law issued on March 15. 2000, the software BRT-CICERO has been recognized by the French authority for the FAC surveillance on the secondary pressure piping lines of the EDF 58 nuclear reactors. It takes advantage of the experience feedback of the French fleet and of the improvements. BRT-CICERO is frequently updated. A guideline is associated to BRT-CICERO to define the rules and the domain of use and to take advantage of all its functionalities. (authors)

  11. Modeling flow-accelerated corrosion in CANDU

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burrill, K.A.

    1995-11-01

    Flow-accelerated corrosion (FAC) of large areas of carbon steel in various circuits of CANDU plants generates significant quantities of corrosion products. As well, the relatively rapid corrosion rate can lead to operating difficulties with some components. Three areas in the plant are identified and a simple model of mass-transfer controlled corrosion of the carbon steel is derived and applied to these areas. The areas and the significant finding for each are given below: A number of lines in the feedwater system generate sludge by FAC, which causes steam generator fouling. Prediction of the steady-state iron concentration at the feedtrain outlet compares well with measured values. Carbon steel outlet feeders connect the reactor core with the steam generators. The feeder surface provides the dissolved iron through FAC, which fouls the primary side of the steam generator tubes, and can lead to derating of the plant and difficulty in tube inspection. Segmented carbon steel divider plates in the steam generator primary head leak at an increasing rate with time. The leakage rate is strongly dependent on the tightness of the overlapping joints. which undergo FAC at an increasing rate with time. (author) 7 refs., 5 tabs., 6 figs

  12. Effect of Flow Velocity on Corrosion Rate and Corrosion Protection Current of Marine Material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Seong Jong [Kunsan National University, Kunsan (Korea, Republic of); Han, Min Su; Jang, Seok Ki; Kim, Seong Jong [Mokpo National Maritime University, Mokpo (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    In spite of highly advanced paint coating techniques, corrosion damage of marine metal and alloys increase more and more due to inherent micro-cracks and porosities in coatings formed during the coating process. Furthermore, flowing seawater conditions promote the breakdown of the protective oxide of the materials introducing more oxygen into marine environments, leading to the acceleration of corrosion. Various corrosion protection methods are available to prevent steel from marine corrosion. Cathodic protection is one of the useful corrosion protection methods by which the potential of the corroded metal is intentionally lowered to an immune state having the advantage of providing additional protection barriers to steel exposed to aqueous corrosion or soil corrosion, in addition to the coating. In the present investigation, the effect of flow velocity was examined for the determination of the optimum corrosion protection current density in cathodic protection as well as the corrosion rate of the steel. It is demonstrated from the result that the material corrosion under dynamic flowing conditions seems more prone to corrosion than under static conditions.

  13. Effect of flow on corrosion in catenary risers and its corrosion inhibitor performance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferreira, Pedro Altoe; Magalhaes, Alvaro Augusto Oliveira; Silva, Jussara de Mello [PETROBRAS S.A., Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Kang, Cheolho; More, Parimal P. [Det Norske Veritas (DNV), Oslo (Norway)

    2009-07-01

    In oil and gas production, multiphase flow is often encountered and a range of different flow patterns can be experienced in pipelines. The flow regime transition and flow characteristics can be changed with the change of pipeline topography, which affects the corrosion and the performance of corrosion inhibitor in these multiphase pipelines. This paper outlines on the effect of inclination on the flow characteristics and their subsequent effect on corrosion rates. Also, this paper presents on the performance of three candidate corrosion inhibitors under severe slugging conditions at low water cut. For the simulation of offshore flow lines and risers, the experiments were carried out in a 44 m long, 10 cm diameter, three different pipeline inclinations of 0, 3 and 45 degrees. Light condensate oil with a viscosity of 2.5 cP at room temperature was used and water cut was 20%. The results indicated that the baseline corrosion rate in 45 degrees showed higher than other inclinations. Each corrosion inhibitor showed a different inhibitor performance. (author)

  14. CHECWORKS integrated software for corrosion control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schefski, C.; Pietralik; Hazelton, T.

    1997-01-01

    CHECWORKS, a comprehensive software package for managing Flow-Accelerated Corrosion (FAC, also called erosion-corrosion and flow-assisted corrosion) concerns, is expanding to include other systems and other aspects of corrosion control in CANDU reactors. This paper will outline CHECWORKS applications at various CANDU stations and further plans for CHECWORKS to become a code for comprehensive corrosion control management. (author)

  15. Microbiologically induced corrosion of carbon steel under continuous flow conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tunaru, Mariana; Dragomir, Maria; Voicu, Anca

    2008-01-01

    Microbiologically induced corrosion is the label generally applied to corrosion involving the action of bacteria on metal surfaces. While different combinations of bacterial species, materials and chemical constituents are interrelated factors, stagnant water is the factor most often mentioned in reported cases. This paper presents the results obtained regarding the testing of microbiologically induced corrosion of carbon steel under continuous flow conditions in the presence of iron-oxidizing bacteria. The tests were performed on coupons of SA106gr.B exposed both in stagnant conditions and in flow conditions. The surfaces of these coupons were studied by metallographic technique, while the developed biofilms were analysed using microbiological technique. The correlation of all the results which were obtained emphasized that the minimizing the occurrence of stagnant or low-flow conditions can prove effective in reducing the risk of microbiologically induced corrosion in plant cooling-water systems. (authors)

  16. Inhibition of Weld Corrosion in Flowing Brines Containing Carbon Dioxide

    OpenAIRE

    Alawadhi, Khaled

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this research was to study the effectiveness of a typical oilfield corrosion inhibitor, which is considered to be a green inhibitor (non toxic to the environment) in controlling internal corrosion of welded X65 pipeline steel in brines saturated with carbon dioxide at one bar pressure, under dynamic flowing conditions, over a range of temperatures. Several experimental configurations were used ranging from a simple flat plate design to a novel rotating cylinder electrode, to all...

  17. Flow accelerated corrosion and erosion-corrosion of RAFM steel in liquid breeders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kondo, Masatoshi; Muroga, Takeo; Sagara, Akio

    2010-11-01

    Corrosion experiments for RAFM, JLF-1 steel (Fe-9Cr-2w-0.1C) in 3types of flowing liquid breeders (i.e. Li, Pb-17Li and Flinak) were performed at the same conditions, and the compatibility was compared with each other. The weight loss of the specimens in the fluids was evaluated by the corrosion model based on mass transfer. The model can be applied to different test systems with different quantity of liquid breeders and different surface area of the systems. The flow enhanced the dissolution of element of the steel in the fluids. The mechanism of an erosion-corrosion in the liquid breeders was the peeling off of the corroded steel surface by the flow. (author)

  18. Irradiation-assisted stress-corrosion cracking in austenitic alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Was, G.S.; Andresen, P.L.

    1992-01-01

    Irradiation-assisted stress-corrosion cracking (IASCC) in austentic alloys is a complicated phenomenon that poses a difficult problem for designers and operators of nuclear plants. Because IASCC accelerates the deterioration of various reactor components, it is imperative that it be understood and modeled to maintain reactor safety. Unfortunately, the costs and dangers of gathering data on radiation effects are high, and the phenomenon itself is so complex that it is difficult to enumerate all of the causes. This article reviews current knowledge of IASCC and describes the goals of ongoing work

  19. Irradiation Assisted Stress Corrosion Cracking of austenitic stainless steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsukada, Takashi [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    1998-03-01

    Irradiation Assisted Stress Corrosion Cracking (IASCC) of austenitic stainless steels in oxygenated high temperature water was studied. The IASCC failure has been considered as a degradation phenomenon potential not only in the present light water reactors but rather common in systems where the materials are exposed simultaneously to radiation and water environments. In this study, effects of the material and environmental factors on the IASCC of austenitic stainless steels were investigated in order to understand the underlying mechanism. The following three types of materials were examined: a series of model alloys irradiated at normal water-cooled research reactors (JRR-3M and JMTR), the material irradiated at a spectrally tailored mixed-spectrum research reactor (ORR), and the material sampled from a duct tube of a fuel assembly used in the experimental LMFBR (JOYO). Post-irradiation stress corrosion cracking tests in a high-temperature water, electrochemical corrosion tests, etc., were performed at hot laboratories. Based on the results obtained, analyses were made on the effects of alloying/impurity elements, irradiation/testing temperatures and material processing, (i.e., post-irradiation annealing and cold working) on the cracking behavior. On the basis of the analyses, possible remedies against IASCC in the core internals were discussed from viewpoints of complex combined effects among materials, environment and processing factors. (author). 156 refs.

  20. Flow-accelerated corrosion characteristics of galvanically coupled dissimilar metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Yoon Seok; Kim, Jnng Gu

    2001-01-01

    Flow accelerated galvanic corrosion characteristics of a carbon steel coupled to stainless steel were investigated in deaerated alkaline-chloride solutions as a function of flow velocities, pH and temperatures. The electrochemical properties of specimens were investigated by potentiodynamic test and galvanic corrosion test using RCE(Rotating Cylinder Electrode). Carbon steel showed active behavior in the deaerated alkaline-chloride solution. The galvanic current density of carbon steel increased with increasing flow velocity and temperature, but decreased with increasing pH. Flow velocity had a small effect on the galvanic current density at 25 deg. C, whereas the flow velocity increased galvanic current density significantly at 50 .deg. C and 75 .deg. C. This might be due to the increased solubility of magnetite at the higher temperatures

  1. Corrosion in Supercritical carbon Dioxide: Materials, Environmental Purity, Surface Treatments, and Flow Issues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sridharan, Kumar; Anderson, Mark

    2013-12-10

    separately to high purity CO{sub 2}. Task 3: Evaluation of surface treatments on the corrosion performance of alloys in supercritical CO{sub 2}: Surface treatments can be very beneficial in improving corrosion resistance. Shot peening and yttrium and aluminum surface treatments will be investigated. Shot peening refines the surface grain sizes and promotes protective Cr-oxide layer formation. Both yttrium and aluminum form highly stable oxide layers (Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}), which can get incorporated in the growing Fe-oxide layer to form an impervious complex oxide to enhance corrosion resistance. Task 4: Study of flow-assisted corrosion of select alloys in supercritical CO{sub 2} under a selected set of test conditions: To study the effects of flow-assisted corrosion, tests will be conducted in a supercritical CO{sub 2} flow loop. An existing facility used for supercritical water flow studies at the proposing university will be modified for use in this task. The system is capable of flow velocities up to 10 m/s and can operate at temperatures and pressures of up to 650°C and 20 MPa, respectively. All above tasks will be performed in conjunction with detailed materials characterization and analysis using scanning electron microscopy/energy dispersive spectroscopy (SEM-EDS), x-ray diffraction (XRD), Auger electron spectroscopy (AES) techniques, and weight change measurements. Inlet and outlet gas compositions will be monitored using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GCMS).

  2. High-Confidence Flow Accelerated Corrosion Screening Technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryu, Kyung Ha; Kim, Ji Hak; Hwang, Il Soon; Lee, Na Young; Kim, Ji Hyun

    2008-01-01

    All carbon steel pipes with fluid traveling through it could potentially be threatened by flowing fluid have a potential threat of Flow Accelerated Corrosion (FAC). FAC in a nuclear power plant (NPP) could cause not only pipe failure leading but fatalities sometimes. It is almost impossible to inspect all carbon steel pipes in NPPs, and FAC prediction programs such as CHECWORKS, WATHEC, and BRT-CICERO have limited capability to in predicting FAC area

  3. Irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking of austenitic alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Was, G.S.; Atzmon, M.

    1991-01-01

    An experimental program has been conducted to determine the mechanism of irradiation-assisted stress-corrosion cracking (IASCC) in austenitic stainless steel. High-energy protons have been used to produce grain boundary segregation and microstructural damage in samples of controlled impurity content. The densities of network dislocations and dislocation loops were determined by transmission electron microscopy and found to resemble those for neutron irradiation under LWR conditions. Grain boundary compositions were determined by in situ fracture and Auger spectroscopy, as well as by scanning transmission electron microscopy. Cr depletion and Ni segregation were observed in all irradiated samples, with the degree of segregation depending on the type and amount of impurities present. P, and to a lesser extent P, impurities were observed to segregate to the grain boundaries. Irradiation was found to increase the susceptibility of ultra-high-purity (UHP), and to a much lesser extent of UHP+P and UHP+S, alloys to intergranular SCC in 288 degree C water at 2 ppm O 2 and 0.5 μS/cm. No intergranular fracture was observed in arcon atmosphere, indicating the important role of corrosion in the embrittlement of irradiated samples. The absence of intergranular fracture in 288 degree C argon and room temperature tests also suggest that the embrittlement is not caused by hydrogen introduced by irradiation. Contrary to common belief, the presence of P impurities led to a significant improvement in IASCC over the ultrahigh purity alloy

  4. Two-phase flow experiments through intergranular stress corrosion cracks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Collier, R.P.; Norris, D.M.

    1984-01-01

    Experimental studies of critical two-phase water flow, through simulated and actual intergranular stress corrosion cracks, were performed to obtain data to evaluate a leak flow rate model and investigate acoustic transducer effectiveness in detecting and sizing leaks. The experimental program included a parametric study of the effects of crack geometry, fluid stagnation pressure and temperature, and crack surface roughness on leak flow rate. In addition, leak detection, location, and leak size estimation capabilities of several different acoustic transducers were evaluated as functions of leak rate and transducer position. This paper presents flow rate data for several different cracks and fluid conditions. It also presents the minimum flows rate detected with the acoustic sensors and a relationship between acoustic signal strength and leak flow rate

  5. Estimation of flow rates through intergranular stress corrosion cracks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Collier, R.P.; Norris, D.M.

    1984-01-01

    Experimental studies of critical two-phase water flow, through simulated and actual intergranular stress corrosion cracks, were performed to obtain data to evaluate a leak flow rate model and investigate acoustic transducer effectiveness in detecting and sizing leaks. The experimental program included a parametric study of the effects of crack geometry, fluid stagnation pressure and temperature, and crack surface roughness on leak flow rate. In addition, leak detection, location, and leak size estimation capabilities of several different acoustic transducers were evaluated as functions of leak rate and transducer position. This paper presents flow rate data for several different cracks and fluid conditions. It also presents the minimum flow rate detected with the acoustic sensors and a relationship between acoustic signal strength and leak flow rate

  6. Flow-induced corrosion behavior of absorbable magnesium-based stents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Juan; Giridharan, Venkataraman; Shanov, Vesselin; Xu, Zhigang; Collins, Boyce; White, Leon; Jang, Yongseok; Sankar, Jagannathan; Huang, Nan; Yun, Yeoheung

    2014-12-01

    The aim of this work was to study corrosion behavior of magnesium (Mg) alloys (MgZnCa plates and AZ31 stents) under varied fluid flow conditions representative of the vascular environment. Experiments revealed that fluid hydrodynamics, fluid flow velocity and shear stress play essential roles in the corrosion behavior of absorbable magnesium-based stent devices. Flow-induced shear stress (FISS) accelerates the overall corrosion (including localized, uniform, pitting and erosion corrosions) due to the increased mass transfer and mechanical force. FISS increased the average uniform corrosion rate, the localized corrosion coverage ratios and depths and the removal rate of corrosion products inside the corrosion pits. For MgZnCa plates, an increase of FISS results in an increased pitting factor but saturates at an FISS of ∼0.15Pa. For AZ31 stents, the volume loss ratio (31%) at 0.056Pa was nearly twice that (17%) at 0Pa before and after corrosion. Flow direction has a significant impact on corrosion behavior as more severe pitting and erosion corrosion was observed on the back ends of the MgZnCa plates, and the corrosion product layer facing the flow direction peeled off from the AZ31 stent struts. This study demonstrates that flow-induced corrosion needs be understood so that Mg-based stents in vascular environments can be effectively designed. Copyright © 2014 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Evaluation of the flow-accelerated corrosion downstream of an orifice. 2. Measurement of corrosion rate and evaluation on the effects of the flow field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagaya, Yukinori; Utanohara, Yoichi; Nakamura, Akira; Murase, Michio

    2008-01-01

    In this study, in order to evaluate the effects of flow field on corrosion rate due to flow accelerated corrosion (FAC), a corrosion rate downstream of an orifice was measured using the electric resistance method. The diameter of the pipe is 50 mm and that of the orifice is 24.3 mm, and flow velocity of the experimental loop was set at 5m/s, and the temperature of water was controlled within ±1 at 150deg-C. There were no significant circumferential difference in measured corrosion rate, and the maximum corrosion rate was observed at 1D or 2D downstream from the orifice. The ratios of the measured corrosion rate and the calculated wall shear stress at the 1D downstream from the orifice to the value at upstream under well developed flow agreed well. (author)

  8. Evaluation of flow accelerated corrosion by coupled analysis of corrosion and flow dynamics (2), flow dynamics calculations for determining mixing factors and mass transfer coefficients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uehara, Yasushi; Uchida, Shunsuke; Naitoh, Masanori; Okada, Hidetoshi; Koshizuka, Seiichi

    2009-01-01

    In order to predict and mitigate flow accelerated corrosion (FAC) of carbon steel piping in PWR and BWR secondary systems, computer program packages for evaluating FAC have been developed by coupling one through three dimensional (1-3D) computational flow dynamics (CFD) models and corrosion models. To evaluate corrosive conditions, e.g., oxygen concentration and electrochemical corrosion potential (ECP) along the flow path, flow pattern and temperature in each elemental volume were obtained with 1D computational flow dynamics (CFD) codes. Precise flow turbulence and mass transfer coefficients at the structure surface were calculated with 3D CFD codes to determine wall thinning rates. One of the engineering options is application of k-ε calculation as a 3D CFD code, which has limitation of detail evaluation of flow distribution at very surface of large scale piping. A combination of k-ε calculation and wall function was proposed to evaluate precise distribution of mass transfer coefficients with reasonable CPU volume and computing time and, at the same time, reasonable accuracy. (author)

  9. Observations and insights into Pb-assisted stress corrosion cracking of alloy 600 steam generator tubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas, L.; Bruemmer, Stephen M.

    2005-01-01

    Pb-assisted stress-corrosion cracking (PbSCC) of Alloy 600 steam-generator tubing in high-temperature-water service and laboratory tests were studied by analytical transmission electron microscopy of cross-sectioned samples. Examinations of pulled tubes from many pressurized water reactors revealed lead in cracks from 11 of 17 samples. Comparisons of the degraded intergranular structures with ones produced in simple laboratory tests with PbO in near-neutral AVT water showed that the PbSCC characteristics in service tubing could be reproduced without complex chemistries and heat-flow conditions that can occur during plant operation. Observations of intergranular and transgranular cracks promoted by Pb in the test samples also provided new insights into the mechanisms of PbSCC in mill-annealed and thermally treated Alloy 600

  10. Local effects in flow-accelerated corrosion wall thinning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pietralik, J.

    2006-01-01

    'Full text:' There is enough evidence that flow conditions play the dominant role locally in Flow-Accelerated Corrosion (FAC) under certain conditions, e.g., in CANDU feeders. While chemistry and materials set the overall potential for FAC, which can be low or high, flow conditions determine the local distribution of wall thinning. This relationship is not new and recent accurate measurements of FAC rate of a plant feeder bend confirm that the relationship between flow local conditions expressed by local mass transfer coefficient and FAC rate in CANDU feeder bends is close. There is also a lot of other direct and indirect, experimental and laboratory evidence about this relationship. This knowledge can be useful for minimizing inspection, predicting new locations for inspection, predicting the location with the highest FAC rate for a given piping component, e.g., feeder element, and determining what components or feeders and to what extent they should be replaced. It applies also to heat exchangers and steam generators. The objective of this paper is to examine the relationship between FAC rate and local flow parameters. For FAC, the most important flow parameter is mass transfer coefficient. The mass transfer coefficient describes the intensity of the transport of corrosion products from the oxide-water interface into the bulk water. Therefore, this parameter can be used for predicting the local distribution of FAC rate. It could also be used in planning experiments because time-varying surface roughness can explain the time-dependence of FAC rates. The paper presents plant and laboratory evidence about the relationship. In addition, it shows correlations for mass transfer coefficient in components that are highly susceptible to FAC. The role of surface roughness, wall shear stress, and local turbulence is also discussed. (author)

  11. Cause Analysis of Flow Accelerated Corrosion and Erosion-Corrosion Cases in Korea Nuclear Power Plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Y. S.; Lee, S. H. [Korea Hydro and Nuclear Power Co., Ltd., Gyeongju (Korea, Republic of); Hwang, K. M. [KEPCO Engineering and Construction Company, Gimcheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-08-15

    Significant piping wall thinning caused by Flow-Accelerated Corrosion (FAC) and Erosion-Corrosion (EC) continues to occur, even after the Mihama Power Station unit 3 secondary pipe rupture in 2004, in which workers were seriously injured or died. Nuclear power plants in many countries have experienced FAC and EC-related cases in steam cycle piping systems. Korea has also experienced piping wall thinning cases including thinning in the downstream straight pipe of a check valve in a feedwater pump line, the downstream elbow of a control valve in a feedwater flow control line, and failure of the straight pipe downstream of an orifice in an auxiliary steam return line. Cause analyses were performed by reviewing thickness data using Ultrasonic Techniques (UT) and, Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) images for the failed pipe, and numerical simulation results for FAC and EC cases in Korea Nuclear Power Plants. It was concluded that the main cause of wall thinning for the downstream pipe of a check valve is FAC caused by water vortex flow due to the internal flow shape of a check valve, the main cause of wall thinning for the downstream elbow of a control valve is FAC caused by a thickness difference with the upstream pipe, and the main cause of wall thinning for the downstream pipe of an orifice is FAC and EC caused by liquid droplets and vortex flow. In order to investigate more cases, additional analyses were performed with the review of a lot of thickness data for inspected pipes. The results showed that pipe wall thinning was also affected by the operating condition of upstream equipment. Management of FAC and EC based on these cases will focus on the downstream piping of abnormal or unusual operated equipment.

  12. Effect of flow conditions on flow accelerated corrosion in pipe bends

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mazhar, H.; Ching, C.Y.

    2015-01-01

    Flow Accelerated Corrosion (FAC) in piping systems is a safety and reliability problem in the nuclear industry. In this study, the pipe wall thinning rates and development of surface roughness in pipe bends are compared for single phase and two phase annular flow conditions. The FAC rates were measured using the dissolution of test sections cast from gypsum in water with a Schmidt number of 1280. The change in location and levels of maximum FAC under single phase and two phase flow conditions are examined. The comparison of the relative roughness indicates a higher effect for the surface roughness in single phase flow than in two phase flow. (author)

  13. Evaluation method of corrosive conditions in cooling systems of nuclear power plants by combined analyses of flow dynamics and corrosion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uchida, Shunsuke [Nuclear Power Engineering Corporation (NUPEC), Tokyo (Japan); Atomic Energy Society of Japan (AESJ) (Japan). Research Committee on Water Chemistry Standard; Naitoh, Masanori [Nuclear Power Engineering Corporation (NUPEC), Tokyo (Japan); Atomic Energy Society of Japan (AESJ) (Japan). Computational Science and Engineering Div.; Uehara, Yasushi; Okada, Hidetoshi [Nuclear Power Engineering Corporation (NUPEC), Tokyo (Japan); Hotta, Koji [ITOCHU Techno-Solutions Corporation (Japan); Ichikawa, Ryoko [Mizuho Information and Research Inst., Inc. (Japan); Koshizuka, Seiichi [Tokyo Univ. (Japan)

    2007-03-15

    Problems in major components and structural materials in nuclear power plants have often been caused by flow induced vibration, corrosion and their overlapping effects. In order to establish safe and reliable plant operation, it is necessary to predict future problems for structural materials based on combined analyses of flow dynamics and corrosion and to mitigate them before they become serious issues for plant operation. The analysis models are divided into two types. 1. Prediction models for future problems with structural materials: Distributions of oxidant concentrations along flow paths are obtained by solving water radiolysis reactions in the boiling water reactor (BWR) primary cooling water and hydrazine-oxygen reactions in the pressurized water reactor (PWR) secondary cooling water. Then, the electrochemical corrosion potential (ECP) at the point of interest is also obtained by the mixed potential model using oxidant concentration. Higher ECP enhances the possibility of intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) in the BWR primary system, while lower ECP enhances flow accelerated corrosion (FAC) in the PWR secondary system. 2. Evaluation models of wall thinning caused by flow accelerated corrosion: The degree of wall thinning is evaluated at a location with a higher possibility of FAC occurrence, and lifetime is estimated for preventive maintenance. General features of models are reviewed in this paper and the prediction models for oxidant concentrations are briefly introduced. (orig.)

  14. Evaluation method of corrosive conditions in cooling systems of nuclear power plants by combined analyses of flow dynamics and corrosion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uchida, Shunsuke; Hotta, Koji; Ichikawa, Ryoko; Koshizuka, Seiichi

    2007-01-01

    Problems in major components and structural materials in nuclear power plants have often been caused by flow induced vibration, corrosion and their overlapping effects. In order to establish safe and reliable plant operation, it is necessary to predict future problems for structural materials based on combined analyses of flow dynamics and corrosion and to mitigate them before they become serious issues for plant operation. The analysis models are divided into two types. 1. Prediction models for future problems with structural materials: Distributions of oxidant concentrations along flow paths are obtained by solving water radiolysis reactions in the boiling water reactor (BWR) primary cooling water and hydrazine-oxygen reactions in the pressurized water reactor (PWR) secondary cooling water. Then, the electrochemical corrosion potential (ECP) at the point of interest is also obtained by the mixed potential model using oxidant concentration. Higher ECP enhances the possibility of intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) in the BWR primary system, while lower ECP enhances flow accelerated corrosion (FAC) in the PWR secondary system. 2. Evaluation models of wall thinning caused by flow accelerated corrosion: The degree of wall thinning is evaluated at a location with a higher possibility of FAC occurrence, and lifetime is estimated for preventive maintenance. General features of models are reviewed in this paper and the prediction models for oxidant concentrations are briefly introduced. (orig.)

  15. Corrosion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slabaugh, W. H.

    1974-01-01

    Presents some materials for use in demonstration and experimentation of corrosion processes, including corrosion stimulation and inhibition. Indicates that basic concepts of electrochemistry, crystal structure, and kinetics can be extended to practical chemistry through corrosion explanation. (CC)

  16. Flow Accelerated Corrosion: Effect of Water Chemistry and Database Construction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Eun Hee; Kim, Kyung Mo; Lee, Gyeong Geun; Kim, Dong Jin [KAERI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-05-15

    Flow accelerated corrosion (FAC) of carbon steel piping in pressurized water reactors (PWRs) has been a major issue in nuclear industry. Severe accidents at Surry Unit 2 in 1986 and Mihama Unit 3 in 2004 initiated the world wide interest in this area. FAC is a dissolution process of the protective oxide layer on carbon steel or low-alloy steel when these parts are exposed to flowing water (single-phase) or wet steam (two-phase). In a single-phase flow, a scalloped, wavy, or orange peel and in a two-phase flow, tiger striping is observed, respectively. FAC is affected by many parameters, like material composition, pH, dissolved oxygen (DO), flow velocity, system pressure, and steam quality. This paper describes the water chemistry factors influencing on FAC and the database is then constructed using literature data. In order to minimize FAC in NPPs, the optimal method is to control water chemistry parameters. However, quantitative data about FAC have not been published for proprietary reason even though qualitative behaviors of FAC have been well understood. A database was constructed using experimental data in literature. Accurate statistical analysis will be performed using this database to identify the relationship between the FAC rate and test environment.

  17. Predicting corrosion product transport in nuclear power stations using a solubility-based model for flow-accelerated corrosion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burrill, K.A.; Cheluget, E.L.

    1995-01-01

    A general model of solubility-driven flow-accelerated corrosion of carbon steel was derived based on the assumption that the solubilities of ferric oxyhydroxide and magnetite control the rate of film dissolution. This process involves the dissolution of an oxide film due to fast-flowing coolant unsaturated in iron. The soluble iron is produced by (i) the corrosion of base metal under a porous oxide film and (ii) the dissolution of the oxide film at the fluid-oxide film interface. The iron released at the pipe wall is transferred into the bulk flow by turbulent mass transfer. The model is suitable for calculating concentrations of dissolved iron in feedtrain lines. These iron levels were used to calculate sludge transport rates around the feedtrain. The model was used to predict sludge transport rates due to flow accelerated corrosion of major feedtrain piping in a CANDU reactor. The predictions of the model compare well with plant measurements

  18. Supplementation of Flow Accelerated Corrosion Prediction Program Using Numerical Analysis Technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hwang, Kyeong Mo; Jin, Tae Eun; Park, Won; Oh, Dong Hoon

    2010-01-01

    Flow-accelerated corrosion (FAC) leads to thinning of steel pipe walls that are exposed to flowing water or wet steam. From experience, it is seen that FAC damage to piping at fossil and nuclear plants can result in outages that require expensive repairs and can affect plant reliability and safety. CHECWORKS have been utilized in domestic nuclear plants as a predictive tool to assist FAC engineers in planning inspections and evaluating the inspection data so that piping failures caused by FAC can be prevented. However, CHECWORKS may be occasionally ignore local susceptible portions when predicting FAC damage in a group of pipelines after constructing a database for all the secondary side piping in nuclear plants. This paper describes the methodologies that can complement CHECWORKS and the verifications of CHECWORKS prediction results using numerical analysis. FAC susceptible locations determined using CHECWORKS for two pipeline groups of a nuclear plant was compared with determined using the numerical-analysis-based FLUENT

  19. Effect of flow velocity on erosion-corrosion behaviour of QSn6 alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Weijiu; Zhou, Yongtao; Wang, Zhenguo; Li, Zhijun; Zheng, Ziqing

    2018-05-01

    The erosion-corrosion behaviour of QSn6 alloy used as propellers in marine environment was evaluated by erosion-corrosion experiments with/without cathodic protection, electrochemical tests and scanning electron microscope (SEM) observations. The analysis was focused on the effect of flow velocity. The dynamic polarization curves showed that the corrosion rate of the QSn6 alloy increased as the flow velocity increased, due to the protective surface film removal at higher velocities. The lowest corrosion current densities of 1.26 × 10‑4 A cm‑2 was obtained at the flow velocity of 7 m s‑1. Because of the higher particle kinetic energies at higher flow velocity, the mass loss rate of the QSn6 alloy increased as the flow velocity increased. The mass loss rate with cathodic protection was lower than that without cathodic protection under the same conditions. Also, the lowest mass loss rate of 0.7 g m‑2 · h‑1 was acquired at the flow velocity of 7 m s‑1 with cathodic protection. However, the increase rate of corrosion rate and mass loss were decreased with increasing the flow velocity. Through observation the SEM morphologies of the worn surfaces, the main wear mechanism was ploughing with/without cathodic protection. The removal rates of the QSn6 alloy increased as the flow velocity increased in both pure erosion and erosion-corrosion, whereas the erosion and corrosion intensified each other. At the flow velocity of 7 m s‑1, the synergy rate (ΔW) exceeded by 5 times the erosion rate (Wwear). Through establishment and observation the erosion-corrosion mechanism map, the erosion-corrosion was the dominant regime in the study due to the contribution of erosion on the mass loss rate exceeded the corrosion contribution. The QSn6 alloy with cathodic protection is feasible as propellers, there are higher security at lower flow velocity, such as the flow velocity of 7 m s‑1 in the paper.

  20. Impact of flow accelerated corrosion (FAC) on feeder refurbishment planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jyrkama, M.; Pandey, M.

    2010-01-01

    Feeder wall thinning due to flow accelerated corrosion (FAC) may result in a large number of feeder replacements in the future. In this study, the process of FAC is modelled using a probabilistic approach and used to predict the expected number of degraded feeders and their replacements in the future. Because of the high cost associated with feeder replacements, it may be optimal to replace the entire feeder population during a single refurbishment outage when the unit cost of replacement is likely to be less. The results of this study demonstrate, however, that the unit cost of feeder replacement must be sufficiently lower than the standard replacement cost and the refurbishment performed at an optimal time to realize the economic benefits associated with the refurbishment. (author)

  1. Transport phenomena of macro and micro flows behind orifice and flow accelerated corrosion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujisawa, Nobuyuki; Hayase, Toshiyuki; Ohara, Taku; Ikohagi, Toshiaki

    2008-01-01

    This paper describes experiment and numerical simulations for macro and micro flows behind an orifice model in a square pipe, which are carried from the viewpoint of flow accelerated corrosion (FAC). The measurements of velocity field behind the orifice model were carried out using particle image velocimetry, and the variations of velocity field with respect to the accuracy of the orifice position were studied. It is found that the reattachment behavior of the flow is highly influenced by the orifice position, which is a critical problem for predicting the pipe thinning phenomena by FAC. The DNS simulation was also conducted for calculating the macro flow behind the orifice. The result suggests that the DNS simulation is applicable to the prediction of pipe thinning macro flow for highly aged nuclear plant. The micro flow simulation can predict the pipe thinning phenomena near the wall. (author)

  2. Investigation of models to predict the corrosion of steels in flowing liquid lead alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balbaud-Celerier, F.; Barbier, F.

    2001-01-01

    Corrosion of steels exposed to flowing liquid lead alloys can be affected by hydrodynamic parameters. The rotating cylinder system is of interest for the practical evaluation of the fluid velocity effect on corrosion and for the prediction of the corrosion behavior in other geometries. Models developed in aqueous medium are tested in the case of liquid metal environments. It is shown that equations established for the rotating cylinder and the pipe flow geometry can be used effectively in liquid lead alloys (Pb-17Li) assuming the corrosion process is mass transfer controlled and the diffusion coefficient of dissolved species is known. The corrosion rate of martensitic steels in Pb-17Li is shown to be independent of the geometry when plotted as a function of the mass transfer coefficient. Predictions about the corrosion of steel in liquid Pb-Bi are performed but experiments are needed to validate the results obtained by modeling

  3. Effect of Inhibitors on Weld Corrosion under Sweet Conditions Using Flow Channel

    OpenAIRE

    Khaled Alawadhi; Abdulkareem Aloraier; Suraj Joshi; Jalal Alsarraf

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to compare the effectiveness and electrochemical behavior of typical oilfield corrosion inhibitors with previous oilfield corrosion inhibitors under the same electrochemical techniques to control preferential weld corrosion of X65 pipeline steel in artificial seawater saturated with carbon dioxide at a pressure of one bar. A secondary aim is to investigate the conditions under which current reversal takes place. A flow channel apparatus was used in the laboratory to s...

  4. Proposed Guidelines for Selection of Methods for Erosion-corrosion Testing in Flowing Liquids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsumura, Masanobu

    2007-01-01

    The corrosion of metals and alloys in flowing liquids can be classified into uniform corrosion and localized corrosion which may be categorized as follows. (1) Localized corrosion of the erosion-corrosion type: the protective oxide layer is assumed to be removed from the metal surface by shear stress or turbulence of the fluid flow. A macro-cell may be defined as a situation in which the bare surface is the macro-anode and the other surface covered with the oxide layer is the macro-cathode. (2) Localized corrosion of the differential flow-velocity corrosion type: at a location of lower fluid velocity, a thin and coarse oxide layer with poor protective qualities may be produced because of an insufficient supply of oxygen. A macro-cell may be defined as a situation in which this surface is the macro-anode and the other surface covered witha dense and stable oxide layer is the macro-cathode. (3) Localized corrosion of the active/passive-cell type: on a metal surface a macro-cell may be defined as a situation in which a part of it is in a passivation state and another in an active dissolution state. This situation may arise from differences in temperature as well as in the supply of the dissolved oxygen. Compared to uniform corrosion, localized corrosion tends to involve a higher wall thinning rate (corrosion rate) due to the macro-cell current as well as to the ratio of the surface area of the macro-anode to that of the macro-cathode, which may be rationalized using potential vs. current density diagrams. The three types of localized corrosion described above can be reproduced in a Jet-in-slit test by changing the flow direction of the test liquid and arranging environmental conditions in an appropriate manner

  5. Correlation of flow accelerated corrosion rate with iron solubility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujiwara, K.; Domae, M.; Yoneda, K.; Inada, F.; Ohira, T.; Hisamune, K.

    2011-01-01

    Flow accelerated corrosion (FAC) of the carbon steel is one of the most important subjects in the coolant systems of the power plants. FAC is influenced by the composition of the material, the flow condition, temperature, and the water chemistry conditions. It is considered that the solubility of iron (Fe) is the most important factor in the water chemistry parameters affecting FAC. In the present study, the effects of temperature and pH on the Fe solubility were evaluated in consideration of the hydrolysis reactions of the ferrous iron, the dissolution equilibria of Fe 3 O 4 , FeO, and Fe(OH) 2 , and the charge balance. The correlation between the Fe solubility and the FAC behavior was discussed. It has been suggested that the product of the Fe solubility equilibrated with Fe 3 O 4 and the mass transfer coefficient can explain the temperature and pH dependence of FAC. These results indicate the presence of the magnetite on the surface of the carbon steel. Diffusion of the Fe from the saturated layer to the bulk solution determines the FAC rate from the water chemistry aspect.

  6. Correlation of flow accelerated corrosion rate with iron solubility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujiwara, K.; Domae, M.; Yoneda, K.; Inada, F.; Ohira, T.; Hisamune, K.; Takiguchi, H.

    2009-01-01

    Flow Accelerated Corrosion (FAC) of carbon steel is one of the most important subjects in coolant systems of power plants. FAC is influenced by material, flow condition, temperature, and water chemistry. It is considered that solubility is the most important factor to determine the effect of water chemistry on FAC. In the present study, effect of specific oxide on FAC rate was studied from the thermodynamic solubility of iron. The effects of temperature and pH on the iron solubility were evaluated by taking into consideration hydrolysis reactions of ferrous iron, dissolution equilibria of Fe 3 O 4 , FeO, and Fe(OH) 2 , and charge balance. The correlation between the iron solubility and FAC behavior was evaluated by using the normalized mass transfer coefficient. It is clarified that the product of iron solubility equilibrated with Fe 3 O 4 and normalized mass transfer coefficient can explain the temperature and pH dependence of FAC. These results indicate presence of magnetite on the surface of carbon steel. Diffusion of iron from the saturated layer determines the FAC rate from water chemistry aspect. (author)

  7. Ductile flow by water-assisted cataclasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    den Brok, Bas

    2003-04-01

    In the presence of water otherwise brittle materials may deform macroscopically ductile by water-assisted cataclastic creep. This is possible as long as (i) solubility is high enough, so that stress-corrosion can occur, and (ii) local stress is low enough, to that fracturing remains subcritical. Water-assisted cataclastic creep (WACC) may play an important role in the middle and lower continental crust where mineral solubilities are high and stresses low. WACC is a poorly understood deformation process. Experiments were performed on very soluble brittle salts (Na-chlorate; K-alum) to study microstructure development by WACC. The experiments were carried out at room temperature and atmospheric pressure in a small see-through vessel. In this way the cataclastic deformation process could be studied "in-situ" under the microscope. Crystals were loaded in the presence of saturated salt solution. It appeared that originally straight mineral surfaces were instable when kept under stress. Grooves (or channels) slowly developed in the surface by local dissolution. These grooves behave like so-called Grinfeld instabilities. They develop because the energy of a grooved surface under stress is lower than the energy of a straight surface under stress. The grooves may deepen and turn into subcritical cracks when local stress further increases. These cracks propagate slowly. They propagate parallel to sigma1 but also at an angle and even perpendicular to sigma1, often following crystallographically controlled directions. The fractures mostly change direction while propagating, locally making turns of more than 180 degrees. Irregular fracture fragments thus develop. The fractures may migrate sideways (as with grain bounday migration) probably by solution-redeposition driven by differences in stress between both sides of the fracture. Thus the shape of the fragments changes. The size of the fracture fragments seems to be controlled by the distance of the grooves, which decreases

  8. Screening method for piping wall loss by flow accelerated corrosion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryu, Kyung Ha; Hwang, Il Soon; Lee, Na Young; Oh, Young Jin; Kim, Ji Hyun; Park, Jin Ho; Sohn, Chang Ho

    2008-01-01

    Flow accelerated corrosion (FAC) phenomenon has persisted its impact on plant reliability and personnel safety. Unless we change the operation condition drastically, most parameters affecting FAC will not be effectively controlled. In order to help expand piping inspection coverage, we have developed a screening approach to monitor the wall thinning by direct current potential drop (DCPD) technique. To improve the applicability to the complex piping network such as the secondary cooling water system in PWR's, we devised the equipotential control method that can eliminate undesired leakage currents outside a measurement section. In this paper, we present Wide Range Monitoring (WiRM) and Narrow Range Monitoring (NaRM) with Equipotential Switching Direct Current Potential Drop (ES-DCPD) method to rapidly monitor the thinning of piping. Based on the WiRM results, susceptible locations can be identified for further inspection by ultrasound technique (UT). On-line monitoring of a thinned location can be made by NaRM. Finite element analysis results and a closed-form resistance model are developed for the comparison with measured wall thinning by the developed DCPD technique. Verification experiments were conducted using UT as the reference. The result shows that model predictions and the experimental results agree well to confirm that both WiRM and NaRM based on ES-DCPD can be applicable to FAC management efforts

  9. Screening method for piping wall loss by flow accelerated corrosion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryu, K.H.; Hwang, I.S.; Lee, N.Y.; Oh, Y.J.; Park, J.H.; Sohn, C.H.

    2007-01-01

    Flow accelerated corrosion (FAC) phenomenon has persisted in its impact on plant reliability and personnel safety. Unless we change the operation condition drastically, most parameters affecting FAC will not be effectively controlled. In order to help expand piping inspection coverage, we have developed a screening approach to monitor the wall thinning by a Direct Current Potential drop (DCPD) technique. To improve the applicability to the complex piping network such as the secondary cooling water system in PWR's, we devised the equipotential control method that can eliminate undesired leakage currents outside a measurement section. In this paper, we present Wide Range Monitoring (WiRM) and Narrow Range Monitoring (NaRM) with Equipotential Switching Direct Current Potential Drop (ES-DCPD) method to rapidly monitor the thinning of piping. Based on the WiRM results, susceptible locations can be identified for further inspection by Ultrasonic Technique (UT). On-line monitoring of a thinned location can be made by NaRM. Finite element analysis results and a closed-form resistance model are developed for the comparison with measured wall thinning by the developed DCPD technique. Verification experiments were conducted using UT as the reference. The result shows that model predictions and the experimental results agree well to confirm that both WiRM and NaRM based on ES-DCPD can be applicable to FAC management efforts. (author)

  10. Flow-accelerated corrosion in power plants. Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chexal, B.; Horowitz, J.; Dooley, B.

    1998-07-01

    Flow-Accelerated Corrosion (FAC) is a phenomenon that results in metal loss from piping, vessels, and equipment made of carbon steel. FAC occurs only under certain conditions of flow, chemistry, geometry, and material. Unfortunately, those conditions are common in much of the high-energy piping in nuclear and fossil-fueled power plants. Undetected, FAC will cause leaks and ruptures. Consequently, FAC has become a major issue, particularly for nuclear plants. Although major failures are rare, the consequences can be severe. In 1986, four men in the area of an FAC-induced pipe rupture were killed. Fossil plants too, are subject to FAC. In 1995, a failure at a fossil-fired plant caused two fatalities. In addition to concerns about personnel safety, FAC failures can pose challenges to plant safety. Regulatory agencies have therefore required nuclear utilities to institute formal programs to address FAC. Finally, a major FAC failure (like the one that happened in 1997 at a US nuclear power plant) can force a plant to shutdown and purchase replacement power at a price approaching a million dollars per day depending upon the MWe rating of the plant. A great deal of time and money has been spent to develop the technology to predict, detect, and mitigate FAC in order to prevent catastrophic failures. Over time, substantial progress has been made towards understanding and preventing FAC. The results of these efforts include dozens of papers, reports, calculations, and manuals, as well as computer programs and other tools. This book is written to provide a detailed treatment of the entire subject in a single document. Any complex issue requires balancing know-how, the risk of decision making, and a pragmatic engineering solution. This book addresses these by carrying out the necessary R and D and engineering along with plant knowledge to cover all quadrants of Chexal's four quadrant known-unknown diagram, as seen in Figure i

  11. Influence of temperature and lithium purity on corrosion of ferrous alloys in a flowing lithium environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chopra, O.K.; Smith, D.L.

    1986-03-01

    Corrosion data have been obtained on ferritic HT-9 and Fe-9Cr-1Mo steel and austenitic Type 316 stainless steel in a flowing lithium environment at temperatures between 372 and 538 0 C. The corrosion behavior is evaluated by measurements of weight loss as a function of time and temperature. A metallographic characterization of materials exposed to a flowing lithium environment is presented

  12. Flow-induced corrosion of absorbable magnesium alloy: In-situ and real-time electrochemical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Juan; Jang, Yongseok; Wan, Guojiang; Giridharan, Venkataraman; Song, Guang-Ling; Xu, Zhigang; Koo, Youngmi; Qi, Pengkai; Sankar, Jagannathan; Huang, Nan; Yun, Yeoheung

    2016-03-01

    An in-situ and real-time electrochemical study in a vascular bioreactor was designed to analyze corrosion mechanism of magnesium alloy (MgZnCa) under mimetic hydrodynamic conditions. Effect of hydrodynamics on corrosion kinetics, types, rates and products was analyzed. Flow-induced shear stress (FISS) accelerated mass and electron transfer, leading to an increase in uniform and localized corrosions. FISS increased the thickness of uniform corrosion layer, but filiform corrosion decreased this layer resistance at high FISS conditions. FISS also increased the removal rate of localized corrosion products. Impedance-estimated and linear polarization-measured polarization resistances provided a consistent correlation to corrosion rate calculated by computed tomography.

  13. Review of current research and understanding of irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nelson, J.L.; Andresen, P.L.

    1992-01-01

    Concerns for irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC) of reactor internals are increasing, especially for components that are not readily replaceable. Both laboratory and field data show that intergranular stress corrosion cracking of stainless steels and nickel-base alloys can result from long term exposure to the high energy neutron and gamma radiation that exists in the core of light water reactors (LWR's). Radiation affects cracking susceptibility via changes in material micro-chemistry (radiation induced segregation, or RIS), water chemistry (radiolysis) and material properties/stress (e.g., radiation induced creep and hardening). Based on many common dependencies, e.g., to solution purity, corrosion potential, crevicing and stress, IASCC falls within the continuum of environmental cracking phenomenon in high temperature water

  14. Assessment of CANDU feeders subject to flow accelerated corrosion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iyer, S. [Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd., Mississauga, Ontario (Canada); Slade, J.P. [New Brunswick Power, Point Lepreau Generating Station, Lepreau, New Brunswick (Canada)

    2003-07-01

    'Full Text:' Inspections of CANDU feeders have indicated greater than expected wall thinning of outlet feeders. This wall thinning is attributed to Flow-Accelerated Corrosion (FAC). The rate of wall loss due to FAC is highest in the close radius bends near the end fitting. The minimum allowed thickness for a feeder pipes is based on design pressure during the design stage. Extended operation of the thinned feeders beyond their design basis, i.e., operation of feeders with thickness below design pressure based minimum thickness has economic benefits for the utilities. In such cases, it is important to establish the remaining life and evaluate the adequacy of the components for safe operation. ASME Code Case N-597 provides the guidelines for acceptance for continued service of Classes 2 and 3 piping components experiencing wall thinning during operation. However, for Class 1 systems, the Code Case recommends that the owner develop the methodology and criteria for the assessment of wall thinning. Therefore, under the CANDU Owner's Group's (COG) Feeder Integrity Joint Program (FIJP), the 'Fitness for Service Guidelines (FFSG) for Feeders Affected by Wall Thinning in Operating CANDU Reactors' was developed and subsequently conditionally approved by CNSC. This paper illustrates the underlying concepts in the FFSG methodology and its benefits to utilities. Specific examples of the application and benefits of the FFSG at Point Lepreau G.S. are described in this paper. The assessment of feeders is based on the requirements of the construction Code (Section III of the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code): The following points briefly describe the assessment methodology. Satisfying the requirements of NB-3650 for design and service loadings are sufficient for continued service and extended life if the predicted minimum wall thickness of the component is greater than or equal to 90% of the pressure based thickness calculated as per NB-3641. The B

  15. Flow-induced corrosion of absorbable magnesium alloy: In-situ and real-time electrochemical study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Juan; Jang, Yongseok; Wan, Guojiang; Giridharan, Venkataraman; Song, Guang-Ling; Xu, Zhigang; Koo, Youngmi; Qi, Pengkai; Sankar, Jagannathan; Huang, Nan; Yun, Yeoheung

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • An in-situ and real-time electrochemical monitoring of flow-induced corrosion of Mg alloy is designed in a vascular bioreactor. • Effect of hydrodynamics on corrosion kinetics, types, rates and products is analyzed. • Flow accelerates mass and electron transfer, leading to an increase in uniform and localized corrosions. • Flow increases not only the thickness of uniform corrosion product layer, but the removal rate of localized corrosion products. • Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and linear polarization-measured polarization resistances provide a consistent correlation to corrosion rate calculated by computed tomography. - Abstract: An in-situ and real-time electrochemical study in a vascular bioreactor was designed to analyze corrosion mechanism of magnesium alloy (MgZnCa) under mimetic hydrodynamic conditions. Effect of hydrodynamics on corrosion kinetics, types, rates and products was analyzed. Flow-induced shear stress (FISS) accelerated mass and electron transfer, leading to an increase in uniform and localized corrosions. FISS increased the thickness of uniform corrosion layer, but filiform corrosion decreased this layer resistance at high FISS conditions. FISS also increased the removal rate of localized corrosion products. Impedance-estimated and linear polarization-measured polarization resistances provided a consistent correlation to corrosion rate calculated by computed tomography.

  16. Study of the Effect of Swelling on Irradiation Assisted Stress Corrosion Cracking

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teysseyre, Sebastien Paul [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2016-09-01

    This report describes the methodology used to study the effect of swelling on the crack growth rate of an irradiation-assisted stress corrosion crack that is propagating in highly irradiated stainless steel 304 material irradiated to 33 dpa in the Experimental Breeder Reactor-II. The material selection, specimens design, experimental apparatus and processes are described. The results of the current test are presented.

  17. Evaluation of the flow-accelerated corrosion downstream of an orifice. 1. Measurements and numerical analysis of flow field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Utanohara, Yoichi; Nagaya, Yukinori; Nakamura, Akira; Murase, Michio

    2008-01-01

    In this study, in order to evaluate the effects of flow field on corrosion rate due to flow accelerated corrosion (FAC), an orifice flow was measured and calculated. The diameter of pipe is 50 mm and that of the orifice is 24.3 mm, and flow velocity in a water loop was set at 2.41 m/s. Flow field was measured by laser Doppler velocimetry (LDV) and particle image velocimetry (PIV), and compared with a calculation for the same flow conditions. Measurements of wall shear stress downstream of the orifice was also planed. The calculated velocity distribution of standard k-□ agreed qualitatively with PIV data and quantitatively with LDV data. Instantaneous flow field measured by PIV showed vortices around the jet from the orifice and some of them reached near the pipe wall. (author)

  18. Study on corrosion test techniques in lead bismuth eutectic flow. Joint research report in JFY2002

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, Minoru; Sekimoto, Hiroshi

    2003-03-01

    The evaluation of corrosion behaviors of core and structural materials in lead bismuth eutectic is one of the key issues for the utilization of lead bismuth eutectic as a coolant of the primary loops of lead bismuth cooled fast breeder reactors (FBRs) and the intermediate heat transport media of new-type steam generators of the sodium cooled FBRs. The purpose of the present study is to establish corrosion test techniques in lead bismuth eutectic flow. The techniques of steel corrosion test and oxygen control in flowing lead bismuth eutectic, and the technologies of a lead bismuth flow test at high temperature and high velocity were developed through corrosion test using a lead bismuth flow test loop of the Tokyo Institute of Technology in JFY2002. The major results are summarized as follows: (1) Techniques of fabrication, mount and rinse of corrosion specimens, measurement method of weight loss, and SEM/EDX analysis method have been established through lead bismuth corrosion test. (2) Weight losses were measured, corrosion and lead bismuth-adhered layers and eroded parts were observed in two 1000 hr-corrosion tests, and the results were compared with each other for twelve existing steels including ODS, F82H and SUH-3. (3) An oxygen sensor made of zirconia electrolyte structurally resistant to thermal stress and thermal shock was developed and tested in the lead bismuth flow loop. Good performance has been obtained. (4) An oxygen control method by injecting argon and hydrogen mixture gas containing steam into lead bismuth was applied to the lead bismuth flow loop, and technical issues for the development of the oxygen control method were extracted. (5) Technical measures for freezing and leakage of lead bismuth in the flow loop were accumulated. (6) Technical measures for flow rate decrease/blockage due to precipitation of oxide and corrosion products in a low temperature section of the lead bismuth flow loop were accumulated. (7) Electromagnetic flow meters with MI

  19. The effect of flow and chemical corrosion in reverse osmosis over desalinated water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Young Jae [Chunnam National Univ., Gwangju (Korea, Republic of); Pak, Byung Gu [Doosan Heavy Industry Co., Tongyoung (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-12-15

    Desalinated water produced by a reverse osmosis (RO) filtering method forms about 22% of total production of desalinated water in the world. However, the RO environment is very corrosive due to the presence of various chemicals for water treatment and the flow of sand particles leading to corrosion. Recently, there has been much effort to substitute cheaper and more corrosion resistant stainless steels for copper based alloys as a valve material in RO. Nevertheless, the effects of chemicals and particles on the corrosion of stainless steels have rarely been studied. Erosion phenomenon was detected under the condition with the flow rate of more than 8ms{sup -1} in spite of the absence of sand particles. In seawater containing sand particles, the erosion in stainless steels was accelerated further.

  20. Corrosion barriers processed by Al electroplating and their resistance against flowing Pb–15.7Li

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krauss, Wolfgang, E-mail: wolfgang.krauss@kit.edu; Konys, Jürgen; Wulf, Sven-Erik

    2014-12-15

    In the HCLL blanket design, ferritic–martensitic steels are in direct contact with the flowing liquid breeder Pb–15.7Li and have to withstand severe corrosion attack. Beyond corrosion, T-permeation from the breeder into the RAFM-steels is also an important issue and has to be reduced significantly. Earlier work showed that Al-based coatings can act as barriers for both, however, applied processes e.g. HDA or VPS exhibited strong drawbacks in the past. Meanwhile new industrial relevant coating processes, using electroplating technology are under development and called ECA (electrochemical aluminization) and ECX (electrochemical deposition from ionic liquids) process. In this study electrochemically Al-coated and heat-treated Eurofer samples were tested in PICOLO loop for exposure times up to 12,000 h (ECA) and 2000 h (first results ECX) respectively to determine corrosion properties in flowing Pb–15.7Li (550 °C, 0.1 m/s). Cross section analysis afterward corrosion testing proved the ability of thin Al-based barriers made by electrochemical techniques to protect the bare Eurofer from corrosion attack even at exposure times of 12,000 h. Determined radial corrosion rates lay between 10 and 20 μm/a. First results for ECX coated samples (2000 h) revealed more homogeneous corrosion behavior of the barrier layer itself compared to ECA.

  1. Activity of corrosion products in pool type reactors with ascending flow in the core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andrade e Silva, Graciete S. de; Queiroz Bogado Leite, Sergio de

    1995-01-01

    A model for the activity of corrosion products in the water of a pool type reactor with ascending flow is presented. The problem is described by a set of coupled differential equations relating the radioisotope concentrations in the core and pool circuits and taking into account two types of radioactive sources: i) those from radioactive species formed in the fuel cladding, control elements, reflector, etc, and afterwards released to the primary stream by corrosion (named reactor sources) and ii) those formed from non radioactive isotopes entering the primary stream by corrosion of the circuit components and being activated when passing through the core (named circuit sources). (author). 6 refs, 3 figs, 4 tabs

  2. Flow accelerated corrosion and life management of the secondary circuit of the Embalse nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chocron, Mauricio; La Gamma, Ana M.; Fernandez, Narciso; Moyano, Ricardo; Schiersmann, Christian; Ovando, Luis E.; Sainz, Ricardo A.; Keitelman, Alberto

    2003-01-01

    Flow accelerated corrosion is a matter of concern in secondary circuits of nuclear power plants as well as in fossil fired plants. It contributes to the piping wall thinning and to the corrosion products transport to the steam generators. Because it is a generalized corrosion phenomena, could address to extensive failures. In that sense the plants conduct extensive programs of surveillance of piping degradation. Because the problem involves many variables like alloys, water chemistry and hydrodynamics several models have been proposed in the literature. In the present paper the variables have been organized in a spreadsheet which allows the calculation of normalized risk factors. (author)

  3. Niobium corrosion in flowing liquid sodium between 400 and 600 degrees C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sannier, J.; Champeix, L.; Darras, R.; Graff, W.

    1966-10-01

    The corrosion of niobium and two of its alloys was studied under temperature, flow rate, and purity conditions of liquid sodium similar to those likely to occur in a fast neutron reactor. The results are discussed with reference to the following parameters: purification method used for the sodium, temperature, metallurgical condition of the structural metal. Generally speaking, an important role is played by the oxygen content of the liquid metal towards the corrosion of the niobium: although the metal behaves very satisfactorily when a hot trap purification is used, it undergoes corrosion in the presence of sodium which has been purified only by a cold trap. (authors) [fr

  4. Coupled modelling of convergence, steel corrosion, gas production and brine flow in a rock salt repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Becker, D.A.; Hirsekorn, R.P.

    2013-01-01

    This poster presents the global simulation of the behaviour of thick-walled steel containers piled up in a borehole in a rock salt repository. The simulation takes into account: the convergence by the creeping of rock salt, the backfill and waste compaction, the porosity dependent flow resistance, the anaerobic corrosion (iron to magnetite transformation, gas production, brine consumption, water consumption and salt precipitation) and pressure development. Mechanical influence of corrosion has not yet been taken into account in the integrated code LOPOS

  5. Simulation of corrosion product activity in ion- exchanger of PWR under acceleration of corrosion and flow rate perturbations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mirza, N.M.; Mirza, S.M.; Rafique, M.

    2005-01-01

    In this paper computer code developed earlier by the authors (CPAIR-P) has been employed to compute corrosion product activity in PWRs for flow rate perturbations. The values of radioactivity in ion exchanger of Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) under normal and flow rate perturbation conditions have been calculated. For linearly accelerating corrosion rates, activity saturates for removal rate of 600 cm/sup 3// s in primary coolant of PWR. A higher removal rate of 750 cm/sup 3// s was selected for which the saturation value is sufficiently low (0. 28 micro Ci/cm/sup 3/). Simulation results shows that the Fe/sup 59/ Na/sup 24/, Mo/sup 99/, Mn/sup 56/ reaches saturation values with in about 700 hours of reactor operation. However, Co/sup 58/ and Co/sup 60/ keep on accumulating and do not saturate with in 2000 hours of these simulation time. When flow rate is decreased by 10% of rated flow rate after 500 hours of reactor operation, a dip in activity is seen, which reaches to the value of 0.00138 micro Ci cm/sup -3/ then again it begins to rise and reaches saturation value of 0.00147 cm/sup 3//s. (author)

  6. Flow and mass transfer downstream of an orifice under flow accelerated corrosion conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmed, Wael H.; Bello, Mufatiu M.; El Nakla, Meamer; Al Sarkhi, Abdelsalam

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Mass transfer downstream of orifices was numerically and experimentally investigated. ► The surface wear pattern is measured and used to validate the present numerical results. ► The maximum mass transfer coefficient found to occur at approximately 2–3 pipe diameters downstream of the orifice. ► The FAC wear rates were correlated with the turbulence kinetic energy and wall mass transfer in terms of Sherwood number. ► The current study offered very useful information for FAC engineers for better preparation of nuclear plant inspection scope. - Abstract: Local flow parameters play an important role in characterizing flow accelerated corrosion (FAC) downstream of sudden area change in power plant piping systems. Accurate prediction of the highest FAC wear rate locations enables the mitigation of sudden and catastrophic failures, and the improvement of the plant capacity factor. The objective of the present study is to evaluate the effect of the local flow and mass transfer parameters on flow accelerated corrosion downstream of an orifice. In the present study, orifice to pipe diameter ratios of 0.25, 0.5 and 0.74 were investigated numerically by solving the continuity and momentum equations at Reynolds number of Re = 20,000. Laboratory experiments, using test sections made of hydrocal (CaSO 4 ·½H 2 O) were carried out in order to determine the surface wear pattern and validate the present numerical results. The numerical results were compared to the plants data as well as to the present experiments. The maximum mass transfer coefficient found to occur at approximately 2–3 pipe diameters downstream of the orifice. This location was also found to correspond to the location of elevated turbulent kinetic energy generated within the flow separation vortices downstream of the orifice. The FAC wear rates were correlated with the turbulence kinetic energy and wall mass transfer in terms of Sherwood number. The current study found to offer very

  7. Corrosion properties of aluminum based alloys deposited by ion beam assisted deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Enders, B.; Krauss, S.; Wolf, G.K.

    1994-01-01

    The replacement of cadmium coatings by other protective measures is an important task because of the environmentally detrimental properties of cadmium. Therefore, aluminum and aluminum alloy coatings containing elements such as silicon or magnesium with more positive or negative positions in the galvanic series in relation to pure aluminum were deposited by ion beam assisted deposition onto glass and low carbon steel. Pure aluminum films were deposited onto low carbon steel in order to study the influence of the ion-to-atom arrival ratio and the angle of ion incidence on the corrosion properties. For examination of the pitting behavior as a function of the concentration of alloying element, quasipotentiostatic current-potential and potentiostatic current-time plots were measured in chlorine-containing acetate buffer. It is shown that these alloys can protect steel substrates under uniform and pitting corrosion conditions considerably better than pure aluminum coatings. ((orig.))

  8. Development of evaluation method on flow-induced vibration and corrosion of components in two-phase flow by coupled analysis. 2. Evaluation of corrosive conditions in cooling systems of nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uchida, Shunsuke; Naitoh, Masanori; Okada, Hidetoshi; Uehara, Yasushi; Katono, Kenichi; Ichikawa, Ryoko; Hotta, Koji

    2007-01-01

    In order to establish safety and reliable plant operation, it is required to forecast future troubles on structural materials based on combined analyses of flow dynamics and corrosion and to mitigate them before they become serious problems on plant operation. The models are divided into two parts, which are as follows. 1. Prediction model of future trouble on structural materials based on evaluation of corrosive conditions. 2. Evaluation model of wall thinning caused by flow accelerated corrosion. (author)

  9. Effects of alloy composition and flow condition on the flow accelerated corrosion in neutral water condition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Satoh, Tomonori; Ugachi, Hirokazu; Tsukada, Takashi; Uchida, Shunsuke

    2008-01-01

    The major mechanism of Flow accelerated corrosion (FAC) is the dissolution of the protective oxide on carbon steel, which is enhanced by mass transfer and erosion under high flow velocity conditions. In this study, the effects of alloy composition and flow velocity on FAC of carbon steel were evaluated by measuring FAC rate of tube type carbon steel specimens in the neutral water condition at 150degC. Obtained results are summarized in follows. 1) High FAC rate was depended upon the v 1.2 in the tube type specimen made of the standard alloy. 2) FAC was mitigated for the carbon steel with more than 0.03% of Cr content. 3) FAC rate decreased as Ni content increased in more than 0.1% of Ni content. 4) The difference in chemical composition of oxide film between Ni added carbon steel and Cr added one was confirmed. The hematite rich oxide was observed for Ni added carbon steel. 5) The effects of Cu on FAC rate was not observed up to 0.1% of Cu content. (author)

  10. Comparison of corrosion behavior of EUROFER and CLAM steels in flowing Pb–15.7Li

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Konys, J., E-mail: juergen.konys@kit.edu [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Hermann-von-Helmholtz-Platz 1, 76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany); Krauss, W. [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Hermann-von-Helmholtz-Platz 1, 76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany); Zhu, Z.; Huang, Q. [Institute of Nuclear Energy Safety Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei, Anhui 230031 (China)

    2014-12-15

    Ferritic martensitic steels are envisaged to be applied as structural materials in HCLL blanket systems. Their compatibility with the liquid breeder, which is in direct contact with the structural alloy, will be essential for reliable and safe operation of the designed blankets. Formerly performed corrosion tests of RAFM steels in PICOLO loop of KIT were mainly done at high flow velocities, e.g., 0.22 m/s and delivered severe attack with material loss rates above 400 μm/yr at 823 K. Meanwhile, flow velocities for corrosion testing have been reduced into the “cm range” to be near fusion relevant conditions. Among the international ITER-partners, many varieties of RAFM steels have been developed and manufactured within the last decade, e.g., the so-called Chinese Low Activation Martensitic steel (CLAM). In this paper, the long term corrosion behavior of EUROFER and CLAM steel in flowing Pb–15.7Li will be presented at a flow velocity of about 0.10 m/s and compared with earlier obtained results of RAFM steels exposed at other operation parameters of PICOLO loop. The observed corrosion attack is near 220 μm/yr and fits well to predictions made by MATLIM-modeling for low flow velocities in the turbulent flow regime.

  11. Corrosion of martensitic steels in flowing 17Li83Pb alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flament, T.; Fauvet, P.; Hocde, B.; Sannier, J.

    1988-01-01

    Corrosion of three martensitic steels - 1.4914, HT9 and T91 - in the presence of flowing 17Li83Pb is investigated in thermal convection loops Tulip entirely made of 1.4914 steel. Two 3000-hour tests were performed at maximal temperatures of respectively 450 and 475 0 C with a δT of 60 0 C and an alloy velocity of about 0.08 m.s -1 . In both tests, corrosion is characterized by an homogeneous dissolution of the steel without formation of a corrosion layer. Corrosion rate is constant and very temperature dependent: the sound-metal loss of 1.4914 steel is 22 μm. year -1 at 450 0 C and 40 μm.year -1 at 475 0 C. Behaviours of 1.4914 and HT9 steels are very similar whereas T91 steel is about 20% less corroded

  12. Corrosion behavior of a positive graphite electrode in vanadium redox flow battery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Huijun; Xu Qian; Yan Chuanwei; Qiao Yonglian

    2011-01-01

    Graphical abstract: The overpotential for gas evolution on positive graphite electrode decreases due to the functional groups of COOH and C=O introduced on the surface of graphite electrode during corrosion process, which can self-catalyze the oxidation of carbon atoms therefore, accelerates corrosion process. Highlights: → Initial potential for gas evolution is higher than 1.60 V vs SCE. → Factors affecting the graphite corrosion are investigated. → Functional groups of COOH and C=O introduced during corrosion process. → The groups can self-catalyze the oxidation of carbon atoms. - Abstract: The graphite plate is easily suffered from corosion because of CO 2 evolution when it acts as the positive electrode for vanadium redox flow battery. The aim is to obtain the initial potential for gas evolution on a positive graphite electrode in 2 mol dm -3 H 2 SO 4 + 2 mol dm -3 VOSO 4 solution. The effects of polarization potential, operating temperature and polarization time on extent of graphite corrosion are investigated by potentiodynamic and potentiostatic techniques. The surface characteristics of graphite electrode before and after corrosion are examined by scanning electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The results show that the gas begins to evolve on the graphite electrode when the anodic polarization potential is higher than 1.60 V vs saturated calomel electrode at 20 deg. C. The CO 2 evolution on the graphite electrode can lead to intergranular corrosion of the graphite when the polarization potential reaches 1.75 V. In addition, the functional groups of COOH and C=O introduced on the surface of graphite electrode during corrosion can catalyze the formation of CO 2 , therefore, accelerates the corrosion rate of graphite electrode.

