WorldWideScience

Sample records for floor microbial biomass

  1. Conditioning biomass for microbial growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodie, Elizabeth A; England, George

    2015-03-31

    The present invention relates to methods for improving the yield of microbial processes that use lignocellulose biomass as a nutrient source. The methods comprise conditioning a composition comprising lignocellulose biomass with an enzyme composition that comprises a phenol oxidizing enzyme. The conditioned composition can support a higher rate of growth of microorganisms in a process. In one embodiment, a laccase composition is used to condition lignocellulose biomass derived from non-woody plants, such as corn and sugar cane. The invention also encompasses methods for culturing microorganisms that are sensitive to inhibitory compounds in lignocellulose biomass. The invention further provides methods of making a product by culturing the production microorganisms in conditioned lignocellulose biomass.

  2. Conditioning biomass for microbial growth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bodie, Elizabeth A; England, George

    2015-03-31

    The present invention relates to methods for improving the yield of microbial processes that use lignocellulose biomass as a nutrient source. The methods comprise conditioning a composition comprising lignocellulose biomass with an enzyme composition that comprises a phenol oxidizing enzyme. The conditioned composition can support a higher rate of growth of microorganisms in a process. In one embodiment, a laccase composition is used to condition lignocellulose biomass derived from non-woody plants, such as corn and sugar cane. The invention also encompasses methods for culturing microorganisms that are sensitive to inhibitory compounds in lignocellulose biomass. The invention further provides methods of making a product by culturing the production microorganisms in conditioned lignocellulose biomass.

  3. Biomass and microbial activity in a biofilter during backwashing*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Yu; Zhang, Jie; Li, Yi-fan; Gao, Yu-nan; Li, Yong

    2005-01-01

    Biomass and microbial activity in backwashing processes of a biofilter for tertiary treatment were investigated. The microbial groups revealed new distribution along the biofilter depth after low flow rate backwashing for a short time. Then the start-up process was accelerated by backwashing. The biomass profile and microbial activity profile both varying with depth before and after backwashing, can be mathematically described by quadratic equations. Using the profiles, the difference of oxygen demand can be calculated to determine the airflow rate during backwashing. Combined with the difference between biofilters and rapid gravity filters, analysis of biomass and microbial activity can determine more accurately the required airflow rate during backwashing. PMID:15822159

  4. Biomass and microbial activity in a biofilter during backwashing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    BAI Yu; ZHANG Jie; LI Yi-fan; GAO Yu-nan; LI Yong

    2005-01-01

    Biomass and microbial activity in backwashing processes of a biofilter for tertiary treatment were investigated. The microbial groups revealed new distribution along the biofilter depth after low flow rate backwashing for a short time. Then the start-up process was accelerated by backwashing. The biomass profile and microbial activity profile both varying with depth before and after backwashing, can be mathematically described by quadratic equations. Using the profiles, the difference of oxygen demand can be calculated to determine the airflow rate during backwashing. Combined with the difference between biofilters and rapid gravity filters, analysis of biomass and microbial activity can determine more accurately the required airflow rate during backwashing.

  5. Priming and turnover of soil microbial biomass C and N

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voroney, Paul; Paul, Eldor

    2015-04-01

    Priming is the altered rate of mineralization of native soil organic matter (SOM) induced by an organic substrate and, depending on the nature of the amendment, can be either positive or negative. Coupled with the use of tracer (14C, 13C, 15N) techniques, measurements of the rates of CO2 evolution and organic N mineralization are typically used to assess priming effects. In this study priming was also assessed from measurements of soil microbial biomass. Soil was amended with 14C-glucose and 15N-nitrate and incubated for 42 d during which unlabelled and labelled microbial biomass C and N were measured using the chloroform-incubation method. All of the 14C-glucose was metabolized within 24-30 h at a C-use efficiency of ~60%, and resulted in a labelled biomass C:N of 9. After this period of rapid microbial growth, labelled microbial biomass C decayed at a rate of 19.3 x 10-3 d-1. Unlabelled microbial biomass C in the amended treatment decayed at 8.6 x 10-3 d-1 whereas in the unamended soil microbial biomass C decayed at half this rate (4.9 x 10-3 d-1). These data suggest that ~25% of the native microbial biomass C responded to the addition of glucose-C and when it was depleted the newly formed microbial biomass, comprised of both labelled and unlabelled- C, collapsed and subsequently was mineralized. The period of rapid microbial biomass decay coincided with an increased evolution of soil (unlabelled) CO2 and accumulation of (unlabelled) mineral N compared to that in the unamended soil. Thus, the apparent priming of soil C and N following addition of glucose can be attributed to biological recycling and increased turnover of native microbial biomass C and N. There was no evidence of priming of native soil organic matter during the first 21 days of the incubation.

  6. Impact of Alkaline Dust Pollution on Soil Microbial Biomass Carbon

    OpenAIRE

    Kara, Ömer; Bolat, İlyas

    2007-01-01

    The effect of alkaline dust pollution emitted from Bartın cement plant on the soil microbial biomass carbon was investigated using the chloroform fumigation-extraction (CFE) method. Microbial biomass C (Cmic) values ranged from 157.82 to 1201.51 µg g-1 soils in the polluted area and from 726.70 to 1529.14 µg g-1 soils in the control area. Soils polluted with alkaline cement dust resulted in significant reductions in Cmic levels compared to control soils. Microbial biomass C correlated negativ...

  7. Impact of Alkaline Dust Pollution on Soil Microbial Biomass Carbon

    OpenAIRE

    KARA, Ömer; Bolat, İlyas

    2014-01-01

    The effect of alkaline dust pollution emitted from Bartın cement plant on the soil microbial biomass carbon was investigated using the chloroform fumigation-extraction (CFE) method. Microbial biomass C (Cmic) values ranged from 157.82 to 1201.51 µg g-1 soils in the polluted area and from 726.70 to 1529.14 µg g-1 soils in the control area. Soils polluted with alkaline cement dust resulted in significant reductions in Cmic levels compared to control soils. Microbial biomass C correlated negativ...

  8. Nitrogen Additions and Microbial Biomass: A Global Meta-analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Treseder, K. K.

    2008-12-01

    Nitrogen (N) enrichment is an element of global change that could influence the growth and abundance of many organisms. In this meta-analysis, I synthesized responses of microbial biomass to N additions in 82 published field studies. I hypothesized that the biomass of fungi, bacteria, or the microbial community as a whole would be altered under N additions. I also predicted that changes in biomass would parallel changes in soil CO2 emissions. Microbial biomass declined 15% on average under N fertilization, but fungi and bacteria were not significantly altered in studies that examined each group separately. Moreover, declines in abundance of microbes and fungi were more evident in studies of longer durations and with higher total amounts of N added. In addition, responses of microbial biomass to N fertilization were significantly correlated with responses of soil CO2 emissions. There were no significant effects of biomes, fertilizer types, ambient N deposition rates, or methods of measuring biomass. Altogether, these results suggest that N enrichment could reduce microbial biomass in many ecosystems, with corresponding declines in soil CO2 emissions.

  9. Impact of pH on Microbial Biomass Carbon and Microbial Biomass Phosphorus in Red Soils

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Guo-Chao; HE Zhen-Li; WANG Yi-Jun

    2004-01-01

    The impact of pH changes on microbial biomass carbon (Cmic) and microbial biomass phosphorus (Pmic)were examined for 3 red soils under citrus production with different lengths of cultivation. Soil pH significantly affected Cmic and Pmic. The Cmic and Pmic changes, as a function of soil pH, appeared to follow a normal distribution with the original soil pH value at the apex and as pH increased or decreased compared to the original soil pH, Cmic and Pmic declined. Moreover, there were critical pH values at both extremes (3.0 on the acidic side and 8.0 to 8.5 on the alkaline side), beyond which most of microorganisms could never survive.The effect of pH on Cmic and Pmic was also related to the original soil pH. The higher the original soil pH was, the less Cmic or Pmic were affected by pH change. It is suggested that soil microorganisms that grow in a soil environment with a more neutral soil pH range (I.e. pH 5.5-7.5) may have a greater tolerance to pH changes than those growing in more acidic or more alkaline soil pH conditions.

  10. [Biomass energy utilization in microbial fuel cells: potentials and challenges].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Liping; Cheng, Shaoan

    2010-07-01

    Microbial fuel cells (MFCs) that can harvest biomass energy from organic wastes through microbial catalysis have garnered more and more attention within the past decade due to its potential benefits to ecological environment. In this article, the updated progress in MFCs is reviewed, with a focus on frontier technologies such as chamber configurations, feedstock varieties and the integration of MFCs with microbial electrolysis cells for hydrogen production. And on the other hand, the challenges like development of cost-effective electrode materials, improvement of biomass energy recovery and power output, design and optimization of commercial MFC devices are presented.

  11. Optimization of biomass composition explains microbial growth-stoichiometry relationships

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franklin, O.; Hall, E.K.; Kaiser, C.; Battin, T.J.; Richter, A.

    2011-01-01

    Integrating microbial physiology and biomass stoichiometry opens far-reaching possibilities for linking microbial dynamics to ecosystem processes. For example, the growth-rate hypothesis (GRH) predicts positive correlations among growth rate, RNA content, and biomass phosphorus (P) content. Such relationships have been used to infer patterns of microbial activity, resource availability, and nutrient recycling in ecosystems. However, for microorganisms it is unclear under which resource conditions the GRH applies. We developed a model to test whether the response of microbial biomass stoichiometry to variable resource stoichiometry can be explained by a trade-off among cellular components that maximizes growth. The results show mechanistically why the GRH is valid under P limitation but not under N limitation. We also show why variability of growth rate-biomass stoichiometry relationships is lower under P limitation than under N or C limitation. These theoretical results are supported by experimental data on macromolecular composition (RNA, DNA, and protein) and biomass stoichiometry from two different bacteria. In addition, compared to a model with strictly homeostatic biomass, the optimization mechanism we suggest results in increased microbial N and P mineralization during organic-matter decomposition. Therefore, this mechanism may also have important implications for our understanding of nutrient cycling in ecosystems.

  12. Optimization of biomass composition explains microbial growth-stoichiometry relationships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franklin, Oskar; Hall, Edward K; Kaiser, Christina; Battin, Tom J; Richter, Andreas

    2011-02-01

    Integrating microbial physiology and biomass stoichiometry opens far-reaching possibilities for linking microbial dynamics to ecosystem processes. For example, the growth-rate hypothesis (GRH) predicts positive correlations among growth rate, RNA content, and biomass phosphorus (P) content. Such relationships have been used to infer patterns of microbial activity, resource availability, and nutrient recycling in ecosystems. However, for microorganisms it is unclear under which resource conditions the GRH applies. We developed a model to test whether the response of microbial biomass stoichiometry to variable resource stoichiometry can be explained by a trade-off among cellular components that maximizes growth. The results show mechanistically why the GRH is valid under P limitation but not under N limitation. We also show why variability of growth rate-biomass stoichiometry relationships is lower under P limitation than under N or C limitation. These theoretical results are supported by experimental data on macromolecular composition (RNA, DNA, and protein) and biomass stoichiometry from two different bacteria. In addition, compared to a model with strictly homeostatic biomass, the optimization mechanism we suggest results in increased microbial N and P mineralization during organic-matter decomposition. Therefore, this mechanism may also have important implications for our understanding of nutrient cycling in ecosystems.

  13. Soil microbial biomass in an agroforestry system of Northeast Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosane C. Rodrigues

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Agroforestry systems (AFS are considered alternative land use options to help prevent soil degradation and improve soil microbial biomass and organic C status. However, it is unclear how different densities of babassu palm [Attalea speciosa (syn. Orbignya phalerata], which is an important tree in Northeast Brazil, affect the soil microbial biomass. We investigated the soil microbial biomass C and activity under AFS with different densities of babassu palm associated with Brachiaria brizantha grass. Soil microbial biomass C (MBC, soil microbial biomass N (MBN, MBC:total organic C ratio, fluorescein diacetate hydrolysis and dehydrogenase activity showed highest values in plots with high density of babassu palm. On the other hand, the respiratory quotient (qCO2 was significantly greater in plots without babassu palm. Brachiaria brizantha in monoculture may promote C losses from the soil, but AFS with high density of babassu palm may increase the potential of soils to accumulate C.Keywords: Enzyme activity, tropical soil, babassu palm, silvopastoral system, soil quality.DOI: 10.17138/TGFT(341-48

  14. BIOMASS AND MICROBIAL ACTIVITY UNDER DIFFERENT FOREST COVERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael Malfitano Braga

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available This study evaluated the soil fertility, biomass and microbial activity of the soil under forest cover of Eucalyptus grandis, Eucalyptus pilularis, Eucalyptus cloeziana and Corymbia maculata; Pinus Caribbean var. hondurensis, 40 years old, and a fragment of Semideciduous Forest, located on the campus of the Federal University of Lavras. In soil samples collected in the 0-5 cm layer were determined fertility parameters, basal respiration and microbial biomass carbon. The results showed that for the species E. grandis and E. cloeziana the carbon of biomass microbial content was higher than for any other ecosystem evaluated, and equal to those observed under native forest. In contrast, the ground under Pinus had the lowest microbiological indexes. Under C. maculata and E. pilularis the contents were intermediate for this parameter. The basal respiration of all ecosystems was equal. The fertility level was very low in all types of evaluated vegetation.

  15. Measures of Microbial Biomass for Soil Carbon Decomposition Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayes, M. A.; Dabbs, J.; Steinweg, J. M.; Schadt, C. W.; Kluber, L. A.; Wang, G.; Jagadamma, S.

    2014-12-01

    Explicit parameterization of the decomposition of plant inputs and soil organic matter by microbes is becoming more widely accepted in models of various complexity, ranging from detailed process models to global-scale earth system models. While there are multiple ways to measure microbial biomass, chloroform fumigation-extraction (CFE) is commonly used to parameterize models.. However CFE is labor- and time-intensive, requires toxic chemicals, and it provides no specific information about the composition or function of the microbial community. We investigated correlations between measures of: CFE; DNA extraction yield; QPCR base-gene copy numbers for Bacteria, Fungi and Archaea; phospholipid fatty acid analysis; and direct cell counts to determine the potential for use as proxies for microbial biomass. As our ultimate goal is to develop a reliable, more informative, and faster methods to predict microbial biomass for use in models, we also examined basic soil physiochemical characteristics including texture, organic matter content, pH, etc. to identify multi-factor predictive correlations with one or more measures of the microbial community. Our work will have application to both microbial ecology studies and the next generation of process and earth system models.

  16. The degradation characteristics of microbial biomass in soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spence, Adrian; Simpson, Andre J.; Mcnally, David J.; Moran, Brian W.; McCaul, Margaret V.; Hart, Kris; Paull, Brett; Kelleher, Brian P.

    2011-05-01

    Soil microbial biomass is a primary source of soil organic carbon (SOC) and therefore plays a fundamental role in carbon and nitrogen cycling. However, little is known about the fate and transformations of microbial biomass in soil. Here we employ HR-MAS NMR spectroscopy to monitor 13C and 15N labeled soil microbial biomass and leachate degradation over time. As expected, there is a rapid loss of carbohydrate structures. However, diffusion edited HR-MAS NMR data reveals that macromolecular carbohydrates are more resistant to degradation and are found in the leachate. Aromatic components survive as dissolved species in the leachate while aliphatic components persist in both the biomass and leachate. Dissolved protein and peptidoglycan accumulate in the leachate and recalcitrant amide nitrogen and lipoprotein persists in both the degraded biomass and leachate. Cross-peaks that appear in 1H- 15N HR-MAS NMR spectra after degradation suggest that specific peptides are either selectively preserved or used for the synthesis of unknown structures. The overall degradation pathways reported here are similar to that of decomposing plant material degraded under similar conditions suggesting that the difference between recalcitrant carbon from different sources is negligible after decomposition.

  17. Engineering microbial surfaces to degrade lignocellulosic biomass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Grace L; Anderson, Timothy D; Clubb, Robert T

    2014-01-01

    Renewable lignocellulosic plant biomass is a promising feedstock from which to produce biofuels, chemicals, and materials. One approach to cost-effectively exploit this resource is to use consolidating bioprocessing (CBP) microbes that directly convert lignocellulose into valuable end products. Because many promising CBP-enabling microbes are non-cellulolytic, recent work has sought to engineer them to display multi-cellulase containing minicellulosomes that hydrolyze biomass more efficiently than isolated enzymes. In this review, we discuss progress in engineering the surfaces of the model microorganisms: Bacillus subtilis, Escherichia coli, and Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We compare the distinct approaches used to display cellulases and minicellulosomes, as well as their surface enzyme densities and cellulolytic activities. Thus far, minicellulosomes have only been grafted onto the surfaces of B. subtilis and S. cerevisiae, suggesting that the absence of an outer membrane in fungi and Gram-positive bacteria may make their surfaces better suited for displaying the elaborate multi-enzyme complexes needed to efficiently degrade lignocellulose. PMID:24430239

  18. Effects of heavy metal pollution on soil microbial biomass

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1999-01-01

    This paper reviews the effects of heavy metals on microbial biomass in metal-polluted soils. Laboratory and field investigations where metals were applied ass inorganic or organic salts demonstrated a significant decline in the size of s oil microbial biomass. In most of the cases, negative effects were evident at metal concentrations below the European Community's (EC) current permissible metal levels in the soil. Application of metal-enriched sludges and composts caused significant inhibition of microbial biomass at surprisingly modest concentrations of metals in the soil that were indeed smaller than those likely to decrease the growth of sensitive crop species. On the whole, relative toxicity of metals decreased in the order of Cd>Cu>Zn>Pb, but a few exceptions to this trend also existed. A significant decline in the biomass carbon to organic carbon ratio(Cmin/Corg) in metal-polluted soils indicated that this parameter can serve as a good indicator of the toxicity of metals on soil microflora. The knowledge regarding the response of soil biota to metal interactions and the factors affecting metal toxicity to soil microorganisms is still very limited and warrants further study.

  19. The survival strategy of the soil microbial biomass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brookes, Philip; Kemmitt, Sarah; Dungait, Jennifer; Xu, Jianming

    2014-05-01

    The soil microbial biomass (biomass) is defined as the sum of the masses of all soil microorganisms > 5000 µm3 (e.g. fungi, bacteria, protozoa, yeasts, actinomycetes and algae). Typically comprising about 1 to 3 % of total soil organic matter (SOM), the biomass might be though to live in a highly substrate-rich environment. However, the SOM is, normally, only exceedingly slowly available to the biomass. However the biomass can survive for months or even years on this meagre energy source. Not surprisingly, therefore, the biomass exhibits many features typical of a dormant or resting population. These include a very low rate of basal and specific respiration, a slow rate of cell division (about once every six months on average) and slow turnover rate. These are clearly adaptations to existing in an environment where substrate availability is very low. Yet, paradoxically, the biomass, in soils worldwide, has an adenosine triphosphate (ATP) concentration (around 10 to 12 µmol ATP g-1 biomass C), and an Adenylate Energy Charge (AEC = [(ATP) + (0.5 ADP)]/[(ATP)+(ADP) + (AMP)]) which are typical of microorganisms growing exponentially in a chemostat. This sets us several questions. Firstly, under the condition of extremely limited substrate availability in soil, why does the biomass not mainly exist as spores, becoming active, by increasing both its ATP concentration and AEC, when substrate (plant and animal residues) becomes available? We surmise that a spore strategy may put organisms at a competitive disadvantage, compared to others which are prepared to invest energy, maintaining high ATP and ATP, to take advantage of a 'food event' as soon as it becomes available. Secondly, since SOM is available (although only very slowly) to the biomass, why have some groups not evolved the ability to mineralize it faster, obtain more energy, and so gain a competitive advantage? We believe that the reason why organisms do not use this strategy is, simply, that they cannot. Our

  20. Size of Microbial Biomass in Soils of China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANGYAN; SHENQIRONG; 等

    1996-01-01

    The microbial biomass C,N and P of soils all over China were determined in this study to study their affecting factors.The results,about 100-417 mg C kg-1 soil,18-51 mg Nkg-1 soil and 4.4-27.3mg P kg-1 soil,showed the biomass C,N and P in linear relationship with the soil total organic C,toal N and soil organic P.The ratios of C:Nand C:P,ranging from 5.6 to 9.6 and from 11.2 to 48.4 respectively,were affected by soil pH.texture,crop rotation,macroclimate etc.The ratio of C:N in soil biomass increases gradually from the north to the south in China.

  1. Renewable biofuels bioconversion of lignocellulosic biomass by microbial community

    CERN Document Server

    Rana, Vandana

    2017-01-01

    This book offers a complete introduction for novices to understand key concepts of biocatalysis and how to produce in-house enzymes that can be used for low-cost biofuels production. The authors discuss the challenges involved in the commercialization of the biofuel industry, given the expense of commercial enzymes used for lignocellulose conversion. They describe the limitations in the process, such as complexity of lignocellulose structure, different microbial communities’ actions and interactions for degrading the recalcitrant structure of lignocellulosic materials, hydrolysis mechanism and potential for bio refinery. Readers will gain understanding of the key concepts of microbial catalysis of lignocellulosic biomass, process complexities and selection of microbes for catalysis or genetic engineering to improve the production of bioethanol or biofuel.

  2. Rapid Shifts in Soil and Forest Floor Microbial Communities with Changes in Vegetation during Secondary Tropical Forest Succession

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, A.; Marin-Spiotta, E.; Balser, T. C.

    2012-12-01

    Soil microorganisms regulate fundamental biochemical processes in plant litter decomposition and soil organic matter (SOM) transformations. In order to predict how disturbance affects belowground carbon storage, it is important to understand how the forest floor and soil microbial community respond to changes in land cover, and the consequences on SOM formation and stabilization. We are measuring microbial functional diversity and activity across a long-term successional chronosequence of secondary forests regrowing on abandoned pastures in the wet subtropical forest life zone of Puerto Rico. Here we report intra- and interannual data on soil and litter microbial community composition (via phospholipid fatty acid analysis, PLFA) and microbial activity (via extracellular enzyme activity) from active pastures, secondary forests aged 20, 30, 40, 70, and 90-years, and primary forests. Microbial community composition and extracellular enzyme activity differed significantly by season in these wet subtropical ecosystems, even though differences in mean monthly precipitation between the middle of the dry season (January) and the wet season (July) is only 30mm. Despite seasonal differences, there was a persistent strong effect of land cover type and forest successional stage, or age, on overall microbial community PLFA structure. Using principal component analysis, we found differences in microbial community structure among active pastures, early, and late successional forests. The separation of soil microbes into early and late successional communities parallels the clustering of tree composition data. While the successional patterns held across seasons, the importance of different microbial groups driving these patterns differed seasonally. Biomarkers for gram-positive and actinobacteria (i15:0 and 16:0 10Me) were associated with early (20, 30 & 40 year old) secondary forests in the dry season. These younger forest communities were identified by the biomarker for

  3. A meta-analysis of soil microbial biomass responses to forest disturbances

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra Robin Holden

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Climate warming is likely to increase the frequency and severity of forest disturbances, with uncertain consequences for soil microbial communities and their contribution to ecosystem C dynamics. To address this uncertainty, we conducted a meta-analysis of 139 published soil microbial responses to forest disturbances. These disturbances included abiotic (fire, harvesting, storm and biotic (insect, pathogen disturbances. We hypothesized that soil microbial biomass would decline following forest disturbances, but that abiotic disturbances would elicit greater reductions in microbial biomass than biotic disturbances. In support of this hypothesis, across all published studies, disturbances reduced soil microbial biomass by an average of 29.4%. However, microbial responses differed between abiotic and biotic disturbances. Microbial responses were significantly negative following fires, harvest, and storms (48.7%, 19.1%, and 41.7% reductions in microbial biomass, respectively. In contrast, changes in soil microbial biomass following insect infestation and pathogen-induced tree mortality were non-significant, although biotic disturbances were poorly represented in the literature. When measured separately, fungal and bacterial responses to disturbances mirrored the response of the microbial community as a whole. Changes in microbial abundance following disturbance were significantly positively correlated with changes in microbial respiration. We propose that the differential effect of abiotic and biotic disturbances on microbial biomass may be attributable to differences in soil disruption and organic C removal from forests among disturbance types. Altogether, these results suggest that abiotic forest disturbances may significantly decrease soil microbial abundance, with corresponding consequences for microbial respiration. Further studies are needed on the effect of biotic disturbances on forest soil microbial communities and soil C dynamics.

  4. Soil plus root respiration and microbial biomass following water, nitrogen, and phosphorus application at a high arctic semi desert

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Illeris, Lotte; Michelsen, Anders; Jonasson, Sven Evert

    2003-01-01

    CO2 emmision, Decomposition, Microbial biomass carbon, Soil organic matter, Tundra, Water and nutrient limitation......CO2 emmision, Decomposition, Microbial biomass carbon, Soil organic matter, Tundra, Water and nutrient limitation...

  5. Soil plus root respiration and microbial biomass following water, nitrogen, and phosphorus application at a high arctic semi desert

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Illeris, Lotte; Michelsen, Anders; Jonasson, Sven Evert

    2003-01-01

    CO2 emmision, Decomposition, Microbial biomass carbon, Soil organic matter, Tundra, Water and nutrient limitation......CO2 emmision, Decomposition, Microbial biomass carbon, Soil organic matter, Tundra, Water and nutrient limitation...

  6. Short Term Inlfuence of Organic and Inorganic Fertilizer on Soil Microbial Biomass and DNA in Summer and Spring

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Erinle Kehinda Olajide

    2016-01-01

    The present study was conducted to see the short term impact of organic and inorganic fertilizers on soil microbial biomass both in spring and summer. Also aimed to observe the correlation between soil microbial biomass and soil DNA. The study concluded that type of fertilizer might alter the soil microbial biomass and DNA contents. In soil treated with organic fertilizers resulted in higher concentrations of microbial biomass and DNA contents in summer as compared to spring dute to increase in temperature. Correspondingly, in case of inorganic fertilizer, concentrations of soil microbial biomass and DNA detected higher in summer instead of spring. The statistical correlation between soil microbial biomass, DNA and ODR in spring and summer along with organic and inorganic fertilizers were calculated highly significant (p>0.01). This study demonstrated the impact of fertilizers and seasonal variations on soil microbial biomass and also revealed significant correlation between soil microbial biomass and soil DNA.

