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Sample records for floor muscle exercise

  1. Effect of pelvic floor muscle exercises on pulmonary function

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    Han, DongWook; Ha, Misook

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] This study aimed to determine the correlation between pelvic floor muscle strength and pulmonary function. In particular, we examined whether pelvic floor muscle exercises can improve pulmonary function. [Subjects] Thirty female college students aged 19?21 with no history of nervous or musculoskeletal system injury were randomly divided into experimental and control groups. [Methods] For the pulmonary function test, spirometry items included forced vital capacity and maximal volunta...

  2. Regular exercisers have stronger pelvic floor muscles than nonregular exercisers at midpregnancy.

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    Bø, Kari; Ellstrøm Engh, Marie; Hilde, Gunvor

    2018-04-01

    Today all healthy pregnant women are encouraged to be physically active throughout pregnancy, with recommendations to participate in at least 30 minutes of aerobic activity on most days of the week in addition to performing strength training of the major muscle groups 2-3 days per week and also pelvic floor muscle training. There is, however, an ongoing debate whether general physical activity enhances or declines pelvic floor muscle function. The objectives of the study were to compare vaginal resting pressure, pelvic floor muscle strength, and endurance in regular exercisers (exercise ≥30 minutes 3 or more times per week) and nonexercisers at midpregnancy. Furthermore, another objective was to assess whether regular general exercise or pelvic floor muscle strength was associated with urinary incontinence. This was a cross-sectional study at mean gestational week 20.9 (±1.4) including 218 nulliparous pregnant women, with a mean age of 28.6 years (range, 19-40 years) and prepregnancy body mass index of 23.9 kg/m 2 (SD, 4.0). Vaginal resting pressure, pelvic floor muscle strength, and pelvic floor muscle endurance were measured by a high-precision pressure transducer connected to a vaginal balloon. The International Consultation on Incontinence Questionnaire Urinary Incontinence Short Form was used to assess urinary incontinence. Differences between groups were analyzed using an independent-sample Student t test. Linear regression analysis was conducted to adjust for prepregnancy body mass index, age, smoking during pregnancy, and regular pelvic floor muscle training during pregnancy. The significance value was set to P ≤ .05. Regular exercisers had statistically significant stronger (mean 6.4 cm H 2 O [95% confidence interval, 1.7-11.2]) and more enduring (mean 39.9 cm H 2 Osec [95% confidence interval, 42.2-75.7]) pelvic floor muscles. Only pelvic floor muscle strength remained statistically significant, when adjusting for possible confounders. Pelvic floor

  3. Assessment of the effect of pelvic floor exercises on pelvic floor muscle strength using ultrasonography in patients with urinary incontinence: a prospective randomized controlled trial

    OpenAIRE

    Tosun, Ozge Celiker; Solmaz, Ulas; Ekin, Atalay; Tosun, Gokhan; Gezer, Cenk; Ergenoglu, Ahmet Mete; Yeniel, Ahmet Ozgur; Mat, Emre; Malkoc, Mehtap; Askar, Niyazi

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to evaluate whether the effect of pelvic floor exercises on pelvic floor muscle strength could be detected via ultrasonography in patients with urinary incontinence. [Subjects and Methods] Of 282 incontinent patients, 116 participated in the study and were randomly divided into a pelvic floor muscle training (n=65) group or control group (n=51). The pelvic floor muscle training group was given pelvic floor exercise training for 12 weeks. Both groups were ev...

  4. EFFECTIVENESS OF SWISS BALL VS FLOOR EXERCISES ON CORE MUSCLE STRENGTH IN ELITE CRICKETERS

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    K. Sai sudha

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Cricket is one of the most popular game in India played by men and women of all ages. The increased physical demands on the players may be associated with an increased risk of injuries. Core muscle strength is important to prevent risk of injuries in elite cricketers. The beginners in the cricket must have enough strength of core muscles, as core is the bridge between upper and lower limbs. So, it should be strong enough to prevent low back and lower limb injuries in cricketers. The aim is to determine the effectiveness of swiss ball exercises versus floor exercises on core muscle strength in elite cricketers. The objective is to study and compare the effectiveness of swiss ball exercises and floor exercises in elite cricketers in terms of back strength. Method: The total number of students in this study were 30 eilte cricketers between 16-25 years out of which 15 subjects were included each in floor exercise(n=15 and swiss ball group(n=15. Back strength was measured before and after the intervention of 6 weeks using isokinetic analyser. Results: After the analysis, the results revealed significant improvement of back strength in both the groups(p< 0.00. The swiss ball group showed significant results when compared with floor exercise group. Conclusion: Although the study showed beneficial results in both the groups, the results reflected that swiss ball group had better improvement of core muscle strength than the floor exercise group.

  5. A comparison between stabilization exercises and pelvic floor muscle training in women with pelvic organ prolapse

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    Nuriye Özengin

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: This study aimed to compare the effectiveness of stabilization exercises and pelvic floor muscle training in women with stage 1 and 2 pelvic organ prolapse. Materials and Methods: In a total 38 women with pelvic organ prolapse whose average age was 45.60 years, pelvic floor muscles were evaluated with electromyography, and prolapse with pelvic organ prolapse quantification system, and the quality of life with prolapse quality of life questionnaire. Afterwards, the subjects were divided into two groups; stabilization exercise group (n=19 and pelvic floor muscle training group (n=19. Stabilization exercise group were given training for 8 weeks, 3 times a week. Pelvic floor muscle training group were given eight-week home exercises. Each group was assessed before training and after eight weeks. Results: An increase was found in the pelvic muscle activation response in the 2 groups (p≤0.05. There was no difference in EMG activity values between the groups (p>0.05. A difference was found in the values Aa, Ba and C in subjects of each group (p≤0.05, and the TVL, Ap, Bp and D values of subjects in pelvic floor muscle training group (p≤0.05 in the before and after pelvic organ prolapse quantification system assessment, however, no difference was found between the groups (p≤0.05. A positive difference was found in the effect of prolapse sub parameter in each of the two groups, and in general health perception sub parameter in subjects of stabilization exercise group (p<0.05 in the prolapse quality of life questionnaire. Conclusions: It was concluded that both training programs increased the pelvic floor muscle strength, provided a decline in prolapse stages. Stabilization exercise has increased general health perception unlike home training, thus, these exercises can be added to the treatment of women with prolapse.

  6. A randomized clinical trial comparing pelvic floor muscle training to a Pilates exercise program for improving pelvic muscle strength.

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    Culligan, Patrick J; Scherer, Janet; Dyer, Keisha; Priestley, Jennifer L; Guingon-White, Geri; Delvecchio, Donna; Vangeli, Margi

    2010-04-01

    The purpose of this study is to determine whether a Pilates exercise program and a pelvic floor muscle-training (PFMT) program could provide similar improvements in pelvic muscle strength. Sixty-two women with little or no pelvic floor dysfunction were randomized to Pilates or PFMT. Each group had 24 biweekly 1-h sessions with either a physical therapist or Pilates instructor. Strength was measured via perineometry (cmH(2)O). Two questionnaires--pelvic floor distress inventory (PFDI-20) and pelvic floor impact questionnaire (PFIQ-7)--were also collected. At baseline, the Pilates and PFMT groups measured 14.9 +/- 12.5 and 12.5 +/- 10.4 cmH(2)O, respectively (p = 0.41). Both the Pilates and PFMT groups got stronger (6.2 +/- 7.5 cmH(2)O, p = 0.0002 and 6.6 +/- 7.4 cmH(2)O, p = 0.0002, respectively), with no difference between groups p = 0.85. PFIQ and PFDI scores improved from baseline but not between groups. Further study is required to determine if Pilates can actually treat pelvic floor dysfunction.

  7. Training in exercises for pelvic floor muscles of patients with an urinary incontinence after radical prostatectomy

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    P. V. Glybochko

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Training of muscles of a pelvic bottom under control of biofeedback is applied at 87 patients with an urinary incontinence after a radical prostatectomy. Biofeedback increases management and control of a pelvic floor. At good ability of management of muscles of a pelvic floor the median of restoration was 4 months. Without opportunity of management of muscles of pelvic floor restoration was 9.4 months.

  8. Training in exercises for pelvic floor muscles of patients with an urinary incontinence after radical prostatectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. V. Glybochko

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Training of muscles of a pelvic bottom under control of biofeedback is applied at 87 patients with an urinary incontinence after a radical prostatectomy. Biofeedback increases management and control of a pelvic floor. At good ability of management of muscles of a pelvic floor the median of restoration was 4 months. Without opportunity of management of muscles of pelvic floor restoration was 9.4 months.

  9. Efficacy of pelvic floor muscle training and hypopressive exercises for treating pelvic organ prolapse in women: randomized controlled trial

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    Bruno Teixeira Bernardes

    Full Text Available CONTEXT AND OBJECTIVE: Previous studies have shown that women with pelvic floor dysfunctions present decreased cross-sectional area (CSA of the levator ani muscle. One way to assess the effects of training programs is to measure the CSA of the muscle, using ultrasonography. The aim here was to evaluate the efficacy of pelvic floor muscle training and hypopressive exercises for increasing the CSA of the levator ani muscle in women with pelvic organ prolapse. DESIGN AND SETTING: Prospective randomized controlled trial at the Urogynecology outpatient clinic of Universidade Federal de São Paulo. METHODS: Fifty-eight women with stage II pelvic organ prolapse were divided into three groups for physiotherapy: a pelvic floor muscle training group (GI; a hypopressive exercise group (GII; and a control group (GIII. The patients underwent transperineal ultrasonographic evaluation using a transducer of frequency 4-9 MHz. The (CSA of the levator ani muscle was measured before physiotherapy and after 12 weeks of treatment. RESULTS: The groups were homogeneous regarding age, number of pregnancies, number of vaginal deliveries, body mass index and hormonal status. Statistically significant differences in CSA were found in GI and GII from before to after the treatment (P < 0.001, but not in relation to GIII (P = 0.816. CONCLUSIONS: The CSA of the levator ani muscle increased significantly with physiotherapy among the women with pelvic organ prolapse. Pelvic floor muscle training and hypopressive exercises produced similar improvements in the CSA of the levator ani muscle.

  10. Effects of pelvic floor muscle exercise on faecal incontinence in rectal cancer patients after stoma closure.

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    Lin, Y-H; Yang, H-Y; Hung, S-L; Chen, H-P; Liu, K-W; Chen, T-B; Chi, S-C

    2016-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of pelvic floor muscle exercise (PFME) on the faecal incontinence (FI) of rectal cancer patients following stoma closure. Participants were randomly distributed into an exercise group (n = 27) and non-exercise group (n = 26). An experimental design and longitudinal approach were implemented for data collection. Baseline data were collected at 1 day before discharge, and then PFME was taught before the patients were discharged from the hospital. We collected data and followed up with the patients at their pre-discharge visit and at 1, 2, 3, 6 and 9 months after discharge. The Cleveland Clinic Faecal Incontinence (CCI) score was used to measure patient outcome. PFME proved to effectively decrease the degree of FI in stoma closure recipients. The FI score of the exercise group significantly decreased from 8.37 to 2.27 after PFME compared with that of the non-exercise group (from 8.54 to 2.58). The generalised estimation equation tests showed that both group and time were significantly different. The tests also indicated that although PFME appeared to hasten the decline of incontinence, this effect was no longer detectable at 9 months; thus, it may be an effective intervention for FI when implemented up to half a year after discharge. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Pelvic floor muscle exercise therapy with myofeedback for women with stress urinary incontinence : A meta-analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Kruif, Yvette P.; Van Wegen, Erwin E.H.

    1996-01-01

    Involuntary urine loss can be a major social and hygienic problem for women suffering from stress urinary incontinence (SUI). A frequently applied treatment method for these women is pelvic floor muscle exercise therapy (PFE), either with or without EMG-biofeedback (myofeedback). This paper attempts

  12. Pelvic floor muscle exercises with or without electric stimulation and post-prostectomy urinary incontinence: a systematic review

    OpenAIRE

    Zaidan,Patrícia; Silva,Elirez Bezerra da

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Introduction: Urinary incontinence (UI) after prostatectomy is difficult to treat and causes profound adverse impacts on the individual's quality of life. The main clinical treatments available for post-prostatectomy UI consist of behavioral techniques and physical therapy techniques, such as exercises, electrical stimulation and biofeedback for pelvic floor muscles (PFMs). Objective: To investigate the effectiveness of PFM exercises with or without electrical stimulation for reduc...

  13. Effectiveness of adding voluntary pelvic floor muscle contraction to a Pilates exercise program: an assessor-masked randomized controlled trial.

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    Torelli, Luiza; de Jarmy Di Bella, Zsuzsanna Ilona Katalin; Rodrigues, Claudinei Alves; Stüpp, Liliana; Girão, Manoel João Batista Castello; Sartori, Marair Gracio Ferreira

    2016-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of adding voluntary pelvic floor muscle contraction (PFMC) to a Pilates exercise program in sedentary nulliparous women. Fifty-seven healthy nulliparous and physically inactive women were randomized to a Pilates exercise program (PEP) with or without PFMC. Forty-eight women concluded this study (24 participants for each group). Each woman was evaluated before and after the PEP, by a physiotherapist and an urogynecologist (UG). Neither of the professionals was revealed to them. This physiotherapist measured their pelvic floor muscle strength by using both a perineometer (Peritron) and vaginal palpation (Oxford Scale). The UG, who performed 3D perineal ultrasound examinations, collected their data and evaluated the results for pubovisceral muscle thickness and the levator hiatus area (LA). Both professionals were blinded to the group allocation. The protocol for both groups consisted of 24 bi-weekly 1-h individual sessions of Pilates exercises, developed by another physiotherapist who specializes in PFM rehabilitation and the Pilates technique. The PEP+ PFMC group showed significantly greater strength improvements than the PEP group when comparing the Oxford scale, vaginal pressure and pubovisceral muscle thickness during contraction measurements at baseline and post-treatment. Our findings suggest that adding a voluntary PFMC to a Pilates exercise program is more effective than Pilates alone in improving PFM strength in sedentary nulliparous women.

  14. Awareness and timing of pelvic floor muscle contraction, pelvic exercises and rehabilitation of pelvic floor in lifelong premature ejaculation: 5 years experience

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    Giuseppe La Pera

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To assess the cure rate of patients with premature ejaculation who underwent a treatment involving: 1 awareness of the pelvic floor muscles 2 learning the timing of execution and maintenance of contraction of the pelvic floor muscles during the sensation of the pre-orgasmic phase 3 pelvic floor rehabilitation (bio feed back, pelvic exercises and electrostimulation. Materials and methods: We recruited 78 patients with lifelong premature ejaculation who completed the training. The patients were informed of the role of the pelvic floor. They were taught to carry out the execution and maintenance of contraction of the pelvic floor muscles during the sensation of the pre-orgasmic phase to control the ejaculatory reflex. In order to improve the awareness, the tone and the endurance of the pelvic floor muscles, patients were treated with the rehabilitation of pelvic floor (RPF consisting mainly in biofeedback, pelvic exercises and in some cases also in electro-stimulation (ES. The training was carried out for a period of about 2-6 months with an average of 2-5 visits per cycle. Results: 54% of patients who completed the training were cured of premature ejaculation and learned over time to be able to postpone the ejaculation reflex. In a subgroup of 26 patients was also measured the IELT which on the average increased from < 2 minutes to >10 minutes. The best results occurred mainly in patients aged less than 35 where the cure rate was 65%. There were no side effects. Conclusions: In this study, approximately half of patients with premature ejaculation were cured after applying the above treatment.This therapy, necessitates a fairly long period of time (2-6 months and a great commitment on the part of the patient, nevertheless it can be a valid and effective treatment for patients with premature ejaculation. This treatment makes the patient independent in that he is not bound to specific times for taking medication. Furthermore there are no

  15. Effects of Pelvic Floor Muscle Exercise on Urinary Incontinence in Elderly Women With Cognitive Impairment

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    Bo Ae Lee

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose Pelvic floor muscle exercise (PFME is a therapeutic option for urinary incontinence (UI. However, studies of the efficacy of PFME on UI in patients with cognitive impairment (CI are lacking. Therefore, we evaluated the effect of PFME on UI in elderly women with mild CI. Methods A total of 150 women with mild CI or Alzheimer disease and UI were screened using the International Consultation on Incontinence Questionnaire-Short Form (ICIQ-SF. Cognitive function and behavioral symptoms were evaluated by the Mini-Mental State Examination and Barthel’s Activities of Daily Living. The patients were randomly divided into a control group (n=46 and a PFME group (n=52, 6 sessions of PFME for 12 weeks. The primary outcome was the change in UI episodes measured with a frequency volume chart (FVC. The secondary outcomes were other FVC parameters and the ICIQ-SF scores. Results A total of 82 women (control group: 40 and PFME group: 42 completed the study. After 12 weeks of PFME, the mean number of UI episodes per 24 hours decreased by 1.6 (from 3.3 to 1.7 in the PFME group and by 0.5 (from 3.4 to 2.9 in the control group (P<0.001 between groups. The mean number of micturition episodes and total ICIQ-SF scores improved in the PFME group to a significantly greater extent than in the control group (P<0.001. Conclusions Supervised PFME can be a good therapeutic option for improving UI in elderly women with CI.

  16. Pelvic floor muscle exercises with or without electric stimulation and post-prostectomy urinary incontinence: a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrícia Zaidan

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction: Urinary incontinence (UI after prostatectomy is difficult to treat and causes profound adverse impacts on the individual's quality of life. The main clinical treatments available for post-prostatectomy UI consist of behavioral techniques and physical therapy techniques, such as exercises, electrical stimulation and biofeedback for pelvic floor muscles (PFMs. Objective: To investigate the effectiveness of PFM exercises with or without electrical stimulation for reducing post-prostatectomy UI. Methods: We included only randomized controlled trials (RCTs which used PFM exercises with or without electrical stimulation. The search was conducted in August of 2013 in the databases of the U.S. National Library of Medicine (MEDLINE, Scientific Electronic Library Online (SciELO, Physiotherapy Evidence Database (PEDro and Virtual Health Library (VHL. We searched for RCTs published between 1999 and 2013. As keywords for our search, we used the following descriptors from the Health Sciences Descriptors (DeCS: urinary incontinence, pelvic diaphragm, prostatectomy, pelvic floor exercises, electrostimulation and electrical stimulation. We also used the following descriptors from the Medical Subject Headings (MeSH: electrical stimulation, pelvic floor, urinary incontinence, prostatectomy, physiotherapy and exercise therapy. Results: Of the 59 RCTs found, 26 were excluded as duplicates, and 28 were excluded for not displaying a minimum score of 5.0 on the PEDro Scale, which left us with five RCTs. Conclusion: PFM exercises can be effective for treating UI after radical prostatectomy, especially if begun soon after surgery. Associating electrical stimulation with PFM exercises did not show additional benefit for treating urinary incontinence. However, the selected studies presented some methodological weaknesses that may have compromised their internal validity.

  17. Influence of a protocol of Pilates exercises on the contractility of the pelvic floor muscles of non-institutionalized elderly persons

    OpenAIRE

    Souza, Ligia Muniz de; Pegorare, Ana Beatriz Gomes de Souza; Christofoletti, Gustavo; Barbosa, Suzi Rosa Miziara

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Objective: To investigate the influence of a protocol of Pilates exercises on the functionality and contractility of the pelvic floor muscles (PFM) of older women living in the city of Campo Grande, Mato Grosso, Brazil. Method: Ten women (median age of 63.4±4.5 years) with little or no pelvic floor dysfunction were subjected to 24 sessions of Pilates exercises lasting one hour each, for 12 weeks. The pressure of the pelvic floor muscles (PFM) was assessed using a perineometer (cmH2...

  18. The impact of acute and chronic strenuous exercise on pelvic floor muscle strength and support in nulliparous healthy women.

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    Middlekauff, Monique L; Egger, Marlene J; Nygaard, Ingrid E; Shaw, Janet M

    2016-09-01

    Strenuous physical activity, which is known to increase intraabdominal pressure and theoretically places stress on the pelvic floor, may affect pelvic support in nulliparous women. The aims of this study were to: (1) examine the differences in maximal vaginal descent (MVD), vaginal resting pressure (VRP), and pelvic floor muscle strength (PFMS) between women who habitually perform strenuous exercise vs women who refrain from performing strenuous exercise; and (2) compare MVD, VRP, and PFMS before and immediately following physical activity in the strenuous and nonstrenuous groups separately. Participants were healthy nulliparous women ages 18-35 years who were habitual strenuous or nonstrenuous exercisers. Women in the strenuous group participated in CrossFit (CrossFit, Inc., Washington, DC) at least 3 days per week for at least 6 months. We assessed anthropometric and body composition values using standardized procedures. Participants completed the Pelvic Organ Prolapse Quantification examination and pelvic muscle strength assessment before and again within 15 minutes of completing exercise (CrossFit for the strenuous group and self-paced walking for the nonstrenuous). A research nurse masked to study group assignment recorded MVD, defined as the greatest value of anterior, posterior, or apical support, and VRP and PFMS using a perineometer. Maximal PFMS was recorded as the highest pressure measured in 3 vaginal contraction trials. Data were analyzed using parametric and nonparametric tests as appropriate. P < .05 was considered significant. Seventy nulliparous women participated in the study, 35 in each group. The mean age was 24.77 ± 4.3 years. Compared to the nonstrenuous group, strenuous participants were heavier (64.70 ± 7.78 kg vs 60.6 ± 8.99 kg, P = .027), had lower percent body fat (23.36 ± 5.88% vs 27.55 ± 7.07%, P = .003), and had higher handgrip strength (20.78 ± 5.97 kg vs 16.04 ± 11.04 kg, P = .001). Before exercise, there were no

  19. A Pilates exercise program with pelvic floor muscle contraction: Is it effective for pregnant women? A randomized controlled trial.

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    Dias, Naiara T; Ferreira, Letícia R; Fernandes, Mariana G; Resende, Ana Paula M; Pereira-Baldon, Vanessa S

    2018-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of a Pilates exercise program with pelvic floor muscle (PFM) contraction compared to a conventional intervention in pregnant women. Fifty primiparous women, without gestational alterations, were randomized to the Pilates group (n = 25) and control group (n = 25). Interventions for both groups consisted of twice-weekly sessions of 1 h each during the period between the 14-16th and 32-34th gestational weeks. The Pilates group performed a Pilates exercises program with the addition of voluntary PFM contraction. Mat-based Pilates exercises were performed involving movement of the upper limbs, lower limbs and trunk in all sessions. The Control group walked for 10 min and performed strengthening exercises of the lower limbs, upper limbs, and trunk with resistance from an elastic band and body weight. Each woman was evaluated by an unblinded physiotherapist before and after intervention for primary (PFM strength using a manometer) and secondary (PFM strength using Oxford Scale, endurance and repeatability) outcomes. Covariance analysis (ANCOVA) was used to compare the groups using the baseline values as a covariate. Thirty-six women were included in the analysis. There were no differences between the groups for manometry. An increase in the PFM strength, endurance, and repeatability was only observed in the Pilates group. In addition, the Pilates group showed greater adherence to the intervention. Pilates exercise program with PFM contraction is not able to change the PFM strength assessed by manometer in pregnant women, but it improved adherence to the intervention. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Assessing prevalence of urinary incontinence in Scottish fitness instructors and experience of teaching pelvic floor muscle exercises: an online survey.

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    Stephen, Kate; van Woerden, Hugo; MacRury, Sandra

    2018-06-18

    The aim of this study was to assess the prevalence of urinary incontinence in fitness instructors, experience of teaching pelvic floor muscle exercises (PFME), and attitudes to incorporating such exercises into classes. An online survey was undertaken of fitness instructors working in Scotland based on the Urinary Incontinence Short Form (ICIQ-UI). The survey was at least partially completed by 106, of whom 73.6% (53/72) were female and 52.8% (38/72) were in the 35-54 years age group. Prevalence of UI was 28.2% (24/85), and severity based on ICIQ-UI scores was 'slight' 65.2% (15/23), or 'moderate' in 26.1% (6/23). Leakage of urine was associated with physical activity in 36% (9/25), of whom 31.8% (7/22) had not taken actions to reduce the impact, and 86.4% (19/22) had not sought professional advice or treatment. There was widespread willingness to incorporate PFME into classes if given appropriate training 86.1% (62/72), and 67.1% (49/73) would be happy to recommend a PFME app. A significant proportion of fitness instructors are in need of PFME and those who perform PFME do so at a level below that which is recommended. However, many have had some training on PFME or are willing to provide this.

  1. There is not yet strong evidence that exercise regimens other than pelvic floor muscle training can reduce stress urinary incontinence in women: a systematic review.

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    Bø, Kari; Herbert, Robert D

    2013-09-01

    What evidence is there for alternative exercises to specific pelvic floor muscle training for treatment of stress urinary incontinence in women? A systematic review was conducted with searches of PubMed and PEDro to January 2013. The quality of randomised trials was evaluated using the PEDro scale. Each type of exercise was classified as being in a Development Phase, Testing Phase, or Refinement and Dissemination Phase. Women with stress or mixed urinary incontinence with predominantly stress urinary incontinence. Exercise regimens other than pelvic floor muscle training. The primary outcome was urinary leakage. Seven randomised controlled trials were found: three on abdominal training, two on the Paula method, and two on Pilates exercise. The methodological quality score ranged between 4 and 8 with a mean of 5.7. There was no convincing evidence for the effect of these exercise regimens so they remain in the Testing Phase. Because no randomised trials were found for posture correction, breathing exercise, yoga, Tai Chi, and general fitness training, these were classified as being in the Development Phase. There is not yet strong evidence that alternative exercise regimens can reduce urinary leakage in women with stress urinary incontinence. Alternative exercise regimens should not yet be recommended for use in clinical practice for women with stress urinary incontinence. Copyright © 2013 Australian Physiotherapy Association. Published by .. All rights reserved.

  2. The Effect of Commonly Performed Exercises on the Levator Hiatus Area and the Length and Strength of Pelvic Floor Muscles in Postpartum Women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siff, Lauren N; Hill, Audra J; Walters, Samantha J; Walters, Ginny; Walters, Mark D

    2018-05-02

    The aim oft his study was to compare the effects of 10 common exercises to traditional pelvic floor muscle (PFM) contractions (Kegel) on levator hiatus (LH) area and PFM length and strength. This is a cross-sectional study of 15 healthy postpartum women. Ten exercises were studied. These were common variations of leg, core, and back exercises used in yoga, Pilates, strength training, and physical therapy. Each participant performed all 10 exercises at a single visit in 2 examination settings: transperineal ultrasound and perineometry. Ultrasound measured the LH area and PFM length, and perineometry measured the muscle strength (peak squeeze pressure). Kegel generates an increase in squeeze pressure (24.3 cm H2O), shortens the muscles (-0.46 cm) and narrows the LH (-0.13 cm). The bird-dog and plank exercises were not different from Kegel in any measurement. While the leg-lift ultrasound dimensions are similar to Kegel, leg lifts generated peak squeeze pressures stronger than any other exercise (including Kegel). Whereas ultrasound dimensions were similar to Kegel, tucked and untucked squats and thigh adductions generated weaker contractions than Kegel. While crunch generated a squeeze pressure similar to Kegel, the ultrasound dimensions showed a significantly wider LH and longer muscle than Kegel. Bridge, clam, and plié exercises affected the PFMs differently than Kegel in all measures. Bird-dog, plank, and leg-lift exercises should be evaluated as alternative exercises to Kegel as they affect PFM strength and length and LH area similarly to Kegel, and leg lifts generate a stronger contraction than Kegel.

  3. Pelvic floor muscle function in women with pelvic floor dysfunction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tibaek, Sigrid; Dehlendorff, Christian

    2014-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to investigate the level of pelvic floor muscle (PFM) function in women with pelvic floor dysfunction (PFD) referred by gynaecologists and urologists for in-hospital pelvic floor muscle training (PFMT), and to identity associated factors for a low level of PFM...

  4. Searching for pelvic floor muscle exercises on YouTube: what individuals may find and where this might fit with health service programmes to promote continence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephen, Kate; Cumming, Grant P

    2012-09-01

    This paper describes the investigation, categorization/characterization and viewing of pelvic floor muscle exercises (PFME) on YouTube from the perspective of the 'wisdom of the crowd'. The aim of the research was to increase awareness of the type of clips that individuals are likely to come across when searching YouTube and to describe trends and popularity. This awareness will be useful for the design of continence promotion services, especially for hard-to-reach individuals. Web-based videos relating to PFE were identified by searching YouTube using the snowball technique. Main outcome measures Number of views; the approach taken (health, fitness, sexual and pregnancy); product promotion; and the use of music, visual cues and elements designed to encourage exercise. The number of views of each video was recorded at three points over a seven-month period. Twenty-two videos were identified. Overall these videos had been viewed over 430,000 times during the study period. One video was viewed over 100,000 times and overall the median increase in views was 59.4%. YouTube is increasingly used to access information about pelvic floor exercises. Different approaches are used to communicate PFME information but there are no formal structures for quality control. Further research is required to identify which elements of the video clips are effective in communicating information and in motivating exercise and to establish appropriate protocols. Kitemarking is recommended in order that women obtain correct advice.

  5. Comparison of changes in the mobility of the pelvic floor muscle on during the abdominal drawing-in maneuver, maximal expiration, and pelvic floor muscle maximal contraction

    OpenAIRE

    Jung, Halim; Jung, Sangwoo; Joo, Sunghee; Song, Changho

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to compare changes in the mobility of the pelvic floor muscle during the abdominal drawing-in maneuver, maximal expiration, and pelvic floor muscle maximal contraction. [Subjects] Thirty healthy adults participated in this study (15 men and 15 women). [Methods] All participants performed a bridge exercise and abdominal curl-up during the abdominal drawing-in maneuver, maximal expiration, and pelvic floor muscle maximal contraction. Pelvic floor mobility...

  6. Comparison of changes in the mobility of the pelvic floor muscle on during the abdominal drawing-in maneuver, maximal expiration, and pelvic floor muscle maximal contraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Halim; Jung, Sangwoo; Joo, Sunghee; Song, Changho

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to compare changes in the mobility of the pelvic floor muscle during the abdominal drawing-in maneuver, maximal expiration, and pelvic floor muscle maximal contraction. [Subjects] Thirty healthy adults participated in this study (15 men and 15 women). [Methods] All participants performed a bridge exercise and abdominal curl-up during the abdominal drawing-in maneuver, maximal expiration, and pelvic floor muscle maximal contraction. Pelvic floor mobility was evaluated as the distance from the bladder base using ultrasound. [Results] According to exercise method, bridge exercise and abdominal curl-ups led to significantly different pelvic floor mobility. The pelvic floor muscle was elevated during the abdominal drawing-in maneuver and descended during maximal expiration. Finally, pelvic floor muscle mobility was greater during abdominal curl-up than during the bridge exercise. [Conclusion] According to these results, the abdominal drawing-in maneuver induced pelvic floor muscle contraction, and pelvic floor muscle contraction was greater during the abdominal curl-up than during the bridge exercise.

  7. Is pilates as effective as conventional pelvic floor muscle exercises in the conservative treatment of post-prostatectomy urinary incontinence? A randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedriali, Fabiana Rotondo; Gomes, Cíntia Spagnolo; Soares, Larissa; Urbano, Mariana Ragassi; Moreira, Eliane Cristina Hilberath; Averbeck, Márcio Augusto; de Almeida, Silvio Henrique Maiade

    2016-06-01

    To verify the efficacy of a Pilates exercise program compared to conventional pelvic floor muscle exercise (PFME) protocol in the conservative treatment of post-prostatectomy urinary incontinence (PPUI). Baseline assessment was performed four weeks postoperatively and included 24 hr pad test, bladder diary, and the ICIQ-SF. Patients were randomised into three groups: Pilates (G1), PFME combined with anal electrical stimulation (G2), and a control group (G3). Both treatment groups had to perform 10 weekly treatment sessions. Primary outcomes were mean reduction of daily pads and mean reduction of ICIQ-SF score four months after surgery. The significance level was set at P  0.05). The control group differed from G1 in daily pad usage (P = 0.01) and ICIQ-SF score (P = 0.0073). Intergroup comparisons revealed that 57.7% of the volunteers in G1 and 50% of the individuals from G2 no longer used pads by the end of the treatment period (P = 0.57). In the control group, 22.6% were not using pads four months after surgery, with statistical difference compared to G1 (P Pilates exercise program proved to be as effective as conventional PFME to speed up continence recovery in PPUI. It also achieved a higher rate of fully continent patients when compared to the control group in the short-term. Neurourol. Urodynam. 35:615-621, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Muscle glycogenolysis during exercise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Richter, Erik; Ruderman, N B; Gavras, H

    1982-01-01

    glycogenolysis during exercise: contractions principally stimulate glycogenolysis early in exercise, and a direct effect of epinephrine on muscle is needed for continued glycogenolysis. In addition, epinephrine increased oxygen consumption and glucose uptake in both resting and electrically stimulated...

  9. [Evaluation of the electromyography activity of pelvic floor muscle during postural exercises using the Wii Fit Plus©. Analysis and perspectives in rehabilitation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steenstrup, B; Giralte, F; Bakker, E; Grise, P

    2014-12-01

    The aim of this work was to evaluate the effect of postural awareness by using the Wii Fit Plus© on the quality of the baseline (automatic) activity of the pelvic floor muscles (PFM) measured by intravaginal surface electromyography (sEMG). Four healthy continent female subjects, all able to perform a voluntary contraction, undertook 2 sets of 3 various exercises offered by the software Wii Fit Plus© using the Wii balance board© (WBB): one set without any visual control and the second set with postural control and sEMG visual feedback. Simultaneously, we recorded the sEMG activity of the PFM. Mean baseline activity of PFM in standing position at start was 2.87 mV, at submaximal voluntary contraction the sEMG activity raised at a mean of 14.43 mV (7.87-21.89). In the first set of exercises on the WBB without any visual feedback, the automatic activity of the PFM increased from 2.87 mV to 8.75 mV (7.96-9.59). In the second set, with visual postural and sEMG control, mean baseline sEMG activity even raised at 11.39 mV (10.17-11.58). Among women able of a voluntary contraction of PFM, visualisation of posture with the help of the WBB and of sEMG activity of the PFM during static and dynamic Wii Fit Plus© activities, may improve the automatic activation of the PFMs. 4. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  10. Morphological changes after pelvic floor muscle training measured by 3-dimensional ultrasonography: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braekken, Ingeborg Hoff; Hoff Braekken, Ingeborg; Majida, Memona; Engh, Marie Ellström; Bø, Kari

    2010-02-01

    To investigate morphological and functional changes after pelvic floor muscle training in women with pelvic organ prolapse. This randomized controlled trial was conducted at a university hospital and a physical therapy clinic. One hundred nine women with pelvic organ prolapse stages I, II, and III were randomly allocated by a computer-generated random number system to pelvic floor muscle training (n=59) or control (n=50). Both groups received lifestyle advice and learned to contract the pelvic floor muscles before and during increases in intraabdominal pressure. In addition the pelvic floor muscle training group did individual strength training with a physical therapist and daily home exercise for 6 months. Primary outcome measures were pelvic floor muscle (pubovisceral muscle) thickness, levator hiatus area, pubovisceral muscle length at rest and Valsalva, and resting position of bladder and rectum, measured by three-dimensional ultrasonography. Seventy-nine percent of women in the pelvic floor muscle training group adhered to at least 80% of the training protocol. Compared with women in the control group, women in the pelvic floor muscle training group increased muscle thickness (difference between groups: 1.9 mm, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.1-2.7, Ppelvic floor muscle stiffness. Supervised pelvic floor muscle training can increase muscle volume, close the levator hiatus, shorten muscle length, and elevate the resting position of the bladder and rectum. www.clinicaltrials.gov, NCT00271297. I.

  11. Pelvic Muscle Rehabilitation: A Standardized Protocol for Pelvic Floor Dysfunction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo Pedraza

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Pelvic floor dysfunction syndromes present with voiding, sexual, and anorectal disturbances, which may be associated with one another, resulting in complex presentation. Thus, an integrated diagnosis and management approach may be required. Pelvic muscle rehabilitation (PMR is a noninvasive modality involving cognitive reeducation, modification, and retraining of the pelvic floor and associated musculature. We describe our standardized PMR protocol for the management of pelvic floor dysfunction syndromes. Pelvic Muscle Rehabilitation Program. The diagnostic assessment includes electromyography and manometry analyzed in 4 phases: (1 initial baseline phase; (2 rapid contraction phase; (3 tonic contraction and endurance phase; and (4 late baseline phase. This evaluation is performed at the onset of every session. PMR management consists of 6 possible therapeutic modalities, employed depending on the diagnostic evaluation: (1 down-training; (2 accessory muscle isolation; (3 discrimination training; (4 muscle strengthening; (5 endurance training; and (6 electrical stimulation. Eight to ten sessions are performed at one-week intervals with integration of home exercises and lifestyle modifications. Conclusions. The PMR protocol offers a standardized approach to diagnose and manage pelvic floor dysfunction syndromes with potential advantages over traditional biofeedback, involving additional interventions and a continuous pelvic floor assessment with management modifications over the clinical course.

  12. Bioelectrical activity of the pelvic floor muscles after 6-week biofeedback training in nulliparous continent women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chmielewska, Daria; Stania, Magdalena; Smykla, Agnieszka; Kwaśna, Krystyna; Błaszczak, Edward; Sobota, Grzegorz; Skrzypulec-Plinta, Violetta

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the effects of a 6-week sEMG-biofeedback-assisted pelvic floor muscle training program on pelvic floor muscle activity in young continent women. Pelvic floor muscle activity was recorded using a vaginal probe during five experimental trials. Biofeedback training was continued for 6 weeks, 3 times a week. Muscle strenghtening and endurance exercises were performed alternately. SEMG (surface electromyography) measurements were recorded on four different occasions: before training started, after the third week of training, after the sixth week of training, and one month after training ended. A 6-week sEMG-biofeedback-assisted pelvic floor muscle training program significantly decreased the resting activity of the pelvic floor muscles in supine lying and standing. The ability to relax the pelvic floor muscles after a sustained 60-second contraction improved significantly after the 6-week training in both positions. SEMG-biofeedback training program did not seem to affect the activity of the pelvic floor muscles or muscle fatigue during voluntary pelvic floor muscle contractions. SEMG-biofeedback-assisted pelvic floor muscle training might be recommended for physiotherapists to improve the effectiveness of their relaxation techniques.

  13. [Comparison of pelvic floor muscle strength in competition-level athletes and untrained women].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ludviksdottir, Ingunn; Hardardottir, Hildur; Sigurdardottir, Thorgerdur; Ulfarsson, Gudmundur F

    2018-01-01

    Exercise can stress the pelvic floor muscles. Numerous women experience urinary incontinence while exercising or competing in sports. This study investigated pelvic floor muscle strength, urinary incontinence, and knowledge in contracting pelvic floor muscles among female athletes and untrained women. This was a prospective case-control study measuring pelvic floor muscle strength using vaginal pressure meas-urement. Participants answered questions regarding general health, urinary incontinence, and knowledge on pelvic floor muscles. Partici-pants were healthy nulliparous women aged 18-30 years, athletes and untrained women. The athletes had competed in their sport for at least three years; including handball, soccer, gymnastics, badminton, BootCamp and CrossFit. The women were comparable in age and height. The athletes (n=18) had a body mass index (BMI) of 22.8 kg/m² vs. 25 kg/m² for the untrained (n=16); p<0.05. The athletes trained on average 11.4 hours/week while the untrained women participated in some activity on average for 1.3 hours/week; p< 0.05. Mean pelvic floor strength was 45±2 hPa in the athletes vs. 43±4 hPa in the untrained; p=0.36 for whether the athletes were stronger. Of the athletes, 61.1% experienced urinary incontinence (n=11) compared with 12.5% of the untrained women (n=2); p<0.05. Incontinence usually occurred during high intensity exercise. The athletes were more knowledgeable about the pelvic floor muscles; p<0.05. There was not a significant difference in the strength of pelvic floor muscles of athletes and untrained women. This suggests that pelvic floor muscles are not strengthened during general training but require specific exercises. This holds especially for football, handball and sports with high physical intensity. Coaches need to pay special attention to training and strengthening women's pelvic floor muscles to reduce the occurrence of urinary incontinence.

  14. Pelvic Floor Muscle Training: Underutilization in the USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamin, Eliza; Parrillo, Lisa M; Newman, Diane K; Smith, Ariana L

    2016-02-01

    Pelvic floor disorders are highly prevalent in women of all ages and can greatly impair quality of life. Pelvic floor muscle training (PFMT) is a viable treatment option for several pelvic floor conditions including urinary incontinence and pelvic organ prolapse. PFMT is a program of therapy initiated by an experienced clinician (e.g., women's health or urology nurse practitioner (NP), physical therapist (PT)) that involves exercises for women with stress urinary incontinence (UI) and exercises combined with behavioral or conservative treatments (lifestyle changes, bladder training with urge suppression) for women with urgency or mixed UI. These exercise programs are more comprehensive than simple Kegel exercises. Despite evidence-based research indicating the efficacy and cost-effectiveness for treatment of urinary incontinence, PFMT is not commonly used as a first-line treatment in clinical practice in the USA (Abrams et al., 2012). This article will review PFMT for the treatment of UI and pelvic organ prolapse (POP) and theorize how this conservative therapy can be utilized more effectively in the USA.

  15. Is Pelvic Floor Muscle Training Effective for Men With Poststroke Lower Urinary Tract Symptoms?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tibaek, Sigrid; Gard, Gunvor; Dehlendorff, Christian

    2017-01-01

    The aim of the current study was to evaluate the effect of pelvic floor muscle training in men with poststroke lower urinary tract symptoms. Thirty-one poststroke men, median age 68 years, were included in this single-blinded randomized controlled trial. Thirty participants, 15 in each group......, completed the study. The intervention consisted of 3 months (12 weekly sessions) of pelvic floor muscle training in groups and home exercises. The effect was evaluated by the DAN-PSS-1 (Danish Prostate Symptom Score) questionnaire, a voiding diary, and digital anal palpation of the pelvic floor muscle...... that pelvic floor muscle training has an effect for lower urinary tract symptoms, although statistical significance was only seen for pelvic floor muscle....

  16. Exercising with blocked muscle glycogenolysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Tue L; Pinós, Tomàs; Brull, Astrid

    2018-01-01

    BACKGROUND: McArdle disease (glycogen storage disease type V) is an inborn error of skeletal muscle metabolism, which affects glycogen phosphorylase (myophosphorylase) activity leading to an inability to break down glycogen. Patients with McArdle disease are exercise intolerant, as muscle glycogen......-derived glucose is unavailable during exercise. Metabolic adaptation to blocked muscle glycogenolysis occurs at rest in the McArdle mouse model, but only in highly glycolytic muscle. However, it is unknown what compensatory metabolic adaptations occur during exercise in McArdle disease. METHODS: In this study, 8......-week old McArdle and wild-type mice were exercised on a treadmill until exhausted. Dissected muscles were compared with non-exercised, age-matched McArdle and wild-type mice for histology and activation and expression of proteins involved in glucose uptake and glycogenolysis. RESULTS: Investigation...

  17. Exercise-induced muscle modifications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kerviler, E. de; Willig, A.L.; Jehenson, P.; Duboc, D.; Syrota, A.

    1990-01-01

    This paper compares changes in muscle proton T2 after exercise in normal subjects and in patients with muscular glycogenoses. Four patients suffering from muscular glycogenosis and eight normal volunteers were studied. Muscle T2s were measured in forearm muscles at rest and after exercise, with a 0.5-T imager. The exercise was performed with handgrips and was evaluated by P-31 spectroscopy (end-exercise decrease in pH and phosphocreatine) performed with a 2-T magnet. In normal subjects, a relative T2 increase, ranging from 14% to 44%, was observed in the exercised muscles. In the patients, who cannot produce lactate during exercise, weak pH variation occurred, and only a slight T2 increase (7% - 9%) was observed

  18. Motor cortical representation of the pelvic floor muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schrum, A; Wolff, S; van der Horst, C; Kuhtz-Buschbeck, J P

    2011-07-01

    Pelvic floor muscle training involves rhythmical voluntary contractions of the external urethral sphincter and ancillary pelvic floor muscles. The representation of these muscles in the motor cortex has not been located precisely and unambiguously. We used functional magnetic resonance imaging to determine brain activity during slow and fast pelvic floor contractions. Cerebral responses were recorded in 17 healthy male volunteers, 21 to 47 years old, with normal bladder control. Functional magnetic resonance imaging was performed during metronome paced slow (0.25 Hertz) and fast (0.7 Hertz) contractions of the pelvic floor that mimicked the interruption of voiding. To study the somatotopy of the cortical representations, flexion-extension movements of the right toes were performed as a control task. Functional magnetic resonance imaging during pelvic floor contractions detected activity of the supplementary motor area in the medial wall and of the midcingulate cortex, insula, posterior parietal cortex, putamen, thalamus, cerebellar vermis and upper ventral pons. There were no significant differences in activation between slow and fast contractions. Toe movements involved significantly stronger activity of the paracentral lobule (ie the medial primary motor cortex) than did the pelvic floor contractions. Otherwise the areas active during pelvic floor and leg muscle contractions overlapped considerably. The motor cortical representation of pelvic floor muscles is located mostly in the supplementary motor area. It extends further ventrally and anteriorly than the representation of distal leg muscles. Copyright © 2011 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Association between preterm labour and pelvic floor muscle function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aran, Turhan; Pekgöz, Ipek; Bozkaya, Hasan; Osmanagaoglu, Mehmet A

    2018-03-23

    We hypothesised that the pressure on the cervix increases with advancing gestation and it may lead to a cervical shortening and cause preterm labour in women with weak pelvic floor muscles. The aim of this prospective study was to measure vaginal resting pressure and pelvic floor muscle strength in the first trimester of pregnancy and to investigate their effects on labour. A study was conducted on the pregnant women with a low risk for preterm birth. The pelvic floor muscle strength and vaginal resting pressure were assessed in 320 pregnant women at their first trimester with a vaginal pressure measurement device. Fifty-two pregnant women were hospitalised for tocolytic therapy because of spontaneous preterm labour. Thirty-two of them (10.2%) had a preterm delivery despite the tocolytic therapy. Both the vaginal resting pressure (p = .009, 95%CI: 0.8; 5.9) and the pelvic floor muscle strength (p = .01, 95%CI: 3.5; 13.1) were significantly lower in the women with a preterm labour. Impact statement What is already known on this subject? The pelvic floor muscles have an essential role in continence and provide support to the pelvic organs. They also have an impact on labour. The pelvic floor muscles should distend to allow the passage of the foetus during labour. The rotation and flexion of the foetal head is due to the pelvic floor resistance. The effect of a vaginal birth on the pelvic floor's function is readily understood. On the other hand, the effect of the pelvic floor muscle function on labour is still controversial. What do the results of this study add? This prospective study showed that there is a negative association between the pelvic floor muscle strength and preterm labour. This is the first clinical study indicating that weak pelvic floor muscles may cause a preterm labour. What are the implications of these findings for clinical practice and/or further research? Pelvic floor physical therapy may be an alternative preventive strategy to reduce

  20. Do stages of menopause affect the outcomes of pelvic floor muscle training?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tosun, Özge Çeliker; Mutlu, Ebru Kaya; Tosun, Gökhan; Ergenoğlu, Ahmet Mete; Yeniel, Ahmet Özgur; Malkoç, Mehtap; Aşkar, Niyazi; İtil, İsmail Mete

    2015-02-01

    The purpose of our study is to determine whether there is a difference in pelvic floor muscle strength attributable to pelvic floor muscle training conducted during different stages of menopause. One hundred twenty-two women with stress urinary incontinence and mixed urinary incontinence were included in this prospective controlled study. The participants included in this study were separated into three groups according to the Stages of Reproductive Aging Workshop staging system as follows: group 1 (n = 41): stages -3 and -2; group 2 (n = 32): stages +1 and -1; and group 3 (n = 30): stage +2. All three groups were provided an individual home exercise program throughout the 12-week study. Pelvic floor muscle strength before and after the 12-week treatment was measured in all participants (using the PERFECT [power, endurance, number of repetitions, and number of fast (1-s) contractions; every contraction is timed] scheme, perineometry, transabdominal ultrasound, Brink scale, pad test, and stop test). Data were analyzed using analysis of variance. There were no statistically significant differences in pre-exercise training pelvic floor muscle strength parameters among the three groups. After 12 weeks, there were statistically significant increases in PERFECT scheme, Brink scale, perineometry, and ultrasound values. In contrast, there were significant decreases in stop test and 1-hour pad test values observed in the three groups (P = 0.001, dependent t test). In comparison with the other groups, group 1 demonstrated statistically significant improvements in the following postexercise training parameters: power, repetition, speed, Brink vertical displacement, and stop test. The lowest increase was observed in group 2 (P menopause with pelvic floor muscle training, but the rates of increase vary according to the menopausal stage of the participants. Women in the late menopausal transition and early menopause are least responsive to pelvic floor muscle strength training

  1. PELVIC FLOOR MUSCLE TRAINING IN THE TREATMENT OF URINARY INCONTINENCE AFTER RADICAL PROSTATECTOMY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu. L. Demidko

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The incidence of urinary incontinence after radical prostatectomy is 0.8 to 87%. This category of patients has pelvic floor muscle weakness and reduced perineal reflex. The treatment of these patients uses a pelvic floor exercise system that is to enhance muscle tone and to develop strong reflex contraction in response to a sudden rise in intraabdominal pressure. Pelvic floor muscle training belongs to first-line therapy for urinary incontinence occurring within 6 to 12 months after prostatectomy. The ability to control pelvic floor muscle knowingly and to train them allows one not only to increase the closing capability of sphincter mechanisms, but also to suppress involuntary detrusor contractions. We used this method in 9 patients who had undergone radical prostatectomy. The duration of pelvic floor muscle training under control was up to 25 weeks. During this period, the symptoms of incontinence were relieved. No contraindications or adverse reactions have put this method in first-line therapy for post-prostatectomy urinary incontinence.

  2. PELVIC FLOOR MUSCLE TRAINING IN THE TREATMENT OF URINARY INCONTINENCE AFTER RADICAL PROSTATECTOMY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu. L. Demidko

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The incidence of urinary incontinence after radical prostatectomy is 0.8 to 87%. This category of patients has pelvic floor muscle weakness and reduced perineal reflex. The treatment of these patients uses a pelvic floor exercise system that is to enhance muscle tone and to develop strong reflex contraction in response to a sudden rise in intraabdominal pressure. Pelvic floor muscle training belongs to first-line therapy for urinary incontinence occurring within 6 to 12 months after prostatectomy. The ability to control pelvic floor muscle knowingly and to train them allows one not only to increase the closing capability of sphincter mechanisms, but also to suppress involuntary detrusor contractions. We used this method in 9 patients who had undergone radical prostatectomy. The duration of pelvic floor muscle training under control was up to 25 weeks. During this period, the symptoms of incontinence were relieved. No contraindications or adverse reactions have put this method in first-line therapy for post-prostatectomy urinary incontinence.

  3. Pelvic floor exercises during and after pregnancy: a systematic review of their role in preventing pelvic floor dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harvey, Marie-Andrée

    2003-06-01

    To review the literature on the origin, anatomical rationale, techniques, and evidence-based effectiveness of peripartum pelvic floor exercises (PFEs) in the prevention of pelvic floor problems including urinary and anal incontinence, and prolapse. Literature was reviewed for background information. MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, and proceedings of scientific meetings were searched for evidence-based data. A comprehensive literature search was performed to find all studies that involved the use of antepartum and/or postpartum PFEs. For the MEDLINE (1966 to 2002) and CINAHL (1980 to 2002) searches, the following key words were used: urinary incontinence (prevention and control, rehabilitation, therapy), fecal incontinence, exercise or exercise therapy, Kegel, muscle contraction, muscle tonus, muscle development, pelvic floor, pregnancy, puerperium, puerperal disorders. For the EMBASE (1980 to 2002) search, the following key words were used: micturition disorder (prevention, rehab, disease management, therapy), fecal incontinence, labour complication, pregnancy disorder, puerperal disorder, antepartum care, pregnancy, kinesiotherapy, exercise, pelvic floor, bladder. A manual search was performed of available abstracts presented at the annual scientific meetings of the International Continence Society (1997, 1999 to 2002), American Urogynecologic Association (1997 to 1998, 2000 to 2002), and International Urogynecological Association (1997, 1999 to 2002). Twelve studies evaluating the role of antepartum PFE were found, of which 3 randomized controlled trials (RCTs) comparing PFEs for the prevention of urinary incontinence to controls were included. Twelve studies evaluating postpartum PFEs for prevention of urinary incontinence were reviewed, of which 4 RCTs were included. Five studies evaluating postpartum PFEs for the prevention of anal incontinence were reviewed, of which 4 RCTs were included. Participants in the studies were primiparous women. DATA TABULATION AND

  4. Pelvic floor muscle thickness measured by perineal ultrasonography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bernstein, Inge Thomsen; Juul, N; Grønvall, S

    1991-01-01

    Pelvic floor muscle thickness was assessed in nine healthy female physiotherapists by perineal sonography. All measurements were performed as triple-measurements. The aims were to assess the reliability of the measurements and to establish a reference material. The muscle thickness at rest...

  5. Muscles, exercise and obesity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Bente K; Febbraio, Mark A

    2012-01-01

    During the past decade, skeletal muscle has been identified as a secretory organ. Accordingly, we have suggested that cytokines and other peptides that are produced, expressed and released by muscle fibres and exert either autocrine, paracrine or endocrine effects should be classified as myokines....... The finding that the muscle secretome consists of several hundred secreted peptides provides a conceptual basis and a whole new paradigm for understanding how muscles communicate with other organs, such as adipose tissue, liver, pancreas, bones and brain. However, some myokines exert their effects within...... the muscle itself. Thus, myostatin, LIF, IL-6 and IL-7 are involved in muscle hypertrophy and myogenesis, whereas BDNF and IL-6 are involved in AMPK-mediated fat oxidation. IL-6 also appears to have systemic effects on the liver, adipose tissue and the immune system, and mediates crosstalk between intestinal...

  6. Pelvic floor muscle strength in primiparous women according to the delivery type: cross-sectional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edilaine de Paula Batista Mendes

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objectives: to compare the pelvic floor muscle strength in primiparous women after normal birth and cesarean section, related to the socio-demographic characteristics, nutritional status, dyspareunia, urinary incontinence, perineal exercise in pregnancy, perineal condition and weight of the newborn. Methods: this was a cross-sectional study conducted after 50 - 70 postpartum days, with 24 primiparous women who underwent cesarean delivery and 72 who had a normal birth. The 9301 PeritronTM was used for analysis of muscle strength. The mean muscle strength was compared between the groups by two-way analysis of variance. Results: the pelvic floor muscle strength was 24.0 cmH2O (±16.2 and 25.4 cmH2O (±14.7 in postpartum primiparous women after normal birth and cesarean section, respectively, with no significant difference. The muscular strength was greater in postpartum women with ≥ 12 years of study (42.0 ±26.3 versus 14.6 ±7.7 cmH2O; p= 0.036 and in those who performed perineal exercises (42.6±25.4 11.8±4.9 vs. cmH2O; p = 0.010, compared to caesarean. There was no difference in muscle strength according to delivery type regarding nutritional status, dyspareunia, urinary incontinence, perineal condition or newborn weight. Conclusion: pelvic floor muscle strength does not differ between primiparous women based on the type of delivery. Postpartum women with normal births, with higher education who performed perineal exercise during pregnancy showed greater muscle strength.

  7. Impact of supervised physiotherapeutic pelvic floor exercises for treating female stress urinary incontinence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Míriam Raquel Diniz Zanetti

    Full Text Available CONTEXT AND OBJECTIVE: Urinary incontinence is a public health problem that affects more than 200 million people worldwide. Stress incontinence is the most prevalent type. Pelvic floor muscle exercises have been used for treating it, although there is no consensus regarding their application. The aim of this study was to compare the results from treating female stress urinary incontinence with pelvic floor muscle exercises with or without physiotherapist supervision. DESIGN AND SETTING: This was a randomized, prospective, controlled trial in the Urogynecology and Vaginal Surgery Sector, Universidade Federal de São Paulo. METHODS: Forty-four women were randomized to be treated for stress urinary incontinence with pelvic floor exercises for three consecutive months, into two groups: one with and the other without physiotherapist supervision. They were evaluated before and after treatment using a quality-of-life questionnaire, pad test, micturition diary and subjective evaluation. Descriptive analysis was used to evaluate the population. The homogeneity of the two groups was evaluated using the Kruskal-Wallis and Chi-squared tests. The success of the two groups after treatment was evaluated using the Wilcoxon test. RESULTS: The supervised group showed statistically greater improvement in the pad test, micturition diary and quality of life than did the control group. In the subjective evaluation, only 23.8% of the control group patients were satised with their treatment. In the supervised group, 66.8% of patients did not want any other treatment. CONCLUSION: Supervised pelvic floor muscle exercises presented better results in objective and subjective evaluations than did unsupervised exercises.

  8. Triglyceride metabolism in exercising muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watt, Matthew J; Cheng, Yunsheng

    2017-10-01

    Triglycerides are stored within lipid droplets in skeletal muscle and can be hydrolyzed to produce fatty acids for energy production through β-oxidation and oxidative phosphorylation. While there was some controversy regarding the quantitative importance of intramyocellular triglyceride (IMTG) as a metabolic substrate, recent advances in proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy and confocal microscopy support earlier tracer and biopsy studies demonstrating a substantial contribution of IMTG to energy production, particularly during moderate-intensity endurance exercise. This review provides an update on the understanding of IMTG utilization during exercise, with a focus on describing the key regulatory proteins that control IMTG breakdown and how these proteins respond to acute exercise and in the adaptation to exercise training. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Recent Advances in Lipid Droplet Biology edited by Rosalind Coleman and Matthijs Hesselink. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Pelvic floor muscle training for female urinary incontinence: Does it work?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Nilanjana; Rashid, Mumtaz; Bayliss, Lorna; Graham, Penny

    2016-06-01

    Supervised pelvic floor muscle training in patients of stress and mixed urinary incontinence has been recommended. Our aim was to assess the utilisation and effectiveness of our supervised pelvic floor muscle training service and assess the impact of incontinence scores before physiotherapy on the subsequent results of physiotherapy. All 271 patients referred to physiotherapy for symptoms of incontinence filled out the International Consultation on Incontinence Modular Questionnaire-Female Lower Urinary Tract Symptoms before starting treatment. Depending on pelvic floor muscle assessment, plans for exercises and follow up were made. If the strength of pelvic floor muscles was poor, electrical stimulation was offered. If awareness of the pelvic floor muscle contraction was poor, bio feedback was offered. Group sessions and vaginal cones were also used. Depending on the response to the treatment; patients were either discharged, referred to Urogynaecology clinic or continued physiotherapy. All patients who were discharged or referred for surgery were given a post treatment questionnaire to fill out. 79 (56 %) of 132 women with stress, 49 (51 %) of 98 with mixed and 27 (66 %) of 41 with urge incontinence reported successful control of symptoms (overall success 54 %). However, 65 % of women with incontinence scores of 0-5 before physiotherapy, 64 % with 6-10, 42 % with 11-15 and mere 28 % with 16-20 achieved success with physiotherapy. 27 (10 %) were lost to follow up. 1 in 2 women referred to physiotherapy for incontinence, achieved successful control of symptoms without the need for invasive investigations or surgery. However, poor incontinence scores before the start of physiotherapy is a poor prognostic indicator for success. 90 % women utilised the service.

  10. Effects of acute exercise on gene expression in exercising and non-exercising human skeletal muscle

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Catoire, Milene; Mensink, Marco; Boekschoten, Mark; Hangelbroek, Roland; Muller, Michael; Schrauwen, Patricht; Kersten, Sander

    2012-01-01

    Background: Exercising is know to have an effect on exercising skeletal muscle, but unkown is the effect on non-exercising skeletal muscle. Gene expression changes in the non-exercising skeletal muscle would point to a signalling role of skeletal muscle

  11. Assessment of pelvic floor muscles in women with deep endometriosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dos Bispo, Ana Paula Santos; Ploger, Christine; Loureiro, Alessandra Fernandes; Sato, Hélio; Kolpeman, Alexander; Girão, Manoel João Batista Castello; Schor, Eduardo

    2016-09-01

    To assess function and prevalence of spasms and trigger points of the pelvic floor muscles in women with deep endometriosis. One hundred and four (104) patients were assessed. Group 1 (G1) was composed of 52 subjects diagnosed with deep endometriosis proven by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI); Group 2 (G2) was composed of 52 women with no signs of endometriosis. Subjects from both G1 and G2 were seen at the Division of Pelvic Pain and Endometriosis and at Center for Prevention of Sexually Transmitted Diseases, both at Federal University of São Paulo (UNIFESP), respectively. A full physical therapy evaluation was carried out, including medical history, presence of dyspareunia and physical examination, which included detailed evaluation of pelvic floor muscles and occurrence of muscle spasm, trigger point and muscle function. The average age of the subjects in the study group was 36.4 and 30.9 years in the control group (p = 0.002). A greater prevalence of deep dyspareunia was found in the subjects in the endometriosis group when compared to the control group (p = 0.010). Women in G1 had higher prevalence of muscle spasms. In this group, 53.9 % had spasms-compared to only 17.3 % of women in G2 (p < 0.001). On the other hand, no significant difference between the groups (p = 0.153) was found while searching for the presence of trigger points. Women with deep endometriosis have increased prevalence of pelvic floor muscle spasms when compared to the control group.

  12. Transvaginal Pelvic Floor Muscle Injection Technique: A Cadaver Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Priyanka; Ehlert, Michael; Sirls, Larry T; Peters, Kenneth

    Women with pelvic floor dysfunction can have tender areas on vaginal examination, which can be treated with trigger-point injections. There are no publications to evaluate the accuracy of pelvic floor muscle injections. Trigger-point injections were performed on 2 fresh cadaveric pelvises using a curved nasal cannula guide and 7-in spinal needle. This was performed using our standard template of 2 sets of injections at the 1-, 3-, and 5-o'clock positions distally and proximally. The first pelvis was dissected to examine dye penetration. Based on these results, we modified our technique and repeated the injections on the second cadaver. We dissected the second pelvis and compared our findings. The 1-o'clock proximal and distal injections stained the obturator internus and externus near the insertion at the ischiopubic ramus. The 3-o'clock injections stained the midbody of the pubococcygeus and puborectalis. The distal 5-o'clock position was too deep and stained the fat of the ischiorectal space. The proximal 5-o'clock injection stained the area of the pudendal nerve. Our goal at the distal 5-o'clock position was to infuse the iliococcygeus muscle, so we shortened the needle depth from 2 to 1 cm beyond the cannula tip. In our second dissection, the distal 5-o'clock injection again stained only the fat of the ischiorectal space. This is the first study to characterize the distribution of pelvic floor muscle injections in a cadaver model and confirms the ability to deliver medications effectively to the pelvic floor muscles.

  13. Pelvic floor muscle thickness measured by perineal ultrasonography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bernstein, Inge Thomsen; Juul, N; Grønvall, S

    1991-01-01

    Pelvic floor muscle thickness was assessed in nine healthy female physiotherapists by perineal sonography. All measurements were performed as triple-measurements. The aims were to assess the reliability of the measurements and to establish a reference material. The muscle thickness at rest...... and at contraction was 9.4 +/- 0.8 mm and 11.5 +/- 1.1 mm respectively (mean +/- SD). Contraction increased the thickness by 2.2 +/- 0.8 mm or 23 +/- 8%. The intra- and inter observer standard deviation of the estimate was in the range of 4-6%. In conclusion, we find the reliability of the measurements acceptable....

  14. Pelvic floor muscle strength and sexual function in women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cinara Sacomori

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction : Pelvic floor (PF muscles react to sexual stimuli with increased local blood circulation and involuntary contractions during orgasm. The training of the PF musculature helps in the improvement of the female sexual function. Objective : To verify the association between PF muscle strength and sexual function in women, controlling age and parity. Method : Cross-sectional study based on associations. The study included women who attended a reference center in Florianópolis, Santa Catarina, for a uterine cancer smear test. The Functional Evaluation of the Pelvic Floor and the Female Sexual Function Index questionnaire were used. Statistical procedures included Mann-Whitney U tests, Spearman correlation and Poisson Regression Analysis, with p < .05. Results : The mean age of the women (n = 177 was 39.05 years (SD = 13.3. Regarding PF function, 53.7% of participants presented weak or not palpable PF muscle function. Women with "good" muscle function (able to maintain contraction under examiner's resistance had significantly better indexes of sexual desire, excitement, lubrication and orgasm than women with weak/poor function. We identified that 52.5% of the women presented sexual dysfunction. Women with "poor" PF function and aged over 50 years had, respectively, 1.36 (CI95% 1.01 - 1.82 and 1.77 (CI95% 1.41 - 2.23 higher prevalence of sexual dysfunction than women with "good" PF function. Conclusions : Adult women with better PF muscle function also presented better sexual function.

  15. Effect of an Exercise Protocol on Pelvic Muscle Resting Pressure in Healthy Adult Women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-01-01

    1988). Pelvic floor musculature exercises in treatment of anatomical urinary stress incontinence . Physical Therapy, 68(5), 652-655. Varney, H. (1987...muscle exercises. Perry, Hullett, and Bollinger (1988) treated 31 patients with urinary incontinence (73% female) using a take-home EMG perineometer...using physiotherapy alone. Tchou, Adams, Varner, and Denton (1988) investigated the effects of pelvic muscle exercise in the treatment of SUI. Fourteen

  16. Overactive pelvic floor muscles (OPFM): improving diagnostic accuracy with clinical examination and functional studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aw, Hau Choong; Ranasinghe, Weranja; Tan, Philip Huang Min; O'Connell, Helen E

    2017-07-01

    To identify the functional correlation of overactive pelvic floor muscles (OPFM) with cystoscopic and fluoroscopic urodynamic studies (FUDS), including urethral pressure measurements. Patients refractory to conservative therapy including bladder retraining, medications and pelvic muscle exercises for a variety of gamut of storage and voiding disorders were evaluated. Prospective data for 201 patients across both genders who underwent flexible cystoscopy and urodynamics for lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) refractory to conservative management between 01 Jan 2014 and 01 Jan 2016 was collected. Factors studied included history of LUTS, voiding patterns, physical examination, cystoscopic findings and functional studies, with maximum urethral closing pressure (MUCP). A total of 201 were patients recruited. The 85 were diagnosed with OPFM based on clinical presentation and presence of pelvic floor tenderness on examination. Significant differences were noted on functional studies with FUDS and urethral pressure measurement. Subjects with pelvic floor tenderness were found to have a higher (MUCP) at 93.1 cm H2O compared to 80.6 cm H2O (P=0.015). There are distinct characteristics of OPFM on clinical examination and functional studies, in particular MUCP. In patients refractory to conservative treatments, specific urodynamics tests are useful in sub-categorising patients. When OPFM is diagnosed, the impact on patient management is significant, and targeted intervention with pelvic floor physiotherapy is central in the multimodal approach of this complex condition.

  17. Urinary incontinence, pelvic floor dysfunction, exercise and sport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bø, Kari

    2004-01-01

    Urinary incontinence is defined as "the complaint of any involuntary leakage of urine" and is a common problem in the female population with prevalence rates varying between 10% and 55% in 15- to 64-year-old women. The most frequent form of urinary incontinence in women is stress urinary incontinence, defined as "involuntary leakage on effort or exertion, or on sneezing or coughing". The aim of this article is to systematically review the literature on urinary incontinence and participation in sport and fitness activities with a special emphasis on prevalence and treatment in female elite athletes. Stress urinary incontinence is a barrier to women's participation in sport and fitness activities and, therefore, it may be a threat to women's health, self-esteem and well-being. The prevalence during sports among young, nulliparous elite athletes varies between 0% (golf) and 80% (trampolinists). The highest prevalence is found in sports involving high impact activities such as gymnastics, track and field, and some ball games. A 'stiff' and strong pelvic floor positioned at an optimal level inside the pelvis may be a crucial factor in counteracting the increases in abdominal pressure occurring during high-impact activities. There are no randomised controlled trials or reports on the effect of any treatment for stress urinary incontinence in female elite athletes. However, strength training of the pelvic floor muscles has been shown to be effective in treating stress urinary incontinence in parous females in the general population. In randomised controlled trials, reported cure rates, defined as athletes than in other women. There is a need for more basic research on pelvic floor muscle function during physical activity and the effect of pelvic floor muscle training in female elite athletes.