  13. Understanding susceptibility of in-core components to irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chung, H.M.; Ruther, W.E.; Sanecki, J.E.; Kassner, T.F.

    1991-03-01

    As nuclear plants age and accumulated fluences of core structural components increase, susceptibility of the components to irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC) is also expected to increase. Irradiation-induced sensitization, commonly associated with an IASCC failure, was investigated in this study to provide a better understanding of long-term structural integrity of safety-significant in-core components. Irradiation-induced sensitization of high- and commercial-purity Type 304 stainless steels irradiated in BWRs was analyzed. 7 refs., 8 figs

  14. Mass transfer coefficient in disturbed flow due to orifice for flow accelerated corrosion in nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prasad, Mahendra; Gaikwad, Avinash J.; Sridharan, Arunkumar; Parida, Smrutiranjan

    2015-01-01

    The flow of fluid in pipes cause corrosion wherein the inner surface of pipe becomes progressively thinner and susceptible to failure. This form of corrosion dependent on flow dynamics is called Flow Accelerated Corrosion (FAC) and has been observed in Nuclear Power Plants (NPPs). Mass transfer coefficient (MTC) is related to extent of wall thinning and it changes from its value in a straight pipe (with same fluid parameters) for flow in orifices, bends, junctions etc. due to gross disturbance of the velocity profile. This paper presents two-dimensional computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations for an orifice configuration in a straight pipe. Turbulent model K- ω with shear stress transport and transition flow was the model used for simulation studies. The mass transfer boundary layer (MTBL) thickness δ mtbl is related to the Schmidt number (Sc) and hydrodynamic boundary layer thickness δ h , as δ mtbl ~ δh/(Sc 1/3 ). MTBL is significantly smaller than δ h and hence boundary layer meshing was carried out deep into δ mtbl . Uniform velocity profile was applied at the inlet. Post orifice fluid shows large recirculating flows on the upper and lower wall. At various locations after orifice, mass transfer coefficient is calculated and compared with the value in straight pipe with fully developed turbulent flow. The MTC due to the orifice increases and it is correlated with enhanced FAC in region after orifice. (author)

  15. Intuitional experiment and numerical analysis of flow characteristics affected by flow accelerated corrosion in elbow pipe system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Hyung Joon [School of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Seoul National University, Gwanak-gu, Seoul 151-744 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Kyung Hoon, E-mail: kimkh@khu.ac.kr [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Kyung Hee University, Seochun 1, Yongin, Gyeonggi 446-701 (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-05-15

    Highlights: • Wall-thinning erosion of pipelines in plants leads to fatal accidents unexpectedly. • Flow Acceleration Corrosion (FAC) is a main reason of wall-thinning. • For industrial safety, it is necessary to verify the tendency of FAC. • We focused on local wall thinning by FAC with intuitional visualization experiment and numerical analysis in elbow pipe.

  16. Brief description of out-of-pile test facilities for study in corrosion and fission product behaviour in flowing sodium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iizawa, K.; Sekiguchi, N.; Atsumo, H.

    1976-01-01

    The experimental methods to perform tests for study in corrosion and fission products behaviour in flowing sodium are outlined. Flow diagrams for the activated materials and fission products behaviour test loop are given

  17. Evaluation of flow accelerated corrosion by coupled analysis of corrosion and flow dynamics. Relationship of oxide film thickness, hematite/magnetite ratio, ECP and wall thinning rate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uchida, Shunsuke; Naitoh, Masanori; Okada, Hidetoshi; Uehara, Yasushi; Koshizuka, Seiichi

    2011-01-01

    Systematic approaches to evaluate flow accelerated corrosion (FAC) are desired before discussing application of countermeasures for FAC. First, future FAC occurrence should be evaluated to identify locations where a higher possibility of FAC occurrence exists, and then, wall thinning rate at the identified FAC occurrence zone is evaluated to obtain the preparation time for applying countermeasures. Wall thinning rates were calculated with two coupled models: 1.static electrochemical analysis and 2.dynamic oxide layer growth analysis. The anodic current density and the electrochemical corrosion potential (ECP) were calculated with the static electrochemistry model based on an Evans diagram. The ferrous ion release rate, determined by the anodic current density, was applied as input for the dynamic double oxide layer model. Some of the dissolved ferrous ion was removed to the bulk water and others precipitated on the surface as magnetite particles. The thickness of oxide layer was calculated with the dynamic oxide layer growth model and then its value was used as input in the electrochemistry model. It was confirmed that the calculated results (corrosion rate and ECP) based on the coupled models were in good agreement with the measured ones. Higher ECP was essential for preventing FAC rate. Moderated conditions due to lower mass transfer coefficients resulted in thicker oxide layer thickness and then higher ECP, while moderated corrosion conditions due to higher oxidant concentrations resulted in larger hematite/magnetite rate and then higher ECP.

  18. Irradiation-Assisted Stress Corrosion Cracking of Austenitic Stainless Steels in BWR Environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Y.; Chopra, O. K.; Gruber, Eugene E.; Shack, William J.

    2010-01-01

    The internal components of light water reactors are exposed to high-energy neutron irradiation and high-temperature reactor coolant. The exposure to neutron irradiation increases the susceptibility of austenitic stainless steels (SSs) to stress corrosion cracking (SCC) because of the elevated corrosion potential of the reactor coolant and the introduction of new embrittlement mechanisms through radiation damage. Various nonsensitized SSs and nickel alloys have been found to be prone to intergranular cracking after extended neutron exposure. Such cracks have been seen in a number of internal components in boiling water reactors (BWRs). The elevated susceptibility to SCC in irradiated materials, commonly referred to as irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC), is a complex phenomenon that involves simultaneous actions of irradiation, stress, and corrosion. In recent years, as nuclear power plants have aged and irradiation dose increased, IASCC has become an increasingly important issue. Post-irradiation crack growth rate and fracture toughness tests have been performed to provide data and technical support for the NRC to address various issues related to aging degradation of reactor-core internal structures and components. This report summarizes the results of the last group of tests on compact tension specimens from the Halden-II irradiation. The IASCC susceptibility of austenitic SSs and heat-affected-zone (HAZ) materials sectioned from submerged arc and shielded metal arc welds was evaluated by conducting crack growth rate and fracture toughness tests in a simulated BWR environment. The fracture and cracking behavior of HAZ materials, thermally sensitized SSs and grain-boundary engineered SSs was investigated at several doses (3 dpa). These latest results were combined with previous results from Halden-I and II irradiations to analyze the effects of neutron dose, water chemistry, alloy compositions, and welding and processing conditions on IASCC. The

  19. Evaluation of flow accelerated corrosion by coupled analysis of corrosion and flow dynamics (1), major features of coupled analysis and application for evaluation of wall thinning rate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naitoh, Masanori; Uchida, Shunsuke; Okada, Hidetoshi; Uehara, Yasushi; Koshizuka, Seiichi

    2009-01-01

    Six calculation steps have been prepared for predicting flow accelerated corrosion (FAC) occurrence and evaluating wall thinning rate. (1) Flow pattern and temperature in each elemental volume along the flow path are obtained with a 1D plant system code, (2) Corrosive conditions, e.g., oxygen concentration and electrochemical corrosion potential (ECP) along the flow path are calculated with a hydrazine-oxygen reaction code, (3) Precise flow patterns and mass transfer coefficients at the structure surface are calculated with a 3D CFD code, (4) Danger zones are evaluated by combining major FAC parameters, (5) Wall thinning rates are calculated with the coupled models of static electrochemical analysis and dynamic double oxide layer analysis at the identified danger zone, and then, (6) Residual life and effects of countermeasures can be evaluated. Anodic and cathodic current densities and ECPs were calculated with the static electrochemistry model, and ferrous ion release rate determined by the anodic current density was used as input for the dynamic double oxide layer model. Thickness of the oxide film and its characteristics determined by the dynamic double oxide layer model were used for the electrochemistry model to determine the resistances of cathodic current from the bulk to the surface and anodic current from the surface to the bulk. The calculated results of the coupled models had been compared with the data measured at operating Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) plants and it was demonstrated that the calculated results had good agreements with the measured ones. 6 step-evaluation procedures for liquid droplet impingement (LDI) were also proposed. (author)

  20. Effects of water chemistry on flow accelerated corrosion and liquid droplet impingement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uchida, Shunsuke; Naitoh, Masanori; Okada, Hidetoshi; Uehara, Yasushi; Koshizuka, Seiichi; Lister, Derek H.

    2009-01-01

    Overlapping effects of flow dynamics and corrosion are important issues to determine reliability and lifetime of major structures and components in light water reactor plants. Flow accelerated corrosion (FAC) and liquid droplet impingement (LDI) are typical phenomena due to both interactions. In order to evaluation local wall thinning due to FAC and LDI, 6 step evaluation procedures have been proposed. (1) Flow pattern along the flow path was obtained with 1D computational flow dynamics (CFD) codes, (2) Corrosive conditions, e.g., oxygen concentration along the flow path were calculated with a hydrazine oxygen reaction code for FAC evaluation, while flow pattern of liquid droplets in high velocity steam and possibility of their collision to pipe inner surface were evaluated for LDI evaluation. (3) Mass transfer coefficient at the structure surface was calculated with 3D CFD codes for FAC evaluation, while frequency of oxide film rupture due to droplet collision was calculated for LDI evaluation. (4) High risk zones for FAC/LDI occurrence were evaluated by coupling major parameters, and then, (5) Wall thinning rates were calculated with the coupled model of static electrochemical analysis and dynamic double oxide layer analysis at the identified high FAC/LDI risk zone. (author)

  1. Carbon-steel corrosion in multiphase slug flow and CO2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Villarreal, J.; Laverde, D.; Fuentes, C.

    2006-01-01

    Hydrocarbon multiphase flow may exhibit various geometric configurations or flow patterns. One of these flow patterns is known as multiphase slug flow. If CO 2 is present in hydrocarbons, the steel pipelines can be corroded as this process is probably enhanced by slug flow turbulence. A hydrodynamic circuit was built to study the CO 2 corrosion rates under different slug flow conditions. The experimental results show how the corrosion rate of a carbon-steel electrode varies according to the flow turbulence. The higher slug frequency used in this study was 80 slugs/min. Experimental results for pressure drop and slug length are in agreement with the Dukler and Hubbard [A model for gas-liquid slug flow in horizontal and near horizontal tubes, Ind. Eng. Chem. Fundam. 14 (1975) 337-347] multiphase flow model. Furthermore, the experimental slug frequencies are well correlated by the Shell and Gregory [Correlation of the liquid volume fraction in the slug for horizontal gas-liquid slug flow. Int. J. Multiphase Flow 4 (1978) 33-39] equations in horizontal pipes

  2. A flow reactor for the flow supercritical water oxidation of wastes to mitigate the reactor corrosion problem

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chitanvis, S.M.

    1994-01-01

    We have designed a flow tube reactor for supercritical water oxidation of wastes that confines the oxidation reaction to the vicinity of the axis of the tube. This prevents high temperatures and reactants as well as reaction products from coming in intimate contact with reactor walls. This implies a lessening of corrosion of the walls of the reactor. We display numerical simulations for a vertical reactor with conservative design parameters that illustrate our concept. We performed our calculations for the destruction of sodium nitrate by ammonium hydroxide In the presence of supercritical water, where the production of sodium hydroxide causes corrosion. We have compared these results with that for a horizontal set-up where the sodium hydroxide created during the reaction ends up on the floor of the tube, implying a higher probability of corrosion

  3. Simulation of corrosion product activity in pressurized water reactors under flow rate transients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mirza, Anwar M.; Mirza, Nasir M.; Mir, Imran

    1998-01-01

    Simulation of coolant activation due to corrosion products and impurities in a typical pressurized water reactor has been done under flow rate transients. Employing time dependent production and losses of corrosion products in the primary coolant path an approach has been developed to calculate the coolant specific activity. Results for 24 Na, 56 Mn, 59 Fe, 60 Co and 99Mo show that the specific activity in primary loop approaches equilibrium value under normal operating conditions fairly rapidly. Predominant corrosion product activity is due to Mn-56. Parametric studies at full power for various ramp decreases in flow rate show initial decline in the activity and then a gradual rise to relatively higher saturation values. The minimum value and the time taken to reach the minima are strong functions of the slope of linear decrease in flow rate. In the second part flow rate coastdown was allowed to occur at different flow half-times. The reactor scram was initiated at 90% of the normal flow rate. The results show that the specific activity decreases and the rate of decrease depends on pump half time and the reactor scram conditions

  4. Flow-induced corrosion of absorbable magnesium alloy: In-situ and real-time electrochemical study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Juan; Jang, Yongseok; Wan, Guojiang; Giridharan, Venkataraman; Song, Guang-Ling; Xu, Zhigang; Koo, Youngmi; Qi, Pengkai; Sankar, Jagannathan; Huang, Nan; Yun, Yeoheung

    2016-01-01

    An in-situ and real-time electrochemical study in a vascular bioreactor was designed to analyze corrosion mechanism of magnesium alloy (MgZnCa) under mimetic hydrodynamic conditions. Effect of hydrodynamics on corrosion kinetics, types, rates and products was analyzed. Flow-induced shear stress (FISS) accelerated mass and electron transfer, leading to an increase in uniform and localized corrosions. FISS increased the thickness of uniform corrosion layer, but filiform corrosion decreased this layer resistance at high FISS conditions. FISS also increased the removal rate of localized corrosion products. Impedance-estimated and linear polarization-measured polarization resistances provided a consistent correlation to corrosion rate calculated by computed tomography. PMID:28626241

  5. Corrosion properties of aluminium coatings deposited on sintered NdFeB by ion-beam-assisted deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mao Shoudong; Yang Hengxiu; Li Jinlong; Huang Feng [Ningbo Institute of Materials Technology and Engineering, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 519 Zhuangshi Road, Ningbo 315201 (China); Song Zhenlun, E-mail: songzhenlun@nimte.ac.cn [Ningbo Institute of Materials Technology and Engineering, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 519 Zhuangshi Road, Ningbo 315201 (China)

    2011-04-15

    Pure Al coatings were deposited by direct current (DC) magnetron sputtering to protect sintered NdFeB magnets. The effects of Ar{sup +} ion-beam-assisted deposition (IBAD) on the structure and the corrosion behaviour of Al coatings were investigated. The Al coating prepared by DC magnetron sputtering with IBAD (IBAD-Al-coating) had fewer voids than the coating without IBAD (Al-coating). The corrosion behaviour of the Al-coated NdFeB specimens was investigated by potentiodynamic polarisation, a neutral salt spray (NSS) test, and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). The pitting corrosion of the Al coatings always began at the voids of the grain boundaries. Bombardment by the Ar{sup +} ion-beams effectively improved the corrosion resistance of the IBAD-Al-coating.

  6. A study on the flow-accelerated corrosion characteristics of galvanically coupled dissimilar metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Yoon Seok; Kim, Jung Gu

    2002-01-01

    The flow-accelerated corrosion characteristics of a carbon steel(CS) coupled to stainless steel(SS) were investigated in deaerated alkaline-chloride solutions with velocities (0, 0.2, 0.4 and 0.6 m/s), pH (8, 9 and 10) and temperatures (25, 50 and 75 .deg. C). The electrochemical properties of specimens were investigated by potentiodynamic test and galvanic corrosion test using RCE (Rotating Cylinder Electrode). CS did not show passive behavior while SS show passive behavior in the alkaline-chloride solution. Galvanic corrosion tests were conducted as a function of flow velocities, pH and temperature. The galvanic current density increases with increasing flow velocity and temperature, but decreased with increasing pH. Flow velocity had a small effect on the galvanic current density at 25 .deg. C, whereas the flow velocity increased galvanic current density significantly at 50 and 75 .deg. C. This might be due to the increased solubility of magnetite at the higher temperature

  7. Evaluation of flow accelerated corrosion by coupled analysis of corrosion and flow dynamics (3), relationship of oxide film thickness, hematite/magnetite ratio, ECP and wall thinning rate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uchida, Shunsuke; Naitoh, Masanori; Okada, Hidetoshi; Uehara, Yasushi; Koshizuka, Seiichi

    2009-01-01

    Systematic approaches for evaluating flow accelerated corrosion (FAC) are desired before discussing application of countermeasures for FAC. Firstly, future FAC occurrence should be evaluated to identify locations where a higher possibility of FAC occurrence exists, and then, wall thinning rate at the identified FAC occurrence zone is evaluated to obtain the preparation time for applying countermeasures. Wall thinning rates were calculated with the coupled models of static electrochemical analysis and dynamic double oxide layer analysis. Anodic current density and electrochemical corrosion potential (ECP) were calculated with the static electrochemistry model based on an Evans diagram and ferrous ion release rate determined by the anodic current density was applied as input for the dynamic double oxide layer model. Some of the dissolved ferrous ion was removed to the bulk water and others precipitated on the surface as magnetite particles. The thickness of oxide layer was calculated with the dynamic double oxide layer model and then was applied as input for the electrochemistry model. It was confirmed that the calculated results based on the coupled models resulted good agreement with the measured ones. Higher ECP was essential for preventing FAC rate. Moderated conditions due to lower mass transfer coefficients resulted in thicker oxide layer thickness and then higher ECP, while moderated corrosion conditions due to higher oxidant concentrations resulted in larger hematite/magnetite rate and then higher ECP. (author)

  8. Evaluation of Flow Accelerated Corrosion of Carbon Steel with Rotating Cylinder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Tae Jun; Lee, Eun Hee; Kim, Kyung Mo; Kim, Hong Pyo

    2012-01-01

    Flow accelerated corrosion (FAC) of the carbon steel piping in nuclear power plants (NPPs) has been major issue in nuclear industry. Rotating cylinder FAC test facility was designed and fabricated and then performance of the facility was evaluated. The facility is very simple in design and economic in fabrication and can be used in material and chemistry screening test. The facility is equipped with on line monitoring of pH, conductivity, dissolved oxygen(DO), and temperature. Fluid velocity is controlled with rotating speed of the cylinder with a test specimen. FAC test of SA106 Gr. B carbon steel under 4 m/s flow velocity was performed with the rotating cylinder at DO concentration of less than 1 ppb and of 1.3 ppm. Also a corrosion test of the carbon steel at static condition, that is at zero fluid velocity, of test specimen and solution was performed at pH from 8 to 10 for comparison with the FAC data. For corrosion test in static condition, the amount of non adherent corrosion product was almost constant at pH ranging from 8 to 10. But adherent corrosion product decreased with increasing pH. This trend is consistent with decrease of Fe solubility with an increase in pH. For FAC test with rotating cylinder FAC test facility, the amount of non adherent corrosion product was also almost same for both DO concentrations. The rotating cylinder FAC test facility will be further improved by redesigning rotating cylinder and FAC specimen geometry for future work

  9. Stress corrosion cracking susceptibility of steam generator tubing on secondary side in restricted flow areas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fulger, M.; Lucan, D.; Radulescu, M.; Velciu, L.

    2003-01-01

    Nuclear steam generator tubes operate in high temperature water and on the secondary side in restricted flow areas many nonvolatile impurities accidentally introduced into circuit tend to concentrate. The concentration process leads to the formation of highly aggressive alkaline or acid solutions in crevices, and these solutions can cause stress corrosion cracking (SCC) on stressed tube materials. Even though alloy 800 has shown to be highly resistant to general corrosion in high temperature water, it has been found that the steam generator tubes may crack during service from the primary and/or secondary side. Stress corrosion cracking is still a serious problem occurring on outside tubes in operating steam generators. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the environmental factors affecting the stress corrosion cracking of steam generators tubing. The main test method was the exposure for 1000 hours into static autoclaves of plastically stressed C-rings of Incoloy 800 in caustic solutions (10% NaOH) and acidic chloride solutions because such environments may sometimes form accidentally in crevices on secondary side of tubes. Because the kinetics of corrosion of metals is indicated by anodic polarization curves, in this study, some stressed specimens were anodically polarized in caustic solutions in electrochemical cell, and other in chloride acidic solutions. The results presented as micrographs, potentiokinetic curves, and electrochemical parameters have been compared to establish the SCC behavior of Incoloy 800 in such concentrated environments. (authors)

  10. Effect of Water Chemistry Factors on Flow Accelerated Corrosion : pH, DO, Hydrazine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Eun Hee; Kim, Kyung Mo; Kim, Hong Pyo

    2013-01-01

    Flow accelerated corrosion(FAC) of the carbon steel piping in pressurized water reactors(PWRs) has been major issue in nuclear industry. Severe accident at Surry Unit 2 in 1986 initiated the worldwide interest in this area. Major parameters influencing FAC are material composition, microstructure, water chemistry, and hydrodynamics. Qualitative behaviors of FAC have been well understood but quantitative data about FAC have not been published for proprietary reason. In order to minimize the FAC in PWRs, the optimal method is to control water chemistry factors. Chemistry factors influencing FAC such as pH, corrosion potential, and hydrazine contents were reviewed in this paper. FAC rate decreased with pH up to 10 because magnetite solubility decreased with pH. Corrosion potential is generally controlled dissolved oxygen (DO) and hydrazine in secondary water. DO increased corrosion potential. FAC rate decreased with DO by stabilizing magnetite at low DO concentration or by formation of hematite at high DO concentration. Even though hydrazine is generally used to remove DO, hydrazine itself thermally decomposed to ammonia, nitrogen, and hydrogen raising pH. Hydrazine could react with iron and increased FAC rate. Effect of hydrazine on FAC is rather complex and should be careful in FAC analysis. FAC could be managed by adequate combination of pH, corrosion potential, and hydrazine

  11. An Industrial Perspective on Environmentally Assisted Cracking of Some Commercially Used Carbon Steels and Corrosion-Resistant Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashida, Yugo; Daigo, Yuzo; Sugahara, Katsuo

    2017-08-01

    Commercial metals and alloys like carbon steels, stainless steels, and nickel-based super alloys frequently encounter the problem of environmentally assisted cracking (EAC) and resulting failure in engineering components. This article aims to provide a perspective on three critical industrial applications having EAC issues: (1) corrosion and cracking of carbon steels in automotive applications, (2) EAC of iron- and nickel-based alloys in salt production and processing, and (3) EAC of iron- and nickel-based alloys in supercritical water. The review focuses on current industrial-level understanding with respect to corrosion fatigue, hydrogen-assisted cracking, or stress corrosion cracking, as well as the dominant factors affecting crack initiation and propagation. Furthermore, some ongoing industrial studies and directions of future research are also discussed.

  12. Mechanisms of irradiation assisted stress corrosion cracking in austenitic stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Was, G.S.; Busby, G.T.

    2004-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: Service and laboratory experience have shown that irradiation enhances the stress corrosion cracking of austenitic alloys in high temperature water. The degree of irradiation assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC) increases with dose as the microstructure undergoes significant changes, including dislocation loop formation, grain boundary segregation and hardening. These changes occur simultaneously and at comparable rates, complicating the attribution of IASCC to specific components of the microstructure. Each of the principal effects of irradiation have been considered as potential causes of IASCC, but the multivariable nature of the problem obscures a definitive determination of the mechanism. Rather, the mechanism of IASCC is more likely due to a combination of factors, some which have not yet been considered. Among these effects is the heterogeneity of deformation caused by the irradiated microstructure, and the interaction of localized deformation bands with grain boundaries. Current understanding and proposed mechanisms of IASCC will be reviewed, and recent progress on the role of heterogeneous deformation on IASCC will be presented. (authors)

  13. Irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking of HTH Alloy X-750 and Alloy 625

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bajaj, R.; Mills, W.J.; Lebo, M.R.; Hyatt, B.Z.; Burke, M.G.

    1995-01-01

    In-reactor testing of bolt-loaded compact tension specimens was performed in 360 C water. New data confirms previous results that high irradiation levels reduce SCC resistance in Alloy X-750. Low boron heats show improved IASCC (irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking). Alloy 625 is resistant to IASCC. Microstructural, microchemical, and deformation studies were carried out. Irradiation of X-750 caused significant strengthening and ductility loss associated with formation of cavities and dislocation loops. High irradiation did not cause segregation in X-750. Irradiation of 625 resulted in formation of small dislocation loops and a fine body-centered-orthorhombic phase. The strengthening due to loops and precipitates was apparently offset in 625 by partial dissolution of γ precipitates. Transmutation of boron to helium at grain boundaries, coupled with matrix strengthening, is believed to be responsible for IASCC in X-750, and the absence of these two effects results in superior IASCC resistance in 625

  14. Grain boundary composition and irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking resistance in Type 348 stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacobs, A.J.; Wozadlo, G.P.; Nakata, K.

    1994-01-01

    Scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) analyses, in-reactor swelling mandrel tests, and laboratory constant extension rate tensile (CERT) tests were conducted on nine custom type 348 (UNS S34800) stainless steel (SS) alloys in an attempt to correlate grain boundary composition with irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC) resistance. Phosphorus (P) enrichment showed the best correlation with in-reactor test results, and chromium (Cr) depletion showed the best correlation with laboratory results. Silicon (Si) and P enrichment were found to depend quantitatively on the bulk concentrations of these elements. The amount of Cr depletion seemed dependent at least partially on the amounts of Si and/or P enrichment. Si and P enrichment and Cr depletion were suppressed by higher carbon (C) contents, such as that present in commercial-purity type 348 SS

  15. Erosion and corrosion of nuclear power plant materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    This conference is composed of 23 papers, grouped in 3 sessions which main themes are: analysis of corrosion and erosion damages of nuclear power plant equipment and influence of water chemistry, temperature, irradiations, metallurgical and electrochemical factors, flow assisted cracking, stress cracking; monitoring and control of erosion and corrosion in nuclear power plants; susceptibility of structural materials to erosion and corrosion and ways to improve the resistance of materials, steels, coatings, etc. to erosion, corrosion and cracking

  16. Microwave-assisted synthesis of lanthanum conversion coating on Mg-Li alloy and its corrosion resistance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song Dalei; Jing Xiaoyan; Wang Jun; Lu Shanshan; Yang Piaoping; Wang Yanli; Zhang Milin

    2011-01-01

    Graphical abstract: Highlights: → The method of microwave is used to synthesize lanthanum conversion coating. → Lanthanum conversion coating on Mg-Li alloy was studied. → Different conditions between room temperature and microwave were compared. → The corrosion behavior of lanthanum conversion coatings was studied. → The corrosion mechanism of lanthanum conversion coatings was studied. - Abstract: Lanthanum-based conversion coating on Mg-Li alloy has been prepared by a microwave-assisted method. X-ray diffractions (XRD) indicate that the intermetallic compounds of lanthanum are formed on Mg-Li alloy surface. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images show that the coating has different morphologies and special structures. The corrosion resistance was assessed by means of potentiodynamic polarization curves and electrochemical impedance spectra (EIS). The results indicate that this coating significantly reduces the corrosion rate of Mg-Li alloy in NaCl solution. A comparing experiment indicates that the coating prepared by microwave-assisted process has superior corrosion resistance to the coating obtained at room temperature.

  17. Characterization of acoustic emission signals generated by water flow through intergranular stress corrosion cracks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Claytor, T.N.; Kupperman, D.S.

    1985-05-01

    A program is under way at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) to develop an independent capability to assess the effectiveness of current and proposed techniques for acoustic leak detection (ALD) in reactor coolant systems. The program will establish whether meaningful quantitative data on flow rates and leak location can be obtained from acoustic signatures of leaks due to intergranular stress corrosion cracks (TGSCCs) and fatigue cracks, and whether these can be distinguished from other types of leaks. 5 refs., 3 figs

  18. Corrosion '98: 53. annual conference and exposition, proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1998-01-01

    This conference was divided into the following sections: Corrosion in Gas Treating; Problems and Solutions in Commercial Building Water Systems; Green Corrosion/Scale Inhibitors; Atmospheric Corrosion; AIRPOL Update/98; Rubber Lining--Answers to Many Problems; Interference Problems; Environmental Assisted Cracking: Fundamental Research and Industrial Applications; Corrosion in Nuclear Systems; New Developments in Scale and Deposit Control; Corrosion and Corrosion Protection in the Transportation Industries; What's All the Noise About--Electrochemical That Is; Refining Industry Corrosion; Corrosion Problems in Military Hardware: Case Histories, Fixes and Lessons Learned; Cathodic Protection Test Methods and Instrumentation for Underground and On-grade Pipelines and Tanks; Recent Developments in Volatile Corrosion Inhibitors; Corrosion in Supercritical Fluids; Microbiologically Influenced Corrosion; Advances in Understanding and Controlling CO 2 Corrosion; Managing Corrosion with Plastics; Material Developments for Use in Exploration and Production Environments; Corrosion in Cold Regions; The Effect of Downsizing and Outsourcing on Cooling System Monitoring and Control Practices; New Developments in Mechanical and Chemical Industrial Cleaning; Mineral Scale Deposit Control in Oilfield Related Operations; Biocides in Cooling Water; Corrosion and Corrosion Control of Reinforced Concrete Structures; Materials Performance for Fossil Energy Conversion Systems; Marine corrosion; Thermal Spray--Coating and Corrosion Control; Flow Effects on Corrosion in Oil and Gas Production; Corrosion Measurement Technologies; Internal Pipeline Monitoring--Corrosion Monitoring, Intelligent Pigging and Leak Detection; Cathodic Protection in Natural Waters; Corrosion in Radioactive Liquid Waste Systems; On-line Hydrogen Permeation Monitoring Equipment and Techniques, State of the Art; Water Reuse and Recovery; Performance of Materials in High Temperature Environments; Advances in Motor

  19. Corrosion behaviour of Al based tritium permeation barriers in flowing Pb-17Li

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glasbrenner, H.; Konys, J.; Voss, Z.; Wedemeyer, O.

    2002-01-01

    Tritium permeation barriers on low-activation steels are required in fusion technology in order to reduce the tritium permeation rate through the structural material into the cooling water system. Al-Fe layers with alumina on top can fulfil the required reduction rate. Three techniques were selected to produce such a multi-layered coating system: chemical vapour deposition (CVD) by CEA, hot-dip aluminising (HDA) by FZK and vacuum plasma spraying (VPS) by JRC Ispra. A sufficient corrosion resistance against Pb-17Li attack is also required for the coating. Therefore, the corrosion behaviour of these three coatings on ferritic-martensitic steels was studied in the PICOLO loop of FZK in flowing Pb-17Li at 480 deg. C up to 10 000 h. Corrosion effects could not be found on HDA and VPS coated specimens even up to the longest time of exposure. The total thickness of the two-layered system remained unchanged at around 130 μm for all examined HDA and VPS specimens. In contrast to this, corrosion effects could be inspected on CVD coated specimens

  20. Redox conditions effect on flow accelerated corrosion: Influence of hydrazine and oxygen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bouvier, O. de [EDF, R and D Div., Moret sur Loing (France); Bouchacourt, M. [EDF, Engineering and Service Div., Villeurbanne (France); Fruzzetti, K. [EPRI, Science and Technology Div., Palo Alto, CA (United States)

    2002-07-01

    Flow accelerated corrosion (FAC) of carbon steels has been studied world-wide for more than twenty years and is now fairly well understood. The influence of several parameters like water chemistry (i.e. pH and oxygen content), temperature, hydrodynamic or mass transfer conditions (i.e. flow velocity, geometry, steam quality..) and steel composition on the corrosion kinetics has been demonstrated both theoretically and experimentally. However, the effect of a reducing environment and variable redox conditions have not yet been fully explored. It's well known that a reducing environment is effective in increasing the resistance of steam generator tubing to intergranular attack / stress corrosion cracking (IGA/SCC) and pitting. In that way, secondary water chemistry specifications have been modified from low hydrazine to high hydrazine chemistry in the steam-water circuit. Nevertheless, increasing hydrazine levels up to 200 {mu}g/kg could have a detrimental effect by potentially enhancing the FAC process. Moreover, in order to have a complete understanding of the possible impact of the water chemistry environment it is also important to consider the impact of redox conditions during shutdowns (cold and/or hot shutdowns) and start up periods when aerated water injections are made to maintain a constant water level in the Steam Generators from the auxiliary feedwater circuit. Therefore, a common EDF and EPRI R and D effort has been recently carried out to study the effects of hydrazine and oxygen on FAC. The results are presented as follows. (authors)

  1. Corrosion behavior of CLAM steel weldment in flowing liquid Pb-17Li at 480 °C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Xizhang; Shen Zheng; Chen Xing; Lei Yucheng; Huang Qunying

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: ► The research shows that the CLAM steel weldment have its own corrosion mechanism in liquid Pb-17Li alloy. The basic rule of the corrosion behaviour of weldments is that the coorosion rate decreases obviously with the increasing of exposed time. ► The weight loss of CLAM steel weldment is far higer than the base metal after exposed to Pb-17Li alloy. Corrosion has little effects on elements of weldment sample surfaces. And an easier corrosion area in the weld joint are found. ► A simple presumably corrosion behavior model is established. The model demonstrate that the easier corroded area will be formed when the direction of martensite laths form small-angle with the specimen surface, The easy corrosion area is the martensite lath area lack of Cr and distributes like laths, the cross-section area is 1 μm 2 to 4 μm 2, the existence of the easier corrosion area is one of the reasons that lead to the difference of the corrosion rate. - Abstract: CLAM (China Low Activation Martensitic) steel is considered as one of the candidate structural materials in liquid LiPb blanket concepts. Welding is one of the essential technologies for its practical application, CLAM steel weldment shows a great difference with base metal due to the effect of welding thermal cycle. In order to investigate the corrosion behavior and mechanism of CLAM weldments in liquid Pb-17Li, the experiments were performed by exposing the TIG weldment samples in flowing LiPb at 480 °C. The weight loss test of exposed specimens show that in 500 h, 1000 h dynamic conditions, corrosion resistance of CLAM steel weldment is poor, SEM analysis shows that the thicker martensite lath in weld area lead to higher corrosion amount, EDS results show that the influence of corrosion on surface elements is small, and surface corrosion is even, EDX analysis shows that the penetration of Pb-17Li does not exist in the joint. With the increasing of exposure time, the corrosion rate decreases

  2. Study of MHD Corrosion and Transport of Corrosion Products of Ferritic/Martensitic Steels in the Flowing PbLi and its Application to Fusion Blanket

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saeidi, Sheida

    Two important components of a liquid breeder blanket of a fusion power reactor are the liquid breeder/coolant and the steel structure that the liquid is enclosed in. One candidate combination for such components is Lead-Lithium (PbLi) eutectic alloy and advanced Reduced Activation Ferritic/Martensitic (RAFM) steel. The research performed here is aimed at: (1) better understanding of corrosion processes in the system including RAFM steel and flowing PbLi in the presence of a strong magnetic field and (2) prediction of corrosion losses in conditions of a Dual Coolant Lead Lithium (DCLL) blanket, which is at present the key liquid metal blanket concept in the US. To do this, numerical and analytical tools have been developed and then applied to the analysis of corrosion processes. First, efforts were taken to develop a computational suite called TRANSMAG (Transport phenomena in Magnetohydrodynamic Flows) as an analysis tool for corrosion processes in the PbLi/RAFM system, including transport of corrosion products in MHD laminar and turbulent flows. The computational approach in TRANSMAG is based on simultaneous solution of flow, energy and mass transfer equations with or without a magnetic field, assuming mass transfer controlled corrosion and uniform dissolution of iron in the flowing PbLi. Then, the new computational tool was used to solve an inverse mass transfer problem where the saturation concentration of iron in PbLi was reconstructed from the experimental data resulting in the following correlation: CS = e 13.604--12975/T, where T is the temperature of PbLi in K and CS is in wppm. The new correlation for saturation concentration was then used in the analysis of corrosion processes in laminar flows in a rectangular duct in the presence of a strong transverse magnetic field. As shown in this study, the mass loss increases with the magnetic field such that the corrosion rate in the presence of a magnetic field can be a few times higher compared to purely

  3. Effect of water chemistry improvement on flow accelerated corrosion in light-water nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugino, Wataru; Ohira, Taku; Nagata, Nobuaki; Abe, Ayumi; Takiguchi, Hideki

    2009-01-01

    Flow Accelerated Corrosion (FAC) of Carbon Steel (CS) piping has been one of main issues in Light-Water Nuclear Reactor (LWRs). Wall thinning of CS piping due to FAC increases potential risk of pipe rupture and cost for inspection and replacement of damaged pipes. In particular, corrosion products generated by FAC of CS piping brought steam generator (SG) tube corrosion and degradation of thermal performance, when it intruded and accumulated in secondary side of PWR. To preserve SG integrity by suppressing the corrosion of CS, High-AVT chemistry (Feedwater pH9.8±0.2) has been adopted to Tsuruga-2 (1160 MWe PWR, commercial operation in 1987) in July 2005 instead of conventional Low-AVT chemistry (Feedwater pH 9.3). By the High-AVT adoption, the accumulation rate of iron in SG was reduced to one-quarter of that under conventional Low-AVT. As a result, a tendency to degradation of the SG thermal efficiency was improved. On the other hand, it was clarified that High-AVT is ineffective against Flow Accelerated Corrosion (FAC) at the region where the flow turbulence is much larger. By contrast, wall thinning of CS feed water pipes due to FAC has been successfully controlled by oxygen treatment (OT) for long time in BWRs. Because Magnetite film formed on CS surface under AVT chemistry has higher solubility and porosity in comparison with Hematite film, which is formed under OT. In this paper, behavior of the FAC under various pH and dissolved oxygen concentration are discussed based on the actual wall thinning rate of BWR and PWR plant and experimental results by FAC test-loop. And, it is clarified that the FAC is suppressed even under extremely low DO concentration such as 2ppb under AVT condition in PWR. Based on this result, we propose the oxygenated water chemistry (OWC) for PWR secondary system which can mitigate the FAC of CS piping without any adverse effect for the SG integrity. Furthermore, the applicability and effectiveness of this concept developed for FAC

  4. Irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking considerations at temperatures below 288 degree C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simonen, E.P.; Jones, R.H.; Bruemmer, S.M.

    1995-03-01

    Irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC) occurs above a critical neutron fluence in light-water reactor (LWR) water environments at 288 C, but very little information exists to indicate susceptibility as temperatures are reduced. Potential low-temperature behavior is assessed based on the temperature dependencies of intergranular (IG) SCC in the absence of irradiation, radiation-induced segregation (RIS) at grain boundaries and micromechanical deformation mechanisms. IGSCC of sensitized SS in the absence of irradiation exhibits high growth rates at temperatures down to 200 C under conditions of anodic dissolution control, while analysis of hydrogen-induced cracking suggests a peak crack growth rate near 100 C. Hence from environmental considerations, IASCC susceptibility appears to remain likely as water temperatures are decreased. Irradiation experiments and model predictions indicate that RIS also persists to low temperatures. Chromium depletion may be significant at temperatures below 100C for irradiation doses greater than 10 displacements per atom (dpa). Macromechanical effects of irradiation on strength and ductility are not strongly dependent on temperature below 288 C. However, temperature does significantly affect radiation effects on SS microstructure and micromechanical deformation mechanisms. The critical conditions for material susceptibility to IASCC at low temperatures may be controlled by radiation-induced grain boundary microchemistry, strain localization due to irradiation microstructure and irradiation creep processes. 39 refs

  5. Effects of material property changes on irradiation assisted stress corrosion cracking

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakano, Morihito; Fukuya, Koji; Fujii, Katsuhiko [Inst. of Nuclear Safety System Inc., Mihama, Fukui (Japan)

    2002-09-01

    Irradiation assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC) susceptibility and radiation-induced material changes in microstructure and microchemistry under pressurized water reactor (PWR) environment were examined on irradiated stainless steels (SSs), post-irradiation annealed SSs and post-irradiation deformed SS. The yield stress and grain boundary segregation were considerably high in SSs highly irradiated to 1-8 x 10{sup 26}n/m{sup 2} (E > 0.1 MeV) in PWR at 290-320degC, resulting in a high IASCC susceptibility. Following post-irradiation annealing of highly irradiated SSs, IASCC susceptibility showed significant recovery from 89% (as-irradiated) to 8% (550degC) of %IGSCC, while the hardness recovered from Hv375 (400degC) to Hv315 (550degC). Apparent recovery of segregation at grain boundaries was not observed. The SSs irradiated to 5.3 x 10{sup 24}n/m{sup 2} (E>1MeV) in the Japan Materials Testing Reactor (JMTR) at < 400degC, which had grain boundary segregation and low hardness, showed no IASCC susceptibility. Due to post-irradiation deforming for JMTR irradiated SS, the hardness increased but IASCC did not occur. These results suggested that the hardening would be a key factor for IASCC initiation under PWR hydrogenated water and that a yield stress threshold for IASCC initiation under slow strain rate tensile (SSRT) testing would the about 600MPa. (author)

  6. Effects of material property changes on irradiation assisted stress corrosion cracking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakano, Morihito; Fukuya, Koji; Fujii, Katsuhiko

    2002-01-01

    Irradiation assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC) susceptibility and radiation-induced material changes in microstructure and microchemistry under pressurized water reactor (PWR) environment were examined on irradiated stainless steels (SSs), post-irradiation annealed SSs and post-irradiation deformed SS. The yield stress and grain boundary segregation were considerably high in SSs highly irradiated to 1-8 x 10 26 n/m 2 (E > 0.1 MeV) in PWR at 290-320degC, resulting in a high IASCC susceptibility. Following post-irradiation annealing of highly irradiated SSs, IASCC susceptibility showed significant recovery from 89% (as-irradiated) to 8% (550degC) of %IGSCC, while the hardness recovered from Hv375 (400degC) to Hv315 (550degC). Apparent recovery of segregation at grain boundaries was not observed. The SSs irradiated to 5.3 x 10 24 n/m 2 (E>1MeV) in the Japan Materials Testing Reactor (JMTR) at < 400degC, which had grain boundary segregation and low hardness, showed no IASCC susceptibility. Due to post-irradiation deforming for JMTR irradiated SS, the hardness increased but IASCC did not occur. These results suggested that the hardening would be a key factor for IASCC initiation under PWR hydrogenated water and that a yield stress threshold for IASCC initiation under slow strain rate tensile (SSRT) testing would the about 600MPa. (author)

  7. Factors affecting stress assisted corrosion cracking of carbon steel under industrial boiler conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Dong

    Failure of carbon steel boiler tubes from waterside has been reported in the utility boilers and industrial boilers for a long time. In industrial boilers, most waterside tube cracks are found near heavy attachment welds on the outer surface and are typically blunt, with multiple bulbous features indicating a discontinuous growth. These types of tube failures are typically referred to as stress assisted corrosion (SAC). For recovery boilers in the pulp and paper industry, these failures are particularly important as any water leak inside the furnace can potentially lead to smelt-water explosion. Metal properties, environmental variables, and stress conditions are the major factors influencing SAC crack initation and propagation in carbon steel boiler tubes. Slow strain rate tests (SSRT) were conducted under boiler water conditions to study the effect of temperature, oxygen level, and stress conditions on crack initation and propagation on SA-210 carbon steel samples machined out of boiler tubes. Heat treatments were also performed to develop various grain size and carbon content on carbon steel samples, and SSRTs were conducted on these samples to examine the effect of microstructure features on SAC cracking. Mechanisms of SAC crack initation and propagation were proposed and validated based on interrupted slow strain tests (ISSRT). Water chemistry guidelines are provided to prevent SAC and fracture mechanics model is developed to predict SAC failure on industrial boiler tubes.

  8. Nuclear power plant life management: flow accelerated corrosion and chemical control. Application to Embalse Nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chocron, Mauricio; Saucedo, Ramona E.; Sainz, Ricardo A.; Ovando, Luis E.

    2006-01-01

    The chemistry of a water-steam cycle is one of the main aspects of the Plant Life Management of a Nuclear Power Plant and it is important for the preservation, efficiency and availability of the whole system. In that sense this aspect has to be prioritized in any study whose aim is the life extension of the plant. In particular, the flow-assisted -corrosion or FAC is a problem that worldwide has been considered important due to the piping wall thinning that in some occasions has led to severe accidents. The FAC phenomena is not easy to be interpreted and addressed although nowadays there are some accepted models to understand and predict sensitive areas of the cycle. The objectives of the present paper have been: a) The construction of an integrated code that involves all the aspects that have influence on FAC, i.e., materials, composition, geometry, temperature and flow rate, quality, chemistry, etc.; b) Establish or adapting current models to the circuit of Embalse PHWR NPP; c) Identify new locations for inspection and wall thickness measurement in order to predict residual life; d) Compare different chemistries and e) handle large sets of inspection data. Among the results, new lines have been incorporated to the inspection schedule of the 2005' programmed outage. Also, the evaluation is part of the PLIM-PLEX programme at Embalse-N.A.S.A. in collaboration with C.N.E.A. is being carried out. (author)

  9. Mass transfer effects in feeder flow-accelerated corrosion wall thinning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pietralik, J.

    2008-01-01

    Flow conditions play a dominant role in Flow-Accelerated Corrosion (FAC) under certain conditions, e.g., in CANDU feeders. While chemistry and materials set the overall potential for FAC, flow conditions determine the local distribution of wall thinning. Recent plant data of feeders and laboratory tests confirms that there is a close relationship between local flow conditions, expressed by mass transfer coefficient, and FAC rate in CANDU feeder bends. The knowledge of local effects can be useful for minimizing the number of inspected components, predicting the location of the highest FAC rate for a given piping component, and determining what components or feeders should be replaced. A similar evaluation applies also to FAC in heat transfer equipment such as heat exchangers and steam generators. The objective of this paper is to examine the relationship between FAC rate and local mass transfer parameters. For FAC where the flow is dominant, the FAC rate is proportional to mass flux of ferrous ions. The mass flux is the product of the mass transfer coefficient and the concentration difference, or degree of saturation. The mass transfer coefficient describes the intensity of the transport of corrosion products (ferrous ions) from the oxide-water interface into the bulk water. Therefore, this parameter can be used for predicting the local distribution of FAC rate in the mass-transfer controlled FAC. The degree of saturation reduces the mass flux, thus reducing the FAC rate. This effect can be significant in long piping, e.g., in outlet feeders. The paper presents plant and laboratory evidence for the relationship between local mass transfer conditions and the FAC rate. It shows correlations for mass transfer coefficient in components that are highly susceptible to FAC and most important flow parameters that affect mass transfer coefficient. The role of surface roughness, wall shear stress, and local turbulence is also discussed. (author)

  10. Corrosion behaviour of martensitic and austenitic steels in flowing lead-bismuth eutectic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin-Munoz, F.J.; Soler-Crespo, L.; Gomez-Briceno, D.

    2011-01-01

    The LINCE loop is a forced convection loop designed for long-term corrosion tests in lead-bismuth eutectic (LBE) at CIEMAT. The LBE volume of in the loop is 250 l and the maximum flow velocity in the region of specimens is approximately 1 m s -1 . An oxygen control system has been implemented in the loop. The corrosion behaviour of AISI 316L and T91 steels was investigated in flowing LBE at temperatures of 575 and 725 K for exposure times of 2000, 5000 and 10,000 h. At 575 K, the results showed a good response, with no weight loss detected in any of the materials after exposure to the flowing LBE up to 10,000 h. A similar behaviour was observed for the specimens tested at 725 K during 2000 and 10,000 h. Specimens extracted at intermediate time (5000 h) showed an anomalous behaviour with important weight loss. These specimens were placed at the bottom of the hot test section, and this position probably made them to suffer an accused process of cavitation-erosion.

  11. Evaluation of wall thinning profile by flow accelerated corrosion in separation and union pipe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watanabe, Shun; Yoneda, Kimitoshi

    2013-01-01

    Flow Accelerated Corrosion (FAC) is a pipe wall thinning phenomena to be monitored and managed in power plants with high priority. At present, its management has been conducted with conservative evaluation of thinning rate and residual lifetime of the piping based on wall thickness measurements. However, noticeable case of wall thinning was occurred at separation and union pipe. In such pipe system, it is a problem to manage section beneath reinforcing plate of T-tube pipe and 'crotch' of T-joint pipe; the region where wall thickness measurement is difficult to conduct with ordinary ultrasonic testing device. In this study, numerical analysis for separation and union part of T-tube and T-joint pipe was conducted, and wall thinning profile by Flow Accelerated Corrosion was evaluated by calculating mass transfer coefficient and geometry factor. Based on these results, we considered applicable wall thinning management for T-tube and T-joint pipe. In the case of union flow from main and branch pipe, the wall thinning profile of T-tube showed the tendency of increase at main pipe like semielliptical region. On the other hand, noticeable profile appeared at 'crotch' in T-joint. Although it was found that geometry factor of T-joint in this case was half the value of T-tube, an alternative evaluation method to previous one might be needed for the profiles of 'semielliptical region' and 'crotch'. (author)

  12. Effect of composition on the corrosion behavior of 316 stainless steel in flowing sodium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bates, J.F.; Brehm, W.F.

    1976-03-01

    Type 316 stainless steel specimens irradiated and non-irradiated, with minor variations in C, N, Cr, Ni, Si, and Mn content, were exposed to flowing sodium in the Source Term Control Loop-1 facility. Test conditions of 604 0 C, a sodium velocity of 6.7 m/s, and an oxygen content of 0.5 and 2.5 ppM were used to ascertain the effect of these compositional variations on the corrosion rate and on the 54 Mn release rate. Variations in C, N, and Mn had no significant effect on the corrosion rate. The corrosion rate increased somewhat as the Ni and Si content of the steel was increased, and decreased with an increase in Cr content. Microprobe examination showed preferential leaching of Mn, Si, Cr, and Ni to depths of up to 10 μm (0.4 mil) after exposure times ranging from 5000 to 8000 hours. Variations in natural ( 55 Mn) content did not affect release rates of 54 Mn generated by 54 Fe(n,p) 54 Mn. 10 fig, 4 tables

  13. Flow-accelerated corrosion in nuclear power plants: application of CHECWORKS at Darlington

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schefski, C.; Pietralik, J.; Dyke, T.; Lewis, M.

    1995-01-01

    CHECWORKS, a comprehensive software package for managing Flow-Accelerated Corrosion (FAC) concerns in the secondary side, was applied to supplement and improve the existing FAC program at Darlington NGS. The database created for the station contains the Heat Balance Diagram, susceptible-to FAC secondary side systems, ultrasonic inspection data, drawings and pictures. The distribution of hot pH and oxygen within the secondary side was calculated and components were ranked by wear rate. The predicted wear rates are relatively small, mainly because of the favourable water chemistry. It was demonstrated that the package is a very useful tool complementing the existing In-Service Inspection program. (author)

  14. Corrosion of vanadium and V 3Ti 1Si in flowing lithium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Konys, J.

    1986-01-01

    A pumped Li loop fabricated from a titanium stabilized Type 316 steel was designed and constructed. At temperatures of about 823 K, experiments over a duration of more than 7500 h were performed. A magnetic trap had to be incorporated just before the flowmeter to avoid the precipitation of magnetic particles. Therefore it was possible to investigate the influence of the magnetic trap on the corrosion behaviour of V in flowing Li. The results are as follows: - The corrosion rate of V is about 14 μm/year and independent of the nitrogen content of Li. The corrosion rate of V 3Ti 1Si depends on the N concentration of Li. At about 30 wppm N in Li a vanadium-titanium-nitride is formed at the surface of the specimens. Hence, a low rate of 4 μm/year can be stated. - Both materials pick-up more N than C from Li, pure vanadium double as much nitrogen as the alloy V 3Ti 1Si. - N diffuses into the bulk of both materials, whilst C is bound near the surface. The hardening at the surface is due to the up-take of N. - The vanadium-carbonitride-, respectively the vanadium-titanium-nitride-layers have a strong influence on the weight loss and the up-take of non-metals. - The magnetic trap reduces the weight loss of vanadium in a significant way. The positive influence of the magnetic trap is supposed to be due to the reduction of the nitrogen content of Li. - The corrosion rates of the alloy V 3Ti 1Si show, that the dissolution due to V loss does not affect the lifetime of the alloy. The comparison with steels and nickle-base-alloys demonstrates the advantages of this material. Nevertheless, the purification of the Li and the control of its nonmetal-levels is indispensable. (orig./HP) [de

  15. In-vitro biodegradation and corrosion-assisted cracking of a coated magnesium alloy in modified-simulated body fluid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jafari, Sajjad; Singh Raman, R K

    2017-09-01

    A calcium phosphate coating was directly synthesized on AZ91D magnesium (Mg) alloy. Resistance of this coating to corrosion in a modified-simulated body fluid (m-SBF) was investigated by potentiodynamic polarization and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). Mechanical properties of the bare and coated alloy were investigated using slow strain rate tensile (SSRT) and fatigue testing in air and m-SBF. Very little is reported in the literature on human-body-fluid-assisted cracking of Mg alloys, viz., resistance to corrosion fatigue (CF) and stress corrosion cracking (SCC). This study has a particular emphasis on the effect of bio-compatible coatings on mechanical and electrochemical degradations of Mg alloys for their applications as implants. The results suggest the coating to improve the general as well as pitting corrosion resistance of the alloy. The coating also provides visible improvement in resistance to SCC, but little improvement in CF resistance. This is explained on the basis of pitting behaviour in the presence and absence of the coating. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking in HTH Alloy X-750 and Alloy 625

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bajaj, R.; Mills, W.J.; Lebo, M.R.; Hyatt, B.Z.; Burke, M.G.

    1995-01-01

    In-reactor testing of bolt-loaded compact tension specimens was performed in 360 C water to determine the irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC) behavior of HTH Alloy X-750 and direct-aged Alloy 625. New data confirm previous results showing that high irradiation levels reduce SCC resistance in Alloy X-750. Heat-to-heat variability correlates with boron content, with low boron heats showing improved IASCC properties. Alloy 625 is resistant to IASCC, as no cracking was observed in any Alloy 625 specimens. Microstructural, microchemical and deformation studies were performed to characterize the mechanisms responsible for IASCC in Alloy X-750 and the lack of an effect in Alloy 625. The mechanisms under investigation are: boron transmutation effects, radiation-induced changes in microstructure and deformation characteristics, and radiation-induced segregation. Irradiation of Alloy X-750 caused significant strengthening and ductility loss that was associated with the formation of cavities and dislocation loops. High irradiation levels did not cause significant segregation of alloying or trace elements in Alloy X-750. Irradiation of Alloy 625 resulted in the formation of small dislocation loops and a fine body-centered-orthorhombic phase. The strengthening due to the loops and precipitates was apparently offset by a partial dissolution of γ double-prime precipitates, as Alloy 625 showed no irradiation-induced strengthening or ductility loss. In the nonirradiated condition, an IASCC susceptible HTH heat containing 28 ppm B showed grain boundary segregation of boron, whereas a nonsusceptible HTH heat containing 2 ppm B and Alloy 625 with 20 ppm B did not show significant boron segregation. Transmutation of boron to helium at grain boundaries, coupled with matrix strengthening, is believed to be responsible for IASCC in Alloy X-750, and the absence of these two effects results in the superior IASCC resistance displayed by Alloy 625

  17. Effect of water flow rate and water chemistry on corrosion environment in reactor pressure vessel bottom of BWRs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ichikawa, Nagayoshi; Hemmi, Yukio; Takagi, Junichi; Urata, Hidehiro [Toshiba Corp., Kawasaki, Kanagawa (Japan)

    1999-07-01

    To evaluate the corrosion environment at the bottom of the reactor pressure vessel in a BWR and the effect of hydrogen water chemistry on the corrosion of materials in the region, measurements of the corrosion potential of Type-304 stainless steel and nickel base alloy were made in a laboratory test loop. The effect of water chemistry on the corrosion potential of nickel base alloy is found to be similar to the effect on Type-304 stainless steel. Flow analysis and precise evaluations of the corrosion potential of materials in the bottom region were implemented. Corrosion potentials throughout the region were evaluated from the flow analysis results. At the jet pump outlet and shroud support leg, a rather large amount of hydrogen had to be added to reduce the potential. Conversely, a small amount of hydrogen was enough in the case of the stub tube of the control rod drive guide tubing and the ICM housings located in the center of the bottom region. (author)

  18. Effect of water flow rate and water chemistry on corrosion environment in reactor pressure vessel bottom of BWRs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ichikawa, Nagayoshi; Hemmi, Yukio; Takagi, Junichi; Urata, Hidehiro

    1999-01-01

    To evaluate the corrosion environment at the bottom of the reactor pressure vessel in a BWR and the effect of hydrogen water chemistry on the corrosion of materials in the region, measurements of the corrosion potential of Type-304 stainless steel and nickel base alloy were made in a laboratory test loop. The effect of water chemistry on the corrosion potential of nickel base alloy is found to be similar to the effect on Type-304 stainless steel. Flow analysis and precise evaluations of the corrosion potential of materials in the bottom region were implemented. Corrosion potentials throughout the region were evaluated from the flow analysis results. At the jet pump outlet and shroud support leg, a rather large amount of hydrogen had to be added to reduce the potential. Conversely, a small amount of hydrogen was enough in the case of the stub tube of the control rod drive guide tubing and the ICM housings located in the center of the bottom region. (author)

  19. Steam assisted oxide growth on aluminium alloys using oxidative chemistries: Part II corrosion performance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Din, Rameez Ud; Jellesen, Morten Stendahl; Ambat, Rajan

    2015-01-01

    the protection provided by steam treatment with HNO3was a function of the concentration of NO3−ions. The coating generated by inclusion of KMnO4showed highest resistance to filiform corrosion. Overall, the performance of the steam treated surfaces under filiform corrosion and AASS test was a result of the local......Surface treatment of aluminium alloys using steam with oxidative chemistries, namely KMnO4 and HNO3 resulted in accelerated growth of oxide on aluminium alloys. Detailed investigation of the corrosion performance of the treated surfaces was carried out using potentiodynamic polarisation...

  20. Evaluation methods for corrosion damage of components in cooling systems of nuclear power plants by coupling analysis of corrosion and flow dynamics (1). Major targets and development strategies of the evaluation methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naitoh, Masanori; Uchida, Shunsuke; Koshizuka, Seiichi; Ninokata, Hisashi; Hiranuma, Naoki; Dosaki, Koji; Nishida, Koji; Akiyama, Minoru; Saitoh, Hiroaki

    2008-01-01

    Problems in major components and structural materials in nuclear power plants have often been caused by flow induced vibration and corrosion and their overlapping effects. In order to establish safe and reliable plant operation, future problems for structural materials should be predicted based on combined analyses of flow dynamics and corrosion and they should be mitigated before becoming serious issues for plant operation. Three approaches have been prepared for predicting future problems in structural materials: 1. Computer program packages for predicting future corrosion fatigue on structural materials, 2. Computer program packages for predicting future corrosion damage on structural materials, and 3. Computer program packages for predicting wall thinning caused by flow accelerated corrosion. General features of evaluation methods and their computer packages, technical innovations required for their development, and application plans for the developed approaches for plant operation are introduced in this paper. (author)

  1. Hydrodynamic Effect on the Inhibition for the Flow Accelerated Corrosion of an Elbow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zeng, L.; Zhang, G. A.; Guo, X. P. [Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan (China)

    2017-02-15

    The inhibition effect of thioureido imidazoline inhibitor (TAI) for flow accelerated corrosion (FAC) at different locations for an X65 carbon steel elbow was studied by array electrode and computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations. The distribution of the inhibition efficiency measured by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) is in good accordance with the distribution of the hydrodynamic parameters at the elbow. The inhibition efficiencies at the outer wall are higher than those at the inner wall meaning that the lower inhibition efficiency is associated with a higher flow velocity, shear stress, and turbulent kinetic energy at the inner wall of the elbow, as well as secondary flow at the elbow rather than the mass transport of inhibitor molecules. Compared to the static condition, the inhibition efficiency of TAI for FAC was relatively low. It is also due to a drastic turbulence flow and high wall shear stress during the FAC test, which prevents the adsorption of inhibitor and/or damages the adsorbed inhibitor film.

  2. Corrosion of austenitic and martensitic stainless steels in flowing 17Li83Pb alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broc, M.; Flament, T.; Fauvet, P.; Sannier, J.

    1988-07-01

    With regard to the behaviour of 316 L stainless steel at 400°C in flowing anisothermal 17Li83Pb the mass transfer suffered by this steel appears to be quite important without noticeable influence of constant or cyclic stress. Evaluation made from solution-annealed specimens leads to a corrosion rate of approximately 30 μm yr -1 at steady state to which a depth of 25 μm has to be added to take into account the initial period phenomena. On the other hand, with semi-stagnant 17Li83Pb at 400° C, the mass transfer of 316 L steel appears to be lower and more acceptable after a 3000-h exposure; but long-time kinetics data have to be achieved in order to see if that better behaviour is persistent and does not correspond to a longer incubation period. As for the martensitic steels their corrosion rate at 450°C in the thermal convection loop TULIP is constant up to 3000 h and five times lower than that observed for 316 L steel in the same conditions.

  3. On-line monitoring system development for single-phase flow accelerated corrosion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Na Young; Lee, Seung Gi; Ryu, Kyung Ha; Hwang, Il Soon

    2007-01-01

    Aged nuclear piping has been reported to undergo corrosion-induced accelerated failures, often without giving signatures to current inspection campaigns. Therefore, we need diverse sensors which can cover a wide area in an on-line application. We suggest an integrated approach to monitor the flow accelerated corrosion (FAC) susceptible piping. Since FAC is a combined phenomenon, we need to monitor as many parameters as possible and that cover wide area, since we do not know where the FAC occurs. For this purpose, we introduce the wearing rate model which focuses on the electrochemical parameters. Using this model, we can predict the wearing rate and then compare testing results. Through analysis we identified feasibility and then developed electrochemical sensors for high temperature application; we also introduced a mechanical monitoring system which is still under development. To support the validation of the monitored results, we adopted high temperature ultrasonic transducer (UT), which shows good resolution in the testing environment. As such, all the monitored results can be compared in terms of thickness. Our validation tests demonstrated the feasibility of sensors. To support direct thickness measurement for a wide-area, the direct current potential drop (DCPD) method will be researched to integrate into the developed framework

  4. Corrosion of austenitic and martensitic stainless steels in flowing 17Li-83Pb alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Broc, M.; Flament, T.; Fauvet, P.; Sannier, J.

    1988-01-01

    With regard to the behaviour of 316 L stainless steel at 400 0 C in flowing anisothermal 17Li-83Pb the mass transfer suffered by this steel appears to be quite important without noticeable influence of constant or cyclic stress. Evaluation made from solution-annealed specimens leads to a corrosion rate of approximately 30 μm yr -1 at steady state to which a depth of 25 μm has to be added to take into account the initial period phenomena. On the other hand, with semi-stagnant 17Li-83Pb at 400 0 C, the mass transfer of 316 L steel appears to be lower and more acceptable after a 3000-h exposure; but long-time kinetics data have to be achieved in order to see if that better behaviour is persistent and does not correspond to a longer incubation period. As for the martensitic steels their corrosion rate at 450 0 C in the thermal convection loop TULIP is constant up to 3000 h and five times lower than that observed for 316 L steel in the same conditions. (orig.)

  5. Development of evaluation method on flow-induced vibration and corrosion of components in two-phase flow by coupled analysis. 1. Evaluation of effects of flow-induced vibration on structural material integrity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naitoh, Masanori; Uchida, Shunsuke; Koshizuka, Seiichi; Ninokata, Hisashi; Anahara, Naoki; Dosaki, Koji; Katono, Kenichi; Akiyama, Minoru; Saitoh, Hiroaki

    2007-01-01

    Problems in major components and structural materials in nuclear power plants have often been caused by flow induced vibration, corrosion and their overlapping effects. In order to establish safe and reliable plant operation, it is necessary to predict future problems for structural materials based on combined analyses of flow dynamics and corrosion and to mitigate them before they become serious issues for plant operation. An innovative method for flow induced vibration of structures in two phase flow by combined analyses of three dimensional flow dynamics and structures is to be introduced. (author)

  6. Heat and mass transfer in porous cavity: Assisting flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Badruddin, Irfan Anjum [Dept. of Mechanical Engineering, University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur, 50603 (Malaysia); Quadir, G. A. [School of Mechatronic Engineering, University Malaysia Perlis, Pauh Putra, 02600 Arau, Perlis (Malaysia)

    2016-06-08

    In this paper, investigation of heat and mass transfer in a porous cavity is carried out. The governing partial differential equations are non-dimensionalised and solved using finite element method. The left vertical surface of the cavity is maintained at constant temperature and concentration which are higher than the ambient temperature and concentration applied at right vertical surface. The top and bottom walls of the cavity are adiabatic. Heat transfer is assumed to take place by natural convection and radiation. The investigation is carried out for assisting flow when buoyancy and gravity force act in same direction.

  7. Corrosion resistance of Al-based coatings in flowing Pb–15.7Li produced by aluminum electrodeposition from ionic liquids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sven-Erik Wulf

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Reduced activation ferritic–martensitic steels are intended to serve as structural materials in different blanket designs, e.g. HCLL, DCLL and WCLL. In these designs the material is supposed to be in direct contact with the flowing liquid breeder material Pb–15.7Li at an operating temperature of up to 550°C. These conditions will lead to severe corrosion attack of the steel and high corrosion rates of up to 400µm per year are reported in the literature. To avoid or reduce corrosion Al-based corrosion barriers were developed in the last years by using electrochemical techniques to deposit aluminum. Until now two processes have been developed. The first one, so called ECA process, is based on volatile toluene electrolytes. Long-term corrosion experiments on these coatings indicated reduced corrosion rates compared to bare Eurofer steel in flowing Pb–15.7Li. However, these Fe–Al scales showed inhomogeneous corrosion attack of the corrosion barrier itself. In this study the improved ECX process was applied to produce Al-based coatings. The short-term corrosion behavior of such barrier coatings was analyzed for up to 4000h by diameter measurements and metallographic examinations. The investigation revealed uniform corrosion in comparison to inhomogeneous attack in case of ECA coated samples and reduced corrosion rates of around 20µm/a even for low exposure times of 4000h.

  8. Investigation of two-phase flow phenomena associated with corrosion in an SF/HLW repository in Opalinus Clay, Switzerland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Senger, R.; Marschall, P.; Finsterle, S.

    2008-01-01

    Gas generation from corrosion of the waste canisters and gas accumulation in the backfilled emplacement tunnels is a key issue in the assessment of long-term radiological safety of the proposed repository for spent fuel and high-level waste (SF/HLW) sited in the Opalinus Clay formation of Northern Switzerland. Previous modeling studies indicated a significant pressure buildup in the backfilled emplacement tunnels for those sensitivity runs, where corrosion rates were high and the permeability of the Opalinus Clay was very low. As an extension to those studies, a refined process model of the canister corrosion phenomena has been developed, which accounts not only for the gas generation but also for the water consumption associated with the chemical reaction of corrosion of steel under anaerobic conditions. The simulations with the new process model indicate, that with increasing corrosion rates and decreasing host-rock permeability, pressure buildup increased, as expected. However, the simulations taking into account water consumption show that the pressure buildup is reduced compared to the simulation considering only gas generation. The pressure reduction is enhanced for lower permeability of the Opalinus Clay and for higher corrosion rates, which correspond to higher gas generations rates and higher water consumption rates. Moreover, the simulated two-phase flow patterns in the engineered barrier system (EBS) and surrounding Opalinus Clay show important differences at late time of the gas production phase as the generated gas continues to migrate outward into the surrounding host rock. For the case without water consumption, the water flow indicates overall downward flow due to a change in the overall density of the gas-fluid mixture from that based on the initially prescribed hydrostatic pressure gradient. For the case with water consumption, water flow converges toward the waste canister at a rate corresponding to the water consumption rate associated with the

  9. Hydrogen assisted cracking and CO2 corrosion behaviors of low-alloy steel with high strength used for armor layer of flexible pipe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhenguang; Gao, Xiuhua; Du, Linxiu; Li, Jianping; Zhou, Xiaowei; Wang, Xiaonan; Wang, Yuxin; Liu, Chuan; Xu, Guoxiang; Misra, R. D. K.