  7. Evolution of Microbial Biomasses C and N during the Composting of Municipal solid Wastes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olfa Fourti

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: The aim of this study was mainly focused on the evolution of microbial biomasses C and N during the composting of municipal solid wastes. Approach: The carbon and the nitrogen of the microbial biomass (BC and BN were studied using the fumigation-extraction method. Results: The dynamics of the BC/BN ratio, index of the chemical composition of the whole microbial population suggested a shift in the composition of microbial populations during the process from prevailing bacteria and actinomycetes to prevailing fungi. Conclusion/Recommendations: Microbial characterization of composting is of importance for the optimization of the process and the quality of the end product.

  8. Conversion of henequen pulp to microbial biomass by submerged fermentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blancas, A. (Center of Scientific Research of Yucatan, Merida, Mexico); Alpizar, L.; Larios, G.; Saval, S.; Huitron, C.

    1982-01-01

    Mexico has cellulosic by-products that could be developed as renewable food sources for animal consumption. Sugarcane bagasse and henequen pulp are the most important of these materials because they are abundant, cheap, renewable, and nontoxic, in addition to being underutilized. A significant research and development effort has centered on the production of single-cell protein from sugarcane begasse. Nevertheless, there are no large-scale processes that utilize this substrate as a source of carbon, probably because of the extensive physical or chemical pretreatment that is needed. Henequen pulp is a by-product which is obtained in large amounts in southeastern Mexico in the process of removing fibers from the leaves of agave (sisal). A group has been working on a fermentative process that will increase the protein content of the henequen pulp by microbial conversion. The primary aim is to carry out the conversion without chemical pretreatment of the substrate and without a separation step for cells and residual substrate. A gram-negative cellulolytic bacteria has been isolated which grows well on microcrystalline cellulose, pectin, and xylane and it is able to convert an appreciable fraction of henequen pulp to microbial biomass. In this article, some results on the effect of substrate and nitrogen source concentration, on the protein enrichment of the henequen pulp, as well as the content of essential amino acids of fermented henequen pulp are presented. 4 figures.

  9. Large-scale patterns in biodiversity of microbial eukaryotes from the abyssal sea floor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheckenbach, Frank; Hausmann, Klaus; Wylezich, Claudia; Weitere, Markus; Arndt, Hartmut

    2010-01-05

    Eukaryotic microbial life at abyssal depths remains "uncharted territory" in eukaryotic microbiology. No phylogenetic surveys have focused on the largest benthic environment on this planet, the abyssal plains. Moreover, knowledge of the spatial patterns of deep-sea community structure is scanty, and what little is known originates primarily from morphology-based studies of foraminiferans. Here we report on the great phylogenetic diversity of microbial eukaryotic communities of all 3 abyssal plains of the southeastern Atlantic Ocean--the Angola, Cape, and Guinea Abyssal Plains--from depths of 5,000 m. A high percentage of retrieved clones had no close representatives in genetic databases. Many clones were affiliated with parasitic species. Furthermore, differences between the communities of the Cape Abyssal Plain and the other 2 abyssal plains point to environmental gradients apparently shaping community structure at the landscape level. On a regional scale, local species diversity showed much less variation. Our study provides insight into the community composition of microbial eukaryotes on larger scales from the wide abyssal sea floor realm and marks a direction for more detailed future studies aimed at improving our understanding of deep-sea microbes at the community and ecosystem levels, as well as the ecological principles at play.

  10. Soil microbial biomass and function are altered by 12 years of crop rotation

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDaniel, Marshall D.; Grandy, A. Stuart

    2016-11-01

    Declines in plant diversity will likely reduce soil microbial biomass, alter microbial functions, and threaten the provisioning of soil ecosystem services. We examined whether increasing temporal plant biodiversity in agroecosystems (by rotating crops) can partially reverse these trends and enhance soil microbial biomass and function. We quantified seasonal patterns in soil microbial biomass, respiration rates, extracellular enzyme activity, and catabolic potential three times over one growing season in a 12-year crop rotation study at the W. K. Kellogg Biological Station LTER. Rotation treatments varied from one to five crops in a 3-year rotation cycle, but all soils were sampled under a corn year. We hypothesized that crop diversity would increase microbial biomass, activity, and catabolic evenness (a measure of functional diversity). Inorganic N, the stoichiometry of microbial biomass and dissolved organic C and N varied seasonally, likely reflecting fluctuations in soil resources during the growing season. Soils from biodiverse cropping systems increased microbial biomass C by 28-112 % and N by 18-58 % compared to low-diversity systems. Rotations increased potential C mineralization by as much as 53 %, and potential N mineralization by 72 %, and both were related to substantially higher hydrolase and lower oxidase enzyme activities. The catabolic potential of the soil microbial community showed no, or slightly lower, catabolic evenness in more diverse rotations. However, the catabolic potential indicated that soil microbial communities were functionally distinct, and microbes from monoculture corn preferentially used simple substrates like carboxylic acids, relative to more diverse cropping systems. By isolating plant biodiversity from differences in fertilization and tillage, our study illustrates that crop biodiversity has overarching effects on soil microbial biomass and function that last throughout the growing season. In simplified agricultural systems

  11. The Effects of Applying Organic Matter in Wind Blown Soil on Microbial Biomass and Enzyme Activity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    Field experiment was conducted to study the effect of applying organic matter in wind blown soil on microbial biomass and enzyme activity.The results showed that microbial biomass and enzyme activity keep dynamic changes during wheat growing season in wind blown soil,and reached the peak level in wheat booting stage.Compared with chemical fertilizer,all the other treatments could increase the microbial biomass in different degree,the same as catalsae and alkaline phosphatase activity,But urease activity was slightly difference from them.

  12. Effects of Lanthanum on Microbial Biomass Carbon and Nitrogen in Red Soil

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    褚海燕; 朱建国; 谢祖彬; 曹志洪; 李振高; 曾青

    2001-01-01

    The result of soil culture experiment shows that lanthanum has inhibitory effect on the microbial biomass C and N in red soil, and the inhibition is strengthened with increasing concentration of La. The result of rice pot culture experiment shows that low concentration of La has slight stimulative effect on the microbial biomass C and N in red soil, but its high concentration has inhibitory effect and the inhibition is strengthened with increasing concentration of La. Soil microbial biomass is an important indicator for evaluating rare earths-polluted soil. It is assumed that the critical La concentration is 100 mg*kg-1 at which red soil tends to be polluted.

  13. Impact of Land Degradation on Soil Microbial Biomass and Activity in Northeast Brazil

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    J. S. NUNES; A. S. F. ARAUJO; L. A. P. L. NUNES; L. M. LIMA; R. F. V. CARNEIRO; A. A. C. SALVIANO; S. M. TSAI

    2012-01-01

    Land degradation causes great changes in the soil biological properties.The process of degradation may decrease soil microbial biomass and consequently decrease soil microbial activity.The study was conducted out during 2009 and 2010 at the four sites of land under native vegetation (NV),moderately degraded land (LDL),highly degraded land (HDL) and land under restoration for four years (RL) to evaluate changes in soil microbial biomass and activity in lands with different degradation levels in comparison with both land under native vegetation and land under restoration in Northeast Brazil.Soil samples were collected at 0-10 cm depth.Soil organic carbon (SOC),soil microbial biomass C (MBC) and N (MBN),soil respiration (SR),and hydrolysis of fluorescein diacetate (FDA) and dehydrogenase (DHA) activities were analyzed.After two years of evaluation,soil MBC,MBN,FDA and DHA had higher values in the NV,followed by the RL.The decreases of soil microbial biomass and enzyme activities in the degraded lands were approximately 8-10 times as large as those found in the NV.However,after land restoration,the MBC and MBN increased approximately 5-fold and 2-fold,respectively,compared with the HDL.The results showed that land degradation produced a strong decrease in soil microbial biomass.However,land restoration may promote short- and long-term increases in soil microbial biomass.

  14. Microbial biomass in red soils and its significance in plant availability of nitrogen

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    姚槐应; 何振立; 黄昌勇

    2002-01-01

    A series of laboratory and pot experiments carried out to examine the role of soil microbial biomass in red soils' nitrogen availability and productivity showed that soil available N (NA), dry matter yield (DMY) of ryegrass, and plant uptake of nitrogen were each closely correlated with microbial biomass-C (Cmic) or -N (Nmic), suggesting that soil microbial biomass is a very important nitrogen pool available to plants in red soils. After correction for the substrate effect, the computed turnover of the Nmic in three tested soils ranged from 63 to 250 days. Soils with low Nmic or light texture generally had higher Nmic turnover rate than those with high Nmic or heavy texture. These results showed that soils with low Nmic, microbial biomass could also play an important role in the availability of nitrogen to plants due to these soils' high turnover rate.

  15. Contribution of the thraustochytrid Corallochytrium limacisporum Raghu-kumar to microbial biomass in coral reef lagoons

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Raghukumar, S.; Chandramohan, D.; Ramaiah, N.

    on the number of C limacisporum, total viable bacteria (saprophyte numbers), chlorophyll a content and total ATP in the lagoon waters, the contribution of C limacisporum to the microbial biomass in coral reef lagoons of the Lakshadweep islands was calculated...

  16. A global analysis of soil microbial biomass carbon, nitrogen and phosphorus in terrestrial ecosystems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Xiaofeng [ORNL; Thornton, Peter E [ORNL; Post, Wilfred M [ORNL

    2013-01-01

    Soil microbes play a pivotal role in regulating land-atmosphere interactions; the soil microbial biomass carbon (C), nitrogen (N), phosphorus (P) and C:N:P stoichiometry are important regulators for soil biogeochemical processes; however, the current knowledge on magnitude, stoichiometry, storage, and spatial distribution of global soil microbial biomass C, N, and P is limited. In this study, 3087 pairs of data points were retrieved from 281 published papers and further used to summarize the magnitudes and stoichiometries of C, N, and P in soils and soil microbial biomass at global- and biome-levels. Finally, global stock and spatial distribution of microbial biomass C and N in 0-30 cm and 0-100 cm soil profiles were estimated. The results show that C, N, and P in soils and soil microbial biomass vary substantially across biomes; the fractions of soil nutrient C, N, and P in soil microbial biomass are 1.6% in a 95% confidence interval of (1.5%-1.6%), 2.9% in a 95% confidence interval of (2.8%-3.0%), and 4.4% in a 95% confidence interval of (3.9%-5.0%), respectively. The best estimates of C:N:P stoichiometries for soil nutrients and soil microbial biomass are 153:11:1, and 47:6:1, respectively, at global scale, and they vary in a wide range among biomes. Vertical distribution of soil microbial biomass follows the distribution of roots up to 1 m depth. The global stock of soil microbial biomass C and N were estimated to be 15.2 Pg C and 2.3 Pg N in the 0-30 cm soil profiles, and 21.2 Pg C and 3.2 Pg N in the 0-100 cm soil profiles. We did not estimate P in soil microbial biomass due to data shortage and insignificant correlation with soil total P and climate variables. The spatial patterns of soil microbial biomass C and N were consistent with those of soil organic C and total N, i.e. high density in northern high latitude, and low density in low latitudes and southern hemisphere.

  17. Microbial Biomass Changes during Decomposition of Plant Residues in a Lixisol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kachaka, SK.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available A lixisol was amended with four different alley cropping species: Senna siamea, Leucaena leucocephala, Dactyladenia barteri and Flemingia macrophylla. Soil samples were incubated for 140 days at 25 °C and the soil microbial biomass was determined by the ninhydrin extraction method along the incubation period. The soil microbial biomass values ranged between 80 and 600 mg.kg-1 and followed, in all cases, the decreasing order: Leucaena> Senna> Flemingia> Dactyladenia.

  18. 油松-辽东栎混交林地表凋落物与氮添加对土壤微生物生物量碳、氮及其活性的影响%Effects of forest floor litter and nitrogen addition on soil microbial biomass C and N and microbial activity in a mixed Pinus tabulaeformis and Quercus liaotungensis forest stand in Shanxi Province of China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    涂玉; 尤业明; 孙建新

    2012-01-01

    From September 2010 to October 2011, a field experiment with randomized block design was conducted in a mixed Pinus tabulaeformis and Quercus liaotungensis forest stand in Lingkong Mountain of Shanxi Province to study the effects of forest floor litter and nitrogen addition on the soil microbial carbon (MBC) and nitrogen (MBN) and microbial activity (MR). The litter treatments included complete litter removal, doubling of leaf litter (L) , doubling of woody litter (B) , and doubling of mixed leaf and woody litter (LB ) , and the nitrogen addition rates were 0 (N0), 5 g·m-2·yr-1 ( N1 ) , and 10 g· m-2 · yr-1 ( N2 ). Except that the treatment of complete litter removal without nitrogen addition decreased the soil organic carbon content significantly, all the other treatments had no significant differences in the effects on soil organic carbon. The soil MBC, MBN, and MR varied in the ranges of 262.42-873. 16 mg · kg-1, 73.55-173.85 mg· kg-1, and 2. 38-3. 68 mg · kg-1· d-1, respectively, and the MBC and MBN had significant positive correlations with the MR. Nitrogen addition did not show any effect on the MBC, MBN, and MR, whereas litter treatments affected the MR significantly, with the highest MR in treatment LB, followed by treatments L and B, and the lowest in treatment of complete litter removal. There were no interactive effects between litter and nitrogen addition treatments on any of the variables studied. It was suggested that short-term nitrogen addition and forest floor litter change could have limited effects on soil microbial processes.%2010年9月-2011年10月,在山西省灵空山油松和辽东栎混交林样地采取随机区组设计,研究了地表凋落物和氮添加处理对土壤微生物生物量碳、氮和微生物活性的影响.凋落物处理包括:剔除凋落物(N)、叶凋落物加倍(L)、枝果凋落物加倍(B)和混合凋落物加倍(LB);氮添加量分别为0(N0)、5 g· m-2·a-1(N1)和10 g·m-2·a-1(N2).结果表明:剔

  19. Performance and organ morphology of broilers fed microbial or antimicrobial additives and raised in batteries or floor pens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedroso AA

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available This study was conducted to determine the effect of microbial or antimicrobial additives on the performance and organ morphology of broilers raised in batteries or in floor pens. The effect of microbial additives on the presence of oocysts in the litter was also studied. Experiments 1 and 2 consisted of four treatments (non-supplemented control diet or diet supplemented with avilamycin, bacitracin methylene disalicylate or enramycin and six repetitions in a randomized block design. In Experiment 1, 288 day-old chicks were housed in heated batteries in a environmentally controlled room, 12 chicks per cage; in Experiment 2, 1,200 day-old chicks were housed in a curtain-sided experimental house, with concrete floor and rice hulls as litter material, 50 chicks per pen. Experiments 3 and 4 were carried out similarly to Experiments 1 and 2, respectively, but the treatments consisted of microbial additives (non-supplemented control diet or Bacillus subtilis added to the feed plus Lactobacillus reuteri and Lactobacillus johnsonii added to the water, undefined microflora added to the water or live yeast added to the feed. The antibiotics did not affect the performance of birds raised in batteries, but improved feed conversion, weight gain and live weight when chickens were kept on the floor pens. Microbial additives did not affect bird performance in any environment; however, treatments affected liver weight. Microbial agents increased intestinal weight in floor-raised broilers. No relationship was seen between the use of microbial additives and the presence of oocysts in the litter.

  20. Effects of different fertilization on microbial biomass carbon from the red soil in tea garden

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Huaqin XU; Runlin XIAO; Tongqing SONG

    2008-01-01

    The present study examined the influence of the different fertilization on the dynamic of soil microbial biomass carbon (SMBC) of red soil in tea gardens. The results showed that straw mulching, intercropping, chem-ical fertilizer could all improve the amount of the soil microbial biomass C. The annual variation of microbial biomass C showed the tendency of"low-high-low high", and the influences were variable with the time. For the annual average of soil microbial biomass C, Treatment l(T1) (straw mulching+100% organic manure), Treatment 2 (T2) (straw mulching+75% organic man-ure+25% fertilizer), Treatment 3 (T3) (straw mulch-ing+ 50% organic manure + 50% fertilizer), Treatment 4 (T4) (straw mulching + 25% organic manure + 75% fert-ilizer), Treatment 5 (T5) (100% fertilizer),Treatment 6 (T6) (intercropping white clover) were 17.05%, 32.38%, 32.05%, 24.30%, 26.23%, 24.63% higher, respectively, than CK, and the differences among all the treatments were significant (P<0.05). The correlation of the SMBC with the active organic matter, the total nitrogen, the microbial biomass N, the microbial biomass P were remarkable, but no significant correlation was found with available nitrogen, total phosphorus, total potassium and moisture. Compared with other treatments, those mixed with organic matter and chemical fertilizer were more advantageous to enhance the soil fertility.

  1. Nitrogen additions and microbial biomass: a meta-analysis of ecosystem studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Treseder, Kathleen K

    2008-10-01

    Nitrogen (N) enrichment is an element of global change that could influence the growth and abundance of many organisms. In this meta-analysis, I synthesized responses of microbial biomass to N additions in 82 published field studies. I hypothesized that the biomass of fungi, bacteria or the microbial community as a whole would be altered under N additions. I also predicted that changes in biomass would parallel changes in soil CO2 emissions. Microbial biomass declined 15% on average under N fertilization, but fungi and bacteria were not significantly altered in studies that examined each group separately. Moreover, declines in abundance of microbes and fungi were more evident in studies of longer durations and with higher total amounts of N added. In addition, responses of microbial biomass to N fertilization were significantly correlated with responses of soil CO2 emissions. There were no significant effects of biomes, fertilizer types, ambient N deposition rates or methods of measuring biomass. Altogether, these results suggest that N enrichment could reduce microbial biomass in many ecosystems, with corresponding declines in soil CO2 emissions.

  2. Effects of different vegetation restoration models on soil microbial biomass in eroded hilly Loess Plateau, China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XUE Sha; LIU Guobin; DAI Quanhou; LAN Xue; YU Na

    2007-01-01

    Vegetation restoration is a key measure to improve the eco-environment in Loess Plateau,China.In order to find the effect of soil microbial biomass under different vegetation restoration models in this region,six trial sites located in Zhifanggou watershed were selected in this study.Results showed that soil microbial biomass,microbial respiration and physical and chemical properties increased apparently.After 30 years of vegetation restoration,soil microbial biomass C,N,P(SMBC,SMBN,SMBP)and microbial respiration,increased by 109.01%-144.22%,34.17%-117.09%,31.79%-79.94% and 26.78%-87.59% respectively,as compared with the farmland.However,metabolic quotient declined dramatically by 57.45%-77.49%.Effects of different models of vegetation restoration are different on improving the properties of soil.In general,mixed stands of Pinus tabulaeformisAmorpha fruticosa and Robinia pseudoacacia-A,fruticosa had the most remarkable effect,followed by R.pseudoacacia and Caragana korshinkii,fallow land and P.tabulaeformis was the lowest.Restoration of mixed forest had greater effective than pure forest in eroded Hilly Loess Plateau.The significant relationships were observed among SMBC,SMBP,microbial respiration,and physical and chemical properties of soil.It was concluded that microbial biomass can be used as indicators of soil quality.

  3. Differences in Soil Microbial Biomass and Activity for Six Agroecosystems with a Management Disturbance Gradient

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Wei-Jian; FENG Jin-Xia; J. WU; K. PARKER

    2004-01-01

    Different management practices in six agroecosystems located near Goldsboro, NC, USA were conducted including a successional field (SU), a plantation woodlot (WO), an integrated cropping system with animals (IN), an organic farming system (OR), and two cash-grain cropping systems employing either tillage (CT) or no-tillage (NT) to examine if and how microbial biomass and activity differ in response to alterations in disturbance intensity from six land management strategies. Results showed that soil microbial biomass and activity differed, with microbial activity in intermediately disturbed ecosystems (NT, OR, IN) being significantly higher (P < 0.01) than systems with either high or low disturbance intensities. There was also a significant and a highly significant ecosystem effect from the treatments on microbial biomass C (MBC) (P < 0.05) and on microbial activity (respiration) (P < 0.01), respectively. Multiple comparisons of mean respiration rates distinctly separated the six ecosystem types into three groups: CT < NT, SU and WO < OR and IN.Thus, for detecting microbial response to disturbance changes these results indicated that the active component of the soil microbial community was a better indicator than total biomass.

  4. Alterations in soil microbial community composition and biomass following agricultural land use change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qian; Wu, Junjun; Yang, Fan; Lei, Yao; Zhang, Quanfa; Cheng, Xiaoli

    2016-11-01

    The effect of agricultural land use change on soil microbial community composition and biomass remains a widely debated topic. Here, we investigated soil microbial community composition and biomass [e.g., bacteria (B), fungi (F), Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) and Actinomycete (ACT)] using phospholipid fatty acids (PLFAs) analysis, and basal microbial respiration in afforested, cropland and adjacent uncultivated soils in central China. We also investigated soil organic carbon and nitrogen (SOC and SON), labile carbon and nitrogen (LC and LN), recalcitrant carbon and nitrogen (RC and RN), pH, moisture, and temperature. Afforestation averaged higher microbial PLFA biomass compared with cropland and uncultivated soils with higher values in top soils than deep soils. The microbial PLFA biomass was strongly correlated with SON and LC. Higher SOC, SON, LC, LN, moisture and lower pH in afforested soils could be explained approximately 87.3% of total variation of higher total PLFAs. Afforestation also enhanced the F: B ratios compared with cropland. The basal microbial respiration was higher while the basal microbial respiration on a per-unit-PLFA basis was lower in afforested land than adjacent cropland and uncultivated land, suggesting afforestation may increase soil C utilization efficiency and decrease respiration loss in afforested soils.

  5. Evolution of soil microbial biomass in restoration process of Robinia pseudoacacia plantations in an eroded environment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sha XUE; Guobin LIU; Quanhou DAI; Chao ZHANG; Na YU

    2008-01-01

    Vegetation recovery is a key measure to improve ecosystems in the Loess Plateau in China. To understand the evolution of soil microorganisms in forest plantations in the hilly areas of the Loess Plateau, the soil microbial biomass, microbial respiration and physical and chemical properties of the soil of Robinia pseudoacacia plantations were studied. In this study, eight forest soils of different age classes were used to study the evolution of soil microbial biomass, while a farmland and a native forest community of Platycladus orientalis L. were chosen as controls. By measuring soil microbial biomass, meta-bolic quotient, and physical and chemical properties, it can be concluded that soil quality was improved steadily after planting. Soil microbial biomass of C, N and P (SMBC, SMBN and SMBP) increased significantly after 10 to 15 years of afforestation and vegetation recovery. A relatively stable state of soil microbial biomass was main-tained in near-mature or mature plantations. There was an increase of soil microbial biomass appearing at the end of the mature stage. After 50 years of afforestation and vegetation recovery, compared with those in farmland, the soil microbial biomass of C, N and P increased by 213%, 201% and 83% respectively, but only accounting for 51%, 55% and 61% of the increase in P. orientalis forest. Microbial soil respiration was enhanced in the early stages, and then weakened in the later stage after restoration, which was different from the change of soil organic carbon. The metabolic quotient (qCO2) was sig-nificantly higher in the soils of the P. orientalis forest than that in farmland at the early restoration stage and then decreased rapidly. After 25 years of afforestation and vegetation recovery, qCO2 in soils of the R. pseudoacacia forest was lower than that in the farmland soil, and reached a minimum after 50 years, which was close to that of the P. orientalis forest. A significant relationship was found among soil microbial

  6. Forest wildfire increases soil microbial biomass C:N:P stoichiometry in long-term effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Xuan

    2017-04-01

    Boreal forest fire strongly influences carbon (C) stock in permafrost soil by thawing permafrost table which accelerated microbe decomposition process. We studied soil microbial biomass stoichiometry in a gradient of four (3 yr, 25 yr, 46 yr and more than 100 yr) ages since fire in Canada boreal forest. Soil microbial biomass (MB) in long-term after fire is significantly higher than in short-term. MB C and nitrogen (N) were mainly dominated by corresponding soil element concentration and inorganic P, while MB phosphorus (P) changes were fully explained by soil N. Fire ages and soil temperature positively increased MB N and P, indicating the negative impact by fire. Microbial C:N:P gradually increased with fire ages from 15:2:1 to 76:6:1 and then drop down to 17:2:1 in the oldest fire ages. The degree of homeostasis of microbial C, N and P are close to 1 indicates non-homoeostasis within microbial elements, while it of C:N:P is close to 8 shows a strong homeostasis within element ratios and proved microbial stoichiometric ratio is not driven by soil element ratios. In conclusion, i) microbial biomass elements highly depends on soil nutrient supply rather than fire ages; ii) wildfire decreased microbial stoichiometry immediate after fire but increased with years after fire (YF) which at least 3 times higher than > 100 fire ages; iii) microbial biomass C, N and P deviated from strict homeostasis but C:N:P ratio reflects stronger homeostasis.

  7. Application of next-generation sequencing methods for microbial monitoring of anaerobic digestion of lignocellulosic biomass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozan, Mahir; Akyol, Çağrı; Ince, Orhan; Aydin, Sevcan; Ince, Bahar

    2017-08-04

    The anaerobic digestion of lignocellulosic wastes is considered an efficient method for managing the world's energy shortages and resolving contemporary environmental problems. However, the recalcitrance of lignocellulosic biomass represents a barrier to maximizing biogas production. The purpose of this review is to examine the extent to which sequencing methods can be employed to monitor such biofuel conversion processes. From a microbial perspective, we present a detailed insight into anaerobic digesters that utilize lignocellulosic biomass and discuss some benefits and disadvantages associated with the microbial sequencing techniques that are typically applied. We further evaluate the extent to which a hybrid approach incorporating a variation of existing methods can be utilized to develop a more in-depth understanding of microbial communities. It is hoped that this deeper knowledge will enhance the reliability and extent of research findings with the end objective of improving the stability of anaerobic digesters that manage lignocellulosic biomass.

