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Sample records for floor muscle exercise

  1. Pelvic floor muscle training exercises

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003975.htm Pelvic floor muscle training exercises To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Pelvic floor muscle training exercises are a series of exercises ...

  2. Effect of pelvic floor muscle exercises on pulmonary function

    OpenAIRE

    Han, DongWook; Ha, Misook

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] This study aimed to determine the correlation between pelvic floor muscle strength and pulmonary function. In particular, we examined whether pelvic floor muscle exercises can improve pulmonary function. [Subjects] Thirty female college students aged 19?21 with no history of nervous or musculoskeletal system injury were randomly divided into experimental and control groups. [Methods] For the pulmonary function test, spirometry items included forced vital capacity and maximal volunta...

  3. Effect of pelvic floor muscle exercise on pelvic floor muscle activity and voiding functions during pregnancy and the postpartum period.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahyaoglu Sut, Hatice; Balkanli Kaplan, Petek

    2016-03-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of pelvic floor muscle exercise during pregnancy and the postpartum period on pelvic floor muscle activity and voiding functions. Pregnant women (n = 60) were randomly assigned into two groups (Training [n = 30] and Control [n = 30]) using a computer-based system. Pelvic floor muscle strength was measured using a perineometry device. Urinary symptoms were measured using the Urinary Distress Inventory (UDI-6), Incontinence Impact Questionnaire (IIQ-7), and the Overactive Bladder Questionnaire (OAB-q). Voiding functions were measured using uroflowmetry and 3-day voiding diaries. Measurements were obtained at week 28, weeks 36-38 of pregnancy, and postpartum weeks 6-8. Pelvic floor muscle strength significantly decreased during the pregnancy (P pelvic floor muscle strength improvement was significantly higher in the Training group compared to the Control group (P  0.05). However, UDI-6, coping, concern, and total scores of OAB-q were significantly decreased during weeks 36-38 of pregnancy in the Control group (P pelvic floor muscle strength, urinary symptoms, quality of life, and voiding functions. Pelvic floor muscle exercises applied during pregnancy and the postpartum period increase pelvic floor muscle strength and prevent deterioration of urinary symptoms and quality of life in pregnancy. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Regular Exercisers Have Stronger Pelvic Floor Muscles than Non-Regular Exercisers at Midpregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bø, Kari; Ellstrøm Engh, Marie; Hilde, Gunvor

    2017-12-26

    Today, all healthy pregnant women are encouraged to be physically active throughout pregnancy, with recommendations to participate in at least 30 min of aerobic activity on most days of the week, in addition to perform strength training of the major muscle groups 2-3 days per week, and also pelvic floor muscle training. There is, however, an ongoing debate whether general physical activity enhances or declines pelvic floor muscle function. To compare vaginal resting pressure, pelvic floor muscle strength and endurance in regular exercisers (exercise ≥ 30 minutes ≥ 3 times per week) and non-exercisers at mid-pregnancy. Furthermore, to assess whether regular general exercise or pelvic floor muscle strength was associated with urinary incontinence. This was a cross-sectional study at mean gestational week 20.9 (± 1.4) including 218 nulliparous pregnant women, mean age 28.6 years (range 19-40) and pre-pregnancy body mass index 23.9 kg/m 2 (SD 4.0). Vaginal resting pressure, pelvic floor muscle strength and pelvic floor muscle endurance were measured by a high precision pressure transducer connected to a vaginal balloon. International Consultation on Incontinence Questionnaire Urinary Incontinence Short Form was used to assess urinary incontinence. Differences between groups were analyzed using Independent Sample T-test. Linear regression analysis was conducted to adjust for pre-pregnancy body mass index, age, smoking during pregnancy and regular pelvic floor muscle training during pregnancy. P-value was set to ≤ 0.05. Regular exercisers had statistically significant stronger ( mean 6.4 cm H 2 O (95% CI: 1.7, 11.2)) and more enduring ( mean 39.9 cm H 2 Osec (95% CI: 42.2, 75.7)) pelvic floor muscles. Only pelvic floor muscle strength remained statistically significant, when adjusting for possible confounders. Pelvic floor muscle strength and not regular general exercise was associated with urinary continence (adjusted B: -6.4 (95% CI: -11.5, -1.4)). Regular

  5. Assessment of the effect of pelvic floor exercises on pelvic floor muscle strength using ultrasonography in patients with urinary incontinence: a prospective randomized controlled trial

    OpenAIRE

    Tosun, Ozge Celiker; Solmaz, Ulas; Ekin, Atalay; Tosun, Gokhan; Gezer, Cenk; Ergenoglu, Ahmet Mete; Yeniel, Ahmet Ozgur; Mat, Emre; Malkoc, Mehtap; Askar, Niyazi

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to evaluate whether the effect of pelvic floor exercises on pelvic floor muscle strength could be detected via ultrasonography in patients with urinary incontinence. [Subjects and Methods] Of 282 incontinent patients, 116 participated in the study and were randomly divided into a pelvic floor muscle training (n=65) group or control group (n=51). The pelvic floor muscle training group was given pelvic floor exercise training for 12 weeks. Both groups were ev...

  6. EFFECTIVENESS OF SWISS BALL VS FLOOR EXERCISES ON CORE MUSCLE STRENGTH IN ELITE CRICKETERS

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    K. Sai sudha

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Cricket is one of the most popular game in India played by men and women of all ages. The increased physical demands on the players may be associated with an increased risk of injuries. Core muscle strength is important to prevent risk of injuries in elite cricketers. The beginners in the cricket must have enough strength of core muscles, as core is the bridge between upper and lower limbs. So, it should be strong enough to prevent low back and lower limb injuries in cricketers. The aim is to determine the effectiveness of swiss ball exercises versus floor exercises on core muscle strength in elite cricketers. The objective is to study and compare the effectiveness of swiss ball exercises and floor exercises in elite cricketers in terms of back strength. Method: The total number of students in this study were 30 eilte cricketers between 16-25 years out of which 15 subjects were included each in floor exercise(n=15 and swiss ball group(n=15. Back strength was measured before and after the intervention of 6 weeks using isokinetic analyser. Results: After the analysis, the results revealed significant improvement of back strength in both the groups(p< 0.00. The swiss ball group showed significant results when compared with floor exercise group. Conclusion: Although the study showed beneficial results in both the groups, the results reflected that swiss ball group had better improvement of core muscle strength than the floor exercise group.

  7. Experience of pelvic floor muscle exercises among women in Taiwan: a qualitative study of improvement in urinary incontinence and sexuality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kao, Hsia-Tzu; Hayter, Mark; Hinchliff, Sharron; Tsai, Chuan-Hsiu; Hsu, Min-Tao

    2015-07-01

    To gain an in-depth understanding of women's experiences of performing pelvic floor muscle exercises for urinary incontinence and the impact on their sexuality. Urinary incontinence is not a life-threatening disorder; however, it has been shown to have detrimental effects on quality of life in terms of psychological, social and sexual dysfunction. Pelvic floor muscle exercises is the first recommended strategy for managing mild to moderate urinary incontinence as it is noninvasive and cost effective. Pelvic floor muscle exercises reduce incontinence and strengthen the pelvic floor muscles, which positively affects sexual function in women. Currently, the data are scarce for qualitative literature regarding the subjective experiences of Taiwanese women undergoing pelvic floor muscle exercises and the impact on their urinary incontinence and sexuality. Qualitative exploratory study. Semi-structured in depth interviews were undertaken with twelve women who had completed a pelvic floor muscle exercises program in Taiwan. Data were analysed using thematic analysis. Themes were related to Taiwanese women's initial feelings that urinary incontinence was inevitable and the effects on their sexuality. Three core themes were identified: perceptions of inevitability, developing awareness and gaining control and sexual taboo. Through developing awareness and control of their pelvic floor muscles women expressed improvement in urinary incontinence. Sexual enjoyment, body image, self confidence and sexuality were also enhanced. Pelvic floor muscle exercises had a positive effect on urinary incontinence and sexuality. The findings demonstrated that sex is a taboo topic for many Taiwanese women. With the sensitive management of pelvic floor muscle exercises programs this issue can be addressed. This study raises awareness of healthcare professionals by identifying how Taiwanese women perceive pelvic floor muscles. The positive impact of pelvic floor muscle exercises upon both

  8. EFFECTS OF PELVIC FLOOR MUSCLE EXERCISES ON URINARY INCONTINENCE IN DIABETIC WOMEN

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    Nadia Ishtiaq

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Urinary incontinence is a common condition among females and it is estimated that 20-40% females of age under 60 years suffer with urinary incontinence however for the females above 60 years the percentage is 30-50%. Keegal exercises are used to strengthen pelvic floor muscles which ultimately treats and reduces urinary incontinence. It is pretty definite that women with diabetes mellitus at advanced phases of age suffer with urine incontinence, but the severity of matter has yet been considered enough to put forth the cautionary measures to evade such concerns. Purpose of the study is to analyze the effect of pelvic floor exercises on the urinary incontinence in diabetic women. Methods: To evaluate the effect of Keegeal exercises (pelvic floor muscle exercises, quantitative research approach has been opted, in which patient were advised to perform the keegeal exercise for 3weekswith 4 weeks follow up. 45 diabetic women were recruited to analyze the effect of keegal exercises to minimize the risk of urine incontinence. In due course, three types of keegeal exercises have been proposed to analyze their effect on urine incontinence i.e. adductor strengthening, pelvic bridging, and draw in maneuver with a follow up of 4 weeks. Results: Reliability test was performed to evaluate the dependency between independent and dependent variable. Through ANOVA with Friedman's Test, it was observed that the data of correlation between the suggestive variables is highly significant. Cronbach’s Alpha test was performed which has concluded the results to 0.753 which is quite significant in context of research hypothesis and approving the fact the with keegeal exercise, urine incontinence can be reduced. Conclusion: With subjective research it was concluded that if the patient efficiently performs the exercise the urine incontinence can be improved.

  9. Training in exercises for pelvic floor muscles of patients with an urinary incontinence after radical prostatectomy

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    P. V. Glybochko

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Training of muscles of a pelvic bottom under control of biofeedback is applied at 87 patients with an urinary incontinence after a radical prostatectomy. Biofeedback increases management and control of a pelvic floor. At good ability of management of muscles of a pelvic floor the median of restoration was 4 months. Without opportunity of management of muscles of pelvic floor restoration was 9.4 months.

  10. Effects of pelvic floor muscle exercise on faecal incontinence in rectal cancer patients after stoma closure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Y-H; Yang, H-Y; Hung, S-L; Chen, H-P; Liu, K-W; Chen, T-B; Chi, S-C

    2016-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of pelvic floor muscle exercise (PFME) on the faecal incontinence (FI) of rectal cancer patients following stoma closure. Participants were randomly distributed into an exercise group (n = 27) and non-exercise group (n = 26). An experimental design and longitudinal approach were implemented for data collection. Baseline data were collected at 1 day before discharge, and then PFME was taught before the patients were discharged from the hospital. We collected data and followed up with the patients at their pre-discharge visit and at 1, 2, 3, 6 and 9 months after discharge. The Cleveland Clinic Faecal Incontinence (CCI) score was used to measure patient outcome. PFME proved to effectively decrease the degree of FI in stoma closure recipients. The FI score of the exercise group significantly decreased from 8.37 to 2.27 after PFME compared with that of the non-exercise group (from 8.54 to 2.58). The generalised estimation equation tests showed that both group and time were significantly different. The tests also indicated that although PFME appeared to hasten the decline of incontinence, this effect was no longer detectable at 9 months; thus, it may be an effective intervention for FI when implemented up to half a year after discharge. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Can hypopressive exercises provide additional benefits to pelvic floor muscle training in women with pelvic organ prolapse?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Resende, Ana Paula Magalhães; Stüpp, Liliana; Bernardes, Bruno Teixeira; Oliveira, Emerson; Castro, Rodrigo Aquino; Girão, Manoel João Batista Castello; Sartori, Marair Gracio Ferreira

    2012-01-01

    The aim of the study was to compare the effect of hypopressive exercises including pelvic floor muscle contraction, pelvic floor muscle training (PFMT) alone and control on pelvic floor muscle function in women with pelvic organ prolapse (POP). Fifty-eight women with a mean age of 55.4 (± 9.8) years old with stage II POP were randomly assigned to participate in the PFMT group, the hypopressive exercises associated with PFMT (HE + PFMT) group or the control group. Each treatment group underwent a 3-month course of treatment. The three groups received lifestyle advice regarding weight loss, constipation, coughing, and the avoidance of heavy lifting. Participants were evaluated before and after the treatment. Maximal voluntary contraction (MVC) and endurance were assessed using the Modified Oxford grading system. To evaluate muscle activation, surface electromyography (SEMG) was used. The two treatment group significantly increase pelvic floor muscle function as measured by MVC (P < 0.001) using the Modified Oxford grading system, as well as muscle activation (P < 0.001), measured by SEMG. The PFMT group was superior regarding endurance (P = 0.007). Both groups were superior to the control group regarding MVC, endurance and muscle activation. Adding hypopressive exercises to PFMT does not improve PFM function. Both treatment groups performed better than the control group. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Pelvic floor muscle exercise therapy with myofeedback for women with stress urinary incontinence : A meta-analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Kruif, Yvette P.; Van Wegen, Erwin E.H.

    1996-01-01

    Involuntary urine loss can be a major social and hygienic problem for women suffering from stress urinary incontinence (SUI). A frequently applied treatment method for these women is pelvic floor muscle exercise therapy (PFE), either with or without EMG-biofeedback (myofeedback). This paper attempts

  13. Pelvic floor muscle exercises with or without electric stimulation and post-prostectomy urinary incontinence: a systematic review

    OpenAIRE

    Zaidan,Patrícia; Silva,Elirez Bezerra da

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Introduction: Urinary incontinence (UI) after prostatectomy is difficult to treat and causes profound adverse impacts on the individual's quality of life. The main clinical treatments available for post-prostatectomy UI consist of behavioral techniques and physical therapy techniques, such as exercises, electrical stimulation and biofeedback for pelvic floor muscles (PFMs). Objective: To investigate the effectiveness of PFM exercises with or without electrical stimulation for reduc...

  14. FES-biofeedback versus intensive pelvic floor muscle exercise for the prevention and treatment of genuine stress incontinence.

    OpenAIRE

    Sung, M. S.; Hong, J. Y.; Choi, Y. H.; Baik, S. H.; Yoon, H.

    2000-01-01

    We undertook this work to compare the treatment efficacies and the changes of quality of life after pelvic floor muscle (PFM) exercise and the functional electrical stimulation (FES)-biofeedback treatment, both of which are being widely used as conservative treatment methods for female urinary incontinence. We randomly selected 60 female incontinence patients who visited our department and divided them evenly into two groups. They were treated for a period of 6 weeks. The subjective changes i...

  15. Effectiveness of adding voluntary pelvic floor muscle contraction to a Pilates exercise program: an assessor-masked randomized controlled trial.

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    Torelli, Luiza; de Jarmy Di Bella, Zsuzsanna Ilona Katalin; Rodrigues, Claudinei Alves; Stüpp, Liliana; Girão, Manoel João Batista Castello; Sartori, Marair Gracio Ferreira

    2016-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of adding voluntary pelvic floor muscle contraction (PFMC) to a Pilates exercise program in sedentary nulliparous women. Fifty-seven healthy nulliparous and physically inactive women were randomized to a Pilates exercise program (PEP) with or without PFMC. Forty-eight women concluded this study (24 participants for each group). Each woman was evaluated before and after the PEP, by a physiotherapist and an urogynecologist (UG). Neither of the professionals was revealed to them. This physiotherapist measured their pelvic floor muscle strength by using both a perineometer (Peritron) and vaginal palpation (Oxford Scale). The UG, who performed 3D perineal ultrasound examinations, collected their data and evaluated the results for pubovisceral muscle thickness and the levator hiatus area (LA). Both professionals were blinded to the group allocation. The protocol for both groups consisted of 24 bi-weekly 1-h individual sessions of Pilates exercises, developed by another physiotherapist who specializes in PFM rehabilitation and the Pilates technique. The PEP+ PFMC group showed significantly greater strength improvements than the PEP group when comparing the Oxford scale, vaginal pressure and pubovisceral muscle thickness during contraction measurements at baseline and post-treatment. Our findings suggest that adding a voluntary PFMC to a Pilates exercise program is more effective than Pilates alone in improving PFM strength in sedentary nulliparous women.

  16. Using the Vibrance Kegel Device With Pelvic Floor Muscle Exercise for Stress Urinary Incontinence: A Randomized Controlled Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ong, Teng Aik; Khong, Su Yen; Ng, Keng Lim; Ting, Jesse Ron Swire; Kamal, Norlia; Yeoh, Wei Sien; Yap, Ning Yi; Razack, Azad Hassan

    2015-09-01

    To evaluate the effectiveness of pelvic floor muscle exercises (PFMEs) performed with the new biofeedback Vibrance Kegel Device (VKD), compared to PFMEs alone, in treating stress urinary incontinence (SUI). This was a pilot prospective, randomized trial of women aged ≥18 years with SUI symptoms who underwent PFMEs at University Malaya Medical Centre from October 2011 to October 2013. The patients were randomly divided into two groups: control (PFMEs alone) and VKD (PFMEs with VKD biofeedback). The patients underwent 16 weeks of pelvic floor training, during which they were assessed using Australian pelvic floor questionnaires and modified Oxford scales for pelvic floor muscle strength at week 0, 4, and 16. Forty patients were recruited (control 19, VKD 21). Three patients in the control group dropped out during week 16 training, whereas the VKD group had no dropouts. The VKD group reported significantly earlier improvement in SUI scores, as assessed by the Australian pelvic floor questionnaires (P = .035) at week 4. However, there was no significant difference between the groups' SUI scores at week 16. Pelvic floor muscle strength was significantly better in the VKD group at week 4 (P = .025) and week 16 (P = 0.001). The subjective cure rate was similar in both groups at week 16 (62.5% for control and 61.9% for VKD) (P = 0.742). Using the VKD resulted in significant early improvement in SUI scores, and pelvic muscle strength had improved significantly by the end of the study. The VKD proved useful as an adjunct for pelvic floor training. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Pelvic floor muscle exercises with or without electric stimulation and post-prostectomy urinary incontinence: a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrícia Zaidan

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction: Urinary incontinence (UI after prostatectomy is difficult to treat and causes profound adverse impacts on the individual's quality of life. The main clinical treatments available for post-prostatectomy UI consist of behavioral techniques and physical therapy techniques, such as exercises, electrical stimulation and biofeedback for pelvic floor muscles (PFMs. Objective: To investigate the effectiveness of PFM exercises with or without electrical stimulation for reducing post-prostatectomy UI. Methods: We included only randomized controlled trials (RCTs which used PFM exercises with or without electrical stimulation. The search was conducted in August of 2013 in the databases of the U.S. National Library of Medicine (MEDLINE, Scientific Electronic Library Online (SciELO, Physiotherapy Evidence Database (PEDro and Virtual Health Library (VHL. We searched for RCTs published between 1999 and 2013. As keywords for our search, we used the following descriptors from the Health Sciences Descriptors (DeCS: urinary incontinence, pelvic diaphragm, prostatectomy, pelvic floor exercises, electrostimulation and electrical stimulation. We also used the following descriptors from the Medical Subject Headings (MeSH: electrical stimulation, pelvic floor, urinary incontinence, prostatectomy, physiotherapy and exercise therapy. Results: Of the 59 RCTs found, 26 were excluded as duplicates, and 28 were excluded for not displaying a minimum score of 5.0 on the PEDro Scale, which left us with five RCTs. Conclusion: PFM exercises can be effective for treating UI after radical prostatectomy, especially if begun soon after surgery. Associating electrical stimulation with PFM exercises did not show additional benefit for treating urinary incontinence. However, the selected studies presented some methodological weaknesses that may have compromised their internal validity.

  18. The impact of acute and chronic strenuous exercise on pelvic floor muscle strength and support in nulliparous healthy women.

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    Middlekauff, Monique L; Egger, Marlene J; Nygaard, Ingrid E; Shaw, Janet M

    2016-09-01

    Strenuous physical activity, which is known to increase intraabdominal pressure and theoretically places stress on the pelvic floor, may affect pelvic support in nulliparous women. The aims of this study were to: (1) examine the differences in maximal vaginal descent (MVD), vaginal resting pressure (VRP), and pelvic floor muscle strength (PFMS) between women who habitually perform strenuous exercise vs women who refrain from performing strenuous exercise; and (2) compare MVD, VRP, and PFMS before and immediately following physical activity in the strenuous and nonstrenuous groups separately. Participants were healthy nulliparous women ages 18-35 years who were habitual strenuous or nonstrenuous exercisers. Women in the strenuous group participated in CrossFit (CrossFit, Inc., Washington, DC) at least 3 days per week for at least 6 months. We assessed anthropometric and body composition values using standardized procedures. Participants completed the Pelvic Organ Prolapse Quantification examination and pelvic muscle strength assessment before and again within 15 minutes of completing exercise (CrossFit for the strenuous group and self-paced walking for the nonstrenuous). A research nurse masked to study group assignment recorded MVD, defined as the greatest value of anterior, posterior, or apical support, and VRP and PFMS using a perineometer. Maximal PFMS was recorded as the highest pressure measured in 3 vaginal contraction trials. Data were analyzed using parametric and nonparametric tests as appropriate. P < .05 was considered significant. Seventy nulliparous women participated in the study, 35 in each group. The mean age was 24.77 ± 4.3 years. Compared to the nonstrenuous group, strenuous participants were heavier (64.70 ± 7.78 kg vs 60.6 ± 8.99 kg, P = .027), had lower percent body fat (23.36 ± 5.88% vs 27.55 ± 7.07%, P = .003), and had higher handgrip strength (20.78 ± 5.97 kg vs 16.04 ± 11.04 kg, P = .001). Before exercise, there were no

  19. Evaluation of the effect of pelvic floor muscle training (PFMT or Kegel exercise) and assisted pelvic floor muscle training (APFMT) by a resistance device (Kegelmaster device) on the urinary incontinence in women: a randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kashanian, Maryam; Ali, Shadab Shah; Nazemi, Mitra; Bahasadri, Shohreh

    2011-11-01

    To evaluate the effect of pelvic floor muscle training (PFMT) or Kegel exercise with and without assistance by a resistance device (Kegelmaster device) on the urinary incontinence in women. A randomized clinical trial was performed on 91 women with the complaint of urinary incontinence. In the assisted pelvic floor muscle training (APFMT) group (n=41), after complete training, Kegelmaster device were used twice daily for 15 min each session, for a total duration of 12 weeks. In the pelvic floor muscle training (PFMT) group (n=50) after complete training, kegel exercises were done (including perineal muscle contractions for 6-8s with 6s rest in between), twice daily for 15 min each session and for a total duration of 12 weeks. These two groups were then compared according to the scores of special questionnaires for quality of life, strength of pelvic floor muscles, capability to participate in social activities, severity of urinary incontinence, and the number of involuntary urine passage, taken before, and after 1 and 3 months after finishing interventions. 85 women out of 91 women finished the study (46 in the PFMT group and 39 in the APFMT group). Strength of pelvic floor muscles, capability to participate in social activities, score of quality of life according to three world questionnaires of IQOL (incontinence Quality Of Life), IIQ (Incontinence Impact Questionnaire), UDI (Urogenital Distress Inventory), showed no difference between the two groups 1 and 3 months after interventions. Pair t test showed a significant improvement in both groups 1 and 3 months after intervention, according to IQOL score (P=0.000), UDI score (P=0.000), IIQ score (P=0.000), strength of pelvic floor muscles, (P=0.000), capability to participate in social activities (P=0.000), severity of urinary incontinence (P=0.000) and the number of involuntary urine passage (P=0.000). Pelvic floor muscle training with or without Kegelmaster show no apparent difference to each other, however

  20. Nursing intervention to enhance efficacy of home practice of pelvic floor muscle exercises in treating mixed urinary incontinence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Soo-Cheen; Lin, Tzu-Li; Chang, Su-Jung; Tai, Hui-Lung; Hu, Shu-Woan; Chen, Gin-Den

    2008-05-01

    This study was conducted to evaluate nursing intervention to enhance the efficacy of a home-based pelvic floor muscle exercise (PFME) in treating mixed urinary incontinence among a community-based population. Eighty-eight women with mixed incontinence were recruited for this study and were asked to practice PFME at home as instructed. A registered nurse monitored the study group via telephone checkups twice a week. The Symptoms (LUTS) Questionnaire and a disease-specific questionnaire of impact index were used for repeat measurements before intervention, at 3 and 6 months after PFME. Symptoms such as frequency, nocturia, urge incontinence, and urinary stress incontinence improved significantly in the study group at 6 months. Quality of life with regard to worry about pads/towels leakage and getting wet also improved in the study group at 6 months. Nursing intervention can significantly improve the efficacy of a home-based PFME program in community women with mixed storage symptoms.

  1. A Pilates exercise program with pelvic floor muscle contraction: Is it effective for pregnant women? A randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dias, Naiara T; Ferreira, Letícia R; Fernandes, Mariana G; Resende, Ana Paula M; Pereira-Baldon, Vanessa S

    2018-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of a Pilates exercise program with pelvic floor muscle (PFM) contraction compared to a conventional intervention in pregnant women. Fifty primiparous women, without gestational alterations, were randomized to the Pilates group (n = 25) and control group (n = 25). Interventions for both groups consisted of twice-weekly sessions of 1 h each during the period between the 14-16th and 32-34th gestational weeks. The Pilates group performed a Pilates exercises program with the addition of voluntary PFM contraction. Mat-based Pilates exercises were performed involving movement of the upper limbs, lower limbs and trunk in all sessions. The Control group walked for 10 min and performed strengthening exercises of the lower limbs, upper limbs, and trunk with resistance from an elastic band and body weight. Each woman was evaluated by an unblinded physiotherapist before and after intervention for primary (PFM strength using a manometer) and secondary (PFM strength using Oxford Scale, endurance and repeatability) outcomes. Covariance analysis (ANCOVA) was used to compare the groups using the baseline values as a covariate. Thirty-six women were included in the analysis. There were no differences between the groups for manometry. An increase in the PFM strength, endurance, and repeatability was only observed in the Pilates group. In addition, the Pilates group showed greater adherence to the intervention. Pilates exercise program with PFM contraction is not able to change the PFM strength assessed by manometer in pregnant women, but it improved adherence to the intervention. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Pelvic floor muscle function in women with pelvic floor dysfunction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tibaek, Sigrid; Dehlendorff, Christian

    2014-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to investigate the level of pelvic floor muscle (PFM) function in women with pelvic floor dysfunction (PFD) referred by gynaecologists and urologists for in-hospital pelvic floor muscle training (PFMT), and to identity associated factors for a low level of PFM...

  3. [Pelvic floor muscle training and pelvic floor disorders in women].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thubert, T; Bakker, E; Fritel, X

    2015-05-01

    Our goal is to provide an update on the results of pelvic floor rehabilitation in the treatment of urinary incontinence and genital prolapse symptoms. Pelvic floor muscle training allows a reduction of urinary incontinence symptoms. Pelvic floor muscle contractions supervised by a healthcare professional allow cure in half cases of stress urinary incontinence. Viewing this contraction through biofeedback improves outcomes, but this effect could also be due by a more intensive and prolonged program with the physiotherapist. The place of electrostimulation remains unclear. The results obtained with vaginal cones are similar to pelvic floor muscle training with or without biofeedback or electrostimulation. It is not known whether pelvic floor muscle training has an effect after one year. In case of stress urinary incontinence, supervised pelvic floor muscle training avoids surgery in half of the cases at 1-year follow-up. Pelvic floor muscle training is the first-line treatment of post-partum urinary incontinence. Its preventive effect is uncertain. Pelvic floor muscle training may reduce the symptoms associated with genital prolapse. In conclusion, pelvic floor rehabilitation supervised by a physiotherapist is an effective short-term treatment to reduce the symptoms of urinary incontinence or pelvic organ prolapse. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  4. Comparison of changes in the mobility of the pelvic floor muscle on during the abdominal drawing-in maneuver, maximal expiration, and pelvic floor muscle maximal contraction

    OpenAIRE

    Jung, Halim; Jung, Sangwoo; Joo, Sunghee; Song, Changho

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to compare changes in the mobility of the pelvic floor muscle during the abdominal drawing-in maneuver, maximal expiration, and pelvic floor muscle maximal contraction. [Subjects] Thirty healthy adults participated in this study (15 men and 15 women). [Methods] All participants performed a bridge exercise and abdominal curl-up during the abdominal drawing-in maneuver, maximal expiration, and pelvic floor muscle maximal contraction. Pelvic floor mobility...

  5. Testing and training of the pelvic floor muscles after childbirth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jonasson, A; Larsson, B; Pschera, H

    1989-01-01

    In a prospective study of 83 women, two different physiotherapy methods for strengthening the pelvic floor muscles after childbirth were evaluated. The training program was carried out by the patients at home for 12 weeks, starting 8 weeks after spontaneous uneventful delivery. Forty-two women did pelvic floor exercises in accordance with the method presented by Kegel. Forty-one women used standard vaginal cones with weights increasing in 10 g stages from 20 to 100 g, to be retained in the vagina both when standing erect and moving. Pelvic floor muscle strength, defined as the weight in grams of the heaviest cone that could be retained in the vagina, was recorded before and after the 12-week training period. Training with vaginal cones produced significantly better pelvic floor muscle strength than did exercise without cones.

  6. Comparison of changes in the mobility of the pelvic floor muscle on during the abdominal drawing-in maneuver, maximal expiration, and pelvic floor muscle maximal contraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Halim; Jung, Sangwoo; Joo, Sunghee; Song, Changho

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to compare changes in the mobility of the pelvic floor muscle during the abdominal drawing-in maneuver, maximal expiration, and pelvic floor muscle maximal contraction. [Subjects] Thirty healthy adults participated in this study (15 men and 15 women). [Methods] All participants performed a bridge exercise and abdominal curl-up during the abdominal drawing-in maneuver, maximal expiration, and pelvic floor muscle maximal contraction. Pelvic floor mobility was evaluated as the distance from the bladder base using ultrasound. [Results] According to exercise method, bridge exercise and abdominal curl-ups led to significantly different pelvic floor mobility. The pelvic floor muscle was elevated during the abdominal drawing-in maneuver and descended during maximal expiration. Finally, pelvic floor muscle mobility was greater during abdominal curl-up than during the bridge exercise. [Conclusion] According to these results, the abdominal drawing-in maneuver induced pelvic floor muscle contraction, and pelvic floor muscle contraction was greater during the abdominal curl-up than during the bridge exercise. PMID:27065532

  7. Comparison of changes in the mobility of the pelvic floor muscle on during the abdominal drawing-in maneuver, maximal expiration, and pelvic floor muscle maximal contraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Halim; Jung, Sangwoo; Joo, Sunghee; Song, Changho

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to compare changes in the mobility of the pelvic floor muscle during the abdominal drawing-in maneuver, maximal expiration, and pelvic floor muscle maximal contraction. [Subjects] Thirty healthy adults participated in this study (15 men and 15 women). [Methods] All participants performed a bridge exercise and abdominal curl-up during the abdominal drawing-in maneuver, maximal expiration, and pelvic floor muscle maximal contraction. Pelvic floor mobility was evaluated as the distance from the bladder base using ultrasound. [Results] According to exercise method, bridge exercise and abdominal curl-ups led to significantly different pelvic floor mobility. The pelvic floor muscle was elevated during the abdominal drawing-in maneuver and descended during maximal expiration. Finally, pelvic floor muscle mobility was greater during abdominal curl-up than during the bridge exercise. [Conclusion] According to these results, the abdominal drawing-in maneuver induced pelvic floor muscle contraction, and pelvic floor muscle contraction was greater during the abdominal curl-up than during the bridge exercise.

  8. Biofeedback, electrical stimulation, pelvic floor muscle exercises, and vaginal cones: a combined rehabilitative approach for sexual dysfunction associated with urinary incontinence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivalta, Massimo; Sighinolfi, Maria Chiara; De Stefani, Stefano; Micali, Salvatore; Mofferdin, Alessandro; Grande, Marco; Bianchi, Giampaolo

    2009-06-01

    Urinary incontinence (UI) is often associated with sexual dysfunction. We present our preliminary experience with a combined rehabilitative approach consisting of biofeedback, functional electrical stimulation, pelvic floor muscle exercises, and vaginal cones. The potential impact of such practice on UI and sexual function was analyzed in our case series and discussed. We evaluated three women affected by UI and sexual dysfunction. The patients underwent combined pelvic floor rehabilitation (PFR), kept voiding diaries, and filled out the Female Sexual Function Index (FSFI questionnaire) before and after the completion of PFR. We evaluated each domain score, including desire, arousal, lubrication, orgasm, satisfaction, and pain. After the combined rehabilitation program, none of them had UI requiring pad use or referred urine leakage during sexual activity, including intercourse. Before PFR, FSFI score ranged from 16 to 21; after treatment, the FSFI score ranged from 22.1 to 29.3. There was an improvement in patients regarding desire, arousal, lubrication, orgasm, satisfaction, and pain. A complete rehabilitation can provide a beneficial effect on sexual function. A larger trial, on a more extended female population, is currently in progress, in order to confirm our findings. The effectiveness of a complete PFR scheme, together with the lack of side effects, makes it a suitable approach to sexual dysfunction that is associated with UI.

  9. Sexual function and quality of life in women with urinary incontinence treated by a complete pelvic floor rehabilitation program (biofeedback, functional electrical stimulation, pelvic floor muscles exercises, and vaginal cones).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivalta, Massimo; Sighinolfi, Maria Chiara; Micali, Salvatore; De Stefani, Stefano; Bianchi, Giampaolo

    2010-03-01

    Urinary incontinence (UI) is a debilitating condition that can cause discomfort, embarrassment, loss of confidence; it can lead to withdrawal from social life, and adversely affects physical and mental health, sexual function and quality of life (QoL) in women. The aim is to determine the impact of combined pelvic floor rehabilitation (PFR) on UI, female sexual dysfunction, and QoL. Female Sexual Function Index questionnaire (FSFI) and King's Health Questionnaire (KHQ). Sixteen patients with UI were selected and underwent a complete PFR program (biofeedback, functional electrical stimulation, pelvic floor muscles exercises, and vaginal cones). Patient filled out the FSFI questionnaire and the KHQ at the baseline and at follow-up. After PFR none of the patients reported urine leakage during sexual activity. Resolution of incontinence was achieved in 13 (81.25%) women. Only three (18.75%) patients had positive 1-hour pad test after the treatment. There was significant difference between pad test leakage before and after the PFR (P incontinence score was 1.37 +/- 0.5 at the baseline vs. 0.25 +/- 0.57 at the follow up (P incontinence scores. The treatment caused an improvement in patient's QoL index and sexual function.

  10. [Postpartum pelvic floor muscle training and abdominal rehabilitation: Guidelines].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deffieux, X; Vieillefosse, S; Billecocq, S; Battut, A; Nizard, J; Coulm, B; Thubert, T

    2015-12-01

    Provide guidelines for clinical practice concerning postpartum rehabilitation. Systematically review of the literature concerning postpartum pelvic floor muscle training and abdominal rehabilitation. Pelvic-floor rehabilitation using pelvic floor muscle contraction exercises is recommended to treat persistent urinary incontinence at 3 months postpartum (grade A), regardless of the type of incontinence. At least 3 guided sessions with a therapist is recommended, associated with pelvic floor muscle exercises at home. This postpartum rehabilitation improves short-term urinary incontinence (1 year) but not long-term (6-12 years). Early pelvic-floor rehabilitation (within 2 months following childbirth) is not recommended (grade C). Postpartum pelvic-floor rehabilitation in women presenting with anal incontinence, is associated with a lower prevalence of anal incontinence symptoms in short-term (1 year) (EL3) but not long-term (6 and 12) (EL3). Postpartum pelvic-floor rehabilitation is recommended to treat anal incontinence (grade C) but results are not maintained in medium or long term. No randomized trials have evaluated the pelvic-floor rehabilitation in asymptomatic women in order to prevent urinary or anal incontinence in medium or long term. It is therefore not recommended (expert consensus). Rehabilitation supervised by a therapist (physiotherapist or midwife) is not associated with better results than simple advice for voluntary contraction of the pelvic floor muscles to prevent/correct, in short term (6 months), a persistent prolapse 6 weeks postpartum (EL2), whether or not with a levator ani avulsion (EL3). Postpartum pelvic-floor rehabilitation is not associated with a decrease in the prevalence of dyspareunia at 1-year follow-up (EL3). Postpartum pelvic-floor rehabilitation guided by a therapist is therefore not recommended to treat or prevent prolapse (grade C) or dyspareunia (grade C). No randomized trials have evaluated the effect of pelvic

  11. Is pilates as effective as conventional pelvic floor muscle exercises in the conservative treatment of post-prostatectomy urinary incontinence? A randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedriali, Fabiana Rotondo; Gomes, Cíntia Spagnolo; Soares, Larissa; Urbano, Mariana Ragassi; Moreira, Eliane Cristina Hilberath; Averbeck, Márcio Augusto; de Almeida, Silvio Henrique Maiade

    2016-06-01

    To verify the efficacy of a Pilates exercise program compared to conventional pelvic floor muscle exercise (PFME) protocol in the conservative treatment of post-prostatectomy urinary incontinence (PPUI). Baseline assessment was performed four weeks postoperatively and included 24 hr pad test, bladder diary, and the ICIQ-SF. Patients were randomised into three groups: Pilates (G1), PFME combined with anal electrical stimulation (G2), and a control group (G3). Both treatment groups had to perform 10 weekly treatment sessions. Primary outcomes were mean reduction of daily pads and mean reduction of ICIQ-SF score four months after surgery. The significance level was set at P  0.05). The control group differed from G1 in daily pad usage (P = 0.01) and ICIQ-SF score (P = 0.0073). Intergroup comparisons revealed that 57.7% of the volunteers in G1 and 50% of the individuals from G2 no longer used pads by the end of the treatment period (P = 0.57). In the control group, 22.6% were not using pads four months after surgery, with statistical difference compared to G1 (P < 0.05). The Pilates exercise program proved to be as effective as conventional PFME to speed up continence recovery in PPUI. It also achieved a higher rate of fully continent patients when compared to the control group in the short-term. Neurourol. Urodynam. 35:615-621, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Muscle glycogenolysis during exercise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Richter, Erik; Ruderman, N B; Gavras, H

    1982-01-01

    glycogenolysis during exercise: contractions principally stimulate glycogenolysis early in exercise, and a direct effect of epinephrine on muscle is needed for continued glycogenolysis. In addition, epinephrine increased oxygen consumption and glucose uptake in both resting and electrically stimulated...

  13. Does pelvic floor muscle training abolish symptoms of urinary incontinence? A randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Celiker Tosun, O; Kaya Mutlu, E; Ergenoglu, A M; Yeniel, A O; Tosun, G; Malkoc, M; Askar, N; Itil, I M

    2015-06-01

    To determine whether symptoms of urinary incontinence is reduced by pelvic floor muscle training, to determine whether urinary incontinence can be totally eliminated by strengthening the pelvic floor muscle to grade 5 on the Oxford scale. Prospective randomized controlled clinical trial. Outpatient urogynecology department. One hundred thirty cases with stress and mixed urinary incontinence. All participants were randomly allocated to the pelvic floor muscle training group or control group. A 12-week home based exercise program, prescribed individually, was performed by the pelvic floor muscle training group. Urinary incontinence symptoms (Incontinence Impact Questionnaire-7, Urogenital Distress Inventory-6, bladder diary, stop test and pad test) were assessed, and the pelvic floor muscle strength was measured for (PERFECT testing, perineometric and ultrasound) all participants before and after 12 weeks of treatment. The pelvic floor muscle training group had significant improvement in their symptoms of urinary incontinence (P=0.001) and an increase in pelvic floor muscle strength (P=0.001, by the dependent t test) compared with the control group. All the symptoms of urinary incontinence were significantly decreased in the patients that had reached pelvic floor muscle strength of grade 5 and continued the pelvic floor muscle training (P<0.05). The study demonstrated that pelvic floor muscle training is effective in reducing the symptoms of stress and mixed urinary incontinence and in increasing pelvic floor muscle strength. © The Author(s) 2014.

  14. [Evaluation of the electromyography activity of pelvic floor muscle during postural exercises using the Wii Fit Plus©. Analysis and perspectives in rehabilitation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steenstrup, B; Giralte, F; Bakker, E; Grise, P

    2014-12-01

    The aim of this work was to evaluate the effect of postural awareness by using the Wii Fit Plus© on the quality of the baseline (automatic) activity of the pelvic floor muscles (PFM) measured by intravaginal surface electromyography (sEMG). Four healthy continent female subjects, all able to perform a voluntary contraction, undertook 2 sets of 3 various exercises offered by the software Wii Fit Plus© using the Wii balance board© (WBB): one set without any visual control and the second set with postural control and sEMG visual feedback. Simultaneously, we recorded the sEMG activity of the PFM. Mean baseline activity of PFM in standing position at start was 2.87 mV, at submaximal voluntary contraction the sEMG activity raised at a mean of 14.43 mV (7.87-21.89). In the first set of exercises on the WBB without any visual feedback, the automatic activity of the PFM increased from 2.87 mV to 8.75 mV (7.96-9.59). In the second set, with visual postural and sEMG control, mean baseline sEMG activity even raised at 11.39 mV (10.17-11.58). Among women able of a voluntary contraction of PFM, visualisation of posture with the help of the WBB and of sEMG activity of the PFM during static and dynamic Wii Fit Plus© activities, may improve the automatic activation of the PFMs. 4. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  15. Pelvic floor muscle contractility: digital assessment vs transperineal ultrasound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Delft, K; Thakar, R; Sultan, A H

    2015-02-01

    A significant reduction in hiatal area and anteroposterior diameter can be induced by pelvic floor muscle contraction, and this has been demonstrated using three-dimensional/four-dimensional (3D/4D) transperineal ultrasound (TPS) in a small group of women. Our objective was to correlate pelvic floor muscle contractility using digital assessment with the change in TPS hiatus measurements during maximum pelvic floor muscle contraction. Nulliparous pregnant women were recruited from the antenatal clinic. Pelvic floor muscle contractility was assessed by digital palpation using the validated Modified Oxford Scale (MOS). Subsequently, women underwent 3D/4D TPS. Measurements of the hiatal area and anteroposterior diameter were taken from the rendered ultrasound images at rest and at maximum contraction, and differences in measurements were expressed as percentages. Spearman's rank (ρ) was used to assess the correlation. Four hundred and fifty-nine assessments were performed, of which 268 were from women at around 36 weeks' gestation, and 191 were from women following delivery at 3 months postpartum. The overall correlation between MOS and TPS was found to be ρ = 0.47 for hiatal area (P biofeedback when training patients in pelvic floor muscle exercises. As TPS is non-intrusive, it may be the method of choice for some women. Copyright © 2014 ISUOG. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Morphological changes after pelvic floor muscle training measured by 3-dimensional ultrasonography: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braekken, Ingeborg Hoff; Hoff Braekken, Ingeborg; Majida, Memona; Engh, Marie Ellström; Bø, Kari

    2010-02-01

    To investigate morphological and functional changes after pelvic floor muscle training in women with pelvic organ prolapse. This randomized controlled trial was conducted at a university hospital and a physical therapy clinic. One hundred nine women with pelvic organ prolapse stages I, II, and III were randomly allocated by a computer-generated random number system to pelvic floor muscle training (n=59) or control (n=50). Both groups received lifestyle advice and learned to contract the pelvic floor muscles before and during increases in intraabdominal pressure. In addition the pelvic floor muscle training group did individual strength training with a physical therapist and daily home exercise for 6 months. Primary outcome measures were pelvic floor muscle (pubovisceral muscle) thickness, levator hiatus area, pubovisceral muscle length at rest and Valsalva, and resting position of bladder and rectum, measured by three-dimensional ultrasonography. Seventy-nine percent of women in the pelvic floor muscle training group adhered to at least 80% of the training protocol. Compared with women in the control group, women in the pelvic floor muscle training group increased muscle thickness (difference between groups: 1.9 mm, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.1-2.7, Ppelvic floor muscle stiffness. Supervised pelvic floor muscle training can increase muscle volume, close the levator hiatus, shorten muscle length, and elevate the resting position of the bladder and rectum. www.clinicaltrials.gov, NCT00271297. I.

  17. Is Pelvic Floor Muscle Training Effective for Men With Poststroke Lower Urinary Tract Symptoms?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tibaek, Sigrid; Gard, Gunvor; Dehlendorff, Christian

    2017-01-01

    The aim of the current study was to evaluate the effect of pelvic floor muscle training in men with poststroke lower urinary tract symptoms. Thirty-one poststroke men, median age 68 years, were included in this single-blinded randomized controlled trial. Thirty participants, 15 in each group......, completed the study. The intervention consisted of 3 months (12 weekly sessions) of pelvic floor muscle training in groups and home exercises. The effect was evaluated by the DAN-PSS-1 (Danish Prostate Symptom Score) questionnaire, a voiding diary, and digital anal palpation of the pelvic floor muscle...... statistically significantly in pelvic floor muscle function (p

  18. Pelvic Muscle Rehabilitation: A Standardized Protocol for Pelvic Floor Dysfunction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo Pedraza

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Pelvic floor dysfunction syndromes present with voiding, sexual, and anorectal disturbances, which may be associated with one another, resulting in complex presentation. Thus, an integrated diagnosis and management approach may be required. Pelvic muscle rehabilitation (PMR is a noninvasive modality involving cognitive reeducation, modification, and retraining of the pelvic floor and associated musculature. We describe our standardized PMR protocol for the management of pelvic floor dysfunction syndromes. Pelvic Muscle Rehabilitation Program. The diagnostic assessment includes electromyography and manometry analyzed in 4 phases: (1 initial baseline phase; (2 rapid contraction phase; (3 tonic contraction and endurance phase; and (4 late baseline phase. This evaluation is performed at the onset of every session. PMR management consists of 6 possible therapeutic modalities, employed depending on the diagnostic evaluation: (1 down-training; (2 accessory muscle isolation; (3 discrimination training; (4 muscle strengthening; (5 endurance training; and (6 electrical stimulation. Eight to ten sessions are performed at one-week intervals with integration of home exercises and lifestyle modifications. Conclusions. The PMR protocol offers a standardized approach to diagnose and manage pelvic floor dysfunction syndromes with potential advantages over traditional biofeedback, involving additional interventions and a continuous pelvic floor assessment with management modifications over the clinical course.

  19. Bioelectrical activity of the pelvic floor muscles after 6-week biofeedback training in nulliparous continent women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chmielewska, Daria; Stania, Magdalena; Smykla, Agnieszka; Kwaśna, Krystyna; Błaszczak, Edward; Sobota, Grzegorz; Skrzypulec-Plinta, Violetta

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the effects of a 6-week sEMG-biofeedback-assisted pelvic floor muscle training program on pelvic floor muscle activity in young continent women. Pelvic floor muscle activity was recorded using a vaginal probe during five experimental trials. Biofeedback training was continued for 6 weeks, 3 times a week. Muscle strenghtening and endurance exercises were performed alternately. SEMG (surface electromyography) measurements were recorded on four different occasions: before training started, after the third week of training, after the sixth week of training, and one month after training ended. A 6-week sEMG-biofeedback-assisted pelvic floor muscle training program significantly decreased the resting activity of the pelvic floor muscles in supine lying and standing. The ability to relax the pelvic floor muscles after a sustained 60-second contraction improved significantly after the 6-week training in both positions. SEMG-biofeedback training program did not seem to affect the activity of the pelvic floor muscles or muscle fatigue during voluntary pelvic floor muscle contractions. SEMG-biofeedback-assisted pelvic floor muscle training might be recommended for physiotherapists to improve the effectiveness of their relaxation techniques.

  20. Use of the SF-36 quality of life scale to assess the effect of pelvic floor muscle exercise on aging males who received transurethral prostate surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hou CP

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Chen-Pang Hou,1,* Tzu-Yu Chen,2,* Chia-Chi Chang,3 Yu-Hsiang Lin,1 Phei-Lang Chang,1 Chien-Lun Chen,1 Yu-Chao Hsu,1 Ke-Hung Tsui1 1Department of Urology, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital Linko, Chang Gung University, Taiwan, Republic of China; 2Department of Nursing, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Taipei, Republic of China; 3College of Nursing, Taipei Medical University, Taipei, Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this work Purpose: We used the Short Form (SF-36® Health Survey scale to assess the effect of pelvic floor muscle exercise (PFE on aging males who received transurethral resection of the prostate (TUR-P. Methods: From April 2010 to December 2010, a total of 66 patients who underwent TUR-P were enrolled in this study. They were randomized into two groups (with 33 patients in each group – an experimental group who performed postoperative PFE every day and a control groups. Data, including the International Prostate Symptom Score (IPSS, uroflowmetry study, and the SF-36 quality of life measure, were collected before the operation, and at 1, 4, 8, and 12 weeks after the operation. We analyzed the differences between the two groups with respect to their IPSS scores, maximal urinary flow rate, residual urine amount, and life quality. Results: A total of 61 patients (experimental group: 32 patients, and control group: 29 patients completed this study. We found that at 12 weeks postop, patients who performed PFE every day had a better maximal urinary flow rate (16.41 ± 6.20 vs 12.41 ± 7.28 mL/min (P = 0.026 compared with patients in the control group. The experimental group had a much greater decrease in IPSS score (P < 0.001. As for the SF-36 scale, the experimental group had higher scores than did the control group on both the physiological domain (54.86 vs 49.86 (P = 0.029 and the psychological domain (61.88 vs 52.69 (P = 0.005. However, there were no significant differences with respect to the postvoiding residual

  1. [Comparison of pelvic floor muscle strength in competition-level athletes and untrained women].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ludviksdottir, Ingunn; Hardardottir, Hildur; Sigurdardottir, Thorgerdur; Ulfarsson, Gudmundur F

    2018-01-01

    Exercise can stress the pelvic floor muscles. Numerous women experience urinary incontinence while exercising or competing in sports. This study investigated pelvic floor muscle strength, urinary incontinence, and knowledge in contracting pelvic floor muscles among female athletes and untrained women. This was a prospective case-control study measuring pelvic floor muscle strength using vaginal pressure meas-urement. Participants answered questions regarding general health, urinary incontinence, and knowledge on pelvic floor muscles. Partici-pants were healthy nulliparous women aged 18-30 years, athletes and untrained women. The athletes had competed in their sport for at least three years; including handball, soccer, gymnastics, badminton, BootCamp and CrossFit. The women were comparable in age and height. The athletes (n=18) had a body mass index (BMI) of 22.8 kg/m² vs. 25 kg/m² for the untrained (n=16); p<0.05. The athletes trained on average 11.4 hours/week while the untrained women participated in some activity on average for 1.3 hours/week; p< 0.05. Mean pelvic floor strength was 45±2 hPa in the athletes vs. 43±4 hPa in the untrained; p=0.36 for whether the athletes were stronger. Of the athletes, 61.1% experienced urinary incontinence (n=11) compared with 12.5% of the untrained women (n=2); p<0.05. Incontinence usually occurred during high intensity exercise. The athletes were more knowledgeable about the pelvic floor muscles; p<0.05. There was not a significant difference in the strength of pelvic floor muscles of athletes and untrained women. This suggests that pelvic floor muscles are not strengthened during general training but require specific exercises. This holds especially for football, handball and sports with high physical intensity. Coaches need to pay special attention to training and strengthening women's pelvic floor muscles to reduce the occurrence of urinary incontinence.

  2. Pelvic Floor Muscle Training: Underutilization in the USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamin, Eliza; Parrillo, Lisa M; Newman, Diane K; Smith, Ariana L

    2016-02-01

    Pelvic floor disorders are highly prevalent in women of all ages and can greatly impair quality of life. Pelvic floor muscle training (PFMT) is a viable treatment option for several pelvic floor conditions including urinary incontinence and pelvic organ prolapse. PFMT is a program of therapy initiated by an experienced clinician (e.g., women's health or urology nurse practitioner (NP), physical therapist (PT)) that involves exercises for women with stress urinary incontinence (UI) and exercises combined with behavioral or conservative treatments (lifestyle changes, bladder training with urge suppression) for women with urgency or mixed UI. These exercise programs are more comprehensive than simple Kegel exercises. Despite evidence-based research indicating the efficacy and cost-effectiveness for treatment of urinary incontinence, PFMT is not commonly used as a first-line treatment in clinical practice in the USA (Abrams et al., 2012). This article will review PFMT for the treatment of UI and pelvic organ prolapse (POP) and theorize how this conservative therapy can be utilized more effectively in the USA.

  3. [Repetitive peripheral muscle stimulation vs. pelvic floor muscle training : Comparison of two approaches to incontinence treatment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schrank, Sabine; Adlbrecht, Laura; Mayer, Hanna

    2017-04-27

    Although there are various measures for the prevention, treatment, and management of urinary incontinence (UI), absorbing aids (and only scant continence-promoting measures) are primarily used in nursing homes in Austria. Repetitive peripheral muscle stimulation (RPMS) is already used as a common method for the treatment and prevention of incontinence in the outpatient setting and is an effective alternative compared to the usual incontinence treatments. However, there are no empirical data as yet on the effect of RPMS in nursing home residents. The primary objective of this study was to evaluate and compare two forms of UI treatment: RPMS and pelvic floor muscle exercises. To this end, a non-equivalent control group design was used. For the purposes of data collection, standardized instruments were used at three points of measurement. The sample consisted of 112 people from 22 institutions. The severity of UI showed a trend, albeit non-significant, toward improvement in both groups. However, a greater increase in quality of life and subjective satisfaction with treatment was observed in the RPMS group compared with the pelvic floor group. Pelvic floor muscle exercises carried out in a consistent and well-guided manner show similar effects compared with technology-assisted therapies. While pelvic floor muscle exercises are feasible in only a small proportion of nursing home residents, RPMS training could be a useful adjunct to conservative incontinence treatment and is also suitable for cognitively impaired individuals. As such, a larger number of elderly individuals could gain access to an appropriate and effective incontinence therapy.

  4. Efficacy of biofeedback-assisted pelvic floor muscle training in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ibrahim Khalil Ibrahim

    2014-07-18

    Jul 18, 2014 ... Pelvic floor dysfunction;. Pelvic floor electrophysiology. Abstract Background: Stress urinary incontinence (SUI), fecal incontinence (FI) and/or pelvic ... Pelvic floor muscle training (PFMT) is the first-line therapy in the treatment of PFD either .... PFD attending the outpatient clinic at the Physical Medicine,.

  5. Efficacy of biofeedback-assisted pelvic floor muscle training in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Stress urinary incontinence (SUI), fecal incontinence (FI) and/or pelvic floor dyssynergia, with pelvic organ prolapse (POP) are described as pelvic floor dysfunction (PFD). Pelvic floor muscle training (PFMT) is the first-line therapy in the treatment of PFD either alone or combined with biofeedback assisted pelvic ...

  6. Exercising with blocked muscle glycogenolysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Tue L; Pinós, Tomàs; Brull, Astrid

    2018-01-01

    of expression and activation of proteins involved in glycolytic flux revealed that in glycolytic, but not oxidative muscle from exercised McArdle mice, the glycolytic flux had changed compared to that in wild-type mice. Specifically, exercise triggered in glycolytic muscle a differentiated activation of insulin......BACKGROUND: McArdle disease (glycogen storage disease type V) is an inborn error of skeletal muscle metabolism, which affects glycogen phosphorylase (myophosphorylase) activity leading to an inability to break down glycogen. Patients with McArdle disease are exercise intolerant, as muscle glycogen......-derived glucose is unavailable during exercise. Metabolic adaptation to blocked muscle glycogenolysis occurs at rest in the McArdle mouse model, but only in highly glycolytic muscle. However, it is unknown what compensatory metabolic adaptations occur during exercise in McArdle disease. METHODS: In this study, 8...

  7. Exercise-induced muscle modifications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kerviler, E. de; Willig, A.L.; Jehenson, P.; Duboc, D.; Syrota, A.

    1990-01-01

    This paper compares changes in muscle proton T2 after exercise in normal subjects and in patients with muscular glycogenoses. Four patients suffering from muscular glycogenosis and eight normal volunteers were studied. Muscle T2s were measured in forearm muscles at rest and after exercise, with a 0.5-T imager. The exercise was performed with handgrips and was evaluated by P-31 spectroscopy (end-exercise decrease in pH and phosphocreatine) performed with a 2-T magnet. In normal subjects, a relative T2 increase, ranging from 14% to 44%, was observed in the exercised muscles. In the patients, who cannot produce lactate during exercise, weak pH variation occurred, and only a slight T2 increase (7% - 9%) was observed

  8. Power to the Pelvis: Strengthening Your Pelvic Floor Muscles

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Special Issues Subscribe March 2018 Print this issue Power to the Pelvis Strengthening Your Pelvic Floor Muscles ... Bulging Hernia Keeping Your Gut in Check The Power of Your Pancreas Pregnancy and Beyond Wise Choices ...

  9. Association between preterm labour and pelvic floor muscle function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aran, Turhan; Pekgöz, Ipek; Bozkaya, Hasan; Osmanagaoglu, Mehmet A

    2018-03-23

    We hypothesised that the pressure on the cervix increases with advancing gestation and it may lead to a cervical shortening and cause preterm labour in women with weak pelvic floor muscles. The aim of this prospective study was to measure vaginal resting pressure and pelvic floor muscle strength in the first trimester of pregnancy and to investigate their effects on labour. A study was conducted on the pregnant women with a low risk for preterm birth. The pelvic floor muscle strength and vaginal resting pressure were assessed in 320 pregnant women at their first trimester with a vaginal pressure measurement device. Fifty-two pregnant women were hospitalised for tocolytic therapy because of spontaneous preterm labour. Thirty-two of them (10.2%) had a preterm delivery despite the tocolytic therapy. Both the vaginal resting pressure (p = .009, 95%CI: 0.8; 5.9) and the pelvic floor muscle strength (p = .01, 95%CI: 3.5; 13.1) were significantly lower in the women with a preterm labour. Impact statement What is already known on this subject? The pelvic floor muscles have an essential role in continence and provide support to the pelvic organs. They also have an impact on labour. The pelvic floor muscles should distend to allow the passage of the foetus during labour. The rotation and flexion of the foetal head is due to the pelvic floor resistance. The effect of a vaginal birth on the pelvic floor's function is readily understood. On the other hand, the effect of the pelvic floor muscle function on labour is still controversial. What do the results of this study add? This prospective study showed that there is a negative association between the pelvic floor muscle strength and preterm labour. This is the first clinical study indicating that weak pelvic floor muscles may cause a preterm labour. What are the implications of these findings for clinical practice and/or further research? Pelvic floor physical therapy may be an alternative preventive strategy to reduce

  10. Pelvic floor exercises during and after pregnancy: a systematic review of their role in preventing pelvic floor dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harvey, Marie-Andrée

    2003-06-01

    To review the literature on the origin, anatomical rationale, techniques, and evidence-based effectiveness of peripartum pelvic floor exercises (PFEs) in the prevention of pelvic floor problems including urinary and anal incontinence, and prolapse. Literature was reviewed for background information. MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, and proceedings of scientific meetings were searched for evidence-based data. A comprehensive literature search was performed to find all studies that involved the use of antepartum and/or postpartum PFEs. For the MEDLINE (1966 to 2002) and CINAHL (1980 to 2002) searches, the following key words were used: urinary incontinence (prevention and control, rehabilitation, therapy), fecal incontinence, exercise or exercise therapy, Kegel, muscle contraction, muscle tonus, muscle development, pelvic floor, pregnancy, puerperium, puerperal disorders. For the EMBASE (1980 to 2002) search, the following key words were used: micturition disorder (prevention, rehab, disease management, therapy), fecal incontinence, labour complication, pregnancy disorder, puerperal disorder, antepartum care, pregnancy, kinesiotherapy, exercise, pelvic floor, bladder. A manual search was performed of available abstracts presented at the annual scientific meetings of the International Continence Society (1997, 1999 to 2002), American Urogynecologic Association (1997 to 1998, 2000 to 2002), and International Urogynecological Association (1997, 1999 to 2002). Twelve studies evaluating the role of antepartum PFE were found, of which 3 randomized controlled trials (RCTs) comparing PFEs for the prevention of urinary incontinence to controls were included. Twelve studies evaluating postpartum PFEs for prevention of urinary incontinence were reviewed, of which 4 RCTs were included. Five studies evaluating postpartum PFEs for the prevention of anal incontinence were reviewed, of which 4 RCTs were included. Participants in the studies were primiparous women. DATA TABULATION AND

  11. Effect of antenatal pelvic floor muscle training on labor and birth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bø, Kari; Fleten, Caroline; Nystad, Wenche

    2009-06-01

    To estimate whether women doing pelvic floor muscle training before and during pregnancy have increased risk of perineal lacerations, episiotomy, vacuum/forceps delivery, or acute cesarean delivery. Participants were 18,865 primiparous women in the Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort Study, conducted by the Norwegian Institute of Public Health. Data were collected by self-completed questionnaires at gestational weeks 17 and 30 and analyzed by logistic regression analysis. Data about obstetric outcomes were obtained from the Medical Birth Registry of Norway. Pelvic floor muscle training was categorized as less than once per week, one to two times per week, and at least three times per week both before and during pregnancy. The results are presented as adjusted odds ratios (OR) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs). Of women who performed pelvic floor muscle training less than once per week, 7.2% sustained a third-degree or fourth-degree laceration compared with 6.3% of women who performed pelvic floor muscle training at least three times per week. A similar pattern was present for rates of episiotomy (29.1% compared with 24.9%), vacuum/forceps delivery (15.9% compared with 15.0%), and acute cesarean delivery (9.5% compared with 7.5%). Adjusting for factors that might be associated with pelvic floor muscle training and the outcomes under study did not distort the effect of pelvic floor muscle training. Exercising at least three times per week was not associated with third-degree and fourth-degree perineal lacerations, episiotomy, vacuum/forceps delivery, or acute cesarean delivery (adjusted OR 0.86 [95% CI 0.60-1.24], 0.82 [0.67-1.01], 0.95 [0.74-1.22], and 0.75 [0.53-1.05], respectively). Pelvic floor muscle training before and during pregnancy does not affect labor and birth outcomes or complication rates. II.

  12. Do stages of menopause affect the outcomes of pelvic floor muscle training?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tosun, Özge Çeliker; Mutlu, Ebru Kaya; Tosun, Gökhan; Ergenoğlu, Ahmet Mete; Yeniel, Ahmet Özgur; Malkoç, Mehtap; Aşkar, Niyazi; İtil, İsmail Mete

    2015-02-01

    The purpose of our study is to determine whether there is a difference in pelvic floor muscle strength attributable to pelvic floor muscle training conducted during different stages of menopause. One hundred twenty-two women with stress urinary incontinence and mixed urinary incontinence were included in this prospective controlled study. The participants included in this study were separated into three groups according to the Stages of Reproductive Aging Workshop staging system as follows: group 1 (n = 41): stages -3 and -2; group 2 (n = 32): stages +1 and -1; and group 3 (n = 30): stage +2. All three groups were provided an individual home exercise program throughout the 12-week study. Pelvic floor muscle strength before and after the 12-week treatment was measured in all participants (using the PERFECT [power, endurance, number of repetitions, and number of fast (1-s) contractions; every contraction is timed] scheme, perineometry, transabdominal ultrasound, Brink scale, pad test, and stop test). Data were analyzed using analysis of variance. There were no statistically significant differences in pre-exercise training pelvic floor muscle strength parameters among the three groups. After 12 weeks, there were statistically significant increases in PERFECT scheme, Brink scale, perineometry, and ultrasound values. In contrast, there were significant decreases in stop test and 1-hour pad test values observed in the three groups (P = 0.001, dependent t test). In comparison with the other groups, group 1 demonstrated statistically significant improvements in the following postexercise training parameters: power, repetition, speed, Brink vertical displacement, and stop test. The lowest increase was observed in group 2 (P menopause with pelvic floor muscle training, but the rates of increase vary according to the menopausal stage of the participants. Women in the late menopausal transition and early menopause are least responsive to pelvic floor muscle strength training

  13. PELVIC FLOOR MUSCLE TRAINING IN THE TREATMENT OF URINARY INCONTINENCE AFTER RADICAL PROSTATECTOMY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu. L. Demidko

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The incidence of urinary incontinence after radical prostatectomy is 0.8 to 87%. This category of patients has pelvic floor muscle weakness and reduced perineal reflex. The treatment of these patients uses a pelvic floor exercise system that is to enhance muscle tone and to develop strong reflex contraction in response to a sudden rise in intraabdominal pressure. Pelvic floor muscle training belongs to first-line therapy for urinary incontinence occurring within 6 to 12 months after prostatectomy. The ability to control pelvic floor muscle knowingly and to train them allows one not only to increase the closing capability of sphincter mechanisms, but also to suppress involuntary detrusor contractions. We used this method in 9 patients who had undergone radical prostatectomy. The duration of pelvic floor muscle training under control was up to 25 weeks. During this period, the symptoms of incontinence were relieved. No contraindications or adverse reactions have put this method in first-line therapy for post-prostatectomy urinary incontinence.

  14. PELVIC FLOOR MUSCLE TRAINING IN THE TREATMENT OF URINARY INCONTINENCE AFTER RADICAL PROSTATECTOMY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu. L. Demidko

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The incidence of urinary incontinence after radical prostatectomy is 0.8 to 87%. This category of patients has pelvic floor muscle weakness and reduced perineal reflex. The treatment of these patients uses a pelvic floor exercise system that is to enhance muscle tone and to develop strong reflex contraction in response to a sudden rise in intraabdominal pressure. Pelvic floor muscle training belongs to first-line therapy for urinary incontinence occurring within 6 to 12 months after prostatectomy. The ability to control pelvic floor muscle knowingly and to train them allows one not only to increase the closing capability of sphincter mechanisms, but also to suppress involuntary detrusor contractions. We used this method in 9 patients who had undergone radical prostatectomy. The duration of pelvic floor muscle training under control was up to 25 weeks. During this period, the symptoms of incontinence were relieved. No contraindications or adverse reactions have put this method in first-line therapy for post-prostatectomy urinary incontinence.

  15. Pelvic floor muscle thickness measured by perineal ultrasonography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bernstein, Inge Thomsen; Juul, N; Grønvall, S

    1991-01-01

    Pelvic floor muscle thickness was assessed in nine healthy female physiotherapists by perineal sonography. All measurements were performed as triple-measurements. The aims were to assess the reliability of the measurements and to establish a reference material. The muscle thickness at rest...

  16. Muscles, exercise and obesity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Bente K; Febbraio, Mark A

    2012-01-01

    of yet unidentified factors, secreted from muscle cells, which may influence cancer cell growth and pancreas function. Many proteins produced by skeletal muscle are dependent upon contraction; therefore, physical inactivity probably leads to an altered myokine response, which could provide a potential...

  17. Impact of supervised physiotherapeutic pelvic floor exercises for treating female stress urinary incontinence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Míriam Raquel Diniz Zanetti

    Full Text Available CONTEXT AND OBJECTIVE: Urinary incontinence is a public health problem that affects more than 200 million people worldwide. Stress incontinence is the most prevalent type. Pelvic floor muscle exercises have been used for treating it, although there is no consensus regarding their application. The aim of this study was to compare the results from treating female stress urinary incontinence with pelvic floor muscle exercises with or without physiotherapist supervision. DESIGN AND SETTING: This was a randomized, prospective, controlled trial in the Urogynecology and Vaginal Surgery Sector, Universidade Federal de São Paulo. METHODS: Forty-four women were randomized to be treated for stress urinary incontinence with pelvic floor exercises for three consecutive months, into two groups: one with and the other without physiotherapist supervision. They were evaluated before and after treatment using a quality-of-life questionnaire, pad test, micturition diary and subjective evaluation. Descriptive analysis was used to evaluate the population. The homogeneity of the two groups was evaluated using the Kruskal-Wallis and Chi-squared tests. The success of the two groups after treatment was evaluated using the Wilcoxon test. RESULTS: The supervised group showed statistically greater improvement in the pad test, micturition diary and quality of life than did the control group. In the subjective evaluation, only 23.8% of the control group patients were satised with their treatment. In the supervised group, 66.8% of patients did not want any other treatment. CONCLUSION: Supervised pelvic floor muscle exercises presented better results in objective and subjective evaluations than did unsupervised exercises.