  18. Exercise Promotes Healthy Aging of Skeletal Muscle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cartee, Gregory D; Hepple, Russell T; Bamman, Marcas M

    2016-01-01

    caused by diseases and lifestyle factors. Secondary aging can exacerbate deficits in mitochondrial function and muscle mass, concomitant with the development of skeletal muscle insulin resistance. Exercise opposes deleterious effects of secondary aging by preventing the decline in mitochondrial...... respiration, mitigating aging-related loss of muscle mass and enhancing insulin sensitivity. This review focuses on mechanisms by which exercise promotes "healthy aging" by inducing modifications in skeletal muscle....

  19. Experiences of incontinence and pelvic floor muscle training after gynaecologic cancer treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindgren, Anna; Dunberger, G; Enblom, A

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of the present study is to describe how gynaecological cancer survivors (GCS) experience incontinence in relation to quality of life, their possibilities for physical activity and exercise and their perceptions and experiences of pelvic floor muscle training. This qualitative interview content analysis study included 13 women (48-82 age) with urinary (n = 10) or faecal (n = 3) incontinence after radiation therapy (n = 2), surgery (n = 5) and surgery and radiation therapy (n = 6) for gynaecological cancer, 0.5-21 years ago. Symptoms related to incontinence and restrictions in daily activities reduced physical quality of life. Emotions related to incontinence reduced psychological quality of life and social and existential quality of life, due to restrictions in activity and feelings of exclusion. Practical and mental strategies for maintaining quality of life were described, such as always bringing a change of clothes and accepting the situation. Possibilities for sexual and physical activity as well as exercise were also restricted by incontinence. The women had little or no experience of pelvic floor muscle training but have a positive attitude towards trying it. They also described a lack of information about the risk of incontinence. The women were willing to spend both money and time on an effective treatment for their incontinence. Nine out of 10 were willing to spend at least 7 h a week. GCS experienced that incontinence reduced quality of life and limited possibilities for sexual and physical activity as well as exercise. Coping strategies, both practical and emotional, facilitated living with incontinence. The women had a positive attitude towards pelvic floor muscle training. Lack of information had a negative impact on their way of dealing with the situation.

  20. Do women with pelvic floor dysfunction referred by gynaecologists and urologists at hospitals complete a pelvic floor muscle training programme?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tibaek, Sigrid; Dehlendorff, Christian

    2013-01-01

    For decades women with pelvic floor dysfunction (PFD) have been referred to pelvic floor muscle training (PFMT), but there is only little information on whether the women complete the programmes and why. The objectives of this study were to investigate to which extent women completed a PFMT...

  1. The effects of surface condition on abdominal muscle activity during single-legged hold exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ha, Sung-min; Oh, Jae-seop; Jeon, In-cheol; Kwon, Oh-yun

    2015-02-01

    To treat low-back pain, various spinal stability exercises are commonly used to improve trunk muscle function and strength. Because human movement for normal daily activity occurs in multi-dimensions, the importance of exercise in multi-dimensions or on unstable surfaces has been emphasized. Recently, a motorized rotating platform (MRP) for facilitating multi-dimensions dynamic movement was introduced for clinical use. However, the abdominal muscle activity with this device has not been reported. The purpose of this study was to compare the abdominal muscle activity (rectus abdominis, external and internal oblique muscles) during an active single-leg-hold (SLH) exercise on a floor (stable surface), foam roll, and motorized rotating platform (MRP). Thirteen healthy male subjects participated in this study. Using electromyography, the abdominal muscle activity was measured while the subjects performed SLH exercises on floor (stable surface), foam roll, and MRP. There were significant differences in the abdominal muscle activities among conditions (P.05) (Fig. 2). After the Bonferroni correction, however, no significant differences among conditions remained, except for differences in both side IO muscle activity between the floor and foam roll conditions (padjexercises on a foam roll and MRP is more effective increased activities of both side of RA and IO, and Rt. EO compared to floor condition. However, there were no significant differences in abdominal muscles activity in the multiple comparison between conditions (mean difference were smaller than the standard deviation in the abdominal muscle activities) (padj>0.017), except for differences in both side IO muscle activity between the floor (stable surface) and foam roll (padj<0.017) (effect size: 0.79/0.62 (non-supporting/supporting leg) for foam-roll versus floor). Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Muscle function of the pelvic floor in healthy, puerperal women with pelvic floor dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro-Pardiñas, M A; Torres-Lacomba, M; Navarro-Brazález, B

    2017-05-01

    To understand the function of the pelvic floor muscles (PFM) at different ages in healthy women and in puerperal women with pelvic floor dysfunctions (PFD) and to ascertain whether there are differences among them. A descriptive cross-sectional study was conducted between June 2014 and September 2016 and included 177 women, 70 of whom had no symptoms of PFD, 53 primiparous mothers in late postpartum and 54 with PFD. The function of the PFM was measured through vaginal palpation (quality of the contraction); manometry (force); dynamometer (tone, strength, and response to stretching), and surface electromyography (neuromuscular activity and resistance). The healthy women showed superior values for PFM tone, maximum strength, neuromuscular activity and resistance than the puerperal mothers and the women with PFD (P.05). The muscle function of the healthy women did not vary significantly with age, except in the case of tone, which was lower in the women older than 46 years (P=.004). Age and births decrease the baseline tone of the PFM in healthy women. Therefore, lower strength, resistance and neuromuscular activity appear to be the main difference between the PFM of women with PFD and the PFM of healthy women. Copyright © 2016 AEU. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  3. Exercise in muscle glycogen storage diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Preisler, Nicolai Rasmus; Haller, Ronald G; Vissing, John

    2015-01-01

    exercise program has the potential to improve general health and fitness and improve quality of life, if executed properly. In this review, we describe skeletal muscle substrate use during exercise in GSDs, and how blocks in metabolic pathways affect exercise tolerance in GSDs. We review the studies...... that have examined the effect of regular exercise training in different types of GSD. Finally, we consider how oral substrate supplementation can improve exercise tolerance and we discuss the precautions that apply to persons with GSD that engage in exercise.......Glycogen storage diseases (GSD) are inborn errors of glycogen or glucose metabolism. In the GSDs that affect muscle, the consequence of a block in skeletal muscle glycogen breakdown or glucose use, is an impairment of muscular performance and exercise intolerance, owing to 1) an increase...

  4. Exercise in muscle glycogen storage diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preisler, Nicolai; Haller, Ronald G; Vissing, John

    2015-05-01

    Glycogen storage diseases (GSD) are inborn errors of glycogen or glucose metabolism. In the GSDs that affect muscle, the consequence of a block in skeletal muscle glycogen breakdown or glucose use, is an impairment of muscular performance and exercise intolerance, owing to 1) an increase in glycogen storage that disrupts contractile function and/or 2) a reduced substrate turnover below the block, which inhibits skeletal muscle ATP production. Immobility is associated with metabolic alterations in muscle leading to an increased dependence on glycogen use and a reduced capacity for fatty acid oxidation. Such changes may be detrimental for persons with GSD from a metabolic perspective. However, exercise may alter skeletal muscle substrate metabolism in ways that are beneficial for patients with GSD, such as improving exercise tolerance and increasing fatty acid oxidation. In addition, a regular exercise program has the potential to improve general health and fitness and improve quality of life, if executed properly. In this review, we describe skeletal muscle substrate use during exercise in GSDs, and how blocks in metabolic pathways affect exercise tolerance in GSDs. We review the studies that have examined the effect of regular exercise training in different types of GSD. Finally, we consider how oral substrate supplementation can improve exercise tolerance and we discuss the precautions that apply to persons with GSD that engage in exercise.

  5. EFFECTIVENESS OF FLOOR EXERCISES VERSES BALL EXERCISES ON SPINAL MOBILITY IN SPASTIC DIPLEGIC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sumitra Sakhawalkar

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: The objective of this present study was to determine the Effectiveness of Floor Exercises versus Ball Exercises on spinal mobility in Spastic Diplegic. Methods: Institutional ethical committee permission was taken before starting the study. A sample of 70 Diplegic CP children was screened, and 40 meeting the inclusion criteria were selected for study were then randomly divided into two groups one control other experimental i.e. 20 in each group by chit method. Both the groups were assessed with spinal goniometry using Tape measurements for Thoracolumbar spine and Modified Schober's Test (MMSTbefore and after the treatment. Control group were given Floor exercise on a mat, and Swiss ball was giving experimental group Ball exercises for ten repetitions with 10-second hold, treatment time was 40 min per session for 3days per week for six weeks. Same sustained stretching technique for both groups in bilateral lower extremities for ten repetitions with 30 sec hold was given for, TA, Iliopsoas, Hamstrings, Hip Adductor, Rectus femoris. Result: Significant improvement was noted in the Intra-group comparison of both the groups from baseline to post six weeks of intervention p-value 0.001*** in both groups, and the Intergroup analysis using with tape measurements for Thoracolumbar spine (p-value and MMST (p-value 0.133NS. Conclusion: The present study concludes that there is a similar effect of both Floor Exercises versus Ball Exercises on spinal mobility in Spastic Diplegic.

  6. Pelvic floor exercises with biofeedback for stress urinary incontinence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria V. Capelini

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Prospective study to objectively evaluate the benefits of pelvic floor strengthening exercises associated to biofeedback for the treatment of stress urinary incontinence. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Fourteen patients diagnosed with stress urinary incontinence (SUI were selected for this study. All patients underwent a pelvic floor training associated to biofeedback for 12 consecutive weeks. Urodynamic tests, pad test and bladder diary were analyzed at the beginning of the study, at the end and after 3 months. The King's Health Questionnaire (KHQ was applied before and after treatment to assess the impact in the quality of life. RESULTS: There was a significant reduction in the pad weight (from 14.21 g to 1 g, number of urinary leakage episodes (from 8.14 per day to 2.57 per day and daytime frequency (from 7.93 per day to 5.85 per day. At urodynamics the authors observed a significant increase in Valsalva leak-point pressure (from 103.93 cm H2O to 139.14 cm H2O, cistometric capacity (from 249.29 mL to 336.43 mL, p = 0.0015 and bladder volume at first desire to void (from 145 mL to 215.71 mL. Those differences were kept during the first 3 months of follow up. The KHQ revealed significant differences except in the case of "general health perception", which covers health in general and not exclusively urinary incontinence. CONCLUSION: Treatment of SUI with pelvic floor exercises associated to biofeedback caused significant changes in the parameters analyzed, with maintenance of good results 3 months after treatment.

  7. Muscle glycogen synthesis before and after exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivy, J L

    1991-01-01

    The importance of carbohydrates as a fuel source during endurance exercise has been known for 60 years. With the advent of the muscle biopsy needle in the 1960s, it was determined that the major source of carbohydrate during exercise was the muscle glycogen stores. It was demonstrated that the capacity to exercise at intensities between 65 to 75% VO2max was related to the pre-exercise level of muscle glycogen, i.e. the greater the muscle glycogen stores, the longer the exercise time to exhaustion. Because of the paramount importance of muscle glycogen during prolonged, intense exercise, a considerable amount of research has been conducted in an attempt to design the best regimen to elevate the muscle's glycogen stores prior to competition and to determine the most effective means of rapidly replenishing the muscle glycogen stores after exercise. The rate-limiting step in glycogen synthesis is the transfer of glucose from uridine diphosphate-glucose to an amylose chain. This reaction is catalysed by the enzyme glycogen synthase which can exist in a glucose-6-phosphate-dependent, inactive form (D-form) and a glucose-6-phosphate-independent, active form (I-form). The conversion of glycogen synthase from one form to the other is controlled by phosphorylation-dephosphorylation reactions. The muscle glycogen concentration can vary greatly depending on training status, exercise routines and diet. The pattern of muscle glycogen resynthesis following exercise-induced depletion is biphasic. Following the cessation of exercise and with adequate carbohydrate consumption, muscle glycogen is rapidly resynthesised to near pre-exercise levels within 24 hours. Muscle glycogen then increases very gradually to above-normal levels over the next few days. Contributing to the rapid phase of glycogen resynthesis is an increase in the percentage of glycogen synthase I, an increase in the muscle cell membrane permeability to glucose, and an increase in the muscle's sensitivity to insulin

  8. Regulation of skeletal muscle glycogenolysis during exercise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hargreaves, M; Richter, Erik

    1988-01-01

    Muscle-glycogen breakdown during exercise is influenced by both local and systemic factors. Contractions per se increase glycogenolysis via a calcium-induced, transient increase in the activity of phosphorylase a, and probably also via increased concentrations of Pi. In fast-twitch muscle...... in contracting muscle by increasing the phosphorylase a activity via increased cyclic AMP production. The availability of blood-borne substrates may also influence muscle glycogenolysis and, therefore, exercise performance......., increases in the AMP and IMP levels may increase phosphorylase activity. The rate of muscle-glycogen breakdown during exercise depends on the pre-exercise glycogen concentration and is also influenced by hormones. Insulin may inhibit glycogen breakdown, whereas epinephrine enhances the rate of glycogen use...

  9. The pelvic floor muscles: muscle thickness in healthy and urinary-incontinent women measured by perineal ultrasonography with reference to the effect of pelvic floor training. Estrogen receptor studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bernstein, Inge Thomsen

    1997-01-01

    demonstrated that the striated periurethral muscles and the pelvic floor muscles are of paramount importance for the closure function. This emphasizes the importance of well-functioning pelvic floor muscles to obtain continence, and probably explains the rationale for the effect of pelvic floor training...... in treating urinary incontinence. This study presents a review of the literature on female urinary incontinence, continence mechanisms, pelvic floor muscles, and pelvic floor training. Furthermore, a review of the literature on estrogen receptors in the pelvic floor muscles is given. Perineal ultrasonography...... the effect of pelvic floor training. Additionally, a study of the Pelvic floor muscles was performed to assess the presence of estrogen receptors. Muscle thickness seems to decrease with age. In women over age 60 years, a significantly thinner pelvic floor muscle was found compared to younger women...

  10. Core Muscle Activation in Suspension Training Exercises.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cugliari, Giovanni; Boccia, Gennaro

    2017-02-01

    A quantitative observational laboratory study was conducted to characterize and classify core training exercises executed in a suspension modality on the base of muscle activation. In a prospective single-group repeated measures design, seventeen active male participants performed four suspension exercises typically associated with core training (roll-out, bodysaw, pike and knee-tuck). Surface electromyographic signals were recorded from lower and upper parts of rectus abdominis, external oblique, internal oblique, lower and upper parts of erector spinae muscles using concentric bipolar electrodes. The average rectified values of electromyographic signals were normalized with respect to individual maximum voluntary isometric contraction of each muscle. Roll-out exercise showed the highest activation of rectus abdominis and oblique muscles compared to the other exercises. The rectus abdominis and external oblique reached an activation higher than 60% of the maximal voluntary contraction (or very close to that threshold, 55%) in roll-out and bodysaw exercises. Findings from this study allow the selection of suspension core training exercises on the basis of quantitative information about the activation of muscles of interest. Roll-out and bodysaw exercises can be considered as suitable for strength training of rectus abdominis and external oblique muscles.

  11. Preventing Urinary Incontinence With Supervised Prenatal Pelvic Floor Exercises: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fritel, Xavier; de Tayrac, Renaud; Bader, Georges; Savary, Denis; Gueye, Ameth; Deffieux, Xavier; Fernandez, Hervé; Richet, Claude; Guilhot, Joëlle; Fauconnier, Arnaud

    2015-08-01

    To compare, in an unselected population of nulliparous pregnant women, the postnatal effect of prenatal supervised pelvic floor muscle training with written instructions on postpartum urinary incontinence (UI). In a randomized controlled trial in two parallel groups, 282 women were recruited from five university teaching hospitals in France and randomized during the second trimester of pregnancy. The physiotherapy group received prenatal individually supervised exercises. Both groups received written instructions about how to perform exercises at home. Women were blindly assessed at baseline, end of pregnancy, and 2 and 12 months postpartum. The primary outcome measured was UI severity, assessed with an International Consultation on Incontinence Questionnaire-Urinary Incontinence Short Form score (range 0-21; 1-5 is slight UI) at 12 months postpartum; other outcomes were UI prevalence and pelvic floor troubles assessed using self-administered questionnaires. To give a 1-point difference in UI severity score, we needed 91 women in each group (standard deviation 2.4, α=0.05, β=0.20, and bilateral analysis). Between February 2008 and June 2010, 140 women were randomized in the physiotherapy group and 142 in the control group. No difference was observed between the two groups in UI severity, prevalence, or pelvic floor troubles at baseline, end of pregnancy, and at 2 and 12 months postpartum. At 12 months postpartum, the primary outcome was available for 190 women (67.4%); mean UI severity was 1.9 in the physiotherapy group compared with 2.1 in the control group (P=.38). Prenatal supervised pelvic floor training was not superior to written instructions in reducing postnatal UI. ClinicalTrials.gov; www.clinicaltrials.gov, NCT00551551. I.

  12. An education program about pelvic floor muscles improved women’s knowledge but not pelvic floor muscle function, urinary incontinence or sexual function: a randomised trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberta Leopoldino de Andrade

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Question: Does an educational program with instructions for performing ‘the Knack’ improve voluntary contraction of the pelvic floor muscles, reduce reports of urinary incontinence, improve sexual function, and promote women’s knowledge of the pelvic floor muscles? Design: Randomised, controlled trial with concealed allocation, intention-to-treat analysis and blinded assessors. Participants: Ninety-nine women from the local community. Intervention: The experimental group (n = 50 received one lecture per week for 4 weeks, and instructions for performing ‘the Knack’. The control group (n = 49 received no intervention. Outcome measures: The primary outcome was maximum voluntary contraction of the pelvic floor muscles measured using manometry. Secondary outcomes were: ability to contract the pelvic floor muscles measured using vaginal palpation; severity of urinary incontinence measured by the International Consultation on Incontinence Questionnaire-Short Form (ICIQ-SF scored from 0 to 21; self-reported sexual function; and knowledge related to the pelvic floor. Outcomes were measured at baseline and after 4 weeks. Results: The intervention did not significantly improve: maximum voluntary contraction (MD 2.7 cmH2O higher in the experimental group, 95% CI –0.5 to 5.9; ability to contract the pelvic floor muscles (RR 2.18, 95% CI 0.49 to 9.65; or self-reported severity of urinary incontinence (MD 1 point greater reduction in the experimental group, 95% CI –3 to 1. Sexual function did not significantly differ between groups, but very few of the women engaged in sexual activity during the study period. The educational program did, however, significantly increase women’s knowledge related to the location, functions and dysfunctions of the pelvic floor muscles, and treatment options. Conclusion: Education and teaching women to perform ‘the Knack’ had no significant effect on voluntary contraction of the pelvic floor muscles

  13. Skeletal muscle glucose uptake during exercise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rose, Adam John; Richter, Erik

    2005-01-01

    The increase in skeletal muscle glucose uptake during exercise results from a coordinated increase in rates of glucose delivery (higher capillary perfusion), surface membrane glucose transport, and intracellular substrate flux through glycolysis. The mechanism behind the movement of GLUT4...

  14. Contribution of pelvic floor muscles to stiffness of the pelvic ring

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pool-Goudzwaard, A.L.; Hoek van Dijke, G; van Gurp, M; Mulder, P; Snijders, C.J.; Stoeckart, R.

    2004-01-01

    STUDY DESIGN: A biomechanical study in embalmed specimens, on the relation between applied tension in the pelvic floor muscles, stiffness of the pelvic ring and generation of movement in the sacroiliac joints. OBJECTIVE: To gain insight into the effect of tension in the pelvic floor muscles on

  15. Synergism between abdominal and pelvic floor muscles in healthy women: a systematic review of observational studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lia Ferla

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction: The training of the pelvic floor muscles is widely used for treating pelvic floor dysfunctions, like urinary incontinence. During the training, abdominal contractions are avoided; however several studies support the use of the synergy between these muscle groups. Objective: Carrying out a systematic review of studies that seek to identify the presence of synergy between the muscles of the abdomen and the pelvic floor and its functionality in women without pelvic floor dysfunction. Methodology: To conduct the review, we have followed the recommendations proposed by the Cochrane Collaboration for systematic reviews. The literature search included the databases SCIELO, PEDro, MEDLINE, Cochrane CENTRAL and EMBASE, and manual research, the starting date of the databases until August 2013. We included cross observational studies with healthy women who were assessed to find the presence of synergy between the abdominal muscles and the pelvic floor. Results: We included 10 articles and they all showed the existence of synergy between the abdominal and pelvic floor muscles in healthy women in the supine, sitting and standing positions. Conclusion: Thus, we can conclude that there is synergy between the muscles of the abdomen and the pelvic floor in healthy women. Better understanding the behavior of these muscles and synergy may favor the development of strategies for the prevention and treatment of disorders of the female pelvic floor muscles.

  16. Muscle electrical activity during exercises with and without load executed on dry land and in an aquatic environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Indira Nayra Paz Santos

    Full Text Available Introduction Muscle activity in the aquatic environment was investigated using electromyographic analyses. The physical properties of water and the resistance used may influence the response of the muscle during exercise. The objective of this study was to evaluate the electrical activity in water and on the floor during flexion and knee extension exercises with and without load and aimed at understanding the muscular response while performing resistance exercises in water. Methods The sample consisted of 14 volunteers between 18 and 35 years old who were subjected to active exercises involving knee flexion and extension with and without load on the floor and in water. Electromyography was performed during the movement. Results A significant increase was found in the electrical activity of the rectus femoris muscle during exercises on the floor. The biceps femoris muscle showed increased electromyographic activity when resistance was used. A significant increase was found in the electrical activity of the rectus femoris muscle compared with exercises with and without load and the moment of rest in immersion. The electrical activity of the rectus and biceps femoris muscles was reduced in exercises with load and without load in a therapy pool compared with on the floor. Conclusion There was a reduction of the electromyographic activity in the aquatic environment compared with that on the ground, which could be attributed to the effects from hot water. Therefore, it is believed that resistance exercises can be performed early in a therapy pool, which will facilitate the prevention and treatment of musculoskeletal disorders.

  17. An education program about pelvic floor muscles improved women's knowledge but not pelvic floor muscle function, urinary incontinence or sexual function: a randomised trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Andrade, Roberta Leopoldino; Bø, Kari; Antonio, Flavia Ignácio; Driusso, Patricia; Mateus-Vasconcelos, Elaine Cristine Lemes; Ramos, Salvador; Julio, Monica Pitanguy; Ferreira, Cristine Homsi Jorge

    2018-04-01

    Does an educational program with instructions for performing 'the Knack' improve voluntary contraction of the pelvic floor muscles, reduce reports of urinary incontinence, improve sexual function, and promote women's knowledge of the pelvic floor muscles? Randomised, controlled trial with concealed allocation, intention-to-treat analysis and blinded assessors. Ninety-nine women from the local community. The experimental group (n=50) received one lecture per week for 4 weeks, and instructions for performing 'the Knack'. The control group (n=49) received no intervention. The primary outcome was maximum voluntary contraction of the pelvic floor muscles measured using manometry. Secondary outcomes were: ability to contract the pelvic floor muscles measured using vaginal palpation; severity of urinary incontinence measured by the International Consultation on Incontinence Questionnaire-Short Form (ICIQ-SF) scored from 0 to 21; self-reported sexual function; and knowledge related to the pelvic floor. Outcomes were measured at baseline and after 4 weeks. The intervention did not significantly improve: maximum voluntary contraction (MD 2.7 cmH 2 O higher in the experimental group, 95% CI -0.5 to 5.9); ability to contract the pelvic floor muscles (RR 2.18, 95% CI 0.49 to 9.65); or self-reported severity of urinary incontinence (MD 1 point greater reduction in the experimental group, 95% CI -3 to 1). Sexual function did not significantly differ between groups, but very few of the women engaged in sexual activity during the study period. The educational program did, however, significantly increase women's knowledge related to the location, functions and dysfunctions of the pelvic floor muscles, and treatment options. Education and teaching women to perform 'the Knack' had no significant effect on voluntary contraction of the pelvic floor muscles, urinary incontinence or sexual function, but it promoted women's knowledge about the pelvic floor. Brazilian Registry of Clinical

  18. Signalling role of skeletal muscle during exercise

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Catoire, M.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract

    Upon acute exercise skeletal muscle is immediately and heavily recruited, while other organs appear to play only a minor role during exercise. These other organs show significant changes and improvements in function, although they are not directly targeted by

  19. Exercise Promotes Healthy Aging of Skeletal Muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cartee, Gregory D; Hepple, Russell T; Bamman, Marcas M; Zierath, Juleen R

    2016-06-14

    Primary aging is the progressive and inevitable process of bodily deterioration during adulthood. In skeletal muscle, primary aging causes defective mitochondrial energetics and reduced muscle mass. Secondary aging refers to additional deleterious structural and functional age-related changes caused by diseases and lifestyle factors. Secondary aging can exacerbate deficits in mitochondrial function and muscle mass, concomitant with the development of skeletal muscle insulin resistance. Exercise opposes deleterious effects of secondary aging by preventing the decline in mitochondrial respiration, mitigating aging-related loss of muscle mass and enhancing insulin sensitivity. This review focuses on mechanisms by which exercise promotes "healthy aging" by inducing modifications in skeletal muscle. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. The exercised skeletal muscle: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marina Marini

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available The skeletal muscle is the second more plastic tissue of the body - second to the nervous tissue only. In fact, both physical activity and inactivity contribute to modify the skeletal muscle, by continuous signaling through nerve impulses, mechanical stimuli and humoral clues. In turn, the skeletal muscle sends signals to the body, thus contributing to its homeostasis. We'll review here the contribute of physical exercise to the shaping of skeletal muscle, to the adaptation of its mass and function to the different needs imposed by different physical activities and to the attainment of the health benefits associated with active skeletal muscles. Focus will primarily be on the molecular pathways and on gene regulation that result in skeletal muscle adaptation to exercise.

  1. Impact of vaginal parity and aging on the architectural design of pelvic floor muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alperin, Marianna; Cook, Mark; Tuttle, Lori J; Esparza, Mary C; Lieber, Richard L

    2016-09-01

    Vaginal delivery and aging are key risk factors for pelvic floor muscle dysfunction, which is a critical component of pelvic floor disorders. However, alterations in the pelvic floor muscle intrinsic structure that lead to muscle dysfunction because of childbirth and aging remain elusive. The purpose of this study was to determine the impact of vaginal deliveries and aging on human cadaveric pelvic floor muscle architecture, which is the strongest predictor of active muscle function. Coccygeus, iliococcygeus, and pubovisceralis were obtained from younger donors who were ≤51 years old, vaginally nulliparous (n = 5) and vaginally parous (n = 6) and older donors who were >51 years old, vaginally nulliparous (n = 6) and vaginally parous (n = 6), all of whom had no history of pelvic floor disorders. Architectural parameters, which are predictive of muscle's excursion and force-generating capacity, were determined with the use of validated methods. Intramuscular collagen content was quantified by hydroxyproline assay. Main effects of parity and aging and the interactions were determined with the use of 2-way analysis of variance, with Tukey's post-hoc testing and a significance level of .05. The mean age of younger and older donors differed by approximately 40 years (P = .001) but was similar between nulliparous and parous donors within each age group (P > .9). The median parity was 2 (range, 1-3) in younger and older vaginally parous groups (P = .7). The main impact of parity was increased fiber length in the more proximal coccygeus (P = .03) and iliococcygeus (P = .04). Aging changes manifested as decreased physiologic cross-sectional area across all pelvic floor muscles (P < .05), which substantially exceeded the age-related decline in muscle mass. The physiologic cross-sectional area was lower in younger vaginally parous, compared with younger vaginally nulliparous, pelvic floor muscles; however, the differences did not reach statistical significance

  2. Comparison of techniques used for functional evaluation of pelvic floor muscles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christiane Kelen Lucena da Costa

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To identify and discuss techniques for evaluation of pelvic floor muscles (PFM focusing on the most used and accessible techniques in health care. Methods: This is a quantitative exploratory and descriptive applied research. Data were collected from March to June 2016 at a higher education institution in the city of João Pessoa, Paraíba, Brazil. Initially, 31 healthy young women were submitted to pelvic floor evaluation using the following methods: PERFECT, vaginal cones, and perineometry using Perine and Peritron. The participants then performed exercises to strengthen PFM. The variables measured by the different methods were also recorded 30 and 60 days after the start of the program. ANOVA was used for repeated measures and Spearman's correlation test was used for the evaluation instruments with significance set at 5%. Results: The functional evaluation using all the methods was adequate in the PFM evaluation. In the digital palpation (PERFECT, the endurance response (E was positively correlated to Perina (rho=0.688 and vaginal cones (rho=0.571, and muscle strength (P was positively correlated to the Peritron technique (rho=0.506. Conclusion: There are several ways to evaluate PFM function and all of them provide sensory feedback to the patient. Given the low costs of digital palpation, the introduction of this technique into women's health services is likely to improve women's quality of life.

  3. Increased muscle glucose uptake after exercise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Richter, Erik; Ploug, Thorkil; Galbo, Henrik

    1985-01-01

    responsiveness of glucose uptake was noted only in controls. Analysis of intracellular glucose-6-phosphate, glucose, glycogen synthesis, and glucose transport suggested that the exercise effect on responsiveness might be due to enhancement of glucose disposal. After electrical stimulation of diabetic...... of glucose. At maximal insulin concentrations, the enhancing effect of exercise on glucose uptake may involve enhancement of glucose disposal, an effect that is probably less in muscle from diabetic rats.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)......It has recently been shown that insulin sensitivity of skeletal muscle glucose uptake and glycogen synthesis is increased after a single exercise session. The present study was designed to determine whether insulin is necessary during exercise for development of these changes found after exercise...

  4. Pelvic floor muscle training for urgency urinary incontinence in women: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greer, Joy A; Smith, Ariana L; Arya, Lily A

    2012-06-01

    The objective of this study is to evaluate the effectiveness of existing physiotherapy modalities for the treatment of urge urinary incontinence (UUI). A systematic review was performed for primary studies of physiotherapy techniques for UUI published in English between 1996 and August 2010 in major electronic databases. Only randomized clinical trials that reported outcomes separately for women with UUI were included. Outcomes assessed were reduction in UUI, urinary frequency, and nocturia. Data from 13 full-text trials including the modalities of pelvic floor muscles exercises with or without biofeedback, vaginal electrical stimulation, magnetic stimulation, and vaginal cones were analyzed. The methodologic quality of these trials was fair. Significant improvement in UUI was reported for all physiotherapy techniques except vaginal cone therapy. There are insufficient data to determine if pelvic physiotherapy improves urinary frequency or nocturia. Evidence suggests that physiotherapy techniques may be beneficial for the treatment of UUI.

  5. Pronounced effects of accute endurance exercise on gene expression in resting and exercising human skeletal muscle

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Catoire, M.; Mensink, M.R.; Boekschoten, M.V.; Hangelbroek, R.W.J.; Muller, M.R.; Schrauwen, P.; Kersten, A.H.

    2012-01-01

    Regular physical activity positively influences whole body energy metabolism and substrate handling in exercising muscle. While it is recognized that the effects of exercise extend beyond exercising muscle, it is unclear to what extent exercise impacts non-exercising muscles. Here we investigated

  6. Making muscles "stronger": exercise, nutrition, drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aagaard, P

    2004-06-01

    As described in this review, maximal muscle strength is strongly influenced by resistive-types of exercise, which induce adaptive changes in both neuromuscular function and muscle morphology. Further, timed intake of protein in conjunction with resistance training elicit greater strength and muscle size gains than resistance training alone. Creatine supplementation amplifies the hypertrophic response to resistance training, although some individuals may not respond positively. Locally produced muscle growth factors are upregulated during creatine supplementation, which contributes to increase the responsiveness of muscle cells to intensive training stimuli. Usage of anabolic steroids boosts muscle hypertrophy beyond inherent genetical limits, not only by increasing the DNA transcription rate for myofibrillar proteins but also by increasing the nucleus-to-cytoplasm ratio due to accelerated activation of myogenic satellite cells. However, severe tissue damaging effects exist with anabolic steroids, some of which are irreversible.

  7. Enhanced muscle glucose metabolism after exercise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Richter, Erik; Garetto, L P; Goodman, M N

    1984-01-01

    Studies in the rat suggest that after voluntary exercise there are two phases of glycogen repletion in skeletal muscle (preceding study). In phase I glucose utilization and glycogen synthesis are enhanced both in the presence and absence of insulin, whereas in phase II only the increase in the pr......Studies in the rat suggest that after voluntary exercise there are two phases of glycogen repletion in skeletal muscle (preceding study). In phase I glucose utilization and glycogen synthesis are enhanced both in the presence and absence of insulin, whereas in phase II only the increase...... in the stimulated leg closely mimicked that observed previously after voluntary exercise on a treadmill. With no insulin added to the perfusate, glucose incorporation into glycogen was markedly enhanced in muscles that were glycogen depleted as were the uptake of 2-deoxyglucose and 3-O-methylglucose. Likewise......, the stimulation of these processes by insulin was enhanced and continued to be so 2 h later when the muscles of the stimulated leg had substantially repleted their glycogen stores. The results suggest that the increases in insulin-mediated glucose utilization and glycogen synthesis in muscle after exercise...

  8. Strength training and aerobic exercise training for muscle disease.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Voet, N.B.M.; Kooi, E.L. van der; Riphagen, I.I.; Lindeman, E.; Engelen, B.G.M. van; Geurts, A.C.H.

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Strength training or aerobic exercise programmes might optimise muscle and cardiorespiratory function and prevent additional disuse atrophy and deconditioning in people with a muscle disease. OBJECTIVES: To examine the safety and efficacy of strength training and aerobic exercise

  9. Does motivation predict outcome of pelvic floor muscle retraining?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Te West, Nevine I D; Parkin, Katrina; Hayes, Wendy; Costa, Daniel S J; Kasparian, Nadine A; Moore, Kate H

    2017-02-01

    Although pelvic floor muscle training (PFMT) is effective for stress urinary incontinence (SUI), patients need to be motivated to obtain cure. An instrument to assess motivation in such patients was published in 2009: the Incontinence Treatment Motivation Questionnaire (ITMQ). The ITMQ consists of five domains: (i) positive attitudes toward PFMT; (ii) reasons for not doing PFMT; (iii) difficulties living with incontinence; (iv) desire for treatment; and (v) incontinence severity influencing motivation. The aim of the present study was to examine the relationship between ITMQ scores and treatment success. After referral for PFMT, women with SUI completed the ITMQ. Pre- and post-treatment outcomes were the International Consultation on Incontinence Questionnaire (ICIQ) score and a 24-hr pad test. Correlations between ITMQ scores and baseline, as well as post-treatment change in ICIQ scores and pad test results were examined. Additionally, the demographics of non-participants, participants, and patients lost to follow-up were compared. Of 85 recruits, 18 did not complete the ITMQ, 14 were lost to follow-up, thus 53 completed the PFMT programme and undertook either one or both outcomes. Pre-treatment, severity on ICIQ correlated with total ITMQ (ρ = 0.33, P = 0.01). Post-treatment change in pad test was inversely correlated with Domain 2 (ρ = -0.33, P = 0.03). The pre-treatment severity of incontinence was significantly associated with motivation for treatment. Unfortunately, post-treatment change correlated with only one domain of the questionnaire. Further modification of the ITMQ is envisaged. Neurourol. Urodynam. 36:316-321, 2017. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Pronounced effects of acute endurance exercise on gene expression in resting and exercising human skeletal muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catoire, Milène; Mensink, Marco; Boekschoten, Mark V; Hangelbroek, Roland; Müller, Michael; Schrauwen, Patrick; Kersten, Sander

    2012-01-01

    Regular physical activity positively influences whole body energy metabolism and substrate handling in exercising muscle. While it is recognized that the effects of exercise extend beyond exercising muscle, it is unclear to what extent exercise impacts non-exercising muscles. Here we investigated the effects of an acute endurance exercise bouts on gene expression in exercising and non-exercising human muscle. To that end, 12 male subjects aged 44-56 performed one hour of one-legged cycling at 50% W(max). Muscle biopsies were taken from the exercising and non-exercising leg before and immediately after exercise and analyzed by microarray. One-legged cycling raised plasma lactate, free fatty acids, cortisol, noradrenalin, and adrenalin levels. Surprisingly, acute endurance exercise not only caused pronounced gene expression changes in exercising muscle but also in non-exercising muscle. In the exercising leg the three most highly induced genes were all part of the NR4A family. Remarkably, many genes induced in non-exercising muscle were PPAR targets or related to PPAR signalling, including PDK4, ANGPTL4 and SLC22A5. Pathway analysis confirmed this finding. In conclusion, our data indicate that acute endurance exercise elicits pronounced changes in gene expression in non-exercising muscle, which are likely mediated by changes in circulating factors such as free fatty acids. The study points to a major influence of exercise beyond the contracting muscle.

  11. Pronounced effects of acute endurance exercise on gene expression in resting and exercising human skeletal muscle.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milène Catoire

    Full Text Available Regular physical activity positively influences whole body energy metabolism and substrate handling in exercising muscle. While it is recognized that the effects of exercise extend beyond exercising muscle, it is unclear to what extent exercise impacts non-exercising muscles. Here we investigated the effects of an acute endurance exercise bouts on gene expression in exercising and non-exercising human muscle. To that end, 12 male subjects aged 44-56 performed one hour of one-legged cycling at 50% W(max. Muscle biopsies were taken from the exercising and non-exercising leg before and immediately after exercise and analyzed by microarray. One-legged cycling raised plasma lactate, free fatty acids, cortisol, noradrenalin, and adrenalin levels. Surprisingly, acute endurance exercise not only caused pronounced gene expression changes in exercising muscle but also in non-exercising muscle. In the exercising leg the three most highly induced genes were all part of the NR4A family. Remarkably, many genes induced in non-exercising muscle were PPAR targets or related to PPAR signalling, including PDK4, ANGPTL4 and SLC22A5. Pathway analysis confirmed this finding. In conclusion, our data indicate that acute endurance exercise elicits pronounced changes in gene expression in non-exercising muscle, which are likely mediated by changes in circulating factors such as free fatty acids. The study points to a major influence of exercise beyond the contracting muscle.

  12. Vascular recruitment in forearm muscles during exercise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Palm, T; Nielsen, S L; Lassen, N A

    1983-01-01

    a more massive recruitment of exchange area during exercise (a factor 12) than suspected on the basis of ultrafiltration in animals made with the prolonged venous stasis technique (showing a factor 2-5). The estimated variability in exchange surface area indicates, that animal studies of muscle...

  13. Exercising with a Muscle Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... light resistance exercise can be done in the water. blood supply they need, the person is said to be ... their normal routine.” (Unfortunately, the device isn’t water- proof and can’t be used ... the key to weight loss is burn- ing more calories than are taken ...

  14. The influence of various risk factors on the strength of pelvic floor muscle in women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parezanović-Ilić Katarina

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. Damage of any element of pelvic floor leads to its functional damages, reflected in the occurrence of urinary incontinence, prolapse of pelvic organs, fecal incontinence and sexual dysfunction. Basic aim of our paper was to investigate the influence of various risk factors on pelvic floor muscle strength in women. Methods. The study included 90 female patients and examined how age, job, body weight and height, number of deliveries, sports activities, incontinence occurrence, previous prolapse-caused gynecological surgeries, other gynecological surgeries and other conservatively treated gynecological diseases influence the value of pelvic floor muscle strength. Pelvic floor muscle strength was measured using vaginal dynamometer. Results. Univariate regression analysis showed that parameters such as age, demanding job, body height, number of deliveries, sports activities, prolapse-caused gynecological surgeries, other gynecological surgeries and other gynecological diseases were in positive correlation with the values of pelvic floor muscle strength. In multivariate regression model, incontinence and gynecological operation of prolapse were singled out as independent risk factors. Conclusion. If risk factors that cause damage to pelvic floor muscle are known, it is possible to prevent the damages and improve the quality of women's life.

  15. Determining the optimal pelvic floor muscle training regimen for women with stress urinary incontinence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumoulin, Chantale; Glazener, Cathryn; Jenkinson, David

    2011-06-01

    Pelvic floor muscle (PFM) training has received Level-A evidence rating in the treatment of stress urinary incontinence (SUI) in women, based on meta-analysis of numerous randomized control trials (RCTs) and is recommended in many published guidelines. However, the actual regimen of PFM training used varies widely in these RCTs. Hence, to date, the optimal PFM training regimen for achieving continence remains unknown and the following questions persist: how often should women attend PFM training sessions and how many contractions should they perform for maximal effect? Is a regimen of strengthening exercises better than a motor control strategy or functional retraining? Is it better to administer a PFM training regimen to an individual or are group sessions equally effective, or better? Which is better, PFM training by itself or in combination with biofeedback, neuromuscular electrical stimulation, and/or vaginal cones? Should we use improvement or cure as the ultimate outcome to determine which regimen is the best? The questions are endless. As a starting point in our endeavour to identify optimal PFM training regimens, the aim of this study is (a) to review the present evidence in terms of the effectiveness of different PFM training regimens in women with SUI and (b) to discuss the current literature on PFM dysfunction in SUI women, including the up-to-date evidence on skeletal muscle training theory and other factors known to impact on women's participation in and adherence to PFM training. Copyright © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  16. Power to the Pelvis: Strengthening Your Pelvic Floor Muscles

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Bulging Hernia Keeping Your Gut in Check The Power of Your Pancreas Wise Choices Lower Your Risk of Pelvic Floor Issues Maintain a healthy weight. Avoid constipation and straining by getting enough ...

  17. Dose-Effect Relationships for Individual Pelvic Floor Muscles and Anorectal Complaints After Prostate Radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smeenk, Robert Jan; Hoffmann, Aswin L.; Hopman, Wim P.M.; Lin, Emile N.J. Th. van; Kaanders, Johannes H.A.M.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To delineate the individual pelvic floor muscles considered to be involved in anorectal toxicity and to investigate dose-effect relationships for fecal incontinence-related complaints after prostate radiotherapy (RT). Methods and Materials: In 48 patients treated for localized prostate cancer, the internal anal sphincter (IAS) muscle, the external anal sphincter (EAS) muscle, the puborectalis muscle (PRM), and the levator ani muscles (LAM) in addition to the anal wall (Awall) and rectal wall (Rwall) were retrospectively delineated on planning computed tomography scans. Dose parameters were obtained and compared between patients with and without fecal urgency, incontinence, and frequency. Dose-effect curves were constructed. Finally, the effect of an endorectal balloon, which was applied in 28 patients, was investigated. Results: The total volume of the pelvic floor muscles together was about three times that of the Awall. The PRM was exposed to the highest RT dose, whereas the EAS received the lowest dose. Several anal and rectal dose parameters, as well as doses to all separate pelvic floor muscles, were associated with urgency, while incontinence was associated mainly with doses to the EAS and PRM. Based on the dose-effect curves, the following constraints regarding mean doses could be deduced to reduce the risk of urgency: ≤30 Gy to the IAS; ≤10 Gy to the EAS; ≤50 Gy to the PRM; and ≤40 Gy to the LAM. No dose-effect relationships for frequency were observed. Patients treated with an endorectal balloon reported significantly less urgency and incontinence, while their treatment plans showed significantly lower doses to the Awall, Rwall, and all pelvic floor muscles. Conclusions: Incontinence-related complaints show specific dose-effect relationships to individual pelvic floor muscles. Dose constraints for each muscle can be identified for RT planning. When only the Awall is delineated, substantial components of the continence apparatus are

  18. Dose-effect relationships for individual pelvic floor muscles and anorectal complaints after prostate radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smeenk, Robert Jan; Hoffmann, Aswin L; Hopman, Wim P M; van Lin, Emile N J Th; Kaanders, Johannes H A M

    2012-06-01

    To delineate the individual pelvic floor muscles considered to be involved in anorectal toxicity and to investigate dose-effect relationships for fecal incontinence-related complaints after prostate radiotherapy (RT). In 48 patients treated for localized prostate cancer, the internal anal sphincter (IAS) muscle, the external anal sphincter (EAS) muscle, the puborectalis muscle (PRM), and the levator ani muscles (LAM) in addition to the anal wall (Awall) and rectal wall (Rwall) were retrospectively delineated on planning computed tomography scans. Dose parameters were obtained and compared between patients with and without fecal urgency, incontinence, and frequency. Dose-effect curves were constructed. Finally, the effect of an endorectal balloon, which was applied in 28 patients, was investigated. The total volume of the pelvic floor muscles together was about three times that of the Awall. The PRM was exposed to the highest RT dose, whereas the EAS received the lowest dose. Several anal and rectal dose parameters, as well as doses to all separate pelvic floor muscles, were associated with urgency, while incontinence was associated mainly with doses to the EAS and PRM. Based on the dose-effect curves, the following constraints regarding mean doses could be deduced to reduce the risk of urgency: ≤ 30 Gy to the IAS; ≤ 10 Gy to the EAS; ≤ 50 Gy to the PRM; and ≤ 40 Gy to the LAM. No dose-effect relationships for frequency were observed. Patients treated with an endorectal balloon reported significantly less urgency and incontinence, while their treatment plans showed significantly lower doses to the Awall, Rwall, and all pelvic floor muscles. Incontinence-related complaints show specific dose-effect relationships to individual pelvic floor muscles. Dose constraints for each muscle can be identified for RT planning. When only the Awall is delineated, substantial components of the continence apparatus are excluded. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights

  19. A COMPARISON OF UPPER-EXTREMITY REACTION FORCES BETWEEN THE YURCHENKO VAULT AND FLOOR EXERCISE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew Kirk Seeley

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to examine reaction forces transmitted to the upper extremities of high-level gymnasts during the round-off phase of the Yurchenko vault. A secondary purpose of this study was to compare reaction forces during the Yurchenko vault to reaction forces observed in a tumbling pass during the floor exercise. Ten high-level, female gymnasts volunteered to participate. Conditions of the independent variable were the Yurchenko vault and floor exercise; dependent variables were peak vertical and peak anterior-posterior reaction forces. Each participant performed three trials of both conditions with the trail hand contacting a force platform. Vertical and anterior-posterior reaction forces, normalized to body weight, were greater (p < 0.05 during the round-off phase of the Yurchenko vault (2.38 than during the floor exercise round-off (2.15. Vertical reaction forces during the round-off phase of the Yurchenko vault and floor exercise round-off are similar to reaction forces transmitted to upper extremities during other gymnastic skills and ground reaction forces transmitted to lower extremities while running and walking at various speeds. Results of this study reveal a need for further research considering methods aimed at reducing reaction forces transmitted to the upper extremities during the Yurchenko vault and floor exercise.

  20. Pelvic Floor Muscle Training Instruction to Control Urinary Incontinence and its Resulting Stress, Anxiety and Depression in Patients with Multiple Sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafii

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Background Urinary disorders are common problems in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS. Urinary incontinence largely affects the physical, social and emotional characteristics and activities of such patients. Objectives The current study aimed to identify the effect of pelvic floor muscle training on urinary incontinence and its resulting stress, anxiety and depression in patients with MS. Methods The present clinical trial with a pre-post design was conducted on 50 patients with MS referring to the MS clinic of Imam Khomeini hospital in Tehran, Iran, selected by convenience sampling method. Participants received instructions on pelvic floor muscle exercises and then practiced for three consecutive months. The international consultation on incontinence questionnaire-urinary incontinence short form (ICIQ-UI-SF was used to measure participants' urinary incontinence, and the 21-item depression, anxiety and stress scale (DASS-21 to measure their depression, anxiety and stress, both before the intervention and at the end of the third month of exercising. The obtained data were analyzed by SPSS16 using descriptive statistics and the dependent t test. Results About 45 (90% participants practiced pelvic floor muscle exercises until the end of the third month. The frequency and amount of urine leakage and the effect of urinary incontinence on the quality of life differed significantly in the patients after the instructions compared to the status before the intervention (P < 0.001. The mean score of stress (P < 0.001, anxiety (P = 0.04 and depression (P = 0.003 decreased significantly after the intervention. Conclusions According to the findings, instructing pelvic floor muscle exercises was effective in reducing urinary incontinence and its resulting stress, anxiety and depression in patients with MS. These exercises were recommended as a non-pharmacological, non-invasive and cost-effective method to control urinary incontinence in patients with MS.

  1. 198: THE EFFECT OF INSTRUCTING PELVIC FLOOR MUSCLE TRAINING FOR CONTROLLING URINARY INCONTINENCE AND ITS RESULTING STRESS, ANXIETY AND DEPRESSION IN PATIENTS WITH MULTIPLE SCLEROSIS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shareinia, Habib; Rafii, Forough; Sarraf, Payam; Seyedalshohahadaee, Mahnaz

    2017-01-01

    Background and aims Urinary disorders are common problems in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS). Urinary incontinence largely affects the physical, social, and emotional characteristics and activities of these patients. The aim of this study was to identify the effect of pelvic floor muscle Training on urinary incontinence and its resulting stress, anxiety and depression in MS patients. Methods The present clinical trial with a pre-post design was conducted on 50 MS patients presenting to the MS clinic of Imam Khomeini Hospital in Tehran (Iran) who had been selected by convenience sampling method. Participants received instructions on pelvic floor muscle exercises and then practiced them for three consecutive months. The International Consultation on Incontinence Questionnaire – Urinary Incontinence Short Form (ICIQ-UI SF) was used to measure participants' urinary incontinence and the 21-item Depression, Anxiety and Stress Scale (DASS-21) then used to measure their depression, anxiety and stress, both before the intervention and at the end of the third month of exercising. The data obtained were analyzed in SPSS16 using descriptive statistics and the dependent t test. Results About 45 (90%) participants practiced pelvic floor muscle exercises up until the end of the third month. The frequency and amount of urine leakage and the effect of urinary incontinence on the quality of life differed significantly in the patients after the instructions compared to before (P<0.001). The mean score of stress (P<0.001), anxiety (P=0.04) and depression (P=0.003) decreased significantly after the intervention. Conclusion According to the findings, instructing pelvic floor muscle exercises is effective in reducing urinary incontinence and its resulting stress, anxiety and depression in MS patients. These exercises are therefore recommended as a non-pharmacological, non-invasive and cost-effective method for controlling urinary incontinence in MS patients.

  2. Factors influencing long-term adherence to pelvic floor exercises in women with urinary incontinence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venegas, Mónica; Carrasco, Bernardita; Casas-Cordero, Romina

    2018-03-01

    To ensure the effectiveness of Physical Therapy for urinary incontinence (UI), it is crucial that patients adhere to treatment in both the long and the short term. Treatment adherence may prevent symptom progression and the need for surgery, which is associated with higher costs and potential complications. Adherence is defined as carrying out a recommended behavioral modification or change. The World Health Organization (WHO) has established that adherence is a multifactorial phenomenon determined by the interaction of five dimensions, which include diverse factors that affect long-term adherence on many levels. To identify the factors that influence long-term adherence to pelvic floor exercises in women with UI. Observational, descriptive, cross-sectional study. The sample was recruited from the "Centro Integral de Reeducación de Piso Pélvico" (CIREP), and included 61 women treated for UI at the center in 2014 and 2015. Participants completed a self-administered, 28-item questionnaire developed for this study based on the WHO five dimensions. Data analysis was performed using STATA 13.0 software. Having performed pelvic floor home exercises after discharge from Physical Therapy was significantly associated with self-rated treatment adherence (P pelvic floor exercise program (P pelvic floor exercises in women with UI; forgetting to do the exercises and boredom with the exercises were the factors most strongly related to low treatment adherence, while motivation and commitment were associated with high adherence in this population. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Tissue Selective Androgen Receptor Modulators (SARMs) Increase Pelvic Floor Muscle Mass in Ovariectomized Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponnusamy, Suriyan; Sullivan, Ryan D; Thiyagarajan, Thirumagal; Tillmann, Heather; Getzenberg, Robert H; Narayanan, Ramesh

    2017-03-01

    Stress urinary incontinence (SUI), a prevalent condition, is represented by an involuntary leakage of urine that results, at least in part, from weakened or damaged pelvic floor muscles and is triggered by physical stress. Current treatment options are limited with no oral therapies available. The pelvic floor is rich in androgen receptor and molecules with anabolic activity including selective androgen receptor modulators (SARMs) may serve as therapeutic options for individuals with SUI. In this study, two SARMs (GTx-024 and GTx-027) were evaluated in a post-menopausal animal model in order to determine their effect on pelvic floor muscles. Female C57BL/6 mice were ovariectomized and their pelvic muscles allowed to regress. The animals were then treated with vehicle or doses of GTx-024 or GTx-027. Animal total body weight, lean body mass, and pelvic floor muscle weights were measured along with the expression of genes associated with muscle catabolism. Treatment with the SARMs resulted in a restoration of the pelvic muscles to the sham-operated weight. Coordinately, the induction of genes associated with muscle catabolism was inhibited. Although a trend was observed towards an increase in total lean body mass in the SARM-treated groups, no significant differences were detected. Treatment of an ovariectomized mouse model with SARMs resulted in an increase in pelvic floor muscles, which may translate to an improvement of symptoms associated with SUI and serves as the basis for evaluating their clinical use. J. Cell. Biochem. 118: 640-646, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Xanthine oxidase in human skeletal muscle following eccentric exercise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hellsten, Ylva; Frandsen, Ulrik; Orthenblad, N.

    1997-01-01

    the increase in xanthine oxidase in the muscle there were no detectable changes in the levels of muscle malondialdehyde or in plasma antioxidant capacity up to 4 days post-exercise. 5. It is concluded that eccentric exercise leads to an increased level of xanthine oxidase in human muscle and that the increase...

  5. Bruxism: Is There an Indication for Muscle-Stretching Exercises?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gouw, Simone; de Wijer, Anton; Creugers, Nico Hj; Kalaykova, Stanimira I

    Bruxism is a common phenomenon involving repetitive activation of the masticatory muscles. Muscle-stretching exercises are a recommended part of several international guidelines for musculoskeletal disorders and may be effective in management of the jaw muscle activity that gives rise to bruxism. However, most studies of muscle-stretching exercises have mainly focused on their influence on performance (eg, range of motion, coordination, and muscle strength) of the limb or trunk muscles of healthy individuals or individuals with sports-related injuries. Very few have investigated stretching of the human masticatory muscles and none muscle-stretching exercises in the management of (sleep) bruxism. This article reviews the literature on muscle-stretching exercises and their potential role in the management of sleep bruxism or its consequences in the musculoskeletal system.

  6. Supervised pelvic floor muscle training versus attention-control massage treatment in patients with faecal incontinence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ussing, Anja; Dahn, Inge; Due, Ulla

    2017-01-01

    supplements is recommended as first-line treatment for faecal incontinence. Despite this, the effect of pelvic floor muscle training for faecal incontinence is unclear. No previous trials have investigated the efficacy of supervised pelvic floor muscle training in combination with conservative treatment...... treatment and conservative treatment. The primary outcome is participants' rating of symptom changes after 16 weeks of treatment using the Patient Global Impression of Improvement Scale. Secondary outcomes are the Vaizey Incontinence Score, the Fecal Incontinence Severity Index, the Fecal Incontinence...

  7. Training through gametherapy promotes coactivation of the pelvic floor and abdominal muscles in young women, nulliparous and continents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valeria Regina Silva

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Introduction and objectives: Several studies have been investigated co-activation can enhance the effectveness of PFM training protocols allowing preventive and therapeutic goals in pelvic floor dysfunctions. The objective of the present study was to investigate if an abdominal-pelvic protocol of training (APT using gametherapy would allow co-activation of PFM and transversus abdominis/oblique internal (TrA/OI muscles. Patients and methods: Twenty-five nulliparous, continent, young females, with median age 24.76 (±3.76 years were evaluated using digital palpation (DP of PFM and surface electromyography of PFM and TrA/OI simultaneously, during maximal voluntary contraction (MVC, alternating PFM and TrA/OI contraction requests. All women participated on a supervised program of APT using gametherapy, that included exercises of pelvic mobilization associated to contraction of TrA/OI muscles oriented by virtual games, for 30 minutes, three times a week, in a total of 10 sessions. Electromyographic data were processed and analyzed by ANOVA - analysis of variance. Results: When MVC of TrA/OI was solicited, it was observed simultaneous increase of electromyographic activity of PFM (p=0.001 following ATP. However, EMG activity did not change significantly during MVC of PFM. Conclusion: Training using gametherapy allowed better co-activation of pelvic floor muscles in response to contraction of TrA, in young nulliparous and continent women.

  8. Pelvic floor muscle strength in primiparous women according to the delivery type: cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendes, Edilaine de Paula Batista; Oliveira, Sonia Maria Junqueira Vasconcellos de; Caroci, Adriana de Souza; Francisco, Adriana Amorim; Oliveira, Sheyla Guimaraes; Silva, Renata Luana da

    2016-08-15

    to compare the pelvic floor muscle strength in primiparous women after normal birth and cesarean section, related to the socio-demographic characteristics, nutritional status, dyspareunia, urinary incontinence, perineal exercise in pregnancy, perineal condition and weight of the newborn. this was a cross-sectional study conducted after 50 - 70 postpartum days, with 24 primiparous women who underwent cesarean delivery and 72 who had a normal birth. The 9301 PeritronTM was used for analysis of muscle strength. The mean muscle strength was compared between the groups by two-way analysis of variance. the pelvic floor muscle strength was 24.0 cmH2O (±16.2) and 25.4 cmH2O (±14.7) in postpartum primiparous women after normal birth and cesarean section, respectively, with no significant difference. The muscular strength was greater in postpartum women with ≥ 12 years of study (42.0 ±26.3 versus 14.6 ±7.7 cmH2O; p= 0.036) and in those who performed perineal exercises (42.6±25.4 11.8±4.9 vs. cmH2O; p = 0.010), compared to caesarean. There was no difference in muscle strength according to delivery type regarding nutritional status, dyspareunia, urinary incontinence, perineal condition or newborn weight. pelvic floor muscle strength does not differ between primiparous women based on the type of delivery. Postpartum women with normal births, with higher education who performed perineal exercise during pregnancy showed greater muscle strength. comparar a força muscular do assoalho pélvico em primíparas no pós-parto normal e cesariana, relacionando-a às características sociodemográficas, estado nutricional, incontinência urinária, dispareunia, exercício perineal na gestação, condição perineal e peso do recém-nascido. estudo transversal realizado entre 50 e 70 dias de pós-parto, com 24 primíparas submetidas à cesariana e 72 ao parto normal. Utilizou-se PeritronTM 9301 para análise da força muscular. Comparou-se as médias da força muscular entre os

  9. How is AMPK activity regulated in skeletal muscles during exercise?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Sebastian Beck; Rose, Adam John

    2008-01-01

    AMPK is a metabolic "master" controller activated in skeletal muscle by exercise in a time and intensity dependent manner, and has been implicated in regulating metabolic pathways in muscle during physical exercise. AMPK signaling in skeletal muscle is regulated by several systemic...... and intracellular factors and the regulation of skeletal muscle AMPK in response to exercise is the focus of this review. Specifically, the role of LKB1 and phosphatase PP2C in nucleotide-dependent activation of AMPK, and ionized calcium in CaMKK-dependent activation of AMPK in working muscle is discussed. We also...

  10. Urinary incontinence during pregnancy and postpartum. Associated risk factors and influence of pelvic floor exercises.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin-Martin, Sergio; Pascual-Fernandez, Angela; Alvarez-Colomo, Cristina; Calvo-Gonzalez, Raul; Muñoz-Moreno, Marife; Cortiñas-Gonzalez, Jose Ramon

    2014-05-01

    To determine the prevalence of urinary incontinence (UI) before pregnancy, in the third trimester and postpartum. To analyze its influence on quality of life and associated potential risk factors and the efficacy of pelvic floor exercises. Prospective study in 413 pregnant women. The modified ICIQ-SF incontinence questionnaire was given to the pregnant women at the end of the third quarter. This questionnaire was administered by telephone at 3 and 6 months postpartum. The influence of several risk factors for UI in pregnancy and postpartum were analyzed. Patients with persistent UI at 6 months postpartum were trained to do pelvic floor exercises. Patients with UI before pregnancy were excluded from the study. UI in the third trimester was 31%. Analyzed risk factors did not condition a higher percentage of UI. Prevalence of UI was 11.3% at 3 months postpartum and 6.9% at 6 months. 70% of the incontinent patients already had it during pregnancy and it appeared de novo post-delivery in 30% of the patients. Prevalence of UI after delivery was higher in women with UI in pregnancy and lower in caesarean cases. Most women improved with pelvic floor exercises. Analysed risk factors did not significantly increase UI in pregnancy. Prevalence of UI after delivery is higher in women with UI in pregnancy and lower in caesarean cases. Postpartum pelvic floor exercises for three months in patients with persistent stress UI at 6 months postpartum clearly improved the degree of continence.

  11. Feedback or biofeedback to augment pelvic floor muscle training for urinary incontinence in women

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Herderschee, Roselien; Hay-Smith, E. Jean C.; Herbison, G. Peter; Roovers, Jan Paul; Heineman, Maas Jan

    2011-01-01

    Pelvic floor muscle training (PFMT) is an effective treatment for stress urinary incontinence in women. Whilst most of the PFMT trials have been done in women with stress urinary incontinence, there is also some trial evidence that PFMT is effective for urgency urinary incontinence and mixed urinary

  12. Pelvic floor muscle lesions at endoanal MR imaging in female patients with faecal incontinence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Terra, Maaike P.; Beets-Tan, Regina G. H.; Vervoorn, Inge; Deutekom, Marije; Wasser, Martin N. J. M.; Witkamp, Theo D.; Dobben, Annette C.; Baeten, Cor G. M. I.; Bossuyt, Patrick M. M.; Stoker, Jaap

    2008-01-01

    To evaluate the frequency and spectrum of lesions of different pelvic floor muscles at endoanal MRI in women with severe faecal incontinence and to study their relation with incontinence severity and manometric findings. In 105 women MRI examinations were evaluated for internal anal sphincter (IAS),

  13. Lifestyle advice with or without pelvic floor muscle training for pelvic organ prolapse

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Due, Ulla; Brostrøm, Søren; Lose, Gunnar

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION AND HYPOTHESIS: We evaluated the effect of adding pelvic floor muscle training (PFMT) to a structured lifestyle advice program. METHODS: This was a single-blinded randomized trial of women with symptomatic pelvic organ prolapse (POP) stage ≥ II. Participants were randomized...

  14. Dose-effect relationships for individual pelvic floor muscles and anorectal complaints after prostate radiotherapy.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smeenk, R.J.; Hoffmann, A.L.; Hopman, W.P.M.; Lin, E.N.J.T. van; Kaanders, J.H.A.M.

    2012-01-01

    PURPOSE: To delineate the individual pelvic floor muscles considered to be involved in anorectal toxicity and to investigate dose-effect relationships for fecal incontinence-related complaints after prostate radiotherapy (RT). METHODS AND MATERIALS: In 48 patients treated for localized prostate

  15. Efficacy of biofeedback-assisted pelvic floor muscle training in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ibrahim Khalil Ibrahim

    2014-07-18

    Jul 18, 2014 ... ized life advice leaflet sheet with instructions.20,21 Standardized proper PFMT instruction .... Unexpectedly, female age and duration of complaint were not predictive factors of .... Chen Gin-Den. Conservative management of ... muscle: comparison of a digital and a manometric techniques. Physiotherapy ...

  16. Muscle metabolism during graded quadriceps exercise in man

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Helge, Jørn W; Stallknecht, Bente; Galbo, Henrik

    2007-01-01

    , oxidation of plasma free fatty acids increases and accordingly oxidation of other fat sources decreases. These findings are in contrast to whole body measurements performed during graded exercise involving a large muscle mass during which fat oxidation peaks at around 60% of .......The aim of the study was to examine local muscle metabolism in response to graded exercise when the involved muscle mass is too small to elicit marked hormonal changes and local blood flow restriction. Nine healthy overnight fasted male subjects performed knee extension exercise with both thighs...... intensity. In conclusion, in the presence of a high blood flow and oxygen supply and only small hormonal changes, total fat oxidation in muscle increases from rest to light exercise, but then remains constant with exercise intensity up to heavy exercise. However, with increasing exercise intensity...

  17. Effects of exercise on insulin binding to human muscle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonen, A.; Tan, M.H.; Clune, P.; Kirby, R.L.

    1985-01-01

    A procedure was developed to measure insulin binding to human skeletal muscle obtained via the percutaneous muscle biopsy technique. With this method the effects of exercise on insulin binding were investigated. Subjects (n = 9) exercised for 60 min on a bicycle ergometer at intensities ranging from 20-86% maximum O 2 consumption (VO 2 max). Blood samples were obtained before, during, and after exercise and analyzed for glucose and insulin. Muscle samples (250 mg) for the vastus lateralis were obtained 30 min before exercise, at the end of exercise, and 60 min after exercise. Two subjects rested during the experimental period. There was no linear relationship between exercise intensities and the changes in insulin binding to human muscle. At rest (n = 2) and at exercise intensities below 60% VO 2 max (n = 5) no change in insulin binding occurred (P greater than 0.05). However, when exercise occurred at greater than or equal to 69% VO 2 max (n = 4), a pronounced decrement in insulin binding (30-50%) was observed (P less than 0.05). This persisted for 60 min after exercise. These results indicate that insulin binding in human muscle is not altered by 60 min of exercise at less than or equal to 60% VO 2 max but that a marked decrement occurs when exercise is greater than or equal to 69% VO 2 max

  18. Architectural design of the pelvic floor is consistent with muscle functional subspecialization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuttle, Lori J; Nguyen, Olivia T; Cook, Mark S; Alperin, Marianna; Shah, Sameer B; Ward, Samuel R; Lieber, Richard L

    2014-02-01

    Skeletal muscle architecture is the strongest predictor of a muscle's functional capacity. The purpose of this study was to define the architectural properties of the deep muscles of the female pelvic floor (PFMs) to elucidate their structure-function relationships. PFMs coccygeus (C), iliococcygeus (IC), and pubovisceral (PV) were harvested en bloc from ten fixed human cadavers (mean age 85 years, range 55-102). Fundamental architectural parameters of skeletal muscles [physiological cross-sectional area (PCSA), normalized fiber length, and sarcomere length (L(s))] were determined using validated methods. PCSA predicts muscle-force production, and normalized fiber length is related to muscle excursion. These parameters were compared using repeated measures analysis of variance (ANOVA) with post hoc t tests, as appropriate. Significance was set to α = 0.05. PFMs were thinner than expected based on data reported from imaging studies and in vivo palpation. Significant differences in fiber length were observed across PFMs: C = 5.29 ± 0.32 cm, IC = 7.55 ± 0.46 cm, PV = 10.45 ± 0.67 cm (p design shows individual muscles demonstrating differential architecture, corresponding to specialized function in the pelvic floor.

  19. Regulation of autophagy in human skeletal muscle: effects of exercise, exercise training and insulin stimulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fritzen, Andreas Mæchel; Madsen, Agnete Louise Bjerregaard; Kleinert, Maximilian

    2016-01-01

    Studies in rodent muscle suggest that autophagy is regulated by acute exercise, exercise training and insulin stimulation. However, little is known about the regulation of autophagy in human skeletal muscle. Here we investigate the autophagic response to acute one-legged exercise, one-legged exer......Studies in rodent muscle suggest that autophagy is regulated by acute exercise, exercise training and insulin stimulation. However, little is known about the regulation of autophagy in human skeletal muscle. Here we investigate the autophagic response to acute one-legged exercise, one......-legged exercise training as well as in response to subsequent insulin stimulation in exercised and non-exercised human muscle. Acute one-legged exercise decreased (phuman muscle....... The decrease in LC3-II/LC3-I ratio did not correlate with activation of AMPK trimer complexes in human muscle. Consistently, pharmacological AMPK activation with AICAR in mouse muscle did not affect the LC3-II/LC3-I ratio. Four hours after exercise, insulin further reduced (p

  20. Pelvic floor muscle rehabilitation for patients with lifelong premature ejaculation: a novel therapeutic approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pastore, Antonio L; Palleschi, Giovanni; Fuschi, Andrea; Maggioni, Cristina; Rago, Rocco; Zucchi, Alessandro; Costantini, Elisabetta; Carbone, Antonio

    2014-06-01

    Premature ejaculation is the most common male sexual disorder. The aim of the study was to evaluate the possible therapeutic role of pelvic floor muscle rehabilitation in patients affected by lifelong premature ejaculation. We treated 40 men with lifelong premature ejaculation, reporting, a baseline intravaginal ejaculatory latency time (IELT) ≤ 1 min, with 12-week pelvic floor muscle rehabilitation. At the end of the rehabilitation, mean IELTs were calculated to evaluate the effectiveness of the therapy. At the end of the treatment, 33 (82.5%) of the 40 patients gained control of their ejaculatory reflex, with a mean IELT of 146.2 s (range: 123.6-152.4 s). A total of 13 out of 33 (39%) patients were evaluated at 6 months follow up, and they maintained a significant IELT (112.6 s) compared with their initial IELT (mean 39.8 s). The results obtained in our subjects treated with pelvic floor rehabilitation are promising. This therapy represents an important cost reduction compared with the standard treatment (selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors). Based on the present data, we propose pelvic floor muscle rehabilitation as a new, viable therapeutic option for the treatment of premature ejaculation.