  8. Short-term parasite-infection alters already the biomass, activity and functional diversity of soil microbial communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jun-Min; Jin, Ze-Xin; Hagedorn, Frank; Li, Mai-He

    2014-11-01

    Native parasitic plants may be used to infect and control invasive plants. We established microcosms with invasive Mikania micrantha and native Coix lacryma-jobi growing in mixture on native soils, with M. micrantha being infected by parasitic Cuscuta campestris at four intensity levels for seven weeks to estimate the top-down effects of plant parasitism on the biomass and functional diversity of soil microbial communities. Parasitism significantly decreased root biomass and altered soil microbial communities. Soil microbial biomass decreased, but soil respiration increased at the two higher infection levels, indicating a strong stimulation of soil microbial metabolic activity (+180%). Moreover, a Biolog assay showed that the infection resulted in a significant change in the functional diversity indices of soil microbial communities. Pearson correlation analysis indicated that microbial biomass declined significantly with decreasing root biomass, particularly of the invasive M. micrantha. Also, the functional diversity indices of soil microbial communities were positively correlated with soil microbial biomass. Therefore, the negative effects on the biomass, activity and functional diversity of soil microbial community by the seven week long plant parasitism was very likely caused by decreased root biomass and root exudation of the invasive M. micrantha.

  9. Short-term parasite-infection alters already the biomass, activity and functional diversity of soil microbial communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jun-Min; Jin, Ze-Xin; Hagedorn, Frank; Li, Mai-He

    2014-11-04

    Native parasitic plants may be used to infect and control invasive plants. We established microcosms with invasive Mikania micrantha and native Coix lacryma-jobi growing in mixture on native soils, with M. micrantha being infected by parasitic Cuscuta campestris at four intensity levels for seven weeks to estimate the top-down effects of plant parasitism on the biomass and functional diversity of soil microbial communities. Parasitism significantly decreased root biomass and altered soil microbial communities. Soil microbial biomass decreased, but soil respiration increased at the two higher infection levels, indicating a strong stimulation of soil microbial metabolic activity (+180%). Moreover, a Biolog assay showed that the infection resulted in a significant change in the functional diversity indices of soil microbial communities. Pearson correlation analysis indicated that microbial biomass declined significantly with decreasing root biomass, particularly of the invasive M. micrantha. Also, the functional diversity indices of soil microbial communities were positively correlated with soil microbial biomass. Therefore, the negative effects on the biomass, activity and functional diversity of soil microbial community by the seven week long plant parasitism was very likely caused by decreased root biomass and root exudation of the invasive M. micrantha.

  10. Soil microbial responses to forest floor litter manipulation and nitrogen addition in a mixed-wood forest of northern China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Xiao-Lu; Zhao, Jing; You, Ye-Ming; Jianxin Sun, Osbert

    2016-01-14

    Changes in litterfall dynamics and soil properties due to anthropogenic or natural perturbations have important implications to soil carbon (C) and nutrient cycling via microbial pathway. Here we determine soil microbial responses to contrasting types of litter inputs (leaf vs. fine woody litter) and nitrogen (N) deposition by conducting a multi-year litter manipulation and N addition experiment in a mixed-wood forest. We found significantly higher soil organic C, total N, microbial biomass C (MBC) and N (MBN), microbial activity (MR), and activities of four soil extracellular enzymes, including β-glucosidase (BG), N-acetyl-β-glucosaminidase (NAG), phenol oxidase (PO), and peroxidase (PER), as well as greater total bacteria biomass and relative abundance of gram-negative bacteria (G-) community, in top soils of plots with presence of leaf litter than of those without litter or with presence of only fine woody litter. No apparent additive or interactive effects of N addition were observed in this study. The occurrence of more labile leaf litter stimulated G-, which may facilitate microbial community growth and soil C stabilization as inferred by findings in literature. A continued treatment with contrasting types of litter inputs is likely to result in divergence in soil microbial community structure and function.

  11. Microbial Functional Diversity, Biomass and Activity as Affected by Soil Surface Mulching in a Semiarid Farmland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Yufang; Chen, Yingying; Li, Shiqing

    2016-01-01

    Mulching is widely used to increase crop yield in semiarid regions in northwestern China, but little is known about the effect of different mulching systems on the microbial properties of the soil, which play an important role in agroecosystemic functioning and nutrient cycling. Based on a 4-year spring maize (Zea mays L.) field experiment at Changwu Agricultural and Ecological Experimental Station, Shaanxi, we evaluated the responses of soil microbial activity and crop to various management systems. The treatments were NMC (no mulching with inorganic N fertilizer), GMC (gravel mulching with inorganic N fertilizer), FMC (plastic-film mulching with inorganic N fertilizer) and FMO (plastic-film mulching with inorganic N fertilizer and organic manure addition). The results showed that the FMO soil had the highest contents of microbial biomass carbon and nitrogen, dehydrogenase activity, microbial activity and Shannon diversity index. The relative use of carbohydrates and amino acids by microbes was highest in the FMO soil, whereas the relative use of polymers, phenolic compounds and amines was highest in the soil in the NMC soil. Compared with the NMC, an increased but no significant trend of biomass production and nitrogen accumulation was observed under the GMC treatment. The FMC and FMO led a greater increase in biomass production than GMC and NMC. Compare with the NMC treatment, FMC increased grain yield, maize biomass and nitrogen accumulation by 62.2, 62.9 and 86.2%, but no significant difference was found between the FMO and FMC treatments. Some soil biological properties, i.e. microbial biomass carbon, microbial biomass nitrogen, being sensitive to the mulching and organic fertilizer, were significant correlated with yield and nitrogen availability. Film mulching over gravel mulching can serve as an effective measure for crop production and nutrient cycling, and plus organic fertilization additions may thus have improvements in the biological quality of the

  12. Microbial Functional Diversity, Biomass and Activity as Affected by Soil Surface Mulching in a Semiarid Farmland.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yufang Shen

    Full Text Available Mulching is widely used to increase crop yield in semiarid regions in northwestern China, but little is known about the effect of different mulching systems on the microbial properties of the soil, which play an important role in agroecosystemic functioning and nutrient cycling. Based on a 4-year spring maize (Zea mays L. field experiment at Changwu Agricultural and Ecological Experimental Station, Shaanxi, we evaluated the responses of soil microbial activity and crop to various management systems. The treatments were NMC (no mulching with inorganic N fertilizer, GMC (gravel mulching with inorganic N fertilizer, FMC (plastic-film mulching with inorganic N fertilizer and FMO (plastic-film mulching with inorganic N fertilizer and organic manure addition. The results showed that the FMO soil had the highest contents of microbial biomass carbon and nitrogen, dehydrogenase activity, microbial activity and Shannon diversity index. The relative use of carbohydrates and amino acids by microbes was highest in the FMO soil, whereas the relative use of polymers, phenolic compounds and amines was highest in the soil in the NMC soil. Compared with the NMC, an increased but no significant trend of biomass production and nitrogen accumulation was observed under the GMC treatment. The FMC and FMO led a greater increase in biomass production than GMC and NMC. Compare with the NMC treatment, FMC increased grain yield, maize biomass and nitrogen accumulation by 62.2, 62.9 and 86.2%, but no significant difference was found between the FMO and FMC treatments. Some soil biological properties, i.e. microbial biomass carbon, microbial biomass nitrogen, being sensitive to the mulching and organic fertilizer, were significant correlated with yield and nitrogen availability. Film mulching over gravel mulching can serve as an effective measure for crop production and nutrient cycling, and plus organic fertilization additions may thus have improvements in the biological

  13. Tracking dynamics of plant biomass composting by changes in substrate structure, microbial community, and enzyme activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Hui

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Understanding the dynamics of the microbial communities that, along with their secreted enzymes, are involved in the natural process of biomass composting may hold the key to breaking the major bottleneck in biomass-to-biofuels conversion technology, which is the still-costly deconstruction of polymeric biomass carbohydrates to fermentable sugars. However, the complexity of both the structure of plant biomass and its counterpart microbial degradation communities makes it difficult to investigate the composting process. Results In this study, a composter was set up with a mix of yellow poplar (Liriodendron tulipifera wood-chips and mown lawn grass clippings (85:15 in dry-weight and used as a model system. The microbial rDNA abundance data obtained from analyzing weekly-withdrawn composted samples suggested population-shifts from bacteria-dominated to fungus-dominated communities. Further analyses by an array of optical microscopic, transcriptional and enzyme-activity techniques yielded correlated results, suggesting that such population shifts occurred along with early removal of hemicellulose followed by attack on the consequently uncovered cellulose as the composting progressed. Conclusion The observed shifts in dominance by representative microbial groups, along with the observed different patterns in the gene expression and enzymatic activities between cellulases, hemicellulases, and ligninases during the composting process, provide new perspectives for biomass-derived biotechnology such as consolidated bioprocessing (CBP and solid-state fermentation for the production of cellulolytic enzymes and biofuels.

  14. Tracking Dynamics of Plant Biomass Composting by Changes in Substrate Structure, Microbial Community, and Enzyme Activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wei, H.; Tucker, M. P.; Baker, J. O.; Harris, M.; Luo, Y. H.; Xu, Q.; Himmel, M. E.; Ding, S. Y.

    2012-04-01

    Understanding the dynamics of the microbial communities that, along with their secreted enzymes, are involved in the natural process of biomass composting may hold the key to breaking the major bottleneck in biomass-to-biofuels conversion technology, which is the still-costly deconstruction of polymeric biomass carbohydrates to fermentable sugars. However, the complexity of both the structure of plant biomass and its counterpart microbial degradation communities makes it difficult to investigate the composting process. In this study, a composter was set up with a mix of yellow poplar (Liriodendron tulipifera) wood-chips and mown lawn grass clippings (85:15 in dry-weight) and used as a model system. The microbial rDNA abundance data obtained from analyzing weekly-withdrawn composted samples suggested population-shifts from bacteria-dominated to fungus-dominated communities. Further analyses by an array of optical microscopic, transcriptional and enzyme-activity techniques yielded correlated results, suggesting that such population shifts occurred along with early removal of hemicellulose followed by attack on the consequently uncovered cellulose as the composting progressed. The observed shifts in dominance by representative microbial groups, along with the observed different patterns in the gene expression and enzymatic activities between cellulases, hemicellulases, and ligninases during the composting process, provide new perspectives for biomass-derived biotechnology such as consolidated bioprocessing (CBP) and solid-state fermentation for the production of cellulolytic enzymes and biofuels.

  15. Total soil DNA quantification as an alternative microbial biomass determination approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semenov, Mikhail

    2015-04-01

    Many studies on geographically widespread soils from arctic permafrost to arid and tropical soils, as well as those studies on extreme events, such as freezing-thawing and drying-rewetting of soils, require immediate freezing of soil after sampling. The two common basic approaches, such as chloroform fumigation-extraction (CFE) and substrate-induced respiration (SIR), however, are not applicable in frozen or dry soil samples due to a partial destruction of microbial cells during freezing-thawing and drying-rewetting. This calls for approaches enabling correct estimation of microbial biomass in frozen or dried soil samples. This study was aimed to compare commonly used SIR and CFE techniques with total soil DNA quantification and demonstrate the applicability of DNA-based determination of microbial biomass in carbonate-containing, slightly (Chernozem) and strongly alkaline (Calcisol) soils of semi-arid climates. The samples of natural and agricultural ecosystems were taken throughout the soil profile from long-term static field experiments in the European part of Russia. The linear regression between SIR-Cmic and total soil dsDNA for the Chernozem showed very strong correlation. From the regression equation, the conversion factor of 5.10 with R2 = 0.96 was obtained. The effect of CO2 retention at alkaline pH (>8) and low microbial biomass-C resulted in an inability to obtain any SIR-CO2 release at deeper horizons of Calcisol, i.e. the CO2 retention potential was higher that the CO2 evolution. As a consequence, the values of SIR-Cmic of Calcisol at the horizons with pH > 8.0 were strongly underestimated (by a factor of 2-3). This smoothed the differences in Cmic between soil horizons. Nevertheless, reliable dsDNA values obtained for these soils demonstrated well-pronounced changes in microbial biomass within soil profile. The CFE and DNA-based approaches showed a good correspondence, with R2 = 0.96 for both soil types. The CFE-Cmic to DNA-Cmic factor of 0

  16. Stabilization of microbial biomass in soils: Implications for SOM formation and xenobiotics degradation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miltner, A.; Kindler, R.; Achtenhagen, J.; Nowak, K.; Girardi, C.; Kästner, M.

    2012-04-01

    Soil organic matter (SOM) plays an important role in soils. It is the carbon source and the habitat of many soil microorganisms, its quality and quantity thus affect soil microbial activity. Therefore, the amount and composition of SOM determines soil quality, but SOM formation and stabilization are not yet sufficiently understood. Recently, microbial biomass residues could be identified as a significant source of SOM. We incubated 13C-labelled bacterial cells for 224 days in an agricultural soil and traced the fate of the 13C label of bacterial biomass in soil by isotopic analysis. The data were combined to a mass balance, and the biomass residues were visualized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). A high percentage of the biomass-derived carbon (in particular from proteins) remained in soil, mainly in the non-living part of SOM, after extended incubation. The SEM micrographs only rarely showed intact cells. Instead, organic patchy fragments of 200-500 nm size were abundant. These fragments were associated with all stages of cell envelope decay and fragmentation, indicating specific disintegration processes of cell walls. Similar fragments developed on initially clean and sterile in situ microcosms during exposure in groundwater, thus providing clear evidence for their microbial origin. Microbial cell envelope fragments thus contribute significantly to SOM formation. A significant contribution of cell envelope fragments to SOM formation provides a simple explanation for the development of the small, nano-scale patchy organic materials observed in soil electron micrographs. It also suggests that microstructures of microbial cells and of small plant debris provide the molecular architecture of SOM attached to particle surfaces. This origin and macromolecular architecture of SOM is consistent with most observations on SOM, e.g. the abundance of microbial-derived biomarkers, the low C/N ratio, the water repellency and the stabilization of microbial biomass. The

  17. Microbial biomass in compost during colonization of Agaricus bisporus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vos, Aurin M; Heijboer, Amber; Boschker, Henricus T S; Bonnet, Barbara; Lugones, Luis G; Wösten, Han A B

    2017-12-01

    Agaricus bisporus mushrooms are commercially produced on a microbe rich compost. Here, fungal and bacterial biomass was quantified in compost with and without colonization by A. bisporus. Chitin content, indicative of total fungal biomass, increased during a 26-day period from 576 to 779 nmol N-acetylglucosamine g(-1) compost in the absence of A. bisporus (negative control). A similar increase was found in the presence of this mushroom forming fungus. The fungal phospholipid-derived fatty acid (PLFA) marker C18:2ω6, indicative of the living fraction of the fungal biomass, decreased from 575 to 280 nmol g(-1) compost in the negative control. In contrast, it increased to 1200 nmol g(-1) compost in the presence of A. bisporus. Laccase activity was absent throughout culturing in the negative control, while it correlated with the fungal PLFA marker in the presence of A. bisporus. PLFA was also used to quantify living bacterial biomass. In the negative control, the bacterial markers remained constant at 3000-3200 nmol PLFA g(-1) compost. In contrast, they decreased to 850 nmol g(-1) compost during vegetative growth of A. bisporus, implying that bacterial biomass decreased from 17.7 to 4.7 mg g(-1) compost. The relative amount of the Gram positive associated PLFA markers a15:0 and a17:0 and the Gram negative PLFA associated markers cy17:0 and cy19:0 increased and decreased, respectively, suggesting that Gram negative bacteria are more suppressed by A. bisporus. Together, these data indicate that fungal biomass can make up 6.8% of the compost after A. bisporus colonization, 57% of which being dead. Moreover, results show that A. bisporus impacts biomass and composition of bacteria in compost.

  18. Continuous exposure of pesticides in an aquifer changes microbial biomass, diversity and degradation potential

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    de Lipthay, J. R.; Johnsen, K.; Aamand, J.;

    2000-01-01

    We studied in situ effects of pesticide exposure on microbial degradation potential and community structure of aquifer sediments. Sediment samples pre-exposed to pesticides were significantly different to non-exposed control samples. Pre-exposed sediment showed an increased degradation potential...... towards phenoxyalcanoic acid herbicides as well as impact on microbial diversity was observed. Furthermore, bacterial biomass was changed, e.g. increased numbers of phenoxyalcanoic acid degraders in pesticide exposed sediment....

  19. Assessment of tillage systems in organic farming: influence of soil structure on microbial biomass. First results

    OpenAIRE

    Vian, Jean François; Peigné, Joséphine; Chaussod, Rémi; Roger-Estrade, Jean

    2007-01-01

    Soil tillage modifies environmental conditions of soil microorganisms and their ability to release nitrogen. We compare the influence of reduced tillage (RT) and mouldboard ploughing (MP) on the soil microbial functioning in organic farming. In order to connect soil structure generated by these tillage systems on the soil microbial biomass we adopt a particular sampling scheme based on the morphological characterisation of the soil structure by the description of the soil profile. This method...

  20. Effect of acetate on lead toxicity to microbial biomass in a red soil

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1999-01-01

    A laboratory incubation experiment was conducted to elucidate the effect of acetate on lead bioavailability and toxicity to microbial biomass in a red soil. Treatment included the application of lead at six different levels i.e., 0(background), 100, 200, 300, 450 and 600μg/g soil with three levels of the acetate(0, 900 and 2700 μg/g soil). Results indicated that the application of acetate along or at the lower lead levels of 100 and 200μg/g soil stimulated the soil microbial biomass. The addition of acetate at the higher lead levels of 300, 450 and 600 μg/g soil caused significantly greater reductions in the biomass carbon(Cmic) and the biomass nitrogen(Nmic), compared with the control or the same lead levels applied individually. A greater increase in the biomass C:N ratio occurred by acetate addition at the same lead levels. The concentration of 0.01mol/L CaCl2-extractable lead was considerably higher in the lead plus acetate treatments than at the same lead levels with no acetate.Based on these results, it was concluded that the application of acetate might have suppressed the lead adsorption in the soil which in turn resulted in its more bioavailability and hence more toxicity to the soil microbial biomass.

  1. Metal impacts on microbial biomass in the anoxic sediments of a contaminated lake

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gough, Heidi L.; Dahl, Amy L.; Nolan, Melissa A.; Gaillard, Jean-Francois; Stahl, David A.

    2008-04-26

    Little is known about the long-term impacts of metal contamination on the microbiota of anoxic lake sediments. In this study, we examined microbial biomass and metals (arsenic, cadmium, chromium, copper, iron, lead, manganese, and zinc) in the sediments of Lake DePue, a backwater lake located near a former zinc smelter. Sediment core samples were examined using two independent measures for microbial biomass (total microscopic counts and total phospholipid-phosphate concentrations), and for various fractions of each metal (pore water extracts, sequential extractions, and total extracts of all studied metals and zinc speciation by X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS). Zinc concentrations were up to 1000 times higher than reported for sediments in the adjacent Illinois River, and ranged from 21,400 mg/kg near the source to 1,680 mg/kg near the river. However, solid metal fractions were not well correlated with pore water concentrations, and were not good predictors of biomass concentrations. Instead, biomass, which varied among sites by as much as two-times, was inversely correlated with concentrations of pore water zinc and arsenic as established by multiple linear regression. Monitoring of other parameters known to naturally influence biomass in sediments (e.g., organic carbon concentrations, nitrogen concentrations, pH, sediment texture, and macrophytes) revealed no differences that could explain observed biomass trends. This study provides strong support for control of microbial abundance by pore water metal concentrations in contaminated freshwater sediments.

  2. Total microbial biomass and metabolic state of microorganisms in a typical chernozem of Moldova

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frunze, N. I.

    2013-04-01

    New data on the total microbial biomass and its metabolic state in a typical chernozem of Moldova were obtained. The carbon content of the microbial biomass in the arable chernozems varied from 419 to 1033 μg/g soil and from 1002 to 1432 μg C/g soil under the shelterbelts. The contents of the microbial biomass under the shelter belts was by 2.1-2.9, 1.6-2.2, and 1.2-1.3 times higher than that in the unfertilized and fertilized with mineral and organic nutrients chernozems, respectively. Crop rotations with and without lucerne were examined. The functional activity of the microbial communities in the chernozem was determined by their metabolic diversity, the ability to use alternative metabolic reactions, and the domination of r-strategists. The content of the active part of the microbial community in the natural ecosystems constituted approximately 1/3 (29.1% on the average) of the total microbial community; in the arable soils, it as lower (9.8-21.8%).

  3. EFFECT OF WATER AVAILABILITY ON SOIL MICROBIAL BIOMASS IN SECONDARY FOREST IN EASTERN AMAZONIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lívia Gabrig Turbay Rangel-Vasconcelos

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Soil microbial biomass (SMB plays an important role in nutrient cycling in agroecosystems, and is limited by several factors, such as soil water availability. This study assessed the effects of soil water availability on microbial biomass and its variation over time in the Latossolo Amarelo concrecionário of a secondary forest in eastern Amazonia. The fumigation-extraction method was used to estimate the soil microbial biomass carbon and nitrogen content (SMBC and SMBN. An adaptation of the fumigation-incubation method was used to determine basal respiration (CO2-SMB. The metabolic quotient (qCO2 and ratio of microbial carbon:organic carbon (CMIC:CORG were calculated based on those results. Soil moisture was generally significantly lower during the dry season and in the control plots. Irrigation raised soil moisture to levels close to those observed during the rainy season, but had no significant effect on SMB. The variables did not vary on a seasonal basis, except for the microbial C/N ratio that suggested the occurrence of seasonal shifts in the structure of the microbial community.

  4. Long-term effects of aided phytostabilisation of trace elements on microbial biomass and activity, enzyme activities, and composition of microbial community in the Jales contaminated mine spoils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renella, Giancarlo; Landi, Loretta; Ascher, Judith; Ceccherini, Maria Teresa; Pietramellara, Giacomo; Mench, Michel; Nannipieri, Paolo

    2008-04-01

    We studied the effectiveness of remediation on microbial endpoints, namely microbial biomass and activity, microbial and plant species richness, of an As-contaminated mine spoil, amended with compost (C) alone and in combination with beringite (B) or zerovalent iron grit (Z), to increase organic matter content and reduce trace elements mobility, and to allow Holcus lanatus and Pinus pinaster growth. Untreated spoil showed the lowest microbial biomass and activity and hydrolase activities, and H. lanatus as sole plant species, whereas the presented aided phytostabilisation option, especially CBZ treatment, significantly increased microbial biomass and activity and allowed colonisation by several plant species, comparable to those of an uncontaminated sandy soil. Microbial species richness was only increased in spoils amended with C alone. No clear correlation occurred between trace element mobility and microbial parameters and plant species richness. Our results indicate that the choice of indicators of soil remediation practices is a bottleneck.

  5. Afforestation impacts microbial biomass and its natural (13)C and (15)N abundance in soil aggregates in central China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Junjun; Zhang, Qian; Yang, Fan; Lei, Yao; Zhang, Quanfa; Cheng, Xiaoli

    2016-10-15

    We investigated soil microbial biomass and its natural abundance of δ(13)C and δ(15)N in aggregates (>2000μm, 250-2000μm, 53-250μm and plantations) soils, adjacent croplands and open area (i.e., control) in the Danjiangkou Reservoir area of central China. The afforested soils averaged higher microbial biomass carbon (MBC) and nitrogen (MBN) levels in all aggregates than in open area and cropland, with higher microbial biomass in micro-aggregates (2000μm). The δ(13)C of soil microbial biomass was more enriched in woodland soils than in other land use types, while δ(15)N of soil microbial biomass was more enriched compared with that of organic soil in all land use types. The δ(13)C and δ(15)N of microbial biomass were positively correlated with the δ(13)C and δ(15)N of organic soil across aggregates and land use types, whereas the (13)C and (15)N enrichment of microbial biomass exhibited linear decreases with the corresponding C:N ratio of organic soil. Our results suggest that shifts in the natural (13)C and (15)N abundance of microbial biomass reflect changes in the stabilization and turnover of soil organic matter (SOM) and thereby imply that afforestation can greatly impact SOM accumulation over the long-term. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Extraction of solubles from plant biomass for use as microbial growth stimulant and methods related thereto

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, Ming Woei

    2015-12-08

    A method for producing a microbial growth stimulant (MGS) from a plant biomass is described. In one embodiment, an ammonium hydroxide solution is used to extract a solution of proteins and ammonia from the biomass. Some of the proteins and ammonia are separated from the extracted solution to provide the MGS solution. The removed ammonia can be recycled and the proteins are useful as animal feeds. In one embodiment, the method comprises extracting solubles from pretreated lignocellulosic biomass with a cellulase enzyme-producing growth medium (such T. reesei) in the presence of water and an aqueous extract.

  7. Microbial biomass and activity in subsurface sediments from Vejen, Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Albrechtsen, Hans-Jørgen; Winding, Anne

    1992-01-01

    of bacteria varied from 0.5 to 1,203 x 103 colony forming units/g dry weight (gdw); total numbers of bacteria acridine orange direct counts (AODC) varied from 1.7 to 147 × 107 cells/gdw; growth rates (incorporation of [3H]-thymidine) varied from 1.4 to 60.7 × 104 cells/(gdw · day); and rate constants...... a single abiotic parameter that could explain the variation of size and activity of the microbial population. The microbial data obtained in these geologically young sediments were compared to literature data from older sediments, and this comparison showed that age and type of geological formation might...... be important for the size and activity of the microbial populations....

  8. Characterization of three plant biomass-degrading microbial consortia by metagenomics- and metasecretomics-based approaches

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jiménez, Diego Javier; Brossi, Maria Julia de Lima; Schuckel, Julia; Kracun, Stjepan Kresimir; Willats, William George Tycho; van Elsas, Jan Dirk

    2016-01-01

    The selection of microbes by enrichment on plant biomass has been proposed as an efficient way to develop new strategies for lignocellulose saccharification. Here, we report an in-depth analysis of soil-derived microbial consortia that were trained to degrade once-used wheat straw (WS1-M),

  9. Digestion of algal biomass for electricity generation in microbial fuel cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishio, Koichi; Hashimoto, Kazuhito; Watanabe, Kazuya

    2013-01-01

    Algal biomass serves as a fuel for electricity generation in microbial fuel cells. This study constructed a model consortium comprised of an alga-digesting Lactobacillus and an iron-reducing Geobacter for electricity generation from photo-grown Clamydomonas cells. Total power-conversion efficiency (from Light to electricity) was estimated to be 0.47%.