  18. Trunk muscle activities during abdominal bracing: comparison among muscles and exercises.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maeo, Sumiaki; Takahashi, Takumi; Takai, Yohei; Kanehisa, Hiroaki

    2013-01-01

    Abdominal bracing is often adopted in fitness and sports conditioning programs. However, there is little information on how muscular activities during the task differ among the muscle groups located in the trunk and from those during other trunk exercises. The present study aimed to quantify muscular activity levels during abdominal bracing with respect to muscle- and exercise-related differences. Ten healthy young adult men performed five static (abdominal bracing, abdominal hollowing, prone, side, and supine plank) and five dynamic (V- sits, curl-ups, sit-ups, and back extensions on the floor and on a bench) exercises. Surface electromyogram (EMG) activities of the rectus abdominis (RA), external oblique (EO), internal oblique (IO), and erector spinae (ES) muscles were recorded in each of the exercises. The EMG data were normalized to those obtained during maximal voluntary contraction of each muscle (% EMGmax). The % EMGmax value during abdominal bracing was significantly higher in IO (60%) than in the other muscles (RA: 18%, EO: 27%, ES: 19%). The % EMGmax values for RA, EO, and ES were significantly lower in the abdominal bracing than in some of the other exercises such as V-sits and sit-ups for RA and EO and back extensions for ES muscle. However, the % EMGmax value for IO during the abdominal bracing was significantly higher than those in most of the other exercises including dynamic ones such as curl-ups and sit-ups. These results suggest that abdominal bracing is one of the most effective techniques for inducing a higher activation in deep abdominal muscles, such as IO muscle, even compared to dynamic exercises involving trunk flexion/extension movements. Key PointsTrunk muscle activities during abdominal bracing was examined with regard to muscle- and exercise-related differences.Abdominal bracing preferentially activates internal oblique muscles even compared to dynamic exercises involving trunk flexion/extension movements.Abdominal bracing should be

  19. Assessment of pelvic floor muscles in women with deep endometriosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dos Bispo, Ana Paula Santos; Ploger, Christine; Loureiro, Alessandra Fernandes; Sato, Hélio; Kolpeman, Alexander; Girão, Manoel João Batista Castello; Schor, Eduardo

    2016-09-01

    To assess function and prevalence of spasms and trigger points of the pelvic floor muscles in women with deep endometriosis. One hundred and four (104) patients were assessed. Group 1 (G1) was composed of 52 subjects diagnosed with deep endometriosis proven by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI); Group 2 (G2) was composed of 52 women with no signs of endometriosis. Subjects from both G1 and G2 were seen at the Division of Pelvic Pain and Endometriosis and at Center for Prevention of Sexually Transmitted Diseases, both at Federal University of São Paulo (UNIFESP), respectively. A full physical therapy evaluation was carried out, including medical history, presence of dyspareunia and physical examination, which included detailed evaluation of pelvic floor muscles and occurrence of muscle spasm, trigger point and muscle function. The average age of the subjects in the study group was 36.4 and 30.9 years in the control group (p = 0.002). A greater prevalence of deep dyspareunia was found in the subjects in the endometriosis group when compared to the control group (p = 0.010). Women in G1 had higher prevalence of muscle spasms. In this group, 53.9 % had spasms-compared to only 17.3 % of women in G2 (p pelvic floor muscle spasms when compared to the control group.

  20. Pelvic floor muscle contraction and abdominal hollowing during walking can selectively activate local trunk stabilizing muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ah Young; Baek, Seung Ok; Cho, Yun Woo; Lim, Tae Hong; Jones, Rodney; Ahn, Sang Ho

    2016-11-21

    Trunk muscle exercises are widely performed, and many studies have been performed to examine their effects on low back pains. However, the effect of trunk muscles activations during walking with pelvic floor muscle contraction (PFMC) and abdominal hollowing (AH) has not been clarified. To investigate whether walking with PFMC and AH is more effective for promoting local trunk muscle activation than walking without PFMC and AH. Twenty healthy men (28.9 ± 3.14 years, 177.2 ± 4.25 cm, 72.1 ± 6.39 kg, body mass index 22.78 ± 2.38 kg/m2) were participated in this study. Surface electrodes were attached over the multifidus (MF), lumbar erector spinae (LES), thoracic erector spinae (TES), transverse abdominus-internal oblique abdominals (TrA-IO), external oblique abdominals (EO), and rectus abdominus (RA). The amplitudes of electromyographic signals were measured during a normal walking with and without PFMC and AH. PFMC and AH while walking was found to result in significant bilateral increases in the normalized maximum voluntary contraction (MVC) of MFs and TrA-IOs (pmuscle activity to global muscle activities were increased while performing PFMC and AH during normal walking. Bilateral TrA-IO/EO activity ratios were significantly increased by PFMC and AH (pmuscles. This study suggests that PFMC and AH during normal daily walking improves activation of muscles responsible for spinal dynamic stabilization and might be useful if integrated into low back disability and pain physical rehabilitation efforts.

  1. Triglyceride metabolism in exercising muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watt, Matthew J; Cheng, Yunsheng

    2017-10-01

    Triglycerides are stored within lipid droplets in skeletal muscle and can be hydrolyzed to produce fatty acids for energy production through β-oxidation and oxidative phosphorylation. While there was some controversy regarding the quantitative importance of intramyocellular triglyceride (IMTG) as a metabolic substrate, recent advances in proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy and confocal microscopy support earlier tracer and biopsy studies demonstrating a substantial contribution of IMTG to energy production, particularly during moderate-intensity endurance exercise. This review provides an update on the understanding of IMTG utilization during exercise, with a focus on describing the key regulatory proteins that control IMTG breakdown and how these proteins respond to acute exercise and in the adaptation to exercise training. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Recent Advances in Lipid Droplet Biology edited by Rosalind Coleman and Matthijs Hesselink. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Pelvic floor muscle training for female urinary incontinence: Does it work?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Nilanjana; Rashid, Mumtaz; Bayliss, Lorna; Graham, Penny

    2016-06-01

    Supervised pelvic floor muscle training in patients of stress and mixed urinary incontinence has been recommended. Our aim was to assess the utilisation and effectiveness of our supervised pelvic floor muscle training service and assess the impact of incontinence scores before physiotherapy on the subsequent results of physiotherapy. All 271 patients referred to physiotherapy for symptoms of incontinence filled out the International Consultation on Incontinence Modular Questionnaire-Female Lower Urinary Tract Symptoms before starting treatment. Depending on pelvic floor muscle assessment, plans for exercises and follow up were made. If the strength of pelvic floor muscles was poor, electrical stimulation was offered. If awareness of the pelvic floor muscle contraction was poor, bio feedback was offered. Group sessions and vaginal cones were also used. Depending on the response to the treatment; patients were either discharged, referred to Urogynaecology clinic or continued physiotherapy. All patients who were discharged or referred for surgery were given a post treatment questionnaire to fill out. 79 (56 %) of 132 women with stress, 49 (51 %) of 98 with mixed and 27 (66 %) of 41 with urge incontinence reported successful control of symptoms (overall success 54 %). However, 65 % of women with incontinence scores of 0-5 before physiotherapy, 64 % with 6-10, 42 % with 11-15 and mere 28 % with 16-20 achieved success with physiotherapy. 27 (10 %) were lost to follow up. 1 in 2 women referred to physiotherapy for incontinence, achieved successful control of symptoms without the need for invasive investigations or surgery. However, poor incontinence scores before the start of physiotherapy is a poor prognostic indicator for success. 90 % women utilised the service.

  3. Differences in muscle activation patterns during pelvic floor muscle contraction and Valsalva maneuver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Judith A; O'Sullivan, Peter B; Briffa, N Kathryn; Neumann, Patricia

    2006-01-01

    To investigate the different muscle activation patterns around the abdomino-pelvic cavity in continent women and their effect on pressure generation during a correct pelvic floor muscle (PFM) contraction and a Valsalva maneuver. Thirteen continent women were assessed. Abdominal, chest wall, and PFM activity and vaginal and intra-abdominal pressure (IAP), were recorded during two tasks: PFM contraction and Valsalva whilst bladder base position was monitored on trans-abdominal ultrasound. A correct PFM contraction was defined as one that resulted in bladder base elevation and a Valsalva resulted in bladder base depression. Comparison of the mean of the normalized EMG activity of all the individual muscle groups was significantly different between PFM contraction and Valsalva (P = 0.04). During a correct PFM contraction, the PFM were more active than during Valsalva (P = 0.001). During Valsalva, all the abdominal muscles (IO (P = 0.006), EO (P < 0.001), RA (P = 0.011)), and the chest wall (P < 0.001) were more active than during PFM contraction. The change in IAP was greater during Valsalva (P = 0.001) but there was no difference in the change in vaginal pressure between PFM contraction and Valsalva (P = 0.971). This study demonstrates a difference in muscle activation patterns between a correct PFM contraction and Valsalva maneuver. It is important to include assessment of the abdominal wall, chest wall, and respiration in the clinical evaluation of women performing PFM exercises as abdominal wall bracing combined with an increase in chest wall activity may cause rises in IAP and PFM descent. (c) 2005 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  4. Laughing: a demanding exercise for trunk muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Heiko; Rehmes, Ulrich; Kohle, Daniel; Puta, Christian

    2014-01-01

    Social, psychological, and physiological studies have provided evidence indicating that laughter imposes an increased demand on trunk muscles. It was the aim of this study to quantify the activation of trunk muscles during laughter yoga in comparison with crunch and back lifting exercises regarding the mean trunk muscle activity. Muscular activity during laughter yoga exercises was measured by surface electromyography of 5 trunk muscles. The activation level of internal oblique muscle during laughter yoga is higher compared to the traditional exercises. The multifidus, erector spinae, and rectus abdominis muscles were nearly half activated during laughter yoga, while the activation of the external oblique muscle was comparable with the crunch and back lifting exercises. Our results indicate that laughter yoga has a positive effect on trunk muscle activation. Thus, laughter seems to be a good activator of trunk muscles, but further research is required whether laughter yoga is a good exercise to improve neuromuscular recruitment patterns for spine stability.

  5. Impact of different body positions on bioelectrical activity of the pelvic floor muscles in nulliparous continent women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chmielewska, Daria; Stania, Magdalena; Sobota, Grzegorz; Kwaśna, Krystyna; Błaszczak, Edward; Taradaj, Jakub; Juras, Grzegorz

    2015-01-01

    We examined pelvic floor muscles (PFM) activity (%MVC) in twenty nulliparous women by body position during exercise as well as the activation of abdominal muscles and the gluteus maximus during voluntary contractions of the PFMs. Pelvic floor muscle activity was recorded using a vaginal probe during five experimental trials. Activation of transversus abdominis, rectus abdominis, and gluteus maximus during voluntary PFM contractions was also assessed. Significant differences in mean normalized amplitudes of baseline PFM activity were revealed between standing and lying (P activity seemed to depend on the body position and was the highest in standing. Pelvic floor muscles activity during voluntary contractions did not differ by position in continent women. Statistically significant differences between the supine lying and sitting positions were only observed during a sustained 60-second contraction of the PFMs.

  6. Evaluation of pelvic floor muscle strength before and after robotic-assisted radical prostatectomy and early outcomes on urinary continence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manley, Lauren; Gibson, Luke; Papa, Nathan; Beharry, Bhawanie Koonj; Johnson, Liana; Lawrentschuk, Nathan; Bolton, Damien M

    2016-12-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the effect of pelvic floor muscle (PFM) assessment and training before and after robot-assisted laparoscopic radical prostatectomy (RARP) in improving PFM strength and urinary continence. We performed an analysis of a database of patients who underwent robot-assisted laparoscopic radical prostatectomy (RARP) performed by two urologists from 2011 to 2013. Pelvic floor muscle (PFM) activation and strength were graded by a trained pelvic floor physiotherapist. Patients were given an exercise program, grouped according to the strength of their pelvic floor as graded by assessment, to complete before and after surgery. PFM strength was recorded preoperatively, 4 days post-catheter removal and 4 weeks post-catheter removal. Continence was recorded at 4 weeks postop and was defined as the requirement of no continence aids. A total of 98 patients had RARP and a preoperative physiotherapy assessment plus postoperative appointments at around 1 and 4 weeks post-RARP. The majority of men improved their PFM strength regardless of preoperative strength with no significant predictors of postoperative strength found. Age was the only significant predictor of postoperative incontinence. In this pilot study, a majority of patients increased their pelvic floor strength with time. Pelvic floor physiotherapy is an important modifiable patient factor, which does have an impact in improving patients' urinary continence by strengthening the pelvic floor muscles. Patient age influences response to pelvic floor physiotherapy.

  7. Pelvic floor muscle retraining for pediatric voiding dysfunction using interactive computer games.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKenna, P H; Herndon, C D; Connery, S; Ferrer, F A

    1999-09-01

    We evaluated a new noninvasive outpatient method of pelvic muscle retraining in children using computer game assisted biofeedback. All patients in whom voiding dysfunction was confirmed by history, uroflowmetry-electromyography and voiding cystourethrography were enrolled in a pelvic floor muscle retraining program. Patients received a pretreatment, mid treatment and posttreatment survey instrument documenting subjective improvement, including the frequency of diurnal enuresis, nocturnal enuresis, constipation and encopresis. Pretreatment and posttreatment simultaneous uroflowmetry surface electrode electromyography was performed and post-void residual urine volume was determined in all patients. A total of 8 boys and 33 girls 5 to 11 years old (mean age 7.2) completed therapy and were available for evaluation. These patients completed 2 to 11 (average 6) hourly treatment sessions. Followup was 3 to 15 months (average 7). At the midterm evaluation improvement in nocturnal enuresis was reported by 57% of the patients, diurnal enuresis by 84%, constipation by 83% and encopresis by 91%. End treatment evaluation revealed improvement in nocturnal enuresis by 90% of patients, diurnal enuresis by 89%, constipation by 100% and encopresis by 100%. Uroflowmetry-electromyography patterns improved in 42% of the patients and post-void residual urine decreased in 57%. Comparison of initial to end recorded millivoltage pelvic floor muscle values demonstrated that 56% of the patients had lower resting tone at the beginning of the session after completing therapy and 78% had improved contracting tone after performing Kegel exercises, as proved by increased microvoltage values. Initial uroflowmetry-electromyography revealed certain categories of cases, including a flattened voiding curve with a hyperactive pelvic floor and low post-void residual urine in 40%, a flattened voiding curve with a hyperactive pelvic floor and high post-void residual urine in 40%, a staccato voiding curve

  8. Transvaginal Pelvic Floor Muscle Injection Technique: A Cadaver Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Priyanka; Ehlert, Michael; Sirls, Larry T; Peters, Kenneth

    Women with pelvic floor dysfunction can have tender areas on vaginal examination, which can be treated with trigger-point injections. There are no publications to evaluate the accuracy of pelvic floor muscle injections. Trigger-point injections were performed on 2 fresh cadaveric pelvises using a curved nasal cannula guide and 7-in spinal needle. This was performed using our standard template of 2 sets of injections at the 1-, 3-, and 5-o'clock positions distally and proximally. The first pelvis was dissected to examine dye penetration. Based on these results, we modified our technique and repeated the injections on the second cadaver. We dissected the second pelvis and compared our findings. The 1-o'clock proximal and distal injections stained the obturator internus and externus near the insertion at the ischiopubic ramus. The 3-o'clock injections stained the midbody of the pubococcygeus and puborectalis. The distal 5-o'clock position was too deep and stained the fat of the ischiorectal space. The proximal 5-o'clock injection stained the area of the pudendal nerve. Our goal at the distal 5-o'clock position was to infuse the iliococcygeus muscle, so we shortened the needle depth from 2 to 1 cm beyond the cannula tip. In our second dissection, the distal 5-o'clock injection again stained only the fat of the ischiorectal space. This is the first study to characterize the distribution of pelvic floor muscle injections in a cadaver model and confirms the ability to deliver medications effectively to the pelvic floor muscles.

  9. Pelvic floor muscle thickness measured by perineal ultrasonography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bernstein, Inge Thomsen; Juul, N; Grønvall, S

    1991-01-01

    Pelvic floor muscle thickness was assessed in nine healthy female physiotherapists by perineal sonography. All measurements were performed as triple-measurements. The aims were to assess the reliability of the measurements and to establish a reference material. The muscle thickness at rest...... and at contraction was 9.4 +/- 0.8 mm and 11.5 +/- 1.1 mm respectively (mean +/- SD). Contraction increased the thickness by 2.2 +/- 0.8 mm or 23 +/- 8%. The intra- and inter observer standard deviation of the estimate was in the range of 4-6%. In conclusion, we find the reliability of the measurements acceptable....

  10. Pelvic floor muscle strength and sexual function in women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cinara Sacomori

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction : Pelvic floor (PF muscles react to sexual stimuli with increased local blood circulation and involuntary contractions during orgasm. The training of the PF musculature helps in the improvement of the female sexual function. Objective : To verify the association between PF muscle strength and sexual function in women, controlling age and parity. Method : Cross-sectional study based on associations. The study included women who attended a reference center in Florianópolis, Santa Catarina, for a uterine cancer smear test. The Functional Evaluation of the Pelvic Floor and the Female Sexual Function Index questionnaire were used. Statistical procedures included Mann-Whitney U tests, Spearman correlation and Poisson Regression Analysis, with p < .05. Results : The mean age of the women (n = 177 was 39.05 years (SD = 13.3. Regarding PF function, 53.7% of participants presented weak or not palpable PF muscle function. Women with "good" muscle function (able to maintain contraction under examiner's resistance had significantly better indexes of sexual desire, excitement, lubrication and orgasm than women with weak/poor function. We identified that 52.5% of the women presented sexual dysfunction. Women with "poor" PF function and aged over 50 years had, respectively, 1.36 (CI95% 1.01 - 1.82 and 1.77 (CI95% 1.41 - 2.23 higher prevalence of sexual dysfunction than women with "good" PF function. Conclusions : Adult women with better PF muscle function also presented better sexual function.

  11. Urinary incontinence, pelvic floor dysfunction, exercise and sport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bø, Kari

    2004-01-01

    Urinary incontinence is defined as "the complaint of any involuntary leakage of urine" and is a common problem in the female population with prevalence rates varying between 10% and 55% in 15- to 64-year-old women. The most frequent form of urinary incontinence in women is stress urinary incontinence, defined as "involuntary leakage on effort or exertion, or on sneezing or coughing". The aim of this article is to systematically review the literature on urinary incontinence and participation in sport and fitness activities with a special emphasis on prevalence and treatment in female elite athletes. Stress urinary incontinence is a barrier to women's participation in sport and fitness activities and, therefore, it may be a threat to women's health, self-esteem and well-being. The prevalence during sports among young, nulliparous elite athletes varies between 0% (golf) and 80% (trampolinists). The highest prevalence is found in sports involving high impact activities such as gymnastics, track and field, and some ball games. A 'stiff' and strong pelvic floor positioned at an optimal level inside the pelvis may be a crucial factor in counteracting the increases in abdominal pressure occurring during high-impact activities. There are no randomised controlled trials or reports on the effect of any treatment for stress urinary incontinence in female elite athletes. However, strength training of the pelvic floor muscles has been shown to be effective in treating stress urinary incontinence in parous females in the general population. In randomised controlled trials, reported cure rates, defined as athletes than in other women. There is a need for more basic research on pelvic floor muscle function during physical activity and the effect of pelvic floor muscle training in female elite athletes.

  12. Overactive pelvic floor muscles (OPFM): improving diagnostic accuracy with clinical examination and functional studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aw, Hau Choong; Ranasinghe, Weranja; Tan, Philip Huang Min; O'Connell, Helen E

    2017-07-01

    To identify the functional correlation of overactive pelvic floor muscles (OPFM) with cystoscopic and fluoroscopic urodynamic studies (FUDS), including urethral pressure measurements. Patients refractory to conservative therapy including bladder retraining, medications and pelvic muscle exercises for a variety of gamut of storage and voiding disorders were evaluated. Prospective data for 201 patients across both genders who underwent flexible cystoscopy and urodynamics for lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) refractory to conservative management between 01 Jan 2014 and 01 Jan 2016 was collected. Factors studied included history of LUTS, voiding patterns, physical examination, cystoscopic findings and functional studies, with maximum urethral closing pressure (MUCP). A total of 201 were patients recruited. The 85 were diagnosed with OPFM based on clinical presentation and presence of pelvic floor tenderness on examination. Significant differences were noted on functional studies with FUDS and urethral pressure measurement. Subjects with pelvic floor tenderness were found to have a higher (MUCP) at 93.1 cm H2O compared to 80.6 cm H2O (P=0.015). There are distinct characteristics of OPFM on clinical examination and functional studies, in particular MUCP. In patients refractory to conservative treatments, specific urodynamics tests are useful in sub-categorising patients. When OPFM is diagnosed, the impact on patient management is significant, and targeted intervention with pelvic floor physiotherapy is central in the multimodal approach of this complex condition.

  13. How common is pelvic floor muscle atrophy after vaginal childbirth?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixit, P; Shek, K L; Dietz, H P

    2014-01-01

    To determine if there is evidence of levator ani atrophy in primiparous women. This was a prospective observational cohort study of 202 primiparous women recruited between November 2006 and March 2008. Translabial ultrasound volumes were obtained at 36-38 weeks' gestation and at a mean of 4.5 months postpartum. Peripartum changes in bladder neck elevation and reduction of anteroposterior hiatal diameter on pelvic floor muscle contraction (PFMC) and changes in muscle thickness were analyzed. Of the 202 participants enrolled, 158 (78%) completed the study. There was a significant reduction in bladder neck elevation (P = 0.001) and change in anteroposterior hiatal diameter (P = 0.03) on PFMC when comparing antenatal and postnatal results, the latter being significantly associated with delivery mode (P = 0.013). No significant changes were detected in muscle thickness (P = 0.76). There is a reduction in sonographic measures of pelvic floor function after childbirth, but muscle atrophy is unlikely to be a significant factor. Copyright © 2013 ISUOG. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Exercise Promotes Healthy Aging of Skeletal Muscle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cartee, Gregory D; Hepple, Russell T; Bamman, Marcas M

    2016-01-01

    caused by diseases and lifestyle factors. Secondary aging can exacerbate deficits in mitochondrial function and muscle mass, concomitant with the development of skeletal muscle insulin resistance. Exercise opposes deleterious effects of secondary aging by preventing the decline in mitochondrial...... respiration, mitigating aging-related loss of muscle mass and enhancing insulin sensitivity. This review focuses on mechanisms by which exercise promotes "healthy aging" by inducing modifications in skeletal muscle....

  15. Experiences of incontinence and pelvic floor muscle training after gynaecologic cancer treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindgren, Anna; Dunberger, G; Enblom, A

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of the present study is to describe how gynaecological cancer survivors (GCS) experience incontinence in relation to quality of life, their possibilities for physical activity and exercise and their perceptions and experiences of pelvic floor muscle training. This qualitative interview content analysis study included 13 women (48-82 age) with urinary (n = 10) or faecal (n = 3) incontinence after radiation therapy (n = 2), surgery (n = 5) and surgery and radiation therapy (n = 6) for gynaecological cancer, 0.5-21 years ago. Symptoms related to incontinence and restrictions in daily activities reduced physical quality of life. Emotions related to incontinence reduced psychological quality of life and social and existential quality of life, due to restrictions in activity and feelings of exclusion. Practical and mental strategies for maintaining quality of life were described, such as always bringing a change of clothes and accepting the situation. Possibilities for sexual and physical activity as well as exercise were also restricted by incontinence. The women had little or no experience of pelvic floor muscle training but have a positive attitude towards trying it. They also described a lack of information about the risk of incontinence. The women were willing to spend both money and time on an effective treatment for their incontinence. Nine out of 10 were willing to spend at least 7 h a week. GCS experienced that incontinence reduced quality of life and limited possibilities for sexual and physical activity as well as exercise. Coping strategies, both practical and emotional, facilitated living with incontinence. The women had a positive attitude towards pelvic floor muscle training. Lack of information had a negative impact on their way of dealing with the situation.

  16. Evaluation of the EmbaGYN™ pelvic floor muscle stimulator in addition to Kegel exercises for the treatment of female stress urinary incontinence: a prospective, open-label, multicenter, single-arm study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eder, Scott Evan

    2014-01-01

    To assess the efficacy and safety of the EmbaGYN™ Pelvic Floor Exerciser, a battery-powered neuromuscular stimulation device with a vaginal, two-electrode stimulation probe in women with stress urinary incontinence. In this prospective, open-label, multicenter, single-arm study, patients with stress urinary incontinence (n = 83) underwent 12 weeks of treatment with EmbaGYN with Kegel exercises. At week 12, the mean number of incontinence episodes/day (primary end point) fell 56.2% (p = 0.152). A ≥50% decrease from baseline in incontinence episodes was seen in 65.3% of subjects (p = 0.006). The mean number of incontinence pads/day fell 57.1% (p = 0.001). Mean 24- and 1-h in-office urine loss declined 59.0% (p Kegel exercises resulted in significant reductions in urine loss, incontinence pad use and improved incontinence-related quality of life, but did not have a significant effect on incontinence episodes/day.

  17. Vibrating vaginal balls to improve pelvic floor muscle performance in women after childbirth: a protocol for a randomised controlled feasibility trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oblasser, Claudia; McCourt, Christine; Hanzal, Engelbert; Christie, Janice

    2016-04-01

    This paper presents a feasibility trial protocol the purpose of which is to prepare for a future randomised controlled trial to determine the effectiveness of vibrating vaginal pelvic floor training balls for postpartum pelvic floor muscle rehabilitation. Vibrating vaginal pelvic floor training balls are available in Austria to enhance women's pelvic floor muscles and thus prevent or treat urinary incontinence and other pelvic floor problems following childbirth. Nonetheless, there is currently little empirical knowledge to substantiate their use or assess their relative effectiveness in comparison to current standard care, which involves pelvic floor muscle exercises. Single blind, randomised controlled feasibility trial with two parallel groups. It is planned to recruit 56 postpartum women in Vienna, who will be randomised into one of two intervention groups to use either vibrating vaginal balls or a comparator pelvic floor muscle exercises for 12 weeks. As this is a feasibility study, study design features (recruitment, selection, randomisation, intervention concordance, data collection methods and tools) will be assessed and participants' views and experiences will be surveyed. Tested outcome measures, collected before and after the intervention, will be pelvic floor muscle performance as reported by participants and measured by perineometry. Descriptive and inferential statistics and content analysis will serve the preparation of the future trial. The results of this feasibility trial will inform the design and conduct of a full randomised controlled trial and provide insight into the experiences of women regarding the interventions and study participation. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Do women with pelvic floor dysfunction referred by gynaecologists and urologists at hospitals complete a pelvic floor muscle training programme?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tibaek, Sigrid; Dehlendorff, Christian

    2013-01-01

    For decades women with pelvic floor dysfunction (PFD) have been referred to pelvic floor muscle training (PFMT), but there is only little information on whether the women complete the programmes and why. The objectives of this study were to investigate to which extent women completed a PFMT...

  19. Exercise Promotes Healthy Aging of Skeletal Muscle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cartee, Gregory D.; Hepple, Russell T.; Bamman, Marcas M.; Zierath, Juleen R.

    2016-01-01

    Primary aging is the progressive and inevitable process of bodily deterioration during adulthood. In skeletal muscle, primary aging causes defective mitochondrial energetics, and reduced muscle mass. Secondary aging refers to additional deleterious structural and functional age-related changes caused by diseases and lifestyle factors. Secondary aging can exacerbate deficits in mitochondrial function and muscle mass, concomitant with the development of skeletal muscle insulin resistance. Exercise opposes deleterious effects of secondary aging by preventing the decline in mitochondrial respiration, mitigating aging-related loss of muscle mass and enhancing insulin sensitivity. This review focuses on mechanisms by which exercise promotes “healthy aging” by inducing modifications in skeletal muscle. PMID:27304505

  20. EFFECTIVENESS OF FLOOR EXERCISES VERSES BALL EXERCISES ON SPINAL MOBILITY IN SPASTIC DIPLEGIC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sumitra Sakhawalkar

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: The objective of this present study was to determine the Effectiveness of Floor Exercises versus Ball Exercises on spinal mobility in Spastic Diplegic. Methods: Institutional ethical committee permission was taken before starting the study. A sample of 70 Diplegic CP children was screened, and 40 meeting the inclusion criteria were selected for study were then randomly divided into two groups one control other experimental i.e. 20 in each group by chit method. Both the groups were assessed with spinal goniometry using Tape measurements for Thoracolumbar spine and Modified Schober's Test (MMSTbefore and after the treatment. Control group were given Floor exercise on a mat, and Swiss ball was giving experimental group Ball exercises for ten repetitions with 10-second hold, treatment time was 40 min per session for 3days per week for six weeks. Same sustained stretching technique for both groups in bilateral lower extremities for ten repetitions with 30 sec hold was given for, TA, Iliopsoas, Hamstrings, Hip Adductor, Rectus femoris. Result: Significant improvement was noted in the Intra-group comparison of both the groups from baseline to post six weeks of intervention p-value 0.001*** in both groups, and the Intergroup analysis using with tape measurements for Thoracolumbar spine (p-value and MMST (p-value 0.133NS. Conclusion: The present study concludes that there is a similar effect of both Floor Exercises versus Ball Exercises on spinal mobility in Spastic Diplegic.

  1. The effects of surface condition on abdominal muscle activity during single-legged hold exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ha, Sung-min; Oh, Jae-seop; Jeon, In-cheol; Kwon, Oh-yun

    2015-02-01

    To treat low-back pain, various spinal stability exercises are commonly used to improve trunk muscle function and strength. Because human movement for normal daily activity occurs in multi-dimensions, the importance of exercise in multi-dimensions or on unstable surfaces has been emphasized. Recently, a motorized rotating platform (MRP) for facilitating multi-dimensions dynamic movement was introduced for clinical use. However, the abdominal muscle activity with this device has not been reported. The purpose of this study was to compare the abdominal muscle activity (rectus abdominis, external and internal oblique muscles) during an active single-leg-hold (SLH) exercise on a floor (stable surface), foam roll, and motorized rotating platform (MRP). Thirteen healthy male subjects participated in this study. Using electromyography, the abdominal muscle activity was measured while the subjects performed SLH exercises on floor (stable surface), foam roll, and MRP. There were significant differences in the abdominal muscle activities among conditions (P.05) (Fig. 2). After the Bonferroni correction, however, no significant differences among conditions remained, except for differences in both side IO muscle activity between the floor and foam roll conditions (padjactivities of both side of RA and IO, and Rt. EO compared to floor condition. However, there were no significant differences in abdominal muscles activity in the multiple comparison between conditions (mean difference were smaller than the standard deviation in the abdominal muscle activities) (padj>0.017), except for differences in both side IO muscle activity between the floor (stable surface) and foam roll (padj<0.017) (effect size: 0.79/0.62 (non-supporting/supporting leg) for foam-roll versus floor). Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. TRUNK MUSCLE ACTIVITIES DURING ABDOMINAL BRACING: COMPARISON AMONG MUSCLES AND EXERCISES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sumiaki Maeo

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Abdominal bracing is often adopted in fitness and sports conditioning programs. However, there is little information on how muscular activities during the task differ among the muscle groups located in the trunk and from those during other trunk exercises. The present study aimed to quantify muscular activity levels during abdominal bracing with respect to muscle- and exercise-related differences. Ten healthy young adult men performed five static (abdominal bracing, abdominal hollowing, prone, side, and supine plank and five dynamic (V- sits, curl-ups, sit-ups, and back extensions on the floor and on a bench exercises. Surface electromyogram (EMG activities of the rectus abdominis (RA, external oblique (EO, internal oblique (IO, and erector spinae (ES muscles were recorded in each of the exercises. The EMG data were normalized to those obtained during maximal voluntary contraction of each muscle (% EMGmax. The % EMGmax value during abdominal bracing was significantly higher in IO (60% than in the other muscles (RA: 18%, EO: 27%, ES: 19%. The % EMGmax values for RA, EO, and ES were significantly lower in the abdominal bracing than in some of the other exercises such as V-sits and sit-ups for RA and EO and back extensions for ES muscle. However, the % EMGmax value for IO during the abdominal bracing was significantly higher than those in most of the other exercises including dynamic ones such as curl-ups and sit-ups. These results suggest that abdominal bracing is one of the most effective techniques for inducing a higher activation in deep abdominal muscles, such as IO muscle, even compared to dynamic exercises involving trunk flexion/extension movements

  3. Pelvic floor exercises with biofeedback for stress urinary incontinence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria V. Capelini

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Prospective study to objectively evaluate the benefits of pelvic floor strengthening exercises associated to biofeedback for the treatment of stress urinary incontinence. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Fourteen patients diagnosed with stress urinary incontinence (SUI were selected for this study. All patients underwent a pelvic floor training associated to biofeedback for 12 consecutive weeks. Urodynamic tests, pad test and bladder diary were analyzed at the beginning of the study, at the end and after 3 months. The King's Health Questionnaire (KHQ was applied before and after treatment to assess the impact in the quality of life. RESULTS: There was a significant reduction in the pad weight (from 14.21 g to 1 g, number of urinary leakage episodes (from 8.14 per day to 2.57 per day and daytime frequency (from 7.93 per day to 5.85 per day. At urodynamics the authors observed a significant increase in Valsalva leak-point pressure (from 103.93 cm H2O to 139.14 cm H2O, cistometric capacity (from 249.29 mL to 336.43 mL, p = 0.0015 and bladder volume at first desire to void (from 145 mL to 215.71 mL. Those differences were kept during the first 3 months of follow up. The KHQ revealed significant differences except in the case of "general health perception", which covers health in general and not exclusively urinary incontinence. CONCLUSION: Treatment of SUI with pelvic floor exercises associated to biofeedback caused significant changes in the parameters analyzed, with maintenance of good results 3 months after treatment.

  4. Muscle function of the pelvic floor in healthy, puerperal women with pelvic floor dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro-Pardiñas, M A; Torres-Lacomba, M; Navarro-Brazález, B

    2017-05-01

    To understand the function of the pelvic floor muscles (PFM) at different ages in healthy women and in puerperal women with pelvic floor dysfunctions (PFD) and to ascertain whether there are differences among them. A descriptive cross-sectional study was conducted between June 2014 and September 2016 and included 177 women, 70 of whom had no symptoms of PFD, 53 primiparous mothers in late postpartum and 54 with PFD. The function of the PFM was measured through vaginal palpation (quality of the contraction); manometry (force); dynamometer (tone, strength, and response to stretching), and surface electromyography (neuromuscular activity and resistance). The healthy women showed superior values for PFM tone, maximum strength, neuromuscular activity and resistance than the puerperal mothers and the women with PFD (P.05). The muscle function of the healthy women did not vary significantly with age, except in the case of tone, which was lower in the women older than 46 years (P=.004). Age and births decrease the baseline tone of the PFM in healthy women. Therefore, lower strength, resistance and neuromuscular activity appear to be the main difference between the PFM of women with PFD and the PFM of healthy women. Copyright © 2016 AEU. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  5. Cortical Activation Associated with Muscle Synergies of the Human Male Pelvic Floor

    OpenAIRE

    Asavasopon, Skulpan; Rana, Manku; Kirages, Daniel J.; Yani, Moheb S.; Fisher, Beth E.; Hwang, Darryl H.; Lohman, Everett B.; Berk, Lee S.; Kutch, Jason J.

    2014-01-01

    Human pelvic floor muscles have been shown to operate synergistically with a wide variety of muscles, which has been suggested to be an important contributor to continence and pelvic stability during functional tasks. However, the neural mechanism of pelvic floor muscle synergies remains unknown. Here, we test the hypothesis that activation in motor cortical regions associated with pelvic floor activation are part of the neural substrate for such synergies. We first use electromyographic reco...

  6. Latent profile analysis of pelvic floor muscle pain in patients with chronic pelvic pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fenton, B W; Grey, S F; Armstrong, A; McCarroll, M; Von Gruenigen, V

    2013-02-01

    Chronic pelvic pain (CPP) is a syndrome of related diagnoses including pain originating from the muscles of the pelvic floor. The objective of this study was to evaluate which muscles are important to examine, in what manner pelvic floor muscle pain contributes to patients' pain experience, or what thresholds should be applied to identify significant pelvic floor muscle pain by comparing exam findings with outcome measures A total of 428 patients meeting the definition for CPP were evaluated using a standardized physical examination of the abdominal wall, pelvic floor, and vestibule along with the 12 domain Patient Reported Outcome Measures Information System (PROMIS). These scores were evaluated for unidimensionality followed by latent profile analysis. The areas under the receiver operator characteristic curves were used to identify the best pain threshold for each muscle. The eight pelvic floor muscle sites all loaded onto a single factor, separate from other areas examined. Two latent classes were found within all the variables. Patients in the severe pelvic floor pain class had significantly worse pain related PROMIS scores. Optimal thresholds for identifying significant pelvic floor pain ranged between 3 and 5. Pain in the pelvic floor muscles is distinguishable from pain in the abdominal wall and vulva. Any of the lateral muscle sites evaluated can be used to identify patients with significant pelvic floor pain. Two latent classes of CPP patients were identified: those with limited and those with severe pain, as identified by moderate to severe pelvic floor tenderness.

  7. Reliability of Eelectromyography of Abdominal Muscles During Abdominal Manoeuvre with and without Pelvic Floor Muscle Contraction

    OpenAIRE

    Motahareh Hashem-Boroujerdi; Amir Masoud A'rab; Nouroddin Karimi; Nahid Tahan

    2012-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this study was to determine the reliability of electromyography measurements of abdominal muscles activity during different manoeuvres (pelvic floor muscle (PFM) contraction, abdominal hollowing and abdominal bracing with and without PFM contraction) in subjects with and without chronic low back pain (LBP). Materials & Methods: In this methodology research 21 subjects (9 with LBP, 12 without LBP) who were selected simply & conveniently participated in the study. ...

  8. Exercise-Associated Muscle Cramps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Kevin C.; Stone, Marcus S.; Huxel, Kellie C.; Edwards, Jeffrey E.

    2010-01-01

    Context: Exercise-associated muscle cramps (EAMC) are a common condition experienced by recreational and competitive athletes. Despite their commonality and prevalence, their cause remains unknown. Theories for the cause of EAMC are primarily based on anecdotal and observational studies rather than sound experimental evidence. Without a clear cause, treatments and prevention strategies for EAMC are often unsuccessful. Evidence Acquisition: A search of Medline (EBSCO), SPORTDiscus, and Silverplatter (CINHAL) was undertaken for journal articles written in English between the years 1955 and 2008. Additional references were collected by a careful analysis of the citations of others’ research and textbooks. Results: Dehydration/electrolyte and neuromuscular causes are the most widely discussed theories for the cause of EAMC; however, strong experimental evidence for either theory is lacking. Conclusions: EAMC are likely due to several factors coalescing to cause EAMC. The variety of treatments and prevention strategies for EAMC are evidence of the uncertainty in their cause. Acute EAMC treatment should focus on moderate static stretching of the affected muscle followed by a proper medical history to determine any predisposing conditions that may have triggered the onset of EAMC. Based on physical findings, prevention programs should be implemented to include fluid and electrolyte balance strategies and/or neuromuscular training. PMID:23015948

  9. Preventing Urinary Incontinence With Supervised Prenatal Pelvic Floor Exercises: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fritel, Xavier; de Tayrac, Renaud; Bader, Georges; Savary, Denis; Gueye, Ameth; Deffieux, Xavier; Fernandez, Hervé; Richet, Claude; Guilhot, Joëlle; Fauconnier, Arnaud

    2015-08-01

    To compare, in an unselected population of nulliparous pregnant women, the postnatal effect of prenatal supervised pelvic floor muscle training with written instructions on postpartum urinary incontinence (UI). In a randomized controlled trial in two parallel groups, 282 women were recruited from five university teaching hospitals in France and randomized during the second trimester of pregnancy. The physiotherapy group received prenatal individually supervised exercises. Both groups received written instructions about how to perform exercises at home. Women were blindly assessed at baseline, end of pregnancy, and 2 and 12 months postpartum. The primary outcome measured was UI severity, assessed with an International Consultation on Incontinence Questionnaire-Urinary Incontinence Short Form score (range 0-21; 1-5 is slight UI) at 12 months postpartum; other outcomes were UI prevalence and pelvic floor troubles assessed using self-administered questionnaires. To give a 1-point difference in UI severity score, we needed 91 women in each group (standard deviation 2.4, α=0.05, β=0.20, and bilateral analysis). Between February 2008 and June 2010, 140 women were randomized in the physiotherapy group and 142 in the control group. No difference was observed between the two groups in UI severity, prevalence, or pelvic floor troubles at baseline, end of pregnancy, and at 2 and 12 months postpartum. At 12 months postpartum, the primary outcome was available for 190 women (67.4%); mean UI severity was 1.9 in the physiotherapy group compared with 2.1 in the control group (P=.38). Prenatal supervised pelvic floor training was not superior to written instructions in reducing postnatal UI. ClinicalTrials.gov; www.clinicaltrials.gov, NCT00551551. I.

  10. Core muscle activity during suspension exercises.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mok, Nicola W; Yeung, Ella W; Cho, Jeran C; Hui, Samson C; Liu, Kimee C; Pang, Coleman H

    2015-03-01

    Suspension exercise has been advocated as an effective means to improve core stability among healthy individuals and those with musculoskeletal complaints. However, the activity of core muscles during suspension exercises has not been reported. In this study, we investigated the level of activation of core muscles during suspension exercises within young and healthy adults. The study was conducted in a controlled laboratory setting. Surface electromyographic (sEMG) activity of core muscles (rectus abdominis, external oblique, internal oblique/transversus abdominis, and superficial lumbar multifidus) during four suspension workouts (hip abduction in plank, hamstring curl, chest press, and 45° row) was investigated. Muscle activity during a 5-s hold period of the workouts was measured by sEMG and normalized to the individual's maximal voluntary isometric contraction (MVIC). Different levels of muscle activation were observed during the hip abduction in plank, hamstring curl, and chest press. Hip abduction in plank generated the highest activation of most abdominal muscles. The 45° row exercise generated the lowest muscle activation. Among the four workouts investigated, the hip abduction in plank with suspension was found to have the strongest potential strengthening effect on core muscles. Also, suspension training was found to generate relatively high levels of core muscle activation when compared with that among previous studies of core exercises on stable and unstable support surfaces. Copyright © 2014 Sports Medicine Australia. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Eccentric exercise-induced muscle damage impairs muscle glycogen repletion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Reilly, K P; Warhol, M J; Fielding, R A; Frontera, W R; Meredith, C N; Evans, W J

    1987-07-01

    Five healthy untrained young male subjects were studied before, immediately after, and 10 days after a 45-min bout of eccentric exercise on a cycle ergometer (201 W). The subjects were sedentary at all other times and consumed a eucaloric meat-free diet. Needle biopsies of the vastus lateralis muscle were examined for intracellular damage and glycogen content. Immediately after exercise, muscle samples showed myofibrillar tearing and edema. At 10 days, there was myofibrillar necrosis, inflammatory cell infiltration, and no evidence of myofibrillar regeneration. Glycogen utilization during the exercise bout was 33 mmol glycosyl units/kg muscle, consistent with the metabolic intensity of 44% of maximal O2 uptake; however, the significant glycogen use by type II fibers contrasted with concentric exercise performed at this intensity. At 10 days after exercise, muscle glycogen was still depleted, in both type I and II fibers. It is possible that the alterations in muscle ultrastructures were related to the lack of repletion of muscle glycogen. Damage produced by eccentric exercise was more persistent than previously reported, indicating that more than 10 days may be necessary for recovery of muscle ultrastructure and carbohydrate reserves.

  12. Aerobic exercise augments muscle transcriptome profile of resistance exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundberg, Tommy R; Fernandez-Gonzalo, Rodrigo; Tesch, Per A; Rullman, Eric; Gustafsson, Thomas

    2016-06-01

    Recent reports suggest that aerobic exercise may boost the hypertrophic response to short-term resistance training. This study explored the effects of an acute aerobic exercise bout on the transcriptional response to subsequent resistance exercise. Ten moderately trained men performed ∼45 min cycling on one leg followed by 4 × 7 maximal knee extensions for each leg, 15 min later. Thus, one limb performed aerobic and resistance exercise (AE + RE) while the opposing leg did resistance exercise only (RE). Biopsies were obtained from the vastus lateralis muscle of each leg 3 h after the resistance exercise bout. Using DNA microarray, we analyzed differences [≥1.5-fold, false discovery rate (FDR) ≤10%] in gene expression profiles for the two modes of exercise. There were 176 genes up (127)- or downregulated (49) by AE + RE compared with RE. Among the most significant differentially expressed genes were established markers for muscle growth and oxidative capacity, novel cytokines, transcription factors, and micro-RNAs (miRNAs). The most enriched functional categories were those linked to carbohydrate metabolism and transcriptional regulation. Upstream analysis revealed that vascular endothelial growth factor, cAMP-response element-binding protein, Tet methylcytosine dioxygenase, and mammalian target of rapamycin were regulators highly activated by AE + RE, whereas JnK, NF-κβ, MAPK, and several miRNAs were inhibited. Thus, aerobic exercise alters the skeletal muscle transcriptional signature of resistance exercise to initiate important gene programs promoting both myofiber growth and improved oxidative capacity. These results provide novel insight into human muscle adaptations to diverse exercise modes and offer the very first genomic basis explaining how aerobic exercise may augment, rather than compromise, muscle growth induced by resistance exercise. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  13. Pregnancy-induced adaptations in intramuscular extracellular matrix of rat pelvic floor muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alperin, Marianna; Kaddis, Timothy; Pichika, Rajeswari; Esparza, Mary C; Lieber, Richard L

    2016-08-01

    Birth trauma to pelvic floor muscles is a major risk factor for pelvic floor disorders. Intramuscular extracellular matrix determines muscle stiffness, supports contractile component, and shields myofibers from mechanical strain. Our goal was to determine whether pregnancy alters extracellular matrix mechanical and biochemical properties in a rat model, which may provide insights into the pathogenesis of pelvic floor muscle birth injury. To examine whether pregnancy effects were unique to pelvic floor muscles, we also studied a hind limb muscle. Passive mechanical properties of coccygeus, iliocaudalis, pubocaudalis, and tibialis anterior were compared among 3-month old Sprague-Dawley virgin, late-pregnant, and postpartum rats. Muscle tangent stiffness was calculated as the slope of the stress-sarcomere length curve between 2.5 and 4.0 μm, obtained from a stress-relaxation protocol at a bundle level. Elastin and collagen isoform concentrations were quantified by the use of enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Enzymatic and glycosylated collagen crosslinks were determined by high-performance liquid chromatography. Data were compared by the use of repeated-measures, 2-way analysis of variance with Tukey post-hoc testing. Correlations between mechanical and biochemical parameters were assessed by linear regressions. Significance was set to P pelvic floor muscle stiffness did not differ from virgins (P > .3). A substantial increase in collagen V in coccygeus and pubocaudalis was observed in late-pregnant, compared with virgin, animals, (P pelvic floor muscles (P pelvic floor muscles, the tibialis anterior was unaltered by pregnancy. In contrast to other pelvic tissues, pelvic floor muscle stiffness increased in pregnancy, returning to prepregnancy state postpartum. This adaptation may shield myofibers from excessive mechanical strain during parturition. Biochemical alterations in pelvic floor muscle extracellular matrix due to pregnancy include increase in collagen V

  14. Pregnancy-induced adaptations in intramuscular extracellular matrix of rat pelvic floor muscles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alperin, Marianna; Kaddis, Timothy; Pichika, Rajeswari; Esparza, Mary C.; Lieber, Richard L.

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND Birth trauma to pelvic floor muscles is a major risk factor for pelvic floor disorders. Intramuscular extracellular matrix determines muscle stiffness, supports contractile component, and shields myofibers from mechanical strain. OBJECTIVE Our goal was to determine whether pregnancy alters extracellular matrix mechanical and biochemical properties in a rat model, which may provide insights into the pathogenesis of pelvic floor muscle birth injury. To examine whether pregnancy effects were unique to pelvic floor muscles, we also studied a hind limb muscle. STUDY DESIGN Passive mechanical properties of coccygeus, iliocaudalis, pubocaudalis, and tibialis anterior were compared among 3-month old Sprague–Dawley virgin, late-pregnant, and postpartum rats. Muscle tangent stiffness was calculated as the slope of the stress–sarcomere length curve between 2.5 and 4.0 μm, obtained from a stress-relaxation protocol at a bundle level. Elastin and collagen isoform concentrations were quantified by the use of enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Enzymatic and glycosylated collagen crosslinks were determined by high-performance liquid chromatography. Data were compared by the use of repeated-measures, 2-way analysis of variance with Tukey post-hoc testing. Correlations between mechanical and biochemical parameters were assessed by linear regressions. Significance was set to P pelvic floor muscle stiffness did not differ from virgins (P > .3). A substantial increase in collagen V in coccygeus and pubocaudalis was observed in late-pregnant, compared with virgin, animals, (P pelvic floor muscles (P pelvic floor muscles, the tibialis anterior was unaltered by pregnancy. CONCLUSIONS In contrast to other pelvic tissues, pelvic floor muscle stiffness increased in pregnancy, returning to prepregnancy state post-partum. This adaptation may shield myofibers from excessive mechanical strain during parturition. Biochemical alterations in pelvic floor muscle extracellular matrix

  15. An education program about pelvic floor muscles improved women’s knowledge but not pelvic floor muscle function, urinary incontinence or sexual function: a randomised trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberta Leopoldino de Andrade

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Question: Does an educational program with instructions for performing ‘the Knack’ improve voluntary contraction of the pelvic floor muscles, reduce reports of urinary incontinence, improve sexual function, and promote women’s knowledge of the pelvic floor muscles? Design: Randomised, controlled trial with concealed allocation, intention-to-treat analysis and blinded assessors. Participants: Ninety-nine women from the local community. Intervention: The experimental group (n = 50 received one lecture per week for 4 weeks, and instructions for performing ‘the Knack’. The control group (n = 49 received no intervention. Outcome measures: The primary outcome was maximum voluntary contraction of the pelvic floor muscles measured using manometry. Secondary outcomes were: ability to contract the pelvic floor muscles measured using vaginal palpation; severity of urinary incontinence measured by the International Consultation on Incontinence Questionnaire-Short Form (ICIQ-SF scored from 0 to 21; self-reported sexual function; and knowledge related to the pelvic floor. Outcomes were measured at baseline and after 4 weeks. Results: The intervention did not significantly improve: maximum voluntary contraction (MD 2.7 cmH2O higher in the experimental group, 95% CI –0.5 to 5.9; ability to contract the pelvic floor muscles (RR 2.18, 95% CI 0.49 to 9.65; or self-reported severity of urinary incontinence (MD 1 point greater reduction in the experimental group, 95% CI –3 to 1. Sexual function did not significantly differ between groups, but very few of the women engaged in sexual activity during the study period. The educational program did, however, significantly increase women’s knowledge related to the location, functions and dysfunctions of the pelvic floor muscles, and treatment options. Conclusion: Education and teaching women to perform ‘the Knack’ had no significant effect on voluntary contraction of the pelvic floor muscles

  16. Integration core exercises elicit greater muscle activation than isolation exercises.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gottschall, Jinger S; Mills, Jackie; Hastings, Bryce

    2013-03-01

    The American College of Sports Medicine and the United States Department of Health and Human Services advocate core training as a means to improve stability, reduce injury, and maintain mobility. There are countless exercises that target the primary core trunk muscles (abdominal and lumbar) with the aim of providing these benefits. However, it is unknown as to which exercises elicit the greatest activation thereby maximizing functional gains and peak performance. Thus, our purpose was to determine whether integration core exercises that require activation of the distal trunk muscles (deltoid and gluteal) elicit greater activation of primary trunk muscles in comparison with isolation core exercises that only require activation of the proximal trunk muscles. Twenty participants, 10 men and 10 women, completed 16 randomly assigned exercises (e.g., crunch, upper body extension, and hover variations). We measured muscle activity with surface electromyography of the anterior deltoid, rectus abdominus, external abdominal oblique, lumbar erector spinae, thoracic erector spinae, and gluteus maximus. Our results indicate that the activation of the abdominal and lumbar muscles was the greatest during the exercises that required deltoid and gluteal recruitment. In conclusion, when completing the core strength guidelines, an integrated routine that incorporates the activation of distal trunk musculature would be optimal in terms of maximizing strength, improving endurance, enhancing stability, reducing injury, and maintaining mobility.

  17. Muscle electrical activity during exercises with and without load executed on dry land and in an aquatic environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Indira Nayra Paz Santos

    Full Text Available Introduction Muscle activity in the aquatic environment was investigated using electromyographic analyses. The physical properties of water and the resistance used may influence the response of the muscle during exercise. The objective of this study was to evaluate the electrical activity in water and on the floor during flexion and knee extension exercises with and without load and aimed at understanding the muscular response while performing resistance exercises in water. Methods The sample consisted of 14 volunteers between 18 and 35 years old who were subjected to active exercises involving knee flexion and extension with and without load on the floor and in water. Electromyography was performed during the movement. Results A significant increase was found in the electrical activity of the rectus femoris muscle during exercises on the floor. The biceps femoris muscle showed increased electromyographic activity when resistance was used. A significant increase was found in the electrical activity of the rectus femoris muscle compared with exercises with and without load and the moment of rest in immersion. The electrical activity of the rectus and biceps femoris muscles was reduced in exercises with load and without load in a therapy pool compared with on the floor. Conclusion There was a reduction of the electromyographic activity in the aquatic environment compared with that on the ground, which could be attributed to the effects from hot water. Therefore, it is believed that resistance exercises can be performed early in a therapy pool, which will facilitate the prevention and treatment of musculoskeletal disorders.

  18. Contribution of pelvic floor muscles to stiffness of the pelvic ring

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pool-Goudzwaard, A.L.; Hoek van Dijke, G; van Gurp, M; Mulder, P; Snijders, C.J.; Stoeckart, R.

    2004-01-01

    STUDY DESIGN: A biomechanical study in embalmed specimens, on the relation between applied tension in the pelvic floor muscles, stiffness of the pelvic ring and generation of movement in the sacroiliac joints. OBJECTIVE: To gain insight into the effect of tension in the pelvic floor muscles on

  19. Synergism between abdominal and pelvic floor muscles in healthy women: a systematic review of observational studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lia Ferla

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction: The training of the pelvic floor muscles is widely used for treating pelvic floor dysfunctions, like urinary incontinence. During the training, abdominal contractions are avoided; however several studies support the use of the synergy between these muscle groups. Objective: Carrying out a systematic review of studies that seek to identify the presence of synergy between the muscles of the abdomen and the pelvic floor and its functionality in women without pelvic floor dysfunction. Methodology: To conduct the review, we have followed the recommendations proposed by the Cochrane Collaboration for systematic reviews. The literature search included the databases SCIELO, PEDro, MEDLINE, Cochrane CENTRAL and EMBASE, and manual research, the starting date of the databases until August 2013. We included cross observational studies with healthy women who were assessed to find the presence of synergy between the abdominal muscles and the pelvic floor. Results: We included 10 articles and they all showed the existence of synergy between the abdominal and pelvic floor muscles in healthy women in the supine, sitting and standing positions. Conclusion: Thus, we can conclude that there is synergy between the muscles of the abdomen and the pelvic floor in healthy women. Better understanding the behavior of these muscles and synergy may favor the development of strategies for the prevention and treatment of disorders of the female pelvic floor muscles.

  20. Skeletal muscle glucose uptake during exercise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rose, Adam John; Richter, Erik

    2005-01-01

    The increase in skeletal muscle glucose uptake during exercise results from a coordinated increase in rates of glucose delivery (higher capillary perfusion), surface membrane glucose transport, and intracellular substrate flux through glycolysis. The mechanism behind the movement of GLUT4...

  1. Exercise in muscle glycogen storage diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Preisler, Nicolai Rasmus; Haller, Ronald G; Vissing, John

    2015-01-01

    oxidation. Such changes may be detrimental for persons with GSD from a metabolic perspective. However, exercise may alter skeletal muscle substrate metabolism in ways that are beneficial for patients with GSD, such as improving exercise tolerance and increasing fatty acid oxidation. In addition, a regular......Glycogen storage diseases (GSD) are inborn errors of glycogen or glucose metabolism. In the GSDs that affect muscle, the consequence of a block in skeletal muscle glycogen breakdown or glucose use, is an impairment of muscular performance and exercise intolerance, owing to 1) an increase...... in glycogen storage that disrupts contractile function and/or 2) a reduced substrate turnover below the block, which inhibits skeletal muscle ATP production. Immobility is associated with metabolic alterations in muscle leading to an increased dependence on glycogen use and a reduced capacity for fatty acid...

  2. An education program about pelvic floor muscles improved women's knowledge but not pelvic floor muscle function, urinary incontinence or sexual function: a randomised trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Andrade, Roberta Leopoldino; Bø, Kari; Antonio, Flavia Ignácio; Driusso, Patricia; Mateus-Vasconcelos, Elaine Cristine Lemes; Ramos, Salvador; Julio, Monica Pitanguy; Ferreira, Cristine Homsi Jorge

    2018-04-01

    Does an educational program with instructions for performing 'the Knack' improve voluntary contraction of the pelvic floor muscles, reduce reports of urinary incontinence, improve sexual function, and promote women's knowledge of the pelvic floor muscles? Randomised, controlled trial with concealed allocation, intention-to-treat analysis and blinded assessors. Ninety-nine women from the local community. The experimental group (n=50) received one lecture per week for 4 weeks, and instructions for performing 'the Knack'. The control group (n=49) received no intervention. The primary outcome was maximum voluntary contraction of the pelvic floor muscles measured using manometry. Secondary outcomes were: ability to contract the pelvic floor muscles measured using vaginal palpation; severity of urinary incontinence measured by the International Consultation on Incontinence Questionnaire-Short Form (ICIQ-SF) scored from 0 to 21; self-reported sexual function; and knowledge related to the pelvic floor. Outcomes were measured at baseline and after 4 weeks. The intervention did not significantly improve: maximum voluntary contraction (MD 2.7 cmH 2 O higher in the experimental group, 95% CI -0.5 to 5.9); ability to contract the pelvic floor muscles (RR 2.18, 95% CI 0.49 to 9.65); or self-reported severity of urinary incontinence (MD 1 point greater reduction in the experimental group, 95% CI -3 to 1). Sexual function did not significantly differ between groups, but very few of the women engaged in sexual activity during the study period. The educational program did, however, significantly increase women's knowledge related to the location, functions and dysfunctions of the pelvic floor muscles, and treatment options. Education and teaching women to perform 'the Knack' had no significant effect on voluntary contraction of the pelvic floor muscles, urinary incontinence or sexual function, but it promoted women's knowledge about the pelvic floor. Brazilian Registry of Clinical

  3. [Pelvic floor exercise and biofeedback in women with urinary stress incontinence].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, D; Luxman, D; Sarig, Y; Groutz, A

    1999-04-15

    Stress urinary incontinence is a medical and social problem. In the past decade there has been increased awareness of this condition and the number of those affected who seek help is increasing. Treatment is usually surgical-elevation of the bladder neck. Pelvic floor exercise is an accepted conservative treatment modality used for mild to moderate cases who have not yet completed their families. We present our results in 30 women, aged 28-71 years, av. 49% with genuine stress incontinence treated with pelvic floor exercise and biofeedback. 14 patients (46.7%) were completely cured and 15 (50%) were improved. In only 1 was there no improvement. Our results show significant improvement in the duration and intensity of pelvic floor contractions after treatment. Pelvic floor exercise with biofeedback is a very important treatment modality, requiring a highly motivated patient and a physiotherapist specialized in pelvic floor exercise.

  4. Signalling role of skeletal muscle during exercise

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Catoire, M.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Upon  acute exercise skeletal muscle is immediately and heavily recruited, while other organs appear to play only a minor role during exercise. These other organs show significant changes and improvements in function, although they are not directly targeted by

  5. Signalling role of skeletal muscle during exercise

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Catoire, M.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract

    Upon acute exercise skeletal muscle is immediately and heavily recruited, while other organs appear to play only a minor role during exercise. These other organs show significant changes and improvements in function, although they are not directly targeted by

  6. Impact of vaginal parity and aging on the architectural design of pelvic floor muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alperin, Marianna; Cook, Mark; Tuttle, Lori J; Esparza, Mary C; Lieber, Richard L

    2016-09-01

    Vaginal delivery and aging are key risk factors for pelvic floor muscle dysfunction, which is a critical component of pelvic floor disorders. However, alterations in the pelvic floor muscle intrinsic structure that lead to muscle dysfunction because of childbirth and aging remain elusive. The purpose of this study was to determine the impact of vaginal deliveries and aging on human cadaveric pelvic floor muscle architecture, which is the strongest predictor of active muscle function. Coccygeus, iliococcygeus, and pubovisceralis were obtained from younger donors who were ≤51 years old, vaginally nulliparous (n = 5) and vaginally parous (n = 6) and older donors who were >51 years old, vaginally nulliparous (n = 6) and vaginally parous (n = 6), all of whom had no history of pelvic floor disorders. Architectural parameters, which are predictive of muscle's excursion and force-generating capacity, were determined with the use of validated methods. Intramuscular collagen content was quantified by hydroxyproline assay. Main effects of parity and aging and the interactions were determined with the use of 2-way analysis of variance, with Tukey's post-hoc testing and a significance level of .05. The mean age of younger and older donors differed by approximately 40 years (P = .001) but was similar between nulliparous and parous donors within each age group (P > .9). The median parity was 2 (range, 1-3) in younger and older vaginally parous groups (P = .7). The main impact of parity was increased fiber length in the more proximal coccygeus (P = .03) and iliococcygeus (P = .04). Aging changes manifested as decreased physiologic cross-sectional area across all pelvic floor muscles (P < .05), which substantially exceeded the age-related decline in muscle mass. The physiologic cross-sectional area was lower in younger vaginally parous, compared with younger vaginally nulliparous, pelvic floor muscles; however, the differences did not reach statistical significance

  7. Regulation of skeletal muscle glycogenolysis during exercise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hargreaves, M; Richter, Erik

    1988-01-01

    Muscle-glycogen breakdown during exercise is influenced by both local and systemic factors. Contractions per se increase glycogenolysis via a calcium-induced, transient increase in the activity of phosphorylase a, and probably also via increased concentrations of Pi. In fast-twitch muscle...

  8. Effectiveness of pelvic floor muscle training in treating urinary incontinence in women: A current review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Sánchez, E; Rubio-Arias, J A; Ávila-Gandía, V; Ramos-Campo, D J; López-Román, J

    2016-06-01

    To analyse the content of various published studies related to physical exercise and its effects on urinary incontinence and to determine the effectiveness of pelvic floor training programmes. We conducted a search in the databases of PubMed, CINAHL, the Cochrane Plus Library, The Cochrane Library, WOS and SPORTDiscus and a manual search in the Google Scholar metasearcher using the search descriptors for documents published in the last 10 years in Spanish or English. The documents needed to have an abstract or complete text on the treatment of urinary incontinence in female athletes and in women in general. We selected 3 full-text articles on treating urinary incontinence in female athletes and 6 full-text articles and 1 abstract on treating urinary incontinence in women in general. The 9 studies included in the review achieved positive results, i.e., there was improvement in the disease in all of the studies. Physical exercise, specifically pelvic floor muscle training programmes, has positive effects on urinary incontinence. This type of training has been shown to be an effective programme for treating urinary incontinence, especially stress urinary incontinence. Copyright © 2015 AEU. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  9. Comparison of techniques used for functional evaluation of pelvic floor muscles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christiane Kelen Lucena da Costa

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To identify and discuss techniques for evaluation of pelvic floor muscles (PFM focusing on the most used and accessible techniques in health care. Methods: This is a quantitative exploratory and descriptive applied research. Data were collected from March to June 2016 at a higher education institution in the city of João Pessoa, Paraíba, Brazil. Initially, 31 healthy young women were submitted to pelvic floor evaluation using the following methods: PERFECT, vaginal cones, and perineometry using Perine and Peritron. The participants then performed exercises to strengthen PFM. The variables measured by the different methods were also recorded 30 and 60 days after the start of the program. ANOVA was used for repeated measures and Spearman's correlation test was used for the evaluation instruments with significance set at 5%. Results: The functional evaluation using all the methods was adequate in the PFM evaluation. In the digital palpation (PERFECT, the endurance response (E was positively correlated to Perina (rho=0.688 and vaginal cones (rho=0.571, and muscle strength (P was positively correlated to the Peritron technique (rho=0.506. Conclusion: There are several ways to evaluate PFM function and all of them provide sensory feedback to the patient. Given the low costs of digital palpation, the introduction of this technique into women's health services is likely to improve women's quality of life.

  10. Reliability of bidirectional and variable-opening equipment for the measurement of pelvic floor muscle strength.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunes, Fabiana Roberta; Martins, Carla Campos; Guirro, Elaine Caldeira de Oliveira; Guirro, Rinaldo Roberto Jesus

    2011-01-01

    In evaluating pelvic floor muscles, it is important to use reliable and accurate methods. Therefore the objective of this study was to verify the reliability of bidirectional and variable-opening equipment designed to measure anteroposterior and left-right strength of pelvic floor muscles. Test-retest to assess reliability. Academic institution, primary level of clinical care. Seventeen nulliparous women between 20 and 33 years of age participated in the procedure during 3 consecutive weeks. A dynamometer was used to evaluate pelvic floor muscle strength. The reliability was tested in 3 sessions, with a 7-day interval between, excluding premenstrual and menstrual periods. On each day of data collection, 3 maximum voluntary contractions of pelvic floor muscles were measured. The abdominal and gluteus muscles were evaluated concomitantly to the assessment in an attempt to isolate the pelvic floor muscle contractions. To evaluate the test-retest reliability with the intraclass correlation coefficient and the SEM. Intraclass correlation of pelvic floor muscle force values ranged from good to excellent. The SEM values for anteroposterior strength were 1.96 N and 1.86 N for left and right, respectively. Test-retest values demonstrated that the equipment we assessed to measure the anteroposterior and left-right force generated reliable pelvic floor muscle strength measurements. Copyright © 2011 American Academy of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Gluteal muscle activation during common therapeutic exercises.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Distefano, Lindsay J; Blackburn, J Troy; Marshall, Stephen W; Padua, Darin A

    2009-07-01

    Experimental laboratory study. To quantify and compare electromyographic signal amplitude of the gluteus maximus and gluteus medius muscles during exercises of varying difficulty to determine which exercise most effectively recruits these muscles. Gluteal muscle weakness has been proposed to be associated with lower extremity injury. Exercises to strengthen the gluteal muscles are frequently used in rehabilitation and injury prevention programs without scientific evidence regarding their ability to activate the targeted muscles. Surface electromyography was used to quantify the activity level of the gluteal muscles in 21 healthy, physically active subjects while performing 12 exercises. Repeated-measures analyses of variance were used to compare normalized mean signal amplitude levels, expressed as a percent of a maximum voluntary isometric contraction (MVIC), across exercises. Significant differences in signal amplitude among exercises were noted for the gluteus medius (F5,90 = 7.9, Pgluteus maximus (F5,95 = 8.1, PGluteus medius activity was significantly greater during side-lying hip abduction (mean +/- SD, 81% +/- 42% MVIC) compared to the 2 types of hip clam (40% +/- 38% MVIC, 38% +/- 29% MVIC), lunges (48% +/- 21% MVIC), and hop (48% +/- 25% MVIC) exercises. The single-limb squat and single-limb deadlift activated the gluteus medius (single-limb squat, 64% +/- 25% MVIC; single-limb deadlift, 59% +/- 25% MVIC) and maximus (single-limb squat, 59% +/- 27% MVIC; single-limb deadlift, 59% +/- 28% MVIC) similarly. The gluteus maximus activation during the single-limb squat and single-limb deadlift was significantly greater than during the lateral band walk (27% +/- 16% MVIC), hip clam (34% +/- 27% MVIC), and hop (forward, 35% +/- 22% MVIC; transverse, 35% +/- 16% MVIC) exercises. The best exercise for the gluteus medius was side-lying hip abduction, while the single-limb squat and single-limb deadlift exercises led to the greatest activation of the gluteus maximus

  12. ACUTE EXERCISE-INDUCED MUSCLE INJURY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew J McKune

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available While much research has recently been focussing on the chronic effects of overtraining, the acute damaging effects of individual eccentric exercise bouts on muscle remain of interest and underlie long-term training effects. Systemic markers of muscle damage are limited in terms of sensitivity and reliability. A clearer insight into the extent of the damage and mechanisms involved are being obtained from ultrastructural, functional and molecular examination of the muscle. There are currently indications that while the initial muscle damage may appear to have negative consequences in the short term, intense eccentric exercise appears to initiate a remodelling process and promote favourable adaptation of muscle following training, which has applications for promoting health, rehabilitation and sports performance.

  13. Impact of Different Body Positions on Bioelectrical Activity of the Pelvic Floor Muscles in Nulliparous Continent Women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daria Chmielewska

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We examined pelvic floor muscles (PFM activity (%MVC in twenty nulliparous women by body position during exercise as well as the activation of abdominal muscles and the gluteus maximus during voluntary contractions of the PFMs. Pelvic floor muscle activity was recorded using a vaginal probe during five experimental trials. Activation of transversus abdominis, rectus abdominis, and gluteus maximus during voluntary PFM contractions was also assessed. Significant differences in mean normalized amplitudes of baseline PFM activity were revealed between standing and lying (P<0.00024 and lying and ball-sitting positions (P<0.0053. Average peak, average time before peak, and average time after peak did not differ significantly during the voluntary contractions of the PFMs. Baseline PFM activity seemed to depend on the body position and was the highest in standing. Pelvic floor muscles activity during voluntary contractions did not differ by position in continent women. Statistically significant differences between the supine lying and sitting positions were only observed during a sustained 60-second contraction of the PFMs.