  1. Estimated Muscle Loads During Squat Exercise in Microgravity Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fregly, Christopher D.; Kim, Brandon T.; Li, Zhao; DeWitt, John K.; Fregly, Benjamin J.

    2012-01-01

    Loss of muscle mass in microgravity is one of the primary factors limiting long-term space flight. NASA researchers have developed a number of exercise devices to address this problem. The most recent is the Advanced Resistive Exercise Device (ARED), which is currently used by astronauts on the International Space Station (ISS) to emulate typical free-weight exercises in microgravity. ARED exercise on the ISS is intended to reproduce Earth-level muscle loads, but the actual muscle loads produced remain unknown as they cannot currently be measured directly. In this study we estimated muscle loads experienced during squat exercise on ARED in microgravity conditions representative of Mars, the moon, and the ISS. The estimates were generated using a subject-specific musculoskeletal computer model and ARED exercise data collected on Earth. The results provide insight into the capabilities and limitations of the ARED machine.

  2. Nox4 Is Dispensable for Exercise Induced Muscle Fibre Switch.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juri Vogel

    Full Text Available By producing H2O2, the NADPH oxidase Nox4 is involved in differentiation of mesenchymal cells. Exercise alters the composition of slow and fast twitch fibres in skeletal. Here we hypothesized that Nox4 contributes to exercise-induced adaptation such as changes in muscle metabolism or muscle fibre specification and studied this in wildtype and Nox4-/- mice.Exercise, as induced by voluntary running in a running wheel or forced running on a treadmill induced a switch from fast twitch to intermediate fibres. However the induced muscle fibre switch was similar between Nox4-/- and wildtype mice. The same held true for exercise-induced expression of PGC1α or AMPK activation. Both are increased in response to exercise, but with no difference was observed between wildtype and Nox4-/- mice.Thus, exercise-induced muscle fibre switch is Nox4-independent.

  3. Oxidation of urate in human skeletal muscle during exercise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hellsten, Ylva; Tullson, P. C.; Richter, Erik

    1997-01-01

    the level was more than twofold higher and remained elevated throughout recovery (p exercise, probably due to generation of free radicals. Furthermore, the findings support the suggested importance of urate......The purpose of the present study was to investigate whether high metabolic stress to skeletal muscle, induced by intensive exercise, would lead to an oxidation of urate to allantoin in the exercised muscle. Seven healthy male subjects performed short term (4.39 +/- 0.04 [+/-SE] min) exhaustive...... cycling exercise. Muscle samples were obtained from m. v. lateralis before and during the first few minutes after the exercise. Venous blood samples were obtained before and up to 45 min after the exercise. The concentration of urate in muscle decreased from a resting level of 0.26 +/- 0.023 to 0...

  4. Exercise-induced metallothionein expression in human skeletal muscle fibres

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Penkowa, Milena; Keller, Pernille; Keller, Charlotte

    2005-01-01

    in both type I and II muscle fibres. This is the first report demonstrating that MT-I + II are significantly induced in human skeletal muscle fibres following exercise. As MT-I + II are antioxidant factors that protect various tissues during pathological conditions, the MT-I + II increases post exercise......Exercise induces free oxygen radicals that cause oxidative stress, and metallothioneins (MTs) are increased in states of oxidative stress and possess anti-apoptotic effects. We therefore studied expression of the antioxidant factors metallothionein I and II (MT-I + II) in muscle biopsies obtained...... in response to 3 h of bicycle exercise performed by healthy men and in resting controls. Both MT-I + II proteins and MT-II mRNA expression increased significantly in both type I and II muscle fibres after exercise. Moreover, 24 h after exercise the levels of MT-II mRNA and MT-I + II proteins were still highly...

  5. Protein-carbohydrate supplements improve muscle protein balance in muscular dystrophy patients after endurance exercise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Grete; Ørngreen, Mette C; Preisler, Nicolai

    2015-01-01

    In healthy individuals, postexercise protein supplementation increases muscle protein anabolism. In patients with muscular dystrophies, aerobic exercise improves muscle function, but the effect of exercise on muscle protein balance is unknown. Therefore, we investigated 1) muscle protein balance...

  6. Molecular Signals and Skeletal Muscle Adaptation to Exercise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark Wilson

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The phenotypic plasticity of skeletal muscle affords a considerable degree of adaptability not seen in other bodily tissues. The mechanical properties of skeletal muscle are highly dependent on loading conditions. The extent of skeletal muscle plasticity is distinctly highlighted by a loss of muscle mass, or atrophy, after a period of reduced weight-bearing activity, for example during periods of extended bed rest, space flight and in spinal cord injury. On the other hand, increased mechanical loading, or resistance training, induces muscle growth, or hypertrophy. Endurance exercise performance is also dependent on the adaptability of skeletal muscle, especially muscles that contribute to posture, locomotion and the mechanics of breathing.  However, the molecular pathways governing skeletal muscle adaptations are yet to be satisfactorily delineated and require further investigation. Researchers in the areas of exercise physiology, physiotherapy and sports medicine are endeavoring to translate experimental knowledge into effective, innovative treatments and regimens in order to improve physical performance and health in both elite athletes and the general community. The efficacy of the translation of molecular biological paradigms in experimental exercise physiology has long been underappreciated. Indeed, molecular biology tools can now be used to answer questions regarding skeletal muscle adaptation in response to exercise and provide new frameworks to improve physical performance. Furthermore, transgenic animal models, knockout animal models and in vivo studies provide tools to test questions concerned with how exercise initiates adaptive changes in gene expression. In light of these perceived deficiencies, an attempt is made here to elucidate the molecular mechanisms of skeletal muscle adaptation to exercise. An examination will be made of the functional capacity of skeletal muscle to respond to a variety of exercise conditions, namely

  7. Molecular Signals and Skeletal Muscle Adaptation to Exercise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark Wilson

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The phenotypic plasticity of skeletal muscle affords a considerable degree of adaptability not seen in other bodily tissues. The mechanical properties of skeletal muscle are highly dependent on loading conditions. The extent of skeletal muscle plasticity is distinctly highlighted by a loss of muscle mass, or atrophy, after a period of reduced weight-bearing activity, for example during periods of extended bed rest, space flight and in spinal cord injury. On the other hand, increased mechanical loading, or resistance training, induces muscle growth, or hypertrophy. Endurance exercise performance is also dependent on the adaptability of skeletal muscle, especially muscles that contribute to posture, locomotion and the mechanics of breathing. However, the molecular pathways governing skeletal muscle adaptations are yet to be satisfactorily delineated and require further investigation. Researchers in the areas of exercise physiology, physiotherapy and sports medicine are endeavoring to translate experimental knowledge into effective, innovative treatments and regimens in order to improve physical performance and health in both elite athletes and the general community. The efficacy of the translation of molecular biological paradigms in experimental exercise physiology has long been underappreciated. Indeed, molecular biology tools can now be used to answer questions regarding skeletal muscle adaptation in response to exercise and provide new frameworks to improve physical performance. Furthermore, transgenic animal models, knockout animal models and in vivo studies provide tools to test questions concerned with how exercise initiates adaptive changes in gene expression. In light of these perceived deficiencies, an attempt is made here to elucidate the molecular mechanisms of skeletal muscle adaptation to exercise. An examination will be made of the functional capacity of skeletal muscle to respond to a variety of exercise conditions, namely

  8. The impact of pelvic floor muscle training on the quality of life of women with urinary incontinence: a systematic literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radzimińska A

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Agnieszka Radzimińska, Agnieszka Strączyńska, Magdalena Weber-Rajek, Hanna Styczyńska, Katarzyna Strojek, Zuzanna Piekorz Department of Physiotherapy, Nicolaus Copernicus University Collegium Medicum in Bydgoszcz, Bydgoszcz, Poland Purpose: The purpose of this review was to assess the effectiveness of pelvic floor muscle training (PFMT in the treatment of urinary incontinence (UI in women, with a particular focus on the impact of this form of therapy on the patients’ quality of life (QoL. Methods: The following electronic databases were searched: PubMed, Embase, and Cochrane Library (articles only in English, 1990–2017. Search terms were as follows: urinary incontinence, pelvic floor muscle training, pelvic floor exercises, quality of life. Systematic review methods were based on the PRISMA (Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses statement. Results: The assessment of the impact of PFMT on the QoL of women with UI was conducted among 2,394 women in 24 selected studies. After the end of treatment, the majority of patients in the experimental groups noted a statistically significant improvement in QoL. Conclusion: The results of this literature review demonstrate that PFMT is an effective treatment for UI in women. PFMT significantly improves the QoL of women with UI, which is an important determinant of their physical, mental, and social functioning. Keywords: urinary incontinence, pelvic floor muscle training, quality of life

  9. The development and psychometric evaluation of a self-efficacy scale for practicing pelvic floor exercises

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cinara Sacomori

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Self-efficacy has been shown to be a predictor of many health-related behaviors, including the practice of pelvic floor exercises with a focus on prevention or cure. OBJECTIVES: To describe the process of construction and the psychometric properties of the scale of self-efficacy for the practice of pelvic floor exercises (EAPEAP. METHOD: A cross-sectional study of validation was carried out with 81 from community and 96 postpartum women, 54.8% of them complained of urinary leakage. An exploratory factor analysis and internal consistency analysis was performed. To check predictive capacity, we analyzed the adherence at 3 months post - intervention and compared the scores of self-efficacy between adherent and non-adherent women. Reliability was analyzed by split half procedure. RESULTS: The instrument showed α=0.923, and revealed three factors: performance expectation considering the action, performance expectation considering the preparation for action and outcome expectations. These factors accounted for 65.32% of the total variance. The instrument was able to differentiate between women who adhere and have not adhered to the exercises (U=352, p=0.013 and there was strong correlation between the two halves of the instrument (rho=0.889, p<0.001. CONCLUSION: The scale is a valid and reliable tool to measure self-efficacy to practice pelvic floor exercises.

  10. "Nutraceuticals" in relation to human skeletal muscle and exercise.

    OpenAIRE

    Deane, Colleen Siobhan; Wilkinson, D.J.; Phillips, B.E.; Smith, K.; Etheridge, T.; Atherton, P.J.

    2017-01-01

    Skeletal muscles have a fundamental role in locomotion and whole body metabolism, with muscle mass and quality being linked to improved health and even lifespan. Optimizing nutrition in combination with exercise is considered an established, effective ergogenic practice for athletic performance. Importantly, exercise and nutritional approaches also remain arguably the most effective countermeasure for muscle dysfunction associated with aging and numerous clinical conditions, e.g., cancer cach...

  11. Pelvic floor muscle training protocol for stress urinary incontinence in women: A systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marlene Oliveira

    Full Text Available Summary Introduction: Strengthening exercises for pelvic floor muscles (SEPFM are considered the first approach in the treatment of stress urinary incontinence (SUI. Nevertheless, there is no evidence about training parameters. Objective: To identify the protocol and/or most effective training parameters in the treatment of female SUI. Method: A literature research was conducted in the PubMed, Cochrane Library, PEDro, Web of Science and Lilacs databases, with publishing dates ranging from January 1992 to March 2014. The articles included consisted of English-speaking experimental studies in which SEPFM were compared with placebo treatment (usual or untreated. The sample had a diagnosis of SUI and their age ranged between 18 and 65 years. The assessment of methodological quality was performed based on the PEDro scale. Results: Seven high methodological quality articles were included in this review. The sample consisted of 331 women, mean age 44.4±5.51 years, average duration of urinary loss of 64±5.66 months and severity of SUI ranging from mild to severe. SEPFM programs included different training parameters concerning the PFM. Some studies have applied abdominal training and adjuvant techniques. Urine leakage cure rates varied from 28.6 to 80%, while the strength increase of PFM varied from 15.6 to 161.7%. Conclusion: The most effective training protocol consists of SEPFM by digital palpation combined with biofeedback monitoring and vaginal cones, including 12 week training parameters, and ten repetitions per series in different positions compared with SEPFM alone or a lack of treatment.

  12. Oscillation of tissue oxygen index in non-exercising muscle during exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yano, T; Afroundeh, R; Shirakawa, K; Lian, C-S; Shibata, K; Xiao, Z; Yunoki, T

    2015-09-01

    The purpose of the present study was to examine how oscillation of tissue oxygen index (TOI) in non-exercising exercise is affected during high-intensity and low-intensity exercises. Three exercises were performed with exercise intensities of 30% and 70% peak oxygen uptake (Vo(2)peak) for 12 min and with exercise intensity of 70% Vo(2)peak for 30 s. TOI in non-exercising muscle (biceps brachii) during the exercises for 12 min was determined by nearinfrared spectroscopy. TOI in the non-exercising muscle during the exercises was analyzed by fast Fourier transform (FFT) to obtain power spectra density (PSD). The frequency at which maximal PSD appeared (Fmax) during the exercise with 70% Vo(2)peak for 12 min (0.00477 ± 0.00172 Hz) was significantly lower than that during the exercise with 30% Vo2peak for 12 min (0.00781 ± 0.00338 Hz). There were significant differences in blood pH and blood lactate between the exercise with 70% Vo(2)peak and the exercise with 30% Vo(2)peak. It is concluded that TOI in nonexercising muscle oscillates during low-intensity exercise as well as during high-intensity exercise and that the difference in Fmax between the two exercises is associated with the difference in increase in blood lactate derived from the exercise.

  13. Exercise and nutritional interventions for improving aging muscle health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forbes, Scott C; Little, Jonathan P; Candow, Darren G

    2012-08-01

    Skeletal muscle mass declines with age (i.e., sarcopenia) resulting in muscle weakness and functional limitations. Sarcopenia has been associated with physiological changes in muscle morphology, protein and hormonal kinetics, insulin resistance, inflammation, and oxidative stress. The purpose of this review is to highlight how exercise and nutritional intervention strategies may benefit aging muscle. It is well known that resistance exercise training increases muscle strength and size and evidence also suggests that resistance training can increase mitochondrial content and decrease oxidative stress in older adults. Recent findings suggest that fast-velocity resistance exercise may be an effective intervention for older adults to enhance muscle power and functional capacity. Aerobic exercise training may also benefit aging skeletal muscle by enhancing mitochondrial bioenergetics, improving insulin sensitivity, and/or decreasing oxidative stress. In addition to exercise, creatine monohydrate, milk-based proteins, and essential fatty acids all have biological effects which could enhance some of the physiological adaptations from exercise training in older adults. Additional research is needed to determine whether skeletal muscle adaptations to increased activity in older adults are further enhanced with effective nutritional interventions and whether this is due to enhanced muscle protein synthesis, improved mitochondrial function, and/or a reduced inflammatory response.

  14. The effects of Pilates method on pelvic floor muscle strength in patients with post-prostatectomy urinary incontinence: A randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes, Cíntia S; Pedriali, Fabiana R; Urbano, Mariana R; Moreira, Eliane H; Averbeck, Marcio A; Almeida, Silvio Henrique M

    2018-01-01

    To assess the effects of a Pilates exercise program compared to conventional pelvic floor muscle training (PFMT) protocol on pelvic floor muscle strength (PFMS) in patients with post-prostatectomy urinary incontinence. Patients were randomized into three treatment groups (G1: Pilates, G2: electrical stimulation combined with PFMT, and G3: control group). Duration of therapy was 10 weeks. Baseline assessment included the 24 h pad-test and the ICI-Q questionnaire. PFMS was measured using a manometric perineometry device at baseline and 4 months after radical prostatectomy (RP). The level of significance was P  0.05). G1 and G2 achieved a higher number of fully continent patients than G3 (P Pilates method promoted similar outcomes in the proportion of fully continent patients when compared to conventional PFMT 4 months after RP. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Regulation of autophagy in human skeletal muscle: effects of exercise, exercise training and insulin stimulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fritzen, Andreas M.; Madsen, Agnete B.; Kleinert, Maximilian; Treebak, Jonas T.; Lundsgaard, Anne‐Marie; Jensen, Thomas E.; Richter, Erik A.; Wojtaszewski, Jørgen; Kiens, Bente

    2016-01-01

    Key points Regulation of autophagy in human muscle in many aspects differs from the majority of previous reports based on studies in cell systems and rodent muscle.An acute bout of exercise and insulin stimulation reduce human muscle autophagosome content.An acute bout of exercise regulates autophagy by a local contraction‐induced mechanism.Exercise training increases the capacity for formation of autophagosomes in human muscle.AMPK activation during exercise seems insufficient to regulate autophagosome content in muscle, while mTORC1 signalling via ULK1 probably mediates the autophagy‐inhibiting effect of insulin. Abstract Studies in rodent muscle suggest that autophagy is regulated by acute exercise, exercise training and insulin stimulation. However, little is known about the regulation of autophagy in human skeletal muscle. Here we investigate the autophagic response to acute one‐legged exercise, one‐legged exercise training and subsequent insulin stimulation in exercised and non‐exercised human muscle. Acute one‐legged exercise decreased (Pexercise in human muscle. The decrease in LC3‐II/LC3‐I ratio did not correlate with activation of 5′AMP activated protein kinase (AMPK) trimer complexes in human muscle. Consistently, pharmacological AMPK activation with 5‐aminoimidazole‐4‐carboxamide riboside (AICAR) in mouse muscle did not affect the LC3‐II/LC3‐I ratio. Four hours after exercise, insulin further reduced (Pexercised and non‐exercised leg in humans. This coincided with increased Ser‐757 phosphorylation of Unc51 like kinase 1 (ULK1), which is suggested as a mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) target. Accordingly, inhibition of mTOR signalling in mouse muscle prevented the ability of insulin to reduce the LC3‐II/LC3‐I ratio. In response to 3 weeks of one‐legged exercise training, the LC3‐II/LC3‐I ratio decreased (Pexercise and insulin stimulation reduce muscle autophagosome content, while exercise

  16. Study of the pelvic floor muscles in vaginismus: a concept of pathogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shafik, Ahmed; El-Sibai, Olfat

    2002-10-10

    Neither the cause of vaginismus nor the muscles involved are precisely identified. To define the involved muscles and their role in the pathogenesis of vaginismus. The EMG activity of the levator ani (LA), puborectalis (PR) and bulbocavernosus (BC) muscles was studied in seven female patients (age (years): 25.6(mean)+/-1.2(S.D.)) and seven healthy volunteers who matched the patients in age. Recordings were performed at rest and during induction of vaginismus by a vaginal dilator. Upon approximating the vaginal dilator to the vaginal introitus or introducing it into the vagina of the healthy volunteers, the EMG activity of the LA, PR and BC muscles showed no significant difference from the basal activity. In the patients, the basal EMG activity of the examined muscles was significantly higher than that of the healthy volunteers (Pvaginismus induction, the muscles showed a significant increase of the EMG activity (P0.05) in the LA, PR and BC muscles, respectively. The muscle response was momentary lasting a mean of 31.2+/-5.7s. It was reproducible provided an off-time of a mean of 13.2+/-2.3s was observed. The pelvic floor muscles of vaginismus patients exhibited increased EMG activity at rest and on vaginismus induction; the cause is unknown. The concept of a disordered sacral reflex arc is put forward but needs further studies to be verified.

  17. Landing errors in the men’s floor exercise are caused by flight characteristics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Marinsek

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Landing errors on men’s floor exercises are caused by the flight parameters. Depending of the flight phase is determined the magnitude of the landing mistake. On the sample of all gymnasts (n=97 who were competing in the qualifications of the senior Men’s European Championships 2004 in Ljubljana, we analyzed saltos which were performed by them. Variables according to the theoretical model for the evaluation of salto landings in the floor exercise were used. From the mentioned model we chose only those variables that relate to the flight phase. Axis of rotation, number of turns around longitudinal axis and initial landing height havea significant impact on the magnitude of the landing mistake.

  18. Biofeedback-guided pelvic floor exercise therapy for obstructive defecation: An effective alternative

    Science.gov (United States)

    ba-bai-ke-re, Ma-Mu-Ti-Jiang A; Wen, Ni-Re; Hu, Yun-Long; Zhao, Liang; Tuxun, Tuerhongjiang; Husaiyin, Aierhati; Sailai, Yalikun; Abulimiti, Alimujiang; Wang, Yun-Hai; Yang, Peng

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To compare biofeedback-guided pelvic floor exercise therapy (BFT) with the use of oral polyethylene glycol (PEG) for the treatment of obstructive defecation. METHODS: A total of 88 subjects were assigned to treatment with either BFT (n = 44) or oral PEG (n = 44). Constipation symptoms (including difficult evacuation, hard stool, digitation necessity, incomplete emptying sensation, laxative dependence, perianal pain at defecation, and constipation satisfaction), Wexner Scores, and quality of life scores were assessed after 1, 3, and 6 mo. RESULTS: At the 6 mo follow-up, the symptoms of the BFT group patients showed significantly greater improvements compared with the PEG group regarding difficult evacuation, hard stools, digitation necessity, laxative dependence, perianal pain at defecation, constipation satisfaction, Wexner Constipation Score, and quality of life score (P biofeedback-guided pelvic floor exercise training is superior to oral polyethylene glycol therapy for obstructive defecation. PMID:25083090

  19. Effect of rubber flooring on dairy cattle stepping behavior and muscle activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajapaksha, Eranda; Winkler, Christoph; Tucker, Cassandra B

    2015-04-01

    Use of compressible flooring, such as rubber, has increased on dairy farms. Rubber improves locomotion and is well used by cattle in preference experiments that combine walking and standing. Previous work has found that rubber is particularly beneficial for lame animals, perhaps because a softer material is particularly useful when a single hoof is compromised. The goal of this work was to evaluate the effect of flooring while standing, because cattle in freestall housing spend 40 to 50% of their time engaged in this behavior. In a 2 × 2 design, cows (n = 16) were evaluated on 4 standing surfaces that varied in terms of both floor type (concrete or rubber) and presentation [same floor under all 4 legs (all 4 legs on either concrete or rubber) or a rough surface under only one hind leg and the other 3 legs on concrete or rubber] in a crossover design. Surface electromyograms were used to evaluate muscle fatigue, total activity, and movement of muscle activity between legs during 1 h of standing. Muscle fatigue was evaluated in 2 contexts: (1) static contractions when cows continuously transferred weight to each hind leg, before and after 1 h of standing, and (2) dynamic contractions associated with steps during 1 h on treatment surfaces. In addition, stepping rate, time between each consecutive step, and the latency to lie down after testing were measured. No interaction between floor type and presentation was found. Presentation had a significant effect; when one hind leg was on a rough surface, cattle took 1.7 times more steps with this leg and the non-rough hind leg had 1.2 times more muscle activity, compared with when all 4 legs were on the same surface. These changes are consistent with movement away from concrete with protrusions. When standing on rubber, muscle-activity movements among legs remained stable (0.6-0.7 movements per min) over 1 h but increased on concrete (0.6-0.9 movements per min), indicating that, like humans, cattle may sway to counteract

  20. Regulatory mechanisms of skeletal muscle protein turnover during exercise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rose, Adam John; Richter, Erik

    2009-01-01

    Skeletal muscle protein turnover is a relatively slow metabolic process that is altered by various physiological stimuli such as feeding/fasting and exercise. During exercise, catabolism of amino acids contributes very little to ATP turnover in working muscle. With regards to protein turnover......, there is now consistent data from tracer studies in rodents and humans showing that global protein synthesis is blunted in working skeletal muscle. Whether there is altered skeletal muscle protein breakdown during exercise remains unclear. The blunting of protein synthesis is believed to be mediated...... downstream of changes in intracellular Ca(2+) and energy turnover. In particular, a signaling cascade involving Ca(2+)-calmodulin-eEF2 kinase-eEF2 is implicated. The possible functional significance of altered protein turnover in working skeletal muscle during exercise is discussed. Further work...

  1. Muscle glucose metabolism following exercise in the rat

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Richter, Erik; Garetto, L P; Goodman, M N

    1982-01-01

    Muscle glycogen stores are depleted during exercise and are rapidly repleted during the recovery period. To investigate the mechanism for this phenomenon, untrained male rats were run for 45 min on a motor-driven treadmill and the ability of their muscles to utilize glucose was then assessed during...... in glucose utilization enhanced by prior exercise appeared to be glucose transport across the cell membrane, as in neither control nor exercised rats did free glucose accumulate in the muscle cell. Following exercise, the ability of insulin to stimulate the release of lactate into the perfusate was unaltered......; however its ability to stimulate the incorporation of [(14)C]glucose into glycogen in certain muscles was enhanced. Thus at a concentration of 75 muU/ml insulin stimulated glycogen synthesis eightfold more in the fast-twitch red fibers of the red gastrocnemius than it did in the same muscle...

  2. Impact of oxidative stress on exercising skeletal muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinbacher, Peter; Eckl, Peter

    2015-04-10

    It is well established that muscle contractions during exercise lead to elevated levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in skeletal muscle. These highly reactive molecules have many deleterious effects, such as a reduction of force generation and increased muscle atrophy. Since the discovery of exercise-induced oxidative stress several decades ago, evidence has accumulated that ROS produced during exercise also have positive effects by influencing cellular processes that lead to increased expression of antioxidants. These molecules are particularly elevated in regularly exercising muscle to prevent the negative effects of ROS by neutralizing the free radicals. In addition, ROS also seem to be involved in the exercise-induced adaptation of the muscle phenotype. This review provides an overview of the evidences to date on the effects of ROS in exercising muscle. These aspects include the sources of ROS, their positive and negative cellular effects, the role of antioxidants, and the present evidence on ROS-dependent adaptations of muscle cells in response to physical exercise.

  3. Correlation of Digital Palpation and Transabdominal Ultrasound for Assessment of Pelvic Floor Muscle Contraction

    OpenAIRE

    Arab, Amir Massoud; Behbahani, Roxana Bazaz; Lorestani, Leila; Azari, Afsaneh

    2009-01-01

    Pelvic floor muscle (PFM) dysfunction has been commonly associated with urinary disorders and lumbo-pelvic pain. Transabdominal (TA) ultrasound is currently used by physical therapists to assess PFM function. Controversy exists regarding the correlation between TA ultrasound measurement and vaginal palpation for assessment of PFM contraction, and this relationship has not yet been examined concurrently during the same contraction. The purpose of this study was to determine the correlation of ...

  4. Electrostimulation, response of the pelvic floor muscles, and urinary incontinence in elderly patients post prostatectomy

    OpenAIRE

    Zaidan,Patrícia; Silva,Elirez Bezerra da

    2014-01-01

    Objective to investigate the response of the pelvic floor muscles (PFM), and urinary incontinence (UI), in patients having undergone a prostatectomy, after treatment using electrical stimulation. Materials and methods this observational study was conducted in an outpatient urogynecologic physical therapy clinic of Hospital dos Servidores in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil from August to September 2012. Ten patients (aged, 64 ± 7 years) with urinary incontinence resulting from radical prostatectom...

  5. Validity of Estimation of Pelvic Floor Muscle Activity from Transperineal Ultrasound Imaging in Men.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryan E Stafford

    Full Text Available To investigate the relationship between displacement of pelvic floor landmarks observed with transperineal ultrasound imaging and electromyography of the muscles hypothesised to cause the displacements.Three healthy men participated in this study, which included ultrasound imaging of the mid-urethra, urethra-vesical junction, ano-rectal junction and bulb of the penis. Fine-wire electromyography electrodes were inserted into the puborectalis and bulbocavernosus muscles and a transurethral catheter electrode recorded striated urethral sphincter electromyography. A nasogastric sensor recorded intra-abdominal pressure. Tasks included submaximal and maximal voluntary contractions, and Valsalva. The relationship between each of the parameters measured from ultrasound images and electromyography or intra-abdominal pressure amplitudes was described with nonlinear regression.Strong, non-linear relationships were calculated for each predicted landmark/muscle pair for submaximal contractions (R2-0.87-0.95. The relationships between mid-urethral displacement and striated urethral sphincter electromyography, and bulb of the penis displacement and bulbocavernosus electromyography were strong during maximal contractions (R2-0.74-0.88. Increased intra-abdominal pressure prevented shortening of puborectalis, which resulted in weak relationships between electromyography and anorectal and urethravesical junction displacement during all tasks.Displacement of landmarks in transperineal ultrasound imaging provides meaningful measures of activation of individual pelvic floor muscles in men during voluntary contractions. This method may aid assessment of muscle function or feedback for training.

  6. Skeletal muscle substrate metabolism during exercise: methodological considerations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Van Hall, Gerrit; González-Alonso, J; Sacchetti, M

    1999-01-01

    and the respiratory exchange ratio. However, if the aim is to quantify limb or muscle metabolism, invasive measurements have to be carried out, such as the determination of blood flow, arterio-venous (a-v) difference measurements for O2 and relevant substrates, and biopsies of the active muscle. As many substrates...... substrates. There are several methodological concerns to be aware of when studying the metabolic response to exercise in human subjects. These concerns include: (1) the muscle mass involved in the exercise is largely unknown (bicycle or treadmill). Moreover, whether the muscle sample obtained from a limb......; (3) the use of net limb glycerol release to estimate lipolysis is probably not valid (triacylglycerol utilization by muscle), since glycerol can be metabolized in skeletal muscle; (4) the precision of blood-borne substrate concentrations during exercise measured by a-v difference is hampered since...

  7. Traditional Gymnastic Exercises for the Pelvic Floor Often Lead to Bladder Neck Descent - a Study Using Perineal Ultrasound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baeßler, Kaven; Junginger, Bärbel

    2017-07-01

    The aims of physiotherapy in stress incontinent women are to improve pelvic floor function and the continence mechanism including bladder neck support and urethral closure pressure. In Germany, traditional conservative treatment often includes gymnastic exercises with unclear effects on the bladder neck. The aim of this study was to sonographically assess bladder neck movements during selected exercises. Fifteen healthy, continent women without previous vaginal births, who were able to voluntarily contract their pelvic floor muscels performed the shoulder bridge, the abdominal press, tiptoe and the Pilates clam exercises. The first set was performed without any additional instructions. During the second set directions were given to activate the pelvic floor before beginning each exercise and to maintain the contraction throughout the exercise. Bladder neck movement was measured on perineal ultrasound using a validated method with the pubic symphysis as a reference point. The median age of participants was 32 years, median BMI was 23. Eight women were nulliparous and seven had given birth to 1 - 2 children via caesarean section. When exercises were performed without voluntary pelvic floor contraction the bladder neck descended on average between 2.3 and 4.4 mm, and with pelvic floor contraction prior to the exercise only between 0.5 and 2.1 mm (p > 0.05 except for abdominal press p = 0.007). The Pilates clam exercise and toe stand stabilised the bladder neck most effectively. Bladder neck descent often occurs during pelvic floor gymnastic exercises as traditionally performed in Germany, and a voluntary pelvic floor contraction during the exercises does not necessarily prevent this.

  8. Surface electromyography and ultrasound evaluation of pelvic floor muscles in hyperandrogenic women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vassimon, Flávia Ignácio Antonio; Ferreira, Cristine Homsi Jorge; Martins, Wellington Paula; Ferriani, Rui Alberto; Batista, Roberta Leopoldino de Andrade; Bo, Kari

    2016-04-01

    High levels of androgens increase muscle mass. Due to the characteristics of hyperandrogenism in polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS), it is plausible that women with PCOS may have increased pelvic floor muscle (PFM) thickness and neuromuscular activity levels compared with controls. The aim of this study was to assess PFM thickness and neuromuscular activity among hyperandrogenic women with PCOS and controls. This was an observational, cross-sectional, case-control study evaluating PFM by ultrasound (US) and surface electromyography (sEMG) in nonobese women with and without PCOS. Seventy-two women were divided into two groups: PCOS (n = 33) and controls (n = 39). PFM thickness during contraction was assessed by US (Vingmed CFM 800). Pelvic floor muscle activity was assessed by sEMG (MyoTrac Infinit) during contractions at different time lengths: quick, and 8 and 60 s. Descriptive analysis, analysis of variance (ANOVA), and Student's t test were used for statistical analyses. There were no significant differences in PFM sEMG activity between PCOS and controls in any of the contractions: quick contraction (73.23 mV/ 71.56 mV; p = 0.62), 8 s (55.77 mV/ 54.17 mV; p = 0.74), and 60 s (49.26 mV/ 47.32 mV; p = 0.68), respectively. There was no difference in PFM thickness during contractions evaluated by US between PCOS and controls (12.78 mm/ 13.43 mm; p =  .48). This study did not find statistically significant differences in pelvic floor muscle thickness or in muscle activity between PCOS women and controls.

  9. ROS and myokines promote muscle adaptation to exercise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scheele, Camilla; Nielsen, Søren; Pedersen, Bente K

    2009-01-01

    in skeletal muscle. In fact, it seems that exercise-induced ROS are able to stimulate cytokine production from skeletal muscle. Despite the initial view that ROS were potentially cell damaging, it now seems possible that these substances have important roles in the regulation of cell signaling. Muscle......-derived cytokines, so-called 'myokines', are distinguished from inflammation and instead possess important anti-inflammatory and metabolic properties. In this opinion piece, we suggest that both ROS and myokines are important players in muscle adaptation to exercise....

  10. Response of macrophages in rat skeletal muscle after eccentric exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuo, Qun; Wang, Shu-Chen; Yu, Xin-Kai; Chao, Wei-Wei

    2018-04-01

    Macrophages are known to be important for healing numerous injured tissues depending on their functional phenotypes in response to different stimuli. The objective of this study was to reveal macrophage phenotypic changes involved in exercise-induced skeletal muscle injury and regeneration. Adult male Sprague-Dawley rats experienced one session of downhill running (16° decline, 16 m/min) for 90 min. After exercise the blood and soleus muscles were collected at 0 h, 6 h, 12 h, 1 d, 2 d, 3 d, 1 w and 2 w after exercise, separately. It was showed that CD68 + M1 macrophages mainly infiltrated into muscle necrotic sites at 1-3 d, while CD163 + M2 macrophages were present in muscles from 0 h to 2 weeks after exercise. Using transmission electron microscopy, we observed activated satellite cells 1 d after exercise. Th1-associated transcripts of iNOS and Ccl2 were inhibited post exercise, while COX-2 mRNA was dramatically increased 12 h after running (p < 0.01). M2 phenotype marker Arg-1 increased 12 h and 3 d (p < 0.05, p < 0.01) after exercise, and Clec10a and Mrc2 were up-regulated in muscles 12 h following exercise (p < 0.05, p < 0.05). The data demonstrate the dynamic patterns of macrophage phenotype in skeletal muscle upon eccentric exercise stimuli, and M1 and M2 phenotypes perform different functions during exercise-induced skeletal muscle injury and recovery. Copyright © 2018 Daping Hospital and the Research Institute of Surgery of the Third Military Medical University. Production and hosting by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Proteome Profiles of Longissimus and Biceps femoris Porcine Muscles Related to Exercise and Resting

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pas, te M.F.W.; Keuning, E.; Wiel, van de D.F.M.; Young, J.F.; Oksbjerg, N.; Kruijt, L.

    2011-01-01

    Exercise affects muscle metabolism and composition in the untrained muscles. The proteome of muscle tissue will be affected by exercise and resting. This is of economic importance for pork quality where transportation relates to exercise of untrained muscles. Rest reverses exercise effects. The

  12. Can endurance exercise preconditioning prevention disuse muscle atrophy?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael P Wiggs

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Emerging evidence suggests that exercise training can provide a level of protection against disuse muscle atrophy. Endurance exercise training imposes oxidative, metabolic, and heat stress on skeletal muscle which activates a variety of cellular signaling pathways that ultimately leads to the increased expression of proteins that have been demonstrated to protect muscle from inactivity –induced atrophy. This review will highlight the effect of exercise-induced oxidative stress on endogenous enzymatic antioxidant capacity (i.e., superoxide dismutase, glutathione peroxidase, and catalase, the role of oxidative and metabolic stress on PGC1-α, and finally highlight the effect heat stress and HSP70 induction. Finally, this review will discuss the supporting scientific evidence that these proteins can attenuate muscle atrophy through exercise preconditioning.

  13. Regulation of exercise-induced lipid metabolism in skeletal muscle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jordy, Andreas Børsting; Kiens, Bente

    2014-01-01

    Exercise increases the utilization of lipids in muscle. The sources of lipids are long-chain fatty acids taken up from the plasma and fatty acids released from stores of intramuscular triacylglycerol by the action of intramuscular lipases. In the present review, we focus on the role of fatty acid...... binding proteins, particularly fatty acid translocase/cluster of differentiation 36 (FAT/CD36), in the exercise- and contraction-induced increase in uptake of long-chain fatty acids in muscle. The FAT/CD36 translocates from intracellular depots to the surface membrane upon initiation of exercise/muscle...... triglyceride lipase in regulation of muscle lipolysis. Although the molecular regulation of the lipases in muscle is not understood, it is speculated that intramuscular lipolysis may be regulated in part by the availability of the plasma concentration of long-chain fatty acids....

  14. Muscle activation during selected strength exercises in women with chronic neck muscle pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Lars L; Kjaer, Michael; Andersen, Christoffer H

    2008-01-01

    selected strengthening exercises in women undergoing rehabilitation for chronic neck muscle pain (defined as a clinical diagnosis of trapezius myalgia). SUBJECTS: The subjects were 12 female workers (age=30-60 years) with a clinical diagnosis of trapezius myalgia and a mean baseline pain intensity of 5......BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Muscle-specific strength training has previously been shown to be effective in the rehabilitation of chronic neck muscle pain in women. The aim of this study was to determine the level of activation of the neck and shoulder muscles using surface electromyography (EMG) during...... muscle pain. Several of the strength exercises had high activation of neck and shoulder muscles in women with chronic neck pain. These exercises can be used equally in the attempt to achieve a beneficial treatment effect on chronic neck muscle pain....

  15. "Nutraceuticals" in relation to human skeletal muscle and exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deane, Colleen S; Wilkinson, Daniel J; Phillips, Bethan E; Smith, Kenneth; Etheridge, Timothy; Atherton, Philip J

    2017-04-01

    Skeletal muscles have a fundamental role in locomotion and whole body metabolism, with muscle mass and quality being linked to improved health and even lifespan. Optimizing nutrition in combination with exercise is considered an established, effective ergogenic practice for athletic performance. Importantly, exercise and nutritional approaches also remain arguably the most effective countermeasure for muscle dysfunction associated with aging and numerous clinical conditions, e.g., cancer cachexia, COPD, and organ failure, via engendering favorable adaptations such as increased muscle mass and oxidative capacity. Therefore, it is important to consider the effects of established and novel effectors of muscle mass, function, and metabolism in relation to nutrition and exercise. To address this gap, in this review, we detail existing evidence surrounding the efficacy of a nonexhaustive list of macronutrient, micronutrient, and "nutraceutical" compounds alone and in combination with exercise in relation to skeletal muscle mass, metabolism (protein and fuel), and exercise performance (i.e., strength and endurance capacity). It has long been established that macronutrients have specific roles and impact upon protein metabolism and exercise performance, (i.e., protein positively influences muscle mass and protein metabolism), whereas carbohydrate and fat intakes can influence fuel metabolism and exercise performance. Regarding novel nutraceuticals, we show that the following ones in particular may have effects in relation to 1 ) muscle mass/protein metabolism: leucine, hydroxyl β-methylbutyrate, creatine, vitamin-D, ursolic acid, and phosphatidic acid; and 2 ) exercise performance: (i.e., strength or endurance capacity): hydroxyl β-methylbutyrate, carnitine, creatine, nitrates, and β-alanine. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  16. Pelvic floor muscle assessment outcomes in women with and without provoked vestibulodynia and the impact of a physical therapy program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gentilcore-Saulnier, Evelyne; McLean, Linda; Goldfinger, Corrie; Pukall, Caroline F; Chamberlain, Susan

    2010-02-01

    Physical therapy (PT) may reduce the pain associated with provoked vestibulodynia (PVD) based on previous findings that pelvic floor muscle dysfunction (PFMD) is associated with PVD symptoms. The goals of this study were: (i) to determine whether women with and without PVD differ on measures of pelvic floor muscle (PFM) behavior; and (ii) to assess the impact of PT treatment for women with PVD on these measures. Eleven women with PVD and 11 control women completed an assessment evaluating PFM behavior using surface electromyography (SEMG) recordings and a digital intravaginal assessment. Women with PVD repeated the assessment after they had undergone eight PT treatment sessions of manual therapy, biofeedback, electrical stimulation, dilator insertions, and home exercises. Superficial and deep PFM SEMG tonic activity and phasic activity in response to a painful pressure stimulus, PFM digital assessment variables (tone, flexibility, relaxation capacity, and strength). At pretreatment, women with PVD had higher tonic SEMG activity in their superficial PFMs compared with the control group, whereas no differences were found in the deep PFMs. Both groups demonstrated contractile responses to the painful pressure stimulus that were significantly higher in the superficial as compared with the deep PFMs, with the responses in the PVD group being higher than those in control women. Women with PVD had higher PFM tone, decreased PFM flexibility and lower PFM relaxation capacity compared with control women. Posttreatment improvements included less PFM responsiveness to pain, less PFM tone, improved vaginal flexibility, and improved PFM relaxation capacity, such that women with PVD no longer differed from controls on these measures. Women with PVD demonstrated altered PFM behavior when compared with controls, providing empirical evidence of PFMD, especially at the superficial layer. A PT rehabilitation program specifically targeting PFMD normalized PFM behavior in women with PVD.

  17. Predictors of improvement in sexual function of women with urinary incontinence after treatment with pelvic floor exercises: a secondary analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sacomori, Cinara; Cardoso, Fernando Luiz

    2015-03-01

    Women with urinary incontinence (UI) frequently present with complaints of sexual problems. To evaluate the predictors of sexual function improvement after participating in three physical therapy sessions and performing home-based pelvic floor muscle exercises (PFME) for the treatment of female UI. This is a secondary analysis of a randomized trial with a 3-month follow-up in which the sexual function of 54 women with UI was evaluated. These women joined three supervised physiotherapy sessions that included PFME and health education during 1 month, with a 15-day interval between each session, and kept practicing home-based PFME for a further 2 months. Sexual function was assessed using the Female Sexual Quotient, the pelvic floor muscle strength was measured using the modified Oxford scale, and UI was assessed using the International Consultation on Incontinence Questionnaire. The mean of sexual quotient score improved after treatment (P = 0.001). With respect to specific domains of sexual function, improvement was observed only in the questions about sexual desire, arousal/excitement, and orgasm. Before treatment, 18 women (33.3%) were classified as having sexual dysfunction, and after treatment, eight remained with sexual dysfunction and two other joined this category (total of 18.5%). Those women who had sexual dysfunction at baseline experienced a higher level of improvement of the sexual quotient compared with those without sexual dysfunction (P = 0.001, 95% CI = 9.1-31.9). A multivariate linear regression with backward elimination revealed the following predictors of improvement of the sexual quotient: higher parity, higher adherence to PFME, improvement in the strength of PFM, and a decrease in the frequency of urine leakage (R(2)  = 0.497). PFME was more beneficial with regard to sexual function in those women who presented with sexual dysfunction at baseline. © 2015 International Society for Sexual Medicine.

  18. Perceived loading and muscle activity during hip strengthening exercises

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brandt, Mikkel; Jakobsen, Markus Due; Thorborg, Kristian

    2013-01-01

    hip muscle activity during hip abduction and hip adduction exercises using elastic resistance and isotonic machines, using electromyography (EMG). METHODS: EMG activity was recorded from 11 muscles at the hip, thigh and trunk during hip adduction and hip abduction exercises in 16 untrained women......, using elastic resistance and isotonic exercise machines. These recordings were normalized to maximal voluntary contraction (MVC) EMG (nEMG). The exercises were performed at four levels of perceived loading reported using the Borg CR10: light (Borg ≤2), moderate (Borg >2-... (r =0.62±0.54). The abduction exercise performed with elastic resistance displayed significantly higher gluteus medius nEMG recruitment than the in machine exercise. CONCLUSIONS: The results of this study show that the Borg CR10 scale can be a useful tool for estimating intensity levels during...

  19. IMP metabolism in human skeletal muscle after exhaustive exercise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tullson, P. C.; Bangsbo, Jens; Hellsten, Ylva

    1995-01-01

    This study addressed whether AMP deaminase (AMPD)myosin binding occurs with deamination during intense exercise in humans and the extent of purine loss from muscle during the initial minutes of recovery. Male subjects performed cycle exercise (265 +/- 2 W for 4.39 +/- 0.04 min) to stimulate muscle...... inosine 5'-monophosphate (IMP) formation. After exercise, blood flow to one leg was occluded. Muscle biopsies (vastus lateralis) were taken before and 3.6 +/- 0.2 min after exercise from the occluded leg and 0.7 +/- 0.0, 1.1 +/- 0.0, and 2.9 +/- 0.1 min postexercise in the nonoccluded leg. Exercise...... activated AMPD; at exhaustion IMP was 3.5 +/- 0.4 mmol/kg dry muscle. Before exercise, 16.0 +/- 1.6% of AMPD cosedimented with the myosin fraction; the extent of AMPD:myosin binding was unchanged by exercise. Inosine content increased about threefold during exercise and twofold more during recovery; by 2...

  20. Stress urinary incontinence: effect of pelvic muscle exercise

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ferguson, K. L.; McKey, P. L.; Bishop, K. R.; Kloen, P.; Verheul, J. B.; Dougherty, M. C.

    1990-01-01

    Twenty women with stress urinary incontinence diagnosed by urodynamic testing participated in a 6-week pelvic muscle exercise program. The aim of the study was to evaluate the effectiveness of the exercise program, with or without an intravaginal balloon, on urinary leakage as determined by a

  1. The effect of whole body vibration exercise on muscle activation ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    African Journal for Physical Activity and Health Sciences ... The effect of whole body vibration exercise (WBV) on muscle activation has recently been a topic for discussion amongst some researchers. ... Participants then performed two different exercises: standing calf raises and prone bridging, without and with WBV.

  2. Acute exercise remodels promoter methylation in human skeletal muscle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barrès, Romain; Yan, Jie; Egan, Brendan

    2012-01-01

    DNA methylation is a covalent biochemical modification controlling chromatin structure and gene expression. Exercise elicits gene expression changes that trigger structural and metabolic adaptations in skeletal muscle. We determined whether DNA methylation plays a role in exercise-induced gene ex...

  3. Ammonia uptake in inactive muscles during exercise in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bangsbo, Jens; Kiens, Bente; Richter, Erik

    1996-01-01

    The present study examined NH3 (ammonia and ammonium) uptake in resting leg muscle. Six male subjects performed intermittent arm exercise at various intensities in two separate 32-min periods (part I and part II) and in one subsequent 20-min period in which one-legged exercise was also performed ...

  4. Molecular responses to moderate endurance exercise in skeletal muscle

    Science.gov (United States)

    This study examined alterations in skeletal-muscle growth and atrophy-related molecular events after a single bout of moderate-intensity endurance exercise. Muscle biopsies were obtained from 10 men (23 +/- 1 yr, body mass 80 +/- 2 kg, and VO(2peak) 45 +/- 1 ml x kg'¹ x min'¹) immediately (0 hr) and...

  5. Strength training and aerobic exercise training for muscle disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Voet, N.B.M.; Kooi, E.L. van der; Riphagen, I.I.; Lindeman, E.; Engelen, B.G.M. van; Geurts, A.C.H.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Strength training or aerobic exercise programmes might optimise muscle and cardiorespiratory function and prevent additional disuse atrophy and deconditioning in people with a muscle disease. This is an update of a review first published in 2004. OBJECTIVES: To examine the safety and

  6. Prevalence of urinary incontinence and pelvic floor muscle dysfunction in primiparae two years after cesarean section: cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbosa, Angélica Mércia Pascon; Marini, Gabriela; Piculo, Fernanda; Rudge, Cibele Vieira Cunha; Calderon, Iracema Mattos Paranhos; Rudge, Marilza Vieira Cunha

    2013-01-01

    There is uncertainty in the literature regarding the theory that obstetric events and pelvic floor injuries give rise to lower risk of subsequent urinary incontinence among women delivering via cesarean section than among women delivering vaginally. The objective of this study was to assess the two-year postpartum prevalence of urinary incontinence and pelvic floor muscle dysfunction and the factors responsible for them. Cross-sectional study, conducted in a public university. 220 women who had undergone elective cesarean section or vaginal childbirth two years earlier were selected. Their urinary incontinence symptoms were investigated, and their pelvic floor muscle dysfunction was assessed using digital palpation and a perineometer. The two-year urinary incontinence prevalences following vaginal childbirth and cesarean section were 17% and 18.9%, respectively. The only risk factor for pelvic floor muscle dysfunction was weight gain during pregnancy. Body mass index less than 25 kg/m 2 and normal pelvic floor muscle function protected against urinary incontinence. Gestational urinary incontinence increased the risk of two-year postpartum urinary incontinence. Gestational urinary incontinence was a crucial precursor of postpartum urinary incontinence. Weight gain during pregnancy increased the subsequent risk of pelvic floor muscle dysfunction, and elective cesarean section did not prevent urinary incontinence.

  7. Prevalence of urinary incontinence and pelvic floor muscle dysfunction in primiparae two years after cesarean section: cross-sectional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angélica Mércia Pascon Barbosa

    Full Text Available CONTEXT AND OBJECTIVE There is uncertainty in the literature regarding the theory that obstetric events and pelvic floor injuries give rise to lower risk of subsequent urinary incontinence among women delivering via cesarean section than among women delivering vaginally. The objective of this study was to assess the two-year postpartum prevalence of urinary incontinence and pelvic floor muscle dysfunction and the factors responsible for them. DESIGN AND SETTING Cross-sectional study, conducted in a public university. METHODS 220 women who had undergone elective cesarean section or vaginal childbirth two years earlier were selected. Their urinary incontinence symptoms were investigated, and their pelvic floor muscle dysfunction was assessed using digital palpation and a perineometer. RESULTS The two-year urinary incontinence prevalences following vaginal childbirth and cesarean section were 17% and 18.9%, respectively. The only risk factor for pelvic floor muscle dysfunction was weight gain during pregnancy. Body mass index less than 25 kg/m 2 and normal pelvic floor muscle function protected against urinary incontinence. Gestational urinary incontinence increased the risk of two-year postpartum urinary incontinence. CONCLUSION Gestational urinary incontinence was a crucial precursor of postpartum urinary incontinence. Weight gain during pregnancy increased the subsequent risk of pelvic floor muscle dysfunction, and elective cesarean section did not prevent urinary incontinence.

  8. Augmentation of Deglutitive Thyrohyoid Muscle Shortening by the Shaker Exercise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mepani, Rachel; Antonik, Stephen; Massey, Benson; Kern, Mark; Logemann, Jerilyn; Pauloski, Barbara; Rademaker, Alfred; Easterling, Caryn

    2010-01-01

    Earlier studies of the effect of 6 weeks of the Shaker Exercise have shown significant increase in UES opening and anterior excursion of larynx and hyoid during swallowing in patients with upper esophageal sphincter (UES) dysfunction, resulting in elimination of aspiration and resumption of oral intake. This effect is attributed to strengthening of the suprahyoid muscles, as evidenced by comparison of electromyographic changes in muscle fatigue before and after completion of the exercise regime. The effect of this exercise on thyrohyoid muscle shortening is unknown. Therefore the aim of this study was to determine the effect of the exercise on thyrohyoid muscle shortening. We studied 11 dysphagic patients with UES dysfunction. Six were randomized to traditional swallowing therapy and five to the Shaker Exercise. Videofluoroscopy was used to measure deglutitive thyrohyoid shortening before and after completion of assigned therapy regimen. Maximum thyrohyoid muscle shortening occurred at close temporal proximity to the time of maximal thyroid cartilage excursion. The percent change in thyrohyoid distance from initiation of deglutition to maximal anterior/superior hyoid excursion showed no statistically significant difference between the two groups prior to either therapy (p = 0.54). In contrast, after completion of therapy, the percent change in thyrohyoid distance in the Shaker Exercise group was significantly greater compared to the traditional therapy (p = 0.034). The Shaker Exercise augments the thyrohyoid muscle shortening in addition to strengthening the suprahyoid muscles. The combination of increased thyrohyoid shortening and suprahyoid strengthening contributes to the Shaker Exercise outcome of deglutitive UES opening augmentation. PMID:18685891

  9. The effect of outpatient physical therapy intervention on pelvic floor muscles in women with urinary incontinence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knorst, Mara R; Resende, Thais L; Santos, Thaís G; Goldim, José R

    2013-01-01

    To assess the effect of a weekly, short-term physical therapy intervention on the pelvic floor muscles and urinary incontinence (UI) among patients of the public health system. Quasi-experimental before-and-after study. Clinical history and function evaluation were performed using perineal bidigital maneuvers and perineometry. The intervention consisted of transvaginal electrical stimulation and pelvic floor kinesiotherapy. Data were analyzed using the paired t test or Wilcoxon signed-rank test, Pearson product-moment correlation coefficient or Spearman's rank correlation coefficient. A value of Pphysical therapy sessions were held on average. There was no difference in perineometry measurements following the intervention (40.6±24.1 versus 41.7±25.4, P=0.098). Muscle function significantly increased (P<0.01) in the bidigital maneuver. The patients reported being continent or satisfied with the treatment in 88.9% of cases. The results demonstrated an increase in muscle function and the attainment of urinary continence or treatment satisfaction in most cases.

  10. The effect of outpatient physical therapy intervention on pelvic floor muscles in women with urinary incontinence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mara R. Knorst

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To assess the effect of a weekly, short-term physical therapy intervention on the pelvic floor muscles and urinary incontinence (UI among patients of the public health system. METHOD: Quasi-experimental before-and-after study. Clinical history and function evaluation were performed using perineal bidigital maneuvers and perineometry. The intervention consisted of transvaginal electrical stimulation and pelvic floor kinesiotherapy. Data were analyzed using the paired t test or Wilcoxon signed-rank test, Pearson product-moment correlation coefficient or Spearman's rank correlation coefficient. A value of P<0.05 was considered significant. RESULTS: Eight-two women 55.1±10.9 years-old were evaluated. Mixed urinary incontinence (MUI, stress urinary incontinence (SUI and urge urinary incontinence (UUI were observed in 52.4%, 36.6% and 11%, respectively. The length of UI was 6.0 years (3.0-10. Approximately 13.64 physical therapy sessions were held on average. There was no difference in perineometry measurements following the intervention (40.6±24.1 versus 41.7±25.4, P=0.098. Muscle function significantly increased (P<0.01 in the bidigital maneuver. The patients reported being continent or satisfied with the treatment in 88.9% of cases. CONCLUSIONS: The results demonstrated an increase in muscle function and the attainment of urinary continence or treatment satisfaction in most cases.

  11. Pelvic floor muscle training decreases hip adductors isometric peak torque in incontinent women: an exploratory study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grasiéla Nascimento Correia

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: The pelvic floor muscle (PFM training is the most common treatment for urinary incontinence (UI, however many women performed the contraction of PFM with associated contraction of abdominal, gluteus and hip adductors muscles. OBJECTIVE: To assess the effects of pelvic floor muscle (PFM training on isometric and isokinetic hip adductors peak torque (PT among women suffering from urinary incontinence (UI. MATERIALS AND METHODS: It is a longitudinal and prospective exploratory study. This study included 15 physically active women aged 45 years old and over, who presented complaints of UI. The PFM function (digital evaluation and perineometry, isometric and isokinetic hip adductors PT and one hour pad test were performed before and after treatment. The PFM training was performed in group, one hour once a week for 12 sessions. RESULTS: Significant improvement of PFM function and pressure level (p = 0.003, and significant decrease of hip adductors isometric PT and one-hour pad test, were found post-treatment. Moderate negative correlations between PFM contraction pressure and hip adductors isokinetic PT for dominant side (DS (r = -0.62; p = 0.03 and non-dominant side (NDS (r = -0.64; p = 0.02; and between PFM fast fibers contraction and hip adductors isometric PT for DS (r = -0.60; p = 0.03 and NDS (r = -0.59; p = 0.04 were also found. CONCLUSIONS: The PFM training decreased hip adductors PT and improved PFM functions and UI.

  12. Scapular muscle activity in a variety of plyometric exercises.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maenhout, Annelies; Benzoor, Maya; Werin, Maria; Cools, Ann

    2016-04-01

    Plyometric shoulder exercises are commonly used to progress from slow analytical strength training to more demanding high speed power training in the return to play phase after shoulder injury. The aim of this study was first, to investigate scapular muscle activity in plyometric exercises to support exercise selection in practice and second, to enhance understanding of how scapular muscles are recruited during the back and forth movement phase of these exercises. Thirty-two healthy subjects performed 10 plyometric exercises while surface EMG-activity of the scapular muscles (upper (UT), middle (MT) and lower trapezius (LT) and serratus anterior (SA)) was registered. A high speed camera tracked start and end of the back and forth movement. Mean scapular EMG activity during the 10 exercises ranged from 14.50% to 76.26%MVC for UT, from 15.19% to 96.55%MVC for MT, from 13.18% to 94.35%MVC for LT and from 13.50% to 98.50%MVC for SA. Anova for repeated measures showed significant differences in scapular muscle activity between exercises (pPlyometric shoulder exercises require moderate (31-60%MVC) to high (>60%MVC) scapular muscle activity. Highest MT/LT activity was present in prone plyometric external rotation and flexion. Highest SA activity was found in plyometric external rotation and flexion with Xco and plyometric push up on Bosu. Specific exercises can be selected that recruit minimal levels of UT activity (plyometric external rotation and horizontal abduction or plyometric push up on the Bosu. The results of this study support exercise selection for clinical practice. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Lactate Accumulation in Muscle and Blood during Submaximal Exercise

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-09-21

    exercise, fast and slow twitch fibers Short title: Lactate in muscle and blood P.A. Tesch, W.L. Daniels and D.S. Sharp Exercise Physiology Division, U.S...KIRBY, R.L. & BELCASTRO, A.N. 1978. Relationship between slow - twitch muscle fibres and lactic acid removal. Can J Appl Sports Sci 3:160-162. BRODAL, P...oxygen uptake (Karlsson 1971, Knuttgen & Saltin 1972). It is generally agreed that the main muscle fiber type to be recruited below this level is the slow

  14. Enhancing facial aesthetics with muscle retraining exercises-a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'souza, Raina; Kini, Ashwini; D'souza, Henston; Shetty, Nitin; Shetty, Omkar

    2014-08-01

    Facial attractiveness plays a key role in social interaction. 'Smile' is not only a single category of facial behaviour, but also the emotion of frank joy which is expressed on the face by the combined contraction of the muscles involved. When a patient visits the dental clinic for aesthetic reasons, the dentist considers not only the chief complaint but also the overall harmony of the face. This article describes muscle retraining exercises to achieve control over facial movements and improve facial appearance which may be considered following any type of dental rehabilitation. Muscle conditioning, training and strengthening through daily exercises will help to counter balance the aging effects.

  15. Metabolic control of muscle blood flow during exercise in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boushel, Robert Christopher

    2003-01-01

    that combined blockade of NOS and PGI2, and NOS and cytochrome P450, both attenuate exercise-induced hyperemia in humans. Combined vasodilator blockade studies offer the potential to uncover important interactions and compensatory vasodilator responses. The signaling pathways that link metabolic events evoked...... to exert control of muscle vasodilation. Adenosine, nitric oxide (NO), prostacyclin (PGI2), and endothelial-derived hyperpolarization factor (EDHF) are possible mediators of muscle vasodilation during exercise. In humans, adenosine has been shown to contribute to functional hyperemia as blood flow...... by muscle contraction to vasodilatory signals in the local vascular bed remains an important area of study....

  16. Pregnancy-induced adaptations in the intrinsic structure of rat pelvic floor muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alperin, Marianna; Lawley, Danielle M; Esparza, Mary C; Lieber, Richard L

    2015-08-01

    Maternal birth trauma to the pelvic floor muscles (PFMs) is a major risk factor for pelvic floor disorders. Modeling and imaging studies suggest that demands placed on PFMs during childbirth exceed their physiologic limits; however many parous women do not sustain PFM injury. Here we determine whether pregnancy induces adaptations in PFM architecture, the strongest predictor of muscle function, and/or intramuscular extracellular matrix (ECM), responsible for load bearing. To establish if parallel changes occur in muscles outside of the PFM, we also examined a hind limb muscle. Coccygeus, iliocaudalis, pubocaudalis, and tibialis anterior of 3-month-old Sprague-Dawley virgin, mid-pregnant, and late-pregnant; 6-month-old virgin; and 4- and 12-week postpartum rats (N = 10/group) were fixed in situ and harvested. Major architectural parameters determining muscle's excursion and force-generating capacity were quantified, namely, normalized fiber length (Lfn), physiologic cross-sectional area, and sarcomere length. Hydroxyproline content was used as a surrogate for intramuscular ECM quantity. Analyses were performed by 2-way analysis of variance with Tukey post hoc testing at a significance level of .05. Pregnancy induced a significant increase in Lfn in all PFMs by the end of gestation relative to virgin controls. Fibers were elongated by 37% in coccygeus (P pregnancy. By 12 weeks' postpartum, Lfn of all PFMs returned to the prepregnancy values. Relative to virgin controls, ECM increased by 140% in coccygeus, 52% in iliocaudalis, and 75% in pubocaudalis in late-pregnant group, but remained unchanged across time in the tibialis anterior. Postpartum, ECM collagen content returned to prepregnancy levels in iliocaudalis and pubocaudalis, but continued to be significantly elevated in coccygeus (P pregnancy induces unique adaptations in the structure of the PFMs, which adjust their architectural design by adding sarcomeres in series to increase fiber length as well as mounting

  17. Exercise-induced phospho-proteins in skeletal muscle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Deshmukh, A S; Hawley, J A; Zierath, J R

    2008-01-01

    Efforts to identify exercise-induced signaling events in skeletal muscle have been influenced by ground-breaking discoveries in the insulin action field. Initial discoveries demonstrating that exercise enhances insulin sensitivity raised the possibility that contraction directly modulates insulin...... receptor signaling events. Although the acute effects of exercise on glucose metabolism are clearly insulin-independent, the canonical insulin signaling cascade has been used as a framework by investigators in an attempt to resolve the mechanisms by which muscle contraction governs glucose metabolism....... This review focuses on recent advances in our understanding of exercise-induced signaling pathways governing glucose metabolism in skeletal muscle. Particular emphasis will be placed on the characterization of AS160, a novel Akt substrate that plays a role in the regulation of glucose transport....

  18. Magnesium enhances exercise performance via increasing glucose availability in the blood, muscle, and brain during exercise.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsuan-Ying Chen

    Full Text Available Glucose mobilization and utilization in the periphery and central nervous system are important during exercise and are responsible for exercise efficacy. Magnesium (Mg is involved in energy production and plays a role in exercise performance. This study aimed to explore the effects of Mg on the dynamic changes in glucose and lactate levels in the muscle, blood and brain of exercising rats using a combination of auto-blood sampling and microdialysis. Sprague-Dawley rats were pretreated with saline or magnesium sulfate (MgSO4, 90 mg/kg, i.p. 30 min before treadmill exercise (20 m/min for 60 min. Our results indicated that the muscle, blood, and brain glucose levels immediately increased during exercise, and then gradually decreased to near basal levels in the recovery periods of both groups. These glucose levels were significantly enhanced to approximately two-fold (P<0.05 in the Mg group. Lactate levels in the muscle, blood, and brain rapidly and significantly increased in both groups during exercise, and brain lactate levels in the Mg group further elevated (P<0.05 than those in the control group during exercise. Lactate levels significantly decreased after exercise in both groups. In conclusion, Mg enhanced glucose availability in the peripheral and central systems, and increased lactate clearance in the muscle during exercise.

  19. The relationship between exercise-induced muscle fatigue, arterial blood flow and muscle perfusion after 56 days local muscle unloading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Tobias; Ducos, Michel; Mulder, Edwin; Beijer, Åsa; Herrera, Frankyn; Zange, Jochen; Degens, Hans; Bloch, Wilhelm; Rittweger, Jörn

    2014-05-01

    In the light of the dynamic nature of habitual plantar flexor activity, we utilized an incremental isokinetic exercise test (IIET) to assess the work-related power deficit (WoRPD) as a measure for exercise-induced muscle fatigue before and after prolonged calf muscle unloading and in relation to arterial blood flow and muscle perfusion. Eleven male subjects (31 ± 6 years) wore the HEPHAISTOS unloading orthosis unilaterally for 56 days. It allows habitual ambulation while greatly reducing plantar flexor activity and torque production. Endpoint measurements encompassed arterial blood flow, measured in the femoral artery using Doppler ultrasound, oxygenation of the soleus muscle assessed by near-infrared spectroscopy, lactate concentrations determined in capillary blood and muscle activity using soleus muscle surface electromyography. Furthermore, soleus muscle biopsies were taken to investigate morphological muscle changes. After the intervention, maximal isokinetic torque was reduced by 23·4 ± 8·2% (Pflow, tissue oxygenation, lactate concentrations and EMG median frequency kinematics during the exercise test were comparable before and after the intervention, whereas the increase of RMS in response to IIET was less following the intervention (P = 0·03). In conclusion, following submaximal isokinetic muscle work exercise-induced muscle fatigue is unaffected after prolonged local muscle unloading. The observation that arterial blood flow was maintained may underlie the unchanged fatigability. © 2013 Scandinavian Society of Clinical Physiology and Nuclear Medicine. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Respiratory Muscle Training and Exercise Endurance at Altitude.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helfer, Samuel; Quackenbush, Joseph; Fletcher, Michael; Pendergast, David R

    2016-08-01

    Climbing and trekking at altitude are common recreational and military activities. Physiological effects of altitude are hypoxia and hyperventilation. The hyperventilatory response to altitude may cause respiratory muscle fatigue and reduce sustained submaximal exercise. Voluntary isocapnic hyperpnea respiratory muscle training (VIHT) improves exercise endurance at sea level and at depth. The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that VIHT would improve exercise time at altitude [3600 m (11,811 ft)] compared to control and placebo groups. Subjects pedaled an ergometer until exhaustion at simulated altitude in a hypobaric chamber while noninvasive arterial saturation (Sao2), ventilation (VE), and oxygen consumption (Vo2) were measured. As expected, Sao2 decreased to 88 ± 4% saturation at rest and to 81 ± 2% during exercise, and was not affected by VIHT. VIHT resulted in a 40% increase in maximal training VE compared to pre-VIHT. Exercise endurance significantly increased 44% after VIHT (P = altitude post-VIHT increased more (49%) for longer (21 min) and decreased less (11% at 25.4 ± 6.7 min). VIHT improved exercise time at altitude and sustained VE. This suggests that VIHT reduced respiratory muscle fatigue and would be useful to trekkers and military personnel working at altitude. Helfer S, Quackenbush J, Fletcher M, Pendergast DR. Respiratory muscle training and exercise endurance at altitutde. Aerosp Med Hum Perform. 2016; 87(8):704-711.

  1. Muscle coordination in healthy subjects during floor walking and stair climbing in robot assisted gait training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussein, S; Schmidt, H; Volkmar, M; Werner, C; Helmich, I; Piorko, F; Krüger, J; Hesse, S

    2008-01-01

    The aim of gait rehabilitation is a restoration of an independent gait and improvement of daily life walking functions. Therefore the specific patterns, that are to be relearned, must be practiced to stimulate the learning process of the central nervous system (CNS). The Walking Simulator HapticWalker allows for the training of arbitrary gait trajectories of daily life. To evaluate the quality of the training a total of 9 subjects were investigated during free floor walking and stair climbing and during the same tasks in two different training modes on the HapticWalker: 1) with and 2) without vertical center of mass (CoM) motion. Electromyograms (EMG) of 8 gait relevant muscles were measured and muscle activation was compared for the various training modes. Besides the muscle activation as an indicator for the quality of rehabilitation training the study investigates if a cancellation of the vertical CoM movement by adaption of the footplate trajectory is feasible i.e. the muscle activation patterns for the two training modes on the HapticWalker agree. Results show no significant differences in activation timing between the training modes. This indicates the feasibility of using a passive patient suspension and emulate the vertical CoM motion by trajectory adaption of the footplates. The muscle activation timing during HapticWalker training shows important characteristics observed in physiological free walking though a few differences can still remain.