  10. Effect of land use on microbial biomass and enzyme activities in tropical soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maharjan, Menuka; Sanaullah, Muhammad; Kuzyakov, Yakov

    2016-04-01

    Land use change especially from forest to intensive agriculture for sustaining livelihood causing severe consequence on soil quality. Soil microbial biomass and enzyme activities are very sensitive to change in environment. The objective was to assess effects of three land uses i.e. forest, organic and conventional farming on microbial biomass C and N and enzymes involved in C-cycle (β-glucosidase), N-cycle (leucine-aminopeptidase), P-cycle (Phosphatase) and S-cycle (Sulphatase) at different depth (0-100 cm with 10 cm in interval) of soil in Chitwan, Nepal. The result showed that both carbon and nitrogen content (%) was significantly higher in organic farming than conventional farming and forest. However, the trend decreased in lower depth. Significantly high microbial biomass C and N (μg C and N g-1 soil) were found in organic farming than conventional farming and forest at 0-10 cm but the trend was inconsistent in lower depth. β-glucosidase, leucine-aminopeptidase and sulphatase (nmol g-1 soil) activities were higher in organic and conventional farming compared to forest at 0-20 cm. Phosphatase activity was higher in conventional farming than forest and organic farming at 0-20cm. The activities were inconsistent below 20 cm. Application of farmyard manure and organic matter from the vegetation contributes the higher microbial biomass and enzyme activities in organic farming.

  11. Stoichiometric modelling of assimilatory and dissimilatory biomass utilisation in a microbial community

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, Kristopher A.; Jennings, Ryan deM.; Inskeep, William P.; Carlson, Ross P.

    2017-01-01

    Summary Assimilatory and dissimilatory utilisation of autotroph biomass by heterotrophs is a fundamental mechanism for the transfer of nutrients and energy across trophic levels. Metagenome data from a tractable, thermoacidophilic microbial community in Yellowstone National Park was used to build an in silico model to study heterotrophic utilisation of autotroph biomass using elementary flux mode analysis and flux balance analysis. Assimilatory and dissimilatory biomass utilisation was investigated using 29 forms of biomass-derived dissolved organic carbon (DOC) including individual monomer pools, individual macromolecular pools and aggregate biomass. The simulations identified ecologically competitive strategies for utilizing DOC under conditions of varying electron donor, electron acceptor or enzyme limitation. The simulated growth environment affected which form of DOC was the most competitive use of nutrients; for instance, oxygen limitation favoured utilisation of less reduced and fermentable DOC while carbon-limited environments favoured more reduced DOC. Additionally, metabolism was studied considering two encompassing metabolic strategies: simultaneous versus sequential use of DOC. Results of this study bound the transfer of nutrients and energy through microbial food webs, providing a quantitative foundation relevant to most microbial ecosystems. PMID:27387069

  12. Comparative Study on Microphytobenthic Pigments and Total Microbial Biomass by ATP in Intertidal Sediments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sun-Yong Ha

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Biomass and community composition of microphytobentos in tidal flats were studied by HPLC analysis and also investigated to examine the relationship between microphytobenthic pigments and Adenosine-5' triphosphate (ATP as an index of total microbial biomass in intertidal environments (muddy and sandy sediment of Gyeonggi Bay, west coast of Korea. Microphytobenthic pigments and ATP concentration in muddy sediment were the highest at the surface while the biomass of microphytobenthos in sandy sediment was the highest at the sub-surface (0.75 cm sediment depth. The detected pigments of microphytobenthos were chlorophyll a, b (euglenophytes, c3, peridinin (dinoflagellates, fucoxanthin (diatom or chrysophytes, diadinoxanthin, alloxanthin (cryptophytes, diatoxanthin, zeaxanthin (cyanobacteria, β-carotein, and pheophytin a (the degraded product of chlorophyll a. Among the pigments which were detected, the concentration of fucoxanthin was the highest, indicating that diatoms dominated in the microphytobenthic community of the tidal flats. There was little significant correlation between OC (Organic Carbon and ATP in both sediments. However, a positive correlation between chlorophyll a concentration and ATP concentration was found in sandy sediment, suggesting that microbial biomass could be affected by labile OC derived from microphytobenthos. These results provide information that may help us understand the relationship between microphytobenthos and microbial biomass in different intertidal sediment environments.

  13. Effect of anions on Toxicity of Cadmium Applied to MIcrobial Biomass in Red Soil

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    K.S.KHAN; XIEZHENGMIAO; 等

    1997-01-01

    A laboratory incubation experiment was conducted to elucidat the effects of associated anions on toxicity of cadmium applied to microbial biomass in the red soil. Cadmium was applied at six different levels,i.e.,O(background),5,15,30,60 and 100μg g-1 soil in the form of either cadmium acetate or cadmium chloride. Application of cadmium as cadmium acetate markedly reduced the soil microbial biomass carbon compared to cadmium applied as cadmium chlorde at all the tested levels.Similarly,organic carbon to biomass carbon ration in the soil was markedly increased by increasing the level of the cadmium in the soil as cadmium acetate,while the change wa much smaller in the case of cadmium chloride at the same cadmium levels.The results suggested that due consideration should be given to the source of cadmium while deciding the cadmium levles in experiments.

  14. Microbial biodiesel production by direct methanolysis of oleaginous biomass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thliveros, Panagiotis; Uçkun Kiran, Esra; Webb, Colin

    2014-04-01

    Biodiesel is usually produced by the transesterification of vegetable oils and animal fats with methanol, catalyzed by strong acids or bases. This study introduces a novel biodiesel production method that features direct base-catalyzed methanolysis of the cellular biomass of oleaginous yeast Rhodosporidium toruloides Y4. NaOH was used as catalyst for transesterification reactions and the variables affecting the esterification level including catalyst concentration, reaction temperature, reaction time, solvent loading (methanol) and moisture content were investigated using the oleaginous yeast biomass. The most suitable pretreatment condition was found to be 4gL(-1) NaOH and 1:20 (w/v) dried biomass to methanol ratio for 10h at 50°C and under ambient pressure. Under these conditions, the fatty acid methyl ester (FAME) yield was 97.7%. Therefore, the novel method of direct base-catalyzed methanolysis of R. toruloides is a much simpler, less tedious and time-consuming, process than the conventional processes with higher FAME (biodiesel) conversion yield.

  15. Annual Removal of Aboveground Plant Biomass Alters Soil Microbial Responses to Warming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Kai; Yuan, Mengting M; Xie, Jianping; Li, Dejun; Qin, Yujia; Hale, Lauren E; Wu, Liyou; Deng, Ye; He, Zhili; Van Nostrand, Joy D; Luo, Yiqi; Tiedje, James M; Zhou, Jizhong

    2016-09-27

    Clipping (i.e., harvesting aboveground plant biomass) is common in agriculture and for bioenergy production. However, microbial responses to clipping in the context of climate warming are poorly understood. We investigated the interactive effects of grassland warming and clipping on soil properties and plant and microbial communities, in particular, on microbial functional genes. Clipping alone did not change the plant biomass production, but warming and clipping combined increased the C4 peak biomass by 47% and belowground net primary production by 110%. Clipping alone and in combination with warming decreased the soil carbon input from litter by 81% and 75%, respectively. With less carbon input, the abundances of genes involved in degrading relatively recalcitrant carbon increased by 38% to 137% in response to either clipping or the combined treatment, which could weaken long-term soil carbon stability and trigger positive feedback with respect to warming. Clipping alone also increased the abundance of genes for nitrogen fixation, mineralization, and denitrification by 32% to 39%. Such potentially stimulated nitrogen fixation could help compensate for the 20% decline in soil ammonium levels caused by clipping alone and could contribute to unchanged plant biomass levels. Moreover, clipping tended to interact antagonistically with warming, especially with respect to effects on nitrogen cycling genes, demonstrating that single-factor studies cannot predict multifactorial changes. These results revealed that clipping alone or in combination with warming altered soil and plant properties as well as the abundance and structure of soil microbial functional genes. Aboveground biomass removal for biofuel production needs to be reconsidered, as the long-term soil carbon stability may be weakened. Global change involves simultaneous alterations, including those caused by climate warming and land management practices (e.g., clipping). Data on the interactive effects of

  16. [Dynamics of microbial biomass P and its affecting factors in a long-term fertilized black soil].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Dongpo; Wu, Zhijie; Chen, Lijun; Zhu, Ping; Ren, Jun; Liang, Chenghua; Peng, Chang; Gao, Hongjun

    2004-10-01

    This paper studied the microbial biomass P in a long-term fertilized black soil. The soil was fertilized by farmyard manure (M2, M4) and chemical fertilizer (NPK), and the dynamics of soil microbial biomass P was monitored during crop growth season. The results showed that the microbial biomass P in different treatments was 8.75-47.68 mg x kg(-1) (M4), 3.02-37.16 mg x kg(-1) (M2), 1.59-10.62 mg x kg(-1) (NPK), and 0.76-6.74 mg x kg(-1) (CK). The microbial biomass P in M4 and M2 was the highest at reproductive growth stage, and that in NPK and CK was the highest at early growth stage. The significant difference of soil microbial biomass P induced by different amounts and types of fertilizer application was not varied with the period and stage of plant growth. In all treatments, no significant correlation was found between the dynamics of soil microbial biomass P and the soil biological, physical and chemical properties in plant growth period. Soil microbial biomass P had a very significant positive correlation with soil biological, physical and chemical properties (expect K), and a significant positive correlation with the N, P and K contents of plants and soil water content.

  17. Temporal and spatial patterns of microbial community biomass and composition in the Southern California Current Ecosystem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Andrew G.; Landry, Michael R.; Selph, Karen E.; Wokuluk, John J.

    2015-02-01

    As part of the California Current Ecosystem Long Term Ecological Research (CCE-LTER) Program, samples for epifluorescence microscopy and flow cytometry (FCM) were collected at ten 'cardinal' stations on the California Cooperative Oceanic Fisheries Investigations (CalCOFI) grid during 25 quarterly cruises from 2004 to 2010 to investigate the biomass, composition and size-structure of microbial communities within the southern CCE. Based on our results, we divided the region into offshore, and inshore northern and southern zones. Mixed-layer phytoplankton communities in the offshore had lower biomass (16±2 μg C L-1; all errors represent the 95% confidence interval), smaller size-class cells and biomass was more stable over seasonal cycles. Offshore phytoplankton biomass peaked during the winter months. Mixed-layer phytoplankton communities in the northern and southern inshore zones had higher biomass (78±22 and 32±9 μg C L-1, respectively), larger size-class cells and stronger seasonal biomass patterns. Inshore communities were often dominated by micro-size (20-200 μm) diatoms; however, autotrophic dinoflagellates dominated during late 2005 to early 2006, corresponding to a year of delayed upwelling in the northern CCE. Biomass trends in mid and deep euphotic zone samples were similar to those seen in the mixed-layer, but with declining biomass with depth, especially for larger size classes in the inshore regions. Mixed-layer ratios of autotrophic carbon to chlorophyll a (AC:Chl a) had a mean value of 51.5±5.3. Variability of nitracline depth, bin-averaged AC:Chl a in the mixed-layer ranged from 40 to 80 and from 22 to 35 for the deep euphotic zone, both with significant positive relationships to nitracline depth. Total living microbial carbon, including auto- and heterotrophs, consistently comprised about half of particulate organic carbon (POC).

  18. Effects of Cadmium,Lead ,and Zinc on Size of Microbial Biomass in Red Soil

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    K.S.KHAN; XIEZHENGMIAO; 等

    1998-01-01

    A laboratory incubation experiment was conducted to study the influence of cadmium(Cd),lead (Pb) and zinc( Zn) on the size of the microbial biomass in red soil.All the three metals were applied,separately,at five different levels that were:Cd at 5,15,30,60, and 100μgg-1;Pb at 100,200,300,450 and 600μg g-1 and Zn at 50,100,150,200 and 250μg g-1 soil,In Comparison to uncaontaminated soil ,the microbial biomass carbon and biomass nitrogen decreased sharply in soils contaminated with Cd,Pb and Zn,A more considerable increase in the microbial biomass C:N ratio was observed in the metal contaminated soils than the non-treated control.Among the tested metals ,Cd displayed the greatest biocidal effect followed by Zn and Pb,showin their relative toxicity in the order of Cd>Zn>Pb.

  19. Annual Removal of Aboveground Plant Biomass Alters Soil Microbial Responses to Warming

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kai Xue

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Clipping (i.e., harvesting aboveground plant biomass is common in agriculture and for bioenergy production. However, microbial responses to clipping in the context of climate warming are poorly understood. We investigated the interactive effects of grassland warming and clipping on soil properties and plant and microbial communities, in particular, on microbial functional genes. Clipping alone did not change the plant biomass production, but warming and clipping combined increased the C4 peak biomass by 47% and belowground net primary production by 110%. Clipping alone and in combination with warming decreased the soil carbon input from litter by 81% and 75%, respectively. With less carbon input, the abundances of genes involved in degrading relatively recalcitrant carbon increased by 38% to 137% in response to either clipping or the combined treatment, which could weaken long-term soil carbon stability and trigger positive feedback with respect to warming. Clipping alone also increased the abundance of genes for nitrogen fixation, mineralization, and denitrification by 32% to 39%. Such potentially stimulated nitrogen fixation could help compensate for the 20% decline in soil ammonium levels caused by clipping alone and could contribute to unchanged plant biomass levels. Moreover, clipping tended to interact antagonistically with warming, especially with respect to effects on nitrogen cycling genes, demonstrating that single-factor studies cannot predict multifactorial changes. These results revealed that clipping alone or in combination with warming altered soil and plant properties as well as the abundance and structure of soil microbial functional genes. Aboveground biomass removal for biofuel production needs to be reconsidered, as the long-term soil carbon stability may be weakened.

  20. Does agricultural crop diversity enhance soil microbial biomass and organic matter dynamics? A meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDaniel, M D; Tiemann, L K; Grandy, A S

    2014-04-01

    Our increasing dependence on a small number of agricultural crops, such as corn, is leading to reductions in agricultural biodiversity. Reductions in the number of crops in rotation or the replacement of rotations by monocultures are responsible for this loss of biodiversity. The belowground implications of simplifying agricultural plant communities remain unresolved; however, agroecosystem sustainability will be severely compromised if reductions in biodiversity reduce soil C and N concentrations, alter microbial communities, and degrade soil ecosystem functions as reported in natural communities. We conducted a meta-analysis of 122 studies to examine crop rotation effects on total soil C and N concentrations, and the faster cycling microbial biomass C and N pools that play key roles in soil nutrient cycling and physical processes such as aggregate formation. We specifically examined how rotation crop type and management practices influence C and N dynamics in different climates and soil types. We found that adding one or more crops in rotation to a monoculture increased total soil C by 3.6% and total N by 5.3%, but when rotations included a cover crop (i.e., crops that are not harvested but produced to enrich the soil and capture inorganic N), total C increased by 8.5% and total N 12.8%. Rotations substantially increased the soil microbial biomass C (20.7%) and N (26.1%) pools, and these overwhelming effects on microbial biomass were not moderated by crop type or management practices. Crop rotations, especially those that include cover crops, sustain soil quality and productivity by enhancing soil C, N, and microbial biomass, making them a cornerstone for sustainable agroecosystems.

  1. Eukaryotic and prokaryotic microbial communities during microalgal biomass production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakaniemi, Aino-Maija; Hulatt, Chris J; Wakeman, Kathryn D; Thomas, David N; Puhakka, Jaakko A

    2012-11-01

    Eukaryotic and bacterial communities were characterized and quantified in microalgal photobioreactor cultures of freshwater Chlorella vulgaris and marine Dunaliella tertiolecta. The microalgae exhibited good growth, whilst both cultures contained diverse bacterial communities. Both cultures included Proteobacteria and Bacteroidetes, while C. vulgaris cultures also contained Actinobacteria. The bacterial genera present in the cultures were different due to different growth medium salinities and possibly different extracellular products. Bacterial community profiles were relatively stable in D. tertiolecta cultures but not in C. vulgaris cultures likely due to presence of ciliates (Colpoda sp.) in the latter. The presence of ciliates did not, however, cause decrease in total number of C. vulgaris or bacteria during 14 days of cultivation. Quantitative PCR (qPCR) reliably showed relative microalgal and bacterial cell numbers in the batch cultures with stable microbial communities, but was not effective when bacterial communities varied. Raw culture samples were successfully used as qPCR templates.

  2. Photosynthetic membrane-less microbial fuel cells to enhance microalgal biomass concentration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uggetti, Enrica; Puigagut, Jaume

    2016-10-01

    The aim of this study was to quantitatively assess the net increase in microalgal biomass concentration induced by photosynthetic microbial fuel cells (PMFC). The experiment was conducted on six lab-scale PMFC constituted by an anodic chamber simulating an anaerobic digester connected to a cathodic chamber consisting of a mixed algae consortia culture. Three PMFC were operated at closed circuit (PMFC(+)) whereas three PMFC were left unconnected as control (PMFC(-)). PMFC(+) produced a higher amount of carbon dioxide as a product of the organic matter oxidation that resulted in 1.5-3 times higher biomass concentration at the cathode compartment when compared to PMFC(-).

  3. Mercury in water and biomass of microbial communities in hot springs of Yellowstone National Park, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, S.A.; Behnke, S.; Slack, K.; Krabbenhoft, D.P.; Nordstrom, D.K.; Burr, M.D.; Striegl, R.G.

    2006-01-01

    Ultra-clean sampling methods and approaches typically used in pristine environments were applied to quantify concentrations of Hg species in water and microbial biomass from hot springs of Yellowstone National Park, features that are geologically enriched with Hg. Microbial populations of chemically-diverse hot springs were also characterized using modern methods in molecular biology as the initial step toward ongoing work linking Hg speciation with microbial processes. Molecular methods (amplification of environmental DNA using 16S rDNA primers, cloning, denatured gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) screening of clone libraries, and sequencing of representative clones) were used to examine the dominant members of microbial communities in hot springs. Total Hg (THg), monomethylated Hg (MeHg), pH, temperature, and other parameters influential to Hg speciation and microbial ecology are reported for hot springs water and associated microbial mats. Several hot springs indicate the presence of MeHg in microbial mats with concentrations ranging from 1 to 10 ng g-1 (dry weight). Concentrations of THg in mats ranged from 4.9 to 120,000 ng g-1 (dry weight). Combined data from surveys of geothermal water, lakes, and streams show that aqueous THg concentrations range from l to 600 ng L-1. Species and concentrations of THg in mats and water vary significantly between hot springs, as do the microorganisms found at each site. ?? 2006.

  4. A survey of Opportunities for Microbial Conversion of Biomass to Hydrocarbon Compatible Fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jovanovic, Iva; Jones, Susanne B.; Santosa, Daniel M.; Dai, Ziyu; Ramasamy, Karthikeyan K.; Zhu, Yunhua

    2010-09-01

    Biomass is uniquely able to supply renewable and sustainable liquid transportation fuels. In the near term, the Biomass program has a 2012 goal of cost competitive cellulosic ethanol. However, beyond 2012, there will be an increasing need to provide liquid transportation fuels that are more compatible with the existing infrastructure and can supply fuel into all transportation sectors, including aviation and heavy road transport. Microbial organisms are capable of producing a wide variety of fuel and fuel precursors such as higher alcohols, ethers, esters, fatty acids, alkenes and alkanes. This report surveys liquid fuels and fuel precurors that can be produced from microbial processes, but are not yet ready for commercialization using cellulosic feedstocks. Organisms, current research and commercial activities, and economics are addressed. Significant improvements to yields and process intensification are needed to make these routes economic. Specifically, high productivity, titer and efficient conversion are the key factors for success.

  5. Passive methods for quantifying the In Situ Flux of Water, Uranium, and Microbial Biomass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newman, M. A.; Peacock, A.; Hatfield, K.; Stucker, V.; Cho, J.; Klammler, H.; Ranville, J. F.; Cabaniss, S.; Annable, M. D.; Perminova, I.

    2011-12-01

    The goal of this project was to develop a novel sensor that incorporates field-tested concepts of the passive flux meter (PFM) to provide direct in situ measures of uranium and groundwater fluxes. The sensor uses two sorbents and tracers to measure uranium flux and specific discharge directly-sensor principles and design will apply to fluxes of other radionuclides, metals, and co-contaminants. Flux measurements will assist in obtaining field-scale quantification of subsurface processes affecting uranium transport (e.g., advection) and transformation (e.g., uranium attenuation) and further advance conceptual and computational models for field scale simulations. Project efforts will expand our current understanding of how field-scale spatial variations in fluxes of uranium, groundwater and salient electron donor/acceptors are coupled to spatial variations in measured microbial biomass/community composition, effective field-scale uranium mass balances, attenuation, and stability. Field tests in the La Quinta and Super 8 galleries at the Rifle IFRC site were conducted to assess ambient groundwater, uranium, and microbial biomass fluxes. The latter were determined using a newly designed Baffled Multilevel Sampling (BMLS) device installed in typical screened monitoring wells to provide aqueous concentrations of dissolved or suspended constituents over multiple isolated vertical sections of the well. Biomass mass fluxes were calculated from the product of BMLS data for microbial cell counts from PCR analyses and PFM water fluxes collected from coincident well sections. Expected microbial discharge for Eubacteria in the La Quinta gallery was estimated to be 1.7 x 1012 cells per day. The biomass discharges for Geobacter, Methanogens, and Anaeromyxobacter remain to be determined. Expected uranium discharges predicted from stochastic simulations using PFM measures of flux over the La Quinta gallery transect and the injection-well transect of the Super 8 gallery were 26 mg

  6. Dynamic relationships between microbial biomass, respiration, inorganic nutrients and enzyme activities: informing enzyme based decomposition models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daryl L Moorhead

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available We re-examined data from a recent litter decay study to determine if additional insights could be gained to inform decomposition modeling. Rinkes et al. (2013 conducted 14-day laboratory incubations of sugar maple (Acer saccharum or white oak (Quercus alba leaves, mixed with sand (0.4% organic C content or loam (4.1% organic C. They measured microbial biomass C, carbon dioxide efflux, soil ammonium, nitrate, and phosphate concentrations, and β-glucosidase (BG, β-N-acetyl-glucosaminidase (NAG, and acid phosphatase (AP activities on days 1, 3, and 14. Analyses of relationships among variables yielded different insights than original analyses of individual variables. For example, although respiration rates per g soil were higher for loam than sand, rates per g soil C were actually higher for sand than loam, and rates per g microbial C showed little difference between treatments. Microbial biomass C peaked on day 3 when biomass-specific activities of enzymes were lowest, suggesting uptake of litter C without extracellular hydrolysis. This result refuted a common model assumption that all enzyme production is constitutive and thus proportional to biomass, and/or indicated that part of litter decay is independent of enzyme activity. The length and angle of vectors defined by ratios of enzyme activities (BG/NAG versus BG/AP represent relative microbial investments in C (length, and N and P (angle acquiring enzymes. Shorter lengths on day 3 suggested low C limitation, whereas greater lengths on day 14 suggested an increase in C limitation with decay. The soils and litter in this study generally had stronger P limitation (angles > 45˚. Reductions in vector angles to < 45˚ for sand by day 14 suggested a shift to N limitation. These relational variables inform enzyme-based models, and are usually much less ambiguous when obtained from a single study in which measurements were made on the same samples than when extrapolated from separate studies.

  7. [Dynamics of microbial biomass C in a black soil under long-term fertilization and related affecting factors].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Dongpo; Wu, Zhijie; Chen, Lijun; Zhu, Ping; Ren, Jun; Peng, Chang; Liang, Chenghua

    2004-08-01

    The effect of long-term fertilization on the dynamics of microbial biomass C in a typical black soil of Northeastern China was studied in a field trail treated by different fertilizations. The results showed that the amount of soil microbial biomass C under different fertilizations varied significantly with growth stages. It was the highest in farmyard manure (M2 and M4) treatments, with a less seasonal fluctuation, second in NPK treatment, the peak at sowing period, and the lowest in CK, the peak at wax maturity stage. No significant correlation was found between the dynamic changes of soil microbial biomass C and soil biological, physical and chemical properties in all treatments, but the correlation of soil microbial biomass C with the contents of N, P and K in plants and that of crude protein in grain was significantly positive.

  8. Effect of Long—Term Straw Incorporation on Soil Microbial Biomass and C and N Dynamics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHENRENFANG; P.C.BROOKES; 等

    1997-01-01

    A study was performed on the long-term effect of straw incorporation on soil microbial biomass C contents,C and N dynamics in both Rothamsted and Woburn soils.The results showed that for both soils,the microbial biomass C contents were significantly different among all the treatments,and followed the sequence in treatments of straw chopped and incorporated into 10 cm(CI10)>straw burnt and incorporated into 10 cm(BI10)>staw chopped and incorporated into 20 cm(CI20)>straw burnt and incorporated into 20 cm(BI20).Laboratory incubation of soils showed that the cumulative CO2 evolution was closely related to the soil microbial biomass C content ,Carbon dioxide evolution rates(CO2-C,μg(g.d)-1)decreased rapidly in the first two weeks' incubation,then decreased more slowly,The initial K2SO4-extractable NH4-N and NO33-N contents were low and similar in all the treatments,and all increased gradually with the incubation time ,However,net N immobiliztion was oberved in chopped treatments for Rothamsted soils durig the first 4 weeks ,Nevertheless,more N mineralization occurred in Treatment CI10 than any other treatment at the end of incubation for both soils .The Woburn soils ,could more easily suffer from the leaching of nitrate because the soils were more pemeable and more N was mineralized during the incubation compared to the Rothamsted soils.

  9. [Progress in electricity generation from biomass using microbial fuel cell MFC)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Yu-Jie; Wang, Xin; Li, He; Yang, Qiao; Qu, You-Peng; Shi, Xin-Xin; Liu, Jia; He, Wei-Hua; Xie, Ming-Li

    2010-10-01

    By applying bacteria as anodic catalyst, microbial fuel cell (MFC) can directly convert biomass energy into electrical energy, provided a new way for biomass utilization. Previous studies showed that the substrates and their concentration substantially affected performance of MFC. High power output was obtained when simple organic such as volatile fatty acids (VFA), alcohols or glucose was used as substrate. However, physical, chemical or even biological pretreatment methods were needed when substrate was complex organic. Addition of simple organic as co-substrate was also demonstrated to be an efficient way for refractory compounds degradation in MFC. Using biomass as substrates, MFC will be applied in area such as bioenergy recovery from wastewater, power supply in outfield and biosensors.