  14. Impact of Different Body Positions on Bioelectrical Activity of the Pelvic Floor Muscles in Nulliparous Continent Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chmielewska, Daria; Stania, Magdalena; Sobota, Grzegorz; Kwaśna, Krystyna; Błaszczak, Edward; Taradaj, Jakub; Juras, Grzegorz

    2015-01-01

    We examined pelvic floor muscles (PFM) activity (%MVC) in twenty nulliparous women by body position during exercise as well as the activation of abdominal muscles and the gluteus maximus during voluntary contractions of the PFMs. Pelvic floor muscle activity was recorded using a vaginal probe during five experimental trials. Activation of transversus abdominis, rectus abdominis, and gluteus maximus during voluntary PFM contractions was also assessed. Significant differences in mean normalized amplitudes of baseline PFM activity were revealed between standing and lying (P < 0.00024) and lying and ball-sitting positions (P < 0.0053). Average peak, average time before peak, and average time after peak did not differ significantly during the voluntary contractions of the PFMs. Baseline PFM activity seemed to depend on the body position and was the highest in standing. Pelvic floor muscles activity during voluntary contractions did not differ by position in continent women. Statistically significant differences between the supine lying and sitting positions were only observed during a sustained 60-second contraction of the PFMs. PMID:25793212

  15. The pelvic floor muscles: muscle thickness in healthy and urinary-incontinent women measured by perineal ultrasonography with reference to the effect of pelvic floor training. Estrogen receptor studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bernstein, Inge Thomsen

    1997-01-01

    depends on the structural components in the urethral wall, the position of the bladder neck and proximal urethra, the periurethral striated muscles, and the pelvic floor muscles. By means of pudendal blockade and simultaneous recordings of pressure and cross-sectional area in the urethra, it has been...... demonstrated that the striated periurethral muscles and the pelvic floor muscles are of paramount importance for the closure function. This emphasizes the importance of well-functioning pelvic floor muscles to obtain continence, and probably explains the rationale for the effect of pelvic floor training...... in treating urinary incontinence. This study presents a review of the literature on female urinary incontinence, continence mechanisms, pelvic floor muscles, and pelvic floor training. Furthermore, a review of the literature on estrogen receptors in the pelvic floor muscles is given. Perineal ultrasonography...

  16. Assessment of voluntary pelvic floor muscle contraction in continent and incontinent women using transperineal ultrasound, manual muscle testing and vaginal squeeze pressure measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Judith A; O'Sullivan, Peter B; Briffa, N Kathryn; Neumann, Patricia

    2006-11-01

    The aims of the study were: (1) to assess women performing voluntary pelvic floor muscle (PFM) contractions, on initial instruction without biofeedback teaching, using transperineal ultrasound, manual muscle testing, and perineometry and (2) to assess for associations between the different measurements of PFM function. Sixty continent (30 nulliparous and 30 parous) and 60 incontinent (30 stress urinary incontinence (SUI) and 30 urge urinary incontinence (UUI)) women were assessed. Bladder neck depression during attempts to perform an elevating pelvic floor muscle (PFM) contraction occurred in 17% of continent and 30% of incontinent women. The UUI group had the highest proportion of women who depressed the bladder neck (40%), although this was not statistically significant (p=0.060). The continent women were stronger on manual muscle testing (p=0.001) and perineometry (p=0.019) and had greater PFM endurance (pelevation than the incontinent women (p=0.051). There was a moderate correlation between bladder neck movement during PFM contraction measured by ultrasound and PFM strength assessed by manual muscle testing (r=0.58, p=0.01) and perineometry (r=0.43, p=0.01). The observation that many women were performing PFM exercises incorrectly reinforces the need for individual PFM assessment with a skilled practitioner. The significant correlation between the measurements of bladder neck elevation during PFM contraction and PFM strength measured using MMT and perineometry supports the use of ultrasound in the assessment of PFM function; however, the correlation was only moderate and, therefore, indicates that the different measurement tools assess different aspects of PFM function. It is recommended that physiotherapists use a combination of assessment tools to evaluate the different aspects of PFM function that are important for continence. Ultrasound is useful to determine the direction of pelvic floor movement in the clinical assessment of pelvic floor muscle function

  17. Symmetry of muscle activity during abdominal exercises.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutkowska-Kucharska, Alicja; Szpala, Agnieszka; Pieciuk, Edyta

    2009-01-01

    In this study, the symmetry of EMG activity of right and left parts of rectus abdominis, erector spinae, rectus femoris has been tested during isometric exercises. Subjects (N = 3) were selected from the university population. In each of nine isometric exercises, the position of lower and upper extremities is different in relation to the upper body. Electromyographic signals were recorded from left and right parts of selected muscles at 1000 Hz sampling frequency. Differences in EMG activity between specific exercises for left and right parts of each muscle were tested for significance with a one-way ANOVA. It was concluded that EMG activity of left and right sides of rectus abdominis and rectus femoris does not differ significantly; nevertheless statistically important differences were noticed between left and right sides of erector spine. These findings provide more detailed knowledge and understanding of different forms of abdominal exercises.

  18. Core Muscle Activation in Suspension Training Exercises

    OpenAIRE

    Cugliari, Giovanni; Boccia, Gennaro

    2017-01-01

    Abstract A quantitative observational laboratory study was conducted to characterize and classify core training exercises executed in a suspension modality on the base of muscle activation. In a prospective single-group repeated measures design, seventeen active male participants performed four suspension exercises typically associated with core training (roll-out, bodysaw, pike and knee-tuck). Surface electromyographic signals were recorded from lower and upper parts of rectus abdominis, ext...

  19. Enhanced muscle glucose metabolism after exercise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Richter, Erik; Garetto, L P; Goodman, M N

    1984-01-01

    Studies in the rat suggest that after voluntary exercise there are two phases of glycogen repletion in skeletal muscle (preceding study). In phase I glucose utilization and glycogen synthesis are enhanced both in the presence and absence of insulin, whereas in phase II only the increase in the pr......Studies in the rat suggest that after voluntary exercise there are two phases of glycogen repletion in skeletal muscle (preceding study). In phase I glucose utilization and glycogen synthesis are enhanced both in the presence and absence of insulin, whereas in phase II only the increase...... in the stimulated leg closely mimicked that observed previously after voluntary exercise on a treadmill. With no insulin added to the perfusate, glucose incorporation into glycogen was markedly enhanced in muscles that were glycogen depleted as were the uptake of 2-deoxyglucose and 3-O-methylglucose. Likewise......, the stimulation of these processes by insulin was enhanced and continued to be so 2 h later when the muscles of the stimulated leg had substantially repleted their glycogen stores. The results suggest that the increases in insulin-mediated glucose utilization and glycogen synthesis in muscle after exercise...

  20. The relationship between postpartum levator ani muscle avulsion and signs and symptoms of pelvic floor dysfunction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Delft, K. van; Sultan, A.H.; Thakar, R.; Schwertner-Tiepelmann, N.; Kluivers, K.B.

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To establish the relationship between postpartum levator ani muscle (LAM) avulsion and signs and/or symptoms of pelvic floor dysfunction (PFD). DESIGN: Observational longitudinal cohort study. SETTING: District General University Hospital, UK. POPULATION OR SAMPLE: Primigravida at 36

  1. Supervised pelvic floor muscle training versus attention-control massage treatment in patients with faecal incontinence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ussing, Anja; Dahn, Inge; Due, Ulla

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Faecal incontinence affects approximately 8–9% of the adult population. The condition is surrounded by taboo; it can have a devastating impact on quality of life and lead to major limitations in daily life. Pelvic floor muscle training in combination with information and fibre...... supplements is recommended as first-line treatment for faecal incontinence. Despite this, the effect of pelvic floor muscle training for faecal incontinence is unclear. No previous trials have investigated the efficacy of supervised pelvic floor muscle training in combination with conservative treatment...... in patients with faecal incontinence. Design Randomised, controlled, superiority trial with two parallel arms. Methods 100 participants with faecal incontinence will be randomised to either (1) individually supervised pelvic floor muscle training and conservative treatment or (2) attention-control massage...

  2. Strength training and aerobic exercise training for muscle disease.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Voet, N.B.M.; Kooi, E.L. van der; Riphagen, I.I.; Lindeman, E.; Engelen, B.G.M. van; Geurts, A.C.H.

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Strength training or aerobic exercise programmes might optimise muscle and cardiorespiratory function and prevent additional disuse atrophy and deconditioning in people with a muscle disease. OBJECTIVES: To examine the safety and efficacy of strength training and aerobic exercise

  3. Does motivation predict outcome of pelvic floor muscle retraining?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Te West, Nevine I D; Parkin, Katrina; Hayes, Wendy; Costa, Daniel S J; Kasparian, Nadine A; Moore, Kate H

    2017-02-01

    Although pelvic floor muscle training (PFMT) is effective for stress urinary incontinence (SUI), patients need to be motivated to obtain cure. An instrument to assess motivation in such patients was published in 2009: the Incontinence Treatment Motivation Questionnaire (ITMQ). The ITMQ consists of five domains: (i) positive attitudes toward PFMT; (ii) reasons for not doing PFMT; (iii) difficulties living with incontinence; (iv) desire for treatment; and (v) incontinence severity influencing motivation. The aim of the present study was to examine the relationship between ITMQ scores and treatment success. After referral for PFMT, women with SUI completed the ITMQ. Pre- and post-treatment outcomes were the International Consultation on Incontinence Questionnaire (ICIQ) score and a 24-hr pad test. Correlations between ITMQ scores and baseline, as well as post-treatment change in ICIQ scores and pad test results were examined. Additionally, the demographics of non-participants, participants, and patients lost to follow-up were compared. Of 85 recruits, 18 did not complete the ITMQ, 14 were lost to follow-up, thus 53 completed the PFMT programme and undertook either one or both outcomes. Pre-treatment, severity on ICIQ correlated with total ITMQ (ρ = 0.33, P = 0.01). Post-treatment change in pad test was inversely correlated with Domain 2 (ρ = -0.33, P = 0.03). The pre-treatment severity of incontinence was significantly associated with motivation for treatment. Unfortunately, post-treatment change correlated with only one domain of the questionnaire. Further modification of the ITMQ is envisaged. Neurourol. Urodynam. 36:316-321, 2017. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Increased muscle glucose uptake after exercise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Richter, Erik; Ploug, Thorkil; Galbo, Henrik

    1985-01-01

    It has recently been shown that insulin sensitivity of skeletal muscle glucose uptake and glycogen synthesis is increased after a single exercise session. The present study was designed to determine whether insulin is necessary during exercise for development of these changes found after exercise....... Diabetic rats and controls ran on a treadmill and their isolated hindquarters were subsequently perfused at insulin concentrations of 0, 100, and 20,000 microU/ml. Exercise increased insulin sensitivity of glucose uptake and glycogen synthesis equally in diabetic and control rats, but insulin...... responsiveness of glucose uptake was noted only in controls. Analysis of intracellular glucose-6-phosphate, glucose, glycogen synthesis, and glucose transport suggested that the exercise effect on responsiveness might be due to enhancement of glucose disposal. After electrical stimulation of diabetic...

  5. Vascular recruitment in forearm muscles during exercise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Palm, T; Nielsen, S L; Lassen, N A

    1983-01-01

    Blood flow and filtration of water across the vascular bed in human forearm muscles were studied at rest and during graded exercise with a hand ergometer. Blood flow was measured by dye dilution and water filtration was determined after injection of hyperoncotic albumin solution (23%) in the brac...

  6. A STUDY TO INVESTIGATE THE ROLE OF PELVIC FLOOR MUSCLE IN CHRONIC NONRESPONSIVE BACK ACHE IN FEMALES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sadaf Subhi

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Chronic low back pain remains a major health problem. Unfortunately, the majority of treatments for this condition produce small effects because not all patients respond to each treatment. It appears that only 25–50% of patients respond to exercise. At present, however, there are no guidelines regarding the best treatment to help clinicians. As a result, time and money are wasted on treatment which ultimately fail to help the patient. A backache is described as annoying and gripping pain. It can be caused by poor posture, lack of manual handling skills, change in the center of gravity due to expanding abdomen, lack of exercise, or the weight of the baby and the stretching ligaments. Pelvic floor muscle weakness is one of the major cause of chronic backache. Weakness in the pelvic floor muscles is common in females which can lead to debilitating urinary symptoms, affect sexual function and cause chronic backache. Methods: In 3 months, 31 female subjects with mean age of 28 who had taken treatment for their chronic backache, were improvised with pelvic floor strength at our setup, with dramatically good results. 31 subjects with non-responsive chronic back pain who had taken conventional physiotherapy were included in the study. Both married and unmarried were included. Any sign of radiculopathy or inflammation were excluded. After assessing pain using Visual Analogue Scale, the Dr Glazer’s program and Kegel’s contractions were taught. Results: There was significant improvement by 50% on reassessment after 7 days. Then exercises for transverse abdominals were included to get a better response. On completion of the treatment sessions, reduction in pain was 92% on VAS and functional abilities increased by 89%. There was a significant improvement in the quality of life and in pelvic-floor muscle strength. Conclusion: Non-responsive chronic back pain in females when treated with pelvic floor muscle strengthening program showed 40

  7. REPEATED ABDOMINAL EXERCISE INDUCES RESPIRATORY MUSCLE FATIGUE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Richard Coast

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Prolonged bouts of hyperpnea or resisted breathing are known to result in respiratory muscle fatigue, as are primarily non respiratory exercises such as maximal running and cycling. These exercises have a large ventilatory component, though, and can still be argued to be respiratory activities. Sit-up training has been used to increase respiratory muscle strength, but no studies have been done to determine whether this type of non-respiratory activity can lead to respiratory fatigue. The purpose of the study was to test the effect of sit-ups on various respiratory muscle strength and endurance parameters. Eight subjects performed pulmonary function, maximum inspiratory pressure (MIP and maximum expiratory pressure (MEP measurements, and an incremental breathing test before and after completing a one-time fatiguing exercise bout of sit-ups. Each subject acted as their own control performing the same measurements 3-5 days following the exercise bout, substituting rest for exercise. Following sit-up induced fatigue, significant decreases were measured in MIP [121.6 ± 26 to 113.8 ± 23 cmH2O (P <0.025], and incremental breathing test duration [9.6 ± 1.5 to 8.5 ± 0.7 minutes (P <0.05]. No significant decreases were observed from control pre-test to control post-test measurements. We conclude that after a one-time fatiguing sit-up exercise bout there is a reduction in respiratory muscle strength (MIP, MEP and endurance (incremental breathing test duration but not spirometric pulmonary function

  8. Comparison of Abdominal Muscle Activity During a Single-Legged Hold in the Hook-Lying Position on the Floor and on a Round Foam Roll

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Su-Jung; Kwon, Oh-Yun; Yi, Chung-Hwi; Jeon, Hye-Seon; Oh, Jae-Seop; Cynn, Heon-Seock; Weon, Jong-Hyuck

    2011-01-01

    Context: To improve trunk stability or trunk muscle strength, many athletic trainers and physiotherapists use various types of unstable equipment for training. The round foam roll is one of those unstable pieces of equipment and may be useful for improving trunk stability. Objective: To assess the effect of the supporting surface (floor versus round foam roll) on the activity of abdominal muscles during a single-legged hold exercise performed in the hook-lying position on the floor and on a round foam roll. Design: Crossover study. Setting: University research laboratory. Patients or Other Participants: Nineteen healthy volunteers (11 men, 8 women) from a university population. Interventions : The participants were instructed to perform a single-legged hold exercise while in the hook-lying position on the floor (stable surface) and on a round foam roll (unstable surface). Main Outcome Measure(s): Surface electromyography (EMG) signals were recorded from the bilateral rectus abdominis, internal oblique, and external oblique muscles. Dependent variables were examined with a paired t test. Results: The EMG activities in all abdominal muscles were greater during the single-legged hold exercise performed on the round foam roll than on the stable surface. Conclusions: The single-legged hold exercise in the hook-lying position on an unstable supporting surface induced greater abdominal muscle EMG amplitude than the same exercise performed on a stable supporting surface. These results suggest that performing the single-legged hold exercise while in the hook-lying position on a round foam roll is useful for activating the abdominal muscles. PMID:21944072

  9. Skeletal muscle overexpression of nicotinamide phosphoribosyl transferase in mice coupled with voluntary exercise augments exercise endurance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheila R. Costford

    2018-01-01

    Conclusions: Our studies have unveiled a fascinating interaction between elevated NAMPT activity in skeletal muscle and voluntary exercise that was manifest as a striking improvement in exercise endurance.

  10. A COMPARISON OF UPPER-EXTREMITY REACTION FORCES BETWEEN THE YURCHENKO VAULT AND FLOOR EXERCISE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew Kirk Seeley

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to examine reaction forces transmitted to the upper extremities of high-level gymnasts during the round-off phase of the Yurchenko vault. A secondary purpose of this study was to compare reaction forces during the Yurchenko vault to reaction forces observed in a tumbling pass during the floor exercise. Ten high-level, female gymnasts volunteered to participate. Conditions of the independent variable were the Yurchenko vault and floor exercise; dependent variables were peak vertical and peak anterior-posterior reaction forces. Each participant performed three trials of both conditions with the trail hand contacting a force platform. Vertical and anterior-posterior reaction forces, normalized to body weight, were greater (p < 0.05 during the round-off phase of the Yurchenko vault (2.38 than during the floor exercise round-off (2.15. Vertical reaction forces during the round-off phase of the Yurchenko vault and floor exercise round-off are similar to reaction forces transmitted to upper extremities during other gymnastic skills and ground reaction forces transmitted to lower extremities while running and walking at various speeds. Results of this study reveal a need for further research considering methods aimed at reducing reaction forces transmitted to the upper extremities during the Yurchenko vault and floor exercise.

  11. Efeito de um programa de exercícios para o fortalecimento dos músculos do assoalho pélvico de multíparas The effect of an exercise program to strengthen pelvic floor muscles in multiparous women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thaís Rocha Assis

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVOS: Investigar o efeito de um programa individualizado e supervisionado de exercícios para os músculos do assoalho pélvico (MAP no pós-parto de multíparas e verificar a correlação entre dois métodos de medida de força dos MAP. MÉTODOS: Conduziu-se um ensaio clínico aberto em que foram incluídas puérperas, multíparas com idade entre 18 e 35 anos. A amostra foi de 23 puérperas divididas em dois grupos: Grupo Intervenção (GI, n=11 e Grupo Controle (GC, n=12. As puérperas do GI participaram de um programa de exercícios para os MAP durante oito semanas, com frequência de duas vezes por semana. As puérperas do GC não receberam orientação quanto à prática de exercícios. A força dos MAP foi medida em duas oportunidades, utilizando-se a palpação vaginal digital e o perineômetro. A análise estatística foi realizada através dos seguintes testes: exato de Fisher, do c², t de Student, Kolmogov-Smirnov para duas amostras e coeficiente de correlação de Pearson. Foi considerado como significativo pPURPOSES: To investigate the effect of an individualized and supervised exercise program for the pelvic floor muscles (PFM in the postpartum period of multiparous women, and to verify the correlation between two methods used to assess PFM strength. METHODS: An open clinical trial was performed with puerperal, multiparous women aged 18 to 35 years. The sample consisted of 23 puerperal women divided into two groups: Intervention Group (IG, n=11 and Control Group (CG, n=12. The puerperal women in IG participated in an eight-week PFM exercise program, twice a week. The puerperal women in CG did not receive any recommendations regarding exercise. PFM strength was assessed using digital vaginal palpation and a perineometer. The statistical analysis was performed using the following tests: Fisher's exact, c², Student's t, Kolmogorov-Smirnov for two samples, and Pearson's correlation coefficient. Significance was defined as p<0

  12. Dose-Effect Relationships for Individual Pelvic Floor Muscles and Anorectal Complaints After Prostate Radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smeenk, Robert Jan; Hoffmann, Aswin L.; Hopman, Wim P.M.; Lin, Emile N.J. Th. van; Kaanders, Johannes H.A.M.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To delineate the individual pelvic floor muscles considered to be involved in anorectal toxicity and to investigate dose-effect relationships for fecal incontinence-related complaints after prostate radiotherapy (RT). Methods and Materials: In 48 patients treated for localized prostate cancer, the internal anal sphincter (IAS) muscle, the external anal sphincter (EAS) muscle, the puborectalis muscle (PRM), and the levator ani muscles (LAM) in addition to the anal wall (Awall) and rectal wall (Rwall) were retrospectively delineated on planning computed tomography scans. Dose parameters were obtained and compared between patients with and without fecal urgency, incontinence, and frequency. Dose-effect curves were constructed. Finally, the effect of an endorectal balloon, which was applied in 28 patients, was investigated. Results: The total volume of the pelvic floor muscles together was about three times that of the Awall. The PRM was exposed to the highest RT dose, whereas the EAS received the lowest dose. Several anal and rectal dose parameters, as well as doses to all separate pelvic floor muscles, were associated with urgency, while incontinence was associated mainly with doses to the EAS and PRM. Based on the dose-effect curves, the following constraints regarding mean doses could be deduced to reduce the risk of urgency: ≤30 Gy to the IAS; ≤10 Gy to the EAS; ≤50 Gy to the PRM; and ≤40 Gy to the LAM. No dose-effect relationships for frequency were observed. Patients treated with an endorectal balloon reported significantly less urgency and incontinence, while their treatment plans showed significantly lower doses to the Awall, Rwall, and all pelvic floor muscles. Conclusions: Incontinence-related complaints show specific dose-effect relationships to individual pelvic floor muscles. Dose constraints for each muscle can be identified for RT planning. When only the Awall is delineated, substantial components of the continence apparatus are

  13. Dose-Effect Relationships for Individual Pelvic Floor Muscles and Anorectal Complaints After Prostate Radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smeenk, Robert Jan, E-mail: r.smeenk@rther.umcn.nl [Department of Radiation Oncology, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Hoffmann, Aswin L. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Hopman, Wim P.M. [Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Lin, Emile N.J. Th. van; Kaanders, Johannes H.A.M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen (Netherlands)

    2012-06-01

    Purpose: To delineate the individual pelvic floor muscles considered to be involved in anorectal toxicity and to investigate dose-effect relationships for fecal incontinence-related complaints after prostate radiotherapy (RT). Methods and Materials: In 48 patients treated for localized prostate cancer, the internal anal sphincter (IAS) muscle, the external anal sphincter (EAS) muscle, the puborectalis muscle (PRM), and the levator ani muscles (LAM) in addition to the anal wall (Awall) and rectal wall (Rwall) were retrospectively delineated on planning computed tomography scans. Dose parameters were obtained and compared between patients with and without fecal urgency, incontinence, and frequency. Dose-effect curves were constructed. Finally, the effect of an endorectal balloon, which was applied in 28 patients, was investigated. Results: The total volume of the pelvic floor muscles together was about three times that of the Awall. The PRM was exposed to the highest RT dose, whereas the EAS received the lowest dose. Several anal and rectal dose parameters, as well as doses to all separate pelvic floor muscles, were associated with urgency, while incontinence was associated mainly with doses to the EAS and PRM. Based on the dose-effect curves, the following constraints regarding mean doses could be deduced to reduce the risk of urgency: {<=}30 Gy to the IAS; {<=}10 Gy to the EAS; {<=}50 Gy to the PRM; and {<=}40 Gy to the LAM. No dose-effect relationships for frequency were observed. Patients treated with an endorectal balloon reported significantly less urgency and incontinence, while their treatment plans showed significantly lower doses to the Awall, Rwall, and all pelvic floor muscles. Conclusions: Incontinence-related complaints show specific dose-effect relationships to individual pelvic floor muscles. Dose constraints for each muscle can be identified for RT planning. When only the Awall is delineated, substantial components of the continence apparatus are

  14. Numerical simulation of the damage evolution in the pelvic floor muscles during childbirth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Dulce A; Parente, Marco P L; Calvo, Begoña; Mascarenhas, Teresa; Natal Jorge, Renato M

    2016-02-29

    Several studies have shown that pelvic floor injuries during a vaginal delivery can be considered a significant factor in the development of pelvic floor dysfunction. Such disorders include a group of conditions affecting women like urinary incontinence, pelvic organ prolapse and fecal incontinence. Numerical simulations are valuable tools that are contributing to the clarification of the mechanisms behind pelvic floor disorders. The aim of this work is to propose a mechanical model implemented in the finite element method context to estimate the damage in the pelvic floor muscles by mechanical effects during a vaginal delivery of a fetus in vertex presentation and occipitoanterior position. The constitutive model adopted has already been successfully used in the simulation of childbirth and the structural damage model added has previously been applied to characterize the damage process in biological soft tissues undergoing finite deformations. The constitutive parameters were fit to experimental data available in the literature and the final proposed material model is suitable to estimate the mechanical damage in the pelvic floor muscle during a vaginal delivery. The computational model predicts that even an apparently uneventful vaginal delivery inflicts injuries to the pelvic floor muscles, particularly during the extension of the fetus head, having been obtained more than 10% of damaged fibers. As a clinical evidence, the present work allows to conclude that the puborectalis component of the levator ani muscle is the most prone to damage. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Factors influencing long-term adherence to pelvic floor exercises in women with urinary incontinence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venegas, Mónica; Carrasco, Bernardita; Casas-Cordero, Romina

    2018-03-01

    To ensure the effectiveness of Physical Therapy for urinary incontinence (UI), it is crucial that patients adhere to treatment in both the long and the short term. Treatment adherence may prevent symptom progression and the need for surgery, which is associated with higher costs and potential complications. Adherence is defined as carrying out a recommended behavioral modification or change. The World Health Organization (WHO) has established that adherence is a multifactorial phenomenon determined by the interaction of five dimensions, which include diverse factors that affect long-term adherence on many levels. To identify the factors that influence long-term adherence to pelvic floor exercises in women with UI. Observational, descriptive, cross-sectional study. The sample was recruited from the "Centro Integral de Reeducación de Piso Pélvico" (CIREP), and included 61 women treated for UI at the center in 2014 and 2015. Participants completed a self-administered, 28-item questionnaire developed for this study based on the WHO five dimensions. Data analysis was performed using STATA 13.0 software. Having performed pelvic floor home exercises after discharge from Physical Therapy was significantly associated with self-rated treatment adherence (P pelvic floor exercise program (P pelvic floor exercises in women with UI; forgetting to do the exercises and boredom with the exercises were the factors most strongly related to low treatment adherence, while motivation and commitment were associated with high adherence in this population. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. The pelvic floor muscles: muscle thickness in healthy and urinary-incontinent women measured by perineal ultrasonography with reference to the effect of pelvic floor training. Estrogen receptor studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bernstein, Inge Thomsen

    1997-01-01

    , a method for visualization and measurement of thickness of the pelvic floor muscle, was developed and evaluated. This method was used to gain information on the thickness of the pelvic floor muscles in younger physiotherapists, healthy women, and women suffering from urinary incontinence, and to evaluate....... The muscle increment during contraction decreased significantly with age, probably reflecting a stronger pelvic floor or a better awareness of pelvic floor function in the younger women. Incontinent women had a thinner pelvic floor muscle compared to healthy women. Hypertrophy of the muscles was demonstrated......-incontinent women. Subjectively, 60% of the women gained a positive effect of the training. In spite of the fact that training increased muscle thickness and the increment of muscle thickness during contraction, no correlation between these parameters and subjective improvement or reduced urine loss in the pad...

  17. [Pelvic floor muscle training with and without functional electrical stimulation as treatment for stress urinary incontinence].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eyjólfsdóttir, Halldóra; Ragnarsdóttir, María; Geirsson, Gudmundur

    2009-09-01

    Twelve to 55% of women experience stress urinary incontinence at some time during their lifetime. To compare the effectiveness of pelvic floor muscle training with and without electrical stimulation in treatment of stress urinary incontinence. Participants were 24 women, 27-73 years of age, diagnosed with stress urinary incontinence. Exclusion criteria were pregnancy and urge urinary incontinence. These participants were randomly divided into group 1 and 2. Both groups trained 15 min. twice a day for 9 weeks. Group 2 used simultaneously intermittent electrical stimulation. The pelvic floor muscles were evaluated using the Oxford scale, vaginal palpation, and by electromyogram, (Myomed 930, Enraf Nonius). The quantity and frequency of urinary incontinence episodes was evaluated using a questionnaire and a VAS scale before and after the treatment. The groups were demographically similar, except group 2 was significantly younger. Both groups had significantly increased pelvic floor muscle strength (p=0.007; p=0.005 respectively) after the treatment and 70% of all the women had reduced or no stress urinary incontinence. Group 2 had significantly (p=0.013) better relaxation post treatment. Pelvic floor muscle training is an effective treatment for stress urinary incontinence, but electrical stimulation gave no additional effect for this patient group. The significantly lower relaxation threshold in group 2 indicates that electrical stimulation could be a possible treatment for symptoms caused by hypertensive pelvic floor muscles.

  18. Pelvic Floor Muscle Training Instruction to Control Urinary Incontinence and its Resulting Stress, Anxiety and Depression in Patients with Multiple Sclerosis

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    Rafii

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Background Urinary disorders are common problems in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS. Urinary incontinence largely affects the physical, social and emotional characteristics and activities of such patients. Objectives The current study aimed to identify the effect of pelvic floor muscle training on urinary incontinence and its resulting stress, anxiety and depression in patients with MS. Methods The present clinical trial with a pre-post design was conducted on 50 patients with MS referring to the MS clinic of Imam Khomeini hospital in Tehran, Iran, selected by convenience sampling method. Participants received instructions on pelvic floor muscle exercises and then practiced for three consecutive months. The international consultation on incontinence questionnaire-urinary incontinence short form (ICIQ-UI-SF was used to measure participants' urinary incontinence, and the 21-item depression, anxiety and stress scale (DASS-21 to measure their depression, anxiety and stress, both before the intervention and at the end of the third month of exercising. The obtained data were analyzed by SPSS16 using descriptive statistics and the dependent t test. Results About 45 (90% participants practiced pelvic floor muscle exercises until the end of the third month. The frequency and amount of urine leakage and the effect of urinary incontinence on the quality of life differed significantly in the patients after the instructions compared to the status before the intervention (P < 0.001. The mean score of stress (P < 0.001, anxiety (P = 0.04 and depression (P = 0.003 decreased significantly after the intervention. Conclusions According to the findings, instructing pelvic floor muscle exercises was effective in reducing urinary incontinence and its resulting stress, anxiety and depression in patients with MS. These exercises were recommended as a non-pharmacological, non-invasive and cost-effective method to control urinary incontinence in patients with MS.

  19. Bioelectrical activity of the pelvic floor muscles during synchronous whole-body vibration--a randomized controlled study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stania, Magdalena; Chmielewska, Daria; Kwaśna, Krystyna; Smykla, Agnieszka; Taradaj, Jakub; Juras, Grzegorz

    2015-10-24

    More and more frequently stress urinary incontinence affects young healthy women. Hence, early implementation of effective preventive strategies in nulliparous continent women is essential, including pelvic floor muscle training. An initial evaluation based on the bioelectrical activity of the pelvic floor muscles (PFM) during whole-body vibration (WBV) would help to devise the best individualized training for prevention of stress urinary incontinence in woman. We hypothesized that synchronous WBV enhances bioelectrical activity of the PFM which depends on vibration frequency and peak-to-peak vibration displacement. The sample consisted of 36 nulliparous continent women randomly allocated to three comparative groups. Group I and II subjects participated in synchronous whole-body vibrations on a vibration platform; the frequency and peak-to-peak displacement of vibration were set individually for each group. Control participants performed exercises similar to those used in the study groups but without the concurrent application of vibrations. Pelvic floor surface electromyography (sEMG) activity was recorded using a vaginal probe during three experimental trials limited to 30s, 60s and 90 s. The mean amplitude and variability of the signal were normalized to the Maximal Voluntary Contraction - MVC. Friedman's two-way ANOVA revealed a statistically significant difference in the mean normalized amplitudes (%MVC) of the sEMG signal from the PFM during 60s- and 90 s-trials between the group exposed to high-intensity WBV and control participants (p continent women. Prolonged maintenance of a static position significantly decreases the variability of sEMG signal amplitude independent of whole-body vibrations. Single whole-body vibrations in nulliparous continent women does not cause pelvic floor muscle fatigue. The trial was registered in the Australian and New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry (no. ACTRN12615000966594); registration date: 15/09/2015.

  20. The effect of water immersion delivery on the strength of pelvic floor muscle and pelvic floor disorders during postpartum period: An experimental study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yun; Xiao, Mei; Tang, Fei; Tang, Wan; Yin, Heng; Sun, Guo-Qiang; Lin, Yin; Zhou, Yong; Luo, Yan; Li, Lu-Man; Tan, Zhi-Hua

    2017-10-01

    Water immersion delivery is a non-pharmacological approach to ease labor pain. This paper aims to investigate the effect of water immersion delivery on increasing strength of pelvic floor muscle (PFM) and relieving pelvic floor disorders (PFDs) during postpartum period. A total of 2749 vaginal-delivery primiparas in postpartum 6-8 weeks were selected as research objects. Based on the modes of delivery, 600 patients were assigned into water immersion delivery group, 2149 were assigned into conventional delivery group. The scales of PFM strength and pelvic organ prolapsed (POP) were determined by specially trained personnel using digital palpation, and the symptoms of stress urinary incontinence (SUI) were investigated by questionnaire survey. The weak PFM strength was improved by doing Kegel exercise at home for 6-8 weeks. We found that ①The rate of episiotomy in water immersion delivery group was 77.50% (465/600), which was lower than that in conventional delivery group (84.69%, 1820/2149) (P  .05); ④The rates of vaginal wall prolapsed and uterus prolapsed were 29.83% (179/600) and 2.83% (17/600) in water immersion delivery group and 30.95% (665/2149) and 4.37% (94/2149) in the conventional delivery group, wherein the intergroup difference was not significant (P > .05). ⑤After Kegel exercise, the strength of PFM was promoted (P < .01). Water immersion delivery has been proved to a beneficial alternative method for conventional delivery method. This delivery mode is associated with fewer episiotomy rate, and avoiding episiotomy is beneficial for maintaining PFM strength of women in postpartum 6-8 weeks. The strength of PFM during postpartum period can be improved by doing Kegel exercise at home.

  1. Comparison of techniques used for functional evaluation of pelvic floor muscles

    OpenAIRE

    Christiane Kelen Lucena da Costa; Maria Helena Constantino Spirydes; Maria Bernardete Cordeiro de Sousa

    2017-01-01

    Objective: To identify and discuss techniques for evaluation of pelvic floor muscles (PFM) focusing on the most used and accessible techniques in health care. Methods: This is a quantitative exploratory and descriptive applied research. Data were collected from March to June 2016 at a higher education institution in the city of João Pessoa, Paraíba, Brazil. Initially, 31 healthy young women were submitted to pelvic floor evaluation using the following methods: PERFECT, vaginal cones, and peri...

  2. Tissue Selective Androgen Receptor Modulators (SARMs) Increase Pelvic Floor Muscle Mass in Ovariectomized Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponnusamy, Suriyan; Sullivan, Ryan D; Thiyagarajan, Thirumagal; Tillmann, Heather; Getzenberg, Robert H; Narayanan, Ramesh

    2017-03-01

    Stress urinary incontinence (SUI), a prevalent condition, is represented by an involuntary leakage of urine that results, at least in part, from weakened or damaged pelvic floor muscles and is triggered by physical stress. Current treatment options are limited with no oral therapies available. The pelvic floor is rich in androgen receptor and molecules with anabolic activity including selective androgen receptor modulators (SARMs) may serve as therapeutic options for individuals with SUI. In this study, two SARMs (GTx-024 and GTx-027) were evaluated in a post-menopausal animal model in order to determine their effect on pelvic floor muscles. Female C57BL/6 mice were ovariectomized and their pelvic muscles allowed to regress. The animals were then treated with vehicle or doses of GTx-024 or GTx-027. Animal total body weight, lean body mass, and pelvic floor muscle weights were measured along with the expression of genes associated with muscle catabolism. Treatment with the SARMs resulted in a restoration of the pelvic muscles to the sham-operated weight. Coordinately, the induction of genes associated with muscle catabolism was inhibited. Although a trend was observed towards an increase in total lean body mass in the SARM-treated groups, no significant differences were detected. Treatment of an ovariectomized mouse model with SARMs resulted in an increase in pelvic floor muscles, which may translate to an improvement of symptoms associated with SUI and serves as the basis for evaluating their clinical use. J. Cell. Biochem. 118: 640-646, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Core muscle activation during dynamic upper limb exercises in women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarnanen, Sami P; Siekkinen, Kirsti M; Häkkinen, Arja H; Mälkiä, Esko A; Kautiainen, Hannu J; Ylinen, Jari J

    2012-12-01

    Although several everyday functions and sporting activities demand controlled use of the abdominal and back muscles while working with the upper limbs, the activity of core muscles during dynamic upper limb exercises in the standing position has not been studied extensively. The purpose of this cross-sectional study was to examine abdominal and back muscle activity during dynamic upper limb exercises while standing and to evaluate whether dynamic exercises are appropriate for strengthening muscles. The activation of the rectus abdominis, obliquus externus abdominis, longissimus, and multifidus muscles during dynamic bilateral or unilateral shoulder exercises with or without fixation of the pelvis was measured in 20 healthy women using surface electromyography. Trunk muscle activation during isometric maximum contraction was used as a comparative reference. With bilateral shoulder extension and unilateral shoulder horizontal adduction, abdominal muscle activity was >60% of activity during reference exercises. With unilateral shoulder horizontal abduction and shoulder extension exercises, back muscle activity was >60% of the activity level reference exercise. Muscle activation levels were 35-64% lower during shoulder horizontal adduction and abduction without fixation compared with exercises with fixation. The results indicate that upper limb exercises performed in the standing position are effective for activating core muscles. Bilateral and unilateral shoulder extension and unilateral shoulder horizontal abduction and adduction with the pelvis fixed elicited the greatest activity of the core muscles.

  4. Relative Activity of Abdominal Muscles during Commonly Prescribed Strengthening Exercises.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willett, Gilbert M.; Hyde, Jennifer E.; Uhrlaub, Michael B.; Wendel, Cara L.; Karst, Gregory M.

    2001-01-01

    Examined the relative electromyographic (EMG) activity of upper and lower rectus abdominis (LRA) and external oblique (EOA) muscles during five abdominal strengthening exercises. Isometric and dynamic EMG data indicated that abdominal strengthening exercises activated various abdominal muscle groups. For the LRA and EOA muscle groups, there were…

  5. Comparison of pelvic floor muscle strength evaluations in nulliparous and primiparous women: a prospective study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mônica Orsi Gameiro

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: This study aimed to compare the pelvic floor muscle strength of nulliparous and primiparous women. METHODS: A total of 100 women were prospectively distributed into two groups: Group 1 (G1 (n = 50 included healthy nulliparous women, and Group 2 (G2 (n = 50 included healthy primiparous women. Pelvic floor muscle strength was subjectively evaluated using transvaginal digital palpation. Pelvic floor muscle strength was objectively assessed using a portable perineometer. All of the parameters were evaluated simultaneously in G1 and were evaluated in G2 during the 20th and 36th weeks of pregnancy and 45 days after delivery. RESULTS: In G2, 14 women were excluded because they left the study before the follow-up evaluation. The median age was 23 years in G1 and 22 years in G2; there was no significant difference between the groups. The average body mass index was 21.7 kg/m² in G1 and 25.0 kg/m² in G2; there was a significant difference between the groups (p = 0.0004. In G2, transvaginal digital palpation evaluation showed significant impairments of pelvic floor muscle strength at the 36th week of pregnancy (p = 0.0006 and 45 days after vaginal delivery (p = 0.0001 compared to G1. Objective evaluations of pelvic floor muscle strength in G2 revealed a significant decrease 45 days after vaginal delivery compared to nulliparous patients. CONCLUSION: Pregnancy and vaginal delivery may cause weakness of the pelvic floor muscles.

  6. Does pelvic floor muscle contraction early after delivery cause perineal pain in postpartum women?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neels, Hedwig; De Wachter, Stefan; Wyndaele, Jean-Jacques; Wyndaele, Michel; Vermandel, Alexandra

    2017-01-01

    Pelvic floor muscle training is effective and necessary in the prevention and treatment of pelvic floor dysfunction during pregnancy and after childbirth. But because of the high prevalence of perineal pain observed in women after childbirth, many women and caregivers fear to start pelvic floor muscle training immediately after childbirth. However, it is unknown whether pelvic floor muscle contractions (PFMC) provoke perineal pain in women shortly after childbirth. Therefore, the main objective is to study whether PFMC performed immediately after childbirth is painful or not. Observational longitudinal study. Perineal pain was assessed (1-6 days and 9 weeks postpartum) using a visual analogue scale (VAS 0-10) during PFMC and during several activities of daily living (ADL), during micturition and defecation. Descriptive statistics, Wilcoxon and McNemar tests were used. A total of 233 women participated (148 primiparous and 85 multiparous). Immediately postpartum the prevalence and intensity of pain during ADL (73%; VAS 4.9 (±2.3)), micturition (47%; VAS 3.4 (±1.7)) and defecation (19%; VAS 3.6 (±2.2)) were significantly higher (all ppelvic floor muscle training shortly after childbirth. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Functional mapping of the pelvic floor and sphincter muscles from high-density surface EMG recordings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Yun; He, Jinbao; Khavari, Rose; Boone, Timothy B; Zhang, Yingchun

    2016-11-01

    Knowledge of the innervation of pelvic floor and sphincter muscles is of great importance to understanding the pathophysiology of female pelvic floor dysfunctions. This report presents our high-density intravaginal and intrarectal electromyography (EMG) probes and a comprehensive innervation zone (IZ) imaging technique based on high-density EMG readings to characterize the IZ distribution. Both intravaginal and intrarectal probes are covered with a high-density surface electromyography electrode grid (8 × 8). Surface EMG signals were acquired in ten healthy women performing maximum voluntary contractions of their pelvic floor. EMG decomposition was performed to separate motor-unit action potentials (MUAPs) and then localize their IZs. High-density surface EMG signals were successfully acquired over the vaginal and rectal surfaces. The propagation patterns of muscle activity were clearly visualized for multiple muscle groups of the pelvic floor and anal sphincter. During each contraction, up to 218 and 456 repetitions of motor units were detected by the vaginal and rectal probes, respectively. MUAPs were separated with their IZs identified at various orientations and depths. The proposed probes are capable of providing a comprehensive mapping of IZs of the pelvic floor and sphincter muscles. They can be employed as diagnostic and preventative tools in clinical practices.

  8. Training through gametherapy promotes coactivation of the pelvic floor and abdominal muscles in young women, nulliparous and continents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Valeria Regina; Riccetto, Cássio Luis Zanettini; Martinho, Natalia Miguel; Marques, Joseane; Carvalho, Leonardo Cesar; Botelho, Simone

    2016-01-01

    several studies have been investigated co-activation can enhance the effectveness of PFM training protocols allowing preventive and therapeutic goals in pelvic floor dysfunctions. The objective of the present study was to investigate if an abdominal-pelvic protocol of training (APT) using gametherapy would allow co-activation of PFM and transversus abdominis/oblique internal (TrA/OI) muscles. Twenty-five nulliparous, continent, young females, with median age 24.76 (±3.76) years were evaluated using digital palpation (DP) of PFM and surfasse electromyography of PFM and TrA/OI simultaneously, during maximal voluntary contraction (MVC), alternating PFM and TrA/OI contraction requests. All women participated on a supervised program of APT using gametherapy, that included exercises of pelvic mobilization associated to contraction of TrA/OI muscles oriented by virtual games, for 30 minutes, three times a week, in a total of 10 sessions. Electromyographic data were processed and analyzed by ANOVA - analysis of variance. When MVC of TrA/OI was solicited, it was observed simultaneous increase of electromyographic activity of PFM (p=0.001) following ATP. However, EMG activity did not change significantly during MVC of PFM. Training using gametherapy allowed better co-activation of pelvic floor muscles in response to contraction of TrA, in young nulliparous and continent women. Copyright© by the International Brazilian Journal of Urology.

  9. Bruxism: Is There an Indication for Muscle-Stretching Exercises?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gouw, Simone; de Wijer, Anton; Creugers, Nico Hj; Kalaykova, Stanimira I

    Bruxism is a common phenomenon involving repetitive activation of the masticatory muscles. Muscle-stretching exercises are a recommended part of several international guidelines for musculoskeletal disorders and may be effective in management of the jaw muscle activity that gives rise to bruxism. However, most studies of muscle-stretching exercises have mainly focused on their influence on performance (eg, range of motion, coordination, and muscle strength) of the limb or trunk muscles of healthy individuals or individuals with sports-related injuries. Very few have investigated stretching of the human masticatory muscles and none muscle-stretching exercises in the management of (sleep) bruxism. This article reviews the literature on muscle-stretching exercises and their potential role in the management of sleep bruxism or its consequences in the musculoskeletal system.

  10. Pelvic floor muscle strength in primiparous women according to the delivery type: cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendes, Edilaine de Paula Batista; Oliveira, Sonia Maria Junqueira Vasconcellos de; Caroci, Adriana de Souza; Francisco, Adriana Amorim; Oliveira, Sheyla Guimaraes; Silva, Renata Luana da

    2016-08-15

    to compare the pelvic floor muscle strength in primiparous women after normal birth and cesarean section, related to the socio-demographic characteristics, nutritional status, dyspareunia, urinary incontinence, perineal exercise in pregnancy, perineal condition and weight of the newborn. this was a cross-sectional study conducted after 50 - 70 postpartum days, with 24 primiparous women who underwent cesarean delivery and 72 who had a normal birth. The 9301 PeritronTM was used for analysis of muscle strength. The mean muscle strength was compared between the groups by two-way analysis of variance. the pelvic floor muscle strength was 24.0 cmH2O (±16.2) and 25.4 cmH2O (±14.7) in postpartum primiparous women after normal birth and cesarean section, respectively, with no significant difference. The muscular strength was greater in postpartum women with ≥ 12 years of study (42.0 ±26.3 versus 14.6 ±7.7 cmH2O; p= 0.036) and in those who performed perineal exercises (42.6±25.4 11.8±4.9 vs. cmH2O; p = 0.010), compared to caesarean. There was no difference in muscle strength according to delivery type regarding nutritional status, dyspareunia, urinary incontinence, perineal condition or newborn weight. pelvic floor muscle strength does not differ between primiparous women based on the type of delivery. Postpartum women with normal births, with higher education who performed perineal exercise during pregnancy showed greater muscle strength. comparar a força muscular do assoalho pélvico em primíparas no pós-parto normal e cesariana, relacionando-a às características sociodemográficas, estado nutricional, incontinência urinária, dispareunia, exercício perineal na gestação, condição perineal e peso do recém-nascido. estudo transversal realizado entre 50 e 70 dias de pós-parto, com 24 primíparas submetidas à cesariana e 72 ao parto normal. Utilizou-se PeritronTM 9301 para análise da força muscular. Comparou-se as médias da força muscular entre os

  11. Urinary incontinence during pregnancy and postpartum. Associated risk factors and influence of pelvic floor exercises.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin-Martin, Sergio; Pascual-Fernandez, Angela; Alvarez-Colomo, Cristina; Calvo-Gonzalez, Raul; Muñoz-Moreno, Marife; Cortiñas-Gonzalez, Jose Ramon

    2014-05-01

    To determine the prevalence of urinary incontinence (UI) before pregnancy, in the third trimester and postpartum. To analyze its influence on quality of life and associated potential risk factors and the efficacy of pelvic floor exercises. Prospective study in 413 pregnant women. The modified ICIQ-SF incontinence questionnaire was given to the pregnant women at the end of the third quarter. This questionnaire was administered by telephone at 3 and 6 months postpartum. The influence of several risk factors for UI in pregnancy and postpartum were analyzed. Patients with persistent UI at 6 months postpartum were trained to do pelvic floor exercises. Patients with UI before pregnancy were excluded from the study. UI in the third trimester was 31%. Analyzed risk factors did not condition a higher percentage of UI. Prevalence of UI was 11.3% at 3 months postpartum and 6.9% at 6 months. 70% of the incontinent patients already had it during pregnancy and it appeared de novo post-delivery in 30% of the patients. Prevalence of UI after delivery was higher in women with UI in pregnancy and lower in caesarean cases. Most women improved with pelvic floor exercises. Analysed risk factors did not significantly increase UI in pregnancy. Prevalence of UI after delivery is higher in women with UI in pregnancy and lower in caesarean cases. Postpartum pelvic floor exercises for three months in patients with persistent stress UI at 6 months postpartum clearly improved the degree of continence.

  12. Exercise-induced phospho-proteins in skeletal muscle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Deshmukh, A S; Hawley, J A; Zierath, J R

    2008-01-01

    Efforts to identify exercise-induced signaling events in skeletal muscle have been influenced by ground-breaking discoveries in the insulin action field. Initial discoveries demonstrating that exercise enhances insulin sensitivity raised the possibility that contraction directly modulates insulin...

  13. Intense and exhaustive exercise induce oxidative stress in skeletal muscle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T Thirumalai

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To assess the oxidative stress and antioxidant defense system in the skeletal muscle of male albino rats subjected to strenuous exercise programme. Methods: Wistar strain albino rats were subjected to exhaustive swimming exercise programme daily for a period of five days. The thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS, conjugated dienes, superoxide dismutase, catalase, glutathione peroxidase and glutathione-S-transferase were measured in the gastrocnemius muscle of the exercised animals. Results: The elevated levels of TBARS and conjugated dienes indicated the oxidative stress in the gastrocemius muscle of the exercised animals. The depleted activity levels of superoxide dismutase, catalase, glutathione peroxidase and glutathione-S-transferase in the exercise animals indicated the increased oxidative stress and decreased antioxidative defense system in the muscle. Conclusions: The study suggests that prolonged strenuous exercise programme can induce oxidative stress and therefore an optimal level of exercise schedule should be advocated to obtain the maximum benefit of exercise programme.

  14. Rehabilitative ultrasound imaging of pelvic floor muscle function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whittaker, Jackie L; Thompson, Judith A; Teyhen, Deydre S; Hodges, Paul

    2007-08-01

    This commentary provides an overview of the current concepts and evidence related to rehabilitative ultrasound imaging of pelvic floor (levator ani) function. As this is an emerging topic, the goal is to provide a basic understanding of ultrasound imaging applications related to levator ani function: the available quantitative and qualitative information, the limitations, as well as how ultrasound imaging can be incorporated as a form of biofeedback during rehabilitation. Furthermore, as the ability to compile and compare existing evidence depends on the degree of similarity in methodology by investigators, this commentary highlights points of consideration and provides guidelines, as well as an agenda, for future investigation.

  15. The management of episiotomy technique and its effect on pelvic floor muscles during a malposition childbirth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Dulce A; Parente, Marco P L; Calvo, Begoña; Mascarenhas, Teresa; Jorge, Renato M Natal

    2017-08-01

    Vaginal childbirth is the leading cause of pelvic floor muscles injury, which contributes to pelvic floor dysfunction, being enhanced by fetal malposition. Therefore, the aim of the present study is to verify the influence of mediolateral episiotomies in the mechanics of the pelvic floor with the fetus in occiput posterior position when compared to the occiput anterior position. Numerical simulations of vaginal deliveries, with and without episiotomy, are performed based on the Finite Element Method. The biomechanical model includes the pelvic floor muscles, a surface to delimit the anterior region of the birth canal and a fetus. Fetal malposition induces greater extension of the muscle compared to the normal position, leading to increases of stretch. The faster enlargement may be responsible for a prolonged second stage of labor. Regarding the force required to achieve delivery, the difference between the analyzed cases are 35 N, which might justify the increased need of surgical interventions. Furthermore, episiotomy is essential in reducing the damage to values near the ones obtained with normal position, making the fetal position irrelevant. These biomechanical models have become extremely useful tools to provide some understanding of pelvic floor function during delivery helping in the development of preventative strategies.

  16. Muscle damage and inflammation during recovery from exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peake, Jonathan M; Neubauer, Oliver; Della Gatta, Paul A; Nosaka, Kazunori

    2017-03-01

    Unaccustomed exercise consisting of eccentric (i.e., lengthening) muscle contractions often results in muscle damage characterized by ultrastructural alterations in muscle tissue, clinical signs, and symptoms (e.g., reduced muscle strength and range of motion, increased muscle soreness and swelling, efflux of myocellular proteins). The time course of recovery following exercise-induced muscle damage depends on the extent of initial muscle damage, which in turn is influenced by the intensity and duration of exercise, joint angle/muscle length, and muscle groups used during exercise. The effects of these factors on muscle strength, soreness, and swelling are well characterized. By contrast, much less is known about how they affect intramuscular inflammation and molecular aspects of muscle adaptation/remodeling. Although inflammation has historically been viewed as detrimental for recovery from exercise, it is now generally accepted that inflammatory responses, if tightly regulated, are integral to muscle repair and regeneration. Animal studies have revealed that various cell types, including neutrophils, macrophages, mast cells, eosinophils, CD8 and T-regulatory lymphocytes, fibro-adipogenic progenitors, and pericytes help to facilitate muscle tissue regeneration. However, more research is required to determine whether these cells respond to exercise-induced muscle damage. A large body of research has investigated the efficacy of physicotherapeutic, pharmacological, and nutritional interventions for reducing the signs and symptoms of exercise-induced muscle damage, with mixed results. More research is needed to examine if/how these treatments influence inflammation and muscle remodeling during recovery from exercise. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  17. How is AMPK activity regulated in skeletal muscles during exercise?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Sebastian Beck; Rose, Adam John

    2008-01-01

    AMPK is a metabolic "master" controller activated in skeletal muscle by exercise in a time and intensity dependent manner, and has been implicated in regulating metabolic pathways in muscle during physical exercise. AMPK signaling in skeletal muscle is regulated by several systemic...... and intracellular factors and the regulation of skeletal muscle AMPK in response to exercise is the focus of this review. Specifically, the role of LKB1 and phosphatase PP2C in nucleotide-dependent activation of AMPK, and ionized calcium in CaMKK-dependent activation of AMPK in working muscle is discussed. We also...

  18. Videourodynamic results in stress urinary incontinence patients after pelvic floor muscle training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, Hann-Chorng

    2003-01-01

    The mechanism by which clinical improvement occurs through pelvic floor muscle training (PFMT) for genuine stress incontinence, detrusor instability, or mixed incontinence is not established. Videourodynamic assessment of the anatomical changes of the pelvic floor muscles has not been reported. This study investigated the anatomical change of bladder base descent as well as the functional changes of bladder and urethra after PFMT using videourodynamic study. Forty women aged 35 to 67 years (median 45 years) with stress urinary incontinence (SUI) with or without urgency incontinence were enrolled in a PFMT program consisting of a structured 12-week treatment course. Videourodynamic study, urethral pressure profilometry (UPP), and abdominal leak point pressure study were performed at baseline and after PFMT. Videourodynamic changes and UPP results were also compared between patients with successful treatment and those with treatment failure. Treatment was successful in 22 patients (55%) and failed in 18 patients. After PFMT, the volume at bladder sensation and the cystometric capacity increased significantly in patients with successful treatment. In all patients, the mean bladder neck descent was significantly reduced during stress compared with that at rest. When pelvic floor contractions were performed voluntarily, the bladder neck elevation was significantly greater after PFMT than at baseline. Patients with successful treatment had a significantly greater bladder neck elevation and pelvic floor contraction pressure both before and after PFMT compared to patients who failed treatment. No significant difference was found in UPP parameters such as maximal urethral closure pressure, functional profile length, or pressure transmission ratio. The results of this study indicate that pelvic floor muscles can be strengthened by PFMT in about one-half of women with SUI as shown by the increased bladder neck elevation during voluntary pelvic floor contraction in

  19. Feedback or biofeedback to augment pelvic floor muscle training for urinary incontinence in women

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Herderschee, Roselien; Hay-Smith, E. Jean C.; Herbison, G. Peter; Roovers, Jan Paul; Heineman, Maas Jan

    2011-01-01

    Pelvic floor muscle training (PFMT) is an effective treatment for stress urinary incontinence in women. Whilst most of the PFMT trials have been done in women with stress urinary incontinence, there is also some trial evidence that PFMT is effective for urgency urinary incontinence and mixed urinary

  20. Pelvic floor muscle function in a general population of women with and without pelvic organ prolapse

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.C.P. Slieker-ten Hove (Marijke); A.L. Pool-Goudzwaard (Annelies); M.J.C. Eijkemans (René); R.P.M. Steegers-Theunissen (Régine); C.W. Burger (Curt); M.E. Vierhout (Mark)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractIntroduction and hypothesis: This study aims to examine the relationship between pelvic floor muscle function (PFMF) and pelvic organ prolapse (POP) in a general female population. Methods: Cross-sectional study on women aged 45-85 years. Validated questionnaires were used to assess

  1. Pelvic floor muscle strength and body self-perception among Brazilian pregnant women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sacomori, Cinara; Cardoso, Fernando Luiz; Vanderlinde, Cristiane

    2010-12-01

    To examine the relationship between pelvic floor muscle strength and body self-perception variables in pregnant women; and, more specifically, to determine the influence of the number of pregnancies (primigravidas vs multigravidas) on the strength of contraction of the pelvic floor muscles and on the body self-perception of pregnant women. Comparative cross-sectional research. Public health centres from Florianópolis, Brazil. Thirty-five pregnant women (18 primigravidas, 17 multigravidas) with a mean age of 25.5 (standard deviation 5.7) years. Pelvic floor strength measured through manual palpation, and body self-perception using the Questionnaire of Corporeality and Human Sexuality. Pelvic floor muscle strength was positively correlated with schooling [rho (ρ)=0.496] and body self-perception variables: finding the body beautiful (ρ=0.476), finding the body sexy (ρ=0.520), feeling that others find them sexy (ρ=0.364), finding the body proportional (ρ=0.412), touching the body generally (ρ=0.554) and recognising the smell of the body (ρ=0.454). Primigravidas found their bodies more beautiful and were more satisfied with their bodies. On a scale of 0 to 6, multigravid participants expressed a greater wish than primigravid participants to be thinner (median difference 2, 95% confidence interval 0-3, P=0.03). Pelvic floor strength did not differ between groups. The results suggest a relationship between pelvic floor muscle strength and body self-perception. Professionals involved in women's health may have a role in helping their patients to understand their bodies. Copyright © 2010 Chartered Society of Physiotherapy. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Relationship between ultrasonography and electromyography measurement of abdominal muscles when activated with and without pelvis floor muscles contraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tahan, N; Arab, A M; Arzani, P; Rahimi, F

    2013-12-01

    The importance of the abdominal musculature in spine stability, has promoted the development of a variety of studies. Ultrasound imaging (UI) is a valuable tool which, when applied appropriately, has the potential to provide significant insight into abdominal muscle contraction. Limited studies have been taken place regarding the relationship between ultrasound measures of muscle thickening and electromyography (EMG) measures of activation. Inconsistent results, however, have been reported. Based on previous studies association between abdominal muscle activation and thickening may be affected by contraction level. The aims of this study were to measure the relationship between abdominal muscle thickness and abdominal muscles amplitude in different levels of abdominal muscles contraction. The research was carried on with a convenience sampling at the Physical Therapy Department of University of Social Welfare and Rehabilitation Sciences. Thirty healthy participants volunteered for this study. Muscle thickness right transversus abdominis (TrA) and obliqus internus (OI) muscles in abdominal hallowing maneuvers with and without pelvic floor muscle (PFM) contraction has been measured. Additionally, surface EMG of the right TrA/IO muscles was recorded. A hardware electrical part that acts as trigger system was used to record the activities of abdominal muscles in UI and EMG synchronously. Thickness change, normalized thickness and maximum amplitude abdominal muscles were used for statistical analysis. Correlations between the thickness change and amplitude measures were -0.03 -- 0.38 for TrA/IO. The Correlations between the normalized thickness and amplitude measures were -0.04--0.26 for TrA/IO. There is not clear relationship between increases in abdominal muscle activation and corresponding measures of thickening during abdominal muscle contraction. Changes in thickness of deep abdominal muscle cannot be used to indicate changes in the electrical activity in this

  3. How is AMPK activity regulated in skeletal muscles during exercise?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Sebastian Beck; Rose, Adam John

    2008-01-01

    AMPK is a metabolic "master" controller activated in skeletal muscle by exercise in a time and intensity dependent manner, and has been implicated in regulating metabolic pathways in muscle during physical exercise. AMPK signaling in skeletal muscle is regulated by several systemic...... and intracellular factors and the regulation of skeletal muscle AMPK in response to exercise is the focus of this review. Specifically, the role of LKB1 and phosphatase PP2C in nucleotide-dependent activation of AMPK, and ionized calcium in CaMKK-dependent activation of AMPK in working muscle is discussed. We also...... discuss the influence of reactive oxygen species produced within the muscle as well as muscle glycogen and TAK1 in regulating AMPK during exercise. Currently, during intensive contraction, activation of alpha2-AMPK seems mainly to rely on AMP accumulating from ATP-hydrolysis whereas calcium signaling may...

  4. Perceived loading and muscle activity during hip strengthening exercises

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brandt, Mikkel; Jakobsen, Markus Due; Thorborg, Kristian

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Decreased hip muscle strength is frequently reported in patients with hip injury or pathology. Furthermore, soccer players suffering from groin injury show decreased strength of hip muscles. Estimating 10-repetition maximum can be time-consuming and difficult, thus, using the Borg...... hip muscle activity during hip abduction and hip adduction exercises using elastic resistance and isotonic machines, using electromyography (EMG). METHODS: EMG activity was recorded from 11 muscles at the hip, thigh and trunk during hip adduction and hip abduction exercises in 16 untrained women...... resistance training of the hip adductor and hip abductor muscles. Although elastic resistance and exercise machine seem equally effective for recruiting muscle activity of the hip adductors, the elastic resistance condition was able to demonstrate greater muscle recruitment than the exercise machine during...

  5. Effect of muscle acidity on muscle metabolism and fatigue during intense exercise in man

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bangsbo, Jens; Madsen, K.; Kiens, Bente

    1996-01-01

    1. The aim of this study was to examine the effect of muscle pH on muscle metabolism and development of fatigue during intense exercise. 2. Seven subjects performed intense exhaustive leg exercise on two occasions: with and without preceding intense intermittent arm exercise leading to high or mo...

  6. Effects of exercise on insulin binding to human muscle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonen, A.; Tan, M.H.; Clune, P.; Kirby, R.L.

    1985-01-01

    A procedure was developed to measure insulin binding to human skeletal muscle obtained via the percutaneous muscle biopsy technique. With this method the effects of exercise on insulin binding were investigated. Subjects (n = 9) exercised for 60 min on a bicycle ergometer at intensities ranging from 20-86% maximum O 2 consumption (VO 2 max). Blood samples were obtained before, during, and after exercise and analyzed for glucose and insulin. Muscle samples (250 mg) for the vastus lateralis were obtained 30 min before exercise, at the end of exercise, and 60 min after exercise. Two subjects rested during the experimental period. There was no linear relationship between exercise intensities and the changes in insulin binding to human muscle. At rest (n = 2) and at exercise intensities below 60% VO 2 max (n = 5) no change in insulin binding occurred (P greater than 0.05). However, when exercise occurred at greater than or equal to 69% VO 2 max (n = 4), a pronounced decrement in insulin binding (30-50%) was observed (P less than 0.05). This persisted for 60 min after exercise. These results indicate that insulin binding in human muscle is not altered by 60 min of exercise at less than or equal to 60% VO 2 max but that a marked decrement occurs when exercise is greater than or equal to 69% VO 2 max

  7. The development and psychometric evaluation of a self-efficacy scale for practicing pelvic floor exercises

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cinara Sacomori

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Self-efficacy has been shown to be a predictor of many health-related behaviors, including the practice of pelvic floor exercises with a focus on prevention or cure. OBJECTIVES: To describe the process of construction and the psychometric properties of the scale of self-efficacy for the practice of pelvic floor exercises (EAPEAP. METHOD: A cross-sectional study of validation was carried out with 81 from community and 96 postpartum women, 54.8% of them complained of urinary leakage. An exploratory factor analysis and internal consistency analysis was performed. To check predictive capacity, we analyzed the adherence at 3 months post - intervention and compared the scores of self-efficacy between adherent and non-adherent women. Reliability was analyzed by split half procedure. RESULTS: The instrument showed α=0.923, and revealed three factors: performance expectation considering the action, performance expectation considering the preparation for action and outcome expectations. These factors accounted for 65.32% of the total variance. The instrument was able to differentiate between women who adhere and have not adhered to the exercises (U=352, p=0.013 and there was strong correlation between the two halves of the instrument (rho=0.889, p<0.001. CONCLUSION: The scale is a valid and reliable tool to measure self-efficacy to practice pelvic floor exercises.

  8. Use of pelvic floor ultrasound to assess pelvic floor muscle function in Urological Chronic Pelvic Pain Syndrome in men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Seth N; Morin, Melanie; Binik, Yitzchak M; Khalife, Samir; Carrier, Serge

    2011-11-01

    An important cause or maintaining factor for pain in Urological Chronic Pelvic Pain Syndrome (UCPPS) may be pelvic floor muscle (PFM) dysfunction, which may also be implicated in sexual dysfunction and influenced by psychosocial factors. Pelvic floor ultrasound is a noninvasive, reliable, and relatively simple method to assess PFM morphology and function and can be assessed by the anorectal angle (ARA) and levator plate angle (LPA). The aim of the present study was to examine PFM morphology in men with UCPPS as compared with controls and to examine the correlation with pain and psychosocial measures. Our participants were 24 men with UCPPS and 26 controls. A GE Voluson E8 ultrasound probe was placed on the perineum, and three-dimensional images were taken at rest and during PFM contraction. The main outcomes were ARA and LPA at rest and contraction. Participants also completed the National Institute of Health (NIH) Chronic Prostatitis Symptom Index, Male Sexual Health Questionnaire, State Anxiety Inventory, and Pain Catastrophizing Scale. Men with UCPPS had more acute ARAs than controls both at rest and during contraction. The two groups did not differ in LPA at rest; however, men with UCPPS had significantly more acute angles during contraction and LP excursion. Acute ARAs were positively correlated with greater pain report and sexual dysfunction. Anxiety was correlated with more acute ARAs and more obtuse LPAs. Three implications can be drawn from the findings. First, ARA at rest and during contraction as well as LP angle during contraction and LPA excursion separates men with UCPPS from controls. Second, ARA at rest and during contraction was correlated with pain and sexual dysfunction, while LPA at rest was related to anxiety. Third, pelvic floor ultrasound has the potential to be a useful and objective method of assessing PFM morphology in UCPPS. © 2011 International Society for Sexual Medicine.

  9. Pelvic-floor rehabilitation, Part 2: Pelvic-floor reeducation with interferential currents and exercise in the treatment of genuine stress incontinence in postpartum women--a cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumoulin, C; Seaborne, D E; Quirion-DeGirardi, C; Sullivan, S J

    1995-12-01

    This descriptive cohort study investigated a physical therapy program of pelvic-floor neuromuscular electrostimulation (NMES) combined with exercises, with the aim of developing a simple, inexpensive, and conservative treatment for postpartum genuine stress incontinence (GSI). Eight female subjects with urodynamically established GSI persisting more than 3 months after delivery participated in the study. The subjects ranged in age from 24 to 37 years (X = 32, SD = 4.2). This was a descriptive multiple-subject cohort study. Each subject received a total of nine treatment sessions during 3 consecutive weeks, consisting of two 15-minute sessions of NMES followed by a 15-minute pelvic-floor muscle exercise program. Patients also practiced daily pelvic-floor exercises during the 3-week treatment period. The treatment intervention was measured using three separate variables. Maximum muscle contractions (pretraining, during training, and post-training) were measured indirectly as pressure, using perineometry. Urine loss pretraining and posttraining was measured by means of a Pad test. Self-reported frequency of incontinence was recorded daily throughout the period of the study, using a diary. Data were analyzed using a one-way repeated-measures analysis of variance (ANOVA), a Wilcoxon signed-ranks test, and a Friedman two-way ANOVA by ranks. The results indicated that maximum pressure generated by pelvic-floor contractions was greater and both the quantity of urine loss and the frequency of incontinence were lower following the implementation of the physical therapy program. Five subjects became continent, and three others improved. A follow-up survey 1 year later confirmed the consistency of these results. The results suggest that the proposed physical therapy program may influence postpartum GSI. Further studies are needed to validate this simple, inexpensive, and conservative physical therapy protocol. [Dumoulin C, Seaborne DE, Quirion-DeGirardi C, Sullivan SJ. Pelvic-floor

  10. Architectural design of the pelvic floor is consistent with muscle functional subspecialization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuttle, Lori J; Nguyen, Olivia T; Cook, Mark S; Alperin, Marianna; Shah, Sameer B; Ward, Samuel R; Lieber, Richard L

    2014-02-01

    Skeletal muscle architecture is the strongest predictor of a muscle's functional capacity. The purpose of this study was to define the architectural properties of the deep muscles of the female pelvic floor (PFMs) to elucidate their structure-function relationships. PFMs coccygeus (C), iliococcygeus (IC), and pubovisceral (PV) were harvested en bloc from ten fixed human cadavers (mean age 85 years, range 55-102). Fundamental architectural parameters of skeletal muscles [physiological cross-sectional area (PCSA), normalized fiber length, and sarcomere length (L(s))] were determined using validated methods. PCSA predicts muscle-force production, and normalized fiber length is related to muscle excursion. These parameters were compared using repeated measures analysis of variance (ANOVA) with post hoc t tests, as appropriate. Significance was set to α = 0.05. PFMs were thinner than expected based on data reported from imaging studies and in vivo palpation. Significant differences in fiber length were observed across PFMs: C = 5.29 ± 0.32 cm, IC = 7.55 ± 0.46 cm, PV = 10.45 ± 0.67 cm (p design shows individual muscles demonstrating differential architecture, corresponding to specialized function in the pelvic floor.