  2. Pelvic floor muscle training as a persistent nursing intervention: Effect on delivery outcome and pelvic floor myodynamia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin Wang

    2014-03-01

    Conclusion: Persistent nursing intervention for pregnant/postpartum women helped to shorten the second stage of labour and contributed to the recovery of postpartum pelvic floor myodynamia. The influence of this intervention on the delivery mode, and rates of episiotomy and perineal laceration remains unknown. Medical staff should strengthen health education programmes that involve pelvic floor functional rehabilitation.

  3. The Effects of Pre-Exercise Ginger Supplementation on Muscle Damage and Delayed Onset Muscle Soreness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumura, Melissa D; Zavorsky, Gerald S; Smoliga, James M

    2015-06-01

    Ginger possesses analgesic and pharmacological properties mimicking non-steroidal antiinflammatory drugs. We aimed to determine if ginger supplementation is efficacious for attenuating muscle damage and delayed onset muscle soreness (DOMS) following high-intensity resistance exercise. Following a 5-day supplementation period of placebo or 4 g ginger (randomized groups), 20 non-weight trained participants performed a high-intensity elbow flexor eccentric exercise protocol to induce muscle damage. Markers associated with muscle damage and DOMS were repeatedly measured before supplementation and for 4 days following the exercise protocol. Repeated measures analysis of variance revealed one repetition maximum lift decreased significantly 24 h post-exercise in both groups (p ginger group (p = 0.002), and improved at 72 (p = 0.021) and 96 h (p = 0.044) only in the placebo group. Blood creatine kinase significantly increased for both groups (p = 0.015) but continued to increase only in the ginger group 72 (p = 0.006) and 96 h (p = 0.027) post-exercise. Visual analog scale of pain was significantly elevated following eccentric exercise (p ginger. In conclusion, 4 g of ginger supplementation may be used to accelerate recovery of muscle strength following intense exercise but does not influence indicators of muscle damage or DOMS. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  4. Effects of pelvic floor muscle training during pregnancy Efeitos da cinesioterapia no assoalho pélvico durante a gravidez

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia de Oliveira

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available OJETIVE: The objective of the present study was to evaluate the effect of pelvic floor muscle training in 46 nulliparous pregnant women. METHODS: The women were divided into 2 groups: an exercise group and a control group. Functional evaluation of the pelvic floor muscle was performed by digital vaginal palpation using the strength scale described by Ortiz and by a perineometer (with and without biofeedback. RESULTS: The functional evaluation of the pelvic floor muscles showed a significant increase in pelvic floor muscle strength during pregnancy in both groups (P INTRODUÇÃO: A gravidez traz importantes modificações hormonais e anatômicas que têm efeito sobre a musculatura do assoalho pélvico. A cinesioterapia aplicada à musculatura do assoalho pélvico na gestação pode ser grande aliada no controle das alterações músculo-esqueléticas. OBJETIVOS: Avaliar efeitos da cinesioterapia no assoalho pélvico durante a gravidez, por meio da perineometria com e sem "biofeedback" e da avaliação funcional do assoalho pélvico, e correlacionar os valores da avaliação funcional com as perineometrias. MÉTODOS: Estudamos 46 gestantes nulíparas em seguimento pré-natal no Departamento de Obstetrícia do Hospital das Clínicas da Universidade de São Paulo, entre novembro de 2003 e dezembro de 2004, com até 20 semanas de gestação, atendidas no Setor de Baixo-Risco, divididas em dois grupos: Grupo exercício (23 casos: pacientes submetidas à cinesioterapia para a musculatura do assoalho pélvico; e grupo controle (23 casos: sem a prática da cinesioterapia. Por 12 semanas, até a 36ª semana, seguiu-se um protocolo, com treinamento de 60 minutos semanais, executando-se quatro séries de 10 contrações destes músculos com seis segundos de manutenção e 12 segundos de relaxamento, em decúbitos distintos. Realizaram-se 2 avaliações: 1ª (até 20 semanas e 2ª (36 semanas gestacionais, por meio da avaliação funcional do assoalho p

  5. Increasing blood flow to exercising muscle attenuates systemic cardiovascular responses during dynamic exercise in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ichinose, Masashi; Ichinose-Kuwahara, Tomoko; Kondo, Narihiko; Nishiyasu, Takeshi

    2015-11-15

    Reducing blood flow to working muscles during dynamic exercise causes metabolites to accumulate within the active muscles and evokes systemic pressor responses. Whether a similar cardiovascular response is elicited with normal blood flow to exercising muscles during dynamic exercise remains unknown, however. To address that issue, we tested whether cardiovascular responses are affected by increases in blood flow to active muscles. Thirteen healthy subjects performed dynamic plantarflexion exercise for 12 min at 20%, 40%, and 60% of peak workload (EX20, EX40, and EX60) with their lower thigh enclosed in a negative pressure box. Under control conditions, the box pressure was the same as the ambient air pressure. Under negative pressure conditions, beginning 3 min after the start of the exercise, the box pressure was decreased by 20, 45, and then 70 mmHg in stepwise fashion with 3-min step durations. During EX20, the negative pressure had no effect on blood flow or the cardiovascular responses measured. However, application of negative pressure increased blood flow to the exercising leg during EX40 and EX60. This increase in blood flow had no significant effect on systemic cardiovascular responses during EX40, but it markedly attenuated the pressor responses otherwise seen during EX60. These results demonstrate that during mild exercise, normal blood flow to exercising muscle is not a factor eliciting cardiovascular responses, whereas it elicits an important pressor effect during moderate exercise. This suggests blood flow to exercising muscle is a major determinant of cardiovascular responses during dynamic exercise at higher than moderate intensity. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  6. Muscle damage induced by stretch-shortening cycle exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kyröläinen, H; Takala, T E; Komi, P V

    1998-03-01

    Strenuous stretch-shortening cycle exercise was used as a model to study the leakage of proteins from skeletal muscle. The analysis included serum levels of creatine kinase (S-CK), myoglobin (S-Mb), and carbonic anhydrase (S-CA III). Blood samples from power- (N=11) and endurance-trained (N=10) athletes were collected before, 0, and 2 h after the exercise, which consisted of a total of 400 jumps. The levels of all determined myocellular proteins increased immediately after the exercise (P exercise, and the ratio of S-CA III and S-Mb decreased (P recruitment order of motor units, and/or differences in training background.

  7. Electromyography and vaginal pressure of the pelvic floor muscles in women with recurrent vulvovaginal candidiasis and vulvodynia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polpeta, Nádia Cristina; Giraldo, Paulo César; Juliato, Cássia Raquel Teatin; Yoshida, Laura Pagotto; do Amaral, Rose Luce Gomes; Eleutério, José

    2012-01-01

    To evaluate the electrical potentials and pressure exerted by the pelvic floor muscles in women with recurrent vulvovaginal candidiasis (RVVC) or vulvodynia as compared to control women. A cross-sectional study performed in the Female Outpatient Clinic of Genital Infections in the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology of the Universidade Estadual de Campinas analyzed and compared electromyography (EMG) and vaginal pressure of the pelvic floor muscles in 61 women. Of these 61 women, 19 had vulvodynia, 12 had RVVC and 30 women had no disorder (control group). For data collection, the instrument used was the Miotool Uro device and its software Biotrainer (Miotec Ltd., Porto Alegre, Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil). The EMG evaluation of the pelvic floor muscles showed significantly lower values in the vulvodynia group (tonic contractions) and RVVC group (phasic and tonic contractions) when compared to the control group. No significant differences in basal tone EMG and vaginal pressure values at rest or during pelvic floor muscle contractions were found among groups. The maximum time of sustained contraction in patients with RVVC or vulvodynia was significantly lower (p < 0.0001) than in controls. Women with vulvodynia and RVVC have more frequent pelvic floor muscle dysfunction than controls when observed by EMG evaluation.

  8. A comparative study of pelvic floor muscle training in women with multiple sclerosis: its impact on lower urinary tract symptoms and quality of life

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adélia Correia Lúcio

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To compare pelvic floor muscle training and a sham procedure for the treatment of lower urinary tract symptoms and quality of life in women with multiple sclerosis. METHODS: Thirty-five female patients with multiple sclerosis were randomized into two groups: a treatment group (n = 18 and a sham group (n = 17. The evaluation included use of the Overactive Bladder Questionnaire, Medical Outcomes Study Short Form 36, International Consultation on Incontinence Questionnaire Short Form, and Qualiveen questionnaire. The intervention was performed twice per week for 12 weeks in both groups. The treatment group underwent pelvic floor muscle training with assistance from a vaginal perineometer and instructions to practice the exercises daily at home. The sham group received a treatment consisting of introducing a perineometer inside the vagina with no exercises required. Pre- and post-intervention data were recorded. RESULTS: The evaluation results of the two groups were similar at baseline. At the end of the treatment, the treatment group reported fewer storage and voiding symptoms than the sham group. Furthermore, the differences found between the groups were significant improvements in the following scores in the treatment group: Overactive Bladder Questionnaire, International Consultation on Incontinence Questionnaire Short Form, and the General Quality of Life, and Specific Impact of Urinary Problems domains of the Qualiveen questionnaire. CONCLUSIONS: The improvement of lower urinary tract symptoms had a positive effect on the quality of life of women with multiple sclerosis who underwent pelvic floor muscle training, as the disease-specific of quality of life questionnaires demonstrated. This study reinforces the importance of assessing quality of life to judge the effectiveness of a treatment intervention.

  9. Calprotectin is released from human skeletal muscle tissue during exercise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, Ole Hartvig; Andersen, Kasper; Fischer, Christian

    2008-01-01

    Skeletal muscle has been identified as a secretory organ. We hypothesized that IL-6, a cytokine secreted from skeletal muscle during exercise, could induce production of other secreted factors in skeletal muscle. IL-6 was infused for 3 h into healthy young males (n = 7) and muscle biopsies obtained...... in skeletal muscle following IL-6 infusion compared to controls. Furthermore, S100A8 and S100A9 mRNA levels were up-regulated 5-fold in human skeletal muscle following cycle ergometer exercise for 3 h at approximately 60% of in young healthy males (n = 8). S100A8 and S100A9 form calprotectin, which is known...... as an acute phase reactant. Plasma calprotectin increased 5-fold following acute cycle ergometer exercise in humans, but not following IL-6 infusion. To identify the source of calprotectin, healthy males (n = 7) performed two-legged dynamic knee extensor exercise for 3 h with a work load of approximately 50...

  10. The impact of pelvic floor muscle training on the quality of life of women with urinary incontinence: a systematic literature review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radzimińska, Agnieszka; Strączyńska, Agnieszka; Weber-Rajek, Magdalena; Styczyńska, Hanna; Strojek, Katarzyna; Piekorz, Zuzanna

    2018-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this review was to assess the effectiveness of pelvic floor muscle training (PFMT) in the treatment of urinary incontinence (UI) in women, with a particular focus on the impact of this form of therapy on the patients’ quality of life (QoL). Methods The following electronic databases were searched: PubMed, Embase, and Cochrane Library (articles only in English, 1990–2017). Search terms were as follows: urinary incontinence, pelvic floor muscle training, pelvic floor exercises, quality of life. Systematic review methods were based on the PRISMA (Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses) statement. Results The assessment of the impact of PFMT on the QoL of women with UI was conducted among 2,394 women in 24 selected studies. After the end of treatment, the majority of patients in the experimental groups noted a statistically significant improvement in QoL. Conclusion The results of this literature review demonstrate that PFMT is an effective treatment for UI in women. PFMT significantly improves the QoL of women with UI, which is an important determinant of their physical, mental, and social functioning.

  11. Relationship among vaginal palpation, vaginal squeeze pressure, electromyographic and ultrasonographic variables of female pelvic floor muscles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanessa S. Pereira

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: The proper evaluation of the pelvic floor muscles (PFM is essential for choosing the correct treatment. Currently, there is no gold standard for the assessment of female PFM function. Objective: To determine the correlation between vaginal palpation, vaginal squeeze pressure, and electromyographic and ultrasonographic variables of the female PFM. Method: This cross-sectional study evaluated 80 women between 18 and 35 years of age who were nulliparous and had no pelvic floor dysfunction. PFM function was assessed based on digital palpation, vaginal squeeze pressure, electromyographic activity, bilateral diameter of the bulbocavernosus muscles and the amount of bladder neck movement during voluntary PFM contraction using transperineal bi-dimensional ultrasound. The Pearson correlation was used for statistical analysis (p<0.05. Results: There was a strong positive correlation between PFM function and PFM contraction pressure (0.90. In addition, there was a moderate positive correlation between these two variables and PFM electromyographic activity (0.59 and 0.63, respectively and movement of the bladder neck in relation to the pubic symphysis (0.51 and 0.60, respectively. Conclusions: This study showed that there was a correlation between vaginal palpation, vaginal squeeze pressure, and electromyographic and ultrasonographic variables of the PFM in nulliparous women. The strong correlation between digital palpation and PFM contraction pressure indicated that perineometry could easily be replaced by PFM digital palpation in the absence of equipment.

  12. Preferential type II muscle fiber damage from plyometric exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macaluso, Filippo; Isaacs, Ashwin W; Myburgh, Kathryn H

    2012-01-01

    Plyometric training has been successfully used in different sporting contexts. Studies that investigated the effect of plyometric training on muscle morphology are limited, and results are controversial with regard to which muscle fiber type is mainly affected. To analyze the skeletal muscle structural and ultrastructural change induced by an acute bout of plyometric exercise to determine which type of muscle fibers is predominantly damaged. Descriptive laboratory study. Research laboratory. Eight healthy, untrained individuals (age = 22 ± 1 years, height = 179.2 ± 6.4 cm, weight = 78.9 ± 5.9 kg). Participants completed an acute bout of plyometric exercise (10 sets of 10 squat-jumps with a 1-minute rest between sets). Blood samples were collected 9 days and immediately before and 6 hours and 1, 2, and 3 days after the acute intervention. Muscle samples were collected 9 days before and 3 days after the exercise intervention. Blood samples were analyzed for creatine kinase activity. Muscle biopsies were analyzed for damage using fluorescent and electron transmission microscopy. Creatine kinase activity peaked 1 day after the exercise bout (529.0 ± 317.8 U/L). Immunofluorescence revealed sarcolemmal damage in 155 of 1616 fibers analyzed. Mainly fast-twitch fibers were damaged. Within subgroups, 7.6% of type I fibers, 10.3% of type IIa fibers, and 14.3% of type IIx fibers were damaged as assessed by losses in dystrophin staining. Similar damage was prevalent in IIx and IIa fibers. Electron microscopy revealed clearly distinguishable moderate and severe sarcomere damage, with damage quantifiably predominant in type II muscle fibers of both the glycolytic and oxidative subtypes (86% and 84%, respectively, versus only 27% of slow-twitch fibers). We provide direct evidence that a single bout of plyometric exercise affected mainly type II muscle fibers.

  13. Hip and trunk muscles activity during nordic hamstring exercise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narouei, Shideh; Imai, Atsushi; Akuzawa, Hiroshi; Hasebe, Kiyotaka; Kaneoka, Koji

    2018-01-01

    The nordic hamstring exercise (NHE) is a dynamic lengthening hamstring exercise that requires trunk and hip muscles activation. Thigh muscles activation, specifically hamstring/quadriceps contractions has been previously examined during NHE. Trunk and hip muscles activity have not been enough studied. The aim of this study was to analyze of hip and trunk muscles activity during NHE. Surface electromyography (EMG) and kinematic data were collected during NHE. Ten healthy men with the age range of 21–36 years performed two sets of two repetitions with downward and upward motions each of NHE. EMG activity of fifteen trunk and hip muscles and knee kinematic data were collected. Muscle activity levels were calculated through repeated measure analysis of variance in downward and upward motions, through Paired t-test between downward and upward motions and gluteus maximus to erector spine activity ratio (Gmax/ES ratio) using Pearson correlation analyses were evaluated. Semitendinosus and biceps femoris muscles activity levels were the greatest in both motions and back extensors and internal oblique muscles activity were greater than other muscles (Phamstrings contractions. It could be important for early assessment of subjects with hamstring injury risk. PMID:29740557

  14. Hip and trunk muscles activity during nordic hamstring exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narouei, Shideh; Imai, Atsushi; Akuzawa, Hiroshi; Hasebe, Kiyotaka; Kaneoka, Koji

    2018-04-01

    The nordic hamstring exercise (NHE) is a dynamic lengthening hamstring exercise that requires trunk and hip muscles activation. Thigh muscles activation, specifically hamstring/quadriceps contractions has been previously examined during NHE. Trunk and hip muscles activity have not been enough studied. The aim of this study was to analyze of hip and trunk muscles activity during NHE. Surface electromyography (EMG) and kinematic data were collected during NHE. Ten healthy men with the age range of 21-36 years performed two sets of two repetitions with downward and upward motions each of NHE. EMG activity of fifteen trunk and hip muscles and knee kinematic data were collected. Muscle activity levels were calculated through repeated measure analysis of variance in downward and upward motions, through Paired t -test between downward and upward motions and gluteus maximus to erector spine activity ratio (Gmax/ES ratio) using Pearson correlation analyses were evaluated. Semitendinosus and biceps femoris muscles activity levels were the greatest in both motions and back extensors and internal oblique muscles activity were greater than other muscles ( P hamstrings contractions. It could be important for early assessment of subjects with hamstring injury risk.

  15. Chronic exercise preserves lean muscle mass in masters athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wroblewski, Andrew P; Amati, Francesca; Smiley, Mark A; Goodpaster, Bret; Wright, Vonda

    2011-09-01

    Aging is commonly associated with a loss of muscle mass and strength, resulting in falls, functional decline, and the subjective feeling of weakness. Exercise modulates the morbidities of muscle aging. Most studies, however, have examined muscle-loss changes in sedentary aging adults. This leaves the question of whether the changes that are commonly associated with muscle aging reflect the true physiology of muscle aging or whether they reflect disuse atrophy. This study evaluated whether high levels of chronic exercise prevents the loss of lean muscle mass and strength experienced in sedentary aging adults. A cross-section of 40 high-level recreational athletes ("masters athletes") who were aged 40 to 81 years and trained 4 to 5 times per week underwent tests of health/activity, body composition, quadriceps peak torque (PT), and magnetic resonance imaging of bilateral quadriceps. Mid-thigh muscle area, quadriceps area (QA), subcutaneous adipose tissue, and intramuscular adipose tissue were quantified in magnetic resonance imaging using medical image processing, analysis, and visualization software. One-way analysis of variance was used to examine age group differences. Relationships were evaluated using Spearman correlations. Mid-thigh muscle area (P = 0.31) and lean mass (P = 0.15) did not increase with age and were significantly related to retention of mid-thigh muscle area (P lean mass (P = 0.4) and PT. This study contradicts the common observation that muscle mass and strength decline as a function of aging alone. Instead, these declines may signal the effect of chronic disuse rather than muscle aging. Evaluation of masters athletes removes disuse as a confounding variable in the study of lower-extremity function and loss of lean muscle mass. This maintenance of muscle mass and strength may decrease or eliminate the falls, functional decline, and loss of independence that are commonly seen in aging adults.

  16. Effect of muscle acidity on muscle metabolism and fatigue during intense exercise in man

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bangsbo, Jens; Madsen, K.; Kiens, Bente

    1996-01-01

    1. The aim of this study was to examine the effect of muscle pH on muscle metabolism and development of fatigue during intense exercise. 2. Seven subjects performed intense exhaustive leg exercise on two occasions: with and without preceding intense intermittent arm exercise leading to high...... or moderate (control) blood lactate concentrations (HL and C, respectively). Prior to and immediately after each exercise bout, a muscle biopsy was taken from m. vastus lateralis of the active leg. Leg blood flow was measured and femoral arterial and venous blood samples were collected before and frequently...... during the exhaustive exercises. 3. The duration of the exercise was shorter in HL than in C (3.46 +/- 0.28 vs. 4.67 +/- 0.55 min; means +/- S.E.M.; P muscle pH was the same in C and HL (7.17 vs. 7.10), but at the end of exercise muscle pH was lower in HL than in C (6.82 vs. 6...

  17. Patients with Pelvic Floor Muscle Spasm Have a Superior Response to Pelvic Floor Physical Therapy at Specialized Centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polackwich, Alan Scott; Li, Jianbo; Shoskes, Daniel A

    2015-10-01

    Chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome is a common condition that often requires multimodal therapy. Patients with chronic pelvic pain syndrome have a high incidence of pelvic floor spasm, which can be treated with pelvic floor physical therapy. However, this is a specialized skill. We compared outcomes of pelvic floor physical therapy as part of multimodal therapy in patients with chronic pelvic pain syndrome between those treated at our institution and elsewhere. We identified patients from our chronic pelvic pain syndrome registry with pelvic floor spasm who were seen between 2010 and 2014 for more than 1 visit. Patient phenotype was assessed with the UPOINT system and symptom severity was determined by the National Institutes of Health CPSI. A 6-point decrease in CPSI was used to define patient improvement. A total of 82 patients fit the study criteria. Mean age was 41.6 years (range 19 to 75) and median symptom duration was 24 months (range 3 to 240). Mean CPSI was 26.8 (range 10 to 41), the median number of positive UPOINT domains was 3 (range 1 to 6) and 27 patients (32.9%) were treated locally. At followup 9 patients had refused pelvic floor physical therapy, and 24 and 48 had undergone pelvic floor physical therapy elsewhere and at CCF, respectively. The mean change in CPSI was 1.11 ± 4.1 in patients who refused, -3.46 ± 6.7 in those treated elsewhere and -11.3 ± 7.0 in those treated at CCF (p physical therapy at CCF (OR 4.23, p = 0.002) and symptom duration (OR 0.52, p = 0.03) predicted improvement. Pelvic floor physical therapy can be effective for chronic pelvic pain syndrome in patients with pelvic floor spasm. However, the outcome depends on specialty training and experience of therapists. Copyright © 2015 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Muscle weakness, afferent sensory dysfunction and exercise in knee osteoarthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roos, Ewa M.; Herzog, Walter; Block, Joel A

    2011-01-01

    Lower-extremity muscle strength and afferent sensory dysfunction, such as reduced proprioceptive acuity, are potentially modifiable putative risk factors for knee osteoarthritis (OA). Findings from current studies suggest that muscle weakness is a predictor of knee OA onset, while there is confli...... with previous knee injuries) are easily identified, and may benefit from exercise interventions to prevent or delay OA onset....... there is conflicting evidence regarding the role of muscle weakness in OA progression. In contrast, the literature suggests a role for afferent sensory dysfunction in OA progression but not necessarily in OA onset. The few pilot exercise studies performed in patients who are at risk of incident OA indicate...... a possibility for achieving preventive structure or load modifications. In contrast, large randomized controlled trials of patients with established OA have failed to demonstrate beneficial effects of strengthening exercises. Subgroups of individuals who are at increased risk of knee OA (such as those...

  19. Norepinephrine spillover from skeletal muscle during exercise in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Savard, G K; Richter, Erik; Strange, S

    1989-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of increasing muscle mass involvement in dynamic exercise on both sympathetic nervous activation and local hemodynamic variables of individual active and inactive skeletal muscle groups. Six male subjects performed 15-min bouts of one...... legs, with a steeper rise occurring approximately 70% VO2max. These increases were not associated with any significant changes in leg blood flow or leg vascular conductance at the exercise intensities examined. These results suggest that, as the total active muscle mass increases, the rise...... in both legs. Arterial and venous plasma concentrations of norepinephrine (NE) and epinephrine were analyzed, and the calculated NE spillover was used as an index of sympathetic nervous activity to the limb. NE spillover increased gradually both in the resting, and to a larger extent in the exercising...

  20. The 12-month effects of structured lifestyle advice and pelvic floor muscle training for pelvic organ prolapse

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Due, Ulla; Brostrøm, Søren; Lose, Gunnar

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: We evaluated the 12-month effects of adding pelvic floor muscle training to a lifestyle advice program in women with symptomatic pelvic organ prolapse stage II-III and the number of women who had sought further treatment. MATERIAL AND METHODS: This study was a 12-month follow up...... of a randomized controlled trial comparing a structured lifestyle advice program alone (lifestyle group) or in combination with pelvic floor muscle training (training and lifestyle group). Both programs consisted of six separate group sessions within 12 weeks. RESULTS: Data were available from 83 (76%) of the 109...... surgery. More severe anterior prolapse and more bladder symptoms at the 3-month follow up were significantly associated with having sought further treatment in both groups. CONCLUSIONS: At 12-month follow up, the effects of adding pelvic floor muscle training to a structured lifestyle advice program were...

  1. Exercise, GLUT4, and Skeletal Muscle Glucose Uptake

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Richter, Erik; Hargreaves, Mark

    2013-01-01

    Glucose is an important fuel for contracting muscle, and normal glucose metabolism is vital for health. Glucose enters the muscle cell via facilitated diffusion through the GLUT4 glucose transporter which translocates from intracellular storage depots to the plasma membrane and T-tubules upon...... muscle contraction. Here we discuss the current understanding of how exercise-induced muscle glucose uptake is regulated. We briefly discuss the role of glucose supply and metabolism and concentrate on GLUT4 translocation and the molecular signaling that sets this in motion during muscle contractions....... Contraction-induced molecular signaling is complex and involves a variety of signaling molecules including AMPK, Ca(2+), and NOS in the proximal part of the signaling cascade as well as GTPases, Rab, and SNARE proteins and cytoskeletal components in the distal part. While acute regulation of muscle glucose...

  2. Muscle metaboreflex control of the circulation during exercise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boushel, Robert Christopher

    2010-01-01

    . It can both elevate and decrease muscle blood flow depending on (1) the intensity and mode of contraction, (2) the limb in which the reflex is evoked, (3) the strength of the signal defined by the muscle mass, (4) the extent to which blood flow is redistributed from inactive vascular beds to increase......This review covers the control of blood pressure, cardiac output and muscle blood flow by the muscle metaboreflex which involves chemically sensitive nerves located in muscle parenchyma activated by metabolites accumulating in the muscle during contraction. The efferent response to metaboreflex...... activation is an increase in sympathetic nerve activity that constricts the systemic vasculature and also evokes parallel inotropic and chronotropic effects on the heart to increase cardiac output. The metaboreflex elicits a significant blood pressure elevating response during exercise and functions...

  3. Human skeletal muscle glycogen utilization in exhaustive exercise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Joachim; Holmberg, Hans-Christer; Schrøder, Henrik Daa

    2011-01-01

    Although glycogen is known to be heterogeneously distributed within skeletal muscle cells, there is presently little information available about the role of fibre types, utilization and resynthesis during and after exercise with respect to glycogen localization. Here, we tested the hypothesis...... to be influenced by fibre type prior to exercise, as well as carbohydrate availability during the subsequent period of recovery. These findings provide insight into the significance of fibre type-specific compartmentalization of glycogen metabolism in skeletal muscle during exercise and subsequent recovery. ....... that utilization of glycogen with different subcellular localizations during exhaustive arm and leg exercise differs and examined the influence of fibre type and carbohydrate availability on its subsequent resynthesis. When 10 elite endurance athletes (22 ± 1 years, VO2 max = 68 ± 5 ml kg-1 min-1, mean ± SD...

  4. Pelvic floor muscle training for overactive bladder symptoms – A prospective study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fátima Fitz

    Full Text Available Summary Introduction: Pelvic floor muscle training (PFMT involves the contraction of the puborectal, anal sphincter and external urethral muscles, inhibiting the detrusor contraction, what justify its use in the treatment of overactive bladder (OAB symptoms. Objective: To verify the effects of isolated PFMT on the symptoms of OAB. Method: Prospective clinical trial with 27 women with mixed urinary incontinence (MUI, with predominance of OAB symptoms and loss ≥ 2 g in the pad test. It was evaluated: pelvic floor muscles (PFMs function (digital palpation and manometry; urinary symptoms (nocturia, frequency and urinary loss; degree of discomfort of OAB symptoms; and quality of life (Incontinence Quality-of-Life Questionnaire [I-QoL]. The PFMT program consisted of 24 outpatient sessions (2x/week + home PFMT. The Mann-Whitney and Wilcoxon tests (with a significance level of 5% were used to analyse the data. Results: There was a significant improvement of the urinary symptoms to the pad test (5.8±9.7, p<0.001, urinary loss (0.7±1.1, p=0.005 and nocturia (0.8±0.9, p=0.011. Reduction in the degree of discomfort of urinary symptoms was observed according to OAB-V8 questionnaire (10.0±7.7, p=0.001. There were also significant results in PFMs function: Oxford (3.6±0.9, p=0.001, endurance (5.2±1.8, p<0.001, fast (8.9±1.5, p<0.001 and manometry (26.6±15.8, p=0.003. In addition, quality of life had a significant improvement in the three domains evaluated by I-QoL. Conclusion: The PFMT without any additional guidelines improves the symptomatology, the function of PFMs and the quality of life of women with OAB symptoms.

  5. Scintigraphic evaluation of muscle damage following extreme exercise: concise communication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matin, P.; Lang, G.; Carretta, R.; Simon, G.

    1983-01-01

    Total body Tc-99m pyrophosphate scintigraphy was performed on 11 ''ultramarathon'' runners to assess the ability of nuclear medicine techniques to evaluate skeletal-muscle injury due to exercise. We found increased muscle radionuclide concentration in 90% of the runners. The pattern of muscle uptake correlated with the regions of maximum pain. The detection of exercise-induced rhabdomyolysis appeared to be best when scintigraphy was performed within 48 hr after the race, and to be almost undetectable after about a week. It was possible to differentiate muscle injury from joint and osseous abnormalities such as bone infarct or stress fracture. Although 77% of the runners had elevated serum creatine kinase MB activity, cardiac scintigraphy showed no evidence of myocardial injury

  6. Can quality of life be improved by pelvic floor muscle training in women with urinary incontinence after ischemic stroke?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tibaek, Sigrid; Jensen, Rigmor; Lindskov, Grethe

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of pelvic floor muscle training in women with urinary incontinence after ischemic stroke measured by quality of life (QoL) parameters. Three hundred thirty-nine medical records of stroke patients were searched. Twenty-six subjects were randomised...... to a Treatment Group or a Control Group in a single blinded, randomised study design. The intervention included 12 weeks of standardised pelvic floor muscle training. The outcome was measured by the Short Form 36 (SF-36) Health Survey Questionnaire and The Incontinence Impact Questionnaire (IIQ). Twenty...

  7. Low intensity exercise training improves skeletal muscle regeneration potential

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tiziana ePietrangelo

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The aim of this study was to determine whether 12 days of low-to-moderate exercise training at low altitude (598 m a.s.l. improves skeletal muscle regeneration in sedentary adult women.Methods: Satellite cells were obtained from the vastus lateralis skeletal muscle of seven women before and after this exercise training at low altitude. They were investigated for differentiation aspects, superoxide anion production, antioxidant enzymes, mitochondrial potential variation after a depolarizing insult, intracellular Ca2+ concentrations, and micro (miRNA expression (miR-1, miR-133, miR-206.Results: In these myogenic populations of adult stem cells, those obtained after exercise training, showed increased Fusion Index and intracellular Ca2+ concentrations. This exercise training also generally reduced superoxide anion production in cells (by 12% to 67%, although not in two women, where there was an increase of ~15% along with a reduced superoxide dismutase activity. miRNA expression showed an exercise-induced epigenetic transcription profile that was specific according to the reduced or increased superoxide anion production of the cells. Conclusions: The present study shows that low-to-moderate exercise training at low altitude improves the regenerative capacity of skeletal muscle in adult women. The differentiation of cells was favored by increased intracellular calcium concentration and increased the fusion index. This low-to-moderate training at low altitude also depicted the epigenetic signature of cells.

  8. Electromyographic analysis of exercise resulting in symptoms of muscle damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McHugh, M P; Connolly, D A; Eston, R G; Gleim, G W

    2000-03-01

    Surface electromyographic (EMG) signals were recorded from the hamstring muscles during six sets of submaximal isokinetic (2.6 rad x s(-1)) eccentric (11 men, 9 women) or concentric (6 men, 4 women) contractions. The EMG per unit torque increased during eccentric (P exercise. Similarly, the median frequency increased during eccentric (P exercise. The EMG per unit torque was lower for submaximal eccentric than maximum isometric contractions (P unit torque was lower for eccentric than concentric contractions (P exercise resulted in significant isometric strength loss (P exercise, while the most severe pain and muscle tenderness occurred 2 days after eccentric exercise. A lower EMG per unit torque is consistent with the selective recruitment of a small number of motor units during eccentric exercise. A higher median frequency during eccentric contractions may be explained by selective recruitment of fast-twitch motor units. The present results are consistent with the theory that muscle damage results from excessive stress on a small number of active fibres during eccentric contractions.

  9. Effectiveness of pelvic floor muscle training on symptoms and uroflowmetry parameters in female patients with overactive bladder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulaksizoğlu, Haluk; Akand, Murat; Çakmakçi, Evrim; Gül, Murat; Seçkin, Bedreddin

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate the effects of pelvic floor muscle training (PFMT) on symptoms of overactive bladder (OAB) as well as uroflowmetry parameters and functional bladder capacity. Fifty-nine female patients with OAB symptoms were included. Patients were assessed by SEAPI-QMM, uroflowmetry, and abdominal ultrasound. A specially designed PFMT program using a Pilates ball was generated for patients. The training period was 1-h sessions twice a week for 6 weeks and aerobic home exercises to be performed at home 4 or 5 times every other day. Following training, subjects were reevaluated for body mass index, SEAPI questionnaire, and uroflowmetry. Initial mean SEAPI score, mean maximum and average flow rates, and mean voided volume were 9.8 ± 7.2, 29.8 ± 16.4 mL/s, 16.3 ± 8.7 mL/s, and 211.6 ± 173.5 mL, respectively. After completion of the training program, SEAPI scores improved significantly to 3.4 ± 6.4 (P < 0.05). Maximum and average flow rate results did not show significant changes, whereas voided volume seemed to have improved in conjunction with patients' symptom scores (Pearson correlation coefficient: 0.86). According to. our results, we think that proper PFMT results in increase of functional bladder capacity as well as improvement in OAB symptoms and can be recommended as first-line therapy or in conjunction with medical therapy in severe cases.

  10. Effects of multidimensional pelvic floor muscle training in healthy young women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talasz, Helena; Kalchschmid, Elisabeth; Kofler, Markus; Lechleitner, Monika

    2012-03-01

    Cross-sectional and interventional study to assess pelvic floor muscle (PFM) function in healthy young nulliparous women and to determine the effects of a 3-month PFM training program with emphasis on co-contraction of PFM and anterolateral abdominal muscles and on correctly performed coughing patterns. PFM function was assessed by digital vaginal palpation in 40 volunteers and graded according to the 6-point Oxford grading scale. The PFM training program was comprised theoretical instruction, as well as verbal feedback during hands-on instruction and repeated training sessions focussing on strengthening PFM and anterolateral abdominal muscle co-contraction during forced expiration and coughing. At baseline, 30 women (75%) were able to perform normal PFM contractions at rest (Oxford scale score ≥ 3); only 4 of them (10%) presented additional involuntary PFM contractions before and during coughing. The remaining 10 women (25%) were unable to perform voluntary or involuntary PFM contractions. Mean Oxford scale score in the whole group was 3.3 ± 1.7. After completing the PFM training program, 29 women (72.5%) performed cough-related PFM contractions and group mean Oxford scale score increased significantly to 4.2 ± 1.0. The study shows that PFM dysfunction may be detected even in healthy young women. Multidimensional training, however, may significantly improve PFM function.

  11. Attenuation of muscle damage by preconditioning with muscle hyperthermia 1-day prior to eccentric exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nosaka, K; Muthalib, M; Lavender, A; Laursen, P B

    2007-01-01

    This study investigated the hypothesis that muscle damage would be attenuated in muscles subjected to passive hyperthermia 1 day prior to exercise. Fifteen male students performed 24 maximal eccentric actions of the elbow flexors with one arm; the opposite arm performed the same exercise 2-4 weeks later. The elbow flexors of one arm received a microwave diathermy treatment that increased muscle temperature to over 40 degrees C, 16-20 h prior to the exercise. The contralateral arm acted as an untreated control. Maximal voluntary isometric contraction strength (MVC), range of motion (ROM), upper arm circumference, muscle soreness, plasma creatine kinase activity and myoglobin concentration were measured 1 day prior to exercise, immediately before and after exercise, and daily for 4 days following exercise. Changes in the criterion measures were compared between conditions (treatment vs. control) using a two-way repeated measures ANOVA with a significance level of P < 0.05. All measures changed significantly following exercise, but the treatment arm showed a significantly faster recovery of MVC, a smaller change in ROM, and less muscle soreness compared with the control arm. However, the protective effect conferred by the diathermy treatment was significantly less effective compared with that seen in the second bout performed 4-6 weeks after the initial bout by a subgroup of the subjects (n = 11) using the control arm. These results suggest that passive hyperthermia treatment 1 day prior to eccentric exercise-induced muscle damage has a prophylactic effect, but the effect is not as strong as the repeated bout effect.

  12. Chronic exercise increases insulin binding in muscles but not liver

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonen, A.; Clune, P.A.; Tan, M.H.

    1986-01-01

    It has been postulated that the improved glucose tolerance provoked by chronic exercise is primarily attributable to increased insulin binding in skeletal muscle. Therefore, the authors investigated the effects of progressively increased training (6 wk) on insulin binding by five hindlimb skeletal muscles and in liver. In the trained animals serum insulin levels at rest were lower either in a fed or fasted state and after an oral glucose tolerance test. Twenty-four hours after the last exercise bout sections of the liver, soleus (S), plantaris (P), extensor digitorum longus (EDL), and red (RG) and white gastrocnemius (WG) muscles were pooled from four to six rats. Insulin binding to plasma membranes increased in S, P, and EDL but not in WG or in liver. There were insulin binding differences among muscles. Comparison of rank orders of insulin binding data with published glucose transport data for the same muscles revealed that these parameters do not correspond well. In conclusion, insulin binding to muscle is shown to be heterogeneous and training can increase insulin binding to selected muscles but not liver

  13. Enhanced muscle glucose metabolism after exercise in the rat

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Garetto, L P; Richter, Erik; Goodman, M N

    1984-01-01

    glycogen was substantially repleted at the time (30 min postexercise) that glucose metabolism was examined. When rats were run at twice the previous rate (36 m/min), muscle glycogen was still substantially diminished 30 min after the run. At this time the previously noted increase in insulin sensitivity......Thirty minutes after a treadmill run, glucose utilization and glycogen synthesis in perfused rat skeletal muscle are enhanced due to an increase in insulin sensitivity (Richter et al., J. Clin. Invest. 69: 785-793, 1982). The exercise used in these studies was of moderate intensity, and muscle...... was still observed in perfused muscle; however, glucose utilization was also increased in the absence of added insulin (1.5 vs. 4.2 mumol X g-1 X h-1). In contrast 2.5 h after the run, muscle glycogen had returned to near preexercise values, and only the insulin-induced increase in glucose utilization...

  14. Feasibility and acceptability of couple counselling and pelvic floor muscle training after operation for prostate cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karlsen, Randi V; E Bidstrup, Pernille; Hvarness, Helle

    2017-01-01

    Can intervention, which consists of up to six couple counselling sessions, group instruction in pelvic floor muscle training (PFMT), up to three individual PFMT sessions and a DVD home training program. We examined its feasibility on the basis of the recruitment rate, adherence to and acceptability...... of the intervention, the response rate and changes in erectile and sexual functioning measured on the International Index of Erectile Function at baseline and at eight and 12 months. RESULTS: The recruitment rate was 14%. One couple withdrew, six couples attended 1-4 counselling sessions, and all patients attended...... PFMT until continence was achieved. The response rate on outcomes was 85% for patients and 71% for partners. The couples reported that counselling improved their sex life but it did not improve their ability to talk openly about sex. Most patients found that the physiotherapist improved...

  15. Decreased muscle oxygenation and increased arterial blood flow in the non-exercising limb during leg exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiroishi, Kiyoshi; Kime, Ryotaro; Osada, Takuya; Murase, Norio; Shimomura, Kousuke; Katsumura, Toshihito

    2010-01-01

    We evaluated arterial blood flow, muscle tissue oxygenation and muscle metabolism in the non-exercising limb during leg cycling exercise. Ten healthy male volunteers performed a graded leg cycling exercise at 0, 40, 80, 120 and 160 watts (W) for 5 min each. Tissue oxygenation index (TOI) of the non-exercising left forearm muscle was measured using a near-infrared spatially resolved spectroscopy (NIR(SRS)), and non-exercising forearm blood flow ((NONEX)FBF) in the brachial artery was also evaluated by a Doppler ultrasound system. We also determined O(2) consumption of the non-exercising forearm muscle (NONEXV(O)(2mus)) by the rate of decrease in O(2)Hb during arterial occlusion at each work rate. TOI was significantly decreased at 160 W (p exercising muscle may be reduced, even though (NONEX)FBF increases at high work rates during leg cycling exercise.

  16. A pilot study of muscle plasma protein changes after exercise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahlqvist, Julia R; Voss, Line G; Lauridsen, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    profiles were measured before and after exercise in 3 groups: subjects affected by either Becker muscular dystrophy or McArdle disease, and healthy subjects. RESULTS: Mb and TnI appeared early in the blood, and the increase of TnI was only observed in patients with muscle disease. The CK increase was more...

  17. Creatine Loading, Resistance Exercise Performance, and Muscle Mechanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevenson, Scott W.; Dudley, Gary A.

    2001-01-01

    Examined whether creatine (CR) monohydrate loading would alter resistance exercise performance, isometric strength, or in vivo contractile properties of the quadriceps femoris muscle compared with placebo loading in resistance-trained athletes. Overall, CR loading did not provide an ergogenic benefit for the unilateral dynamic knee extension…

  18. Muscle Activity during Unilateral Vs. Bilateral Battle Rope Exercises

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Calatayud, J.; Martin, F.; Colado, J. C.

    2015-01-01

    Calatayud, J, Martin, F, Colado, JC, Benitez, JC, Jakobsen, MD, and Andersen, LL. Muscle activity during unilateral vs. bilateral battle rope exercises. J Strength Cond Res 29(10): 2854-2859, 2015High training intensity is important for efficient strength gains. Although battle rope training is m...

  19. Muscle blood volume assessment during exercise with Power Doppler Ultrasound

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heres, H.M.; Tchang, B.C.Y.; Schoots, T.; Rutten, M.C.M.; van de Vosse, F.N.; Lopata, R.G.P.

    2016-01-01

    Assessment of perfusion adaptation in muscle during exercise can provide diagnostic information on cardiac and endothelial diseases. Power Doppler Ultrasound (PDUS) is known for its feasibility in the non-invasive measurement of moving blood volume (MBV), a perfusion related parameter. In this

  20. Expression of interleukin-15 in human skeletal muscle effect of exercise and muscle fibre type composition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Anders Rinnov; Mounier, Remi; Plomgaard, Peter

    2007-01-01

    The cytokine interleukin-15 (IL-15) has been demonstrated to have anabolic effects in cell culture systems. We tested the hypothesis that IL-15 is predominantly expressed by type 2 skeletal muscle fibres, and that resistance exercise regulates IL-15 expression in muscle. Triceps brachii, vastus...... lateralis quadriceps and soleus muscle biopsies were obtained from normally physically active, healthy, young male volunteers (n = 14), because these muscles are characterized by having different fibre-type compositions. In addition, healthy, normally physically active male subjects (n = 8) not involved...

  1. Influence of parity, type of delivery, and physical activity level on pelvic floor muscles in postmenopausal women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varella, Larissa Ramalho Dantas; Torres, Vanessa Braga; Angelo, Priscylla Helouyse Melo; Eugênia de Oliveira, Maria Clara; Matias de Barros, Alef Cavalcanti; Viana, Elizabel de Souza Ramalho; Micussi, Maria Thereza de Albuquerque Barbosa Cabral

    2016-03-01

    [Purpose] The aim of the present study was to assess the influence of parity, type of delivery, and physical activity level on pelvic floor muscles in postmenopausal women. [Subjects and Methods] This was an observational analytic cross-sectional study with a sample of 100 postmenopausal women, aged between 45 and 65 years, divided into three groups according to menopausal stage: hysterectomized and early and late postmenopause. Patients were assessed for sociodemographic and gyneco-obstetric factors and subjected to a muscle strength test and perineometry. Descriptive statistics, ANOVA, Kruskal-Wallis and multiple regression were applied. [Results] The results showed homogeneity in sociodemographic and anthropometric characteristics. There was no difference in pelvic floor muscle function among the three groups. Type of delivery, parity and physical activity level showed no influence on muscle function. [Conclusion] The findings demonstrate that parity, type of delivery, and physical activity level had no influence on pelvic floor muscle pressure in postmenopausal women. One hypothesis to explain these results is the fact that the decline in muscle function in postmenopausal women is related to the female aging process.

  2. Effect of exercise on insulin action in human skeletal muscle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Richter, Erik; Mikines, K J; Galbo, Henrik

    1989-01-01

    The effect of 1 h of dynamic one-legged exercise on insulin action in human muscle was studied in 6 healthy young men. Four hours after one-legged knee extensions, a three-step sequential euglycemic hyperinsulinemic clamp combined with arterial and bilateral femoral vein catheterization...... was performed. Increased insulin action on glucose uptake was found in the exercised compared with the rested thigh at mean plasma insulin concentrations of 23, 40, and 410 microU/ml. Furthermore, prior contractions directed glucose uptake toward glycogen synthesis and increased insulin effects on thigh O2...... consumption and at some insulin concentrations on potassium exchange. In contrast, no change in insulin effects on limb exchange of free fatty acids, glycerol, alanine or tyrosine were found after exercise. Glycogen concentration in rested vastus lateralis muscle did not increase measurably during the clamp...

  3. Home exercises for pelvic floor in continent women one year after physical therapy treatment for urinary incontinence: an observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krüger, Ana P; Luz, Soraia C T; Virtuoso, Janeisa F

    2011-01-01

    To describe the results of home exercise targeting the pelvic floor in continent women one year after the end of a physical therapy treatment for the following outcomes: functional assessment of the pelvic floor and urinary incontinence. This is an observational study that evaluated fifteen women one year after physical therapy treatment for Stress Urinary Incontinence (SUI). The outcomes for this study were: situations of urinary loss, use of daily protection, practice of home exercises for the pelvic floor, functional assessment of the pelvic floor (FAPF) and patient satisfaction. We also investigated some confounding variables such as hormonal status, number of vaginal deliveries and previous history of episiotomy. One year after completion of physical therapy treatment, we observed that the FAPF median remained stable over time (Median=5, p=0.08). The presence of urinary incontinence was reported by 40% of women in the sample, however, was characterized as mild (i.e. not requiring the use of daily protection). There was also a significant association (p=0.001) between the completion of home exercises (twice or more per week) and the normal clinical status. Confounding variables, which could compromise the clinical status, showed no significant association with the outcomes (p≥0.05). Home exercises contributed to the maintenance of continence following a physical therapy treatment.

  4. Pelvic floor muscle training is not effective in women with UI in pregnancy: a randomised controlled trial.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Woldringh, C.; Wijngaart, M.A.G. van den; Albers-Heitner, P.; Lycklama á Nijeholt, A.A.B.; Lagro-Janssen, A.L.M.

    2007-01-01

    The objective of this study was to test the short- and long-term effects of pelvic floor muscle training (PFMT) during pregnancy in women at risk, i.e. women who were already affected by urinary incontinence (UI) during pregnancy. The intervention consisted of three sessions of PFMT between week 23

  5. Pelvic floor muscle training in the prevention and treatment of urinary incontinence in women - what is the evidence?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brostrøm, Søren; Lose, G.

    2008-01-01

    Many women suffer from urinary incontinence (UI). During and after pregnancy, women are advised to perform pelvic floor muscle training (PFMT) to prevent the development of UI. In established UI, PFMT is prescribed routinely as first-line treatment. Published studies are small, underpowered...

  6. Pelvic floor muscle training is not effective in women with UI in pregnancy: a randomised controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Woldringh, C.; Wijngaart, M.A.G. van den; Albers-Heitner, P.; Lycklama á Nijeholt, A.A.B.; Lagro-Janssen, A.L.M.

    2007-01-01

    The objective of this study was to test the short- and long-term effects of pelvic floor muscle training (PFMT) during pregnancy in women at risk, i.e. women who were already affected by urinary incontinence (UI) during pregnancy. The intervention consisted of three sessions of PFMT between week 23

  7. The effect of pelvic floor muscle training on sexual function in men with lower urinary tract symptoms after stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tibaek, S; Gard, G; Dehlendorff, C

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Erectile dysfunction and lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) are common sequelae in men after stroke. OBJECTIVE: The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of pelvic floor muscle training (PFMT) on measured erectile function as an indicator of sexuality in men with LUTS...

  8. Exercise and Type 2 Diabetes: Molecular Mechanisms Regulating Glucose Uptake in Skeletal Muscle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanford, Kristin I.; Goodyear, Laurie J.

    2014-01-01

    Exercise is a well-established tool to prevent and combat type 2 diabetes. Exercise improves whole body metabolic health in people with type 2 diabetes, and adaptations to skeletal muscle are essential for this improvement. An acute bout of exercise increases skeletal muscle glucose uptake, while chronic exercise training improves mitochondrial…

  9. Pelvic floor muscle lesions at endoanal MR imaging in female patients with faecal incontinence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Terra, Maaike P.; Vervoorn, Inge; Dobben, Annette C.; Stoker, Jaap; Beets-Tan, Regina G.H.; Deutekom, Marije; Bossuyt, Patrick M.M.; Wasser, Martin N.J.M.; Witkamp, Theo D.; Baeten, Cor G.M.I.

    2008-01-01

    To evaluate the frequency and spectrum of lesions of different pelvic floor muscles at endoanal MRI in women with severe faecal incontinence and to study their relation with incontinence severity and manometric findings. In 105 women MRI examinations were evaluated for internal anal sphincter (IAS), external anal sphincter (EAS), puborectal muscle (PM) and levator ani (LA) lesions. The relative contribution of lesions to differences in incontinence severity and manometric findings was studied. IAS (n=59) and EAS (n=61) defects were more common than PM (n=23) and LA (n=26) defects. PM and LA defects presented mainly with IAS and/or EAS defects (isolated n=2 and n=3). EAS atrophy (n=73) was more common than IAS (n=19), PM (n=16) and LA (n=9) atrophy and presented mainly isolated. PM and LA atrophy presented primarily with EAS atrophy (isolated n=3 and n=1). Patients with IAS and EAS lesions had a lower resting and squeeze pressure, respectively; no other associations were found. PM and LA lesions are relatively common in patients with severe faecal incontinence, but the majority of lesions are found in women who also have IAS and/or EAS lesions. Only an association between anal sphincter lesions and manometry was observed. (orig.)

  10. Effects of concentric and repeated eccentric exercise on muscle damage and calpain-calpastatin gene expression in human skeletal muscle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vissing, K.; Overgaard, K.; Nedergaard, A.

    2008-01-01

    , and was compared to a control-group (n = 6). Muscle strength and soreness and plasma creatine kinase and myoglobin were measured before and during 7 days following exercise bouts. Muscle biopsies were collected from m. vastus lateralis of both legs prior to and at 3, 24 h and 7 days after exercise and quantified...... for muscle Ca2+-content and mRNA levels for calpain isoforms and calpastatin. Exercise reduced muscle strength and increased muscle soreness predominantly in the eccentric leg (P ... eccentric exercise bout (P muscle Ca2+-content did not differ between interventions. mRNA levels for calpain 2 and calpastatin were upregulated exclusively by eccentric exercise 24 h post-exercise (P

  11. Comparison of deep and superficial abdominal muscle activity between experienced Pilates and resistance exercise instructors and controls during stabilization exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, Ji-Hyun; Hong, Sang-Min; Kim, Chang-Won; Shin, Yun-A

    2015-06-01

    Pilates and resistance exercises are used for lumbar stabilization training. However, it is unclear which exercise is more effective for lumbar stabilization. In our study, we aimed to compare surface muscle activity and deep muscle thickness during relaxation and spinal stabilization exercise in experienced Pilates and resistance exercise instructors. This study is a retrospective case control study set in the Exercise Prescription Laboratory and Sports Medicine Center. The participants included Pilates instructors (mean years of experience, 3.20±1.76; n=10), resistance exercise instructors (mean years of experience, 2.53±0.63; n=10), and controls (n=10). The participants performed 4 different stabilization exercises: abdominal drawing-in maneuver, bridging, roll-up, and one-leg raise. During the stabilization exercises, surface muscle activity was measured with electromyography, whereas deep muscle thickness was measured by ultrasound imaging. During the 4 stabilization exercises, the thickness of the transverse abdominis (TrA) was significantly greater in the Pilates-trained group than the other 2 other groups. The internal oblique (IO) thickness was significantly greater in the Pilates- and resistance-trained group than the control group, during the 4 exercises. However, the surface muscle activities were similar between the groups. Both Pilates and resistance exercise instructors had greater activation of deep muscles, such as the TrA and IO, than the control subjects. Pilates and resistance exercise are both effective for increasing abdominal deep muscle thickness.

  12. Electrostimulation, response of the pelvic floor muscles, and urinary incontinence in elderly patients post prostatectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrícia Zaidan

    Full Text Available Objective to investigate the response of the pelvic floor muscles (PFM, and urinary incontinence (UI, in patients having undergone a prostatectomy, after treatment using electrical stimulation. Materials and methods this observational study was conducted in an outpatient urogynecologic physical therapy clinic of Hospital dos Servidores in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil from August to September 2012. Ten patients (aged, 64 ± 7 years with urinary incontinence resulting from radical prostatectomy, having received surgery within six months of study entry, without urinary infection, and without metallic implants underwent electrical stimulation of the PFM, while in lateral decubitus position with knees and hips flexed. The parameters used were 65 Hz frequency, pulse width of 500 µs, biphasic current, intensity according to the tolerance level reported by the patient, perineal contraction time of four seconds, and rest time of eight seconds for 20 minutes twice a week, totaling 16 sessions of electrical stimulation with active-assisted contraction. Patients were evaluated before and after electrical stimulation through physical therapy evaluation of urinary incontinence, by being asked about the number of disposable guards used daily, using a visual analogue scale (VAS to measure how the UI interfered with activities of daily living, and by electromyographic biofeedback to measure the work of the PFM. Data were analyzed using Student’s paired t-tests and a significance level of 0.05. Results after 16 sessions of electrical stimulation, the electromyographic biofeedback evaluation showed a significant increase in muscle strength of 10.73 ± 8.64 to 17.16 ± 9.00 µV (t = -3.39, P = 0.008, a significant decrease in the number of diapers used before and after treatment (3.9 ± 1.2 to 1.8 ± 1.5, respectively; t = 5.16, P = 0.0006, and a significant decrease in the interference of urinary incontinence on daily activities of 9.6 ± 0.5 to 4.0 ± 3.8 (t = 5

  13. Skeletal muscle metabolism during prolonged exercise in Pompe disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Preisler, Nicolai; Laforêt, Pascal; Madsen, Karen Lindhardt

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Pompe disease (glycogenosis type II) is caused by lysosomal alpha-glucosidase deficiency, which leads to a block in intra-lysosomal glycogen breakdown. In spite of enzyme replacement therapy, Pompe disease continues to be a progressive metabolic myopathy. Considering the health benefits...... of exercise, it is important in Pompe disease to acquire more information about muscle substrate use during exercise. METHODS: Seven adults with Pompe disease were matched to a healthy control group (1:1). We determined (1) peak oxidative capacity (VO2peak) and (2) carbohydrate and fatty acid metabolism...... during submaximal exercise (33 W) for 1 h, using cycle-ergometer exercise, indirect calorimetry and stable isotopes. RESULTS: In the patients, VO2peak was less than half of average control values; mean difference -1659 mL/min (CI: -2450 to -867, P = 0.001). However, the respiratory exchange ratio...

  14. Fasting- and Exercise-Induced PDH Regulation in Skeletal Muscle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gudiksen, Anders

    in selected mitochondrial proteins. Lastly, increased oxidative capacity leads to exercise-induced skeletal muscle PDH activation that is closely matched to the relative exercise intensity at submaximal exercise, while reaching a higher level at maximal exercise in trained individuals. These responses......Pyruvate dehydrogenase PDH constitutes the only mammalian pathway for irreversible conversion of pyruvate to acetyl-CoA thus providing the vital link between glycolytic energy production, the TCA cycle, and oxidative phosphorylation. Because the PDC controls the conversion of pyruvate it occupies...... a central position in relation to the control of mitochondrial energy production and cellular substrate metabolism. Suppression and activation of PDH becomes essential in situations where glucose availability and/or use changes with swift and appropriate regulation of the complex to maintain energy...

  15. Muscle interstitial potassium kinetics during intense exhaustive exercise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nordsborg, Nikolai; Mohr, Magni; Pedersen, Lasse Dannemann

    2003-01-01

    Interstitial K+ ([K+]i) was measured in human skeletal muscle by microdialysis during exhaustive leg exercise, with (AL) and without (L) previous intense arm exercise. In addition, the reproducibility of the [K+]i determinations was examined. Possible microdialysis-induced rupture of the sarcolemma...... was assessed by measurement of carnosine in the dialysate, because carnosine is only expected to be found intracellularly. Changes in [K+]i could be reproduced, when exhaustive leg exercise was performed on two different days, with a between-day difference of approximately 0.5 mM at rest and 1.5 m......M at exhaustion. The time to exhaustion was shorter in AL than in L (2.7 +/- 0.3 vs. 4.0 +/- 0.3 min; P exercise period in AL compared with L (9.2 +/- 0.7 vs. 6.4 +/- 0.9 mM; P

  16. Coordinated collagen and muscle protein synthesis in human patella tendon and quadriceps muscle after exercise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Miller, Benjamin F; Olesen, Jens L; Hansen, Mette

    2005-01-01

    We hypothesized that an acute bout of strenuous, non-damaging exercise would increase rates of protein synthesis of collagen in tendon and skeletal muscle but these would be less than those of muscle myofibrillar and sarcoplasmic proteins. Two groups (n = 8 and 6) of healthy young men were studied...... collagen (0.077% h(-1)), muscle collagen (0.054% h(-1)), myofibrillar protein (0.121% h(-1)), and sarcoplasmic protein (0.134% h(-1))). The rates decreased toward basal values by 72 h although rates of tendon collagen and myofibrillar protein synthesis remained elevated. There was no tissue damage...... of muscle visible on histological evaluation. Neither tissue microdialysate nor serum concentrations of IGF-I and IGF binding proteins (IGFBP-3 and IGFBP-4) or procollagen type I N-terminal propeptide changed from resting values. Thus, there is a rapid increase in collagen synthesis after strenuous exercise...

  17. Skeletal muscle glucose uptake during dynamic exercise in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Richter, Erik; Kiens, Bente; Saltin, Bengt

    1988-01-01

    uptake was not compensated for by increased uptake of free fatty acids but was accompanied by decreases in plasma insulin and increases in plasma epinephrine and norepinephrine. During work with large muscle masses, arterial lactate increased to approximately 6 mM, and net leg lactate release reverted......To study the role of muscle mass in glucoregulation, six subjects worked with the knee extensors of one leg on a specially constructed cycle ergometer. The knee extensors of one leg worked either alone or in combination with the knee extensors of the other leg and/or with the arms. Substrate usage...... to net lactate uptake. Decreased glucose uptake could not be explained by decreased perfusion. It is concluded that thigh muscle glucose uptake is affected by the size of the total muscle mass engaged in exercise. The decrease in thigh glucose uptake, when arm cranking was added and O2 uptake...

  18. Adrenaline and glycogenolysis in skeletal muscle during exercise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjaer, M; Howlett, K; Langfort, J

    2000-01-01

    The role of adrenaline in regulating muscle glycogenolysis and hormone-sensitive lipase (HSL) activity during exercise was examined in six adrenaline-deficient bilaterally adrenalectomised, adrenocortico-hormonal-substituted humans (Adr) and in six healthy control individuals (Con). Subjects cycled...... for 45 min at approximately 70% maximal pulmonary O2 uptake (VO2,max) followed by 15 min at approximately 86% VO2,max either without (-Adr and Con) or with (+Adr) adrenaline infusion that elevated plasma adrenaline levels (45 min, 4.49+/-0.69 nmol l(-1); 60 min, 12.41+/-1.80 nmol l(-1)). Muscle samples...... were obtained at 0, 45 and 60 min of exercise. In -Adr and Con, muscle glycogen was similar at rest (-Adr, 409+/-19 mmol (kg dry wt)(-1); Con, 453+/-24 mmol (kg dry wt)(-1)) and following exercise (-Adr, 237+/-52 mmol (kg dry wt)(-1); Con, 227+/-50 mmol (kg dry wt)(-1)). Muscle lactate, glucose-6...

  19. An Exercise Model to Study Progressive Muscle Fatigue During Constant Work Rate Exercise on a Cycle Ergometer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Fulco, Charles

    2003-01-01

    ... of the same muscles during the activity. However, conventional ergometric testing modes such as stationary cycling or treadmill exercise do not readily lend themselves to quantitating the progressive increase in muscle fatigue...

  20. Immunohistochemical detection of interleukin-6 in human skeletal muscle fibers following exercise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Penkowa, Milena; Keller, Charlotte; Keller, Pernille

    2003-01-01

    individuals. The IL-6 immunostainings of skeletal muscle cells were homogeneous and without difference between muscle fiber types. The IL-6 mRNA peaked immediately after the exercise, and, in accordance, the IL-6 protein expression within muscle cells was most pronounced around 3 h post-exercise. However......, the finding that plasma IL-6 concentration peaked in the end of exercise indicates a high turnover of muscle-derived IL-6. In conclusion, the finding of marked IL-6 protein expression exclusively within skeletal muscle fibers following exercise demonstrates that skeletal muscle fibers of all types...

  1. Exercise promotes BCAA catabolism: effects of BCAA supplementation on skeletal muscle during exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimomura, Yoshiharu; Murakami, Taro; Nakai, Naoya; Nagasaki, Masaru; Harris, Robert A

    2004-06-01

    Branched-chain amino acids (BCAAs) are essential amino acids that can be oxidized in skeletal muscle. It is known that BCAA oxidation is promoted by exercise. The mechanism responsible for this phenomenon is attributed to activation of the branched-chain alpha-keto acid dehydrogenase (BCKDH) complex, which catalyzes the second-step reaction of the BCAA catabolic pathway and is the rate-limiting enzyme in the pathway. This enzyme complex is regulated by a phosphorylation-dephosphorylation cycle. The BCKDH kinase is responsible for inactivation of the complex by phosphorylation, and the activity of the kinase is inversely correlated with the activity state of the BCKDH complex, which suggests that the kinase is the primary regulator of the complex. We found recently that administration of ligands for peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-alpha (PPARalpha) in rats caused activation of the hepatic BCKDH complex in association with a decrease in the kinase activity, which suggests that promotion of fatty acid oxidation upregulates the BCAA catabolism. Long-chain fatty acids are ligands for PPARalpha, and the fatty acid oxidation is promoted by several physiological conditions including exercise. These findings suggest that fatty acids may be one of the regulators of BCAA catabolism and that the BCAA requirement is increased by exercise. Furthermore, BCAA supplementation before and after exercise has beneficial effects for decreasing exercise-induced muscle damage and promoting muscle-protein synthesis; this suggests the possibility that BCAAs are a useful supplement in relation to exercise and sports.

  2. Cytosolic adenylate changes during exercise in prawn muscle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thebault, M.T.; Raffin, J.P.; Pichon, R.

    1994-01-01

    31 P NMR and biochemical analysis were used to assess the effect of heavy exercise on cytosolic adenylate levels in Palaemon serratus abdominal muscle. At rest, the MgATP level corresponded to 85.5% of the total ATP content. The cytosolic adenylate concentrations of the prawn muscle are considerably different from that of vertebrates. The percentage of ADP bound to myofilaments was lower in the prawn muscle. Consequently, the level of free cytosolic AMP was greatly higher (thirty fold higher) than in vertebrate muscle. During vigorous work, the concentration of MgATP dropped and the cytosolic AMP accumulated, while the cytosolic adenine nucleotide pool decreased significantly. The phosphorylation potential value and the ATP/ADP ratio, calculated from the cytosolic adenylate, dropped acutely during the whole period of muscular contractions. On the contrary, the adenylate energy charge calculated from the cytosolic adenylate decreased slightly. Therefore, even in muscle displaying no AMP deamination, the adenylate charge is stabilized during exercise by the dynamic changes between cytosolic and bound adenylate species. (author). 21 refs., 2 tabs

  3. The reliability of surface EMG recorded from the pelvic floor muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auchincloss, Cindy C; McLean, Linda

    2009-08-30

    The neuromuscular function of the pelvic floor muscles (PFMs) is frequently evaluated using surface electrodes embedded on vaginal probes. The purpose of this study was to determine the between-trial and between-day reliability of EMG data recorded from the PFM using two different vaginal probes while subjects performed PFM maximum voluntary contractions and a coughing task. The Femiscan and the Periform vaginal probes were used to acquire EMG data while the subjects performed the tasks. Peak RMS amplitudes were computed for each instrument, task, and side of the pelvic floor using a sliding window technique. The between-trial reliability was evaluated using intraclass correlation coefficients (ICCs) and coefficients of variation (CV). Between-trial reliability was determined using ICCs, Pearson's correlation coefficients, computing the mean absolute difference between days, and calculating the standard error the measurement (SEM) for each instrument and task. EMG amplitude differences were detected between the left and right PFM (pperformed separately for each side. Overall, between-trial reliability was fair to high for the Femiscan (ICC((3,1))=0.58-0.98, CV=8.5-20.7%) and good to high for the Periform (ICC((3,1))=0.80-0.98, CV=9.6-19.5%), however between-day reliability was generally poor for both vaginal probes (ICC((3,1))=0.08-0.84). The results suggest that although it is acceptable to use PFM surface EMG as a biofeedback tool for training purposes, it is not recommended for use to make between-subject comparisons or to use as an outcome measure between-days when evaluating PFM function.

  4. Intra and inter-rater reliability study of pelvic floor muscle dynamometric measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalia M. Martinho

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to evaluate the intra and inter-rater reliability of pelvic floor muscle (PFM dynamometric measurements for maximum and average strengths, as well as endurance. METHOD: A convenience sample of 18 nulliparous women, without any urogynecological complaints, aged between 19 and 31 (mean age of 25.4±3.9 participated in this study. They were evaluated using a pelvic floor dynamometer based on load cell technology. The dynamometric evaluations were repeated in three successive sessions: two on the same day with a rest period of 30 minutes between them, and the third on the following day. All participants were evaluated twice in each session; first by examiner 1 followed by examiner 2. The vaginal dynamometry data were analyzed using three parameters: maximum strength, average strength, and endurance. The Intraclass Correlation Coefficient (ICC was applied to estimate the PFM dynamometric measurement reliability, considering a good level as being above 0.75. RESULTS: The intra and inter-raters' analyses showed good reliability for maximum strength (ICCintra-rater1=0.96, ICCintra-rater2=0.95, and ICCinter-rater=0.96, average strength (ICCintra-rater1=0.96, ICCintra-rater2=0.94, and ICCinter-rater=0.97, and endurance (ICCintra-rater1=0.88, ICCintra-rater2=0.86, and ICCinter-rater=0.92 dynamometric measurements. CONCLUSIONS: The PFM dynamometric measurements showed good intra- and inter-rater reliability for maximum strength, average strength and endurance, which demonstrates that this is a reliable device that can be used in clinical practice.