    2018-05-01

    In this study, hydrogen induced cracking (HIC), sulfide stress corrosion cracking (SSCC) and hydrogen embrittlement (HE) were carried out to study hydrogen assisted cracking behavior (HIC, SSCC and HE) of high strength pipeline steel used for armor layer of flexible pipe in ocean. The CO2 corrosion behavior of designed steel with high strength was studied by using immersion experiment. The experimental results demonstrate that the corrosion resistance of designed steel with tempered martensite to HIC, SSCC and HE is excellent according to specific standards, which contributes to the low concentration of dislocation and vacancies previously formed in cold rolling process. The corrosion mechanism of hydrogen induced cracking of designed steel, which involves in producing process, microstructure and cracking behavior, is proposed. The designed steel with tempered martensite shows excellent corrosion resistance to CO2 corrosion. Cr-rich compound was first formed on the coupon surface exposed to CO2-saturated brine condition and chlorine, one of the corrosion ions in solution, was rich in the inner layer of corrosion products.

  10. Experimental and numerical study of hydrodynamics of flow-accelerated corrosion in CANDU primary coolant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Supa-Amornkul, S

    2006-07-01

    In CANDU-6 reactors, the pressurised high-temperature coolant flows through 380 fuel channels passing horizontally through the core. Each end of a fuel channel has a stainless steel annular end-fitting connected to a carbon steel feeder pipe. The outlet coolant, which is at 310{sup o}C with up to 0.30 steam voidage, turns through 90{sup o} as it passes from flow in the annular end-fitting to pipe flow in the feeder via a Grayloc connector. Since 1996, several CANDU stations reported excessive corrosion of their outlet feeder pipes, especially over the first metre, which consists of single or double bends. Early studies related the attack to the hydrodynamics of the coolant and verified that it was a type of flow-accelerated corrosion (FAC). Local shear stress, which is believed to be one of the important factors contributing to FAC, was approximated in the studies with standard empirical correlations. In order to understand the hydrodynamics of the coolant in the outlet feeders, flow-visualisation studies were done at AECL and UNB. At AECL, the observations were confined to a transparent simulation of an outlet feeder bend but at UNB a full-scale transparent test section simulating the geometry and orientation of an outlet feeder bend with its upstream annular end-fitting was fabricated. The feeder consisted of a 54 mm (inside diameter) acrylic pipe with a 73{sup o} bend, connected to an acrylic simulation of a Grayloc flanged fitting and annular end-fitting. The annular end-fitting consisted of an inner pipe, 110 mm outside diameter, and an outer pipe, 150 mm inside diameter, both 1.907 m long. The tests were performed with water and air at atmospheric pressure and room temperature. The maximum water volumetric flow rate was 0.019 m{sup 3}/s and the volume fraction of air varied from 0.05 to 0.56. In characterizing the flow in the UNB study, particular attention was paid to the patterns at the inside of the bend, where a CFD (computational fluid dynamics) code

  11. Experimental and numerical study of hydrodynamics of flow-accelerated corrosion in CANDU primary coolant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Supa-Amornkul, S.

    2006-01-01

    In CANDU-6 reactors, the pressurised high-temperature coolant flows through 380 fuel channels passing horizontally through the core. Each end of a fuel channel has a stainless steel annular end-fitting connected to a carbon steel feeder pipe. The outlet coolant, which is at 310 o C with up to 0.30 steam voidage, turns through 90 o as it passes from flow in the annular end-fitting to pipe flow in the feeder via a Grayloc connector. Since 1996, several CANDU stations reported excessive corrosion of their outlet feeder pipes, especially over the first metre, which consists of single or double bends. Early studies related the attack to the hydrodynamics of the coolant and verified that it was a type of flow-accelerated corrosion (FAC). Local shear stress, which is believed to be one of the important factors contributing to FAC, was approximated in the studies with standard empirical correlations. In order to understand the hydrodynamics of the coolant in the outlet feeders, flow-visualisation studies were done at AECL and UNB. At AECL, the observations were confined to a transparent simulation of an outlet feeder bend but at UNB a full-scale transparent test section simulating the geometry and orientation of an outlet feeder bend with its upstream annular end-fitting was fabricated. The feeder consisted of a 54 mm (inside diameter) acrylic pipe with a 73 o bend, connected to an acrylic simulation of a Grayloc flanged fitting and annular end-fitting. The annular end-fitting consisted of an inner pipe, 110 mm outside diameter, and an outer pipe, 150 mm inside diameter, both 1.907 m long. The tests were performed with water and air at atmospheric pressure and room temperature. The maximum water volumetric flow rate was 0.019 m 3 /s and the volume fraction of air varied from 0.05 to 0.56. In characterizing the flow in the UNB study, particular attention was paid to the patterns at the inside of the bend, where a CFD (computational fluid dynamics) code - Fluent 6.1- had

  12. Long-term corrosion behavior of ODS-Eurofer in flowing Pb-15.7Li at 550°C

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Krauss

    2016-12-01

    In this paper results from long-term corrosion testing of ODS-Eurofer will be reported for exposure times up to 1.5 years at a flow velocity of 0.1m/s. The evaluated data for ODS-Eurofer corrosion will be compared with values of ‘single’ phase ’classical‘ Eurofer. The observed corrosion attack and mechanisms will be discussed in detail considering the testing conditions and the microstructure of the RAFM-steels.

  13. Flow accelerated corrosion and its control measures for the secondary circuit pipelines in Indian nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kain, Vivekanand; Roychowdhury, S.; Mathew, Thomas; Bhandakkar, Atul

    2008-01-01

    A plain carbon steel feeder pipeline in the secondary circuit failed downstream of a flow measurement device (orifice meter) during operation at nuclear power plant. A detailed failure analysis done on the failed pipeline is described in this paper. The results established the fine surface pattern of 'Horseshoe pits' at the affected regions. X-ray diffraction analysis on the samples far from the failed regions showed presence of magnetite but on the sample from the failed region showed peaks due to base metal only, indicating dissolution of the oxide. Thickness profiling of the pipeline indicated reduction of thickness from the design 7.62 mm to a minimum of 0.4-1.4 mm at the location of the failure. These observations are characteristic of single phase flow accelerated corrosion. This paper details the extent of flow accelerated corrosion in various Indian power plants and the remedial measures for replacement and possible design and water chemistry changes to combat it

  14. Role of turbulent flow seawater in the corrosion enhancement of an Al–Zn–Mg alloy: an electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS analysis of oxygen reduction reaction (ORR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcela C. Quevedo

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available The effect of flow on the corrosion of Al–14 wt% Zn–8 wt% Mg alloy in aerated synthetic seawater at ambient temperature was studied using a rotating cylinder electrode (RCE under turbulent regime conditions by means of electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS. The overall electrochemical corrosion process was found to be strongly influenced by the oxygen mass transfer process under turbulent flow conditions on the cathodic kinetics, driving to a significant increase in corrosion rate.At corrosion potential, Ecorr value, contributions from the anodic and cathodic processes involved were observed in the impedance diagrams. Instead, at a cathodic potential of −1.2 V (sce, impedance measurements proved the predominance of the mass-transfer process for oxygen. A primary analysis of the impedance plots allowed to confirm such situation. Keywords: Aluminum alloy, Corrosion, EIS, Flow, Oxygen, Mass transfer, Rotating cylinder electrode, Seawater

  15. Synthesis and corrosion properties of silicon nitride films by ion beam assisted deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baba, K.; Hatada, R.; Emmerich, R.; Enders, B.; Wolf, G. K.

    1995-12-01

    Silicon nitride films SiN x were deposited on 316L austenitic stainless steel substrates by silicon evaporation and simultaneous nitrogen ion irradiation with an acceleration voltage of 2 kV. In order to study the influence of the nitrogen content on changes in stoichiometry, structure, morphology, thermal oxidation behaviour and corrosion behaviour, the atom to ion transport ratio was systematically varied. The changes of binding states and the stoichiometry were evaluated with XPS and AES analysis. A maximum nitrogen content was reached with a {Si}/{N} transport ratio lower than 2. The films are chemically inert when exposed to laboratory atmosphere up to a temperature of more than 1000°C. XRD and SEM measurements show amorphous and featureless films for transport ratios {Si}/{N} from 1 up to 10. The variation of the corrosion behaviour of coated stainless steel substrates in sulphuric acid and hydrochloric acid shows a minimum at medium transport ratios. This goes parallel with changes in porosity and adhesion. Additional investigations showed that titanium implantation as an intermediate step improves the corrosion resistance considerably.

  16. Influence of turbulent flow on the corrosion kinetics of API X52 pipeline steel in aqueous solutions containing H{sub 2}S

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galvan-Martinez, Ricardo; Genesca-Llongueras, Juan [Departamento Ingenieria Metalurgica, Facultad Quimica, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, UNAM, Ciudad Universitaria, 04510 Mexico D.F. (Mexico); Mendoza-Flores, Juan; Duran-Romero, Ruben [Corrosion, Instituto Mexicano del Petroleo, Eje Central Lazaro Cardenas 152, 07730 Mexico D.F. (Mexico)

    2004-07-01

    A corrosion process can be influenced by the relative movement between the corroding environment and the metal. This relative movement could increase the heat transfer and the mass transfer of reactants towards and from the surface of the corroding metal, with a consequent increase in the corrosion rate. Also, if solid particles are present, removal of protective films, erosion and wear can occur on the metallic surface. Many industrial processes involve the movement of corrosive liquids in close contact to metallic structures. Therefore, the influence of flow on the corrosion processes is an important issue to be considered in the design and operation of industrial equipment. This influence is complex and many variables are involved. Several observations of flow-accelerated corrosion problems have been documented, particularly in the oil and gas industries, where the combined effect of flow and dissolved gases, such as hydrogen sulphide (H{sub 2}S) and carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}), is important. Turbulent flow conditions are commonly found in industrial processes. However, few corrosion studies in controlled turbulent flow conditions are available. With the increasing necessity to describe the corrosion of metals in turbulent flow conditions some laboratory hydrodynamic systems have been used with different degrees of success. The use of the rotating cylinder electrode (RCE), as a laboratory hydrodynamic test system, has gained popularity in corrosion studies. This popularity is due to its characteristics, such as, its operation mainly at turbulent flow conditions; its well understood mass transfer properties and its easiness of construction and operation. The aim of the present work is to explore the effect that turbulent flow conditions have on the electrochemical kinetics of steel samples immersed in aqueous environments containing H{sub 2}S. In order to control the turbulent flow conditions in the laboratory, a rotating cylinder electrode (RCE) was used. In

  17. Vision-Based Corrosion Detection Assisted by a Micro-Aerial Vehicle in a Vessel Inspection Application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto Ortiz

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Vessel maintenance requires periodic visual inspection of the hull in order to detect typical defective situations of steel structures such as, among others, coating breakdown and corrosion. These inspections are typically performed by well-trained surveyors at great cost because of the need for providing access means (e.g., scaffolding and/or cherry pickers that allow the inspector to be at arm’s reach from the structure under inspection. This paper describes a defect detection approach comprising a micro-aerial vehicle which is used to collect images from the surfaces under inspection, particularly focusing on remote areas where the surveyor has no visual access, and a coating breakdown/corrosion detector based on a three-layer feed-forward artificial neural network. As it is discussed in the paper, the success of the inspection process depends not only on the defect detection software but also on a number of assistance functions provided by the control architecture of the aerial platform, whose aim is to improve picture quality. Both aspects of the work are described along the different sections of the paper, as well as the classification performance attained.

  18. Pipe degradation investigations for optimization of flow-accelerated corrosion inspection location selection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chandra, S.; Habicht, P.; Chexal, B.; Mahini, R.; McBrine, W.; Esselman, T.; Horowitz, J.

    1995-01-01

    A large amount of piping in a typical nuclear power plant is susceptible to Flow-Accelerated Corrosion (FAC) wall thinning to varying degrees. A typical PAC monitoring program includes the wall thickness measurement of a select number of components in order to judge the structural integrity of entire systems. In order to appropriately allocate resources and maintain an adequate FAC program, it is necessary to optimize the selection of components for inspection by focusing on those components which provide the best indication of system susceptibility to FAC. A better understanding of system FAC predictability and the types of FAC damage encountered can provide some of the insight needed to better focus and optimize the inspection plan for an upcoming refueling outage. Laboratory examination of FAC damaged components removed from service at Northeast Utilities' (NU) nuclear power plants provides a better understanding of the damage mechanisms involved and contributing causes. Selected results of this ongoing study are presented with specific conclusions which will help NU to better focus inspections and thus optimize the ongoing FAC inspection program

  19. Inspection of piping wall loss with flow accelerated corrosion accelerated simulation test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryu, Kyung Ha; Kim, Ji Hak; Hwang, Il Soon; Lee, Na Young; Kim, Ji Hyun

    2009-01-01

    Flow Accelerated Corrosion (FAC) has become a hot issue for aging of passive components. Ultrasonic Technique (UT) has been adopted to inspect the secondary piping of Nuclear Power Plants (NPPs). UT, however, uses point detection method, which results in numerous detecting points and thus takes time. We developed an Equipotential Switching Direct Current Potential Drop (ES-DCPD) method to monitor the thickness of piping that covers wide range of piping at once time. Since the ES-DCPD method covers area, not a point, it needs less monitoring time. This can be a good approach to broad carbon steel piping system such as secondary piping of NPPs. In this paper, FAC accelerated simulation test results is described. We realized accelerated FAC phenomenon by 2 times test: 23.7% thinning in 216.7 hours and 51% thinning in 795 hours. These were monitored by ES-DCPD and traditional UT. Some parameters of water chemistry are monitored and controlled to accelerate FAC process. As sensitive factors on FAC, temperature and pH was changed during the test. The wall loss monitored results reflected these changes of water chemistry successfully. Developed electrodes are also applied to simulation loop to monitor water chemistry. (author)

  20. Fluid-structure-interaction analysis for welded pipes with flow-accelerated corrosion wall thinning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, L.; Ding, Y., E-mail: lan.sun@cnl.ca [Canadian Nuclear Laboratories, Chalk River, Ontario (Canada)

    2016-06-15

    The flow-accelerated corrosion (FAC) entrance effect results in enhanced wall thinning immediately downstream of a weld if the weld connects an upstream FAC-resistant material with a downstream less resistant material. The weld regions, especially those with local repairs, are susceptible to cracking due to the high residual stresses induced by fabrication. The combined effects of the FAC entrance effect and high stresses at a weld might compromise the structural integrity of the piping and lead to a failure. Weld degradation by FAC entrance effect has been observed at nuclear and fossil power plants. This paper describes an application using fluid-structure-interaction (FSI) modelling to study the combined effects of FAC wall thinning, weld residual stresses, and in-service loads on welded structures. Simplified cases analyzed were based on CANDU outlet feeder conditions. The analysis includes the flow and mass transfer modelling of the FAC entrance effect using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) and nonlinear structural analyses of the welded structures with wall thinning and an assumed weld residual stress and strain distribution. The FSI analyses were performed using ANSYS Workbench, an integrated platform that enables the coupling of CFD and structural analysis solutions. The obtained results show that the combination of FAC, weld residual stresses, in-service loads (including the internal pressure) and (or) extreme loads could cause high stresses and affect the integrity of the welded pipes. The present work demonstrated that the FSI modelling can be used as an effective approach to assess the integrity of welded structures. (author)

  1. Model of physico-chemical effect on flow accelerated corrosion in power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujiwara, Kazutoshi; Domae, Masafumi; Yoneda, Kimitoshi; Inada, Fumio

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → Model of chemical effect on FAC was developed. → Equation to evaluate the dissolved oxygen concentration for FAC suppression was derived. → The model explains the qualitatively the effect of parameters on FAC rate. → Diffusion of soluble species well reproduces the unique FAC behavior. - Abstract: Flow accelerated corrosion (FAC) is caused by the accelerated dissolution of protective oxide film under the condition of high flow rate and has been one of the most important subjects in fossil and nuclear power plants. The dominant factors of FAC are water chemistry, material, and fluid dynamics. Understanding of the thinning mechanism is very important to estimate the quantitative effects of the dominant factors on FAC. In this study, a novel model of chemical effect on FAC under the steady-state condition was developed in consideration of the diffusion of soluble iron and chromium species, dissolved hydrogen, and dissolved oxygen. The formula to evaluate the critical concentration of dissolved oxygen for FAC suppression was derived. The present model reproduced qualitatively the effect of major environmental parameters on FAC rate. The model could explain the following facts. (1) The FAC rate shows a peak around 413 K. (2) The FAC rate decreases with an increase in Cr content. (3) The FAC rate decreases with an increase in pH. (4) The FAC rate decreases with an increase in dissolved oxygen concentration. (5) The maximum of critical dissolved oxygen concentration is observed around 353 K. (6) The critical dissolved oxygen concentration decreases with an increase in pH. We conclude that the diffusion of soluble species from the saturated layer under the steady-state condition well reproduces the unique FAC behavior with variation of water chemistry parameters.

  2. A study on prediction of metal loss by flow-accelerated corrosion in the CANDU NPP secondary piping systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shim, S. H.; Song, J. S.; Yoon, K. B.; Hwang, K. M.; Jin, T. E.; Lee, S. H.; Kim, W. S.

    2001-01-01

    Flow-Accelerated Corrosion(FAC) is a phenomenon that results in metal loss from piping, vessels, and equipment made of carbon steel. FAC occurs only under certain conditions of flow, chemistry, geometry, and material. Unfortunately, those conditions are in much of the high-energy piping in nuclear and fossil-fueled power plants. Also, for domestic NPP secondary pipings whose operating time become longer, more evidences of FAC have been reported. The authors are studying on FAC management using CHECWORKS, computer code developed by EPRI. This paper is on the prediction results of metal loss by FAC in the one of CANDU type NPP secondary piping systems

  3. Influence of geometry of pipe on flow accelerated corrosion - a study under neutral pH condition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Madasamy, P.; Mukunthan, M.; Chandramohan, P.; Krishna Mohan, T.V.; Velmurugan, S.; Sylvanus, Andrews; Natarajan, E.

    2015-01-01

    The carbon steel piping material's degradation due to flow accelerated corrosion (FAC) is one of the problems in nuclear power plant. FAC impacts plant operation and maintenance significantly. Wall thinning of structural materials should be predictable based on combined hydrodynamics analyses and experimental corrosion data. Such predictive tools help to take preventive measures before loss of material becomes a serious issue for plant operation. In order to develop predictive tools, data on the effect of various parameters that control FAC are required. As per existing literature, one of the important parameters that affect FAC is piping configuration (Geometry of flow path). Hence, experiments were carried out to assess the role played by the geometry of the piping in the FAC of carbon steel. In this study, experiments were conducted in simulation loop under neutral pH condition while varying the geometry parameter of bend such as bend angle and bend radius. Therefore, pipe specimen holder 15 NB bend with 58 °, 73 ° as bend angle and 4D, 2D bend radius was designed and fabricated. The experiments were carried out in order to quantify the wear rate (wall thickness measurement was by ultrasonic method) with a single phase flow velocity (7 m/s) under neutral pH conditions With the pipe specimen four experiments were conducted under neutral pH condition and at 120 DC. Wall thickness mapping was carried out by ultrasonic thickness gauge using a template before and after the experiment. High wall thickness reduction under neutral water chemistry enables easy measurement by ultrasonic thickness gauge. It was observed from the first two sets (2D 58°, 4D 58°) that the corrosion rate with 4D, 58 ° was 50% less than the corrosion with 2D 58°. Subsequently, another two sets of experiments (2D 73° and 4D 73°) was carried out in SIM loop at 7 m/s under neutral pH conditions for two months. Thus, this method of experiments enables us to understand the geometrical

  4. Spatially and time-resolved element-specific in situ corrosion investigations with an online hyphenated microcapillary flow injection inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry set-up

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Homazava, N.; Ulrich, A.; Kraehenbuehl, U.

    2008-01-01

    A novel technique for in situ spatial, time-resolved element-specific investigations of corrosion processes is developed. The technique is based on an online hyphenation of a specially designed microflow-capillary set-up to inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) using flow injection sample introduction. Detailed aspects of the method development, optimization of the sample microflow introduction and flow injection characteristics for the localized corrosion analysis are described. Moreover, specific challenges of the ICP-MS analysis as applied to the analysis of corrosion sample probes, e.g. high matrix load and limited sample volume, are discussed. The efficiency of the developed technique is proved by corrosion susceptibility analysis of a commercial Al alloy. Results of the corrosion experiments of the aluminum alloy AA 6111 are presented to demonstrate the influence of various factors such as exposure time and pH value of the corrosive medium on the element-specific dissolution rates of the alloy. This novel technique provides new aspects in corrosion science and sheds new light on corrosion mechanisms

  5. Recent Developments for Ultrasonic-Assisted Friction Stir Welding: Joining, Testing, Corrosion - an Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomä, M.; Wagner, G.; Straß, B.; Conrad, C.; Wolter, B.; Benfer, S.; Fürbeth, W.

    2016-03-01

    Due to the steadily increasing demand on innovative manufacturing processes, modern lightweight construction concepts become more and more important. Especially joints of dissimilar metals offer a variety of advantages due to their high potential for lightweight construction. The focus of the investigations was Al/Mg-joints. Friction Stir Welding (FSW) is an efficient process to realize high strength joints between these materials in ductile condition. Furthermore, for a simultaneous transmission of power ultrasound during the FSW-process (US-FSW) a positive effect on the achievable tensile strength of the Al/Mg-joints was proven. In the present work the industrial used die cast alloys EN AC-48000 (AlSi12CuNiMg) and AZ80 (MgAl8Zn) were joined by a machining center modified especially for Ultrasound Supported Friction Stir Welding. The appearing welding zone and the formation of intermetallic phases under the influence of power ultrasound were examined in particular. In order to identify optimal process parameters extensive preliminary process analyzes have been carried out. Following this, an ultrasound-induced more intensive stirring of the joining zone and as a result of this a considerably modified intermetallic zone was detected. At the same time an increase of the tensile strength of about 25% for US-FSW-joints and for fatigue an up to three times higher number of cycles to failure in comparison to a conventional welding process was observed. Moreover, detailed corrosion analyzes have shown that especially the welding zone was influenced by the corrosive attack. To expand and deepen the knowledge of the US-FSW-process further material combinations such as Ti/Steel and Al/Steel will be considered in future.

  6. Recent Developments for Ultrasonic-Assisted Friction Stir Welding: Joining, Testing, Corrosion - an Overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomä, M; Wagner, G; Straß, B; Conrad, C; Wolter, B; Benfer, S; Fürbeth, W

    2016-01-01

    Due to the steadily increasing demand on innovative manufacturing processes, modern lightweight construction concepts become more and more important. Especially joints of dissimilar metals offer a variety of advantages due to their high potential for lightweight construction. The focus of the investigations was Al/Mg-joints. Friction Stir Welding (FSW) is an efficient process to realize high strength joints between these materials in ductile condition. Furthermore, for a simultaneous transmission of power ultrasound during the FSW-process (US-FSW) a positive effect on the achievable tensile strength of the Al/Mg-joints was proven. In the present work the industrial used die cast alloys EN AC-48000 (AlSi12CuNiMg) and AZ80 (MgAl8Zn) were joined by a machining center modified especially for Ultrasound Supported Friction Stir Welding. The appearing welding zone and the formation of intermetallic phases under the influence of power ultrasound were examined in particular. In order to identify optimal process parameters extensive preliminary process analyzes have been carried out. Following this, an ultrasound-induced more intensive stirring of the joining zone and as a result of this a considerably modified intermetallic zone was detected. At the same time an increase of the tensile strength of about 25% for US-FSW-joints and for fatigue an up to three times higher number of cycles to failure in comparison to a conventional welding process was observed. Moreover, detailed corrosion analyzes have shown that especially the welding zone was influenced by the corrosive attack. To expand and deepen the knowledge of the US-FSW-process further material combinations such as Ti/Steel and Al/Steel will be considered in future. (paper)

  7. Identification and control of factors influencing flow-accelerated corrosion in HRSG units using computational fluid dynamics modeling, full-scale air flow testing, and risk analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pietrowski, Ronald L. [The Consolidated Edison Company of New York, Inc., New York, NY (United States)

    2010-11-15

    In 2009, Consolidated Edison's East River heat recovery steam generator units 10 and 20 both experienced economizer tube failures which forced each unit offline. Extensive inspections indicated that the primary failure mechanism was flow-accelerated corrosion (FAC). The inspections revealed evidence of active FAC in all 7 of the economizer modules, with the most advanced stages of degradation being noted in center modules. Analysis determined that various factors were influencing and enabling this corrosion mechanism. Computational fluid dynamics and full-scale air flow testing showed very turbulent feedwater flow prevalent in areas of the modules corresponding with the pattern of FAC damage observed through inspection. It also identified preferential flow paths, with higher flow velocities, in certain tubes directly under the inlet nozzles. A FAC risk analysis identified more general susceptibility to FAC in the areas experiencing damage due to feedwater pH, operating temperatures, local shear fluid forces, and the chemical composition of the original materials of construction. These, in combination, were the primary root causes of the failures. Corrective actions were identified, analyzed, and implemented, resulting in equipment replacements and repairs. (orig.)

  8. Corrosion-resistant titanium nitride coatings formed on stainless steel by ion-beam-assisted deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baba, K.; Hatada, R.

    1994-01-01

    Titanium films 70nm thick were deposited on austenitic type 316L stainless steel substrates, and these specimens were irradiated with titanium ions of energy 70kV at a fluence of 1x10 17 ioncm -2 , using a metal vapor vacuum arc (MEVVA) IV metallic ion source at room temperature. After irradiation, titanium nitride (TiN) films were deposited by titanium evaporation and simultaneous irradiation by a nitrogen ion beam, with transport ratios of Ti to N atoms from 0.5 to 10.0 and an ion acceleration voltage of 2kV. The preferred orientation of the TiN films varied from left angle 200 right angle to left angle 111 right angle normal to the surface when the transport ratio was increased. With the help of Auger electron spectroscopy, interfacial mixing was verified. Nitrogen atoms were present in the state of titanium nitride for all transport ratios from 0.5 up to 10.0. However, the chemical bonding state of titanium changed from titanium nitride to the metallic state with increasing transport ratio Ti/N. The corrosion behavior was evaluated in an aqueous solution of sulfuric acid saturated with oxygen, using multisweep cyclic voltammetry measurements. Thin film deposition of pure titanium and titanium implantation prior to TiN deposition have beneficial effects on the suppression of transpassive chromium dissolution. ((orig.))

  9. The microwave assisted synthesis of 1-alkyl-3-methylimidazolium bromide as potential corrosion inhibitor toward carbon steel in 1 M HCl solution saturated with carbon dioxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pasasa, Norman Vincent A., E-mail: npasasa@gmail.com; Bundjali, Bunbun; Wahyuningrum, Deana [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Mathematics and Natural Sciences, Institut Teknologi Bandung, Jalan Ganesha No. 10 Bandung, Jawa Barat (Indonesia)

    2015-09-30

    Injection of corrosion inhibitor into the fluid current of oil and gas pipelines is an effective way to mitigate corrosion rate on the inner-surface parts of pipelines, especially carbon steel pipelines. In this research, two alkylimidazolium ionic liquids, 1-decyl-3-methylimidazolium bromide (IL1) and 1-dodecyl-3-methylimidazolium bromide (IL2) have been synthesized and studied as a potential corrosion inhibitor towards carbon steel in 1 M HCl solution saturated with carbon dioxide. IL1 and IL2 were synthesized using microwave assisted organic synthesis (MAOS) method. Mass Spectrometry analysis of IL1 and IL2 showed molecular mass [M-H+] peak at 223.2166 and 251.2484, respectively. The FTIR,{sup 1}H-NMR and {sup 13}C-NMR spectra confirmed that IL1 and IL2 were successfully synthesized. Corrosion inhibition activity of IL1 and IL2 were determined using weight loss method. The results showed that IL1 and IL2 have the potential as good corrosion inhibitors with corrosion inhibition efficiency of IL1 and IL2 are 96.00% at 100 ppm (343 K) and 95.60% at 50 ppm (343 K), respectively. The increase in the concentration of IL1 and IL2 tends to improve their corrosion inhibition activities. Analysis of the data obtained from the weight loss method shows that the adsorption of IL1 and IL2 on carbon steel is classified into chemisorption which obeys Langmuir’s adsorption isotherm.

  10. Effect of water chemistry on flow accelerated corrosion rate of carbon steel measured by on-line corrosion-monitoring system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujiwara, K.; Domae, M.; Yoneda, K.; Inada, F.

    2010-01-01

    Flow Accelerated Corrosion (FAC) of carbon steel is one of the most important subjects in coolant systems of power plants. FAC is influenced by material, flow condition, temperature, and water chemistry. Iron and chromium solubility should be the most effective factor to determine the effect of water chemistry on the FAC. It is very important to evaluate the correlation between the solubility and the FAC rate of the carbon steel. In the present study, the effects of pH and Cr concentration of material on the FAC rate of carbon steel were evaluated by using high temperature loop equipment with on-line corrosion-monitoring system. Effect of dissolved oxygen concentration at pH 7 was also evaluated. The experimental FAC rates were compared with the calculation result, which was obtained from a FAC model developed previously by the authors' group. The tube specimens made of STPT 480 carbon steel were used for the FAC tests. The Cr concentration of STPT 480 was specially adjusted to 0.001 and 0.08 %. The inner diameters of the tubes were 1.6, 2.4, and 3.2 mm. The solutions were fed to the specimens with the flow rate of 1.5 l/min. The temperature of the solution at the specimen was controlled at 140 o C. Test solutions were demineralized water or NH 3 solutions of pH 8.0, 9.2, and 10.0. The increase in pH more than 9 decreased the FAC rates of both 0.001 and 0.08 % Cr specimens at 140 o C. Increase of the Cr concentration of the material decreased the FAC rate in the solution of pH 7.0, 8.0, 9.2, and 10.0. The FAC model reproduced well dependence of the experimental FAC behavior on water chemistry. It was confirmed that effect of pH and Cr concentration of material on the FAC rate were closely related to the solubility and diffusion of iron and chromium. (author)

  11. Melt flow characteristics in gas-assisted laser cutting

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R. Narasimhan (Krishtel eMaging) 1461 1996 Oct 15 13:05:22

    industrial applications. In this process the cut ... Under these assumptions the boundary layer theory flow over. Laser beam ... a flat plate can be applied to estimate the distance after which the flow separation takes place by calculating the ...

  12. Development of an on-line ultrasonic system to monitor flow-accelerated corrosion of piping in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, N.Y.; Bahn, C.B.; Lee, S.G.; Kim, J.H.; Hwang, I.S.; Lee, J.H.; Kim, J.T.; Luk, V.

    2004-01-01

    Designs of contemporary nuclear power plants (NPPs) are concentrated on improving plant life as well as safety. As the nuclear industry prepares for continued operation beyond the design lifetime of existing NPP, aging management through advanced monitoring is called for. Therefore, we suggested two approaches to develop the on-line piping monitoring system. Piping located in some position is reported to go through flow accelerated corrosion (FAC). One is to monitor electrochemical parameters, ECP and pH, which can show occurrence of corrosion. The other is to monitor mechanical parameters, displacement and acceleration. These parameters are shown to change with thickness. Both measured parameters will be combined to quantify the amount of FAC of a target piping. In this paper, we report the progress of a multidisciplinary effort on monitoring of flow-induced vibration, which changes with reducing thickness. Vibration characteristics are measured using accelerometers, capacitive sensor and fiber optic sensors. To theoretically support the measurement, we analyzed the vibration mode change in a given thickness with the aid of finite element analysis assuming FAC phenomenon is represented only as thickness change. A high temperature flow loop has been developed to simulate the NPP secondary condition to show the applicability of new sensors. Ultrasonic transducer is introduced as validation purpose by directly measuring thickness. By this process, we identify performance and applicability of chosen sensors and also obtain base data for analyzing measured value in unknown conditions. (orig.)

  13. Investigation of surface oxide morphology in SG feedwater pipes and study of its influence on flow accelerated corrosion rate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qiu, G.; Alos-Ramos, O.; Monchecourt, D.; Mansour, C.; Delaunay, S.; Trevin, S.

    2015-01-01

    Flow accelerated corrosion (FAC) affects carbon steel components in the secondary circuits of PWR plants. The mandatory use of the prediction tool BRT-CICERO in all its PWR plants enables EDF to perform efficient inspections programs and minimize the number of leaks in the secondary circuits. Due to the operating conditions, SG feedwater flow regulation (ARE) circuits can be affected by FAC phenomenon. Thickness loss has been reported by several plants during the last 10 years, although significant damage by FAC remains very rare. This paper describes the surface features observed on an ARE straight tube that has orange peel pattern with thickness loss on the one half of its inner surface and a thick fouling layer without much thickness loss on the other. An analysis of the oxide porosity and structure by SEM investigation has been carried out. The origin of fouling layer and its behavior in the ARE circuits environment (oxide solubility, flow stability/turbulence) have been discussed. Finally by comparing with the classic FAC models, an attempt of correlation between the presence of the fouling layer and the lower corrosion rate is proposed. (authors)

  14. Methodology and measures for preventing unacceptable flow-accelerated corrosion thinning of pipelines and equipment of NPP power generating units

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomarov, G. V.; Shipkov, A. A.; Lovchev, V. N.; Gutsev, D. F.

    2016-10-01

    Problems of metal flow-accelerated corrosion (FAC) in the pipelines and equipment of the condensate- feeding and wet-steam paths of NPP power-generating units (PGU) are examined. Goals, objectives, and main principles of the methodology for the implementation of an integrated program of AO Concern Rosenergoatom for the prevention of unacceptable FAC thinning and for increasing operational flow-accelerated corrosion resistance of NPP EaP are worded (further the Program). A role is determined and potentialities are shown for the use of Russian software packages in the evaluation and prediction of FAC rate upon solving practical problems for the timely detection of unacceptable FAC thinning in the elements of pipelines and equipment (EaP) of the secondary circuit of NPP PGU. Information is given concerning the structure, properties, and functions of the software systems for plant personnel support in the monitoring and planning of the inservice inspection of FAC thinning elements of pipelines and equipment of the secondary circuit of NPP PGUs, which are created and implemented at some Russian NPPs equipped with VVER-1000, VVER-440, and BN-600 reactors. It is noted that one of the most important practical results of software packages for supporting NPP personnel concerning the issue of flow-accelerated corrosion consists in revealing elements under a hazard of intense local FAC thinning. Examples are given for successful practice at some Russian NPP concerning the use of software systems for supporting the personnel in early detection of secondary-circuit pipeline elements with FAC thinning close to an unacceptable level. Intermediate results of working on the Program are presented and new tasks set in 2012 as a part of the updated program are denoted. The prospects of the developed methods and tools in the scope of the Program measures at the stages of design and construction of NPP PGU are discussed. The main directions of the work on solving the problems of flow

  15. Corrosion fatigue crack growth in clad low-alloy steels. Part 2: Water flow rate effects in high-sulfur plate steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    James, L.A.; Lee, H.B.; Wire, G.L.; Novak, S.R.; Cullen, W.H.

    1997-01-01

    Corrosion fatigue crack propagation tests were conducted on a high-sulfur ASTM A302-B plate steel overlaid with weld-deposited Alloy EN82H cladding. The specimens featured semi-elliptical surface cracks penetrating approximately 6.3 mm of cladding into the underlying steel. The initial crack sizes were relatively large with surface lengths of 22.8--27.3 mm, and depths of 10.5--14.1 mm. The experiments were initiated in a quasi-stagnant low-oxygen (O 2 < 10 ppb) aqueous environment at 243 C, under loading conditions (ΔK, R, cyclic frequency) conducive to environmentally assisted cracking (EAC) under quasi-stagnant conditions. Following fatigue testing under quasi-stagnant conditions where EAC was observed, the specimens were then fatigue tested under conditions where active water flow of either 1.7 m/s or 4.7 m/s was applied parallel to the crack. Earlier experiments on unclad surface-cracked specimens of the same steel exhibited EAC under quasi-stagnant conditions, but water flow rates at 1.7 m/s and 5.0 m/s parallel to the crack mitigated EAC. In the present experiments on clad specimens, water flow at approximately the same as the lower of these velocities did not mitigate EAC, and a free stream velocity approximately the same as the higher of these velocities resulted in sluggish mitigation of EAC. The lack of robust EAC mitigation was attributed to the greater crack surface roughness in the cladding interfering with flow induced within the crack cavity. An analysis employing the computational fluid dynamics code, FIDAP, confirmed that frictional forces associated with the cladding crack surface roughness reduced the interaction between the free stream and the crack cavity

  16. Erosion and erosion-corrosion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Isomoto, Yoshinori

    2008-01-01

    It is very difficult to interpret the technical term of erosion-corrosion' which is sometimes encountered in piping systems of power plants, because of complicated mechanisms and several confusing definitions of erosion-corrosion phenomena. 'FAC (flow accelerated corrosion)' is recently introduced as wall thinning of materials in power plant systems, as a representative of 'erosion-corrosion'. FAC is, however, not necessarily well understood and compared with erosion-corrosion. This paper describes firstly the origin, definition and fundamental understandings of erosion and erosion-corrosion, in order to reconsider and reconfirm the phenomena of erosion, erosion-corrosion and FAC. Next, typical mapping of erosion, corrosion, erosion-corrosion and FAC are introduced in flow velocity and environmental corrosiveness axes. The concept of damage rate in erosion-corrosion is finally discussed, connecting dissolution rate, mass transfer of metal ions in a metal oxide film and film growth. (author)

  17. Application of nano-structured coatings to mitigate flow-accelerated corrosion in secondary pipe systems of nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Seung Hyun; Kim, Jong Jin; Yoo, Seung Chang; Kim, Ji Hyun

    2014-01-01

    Carbon steel is widely used as a structural material in secondary pipe systems. However, the passivity of carbon steel is not sufficient for protection in secondary water chemistry with a very fast-flowing fluid because of the dissolution of ferrous and magnetite ions and surface friction at the interface of the coolant and pipe surface. There have been many efforts to mitigate flow-accelerated corrosion through adoption of advanced water chemistries such as optimized dissolve oxygen (DO) concentration and temperature, as well as usage of new additives such as monoethanol amine (ETA) to adjust pH. However, these mitigation techniques pose certain challenges relating to the compatibility of new water chemistries with the steam generator, the thermal efficiency of the secondary side, etc. In this study, to improve the passivity of carbon steel, nanostructured coatings especially nanoparticle-enhanced surface coatings were adopted to improve resistance to corrosion and wear. Nanoparticles in the coating matrix help decrease the electrochemical potential compared coatings without nanoparticles, and thus help improve the mechanical properties, especially hardness, through precipitation. In other words, nanoparticle-enhanced surface coatings have the potential to mitigate flow-accelerated corrosion in secondary pipe systems. As candidate coatings, TiO 2 - and SiC-enhanced electrolytic and electroless nickel plating and Fe-Cr-W amorphous metallic coatings (AMC) were selected by acquiring the Pourbaix diagram with thermodynamic calculations. Both TiO 2 and SiC show a stable state in secondary water chemistry, and it is estimated that Fe-Cr-W can be applied to secondary water chemistry because it has a similar chemical composition to carbon steel. Electron microscopic analysis results with scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and tunneling electron microscopy (TEM) show the distribution of TiO 2 nanoparticles in the nickel matrix coating layer, whereas the SiC nanoparticles

  18. Biochemical Contributions to Corrosion of Carbon Steel and Alloy 22 in a Continual Flow System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horn, J.; Martin, S.; Masterson, B.; Lian, T.

    1998-01-01

    Microbiologically influenced corrosion (MIC) may decrease the functional lifetime of nuclear waste packaging materials in the potential geologic repository at Yucca Mountain (YM), Nevada. Biochemical contributions to corrosion of package materials are being determined in reactors containing crushed repository-site rock with the endogenous microbial community, and candidate waste package materials. These systems are being continually supplied with simulated ground water. Periodically, bulk chemistries are analyzed on the system outflow, and surfacial chemistries are assessed on withdrawn material coupons. Both Fe and Mn dissolved from C1020 coupons under conditions that included the presence of YM microorganisms. Insoluble corrosion products remained in a reduced state at the coupon surface, indicating at least a localized anoxic condition; soluble reduced Mn and Fe were also detected in solution, while precipitated and spalled products were oxidized. Alloy 22 surfaces showed a layer of chrome oxide, almost certainly in the Cr(III) oxidation state, on microcosm-exposed coupons, while no soluble chrome was detected in solution. The results of these studies will be compared to identical testing on systems containing sterilized rock to generate, and ultimately predict, microbial contributions to waste package corrosion chemistries

  19. Changes of the corrosion potential of iron in stagnation and flow conditions and their relationship with metal release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fabbricino, Massimiliano; Korshin, Gregory V

    2014-10-01

    This study examined the behavior of corrosion potential (Ecorr) of iron exposed to drinking water during episodes of stagnation and flow. These measurements showed that during stagnation episodes, Ecorr values decrease prominently and consistently. This decrease is initially rapid but it becomes slower as the stagnation time increases. During flow episodes, the Ecorr values increase and reach a quasi-steady state. Experiments with varying concentrations of dissolved oxygen showed that the decrease of Ecorr values characteristic for stagnation is likely to be associated with the consumption of dissolved oxygen by the exposed metal. The corrosion potential of iron and its changes during stagnation were sensitive to the concentrations of sulfate and chloride ions. Measurements of iron release showed that both the absolute values of Ecorr measured prior to or after stagnation episodes were well correlated with the logarithms of concentrations of total iron. The slope of this dependence showed that the observed correlations between Ecorr values and Fe concentrations corresponded to the coupling between the oxidant consumption and changes of Fe redox status. These results demonstrate that in situ Ecorr measurements can be a sensitive method with which to ascertain effects of hydrodynamic conditions and short-term variations of water chemistry on metal release and corrosion in drinking water. This approach is valuable practically because Ecorr measurements are precise, can be carried out in situ with any desired time resolution, do not affect the state of exposed surface in any extent and can be carried out with readily available equipment. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Association of HeartMate II left ventricular assist device flow estimate with thermodilution cardiac output.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasin, Tal; Huebner, Marianne; Li, Zhuo; Brown, Daniel; Stulak, John M; Boilson, Barry A; Joyce, Lyle; Pereira, Naveen L; Kushwaha, Sudhir S; Park, Soon J

    2014-01-01

    Cardiac output (CO) assessment is important in treating patients with heart failure. Durable left ventricular assist devices (LVADs) provide essentially all CO. In currently used LVADs, estimated device flow is generated by a computerized algorithm. However, LVAD flow estimate may be inaccurate in tracking true CO. We correlated LVAD (HeartMate II) flow with thermodilution CO during postoperative care (day 2-10 after implant) in 81 patients (5,616 paired measurements). Left ventricular assist device flow and CO correlated with a low correlation coefficient (r = 0.42). Left ventricular assist device readings were lower than CO measurements by approximately 0.36 L/min, trending for larger difference with higher values. Left ventricular assist device flow measurements showed less temporal variability compared with CO. Grouping for simultaneous measured blood pressure (BP device flow generally trends with measured CO, but large variability exists, hence flow measures should not be assumed to equal with CO. Clinicians should take into account variables such as high CO, BP, and opening of the aortic valve when interpreting LVAD flow readout. Direct flow sensors incorporated in the LVAD system may allow for better estimation.

  1. Exploratory shaft liner corrosion estimate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duncan, D.R.

    1985-10-01

    An estimate of expected corrosion degradation during the 100-year design life of the Exploratory Shaft (ES) is presented. The basis for the estimate is a brief literature survey of corrosion data, in addition to data taken by the Basalt Waste Isolation Project. The scope of the study is expected corrosion environment of the ES, the corrosion modes of general corrosion, pitting and crevice corrosion, dissimilar metal corrosion, and environmentally assisted cracking. The expected internal and external environment of the shaft liner is described in detail and estimated effects of each corrosion mode are given. The maximum amount of general corrosion degradation was estimated to be 70 mils at the exterior and 48 mils at the interior, at the shaft bottom. Corrosion at welds or mechanical joints could be significant, dependent on design. After a final determination of corrosion allowance has been established by the project it will be added to the design criteria. 10 refs., 6 figs., 5 tabs

  2. Investigation of corrosion behavior of biodegradable magnesium alloys using an online-micro-flow capillary flow injection inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry setup with electrochemical control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ulrich, A., E-mail: andrea.ulrich@empa.ch [Laboratory for Analytical Chemistry, EMPA, Swiss Federal Laboratories for Materials Science and Technology, Ueberlandstrasse 129, 8600 Duebendorf (Switzerland); Ott, N. [Laboratory for Analytical Chemistry, EMPA, Swiss Federal Laboratories for Materials Science and Technology, Ueberlandstrasse 129, 8600 Duebendorf (Switzerland); EPFL-Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne, 1015 Lausanne (Switzerland); Tournier-Fillon, A. [Laboratory for Corrosion and Material Integrity, EMPA, Swiss Federal Laboratories for Materials Science and Technology, Ueberlandstrasse 129, 8600 Duebendorf (Switzerland); Homazava, N. [Laboratory for Analytical Chemistry, EMPA, Swiss Federal Laboratories for Materials Science and Technology, Ueberlandstrasse 129, 8600 Duebendorf (Switzerland); Swiss Centre for Applied Ecotoxicology, Eawag/EPFL, Ueberlandstrasse 133, 8600 Duebendorf (Switzerland); Schmutz, P. [Laboratory for Corrosion and Material Integrity, EMPA, Swiss Federal Laboratories for Materials Science and Technology, Ueberlandstrasse 129, 8600 Duebendorf (Switzerland)

    2011-07-15

    The development of biodegradable metallic materials designed for implants or medical stents is new and is one of the most interesting new fields in material science. Besides biocompatibility, a detailed understanding of corrosion mechanisms and dissolution processes is required to develop materials with tailored degradation behavior. The materials need to be sufficiently stable as long as they have to fulfill their medical task. However, subsequently they should dissolve completely in a controlled manner in terms of maximum body burden. This study focuses on the elemental and time resolved dissolution processes of a magnesium rare earth elements alloy which has been compared to pure magnesium with different impurity level. The here described investigations were performed using a novel analytical setup based on a micro-flow capillary online-coupled via a flow injection system to a plasma mass spectrometer. Differences in element-specific and time-dependent dissolution were monitored for various magnesium alloys in contact with sodium chloride or mixtures of sodium and calcium chloride as corrosive media. The dissolution behavior strongly depends on bulk matrix elements, secondary alloying elements and impurities, which are usually present even in pure magnesium.

  3. Investigation of corrosion behavior of biodegradable magnesium alloys using an online-micro-flow capillary flow injection inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry setup with electrochemical control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ulrich, A.; Ott, N.; Tournier-Fillon, A.; Homazava, N.; Schmutz, P.

    2011-01-01

    The development of biodegradable metallic materials designed for implants or medical stents is new and is one of the most interesting new fields in material science. Besides biocompatibility, a detailed understanding of corrosion mechanisms and dissolution processes is required to develop materials with tailored degradation behavior. The materials need to be sufficiently stable as long as they have to fulfill their medical task. However, subsequently they should dissolve completely in a controlled manner in terms of maximum body burden. This study focuses on the elemental and time resolved dissolution processes of a magnesium rare earth elements alloy which has been compared to pure magnesium with different impurity level. The here described investigations were performed using a novel analytical setup based on a micro-flow capillary online-coupled via a flow injection system to a plasma mass spectrometer. Differences in element-specific and time-dependent dissolution were monitored for various magnesium alloys in contact with sodium chloride or mixtures of sodium and calcium chloride as corrosive media. The dissolution behavior strongly depends on bulk matrix elements, secondary alloying elements and impurities, which are usually present even in pure magnesium.

  4. Investigation of corrosion behavior of biodegradable magnesium alloys using an online-micro-flow capillary flow injection inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry setup with electrochemical control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulrich, A.; Ott, N.; Tournier-Fillon, A.; Homazava, N.; Schmutz, P.

    2011-07-01

    The development of biodegradable metallic materials designed for implants or medical stents is new and is one of the most interesting new fields in material science. Besides biocompatibility, a detailed understanding of corrosion mechanisms and dissolution processes is required to develop materials with tailored degradation behavior. The materials need to be sufficiently stable as long as they have to fulfill their medical task. However, subsequently they should dissolve completely in a controlled manner in terms of maximum body burden. This study focuses on the elemental and time resolved dissolution processes of a magnesium rare earth elements alloy which has been compared to pure magnesium with different impurity level. The here described investigations were performed using a novel analytical setup based on a micro-flow capillary online-coupled via a flow injection system to a plasma mass spectrometer. Differences in element-specific and time-dependent dissolution were monitored for various magnesium alloys in contact with sodium chloride or mixtures of sodium and calcium chloride as corrosive media. The dissolution behavior strongly depends on bulk matrix elements, secondary alloying elements and impurities, which are usually present even in pure magnesium.

  5. Flow velocity effect on the corrosion/erosion in water injection systems; Efecto de la velocidad de flujo en la corrosion/erosion en sistemas de inyeccion de agua

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jimenez, C.; Mendez, J. [PDVSA Exploracion y reduccion, Departamento de Ingenieria de Instalaciones, Torres Petroleras EX-MRV, Torre Lama, Piso No. 6, Zulia, Apartado 4013, Venezuela (Venezuela)

    1998-12-31

    The main causes of fails at water injection lines on the secondary petroleum recovery systems are related with corrosion/erosion problems which are influenced by the flow velocity, the presence of dissolved oxygen, solids in the medium and the microorganisms proliferation. So too, this corrosion process promotes the suspended solids generation which affects the water quality injected, causing wells tamponage and loss of injectivity, with the consequent decrease in the crude production. This situation has been impacted in meaning order at the production processes of an exploration enterprise which utilizes the Maracaibo lake as water resource for their injection by pattern projects. Stating that, it was developed a study for determining in experimental order the effect of flow velocity on the corrosion/erosion process joined to the presence of dissolved oxygen which allows to determine the optimum range of the said working velocity for the water injection systems. This range is defined by critical velocities of bio layers deposition and erosion. They were realized simulation pilot tests of the corrosion standard variables, concentration of dissolved oxygen and fluid velocity in the injection systems with filtered and non filtered water. For the development of these tests it was constructed a device which allows to install and expose cylindrical manometers of carbon steel according to predetermined conditions which was obtained the necessary information to make correlations the results of these variables. Additionally, they were determined the mathematical models that adjusts to dynamical behavior of the corrosion/erosion process, finding the optimum range of the flow velocity for the control of this process, being necessary to utilize the following techniques: Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), X-ray dispersion analysis (EDX) for encourage the surface studies. They were effected morphological analysis of the surfaces studies and the values were determined of

  6. Isolating the effect of radiation-induced segregation in irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking of austenitic stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Busby, J.T.; Was, G.S.; Kenik, E.A.

    2002-01-01

    Post-irradiation annealing was used to help identify the role of radiation-induced segregation (RIS) in irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC) by preferentially removing dislocation loop damage from proton-irradiated austenitic stainless steels while leaving the RIS of major and minor alloying elements largely unchanged. The goal of this study is to better understand the underlying mechanisms of IASCC. Simulations of post-irradiation annealing of RIS and dislocation loop microstructure predicted that dislocation loops would be removed preferentially over RIS due to both thermodynamic and kinetic considerations. To verify the simulation predictions, a series of post-irradiation annealing experiments were performed. Both a high purity 304L (HP-304L) and a commercial purity 304 (CP-304) stainless steel alloy were irradiated with 3.2 MeV protons at 360 deg. C to doses of 1.0 and 2.5 dpa. Following irradiation, post-irradiation anneals were performed at temperatures ranging from 400 to 650 deg. C for times between 45 and 90 min. Grain boundary composition was measured using scanning transmission electron microscopy with energy-dispersive spectrometry in both as-irradiated and annealed samples. The dislocation loop population and radiation-induced hardness were also measured in as-irradiated and annealed specimens. At all annealing temperatures above 500 deg. C, the hardness and dislocation densities decreased with increasing annealing time or temperature much faster than RIS. Annealing at 600 deg. C for 90 min removed virtually all dislocation loops while leaving RIS virtually unchanged. Cracking susceptibility in the CP-304 alloy was mitigated rapidly during post-irradiation annealing, faster than RIS, dislocation loop density or hardening. That the cracking susceptibility changed while the grain boundary chromium composition remained essentially unchanged indicates that Cr depletion is not the primary determinator for IASCC susceptibility. For the same

  7. Measurement of blood flow from an assist ventricle by computation of pneumatic driving parameters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, K X

    1992-03-01

    The measurement of blood flow from an assist ventricle is important but sometimes difficult in artificial heart experiments. Along with the development of a pneumatic cylinder-piston driver coupled with a ventricular assist device, a simplified method for measuring pump flow was established. From driving parameters such as the piston (or cylinder) displacement and air pressure, the pump flow could be calculated by the use of the equation of state for an ideal gas. The results of this method are broadly in agreement with electromagnetic and Doppler measurements.

  8. The corrosion of austenitic steel in flowing high-temperature water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asmundis, C. de; Weisgerber, P.; Mazzocchi, N.; Plog, C.

    1981-01-01

    This work represents an attempt to obtain data on the corrosion product formation, including corrosion products which are released to the water, of austenitic steel. AISI 316 or DIN Werkstoff No. 14401. The oxidation experiments were carried out in a small laboratory test loop, which was designed for this study. In the stainless water system considered during an oxidation time of 1800 h at 300 0 C, five zones of differing composition developed. 1. The base metal (for comparison) Fe/Cr/Ni = 67/20/13. 2. The metal at the metal/oxide interface nickel enriched, chromium and iron decreased Fe/Cr/Ni = 64/19/17. 3. The inner oxide chromium enriched and iron and nickel decreased Fe/Cr/Ni = 53/32/14. 4. The outer oxide iron enriched, chromium decreased Fe/Cr/Ni = 70/17/13. 5. The corrosion products released to the water, in total, i.e. particulate and dispersed matter, a Fe/Cr/Ni ratio rather close to that base metal: Fe/Cr/Ni = 68/19/13. (80% particulate: Fe/Cr/Ni = 72/23/5, 20% dispersed: Fe/Cr/Ni = 55/1/44)

  9. Battery operated preconcentration-assisted lateral flow assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Cheonjung; Yoo, Yong Kyoung; Han, Sung Il; Lee, Junwoo; Lee, Dohwan; Lee, Kyungjae; Hwang, Kyo Seon; Lee, Kyu Hyoung; Chung, Seok; Lee, Jeong Hoon

    2017-07-11

    Paper-based analytical devices (e.g. lateral flow assays) are highly advantageous as portable diagnostic systems owing to their low costs and ease of use. Because of their low sensitivity and detection limits for biomolecules, these devices have several limitations in applications for real-field diagnosis. Here, we demonstrate a paper-based preconcentration enhanced lateral flow assay using a commercial β-hCG-based test. Utilizing a simple 9 V battery operation with a low power consumption of approximately 81 μW, we acquire a 25-fold preconcentration factor, demonstrating a clear sensitivity enhancement in the colorimetric lateral flow assay; consequently, clear colors are observed in a rapid kit test line, which cannot be monitored without preconcentration. This device can also facilitate a semi-quantitative platform using the saturation value and/or color intensity in both paper-based colorimetric assays and smartphone-based diagnostics.

  10. Enhancement of arterial pressure pulsatility by controlling continuous-flow left ventricular assist device flow rate in mock circulatory system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bozkurt, S.; van de Vosse, F.N.; Rutten, M.C.M.

    Continuous-flow left ventricular assist devices (CF-LVADs) generally operate at a constant speed, which reduces pulsatility in the arteries and may lead to complications such as functional changes in the vascular system, gastrointestinal bleeding, or both. The purpose of this study is to increase

  11. Plasma-Assisted Chemistry in High-Speed Flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leonov, Sergey B.; Yarantsev, Dmitry A.; Napartovich, Anatoly P.; Kochetov, Igor V.

    2007-01-01

    Fundamental problems related to the high-speed combustion are analyzed. The result of plasma-chemical modeling is presented as a motivation of experimental activity. Numerical simulations of the effect of uniform non-equilibrium discharge on the premixed hydrogen and ethylene-air mixture in supersonic flow demonstrate an advantage of such a technique over a heating. Experimental results on multi-electrode non-uniform discharge maintenance behind wallstep and in cavity of supersonic flow are presented. The model test on hydrogen and ethylene ignition is demonstrated at direct fuel injection to low-temperature high-speed airflow

  12. Enhancement of Arterial Pressure Pulsatility by Controlling Continuous-Flow Left Ventricular Assist Device Flow Rate in Mock Circulatory System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozkurt, Selim; van de Vosse, Frans N; Rutten, Marcel C M

    Continuous-flow left ventricular assist devices (CF-LVADs) generally operate at a constant speed, which reduces pulsatility in the arteries and may lead to complications such as functional changes in the vascular system, gastrointestinal bleeding, or both. The purpose of this study is to increase the arterial pulse pressure and pulsatility by controlling the CF-LVAD flow rate. A MicroMed DeBakey pump was used as the CF-LVAD. A model simulating the flow rate through the aortic valve was used as a reference model to drive the pump. A mock circulation containing two synchronized servomotor-operated piston pumps acting as left and right ventricles was used as a circulatory system. Proportional-integral control was used as the control method. First, the CF-LVAD was operated at a constant speed. With pulsatile-speed CF-LVAD assistance, the pump was driven such that the same mean pump output was generated. Continuous and pulsatile-speed CF-LVAD assistance provided the same mean arterial pressure and flow rate, while the index of pulsatility increased significantly for both arterial pressure and pump flow rate signals under pulsatile speed pump support. This study shows the possibility of improving the pulsatility of CF-LVAD support by regulating pump speed over a cardiac cycle without reducing the overall level of support.

  13. Effect of fluid flow, pH and tobacco extracts concentration as organic inhibitors to corrosion characteristics of AISI 1045 steel in 3.5% NaCl environment containing CO2 gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurniawan, Budi Agung; Pratiwi, Vania Mitha; Ahmadi, Nafi'ul Fikri

    2018-04-01

    Corrosion become major problem in most industries. In the oil and gas company, corrosion occurs because of reaction between steel and chemical species inside crude oil. Crude oil or nature gas provide corrosive species, such as CO2, O2, H2S and so on. Fluid containing CO2 gas causes CO2 corrosion which attack steel as well as other corrosion phenomena. This CO2 corrosion commonly called as sweet environment and produce FeCO3 as corrosion products. Fluid flow factor in pipelines during the oil and gas transportation might increase the rate of corrosion itself. Inhibitor commonly use used as corrosion protection because its simplicity in usage. Nowadays, organic inhibitor become main issue in corrosion protection because of biodegradable, low cost, and environmental friendly. This research tried to use tobacco leaf extract as organic inhibitor to control corrosion in CO2 environment. The electrolyte solution used was 3.5% NaCl at pH 4 and pH 7. Weight loss test results showed that the lowest corrosion rate was reach at 132.5 ppm inhibitor, pH 7 and rotational speed of 150 rpm with corrosion rate of 0.091 mm/y. While at pH 4, the lowest corrosion rate was found at rotational speed of 150 rpm with inhibitor concentration of 265 ppm and corrosion rate of 0.327 mm/y. FTIR results indicate the presence of nicotine functional groups on the steel surface. However, based on corrosion rate, it is believed that corrosion occurs, and FeCO3 was soluble in electrolyte. Tobacco leaf extract inhibitors worked by a physisorption mechanism, where tobacco inhibitors formed thin layer on the steel surface.

  14. Fighting corrosion in India

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rajagopalan, K S; Rangaswamy, N S

    1979-03-01

    A survey covers the cost of corrosion in India; methods of preventing corrosion in industrial plants; some case histories, including the prevention of corrosion in pipes through which fuels are pumped to storage and the stress-corrosion cracking of evaporators in fertilizer plants; estimates of the increase in demand in 1979-89 for anticorrosion products and processes developed by the Central Electrochemical Research Institute (CECRI) at Karaikudi, India; industries that may face corrosion problems requiring assistance from CECRI, including the light and heavy engineering structural, and transport industries and the chemical industry; and some areas identified for major efforts, including the establishment of a Corrosion Advisory Board with regional centers and the expansion of the Tropical Corrosion Testing Station at Mandapam Camp, Tamil Nadu.

  15. Preliminary review of mass transfer and flow visualization studies and techniques relevant to the study of erosion-corrosion of reactor piping systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuzay, T.M.; Halle, H.J.; Kasza, K.E.

    1988-06-01

    This report provides some background information on the failed piping at the Surry-2 reactor; a summary of pertinent literature on mass transfer in related geometries; and a description of methodologies for visualization and erosion rate measurements in laboratory model studies that can provide greater insight into the role of flow geometry in erosion-corrosion. 18 refs., 9 figs., 1 tab

  16. Preliminary review of mass transfer and flow visualization studies and techniques relevant to the study of erosion-corrosion of reactor piping systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuzay, T.M.; Halle, H.J.; Kasza, K.E.

    1988-06-01

    This report provides some background information on the failed piping at the Surry-2 reactor; a summary of pertinent literature on mass transfer in related geometries; and a description of methodologies for visualization and erosion rate measurements in laboratory model studies that can provide greater insight into the role of flow geometry in erosion-corrosion. 18 refs., 9 figs., 1 tab.

  17. Effect of flowing sodium on corrosion and tensile properties of AISI type 316LN stainless steel at 823 K

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivai Bharasi, N.; Thyagarajan, K.; Shaikh, H.; Balamurugan, A. K.; Bera, Santanu; Kalavathy, S.; Gurumurthy, K.; Tyagi, A. K.; Dayal, R. K.; Rajan, K. K.; Khatak, H. S.

    2008-07-01

    AISI type 316LN stainless steel was exposed to flowing sodium in mass transfer loop (MTL) at 823 K for 16 000 h and then examined for changes in the tensile properties due to the mass transfer and corrosion effects. Comparisons in microstructural and mechanical properties were made between annealed, thermally aged and sodium exposed materials. Microstructural examination of thermally aged and sodium exposed materials revealed precipitation of carbides at the grain boundaries. The sodium exposed samples contained a degraded layer at the surface up to a depth of around 10 μm and a surface carburized layer of about 30 μm. There was about 15% increase in yield strength and a decrease of about 20% in ductility for the sodium exposed material vis-a-vis thermally aged material and this was attributed to carburization effects and microstructural changes.

  18. Effect of flowing sodium on corrosion and tensile properties of AISI type 316LN stainless steel at 823 K

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sivai Bharasi, N.; Thyagarajan, K.; Shaikh, H.; Balamurugan, A.K.; Bera, Santanu; Kalavathy, S.; Gurumurthy, K.; Tyagi, A.K.; Dayal, R.K.; Rajan, K.K.; Khatak, H.S.

    2008-01-01

    AISI type 316LN stainless steel was exposed to flowing sodium in mass transfer loop (MTL) at 823 K for 16 000 h and then examined for changes in the tensile properties due to the mass transfer and corrosion effects. Comparisons in microstructural and mechanical properties were made between annealed, thermally aged and sodium exposed materials. Microstructural examination of thermally aged and sodium exposed materials revealed precipitation of carbides at the grain boundaries. The sodium exposed samples contained a degraded layer at the surface up to a depth of around 10 μm and a surface carburized layer of about 30 μm. There was about 15% increase in yield strength and a decrease of about 20% in ductility for the sodium exposed material vis-a-vis thermally aged material and this was attributed to carburization effects and microstructural changes

  19. Field experience on weld assemblies behaviour toward flow-accelerated corrosion in French nuclear power plants (NPP)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calonne-Chatelee, V.; Thebault, Y.; De Bouvier, O.; Dejoux, L.; Trevin, S.; Pavageau, E.-M.

    2007-01-01

    After the Mihama accident (2004), EDF re-examined its existing inspection strategy of Flow-Accelerated Corrosion (FAC) for the secondary loop of NPPs. Welds, which are still not taken into account by the predictive software BRT-CICERO, have been identified as a weak point. An inventory of the welds' inspections and a program of metallurgical examinations on field components have been established. The chromium content, hydrodynamic effects and dissimilar metal welds have been studied. These examinations showed that the welds' degradation was really due to FAC. It appears that the chromium contents, of the weld and of the base metal, is an important parameter. Moreover, the presence of a weld penetration and dissimilar metal welds seem to have a consequence on the damage of the weld assembly. These parameters will be investigated in an R and D program on the CIROCO loop. Meanwhile, all these results have been taken into account by the maintenance program. (author)

  20. Application of Nano-Structured Coatings for Mitigation of Flow-Accelerated Corrosion in Secondary Pipe Systems of Nuclear Power Plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Seung Hyun; Kim, Jong Jin; Yoo, Seung Chang; Huh, Jae Hoon; Kim, Ji Hyun [Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology, Ulsan (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-05-15

    Flow-accelerated corrosion (FAC) is a complex corrosion process combined with mechanical reaction with fluid. There were lots of research to mitigate FAC such as controlling temperature or water chemistry but in this research, we adopt active coating techniques especially nano-particle reinforced coatings. One of the general characteristics of FAC and its mitigation is that surface friction due to surface morphology makes a significant effect on FAC. Therefore to form a uniform coating layers, nano-particles including TiO2, SiC, Fe-Cr-W and Graphene were utilized. Those materials are known as greatly improve the corrosion resistance of substrates such as carbon steels but their effects on mitigation of FAC are not revealed clearly. Therefore in this research, the FAC resistive performance of nano-structured coatings were tested by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) in room temperature 15 wt% sulfuric acid. As the flow-accelerated corrosion inhibitors in secondary piping system of nuclear power plants, various kinds of nano-structured coatings were prepared and tested in room-temperature electrochemical cells. SHS7740 with two types of Densifiers, electroless nickel plating with TiO2 are prepared. Electropolarization curves shows the outstanding corrosion mitigation performance of SHS7740 but EIS results shows the promising potential of Ni-P and Ni-P-TiO2 electroless nickel plating. For future work, high-temperature electrochemical analysis system will be constructed and in secondary water chemistry will be simulated.

  1. Corrosion and corrosion control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khanna, A.S.; Totlani, M.K.

    1995-01-01

    Corrosion has always been associated with structures, plants, installations and equipment exposed to aggressive environments. It effects economy, safety and product reliability. Monitoring of component corrosion has thus become an essential requirement for the plant health and safety. Protection methods such as appropriate coatings, cathodic protection and use of inhibitors have become essential design parameters. High temperature corrosion, especially hot corrosion, is still a difficult concept to accommodate in corrosion allowance; there is a lack of harmonized system of performance testing of materials at high temperatures. In order to discuss and deliberate on these aspects, National Association for Corrosion Engineers International organised a National Conference on Corrosion and its Control in Bombay during November 28-30, 1995. This volume contains papers presented at the symposium. Paper relevant to INIS is indexed separately. refs., figs., tabs

  2. Dictionary corrosion and corrosion control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-01-01

    This dictionary has 13000 entries in both languages. Keywords and extensive accompanying information simplify the choice of word for the user. The following topics are covered: Theoretical principles of corrosion; Corrosion of the metals and alloys most frequently used in engineering. Types of corrosion - (chemical-, electro-chemical, biological corrosion); forms of corrosion (superficial, pitting, selective, intercrystalline and stress corrosion; vibrational corrosion cracking); erosion and cavitation. Methods of corrosion control (material selection, temporary corrosion protection media, paint and plastics coatings, electro-chemical coatings, corrosion prevention by treatment of the corrosive media); Corrosion testing methods. (orig./HP) [de

  3. Tomographic flow cytometry assisted by intelligent wavefronts analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merola, F.; Memmolo, P.; Miccio, L.; Mugnano, M.; Ferraro, P.