  11. Reduced muscle strength, exercise intolerance and disabling symptoms in sarcoidosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marcellis, R.G.; Lenssen, A.F.; de Vries, J.; Drent, M.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose of review: This review focuses on innovations in the field of assessment and treatment of muscle weakness and exercise intolerance in sarcoidosis and the association between these and fatigue, dyspnea and quality of life (QoL). Recent findings: Muscle strength and exercise intolerance are

  12. Trunk muscle activity in healthy subjects during bridging stabilization exercises

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanderstraeten Guy G

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Trunk bridging exercises are often used as therapeutic exercises for lumbopelvic stabilization. These exercises focus on the retraining of muscle coordination patterns in which optimal ratios between local segmental stabilizing and global torque producing muscle activity are assumed to be essential. However, a description of such ratios is lacking. The purpose of this study was to investigate both relative (as a percentage of maximal voluntary isometric contraction muscle activity levels and ratios of local to global muscle activity, during bridging stabilization exercises. Methods Thirty healthy university students (15 men, 15 women with a mean age of 19.6 year volunteered to perform 3 bridging exercises (single bridging, ball bridge and unilateral bridging. The surface electromyographic activity of different trunk muscles was evaluated on both sides. Results During all bridging exercises, the ratio of the internal oblique to the rectus abdominis was very high due to minimal relative activity of the rectus abdominis. In general, the ratio of the internal/external abdominal oblique activity was about 1. However, during the unilateral bridging exercise, the ipsilateral internal/external abdominal oblique activity ratio was 2.79 as a consequence of the significant higher relative activity of the internal oblique compared to the external oblique. The relative muscle activity and the ratios of the back muscles demonstrated similar activity levels for all back muscles, resulting in ratios about 1. Conclusion Both the minimal relative activity of the rectus abdominis and the high internal oblique to the rectus abdominis activity ratio reported in the present study are in accordance with results of other trunk stabilization exercises. The relative muscle activity and the ratio of the abdominal obliques seem to alter depending on the task and the presumable need for stability. The findings concerning the relative muscle activity and

  13. Skeletal muscle substrate metabolism during exercise: methodological considerations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Van Hall, Gerrit; González-Alonso, J; Sacchetti, M

    1999-01-01

    The aim of the present article is to evaluate critically the various methods employed in studies designed to quantify precisely skeletal muscle substrate utilization during exercise. In general, the pattern of substrate utilization during exercise can be described well from O2 uptake measurements...... substrates. There are several methodological concerns to be aware of when studying the metabolic response to exercise in human subjects. These concerns include: (1) the muscle mass involved in the exercise is largely unknown (bicycle or treadmill). Moreover, whether the muscle sample obtained from a limb...

  14. Xanthine oxidase in human skeletal muscle following eccentric exercise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hellsten, Ylva; Frandsen, Ulrik; Orthenblad, N.

    1997-01-01

    1. The present study tested the hypothesis that the level of xanthine oxidase is elevated in injured human skeletal muscle in association with inflammatory events. Seven male subjects performed five bouts of strenuous one-legged eccentric exercise. Muscle biopsies from both the exercised...... and the control leg, together with venous blood samples, were obtained prior to exercise and at 45 min, 24, 48 and 96 h after exercise. The time courses of xanthine oxidase immunoreactivity and indicators of muscle damage and inflammation were examined. 2. The number of xanthine oxidase structures observed...... by immunohistological methods in the exercised muscle was up to eightfold higher than control from day 1 to day 4 after exercise (P

  15. Xanthine oxidase in human skeletal muscle following eccentric exercise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hellsten, Ylva; Frandsen, Ulrik; Orthenblad, N.

    1997-01-01

    1. The present study tested the hypothesis that the level of xanthine oxidase is elevated in injured human skeletal muscle in association with inflammatory events. Seven male subjects performed five bouts of strenuous one-legged eccentric exercise. Muscle biopsies from both the exercised...... and the control leg, together with venous blood samples, were obtained prior to exercise and at 45 min, 24, 48 and 96 h after exercise. The time courses of xanthine oxidase immunoreactivity and indicators of muscle damage and inflammation were examined. 2. The number of xanthine oxidase structures observed...... by immunohistological methods in the exercised muscle was up to eightfold higher than control from day 1 to day 4 after exercise (P xanthine oxidase in microvascular endothelial cells and an invasion of leucocytes containing xanthine oxidase. 3...

  16. Oxidation of urate in human skeletal muscle during exercise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hellsten, Ylva; Tullson, P. C.; Richter, Erik

    1997-01-01

    the level was more than twofold higher and remained elevated throughout recovery (p exercise, probably due to generation of free radicals. Furthermore, the findings support the suggested importance of urate......The purpose of the present study was to investigate whether high metabolic stress to skeletal muscle, induced by intensive exercise, would lead to an oxidation of urate to allantoin in the exercised muscle. Seven healthy male subjects performed short term (4.39 +/- 0.04 [+/-SE] min) exhaustive...... cycling exercise. Muscle samples were obtained from m. v. lateralis before and during the first few minutes after the exercise. Venous blood samples were obtained before and up to 45 min after the exercise. The concentration of urate in muscle decreased from a resting level of 0.26 +/- 0.023 to 0...

  17. Exercise-induced metallothionein expression in human skeletal muscle fibres

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Penkowa, Milena; Keller, Pernille; Keller, Charlotte

    2005-01-01

    in both type I and II muscle fibres. This is the first report demonstrating that MT-I + II are significantly induced in human skeletal muscle fibres following exercise. As MT-I + II are antioxidant factors that protect various tissues during pathological conditions, the MT-I + II increases post exercise......Exercise induces free oxygen radicals that cause oxidative stress, and metallothioneins (MTs) are increased in states of oxidative stress and possess anti-apoptotic effects. We therefore studied expression of the antioxidant factors metallothionein I and II (MT-I + II) in muscle biopsies obtained...... in response to 3 h of bicycle exercise performed by healthy men and in resting controls. Both MT-I + II proteins and MT-II mRNA expression increased significantly in both type I and II muscle fibres after exercise. Moreover, 24 h after exercise the levels of MT-II mRNA and MT-I + II proteins were still highly...

  18. ROS and myokines promote muscle adaptation to exercise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scheele, Camilla; Nielsen, Søren; Pedersen, Bente K

    2009-01-01

    in skeletal muscle. In fact, it seems that exercise-induced ROS are able to stimulate cytokine production from skeletal muscle. Despite the initial view that ROS were potentially cell damaging, it now seems possible that these substances have important roles in the regulation of cell signaling. Muscle......-derived cytokines, so-called 'myokines', are distinguished from inflammation and instead possess important anti-inflammatory and metabolic properties. In this opinion piece, we suggest that both ROS and myokines are important players in muscle adaptation to exercise.......Physical exercise induces a network of alterations in the transcriptome and proteome of the skeletal muscle, resulting in modifications of the muscle physiology. Intriguingly, exercise also transiently induces the production of both reactive oxygen species (ROS) and some inflammatory cytokines...

  19. Pelvic floor muscle training protocol for stress urinary incontinence in women: A systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marlene Oliveira

    Full Text Available Summary Introduction: Strengthening exercises for pelvic floor muscles (SEPFM are considered the first approach in the treatment of stress urinary incontinence (SUI. Nevertheless, there is no evidence about training parameters. Objective: To identify the protocol and/or most effective training parameters in the treatment of female SUI. Method: A literature research was conducted in the PubMed, Cochrane Library, PEDro, Web of Science and Lilacs databases, with publishing dates ranging from January 1992 to March 2014. The articles included consisted of English-speaking experimental studies in which SEPFM were compared with placebo treatment (usual or untreated. The sample had a diagnosis of SUI and their age ranged between 18 and 65 years. The assessment of methodological quality was performed based on the PEDro scale. Results: Seven high methodological quality articles were included in this review. The sample consisted of 331 women, mean age 44.4±5.51 years, average duration of urinary loss of 64±5.66 months and severity of SUI ranging from mild to severe. SEPFM programs included different training parameters concerning the PFM. Some studies have applied abdominal training and adjuvant techniques. Urine leakage cure rates varied from 28.6 to 80%, while the strength increase of PFM varied from 15.6 to 161.7%. Conclusion: The most effective training protocol consists of SEPFM by digital palpation combined with biofeedback monitoring and vaginal cones, including 12 week training parameters, and ten repetitions per series in different positions compared with SEPFM alone or a lack of treatment.

  20. Protein-carbohydrate supplements improve muscle protein balance in muscular dystrophy patients after endurance exercise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Grete; Ørngreen, Mette C; Preisler, Nicolai

    2015-01-01

    In healthy individuals, postexercise protein supplementation increases muscle protein anabolism. In patients with muscular dystrophies, aerobic exercise improves muscle function, but the effect of exercise on muscle protein balance is unknown. Therefore, we investigated 1) muscle protein balance ...

  1. Molecular Signals and Skeletal Muscle Adaptation to Exercise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark Wilson

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The phenotypic plasticity of skeletal muscle affords a considerable degree of adaptability not seen in other bodily tissues. The mechanical properties of skeletal muscle are highly dependent on loading conditions. The extent of skeletal muscle plasticity is distinctly highlighted by a loss of muscle mass, or atrophy, after a period of reduced weight-bearing activity, for example during periods of extended bed rest, space flight and in spinal cord injury. On the other hand, increased mechanical loading, or resistance training, induces muscle growth, or hypertrophy. Endurance exercise performance is also dependent on the adaptability of skeletal muscle, especially muscles that contribute to posture, locomotion and the mechanics of breathing. However, the molecular pathways governing skeletal muscle adaptations are yet to be satisfactorily delineated and require further investigation. Researchers in the areas of exercise physiology, physiotherapy and sports medicine are endeavoring to translate experimental knowledge into effective, innovative treatments and regimens in order to improve physical performance and health in both elite athletes and the general community. The efficacy of the translation of molecular biological paradigms in experimental exercise physiology has long been underappreciated. Indeed, molecular biology tools can now be used to answer questions regarding skeletal muscle adaptation in response to exercise and provide new frameworks to improve physical performance. Furthermore, transgenic animal models, knockout animal models and in vivo studies provide tools to test questions concerned with how exercise initiates adaptive changes in gene expression. In light of these perceived deficiencies, an attempt is made here to elucidate the molecular mechanisms of skeletal muscle adaptation to exercise. An examination will be made of the functional capacity of skeletal muscle to respond to a variety of exercise conditions, namely

  2. The effect of high-intensity exhaustive exercise studied in isolated mitochondria from human skeletal muscle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, U.F.; Krustrup, Peter; Bangsbo, Jens

    2001-01-01

    Bicycle exercise; cytochromes; Fatigue; Lactate; Oxidative phosphorylation; Oxygen uptake; Quadriceps muscle; Respiration......Bicycle exercise; cytochromes; Fatigue; Lactate; Oxidative phosphorylation; Oxygen uptake; Quadriceps muscle; Respiration...

  3. Assessment of pelvic floor muscle contractility: digital palpation versus 2D and 3D perineal ultrasound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albrich, Stefan; Steetskamp, Joscha; Knoechel, Sophie-Luise; Porta, Saskia; Hoffmann, Gerald; Skala, Christine

    2016-04-01

    The aim of our study was to investigate 2D and 3D ultrasound assessment of pelvic floor muscle contractility as an objective non-invasive diagnostic tool in urogynecologic patients. Patients from our urogynecological outpatient clinic were examined clinically by a single investigator including digital palpation as well as 2D and 3D perineal ultrasound. Muscle contractility was graded according to the modified Oxford Score and ultrasound images were saved for later analysis. Stored images were evaluated offline by another investigator blinded to all clinical data at a later stage. Bladder neck distance from pubic symphysis and symphysis-levator distance were measured in 2D at rest and during maximal pelvic floor muscle contraction. Hiatal area at the level of minimal hiatal dimensions as a 3D ultrasound parameter was measured at rest and during maximal pelvic floor muscle contraction, too. Spearman's rho was used to calculate statistical correlation between ultrasound parameters and digital assessment. A total of 114 patients were examined in our study. We found a significant correlation between modified Oxford Score and 2D ultrasound parameters of elongation of bladder neck length (Spearman's rho 0.292, p = 0.002) and reduction of symphysis-levator distance (Spearman's rho 0.0.301, p = 0.001), respectively. In addition, we detected a statistical significant correlation of modified Oxford Score and reduction of hiatal area in 3D ultrasound (Spearman's rho 0.458, p pelvic floor muscle strength with 2D and 3D ultrasound parameters as an objective diagnostic tool.

  4. The effects of Pilates method on pelvic floor muscle strength in patients with post-prostatectomy urinary incontinence: A randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes, Cíntia S; Pedriali, Fabiana R; Urbano, Mariana R; Moreira, Eliane H; Averbeck, Marcio A; Almeida, Silvio Henrique M

    2018-01-01

    To assess the effects of a Pilates exercise program compared to conventional pelvic floor muscle training (PFMT) protocol on pelvic floor muscle strength (PFMS) in patients with post-prostatectomy urinary incontinence. Patients were randomized into three treatment groups (G1: Pilates, G2: electrical stimulation combined with PFMT, and G3: control group). Duration of therapy was 10 weeks. Baseline assessment included the 24 h pad-test and the ICI-Q questionnaire. PFMS was measured using a manometric perineometry device at baseline and 4 months after radical prostatectomy (RP). The level of significance was P  0.05). G1 and G2 achieved a higher number of fully continent patients than G3 (P Pilates method promoted similar outcomes in the proportion of fully continent patients when compared to conventional PFMT 4 months after RP. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Architectural design of the pelvic floor is consistent with muscle functional subspecialization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuttle, Lori J.; Nguyen, Olivia T.; Cook, Mark S.; Alperin, Marianna; Shah, Sameer B.; Ward, Samuel R.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction and hypothesis Skeletal muscle architecture is the strongest predictor of a muscle’s functional capacity. The purpose of this study was to define the architectural properties of the deep muscles of the female pelvic floor (PFMs) to elucidate their structure–function relationships. Methods PFMs coccygeus (C), iliococcygeus (IC), and pubovisceral (PV) were harvested en bloc from ten fixed human cadavers (mean age 85 years, range 55–102). Fundamental architectural parameters of skeletal muscles [physiological cross-sectional area (PCSA), normalized fiber length, and sarcomere length (Ls)] were determined using validated methods. PCSA predicts muscle-force production, and normalized fiber length is related to muscle excursion. These parameters were compared using repeated measures analysis of variance (ANOVA) with post hoc t tests, as appropriate. Significance was set to α=0.05. Results PFMs were thinner than expected based on data reported from imaging studies and in vivo palpation. Significant differences in fiber length were observed across PFMs: C=5.29±0.32 cm, IC=7.55±0.46 cm, PV=10.45±0.67 cm (pstabilizer. PV demonstrated the longest fibers, suggesting that it functions to produce large excursions. Conclusions PFM design shows individual muscles demonstrating differential architecture, corresponding to specialized function in the pelvic floor. PMID:23903821

  6. Muscle strength measurement of pelvic floor in women by vaginal dynamometer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parezanović-Ilić Katarina

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction The pelvic floor is made of a mutually connected system that consists of muscles, connecting tissue and nerve components. Damage to any of these elements creates dysfunction which is exerted through stress, urinary incontinence, prolapse of genital organs and faecal incontinence. Objective The primary aim of this study was to present the possibility of objective assessment of pelvic floor muscle force in healthy and sick women using a newly designed instrument, the vaginal dynamometer, as well as to establish the correlation between the values of pelvic floor muscle force obtained by the vaginal dynamometer and digital palpation method. Methods The study included 90 female patients, age 20-58 years. One group of respondents was made of healthy women (who gave birth, and those who have not given birth, while the other one consisted of sick women (who suffered from incontinence or prolapse of genital organs, operated on or not. The pelvic floor muscle strength of every woman was measured with a newly-constructed device for measuring and monitoring of the pelvic floor muscle force in women, the vaginal dynamometer. Then it was compared with the valid clinical digital palpation (palpation with two fingers based on the scale for measuring muscle contractions with the digital palpation - the digital pelvic assessment rating scale. The vaginal dynamometer consists of a redesigned speculum which is inserted into the vagina and a sensor for measuring the force. Results Statistically significant linear correlation was found in the values of the measured muscle force with the vaginal dynamometer and ratings produced by digital palpation (r=0.92; p<0.001. Mean value of the muscle force of the healthy women measured by the vaginal dynamometer was 1.44±0.38 daN and that value of the sick women was 0.78±0.31 daN (t=8.89 for df=88; p<0.001. Mean value of the ratings produced by digital palpation in healthy women was 4.10 (95% of trust limits 3

  7. Bruxism: Is There an Indication for Muscle-Stretching Exercises?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gouw, S.; Wijer, A. de; Creugers, N.H.J.; Kalaykova, S.I.

    2017-01-01

    Bruxism is a common phenomenon involving repetitive activation of the masticatory muscles. Muscle-stretching exercises are a recommended part of several international guidelines for musculoskeletal disorders and may be effective in management of the jaw muscle activity that gives rise to bruxism.

  8. Pelvic floor rehabilitation is effective in patients with multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vahtera, T; Haaranen, M; Viramo-Koskela, A L; Ruutiainen, J

    1997-08-01

    To determine the effect of pelvic floor muscle exercises combined with electrical stimulation of pelvic floor on lower urinary tract dysfunction in multiple sclerosis (MS) patients with near normal (current symptoms of lower urinary tract dysfunction. The muscle activity of the pelvic floor muscles was tested using surface EMG. Subjective urinary symptoms were assessed using a questionnaire. Pelvic floor muscles were stimulated using electrical stimulation at six sessions. During and after the final session the patients were taught to exercise their pelvic floor muscles and advised to continue these exercises regularly for at least six months. The control group was not treated. The maximal contraction power and endurance of the pelvic floor muscles increased after six sessions of electrical stimulation with interferential currents. Symptoms of urinary urgency, frequency and incontinence were significantly less frequent in the treated group than in the untreated subjects. Male patients appeared to respond better to the treatment than female patients. Compliance with the pelvic floor exercises was over 60% at the end of a follow-up for six months. Most drop-outs were due to the disappearance of urinary tract symptoms or to severe relapses in MS. The present study indicates that pelvic floor muscle exercises combined with electrical stimulation of the pelvic floor constitute an effective treatment for lower urinary tract dysfunction at least in male patients with MS.

  9. Regulation of autophagy in human skeletal muscle: effects of exercise, exercise training and insulin stimulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fritzen, Andreas M.; Madsen, Agnete B.; Kleinert, Maximilian; Treebak, Jonas T.; Lundsgaard, Anne‐Marie; Jensen, Thomas E.; Richter, Erik A.; Wojtaszewski, Jørgen; Kiens, Bente

    2016-01-01

    Key points Regulation of autophagy in human muscle in many aspects differs from the majority of previous reports based on studies in cell systems and rodent muscle.An acute bout of exercise and insulin stimulation reduce human muscle autophagosome content.An acute bout of exercise regulates autophagy by a local contraction‐induced mechanism.Exercise training increases the capacity for formation of autophagosomes in human muscle.AMPK activation during exercise seems insufficient to regulate autophagosome content in muscle, while mTORC1 signalling via ULK1 probably mediates the autophagy‐inhibiting effect of insulin. Abstract Studies in rodent muscle suggest that autophagy is regulated by acute exercise, exercise training and insulin stimulation. However, little is known about the regulation of autophagy in human skeletal muscle. Here we investigate the autophagic response to acute one‐legged exercise, one‐legged exercise training and subsequent insulin stimulation in exercised and non‐exercised human muscle. Acute one‐legged exercise decreased (Pexercise in human muscle. The decrease in LC3‐II/LC3‐I ratio did not correlate with activation of 5′AMP activated protein kinase (AMPK) trimer complexes in human muscle. Consistently, pharmacological AMPK activation with 5‐aminoimidazole‐4‐carboxamide riboside (AICAR) in mouse muscle did not affect the LC3‐II/LC3‐I ratio. Four hours after exercise, insulin further reduced (Pexercised and non‐exercised leg in humans. This coincided with increased Ser‐757 phosphorylation of Unc51 like kinase 1 (ULK1), which is suggested as a mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) target. Accordingly, inhibition of mTOR signalling in mouse muscle prevented the ability of insulin to reduce the LC3‐II/LC3‐I ratio. In response to 3 weeks of one‐legged exercise training, the LC3‐II/LC3‐I ratio decreased (Pexercise and insulin stimulation reduce muscle autophagosome content, while exercise

  10. Traditional Gymnastic Exercises for the Pelvic Floor Often Lead to Bladder Neck Descent - a Study Using Perineal Ultrasound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baeßler, Kaven; Junginger, Bärbel

    2017-07-01

    The aims of physiotherapy in stress incontinent women are to improve pelvic floor function and the continence mechanism including bladder neck support and urethral closure pressure. In Germany, traditional conservative treatment often includes gymnastic exercises with unclear effects on the bladder neck. The aim of this study was to sonographically assess bladder neck movements during selected exercises. Fifteen healthy, continent women without previous vaginal births, who were able to voluntarily contract their pelvic floor muscels performed the shoulder bridge, the abdominal press, tiptoe and the Pilates clam exercises. The first set was performed without any additional instructions. During the second set directions were given to activate the pelvic floor before beginning each exercise and to maintain the contraction throughout the exercise. Bladder neck movement was measured on perineal ultrasound using a validated method with the pubic symphysis as a reference point. The median age of participants was 32 years, median BMI was 23. Eight women were nulliparous and seven had given birth to 1 - 2 children via caesarean section. When exercises were performed without voluntary pelvic floor contraction the bladder neck descended on average between 2.3 and 4.4 mm, and with pelvic floor contraction prior to the exercise only between 0.5 and 2.1 mm (p > 0.05 except for abdominal press p = 0.007). The Pilates clam exercise and toe stand stabilised the bladder neck most effectively. Bladder neck descent often occurs during pelvic floor gymnastic exercises as traditionally performed in Germany, and a voluntary pelvic floor contraction during the exercises does not necessarily prevent this.

  11. Single blind, randomised controlled trial of pelvic floor exercises, electrical stimulation, vaginal cones, and no treatment in management of genuine stress incontinence in women

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bø, Kari; Talseth, Trygve; Holme, Ingar

    1999-01-01

    Objective To compare the effect of pelvic floor exercises, electrical stimulation, vaginal cones, and no treatment for genuine stress incontinence. Design Stratified, single blind, randomised controlled trial. Setting Multicentre. Participants 107 women with clinically and urodynamically proved genuine stress incontinence. Mean (range) age was 49.5 (24-70) years, and mean (range) duration of symptoms 10.8 (1-45) years. Interventions Pelvic floor exercise (n=25) comprised 8-12 contractions 3 times a day and exercise in groups with skilled physical therapists once a week. The electrical stimulation group (n=25) used vaginal intermittent stimulation with the MS 106 Twin at 50 Hz 30 minutes a day. The vaginal cones group (n=27) used cones for 20 minutes a day. The untreated control group (n=30) was offered the use of a continence guard. Muscle strength was measured by vaginal squeeze pressure once a month. Main outcome measures Pad test with standardised bladder volume, and self report of severity. Results Improvement in muscle strength was significantly greater (P=0.03) after pelvic floor exercises (11.0 cm H2O (95% confidence interval 7.7 to 14.3) before v 19.2 cm H2O (15.3 to 23.1) after) than either electrical stimulation (14.8 cm H2O (10.9 to 18.7) v 18.6 cm H2O (13.3 to 23.9)) or vaginal cones (11.8 cm H2O (8.5 to 15.1) v 15.4 cm H2O (11.1 to 19.7)). Reduction in leakage on pad test was greater in the exercise group (−30.2 g; −43.3 to 16.9) than in the electrical stimulation group (−7.4 g; −20.9 to 6.1) and the vaginal cones group (−14.7 g; −27.6 to −1.8). On completion of the trial one participant in the control group, 14 in the pelvic floor exercise group, three in the electrical stimulation group, and two in the vaginal cones group no longer considered themselves as having a problem. Conclusion Training of the pelvic floor muscles is superior to electrical stimulation and vaginal cones in the treatment of genuine stress

  12. Transperineal Sonography Evaluation of Muscles and Vascularity in the Male Pelvic Floor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roll, Shawn C; Kutch, Jason J

    2013-01-01

    Idiopathic chronic male pelvic pain is difficult to diagnose and treat. Currently, diagnosis relies on subjective symptoms; objective measures of neuromuscular mechanisms have not been investigated. Sonographic imaging has been used to investigate these neuromuscular mechanisms in the female pelvic floor, but neither research nor books describe sonography evaluation of the male pelvic floor. The purpose of this study was to develop and evaluate a perineal sonographic technique for the examination of the male pelvic floor muscles. Anatomic landmarks were identified with images collected from two subjects, one with intermittent reports of pelvic pain and one with no history of pain in the pelvic region. A description of the equipment settings, the examination protocol, and the resulting comparative image analysis is included. A validated protocol such as this may be useful in documenting differences in the soft tissue structures between asymptomatic individuals and patients with chronic pelvic pain to aid in diagnosis and treatment. This is the first known study to report sonographic findings of the individual muscles in the male pelvic floor, and additional research is needed to validate the techniques that have been deemed feasible.

  13. Tridimensional sonographic anatomical changes on pelvic floor muscle according to the type of delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassadó Garriga, Jordi; Pessarrodona Isern, Antoni; Espuña Pons, Montserrat; Durán Retamal, Montserrat; Felgueroso Fabregas, Anna; Rodriguez-Carballeira, Monica

    2011-08-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the association of avulsion and postnatal hiatal dimensions with delivery mode. These anatomical changes on pelvic floor muscle may be assessed by 3-4D ultrasonography. This is a prospective observational study that included 164 women: 20 nulliparous, 20 primigravid, and 124 postpartum women (62 at 1 month, 62 at 9 months postpartum). We performed an introital 3-4D ultrasonography to assess levator ani muscle's integrity, levator hiatal area at rest, on Valsalva, and on contraction. Levator ani avulsion was diagnosed in 59.5% of forceps deliveries. There were no statistically significant differences in postnatal hiatal dimensions between normal vaginal deliveries at 9 months postpartum and nulligravid. Levator hiatal area was significantly higher after forceps delivery. Low incidence of levator avulsion takes place in normal vaginal deliveries. However, forceps delivery is the riskiest type of delivery for pelvic floor pathology and its recovery.

  14. Ammonia uptake in inactive muscles during exercise in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bangsbo, Jens; Kiens, Bente; Richter, Erik

    1996-01-01

    The present study examined NH3 (ammonia and ammonium) uptake in resting leg muscle. Six male subjects performed intermittent arm exercise at various intensities in two separate 32-min periods (part I and part II) and in one subsequent 20-min period in which one-legged exercise was also performed.......0 +/- 4.5, and 57.7 +/- 18.3 mumol/min. Throughout each exercise period a net uptake of NH3 was observed in the resting leg (P muscle NH3 concentration of 195.1 +/- 15.0 mumol/kg wet wt at rest was largely...... unchanged throughout the experiment. The present data suggest that resting muscles extract NH3 and contribute significantly to clearance of NH3 during exercise and in early recovery from exercise. The extracted NH3 appears to be metabolized within the resting muscles....

  15. Correlation of Digital Palpation and Transabdominal Ultrasound for Assessment of Pelvic Floor Muscle Contraction

    OpenAIRE

    Arab, Amir Massoud; Behbahani, Roxana Bazaz; Lorestani, Leila; Azari, Afsaneh

    2009-01-01

    Pelvic floor muscle (PFM) dysfunction has been commonly associated with urinary disorders and lumbo-pelvic pain. Transabdominal (TA) ultrasound is currently used by physical therapists to assess PFM function. Controversy exists regarding the correlation between TA ultrasound measurement and vaginal palpation for assessment of PFM contraction, and this relationship has not yet been examined concurrently during the same contraction. The purpose of this study was to determine the correlation of ...

  16. Muscle glucose metabolism following exercise in the rat

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Richter, Erik; Garetto, L P; Goodman, M N

    1982-01-01

    Muscle glycogen stores are depleted during exercise and are rapidly repleted during the recovery period. To investigate the mechanism for this phenomenon, untrained male rats were run for 45 min on a motor-driven treadmill and the ability of their muscles to utilize glucose was then assessed during...... in glucose utilization enhanced by prior exercise appeared to be glucose transport across the cell membrane, as in neither control nor exercised rats did free glucose accumulate in the muscle cell. Following exercise, the ability of insulin to stimulate the release of lactate into the perfusate was unaltered......; however its ability to stimulate the incorporation of [(14)C]glucose into glycogen in certain muscles was enhanced. Thus at a concentration of 75 muU/ml insulin stimulated glycogen synthesis eightfold more in the fast-twitch red fibers of the red gastrocnemius than it did in the same muscle...

  17. Maximum expiration activates the abdominal muscles during side bridge exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishida, Hiroshi; Watanabe, Susumu

    2014-01-01

    Recent studies have indicated that maximum expiration could be a useful way of performing challenging exercises that include coactivation of the deep and superficial abdominal muscles. However, little is known about the effect of maximum expiration on the activity of the abdominal muscles during lumbar stabilizing exercise. The purpose of our study was to quantify changes in the activities of the abdominal muscles during side bridge exercise in combination with maximum expiration. Experimental laboratory study. The activities of the rectus abdominis (RA), external oblique (EO), and internal oblique (IO) muscles were measured using electromyography in 12 healthy men performing 3 tasks: holding the breath after maximum expiration in the prone position, holding the breath after resting expiration during side bridge exercise, and holding the breath after maximum expiration during side bridge exercise. Significant increases in the activities of the abdominal muscles (RA, EO, and IO) occurred with maximum expiration when compared with resting expiration during side bridge exercise (P abdominal muscle activities during a stabilizing exercise, thus contributing to existing knowledge about therapeutic exercise for alternative core training.

  18. Validity of Estimation of Pelvic Floor Muscle Activity from Transperineal Ultrasound Imaging in Men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stafford, Ryan E; Coughlin, Geoff; Lutton, Nicholas J; Hodges, Paul W

    2015-01-01

    To investigate the relationship between displacement of pelvic floor landmarks observed with transperineal ultrasound imaging and electromyography of the muscles hypothesised to cause the displacements. Three healthy men participated in this study, which included ultrasound imaging of the mid-urethra, urethra-vesical junction, ano-rectal junction and bulb of the penis. Fine-wire electromyography electrodes were inserted into the puborectalis and bulbocavernosus muscles and a transurethral catheter electrode recorded striated urethral sphincter electromyography. A nasogastric sensor recorded intra-abdominal pressure. Tasks included submaximal and maximal voluntary contractions, and Valsalva. The relationship between each of the parameters measured from ultrasound images and electromyography or intra-abdominal pressure amplitudes was described with nonlinear regression. Strong, non-linear relationships were calculated for each predicted landmark/muscle pair for submaximal contractions (R2-0.87-0.95). The relationships between mid-urethral displacement and striated urethral sphincter electromyography, and bulb of the penis displacement and bulbocavernosus electromyography were strong during maximal contractions (R2-0.74-0.88). Increased intra-abdominal pressure prevented shortening of puborectalis, which resulted in weak relationships between electromyography and anorectal and urethravesical junction displacement during all tasks. Displacement of landmarks in transperineal ultrasound imaging provides meaningful measures of activation of individual pelvic floor muscles in men during voluntary contractions. This method may aid assessment of muscle function or feedback for training.

  19. Validity of Estimation of Pelvic Floor Muscle Activity from Transperineal Ultrasound Imaging in Men.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryan E Stafford

    Full Text Available To investigate the relationship between displacement of pelvic floor landmarks observed with transperineal ultrasound imaging and electromyography of the muscles hypothesised to cause the displacements.Three healthy men participated in this study, which included ultrasound imaging of the mid-urethra, urethra-vesical junction, ano-rectal junction and bulb of the penis. Fine-wire electromyography electrodes were inserted into the puborectalis and bulbocavernosus muscles and a transurethral catheter electrode recorded striated urethral sphincter electromyography. A nasogastric sensor recorded intra-abdominal pressure. Tasks included submaximal and maximal voluntary contractions, and Valsalva. The relationship between each of the parameters measured from ultrasound images and electromyography or intra-abdominal pressure amplitudes was described with nonlinear regression.Strong, non-linear relationships were calculated for each predicted landmark/muscle pair for submaximal contractions (R2-0.87-0.95. The relationships between mid-urethral displacement and striated urethral sphincter electromyography, and bulb of the penis displacement and bulbocavernosus electromyography were strong during maximal contractions (R2-0.74-0.88. Increased intra-abdominal pressure prevented shortening of puborectalis, which resulted in weak relationships between electromyography and anorectal and urethravesical junction displacement during all tasks.Displacement of landmarks in transperineal ultrasound imaging provides meaningful measures of activation of individual pelvic floor muscles in men during voluntary contractions. This method may aid assessment of muscle function or feedback for training.

  20. Exercise-induced muscle glucose uptake in mice with graded, muscle-specific GLUT-4 deletion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howlett, Kirsten F; Andrikopoulos, Sofianos; Proietto, Joseph; Hargreaves, Mark

    2013-01-01

    To investigate the importance of the glucose transporter GLUT-4 for muscle glucose uptake during exercise, transgenic mice with skeletal muscle GLUT-4 expression approximately 30–60% of normal (CON) and approximately 5–10% of normal (KO) were generated using the Cre/Lox system and compared with wild-type (WT) mice during approximately 40 min of treadmill running (KO: 37.7 ± 1.3 min; WT: 40 min; CON: 40 min, P = 0.18). In WT and CON animals, exercise resulted in an overall increase in muscle glucose uptake. More specifically, glucose uptake was increased in red gastrocnemius of WT mice and in the soleus and red gastrocnemius of CON mice. In contrast, the exercise-induced increase in muscle glucose uptake in all muscles was completely abolished in KO mice. Muscle glucose uptake increased during exercise in both red and white quadriceps of WT mice, while the small increases in CON mice were not statistically significant. In KO mice, there was no change at all in quadriceps muscle glucose uptake. No differences in muscle glycogen use during exercise were observed between any of the groups. However, there was a significant increase in plasma glucose levels after exercise in KO mice. The results of this study demonstrated that a reduction in skeletal muscle GLUT-4 expression to approximately 10% of normal levels completely abolished the exercise-induced increase in muscle glucose uptake. PMID:24303141

  1. Effect of abdominal and pelvic floor tasks on muscle activity, abdominal pressure and bladder neck.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Junginger, Baerbel; Baessler, Kaven; Sapsford, Ruth; Hodges, Paul W

    2010-01-01

    Although the bladder neck is elevated during a pelvic floor muscle (PFM) contraction, it descends during straining. This study aimed to investigate the relationship between bladder neck displacement, electromyography (EMG) activity of the pelvic floor and abdominal muscles and intra-abdominal pressure (IAP) during different pelvic floor and abdominal contractions. Nine women without PFM dysfunction performed maximal, gentle and moderate PFM contractions, maximal and gentle transversus abdominis (TrA) contractions, bracing, Valsalva and head lift. Bladder neck position was assessed with perineal ultrasound. PFM and abdominal muscle activities were recorded with a vaginal probe and fine-wire electrodes, respectively. IAP was recorded with a rectal balloon. Bladder neck elevation only occurred during PFM and TrA contractions. PFM EMG and IAP increased during all tasks from 0.5 (gentle TrA) to 45.7 cmH2O (maximal Valsalva). Bladder neck elevation was only observed when the activity of PFM EMG was high relative to the IAP increase.

  2. Exercise-induced Protein Arginine Methyltransferase Expression in Skeletal Muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanlieshout, Tiffany L; Stouth, Derek W; Tajik, Tania; Ljubicic, Vladimir

    2018-03-01

    This study aimed to determine protein arginine methyltransferase 1 (PRMT1), -4 (also known as coactivator-associated arginine methyltransferase 1 [CARM1]), and -5 expression and function during acute, exercise-induced skeletal muscle remodeling in vivo. C57BL/6 mice were assigned to one of three experimental groups: sedentary, acute bout of exercise, or acute exercise followed by 3 h of recovery. Mice in the exercise groups performed a single bout of treadmill running at 15 m·min for 90 min. Hindlimb muscles were collected, and quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction and Western blotting were used to examine exercise-induced gene expression. The PRMT gene expression and global enzyme activity were muscle-specific, generally being higher (P < 0.05) in slow, oxidative muscle, as compared with faster, more glycolytic tissue. Despite the significant activation of canonical exercise-induced signaling involving AMP-activated protein kinase and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ coactivator-1α (PGC-1α), PRMT expression and activity at the whole muscle level were unchanged. However, subcellular analyses revealed a significant exercise-evoked myonuclear translocation of PRMT1 before the nuclear accumulation of PGC-1α. Acute physical activity also augmented (P < 0.05) the targeted methyltransferase activities of the PRMT in the myonuclear compartment, suggesting that PRMT-mediated histone arginine methylation is part of the early signals that drive muscle plasticity. Finally, basal PGC-1α asymmetric dimethylarginine status, as well as constitutive interactions between PGC-1α and PRMT1 or CARM1 may contribute to the exercise-induced muscle remodeling process. The present study provides the first evidence that PRMT activity is selectively augmented during the initial activation of exercise-induced skeletal muscle remodeling in vivo. These data support the emergence of PRMTs as important players in the regulation of skeletal muscle plasticity.

  3. Regulation of autophagy in human skeletal muscle: effects of exercise, exercise training and insulin stimulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fritzen, Andreas Mæchel; Madsen, Agnete Louise Bjerregaard; Kleinert, Maximilian

    2016-01-01

    %) in muscle of the exercised and non-exercised leg in man. This coincided with increased Ser-757 phosphorylation of ULK1, which is suggested as an mTORC1 target. Accordingly, inhibition of mTOR signalling in mouse muscle prevented the ability of insulin to reduce the LC3-II/LC3-I ratio. In response to 3 weeks...

  4. Dynamics of pelvic floor muscle functional parameters and their correlations with urinary incontinence in men after radical prostatectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zachovajevienė, Brigita; Šiupšinskas, Laimonas; Zachovajevas, Pavelas; Milonas, Daimantas

    2017-01-01

    To evaluate the dynamics of pelvic floor muscle strength, endurance, and urinary incontinence in a 6-month period in men after radical prostatectomy and to determine correlations between pelvic floor muscle strength, endurance, and urinary incontinence. Forty-two men with prostate cancer treated with radical prostatectomy participated in the study. Pelvic floor muscles parameters were evaluated using the anal perineometer. An 8-hour pad test was used with the catheter removed. The greatest change in strength occurred during the last 3 months, i.e., from the third to the sixth month following surgery (P ≤ 0.05). The average amount of urinary incontinence on the day of catheter removal was approximately 311 g per 8 hr. Urinary incontinence decreased by 93.6% from the day of catheter removal 6 months later. A strong correlation (P ≤ 0.001) of reverse dependence was determined between pelvic floor muscle strength before surgery and the amount of urinary incontinence 6 months following surgery. The greatest change of pelvic floor muscles strength and endurance occurred during the third to the sixth month following surgery. The greatest change in urinary incontinence occurred during the first month following surgery. Pelvic floor muscle strength causes a greater decrease in urinary incontinence than endurance. The greater the pelvic floor muscle strength before surgery, the lower the amount of urinary incontinence. Age also affects pelvic floor muscle strength and endurance; this relation gradually weakens and with age disappears. Neurourol. Urodynam. 36:126-131, 2017. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Effect of muscle acidity on muscle metabolism and fatigue during intense exercise in man

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bangsbo, Jens; Madsen, K.; Kiens, Bente

    1996-01-01

    .65; P potassium during exercise was higher (P potassium concentrations were the same at exhaustion in HL and C. 4. Muscle lactate concentration was higher in HL compared with C (3.7 +/- 0.4 vs. 1.6 +/- 0...... intense exercise in man. Instead, accumulation of potassium in muscle interstitium may be an important factor in the development of fatigue....

  6. Systematic review of core muscle activity during physical fitness exercises.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martuscello, Jason M; Nuzzo, James L; Ashley, Candi D; Campbell, Bill I; Orriola, John J; Mayer, John M

    2013-06-01

    A consensus has not been reached among strength and conditioning specialists regarding what physical fitness exercises are most effective to stimulate activity of the core muscles. Thus, the purpose of this article was to systematically review the literature on the electromyographic (EMG) activity of 3 core muscles (lumbar multifidus, transverse abdominis, quadratus lumborum) during physical fitness exercises in healthy adults. CINAHL, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, EMBASE, PubMed, SPORTdiscus, and Web of Science databases were searched for relevant articles using a search strategy designed by the investigators. Seventeen studies enrolling 252 participants met the review's inclusion/exclusion criteria. Physical fitness exercises were partitioned into 5 major types: traditional core, core stability, ball/device, free weight, and noncore free weight. Strength of evidence was assessed and summarized for comparisons among exercise types. The major findings of this review with moderate levels of evidence indicate that lumbar multifidus EMG activity is greater during free weight exercises compared with ball/device exercises and is similar during core stability and ball/device exercises. Transverse abdominis EMG activity is similar during core stability and ball/device exercises. No studies were uncovered for quadratus lumborum EMG activity during physical fitness exercises. The available evidence suggests that strength and conditioning specialists should focus on implementing multijoint free weight exercises, rather than core-specific exercises, to adequately train the core muscles in their athletes and clients.

  7. Exercise and the Regulation of Skeletal Muscle Hypertrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGlory, Chris; Phillips, Stuart M

    2015-01-01

    Skeletal muscle is a critical organ serving as the primary site for postprandial glucose disposal and the generation of contractile force. The size of human skeletal muscle mass is dependent upon the temporal relationship between changes in muscle protein synthesis (MPS) and muscle protein breakdown. The aim of this chapter is to review our current understanding of how resistance exercise influences protein turnover with a specific emphasis on the molecular factors regulating MPS. We also will discuss recent data relating to the prescription of resistance exercise to maximize skeletal muscle hypertrophy. Finally, we evaluate the impact of age and periods of disuse on the loss of muscle mass and the controversy surround the etiology of muscle disuse atrophy. © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Postural response of the pelvic floor and abdominal muscles in women with and without incontinence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Michelle D; Coppieters, Michel W; Hodges, Paul W

    2007-01-01

    To determine whether activity of the pelvic floor (PF) and abdominal muscles differs between continent and incontinent women in response to a postural perturbation with a moderately full or empty bladder. Electromyographic (EMG) activity of the PF and abdominal muscles was recorded with surface electrodes prior to and after a postural perturbation in which a 1 kg weight was dropped 30 cm into a bucket held by the subject. Perturbations were applied to the trunk in trials in which the timing of the weight drop was unknown (unexpected) or predictable (expected). Trials were performed with the bladder empty, and when the subject reported a sensation of moderate bladder fullness after drinking between 200 and 1,000 ml of water. Women with incontinence demonstrated increased PF EMG compared to continent women both prior to and during the postural response associated with unexpected loading. In addition, obliquus externus abdominis EMG was increased in incontinent women during these trials. When the bladder was moderately full, PF EMG decreased, whereas abdominal muscle EMG tended to increase. These data suggest that women with incontinence have increased PF and abdominal muscle activity associated with postural perturbations. This finding challenges the clinical assumption that incontinence is associated with reduced PF muscle activity, and suggests that training control and coordination of abdominal muscle activity may be important in treatment of this condition. The contrasting effects of increased bladder volume on PF and abdominal muscle EMG are likely to present further challenges to the maintenance of continence.

  9. Proteome Profiles of Longissimus and Biceps femoris Porcine Muscles Related to Exercise and Resting

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pas, te M.F.W.; Keuning, E.; Wiel, van de D.F.M.; Young, J.F.; Oksbjerg, N.; Kruijt, L.

    2011-01-01

    Exercise affects muscle metabolism and composition in the untrained muscles. The proteome of muscle tissue will be affected by exercise and resting. This is of economic importance for pork quality where transportation relates to exercise of untrained muscles. Rest reverses exercise effects. The

  10. Can endurance exercise preconditioning prevention disuse muscle atrophy?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael P Wiggs

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Emerging evidence suggests that exercise training can provide a level of protection against disuse muscle atrophy. Endurance exercise training imposes oxidative, metabolic, and heat stress on skeletal muscle which activates a variety of cellular signaling pathways that ultimately leads to the increased expression of proteins that have been demonstrated to protect muscle from inactivity –induced atrophy. This review will highlight the effect of exercise-induced oxidative stress on endogenous enzymatic antioxidant capacity (i.e., superoxide dismutase, glutathione peroxidase, and catalase, the role of oxidative and metabolic stress on PGC1-α, and finally highlight the effect heat stress and HSP70 induction. Finally, this review will discuss the supporting scientific evidence that these proteins can attenuate muscle atrophy through exercise preconditioning.

  11. Do Running and Strength Exercises Reduce Daily Muscle Inactivity Time?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taija Finni

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Understanding how a specific exercise changes daily activity patterns is important when designing physical activity interventions. We examined the effects of strength and interval running exercise sessions on daily activity patterns using recordings of quadriceps and hamstring muscle electromyographic (EMG activity and inactivity. Five male and five female subjects taking part in a 10-week training programme containing both strength and interval running training sessions were measured for daily muscle EMG activities during three days: on a strength day, an interval running day, and a day without exercise. EMG was measured using textile electrodes embedded into sport shorts that were worn 9.1 ± 1.4 hours/day and results are given as % of recording time. During the total measurement time the muscles were inactive 55 ± 26%, 53 ± 30% and 71 ± 12% during strength training day, interval running day, and day without exercise (n.s.. When compared to the day without exercise, the change in muscle inactivity correlated negatively with change in light muscle activity in strength (r = -0.971,p< 0.001 and interval running days (r = -0.965,p< 0.001. While interval running exercise bout induced a more systematic decrease in muscle inactivity time (from 62 ± 15% to 6 ± 6%,p< 0.001, reductions in muscle inactivity in response to strength exercise were highly individual (range 5–70 pp despite the same training programme. Strength, but not running exercise bout, increased muscle activity levels occurring above 50% MVC (p< 0.05 when compared to a similar period without exercise. The effect of strength exercise bout on totaldaily recording time increased the EMG amplitudes across the entire intensity spectrum. While strength and interval running exercise are effective in increasing muscle moderate-to-vigorous activity when compared to a similar period without exercise, it comprises only a small part of the day and does not seem to have a systematic effect

  12. The effect of exercise training on lower trunk muscle morphology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahtahmassebi, Behnaz; Hebert, Jeffrey J; Stomski, Norman J; Hecimovich, Mark; Fairchild, Timothy J

    2014-10-01

    Skeletal muscle plays an important role in maintaining the stability of the lumbar region. However, there is conflicting evidence regarding the effects of exercise on trunk muscle morphology. To systematically review the literature on the effects of exercise training on lower trunk muscle morphology to determine the comparative effectiveness of different exercise interventions. A systematic search strategy was conducted in the following databases: PubMed, SportDiscus, CINAHL, the Cochrane Library and PEDro. We included full, peer-reviewed, prospective longitudinal studies, including randomized controlled trials and single-group designs, such as pre- to post-intervention and crossover studies, reporting on the effect of exercise training on trunk muscle morphology. Study quality was assessed with the Cochrane risk-of-bias tool. We classified each exercise intervention into four categories, based on the primary exercise approach: motor control, machine-based resistance, non-machine-based resistance or cardiovascular. Treatment effects were estimated using within-group standardized mean differences (SMDs). The systematic search identified 1,911 studies; of which 29 met our selection criteria: motor control (n = 12), machine-based resistance (n = 10), non-machine-based resistance (n = 5) and cardiovascular (n = 2). Fourteen studies (48 %) reported an increase in trunk muscle size following exercise training. Among positive trials, the largest effects were reported by studies testing combined motor control and non-machine-based resistance exercise (SMD [95 % CI] = 0.66 [0.06 to 1.27] to 3.39 [2.80 to 3.98]) and machine-based resistance exercise programmes (SMD [95 % CI] = 0.52 [0.01 to 1.03] to 1.79 [0.87 to 2.72]). Most studies investigating the effects of non-machine-based resistance exercise reported no change in trunk muscle morphology, with one study reporting a medium effect on trunk muscle size (SMD [95 % CI] = 0.60 [0.03 to 1.16]). Cardiovascular exercise

  13. Perceived loading and muscle activity during hip strengthening exercises

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brandt, Mikkel; Jakobsen, Markus Due; Thorborg, Kristian

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Decreased hip muscle strength is frequently reported in patients with hip injury or pathology. Furthermore, soccer players suffering from groin injury show decreased strength of hip muscles. Estimating 10-repetition maximum can be time-consuming and difficult, thus, using the Borg...... category rating 10 scale (Borg CR10 scale) can be a useful tool for estimating the intensity of exercise. The aims of this study were 1) to investigate the feasibility of the use of the Borg CR10 scale for rating strength training intensity of the hip abductor and hip adductor muscles, and 2) to compare...... hip muscle activity during hip abduction and hip adduction exercises using elastic resistance and isotonic machines, using electromyography (EMG). METHODS: EMG activity was recorded from 11 muscles at the hip, thigh and trunk during hip adduction and hip abduction exercises in 16 untrained women...

  14. Pelvic floor muscle assessment outcomes in women with and without provoked vestibulodynia and the impact of a physical therapy program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gentilcore-Saulnier, Evelyne; McLean, Linda; Goldfinger, Corrie; Pukall, Caroline F; Chamberlain, Susan

    2010-02-01

    Physical therapy (PT) may reduce the pain associated with provoked vestibulodynia (PVD) based on previous findings that pelvic floor muscle dysfunction (PFMD) is associated with PVD symptoms. The goals of this study were: (i) to determine whether women with and without PVD differ on measures of pelvic floor muscle (PFM) behavior; and (ii) to assess the impact of PT treatment for women with PVD on these measures. Eleven women with PVD and 11 control women completed an assessment evaluating PFM behavior using surface electromyography (SEMG) recordings and a digital intravaginal assessment. Women with PVD repeated the assessment after they had undergone eight PT treatment sessions of manual therapy, biofeedback, electrical stimulation, dilator insertions, and home exercises. Superficial and deep PFM SEMG tonic activity and phasic activity in response to a painful pressure stimulus, PFM digital assessment variables (tone, flexibility, relaxation capacity, and strength). At pretreatment, women with PVD had higher tonic SEMG activity in their superficial PFMs compared with the control group, whereas no differences were found in the deep PFMs. Both groups demonstrated contractile responses to the painful pressure stimulus that were significantly higher in the superficial as compared with the deep PFMs, with the responses in the PVD group being higher than those in control women. Women with PVD had higher PFM tone, decreased PFM flexibility and lower PFM relaxation capacity compared with control women. Posttreatment improvements included less PFM responsiveness to pain, less PFM tone, improved vaginal flexibility, and improved PFM relaxation capacity, such that women with PVD no longer differed from controls on these measures. Women with PVD demonstrated altered PFM behavior when compared with controls, providing empirical evidence of PFMD, especially at the superficial layer. A PT rehabilitation program specifically targeting PFMD normalized PFM behavior in women with PVD.

  15. [Anatomical characteristics of the pelvic floor muscles in young nulliparous women based on three-dimensional MRI].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ping, Liu; Ruolan, Chen; Chunlin, Chen; Lu, Huang; Chuanjia, Guo; Lan, Chen; Cheng, Peng; Jun, Wang; Kedan, Liao; Xuan, Liang; Jianping, Wang; Daokun, Ren; Huanqing, Tan; Lei, Tang; Shizhen, Zhong

    2014-05-01

    To analyse anatomical characteristics of the pelvic floor in young nulliparous volunteers based on three-dimensional MRI. Thin-slice MRI was performed in 25 young nulliparous volunteers in Southern Medical University, MRI were imported into Mimics 10.01 for 3D reconstruction.Using 3D models we measured follow indicators: the levator ani muscle volume (LVOL) , levator plate angle (LPA), levator hiatus width (LH-W)and length (LH-L), distance between symphysis and levator sling muscle (LSG). (1) 25 cases of pelvic three-dimensional models was successfully constructed, including the pelvis, pelvic organs and the pelvic floor muscles (including the ischial coccyx muscle, levator ani muscle and its various components, perineal muscles), the models could be able to clearly reflect the level of the pelvic floor muscles; (2) 25 cases of levator ani muscle measurement results:LVOL: (34 ± 6) cm(3), LPA: (43 ± 4) °, LH-W: (33 ± 4) mm, LH-L: (54 ± 5) mm, left LSG: (18.8 ± 2.5) mm, right LSG: (18.3 ± 2.5) mm. It is an effective way to use the computer to reconstruct the 3D model of female pelvic floor muscles using MRI data set. The quantitative analysis of levator ani muscle three-dimensional model can be assessed pelvic floor function, which is of great value in clinical practice.It is helpful to understand the pelvic floor disorders pathogenesis, clinical diagnosis, treatment options and treatment evaluation to provide reference standards.

  16. Muscle activation during selected strength exercises in women with chronic neck muscle pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Lars L; Kjaer, Michael; Andersen, Christoffer H

    2008-01-01

    selected strengthening exercises in women undergoing rehabilitation for chronic neck muscle pain (defined as a clinical diagnosis of trapezius myalgia). SUBJECTS: The subjects were 12 female workers (age=30-60 years) with a clinical diagnosis of trapezius myalgia and a mean baseline pain intensity of 5......BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Muscle-specific strength training has previously been shown to be effective in the rehabilitation of chronic neck muscle pain in women. The aim of this study was to determine the level of activation of the neck and shoulder muscles using surface electromyography (EMG) during...... muscle pain. Several of the strength exercises had high activation of neck and shoulder muscles in women with chronic neck pain. These exercises can be used equally in the attempt to achieve a beneficial treatment effect on chronic neck muscle pain....

  17. Pelvic-floor muscle rehabilitation in erectile dysfunction and premature ejaculation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavoisier, Pierre; Roy, Pascal; Dantony, Emmanuelle; Watrelot, Antoine; Ruggeri, Jean; Dumoulin, Sébastien

    2014-12-01

    In men, involuntary or voluntary ischiocavernosus muscle contractions after erection lead to intracavernous blood pressures far higher than the systolic pressure, which builds and maintains penile rigidity. Thus, erectile dysfunction may be partly due to ischiocavernosus muscle atrophy and may be treated by rehabilitation interventions. The purpose of this study was to determine whether pelvic-floor muscle strengthening interventions could be associated with increases in intracavernous pressure that would increase penile rigidity. An observational study was conducted. One hundred twenty-two men with isolated erectile dysfunction and 108 men with isolated premature ejaculation participated (no neuromuscular diseases or previous perineal rehabilitation). Thirty-minute sessions of voluntary contractions coupled with electrical stimulation were designed to increase ischiocavernosus muscle strength (monitored through intracavernous pressure increase). A linear mixed-effects model per group analyzed separately, then jointly, the maximum change in pressure (ΔP) and the maximum baseline (ie, respectively, the average contraction-generated difference in intracavernous pressure and the intracavernous pressure plateau at full erection, both measured during the highest moving average of the best 2 minutes of each session). Over 20 sessions, the maximum ΔP increased in erectile dysfunction as well as in premature ejaculation (87% and 88%, respectively, in men with positive trends). The maximum baseline also increased (99% and 72%, respectively, in men with positive trends). The joint modeling indicated that the mean expected progressions of the intracavernous pressure after 5 sessions in erectile dysfunction and premature ejaculation were 62.85 and 64.15 cm H2O, respectively. Indirect measurements were obtained of intracavernous pressure and ischiocavernosus muscle force. Pelvic-floor muscle rehabilitation was found to be beneficial in erectile dysfunction. However, its

  18. Prevalence of urinary incontinence and pelvic floor muscle dysfunction in primiparae two years after cesarean section: cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbosa, Angélica Mércia Pascon; Marini, Gabriela; Piculo, Fernanda; Rudge, Cibele Vieira Cunha; Calderon, Iracema Mattos Paranhos; Rudge, Marilza Vieira Cunha

    2013-01-01

    There is uncertainty in the literature regarding the theory that obstetric events and pelvic floor injuries give rise to lower risk of subsequent urinary incontinence among women delivering via cesarean section than among women delivering vaginally. The objective of this study was to assess the two-year postpartum prevalence of urinary incontinence and pelvic floor muscle dysfunction and the factors responsible for them. Cross-sectional study, conducted in a public university. 220 women who had undergone elective cesarean section or vaginal childbirth two years earlier were selected. Their urinary incontinence symptoms were investigated, and their pelvic floor muscle dysfunction was assessed using digital palpation and a perineometer. The two-year urinary incontinence prevalences following vaginal childbirth and cesarean section were 17% and 18.9%, respectively. The only risk factor for pelvic floor muscle dysfunction was weight gain during pregnancy. Body mass index less than 25 kg/m 2 and normal pelvic floor muscle function protected against urinary incontinence. Gestational urinary incontinence increased the risk of two-year postpartum urinary incontinence. Gestational urinary incontinence was a crucial precursor of postpartum urinary incontinence. Weight gain during pregnancy increased the subsequent risk of pelvic floor muscle dysfunction, and elective cesarean section did not prevent urinary incontinence.

  19. Prevalence of urinary incontinence and pelvic floor muscle dysfunction in primiparae two years after cesarean section: cross-sectional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angélica Mércia Pascon Barbosa

    Full Text Available CONTEXT AND OBJECTIVE There is uncertainty in the literature regarding the theory that obstetric events and pelvic floor injuries give rise to lower risk of subsequent urinary incontinence among women delivering via cesarean section than among women delivering vaginally. The objective of this study was to assess the two-year postpartum prevalence of urinary incontinence and pelvic floor muscle dysfunction and the factors responsible for them. DESIGN AND SETTING Cross-sectional study, conducted in a public university. METHODS 220 women who had undergone elective cesarean section or vaginal childbirth two years earlier were selected. Their urinary incontinence symptoms were investigated, and their pelvic floor muscle dysfunction was assessed using digital palpation and a perineometer. RESULTS The two-year urinary incontinence prevalences following vaginal childbirth and cesarean section were 17% and 18.9%, respectively. The only risk factor for pelvic floor muscle dysfunction was weight gain during pregnancy. Body mass index less than 25 kg/m 2 and normal pelvic floor muscle function protected against urinary incontinence. Gestational urinary incontinence increased the risk of two-year postpartum urinary incontinence. CONCLUSION Gestational urinary incontinence was a crucial precursor of postpartum urinary incontinence. Weight gain during pregnancy increased the subsequent risk of pelvic floor muscle dysfunction, and elective cesarean section did not prevent urinary incontinence.

  20. The effect of whole body vibration exercise on muscle activation ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    African Journal for Physical Activity and Health Sciences ... The effect of whole body vibration exercise (WBV) on muscle activation has recently been a topic for discussion amongst some researchers. ... Participants then performed two different exercises: standing calf raises and prone bridging, without and with WBV.

  1. Muscle metabolism during graded quadriceps exercise in man

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Helge, Jørn W; Stallknecht, Bente; Galbo, Henrik

    2007-01-01

    )) increased (Pglycogen breakdown always increased with exercise......, oxidation of plasma free fatty acids increases and accordingly oxidation of other fat sources decreases. These findings are in contrast to whole body measurements performed during graded exercise involving a large muscle mass during which fat oxidation peaks at around 60% of ....

  2. Muscle interstitial potassium kinetics during intense exhaustive exercise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nordsborg, Nikolai; Mohr, Magni; Pedersen, Lasse Dannemann

    2003-01-01

    Interstitial K+ ([K+]i) was measured in human skeletal muscle by microdialysis during exhaustive leg exercise, with (AL) and without (L) previous intense arm exercise. In addition, the reproducibility of the [K+]i determinations was examined. Possible microdialysis-induced rupture of the sarcolem...

  3. Skeletal muscle perfusion measured by positron emission tomography during exercise

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ament, W; Lubbers, J; Rakhorst, G; Vaalburg, W; Verkerke, GJ; Paans, AMJ; Willemsen, ATM

    1998-01-01

    The applicability of (H2O)-O-15-positron emission tomographic (PET) imaging for the assessment of skeletal muscle perfusion during exercise was investigated in five healthy subjects performing intermittent isometric contractions on a calf ergometer. The workload of the left calf muscles was kept

  4. Strength training and aerobic exercise training for muscle disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Voet, N.B.M.; Kooi, E.L. van der; Riphagen, I.I.; Lindeman, E.; Engelen, B.G.M. van; Geurts, A.C.H.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Strength training or aerobic exercise programmes might optimise muscle and cardiorespiratory function and prevent additional disuse atrophy and deconditioning in people with a muscle disease. This is an update of a review first published in 2004. OBJECTIVES: To examine the safety and

  5. Skeletal muscle glucose uptake during dynamic exercise in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Richter, Erik; Kiens, Bente; Saltin, Bengt

    1988-01-01

    to net lactate uptake. Decreased glucose uptake could not be explained by decreased perfusion. It is concluded that thigh muscle glucose uptake is affected by the size of the total muscle mass engaged in exercise. The decrease in thigh glucose uptake, when arm cranking was added and O2 uptake...

  6. Reliability of the ultrasound measurements of abdominal muscles activity when activated with and without pelvic floor muscles contraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tahan, Nahid; Rasouli, Omid; Arab, Amir Massoud; Khademi, Khosro; Samani, Elham Neisani

    2014-01-01

    Synergistic co-activation of the abdominal and pelvic floor muscles (PFM) has been shown in literature. Some studies have assessed the reliability of ultrasound measures of the abdominal muscles. The aim of this study was to determine the reliability of ultrasound measurements of transverses abdominis (TrA) and obliquus internus (OI) muscles during different conditions (PFM contraction, abdominal hollowing manoeuvre (AHM) with and without PFM contraction) in participants with and without chronic low back pain (LBP). 21 participants (9 with LBP, 12 healthy) participated in the study. The reliability of thickness measurements at rest and during each condition and thickness changes and percentage of this changes at different conditions were assessed. The results showed high reliability of the thickness measurement at rest and during each condition of TrA and OI muscles, moderate to substantial reliability for the thickness change and percentage of thickness change of TrA, and fair to moderate reliability of the thickness change and percentage of thickness change of OI in both groups. Ultrasound imaging can be used as a reliable method for assessment of abdominal muscle activity with and without PFM contraction.

  7. The effect of outpatient physical therapy intervention on pelvic floor muscles in women with urinary incontinence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knorst, Mara R; Resende, Thais L; Santos, Thaís G; Goldim, José R

    2013-01-01

    To assess the effect of a weekly, short-term physical therapy intervention on the pelvic floor muscles and urinary incontinence (UI) among patients of the public health system. Quasi-experimental before-and-after study. Clinical history and function evaluation were performed using perineal bidigital maneuvers and perineometry. The intervention consisted of transvaginal electrical stimulation and pelvic floor kinesiotherapy. Data were analyzed using the paired t test or Wilcoxon signed-rank test, Pearson product-moment correlation coefficient or Spearman's rank correlation coefficient. A value of Pphysical therapy sessions were held on average. There was no difference in perineometry measurements following the intervention (40.6±24.1 versus 41.7±25.4, P=0.098). Muscle function significantly increased (P<0.01) in the bidigital maneuver. The patients reported being continent or satisfied with the treatment in 88.9% of cases. The results demonstrated an increase in muscle function and the attainment of urinary continence or treatment satisfaction in most cases.

  8. The effect of outpatient physical therapy intervention on pelvic floor muscles in women with urinary incontinence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mara R. Knorst

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To assess the effect of a weekly, short-term physical therapy intervention on the pelvic floor muscles and urinary incontinence (UI among patients of the public health system. METHOD: Quasi-experimental before-and-after study. Clinical history and function evaluation were performed using perineal bidigital maneuvers and perineometry. The intervention consisted of transvaginal electrical stimulation and pelvic floor kinesiotherapy. Data were analyzed using the paired t test or Wilcoxon signed-rank test, Pearson product-moment correlation coefficient or Spearman's rank correlation coefficient. A value of P<0.05 was considered significant. RESULTS: Eight-two women 55.1±10.9 years-old were evaluated. Mixed urinary incontinence (MUI, stress urinary incontinence (SUI and urge urinary incontinence (UUI were observed in 52.4%, 36.6% and 11%, respectively. The length of UI was 6.0 years (3.0-10. Approximately 13.64 physical therapy sessions were held on average. There was no difference in perineometry measurements following the intervention (40.6±24.1 versus 41.7±25.4, P=0.098. Muscle function significantly increased (P<0.01 in the bidigital maneuver. The patients reported being continent or satisfied with the treatment in 88.9% of cases. CONCLUSIONS: The results demonstrated an increase in muscle function and the attainment of urinary continence or treatment satisfaction in most cases.

  9. Pelvic floor muscle training decreases hip adductors isometric peak torque in incontinent women: an exploratory study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grasiéla Nascimento Correia

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: The pelvic floor muscle (PFM training is the most common treatment for urinary incontinence (UI, however many women performed the contraction of PFM with associated contraction of abdominal, gluteus and hip adductors muscles. OBJECTIVE: To assess the effects of pelvic floor muscle (PFM training on isometric and isokinetic hip adductors peak torque (PT among women suffering from urinary incontinence (UI. MATERIALS AND METHODS: It is a longitudinal and prospective exploratory study. This study included 15 physically active women aged 45 years old and over, who presented complaints of UI. The PFM function (digital evaluation and perineometry, isometric and isokinetic hip adductors PT and one hour pad test were performed before and after treatment. The PFM training was performed in group, one hour once a week for 12 sessions. RESULTS: Significant improvement of PFM function and pressure level (p = 0.003, and significant decrease of hip adductors isometric PT and one-hour pad test, were found post-treatment. Moderate negative correlations between PFM contraction pressure and hip adductors isokinetic PT for dominant side (DS (r = -0.62; p = 0.03 and non-dominant side (NDS (r = -0.64; p = 0.02; and between PFM fast fibers contraction and hip adductors isometric PT for DS (r = -0.60; p = 0.03 and NDS (r = -0.59; p = 0.04 were also found. CONCLUSIONS: The PFM training decreased hip adductors PT and improved PFM functions and UI.

  10. Trunk muscle electromyographic activity with unstable and unilateral exercises.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behm, David G; Leonard, Allison M; Young, Warren B; Bonsey, W Andrew C; MacKinnon, Scott N

    2005-02-01

    The purpose of this cross-sectional study was to evaluate the effect of unstable and unilateral resistance exercises on trunk muscle activation. Eleven subjects (6 men and 5 women) between 20 and 45 years of age participated. Six trunk exercises, as well as unilateral and bilateral shoulder and chest presses against resistance, were performed on stable (bench) and unstable (Swiss ball) bases. Electromyographic activity of the upper lumbar, lumbosacral erector spinae, and lower-abdominal muscles were monitored. Instability generated greater activation of the lower-abdominal stabilizer musculature (27.9%) with the trunk exercises and all trunk stabilizers (37.7-54.3%) with the chest press. There was no effect of instability on the shoulder press. Unilateral shoulder press produced greater activation of the back stabilizers, and unilateral chest press resulted in higher activation of all trunk stabilizers, when compared with bilateral presses. Regardless of stability, the superman exercise was the most effective trunk-stabilizer exercise for back-stabilizer activation, whereas the side bridge was the optimal exercise for lower-abdominal muscle activation. Thus, the most effective means for trunk strengthening should involve back or abdominal exercises with unstable bases. Furthermore, trunk strengthening can also occur when performing resistance exercises for the limbs, if the exercises are performed unilaterally.