  5. Does caffeine alter muscle carbohydrate and fat metabolism during exercise?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Graham, Terry E; Battram, Danielle S; Dela, Flemming

    2008-01-01

    and carbohydrate metabolism. While caffeine certainly mobilizes fatty acids from adipose tissue, rarely have measures of the respiratory exchange ratio indicated an increase in fat oxidation. However, this is a difficult measure to perform accurately during exercise, and small changes could be physiologically...... important. The few studies examining human muscle metabolism directly have also supported the fact that there is no change in fat or carbohydrate metabolism, but these usually have had a small sample size. We combined the data from muscle biopsy analyses of several similar studies to generate a sample size...

  6. Impact of exercise selection on hamstring muscle activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourne, Matthew N; Williams, Morgan D; Opar, David A; Al Najjar, Aiman; Kerr, Graham K; Shield, Anthony J

    2017-07-01

    To determine which strength training exercises selectively activate the biceps femoris long head (BF LongHead ) muscle. We recruited 24 recreationally active men for this two-part observational study . Part 1: We explored the amplitudes and the ratios of lateral (BF) to medial hamstring (MH) normalised electromyography (nEMG) during the concentric and eccentric phases of 10 common strength training exercises. Part 2: We used functional MRI (fMRI) to determine the spatial patterns of hamstring activation during two exercises which (1) most selectively and (2) least selectively activated the BF in part 1. Eccentrically, the largest BF/MH nEMG ratio occurred in the 45° hip-extension exercise; the lowest was in the Nordic hamstring (Nordic) and bent-knee bridge exercises. Concentrically, the highest BF/MH nEMG ratio occurred during the lunge and 45° hip extension; the lowest was during the leg curl and bent-knee bridge. fMRI revealed a greater BF (LongHead) to semitendinosus activation ratio in the 45° hip extension than the Nordic (phamstring muscles (p≤0.002). We highlight the heterogeneity of hamstring activation patterns in different tasks. Hip-extension exercise selectively activates the long hamstrings, and the Nordic exercise preferentially recruits the semitendinosus. These findings have implications for strategies to prevent hamstring injury as well as potentially for clinicians targeting specific hamstring components for treatment (mechanotherapy). Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  7. Exercise quantity-dependent muscle hypertrophy in adult zebrafish (Danio rerio).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasumura, Takahiro; Meguro, Shinichi

    2016-07-01

    Exercise is very important for maintaining and increasing skeletal muscle mass, and is particularly important to prevent and care for sarcopenia and muscle disuse atrophy. However, the dose-response relationship between exercise quantity, duration/day, and overall duration and muscle mass is poorly understood. Therefore, we investigated the effect of exercise duration on skeletal muscle to reveal the relationship between exercise quantity and muscle hypertrophy in zebrafish forced to exercise. Adult male zebrafish were exercised 6 h/day for 4 weeks, 6 h/day for 2 weeks, or 3 h/day for 2 weeks. Flow velocity was adjusted to maximum velocity during continual swimming (initial 43 cm/s). High-speed consecutive photographs revealed that zebrafish mainly drove the caudal part. Additionally, X-ray micro computed tomography measurements indicated muscle hypertrophy of the mid-caudal half compared with the mid-cranial half part. The cross-sectional analysis of the mid-caudal half muscle revealed that skeletal muscle (red, white, or total) mass increased with increasing exercise quantity, whereas that of white muscle and total muscle increased only under the maximum exercise load condition of 6 h/day for 4 weeks. Additionally, the muscle fiver size distributions of exercised fish were larger than those from non-exercised fish. We revealed that exercise quantity, duration/day, and overall duration were correlated with skeletal muscle hypertrophy. The forced exercise model enabled us to investigate the relationship between exercise quantity and skeletal muscle mass. These results open up the possibility for further investigations on the effects of exercise on skeletal muscle in adult zebrafish.

  8. Extracellular matrix adaptation of tendon and skeletal muscle to exercise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjaer, Michael; Magnusson, Peter; Krogsgaard, Michael

    2006-01-01

    The extracellular matrix (ECM) of connective tissues enables linking to other tissues, and plays a key role in force transmission and tissue structure maintenance in tendons, ligaments, bone and muscle. ECM turnover is influenced by physical activity, and both collagen synthesis and metalloprotease......-beta and IL-6 is enhanced following exercise. For tendons, metabolic activity (e.g. detected by positron emission tomography scanning), circulatory responses (e.g. as measured by near-infrared spectroscopy and dye dilution) and collagen turnover are markedly increased after exercise. Tendon blood flow...... is regulated by cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2)-mediated pathways, and glucose uptake is regulated by specific pathways in tendons that differ from those in skeletal muscle. Chronic loading in the form of physical training leads both to increased collagen turnover as well as to some degree of net collagen synthesis...

  9. Muscle specific microRNAs are regulated by endurance exercise in human skeletal muscle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Søren; Scheele, Camilla; Yfanti, Christina

    2010-01-01

    Muscle specific miRNAs, myomiRs, have been shown to control muscle development in vitro and are differentially expressed at rest in diabetic skeletal muscle. Therefore, we investigated the expression of these myomiRs, including miR-1, miR-133a, miR-133b and miR-206 in muscle biopsies from vastus...... lateralis of healthy young males (n = 10) in relation to a hyperinsulinaemic–euglycaemic clamp as well as acute endurance exercise before and after 12 weeks of endurance training. The subjects increased their endurance capacity, VO2max (l min-1) by 17.4% (P improved insulin sensitivity by 19......, but their role in regulating human skeletal muscle adaptation remains unknown....

  10. Antioxidants for preventing and reducing muscle soreness after exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranchordas, Mayur K; Rogerson, David; Soltani, Hora; Costello, Joseph T

    2017-12-14

    Muscle soreness typically occurs after intense exercise, unaccustomed exercise or actions that involve eccentric contractions where the muscle lengthens while under tension. It peaks between 24 and 72 hours after the initial bout of exercise. Many people take antioxidant supplements or antioxidant-enriched foods before and after exercise in the belief that these will prevent or reduce muscle soreness after exercise. To assess the effects (benefits and harms) of antioxidant supplements and antioxidant-enriched foods for preventing and reducing the severity and duration of delayed onset muscle soreness following exercise. We searched the Cochrane Bone, Joint and Muscle Trauma Group Specialised Register, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, MEDLINE, Embase, SPORTDiscus, trial registers, reference lists of articles and conference proceedings up to February 2017. We included randomised and quasi-randomised controlled trials investigating the effects of all forms of antioxidant supplementation including specific antioxidant supplements (e.g. tablets, powders, concentrates) and antioxidant-enriched foods or diets on preventing or reducing delayed onset muscle soreness (DOMS). We excluded studies where antioxidant supplementation was combined with another supplement. Two review authors independently screened search results, assessed risk of bias and extracted data from included trials using a pre-piloted form. Where appropriate, we pooled results of comparable trials, generally using the random-effects model. The outcomes selected for presentation in the 'Summary of findings' table were muscle soreness, collected at times up to 6 hours, 24, 48, 72 and 96 hours post-exercise, subjective recovery and adverse effects. We assessed the quality of the evidence using GRADE. Fifty randomised, placebo-controlled trials were included, 12 of which used a cross-over design. Of the 1089 participants, 961 (88.2%) were male and 128 (11.8%) were female. The age range for

  11. Muscle fibre capillarization is a critical factor in muscle fibre hypertrophy during resistance exercise training in older men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snijders, Tim; Nederveen, Joshua P; Joanisse, Sophie; Leenders, Marika; Verdijk, Lex B; van Loon, Luc J C; Parise, Gianni

    2017-04-01

    Adequate muscle fibre perfusion is critical for the maintenance of muscle mass; it is essential in the rapid delivery of oxygen, nutrients and growth factors to the muscle, stimulating muscle fibre growth. Muscle fibre capillarization is known to decrease substantially with advancing age. However, whether (relative) low muscle fibre capillarization negatively impacts the muscle hypertrophic response following resistance exercise training in older adults is unknown. Twenty-two healthy older men (71 ± 1 years) performed 24 weeks of progressive resistance type exercise training. To assess the change in muscle fibre characteristics, percutaneous biopsies from the vastus lateralis muscle were taken before and following 12 and 24 weeks of the intervention programme. A comparison was made between participants who had a relatively low type II muscle fibre capillary-to-fibre perimeter exchange index (CFPE; LOW group) and high type II muscle fibre CFPE (HIGH group) at baseline. Type I and type II muscle fibre size, satellite cell, capillary content and distance between satellite cells to the nearest capillary were determined by immunohistochemistry. Overall, type II muscle fibre size (from 5150 ± 234 to 6719 ± 446 µm 2 , P muscle fibre, P muscle fibre capillarization, whereas muscle fibre size (from 5170 ± 390 to 7133 ± 314 µm 2 , P muscle fibre, P muscle fibre capillarization were observed in response to 12 and 24 weeks of resistance exercise training in both the LOW and HIGH group. Type II muscle fibre capillarization at baseline may be a critical factor for allowing muscle fibre hypertrophy to occur during prolonged resistance exercise training in older men. © 2016 The Authors. Journal of Cachexia, Sarcopenia and Muscle published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of the Society on Sarcopenia, Cachexia and Wasting Disorders.

  12. Oral quercetin supplementation hampers skeletal muscle adaptations in response to exercise training

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Casuso, R A; Martínez-López, E J; Nordsborg, Nikolai Baastrup

    2014-01-01

    We aimed to test exercise-induced adaptations on skeletal muscle when quercetin is supplemented. Four groups of rats were tested: quercetin sedentary, quercetin exercised, placebo sedentary, and placebo exercised. Treadmill exercise training took place 5 days a week for 6 weeks. Quercetin groups ...... status was also quantified by measuring muscle antioxidant enzymatic activity and oxidative damage product, such as protein carbonyl content (PCC). Quercetin supplementation increased oxidative damage in both exercised and sedentary rats by inducing higher amounts of PCC (P ...

  13. A manometry classification to assess pelvic floor muscle function in women.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priscylla Helouyse Angelo

    Full Text Available To develop a classification scale for manometry of pelvic floor muscles (PFM in Brazilian women, according to the modified Oxford scale.A cross sectional study, with 288 women enrolled in the Maternity, Natal, Brazil. Manometry and PFM strength data were collected and classified according to the modified Oxford scale. A simple linear regression was performed to determine the classification scale of manometry using the modified Oxford scale as the explanatory variable and the arithmetic mean of the manometry measurements as the response variable.The average age was 52.80 (±8.78; CI: 51.67-53.93 years. Manometry showed an average of 35.1 (±22.7; CI: 32.1-38.0 cmH2O and most women (29.7% scored grade 3 on the modified Oxford scale. According to the proposed scale, values between 7.5 to 14.5 cmH2O correspond to very weak pressure; 14.6 to 26.5 cmH2O represent weak pressure; 26.6 to 41.5 cmH2O represent moderate pressure; 41.6 to 60.5 cmH2O represent good pressure, and values above 60.6 cmH2O correspond to strong pressure.Manometry values were rated on a five-point scale. It is possible to rank the pressure levels performed by voluntary contraction of PFM with this new scale.

  14. Efficacy of pelvic floor muscle training in women with overactive bladder syndrome: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monteiro, Silvia; Riccetto, Cassio; Araújo, Angélica; Galo, Laryssa; Brito, Nathália; Botelho, Simone

    2018-04-11

    Our objective was to evaluate the effectiveness of pelvic floor muscle training (PFMT) in reducing overactive bladder (OAB) symptoms in women. Searches were performed at MEDLINE, PubMed, Physiotherapy Evidence Database (PEDro), Scielo, and Central Cochrane Library PubMed until January 2017. Controlled trials were researched by two independent reviewers. Eligible studies were restricted to random and controlled clinical trials that investigated the effectiveness of PFMT in decreasing OAB symptoms. Qualitative methodology was evaluated using the PEDro scale. Data was analyzed and interpreted qualitatively. The final search retrieved eight studies (n = 1161 women with urgency symptoms), which were published between 2002 and 2016. The methodological scores varied between 4 and 7 in the PEDro scale. PFMT, with the objective of controlling urgent micturition, demonstrated improvements in quality of life in women with OAB. Most data in this revision came from small- to moderate-sized trials, with different and inconsistent outcome measures, which could have impacted the end results. The literature regarding the effectiveness of PFMT in OAB remains heterogeneous and inconclusive.

  15. The effect of pelvic floor muscle training in urinary incontinent elderly women: a sistematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raquel Henriques Jácomo

    Full Text Available Introduction The International Continence Society (ICS determines that the pelvic floor muscles training (PFMT is the first-choice treatment of urinary symptoms in women. Objective The aim of this study was to systematize randomized controlled clinical trials that address the effects of PFMT in the treatment of urinary symptoms in older women using objective outcome measures. Method Systematic review search was performed eletronic the following databases: Medline, Pubmed, Lilacs, PEDro and manual research conducted in the references of the studies. Were considered eligible women aged over 60 years who performed PFMT in isolation, without the involvement of another technique. The PFMT performed in clinic or at home, with or without the supervision of a therapist and with or without the use of biofeedback as an adjunct. Considered as outcome measures urodynamic studies, voiding diary that assesses daytime urinary frequency, nocturnal urinary frequency, urinary incontinence and exchange absorbent, and, finally, the absorbent test that quantifies loss urinary grams. The assessment of methodological quality of the studies was conducted by PEDro scale. Results Three studies were reviewed in full. Only one trial was rated high methodological quality. There was significant improvement in urinary symptoms after treatment proposed in the three selected studies. Conclusion Considering the studies available so far are weak the evidence for the use of PFMT in the treatment of urinary symptoms in elderly women.

  16. [Core muscle chains activation during core exercises determined by EMG-a systematic review].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogan, Slavko; Riesen, Jan; Taeymans, Jan

    2014-10-15

    Good core muscles strength is essential for daily life and sports activities. However, the mechanism how core muscles may be effectively triggered by exercises is not yet precisely described in the literature. The aim of this systematic review was to evaluate the rate of activation as measured by electromyography of the ventral, lateral and dorsal core muscle chains during core (trunk) muscle exercises. A total of 16 studies were included. Exercises with a vertical starting position, such as the deadlift or squat activated significantly more core muscles than exercises in the horizontal initial position.

  17. Role of AMPK in skeletal muscle metabolic regulation and adaptation in relation to exercise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Sebastian Beck; Richter, Erik; Wojtaszewski, Jørgen

    2006-01-01

    The 5'-AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is a potent regulator of skeletal muscle metabolism and gene expression. AMPK is activated both in response to in vivo exercise and ex vivo contraction. AMPK is therefore believed to be an important signalling molecule in regulating muscle metabolism...... during exercise as well as in adaptation of skeletal muscle to exercise training. The first part of this review is focused on different mechanisms regulating AMPK activity during muscle work such as alterations in nucleotide concentrations, availability of energy substrates and upstream AMPK kinases. We...... in relation to adaptation of skeletal muscle to exercise training....

  18. The influence of external compression on muscle blood flow during exercise

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Styf, J.

    1990-01-01

    Intramuscular pressures and muscle blood flow were measured in the anterior tibial muscle during dynamic concentric exercise in 14 subjects. Pressures were recorded by the microcapillary infusion method and muscle blood flow by the 133-Xenon clearance technique. Muscle blood flow during constant exercise decreased from 34.5 (SD = 10.3) to 10.6 (SD = 4.9) ml/100 g/min (P less than 0.001) when muscle relaxation pressure was increased from 13.5 (SD = 2.7) to 39.9 (SD = 9.0) mm Hg by external compression. Muscle relaxation pressure during exercise is the intramuscular pressure between contractions. External compression of the lower limb during exercise impedes muscle blood flow by increasing muscle relaxation pressure. The experimental model seems suitable to study the influence of external compression by knee braces on intramuscular pressure during exercise

  19. Can quality of life be improved by pelvic floor muscle training in women with urinary incontinence after ischemic stroke?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tibaek, Sigrid; Jensen, Rigmor; Lindskov, Grethe

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of pelvic floor muscle training in women with urinary incontinence after ischemic stroke measured by quality of life (QoL) parameters. Three hundred thirty-nine medical records of stroke patients were searched. Twenty-six subjects were randomised...... to a Treatment Group or a Control Group in a single blinded, randomised study design. The intervention included 12 weeks of standardised pelvic floor muscle training. The outcome was measured by the Short Form 36 (SF-36) Health Survey Questionnaire and The Incontinence Impact Questionnaire (IIQ). Twenty....... Development of specific instruments for QoL in stroke patients with urinary incontinence can be recommended....

  20. Regular physical exercise improves cardiac autonomic and muscle vasodilatory responses to isometric exercise in healthy elderly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarmento, Adriana de Oliveira; Santos, Amilton da Cruz; Trombetta, Ivani Credidio; Dantas, Marciano Moacir; Oliveira Marques, Ana Cristina; do Nascimento, Leone Severino; Barbosa, Bruno Teixeira; Dos Santos, Marcelo Rodrigues; Andrade, Maria do Amparo; Jaguaribe-Lima, Anna Myrna; Brasileiro-Santos, Maria do Socorro

    2017-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate cardiac autonomic control and muscle vasodilation response during isometric exercise in sedentary and physically active older adults. Twenty healthy participants, 10 sedentary and 10 physically active older adults, were evaluated and paired by gender, age, and body mass index. Sympathetic and parasympathetic cardiac activity (spectral and symbolic heart rate analysis) and muscle blood flow (venous occlusion plethysmography) were measured for 10 minutes at rest (baseline) and during 3 minutes of isometric handgrip exercise at 30% of the maximum voluntary contraction (sympathetic excitatory maneuver). Variables were analyzed at baseline and during 3 minutes of isometric exercise. Cardiac autonomic parameters were analyzed by Wilcoxon and Mann–Whitney tests. Muscle vasodilatory response was analyzed by repeated-measures analysis of variance followed by Tukey’s post hoc test. Sedentary older adults had higher cardiac sympathetic activity compared to physically active older adult subjects at baseline (63.13±3.31 vs 50.45±3.55 nu, P=0.02). The variance (heart rate variability index) was increased in active older adults (1,438.64±448.90 vs 1,402.92±385.14 ms, P=0.02), and cardiac sympathetic activity (symbolic analysis) was increased in sedentary older adults (5,660.91±1,626.72 vs 4,381.35±1,852.87, P=0.03) during isometric handgrip exercise. Sedentary older adults showed higher cardiac sympathetic activity (spectral analysis) (71.29±4.40 vs 58.30±3.50 nu, P=0.03) and lower parasympathetic modulation (28.79±4.37 vs 41.77±3.47 nu, P=0.03) compared to physically active older adult subjects during isometric handgrip exercise. Regarding muscle vasodilation response, there was an increase in the skeletal muscle blood flow in the second (4.1±0.5 vs 3.7±0.4 mL/min per 100 mL, P=0.01) and third minute (4.4±0.4 vs 3.9±0.3 mL/min per 100 mL, P=0.03) of handgrip exercise in active older adults. The results indicate that

  1. Muscle oxygen kinetics at onset of intense dynamic exercise in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bangsbo, J; Krustrup, P; González-Alonso, J

    2000-01-01

    The present study examined the onset and the rate of rise of muscle oxidation during intense exercise in humans and whether oxygen availability limits muscle oxygen uptake in the initial phase of intense exercise. Six subjects performed 3 min of intense one-legged knee-extensor exercise [65.3 +/-...

  2. Mammalian target of rapamycin complex 2 regulates muscle glucose uptake during exercise in mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kleinert, Maximilian; Parker, Benjamin L; Fritzen, Andreas Mæchel

    2017-01-01

    Exercise increases glucose uptake into insulin-resistant muscle. Thus, elucidating the exercise signalling network in muscle may uncover new therapeutic targets. mTORC2, a regulator of insulin-controlled glucose uptake, has been reported to interact with Rac1, which plays a role in exercise-induc...

  3. Exercise countermeasures for long-duration spaceflight: muscle- and intensity-specific considerations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trappe, Todd

    2012-07-01

    On-orbit and ground-based microgravity simulation studies have provided a wealth of information regarding the efficacy of exercise countermeasures for protecting skeletal muscle and cardiovascular function during long-duration spaceflights. While it appears that exercise will be the central component to maintaining skeletal muscle and cardiovascular health of astronauts, the current exercise prescription is not completely effective and is time consuming. This lecture will focus on recent exercise physiology studies examining high intensity, low volume exercise in relation to muscle specific and cardiovascular health. These studies provide the basis of the next generation exercise prescription currently being implemented during long-duration space missions on the International Space Station.

  4. Effectiveness of pelvic floor muscle training on symptoms and uroflowmetry parameters in female patients with overactive bladder

    OpenAIRE

    KULAKSIZOĞLU, HALUK; AKAND, MURAT; ÇAKMAKÇI, EVRİM; GÜL, MURAT; SEÇKİN, BEDREDDİN

    2015-01-01

    Background/aim: To evaluate the effects of pelvic floor muscle training (PFMT) on symptoms of overactive bladder (OAB) as well as uroflowmetry parameters and functional bladder capacity. Materials and methods: Fifty-nine female patients with OAB symptoms were included. Patients were assessed by SEAPI-QMM, uroflowmetry, and abdominal ultrasound. A specially designed PFMT program using a Pilates ball was generated for patients. The training period was 1-h sessions twice a week for 6 weeks and ...

  5. Comparison of the functionality of pelvic floor muscles in women who practice the Pilates method and sedentary women: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferla, Lia; Paiva, Luciana Laureano; Darki, Caroline; Vieira, Adriane

    2016-01-01

    The Pilates method is a form of physical exercise that improves the control of the core muscles, improving the conditioning of all the muscle groups that comprise the core, including the pelvic floor muscles (PFM). Thus, this study had the goal of verifying the existence of differences in the functioning of the PFM in women who practice the Pilates method and sedentary women. This was an observational, cross-sectional pilot study. A sample size calculation was performed using preliminary data and it determined that the sample should have at least 24 individuals in each group. The participants were 60 women aged 20 to 40 years; 30 women practiced the Pilates method (PMG) and 30 were sedentary (SG). An anamnesis file was used to collect personal data and assess the knowledge and perception of the PFM. The Perina perineometer and vaginal palpation were used to determine the functionality of the PFM. There was no significant difference between the PMG and the SG in any of the variables analyzed. We concluded that the functionality of the PFM in younger women who practice the Pilates method is not different from that of sedentary women.

  6. Partial neuromuscular blockade in humans enhances muscle blood flow during exercise independently of muscle oxygen uptake and acetylcholine receptor blockade

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hellsten, Ylva; Krustrup, Peter; Iaia, F Marcello

    2009-01-01

    This study examined the role of acetylcholine for skeletal muscle blood flow during exercise by use of the competitive neuromuscular blocking agent cisatracurium in combination with the acetylcholine receptor blocker glycopyrrone. Nine healthy male subjects performed a 10-min bout of one-legged k......This study examined the role of acetylcholine for skeletal muscle blood flow during exercise by use of the competitive neuromuscular blocking agent cisatracurium in combination with the acetylcholine receptor blocker glycopyrrone. Nine healthy male subjects performed a 10-min bout of one...... conductance during exercise, events that are not associated with either acetylcholine or an increased oxygen demand. The results do not support an essential role for acetylcholine, released form the neuromuscular junction, in exercise hyperaemia or for the enhanced blood flow during neuromuscular blockade....... The enhanced exercise hyperemia during partial neuromuscular blockade may be related to a greater recruitment of fast-twitch muscle fibres. Key words: blood flow, neuromuscular blockade, exercise, skeletal muscle....

  7. Muscle glycogen content and glucose uptake during exercise in humans: influence of prior exercise and dietary manipulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steensberg, Adam; van Hall, Gerrit; Keller, Charlotte

    2002-01-01

    on two occasions: one after 60 min of two-legged cycling (16 h prior to the experimental trial) followed by a high carbohydrate diet (HCHO) and the other after the same exercise followed by a low carbohydrate diet (LCHO) (Series 2). Muscle glycogen was decreased by 40 % when comparing the pre-exercised......There are many factors that can influence glucose uptake by contracting skeletal muscle during exercise and although one may be intramuscular glycogen content, this relationship is at present not fully elucidated. To test the hypothesis that muscle glycogen concentration influences glucose uptake...... during exercise, 13 healthy men were studied during two series of experiments. Seven men completed 4 h of two-legged knee extensor exercise 16 h after reducing of muscle glycogen by completing 60 min of single-legged cycling (Series 1). A further six men completed 3 h of two-legged knee extensor exercise...

  8. Influence of pre-exercise muscle glycogen content on exercise-induced transcriptional regulation of metabolic genes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pilegaard, Henriette; Keller, Charlotte; Steensberg, Adam

    2002-01-01

    Transcription of metabolic genes is transiently induced during recovery from exercise in skeletal muscle of humans. To determine whether pre-exercise muscle glycogen content influences the magnitude and/or duration of this adaptive response, six male subjects performed one-legged cycling exercise...... to lower muscle glycogen content in one leg and then, the following day, completed 2.5 h low intensity two-legged cycling exercise. Nuclei and mRNA were isolated from biopsies obtained from the vastus lateralis muscle of the control and reduced glycogen (pre-exercise glycogen = 609 +/- 47 and 337 +/- 33...... mmol kg(-1) dry weight, respectively) legs before and after 0, 2 and 5 h of recovery. Exercise induced a significant (P glycogen leg only. Although PDK4...

  9. Skeletal muscle metabolism during prolonged exercise in Pompe disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Preisler, Nicolai; Laforêt, Pascal; Madsen, Karen Lindhardt

    2017-01-01

    of exercise, it is important in Pompe disease to acquire more information about muscle substrate use during exercise. METHODS: Seven adults with Pompe disease were matched to a healthy control group (1:1). We determined (1) peak oxidative capacity (VO2peak) and (2) carbohydrate and fatty acid metabolism...... during submaximal exercise (33 W) for 1 h, using cycle-ergometer exercise, indirect calorimetry and stable isotopes. RESULTS: In the patients, VO2peak was less than half of average control values; mean difference -1659 mL/min (CI: -2450 to -867, P = 0.001). However, the respiratory exchange ratio...... increased to >1.0 and lactate levels rose 5-fold in the patients, indicating significant glycolytic flux. In line with this, during submaximal exercise, the rates of oxidation (ROX) of carbohydrates and palmitate were similar between patients and controls (mean difference 0.226 g/min (CI: 0.611 to -0.078, P...

  10. Quantification of pelvic floor muscle strength in female urinary incontinence: A systematic review and comparison of contemporary methodologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deegan, Emily G; Stothers, Lynn; Kavanagh, Alex; Macnab, Andrew J

    2018-01-01

    There remains no gold standard for quantification of voluntary pelvic floor muscle (PFM) strength, despite international guidelines that recommend PFM assessment in females with urinary incontinence (UI). Methods currently reported for quantification of skeletal muscle strength across disciplines are systematically reviewed and their relevance for clinical and academic use related to the pelvic floor are described. A systematic review via Medline, PubMed, CINHAL, and the Cochrane database using key terms for pelvic floor anatomy and function were cross referenced with skeletal muscle strength quantification from 1946 to 2016. Full text peer-reviewed articles in English having female subjects with incontinence were identified. Each study was analyzed for use of controls, type of methodology as direct or indirect measures, benefits, and limitations of the technique. A total of 1586 articles were identified of which 50 met the inclusion criteria. Nine methodologies of determining PFM strength were described including: digital palpation, perineometer, dynamometry, EMG, vaginal cones, ultrasonography, magnetic resonance imaging, urine stream interruption test, and the Colpexin pull test. Thirty-two percent lacked a control group. Technical refinements in both direct and indirect instrumentation for PFM strength measurement are allowing for sensitivity. However, the most common methods of quantification remain digital palpation and perineometry; techniques that pose limitations and yield subjective or indirect measures of muscular strength. Dynamometry has potential as an accurate and sensitive tool, but is limited by inability to assess PFM strength during dynamic movements. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Effect of a Facial Muscle Exercise Device on Facial Rejuvenation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Ui-Jae; Kwon, Oh-Yun; Jung, Sung-Hoon; Ahn, Sun-Hee; Gwak, Gyeong-Tae

    2018-01-20

    The efficacy of facial muscle exercises (FMEs) for facial rejuvenation is controversial. In the majority of previous studies, nonquantitative assessment tools were used to assess the benefits of FMEs. This study examined the effectiveness of FMEs using a Pao (MTG, Nagoya, Japan) device to quantify facial rejuvenation. Fifty females were asked to perform FMEs using a Pao device for 30 seconds twice a day for 8 weeks. Facial muscle thickness and cross-sectional area were measured sonographically. Facial surface distance, surface area, and volumes were determined using a laser scanning system before and after FME. Facial muscle thickness, cross-sectional area, midfacial surface distances, jawline surface distance, and lower facial surface area and volume were compared bilaterally before and after FME using a paired Student t test. The cross-sectional areas of the zygomaticus major and digastric muscles increased significantly (right: P jawline surface distances (right: P = 0.004, left: P = 0.003) decreased significantly after FME using the Pao device. The lower facial surface areas (right: P = 0.005, left: P = 0.006) and volumes (right: P = 0.001, left: P = 0.002) were also significantly reduced after FME using the Pao device. FME using the Pao device can increase facial muscle thickness and cross-sectional area, thus contributing to facial rejuvenation. © 2018 The American Society for Aesthetic Plastic Surgery, Inc.

  12. Effect of pelvic floor muscle training compared with watchful waiting in older women with symptomatic mild pelvic organ prolapse : randomised controlled trial in primary care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wiegersma, Marian; Panman, Chantal M. C. R.; Kollen, Boudewijn J.; Berger, Marjolein Y.; Lisman-Van Leeuwen, Yvonne; Dekker, Janny H.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To compare the effects of pelvic floor muscle training and watchful waiting on pelvic floor symptoms in a primary care population of women aged 55 years and over with symptomatic mild pelvic organ prolapse. Design Randomised controlled trial. Setting Dutch primary care. Participants Women

  13. Ibuprofen ingestion does not affect markers of post-exercise muscle inflammation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luke eVella

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: We investigated if oral ingestion of ibuprofen influenced leucocyte recruitment and infiltration following an acute bout of traditional resistance exercise. Methods: Sixteen male subjects were divided into two groups that received the maximum over-the-counter dose of ibuprofen (1200 mg d-1 or a similarly administered placebo following lower body resistance exercise. Muscle biopsies were taken from m.vastus lateralis and blood serum samples were obtained before and immediately after exercise, and at 3 h and 24 h after exercise. Muscle cross-sections were stained with antibodies against neutrophils (CD66b and MPO and macrophages (CD68. Muscle damage was assessed via creatine kinase and myoglobin in blood serum samples, and muscle soreness was rated on a ten-point pain scale. Results: The resistance exercise protocol stimulated a significant increase in the number of CD66b+ and MPO+ cells when measured 3 h post exercise. Serum creatine kinase, myoglobin and subjective muscle soreness all increased post-exercise. Muscle leucocyte infiltration, creatine kinase, myoglobin and subjective muscle soreness were unaffected by ibuprofen treatment when compared to placebo. There was also no association between increases in inflammatory leucocytes and any other marker of cellular muscle damage. Conclusion: Ibuprofen administration had no effect on the accumulation of neutrophils, markers of muscle damage or muscle soreness during the first 24 h of post-exercise muscle recovery.

  14. Interleukin-6 production in contracting human skeletal muscle is influenced by pre-exercise muscle glycogen content

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steensberg, A; Febbraio, M A; Osada, T

    2001-01-01

    1. Prolonged exercise results in a progressive decline in glycogen content and a concomitant increase in the release of the cytokine interleukin-6 (IL-6) from contracting muscle. This study tests the hypothesis that the exercise-induced IL-6 release from contracting muscle is linked to the intram......1. Prolonged exercise results in a progressive decline in glycogen content and a concomitant increase in the release of the cytokine interleukin-6 (IL-6) from contracting muscle. This study tests the hypothesis that the exercise-induced IL-6 release from contracting muscle is linked...... to the intramuscular glycogen availability. 2. Seven men performed 5 h of a two-legged knee-extensor exercise, with one leg with normal, and one leg with reduced, muscle glycogen content. Muscle biopsies were obtained before (pre-ex), immediately after (end-ex) and 3 h into recovery (3 h rec) from exercise in both...... legs. In addition, catheters were placed in one femoral artery and both femoral veins and blood was sampled from these catheters prior to exercise and at 1 h intervals during exercise and into recovery. 3. Pre-exercise glycogen content was lower in the glycogen-depleted leg compared with the control...

  15. Exercise intensity and muscle hypertrophy in blood flow-restricted limbs and non-restricted muscles: a brief review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abe, Takashi; Loenneke, Jeremy P; Fahs, Christopher A; Rossow, Lindy M; Thiebaud, Robert S; Bemben, Michael G

    2012-07-01

    Although evidence for high-intensity resistance training-induced muscle hypertrophy has accumulated over the last several decades, the basic concept of the training can be traced back to ancient Greece: Milo of Croton lifted a bull-calf daily until it was fully grown, which would be known today as progressive overload. Now, in the 21st century, different types of training are being tested and studied, such as low-intensity exercise combined with arterial as well as venous blood flow restriction (BFR) to/from the working muscles. Because BFR training requires the use of a cuff that is placed at the proximal ends of the arms and/or legs, the BFR is only applicable to limb muscles. Consequently, most previous BFR training studies have focused on the physiological adaptations of BFR limb muscles. Muscle adaptations in non-BFR muscles of the hip and trunk are lesser known. Recent studies that have reported both limb and trunk muscle adaptations following BFR exercise training suggest that low-intensity (20-30% of 1RM) resistance training combined with BFR elicits muscle hypertrophy in both BFR limb and non-BFR muscles. However, the combination of leg muscle BFR with walk training elicits muscle hypertrophy only in the BFR leg muscles. In contrast to resistance exercise with BFR, the exercise intensity may be too low during BFR walk training to cause muscle hypertrophy in the non-BFR gluteus maximus and other trunk muscles. Other mechanisms including hypoxia, local and systemic growth factors and muscle cell swelling may also potentially affect the hypertrophic response of non-BFR muscles to BFR resistance exercise. © 2012 The Authors Clinical Physiology and Functional Imaging © 2012 Scandinavian Society of Clinical Physiology and Nuclear Medicine.

  16. Pengaruh Pelvic Floor Muscle Training terhadap Pengembalian Fungsi Miksi dan Defekasi pada Ibu Postpartum Spontan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mustika Dewi

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available AbstrakPersalinan membawa dampak terhadap fungsi miksi dan defekasi pada ibu postpartum. Stimulasi dini yang dapat dilakukan guna memulihkan fungsi miksi dan defekasi, antara lain dengan Pelvic Floor Muscle Training (PFMT atau latihan yang dilakukan khusus untuk otot dasar panggul. Tujuan penelitian ini adalah untuk mengetahui pengaruh PFMT terhadap pengembalian fungsi miksi dan defekasi pada ibu postpartum spontan (tanpa bantuan alat penolong persalinan. Penelitian ini merupakan studi kuasi eksperimen dengan post test only control group design. PFMT dilakukan setelah 2 jam persalinan sebanyak 3 sesi selama 3 hari postpartum. Selanjutnya mewawancarai kelompok yang melakukan PFMT maupun kelompok yang tidak melakukan PFMT untuk mengetahui miksi dan defekasi pertama kali dimasa postpartum. Data dianalisis secara statistik menggunakan uji chi-square dan nilai p < 0.05 dianggap bermakna secara statistik. Hasil penelitian didapatkan persentase miksi spontan lebih tinggi pada ibu yang melakukan PFMT dari pada ibu yang tidak melakukan PFMT (83.3% : 58.3%, Secara statistik perbedaan tersebut tidak signifikan (p > 0.05, maka dapat dinyatakan tidak terdapat pengaruh PFMT terhadap miksi pada ibu postpatum spontan. Persentase defekasi normal lebih tinggi pada ibu yang melakukan PFMT dari pada ibu yang tidak melakukan PFMT (87.5% : 16.7%. Secara statistik perbedaan tersebut signifikan (p < 0.05, maka dapat dinyatakan ada pengaruh PFMT terhadap defekasi pada ibu postpartum spontan. Dari hasil penelitian disimpulkan tidak terdapat pengaruh PFMT terhadap miksi pada ibu postpartum spontan dan terdapat pengaruh PFMT terhadap defekasi pada ibu postpartum.Kata Kunci: PFMT, miksi, defekasi, postpartum spontanAbstractLabour have an impact on the function of micturition and defecation in postpartum. Early stimulation that can be done to restore the function of micturition and defecation, among others, with Pelvic Floor Muscle Training (PFMT. The purpose of this study

  17. Is there any difference in pelvic floor muscles performance between continent and incontinent women?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burti, Juliana Schulze; Hacad, Claudia R; Zambon, João Paulo; Polessi, Emily Assis; Almeida, Fernando G

    2015-08-01

    To compare pelvic floor muscles (PFMs) performance in women with and without stress urinary incontinence (SUI) during endurance test. It is a prospective case-control clinical trial. After determining PFM maximal voluntary contraction (MVC) by electromyography (EMG), women underwent endurance test, which consisted of consecutively PFM 1-sec fast contractions reaching MVC amplitude followed by 1-sec rest. Training time guided by Borg perceived exertion scale was noted. Heart rate (HR) behavior and EMG variables were assessed before and after training making a physiological analysis in both groups. A total of 56 women, mean age 52.19 years old, were evaluated (26 continent and 30 incontinent women). The time that SUI and continent women took to reach fatigue (Borg 10) was 9.1 ± 4.7 and 14.19 ± 8.32 min, respectively (P = 0.006). Confirming that all women performed similar effort during the test, analysis of variance with repeated measures showed that during the endurance test both groups presented similar increase in HR, showing detectable and significant increase from resting time to Borg 10 (P continent and SUI women, with a decrease from the baseline resting amplitude (P = 0.003 for SUI women and P = 0.006 for continent women). Women with SUI showed worse performance during an endurance test than continent women. It suggests that women have different capacity to perform PFM training. An initial evaluation based on PFM performance would help to define the best individualized PFM training. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Proteome profiles of longissimus and biceps femoris porcine muscles related to exercise and resting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    F.W.Te Pas, Marinus; Keuning, Els; Van der Wiel, Dick J.M.

    2011-01-01

    Exercise affects muscle metabolism and composition in the untrained muscles. The proteome of muscle tissue will be affected by exercise and resting. This is of economic importance for pork quality where transportation relates to exercise of untrained muscles. Rest reverses exercise effects....... The objective of this research was to develop potential protein biomarkers that predict the optimal resting time after exercise related to optimal pork quality. Ten litters of four female pigs were within litter allocated to the four treatment groups: exercise by running on a treadmill for 27 minutes followed...... by rest for 0, 1, or 3 h; control pigs without exercise. Proteome profiles and biochemical traits measuring energy metabolism and meat quality traits expected to be related to exercise were determined in the Longissimus and the Biceps femoris of the pigs. The results indicated associations between protein...

  19. Obesity impairs skeletal muscle AMPK signaling during exercise: role of AMPKα2 in the regulation of exercise capacity in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee-Young, R S; Ayala, J E; Fueger, P T; Mayes, W H; Kang, L; Wasserman, D H

    2011-07-01

    Skeletal muscle AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK)α2 activity is impaired in obese, insulin-resistant individuals during exercise. We determined whether this defect contributes to the metabolic dysregulation and reduced exercise capacity observed in the obese state. C57BL/6J wild-type (WT) mice and/or mice expressing a kinase dead AMPKα2 subunit in skeletal muscle (α2-KD) were fed chow or high-fat (HF) diets from 3 to 16 weeks of age. At 15 weeks, mice performed an exercise stress test to determine exercise capacity. In WT mice, muscle glucose uptake and skeletal muscle AMPKα2 activity was assessed in chronically catheterized mice (carotid artery/jugular vein) at 16 weeks. In a separate study, HF-fed WT and α2-KD mice performed 5 weeks of exercise training (from 15 to 20 weeks of age) to test whether AMPKα2 is necessary to restore work tolerance. HF-fed WT mice had reduced exercise tolerance during an exercise stress test, and an attenuation in muscle glucose uptake and AMPKα2 activity during a single bout of exercise (Pfeeding further reduced running time ∼25% (Pexercise training, HF-fed WT and α2-KD mice increased maximum running speed ∼35% (PExercise training restored running speed to levels seen in healthy, chow-fed mice. HF feeding impairs AMPKα2 activity in skeletal muscle during exercise in vivo. Although this defect directly contributes to reduced exercise capacity, findings in HF-fed α2-KD mice show that AMPKα2-independent mechanisms are also involved. Importantly, α2-KD mice on a HF-fed diet adapt to regular exercise by increasing exercise tolerance, demonstrating that this adaptation is independent of skeletal muscle AMPKα2 activity.

  20. Pelvic floor muscle problems mediate sexual problems in young adult rape victims

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Postma, Riemke; Bicanic, Iva; van der Vaart, Huub; Laan, Ellen

    2013-01-01

    Prior studies have addressed sexual abuse and sexual function in adult women. No studies have focused on the effect of adolescence rape on sexual functioning. To investigate the effect of rape on sexual problems and on pelvic floor problems, as well as the mediating role of pelvic floor problems on

  1. Exercise-Induced Muscle Damage and Hypertrophy: A Closer Look Reveals the Jury is Still Out

    OpenAIRE

    Schoenfeld, Brad; Contreras, Bret

    2018-01-01

    This letter is a response to the paper by Damas et al (2017) titled, “The development of skeletal muscle hypertrophy through resistance training: the role of muscle damage and muscle protein synthesis,” which, in part, endeavored to review the role of exercise-induced muscle damage on muscle hypertrophy. We feel there are a number of issues in interpretation of research and extrapolation that preclude drawing the inference expressed in the paper that muscle damage neither explains nor potenti...

  2. Simplified data access on human skeletal muscle transcriptome responses to differentiated exercise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vissing, Kristian; Schjerling, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Few studies have investigated exercise-induced global gene expression responses in human skeletal muscle and these have typically focused at one specific mode of exercise and not implemented non-exercise control models. However, interpretation on effects of differentiated exercise necessitate dir...

  3. Prior exercise and antioxidant supplementation: effect on oxidative stress and muscle injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schilling Brian K

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Both acute bouts of prior exercise (preconditioning and antioxidant nutrients have been used in an attempt to attenuate muscle injury or oxidative stress in response to resistance exercise. However, most studies have focused on untrained participants rather than on athletes. The purpose of this work was to determine the independent and combined effects of antioxidant supplementation (vitamin C + mixed tocopherols/tocotrienols and prior eccentric exercise in attenuating markers of skeletal muscle injury and oxidative stress in resistance trained men. Methods Thirty-six men were randomly assigned to: no prior exercise + placebo; no prior exercise + antioxidant; prior exercise + placebo; prior exercise + antioxidant. Markers of muscle/cell injury (muscle performance, muscle soreness, C-reactive protein, and creatine kinase activity, as well as oxidative stress (blood protein carbonyls and peroxides, were measured before and through 48 hours of exercise recovery. Results No group by time interactions were noted for any variable (P > 0.05. Time main effects were noted for creatine kinase activity, muscle soreness, maximal isometric force and peak velocity (P Conclusion There appears to be no independent or combined effect of a prior bout of eccentric exercise or antioxidant supplementation as used here on markers of muscle injury in resistance trained men. Moreover, eccentric exercise as used in the present study results in minimal blood oxidative stress in resistance trained men. Hence, antioxidant supplementation for the purpose of minimizing blood oxidative stress in relation to eccentric exercise appears unnecessary in this population.

  4. Assessment of bioelectrical activity of synergistic muscles during pelvic floor muscles activation in postmenopausal women with and without stress urinary incontinence: a preliminary observational study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ptaszkowski K

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Kuba Ptaszkowski,1 Małgorzata Paprocka-Borowicz,2 Lucyna Słupska,2 Janusz Bartnicki,1,3 Robert Dymarek,4 Joanna Rosińczuk,4 Jerzy Heimrath,5 Janusz Dembowski,6 Romuald Zdrojowy6 1Department of Obstetrics, 2Department of Clinical Biomechanics and Physiotherapy in Motor System Disorders, Wroclaw Medical University, Wroclaw, Poland; 3Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Health Center Bitterfeld/Wolfen gGmbH, Bitterfeld-Wolfen, Germany; 4Department of Nervous System Diseases, 5Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Faculty of Health Science, 6Department and Clinic of Urology, Faculty of Postgraduate Medical Training, Wroclaw Medical University, Wroclaw, Poland Objective: Muscles such as adductor magnus (AM, gluteus maximus (GM, rectus abdominis (RA, and abdominal external and internal oblique muscles are considered to play an important role in the treatment of stress urinary incontinence (SUI, and the relationship between contraction of these muscles and pelvic floor muscles (PFM has been established in previous studies. Synergistic muscle activation intensifies a woman’s ability to contract the PFM. In some cases, even for continent women, it is not possible to fully contract their PFM without involving the synergistic muscles. The primary aim of this study was to assess the surface electromyographic activity of synergistic muscles to PFM (SPFM during resting and functional PFM activation in postmenopausal women with and without SUI.Materials and methods: This study was a preliminary, prospective, cross-sectional observational study and included volunteers and patients who visited the Department and Clinic of Urology, University Hospital in Wroclaw, Poland. Forty-two patients participated in the study and were screened for eligibility criteria. Thirty participants satisfied the criteria and were categorized into two groups: women with SUI (n=16 and continent women (n=14. The bioelectrical activity of PFM and SPFM (AM, RA, GM was

  5. Noradrenaline spillover during exercise in active versus resting skeletal muscle in man

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Savard, G; Strange, S; Kiens, Bente

    1987-01-01

    Increases in plasma noradrenaline (NA) concentration occur during moderate to heavy exercise in man. This study was undertaken to examine the spillover of NA from both resting and contracting skeletal muscle during exercise. Six male subjects performed one-legged knee-extension so that all...... in the exercising leg than in the resting leg both during 50% and 100% leg exercise. These results suggest that contracting skeletal muscle may contribute to a larger extent than resting skeletal muscle to increasing the level of plasma NA during exercise. Contractile activity may influence the NA spillover from...

  6. The magnitude of muscle strain does not influence serial sarcomere number adaptations following eccentric exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butterfield, Timothy A; Herzog, Walter

    2006-02-01

    It is generally accepted that eccentric exercise, when performed by a muscle that is unaccustomed to that type of contraction, results in a delayed onset of muscle soreness (DOMS). A prolonged exposure to eccentric exercise leads to the disappearance of the signs and symptoms associated with DOMS, which has been referred to as the repeated bout effect (RBE). Although the mechanisms underlying the RBE remain unclear, several mechanisms have been proposed, including the serial sarcomere number addition following exercise induced muscle damage. In the traditional DOMS and RBE protocols, muscle injury has been treated as a global parameter, with muscle force and strain assumed to be uniform throughout the muscle. To assess the effects of muscle-tendon unit strain, fiber strain, torque and injury on serial sarcomere number adaptations, three groups of New Zealand White (NZW) rabbits were subjected to chronic repetitive eccentric exercise bouts of the ankle dorsiflexors for 6 weeks. These eccentric exercise protocols consisted of identical muscle tendon unit (MTU) strain, but other mechanical factors were systematically altered. Following chronic eccentric exercise, serial sarcomere number adaptations were not identical between the three eccentric exercise protocols, and serial sarcomere number adaptations were not uniform across all regions of the muscle. Peak torque and relaxation fiber strain were the best predictors of serial sarcomere number across all three protocols. Therefore, MTU strain does not appear to be the primary cause for sarcomerogenesis, and differential adaptations within the muscle may be explained by the nonuniform architecture of the muscle, resulting in differential local fiber strains.

  7. Exercise and exercise training-induced increase in autophagy markers in human skeletal muscle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brandt, Nina; Gunnarsson, Thomas Gunnar Petursson; Bangsbo, Jens

    2018-01-01

    Moderately trained male subjects (mean age 25 years; range 19-33 years) completed an 8-week exercise training intervention consisting of continuous moderate cycling at 157 ± 20 W for 60 min (MOD; n = 6) or continuous moderate cycling (157 ± 20 W) interspersed by 30-sec sprints (473 ± 79 W) every 10...... muscle AMPKThr172 and ULKSer317 phosphorylation was elevated immediately after exercise, whereas mTORSer2448 and ULKSer757 phosphorylation was unchanged. Two hours after exercise LC3I, LC3II and BNIP3 protein content was overall higher than before exercise with no change in p62 protein. In MOD, Beclin1...... protein content was higher immediately and 2 h after exercise than before exercise, while there were no differences within SPRINT. Oxphos complex I, LC3I, BNIP3 and Parkin protein content was higher after the training intervention than before in both groups, while there was no difference in LC3II and p62...

  8. Regular physical exercise improves cardiac autonomic and muscle vasodilatory responses to isometric exercise in healthy elderly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarmento AO

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Adriana de Oliveira Sarmento,1–3 Amilton da Cruz Santos,1,4 Ivani Credidio Trombetta,2,5 Marciano Moacir Dantas,1 Ana Cristina Oliveira Marques,1,4 Leone Severino do Nascimento,1,4 Bruno Teixeira Barbosa,1,2 Marcelo Rodrigues Dos Santos,2 Maria do Amparo Andrade,3 Anna Myrna Jaguaribe-Lima,3,6 Maria do Socorro Brasileiro-Santos1,3,4 1Laboratory of Physical Training Studies Applied to Health, Department of Physical Education, Federal University of Paraiba, João Pessoa, Brazil; 2Unit of Cardiovascular Rehabilitation and Exercise Physiology – Heart Institute (InCor/HC-FMUSP, University of São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil; 3Graduate Program in Physiotherapy, Federal University of Pernambuco, Recife, Brazil; 4Associate Graduate Program in Physical Education UPE/UFPB, João Pessoa, Brazil; 5Graduate Program in Medicine, Universidade Nove de Julho (UNINOVE, São Paulo, Brazil; 6Department of Morphology and Animal Physiology, Federal Rural University of Pernambuco, Recife, Brazil Abstract: The objective of this study was to evaluate cardiac autonomic control and muscle vasodilation response during isometric exercise in sedentary and physically active older adults. Twenty healthy participants, 10 sedentary and 10 physically active older adults, were evaluated and paired by gender, age, and body mass index. Sympathetic and parasympathetic cardiac activity (spectral and symbolic heart rate analysis and muscle blood flow (venous occlusion plethysmography were measured for 10 minutes at rest (baseline and during 3 minutes of isometric handgrip exercise at 30% of the maximum voluntary contraction (sympathetic excitatory maneuver. Variables were analyzed at baseline and during 3 minutes of isometric exercise. Cardiac autonomic parameters were analyzed by Wilcoxon and Mann–Whitney tests. Muscle vasodilatory response was analyzed by repeated-measures analysis of variance followed by Tukey’s post hoc test. Sedentary older adults had higher cardiac

  9. The Role of Pelvic Floor Muscles in Male Sexual Dysfunction and Pelvic Pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Deborah; Gonzalez, Joshua; Goldstein, Irwin

    2016-01-01

    Sexual function is essential to good health and well-being in men. The relationship between male sexual function, pelvic floor function, and pelvic pain is complex and only beginning to be appreciated. The objectives of the current review are to examine these complex relationships, and to demonstrate how pelvic floor physical therapy can potentially improve the treatment of various male sexual dysfunctions, including erectile dysfunction and dysfunction of ejaculation and orgasm. Contemporary data on pelvic floor anatomy and function as they relate to the treatment of various male sexual dysfunctions were reviewed. Examination of evidence supporting the association between the male pelvic floor and erectile dysfunction, ejaculatory/orgasmic dysfunction, and chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome, respectively. Evidence suggests a close relationship between the pelvic floor and male sexual dysfunction and a potential therapeutic benefit from pelvic floor therapy for men who suffer from these conditions. Pelvic floor physical therapy is a necessary tool in a more comprehensive bio-neuromusculoskeletal-psychosocial approach to the treatment of male sexual dysfunction and pelvic pain. Copyright © 2016 International Society for Sexual Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Pelvic floor muscle training in women with stress urinary incontinence causes hypertrophy of the urethral sphincters and reduces bladder neck mobility during coughing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLean, Linda; Varette, Kevin; Gentilcore-Saulnier, Evelyne; Harvey, Marie-Andree; Baker, Kevin; Sauerbrei, Eric

    2013-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of a 12-week pelvic floor muscle (PFM) training program on urethral morphology and mobility in women with stress urinary incontinence (SUI). Forty women with SUI were randomly assigned to one of two groups: the treatment group received 12 weekly physiotherapy sessions during which they learned how to properly contract their pelvic floor muscles (PFMs) and a home exercise program was prescribed, reviewed, and progressed; the control group received no treatment. Before and after the 12-week study period, ultrasound imaging was used to evaluate bladder neck position and mobility during coughing and Valsalva maneuver in supine and in standing, as well as urethral morphology. Secondary outcome measures included a 3-day bladder diary, 30-min pad test, the Incontinence Impact Questionnaire (IIQ-7) and the Urogenital Distress Inventory (UDI-6). The women in the treatment group demonstrated reduced bladder neck mobility during coughing and increased cross-sectional area of their urethra after as compared to before the training. These changes were not evident in the control group. No differences in the resting position of the bladder neck or in bladder neck excursion during Valsalva maneuver were noted in either group. Concomitantly the women in the treatment group demonstrated significant improvements in the 3-day bladder diary and IIQ-7 after the PFM training and improved significantly more than the control group. Physiotherapist-supervised PFM training reduces bladder neck motion during coughing, and results in hypertrophy of the urethral sphincter in women who present with SUI. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Effects of neuromuscular joint facilitation on bridging exercises with respect to deep muscle changes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Bin; Huang, QiuChen; Zheng, Tao; Huo, Ming; Maruyama, Hitoshi

    2015-05-01

    [Purpose] This study examined the effects of neuromuscular joint facilitation on bridging exercises by assessing the cross-sectional area of the multifidus muscle and thickness of the musculus transversus abdominis. [Subjects] Twelve healthy men. [Methods] Four exercises were evaluated: (a) supine resting, (b) bridging resistance exercise involving posterior pelvic tilting, (c) bridging resistance exercise involving anterior pelvic tilting, and (d) bridging resistance exercise involving neuromuscular joint facilitation. The cross-sectional area of the multifidus muscle and thickness of the musculus transversus abdominis were measured during each exercise. [Results] The cross-sectional area of the multifidus muscle and thickness of the musculus transversus abdominis were significantly greater in the neuromuscular joint facilitation group than the others. [Conclusion] Neuromuscular joint facilitation intervention improves the function of deep muscles such as the multifidus muscle and musculus transversus abdominis. Therefore, it can be recommended for application in clinical treatments such as that for back pain.

  12. Skeletal Muscle Sorbitol Levels in Diabetic Rats with and without Insulin Therapy and Endurance Exercise Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez, O. A.; Walseth, T. F.; Snow, L. M.; Serfass, R. C.; Thompson, L. V.

    2009-01-01

    Sorbitol accumulation is postulated to play a role in skeletal muscle dysfunction associated with diabetes. The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of insulin and of endurance exercise on skeletal muscle sorbitol levels in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats. Rats were assigned to one experimental group (control sedentary, control exercise, diabetic sedentary, diabetic exercise, diabetic sedentary no-insulin). Diabetic rats received daily subcutaneous insulin. The exercise-trained rats ran on a treadmill (1 hour, 5X/wk, for 12 weeks). Skeletal muscle sorbitol levels were the highest in the diabetic sedentary no-insulin group. Diabetic sedentary rats receiving insulin had similar sorbitol levels to control sedentary rats. Endurance exercise did not significantly affect sorbitol levels. These results indicate that insulin treatment lowers sorbitol in skeletal muscle; therefore sorbitol accumulation is probably not related to muscle dysfunction in insulin-treated diabetic individuals. Endurance exercise did not influence intramuscular sorbitol values as strongly as insulin. PMID:20016800

  13. Rac1 in muscle is dispensable for improved insulin action after exercise in mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sylow, Lykke; Møller, Lisbeth Liliendal Valbjørn; D'Hulst, Gommaar

    2016-01-01

    sensitivity in inducible muscle-specific Rac1 knockout (mKO) and wildtype littermate (WT) mice. Prior exercise enhanced whole body insulin sensitivity by 40% in WT mice and rescued the insulin intolerance in Rac1 mKO mice by improving whole body insulin sensitivity by 230%. In agreement, prior exercise...... significantly improved insulin sensitivity by 20% in WT and by 40% in Rac1 mKO soleus muscles. These findings suggest that muscle Rac1 is dispensable for the insulin sensitizing effect of exercise. Moreover, insulin resistance in Rac1 mKO mice can be completely normalized by prior exercise explaining why......Exercise has a potent insulin-sensitivity enhancing effect on skeletal muscle but the intracellular mechanisms that mediate this effect are not well understood. In muscle, Rac1 regulates both insulin- and contraction-stimulated glucose transport and is dysregulated in insulin resistant muscle...

  14. New insights into the benefits of exercise for muscle health in patients with idiopathic inflammatory myositis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alemo Munters, Li; Alexanderson, Helene; Crofford, Leslie J; Lundberg, Ingrid E

    2014-07-01

    With recommended treatment, a majority with idiopathic inflammatory myopathy (IIM) develop muscle impairment and poor health. Beneficial effects of exercise have been reported on muscle performance, aerobic capacity and health in chronic polymyositis and dermatomyositis and to some extent in active disease and inclusion body myositis (IBM). Importantly, randomized controlled trials (RCTs) indicate that improved health and decreased clinical disease activity could be mediated through increased aerobic capacity. Recently, reports seeking mechanisms underlying effects of exercise in skeletal muscle indicate increased aerobic capacity (i.e. increased mitochondrial capacity and capillary density, reduced lactate levels), activation of genes in aerobic phenotype and muscle growth programs, and down regulation in genes related to inflammation. Altogether, exercise contributes to both systemic and within-muscle adaptations demonstrating that exercise is fundamental to improve muscle performance and health in IIM. There is a need for RCTs to study effects of exercise in active disease and IBM.

  15. Assessment of bioelectrical activity of synergistic muscles during pelvic floor muscles activation in postmenopausal women with and without stress urinary incontinence: a preliminary observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ptaszkowski, Kuba; Paprocka-Borowicz, Małgorzata; Słupska, Lucyna; Bartnicki, Janusz; Dymarek, Robert; Rosińczuk, Joanna; Heimrath, Jerzy; Dembowski, Janusz; Zdrojowy, Romuald

    2015-01-01

    Muscles such as adductor magnus (AM), gluteus maximus (GM), rectus abdominis (RA), and abdominal external and internal oblique muscles are considered to play an important role in the treatment of stress urinary incontinence (SUI), and the relationship between contraction of these muscles and pelvic floor muscles (PFM) has been established in previous studies. Synergistic muscle activation intensifies a woman's ability to contract the PFM. In some cases, even for continent women, it is not possible to fully contract their PFM without involving the synergistic muscles. The primary aim of this study was to assess the surface electromyographic activity of synergistic muscles to PFM (SPFM) during resting and functional PFM activation in postmenopausal women with and without SUI. This study was a preliminary, prospective, cross-sectional observational study and included volunteers and patients who visited the Department and Clinic of Urology, University Hospital in Wroclaw, Poland. Forty-two patients participated in the study and were screened for eligibility criteria. Thirty participants satisfied the criteria and were categorized into two groups: women with SUI (n=16) and continent women (n=14). The bioelectrical activity of PFM and SPFM (AM, RA, GM) was recorded with a surface electromyographic instrument in a standing position during resting and functional PFM activity. Bioelectrical activity of RA was significantly higher in the incontinent group than in the continent group. These results concern the RA activity during resting and functional PFM activity. The results for other muscles showed no significant difference in bioelectrical activity between groups. In women with SUI, during the isolated activation of PFM, an increased synergistic activity of RA muscle was observed; however, this activity was not observed in asymptomatic women. This may indicate the important accessory contribution of these muscles in the mechanism of continence.

  16. Is Pelvic-Floor Muscle Training a Physical Therapy or a Behavioral Therapy? A Call to Name and Report the Physical, Cognitive, and Behavioral Elements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frawley, Helena C; Dean, Sarah G; Slade, Susan C; Hay-Smith, E Jean C

    2017-04-01

    This perspective article explores whether pelvic-floor muscle training (PFMT) for the management of female urinary incontinence and prolapse is a physical therapy or a behavioral therapy. The primary aim is to demonstrate that it is both. A secondary aim is to show that the plethora of terms used for PFMT is potentially confusing and that current terminology inadequately represents the full intent, content, and delivery of this complex intervention. While physical therapists may be familiar with exercise terms, the details are often incompletely reported; furthermore, physical therapists are less familiar with the terminology used in accurately representing cognitive and behavioral therapy interventions, which results in these elements being even less well reported. Thus, an additional aim is to provide greater clarity in the terminology used in the reporting of PFMT interventions, specifically, descriptions of the exercise and behavioral elements. First, PFMT is described as a physical therapy and as an exercise therapy informed predominantly by the discipline of physical therapy. However, effective implementation requires use of the cognitive and behavioral perspectives of the discipline of psychology. Second, the theoretical underpinning of the psychology-informed elements of PFMT is summarized. Third, to address some identified limitations and confusion in current terminology and reporting, recommendations for ways in which physical therapists can incorporate the psychology-informed elements of PFMT alongside the more familiar exercise therapy-informed elements are made. Fourth, an example of how both elements can be described and reported in a PFMT intervention is provided. In summary, this perspective explores the underlying concepts of PFMT to demonstrate that it is both a physical intervention and a behavioral intervention and that it can and should be described as such, and an example of the integration of these elements into clinical practice is provided

  17. An Analysis of Muscle Activities of Healthy Women during Pilates Exercises in a Prone Position.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Bo-In; Jung, Ju-Hyeon; Shim, Jemyung; Kwon, Hae-Yeon; Kim, Haroo

    2014-01-01

    [Purpose] This study analyzed the activities of the back and hip muscles during Pilates exercises conducted in a prone position. [Subjects] The subjects were 18 healthy women volunteers who had practiced at a Pilates center for more than three months. [Methods] The subjects performed three Pilates exercises. To examine muscle activity during the exercises, 8-channel surface electromyography (Noraxon USA, Inc., Scottsdale, AZ) was used. The surface electrodes were attached to the bilateral latissimus dorsi muscle, multifidus muscle, gluteus maximus, and semitendinous muscle. Three Pilates back exercises were compared: (1) double leg kick (DLK), (2) swimming (SW), and (3) leg beat (LB). Electrical muscle activation was normalized to maximal voluntary isometric contraction. Repeated measures analysis of variance was performed to assess the differences in activation levels among the exercises. [Results] The activity of the multifidus muscle was significantly high for the SW (52.3±11.0, 50.9±9.8) and LB exercises(51.8±12.8, 48.3±13.9) and the activity of the semitendinosus muscle was higher for the LB exercise (49.2±8.7, 52.9±9.3) than for the DLK and SW exercises. [Conclusion] These results may provide basic material for when Pilates exercises are performed in a prone position and may be useful information on clinical Pilates for rehabilitation programs.

  18. Noninvasive Sensor for Measuring Muscle Metabolism During Exercise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soller, B. R.; Yang, Y.; Lee, S. M. C.; Soyemi, O. O.; Wilson, C.; Hagan, R. D.

    2007-01-01

    The measurement of oxygen uptake (VO2) and lactate threshold (LT) are utilized to assess changes in aerobic capacity and the efficacy of exercise countermeasures in astronauts. During extravehicular activity (EVA), real-time knowledge of VO2 and relative work intensity can be used to monitor crew activity levels and organize tasks to reduce the cumulative effects of fatigue. Currently VO2 and LT are determined with complicated measurement techniques that require sampling of expired ventilatory gases, which may not be accurate in enclosed, oxygen-rich environments such as the EVA suit. The UMMS team has developed a novel near infrared spectroscopic (NIRS) system which noninvasively, simultaneously and continuously measures muscle oxygen tension, oxygen saturation, pH (pHm), and hematocrit from a small sensor placed on the leg. This system is unique in that it allows accurate, absolute measurement of these parameters in the thigh muscle by correcting spectra for the interference from skin pigment and fat. These parameters can be used to estimate VO2 and LT. A preliminary evaluation of the system s capabilities was performed in the NASA JSC Exercise Physiology Lab.

  19. The influence of training status on the drop in muscle strength after acute exercise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pingel, Jessica; Moerch, L; Kjaer, M

    2009-01-01

    to running exercise immediately after immobilization, the muscle strength of the triceps-surae muscles dropped even further, but just in the immobilized leg (41%; P importance of determining the muscle endurance when evaluating the effect of immobilization on muscle......Skeletal muscles fatigue after exercise, and reductions in maximal force appear. A difference in training status between the legs was introduced by unilateral immobilization of the calf muscles for 2 weeks in young men, who were randomly assigned to two groups, either a RUN group (n = 8......) that was exposed to prolonged exercise (1-h running: individual pace) or a REST group (n = 12) that did no exercise after immobilization. Cross-sectional area (CSA) of the triceps-surae muscles was calculated by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and maximal voluntary contraction (MVC) force of the plantar flexors...

  20. ALDH2 restores exhaustive exercise-induced mitochondrial dysfunction in skeletal muscle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Qiuping; Zheng, Jianheng; Qiu, Jun; Wu, Xiahong; Xu, Yangshuo; Shen, Weili; Sun, Mengwei

    2017-01-01

    Background: Mitochondrial aldehyde dehydrogenase 2 (ALDH2) is highly expressed in heart and skeletal muscles, and is the major enzyme that metabolizes acetaldehyde and toxic aldehydes. The cardioprotective effects of ALDH2 during cardiac ischemia/reperfusion injury have been recognized. However, less is known about the function of ALDH2 in skeletal muscle. This study was designed to evaluate the effect of ALDH2 on exhaustive exercise-induced skeletal muscle injury. Methods: We created transgenic mice expressing ALDH2 in skeletal muscles. Male wild-type C57/BL6 (WT) and ALDH2 transgenic mice (ALDH2-Tg), 8-weeks old, were challenged with exhaustive exercise for 1 week to induce skeletal muscle injury. Animals were sacrificed 24 h post-exercise and muscle tissue was excised. Results: ALDH2-Tg mice displayed significantly increased treadmill exercise capacity compared to WT mice. Exhaustive exercise caused an increase in mRNA levels of the muscle atrophy markers, Atrogin-1 and MuRF1, and reduced mitochondrial biogenesis and fusion in WT skeletal muscles; these effects were attenuated in ALDH2-Tg mice. Exhaustive exercise also enhanced mitochondrial autophagy pathway activity, including increased conversion of LC3-I to LC3-II and greater expression of Beclin1 and Bnip3; the effects of which were mitigated by ALDH2 overexpression. In addition, ALDH2-Tg reversed the increase of an oxidative stress biomarker (4-hydroxynonenal) and decreased levels of mitochondrial antioxidant proteins, including manganese superoxide dismutase and NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase 1, in skeletal muscle induced by exhaustive exercise. Conclusion: ALDH2 may reverse skeletal muscle mitochondrial dysfunction due to exhaustive exercise by regulating mitochondria dynamic remodeling and enhancing the quality of mitochondria. - Highlights: • Skeletal muscle ALDH2 expression and activity declines during exhaustive exercise. • ALDH2 overexpression enhances physical performance and restores muscle

  1. Resistance exercise-induced fluid shifts: change in active muscle size and plasma volume

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ploutz-Snyder, L. L.; Convertino, V. A.; Dudley, G. A.

    1995-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that the reduction in plasma volume (PV) induced by resistance exercise reflects fluid loss to the extravascular space and subsequently selective increase in cross-sectional area (CSA) of active but not inactive skeletal muscle. We compared changes in active and inactive muscle CSA and PV after barbell squat exercise. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was used to quantify muscle involvement in exercise and to determine CSA of muscle groups or individual muscles [vasti (VS), adductor (Add), hamstring (Ham), and rectus femoris (RF)]. Muscle involvement in exercise was determined using exercise-induced contrast shift in spin-spin relaxation time (T2)-weighted MR images immediately postexercise. Alterations in muscle size were based on the mean CSA of individual slices. Hematocrit, hemoglobin, and Evans blue dye were used to estimate changes in PV. Muscle CSA and PV data were obtained preexercise and immediately postexercise and 15 and 45 min thereafter. A hierarchy of muscle involvement in exercise was found such that VS > Add > Ham > RF, with the Ham and RF showing essentially no involvement. CSA of the VS and Add muscle groups were increased 10 and 5%, respectively, immediately after exercise in each thigh with no changes in Ham and RF CSA. PV was decreased 22% immediately following exercise. The absolute loss of PV was correlated (r2 = 0.75) with absolute increase in muscle CSA immediately postexercise, supporting the notion that increased muscle size after resistance exercise reflects primarily fluid movement from the vascular space into active but not inactive muscle.