  10. Effects of elevated nitrogen deposition on soil microbial biomass carbon in major subtropical forests of southern China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hui WANG; Jiangming MO; Xiankai LU; Jinghua XUE; Jiong LI; Yunting FANG

    2009-01-01

    The effects of elevated nitrogen deposition on soil microbial biomass carbon (C) and extractable dissolved organic carbon (DOC) in three types of forest of southern China were studied in November, 2004 and June, 2006. Plots were established in a pine forest (PF), a mixed pine and broad-leaved forest (MF) and monsoon evergreen broad-leaved forest (MEBF) in the Dinghushan Nature Reserve. Nitrogen treatments included a control (no N addition), low N (50 kg N/(hm2.a)), medium N (100 kg N/ (hm2. a)) and high N (150 kg N/(hm2. a)). Microbial biomass C and extractable DOC were determined using a chloro-form fumigation-extraction method. Results indicate that microbial biomass C and extractable DOC were higher in June, 2006 than in November, 2004 and higher in the MEBF than in the PF or the MF. The response of soil microbial biomass C and extractable DOC to nitrogen deposition varied depending on the forest type and the level of nitrogen treatment. In the PF or MF forests, no significantly different effects of nitrogen addition were found on soil microbial biomass C and extractable DOC. In the MEBF, however, the soil microbial biomass C generally decreased with increased nitrogen levels and high nitrogen addition significantly reduced soil microbial biomass C. The response of soil extractable DOC to added nitrogen in the MEBF shows the opposite trend to soil microbial biomass C. These results suggest that nitrogen deposition may increase the accumulation of soil organic carbon in the MEBF in the study region.

  11. Effects of phosphorus addition on soil microbial biomass and community composition in three forest types in tropical China

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Lei; Gundersen, Per; Zhang, Tao;

    2012-01-01

    Elevated nitrogen (N) deposition in humid tropical regions may aggravate phosphorus (P) deficiency in forest on old weathered soil found in these regions. From January 2007 to August 2009, we studied the responses of soil microbial biomass and community composition to P addition (in two monthly...... portions at level of 15 g P m-2 yr-1) in three tropical forests in southern China. The forests were an old-growth forest and two disturbed forests (mixed species and pine dominated). The objective was to test the hypothesis that P addition would increase microbial biomass and change the composition...... of the microbial community, and that the old-growth forests would be more sensitive to P addition due to its higher soil N availability. Microbial biomass C (MBC) was estimated twice a year and the microbial community structure was quantified by phospholipid fatty acid (PLFA) analysis at the end of the experiment...

  12. Analysis of Low-Biomass Microbial Communities in the Deep Biosphere.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morono, Y; Inagaki, F

    2016-01-01

    Over the past few decades, the subseafloor biosphere has been explored by scientific ocean drilling to depths of about 2.5km below the seafloor. Although organic-rich anaerobic sedimentary habitats in the ocean margins harbor large numbers of microbial cells, microbial populations in ultraoligotrophic aerobic sedimentary habitats in the open ocean gyres are several orders of magnitude less abundant. Despite advances in cultivation-independent molecular ecological techniques, exploring the low-biomass environment remains technologically challenging, especially in the deep subseafloor biosphere. Reviewing the historical background of deep-biosphere analytical methods, the importance of obtaining clean samples and tracing contamination, as well as methods for detecting microbial life, technological aspects of molecular microbiology, and detecting subseafloor metabolic activity will be discussed.

  13. Dynamics of Microbial Biomass in a Rainfed Soil Under Wheat Cultivation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    M. AKMAL; K. S.KHAN; XU Jian-Ming

    2004-01-01

    A pot experiment was conducted to determine the dynamics of soil microbial biomass in a rainfed soil under wheat cultivation at the University of Arid Agriculture, Rawalpindi, Pakistan. The treatments applied were: 1) a control (CK), 2) NPK (0.44-0.26-0.18 g pot-1), 3) farmyard manure (FYM, 110 g pot-1), 4)poultry manure (PM, 110 g pot-1), 5) FYM (110 g pot-1) + NPK (0.44-0.26-0.18 g pot-1), 6) poultry manure (PM, 110 g pot-1) + NPK (0.44-0.26-0.18 g pot-1), 7) FYM (110 g pot-1) + NPK(S) (0.44-0.26-0.18 g pot-1, one half of the NPK at sowing and the other half one month after sowing), and 8) PM (110 g pot-1) + NPK(S) (0.44-0.26-0.18 g pot-1, one half of the NPK applied at sowing and the other half one month after sowing). The experiment was laid out using a completely randomized design with three replications. Microbial biomass C, N and P contents increased continuously from the beginning of the experiment up to the three-leaf stage. A slight decline was observed at the tillering stage in all treatments except with the organic manures + NPK(S) treatments. After tillering there was an increase in all treatments to the recorded maximum point at the full heading stage in all treatments except with the organic manures + NPK(S) treatments. In the FYM + NPK(S) and PM + NPK(S) treatments; however, there was a continuous increase in microbial biomass up to the heading stage. At the harvesting stage a sharp decline was noted in all treatments. The C:N ratio of microbial biomass in tested soil ranged from 7.8 to 11.3, while C:P ratio of microbial biomass in the tested soil ranged from 22.6 to 35.1 throughout all growth stages of the wheat crop.

  14. Short-term effects of natural and NH4+-enriched chabazite zeolitite amendments to soil microbial biomass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferretti, Giacomo; Keiblinger, Katharina Maria; Di Giuseppe, Dario; Faccini, Barbara; Colombani, Nicolò; Zechmeister-Boltenstern, Sophie; Coltorti, Massimo; Mastrocicco, Micòl

    2017-04-01

    Natural zeolite-bearing rocks (zeolitites) are known to be a suitable material for agricultural purposes by improving soil physicochemical properties and nitrogen use efficiency (NUE). However, little is known about their effects on soil microbial biomass. Aim of this work is to evaluate short-term effects of different chabazite-zeolitite amendments on soil microbial biomass (and activity). To this purpose a silty-clay agricultural soil was amended in three different ways, by the addition of 5 and 15 wt% of natural chabazite zeolitites (NZ) and 10 wt% of NH4+-enriched chabazite zeolitites (CZ). Soil pH, water content, dissolved organic carbon (C), total dissolved N, NH4+, NO3-, NO2-, microbial biomass C and N and ergosterol were periodically measured over a time course of 16 days in a laboratory incubation experiment. In order to verify the immobilization of N derived from CZ into microbial biomass, the δ15N signature of microorganisms was evaluated by the Extraction-Fumigation-Extraction method followed by EA-IRMS analysis. This latter investigation was possible because zeolitites were enriched with NH4+ derived from pig-slurry, which have a very high 15N natural abundance that allow to trace microbial incorporation. Soil amended with 5 wt% of NZ showed increased ergosterol content as well as microbial C/N ratio starting from day 9 of incubation, suggesting that fungal biomass was probably favored, although the same behavior was not found in the soil amended with 15 wt% of the same material. On the other hand, the NH4+-enriched CZ showed strong interactions with soil microbial biomass N. Isotopic measurements supported microbial assimilation of the N introduced with CZ since the second day of incubation. The high dissolved organic C and microbial biomass N suggested an increase of mineralization and immobilization processes. In addition, in CZ amended soil, microbial biomass N was related to NO3- production over time and inversely related to NH4+, suggesting high

  15. Looking inside the box: using Raman microspectroscopy to deconstruct microbial biomass stoichiometry one cell at a time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Edward K; Singer, Gabriel A; Pölzl, Marvin; Hämmerle, Ieda; Schwarz, Christian; Daims, Holger; Maixner, Frank; Battin, Tom J

    2011-02-01

    Stoichiometry of microbial biomass is a key determinant of nutrient recycling in a wide variety of ecosystems. However, little is known about the underlying causes of variance in microbial biomass stoichiometry. This is primarily because of technological constraints limiting the analysis of macromolecular composition to large quantities of microbial biomass. Here, we use Raman microspectroscopy (MS), to analyze the macromolecular composition of single cells of two species of bacteria grown on minimal media over a wide range of resource stoichiometry. We show that macromolecular composition, determined from a subset of identified peaks within the Raman spectra, was consistent with macromolecular composition determined using traditional analytical methods. In addition, macromolecular composition determined by Raman MS correlated with total biomass stoichiometry, indicating that analysis with Raman MS included a large proportion of a cell's total macromolecular composition. Growth phase (logarithmic or stationary), resource stoichiometry and species identity each influenced each organism's macromolecular composition and thus biomass stoichiometry. Interestingly, the least variable peaks in the Raman spectra were those responsible for differentiation between species, suggesting a phylogenetically specific cellular architecture. As Raman MS has been previously shown to be applicable to cells sampled directly from complex environments, our results suggest Raman MS is an extremely useful application for evaluating the biomass stoichiometry of environmental microorganisms. This includes the ability to partition microbial biomass into its constituent macromolecules and increase our understanding of how microorganisms in the environment respond to resource heterogeneity.

  16. Looking inside the box: using Raman microspectroscopy to deconstruct microbial biomass stoichiometry one cell at a time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Edward K.; Singer, Gabriel A.; Pölzl, Marvin; Hämmerle, Ieda; Schwarz, Christian; Daims, Holger; Maixner, Frank; Battin, Tom J.

    2011-01-01

    Stoichiometry of microbial biomass is a key determinant of nutrient recycling in a wide variety of ecosystems. However, little is known about the underlying causes of variance in microbial biomass stoichiometry. This is primarily because of technological constraints limiting the analysis of macromolecular composition to large quantities of microbial biomass. Here, we use Raman microspectroscopy (MS), to analyze the macromolecular composition of single cells of two species of bacteria grown on minimal media over a wide range of resource stoichiometry. We show that macromolecular composition, determined from a subset of identified peaks within the Raman spectra, was consistent with macromolecular composition determined using traditional analytical methods. In addition, macromolecular composition determined by Raman MS correlated with total biomass stoichiometry, indicating that analysis with Raman MS included a large proportion of a cell's total macromolecular composition. Growth phase (logarithmic or stationary), resource stoichiometry and species identity each influenced each organism's macromolecular composition and thus biomass stoichiometry. Interestingly, the least variable peaks in the Raman spectra were those responsible for differentiation between species, suggesting a phylogenetically specific cellular architecture. As Raman MS has been previously shown to be applicable to cells sampled directly from complex environments, our results suggest Raman MS is an extremely useful application for evaluating the biomass stoichiometry of environmental microorganisms. This includes the ability to partition microbial biomass into its constituent macromolecules and increase our understanding of how microorganisms in the environment respond to resource heterogeneity.

  17. [Effects of growing time on Panax ginseng rhizosphere soil microbial activity and biomass].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Chun-ping; Yang, Li-min; Ma, Feng-min

    2014-12-01

    Using the field sampling and indoor soil cultivation methods, the dynamic of ginseng rhizosphere soil microbial activity and biomass with three cultivated ages was studied to provide a theory basis for illustrating mechanism of continuous cropping obstacles of ginseng. The results showed that ginseng rhizosphere soil microbial activity and biomass accumulation were inhibited observably by growing time. The soil respiration, soil cellulose decomposition and soil nitrification of ginseng rhizosphere soil microorganism were inhibited significantly (P SMB-C and SMB-N in ginseng rhizosphere soil had a decreased tendency with the number of growing years. The SMB-C difference among 3 cultivated ages was significant, while the SMB-N was not. The SMB of R3 was the lowest. Compared with R0, the SMB-C and the SMB-N were significantly reduced 77.30% and 69.36%. It was considered by integrated analysis that the leading factor of continuous cropping obstacle in ginseng was the changes of the rhizosphere soil microbial species, number and activity as well as the micro-ecological imbalance of rhizosphere soil caused by the accumulation of ginseng rhizosphere secretions.

  18. Variation of Soil Microbial Biomass and Enzyme Activities at Different Growth Stages of Rice (Oryza sativa)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZENG Lu-sheng; LIAO Min; CHEN Cheng-li; HUANG Chang-yong

    2005-01-01

    A pot experiment was conducted under submerged conditions with hybrid rice Zhenong 7 to study the variation in the soil microbial biomass carbon (Cmic), soil microbial biomass nitrogen (Nmic), soil respiration rate, soil microbial metabolic quotient, soil enzyme activities, chlorophyll content, proline content and peroxidase activity (POD) in rice leaf at different growth stages. The soil Cmic, Nmic and soii respiration rate significantly increased at the early stage and then declined during rice growth, but ascended slightly at maturity. However, soil metabolic quotient declined at all the stages. Soil urease activity increased at first and then decreased, while acid phosphatase and dehydrogenase activities descended before ascended and then descended again. Soil urease activity and acid phosphatase activity showed a peak value at the tillering stage about 30 days after rice transplanting, but the peak value of dehydrogenase activity emerged at about 50 days after rice transplanting and the three soil enzymatic activities were significantly different at the different developmental stages. As rice growing, chlorophyll content in rice leaf descended at the early stage then ascended and a peak value appeared at about the 70th after rice transplanting, after that declined drastically, while POD activity increased gradually, but proline content declined gradually. There was a slight relation between rice physiological indices and soil biochemical indices, which indicated that soil biochemical characteristics were affected significantly by rice growth in the interactior system of the rice, soil and microorganisms.

  19. The ecological effects of different loading rates of metalaxyl on microbial biomass in unplanted and planted soils under field conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Mansourzadeh

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Fungicides are most widely used pesticides in Iran and the world. Application of fungicides may affect the populations and activity of soil microorganisms, particularly fungi, with a consequence for soil fertility and crop growth. In the current study, the effects of different levels of metalaxyl on soil microbial biomass carbon (C and nitrogen (N, microbial biomass C/N ratio and metabolic quotient under field conditions were assessed. Two levels of metalaxyl (30 and 60 kg.ha-1 were applied in planted soils with corn and unplanted calcareous soils, using a split-plots experiment in a completely randomized design with three replications. The C and N contents in soil microbial biomass as well as metabolic quotient were measured at 30 and 90 days after the onset of the experiment. Results showed that in cultivated soils metalaxyl application at 30 kg.ha-1 increased (15-80% significantly (p≤0.01 the amounts of microbial biomass C and N at both intervals (except microbial biomass C at 90 days compared to the control soil (0 kg.ha-1, while in uncultivated soils both microbial biomass C and N reduced by almost 1-34%. Microbial biomass C/N ratios in unplanted soils decreased (15 and 53% with increasing loading rates of metalaxyl, without a clear effect in cultivated soils. On the other hand, metabolic quotient values reduced (48% at 30 and 60 kg.ha-1 metalaxyl in corn-cultivated soils when compared to untreated soils while in uncultivated soils metalaxyl rate at 30 kg.a-1 had the greatest values at 30 days, and increased with increasing the levels of metalaxyl at 90 days. In summary, application of metalaxyl can either reduce or increase soil biological indices, and the direction and changes are depended upon the application rate of metalaxyl, time elapsed since metalaxyl application and the presence or absence of plant.

  20. Effects of Cotton Straw Incorporation on Soil Microbial Biomass Carbon, Nitrogen and Phosphorus in Long-Term Continuous Cropping Cotton Field

    OpenAIRE

    GUO Cheng-zang; LI Lu-hua; Huang, Jin-Hua; LIU Jun; YANG Zhi-lan; Wei, Fei; Liu, Jian-guo

    2015-01-01

    This study explored the effect of straw incorporation on the content of soil microbial biomass carbon (SMBC), microbial biomass nitrogen (SMBN) and microbial biomass phosphorus(SMBP) in the continuous cropping cotton field. Results showed that cotton straw incorporation could increase the content of SMBC, SMBN and SMBP significantly in different soil layers. Besides, with the time of continuous cropping increasing, the content of SMBC, SMBN and SMBP were all remarkably raised in the straw inc...

  1. Effects of carbon amendment on in situ atrazine degradation and total microbial biomass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngigi, Anastasiah N; Getenga, Zachary M; Dörfler, Ulrike; Boga, Hamadi I; Kuria, Benson; Ndalut, Paul; Schroll, Reiner

    2013-01-01

    This study elucidates the effects of carbon amendment on metabolic degradation of atrazine (6-chloro-N(2)-ethyl-N(4)-isopropyl-1,3,5-triazine-2,4-diamine) and total microbial biomass in soil. Degradation of (14)C-ring-labelled atrazine was monitored in laboratory incubations of soils supplemented with 0, 10, 100 and 1000 μg g(-1) sucrose concentrations. An experiment to determine the effect of carbon amendment on total microbial biomass and soil respiration was carried out with different concentrations of sucrose and non-labelled atrazine. The soils were incubated at a constant temperature and constant soil moisture at water potential of -15 kPa and a soil density of 1.3 g cm(-3). Mineralization of (14)C-ring-labelled atrazine was monitored continuously over a period of 59 d in the first experiment. The CO(2) production was monitored for 62 d in the second experiment and microbial biomass determined at the end of the incubation period. The addition of 1000 μg g(-1) sucrose reduced atrazine mineralization to 43.5% compared to 51.7% of the applied amount for the treatment without sucrose. The addition of 1000 μg g(-1) sucrose modified the transformation products to 1.08 μg g(-1) deisopropylatrazine (DIA), 0.32 μg g(-1) desethylatrazine (DEA) and 0.18 μg g(-1) deisopropyl-2-hydroxyatrazine (OH-DIA). Treatment without sucrose resulted in formation of 0.64 μg g(-1) hydroxyatrazine (HA), 0.28 μg g(-1) DIA and 0.20 μg g(-1) OH-DIA. Atrazine dealkylation was enhanced in treatments with 100 and 1000 μg g(-1) of sucrose added. HA metabolite was formed in the control (no sucrose) and in the presence of 10 μg g(-1) of sucrose, whereas DEA was only detected in treatment with 1000 μg g(-1) sucrose. Results indicate that total microbial biomass increased significantly (P < 0.001) with the addition of 1000 μg g(-1) sucrose.

  2. RESPONSE OF SOIL MICROBIAL BIOMASS TO CeO2 NANOPARTICLES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Livia Vittori Antisari

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Aim of this work was to assess the impact of the chronic exposure of CeO2 nanoparticles (NPs (50 to 105 nm nominal size on soil microbial biomass.To evaluate if the CeO2 NPs can affect the soil quality, they were mixed to an A1 and A2 horizon of Epileptic Cambisols at a concentrations of 100 ppm and incubated in lab for short and medium (7 and 60 days times, at a constant temperature (25°C and moisture (60% WHC.The preliminary results of the soil physicochemical analyses have showed an insolubility of the CeO2 NPs at short-term incubation in water, EDTA and aqua regia. The biological assays detect a storing of Ce-CeO2 in the microbial biomass at short time that decreases in the C amount. An increment of the basal respiration and a decrease in the amount of carbon soil microbial biomass determined a higher metabolic quotient (qCO2 than the control test, that identifies a stressful situation, most evident in the short term condition.Physical-chemical characterization of the CeO2 NPs and of the soil before and after the NPs addition, was carried out by means of Environmental Scanning Electron Microscope (ESEM and an Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy (EDS. The investigations showed Ce-NPs and Ce-compounds in both- incubation-condition samples. The control soil showed the presence of cerium associated with other elements, like P, Nd, La, Th e Si. From literature, it appears that these elements identify Monazite-Ce/Nd minerals, whose chemical formulas are respectively (Ce, La, Nd, Th PO4 and (Nd, Ce, La (P, Si O4. The presence of CeO2 NPs was clearly detected in soil and recognized by ESEM morphological observations coupled with EDS characterization. The NPs chemical composition appears unaltered, while the size can be modified by NPs aggregation and clustering.The results contribute to setting reference baseline values of cerium in soil and indicate an impact on the amount of carbon soil microbial biomass due to a higher metabolic quotient (qCO2 that

  3. Optimization studies for the bioconversion of Jerusalem artichoke tubers to ethanol and microbial biomass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Margaritis, A.; Bajpai, P.; Cannell, E.

    1981-01-01

    A total of 8 yeast and other microbial cultures were grown in the extract derived from the tubers of Jerusalem artichoke (Helianthus tuberosus) and screened according to the following optimization criteria: rates and yields of ethanol production, rates and yields of biomass production, and percent of original sugars utilized during fermentation. Batch growth kinetic parameters were also determined for the cultures studied. Kluyveromyces marxianus UCD (FST) 55-82 had the highest specific growth rate, 0.41/h, with a high ethanol yield, 88% of theoretical.

  4. STATUS OF SOIL MICROBIAL POPULATION, ENZYMATIC ACTIVITY AND BIOMASS OF SELECTED NATURAL, SECONDARY AND REHABILITATED FORESTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. S. Daljit Singh

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Substantial clearance of forests and conversion of forest into various land use types contribute to deterioration of soil fertility and associated nutrients loss. Soils from natural and rehabilitated forest in Chikus Forest Reserve and also enrichment planting forest and secondary forest of Tapah Hill Forest Reserve, Perak, Malaysia were selected in order to assess the influence of land use change on biological properties. This study was carried out to provide fundamental information on soil biological properties and also to compare the differences between natural forest, mono-rehabilitated forest, mixed planting forest and natural regenerated forest (secondary forest. Six subplots (20×20 m were established at each study plot and soil samples were collected at the depths of 0-15 cm (topsoil and 15-30 cm (subsoil. Soil microbial population was determined using spread-plate technique. Fluorescein Diacetate (FDA hydrolysis was used to assess the amount of microbial enzymatic activity for each forest plot. Soil Microbial Biomass C (MBC and N (MBN were extracted using chloroform fumigation extraction technique and the amount of MBC was determined by dichromate digestion, while MBN via Kjeldahl digestion technique. Soil acidity was determined by pH meter and moisture content was elucidated using gravimetric method. The levels of microbial population of bacterial and fungal at natural significantly exceeded the corresponding values of rehabilitated and secondary forest. However, microbial population is much higher in rehabilitated forest of Tapah Hill compared to that of secondary forest and also Chikus Forest Reserve planted forest which proves that rehabilitation activities do help increase the level of microbial community in the soils. Longer period of time after planting as in enrichment planting compared to mono planting of S. leprosula plantation showed that restoring and recovery of the planted forest needed time. Deforestation activities

  5. Activity, biomass and composition of microbial communities and their degradation pathways in exposed propazine soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Chen; Lu, Yi Chen; Xu, Jiang Yan; Song, Yang; Song, Yue; Zhang, Shu Hao; Ma, Li Ya; Lu, Feng Fan; Wang, Ya Kun; Yang, Hong

    2017-11-01

    Propazine is a s-triazine herbicide widely used for controlling weeds for crop production. Its persistence and contamination in environment nagatively affect crop growth and food safety. Elimination of propazine residues in the environment is critical for safe crop production. This study identified a microbial community able to degrade propazine in a farmland soil. About 94% of the applied propazine was degraded within 11 days of incubation when soil was treated with 10mgkg(-1) propazine as the initial concentration. The process was accompanied by increased microbial biomass and activities of soil enzymes. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) revealed multiple bacterial strains in the community as well as dynamic change of the composition of microbial community with a reduced microbial diversity (H' from 3.325 to 2.78). Tracking the transcript level of degradative genes AtzB, AtzC and TrzN showed that these genes were induced by propazine and played important roles in the degradation process. The activities of catalase, dehydrogenase and phenol oxidase were stimulated by propazine exposure. Five degradation products (hydroxyl-, methylated-, dimeric-propazine, ammeline and ammelide) were characterized by UPLC-MS(2), revealing a biodegradation of propazine in soil. Several novel methylated and dimeric products of propazine were characterized in thepropazine-exposed soil. These data help understand the pathway, detailed mechanism and efficiency of propazine biodegradation in soil under realistic field condition. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Winter climate change affects growing-season soil microbial biomass and activity in northern hardwood forests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durán, Jorge; Morse, Jennifer L; Groffman, Peter M; Campbell, John L; Christenson, Lynn M; Driscoll, Charles T; Fahey, Timothy J; Fisk, Melany C; Mitchell, Myron J; Templer, Pamela H

    2014-11-01

    Understanding the responses of terrestrial ecosystems to global change remains a major challenge of ecological research. We exploited a natural elevation gradient in a northern hardwood forest to determine how reductions in snow accumulation, expected with climate change, directly affect dynamics of soil winter frost, and indirectly soil microbial biomass and activity during the growing season. Soils from lower elevation plots, which accumulated less snow and experienced more soil temperature variability during the winter (and likely more freeze/thaw events), had less extractable inorganic nitrogen (N), lower rates of microbial N production via potential net N mineralization and nitrification, and higher potential microbial respiration during the growing season. Potential nitrate production rates during the growing season were particularly sensitive to changes in winter snow pack accumulation and winter soil temperature variability, especially in spring. Effects of elevation and winter conditions on N transformation rates differed from those on potential microbial respiration, suggesting that N-related processes might respond differently to winter climate change in northern hardwood forests than C-related processes.

  7. Effects of Heavy Metal Contamination on Microbial Biomass and Community Structure in Soils

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨元根; 刘丛强; 徐磊; 吴攀; 张国平

    2004-01-01

    Zinc smelting near Magu Town, Hezhang County, Guizhou Province, resulted in vegetation destruction and the accumulation of heavy metals, to varying extent, in adjacent soils, where up to 162.2-877.9 mg·kg+-1 Zn, 37.24-305.6 mg·kg+-1 Pb, and 0.50-16.43 mg·kg+-1 Cd, were detected. These values greatly exceed the background levels of these elements in soils. The concentrations of heavy metals (particularly Pb, Zn) were positively correlated with the contents of Fe-2O-3 and Al-2O-3 in the soils, showing that Fe and Al oxides play an important role in retaining heavy metals. Chemical fractionation indicates that Pb and Zn were associated mainly with Fe and Mn oxides and minerals, whereas Cd was dominated by exchangeable form. Microbial biomass in the soils was relatively low, in the range of 57.00-388.0μg C·g+-1, and was negatively correlated with heavy metal concentrations in the soils. The correlation coefficient of microbial biomass C to Zn concentrations in the soils was as high as -0.778 (p<0.01), indicating that the heavy metal contamination has toxic effects on microorganisms in soil. The results of Biolog measurements demonstrated that there were no significant changes in microbial community structure in the heavy metal contaminated soils. Gene fragments were similar to one another after the DNA was extracted from soil microbes and experienced PCR (polymerase chain reaction) and DGGE (denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis) reactions. These results indicated that light heavy-metal pollution may not result in any change in soil microbial community structure.