  11. Scapular muscle activity in a variety of plyometric exercises.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maenhout, Annelies; Benzoor, Maya; Werin, Maria; Cools, Ann

    2016-04-01

    Plyometric shoulder exercises are commonly used to progress from slow analytical strength training to more demanding high speed power training in the return to play phase after shoulder injury. The aim of this study was first, to investigate scapular muscle activity in plyometric exercises to support exercise selection in practice and second, to enhance understanding of how scapular muscles are recruited during the back and forth movement phase of these exercises. Thirty-two healthy subjects performed 10 plyometric exercises while surface EMG-activity of the scapular muscles (upper (UT), middle (MT) and lower trapezius (LT) and serratus anterior (SA)) was registered. A high speed camera tracked start and end of the back and forth movement. Mean scapular EMG activity during the 10 exercises ranged from 14.50% to 76.26%MVC for UT, from 15.19% to 96.55%MVC for MT, from 13.18% to 94.35%MVC for LT and from 13.50% to 98.50%MVC for SA. Anova for repeated measures showed significant differences in scapular muscle activity between exercises (pPlyometric shoulder exercises require moderate (31-60%MVC) to high (>60%MVC) scapular muscle activity. Highest MT/LT activity was present in prone plyometric external rotation and flexion. Highest SA activity was found in plyometric external rotation and flexion with Xco and plyometric push up on Bosu. Specific exercises can be selected that recruit minimal levels of UT activity (plyometric external rotation and horizontal abduction or plyometric push up on the Bosu. The results of this study support exercise selection for clinical practice. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Human skeletal muscle glycogen utilization in exhaustive exercise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Joachim; Holmberg, Hans-Christer; Schrøder, Henrik Daa

    2011-01-01

    Although glycogen is known to be heterogeneously distributed within skeletal muscle cells, there is presently little information available about the role of fibre types, utilization and resynthesis during and after exercise with respect to glycogen localization. Here, we tested the hypothesis...... to be influenced by fibre type prior to exercise, as well as carbohydrate availability during the subsequent period of recovery. These findings provide insight into the significance of fibre type-specific compartmentalization of glycogen metabolism in skeletal muscle during exercise and subsequent recovery. ....

  13. Eccentric exercise facilitates mesenchymal stem cell appearance in skeletal muscle.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Carmen Valero

    Full Text Available Eccentric, or lengthening, contractions result in injury and subsequently stimulate the activation and proliferation of satellite stem cells which are important for skeletal muscle regeneration. The discovery of alternative myogenic progenitors in skeletal muscle raises the question as to whether stem cells other than satellite cells accumulate in muscle in response to exercise and contribute to post-exercise repair and/or growth. In this study, stem cell antigen-1 (Sca-1 positive, non-hematopoetic (CD45⁻ cells were evaluated in wild type (WT and α7 integrin transgenic (α7Tg mouse muscle, which is resistant to injury yet liable to strain, 24 hr following a single bout of eccentric exercise. Sca-1⁺CD45⁻ stem cells were increased 2-fold in WT muscle post-exercise. The α7 integrin regulated the presence of Sca-1⁺ cells, with expansion occurring in α7Tg muscle and minimal cells present in muscle lacking the α7 integrin. Sca-1⁺CD45⁻ cells isolated from α7Tg muscle following exercise were characterized as mesenchymal-like stem cells (mMSCs, predominantly pericytes. In vitro multiaxial strain upregulated mMSC stem cells markers in the presence of laminin, but not gelatin, identifying a potential mechanistic basis for the accumulation of these cells in muscle following exercise. Transplantation of DiI-labeled mMSCs into WT muscle increased Pax7⁺ cells and facilitated formation of eMHC⁺DiI⁻ fibers. This study provides the first demonstration that mMSCs rapidly appear in skeletal muscle in an α7 integrin dependent manner post-exercise, revealing an early event that may be necessary for effective repair and/or growth following exercise. The results from this study also support a role for the α7 integrin and/or mMSCs in molecular- and cellular-based therapeutic strategies that can effectively combat disuse muscle atrophy.

  14. Enhancing facial aesthetics with muscle retraining exercises-a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'souza, Raina; Kini, Ashwini; D'souza, Henston; Shetty, Nitin; Shetty, Omkar

    2014-08-01

    Facial attractiveness plays a key role in social interaction. 'Smile' is not only a single category of facial behaviour, but also the emotion of frank joy which is expressed on the face by the combined contraction of the muscles involved. When a patient visits the dental clinic for aesthetic reasons, the dentist considers not only the chief complaint but also the overall harmony of the face. This article describes muscle retraining exercises to achieve control over facial movements and improve facial appearance which may be considered following any type of dental rehabilitation. Muscle conditioning, training and strengthening through daily exercises will help to counter balance the aging effects.

  15. Metabolic control of muscle blood flow during exercise in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boushel, Robert Christopher

    2003-01-01

    that combined blockade of NOS and PGI2, and NOS and cytochrome P450, both attenuate exercise-induced hyperemia in humans. Combined vasodilator blockade studies offer the potential to uncover important interactions and compensatory vasodilator responses. The signaling pathways that link metabolic events evoked...... to exert control of muscle vasodilation. Adenosine, nitric oxide (NO), prostacyclin (PGI2), and endothelial-derived hyperpolarization factor (EDHF) are possible mediators of muscle vasodilation during exercise. In humans, adenosine has been shown to contribute to functional hyperemia as blood flow...... by muscle contraction to vasodilatory signals in the local vascular bed remains an important area of study....

  16. Vaginal pressure during lifting, floor exercises, jogging, and use of hydraulic exercise machines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Dell, Katharine K; Morse, Abraham N; Crawford, Sybil L; Howard, Allison

    2007-12-01

    We recorded vaginal pressure in 12 women without risk factors for prolapse during two activity and exercise sessions, compared exercise and cough pressure, and evaluated method reproducibility and patterns of relative pressure. Portable urodynamic equipment, repeated measures descriptive design, and purposeful sampling were used with nonparametric analysis and visual comparison of pressure graphs. Mean participant age was 31.1 years (range 20-51), and mean body mass index was 22.7 (range 18.5-29.3). Mean pressures (in cm H(2)O): cough, 98.0 (48.0-133.7); standing, 24.0 (15.9-28.5); supine exercise, 34.0 (6.3-91.9); exercise machines, 37.0 (20.3-182.3). Repeated measures correlations for selected measures ranged from 0.66 (p exercises generally produced lower pressure than cough, but individuals varied in pressure exerted. Individual variations warrant further study.

  17. Pelvic floor muscle training as a persistent nursing intervention: Effect on delivery outcome and pelvic floor myodynamia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin Wang

    2014-03-01

    Conclusion: Persistent nursing intervention for pregnant/postpartum women helped to shorten the second stage of labour and contributed to the recovery of postpartum pelvic floor myodynamia. The influence of this intervention on the delivery mode, and rates of episiotomy and perineal laceration remains unknown. Medical staff should strengthen health education programmes that involve pelvic floor functional rehabilitation.

  18. Muscle metabolism during intense, heavy-resistance exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tesch, P A; Colliander, E B; Kaiser, P

    1986-01-01

    The objective of this study was to examine the muscle metabolic changes occurring during intense and prolonged, heavy-resistance exercise. Muscle biopsies were obtained from the vastus lateralis of 9 strength trained athletes before and 30 s after an exercise regimen comprising 5 sets each of front squats, back squats, leg presses and knee extensions using barbell or variable resistance machines. Each set was executed until muscle failure, which occurred within 6-12 muscle contractions. The exercise: rest ratio was approximately 1:2 and the total performance time was 30 min. Concentrations of adenosine triphosphate (ATP), creatine phosphate (CP), creatine, glycogen, glucose, glucose-6-phosphate (G-6-P), alpha-glycerophosphate (alpha-G-P) and lactate were determined on freeze-dried tissue samples using fluorometric assays. Blood samples were analyzed for lactate and glucose. The exercise produced significant reductions in ATP (p less than 0.01) and CP (p less than 0.001), while alpha-G-P more than doubled (p less than 0.05), glucose increased tenfold (p less than 0.001) and G-6-P fourfold (p less than 0.001). Muscle lactate concentration at cessation of exercise averaged 17.3 mmol X kg-1 w. w. Glycogen concentration decreased (p less than 0.001) from 160 to 118 mmol X kg-1 w. w. It is concluded that high intensity, heavy resistance exercise is associated with a high rate of energy utilization through phosphagen breakdown and activation of glycogenolysis.

  19. Exercise and obesity-induced insulin resistance in skeletal muscle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyo-Bum Kwak

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The skeletal muscle in our body is a major site for bioenergetics and metabolism during exercise. Carbohydrates and fats are the primary nutrients that provide the necessary energy required to maintain cellular activities during exercise. The metabolic responses to exercise in glucose and lipid regulation depend on the intensity and duration of exercise. Because of the increasing prevalence of obesity, recent studies have focused on the cellular and molecular mechanisms of obesity-induced insulin resistance in skeletal muscle. Accumulation of intramyocellular lipid may lead to insulin resistance in skeletal muscle. In addition, lipid intermediates (e.g., fatty acyl-coenzyme A, diacylglycerol, and ceramide impair insulin signaling in skeletal muscle. Recently, emerging evidence linking obesity-induced insulin resistance to excessive lipid oxidation, mitochondrial overload, and mitochondrial oxidative stress have been provided with mitochondrial function. This review will provide a brief comprehensive summary on exercise and skeletal muscle metabolism, and discuss the potential mechanisms of obesity-induced insulin resistance in skeletal muscle.

  20. Respiratory Muscle Training and Exercise Endurance at Altitude.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helfer, Samuel; Quackenbush, Joseph; Fletcher, Michael; Pendergast, David R

    2016-08-01

    Climbing and trekking at altitude are common recreational and military activities. Physiological effects of altitude are hypoxia and hyperventilation. The hyperventilatory response to altitude may cause respiratory muscle fatigue and reduce sustained submaximal exercise. Voluntary isocapnic hyperpnea respiratory muscle training (VIHT) improves exercise endurance at sea level and at depth. The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that VIHT would improve exercise time at altitude [3600 m (11,811 ft)] compared to control and placebo groups. Subjects pedaled an ergometer until exhaustion at simulated altitude in a hypobaric chamber while noninvasive arterial saturation (Sao2), ventilation (VE), and oxygen consumption (Vo2) were measured. As expected, Sao2 decreased to 88 ± 4% saturation at rest and to 81 ± 2% during exercise, and was not affected by VIHT. VIHT resulted in a 40% increase in maximal training VE compared to pre-VIHT. Exercise endurance significantly increased 44% after VIHT (P = altitude post-VIHT increased more (49%) for longer (21 min) and decreased less (11% at 25.4 ± 6.7 min). VIHT improved exercise time at altitude and sustained VE. This suggests that VIHT reduced respiratory muscle fatigue and would be useful to trekkers and military personnel working at altitude. Helfer S, Quackenbush J, Fletcher M, Pendergast DR. Respiratory muscle training and exercise endurance at altitutde. Aerosp Med Hum Perform. 2016; 87(8):704-711.

  1. Exercise capacity, muscle strength and fatigue in sarcoidosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcellis, R G J; Lenssen, A F; Elfferich, M D P; De Vries, J; Kassim, S; Foerster, K; Drent, M

    2011-09-01

    The aim of this case-control study was to investigate the prevalence of exercise intolerance, muscle weakness and fatigue in sarcoidosis patients. Additionally, we evaluated whether fatigue can be explained by exercise capacity, muscle strength or other clinical characteristics (lung function tests, radiographic stages, prednisone usage and inflammatory markers). 124 sarcoidosis patients (80 males) referred to the Maastricht University Medical Centre (Maastricht, the Netherlands) were included (mean age 46.6±10.2 yrs). Patients performed a 6-min walk test (6MWT) and handgrip force (HGF), elbow flexor muscle strength (EFMS), quadriceps peak torque (QPT) and hamstring peak torque (HPT) tests. Maximal inspiratory pressure (P(I,max)) was recorded. All patients completed the Fatigue Assessment Scale (FAS) questionnaire. The 6MWT was reduced in 45% of the population, while HGF, EFMS, QPT and HPT muscle strength were reduced in 15, 12, 27 and 18%, respectively. P(I,max) was reduced in 43% of the population. The majority of the patients (81%) reported fatigue (FAS ≥22). Patients with reduced peripheral muscle strength of the upper and/or lower extremities were more fatigued and demonstrated impaired lung functions, fat-free mass, P(I,max), 6MWT and quality of life. Fatigue was neither predicted by exercise capacity, nor by muscle strength. Besides fatigue, exercise intolerance and muscle weakness are frequent problems in sarcoidosis. We therefore recommend physical tests in the multidisciplinary management of sarcoidosis patients, even in nonfatigued patients.

  2. Core muscle activation during Swiss ball and traditional abdominal exercises.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escamilla, Rafael F; Lewis, Clare; Bell, Duncan; Bramblet, Gwen; Daffron, Jason; Lambert, Steve; Pecson, Amanda; Imamura, Rodney; Paulos, Lonnie; Andrews, James R

    2010-05-01

    Controlled laboratory study using a repeated-measures, counterbalanced design. To test the ability of 8 Swiss ball exercises (roll-out, pike, knee-up, skier, hip extension right, hip extension left, decline push-up, and sitting march right) and 2 traditional abdominal exercises (crunch and bent-knee sit-up) on activating core (lumbopelvic hip complex) musculature. Numerous Swiss ball abdominal exercises are employed for core muscle strengthening during training and rehabilitation, but there are minimal data to substantiate the ability of these exercises to recruit core muscles. It is also unknown how core muscle recruitment in many of these Swiss ball exercises compares to core muscle recruitment in traditional abdominal exercises such as the crunch and bent-knee sit-up. A convenience sample of 18 subjects performed 5 repetitions for each exercise. Electromyographic (EMG) data were recorded on the right side for upper and lower rectus abdominis, external and internal oblique, latissimus dorsi, lumbar paraspinals, and rectus femoris, and then normalized using maximum voluntary isometric contractions (MVICs). EMG signals during the roll-out and pike exercises for the upper rectus abdominis (63% and 46% MVIC, respectively), lower rectus abdominis (53% and 55% MVIC, respectively), external oblique (46% and 84% MVIC, respectively), and internal oblique (46% and 56% MVIC, respectively) were significantly greater compared to most other exercises, where EMG signals ranged between 7% to 53% MVIC for the upper rectus abdominis, 7% to 44% MVIC for the lower rectus abdominis, 14% to 73% MVIC for the external oblique, and 16% to 47% MVIC for the internal oblique. The lowest EMG signals were consistently found in the sitting march right exercise. Latissimus dorsi EMG signals were greatest in the pike, knee-up, skier, hip extension right and left, and decline push-up (17%-25% MVIC), and least with the sitting march right, crunch, and bent-knee sit-up exercises (7%-8% MVIC

  3. IMP metabolism in human skeletal muscle after exhaustive exercise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tullson, P. C.; Bangsbo, Jens; Hellsten, Ylva

    1995-01-01

    This study addressed whether AMP deaminase (AMPD)myosin binding occurs with deamination during intense exercise in humans and the extent of purine loss from muscle during the initial minutes of recovery. Male subjects performed cycle exercise (265 +/- 2 W for 4.39 +/- 0.04 min) to stimulate muscle.......9 min postexercise it was 0.43 +/- 0.02 mmol/kg dry muscle. IMP decreased 2.1 +/- 0.3 mmol/kg dry muscle with no change in total adenylates. Total purines declined significantly (P purines to the circulation, whereas...... total purines were unchanged in the occluded leg. Regulation of muscle purine content is a dynamic process that must accommodate rapid changes due to degradation and efflux....

  4. Relationship among vaginal palpation, vaginal squeeze pressure, electromyographic and ultrasonographic variables of female pelvic floor muscles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanessa S. Pereira

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: The proper evaluation of the pelvic floor muscles (PFM is essential for choosing the correct treatment. Currently, there is no gold standard for the assessment of female PFM function. Objective: To determine the correlation between vaginal palpation, vaginal squeeze pressure, and electromyographic and ultrasonographic variables of the female PFM. Method: This cross-sectional study evaluated 80 women between 18 and 35 years of age who were nulliparous and had no pelvic floor dysfunction. PFM function was assessed based on digital palpation, vaginal squeeze pressure, electromyographic activity, bilateral diameter of the bulbocavernosus muscles and the amount of bladder neck movement during voluntary PFM contraction using transperineal bi-dimensional ultrasound. The Pearson correlation was used for statistical analysis (p<0.05. Results: There was a strong positive correlation between PFM function and PFM contraction pressure (0.90. In addition, there was a moderate positive correlation between these two variables and PFM electromyographic activity (0.59 and 0.63, respectively and movement of the bladder neck in relation to the pubic symphysis (0.51 and 0.60, respectively. Conclusions: This study showed that there was a correlation between vaginal palpation, vaginal squeeze pressure, and electromyographic and ultrasonographic variables of the PFM in nulliparous women. The strong correlation between digital palpation and PFM contraction pressure indicated that perineometry could easily be replaced by PFM digital palpation in the absence of equipment.

  5. Clinico-radiologic findings of entrapped inferior oblique muscle in a fracture of the orbital floor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Soo; Kim, Taik-Kun; Kim, Seung-Hyun

    2009-09-01

    A 51-year old man presented with vertical and torsional diplopia after reduction of a blowout fracture at another hospital one year ago. He had no anormalies of head position and 14 prism diopters (PD) right hypertropia (RHT) in the primary position. In upgaze no vertical deviation was found, and hyperdeviation on downgaze was 35PD. Bielschowsky head tilt test showed a negative response. Distinct superior oblique (SO) and inferior rectus (IR) underaction of the right eye was noted but IO overaction was mild on the ocular version test. Double Maddox rod test (DMRT) revealed 10-degree extorsion, but fundus extorsion was minimal in the right eye.Thin-section coronal CT scan showed that there was no fracture line on the anterior orbital floor, but a fracture remained on the posterior orbital floor. Also, the anterior part of the right inferior oblique muscle was vertically reoriented and the medial portion of the inferior oblique muscle was not traced on the coronal CT scan. The patient underwent 14 mm right IO recession and 3 mm right IR resection. One month after the surgery, his vertical and torsional diplopia were eliminated in the primary position.

  6. Lifestyle advice with or without pelvic floor muscle training for pelvic organ prolapse

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Due, Ulla; Brostrøm, Søren; Lose, Gunnar

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION AND HYPOTHESIS: We evaluated the effect of adding pelvic floor muscle training (PFMT) to a structured lifestyle advice program. METHODS: This was a single-blinded randomized trial of women with symptomatic pelvic organ prolapse (POP) stage ≥ II. Participants were randomized to a stru......INTRODUCTION AND HYPOTHESIS: We evaluated the effect of adding pelvic floor muscle training (PFMT) to a structured lifestyle advice program. METHODS: This was a single-blinded randomized trial of women with symptomatic pelvic organ prolapse (POP) stage ≥ II. Participants were randomized...... to a structured lifestyle advice program with or without PFMT. Both groups received similar lifestyle advice in six separate group sessions. The combined group performed group PFMT after an individual assessment. Primary outcome was a global improvement scale at six-month follow-up. Secondary outcomes were...... %) completed six-month follow-up. At both follow-ups, significantly more women in the combined group reported improvement in the global scale. At the three-month follow-up, the combined group only had significant improvement of POP symptoms while only the lifestyle advice group had significant improvement...

  7. Preferential type II muscle fiber damage from plyometric exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macaluso, Filippo; Isaacs, Ashwin W; Myburgh, Kathryn H

    2012-01-01

    Plyometric training has been successfully used in different sporting contexts. Studies that investigated the effect of plyometric training on muscle morphology are limited, and results are controversial with regard to which muscle fiber type is mainly affected. To analyze the skeletal muscle structural and ultrastructural change induced by an acute bout of plyometric exercise to determine which type of muscle fibers is predominantly damaged. Descriptive laboratory study. Research laboratory. Eight healthy, untrained individuals (age = 22 ± 1 years, height = 179.2 ± 6.4 cm, weight = 78.9 ± 5.9 kg). Participants completed an acute bout of plyometric exercise (10 sets of 10 squat-jumps with a 1-minute rest between sets). Blood samples were collected 9 days and immediately before and 6 hours and 1, 2, and 3 days after the acute intervention. Muscle samples were collected 9 days before and 3 days after the exercise intervention. Blood samples were analyzed for creatine kinase activity. Muscle biopsies were analyzed for damage using fluorescent and electron transmission microscopy. Creatine kinase activity peaked 1 day after the exercise bout (529.0 ± 317.8 U/L). Immunofluorescence revealed sarcolemmal damage in 155 of 1616 fibers analyzed. Mainly fast-twitch fibers were damaged. Within subgroups, 7.6% of type I fibers, 10.3% of type IIa fibers, and 14.3% of type IIx fibers were damaged as assessed by losses in dystrophin staining. Similar damage was prevalent in IIx and IIa fibers. Electron microscopy revealed clearly distinguishable moderate and severe sarcomere damage, with damage quantifiably predominant in type II muscle fibers of both the glycolytic and oxidative subtypes (86% and 84%, respectively, versus only 27% of slow-twitch fibers). We provide direct evidence that a single bout of plyometric exercise affected mainly type II muscle fibers.

  8. Patients with Pelvic Floor Muscle Spasm Have a Superior Response to Pelvic Floor Physical Therapy at Specialized Centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polackwich, Alan Scott; Li, Jianbo; Shoskes, Daniel A

    2015-10-01

    Chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome is a common condition that often requires multimodal therapy. Patients with chronic pelvic pain syndrome have a high incidence of pelvic floor spasm, which can be treated with pelvic floor physical therapy. However, this is a specialized skill. We compared outcomes of pelvic floor physical therapy as part of multimodal therapy in patients with chronic pelvic pain syndrome between those treated at our institution and elsewhere. We identified patients from our chronic pelvic pain syndrome registry with pelvic floor spasm who were seen between 2010 and 2014 for more than 1 visit. Patient phenotype was assessed with the UPOINT system and symptom severity was determined by the National Institutes of Health CPSI. A 6-point decrease in CPSI was used to define patient improvement. A total of 82 patients fit the study criteria. Mean age was 41.6 years (range 19 to 75) and median symptom duration was 24 months (range 3 to 240). Mean CPSI was 26.8 (range 10 to 41), the median number of positive UPOINT domains was 3 (range 1 to 6) and 27 patients (32.9%) were treated locally. At followup 9 patients had refused pelvic floor physical therapy, and 24 and 48 had undergone pelvic floor physical therapy elsewhere and at CCF, respectively. The mean change in CPSI was 1.11 ± 4.1 in patients who refused, -3.46 ± 6.7 in those treated elsewhere and -11.3 ± 7.0 in those treated at CCF (p physical therapy at CCF (OR 4.23, p = 0.002) and symptom duration (OR 0.52, p = 0.03) predicted improvement. Pelvic floor physical therapy can be effective for chronic pelvic pain syndrome in patients with pelvic floor spasm. However, the outcome depends on specialty training and experience of therapists. Copyright © 2015 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Effects of strenuous exercise with eccentric muscle contraction: physiological and functional aspects of human skeletal muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanagisawa, Osamu; Kurihara, Toshiyuki; Okumura, Koji; Fukubayashi, Toru

    2010-01-01

    we used magnetic resonance (MR) imaging and ultrasonography in combination with a dynamometer to assess physiological and functional aspects of the skeletal muscles after strenuous exercise that included eccentric contraction. seven male subjects (mean age, 21.7 years) performed ankle plantar flexion that included eccentric contraction and underwent diffusion-weighted MR imaging for calculation of the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) of the triceps surae muscles. We used ultrasonography combined with a dynamometer to measure the displacement of the myotendinous junction (MTJ) of the medial gastrocnemius and maximal isometric force during ankle plantar flexion. We also assessed the level of muscle soreness of the calf using a visual analogue scale. We measured these parameters before exercise and one, 2, 3, 5, and 8 days after exercise and examined significant changes from the pre-exercise value using repeated-measures analysis of variance with Dunnett's test for each measurement parameter. one day after exercise, we observed increased muscle soreness (Peccentric contraction manifests as muscle soreness and dysfunction early after exercise and later increases water diffusion within damaged muscle.

  10. The 12-month effects of structured lifestyle advice and pelvic floor muscle training for pelvic organ prolapse

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Due, Ulla; Brostrøm, Søren; Lose, Gunnar

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: We evaluated the 12-month effects of adding pelvic floor muscle training to a lifestyle advice program in women with symptomatic pelvic organ prolapse stage II-III and the number of women who had sought further treatment. MATERIAL AND METHODS: This study was a 12-month follow up...... of a randomized controlled trial comparing a structured lifestyle advice program alone (lifestyle group) or in combination with pelvic floor muscle training (training and lifestyle group). Both programs consisted of six separate group sessions within 12 weeks. RESULTS: Data were available from 83 (76%) of the 109...... surgery. More severe anterior prolapse and more bladder symptoms at the 3-month follow up were significantly associated with having sought further treatment in both groups. CONCLUSIONS: At 12-month follow up, the effects of adding pelvic floor muscle training to a structured lifestyle advice program were...

  11. Air to muscle O2 delivery during exercise at altitude

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Calbet, J.A.; Lundby, C.

    2009-01-01

    Hypoxia-induced hyperventilation is critical to improve blood oxygenation, particularly when the arterial Po2 lies in the steep region of the O2 dissociation curve of the hemoglobin (ODC). Hyperventilation increases alveolar Po2 and, by increasing pH, left shifts the ODC, increasing arterial...... saturation (Sao2) 6 to 12 percentage units. Pulmonary gas exchange (PGE) is efficient at rest and, hence, the alveolar-arterial Po2 difference (Pao2-Pao2) remains close to 0 to 5mm Hg. The (Pao2-Pao2) increases with exercise duration and intensity and the level of hypoxia. During exercise in hypoxia...... and LBF achieve values similar to normoxia. Although the Po2 gradient driving O2 diffusion into the muscles is reduced in hypoxia, similar levels of muscle O2 diffusion are observed during small-mass exercise in chronic hypoxia and in normoxia, indicating that humans have a functional reserve in muscle O2...

  12. Muscle weakness, afferent sensory dysfunction and exercise in knee osteoarthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roos, Ewa M.; Herzog, Walter; Block, Joel A

    2011-01-01

    Lower-extremity muscle strength and afferent sensory dysfunction, such as reduced proprioceptive acuity, are potentially modifiable putative risk factors for knee osteoarthritis (OA). Findings from current studies suggest that muscle weakness is a predictor of knee OA onset, while there is confli...... with previous knee injuries) are easily identified, and may benefit from exercise interventions to prevent or delay OA onset....... there is conflicting evidence regarding the role of muscle weakness in OA progression. In contrast, the literature suggests a role for afferent sensory dysfunction in OA progression but not necessarily in OA onset. The few pilot exercise studies performed in patients who are at risk of incident OA indicate...... a possibility for achieving preventive structure or load modifications. In contrast, large randomized controlled trials of patients with established OA have failed to demonstrate beneficial effects of strengthening exercises. Subgroups of individuals who are at increased risk of knee OA (such as those...

  13. Effect of exercise on insulin action in human skeletal muscle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Richter, Erik; Mikines, K J; Galbo, Henrik

    1989-01-01

    even though indirect estimates indicated net glycogen synthesis. In contrast, in exercised muscle estimated and biopsy-verified increases in muscle glycogen concentration agreed. Local contraction-induced increases in insulin sensitivity and responsiveness play an important role in postexercise......The effect of 1 h of dynamic one-legged exercise on insulin action in human muscle was studied in 6 healthy young men. Four hours after one-legged knee extensions, a three-step sequential euglycemic hyperinsulinemic clamp combined with arterial and bilateral femoral vein catheterization...... was performed. Increased insulin action on glucose uptake was found in the exercised compared with the rested thigh at mean plasma insulin concentrations of 23, 40, and 410 microU/ml. Furthermore, prior contractions directed glucose uptake toward glycogen synthesis and increased insulin effects on thigh O2...

  14. Pelvic floor muscle training for overactive bladder symptoms – A prospective study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fátima Fitz

    Full Text Available Summary Introduction: Pelvic floor muscle training (PFMT involves the contraction of the puborectal, anal sphincter and external urethral muscles, inhibiting the detrusor contraction, what justify its use in the treatment of overactive bladder (OAB symptoms. Objective: To verify the effects of isolated PFMT on the symptoms of OAB. Method: Prospective clinical trial with 27 women with mixed urinary incontinence (MUI, with predominance of OAB symptoms and loss ≥ 2 g in the pad test. It was evaluated: pelvic floor muscles (PFMs function (digital palpation and manometry; urinary symptoms (nocturia, frequency and urinary loss; degree of discomfort of OAB symptoms; and quality of life (Incontinence Quality-of-Life Questionnaire [I-QoL]. The PFMT program consisted of 24 outpatient sessions (2x/week + home PFMT. The Mann-Whitney and Wilcoxon tests (with a significance level of 5% were used to analyse the data. Results: There was a significant improvement of the urinary symptoms to the pad test (5.8±9.7, p<0.001, urinary loss (0.7±1.1, p=0.005 and nocturia (0.8±0.9, p=0.011. Reduction in the degree of discomfort of urinary symptoms was observed according to OAB-V8 questionnaire (10.0±7.7, p=0.001. There were also significant results in PFMs function: Oxford (3.6±0.9, p=0.001, endurance (5.2±1.8, p<0.001, fast (8.9±1.5, p<0.001 and manometry (26.6±15.8, p=0.003. In addition, quality of life had a significant improvement in the three domains evaluated by I-QoL. Conclusion: The PFMT without any additional guidelines improves the symptomatology, the function of PFMs and the quality of life of women with OAB symptoms.

  15. Exercise, GLUT4, and Skeletal Muscle Glucose Uptake

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Richter, Erik; Hargreaves, Mark

    2013-01-01

    Glucose is an important fuel for contracting muscle, and normal glucose metabolism is vital for health. Glucose enters the muscle cell via facilitated diffusion through the GLUT4 glucose transporter which translocates from intracellular storage depots to the plasma membrane and T-tubules upon...... muscle contraction. Here we discuss the current understanding of how exercise-induced muscle glucose uptake is regulated. We briefly discuss the role of glucose supply and metabolism and concentrate on GLUT4 translocation and the molecular signaling that sets this in motion during muscle contractions....... Contraction-induced molecular signaling is complex and involves a variety of signaling molecules including AMPK, Ca(2+), and NOS in the proximal part of the signaling cascade as well as GTPases, Rab, and SNARE proteins and cytoskeletal components in the distal part. While acute regulation of muscle glucose...

  16. Resistance exercise reverses aging in human skeletal muscle.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon Melov

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Human aging is associated with skeletal muscle atrophy and functional impairment (sarcopenia. Multiple lines of evidence suggest that mitochondrial dysfunction is a major contributor to sarcopenia. We evaluated whether healthy aging was associated with a transcriptional profile reflecting mitochondrial impairment and whether resistance exercise could reverse this signature to that approximating a younger physiological age. Skeletal muscle biopsies from healthy older (N = 25 and younger (N = 26 adult men and women were compared using gene expression profiling, and a subset of these were related to measurements of muscle strength. 14 of the older adults had muscle samples taken before and after a six-month resistance exercise-training program. Before exercise training, older adults were 59% weaker than younger, but after six months of training in older adults, strength improved significantly (P<0.001 such that they were only 38% lower than young adults. As a consequence of age, we found 596 genes differentially expressed using a false discovery rate cut-off of 5%. Prior to the exercise training, the transcriptome profile showed a dramatic enrichment of genes associated with mitochondrial function with age. However, following exercise training the transcriptional signature of aging was markedly reversed back to that of younger levels for most genes that were affected by both age and exercise. We conclude that healthy older adults show evidence of mitochondrial impairment and muscle weakness, but that this can be partially reversed at the phenotypic level, and substantially reversed at the transcriptome level, following six months of resistance exercise training.

  17. Coordinated collagen and muscle protein synthesis in human patella tendon and quadriceps muscle after exercise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Miller, Benjamin F; Olesen, Jens L; Hansen, Mette

    2005-01-01

    We hypothesized that an acute bout of strenuous, non-damaging exercise would increase rates of protein synthesis of collagen in tendon and skeletal muscle but these would be less than those of muscle myofibrillar and sarcoplasmic proteins. Two groups (n = 8 and 6) of healthy young men were studie...

  18. Scintigraphic evaluation of muscle damage following extreme exercise: concise communication

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matin, P.; Lang, G.; Carretta, R.; Simon, G.

    1983-04-01

    Total body Tc-99m pyrophosphate scintigraphy was performed on 11 ''ultramarathon'' runners to assess the ability of nuclear medicine techniques to evaluate skeletal-muscle injury due to exercise. We found increased muscle radionuclide concentration in 90% of the runners. The pattern of muscle uptake correlated with the regions of maximum pain. The detection of exercise-induced rhabdomyolysis appeared to be best when scintigraphy was performed within 48 hr after the race, and to be almost undetectable after about a week. It was possible to differentiate muscle injury from joint and osseous abnormalities such as bone infarct or stress fracture. Although 77% of the runners had elevated serum creatine kinase MB activity, cardiac scintigraphy showed no evidence of myocardial injury.

  19. Scintigraphic evaluation of muscle damage following extreme exercise: concise communication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matin, P.; Lang, G.; Carretta, R.; Simon, G.

    1983-01-01

    Total body Tc-99m pyrophosphate scintigraphy was performed on 11 ''ultramarathon'' runners to assess the ability of nuclear medicine techniques to evaluate skeletal-muscle injury due to exercise. We found increased muscle radionuclide concentration in 90% of the runners. The pattern of muscle uptake correlated with the regions of maximum pain. The detection of exercise-induced rhabdomyolysis appeared to be best when scintigraphy was performed within 48 hr after the race, and to be almost undetectable after about a week. It was possible to differentiate muscle injury from joint and osseous abnormalities such as bone infarct or stress fracture. Although 77% of the runners had elevated serum creatine kinase MB activity, cardiac scintigraphy showed no evidence of myocardial injury

  20. Muscle-damaging exercise affects isokinetic torque more at short muscle length.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skurvydas, Albertas; Brazaitis, Marius; Kamandulis, Sigitas

    2011-05-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the differences in the length-dependent changes in quadriceps muscle torque during voluntary isometric and isokinetic contractions performed after severe muscle-damaging exercise. Thirteen physically active men (age = 23.8 ± 3.2 years, body weight = 77.2 ± 4.5 kg) performed stretch-shortening cycle (SSC) exercise comprising 100 drop jumps with 30-second intervals between each jump. Changes in the voluntary and electrically evoked torque in concentric and isometric conditions at different muscle lengths, muscle soreness, and plasma creatine kinase (CK) activity were assessed within 72 hours after SSC exercise. Isokinetic knee extension torque decreased significantly (p torque were significantly smaller at 80° (where 180° = full knee extension) than at 110-130°. At 2 minutes after SSC exercise, the optimal angle for isokinetic knee extension torque shifted by 9.5 ± 8.9° to a longer muscle length (p torque at low-frequency (20-Hz) stimulation decreased significantly more at a knee joint angle of 130° than at 90°. The subjects felt acute muscle pain and CK activity in the blood increased to 1,593.9 ± 536.2 IU·L⁻¹ within 72 hours after SSC exercise (p muscle-damaging exercise on isokinetic torque is greatest for contractions at short muscle lengths. These findings have practical importance because the movements in most physical activities are dynamic in nature, and the decrease in torque at various points in the range of motion during exercise might affect overall performance.

  1. Can quality of life be improved by pelvic floor muscle training in women with urinary incontinence after ischemic stroke?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tibaek, Sigrid; Jensen, Rigmor; Lindskov, Grethe

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of pelvic floor muscle training in women with urinary incontinence after ischemic stroke measured by quality of life (QoL) parameters. Three hundred thirty-nine medical records of stroke patients were searched. Twenty-six subjects were randomised...... to a Treatment Group or a Control Group in a single blinded, randomised study design. The intervention included 12 weeks of standardised pelvic floor muscle training. The outcome was measured by the Short Form 36 (SF-36) Health Survey Questionnaire and The Incontinence Impact Questionnaire (IIQ). Twenty...

  2. Acute exercise remodels promoter methylation in human skeletal muscle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barrès, Romain; Yan, Jie; Egan, Brendan

    2012-01-01

    DNA methylation is a covalent biochemical modification controlling chromatin structure and gene expression. Exercise elicits gene expression changes that trigger structural and metabolic adaptations in skeletal muscle. We determined whether DNA methylation plays a role in exercise-induced gene...... methylation of PGC-1a, PDK4, and PPAR-d was markedly decreased in mouse soleus muscles 45 min after ex vivo contraction. In L6 myotubes, caffeine exposure induced gene hypomethylation in parallel with an increase in the respective mRNA content. Collectively, our results provide evidence that acute gene...

  3. Cricothyroid muscle function and vocal fold stability in exercising horses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holcombe, Susan J; Rodriguez, Katie; Lane, Jennifer; Caron, John P

    2006-08-01

    To determine (1) if the cricothyroid muscle had respiratory-related electromyographic (EMG) activity that increased with respiratory effort and (2) if bilateral cricothyroid myotomy resulted in vocal fold instability and collapse in exercising horses. Experimental. Seven (3 EMG; 4 cricothyroid myotomy) Standardbred horses. Three horses exercised on a treadmill at speeds corresponding to the speed that produced maximum heart rate (HR(max)), 75% of maximum heart rate (HR(75%max)), and 50% of maximum heart rate (HR(50%max)) for 60 seconds at each speed while EMG activity of the cricothyroid muscle and nasopharyngeal pressures were measured. Another 4 normal horses were exercised on the treadmill at HR(max) and HR(75%max) for 60 seconds at each speed before and after bilateral cricothyroid myotomy. Upper airway pressures were measured and videoendoscopic examinations were performed and videotaped at each speed. Peak phasic EMBG activity of the cricothyroid muscle was coincident with inspiration and increased with treadmill speed. Bilateral cricothyroid myotomy resulted in vocal fold collapse in all horses. Mean peak inspiratory pressures were significantly more negative compared with control values at both HR(max) and HR(75%max). Cricothyroid muscle dysfunction may be implicated in vocal fold collapse and likely causes inspiratory airway obstruction in exercising horses. Conditions compromising cricothyroid muscle function or motor innervation could result in vocal fold collapse.

  4. Assessment of pelvic floor muscle function in women with and without low back pain using transabdominal ultrasound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arab, Amir Massoud; Behbahani, Roxana Bazaz; Lorestani, Leila; Azari, Afsaneh

    2010-06-01

    Pelvic floor muscle (PFM) dysfunction has been recently associated with the development of low back pain (LBP). Transabdominal ultrasound imaging has been established as an appropriate method for visualizing and measuring PFM function. No study has directly evaluated PFM function in individuals with and without LBP. The purpose of this study was to investigate the PFM function in women with and without LBP using transabdominal ultrasound. Convenience sample of 40 non-pregnant female participated in the study. Subjects were categorized into two groups: with LBP (n = 20) and without LBP (n = 20). The amount of bladder base movement on ultrasound (normalized to body mass index) was measured in all subjects and considered as an indicator of PFM function. Statistical analysis (Independent t-test) revealed significant difference in transabdominal ultrasound measurements for PFM function between the two groups (P = 0.04, 95% CI of difference: 0.002-0.27). The results of this study indicate PFM dysfunction in individuals with LBP compared to those without LBP. The results could be beneficial to clinicians when assessing and prescribing therapeutic exercises for patients with LBP.

  5. The Effect of Smoking on Muscle Adaptation to Exercise Stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-01

    orthopedic surgeon examined the subject and differential diagnosis focused on compartment syndrome, rhabdomyolysis , infection, and hematoma. Compartment... rhabdomyolysis (i.e. ! W81XWH- 10-1-0044 The Effect of Smoking on Muscle Adaptation to Exercise #"! danger of renal failure). X-ray of the thigh...promoting a hematoma. These data emphasize the importance of limiting activity for at least a week after a muscle biopsy. Key words: rhabdomyolysis

  6. The effect of bridge exercise method on the strength of rectus abdominis muscle and the muscle activity of paraspinal muscles while doing treadmill walking with high heels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Taewook; Lee, Jaeseok; Seo, Junghoon; Han, Dongwook

    2017-04-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this research is to investigate the effect of the method of bridge exercise on the change of rectus abdominis muscle and the muscle activity of paraspinal muscles while doing treadmill walking with high heels. [Subjects and Methods] The subjects of this research are healthy female students consisting of 10 persons performing bridge exercises in a supine group, 10 persons performing bridge exercises in a prone group, and 10 persons in a control group while in S university in Busan. Bridge exercise in supine position is performed in hook lying position. Bridge exercise in prone position is plank exercise in prostrate position. To measure the strength of rectus abdominis muscle, maintaining times of the posture was used. To measure the muscle activity of paraspinal muscles, EMG (4D-MT & EMD-11, Relive, Korea) was used. [Results] The strength of rectus abdominis muscle of both bridge exercises in the supine group and bridge exercises in the prone group increases significantly after exercise. The muscle activity of paraspinal muscle such as thoracic parts and lumbar parts in bridge exercises in the prone group decreases statistically while walking on a treadmill with high heels. Muscle activity of thoracic parts paraspinal muscle and bridge exercises in the supine group decreased significantly. [Conclusion] According to this study, we noticed that bridge exercise in a prone position is desirable for women who prefer wearing high heels as a back pain prevention exercise method.

  7. Low intensity exercise training improves skeletal muscle regeneration potential

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tiziana ePietrangelo

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The aim of this study was to determine whether 12 days of low-to-moderate exercise training at low altitude (598 m a.s.l. improves skeletal muscle regeneration in sedentary adult women.Methods: Satellite cells were obtained from the vastus lateralis skeletal muscle of seven women before and after this exercise training at low altitude. They were investigated for differentiation aspects, superoxide anion production, antioxidant enzymes, mitochondrial potential variation after a depolarizing insult, intracellular Ca2+ concentrations, and micro (miRNA expression (miR-1, miR-133, miR-206.Results: In these myogenic populations of adult stem cells, those obtained after exercise training, showed increased Fusion Index and intracellular Ca2+ concentrations. This exercise training also generally reduced superoxide anion production in cells (by 12% to 67%, although not in two women, where there was an increase of ~15% along with a reduced superoxide dismutase activity. miRNA expression showed an exercise-induced epigenetic transcription profile that was specific according to the reduced or increased superoxide anion production of the cells. Conclusions: The present study shows that low-to-moderate exercise training at low altitude improves the regenerative capacity of skeletal muscle in adult women. The differentiation of cells was favored by increased intracellular calcium concentration and increased the fusion index. This low-to-moderate training at low altitude also depicted the epigenetic signature of cells.

  8. Polyphenols in Exercise Performance and Prevention of Exercise-Induced Muscle Damage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Malaguti

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Although moderate physical exercise is considered an essential component of a healthy lifestyle that leads the organism to adapt itself to different stresses, exercise, especially when exhaustive, is also known to induce oxidative stress, inflammation, and muscle damage. Many efforts have been carried out to identify dietary strategies or micronutrients able to prevent or at least attenuate the exercise-induced muscle damage and stress. Unfortunately most studies have failed to show protection, and at the present time data supporting the protective effect of micronutrients, as antioxidant vitamins, are weak and trivial. This review focuses on those polyphenols, present in the plant kingdom, that have been recently suggested to exert some positive effects on exercise-induced muscle damage and oxidative stress. In the last decade flavonoids as quercetin, catechins, and other polyphenols as resveratrol have caught the scientists attention. However, at the present time drawing a clear and definitive conclusion seems to be untimely.

  9. Skeletal muscle aging: influence of oxidative stress and physical exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes, Mariana Janini; Martinez, Paula Felippe; Pagan, Luana Urbano; Damatto, Ricardo Luiz; Cezar, Marcelo Diacardia Mariano; Lima, Aline Regina Ruiz; Okoshi, Katashi; Okoshi, Marina Politi

    2017-03-21

    Skeletal muscle abnormalities are responsible for significant disability in the elderly. Sarcopenia is the main alteration occurring during senescence and a key public health issue as it predicts frailty, poor quality of life, and mortality. Several factors such as reduced physical activity, hormonal changes, insulin resistance, genetic susceptibility, appetite loss, and nutritional deficiencies are involved in the physiopathology of muscle changes. Sarcopenia is characterized by structural, biochemical, molecular and functional muscle changes. An imbalance between anabolic and catabolic intracellular signaling pathways and an increase in oxidative stress both play important roles in muscle abnormalities. Currently, despite the discovery of new targets and development of new drugs, nonpharmacological therapies such as physical exercise and nutritional support are considered the basis for prevention and treatment of age-associated muscle abnormalities. There has been an increase in information on signaling pathways beneficially modulated by exercise; nonetheless, studies are needed to establish the best type, intensity, and frequency of exercise to prevent or treat age-induced skeletal muscle alterations.

  10. Time course of muscle soreness following different types of exercise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vickers, Andrew J

    2001-01-01

    Background Post-exercise muscle soreness is a dull, aching sensation that follows unaccustomed muscular exertion. Primarily on the basis of previous laboratory-based research on eccentric exercise, soreness is usually said to follow an inverted U-shaped curve over time, peaking 24 – 48 hours after exercise. As such, it is often described as "delayed-onset" muscle soreness. In a study of long-distance runners, soreness seemed to peak immediately and then reduce gradually over time. The study is a secondary analysis of clinical trial data that aims to determine whether the time course of soreness following a natural exercise, long-distance running, is different from that following a laboratory-based exercise, bench-stepping. Methods This is a reanalysis of data from three previous clinical trials. The trials included 400 runners taking part in long-distance races and 82 untrained volunteers performing a bench-stepping test. Subjects completed a Likert scale of muscle soreness every morning and evening for the five days following their exercise. Results Interaction between trial and time is highly significant, suggesting a different time course of soreness following running and bench-stepping. 45% of subjects in the bench-stepping trial experienced peak soreness at the third or fourth follow-up (approximately 36 – 48 hours after exercise) compared to only 14% of those in the running trial. The difference between groups is robust to multivariate analysis incorporating possible confounding variables. Conclusion Soreness in runners following long-distance running follows a different time course to that in untrained individuals undertaking bench-stepping. Research on exercise taking place in the laboratory context does not necessarily generalize to exercise undertaken by trained athletes when engaged in their chosen sport. PMID:11701094

  11. Home exercises for pelvic floor in continent women one year after physical therapy treatment for urinary incontinence: an observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krüger, Ana P; Luz, Soraia C T; Virtuoso, Janeisa F

    2011-01-01

    To describe the results of home exercise targeting the pelvic floor in continent women one year after the end of a physical therapy treatment for the following outcomes: functional assessment of the pelvic floor and urinary incontinence. This is an observational study that evaluated fifteen women one year after physical therapy treatment for Stress Urinary Incontinence (SUI). The outcomes for this study were: situations of urinary loss, use of daily protection, practice of home exercises for the pelvic floor, functional assessment of the pelvic floor (FAPF) and patient satisfaction. We also investigated some confounding variables such as hormonal status, number of vaginal deliveries and previous history of episiotomy. One year after completion of physical therapy treatment, we observed that the FAPF median remained stable over time (Median=5, p=0.08). The presence of urinary incontinence was reported by 40% of women in the sample, however, was characterized as mild (i.e. not requiring the use of daily protection). There was also a significant association (p=0.001) between the completion of home exercises (twice or more per week) and the normal clinical status. Confounding variables, which could compromise the clinical status, showed no significant association with the outcomes (p≥0.05). Home exercises contributed to the maintenance of continence following a physical therapy treatment.

  12. Effects of whole-body vibration after eccentric exercise on muscle soreness and muscle strength recovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timon, Rafael; Tejero, Javier; Brazo-Sayavera, Javier; Crespo, Carmen; Olcina, Guillermo

    2016-06-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to investigate whether or not a single whole-body vibration treatment after eccentric exercise can reduce muscle soreness and enhance muscle recovery. [Subjects and Methods] Twenty untrained participants were randomly assigned to two groups: a vibration group (n=10) and control group (n=10). Participants performed eccentric quadriceps training of 4 sets of 5 repetitions at 120% 1RM, with 4 min rest between sets. After that, the vibration group received 3 sets of 1 min whole body vibration (12 Hz, 4 mm) with 30 s of passive recovery between sets. Serum creatine kinase, blood urea nitrogen, muscle soreness (visual analog scale) and muscle strength (peak isometric torque) were assessed. [Results] Creatine kinase was lower in the vibration group than in the control group at 24 h (200.2 ± 8.2 vs. 300.5 ± 26.1 U/L) and at 48 h (175.2 ± 12.5 vs. 285.2 ± 19.7 U/L) post-exercise. Muscle soreness decreased in vibration group compared to control group at 48 h post-exercise (34.1 ± 11.4 vs. 65.2 ± 13.2 mm). [Conclusion] Single whole-body vibration treatment after eccentric exercise reduced delayed onset muscle soreness but it did not affect muscle strength recovery.

  13. Regulation of PGC-1α and exercise training-induced metabolic adaptations in skeletal muscle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brandt, Nina

    and intracellular signalling in human skeletal muscle depend on adrenaline levels or metabolic stress. 2) PGC-1α mediated exercise and exercise training-induced adaptive metabolic responses in mouse skeletal muscle depend on exercise intensity. 3) β-adrenergic signalling contributes to exercise training......-induced metabolic adaptations in mouse skeletal muscle through PGC-1α . Paper I demonstrated that di erences in plasma adrenaline and muscle metabolic stress during exercise do not reinforce exercise-induced PGC-1 α mRNA response in human skeletal muscle. In addition, di erences in exercise-induced AMPK and p38......-adrenergic signaling mediates exercise-induced PGC-1α mRNA responses with most potent stimulation of the alternative promoter of the PGC-1α gene in mouse skeletal muscle but, neither elevated plasma adrenaline nor metabolic stress augment exercise-induced PGC-1α mRNA response in human skeletal muscle. While...

  14. The Effects of Pre-Exercise Ginger Supplementation on Muscle Damage and Delayed Onset Muscle Soreness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumura, Melissa D; Zavorsky, Gerald S; Smoliga, James M

    2015-06-01

    Ginger possesses analgesic and pharmacological properties mimicking non-steroidal antiinflammatory drugs. We aimed to determine if ginger supplementation is efficacious for attenuating muscle damage and delayed onset muscle soreness (DOMS) following high-intensity resistance exercise. Following a 5-day supplementation period of placebo or 4 g ginger (randomized groups), 20 non-weight trained participants performed a high-intensity elbow flexor eccentric exercise protocol to induce muscle damage. Markers associated with muscle damage and DOMS were repeatedly measured before supplementation and for 4 days following the exercise protocol. Repeated measures analysis of variance revealed one repetition maximum lift decreased significantly 24 h post-exercise in both groups (p < 0.005), improved 48 h post-exercise only in the ginger group (p = 0.002), and improved at 72 (p = 0.021) and 96 h (p = 0.044) only in the placebo group. Blood creatine kinase significantly increased for both groups (p = 0.015) but continued to increase only in the ginger group 72 (p = 0.006) and 96 h (p = 0.027) post-exercise. Visual analog scale of pain was significantly elevated following eccentric exercise (p < 0.001) and was not influenced by ginger. In conclusion, 4 g of ginger supplementation may be used to accelerate recovery of muscle strength following intense exercise but does not influence indicators of muscle damage or DOMS. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  15. Gluteal muscle activity during weightbearing and non-weightbearing exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacAskill, Matthew J; Durant, Thomas J S; Wallace, David A

    2014-12-01

    Researchers suggest that decreased strength of the gluteus medius (GMed) and the gluteus maximus (GMax) muscles contributes to the etiology of various orthopedic pathologies of the knee. Currently, equivocal evidence exists regarding Electromyography (EMG) activity of gluteal musculature during weightbearing (WB) and non-weightbearing (NWB) exercise. The purpose of this study was to compare GMed and GMax muscle activation during WB functional exercise and NWB 10 repetition maximum (RM) exercises. Surface EMG electrodes recorded the muscle activity of the GMax and GMed as subjects performed three sets of 10 repetitions of the following exercises: (1) forward step-up, (2) lateral step-up, (3) 10 repetition maximum (10 RM) side-lying hip abduction and (4) 10 RM prone hip extension. The 10 RM resistances were determined one week prior to data collection. The GMed was recruited significantly more during side-lying 10 RM than the remaining exercises (side-lying, 99.9±17% vs. lateral step-up, 61±20%; Forward step-up, 62.7±18.2%; prone, 38±22.2%)(p<0.001). The GMax was recruited to the greatest extent during prone 10 RM hip extension (prone, 100.7±14.5% vs. forward step-up, 28.7±18.7%; lateral step-up, 31±19.9%; side-lying, 38±23.3%)(p<0.001). These results suggest that performing a 10 RM NWB exercise results in greater muscle activation than two functional WB exercise without load in young, healthy individuals. In addition, forward and lateral step-ups failed to effectively recruit the GMax at a high enough level to achieve a strengthening stimulus. The GMed was recruited to a higher extent than the GMax during the stepping tasks which might be further augmented if the activity is performed with an additional external load. III.

  16. Influence of pelvic floor muscle fatigue on stress urinary incontinence: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomaz, Rafaela Prusch; Colla, Cássia; Darski, Caroline; Paiva, Luciana Laureano

    2018-02-01

    Stress urinary incontinence (SUI) is the most common urinary complaint among women and is defined by the International Continence Society as any involuntary loss of urine due to physical effort, sneezing or coughing. Many women with SUI state that the loss of urine occurs after performing repetitive movements, which may suggest that it is the result of fatigue of the pelvic floor muscles (PFM). Thus, we performed the systematic review of the literature on the influence of PFM fatigue on the development or worsening of the symptoms of SUI in women. The PubMed, Scopus, EMBASE, PEDro, LILACS, SciELO, Cochrane Library, Google Scholar, CINAHL and Periódicos CAPES databases were searched for articles using the keywords "fatigue", "pelvic floor", "stress urinary incontinence" and "women", in Portuguese and in English. Methodological quality was assessed using the Downs and Black scale, and the data collected from the studies were analyzed descriptively. Of the 2,010 articles found, five met the inclusion criteria and were analyzed. They were published between 2004 and 2015, and included a total of 30,320 women with ages ranging from 24 to 53.6 years. Of the studies analyzed, three showed an association between fatigue and SUI, and two did not show such an association. This study confirmed that PFM fatigue can influence the development and/or worsening of SUI.

  17. Feasibility and acceptability of couple counselling and pelvic floor muscle training after operation for prostate cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karlsen, Randi V; E Bidstrup, Pernille; Hvarness, Helle

    2017-01-01

    Can intervention, which consists of up to six couple counselling sessions, group instruction in pelvic floor muscle training (PFMT), up to three individual PFMT sessions and a DVD home training program. We examined its feasibility on the basis of the recruitment rate, adherence to and acceptability...... of the intervention, the response rate and changes in erectile and sexual functioning measured on the International Index of Erectile Function at baseline and at eight and 12 months. RESULTS: The recruitment rate was 14%. One couple withdrew, six couples attended 1-4 counselling sessions, and all patients attended...... PFMT until continence was achieved. The response rate on outcomes was 85% for patients and 71% for partners. The couples reported that counselling improved their sex life but it did not improve their ability to talk openly about sex. Most patients found that the physiotherapist improved...

  18. Pelvic floor muscle dysfunctions are prevalent in female chronic pelvic pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Loving, S; Thomsen, Thordis; Jaszczak, Poul P.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: No current standardized set of pelvic floor muscle (PFM) outcome measures have been specifically tested for their applicability in a general female chronic pelvic pain (CPP) population. We aimed to compare PFM function between a randomly selected population-based sample of women...... with CPP and age-matched pain-free controls using multiple standardized intravaginal examination measures recommended by the International Continence Society. METHODS: This was a cross-sectional, population-based and controlled study with randomly selected participants among women in Denmark. We reported...... blinded findings from a set of standardized vaginal PFM examination manoeuvres in 50 female participants (24 with CPP, 26 pain free). A preliminary pilot study ensured the intra- and intertester reliability of the test procedure. PFM outcomes were resting tone, relaxation capacity, strength, surface...

  19. Chronic exercise increases insulin binding in muscles but not liver

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonen, A.; Clune, P.A.; Tan, M.H.

    1986-01-01

    It has been postulated that the improved glucose tolerance provoked by chronic exercise is primarily attributable to increased insulin binding in skeletal muscle. Therefore, the authors investigated the effects of progressively increased training (6 wk) on insulin binding by five hindlimb skeletal muscles and in liver. In the trained animals serum insulin levels at rest were lower either in a fed or fasted state and after an oral glucose tolerance test. Twenty-four hours after the last exercise bout sections of the liver, soleus (S), plantaris (P), extensor digitorum longus (EDL), and red (RG) and white gastrocnemius (WG) muscles were pooled from four to six rats. Insulin binding to plasma membranes increased in S, P, and EDL but not in WG or in liver. There were insulin binding differences among muscles. Comparison of rank orders of insulin binding data with published glucose transport data for the same muscles revealed that these parameters do not correspond well. In conclusion, insulin binding to muscle is shown to be heterogeneous and training can increase insulin binding to selected muscles but not liver

  20. Chronic exercise increases insulin binding in muscles but not liver

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bonen, A.; Clune, P.A.; Tan, M.H.

    1986-08-01

    It has been postulated that the improved glucose tolerance provoked by chronic exercise is primarily attributable to increased insulin binding in skeletal muscle. Therefore, the authors investigated the effects of progressively increased training (6 wk) on insulin binding by five hindlimb skeletal muscles and in liver. In the trained animals serum insulin levels at rest were lower either in a fed or fasted state and after an oral glucose tolerance test. Twenty-four hours after the last exercise bout sections of the liver, soleus (S), plantaris (P), extensor digitorum longus (EDL), and red (RG) and white gastrocnemius (WG) muscles were pooled from four to six rats. Insulin binding to plasma membranes increased in S, P, and EDL but not in WG or in liver. There were insulin binding differences among muscles. Comparison of rank orders of insulin binding data with published glucose transport data for the same muscles revealed that these parameters do not correspond well. In conclusion, insulin binding to muscle is shown to be heterogeneous and training can increase insulin binding to selected muscles but not liver.

  1. Influence of pre-exercise muscle glycogen content on exercise-induced transcriptional regulation of metabolic genes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pilegaard, Henriette; Keller, Charlotte; Steensberg, Adam

    2002-01-01

    Transcription of metabolic genes is transiently induced during recovery from exercise in skeletal muscle of humans. To determine whether pre-exercise muscle glycogen content influences the magnitude and/or duration of this adaptive response, six male subjects performed one-legged cycling exercise...

  2. Satellite Cells Contribution to Exercise Mediated Muscle Hypertrophy and Repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bazgir, Behzad; Fathi, Rouhollah; Rezazadeh Valojerdi, Mojtaba; Mozdziak, Paul; Asgari, Alireza

    2017-01-01

    Satellite cells (SCs) are the most abundant skeletal muscle stem cells. They are widely recognized for their contributions to maintenance of muscle mass, regeneration and hypertrophy during the human life span. These cells are good candidates for cell therapy due to their self-renewal capabilities and presence in an undifferentiated form. Presently, a significant gap exists between our knowledge of SCs behavior and their application as a means for human skeletal muscle tissue repair and regeneration. Both physiological and pathological stimuli potentially affect SCs activation, proliferation, and terminal differentiation the former category being the focus of this article. Activation of SCs occurs following exercise, post-training micro-injuries, and electrical stimulation. Exercise, as a potent and natural stimulus, is at the center of numerous studies on SC activation and relevant fields. According to research, different exercise modalities end with various effects. This review article attempts to picture the state of the art of the SCs life span and their engagement in muscle regeneration and hypertrophy in exercise.

  3. Muscle Activity during Unilateral Vs. Bilateral Battle Rope Exercises

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Calatayud, J.; Martin, F.; Colado, J. C.

    2015-01-01

    Calatayud, J, Martin, F, Colado, JC, Benitez, JC, Jakobsen, MD, and Andersen, LL. Muscle activity during unilateral vs. bilateral battle rope exercises. J Strength Cond Res 29(10): 2854-2859, 2015High training intensity is important for efficient strength gains. Although battle rope training is m...

  4. Influence of parity, type of delivery, and physical activity level on pelvic floor muscles in postmenopausal women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varella, Larissa Ramalho Dantas; Torres, Vanessa Braga; Angelo, Priscylla Helouyse Melo; Eugênia de Oliveira, Maria Clara; Matias de Barros, Alef Cavalcanti; Viana, Elizabel de Souza Ramalho; Micussi, Maria Thereza de Albuquerque Barbosa Cabral

    2016-03-01

    [Purpose] The aim of the present study was to assess the influence of parity, type of delivery, and physical activity level on pelvic floor muscles in postmenopausal women. [Subjects and Methods] This was an observational analytic cross-sectional study with a sample of 100 postmenopausal women, aged between 45 and 65 years, divided into three groups according to menopausal stage: hysterectomized and early and late postmenopause. Patients were assessed for sociodemographic and gyneco-obstetric factors and subjected to a muscle strength test and perineometry. Descriptive statistics, ANOVA, Kruskal-Wallis and multiple regression were applied. [Results] The results showed homogeneity in sociodemographic and anthropometric characteristics. There was no difference in pelvic floor muscle function among the three groups. Type of delivery, parity and physical activity level showed no influence on muscle function. [Conclusion] The findings demonstrate that parity, type of delivery, and physical activity level had no influence on pelvic floor muscle pressure in postmenopausal women. One hypothesis to explain these results is the fact that the decline in muscle function in postmenopausal women is related to the female aging process.

  5. Architectural assessment of rhesus macaque pelvic floor muscles: comparison for use as a human model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Amanda M; Cook, Mark S; Esparza, Mary C; Slayden, Ov D; Alperin, Marianna

    2017-10-01

    Animal models are essential to further our understanding of the independent and combined function of human pelvic floor muscles (PFMs), as direct studies in women are limited. To assure suitability of the rhesus macaque (RM), we compared RM and human PFM architecture, the strongest predictor of muscle function. We hypothesized that relative to other models, RM best resembles human PFM. Major architectural parameters of cadaveric human coccygeus, iliococcygeus, and pubovisceralis (pubococcygeus + puborectalis) and corresponding RM coccygeus, iliocaudalis, and pubovisceralis (pubovaginalis + pubocaudalis) were compared using 1- and 2-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) with post hoc testing. Architectural difference index (ADI), a combined measure of functionally relevant structural parameters predictive of length-tension, force-generation, and excursional muscle properties was used to compare PFMs across RM, rabbit, rat, and mouse. RM and human PFMs were similar with respect to architecture. However, the magnitude of similarity varied between individual muscles, with the architecture of the most distinct RM PFM, iliocaudalis, being well suited for quadrupedal locomotion. Except for the pubovaginalis, RM PFMs inserted onto caudal vertebrae, analogous to all tailed animals. Comparison of the PFM complex architecture across species revealed the lowest, thus closest to human, ADI for RM (1.9), followed by rat (2.0), mouse (2.6), and rabbit (4.7). Overall, RM provides the closest architectural representation of human PFM complex among species examined; however, differences between individual PFMs should be taken into consideration. As RM is closely followed by rat with respect to PFM similarity with humans, this less-sentient and substantially cheaper model is a good alternative for PFM studies.

  6. Scapular muscle activity from selected strengthening exercises performed at low and high intensity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Christoffer H; Zebis, Mette K; Saervoll, Charlotte

    2012-01-01

    for proper exercise prescription. This study determines scapular muscle activity during strengthening exercises for scapular muscles performed at low and high intensities (Borg-CR10 level 3 and 8). Surface electromyography (EMG) from selected scapular muscles was recorded during seven strengthening exercises...

  7. Factors influencing postpartum women's willingness to participate in a preventive pelvic floor muscle training program: a web-based survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moossdorff-Steinhauser, Heidi F A; Albers-Heitner, Pytha; Weemhoff, Mirjam; Spaanderman, Marc E A; Nieman, Fred H M; Berghmans, Bary

    2015-12-01

    Pregnancy and delivery are the most prominent risk factors for the onset of pelvic floor injuries and - later-on - urinary incontinence. Supervised pelvic floor muscle training during and after pregnancy is proven effective for the prevention of urinary incontinence on the short term. However, only a minority of women do participate in preventive pelvic floor muscle training programs. Our aim was to analyze willingness to participate (WTP) in an intensive preventive pelvic floor muscle training (PFMT) program and influencing factors, from the perspective of postpartum women, for participation. We included 169 three-month postpartum women in a web-based survey in the Netherlands. Demographic and clinical characteristics, knowledge and experience with PFMT and preconditions for actual WTP were assessed. Main outcome measures were frequencies and percentages for categorical data. Cross tabulations were used to explore the relationship between WTP and various independent categorical variables. A linear regression analysis was done to analyze which variables are associated with WTP. A response rate of 64% (n=169) was achieved. 31% of the women was WTP, 41% was hesitating, 12% already participated in PFMT and 15% was not interested (at all). No statistically significant association was found between WTP and risk or prognostic pelvic floor dysfunction factors. Women already having symptoms of pelvic floor dysfunction such as incontinence and pelvic organ prolapse symptoms were more WTP (p=0.010, p=0.001, respectively) as were women perceiving better general health (ppelvic floor management. Further research should focus on strategies to tackle major barriers and to introduce facilitators for postpartum women to participate in PFMT programs. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Assessment of pelvic floor muscle contraction with palpation, perineometry and transperineal ultrasound: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volløyhaug, I; Mørkved, S; Salvesen, Ø; Salvesen, K Å

    2016-06-01

    To study the correlation between palpation, perineometry and transperineal ultrasound for assessment of pelvic floor muscle contraction and to define a contraction scale for ultrasound measurements. This was a cross-sectional study of 608 women examined with palpation of pelvic floor muscle contraction, using the Modified Oxford Scale, and measurement of the vaginal squeeze pressure with a vaginal balloon connected to a fiber-optic microtip transducer (perineometry). Transperineal ultrasound was used for measurements of levator hiatal area and anteroposterior (AP) diameter in the plane of minimal hiatal dimensions, at rest and on contraction. The pelvic floor muscle contraction was expressed as the percentage difference between values at rest and on contraction. Spearman's rank was used to test for correlation between the different methods of assessment. Significant correlations were found between all assessment methods (P 35% corresponded to strong contractions. We found moderate to strong correlation between ultrasound measurements, palpation and perineometry for assessing pelvic floor muscle contraction. The proportional change in levator hiatal AP diameter was the ultrasound measurement with strongest correlation to palpation and perineometry and formed the basis for the contraction scale for ultrasound measurements. Copyright © 2015 ISUOG. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. Copyright © 2015 ISUOG. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. High prevalence of urinary incontinence and poor knowledge of pelvic floor exercises among women in a health district in Kwazulu-Natal, South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.P. Madombwe

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The purpose of the study was to determine the prevalence and health seeking behaviour of women with urinary incontinence andtheir knowledge of pelvic floor exercises, in a health district in KwaZulu-Natal.Methods: An observational cross-sectional study design was used. BetweenSeptember 2005 and November 2005, a questionnaire was administered to 99 womenaged 21 – 76 years at randomly selected from. Results: The study found that the prevalence of the urinary incontinence was 35% (95% Confidence Interval, 26 to 45.  The most common type of incontinencewas stress urinary incontinence, 63% (95% CI, 46 to 79.  Of the 99 women, 32%(95% CI, 23 to 42 had heard of pelvic floor muscle exercises, while only 18% (95%CI, 11 – 26 had actually carried out the intervention.  Of the 35 women with urinary incontinence, 26% had soughtprofessional help, the most common reason for seeking help being a worsening in condition.Conclusion: The prevalence of urinary incontinence in KwaZulu-Natal is high, knowledge of urinary incontinenceas a disease and its management, among both women and health service providers is poor.

  10. High prevalence of urinary incontinence and poor knowledge of pelvic floor exercises among women in a health district in Kwazulu-Natal, South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.P. Madombwe

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The purpose of the study was to determine the prevalence and health seeking behaviour of women with urinary incontinence andtheir knowledge of pelvic floor exercises, in a health district in KwaZulu-Natal.Methods: An observational cross-sectional study design was used. BetweenSeptember 2005 and November 2005, a questionnaire was administered to 99 womenaged 21 – 76 years at randomly selected from. Results: The study found that the prevalence of the urinary incontinence was 35% (95% Confidence Interval, 26 to 45.  The most common type of incontinencewas stress urinary incontinence, 63% (95% CI, 46 to 79.  Of the 99 women, 32%(95% CI, 23 to 42 had heard of pelvic floor muscle exercises, while only 18% (95%CI, 11 – 26 had actually carried out the intervention.  Of the 35 women with urinary incontinence, 26% had soughtprofessional help, the most common reason for seeking help being a worsening in condition.Conclusion: The prevalence of urinary incontinence in KwaZulu-Natal is high, knowledge of urinary incontinenceas a disease and its management, among both women and health service providers is poor.

  11. Effects of inspiratory muscle training on resistance to fatigue of respiratory muscles during exhaustive exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segizbaeva, M O; Timofeev, N N; Donina, Zh A; Kur'yanovich, E N; Aleksandrova, N P

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the effect of inspiratory muscle training (IMT) on resistance to fatigue of the diaphragm (D), parasternal (PS), sternocleidomastoid (SCM) and scalene (SC) muscles in healthy humans during exhaustive exercise. Daily inspiratory muscle strength training was performed for 3 weeks in 10 male subjects (at a pressure threshold load of 60% of maximal inspiratory pressure (MIP) for the first week, 70% of MIP for the second week, and 80% of MIP for the third week). Before and after training, subjects performed an incremental cycle test to exhaustion. Maximal inspiratory pressure and EMG-analysis served as indices of inspiratory muscle fatigue assessment. The before-to-after exercise decreases in MIP and centroid frequency (fc) of the EMG (D, PS, SCM, and SC) power spectrum (Pinspiratory muscle fatigue during exhaustive exercise, and a significant improvement in maximal work performance. We conclude that the IMT elicits resistance to the development of inspiratory muscles fatigue during high-intensity exercise.