  2. Evaluation of the relationship between the pelvic floor muscles and insulin resistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Micussi MT

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Maria Thereza Micussi,1 Rodrigo Pegado Freitas,1 Priscylla Helouyse Angelo,2 Elvira Maria Soares,3 Telma Maria Lemos,4 Técia Maria Maranhão51Physical Therapy Department, 2Postgraduate Program in Physical Therapy, 3Januário Cicco Maternity School, 4Clinical Analysis Department, 5Tocogynecology Department, Federal University of Rio Grande do Norte (UFRN, Natal, Rio Grande do Norte, BrazilPurpose: The aim of this study was to evaluate the pelvic floor muscles (PFMs in women with insulin resistance (IR using surface electromyography and to associate the results with insulin levels.Patients and methods: Through an analytical, cross-sectional study, 86 women were evaluated and divided into two groups: a control group (n=35 and an IR group (n=51. Data were collected through detailed history-taking, physical examination, and biochemical analysis. Fasting insulin levels were used for diagnosing IR. Electromyography of the PFMs was used for analyzing the tone and maximal voluntary contraction (MVC. The measures of central tendency and linear regression models were used.Results: The average age was 25.3±4.5 years in the IR group and 27.2±4.4 years in the control group. The mean weight was 75.6±17.6 kg and 51.8±4.9 kg in the IR and control groups, respectively. Fasting insulin levels were 19.7±6.6 µIU/mL in the IR group and 5.4±1.8 µIU/mL in the control group (P<0.010. There were significant differences between the groups with regard to PFM tone (IR: 13.4±3.4 µV; control: 25.1±3.3 µV; P<0.001 and MVC (IR: 47.6±4.5 µV; control: 64.3±5.0 µV; P<0.001. Multiple linear regression analysis using the insulin levels as dependent variable showed a significant association for MVC (P=0.047, weight (P=0.017, and waist circumference (P=0.000.Conclusion: Compared with the control group, the IR group showed lower electromyographic activity of the PFMs, and there was an association between insulin levels and electromyographic activity.Keywords: tone

  3. Muscle and intensity based hamstring exercise classification in elite female track and field athletes: implications for exercise selection during rehabilitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsaklis, Panagiotis; Malliaropoulos, Nikos; Mendiguchia, Jurdan; Korakakis, Vasileios; Tsapralis, Kyriakos; Pyne, Debasish; Malliaras, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Background Hamstring injuries are common in many sports, including track and field. Strains occur in different parts of the hamstring muscle but very little is known about whether common hamstring loading exercises specifically load different hamstring components. The purpose of this study was to investigate muscle activation of different components of the hamstring muscle during common hamstring loading exercises. Methods Twenty elite female track and field athletes were recruited into this study, which had a single-sample, repeated-measures design. Each athlete performed ten hamstring loading exercises, and an electromyogram (EMG) was recorded from the biceps femoris and semitendinosus components of the hamstring. Hamstring EMG during maximal voluntary isometric contraction (MVIC) was used to normalize the mean data across ten repetitions of each exercise. An electrogoniometer synchronized to the EMG was used to determine whether peak EMG activity occurred during muscle-tendon unit lengthening, shortening, or no change in length. Mean EMG values were compared between the two recording sites for each exercise using the Student’s t-test. Results The lunge, dead lift, and kettle swings were low intensity (hamstring bridge, and hamstring curl were all medium intensity exercises (≥50% or hamstrings. Low, medium, and high intensity exercises were demonstrated. This information enables the clinician, strength and conditioning coach and physiotherapist to better understand intensity- and muscle-specific activation during hamstring muscle rehabilitation. Therefore, these results may help in designing progressive strengthening and rehabilitation and prevention programs. PMID:26170726

  4. Single muscle fiber gene expression in human skeletal muscle: validation of internal control with exercise

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jemiolo, Bozena; Trappe, Scott

    2004-01-01

    Reverse transcription and real-time PCR have become the method of choice for the detection of low-abundance mRNA transcripts obtained from small human muscle biopsy samples. GAPDH, β-actin, β-2M, and 18S rRNA are widely employed as endogenous control genes, with the assumption that their expression is unregulated and constant for given experimental conditions. The aim of this study was to determine if mRNA transcripts could be performed on isolated human single muscle fibers and to determine reliable housekeeping genes (HKGs) using quantitative gene expression protocols at rest and in response to an acute exercise bout. Muscle biopsies were obtained from the gastrocnemius of three adult males before, immediately after, and 4 h following 30 min of treadmill running at 70% of VO 2 max. A total of 40 single fibers (MHC I and IIa) were examined for GAPDH, β-actin, β-2M, and 18S rRNA using quantitative RT-PCR and SYBR Green detection. All analyzed single fiber segments showed ribosomal RNA (28S/18S). No degradation or additional bands below ribosomal were detected (rRNA ratio 1.5-1.8). Also, no high or low-molecular weight genomic DNA contamination was observed. For each housekeeping gene the duplicate average SD was ±0.13 with a CV of 0.58%. Stable expression of GAPDH was observed at all time points for each fiber type (MHC I and IIa). Inconsistent expression of β-actin, β-2M, and 18S rRNA was observed during the post-exercise time points for each fiber type. These data indicate that successful extraction of high quality RNA from human single muscle fibers along with quantification of mRNA of selected genes can be performed. Furthermore, exercise does influence the expression of certain HKGs with GAPDH being the most stable

  5. NAD+/NADH and skeletal muscle mitochondrial adaptations to exercise

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Amanda T.

    2012-01-01

    The pyridine nucleotides, NAD+ and NADH, are coenzymes that provide oxidoreductive power for the generation of ATP by mitochondria. In skeletal muscle, exercise perturbs the levels of NAD+, NADH, and consequently, the NAD+/NADH ratio, and initial research in this area focused on the contribution of redox control to ATP production. More recently, numerous signaling pathways that are sensitive to perturbations in NAD+(H) have come to the fore, as has an appreciation for the potential importance of compartmentation of NAD+(H) metabolism and its subsequent effects on various signaling pathways. These pathways, which include the sirtuin (SIRT) proteins SIRT1 and SIRT3, the poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) proteins PARP1 and PARP2, and COOH-terminal binding protein (CtBP), are of particular interest because they potentially link changes in cellular redox state to both immediate, metabolic-related changes and transcriptional adaptations to exercise. In this review, we discuss what is known, and not known, about the contribution of NAD+(H) metabolism and these aforementioned proteins to mitochondrial adaptations to acute and chronic endurance exercise. PMID:22436696

  6. Do metabolites that are produced during resistance exercise enhance muscle hypertrophy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dankel, Scott J; Mattocks, Kevin T; Jessee, Matthew B; Buckner, Samuel L; Mouser, J Grant; Loenneke, Jeremy P

    2017-11-01

    Many reviews conclude that metabolites play an important role with respect to muscle hypertrophy during resistance exercise, but their actual physiologic contribution remains unknown. Some have suggested that metabolites may work independently of muscle contraction, while others have suggested that metabolites may play a secondary role in their ability to augment muscle activation via inducing fatigue. Interestingly, the studies used as support for an anabolic role of metabolites use protocols that are not actually designed to test the importance of metabolites independent of muscle contraction. While there is some evidence in vitro that metabolites may induce muscle hypertrophy, the only study attempting to answer this question in humans found no added benefit of pooling metabolites within the muscle post-exercise. As load-induced muscle hypertrophy is thought to work via mechanotransduction (as opposed to being metabolically driven), it seems likely that metabolites simply augment muscle activation and cause the mechanotransduction cascade in a larger proportion of muscle fibers, thereby producing greater muscle growth. A sufficient time under tension also appears necessary, as measurable muscle growth is not observed after repeated maximal testing. Based on current evidence, it is our opinion that metabolites produced during resistance exercise do not have anabolic properties per se, but may be anabolic in their ability to augment muscle activation. Future studies are needed to compare protocols which produce similar levels of muscle activation, but differ in the magnitude of metabolites produced, or duration in which the exercised muscles are exposed to metabolites.

  7. Prevention of postpartum stress incontinence in primigravidae with increased bladder neck mobility: a randomised controlled trial of antenatal pelvic floor exercises.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reilly, E T C; Freeman, R M; Waterfield, M R; Waterfield, A E; Steggles, P; Pedlar, F

    2014-12-01

    To test whether supervised pelvic floor exercises antenatally will reduce the incidence of postpartum stress incontinence in at-risk primigravidae with bladder neck mobility, ultrasonically proven. Single blind, randomised controlled trial. Antenatal clinic in a UK NHS Trust Hospital. Two hundred and sixty-eight primigravidae attending an antenatal clinic at approximately 20 weeks of gestation with bladder neck mobility, on standardised valsalva, of 5 mm or more linear movement. The median age was 28, ranging from 16 to 47 years. Patients randomised to supervised pelvic floor exercises (n = 139) attended a physiotherapist at monthly intervals from 20 weeks until delivery. The exercises comprised three repetitions of eight contractions each held for six seconds, with two minutes rest between repetitions. These were repeated twice daily. At 34 weeks of gestation the number of contractions per repetition was increased to 12. Both the untreated control group and the study group received verbal advice on pelvic floor exercises from their midwives antenatally. Subjective reporting of stress incontinence at three months postpartum. Pelvic floor strength, using perineometry, and bladder neck mobility measured by perineal ultrasound. Of the 268 women enrolled, information on the main outcome variable was available for 110 in the control group and 120 in the study group. Fewer women in the supervised pelvic floor exercise group reported postpartum stress incontinence, 19.2% compared with 32.7% in the control group (RR 0.59 [0.37-0.92]). There was no change in bladder neck mobility and no difference in pelvic floor strength between groups after exercise, although all those developing postpartum stress incontinence had significantly poorer perineometry scores than those who were continent. The findings suggest that antenatal supervised pelvic floor exercises are effective in reducing the risk of postpartum stress incontinence in primigravidae with bladder neck mobility.

  8. PGC-1α and exercise intensity dependent adaptations in mouse skeletal muscle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brandt, Nina; Dethlefsen, Maja Munk; Bangsbo, Jens

    2017-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to examine the role of PGC-1α in intensity dependent exercise and exercise training-induced metabolic adaptations in mouse skeletal muscle. Whole body PGC-1α knockout (KO) and littermate wildtype (WT) mice performed a single treadmill running bout at either low...... intensity dependent increases in LC3I and LC3II protein and intensity independent decrease in p62 protein in skeletal muscle late in recovery and increased LC3II with exercise training independent of exercise intensity and volume in WT mice. Furthermore, acute exercise and exercise training did not increase...... LC3I and LC3II protein in PGC-1α KO. In addition, exercise-induced mRNA responses of PGC-1α isoforms were intensity dependent. In conclusion, these findings indicate that exercise intensity affected autophagy markers differently in skeletal muscle and suggest that PGC-1α regulates both acute...

  9. Vascular endothelial growth factor in skeletal muscle following glycogen-depleting exercise in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Line; Gejl, Kasper Degn; Ørtenblad, Niels

    2015-01-01

    unclear. However, as VEGF is also considered very important for the regulation of vascular permeability, it is possible that metabolic stress may trigger muscle VEGF release. PURPOSE: To study the role of metabolic stress induced by glycogen-depleting exercise on muscle VEGF expression. METHODS: Fifteen......Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is traditionally considered important for skeletal muscle angiogenesis. VEGF is released from vascular endothelium as well as the muscle cells in response to exercise. The mechanism and the physiological role of VEGF secreted from the muscle cells remain...... levels by 24h irrespective of treatment. CONCLUSIONS: Muscle glycogen depletion induced by prolonged exercise leads to up-regulation as well as co-localization of HSP70 and VEGF primarily in type I fibers, thus suggesting that VEGF released from muscle is involved in the maintenance of muscle metabolic...

  10. The role of muscle strengthening in exercise therapy for knee osteoarthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bartholdy, Cecilie; Juhl, Carsten; Christensen, Robin

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To analyze if exercise interventions for patients with knee osteoarthritis (OA) following the American College of Sports Medicine (ACSM) definition of muscle strength training differs from other types of exercise, and to analyze associations between changes in muscle strength, pain, a...

  11. Dissociation between lactate and proton exchange in muscle during intense exercise in man

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bangsbo, Jens; Juel, Carsten; Hellsten, Ylva

    1997-01-01

    1. Transport of lactate, H+ and fluid across muscle sarcolemma was studied in contracting muscles under varying blood acid-base conditions. 2. Subjects performed two-legged submaximal knee-extensor exercise for 29-35 min consisting of warming up for 5 min followed by 10 min of leg exercise (L1...

  12. Induction of amino acid transporters expression by endurance exercise in rat skeletal muscle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murakami, Taro; Yoshinaga, Mariko

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: •Regulation of amino acid transporter expression in working muscle remains unclear. •Expression of amino acid transporters for leucine were induced by a bout of exercise. •Requirement of leucine in muscle cells might regulate expression of its transporters. •This information is beneficial for understanding the muscle remodeling by exercise. -- Abstract: We here investigated whether an acute bout of endurance exercise would induce the expression of amino acid transporters that regulate leucine transport across plasma and lysosomal membranes in rat skeletal muscle. Rats ran on a motor-driven treadmill at a speed of 28 m/min for 90 min. Immediately after the exercise, we observed that expression of mRNAs encoding L-type amino acid transporter 1 (LAT1) and CD98 was induced in the gastrocnemius, soleus, and extensor digitorum longus (EDL) muscles. Sodium-coupled neutral amino acid transporter 2 (SNAT2) mRNA was also induced by the exercise in those three muscles. Expression of proton-assisted amino acid transporter 1 (PAT1) mRNA was slightly but not significantly induced by a single bout of exercise in soleus and EDL muscles. Exercise-induced mRNA expression of these amino acid transporters appeared to be attenuated by repeated bouts of the exercise. These results suggested that the expression of amino acid transporters for leucine may be induced in response to an increase in the requirement for this amino acid in the cells of working skeletal muscles

  13. The emerging role of skeletal muscle extracellular matrix remodelling in obesity and exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez-Huenchullan, S; McLennan, S V; Verhoeven, A; Twigg, S M; Tam, C S

    2017-07-01

    Skeletal muscle extracellular matrix remodelling has been proposed as a new feature associated with obesity and metabolic dysfunction. Exercise training improves muscle function in obesity, which may be mediated by regulatory effects on the muscle extracellular matrix. This review examined available literature on skeletal muscle extracellular matrix remodelling during obesity and the effects of exercise. A non-systematic literature review was performed on PubMed of publications from 1970 to 2015. A total of 37 studies from humans and animals were retained. Studies reported overall increases in gene and protein expression of different types of collagen, growth factors and enzymatic regulators of the skeletal muscle extracellular matrix in obesity. Only two studies investigated the effects of exercise on skeletal muscle extracellular matrix during obesity, with both suggesting a regulatory effect of exercise. The effects of exercise on muscle extracellular matrix seem to be influenced by the duration and type of exercise training with variable effects from a single session compared with a longer duration of exercise. More studies are needed to elucidate the mechanisms behind skeletal muscle extracellular matrix remodelling during obesity and the effects of exercise. © 2017 World Obesity Federation.

  14. Pelvic floor muscle problems mediate sexual problems in young adult rape victims.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Postma, Riemke; Bicanic, Iva; van der Vaart, Huub; Laan, Ellen

    2013-08-01

    Prior studies have addressed sexual abuse and sexual function in adult women. No studies have focused on the effect of adolescence rape on sexual functioning. To investigate the effect of rape on sexual problems and on pelvic floor problems, as well as the mediating role of pelvic floor problems on sexual problems, in a homogenous group of victims of adolescence rape without a history of childhood sexual, physical, and/or emotional abuse. Sexual functioning and pelvic floor functioning were assessed using self-report questionnaires. In this cross-sectional study, a group of 89 young women aged 18-25 years who were victimized by rape in adolescence was compared with a group of 114 nonvictimized controls. The rape victims were treated for posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) 3 years prior to participation in the study. Three years posttreatment, rape victims were 2.4 times more likely to have a sexual dysfunction (lubrication problems and pain) and 2.7 times more likely to have pelvic floor dysfunction (symptoms of provoked vulvodynia, general stress, lower urinary tract, and irritable bowel syndrome) than nonvictimized controls. The relationship between rape and sexual problems was partially mediated by the presence of pelvic floor problems. Rape victims and controls did not differ with regard to sexual activities. Rape victims suffer significantly more from sexual dysfunction and pelvic floor dysfunction when compared with nontraumatized controls, despite the provision of treatment for PTSD. Possibly, physical manifestations of PTSD have been left unaddressed in treatment. Future treatment protocols should consider incorporating (physical or psychological) treatment strategies for sexual dysfunction and/or pelvic floor dysfunction into trauma exposure treatments. © 2013 International Society for Sexual Medicine.

  15. Transcriptional adaptations following exercise in Thoroughbred horse skeletal muscle highlights molecular mechanisms that lead to muscle hypertrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Park Stephen DE

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Selection for exercise-adapted phenotypes in the Thoroughbred racehorse has provided a valuable model system to understand molecular responses to exercise in skeletal muscle. Exercise stimulates immediate early molecular responses as well as delayed responses during recovery, resulting in a return to homeostasis and enabling long term adaptation. Global mRNA expression during the immediate-response period has not previously been reported in skeletal muscle following exercise in any species. Also, global gene expression changes in equine skeletal muscle following exercise have not been reported. Therefore, to identify novel genes and key regulatory pathways responsible for exercise adaptation we have used equine-specific cDNA microarrays to examine global mRNA expression in skeletal muscle from a cohort of Thoroughbred horses (n = 8 at three time points (before exercise, immediately post-exercise, and four hours post-exercise following a single bout of treadmill exercise. Results Skeletal muscle biopsies were taken from the gluteus medius before (T0, immediately after (T1 and four hours after (T2 exercise. Statistically significant differences in mRNA abundance between time points (T0 vs T1 and T0 vs T2 were determined using the empirical Bayes moderated t-test in the Bioconductor package Linear Models for Microarray Data (LIMMA and the expression of a select panel of genes was validated using real time quantitative reverse transcription PCR (qRT-PCR. While only two genes had increased expression at T1 (P 2 932 genes had increased (P P 2 revealed an over-representation of genes localized to the actin cytoskeleton and with functions in the MAPK signalling, focal adhesion, insulin signalling, mTOR signaling, p53 signaling and Type II diabetes mellitus pathways. At T1, using a less stringent statistical approach, we observed an over-representation of genes involved in the stress response, metabolism and intracellular signaling

  16. Reorganized trunk muscle activity during multidirectional floor perturbations after experimental low back pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Lars Henrik; Hirata, Rogerio Pessoto; Graven-Nielsen, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Low back pain changes the trunk muscle activity after external perturbations but the relationship between pain intensities and distributions and their effect on the trunk muscle activity remains unclear. The effects of unilateral and bilateral experimental low back pain on trunk muscle activity w...

  17. Protein hydrolysates and recovery of muscle damage following eccentric exercise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dale M.J.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: A whey protein hydrolysate (NatraBoost XR; WPHNB has been shown to speed repair muscle damage. We sought to determine whether this benefit is specific to this hydrolysate to evaluate a marker for quality control. Methods: Three hydrolysates of the same whey protein isolate (WPI were prepared (WPHNB, WPH1 and WPH2. Isometric knee extensor strength was measured in 39 sedentary male participants before and after 100 maximal eccentric contractions of the knee extensors to induce muscle damage. Participants were then randomised to consume 250 ml of flavoured water (FW, n=9, or 250 ml of FW containing 25 g of either NatraBoost XR (n=3, WPH1 (n=9, WPH2 (n=9 or WPI (n=9. Strength was reassessed over the next seven days while the supplements were consumed daily. Fibroblasts were cultured for 48 hr in the presence of the different hydrolysates, WPI, saline or fetal bovine serum to ascertain effects on cell proliferation. Results: Strength was reduced in all treatment groups after eccentric exercise (P<0.001. Strength recovered steadily over 7 days in the FW, WPI, WPH1 and WPH2 treatment groups (P<0.001, with no difference between treatments (P=0.87. WPHNB promoted faster strength recovery compared with the other treatments (P<0.001. Fibroblast proliferation was greater with WPHNB compared with saline, WPI or the other hydrolysates (P<0.001. Conclusions: Promoting recovery from muscle damage seems unique to WPHNB. In vitro fibroblast proliferation may be a useful marker for quality control. It is not clear whether effects on fibroblast proliferation contribute to the in vivo effect of WPHNB on muscle damage.

  18. [Impacts of physical exercise on remodeling and hypertrophy of skeletal muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakashita, Yoshihiro; Uchida, Takayuki; Nikawa, Takeshi

    The skeletal muscle has high sensitivity for the mechanical stress. Because it is enlarged by training, whereas it is easily withered by lack of exercise. When we exercise, skeletal muscle cells per se sense mechanical loading, and muscular remodeling and the muscular hypertrophy occur. It has been revealed that the intracellular signaling through PGC-1α participates in the remodeling of the skeletal muscle, while PGC-1α4, an isoform of PGC-1α, and the dystrophin-glycoprotein complex play important roles in muscular hypertrophy. This review describes the impact of physical exercise gives on the remodeling and hypertrophy of muscle through the signaling.

  19. Lack of skeletal muscle IL-6 influences hepatic glucose metabolism in mice during prolonged exercise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bertholdt, Lærke; Gudiksen, Anders; Schwartz, Camilla Lindgren

    2017-01-01

    The liver is essential in maintaining and regulating glucose homeostasis during prolonged exercise. IL-6 has been shown to be secreted from skeletal muscle during exercise and has been suggested to signal to the liver. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate the role of skeletal muscle...... IL-6 on hepatic glucose regulation and substrate choice during prolonged exercise. Skeletal muscle-specific IL-6 knockout (IL-6 MKO) mice (age, 12-14 wk) and littermate lox/lox (Control) mice were either rested (Rest) or completed a single bout of exercise for 10, 60, or 120 min, and the liver....... Furthermore, IL-6 MKO mice had higher hepatic pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH)Ser232 and PDHSer300 phosphorylation than control mice at rest. In conclusion, hepatic gluconeogenic capacity in mice is increased during prolonged exercise independent of muscle IL-6. Furthermore, Skeletal muscle IL-6 influences...

  20. The Pleiotropic Effect of Physical Exercise on Mitochondrial Dynamics in Aging Skeletal Muscle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Barbieri

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Decline in human muscle mass and strength (sarcopenia is one of the principal hallmarks of the aging process. Regular physical exercise and training programs are certain powerful stimuli to attenuate the physiological skeletal muscle alterations occurring during aging and contribute to promote health and well-being. Although the series of events that led to these muscle adaptations are poorly understood, the mechanisms that regulate these processes involve the “quality” of skeletal muscle mitochondria. Aerobic/endurance exercise helps to maintain and improve cardiovascular fitness and respiratory function, whereas strength/resistance-exercise programs increase muscle strength, power development, and function. Due to the different effect of both exercises in improving mitochondrial content and quality, in terms of biogenesis, dynamics, turnover, and genotype, combined physical activity programs should be individually prescribed to maximize the antiaging effects of exercise.

  1. Increase in interstitial interleukin-6 of human skeletal muscle with repetitive low-force exercise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosendal, Lars; Søgaard, Karen; Kjaer, Michael

    2005-01-01

    Interleukin (IL)-6, which is released from muscle tissue during intense exercise, possesses important metabolic and probably anti-inflammatory properties. To evaluate the IL-6 response to low-intensity exercise, we conducted two studies: 1) a control study with insertion of microdialysis catheters...... in muscle and determination of interstitial muscle IL-6 response over 2 h of rest and 2) an exercise study to investigate the IL-6 response to 20 min of repetitive low-force exercise. In both studies, a microdialysis catheter (cutoff: 3,000 kDa) was inserted into the upper trapezius muscle of six male...... subjects, and the catheters were perfused with Ringer-acetate at 5 microl/min. Venous plasma samples were taken in the exercise study. The insertion of microdialysis catheters into muscle resulted in an increase in IL-6 from 8 +/- 0 to 359 +/- 171 and 484 +/- 202 pg/ml after 65 and 110 min, respectively (P...

  2. Molecular networks of human muscle adaptation to exercise and age.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bethan E Phillips

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Physical activity and molecular ageing presumably interact to precipitate musculoskeletal decline in humans with age. Herein, we have delineated molecular networks for these two major components of sarcopenic risk using multiple independent clinical cohorts. We generated genome-wide transcript profiles from individuals (n = 44 who then undertook 20 weeks of supervised resistance-exercise training (RET. Expectedly, our subjects exhibited a marked range of hypertrophic responses (3% to +28%, and when applying Ingenuity Pathway Analysis (IPA up-stream analysis to ~580 genes that co-varied with gain in lean mass, we identified rapamycin (mTOR signaling associating with growth (P = 1.4 × 10(-30. Paradoxically, those displaying most hypertrophy exhibited an inhibited mTOR activation signature, including the striking down-regulation of 70 rRNAs. Differential analysis found networks mimicking developmental processes (activated all-trans-retinoic acid (ATRA, Z-score = 4.5; P = 6 × 10(-13 and inhibited aryl-hydrocarbon receptor signaling (AhR, Z-score = -2.3; P = 3 × 10(-7 with RET. Intriguingly, as ATRA and AhR gene-sets were also a feature of endurance exercise training (EET, they appear to represent "generic" physical activity responsive gene-networks. For age, we found that differential gene-expression methods do not produce consistent molecular differences between young versus old individuals. Instead, utilizing two independent cohorts (n = 45 and n = 52, with a continuum of subject ages (18-78 y, the first reproducible set of age-related transcripts in human muscle was identified. This analysis identified ~500 genes highly enriched in post-transcriptional processes (P = 1 × 10(-6 and with negligible links to the aforementioned generic exercise regulated gene-sets and some overlap with ribosomal genes. The RNA signatures from multiple compounds all targeting serotonin, DNA topoisomerase antagonism, and RXR activation were significantly related to

  3. Exercise induces transient transcriptional activation of the PGC-1a gene in human skeletal muscle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pilegaard, Henriette; Saltin, Bengt; Neufer, P. Darrell

    2003-01-01

    Endurance exercise training induces mitochondrial biogenesis in skeletal muscle. The peroxisome proliferator activated receptor co-activator 1a (PGC-1a) has recently been identified as a nuclear factor critical for coordinating the activation of genes required for mitochondrial biogenesis in cell...... culture and rodent skeletal muscle. To determine whether PGC-1a transcription is regulated by acute exercise and exercise training in human skeletal muscle, seven male subjects performed 4 weeks of one-legged knee extensor exercise training. At the end of training, subjects completed 3 h of two......-legged knee extensor exercise. Biopsies were obtained from the vastus lateralis muscle of both the untrained and trained legs before exercise and after 0, 2, 6 and 24 h of recovery. Time to exhaustion (2 min maximum resistance), as well as hexokinase II (HKII), citrate synthase and 3-hydroxyacyl...

  4. Scapular muscle activity from selected strengthening exercises performed at low and high intensity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Christoffer H; Zebis, Mette K; Saervoll, Charlotte

    2012-01-01

    A balanced level of muscle strength between the different parts of the scapular muscles is important to optimize performance and prevent injuries in athletes. Emerging evidence suggests that many athletes lack balanced strength in the scapular muscles. Evidence based recommendations are important...... for proper exercise prescription. This study determines scapular muscle activity during strengthening exercises for scapular muscles performed at low and high intensities (Borg-CR10 level 3 and 8). Surface electromyography (EMG) from selected scapular muscles was recorded during seven strengthening exercises...... and expressed as a percentage of the maximal EMG. Seventeen women (aged 24-55 years) without serious disorders participated. Several of the investigated exercises - press-up, prone flexion, one-arm row and prone abduction at Borg 3 and press-up, push-up plus and one-arm row at Borg 8 - predominantly activated...

  5. Relationship between physical exercise, muscle damage and delayed-onset muscle soreness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denis Foschini

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the present study was to investigate the relationship between physical exercise involving muscle damage and delayed-onset muscle soreness (DOMS. A literature review of national and international periodicals was carried out. Muscle structures (membranes, Z-line, sarcomeres, T tubules and myofi brils can become damaged as a result of an imposed mechanical overload. Of greatest note are exercises requiring strength, particularly when muscular action is eccentric. Damage to skeletal musculature can be analyzed by direct methods (muscle biopsy or magnetic resonance or by indirect methods (maximum voluntary movement, subjective pain perception scales, analysis of enzyme and protein concentrations in blood. Creatine kinase (CK, lactate dehydrogenase (LDH, myosin heavy chain fragments, troponin-I and myoglobin can be used as indirect markers of muscle damage. Both DOMS and muscle damage can be infl uenced by the type of activity, with emphasis on eccentric muscle movements, type of exercise, velocity of the movement, interval period between series, the level of individual fi tness, this last primarily affecting beginners. When myotrauma occurs, muscle damage repair is initiated by leukocytes migrating to the injured area, although, the histamines, prostaglandins, kinins and K+ produced by neutrophils and macrophages stimulate free nerve endings in the muscle, causing the DOMS. Despite this apparent relationship between muscle damage and DOMS, it is not possible toestablish a linear relationship between these two variables, since published data are divergent. RESUMO O objetivo desse estudo foi investigar as relações do exercício físico com o dano muscular e dor muscular de início tardio (DMIT. Para tanto, foi realizada uma revisão de literatura de periódicos nacionais e internacionais. O dano muscular pode ocorrer em estruturas musculares (membranas, linha Z, sarcolema, túbulos T e miofi brilas em função da sobrecarga mec

  6. Single-blind, randomized, controlled trial of pelvic floor muscle training, electrical stimulation, vaginal cones, and no active treatment in the management of stress urinary incontinence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo A. Castro

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: To compare the effectiveness of pelvic floor exercises, electrical stimulation, vaginal cones, and no active treatment in women with urodynamic stress urinary incontinence. PATIENTS AND METHODS: One hundred eighteen subjects were randomly selected to recieve pelvic floor exercises (n=31, ES (n=30, vaginal cones (n=27, or no treatment (untreated control (n=30. Women were evaluated before and after completion of six months of treatment by the pad test, quality of life questionnaire (I-QOL, urodynamic test, voiding diary, and subjective response. RESULTS: In the objective evaluation, we observed a statistically significant reduction in the pad test (p=0.003, in the number of stress urinary episodes (p<0.001, and a significant improvement in the quality of life (p<0.001 in subjects who used pelvic floor exercises, electrical stimulation, and vaginal cones compared to the control group. No significant difference was found between groups in the urodynamic parameters. In the subjective evaluation, 58%, 55%, and 54% of women who had used pelvic floor exercises, electrical stimulation, and vaginal cones, respectively, reported being satisfied after treatment. In the control group, only 21% patients were satisfied with the treatment. CONCLUSION: Based on this study, pelvic floor exercises, electrical stimulation, and vaginal cones are equally effective treatments and are far superior to no treatment in women with urodynamic stress urinary incontinence.

  7. Aerobic exercise and respiratory muscle strength in patients with cystic fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dassios, Theodore; Katelari, Anna; Doudounakis, Stavros; Dimitriou, Gabriel

    2013-05-01

    The beneficial role of exercise in maintaining health in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) is well described. Few data exist on the effect of exercise on respiratory muscle function in patients with CF. Our objective was to compare respiratory muscle function indices in CF patients that regularly exercise with those CF patients that do not. This cross-sectional study assessed nutrition, pulmonary function and respiratory muscle function in 37 CF patients that undertook regular aerobic exercise and in a control group matched for age and gender which consisted of 44 CF patients that did not undertake regular exercise. Respiratory muscle function in CF was assessed by maximal inspiratory pressure (Pimax), maximal expiratory pressure (Pemax) and pressure-time index of the respiratory muscles (PTImus). Median Pimax and Pemax were significantly higher in the exercise group compared to the control group (92 vs. 63 cm H2O and 94 vs. 64 cm H2O respectively). PTImus was significantly lower in the exercise group compared to the control group (0.089 vs. 0.121). Upper arm muscle area (UAMA) and mid-arm muscle circumference were significantly increased in the exercise group compared to the control group (2608 vs. 2178 mm2 and 23 vs. 21 cm respectively). UAMA was significantly related to Pimax in the exercising group. These results suggest that CF patients that undertake regular aerobic exercise maintain higher indices of respiratory muscle strength and lower PTImus values, while increased UAMA values in exercising patients highlight the importance of muscular competence in respiratory muscle function in this population. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Biomechanical properties of the pelvic floor muscles of continent and incontinent women using an inverse finite element analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, M E T; Brandão, S; Parente, M P L; Mascarenhas, T; Natal Jorge, R M

    2017-06-01

    Pelvic disorders can be associated with changes in the biomechanical properties in the muscle, ligaments and/or connective tissue form fascia and ligaments. In this sense, the study of their mechanical behavior is important to understand the structure and function of these biological soft tissues. The aim of this study was to establish the biomechanical properties of the pelvic floor muscles of continent and incontinent women, using an inverse finite element analysis (FEA). The numerical models, including the pubovisceral muscle and pelvic bones were built from magnetic resonance (MR) images acquired at rest. The numerical simulation of Valsalva maneuver was based on the finite element method and the material constants were determined for different constitutive models (Neo-Hookean, Mooney-Rivlin and Yeoh) using an iterative process. The material constants (MPa) for Neo-Hookean (c 1 ) were 0.039 ± 0.022 and 0.024 ± 0.004 for continent vs. incontinent women. For Mooney-Rivlin (c 1 ) the values obtained were 0.026 ± 0.010 vs. 0.016 ± 0.003, and for Yeoh (c 1 ) the values obtained were 0.031 ± 0.023 vs. 0.016 ± 0.002, (p continent women. The results were also similar between MRI and numerical simulations (40.27% vs. 42.17% for Neo-Hookean, 39.87% for Mooney-Rivlin and 41.61% for Yeoh). Using an inverse FEA coupled with MR images allowed to obtain the in vivo biomechanical properties of the pelvic floor muscles, leading to a relationship between them for the continent and incontinent women in a non-invasive manner.

  9. A Comparative Study of Whole Body Vibration Training and Pelvic Floor Muscle Training on Women's Stress Urinary Incontinence: Three- Month Follow- Up

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azizeh Farzinmehr

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To determine whether Whole Body Vibration Training (WBVT is effective at improving pelvic floor muscles strength in women with Stress Urinary Incontinence (SUI.Materials and methods: The study was designed as a randomized clinical trial. 43 women with SUI were randomly assigned in two groups; WBVT and Pelvic Floor Muscle Training (PFMT and received interventions for four weeks. Pelvic floor muscle (PFM strength, quality of life and incontinence intensity were evaluated. All measurements were conducted pre and post intervention and also after 3 months in all participants. The ANOVA and the independent sample t test were applied respectively to determine the differences in each group and between the groups.Results: This study showed the WBVT protocol in this study was effective in pelvic floor muscles strength similar to PFMT, and also in reducing the severity of incontinence and increasing I-QOL questionnaire score. We found significant differences in each group pre and post intervention (p = 0.0001; but no significant difference in comparison of two groups' outcomes. Also after three-month follow up, there was no significant difference between groups.Conclusion: The findings of this study showed the beneficial effects of WBVT in improving pelvic floor muscles strength and quality of life in patients with urinary incontinence in four-week treatment period and after three months follow up.

  10. Motor unit activity after eccentric exercise and muscle damage in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semmler, J G

    2014-04-01

    It is well known that unaccustomed eccentric exercise leads to muscle damage and soreness, which can produce long-lasting effects on muscle function. How this muscle damage influences muscle activation is poorly understood. The purpose of this brief review is to highlight the effect of eccentric exercise on the activation of muscle by the nervous system, by examining the change in motor unit activity obtained from surface electromyography (EMG) and intramuscular recordings. Previous research shows that eccentric exercise produces unusual changes in the EMG–force relation that influences motor performance during isometric, shortening and lengthening muscle contractions and during fatiguing tasks. When examining the effect of eccentric exercise at the single motor unit level, there are substantial changes in recruitment thresholds, discharge rates, motor unit conduction velocities and synchronization, which can last for up to 1 week after eccentric exercise. Examining the time course of these changes suggests that the increased submaximal EMG after eccentric exercise most likely occurs through a decrease in motor unit conduction velocity and an increase in motor unit activity related to antagonist muscle coactivation and low-frequency fatigue. Furthermore, there is a commonly held view that eccentric exercise produces preferential damage to high-threshold motor units, but the evidence for this in humans is limited. Further research is needed to establish whether there is preferential damage to high-threshold motor units after eccentric exercise in humans, preferably by linking changes in motor unit activity with estimates of motor unit size using selective intramuscular recording techniques.

  11. Skeletal muscle signaling and the heart rate and blood pressure response to exercise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, Stefan P; Svendsen, Jesper H; Ersbøll, Mads

    2013-01-01

    Endurance training lowers heart rate and blood pressure responses to exercise, but the mechanisms and consequences remain unclear. To determine the role of skeletal muscle for the cardioventilatory response to exercise, 8 healthy young men were studied before and after 5 weeks of 1-legged knee-ex...... was ≈ 15 bpm lower during exercise with the trained leg (P...

  12. Bed rest attenuates sympathetic and pressor responses to isometric exercise in antigravity leg muscles in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamiya, Atsunori; Michikami, Daisaku; Shiozawa, Tomoki; Iwase, Satoshi; Hayano, Junichiro; Kawada, Toru; Sunagawa, Kenji; Mano, Tadaaki

    2004-05-01

    Although spaceflight and bed rest are known to cause muscular atrophy in the antigravity muscles of the legs, the changes in sympathetic and cardiovascular responses to exercises using the atrophied muscles remain unknown. We hypothesized that bed rest would augment sympathetic responses to isometric exercise using antigravity leg muscles in humans. Ten healthy male volunteers were subjected to 14-day 6 degrees head-down bed rest. Before and after bed rest, they performed isometric exercises using leg (plantar flexion) and forearm (handgrip) muscles, followed by 2-min postexercise muscle ischemia (PEMI) that continues to stimulate the muscle metaboreflex. These exercises were sustained to fatigue. We measured muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA) in the contralateral resting leg by microneurography. In both pre- and post-bed-rest exercise tests, exercise intensities were set at 30 and 70% of the maximum voluntary force measured before bed rest. Bed rest attenuated the increase in MSNA in response to fatiguing plantar flexion by approximately 70% at both exercise intensities (both P antigravity leg muscles.

  13. Phosphorus Spectroscopy of Calf Muscles before and after Exercise

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wcisło, Bożena; Cichocka, Monika; Urbanik, Andrzej

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine 31 PMRS reference spectrum and intracellular pH of calf muscles in the dominant limb of healthy, young, male volunteers before and after intense physical effort. Examinations were performed with a 1.5 T MR system. FID CSI (Free Induction Decay Chemical Shift Imaging) sequence was used with the following parameters: TR=4000 ms, FA=90°, NEX=2 and VOI (Volume Of Interest)=8×8×8 cm 3 (512 cm 3 ) involving in calf muscles. Raw data was preprocessed using SAGE (GE) software. Authors analyzed relative concentrations ratios of selected metabolites: PCr/ATP and PCr/P i . Intracellular pH and relative concentrations ratios of each metabolite (P i , PCr, α-ATP, β-ATP, γ-ATP, ATP) were also calculated relative to the sum of concentrations of all metabolites. Results were compared with a t-test. Based on statistical analysis of results significant differences (p<0.05) were demonstrated for some of the studied metabolites and for intracellular pH. Increase in PCr concentration in relation to the sum of concentrations of all metabolites and to ATP concentration was noted. However, β-ATP, α-ATP and ATP concentrations relative to the sum of concentrations of all metabolites become reduced. Decrease in pH after physical effort was demonstrated. There were no significant differences (p<0.05) in concentrations of remaining metabolites before and after exercise. Increase in PCr concentration relative to P i concentration and decrease of P i and γ-ATP concentration relative to the sum of concentrations of all metabolites were demonstrated. The 31 PMRS method enables assessment of concentrations of phosphorus-containing metabolites as well as intercellular pH before and after exercise. This method is still under examination, but it has already shown promise as a diagnostic tool for the future

  14. Muscle blood flow at onset of dynamic exercise in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rådegran, G; Saltin, B

    1998-01-01

    To evaluate the temporal relationship between blood flow, blood pressure, and muscle contractions, we continuously measured femoral arterial inflow with ultrasound Doppler at onset of passive exercise and voluntary, one-legged, dynamic knee-extensor exercise in humans. Blood velocity and inflow increased (P dicrotic and diastolic blood pressure notches, respectively. Mechanical hindrance occurred (P dicrotic notch. The increase in blood flow (Q) was characterized by a one-component (approximately 15% of peak power output), two-component (approximately 40-70% of peak power output), or three-component exponential model (> or = 75% of peak power output), where Q(t) = Qpassive + delta Q1.[1 - e-(t - TD1/tau 1)]+ delta Q2.[1 - e-(t - TD2/tau 2)]+ delta Q3.[1 - e-(t - TD3/tau 3)]; Qpassive, the blood flow during passive leg movement, equals 1.17 +/- 0.11 l/min; TD is the onset latency; tau is the time constant; delta Q is the magnitude of blood flow rise; and subscripts 1-3 refer to the first, second, and third components of the exponential model, respectively. The time to reach 50% of the difference between passive and voluntary asymptotic blood flow was approximately 2.2-8.9 s. The blood flow leveled off after approximately 10-150 s, related to the power outputs. It is concluded that the elevation in blood flow with the first duty cycle(s) is due to muscle mechanical factors, but vasodilators initiate a more potent amplification within the second to fourth contraction.

  15. Is hypoxia training good for muscles and exercise performance?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogt, Michael; Hoppeler, Hans

    2010-01-01

    Altitude training has become very popular among athletes as a means to further increase exercise performance at sea level or to acclimatize to competition at altitude. Several approaches have evolved during the last few decades, with "live high-train low" and "live low-train high" being the most popular. This review focuses on functional, muscular, and practical aspects derived from extensive research on the "live low-train high" approach. According to this, subjects train in hypoxia but remain under normoxia for the rest of the time. It has been reasoned that exercising in hypoxia could increase the training stimulus. Hypoxia training studies published in the past have varied considerably in altitude (2300-5700 m) and training duration (10 days to 8 weeks) and the fitness of the subjects. The evidence from muscle structural, biochemical, and molecular findings point to a specific role of hypoxia in endurance training. However, based on the available performance capacity data such as maximal oxygen uptake (Vo(2)max) and (maximal) power output, hypoxia as a supplement to training is not consistently found to be advantageous for performance at sea level. Stronger evidence exists for benefits of hypoxic training on performance at altitude. "Live low-train high" may thus be considered when altitude acclimatization is not an option. In addition, the complex pattern of gene expression adaptations induced by supplemental training in hypoxia, but not normoxia, suggest that muscle tissue specifically responds to hypoxia. Whether and to what degree these gene expression changes translate into significant changes in protein concentrations that are ultimately responsible for observable structural or functional phenotypes remains open. It is conceivable that the global functional markers such as Vo(2)max and (maximal) power output are too coarse to detect more subtle changes that might still be functionally relevant, at least to high-level athletes.

  16. Exercise training normalizes skeletal muscle vascular endothelial growth factor levels in patients with essential hypertension

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Ane Håkansson; Nielsen, Jens Jung; Saltin, Bengt

    2010-01-01

    METHODS: Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) protein and capillarization were determined in muscle vastus lateralis biopsy samples in individuals with essential hypertension (n = 10) and normotensive controls (n = 10). The hypertensive individuals performed exercise training for 16 weeks....... Muscle samples as well as muscle microdialysis fluid samples were obtained at rest, during and after an acute exercise bout, performed prior to and after the training period, for the determination of muscle VEGF levels, VEGF release, endothelial cell proliferative effect and capillarization. RESULTS......: Prior to training, the hypertensive individuals had 36% lower levels of VEGF protein and 22% lower capillary density in the muscle compared to controls. Training in the hypertensive group reduced (P

  17. Nuclear receptors and myokines : mediators of exercise-induced skeletal muscle metabolism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Gogh, IJA

    2016-01-01

    Skeletal muscle is a crucial organ in mediating (exercise-induced) beneficial health effects. In this thesis we gained important knowledge on the molecular biology of the muscle. With our focus on the muscle, we investigated the crosstalk with other organs, the regulation of myokines and the role of

  18. Regulation of increased blood flow (hyperemia) to muscles during exercise: a hierarchy of competing physiological needs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joyner, Michael J; Casey, Darren P

    2015-04-01

    This review focuses on how blood flow to contracting skeletal muscles is regulated during exercise in humans. The idea is that blood flow to the contracting muscles links oxygen in the atmosphere with the contracting muscles where it is consumed. In this context, we take a top down approach and review the basics of oxygen consumption at rest and during exercise in humans, how these values change with training, and the systemic hemodynamic adaptations that support them. We highlight the very high muscle blood flow responses to exercise discovered in the 1980s. We also discuss the vasodilating factors in the contracting muscles responsible for these very high flows. Finally, the competition between demand for blood flow by contracting muscles and maximum systemic cardiac output is discussed as a potential challenge to blood pressure regulation during heavy large muscle mass or whole body exercise in humans. At this time, no one dominant dilator mechanism accounts for exercise hyperemia. Additionally, complex interactions between the sympathetic nervous system and the microcirculation facilitate high levels of systemic oxygen extraction and permit just enough sympathetic control of blood flow to contracting muscles to regulate blood pressure during large muscle mass exercise in humans. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  19. Respiratory muscle function and exercise limitation in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charususin, Noppawan; Dacha, Sauwaluk; Gosselink, Rik; Decramer, Marc; Von Leupoldt, Andreas; Reijnders, Thomas; Louvaris, Zafeiris; Langer, Daniel

    2018-01-01

    Respiratory muscle dysfunction is common and contributes to dyspnea and exercise limitation in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Improving dynamic function of respiratory muscles during exercise might help to reduce symptoms and improve exercise capacity. Areas covered: The aims of this review are to 1) summarize physiological mechanisms linking respiratory muscle dysfunction to dyspnea and exercise limitation; 2) provide an overview of available therapeutic approaches to better maintain load-capacity balance of respiratory muscles during exercise; and 3) to summarize current knowledge on potential mechanisms explaining effects of interventions aimed at optimizing dynamic respiratory muscle function with a special focus on inspiratory muscle training. Expert commentary: Several mechanisms which are potentially linking improvements in dynamic respiratory muscle function to symptomatic and functional benefits have not been studied so far in COPD patients. Examples of underexplored areas include the study of neural processes related to the relief of acute dyspnea and the competition between respiratory and peripheral muscles for limited energy supplies during exercise. Novel methodologies are available to non-invasively study these mechanisms. Better insights into the consequences of dynamic respiratory muscle dysfunction will hopefully contribute to further refine and individualize therapeutic approaches in patients with COPD.

  20. [Simultaneous repairing defects of orbital floor and palate with the modified temporalis muscle flap after the maxillectomy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Q; Huang, Z G; Fang, J G; Chen, X J; Chen, X H; Hou, L Z; Li, P D; Ma, H Z; He, S Z

    2016-09-07

    Objective: To evaluate the outcome of one-stage reconstruction of maxillary and orbital defects with modified temporalis muscle flap (TMF) following the removal of malignant neoplasms. Methods: In this retrospective study, 15 patients underwent the reconstruction of defects of orbital floor and palate after maxillectomy for malignant tumor were included from June 2008 to June 2014. The modified temporalis muscle flap was used to repair the defects after surgery, and functional outcomes were analyzed. Results: All the patients were followed up for 12-81 months. Three cases of them received preoperative radiotherapy and 12 cases underwent postoperative radiotherapy. All flaps were survived. Epithelization of the tissues in oral and nasal cavity was completed in 4-6 weeks. Good functional reconstruction on swallowing and speaking functional results were achieved with maxillary and orbital reconstruction and no secondary deformity of external nose was observed. The eye positions in all cases were normal. Diplopia, diminution and loss of vision were not found. Conclusion: The modified TMF can be used for simultaneous reconstruction for the defects of orbital floor and palate after maxillectomy in patients whom free tissue flap can not be applied to, showing better cosmetic and functional results.

  1. A pilot randomized control trial to evaluate pelvic floor muscle training for urinary incontinence among gynecologic cancer survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutledge, Teresa L; Rogers, Rebecca; Lee, Sang-Joon; Muller, Carolyn Y

    2014-01-01

    We previously reported high rates of urinary incontinence among gynecologic cancer survivors and aimed to evaluate the effectiveness of a simple intervention for treatment of urinary incontinence in this population. We recruited 40 gynecologic cancer survivors who reported urinary incontinence on a validated questionnaire. Women were randomized to either pelvic floor muscle training/behavioral therapy (treatment group) or usual care (control group). The primary outcome measure, assessed at 12 weeks post intervention, was a 40% difference in the validated Patient Global Impression of Improvement (PGI-I) score. Fisher's exact test was used to identify differences between groups for frequency data; two-sample t-test was conducted for continuous measurements. Mean age of this cohort was 57 (range: 37-79). The majority of the survivors had uterine cancer (60%), 18% had received radiation therapy, 95% had received surgical therapy, and 35% had received chemotherapy. At three months, 80% of the treatment and 40% of the control group reported that their urinary incontinence was "much better" or "very much better" as evaluated by the Patient Global Impression of Improvement scale (p=0.02). Brink's scores were significantly improved in the treatment group as compared to those of the controls (pgynecologic cancer survivors, it is often under-assessed and undertreated. We found a simple intervention that included pelvic floor muscle training and behavioral therapy, which significantly improved cancer survivor's urinary incontinence. © 2013.

  2. Element nodes of sports equipment double back flip factions and double back flip hunched performed gymnast in floor exercise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.A. Potop

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: to identify the node elements of sports equipment double back somersault tuck and double back flip bent. To compare the two types of nodes for double somersault. Material : the study involved eight gymnasts (age 12 - 14 years. All finalists in the competition floor exercise - reserve team Romania. The method of video - computer research and method of postural orientation movements. Results : identified nodal elements of sports equipment double back somersault tuck and double back flip bent. In the preparatory phase of motor actions - launcher body posture for reaching is repulsive to flip. In the phase of basic motor action - animation body postures (double back somersault tuck and bent (bent double back flip. Exercises are performed on the ascending and descending parts of the flight path of the demonstration of individual maximum lift height common center of mass. In the final phase of motor actions - final body posture - steady landing. Conclusions : indicators of key elements of sports equipment acrobatic exercises contain new scientific facts kinematic and dynamic structures of motor actions. They are necessary for the development of modern training programs acrobatic exercises in step specialized base preparation.

  3. Skeletal muscle eEF2 and 4EBP1 phosphorylation during endurance exercise is dependent on intensity and muscle fiber type

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rose, Adam John; Bisiani, Bruno; Vistisen, Bodil

    2009-01-01

    that the increase in skeletal muscle eEF2 Thr(56) phosphorylation was restricted to type I myofibers. Taken together, these data suggest that the depression of skeletal muscle protein synthesis with endurance-type exercise may be regulated at both initiation (i.e. 4EBP1) and elongation (i.e. eEF2) steps, with eEF2......Protein synthesis in skeletal muscle is known to decrease during exercise and it has been suggested that this may depend on the magnitude of the relative metabolic stress within the contracting muscle. To examine the mechanisms behind this, the effect of exercise intensity on skeletal muscle......) increased during exercise but was not influenced by exercise intensity, and was lower than rest 30min after exercise. On the other hand, 4EBP1 phosphorylation at Thr(37/46) decreased during exercise and this decrease was greater at higher exercise intensities, and was similar to rest 30min after exercise...

  4. Can pelvic floor muscle training improve sexual function in women with pelvic organ prolapse? A randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braekken, Ingeborg H; Majida, Memona; Ellström Engh, Marie; Bø, Kari

    2015-02-01

    Pelvic floor muscle training (PFMT) has level 1 evidence of reducing the size and symptoms associated with pelvic organ prolapse (POP). There is scant knowledge, however, regarding whether PFMT has an effect on sexual function. The aim of the trial was to evaluate the effect of PFMT on sexual function in women with POP. In this randomized controlled trial, 50 women were randomized to an intervention group (6 months of PFMT and lifestyle advice) and 59 women were randomized to a control group (lifestyle advice only). Participants completed a validated POP-specific questionnaire to describe frequency and bother of prolapse, bladder, bowel, and sexual symptoms and answered a semi-structured interview. No significant change in number of women being sexually active was reported. There were no significant differences between groups regarding change in satisfaction with frequency of intercourse. Interview data revealed that 19 (39%) of women in the PFMT group experienced improved sexual function vs. two (5%) in the control group (Ppelvic floor, improved self-confidence, sensation of a "tighter" vagina, improved libido and orgasms, resolution of pain with intercourse, and heightened sexual gratification for partners. Women who described improved sexual function demonstrated the greatest increases in pelvic floor muscle (PFM) strength (mean 16 ± 10 cmH2 0) and endurance (mean 150 ± 140 cmH2 0s) (P<0.01). PFMT can improve sexual function in some women. Women reporting improvement in sexual function demonstrated the greatest increase in PFM strength and endurance. © 2014 International Society for Sexual Medicine.

  5. Orbital Floor Fracture with Atypical Extraocular Muscle Entrapment Pattern and Intraoperative Asystole in an Adult

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merali, Farhan I.; Grant, Michael P.; Mahoney, Nicholas R.

    2015-01-01

    Extraocular muscle entrapment in a nondisplaced orbital fracture, although a well-known entity in pediatric trauma, is atypical in adults. It can present with a triad of bradycardia, nausea, and in rare cases, syncope, and result in severe fibrosis of damaged and incarcerated muscle. We present a case of muscle entrapment in a partially nondisplaced two-wall orbital fracture with accompanying preoperative bradycardia and intraoperative asystole in an adult PMID:26576246

  6. Respiratory Muscle Training and Cognitive Function Exercising at Altitude.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quackenbush, Joseph; Duquin, Aubrey; Helfer, Samuel; Pendergast, David R

    2016-01-01

    Hiking and trekking often occur at altitudes up to 12,000 ft altitude. The hypoxia-induced hyperventilation at altitude paradoxically reduces arterial CO2 (Paco2). A reduction in Paco2 results in vasoconstriction of the blood vessels of the brain and thus in local hypoxia. The local hypoxia likely affects cognitive function, which may result in reduced performance and altitude accidents. Recent publications have demonstrated that voluntary isocapnic hyperventilatory training of the respiratory muscles (VIHT) can markedly enhance exercise endurance as it is associated with reduced ventilation and its energy cost. VIHT may be useful in blunting the altitude-induced hyperventilation leading to higher Paco2 and improved cognitive function. This study examined the effects of VIHT, compared to control (C) and placebo (PVIHT) groups, on selected measures of executive functioning, including working memory and processing speed (i.e., Stroop Test, Symbol Digit Modalities Test, and Digit Span Forward) at simulated altitude up to 12,000 ft. Associated physiological parameters were also measured. The Digit Span Forward Test did not show improvements after VIHT in any group. The VIHT group, but not C or PVIHT groups, improved significantly (17-30%) on the Stroop Test. Similarly the VIHT group, but not the C and PVIHT groups, improved correct responses (26%) and number of attempts (24%) on the Symbol Digit Modalities Test. In addition, reaction time was also improved (16%). VIHT improved processing speed and working memory during exercise at altitude.

  7. Obesity impairs skeletal muscle AMPK signaling during exercise: role of AMPK?2 in the regulation of exercise capacity in vivo

    OpenAIRE

    Lee-Young, Robert S.; Ayala, Julio E.; Fueger, Patrick T.; Mayes, Wesley H.; Kang, Li; Wasserman, David H.

    2010-01-01

    Objective Skeletal muscle AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK)?2 activity is impaired in obese, insulin resistant individuals during exercise. We determined whether this defect contributes to the metabolic dysregulation and reduced exercise capacity observed in the obese state. Design C57BL/6J wild-type (WT) mice and/or mice expressing a kinase dead AMPK?2 subunit in skeletal muscle (?2-KD) were fed chow or high fat (HF) diets from 3?16 weeks (wks) of age. At 15wks mice performed an exercise s...

  8. Changes in muscle thickness after exercise and biofeedback in people with low back pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Partner, Shandi L; Sutherlin, Mark Alan; Acocello, Shellie; Saliba, Susan A; Magrum, Eric M; Hart, Joe M

    2014-11-01

    Individuals with low back pain (LBP) have reduced function of the transversus abdominis (TrA) and lumbar multifidus (LM) muscles. Biofeedback during exercise may increase the ability to contract the TrA and LM muscles compared with exercise alone. To compare TrA preferential activation ratio (PAR) and the percent change in LM-muscle thickness in patients with LBP history before and after exercise with or without biofeedback. Controlled laboratory study. University research laboratory. 20 LBP individuals, 10 exercise alone and 10 exercise with biofeedback. Patients were allotted to tabletop exercises in isolation or tabletop exercises with visual, auditory, and tactile biofeedback. TrA PAR and percent change in LM-muscle thickness. There were no differences between groups at baseline (all P > .05). Nonparametric statistics showed decreased resting muscle thickness for total lateral abdominal-wall muscles (P = .007) but not TrA (P = .410) or LM (P = .173). Percent TrA thickness increased from table to standing positions before (P = .006) and after exercise (P = .009). TrA PAR increased after exercise (pre 0.01 ± 0.02, post 0.03 ± 0.04, P = .033) for all patients and for exercise with biofeedback (pre 0.02 ± 0.01, post 0.03 ± 0.01, P = .037) but not for exercise alone (pre 0.01 ± 0.02, post 0.02 ± 0.05, P = .241). No group differences were observed for TrA PAR before (exercise 0.01 ± 0.02, exercise with biofeedback 0.02 ± 0.01, P = .290) or after exercise (exercise 0.02 ± 0.05, exercise with biofeedback 0.03 ± 0.01, P = .174). There were no group differences in LM percent change before exercise (P = .999) or after exercise (P = .597). In addition, no changes were observed in LM percent change as a result of exercise among all participants (P = .391) or for each group (exercise P = .508, exercise with biofeedback P = .575). TrA PAR increased after a single session of exercises, whereas no thickness changes occurred in LM.

  9. Effect of exercise and recovery on muscle protein synthesis in human subjects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carraro, F.; Stuart, C.A.; Hartl, W.H.; Rosenblatt, J.; Wolfe, R.R.

    1990-01-01

    Previous studies using indirect means to assess the response of protein metabolism to exercise have led to conflicting conclusions. Therefore, in this study we have measured the rate of muscle protein synthesis in normal volunteers at rest, at the end of 4 h of aerobic exercise (40% maximal O2 consumption), and after 4 h of recovery by determining directly the rate of incorporation of 1,2-[13C]leucine into muscle. The rate of muscle protein breakdown was assessed by 3-methylhistidine (3-MH) excretion, and total urinary nitrogen excretion was also measured. There was an insignificant increase in 3-MH excretion in exercise of 37% and a significant increase (P less than 0.05) of 85% during 4 h of recovery from exercise (0.079 +/- 0.008 vs. 0.147 +/- 0.0338 mumol.kg-1.min-1 for rest and recovery from exercise, respectively). Nonetheless, there was no effect of exercise on total nitrogen excretion. Muscle fractional synthetic rate was not different in the exercise vs. the control group at the end of exercise (0.0417 +/- 0.004 vs. 0.0477 +/- 0.010%/h for exercise vs. control), but there was a significant increase in fractional synthetic rate in the exercise group during the recovery period (0.0821 +/- 0.006 vs. 0.0654 +/- 0.012%/h for exercise vs. control, P less than 0.05). Thus we conclude that although aerobic exercise may stimulate muscle protein breakdown, this does not result in a significant depletion of muscle mass because muscle protein synthesis is stimulated in recovery

  10. Botulinum Toxin A Injections Into Pelvic Floor Muscles Under Electromyographic Guidance for Women With Refractory High-Tone Pelvic Floor Dysfunction: A 6-Month Prospective Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrissey, Darlene; El-Khawand, Dominique; Ginzburg, Natasha; Wehbe, Salim; O'Hare, Peter; Whitmore, Kristene

    2015-01-01

    High-tone pelvic floor dysfunction (HTPFD) is a debilitating chronic pain disorder for many women with significant impact on their quality of life (QoL). Our objective was to determine the efficacy of electromyography-guided onabotulinumtoxinA (Botox; Allergan, Irvine, Calif) injections in treating patient's perception of pelvic pain and improving QoL measurement scores. This is a prospective pilot open-label study of women with chronic pelvic pain and HTPFD who have failed conventional therapy between January 2011 and August 2013. Botox injections (up to 300 U) were done using needle electromyography guidance, from a transperineal approach, to localize spastic pelvic floor muscles (PFMs). Data were collected at baseline, 4, 8, 12, and 24 weeks after injections. This included demographics; Visual Analog Scale (VAS) scores for pain and dyspareunia; validated questionnaires for symptoms, QoL, and sexual function; Global Response Assessment scale for pelvic pain; digital examination of PFM for tone and tenderness; and vaginal manometry. Side effects were also recorded. Out of 28 women who enrolled in the study, 21 completed the 6-month follow-up and qualified for analysis. The mean (SD) age was 35.1 (9.4) years (range, 22-50 years), and the mean (SD) body mass index was 25 (4.4). Comorbidities included interstitial cystitis/bladder pain syndrome (42.9%) and vulvodynia (66.7%). Overall, 61.9% of subjects reported improvement on Global Response Assessment at 4 weeks and 80.9% at 8, 12, and 24 weeks post injection, compared with baseline. Of the subjects who were sexually active at baseline, 58.8% (10/17), 68.8% (11/16), 80% (12/15), and 83.3% (15/18) reported less dyspareunia at 4, 8, 12, and 24 weeks, respectively. Dyspareunia Visual Analog Scale score significantly improved at weeks 12 (5.6, P = 0.011) and 24 (5.4, P = 0.004) compared with baseline (7.8). Two of the 4 patients who avoided sexual activity at baseline secondary to dyspareunia resumed and tolerated

  11. Human Skeletal Muscle Stem Cells in Adaptations to Exercise; Effects of Resistance Exercise Contraction Mode and Protein Supplementation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Farup, Jean

    2014-01-01

    the effect of contraction mode specific resistance training and protein supplementation on whole muscle and tendon hypertrophy. Quadriceps muscle and patellar tendon cross-sectional area (CSA) was quantified using magnetic resonance imaging pre and post 12 weeks of eccentric (Ecc) or concentric (Conc...... concentric resistance training and ingestion of protein influence myocellular adaptations, with special emphasis on muscle stem cell adaptations, during both acute and prolonged resistance exercise in human skeletal muscle. Paper I. Whey protein supplementation accelerates satellite cell proliferation during...... recovery from eccentric exercise In paper I, we evaluated the effect of a single bout of unaccustomed eccentric exercise on fiber type specific SC content by immunohistochemistry. Subjects received either hydrolysed whey protein (Whey) or iso-caloric carbohydrate (Placebo) in the days post eccentric...

  12. ‘Fine-tuning’ blood flow to the exercising muscle with advancing age: an update

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wray, D. Walter; Richardson, Russell S.

    2016-01-01

    During dynamic exercise, oxygen demand from the exercising muscle is dramatically elevated, requiring a marked increase in skeletal muscle blood flow that is accomplished through a combination of systemic sympathoexcitation and local metabolic vasodilatation. With advancing age, the balance between these factors appears to be disrupted in favour of vasoconstriction, leading to an impairment in exercising skeletal muscle blood flow in the elderly. This ‘hot topic’ review aims to provide an update to our current knowledge of age-related changes in the neural and local mechanisms that contribute to this ‘fine-tuning’ of blood flow during exercise. The focus is on results from recent human studies that have adopted a reductionist approach to explore how age-related changes in both vasodilators (nitric oxide) and vasoconstrictors (endothelin-1, α-adrenergic agonists and angiotensin II) interact and how these changes impact blood flow to the exercising skeletal muscle with advancing age. PMID:25858164

  13. Interstitial and arterial-venous [K+] in human calf muscle during dynamic exercise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Green, S; Langberg, Henning; Skovgaard, D

    2000-01-01

    +. Calf muscle pain was assessed using a visual analogue scale. On average, [K+]I was 4.4 mmol l(-1) at rest and increased during minutes 3-5 of incremental exercise by approximately 1-7 mmol l(-1) as a positive function of power output. K+ release also increased as a function of exercise intensity......Changes in the concentration of interstitial K+ surrounding skeletal muscle fibres ([K+]I) probably play some role in the regulation of cardiovascular adjustments to muscular activity, as well as in the aetiology of muscle pain and fatigue during high-intensity exercise. However, there is very...... little information on the response of [K+]I to exercise in human skeletal muscle. Five young healthy subjects performed plantar flexion exercise for four 5 min periods at increasing power outputs ( approximately 1-6 W) with 10 min intervening recovery periods, as well as for two 5 min periods...

  14. Effects of isokinetic calf muscle exercise program on muscle strength and venous function in patients with chronic venous insufficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ercan, Sabriye; Çetin, Cem; Yavuz, Turhan; Demir, Hilmi M; Atalay, Yurdagül B

    2018-05-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to observe the change of the ankle joint range of motion, the muscle strength values measured with an isokinetic dynamometer, pain scores, quality of life scale, and venous return time in chronic venous insufficiency diagnosed patients by prospective follow-up after 12-week exercise program including isokinetic exercises. Methods The patient group of this study comprised 27 patients (23 female, 4 male) who were diagnosed with chronic venous insufficiency. An exercise program including isokinetic exercise for the calf muscle was given to patients three days per week for 12 weeks. At the end of 12 weeks, five of the patients left the study due to inadequate compliance with the exercise program. As a result, control data of 22 patients were included. Ankle joint range of active motion, isokinetic muscle strength, pain, quality of life, and photoplethysmography measurements were assessed before starting and after the exercise program. Results Evaluating changes of the starting and control data depending on time showed that all isokinetic muscle strength measurement parameters, range of motion, and overall quality of life values of patients improved. Venous return time values have also increased significantly ( p < 0.05). Conclusion In conclusion, increase in muscle strength has been provided with exercise therapy in patients with chronic venous insufficiency. It has been determined that the increase in muscle strength affected the venous pump and this ensured improvement in venous function and range of motion of the ankle. In addition, it has been detected that pain reduced and quality of life improved after the exercise program.

  15. Evaluation of skeletal muscle during exercise on short repetition time MR imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshioka, Hiroshi; Niitsu, Mamoru; Anno, Izumi; Takahashi, Hideyuki; Kuno, Shinya; Matsumoto, Kunihiko; Itai, Yuji

    1992-01-01

    There have been many reports on the effects of exercise on skeletal muscle signal intensities based on magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. These images were obtained using T 2 -weighted MR images. The purpose of this study was to observe muscles during exercise while shortening the repetition time (TR) on spin echo images. In addition, inactive and active muscles were differentiated in the same manner. T 2 values of the tibialis anterior m. were calculated from TR=400 ms to TR=3000 ms. These values were mostly constant and didn't depend upon TR. Increases in signal intensities of the exercise muscles could be observed on the short TR (600 ms) MR images since the changes of the signal intensities mainly depend upon T 2 values. Thus, the T 2 value is useful as a quantitative index to assess the exercise muscle even on the short TR MR images. (author)

  16. Exercise and training effects on ceramide metabolism in human skeletal muscle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Helge, Jørn Wulff; Dobrzyn, Agnieszka; Saltin, Bengt

    2004-01-01

    in skeletal muscle in untrained and trained subjects before and after prolonged exercise. Healthy male subjects were recruited into an untrained (n = 8, VO2,max 3.8 +/- 0.2 1 min1) and a trained (n = 8, Vo2,max 5.1 +/- 0.1 1 min2) group. Before and after a 3-h exercise bout (58 +/- 1% VO2,max) a muscle biopsy...... was measured using N-[14CH3]-sphingomyelin as a substrate. Prior to exercise, the muscle total ceramide fatty acid content in both groups was similar (201 +/- 18 and 197 +/- 9 nmol g(-1) in the untrained and trained group, respectively) and after exercise a 25% increase in the content was observed in each...... group. At rest, the muscle total sphingomyelin fatty acid content was higher in untrained than in trained subjects (456 +/- 10, 407 +/- 7 nmol g(-1), respectively; P trained subjects. The muscle neutral, Mg...