  8. [Characteristics of soil microbial biomass and community composition in three types of plantations in southern subtropical area of China].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wei-Xia; Shi, Zuo-Min; Luo, Da; Liu, Shi-Rong; Lu, Li-Hua

    2013-07-01

    By using fumigation-extraction method and phospholipid fatty acids (PLFAs) analysis, this paper studied the characteristics of soil microbial biomass and community composition in the Erythrophleum fordii, Castanopsis hystrix, and Pinus massoniana plantations in south subtropical China. The soil microbial biomass, total PLFAs, bacterial PLFAs, and fungal PLFAs in the plantations were significantly affected by the plantation type and season, and the soil microbial biomass, total PLFAs, and individual PLFA signatures were higher in dry season than in rainy season. The C. hystrix plantation had the highest soil microbial biomass carbon and total PLFAs, while the E. fordii plantation had the highest soil microbial biomass nitrogen. There was a significant positive correlation between the soil pH and arbuscular mycorrhizal fungal (AMF) PLFA (16:1omega5c). The soil total PLFAs, gram-positive bacterial PLFAs, saprophytic fungal PLFA (18:2omega6,9c), and the ratio of gram-positive to gram-negative bacterial PLFAs were significantly positively correlated with soil organic carbon, total nitrogen, and total phosphorus, suggesting that the soil organic carbon, total nitrogen, and total phosphorus contents were the most important nutrient factors affecting the numbers and types of the soil microorganisms. In addition, the ectomycorrhizae fungal PLFA (18:1omega9c) and AMF PLFA were significantly correlated with the soil C/N ratio.

  9. Effects of biochar on soil microbial biomass after four years of consecutive application in the north China Plain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qing-zhong Zhang

    Full Text Available The long term effect of biochar application on soil microbial biomass is not well understood. We measured soil microbial biomass carbon (MBC and nitrogen (MBN in a field experiment during a winter wheat growing season after four consecutive years of no (CK, 4.5 (B4.5 and 9.0 t biochar ha(-1 yr(-1 (B9.0 applied. For comparison, a treatment with wheat straw residue incorporation (SR was also included. Results showed that biochar application increased soil MBC significantly compared to the CK treatment, and that the effect size increased with biochar application rate. The B9.0 treatment showed the same effect on MBC as the SR treatment. Treatments effects on soil MBN were less strong than for MBC. The microbial biomass C∶N ratio was significantly increased by biochar. Biochar might decrease the fraction of biomass N mineralized (KN, which would make the soil MBN for biochar treatments underestimated, and microbial biomass C∶N ratios overestimated. Seasonal fluctuation in MBC was less for biochar amended soils than for CK and SR treatments, suggesting that biochar induced a less extreme environment for microorganisms throughout the season. There was a significant positive correlation between MBC and soil water content (SWC, but there was no significant correlation between MBC and soil temperature. Biochar amendments may therefore reduce temporal variability in environmental conditions for microbial growth in this system thereby reducing temporal fluctuations in C and N dynamics.

  10. Effects of Biochar on Soil Microbial Biomass after Four Years of Consecutive Application in the North China Plain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qing-zhong; Dijkstra, Feike A.; Liu, Xing-ren; Wang, Yi-ding; Huang, Jian; Lu, Ning

    2014-01-01

    The long term effect of biochar application on soil microbial biomass is not well understood. We measured soil microbial biomass carbon (MBC) and nitrogen (MBN) in a field experiment during a winter wheat growing season after four consecutive years of no (CK), 4.5 (B4.5) and 9.0 t biochar ha−1 yr−1 (B9.0) applied. For comparison, a treatment with wheat straw residue incorporation (SR) was also included. Results showed that biochar application increased soil MBC significantly compared to the CK treatment, and that the effect size increased with biochar application rate. The B9.0 treatment showed the same effect on MBC as the SR treatment. Treatments effects on soil MBN were less strong than for MBC. The microbial biomass C∶N ratio was significantly increased by biochar. Biochar might decrease the fraction of biomass N mineralized (KN), which would make the soil MBN for biochar treatments underestimated, and microbial biomass C∶N ratios overestimated. Seasonal fluctuation in MBC was less for biochar amended soils than for CK and SR treatments, suggesting that biochar induced a less extreme environment for microorganisms throughout the season. There was a significant positive correlation between MBC and soil water content (SWC), but there was no significant correlation between MBC and soil temperature. Biochar amendments may therefore reduce temporal variability in environmental conditions for microbial growth in this system thereby reducing temporal fluctuations in C and N dynamics. PMID:25025330

  11. Effect of Long-Term Application of Chemical Fertilizers on microbial biomass and Functional Diversity of a Black Soil

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    KONG Wei-Dong; ZHU Yong-Guan; FU Bo-Jie; HAN Xiao-Zeng; ZHANG Lei; HE Ji-Zheng

    2008-01-01

    An experiment with seven N, P, K-fertilizer treatments, i.e., control (no fertilizer), NP, NK, PK, NPK, NP2K, and NPK2 where P2 and K2 indicate double amounts of P and K fertilizers respectively, was conducted to examine the effect of long-term continuous application of chemical fertilizers on microbial biomass and functional diversity of a black soil (Udoll in the USDA Soil Taxonomy) in Northeast China. The soil microbial biomass C ranged between 94 and 145 mg kg-1, with the NK treatment showing a lower biomass; the functional diversity of soil microbial community ranged from 4.13 to 4.25, with an increasing tendency from control to double-fertilizer treatments, and to triple-fertilizer treatments. The soil microbial biomass, and the microbial functional diversity and evenness did not show any significant differences among the different fertilizer treatments including control, suggesting that the long-term application of chemical fertilization would not result in significant changes in the microbial characteristics of the black soil.

  12. Bioaugmentation for electricity generation from corn stover biomass using microbial fuel cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xin; Feng, Yujie; Wang, Heming; Qu, Youpeng; Yu, Yanling; Ren, Nanqi; Li, Nan; Wang, Elle; Lee, He; Logan, Bruce E

    2009-08-01

    Corn stover is usually treated by an energy-intensive or expensive process to extract sugars for bioenergy production. However, it is possible to directly generate electricity from corn stover in microbial fuel cells (MFCs) through the addition of microbial consortia specifically acclimated for biomass breakdown. A mixed culture that was developed to have a high saccharification rate with corn stover was added to single-chamber, air-cathode MFCs acclimated for power production using glucose. The MFC produced a maximum power of 331 mW/m2 with the bioaugmented mixed culture and corn stover, compared to 510 mW/m2 using glucose. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) showed the communities continued to evolve on both the anode and corn stover biomass over 60 days, with several bacteria identified including Rhodopseudomonas palustris. The use of residual solids from the steam exploded corn stover produced 8% more power (406 mW/m2) than the raw corn stover. These results show that it is possible to directly generate electricity from waste corn stover in MFCs through bioaugmentation using naturally occurring bacteria.

  13. Bioaugmentation for Electricity Generation from Corn Stover Biomass Using Microbial Fuel Cells

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Xin

    2009-08-01

    Corn stover is usually treated by an energy-intensive or expensive process to extract sugars for bioenergy production. However, it is possible to directly generate electricity from corn stover in microbial fuel cells (MFCs) through the addition of microbial consortia specifically acclimated for biomass breakdown. A mixed culture that was developed to have a high saccharification rate with corn stover was added to singlechamber, air-cathode MFCs acclimated for power production using glucose. The MFC produced a maximum power of 331 mW/ m 2 with the bioaugmented mixed culture and corn stover, compared to 510 mW/m2 using glucose. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) showed the communities continued to evolve on both the anode and corn stover biomass over 60 days, with several bacteria identified including Rhodopseudomonas palustris. The use of residual solids from the steam exploded corn stover produced 8% more power (406 mW/m2) than the raw corn stover. These results show that it is possible to directly generate electricity from waste corn stover in MFCs through bioaugmentation using naturally occurring bacteria. © 2009 American Chemical Society.

  14. Effect of AMmonium Fixation on Estimation of Soil Microbial Biomass Nitrogen

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YINSHI-XUE; FENGKE; 等

    1994-01-01

    The effect of ammonium fixation on the estimation of soil microbial biomass N was studied by the standard fumigation-incubation(FI) and fumigation-extraction (FE) methods,NO3-N content of fumigated soil changed little during incubation,while the fixed NH4+ in soils capable of fixing NH4+ increased with the increase of K2SO4-extractable NH4-N.one day fumigation increased both extractable NH4+ and fixed NH4+,However,prolonged fumigation gave no further increase.One day fumigation caused significant loss of NO3-N,while prolonged fumigation caused no further loss.For soils tested,the net increases of fixed NH4+ in fumigated soil equaled to 0-94% of NH4-N flush measured by the FI metod,and 1-74% of extractable N measured by the FE method.depending on different soils.It is concluded that the ammonium fixation was one of the processes taking place in soils during fumigation as well as incubation ofter fumigation and should not be neglected in the estimation of microbial biomass nitrogen by either FI or FE method.

  15. Spatial variability of microbial biomass and organic matter labile pools in a haplic planosol soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diego Campana Loureiro

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this work was to study the spatial variability of soil microbial biomass (SMB and labile soil organic matter pools (labile SOM, under different management systems and plant cover. The experiment was conducted in a Haplic Planosol soil on an Integrated Agroecological Production System (SIPA, in Seropédica, Rio de Janeiro. The evaluated management systems were: alley cropping, pasture, and bush garden, the late one was used as reference area. Three grids of regular spacing of 2.5 x 2.5 meters were used for sampling, consisting of 25 georeferenced points each, where soil samples were taken at 0-10 cm depth. The following labile constituents of soil organic matter were determined: free light fraction (FLF, water soluble C and N, C and N of SMB (SMB-C and SMB-N, and glomalin content. The textural fractions (sand, silt, and clay, pH in water, and chemical attributes (organic C, total N, Ca, Mg, Al, P, K, and CEC-cation exchange capacity were also determined. The areas of alley cropping and pasture showed spatial dependence to the attributes of SOM. The occurrence of high spatial dependence for the attributes associated to microbial biomass in the alley cropping system (C, FLF, SMB-N and respiration, probably was due to external factors related to management, such as: intensive rotational cropping system, diversity of crops and different inputs of organic matter to soil such as pruning material and organic compost.

  16. [Effects of nitrogen fertilization and straw amendment on soil microbial biomass and soil functions after heat stress].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiao-Yun; Chen, Shi; Liu, Man-Qiang; Jiao, Jia-Guo; Li, Hui-Xin; Hu, Feng

    2013-02-01

    A 60-day incubation experiment was conducted to study the effects of nitrogen fertilization (N), rice straw amendment (R), and their combination (RN) on the changes of soil microbial biomass and soil functions (basal respiration, substrate-induced respiration, and straw decomposition) after heat stress (40 degrees C for 18 h). Heat stress tended to promote the soil microbial biomass and soil functions, but the effects were weak and transient. Either with or without heating, treatment R and especially RN could greatly stimulate soil microbial biomass, basal respiration, substrate-induced respiration and straw decomposition, as compared to no straw amendment and with nitrogen fertilization alone, but the parameters in treatment N had less change, and even, presented a decreasing trend. It was suggested that straw amendment and its combination with nitrogen fertilization could improve soil functions in natural conditions or after environmental stress.

  17. Effects of myclobutanil on soil microbial biomass, respiration, and soil nitrogen transformations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ju, Chao; Xu, Jun; Wu, Xiaohu; Dong, Fengshou; Liu, Xingang; Zheng, Yongquan

    2016-01-01

    A 3-month-long experiment was conducted to ascertain the effects of different concentrations of myclobutanil (0.4 mg kg(-1) soil [T1]; 1.2 mg kg(-1) soil [T3]; and 4 mg kg(-1) soil [T10]) on soil microbial biomass, respiration, and soil nitrogen transformations using two typical agricultural soils (Henan fluvo-aquic soil and Shanxi cinnamon soil). Soil was sampled after 7, 15, 30, 60, and 90 days of incubation to determine myclobutanil concentration and microbial parameters: soil basal respiration (RB), microbial biomass carbon (MBC) and nitrogen (MBN), NO(-)3-N and NH(+)4-N concentrations, and gene abundance of total bacteria, N2-fixing bacteria, fungi, ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA), and ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB). The half-lives of the different doses of myclobutanil varied from 20.3 to 69.3 d in the Henan soil and from 99 to 138.6 d in the Shanxi soil. In the Henan soil, the three treatments caused different degrees of short-term inhibition of RB and MBC, NH(+)4-N, and gene abundance of total bacteria, fungi, N2-fixing bacteria, AOA, and AOB, with the exception of a brief increase in NO(-)3-N content during the T10 treatment. The MBN (immobilized nitrogen) was not affected. In the Shanxi soil, MBC, the populations of total bacteria, fungi, and N2-fixing bacteria, and NH(+)4-N concentration were not significantly affected by myclobutanil. The RB and MBN were decreased transitorily in the T10 treatment. The NO(-)3-N concentrations and the abundance of both AOA and AOB were erratically stimulated by myclobutanil. Regardless of whether stimulation or suppression occurred, the effects of myclobutanil on the two soil types were short term. In summary, myclobutanil had no long-term negative effects on the soil microbial biomass, respiration, and soil nitrogen transformations in the two types of soil, even at 10-fold the recommended dosage. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Comparative Study of Two Carbon Fiber Cathodes and Theoretical Analysis in Microbial Fuel Cells on Ocean Floor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FU Yubin; LIU Yuanyuan; XU Qian; LU Zhikai; ZHANG Yelong

    2014-01-01

    Cathode activity plays an important role in the improvement of the microbial fuel cells on ocean floor (BMFCs). A comparison study between Rayon-based (CF-R) and PAN-based carbon fiber (CF-P) cathodes is conducted in the paper. The two carbon fibers were heat treated to improve cell performance (CF-R-H&CF-P-H), and were used to build a new BMFCs structure with a foamy carbon anode. The maximum power density was 112.4 mW m-2 for CF-R-H, followed by 66.6 mW m-2 for CF-R, 49.7 mW m-2 for CF-P-H and 21.6 mW m-2 for CF-P respectively. The higher specific area and deep groove make CF-R have a better power output than with CF-P. Meanwhile, heat treatment of carbon fiber can improve cell power, nearly two-fold higher than heat treatment of plain fiber. This improvement may be due to the quinones group formation to accelerate the reduction of oxygen and electron transfer on the fiber surface in the three phase boundary after heat treatment. Compared to PAN-based carbon fiber, Rayon-based carbon fiber would be preferentially selected as cathode in novel BMFCs design due to its high surface area, low cost and higher power. The comparison research is significant for cathode material selection and cell design.

  19. Soil microbial biomass under different management and tillage systems of permanent intercropped cover species in an orange orchard

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elcio Liborio Balota

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available To mitigate soil erosion and enhance soil fertility in orange plantations, the permanent protection of the inter-rows by cover species has been suggested. The objective of this study was to evaluate alterations in the microbial biomass, due to different soil tillage systems and intercropped cover species between rows of orange trees. The soil of the experimental area previously used as pasture (Brachiaria humidicola was an Ultisol (Typic Paleudult originating from Caiuá sandstone in the northwestern part of the State of Paraná, Brazil. Two soil tillage systems were evaluated: conventional tillage (CT in the entire area and strip tillage (ST (strip width 2 m, in combination with different ground cover management systems. The citrus cultivar 'Pera' orange (Citrus sinensis grafted onto 'Rangpur' lime rootstock was used. Soil samples were collected after five years of treatment from a depth of 0-15 cm, under the tree canopy and in the inter-row, in the following treatments: (1 CT and an annual cover crop with the leguminous species Calopogonium mucunoides; (2 CT and a perennial cover crop with the leguminous peanut Arachis pintoi; (3 CT and an evergreen cover crop with Bahiagrass Paspalum notatum; (4 CT and a cover crop with spontaneous Brachiaria humidicola grass vegetation; and (5 ST and maintenance of the remaining grass (pasture of Brachiaria humidicola. Soil tillage and the different cover species influenced the microbial biomass, both under the tree canopy and in the inter-row. The cultivation of brachiaria increased C and N in the microbial biomass, while bahiagrass increased P in the microbial biomass. The soil microbial biomass was enriched in N and P by the presence of ground cover species and according to the soil P content. The grass species increased C, N and P in the soil microbial biomass from the inter-row more than leguminous species.

  20. Impact of Soil Fumigation Practices on Soil Nematodes and Microbial Biomass

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CAO Zhi-Ping; YU Yong-Li; CHEN Guo-Kang; R. DAWSON

    2004-01-01

    This study was designed to understand the impact of methyl bromide (MB) (CH3Br) and its alternatives on both free-living and root-knot nematodes in the soil. A randomized complete block experiment with six treatments and 4 replicates (each replicate in a separate greenhouse) was established in Qingzhou, Shandong Province, China. In addition to MB and untreated control (CK) treatments there were four alternative soil fumigation practices including MB+virtually impermeable films (VIF), metam sodium (MS), MS +VIF and soil solarization combined with selected biological control agents (SS+BCA). Two tomato (Lycopersicum esculentum Mill.) cultivars, cv. Maofen-802 from the Xian Institute of Vegetable Science, China, and cv. AF179 Brillante from the Israeli Hazera Quality Seeds, were selected as test crops. The results indicated that Rhabditidae was the most dominant population with percentage abundance as high as 85% of the total number of identified free-living nematodes, followed by that of Cephalobidae. Methyl bromide and its alternatives except for the non-chemical SS+BCA treatment controlled the target pest, root-knot nematodes. Also, the impact of the three chemical alternatives on free-living nematode number and functional group abundance was similar to the impact associated with a typical methyl bromide application. Chemical fumigation practices, especially that with MB, significantly reduced the number of nematodes in the soil and simultaneously significantly reduced the number of nematode genera thereby reducing nematode diversity. All the four soil chemical fumigation activities decreased soil microbial biomass and had an obvious initial impact on microorganism biomass. Furthermore, both plant-parasitic and fungivore nematodes were positively correlated with soil microbial biomass.

  1. Biomass production from electricity using ammonia as an electron carrier in a reverse microbial fuel cell.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wendell O Khunjar

    Full Text Available The storage of renewable electrical energy within chemical bonds of biofuels and other chemicals is a route to decreasing petroleum usage. A critical challenge is the efficient transfer of electrons into a biological host that can covert this energy into high energy organic compounds. In this paper, we describe an approach whereby biomass is grown using energy obtained from a soluble mediator that is regenerated electrochemically. The net result is a separate-stage reverse microbial fuel cell (rMFC that fixes CO₂ into biomass using electrical energy. We selected ammonia as a low cost, abundant, safe, and soluble redox mediator that facilitated energy transfer to biomass. Nitrosomonas europaea, a chemolithoautotroph, was used as the biocatalyst due to its inherent capability to utilize ammonia as its sole energy source for growth. An electrochemical reactor was designed for the regeneration of ammonia from nitrite, and current efficiencies of 100% were achieved. Calculations indicated that overall bioproduction efficiency could approach 2.7±0.2% under optimal electrolysis conditions. The application of chemolithoautotrophy for industrial bioproduction has been largely unexplored, and results suggest that this and related rMFC platforms may enable biofuel and related biochemical production.

  2. Electricity and biomass production in a bacteria-Chlorella based microbial fuel cell treating wastewater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Commault, Audrey S.; Laczka, Olivier; Siboni, Nachshon; Tamburic, Bojan; Crosswell, Joseph R.; Seymour, Justin R.; Ralph, Peter J.

    2017-07-01

    The chlorophyte microalga Chlorella vulgaris has been exploited within bioindustrial settings to treat wastewater and produce oxygen at the cathode of microbial fuel cells (MFCs), thereby accumulating algal biomass and producing electricity. We aimed to couple these capacities by growing C. vulgaris at the cathode of MFCs in wastewater previously treated by anodic bacteria. The bioelectrochemical performance of the MFCs was investigated with different catholytes including phosphate buffer and anode effluent, either in the presence or absence of C. vulgaris. The power output fluctuated diurnally in the presence of the alga. The maximum power when C. vulgaris was present reached 34.2 ± 10.0 mW m-2, double that observed without the alga (15.6 ± 9.7 mW m-2), with a relaxation of 0.19 gL-1 d-1 chemical oxygen demand and 5 mg L-1 d-1 ammonium also removed. The microbial community associated with the algal biofilm included nitrogen-fixing (Rhizobiaceae), denitrifying (Pseudomonas stutzeri and Thauera sp., from Pseudomonadales and Rhodocyclales orders, respectively), and nitrate-reducing bacteria (Rheinheimera sp. from the Alteromonadales), all of which likely contributed to nitrogen cycling processes at the cathode. This paper highlights the importance of coupling microbial community screening to electrochemical and chemical analyses to better understand the processes involved in photo-cathode MFCs.

  3. Photosynthetic microbial desalination cells (PMDCs) for clean energy, water and biomass production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kokabian, Bahareh; Gude, Veera Gnaneswar

    2013-12-01

    Current microbial desalination cell (MDC) performances are evaluated with chemical catalysts such as ferricyanide, platinum catalyzed air-cathodes or aerated cathodes. All of these methods improve power generation potential in MDCs, however, they are not preferable for large scale applications due to cost, energy and environmental toxicity issues. In this study, performance of microbial desalination cells with an air cathode and an algae biocathode (Photosynthetic MDC - PMDC) were evaluated, both under passive conditions (no mechanical aeration or mixing). The results indicate that passive algae biocathodes perform better than air cathodes and enhance COD removal and utilize treated wastewater as the growth medium to obtain valuable biomass for high value bioproducts. Maximum power densities of 84 mW m(-3) (anode volume) or 151 mW m(-3) (biocathode volume) and a desalination rate of 40% were measured with 0.9 : 1 : 0.5 volumetric ratios of anode, desalination and algae biocathode chambers respectively. This first proof-of-concept study proves that the passive mechanisms can be beneficial in enhancing the sustainability of microbial desalination cells.

  4. Nitrogen fractions in the microbial biomass in soils of southern Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. A.O. Camargo

    1999-03-01

    Full Text Available The reaction of nitrogen compounds with ninhydrin can be used as an indicator of cytoplasmic materials released from microbial cells killed by fumigation. Total-N, ninhydrin-reactive-N (NR-N, ammonium-N (A-N, and α-amino-N in the microbial biomass of soils from the State of Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil, were determined, in 1996, in 0.5 mol L-1 K2SO4 extracts of fumigated and non-fumigated soils. Total-N varied from 20.3 to 104.4 mg kg-1 and the ninhydrin-reactive-N corresponded, in average, to 27% of this. The ninhydrin-reactive-N was made up of 67% ammonium-N and 33% aminoacids with the amino group at the α-carbon position. It was concluded that colorimetric analysis of NR-N and A-N may be used as a direct measure of microbial N in soil. This simple and rapid procedure is adequate for routine analyses.

  5. Repeated application of composted tannery sludge affects differently soil microbial biomass, enzymes activity, and ammonia-oxidizing organisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araújo, Ademir Sérgio Ferreira; Lima, Luciano Moura; Santos, Vilma Maria; Schmidt, Radomir

    2016-10-01

    Repeated application of composted tannery sludge (CTS) changes the soil chemical properties and, consequently, can affect the soil microbial properties. The aim of this study was to evaluate the responses of soil microbial biomass and ammonia-oxidizing organisms to repeated application of CTS. CTS was applied repeatedly during 6 years, and, at the sixth year, the soil microbial biomass, enzymes activity, and ammonia-oxidizing organisms were determined in the soil. The treatments consisted of 0 (without CTS application), 2.5, 5, 10, and 20 t ha(-1) of CTS (dry basis). Soil pH, EC, SOC, total N, and Cr concentration increased with the increase in CTS rate. Soil microbial biomass did not change significantly with the amendment of 2.5 Mg ha(-1), while it decreased at the higher rates. Total and specific enzymes activity responded differently after CTS application. The abundance of bacteria did not change with the 2.5-Mg ha(-1) CTS treatment and decreased after this rate, while the abundance of archaea increased significantly with the 2.5-Mg ha(-1) CTS treatment. Repeated application of different CTS rates for 6 years had different effects on the soil microbial biomass and ammonia-oxidizing organisms as a response to changes in soil chemical properties.

  6. The Influence of Tallow on Rumen Metabolism, Microbial Biomass Synthesis and Fatty Acid Composition of Bacteria and Protozoa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weisbjerg, Martin Riis; Børsting, Christian Friis; Hvelplund, Torben

    1992-01-01

    Rumen metabolism, microbial biomass synthesis and microbial long chain fatty acid composition were studied in lactating cows fed at two levels of dry matter intake (L, 8.6 kg DM and H, 12.6 kg DM) with 0, 4 and 6% added tallow at the low feed level (L0, L4 and L6) and 0, 2, 4 and 6% at the high f...

  7. Effect of distance and depth on soil microbial biomass, N mineralization and genetic diversity of Rhizobia under Acacia senegal Tree

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fall, D.; Faye, A.; Sall, S. N.; Diouf, D.

    2009-07-01

    The relations between plants and soil biota involve positive and negative feedbacks between soil organisms, their chemical environment, and plants. Then, the characterization of microbial community functioning and their diversity are important to understand these linkages. An experiment was conducted in a field system for two years (2005 and 2006) to investigate the effect of distance from tree stem on soil microbial biomass, N mineral content and the diversity of rhizobia associated to Acacia senegal. (Author)

  8. Microbial respiration, but not biomass, responded linearly to increasing light fraction organic matter input: Consequences for carbon sequestration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rui, Yichao; Murphy, Daniel V.; Wang, Xiaoli; Hoyle, Frances C.