  12. Exercise and Type 2 Diabetes: Molecular Mechanisms Regulating Glucose Uptake in Skeletal Muscle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanford, Kristin I.; Goodyear, Laurie J.

    2014-01-01

    Exercise is a well-established tool to prevent and combat type 2 diabetes. Exercise improves whole body metabolic health in people with type 2 diabetes, and adaptations to skeletal muscle are essential for this improvement. An acute bout of exercise increases skeletal muscle glucose uptake, while chronic exercise training improves mitochondrial…

  13. Comparison of deep and superficial abdominal muscle activity between experienced Pilates and resistance exercise instructors and controls during stabilization exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, Ji-Hyun; Hong, Sang-Min; Kim, Chang-Won; Shin, Yun-A

    2015-06-01

    Pilates and resistance exercises are used for lumbar stabilization training. However, it is unclear which exercise is more effective for lumbar stabilization. In our study, we aimed to compare surface muscle activity and deep muscle thickness during relaxation and spinal stabilization exercise in experienced Pilates and resistance exercise instructors. This study is a retrospective case control study set in the Exercise Prescription Laboratory and Sports Medicine Center. The participants included Pilates instructors (mean years of experience, 3.20±1.76; n=10), resistance exercise instructors (mean years of experience, 2.53±0.63; n=10), and controls (n=10). The participants performed 4 different stabilization exercises: abdominal drawing-in maneuver, bridging, roll-up, and one-leg raise. During the stabilization exercises, surface muscle activity was measured with electromyography, whereas deep muscle thickness was measured by ultrasound imaging. During the 4 stabilization exercises, the thickness of the transverse abdominis (TrA) was significantly greater in the Pilates-trained group than the other 2 other groups. The internal oblique (IO) thickness was significantly greater in the Pilates- and resistance-trained group than the control group, during the 4 exercises. However, the surface muscle activities were similar between the groups. Both Pilates and resistance exercise instructors had greater activation of deep muscles, such as the TrA and IO, than the control subjects. Pilates and resistance exercise are both effective for increasing abdominal deep muscle thickness.

  14. Pelvic floor muscle lesions at endoanal MR imaging in female patients with faecal incontinence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Terra, Maaike P.; Vervoorn, Inge; Dobben, Annette C.; Stoker, Jaap [Academic Medical Center, University of Amsterdam, Department of Radiology, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Beets-Tan, Regina G.H. [University Hospital Maastricht, Department of Radiology, Maastricht (Netherlands); Deutekom, Marije; Bossuyt, Patrick M.M. [Academic Medical Center, University of Amsterdam, Department of Clinical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Wasser, Martin N.J.M. [Leiden University Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Leiden (Netherlands); Witkamp, Theo D. [University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Radiology, Utrecht (Netherlands); Baeten, Cor G.M.I. [University Hospital Maastricht, Department of Surgery, Maastricht (Netherlands)

    2008-09-15

    To evaluate the frequency and spectrum of lesions of different pelvic floor muscles at endoanal MRI in women with severe faecal incontinence and to study their relation with incontinence severity and manometric findings. In 105 women MRI examinations were evaluated for internal anal sphincter (IAS), external anal sphincter (EAS), puborectal muscle (PM) and levator ani (LA) lesions. The relative contribution of lesions to differences in incontinence severity and manometric findings was studied. IAS (n=59) and EAS (n=61) defects were more common than PM (n=23) and LA (n=26) defects. PM and LA defects presented mainly with IAS and/or EAS defects (isolated n=2 and n=3). EAS atrophy (n=73) was more common than IAS (n=19), PM (n=16) and LA (n=9) atrophy and presented mainly isolated. PM and LA atrophy presented primarily with EAS atrophy (isolated n=3 and n=1). Patients with IAS and EAS lesions had a lower resting and squeeze pressure, respectively; no other associations were found. PM and LA lesions are relatively common in patients with severe faecal incontinence, but the majority of lesions are found in women who also have IAS and/or EAS lesions. Only an association between anal sphincter lesions and manometry was observed. (orig.)

  15. Pelvic floor muscle lesions at endoanal MR imaging in female patients with faecal incontinence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Terra, Maaike P.; Vervoorn, Inge; Dobben, Annette C.; Stoker, Jaap; Beets-Tan, Regina G.H.; Deutekom, Marije; Bossuyt, Patrick M.M.; Wasser, Martin N.J.M.; Witkamp, Theo D.; Baeten, Cor G.M.I.

    2008-01-01

    To evaluate the frequency and spectrum of lesions of different pelvic floor muscles at endoanal MRI in women with severe faecal incontinence and to study their relation with incontinence severity and manometric findings. In 105 women MRI examinations were evaluated for internal anal sphincter (IAS), external anal sphincter (EAS), puborectal muscle (PM) and levator ani (LA) lesions. The relative contribution of lesions to differences in incontinence severity and manometric findings was studied. IAS (n=59) and EAS (n=61) defects were more common than PM (n=23) and LA (n=26) defects. PM and LA defects presented mainly with IAS and/or EAS defects (isolated n=2 and n=3). EAS atrophy (n=73) was more common than IAS (n=19), PM (n=16) and LA (n=9) atrophy and presented mainly isolated. PM and LA atrophy presented primarily with EAS atrophy (isolated n=3 and n=1). Patients with IAS and EAS lesions had a lower resting and squeeze pressure, respectively; no other associations were found. PM and LA lesions are relatively common in patients with severe faecal incontinence, but the majority of lesions are found in women who also have IAS and/or EAS lesions. Only an association between anal sphincter lesions and manometry was observed. (orig.)

  16. Fatiguing exercise enhances hyperalgesia to muscle inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sluka, Kathleen A; Rasmussen, Lynn A

    2010-02-01

    Since many people with chronic fatigue present with pain and many people with chronic pain present with fatigue, we tested if fatigue would enhance the response to pain in male and female mice. We further tested for the activation of brainstem nuclei by the fatigue task using c-fos as a marker. Fatigue was induced by having mice spontaneously run in running wheel for 2h. Carrageenan (0.03%) was injected into the gastrocnemius muscle either 2h before or 2h after the fatigue task. The mechanical sensitivity of the paw (von Frey filaments), muscle (tweezers), grip force and running wheel activity was assessed before and 24h after injection of carrageenan. Both male and female mice that performed the fatigue task, either before or after intramuscular injection of carrageenan, showed an enhanced mechanical sensitivity of the paw, but not the muscle. Ovariectomized mice showed a similar response to male mice. There was a decrease in running wheel activity after carrageenan injection, but no change in grip force suggesting that mice had no deficit in motor performance induced by the carrageenan. C-fos expression was observed in the nucleus raphe pallidus, obscurus, and magnus after the fatigue task suggesting an increased activity in the raphe nuclei in response to the fatigue task. Therefore, widespread hyperalgesia is enhanced by the fatigue response but not hyperalgesia at the site of insult. We suggest that this effect is sex-dependent and involves mechanisms in the brainstem to result in an enhanced hyperalgesia.

  17. Markers of muscle damage and performance recovery following exercise in the heat

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nybo, Lars; Girard, Olivier; Mohr, Magni

    2013-01-01

    PURPOSE: To determine whether competitive intermittent exercise in the heat affects recovery, aggravates markers of muscle fiber damage, and delay the recovery of performance and muscle glycogen stores. METHODS: Plasma creatine kinase, serum myoglobin, muscle glycogen and performance parameters...

  18. Electrostimulation, response of the pelvic floor muscles, and urinary incontinence in elderly patients post prostatectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrícia Zaidan

    Full Text Available Objective to investigate the response of the pelvic floor muscles (PFM, and urinary incontinence (UI, in patients having undergone a prostatectomy, after treatment using electrical stimulation. Materials and methods this observational study was conducted in an outpatient urogynecologic physical therapy clinic of Hospital dos Servidores in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil from August to September 2012. Ten patients (aged, 64 ± 7 years with urinary incontinence resulting from radical prostatectomy, having received surgery within six months of study entry, without urinary infection, and without metallic implants underwent electrical stimulation of the PFM, while in lateral decubitus position with knees and hips flexed. The parameters used were 65 Hz frequency, pulse width of 500 µs, biphasic current, intensity according to the tolerance level reported by the patient, perineal contraction time of four seconds, and rest time of eight seconds for 20 minutes twice a week, totaling 16 sessions of electrical stimulation with active-assisted contraction. Patients were evaluated before and after electrical stimulation through physical therapy evaluation of urinary incontinence, by being asked about the number of disposable guards used daily, using a visual analogue scale (VAS to measure how the UI interfered with activities of daily living, and by electromyographic biofeedback to measure the work of the PFM. Data were analyzed using Student’s paired t-tests and a significance level of 0.05. Results after 16 sessions of electrical stimulation, the electromyographic biofeedback evaluation showed a significant increase in muscle strength of 10.73 ± 8.64 to 17.16 ± 9.00 µV (t = -3.39, P = 0.008, a significant decrease in the number of diapers used before and after treatment (3.9 ± 1.2 to 1.8 ± 1.5, respectively; t = 5.16, P = 0.0006, and a significant decrease in the interference of urinary incontinence on daily activities of 9.6 ± 0.5 to 4.0 ± 3.8 (t = 5

  19. Heightened Pelvic Floor Muscle Tone and Altered Contractility in Women With Provoked Vestibulodynia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morin, Mélanie; Binik, Yitzchak M; Bourbonnais, Daniel; Khalifé, Samir; Ouellet, Stéphane; Bergeron, Sophie

    2017-04-01

    Pelvic floor muscle (PFM) dysfunctions are reported to be involved in provoked vestibulodynia (PVD). Although heightened PFM tone has been suggested, the relative contribution of active and passive components of tone remains misunderstood. Likewise, alterations in PFM contractility have been scarcely studied. To compare PFM tone, including the relative contribution of its active and passive components, and muscular contractility in women with PVD and asymptomatic controls. Fifty-six asymptomatic women and 56 women with PVD participated in the study. The PVD diagnosis was confirmed by a gynecologist based on a standardized examination. PFM function was evaluated using a dynamometric speculum combined with surface electromyography (EMG). PFM general tone was evaluated in static conditions at different vaginal apertures and during repeated dynamic cyclic stretching. The active contribution of tone was characterized using the ratio between EMG in a static position and during stretching and the proportion of women presenting PFM activation during stretching. Contribution of the passive component was evaluated using resting forces, stiffness, and hysteresis in women sustaining a negligible EMG signal during stretching. PFM contractility, such as strength, speed of contraction, coordination, and endurance, also was assessed during voluntary isometric efforts. Greater PFM resting forces and stiffness were found in women with PVD compared with controls, indicating an increased general tone. An increased active component also was found in women with PVD because they presented a superior EMG ratio, and a larger proportion of them presented PFM activation during stretching. Higher passive properties also were found in women with PVD. Women with PVD also showed decreased strength, speed of contraction, coordination, and endurance compared with controls. Findings provide further evidence of the contribution of PFM alterations in the etiology of PVD. These alterations should be

  20. Effects of concentric and repeated eccentric exercise on muscle damage and calpain-calpastatin gene expression in human skeletal muscle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vissing, K.; Overgaard, K.; Nedergaard, A.

    2008-01-01

    , and was compared to a control-group (n = 6). Muscle strength and soreness and plasma creatine kinase and myoglobin were measured before and during 7 days following exercise bouts. Muscle biopsies were collected from m. vastus lateralis of both legs prior to and at 3, 24 h and 7 days after exercise and quantified...... for muscle Ca2+-content and mRNA levels for calpain isoforms and calpastatin. Exercise reduced muscle strength and increased muscle soreness predominantly in the eccentric leg (P ... eccentric exercise bout (P muscle Ca2+-content did not differ between interventions. mRNA levels for calpain 2 and calpastatin were upregulated exclusively by eccentric exercise 24 h post-exercise (P

  1. Short-term exercise training in humans reduces AMPK signalling during prolonged exercise independent of muscle glycogen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McConell, Glenn K; Lee-Young, Robert S; Chen, Zhi-Ping; Stepto, Nigel K; Huynh, Ngan N; Stephens, Terry J; Canny, Benedict J; Kemp, Bruce E

    2005-10-15

    We examined the effect of short-term exercise training on skeletal muscle AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) signalling and muscle metabolism during prolonged exercise in humans. Eight sedentary males completed 120 min of cycling at 66 +/- 1% , then exercise trained for 10 days, before repeating the exercise bout at the same absolute workload. Participants rested for 72 h before each trial while ingesting a high carbohydrate diet (HCHO). Exercise training significantly (P free AMP: ATP ratio and glucose disposal and increased fat oxidation. Exercise training abolished the 9-fold increase in AMPK alpha2 activity observed during pretraining exercise. Since training increased muscle glycogen content by 93 +/- 12% (P glycogen content was essentially matched pre- and post-training by exercise and a low CHO diet (LCHO; post-training muscle glycogen 52 +/- 7% less than in HCHO, P glycogen levels in the two studies we obtained very similar results. In both studies the increase in ACCbeta Ser(221) phosphorylation was reduced during exercise after training. In conclusion, there is little activation of AMPK signalling during prolonged exercise following short-term exercise training suggesting that other factors are important in the regulation of glucose disposal and fat oxidation under these circumstances. It appears that muscle glycogen is not an important regulator of AMPK activation during exercise in humans when exercise is begun with normal or high muscle glycogen levels.

  2. Skeletal muscle metabolism during prolonged exercise in Pompe disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Preisler, Nicolai; Laforêt, Pascal; Madsen, Karen Lindhardt

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Pompe disease (glycogenosis type II) is caused by lysosomal alpha-glucosidase deficiency, which leads to a block in intra-lysosomal glycogen breakdown. In spite of enzyme replacement therapy, Pompe disease continues to be a progressive metabolic myopathy. Considering the health benefits...... of exercise, it is important in Pompe disease to acquire more information about muscle substrate use during exercise. METHODS: Seven adults with Pompe disease were matched to a healthy control group (1:1). We determined (1) peak oxidative capacity (VO2peak) and (2) carbohydrate and fatty acid metabolism...... during submaximal exercise (33 W) for 1 h, using cycle-ergometer exercise, indirect calorimetry and stable isotopes. RESULTS: In the patients, VO2peak was less than half of average control values; mean difference -1659 mL/min (CI: -2450 to -867, P = 0.001). However, the respiratory exchange ratio...

  3. An Exercise Model to Study Progressive Muscle Fatigue During Constant Work Rate Exercise on a Cycle Ergometer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Fulco, Charles

    2003-01-01

    ... of the same muscles during the activity. However, conventional ergometric testing modes such as stationary cycling or treadmill exercise do not readily lend themselves to quantitating the progressive increase in muscle fatigue...

  4. Effects of Fish Oil Supplementation on Postresistance Exercise Muscle Soreness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tinsley, Grant M; Gann, Joshua J; Huber, Stefan R; Andre, Thomas L; La Bounty, Paul M; Bowden, Rodney G; Gordon, Paul M; Grandjean, Peter W

    2016-07-21

    The aim of this study was to examine the effects of fish oil supplementation on the magnitude and time-course of postresistance exercise muscle soreness. This study was a randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind trial. Nonresistance trained females were randomized into one of two groups: fish oil supplementation (6 g/day; 5:1 eicosapentaenoic acid to docosahexaenoic acid (EPA:DHA)) or placebo (6 g/day corn/soy oil). After consuming the supplements for one week, participants underwent a single bout of resistance exercise consisting of 10 sets to failure of elbow flexion and leg extension machines. Muscle soreness was measured daily over the next week via grounded visual analog scale while participants continued to consume their assigned supplement. At 48 hours and one week postexercise, soreness during functional movements and limb circumferences were measured. The fish oil group perceived less static and functional muscle soreness than placebo, although the differences were not statistically significant. Effect sizes for resistance exercise-induced static and functional soreness responses were 33 to 42% lower in fish oil versus placebo without changes in upper arm and thigh circumferences. Supplementing the diet with 6 g per day of fish oil may alleviate muscle soreness experienced after resistance training in young untrained females.

  5. Stretching to prevent or reduce muscle soreness after exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herbert, Robert D; de Noronha, Marcos; Kamper, Steven J

    2011-07-06

    Many people stretch before or after engaging in athletic activity. Usually the purpose is to reduce risk of injury, reduce soreness after exercise, or enhance athletic performance. This is an update of a Cochrane review first published in 2007. The aim of this review was to determine effects of stretching before or after exercise on the development of delayed-onset muscle soreness. We searched the Cochrane Bone, Joint and Muscle Trauma Group Specialised Register (to 10 August 2009), the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (2010, Issue 1), MEDLINE (1966 to 8th February 2010), EMBASE (1988 to 8th February 2010), CINAHL (1982 to 23rd February 2010), SPORTDiscus (1949 to 8th February 2010), PEDro (to 15th February 2010) and reference lists of articles. Eligible studies were randomised or quasi-randomised studies of any pre-exercise or post-exercise stretching technique designed to prevent or treat delayed-onset muscle soreness (DOMS). For the studies to be included, the stretching had to be conducted soon before or soon after exercise and muscle soreness had to be assessed. Risk of bias was assessed using The Cochrane Collaboration's 'Risk of bias' tool and quality of evidence was assessed using GRADE. Estimates of effects of stretching were converted to a common 100-point scale. Outcomes were pooled in fixed-effect meta-analyses. Twelve studies were included in the review. This update incorporated two new studies. One of the new trials was a large field-based trial that included 2377 participants, 1220 of whom were allocated stretching. All other 11 studies were small, with between 10 and 30 participants receiving the stretch condition. Ten studies were laboratory-based and other two were field-based. All studies were exposed to either a moderate or high risk of bias. The quality of evidence was low to moderate.There was a high degree of consistency of results across studies. The pooled estimate showed that pre-exercise stretching reduced soreness at one

  6. Effects of Inspiratory Muscle Training and Calisthenics-and-Breathing Exercises in COPD With and Without Respiratory Muscle Weakness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basso-Vanelli, Renata P; Di Lorenzo, Valéria A Pires; Labadessa, Ivana G; Regueiro, Eloisa M G; Jamami, Mauricio; Gomes, Evelim L F D; Costa, Dirceu

    2016-01-01

    Patients with COPD may experience respiratory muscle weakness. Two therapeutic approaches to the respiratory muscles are inspiratory muscle training and calisthenics-and-breathing exercises. The aims of the study are to compare the effects of inspiratory muscle training and calisthenics-and-breathing exercises associated with physical training in subjects with COPD as an additional benefit of strength and endurance of the inspiratory muscles, thoracoabdominal mobility, physical exercise capacity, and reduction in dyspnea on exertion. In addition, these gains were compared between subjects with and without respiratory muscle weakness. 25 subjects completed the study: 13 composed the inspiratory muscle training group, and 12 composed the calisthenics-and-breathing exercises group. Subjects were assessed before and after training by spirometry, measurements of respiratory muscle strength and test of inspiratory muscle endurance, thoracoabdominal excursion measurements, and the 6-min walk test. Moreover, scores for the Modified Medical Research Council dyspnea scale were reported. After intervention, there was a significant improvement in both groups of respiratory muscle strength and endurance, thoracoabdominal mobility, and walking distance in the 6-min walk test. Additionally, there was a decrease of dyspnea in the 6-min walk test peak. A difference was found between groups, with higher values of respiratory muscle strength and thoracoabdominal mobility and lower values of dyspnea in the 6-min walk test peak and the Modified Medical Research Council dyspnea scale in the inspiratory muscle training group. In the inspiratory muscle training group, subjects with respiratory muscle weakness had greater gains in inspiratory muscle strength and endurance. Both interventions increased exercise capacity and decreased dyspnea during physical effort. However, inspiratory muscle training was more effective in increasing inspiratory muscle strength and endurance, which could

  7. Norepinephrine spillover from skeletal muscle during exercise in humans: role of muscle mass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savard, G K; Richter, E A; Strange, S; Kiens, B; Christensen, N J; Saltin, B

    1989-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of increasing muscle mass involvement in dynamic exercise on both sympathetic nervous activation and local hemodynamic variables of individual active and inactive skeletal muscle groups. Six male subjects performed 15-min bouts of one-legged knee extension either alone or in combination with the knee extensors of the other leg and/or with the arms. The range of work intensities varied between 24 and 71% (mean) of subjects' maximal aerobic capacity (% VO2max). Leg blood flow, measured in the femoral vein by thermodilution, was determined in both legs. Arterial and venous plasma concentrations of norepinephrine (NE) and epinephrine were analyzed, and the calculated NE spillover was used as an index of sympathetic nervous activity to the limb. NE spillover increased gradually both in the resting, and to a larger extent in the exercising legs, with a steeper rise occurring approximately 70% VO2max. These increases were not associated with any significant changes in leg blood flow or leg vascular conductance at the exercise intensities examined. These results suggest that, as the total active muscle mass increases, the rise in sympathetic nervous activity to skeletal muscle, either resting or working at a constant load, is not associated with any significant neurogenic vasoconstriction and reduction in flow or conductance through the muscle vascular bed, during whole body exercise demanding up to 71% VO2max.

  8. Resistance Exercise Reduces Skeletal Muscle Cachexia and Improves Muscle Function in Rheumatoid Arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salaheddin Sharif

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Rheumatoid arthritis (RA is a chronic, systemic, autoimmune, inflammatory disease associated with cachexia (reduced muscle and increased fat. Although strength-training exercise has been used in persons with RA, it is not clear if it is effective for reducing cachexia. A 46-year-old woman was studied to determine: (i if resistance exercise could reverse cachexia by improving muscle mass, fiber cross-sectional area, and muscle function; and (2 if elevated apoptotic signaling was involved in cachexia with RA and could be reduced by resistance training. A needle biopsy was obtained from the vastus lateralis muscle of the RA subject before and after 16 weeks of resistance training. Knee extensor strength increased by 13.6% and fatigue decreased by 2.8% Muscle mass increased by 2.1%. Average muscle fiber cross-sectional area increased by 49.7%, and muscle nuclei increased slightly after strength training from 0.08 to 0.12 nuclei/μm2. In addition, there was a slight decrease (1.6% in the number of apoptotic muscle nuclei after resistance training. This case study suggests that resistance training may be a good tool for increasing the number of nuclei per fiber area, decreasing apoptotic nuclei, and inducing fiber hypertrophy in persons with RA, thereby slowing or reversing rheumatoid cachexia.

  9. Bone mineral density, muscle strength, and recreational exercise in men

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snow-Harter, C.; Whalen, R.; Myburgh, K.; Arnaud, S.; Marcus, R.

    1992-01-01

    Muscle strength has been shown to predict bone mineral density (BMD) in women. We examined this relationship in 50 healthy men who ranged in age from 28 to 51 years (average 38.3 years). BMD of the lumbar spine, proximal femur, whole body, and tibia were measured by dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry (Hologic QDR 1000W). Dynamic strength using one repetition maximum was assessed for the biceps, quadriceps, and back extensors and for the hip abductors, adductors, and flexors. Isometric grip strength was measured by dynamometry. Daily walking mileage was assessed by 9 week stepmeter records and kinematic analysis of video filming. Subjects were designated as exercisers and nonexercisers. Exercisers participated in recreational exercise at least two times each week. The results demonstrated that BMD at all sites correlated with back and biceps strength (p density (R2 = 0.27). Further, back strength was the most robust predictor of BMD at the trochanter, Ward's triangle, whole body, and tibia, although biceps strength, age, body weight, and leg strength contributed significantly to BMD at these skeletal sites, accounting for 35-52% of the variance in BMD. Exercisers and nonexercisers were similar for walking (3.97 versus 3.94 miles/day), age (37.8 versus 38.5) years, and weight (80.0 versus 77.7 kg). However, BMD and muscle strength were significantly greater in exercises than in nonexercisers.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS).

  10. A prospective observational trial of pelvic floor muscle training for female stress urinary incontinence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balmforth, James R; Mantle, Jill; Bidmead, John; Cardozo, Linda

    2006-10-01

    To assess the impact of pelvic floor muscle training (PFMT) on bladder neck mobility in a prospective observational study, and to correlate any observed changes with objective, standardized outcome measures of the severity of stress urinary incontinence (SUI). Women with the symptom of SUI were recruited prospectively over a 3-year period from a tertiary referral urogynaecology clinic in a teaching hospital. A group of 97 treatment-naive women complaining of SUI and confirmed as having urodynamic SUI on video-urodynamic assessment agreed to participate. Bladder neck mobility on perineal ultrasonography was assessed immediately before and on completing a 14-week programme of 'PFM rehabilitation'. Treatment outcome was assessed using a standardized pad-test and a condition-specific, validated quality-of-life questionnaire (King's Health Questionnaire). Changes in functional anatomy were quantified using transperineal ultrasonography to measure the bladder neck position at rest, maximum PFM contraction and maximum Valsalva manoeuvre. Bladder neck rotational mobility from rest to maximum incursion and maximum excursion was calculated. Treatment with an intensive package of PFMT and behavioural modification resulted in significant elevation of the bladder neck position at all three measured positions. Displacement of the bladder neck on Valsalva (rotational excursion) was reduced after treatment, suggesting increased levator 'stiffness'. These changes in functional anatomy were associated with a statistically and clinically significant reduction in urine loss and improvement in condition-specific quality of life. The present results show that PFMT is an effective treatment for SUI and provide an important new insight into how dynamic pelvic floor anatomy can be modified by this widely used intervention.

  11. Intra and inter-rater reliability study of pelvic floor muscle dynamometric measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalia M. Martinho

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to evaluate the intra and inter-rater reliability of pelvic floor muscle (PFM dynamometric measurements for maximum and average strengths, as well as endurance. METHOD: A convenience sample of 18 nulliparous women, without any urogynecological complaints, aged between 19 and 31 (mean age of 25.4±3.9 participated in this study. They were evaluated using a pelvic floor dynamometer based on load cell technology. The dynamometric evaluations were repeated in three successive sessions: two on the same day with a rest period of 30 minutes between them, and the third on the following day. All participants were evaluated twice in each session; first by examiner 1 followed by examiner 2. The vaginal dynamometry data were analyzed using three parameters: maximum strength, average strength, and endurance. The Intraclass Correlation Coefficient (ICC was applied to estimate the PFM dynamometric measurement reliability, considering a good level as being above 0.75. RESULTS: The intra and inter-raters' analyses showed good reliability for maximum strength (ICCintra-rater1=0.96, ICCintra-rater2=0.95, and ICCinter-rater=0.96, average strength (ICCintra-rater1=0.96, ICCintra-rater2=0.94, and ICCinter-rater=0.97, and endurance (ICCintra-rater1=0.88, ICCintra-rater2=0.86, and ICCinter-rater=0.92 dynamometric measurements. CONCLUSIONS: The PFM dynamometric measurements showed good intra- and inter-rater reliability for maximum strength, average strength and endurance, which demonstrates that this is a reliable device that can be used in clinical practice.

  12. The association between different measures of pelvic floor muscle function and female pelvic organ prolapse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oversand, Sissel H; Atan, Ixora Kamisan; Shek, Ka Lai; Dietz, Hans Peter

    2015-12-01

    We aimed to compare palpatory and translabial ultrasound (TLUS) measurements of pelvic floor muscle (PFM) function with symptoms and signs of female pelvic organ prolapse (FPOP) to determine a possible association. We analysed data from 726 women with a mean age of 56 (SD 13.7, range 18-88) years, seen for symptoms of pelvic floor dysfunction between August 2011 and April 2013. The examination included a standardised interview and clinical assessment of FPOP with Pelvic Organ Prolapse Quantification (POP-Q) measurements, Modified Oxford Scale (MOS) grading and 4D TLUS. Symptoms of prolapse were reported in 51.4% (373 out of 726) with a mean bother score of 5.8 (SD 2.91, range 0-10). A clinically significant POP (Incontinence Society [ICS]-POP-Q stage ≥ 2) in any compartment was diagnosed in 77.1%. Mean MOS was 2.4 (SD 1.1, range 0-5). Significant POP on TLUS was seen in 54.6% (389 out of 712). TLUS volumes at rest and on maximal PFM contraction were analysed on a desktop PC, to assess the degree of bladder neck (BN) cranioventral shift and levator antero-posterior (AP) diameter reduction, blinded against other data. Mean cranioventral BN shift was 7.11 (SD 4.36, range 0.32-25.32) mm and mean levator AP diameter reduction was 8.6 (SD 4.8, range 0.3-31.3) mm. MOS was strongly associated with subjective and objective POP (P ≤ 0.001), whereas this was not true for TLUS measurements of tissue displacement. The MOS seems to be a more valid measure of PFM function than sonographically determined BN displacement or reduction of hiatal AP diameter observed on PFM contraction.

  13. The reliability of surface EMG recorded from the pelvic floor muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auchincloss, Cindy C; McLean, Linda

    2009-08-30

    The neuromuscular function of the pelvic floor muscles (PFMs) is frequently evaluated using surface electrodes embedded on vaginal probes. The purpose of this study was to determine the between-trial and between-day reliability of EMG data recorded from the PFM using two different vaginal probes while subjects performed PFM maximum voluntary contractions and a coughing task. The Femiscan and the Periform vaginal probes were used to acquire EMG data while the subjects performed the tasks. Peak RMS amplitudes were computed for each instrument, task, and side of the pelvic floor using a sliding window technique. The between-trial reliability was evaluated using intraclass correlation coefficients (ICCs) and coefficients of variation (CV). Between-trial reliability was determined using ICCs, Pearson's correlation coefficients, computing the mean absolute difference between days, and calculating the standard error the measurement (SEM) for each instrument and task. EMG amplitude differences were detected between the left and right PFM (pperformed separately for each side. Overall, between-trial reliability was fair to high for the Femiscan (ICC((3,1))=0.58-0.98, CV=8.5-20.7%) and good to high for the Periform (ICC((3,1))=0.80-0.98, CV=9.6-19.5%), however between-day reliability was generally poor for both vaginal probes (ICC((3,1))=0.08-0.84). The results suggest that although it is acceptable to use PFM surface EMG as a biofeedback tool for training purposes, it is not recommended for use to make between-subject comparisons or to use as an outcome measure between-days when evaluating PFM function.

  14. Pelvic floor muscle training versus no treatment, or inactive control treatments, for urinary incontinence in women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumoulin, Chantale; Hay-Smith, E Jean C; Mac Habée-Séguin, Gabrielle

    2014-05-14

    Pelvic floor muscle training is the most commonly used physical therapy treatment for women with stress urinary incontinence (SUI). It is sometimes also recommended for mixed and, less commonly, urgency urinary incontinence. To determine the effects of pelvic floor muscle training for women with urinary incontinence in comparison to no treatment, placebo or sham treatments, or other inactive control treatments. We searched the Cochrane Incontinence Group Specialised Register, which contains trials identified from the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (1999 onwards), MEDLINE (1966 onwards) and MEDLINE In-Process (2001 onwards), and handsearched journals and conference proceedings (searched 15 April 2013) and the reference lists of relevant articles. Randomised or quasi-randomised trials in women with stress, urgency or mixed urinary incontinence (based on symptoms, signs, or urodynamics). One arm of the trial included pelvic floor muscle training (PFMT). Another arm was a no treatment, placebo, sham, or other inactive control treatment arm. Trials were independently assessed by two review authors for eligibility and methodological quality. Data were extracted then cross-checked. Disagreements were resolved by discussion. Data were processed as described in the Cochrane Handbook for Systematic Reviews of Interventions. Trials were subgrouped by diagnosis of urinary incontinence. Formal meta-analysis was undertaken when appropriate. Twenty-one trials involving 1281 women (665 PFMT, 616 controls) met the inclusion criteria; 18 trials (1051 women) contributed data to the forest plots. The trials were generally small to moderate sized, and many were at moderate risk of bias, based on the trial reports. There was considerable variation in the interventions used, study populations, and outcome measures. There were no studies of women with mixed or urgency urinary incontinence alone.Women with SUI who were in the PFMT groups were 8 times more likely

  15. Muscle metaboreflex control of the circulation during exercise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boushel, Robert Christopher

    2010-01-01

    activation is an increase in sympathetic nerve activity that constricts the systemic vasculature and also evokes parallel inotropic and chronotropic effects on the heart to increase cardiac output. The metaboreflex elicits a significant blood pressure elevating response during exercise and functions....... It can both elevate and decrease muscle blood flow depending on (1) the intensity and mode of contraction, (2) the limb in which the reflex is evoked, (3) the strength of the signal defined by the muscle mass, (4) the extent to which blood flow is redistributed from inactive vascular beds to increase...

  16. A pilot study of muscle plasma protein changes after exercise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahlqvist, Julia R; Voss, Line G; Lauridsen, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    profiles were measured before and after exercise in 3 groups: subjects affected by either Becker muscular dystrophy or McArdle disease, and healthy subjects. RESULTS: Mb and TnI appeared early in the blood, and the increase of TnI was only observed in patients with muscle disease. The CK increase was more...... delayed in plasma. Tcap was not detectable at any time. CONCLUSIONS: Our results suggest that TnI is a marker of more severe damage signifying sarcomeric damage, and it could therefore be an important supplement to CK and Mb in clinical practice. Tcap is not useful as a marker for skeletal muscle damage....

  17. Effects of concentric and repeated eccentric exercise on muscle damage and calpain-calpastatin gene expression in human skeletal muscle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vissing, K.; Overgaard, K.; Nedergaard, A.

    2008-01-01

    , and was compared to a control-group (n = 6). Muscle strength and soreness and plasma creatine kinase and myoglobin were measured before and during 7 days following exercise bouts. Muscle biopsies were collected from m. vastus lateralis of both legs prior to and at 3, 24 h and 7 days after exercise and quantified...... for muscle Ca2+-content and mRNA levels for calpain isoforms and calpastatin. Exercise reduced muscle strength and increased muscle soreness predominantly in the eccentric leg (P

  18. Does it work in the long term?--A systematic review on pelvic floor muscle training for female stress urinary incontinence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bø, Kari; Hilde, Gunvor

    2013-03-01

    There is level 1, grade A evidence that pelvic floor muscle training (PFMT) is effective in treatment of stress urinary incontinence (SUI), but long-term outcome has been questioned. The aim of this systematic review was to evaluate the long-term outcome of PFMT for female SUI. Computerized search on PubMed up to year 2012 was undertaken with the search strategy: pelvic floor AND (urinary incontinence OR stress urinary incontinence) AND (training OR exercise OR physical activity) AND (follow-up OR long-term). Limitations were: humans, female, clinical trial, English, and adults. Inclusion criteria were: studies on SUI using PFMT with or without biofeedback as the intervention, follow-up period of ≥1 year. Exclusion criteria were studies using electrical stimulation alone and studies in the peripartum period. Nineteen studies were included (1,141 women followed between 1 and 15 years). Statistical meta-analysis was not performed due to high heterogeneity. Only two studies provided follow-up interventions. Losses to follow-up during the long-term period ranged between 0% and 39%. Long-term adherence to PFMT varied between 10% and 70%. Five studies reported that the initial success rate on SUI and MUI was maintained at long-term. Long-term success based on responders to the original trial varied between 41% and 85%. Surgery rates at long term varied between 4.9% and 58%. Short-term outcome of PFMT can be maintained at long-term follow-up without incentives for continued training, but there is a high heterogeneity in both interventional and methodological quality in short-and long-term pelvic floor muscle training studies. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Impact of exercise selection on hamstring muscle activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourne, Matthew N; Williams, Morgan D; Opar, David A; Al Najjar, Aiman; Kerr, Graham K; Shield, Anthony J

    2017-07-01

    To determine which strength training exercises selectively activate the biceps femoris long head (BF LongHead ) muscle. We recruited 24 recreationally active men for this two-part observational study . Part 1: We explored the amplitudes and the ratios of lateral (BF) to medial hamstring (MH) normalised electromyography (nEMG) during the concentric and eccentric phases of 10 common strength training exercises. Part 2: We used functional MRI (fMRI) to determine the spatial patterns of hamstring activation during two exercises which (1) most selectively and (2) least selectively activated the BF in part 1. Eccentrically, the largest BF/MH nEMG ratio occurred in the 45° hip-extension exercise; the lowest was in the Nordic hamstring (Nordic) and bent-knee bridge exercises. Concentrically, the highest BF/MH nEMG ratio occurred during the lunge and 45° hip extension; the lowest was during the leg curl and bent-knee bridge. fMRI revealed a greater BF (LongHead) to semitendinosus activation ratio in the 45° hip extension than the Nordic (phamstring muscles (p≤0.002). We highlight the heterogeneity of hamstring activation patterns in different tasks. Hip-extension exercise selectively activates the long hamstrings, and the Nordic exercise preferentially recruits the semitendinosus. These findings have implications for strategies to prevent hamstring injury as well as potentially for clinicians targeting specific hamstring components for treatment (mechanotherapy). Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  20. Exercise quantity-dependent muscle hypertrophy in adult zebrafish (Danio rerio).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasumura, Takahiro; Meguro, Shinichi

    2016-07-01

    Exercise is very important for maintaining and increasing skeletal muscle mass, and is particularly important to prevent and care for sarcopenia and muscle disuse atrophy. However, the dose-response relationship between exercise quantity, duration/day, and overall duration and muscle mass is poorly understood. Therefore, we investigated the effect of exercise duration on skeletal muscle to reveal the relationship between exercise quantity and muscle hypertrophy in zebrafish forced to exercise. Adult male zebrafish were exercised 6 h/day for 4 weeks, 6 h/day for 2 weeks, or 3 h/day for 2 weeks. Flow velocity was adjusted to maximum velocity during continual swimming (initial 43 cm/s). High-speed consecutive photographs revealed that zebrafish mainly drove the caudal part. Additionally, X-ray micro computed tomography measurements indicated muscle hypertrophy of the mid-caudal half compared with the mid-cranial half part. The cross-sectional analysis of the mid-caudal half muscle revealed that skeletal muscle (red, white, or total) mass increased with increasing exercise quantity, whereas that of white muscle and total muscle increased only under the maximum exercise load condition of 6 h/day for 4 weeks. Additionally, the muscle fiver size distributions of exercised fish were larger than those from non-exercised fish. We revealed that exercise quantity, duration/day, and overall duration were correlated with skeletal muscle hypertrophy. The forced exercise model enabled us to investigate the relationship between exercise quantity and skeletal muscle mass. These results open up the possibility for further investigations on the effects of exercise on skeletal muscle in adult zebrafish.

  1. Adrenaline and glycogenolysis in skeletal muscle during exercise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjaer, M; Howlett, K; Langfort, J

    2000-01-01

    The role of adrenaline in regulating muscle glycogenolysis and hormone-sensitive lipase (HSL) activity during exercise was examined in six adrenaline-deficient bilaterally adrenalectomised, adrenocortico-hormonal-substituted humans (Adr) and in six healthy control individuals (Con). Subjects cycled...... for 45 min at approximately 70% maximal pulmonary O2 uptake (VO2,max) followed by 15 min at approximately 86% VO2,max either without (-Adr and Con) or with (+Adr) adrenaline infusion that elevated plasma adrenaline levels (45 min, 4.49+/-0.69 nmol l(-1); 60 min, 12.41+/-1.80 nmol l(-1)). Muscle samples......-phosphate and glucose were similar in -Adr and Con, whereas glycogen phosphorylase (a/a + b x 100 %) and HSL (% phosphorylated) activities increased during exercise in Con only. Adrenaline infusion increased activities of phosphorylase and HSL as well as blood lactate concentrations compared with those...

  2. Extracellular matrix adaptation of tendon and skeletal muscle to exercise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjaer, Michael; Magnusson, Peter; Krogsgaard, Michael

    2006-01-01

    The extracellular matrix (ECM) of connective tissues enables linking to other tissues, and plays a key role in force transmission and tissue structure maintenance in tendons, ligaments, bone and muscle. ECM turnover is influenced by physical activity, and both collagen synthesis and metalloprotease......-beta and IL-6 is enhanced following exercise. For tendons, metabolic activity (e.g. detected by positron emission tomography scanning), circulatory responses (e.g. as measured by near-infrared spectroscopy and dye dilution) and collagen turnover are markedly increased after exercise. Tendon blood flow...... is regulated by cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2)-mediated pathways, and glucose uptake is regulated by specific pathways in tendons that differ from those in skeletal muscle. Chronic loading in the form of physical training leads both to increased collagen turnover as well as to some degree of net collagen synthesis...

  3. CURRENT CONCEPTS IN MUSCLE STRETCHING FOR EXERCISE AND REHABILITATION

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Stretching is a common activity used by athletes, older adults, rehabilitation patients, and anyone participating in a fitness program. While the benefits of stretching are known, controversy remains about the best type of stretching for a particular goal or outcome. The purpose of this clinical commentary is to discuss the current concepts of muscle stretching interventions and summarize the evidence related to stretching as used in both exercise and rehabilitation. PMID:22319684

  4. CURRENT CONCEPTS IN MUSCLE STRETCHING FOR EXERCISE AND REHABILITATION

    OpenAIRE

    Page, Phil

    2012-01-01

    Stretching is a common activity used by athletes, older adults, rehabilitation patients, and anyone participating in a fitness program. While the benefits of stretching are known, controversy remains about the best type of stretching for a particular goal or outcome. The purpose of this clinical commentary is to discuss the current concepts of muscle stretching interventions and summarize the evidence related to stretching as used in both exercise and rehabilitation.

  5. Strength training and aerobic exercise training for muscle disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voet, Nicoline B M; van der Kooi, Elly L; Riphagen, Ingrid I; Lindeman, Eline; van Engelen, Baziel G M; Geurts, Alexander C H

    2013-07-09

    Strength training or aerobic exercise programmes might optimise muscle and cardiorespiratory function and prevent additional disuse atrophy and deconditioning in people with a muscle disease. This is an update of a review first published in 2004. To examine the safety and efficacy of strength training and aerobic exercise training in people with a muscle disease. We searched the Cochrane Neuromuscular Disease Group Specialized Register (July 2012), CENTRAL (2012 Issue 3 of 4), MEDLINE (January 1946 to July 2012), EMBASE (January 1974 to July 2012), EMBASE Classic (1947 to 1973) and CINAHL (January 1982 to July 2012). Randomised or quasi-randomised controlled trials comparing strength training or aerobic exercise programmes, or both, to no training, and lasting at least six weeks, in people with a well-described diagnosis of a muscle disease.We did not use the reporting of specific outcomes as a study selection criterion. Two authors independently assessed trial quality and extracted the data obtained from the full text-articles and from the original investigators. We collected adverse event data from included studies. We included five trials (170 participants). The first trial compared the effect of strength training versus no training in 36 people with myotonic dystrophy. The second trial compared aerobic exercise training versus no training in 14 people with polymyositis and dermatomyositis. The third trial compared strength training versus no training in a factorial trial that also compared albuterol with placebo, in 65 people with facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD). The fourth trial compared combined strength training and aerobic exercise versus no training in 18 people with mitochondrial myopathy. The fifth trial compared combined strength training and aerobic exercise versus no training in 35 people with myotonic dystrophy type 1.In both myotonic dystrophy trials and the dermatomyositis and polymyositis trial there were no significant differences

  6. Functional changes of human quadriceps muscle injured by eccentric exercise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F.V. Serrão

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available The present study evaluated functional changes of quadriceps muscle after injury induced by eccentric exercise. Maximal isometric torque of quadriceps and the surface electromyography (root mean square, RMS, and median frequency, MDF of the vastus medialis oblique (VMO and vastus lateralis (VL muscles were examined before, immediately after and during the first 7 days after injury. Serum creatine kinase (CK levels and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI were used to identify muscle injury. The subject was used as her own control and percent refers to pre-injury data. Experiments were carried out with a sedentary 23-year-old female. Injury was induced by 4 bouts of 15 maximal isokinetic eccentric contractions (angular velocity of 5º/s; range of motion from 40º to 110º of knee flexion. The isometric torque of the quadriceps (knee at 90º flexion decreased 52% immediately after eccentric exercise and recovered on the 5th day. The highest reduction of RMS occurred on the 2nd day after injury in both VL (63% and VMO (66% and only VL recovered to the pre-injury level on the 7th day. Immediately after injury, the MDF decreased by 5 and 3% (VMO and VL, respectively and recovered one day later. Serum CK levels increased by 109% on the 2nd day and were still increased by 32% on the 7th day. MRI showed large areas of injury especially in the deep region of quadriceps. In conclusion, eccentric exercise decreased the isometric torque and electromyographic signals of quadriceps muscle, which were recovered in one week, despite the muscle regeneration signals.

  7. Leg muscles activities during hyperventilation following a cycling exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    David, P; Mora, I; Terrien, J; Lelard, T; Petitjean, M

    2010-01-01

    The goal of this study was to establish how increased ventilation modifies postural stability, as characterized by body sway and leg muscle activities. Twelve healthy subjects had to perform six 30-second postural tests: one pre-exercise test while breathing gently and then one test every minute for the five minutes immediately following a maximum-intensity, incremental cycling exercise test. Subjects were asked to maintain an upright stance on a force plate for 30 s, with their eyes open. Movement of the centre of pressure in the sagittal plane was monitored in the time and spectral domains. Myoelectric activities of the soleus and tibialis anterior muscles were recorded using surface electromyography. Ventilatory parameters were measured with a portable, telemetric device. Postural changes related to respiratory variations were quantified by coherence analysis. The results showed that hyperventilation induced by exercise was accompanied by a significant increase in postural parameters, indicating a reduction in postural stability following a change in ventilatory drive. Coherence analysis confirmed the ventilatory origin of the postural oscillations. The results suggest that ventilation may be an important factor in postural disturbance during physical activity. The observed increases in leg muscle activities were most likely related to musculo-articular stiffening.

  8. Antioxidants for preventing and reducing muscle soreness after exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranchordas, Mayur K; Rogerson, David; Soltani, Hora; Costello, Joseph T

    2017-12-14

    Muscle soreness typically occurs after intense exercise, unaccustomed exercise or actions that involve eccentric contractions where the muscle lengthens while under tension. It peaks between 24 and 72 hours after the initial bout of exercise. Many people take antioxidant supplements or antioxidant-enriched foods before and after exercise in the belief that these will prevent or reduce muscle soreness after exercise. To assess the effects (benefits and harms) of antioxidant supplements and antioxidant-enriched foods for preventing and reducing the severity and duration of delayed onset muscle soreness following exercise. We searched the Cochrane Bone, Joint and Muscle Trauma Group Specialised Register, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, MEDLINE, Embase, SPORTDiscus, trial registers, reference lists of articles and conference proceedings up to February 2017. We included randomised and quasi-randomised controlled trials investigating the effects of all forms of antioxidant supplementation including specific antioxidant supplements (e.g. tablets, powders, concentrates) and antioxidant-enriched foods or diets on preventing or reducing delayed onset muscle soreness (DOMS). We excluded studies where antioxidant supplementation was combined with another supplement. Two review authors independently screened search results, assessed risk of bias and extracted data from included trials using a pre-piloted form. Where appropriate, we pooled results of comparable trials, generally using the random-effects model. The outcomes selected for presentation in the 'Summary of findings' table were muscle soreness, collected at times up to 6 hours, 24, 48, 72 and 96 hours post-exercise, subjective recovery and adverse effects. We assessed the quality of the evidence using GRADE. Fifty randomised, placebo-controlled trials were included, 12 of which used a cross-over design. Of the 1089 participants, 961 (88.2%) were male and 128 (11.8%) were female. The age range for

  9. The role of the levator ani muscle in evacuation, sexual performance and pelvic floor disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shafik, A

    2000-12-01

    This paper reviews the role of the levator ani muscle (LAM) in evacuation, sexual performance and pelvic floor disorders. The LAM fixes the vesical neck, anorectal junction and vaginal fornices to the side wall of the pelvis by means of the suspensory sling and hiatal ligament. On contraction it shares in the mechanism of evacuation (urination, defecation). During the sexual act vaginal distension by the erect penis evokes the vaginolevator and vaginopuborectalis reflexes, with a resulting LAM contraction. The LAM also contracts upon stimulation of the clitoris or cervix uteri, an action mediated through clitoromotor and cervicomotor reflexes. LAM contraction leads to upper vagina ballooning, which acts as receptacle for semen collection, to uterine elevation and straightening and to elongation and narrowing of the vagina. These actions enhance the sexual response and prepare the uterus and vagina for the reproductive process. During ejaculation LAM contraction facilitates semen ejection. Levator subluxation and sagging leads to levator dysfunction syndrome, which may present as pudendal canal syndrome.

  10. High prevalence of pelvic floor muscle dysfunction in hospitalized elderly women with urinary incontinence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talasz, Helena; Jansen, Stephan C; Kofler, Markus; Lechleitner, Monika

    2012-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine pelvic floor muscle (PFM) function in hospitalized elderly women with urinary incontinence (UI). A cross-sectional study was performed using data of 704 patients, routinely collected by means of a clinical UI assessment. Only 25.5% of the patients were able to perform normal PFM contractions (Oxford grading scale score ≥3); 74.5% were unable to contract their PFM or showed weak PFM activity without circular contraction or elevation of the vagina. Vulvovaginal mucosal dystrophy was noted in 84% of the patients. A significant positive correlation of PFM function was found to cognitive status (MMSE score), mobility (Tinetti performance score), and history of previous PFM training; a negative correlation of PFM function was found to patients' age and vulvovaginal mucosal dystrophy, and no significant correlation to body mass index, parity, or history of hysterectomy. Targeted clinical UI assessment including digital vaginal palpation should be performed in all incontinent elderly women in order to detect PFM dysfunction and to optimize therapeutic measures.

  11. [The study of electrical acupuncture stimulation therapy combined with pelvic floor muscle therapy for postprostatectomy incontinence].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Bo-shuai; Ye, Ding-wei; Yao, Xu-dong; Peng, Jiang-yan; Zhang, Shi-lin; Dai, Bo; Zhang, Hai-liang; Shen, Yi-jun; Zhu, Yao; Zhu, Yi-ping; Shi, Guo-hai

    2010-09-01

    To explore the effectiveness and significance of whether electrical acupuncture stimulation combining with pelvic floor muscle therapy (PFMT) can improve the recovery of urinary continence. A total of 109 patients took part in the study of novel combination treatment for urinary continence from September 2008 to September 2009. Patients were divided into study group (n = 40) and control group (n = 69). The patients in study group received electrical acupuncture stimulation therapy combined with PFMT one week after removal the catheter. The patients in control group performed PFMT as the only treatment for post prostatectomy incontinence. The patients were followed up closely, with their clinical characteristics recorded, questionnaires of ICI-Q-SF filled up, and all the data for statistical analysis collected. There was a significant difference between the study group and the control group in the urinary control curve (P = 0.029). The difference of continence probability between these two groups became greater from 4 weeks after surgery, and the difference reached the peak at 6 weeks (P = 0.023). Then the difference became smaller, and there was no difference at 16 weeks after surgery. ICI-Q-SF questionnaires showed the same results. Electrical acupuncture stimulation therapy combining with PFMT can improve the recovery of patients' urinary continence after radical prostatectomy.

  12. Efficacy of pelvic floor muscle training in women with overactive bladder syndrome: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monteiro, Silvia; Riccetto, Cassio; Araújo, Angélica; Galo, Laryssa; Brito, Nathália; Botelho, Simone

    2018-04-11

    Our objective was to evaluate the effectiveness of pelvic floor muscle training (PFMT) in reducing overactive bladder (OAB) symptoms in women. Searches were performed at MEDLINE, PubMed, Physiotherapy Evidence Database (PEDro), Scielo, and Central Cochrane Library PubMed until January 2017. Controlled trials were researched by two independent reviewers. Eligible studies were restricted to random and controlled clinical trials that investigated the effectiveness of PFMT in decreasing OAB symptoms. Qualitative methodology was evaluated using the PEDro scale. Data was analyzed and interpreted qualitatively. The final search retrieved eight studies (n = 1161 women with urgency symptoms), which were published between 2002 and 2016. The methodological scores varied between 4 and 7 in the PEDro scale. PFMT, with the objective of controlling urgent micturition, demonstrated improvements in quality of life in women with OAB. Most data in this revision came from small- to moderate-sized trials, with different and inconsistent outcome measures, which could have impacted the end results. The literature regarding the effectiveness of PFMT in OAB remains heterogeneous and inconclusive.

  13. Use of transabdominal ultrasound imaging in retraining the pelvic-floor muscles of a woman postpartum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ariail, Allison; Sears, Trace; Hampton, Elizabeth

    2008-10-01

    Postpartum stress urinary incontinence (SUI) often compromises a woman's ability to participate in normal daily routines or physical activities. Pelvic-floor muscle (PFM) training has been shown to be effective in improving urinary incontinence. Transabdominal ultrasound (TAUS) imaging is a new, noninvasive method for assessing the function of the PFMs. This case report describes the use of TAUS imaging in the strengthening of a patient's PFMs. The patient was a 29-year-old woman experiencing SUI with high-impact activities following a history of 2 vaginal deliveries, 1 resulting in a grade III perineal laceration. Intervention included PFM training with the use of TAUS imaging. A 1-year follow-up examination was performed to assess the long-term functional outcomes experienced by the patient. The patient's ability to maintain a PFM contraction during motor tasks was documented throughout the course of treatment to demonstrate her gain in PFM control. The patient gained strength in her PFMs, enabling her to maintain a PFM contraction during various motor tasks. She was able to return to a running program with no SUI symptoms. Her satisfaction level was high at 1 year. The use of TAUS imaging was a helpful assessment and biofeedback tool for re-education and rehabilitation of the PFMs for this patient.

  14. The effect of pelvic floor muscle training in urinary incontinent elderly women: a sistematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raquel Henriques Jácomo

    Full Text Available Introduction The International Continence Society (ICS determines that the pelvic floor muscles training (PFMT is the first-choice treatment of urinary symptoms in women. Objective The aim of this study was to systematize randomized controlled clinical trials that address the effects of PFMT in the treatment of urinary symptoms in older women using objective outcome measures. Method Systematic review search was performed eletronic the following databases: Medline, Pubmed, Lilacs, PEDro and manual research conducted in the references of the studies. Were considered eligible women aged over 60 years who performed PFMT in isolation, without the involvement of another technique. The PFMT performed in clinic or at home, with or without the supervision of a therapist and with or without the use of biofeedback as an adjunct. Considered as outcome measures urodynamic studies, voiding diary that assesses daytime urinary frequency, nocturnal urinary frequency, urinary incontinence and exchange absorbent, and, finally, the absorbent test that quantifies loss urinary grams. The assessment of methodological quality of the studies was conducted by PEDro scale. Results Three studies were reviewed in full. Only one trial was rated high methodological quality. There was significant improvement in urinary symptoms after treatment proposed in the three selected studies. Conclusion Considering the studies available so far are weak the evidence for the use of PFMT in the treatment of urinary symptoms in elderly women.

  15. Vaginal weight cones. Theoretical framework, effect on pelvic floor muscle strength and female stress urinary incontinence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bø, K

    1995-02-01

    The purpose of the present review article is to analyze the scientific background for the use of vaginal cones in measurement of pelvic floor muscle (PFM) strength and effect on female stress urinary incontinence (SUI). Literature search is based on articles written in English language compiled from MEDLINE, EMBASE, BIOSIS, and SCISEARCH from 1985 up to 1993. Only one study and one abstract were found dealing with methodology of cones used as measuring devices for PFM strength. Six articles were found evaluating the effect of cones on PFM strength and/or SUI. The analysis of the literature revealed that there is low correlation between PFM strength (measured by vaginal squeeze pressure and vaginal palpation) and ability to hold the cones in incontinent women. The theoretical basis for strength development using cones can be questioned. The studies evaluating effect on PFM strength and SUI have flaws in design, outcome variables and measurement of PFM strength. Including drop out rates, subjective improvement rates vary between 30-63% in uncontrolled studies. It is concluded that cones may not be used as objective measuring devices for PFM strength. There is a need for prospective controlled randomized studies applying reliable and valid outcome variables to evaluate the effect of cones in treatment of SUI.

  16. A manometry classification to assess pelvic floor muscle function in women.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priscylla Helouyse Angelo

    Full Text Available To develop a classification scale for manometry of pelvic floor muscles (PFM in Brazilian women, according to the modified Oxford scale.A cross sectional study, with 288 women enrolled in the Maternity, Natal, Brazil. Manometry and PFM strength data were collected and classified according to the modified Oxford scale. A simple linear regression was performed to determine the classification scale of manometry using the modified Oxford scale as the explanatory variable and the arithmetic mean of the manometry measurements as the response variable.The average age was 52.80 (±8.78; CI: 51.67-53.93 years. Manometry showed an average of 35.1 (±22.7; CI: 32.1-38.0 cmH2O and most women (29.7% scored grade 3 on the modified Oxford scale. According to the proposed scale, values between 7.5 to 14.5 cmH2O correspond to very weak pressure; 14.6 to 26.5 cmH2O represent weak pressure; 26.6 to 41.5 cmH2O represent moderate pressure; 41.6 to 60.5 cmH2O represent good pressure, and values above 60.6 cmH2O correspond to strong pressure.Manometry values were rated on a five-point scale. It is possible to rank the pressure levels performed by voluntary contraction of PFM with this new scale.

  17. Prior eccentric exercise augments muscle pain and perception of effort during cycling exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Black, Christopher D; Dobson, Richard M

    2013-05-01

    This study examined the effects of exercise-induced muscle damage (EIMD) on the physiological and perceptual responses to 30 minutes of submaximal cycling at 60% of oxygen consumption (VO2 peak). Ten participants completed two 30-minute bouts of cycling, one before and one 48 hours after performance of strenuous (24 contractions with 120% of concentric 1-repeition maximum) eccentric exercise. Eccentric exercise resulted in a significant delayed-onset muscle pain (1.6±1.6 mm to 44.8±20 mm on a 100-mm visual analog scale; P30±0.56; P=0.003) and perceived exertion (RPE; 13.0±0.30 vs. 13.8±0.61; P=0.02) were elevated during cycling after EIMD at identical work rates. No changes were observed in VO2 (29.6±4.6 vs. 30.2±4.4 mL/kg/min; P=0.41), heart rate (154±15 vs. 155±9 beats/min; P=0.58), and ventilation (57.2±12.1 vs. 59.8±12.7 L/min; P=0.13) during exercise after EIMD. The mean change in RPE was significantly correlated (r=0.56; Pcycling and delayed-onset pain during resistance exercise (r=0.86; Pcycling exercise.

  18. Muscle fibre capillarization is a critical factor in muscle fibre hypertrophy during resistance exercise training in older men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snijders, Tim; Nederveen, Joshua P; Joanisse, Sophie; Leenders, Marika; Verdijk, Lex B; van Loon, Luc J C; Parise, Gianni

    2017-04-01

    Adequate muscle fibre perfusion is critical for the maintenance of muscle mass; it is essential in the rapid delivery of oxygen, nutrients and growth factors to the muscle, stimulating muscle fibre growth. Muscle fibre capillarization is known to decrease substantially with advancing age. However, whether (relative) low muscle fibre capillarization negatively impacts the muscle hypertrophic response following resistance exercise training in older adults is unknown. Twenty-two healthy older men (71 ± 1 years) performed 24 weeks of progressive resistance type exercise training. To assess the change in muscle fibre characteristics, percutaneous biopsies from the vastus lateralis muscle were taken before and following 12 and 24 weeks of the intervention programme. A comparison was made between participants who had a relatively low type II muscle fibre capillary-to-fibre perimeter exchange index (CFPE; LOW group) and high type II muscle fibre CFPE (HIGH group) at baseline. Type I and type II muscle fibre size, satellite cell, capillary content and distance between satellite cells to the nearest capillary were determined by immunohistochemistry. Overall, type II muscle fibre size (from 5150 ± 234 to 6719 ± 446 µm 2 , P muscle fibre, P muscle fibre capillarization, whereas muscle fibre size (from 5170 ± 390 to 7133 ± 314 µm 2 , P muscle fibre, P muscle fibre capillarization were observed in response to 12 and 24 weeks of resistance exercise training in both the LOW and HIGH group. Type II muscle fibre capillarization at baseline may be a critical factor for allowing muscle fibre hypertrophy to occur during prolonged resistance exercise training in older men. © 2016 The Authors. Journal of Cachexia, Sarcopenia and Muscle published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of the Society on Sarcopenia, Cachexia and Wasting Disorders.

  19. Role of AMPK in skeletal muscle metabolic regulation and adaptation in relation to exercise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Sebastian Beck; Richter, Erik; Wojtaszewski, Jørgen

    2006-01-01

    The 5'-AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is a potent regulator of skeletal muscle metabolism and gene expression. AMPK is activated both in response to in vivo exercise and ex vivo contraction. AMPK is therefore believed to be an important signalling molecule in regulating muscle metabolism...... during exercise as well as in adaptation of skeletal muscle to exercise training. The first part of this review is focused on different mechanisms regulating AMPK activity during muscle work such as alterations in nucleotide concentrations, availability of energy substrates and upstream AMPK kinases. We...... in relation to adaptation of skeletal muscle to exercise training....

  20. [Core muscle chains activation during core exercises determined by EMG-a systematic review].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogan, Slavko; Riesen, Jan; Taeymans, Jan

    2014-10-15

    Good core muscles strength is essential for daily life and sports activities. However, the mechanism how core muscles may be effectively triggered by exercises is not yet precisely described in the literature. The aim of this systematic review was to evaluate the rate of activation as measured by electromyography of the ventral, lateral and dorsal core muscle chains during core (trunk) muscle exercises. A total of 16 studies were included. Exercises with a vertical starting position, such as the deadlift or squat activated significantly more core muscles than exercises in the horizontal initial position.

  1. Can quality of life be improved by pelvic floor muscle training in women with urinary incontinence after ischemic stroke?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tibaek, Sigrid; Jensen, Rigmor; Lindskov, Grethe

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of pelvic floor muscle training in women with urinary incontinence after ischemic stroke measured by quality of life (QoL) parameters. Three hundred thirty-nine medical records of stroke patients were searched. Twenty-six subjects were randomised...... to a Treatment Group or a Control Group in a single blinded, randomised study design. The intervention included 12 weeks of standardised pelvic floor muscle training. The outcome was measured by the Short Form 36 (SF-36) Health Survey Questionnaire and The Incontinence Impact Questionnaire (IIQ). Twenty-four...... subjects completed the study. The SF-36 and IIQ did not show significant difference between the two groups. Despite the high prevalence of stroke with urinary incontinence, it is difficult to include these patients in such studies. The samples were too small to detect any significant differences...

  2. Regular physical exercise improves cardiac autonomic and muscle vasodilatory responses to isometric exercise in healthy elderly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarmento, Adriana de Oliveira; Santos, Amilton da Cruz; Trombetta, Ivani Credidio; Dantas, Marciano Moacir; Oliveira Marques, Ana Cristina; do Nascimento, Leone Severino; Barbosa, Bruno Teixeira; Dos Santos, Marcelo Rodrigues; Andrade, Maria do Amparo; Jaguaribe-Lima, Anna Myrna; Brasileiro-Santos, Maria do Socorro

    2017-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate cardiac autonomic control and muscle vasodilation response during isometric exercise in sedentary and physically active older adults. Twenty healthy participants, 10 sedentary and 10 physically active older adults, were evaluated and paired by gender, age, and body mass index. Sympathetic and parasympathetic cardiac activity (spectral and symbolic heart rate analysis) and muscle blood flow (venous occlusion plethysmography) were measured for 10 minutes at rest (baseline) and during 3 minutes of isometric handgrip exercise at 30% of the maximum voluntary contraction (sympathetic excitatory maneuver). Variables were analyzed at baseline and during 3 minutes of isometric exercise. Cardiac autonomic parameters were analyzed by Wilcoxon and Mann–Whitney tests. Muscle vasodilatory response was analyzed by repeated-measures analysis of variance followed by Tukey’s post hoc test. Sedentary older adults had higher cardiac sympathetic activity compared to physically active older adult subjects at baseline (63.13±3.31 vs 50.45±3.55 nu, P=0.02). The variance (heart rate variability index) was increased in active older adults (1,438.64±448.90 vs 1,402.92±385.14 ms, P=0.02), and cardiac sympathetic activity (symbolic analysis) was increased in sedentary older adults (5,660.91±1,626.72 vs 4,381.35±1,852.87, P=0.03) during isometric handgrip exercise. Sedentary older adults showed higher cardiac sympathetic activity (spectral analysis) (71.29±4.40 vs 58.30±3.50 nu, P=0.03) and lower parasympathetic modulation (28.79±4.37 vs 41.77±3.47 nu, P=0.03) compared to physically active older adult subjects during isometric handgrip exercise. Regarding muscle vasodilation response, there was an increase in the skeletal muscle blood flow in the second (4.1±0.5 vs 3.7±0.4 mL/min per 100 mL, P=0.01) and third minute (4.4±0.4 vs 3.9±0.3 mL/min per 100 mL, P=0.03) of handgrip exercise in active older adults. The results indicate that

  3. Regular physical exercise improves cardiac autonomic and muscle vasodilatory responses to isometric exercise in healthy elderly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarmento, Adriana de Oliveira; Santos, Amilton da Cruz; Trombetta, Ivani Credidio; Dantas, Marciano Moacir; Oliveira Marques, Ana Cristina; do Nascimento, Leone Severino; Barbosa, Bruno Teixeira; Dos Santos, Marcelo Rodrigues; Andrade, Maria do Amparo; Jaguaribe-Lima, Anna Myrna; Brasileiro-Santos, Maria do Socorro

    2017-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate cardiac autonomic control and muscle vasodilation response during isometric exercise in sedentary and physically active older adults. Twenty healthy participants, 10 sedentary and 10 physically active older adults, were evaluated and paired by gender, age, and body mass index. Sympathetic and parasympathetic cardiac activity (spectral and symbolic heart rate analysis) and muscle blood flow (venous occlusion plethysmography) were measured for 10 minutes at rest (baseline) and during 3 minutes of isometric handgrip exercise at 30% of the maximum voluntary contraction (sympathetic excitatory maneuver). Variables were analyzed at baseline and during 3 minutes of isometric exercise. Cardiac autonomic parameters were analyzed by Wilcoxon and Mann-Whitney tests. Muscle vasodilatory response was analyzed by repeated-measures analysis of variance followed by Tukey's post hoc test. Sedentary older adults had higher cardiac sympathetic activity compared to physically active older adult subjects at baseline (63.13±3.31 vs 50.45±3.55 nu, P =0.02). The variance (heart rate variability index) was increased in active older adults (1,438.64±448.90 vs 1,402.92±385.14 ms, P =0.02), and cardiac sympathetic activity (symbolic analysis) was increased in sedentary older adults (5,660.91±1,626.72 vs 4,381.35±1,852.87, P =0.03) during isometric handgrip exercise. Sedentary older adults showed higher cardiac sympathetic activity (spectral analysis) (71.29±4.40 vs 58.30±3.50 nu, P =0.03) and lower parasympathetic modulation (28.79±4.37 vs 41.77±3.47 nu, P =0.03) compared to physically active older adult subjects during isometric handgrip exercise. Regarding muscle vasodilation response, there was an increase in the skeletal muscle blood flow in the second (4.1±0.5 vs 3.7±0.4 mL/min per 100 mL, P =0.01) and third minute (4.4±0.4 vs 3.9±0.3 mL/min per 100 mL, P =0.03) of handgrip exercise in active older adults. The results indicate

  4. Mammalian target of rapamycin complex 2 regulates muscle glucose uptake during exercise in mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kleinert, Maximilian; Parker, Benjamin L; Fritzen, Andreas Mæchel

    2017-01-01

    Exercise increases glucose uptake into insulin-resistant muscle. Thus, elucidating the exercise signalling network in muscle may uncover new therapeutic targets. mTORC2, a regulator of insulin-controlled glucose uptake, has been reported to interact with Rac1, which plays a role in exercise...

  5. Substrate availability and transcriptional regulation of metabolic genes in human skeletal muscle during recovery from exercise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pilegaard, Henriette; Osada, Takuya; Andersen, Lisbeth Tingsted

    2005-01-01

    In skeletal muscle of humans, transcription of several metabolic genes is transiently induced during recovery from exercise when no food is consumed. To determine the potential influence of substrate availability on the transcriptional regulation of metabolic genes during recovery from exercise, 9...... the transcriptional regulation of metabolic genes in skeletal muscle of humans during recovery from exercise....