  17. Dysregulation of muscle glycogen synthase in recovery from exercise in type 2 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Andreas J T; Hingst, Janne Rasmuss; Friedrichsen, Martin

    2015-01-01

    AIMS/HYPOTHESIS: Insulin and exercise stimulate skeletal muscle glycogen synthase (GS) activity by dephosphorylation and changes in kinetic properties. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of insulin, exercise and post-exercise insulin stimulation on GS phosphorylation, activity a...... and increased phosphorylation at sites 2 + 2a in type 2 diabetes in the recovery period imply an impaired response to exercise....

  18. Pelvic floor muscle training for secondary prevention of pelvic organ prolapse (PREVPROL): a multicentre randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagen, Suzanne; Glazener, Cathryn; McClurg, Doreen; Macarthur, Christine; Elders, Andrew; Herbison, Peter; Wilson, Don; Toozs-Hobson, Philip; Hemming, Christine; Hay-Smith, Jean; Collins, Marissa; Dickson, Sylvia; Logan, Janet

    2017-01-28

    Pelvic floor muscle training can reduce prolapse severity and symptoms in women seeking treatment. We aimed to assess whether this intervention could also be effective in secondary prevention of prolapse and the need for future treatment. We did this multicentre, parallel-group, randomised controlled trial at three centres in New Zealand and the UK. Women from a longitudinal study of pelvic floor function after childbirth were potentially eligible for inclusion. Women of any age who had stage 1-3 prolapse, but had not sought treatment, were randomly assigned (1:1), via remote computer allocation, to receive either one-to-one pelvic floor muscle training (five physiotherapy appointments over 16 weeks, and annual review) plus Pilates-based pelvic floor muscle training classes and a DVD for home use (intervention group), or a prolapse lifestyle advice leaflet (control group). Randomisation was minimised by centre, parity (three or less vs more than three deliveries), prolapse stage (above the hymen vs at or beyond the hymen), and delivery method (any vaginal vs all caesarean sections). Women and intervention physiotherapists could not be masked to group allocation, but allocation was masked from data entry researchers and from the trial statistician until after database lock. The primary outcome was self-reported prolapse symptoms (Pelvic Organ Prolapse Symptom Score [POP-SS]) at 2 years. Analysis was by intention to treat. This trial is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT01171846. Between Dec 21, 2008, and Feb 24, 2010, in New Zealand, and Oct 27, 2010, and Sept 5, 2011, in the UK, we randomly assigned 414 women to the intervention group (n=207) or the control group (n=207). One participant in each group was excluded after randomisation, leaving 412 women for analysis. At baseline, 399 (97%) women had prolapse above or at the level of the hymen. The mean POP-SS score at 2 years was 3·2 (SD 3·4) in the intervention group versus 4·2 (SD 4·4) in the

  19. EFFECT OF MODERATE ALTITUDE ON PERIPHERAL MUSCLE OXYGENATION DURING LEG RESISTANCE EXERCISE IN YOUNG MALES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toshio Matsuoka

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available Training at moderate altitude (~1800m is often used by athletes to stimulate muscle hypoxia. However, limited date is available on peripheral muscle oxidative metabolism at this altitude (1800AL. The purpose of this study was to determine whether acute exposure to 1800AL alters muscle oxygenation in the vastus lateralis muscle during resistance exercise. Twenty young active male subjects (aged 16 - 21 yr performed up to 50 repetitions of the parallel squat at 1800AL and near sea level (SL. They performed the exercise protocol within 3 h after arrival at 1800 AL. During the exercise, the changes in oxygenated hemoglobin (OxyHb in the vastus lateralis muscle, arterial oxygen saturation (SpO2, and heart rate were measured using near infrared continuous wave spectroscopy (NIRcws and pulse oximetry, respectively. Changes in OxyHb were expressed by Deff defined as the relative index of the maximum change ratio (% from the resting level. OxyHb in the vastus lateralis muscle decreased dramatically from the resting level immediately after the start of exercise at both altitudes. The Deff during exercise was significantly (p < 0.001 lower at 1800AL (60.4 ± 6.2 % than at near SL (74.4 ± 7.6 %. SpO2 during exercise was significantly (p < 0.001 lower at 1800AL (92.0 ± 1.7 % than at near SL (96.7 ± 1.2 %. Differences (SL - 1800AL in Deff during exercise correlated fairly strongly with differences in SpO2 during exercise (r = 0.660. These results suggested that acute exposure to moderate altitude caused a more dramatical decrease in peripheral muscle oxygenation during leg resistance exercise. It is salient to note, therefore , that peripheral muscle oxygenation status at moderate altitude could be evaluated using NIRcws and that moderate altitudes might be effectively used to apply hypoxic stress on peripheral muscles.

  20. Effect of birth weight and 12 weeks of exercise training on exercise-induced AMPK signaling in human skeletal muscle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, Brynjulf; Hingst, Janne Rasmuss; Frederiksen, Nicklas

    2013-01-01

    . We investigated 21 LBW and 21 normal birth weight (NBW) subjects during 1 hour of acute exercise performed at the same relative workload before and after 12 weeks of exercise training. Multiple skeletal muscle biopsies were obtained before and after exercise. Protein levels and phosphorylation status......Subjects with a low birth weight (LBW) display increased risk of developing type 2 diabetes (T2D). We hypothesized that this is associated with defects in muscle adaptations following acute and regular physical activity, evident by impairments in the exercise-induced activation of AMPK signaling...... were determined by Western blotting. AMPK activities were measured using activity assays. Protein levels of AMPK isoforms a1 and ¿1 were significantly increased while ¿3 levels decreased with training independent of group. The LBW group had higher exercise-induced AMPK Thr(172) phosphorylation before...

  1. Strenuous exercise induces mitochondrial damage in skeletal muscle of old mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Sangho; Kim, Minjung; Lim, Wonchung; Kim, Taeyoung; Kang, Chounghun

    2015-01-01

    Strenuous exercise is known to cause excessive ROS generation and inflammation. However, the mechanisms responsible for the regulation of mitochondrial integrity in the senescent muscle during high-intensity exercise (HE) are not well studied. Here, we show that HE suppresses up-regulation of mitochondrial function despite increase in mitochondrial copy number, following excessive ROS production, proinflammatory cytokines and NFκB activation. Moreover, HE in the old group resulted in the decreasing of both fusion (Mfn2) and fission (Drp1) proteins that may contribute to alteration of mitochondrial morphology. This study suggests that strenuous exercise does not reverse age-related mitochondrial damage and dysfunction by the increased ROS and inflammation. - Highlights: • Effect of exercise on mitochondrial function of aged skeletal muscles was studied. • Strenuous exercise triggered excessive ROS production and inflammatory cytokines. • Strenuous exercise suppressed mitochondrial function in senescent muscle

  2. Quality assessment of shoulder plyometric exercises: Examining the relationship to scapular muscle activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calé-Benzoor, Maya; Maenhout, Annelies; Arnon, Michal; Tenenbaum, Gershon; Werrin, Mia; Cools, Ann

    2017-07-01

    The purpose of the study was to evaluate performance quality of shoulder plyometric exercises, and examine the relationship to scapular muscle activation during an intense exercise bout. Observational study. University laboratory. 32 healthy university students (male/female: 14/18) volunteers. Subjects performed 10 plyometric exercises. Surface EMG of upper (UT), middle (MT) and lower (LT) trapezius and serratus anterior (SA) was registered. A quality assessment questionnaire was administered at the beginning and end of the exercise bout. Muscle activation at the beginning and end was evaluated by t-test. Mixed repeated measures ANOVA was conducted to test the effects of criterion-quality, time, muscles, exercises, and their interactions. Increased EMG activation was noted in 34/40 cases, (21/40 significant (p plyometric exercises. Ability to keep a consistent arc of motion was the most sensitive marker of decline of performance quality. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Strenuous exercise induces mitochondrial damage in skeletal muscle of old mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Sangho; Kim, Minjung [Department of Physical Education, Hankuk Univrsity of Foreign Studies, Seoul 130-791 (Korea, Republic of); Lim, Wonchung [Department of Sports Medicine, College of Health Science, Cheongju University, Cheongju 363-764 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Taeyoung [Department of Physical Education, Hankuk Univrsity of Foreign Studies, Seoul 130-791 (Korea, Republic of); Kang, Chounghun, E-mail: kangx119@umn.edu [Department of Physical Education, Hankuk Univrsity of Foreign Studies, Seoul 130-791 (Korea, Republic of); Laboratory of Physiological Hygiene and Exercise Science, School of Kinesiology, University of Minnesota at Twin Cities, Minneapolis, MN 55455 (United States)

    2015-05-29

    Strenuous exercise is known to cause excessive ROS generation and inflammation. However, the mechanisms responsible for the regulation of mitochondrial integrity in the senescent muscle during high-intensity exercise (HE) are not well studied. Here, we show that HE suppresses up-regulation of mitochondrial function despite increase in mitochondrial copy number, following excessive ROS production, proinflammatory cytokines and NFκB activation. Moreover, HE in the old group resulted in the decreasing of both fusion (Mfn2) and fission (Drp1) proteins that may contribute to alteration of mitochondrial morphology. This study suggests that strenuous exercise does not reverse age-related mitochondrial damage and dysfunction by the increased ROS and inflammation. - Highlights: • Effect of exercise on mitochondrial function of aged skeletal muscles was studied. • Strenuous exercise triggered excessive ROS production and inflammatory cytokines. • Strenuous exercise suppressed mitochondrial function in senescent muscle.

  4. Effects of functional exercise training on performance and muscle strength after meniscectomy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ericsson, Y B; Dahlberg, L E; Roos, E M

    2008-01-01

    Muscular deficits and functional limitations have been found years after meniscectomy of the knee. The purpose of this randomized controlled trial was to examine the effect of functional exercise training on functional performance and isokinetic thigh muscle strength in middle-aged patients...... subsequent to meniscectomy for a degenerative tear. Four years after meniscectomy, 45 patients (29 men, 16 women) were randomized to functional exercise training, supervised by a physical therapist, three times weekly for 4 months or to no intervention. The exercise program comprised of postural stability...... training and functional strength and endurance exercises for leg and trunk muscles. Outcomes were three functional performance tests and isokinetic muscle strength. Thirty patients (16 exercisers/14 controls) completed the study. Compared with control patients, the exercise group showed significant...

  5. Neuromuscular blockade of slow twitch muscle fibres elevates muscle oxygen uptake and energy turnover during submaximal exercise in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krustrup, Peter; Secher, Niels H; Relu, Mihai U; Hellsten, Ylva; Söderlund, Karin; Bangsbo, Jens

    2008-12-15

    We tested the hypothesis that a greater activation of fast-twitch (FT) fibres during dynamic exercise leads to a higher muscle oxygen uptake (VO2 ) and energy turnover as well as a slower muscle on-kinetics. Subjects performed one-legged knee-extensor exercise for 10 min at an intensity of 30 W without (CON) and with (CUR) arterial injections of the non-depolarizing neuromuscular blocking agent cisatracurium. In CUR, creatine phosphate (CP) was unaltered in slow twitch (ST) fibres and decreased (P fibres, whereas in CON, CP decreased (P fibres, respectively. From 127 s of exercise, muscle VO2 was higher (P muscle VO2 response was slower (P muscle homogenate CP was lowered (P muscle lactate production was similar in CUR and CON (37.8 +/- 4.1 versus 35.2 +/- 6.2 mmol). Estimated total muscle ATP turnover was 19% higher (P fibres are less efficient than ST fibres in vivo at a contraction frequency of 1 Hz, and that the muscle VO2 kinetics is slowed by FT fibre activation.

  6. Acute effects of massage or active exercise in relieving muscle soreness

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Lars L; Jay, Kenneth; Andersen, Christoffer H

    2013-01-01

    Massage is commonly believed to be the best modality for relieving muscle soreness. However, actively warming up the muscles with exercise may be an effective alternative. The purpose of this study was to compare the acute effect of massage with active exercise for relieving muscle soreness. Twenty...... healthy female volunteers (mean age 32 years) participated in this examiner-blind randomized controlled trial (ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01478451). The participants performed eccentric contractions for the upper trapezius muscle on a Biodex dynamometer. Delayed onset muscle soreness (DOMS) presented 48 hours...... later, at which the participants (a) received 10 minutes of massage of the trapezius muscle or (b) performed 10 minutes of active exercise (shoulder shrugs 10 × 10 reps) with increasing elastic resistance (Thera-Band). First, 1 treatment was randomly applied to 1 shoulder while the contralateral...

  7. Pelvic floor muscle training for prevention and treatment of urinary and faecal incontinence in antenatal and postnatal women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodley, Stephanie J; Boyle, Rhianon; Cody, June D; Mørkved, Siv; Hay-Smith, E Jean C

    2017-12-22

    About one-third of women have urinary incontinence and up to one-tenth have faecal incontinence after childbirth. Pelvic floor muscle training (PFMT) is commonly recommended during pregnancy and after birth for both prevention and treatment of incontinence.This is an update of a review previously published in 2012. To determine the effectiveness of pelvic floor muscle training (PFMT) in the prevention or treatment of urinary and faecal incontinence in pregnant or postnatal women. We searched the Cochrane Incontinence Specialised Register (16 February 2017) and reference lists of retrieved studies. Randomised or quasi-randomised trials in pregnant or postnatal women. One arm of the trial included PFMT. Another arm was no PFMT, usual antenatal or postnatal care, another control condition, or an alternative PFMT intervention. Review authors independently assessed trials for inclusion and risk of bias. We extracted data and checked them for accuracy. Populations included: women who were continent (PFMT for prevention), women who were incontinent (PFMT for treatment) at randomisation and a mixed population of women who were one or the other (PFMT for prevention or treatment). We assessed quality of evidence using the GRADE approach. The review included 38 trials (17 of which were new for this update) involving 9892 women from 20 countries. Overall, trials were small to moderate sized, and the PFMT programmes and control conditions varied considerably and were often poorly described. Many trials were at moderate to high risk of bias. Other than two reports of pelvic floor pain, trials reported no harmful effects of PFMT.Prevention of urinary incontinence: compared with usual care, continent pregnant women performing antenatal PFMT may have had a lower risk of reporting urinary incontinence in late pregnancy (62% less; risk ratio (RR) for incontinence 0.38, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.20 to 0.72; 6 trials, 624 women; low-quality evidence). Similarly, antenatal PFMT

  8. Kegel Exercises

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... exercised my pelvic muscles ____ times. I spent ____ minutes exercising. At each exercise session, I squeezed my pelvic ... exercised my pelvic muscles ____ times. I spent ____ minutes exercising. At each exercise session, I squeezed my pelvic ...

  9. Kegel Exercises for Men: Understand the Benefits

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... a few times in a row. When your muscles get stronger, try doing Kegel exercises while sitting, standing or walking. Maintain your focus. For best results, focus on tightening only your pelvic floor muscles. Be careful not to flex the muscles in ...

  10. Exercise induced capillary growth in human skeletal muscle and the dynamics of VEGF

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høier, Birgitte; Hellsten, Ylva

    2014-01-01

    , such as shear stress and passive stretch, lead to cellular signalling, enhanced expression of angiogenic factors and initiation of capillary growth. The most central angiogenic factor in skeletal muscle capillary growth is vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). During muscle contraction, VEGF increases...... in the muscle interstitium, acts on VEGF receptors on the capillary endothelium and thereby stimulates angiogenic processes. A primary source of muscle interstitial VEGF during exercise is the skeletal muscle fibers which contain large stores of VEGF within vesicles. We propose that, during muscle activity...

  11. Relationship between lower limb position and pelvic floor muscle surface electromyography activity in menopausal women: a prospective observational study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Halski T

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Tomasz Halski,1 Kuba Ptaszkowski,2 Lucyna Słupska,1 Robert Dymarek,3 Małgorzata Paprocka-Borowicz2 1Department of Physiotherapy, Opole Medical School, Opole, 2Department of Clinical Biomechanics and Physiotherapy in Motor System Disorders, 3Department of Nervous System Diseases, Faculty of Health Science, Wroclaw Medical University, Wroclaw, Poland Objectives: In physiotherapeutic practice, special attention is being given to the reciprocal anatomical, physiological, and biomechanical relationship of the pelvis and the structures connected to it. However, the scientific literature shows mainly the theoretical information about their mutual connections. The lack of information about these relations from a practical aspect coupled with the paucity of scientific papers on the impact of posture changes on the pelvic floor led the authors to conduct this study. The primary aim of this study was to compare the resting and functional bioelectrical activities of pelvic floor muscles (PFMs depending on three different positions of the lower limbs (positions A, B, and C in the supine position.Materials and methods: This was a prospective observational study evaluating resting and functional activities of the PFM depending on the position of the lower limbs. The study was carried out at the Department and Clinic of Urology, University Hospital in Wroclaw, Poland and the target group were women in the menopausal period. Bioelectrical activity of PFM was recorded using a surface electromyographic instrument in the supine position. Results of the values obtained in A, B, and C positions were compared using a one-way analysis of variance.Results: In position A, the average resting surface electromyography (sEMG activity of PFM was 6.9±2.6 µV; in position B, the result was 6.9±2.5 µV and in position C, the resting sEMG activity was 5.7±1.8 µV (P=0.0102. The results of the functional bioelectrical activity of PFM were as follows: position A – 20.3

  12. NOX2 Inhibition Impairs Early Muscle Gene Expression Induced by a Single Exercise Bout.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henríquez-Olguín, Carlos; Díaz-Vegas, Alexis; Utreras-Mendoza, Yildy; Campos, Cristian; Arias-Calderón, Manuel; Llanos, Paola; Contreras-Ferrat, Ariel; Espinosa, Alejandra; Altamirano, Francisco; Jaimovich, Enrique; Valladares, Denisse M

    2016-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) participate as signaling molecules in response to exercise in skeletal muscle. However, the source of ROS and the molecular mechanisms involved in these phenomena are still not completely understood. The aim of this work was to study the role of skeletal muscle NADPH oxidase isoform 2 (NOX2) in the molecular response to physical exercise in skeletal muscle. BALB/c mice, pre-treated with a NOX2 inhibitor, apocynin, (3 mg/kg) or vehicle for 3 days, were swim-exercised for 60 min. Phospho-p47(phox) levels were significantly upregulated by exercise in flexor digitorum brevis (FDB). Moreover, exercise significantly increased NOX2 complex assembly (p47(phox)-gp91(phox) interaction) demonstrated by both proximity ligation assay and co-immunoprecipitation. Exercise-induced NOX2 activation was completely inhibited by apocynin treatment. As expected, exercise increased the mRNA levels of manganese superoxide dismutase (MnSOD), glutathione peroxidase (GPx), citrate synthase (CS), mitochondrial transcription factor A (tfam) and interleukin-6 (IL-I6) in FDB muscles. Moreover, the apocynin treatment was associated to a reduced activation of p38 MAP kinase, ERK 1/2, and NF-κB signaling pathways after a single bout of exercise. Additionally, the increase in plasma IL-6 elicited by exercise was decreased in apocynin-treated mice compared with the exercised vehicle-group (p < 0.001). These results were corroborated using gp91-dstat in an in vitro exercise model. In conclusion, NOX2 inhibition by both apocynin and gp91dstat, alters the intracellular signaling to exercise and electrical stimuli in skeletal muscle, suggesting that NOX2 plays a critical role in molecular response to an acute exercise.

  13. NOX2 inhibition impairs early muscle gene expression induced by a single exercise bout

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Henríquez-Olguín

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Reactive oxygen species (ROS participate as signaling molecules in response to exercise in skeletal muscle. However, the source of ROS and the molecular mechanisms involved in these phenomena are still not completely understood. The aim of this work was to study the role of skeletal muscle NADPH oxidase isoform 2 (NOX2 in the molecular response to physical exercise in skeletal muscle. BALB/c mice, pre-treated with a NOX2 inhibitor, apocynin, (3 mg/kg or vehicle for 3 days, were swim-exercised for 60 min. Phospho-p47phox levels were significantly upregulated by exercise in flexor digitorum brevis (FDB. Moreover, exercise significantly increased NOX2 complex assembly (p47phox-gp91phox interaction demonstrated by both proximity ligation assay and co-immunoprecipitation. Exercise-induced NOX2 activation was completely inhibited by apocynin treatment. As expected, exercise increased the mRNA levels of manganese superoxide dismutase (MnSOD, glutathione peroxidase (GPx, citrate synthase (CS, mitochondrial transcription factor A (tfam and interleukin-6 (IL-6 in FDB muscles. Moreover, the apocynin treatment was associated to a reduced activation of p38 MAP kinase, ERK 1/2, and NF-κB signaling pathways after a single bout of exercise. Additionally, the increase in plasma IL-6 elicited by exercise was decreased in apocynin-treated mice compared with the exercised vehicle-group (p<0.001. These results were corroborated using gp91-dstat in an in-vitro exercise model. In conclusion, NOX2 inhibition by both apocynin and gp91dstat, alters the intracellular signaling to exercise and electrical stimuli in skeletal muscle, suggesting that NOX2 plays a critical role in molecular response to an acute exercise.

  14. The Physiological Regulation of Skeletal Muscle Fatty Acid Supply and Oxidation During Moderate-Intensity Exercise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van Hall, Gerrit

    2015-01-01

    ) in the muscle of the very-low-density lipoproteins and in the (semi) post-prandial state chylomicrons may also contribute. In this review, the NEFA fluxes and oxidation by skeletal muscle during prolonged moderate-intensity exercise are described in terms of the integration of physiological systems. Steps...... demand of the exercising muscle is the main driving force for all physiological regulatory processes. It elicits functional hyperemia, increasing the recruitment of capillaries and muscle blood flow resulting in increased NEFA delivery and accessibility to NEFA transporters and LPL. It also releases...

  15. Myogenin regulates exercise capacity and skeletal muscle metabolism in the adult mouse.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jesse M Flynn

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Although skeletal muscle metabolism is a well-studied physiological process, little is known about how it is regulated at the transcriptional level. The myogenic transcription factor myogenin is required for skeletal muscle development during embryonic and fetal life, but myogenin's role in adult skeletal muscle is unclear. We sought to determine myogenin's function in adult muscle metabolism. A Myog conditional allele and Cre-ER transgene were used to delete Myog in adult mice. Mice were analyzed for exercise capacity by involuntary treadmill running. To assess oxidative and glycolytic metabolism, we performed indirect calorimetry, monitored blood glucose and lactate levels, and performed histochemical analyses on muscle fibers. Surprisingly, we found that Myog-deleted mice performed significantly better than controls in high- and low-intensity treadmill running. This enhanced exercise capacity was due to more efficient oxidative metabolism during low- and high-intensity exercise and more efficient glycolytic metabolism during high-intensity exercise. Furthermore, Myog-deleted mice had an enhanced response to long-term voluntary exercise training on running wheels. We identified several candidate genes whose expression was altered in exercise-stressed muscle of mice lacking myogenin. The results suggest that myogenin plays a critical role as a high-level transcriptional regulator to control the energy balance between aerobic and anaerobic metabolism in adult skeletal muscle.

  16. Wnt and β-Catenin Signaling and Skeletal Muscle Myogenesis in Response to Muscle Damage and Resistance Exercise and Training

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    Dan Newmire

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The factors that regulate skeletal muscle hypertrophy in human adults in response to resistance training (RT has largely focused on endogenous endocrine responses. However, the endocrine response to RT as having an obligatory role in muscle hypertrophy has come under scrutiny, as other mechanisms and pathways seem to also be involved in up-regulating muscle protein synthesis (MPS. Skeletal muscle myogenesis is a multifactorial process of tissue growth and repair in response to resistance training is regulated by many factors.  As a result, satellite cell-fused myogenesis is a possible factor in skeletal muscle regeneration and hypertrophy in response to RT.  The Wnt family ligands interact with various receptors and activate different downstream signaling pathways and have been classified as either canonical (β-catenin dependent or non-canonical (β-catenin independent.  Wnt is secreted from numerous tissues in a paracrine fashion. The Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway is a highly-regulated and intricate pathway that is essential to skeletal muscle myogenesis.  The canonical Wnt/β-catenin pathway may influence satellite cells to myogenic commitment, differentiation, and fusion into muscle fibers in response to injury or trauma, self-renewal, and normal basal turnover.  The current literature has shown that, in response mechanical overload from acute resistance exercise and chronic resistance training, that the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway is stimulated which may actuate the process of muscle repair and hypertrophy in response to exercise-induced muscle damage. The purpose of this review is to elaborate on the Wnt/β-catenin signaling  pathway, the current literature investigating the relationship of the Wnt/β-catenin pathway and its effects on myogenesis is response to muscle damage and resistance exercise and training.      Keywords: skeletal muscle, hypertrophy, myogenesis, cell signaling, protein synthesis, resistance

  17. Effect of chronic ethanol ingestion and exercise training on skeletal muscle in rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vila, L; Ferrando, A; Voces, J; Cabral de Oliveira, C; Prieto, J G; Alvarez, A I

    2001-09-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the interactive effects of exercise training and chronic ethanol consumption on metabolism, capillarity, and myofibrillar composition in rat limb muscles. Male Wistar rats were treated in separate groups as follows: non exercised-control; ethanol (15%) in animals' drinking water for 12 weeks; exercise training in treadmill and ethanol administration plus exercise for 12 weeks. Ethanol administration decreased capillarity and increased piruvate kinase and lactate dehydrogenase activities in white gastrocnemius; in plantaris muscle, ethanol increased citrate synthase activity and decreased cross-sectional area of type I, IIa, and IIb fibres. Exercise increased capillarity in all four limb muscles and decreased type I fibre area in plantaris. The decreased capillarity effect induced by ethanol in some muscles, was ameliorated when alcohol was combined with exercise. While alcoholic myopathy affects predominantly type IIb fibres, ethanol administration and aerobic exercise in some cases can affect type I and type IIa fibre areas. The exercise can decrease some harmful effects produced by ethanol in the muscle, including the decrease in the fibre area and capillary density.

  18. Effect of combined actions of hip adduction/abduction on the force generation and maintenance of pelvic floor muscles in healthy women.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amanda C Amorim

    Full Text Available Pelvic floor muscle (PFM force and coordination are related to urinary incontinence severity and to sexual satisfaction. Health professionals frequently combine classic PFM exercises with hip adduction/abduction contraction to treat these disorders, but the real benefits of this practice are still unknown. Based on a theoretical anatomy approach whereby the levator ani muscle is inserted into the obturator internus myofascia and in which force generated by hip movements should increase the contraction quality of PFMs, our aim was to investigate the effects of isometric hip adduction and abduction on PFM force generation. Twenty healthy, nulliparous women were evaluated using two strain-gauge dynamometers (one cylinder-like inside the vaginal cavity, and the other measuring hip adduction/abduction forces around both thighs while performing three different tasks: (a isolated PFM contraction; (b PFM contraction combined with hip adduction (30% and 50% maximum hip force; and (c PFM contraction combined with hip abduction (30% and 50% maximum hip force. Data were sampled at 100Hz and subtracted from the offset if existent. We calculated a gradient between the isolated PFM contraction and each hip condition (Δ Adduction and Δ Abduction for all variables: Maximum force (N, instant of maximum-force occurrence (s, mean force in an 8-second window (N, and PFM force loss (N.s. We compared both conditions gradients in 30% and 50% by paired t-tests. All variables did not differ between hip conditions both in 30% and 50% of maximum hip force (p>.05. PFM contraction combined with isometric hip abduction did not increase vaginal force in healthy and nulliparous women compared to PFM contraction combined with isometric hip adduction. Therefore, so far, the use of hip adduction or abduction in PFM training and treatments are not justified for improving PFM strength and endurance.

  19. Do interindividual differences in cardiac output during submaximal exercise explain differences in exercising muscle oxygenation and ratings of perceived exertion?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bentley, Robert F; Jones, Joshua H; Hirai, Daniel M; Zelt, Joel T; Giles, Matthew D; Raleigh, James P; Quadrilatero, Joe; Gurd, Brendon J; Neder, J Alberto; Tschakovsky, Michael E

    2018-01-01

    Considerable interindividual differences in the Q˙-V˙O2 relationship during exercise have been documented but implications for submaximal exercise tolerance have not been considered. We tested the hypothesis that these interindividual differences were associated with differences in exercising muscle deoxygenation and ratings of perceived exertion (RPE) across a range of submaximal exercise intensities. A total of 31 (21 ± 3 years) healthy recreationally active males performed an incremental exercise test to exhaustion 24 h following a resting muscle biopsy. Cardiac output (Q˙ L/min; inert gas rebreathe), oxygen uptake (V˙O2 L/min; breath-by-breath pulmonary gas exchange), quadriceps saturation (near infrared spectroscopy) and exercise tolerance (6-20; Borg Scale RPE) were measured. The Q˙-V˙O2 relationship from 40 to 160 W was used to partition individuals post hoc into higher (n = 10; 6.3 ± 0.4) versus lower (n = 10; 3.7 ± 0.4, P exercise (all P > 0.4). Lower cardiac responders had greater leg (P = 0.027) and whole body (P = 0.03) RPE only at 185 W, but this represented a higher %peak V˙O2 in lower cardiac responders (87 ± 15% vs. 66 ± 12%, P = 0.005). Substantially lower Q˙-V˙O2 in the lower responder group did not result in altered RPE or exercising muscle deoxygenation. This suggests substantial recruitment of blood flow redistribution in the lower responder group as part of protecting matching of exercising muscle oxygen delivery to demand. © 2018 The Authors. Physiological Reports published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of The Physiological Society and the American Physiological Society.

  20. Effect of Constraint Loading on the Lower Limb Muscle Forces in Weightless Treadmill Exercise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ning Guo

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Long exposure to the microgravity will lead to muscle atrophy and bone loss. Treadmill exercise could mitigate the musculoskeletal decline. But muscle atrophy remains inevitable. The constraint loading applied on astronauts could affect the muscle force and its atrophy severity. However, the quantitative correlation between constraint loading mode and muscle forces remains unclear. This study aimed to characterize the influence of constraint loading mode on the lower limb muscle forces in weightless treadmill exercise. The muscle forces in the full gait cycle were calculated with the inverse dynamic model of human musculoskeletal system. The calculated muscle forces at gravity were validated with the EMG data. Muscle forces increased at weightlessness compared with those at the earth’s gravity. The increasing percentage from high to low is as follows: biceps femoris, gastrocnemius, soleus, vastus, and rectus femoris, which was in agreement with the muscle atrophy observed in astronauts. The constraint loading mode had an impact on the muscle forces in treadmill exercise and thus could be manipulated to enhance the effect of the muscle training in spaceflight. The findings could provide biomechanical basis for the optimization of treadmill constraint system and training program and improve the countermeasure efficiency in spaceflight.

  1. Long-term high-level exercise promotes muscle reinnervation with age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosole, Simone; Carraro, Ugo; Kern, Helmut; Loefler, Stefan; Fruhmann, Hannah; Vogelauer, Michael; Burggraf, Samantha; Mayr, Winfried; Krenn, Matthias; Paternostro-Sluga, Tatjana; Hamar, Dusan; Cvecka, Jan; Sedliak, Milan; Tirpakova, Veronika; Sarabon, Nejc; Musarò, Antonio; Sandri, Marco; Protasi, Feliciano; Nori, Alessandra; Pond, Amber; Zampieri, Sandra

    2014-04-01

    The histologic features of aging muscle suggest that denervation contributes to atrophy, that immobility accelerates the process, and that routine exercise may protect against loss of motor units and muscle tissue. Here, we compared muscle biopsies from sedentary and physically active seniors and found that seniors with a long history of high-level recreational activity up to the time of muscle biopsy had 1) lower loss of muscle strength versus young men (32% loss in physically active vs 51% loss in sedentary seniors); 2) fewer small angulated (denervated) myofibers; 3) a higher percentage of fiber-type groups (reinnervated muscle fibers) that were almost exclusive of the slow type; and 4) sparse normal-size muscle fibers coexpressing fast and slow myosin heavy chains, which is not compatible with exercise-driven muscle-type transformation. The biopsies from the old physically active seniors varied from sparse fiber-type groupings to almost fully transformed muscle, suggesting that coexpressing fibers appear to fill gaps. Altogether, the data show that long-term physical activity promotes reinnervation of muscle fibers and suggest that decades of high-level exercise allow the body to adapt to age-related denervation by saving otherwise lost muscle fibers through selective recruitment to slow motor units. These effects on size and structure of myofibers may delay functional decline in late aging.

  2. Physical Therapy in the Management of Pelvic Floor Muscles Hypertonia in a Woman with Hereditary Spastic Paraplegia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aline Moreira Ribeiro

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Pelvic floor (PF hypertonic disorders are a group of conditions that present with muscular hypertonia or spasticity, resulting in a diminished capacity to isolate, contract, and relax the PF. Their presentation includes voiding and sexual dysfunctions, pelvic pain, and constipation. Various factors are associated, such as complicated vaginal birth, muscular injury, scar tissue formation, and neuropathies. Study Design. The case of a single patient will be presented, together with the management strategies employed. Case Description. A woman with hereditary spastic paraparesis and a history of muscle spasticity and urinary and fecal complaints since childhood. She presented to this institution seeking treatment for pelvic pain, pain during intercourse, constipation, and micturition problems. A physical therapy protocol was developed, with the trial of several treatment modalities. Outcome. After some failed attempts, perineal and pelvic floor stretching proved to be very efficacious therapies for this patient’s complaint, leading to improved pain during intercourse, constipation, pelvic pain, and urinary stream. Discussion. PF spasticity can lead to severe disability and interfere with daily basic functions, such as micturition and evacuation. Physical therapy plays an essential role in the management of these patients and can lead to significant improvement in quality of life.

  3. Effects of intensive therapy using gait trainer or floor walking exercises early after stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peurala, Sinikka H; Airaksinen, Olavi; Huuskonen, Pirjo; Jäkälä, Pekka; Juhakoski, Mika; Sandell, Kaisa; Tarkka, Ina M; Sivenius, Juhani

    2009-02-01

    To analyse the effects of gait therapy for patients after acute stroke in a randomized controlled trial. Fifty-six patients with a mean of 8 days post-stroke participated in: (i) gait trainer exercise; (ii) walking training over ground; or (iii) conventional treatment. Patients in the gait trainer exercise and walking groups practiced gait for 15 sessions over 3 weeks and received additional physiotherapy. Functional Ambulatory Category and several secondary outcome measures assessing gait and mobility were administered before and after rehabilitation and at 6-month follow-up. Patients also evaluated their own effort. Walking ability improved more with intensive walk training compared with conventional treatment; median Functional Ambulatory Category was zero in all patients at the start of the study, but it was 3 in both walk-training groups and 0.5 in the conventional treatment group at the end of the therapy. Median Functional Ambulatory Category was 4 in both walk-training groups and 2.5 in conventional treatment group at 6-month follow-up. Mean accomplished walking distance was not different between the gait trainer exercise and over ground walking groups. Borg scale indicated more effort in over ground walking. Secondary outcomes also indicated improvements. Exercise therapy with walking training improved gait function irrespective of the method used, but the time and effort required to achieve the results favour the gait trainer exercise. Early intensive gait training resulted in better walking ability than did conventional treatment.

  4. Low blood flow at onset of moderate-intensity exercise does not limit muscle oxygen uptake

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nyberg, Michael Permin; Mortensen, Stefan P; Saltin, Bengt

    2010-01-01

    The effect of low blood flow at onset of moderate-intensity exercise on the rate of rise in muscle oxygen uptake was examined. Seven male subjects performed a 3.5-min one-legged knee-extensor exercise bout (24 +/- 1 W, mean +/- SD) without (Con) and with (double blockade; DB) arterial infusion...... of inhibitors of nitric oxide synthase (N(G)-monomethyl-l-arginine) and cyclooxygenase (indomethacin) to inhibit the synthesis of nitric oxide and prostanoids, respectively. Leg blood flow and leg oxygen delivery throughout exercise was 25-50% lower (P ... +/- 12 vs. 262 +/- 39 ml/min). The present data demonstrate that muscle blood flow and oxygen delivery can be markedly reduced without affecting muscle oxygen uptake in the initial phase of moderate-intensity exercise, suggesting that blood flow does not limit muscle oxygen uptake at the onset...

  5. Effects of prior heavy exercise on VO(2) kinetics during heavy exercise are related to changes in muscle activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burnley, Mark; Doust, Jonathan H; Ball, Derek; Jones, Andrew M

    2002-07-01

    We hypothesized that the elevated primary O(2) uptake (VO(2)) amplitude during the second of two bouts of heavy cycle exercise would be accompanied by an increase in the integrated electromyogram (iEMG) measured from three leg muscles (gluteus maximus, vastus lateralis, and vastus medialis). Eight healthy men performed two 6-min bouts of heavy leg cycling (at 70% of the difference between the lactate threshold and peak VO(2)) separated by 12 min of recovery. The iEMG was measured throughout each exercise bout. The amplitude of the primary VO(2) response was increased after prior heavy leg exercise (from mean +/- SE 2.11 +/- 0.12 to 2.44 +/- 0.10 l/min, P exercise (491 +/- 108 vs. 604 +/- 151% increase above baseline values, P exercise is related to a greater recruitment of motor units at the onset of exercise.

  6. A nurse-led long-term pelvic floor muscle training program in the management of female patients with overactive bladder – A study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tu-Zhen Xu

    2015-06-01

    Conclusion: A nurse-led long-term (6 months pelvic floor muscle training program may alleviate OAB symptoms effectively and improve the quality of life more than a short term (3 months pelvic floor muscle training program combined with solifenacin succinate tablets.

  7. Exercise-induced quadriceps muscle fatigue in men and women: effects of arterial oxygen content and respiratory muscle work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dominelli, Paolo B; Molgat-Seon, Yannick; Griesdale, Donald E G; Peters, Carli M; Blouin, Jean-Sébastien; Sekhon, Mypinder; Dominelli, Giulio S; Henderson, William R; Foster, Glen E; Romer, Lee M; Koehle, Michael S; Sheel, A William

    2017-08-01

    High work of breathing and exercise-induced arterial hypoxaemia (EIAH) can decrease O 2 delivery and exacerbate exercise-induced quadriceps fatigue in healthy men. Women have a higher work of breathing during exercise, dedicate a greater fraction of whole-body V̇O2 towards their respiratory muscles and develop EIAH. Despite a greater reduction in men's work of breathing, the attenuation of quadriceps fatigue was similar between the sexes. The degree of EIAH was similar between sexes, and regardless of sex, those who developed the greatest hypoxaemia during exercise demonstrated the most attenuation of quadriceps fatigue. Based on our previous finding that women have a greater relative oxygen cost of breathing, women appear to be especially susceptible to work of breathing-related changes in quadriceps muscle fatigue. Reducing the work of breathing or eliminating exercise-induced arterial hypoxaemia (EIAH) during exercise decreases the severity of quadriceps fatigue in men. Women have a greater work of breathing during exercise, dedicate a greater fraction of whole-body V̇O2 towards their respiratory muscles, and demonstrate EIAH, suggesting women may be especially susceptible to quadriceps fatigue. Healthy subjects (8 male, 8 female) completed three constant load exercise tests over 4 days. During the first (control) test, subjects exercised at ∼85% of maximum while arterial blood gases and work of breathing were assessed. Subsequent constant load exercise tests were iso-time and iso-work rate, but with EIAH prevented by inspiring hyperoxic gas or work of breathing reduced via a proportional assist ventilator (PAV). Quadriceps fatigue was assessed by measuring force in response to femoral nerve stimulation. For both sexes, quadriceps force was equally reduced after the control trial (-27 ± 2% baseline) and was attenuated with hyperoxia and PAV (-18 ± 1 and -17 ± 2% baseline, P Physiology © 2017 The Physiological Society.

  8. Local NSAID infusion inhibits satellite cell proliferation in human skeletal muscle after eccentric exercise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mikkelsen, U R; Langberg, H; Helmark, I C

    2009-01-01

    Despite the widespread consumption of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), the influence of these drugs on muscle satellite cells is not fully understood. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of a local NSAID infusion on satellite cells after unaccustomed eccentric...... exercise in vivo in human skeletal muscle. Eight young healthy males performed 200 maximal eccentric contractions with each leg. An NSAID was infused via a microdialysis catheter into the vastus lateralis muscle of one leg (NSAID leg) before, during, and for 4.5 h after exercise, with the other leg working...... cells (CD68(+) or CD16(+) cells) was not significantly increased in either of the legs 8 days after exercise and was unaffected by the NSAID. The main finding in the present study was that the NSAID infusion for 7.5 h during the exercise day suppressed the exercise-induced increase in the number...

  9. Substrate availability and transcriptional regulation of metabolic genes in human skeletal muscle during recovery from exercise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pilegaard, Henriette; Osada, Takuya; Andersen, Lisbeth Tingsted

    2005-01-01

    before exercise and 2, 5, 8, and 24 hours after exercise. Muscle glycogen was restored to near resting levels within 5 hours in the HC trial, but remained depressed through 24 hours in the LC trial. During the 2- to 8-hour recovery period, leg glucose uptake was 5- to 15-fold higher with HC ingestion......In skeletal muscle of humans, transcription of several metabolic genes is transiently induced during recovery from exercise when no food is consumed. To determine the potential influence of substrate availability on the transcriptional regulation of metabolic genes during recovery from exercise, 9...... male subjects (aged 22-27) completed 75 minutes of cycling exercise at 75% V¿o2max on 2 occasions, consuming either a high-carbohydrate (HC) or low-carbohydrate (LC) diet during the subsequent 24 hours of recovery. Nuclei were isolated and tissue frozen from vastus lateralis muscle biopsies obtained...

  10. Reduced muscle activation during exercise related to brain oxygenation and metabolism in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Peter; Nielsen, Jannie; Overgaard, M

    2010-01-01

    Maximal exercise may be limited by central fatigue defined as an inability of the central nervous system to fully recruit the involved muscles. This study evaluated whether a reduction in the cerebral oxygen-to-carbohydrate index (OCI) and in the cerebral mitochondrial oxygen tension relate to th...... indicating that reduced cerebral oxygenation may play a role in the development of central fatigue and may be an exercise capacity limiting factor.......Maximal exercise may be limited by central fatigue defined as an inability of the central nervous system to fully recruit the involved muscles. This study evaluated whether a reduction in the cerebral oxygen-to-carbohydrate index (OCI) and in the cerebral mitochondrial oxygen tension relate...... of perceived exertion (RPE), arm maximal voluntary force (MVC), and voluntary activation of elbow flexor muscles assessed with transcranial magnetic stimulation. Low intensity exercise did not produce any indication of central fatigue or marked cerebral metabolic deviations. Exercise in hypoxia (0.10) reduced...

  11. Skeletal muscle metabolism is impaired during exercise in glycogen storage disease type III

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Preisler, Nicolai; Laforêt, Pascal; Madsen, Karen Lindhardt

    2015-01-01

    /kg/min (p = 0.024). Fructose ingestion improved exercise tolerance in the patients. CONCLUSION: Similar to patients with McArdle disease, in whom muscle glycogenolysis is also impaired, GSDIIIa is associated with a reduced skeletal muscle oxidation of carbohydrates and a compensatory increase in fatty acid......OBJECTIVE: Glycogen storage disease type IIIa (GSDIIIa) is classically regarded as a glycogenosis with fixed weakness, but we hypothesized that exercise intolerance in GSDIIIa is related to muscle energy failure and that oral fructose ingestion could improve exercise tolerance in this metabolic...... myopathy. METHODS: We challenged metabolism with cycle-ergometer exercise and measured substrate turnover and oxidation rates using stable isotope methodology and indirect calorimetry in 3 patients and 6 age-matched controls on 1 day, and examined the effect of fructose ingestion on exercise tolerance...

  12. Regulation of human skeletal muscle perfusion and its heterogeneity during exercise in moderate hypoxia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heinonen, Ilkka H; Kemppainen, Jukka; Kaskinoro, Kimmo

    2010-01-01

    , the results show that increased BF during one-leg exercise in moderate hypoxia is confined only to the contracting muscles, and the working muscle hyperemia appears not to be directly mediated by adenosine. Increased flow heterogeneity in noncontracting muscles likely reflects sympathetic nervous constraints...... healthy young men using positron emission tomography during one-leg dynamic knee extension exercise in normoxia and moderate physiological systemic hypoxia (14% O(2) corresponding to approximately 3,400 m of altitude) without and with local adenosine receptor inhibition with femoral artery infusion...... to curtail BF increments in areas other than working skeletal muscles, but this effect is not potentiated in moderate systemic hypoxia during small muscle mass exercise....

  13. Noninvasive detection of change in skeletal muscle oxygenation during incremental exercise with near-infrared spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Fang; Luo, Qingming; Xu, Guodong; Li, Pengcheng

    2003-12-01

    Near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) has been developed as a non-invasive method to assess O2 delivery, O2 consumption and blood flow, in diverse local muscle groups at rest and during exercise. The aim of this study was to investigate local O2 consumption in exercising muscle by use of near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS). Ten elite athletes of different sport items were tested in rest and during step incremental load exercise. Local variations of quadriceps muscles were investigated with our wireless NIRS blood oxygen monitor system. The results show that the changes of blood oxygen relate on the sport items, type of muscle, kinetic capacity et al. These results indicate that NIRS is a potential useful tool to detect local muscle oxygenation and blood flow profiles; therefore it might be easily applied for evaluating the effect of athletes training.

  14. The effects of therapeutic hip exercise with abdominal core activation on recruitment of the hip muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Mandy Ky; Chow, Ka Wai; Lai, Alfred Ys; Mak, Noble Kc; Sze, Jason Ch; Tsang, Sharon Mh

    2017-07-21

    Core stabilization has been utilized for rehabilitation and prevention of lower limb musculoskeletal injuries. Previous studies showed that activation of the abdominal core muscles enhanced the hip muscle activity in hip extension and abduction exercises. However, the lack of the direct measurement and quantification of the activation level of the abdominal core muscles during the execution of the hip exercises affect the level of evidence to substantiate the proposed application of core exercises to promote training and rehabilitation outcome of the hip region. The aim of the present study was to examine the effects of abdominal core activation, which is monitored directly by surface electromyography (EMG), on hip muscle activation while performing different hip exercises, and to explore whether participant characteristics such as gender, physical activity level and contractile properties of muscles, which is assessed by tensiomyography (TMG), have confounding effect to the activation of hip muscles in enhanced core condition. Surface EMG of bilateral internal obliques (IO), upper gluteus maximus (UGMax), lower gluteus maximus (LGMax), gluteus medius (GMed) and biceps femoris (BF) of dominant leg was recorded in 20 young healthy subjects while performing 3 hip exercises: Clam, side-lying hip abduction (HABD), and prone hip extension (PHE) in 2 conditions: natural core activation (NC) and enhanced core activation (CO). EMG signals normalized to percentage of maximal voluntary isometric contraction (%MVIC) were compared between two core conditions with the threshold of the enhanced abdominal core condition defined as >20%MVIC of IO. Enhanced abdominal core activation has significantly promoted the activation level of GMed in all phases of clam exercise (P recruitment in Clam, HABD and PHE exercises, and this enhancement is correlated with higher physical activity and stiffer hip muscle. Our results suggest the potential application of abdominal core activation for

  15. Blocked muscle fat oxidation during exercise in neutral lipid storage disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laforêt, Pascal; Ørngreen, Mette; Preisler, Nicolai

    2012-01-01

    To determine whether impaired exercise capacity in neutral lipid storage disease with myopathy is solely caused by muscle weakness or whether a defect in energy metabolism (blocked fat oxidation) may also play a role.......To determine whether impaired exercise capacity in neutral lipid storage disease with myopathy is solely caused by muscle weakness or whether a defect in energy metabolism (blocked fat oxidation) may also play a role....

  16. “Nutraceuticals” in relation to human skeletal muscle and exercise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deane, Colleen S.; Wilkinson, Daniel J.; Phillips, Bethan E.; Smith, Kenneth; Etheridge, Timothy

    2017-01-01

    Skeletal muscles have a fundamental role in locomotion and whole body metabolism, with muscle mass and quality being linked to improved health and even lifespan. Optimizing nutrition in combination with exercise is considered an established, effective ergogenic practice for athletic performance. Importantly, exercise and nutritional approaches also remain arguably the most effective countermeasure for muscle dysfunction associated with aging and numerous clinical conditions, e.g., cancer cachexia, COPD, and organ failure, via engendering favorable adaptations such as increased muscle mass and oxidative capacity. Therefore, it is important to consider the effects of established and novel effectors of muscle mass, function, and metabolism in relation to nutrition and exercise. To address this gap, in this review, we detail existing evidence surrounding the efficacy of a nonexhaustive list of macronutrient, micronutrient, and “nutraceutical” compounds alone and in combination with exercise in relation to skeletal muscle mass, metabolism (protein and fuel), and exercise performance (i.e., strength and endurance capacity). It has long been established that macronutrients have specific roles and impact upon protein metabolism and exercise performance, (i.e., protein positively influences muscle mass and protein metabolism), whereas carbohydrate and fat intakes can influence fuel metabolism and exercise performance. Regarding novel nutraceuticals, we show that the following ones in particular may have effects in relation to 1) muscle mass/protein metabolism: leucine, hydroxyl β-methylbutyrate, creatine, vitamin-D, ursolic acid, and phosphatidic acid; and 2) exercise performance: (i.e., strength or endurance capacity): hydroxyl β-methylbutyrate, carnitine, creatine, nitrates, and β-alanine. PMID:28143855

  17. Skeletal muscle gene expression in response to resistance exercise: sex specific regulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Burant Charles F

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The molecular mechanisms underlying the sex differences in human muscle morphology and function remain to be elucidated. The sex differences in the skeletal muscle transcriptome in both the resting state and following anabolic stimuli, such as resistance exercise (RE, might provide insight to the contributors of sexual dimorphism of muscle phenotypes. We used microarrays to profile the transcriptome of the biceps brachii of young men and women who underwent an acute unilateral RE session following 12 weeks of progressive training. Bilateral muscle biopsies were obtained either at an early (4 h post-exercise or late recovery (24 h post-exercise time point. Muscle transcription profiles were compared in the resting state between men (n = 6 and women (n = 8, and in response to acute RE in trained exercised vs. untrained non-exercised control muscle for each sex and time point separately (4 h post-exercise, n = 3 males, n = 4 females; 24 h post-exercise, n = 3 males, n = 4 females. A logistic regression-based method (LRpath, following Bayesian moderated t-statistic (IMBT, was used to test gene functional groups and biological pathways enriched with differentially expressed genes. Results This investigation identified extensive sex differences present in the muscle transcriptome at baseline and following acute RE. In the resting state, female muscle had a greater transcript abundance of genes involved in fatty acid oxidation and gene transcription/translation processes. After strenuous RE at the same relative intensity, the time course of the transcriptional modulation was sex-dependent. Males experienced prolonged changes while females exhibited a rapid restoration. Most of the biological processes involved in the RE-induced transcriptional regulation were observed in both males and females, but sex specificity was suggested for several signaling pathways including activation of notch signaling and TGF-beta signaling in females

  18. Ibuprofen Differentially Affects Supraspinatus Muscle and Tendon Adaptations to Exercise in a Rat Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rooney, Sarah Ilkhanipour; Baskin, Rachel; Torino, Daniel J; Vafa, Rameen P; Khandekar, Pooja S; Kuntz, Andrew F; Soslowsky, Louis J

    2016-09-01

    Previous studies have shown that ibuprofen is detrimental to tissue healing after acute injury; however, the effects of ibuprofen when combined with noninjurious exercise are debated. Administration of ibuprofen to rats undergoing a noninjurious treadmill exercise protocol will abolish the beneficial adaptations found with exercise but will have no effect on sedentary muscle and tendon properties. Controlled laboratory study. A total of 167 male Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into exercise or cage activity (sedentary) groups and acute (a single bout of exercise followed by 24 hours of rest) and chronic (2 or 8 weeks of repeated exercise) response times. Half of the rats were administered ibuprofen to investigate the effects of this drug over time when combined with different activity levels (exercise and sedentary). Supraspinatus tendons were used for mechanical testing and histologic assessment (organization, cell shape, cellularity), and supraspinatus muscles were used for morphologic (fiber cross-sectional area, centrally nucleated fibers) and fiber type analysis. Chronic intake of ibuprofen did not impair supraspinatus tendon organization or mechanical adaptations (stiffness, modulus, maximum load, maximum stress, dynamic modulus, or viscoelastic properties) to exercise. Tendon mechanical properties were not diminished and in some instances increased with ibuprofen. In contrast, total supraspinatus muscle fiber cross-sectional area decreased with ibuprofen at chronic response times, and some fiber type-specific changes were detected. Chronic administration of ibuprofen does not impair supraspinatus tendon mechanical properties in a rat model of exercise but does decrease supraspinatus muscle fiber cross-sectional area. This fundamental study adds to the growing literature on the effects of ibuprofen on musculoskeletal tissues and provides a solid foundation on which future work can build. The study findings suggest that ibuprofen does not detrimentally affect

  19. Can pelvic floor muscle training improve quality of life in men with mild to moderate post‑stroke and lower urinary tract symptoms?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tibaek, Sigrid; Gard, Gunvor; Dehlendorff, Christian

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) have a significant impact on quality of life (QoL) in post‑stroke patients. AIM: The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of pelvic floor muscle training (PFMT) on QoL parameters in men with post‑stroke LUTS. DESIGN: Randomized, controlled...

  20. Two-year effects and cost-effectiveness of pelvic floor muscle training in mild pelvic organ prolapse : a randomised controlled trial in primary care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Panman, Chantal M.C.R.; Wiegersma, M; Kollen, B J; Berger, M Y; Lisman-Van Leeuwen, Y; Vermeulen, K M; Dekker, J H

    OBJECTIVE: To compare effects and cost-effectiveness of pelvic floor muscle training (PFMT) and watchful waiting in women with pelvic organ prolapse. DESIGN: Randomised controlled trial. SETTING: Dutch general practice. POPULATION: Women (≥55 years) with symptomatic mild prolapse, identified by

  1. Feedback or biofeedback to augment pelvic floor muscle training for urinary incontinence in women: shortened version of a Cochrane systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Herderschee, Roselien; Hay-Smith, E. C. Jean; Herbison, G. Peter; Roovers, Jan Paul; Heineman, Maas Jan

    2013-01-01

    Feedback and biofeedback (BF) are common adjuncts to pelvic floor muscle training (PFMT) for women with stress, urgency, and mixed urinary incontinence (UI). An up to date systematic review of adjunctive feedback or BF was needed to guide practice and further research. To determine whether feedback

  2. The efficacy of electroacupuncture for the treatment of simple female stress urinary incontinence - comparison with pelvic floor muscle training: study protocol for a multicenter randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Tongsheng; Zhou, Jing; Liu, Zhishun; Chen, Yuelai; Zhang, Wei; Chu, Haoran; Luo, Qiong; Lu, Jin; An, Junming; Liu, Baoyan

    2015-02-08

    Previous research has shown that electroacupuncture therapy has a potential therapeutic effect for simple female stress urinary incontinence. In this study, pelvic floor muscle training, the first-line treatment for stress urinary incontinence in women based on meta-analysis of numerous randomized control trials and recommended by international clinical practice, is used as a control group to demonstrate whether electroacupuncture therapy is a better method for female stress urinary incontinence. A randomized controlled trial has been designed to evaluate the therapeutic benefit of electroacupuncture for female stress urinary incontinence compared with pelvic floor muscle training. The safety of electroacupuncture and patient compliance will also be evaluated. Untoward reaction to the electroacupuncture, including a broken needle, fainting on acupuncture, or pain during acupuncture, will be recorded and the therapy will be stopped if an untoward reaction occurs. After we have received full ethical approval and patient consent, participants will be randomized to receive a series of 24 electroacupuncture or pelvic floor muscle training interventions. The frequency and amount of leakage will be measured as the primary outcome parameters. Secondary outcome parameters include the 1-hour pad test, the short-form of the International Consultation on Incontinence Questionnaire, patient subjective effectiveness evaluation, weekly usage of pad, and usage of specialty therapy for female stress urinary incontinence. This trial will help to determine whether electroacupuncture is a more effective treatment than pelvic floor muscle training for patients with female stress urinary incontinence. ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01940432 (12 September 2013).

  3. EFFECT OF HEAT PRECONDITIONING BY MICROWAVE HYPERTHERMIA ON HUMAN SKELETAL MUSCLE AFTER ECCENTRIC EXERCISE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norio Saga

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to clarify whether heat preconditioning results in less eccentric exercise-induced muscle damage and muscle soreness, and whether the repeated bout effect is enhanced by heat preconditioning prior to eccentric exercise. Nine untrained male volunteers aged 23 ± 3 years participated in this study. Heat preconditioning included treatment with a microwave hyperthermia unit (150 W, 20 min that was randomly applied to one of the subject's arms (MW; the other arm was used as a control (CON. One day after heat preconditioning, the subjects performed 24 maximal isokinetic eccentric contractions of the elbow flexors at 30°·s-1 (ECC1. One week after ECC1, the subjects repeated the procedure (ECC2. After each bout of exercise, maximal voluntary contraction (MVC, range of motion (ROM of the elbow joint, upper arm circumference, blood creatine kinase (CK activity and muscle soreness were measured. The subjects experienced both conditions at an interval of 3 weeks. MVC and ROM in the MW were significantly higher than those in the CON (p < 0.05 for ECC1; however, the heat preconditioning had no significant effect on upper arm circumference, blood CK activity, or muscle soreness following ECC1 and ECC2. Heat preconditioning may protect human skeletal muscle from eccentric exercise-induced muscle damage after a single bout of eccentric exercise but does not appear to promote the repeated bout effect after a second bout of eccentric exercise

  4. Colostrum supplementation protects against exercise - induced oxidative stress in skeletal muscle in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Appukutty Mahenderan

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This study examined the effects of bovine colostrum on exercise –induced modulation of antioxidant parameters in skeletal muscle in mice. Adult male BALB/c mice were randomly divided into four groups (control, colostrum alone, exercise and exercise with colostrum and each group had three subgroups (day 0, 21 and 42. Colostrum groups of mice were given a daily oral supplement of 50 mg/kg body weight of bovine colostrum and the exercise group of mice were made to exercise on the treadmill for 30 minutes per day. Total antioxidants, lipid hydroperoxides, xanthine oxidase and super oxide dismutase level was assayed from the homogenate of hind limb skeletal muscle. Results Exercise—induced a significant oxidative stress in skeletal muscles as evidenced by the elevated lipid hydroperoxides and xanthine oxidase levels. There was a significant decrease in skeletal muscle total antioxidants and superoxide dismutase levels. Daily colostrum supplement significantly reduced the lipid hydroperoxides and xanthine oxidase enzyme level and increased the total antioxidant levels in the leg muscle. Conclusion Thus, the findings of this study showed that daily bovine colostrum supplementation was beneficial to skeletal muscle to reduce the oxidant-induced damage during muscular exercise.

  5. Effectiveness of water-based Liuzijue exercise on respiratory muscle strength and peripheral skeletal muscle function in patients with COPD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wu W

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Weibing Wu,1,* Xiaodan Liu,2,* Jingxin Liu,1 Peijun Li,1 Zhenwei Wang3 1Department of Sports Medicine, Shanghai University of Sport, 2School of Rehabilitation Medicine, Shanghai University of Traditional Chinese Medicine, 3Department of Respiratory Medicine, Yueyang Hospital of Integrated Traditional Chinese and Western Medicine, Shanghai, People’s Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this work Objects: The purpose of this study was to quantitatively assess the effects of water-based Liuzijue exercise on patients with COPD and compare it with land-based Liuzijue exercise.Materials and methods: Participants were randomly allocated to one of three groups: the water-based Liuzijue exercise group (WG, the land-based Liuzijue exercise group (LG, and the control group (CG. CG participants accepted no exercise intervention, while training groups performed Liuzijue exercise according to Health Qigong Liuzijue (People’s Republic of China in different environments for 60-min sessions twice a week for 3 months.Results: Of the 50 patients enrolled, 45 (90% completed the 3-month intervention. The CG showed decreased expiratory muscle strength, extensor and flexor endurance ratio (ER of the elbow joints and flexor peak torque (PT, total work (TW, and ER of the knee joints (p<0.05. Both training groups showed improved respiratory muscle strength, which differed from the CG (p<0.001. In addition, extensor and flexor TW of the elbow joints in the training groups were increased (p<0.01, and the WG differed from the CG in extensor TW and ER and flexor TW (p<0.01, while the LG differed from the CG in flexor TW and extensor ER (p<0.05. PT, PT/body weight (BW, and TW in the knee joint extensor in the training groups were increased as well (PT and PT/BW: p<0.05, TW: p<0.01, and the WG differed from the CG in terms of knee joints outcomes, while the LG differed from the CG in flexor TW only (p<0.05.Conclusion: Water-based Liuzijue exercise has

  6. Effects of caffeinated chewing gum on muscle pain during submaximal isometric exercise in individuals with fibromyalgia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umeda, Masataka; Kempka, Laura; Weatherby, Amy; Greenlee, Brennan; Mansion, Kimberly

    2016-04-01

    Physical activity is important to manage symptom of fibromyalgia (FM); however, individuals with FM typically experience augmented muscle pain during exercise. This study examined the effects of caffeinated chewing gum on exercise-induced muscle pain in individuals with FM. This study was conducted with a double-blind, placebo-controlled, cross-over design. Twenty-three patients with FM completed a caffeine condition where they consumed a caffeinated chewing gum that contains 100mg of caffeine, and a placebo condition where they consumed a non-caffeinated chewing gum. They completed isometric handgrip exercise at 25% of their maximal strength for 3 min, and muscle pain rating (MPR) was recorded every 30s during exercise. Clinical pain severity was assessed in each condition using a pain questionnaire. The order of the two conditions was randomly determined. MPR increased during exercise, but caffeinated chewing gum did not attenuate the increase in MPR compared to placebo gum. Clinical pain severity was generally associated with the average MPR and the caffeine effects on MPR, calculated as difference in the average MPR between the two conditions. The results suggest that more symptomatic individuals with FM may experience greater exercise-induced muscle pain, but benefit more from caffeinated chewing gum to reduce exercise-induced muscle pain. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Optical measurement of blood flow in exercising skeletal muscle: a pilot study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Detian; Baker, Wesley B.; Parthasarathy, Ashwin B.; Zhu, Liguo; Li, Zeren; Yodh, Arjun G.

    2017-07-01

    Blood flow monitoring during rhythm exercising is very important for sports medicine and muscle dieases. Diffuse correlation spectroscopy(DCS) is a relative new invasive way to monitor blood flow but suffering from muscle fiber motion. In this study we focus on how to remove exercise driven artifacts and obtain accurate estimates of the increase in blood flow from exercise. Using a novel fast software correlator, we measured blood flow in forearm flexor muscles of N=2 healthy adults during handgrip exercise, at a sampling rate of 20 Hz. Combining the blood flow and acceleration data, we resolved the motion artifact in the DCS signal induced by muscle fiber motion, and isolated the blood flow component of the signal from the motion artifact. The results show that muscle fiber motion strongly affects the DCS signal, and if not accounted for, will result in an overestimate of blood flow more than 1000%. Our measurements indicate rapid dilation of arterioles following exercise onset, which enabled blood flow to increase to a plateau of 200% in 10s. The blood flow also rapidly recovered to baseline following exercise in 10s. Finally, preliminary results on the dependence of blood flow from exercise intensity changes will be discussed.

  8. Neuromuscular and muscle-tendon system adaptations to isotonic and isokinetic eccentric exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guilhem, G; Cornu, C; Guével, A

    2010-06-01

    To present the properties of an eccentric contraction and compare neuromuscular and muscle-tendon system adaptations induced by isotonic and isokinetic eccentric trainings. An eccentric muscle contraction is characterized by the production of muscle force associated to a lengthening of the muscle-tendon system. This muscle solicitation can cause micro lesions followed by a regeneration process of the muscle-tendon system. Eccentric exercise is commonly used in functional rehabilitation for its positive effect on collagen synthesis but also for resistance training to increase muscle strength and muscle mass in athletes. Indeed, eccentric training stimulates muscle hypertrophy, increases the fascicle pennation angle, fascicles length and neural activation, thus inducing greater strength gains than concentric or isometric training programs. Eccentric exercise is commonly performed either against a constant external load (isotonic) or at constant velocity (isokinetic), inducing different mechanical constraints. These different mechanical constraints could induce structural and neural adaptive strategies specific to each type of exercise. The literature tends to show that isotonic mode leads to a greater strength gain than isokinetic mode. This observation could be explained by a greater neuromuscular activation after IT training. However, the specific muscle adaptations induced by each mode remain difficult to determine due to the lack of standardized, comparative studies. 2010 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  9. REDD1 induction regulates the skeletal muscle gene expression signature following acute aerobic exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Bradley S; Steiner, Jennifer L; Rossetti, Michael L; Qiao, Shuxi; Ellisen, Leif W; Govindarajan, Subramaniam S; Eroshkin, Alexey M; Williamson, David L; Coen, Paul M

    2017-12-01

    The metabolic stress placed on skeletal muscle by aerobic exercise promotes acute and long-term health benefits in part through changes in gene expression. However, the transducers that mediate altered gene expression signatures have not been completely elucidated. Regulated in development and DNA damage 1 (REDD1) is a stress-induced protein whose expression is transiently increased in skeletal muscle following acute aerobic exercise. However, the role of this induction remains unclear. Because REDD1 altered gene expression in other model systems, we sought to determine whether REDD1 induction following acute exercise altered the gene expression signature in muscle. To do this, wild-type and REDD1-null mice were randomized to remain sedentary or undergo a bout of acute treadmill exercise. Exercised mice recovered for 1, 3, or 6 h before euthanization. Acute exercise induced a transient increase in REDD1 protein expression within the plantaris only at 1 h postexercise, and the induction occurred in both cytosolic and nuclear fractions. At this time point, global changes in gene expression were surveyed using microarray. REDD1 induction was required for the exercise-induced change in expression of 24 genes. Validation by RT-PCR confirmed that the exercise-mediated changes in genes related to exercise capacity, muscle protein metabolism, neuromuscular junction remodeling, and Metformin action were negated in REDD1-null mice. Finally, the exercise-mediated induction of REDD1 was partially dependent upon glucocorticoid receptor activation. In all, these data show that REDD1 induction regulates the exercise-mediated change in a distinct set of genes within skeletal muscle. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  10. COMPARISON OF HAMSTRING MUSCLE ACTIVATION DURING HIGH-SPEED RUNNING AND VARIOUS HAMSTRING STRENGTHENING EXERCISES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solheim, Jens Asmund Brevik; Bencke, Jesper

    2017-01-01

    Purpose/Background Several studies have examined the effect of hamstring strength exercises upon hamstring strains in team sports that involve many sprints. However, there has been no cross comparison among muscle activation of these hamstring training exercises with actual sprinting. Therefore, the aim of this study was to examine different hamstring exercises and compare the muscle activity in the hamstring muscle group during various exercises with the muscular activity produced during maximal sprints. Methods Twelve male sports students (age 25 ± 6.2 years, 1.80 ± 7.1 m, body mass 81.1 ± 15.6 kg) participated in this study. Surface EMG electrodes were placed on semimembranosus, semitendinosus and biceps femoris to measure muscle activity during seven hamstrings exercises and sprinting together with 3D motion capture to establish at what hip and knee angles maximal muscle activation (EMG) occurs. Maximal EMG activity during sprints for each muscle was used in order to express each exercise as a percentage of max activation during sprinting. Results The main findings were that maximal EMG activity of the different hamstring exercises were on average between 40-65% (Semitendinosus), 18-40% (biceps femoris) and 40-75% (Semimembranosus) compared with the max EMG activity in sprints, which were considered as 100%. The laying kick together with the Nordic hamstring exercises and its variations had the highest muscle activations, while the cranes showed the lowest muscle activation (in all muscles) together with the standing kick for the semimembranosus. In addition, angles at which the peak EMG activity of the hamstring muscle occurs were similar for the Nordic hamstring exercises and different for the two crane exercises (hip angle), standing kick (hip angle) and the laying kick (knee angle) compared with the sprint. Conclusions Nordic hamstring exercises with its variation together with the laying kick activates the hamstrings at high levels and

  11. Post-exercise adipose tissue and skeletal muscle lipid metabolism in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mulla, N A; Simonsen, L; Bülow, J

    2000-01-01

    , a subcutaneous abdominal vein and a femoral vein. Adipose tissue metabolism and skeletal muscle (leg) metabolism were measured using Fick's principle. The results show that the lipolytic rate in adipose tissue during exercise was the same in each experiment. Post-exercise, there was a very fast decrease......One purpose of the present experiments was to examine whether the relative workload or the absolute work performed is the major determinant of the lipid mobilization from adipose tissue during exercise. A second purpose was to determine the co-ordination of skeletal muscle and adipose tissue lipid...... metabolism during a 3 h post-exercise period. Six subjects were studied twice. In one experiment, they exercised for 90 min at 40% of maximal O2 consumption (VO2,max) and in the other experiment they exercised at 60% VO2,max for 60 min. For both experiments, catheters were inserted in an artery...