    2017-06-01

    High-throughput single-cell analysis is a challenging target for implementing advanced biomedical applications. An excellent candidate for this aim is label-free tomographic phase microscopy. However, in-line tomography is very difficult to be implemented in practice, as it requires complex setup for rotating the sample and/or illuminate the cell along numerous directions [1]. We exploit random rolling of cells while they are flowing along a microfluidic channel demonstrating that it is possible to obtain in-line phase-contrast tomography by adopting strategies for intelligent wavefronts analysis thus obtaining complete retrieval of both 3D-position and orientation of rotating cells [2]. Thus, by numerical wavefront analysis a-priori knowledge of such information is no longer needed. This approach makes continuos-flow cyto-tomography suitable for practical operation in real-world, single-cell analysis and with substantial simplification of the optical system avoiding any mechanical/optical scanning of light source. Demonstration is given for different classes of biosamples, red-blood-cells (RBCs), diatom algae and fibroblast cells [3]. Accurate characterization of each type of cells is reported despite their very different nature and materials content, thus showing the proposed method can be extended, by adopting two alternate strategies of wavefront-analysis, to many classes of cells. In particular, for RBCs we furnish important parameters as 3D morphology, Corpuscular Hemoglobin (CH), Volume (V), and refractive index (RI) for each single cell in the total population [3]. This could open a new route in blood disease diagnosis, for example for the isolation and characterization of "foreign" cells in the blood stream, the so called Circulating Tumor Cells (CTC), early manifestation of metastasis.

  4. Injection of nano-particles in mitigating flow accelerated corrosion (FAC) damage in the secondary system of nuclear power plants (NPPs)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lim, Dong Seok; Ku, Hee Kwon; Cho, Jae Seon

    2015-01-01

    NPPs produces electric energy through phase transition of water. According to this, a piping, which is flow path, integrity is essential for safety functions. Erosion, FAC and fittings are corrosion failure mechanism by increasing service life. Especially, there are 10-kilometers of piping in secondary systems. It needs to estimate FAC and apply periodic management. Iron oxides produced by FAC cause power reduction and Loss Of Coolant Accident (LOCA) will be occurred through the continued piping wall thinning. In this study, corrosion rate of pipe materials with carbon steel(SA106.Gr.B) and low-alloy steel (SA335.P22) was evaluated for pipe configuration and dissolved oxygen concentration on 150 °C, pH 9.5∼10.0 and flow velocity of 5m/s. Temperature of 150°C is well known that causes high FAC rate and pH consider a NPPs in-service condition. Further corrosion rate test was performed to develop FAC reduction technology through Pt-nanoparticle injection. In this study, corrosion rate is evaluated by weight depletion method. The results of material impact assessment show that corrosion rate of carbon steel is more higher than that of low-alloy steel because of Cr content. And also, the results of pipe configuration test show that case with 90° elbow had maximum wall thinning than with 180° horizontal pipe. The dissolved oxygen concentration test shows that low oxygen condition, ≤5 ppb, had high corrosion rate compared to normal condition and the corrosion rate decreased 50% at Pt-nanoparticle injection test on maximum corrosion rate condition compared to maximum wall thinning condition without Pt-nanoparticle injection. In this study, samples provided by each test case had analyzed through SEM-EDX (Scanning Electron Microscopy-Energy Dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy). Behavior evaluation for oxide film was performed and Electrochemical corrosion potential (ECP) was measured for electrochemistry evaluation. To apply Pt-nanoparticle injection technology on nuclear

  5. Model-assisted measurements of suspension-feeding flow velocities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du Clos, Kevin T; Jones, Ian T; Carrier, Tyler J; Brady, Damian C; Jumars, Peter A

    2017-06-01

    Benthic marine suspension feeders provide an important link between benthic and pelagic ecosystems. The strength of this link is determined by suspension-feeding rates. Many studies have measured suspension-feeding rates using indirect clearance-rate methods, which are based on the depletion of suspended particles. Direct methods that measure the flow of water itself are less common, but they can be more broadly applied because, unlike indirect methods, direct methods are not affected by properties of the cleared particles. We present pumping rates for three species of suspension feeders, the clams Mya arenaria and Mercenaria mercenaria and the tunicate Ciona intestinalis , measured using a direct method based on particle image velocimetry (PIV). Past uses of PIV in suspension-feeding studies have been limited by strong laser reflections that interfere with velocity measurements proximate to the siphon. We used a new approach based on fitting PIV-based velocity profile measurements to theoretical profiles from computational fluid dynamic (CFD) models, which allowed us to calculate inhalant siphon Reynolds numbers ( Re ). We used these inhalant Re and measurements of siphon diameters to calculate exhalant Re , pumping rates, and mean inlet and outlet velocities. For the three species studied, inhalant Re ranged from 8 to 520, and exhalant Re ranged from 15 to 1073. Volumetric pumping rates ranged from 1.7 to 7.4 l h -1 for M . arenaria , 0.3 to 3.6 l h -1 for M . m ercenaria and 0.07 to 0.97 l h -1 for C . intestinalis We also used CFD models based on measured pumping rates to calculate capture regions, which reveal the spatial extent of pumped water. Combining PIV data with CFD models may be a valuable approach for future suspension-feeding studies. © 2017. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  6. An aqueous, polymer-based redox-flow battery using non-corrosive, safe, and low-cost materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janoschka, Tobias; Martin, Norbert; Martin, Udo; Friebe, Christian; Morgenstern, Sabine; Hiller, Hannes; Hager, Martin D.; Schubert, Ulrich S.

    2015-11-01

    For renewable energy sources such as solar, wind, and hydroelectric to be effectively used in the grid of the future, flexible and scalable energy-storage solutions are necessary to mitigate output fluctuations. Redox-flow batteries (RFBs) were first built in the 1940s and are considered a promising large-scale energy-storage technology. A limited number of redox-active materials--mainly metal salts, corrosive halogens, and low-molar-mass organic compounds--have been investigated as active materials, and only a few membrane materials, such as Nafion, have been considered for RFBs. However, for systems that are intended for both domestic and large-scale use, safety and cost must be taken into account as well as energy density and capacity, particularly regarding long-term access to metal resources, which places limits on the lithium-ion-based and vanadium-based RFB development. Here we describe an affordable, safe, and scalable battery system, which uses organic polymers as the charge-storage material in combination with inexpensive dialysis membranes, which separate the anode and the cathode by the retention of the non-metallic, active (macro-molecular) species, and an aqueous sodium chloride solution as the electrolyte. This water- and polymer-based RFB has an energy density of 10 watt hours per litre, current densities of up to 100 milliamperes per square centimetre, and stable long-term cycling capability. The polymer-based RFB we present uses an environmentally benign sodium chloride solution and cheap, commercially available filter membranes instead of highly corrosive acid electrolytes and expensive membrane materials.

  7. An aqueous, polymer-based redox-flow battery using non-corrosive, safe, and low-cost materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janoschka, Tobias; Martin, Norbert; Martin, Udo; Friebe, Christian; Morgenstern, Sabine; Hiller, Hannes; Hager, Martin D; Schubert, Ulrich S

    2015-11-05

    For renewable energy sources such as solar, wind, and hydroelectric to be effectively used in the grid of the future, flexible and scalable energy-storage solutions are necessary to mitigate output fluctuations. Redox-flow batteries (RFBs) were first built in the 1940s and are considered a promising large-scale energy-storage technology. A limited number of redox-active materials--mainly metal salts, corrosive halogens, and low-molar-mass organic compounds--have been investigated as active materials, and only a few membrane materials, such as Nafion, have been considered for RFBs. However, for systems that are intended for both domestic and large-scale use, safety and cost must be taken into account as well as energy density and capacity, particularly regarding long-term access to metal resources, which places limits on the lithium-ion-based and vanadium-based RFB development. Here we describe an affordable, safe, and scalable battery system, which uses organic polymers as the charge-storage material in combination with inexpensive dialysis membranes, which separate the anode and the cathode by the retention of the non-metallic, active (macro-molecular) species, and an aqueous sodium chloride solution as the electrolyte. This water- and polymer-based RFB has an energy density of 10 watt hours per litre, current densities of up to 100 milliamperes per square centimetre, and stable long-term cycling capability. The polymer-based RFB we present uses an environmentally benign sodium chloride solution and cheap, commercially available filter membranes instead of highly corrosive acid electrolytes and expensive membrane materials.

  8. Scale-up of microwave assisted flow synthesis by transient processing through monomode cavities in series

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Patil, N.G.; Benaskar, F.; Rebrov, E.; Meuldijk, J.; Hulshof, L.A.; Hessel, V.; Schouten, J.C.

    2014-01-01

    A new scale-up concept for microwave assisted flow processing is presented where modular scale-up is achieved by implementing microwave cavities in series. The scale-up concept is demonstrated for case studies of a packed-bed reactor and a wall-coated tubular reactor. With known kinetics and

  9. Continuous-flow cardiac assistance : effects on aortic valve function in a mock loop

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tuzun, E.; Rutten, M.C.M.; Dat, M.; Kadipasaoglu, C.; Vosse, van de F.N.; Mol, de B.A.J.M.

    2011-01-01

    Background As the use of left ventricular assist devices (LVADs) to treat end-stage heart failure has become more widespread, leaflet fusion—with resul-tant aortic regurgitation—has been observed more frequently. To quantitatively assess the effects of nonpulsatile flow on aortic valve function, we

  10. COST-EFFECTIVENESS OF CONTINUOUS-FLOW LEFT VENTRICULAR ASSIST DEVICES

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Neyt, Mattias; Van den Bruel, Ann; Smit, Yolba; De Jonge, Nicolaas; Erasmus, Michiel; Van Dijk, Diederik; Vlayen, Joan

    Objectives: Mechanical circulatory support through left ventricular assist devices (LVADs) improves survival and quality of life for patients with end-stage heart failure who are ineligible for cardiac transplantation. Our aim was to calculate the cost-effectiveness of continuous-flow LVADs.

  11. Noninvasive arterial blood pressure waveforms in patients with continuous-flow left ventricular assist devices

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Martina, Jerson R.; Westerhof, Berend E.; de Jonge, Nicolaas; van Goudoever, Jeroen; Westers, Paul; Chamuleau, Steven; van Dijk, Diederik; Rodermans, Ben F. M.; de Mol, Bas A. J. M.; Lahpor, Jaap R.

    2014-01-01

    Arterial blood pressure and echocardiography may provide useful physiological information regarding cardiac support in patients with continuous-flow left ventricular assist devices (cf-LVADs). We investigated the accuracy and characteristics of noninvasive blood pressure during cf-LVAD support.

  12. Effect of cold working on the corrosion resistance of JPCA stainless steel in flowing Pb–Bi at 450 °C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rivai, Abu Khalid; Saito, Shigeru; Tezuka, Masao; Kato, Chiaki; Kikuchi, Kenji

    2012-01-01

    Development of a high performance proton beam window material is one of the critical issues for the deployment of the accelerator-driven transmutation system (ADS) with liquid Pb–Bi eutectic as a spallation target and coolant. In the present study, we applied 20% cold work treatment to JPCA austenitic stainless steel and investigated it from the corrosion behavior viewpoint. The corrosion test of 20% cold-worked JPCA SS has been carried in the JLBL-1 (JAEA Lead–Bismuth Loop-1) apparatus. The maximum temperature, the temperature difference, the flow velocity and the exposure time of the liquid Pb–Bi were 450 °C, 100 °C, 1 m/s, and 1000 h, respectively. For comparison analysis, JPCA SS without cold working was also tested in the same time and conditions with the 20% cold-worked JPCA SS. The results showed a different corrosion behavior between the JPCA SS without and with cold working. As for the JPCA SS without cold working, Pb–Bi penetrated into the matrix through a ferrite layer which was formed because of constituent metals dissolution from the matrix into Pb–Bi. As for the 20% cold-worked JPCA SS, dissolution attack occurred only partially and formed localized superficial pitting corrosion. It was found that the different corrosion behavior occurred because the cold working induced a structure transformation from γ-austenite to α′-martensite and affected the corrosion resistance of the JPCA SS in flowing Pb–Bi at 450 °C.

  13. Microbial corrosion and cracking in steel. A concept for evaluation of hydrogen-assisted stress corrosion cracking in cathodically protected high-pressure gas transmission pipelines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Lars Vendelbo

    An effort has been undertaken in order to develop a concept for evaluation of the risk of hydrogen-assisted cracking in cathodically protected gas transmission pipelines. The effort was divided into the following subtasks: A. Establish a correlation between the fracture mechanical properties...... crack propagation. This resulted in threshold curves that can be used for assessment of the risk of hydrogen-assisted cracking as a function of operating pressure and hydrogen content - having the flaw size as discrete parameter. The results are to be used mainly on a conceptual basis......, but it was indicated that the requirements for crack propagation include an overprotective CP-condition, a severe sulphate-reducing environment, as well as a large flaw (8 mm or a leak in the present case). A 1 mm flaw (which may be the maximum realistic flaw size) is believed to be unable to provoke crack propagation...

  14. Development of on-line monitoring system for flow accelerated corrosion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, N.Y.; Lee, S.G.; Hwang, I.S.; Kim, J.T.; Luk, V.K.

    2005-01-01

    Aged nuclear piping has been reported to undergo corrosion-induced accelerated failures, often without giving signatures to current inspection campaigns. Therefore, we need diverse sensors which can cover wide area in the on-line application. We suggested integrated approach to monitor the FAC-susceptible piping. Since FAC is a combined phenomenon, we need to monitor as many parameters as possible, and that cover wide area, since we don't know where the FAC occurs. For this purpose, we introduced wearing rate model, which concentrates on the electrochemical parameters. By the model, we can predict the wearing rate and then can compare the testing result. After we identified feasibility by analytical way, we developed electrochemical sensors for high temperature application, and introduced mechanical monitoring system, which is still under development. To support the validation of the monitored results, we adopted high temperature UT, which shows good resolution in the testing environment. By this way, all the monitored results can be compared in terms of thickness. Validation test shows the feasibility of sensors. To support direct thickness measurement for wide-area, Direct Current Potential Drop method will be researched to integrate to the developed framework. (authors)

  15. Effects of flow on corrosion and surface film formation on an alkali borosilicate glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clark, D.E.; Christensen, H.; Hermansson, H.P.; Sundvall, S.B.; Werme, L.

    1984-01-01

    Samples of the Swedish KBS glass type ABS 39 have been leached in doubly distilled water for 28 days at 90 0 C under static and flow conditions. After leaching, pH, weight loss, and elemental mass loss were determined. Surface film formation was studied by using IRRS, SEM-EDS, and SIMS analyses. Increasing the flow rate resulted in a decreased attack on the glass surface. Na and B were depleted while Al, Fe, La, and U were enriched at the surfaces of all the samples. The depth of the extensively leached layer determined by SIMS was approximately 6 μm on the low-flow-rate sample and about 2 μm on the high-flow-rate sample. SEM analysis also showed some variations in the thickness of the leached layers, but in general, the thickness of the layer on the 0.5 mL/h samples was about 3 times greater than on the 90 mL/g samples. Small particles ( 2 for the static and 0.5 mL/h samples and 6 g/m 2 for the 90 mL/h samples. This factor of 3 difference in weight loss between the low and high flow rates correlates well with the factor of 3 difference in their leached depths. A model is proposed to explain the results based on the effectiveness of protective surface layers

  16. Durability of central aortic valve closure in patients with continuous flow left ventricular assist devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKellar, Stephen H; Deo, Salil; Daly, Richard C; Durham, Lucian A; Joyce, Lyle D; Stulak, John M; Park, Soon J

    2014-01-01

    A competent aortic valve is essential to providing effective left ventricular assist device support. We have adopted a practice of central aortic valve closure by placing a simple coaptation stitch at left ventricular assist device implantation in patients with significant aortic insufficiency. We conducted a follow-up study to evaluate the efficacy and durability of this procedure. The study included patients who had undergone continuous flow left ventricular assist device implantation. The patients were divided into 2 groups, those who did not require any aortic procedure because the valve was competent and those who underwent central aortic valve closure for mild or greater aortic regurgitation. The clinical endpoints were mortality, progression or recurrence of aortic insufficiency, and reoperation for aortic valve pathologic features. Aortic insufficiency was measured qualitatively from mild to severe on a scale of 0 to 5. A total of 123 patients received continuous flow left ventricular assist devices from February 2007 to August 2011. Of those, 18 (15%) underwent central aortic valve closure at left ventricular assist device implantation because of significant aortic insufficiency (1.8 ± 1.4) and 105 who did not (competent aortic valve, 0.15 ± 0.43; P assist device-supported patients, with follow-up extending into 2 years. Although aortic insufficiency progressed over time in those with minimal native valve regurgitation initially, no such progression was noted in those with central aortic valve closure. Additional investigation is needed to evaluate whether prophylactic central aortic valve closure should be performed at left ventricular assist device implantation to avoid problematic aortic regurgitation developing over time, in particular in patients undergoing left ventricular assist device implantation for life-long (destination therapy) support. Copyright © 2014 The American Association for Thoracic Surgery. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights

  17. Corrosion rate of parent and weld materials of F82H and JPCA steels under LBE flow with active oxygen control at 450 and 500 deg. C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kikuchi, Kenji; Kamata, Kinya; Ono, Mikinori; Kitano, Teruaki; Hayashi, Kenichi; Oigawa, Hiroyuki

    2008-01-01

    Corrosion behavior of parent and weld materials of F82H and JPCA was studied in the circulating LBE loop under impinging flow. These are candidate materials for Japanese Accelerator Driven System (ADS) beam windows. Maximum temperatures were kept to 450 and 500 deg. C with 100 deg. C constant temperature difference. Main flow velocity was 0.4-0.6 m/s in every case. Oxygen concentration was controlled to 2-4 x 10 -5 mass% although there was one exception. Testing time durations were 500-3000 h. Round bar type specimens were put in the circular tube of the loop. An electron beam weld in the middle of specimens was also studied. Optical microscopy, electron microscopy, X-ray element analyses and X-ray diffraction were used to investigate corrosion in these materials. Consequently corrosion depth and stability of those oxide layers were characterized based on the analyses. For a long-term behavior a linear law is recommended to predict corrosion in the ADS target design

  18. Corrosion and flow resistance of metal filter elements used in the cleanup of syngas from the Transport Gasifier at the Power Systems Development Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robert S. Dahlin; E. Carl Landham; Xiaofeng Guan [Southern Research Institute, Wilsonville, AL (United States). Power Systems Development Facility

    2008-07-01

    At the Power Systems Development Facility (PSDF), a variety of filter elements and failsafes are being tested for the cleanup of coal-generated syngas from the Kellogg Brown and Root (KBR) Transport Gasifier. Thus far, no evidence of corrosion or plugging has been found in the HR-160 failsafes or sinterned metal fiber elements. However, a progressive corrosion and increase in pressure drop has been noted in the iron aluminide elements. The corrosion was first detected as reddish-brown spots of iron oxide after about 2,000 to 3,000 hours of syngas exposure. As the corrosion progressed, the spots of iron oxide merged to form a continuous scale after about 5,000 to 5,500 hours of exposure. With additional exposure, a black scale containing iron sulfide also appeared, and localized areas of sulfidation and plugging were noted in element cross sections. These effects have not resulted in any significant reduction in tensile strength, but a gradual increase in the clean element pressure drop has been noted. Flow test results suggest that there is an interaction between the corroded filter surface and the dustcake that effectively increases the residual cake flow resistance and baseline pressure drop. 10 refs., 14 figs., 1 tab.

  19. Evaluation of the Synergistic Effect of Erosion-Corrosion on AISI 4330 Steel in Saline-Sand Multiphase Flow by Electrochemical and Gravimetric Techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dario Yesid Peña Ballesteros

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The synergistic effects of fluid flow, sand particles, and solution pH on erosion-corrosion of AISI 4330 steel alloy in saline-sand medium were studied through a rotating cylinder electrode (RCE system by weight-loss and electrochemical measurements. The worn surface was analyzed by X-ray diffraction (XRD and scanning electron microscopy (SEM. Results show that, under all the test conditions assessed, the passivity of the steel alloy could not be maintained; as a result, an activation mechanism dominates the corrosion process of steel alloy. Furthermore, the potentiodynamic curves show that, with the increasing of the electrode flow rate and particle size, the anodic current density increased, which is due to deterioration of the electrode by the impacting slurry. Although the increase of particle size affects the anodic current density, the effect of particle size does not cause a significant change in the polarization behavior of the steel electrode. The electrochemical impedance and potentiodynamic curves suggest that erosion-corrosion phenomenon of the ASISI 4330 steel is under mixed control of mass transport and charge transfer. The inductive loops formed in the impedance plots are representative of an increase in roughness of the electrode caused by the particles impacting at the surface. The change in the passivity of the steel alloy as the pH is altered plays an important role in the corrosion rate.

  20. Stress corrosion and corrosion fatigue crack growth monitoring in metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Senadheera, T.; Shipilov, S.A.

    2003-01-01

    Environmentally assisted cracking (including stress corrosion cracking and corrosion fatigue) is one of the major causes for materials failure in a wide variety of industries. It is extremely important to understand the mechanism(s) of environmentally assisted crack propagation in structural materials so as to choose correctly from among the various possibilities-alloying elements, heat treatment of steels, parameters of cathodic protection, and inhibitors-to prevent in-service failures due to stress corrosion cracking and corrosion fatigue. An important step towards understanding the mechanism of environmentally assisted crack propagation is designing a testing machine for crack growth monitoring and that simultaneously provides measurement of electrochemical parameters. In the present paper, a direct current (DC) potential drop method for monitoring crack propagation in metals and a testing machine that uses this method and allows for measuring electrochemical parameters during stress corrosion and corrosion fatigue crack growth are described. (author)

  1. Online monitoring method using Equipotential Switching Direct Current potential drop for piping wall loss by flow accelerated corrosion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryu, Kyung Ha; Lee, Tae Hyun; Kim, Ji Hak; Hwang, Il Soon; Lee, Na Young; Kim, Ji Hyun; Park, Jin Ho; Sohn, Chang Ho

    2010-01-01

    The flow accelerated corrosion (FAC) phenomenon persistently impacts plant reliability and personnel safety. We have shown that Equipotential Switching Direct Current Potential Drop (ES-DCPD) can be employed to detect piping wall loss induced by FAC. It has been demonstrated to have sufficient sensitivity to cover both long and short lengths of piping. Based on this, new FAC screening and inspection approaches have been developed. For example, resolution of ES-DCPD can be adjusted according to its monitoring purpose. The developed method shows good integrity during long test periods. It also shows good reproducibility. The Seoul National University FAC Accelerated Simulation Loop (SFASL) has been constructed for ES-DCPD demonstration purposes. During one demonstration, the piping wall was thinned by 23.7% through FAC for a 13,000 min test period. In addition to the ES-DCPD method, ultrasonic technique (UT) has been applied to SFASL for verification while water chemistry was continually monitored and controlled using electrochemical sensors. Developed electrochemical sensors showed accurate and stable water conditions in the SFASL during the test period. The ES-DCPD results were also theoretically predicted by the Sanchez-Caldera's model. The UT, however, failed to detect thinning because of its localized characteristics. Online UT that covers only local areas cannot assure the detection of wall loss.

  2. Feasibility Study on Nano-structured Coatings to Mitigate Flow-accelerated Corrosion in Secondary System of Nuclear Power Plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Seunghyun; Kim, Jeong Won; Kim, Ji Hyun [Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology, Banyeon-ri, Eonyang-eup, Ulju-gun, Ulsan (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-05-15

    There have been many efforts to mitigate FAC through the adoption of the advanced and modified water chemistries such as optimized dissolved oxygen (DO) concentration and temperature. However, these mitigation techniques pose certain challenges relating to the compatibility of new water chemistries with the steam generator, the thermal efficiency of the secondary side, etc. In this context, nano-particle reinforced electroless nickel plating (NP ENP) could help solve the FAC issues in secondary pipe systems. This does not require modification of water chemistry or structural materials, and hence, its application is reasonable and time-saving compared to previous FAC mitigation techniques. The main parameters of FAC are known as electrochemical reaction at the interface, dissolution of magnetite and ferrous ions due to concentration gradient between carbon steels and water and wear due to a fast-flowing fluid. High-temperature corrosion characteristics of the both coatings have potential as FAC barrier for carbon steel. Feasibility study will be carried out with FAC simulation experiments.

  3. Organic Contaminants and Treatment Chemicals in Steam-Water Cycles : Thermal stability, decomposition products and flow-accelerated corrosion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moed, D.H.

    2015-01-01

    Boiler feedwater and steam have to be of high purity, because of the susceptibility of the steam-water cycle to corrosion. Organic contaminants break down in boilers by hydrothermolysis, leading to the formation of organic acid anions, which are suspected to cause corrosion of steam-water cycle

  4. A programmable and portable NMES device for drop foot correction and blood flow assist applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breen, Paul P; Corley, Gavin J; O'Keeffe, Derek T; Conway, Richard; Olaighin, Gearóid

    2009-04-01

    The Duo-STIM, a new, programmable and portable neuromuscular stimulation system for drop foot correction and blood flow assist applications is presented. The system consists of a programmer unit and a portable, programmable stimulator unit. The portable stimulator features fully programmable, sensor-controlled, constant-voltage, dual-channel stimulation and accommodates a range of customized stimulation profiles. Trapezoidal and free-form adaptive stimulation intensity envelope algorithms are provided for drop foot correction applications, while time dependent and activity dependent algorithms are provided for blood flow assist applications. A variety of sensor types can be used with the portable unit, including force sensitive resistor-based foot switches and MEMS-based accelerometer and gyroscope devices. The paper provides a detailed description of the hardware and block-level system design for both units. The programming and operating procedures for the system are also presented. Finally, functional bench test results for the system are presented.

  5. Corrosion control. 2. ed.

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bradford, S.A.

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of this text is to train engineers and technologists not just to understand corrosion but to control it. Materials selection, coatings, chemical inhibitors, cathodic and anodic protection, and equipment design are covered in separate chapters. High-temperature oxidation is discussed in the final two chapters ne on oxidation theory and one on controlling oxidation by alloying and with coatings. This book treats corrosion and high-temperature oxidation separately. Corrosion is divided into three groups: (1) chemical dissolution including uniform attack, (2) electrochemical corrosion from either metallurgical or environmental cells, and (3) stress-assisted corrosion. Corrosion is logically grouped according to mechanisms rather than arbitrarily separated into different types of corrosion as if they were unrelated. For those university students and industry personnel who approach corrosion theory very hesitantly, this text will present the electrochemical reactions responsible for corrosion summed up in only five simple half-cell reactions. When these are combined on a polarization diagram, which is also explained in detail, the electrochemical processes become obvious. For those who want a text stripped bare of electrochemical theory, several noted sections can be omitted without loss of continuity. However, the author has presented the material in such a manner that these sections are not beyond the abilities of any high school graduate who is interested in technology

  6. Computational fluid dynamics analysis for flow accelerated corrosion in CANDU6 feeder pipes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Catana, A.; Pauna, E.; Ioan, M.

    2013-01-01

    CANDU6 plant management over a long time period includes various ageing and degradation mechanisms like FAC manifested mainly at first and second elbow of CANDU6 outlet feeders. FAC take place at all CANDU6 built before 2000 year with feeders made from SA106 grade B low alloy carbon-steel (with chromium at 0.02%). CFD method is used in this paper to investigate the feeder's wall thinning process taking place mainly due local flow conditions in complex 3D geometrical configurations. The 380 outlet feeders grouped in 2.5'' (320) and 2.0'' feeders (60). The objective of this paper is to help, as much as possible, to focus investigation on most probable maximum thinning rate locations through 3D distribution of some TH parameters. Application of CFD methods in CANDU6 nuclear reactors implies the knowledge of real plant operating data like: long term time averaged channel power and mass flow as well as temperature, pressure, pHa etc allowing the optimization and cost reduction of wall thinning monitoring process at CANDU6 nuclear power plants. (authors)

  7. Compaction and flow of cohesive granular media assisted by vibrations: application to filling press molds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mathonnet, Jean-Eric

    2016-01-01

    In the framework of the ASTRID project, the nuclear fuel production process by powder metallurgy, for Fast Neutron Reactors, is revisited in order to be simplified. In particular, we seek to remove the mechanical granulation step of the powder which gives a good flow behavior during the filling of press molds. The aim is to reach a spontaneous and quick powder flow through a hole in which the powder does not flow without external energy. Furthermore, the powder alternates between flow phases during the filling of press molds, and non-flow phases during the compaction and ejection of the pellet. We hence apply horizontal vibrations to ensure the flow of the powder through the press mold. The vibrations help the powder to flow and increase the production rates. However, they have the disadvantage to compact the powder and delay the future flows, during the non-flow phases. The art of filling the press mold assisted by vibrations is to master/control the ambivalent nature of the vibrations. The remarkable packing fraction evolution of actinides powders, during the non-flow phases, allows us to define a simple 1D stochastic model to understand the compaction kinetics. The comparison of the stochastic model with the empirical compaction laws found in the literature helps us to identify the physical meaning of fitting parameters proposed by the empirical models. Furthermore, we have also proposed a new compaction law with two-stretched exponentials. This new law not only reflects the compaction kinetics of actinides powders, but also of all the compaction data we found in the literature. (author) [fr

  8. Proton-conducting beta"-alumina via microwave-assisted synthesis and mechanism of enhanced corrosion prevention of a zinc rich coating with electronic control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirby, Brent William

    Proton Conducting beta-alumina via Microwave Assisted Synthesis. The microwave assisted synthesis of proton conducting Mg- and Li-stabilized NH4+/H3O+ beta-alumina from a solution based gel precursor is reported. beta-alumina is a ceramic fast ion conductor containing two-dimensional sheets of mobile cations. Na +-beta-alumina is the most stable at the sintering temperatures (1740°C) reached in a modified microwave oven, and can be ion exchanged to the K+ form and then to the NH4+/H 3O+ form. beta-phase impurity is found to be 20% for Mg-stabilized material and 30-40% for Li-stabilized material. The composition of the proton conducting form produced here is deficient in NH4 + as compared to the target composition (NH4)1.00 (H3O)0.67Mg0.67Al10.33O 17. Average grain conductivity for Li-stabilized material at 150°C is 6.6x10-3 +/- 1.6x10-3 S/cm with 0.29 +/- 0.05 eV activation energy, in agreement with single crystal studies in the literature. Grain boundary conductivity is found to be higher in the Li-stabilized material. A hydrogen bond energy hypothesis is presented to explain these differences. Li-stabilized NH4+/H3O + beta-alumina is demonstrated as a fuel cell electrolyte, producing 28 muA/cm2 of electrical current at 0.5 V. Mechanism of Enhanced Corrosion Prevention of a Zinc Rich Coating with Electronic Control. A corrosion inhibition system consisting of high weight-loading zinc rich coating applied to steel panels is examined. An electronic control unit (ECU) consisting of a battery and a large capacitor in series with the panel is shown to improve corrosion protection upon immersion in 3% NaCl solution. Weekly solution changes to avoid zinc saturation in solution system were necessary to see well differentiated results. The corrosion product, hydrozincite [Zn5(CO3) 2(OH)6] is observed to deposit within the pores of the coating and on the surface as a barrier layer. Simonkolleite [Zn5(OH) 8Cl2·H2O] is found to form in place of the original zinc particles

  9. Corrosion degradation of materials in nuclear reactors and its control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kain, Vivekanand

    2016-01-01

    As in every industry, nuclear industry also faces the challenge of corrosion degradation due to the exposure of the materials to the working environment. The aggressiveness of the environment is enhanced by the presence of radiation and high temperature and high-pressure environment. Radiation has influence on both the materials (changes in microstructure and microchemistry) and the aqueous environment (radiolysis producing oxidizing conditions). A survey of all the light water reactors in the world showed that stress corrosion cracking (SCC) and flow accelerated corrosion (FAC) account for more than two third of all the corrosion degradation cases. This paper visits these two forms of corrosion in nuclear power plants and illustrates cases from Indian nuclear power plants. Remedial measures against these two forms of corrosion that are possible to be employed and the actual measures employed in Indian nuclear power plants are discussed. Key features of SCC in different types of nuclear power plants are discussed. Main reasons for irradiation assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC) are presented and discussed. The signature patterns of single and dual phase FAC captured from components replaced from Indian nuclear power plants are presented. The development of a correlation between the scallop size and rate of single phase FAC - based on the database developed in Indian nuclear power plants is presented. Based on these two forms of degradation in nuclear reactors, design of materials that would resist these forms of degradation is presented. (author)

  10. FY2016 ILAW Glass Corrosion Testing with the Single-Pass Flow-Through Method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neeway, James J. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Asmussen, Robert M. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Parruzot, Benjamin PG [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Cordova, Elsa [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Williams, Benjamin D. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Leavy, Ian I. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Stephenson, John R. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); McElroy, Erin M. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2017-04-21

    The inventory of immobilized low-activity waste (ILAW) produced at the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) will be disposed of at the near-surface, on-site Integrated Disposal Facility (IDF). When groundwater comes into contact with the waste form, the glass will corrode and radionuclides will be released into the near-field environment. Because the release of the radionuclides is dependent on the dissolution rate of the glass, it is important that the performance assessment (PA) model accounts for the dissolution rate of the glass as a function of various chemical conditions. To accomplish this, an IDF PA model based on Transition State Theory (TST) can be employed. The model is able to account for changes in temperature, exposed surface area, and pH of the contacting solution as well as the effect of silicon concentrations in solution, specifically the activity of orthosilicic acid (H4SiO4), whose concentration is directly linked to the glass dissolution rate. In addition, the IDF PA model accounts for the alkali-ion exchange process as sodium is leached from the glass and into solution. The effect of temperature, pH, H4SiO4 activity, and the rate of ion-exchange can be parameterized and implemented directly into the PA rate law model. The rate law parameters are derived from laboratory tests with the single-pass flow-through (SPFT) method. To date, rate law parameters have been determined for seven ILAW glass compositions, thus additional rate law parameters on a wider range of compositions will supplement the existing body of data for PA maintenance activities. The data provided in this report can be used by ILAW glass scientists to further the understanding of ILAW glass behavior, by IDF PA modelers to use the rate law parameters in PA modeling efforts, and by Department of Energy (DOE) contractors and decision makers as they assess the IDF PA program.

  11. Non-Invasive Mapping of Intraventricular Flow Patterns in Patients Treated with Left Ventricular Assist Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miramontes, Marissa; Rossini, Lorenzo; Braun, Oscar; Brambatti, Michela; Almeida, Shone; Mizeracki, Adam; Martinez-Legazpi, Pablo; Benito, Yolanda; Bermejo, Javier; Kahn, Andrew; Adler, Eric; Del Álamo, Juan C.

    2017-11-01

    In heart failure patients, left ventricular (LV) assist devices (LVADs) decrease mortality and improve quality of life. We hypothesize echo color Doppler velocimetry (echo-CDV), an echocardiographic flow mapping modality, can non-invasively characterize the effect of LVAD support, optimize the device, thereby decreasing the stoke rate present in these patients. We used echo-CDV to image LV flow at baseline LVAD speed and during a ramp test in LVAD patients (Heartmate II, N =10). We tracked diastolic vortices and mapped blood stasis and cumulative shear. Compared to dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) patients without LVADs, the flow had a less prominent diastolic vortex ring, and transited directly from mitral valve to cannula. Residence time and shear were significantly lower compared to healthy controls and DCMs. Aortic regurgitation and a large LV vortex presence or a direct mitral jet towards the cannula affected blood stasis region location and size. Flow patterns, residence time and shear depended on LV geometry, valve function and LVAD speed in a patient specific manner. This new methodology could be used with standard echo, hemodynamics and clinical information to find the flow optimizing LAVD setting minimizing stasis for each patient.

  12. Corrosion of Ferritic-Martensitic steels in high temperature water: A literature Review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernandez, P.; Lapena, J.; Blazquez, F.

    2001-01-01

    Available literature concerning corrosion of high-chromium ferritic/martensitic steel in high temperature water as reviewed. The subjects considered are general corrosion, effect of irradiation on corrosion, environmentally assisted cracking (EAC) including stress corrosion cracking (SCC), corrosion fatigue and irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC). In addition some investigations about radiation induced segregation (RIS). Are shown in order to know the compositional changes at grain boundaries of these alloys and their influence on corrosion properties. (Author)

  13. Laminar mixed convection heat transfer in a vertical circular tube under buoyancy-assisted and opposed flows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohammed, Hussein A.

    2008-01-01

    Laminar mixed convection heat transfer for assisted and opposed air flows in the entrance region of a vertical circular tube with the using of a uniform wall heat flux boundary condition has been experimentally investigated. The experimental setup was designed for determining the effect of flow direction and the effect of tube inclination on the surface temperature, local and average Nusselt numbers with Reynolds number ranged from 400 to 1600 and Grashof number from 2.0 x 10 5 to 6.2 x 10 6 . It was found that the circumferential surface temperature along the dimensionless tube length for opposed flow would be higher than that both of assisted flow and horizontal tube [Mohammed HA, Salman YK. Experimental investigation of combined convection heat transfer for thermally developing flow in a horizontal circular cylinder. Appl Therm Eng 2007;27(8-9):1522-33] due to the stronger free convective currents within the cross-section. The Nusselt number values would be lower for opposed flow than that for assisted flow. It was inferred that the behaviour of Nu x for opposed flow to be strongly dependent on the combination of Re and Gr numbers. Empirical equations expressing the average Nusselt numbers in terms of Grashof and Reynolds numbers were proposed for both assisted and opposed flow cases. The average heat transfer results were compared with previous literature and showed similar trend and satisfactory agreement

  14. Optimized chemical composition, working and heat treatment condition for resistance to irradiation assisted stress corrosion cracking of cold worked 316 and high-chromium austenitic stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yonezawa, Toshio; Iwamura, Toshihiko; Fujimoto, Koji; Ajiki, Kazuhide

    2000-01-01

    The authors have reported that the primary water stress corrosion cracking (PWSCC) in baffle former bolts made of austenitic stainless steels for PWR after long-term operation is caused by irradiation-induced grain boundary segregation. The resistance to PWSCC of simulated austenitic stainless steels whose chemical compositions are simulated to the grain boundary chemical composition of 316 stainless steel after irradiation increased with decrease of the silicon content, increases of the chromium content, and precipitation of M 23 C 6 carbides at the grain boundaries. In order to develop resistance to irradiation assisted stress corrosion cracking in austenitic stainless steels, optimized chemical compositions and heat treatment conditions for 316CW and high-chromium austenitic stainless steels for PWR baffle former bolts were investigated. For 316CW stainless steel, ultra-low-impurities and high-chromium content are beneficial. About 20% cold working before aging and after solution treatment has also been recommended to recover sensitization and make M 23 C 6 carbides coherent with the matrix at the grain boundaries. Heating at 700 to 725degC for 20 to 50 h was selected as a suitable aging procedure. Cold working of 5 to 10% after aging produced the required mechanical properties. The optimized composition of the high-chromium austenitic stainless steel contents 30% chromium, 30% nickel, and ultra-low impurity levels. This composition also reduces the difference between its thermal expansion coefficient and that of 304 stainless steel for baffle plates. Aging at 700 to 725degC for longer than 40 h and cold working of 10 to 15% after aging were selected to meet mechanical property specifications. (author)

  15. Corrosion cracking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goel, V.S.

    1985-01-01

    This book presents the papers given at a conference on alloy corrosion cracking. Topics considered at the conference included the effect of niobium addition on intergranular stress corrosion cracking, corrosion-fatigue cracking in fossil-fueled-boilers, fracture toughness, fracture modes, hydrogen-induced thresholds, electrochemical and hydrogen permeation studies, the effect of seawater on fatigue crack propagation of wells for offshore structures, the corrosion fatigue of carbon steels in seawater, and stress corrosion cracking and the mechanical strength of alloy 600

  16. Embedded Systems and TensorFlow Frameworks as Assistive Technology Solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulfari, Davide; Palla, Alessandro; Fanucci, Luca

    2017-01-01

    In the field of deep learning, this paper presents the design of a wearable computer vision system for visually impaired users. The Assistive Technology solution exploits a powerful single board computer and smart glasses with a camera in order to allow its user to explore the objects within his surrounding environment, while it employs Google TensorFlow machine learning framework in order to real time classify the acquired stills. Therefore the proposed aid can increase the awareness of the explored environment and it interacts with its user by means of audio messages.

  17. Update of the water chemistry effect on the flow-accelerated corrosion rate of carbon steel: influence of hydrazine, boric acid, ammonia, morpholine and ethanolamine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pavageau, E.-M.; De Bouvier, O.; Trevin, S.; Bretelle, J.-L.; Dejoux, L.

    2007-01-01

    The influence of the water chemistry on Flow-Accelerated Corrosion (FAC) affecting carbon steel components has been studied for many years and is relatively well known and taken into account by the models. Nonetheless, experimental studies were conducted in the last few years at EDF on the CIROCO loop in order to check the influence of the water chemistry parameters (hydrazine, boric acid, ammonia, morpholine and ethanolamine) on the FAC rate of carbon steel in one phase flow conditions. The hydrazine impact on the FAC rate was shown to be minor in EDF's chemistry recommendation range, compared to other parameters' effects such as the pH effect. The presence of boric acid in the nominal secondary circuit conditions was negligible. Finally, as expected, the nature of the chemical conditioning (ammonia, morpholine or ethanolamine) did not modify the FAC rate, the influencing chemical variable being the at-temperature pH in one-phase flow conditions. (author)

  18. Microstructure-sensitive flow stress modeling for force prediction in laser assisted milling of Inconel 718

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pan Zhipeng

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Inconel 718 is a typical hard-to-machine material that requires thermally enhanced machining technology such as laser-assisted milling. Based upon finite element analysis, this study simulates the forces in the laser-assisted milling process of Inconel 718 considering the effects of grain growth due to γ' and γ" phases. The γ" phase is unstable and becomes the δ phase, which is likely to precipitate at a temperature over 750 °C. The temperature around the center of spot in the experiments is 850 °C, so the phase transformation and grain growth happen throughout the milling process. In the analysis, this study includes the microstructure evolution while accounting for the effects of dynamic recrystallization and grain growth through the Avrami model. The grain growth reduces the yield stress and flow stress, which improves the machinability. In finite element analysis (FEA, several boundary conditions of temperature varying with time are defined to simulate the movement of laser spot, and the constitutive model is described by Johnson-Cook equation. In experiments, this study collects three sets of cutting forces and finds that the predicted values are in close agreements with measurements especially in feed direction, in which the smallest error is around 5%. In another three simulations, this study also examines the effect of laser preheating on the cutting forces by comparison with a traditional milling process without laser assist. When the laser is off, the forces increase in all cases, which prove the softening effect of laser-assisted milling. In addition, when the axial depth of milling increases, the laser has a more significant influence, especially in axial direction, in which the force with laser is more than 18% smaller than the one without laser. Overall, this study validates the influence of laser-assisted milling on Inconel 718 by predicting the cutting forces in FEA.

  19. Flow Visualization Studies in the Novacor Left Ventricular Assist System CRADA PC91-002, Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borovetz, H.S.; Shaffer, F.; Schaub, R.; Lund, L.; Woodard, J.

    1999-01-01

    This paper discusses a series of experiments to visualize and measure flow fields in the Novacor left ventricular assist system (LVAS). The experiments utilize a multiple exposure, optical imaging technique called fluorescent image tracking velocimetry (FITV) to hack the motion of small, neutrally-buoyant particles in a flowing fluid.

  20. Use of oxygen dosing to prevent flow accelerated corrosion in British Energy's Advanced Gas-Cooled Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quirk, G.P.; Woolsey, I.S.; Rudge, A.

    2010-01-01

    Flow accelerated corrosion (FAC) was recognized as major threat to the carbon steel feed and economizer tubing of the once-through boilers of the UK's Advanced Gas-cooled Reactors (AGRs) following the observation of FAC damage of the boiler inlet orifice assemblies at two plants in 1977, and subsequent review of the likelihood of further damage elsewhere within the boilers of all AGRs. In most cases, replacement of susceptible tubing was not feasible; due to the inaccessibility of the boiler components within the reactor concrete pressure vessel. Preventing further FAC damage within the boilers therefore had to rely largely on changes to the boiler feedwater chemistry. Following extensive research programs carried out in the late 1970s and early 1980s two main feedwater chemistry regimes were adopted to suppress FAC in different AGRs. The four units found to be at greatest risk of FAC damage adopted an oxygen dosed All Volatile Treatment (AVT) regime during commissioning, while four other units retained the original deoxygenated ammonia dosed AVT regime, but with an increased feedwater pH. The deoxygenated ammonia dosed chemistry regime was also adopted in four AGR units subsequently built, which used 1%Cr0.5%Mo feed and economizer tubing in their once-through boilers. The oxygen dosed AVT chemistry regime adopted in four units having helical once-through boilers has proved highly effective in preventing FAC, with no evidence of damage after around 150,000 hours of operation. However, FAC damage was eventually found in some of the other units operating with a deoxygenated feedwater chemistry regime, in spite of having adopted an elevated feedwater pH. These units have now successfully converted to an oxygen dosed AVT feedwater chemistry regime to prevent further FAC damage, with the result that all 14 AGR reactors now operate with variants of the original oxygen dosed feedwater chemistry regime developed during the 1980s. The paper outlines the development of

  1. Experimental Assessment of the Hydraulics of a Miniature Axial-Flow Left Ventricular Assist Device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, P. Alex; Cohn, William; Metcalfe, Ralph

    2017-11-01

    A minimally invasive partial-support left ventricular assist device (LVAD) has been proposed with a flow path from the left atrium to the arterial system to reduce left ventricular stroke work. In LVAD design, peak and average efficiency must be balanced over the operating range to reduce blood trauma. Axial flow pumps have many geometric parameters. Until recently, testing all these parameters was impractical, but modern 3D printing technology enables multi-parameter studies. Following theoretical design, experimental hydraulic evaluation in steady state conditions examines pressure, flow, pressure-flow gradient, efficiency, torque, and axial force as output parameters. Preliminary results suggest that impeller blades and stator vanes with higher inlet angles than recommended by mean line theory (MLT) produce flatter gradients and broader efficiency curves, increasing compatibility with heart physiology. These blades also produce less axial force, which reduces bearing load. However, they require slightly higher torque, which is more demanding of the motor. MLT is a low order, empirical model developed on large pumps. It does not account for the significant viscous losses in small pumps like LVADs. This emphasizes the importance of experimental testing for hydraulic design. Roderick D MacDonald Research Fund.

  2. Carotid Artery Stenting in a Patient With a Continuous-Flow Left Ventricular Assist Device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piazza, Michele; Squizzato, Francesco; Grego, Franco; Bottio, Tommaso; Gerosa, Gino; Antonello, Michele

    2016-08-01

    To demonstrate the safety and feasibility of carotid artery stenting (CAS) in a patient with a continuous-flow left ventricular assist device (LVAD). A 54-year-old woman with a LVAD was referred for a 90% stenosis of the right internal carotid artery (ICA). The patient was offered CAS, and oral anticoagulant was not discontinued in the periprocedural period. Because of absent arterial pulses, percutaneous transfemoral access was obtained under ultrasound guidance. Particular attention was paid to cannulation of the innominate artery; a 7-F guiding catheter was advanced from the descending aorta into the innominate artery under road-mapping, avoiding maneuvers in the ascending aorta where the outflow Dacron graft of the LVAD was anastomosed. To avoid cerebral flow modifications, the Angioguard RX was used as the cerebral protection device rather than other devices such as the flow reversal or flow-clamping systems. At this point, CAS was performed in a standard fashion using the 7×30-mm Precise ProRX stent. The computed tomography angiogram at 6 months showed patency of the stented right ICA. With adequate planning, CAS appears feasible in patients with a LVAD. © The Author(s) 2016.

  3. The effect of ventricular assist devices on cerebral blood flow and blood pressure fractality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bellapart, Judith; Fraser, John F; Chan, Gregory S H; Tzeng, Yu-Chieh; Ainslie, Philip N; Dunster, Kimble R; Barnett, Adrian G; Boots, Rob

    2011-01-01

    Biological signals often exhibit self-similar or fractal scaling characteristics which may reflect intrinsic adaptability to their underlying physiological system. This study analysed fractal dynamics of cerebral blood flow in patients supported with ventricular assist devices (VAD) to ascertain if sustained modifications of blood pressure waveform affect cerebral blood flow fractality. Simultaneous recordings of arterial blood pressure and cerebral blood flow velocity using transcranial Doppler were obtained from five cardiogenic shock patients supported by VAD, five matched control patients and five healthy subjects. Computation of a fractal scaling exponent (α) at the low-frequency time scale by detrended fluctuation analysis showed that cerebral blood flow velocity exhibited 1/f fractal scaling in both patient groups (α = 0.95 ± 0.09 and 0.97 ± 0.12, respectively) as well as in the healthy subjects (α = 0.86 ± 0.07). In contrast, fluctuation in blood pressure was similar to non-fractal white noise in both patient groups (α = 0.53 ± 0.11 and 0.52 ± 0.09, respectively) but exhibited 1/f scaling in the healthy subjects (α = 0.87 ± 0.04, P < 0.05 compared with the patient groups). The preservation of fractality in cerebral blood flow of VAD patients suggests that normal cardiac pulsation and central perfusion pressure changes are not the integral sources of cerebral blood flow fractality and that intrinsic vascular properties such as cerebral autoregulation may be involved. However, there is a clear difference in the fractal scaling properties of arterial blood pressure between the cardiogenic shock patients and the healthy subjects

  4. Continuous-flow cardiac assistance: effects on aortic valve function in a mock loop.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuzun, Egemen; Rutten, Marcel; Dat, Marco; van de Vosse, Frans; Kadipasaoglu, Cihan; de Mol, Bas

    2011-12-01

    As the use of left ventricular assist devices (LVADs) to treat end-stage heart failure has become more widespread, leaflet fusion--with resul-tant aortic regurgitation--has been observed more frequently. To quantitatively assess the effects of nonpulsatile flow on aortic valve function, we tested a continuous-flow LVAD in a mock circulatory system (MCS) with an interposed valve. To mimic the hemodynamic characteristics of LVAD patients, we utilized an MCS in which a Jarvik 2000 LVAD was positioned at the base of a servomotor-operated piston pump (left ventricular chamber). We operated the LVAD at 8000 to 12,000 rpm, changing the speed in 1000-rpm increments. At each speed, we first varied the outflow resistance at a constant stroke volume, then varied the stroke volume at a constant outflow resistance. We measured the left ventricular pressure, aortic pressure, pump flow, and total flow, and used these values to compute the change, if any, in the aortic duty cycle (aortic valve open time) and transvalvular aortic pressure loads. Validation of the MCS was demonstrated by the simulation of physiologic pressure and flow waveforms. At increasing LVAD speeds, the mean aortic pressure load steadily increased, while the aortic duty cycle steadily decreased. Changes were consistent for each MCS experimental setting, despite variations in stroke volume and outflow resistance. Increased LVAD flow results in an impaired aortic valve-open time due to a pressure overload above the aortic valve. Such an overload may initiate structural changes, causing aortic leaflet fusion and/or regurgitation. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Verification of a computational cardiovascular system model comparing the hemodynamics of a continuous flow to a synchronous valveless pulsatile flow left ventricular assist device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gohean, Jeffrey R; George, Mitchell J; Pate, Thomas D; Kurusz, Mark; Longoria, Raul G; Smalling, Richard W

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this investigation is to use a computational model to compare a synchronized valveless pulsatile left ventricular assist device with continuous flow left ventricular assist devices at the same level of device flow, and to verify the model with in vivo porcine data. A dynamic system model of the human cardiovascular system was developed to simulate the support of a healthy or failing native heart from a continuous flow left ventricular assist device or a synchronous pulsatile valveless dual-piston positive displacement pump. These results were compared with measurements made during in vivo porcine experiments. Results from the simulation model and from the in vivo counterpart show that the pulsatile pump provides higher cardiac output, left ventricular unloading, cardiac pulsatility, and aortic valve flow as compared with the continuous flow model at the same level of support. The dynamic system model developed for this investigation can effectively simulate human cardiovascular support by a synchronous pulsatile or continuous flow ventricular assist device.

  6. Corrosion in Electronics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ambat, Rajan; Gudla, Helene Virginie Conseil; Verdingovas, Vadimas

    2017-01-01

    Electronic control units, power modules, and consumer electronics are used today in a wide variety of varying climatic conditions. Varying external climatic conditions of temperature and humidity can cause an uncontrolled local climate inside the device enclosure. Uncontrolled humidity together...... and high density packing combined with the use of several materials, which can undergo electrochemical corrosion in the presence of water film formed due to humidity exposure and bias conditions on the PCBA surface. This article provides a short review of the corrosion reliability issues of electronics due...... to the use of electronics under varying humidity conditions. Important PCBA aspects, which are fundamental to the corrosion cell formation under humid conditions, are discussed. Effect of hygroscopic residues from the process and service and their role in assisting water film build up and corrosion...

  7. Corrosion engineering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fontana, M.G.

    1986-01-01

    This book emphasizes the engineering approach to handling corrosion. It presents corrosion data by corrosives or environments rather than by materials. It discusses the corrosion engineering of noble metals, ''exotic'' metals, non-metallics, coatings, mechanical properties, and corrosion testing, as well as modern concepts. New sections have been added on fracture mechanics, laser alloying, nuclear waste isolation, solar energy, geothermal energy, and the Statue of Liberty. Special isocorrosion charts, developed by the author, are introduced as a quick way to look at candidates for a particular corrosive.

  8. Stress-assisted, microbial-induced corrosion of stainless steel primary piping and other aging issues at the Omega West Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andrade, A.

    1995-01-01

    After the discovery of cooling system leak of about 284 liters per twenty-four (24) hour period, an investigation determined that the 76.2-cm diameter, 33.5-m long stainless-steel (304) OWR delay line was losing water at the same nominal rate. An excavation effort revealed that a circumferential crack, approximately 0.0025 cm in width, extended around the bottom half of the delay line. In addition, other evidence of what appeared to be microcracking and pitting that originated at random nucleated sites around the pipe were also found. Results of destructive analysis and nondestructive testing allowed Los Alamos staff to conclude that the direct cause for the main crack and other pitting resulted from stress-assisted, microbial-induced corrosion of the stainless steel primary piping. The results also indicated that microbial action from bacteria that are normally present in earth can be extremely harmful to stainless- steel piping under certain conditions. Other potential problems that could have also eventually led to a permanent shutdown of the OWR were discussed. These problems, although never encountered nor associated with the current shutdown, were identified in aging studies and are associated with: (1) the water-cooled, bismuth gamma-ray shield and, (2) the aluminum thermal column head seal that prevents reactor vessel water from entering into the graphite-filled thermal column

  9. Pulse Oximeter Derived Blood Pressure Measurement in Patients With a Continuous Flow Left Ventricular Assist Device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hellman, Yaron; Malik, Adnan S; Lane, Kathleen A; Shen, Changyu; Wang, I-Wen; Wozniak, Thomas C; Hashmi, Zubair A; Munson, Sarah D; Pickrell, Jeanette; Caccamo, Marco A; Gradus-Pizlo, Irmina; Hadi, Azam

    2017-05-01

    Currently, blood pressure (BP) measurement is obtained noninvasively in patients with continuous flow left ventricular assist device (LVAD) by placing a Doppler probe over the brachial or radial artery with inflation and deflation of a manual BP cuff. We hypothesized that replacing the Doppler probe with a finger-based pulse oximeter can yield BP measurements similar to the Doppler derived mean arterial pressure (MAP). We conducted a prospective study consisting of patients with contemporary continuous flow LVADs. In a small pilot phase I inpatient study, we compared direct arterial line measurements with an automated blood pressure (ABP) cuff, Doppler and pulse oximeter derived MAP. Our main phase II study included LVAD outpatients with a comparison between Doppler, ABP, and pulse oximeter derived MAP. A total of five phase I and 36 phase II patients were recruited during February-June 2014. In phase I, the average MAP measured by pulse oximeter was closer to arterial line MAP rather than Doppler (P = 0.06) or ABP (P < 0.01). In phase II, pulse oximeter MAP (96.6 mm Hg) was significantly closer to Doppler MAP (96.5 mm Hg) when compared to ABP (82.1 mm Hg) (P = 0.0001). Pulse oximeter derived blood pressure measurement may be as reliable as Doppler in patients with continuous flow LVADs. © 2016 International Center for Artificial Organs and Transplantation and Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Heat Generation in Axial and Centrifugal Flow Left Ventricular Assist Devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yost, Gardner; Joseph, Christine Rachel; Royston, Thomas; Tatooles, Antone; Bhat, Geetha

    Despite increasing use of left ventricular assist devices (LVADs) as a surgical treatment for advanced heart failure in an era of improved outcomes with LVAD support, the mechanical interactions between these pumps and the cardiovascular system are not completely understood. We utilized an in vitro mock circulatory loop to analyze the heat production incurred by operation of an axial flow and centrifugal flow LVAD. A HeartMate II and a HeartWare HVAD were connected to an abbreviated flow loop and were implanted in a viscoelastic gel. Temperature was measured at the surface of each LVAD. Device speed and fluid viscosity were altered and, in the HeartMate II, as artificial thrombi were attached to the inflow stator, impeller, and outflow stator. The surface temperatures of both LVADs increased in all trials and reached a plateau within 80 minutes of flow initiation. Rate of heat generation and maximum system temperature were greater when speed was increased, when viscosity was increased, and when artificial thrombi were attached to the HeartMate II impeller. Normal operation of these two widely utilized LVADs results in appreciable heat generation in vitro. Increased pump loading resulted in more rapid heat generation, which was particularly severe when a large thrombus was attached to the impeller of the HeartMate II. While heat accumulation in vivo is likely minimized by greater dissipation in the blood and soft tissues, focal temperature gains with the pump housing of these two devices during long-term operation may have negative hematological consequences.

  11. Gravity assisted recovery of liquid xenon at large mass flow rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Virone, L.; Acounis, S.; Beaupère, N.; Beney, J.-L.; Bert, J.; Bouvier, S.; Briend, P.; Butterworth, J.; Carlier, T.; Chérel, M.; Crespi, P.; Cussonneau, J.-P.; Diglio, S.; Manzano, L. Gallego; Giovagnoli, D.; Gossiaux, P.-B.; Kraeber-Bodéré, F.; Ray, P. Le; Lefèvre, F.; Marty, P.; Masbou, J.; Morteau, E.; Picard, G.; Roy, D.; Staempflin, M.; Stutzmann, J.-S.; Visvikis, D.; Xing, Y.; Zhu, Y.; Thers, D.

    2018-06-01

    We report on a liquid xenon gravity assisted recovery method for nuclear medical imaging applications. The experimental setup consists of an elevated detector enclosed in a cryostat connected to a storage tank called ReStoX. Both elements are part of XEMIS2 (XEnon Medical Imaging System): an innovative medical imaging facility for pre-clinical research that uses pure liquid xenon as detection medium. Tests based on liquid xenon transfer from the detector to ReStoX have been successfully performed showing that an unprecedented mass flow rate close to 1 ton per hour can be reached. This promising achievement as well as future areas of improvement will be discussed in this paper.

  12. Heat transfer and material flow during laser assisted multi-layer additive manufacturing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manvatkar, V.; De, A.; DebRoy, T.

    2014-01-01

    A three-dimensional, transient, heat transfer, and fluid flow model is developed for the laser assisted multilayer additive manufacturing process with coaxially fed austenitic stainless steel powder. Heat transfer between the laser beam and the powder particles is considered both during their flight between the nozzle and the growth surface and after they deposit on the surface. The geometry of the build layer obtained from independent experiments is compared with that obtained from the model. The spatial variation of melt geometry, cooling rate, and peak temperatures is examined in various layers. The computed cooling rates and solidification parameters are used to estimate the cell spacings and hardness in various layers of the structure. Good agreement is achieved between the computed geometry, cell spacings, and hardness with the corresponding independent experimental results.

  13. Resin Flow in Fiber Preformed by Vacuum Assisted Resin Transfer Molding with Flexible Tools

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.M. Shokrieh

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Vacuum assisted resin transfer molding, as a sub-branch of RTM is a method of manufacturing composite specimens. Considering the industrial development of this method, different modified techniques are designed to improve its performance. Among these techniques, using a half flexible mold is regarded as an important method. In this work, dominant equations of resin flow through the mold in polar coordinates are solved analytically. Based on this approach, closed-form solutions have been presented for different parameters such as thickness variation of preformed fiber, resin pressure, resin velocity and fiber volume fraction as functions of two variables, namely, time and the distance from injection port. After verification of the approach employed in this work, the results are presented. Important parameters influencing the quality and the rate production are studied in detail.

  14. Continuous flow left ventricular assist devices: shared care goals of monitoring and treating patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estep, Jerry D; Trachtenberg, Barry H; Loza, Laurie P; Bruckner, Brian A

    2015-01-01

    Continuous-flow left ventricular assist devices (CF-LVADs) have been clinically adopted as a long-term standard of care therapy option for patients with end-stage heart failure. For many patients, shared care between the care providers at the implanting center and care providers in the community in which the patient resides is a clinical necessity. The aims of this review are to (1) provide a rationale for the outpatient follow-up exam and surveillance testing used at our center to monitor patients supported by the HeartMate II(®) CF-LVAD (Thoratec Corporation, Pleasanton, CA) and (2) provide the protocol/algorithms we use for blood pressure, driveline exit site, LVAD alarm history, surveillance blood work, and echocardiography monitoring in this patient population. In addition, we define our partnership outpatient follow-up protocol and the "shared care" specific responsibilities we use with referring health care providers to best manage many of our patients.

  15. Exploring the potential of laser assisted flow deposition grown ZnO for photovoltaic applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodrigues, J., E-mail: joana.catarina@ua.pt [Departamento de Física & I3N, Universidade de Aveiro, Campus Universitário de Santiago, 3810-193 Aveiro (Portugal); Cerqueira, A.F.R.; Sousa, M.G.; Santos, N.F. [Departamento de Física & I3N, Universidade de Aveiro, Campus Universitário de Santiago, 3810-193 Aveiro (Portugal); Pimentel, A.; Fortunato, E. [CENIMAT/I3N, Departamento de Ciência dos Materiais, Faculdade de Ciências e Tecnologia, Universidade Nova de Lisboa, 2829-516 Caparica (Portugal); Cunha, A.F. da; Monteiro, T.; Costa, F.M. [Departamento de Física & I3N, Universidade de Aveiro, Campus Universitário de Santiago, 3810-193 Aveiro (Portugal)

    2016-07-01

    Zinc oxide (ZnO) is a widely studied wide band gap semiconductor with applications in several fields, namely to enhance solar cells efficiency. Its ability to be grown in a wide variety of nanostructured morphologies, allowing the designing of the surface area architecture constitutes an important advantage over other semiconductors. Laser assisted flow deposition (LAFD) is a recently developed growth method, based on a vapour-solid mechanism, which proved to be a powerful approach in the production of ZnO micro/nanostructures with different morphologies as well as high crystallinity and optical quality. In the present work we report the use of the LAFD technique to grow functional ZnO nanostructures (nanoparticles and tetrapods) working as nano templates to improve the dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs) efficiency. The structural and morphological characterization of the as-grown ZnO crystals were performed by X-ray diffraction and electron microscopy, respectively, and the optical quality was assessed by photoluminescence spectroscopy. DSSCs were produced using a combination of these nanostructures, which were subsequently sensitized with N719 dye. An efficiency of ∼3% was achieved under simulated AM 1.5 illumination conditions for a dye loading time of 1 h. - Highlights: • Laser assisted flow deposition proved to be an efficient technique to produce high quality ZnO. • Active layer formed by an interconnected network of tetrapods and a small amount of nanoparticles. • Efficiency of ∼3% obtained under simulated AM 1.5 illumination conditions.

  16. Study on Gap Flow Field Simulation in Small Hole Machining of Ultrasonic Assisted EDM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yu; Chang, Hao; Zhang, Wenchao; Ma, Fujian; Sha, Zhihua; Zhang, Shengfang

    2017-12-01

    When machining a small hole with high aspect ratio in EDM, it is hard for the flushing liquid entering the bottom gap and the debris could hardly be removed, which results in the accumulation of debris and affects the machining efficiency and machining accuracy. The assisted ultrasonic vibration can improve the removal of debris in the gap. Based on dynamics simulation software Fluent, a 3D model of debris movement in the gap flow field of EDM small hole machining assisted with side flushing and ultrasonic vibration is established in this paper. When depth to ratio is 3, the laws of different amplitudes and frequencies on debris distribution and removal are quantitatively analysed. The research results show that periodic ultrasonic vibration can promote the movement of debris, which is beneficial to the removal of debris in the machining gap. Compared to traditional small hole machining in EDM, the debris in the machining gap is greatly reduced, which ensures the stability of machining process and improves the machining efficiency.

  17. Cardiac transplantation after bridged therapy with continuous flow left ventricular assist devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deo, Salil V; Sung, Kiick; Daly, Richard C; Shah, Ishan K; Altarabsheh, Salah E; Stulak, John M; Joyce, Lyle D; Boilson, Barry A; Kushwaha, Sudhir S; Park, Soon J

    2014-03-01

    Cardiac transplantation is an effective surgical therapy for end-stage heart failure. Patients (pts) may need to be bridged with a continuous flow left ventricular assist device (CF-LVAD) while on the transplant list as logistic factors like organ availability are unknown. Cardiac transplantation post-LVAD can be a surgically challenging procedure and outcome in these pts is perceived to be poorer based on experience with earlier generation pulsatile flow pumps. Data from a single institution comparing these pts with those undergoing direct transplantation in the present era of continuous flow device therapy are limited. Evaluate results of cardiac transplantation in pts bridged with a CF-LVAD (BTx) and compare outcomes with pts undergoing direct transplantation (Tx) in a single institution. From June 2007 till January 2012, 106 pts underwent cardiac transplantation. Among these, 37 (35%) pts (51±11 years; 85% male) were bridged with a CF-LVAD (BTx), while 70 (65%) comprised the Tx group (53±12 years; 72% males). The median duration of LVAD support was 227 (153,327) days. During the period of LVAD support, 10/37 (27%) pts were upgraded to status 1A and all were successfully transplanted. Median hospital stay in the BTx (14 days) was slightly longer than the Tx group (12 days) but not statistically significant (p=0.21). In-hospital mortality in the BTx (5%) and Tx (1%) were comparable (p=0.25). Estimated late survival in the BTx cohort was 94±7, 90±10 and 83±16% at the end of one, two and three years, respectively which was comparable to 97±4%, 93±6% and 89±9% for the Tx group (p=0.50). Cardiac transplantation after LVAD implant can be performed with excellent results. Patients can be supported on the left ventricular assist device even for periods close to a year with good outcome after cardiac transplantation. Copyright © 2013 Australian and New Zealand Society of Cardiac and Thoracic Surgeons (ANZSCTS) and the Cardiac Society of Australia and New Zealand

  18. Flow Visualization of Three-Dimensionality Inside the 12 cc Penn State Pulsatile Pediatric Ventricular Assist Device

    OpenAIRE

    Roszelle, Breigh N.; Deutsch, Steven; Manning, Keefe B.