  6. Comparison of the functionality of pelvic floor muscles in women who practice the Pilates method and sedentary women: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferla, Lia; Paiva, Luciana Laureano; Darki, Caroline; Vieira, Adriane

    2016-01-01

    The Pilates method is a form of physical exercise that improves the control of the core muscles, improving the conditioning of all the muscle groups that comprise the core, including the pelvic floor muscles (PFM). Thus, this study had the goal of verifying the existence of differences in the functioning of the PFM in women who practice the Pilates method and sedentary women. This was an observational, cross-sectional pilot study. A sample size calculation was performed using preliminary data and it determined that the sample should have at least 24 individuals in each group. The participants were 60 women aged 20 to 40 years; 30 women practiced the Pilates method (PMG) and 30 were sedentary (SG). An anamnesis file was used to collect personal data and assess the knowledge and perception of the PFM. The Perina perineometer and vaginal palpation were used to determine the functionality of the PFM. There was no significant difference between the PMG and the SG in any of the variables analyzed. We concluded that the functionality of the PFM in younger women who practice the Pilates method is not different from that of sedentary women.

  7. Human Skeletal Muscle Stem Cells in Adaptations to Exercise; Effects of Resistance Exercise Contraction Mode and Protein Supplementation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Farup, Jean

    2014-01-01

    . In conclusion, protein supplementation may accelerate SC proliferation as part of regeneration or remodeling processes after maximal eccentric exercise. Paper II. Whey protein hydrolysate augments tendon and muscle hypertrophy independent of exercise contraction mode. The aim of paper II was to investigate...... the effect of contraction mode specific resistance training and protein supplementation on whole muscle and tendon hypertrophy. Quadriceps muscle and patellar tendon cross-sectional area (CSA) was quantified using magnetic resonance imaging pre and post 12 weeks of eccentric (Ecc) or concentric (Conc...... compared to Placebo. Exercise contraction mode did not influence muscle or tendon hypertrophy. In conclusion, hydrolysed whey protein may augment both muscle and tendon hypertrophy independently of exercise contraction mode during training. Paper III. Influence of exercise contraction mode and protein...

  8. Influence of pre-exercise muscle glycogen content on exercise-induced transcriptional regulation of metabolic genes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pilegaard, Henriette; Keller, Charlotte; Steensberg, Adam

    2002-01-01

    Transcription of metabolic genes is transiently induced during recovery from exercise in skeletal muscle of humans. To determine whether pre-exercise muscle glycogen content influences the magnitude and/or duration of this adaptive response, six male subjects performed one-legged cycling exercise...... to lower muscle glycogen content in one leg and then, the following day, completed 2.5 h low intensity two-legged cycling exercise. Nuclei and mRNA were isolated from biopsies obtained from the vastus lateralis muscle of the control and reduced glycogen (pre-exercise glycogen = 609 +/- 47 and 337 +/- 33...... mmol kg(-1) dry weight, respectively) legs before and after 0, 2 and 5 h of recovery. Exercise induced a significant (P glycogen leg only. Although PDK4...

  9. Effects of inspiratory muscle training on respiratory muscle electromyography and dyspnea during exercise in healthy men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramsook, Andrew H; Molgat-Seon, Yannick; Schaeffer, Michele R; Wilkie, Sabrina S; Camp, Pat G; Reid, W Darlene; Romer, Lee M; Guenette, Jordan A

    2017-05-01

    Inspiratory muscle training (IMT) has consistently been shown to reduce exertional dyspnea in health and disease; however, the physiological mechanisms remain poorly understood. A growing body of literature suggests that dyspnea intensity can be explained largely by an awareness of increased neural respiratory drive, as measured indirectly using diaphragmatic electromyography (EMGdi). Accordingly, we sought to determine whether improvements in dyspnea following IMT can be explained by decreases in inspiratory muscle electromyography (EMG) activity. Twenty-five young, healthy, recreationally active men completed a detailed familiarization visit followed by two maximal incremental cycle exercise tests separated by 5 wk of randomly assigned pressure threshold IMT or sham control (SC) training. The IMT group ( n = 12) performed 30 inspiratory efforts twice daily against a 30-repetition maximum intensity. The SC group ( n = 13) performed a daily bout of 60 inspiratory efforts against 10% maximal inspiratory pressure (MIP), with no weekly adjustments. Dyspnea intensity was measured throughout exercise using the modified 0-10 Borg scale. Sternocleidomastoid and scalene EMG was measured using surface electrodes, whereas EMGdi was measured using a multipair esophageal electrode catheter. IMT significantly improved MIP (pre: -138 ± 45 vs. post: -160 ± 43 cmH 2 O, P muscle EMG during exercise in either group. Improvements in dyspnea intensity ratings following IMT in healthy humans cannot be explained by changes in the electrical activity of the inspiratory muscles. NEW & NOTEWORTHY Exertional dyspnea intensity is thought to reflect an increased awareness of neural respiratory drive, which is measured indirectly using diaphragmatic electromyography (EMGdi). We examined the effects of inspiratory muscle training (IMT) on dyspnea, EMGdi, and EMG of accessory inspiratory muscles. IMT significantly reduced submaximal dyspnea intensity ratings but did not change EMG of any

  10. Effect of Contraction Velocity on Selected Muscle Damage Indices Following Acute Eccentric Exercise-Induced Muscle Damage: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farzaneh Movaseghi

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Background & Objective: Eccentric muscle action is mechanically more efficient but employs a unique activation strategy which predisposes the muscle to damage. Type II muscle fibers are more susceptible than type I fibers to muscle damage; hence, velocity probably interferes with mechanical stress and thus may modulate muscle damage. The purpose of this review study was to investigate the effect of contraction velocity on selected muscle damage indices following acute eccentric exercise-induced muscle damage. Material & Method: Looking up related articles published in valid scientific databases such as PubMed, Springer, Elsevier, Science Direct, and SID with standard keywords and according to the research criteria, 16 studies (1980 to 2015 were selected. Results: Ten studies showed that high velocity eccentric exercise induced greater muscle damage. Five studies showed no differences between velocities, and a single study indicated a greater magnitude of muscle damage following slow eccentric exercise. Conclusion: Thus, greater magnitude of damage is induced by contractions performed at a higher velocity. However, considering differences during tension in the majority of studies, focusing on elbow flexor muscles and muscle damage profile variety in various muscle groups, and more animal and human studies in other muscular groups are necessary to confirm how the velocity of acute eccentric exercise would affect the muscle damage.

  11. Single-blind, randomized, controlled trial of pelvic floor muscle training, electrical stimulation, vaginal cones, and no active treatment in the management of stress urinary incontinence

    OpenAIRE

    Castro, Rodrigo A.; Arruda, Raquel M.; Zanetti, Miriam R. D.; Santos, Patricia D.; Sartori, Marair G. F.; Girão, Manoel J. B. C.

    2008-01-01

    PURPOSE: To compare the effectiveness of pelvic floor exercises, electrical stimulation, vaginal cones, and no active treatment in women with urodynamic stress urinary incontinence. PATIENTS AND METHODS: One hundred eighteen subjects were randomly selected to recieve pelvic floor exercises (n=31), ES (n=30), vaginal cones (n=27), or no treatment (untreated control) (n=30). Women were evaluated before and after completion of six months of treatment by the pad test, quality of life questionnair...

  12. Effect of pelvic floor muscle training compared with watchful waiting in older women with symptomatic mild pelvic organ prolapse : randomised controlled trial in primary care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wiegersma, Marian; Panman, Chantal M. C. R.; Kollen, Boudewijn J.; Berger, Marjolein Y.; Lisman-Van Leeuwen, Yvonne; Dekker, Janny H.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To compare the effects of pelvic floor muscle training and watchful waiting on pelvic floor symptoms in a primary care population of women aged 55 years and over with symptomatic mild pelvic organ prolapse. Design Randomised controlled trial. Setting Dutch primary care. Participants Women

  13. Effect of a Facial Muscle Exercise Device on Facial Rejuvenation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Ui-Jae; Kwon, Oh-Yun; Jung, Sung-Hoon; Ahn, Sun-Hee; Gwak, Gyeong-Tae

    2018-01-20

    The efficacy of facial muscle exercises (FMEs) for facial rejuvenation is controversial. In the majority of previous studies, nonquantitative assessment tools were used to assess the benefits of FMEs. This study examined the effectiveness of FMEs using a Pao (MTG, Nagoya, Japan) device to quantify facial rejuvenation. Fifty females were asked to perform FMEs using a Pao device for 30 seconds twice a day for 8 weeks. Facial muscle thickness and cross-sectional area were measured sonographically. Facial surface distance, surface area, and volumes were determined using a laser scanning system before and after FME. Facial muscle thickness, cross-sectional area, midfacial surface distances, jawline surface distance, and lower facial surface area and volume were compared bilaterally before and after FME using a paired Student t test. The cross-sectional areas of the zygomaticus major and digastric muscles increased significantly (right: P jawline surface distances (right: P = 0.004, left: P = 0.003) decreased significantly after FME using the Pao device. The lower facial surface areas (right: P = 0.005, left: P = 0.006) and volumes (right: P = 0.001, left: P = 0.002) were also significantly reduced after FME using the Pao device. FME using the Pao device can increase facial muscle thickness and cross-sectional area, thus contributing to facial rejuvenation. © 2018 The American Society for Aesthetic Plastic Surgery, Inc.

  14. Bone mineral density, muscle strength, and recreational exercise in men

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snow-Harter, C.; Whalen, R.; Myburgh, K.; Arnaud, S.; Marcus, R.

    1992-01-01

    Muscle strength has been shown to predict bone mineral density (BMD) in women. We examined this relationship in 50 healthy men who ranged in age from 28 to 51 years (average 38.3 years). BMD of the lumbar spine, proximal femur, whole body, and tibia were measured by dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry (Hologic QDR 1000W). Dynamic strength using one repetition maximum was assessed for the biceps, quadriceps, and back extensors and for the hip abductors, adductors, and flexors. Isometric grip strength was measured by dynamometry. Daily walking mileage was assessed by 9 week stepmeter records and kinematic analysis of video filming. Subjects were designated as exercisers and nonexercisers. Exercisers participated in recreational exercise at least two times each week. The results demonstrated that BMD at all sites correlated with back and biceps strength (p strength was the only independent predictor of spine and femoral neck density (R2 = 0.27). Further, back strength was the most robust predictor of BMD at the trochanter, Ward's triangle, whole body, and tibia, although biceps strength, age, body weight, and leg strength contributed significantly to BMD at these skeletal sites, accounting for 35-52% of the variance in BMD. Exercisers and nonexercisers were similar for walking (3.97 versus 3.94 miles/day), age (37.8 versus 38.5) years, and weight (80.0 versus 77.7 kg). However, BMD and muscle strength were significantly greater in exercises than in nonexercisers.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS).

  15. Bone mineral density, muscle strength, and recreational exercise in men

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snow-Harter, C.; Whalen, R.; Myburgh, K.; Arnaud, S.; Marcus, R.

    1992-01-01

    Muscle strength has been shown to predict bone mineral density (BMD) in women. We examined this relationship in 50 healthy men who ranged in age from 28 to 51 years (average 38.3 years). BMD of the lumbar spine, proximal femur, whole body, and tibia were measured by dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry (Hologic QDR 1000W). Dynamic strength using one repetition maximum was assessed for the biceps, quadriceps, and back extensors and for the hip abductors, adductors, and flexors. Isometric grip strength was measured by dynamometry. Daily walking mileage was assessed by 9 week stepmeter records and kinematic analysis of video filming. Subjects were designated as exercisers and nonexercisers. Exercisers participated in recreational exercise at least two times each week. The results demonstrated that BMD at all sites correlated with back and biceps strength (p < 0.01 to p = 0.0001). Body weight correlated with tibia and whole-body BMD (p < 0.001); age negatively correlated with Ward's triangle BMD (p < 0.01). In stepwise multiple regressions, back strength was the only independent predictor of spine and femoral neck density (R2 = 0.27). Further, back strength was the most robust predictor of BMD at the trochanter, Ward's triangle, whole body, and tibia, although biceps strength, age, body weight, and leg strength contributed significantly to BMD at these skeletal sites, accounting for 35-52% of the variance in BMD. Exercisers and nonexercisers were similar for walking (3.97 versus 3.94 miles/day), age (37.8 versus 38.5) years, and weight (80.0 versus 77.7 kg). However, BMD and muscle strength were significantly greater in exercises than in nonexercisers.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS).

  16. Prevention: Exercise

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... and toes turned in very slightly. Hold a ball directly in front of you. Keep your abdominal muscles tight and feet flat on the floor; rotate from side to side. Repeat 10 times. Check with your ... balls, you will experience more benefit from this exercise... ...

  17. The effect of inspiratory muscle training on respiratory and limb locomotor muscle deoxygenation during exercise with resistive inspiratory loading.

    OpenAIRE

    Turner, Louise; Tecklenburg-Lund, S.L.; Chapman, R.; Shei, R.J.; Wilhite, D.P.; Mickleborough, T.

    2016-01-01

    We investigated how inspiratory muscle training impacted respiratory and locomotor muscle deoxygenation during submaximal exercise with resistive inspiratory loading. 16 male cyclists completed 6 weeks of either true (n=8) or sham (n=8) inspiratory muscle training. Pre- and post-training, subjects completed 3, 6-min experimental trials performed at ~80%  ˙VO2peak with interventions of either moderate inspiratory loading, heavy inspiratory loading, or maximal exercise imposed in the final 3 mi...

  18. Ibuprofen Ingestion Does Not Affect Markers of Post-exercise Muscle Inflammation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vella, Luke; Markworth, James F.; Paulsen, Gøran; Raastad, Truls; Peake, Jonathan M.; Snow, Rod J.; Cameron-Smith, David; Russell, Aaron P.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: We investigated if oral ingestion of ibuprofen influenced leucocyte recruitment and infiltration following an acute bout of traditional resistance exercise Methods: Sixteen male subjects were divided into two groups that received the maximum over-the-counter dose of ibuprofen (1200mg d−1) or a similarly administered placebo following lower body resistance exercise. Muscle biopsies were taken from m.vastus lateralis and blood serum samples were obtained before and immediately after exercise, and at 3 and 24 h after exercise. Muscle cross-sections were stained with antibodies against neutrophils (CD66b and MPO) and macrophages (CD68). Muscle damage was assessed via creatine kinase and myoglobin in blood serum samples, and muscle soreness was rated on a ten-point pain scale. Results: The resistance exercise protocol stimulated a significant increase in the number of CD66b+ and MPO+ cells when measured 3 h post exercise. Serum creatine kinase, myoglobin and subjective muscle soreness all increased post-exercise. Muscle leucocyte infiltration, creatine kinase, myoglobin and subjective muscle soreness were unaffected by ibuprofen treatment when compared to placebo. There was also no association between increases in inflammatory leucocytes and any other marker of cellular muscle damage. Conclusion: Ibuprofen administration had no effect on the accumulation of neutrophils, markers of muscle damage or muscle soreness during the first 24 h of post-exercise muscle recovery. PMID:27064890

  19. Effect of electroacupuncture versus pelvic floor muscle training plus solifenacin for moderate and severe mixed urinary incontinence in women: a study protocol

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Baoyan; Wang, Yang; Xu, Huanfang; Chen, Yuelai; Wu, Jiani; Mo, Qian; Liu, Zhishun

    2014-01-01

    Background In women with mixed urinary incontinence, pelvic floor muscle training and solifenacin is the recommended conservative treatment, while electroacupuncture is a safe, economical and effective option. Methods/Design In this prospective, multi-center, randomized controlled trial, five hundred women with mixed urinary incontinence, from 10 centers will be randomized to receive either electroacupuncture or pelvic floor muscle training plus solifenacin. Women in the acupuncture group wil...

  20. The Pathophysiology and Care of Exercise Related Muscle Cramps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abhay Kumar Pandey

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Cramps are major concerns to competing athletes occurring during or after exercise, are common yet, poorly understood phenomena. Pain alone is not object of treatment as serious musculophysiologic and metabolic disturbance of fluid and electrolyte deserve correction. Acute muscle pain and stiffness may cause soreness for longer time. Based on observations, two etiological theories are construed, i.e. the muscle fatigue theory and sodium-water deficit theory. Either has supporting and contradicting facts, but these are relevant to guide prevention and management interventions. Cramps may be different in kind based on different local and/or general causes. Occurrence of cramps in varied situations, environmental conditions and populations, suggests of pleural causal determinents. These include neuromuscular and fluid-electrolyte disturbance factors directly responsible under specific circumstances of individual sports person. Degree of conditioning to particular kind of physical exertion appears most significant factor. Prevention exercises target theorised physiology of muscle tendon and golgi organ receptors, toward delaying fatigability and cramp risk. Occurrence of cramps mostly in hot environments emphasizes support to dehydration-electrolyte imbalance theory. Maintenance of hydration and adequate electrolyte levels in cramp-prone individuals thus makes sense. Worth of variety of measures empirically employed for cramp relief can be judged by scientific understanding. Drugs found useful may not be the best match to pathophysiologic proprieties and thus irrational. The pathophysiological details and relevant clinical information is presented and discussed as first hand understanding for the sports persons and their care givers.

  1. Preventive effects of stretching and stabilization exercises on muscle fatigue in mobile phone users.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hye-Young; Yeun, Young-Ran; Kim, Sung-Joong

    2016-09-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to investigate the preventive effects of stretching and stabilization exercises on muscle fatigue of the neck erector spine and upper trapezius muscles. [Subjects and Methods] The subjects of this study were 26 healthy university students (14 males and 12 females). Each subject was assigned randomly to each of three study groups in order to prevent order effect. The three groups included in this study were the no-exercise, stretching exercise, and neck stabilization exercise groups. The median electromyographic frequency was used as a gauge of muscle fatigue. [Results] Decreased muscle fatigue was demonstrated by an increase in the median electromyographic frequency values in all the four muscle groups in the comparison between conditions 1 and 3. In particular, statistically significant differences were found between the two conditions in the right upper trapezius muscle group. [Conclusion] These findings suggest that the effect of stretching and stabilization exercises can reduce muscle fatigue in mobile phone users.

  2. Pelvic floor muscle functions are improved after successful transobturator vaginal mesh procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Wen-Chen; Yang, Shwu-Huey; Yang, Jenn-Ming

    2017-02-01

    To explore functional changes of pelvic floor muscle (PFM) after successful Perigee procedures. We retrospectively analyzed information from 145 women having achieved anatomic success, defined as pelvic organ prolapse quantification (POP-Q) system. The investigated data included results from the POP-Q system and four-dimensional ultrasound at the preoperative and 12-month postoperative evaluations. The involuntary and voluntary PFM functions were, respectively, investigated during coughing and squeezing using the ultrasound parameters of the bladder neck distance (BND), bladder neck angle (BNA), genitohiatal distance (GHD), and genitohiatal angle. Postoperatively more women displayed normal involuntary PFM function in maintaining a stable bladder neck (preoperative vs. postoperative: 4.8% vs. 22.8%, P < 0.001) and genitohiatal (preoperative vs. postoperative: 16.6% vs. 30.3%, P = 0.008) locations upon coughing and could perform voluntary PFM contractions (preoperative vs. postoperative: 49.7% vs. 64.1%, P = 0.018). Compared with preoperative manifestations, less caudal displacement of the bladder neck indicated by smaller ranges of dynamic changes in BNA following coughing (preoperative vs. postoperative: 28° vs. 12°, P < 0.001), more cranial movement of the bladder neck indicated by larger values of changes in BND following squeezing (-0.26 vs. 0.06 cm, P < 0.001), and less reduction of genitohiatal size indicated by larger values of changes in GHD following squeezing (preoperative vs. postoperative: -0.95 vs. -0.63 cm, P = 0.027) were demonstrated postoperatively. Involuntary and voluntary PFM functions are improved after successful Perigee procedures. Neurourol. Urodynam. 36:380-384, 2017. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Physical activity and pelvic floor muscle training in patients with pelvic organ prolapse: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouchi, Mifuka; Kato, Kumiko; Gotoh, Momokazu; Suzuki, Shigeyuki

    2017-12-01

    The details of the physical activity in patients with mild to moderate pelvic organ prolapse (Pmoderate pelvic organ prolapse (POP) remain under-studied. The purpose of the present study was to investigate objective physical activity levels and the changes in pelvic floor muscle(PFM) strength, symptoms and quality of life (QOL) between before and after PFM training (PFMT) in patients with POP. In a prospective pilot study, 29 patients with stage II or III POP completed approximately 16 weeks of PFMT. A reliable activity monitor was used to measure physical activity parameters including step counts, activity and total calories expended, and duration at each intensity level. Maximum vaginal squeeze pressure, POP symptoms and QOL were assessed. Changes in these outcome measures were compared before and after PFMT. The step counts per day (mean ± SD) of women with POP was 7,272.9 ± 3,091.7 before PFMT and 7,553.4 ± 2,831.0 after PFMT. There was no significant change between before and PFMT. PFM strength was significantly increased after PFMT. POP-related symptoms including stress urinary incontinence, frequency, postmicturition dribble and interference with emptying the bowels were significantly improved. The QOL scores for general health, physical limitations, emotion, and severity measures were significantly improved after PFMT. Although PFMT changed PFM strength symptoms, and QOL, there were no changes for any physical activity parameters before and after PFMT. This is probably because the physical activity levels in patients with mild to moderate POP were almost same as in age-matched healthy women.

  4. Exercise intensity and muscle hypertrophy in blood flow-restricted limbs and non-restricted muscles: a brief review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abe, Takashi; Loenneke, Jeremy P; Fahs, Christopher A; Rossow, Lindy M; Thiebaud, Robert S; Bemben, Michael G

    2012-07-01

    Although evidence for high-intensity resistance training-induced muscle hypertrophy has accumulated over the last several decades, the basic concept of the training can be traced back to ancient Greece: Milo of Croton lifted a bull-calf daily until it was fully grown, which would be known today as progressive overload. Now, in the 21st century, different types of training are being tested and studied, such as low-intensity exercise combined with arterial as well as venous blood flow restriction (BFR) to/from the working muscles. Because BFR training requires the use of a cuff that is placed at the proximal ends of the arms and/or legs, the BFR is only applicable to limb muscles. Consequently, most previous BFR training studies have focused on the physiological adaptations of BFR limb muscles. Muscle adaptations in non-BFR muscles of the hip and trunk are lesser known. Recent studies that have reported both limb and trunk muscle adaptations following BFR exercise training suggest that low-intensity (20-30% of 1RM) resistance training combined with BFR elicits muscle hypertrophy in both BFR limb and non-BFR muscles. However, the combination of leg muscle BFR with walk training elicits muscle hypertrophy only in the BFR leg muscles. In contrast to resistance exercise with BFR, the exercise intensity may be too low during BFR walk training to cause muscle hypertrophy in the non-BFR gluteus maximus and other trunk muscles. Other mechanisms including hypoxia, local and systemic growth factors and muscle cell swelling may also potentially affect the hypertrophic response of non-BFR muscles to BFR resistance exercise. © 2012 The Authors Clinical Physiology and Functional Imaging © 2012 Scandinavian Society of Clinical Physiology and Nuclear Medicine.

  5. Biofeedback for the treatment of female pelvic floor muscle dysfunction: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitz, Fátima Faní; Resende, Ana Paula Magalhães; Stüpp, Liliana; Sartori, Marair Gracio Ferreira; Girão, Manoel João Batista Castello; Castro, Rodrigo Aquino

    2012-11-01

    Biofeedback (BF) has been widely used in the treatment of pelvic floor dysfunctions, mainly by promoting patient learning about muscle contraction with no side effects. However, its effectiveness remains poorly understood with some studies suggesting that BF offers no advantage over the isolated pelvic floor muscle training (PFMT). The main objective of this study was to systematically review available randomized controlled trials assessing the effectiveness of BF in female pelvic floor dysfunction treatment. Trials were electronically searched and rated for quality by use of the PEDro scale (values of 0-10). Randomized controlled trials assessing the training of pelvic floor muscle (PFM) using BF in women with PFM dysfunction were selected. Outcomes were converted to a scale ranging from 0 to 100. Trials were pooled with software used to prepare and update Cochrane reviews. Results are presented as weighted mean differences with 95 % confidence intervals (CI). Twenty-two trials with 1,469 patients that analyzed BF in the treatment of urinary, anorectal, and/or sexual dysfunctions were included. PFMT alone led to a superior but not significant difference in the function of PFM when compared to PFMT with BF, by using vaginal measurement in the short and intermediate term: 9.89 (95 % CI -5.05 to 24.83) and 15.03 (95 % CI -9.71 to 39.78), respectively. We found a few and nonhomogeneous studies addressing anorectal and sexual function, which do not provide the cure rate calculations. Limitations of this review are the low quality and heterogeneity of the studies, involving the usage of distinct protocols of interventions, and various and different outcome measures. The results of this systematic review suggest that PFMT with BF is not more effective than other conservative treatments for female PFM dysfunction.

  6. Pengaruh Immediet Instrumental Music Hearing Therapy Dengan Progresive Muscle Relaxation Exercise Terhadap Rest Heart Reat

    OpenAIRE

    Trisnowiyanto, Bambang

    2015-01-01

    Objective: to know the immediate effect of listening to music (instrumental music hearing therapy) and muscle relaxation exercises (progressive muscle relaxation exercise) to the resting pulse rate.Background: the number of heartbeats in one minute, which gives a clear picture of the load when the activity of the heart muscle is needed at a particular time. The heart rate can be affected by physical exercise and a good atmosphere to listen to music.Subject: students of junior high school were...

  7. Proteome profiles of longissimus and biceps femoris porcine muscles related to exercise and resting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    F.W.Te Pas, Marinus; Keuning, Els; Van der Wiel, Dick J.M.

    2011-01-01

    Exercise affects muscle metabolism and composition in the untrained muscles. The proteome of muscle tissue will be affected by exercise and resting. This is of economic importance for pork quality where transportation relates to exercise of untrained muscles. Rest reverses exercise effects....... The objective of this research was to develop potential protein biomarkers that predict the optimal resting time after exercise related to optimal pork quality. Ten litters of four female pigs were within litter allocated to the four treatment groups: exercise by running on a treadmill for 27 minutes followed...... by rest for 0, 1, or 3 h; control pigs without exercise. Proteome profiles and biochemical traits measuring energy metabolism and meat quality traits expected to be related to exercise were determined in the Longissimus and the Biceps femoris of the pigs. The results indicated associations between protein...

  8. Pelvic floor muscle problems mediate sexual problems in young adult rape victims

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Postma, Riemke; Bicanic, Iva; van der Vaart, Huub; Laan, Ellen

    2013-01-01

    Prior studies have addressed sexual abuse and sexual function in adult women. No studies have focused on the effect of adolescence rape on sexual functioning. To investigate the effect of rape on sexual problems and on pelvic floor problems, as well as the mediating role of pelvic floor problems on

  9. Oral quercetin supplementation hampers skeletal muscle adaptations in response to exercise training

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Casuso, R A; Martínez-López, E J; Nordsborg, Nikolai Baastrup

    2014-01-01

    We aimed to test exercise-induced adaptations on skeletal muscle when quercetin is supplemented. Four groups of rats were tested: quercetin sedentary, quercetin exercised, placebo sedentary, and placebo exercised. Treadmill exercise training took place 5 days a week for 6 weeks. Quercetin groups ...

  10. Creatine loading, resistance exercise performance, and muscle mechanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevenson, S W; Dudley, G A

    2001-11-01

    We tested the null hypothesis that creatine monohydrate loading (20 g per day for 7 days, n = 18) would not alter resistance exercise performance, isometric strength, or in vivo contractile properties of the quadriceps femoris muscle compared with loading with placebo (n = 13) in resistance-trained subjects. For the entire study group, the 1 repetition maximum (1RM) and 5-set performance (the number of repetitions) for unilateral, dynamic knee extension increased slightly (2% and 5%, respectively) after dietary supplementation, and these responses did not differ by condition. Maximal voluntary isometric torque and the rate of torque development did not change. During electromyostimulation, torque development and relaxation time were also unaffected. Our data suggest that creatine loading does not augment unilateral strength or multiset resistance exercise performance for knee extensions compared with placebo loading.

  11. Norepinephrine spillover from skeletal muscle during exercise in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Savard, G K; Richter, Erik; Strange, S

    1989-01-01

    -legged knee extension either alone or in combination with the knee extensors of the other leg and/or with the arms. The range of work intensities varied between 24 and 71% (mean) of subjects' maximal aerobic capacity (% VO2max). Leg blood flow, measured in the femoral vein by thermodilution, was determined...... legs, with a steeper rise occurring approximately 70% VO2max. These increases were not associated with any significant changes in leg blood flow or leg vascular conductance at the exercise intensities examined. These results suggest that, as the total active muscle mass increases, the rise...

  12. Prior exercise and antioxidant supplementation: effect on oxidative stress and muscle injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schilling Brian K

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Both acute bouts of prior exercise (preconditioning and antioxidant nutrients have been used in an attempt to attenuate muscle injury or oxidative stress in response to resistance exercise. However, most studies have focused on untrained participants rather than on athletes. The purpose of this work was to determine the independent and combined effects of antioxidant supplementation (vitamin C + mixed tocopherols/tocotrienols and prior eccentric exercise in attenuating markers of skeletal muscle injury and oxidative stress in resistance trained men. Methods Thirty-six men were randomly assigned to: no prior exercise + placebo; no prior exercise + antioxidant; prior exercise + placebo; prior exercise + antioxidant. Markers of muscle/cell injury (muscle performance, muscle soreness, C-reactive protein, and creatine kinase activity, as well as oxidative stress (blood protein carbonyls and peroxides, were measured before and through 48 hours of exercise recovery. Results No group by time interactions were noted for any variable (P > 0.05. Time main effects were noted for creatine kinase activity, muscle soreness, maximal isometric force and peak velocity (P Conclusion There appears to be no independent or combined effect of a prior bout of eccentric exercise or antioxidant supplementation as used here on markers of muscle injury in resistance trained men. Moreover, eccentric exercise as used in the present study results in minimal blood oxidative stress in resistance trained men. Hence, antioxidant supplementation for the purpose of minimizing blood oxidative stress in relation to eccentric exercise appears unnecessary in this population.

  13. Exercise and exercise training-induced increase in autophagy markers in human skeletal muscle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brandt, Nina; Gunnarsson, Thomas Gunnar Petursson; Bangsbo, Jens

    2018-01-01

    Moderately trained male subjects (mean age 25 years; range 19-33 years) completed an 8-week exercise training intervention consisting of continuous moderate cycling at 157 ± 20 W for 60 min (MOD; n = 6) or continuous moderate cycling (157 ± 20 W) interspersed by 30-sec sprints (473 ± 79 W) every 10...... muscle AMPKThr172 and ULKSer317 phosphorylation was elevated immediately after exercise, whereas mTORSer2448 and ULKSer757 phosphorylation was unchanged. Two hours after exercise LC3I, LC3II and BNIP3 protein content was overall higher than before exercise with no change in p62 protein. In MOD, Beclin1...... protein content was higher immediately and 2 h after exercise than before exercise, while there were no differences within SPRINT. Oxphos complex I, LC3I, BNIP3 and Parkin protein content was higher after the training intervention than before in both groups, while there was no difference in LC3II and p62...

  14. Variations in muscle activation levels during traditional latissimus dorsi weight training exercises: An experimental study.

    OpenAIRE

    Lehman, Gregory J; Buchan, Day Deans; Lundy, Angela; Myers, Nicole; Nalborczyk, Andrea

    2004-01-01

    Background Exercise beliefs abound regarding variations in strength training techniques on muscle activation levels yet little research has validated these ideas. The purpose of the study is to determine muscle activation level, expressed as a percent of a normalization contraction, of the latissimus dorsi, biceps brachii and middle trapezius/rhomboids muscle groups during a series of different exercise tasks. Methods The average muscle activity during four tasks; wide grip pulldown, reverse ...

  15. Assessment of bioelectrical activity of synergistic muscles during pelvic floor muscles activation in postmenopausal women with and without stress urinary incontinence: a preliminary observational study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ptaszkowski K

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Kuba Ptaszkowski,1 Małgorzata Paprocka-Borowicz,2 Lucyna Słupska,2 Janusz Bartnicki,1,3 Robert Dymarek,4 Joanna Rosińczuk,4 Jerzy Heimrath,5 Janusz Dembowski,6 Romuald Zdrojowy6 1Department of Obstetrics, 2Department of Clinical Biomechanics and Physiotherapy in Motor System Disorders, Wroclaw Medical University, Wroclaw, Poland; 3Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Health Center Bitterfeld/Wolfen gGmbH, Bitterfeld-Wolfen, Germany; 4Department of Nervous System Diseases, 5Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Faculty of Health Science, 6Department and Clinic of Urology, Faculty of Postgraduate Medical Training, Wroclaw Medical University, Wroclaw, Poland Objective: Muscles such as adductor magnus (AM, gluteus maximus (GM, rectus abdominis (RA, and abdominal external and internal oblique muscles are considered to play an important role in the treatment of stress urinary incontinence (SUI, and the relationship between contraction of these muscles and pelvic floor muscles (PFM has been established in previous studies. Synergistic muscle activation intensifies a woman’s ability to contract the PFM. In some cases, even for continent women, it is not possible to fully contract their PFM without involving the synergistic muscles. The primary aim of this study was to assess the surface electromyographic activity of synergistic muscles to PFM (SPFM during resting and functional PFM activation in postmenopausal women with and without SUI.Materials and methods: This study was a preliminary, prospective, cross-sectional observational study and included volunteers and patients who visited the Department and Clinic of Urology, University Hospital in Wroclaw, Poland. Forty-two patients participated in the study and were screened for eligibility criteria. Thirty participants satisfied the criteria and were categorized into two groups: women with SUI (n=16 and continent women (n=14. The bioelectrical activity of PFM and SPFM (AM, RA, GM was

  16. Pelvic-Floor-Muscle Training Adherence: Tools, Measurements and Strategies-2011 ICS State-of-the-Science Seminar Research Paper II of IV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumoulin, Chantal; Alewijnse, Dianne; Bo, Kari; Hagen, Suzanne; Stark, Diane; Van Kampen, Marijke; Herbert, Julia; Hay-Smith, Jean; Frawley, Helena; McClurg, Doreen; Dean, Sarah

    2015-09-01

    This paper on pelvic-floor-muscle training (PFMT) adherence, the second of four from the International Continence Society's 2011 State-of-the-Science Conference, aims to (1) identify and collate current adherence outcome measures, (2) report the determinants of adherence, (3) report on PFMT adherence strategies, and (4) make actionable clinical and research recommendations. Data were amassed from a literature review and an expert panel (2011 conference), following consensus statement methodology. Experts in pelvic floor dysfunction collated and synthesized the evidence and expert opinions on PFMT adherence for urinary incontinence (UI) and lower bowel dysfunction in men and women and pelvic organ prolapse in women. The literature was scarce for most of the studied populations except for limited research on women with UI. Exercise diaries were the most widely-used adherence outcome measure, PFMT adherence was inconsistently monitored and inadequately reported. Determinants: Research, mostly secondary analyses of RCTs, suggested that intention to adhere, self-efficacy expectations, attitudes towards the exercises, perceived benefits and a high social pressure to engage in PFMT impacted adherence. Few trials studied and compared adherence strategies. A structured PFMT programme, an enthusiastic physiotherapist, audio prompts, use of established theories of behavior change, and user-consultations seem to increase adherence. The literature on adherence outcome measures, determinants and strategies remains scarce for the studied populations with PFM dysfunction, except in women with UI. Although some current adherence findings can be applied to clinical practice, more effective and standardized research is urgently needed across all the sub-populations. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Effect of single bout versus repeated bouts of stretching on muscle recovery following eccentric exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres, Rui; Pinho, Francisco; Duarte, José Alberto; Cabri, Jan M H

    2013-11-01

    To analyze the effects of a single bout and repeated bouts of stretching on indirect markers of exercise-induced muscle damage. A randomized controlled clinical trial at a university human research laboratory was conducted. Fifty-six untrained males were randomly divided into four groups. (I) a single stretching group underwent a single bout of stretching on the quadriceps muscle; (II) an eccentric exercised group underwent eccentric quadriceps muscle contractions until exhaustion; (III) an eccentric exercise group followed by a single bout of stretching; (IV) an eccentric exercised group submitted to repeated bouts of stretching performed immediately and 24, 48, and 72 h post-exercise. Muscle stiffness, muscle soreness, maximal concentric peak torque, and plasma creatine kinase activity were assessed before exercise and 1, 24, 48, 72, and 96 h post-exercise. All exercised groups showed significant reduction in maximal concentric peak torque and significant increases in muscle soreness, muscle stiffness, and plasma creatine kinase. There were no differences between these groups in all assessed variables, with the exception of markers of muscle stiffness, which were significantly lower in the eccentric exercise group followed by single or repeated bouts. The single stretching group showed no change in any assessed variables during the measurement period. Muscle stretching performed after exercise, either as single bout or as repeated bouts, does not influence the levels of the main markers of exercise-induced muscle damage; however, repeated bouts of stretching performed during the days following exercise may have favorable effects on muscle stiffness. Copyright © 2013 Sports Medicine Australia. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. The Role of Pelvic Floor Muscles in Male Sexual Dysfunction and Pelvic Pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Deborah; Gonzalez, Joshua; Goldstein, Irwin

    2016-01-01

    Sexual function is essential to good health and well-being in men. The relationship between male sexual function, pelvic floor function, and pelvic pain is complex and only beginning to be appreciated. The objectives of the current review are to examine these complex relationships, and to demonstrate how pelvic floor physical therapy can potentially improve the treatment of various male sexual dysfunctions, including erectile dysfunction and dysfunction of ejaculation and orgasm. Contemporary data on pelvic floor anatomy and function as they relate to the treatment of various male sexual dysfunctions were reviewed. Examination of evidence supporting the association between the male pelvic floor and erectile dysfunction, ejaculatory/orgasmic dysfunction, and chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome, respectively. Evidence suggests a close relationship between the pelvic floor and male sexual dysfunction and a potential therapeutic benefit from pelvic floor therapy for men who suffer from these conditions. Pelvic floor physical therapy is a necessary tool in a more comprehensive bio-neuromusculoskeletal-psychosocial approach to the treatment of male sexual dysfunction and pelvic pain. Copyright © 2016 International Society for Sexual Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Regular physical exercise improves cardiac autonomic and muscle vasodilatory responses to isometric exercise in healthy elderly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarmento AO

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Adriana de Oliveira Sarmento,1–3 Amilton da Cruz Santos,1,4 Ivani Credidio Trombetta,2,5 Marciano Moacir Dantas,1 Ana Cristina Oliveira Marques,1,4 Leone Severino do Nascimento,1,4 Bruno Teixeira Barbosa,1,2 Marcelo Rodrigues Dos Santos,2 Maria do Amparo Andrade,3 Anna Myrna Jaguaribe-Lima,3,6 Maria do Socorro Brasileiro-Santos1,3,4 1Laboratory of Physical Training Studies Applied to Health, Department of Physical Education, Federal University of Paraiba, João Pessoa, Brazil; 2Unit of Cardiovascular Rehabilitation and Exercise Physiology – Heart Institute (InCor/HC-FMUSP, University of São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil; 3Graduate Program in Physiotherapy, Federal University of Pernambuco, Recife, Brazil; 4Associate Graduate Program in Physical Education UPE/UFPB, João Pessoa, Brazil; 5Graduate Program in Medicine, Universidade Nove de Julho (UNINOVE, São Paulo, Brazil; 6Department of Morphology and Animal Physiology, Federal Rural University of Pernambuco, Recife, Brazil Abstract: The objective of this study was to evaluate cardiac autonomic control and muscle vasodilation response during isometric exercise in sedentary and physically active older adults. Twenty healthy participants, 10 sedentary and 10 physically active older adults, were evaluated and paired by gender, age, and body mass index. Sympathetic and parasympathetic cardiac activity (spectral and symbolic heart rate analysis and muscle blood flow (venous occlusion plethysmography were measured for 10 minutes at rest (baseline and during 3 minutes of isometric handgrip exercise at 30% of the maximum voluntary contraction (sympathetic excitatory maneuver. Variables were analyzed at baseline and during 3 minutes of isometric exercise. Cardiac autonomic parameters were analyzed by Wilcoxon and Mann–Whitney tests. Muscle vasodilatory response was analyzed by repeated-measures analysis of variance followed by Tukey’s post hoc test. Sedentary older adults had higher cardiac

  20. Effect of pelvic floor muscle training during pregnancy and after childbirth on prevention and treatment of urinary incontinence: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mørkved, Siv; Bø, Kari

    2014-02-01

    Urinary incontinence (UI) is a common condition in women causing reduced quality of life and withdrawal from fitness and exercise activities. Pregnancy and childbirth are established risk factors. Current guidelines for exercise during pregnancy have no or limited focus on the evidence for the effect of pelvic floor muscle training (PFMT) in the prevention and treatment of UI. Systematic review to address the effect of PFMT during pregnancy and after delivery in the prevention and treatment of UI. PubMed, CENTRAL, Cochrane Library, EMBASE and PEDro databases and hand search of available reference lists and conference abstracts (June 2012). Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) and quasiexperimental trials published in the English language. Primiparous or multiparous pregnant or postpartum women. PFMT with or without biofeedback, vaginal cones or electrical stimulation. Both authors independently reviewed, grouped and qualitatively synthesised the trials. 22 randomised or quasiexperimental trials were found. There is a very large heterogeneity in the populations studied, inclusion and exclusion criteria, outcome measures and content of PFMT interventions. Based on the studies with relevant sample size, high adherence to a strength-training protocol and close follow-up, we found that PFMT during pregnancy and after delivery can prevent and treat UI. A supervised training protocol following strength-training principles, emphasising close to maximum contractions and lasting at least 8 weeks is recommended. PFMT is effective when supervised training is conducted. Further high-quality RCTs are needed especially after delivery. Given the prevalence of female UI and its impact on exercise participation, PFMT should be incorporated as a routine part of women's exercise programmes in general.

  1. Is Pelvic-Floor Muscle Training a Physical Therapy or a Behavioral Therapy? A Call to Name and Report the Physical, Cognitive, and Behavioral Elements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frawley, Helena C; Dean, Sarah G; Slade, Susan C; Hay-Smith, E Jean C

    2017-04-01

    This perspective article explores whether pelvic-floor muscle training (PFMT) for the management of female urinary incontinence and prolapse is a physical therapy or a behavioral therapy. The primary aim is to demonstrate that it is both. A secondary aim is to show that the plethora of terms used for PFMT is potentially confusing and that current terminology inadequately represents the full intent, content, and delivery of this complex intervention. While physical therapists may be familiar with exercise terms, the details are often incompletely reported; furthermore, physical therapists are less familiar with the terminology used in accurately representing cognitive and behavioral therapy interventions, which results in these elements being even less well reported. Thus, an additional aim is to provide greater clarity in the terminology used in the reporting of PFMT interventions, specifically, descriptions of the exercise and behavioral elements. First, PFMT is described as a physical therapy and as an exercise therapy informed predominantly by the discipline of physical therapy. However, effective implementation requires use of the cognitive and behavioral perspectives of the discipline of psychology. Second, the theoretical underpinning of the psychology-informed elements of PFMT is summarized. Third, to address some identified limitations and confusion in current terminology and reporting, recommendations for ways in which physical therapists can incorporate the psychology-informed elements of PFMT alongside the more familiar exercise therapy-informed elements are made. Fourth, an example of how both elements can be described and reported in a PFMT intervention is provided. In summary, this perspective explores the underlying concepts of PFMT to demonstrate that it is both a physical intervention and a behavioral intervention and that it can and should be described as such, and an example of the integration of these elements into clinical practice is provided

  2. Exercise training and inspiratory muscle training in patients with bronchiectasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newall, C; Stockley, R A; Hill, S L

    2005-11-01

    Bronchiectasis is a chronic suppurative lung disease often characterised by airflow obstruction and hyperinflation, and leading to decreased exercise tolerance and reduced health status. The role of pulmonary rehabilitation (PR) and inspiratory muscle training (IMT) has not been investigated in this group of patients. Thirty two patients with idiopathic bronchiectasis were randomly allocated to one of three groups: PR plus sham IMT (PR-SHAM), PR plus targeted IMT (PR-IMT), or control. All patients (except the control group) underwent an 8 week training programme of either PR or PR plus targeted IMT. Exercise training during PR was performed three times weekly at 80% of the peak heart rate. IMT was performed at home for 15 minutes twice daily over the 8 week period. PR-SHAM and PR-IMT resulted in significant increases in the incremental shuttle walking test of 96.7 metres (95% confidence interval (CI) 59.6 to 133.7) and 124.5 metres (95% CI 63.2 to 185.9), respectively, and in endurance exercise capacity of 174.9% (95% CI 34.7 to 426.1) and 205.7% (95% CI 31.6 to 310.6). There were no statistically significant differences in the improvements in exercise between the two groups. Significant improvements in inspiratory muscle strength were also observed both in the PR-IMT group (21.4 cm H2O increase, 95% CI 9.3 to 33.4; p = 0.008) and the PR-SHAM group (12.0 cm H2O increase, 95% CI 1.1 to 22.9; p = 0.04), the magnitude of which were also similar (p = 0.220). Improvements in exercise capacity were maintained in the PR-IMT group 3 months after training, but not in the PR-SHAM group. PR is effective in improving exercise tolerance in bronchiectasis but there is no additional advantage of simultaneous IMT. IMT may, however, be important in the longevity of the training effects.

  3. Exercise induced capillary growth in human skeletal muscle and the dynamics of VEGF

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høier, Birgitte; Hellsten, Ylva

    2014-01-01

    In skeletal muscle, growth of capillaries is an important adaptation to exercise training that secures adequate diffusion capacity for oxygen and nutrients even at high intensity exercise when increases in muscle blood flow are profound. Mechanical forces present during muscle activity......, such as shear stress and passive stretch, lead to cellular signalling, enhanced expression of angiogenic factors and initiation of capillary growth. The most central angiogenic factor in skeletal muscle capillary growth is vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). During muscle contraction, VEGF increases...... in the muscle interstitium, acts on VEGF receptors on the capillary endothelium and thereby stimulates angiogenic processes. A primary source of muscle interstitial VEGF during exercise is the skeletal muscle fibers which contain large stores of VEGF within vesicles. We propose that, during muscle activity...

  4. Regulation of human skeletal muscle perfusion and its heterogeneity during exercise in moderate hypoxia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heinonen, Ilkka H; Kemppainen, Jukka; Kaskinoro, Kimmo

    2010-01-01

    Although many effects of both acute and chronic hypoxia on the circulation are well characterized, the distribution and regulation of blood flow (BF) heterogeneity in skeletal muscle during systemic hypoxia is not well understood in humans. We measured muscle BF within the thigh muscles of nine......, the results show that increased BF during one-leg exercise in moderate hypoxia is confined only to the contracting muscles, and the working muscle hyperemia appears not to be directly mediated by adenosine. Increased flow heterogeneity in noncontracting muscles likely reflects sympathetic nervous constraints...... of aminophylline. Systemic hypoxia reduced oxygen extraction of the limb but increased muscle BF, and this flow increment was confined solely to the exercising quadriceps femoris muscle. Exercising muscle BF heterogeneity was reduced from rest (P = 0.055) but was not affected by hypoxia. Adenosine receptor...

  5. Correct performance of pelvic muscle exercises in women reporting prior knowledge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kandadai, Padma; O'Dell, Katharine; Saini, Jyot

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to assess correct performance of pelvic muscle exercises (PMEs) in women presenting for urogynecologic care who express prior PME knowledge and to identify optimal instruction. New patients referred to urogynecology clinic reporting knowledge of PME or Kegels were asked to complete a questionnaire concerning knowledge, prior instruction, and current use of PME. During examination, the participants were asked to perform their PME or Kegel. Initial levator strength was documented by Oxford Scale. Randomized-order instructions were then given to educate women who contracted incorrectly. The participants completed a postexamination questionnaire. Analyses described percentage of women who were able to perform a correct contraction on initial attempt and factors associated with correct performance. Standard statistical methods were used to assess factors associated with correct PME performance and initial strength. Two hundred fifty eligible participants completed the questionnaires. Sixty (24%) participants were unable to correctly perform a PME initially. Of the 83 participants reporting current practice of PME, 23% performed them incorrectly. Prior instruction (odds ratio, 3.0; 95% confidence interval, 1.6-5.7; P PME performance. In women who performed PME incorrectly at the initial assessment, "Squeeze the vaginal muscles you use to hold your urine" resulted in correct PME performance most often. Women reporting prior knowledge of PME may still perform them incorrectly. Providing instruction and feedback is strongly associated with correct performance and can be easily incorporated into pelvic examination. This may improve PME use and effectiveness to control symptoms of pelvic floor disorders.

  6. Rac1 in muscle is dispensable for improved insulin action after exercise in mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sylow, Lykke; Møller, Lisbeth Liliendal Valbjørn; D'Hulst, Gommaar

    2016-01-01

    Exercise has a potent insulin-sensitivity enhancing effect on skeletal muscle but the intracellular mechanisms that mediate this effect are not well understood. In muscle, Rac1 regulates both insulin- and contraction-stimulated glucose transport and is dysregulated in insulin resistant muscle....... However, whether Rac1 is involved in mediating enhanced insulin sensitivity after an acute bout of exercise is unresolved. To address this question we investigated post exercise whole body (insulin tolerance test) as well as muscle (insulin-stimulated 2DG transport in isolated soleus muscle) insulin...... sensitivity in inducible muscle-specific Rac1 knockout (mKO) and wildtype littermate (WT) mice. Prior exercise enhanced whole body insulin sensitivity by 40% in WT mice and rescued the insulin intolerance in Rac1 mKO mice by improving whole body insulin sensitivity by 230%. In agreement, prior exercise...

  7. Muscle strength and stiffness in resistance exercise: Force transmission in tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhry, Hans; Bukiet, Bruce; Anderson, Ellen Z; Burch, Jared; Findley, Thomas

    2017-07-01

    Physical therapists and osteopaths want to know the quantitative force transmitted in the tissues during resistance exercise and also the relationship between tissue strength and the specific type of resistance exercise of the skeletal muscles. This paper uses the strain energy function for large deformations associated with the active and passive response of transversely isotropic skeletal muscle tissue to evaluate muscle strength and force transmitted in tissues during resistance exercises for the quadriceps muscle at the knee during isometric training exercise at different knee angles in vivo. It is found that after an exercise program, the muscle stiffness is halved when the bending angle of the knee increases from 50° to 100°. The muscle strength generated is marginally greater at 100° than at 50°. The stress transmitted in the lateral direction for 100° bending is double that for 50°. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. New insights into the benefits of exercise for muscle health in patients with idiopathic inflammatory myositis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alemo Munters, Li; Alexanderson, Helene; Crofford, Leslie J; Lundberg, Ingrid E

    2014-07-01

    With recommended treatment, a majority with idiopathic inflammatory myopathy (IIM) develop muscle impairment and poor health. Beneficial effects of exercise have been reported on muscle performance, aerobic capacity and health in chronic polymyositis and dermatomyositis and to some extent in active disease and inclusion body myositis (IBM). Importantly, randomized controlled trials (RCTs) indicate that improved health and decreased clinical disease activity could be mediated through increased aerobic capacity. Recently, reports seeking mechanisms underlying effects of exercise in skeletal muscle indicate increased aerobic capacity (i.e. increased mitochondrial capacity and capillary density, reduced lactate levels), activation of genes in aerobic phenotype and muscle growth programs, and down regulation in genes related to inflammation. Altogether, exercise contributes to both systemic and within-muscle adaptations demonstrating that exercise is fundamental to improve muscle performance and health in IIM. There is a need for RCTs to study effects of exercise in active disease and IBM.

  9. An Analysis of Muscle Activities of Healthy Women during Pilates Exercises in a Prone Position.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Bo-In; Jung, Ju-Hyeon; Shim, Jemyung; Kwon, Hae-Yeon; Kim, Haroo

    2014-01-01

    [Purpose] This study analyzed the activities of the back and hip muscles during Pilates exercises conducted in a prone position. [Subjects] The subjects were 18 healthy women volunteers who had practiced at a Pilates center for more than three months. [Methods] The subjects performed three Pilates exercises. To examine muscle activity during the exercises, 8-channel surface electromyography (Noraxon USA, Inc., Scottsdale, AZ) was used. The surface electrodes were attached to the bilateral latissimus dorsi muscle, multifidus muscle, gluteus maximus, and semitendinous muscle. Three Pilates back exercises were compared: (1) double leg kick (DLK), (2) swimming (SW), and (3) leg beat (LB). Electrical muscle activation was normalized to maximal voluntary isometric contraction. Repeated measures analysis of variance was performed to assess the differences in activation levels among the exercises. [Results] The activity of the multifidus muscle was significantly high for the SW (52.3±11.0, 50.9±9.8) and LB exercises(51.8±12.8, 48.3±13.9) and the activity of the semitendinosus muscle was higher for the LB exercise (49.2±8.7, 52.9±9.3) than for the DLK and SW exercises. [Conclusion] These results may provide basic material for when Pilates exercises are performed in a prone position and may be useful information on clinical Pilates for rehabilitation programs.

  10. Assessment of bioelectrical activity of synergistic muscles during pelvic floor muscles activation in postmenopausal women with and without stress urinary incontinence: a preliminary observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ptaszkowski, Kuba; Paprocka-Borowicz, Małgorzata; Słupska, Lucyna; Bartnicki, Janusz; Dymarek, Robert; Rosińczuk, Joanna; Heimrath, Jerzy; Dembowski, Janusz; Zdrojowy, Romuald

    2015-01-01

    Muscles such as adductor magnus (AM), gluteus maximus (GM), rectus abdominis (RA), and abdominal external and internal oblique muscles are considered to play an important role in the treatment of stress urinary incontinence (SUI), and the relationship between contraction of these muscles and pelvic floor muscles (PFM) has been established in previous studies. Synergistic muscle activation intensifies a woman's ability to contract the PFM. In some cases, even for continent women, it is not possible to fully contract their PFM without involving the synergistic muscles. The primary aim of this study was to assess the surface electromyographic activity of synergistic muscles to PFM (SPFM) during resting and functional PFM activation in postmenopausal women with and without SUI. This study was a preliminary, prospective, cross-sectional observational study and included volunteers and patients who visited the Department and Clinic of Urology, University Hospital in Wroclaw, Poland. Forty-two patients participated in the study and were screened for eligibility criteria. Thirty participants satisfied the criteria and were categorized into two groups: women with SUI (n=16) and continent women (n=14). The bioelectrical activity of PFM and SPFM (AM, RA, GM) was recorded with a surface electromyographic instrument in a standing position during resting and functional PFM activity. Bioelectrical activity of RA was significantly higher in the incontinent group than in the continent group. These results concern the RA activity during resting and functional PFM activity. The results for other muscles showed no significant difference in bioelectrical activity between groups. In women with SUI, during the isolated activation of PFM, an increased synergistic activity of RA muscle was observed; however, this activity was not observed in asymptomatic women. This may indicate the important accessory contribution of these muscles in the mechanism of continence.

  11. The Activity of Surface Electromyographic Signal of Selected Muscles during Classic Rehabilitation Exercise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinzhuang Xiao

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. Prone bridge, unilateral bridge, supine bridge, and bird-dog are classic rehabilitation exercises, which have been advocated as effective ways to improve core stability among healthy individuals and patients with low back pain. The aim of this study was to investigate the activity of seven selected muscles during rehabilitation exercises through the signal of surface electromyographic. Approaches. We measured the surface electromyographic signals of four lower limb muscles, two abdominal muscles, and one back muscle during rehabilitation exercises of 30 healthy students and then analyzed its activity level using the median frequency method. Results. Different levels of muscle activity during the four rehabilitation exercises were observed. The prone bridge and unilateral bridge caused the greatest muscle fatigue; however, the supine bridge generated the lowest muscle activity. There was no significant difference (P>0.05 between left and right body side muscles in the median frequency slope during the four rehabilitation exercises of seven muscles. Conclusions. The prone bridge can affect the low back and lower limb muscles of most people. The unilateral bridge was found to stimulate muscles much more active than the supine bridge. The bird-dog does not cause much fatigue to muscles but can make most selected muscles active.

  12. Redox signaling in skeletal muscle: role of aging and exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Li Li

    2015-12-01

    Skeletal muscle contraction is associated with the production of ROS due to altered O2 distribution and flux in the cell. Despite a highly efficient antioxidant defense, a small surplus of ROS, such as hydrogen peroxide and nitric oxide, may serve as signaling molecules to stimulate cellular adaptation to reach new homeostasis largely due to the activation of redox-sensitive signaling pathways. Recent research has highlighted the important role of NF-κB, MAPK, and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ coactivator-1α, along with other newly discovered signaling pathways, in some of the most vital biological functions, such as mitochondrial biogenesis, antioxidant defense, inflammation, protein turnover, apoptosis, and autophagy. There is evidence that the inability of the cell to maintain proper redox signaling underlies some basic mechanisms of biological aging, during which inflammatory and catabolic pathways eventually predominate. Physical exercise has been shown to activate various redox signaling pathways that control the adaptation and remodeling process. Although this stimulatory effect of exercise declines with aging, it is not completed abolished. Thus, aged people can still benefit from regular physical activity in the appropriate forms and at proper intensity to preserve muscle function. Copyright © 2015 The American Physiological Society.

  13. Resistance exercise, but not endurance exercise, induces IKKβ phosphorylation in human skeletal muscle of training-accustomed individuals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Andreas Buch; Vendelbo, Mikkel Holm; Rahbek, Stine Klejs

    2013-01-01

    of repeated biopsy sampling on protein expression and phosphorylation was observed. In conclusion, resistance exercise, but not endurance exercise, increases IKKβ phosphorylation in trained human subjects, which support the idea that IKKβ can influence the activation of mTORC1 in human skeletal muscle....... following exercise. Previously, we demonstrated that mTOR is preferentially activated in response to resistance exercise compared to endurance exercise in trained individuals without concomitant activation of Akt. In the present study, we extended this investigation by examining IκB kinase complex (IKK......), TSC1, MAPK, and upstream Akt activators, along with gene expression of selected cytokines, in skeletal muscles from these subjects. Biopsies were sampled prior to, immediately after, and in the recovery period following resistance exercise, endurance exercise, and control interventions. The major...

  14. The influence of training status on the drop in muscle strength after acute exercise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pingel, Jessica; Moerch, L; Kjaer, M

    2009-01-01

    to running exercise immediately after immobilization, the muscle strength of the triceps-surae muscles dropped even further, but just in the immobilized leg (41%; P importance of determining the muscle endurance when evaluating the effect of immobilization on muscle......Skeletal muscles fatigue after exercise, and reductions in maximal force appear. A difference in training status between the legs was introduced by unilateral immobilization of the calf muscles for 2 weeks in young men, who were randomly assigned to two groups, either a RUN group (n = 8......) that was exposed to prolonged exercise (1-h running: individual pace) or a REST group (n = 12) that did no exercise after immobilization. Cross-sectional area (CSA) of the triceps-surae muscles was calculated by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and maximal voluntary contraction (MVC) force of the plantar flexors...

  15. Muscle and intensity based hamstring exercise classification in elite female track and field athletes: implications for exercise selection during rehabilitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsaklis, Panagiotis; Malliaropoulos, Nikos; Mendiguchia, Jurdan; Korakakis, Vasileios; Tsapralis, Kyriakos; Pyne, Debasish; Malliaras, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Background Hamstring injuries are common in many sports, including track and field. Strains occur in different parts of the hamstring muscle but very little is known about whether common hamstring loading exercises specifically load different hamstring components. The purpose of this study was to investigate muscle activation of different components of the hamstring muscle during common hamstring loading exercises. Methods Twenty elite female track and field athletes were recruited into this study, which had a single-sample, repeated-measures design. Each athlete performed ten hamstring loading exercises, and an electromyogram (EMG) was recorded from the biceps femoris and semitendinosus components of the hamstring. Hamstring EMG during maximal voluntary isometric contraction (MVIC) was used to normalize the mean data across ten repetitions of each exercise. An electrogoniometer synchronized to the EMG was used to determine whether peak EMG activity occurred during muscle-tendon unit lengthening, shortening, or no change in length. Mean EMG values were compared between the two recording sites for each exercise using the Student’s t-test. Results The lunge, dead lift, and kettle swings were low intensity (hamstring bridge, and hamstring curl were all medium intensity exercises (≥50% or hamstrings. Low, medium, and high intensity exercises were demonstrated. This information enables the clinician, strength and conditioning coach and physiotherapist to better understand intensity- and muscle-specific activation during hamstring muscle rehabilitation. Therefore, these results may help in designing progressive strengthening and rehabilitation and prevention programs. PMID:26170726

  16. Evaluation of the relationship between the pelvic floor muscles and insulin resistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Micussi MT

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Maria Thereza Micussi,1 Rodrigo Pegado Freitas,1 Priscylla Helouyse Angelo,2 Elvira Maria Soares,3 Telma Maria Lemos,4 Técia Maria Maranhão51Physical Therapy Department, 2Postgraduate Program in Physical Therapy, 3Januário Cicco Maternity School, 4Clinical Analysis Department, 5Tocogynecology Department, Federal University of Rio Grande do Norte (UFRN, Natal, Rio Grande do Norte, BrazilPurpose: The aim of this study was to evaluate the pelvic floor muscles (PFMs in women with insulin resistance (IR using surface electromyography and to associate the results with insulin levels.Patients and methods: Through an analytical, cross-sectional study, 86 women were evaluated and divided into two groups: a control group (n=35 and an IR group (n=51. Data were collected through detailed history-taking, physical examination, and biochemical analysis. Fasting insulin levels were used for diagnosing IR. Electromyography of the PFMs was used for analyzing the tone and maximal voluntary contraction (MVC. The measures of central tendency and linear regression models were used.Results: The average age was 25.3±4.5 years in the IR group and 27.2±4.4 years in the control group. The mean weight was 75.6±17.6 kg and 51.8±4.9 kg in the IR and control groups, respectively. Fasting insulin levels were 19.7±6.6 µIU/mL in the IR group and 5.4±1.8 µIU/mL in the control group (P<0.010. There were significant differences between the groups with regard to PFM tone (IR: 13.4±3.4 µV; control: 25.1±3.3 µV; P<0.001 and MVC (IR: 47.6±4.5 µV; control: 64.3±5.0 µV; P<0.001. Multiple linear regression analysis using the insulin levels as dependent variable showed a significant association for MVC (P=0.047, weight (P=0.017, and waist circumference (P=0.000.Conclusion: Compared with the control group, the IR group showed lower electromyographic activity of the PFMs, and there was an association between insulin levels and electromyographic activity.Keywords: tone

  17. Early pelvic floor muscle training after obstetrical anal sphincter injuries for the reduction of anal incontinence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathé, Mélodie; Valancogne, Guy; Atallah, Anthony; Sciard, Clémentine; Doret, Muriel; Gaucherand, Pascal; Beaufils, Etienne

    2016-04-01

    Between 0.5 and 5% of vaginal deliveries involve obstetrical anal sphincter injuries (OASIS). Thirty to forty percent of patients with OASIS will suffer from anal incontinence in the subacute postpartum period. The aim of the present study was to assess the effectiveness of early pelvic floor muscle training (PFMT) combined with standard rehabilitation on anal incontinence after vaginal deliveries complicated by OASIS. The present work was a retrospective quantitative study performed in a tertiary-level maternity hospital. Women with 3rd or 4th degree obstetric tears were included. Women who gave birth between January 1st, 2011 and December 31st, 2012 underwent standard pelvic-perineal rehabilitation within 6-8 weeks postpartum. Women who gave birth between January 1st, 2013 and July 1st, 2014 had early rehabilitation (within 30 days after delivery) followed by the same standard rehabilitation received by the other group. Rehabilitation was performed by physiotherapists specialized in perineology. No electrostimulation was done in early rehabilitation. An in-house-validated modification of the Jorge and Wexner questionnaire was sent by mail to the patients to assess symptoms. The main judgment criterion was anal incontinence to gas, loose stools and/or solid stool. Two hundred and thirty patients were diagnosed with OASIS. Nineteen women (8.3%) were lost to follow-up. The intention-to-treat analysis included 211 patients, 109 of whom underwent standard rehabilitation and 102 early rehabilitation plus standard rehabilitation. The two groups were comparable in terms of parity, birth weight, assisted delivery, epidural anesthesia and rates of mediolateral episiotomy. Multivariate analyses adjusted for type of perineal lesion were performed. Early rehabilitation significantly reduced gas leakage: OR 0.51 [0.29-0.90] (p=0.02), liquid stool leakage: OR 0.22 [0.08-0.58] (p=0.02) and urinary stress incontinence: OR 0.43 [0.24-0.77] (p=0.004). We recommend early (during the

  18. Transperineal Sonography Evaluation of Muscles and Vascularity in the Male Pelvic Floor

    OpenAIRE

    Roll, Shawn C.; Kutch, Jason J.

    2013-01-01

    Idiopathic chronic male pelvic pain is difficult to diagnose and treat. Currently, diagnosis relies on subjective symptoms; objective measures of neuromuscular mechanisms have not been investigated. Sonographic imaging has been used to investigate these neuromuscular mechanisms in the female pelvic floor, but neither research nor books describe sonography evaluation of the male pelvic floor. The purpose of this study was to develop and evaluate a perineal sonographic technique for the examina...

  19. Resistance exercise-induced fluid shifts: change in active muscle size and plasma volume

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ploutz-Snyder, L. L.; Convertino, V. A.; Dudley, G. A.

    1995-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that the reduction in plasma volume (PV) induced by resistance exercise reflects fluid loss to the extravascular space and subsequently selective increase in cross-sectional area (CSA) of active but not inactive skeletal muscle. We compared changes in active and inactive muscle CSA and PV after barbell squat exercise. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was used to quantify muscle involvement in exercise and to determine CSA of muscle groups or individual muscles [vasti (VS), adductor (Add), hamstring (Ham), and rectus femoris (RF)]. Muscle involvement in exercise was determined using exercise-induced contrast shift in spin-spin relaxation time (T2)-weighted MR images immediately postexercise. Alterations in muscle size were based on the mean CSA of individual slices. Hematocrit, hemoglobin, and Evans blue dye were used to estimate changes in PV. Muscle CSA and PV data were obtained preexercise and immediately postexercise and 15 and 45 min thereafter. A hierarchy of muscle involvement in exercise was found such that VS > Add > Ham > RF, with the Ham and RF showing essentially no involvement. CSA of the VS and Add muscle groups were increased 10 and 5%, respectively, immediately after exercise in each thigh with no changes in Ham and RF CSA. PV was decreased 22% immediately following exercise. The absolute loss of PV was correlated (r2 = 0.75) with absolute increase in muscle CSA immediately postexercise, supporting the notion that increased muscle size after resistance exercise reflects primarily fluid movement from the vascular space into active but not inactive muscle.

  20. Cereal and nonfat milk support muscle recovery following exercise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liao Yi-Hung

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This study compared the effects of ingesting cereal and nonfat milk (Cereal and a carbohydrate-electrolyte sports drink (Drink immediately following endurance exercise on muscle glycogen synthesis and the phosphorylation state of proteins controlling protein synthesis: Akt, mTOR, rpS6 and eIF4E. Methods Trained cyclists or triathletes (8 male: 28.0 ± 1.6 yrs, 1.8 ± 0.0 m, 75.4 ± 3.2 kg, 61.0 ± 1.6 ml O2•kg-1•min-1; 4 female: 25.3 ± 1.7 yrs, 1.7 ± 0.0 m, 66.9 ± 4.6 kg, 46.4 ± 1.2 mlO2•kg-1•min-1 completed two randomly-ordered trials serving as their own controls. After 2 hours of cycling at 60–65% VO2MAX, a biopsy from the vastus lateralis was obtained (Post0, then subjects consumed either Drink (78.5 g carbohydrate or Cereal (77 g carbohydrate, 19.5 g protein and 2.7 g fat. Blood was drawn before and at the end of exercise, and at 15, 30 and 60 minutes after treatment. A second biopsy was taken 60 minutes after supplementation (Post60. Differences within and between treatments were tested using repeated measures ANOVA. Results At Post60, blood glucose was similar between treatments (Drink 6.1 ± 0.3, Cereal 5.6 ± 0.2 mmol/L, p Conclusion These results suggest that Cereal is as good as a commercially-available sports drink in initiating post-exercise muscle recovery.

  1. Skeletal Muscle Hypertrophy with Concurrent Exercise Training: Contrary Evidence for an Interference Effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murach, Kevin A; Bagley, James R

    2016-08-01

    Over the last 30+ years, it has become axiomatic that performing aerobic exercise within the same training program as resistance exercise (termed concurrent exercise training) interferes with the hypertrophic adaptations associated with resistance exercise training. However, a close examination of the literature reveals that the interference effect of concurrent exercise training on muscle growth in humans is not as compelling as previously thought. Moreover, recent studies show that, under certain conditions, concurrent exercise may augment resistance exercise-induced hypertrophy in healthy human skeletal muscle. The purpose of this article is to outline the contrary evidence for an acute and chronic interference effect of concurrent exercise on skeletal muscle growth in humans and provide practical literature-based recommendations for maximizing hypertrophy when training concurrently.