    2016-10-01

    Rebuilding ‘lost’ soil carbon (C) is a priority in mitigating climate change and underpinning key soil functions that support ecosystem services. Microorganisms determine if fresh C input is converted into stable soil organic matter (SOM) or lost as CO2. Here we quantified if microbial biomass and respiration responded positively to addition of light fraction organic matter (LFOM, representing recent inputs of plant residue) in an infertile semi-arid agricultural soil. Field trial soil with different historical plant residue inputs [soil C content: control (tilled) = 9.6 t C ha‑1 versus tilled + plant residue treatment (tilled + OM) = 18.0 t C ha‑1] were incubated in the laboratory with a gradient of LFOM equivalent to 0 to 3.8 t C ha‑1 (0 to 500% LFOM). Microbial biomass C significantly declined under increased rates of LFOM addition while microbial respiration increased linearly, leading to a decrease in the microbial C use efficiency. We hypothesise this was due to insufficient nutrients to form new microbial biomass as LFOM input increased the ratio of C to nitrogen, phosphorus and sulphur of soil. Increased CO2 efflux but constrained microbial growth in response to LFOM input demonstrated the difficulty for C storage in this environment.

  9. D:L-AMINO Acids and the Turnover of Microbial Biomass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lomstein, B. A.; Braun, S.; Mhatre, S. S.; Jørgensen, B. B.

    2015-12-01

    Decades of ocean drilling have demonstrated wide spread microbial life in deep sub-seafloor sediment, and surprisingly high microbial cell numbers. Despite the ubiquity of life in the deep biosphere, the large community sizes and the low energy fluxes in the vast buried ecosystem are still poorly understood. It is not know whether organisms of the deep biosphere are specifically adapted to extremely low energy fluxes or whether most of the observed cells are in a maintenance state. Recently we developed and applied a new culture independent approach - the D:L-amino acid model - to quantify the turnover times of living microbial biomass, microbial necromass and mean metabolic rates. This approach is based on the built-in molecular clock in amino acids that very slowly undergo chemical racemization until they reach an even mixture of L- and D- forms, unless microorganisms spend energy to keep them in the L-form that dominates in living organisms. The approach combines sensitive analyses of amino acids, the unique bacterial endospore marker (dipicolinic acid) with racemization dynamics of stereo-isomeric amino acids. Based on a heating experiment, we recently reported kinetic parameters for racemization of aspartic acid, glutamic acid, serine and alanine in bulk sediment from Aarhus Bay, Denmark. The obtained racemization rate constants were faster than the racemization rate constants of free amino acids, which we have previously applied in Holocene sediment from Aarhus Bay and in up to 10 mio yr old sediment from ODP Leg 201. Another important input parameter for the D:L-amino acid model is the cellular carbon content. It has recently been suggested that the cellular carbon content most likely is lower than previously thought. In recognition of these new findings, previously published data based on the D:L-amino acid model were recalculated and will be presented together with new data from an Arctic Holocene setting with constant sub-zero temperatures.

  10. Effect of Ammonium Fixation on Determination of N Mineralized from Soil Microbial Biomass

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YINSHIXUE; LIANGYONGCHAO; 等

    1997-01-01

    Two soils with relatively high(Soil 1)and low(Soil 2) ammonium fixation capacities were used in this study to examiune the effect of ammonium fixation on the determination of N mineralized from soil microbial biomass.Organism suspension was quantitatively introduced to Soil 1 at various rates.Both fumigation-incubation (FI) and fumigation-extraction (FE) methods were used to treat the soil.The amount of fixed NH4+ increased with increasing rate of organism-N addition.A close correlation was found between the amount of fixed ammonium and th rate of organism-m addition.The net increases of fixed NH4+-N were equivalent to 38% and 12% of the added organism-N for FI and FE treatments,rspectively,in this specific soil.To provide isotopic evidence,15N-labelled organism-N was added to Soils 1 and 2 at 121.4 mg N kg-1.In FI treatment,22 and 3mg N kg-1 of labelled N were found in the fraction of fixed NH4+-N in Soile 1 and 2 respectively;while in FE treatment,9 mg N kg-1 of labelled N was found in the fraction of fixed NH4+-N in Soil 1 only.There was no labelled N in the fraction of fixed NH4+-N in Soil 2.In all of the unfumigated (check) soils,there was little or no labelled N in the fixed fractions,probably because the organism-N added was easily mineralized and nitrified.A mean of 0.64 for KN value,the fraction of N mineralized in the killed microbial biomass,as obtained with inclusion of the net increase of fixed NH4+-N,The corresponding value calculated with exclusion of the net increase of ficed NH4+-N was 0.46 ,It was concluded that ammonium fixation was a problem in deterination of KN,particularly for soils with a high ammonium fixation capacity, Results also showed that microbial biomass N measurement by FFE method was less affected by ammonium process than that by FI method.

  11. Effect of oxygen on the microbial activities of thermophilic anaerobic biomass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedizzi, C; Regueiro, L; Rodriguez-Verde, I; Lema, J M; Carballa, M

    2016-07-01

    Low oxygen levels (μgO2L(-1)) in anaerobic reactors are quite common and no relevant consequences are expected. On the contrary, higher concentrations could affect the process. This work aimed to study the influence of oxygen (4.3 and 8.8mgO2L(-1), respectively) on the different microbial activities (hydrolytic, acidogenic and methanogenic) of thermophilic anaerobic biomass and on the methanogenic community structure. Batch tests in presence of oxygen were conducted using specific substrates for each biological activity and a blank (with minimum oxygen) was included. No effect of oxygen was observed on the hydrolytic and acidogenic activities. In contrast, the methane production rate decreased by 40% in all oxygenated batches and the development of active archaeal community was slower in presence of 8.8mgO2L(-1). However, despite this sensitivity of methanogens to oxygen at saturation levels, the inhibition was reversible.

  12. Microbial biomass and carbon mineralization in agricultural soils as affected by pesticide addition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Anjani; Nayak, A K; Shukla, Arvind K; Panda, B B; Raja, R; Shahid, Mohammad; Tripathi, Rahul; Mohanty, Sangita; Rath, P C

    2012-04-01

    A laboratory study was conducted with four pesticides, viz. a fungicide (carbendazim), two insecticides (chlorpyrifos and cartap hydrochloride) and an herbicide (pretilachlor) applied to a sandy clay loam soil at a field rate to determine their effect on microbial biomass carbon (MBC) and carbon mineralization (C(min)). The MBC content of soil increased with time up to 30 days in cartap hydrochloride as well as chlorpyrifos treated soil. Thereafter, it decreased and reached close to the initial level by 90th day. However, in carbendazim treated soil, the MBC showed a decreasing trend up to 45 days and subsequently increased up to 90 days. In pretilachlor treated soil, MBC increased through the first 15 days, and thereafter decreased to the initial level. Application of carbendazim, chlorpyrifos and cartap hydrochloride decreased C(min) for the first 30 days and then increased afterwards, while pretilachlor treated soil showed an increasing trend.

  13. Electrochemical Properties of Electrodes with Different Shapes and Diffusion Kinetic Analysis of Microbial Fuel Cells on Ocean Floor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FU Yubin; LIU Jia; SU Jia; ZHAO Zhongkai; LIU Yang; XU Qian

    2012-01-01

    Microbial fuel cell (MFC) on the ocean floor is a kind of novel energy- harvesting device that can be developed to drive small instruments to work continuously.The shape of electrode has a great effect on the performance of the MFC.In this paper,several shapes of electrode and cell structure were designed,and their performance in MFC were compared in pairs:Mesh (cell-1) vs.flat plate (cell-2),branch (cell-3) vs.cylinder (cell-4),and forest (cell-5) vs.disk (cell-6) FC.Our results showed that the maximum power densities were 16.50,14.20,19.30,15.00,14.64,and 9.95 mWm-2 for cell-l,2,3,4,5 and 6 respectively.And the corresponding diffusion-limited currents were 7.16,2.80,18.86,10.50,18.00,and 6.900 mA.The mesh and branch anodes showed higher power densities and much higher diffusion-limited currents than the flat plate and the cylinder anodes respectively due to the low diffusion hindrance with the former anodes.The forest cathode improved by 47% of the power density and by 161% of diffusionlimited current than the disk cathode due to the former's extended solid/liquid/gas three-phase boundary.These results indicated that the shape of electrode is a major parameter that determining the diffusion-limited current of an MFC,and the differences in the electrode shape lead to the differences in cell performance.These results would be useful for MFC structure design in practical applications.

  14. Soil-derived microbial consortia enriched with different plant biomass reveal distinct players acting in lignocellulose degradation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Lima Brossi, Maria Julia; Jiménez Avella, Diego; Cortes Tolalpa, Larisa; van Elsas, Jan

    Here, we investigated how different plant biomass, and-for one substrate-pH, drive the composition of degrader microbial consortia. We bred such consortia from forest soil, incubated along nine aerobic sequential - batch enrichments with wheat straw (WS1, pH 7.2; WS2, pH 9.0), switchgrass (SG, pH

  15. Assessment of microbial biomass carbon and nitrogen of native and non native perennial pasture soil using hyperspetral

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soil microbial biomass carbon and nitrogen (MBC/MBN) are integral parts of soil organic matter, and if left out of nutrient calculations may suggest increased need of fertilizer resulting in increased production costs and chemical runoff. Timely and cost-effective methods are needed to assess MBC a...

  16. [Effects of organic fish protein liquid fertilizer on enzyme activities and microbial biomass C and N in a silt soil].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Xiu-Li; Lei, Ping; Shi, Wei-Yong

    2010-08-01

    By the method of thermostatic culture, this paper studied the effects of different application rates (0.5, 1.5, and 2.5 ml x kg(-1)) of organic fish protein liquid fertilizer on the enzyme activities and microbial biomass C and N in a silt soil, and the relationships between these parameters and soil nutrient contents. Under the application of the liquid fertilizer, soil pH varied in the range of 7.07-7.31, but had no significant difference from the control. With the increasing application rate of the liquid fertilizer, the activities of soil phosphatase, urease, and protease, as well as the soil biomass C and N, all increased significantly, and the increment was 127, 190 and 196%, 39.81, 78.06 and 173.24%, 56.37, 108.29 and 199.98%, 167, 395 and 474%, and 121, 243 and 406%, respectively, compared with the control. The peak time of the soil urease and protease activities and microbial biomass C and N differed with the fertilization treatments. Soil phosphase, urease, and protease activities and microbial biomass C and N were significantly positively correlated with soil nutrient contents, suggesting that applying organic fish protein liquid fertilizer to silt soil could improve soil microbial growth and enzyme activities, and accordingly, promote the decomposition and transformation of soil organic matter and the release of soil available nutrient elements.

  17. Assessment of microbial biomass carbon nitrogen of native and non native perennial pasture soil using hyperspectral data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soil microbial biomass carbon and nitrogen (MBC/MBN) are integral parts of soil organic matter, and if left out of nutrient calculations may suggest increased need of fertilizer resulting in increased production costs and chemical runoff. Timely and cost-effective methods are needed to assess MBC a...

  18. Soil Inorganic Nitrogen and Microbial biomass Carbon and Nitrogen Under Pine Plantations in Zhanggutai Sandy Soil

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YU Zhan-Yuan; CHEN Fu-Sheng; ZENG De-Hui; ZHAO Qiong; CHEN Guang-Sheng

    2008-01-01

    The dynamics of soil inorganic nitrogen (NH+4-N and NO-3N) and microbial biomass carbon (Cmic) and nitrogen (Nmic) under 30-year-old fenced Pinus sylvestris L. var. mongolica Litvin (SF), unfenced P. sylvestris L. var. mongolica Litvin (SUF), and unfenced Pinus densiflora Siebold et Zucc. (DUF) plantations in the Zhanggutai sandy soil of China were studied during Apr. to Oct. 2004 by the in situ closed-top core incubation method. All mentioned C and N indices in each stand type fluctuated over time. The ranges of inorganic N, Cmic, and Nmic contents in the three stand types were 0.7-2.6, 40.0-128.9, and 5.4-15.2 μg g-1, respectively. The average contents of soil NH+4-N and Cmic under the three 30-year-old pine plantations were not different. However, soil NO-3-N and total inorganic N contents decreased in the order of SUF > SF > DUF, the Nmic content was in the order of SF = SUF > DUF, and the Cmic:Nmic ratio was in the order of SUF = DUF > SF. Seasonal variations were observed in soil inorganic N, microbial biomass, and plant growth. These seasonal variations had certain correlations with microbe and plant N use in the soil, and their competition for NH+4-N was mostly regulated by soil N availability. The influence of tree species on inorganic N and Nmic were mainly because of differences in litter quality. Lack of grazing decreased the Cmic:N ratio owing to decreased carbon output and increased the ability of soil to supply N. The soil N supply under the P. sylvestris var. mongolica plantation was lower than under the P. densiflora plantation.

  19. [Dynamic changes of soil microbial biomass in the restoration process of shrub plantations in loess hilly area].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Sha; Liu, Guo-Bin; Dai, Quan-Hou; Li, Xiao-Li; Wu, Rui-Jun

    2008-03-01

    By the method of spatiotemporal substitution and taking a slope farmland and a natural Platycladus orientailis L. forest as the controls, this paper studied the dynamic changes of soil microbial biomass, microbial respiration, metabolic quotient (qCO2) and physicochemical properties under the Caragana korshinkii and Hippophae rhamnoides plantations with different restoration age in loess hilly area. The results showed that with the increasing restoration age of the shrubs, soil physicochemical properties improved obviously, and soil microbial biomass had a significant increase. After 7 years restoration of C. korshinkii plantation, soil microbial biomass C increased apparently, compared with that in farmland, and the increments after each 5-7 years were all significant. Microbial biomass N and P had no significant increase in the first 13 years but kept relatively stable in the 20-30 years restoration of C. korshinkii plantation, and were significantly higher than those in farmland but lower than those under P. orientailis plantation after 30 years restoration of C. korshinkii plantation. Soil microbial respiration was enhanced with the increasing restoration age of the shrubs, with the peak in the 20-25 years restoration. After then, it decreased rapidly, and bottomed out in the 30 years restoration. qCO2 was significantly higher under P. orientailis plantation than in farmland in the early periods of shrubs restoration, and then decreased rapidly. After 30 years restoration of C. korshinkii plantation, qCO2 was lower than that in farmland but still much higher than that under P. orientailis plantation. Different shrub plantations had different effects on soil properties. H. rhamnoides with the same restoration age of C. korshinkii contributed more to the increase of soil microbial biomass and respiration. There were significant correlations between the restoration age of test shrub plantations and the microbial biomass, qCO2, and physicochemical properties of

  20. Microbial inhibitors: formation and effects on acetone-butanol-ethanol fermentation of lignocellulosic biomass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baral, Nawa Raj; Shah, Ajay

    2014-11-01

    Biobutanol is a promising biofuel due to the close resemblance of its fuel properties to gasoline, and it is produced via acetone-butanol-ethanol (ABE) fermentation using Clostridium species. However, lignin in the crystalline structure of the lignin-cellulose-hemicellulose biomass complex is not readily consumed by the Clostridium; thus, pretreatment is required to degrade this complex. During pretreatment, some fractions of cellulose and hemicellulose are converted into fermentable sugars, which are further converted to ABE. However, a major setback resulting from common pretreatment processes is the formation of sugar and lignin degradation compounds, including weak acids, furan derivatives, and phenolic compounds, which have inhibitory effects on the Clostridium. In addition, butanol concentration above 13 g/L in the fermentation broth is itself toxic to most Clostridium strain(s). This review summarizes the current state-of-the-art knowledge on the formation of microbial inhibitors during the most common lignocellulosic biomass pretreatment processes. Metabolic effects of inhibitors and their impacts on ABE production, as well as potential solutions for reducing inhibitor formation, such as optimizing pretreatment process parameters, using inhibitor tolerant strain(s) with high butanol yield ability, continuously recovering butanol during ABE fermentation, and adopting consolidated bioprocessing, are also discussed.

  1. Model for the study of the impact of atmospheric heavy metals on soil microbial biomass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marchionni, M.; Benedetti, A. [Istituto Sperimentale per la Nutrizione delle Piante, Rome (Italy); Riccardi, C.; Villarini, M. [Istituto Superiore per la Sicurezza e la Prevenzione del Lavoro, Rome (Italy)

    2000-12-01

    In the Castelporziano (Rome) protected area the inputs of atmospheric heavy metals on the soil-plant system were evaluated by the analysis of stem-flowing water from Quercus ilex L. The heavy metals detected in the soil under the canopies exhibited higher concentrations near to the tree trunks, highlighting the tree's capacity to concentrate such polluting substances. Microbial biomass, its specific respiration and the biomass calculated as a percentage of total soil organic matter, were utilised as indicators of the state of the soil and consequently also its quality with respect to heavy metal contamination. [Italian] Nell'area protetta di Castelporziano (Roma) e' stato valutato l'apporto dei metalli pesanti di origine atmosferica al sistema suolo-pianta analizzando le acque dilavanti di alberi d'alto fusto (Quercus ilex L.). I metalli pesanti rilevati nel suolo sottochioma presentano una piu' alta concentrazione in prossimita' del fusto, evidenziando la capacita' dell'albero di concentrare tali inquinanti. La biomassa microbica, la sua respirazione specifica e la biomassa espressa come percentuale della sostanza organica totale del suolo, sono state utilizzate quali indicatori dello stato del suolo, quindi della sua qualita', rispetto alla contaminazione da metalli pesanti.

  2. Simultaneous Wastewater Treatment, Algal Biomass Production and Electricity Generation in Clayware Microbial Carbon Capture Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jadhav, Dipak A; Jain, Sumat C; Ghangrekar, Makarand M

    2017-05-02

    Performance of microbial carbon capture cells (MCCs), having a low-cost clayware separator, was evaluated in terms of wastewater treatment and electricity generation using algae Chlorella pyrenoidosa in MCC-1 and Anabaena ambigua in MCC-2 and without algae in a cathodic chamber of MCC-3. Higher power production was achieved in MCC-1 (6.4 W/m(3)) compared to MCC-2 (4.29 W/m(3)) and MCC-3 (3.29 W/m(3)). Higher coulombic efficiency (15.23 ± 1.30%) and biomass production (66.4 ± 4.7 mg/(L*day)) in MCC-1 indicated the superiority of Chlorella over Anabaena algae for carbon capture and oxygen production to facilitate the cathodic reduction. Algal biofilm formation on the cathode surface of MCC-1 increased dissolved oxygen in the catholyte and decreased the cathodic charge transfer resistance with increase in reduction current. Electrochemical analyses revealed slow cathodic reactions and increase in internal resistance in MCC-2 (55 Ω) than MCC-1 (30 Ω), due to lower oxygen produced by Anabaena algae. Thus, biomass production in conjunction with wastewater treatment, CO2 sequestration and electricity generation can be achieved using Chlorella algal biocathode in MCC.

  3. New perspectives on viable microbial communities in low-biomass cleanroom environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaishampayan, Parag; Probst, Alexander J; La Duc, Myron T; Bargoma, Emilee; Benardini, James N; Andersen, Gary L; Venkateswaran, Kasthuri

    2013-02-01

    The advent of phylogenetic DNA microarrays and high-throughput pyrosequencing technologies has dramatically increased the resolution and accuracy of detection of distinct microbial lineages in mixed microbial assemblages. Despite an expanding array of approaches for detecting microbes in a given sample, rapid and robust means of assessing the differential viability of these cells, as a function of phylogenetic lineage, remain elusive. In this study, pre-PCR propidium monoazide (PMA) treatment was coupled with downstream pyrosequencing and PhyloChip DNA microarray analyses to better understand the frequency, diversity and distribution of viable bacteria in spacecraft assembly cleanrooms. Sample fractions not treated with PMA, which were indicative of the presence of both live and dead cells, yielded a great abundance of highly diverse bacterial pyrosequences. In contrast, only 1% to 10% of all of the pyrosequencing reads, arising from a few robust bacterial lineages, originated from sample fractions that had been pre-treated with PMA. The results of PhyloChip analyses of PMA-treated and -untreated sample fractions were in agreement with those of pyrosequencing. The viable bacterial population detected in cleanrooms devoid of spacecraft hardware was far more diverse than that observed in cleanrooms that housed mission-critical spacecraft hardware. The latter was dominated by hardy, robust organisms previously reported to survive in oligotrophic cleanroom environments. Presented here are the findings of the first ever comprehensive effort to assess the viability of cells in low-biomass environmental samples, and correlate differential viability with phylogenetic affiliation.

  4. Effect of forest and soil type on microbial biomass carbon and respiration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habashi, Hashem

    2016-09-01

    The aim of study was to evaluate the variation of soil microbial biomass carbon (Cmic) and microbial respiration (MR) in three types soil (Chromic Cambisols, Chromic Luvisols and Eutric Leptosols) of mixed beech forest (Beech- Hornbeam and Beech- Maple). Soil was randomly sampled from 0-10 cm layer (plant litter removed), 90 soil samples were taken. Cmic determined by the fumigation-extraction method and MR by closed bottle method. Soil Corg, Ntot and pH were measured. There are significant differences between the soil types concerning the Cmic content and MR. These parameters were highest in Chromic Cambisols following Chromic Luvisols, while the lowest were in Eutric Leptosols. A similar trend of Corg and Ntot was observed in studied soils. Two-way ANOVA indicated that soil type and forest type have significantly effect on the most soil characteristics. Chromic Cambisols shows a productive soil due to have the maximum Cmic, MR, Corg and Ntot. In Cambisols under Beech- Maple forest the Cmic value and soil C/N ratio were higher compared to Beech-Hornbeam (19.5 and 4.1 mg C g-1, and 16.3 and 3.3, respectively). This fact might be indicated that Maple litter had more easy decomposable organic compounds than Hornbeam. According to regression analysis, 89 and 68 percentage of Cmic variability could explain by soil Corg and Ntot respectively.

  5. Microbial biomass and enzyme activity of a Cerrado Oxisol under agroecological production system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enderson Petrônio de Brito Ferreira

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Aiming to evaluate the effects of soil management and cover crops on microbial indicators of soil quality, an experiment was carried out under field conditions in which common bean and corn were cropped under no-tillage (NT and conventional tillage (CT after sunnhemp, velvet bean, pigeon pea, jack bean, sorghum and fallow (weeds. The basal soil respiration (BSR, C and N of the microbial biomass (Cmic and Nmic, metabolic quotient (qCO2, total enzymatic activity (TEA, β-glycosidase (β-GA activity and acid phosphatase activity (APA were evaluated in samples collected in 0-0.10 m depth. Cmic, qCO2, TEA, β-GA and APA were more sensitive in determining the effects caused by tillage and cover crops. Although the cover crops had not provided a remarkably influence on the studied indicators, in general, the highest values of Cmic, Nmic, BSR, TEA, β-GA and APA and the lowest values of qCO2 were observed under NT compared to CT. Cmic and TEA values were 35% and 13% higher under NT when compared to CT, respectively. In addition, NT showed values closer to those found under "Cerrado" area for the studied parameters, indicating a greater sustainability under this soil management system compared to CT management.

  6. Soil microbial biomass alterations during the maize silage growing season relative to tillage method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Staley, T.E.

    1999-12-01

    Tillage method can significantly alter soil microbial populations and activities. Although considerable literature exists on microbial and soil chemical alterations under various tillage methods, little information exists on soil microbial biomass C (SMB) alterations during the growing season, and especially on the relationship of SMB to crop N use. The objective of this study was to determine the effect of notillage (NT) or conventional tillage (CT), and soil location, on SMB during the growing season. A maize (Zea mays L.) silage/{sup 15}N field experiment, under NT or CT for 3 yr before this study, was used during the fourth growing season. Averaged over sampling times and location (within-row or between-row), SMB in the 0- to 3.8-cm and 3.8- to 7.5-cm soil layers under NT was 87 and 33% greater, respectively, than under CT. Linear regression of soil surface layer (0--3.8 cm) SMB on day-of-year revealed a significant (P {le} 0.10) relationship only within-row and under NT, with a 29% SMB decrease during the growing season. Similar regressions for the other layers and treatments were significant (P > 0.10) or had small seasonal differences. SMB was consistently higher in the between-row locations under both tillage methods. Despite substantial tillage method-induced differences in SMB (50% overall, accompanied by small differential seasonal differences) in the more surficial layers, these alterations appear to have been of little practical consequence, since previous work on these plots revealed essentially no differences in silage utilization of either fertilizer N or soil N relative to tillage method. Thus, the importance of SMB in significantly affecting crop N use in this within-row, banded, maize silage system is questioned.

  7. Radiocesium storage in soil microbial biomass of undisturbed alpine meadow soils and its relation to {sup 137}Cs soil-plant transfer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stemmer, Michael [Institute of Soil Research, University of Agricultural Sciences, Gregor-Mendel-Strasse 33, 1180 Vienna (Austria)]. E-mail: michael.stemmer@boku.ac.at; Hromatka, Angelika [Department of Environmental Research, ARC Seibersdorf Research GmbH, 2444 Seibersdorf (Austria); Lettner, Herbert [Institute of Physics and Biophysics, University of Salzburg, Hellbrunner Strasse 34, 5020 Salzburg (Austria); Strebl, Friederike [Department of Environmental Research, ARC Seibersdorf Research GmbH, 2444 Seibersdorf (Austria)

    2005-07-01

    This study focuses on radiocesium storage in soil microbial biomass of undisturbed alpine meadow sites and its relation to the soil-to-plant transfer. Soil and plant samples were taken in August 1999 from an altitude transect (800-1600 m.a.s.l.) at Gastein valley, Austria. Soil samples were subdivided into 3-cm layers for analyses of total, K{sub 2}SO{sub 4}-extractable and microbially stored {sup 137}Cs. Microbial biomass was measured by the fumigation extraction method, and fungal biomass was quantified using ergosterol as biomarker molecule. In general, the quantity of {sup 137}Cs stored in the living soil microbial biomass was relatively small. At the high-altitude meadows, showing high amounts of fungal biomass, microbially stored {sup 137}Cs amounted to 0.64 {+-} 0.14 kBq m{sup -2} which corresponds to about 1.2-2.7% of the total {sup 137}Cs soil inventory. At lower altitudes, microbial {sup 137}Cs content was distinctly smaller and in most cases not measurable at all using the fumigation extraction method. However, a positive correlation between the observed soil-to-plant aggregated transfer factor, microbially stored {sup 137}Cs and fungal biomass was found, which indicates a possible role of fungal biomass in the storage and turnover of {sup 137}Cs in soils and in the {sup 137}Cs uptake by plants.