    2010-01-01

    In order to aid the ongoing concern of limited organ availability for pediatric heart transplants, Penn State has continued development of a pulsatile Pediatric Ventricular Assist Device (PVAD). Initial studies of the PVAD observed an increase in thrombus formation due to differences in flow field physics when compared to adult sized devices, which included a higher degree of three-dimensionality. This unique flow field brings into question the use of 2D planar particle image velocimetry (PIV...

  19. A Technique for Dynamic Corrosion Testing in Supercritical CO2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loewen, Eric P.; Davis, Cliff B.; Shropshire, David E.; Weaver, Kevan

    2004-01-01

    An experimental apparatus for the investigation of the flow-assisted corrosion of potential fuel cladding and structural materials to be used on a fast reactor cooled by supercritical carbon dioxide has been designed. This experimental project is part of a larger research at the Department of Energy being lead by the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) to investigate the suitability of supercritical carbon dioxide for cooling a fast reactor designed to produce low-cost electricity as well as for actinide burning. The INEEL once-through corrosion apparatus consists of two syringe pumps, a pre-heat furnace, a 1.3 meter long heated corrosion test section, and a gas measuring system. The gas flow rates, heat input, and operating pressure can be adjusted so that a controlled coolant flow rate, temperature, and oxygen potential are created within each of six test sections. The corrosion cell will test tubing that is commercially available in the U.S. and specialty coupons to temperatures up to 600 deg. C and a pressure of 20 MPa. The ATHENA computer code was used to estimate the fluid conditions in each of the six test sections during normal operation. (authors)

  20. Measurements of local mass transfer coefficient of Flow Accelerated Corrosion at feeder outlet pipes in CANDU using Plaster of Paris method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hyuk Kwon; Dong Un Seo; Goon-Cherl Park

    2005-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: Flow Accelerated Corrosion (FAC) is a corrosion mechanism that results in wall thinning in piping systems and components. FAC on carbon steels in pure water has occurred in a number of industry and power plant. A pipe wall thinning due to the FAC at nuclear power plant is just reported in confined to carbon steel pipe on the secondary system which does not equip a radioactive component. Recently, at Canadian Deuterium Uranium type reactor, it is reported that the feeder lines suffer the wall thinning on the primary system to equip 380 feeder pipes. Differently from the fast FAC rate of the secondary system on PWR, FAC rate of feeder pipes on CANDU is not more than the 0.2 mm/year. Although the FAC rate of feeder pipe is relatively slow, the narrow thickness margin of 2.6089 mm is endangered sufficiently by only the slow FAC rate. The FAC is governed by the mass transfer coefficient which is determined by the flow field. To well predict the FAC rate, mass transfer coefficient should be well measured or calculated. New measurement method of mass transfer coefficient is developed to obtain the coefficient for the complex shape like feeder pipe. The method evaluated the naphthalene sublimation method to apply it under the water flow. The naphthalene sublimation method can be used to study mass and heat transfer with confidence for a variety of applications, but with certain restrictions. At present, Plaster of paris method can modified the sublimation method to overcome the restrictions. This method is particularly useful in complex flows on geometries and for flows with large gradients in wall transport rate. The test specimen can be easily prepared by several methods, including dipping, machining, spraying, and casting. The local transfer coefficients can be determined with high accuracy and in detail by automated measurement systems that eliminate most human errors during the measurement process. To evaluate the method, the

  1. Beneficial aspects of real time flow measurements for the management of acute right ventricular heart failure following continuous flow ventricular assist device implantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Spiliopoulos Sotirios

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Optimal management of acute right heart failure following the implantation of a left ventricular assist device requires a reliable estimation of left ventricular preload and contractility. This is possible by real-time pump blood flow measurements. Clinical case We performed implantation of a continuous flow left ventricular assist device in a 66 years old female patient with an end-stage heart failure on the grounds of a dilated cardiomyopathy. Real-time pump blood flow was directly measured by an ultrasonic flow probe placed around the outflow graft. Diagnosis The progressive decline of real time flow and the loss of pulsatility were associated with an increase of central venous pressure, inotropic therapy and progressive renal failure suggesting the presence of an acute right heart failure. Diagnosis was validated by echocardiography and thermodilution measurements. Treatment Temporary mechanical circulatory support of the right ventricle was successfully performed. Real time flow measurement proved to be a useful tool for the diagnosis and ultimately for the management of right heart failure including the weaning from extracorporeal membrane oxygenation.

  2. Pulsatile operation of a continuous-flow right ventricular assist device (RVAD) to improve vascular pulsatility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Boon C; Kleinheyer, Matthias; Smith, Peter A; Timms, Daniel; Cohn, William E; Lim, Einly

    2018-01-01

    Despite the widespread acceptance of rotary blood pump (RBP) in clinical use over the past decades, the diminished flow pulsatility generated by a fixed speed RBP has been regarded as a potential factor that may lead to adverse events such as vasculature stiffening and hemorrhagic strokes. In this study, we investigate the feasibility of generating physiological pulse pressure in the pulmonary circulation by modulating the speed of a right ventricular assist device (RVAD) in a mock circulation loop. A rectangular pulse profile with predetermined pulse width has been implemented as the pump speed pattern with two different phase shifts (0% and 50%) with respect to the ventricular contraction. In addition, the performance of the speed modulation strategy has been assessed under different cardiovascular states, including variation in ventricular contractility and pulmonary arterial compliance. Our results indicated that the proposed pulse profile with optimised parameters (Apulse = 10000 rpm and ωmin = 3000 rpm) was able to generate pulmonary arterial pulse pressure within the physiological range (9-15 mmHg) while avoiding undesirable pump backflow under both co- and counter-pulsation modes. As compared to co-pulsation, stroke work was reduced by over 44% under counter-pulsation, suggesting that mechanical workload of the right ventricle can be efficiently mitigated through counter-pulsing the pump speed. Furthermore, our results showed that improved ventricular contractility could potentially lead to higher risk of ventricular suction and pump backflow, while stiffening of the pulmonary artery resulted in increased pulse pressure. In conclusion, the proposed speed modulation strategy produces pulsatile hemodynamics, which is more physiologic than continuous blood flow. The findings also provide valuable insight into the interaction between RVAD speed modulation and the pulmonary circulation under various cardiovascular states.

  3. Fatigue and Corrosion in Metals

    CERN Document Server

    Milella, Pietro Paolo

    2013-01-01

    This textbook, suitable for students, researchers and engineers, gathers the experience of more than 20 years of teaching fracture mechanics, fatigue and corrosion to professional engineers and running experimental tests and verifications to solve practical problems in engineering applications. As such, it is a comprehensive blend of fundamental knowledge and technical tools to address the issues of fatigue and corrosion. The book initiates with a systematic description of fatigue from a phenomenological point of view, since the early signs of submicroscopic damage in few surface grains and continues describing, step by step, how these precursors develop to become mechanically small cracks and, eventually, macrocracks whose growth is governed by fracture mechanics. But fracture mechanics is also introduced to analyze stress corrosion and corrosion assisted fatigue in a rather advanced fashion. The author dedicates a particular attention to corrosion starting with an electrochemical treatment that mechanical e...

  4. ‘Momentum rejuvenation’ underlies the phenomenon of noise-assisted quantum energy flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Ying; Gauger, Erik; Benjamin, Simon C; Caruso, Filippo

    2015-01-01

    An important challenge in quantum science is to fully understand the efficiency of energy flow in networks. Here we present a simple and intuitive explanation for the intriguing observation that optimally efficient networks are not purely quantum, but are assisted by some interaction with a ‘noisy’ classical environment. By considering the system's dynamics in both the site-basis and the momentum-basis, we show that the effect of classical noise is to sustain a broad momentum distribution, countering the depletion of high mobility terms which occurs as energy exits from the network. This picture suggests that the optimal level of classical noise is reciprocally related to the linear dimension of the lattice; our numerical simulations verify this prediction to high accuracy for regular 1D and 2D networks over a range of sizes up to thousands of sites. This insight leads to the discovery that dramatic further improvements in performance occur when a driving field targets noise at the low mobility components. The simulation code which we wrote for this study has been made openly available at figshare 4 . (paper)

  5. Microbiological corrosion of ASTM SA105 carbon steel pipe for industrial fire water usage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chidambaram, S.; Ashok, K.; Karthik, V.; Venkatakrishnan, P. G.

    2018-02-01

    The large number of metallic systems developed for last few decades against both general uniform corrosion and localized corrosion. Among all microbiological induced corrosion (MIC) is attractive, multidisciplinary and complex in nature. Many chemical processing industries utilizes fresh water for fire service to nullify major/minor fire. One such fire water service line pipe attacked by micro-organisms leads to leakage which is industrially important from safety point of view. Also large numbers of leakage reported in similar fire water service of nearby food processing plant, paper & pulp plant, steel plant, electricity board etc…In present investigation one such industrial fire water service line failure analysis of carbon steel line pipe was analyzed to determine the cause of failure. The water sample subjected to various chemical and bacterial analyses. Turbidity, pH, calcium hardness, free chlorine, oxidation reduction potential, fungi, yeasts, sulphide reducing bacteria (SRB) and total bacteria (TB) were measured on water sample analysis. The corrosion rate was measured on steel samples and corrosion coupon measurements were installed in fire water for validating non flow assisted localized corrosion. The sulphide reducing bacteria (SRB) presents in fire water causes a localized micro biological corrosion attack of line pipe.

  6. Corrosion Engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Charles V.

    A description is provided for a Corrosion and Corrosion Control course offered in the Continuing Engineering Education Program at the General Motors Institute (GMI). GMI is a small cooperative engineering school of approximately 2,000 students who alternate between six-week periods of academic study and six weeks of related work experience in…

  7. A Technique for Dynamic Corrosion Testing in Liquid Lead Alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loewen, Eric Paul; Davis, Cliff Bybee; Mac Donald, Philip Elsworth

    2001-04-01

    An experimental apparatus for the investigation of the flow-assisted dissolution and precipitation (corrosion) of potential fuel cladding and structural materials to be used in liquid lead alloy cooled reactors has been designed. This experimental project is part of a larger research effort between Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) and Massachusetts Institute of Technology to investigate the suitability of lead, lead-bismuth, and other lead alloys for cooling fast reactors designed to produce low-cost electricity as well as for actinide burning. The INEEL forced convection corrosion cell consists of a small heated vessel with a shroud and gas flow system. The gas flow rates, heat input, and shroud and vessel dimensions have been adjusted so that a controlled coolant flow rate, temperature, and oxygen potential are created within the downcomer located between the shroud and vessel wall. The ATHENA computer code was used to design the experimental apparatus and estimate the fluid conditions. The corrosion cell will test steel that is commercially available in the U. S. to temperatures above 650oC.

  8. Anti-Corrosion Coating

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-01-01

    SuperSpan RM 8000 is an anti-corrosion coating which effectively counteracts acid degradation, abrasive wear, and cracking in power industry facilities. It was developed by RM Industrial Products Company, Inc. with NERAC assistance. It had previously been necessary to shut down plants to repair or replace corroded duct-work in coal burning utilities. NASA-developed technology was especially useful in areas relating to thermoconductivity of carbon steel and the bonding characteristics of polymers. The product has sold well.

  9. Long-term corrosion studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gdowski, G.

    1998-01-01

    The scope of this activity is to assess the long-term corrosion properties of metallic materials under consideration for fabricating waste package containers. Three classes of metals are to be assessed: corrosion resistant, intermediate corrosion resistant, and corrosion allowance. Corrosion properties to be evaluated are general, pitting and crevice corrosion, stress-corrosion cracking, and galvanic corrosion. The performance of these materials will be investigated under conditions that are considered relevant to the potential emplacement site. Testing in four aqueous solutions, and vapor phases above them, and at two temperatures are planned for this activity. (The environmental conditions, test metals, and matrix are described in detail in Section 3.0.) The purpose and objective of this activity is to obtain the kinetic and mechanistic information on degradation of metallic alloys currently being considered for waste package containers. This information will be used to provide assistance to (1) waste package design (metal barrier selection) (E-20-90 to E-20-92), (2) waste package performance assessment activities (SIP-PA-2), (3) model development (E-20-75 to E-20-89). and (4) repository license application

  10. Acid corrosion inhibitor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, N G

    1964-04-28

    An acid corrosion inhibitor is prepared by a 2-stage vacuum evaporation of effluents obtained from the ammonia columns of the coking oven plant. The effluent, leaving a scrubber in which the phenols are removed at a temperature of 98$C, passes through a quartz filter and flows into a heated chamber in which it is used for preheating a solution circulating through a vacuum unit, maintaining the temperature of the solution at 55$ to 60$C. The effluent enters a large tank in which it is boiled at 55$ to 60$C under 635 to 640 mm Hg pressure. Double evaporation of this solution yields a very effective acid corrosion inhibitor. Its corrosion-preventing effect is 97.9% compared with 90.1% for thiourea and 88.5% for urotropin under identical conditions.

  11. A Performance Assessment of an Airborne Separation Assistance System Using Realistic Complex Traffic Flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Jeremy C.; Bussink, Frank J. L.

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents the results from a study that investigates the performance of a tactical Airborne Separation Assistance System (ASAS) in en route airspace, under varying demand levels, with realistic traffic flows. The ASAS concept studied here allows flight crews of equipped aircraft to perform separation from other air traffic autonomously. This study addresses the tactical aspects of an ASAS using aircraft state data (i.e. position and velocity) to detect and resolve projected conflicts. In addition, use of a conflict prevention system helps ASAS-equipped aircraft avoid maneuvers that may cause new conflicts. ASAS-capable aircraft are equipped with satellite-based navigation and Automatic Dependent Surveillance Broadcast (ADS-B) for transmission and receipt of aircraft state data. In addition to tactical conflict detection and resolution (CD&R), a complete, integrated ASAS is likely to incorporate a strategic CD&R component with a longer look-ahead time, using trajectory intent information. A system-wide traffic flow management (TFM) component, located at the FAA command center helps aircraft to avoid regions of excessive traffic density and complexity. A Traffic Alert and Collision Avoidance System (TCAS), as used today is the system of last resort. This integrated approach avoids sole reliance on the use of the tactical CD&R studied here, but the tactical component remains a critical element of the complete ASAS. The focus of this paper is to determine to what extent the proposed tactical component of ASAS alone can maintain aircraft separation at demand levels up to three times that of current traffic. The study also investigates the effect of mixing ASAS-equipped aircraft with unequipped aircraft (i.e. current day) that do not have the capability to self-separate. Position and velocity data for unequipped aircraft needs to be available to ASASequipped. Most likely, for this future concept, state data would be available from instrument flight rules (IFR

  12. Noninvasive arterial blood pressure waveforms in patients with continuous-flow left ventricular assist devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martina, Jerson R; Westerhof, Berend E; de Jonge, Nicolaas; van Goudoever, Jeroen; Westers, Paul; Chamuleau, Steven; van Dijk, Diederik; Rodermans, Ben F M; de Mol, Bas A J M; Lahpor, Jaap R

    2014-01-01

    Arterial blood pressure and echocardiography may provide useful physiological information regarding cardiac support in patients with continuous-flow left ventricular assist devices (cf-LVADs). We investigated the accuracy and characteristics of noninvasive blood pressure during cf-LVAD support. Noninvasive arterial pressure waveforms were recorded with Nexfin (BMEYE, Amsterdam, The Netherlands). First, these measurements were validated simultaneously with invasive arterial pressures in 29 intensive care unit patients. Next, the association between blood pressure responses and measures derived by echocardiography, including left ventricular end-diastolic dimensions (LVEDDs), left ventricular end-systolic dimensions (LVESDs), and left ventricular shortening fraction (LVSF) were determined during pump speed change procedures in 30 outpatients. Noninvasive arterial blood pressure waveforms by the Nexfin monitor slightly underestimated invasive measures during cf-LVAD support. Differences between noninvasive and invasive measures (mean ± SD) of systolic, diastolic, mean, and pulse pressures were -7.6 ± 5.8, -7.0 ± 5.2, -6.9 ± 5.1, and -0.6 ± 4.5 mm Hg, respectively (all blood pressure responses did not correlate with LVEDD, LVESD, or LVSF, while LVSF correlated weakly with both pulse pressure (r = 0.24; p = 0.005) and (dP(art)/dt)max (r = 0.25; p = 0.004). The dicrotic notch in the pressure waveform was a better predictor of aortic valve opening (area under the curve [AUC] = 0.87) than pulse pressure (AUC = 0.64) and (dP(art)/dt)max (AUC = 0.61). Patients with partial support rather than full support at 9,000 rpm had a significant change in systolic pressure, pulse pressure, and (dP(art)/dt)max during ramp studies, while echocardiographic measures did not change. Blood pressure measurements by Nexfin were reliable and may thereby act as a compliment to the assessment of the cf-LVAD patient.

  13. Use of flow-diverting stents as salvage treatment following failed stent-assisted embolization of intracranial aneurysms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heiferman, Daniel M; Billingsley, Joshua T; Kasliwal, Manish K; Johnson, Andrew K; Keigher, Kiffon M; Frudit, Michel E; Moftakhar, Roham; Lopes, Demetrius K

    2016-07-01

    Flow-diverting stents, including the Pipeline embolization device (PED) and Silk, have been beneficial in the treatment of aneurysms previously unable to be approached via endovascular techniques. Recurrent aneurysms for which stent-assisted embolization has failed are a therapeutic challenge, given the existing intraluminal construct with continued blood flow into the aneurysm. We report our experience using flow-diverting stents in the repair of 25 aneurysms for which stent-assisted embolization had failed. Nineteen (76%) of these aneurysms at the 12-month follow-up showed improved Raymond class occlusion, with 38% being completely occluded, and all aneurysms demonstrated decreased filling. One patient developed a moderate permanent neurologic deficit. Appropriate stent sizing, proximal and distal construct coverage, and preventing flow diverter deployment between the previously deployed stent struts are important considerations to ensure wall apposition and prevention of endoleak. Flow diverters are shown to be a reasonable option for treating previously stented recurrent cerebral aneurysms. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  14. Flow Cytometry-Assisted Cloning of Specific Sequence Motifs from Complex 16S rRNA Gene Libraries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jeppe Lund; Schramm, Andreas; Bernhard, Anne E.

    2004-01-01

    for Systems Biology,3 Seattle, Washington, and Department of Ecological Microbiology, University of Bayreuth, Bayreuth, Germany2 A flow cytometry method was developed for rapid screening and recovery of cloned DNA containing common sequence motifs. This approach, termed fluorescence-activated cell sorting......  FLOW CYTOMETRY-ASSISTED CLONING OF SPECIFIC SEQUENCE MOTIFS FROM COMPLEX 16S RRNA GENE LIBRARIES Jeppe L. Nielsen,1 Andreas Schramm,1,2 Anne E. Bernhard,1 Gerrit J. van den Engh,3 and David A. Stahl1* Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of Washington,1 and Institute......-assisted cloning, was used to recover sequences affiliated with a unique lineage within the Bacteroidetes not abundant in a clone library of environmental 16S rRNA genes.  ...

  15. Early Right Ventricular Assist Device Use in Patients Undergoing Continuous-Flow Left Ventricular Assist Device Implantation: Incidence and Risk Factors From the Interagency Registry for Mechanically Assisted Circulatory Support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiernan, Michael S; Grandin, E Wilson; Brinkley, Marshall; Kapur, Navin K; Pham, Duc Thinh; Ruthazer, Robin; Rame, J Eduardo; Atluri, Pavan; Birati, Edo Y; Oliveira, Guilherme H; Pagani, Francis D; Kirklin, James K; Naftel, David; Kormos, Robert L; Teuteberg, Jeffrey J; DeNofrio, David

    2017-10-01

    To investigate preimplant risk factors associated with early right ventricular assist device (RVAD) use in patients undergoing continuous-flow left ventricular assist device (LVAD) surgery. Patients in the Interagency Registry for Mechanically Assisted Circulatory Support who underwent primary continuous-flow-LVAD surgery were examined for concurrent or subsequent RVAD implantation within 14 days of LVAD. Risk factors for RVAD implantation and the combined end point of RVAD or death within 14 days of LVAD were assessed with stepwise logistic regression. We compared survival between patients with and without RVAD using Kaplan-Meier method and Cox proportional hazards modeling. Of 9976 patients undergoing continuous-flow-LVAD implantation, 386 patients (3.9%) required an RVAD within 14 days of LVAD surgery. Preimplant characteristics associated with RVAD use included interagency registry for mechanically assisted circulatory support patient profiles 1 and 2, the need for preoperative extracorporeal membrane oxygenation or renal replacement therapy, severe preimplant tricuspid regurgitation, history of cardiac surgery, and concomitant procedures other than tricuspid valve repair at the time of LVAD. Hemodynamic determinants included elevated right atrial pressure, reduced pulmonary artery pulse pressure, and reduced stroke volume. The final model demonstrated good performance for both RVAD implant (area under the curve, 0.78) and the combined end point of RVAD or death within 14 days (area under the curve, 0.73). Compared with patients receiving an isolated LVAD, patients requiring RVAD had decreased 1- and 6-month survival: 78.1% versus 95.8% and 63.6% versus 87.9%, respectively ( P The need for RVAD implantation after LVAD is associated with indices of global illness severity, markers of end-organ dysfunction, and profiles of hemodynamic instability. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  16. Flow Accelerated Erosion-Corrosion (FAC) considerations for secondary side piping in the AP1000{sup R} nuclear power plant design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vanderhoff, J. F.; Rao, G. V. [Westinghouse Electric Company LLC, 1000 Westinghouse Drive, Cranberry Township, PA 16066 (United States); Stein, A. [Shaw Power Nuclear, 1000 Technology Center Drive, Stoughton, MA 02072 (United States)

    2012-07-01

    The issue of Flow Accelerated Erosion-Corrosion (FAC) in power plant piping is a known phenomenon that has resulted in material replacements and plant accidents in operating power plants. Therefore, it is important for FAC resistance to be considered in the design of new nuclear power plants. This paper describes the design considerations related to FAC that were used to develop a safe and robust AP1000{sup R} plant secondary side piping design. The primary FAC influencing factors include: - Fluid Temperature - Pipe Geometry/layout - Fluid Chemistry - Fluid Velocity - Pipe Material Composition - Moisture Content (in steam lines) Due to the unknowns related to the relative impact of the influencing factors and the complexities of the interactions between these factors, it is difficult to accurately predict the expected wear rate in a given piping segment in a new plant. This paper provides: - a description of FAC and the factors that influence the FAC degradation rate, - an assessment of the level of FAC resistance of AP1000{sup R} secondary side system piping, - an explanation of options to increase FAC resistance and associated benefits/cost, - discussion of development of a tool for predicting FAC degradation rate in new nuclear power plants. (authors)

  17. The influence of device position on the flow within the Penn State 12 cc pediatric ventricular assist device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schönberger, Markus; Deutsch, Steven; Manning, Keefe B

    2012-01-01

    Ventricular assist devices are a commonly used heart failure therapy for adult patients as bridge-to-transplant or bridge-to-recovery tools. The application of adult ventricular assist devices in pediatric patients has led to increased thrombotic events. Therefore, we have been developing a pediatric ventricular assist device (PVAD), the Penn State 12 cc PVAD. It is designed for patients with a body weight of 5-15 kg and has a stroke volume of 12 cc. Clot formation is the major concern. It is correlated to the coagulability of blood, the blood contacting materials and the fluid dynamics within the system. The intent is for the PVAD to be a long term therapy. Therefore, the system may be oriented in different positions according to the patient's behavior. This study evaluates for the first time the impact of position on the flow patterns within the Penn State 12 cc PVAD, which may help to improve the PVAD design concerning chamber and ports geometries. The fluid dynamics are visualized by particle image velocimetry. The evaluation is based on inlet jet behavior and calculated wall shear rates. Vertical and horizontal model orientations are compared, both with a beat rate of 75, outlet pressures of 90/60 mm Hg and a flow rate of 1.3 l/min. The results show a significant change of the inlet jet behavior and the development of a rotational flow pattern. Vertically, the inlet jet is strong along the wall. It initiates a rotational flow pattern with a wandering axis of rotation. In contrast, the horizontal model orientation results show a weaker inlet jet along the wall with a nearly constant center of rotation location, which can be correlated to a higher risk of thrombotic events. In addition, high speed videography illustrates differences in the diaphragm motion during diastole. Diaphragm opening trajectories measurements determine no significant impact of the density of the blood analog fluids. Hence, the results correlate to human blood.

  18. Some loop experiments in the NRX reactor to study the corrosion of mild steel by flowing water at 90oF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allison, G.M.

    1956-11-01

    This work was undertaken to find the water conditions necessary for minimum corrosion in the mild steel thermal shield recirculating systems in NRX and NRU. This report contains the chemical and corrosion results obtained by operating three mild steel loops in which water at 85-95 o F was recirculated through test sections located in J-rod positions in the NRX reactor. Lowest corrosion rates were found when the water was maintained at pH 10.5 with or without oxygen being present. In both cases the corrosion was general in nature and no pitting occurred. At pH 7 with oxygen present in the water severe pitting took place and the corrosion rate was several times higher than similar conditions without oxygen in the water. Under oxygen-free conditions the corrosion product was Fe 3 O 4 . At pH 7 and with 3-5 ppm of O 2 in the water the corrosion product was a mixture of Fe 3 O 4 and γ-Fe 2 O 3 . At high pH with oxygen present Fe 3 O 4 predominated with some traces of Fe 2 O 3 . The systems tested may he listed in order of increasing corrosiveness: High pH with or without O 2 in the water 2 present and continual purification 2 present and no purification or pH control 2 present. (author)

  19. Corrosion and Protection of Metal in the Seawater Desalination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Xiangyu; Gao, Lili; Cui, Zhendong; Yin, Jianhua

    2018-01-01

    Seawater desalination develops rapid for it can solve water scarcity efficiently. However, corrosion problem in the seawater desalination system is more serious than that in normal water. So, it is important to pay attention to the corrosion and protection of metal in seawater desalination. The corrosion characteristics and corrosion types of metal in the seawater desalination system are introduced in this paper; In addition, corrosion protect methods and main influencing factors are stated, the latest new technologies about anti-corrosion with quantum energy assisted and magnetic inhibitor are presented.

  20. Device of capturing for radioactive corrosion products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohara, Atsushi; Fukushima, Kimichika.

    1984-01-01

    Purpose: To increase the area of contact between the capturing materials for the radioactive corrosion products contained in the coolants and the coolants by producing stirred turbulent flows in the coolant flow channel of LMFBR type reactors. Constitution: Constituent materials for the nuclear fuel elements or the reactor core structures are activated under the neutron irradiation, corroded and transferred into the coolants. While capturing devices made of pure metal nickel are used for the elimination of the corrosion products, since the coolants form laminar flows due to the viscosity thereof near the surface of the capturing materials, the probability that the corrosion products in the coolants flowing through the middle portion of the channel contact the capturing materials is reduced. In this invention, rotating rolls and flow channels in which the balls are rotated are disposed at the upstream of the capturing device to forcively disturb the flow of the liquid sodium, whereby the radioactive corrosion products can effectively be captured. (Kamimura, M.)

  1. Corrosion in airframes

    OpenAIRE

    PETROVIC ZORAN C.

    2016-01-01

    The introductory chapter provides a brief reference to the issue of corrosion and corrosion damage to aircraft structures. Depending on the nature and dimensions of this non uniformity, three different categories of corrosion are defined: uniform, selective and localized corrosion. The following chapters present the forms of corrosion that can occur in three defined categories of corrosion. Conditions that cause certain types of corrosion in various corrosive environments are discussed. Examp...

  2. Corrosion resistance of multilayered magnesium phosphate/magnesium hydroxide film formed on magnesium alloy using steam-curing assisted chemical conversion method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishizaki, Takahiro; Kudo, Ruriko; Omi, Takeshi; Teshima, Katsuya; Sonoda, Tsutomu; Shigematsu, Ichinori; Sakamoto, Michiru

    2012-01-01

    Anticorrosive multilayered films were successfully prepared on magnesium alloy AZ31 by chemical conversion treatment, followed by steam curing treatment. The crystal structures, chemical composition, surface morphologies, chemical bonding states of the film was characterized using X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and field emission scanning electron microscope (FE-SEM) measurements. All the films had thicknesses of ranging from 24 to 32 μm. The film had two layers that were composed of crystalline NH 4 MgPO 4 ·H 2 O, Mg 2 PO 4 OH·3H 2 O, Mg(OH) 2 and amorphous MgO. The outer layers include magnesium, oxygen, and phosphorous, and the inner layers include magnesium and oxygen. The corrosion resistant performances of the multilayered films in 5 wt% NaCl aqueous solution were investigated by electrochemical and gravimetric measurements. The potentiodynamic polarization curves revealed that the corrosion current density (j corr ) of all the film coated magnesium alloys decreased by more than four orders of magnitude as compared to that of the bare magnesium alloy, indicating that all the films had an inhibiting effect of corrosion reaction. Gravimetric measurements showed that the average corrosion rates obtained from the weight loss rates were estimated to be in the ranges of ca. 0.085–0.129 mm/y. American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) standard D 3359-02 cross cut tape test revealed that the adhesion of our anticorrosive multilayered film to the magnesium alloy surface was very good.

  3. Flow visualization of three-dimensionality inside the 12 cc Penn State pulsatile pediatric ventricular assist device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roszelle, Breigh N; Deutsch, Steven; Manning, Keefe B

    2010-02-01

    In order to aid the ongoing concern of limited organ availability for pediatric heart transplants, Penn State has continued development of a pulsatile Pediatric Ventricular Assist Device (PVAD). Initial studies of the PVAD observed an increase in thrombus formation due to differences in flow field physics when compared to adult sized devices, which included a higher degree of three-dimensionality. This unique flow field brings into question the use of 2D planar particle image velocimetry (PIV) as a flow visualization technique, however the small size and high curvature of the PVAD make other tools such as stereoscopic PIV impractical. In order to test the reliability of the 2D results, we perform a pseudo-3D PIV study using planes both parallel and normal to the diaphragm employing a mock circulatory loop containing a viscoelastic fluid that mimics 40% hematocrit blood. We find that while the third component of velocity is extremely helpful to a physical understanding of the flow, particularly of the diastolic jet and the development of a desired rotational pattern, the flow data taken parallel to the diaphragm is sufficient to describe the wall shear rates, a critical aspect to the study of thrombosis and design of such pumps.

  4. The successful implantation of continuous-flow left ventricular assist device as a destination therapy in Korea: echocardiographic assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ga Yeon; Park, Sung-Ji; Kim, Sujin; Choi, Namgyung; Jeong, Dong Seop; Jeon, Eun-Seok; Lee, Young Tak

    2014-01-01

    Left ventricular assist device (LVAD) is a good treatment option for the patients ineligible for cardiac transplantation. Several studies have demonstrated that a ventricular assist device improves the quality of life and prognosis of the patients with end-stage heart failure. A 75-yr-old man debilitated with New York Heart Association (NYHA) functional class III-IV due to severe left ventricular systolic dysfunction received LVAD implantation as a destination therapy. The patient was discharged with improved functional status (NYHA functional class II) after appropriate cardiac rehabilitation and education about how to manage the device and potential emergency situations. This is the first case of successful continuous-flow LVAD implantation as a destination therapy in Korea.

  5. Corrosion inhibition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fisher, A O

    1965-12-29

    An acid corrosion-inhibiting composition consists essentially of a sugar, and an alkali metal salt selected from the group consisting of iodides and bromides. The weight ratio of the sugar to the alkali metal salt is between 2:1 and about 20,000:1. Also, a corrosion- inhibited phosphoric acid composition comprising at least about 20 wt% of phosphoric acid and between about 0.1 wt% and about 10 wt% of molasses, and between about 0.0005 wt% and about 1 wt% of potassium iodide. The weight ratio of molasses to iodide is greater than about 2:1. (11 claims)

  6. Ramp Study Hemodynamics, Functional Capacity, and Outcome in Heart Failure Patients with Continuous-Flow Left Ventricular Assist Devices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jung, Mette H; Gustafsson, Finn; Houston, Brian

    2016-01-01

    Ramp studies-measuring changes in cardiac parameters as a function of serial pump speed changes (revolutions per minute [rpm])-are increasingly used to evaluate function and malfunction of continuous-flow left ventricular assist devices (CF-LVADs). We hypothesized that ramp studies can predict...... patients (HeartMate II, Thoratec Corporation, Pleasanton, CA). Functional status was evaluated in 70% (31/44); average 6 minute walk test (6MWT) was 312 ± 220 min, New York Heart Association (NYHA) I-II/III-IV (70/30%) and activity scores very low-low/moderate-very high (55/45%). Decrease in pulmonary...

  7. Surgical treatment of tricuspid valve insufficiency promotes early reverse remodeling in patients with axial-flow left ventricular assist devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maltais, Simon; Topilsky, Yan; Tchantchaleishvili, Vakhtang; McKellar, Stephen H; Durham, Lucian A; Joyce, Lyle D; Daly, Richard C; Park, Soon J

    2012-06-01

    The HeartMate II (Thoratec Corp, Pleasanton, Calif) continuous-flow left ventricular assist device has emerged as the standard of care for patients with advanced heart failure. The objective of this study was to assess the safety and early effectiveness of concomitant tricuspid valve procedures in patients undergoing implantation of a HeartMate II device. From February 2007 to April 2010, 83 patients underwent HeartMate II left ventricular assist device implantation. Of these, 37 patients had concomitant tricuspid valve procedures (32 repairs, 5 replacements) for severe tricuspid regurgitation. The effects of a tricuspid valve procedure on tricuspid regurgitation and right ventricular remodeling were assessed comparing echocardiographic findings at baseline and 30 days after left ventricular assist device implantation. Overall survival was also compared. Patients undergoing a concomitant tricuspid valve procedure had more tricuspid regurgitation (vena contracta, 5.6 ± 2.1 mm vs 2.9 ± 2.0 mm; P tricuspid regurgitation was worse in patients who underwent left ventricular assist device implantation alone (+18.6%), whereas it improved significantly in patients undergoing a concomitant tricuspid valve procedure (-50.2%) (P = .005). A corresponding significant reduction in right ventricular end-diastolic area (33.6% ± 6.2% vs 30.1% ± 9.7%; P = .03) and a trend toward better right ventricular function (55.5% ± 79.7% vs 35.7% ± 60.5%; P = .28) were noted in patients undergoing a concomitant tricuspid valve procedure. Survival was comparable between the 2 groups. In patients with severe tricuspid regurgitation undergoing left ventricular assist device implantation, a concomitant tricuspid valve procedure effectively reduces tricuspid regurgitation and promotes reverse remodeling of the right ventricle. Copyright © 2012 The American Association for Thoracic Surgery. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Right ventricular failure after implantation of a continuous-flow left ventricular assist device

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cordtz, Johan Joakim; Nilsson, Jens C; Hansen, Peter B

    2014-01-01

    Right ventricular failure (RVF) is a significant complication after implantation of a left ventricular assist device. We aimed to identify haemodynamic changes in the early postoperative phase that predicted subsequent development of RVF in a cohort of HeartMate II (HMII) implanted patients....

  9. The Effect of Impingement Velocity and Angle Variation on the Erosion Corrosion Performance of API 5L-X65 Carbon Steel in a Flow Loop

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ihsan UlHaq Toor

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Erosion corrosion performance of API 5L-X65 carbon steel was investigated at three different impingement velocities (3, 6 & 12 m/s, five different angles (15, 30, 45, 60, & 90°, and with/without solid particles (average particle size of 314 µm. The experiments were conducted in 0.2 M NaCl solution at room temperature for a duration of 24 h and the results showed that the maximum erosion corrosion rate was observed at 45° irrespective of the velocity. The highest erosion corrosion rate at 45° was due to the balance between the shear and normal impact stress at this angle. Ploughing, deep craters, and micro-forging/plastic deformation were found to be the main erosion corrosion mechanisms. The maximum wear scar depth measured using optical profilometery was found to be 51 µm (average at an impingement angle of 45°.

  10. Corrosion potential analysis system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiefer, Karl F.

    1998-03-01

    Many cities in the northeastern U.S. transport electrical power from place to place via underground cables, which utilize voltages from 68 kv to 348 kv. These cables are placed in seamless steel pipe to protect the conductors. These buried pipe-type-cables (PTCs) are carefully designed and constantly pressurized with transformer oil to prevent any possible contamination. A protective coating placed on the outside diameter of the pipe during manufacture protects the steel pipe from the soil environment. Notwithstanding the protection mechanisms available, the pipes remain vulnerable to electrochemical corrosion processes. If undetected, corrosion can cause the pipes to leak transformer oil into the environment. These leaks can assume serious proportions due to the constant pressure on the inside of the pipe. A need exists for a detection system that can dynamically monitor the corrosive potential on the length of the pipe and dynamically adjust cathodic protection to counter local and global changes in the cathodic environment surrounding the pipes. The northeastern United States contains approximately 1000 miles of this pipe. This milage is critical to the transportation and distribution of power. So critical, that each of the pipe runs has a redundant double running parallel to it. Invocon, Inc. proposed and tested a technically unique and cost effective solution to detect critical corrosion potential and to communicate that information to a central data collection and analysis location. Invocon's solution utilizes the steel of the casing pipe as a communication medium. Each data gathering station on the pipe can act as a relay for information gathered elsewhere on the pipe. These stations must have 'smart' network configuration algorithms that constantly test various communication paths and determine the best and most power efficient route through which information should flow. Each network station also performs data acquisition and analysis tasks that ultimately

  11. Corrosion inhibitors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El Ashry, El Sayed H.; El Nemr, Ahmed; Esawy, Sami A.; Ragab, Safaa

    2006-01-01

    The corrosion inhibition efficiencies of some triazole, oxadiazole and thiadiazole derivatives for steel in presence of acidic medium have been studied by using AM1, PM3, MINDO/3 and MNDO semi-empirical SCF molecular orbital methods. Geometric structures, total negative charge on the molecule (TNC), highest occupied molecular energy level (E HOMO ), lowest unoccupied molecular energy level (E LUMO ), core-core repulsion (CCR), dipole moment (μ) and linear solvation energy terms, molecular volume (V i ) and dipolar-polarization (π *), were correlated to corrosion inhibition efficiency. Four equations were proposed to calculate corrosion inhibition efficiency. The agreement with the experimental data was found to be satisfactory; the standard deviations between the calculated and experimental results ranged between ±0.03 and ±4.18. The inhibition efficiency was closely related to orbital energies (E HOMO and E LUMO ) and μ. The correlation between quantum parameters and experimental inhibition efficiency has been validated by single point calculations for the semi-empirical AM1 structures using B3LYP/6-31G** as a higher level of theory. The proposed equations were applied to predict the corrosion inhibition efficiency of some related structures to select molecules of possible activity from a presumable library of compounds

  12. Some loop experiments in the NRX reactor to study the corrosion of mild steel by flowing water at 90{sup o}F

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allison, G. M.

    1956-11-15

    This work was undertaken to find the water conditions necessary for minimum corrosion in the mild steel thermal shield recirculating systems in NRX and NRU. This report contains the chemical and corrosion results obtained by operating three mild steel loops in which water at 85-95{sup o}F was recirculated through test sections located in J-rod positions in the NRX reactor. Lowest corrosion rates were found when the water was maintained at pH 10.5 with or without oxygen being present. In both cases the corrosion was general in nature and no pitting occurred. At pH 7 with oxygen present in the water severe pitting took place and the corrosion rate was several times higher than similar conditions without oxygen in the water. Under oxygen-free conditions the corrosion product was Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}. At pH 7 and with 3-5 ppm of O{sub 2} in the water the corrosion product was a mixture of Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} and {gamma}-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}. At high pH with oxygen present Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} predominated with some traces of Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}. The systems tested may he listed in order of increasing corrosiveness: High pH with or without O{sub 2} in the water < water at pH 7 with no O{sub 2} present and continual purification < water with no O{sub 2} present and no purification or pH control < water at pH 7 with 3-5 ppm of O{sub 2} present. (author)

  13. Study of the action of a phosphonate additive on steel scale deposit and corrosion in the hydrodynamic conditions of a channel flow cell; Etude de l'action d'un additif phosphone sur l'entartrage et sur la corrosion de l'acier dans les conditions hydrodynamiques d'une cellule a canal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia, C.

    2000-10-17

    In cooling systems, an improved control of scale deposit and corrosion processes is a major challenge and an realistic evaluation tool for water treatments is of the utmost economic importance. In this study, a channel flow cell was used to allow in-situ electrochemical measurements in well defined electrolyte tube flowing conditions. An expression of the mass transfer towards the electrode was established where the diffusion-limited current is a function of Re{sup 1/3} in the laminar regime and was verified experimentally using the redox couples Fe[CN]{sub 6}{sup 4-}/ Fe[CN]{sub 6}{sup 3-} and O{sub 2}/OH{sup -}. This hydrodynamically controlled experimental device was developed to investigate scale deposit processes and to evaluate scale inhibitor efficiency using a electrochemical quartz crystal microbalance. Experiments were performed on three different waters, at various flow rates and temperatures. The efficiency of a well known phosphonate (HEDP) was tested at different concentrations and an optimum concentration could be established (0.7 mg dm{sup -3}). The effect of additive injection during the scale formation as well as the influence of flow rate on the inhibiting efficiency were evaluated. The anti-scale additive was shown to be more effective in the turbulent regime. HEDP has shown a strong effect on inhibiting crystal growth and that affected the morphology of CaCO{sub 3} crystals. The HEDP effect on protecting carbon steel against corrosion was also studied in mineral water containing Ca{sup 2+} ions. It was found that anti-corrosion effect of HEDP is enhanced by the presence of calcium in solution and that is due to the formation of an HEDP-Ca{sup 2+} complex, which adsorbs onto the metallic surface and protects it from dissolution. (author)

  14. Underground pipeline corrosion

    CERN Document Server

    Orazem, Mark

    2014-01-01

    Underground pipelines transporting liquid petroleum products and natural gas are critical components of civil infrastructure, making corrosion prevention an essential part of asset-protection strategy. Underground Pipeline Corrosion provides a basic understanding of the problems associated with corrosion detection and mitigation, and of the state of the art in corrosion prevention. The topics covered in part one include: basic principles for corrosion in underground pipelines, AC-induced corrosion of underground pipelines, significance of corrosion in onshore oil and gas pipelines, n

  15. Formation of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/FeAl coatings on a 9Cr-1Mo steel, and corrosion evaluation in flowing Pb-17Li loop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Majumdar, Sanjib, E-mail: sanjib@barc.gov.in [High Temperature Materials Development Section, Materials Processing & Corrosion Engineering Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Trombay, Mumbai (India); Paul, Bhaskar [High Temperature Materials Development Section, Materials Processing & Corrosion Engineering Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Trombay, Mumbai (India); Chakraborty, Poulami [Materials Science Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Trombay, Mumbai (India); Kishor, Jugal; Kain, Vivekanand [High Temperature Materials Development Section, Materials Processing & Corrosion Engineering Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Trombay, Mumbai (India); Dey, Gautam Kumar [Materials Science Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Trombay, Mumbai (India); Materials Group, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Trombay, Mumbai (India)

    2017-04-01

    Iron aluminide coating layers were formed on a ferritic martensitic grade 9Cr-1Mo (P 91) steel using pack aluminizing process. The formation of different aluminide compositions such as orthorhombic-Fe{sub 2}Al{sub 5}, B2-FeAl and A2-Fe(Al) on the pack chemistry and heat treatment conditions have been established. About 4–6 μm thick Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} scale was formed on the FeAl phase by controlled heat treatment. The corrosion tests were conducted using both the FeAl and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/FeAl coated specimens in an electro-magnetic pump driven Pb-17Li Loop at 500 °C for 5000 h maintaining a flow velocity of 1.5 m/s. The detailed characterization studies using scanning electron microscopy, back-scattered electron imaging and energy dispersive spectrometry revealed no deterioration of the coating layers after the corrosion tests. Self-healing oxides were formed at the cracks generated in the aluminide layers during thermal cycling and protected the base alloy (steel) from any kind of elemental dissolution or microstructural degradation. - Highlights: •Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/FeAl coating produced on P91 steel by pack aluminizing and heat treatment. •Corrosion tests of coated steel conducted in flowing Pb-17Li loop at 500 °C for 5000 h. •Coating was protective against molten metal corrosion during prolonged exposure. •Self-healing protective oxides formed in the cracks generated in aluminide layers.

  16. Corrosion/95 conference papers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1995-01-01

    The papers in this conference represent the latest technological advances in corrosion control and prevention. The following subject areas are covered: cathodic protection in natural waters; materials for fossil fuel combustion and conversion systems; modern problems in atmospheric corrosion; innovative ideas for controlling the decaying infrastructure; deposits and their effects on corrosion in industry; volatile high temperature and non aqueous corrosion inhibitors; corrosion of light-weight and precoated metals for automotive application; refining industry corrosion; corrosion in pulp and paper industry; arctic/cold weather corrosion; materials selection for waste incinerators and associated equipment; corrosion measurement technology; environmental cracking of materials; advancing technology in the coating industry; corrosion in gas treating; green inhibition; recent advances in corrosion control of rail equipment; velocity effects and erosion corrosion in oil and gas production; marine corrosion; corrosion of materials in nuclear systems; underground corrosion control; corrosion in potable and industrial water systems in buildings and its impact on environmental compliance; deposit related boiler tube failures; boiler systems monitoring and control; recent developments and experiences in reactive metals; microbiologically influenced corrosion; corrosion and corrosion control for steel reinforced concrete; international symposium on the use of 12 and 13 Cr stainless steels in oil and gas production environments; subsea corrosion /erosion monitoring in production facilities; fiberglass reinforced pipe and tubulars in oilfield service; corrosion control technology in power transmission and distribution; mechanisms and methods of scale and deposit control; closing the loop -- results oriented cooling system monitoring and control; and minimization of aqueous discharge

  17. New corrosion issues in gas sweetening plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Asperger, R.G. (CLI International and Asperger Technologies, Houston, TX (United States))

    Gas treating plants are experiencing corrosion problems which impact on efficiency and safety. While general corrosion is not particularly hazardous in the gas processing industry, local corrosion is very dangerous since it has several different mechanisms, all of which have dangerously high rates, and it occurs at locations which are hard to find and hard to predict. A newly discovered, velocity-dependent type of corrosion is reported. It is related to yet-undefined species which cause excessively high corrosion in areas of turbulence. This accelerated corrosion is not due to erosion or cavitation, but to a diffusion-limited reaction accelerated by turbulence. A full-flow test loop was built to evaluate the corrosiveness of gas plant solutions at their normal temperature and flow rates. Test runs were conducted with Co[sub 2]-loaded amine solutions for periods of 12 days. Carbon steel specimens mounted in the test loop were examined and corrosion rates calculated. Chromium alloys were shown to be attacked by corrodents in the low-velocity part of the loop and very aggressively attacked in the high-velocity part. The tests demonstrate the need for rigorous monitoring of corrosion in areas of higher velocity such as piping elbows and other points of turbulence. 5 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.

  18. Boric Acid Corrosion of Concrete Rebar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang L.

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Borated water leakage through spent fuel pools (SFPs at pressurized water reactors is a concern because it could cause corrosion of reinforcement steel in the concrete structure and compromise the integrity of the structure. Because corrosion rate of carbon steel in concrete in the presence of boric acid is lacking in published literature and available data are equivocal on the effect of boric acid on rebar corrosion, corrosion rate measurements were conducted in this study using several test methods. Rebar corrosion rates were measured in (i borated water flowing in a simulated concrete crack, (ii borated water flowing over a concrete surface, (iii borated water that has reacted with concrete, and (iv 2,400 ppm boric acid solutions with pH adjusted to a range of 6.0 to 7.7. The corrosion rates were measured using coupled multielectrode array sensor (CMAS and linear polarization resistance (LPR probes, both made using carbon steel. The results indicate that rebar corrosion rates are low (~1 μm/yr or lesswhen the solution pH is ~7.1 or higher. Below pH ~7.1, the corrosion rate increases with decreasing pH and can reach ~100 μm/yr in solutions with pH less than ~6.7. The threshold pH for carbon steel corrosion in borated solution is between 6.8 and 7.3.

  19. A physical model of laser-assisted blocking of blood flow: I. Rectangular radiation pulses

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Zheltov, GI

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available as to the investigation of destructive changes in these objects [1–16]. Various models were considered in these studies: a model of skin as a set of plane layers with different optical and physical properties (epider- mis, dermis, blood layer) [1–9], a similar model... conditions of minimal damage to adjacent healthy tissues. The necessity of local block- ing of the blood flow arises, e.g., upon dissection of tis- sues (stanching blood flow), upon treatment of vascular malformations (including those of diabetic origin...

  20. Protecting solar collector systems from corrosion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1978-01-01

    The main cause of the reduced life of a solar heating system is corrosion of the exterior parts and the internal components. This report outlines ways of reducing the cost of solar heating by reducing the corrosion in solar heating systems, and hence increasing the system's service life. Mechanisms for corrosion are discussed: these include galvanic corrosion and crevice corrosion. Means of minimizing corrosion at the design stage are then described. Such methods, when designing the solar collector, involve ensuring proper drainage of exterior water; eliminating situations where moisture, dirt and pollutants may collect; preventing condensation inside the collector; using proper gaskets and sealants at appropriate places; and selecting optimum materials and coatings. Interior corrosion can be minimized at the design stage by choosing a good heat transfer fluid and corrosion inhibitor, in the case of systems where liquids are used; ensuring a low enough flow rate to avoid erosion; designing the system to avoid crevices; and avoiding situations where galvanic corrosion could occur. Other procedures are given for minimizing corrosion in the construction and operation of solar heating systems. 7 figs., 7 tabs.

  1. A Review Corrosion of TI Grade 7 and Other TI Alloys in Nuclear Waste Repository Environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    F. Hua; K. Mon; P. Pasupathi; G. Gordon

    2004-05-11

    Titanium alloy degradation modes are reviewed in relation to their performance in repository environments. General corrosion, localized corrosion, stress corrosion cracking, hydrogen induced cracking, microbially influenced corrosion, and radiation-assisted corrosion of Ti alloys are considered. With respect to the Ti Grade 7 drip shields selected for emplacement in the repository at Yucca Mountain, general corrosion, hydrogen induced cracking, and radiation-assisted corrosion will not lead to failure within the 10,000 year regulatory period; stress corrosion cracking (in the absence of disruptive events) is of no consequence to barrier performance; and localized corrosion and microbially influenced corrosion are not expected to occur. To facilitate the discussion, Ti Grades 2, 5, 7, 9, 11, 12, 16, 17, 18, and 24 are included in this review.

  2. A Review Corrosion of TI Grade 7 and Other TI Alloys in Nuclear Waste Repository Environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hua, F.; Mon, K.; Pasupathi, P.; Gordon, G.

    2004-01-01

    Titanium alloy degradation modes are reviewed in relation to their performance in repository environments. General corrosion, localized corrosion, stress corrosion cracking, hydrogen induced cracking, microbially influenced corrosion, and radiation-assisted corrosion of Ti alloys are considered. With respect to the Ti Grade 7 drip shields selected for emplacement in the repository at Yucca Mountain, general corrosion, hydrogen induced cracking, and radiation-assisted corrosion will not lead to failure within the 10,000 year regulatory period; stress corrosion cracking (in the absence of disruptive events) is of no consequence to barrier performance; and localized corrosion and microbially influenced corrosion are not expected to occur. To facilitate the discussion, Ti Grades 2, 5, 7, 9, 11, 12, 16, 17, 18, and 24 are included in this review

  3. Analysis of thickness measurements on secondary lines in EDF PWRs to evaluate the accuracy of the flow accelerated corrosion monitoring software: BRT-CICERO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Persoz, Matthieu [CAP AMPERE, 1 place Pleyel, 93282 Saint Denis (France); Bouvier, Jean-Baptiste [CNEN, 165-173 av. Pierre Brossolette, 92542 Montrouge Cedex (France); Ardillon, Emmanuel [R and D Division, EDF, 6 quai Watier, 78401 Chatou Cedex (France); Trevin, Stephane [SEPTEN, 12 - 14 av. Dutrievoz, 69628 Villeurbanne Cedex (France)

    2006-09-15

    The surveillance of Flow Accelerated Corrosion (FAC) on secondary pipes is a major concern for every nuclear power plant operator. After the Surry accident in 1986, EDF launched a computer code development program to monitor this degradation phenomenon. A chemical corrosion model has been developed, based on laboratory test results obtained by EDF R and D since the late 70's. This model enables to compute the wall thickness loss of pipes submitted to FAC, with respect to the thermo-hydraulic conditions, the fluid chemistry, the material chromium content, the pipe geometry and the cycles duration. The computer code, called BRT-CICERO(TM), has first been tested on a few plants in the years 1993-1995. Most of the EDF NPPs began to use it afterwards. In 2001, after the discovery of a severe damage on a 4'' x 6'' reducer at Fessenheim unit 2, that was correctly predicted by BRT-CICERO(TM), the EDF corporate level made its use mandatory for each of its 58 Pressurized Water Reactors (PWR). Several years of operation and experience feedback have enabled to carry out different improvements on the BRT-CICERO(TM) software. Since 2003, EDF NPPs are using the 2.2 version. At the beginning of year 2005, the 58 BRT-CICERO(TM) input-databases were gathered and structured in a form such that statistical treatments could be made. A very great number of data were collected from BRT-CICERO(TM) input-databases by a specific modification of a tool integrated into the software. It appears that a statistical approach could allow an effective analysis of these data. The first goal of this study was to give the degree of confidence in the application and this approach appeared effective. The second goal was to prove that a part of the conservatism is due to the FAC kinetics calculation algorithm implemented in BRT-CICERO(TM). The investigation of the relative difference between measured and calculated thicknesses shows that a part of the conservatism should be due

  4. Analysis of thickness measurements on secondary lines in EDF PWRs to evaluate the accuracy of the flow accelerated corrosion monitoring software: BRT-CICERO

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Persoz, Matthieu; Bouvier, Jean-Baptiste; Ardillon, Emmanuel; Trevin, Stephane

    2006-09-01

    The surveillance of Flow Accelerated Corrosion (FAC) on secondary pipes is a major concern for every nuclear power plant operator. After the Surry accident in 1986, EDF launched a computer code development program to monitor this degradation phenomenon. A chemical corrosion model has been developed, based on laboratory test results obtained by EDF R and D since the late 70's. This model enables to compute the wall thickness loss of pipes submitted to FAC, with respect to the thermo-hydraulic conditions, the fluid chemistry, the material chromium content, the pipe geometry and the cycles duration. The computer code, called BRT-CICERO(TM), has first been tested on a few plants in the years 1993-1995. Most of the EDF NPPs began to use it afterwards. In 2001, after the discovery of a severe damage on a 4'' x 6'' reducer at Fessenheim unit 2, that was correctly predicted by BRT-CICERO(TM), the EDF corporate level made its use mandatory for each of its 58 Pressurized Water Reactors (PWR). Several years of operation and experience feedback have enabled to carry out different improvements on the BRT-CICERO(TM) software. Since 2003, EDF NPPs are using the 2.2 version. At the beginning of year 2005, the 58 BRT-CICERO(TM) input-databases were gathered and structured in a form such that statistical treatments could be made. A very great number of data were collected from BRT-CICERO(TM) input-databases by a specific modification of a tool integrated into the software. It appears that a statistical approach could allow an effective analysis of these data. The first goal of this study was to give the degree of confidence in the application and this approach appeared effective. The second goal was to prove that a part of the conservatism is due to the FAC kinetics calculation algorithm implemented in BRT-CICERO(TM). The investigation of the relative difference between measured and calculated thicknesses shows that a part of the conservatism should be due to the FAC kinetics

  5. Farm level optimal water management : assistant for irrigation under deficit (FLOW-AID)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Balendonck, J.; Stanghellini, C.; Hemming, J.; Kempkes, F.L.K.; Tuijl, van B.A.J.

    2008-01-01

    FLOW-AID is an on-going 6th Framework European project (2006-2009) with the objective to contribute to sustainable irrigated agriculture by developing an irrigation management system that can be used for crop production in cases with limited water supply and marginal water quality. The project

  6. Farm level optimal water management: Assistant for irrigation under Defecit (FLOW-AID)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Balendonck, J.; Stanghellini, C.; Hemming, J.; Kempkes, F.L.K.; Tuijl, van B.A.J.

    2009-01-01

    Flow-aid is an on-going 6th Framework European project (2006-2009) with the objective to contribute to sustainable irrigated agriculture by developing an irrigation management system that can be used for crop production in cases with limited water supply and marginal water quality. The project

  7. Peripheral Artery Disease and Continuous Flow Left Ventricle Assist Device: An Engaging Complement Analysis May Help to Guide Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falletta, Calogero; Pasta, Salvatore; Raffa, Giuseppe Maria; Crinò, Francesca; Sciacca, Sergio; Clemenza, Francesco

    2018-02-13

    Use of continuous flow left ventricle assist device (CF-LVAD) in advanced heart failure (HF) patients results in clinically relevant improvements in survival, functional capacity, and quality of life. Peripheral artery disease (PAD) can occur in patients with CF-LVAD due to the high rate of concomitance between risk factors for atherosclerosis and HF. Diagnosis of PAD can be difficult in the specific setting of a patient supported by this kind of device because of the marked alteration in waveform morphology and velocity created by the artificial physiology of an LVAD. We report the case of a 53-year-old man with HF secondary to ischemic cardiomyopathy supported by the HeartWare HVAD as bridge to transplant, who after the implant developed symptoms suggestive of PAD. We describe additional computational flow analysis for the study of PAD-related hemodynamic disturbances induced by a CF-LVAD. Flow simulations enhance the information of clinical image data, and may have an application in clinical investigations of the risk of hemodynamic disturbances induced by LVAD implantation. © 2018 International Center for Artificial Organs and Transplantation and Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Preliminary design of the internal geometry in a minimally invasive left ventricular assist device under pulsatile-flow conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, P Alex; Wang, Yaxin; Metcalfe, Ralph W; Sampaio, Luiz C; Timms, Daniel L; Cohn, William E; Frazier, O H

    2018-03-01

    A minimally invasive, partial-assist, intra-atrial blood pump has been proposed, which would unload the left ventricle with a flow path from the left atrium to the arterial system. Flow modulation is a common strategy for ensuring washout in the pump, but it can increase power consumption because it is typically achieved through motor-speed variation. However, if a pump's performance curve had the proper gradient, flow modulation could be realized passively. To achieve this goal, we propose a pump performance operating curve as an alternative to the more standard operating point. Mean-line theory was employed to generate an initial set of geometries that were then tested on a hydraulic test rig at ~20,000 r/min. Experimental results show that the intra-atrial blood pump performed below the operating region; however, it was determined that smaller hub diameter and longer chord length bring the performance of the intra-atrial blood pump device closer to the operating curve. We found that it is possible to shape the pump performance curve for specifically targeted gradients over the operating region through geometric variations inside the pump.

  9. Continuous-flow ultrasound assisted oxidative desulfurization (UAOD) process: An efficient diesel treatment by injection of the aqueous phase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahimi, Masoud; Shahhosseini, Shahrokh; Movahedirad, Salman

    2017-11-01

    A new continuous-flow ultrasound assisted oxidative desulfurization (UAOD) process was developed in order to decrease energy and aqueous phase consumption. In this process the aqueous phase is injected below the horn tip leading to enhanced mixing of the phases. Diesel fuel as the oil phase with sulfur content of 1550ppmw and an appropriate mixture of hydrogen peroxide and formic acid as the aqueous phase were used. At the first step, the optimized condition for the sulfur removal has been obtained in the batch mode operation. Hence, the effect of more important oxidation parameters; oxidant-to-sulfur molar ratio, acid-to-sulfur molar ratio and sonication time were investigated. Then the optimized conditions were obtained using Response Surface Methodology (RSM) technique. Afterwards, some experiments corresponding to the best batch condition and also with objective of minimizing the residence time and aqueous phase to fuel volume ratio have been conducted in a newly designed double-compartment reactor with injection of the aqueous phase to evaluate the process in a continuous flow operation. In addition, the effect of nozzle diameter has been examined. Significant improvement on the sulfur removal was observed specially in lower sonication time in the case of dispersion method in comparison with the conventional contact between two phases. Ultimately, the flow pattern induced by ultrasonic device, and also injection of the aqueous phase were analyzed quantitatively and qualitatively by capturing the sequential images. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Flow visualization of a monoleaflet and bileaflet mechanical heart valve in a pneumatic ventricular assist device using a PIV system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hwansung; Tatsumi, Eisuke; Taenaka, Yoshiyuki

    2010-01-01

    Our group is developing a new type of pulsatile pneumatic ventricular assist device (PVAD) that uses the Medtronic Hall tilting disc valve (M-H valve). Although tilting disc valves have good washout effect inside the blood pump, they are no longer in common clinical use and may be difficult to obtain in the future. To investigate the stability of the Sorin Bicarbon valve (S-B valve) in our PVAD, we constructed a model pump made of an acrylic resin with the same configuration as our PVAD and attempted to compare the flow visualization upstream and downstream of the outlet position valve between the M-H valve and the S-B valve using a particle image velocimetry (PIV) method. The outlet S-B valve had faster closure than the M-H valve. The maximum flow velocity was greater than with the M-H valve. The maximum Reynolds shear stress (RSS) of the M-H valve reached 150 N/m(2) and that of the S-B valve reached 300 N/m(2) upstream during the end-systolic and early-diastolic phases. In both valves, the maximum RSS upstream of the valve was higher than downstream of the valve because of the regurgitation flow during valve closure. In addition, the maximum viscous shear stress reached above 2 N/m(2), which occupied only about 1%-1.5% of the maximum RSS.

  11. Aircraft Corrosion

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-08-01

    attribud au choix de traitements et de rev~tements spproprids. Au contrairo, dens d’sutros structures des corrosions iirportsntea se sont msnifestdes...au traitement . micaniqus qui provoque une compression de surface - h1l’spplication i1’une double protection comportant oxydation snodique et...chlore mais dans une proportion semblable b cells d’une eau de vil)e ; - lea solides, d’aprbs lea analyses chimique et criatallographique, paraissaiont

  12. Corrosion behaviour of non-ferrous metals in sea water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Birn, Jerzy; Skalski, Igor [Ship Design and Research Centre, Al. Rzeczypospolitej 8, 80-369 Gdansk (Poland)

    2004-07-01

    The most typical kinds of corrosion of brasses are selective corrosion (dezincification) and stress corrosion. Prevention against these kinds of corrosion lies in application of arsenic alloy addition and appropriate heat treatment removing internal stresses as well as in maintaining the arsenic and phosphorus contents on a proper level. The most typical corrosion of cupronickels is the local corrosion. Selective corrosion occurs less often and corrosion cracking caused by stress corrosion in sea water does not usually occur. Crevice corrosion is found especially in places of an heterogeneous oxidation of the surface under inorganic deposits or under bio-film. Common corrosive phenomena for brasses and cupronickels are the effects caused by sea water flow and most often the impingement attack. Alloy additions improve resistance to the action of intensive sea water flow but situation in this field requires further improvement, especially if the cheaper kinds of alloys are concerned. Contaminants of sea water such as ammonia and hydrogen sulphide are also the cause of common corrosion processes for all copper alloys. Corrosion of copper alloys may be caused also by sulphate reducing bacteria (SRB). Galvanic corrosion caused by a contact with titanium alloys e.g. in plate heat exchangers may cause corrosion of both kinds copper alloys. Bronzes belong to copper alloys of the highest corrosion resistance. Failures that sometimes occur are caused most often by the cavitation erosion, by an incorrect chemical composition of alloys or at last by their inadequate structure. The main problems of aluminium alloys service in sea water are following phenomena: local corrosion (pitting and crevice corrosion), galvanic corrosion, exfoliation and corrosion in the presence of OH- ions. The cause of local corrosion are caused by presence of passive film on the alloy's surface and presence of chlorides in sea water which are able to damage the passive film. Galvanic corrosion is

  13. High-flow nasal cannula: transient fashion or new method of non-invasive ventilatory assistance?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosca, F; Colnaghi, M; Agosti, M; Fumagalli, M

    2012-10-01

    Respiratory failure in the premature infants remains a difficult challenge. An alternative to the use of nasal continuous positive airway pressure (NCPAP) as a non-invasive modality to support respiratory distress in premature infants has been the recent introduction of high flow nasal cannula (HFNC) devices in many neonatal units. There has been increased use of HFNC presumably because of anecdotal reports and experience that it is easy to use, and well tolerated by the infants, while experiencing decreased nasal septumerosion. The paucity of evidence regarding its efficacy and safety, would support a caution approach to the use of HFNC. Particular concern has focused on the imprecise regulation and generation of pressure that may occur at higher flows especially in the smallest of infants.

  14. Gold film-catalysed benzannulation by Microwave-Assisted, Continuous Flow Organic Synthesis (MACOS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gjergji Shore

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Methodology has been developed for laying down a thin gold-on-silver film on the inner surface of glass capillaries for the purpose of catalysing benzannulation reactions. The cycloaddition precursors are flowed through these capillaries while the metal film is being heated to high temperatures using microwave irradiation. The transformation can be optimized rapidly, tolerates a wide number of functional groups, is highly regioselective, and proceeds in good to excellent conversion.

  15. Machine assisted reaction optimization: A self-optimizing reactor system for continuous-flow photochemical reactions

    KAUST Repository

    Poscharny, K.; Fabry, D.C.; Heddrich, S.; Sugiono, E.; Liauw, M.A.; Rueping, Magnus

    2018-01-01

    A methodology for the synthesis of oxetanes from benzophenone and furan derivatives is presented. UV-light irradiation in batch and flow systems allowed the [2 + 2] cycloaddition reaction to proceed and a broad range of oxetanes could be synthesized in manual and automated fashion. The identification of high-yielding reaction parameters was achieved through a new self-optimizing photoreactor system.

  16. Machine assisted reaction optimization: A self-optimizing reactor system for continuous-flow photochemical reactions

    KAUST Repository

    Poscharny, K.

    2018-04-07

    A methodology for the synthesis of oxetanes from benzophenone and furan derivatives is presented. UV-light irradiation in batch and flow systems allowed the [2 + 2] cycloaddition reaction to proceed and a broad range of oxetanes could be synthesized in manual and automated fashion. The identification of high-yielding reaction parameters was achieved through a new self-optimizing photoreactor system.

  17. On-Chip Enucleation of Bovine Oocytes using Microrobot-Assisted Flow-Speed Control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akihiko Ichikawa

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we developed a microfluidic chip with a magnetically driven microrobot for oocyte enucleation. A microfluidic system was specially designed for enucleation, and the microrobot actively controls the local flow-speed distribution in the microfluidic chip. The microrobot can adjust fluid resistances in a channel and can open or close the channel to control the flow distribution. Analytical modeling was conducted to control the fluid speed distribution using the microrobot, and the model was experimentally validated. The novelties of the developed microfluidic system are as follows: (1 the cutting speed improved significantly owing to the local fluid flow control; (2 the cutting volume of the oocyte can be adjusted so that the oocyte undergoes less damage; and (3 the nucleus can be removed properly using the combination of a microrobot and hydrodynamic forces. Using this device, we achieved a minimally invasive enucleation process. The average enucleation time was 2.5 s and the average removal volume ratio was 20%. The proposed new system has the advantages of better operation speed, greater cutting precision, and potential for repeatable enucleation.