  2. Effects of isokinetic calf muscle exercise program on muscle strength and venous function in patients with chronic venous insufficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ercan, Sabriye; Çetin, Cem; Yavuz, Turhan; Demir, Hilmi M; Atalay, Yurdagül B

    2017-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to observe the change of the ankle joint range of motion, the muscle strength values measured with an isokinetic dynamometer, pain scores, quality of life scale, and venous return time in chronic venous insufficiency diagnosed patients by prospective follow-up after 12-week exercise program including isokinetic exercises. Methods The patient group of this study comprised 27 patients (23 female, 4 male) who were diagnosed with chronic venous insufficiency. An exercise program including isokinetic exercise for the calf muscle was given to patients three days per week for 12 weeks. At the end of 12 weeks, five of the patients left the study due to inadequate compliance with the exercise program. As a result, control data of 22 patients were included. Ankle joint range of active motion, isokinetic muscle strength, pain, quality of life, and photoplethysmography measurements were assessed before starting and after the exercise program. Results Evaluating changes of the starting and control data depending on time showed that all isokinetic muscle strength measurement parameters, range of motion, and overall quality of life values of patients improved. Venous return time values have also increased significantly ( p strength has been provided with exercise therapy in patients with chronic venous insufficiency. It has been determined that the increase in muscle strength affected the venous pump and this ensured improvement in venous function and range of motion of the ankle. In addition, it has been detected that pain reduced and quality of life improved after the exercise program.

  3. Do metabolites that are produced during resistance exercise enhance muscle hypertrophy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dankel, Scott J; Mattocks, Kevin T; Jessee, Matthew B; Buckner, Samuel L; Mouser, J Grant; Loenneke, Jeremy P

    2017-11-01

    Many reviews conclude that metabolites play an important role with respect to muscle hypertrophy during resistance exercise, but their actual physiologic contribution remains unknown. Some have suggested that metabolites may work independently of muscle contraction, while others have suggested that metabolites may play a secondary role in their ability to augment muscle activation via inducing fatigue. Interestingly, the studies used as support for an anabolic role of metabolites use protocols that are not actually designed to test the importance of metabolites independent of muscle contraction. While there is some evidence in vitro that metabolites may induce muscle hypertrophy, the only study attempting to answer this question in humans found no added benefit of pooling metabolites within the muscle post-exercise. As load-induced muscle hypertrophy is thought to work via mechanotransduction (as opposed to being metabolically driven), it seems likely that metabolites simply augment muscle activation and cause the mechanotransduction cascade in a larger proportion of muscle fibers, thereby producing greater muscle growth. A sufficient time under tension also appears necessary, as measurable muscle growth is not observed after repeated maximal testing. Based on current evidence, it is our opinion that metabolites produced during resistance exercise do not have anabolic properties per se, but may be anabolic in their ability to augment muscle activation. Future studies are needed to compare protocols which produce similar levels of muscle activation, but differ in the magnitude of metabolites produced, or duration in which the exercised muscles are exposed to metabolites.

  4. Urinary incontinence in elderly women from Porto Alegre: its prevalence and relation to pelvic floor muscle function

    OpenAIRE

    Langoni, Chandra da Silveira; Knorst, Mara Regina; Lovatel, Gisele Agustini; Leite, Valesca de Oliveira; Resende, Thais de Lima

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this cross-sectional study was to assess the prevalence of self-reported urinary loss in elderly women living in the city of Porto Alegre (Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil), as well as to determine the relation between urinary incontinence (UI) and pelvic floor muscle function (PFMF). It included 270 elderly women (aged from 60 to 92 years) from a population sample, who reported the presence (n=155; 69.1±7.8 years) or absence (n=115; 67.7±7.9 years) of urine loss. Those who reported U...

  5. Pelvic floor muscle problems mediate sexual problems in young adult rape victims.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Postma, Riemke; Bicanic, Iva; van der Vaart, Huub; Laan, Ellen

    2013-08-01

    Prior studies have addressed sexual abuse and sexual function in adult women. No studies have focused on the effect of adolescence rape on sexual functioning. To investigate the effect of rape on sexual problems and on pelvic floor problems, as well as the mediating role of pelvic floor problems on sexual problems, in a homogenous group of victims of adolescence rape without a history of childhood sexual, physical, and/or emotional abuse. Sexual functioning and pelvic floor functioning were assessed using self-report questionnaires. In this cross-sectional study, a group of 89 young women aged 18-25 years who were victimized by rape in adolescence was compared with a group of 114 nonvictimized controls. The rape victims were treated for posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) 3 years prior to participation in the study. Three years posttreatment, rape victims were 2.4 times more likely to have a sexual dysfunction (lubrication problems and pain) and 2.7 times more likely to have pelvic floor dysfunction (symptoms of provoked vulvodynia, general stress, lower urinary tract, and irritable bowel syndrome) than nonvictimized controls. The relationship between rape and sexual problems was partially mediated by the presence of pelvic floor problems. Rape victims and controls did not differ with regard to sexual activities. Rape victims suffer significantly more from sexual dysfunction and pelvic floor dysfunction when compared with nontraumatized controls, despite the provision of treatment for PTSD. Possibly, physical manifestations of PTSD have been left unaddressed in treatment. Future treatment protocols should consider incorporating (physical or psychological) treatment strategies for sexual dysfunction and/or pelvic floor dysfunction into trauma exposure treatments. © 2013 International Society for Sexual Medicine.

  6. Muscle changes with eccentric exercise: Implications on earth and in space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hargens, Alan R.; Parazynski, Scott; Aratow, Michael; Friden, Jan

    1989-01-01

    Recent investigations of fluid pressure, morpholo gy, and enzyme activities of skeletal muscle exercised eccentrically or concentrically in normal human subjects are reviewed. Intramuscular pressures were measured before, during, and after submaximal exercise and correlated with subjective muscle soreness, fiber size, water content, and blood indices of muscle enzymes. High intensity eccentric exercise is characterized by post exercise pain, elevated intramuscular pressures, and swelling of both type 1 and 2 fibers as compared to concentric exercise. Thus, long periods of unaccustomed, high level eccentric contraction may cause muscle injury, fiber swelling, fluid accumulation, elevated intramuscular pressure, and delayed muscle soreness. Training regimens of progressively increasing eccentric exercise, however, cause less soreness and are extremely efficacious in increasing muscle mass and strength. It is proposed that on Earth, postural muscles are uniquely adapted to low levels of prolonged eccentric contraction that are absent during weightlessness. The almost complete absence of eccentric exercise in space may be an important contributor to muscle atrophy and therefore equipment should be designed to integrate eccentric contractions into exercise protocols for long-term spaceflight.

  7. Induction of amino acid transporters expression by endurance exercise in rat skeletal muscle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murakami, Taro; Yoshinaga, Mariko

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: •Regulation of amino acid transporter expression in working muscle remains unclear. •Expression of amino acid transporters for leucine were induced by a bout of exercise. •Requirement of leucine in muscle cells might regulate expression of its transporters. •This information is beneficial for understanding the muscle remodeling by exercise. -- Abstract: We here investigated whether an acute bout of endurance exercise would induce the expression of amino acid transporters that regulate leucine transport across plasma and lysosomal membranes in rat skeletal muscle. Rats ran on a motor-driven treadmill at a speed of 28 m/min for 90 min. Immediately after the exercise, we observed that expression of mRNAs encoding L-type amino acid transporter 1 (LAT1) and CD98 was induced in the gastrocnemius, soleus, and extensor digitorum longus (EDL) muscles. Sodium-coupled neutral amino acid transporter 2 (SNAT2) mRNA was also induced by the exercise in those three muscles. Expression of proton-assisted amino acid transporter 1 (PAT1) mRNA was slightly but not significantly induced by a single bout of exercise in soleus and EDL muscles. Exercise-induced mRNA expression of these amino acid transporters appeared to be attenuated by repeated bouts of the exercise. These results suggested that the expression of amino acid transporters for leucine may be induced in response to an increase in the requirement for this amino acid in the cells of working skeletal muscles

  8. Induction of amino acid transporters expression by endurance exercise in rat skeletal muscle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murakami, Taro, E-mail: tamuraka@sgk.ac.jp; Yoshinaga, Mariko

    2013-10-04

    Highlights: •Regulation of amino acid transporter expression in working muscle remains unclear. •Expression of amino acid transporters for leucine were induced by a bout of exercise. •Requirement of leucine in muscle cells might regulate expression of its transporters. •This information is beneficial for understanding the muscle remodeling by exercise. -- Abstract: We here investigated whether an acute bout of endurance exercise would induce the expression of amino acid transporters that regulate leucine transport across plasma and lysosomal membranes in rat skeletal muscle. Rats ran on a motor-driven treadmill at a speed of 28 m/min for 90 min. Immediately after the exercise, we observed that expression of mRNAs encoding L-type amino acid transporter 1 (LAT1) and CD98 was induced in the gastrocnemius, soleus, and extensor digitorum longus (EDL) muscles. Sodium-coupled neutral amino acid transporter 2 (SNAT2) mRNA was also induced by the exercise in those three muscles. Expression of proton-assisted amino acid transporter 1 (PAT1) mRNA was slightly but not significantly induced by a single bout of exercise in soleus and EDL muscles. Exercise-induced mRNA expression of these amino acid transporters appeared to be attenuated by repeated bouts of the exercise. These results suggested that the expression of amino acid transporters for leucine may be induced in response to an increase in the requirement for this amino acid in the cells of working skeletal muscles.

  9. Effect of fuels on exercise capacity in muscle phosphoglycerate mutase deficiency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vissing, John; Quistorff, Bjørn; Haller, Ronald G

    2005-01-01

    Hospital, University of Copenhagen, and Neuromuscular Center, Institute for Exercise and Environmental Medicine.Patients Two unrelated men (21 and 26 years old) with PGAMD who since their teens had experienced muscle cramps, muscle pain, and episodes of myoglobinuria provoked by brief vigorous exercise, 4...

  10. Lack of skeletal muscle IL-6 influences hepatic glucose metabolism in mice during prolonged exercise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bertholdt, Lærke; Gudiksen, Anders; Schwartz, Camilla Lindgren

    2017-01-01

    The liver is essential in maintaining and regulating glucose homeostasis during prolonged exercise. IL-6 has been shown to be secreted from skeletal muscle during exercise and has been suggested to signal to the liver. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate the role of skeletal muscl...

  11. Electromyographic evaluation of high-intensity elastic resistance exercises for lower extremity muscles during bed rest

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vinstrup, Jonas; Skals, Sebastian; Calatayud, Joaquin

    2017-01-01

    extremity muscles and normalized to the maximal EMG (nEMG). Likewise, exercise satisfaction was evaluated by a questionnaire. RESULTS: All participants were able to perform all exercises without discomfort and generally rated them satisfactory. High levels of muscle activity were observed for all prime...

  12. Pre-Sleep Protein Ingestion to Improve the Skeletal Muscle Adaptive Response to Exercise Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trommelen, Jorn; van Loon, Luc J C

    2016-11-28

    Protein ingestion following resistance-type exercise stimulates muscle protein synthesis rates, and enhances the skeletal muscle adaptive response to prolonged resistance-type exercise training. As the adaptive response to a single bout of resistance exercise extends well beyond the first couple of hours of post-exercise recovery, recent studies have begun to investigate the impact of the timing and distribution of protein ingestion during more prolonged recovery periods. Recent work has shown that overnight muscle protein synthesis rates are restricted by the level of amino acid availability. Protein ingested prior to sleep is effectively digested and absorbed, and thereby stimulates muscle protein synthesis rates during overnight recovery. When applied during a prolonged period of resistance-type exercise training, protein supplementation prior to sleep can further augment gains in muscle mass and strength. Recent studies investigating the impact of pre-sleep protein ingestion suggest that at least 40 g of protein is required to display a robust increase in muscle protein synthesis rates throughout overnight sleep. Furthermore, prior exercise allows more of the pre-sleep protein-derived amino acids to be utilized for de novo muscle protein synthesis during sleep. In short, pre-sleep protein ingestion represents an effective dietary strategy to improve overnight muscle protein synthesis, thereby improving the skeletal muscle adaptive response to exercise training.

  13. Pre-Sleep Protein Ingestion to Improve the Skeletal Muscle Adaptive Response to Exercise Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trommelen, Jorn; van Loon, Luc J. C.

    2016-01-01

    Protein ingestion following resistance-type exercise stimulates muscle protein synthesis rates, and enhances the skeletal muscle adaptive response to prolonged resistance-type exercise training. As the adaptive response to a single bout of resistance exercise extends well beyond the first couple of hours of post-exercise recovery, recent studies have begun to investigate the impact of the timing and distribution of protein ingestion during more prolonged recovery periods. Recent work has shown that overnight muscle protein synthesis rates are restricted by the level of amino acid availability. Protein ingested prior to sleep is effectively digested and absorbed, and thereby stimulates muscle protein synthesis rates during overnight recovery. When applied during a prolonged period of resistance-type exercise training, protein supplementation prior to sleep can further augment gains in muscle mass and strength. Recent studies investigating the impact of pre-sleep protein ingestion suggest that at least 40 g of protein is required to display a robust increase in muscle protein synthesis rates throughout overnight sleep. Furthermore, prior exercise allows more of the pre-sleep protein-derived amino acids to be utilized for de novo muscle protein synthesis during sleep. In short, pre-sleep protein ingestion represents an effective dietary strategy to improve overnight muscle protein synthesis, thereby improving the skeletal muscle adaptive response to exercise training. PMID:27916799

  14. Pre-Sleep Protein Ingestion to Improve the Skeletal Muscle Adaptive Response to Exercise Training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorn Trommelen

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Protein ingestion following resistance-type exercise stimulates muscle protein synthesis rates, and enhances the skeletal muscle adaptive response to prolonged resistance-type exercise training. As the adaptive response to a single bout of resistance exercise extends well beyond the first couple of hours of post-exercise recovery, recent studies have begun to investigate the impact of the timing and distribution of protein ingestion during more prolonged recovery periods. Recent work has shown that overnight muscle protein synthesis rates are restricted by the level of amino acid availability. Protein ingested prior to sleep is effectively digested and absorbed, and thereby stimulates muscle protein synthesis rates during overnight recovery. When applied during a prolonged period of resistance-type exercise training, protein supplementation prior to sleep can further augment gains in muscle mass and strength. Recent studies investigating the impact of pre-sleep protein ingestion suggest that at least 40 g of protein is required to display a robust increase in muscle protein synthesis rates throughout overnight sleep. Furthermore, prior exercise allows more of the pre-sleep protein-derived amino acids to be utilized for de novo muscle protein synthesis during sleep. In short, pre-sleep protein ingestion represents an effective dietary strategy to improve overnight muscle protein synthesis, thereby improving the skeletal muscle adaptive response to exercise training.

  15. Shoulder muscle activity and function in common shoulder rehabilitation exercises.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escamilla, Rafael F; Yamashiro, Kyle; Paulos, Lonnie; Andrews, James R

    2009-01-01

    The rotator cuff performs multiple functions during shoulder exercises, including glenohumeral abduction, external rotation (ER) and internal rotation (IR). The rotator cuff also stabilizes the glenohumeral joint and controls humeral head translations. The infraspinatus and subscapularis have significant roles in scapular plane abduction (scaption), generating forces that are two to three times greater than supraspinatus force. However, the supraspinatus still remains a more effective shoulder abductor because of its more effective moment arm. Both the deltoids and rotator cuff provide significant abduction torque, with an estimated contribution up to 35-65% by the middle deltoid, 30% by the subscapularis, 25% by the supraspinatus, 10% by the infraspinatus and 2% by the anterior deltoid. During abduction, middle deltoid force has been estimated to be 434 N, followed by 323 N from the anterior deltoid, 283 N from the subscapularis, 205 N from the infraspinatus, and 117 N from the supraspinatus. These forces are generated not only to abduct the shoulder but also to stabilize the joint and neutralize the antagonistic effects of undesirable actions. Relatively high force from the rotator cuff not only helps abduct the shoulder but also neutralizes the superior directed force generated by the deltoids at lower abduction angles. Even though anterior deltoid force is relatively high, its ability to abduct the shoulder is low due to a very small moment arm, especially at low abduction angles. The deltoids are more effective abductors at higher abduction angles while the rotator cuff muscles are more effective abductors at lower abduction angles. During maximum humeral elevation the scapula normally upwardly rotates 45-55 degrees, posterior tilts 20-40 degrees and externally rotates 15-35 degrees. The scapular muscles are important during humeral elevation because they cause these motions, especially the serratus anterior, which contributes to scapular upward rotation

  16. Macrophage depletion by clodronate liposome attenuates muscle injury and inflammation following exhaustive exercise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noriaki Kawanishi

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Exhaustive exercise promotes muscle injury, including myofiber lesions; however, its exact mechanism has not yet been elucidated. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that macrophage depletion by pretreatment with clodronate liposomes alters muscle injury and inflammation following exhaustive exercise. Male C57BL/6J mice were divided into four groups: rest plus control liposome (n=8, rest plus clodronate liposome (n=8, exhaustive exercise plus control liposome (n=8, and exhaustive exercise plus clodronate liposome (n=8. Mice were treated with clodronate liposome or control liposome for 48 h before undergoing exhaustive exercise on a treadmill. Twenty-four hours after exhaustive exercise, the gastrocnemius muscles were removed for histological and PCR analyses. Exhaustive exercise increased the number of macrophages in the muscle; however, clodronate liposome treatment reduced this infiltration. Although exhaustive exercise resulted in an increase in injured myofibers, clodronate liposome treatment following exhaustive exercise reduced the injured myofibers. Clodronate liposome treatment also decreased the mRNA expression levels of inflammatory cytokines (TNF-α, IL-1β, and IL-6 in the skeletal muscle after exhaustive exercise. These results suggest that macrophages play a critical role in increasing muscle injury by regulating inflammation.

  17. Reorganized trunk muscle activity during multidirectional floor perturbations after experimental low back pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Lars Henrik; Hirata, Rogerio Pessoto; Graven-Nielsen, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Low back pain changes the trunk muscle activity after external perturbations but the relationship between pain intensities and distributions and their effect on the trunk muscle activity remains unclear. The effects of unilateral and bilateral experimental low back pain on trunk muscle activity w...

  18. Single-blind, randomized, controlled trial of pelvic floor muscle training, electrical stimulation, vaginal cones, and no active treatment in the management of stress urinary incontinence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo A. Castro

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: To compare the effectiveness of pelvic floor exercises, electrical stimulation, vaginal cones, and no active treatment in women with urodynamic stress urinary incontinence. PATIENTS AND METHODS: One hundred eighteen subjects were randomly selected to recieve pelvic floor exercises (n=31, ES (n=30, vaginal cones (n=27, or no treatment (untreated control (n=30. Women were evaluated before and after completion of six months of treatment by the pad test, quality of life questionnaire (I-QOL, urodynamic test, voiding diary, and subjective response. RESULTS: In the objective evaluation, we observed a statistically significant reduction in the pad test (p=0.003, in the number of stress urinary episodes (p<0.001, and a significant improvement in the quality of life (p<0.001 in subjects who used pelvic floor exercises, electrical stimulation, and vaginal cones compared to the control group. No significant difference was found between groups in the urodynamic parameters. In the subjective evaluation, 58%, 55%, and 54% of women who had used pelvic floor exercises, electrical stimulation, and vaginal cones, respectively, reported being satisfied after treatment. In the control group, only 21% patients were satisfied with the treatment. CONCLUSION: Based on this study, pelvic floor exercises, electrical stimulation, and vaginal cones are equally effective treatments and are far superior to no treatment in women with urodynamic stress urinary incontinence.

  19. Transcriptional adaptations following exercise in Thoroughbred horse skeletal muscle highlights molecular mechanisms that lead to muscle hypertrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Park Stephen DE

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Selection for exercise-adapted phenotypes in the Thoroughbred racehorse has provided a valuable model system to understand molecular responses to exercise in skeletal muscle. Exercise stimulates immediate early molecular responses as well as delayed responses during recovery, resulting in a return to homeostasis and enabling long term adaptation. Global mRNA expression during the immediate-response period has not previously been reported in skeletal muscle following exercise in any species. Also, global gene expression changes in equine skeletal muscle following exercise have not been reported. Therefore, to identify novel genes and key regulatory pathways responsible for exercise adaptation we have used equine-specific cDNA microarrays to examine global mRNA expression in skeletal muscle from a cohort of Thoroughbred horses (n = 8 at three time points (before exercise, immediately post-exercise, and four hours post-exercise following a single bout of treadmill exercise. Results Skeletal muscle biopsies were taken from the gluteus medius before (T0, immediately after (T1 and four hours after (T2 exercise. Statistically significant differences in mRNA abundance between time points (T0 vs T1 and T0 vs T2 were determined using the empirical Bayes moderated t-test in the Bioconductor package Linear Models for Microarray Data (LIMMA and the expression of a select panel of genes was validated using real time quantitative reverse transcription PCR (qRT-PCR. While only two genes had increased expression at T1 (P 2 932 genes had increased (P P 2 revealed an over-representation of genes localized to the actin cytoskeleton and with functions in the MAPK signalling, focal adhesion, insulin signalling, mTOR signaling, p53 signaling and Type II diabetes mellitus pathways. At T1, using a less stringent statistical approach, we observed an over-representation of genes involved in the stress response, metabolism and intracellular signaling

  20. Light-load resistance exercise increases muscle protein synthesis and hypertrophy signaling in elderly men

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Agergaard, Jakob; Bülow, Jacob; Jensen, Jacob K

    2017-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: The present study investigated whether well-tolerated light-load resistance exercise (LL-RE) affects skeletal muscle fractional synthetic rate (FSR) and anabolic intracellular signaling as a way to counteract age-related loss of muscle mass. METHODS: Untrained healthy men (age: +65...... and 12g whey protein at 7 hours post-exercise; N=10) or placebo (4g maltodextrin/hour; N=10). Quadriceps muscle biopsies were taken at 0, 3, 7 and 10 hours post-exercise from both the resting and exercised leg. Myofibrillar-FSR and activity of select targets from the mTORC1-signalling cascade were...

  1. Element nodes of sports equipment double back flip factions and double back flip hunched performed gymnast in floor exercise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.A. Potop

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: to identify the node elements of sports equipment double back somersault tuck and double back flip bent. To compare the two types of nodes for double somersault. Material : the study involved eight gymnasts (age 12 - 14 years. All finalists in the competition floor exercise - reserve team Romania. The method of video - computer research and method of postural orientation movements. Results : identified nodal elements of sports equipment double back somersault tuck and double back flip bent. In the preparatory phase of motor actions - launcher body posture for reaching is repulsive to flip. In the phase of basic motor action - animation body postures (double back somersault tuck and bent (bent double back flip. Exercises are performed on the ascending and descending parts of the flight path of the demonstration of individual maximum lift height common center of mass. In the final phase of motor actions - final body posture - steady landing. Conclusions : indicators of key elements of sports equipment acrobatic exercises contain new scientific facts kinematic and dynamic structures of motor actions. They are necessary for the development of modern training programs acrobatic exercises in step specialized base preparation.

  2. [Impacts of physical exercise on remodeling and hypertrophy of skeletal muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakashita, Yoshihiro; Uchida, Takayuki; Nikawa, Takeshi

    The skeletal muscle has high sensitivity for the mechanical stress. Because it is enlarged by training, whereas it is easily withered by lack of exercise. When we exercise, skeletal muscle cells per se sense mechanical loading, and muscular remodeling and the muscular hypertrophy occur. It has been revealed that the intracellular signaling through PGC-1α participates in the remodeling of the skeletal muscle, while PGC-1α4, an isoform of PGC-1α, and the dystrophin-glycoprotein complex play important roles in muscular hypertrophy. This review describes the impact of physical exercise gives on the remodeling and hypertrophy of muscle through the signaling.

  3. The Pleiotropic Effect of Physical Exercise on Mitochondrial Dynamics in Aging Skeletal Muscle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Barbieri

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Decline in human muscle mass and strength (sarcopenia is one of the principal hallmarks of the aging process. Regular physical exercise and training programs are certain powerful stimuli to attenuate the physiological skeletal muscle alterations occurring during aging and contribute to promote health and well-being. Although the series of events that led to these muscle adaptations are poorly understood, the mechanisms that regulate these processes involve the “quality” of skeletal muscle mitochondria. Aerobic/endurance exercise helps to maintain and improve cardiovascular fitness and respiratory function, whereas strength/resistance-exercise programs increase muscle strength, power development, and function. Due to the different effect of both exercises in improving mitochondrial content and quality, in terms of biogenesis, dynamics, turnover, and genotype, combined physical activity programs should be individually prescribed to maximize the antiaging effects of exercise.

  4. The pleiotropic effect of physical exercise on mitochondrial dynamics in aging skeletal muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbieri, Elena; Agostini, Deborah; Polidori, Emanuela; Potenza, Lucia; Guescini, Michele; Lucertini, Francesco; Annibalini, Giosuè; Stocchi, Laura; De Santi, Mauro; Stocchi, Vilberto

    2015-01-01

    Decline in human muscle mass and strength (sarcopenia) is one of the principal hallmarks of the aging process. Regular physical exercise and training programs are certain powerful stimuli to attenuate the physiological skeletal muscle alterations occurring during aging and contribute to promote health and well-being. Although the series of events that led to these muscle adaptations are poorly understood, the mechanisms that regulate these processes involve the "quality" of skeletal muscle mitochondria. Aerobic/endurance exercise helps to maintain and improve cardiovascular fitness and respiratory function, whereas strength/resistance-exercise programs increase muscle strength, power development, and function. Due to the different effect of both exercises in improving mitochondrial content and quality, in terms of biogenesis, dynamics, turnover, and genotype, combined physical activity programs should be individually prescribed to maximize the antiaging effects of exercise.

  5. Increase in interstitial interleukin-6 of human skeletal muscle with repetitive low-force exercise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosendal, Lars; Søgaard, Karen; Kjaer, Michael

    2005-01-01

    Interleukin (IL)-6, which is released from muscle tissue during intense exercise, possesses important metabolic and probably anti-inflammatory properties. To evaluate the IL-6 response to low-intensity exercise, we conducted two studies: 1) a control study with insertion of microdialysis catheters...... in muscle and determination of interstitial muscle IL-6 response over 2 h of rest and 2) an exercise study to investigate the IL-6 response to 20 min of repetitive low-force exercise. In both studies, a microdialysis catheter (cutoff: 3,000 kDa) was inserted into the upper trapezius muscle of six male...... subjects, and the catheters were perfused with Ringer-acetate at 5 microl/min. Venous plasma samples were taken in the exercise study. The insertion of microdialysis catheters into muscle resulted in an increase in IL-6 from 8 +/- 0 to 359 +/- 171 and 484 +/- 202 pg/ml after 65 and 110 min, respectively (P...

  6. Protein hydrolysates and recovery of muscle damage following eccentric exercise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dale M.J.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: A whey protein hydrolysate (NatraBoost XR; WPHNB has been shown to speed repair muscle damage. We sought to determine whether this benefit is specific to this hydrolysate to evaluate a marker for quality control. Methods: Three hydrolysates of the same whey protein isolate (WPI were prepared (WPHNB, WPH1 and WPH2. Isometric knee extensor strength was measured in 39 sedentary male participants before and after 100 maximal eccentric contractions of the knee extensors to induce muscle damage. Participants were then randomised to consume 250 ml of flavoured water (FW, n=9, or 250 ml of FW containing 25 g of either NatraBoost XR (n=3, WPH1 (n=9, WPH2 (n=9 or WPI (n=9. Strength was reassessed over the next seven days while the supplements were consumed daily. Fibroblasts were cultured for 48 hr in the presence of the different hydrolysates, WPI, saline or fetal bovine serum to ascertain effects on cell proliferation. Results: Strength was reduced in all treatment groups after eccentric exercise (P<0.001. Strength recovered steadily over 7 days in the FW, WPI, WPH1 and WPH2 treatment groups (P<0.001, with no difference between treatments (P=0.87. WPHNB promoted faster strength recovery compared with the other treatments (P<0.001. Fibroblast proliferation was greater with WPHNB compared with saline, WPI or the other hydrolysates (P<0.001. Conclusions: Promoting recovery from muscle damage seems unique to WPHNB. In vitro fibroblast proliferation may be a useful marker for quality control. It is not clear whether effects on fibroblast proliferation contribute to the in vivo effect of WPHNB on muscle damage.

  7. Exercise induces transient transcriptional activation of the PGC-1a gene in human skeletal muscle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pilegaard, Henriette; Saltin, Bengt; Neufer, P. Darrell

    2003-01-01

    Endurance exercise training induces mitochondrial biogenesis in skeletal muscle. The peroxisome proliferator activated receptor co-activator 1a (PGC-1a) has recently been identified as a nuclear factor critical for coordinating the activation of genes required for mitochondrial biogenesis in cell...... culture and rodent skeletal muscle. To determine whether PGC-1a transcription is regulated by acute exercise and exercise training in human skeletal muscle, seven male subjects performed 4 weeks of one-legged knee extensor exercise training. At the end of training, subjects completed 3 h of two......-legged knee extensor exercise. Biopsies were obtained from the vastus lateralis muscle of both the untrained and trained legs before exercise and after 0, 2, 6 and 24 h of recovery. Time to exhaustion (2 min maximum resistance), as well as hexokinase II (HKII), citrate synthase and 3-hydroxyacyl...

  8. Beneficial effects of biofeedback-assisted pelvic floor muscle training in patients with urinary incontinence after radical prostatectomy: A systematic review and metaanalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Lan-Fang; Liao, Yuan-Mei; Lai, Fu-Chih; Tsai, Pei-Shan

    2016-08-01

    This systematic review and metaanalysis compared the effects of biofeedback-assisted pelvic floor muscle training with those of pelvic floor muscle training alone in patients with urinary incontinence after radical prostetactomy. A review and metaanalysis study design. The metaanalysis was conducted in accordance with the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and MetaAnalyses guidelines. A systematic search of PubMed/Medline OVID, the Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature, Cochrane Library, BioMed Central, Web of Science, Chinese Electronic Periodical Services, Chinese Journal and Thesis Database, and China National Knowledge Infrastructure was performed for retrieving records. For determining the effects of training type on urinary incontinence, randomized controlled trials on biofeedback-assisted pelvic floor muscle training with or without electrical stimulation were compared with those on pelvic floor muscle training with or without electrical stimulation, respectively, in the metaanalysis. The Cochrane Collaboration tool in the Cochrane Handbook for Systematic Review of Interventions 5.1.0 was used to assess the methodological quality of the included trials. Subjective and objective measurement of urinary incontinence improvement and the quality of life were the primary and secondary outcome measures, respectively. Data were analyzed using Comprehensive Meta-Analysis software 2.0. In addition, subgroup analyses and metaregression were performed to explore the possible sources of heterogeneity. Thirteen randomized controlled trials involving 1108 patients with prostatectomy incontinence were included. The immediate-, intermediate-, and long-term effects of objectively measured biofeedback-assisted pelvic floor muscle training on urinary incontinence were significant (mean effect size=-0.316, -0.335, and -0.294; 95% CI: -0.589 to -0.043, -0.552 to -0.118 and -0.535 to -0.053; p=0.023, 0.002, and 0.017, respectively) when compared

  9. Velocity of isokinetic trunk exercises influences back muscle recruitment patterns in healthy subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Damme, Benedicte B L; Stevens, Veerle K; Van Tiggelen, Damien E; Duvigneaud, Nathalie N P; Neyens, Ellen; Danneels, Lieven A

    2013-04-01

    Isokinetic exercises at different angular velocities on Cybex devices are often used for assessment and therapy in chronic low back pain patients. Little is known about the effect of velocity of movement on the muscle activity during these exercises. The purpose of this study was to investigate both relative muscle activity and ratios of local to global muscle activity at the different velocities of isokinetic movements on a Cybex dynamometer. Fifty-three healthy employees of Belgian Defence (26 male and 27 female) aged between 20 and 57 years old voluntarily performed isometric and isokinetic exercises at four different velocities. Surface electromyographic signals of different abdominal and back muscles were recorded on both sides. Both the relative muscle activity and the local to global muscle activity ratio of the back muscles were affected by changes in velocities of isokinetic exercises. The global muscle system was more influenced by changes in velocity, than the local muscle system. Abdominal relative muscle activity and ratios were not influenced by velocity of movement. This study revealed that the velocity of isokinetic extension exercises influences the recruitment of the back muscles, meaning that protocols of training programs should be adapted in function of the focus of the therapy. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. A RANDOMISED CONTROLLED STUDY ON CORE STABILITY EXERCISE PROGRAMME USING SWISS BALL, THERABAND AND FLOOR EXERCISES IN CRICKETERS WITH LOW BACK PAIN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.Seshagirirao

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Low back pain is one of the common complaints seen in cricketers. Core stability is defined as the ability to control the position and motion of the trunk over the pelvis to allow optimum production, transfer and control of force and motion to the terminal segment in integrated athletic activities and generally given as treatment in many instances. No randomized controlled studies were there for low back pain in cricketers. So, purpose of this study was to know the efficacy of Swiss ball(SB, Thera-band(TB, and Floor exercises(FE in cricketers with low back pain. Methods: Sixty male competitive cricket players between 15-35 years age were randomly assigned into 4 groups. SB (n=15, TB (n=15, FE (n=15, control group (n=15. Analysis of data within group and between groups of the pre and post treatment values of pain-disability(Modified Oswestry Low Back Pain Questionnaire and core strength(double-leg lowering test was done statistically using t test and ANOVA test. Results: The results of within group analysis, showed extremely significant improvement in terms of pain & disability and back strength (p<0.0001 in all the groups, whereas in between groups, TB(theraband group showed significant improvement compared to SB(swissball, FE(floor-exercise and control groups. Conclusion: The results revealed that Thera-band (TB group had better improvement than the other three groups in decreasing low back pain and improving core stability.

  11. The effects of therapeutic hip exercise with abdominal core activation on recruitment of the hip muscles

    OpenAIRE

    Chan, Mandy KY; Chow, Ka Wai; Lai, Alfred YS; Mak, Noble KC; Sze, Jason CH; Tsang, Sharon MH

    2017-01-01

    Background Core stabilization has been utilized for rehabilitation and prevention of lower limb musculoskeletal injuries. Previous studies showed that activation of the abdominal core muscles enhanced the hip muscle activity in hip extension and abduction exercises. However, the lack of the direct measurement and quantification of the activation level of the abdominal core muscles during the execution of the hip exercises affect the level of evidence to substantiate the proposed application o...

  12. The AMPK activator R419 improves exercise capacity and skeletal muscle insulin sensitivity in obese mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katarina Marcinko

    2015-09-01

    Conclusions: Treatment of obese mice with R419 improved skeletal muscle insulin sensitivity through a mechanism that is independent of skeletal muscle AMPK. R419 also increases exercise capacity and improves mitochondrial function in obese WT mice; effects that are diminished in the absence of skeletal muscle AMPK. These findings suggest that R419 may be a promising therapy for improving whole-body glucose homeostasis and exercise capacity.

  13. Eccentric exercise slows in vivo microvascular reactivity during brief contractions in human skeletal muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsen, Ryan G; Hirata, Rogerio P; Madzak, Adnan; Frøkjær, Jens B; Graven-Nielsen, Thomas

    2015-12-01

    Unaccustomed exercise involving eccentric contractions results in muscle soreness and an overall decline in muscle function, however, little is known about the effects of eccentric exercise on microvascular reactivity in human skeletal muscle. Fourteen healthy men and women performed eccentric contractions of the dorsiflexor muscles in one leg, while the contralateral leg served as a control. At baseline, and 24 and 48 h after eccentric exercise, the following were acquired bilaterally in the tibialis anterior muscle: 1) transverse relaxation time (T2)-weighted magnetic resonance images to determine muscle cross-sectional area (mCSA) and T2; 2) blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) images during and following brief, maximal voluntary contractions (MVC) to monitor the hyperemic responses with participants positioned supine in a 3T magnet; 3) muscle strength; and 4) pain pressure threshold. Compared with the control leg, eccentric exercise resulted in soreness, decline in strength (∼20%), increased mCSA (∼7%), and prolonged T2 (∼7%) at 24 and 48 h (P eccentric exercise, such that time-to-peak (∼35%, P contraction-induced hyperemic response suggests slowed microvascular reactivity and altered matching of O2 delivery to O2 utilization within muscle tissue showing signs of muscle damage. These changes in microvascular regulation after eccentric exercise may impede rapid adjustments in muscle blood flow at exercise onset and during activities involving brief bursts of muscle activation, which may impair O2 delivery and contribute to reduced muscle function after eccentric exercise. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  14. Immunohistochemical detection of interleukin-6 in human skeletal muscle fibers following exercise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Penkowa, Milena; Keller, Charlotte; Keller, Pernille

    2003-01-01

    Interleukin-6 (IL-6) is produced by many different cell types. Human skeletal muscles produce and release high amounts of IL-6 during exercise; however, the cell source of origin in the muscle is not known. Therefore, we studied the protein expression of IL-6 by immunohistochemistry in human musc...... are the dominant cell source of exercise-induced release of IL-6 from working muscle....

  15. Effects of performing an abdominal hollowing exercise on trunk muscle activity during curl-up exercise on an unstable surface

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Moon-Hwan; Oh, Jae-Seop

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of the abdominal hollowing exercise on trunk muscle activity during the curl-up exercise on an unstable surface by measuring electromyography (EMG) activity. [Subjects] Fourteen young healthy adults (nine male, five female) voluntarily participated in this study. [Methods] Each subject was asked to perform a curl-up exercise on two supporting surfaces (stable and unstable surfaces) combined with the abdominal hollowing exercis...

  16. Effect of pelvic floor muscle training compared with watchful waiting in older women with symptomatic mild pelvic organ prolapse: randomised controlled trial in primary care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiegersma, Marian; Panman, Chantal M C R; Kollen, Boudewijn J; Berger, Marjolein Y; Lisman-Van Leeuwen, Yvonne

    2014-01-01

    Objective To compare the effects of pelvic floor muscle training and watchful waiting on pelvic floor symptoms in a primary care population of women aged 55 years and over with symptomatic mild pelvic organ prolapse. Design Randomised controlled trial. Setting Dutch primary care. Participants Women aged 55 years or over with symptomatic mild prolapse (leading edge above the hymen) were identified by screening. Exclusion criteria were current prolapse treatment or treatment in the previous year, malignancy of pelvic organs, current treatment for another gynaecological disorder, severe/terminal illness, impaired mobility, cognitive impairment, and insufficient command of the Dutch language. Interventions Pelvic floor muscle training versus watchful waiting. Main outcome measures The primary outcome was change in bladder, bowel, and pelvic floor symptoms measured with the Pelvic Floor Distress Inventory-20 (PFDI-20), three months after the start of treatment. Secondary outcomes were changes in condition specific and general quality of life, sexual function, degree of prolapse, pelvic floor muscle function, and patients’ perceived change in symptoms. Results Of the 287 women who were randomised to pelvic floor muscle training (n=145) or watchful waiting (n=142), 250 (87%) completed follow-up. Participants in the intervention group improved by (on average) 9.1 (95% confidence interval 2.8 to 15.4) points more on the PFDI-20 than did participants in the watchful waiting group (P=0.005). Of women in the pelvic floor muscle training group, 57% (82/145) reported an improvement in overall symptoms from the start of the study compared with 13% (18/142) in the watchful waiting group (Ppelvic floor muscle training led to a significantly greater improvement in PFDI-20 score, the difference between the groups was below the presumed level of clinical relevance (15 points). Nevertheless, 57% of the participants in the intervention group reported an improvement of overall symptoms

  17. Noradrenaline spillover during exercise in active versus resting skeletal muscle in man

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Savard, G; Strange, S; Kiens, Bente

    1987-01-01

    Increases in plasma noradrenaline (NA) concentration occur during moderate to heavy exercise in man. This study was undertaken to examine the spillover of NA from both resting and contracting skeletal muscle during exercise. Six male subjects performed one-legged knee-extension so that all...... in the exercising leg than in the resting leg both during 50% and 100% leg exercise. These results suggest that contracting skeletal muscle may contribute to a larger extent than resting skeletal muscle to increasing the level of plasma NA during exercise. Contractile activity may influence the NA spillover from...... measurements could be made both in the exercising and in the resting leg. Subjects exercised for 10 min at each of 50% and 100% of the peak performance capacity of the leg. Leg blood flow was measured by thermodilution and blood samples were drawn for the determination of plasma NA and adrenaline, first...

  18. Relationship between physical exercise, muscle damage and delayed-onset muscle soreness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denis Foschini

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the present study was to investigate the relationship between physical exercise involving muscle damage and delayed-onset muscle soreness (DOMS. A literature review of national and international periodicals was carried out. Muscle structures (membranes, Z-line, sarcomeres, T tubules and myofi brils can become damaged as a result of an imposed mechanical overload. Of greatest note are exercises requiring strength, particularly when muscular action is eccentric. Damage to skeletal musculature can be analyzed by direct methods (muscle biopsy or magnetic resonance or by indirect methods (maximum voluntary movement, subjective pain perception scales, analysis of enzyme and protein concentrations in blood. Creatine kinase (CK, lactate dehydrogenase (LDH, myosin heavy chain fragments, troponin-I and myoglobin can be used as indirect markers of muscle damage. Both DOMS and muscle damage can be infl uenced by the type of activity, with emphasis on eccentric muscle movements, type of exercise, velocity of the movement, interval period between series, the level of individual fi tness, this last primarily affecting beginners. When myotrauma occurs, muscle damage repair is initiated by leukocytes migrating to the injured area, although, the histamines, prostaglandins, kinins and K+ produced by neutrophils and macrophages stimulate free nerve endings in the muscle, causing the DOMS. Despite this apparent relationship between muscle damage and DOMS, it is not possible toestablish a linear relationship between these two variables, since published data are divergent. RESUMO O objetivo desse estudo foi investigar as relações do exercício físico com o dano muscular e dor muscular de início tardio (DMIT. Para tanto, foi realizada uma revisão de literatura de periódicos nacionais e internacionais. O dano muscular pode ocorrer em estruturas musculares (membranas, linha Z, sarcolema, túbulos T e miofi brilas em função da sobrecarga mec

  19. Serratus anterior or pectoralis minor: Which muscle has the upper hand during protraction exercises?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castelein, Birgit; Cagnie, Barbara; Parlevliet, Thierry; Cools, Ann

    2016-04-01

    The Serratus Anterior (SA) has a critical role in stabilizing the scapula against the thorax. Research has linked shoulder and neck disorders to impairments in the SA activation. Exercises that target the SA are included in the rehabilitation of shoulder or neck pain and mostly include a protraction component. The Pectoralis Minor (PM) functions as a synergist of the SA. From the literature it is unclear to what extent PM is activated during SA exercises. To determine the activity of SA and PM during different protraction exercises. Controlled laboratory study. 26 subjects performed 3 exercises: Modified Push-Up Plus (Wall Version), Modified Knee Push-Up Plus (Floor version) and Serratus Punch. Electromyographic (EMG) data was collected from the SA (surface) and PM (fine-wire EMG). During the Serratus Punch the SA activity was significantly higher than the PM activity. During the Modified Push-Up Plus exercises (both Wall and Floor version), the SA and PM activity were comparable. The PM showed the highest activity during the Serratus Punch and the Modified Push-Up Plus (Floor), which was significantly higher than during the Modified Push-Up Plus (Wall). The SA showed the highest activity during the Serratus Punch, which was significantly higher than during the Modified Push-Up Plus (Floor) which was in turn significantly higher than the activity during the Modified Push-Up Plus (Wall). All exercises activated the PM between 15 and 29% Maximum Voluntary Isometric Contraction and the SA between 15 and 43%. The Modified Push-Up Plus exercise against the wall and the floor activated the SA and PM to a similar degree. When maximum activation of the SA with minimal activation of the PM is desired in healthy subjects, the "Serratus punch" seems to be the optimal exercise. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Local and Generalized Endogenous Pain Modulation in Healthy Men: Effects of Exercise and Exercise-Induced Muscle Damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Black, Christopher D; Tynes, Brandon K; Gonglach, Alexander R; Waddell, Dwight E

    2016-12-01

    Isometric exercise has been shown to activate endogenous pain inhibitory pathways in healthy adults, but not in some clinical pain populations.  Exercise-induced muscle damage (EIMD) and the associated delayed-onset muscle soreness (DOMS) are a model for studying clinical pain; thus, our purpose was to examine the effects of isometric exercise on pressure pain threshold (PPT) in the presence and absence of DOMS.  Data were collected on 23 males (22.8 ± 2.5 yrs). PPT was assessed in the right (exercising) and left (resting) quadriceps prior to, every 30 seconds during, and 2 and 15 minutes following an isometric contraction of the right quadriceps at 25% of maximal voluntary contraction (MVC) held until fatigue. Unilateral eccentric exercise was performed to induce DOMS in the exercising leg and testing was repeated 48 hours later.  DOMS increased (P exercise in the exercising (P ≤ 0.002) and resting (P ≤ 0.002) quadriceps but did not differ between the control and EIMD conditions in either leg (P ≤ 0.61). PPT remained elevated 2 and 15 minutes postexercise (P exercised quadriceps in both conditions, but values returned to baseline at 2 (P = 0.91) and 15 minutes (P = 0.28) postisometric exercise in the resting quadriceps.  Unlike clinical pain, DOMS had no effect on the PPT response during exercise in either the exercising or resting quadriceps. The fact that exercise altered PPT in both quadriceps during exercise suggests a generalized pain inhibitory mechanism was activated. However, the restriction of postexercise effects to the exercised limb suggests localized inhibitory mechanism(s) were activated after exercise. © 2016 American Academy of Pain Medicine. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  1. A pilot randomized control trial to evaluate pelvic floor muscle training for urinary incontinence among gynecologic cancer survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutledge, Teresa L; Rogers, Rebecca; Lee, Sang-Joon; Muller, Carolyn Y

    2014-01-01

    We previously reported high rates of urinary incontinence among gynecologic cancer survivors and aimed to evaluate the effectiveness of a simple intervention for treatment of urinary incontinence in this population. We recruited 40 gynecologic cancer survivors who reported urinary incontinence on a validated questionnaire. Women were randomized to either pelvic floor muscle training/behavioral therapy (treatment group) or usual care (control group). The primary outcome measure, assessed at 12 weeks post intervention, was a 40% difference in the validated Patient Global Impression of Improvement (PGI-I) score. Fisher's exact test was used to identify differences between groups for frequency data; two-sample t-test was conducted for continuous measurements. Mean age of this cohort was 57 (range: 37-79). The majority of the survivors had uterine cancer (60%), 18% had received radiation therapy, 95% had received surgical therapy, and 35% had received chemotherapy. At three months, 80% of the treatment and 40% of the control group reported that their urinary incontinence was "much better" or "very much better" as evaluated by the Patient Global Impression of Improvement scale (p=0.02). Brink's scores were significantly improved in the treatment group as compared to those of the controls (pgynecologic cancer survivors, it is often under-assessed and undertreated. We found a simple intervention that included pelvic floor muscle training and behavioral therapy, which significantly improved cancer survivor's urinary incontinence. © 2013.

  2. Exercise training normalizes skeletal muscle vascular endothelial growth factor levels in patients with essential hypertension

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Ane Håkansson; Nielsen, Jens Jung; Saltin, Bengt

    2010-01-01

    METHODS: Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) protein and capillarization were determined in muscle vastus lateralis biopsy samples in individuals with essential hypertension (n = 10) and normotensive controls (n = 10). The hypertensive individuals performed exercise training for 16 weeks....... Muscle samples as well as muscle microdialysis fluid samples were obtained at rest, during and after an acute exercise bout, performed prior to and after the training period, for the determination of muscle VEGF levels, VEGF release, endothelial cell proliferative effect and capillarization. RESULTS......: Prior to training, the hypertensive individuals had 36% lower levels of VEGF protein and 22% lower capillary density in the muscle compared to controls. Training in the hypertensive group reduced (P

  3. Phosphorus Spectroscopy of Calf Muscles before and after Exercise

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wcisło, Bożena; Cichocka, Monika; Urbanik, Andrzej

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine 31 PMRS reference spectrum and intracellular pH of calf muscles in the dominant limb of healthy, young, male volunteers before and after intense physical effort. Examinations were performed with a 1.5 T MR system. FID CSI (Free Induction Decay Chemical Shift Imaging) sequence was used with the following parameters: TR=4000 ms, FA=90°, NEX=2 and VOI (Volume Of Interest)=8×8×8 cm 3 (512 cm 3 ) involving in calf muscles. Raw data was preprocessed using SAGE (GE) software. Authors analyzed relative concentrations ratios of selected metabolites: PCr/ATP and PCr/P i . Intracellular pH and relative concentrations ratios of each metabolite (P i , PCr, α-ATP, β-ATP, γ-ATP, ATP) were also calculated relative to the sum of concentrations of all metabolites. Results were compared with a t-test. Based on statistical analysis of results significant differences (p<0.05) were demonstrated for some of the studied metabolites and for intracellular pH. Increase in PCr concentration in relation to the sum of concentrations of all metabolites and to ATP concentration was noted. However, β-ATP, α-ATP and ATP concentrations relative to the sum of concentrations of all metabolites become reduced. Decrease in pH after physical effort was demonstrated. There were no significant differences (p<0.05) in concentrations of remaining metabolites before and after exercise. Increase in PCr concentration relative to P i concentration and decrease of P i and γ-ATP concentration relative to the sum of concentrations of all metabolites were demonstrated. The 31 PMRS method enables assessment of concentrations of phosphorus-containing metabolites as well as intercellular pH before and after exercise. This method is still under examination, but it has already shown promise as a diagnostic tool for the future

  4. Is hypoxia training good for muscles and exercise performance?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogt, Michael; Hoppeler, Hans

    2010-01-01

    Altitude training has become very popular among athletes as a means to further increase exercise performance at sea level or to acclimatize to competition at altitude. Several approaches have evolved during the last few decades, with "live high-train low" and "live low-train high" being the most popular. This review focuses on functional, muscular, and practical aspects derived from extensive research on the "live low-train high" approach. According to this, subjects train in hypoxia but remain under normoxia for the rest of the time. It has been reasoned that exercising in hypoxia could increase the training stimulus. Hypoxia training studies published in the past have varied considerably in altitude (2300-5700 m) and training duration (10 days to 8 weeks) and the fitness of the subjects. The evidence from muscle structural, biochemical, and molecular findings point to a specific role of hypoxia in endurance training. However, based on the available performance capacity data such as maximal oxygen uptake (Vo(2)max) and (maximal) power output, hypoxia as a supplement to training is not consistently found to be advantageous for performance at sea level. Stronger evidence exists for benefits of hypoxic training on performance at altitude. "Live low-train high" may thus be considered when altitude acclimatization is not an option. In addition, the complex pattern of gene expression adaptations induced by supplemental training in hypoxia, but not normoxia, suggest that muscle tissue specifically responds to hypoxia. Whether and to what degree these gene expression changes translate into significant changes in protein concentrations that are ultimately responsible for observable structural or functional phenotypes remains open. It is conceivable that the global functional markers such as Vo(2)max and (maximal) power output are too coarse to detect more subtle changes that might still be functionally relevant, at least to high-level athletes.

  5. AMPKα is critical for enhancing skeletal muscle fatty acid utilization during in vivo exercise in mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fentz, Joachim; Kjøbsted, Rasmus; Birk, Jesper Bratz

    2015-01-01

    The importance of AMPK in regulation of fatty acid (FA) oxidation in skeletal muscle with contraction/exercise is unresolved. Using a mouse model lacking both AMPKα1 and -α2 in skeletal muscle specifically (mdKO), we hypothesized that FA utilization would be impaired in skeletal muscle. AMPKα md.......01), indicating a decreased utilization of FA. Further, ex vivo contraction-induced FA oxidation was impaired in AMPKα mdKO muscle, suggesting that the increased RER during exercise originated from decreased skeletal muscle FA oxidation. A decreased muscle protein expression of CD36 (cluster of differentiation 36...... to sarcolemma, respectively. AMPKα is thus required for normal FA metabolism during exercise and muscle contraction.-Fentz, J., Kjøbsted, R., Birk, J. B., Jordy, A. B., Jeppesen, J., Thorsen, K., Schjerling, P., Kiens, B., Jessen, N., Viollet, B., Wojtaszewski, J. F. P. AMPKα is critical for enhancing skeletal...

  6. Regulation of Increased Blood Flow (Hyperemia) to Muscles During Exercise: A Hierarchy of Competing Physiological Needs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joyner, Michael J.; Casey, Darren P.

    2015-01-01

    This review focuses on how blood flow to contracting skeletal muscles is regulated during exercise in humans. The idea is that blood flow to the contracting muscles links oxygen in the atmosphere with the contracting muscles where it is consumed. In this context, we take a top down approach and review the basics of oxygen consumption at rest and during exercise in humans, how these values change with training, and the systemic hemodynamic adaptations that support them. We highlight the very high muscle blood flow responses to exercise discovered in the 1980s. We also discuss the vasodilating factors in the contracting muscles responsible for these very high flows. Finally, the competition between demand for blood flow by contracting muscles and maximum systemic cardiac output is discussed as a potential challenge to blood pressure regulation during heavy large muscle mass or whole body exercise in humans. At this time, no one dominant dilator mechanism accounts for exercise hyperemia. Additionally, complex interactions between the sympathetic nervous system and the microcirculation facilitate high levels of systemic oxygen extraction and permit just enough sympathetic control of blood flow to contracting muscles to regulate blood pressure during large muscle mass exercise in humans. PMID:25834232

  7. Respiratory muscle function and exercise limitation in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charususin, Noppawan; Dacha, Sauwaluk; Gosselink, Rik; Decramer, Marc; Von Leupoldt, Andreas; Reijnders, Thomas; Louvaris, Zafeiris; Langer, Daniel

    2018-01-01

    Respiratory muscle dysfunction is common and contributes to dyspnea and exercise limitation in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Improving dynamic function of respiratory muscles during exercise might help to reduce symptoms and improve exercise capacity. Areas covered: The aims of this review are to 1) summarize physiological mechanisms linking respiratory muscle dysfunction to dyspnea and exercise limitation; 2) provide an overview of available therapeutic approaches to better maintain load-capacity balance of respiratory muscles during exercise; and 3) to summarize current knowledge on potential mechanisms explaining effects of interventions aimed at optimizing dynamic respiratory muscle function with a special focus on inspiratory muscle training. Expert commentary: Several mechanisms which are potentially linking improvements in dynamic respiratory muscle function to symptomatic and functional benefits have not been studied so far in COPD patients. Examples of underexplored areas include the study of neural processes related to the relief of acute dyspnea and the competition between respiratory and peripheral muscles for limited energy supplies during exercise. Novel methodologies are available to non-invasively study these mechanisms. Better insights into the consequences of dynamic respiratory muscle dysfunction will hopefully contribute to further refine and individualize therapeutic approaches in patients with COPD.

  8. Detection of ultrastructural changes in genetically altered and exercised skeletal muscle using PS-OCT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasquesi, James J.; Schlachter, Simon C.; Boppart, Marni D.; Chaney, Eric; Kaufman, Stephen J.; Boppart, Stephen A.

    2006-02-01

    Birefringence of skeletal muscle has been associated with the ultrastructure of individual sarcomeres, specifically the arrangement of A-bands corresponding to the thick myosin filaments. Murine skeletal muscle (gastrocnemius) was imaged with a fiber-based PS-OCT imaging system to determine the level of birefringence present in the tissue under various conditions. In addition to muscle controls from wild-type mice, muscle from abnormal mice included: genetically-modified (mdx) mice which model human muscular dystrophy, transgenic mice exhibiting an overexpression of integrin (α7β1), and transgenic integrin (α7β1)knockout mice. Comparisons were also made between rested and exercised muscles to determine the effects of exercise on muscle birefringence for each of these normal and abnormal conditions. The PS-OCT images revealed that the presence of birefringence was similar in the rested muscle with dystrophy-like features (i.e., lacking the structural protein dystrophin - mdx) and in the integrin (α7β1)knockout muscle when compared to the normal (wild-type) control. However, exercising these abnormal muscle tissues drastically reduced the presence of birefringence detected by the PS-OCT system. The muscle exhibiting an overexpression of integrin (α7β1) remained heavily birefringent before and after exercise, similar to the normal (wild-type) muscle. These results suggest that there is a distinct relationship between the degree of birefringence detected using PS-OCT and the sarcomeric ultrastructure present within skeletal muscle.

  9. Can pelvic floor muscle training improve sexual function in women with pelvic organ prolapse? A randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braekken, Ingeborg H; Majida, Memona; Ellström Engh, Marie; Bø, Kari

    2015-02-01

    Pelvic floor muscle training (PFMT) has level 1 evidence of reducing the size and symptoms associated with pelvic organ prolapse (POP). There is scant knowledge, however, regarding whether PFMT has an effect on sexual function. The aim of the trial was to evaluate the effect of PFMT on sexual function in women with POP. In this randomized controlled trial, 50 women were randomized to an intervention group (6 months of PFMT and lifestyle advice) and 59 women were randomized to a control group (lifestyle advice only). Participants completed a validated POP-specific questionnaire to describe frequency and bother of prolapse, bladder, bowel, and sexual symptoms and answered a semi-structured interview. No significant change in number of women being sexually active was reported. There were no significant differences between groups regarding change in satisfaction with frequency of intercourse. Interview data revealed that 19 (39%) of women in the PFMT group experienced improved sexual function vs. two (5%) in the control group (Ppelvic floor, improved self-confidence, sensation of a "tighter" vagina, improved libido and orgasms, resolution of pain with intercourse, and heightened sexual gratification for partners. Women who described improved sexual function demonstrated the greatest increases in pelvic floor muscle (PFM) strength (mean 16 ± 10 cmH2 0) and endurance (mean 150 ± 140 cmH2 0s) (P<0.01). PFMT can improve sexual function in some women. Women reporting improvement in sexual function demonstrated the greatest increase in PFM strength and endurance. © 2014 International Society for Sexual Medicine.

  10. Comparison of Hip- and Back-Muscle Activity and Pelvic Compensation in Healthy Subjects During 3 Different Prone Table Hip-Extension Exercises.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeon, In-Cheol; Kwon, Oh-Yun; Weon, Jong-Hyuck; Hwang, Ui-Jae; Jung, Sung-Hoon

    2017-07-01

    Prone hip extension has been recommended for strengthening the back and hip muscles. Previous studies have investigated prone hip extension conducted with subjects on the floor in the prone position. However, no study has compared 3 different table hip-extension (THE) positions in terms of the activities of the back- and hip-joint muscles with lumbopelvic motion. To identify more effective exercises for strengthening the gluteus maximus (GM) by comparing 3 different exercises (THE alone, THE with the abdominal drawing-in maneuver [THEA], and THEA with chair support under the knee [THEAC]) based on electromyographic muscle activity and pelvic compensation. Repeated-measure within-subject intervention. University research laboratory. 16 healthy men. Surface electromyography (EMG) was used to obtain data on the GM, erector spinae (ES), multifidus, biceps femoris (BF), and semitendinosus (ST). Pelvic compensation was monitored using an electromagnetic motion-tracking device. Exertion during each exercise was recorded. Any significant difference in electromyographic muscle activity and pelvic motion among the 3 conditions (THE vs THEA vs THEAC) was assessed using a 1-way repeated-measures analysis of variance (ANOVA) with Bonferroni post hoc test. The muscle activities recorded by EMG differed significantly among the 3 exercises (P < .01). GM activity was increased significantly during THEAC (P < .01). There was a significant difference in lumbopelvic kinematics in terms of anterior tilting (F = 19.49, P < .01) and rotation (F= 27.38, P < .01) among the 3 exercises. The THEAC exercise was the most effective for strengthening the GM without overactivity of the ES, BF, and ST muscles and lumbopelvic compensation compared with THE and THEA.

  11. Apoptosis and physical exercise: effects on skeletal muscle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Alberto Ramos Duarte

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available This brief review will discuss an exciting new area in exercise science, namely the role of apoptosis programmed cell death in exercise. Apoptotic cell death differs morphologically and biochemically from necrotic cell death, although both appear to occur after exercise. Accelerated apoptosis has been documented to occur in a variety of disease states, such as AIDS and Alzheimer’s disease, as well as in the aging heart. In striking contrast, failure to activate this genetically regulated cell death may result in cancer and certain viral infections. Here, the apoptosis phenomenon will be discussed, as it occurs in skeletal muscle, and its relation to physical exercise, as well as the interaction with the HSP70 protein. We speculate that exercise-induced apoptosis is a normal regulatory process that serves to remove certain damaged cells without a pronounced inflammatory response, thus ensuring optimal organism function. Resumo Esta breve revisão irá discutir uma nova e excitante área em ciências do exercício, conhecida como o papel da apoptose ou morte celular programada no exercício. A morte celular por apoptose difere morfológica e bioquimicamente da morte celular por necrose, embora ambas parecem ocorrer após o exercício. A ocorrência de apoptose acelerada tem sido relatada em uma grande variedade de doenças, tais como a AIDS e o mal de Alzheimer, bem como em problemas cardíacos relacionados com o envelhecimento. Por outro lado, falhas ao ativar essa regulação genética de morte celular pode resultar em câncer e em certas infecções virais. Aqui será discutido o fenômeno da apoptose, na musculatura esquelética, relacionado com o exercício físico, assim como a interação com a proteína HSP70. Nós especulamos que a apoptose induzida pelo exercício é um processo regulatório normal, que se torna útil no sentido de remover certas células lesadas com ausência de resposta inflamatória pronunciada, otimizando, assim

  12. Simultaneous measurement of pelvic floor muscle activity and vaginal blood flow: a pilot study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Both, Stephanie; Laan, Ellen

    2007-01-01

    Dyspareunia, defined as persistent or recurrent genital pain associated with sexual intercourse, is hypothesized to be related to pelvic floor hyperactivity and to diminished sexual arousal. Empirical research to support these hypotheses is scarce and concentrates mostly on the role of either pelvic

  13. Effect of pelvic floor muscle training compared with watchful waiting in older women with symptomatic mild pelvic organ prolapse: randomised controlled trial in primary care

    OpenAIRE

    Wiegersma, Marian; Panman, Chantal M C R; Kollen, Boudewijn J; Berger, Marjolein Y; Lisman-Van Leeuwen, Yvonne; Dekker, Janny H

    2014-01-01

    Objective To compare the effects of pelvic floor muscle training and watchful waiting on pelvic floor symptoms in a primary care population of women aged 55 years and over with symptomatic mild pelvic organ prolapse. Design Randomised controlled trial. Setting Dutch primary care. Participants Women aged 55 years or over with symptomatic mild prolapse (leading edge above the hymen) were identified by screening. Exclusion criteria were current prolapse treatment or treatment in the previous yea...

  14. Alterations in pelvic floor muscles and pelvic organ support by pregnancy and vaginal delivery in squirrel monkeys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyes, Michelle; Gendron, Jilene M.; Pierce, Lisa M.; Runge, Val M.; Kuehl, Thomas J.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction and hypothesis The objective of this study was to measure the effects of pregnancy and parturition on pelvic floor muscles and pelvic organ support. Methods Levator ani, obturator internus, and coccygeus (COC) muscle volumes and contrast uptake were assessed by MRI of seven females prior to pregnancy, 3 days, and 4 months postpartum. Bladder neck and cervix position were measured dynamically with abdominal squeezing. Results The sides of three paired muscles were similar (p>0.66). COC volumes were greater (p<0.004) after parturition than before pregnancy or after recovery. COC contrast uptake increased (p<0.02) immediately after delivery. Bladder neck position both in the relaxed state and abdominal pressure descended (p<0.04) after delivery and descended further (p<0.001) after recovery. Cervical position in the relaxed state before delivery was higher (p<0.001) than postpartum but was unchanged (p=0.50) with abdominal pressure relative to delivery. Conclusion In squirrel monkeys, coccygeus muscles demonstrate the greatest change related to parturition, and parturition-related bladder neck descent seems permanent. PMID:21567260

  15. Respiratory Muscle Training and Cognitive Function Exercising at Altitude.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quackenbush, Joseph; Duquin, Aubrey; Helfer, Samuel; Pendergast, David R

    2016-01-01

    Hiking and trekking often occur at altitudes up to 12,000 ft altitude. The hypoxia-induced hyperventilation at altitude paradoxically reduces arterial CO2 (Paco2). A reduction in Paco2 results in vasoconstriction of the blood vessels of the brain and thus in local hypoxia. The local hypoxia likely affects cognitive function, which may result in reduced performance and altitude accidents. Recent publications have demonstrated that voluntary isocapnic hyperventilatory training of the respiratory muscles (VIHT) can markedly enhance exercise endurance as it is associated with reduced ventilation and its energy cost. VIHT may be useful in blunting the altitude-induced hyperventilation leading to higher Paco2 and improved cognitive function. This study examined the effects of VIHT, compared to control (C) and placebo (PVIHT) groups, on selected measures of executive functioning, including working memory and processing speed (i.e., Stroop Test, Symbol Digit Modalities Test, and Digit Span Forward) at simulated altitude up to 12,000 ft. Associated physiological parameters were also measured. The Digit Span Forward Test did not show improvements after VIHT in any group. The VIHT group, but not C or PVIHT groups, improved significantly (17-30%) on the Stroop Test. Similarly the VIHT group, but not the C and PVIHT groups, improved correct responses (26%) and number of attempts (24%) on the Symbol Digit Modalities Test. In addition, reaction time was also improved (16%). VIHT improved processing speed and working memory during exercise at altitude.

  16. Exercise-associated muscle cramps: causes, treatment, and prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Kevin C; Stone, Marcus S; Huxel, Kellie C; Edwards, Jeffrey E

    2010-07-01

    Exercise-associated muscle cramps (EAMC) are a common condition experienced by recreational and competitive athletes. Despite their commonality and prevalence, their cause remains unknown. Theories for the cause of EAMC are primarily based on anecdotal and observational studies rather than sound experimental evidence. Without a clear cause, treatments and prevention strategies for EAMC are often unsuccessful. A search of Medline (EBSCO), SPORTDiscus, and Silverplatter (CINHAL) was undertaken for journal articles written in English between the years 1955 and 2008. Additional references were collected by a careful analysis of the citations of others' research and textbooks. Dehydration/electrolyte and neuromuscular causes are the most widely discussed theories for the cause of EAMC; however, strong experimental evidence for either theory is lacking. EAMC are likely due to several factors coalescing to cause EAMC. The variety of treatments and prevention strategies for EAMC are evidence of the uncertainty in their cause. Acute EAMC treatment should focus on moderate static stretching of the affected muscle followed by a proper medical history to determine any predisposing conditions that may have triggered the onset of EAMC. Based on physical findings, prevention programs should be implemented to include fluid and electrolyte balance strategies and/or neuromuscular training.

  17. Botulinum Toxin A Injections Into Pelvic Floor Muscles Under Electromyographic Guidance for Women With Refractory High-Tone Pelvic Floor Dysfunction: A 6-Month Prospective Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrissey, Darlene; El-Khawand, Dominique; Ginzburg, Natasha; Wehbe, Salim; O'Hare, Peter; Whitmore, Kristene

    2015-01-01

    High-tone pelvic floor dysfunction (HTPFD) is a debilitating chronic pain disorder for many women with significant impact on their quality of life (QoL). Our objective was to determine the efficacy of electromyography-guided onabotulinumtoxinA (Botox; Allergan, Irvine, Calif) injections in treating patient's perception of pelvic pain and improving QoL measurement scores. This is a prospective pilot open-label study of women with chronic pelvic pain and HTPFD who have failed conventional therapy between January 2011 and August 2013. Botox injections (up to 300 U) were done using needle electromyography guidance, from a transperineal approach, to localize spastic pelvic floor muscles (PFMs). Data were collected at baseline, 4, 8, 12, and 24 weeks after injections. This included demographics; Visual Analog Scale (VAS) scores for pain and dyspareunia; validated questionnaires for symptoms, QoL, and sexual function; Global Response Assessment scale for pelvic pain; digital examination of PFM for tone and tenderness; and vaginal manometry. Side effects were also recorded. Out of 28 women who enrolled in the study, 21 completed the 6-month follow-up and qualified for analysis. The mean (SD) age was 35.1 (9.4) years (range, 22-50 years), and the mean (SD) body mass index was 25 (4.4). Comorbidities included interstitial cystitis/bladder pain syndrome (42.9%) and vulvodynia (66.7%). Overall, 61.9% of subjects reported improvement on Global Response Assessment at 4 weeks and 80.9% at 8, 12, and 24 weeks post injection, compared with baseline. Of the subjects who were sexually active at baseline, 58.8% (10/17), 68.8% (11/16), 80% (12/15), and 83.3% (15/18) reported less dyspareunia at 4, 8, 12, and 24 weeks, respectively. Dyspareunia Visual Analog Scale score significantly improved at weeks 12 (5.6, P = 0.011) and 24 (5.4, P = 0.004) compared with baseline (7.8). Two of the 4 patients who avoided sexual activity at baseline secondary to dyspareunia resumed and tolerated

  18. Muscle glycogen resynthesis, signalling and metabolic responses following acute exercise in exercise-trained pigs carrying the