  12. Effect of fuels on exercise capacity in muscle phosphoglycerate mutase deficiency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vissing, John; Quistorff, Bjørn; Haller, Ronald G

    2005-01-01

    , it is unknown whether PGAMD is associated with a second-wind phenomenon during exercise, as in McArdle disease, and whether patients with PGAMD, like patients with PFKD and McArdle disease, benefit from supplementation with fuels that bypass the metabolic block. OBJECTIVE: To investigate whether fuels...... that bypass the metabolic block can improve exercise capacity or whether exercise capacity improves during sustained exercise. DESIGN: Single-blind, placebo-controlled investigation of the effects of glucose, lactate, and intralipid on work capacity in patients with PGAMD. SETTING: National University...... Hospital, University of Copenhagen, and Neuromuscular Center, Institute for Exercise and Environmental Medicine.Patients Two unrelated men (21 and 26 years old) with PGAMD who since their teens had experienced muscle cramps, muscle pain, and episodes of myoglobinuria provoked by brief vigorous exercise, 4...

  13. Exercise induces expression of leukaemia inhibitory factor in human skeletal muscle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Broholm, Christa; Mortensen, Ole Hartvig; Nielsen, Søren

    2008-01-01

    the exercise trial. Skeletal muscle LIF mRNA increased immediately after the exercise and declined gradually during recovery. However, LIF protein was unchanged at the investigated time points. Moreover, we tested the hypothesis that LIF mRNA and protein expressions are modulated by calcium (Ca(2+)) in primary...

  14. Cardiopulmonary exercise capacity, muscle strength, and physical activity in children and adolescents with achondroplasia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Takken, Tim; van Bergen, Monique W. M.; Sakkers, Ralph J. B.; Helders, Paul J. M.; Engelbert, Raoul H. H.

    2007-01-01

    To study in children with achondroplasia the response to exercise and muscle strength compared with healthy peers and to describe the relation between exercise capacity, anthropometric factors, and physical activity. Patients (7 boys and 10 girls; mean age, 11.8 +/- 3.3 years) with achondroplasia

  15. Changes in satellite cells in human skeletal muscle after a single bout of high intensity exercise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Crameri, Regina M; Langberg, Henning; Magnusson, Peter

    2004-01-01

    increase in mononuclear cells staining for the neural cell adhesion molecule (N-CAM) and fetal antigen 1 (FA1) were observed within the exercised human vastus lateralis muscle on days 4 and 8 post exercise. In addition, a significant increase in the concentration of the FA1 protein was determined...

  16. Interstitial and arterial-venous [K+] in human calf muscle during dynamic exercise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Green, S; Langberg, Henning; Skovgaard, D

    2000-01-01

    little information on the response of [K+]I to exercise in human skeletal muscle. Five young healthy subjects performed plantar flexion exercise for four 5 min periods at increasing power outputs ( approximately 1-6 W) with 10 min intervening recovery periods, as well as for two 5 min periods...

  17. Muscle activation and perceived loading during rehabilitation exercises: comparison of dumbbells and elastic resistance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Lars L; Andersen, Christoffer H; Mortensen, Ole S

    2010-01-01

    High-intensity resistance training plays an essential role in the prevention and rehabilitation of musculoskeletal injuries and disorders. Although resistance exercises with heavy weights yield high levels of muscle activation, the efficacy of more user-friendly forms of exercise needs to be exam...

  18. Ca2+-calmodulin-dependent protein kinase expression and signalling in skeletal muscle during exercise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rose, Adam John; Kiens, Bente; Richter, Erik

    2006-01-01

    Ca2+ signalling is proposed to play an important role in skeletal muscle function during exercise. Here, we examined the expression of multifunctional Ca2+-calmodulin-dependent protein kinases (CaMK) in human skeletal muscle and show that CaMKII and CaMKK, but not CaMKI or CaMKIV, are expressed...

  19. Glucose clearance in aged trained skeletal muscle during maximal insulin with superimposed exercise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dela, Flemming; Mikines, K J; Larsen, J J

    1999-01-01

    Insulin and muscle contractions are major stimuli for glucose uptake in skeletal muscle and have in young healthy people been shown to be additive. We studied the effect of superimposed exercise during a maximal insulin stimulus on glucose uptake and clearance in trained (T) (1-legged bicycle tra...

  20. Proteomics of Skeletal Muscle: Focus on Insulin Resistance and Exercise Biology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atul S. Deshmukh

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Skeletal muscle is the largest tissue in the human body and plays an important role in locomotion and whole body metabolism. It accounts for ~80% of insulin stimulated glucose disposal. Skeletal muscle insulin resistance, a primary feature of Type 2 diabetes, is caused by a decreased ability of muscle to respond to circulating insulin. Physical exercise improves insulin sensitivity and whole body metabolism and remains one of the most promising interventions for the prevention of Type 2 diabetes. Insulin resistance and exercise adaptations in skeletal muscle might be a cause, or consequence, of altered protein expressions profiles and/or their posttranslational modifications (PTMs. Mass spectrometry (MS-based proteomics offer enormous promise for investigating the molecular mechanisms underlying skeletal muscle insulin resistance and exercise-induced adaptation; however, skeletal muscle proteomics are challenging. This review describes the technical limitations of skeletal muscle proteomics as well as emerging developments in proteomics workflow with respect to samples preparation, liquid chromatography (LC, MS and computational analysis. These technologies have not yet been fully exploited in the field of skeletal muscle proteomics. Future studies that involve state-of-the-art proteomics technology will broaden our understanding of exercise-induced adaptations as well as molecular pathogenesis of insulin resistance. This could lead to the identification of new therapeutic targets.

  1. Electromyographic analysis of an eccentric calf muscle exercise in persons with and without Achilles tendinopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reid, Duncan; McNair, Peter J; Johnson, Shelley; Potts, Geoff; Witvrouw, Erik; Mahieu, Nele

    2012-08-01

    To compare surface electromyographic (EMG) activity of the gastrocnemius and soleus muscles between persons with and without Achilles tendinopathy (AT) during an eccentric muscle exercise in different knee joint positions. Repeated measures design. Research laboratory. Participants (n = 18) diagnosed with AT and 18 control subjects were recruited. Gastrocnemius and soleus muscle activity was examined by surface (EMG) during extended and flexed knee joint conditions while performing the eccentric training technique. The EMG data were expressed as a percentage of a maximum voluntary contraction (MVC). EMG activity was notably higher (mean difference: 10%, effect size: 0.59) in those subjects with AT. Irrespective of the presence of AT, there was a significant interaction effect between muscle and joint position. The gastrocnemius muscle was significantly more active in the extended knee condition and soleus muscle activity was unchanged across joint positions. The results indicated that the presence of AT influenced calf muscle activity levels during performance of the eccentric exercise. There were differences in muscle activity during the extended and flexed knee conditions. This result does support performing Alfredson, Pietila, Jonsson, and Lorentzon (1998) eccentric exercise in an extended knee position but the specific effects of the knee flexed position on the Achilles tendon during eccentric exercise have yet to be determined, particularly in those with AT. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. MRI-based screening for metabolic insufficiency of leg muscle during aerobic exercise in Cystic Fibrosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jeneson, J.A.L.; Werkman, M.S.; Blanken, N.; Oorschot, van J.W.M.; Ent, van der K.; Arets, H.G.; Hulzebos, H.J.; Takken, T.

    2012-01-01

    There is evidence for mitochondrial dysfunction in various tissues in Cystic Fibrosis (CF) including muscle. Among others, a slow rate of high-energy phosphate resynthesis following exercise involving single limb muscle activity was found in human CF using in vivo 31P magnetic resonance spectroscopy

  3. Role of Exercise Therapy in Prevention of Decline in Aging Muscle Function: Glucocorticoid Myopathy and Unloading

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teet Seene

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Changes in skeletal muscle quantity and quality lead to disability in the aging population. Physiological changes in aging skeletal muscle are associated with a decline in mass, strength, and inability to maintain balance. Glucocorticoids, which are in wide exploitation in various clinical scenarios, lead to the loss of the myofibrillar apparatus, changes in the extracellular matrix, and a decrease in muscle strength and motor activity, particularly in the elderly. Exercise therapy has shown to be a useful tool for the prevention of different diseases, including glucocorticoid myopathy and muscle unloading in the elderly. The purpose of the paper is to discuss the possibilities of using exercise therapy in the prevention of glucocorticoid caused myopathy and unloading in the elderly and to describe relationships between the muscle contractile apparatus and the extracellular matrix in different types of aging muscles.

  4. Enhanced muscle insulin sensitivity after contraction/exercise is mediated by AMPK

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjøbsted, Rasmus; Munk-Hansen, Nanna; Birk, Jesper Bratz

    2017-01-01

    muscle and whole body insulin sensitivity in wild type (WT) mice, respectively. These effects were not found in AMPKα1α2 muscle-specific knockout mice. Prior in situ contraction did not increase insulin sensitivity in m. soleus from either genotype. Improvement in muscle insulin sensitivity....... Collectively, our data suggest that the AMPK-TBC1D4 signaling axis is likely mediating the improved muscle insulin sensitivity after contraction/exercise and illuminates an important and physiological relevant role of AMPK in skeletal muscle.......Earlier studies have demonstrated that muscle insulin sensitivity to stimulate glucose uptake is enhanced several hours after an acute bout of exercise. Using 5-aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide-ribonucleotide (AICAR), we recently demonstrated that prior activation of AMPK is sufficient to increase...

  5. Supervised pelvic floor muscle training versus attention-control massage treatment in patients with faecal incontinence: Statistical analysis plan for a randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ussing, Anja; Dahn, Inge; Due, Ulla; Sørensen, Michael; Petersen, Janne; Bandholm, Thomas

    2017-12-01

    Faecal incontinence affects approximately 8-9% of the adult population. The condition is surrounded by taboo; it can have a devastating impact on quality of life and lead to major limitations in daily life. Pelvic floor muscle training in combination with information and fibre supplements is recommended as first-line treatment for faecal incontinence. Despite this, the effect of pelvic floor muscle training for faecal incontinence is unclear. No previous trials have investigated the efficacy of supervised pelvic floor muscle training in combination with conservative treatment and compared this to an attention-control massage treatment including conservative treatment. The aim of this trial is to investigate if 16 weeks of supervised pelvic floor muscle training in combination with conservative treatment is superior to attention-control massage treatment and conservative treatment in patients with faecal incontinence. Randomised, controlled, superiority trial with two parallel arms. 100 participants with faecal incontinence will be randomised to either (1) individually supervised pelvic floor muscle training and conservative treatment or (2) attention-control massage treatment and conservative treatment. The primary outcome is participants' rating of symptom changes after 16 weeks of treatment using the Patient Global Impression of Improvement Scale. Secondary outcomes are the Vaizey Incontinence Score, the Fecal Incontinence Severity Index, the Fecal Incontinence Quality of Life Scale, a 14-day bowel diary, anorectal manometry and rectal capacity measurements. Follow-up assessment at 36 months will be conducted. This paper describes and discusses the rationale, the methods and in particular the statistical analysis plan of this trial.

  6. Influence of erythrocyte oxygenation and intravascular ATP on resting and exercising skeletal muscle blood flow in humans with mitochondrial myopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jeppesen, Tina D; Vissing, John; González-Alonso, José

    2012-01-01

    Oxygen (O(2)) extraction is impaired in exercising skeletal muscle of humans with mutations of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA), but the muscle hemodynamic response to exercise has never been directly investigated. This study sought to examine the extent to which human skeletal muscle perfusion can incr...

  7. Effect of acute exercise on glycogen synthase in muscle from obese and diabetic subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Jørgen; Tantiwong, Puntip; Stuenæs, Jorid T; Molina-Carrion, Marjorie; DeFronzo, Ralph A; Sakamoto, Kei; Musi, Nicolas

    2012-07-01

    Insulin stimulates glycogen synthase (GS) through dephosphorylation of serine residues, and this effect is impaired in skeletal muscle from insulin-resistant [obese and type 2 diabetic (T2DM)] subjects. Exercise also increases GS activity, yet it is not known whether the ability of exercise to affect GS is impaired in insulin-resistant subjects. The objective of this study was to examine the effect of acute exercise on GS phosphorylation and enzyme kinetic properties in muscle from insulin-resistant individuals. Lean normal glucose-tolerant (NGT), obese NGT, and obese T2DM subjects performed 40 min of moderate-intensity cycle exercise (70% of Vo(2max)). GS kinetic properties and phosphorylation were measured in vastus lateralis muscle before exercise, immediately after exercise, and 3.5 h postexercise. In lean subjects, GS fractional activity increased twofold after 40 min of exercise, and it remained elevated after the 3.5-h rest period. Importantly, exercise also decreased GS K(m) for UDP-glucose from ≈0.5 to ≈0.2 mM. In lean subjects, exercise caused significant dephosphorylation of GS by 50-70% (Ser(641), Ser(645), and Ser(645,649,653,657)), and phosphorylation of these sites remained decreased after 3.5 h; Ser⁷ phosphorylation was not regulated by exercise. In obese NGT and T2DM subjects, exercise increased GS fractional activity, decreased K(m) for UDP-glucose, and decreased GS phosphorylation as effectively as in lean NGT subjects. We conclude that the molecular regulatory process by which exercise promotes glycogen synthesis in muscle is preserved in insulin-resistant subjects.

  8. Electromyographic evaluation of high-intensity elastic resistance exercises for lower extremity muscles during bed rest

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vinstrup, Jonas; Skals, Sebastian; Calatayud, Joaquin

    2017-01-01

    PURPOSE: Prolonged hospital bed rest after severe injury or disease leads to rapid muscle atrophy and strength loss. Therefore, the main aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of lower extremity strengthening exercises using elastic resistance that can be performed while lying in a hospit......, the present study has the potential to provide a reference table of exercises to select from when individualizing and progressing strengthening exercises during the early rehabilitation of bedridden individuals....

  9. Wii balance board exercise improves balance and lower limb muscle strength of overweight young adults

    OpenAIRE

    Siriphorn, Akkradate; Chamonchant, Dannaovarat

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The potential health benefits of the Nintendo Wii balance board exercise have been widely investigated. However, no study has been conducted to examine the benefits of Wii exercise for overweight young adults. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of exercise performed on a Nintendo Wii balance board on the balance and lower limb muscle strength in overweight young adults. [Subjects and Methods] Within-subject repeated measures analysis was used. Sixteen young adults (...

  10. Association between healthy diet and exercise and greater muscle mass in older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jinhee; Lee, Yunhwan; Kye, Seunghee; Chung, Yoon-Sok; Kim, Kwang-Min

    2015-05-01

    To examine the association between healthy diet and exercise, individually and combined, and low muscle mass in older Korean adults. Population-based cross-sectional study from the Fourth and Fifth Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys from 2008 to 2011. Community. Nationally representative sample aged 65 and older (1,486 men, 1,799 women) in the Republic of Korea. A food frequency questionnaire was used to determine frequency of food group consumption (meat, fish, eggs, legumes; vegetables; fruits). Participation in exercise (aerobic and resistance) was based on self-report. Combined healthy lifestyle factors were calculated as the number of recommendations met regarding consumption of food groups and exercise performed. Appendicular skeletal muscle mass (ASM) was measured using dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry, and low muscle mass was defined using the variable of ASM adjusted for weight. Logistic regression analysis was performed to examine the association between healthy lifestyle factors and low muscle mass, adjusting for sociodemographic characteristics and health-related variables. In women, after controlling for covariates, vegetable consumption (odds ratio (OR)=0.52, 95% confidence interval (CI)=0.30-0.89) and aerobic exercise (OR=0.62, 95% CI=0.39-1.00) were inversely associated with low muscle mass. Also, the odds of low muscle mass was lower in women with three or more healthy lifestyle factors versus none (OR=0.45, 95% CI=0.23-0.87). In men, there were no associations between food group consumption and exercise and low muscle mass. Older women who exercise and consume a healthy diet have lower odds of low muscle mass. Engaging in multiple healthy behaviors may be important in preventing low muscle mass in late life. © 2015, Copyright the Authors Journal compilation © 2015, The American Geriatrics Society.

  11. POST-EXERCISE MUSCLE GLYCOGEN REPLETION IN THE EXTREME: EFFECT OF FOOD ABSENCE AND ACTIVE RECOVERY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul A. Fournier

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available Glycogen plays a major role in supporting the energy demands of skeletal muscles during high intensity exercise. Despite its importance, the amount of glycogen stored in skeletal muscles is so small that a large fraction of it can be depleted in response to a single bout of high intensity exercise. For this reason, it is generally recommended to ingest food after exercise to replenish rapidly muscle glycogen stores, otherwise one's ability to engage in high intensity activity might be compromised. But what if food is not available? It is now well established that, even in the absence of food intake, skeletal muscles have the capacity to replenish some of their glycogen at the expense of endogenous carbon sources such as lactate. This is facilitated, in part, by the transient dephosphorylation-mediated activation of glycogen synthase and inhibition of glycogen phosphorylase. There is also evidence that muscle glycogen synthesis occurs even under conditions conducive to an increased oxidation of lactate post-exercise, such as during active recovery from high intensity exercise. Indeed, although during active recovery glycogen resynthesis is impaired in skeletal muscle as a whole because of increased lactate oxidation, muscle glycogen stores are replenished in Type IIa and IIb fibers while being broken down in Type I fibers of active muscles. This unique ability of Type II fibers to replenish their glycogen stores during exercise should not come as a surprise given the advantages in maintaining adequate muscle glycogen stores in those fibers that play a major role in fight or flight responses

  12. Morphological changes in the cervical muscles of women with chronic whiplash can be modified with exercise-A pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'leary, Shaun; Jull, Gwendolen; Van Wyk, Luke; Pedler, Ashley; Elliott, James

    2015-11-01

    In this preliminary study we determined whether MRI markers of cervical muscle degeneration [elevated muscle fatty infiltration (MFI), cross-sectional area (CSA), and reduced relative muscle CSA (rmCSA)] could be modified with exercise in patients with chronic whiplash. Five women with chronic whiplash undertook 10 weeks of neck exercise. MRI measures of the cervical multifidus (posterior) and longus capitus/colli (anterior) muscles, neck muscle strength, and self-reported neck disability were recorded at baseline and at completion of the exercise program. Overall significant increases in CSA and rmCSA were observed for both muscles, but significant reductions in MFI were only evident in the cervical multifidus muscle. These changes coincided with increased muscle strength and reduced neck disability. MRI markers of muscle morphology in individuals with chronic whiplash appear to be modifiable with exercise. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Interdependence of AMPK and SIRT1 for metabolic adaptation to fasting and exercise in skeletal muscle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cantó, Carles; Jiang, Lake Q; Deshmukh, Atul S

    2010-01-01

    During fasting and after exercise, skeletal muscle efficiently switches from carbohydrate to lipid as the main energy source to preserve glycogen stores and blood glucose levels for glucose-dependent tissues. Skeletal muscle cells sense this limitation in glucose availability and transform...... and lipid utilization genes. Deficient AMPK activity compromises SIRT1-dependent responses to exercise and fasting, resulting in impaired PGC-1alpha deacetylation and blunted induction of mitochondrial gene expression. Thus, we conclude that AMPK acts as the primordial trigger for fasting- and exercise...

  14. Metabolic adaptations of skeletal muscle to voluntary wheel running exercise in hypertensive heart failure rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schultz, R L; Kullman, E L; Waters, Ryan

    2013-01-01

    SHHF and Wistar-Furth (WF) rats were randomized to sedentary (SHHFsed and WFsed) and exercise groups (SHHFex and WFex). The exercise groups had access to running wheels from 6-22 months of age. Hindlimb muscles were obtained for metabolic measures that included mitochondrial enzyme function...... robust amounts of aerobic activity, voluntary wheel running exercise was not sufficiently intense to improve the oxidative capacity of skeletal muscle in adult SHHF animals, indicating an inability to compensate for declining heart function by improving peripheral oxidative adaptations in the skeletal...

  15. Blood flow and oxygenation in peritendinous tissue and calf muscle during dynamic exercise in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boushel, Robert Christopher; Langberg, H; Green, Sara Marie Ehrenreich

    2000-01-01

    1. Circulation around tendons may act as a shunt for muscle during exercise. The perfusion and oxygenation of Achilles' peritendinous tissue was measured in parallel with that of calf muscle during exercise to determine (1) whether blood flow is restricted in peritendinous tissue during exercise......, and (2) whether blood flow is coupled to oxidative metabolism. 2. Seven individuals performed dynamic plantar flexion from 1 to 9 W. Radial artery and popliteal venous blood were sampled for O2, peritendinous blood flow was determined by 133Xe-washout, calf blood flow by plethysmography, cardiac output...

  16. Combined inhibition of nitric oxide and prostaglandins reduces human skeletal muscle blood flow during exercise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boushel, Robert Christopher; Langberg, Henning; Gemmer, Carsten

    2002-01-01

    The vascular endothelium is an important mediator of tissue vasodilatation, yet the role of the specific substances, nitric oxide (NO) and prostaglandins (PG), in mediating the large increases in muscle perfusion during exercise in humans is unclear. Quadriceps microvascular blood flow......, respectively (P exercise in humans. These findings demonstrate an important synergistic role of NO and PG for skeletal muscle vasodilatation and hyperaemia during muscular contraction....... was quantified by near infrared spectroscopy and indocyanine green in six healthy humans during dynamic knee extension exercise with and without combined pharmacological inhibition of NO synthase (NOS) and PG by L-NAME and indomethacin, respectively. Microdialysis was applied to determine interstitial release...

  17. Trunk muscle activity during different variations of the supine plank exercise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Calatayud, Joaquin; Casaña, Jose; Martín, Fernando

    2017-01-01

    Background Exercises providing neuromuscular challenges of the spinal muscles are desired for core stability, which is important for workers with heavy manual labour as well as people recovering from back pain. Purpose This study evaluated whether using a suspended modality increases trunk muscle...... voluntary isometric contraction (MVIC). Results No differences between exercises were found for UP ABS, LOW ABS and OBLIQ muscle activity. The unilateral suspended supine plank provided the highest LUMB activity (20% of MVIC) whiles the bilateral stable supine plank provided the lowest activity (11% of MVIC...

  18. Muscle Volume Increases Following 16 Weeks of Resistive Exercise Training with the Advanced Resistive Exercise Device (ARED) and Free Weights

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nash, R. E.; Loehr, J. A.; Lee, S. M. C.; English, K. L.; Evans, H.; Smith, S. A.; Hagan, R. D.

    2009-01-01

    Space flight-induced muscle atrophy, particularly in the postural and locomotorymuscles, may impair task performance during long-duration space missions and planetary exploration. High intensity free weight (FW) resistive exercise training has been shown to prevent atrophy during bed rest, a space flight analog. NASA developed the Advanced Resistive Exercise Device (ARED) to simulate the characteristics of FW exercise (i.e. constant mass, inertial force) and to be used as a countermeasure during International Space Station (ISS) missions. PURPOSE: To compare the efficacy of ARED and FW training to induce hypertrophy in specific muscle groups in ambulatory subjects prior to deploying ARED on the ISS. METHODS: Twenty untrained subjects were assigned to either the ARED (8 males, 3 females) or FW (6 males, 3 females) group and participated in a periodizedtraining protocol consisting of squat (SQ), heel raise (HR), and deadlift(DL) exercises 3 d wk-1 for 16 wks. SQ, HR, and DL muscle strength (1RM) was measured before, after 8 wks, and after 16 wks of training to prescribe exercise and measure strength changes. Muscle volume of the vastigroup (V), hamstring group (H), hip adductor group (ADD), medial gastrocnemius(MG), lateral gastrocnemius(LG), and deep posterior muscles including soleus(DP) was measured using MRI pre-and post-training. Consecutive cross-sectional images (8 mm slices with a 2 mm gap) were analyzed and summed. Anatomical references insured that the same muscle sections were analyzed pre-and post-training. Two-way repeated measures ANOVAs (ptraining devices. RESULTS: SQ, HR, and DL 1RM increased in both FW (SQ: 49+/-6%, HR: 12+/-2%, DL: 23+/-4%) and ARED (SQ: 31+/-4%, HR: 18+/-2%, DL: 23+/-3%) groups. Both groups increased muscle volume in the V (FW: 13+/-2%, ARED: 10+/-2%), H (FW: 3+/-1%, ARED: 3+/-1 %), ADD (FW: 15=/-2%, ARED: 10+/-1%), LG (FW: 7+/-2%, ARED: 4+/-1%), MG (FW: 7+/-2%, ARED: 5+/-2%), and DP (FW: 2+/-1%; ARED: 2+/-1%) after training. There

  19. Impact of dietary nitrate supplementation via beetroot juice on exercising muscle vascular control in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferguson, Scott K; Hirai, Daniel M; Copp, Steven W; Holdsworth, Clark T; Allen, Jason D; Jones, Andrew M; Musch, Timothy I; Poole, David C

    2013-01-15

    Dietary nitrate (NO(3)(-)) supplementation, via its reduction to nitrite (NO(2)(-)) and subsequent conversion to nitric oxide (NO) and other reactive nitrogen intermediates, reduces blood pressure and the O(2) cost of submaximal exercise in humans. Despite these observations, the effects of dietary NO(3)(-) supplementation on skeletal muscle vascular control during locomotory exercise remain unknown. We tested the hypotheses that dietary NO(3)(-) supplementation via beetroot juice (BR) would reduce mean arterial pressure (MAP) and increase hindlimb muscle blood flow in the exercising rat. Male Sprague-Dawley rats (3-6 months) were administered either NO(3)(-) (via beetroot juice; 1 mmol kg(-1) day(-1), BR n = 8) or untreated (control, n = 11) tap water for 5 days. MAP and hindlimb skeletal muscle blood flow and vascular conductance (radiolabelled microsphere infusions) were measured during submaximal treadmill running (20 m min(-1), 5% grade). BR resulted in significantly lower exercising MAP (control: 137 ± 3, BR: 127 ± 4 mmHg, P exercising hindlimb skeletal muscle blood flow (control: 108 ± 8, BR: 150 ± 11 ml min(-1) (100 g)(-1), P exercise predominantly in fast-twitch type II muscles, and provide a potential mechanism by which NO(3)(-) supplementation improves metabolic control.

  20. Treatment of dyslipidemia with statins and physical exercises: recent findings of skeletal muscle responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonfim, Mariana Rotta; Oliveira, Acary Souza Bulle; do Amaral, Sandra Lia; Monteiro, Henrique Luiz

    2015-04-01

    Statin treatment in association with physical exercise practice can substantially reduce cardiovascular mortality risk of dyslipidemic individuals, but this practice is associated with myopathic event exacerbation. This study aimed to present the most recent results of specific literature about the effects of statins and its association with physical exercise on skeletal musculature. Thus, a literature review was performed using PubMed and SciELO databases, through the combination of the keywords "statin" AND "exercise" AND "muscle", restricting the selection to original studies published between January 1990 and November 2013. Sixteen studies evaluating the effects of statins in association with acute or chronic exercises on skeletal muscle were analyzed. Study results indicate that athletes using statins can experience deleterious effects on skeletal muscle, as the exacerbation of skeletal muscle injuries are more frequent with intense training or acute eccentric and strenuous exercises. Moderate physical training, in turn, when associated to statins does not increase creatine kinase levels or pain reports, but improves muscle and metabolic functions as a consequence of training. Therefore, it is suggested that dyslipidemic patients undergoing statin treatment should be exposed to moderate aerobic training in combination to resistance exercises three times a week, and the provision of physical training prior to drug administration is desirable, whenever possible.

  1. Detection of titin fragments in urine in response to exercise-induced muscle damage.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazue Kanda

    Full Text Available Many studies have attempted to determine the associations between blood biomarkers and exercise-induced muscle damage. However, poor correlations between the changes in biomarker levels and the magnitude of muscle symptoms have been reported. Recent advances in proteomic tools offer a strategy for the comprehensive analysis of protein expression, which can be used to identify biomarkers. Here, we used a proteomic analysis to identify urinary proteins that appear in response to a calf-raise exercise, including repetitive eccentric muscle contractions, and found that a titin (also known as connectin N-terminal fragment molecule appears in the urine after eccentric exercise. We measured the titin fragment in urine samples from nine individuals before and after eccentric exercise using a newly-established enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and found that the titin fragment excretion rate increased 96 h after the exercise (5.1 to 77.6 pg/min, p <0.01. The changes in the titin fragment excretion rate were correlated strongly with blood markers of muscle damage and with muscle symptoms. These findings suggest that the urinary titin fragment is potentially a noninvasive biomarker of muscle damage.

  2. Effect of elastic-band exercise on muscle damage and inflammatory responses in Taekwondo athletes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keivan Gadruni

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Elastic bands offer variable elastic resistance (ER throughout a range of motion and their incorporation with exercise movements has been used for variable strength training and rehabilitation purposes. Objective: Investigate the effect of acute bout of progressive elastic-band exercise on muscle damage and inflammatory response in Taekwondo athletes (TKD compared with untrained ones.METHODS: Fourteen (TKD, n = 7 and untrained, n = 7 men performed 3 sets of progressive resistance elastic exercise. Blood samples were taken pre-exercise and also immediately and 24h post exercise. Delayed onset muscle soreness (DOMS, creatine kinase (CK and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH activity, total leukocyte counts, interleukin-6 and C-reactive protein (CRP were analyzed.RESULTS: Only DOMS increased in untrained group, but elevation of DOMS was observed in both groups (TKD and untrained at 24h after exercise (p<0.05. CK and LDH activity increased in both groups significantly. Also TKD group only showed CK increasing 24h post exercise (p<0.05. Total circulating leukocyte counts increased immediately in post exercise experiments and decreased in 24h ones in both groups (p<0.05. Serum IL-6 immediately increased in both groups and 24h post exercises but there was no significant difference between immediate and 24h post exercise experiments in TKD group. Furthermore, CRP just increased 24h after exercise in both groups (p<0.05.CONCLUSION: Progressive resistance elastic exercise induced muscle damage and inflammation in TKD athletes, but also had smaller changes in comparison with untrained group and other forms of exercise.

  3. Muscle and intensity based hamstring exercise classification in elite female track and field athletes: implications for exercise selection during rehabilitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsaklis P

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Panagiotis Tsaklis,1,2 Nikos Malliaropoulos,3–5,10 Jurdan Mendiguchia,6 Vasileios Korakakis,7–9 Kyriakos Tsapralis,11 Debasish Pyne,5 Peter Malliaras101Department of Physiotherapy, Laboratory of Biomechanics and Ergonomics, Alexander Technological Educational Institute of Thessaloniki, Thessaloniki, Greece; 2Department of Mechanical Engineering, Bioengineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA, USA; 3National Track and Field Centre, Sports Injury Clinic, Sports Medicine Clinic of SEGAS, 4Thessaloniki Sports Medicine Clinic, Thessaloniki, Greece; 5Rheumatology Department, Sports Medicine Clinic, Mile End Hospital, London, UK; 6Department of Physical Therapy, Zentrum Rehabilitation and Performance Center, Pamplona, Spain; 7Aspetar, Orthopaedic and Sports Medicine Hospital, Doha, Qatar; 8Faculty of Physical Education and Sport Science, University of Thessaly, Trikala, 9Hellenic Orthopaedic Manipulative Therapy Diploma, Athens, Greece; 10Centre for Sports and Exercise Medicine, Queen Mary, University of London, London, UK; 11K Tsapralis Isokinetic Medical Group, Bologna, ItalyBackground: Hamstring injuries are common in many sports, including track and field. Strains occur in different parts of the hamstring muscle but very little is known about whether common hamstring loading exercises specifically load different hamstring components. The purpose of this study was to investigate muscle activation of different components of the hamstring muscle during common hamstring loading exercises.Methods: Twenty elite female track and field athletes were recruited into this study, which had a single-sample, repeated-measures design. Each athlete performed ten hamstring loading exercises, and an electromyogram (EMG was recorded from the biceps femoris and semitendinosus components of the hamstring. Hamstring EMG during maximal voluntary isometric contraction (MVIC was used to normalize the mean data across ten repetitions of each

  4. Exercise training, but not resveratrol, improves metabolic and inflammatory status in skeletal muscle of aged men

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Jesper; Gliemann Hybholt, Lasse; Biensøe, Rasmus S

    2014-01-01

    Aim: To investigate the metabolic and anti-inflammatory effects of resveratrol alone and when combined with exercise training in skeletal muscle of aged human subjects. Material and Methods: Healthy physically inactive men (60-72 year old) were randomized into either 8 weeks of daily intake of 250...... mg resveratrol or placebo or into 8 weeks of high intensity exercise training with 250 mg resveratrol or placebo. Before and after the interventions, resting blood samples and muscle biopsies were obtained and a one-leg knee-extensor endurance exercise test (KEE) was performed. Results: Exercise...... with no significant additive or adverse effects of resveratrol on these parameters. Despite an overall ~25% reduction in total acetylation level in skeletal muscle with resveratrol, no exclusive resveratrol-mediated metabolic effects were observed on the investigated parameters. Notably however, resveratrol blunted...

  5. Muscle Contraction Induces Acute Hydroxymethylation of the Exercise-Responsive Gene Nr4a3

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pattamaprapanont, Pattarawan; Garde, Christian; Fabre, Odile

    2016-01-01

    stimulated over time is required to determine whether contraction-induced demethylation is preceded by changes in the hydroxymethylcytosine level. Here, we established an acute skeletal muscle contraction model to mimic the effects of acute exercise on gene expression. We used this model to investigate...... promoters. Exercise induces dynamic DNA demethylation at gene promoters; however, the contribution of the demethylation precursor hydroxymethylcytosine is unknown. Given the evanescent nature of hydroxymethylcytosine, a muscle contraction model that allows for the collection of samples that are repeatedly...... the effect of muscle contraction on DNA demethylation and hydroxymethylation. First, we performed an acute exercise study in healthy humans to identify an exercise-responsive gene that we could study in culture. We identified the nuclear receptor subfamily 4 group A member 3 (Nr4a3) gene with the highest...

  6. Impact of high intensity exercise on muscle morphology in EAE rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wens, I; Dalgas, U; Verboven, K

    2015-01-01

    paralysis (experiment 2, n=40), isokinetic foot extensor strength, cross sectional area (CSA) of tibialis anterior (TA), extensor digitorum longus (EDL) and soleus (SOL) and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) levels were assessed. EAE reduced muscle fiber CSA of TA, EDL and SOL. In general, exercise......The impact of high-intensity exercise on disease progression and muscle contractile properties in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) remains unclear. Control (CON) and EAE rats were divided into sedentary and exercise groups. Before onset (experiment 1, n=40) and after hindquarter...... was not able to affect CSA, whereas it delayed hindquarter paralysis peak. CON muscle work peaked and declined, while it remained stable in EAE. BDNF-responses were not affected by EAE or exercise. In conclusion, EAE affected CSA-properties of TA, EDL and SOL, which could, partly, explain the absence of peak...

  7. Predominant alpha2/beta2/gamma3 AMPK activation during exercise in human skeletal muscle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Birk, Jesper Bratz; Wojtaszewski, Jørgen

    2006-01-01

    -Thr-172 AMPK phosphorylation (r2 = 0.84, P important actor in exercise-regulated AMPK signalling in human skeletal muscle, probably mediating phosphorylation of ACCß.......5'AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is a key regulator of cellular metabolism and is regulated in muscle during exercise. We have previously established that only three of 12 possible AMPK a/ß/¿-heterotrimers are present in human skeletal muscle. Previous studies describe discrepancies between...... total AMPK activity and regulation of its target acetyl-CoA-carboxylase (ACC)ß. Also, exercise training decreases expression of the regulatory ¿3 AMPK subunit and attenuates a2 AMPK activity during exercise. We hypothesize that these observations reflect a differential regulation of the AMPK...

  8. Pharmacological targeting of exercise adaptations in skeletal muscle: Benefits and pitfalls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weihrauch, Martin; Handschin, Christoph

    2018-01-01

    Exercise exerts significant effects on the prevention and treatment of many diseases. However, even though some of the key regulators of training adaptation in skeletal muscle have been identified, this biological program is still poorly understood. Accordingly, exercise-based pharmacological interventions for many muscle wasting diseases and also for pathologies that are triggered by a sedentary lifestyle remain scarce. The most efficacious compounds that induce muscle hypertrophy or endurance are hampered by severe side effects and are classified as doping. In contrast, dietary supplements with a higher safety margin exert milder outcomes. In recent years, the design of pharmacological agents that activate the training program, so-called "exercise mimetics", has been proposed, although the feasibility of such an approach is highly debated. In this review, the most recent insights into key regulatory factors and therapeutic approaches aimed at leveraging exercise adaptations are discussed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Supplementation Strategies to Reduce Muscle Damage and Improve Recovery Following Exercise in Females: A Systematic Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica L. Köhne

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Exercise-induced muscle damage (EIMD caused by unaccustomed or strenuous exercise can result in reduced muscle force, increased muscle soreness, increased intramuscular proteins in the blood, and reduced performance. Pre- and post-exercise optimal nutritional intake is important to assist with muscle-damage repair and reconditioning to allow for an accelerated recovery. The increased demand for training and competing on consecutive days has led to a variety of intervention strategies being used to reduce the negative effects of EIMD. Nutritional intervention strategies are largely tested on male participants, and few report on sex-related differences relating to the effects of the interventions employed. This review focuses on nutritional intervention strategies employed to negate the effects of EIMD, focussing solely on females.

  10. EFFECTS OF PHYSICAL EXERCISES ON TRIACYLGLYCEROL LEVEL IN SKELETAL MUSCLES IN DIETARY-INDUCED OBESE RATS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Yu. Yakimovich

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The accumulation of triacylglycerol in peripheral tissues is one of mechanisms of insulin resistance. This paper presents the investigation of the influence of aerobic and anaerobic physical exercises on triacylglycerol level in skeletal muscles and on insulin resistance in dietary-induced obese rats. It is estimated that a high-energy (HE diet causes the accumulation of triacylglycerols in skeletal muscles that leads to high resistance to insulin. Aerobic and anaerobic physical exercises reduce the level of triacylglycerols in skeletal  muscles  and  raise  sensitivity to  insulin  in  obese  rats.  Physical  exercises  raise  the  level  of triacylglycerols in skeletal muscles in standard-diet rats that probably is the adaptation to high energy expenditure, but does not lead to high insulin resistance.

  11. Regulation of PDH in human arm and leg muscles at rest and during intense exercise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kiilerich, Kristian; Birk, Jesper Bratz; Damsgaard, Rasmus

    2008-01-01

    To test the hypothesis that pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH) is differentially regulated in specific human muscles, regulation of PDH was examined in triceps, deltoid, and vastus lateralis at rest and during intense exercise. To elicit considerable glycogen use, subjects performed 30 min of exhaustive...... arm cycling on two occasions and leg cycling exercise on a third day. Muscle biopsies were obtained from deltoid or triceps on the arm exercise days and from vastus lateralis on the leg cycling day. Resting PDH protein content and phosphorylation on PDH-E1 alpha sites 1 and 2 were higher (P ....05) in vastus lateralis than in triceps and deltoid as was the activity of oxidative enzymes. Net muscle glycogen utilization was similar in vastus lateralis and triceps ( approximately 50%) but less in deltoid (likely reflecting less recruitment of deltoid), while muscle lactate accumulation was approximately...

  12. Muscle protein degradation and amino acid metabolism during prolonged knee-extensor exercise in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Van Hall, Gerrit; Saltin, B; Wagenmakers, A J

    1999-01-01

    to a substantial increase in net muscle protein degradation, and that a lowering of the starting muscle glycogen content leads to a further increase. The carbon atoms of the branched-chain amino acids (BCAA), glutamate, aspartate and asparagine, liberated by protein degradation, and the BCAA and glutamate......The aim of this study was to investigate whether prolonged one-leg knee-extensor exercise enhances net protein degradation in muscle with a normal or low glycogen content. Net amino acid production, as a measure of net protein degradation, was estimated from leg exchange and from changes...... in the concentrations of amino acids that are not metabolized in skeletal muscle. Experiments were performed at rest and during one-leg knee-extensor exercise in six subjects having one leg with a normal glycogen content and the other with a low glycogen content. Exercise was performed for 90 min at a workload of 60...

  13. Leg blood flow is impaired during small muscle mass exercise in patients with COPD

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iepsen, Ulrik Winning; Munch, Gregers Druedal Wibe; Rugbjerg, Mette

    2017-01-01

    to both endothelium-independent (SNP) and endothelium-dependent (ACh) stimulation. The results suggests that leg muscle blood flow is impaired during small muscle mass exercise in patients with COPD possibly due to impaired formation of prostacyclin and increased levels of endothelin-1.......Skeletal muscle blood flow is regulated to match the oxygen demand and dysregulation could contribute to exercise intolerance in patients with COPD. We measured leg hemodynamics and metabolites from vasoactive compounds in muscle interstitial fluid and plasma at rest, during one-legged knee...... the formation of interstitial prostacyclin (vasodilator) was only increased in the controls. There was no difference between groups in the nitrite/nitrate levels (vasodilator) in plasma or interstitial fluid during exercise. Moreover, patients and controls showed similar vasodilatory capacity in response...

  14. Eccentric exercise training as a countermeasure to non-weight-bearing soleus muscle atrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirby, Christopher R.; Ryan, Mirelle J.; Booth, Frank W.

    1992-01-01

    This investigation tested whether eccentric resistance training could prevent soleus muscle atrophy during non-weight bearing. Adult female rats were randomly assigned to either weight bearing +/- intramuscular electrodes or non-weight bearing +/- intramuscular electrodes groups. Electrically stimulated maximal eccentric contractions were performed on anesthetized animals at 48-h intervals during the 10-day experiment. Non-weight bearing significantly reduced soleus muscle wet weight (28-31 percent) and noncollagenous protein content (30-31 percent) compared with controls. Eccentric exercise training during non-weight bearing attenuated but did not prevent the loss of soleus muscle wet weight and noncollagenous protein by 77 and 44 percent, respectively. The potential of eccentric exercise training as an effective and highly efficient counter-measure to non-weight-bearing atrophy is demonstrated in the 44 percent attenuation of soleus muscle noncollagenous protein loss by eccentric exercise during only 0.035 percent of the total non-weight-bearing time period.

  15. Ginseng administration protects skeletal muscle from oxidative stress induced by acute exercise in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voces, J; Cabral de Oliveira, A C; Prieto, J G; Vila, L; Perez, A C; Duarte, I D G; Alvarez, A I

    2004-12-01

    Enzymatic activity was analyzed in the soleus, gastrocnemius (red and white) and plantaris muscles of acutely exercised rats after long-term administration of Panax ginseng extract in order to evaluate the protective role of ginseng against skeletal muscle oxidation. Ginseng extract (3, 10, 100, or 500 mg/kg) was administered orally for three months to male Wistar rats weighing 200 +/- 50 g before exercise and to non-exercised rats (N = 8/group). The results showed a membrane stabilizing capacity of the extract since mitochondrial function measured on the basis of citrate synthase and 3-hydroxyacyl-CoA dehydrogenase activities was reduced, on average, by 20% (P < 0.05) after exercise but the activities remained unchanged in animals treated with a ginseng dose of 100 mg/kg. Glutathione status did not show significant changes after exercise or treatment. Lipid peroxidation, measured on the basis of malondialdehyde levels, was significantly higher in all muscles after exercise, and again was reduced by about 74% (P < 0.05) by the use of ginseng extract. The administration of ginseng extract was able to protect muscle from exercise-induced oxidative stress irrespective of fiber type.

  16. Ginseng administration protects skeletal muscle from oxidative stress induced by acute exercise in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Voces

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Enzymatic activity was analyzed in the soleus, gastrocnemius (red and white and plantaris muscles of acutely exercised rats after long-term administration of Panax ginseng extract in order to evaluate the protective role of ginseng against skeletal muscle oxidation. Ginseng extract (3, 10, 100, or 500 mg/kg was administered orally for three months to male Wistar rats weighing 200 ± 50 g before exercise and to non-exercised rats (N = 8/group. The results showed a membrane stabilizing capacity of the extract since mitochondrial function measured on the basis of citrate synthase and 3-hydroxyacyl-CoA dehydrogenase activities was reduced, on average, by 20% (P < 0.05 after exercise but the activities remained unchanged in animals treated with a ginseng dose of 100 mg/kg. Glutathione status did not show significant changes after exercise or treatment. Lipid peroxidation, measured on the basis of malondialdehyde levels, was significantly higher in all muscles after exercise, and again was reduced by about 74% (P < 0.05 by the use of ginseng extract. The administration of ginseng extract was able to protect muscle from exercise-induced oxidative stress irrespective of fiber type.

  17. Effects of respiratory alkalosis on human skeletal muscle metabolism at the onset of submaximal exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LeBlanc, P J; Parolin, M L; Jones, N L; Heigenhauser, G J F

    2002-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of respiratory alkalosis on human skeletal muscle metabolism at rest and during submaximal exercise. Subjects exercised on two occasions for 15 min at 55 % of their maximal oxygen uptake while either hyperventilating (R-Alk) or breathing normally (Con). Muscle biopsies were taken at rest and after 1 and 15 min of exercise. At rest, no effects on muscle metabolism were observed in response to R-Alk. In the first minute of exercise, there was a delayed activation of pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH) in R-Alk compared with Con, resulting in a reduced rate of pyruvate oxidation. Also, glycogenolysis was higher in R-Alk compared with Con, which was attributed to a higher availability of the monoprotonated form of inorganic phosphate (P(i)), resulting in an elevated rate of pyruvate production. The mismatch between pyruvate production and its oxidation resulted in net lactate accumulation. These effects were not seen after 15 min of exercise, with no further differences in muscle metabolism between conditions. The results from the present study suggest that respiratory alkalosis may play an important role in lactate accumulation during the transition from rest to exercise in acute hypoxic conditions, but that other factors mediate lactate accumulation during steady-state exercise.

  18. Nitrosative stress in human skeletal muscle attenuated by exercise countermeasure after chronic disuse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salanova, Michele; Schiffl, Gudrun; Gutsmann, Martina; Felsenberg, Dieter; Furlan, Sandra; Volpe, Pompeo; Clarke, Andrew; Blottner, Dieter

    2013-01-01

    Activity-induced nitric oxide (NO) imbalance and "nitrosative stress" are proposed mechanisms of disrupted Ca(2+) homeostasis in atrophic skeletal muscle. We thus mapped S-nitrosylated (SNO) functional muscle proteins in healthy male subjects in a long-term bed rest study (BBR2-2 Study) without and with exercise as countermeasure in order to assess (i) the negative effects of chronic muscle disuse by nitrosative stress, (ii) to test for possible attenuation by exercise countermeasure in bed rest and (iii) to identify new NO target proteins. Muscle biopsies from calf soleus and hip vastus lateralis were harvested at start (Pre) and at end (End) from a bed rest disuse control group (CTR, n=9) and two bed rest resistive exercise groups either without (RE, n=7) or with superimposed vibration stimuli (RVE, n=7). At subcellular compartments, strong anti-SNO-Cys immunofluorescence patterns in control muscle fibers after bed rest returned to baseline following vibration exercise. Total SNO-protein levels, Nrf-2 gene expression and nucleocytoplasmic shuttling were changed to varying degrees in all groups. Excess SNO-protein levels of specific calcium release/uptake proteins (SNO-RyR1, -SERCA1 and -PMCA) and of contractile myosin heavy chains seen in biopsy samples of chronically disused skeletal muscle were largely reduced by vibration exercise. We also identified NOS1 as a novel NO target in human skeletal muscle controlled by activity driven auto-nitrosylation mechanisms. Our findings suggest that aberrant levels of functional SNO-proteins represent signatures of uncontrolled nitrosative stress management in disused human skeletal muscle that can be offset by exercise as countermeasure.

  19. Nitrosative stress in human skeletal muscle attenuated by exercise countermeasure after chronic disuse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michele Salanova

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Activity-induced nitric oxide (NO imbalance and “nitrosative stress” are proposed mechanisms of disrupted Ca2+ homeostasis in atrophic skeletal muscle. We thus mapped S-nitrosylated (SNO functional muscle proteins in healthy male subjects in a long-term bed rest study (BBR2-2 Study without and with exercise as countermeasure in order to assess (i the negative effects of chronic muscle disuse by nitrosative stress, (ii to test for possible attenuation by exercise countermeasure in bed rest and (iii to identify new NO target proteins. Muscle biopsies from calf soleus and hip vastus lateralis were harvested at start (Pre and at end (End from a bed rest disuse control group (CTR, n=9 and two bed rest resistive exercise groups either without (RE, n=7 or with superimposed vibration stimuli (RVE, n=7. At subcellular compartments, strong anti-SNO-Cys immunofluorescence patterns in control muscle fibers after bed rest returned to baseline following vibration exercise. Total SNO-protein levels, Nrf-2 gene expression and nucleocytoplasmic shuttling were changed to varying degrees in all groups. Excess SNO-protein levels of specific calcium release/uptake proteins (SNO-RyR1, –SERCA1 and –PMCA and of contractile myosin heavy chains seen in biopsy samples of chronically disused skeletal muscle were largely reduced by vibration exercise. We also identified NOS1 as a novel NO target in human skeletal muscle controlled by activity driven auto-nitrosylation mechanisms. Our findings suggest that aberrant levels of functional SNO-proteins represent signatures of uncontrolled nitrosative stress management in disused human skeletal muscle that can be offset by exercise as countermeasure.

  20. Vitamin D2 Supplementation Amplifies Eccentric Exercise-Induced Muscle Damage in NASCAR Pit Crew Athletes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David C. Nieman

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available This study determined if 6-weeks vitamin D2 supplementation (vitD2, 3800 IU/day had an influence on muscle function, eccentric exercise-induced muscle damage (EIMD, and delayed onset of muscle soreness (DOMS in National Association for Stock Car Auto Racing (NASCAR NASCAR pit crew athletes. Subjects were randomized to vitD2 (n = 13 and placebo (n = 15, and ingested supplements (double-blind for six weeks. Blood samples were collected and muscle function tests conducted pre- and post-study (leg-back and hand grip dynamometer strength tests, body weight bench press to exhaustion, vertical jump, 30-s Wingate test. Post-study, subjects engaged in 90 min eccentric-based exercise, with blood samples and DOMS ratings obtained immediately after and 1- and 2-days post-exercise. Six weeks vitD2 increased serum 25(OHD2 456% and decreased 25(OHD3 21% versus placebo (p < 0.001, p = 0.036, respectively, with no influence on muscle function test scores. The post-study eccentric exercise bout induced EIMD and DOMS, with higher muscle damage biomarkers measured in vitD2 compared to placebo (myoglobin 252%, 122% increase, respectively, p = 0.001; creatine phosphokinase 24 h post-exercise, 169%, 32%, p < 0.001, with no differences for DOMS. In summary, 6-weeks vitD2 (3800 IU/day significantly increased 25(OHD2 and decreased 25(OHD3, had no effect on muscle function tests, and amplified muscle damage markers in NASCAR pit crew athletes following eccentric exercise.

  1. Pelvic floor muscle training for prevention and treatment of urinary and faecal incontinence in antenatal and postnatal women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyle, Rhianon; Hay-Smith, E Jean C; Cody, June D; Mørkved, Siv

    2012-10-17

    About a third of women have urinary incontinence and up to a 10th have faecal incontinence after childbirth. Pelvic floor muscle training is commonly recommended during pregnancy and after birth both for prevention and the treatment of incontinence. To determine the effect of pelvic floor muscle training compared to usual antenatal and postnatal care on incontinence. We searched the Cochrane Incontinence Group Specialised Register, which includes searches of CENTRAL, MEDLINE, MEDLINE in Process and handsearching (searched 7 February 2012) and the references of relevant articles. Randomised or quasi-randomised trials in pregnant or postnatal women. One arm of the trial needed to include pelvic floor muscle training (PFMT). Another arm was either no PFMT or usual antenatal or postnatal care. Trials were independently assessed for eligibility and methodological quality. Data were extracted then cross checked. Disagreements were resolved by discussion. Data were processed as described in the Cochrane Handbook for Systematic Reviews of Interventions. Three different populations of women were considered separately, women dry at randomisation (prevention); women wet at randomisation (treatment); and a mixed population of women who might be one or the other (prevention or treatment). Trials were further divided into those which started during pregnancy (antenatal); and those started after delivery (postnatal). Twenty-two trials involving 8485 women (4231 PFMT, 4254 controls) met the inclusion criteria and contributed to the analysis.Pregnant women without prior urinary incontinence (prevention) who were randomised to intensive antenatal PFMT were less likely than women randomised to no PFMT or usual antenatal care to report urinary incontinence up to six months after delivery (about 30% less; risk ratio (RR) 0.71, 95% CI 0.54 to 0.95, combined result of 5 trials).Postnatal women with persistent urinary incontinence (treatment) three months after delivery and who received

  2. Prior acetaminophen consumption impacts the early adaptive cellular response of human skeletal muscle to resistance exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Lugos, Andrew C; Patel, Shivam H; Ormsby, Jordan C; Curtis, Donald P; Fry, Christopher S; Carroll, Chad C; Dickinson, Jared M

    2018-04-01

    Resistance exercise (RE) is a powerful stimulus for skeletal muscle adaptation. Previous data demonstrate that cyclooxygenase (COX)-inhibiting drugs alter the cellular mechanisms regulating the adaptive response of skeletal muscle. The purpose of this study was to determine whether prior consumption of the COX inhibitor acetaminophen (APAP) alters the immediate adaptive cellular response in human skeletal muscle after RE. In a double-blinded, randomized, crossover design, healthy young men ( n = 8, 25 ± 1 yr) performed two trials of unilateral knee extension RE (8 sets, 10 reps, 65% max strength). Subjects ingested either APAP (1,000 mg/6 h) or placebo (PLA) for 24 h before RE (final dose consumed immediately after RE). Muscle biopsies (vastus lateralis) were collected at rest and 1 h and 3 h after exercise. Mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) complex 1 signaling was assessed through immunoblot and immunohistochemistry, and mRNA expression of myogenic genes was examined via RT-qPCR. At 1 h p-rpS6 Ser240/244 was increased in both groups but to a greater extent in PLA. At 3 h p-S6K1 Thr389 was elevated only in PLA. Furthermore, localization of mTOR to the lysosome (LAMP2) in myosin heavy chain (MHC) II fibers increased 3 h after exercise only in PLA. mTOR-LAMP2 colocalization in MHC I fibers was greater in PLA vs. APAP 1 h after exercise. Myostatin mRNA expression was reduced 1 h after exercise only in PLA. MYF6 mRNA expression was increased 1 h and 3 h after exercise only in APAP. APAP consumption appears to alter the early adaptive cellular response of skeletal muscle to RE. These findings further highlight the mechanisms through which COX-inhibiting drugs impact the adaptive response of skeletal muscle to exercise. NEW & NOTEWORTHY The extent to which the cellular reaction to acetaminophen impacts the mechanisms regulating the adaptive response of human skeletal muscle to resistance exercise is not well understood. Consumption of acetaminophen before

  3. The Evaluation of Bioelectrical Activity of Pelvic Floor Muscles Depending on Probe Location: A Pilot Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomasz Halski

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. The main objective was to determine how the depth of probe placement affects functional and resting bioelectrical activity of the PFM and whether the recorded signal might be dependent on the direction in which the probe is rotated. Participants. The study comprised of healthy, nulliparous women between the ages of 21 and 25. Outcome Measures. Bioelectric activity of the PFM was recorded from four locations of the vagina by surface EMG and vaginal probe. Results. There were no statistically significant differences between the results during functional sEMG activity. During resting sEMG activity, the highest bioelectrical activity of the PFM was observed in the L1 and the lowest in the L4 and a statistically significant difference between the highest and the lowest results of resting sEMG activity was observed (P=0.0043. Conclusion. Different electrodes placement during functional contraction of PFM does not affect the obtained results in sEMG evaluation. In order to diagnose the highest resting activity of PFM the recording plates should be placed toward the anterior vaginal wall and distally from the introitus. However, all of the PFM have similar bioelectrical activity and it seems that these muscles could be treated as a single muscle.

  4. Neuromuscular blockade of slow twitch muscle fibres elevates muscle oxygen uptake and energy turnover during submaximal exercise in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krustrup, Peter; Secher, Niels; Relu, Mihai U.

    2008-01-01

    We tested the hypothesis that a greater activation of fast-twitch (FT) fibres during dynamic exercise leads to a higher muscle oxygen uptake (VO2 ) and energy turnover as well as a slower muscle on-kinetics. Subjects performed one-legged knee-extensor exercise for 10 min at an intensity of 30 W...... without (CON) and with (CUR) arterial injections of the non-depolarizing neuromuscular blocking agent cisatracurium. In CUR, creatine phosphate (CP) was unaltered in slow twitch (ST) fibres and decreased (P fibres, whereas in CON, CP decreased (P ... at a contraction frequency of 1 Hz, and that the muscle VO2 kinetics is slowed by FT fibre activation....

  5. Skeletal muscle water T2 as a biomarker of disease status and exercise effects in patients with Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mankodi, Ami; Azzabou, Noura; Bulea, Thomas; Reyngoudt, Harmen; Shimellis, Hirity; Ren, Yupeng; Kim, Eunhee; Fischbeck, Kenneth H; Carlier, Pierre G

    2017-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine exercise effects on muscle water T 2 in patients with Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). In 12 DMD subjects and 19 controls, lower leg muscle fat (%) was measured by Dixon and muscle water T 2 and R 2 (1/T 2 ) by the tri-exponential model. Muscle water R 2 was measured again at 3 hours after an ankle dorsiflexion exercise. The muscle fat fraction was higher in DMD participants than in controls (p muscle. Muscle water T 2 was measured independent of the degree of fatty degeneration in DMD muscle. At baseline, muscle water T 2 was higher in all but the extensor digitorum longus muscles of DMD participants than controls (p muscle torque (p muscle water R 2 decreased (T 2 increased) after exercise from baseline in DMD subjects and controls with greater changes in the target muscles of the exercise than in ankle plantarflexor muscles. Skeletal muscle water T 2 is a sensitive biomarker of the disease status in DMD and of the exercise response in DMD patients and controls. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  6. Inefficient skeletal muscle oxidative function flanks impaired motor neuron recruitment in Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis during exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanfranconi, F; Ferri, A; Corna, G; Bonazzi, R; Lunetta, C; Silani, V; Riva, N; Rigamonti, A; Maggiani, A; Ferrarese, C; Tremolizzo, L

    2017-06-07

    This study aimed to evaluate muscle oxidative function during exercise in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis patients (pALS) with non-invasive methods in order to assess if determinants of reduced exercise tolerance might match ALS clinical heterogeneity. 17 pALS, who were followed for 4 months, were compared with 13 healthy controls (CTRL). Exercise tolerance was assessed by an incremental exercise test on cycle ergometer measuring peak O 2 uptake ([Formula: see text]O 2peak ), vastus lateralis oxidative function by near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) and breathing pattern ([Formula: see text]E peak ). pALS displayed: (1) 44% lower [Formula: see text]O 2peak vs. CTRL (p motor units recruitment, is a major determinant of pALS clinical heterogeneity and working capacity exercise tolerance. CPET and NIRS are useful tools for detecting early stages of oxidative deficiency in skeletal muscles, disclosing individual impairments in the O 2 transport and utilization chain.

  7. Liver and Muscle Contribute Differently to the Plasma Acylcarnitine Pool During Fasting and Exercise in Humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xu, G.; Hansen, J S; Zhao, Jian-xin

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Plasma acylcarnitine levels are elevated by physiological conditions such as fasting and exercise but also in states of insulin resistance and obesity. AIM: To elucidate the contribution of liver and skeletal muscle to plasma acylcarnitines in the fasting state and during exercise...... in humans. METHODS: In 2 independent studies, young healthy males were fasted overnight and performed an acute bout of exercise to investigate either acylcarnitines in skeletal muscle biopsies and arterial-to-venous plasma differences over the exercising and resting leg (n = 9) or the flux over the hepato......-splanchnic bed (n = 10). RESULTS: In the fasting state, a pronounced release of C2- and C3-carnitines from the hepato-splanchnic bed and an uptake of free carnitine by the legs were detected. Exercise further increased the release of C3-carnitine from the hepato-splanchnic bed and the uptake of free carnitine...

  8. Glycogen synthesis in liver and skeletal muscle after exercise: participation of the gluconeogenic pathway

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, J.L.

    1986-01-01

    Hepatic glycogenesis occurs by both the uptake of plasma glucose (direct pathway) as well as from gluconeogenesis (indirect pathway). In vitro studies suggest that skeletal muscle can also synthesize glycogen from lactate. The purpose of the present studies was to assess the contribution of the indirect pathway to liver and muscle glycogen synthesis after exercise with various substrata infusions. The authors hypothesis was the contribution of the indirect pathway of hepatic glycogenesis would increase after exercise. To this end, fasted rats were depleted of glycogen by exhaustive exercise; a second group of fasted rats remained rested. Both groups were then infused intravenously with glucose containing tracer quantities of [6- 3 H] and [U- 14 C] glucose for 4 hrs. The ensuing hyperglycemic response was exaggerated in post-exercised rats; whereas, plasma lactate levels were lower than those of nonexercised rats. The percent of hepatic glycogen synthesized from gluconeogenic precursors did not differ between exercised (39%) and nonexercised (36%) rats

  9. Coronary and muscle blood flow during physical exercise in humans; heterogenic alliance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zoladz, Jerzy A; Majerczak, Joanna; Duda, Krzysztof; Chlopicki, Stefan

    2015-08-01

    In this review, we present the relation between power generation capabilities and pulmonary oxygen uptake during incremental cycling exercise in humans and the effect of exercise intensity on the oxygen cost of work. We also discuss the importance of oxygen delivery to the working muscles as a factor determining maximal oxygen uptake in humans. Subsequently, we outline the importance of coronary blood flow, myocardial oxygen uptake and myocardial metabolic stability for exercise tolerance. Finally, we describe mechanisms of endothelium-dependent regulation of coronary and skeletal muscle blood flow, dysregulation of which may impair exercise capacity and increase the cardiovascular risk of exercise. Copyright © 2015 Institute of Pharmacology, Polish Academy of Sciences. All rights reserved.

  10. Effect of vibration during fatiguing resistance exercise on subsequent muscle activity during maximal voluntary isometric contractions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McBride, Jeffrey M; Porcari, John P; Scheunke, Mark D

    2004-11-01

    This investigation was designed to determine if vibration during fatiguing resistance exercise would alter associated patterns of muscle activity. A cross-over design was employed with 8 subjects completing a resistance exercise bout once with a vibrating dumbbell (V) (44 Hz, 3 mm displacement) and once without vibration (NV). For both exercise bouts, 10 sets were performed with a load that induced concentric muscle failure during the 10th repetition. The appropriate load for each set was determined during a pretest. Each testing session was separated by 1 week. Electromyography (EMG) was obtained from the biceps brachii muscle at 12 different time points during a maximum voluntary contraction (MVC) at a 170 degrees elbow angle after each set of the dumbbell exercise. The time points were as follows: pre (5 minutes before the resistance exercise bout), T1-T10 (immediately following each set of resistance exercise), and post (15 minutes after the resistance exercise bout). EMG was analyzed for median power frequency (MPF) and maximum (mEMG). NV resulted in a significant decrease in MPF at T1-T4 (p recruitment of high threshold motor units during fatiguing contractions. This may indicate the usage of vibration with resistance exercise as an effective tool for strength training athletes.

  11. Does intermittent pneumatic leg compression enhance muscle recovery after strenuous eccentric exercise?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cochrane, D J; Booker, H R; Mundel, T; Barnes, M J

    2013-11-01

    Intermittent pneumatic compression (IPC) has gained rapid popularity as a post-exercise recovery modality. Despite its widespread use and anecdotal claims for enhancing muscle recovery there is no scientific evidence to support its use. 10 healthy, active males performed a strenuous bout of eccentric exercise (3 sets of 100 repetitions) followed by IPC treatment or control performed immediately after exercise and at 24 and 48 h post-exercise. Muscular performance measurements were taken prior to exercise and 24, 48 and 72 h post-exercise and included single-leg vertical jump (VJ) and peak and average isometric [knee angle 75º] (ISO), concentric (CON) and eccentric (ECC) contractions performed at slow (30° · s⁻¹) and fast (180° · s⁻¹) velocities. Plasma creatine kinase (CK) samples were taken at pre- and post-exercise 24, 48 and 72 h. Strenuous eccentric exercise resulted in a significant decrease in peak ISO, peak and average CON (30° · s⁻¹) at 24 h compared to pre-exercise for both IPC and control, however VJ performance remained unchanged. There were no significant differences between conditions (IPC and control) or condition-time interactions for any of the contraction types (ISO, CON, ECC) or velocities (CON, ECC 30° · s⁻¹ and 180° · s⁻¹). However, CK was significantly elevated at 24 h compared to pre-exercise in both conditions (IPC and control). IPC did not attenuate muscle force loss following a bout of strenuous eccentric exercise in comparison to a control. While IPC has been used in the clinical setting to treat pathologic conditions, the parameters used to treat muscle damage following strenuous exercise in healthy participants are likely to be very different than those used to treat pathologic conditions. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  12. Human skeletal muscle fatty acid and glycerol metabolism during rest, exercise and recovery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Van Hall, Gerrit; Sacchetti, M; Rådegran, G

    2002-01-01

    glycerol uptake was observed, which was substantially higher during exercise. Total body skeletal muscle FA and glycerol uptake/release was estimated to account for 18-25 % of whole body R(d) or R(a). In conclusion: (1) skeletal muscle FA and glycerol metabolism, using the leg arterial-venous difference......This study was conducted to investigate skeletal muscle fatty acid (FA) and glycerol kinetics and to determine the contribution of skeletal muscle to whole body FA and glycerol turnover during rest, 2 h of one-leg knee-extensor exercise at 65 % of maximal leg power output, and 3 h of recovery....... To this aim, the leg femoral arterial-venous difference technique was used in combination with a continuous infusion of [U-(13)C]palmitate and [(2)H(5)]glycerol in five post-absorptive healthy volunteers (22 +/- 3 years). The influence of contamination from non-skeletal muscle tissues, skin and subcutaneous...

  13. Novel, high incidence exercise-induced muscle bleeding model in hemophilia B mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tranholm, M.; Kristensen, Annemarie Thuri; Broberg, M. L.

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Muscle hematomas are the second most common complication of hemophilia and insufficient treatment may result in serious and even life-threatening complications. Hemophilic dogs and rats do experience spontaneous muscle bleeding, but currently, no experimental animal model is available...... specifically investigating spontaneous muscle bleeds in a hemophilic setting. AIM: The objective of this study was to develop a model of spontaneous muscle bleeds in hemophilia B mice. We hypothesized that treadmill exercise would induce muscle bleeds in hemophilia B mice but not in normal non-hemophilic mice...... and that treatment with recombinant factor IX (rFIX) before treadmill exercise could prevent the occurrence of pathology. METHODS: A total of 203 mice (123 F9-KO and 80 C57BL/6NTac) were included in three separate studies: (i) the model implementation study investigating the bleeding pattern in hemophilia B mice...

  14. Effects of respiratory muscle work on respiratory and locomotor blood flow during exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dominelli, Paolo B; Archiza, Bruno; Ramsook, Andrew H; Mitchell, Reid A; Peters, Carli M; Molgat-Seon, Yannick; Henderson, William R; Koehle, Michael S; Boushel, Robert; Sheel, A William

    2017-11-01

    What is the central question of this study? Does manipulation of the work of breathing during high-intensity exercise alter respiratory and locomotor muscle blood flow? What is the main finding and its importance? We found that when the work of breathing was reduced during exercise, respiratory muscle blood flow decreased, while locomotor muscle blood flow increased. Conversely, when the work of breathing was increased, respiratory muscle blood flow increased, while locomotor muscle blood flow decreased. Our findings support the theory of a competitive relationship between locomotor and respiratory muscles during intense