  18. Using X-Ray portable fluorescence for alloy contents measurement of steel pipe and optimization of Flow Accelerated Corrosion kinetic calculation with BRT-CICEROTM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trevin, Stephane; Moutrille, Marie-Pierre; Qiu, Gonghao; Miller, Cecile; Mellin, Nicolas

    2012-09-01

    EDF has developed during these 15 last years a software called BRT-CICERO TM for the surveillance of the secondary piping system of its Pressurized Water Reactors (PWRs). This software enables the operator to calculate the FAC wear rates taking into account all the influencing parameters such as: pipe isometrics, chromium content of the steel, chemical conditioning and operating parameters of the secondary circuit (temperature, pressure, etc.). This is a major tool for the operators to organize the maintenance and to plan the inspections. In the framework of the French pressure vessel law issued on March 15, 2000, the software BRT-CICERO TM has been recognized by the French authority for the FAC surveillance on the secondary pressure piping lines of the EDF 58 NPPs. It takes advantage of the experience feedback of EDF's fleet, of the R and D improvements (especially from the laboratory tests conducted on EDF's CIROCO loop) and is frequently updated. Kinetics calculations made with BRT-CICERO TM are highly dependent of chromium, copper and molybdenum contents of steel. These values are measured on site by X-ray portable fluorescence. EDF elaborated a measurement procedure with a validation process and verification of the measurement devices using certified blocks standard. This procedure enables EDF and service provider companies to measure more than 6 thousand components per year. These values are input in BRT-CICERO TM and the flow accelerated corrosion kinetic is calculated with a higher accuracy than before alloy contents measurement. The next version of BRT-CICERO will take into account chromium, copper and molybdenum contents. The actual version is using only chromium contents. This paper describes the X-Ray fluorescence and the procedure used at EDF. The advantage and drawbacks of this technique are discussed. According to research and development studies, the future algorithm for FAC calculation with these 3 alloys contents is described. Because of

  19. Corrosion of beryllium oxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elston, J.; Caillat, R.

    1958-01-01

    Data are reported on the volatilization rate of beryllium oxide in moist air depending on temperature and water vapour concentration. They are concerned with powder samples or sintered shapes of various densities. For sintered samples, the volatilization rate is very low under the following conditions: - temperature: 1300 deg. C, - water vapour concentration in moist air: 25 g/m 3 , - flow rate: 12 I/hour corresponding to a speed of 40 m/hour on the surface of the sample. For calcinated powders (1300 deg. C), grain growth has been observed under a stream of moist air at 1100 deg. C. For instance, grain size changes from 0,5 to at least 2 microns after 500 hours of exposure at this temperature. Furthermore, results data are reported on corrosion of sintered beryllium oxide in pressurized water. At 250 deg. C, under a pressure of 40 kg/cm 2 water is very slightly corrosive; however, internal strains are revealed. Finally, some features on the corrosion in liquid sodium are exposed. (author) [fr

  20. Corrosion Testing Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Corrosion Testing Facility is part of the Army Corrosion Office (ACO). It is a fully functional atmospheric exposure site, called the Corrosion Instrumented Test...

  1. Corrosion of High Chromium Ferritic/Martensitic Steels in High Temperature Water. a Literature Review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fernandez, P.; Lapena, J.; Blazquez, F. [Ciemat, Madrid (Spain)

    2000-07-01

    Available literature concerning corrosion of high-chromium ferritic/martensitic steels in high temperature water has been reviewed. The subjects considered are general corrosion, effect of irradiation on corrosion, stress corrosion cracking (SCC) and irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC). In addition some investigations about radiation induced segregation (RIS) are shown in order to know the compositional changes at grain boundaries of these alloys and their influence on corrosion properties. The data on general corrosion indicate moderate corrosion rates in high temperature water up to 350 degree centigree. Considerably larger corrosion rates were observed under neutron irradiation. The works concerning to the behaviour of these alloys to stress corrosion cracking seem to conclude that in these materials is necessary to optimize the temper temperature and to carry out the post-weld heat treatments properly in order to avoid stress corrosion cracking. (Author) 40 refs.

  2. Corrosion of High Chromium Ferritic/Martensitic Steels in High Temperature Water. a Literature Review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernandez, P.; Lapena, J.; Blazquez, F.

    2000-01-01

    Available literature concerning corrosion of high-chromium ferritic/martensitic steels in high temperature water has been reviewed. The subjects considered are general corrosion, effect of irradiation on corrosion, stress corrosion cracking (SCC) and irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC). In addition some investigations about radiation induced segregation (RIS) are shown in order to know the compositional changes at grain boundaries of these alloys and their influence on corrosion properties. The data on general corrosion indicate moderate corrosion rates in high temperature water up to 350 degree centigrade. Considerably larger corrosion rates were observed under neutron irradiation. The works concerning to the behaviour of these alloys to stress corrosion cracking seem to conclude that in these materials is necessary to optimize the temper temperature and to carry out the post-weld heat treatments properly in order to avoid stress corrosion cracking. (Author) 40 refs

  3. Microbiologically Influenced Corrosion

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-11-05

    high in water content, are less corrosive owing to their elevated viscosity and resulting low conductivity (᝺-7 S/cm) [30]. Asphaltenes and resins...wet surface to a water-wet surface. Sludge deposits are combinations of hydrocarbons, sand, clay , corTosion prod- ucts, and biomass that can reach 50...fine clay sun·ounded by a film of water. Under low flow conditions, these particles precipitate and form a sludge deposit. 27.4 TESTING 27 .4.1 A

  4. Start-up assist by magnetized plasma flow injection in TPE-RX reversed-field pinch

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Asai, T. [College of Science and Technology, Nihon University, 1-8 Kanda-Surugadai, Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo 101-8308 (Japan)]. E-mail: asai@phys.cst.nihon-u.ac.jp; Nagata, M. [Graduate School of Engineering, University of Hyogo, Himeji (Japan); Koguchi, H. [National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), Tsukuba (Japan); Hirano, Y. [National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), Tsukuba (Japan); Sakakita, H. [National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), Tsukuba (Japan); Yambe, K. [National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), Tsukuba (Japan); Kiyama, S. [National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), Tsukuba (Japan)

    2006-11-15

    A reversed-field pinch (RFP) start-up assisted by a magnetized plasma flow injection was demonstrated for the first time on a TPE-RX machine. This sequence of experiments aimed to establish a new method of ionization, gas-fill and helicity injection in the start-up phase of an RFP. In this start-up method, magnetized and well-ionized plasma is formed by a magnetized coaxial plasma gun and injected into the torus chamber as an initial pre-ionized plasma for RFP formation. In the initial experiments, attenuated density pump-out and comparatively slow decay of the toroidal flux and plasma current were observed as evidence of its being an effective start-up method.

  5. Discontinuation of antithrombotic therapy for a year or more in patients with continuous-flow left ventricular assist devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Naveen L; Chen, Dong; Kushwaha, Sudhir S; Park, Soon J

    2010-10-01

    The recommended anticoagulation regimen during continuous-flow axial left ventricular assist device (LVAD) support is aspirin and warfarin with a targeted international normalized ratio of 2.0-3.0. We report two patients in whom recurrent gastrointestinal bleeding during LVAD support necessitated discontinuation of this anti-thrombotic regimen for a year or more. Despite this, neither patients developed thrombotic complications during 29 patient-months of follow-up. An acquired von Willebrand factor (VWF) abnormality reflected by the absence or decreased abundance of the highest molecular weight multimers was demonstrated in both patients. The gold standard test for platelet function, light transmission platelet aggregometry was measured in one patient and was normal, indicative that the predominant abnormality in the coagulation profile of these patients is an acquired VWF syndrome. Clinical trials are required to address the question whether it is safe to discontinue anticoagulation in LVAD patients with acquired VWF abnormalities.

  6. Neurohormonal activation and exercise tolerance in patients supported with a continuous-flow left ventricular assist device

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jung, Mette Holme; Goetze, Jens Peter; Boesgaard, Soeren

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Neurohormones play a key role in regulating hemodynamics in heart failure (HF) both at rest and during exercise. In contrast, little is known about the importance of neurohormonal regulation for exercise capacity in continuous-flow left ventricular assist device (CF-LVAD) patients....... The aim of this study was to assess the relation between neurohormonal activation patterns in CF-LVAD patients and exercise capacity. METHODS: Plasma concentrations of the C-terminal portion of pro-arginine vasopressin precursor (copeptin), pro-adrenomedullin (proADM), pro-B-type (proBNP) and pro......-atrial (proANP) natriuretic peptides were measured in 25 CF-LVAD patients (HeartMate II) in the morning prior to maximal cardiopulmonary exercise testing determining peak oxygen uptake (peak VO2). Quality of life (QOL) was determined by questionnaires. RESULTS: Peak VO2 was severely reduced averaging 13...

  7. Acetazolamide assisted Tc-99m MAG3 renography to assess renal blood flow reserve

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horita, Yoshio; Hayashida, Kohei; Fukuchi, Kazuki

    2003-01-01

    The present study examines whether or not baseline and acetazolamide (ACZ) Tc-99m MAG3 renography can assess renal blood flow reserve. Renography proceeded for 50 min after sequential injections of 370 MBq Tc-99m MAG3 for baseline renography and 10 min after a 1,000 mg injection of ACZ for ACZ renography. Effective renal plasma flow of renal cortex (cERPF) in each kidney and the percentage change in cERPF of those parameters (ΔERPF) were obtained before and after the administration of ACZ in 10 subjects without hypertension or diabetes (normal group), in 10 with essential hypertension (hypertensive group) and in 10 who had Type 2 diabetes with hypertension (diabetic group). A placebo test was performed in the 10 without hypertension or diabetes using distilled water instead of ACZ (placebo group). The placebo test performed in the 10 without hypertension or diabetes using distilled water instead of ACZ indicated that the parameter variance between the two types of renogram was below 3.2%. The cERPF of baseline and ACZ Tc-99m MAG3 renography and ΔERPF in the normal, hypertensive and diabetic groups were 89±10 and 110±10 ml/min, 89±14 and 117±22 ml/min, 100±23 and 112±23 ml/min, respectively, and 24.5±13.5%, 26.0±9.7% and 12.3±11.1%, respectively. The difference in the cERPF value was significant in the normal and hypertensive groups whereas this did not change in the diabetic group before or after ACZ administration. We suggested that the ΔERPF determined by baseline and ACZ Tc-99m MAG3 renography is a useful parameter for assessing renal blood flow reserve. (author)

  8. Physical Model of Laser-Assisted Blocking of Blood Flow: II. Pulse Modulation of Radiation

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Zheltov, GI

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available and Spectroscopy, 2007, Vol. 102, No. 3, pp. 475–477. © Pleiades Publishing, Ltd., 2007. Original Russian Text © G.I. Zheltov, L.G. Astafyeva, A. Karsten, 2007, published in Optika i Spektroskopiya, 2007, Vol. 102, No. 3, pp. 524–526. 475 INTRODUCTION... This study is a continuation of our preceding inves- tigation [1], where we considered the mechanism of blocking blood flow under laser irradiation and assumed that the experimentally observed contraction of blood vessels [2] is a consequence...

  9. Enhanced adsorption of ionizable antibiotics on activated carbon fiber under electrochemical assistance in continuous-flow modes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Sitan; Li, Xiaona; Zhao, Huimin; Quan, Xie; Chen, Shuo; Yu, Hongtao

    2018-05-01

    Ionizable antibiotics have attracted serious concerns because of their variable dissociation forms and thereby rendering unique toxicity and microorganism resistance. Developing an efficient and environmentally friendly method for removing these micropollutants from environmental media remains very challenging. Here, electro-assisted adsorption onto activated carbon fiber in continuous-flow mode was used to remove three ionizable antibiotics, sulfadimethoxine (SDM), ciprofloxacin (CIP), and clarithromycin (CLA), from water. Benefiting from strengthened electrostatic interactions, the adsorption capacities for the target antibiotics (10 mg/L) in flow mode (70.9-202.2 mg/g) increased by ∼5 times under a potential of 1.0 V (SDM) or -1.0 V (CIP and CLA) relative to those of open circuit (OC) adsorption. Meanwhile, effluent concentration decreased from >100 μg/L to 9.6 μg/L with removal efficiency increasing from 99.0% to 99.9%. Moreover, high recovery efficiency of ACF up to 96.35 ± 0.65% was achieved by imposing a reverse potential (-1.0 V) relative to that used for SDM adsorption. In addition, trace levels of antibiotics (364-580 ng/L) in surface water could be removed effectively to achieve low effluent concentration (0.4-1.2 ng/L) and high removal efficiency (99.9%) upon treating up to ∼1560 bed volumes (BVs), demonstrating the potential of electro-assisted adsorption for practical application in water treatment. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Risk Stratification of Patients With Current Generation Continuous-Flow Left Ventricular Assist Devices Being Bridged to Heart Transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guha, Ashrith; Nguyen, Duc; Cruz-Solbes, Ana S; Amione-Guerra, Javier; Schutt, Robert C; Bhimaraj, Arvind; Trachtenberg, Barry H; Park, Myung H; Graviss, Edward A; Gaber, Osama; Suarez, Erik; Montane, Eva; Torre-Amione, Guillermo; Estep, Jerry D

    Patients bridged to transplant (BTT) with continuous-flow left ventricular assist devices (CF-LVADs) have increased in the past decade. Decision support tools for these patients are limited. We developed a risk score to estimate prognosis and guide decision-making. We included heart transplant recipients bridged with CF-LVADs from the United Network for Organ Sharing (UNOS) database and divided them into development (2,522 patients) and validation cohorts (1,681 patients). Univariate and multivariate Cox proportional hazards models were performed. Variables that independently predicted outcomes (age, African American race, recipient body mass index [BMI], intravenous [IV] antibiotic use, pretransplant dialysis, and total bilirubin) were assigned weight using linear transformation, and risk scores were derived. Patients were grouped by predicted posttransplant mortality: low risk (≤ 38 points), medium risk (38-41 points), and high risk (≥ 42 points). We performed Cox proportional hazards analysis on wait-listed CF-LVAD patients who were not transplanted. Score significantly discriminated survival among the groups in the development cohort (6.7, 12.9, 20.7; p = 0.001), validation cohort (6.4, 10.1, 13.6; p assist device (LVAD) BTT risk score that effectively identifies CF-LVAD patients who are at higher risk for worse outcomes after heart transplant. This score may help physicians weigh the risks of transplantation in patients with CF-LVAD.

  11. Effect of water chemistry on corrosion of stainless steel and deposition of corrosion products in high temperature pressurised water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morrison, Jonathan; Cooper, Christopher; Ponton, Clive; Connolly, Brian; Banks, Andrew

    2012-09-01

    temperatures between 200 and 300 deg. C. Finally, it has been recognised that there is an electrokinetic component to the deposition occurring within flow restrictions, but very few investigations have been performed to study the electrokinetic behaviour at a geometric flow restriction. Work that has been previously attempted has focused on electrokinetics of crud deposition in the secondary side water chemistry. This electrokinetic behaviour, manifested as a streaming current, is believed to be influential in the electrochemical reactions occurring at flow restrictions resulting in the formation of the observed crud deposits. As part of this programme a high velocity (up to 30 ms -1 ) flow rate loop operating at high temperature (up to 315 deg. C) and pressure (up to 150 bar) has been constructed to study the deposition of material at a flow restriction of known geometry under simulated primary side water chemistry, temperature and pressure conditions. Furthermore, to assist in the understanding of measured streaming currents present as a function of desired geometries, preliminary experiments utilising a second 'cold' loop will be performed, where water of up to 373 K will be flowed at high velocity through an instrumented sample section. (authors)

  12. Corrosion technology. V. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, I.H.

    1989-01-01

    This book has been produced for dissemination of information on corrosion technology, corrosion hazards and its control. Chapter one of this book presents an overall view of the subject and chapter 2-5 deals with electrochemical basics, types of corrosion, pourbaix diagrams and form of corrosion. The author explains polarization/kinetics of corrosion, passivity, aqueous corrosion and corrosion testing and monitoring in 6-11 chapters. The author hopes it will provide incentive to all those interested in the corrosion technology. (A.B.)

  13. Corrosion/94 conference papers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1994-01-01

    The approximately 500 papers from this conference are divided into the following sections: Rail transit systems--stray current corrosion problems and control; Total quality in the coatings industry; Deterioration mechanisms of alloys at high temperatures--prevention and remediation; Research needs and new developments in oxygen scavengers; Computers in corrosion control--knowledge based system; Corrosion and corrosivity sensors; Corrosion and corrosion control of steel reinforced concrete structures; Microbiologically influenced corrosion; Practical applications in mitigating CO 2 corrosion; Mineral scale deposit control in oilfield-related operations; Corrosion of materials in nuclear systems; Testing nonmetallics for life prediction; Refinery industry corrosion; Underground corrosion control; Mechanisms and applications of deposit and scale control additives; Corrosion in power transmission and distribution systems; Corrosion inhibitor testing and field application in oil and gas systems; Decontamination technology; Ozone in cooling water applications, testing, and mechanisms; Corrosion of water and sewage treatment, collection, and distribution systems; Environmental cracking of materials; Metallurgy of oil and gas field equipment; Corrosion measurement technology; Duplex stainless steels in the chemical process industries; Corrosion in the pulp and paper industry; Advances in cooling water treatment; Marine corrosion; Performance of materials in environments applicable to fossil energy systems; Environmental degradation of and methods of protection for military and aerospace materials; Rail equipment corrosion; Cathodic protection in natural waters; Characterization of air pollution control system environments; and Deposit-related problems in industrial boilers. Papers have been processed separately for inclusion on the data base

  14. Quantum localization and protein-assisted vibrational energy flow in cofactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leitner, David M

    2010-01-01

    Quantum effects influence vibrational dynamics and energy flow in biomolecules, which play a central role in biomolecule function, including control of reaction kinetics. Lifetimes of many vibrational modes of proteins and their temperature dependence, as determined by quantum golden-rule-based calculations, exhibit trends consistent with experimental observation and distinct from estimates based on classical modeling. Particularly notable are quantum coherence effects that give rise to localization of vibrational states of sizable organic molecules in the gas phase. Even when such a molecule, for instance a cofactor, is embedded in a protein, remnants of quantum localization survive that influence vibrational energy flow and its dependence on temperature. We discuss these effects on the mode-damping rates of a cofactor embedded in a protein, using the green fluorescent protein chromophore as a specific example. We find that for cofactors of this size embedded in their protein and solvent environment at room temperature a golden-rule calculation often overestimates the mode-damping rate.

  15. Continuous-flow electro-assisted acid hydrolysis of granular potato starch via inductive methodology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Dandan; Yang, Na; Jin, Yamei; Guo, Lunan; Zhou, Yuyi; Xie, Zhengjun; Jin, Zhengyu; Xu, Xueming

    2017-08-15

    The induced electric field assisted hydrochloric acid (IEF-HCl) hydrolysis of potato starch was investigated in a fluidic system. The impact of various reaction parameters on the hydrolysis rate, including reactor number (1-4), salt type (KCl, MgCl 2 , FeCl 3 ), salt concentration (3-12%), temperature (40-55°C), and hydrolysis time (0-60h), were comprehensively assessed. Under optimal conditions, the maximum reducing sugar content in the hydrolysates was 10.59g/L. X-ray diffraction suggested that the crystallinity of IEF-HCl-modified starches increased with the intensification of hydrolysis but was lower than that of native starch. Scanning electron microscopy indicated that the surface and interior regions of starch granules were disrupted by the hydrolysis. The solubility of IEF-HCl-modified starches increased compared to native starch while their swelling power decreased, contributing to a decline in paste viscosity. These results suggest that IEF is a notable potential electrotechnology to conventional hydrolysis under mild conditions without any electrode touching the subject. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Magnetic suspension of the rotor of a ventricular assist device of mixed flow type.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horikawa, Oswaldo; de Andrade, Aron José Pazin; da Silva, Isaías; Bock, Eduardo Guy Perpetuo

    2008-04-01

    This work presents results of preliminary studies concerning application of magnetic bearing in a ventricular assist device (VAD) being developed by Dante Pazzanese Institute of Cardiology-IDPC (São Paulo, Brazil). The VAD-IDPC has a novel architecture that distinguishes from other known VADs. In this, the rotor has a conical geometry with spiral impellers, showing characteristics that are intermediate between a centrifugal VAD and an axial VAD. The effectiveness of this new type of blood pumping principle was showed by tests and by using it in heart surgery for external blood circulation. However, the developed VAD uses a combination of ball bearings and mechanical seals, limiting the life for some 10 h, making impossible its long-term use or its use as an implantable VAD. As a part of development of an implantable VAD, this work aims at the replacement of ball bearings by a magnetic bearing. The most important magnetic bearing principles are studied and the magnetic bearing developed by Escola Politécnica of São Paulo University (EPUSP-MB) is elected because of its very simple architecture. Besides presenting the principle of the EPUSP-MB, this work presents one possible alternative for applying the EPUSP-MB in the IDPC-VAD.

  17. Production of microscale particles from fish bone by gas flow assisted laser ablation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boutinguiza, M.; Lusquinos, F.; Comesana, R.; Riveiro, A.; Quintero, F.; Pou, J.

    2007-01-01

    Recycled wastes from fish and seafood can constitute a source of precursor material for different applications in the biomedical field such as bone fillers or precursor material for bioceramic coatings to improve the osteointegration of metallic implants. In this work, fish bones have been used directly as target in a laser ablation system. A pulsed Nd:YAG laser was used to ablate the fish bone material and a transverse air flow was used to extract the ablated material out of the interaction zone. The particles collected at a filter were in the micro and nanoscale range. The morphology as well as the composition of the obtained particles were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The results reveal that the composition of the analyzed particles is similar to that of the inorganic part of the fish bone

  18. Production of microscale particles from fish bone by gas flow assisted laser ablation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boutinguiza, M.; Lusquiños, F.; Comesaña, R.; Riveiro, A.; Quintero, F.; Pou, J.

    2007-12-01

    Recycled wastes from fish and seafood can constitute a source of precursor material for different applications in the biomedical field such as bone fillers or precursor material for bioceramic coatings to improve the osteointegration of metallic implants. In this work, fish bones have been used directly as target in a laser ablation system. A pulsed Nd:YAG laser was used to ablate the fish bone material and a transverse air flow was used to extract the ablated material out of the interaction zone. The particles collected at a filter were in the micro and nanoscale range. The morphology as well as the composition of the obtained particles were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The results reveal that the composition of the analyzed particles is similar to that of the inorganic part of the fish bone.

  19. Flow reactor studies of non-equilibrium plasma-assisted oxidation of n-alkanes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsolas, Nicholas; Lee, Jong Guen; Yetter, Richard A

    2015-08-13

    The oxidation of n-alkanes (C1-C7) has been studied with and without the effects of a nanosecond, non-equilibrium plasma discharge at 1 atm pressure from 420 to 1250 K. Experiments have been performed under nearly isothermal conditions in a flow reactor, where reactive mixtures are diluted in Ar to minimize temperature changes from chemical reactions. Sample extraction performed at the exit of the reactor captures product and intermediate species and stores them in a multi-position valve for subsequent identification and quantification using gas chromatography. By fixing the flow rate in the reactor and varying the temperature, reactivity maps for the oxidation of fuels are achieved. Considering all the fuels studied, fuel consumption under the effects of the plasma is shown to have been enhanced significantly, particularly for the low-temperature regime (T<800 K). In fact, multiple transitions in the rates of fuel consumption are observed depending on fuel with the emergence of a negative-temperature-coefficient regime. For all fuels, the temperature for the transition into the high-temperature chemistry is lowered as a consequence of the plasma being able to increase the rate of fuel consumption. Using a phenomenological interpretation of the intermediate species formed, it can be shown that the active particles produced from the plasma enhance alkyl radical formation at all temperatures and enable low-temperature chain branching for fuels C3 and greater. The significance of this result demonstrates that the plasma provides an opportunity for low-temperature chain branching to occur at reduced pressures, which is typically observed at elevated pressures in thermal induced systems. © 2015 The Author(s) Published by the Royal Society. All rights reserved.

  20. Erosion-corrosion of structural materials of wet steam turbines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tomarov, G.V.

    1989-01-01

    A model of erosion-corrosion wear of elements of a wet steam zone and a condensate-feeding path of turbines is considered. It is shown that diffusion of impurities and corrosion products in pores of an oxide layer is the control mechanism under conditions of laminar flow of a media. Processes of mass transfer are controlling factors in turbulent flow

  1. Corrosion of circulating water pipings in thermal and nuclear power stations and corrosion prevention measures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hachiya, Minoru

    1982-01-01

    In the age of energy conservation at present, the power generation facilities have been examined from the viewpoint of performance, endurance and economy, and in particular, the prevention of the loss due to the corrosion of various facilities is one of most important problems. Since circulating water pipings are in contact with sea water and soil, the peculiar corrosion phenomena are brought about on their external and internal surfaces. Namely, the pitting corrosion due to the environment of soil quality difference, the defects of coating and the contact with reinforcing bars in concrete occurs on the external surface, and the overall corrosion due to the increase of flow velocity and the pitting corrosion due to the defects of coating, the contact with different kinds of metals and the gap in corrosion-resistant steel occur on the internal surface. As the measures for corrosion prevention, corrosion-preventive coating and electric corrosion prevention are applied. The principle, the potential and current density, the system, the design procedure and the examples of application of electric corrosion prevention are described. (Kako, I.)

  2. Electrodeposition of Au/Ag bimetallic dendrites assisted by Faradaic AC-electroosmosis flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ji, Jianlong; Li, Pengwei; Sang, Shengbo, E-mail: sbsang@tyut.edu.cn; Zhang, Wendong, E-mail: wdzhang@tyut.edu.cn; Li, Gang; Hu, Jie [Micro and Nano-system Research Centre, College of Information Engineering, Taiyuan University of Technology, 030024, Taiyuan (China); Zhou, Zhaoying, E-mail: zhouzy@mail.tsinghua.edu.cn; Yang, Xing; Dong, Hualai [MEMS Laboratory, Department of Precision Instruments, Tsinghua University, 100084, Beijing (China)

    2014-03-15

    Au/Ag bimetallic dendrites were synthesized successfully from the corresponding aqueous solution via the AC electrodeposition method. Both of the morphologies and compositions could be tuned by the electrolyte concentration and AC frequency. The prepared bimetallic dendrites were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive X-ray spectrometer (EDS), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and UV–vis spectroscopy. The underlying dendrite growth mechanism was then proposed in the context of the Directed Electrochemical Nanowires Assembly (DENA) models. Owing to the unscreened voltage dropping in the electrolyte bulk, electromigration dominates the species flux process, and cations tend to accumulate in areas with strong electric field intensity, such as electrode edges. Moreover, Faradaic AC-electro-osmosis (ACEO) flow could increase the effective diffusion layer thickness in these areas during the electrochemical reaction, and leads to dendrite growth. Further Micro-Raman observations illustrated that the Au/Ag bimetallic dendrites exhibited pronounced surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) activity, using 4-mercaptopyridine (4-MP) as model molecules.

  3. Electrodeposition of Au/Ag bimetallic dendrites assisted by Faradaic AC-electroosmosis flow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianlong Ji

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Au/Ag bimetallic dendrites were synthesized successfully from the corresponding aqueous solution via the AC electrodeposition method. Both of the morphologies and compositions could be tuned by the electrolyte concentration and AC frequency. The prepared bimetallic dendrites were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM, energy dispersive X-ray spectrometer (EDS, transmission electron microscopy (TEM and UV–vis spectroscopy. The underlying dendrite growth mechanism was then proposed in the context of the Directed Electrochemical Nanowires Assembly (DENA models. Owing to the unscreened voltage dropping in the electrolyte bulk, electromigration dominates the species flux process, and cations tend to accumulate in areas with strong electric field intensity, such as electrode edges. Moreover, Faradaic AC-electro-osmosis (ACEO flow could increase the effective diffusion layer thickness in these areas during the electrochemical reaction, and leads to dendrite growth. Further Micro-Raman observations illustrated that the Au/Ag bimetallic dendrites exhibited pronounced surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS activity, using 4-mercaptopyridine (4-MP as model molecules.

  4. Metric Ambiguity and Flow in Rap Music: A Corpus-Assisted Study of Outkast's "Mainstream" (1996

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mitchell Ohriner

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Recent years have seen the rise of musical corpus studies, primarily detailing harmonic tendencies of tonal music. This article extends this scholarship by addressing a new genre (rap music and a new parameter of focus (rhythm. More specifically, I use corpus methods to investigate the relation between metric ambivalence in the instrumental parts of a rap track (i.e., the beat and an emcee's rap delivery (i.e., the flow. Unlike virtually every other rap track, the instrumental tracks of Outkast's "Mainstream" (1996 simultaneously afford hearing both a four-beat and a three-beat metric cycle. Because three-beat durations between rhymes, phrase endings, and reiterated rhythmic patterns are rare in rap music, an abundance of them within a verse of "Mainstream" suggests that an emcee highlights the three-beat cycle, especially if that emcee is not prone to such durations more generally. Through the construction of three corpora, one representative of the genre as a whole, and two that are artist specific, I show how the emcee T-Mo Goodie's expressive practice highlights the rare three-beat affordances of the track.

  5. Laminar flow assisted anisotropic bacteria absorption for chemotaxis delivery of bacteria-attached microparticle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huh, Keon; Oh, Darong; Son, Seok Young; Yoo, Hyung Jung; Song, Byeonghwa; Cho, Dong-il Dan; Seo, Jong-Mo; Kim, Sung Jae

    2016-12-01

    The concepts of microrobots has been drawn significant attentions recently since its unprecedented applicability in nanotechnology and biomedical field. Bacteria attached microparticles presented in this work are one of pioneering microrobot technology for self-propulsion or producing kinetic energy from ambient for their motions. Microfluidic device, especially utilizing laminar flow characteristics, were employed for anisotropic attachment of Salmonella typhimurium flagellated chemotactic bacteria to 30 um × 30 um and 50 um × 50 um microparticles that made of biodegradable polymer. Any toxic chemicals or harmful treatments were excluded during the attachment process and it finished within 100 s for the anisotropic attachment. The attachments were directly confirmed by fluorescent intensity changes and SEM visualization. Chemotaxis motions were tracked using aspartate and the maximum velocity of the bacteria-attached microrobot was measured to be 5 um/s which is comparable to prior state of art technologies. This reusable and scalable method could play a key role in chemotaxis delivery of functional microparticles such as drug delivery system.

  6. Development assistance for health: past trends, associations, and the future of international financial flows for health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dieleman, Joseph L; Schneider, Matthew T; Haakenstad, Annie; Singh, Lavanya; Sadat, Nafis; Birger, Maxwell; Reynolds, Alex; Templin, Tara; Hamavid, Hannah; Chapin, Abigail; Murray, Christopher J L

    2016-06-18

    Disbursements of development assistance for health (DAH) have risen substantially during the past several decades. More recently, the international community's attention has turned to other international challenges, introducing uncertainty about the future of disbursements for DAH. We collected audited budget statements, annual reports, and project-level records from the main international agencies that disbursed DAH from 1990 to the end of 2015. We standardised and combined records to provide a comprehensive set of annual disbursements. We tracked each dollar of DAH back to the source and forward to the recipient. We removed transfers between agencies to avoid double-counting and adjusted for inflation. We classified assistance into nine primary health focus areas: HIV/AIDS, tuberculosis, malaria, maternal health, newborn and child health, other infectious diseases, non-communicable diseases, Ebola, and sector-wide approaches and health system strengthening. For our statistical analysis, we grouped these health focus areas into two categories: MDG-related focus areas (HIV/AIDS, tuberculosis, malaria, child and newborn health, and maternal health) and non-MDG-related focus areas (other infectious diseases, non-communicable diseases, sector-wide approaches, and other). We used linear regression to test for structural shifts in disbursement patterns at the onset of the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs; ie, from 2000) and the global financial crisis (impact estimated to occur in 2010). We built on past trends and associations with an ensemble model to estimate DAH through the end of 2040. In 2015, US$36·4 billion of DAH was disbursed, marking the fifth consecutive year of little change in the amount of resources provided by global health development partners. Between 2000 and 2009, DAH increased at 11·3% per year, whereas between 2010 and 2015, annual growth was just 1·2%. In 2015, 29·7% of DAH was for HIV/AIDS, 17·9% was for child and newborn health, and 9·8

  7. Technical assistance to the manufacture, construction and assembly of Osorio-Canoas oil pipeline flow pumps

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Menezes, Kellson Takenaka; Rangel Junior, Joilson Rangel; Costa, Jose Coelho [Petroleo Brasileiro S/A (PETROBRAS), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)], E-mails: kellson.telsan@petrobras.com.br, joilson_jr@petrobras.com.br, jccoelho.telsan@petrobras.com.br

    2010-07-01

    This paper reports the experiences acquired through the modifications and improvements implemented in the manufacture, construction and assembly of the oil flow centrifugal pumps of the Osorio-Canoas Oil Pipeline (OSCAN 22''), located in Rio Grande do Sul. The OSCAN 22'' pumping capacity expansion was conceived aiming at meeting the Alberto Pasqualini Refinery (REFAP) processing increase project from 20,000 m{sup 3}/day to 30,000 m{sup 3}/day, besides changing the product profile from processed product to national high viscosity national oils. Due to this reason, a new pump park at the Almirante Soares Dutra Terminal (TEDUT) and a new intermediate pump station named Estacao de Santo Antonio da Patrulha (ESPAT) have been erected. Thus, the oil received by a tanker and stored at TEDUT was now pumped to ESPAT and then to REFAP through a 97 km long and 22 inch diameter oil pipeline named OSCAN 22''. In order to get such oil flow done, 03 new main pumps have been installed at TEDUT, one of them being a stand-by one, and other 03 pumps at ESPAT, one of them being also a stand-by one. During the startup of TEDUT's pumps, high vibration levels were observed in the rotors and in the equipment structures. The values defined by the manufacturer for equipment alarm and shutdown were, respectively, 50.0 {mu}m and 75.0 {mu}m, measured on the pump rotors in the bearing region. However, the global vibration levels of the TEDUT's pumps reached 110.0 {mu}m during the startup attended by the manufacturers. The equipment warranty period started after that, and a detailed activity planning was drawn up with the purpose of keeping TEDUT running with the new pumps at the lowest possible operational risk and avoiding a production reduction at REFAP. Simultaneously, various actions were taken in order to identify the vibration sources and reduce its intensity to the lowest possible values. After equipment modifications, median vibration values at 15

  8. Stability enhancement of ozone-assisted laminar premixed Bunsen flames in nitrogen co-flow

    KAUST Repository

    Vu, Tran Manh

    2014-04-01

    Ozone (O3) is known as one of the strongest oxidizers and therefore is widely used in many applications. Typically in the combustion field, a combination of non-thermal plasma and combustion systems have been studied focusing on the effects of ozone on flame propagation speeds and ignition characteristics. Here, we experimentally investigated the effects of ozone on blowoff of premixed methane/air and propane/air flames over a full range of equivalence ratios at room temperature and atmospheric pressure by using a co-flow burner and a dielectric barrier discharge. The results with ozone showed that a nozzle exit jet velocity at the moment of flame blowoff (blowoff velocity) significantly increased, and flammability limits for both fuel-lean and rich mixtures were also extended. Ozone had stronger effects of percent enhancement in the blowoff velocity for off-stoichiometric mixtures, while minimum enhancements could be observed around stoichiometric conditions for both fuels showing linear positive dependence on a tested range of ozone concentration up to 3810ppm. Through chemical kinetic simulations, the experimentally observed trends of the enhancement in blowoff velocity were identified as a result of the modification of the laminar burning velocity. Two ozone decomposition pathways of O3+N2→O+O2+N2 and O3+H→O2+OH were identified as the most controlling steps. These reactions, coupled with fuel consumption characteristics of each fuel determined the degree of promotion in laminar burning velocities, supporting experimental observations on blowoff velocities with ozone addition. © 2013 The Combustion Institute.

  9. Review of Artificial Neural Networks (ANN) applied to corrosion monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mabbutt, S; Picton, P; Shaw, P; Black, S

    2012-01-01

    The assessment of corrosion within an engineering system often forms an important aspect of condition monitoring but it is a parameter that is inherently difficult to measure and predict. The electrochemical nature of the corrosion process allows precise measurements to be made. Advances in instruments, techniques and software have resulted in devices that can gather data and perform various analysis routines that provide parameters to identify corrosion type and corrosion rate. Although corrosion rates are important they are only useful where general or uniform corrosion dominates. However, pitting, inter-granular corrosion and environmentally assisted cracking (stress corrosion) are examples of corrosion mechanisms that can be dangerous and virtually invisible to the naked eye. Electrochemical noise (EN) monitoring is a very useful technique for detecting these types of corrosion and it is the only non-invasive electrochemical corrosion monitoring technique commonly available. Modern instrumentation is extremely sensitive to changes in the system and new experimental configurations for gathering EN data have been proven. In this paper the identification of localised corrosion by different data analysis routines has been reviewed. In particular the application of Artificial Neural Network (ANN) analysis to corrosion data is of key interest. In most instances data needs to be used with conventional theory to obtain meaningful information and relies on expert interpretation. Recently work has been carried out using artificial neural networks to investigate various types of corrosion data in attempts to predict corrosion behaviour with some success. This work aims to extend this earlier work to identify reliable electrochemical indicators of localised corrosion onset and propagation stages.

  10. IN DRIFT CORROSION PRODUCTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D.M. Jolley

    1999-12-02

    As directed by a written development plan (CRWMS M&O 1999a), a conceptual model for steel and corrosion products in the engineered barrier system (EBS) is to be developed. The purpose of this conceptual model is to assist Performance Assessment Operations (PAO) and its Engineered Barrier Performance Department in modeling the geochemical environment within a repository drift, thus allowing PAO to provide a more detailed and complete in-drift geochemical model abstraction and to answer the key technical issues (KTI) raised in the NRC Issue Resolution Status Report (IRSR) for the Evolution of the Near-Field Environment (NFE) Revision 2 (NRC 1999). This document provides the conceptual framework for the in-drift corrosion products sub-model to be used in subsequent PAO analyses including the EBS physical and chemical model abstraction effort. This model has been developed to serve as a basis for the in-drift geochemical analyses performed by PAO. However, the concepts discussed within this report may also apply to some near and far-field geochemical processes and may have conceptual application within the unsaturated zone (UZ) and saturated zone (SZ) transport modeling efforts.

  11. Characterization of the corrosion behavior of different stainless steel alloys exposed to flowing fresh seawater, using E.I.S technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Al Muhanna, K. [Petroleum Research and Studies Center, Kuwait Institute for Scientific Research, KISR, P.O.Box 24885, Safat 13109 Kuwait (Kuwait)

    2004-07-01

    E.I.S technique was used to characterize the corrosion behavior of UNS NO. S 31600 stainless steel, UNS NO. S 30400 stainless steel and UNS NO. S 62800 sanicro 28 exposed to continuous fresh Seawater. The total exposure time of the test was about 180 days. Two types of additives (4 ppm of Cl{sub 2} and 5 ppm of NH{sub 3}) were also added to the seawater to investigate their effect on the surfaces of these alloys. During the tests, no marine - macro fouling was observed on the surfaces of the tested alloys, as the seawater was filtrated at the Doha Desalination Research Center, where the study was carried out, but only a slimy layer spread on the whole surface of the alloys. The corrosion behavior of each alloy was monitored by the open circuit potential measurement, and the E.I.S technique using the EG and G 352 software and hardware instrument, where the resistance of the solution (R{sub sol}), the resistance of the surface of the tested alloy (R{sub p}), and the double layer capacitance (Cdl) was calculated. Under this study's experimental conditions, results indicated that the stainless steel alloys were highly resistant to marine fouling and corrosion in seawater, and were not affected by the aggressive additives, such as NH{sub 3}, and Cl{sub 2} in the seawater. (author)

  12. Topographical, microstructural and chemical effects of simulated high heat flux on the corrosion of Type 316 stainless steel in flowing sodium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bagnall, C.; Shiels, S.A.; Orbon, S.J.

    1976-01-01

    Earlier work, performed in sodium test facilities around the world, have produced corrosion data for Type 316 SS which has been used to estimate metal loss rates from the core of a liquid metal fast breeder reactor. Practical difficulties precluded evaluation of the influence on corrosion of irradiation, a high heat flux and the high axial temperature gradient the latter produces. Downstream effects in isothermal regions were, however, documented in some tests. This paper presents recent results of corrosion experiments conducted in a test facility designed to produce a temperature rise in the fluid equivalent to a heat flux in the primary heater of about 0.5 x10 6 Btu/(h-ft 2 ). The axial temperature gradient was such that the sodium temperature was increased over a distance of three feet from 820F at the inlet, to 1360F at the outlet. The secondary ion mass spectrometer, the electron probe microanalyzer, the scanning electron microscope, and the optical microscope were used individually to characterize the various compositional, topographical and structural changes that occurred in the stainless steel as a result of the sodium exposure. Several important effects attributable to the high axial temperature gradient were noted. The collective results presented provide a clarified picture of material reaction to this environment and permit a more meaningful prediction of the behavior of critical components within the core of a liquid metal fast breeder reactor. (Auth.)

  13. Topographical, microstructural, and chemical effects of simulated high heat flux on the corrosion of Type 316 stainless steel in flowing sodium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bagnall, C.; Shiels, S.A.; Orbon, S.J.

    1976-01-01

    Earlier work, performed in sodium test facilities around the world, have produced corrosion data for Type 306 SS which has been used to estimate metal loss rates from the core of a LMFBR. Practical difficulties precluded evaluation of the influence on corrosion of irradiation, a high heat flux and the high axial temperature gradient the latter produces. Downstream effects in isothermal regions were, however, documented in some tests. This paper presents recent results of corrosion experiments conducted in a test facility designed to produce a temperature rise in the fluid equivalent to a heat flux in the primary heater of about 0.5 x 10 6 Btu/(h-ft 2 ). The axial temperature gradient was such that the sodium temperature was increased over a distance of three feet from 820F at the inlet, to 1360F at the outlet. The secondary ion mass spectrometer, electron probe microanalyzer, scanning electron microscope, and optical microscope were used individually to characterize the various compositional, topographical, and structural changes that occurred in the stainless steel as a result of the sodium exposure. Several important effects attributable to the high axial temperature gradient were noted

  14. Accelerated Corrosion Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-12-01

    Treaty Organization, Brussels, 1971), p. 449. 14. D. 0. Sprowls, T. J. Summerson, G. M. Ugianski, S. G. Epstein, and H. L. Craig , Jr., in Stress...National Association of Corrosion Engineers Houston, TX, 1972). 22. H. L. Craig , Jr. (ed.), Stress Corrosion-New Approaches, ASTM-STP- 610 (American...62. M. Hishida and H. Nakada, Corrosion 33 (11) 403 (1977). b3. D. C. Deegan and B. E. Wilde, Corrosion 34 (6), 19 (1978). 64. S. Orman, Corrosion Sci

  15. Is anti-platelet therapy needed in continuous flow left ventricular assist device patients? A single-centre experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Litzler, Pierre-Yves; Smail, Hassiba; Barbay, Virginie; Nafeh-Bizet, Catherine; Bouchart, François; Baste, Jean-Marc; Abriou, Caroline; Bessou, Jean-Paul

    2014-01-01

    We report our 5-year experience of continuous flow left ventricular assist device (LVAD) implantation without the use of anti-platelet therapy. Between February 2006 and September 2011, 27 patients (26 men; 1 woman) were implanted with a continuous flow LVAD (HeartMate II, Thoratec Corporation, Pleasanton, CA, USA). The mean age was 55.7 ± 9.9 years. The mean duration of support was 479 ± 436 (1-1555) days with 35.4 patient-years on support. Twenty-one patients were implanted as a bridge to transplantation and 6 for destination therapy. The anticoagulation regimen was fluindione for all patients, with aspirin for only 4 patients. At the beginning of our experience, aspirin was administered to 4 patients for 6, 15, 60 and 460 days. Due to gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding and epistaxis, aspirin was discontinued, and since August 2006, no patients have received anti-platelet therapy. At 3 years, the survival rate during support was 76%. The most common postoperative adverse event was GI bleeding (19%) and epistaxis (30%) (median time: 26 days) for patients receiving fluindione and aspirin. The mean International Normalized Ratio (INR) was 2.58 ± 0.74 during support. Fifteen patients have been tested for acquired Von Willebrand disease. A diminished ratio of collagen-binding capacity and ristocetin cofactor activity to Von Willebrand factor antigen was observed in 7 patients. In the postoperative period, 2 patients presented with ischaemic stroke at 1 and 8 months. One of these 2 patients had a previous history of carotid stenosis with ischaemic stroke. There were no patients with haemorrhagic stroke, transient ischaemic attack or pump thrombosis. The event rate of stroke (ischaemic and haemorrhagic) per patient-year was 0.059 among the patients without aspirin with fluindione regimen only. A fluindione regimen without aspirin in long-duration LVAD support appears to not increase thromboembolic events and could lead to a diminished risk of haemorrhagic stroke.

  16. Corrosion of materials for heat exchangers and the countermeasures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawamoto, Teruaki

    1978-01-01

    When the materials for heat exchangers are selected, the heat transfer performance, mechanical strength, workability, cost, corrosion resistance and so on are taken in consideration. Most of the failure of heat exchangers is due to corrosion, and the corrosion failure on cooling water side occurs frequently, to which attention is not paid much usually. The rate of occurrence of corrosion failure is overwhelmingly high in heating tubes, and the failure owing to cooling water exceeds that owing to process fluid. The material of heating tubes is mostly aluminum brass, and local failure such as pitting corrosion or stress corrosion cracking holds a majority. The cause of corrosion failure due to cooling water is mostly the poor water quality. The mechanism of corrosion of metals can be explained by the electrochemical reaction between the metals and solutions. As for the factors affecting corrosion, dissolved oxygen, pH, Cl - ions, temperature, flow velocity, and foreign matters are enumerated. Copper alloys are sensitive to the effect of polluted sea water. Erosion corrosion is caused by eddies and bubbles owing to high flow velocity, and impingement attack is caused by scratching foreign matters. The quality of fresh water affects corrosion more than sea water in case of copper alloys. The preliminary examination of water quality is essential. (Kako, I.)

  17. Downhole corrosion mechanisms and mitigation strategies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McDougall, D. [Baker Hughes Canada, Calgary, AB (Canada)

    2010-07-01

    Pipeline corrosion refers to its deterioration because of a reaction with its environment. Although the physical condition of the metal at the anode initiates the corrosion process, it is the chemistry and composition of the electrolyte that controls the rate of the corrosion reaction and the severity of the corrosion. This presentation described the role of corrosion rate accelerators, with particular reference to dissolved gases such as oxygen, hydrogen sulfides and carbon dioxide, as well as pH levels, salinity, flow rate, temperature and presence of solids such as iron sulfides and sulfur. The effects of these accelerators were shown to be additive. Mitigation strategies include using materials such as resistant metal alloys or fiberglass, and applying coatings and chemical inhibitors. The importance of corrosion monitoring was also emphasized, with particular reference to the value of examining the number of corrosion related failures that have occurred over a fixed period of time. It was concluded that the ability to analyze samples of failed materials results in a better understanding of the cause of the failure, and is an integral part of designing any successful corrosion control program. tabs., figs.

  18. Capturing device for radioactive corrosion products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ono, Kiyoshi.

    1987-01-01

    Purpose: To render the flow channel area uniform for each of coolants over the entire capturing device and reduce the corrosion of capturing materials due to coolants. Constitution: Most of radioactivity caused by radioactive corrosion products are due to Mn-54 radioactive nuclides and it has been known that the nuclides are readily deposited to the surface of nickel material in sodium at high temperature. It is difficult in a conventional capturing device constituted by winding a nickel plate fabricated with protrusions in a multiple-coaxial configuration, that the flow channel area is reduced in a portion of the flow channel and it is difficult to make the flow of the coolants uniform. In view of the above, by winding a nickel plate having a plurality of protrusions at the surface formed integrally by way of an electrolytic process into a multiple-coaxial or spiral shape, those having high resistance to the coolant corrosion can be obtained. (Takahashi, M.)

  19. The Leakage determination on corrosion fretting machine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sriyono; Satmoko, Ari; Hafid, Abdul; Febrianto; Prasetio, Joko; Abtokhi; Sumarno, Edy; Handoyo, Ismu; Hidayati, Nur Rahmah; Histori

    1998-01-01

    Fretting machine is an experimental loop to learn fretting corrosion phenomena wich is caused by loading and vibration. On the steam generator, one of the corrosion process that's occurred, it can be caused by vibration between tubes and bending material. Because of high flow rate inside the tube, the high frequency vibration will appeared so it can make the corrosion on bending material more faster. This process can be simulate by fretting machine. This machine has already damage because of leakage. So it will be repaired by dismantling, radiography testing and redrawing. from the result of radiography, the leakage is caused by cracking on bellows seals of the dynamic main support

  20. IMPROVED CORROSION RESISTANCE OF ALUMINA REFRACTORIES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    John P. Hurley; Patty L. Kleven

    2001-09-30

    The initial objective of this project was to do a literature search to define the problems of refractory selection in the metals and glass industries. The problems fall into three categories: Economic--What do the major problems cost the industries financially? Operational--How do the major problems affect production efficiency and impact the environment? and Scientific--What are the chemical and physical mechanisms that cause the problems to occur? This report presents a summary of these problems. It was used to determine the areas in which the EERC can provide the most assistance through bench-scale and laboratory testing. The final objective of this project was to design and build a bench-scale high-temperature controlled atmosphere dynamic corrosion application furnace (CADCAF). The furnace will be used to evaluate refractory test samples in the presence of flowing corrodents for extended periods, to temperatures of 1600 C under controlled atmospheres. Corrodents will include molten slag, steel, and glass. This test should prove useful for the glass and steel industries when faced with the decision of choosing the best refractory for flowing corrodent conditions.

  1. Corrosion/96 conference papers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1996-01-01

    Topics covered by this conference include: cathodic protection in natural waters; cleaning and repassivation of building HVAC systems; worldwide opportunities in flue gas desulfurization; advancements in materials technology for use in oil and gas service; fossil fuel combustion and conversion; technology of corrosion inhibitors; computers in corrosion control--modeling and information processing; recent experiences and advances of austenitic alloys; managing corrosion with plastics; corrosion measurement technology; corrosion inhibitors for concrete; refining industry; advances in corrosion control for rail and tank trailer equipment; CO 2 corrosion--mechanisms and control; microbiologically influenced corrosion; corrosion in nuclear systems; role of corrosion in boiler failures; effects of water reuse on monitoring and control technology in cooling water applications; methods and mechanisms of scale and deposit control; corrosion detection in petroleum production lines; underground corrosion control; environmental cracking--relating laboratory results and field behavior; corrosion control in reinforced concrete structures; corrosion and its control in aerospace and military hardware; injection and process addition facilities; progress reports on the results of reinspection of deaerators inspected or repaired per RP0590 criteria; near 100% volume solids coating technology and application methods; materials performance in high temperature environments containing halides; impact of toxicity studies on use of corrosion/scale inhibitors; mineral scale deposit control in oilfield related operations; corrosion in gas treating; marine corrosion; cold climate corrosion; corrosion in the pulp and paper industry; gaseous chlorine alternatives in cooling water systems; practical applications of ozone in recirculating cooling water systems; and water reuse in industry. Over 400 papers from this conference have been processed separately for inclusion on the data base

  2. Application of Moessbauer spectroscopy to study corrosion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramshesh, V.; Ravichandran, K.; Venkateswarlu, K.S.

    1976-01-01

    The system components in a nuclear power station include steel, stainless steel and various alloys such as Monel, Inconel, Stellite etc. Usually water/heavy water used as the coolant flows at high temperatures and pressures. Under such conditions the interaction of system components with the coolant produces a host of corrosion products. The deposition of such products is essential. This report attempts to review the salient features of identification of such corrosion products using Moessbauer spectroscopy. (author)

  3. Improved Navy Maintenance Through Corrosion-Fatigue Assessment Program

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hoppe, Wally

    2008-01-01

    ... to evaluate issues relevant to corrosion-fatigue of aircraft components. In this multi-year, multi-contract program, tools have been developed to assist in the establishment of maintenance options for corroded components...

  4. Corrosion of carbon steel under waste disposal conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marsh, G.

    1990-01-01

    The corrosion of carbon steel has been studied in the United Kingdom under granitic groundwater conditions, with pH between 5 and 10 and possibly substantial amounts of Cl - , SO 4 2- and HCO 3 - /CO 3 2- . Corrosion modes considered include uniform corrosion under both aerobic and anaerobic conditions; passive corrosion; localized attack in the form of pitting or crevice corrosion; and environmentally assisted cracking - hydrogen embrittlement or stress corrosion cracking. Studies of these processes are being carried out in order to predict the metal thicknesses required to give container lifetimes of 500 to 1000 years. A simple uniform corrosion model predicts a corrosion rate of around 13.4 μm/a at 20C, rising to 69 μm/a at 50C and 208 μm/a at 90C. A radiation dose of 10 5 rad/h and a G-value of 2.8 for the production of oxidizing species would account for an increase in corrosion rate of 7 μm/a. This model overestimates slightly the results actually achieved for experimental samples exposed for two years, the difference being due to a protective film formed on the samples. These corrosion rates predict that the container must be 227 mm thick to withstand uniform corrosion; however, they predict very high levels of hydrogen production. Conditions will be favourable for localized or pitting corrosion for about 125 years, leading to a maximum penetration of 160 mm. Since the exposure environment cannot be predicted precisely, one cannot state that stress corrosion cracking is impossible. Thus the container must be stress relieved. Other corrosion mechanisms such as microbial corrosion and hydrogen embrittlement are not considered significant

  5. Model-Assisted Control of Flow Front in Resin Transfer Molding Based on Real-Time Estimation of Permeability/Porosity Ratio

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bai-Jian Wei

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Resin transfer molding (RTM is a popular manufacturing technique that produces fiber reinforced polymer (FRP composites. In this paper, a model-assisted flow front control system is developed based on real-time estimation of permeability/porosity ratio using the information acquired by a visualization system. In the proposed control system, a radial basis function (RBF network meta-model is utilized to predict the position of the future flow front by inputting the injection pressure, the current position of flow front, and the estimated ratio. By conducting optimization based on the meta-model, the value of injection pressure to be implemented at each step is obtained. Moreover, a cascade control structure is established to further improve the control performance. Experiments show that the developed system successfully enhances the performance of flow front control in RTM. Especially, the cascade structure makes the control system robust to model mismatch.

  6. Right ventricular dysfunction following continuous flow left ventriccular assist device placement in 51 patients: predicators and outcomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neragi-Miandoab Siyamek

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Right ventricular (RV dysfunction following implantation of a left ventricular assist device (LVAD is a serious condition and is associated with increased mortality. Methods The aim of the study is to investigate the significance of pre-existing RV dysfunction, tricuspid valve (TV insufficiency, and the severity of septal deviation following LVAD implantation on RV dysfunction, as well as the outcome and short-term complications in 51 patients from June 2006 to August 2010. Student t test was used to compare the data and estimate the p value. Results Mean age was 55.1 ± 13, with a male to female ratio of 3.25. The 30-day mortality was 13.7% (7/51 patients, and the overall mortality was 23.5% (12/51 patients. Meanwhile, 21 patients (21/51; 41.2% have undergone orthotopic heart transplantation. The mean time of support was 314.5±235 days with a median of 240 days at the time of closing this study. Echocardiographic evaluation of RV function pre- and post-implantation of an LVAD demonstrated septal deviation towards the left ventricle in immediate postoperative phase, which correlated with acute RV dysfunction (p = 0.002. Preoperative RV dysfunction was a significant predictor of postoperative right heart dysfunction following implantation of an LVAD (p = 0.001. Conclusion Preoperative RV dysfunction is a predictor of RV failure in LVAD patients. The adjustment of septal deviation through gradual increase of the LVAD flow can prevent the acute RV dysfunction following LVAD placement.

  7. Hepatic and renal function with successful long-term support on a continuous flow left ventricular assist device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deo, Salil V; Sharma, Vikas; Altarabsheh, Salah E; Hasin, Tal; Dillon, John; Shah, Ishan K; Durham, Lucian A; Stulak, John M; Daly, Richard C; Joyce, Lyle D; Park, Soon J

    2014-03-01

    Data regarding the long-term clinical effects of a continuous flow left ventricular assist device (CF-LVAD) on hepato-renal function is limited. Hence our aim was to assess changes in hepato-renal function over a one-year period in patients supported on a CF-LVAD. During the study period 126 patients underwent CF-LVAD implant. Changes in hepato-renal laboratory parameters were studied in 61/126 patients successfully supported on a CF-LVAD for period of one year. A separate cohort of a high-risk group (HCrB) of patients (56/126) with a serum creat>1.9 mg/dL (168 μmol/L) (75th percentile) or a serum bil>1.5 mg/dL (25.65 μmol/L) (75th percentile) was created. Changes in serum creatinine and bilirubin were analysed at regular intervals for this group along with the need for renal replacement therapy. Baseline creatinine and blood urea nitrogen (BUN) for the entire cohort was 1.4[1.2,1.9 mg/dL] [123.7(106,168) μmol/L) and 27[20,39.5 mg/dL] [9.6(7.1,14.1) mmol/L] respectively. After an initial reduction at the end of one month [1(0.8,1.2) mg/dL; 88(70,105) μmol/L] (passist device support for one year. High-risk patients demonstrate a higher 30-day mortality and temporary need for renal replacement therapy. Yet even in this cohort, improvement is present over a period of one year on the device, with a minimal need for permanent haemodialysis. Copyright © 2013 Australian and New Zealand Society of Cardiac and Thoracic Surgeons (ANZSCTS) and the Cardiac Society of Australia and New Zealand (CSANZ). Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. A practical review for cardiac rehabilitation professionals of continuous-flow left ventricular assist devices: historical and current perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Compostella, Leonida; Russo, Nicola; Setzu, Tiziana; Bottio, Tomaso; Compostella, Caterina; Tarzia, Vincenzo; Livi, Ugolino; Gerosa, Gino; Iliceto, Sabino; Bellotto, Fabio

    2015-01-01

    An increasing number of patients with end-stage heart failure are being treated with continuous-flow left ventricular assist devices (cf-LVADs). These patients provide new challenges to the staff in exercise-based cardiac rehabilitation (CR) programs. Even though experience remains limited, it seems that patients supported by cf-LVADs may safely engage in typical rehabilitative activities, provided that some attention is paid to specific aspects, such as the presence of a short external drive line. In spite of initial physical deconditioning, CR allows progressive improvement of symptoms such as fatigue and dyspnea. Intensity of rehabilitative activities should ideally be based on measured aerobic capacity and increased appropriately over time. Regular, long-term exercise training results in improved physical fitness and survival rates. Appropriate adjustment of cf-LVAD settings, together with maintenance of adequate blood volume, provides maximal output, while avoiding suction effects. Ventricular arrhythmias, although not necessarily constituting an immediate life-threatening situation, deserve treatment as they could lead to an increased rate of hospitalization and poorer quality of life. Atrial fibrillation may worsen symptoms of right ventricular failure and reduce exercise tolerance. Blood pressure measurements are possible in cf-LVAD patients only using a Doppler technique, and a mean blood pressure ≤80 mmHg is considered "ideal." Some patients may present with orthostatic intolerance, related to autonomic dysfunction. While exercise training constitutes the basic rehabilitative tool, a comprehensive intervention that includes psychological and social support could better meet the complex needs of patients in which cf-LVAD may offer prolonged survival.

  9. Corrosion problems in boiling water reactors and their remedies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosborg, B.

    1989-01-01

    This article briefly presents current corrosion problems in boiling water reactors and their remedies. The problems are different forms of environmentally assisted cracking, and the remedies are divided into material-, environment-, and stress-related remedies. The list of problems comprises: intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) in weld-sensitized stainless steel piping; IGSCC in cold-bent stainless steel piping; irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC) in stainless alloys; IGSCC in high-strength stainless alloys. A prospective corrosion problem, as judged from literature references, and one which relates to plant life, is corrosion fatigue in pressure vessel steel, since the reactor pressure vessel is the most critical component in the BWR pressure boundary as regards plant safety. (author)

  10. Effect of hydrazine on general corrosion of carbon and low-alloyed steels in pressurized water reactor secondary side water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Järvimäki, Sari [Fortum Ltd, Loviisa Power Plant, Loviisa (Finland); Saario, Timo; Sipilä, Konsta [VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland Ltd., Nuclear Safety, P.O. Box 1000, FIN-02044 VTT (Finland); Bojinov, Martin, E-mail: martin@uctm.edu [Department of Physical Chemistry, University of Chemical Technology and Metallurgy, Kl. Ohridski Blvd, 8, 1756 Sofia (Bulgaria)

    2015-12-15

    Highlights: • The effect of hydrazine on the corrosion of steel in secondary side water investigated by in situ and ex situ techniques. • Oxide grown on steel in 100 ppb hydrazine shows weaker protective properties – higher corrosion rates. • Possible explanation of the accelerating effect of higher concentrations of hydrazine on flow assisted corrosion offered. - Abstract: The effect of hydrazine on corrosion rate of low-alloyed steel (LAS) and carbon steel (CS) was studied by in situ and ex situ techniques under pressurized water reactor secondary side water chemistry conditions at T = 228 °C and pH{sub RT} = 9.2 (adjusted by NH{sub 3}). It is found that hydrazine injection to a maximum level of 5.06 μmol l{sup −1} onto surfaces previously oxidized in ammonia does not affect the corrosion rate of LAS or CS. This is confirmed also by plant measurements at Loviisa NPP. On the other hand, hydrazine at the level of 3.1 μmol l{sup −1} decreases markedly the amount and the size of deposited oxide crystals on LAS and CS surface. In addition, the oxide grown in the presence of 3.1 μmol l{sup −1} hydrazine is somewhat less protective and sustains a higher corrosion rate compared to an oxide film grown without hydrazine. These observations could explain the accelerating effect of higher concentrations of hydrazine found in corrosion studies of LAS and CS.

  11. Catastrophes caused by corrosion

    OpenAIRE

    PETROVIC ZORAN C.

    2016-01-01

    For many years, huge attention has been paid to the problem of corrosion damage and destruction of metallic materials. Experience shows that failures due to corrosion problems are very important, and statistics at the world level shows that the damage resulting from the effects of various forms of corrosion is substantial and that, for example, in industrialized countries it reaches 4-5% of national incomes. Significant funds are determined annually for the prevention and control of corrosion...

  12. Modelling of Corrosion Cracks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thoft-Christensen, Palle

    Modelling of corrosion cracking of reinforced concrete structures is complicated as a great number of uncertain factors are involved. To get a reliable modelling a physical and mechanical understanding of the process behind corrosion in needed.......Modelling of corrosion cracking of reinforced concrete structures is complicated as a great number of uncertain factors are involved. To get a reliable modelling a physical and mechanical understanding of the process behind corrosion in needed....

  13. Erosion-corrosion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aghili, B.

    1999-05-01

    A literature study on erosion-corrosion of pipings in the nuclear industry was performed. Occurred incidents are reviewed, and the mechanism driving the erosion-corrosion is described. Factors that influence the effect in negative or positive direction are treated, as well as programs for control and inspection. Finally, examples of failures from databases on erosion-corrosion are given in an attachment

  14. Microbiological corrosion of metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vladislavlev, V.V.

    1992-01-01

    Problems is considered of development of the microbiological corrosion of the NPP equipment. The main attention is paid to the selective character of microbiological corrosion in zones of welded joints of austenitic steels. It is noted that the presence of technological defects promotes growth of corrosional damages. Methods for microbiological corrosion protection are discussed

  15. Management of Reinforcement Corrosion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Küter, André; Geiker, Mette Rica; Møller, Per

    Reinforcement corrosion is the most important cause for deterioration of reinforced concrete structures, both with regard to costs and consequences. Thermodynamically consistent descriptions of corrosion mechanisms are expected to allow the development of innovative concepts for the management...... of reinforcement corrosion....

  16. Irradiation-Accelerated Corrosion of Reactor Core Materials. Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiao, Zhujie [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Was, Gary [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Bartels, David [Univ. of Notre Dame, IN (United States)

    2015-04-02

    This project aims to understand how radiation accelerates corrosion of reactor core materials. The combination of high temperature, chemically aggressive coolants, a high radiation flux and mechanical stress poses a major challenge for the life extension of current light water reactors, as well as the success of most all GenIV concepts. Of these four drivers, the combination of radiation and corrosion places the most severe demands on materials, for which an understanding of the fundamental science is simply absent. Only a few experiments have been conducted to understand how corrosion occurs under irradiation, yet the limited data indicates that the effect is large; irradiation causes order of magnitude increases in corrosion rates. Without a firm understanding of the mechanisms by which radiation and corrosion interact in film formation, growth, breakdown and repair, the extension of the current LWR fleet beyond 60 years and the success of advanced nuclear energy systems are questionable. The proposed work will address the process of irradiation-accelerated corrosion that is important to all current and advanced reactor designs, but remains very poorly understood. An improved understanding of the role of irradiation in the corrosion process will provide the community with the tools to develop predictive models for in-reactor corrosion, and to address specific, important forms of corrosion such as irradiation assisted stress corrosion cracking.

  17. Effect of zinc injection on BWR fuel cladding corrosion. Pt. 1. Study on an accelerated corrosion condition to evaluate corrosion resistance of zircaloy-2 fuel cladding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawamura, Hirotaka; Kanbe, Hiromu; Furuya, Masahiro

    2002-01-01

    Japanese BWR utilities have a plan to apply zinc injection to the primary coolant in order to reduce radioactivity accumulation on the structure. Prior to applying the zinc injection to BWR plants, it is necessary to evaluate the effect of zinc injection on corrosion resistance of fuel cladding. The objective of this report was to examine the accelerated corrosion condition for evaluation of BWR fuel cladding corrosion resistance under non-irradiated conditions, as the first step of a zinc injection evaluation study. A heat transfer corrosion test facility, in which a two phase flow condition could be achieved, was designed and constructed. The effects of heat flux, void fraction and solution temperature on BWR fuel cladding corrosion resistance were quantitatively investigated. The main findings were as follows. (1) In situ measurements using high speed camera and a void sensor together with one dimensional two phase flow analysis results showed that a two phase flow simulated BWR core condition can be obtained in the corrosion test facility. (2) The heat transfer corrosion test results showed that the thickness of the zirconium oxide layer increased with increasing solution temperature and was independent of heat flux and void fraction. The corrosion accelerating factor was about 2.5 times in the case of a temperature increase from 288degC to 350degC. (author)

  18. The impact of a congestion assistant on traffic flow efficiency and safety in congested traffic caused by a lane drop

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Driel, Cornelie; van Arem, Bart

    2010-01-01

    This article presents the results of a microscopic traffic simulation study conducted to investigate the impact of a Congestion Assistant on traffic efficiency and traffic safety. The Congestion Assistant is an in-vehicle system in which an active pedal supports the driver when approaching

  19. Corrosion of metallic materials. Dry corrosion, aqueous corrosion and corrosion by liquid metal, methods of protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Helie, Max

    2015-01-01

    This book is based on a course on materials given in an engineering school. The author first gives an overview of metallurgy issues: metallic materials (pure metals, metallic alloys), defects of crystal lattices (point defects, linear defects or dislocations), equilibrium diagrams, steels and cast, thermal processing of steels, stainless steels, aluminium and its alloys, copper and its alloys. The second part addresses the properties and characterization of surfaces and interfaces: singularity of a metal surface, surface energy of a metal, energy of grain boundaries, adsorption at a material surface, metal-electrolyte interface, surface oxide-electrolyte interface, techniques of surface analysis. The third chapter addresses the electrochemical aspects of corrosion: description of the corrosion phenomenon, free enthalpy of a compound and free enthalpy of a reaction, case of dry corrosion (thermodynamic aspect, Ellingham diagram, oxidation mechanisms, experimental study, macroscopic modelling), case of aqueous corrosion (electrochemical thermodynamics and kinetics, experimental determination of corrosion rate). The fourth part addresses the different forms of aqueous corrosion: generalized corrosion (atmospheric corrosion, mechanisms and tests), localized corrosion (galvanic, pitting, cracking, intergranular, erosion and cavitation), particular cases of stress cracking (stress corrosion, fatigue-corrosion, embrittlement by hydrogen), and bi-corrosion (of non alloyed steels, of stainless steels, and of aluminium and copper alloys). The sixth chapter addresses the struggle and the protection against aqueous corrosion: methods of prevention, scope of use of main alloys, geometry-based protection of pieces, use of corrosion inhibitors, use of organic or metallic coatings, electrochemical protection. The last chapter proposes an overview of corrosion types in industrial practices: in the automotive industry, in the oil industry, in the aircraft industry, and in the

  20. Coaxial stub resonator for online monitoring early stages of corrosion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoog-Antonyuk, N.A.; Mayer, Mateo J.J.; Miedema, Henk; Olthuis, Wouter; van den Berg, Albert

    2014-01-01

    Here we demonstrate the proof-of-principle of a new type of flow-through sensor to assess the corrosion rate of metal surfaces. The method can be applied to all situations where metals are exposed to a corrosive (fluidic) environment, including, for instance, the interior of pipes and tubes. Our

  1. Study on stainless steel electrode based on dynamic aluminum liquid corrosion mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Hua; Yang, Ruifeng

    2009-01-01

    Scanning electrion microscope (SEM) was performed for investigations on the corrosion mechanism of stainless steel electrode in dynamic melting aluminum liquid. Microstructures and composition analysis was made by electron probe analysis (EPA) combined with metallic phase analysis. It can be concluded that the corrosion process is mainly composed of physical corrosion (flowing and scouring corrosion) and chemical corrosion (forming FeAl and Fe2Al5) and the two mechanisms usually exist simultaneously. The corrosion interface thickness is about 10 μm, which is different to usual interface width of hundreds μm in the static melting Al with iron matrix.

  2. Central and peripheral blood flow during exercise with a continuous-flow left ventricular assist device: constant versus increasing pump speed: a pilot study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brassard, Patrice; Jensen, Annette S; Nordsborg, Nikolai

    2011-01-01

    with work rate would increase organ blood flow. Methods and Results- Invasively determined CO and leg blood flow and Doppler-determined cerebral perfusion were measured during 2 incremental cycle exercise tests on the same day in 8 patients provided with a HeartMate II LVAD. In random order, patients...

  3. Formation of a vortex flow at the laser cutting of sheet metal with low pressure of assisting gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kovalev, O B; Yudin, P V; Zaitsev, A V [Khristianovich' s Institute of Theoretical and Applied Mechanics, Russian Academy of Sciences, Siberian Branch, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation)], E-mail: kovalev@itam.nsc.ru

    2008-08-07

    Specific features of subsonic jet gas flows in narrow channels geometrically similar to the laser cut are studied experimentally and theoretically. Such flows are visualized by a technique based on prior application of a viscous liquid film onto the side walls of the channel made of transparent glass. The gas flow inside the channel induces a liquid flow on the glass wall in the form of extremely small filaments, which coincide with the streamlines of the gas flow. Filming of these filaments by a CCD camera allows one to capture the specific features of these gas-dynamic flows. Mathematical modelling of the dynamics of a viscous compressible heat-conducting gas was performed by solving full three-dimensional Navier-Stokes equations. Numerical calculations and experiments reveal vortex structures in the flow at the entrance and exit of the channel, which may directly affect the surface quality in real gas-laser cutting of metals. The largest vortex, which arises at the channel exit, collects and accumulates the liquid flowing down the channel walls. Jet flows are generated by sonic nozzles with conical or cylindrical exit sections or by a double coaxial nozzle. The double nozzle includes the central conical nozzle and the side concentric nozzle, which allows additional side injection of the gas to be organized. The study with the double nozzle shows that the vortices disappear as the pressure in the external nozzle is increased, and a stable vortex-free attached gas flow is formed.

  4. Contribution of the characterization of radioactive surfaces after sodium corrosion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Menken, G.; Holl, M.

    1978-01-01

    Since 1972 INTERATOM is performing sodium mass and activity transfer investigations in an SNR-corrosion mockup loop which allows to study the transport of activated corrosion products in the primary heat transfer system of a sodium cooled reactor. The loop simulates the temperature and flow conditions and the materials combination of the SNR 300. The mass transfer examinations were aimed at the determination of the following: the linear corrosion and deposition rates; the selective corrosion of the alloying elements; the transfer of activated corrosion products. The results of a number of corrosion runs will be used in the following contribution to characterize the contaminated and corroded surface layers of reactor components. The loop reached a total operation time of 12300 h while the cold trap temperature was changed between 105 deg. C and 165 deg. C in successive runs

  5. Corrosion principles and surface modification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kruger, J.

    1982-01-01

    This chapter examines the important strategies provided by the newer ideas of corrosion science and engineering that surface modification techniques must utilize to help prevent corrosion, especially the most damaging kind of aqueous corrosion, localized corrosion. Provides a brief introduction to the principles underlying the phenomenon of corrosion in order to use them to discuss surface modification strategies to combat corrosion. Discusses the electrochemistry of corrosion; the thermodynamics of corrosion; the kinetics of corrosion; thermodynamic strategies; and kinetic strategies (formation of more protective passive films; resistance to breakdown; ductility; repassivation)

  6. Corrosion detector apparatus for universal assessment of pollution in data centers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamann, Hendrik F.; Klein, Levente I.

    2015-08-18

    A compact corrosion measurement apparatus and system includes an air fan, a corrosion sensor, a temperature sensor, a humidity sensor, a heater element, and an air flow sensor all under control to monitor and maintain constant air parameters in an environment and minimize environmental fluctuations around the corrosion sensor to overcome the variation commonly encountered in corrosion rate measurement. The corrosion measurement apparatus includes a structure providing an enclosure within which are located the sensors. Constant air flow and temperature is maintained within the enclosure where the corrosion sensor is located by integrating a variable speed air fan and a heater with the corresponding feedback loop control. Temperature and air flow control loops ensure that corrosivity is measured under similar conditions in different facilities offering a general reference point that allow a one to one comparison between facilities with similar or different pollution levels.

  7. Development and evaluation of totally implantable ventricular assist system using a vibrating flow pump and transcutaneous energy transmission system with amorphous fibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yambe, T; Hashimoto, H; Kobayashi, S; Sonobe, T; Naganuma, S; Nanka, S S; Matsuki, H; Yoshizawa, M; Tabayashi, K; Takayasu, H; Takeda, H; Nitta, S

    1997-01-01

    We have developed a vibrating flow pump (VFP) that can generate oscillated blood flow with a relatively high frequency (10-50 Hz) for a totally implantable ventricular assist system (VAS). To evaluate the newly developed VAS, left heart bypasses, using the VFP, were performed in chronic animal experiments. Hemodynamic parameters were recorded in a data recorder in healthy adult goats during an awake condition and analyzed in a personal computer system through an alternating-direct current converter. Basic performance of the total system with a transcutaneous energy transmission system were satisfactory. During left ventricular assistance with the VFP, Mayer wave fluctuations of hemodynamics were decreased in the power spectrum, the fractal dimensions of the hemodynamics were significantly decreased, and peripheral vascular resistance was significantly decreased. These results suggest that cardiovascular regulatory nonlinear dynamics, which mediate the hemodynamics, may be affected by left ventricular bypass with oscillated flow. The decreased power of the Mayer wave in the spectrum caused the limit cycle attractor of the hemodynamics and decreased peripheral resistance. These results suggest that this newly developed VAS is useful for the totally implantable system with unique characteristics that can control hemodynamic properties.

  8. A study of the flow boiling heat transfer in a minichannel for a heated wall with surface texture produced by vibration-assisted laser machining

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piasecka, Magdalena; Strąk, Kinga; Grabas, Bogusław; Maciejewska, Beata

    2016-01-01

    The paper presents results concerning flow boiling heat transfer in a vertical minichannel with a depth of 1.7 mm and a width of 16 mm. The element responsible for heating FC-72, which flowed laminarly in the minichannel, was a plate with an enhanced surface. Two types of surface textures were considered. Both were produced by vibration-assisted laser machining. Infrared thermography was used to record changes in the temperature on the outer smooth side of the plate. Two-phase flow patterns were observed through a glass pane. The main aim of the study was to analyze how the two types of surface textures affect the heat transfer coefficient. A two-dimensional heat transfer approach was proposed to determine the local values of the heat transfer coefficient. The inverse problem for the heated wall was solved using a semi-analytical method based on the Trefftz functions. The results are presented as relationships between the heat transfer coefficient and the distance along the minichannel length and as boiling curves. The experimental data obtained for the two types of enhanced heated surfaces was compared with the results recorded for the smooth heated surface. The highest local values of the heat transfer coefficient were reported in the saturated boiling region for the plate with the type 1 texture produced by vibration-assisted laser machining. (paper)

  9. Microwave-assisted preparation of carbon nanofiber-functionalized graphite felts as electrodes for polymer-based redox-flow batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwenke, A. M.; Janoschka, T.; Stolze, C.; Martin, N.; Hoeppener, S.; Schubert, U. S.

    2016-12-01

    A simple and fast microwave-assisted protocol to functionalize commercially available graphite felts (GFs) with carbon nanofibers (CNFs) for the application as electrode materials in redox-flow batteries (RFB) is demonstrated. As catalyst for the CNF synthesis nickel acetate is applied and ethanol serves as the carbon source. By the in-situ growth of CNFs, the active surface of the electrodes is increased by a factor of 50, which is determined by the electrochemical double layer capacities of the obtained materials. Furthermore, the morphology of the CNF-coating is investigated by scanning electron microscopy. Subsequently, the functionalized electrodes are applied in a polymer-based redox-flow battery (pRFB) using a TEMPO- and a viologen polymer as active materials. Due to the increased surface area as compared to an untreated graphite felt electrode, the current rating is improved by about 45% at 80 mA cm-2 and, furthermore, a decrease in overpotentials is observed. Thus, using this microwave-assisted synthesis approach, CNF-functionalized composite electrodes are prepared with a very simple protocol suitable for real life applications and an improvement of the overall performance of the polymer-based redox-flow battery is demonstrated.

  10. Monitoring Microbially Influenced Corrosion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hilbert, Lisbeth Rischel

    and diffusional effects and unreliable corrosion rates, when biofilm and ferrous sulphide corrosion products cover the steel surface. Corrosion rates can be overestimated by a factor of 10 to 100 by electrochemical techniques. Weight loss coupons and ER are recommended as necessary basic monitoring techniques......Abstract Microbially influenced corrosion (MIC) of carbon steel may occur in media with microbiological activity of especially sulphate-reducing bacteria (SRB). The applicability and reliability of a number of corrosion monitoring techniques for monitoring MIC has been evaluated in experiments....... EIS might be used for detection of MIC as the appearance of very large capacitances can be attributed to the combined ferrous sulphide and biofilm formation. Capacitance correlates directly with sulphide concentration in sterile sulphide media. Keywords: Corrosion monitoring, carbon steel, MIC, SRB...

  11. SRB seawater corrosion project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozack, M. J.

    1991-01-01

    The corrosion behavior of 2219 aluminum when exposed to seawater was characterized. Controlled corrosion experiments at three different temperatures (30, 60 and 100 C) and two different environments (seawater and 3.5 percent salt solution) were designed to elucidate the initial stages in the corrosion process. It was found that 2219 aluminum is an active catalytic surface for growth of Al2O3, NaCl, and MgO. Formation of Al2O3 is favored at lower temperatures, while MgO is favored at higher temperatures. Visible corrosion products are formed within 30 minutes after seawater exposure. Corrosion characteristics in 3.5 percent salt solution are different than corrosion in seawater. Techniques utilized were: (1) scanning electron microscopy, (2) energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy, and (3) Auger electron spectroscopy.

  12. Coatings and Corrosion Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Purpose: The mission of the Coatings and Corrosion Laboratory is to develop and analyze the effectiveness of innovative coatings test procedures while evaluating the...

  13. Relation Between Pressure and Volume Unloading During Ramp Testing in Patients Supported with a Continuous-Flow Left Ventricular Assist Device

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jung, Mette H; Hassager, Christian; Balling, Louise

    2015-01-01

    Pulmonary capillary wedge pressure (PCWP) is the key to describing left ventricular (LV) unloading, however, the relation between pressure and the echocardiography-derived surrogate of LV volume (left ventricular end-diastolic diameter (LVEDD)) as a function of pump speed (RPM) in continuous......-flow left ventricular assist device (CF-LVAD) patients is unknown. In this study the pressure-volume relationship as a function of RPM during ramp testing was investigated by simultaneously measuring PCWP by Swan-Ganz catheter and LVEDD by echocardiography. The ramp protocol started at usual pump setting...

  14. Corrosion protected reversing heat exchanger

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zawierucha, R.

    1984-01-01

    A reversing heat exchanger of the plate and fin type having multiple aluminum parting sheets in a stacked arrangement with corrugated fins separating the sheets to form multiple flow paths, means for closing the ends of the sheets, an input manifold arrangement of headers for the warm end of of the exchanger and an output manifold arrangement for the cold end of the exchanger with the input air feed stream header and the waste gas exhaust header having an alloy of zinc and aluminum coated on the inside surface for providing corrosion protection to the stack

  15. Corrosion in the oil industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brondel, D [Sedco Forex, Montrouge (France); Edwards, R [Schlumberger Well Services, Columbus, OH (United States); Hayman, A [Etudes et Productions Schlumberger, Clamart (France); Hill, D [Schlumberger Dowell, Tulsa, OK (United States); Mehta, S [Schlumberger Dowell, St. Austell (United Kingdom); Semerad, T [Mobil Oil Indonesia, Inc., Sumatra (Indonesia)

    1994-04-01

    Corrosion costs the oil industry billions of dollars a year, a fact that makes the role of the corrosion engineer an increasingly important one. Attention is paid to how corrosion affects every aspect of exploration and production, from offshore rigs to casing. Also the role of corrosion agents such as drilling and production fluids is reviewed. Methods of control and techniques to monitor corrosion are discussed, along with an explanation of the chemical causes of corrosion. 21 figs., 32 refs.

  16. Reactor Structure Materials: Corrosion of Reactor Core Internals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Dyck, S.

    2000-01-01

    The objectives of SCK-CEN's R and D programme on the corrosion of reactor core internals are: (1) to gain mechanistic insight into the Irradition Assisted Stress Corrosion Cracking (IASCC) phenomenon by studying the influence of separate parameters in well controlled experiments; (2) to develop and validate a predictive capability on IASCC by model description and (3) to define and validate countermeasures and monitoring techniques for application in reactors. Progress and achievements in 1999 are described

  17. Protection against deposits and corrosion in water systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lehmkuhl, J

    1978-11-01

    Industry generally, including mining and coal preparation, are in the habit of using large amounts of untreated service water. The service water can be softened or treated with hardness stabilisers in order to prevent deposit formation and corrosion. As often as not, deposits of dirt and attack by microorganisma also have to be eliminated. The article puts forward some suggestions for practical assistance in protecting water systems against the dangers of deposits and corrosion.

  18. Corrosion-product inventory: the Bruce-B secondary system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sawicki, J.A.; Price, J.; Brett, M.E.

    1995-01-01

    Corrosion inspection and corrosion-product characterization in water and steam systems are important for component and systems maintenance in nuclear power stations. Corrosion products are produced, released and redeposited at various sites in the secondary system. Depending on the alloys used in the condenser and feedwater heaters, particulate iron oxides and hydroxides can account for about 95-99% of the total corrosion-product transport. Where brass or cupro-nickel alloys are present, copper and zinc contribute significantly to the total transport and deposition. Particulates are transported by the feedwater to the steam generators, where they accumulate and can cause a variety of problems, such as loss of heat transfer capability through deposition on boiler tubes, blockage of flow through boiler-tube support plates and accelerated corrosion in crevices, either in deep sludge piles or at blocked tube supports. The influx of oxidized corrosion products may have a particularly adverse effect on the redox environment of steam generator tubing, thereby increasing the probability of localized corrosion and other degradation mechanisms. In this paper, there is a description of a survey of general corrosion deposits in Bruce-B, Units 5-8, which helps to identify the origin, evolution and inventory of corrosion products along the secondary system of Candu reactors

  19. An insight in spatial corrosion prediction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mustaffa, Zahiraniza; Gelder, Pieter van; Hashim, Ahmad Mustafa

    2012-01-01

    Recent discoveries on fluid–structure interactions between the external flows and circular cylinders placed close to the wall have added new values to the hydrodynamics of unburied offshore pipelines laid on a sea bed. The hydrodynamics of waves and/or currents introduced vortex flows surrounding the pipeline. External corrosions formed in the pipelines were assumed to be partly contributed by such fluid–structure interactions. The spatial consequences of such interactions were of interest of this study. This paper summarizes selected previous experimental and numerical works reported by literature on these discoveries. Actual field data were utilized in this study for further validation. The characteristics of corrosion orientations in the pipelines were studied comprehensively using simple statistics and results were discussed. Results adopted from the field data acknowledged well to the hypothesis from the reported literature. The updated knowledge from this fluid–structure interaction is hoped to benefit the industry and constructively incorporated into the current subsea pipeline designs. Highlights: ► We attempt to predict spatial corrosions in offshore pipelines. ► We validate the analysis using theories on fluid–structure interactions. ► Vortex flows are assumed to cause external corrosions on pipeline walls. ► More defects are expected for pipelines placed in areas governed by waves.

  20. Corrosion evaluation technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Uh Chul; Han, Jeong Ho; Nho, Kye Ho; Lee, Eun Hee; Kim, Hong Pyo; Hwang, Seong Sik; Lee, Deok Hyun; Hur, Do Haeng; Kim, Kyung Mo.

    1997-09-01

    A multifrequency ACPD system was assembled which can measure very small crack. Stress corrosion cracking test system with SSRT operating high temperature was installed. Stress corrosion cracking test of newly developed alloy 600 and existing alloy 600 was carried out in steam atmosphere of 400 deg C. No crack was observed in both materials within a test period of 2,000 hrs. Corrosion fatigue test system operating at high temperature was installed in which fatigue crack was measured by CDPD. Lead enhanced the SCC of the Alloy 600 in high temperature water, had a tendency to modify a cracking morphology from intergranular to transgranular. Pit initiation preferentially occurred at Ti-rich carbide. Resistance to pit initiation decreased with increasing temperature up to 300 deg C. Test loop for erosion corrosion was designed and fabricated. Thin layer activation technique was very effective in measuring erosion corrosion. Erosion corrosion of a part of secondary side pipe was evaluated by the Check Family Codes of EPRI. Calculated values of pipe thickness by Check Family Codes coincided with the pipe thickness measured by UT with an error of ± 20%. Literature review on turbine failure showed that failure usually occurred in low pressure turbine rotor disc and causes of failure are stress corrosion cracking and corrosion fatigue. (author). 12 refs., 20 tabs., 77 figs

  1. Aluminum Corrosion and Turbidity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Longtin, F.B.

    2003-01-01

    Aluminum corrosion and turbidity formation in reactors correlate with fuel sheath temperature. To further substantiate this correlation, discharged fuel elements from R-3, P-2 and K-2 cycles were examined for extent of corrosion and evidence of breaking off of the oxide film. This report discusses this study

  2. Demystifying Controlling Copper Corrosion

    Science.gov (United States)

    The LCR systematically misses the highest health and corrosion risk sites for copper. Additionally, there are growing concerns for WWTP copper in sludges and discharge levels. There are many corrosion control differences between copper and lead. This talk explains the sometimes c...

  3. Archaeological analogs and corrosion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    David, D.

    2008-01-01

    In the framework of the high level and long life radioactive wastes disposal deep underground, the ANDRA built a research program on the material corrosion. In particular they aim to design containers for a very long time storage. Laboratory experiments are in progress and can be completed by the analysis of metallic archaeological objects and their corrosion after hundred years. (A.L.B.)

  4. The jet impingement cell: A valuable device for investigating CO{sub 2} corrosion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kinsella, Brian; John, Douglas; Bailey, Stuart; De Marco, Roland [Western Australian Corrosion Research Group, School of Applied Chemistry, Curtin University of Technology, GPO Box U1987, Perth WA, 6845 (Australia)

    2004-07-01

    The jet impingement cell (JIC) is a valuable technique for the investigation of carbon dioxide corrosion of steel and its inhibition under high flow conditions or high wall shear stress. Despite the use of the JIC in corrosion testing laboratories not a great deal has been published on the design and calibration of these cells. In the evaluation of corrosion inhibitors, the type of corrosion and relative performance of the inhibitors depends on the metallurgy of the steel used to manufacture electrodes and measure the corrosion rate. This paper covers aspects of cell design and the determination of mass transfer and wall shear stress at electrodes used in the cell. The performance of different generic type corrosion inhibitors and their affect on the type of corrosion (i.e, uniform, pitting and crevice corrosion) is shown and discussed. (authors)

  5. Corrosion of structural materials and electrochemistry in high temperature water of nuclear power systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uchida, Shunsuke

    2014-01-01

    The latest experiences with corrosion in the cooling systems of nuclear power plants are reviewed. High temperature cooling water causes corrosion of structural materials, which often leads to adverse effects in the plants, e.g., generating defects in materials of major components and fuel claddings, increasing shutdown radiation and increasing the volume of radwaste sources. Corrosion behaviors are much affected by water qualities and differ according to the values of water qualities and the materials themselves. In order to establish reliable operation, each plant requires its own unique optimal water chemistry control based on careful consideration of its system, materials and operational history. Electrochemistry is one of key issues that determine corrosion related problems but it is not the only issue. Most phenomena for corrosion related problems, e.g., flow-accelerated corrosion (FAC), intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC), primary water stress corrosion cracking (PWSCC) and thinning of fuel cladding materials, can be understood based on an electrochemical index, e.g., electrochemical corrosion potential (ECP), conductivities and pH. The most important electrochemical index, ECP, can be measured at elevated temperature and applied to in situ sensors of corrosion conditions to detect anomalous conditions of structural materials at their very early stages. In the paper, theoretical models based on electrochemistry to estimate wall thinning rate of carbon steel piping due to flow-accelerated corrosion and corrosive conditions determining IGSCC crack initiation and growth rate are introduced. (author)

  6. Prediction of Corrosion of Advanced Materials and Fabricated Components

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    A. Anderko; G. Engelhardt; M.M. Lencka (OLI Systems Inc.); M.A. Jakab; G. Tormoen; N. Sridhar (Southwest Research Institute)

    2007-09-29

    The goal of this project is to provide materials engineers, chemical engineers and plant operators with a software tool that will enable them to predict localized corrosion of process equipment including fabricated components as well as base alloys. For design and revamp purposes, the software predicts the occurrence of localized corrosion as a function of environment chemistry and assists the user in selecting the optimum alloy for a given environment. For the operation of existing plants, the software enables the users to predict the remaining life of equipment and help in scheduling maintenance activities. This project combined fundamental understanding of mechanisms of corrosion with focused experimental results to predict the corrosion of advanced, base or fabricated, alloys in real-world environments encountered in the chemical industry. At the heart of this approach is the development of models that predict the fundamental parameters that control the occurrence of localized corrosion as a function of environmental conditions and alloy composition. The fundamental parameters that dictate the occurrence of localized corrosion are the corrosion and repassivation potentials. The program team, OLI Systems and Southwest Research Institute, has developed theoretical models for these parameters. These theoretical models have been applied to predict the occurrence of localized corrosion of base materials and heat-treated components in a variety of environments containing aggressive and non-aggressive species. As a result of this project, a comprehensive model has been established and extensively verified for predicting the occurrence of localized corrosion as a function of environment chemistry and temperature by calculating the corrosion and repassivation potentials.To support and calibrate the model, an experimental database has been developed to elucidate (1) the effects of various inhibiting species as well as aggressive species on localized corrosion of nickel

  7. Corrosion fatigue of steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spaehn, H.; Wagner, G.H.

    1976-01-01

    Corrosion fatigue phenomena can be classified into two main groups according to the electrochemical state of the metal surface in the presence of electrolytes: the active and the passive state with an important sub-group of corrosion fatigue in the unstable passive state. The allowable stress for structures exposed to the conjoint action of corrosion and fatigue is influenced by many factors: kind of media, number of cycles, frequency, mean stress, size, notches, loading mode, alloy composition and mechanical strength. A critical literature review shows contradictory results if a classification by the electrochemical surface state is not applied. Case histories and counter measures illustrate the practical importance of corrosion fatigue in many branches of industry as well as the urgent need for a better knowledge about the mutual influence of the phenomena to get rules by which the engineer can appraise the risk of corrosion fatigue. (orig.) [de

  8. A Localised Corrosion Cell for Industrial Applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, A.; Hilbert, Lisbeth Rischel; Jansen, P.

    2003-01-01

    The LOCORR-CELL™ developed by FORCE TECHNOLOGY is an electrochemical cell for industrial applications estimating localised corrosion. The cell is constructed in a carbon steel casing for direct mounting into the system. It is based on an oxygen concentration element reflecting the interaction...... between the environment formed under a deposit or in a crevice. The essential feature of the method is that it reflects the influence of oxygen content, conductivity and temperature as well as the influence of corrosion inhibitors, MIC and other effects that have an effect on localised corrosion under...... deposits and in crevices. The measuring principle in the cell is based on measurements of the galvanic current flow between the steel anode covered by a porous glass frit and the surrounding steel casing. The current is measured by a zero-resistance circuit-instrument and the activity can be presented...

  9. Corrosion resistance of uranium with carbon ion implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liang Hongwei; Yan Dongxu; Bai Bin; Lang Dingmu; Xiao Hong; Wang Xiaohong

    2008-01-01

    The carbon modified layers prepared on uranium surface by carbon ion implantation, gradient implantation, recoil implantation and ion beam assisted deposition process techniques were studied. Depth profile elements of the samples based on Auger electron spectroscopy, phase composition identified by X-ray diffraction as well as corrosion resistance of the surface modified layers by electrochemistry tester and humid-thermal oxidation test were carried out. The carbon modified layers can be obtained by above techniques. The samples deposited with 45 keV ion bombardment, implanted by 50 keV ions and implanted with gradient energies are of better corrosion resistance properties. The samples deposited carbon before C + implantation and C + assisted deposition exhibit worse corrosion resistance properties. The modified layers are dominantly dot-corraded, which grows from the dots into substructure, however, the assisted deposition samples have comparatively high carbon composition and are corraded weakly. (authors)

  10. Computational investigation of the flow field contribution to improve electricity generation in granular activated carbon-assisted microbial fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Lei; Li, Jian; Battaglia, Francine; He, Zhen

    2016-11-01

    Microbial fuel cells (MFCs) offer an alternative approach to treat wastewater with less energy input and direct electricity generation. To optimize MFC anodic performance, adding granular activated carbon (GAC) has been proved to be an effective way, most likely due to the enlarged electrode surface for biomass attachment and improved mixing of the flow field. The impact of a flow field on the current enhancement within a porous anode medium (e.g., GAC) has not been well understood before, and thus is investigated in this study by using mathematical modeling of the multi-order Butler-Volmer equation with computational fluid dynamics (CFD) techniques. By comparing three different CFD cases (without GAC, with GAC as a nonreactive porous medium, and with GAC as a reactive porous medium), it is demonstrated that adding GAC contributes to a uniform flow field and a total current enhancement of 17%, a factor that cannot be neglected in MFC design. However, in an actual MFC operation, this percentage could be even higher because of the microbial competition and energy loss issues within a porous medium. The results of the present study are expected to help with formulating strategies to optimize MFC with a better flow pattern design.

  11. Quantum dots assisted photocatalysis for the chemiluminometric determination of chemical oxygen demand using a single interface flow system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silvestre, Cristina I.C.; Frigerio, Christian [Requimte, Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Pharmacy, Porto University, Rua Anibal Cunha 164, 4099-030, Porto (Portugal); Santos, Joao L.M., E-mail: joaolms@ff.up.pt [Requimte, Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Pharmacy, Porto University, Rua Anibal Cunha 164, 4099-030, Porto (Portugal); Lima, Jose L.F.C. [Requimte, Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Pharmacy, Porto University, Rua Anibal Cunha 164, 4099-030, Porto (Portugal)

    2011-08-12

    Highlights: {yields} A novel flow method for the determination of chemical oxygen demand is proposed. {yields} CdTe nanocrystals are irradiated with UV light to generate strong oxidizing species. {yields} Reactive species promote a fast catalytic degradation of organic matter. {yields} Luminol is used as a chemiluminescence probe for indirect COD assessment. {yields} A single interface flow system was implemented to automate the assays. - Abstract: A novel flow method for the determination of chemical oxygen demand (COD) is proposed in this work. It relies on the combination of a fully automated single interface flow system, an on-line UV photocatalytic unit and quantum dot (QD) nanotechnology. The developed approach takes advantage of CdTe nanocrystals capacity to generate strong oxidizing species upon irradiation with UV light, which fostered a fast catalytic degradation of the organic compounds. Luminol was used as a chemiluminescence (CL) probe for indirect COD assessment, since it is easily oxidized by the QD generated species yielding a strong CL emission that is quenched in the presence of the organic matter. The proposed methodology allowed the determination of COD concentrations between 1 and 35 mg L{sup -1}, with good precision (R.S.D. < 1.1%, n = 3) and a sampling frequency of about 33 h{sup -1}. The procedure was applied to the determination of COD in wastewater certified reference materials and the obtained results showed an excellent agreement with the certified values.

  12. Corrosion evaluation of service water system materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stein, A.A.; Felder, C.M.; Martin, R.L.

    1994-01-01

    The availability and reliability of the service water system is critical for safe operation of a nuclear power plant. Degradation of the system piping and components has forced utilities to re-evaluate the corrosion behavior of current and alternative system materials, to support assessments of the remaining service life of the service water system, selection of replacement materials, implementation of corrosion protection methods and corrosion monitoring programs, and identification of maintenance and operational constraints consistent with the materials used. TU Electric and Stone and Webster developed a service water materials evaluation program for the Comanche Peak Steam Electric Station. Because of the length of exposure and the generic interest in this program by the nuclear power industry, EPRI joined TU to co-sponsor the test program. The program was designed to evaluate the corrosion behavior of current system materials and candidate replacement materials and to determine the operational and design changes which could improve the corrosion performance of the system. Although the test program was designed to be representative of service water system materials and environments targeted to conditions at Comanche Peak, these conditions are typical of and relevant to other fresh water cooled nuclear service water systems. Testing was performed in raw water and water treated with biocide under typical service water operating conditions including continuous flow, intermittent flow, and stagnant conditions. The test program evaluated the 300 Series and 6% molybdenum stainless steels, copper-nickel, titanium, carbon steel, and a formed-in-place nonmetallic pipe lining to determine susceptibility to general, crevice, and microbiologically influenced corrosion and pitting attack. This report presents the results of the test program after 4 years of exposure

  13. Generating pipeline networks for corrosion assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferguson, J. [Cimarron Engineering Ltd., Calgary, AB (Canada)

    2008-07-01

    Production characteristics and gas-fluid compositions of fluids must be known in order to assess pipelines for internal corrosion risk. In this study, a gathering system pipeline network was built in order to determine corrosion risk for gathering system pipelines. Connections were established between feeder and collector lines in order measure upstream production and the weighted average of the upstream composition of each pipeline in the system. A Norsok M-506 carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) corrosion rate model was used to calculate corrosion rates. A spreadsheet was then used to tabulate the obtained data. The analysis used straight lines drawn between the 'from' and 'to' legal sub-division (LSD) endpoints in order to represent pipelines on an Alberta township system (ATS) and identify connections between pipelines. Well connections were established based on matching surface hole location and 'from' LSDs. Well production, composition, pressure, and temperature data were sourced and recorded as well attributes. XSL hierarchical computations were used to determine the production and composition properties of the commingled inflows. It was concluded that the corrosion assessment process can identify locations within the pipeline network where potential deadlegs branched off from flowing pipelines. 4 refs., 2 tabs., 2 figs.

  14. Evaluation of annual corrosion tests for aggressive water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubová, V.; Ilavský, J.; Barloková, D.

    2011-12-01

    Internal corrosion has a significant effect on the useful life of pipes, the hydraulic conditions of a distribution system and the quality of the water transported. All water is corrosive under some conditions, and the level of this corrosion depends on the physical and chemical properties of the water and properties of the pipe material. Galvanic treatment is an innovation for protecting against corrosion, and this method is also suitable for removal of water stone too. This method consists of the electrogalvanic principle, which is generated by the flowing of water between a zinc anode and the cupro-alloy cover of a column. This article presents experimental corrosion tests at water resource Pernek (This water resource-well marked as HL-1 is close to the Pernek of village), where the device is operating based on this principle.

  15. Automated Methods Of Corrosion Measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bech-Nielsen, Gregers; Andersen, Jens Enevold Thaulov; Reeve, John Ch

    1997-01-01

    The chapter describes the following automated measurements: Corrosion Measurements by Titration, Imaging Corrosion by Scanning Probe Microscopy, Critical Pitting Temperature and Application of the Electrochemical Hydrogen Permeation Cell.......The chapter describes the following automated measurements: Corrosion Measurements by Titration, Imaging Corrosion by Scanning Probe Microscopy, Critical Pitting Temperature and Application of the Electrochemical Hydrogen Permeation Cell....

  16. Corrosion of carbon steel in contact with bentonite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dobrev, D.; Vokal, A.; Bruha, P.

    2010-01-01

    of approximately 2-3 mm/yr in bentonite pore water solution. No significant pressure increase was observed due to generation of hydrogen. The results of surprising behaviour of carbon steels in bentonite could be explained by the different composition of solution after granitic water flow through bentonite or by hypothesis based on our modelling experiments that corrosion rate increase is caused by so called pumping effect of bentonite which is in turn caused by different solubilities of corrosion products in the corrosion layer and bentonite. Influence of corrosion products on bentonite is another important question. It was clearly visible that the transport of corrosion products into Volclay bentonite is approximately 1 mm after 30 days of corrosion at 70 deg. C. The reason why no pressure increase was observed due to hydrogen evolution could be explained by higher rate of hydrogen transport in bubbles than is its evolution rate. But these hydrogen bubbles might be also accumulated between carbon steel layer and bentonite what results in inhomogeneity of corrosion layer. The results achieved significantly affect performance assessment of concept of disposal with carbon steel and bentonite. Only rather short term (30 days) experiments were carried out. In the next period longer experiments will have to give answer if the increase of corrosion rate of carbon steel in contact with bentonite is transient or will last for long time. (authors)

  17. Fluoroscopy-Guided Resolution of Ingested Thrombus Leading to Functional Disturbance of a Continuous-Flow Left Ventricular Assist Device

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jens Garbade

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The third generation of left ventricular assist devices (LVADs has been shown to improve outcome and quality of life in patients suffering from acute and chronic heart failure. However, VAD-associated complications are still a challenge in the clinical practice. Here we report the resolution of a mobile thrombus formation in the proximity of the inflow cannula of a third generation of LVADs (HVAD Pump, HeartWare, Inc. in a patient with chronic heart failure 4 months after implantation.

  18. Metal temperature monitoring in corrosive gases at high temperature and high thermal flows; Monitoreo de temperaturas de metal en gases corrosivos a alta temperatura y altos flujos termicos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huerta Espino, Mario; Martinez Flores, Marco Antonio; Martinez Villafane, Alberto; Porcayo Calderon, Jesus; Gomez Guzman, Roberto; Reyes Cervantes, Fernando [Instituto de Investigaciones Electricas, Cuernavaca (Mexico)

    1990-12-31

    The direct measurement of metal temperatures during operation in superheater, reheater, and water wall tubes in zones exposed to high thermal flows is of great interest for the operation and analysis of the correct functioning of a steam generator. The operation temperature measurement of these zones differs very much of the monitored temperature in headers in the dead chamber, since the temperature measured in this zone is the steam temperature that does not reflect the one detected in the gas zone. For this reason, the thermocouples implant in gas zones will detect the real metal temperature and the incidence that some operation variables might have on it (Martinez et al., (1990). [Espanol] La medicion directa de temperaturas de metal durante operacion en tubos de sobrecalentador, recalentador y pared de agua en zonas expuestas a altos flujos termicos es de gran interes para la operacion y analisis del buen funcionamiento de un generador de vapor. La medicion de la temperatura de operacion de estas zonas, difiere mucho de la temperatura monitoreada en cabezales en zona de camara muerta, ya que la temperatura registrada en esta zona es la de vapor que no es un reflejo de la detectada en zona de gases. Por esta razon, la implantacion de termopares en zona de gases detectara la temperatura de metal real y la incidencia que algunas variables de operacion tengan sobre esta (Martinez et al., 1990).

  19. Metal temperature monitoring in corrosive gases at high temperature and high thermal flows; Monitoreo de temperaturas de metal en gases corrosivos a alta temperatura y altos flujos termicos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huerta Espino, Mario; Martinez Flores, Marco Antonio; Martinez Villafane, Alberto; Porcayo Calderon, Jesus; Gomez Guzman, Roberto; Reyes Cervantes, Fernando [Instituto de Investigaciones Electricas, Cuernavaca (Mexico)

    1991-12-31

    The direct measurement of metal temperatures during operation in superheater, reheater, and water wall tubes in zones exposed to high thermal flows is of great interest for the operation and analysis of the correct functioning of a steam generator. The operation temperature measurement of these zones differs very much of the monitored temperature in headers in the dead chamber, since the temperature measured in this zone is the steam temperature that does not reflect the one detected in the gas zone. For this reason, the thermocouples implant in gas zones will detect the real metal temperature and the incidence that some operation variables might have on it (Martinez et al., (1990). [Espanol] La medicion directa de temperaturas de metal durante operacion en tubos de sobrecalentador, recalentador y pared de agua en zonas expuestas a altos flujos termicos es de gran interes para la operacion y analisis del buen funcionamiento de un generador de vapor. La medicion de la temperatura de operacion de estas zonas, difiere mucho de la temperatura monitoreada en cabezales en zona de camara muerta, ya que la temperatura registrada en esta zona es la de vapor que no es un reflejo de la detectada en zona de gases. Por esta razon, la implantacion de termopares en zona de gases detectara la temperatura de metal real y la incidencia que algunas variables de operacion tengan sobre esta (Martinez et al., 1990).

  20. Flow Characteristics of Multi-circular Jet Plate in Premix Chamber of Air-Assist Atomizer for Burner System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amirnordin Shahrin Hisham

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The flow characteristics of multi-circular jet (MCJ plate in the premix chamber of an atomizer were investigated using Computational Fluid Dynamics. Multiphase volume of fluid behavior inside the chamber was determined via steady simulations. The Eulerian–Eulerian two-fluid approach was used for execution mixing of diesel fuel and air. Spray simulation using the discrete phase with injection was generated from the nozzle hole into the ambient atmosphere. The behavior of three MCJ plates in the premix chamber was studied numerically. Results illustrated that plate open area, Ae, influenced the turbulence inside the chamber. MCJ 3, which had the lowest open area, generated the highest flow velocity and turbulence kinetic energy compared with MCJ 1 and 2. The MCJ plates could increase the turbulence in the premix chamber and contribute to the combustion efficiency.

  1. Corrosion in power industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ventakeshwarlu, K.S.

    1979-01-01

    A brief account of the problem areas encountered as a result of corrosion in the electrical power industry including nuclear power industry is given and some of the measures contemplated and/or implemented to control corrosion are outlined. The corrosion problems in the steam generators and cladding tubes of the nuclear power plant have an added dimension of radioactivation which leads to contamination and radiation field. Importance of monitoring water quality and controlling water chemistry by addition of chemicals is emphasised. (M.G.B.)

  2. Corrosion of reactor materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1963-01-15

    Much operational experience and many experimental results have accumulated in recent years regarding corrosion of reactor materials, particularly since the 1958 Geneva Conference on the Peaceful Uses of Atomic Energy, where these problems were also discussed. It was, felt that a survey and critical appraisal of the results obtained during this period had become necessary and, in response to this need, IAEA organized a Conference on the Corrosion of Reactor Materials at Salzburg, Austria (4-9 June 1962). It covered many of the theoretical, experimental and engineering problems relating to the corrosion phenomena which occur in nuclear reactors as well as in the adjacent circuits

  3. Flow cytometry-assisted rapid isolation of recombinant Plasmodium berghei parasites exemplified by functional analysis of aquaglyceroporin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenthirapalan, Sanketha; Waters, Andrew P.; Matuschewski, Kai; Kooij, Taco W.A.

    2012-01-01

    The most critical bottleneck in the generation of recombinant Plasmodium berghei parasites is the mandatory in vivo cloning step following successful genetic manipulation. This study describes a new technique for rapid selection of recombinant P. berghei parasites. The method is based on flow cytometry to isolate isogenic parasite lines and represents a major advance for the field, in that it will speed the generation of recombinant parasites as well as cut down on animal use significantly. High expression of GFP during blood infection, a prerequisite for robust separation of transgenic lines by flow cytometry, was achieved. Isogenic recombinant parasite populations were isolated even in the presence of a 100-fold excess of wild-type (WT) parasites. Aquaglyceroporin (AQP) loss-of-function mutants and parasites expressing a tagged AQP were generated to validate this approach. aqp− parasites grow normally within the WT phenotypic range during blood infection of NMRI mice. Similarly, colonization of the insect vector and establishment of an infection after mosquito transmission were unaffected, indicating that AQP is dispensable for life cycle progression in vivo under physiological conditions, refuting its use as a suitable drug target. Tagged AQP localized to perinuclear structures and not the parasite plasma membrane. We suggest that flow-cytometric isolation of isogenic parasites overcomes the major roadblock towards a genome-scale repository of mutant and transgenic malaria parasite lines. PMID:23137753

  4. Hydraulic testing of intravascular axial flow blood pump designs with a protective cage of filaments for mechanical cavopulmonary assist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapadia, Jugal Y; Pierce, Kathryn C; Poupore, Amy K; Throckmorton, Amy L

    2010-01-01

    To provide hemodynamic support to patients with a failing single ventricle, we are developing a percutaneously inserted, magnetically levitated axial flow blood pump designed to augment pressure in the cavopulmonary circulation. The device is designed to serve as a bridge-to-transplant, bridge-to-recovery, bridge-to-hemodynamic stability, or bridge-to-surgical reconstruction. This study evaluated the hydraulic performance of three blood pump prototypes (a four-bladed impeller, a three-bladed impeller, and a three-bladed impeller with a four-bladed diffuser) whose designs evolved from previous design optimization phases. Each prototype included the same geometric protective cage of filaments, which stabilize the rotor within the housing and protect the housing wall from the rotating blades. All prototypes delivered pressure rises over a range of flow rates and rotational speeds that would be sufficient to augment hemodynamic conditions in the cavopulmonary circulation. The four-bladed impeller outperformed the two remaining prototypes by >40%; this design was able to generate a pressure rise of 4-28 mm Hg for flow rates of 0.5-10 L/min at rotational speeds of 4,000-7,000 RPM. Successful development of this blood pump will provide clinicians with a feasible therapeutic option for mechanically supporting the failing Fontan.

  5. Modelling reinforcement corrosion in concrete

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Michel, Alexander; Geiker, Mette Rica; Stang, Henrik

    2012-01-01

    A physio-chemical model for the simulation of reinforcement corrosion in concrete struc-tures was developed. The model allows for simulation of initiation and subsequent propaga-tion of reinforcement corrosion. Corrosion is assumed to be initiated once a defined critical chloride threshold......, a numerical example is pre-sented, that illustrates the formation of corrosion cells as well as propagation of corrosion in a reinforced concrete structure....

  6. Corrosion of PWR steam generators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garnsey, R.

    1979-01-01

    Some designs of pressurized water reactor (PWR) steam generators have experienced a variety of corrosion problems which include stress corrosion cracking, tube thinning, pitting, fatigue, erosion-corrosion and support plate corrosion resulting in 'denting'. Large international research programmes have been mounted to investigate the phenomena. The operational experience is reviewed and mechanisms which have been proposed to explain the corrosion damage are presented. The implications for design development and for boiler and feedwater control are discussed. (author)

  7. Impact of heat treatment on surface chemistry of Al-coated Eurofer for application as anti-corrosion and T-permeation barriers in a flowing Pb-15.7Li environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Konys, J., E-mail: juergen.konys@kit.edu [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Hermann-von-Helmholtz-Platz 1 76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany); Krauss, W.; Holstein, N.; Lorenz, J.; Wulf, S. [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Hermann-von-Helmholtz-Platz 1 76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany); Bhanumurthy, K. [Scientific Information Resource Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400 085 (India)

    2012-08-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Electro-chemical Al deposition is industrially relevant for barrier formation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Al scales have to be converted into protective layers by heat treatments. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Morphology of scales depend on deposition parameters. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Solid state diffusion step at 640 Degree-Sign C avoids critical Al melting and activates steel surface. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} protective scales detected. - Abstract: The compatibility testing of Eurofer steel in flowing Pb-15.7Li has shown that corrosion attack is a serious concern at least under view of precipitate formation from dissolved steel components in cooler system sections, leading to a high risk of tube blockages. Additionally, the T-permeation from the liquid breeder through the steel structure into the He-cooling system is an important safety issue. Both topics may be reduced by the application of barriers. Hot dip aluminization (HDA) showed that Al scales exhibit such ability but claimed also the development of improved coating technologies. Thus, two electro-chemically-based deposition processes, which exhibit industrial relevance and adjustable layer thickness of deposited Al, were developed, tested and characterized. Both are working with water-free electrolytes of toluene or ionic liquid (IL) base near room temperature (RT). The successfully deposited homogeneous layers need a heat treatment to establish the required protective/functional properties. During this stage, the Al reacts with the steel and forms an Al-enriched zone with a thin protective Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} surface scale. However, the topology is rough and pores are visible. Thus, for optimization of surface structure and scale quality, investigations concerning the required heat treatment were performed including effects coming from the applied coating technology.

  8. Analysis of the air flow generated by an air-assisted sprayer equipped with two axial fans using a 3D sonic anemometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Ramos, F Javier; Vidal, Mariano; Boné, Antonio; Malón, Hugo; Aguirre, Javier

    2012-01-01

    The flow of air generated by a new design of air assisted sprayer equipped with two axial fans of reversed rotation was analyzed. For this goal, a 3D sonic anemometer has been used (accuracy: 1.5%; measurement range: 0 to 45 m/s). The study was divided into a static test and a dynamic test. During the static test, the air velocity in the working vicinity of the sprayer was measured considering the following machine configurations: (1) one activated fan regulated at three air flows (machine working as a traditional sprayer); (2) two activated fans regulated at three air flows for each fan. In the static test 72 measurement points were considered. The location of the measurement points was as follow: left and right sides of the sprayer; three sections of measurement (A, B and C); three measurement distances from the shaft of the machine (1.5 m, 2.5 m and 3.5 m); and four measurement heights (1 m, 2 m, 3 m and 4 m). The static test results have shown significant differences in the module and the vertical angle of the air velocity vector in function of the regulations of the sprayer. In the dynamic test, the air velocity was measured at 2.5 m from the axis of the sprayer considering four measurement heights (1 m, 2 m, 3 m and 4 m). In this test, the sprayer regulations were: one or two activated fans; one air flow for each fan; forward speed of 2.8 km/h. The use of one fan (back) or two fans (back and front) produced significant differences on the duration of the presence of wind in the measurement point and on the direction of the air velocity vector. The module of the air velocity vector was not affected by the number of activated fans.

  9. Surface films and corrosion of copper

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hilden, J.; Laitinen, T.; Maekelae, K.; Saario, T.; Bojinov, M.

    1999-03-01

    In Sweden and Finland the spent nuclear fuel is planned to be encapsulated in cast iron canisters that have an outer shield made of copper. The copper shield is responsible for the corrosion protection of the canister construction. General corrosion of the copper is not expected to be the limiting factor in the waste repository environment when estimating the life-time of the canister construction. However, different forms of localised corrosion, i.e. pitting, stress corrosion cracking, or environmentally assisted creep fracture may cause premature failure of the copper shield. Of the probable constituents in the groundwater, nitrites, chlorides, sulphides and carbonates have been suggested to promote localised corrosion of copper. The main assumption made in planning this research program is that the surface films forming on copper in the repository environment largely determine the susceptibility of copper to the different forms of localised corrosion. The availability of reactants, which also may become corrosion rate limiting, is investigated in several other research programs. This research program consists of a set of successive projects targeted at characterising the properties of surface films on copper in repository environment containing different detrimental anions. A further aim was to assess the significance of the anion-induced changes in the stability of the oxide films with regard to localised corrosion of copper. This report summarises the results from a series of investigations on properties of surface films forming on copper in water of pH = 8.9 at temperature of 80 deg C and pressure of 2 MPa. The main results gained so far in this research program are as follows: The surface films forming on copper in the thermodynamic stability region of monovalent copper at 80 deg C consist of a bulk part (about 1 mm thick) which is a good ionic and electronic conductor, and an outer, interfacial layer (0.001 - 0.005 mm thick) which shows p-type semiconductor

  10. Superheater fireside corrosion mechanisms in MSWI plants: Lab-scale study and on-site results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brossard, J.M.; Chaucherie, X.; Nicol, F. [Veolia Environnement R and D, Zone Portuaire de Limay, 291 Avenue Dreyfous Ducas, Limay 78520 (France); Diop, I. [Veolia Environnement R and D, Zone Portuaire de Limay, 291 Avenue Dreyfous Ducas, Limay 78520 (France); Institut Jean Lamour, departement Chimie et physique des solides et des surfaces, UMR 7198 CNRS - Universite Henri Poincare Nancy 1, Vandoeuvre-Les-Nancy (France); Rapin, C.; Vilasi, M. [Institut Jean Lamour, departement Chimie et physique des solides et des surfaces, UMR 7198 CNRS - Universite Henri Poincare Nancy 1, Vandoeuvre-Les-Nancy (France)

    2011-06-15

    Combustion of municipal waste generates highly corrosive gases (HCl, SO{sub 2}, NaCl, KCl, and heavy metals chlorides) and ashes containing alkaline chlorides and sulfates. Currently, corrosion phenomena are particularly observed on superheater's tubes. Corrosion rates depend mainly on installation design, operating conditions i.e., gas and steam temperature and velocity of the flue gas containing ashes. This paper presents the results obtained using an innovative laboratory-scale corrosion unit, which simulates MSWI (Municipal Solid Waste Incineration) boilers conditions characterized by a temperature gradient at the metal tube in the presence of corrosive gases and ashes. The presented corrosion tests were realized on carbon steel at fixed metal temperature (400 C). The influence of the flue gas temperature, synthetic ashes composition, and flue gas flow pattern were investigated. After corrosion test, cross sections of tube samples were characterized to evaluate thickness loss and estimate corrosion rate while the elements present in corrosion layers were analyzed. Corrosion tests were carried out twice in order to validate the accuracy and reproducibility of results. First results highlight the key role of molten phase related to the ash composition and flue gas temperature as well as the deposit morphology, related to the flue gas flow pattern, on the mechanisms and corrosion rates. (Copyright copyright 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  11. Alternating current techniques for corrosion monitoring in water reactor systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Isaacs, H.S.; Weeks, J.R.

    1977-01-01

    Corrosion in both nuclear and fossil fueled steam generators is generally a consequence of the presence of aggressive impurities introduced into the coolant system through condenser leakage. The impurities concentrate in regions of the steam generator protected from coolant flow, in crevices or under deposited corrosion products and adjacent to heat transfer surfaces. These three factors, the aggressive impurity, crevice type areas and heat transfer surfaces appear to be the requirements for the onset of rapid corrosion. Under conditions where coolant impurities do not concentrate the corrosion rates are low, easily measured and can be accounted for by allowances in the design of the steam generator. Rapid corrosion conditions cannot be designed for and must be suppressed. The condition of the surfaces when rapid corrosion develops must be markedly different from those during normal operation and these changes should be observable using electrochemical techniques. This background formed the basis of a design of a corrosion monitoring device, work on which was initiated at BNL. The basic principles of the technique are described. The object of the work is to develop a corrosion monitoring device which can be operated with PWR steam generator secondary coolant feed water

  12. U.S. industry response to surry corrosion event

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chexal, V.K.; Dietrich, E.B.; Torok, R.C.; Randall, G.A.; Shevde, V.C.; Horowitz, J.S.

    1990-01-01

    On December 9, 1986, a 460 mm (18 inch) diameter carbon steel elbow in the condensate system at Surry Unit-2 failed. The failure occurred as a consequence of thinning of the elbow by erosion-corrosion. Inspections revealed significant thinning of carbon steel sections at numerous locations in the condensate and feedwater piping of both Surry units. The subsequent discovery of thinning at other plants established erosion-corrosion as a generic issue for nuclear and fossil plants. To quickly resolve industry and regulatory concerns associated with single-phase erosion-corrosion, EPRI sought to: (1) find ways to determine where single phase erosion-corrosion is most likely to occur; (2) define accurate and low-cost inspection methods; and (3) identify techniques for preventing further pipe degradation. Erosion-corrosion programs have been conducted in a number of laboratories world-wide. The associated phenomena are complex and depend on the interrelationship of water temperature, water chemistry, component material, flow velocity and the geometry of the flow path (straight, bend, tee, etc.). EPRI supplemented existing data and developed technical products tailored for utility use on the erosion-corrosion issue. This paper describes the U.S. industry response to the Surry event and the related EPRI activities in the corrosion area

  13. Step-flow anisotropy of the m-plane GaN (1100) grown under nitrogen-rich conditions by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sawicka, Marta; Siekacz, Marcin; Skierbiszewski, Czeslaw; Turski, Henryk; Krysko, Marcin; DziePcielewski, Igor; Grzegory, Izabella; Smalc-Koziorowska, Julita

    2011-01-01

    The homoepitaxial growth of m-plane (1100) GaN was investigated by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy under nitrogen-rich conditions. The surface morphologies as a function of sample miscut were studied, providing evidence for a strong growth anisotropy that is a consequence of the anisotropy of Ga adatom diffusion barriers on the m-plane surface recently calculated ab initio[Lymperakis and Neugebauer, Phys. Rev. B 79, 241308(R) (2009)]. We found that substrate miscut toward [0001] implies a step flow toward while substrate miscut toward [0001] causes formation of atomic steps either perpendicular or parallel to the [0001] direction, under N-rich conditions at 730 deg C. We describe the growth conditions for achieving atomically flat m-plane GaN layers with parallel atomic steps.

  14. Corrosion of valve metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Draley, J.E.

    1976-01-01

    A general survey related to the corrosion of valve metals or film-forming metals. The way these metals corrode with some general examples is described. Valve metals form relatively perfect oxide films with little breakdown or leakage when anodized

  15. Microbiologically Influenced Corrosion

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    species grow as multicel- lular filaments called hyphae forming a mycelium, some fungal species also grow as single cells. Sexual and asexual...reinforced fluorinated 18 MICROBIOLOGICALLY INFLUENCED CORROSION polyimide composites due to hyphae penetration into resin interiors. The

  16. Carbon Dioxide Corrosion:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fosbøl, Philip Loldrup

    2008-01-01

    CO2 corrosion is a general problem in the industry and it is expensive. The focus of this study is an oil gas production related problem. CO2 corrosion is observed in offshore natural gas transportation pipelines. A general overview of the problem is presented in chapter 1. The chemical system...... with the basic thermodynamics of electrolytes in chapter 2, the extension and general description of electrolyte mass transport in chapter 3, and the electrochemical kinetics of corrosion in chapter 4. A literature overview of CO2 corrosion is shown in chapter 5 and possible extensions of the models...... and validated against heat capacity data. The model is also fitted to experimental data produced and shown in chapter 8 for SLE in the Na2CO3-NaHCO3-MEG-H2O system. The application of the above model is shown in chapter 9. Here the thermodynamic correction factors are calculated. These show how the diffusion...

  17. BWR steel containment corrosion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tan, C.P.; Bagchi, G.

    1996-04-01

    The report describes regulatory actions taken after corrosion was discovered in the drywell at the Oyster Creek Plant and in the torus at the Nine Mile Point 1 Plant. The report describes the causes of corrosion, requirements for monitoring corrosion, and measures to mitigate the corrosive environment for the two plants. The report describes the issuances of generic letters and information notices either to collect information to determine whether the problem is generic or to alert the licensees of similar plants about the existence of such a problem. Implementation of measures to enhance the containment performance under severe accident conditions is discussed. A study by Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) of the performance of a degraded containment under severe accident conditions is summarized. The details of the BNL study are in the appendix to the report.

  18. Corrosion Inhibitors for Aluminum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muller, Bodo

    1995-01-01

    Describes a simple and reliable test method used to investigate the corrosion-inhibiting effects of various chelating agents on aluminum pigments in aqueous alkaline media. The experiments that are presented require no complicated or expensive electronic equipment. (DDR)

  19. Engineering considerations for corrosion monitoring of gas gathering pipeline systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Braga, T.G.; Asperger, R.G.

    1987-01-01

    Proper corrosion monitoring of gas gathering pipelines requires a system review to determine the appropriate monitor locations and types of monitoring techniques. This paper develops and discusses a classification of conditions such as flow regime and gas composition. Also discussed are junction categories which, for corrosion monitoring, need to be considered from two points of view. The first is related to fluid flow in the line and the second is related corrosion inhibitor movement along the pipeline. The appropriate application of the various monitoring techniques such as coupons, hydrogen detectors, electrical resistance probe and linear polarization probes are discussed in relation to flow regime and gas composition. Problems caused by semi-conduction from iron sulfide are considered. Advantages and disadvantages of fluid gathering methods such as pots and flow-through drips are discussed in relation to their reliability as on-line monitoring locations.

  20. Outcomes of pediatric patients supported with continuous-flow ventricular assist devices: A report from the Pediatric Interagency Registry for Mechanical Circulatory Support (PediMACS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossano, Joseph W; Lorts, Angela; VanderPluym, Christina J; Jeewa, Aamir; Guleserian, Kristine J; Bleiweis, Mark S; Reinhartz, Olaf; Blume, Elizabeth D; Rosenthal, David N; Naftel, David C; Cantor, Ryan S; Kirklin, James K

    2016-05-01

    Continuous-flow (CF) ventricular assist devices (VADs) have largely replaced pulsatile-flow VADs in adult patients. However, there are few data on CF VADs among pediatric patients. In this study we aimed to describe the overall use, patients' characteristics and outcomes of CF VADs in this population. The Pediatric Interagency Registry for Mechanical Circulatory Support (PediMACS) is a national registry for U.S. Food and Drug Adminstration (FDA)-approved VADs in patients <19 years of age. Patients undergoing placement of durable CF VADs between September 2012 and June 2015 were included and outcomes were compared with those of adults from the Interagency Registry for Mechanically Assisted Circulatory Support (INTERMACS). CF VADs were implanted in 109 patients at 35 hospitals. The median age at implantation was 15 years (2.8 to 18.9 years) and median weight was 62 kg (range 16 to 141 kg). The underlying disease was cardiomyopathy in 89 (82%) patients. The INTERMACS level at time of implant was Level 1 in 20 (19%), Level 2 in 64 (61%) and Levels 3 to 7 in 21 (20%) patients. Most were implanted as LVADs (n = 102, 94%). Median duration of support was 2.3 months (range <1 day to 28 months). Serious adverse event rates were low, including neurologic dysfunction (early event rate 4.1 per 100 patient-months with 2 late events). Competing outcomes analysis at 6 months post-implant indicated 61% transplanted, 31% alive with device in place and 8% death before transplant. These outcomes compared favorably with the 3,894 adults supported with CF VADs as a bridge to transplant. CF VADs are commonly utilized in older children and adolescents, with excellent survival rates. Further study is needed to understand impact of patient and device characteristics on outcomes in pediatric patients. Copyright © 2016 International Society for Heart and Lung Transplantation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Validity and reliability of a novel slow cuff-deflation system for noninvasive blood pressure monitoring in patients with continuous-flow left ventricular assist device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanier, Gregg M; Orlanes, Khristine; Hayashi, Yacki; Murphy, Jennifer; Flannery, Margaret; Te-Frey, Rosie; Uriel, Nir; Yuzefpolskaya, Melana; Mancini, Donna M; Naka, Yoshifumi; Takayama, Hiroo; Jorde, Ulrich P; Demmer, Ryan T; Colombo, Paolo C

    2013-09-01

    Doppler ultrasound is the clinical gold standard for noninvasive blood pressure (BP) measurement among continuous-flow left ventricular assist device patients. The relationship of Doppler BP to systolic BP (SBP) and mean arterial pressure (MAP) is uncertain and Doppler measurements require a clinic visit. We studied the relationship between Doppler BP and both arterial-line (A-line) SBP and MAP. Validity and reliability of the Terumo Elemano BP Monitor, a novel slow cuff-deflation device that could potentially be used by patients at home, were assessed. Doppler and Terumo BP measurements were made in triplicate among 60 axial continuous-flow left ventricular assist device (HeartMate II) patients (30 inpatients and 30 outpatients) at 2 separate exams (360 possible measurements). A-line measures were also obtained among inpatients. Mean absolute differences (MADs) and correlations were used to determine within-device reliability (comparison of second and third BP measures) and between-device validity. Bland-Altman plots assessed BP agreement between A-line, Doppler BP, and Terumo Elemano. Success rates for Doppler and Terumo Elemano were 100% and 91%. Terumo Elemano MAD for repeat SBP and MAP were 4.6±0.6 and 4.2±0.6 mm Hg; repeat Doppler BP MAD was 2.9±0.2 mm Hg. Mean Doppler BP was lower than A-line SBP by 4.1 (MAD=6.4±1.4) mm Hg and higher than MAP by 9.5 (MAD=11.0±1.2) mm Hg; Terumo Elemano underestimated A-line SBP by 0.3 (MAD=5.6±0.9) mm Hg and MAP by 1.7 (MAD=6.0±1.0) mm Hg. Doppler BP more closely approximates SBP than MAP. Terumo Elemano was successful, reliable, and valid when compared with A-line and Doppler.

  2. Corrosion of beryllium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mueller, J.J.; Adolphson, D.R.

    1987-01-01

    The corrosion behavior of beryllium in aqueous and elevated-temperature oxidizing environments has been extensively studied for early-intended use of beryllium in nuclear reactors and in jet and rocket propulsion systems. Since that time, beryllium has been used as a structural material in les corrosive environments. Its primary applications include gyro systems, mirror and reentry vehicle structures, and aircraft brakes. Only a small amount of information has been published that is directly related to the evaluation of beryllium for service in the less severe or normal atmospheric environments associated with these applications. Despite the lack of published data on the corrosion of beryllium in atmospheric environments, much can be deduced about its corrosion behavior from studies of aqueous corrosion and the experiences of fabricators and users in applying, handling, processing, storing, and shipping beryllium components. The methods of corrosion protection implemented to resist water and high-temperature gaseous environments provide useful information on methods that can be applied to protect beryllium for service in future long-term structural applications

  3. Monitoring corrosion rates and localised corrosion in low conductivity water

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hilbert, Lisbeth Rischel

    2006-01-01

    Monitoring of low corrosion rates and localised corrosion in a media with low conductivity is a challenge. In municipal district heating, quality control may be improved by implementing on-line corrosion monitoring if a suitable technique can be identified to measure both uniform and localised...... corrosion. Electrochemical techniques (LPR, EIS, crevice corrosion current) as well as direct measurement techniques (high-sensitive electrical resistance, weight loss) have been applied in operating plants. Changes in the corrosion processes are best monitored in non-aggressive, low conductivity media...

  4. Corrosion and anticorrosion. Industrial practice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beranger, G.; Mazille, H.

    2002-01-01

    This book comprises 14 chapters written with the collaboration of about 50 French experts of corrosion. It is complementary to another volume entitled 'corrosion of metals and alloys' and published by the same editor. This volume comprises two parts: part 1 presents the basic notions of corrosion phenomena, the properties of surfaces, the electrochemical properties of corrosion etc.. Part 2 describes the most frequent forms of corrosion encountered in industrial environments and corresponding to specific problems of protection: marine environment, atmospheric corrosion, galvanic corrosion, tribo-corrosion, stress corrosion etc.. The first 8 chapters (part 1) treat of the corrosion problems encountered in different industries and processes: oil and gas production, chemical industry, phosphoric acid industry, PWR-type power plants, corrosion of automobile vehicles, civil engineering and buildings, corrosion of biomaterials, non-destructive testing for the monitoring of corrosion. The other chapters (part 2) deal with anticorrosion and protective coatings and means: choice of materials, coatings and surface treatments, thick organic coatings and enamels, paints, corrosion inhibitors and cathodic protection. (J.S.)

  5. Corrosion and protection of aluminum alloys in seawater

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nisancioglu Kemal [Department of Materials Technology, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, N-7491 Trondheim (Norway)

    2004-07-01

    The paper deals with pitting and uniform corrosion and effectiveness of cathodic protection in reducing these corrosion forms. In stagnant waters or presence of low flow rates, pitting may occur. However, pitting corrosion, driven by the Fe-rich cathodic intermetallic compounds, is often of superficial nature. The pits tend to passivate as a result of etching or passivation of the intermetallics with time. Cathodic protection is an effective way of preventing pitting. It also requires low current densities since the cathodic area, defined by the Fe-rich intermetallics, is small in contrast to steel, which is uniformly accessible to the cathodic reaction. Although thermodynamic calculations suggest possible instability of the oxide in slightly alkaline solutions, such as seawater, protective nature of the oxide in practice is attributed to the presence of alloying elements such as Mg and Mn. Thus, the passivity of both the aluminum matrix alloy (the anode) and the intermetallics (cathodes) have to be considered in evaluating the corrosion and protection of aluminum alloys. With increasing flow rate, the possibility of pitting corrosion reduces with increase in the rate of uniform corrosion, which is controlled by the flow dependent chemical dissolution of the oxide. Cathodic protection does not stop this phenomenon, and coatings have to be used. (authors)

  6. Investigation of physical properties of porous rocks and fluid flow phenomena in porous media using computer assisted tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kantzas, A.

    1990-01-01

    Computer assisted tomography is becoming a very attractive tool for petroleum engineers. The method can give an image of a core in two or three dimensions with a very fine resolution and high accuracy. The image data can be processed to give information about the physical properties of the core (density, porosity, mineralogy, heterogeneities) and the fluids within the core (saturation and saturation profiles). This paper presents a software package that uses the CAT scanner output data as input for petrographic and dynamic modelling of a porous rock. Core samples up to 10 cm in diameter are scanned at different x-ray energy levels using an EMI CT5005 full body scanner. The scanner computer is producing an array of normalized linear attenuation coefficients per scanned slice. The resolution is 0.75 mm x 0.75 mm while the slice thickness can vary from 15 mm down to 1 mm depending on the bulk density and size of the sample. The developed package analyzes the CAT scanner data for bulk and grain density, effective atomic number, static and dynamic porosity and fluid saturations for up to three fluids present. The capabilities and limitations of the presented algorithm are discussed and characteristic examples are presented

  7. Implantable Cardioverter-Defibrillators in Patients With a Continuous-Flow Left Ventricular Assist Device: An Analysis of the INTERMACS Registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clerkin, Kevin J; Topkara, Veli K; Demmer, Ryan T; Dizon, Jose M; Yuzefpolskaya, Melana; Fried, Justin A; Mai, Xingchen; Mancini, Donna M; Takeda, Koji; Takayama, Hiroo; Naka, Yoshifumi; Colombo, Paolo C; Garan, A Reshad

    2017-12-01

    This study sought to determine if the presence of implantable cardioverter-defibrillators (ICD) provided a mortality benefit during continuous-flow left ventricular assist device (LVAD) support. An ICD decreases mortality in selected patients with advanced heart failure and have been associated with reduced mortality in patients with pulsatile LVAD. However, it is unclear whether that benefit extends to patients with a contemporary continuous-flow LVAD. Propensity score matching was used to generate a cohort of patients with similar baseline characteristics. The primary outcome was freedom from death during LVAD support. Secondary endpoints included freedom from unexpected death, likelihood of transplantation and recovery, and adverse events. Among 16,384 eligible patients in the Interagency Registry for Mechanically Assisted Circulatory Support registry, 2,209 patients with an ICD and 2,209 patients without one had similar propensity scores and were included. The presence of an ICD was associated with an increased mortality risk (hazard ratio: 1.20; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.04 to 1.39; p = 0.013) and an increased risk of unexpected death during device support (HR: 1.33; 95% CI: 1.03 to 1.71; p = 0.03). Patients with an ICD were more likely to undergo transplantation (HR: 1.16; 95% CI: 0.99 to 1.35; p = 0.06) and less likely to have LVAD explant for recovery (HR: 0.53, 95% CI: 0.29 to 0.98; p = 0.04). Patients with an ICD had a higher rate of treated ventricular arrhythmias (rate ratio: 1.27; 95% CI: 1.10 to 1.48; p = 0.001) and rehospitalization (rate ratio: 1.08; 95% CI: 1.04 to 1.12; p < 0.0001), but rates of hemorrhagic stroke were similar (rate ratio: 1.01; 95% CI: 0.81 to 1.26; p = 0.98). Among patients with a continuous flow LVAD, the presence of an ICD was not associated with reduced mortality. Copyright © 2017 American College of Cardiology Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Study on corrosion of thermal power plant condenser tubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mohammadi, Abdolreza Rashidi; Zhaam, Ali Akbar [Niroo Research Institute, end of Poonak Bakhtari blvd., Shahrak Ghods, Tehran (Iran)

    2004-07-01

    The aim of this investigation is to study kinds of corrosion mechanisms in thermal power plant condenser tubes. Condenser is a shell and tube heat exchanger in which cooling water flows through its tubes. While the steam from low pressure turbine passes within condenser tubes, it is condensed by cooling water. The exhausted steam from low pressure turbine is condensed on external surface of condenser tubes and heat is transferred to cooling water which flow into tubes. Tubes composition is usually copper-based alloys, stainless steel or titanium. Annual damages due to corrosion cause much cost for replacement and repairing metallic equipment and installations in electric power industry. Because of existence of different contaminants in water and steam cycle, condenser tubes surfaces are exposed to corrosion. Contaminants like oxygen, carbon dioxide, chloride ion and ammonia in water and steam cycle originate several damages such as pitting and crevice corrosion, erosion, galvanic attack, SCC, condensed corrosion, de-alloying in thermal power plant condenser. The paper first states how corrosion damage takes place in condensers and then introduces types of usual alloys used in condensers and also their corrosion behavior. In continuation, a brief explanation is presented about kinds of condenser failures due to corrosion. Then, causes and locations of different mechanisms of corrosion events on condenser tubes and effects of different parameters such as composition, temperature, chloride and sulfide ion concentration, pH, water velocity and biological precipitation are examined and finally protection methods are indicated. Also some photos of tubes specimens related to power plants are studied and described in each case of mentioned mechanisms. (authors)

  9. HPLC/ELSD analysis of amidated bile acids: an effective and rapid way to assist continuous flow chemistry processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sardella, Roccaldo; Gioiello, Antimo; Ianni, Federica; Venturoni, Francesco; Natalini, Benedetto

    2012-10-15

    The employment of the flow N-acyl amidation of natural bile acids (BAs) required the in-line connection with suitable analytical tools enabling the determination of reaction yields as well as of the purity grade of the synthesized glyco- and tauro-conjugated derivatives. In this framework, a unique HPLC method was successfully established and validated for ursodeoxycholic (UDCA), chenodeoxycholic (CDCA), deoxycholic (DCA) and cholic (CA) acids, as well as the corresponding glyco- and tauro-conjugated forms. Because of the shared absence of relevant chromophoric moieties in the sample structure, an evaporative light scattering detector (ELSD) was profitably utilized for the analysis of such steroidal species. For each of the investigated compounds, all the runs were contemporarily carried out on the acidic free and the two relative conjugated variants. The different ELSD response of the free and the corresponding conjugated BAs, imposed to build-up separate calibration curves. In all the cases, very good precision (RSD% values ranging from 1.04 to 6.40% in the long-period) and accuracy (Recovery% values ranging from 96.03 to 111.14% in the long-period) values along with appreciably low LOD and LOQ values (the former being within the range 1-27 ng mL(-1) and the latter within the range 2-44 ng mL(-1)) turned out. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Lanthanides determination in red wine using ultrasound assisted extraction, flow injection, aerosol desolvation and ICP-MS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bentlin, Fabrina R S; dos Santos, Clarissa M M; Flores, Erico M M; Pozebon, Dirce

    2012-01-13

    This paper deals with the determination of the fourteen naturally occurring elements of the lanthanide series in red wine. Ultrasound (US) was used for sample preparation prior lanthanides determination using ICP-MS. Flow injection (FI) and pneumatic nebulization/aerosol desolvation were used for nebulization of aliquots of 50 μL of sample and its subsequent transportation to plasma. Sample preparation procedures, matrix interference and time of sonication were evaluated. Better results for lanthanides in red wine were obtained by sonication with US probe for 90 s and sample 10-fold diluted. The limits of detection of La, Ce, Nd, Sm, Gd, Pr, Eu, Tb, Dy, Ho, Er, Tm, Lu and Yb were 6.57, 10.8, 9.97, 9.38, 2.71, 1.29, 1.22, 0.52, 2.35, 0.96, 2.30, 0.45, 0.24 and 1.35 ng L(-1), respectively. Red wines of different varieties from three countries of South America were discriminated according to the country of origin by means of multivariate analysis of lanthanides concentration. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Evaluation of corrosive behavior of SAE 5155 by corrosion environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An, Jae Pil; Park, Keyung Dong

    2005-01-01

    In this study, the influence of shot peening and corrosive condition for corrosion property was investigated on immersed in 3.5% NaCl, 10% HNO 3 + 3% HF, 6% FeCl 3 . The immersion test was performed on two kinds of specimen. The immersion periods was performed 30days. Corrosion potential, weight loss were investigated from experimental results. From test results, the effect of shot peening on the corrosion was evaluated

  12. Microbiologically induced corrosion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stein, A.A.

    1988-01-01

    Biological attack is a problem that can affect all metallic materials in a variety of environments and systems. In the power industry, corrosion studies have focused on condensers and service water systems where slime, barnacles, clams, and other macro-organisms are easily detected. Efforts have been made to eliminate the effect of these organisms through the use of chlorination, backflushing, organic coating, or thermal shock. The objective is to maintain component performance by eliminating biofouling and reducing metallic corrosion. Recently, corrosion of power plant components by micro-organisms (bacteria) has been identified even in very clean systems. A system's first exposure to microbiologically induced corrosion (MIC) occurs during its first exposure to an aqueous environment, such as during hydrotest or wet layup. Corrosion of buried pipelines by sulfate-reducing bacteria has been studied by the petrochemical industry for years. This paper discusses various methods of diagnosing, monitoring, and controlling MIC in a variety of systems, as well as indicates areas where further study is needed

  13. Corrosion failure analysis as related to prevention of corrosion failures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suss, H.

    1977-10-01

    The factors and conditions which have contributed to many of the corrosion related service failures are discussed based on a review of actual case histories. The anti-corrosion devices which developed as a result of these failure analyses are reviewed, and the method which must be adopted and used to take advantage of the available corrosion prevention techniques is discussed

  14. Wood Pulp Digetster Wall Corrosion Investigation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giles, GE

    2003-09-18

    The modeling of the flow in a wood pulp digester is but one component of the investigation of the corrosion of digesters. This report describes the development of a Near-Wall-Model (NWM) that is intended to couple with a CFD model that determines the flow, heat, and chemical species transport and reaction within the bulk flow of a digester. Lubrication theory approximations were chosen from which to develop a model that could determine the flow conditions within a thin layer near the vessel wall using information from the interior conditions provided by a CFD calculation of the complete digester. The other conditions will be determined by coupled solutions of the wood chip, heat, and chemical species transport and chemical reactions. The NWM was to couple with a digester performance code in an iterative fashion to provide more detailed information about the conditions within the NW region. Process Simulations, Ltd (PSL) is developing the digester performance code. This more detailed (and perhaps more accurate) information from the NWM was to provide an estimate of the conditions that could aggravate the corrosion at the wall. It is intended that this combined tool (NWM-PSL) could be used to understand conditions at/near the wall in order to develop methods to reduce the corrosion. However, development and testing of the NWM flow model took longer than anticipated and the other developments (energy and species transport, chemical reactions and linking with the PSL code) were not completed. The development and testing of the NWM are described in this report. In addition, the investigation of the potential effects of a clear layer (layer reduced in concentration of wood chips) near the wall is reported in Appendix D. The existence of a clear layer was found to enhance the flow near the wall.

  15. Lanthanides determination in red wine using ultrasound assisted extraction, flow injection, aerosol desolvation and ICP-MS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bentlin, Fabrina R.S. [Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Av. Bento Goncalves 9500, 91501.970 Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Santos, Clarissa M.M. dos; Flores, Erico M.M. [Departamento de Quimica Universidade Federal de Santa Maria, 97105-900 Santa Maria, RS (Brazil); Pozebon, Dirce, E-mail: dircepoz@iq.ufrgs.br [Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Av. Bento Goncalves 9500, 91501.970 Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil)

    2012-01-13

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Ultrasound was investigated and applied for red wine samples preparation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Aliquots of 50 {mu}L of sample were nebulized and transported to plasma. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer FI and pneumatic nebulization/aerosol desolvation were used. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer LODs of the ICP-MS method for lanthanides determination were at ng L{sup -1} level. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Lanthanides concentration allowed red wines classification. - Abstract: This paper deals with the determination of the fourteen naturally occurring elements of the lanthanide series in red wine. Ultrasound (US) was used for sample preparation prior lanthanides determination using ICP-MS. Flow injection (FI) and pneumatic nebulization/aerosol desolvation were used for nebulization of aliquots of 50 {mu}L of sample and its subsequent transportation to plasma. Sample preparation procedures, matrix interference and time of sonication were evaluated. Better results for lanthanides in red wine were obtained by sonication with US probe for 90 s and sample 10-fold diluted. The limits of detection of La, Ce, Nd, Sm, Gd, Pr, Eu, Tb, Dy, Ho, Er, Tm, Lu and Yb were 6.57, 10.8, 9.97, 9.38, 2.71, 1.29, 1.22, 0.52, 2.35, 0.96, 2.30, 0.45, 0.24 and 1.35 ng L{sup -1}, respectively. Red wines of different varieties from three countries of South America were discriminated according to the country of origin by means of multivariate analysis of lanthanides concentration.

  16. Lanthanides determination in red wine using ultrasound assisted extraction, flow injection, aerosol desolvation and ICP-MS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bentlin, Fabrina R.S.; Santos, Clarissa M.M. dos; Flores, Érico M.M.; Pozebon, Dirce

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Ultrasound was investigated and applied for red wine samples preparation. ► Aliquots of 50 μL of sample were nebulized and transported to plasma. ► FI and pneumatic nebulization/aerosol desolvation were used. ► LODs of the ICP-MS method for lanthanides determination were at ng L −1 level. ► Lanthanides concentration allowed red wines classification. - Abstract: This paper deals with the determination of the fourteen naturally occurring elements of the lanthanide series in red wine. Ultrasound (US) was used for sample preparation prior lanthanides determination using ICP-MS. Flow injection (FI) and pneumatic nebulization/aerosol desolvation were used for nebulization of aliquots of 50 μL of sample and its subsequent transportation to plasma. Sample preparation procedures, matrix interference and time of sonication were evaluated. Better results for lanthanides in red wine were obtained by sonication with US probe for 90 s and sample 10-fold diluted. The limits of detection of La, Ce, Nd, Sm, Gd, Pr, Eu, Tb, Dy, Ho, Er, Tm, Lu and Yb were 6.57, 10.8, 9.97, 9.38, 2.71, 1.29, 1.22, 0.52, 2.35, 0.96, 2.30, 0.45, 0.24 and 1.35 ng L −1 , respectively. Red wines of different varieties from three countries of South America were discriminated according to the country of origin by means of multivariate analysis of lanthanides concentration.

  17. Corrosion testing facilities in India

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Viswanathan, R.; Subramanian, Venu

    1981-01-01

    Major types of corrosion tests, establishment of specifications on corrosion testing and scope of their application in practice are briefly described. Important organizations in the world which publish specifications/standards are listed. Indian organizations which undertake corrosion testing and test facilities available at them are also listed. Finally in an appendix, a comprehensive list of specifications relevant to corrosion testing is given. It is arranged under the headings: environmental testing, humidity tests, salt spray/fog tests, immersion tests, specification corrosion phenomena, (tests) with respect to special corrosion media, (tests) with respect to specific corrosion prevention methods, and specific corrosion tests using electrical and electrochemical methods (principles). Each entry in the list furnishes information about: nature of the test, standard number, and its specific application. (M.G.B.)

  18. Plastics for corrosion inhibition

    CERN Document Server

    Goldade, Victor A; Makarevich, Anna V; Kestelman, Vladimir N

    2005-01-01

    The development of polymer composites containing inhibitors of metal corrosion is an important endeavour in modern materials science and technology. Corrosion inhibitors can be located in a polymer matrix in the solid, liquid or gaseous phase. This book details the thermodynamic principles for selecting these components, their compatibility and their effectiveness. The various mechanisms of metal protection – barrier, inhibiting and electromechanical – are considered, as are the conflicting requirements placed on the structure of the combined material. Two main classes of inhibited materials (structural and films/coatings) are described in detail. Examples are given of structural plastics used in friction units subjected to mechano-chemical wear and of polymer films/coatings for protecting metal objects against corrosion.

  19. Corrosion Monitoring System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dr. Russ Braunling

    2004-10-31

    The Corrosion Monitoring System (CMS) program developed and demonstrated a continuously on-line system that provides real-time corrosion information. The program focused on detecting pitting corrosion in its early stages. A new invention called the Intelligent Ultrasonic Probe (IUP) was patented on the program. The IUP uses ultrasonic guided waves to detect small defects and a Synthetic Aperture Focusing Technique (SAFT) algorithm to provide an image of the pits. Testing of the CMS demonstrated the capability to detect pits with dimensionality in the sub-millimeter range. The CMS was tested in both the laboratory and in a pulp and paper industrial plant. The system is capable of monitoring the plant from a remote location using the internet.

  20. Stochastic theory of fatigue corrosion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Haiyun

    1999-10-01

    A stochastic theory of corrosion has been constructed. The stochastic equations are described giving the transportation corrosion rate and fluctuation corrosion coefficient. In addition the pit diameter distribution function, the average pit diameter and the most probable pit diameter including other related empirical formula have been derived. In order to clarify the effect of stress range on the initiation and growth behaviour of pitting corrosion, round smooth specimen were tested under cyclic loading in 3.5% NaCl solution.

  1. Corrosion-resistant metal surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugama, Toshifumi [Wading River, NY

    2009-03-24

    The present invention relates to metal surfaces having thereon an ultrathin (e.g., less than ten nanometer thickness) corrosion-resistant film, thereby rendering the metal surfaces corrosion-resistant. The corrosion-resistant film includes an at least partially crosslinked amido-functionalized silanol component in combination with rare-earth metal oxide nanoparticles. The invention also relates to methods for producing such corrosion-resistant films.

  2. Corrosion test plan to guide canister material selection and design for a tuff repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCright, R.D.; van Konynenburg, R.A.; Ballou, L.B.

    1983-11-01

    Corrosion rates and the mode of corrosion attack form a most important basis for selection of canister materials and design of a nuclear waste package. Type 304L stainless steel was selected as the reference material for canister fabrication because of its generally excellent corrosion resistance in water, steam and air. However, 304L may be susceptible to localized and stress-assisted forms of corrosion under certain conditions. Alternative alloys are also investigated; these alloys were chosen because of their improved resistance to these forms of corrosion. The fabrication and welding processes, as well as the glass pouring operation for defense and commercial high-level wastes, may influence the susceptibility of the canister to localized and stress forms of corrosion. 12 references, 2 figures, 4 tables

  3. Rhenium corrosion in chloride melts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stepanov, A.D.; Shkol'nikov, S.N.; Vetyukov, M.M.

    1989-01-01

    The results investigating rhenium corrosion in chloride melts containing sodium, potassium and chromium ions by a gravimetry potentials in argon atmosphere in a sealing quarth cell are described. Rhenium corrosion is shown to be rather considerable in melts containing CrCl 2 . The value of corrosion rate depending on temperature is determined

  4. Testing and prediction of erosion-corrosion for corrosion resistant alloys used in the oil and gas production industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rincon, Hernan E.

    The corrosion behavior of CRAs has been thoroughly investigated and documented in the public literature by many researchers; however, little work has been done to investigate erosion-corrosion of such alloys. When sand particles are entrained in the flow, the degradation mechanism is different from that observed for sand-free corrosive environment. There is a need in the oil and gas industry to define safe service limits for utilization of such materials. The effects of flow conditions, sand rate, pH and temperature on the erosion-corrosion of CRAs were widely studied. An extensive experimental work was conducted using scratch tests and flow loop tests using several experimental techniques. At high erosivity conditions, a synergistic effect between erosion and corrosion was observed. Under the high sand rate conditions tested, erosivity is severe enough to damage the passive layer protecting the CRA thereby enhancing the corrosion rate. In most cases there is likely a competition between the rates of protective film removal due to mechanical erosion and protective film healing. Synergism occurs for each of the three alloys examined (13Cr and Super13Cr and 22Cr); however, the degree of synergism is quite different for the three alloys and may not be significant for 22Cr for field conditions where erosivities are typically much lower that those occurring in the small bore loop used in this research. Predictions of the corrosion component of erosion-corrosion based on scratch test data compared reasonably well to test results from flow loops for the three CRAs at high erosivity conditions. Second order behavior appears to be an appropriate and useful model for representing the repassivation process of CRAs. A framework for a procedure to predict penetration rates for erosion-corrosion conditions was developed based on the second order model behavior observed for the re-healing process of the passive film of CRAs and on computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations

  5. Accelerated cyclic corrosion tests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prošek T.

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Accelerated corrosion testing is indispensable for material selection, quality control and both initial and residual life time prediction for bare and painted metallic, polymeric, adhesive and other materials in atmospheric exposure conditions. The best known Neutral Salt Spray (NSS test provides unrealistic conditions and poor correlation to exposures in atmosphere. Modern cyclic accelerated corrosion tests include intermittent salt spray, wet and dry phases and eventually other technical phases. They are able to predict the material performance in service more correctly as documented on several examples. The use of NSS should thus be restricted for quality control.

  6. Achievments of corrosion science and corrosion protection technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fontana, M.; Stehjl, R.

    1985-01-01

    Problems of corrosion-mechanical strength of metals, effect of corrosive media on creep characteristics are presented. New concepts of the mechanism of corrosion cracking and its relation to hydrogen embrittlement are described. Kinetics and mechanism of hydrogen embrittlement effect on the process of corrosion cracking of different steels and alloys are considered. The dependence of such types of failure on various structural factors is shown. Data on corrosion cracking of high-strength aluminium and titanium alloys, mechanism of the processes and protective methods are given

  7. Initiation model for intergranular stress corrosion cracking in BWR pipes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hishida, Mamoru; Kawakubo, Takashi; Nakagawa, Yuji; Arii, Mitsuru.

    1981-01-01

    Discussions were made on the keys of intergranular stress corrosion cracking of austenitic stainless steel in high-temperature water in laboratories and stress corrosion cracking incidents in operating plants. Based on these discussions, a model was set up of intergranular stress corrosion cracking initiation in BWR pipes. Regarding the model, it was presumed that the intergranular stress corrosion cracking initiates during start up periods whenever heat-affected zones in welded pipes are highly sensitized and suffer dynamic strain in transient water containing dissolved oxygen. A series of BWR start up simulation tests were made by using a flowing autoclave system with slow strain rate test equipment. Validity of the model was confirmed through the test results. (author)

  8. The corrosion of steels in molten sodium hydroxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Newman, R.N.; Smith, C.A.; Smith, R.J.

    1976-09-01

    The role of sodium hydroxide corrosion is discussed in relation to the wastage of materials observed in fast reactor boilers under fault conditions in the vicinity of a water leak into sodium. An experimental technique to study the corrosion under varying conditions is described. The results presented are for 2 1/4Cr 1Mo obtained in static sodium hydroxide in a closed volume over the temperature range 1033K to 1273K. It is found that the corrosion rate can be followed by monitoring the hydrogen produced by the reaction, which can be written as: Fe + 2NaOH = NaFeO 2 + NaH + 1/2H 2 . After an initial acceleration period the rate law is parabolic. The effect on the corrosion rate of melt and cover gas composition has been in part investigated, and the relevance of mass flow of reactants is discussed. (author)

  9. Development of the mitigation method for carbon steel corrosion with ceramics in PWR secondary system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okamura, Masato; Shibasaki, Osamu; Miyazaki, Toyoaki; Kaneko, Tetsuji

    2012-09-01

    To verify the effect of depositing ceramic (TiO 2 , La 2 O 3 , and Y 2 O 3 ) on carbon steel to mitigate corrosion, corrosion tests were conducted under simulated chemistry conditions in a PWR secondary system. Test specimens (STPT410) were prepared with and without deposited ceramics. The ceramics were deposited on the specimens under high-temperature and high-pressure water conditions. Corrosion tests were conducted under high pH conditions (9.8) with a flow rate of 1.0-4.7 m/s at 185 deg. C for 200 hours. At a flow rate of 1.0 m/s, the amount of corrosion of the specimens with the ceramics was less than half of that of the specimens without the ceramics. As the flow rate increased, the amount of corrosion increased. However, even at a flow rate of 4.7 m/s, the amount of corrosion was reduced by approximately 30% by depositing the ceramics. After the corrosion tests, the surfaces of the specimens were analyzed with SEM and XRD. When the deposited ceramic was TiO 2 , the surface was densely covered with fine particles (less than 1 μm). From XRD analysis, these particles were identified as ilmenite (FeTiO 3 ). We consider that ilmenite may play an important role in mitigating the corrosion of carbon steel. (authors)

  10. Effect of Wall Shear Stress on Corrosion Inhibitor Film Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canto Maya, Christian M.

    In oil and gas production, internal corrosion of pipelines causes the highest incidence of recurring failures. Ensuring the integrity of ageing pipeline infrastructure is an increasingly important requirement. One of the most widely applied methods to reduce internal corrosion rates is the continuous injection of chemicals in very small quantities, called corrosion inhibitors. These chemical substances form thin films at the pipeline internal surface that reduce the magnitude of the cathodic and/or anodic reactions. However, the efficacy of such corrosion inhibitor films can be reduced by different factors such as multiphase flow, due to enhanced shear stress and mass transfer effects, loss of inhibitor due to adsorption on other interfaces such as solid particles, bubbles and droplets entrained by the bulk phase, and due to chemical interaction with other incompatible substances present in the stream. The first part of the present project investigated the electrochemical behavior of two organic corrosion inhibitors (a TOFA/DETA imidazolinium, and an alkylbenzyl dimethyl ammonium chloride), with and without an inorganic salt (sodium thiosulfate), and the resulting enhancement. The second part of the work explored the performance of corrosion inhibitor under multiphase (gas/liquid, solid/liquid) flow. The effect of gas/liquid multiphase flow was investigated using small and large scale apparatus. The small scale tests were conducted using a glass cell and a submersed jet impingement attachment with three different hydrodynamic patterns (water jet, CO 2 bubbles impact, and water vapor cavitation). The large scale experiments were conducted applying different flow loops (hilly terrain and standing slug systems). Measurements of weight loss, linear polarization resistance (LPR), and adsorption mass (using an electrochemical quartz crystal microbalance, EQCM) were used to quantify the effect of wall shear stress on the performance and integrity of corrosion inhibitor

  11. Flow cytometry-assisted quantification of γH2AX expression has potential as a rapid high-throughput biodosimetry tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Achel, Daniel G; Serafin, Antonio M; Akudugu, John M

    2016-08-01

    Large-scale radiological events require immediate and accurate estimates of doses received by victims, and possibly the first responders, to assist in treatment decisions. Although there are numerous efforts worldwide to develop biodosimetric tools to adequately handle triage needs during radiological incidents, such endeavours do not seem to actively involve sub-Saharan Africa which currently has a significant level of nuclear-related activity. To initiate a similar interest in Africa, ex vivo radiation-induced γH2AX expression in peripheral blood lymphocytes from fourteen healthy donors was assessed using flow cytometry. While the technique shows potential for use as a rapid high-throughput biodosimetric tool for radiation absorbed doses up to 5 Gy, significant inter-individual differences in γH2AX expression emerged. Also, female donors exhibited higher levels of γH2AX expression than their male counterparts. To address these shortcomings, gender-based in-house dose-response curves for γH2AX induction in lymphocytes 2, 4, and 6 h after X-ray irradiation are proposed for the South African population. The obtained results show that γH2AX is a good candidate biomarker for biodosimetry, but might need some refinement and validation through further studies involving a larger cohort of donors.

  12. The pharmacotherapy of the HeartMate II, a continuous flow left ventricular assist device, in patients with advanced heart failure: integration of disease, device, and drug.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jennings, Douglas L; Chambers, Rachel M; Schillig, Jessica M

    2010-10-01

    Advanced heart failure continues to be a significant cause of morbidity and mortality in the US. Patients with advanced heart failure have a poor prognosis without cardiac transplantation. The use of left ventricular assist devices (LVADs) as destination therapy for these patients is therefore expected to increase in the coming years as technology advances. The HeartMate II, a continuous flow implantable device, is currently the only LVAD that has been approved by the Food and Drug Administration for destination therapy in patients with advanced heart failure. The pharmacotherapy associated with this device is very complex and, therefore, the need for expertly trained clinical pharmacists to care for this expanding patient population will also likely increase. Unfortunately, most pharmacists are unfamiliar with the effect of LVADs on the physiology and pharmacotherapy of a patient's heart failure. The purpose of this article is to give clinical pharmacists an introduction to the most common pharmacotherapeutic issues for patients with LVADs and present practical solutions for managing common drug therapy problems.

  13. Modeling pore corrosion in normally open gold- plated copper connectors.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Battaile, Corbett Chandler; Moffat, Harry K.; Sun, Amy Cha-Tien; Enos, David George; Serna, Lysle M.; Sorensen, Neil Robert

    2008-09-01

    The goal of this study is to model the electrical response of gold plated copper electrical contacts exposed to a mixed flowing gas stream consisting of air containing 10 ppb H{sub 2}S at 30 C and a relative humidity of 70%. This environment accelerates the attack normally observed in a light industrial environment (essentially a simplified version of the Battelle Class 2 environment). Corrosion rates were quantified by measuring the corrosion site density, size distribution, and the macroscopic electrical resistance of the aged surface as a function of exposure time. A pore corrosion numerical model was used to predict both the growth of copper sulfide corrosion product which blooms through defects in the gold layer and the resulting electrical contact resistance of the aged surface. Assumptions about the distribution of defects in the noble metal plating and the mechanism for how corrosion blooms affect electrical contact resistance were needed to complete the numerical model. Comparisons are made to the experimentally observed number density of corrosion sites, the size distribution of corrosion product blooms, and the cumulative probability distribution of the electrical contact resistance. Experimentally, the bloom site density increases as a function of time, whereas the bloom size distribution remains relatively independent of time. These two effects are included in the numerical model by adding a corrosion initiation probability proportional to the surface area along with a probability for bloom-growth extinction proportional to the corrosion product bloom volume. The cumulative probability distribution of electrical resistance becomes skewed as exposure time increases. While the electrical contact resistance increases as a function of time for a fraction of the bloom population, the median value remains relatively unchanged. In order to model this behavior, the resistance calculated for large blooms has been weighted more heavily.

  14. Corrosion resistant cemented carbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hong, J.

    1990-01-01

    This paper describes a corrosion resistant cemented carbide composite. It comprises: a granular tungsten carbide phase, a semi-continuous solid solution carbide phase extending closely adjacent at least a portion of the grains of tungsten carbide for enhancing corrosion resistance, and a substantially continuous metal binder phase. The cemented carbide composite consisting essentially of an effective amount of an anti-corrosion additive, from about 4 to about 16 percent by weight metal binder phase, and with the remaining portion being from about 84 to about 96 percent by weight metal carbide wherein the metal carbide consists essentially of from about 4 to about 30 percent by weight of a transition metal carbide or mixtures thereof selected from Group IVB and of the Periodic Table of Elements and from about 70 to about 96 percent tungsten carbide. The metal binder phase consists essentially of nickel and from about 10 to about 25 percent by weight chromium, the effective amount of an anti-corrosion additive being selected from the group consisting essentially of copper, silver, tine and combinations thereof

  15. Corrosion resistant steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zubchenko, A.S.; Borisov, V.P.; Latyshev, V.B.

    1980-01-01

    Corrosion resistant steel for production of sheets and tubes containing C, Mn, Cr, Si, Fe is suggested. It is alloyed with vanadium and cerium for improving tensile properties and ductility. The steel can be melted by a conventional method in electric-arc or induction furnaces. The mentioned steel is intended to be used as a substitute for nickel-bearing austenitic steels

  16. Corrosion in seawater systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henrikson, S.

    1988-01-01

    Highly alloyed stainless steels have been exposed to natural chlorinated and chlorine-free seawater at 35 deg. C. Simulated tube-tubesheet joints, weld joints and galvanic couples with titanium, 90/10 CuNi and NiAl bronze were tested and evaluated for corrosion. The corrosion rates of various anode materials - zinc, aluminium and soft iron - were also determined. Finally the risk of hydrogen embrittlement of tubes of ferritic stainless steels and titanium as a consequence of cathodic protection was studied. An attempt was also made to explain the cracking mechanism of the ferritic steels by means of transmission electron microscopy. One important conclusion of the project is that chlorinated seawater is considerably more corrosive to stainless steels than chlorine-free water, whereas chlorination reduces the rate of galvanic corrosion of copper materials coupled to stainless steels. Hydrogen embrittlement of ferritic stainless steels and titanium as a consequence of cathodic protection of carbon steel or cast iron in the same structure can be avoided by strict potentiostatic control of the applied potential. (author)

  17. Corrosion resistant composite materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ul'yanin, E.A.

    1986-01-01

    Foundations for corrosion-resistant composite materials design are considered with account of components compatibility. Fibrous and lamellar composites with metal matrix, dispersion-hardened steels and alloys, refractory metal carbides-, borides-, nitrides-, silicides-based composites are described. Cermet compositions and fields of their application, such as protective coatings for operation in agressive media at high temperatures, are presented

  18. Smart Coatings for Corrosion Protection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calle, Luz Marina; Li, Wendy; Buhrow, Jerry W.; Johnsey, Marissa N.

    2016-01-01

    Nearly all metals and their alloys are subject to corrosion that causes them to lose their structural integrity or other critical functionality. It is essential to detect corrosion when it occurs, and preferably at its early stage, so that action can be taken to avoid structural damage or loss of function. Protective coatings are the most commonly used method of corrosion control. However, progressively stricter environmental regulations have resulted in the ban of many commercially available corrosion protective coatings due to the harmful effects of their solvents or corrosion inhibitors. This work concerns the development of a multifunctional, smart coating for the autonomous control of corrosion. This coating is being developed to have the inherent ability to detect the chemical changes associated with the onset of corrosion and respond autonomously to indicate it and control it.

  19. Mobile evaporator corrosion test results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rozeveld, A.; Chamberlain, D.B.

    1997-05-01

    Laboratory corrosion tests were conducted on eight candidates to select a durable and cost-effective alloy for use in mobile evaporators to process radioactive waste solutions. Based on an extensive literature survey of corrosion data, three stainless steel alloys (304L, 316L, AL-6XN), four nickel-based alloys (825, 625, 690, G-30), and titanium were selected for testing. The corrosion tests included vapor phase, liquid junction (interface), liquid immersion, and crevice corrosion tests on plain and welded samples of candidate materials. Tests were conducted at 80 degrees C for 45 days in two different test solutions: a nitric acid solution. to simulate evaporator conditions during the processing of the cesium ion-exchange eluant and a highly alkaline sodium hydroxide solution to simulate the composition of Tank 241-AW-101 during evaporation. All of the alloys exhibited excellent corrosion resistance in the alkaline test solution. Corrosion rates were very low and localized corrosion was not observed. Results from the nitric acid tests showed that only 316L stainless steel did not meet our performance criteria. The 316L welded interface and crevice specimens had rates of 22.2 mpy and 21.8 mpy, respectively, which exceeds the maximum corrosion rate of 20 mpy. The other welded samples had about the same corrosion resistance as the plain samples. None of the welded samples showed preferential weld or heat-affected zone (HAZ) attack. Vapor corrosion was negligible for all alloys. All of the alloys except 316L exhibited either open-quotes satisfactoryclose quotes (2-20 mpy) or open-quotes excellentclose quotes (<2 mpy) corrosion resistance as defined by National Association of Corrosion Engineers. However, many of the alloys experienced intergranular corrosion in the nitric acid test solution, which could indicate a susceptibility to stress corrosion cracking (SCC) in this environment

  20. Treatment screening for internal corrosion control of PETROBRAS oil pipelines; Selecao de tratamento para controle da corrosao interna de oleodutos da PETROBRAS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andrade, Cynthia de Azevedo; Muller, Eduardo Gullo [PETROBRAS, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Centro de Pesquisas; Antunes, Warlley Ligorio; Shioya, Nilce Hiromi; Salvador, Angelica Dias [PETROBRAS, RJ (Brazil). Unidade de Negocios da Bacia de Campos

    2005-07-01

    The use of corrosion inhibitors is spread out in oil and gas industry and is the most common methodology to control pipeline internal corrosion. However, their effectiveness depends on the pipeline material, inhibitor composition, flow type and scale characteristics. When a pipeline has heavy scale deposits, thick bacterial biofilm, or oxygen contamination, the corrosion control via filmic inhibitors is not effective. So, the only way to control internal corrosion of an oil pipeline is to primary identifies the corrosive agent and the main corrosion mechanism. The monitoring of the inhibitor efficiency and the determination of minimal residual concentration to prevent corrosion, are also fundamental. In this paper, is presented the criteria used to identify the main corrosion mechanism of oil pipelines, the treatment proposed in each case and the techniques employed in real time corrosion monitoring. (author)

  1. Magnesium microelectrode corrosion product transport modelling in relation to chloride induced pitting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burrows, R.; Cook, A.; Stevens, N.P.C.

    2012-09-01

    The high magnesium alloy Magnox is used as a fuel clad for the UK gas cooled, graphite moderated reactors of the same name. The fuel is metallic uranium (typically natural enrichment), so a low neutron absorption cross-section clad is required. Following discharge from reactor, spent fuel is stored in water, which acts as an effective heat transfer medium and biological shield. The chemistry of these ponds is carefully controlled to ensure that the Magnox clad remains in a passive state. This is primarily through the maintenance of a high pH and very low anion concentration. Of particular concern is the presence of chloride ions as even very low levels may allow localised corrosion to initiate. Although extensive work has been undertaken historically considering the behaviour of Magnox clad and the acceptable storage envelopes, the challenges of ageing plant and aspirations for accelerated decommissioning give value to further understanding of the corrosion mechanisms of this material. Recently, electrochemical techniques have been employed to characterise performance in a variety of chemistries and microelectrodes have been produced which have shown characteristics of salt film corrosion at moderate chloride concentrations under polarisation. A characteristic of the electrochemical response observed during the mass transport limited (potential independent) salt film regime has been periodic transients which correspond to emission of microscopic hydrogen bubbles from the microelectrode cavity. A simple finite element multi-physics model has been employed to assist in understanding the dominant processes of corrosion product transport away from a magnesium electrode surface which is dissolving under a salt film and this shows that characteristic transients observed in electrochemical tests may be simulated with reasonable agreement by consideration of convection from laminar flow around hydrogen micro-bubbles in the pit cavity combined with aqueous diffusion in the

  2. Mechanism of magnetite formation in high temperature corrosion by model naphthenic acids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jin, Peng; Robbins, Winston; Bota, Gheorghe

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Magnetite scales were found in naphthenic acid (NAP) corrosion. • Magnetite scales were formed due to thermal decomposition of iron naphthenates. • Formation and protectiveness of magnetite scales depended on structure of NAP. • Carboxylic acids confirm corrosion observations for commercial NAP. - Abstract: Naphthenic acid (NAP) corrosion is a major concern for refineries. The complexity of NAP in crude oil and the sulfidation process hinder a fundamental knowledge of their corrosive behavior. Studies with model acids were performed to explore the corrosion mechanism and magnetite scales were found on carbon steel. Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM), and X-ray diffraction methods detected differences in the quantity and quality of magnetite formed by model acids. These scales exhibited different resistance to higher severity NAP corrosion in a flow through apparatus. Magnetite is proposed to be formed by thermal decomposition of iron naphthenates.

  3. Electrochemical techniques for practical evaluation of corrosion inhibitor effectiveness. Performance of cerium nitrate as corrosion inhibitor for AA2024T3 alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosero-Navarro, N.C.; Curioni, M.; Bingham, R.; Duran, A.; Aparicio, M.; Cottis, R.A.; Thompson, G.E.

    2010-01-01

    In this work, a split-cell technique and image-assisted electrochemical noise analysis, which provide minimal perturbation of the freely corroding system and good time resolution, are proposed as a tool for simultaneous investigation of the corrosion inhibition mechanism and assessment of performance. The results obtained are compared with results from traditional electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, disclosing the advantages of these techniques in the evaluation of inhibitor performance. Specific attention is also given to the investigation of corrosion inhibition by cerium nitrate.

  4. Erosion corrosion in water-steam systems: Causes and countermeasures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heitmann, H.G.; Kastner, W.

    1985-01-01

    For the purpose of a better understanding of erosion corrosion, the physical and chemical principles will be summarized briefly. Then results obtained at KWU in the BENSON test section in tests on test specimens in single-phase flow of fully demineralized water will be presented. The experimental studies provide information about the most important influencing parameters. These include flow rate, fluid temperature and water quality (pH value and oxygen content). In addition, the resistance of various materials is compared, and the resistance of magnetite coatings to erosion corrosion is investigated. Furthermore, tests are presented that will show the extent to which erosion corrosion in power plants can be influenced by chemical measures

  5. Corrosion of structural materials and electrochemistry in high temperature water of nuclear power systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uchida, Shunsuke

    2008-01-01

    The latest experiences with corrosion in the cooling systems of nuclear power plants are reviewed. High temperature cooling water causes corrosion of structural materials, which often leads to adverse effects in the plants, e.g., increased shutdown radiation, generation of defects in materials of major components and fuel claddings, and increased volume of radwaste sources. Corrosion behavior is greatly affected by water quality and differs according to the water quality values and the materials themselves. In order to establish reliable operation, each plant requires its own unique optimal water chemistry control based on careful consideration of its system, materials and operational history. Electrochemistry is one of the key issues that determine corrosion-related problems, but it is not the only issue. Most corrosion-related phenomena, e.g., flow accelerated corrosion (FAC), intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC), primary water stress corrosion cracking (PWSCC) and thinning of fuel cladding materials, can be understood based on an electrochemical index, e.g., the electrochemical corrosion potential (ECP), conductivities and pH. The most important electrochemical index, the ECP, can be measured at elevated temperature and applied to in situ sensors of corrosion conditions to detect anomalous conditions of structural materials at their very early stages. (orig.)

  6. Effects of partial crystallinity and quenched-in defects on corrosion of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    Rapid solidification by planar flow casting has been found to have introduced deficiencies, viz. ... alloy. In order to investigate the effects of these deficiencies on the corrosion of rapidly ... Partial crystallinity (Dutta et al 1995; Savalia et al 1996),.

  7. Corrosion Evaluation and Corrosion Control of Steam Generators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maeng, W. Y.; Kim, U. C.; Sung, K. W.; Na, J. W.; Lee, Y. H.; Lee, D. H.; Kim, K. M.

    2008-06-01

    Corrosion damage significantly influences the integrity and efficiency of steam generator. Corrosion problems of steam generator are unsolved issues until now even though much effort is made around world. Especially the stress corrosion cracking of heat exchange materials is the first issue to be solved. The corrosion protection method of steam generator is important and urgent for the guarantee of nuclear plant's integrity. The objectives of this study are 1) to evaluate the corrosion properties of steam generator materials, 2) to optimize the water chemistry of steam generator and 3) to develop the corrosion protection method of primary and secondary sides of steam generator. The results will be reflected to the water chemistry guideline for improving the integrity and efficiency of steam generator in domestic power plants

  8. Corrosion Evaluation and Corrosion Control of Steam Generators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maeng, W. Y.; Kim, U. C.; Sung, K. W.; Na, J. W.; Lee, Y. H.; Lee, D. H.; Kim, K. M

    2008-06-15

    Corrosion damage significantly influences the integrity and efficiency of steam generator. Corrosion problems of steam generator are unsolved issues until now even though much effort is made around world. Especially the stress corrosion cracking of heat exchange materials is the first issue to be solved. The corrosion protection method of steam generator is important and urgent for the guarantee of nuclear plant's integrity. The objectives of this study are 1) to evaluate the corrosion properties of steam generator materials, 2) to optimize the water chemistry of steam generator and 3) to develop the corrosion protection method of primary and secondary sides of steam generator. The results will be reflected to the water chemistry guideline for improving the integrity and efficiency of steam generator in domestic power plants.

  9. Scanning reference electrode techniques in localized corrosion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Isaacs, H.S.; Vyas, B.

    1979-04-01

    The principles, advantages, and implementations of scanning reference electrode techniques are reviewed. Data related to pitting, intergranular corrosion, welds and stress corrosion cracking are presented. The technique locates the position of localized corrosion and can be used to monitor the development of corrosion and changes in the corrosion rate under a wide range of conditions

  10. Corrosion control for low-cost reliability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1993-01-01

    This conference was held September 19-24, 1993 in Houston, Texas to provide a forum for exchange of state-of-the-art information on corrosion. Topics of interest focus on the following: atmospheric corrosion; chemical process industry corrosion; high temperature corrosion; and corrosion of plant materials. Individual papers have been processed separately for inclusion in the appropriate data bases

  11. Computer-assisted system for diagnosing degenerative dementia using cerebral blood flow SPECT and 3D-SSP. A multicenter study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishii, Kazunari; Ito, Kengo; Nakanishi, Atsushi; Kitamura, Shin; Terashima, Akira

    2014-01-01

    Due to increasing numbers of patients with dementia, more physicians who do not specialize in brain nuclear medicine are being asked to interpret SPECT images of cerebral blood flow. We conducted a multicenter study to determine whether a computer-assisted diagnostic system Z-score summation analysis method (ZSAM) using three-dimensional stereotactic surface projections (3D-SSP) can differentiate Alzheimer's disease (AD)/dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB) and non-AD/DLB in institutions using various types of gamma cameras. We determined the normal thresholds of Z-sum (summed Z-score) within a template region of interest for each single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) device and then compared them with the Z-sums of patients and calculated the accuracy of the differential diagnosis by ZSAM. We compared the diagnostic accuracy between ZSAM and visual assessment. We enrolled 202 patients with AD (mean age, 76.8 years), 40 with DLB (mean age 76.3 years) and 36 with non-AD/DLB (progressive supranuclear palsy, n=10; frontotemporal dementia, n=20; slowly progressive aphasia, n=2 and one each with idiopathic normal pressure hydrocephalus, corticobasal degeneration, multiple system atrophy and Parkinson's disease) who underwent N-isopropyl-p-[ 123 I] iodoamphetamine cerebral blood flow SPECT imaging at each participating institution. The ZSAM sensitivity to differentiate between AD/DLB and non-AD/DLB in all patients, as well as those with mini-mental state examination scores of ≥24 and 20-23 points were 88.0, 78.0 and 88.4%, respectively, with specificity of 50.0, 44.4 and 60.0%, respectively. The diagnostic accuracy rates were 83.1, 72.9 and 84.2%, respectively. The areas under receiver operating characteristics curves for visual inspection by four expert raters were 0.74-0.84, 0.66-0.85 and 0.81-0.93, respectively, in the same patient groups. The diagnostic accuracy rates were 70.9-89.2%, 50.9-84.8% and 76.2-93.1%, respectively. The diagnostic

  12. Prediction of the fertility of stallion frozen-thawed semen using a combination of computer-assisted motility analysis, microscopical observation and flow cytometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Battut, I Barrier; Kempfer, A; Lemasson, N; Chevrier, L; Camugli, S

    2017-07-15

    Spermatozoa from some stallions do not maintain an acceptable fertility after freezing and thawing. The selection of frozen ejaculates that would be suitable for insemination is mainly based on post-thaw motility, but the prediction of fertility remains limited. A recent study in our laboratory has enabled the determination of a new protocol for the evaluation of fresh stallion semen, combining microscopical observation, computer-assisted motility analysis and flow cytometry, and providing a high level of fertility prediction. The purpose of the present experiment was to perform similar investigations on frozen semen. A panel of tests evaluating a large number of compartments or functions of the spermatozoa was applied to a population of 42 stallions, 33 of which showing widely differing fertilities (17-67% pregnancy rate per cycle [PRC]). Variability was evaluated by calculating the coefficient of variation (CV=SD/mean) and the intra-class correlation or "repeatability" for each variable. For paired variables, mean within-stallion CV% was significantly lower than between-stallion CV%, which was significantly lower than total CV%. Within-ejaculate repeatability, determined by analysing 6 straws for each of 10 ejaculates, ranged from 0.60 to 0.97. Within-stallion repeatability, determined by analysing at least 5 ejaculates for each of 38 stallions, ranged from 0.12 to 0.95. Principal component regression using a combination of 25 variables, including motility, morphology, viability, oxidation level, acrosome integrity, DNA integrity and hypoosmotic resistance, accounted for 94.5% of the variability regarding fertility, and was used to calculate a prediction of the PRC with a mean standard deviation of 2.2. The difference between the observed PRC and the calculated value ranged from -3.4 to 4.2. The 90% confidence interval (90CI) for the prediction of the PRC for the stallions of unknown fertility ranged from 8 to 30 (mean = 17). The best-fit model using only

  13. Simulation of Deposition the Corrosion Waste in a Water Distribution System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peráčková Jana

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available In water distribution systems can be found particles of rust and other mechanical contaminants. The particles are deposited in locations where the low velocity of water flow. Where a can cause the pitting corrosion. Is a concern in the systems made of galvanized steel pipes. The contribution deals with CFD (Computational Fluid Dynamics simulations of water flow and particles deposition in water distribution system. CFD Simulations were compared with the corrosive deposits in real pipeline. Corrosion is a spontaneous process of destruction of metal material due to electrochemical reactions of metal with the aggressive surrounding. Electrochemical corrosion is caused by the thermodynamic instability of metal and therefore can not be completely suppress, it can only influence the speed of corrosion. The requirement is to keep metal properties during the whole its lifetime. Requested service lifetime the water pipe according to EN 806-2 is 50 years.

  14. Study on Increasing High Temperature pH(t) to Reduce Iron Corrosion Products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shin, Dong Man; Hur, Nam Yong; Kim, Waang Bae

    2011-01-01

    The transportation and deposition of iron corrosion products are important elements that affect both the steam generator (SG) integrity and secondary system in pressurized water reactor (PWR) nuclear power plants. Most of iron corrosion products are generated on carbon steel materials due to flow accelerated corrosion (FAC). The several parameters like water chemistry, temperature, hydrodynamic, and steel composition affect FAC. It is well established that the at-temperature pH of the deaerated water system has a first order effect on the FAC rate of carbon steels through nuclear industry researches. In order to reduce transportation and deposition of iron corrosion products, increasing pH(t) tests were applied on secondary system of A, B units. Increasing pH(t) successfully reduced flow accelerated corrosion. The effect of increasing pH(t) to inhibit FAC was identified through the experiment and pH(t) evaluation in this paper

  15. Persistent blood stream infection in patients supported with a continuous-flow left ventricular assist device is associated with an increased risk of cerebrovascular accidents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trachtenberg, Barry H; Cordero-Reyes, Andrea M; Aldeiri, Molham; Alvarez, Paulino; Bhimaraj, Arvind; Ashrith, Guha; Elias, Barbara; Suarez, Erik E; Bruckner, Brian; Loebe, Matthias; Harris, Richard L; Zhang, J Yi; Torre-Amione, Guillermo; Estep, Jerry D

    2015-02-01

    Common adverse events in patients supported with Continuous-flow left ventricular assist devices (CF-LVAD) include infections and cerebrovascular accidents (CVA). Some studies have suggested a possible association between blood stream infection (BSI) and CVA. Medical records of patients who received Heartmate II (HMII) CF-LVADs in 2008-2012 at a single center were reviewed. CVA was categorized as either hemorrhagic (HCVA) or ischemic (ICVA). BSI was divided into persistent (pBSI) and nonpersistent (non-pBSI). pBSI was defined as BSI with the same organism on repeated blood culture >72 hours from initial blood culture despite antibiotics. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed to determine predictors. A total of 149 patients had HMII implanted; 76% were male, and the overall mean age was 55.4 ± 13 years. There were a total of 19 (13%) patients who had CVA (7 HCVA and 12 ICVA) at a median of 295 days (range 5-1,096 days) after implantation. There were a total of 28 (19%) patients with pBSI and 17 (11%) patients with non-pBSI. Patients with pBSI had a trend toward greater BMI (31 kg/m(2) vs 27 kg/m(2); P = .09), and longer duration of support (1,019 d vs 371 d; P < .001) compared with those with non-pBSI. Persistent BSI was associated with an increased risk of mortality and with all-cause CVA on multivariate analysis (odds ratio [OR] 5.97; P = .003) as well as persistent Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection (OR 4.54; P = .048). Persistent BSI is not uncommon in patients supported by CF-LVAD and is highly associated with all-cause CVA and increased all-cause mortality. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. The Role of Implantable Cardioverter Defibrillators in Patients Bridged to Transplantation with a Continuous Flow Left Ventricular Assist Device: A Propensity Score Matched Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clerkin, Kevin J.; Topkara, Veli K.; Mancini, Donna M.; Yuzefpolskaya, Melana; Demmer, Ryan T.; Dizon, Jose M.; Takeda, Koji; Takayama, Hiroo; Naka, Yoshifumi; Colombo, Paolo C.; Garan, A. Reshad

    2016-01-01

    Background Implantable cardioverter defibrillators (ICD) provide a significant mortality benefit for appropriately selected patients with advanced heart failure. ICDs are associated with a mortality benefit when used in patients with a pulsatile left ventricular assist device (LVAD). However it is unclear whether patients with a continuous flow LVAD (CF-LVAD) derive the same benefit. This study sought to determine if the presence of an ICD provided a mortality benefit during CFLVAD support as a bridge to transplantation. Methods Patients were identified in the United Network for Organ Sharing (UNOS) registry that underwent LVAD implantation as bridge to transplantation from May 2004 and April 2014, with follow-up through June 2014. The primary outcome was freedom from death while on CF-LVAD support with adjustment for complications requiring UNOS listing status upgrade. Secondary endpoints included freedom from delisting while on CF-LVAD support and incidence of transplantation. Results 2,990 patients composed the study cohort and propensity score matching identified 1,012 patients with similar propensity scores. There was no difference in survival during device support between patients with and without an ICD (Hazard Ratio [HR] 1.20, 95% Confidence Interval [CI] 0.66-2.17, p=0.55). Adjusting for device complications requiring a UNOS listing status upgrade had minimal influence (HR 1.11, 95% CI 0.60-2.05, p=0.74). There was no increased risk of delisting due to being too sick for those with an ICD (HR 1.08, 95% CI 0.63-1.86, p=0.78). Likewise, the probability of transplantation was similar (HR 1.05, 95% CI 0.87-1.27, p=0.62). Conclusions Among patients bridged to transplantation with a CF-LVAD, the presence of an ICD did not reduce mortality. PMID:28089072

  17. The role of implantable cardioverter defibrillators in patients bridged to transplantation with a continuous-flow left ventricular assist device: A propensity score matched analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clerkin, Kevin J; Topkara, Veli K; Mancini, Donna M; Yuzefpolskaya, Melana; Demmer, Ryan T; Dizon, Jose M; Takeda, Koji; Takayama, Hiroo; Naka, Yoshifumi; Colombo, Paolo C; Garan, A Reshad

    2017-06-01

    Implantable cardioverter defibrillators (ICDs) provide a significant mortality benefit for appropriately selected patients with advanced heart failure. ICDs are associated with a mortality benefit when used in patients with a pulsatile left ventricular assist device (LVAD). It is unclear whether patients with a continuous-flow LVAD (CF-LVAD) derive the same benefit. We sought to determine if the presence of an ICD provided a mortality benefit during CF-LVAD support as a bridge to transplantation. Patients were identified in the United Network for Organ Sharing (UNOS) registry who underwent LVAD implantation as bridge to transplantation between May 2004 and April 2014, with follow-up through June 2014. Primary outcome was freedom from death while on CF-LVAD support with adjustment for complications requiring UNOS listing status upgrade. Secondary end-points included freedom from delisting while on CF-LVAD support and incidence of transplantation. The study cohort comprised 2,990 patients, and propensity score matching identified 1,012 patients with similar propensity scores. There was no difference in survival during device support between patients with and without an ICD (hazard ratio [HR] = 1.20; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.66-2.17; p = 0.55). Adjusting for device complications requiring a UNOS listing status upgrade had minimal influence (HR = 1.11; 95% CI, 0.60-2.05; p = 0.74). There was no increased risk of delisting owing to being too sick for patients with an ICD (HR = 1.08; 95% CI, 0.63-1.86; p = 0.78). Likewise, the probability of transplantation was similar (HR = 1.05; 95% CI, 0.87-1.27; p = 0.62). Among patients bridged to transplantation with a CF-LVAD, the presence of an ICD did not reduce mortality. Copyright © 2017 International Society for Heart and Lung Transplantation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Numerical model of RC beam response to corrosion

    Science.gov (United States)

    German, Magdalena; Pamin, Jerzy

    2018-01-01

    The chloride-induced corrosion of reinforcement used to be represented by Tuutti's model with initiation and propagation phases. During the initiation phase chlorides penetrate the concrete cover and accumulate around reinforcement bars. The chloride concentration in concrete increases until it reaches a chloride threshold value, causing deterioration of the passive layer of reinforcement. Then the propagation phase begins. During the propagation phase steel has no natural anti-corrosion protection, a corrosion current flows and this induces the production of rust. A growing volume of corrosion products generates stresses in concrete, which leads to cracking, splitting, delamination and loss of strength. The mechanical response of RC elements to reinforcement corrosion has mostly been examined on the basis of a 2D cross-section analysis. However, with this approach it is not possible to represent both corrosion and static loading. In the paper a 3D finite element model of an RC beam with the two actions applied is presented. Rust is represented as an interface between steel and concrete, considering the volumetric expansion of rust.

  19. The effect of zinc addition on PWR corrosion product deposition on zircaloy-4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walters, W.S.; Page, J.D.; Gaffka, A.P.; Kingsbury, A.F.; Foster, J.; Anderson, A.; Wickenden, D.; Henshaw, J.; Zmitko, M.; Masarik, V.; Svarc, V.

    2002-01-01

    During the period 1995 to 2001 a programme of loop irradiation tests have been performed to confirm the effectiveness of zinc additions on PWR circuit chemistry and corrosion. The programme included two loop irradiation experiments, and subsequent PIE; the experiments were a baseline test (no added zinc) and a test with added zinc (10 ppb). This paper addresses the findings regarding corrosion product deposition and activation on irradiated Zircaloy-4 surfaces. The findings are relevant to overall corrosion of the reactor primary circuit, the use of zinc as a corrosion inhibitor, and activation and transport of corrosion products. The irradiation experience provides information on the equilibration of the loop chemistry, with deliberate injection of zinc. The PIE used novel and innovative techniques (described below) to obtain samples of the oxide from the irradiated Zircaloy. The results of the PIE, under normal chemistry and zinc chemistry, indicate the effect of zinc on the deposition and activation of corrosion products on Zircaloy. It was found that corrosion product deposition on Zircaloy is enhanced by the addition of zinc (but corrosion product deposition on other materials was reduced in the presence of zinc). Chemical analysis and radioisotope gamma counting results are presented, to interpret the findings. A computer model has also been used to simulate the corrosion product deposition and activation, to assist in the interpretation of the results. (authors)

  20. Corrosion in power engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-03-01

    The proceedings contain the full texts of 25 papers of which 10 fall under the INIS Subject Scope. They concern the problems of corrosion in WWER type nuclear power plants. The topics include structural materials and equipment of the primary and the secondary circuits of nuclear power plants, components used in disposal of spent nuclear fuel, sodium valves for fast reactors and basic study of the properties of materials used in nuclear power. (Z.M.). 12 figs., 6 tabs., 46 refs

  1. Air corrosion in storing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mazaudier, F.; Feron, D.; Baklouti, M.; Midoux, N.

    2001-01-01

    The air corrosiveness of a radioactive waste package has been estimated in a store inside which the environmental conditions are supposed to be rather close to the outside ones. It is expressed according to the ISO 9223 standard, from the humidification value and the amounts of sulfur dioxide and chlorine ions. A computer code has been perfected too; the thermal behaviour of the package can then been determined. (O.M.)

  2. Corrosion Protection of Aluminum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalrymple, R. S.; Nelson, W. B.

    1963-07-01

    Treatment of aluminum-base metal surfaces in an autoclave with an aqueous chromic acid solution of 0.5 to 3% by weight and of pH below 2 for 20 to 50 hrs at 160 to 180 deg C produces an extremely corrosion-resistant aluminum oxidechromium film on the surface. A chromic acid concentration of 1 to 2% and a pH of about 1 are preferred.

  3. Recent work on graphite corrosion in dragon HTR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilkinson, V.J.; Parsons, P.D.; Lind, R.

    1976-01-01

    Recent studies are described of graphite corrosion in the Dragon reactor as a consequence of a programme of moisture additions to the helium coolant. The pattern of oxidation was significantly different from that expected from out-of-pile studies. Explanations are suggested in terms of flow and pore structure effects. (orig.) [de

  4. Zircaloy-4 corrosion in PWR's

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fyfitch, S.; Smalley, W.R.; Roberts, E.

    1985-01-01

    Zircaloy-4 waterside corrosion has been studied extensively in the nuclear industry for a number of years. Following the early crud-related corrosion failures in the Saxton test reactor, Westinghouse undertook numerous programs to minimize crud deposition on fuel rods in power reactors through primary coolant chemistry control. Modern plants today are operating with improved coolant chemistry guidelines, and crud deposition levels are very low in proportion to earlier experience. Zircaloy-4 corrosion under a variety of coolant chemistry, heat flux and exposure conditions has been studied extensively. Experience to date, even in relatively high coolant temperature plants, has indicated that -for both fuel cladding and structural components- Zircaloy-4 waterside corrosion performance has been excellent. Recognizing future industry trends, however, which will result in Zircaloy-4 being subjected to ever increasing corrosion duties, Westinghouse will continue accumulating Zircaloy-4 corrosion experience in large power plants. 13 refs.

  5. Nuclear corrosion science and engineering

    CERN Document Server

    2012-01-01

    Understanding corrosion mechanisms, the systems and materials they affect, and the methods necessary for accurately measuring their incidence is of critical importance to the nuclear industry for the safe, economic and competitive running of its plants. This book reviews the fundamentals of nuclear corrosion. Corrosion of nuclear materials, i.e. the interaction between these materials and their environments, is a major issue for plant safety as well as for operation and economic competitiveness. Understanding these corrosion mechanisms, the systems and materials they affect, and the methods to accurately measure their incidence is of critical importance to the nuclear industry. Combining assessment techniques and analytical models into this understanding allows operators to predict the service life of corrosion-affected nuclear plant materials, and to apply the most appropriate maintenance and mitigation options to ensure safe long term operation. This book critically reviews the fundamental corrosion mechani...

  6. Pipe Lines – External Corrosion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dan Babor

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Two areas of corrosion occur in pipe lines: corrosion from the medium carried inside the pipes; corrosion attack upon the outside of the pipes (underground corrosion. Electrolytic processes are also involved in underground corrosion. Here the moisture content of the soil acts as an electrolyte, and the ions required to conduct the current are supplied by water-soluble salts (chlorides, sulfates, etc. present in the soil. The nature and amount of these soluble materials can vary within a wide range, which is seen from the varying electrical conductivity and pH (varies between 3 and 10. Therefore the characteristics of a soil will be an important factor in under-ground corrosion.

  7. Metal surface corrosion grade estimation from single image

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yijun; Qi, Lin; Sun, Huyuan; Fan, Hao; Dong, Junyu

    2018-04-01

    Metal corrosion can cause many problems, how to quickly and effectively assess the grade of metal corrosion and timely remediation is a very important issue. Typically, this is done by trained surveyors at great cost. Assisting them in the inspection process by computer vision and artificial intelligence would decrease the inspection cost. In this paper, we propose a dataset of metal surface correction used for computer vision detection and present a comparison between standard computer vision techniques by using OpenCV and deep learning method for automatic metal surface corrosion grade estimation from single image on this dataset. The test has been performed by classifying images and calculating the accuracy for the two different approaches.

  8. Selection of Corrosion Resistant Materials for Nuclear Waste Repositories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    R.B. Rebak

    2006-01-01

    Several countries are considering geological repositories to dispose of nuclear waste. The environment of most of the currently considered repositories will be reducing in nature, except for the repository in the US, which is going to be oxidizing. For the reducing repositories, alloys such as carbon steel, stainless steels and titanium are being evaluated. For the repository in the US, some of the most corrosion resistant commercially available alloys are being investigated. This paper presents a summary of the behavior of the different materials under consideration for the repositories and the current understanding of the degradation modes of the proposed alloys in ground water environments from the point of view of general corrosion, localized corrosion and environmentally assisted cracking

  9. Accelerated Stress-Corrosion Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-01-01

    Test procedures for accelerated stress-corrosion testing of high-strength aluminum alloys faster and provide more quantitative information than traditional pass/fail tests. Method uses data from tests on specimen sets exposed to corrosive environment at several levels of applied static tensile stress for selected exposure times then subsequently tensile tested to failure. Method potentially applicable to other degrading phenomena (such as fatigue, corrosion fatigue, fretting, wear, and creep) that promote development and growth of cracklike flaws within material.

  10. Corrosion of fuel assembly materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noe, M.; Frejaville, G.; Beslu, P.

    1985-08-01

    Corrosion of zircaloy-4 is reviewed in relation with previsions of improvement in PWRs performance: higher fuel burnup; increase coolant temperature, implying nucleate boiling on the hot clad surfaces; increase duration of the cycle due to load-follow operation. Actual knowledge on corrosion rates, based partly on laboratory tests, is insufficient to insure that external clad corrosion will not constitute a limitation to these improvements. Therefore, additional testing within representative conditions is felt necessary [fr

  11. Corrosion Monitors for Embedded Evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robinson, Alex L. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Pfeifer, Kent B. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Casias, Adrian L. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Howell, Stephen W. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Sorensen, Neil R. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Missert, Nancy A. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2017-05-01

    We have developed and characterized novel in-situ corrosion sensors to monitor and quantify the corrosive potential and history of localized environments. Embedded corrosion sensors can provide information to aid health assessments of internal electrical components including connectors, microelectronics, wires, and other susceptible parts. When combined with other data (e.g. temperature and humidity), theory, and computational simulation, the reliability of monitored systems can be predicted with higher fidelity.

  12. Grain boundary defects initiation at the outer surface of dissimilar welds: corrosion mechanism studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Bouvier, O.; Yrieix, B.

    1995-11-01

    Dissimilar welds located on the primary coolant system of the French PWR I plants exhibit grain boundary defects in the true austenitic zones of the first buttering layer. If grain boundaries reach the interface, they can extend to the martensitic band. Those defects are filled with compact oxides. In addition, the ferritic base metal presents some pits along the interface. Nowadays, three mechanisms are proposed to explain the initiation of those defects: stress corrosion cracking, intergranular corrosion and high temperature intergranular oxidation. This paper is dealing with the study of the mechanisms involved in the corrosion phenomenon. Intergranular corrosion tests performed on different materials show that only the first buttering layer, even with some δ ferrite, is sensitized. The results of stress corrosion cracking tests in water solutions show that intergranular cracking is possible on a bulk material representative of the first buttering layer. It is unlikely on actual dissimilar welds where the ferritic base metal protects the first austenitic layer by galvanic coupling. Therefore, the stress corrosion cracking assumption cannot explain the initiation of the defects in aqueous environment. The results of the investigations and of the corrosion studies led to the conclusion that the atmosphere could be the only possible aggressive environment. This conclusion is based on natural atmospheric exposure and accelerated corrosion tests carried out with SO 2 additions in controlled atmosphere. They both induce a severe intergranular corrosion on true sensitized austenitic materials. This corrosion studies cannot conclude definitively on the causes of the defect initiation on field, but they show that the atmospheric corrosion could produce intergranular attacks in the pure austenitic zones of the first buttering layer of the dissimilar welds and that this corrosion is stress assisted. (author). 1 ref., 6 figs., 4 tabs

  13. Electrochemical aspects of microbiologically influenced corrosion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Licina, G.J.

    1989-01-01

    Microbiologically influenced corrosion (MIC) is a topic that has gained considerable interest over the past decade, particularly in the oil production and nuclear power generation industries. Failures of stainless steels and copper-nickel alloys under conditions that would not be expected to be at all demanding such as during lay-up have been observed as a result of MIC. Failures in the time period between system construction and its operation are often associated with biological activity. Finally, MIC is generally associated with normally stagnant systems or systems which experience intermittent flow conditions. The diverse and redundant design philosophy of nuclear plants necessitates that a large number of systems are operated in this manner. Some of these systems are safety related while still others support safety related systems. As a result, the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission and all nuclear utilities have become increasingly concerned with MIC. The purpose of this workshop is to provide a review of the most current technology related to the fundamental aspects of microbiologically influenced corrosion, its diagnosis, and its control. This paper reviews how microbes can influence the electrochemical processes that influen