  8. [Comparisons of Microbial Numbers, Biomasses and Soil Enzyme Activities Between Paddy Field and Drvland Origins in Karst Cave Wetland].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Zhen-jiang; Zeng, Hong-hu; Li, Qiang; Cheng, Ya-ping; Tang, Hua-feng; Li, Min; Huang, Bing-fu

    2016-01-15

    The purpose of this study is to compare microbial number, microbial biomass as well as soil enzyme activity between paddy field and dryland originated karst wetland ecosystems. The soil samples (0-20 cm) of uncultivated wetland, paddy field and dryland were collected in Huixian karst cave wetland, Guilin, China. Microbial numbers and biomass were detected using dilute plate incubation counting and chloroform fumigation-extraction, respectively. Microbial DNA was extracted according to the manufacturer's instructions of the kit. Microbial activity was examined using soil enzyme assays as well. The result showed that the bacteria number in paddy filed was (4.36 +/- 2.25) x 10(7) CFU x g(-1), which was significantly higher than those in wetland and dryland. Fungi numbers were (6.41 +/- 2.16) x 10(4) CFU x g(-1) in rice paddy and (6.52 +/- 1.55) x 10(4) CFU x g(-1) in wetland, which were higher than that in dryland. Actinomycetes number was (2.65 +/- 0.72) x 10(6) CFU x g(-1) in dryland, which was higher than that in wetland. Microbial DNA concentration in rice paddy was (11.92 +/- 3.69) microg x g(-1), which was higher than that in dryland. Invertase activity was (66.87 +/- 18.61) mg x (g x 24 h)(-1) in rice paddy and alkaline phosphatase activity was (2.07 +/- 0.99) mg x (g x 2 h)(-1) in wetland, both of which were higher than those in dryland. Statistical analysis showed there was a significant positive correlation of microbial DNA content, alkaline phosphatase activity and microbial carbon with soil pH, soil organic carbon (SOC), total nitrogen, alkali-hydrolyzable nitrogen, soil moisture, exchangeable Ca2+ and exchangeable Mg2+, as well as a significant positive correlation of intervase activity with the former three microbial factors. The above results indicated that microbial biomass and function responded much more sensitively to land-use change than microbial number in karst cave wetland system. Soil moisture, SOC and some factors induced by land-use change

  9. Response of soil microbial biomass and community structures to conventional and organic farming systems under identical crop rotations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esperschütz, Jürgen; Gattinger, Andreas; Mäder, Paul; Schloter, Michael; Fliessbach, Andreas

    2007-07-01

    In this study the influence of different farming systems on microbial community structure was analyzed using soil samples from the DOK long-term field experiment in Switzerland, which comprises organic (BIODYN and BIOORG) and conventional (CONFYM and CONMIN) farming systems as well as an unfertilized control (NOFERT). We examined microbial communities in winter wheat plots at two different points in the crop rotation (after potatoes and after maize). Employing extended polar lipid analysis up to 244 different phospholipid fatty acids (PLFA) and phospholipid ether lipids (PLEL) were detected. Higher concentrations of PLFA and PLEL in BIODYN and BIOORG indicated a significant influence of organic agriculture on microbial biomass. Farmyard manure (FYM) application consistently revealed the strongest, and the preceding crop the weakest, influence on domain-specific biomass, diversity indices and microbial community structures. Esterlinked PLFA from slowly growing bacteria (k-strategists) showed the strongest responses to long-term organic fertilization. Although the highest fungal biomass was found in the two organic systems of the DOK field trial, their contribution to the differentiation of community structures according to the management regime was relatively low. Prokaryotic communities responded most strongly to either conventional or organic farming management.

  10. Respiration, microbial biomass and soil phosphatase activity in two agroecosystems and one forest in Turrialba, Costa Rica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wuellins Durango

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available In order to evaluate some microbiological and biochemical characteristics, a comparative study was carried out, as related to 3 different land uses in Ultisols located in Grano de Oro, Turrialba, Costa Rica. Three soil management systems were selected (two agroecosystems, coffee and coffee-banana and forest. In each farm, 4 composite soil samples were collected, on which microbial biomass and respiration, and phosphatase enzyme activity analysis were performed. The microbial biomass in forest was statistically higher (423 mg C kg-1 compared to those in agroecosystems coffee and coffee-banana (77 and 111 mg C kg-1 respectively. Microbial respiration did not show differences due to land management (580, 560 and 570 μg CO2 g-1.day-1 in coffee, coffee-banana and forest systems, respectively. It was also determined that the enzyme phosphatase activity in forest soils was statistically higher (4432 μg p-NP g-1.h-1. The data suggest that soil conditions in the forest favor greater microbial activity and phosphatase biomass, as compared to agricultural systems.

  11. [Characteristics of soil microbial biomass carbon and nitrogen and their relationships with soil nutrients in Cunninghamia lanceolata plantations].

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Youjun; Wang, Qingkui; Wang, Silong; Yu, Xiaojun

    2006-12-01

    The study on the soil microbial biomass and nutrient status under native broadleaved forest and Cunninghamia lanceolata plantations at the Huitong National Research Station of Forest Ecosystem showed that after the native broadleaved forest was replaced by mono-cultured C. lanceolata or C. lanceolata was planted continuously, soil microbial biomass and nutrient pool decreased greatly. In 0 - 10 cm soil layer, the concentrations of soil microbial carbon and nitrogen in broadleaved forest were 800.5 and 84.5 mg x kg(-1) , being 1.90 and 1.03 times as much as those in the first rotation of C. lanceolata plantation, and 2.16 and 1.27 times as much as those in the second rotation of the plantation, respectively, while in 10 - 20 cm soil layer, the microbial carbon and nitrogen in broad-leaved forest were 475.4 and 63.3 mg x kg(-1), being 1.86 and 1.60 times as much as those in the first rotation, and 2.11 and 1.76 times as much as those in the second rotation, respectively. Soil nutrient pools such as total nitrogen, total potassium, NH4(+) -N, and available potassium also declined after the C. lanceolata plantation replaced native broad-leaved forest, or C. lanceolata was planted continuously. Less litter and its slower decay rate in pure C. lanceolata plantation were the crucial factors leading to the decrease of soil microbial biomass and nutrient pool in this area, and human disturbance, especially slash-burning and site preparation, was the another factor leading to the decrease. There were significant positive correlations between soil microbial carbon and nitrogen and soil nutrients. To improve soil quality and maintain sustainable productivity, some measures including planting mixed conifer with hardwood, preserving residues after harvest, and adopting scientific site preparation should be taken.

  12. Biomass-derived heteroatoms-doped mesoporous carbon for efficient oxygen reduction in microbial fuel cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Yu; Zhu, Nengwu; Yin, Fuhua; Yang, Tingting; Wu, Pingxiao; Dang, Zhi; Liu, Meilin; Wei, Xiaorong

    2017-12-15

    Currently, the development of less expensive, more active and more stable catalysts like heteroatom-doped carbon based non-precious metal materials are highly desired for the cathodic oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) in microbial fuel cells (MFCs). Comparing with heteroatom sources from chemical reagents, biomass is notably inexpensive and abundant, containing more elements which contribute to ORR activity. Herein, we demonstrate an easy operating one-step and low-cost way to synthesize egg-derived heteroatoms-doped mesoporous carbon (EGC) catalysts utilizing egg as the biomass carbon and other elements source (sulphur, phosphorus, boron and iron), and porous g-C3N4 as both template and nitrogen source. After carbonized, such hybrid materials possess an outstanding electrocatalytic activity towards ORR comparable to the commercial Pt/C catalyst in neutral media. Electrochemical detections as cyclic voltammogram and rotating ring-disk electrode tests show that the potential of oxygen reduction peak of EGC1-10-2 is at + 0.10V, onset potential is at + 0.257V (vs. Ag/AgCl) and electron transfer number of that is 3.84-3.92, which indicate that EGC1-10-2 via a four-electron pathway. Reactor operation shows that the maximum power density of MFC-EGC1-10-2 (737.1mWm(-2)), which is slightly higher than MFC-Pt/C (20%) (704mWm(-2)). The low cost (0.049 $g(-1)), high yield (20.26%) and high performance of EGC1-10-2 provide a promising alternative to noble metal catalysts by using abundant natural biological resources, which contribute a lot to expansion and commercialization of MFCs. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Prediction of microbial growth rate versus biomass yield by a metabolic network with kinetic parameters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adadi, Roi; Volkmer, Benjamin; Milo, Ron; Heinemann, Matthias; Shlomi, Tomer

    2012-01-01

    Identifying the factors that determine microbial growth rate under various environmental and genetic conditions is a major challenge of systems biology. While current genome-scale metabolic modeling approaches enable us to successfully predict a variety of metabolic phenotypes, including maximal biomass yield, the prediction of actual growth rate is a long standing goal. This gap stems from strictly relying on data regarding reaction stoichiometry and directionality, without accounting for enzyme kinetic considerations. Here we present a novel metabolic network-based approach, MetabOlic Modeling with ENzyme kineTics (MOMENT), which predicts metabolic flux rate and growth rate by utilizing prior data on enzyme turnover rates and enzyme molecular weights, without requiring measurements of nutrient uptake rates. The method is based on an identified design principle of metabolism in which enzymes catalyzing high flux reactions across different media tend to be more efficient in terms of having higher turnover numbers. Extending upon previous attempts to utilize kinetic data in genome-scale metabolic modeling, our approach takes into account the requirement for specific enzyme concentrations for catalyzing predicted metabolic flux rates, considering isozymes, protein complexes, and multi-functional enzymes. MOMENT is shown to significantly improve the prediction accuracy of various metabolic phenotypes in E. coli, including intracellular flux rates and changes in gene expression levels under different growth rates. Most importantly, MOMENT is shown to predict growth rates of E. coli under a diverse set of media that are correlated with experimental measurements, markedly improving upon existing state-of-the art stoichiometric modeling approaches. These results support the view that a physiological bound on cellular enzyme concentrations is a key factor that determines microbial growth rate.

  14. [Effects of urease/nitrification inhibitors on soil available N and microbial biomass N and on N uptake of wheat].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiao, Xiaoguang; Liang, Wenju; Chen, Lijun; Jiang, Yong; Wen, Dazhong

    2004-10-01

    With an aquic brown earth as test soil, this paper studied the effects of urease inhibitor (NBPT), nitrification inhibitor (DCD) and their combinations on the dynamics of soil available N and microbial biomass N. The results showed that the treatments of inhibitors, especially the combined application of NBPT and DCD, could increase soil NH4+-N by 2%-53%, inhibit NH4+ oxidation, decrease soil NO3(-)-N concentration, increase soil total available N by 34%-44%, and increase wheat N uptake by 0.26%-6.79%. The best treatment was urease inhibitor combined with nitrification inhibitor. The application of inhibitors increased soil microbial biomass N immobilization at the early growth stage of wheat, and promoted soil N mineralization at filling stage.

  15. Carbon use efficiency (CUE) and biomass turnover of soil microbial communities as affected by bedrock, land management and soil temperature and moisture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Qing; Hu, Yuntao; Richter, Andreas; Wanek, Wolfgang

    2017-04-01

    Soil microbial carbon use efficiency (CUE), defined as the proportion of organic C taken up that is allocated to microbial growth, represents an important synthetic representation of microbial community C metabolism that describes the flux partitioning between microbial respiration and growth. Therefore, studying microbial CUE is critical for the understanding of soil C cycling. Microbial CUE is thought to vary with environmental conditions (e.g. temperature and soil moisture). Microbial CUE is thought to decrease with increasing temperature and declining soil moisture, as the latter may trigger stress responses (e.g. the synthesis of stress metabolites), which may consequently lower microbial community CUE. However, these effects on microbial CUE have not been adequately measured so far due to methodological restrictions. The most widely used methods for microbial CUE estimation are based on tracing 13C-labeled substrates into microbial biomass and respiratory CO2, approaches that are known to overestimate microbial CUE of native organic matter in soil. Recently, a novel substrate-independent approach based on the measurement of (i) respiration rates and (ii) the incorporation rates of 18O from labelled water into newly formed microbial DNA has been developed in our laboratory for measuring microbial CUE. This approach overcomes the shortcomings of previously used methods and has already been shown to yield realistic estimations of soil microbial CUE. This approach can also be applied to concurrently measure microbial biomass turnover rates, which also influence the sequestration of soil organic C. Microbial turnover rates are also thought to be impacted by environmental factors, but rarely have been directly measured so far. Here, we aimed at determining the short-term effects of environmental factors (soil temperature and soil moisture) on microbial CUE and microbial biomass turnover rates based on the novel 18O approach. Soils from three land-use types (arable

  16. [Impact of tillage practices on microbial biomass carbon in top layer of black soils].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Bing-jie; Jia, Shu-xia; Zhang, Xiao-ping; Liang, Ai-zhen; Chen, Xue-wen; Zhang, Shi-xiu; Liu, Si-yi; Chen, Sheng-long

    2015-01-01

    A study was conducted on a long-term (13 years) tillage and rotation experiment on black soil in northeast China to determine the effects of tillage, time and soil depth on soil microbial biomass carbon (MBC). Tillage systems included no tillage (NT), ridge tillage (RT) and mould-board plough (MP). Soil sampling was done at 0-5, 5-10 and 10-20 cm depths in June, August and September, 2013, and April, 2014 in the corn phase of corn-soybean rotation plots. MBC content was measured by the chloroform fumigation extraction (CFE) method. The results showed that the MBC content varied with sampling time and soil depth. Soil MBC content was the lowest in April for all three tillage systems, and was highest in June for MP, and highest in August for NT and RT. At each sampling time, tillage system had a significant effect on soil MBC content only in the top 0-5 cm layer. The MBC content showed obvious stratification under NT and RT with a higher MBC content in the top 0-5 cm layer than under MP. The stratification ratios under NT and RT were greatest in September when they were respectively 67.8% and 95.5% greater than under MP. Our results showed that soil MBC contents were greatly affected by the time and soil depth, and were more apparently accumulated in the top layer under NT and RT.

  17. Activity of soil microbial biomass altered by land use in the southwestern Amazon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    André Mancebo Mazzetto

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT The increasing demand for food creates environmental problems, mainly due to the removal of native vegetation cover for agriculture expansion in Brazil. These changes in land use lead to changes in the soil organic matter dynamics. Microorganisms represent the most biological and physiological diversity in soil, as well as are responsible for more than 95% of the decomposition and nutrient cycling processes. The objective in this research was to check if there is difference of patterns in activity of soil microbial biomass under varied natural vegetation, pastures in use and agricultural systems recently established. The area covered by this study corresponds to the states of Rondônia and Mato Grosso. Canonical variate analysis was used in physical, chemical and microbiological factors in each ecoregion and land use, looking for patterns and variables that can differentiate them. The native areas showed distinct patterns in the dynamics of microbiological attributes mainly related to the amount of litter in each biome studied. For the disturbed areas, there were similar results between pastures and native areas, significantly different from the results obtained in agricultural areas, which, due to differences in management and kind of cultures analyzed, showed a great variability in the final result. The results support the recommendation for use of microbiological attributes as indicators of land use change, combined with chemical and physical factors of the soil.

  18. Grasslands and Croplands Have Different Microbial Biomass Carbon Levels per Unit of Soil Organic Carbon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Terence P. McGonigle

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Primarily using cropped systems, previous studies have reported a positive linear relationship between microbial biomass carbon (MBC and soil organic carbon (SOC. We conducted a meta-analysis to explore this relationship separately for grasslands and croplands using available literature. Studies were limited to those using fumigation–extraction for MBC for field samples. Trials were noted separately where records were distinct in space or time. Grasslands were naturally occurring, restored, or seeded. Cropping systems were typical of the temperate zone. MBC had a positive linear response to increasing SOC that was significant in both grasslands (p < 0.001; r2 = 0.76 and croplands (p < 0.001; r2 = 0.48. However, MBC increased 2.5-fold more steeply per unit of increasing SOC for grassland soils, as compared to the corresponding response in cropland soils. Expressing MBC as a proportion of SOC across the regression overall, slopes corresponded to 2.7% for grasslands and 1.1% for croplands. The slope of the linear relationship for grasslands was significantly (p = 0.0013 steeper than for croplands. The difference between the two systems is possibly caused by a greater proportion of SOC in grasslands being active rather than passive, relative to that in croplands, with that active fraction promoting the formation of MBC.

  19. No enhancement of cyanobacterial bloom biomass decomposition by sediment microbial fuel cell (SMFC) at different temperatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Tian-Ran; Song, Na; Chen, Mo; Yan, Zai-Sheng; Jiang, He-Long

    2016-11-01

    The sediment microbial fuel cell (SMFC) has potential application to control the degradation of decayed cyanobacterial bloom biomass (CBB) in sediment in eutrophic lakes. In this study, temperatures from 4 to 35 °C were investigated herein as the major impact on SMFC performance in CBB-amended sediment. Under low temperature conditions, the SMFC could still operate, and produced a maximum power density of 4.09 mW m(-2) at 4 °C. Coupled with the high substrate utilization, high output voltage was generated in SMFCs at high temperatures. The application of SMFC affected the anaerobic fermentation progress and was detrimental to the growth of methanogens. At the same time, organic matter of sediments in SMFC became more humified. As a result, the fermentation of CBB was not accelerated with the SMFC application, and the removal efficiency of the total organic matter was inhibited by 5% compared to the control. Thus, SMFC could operate well year round in sediments with a temperature ranging from 4 to 35 °C, and also exhibit practical value by inhibiting quick CBB decomposition in sediments in summer against the pollution of algae organic matter.

  20. Microbial Biomass Carbon and Total Organic Carbon of Soils as Affected by Rubber Cultivation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Hua; ZHANG Gan-Lin

    2003-01-01

    Soil samples were collected from different rubber fields in twenty-five plots selected randomly in the Experimental Farm of the Chinese Academy of Tropical Agriculture Sciences located in Hainan, China, to analyse the ecological effect of rubber cultivation. The results showed that in the tropical rubber farm,soil microbial biomass C (MBC) and total organic C (TOC) were relatively low in the content but highly correlated with each other. After rubber tapping, soil MBC of mature rubber fields decreased significantly,by 55.5%, compared with immature rubber fields. Soil TOC also decreased but the difference was not significant. Ratios of MBC to TOC decreased significantly. The decreasing trend of MBC stopped at about ten years of rubber cultivation. After this period, soil MBC increased relatively while soil TOC still kept in decreasing. Soil MBC changes could be measured to predict the tendency of soil organic matter changes due to management practices in a tropical rubber farm several years before the changes in soil TOC become detectable.

  1. Some soil properties and microbial biomass of Pinus maritima, Pinus pinea and Eucalyptus camaldulensis from the Eastern Mediterranean coasts

    OpenAIRE

    Nacide Kizildag; Husniye Aka Sagliker; Ahu Kutlay; Sahin Cenkseven; Cengiz Darici

    2012-01-01

    Background: Salt-affected soils occupy wide areas that have ecological importance in semi-arid and arid regions. Excessive amounts of salt have adverse effects on soil physical and chemical properties and also on the microbiological processes. The soils of Pinus maritima, Pinus pinea, and Eucalyptus camaldulensis were found to be under salinity stress in the present study area. Thus, the carbon, nitrogen, phosphorus contents, microbial biomass, and carbon mineralization were determined in the...

  2. Biological effects of native and exotic plant residues on plant growth, microbial biomass and N availability under controlled conditions

    OpenAIRE

    Diallo, Mariama-Dalanda; Duponnois, Robin; Guisse, A.; Sall, Saïdou; Chotte, Jean-Luc; Thioulouse, J.

    2006-01-01

    The leaf litter of six tropical tree species (Acacia holosericea, Acacia tortilis, Azadirachta indica, Casuarina equisetifolia, Cordyla pinnata and Faidherbia albida) frequently used in agroforestry plantations in Sahelian and Soudano-Sahelian areas were tested for their influence on soil nitrogen content, microbial biomass and plant growth under controlled greenhouse conditions. Half of the soil was planted with onion (Allium cepa L.) seedlings and the other half was not. Two herbaceous spec...

  3. Black Nitrogen as a source for the built-up of microbial biomass in soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Martín, María; Milter, Anja; Knicker, Heike

    2016-04-01

    In areas with frequent wildfires, soil organic nitrogen (SON) is sequestered in pyrogenic organic matter (PyOM) due to heat-induced transformation of proteinaceous compounds into N-heterocycles, i.e. pyrrole, imidazole and indole compounds. These newly formed structures, known as Black Nitrogen (BN), have been assumed to be hardly degradable by microorganisms, thus being efficiently sequestered from the N cycle. On the other hand, a previous study showed that nitrogen of BN can be used by plants for the built-up of their biomass (de la Rosa and Knicker 2011). Thus, BN may play an important role as an N source during the recovery of the forest after a fire event. In order to obtain a more profound understanding of the role of BN within the N cycle in soils, we studied the bioavailability and incorporation of N derived from PyOM into microbial amino acids. For that, pots with soil from a burnt and an unburnt Cambisol located under a Mediterranean forest were covered with different amendments. The toppings were mixtures of unlabeled KNO3 with 15N labeled grass or 15N-labeled PyOM from burned grass and K15NO3 mixed with unlabeled grass material or PyOM. The pots were kept in the greenhouse under controlled conditions for 16 months and were sampled after 0.5, 1, 5, 8 and 16 months. From all samples the amino acids were extracted after hydrolysis (6 M HCl, 22 h, 110 °C) and quantified via gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GC/MS). The fate of 15N was followed by isotopic ratio mass spectrometry (IRMS). The results show that the contribution of extractable amino acids to total soil organic matter was always higher in the unburnt than in the burnt soil. However, with ongoing incubation their amount decreased. Already after 0.5 months, some PyOM-derived 15N was incorporated into the extractable amino acids and the amount increased with experiment time. Since this can only occur after prior microbial degradation of PyOM our results clearly support a lower biochemical

  4. [Effects of adding straw carbon source to root knot nematode diseased soil on soil microbial biomass and protozoa abundance].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Si-Hui; Lian, Jian-Hong; Cao, Zhi-Ping; Zhao, Li

    2013-06-01

    A field experiment with successive planting of tomato was conducted to study the effects of adding different amounts of winter wheat straw (2.08 g x kg(-1), 1N; 4.16 g x kg(-1), 2N; and 8.32 g x kg(-1), 4N) to the soil seriously suffered from root knot nematode disease on the soil microbial biomass and protozoa abundance. Adding straw carbon source had significant effects on the contents of soil microbial biomass carbon (MBC) and microbial biomass nitrogen (MBN) and the abundance of soil protozoa, which all decreased in the order of 4N > 2N > 1N > CK. The community structure of soil protozoa also changed significantly under straw addition. In the treatments with straw addition, the average proportion of fagellate, amoeba, and ciliates accounted for 36.0%, 59.5%, and 4.5% of the total protozoa, respectively. Under the same adding amounts of wheat straw, there was an increase in the soil MBC and MBN contents, MBC/MBN ratio, and protozoa abundance with increasing cultivation period.

  5. Organic and inorganic fertilizer effect on soil CO2 flux, microbial biomass, and growth of Nigella sativa L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salehi, Aliyeh; Fallah, Seyfollah; Sourki, Ali Abasi

    2017-01-01

    Cattle manure has a high carbon/nitrogen ratio and may not decompose; therefore, full-dose application of urea fertilizer might improve biological properties by increasing manure decomposition. This study aimed to investigate the effect of combining cattle manure and urea fertilizer on soil CO2 flux, microbial biomass carbon, and dry matter accumulation during Nigella sativa L. (black cumin) growth under field conditions. The treatments were control, cattle manure, urea, different levels of split and full-dose integrated fertilizer. The results showed that integrated application of cattle manure and chemical fertilizer significantly increased microbial biomass carbon by 10%, soil organic carbon by 2.45%, total N by 3.27%, mineral N at the flowering stage by 7.57%, and CO2 flux by 9% over solitary urea application. Integrated application increased microbial biomass carbon by 10% over the solitary application and the full-dose application by 5% over the split application. The soil properties and growth parameters of N. sativa L. benefited more from the full-dose application than the split application of urea. Cattle manure combined with chemical fertilizer and the full-dose application of urea increased fertilizer efficiency and improved biological soil parameters and plant growth. This method decreased the cost of top dressing urea fertilizer and proved beneficial for the environment and medicinal plant health.

  6. Factors Controlling Soil Microbial Biomass and Bacterial Diversity and Community Composition in a Cold Desert Ecosystem: Role of Geographic Scale.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David J Van Horn

    Full Text Available Understanding controls over the distribution of soil bacteria is a fundamental step toward describing soil ecosystems, understanding their functional capabilities, and predicting their responses to environmental change. This study investigated the controls on the biomass, species richness, and community structure and composition of soil bacterial communities in the McMurdo Dry Valleys, Antarctica, at local and regional scales. The goals of the study were to describe the relationships between abiotic characteristics and soil bacteria in this unique, microbially dominated environment, and to test the scale dependence of these relationships in a low complexity ecosystem. Samples were collected from dry mineral soils associated with snow patches, which are a significant source of water in this desert environment, at six sites located in the major basins of the Taylor and Wright Valleys. Samples were analyzed for a suite of characteristics including soil moisture, pH, electrical conductivity, soil organic matter, major nutrients and ions, microbial biomass, 16 S rRNA gene richness, and bacterial community structure and composition. Snow patches created local biogeochemical gradients while inter-basin comparisons encompassed landscape scale gradients enabling comparisons of microbial controls at two distinct spatial scales. At the organic carbon rich, mesic, low elevation sites Acidobacteria and Actinobacteria were prevalent, while Firmicutes and Proteobacteria were dominant at the high elevation, low moisture and biomass sites. Microbial parameters were significantly related with soil water content and edaphic characteristics including soil pH, organic matter, and sulfate. However, the magnitude and even the direction of these relationships varied across basins and the application of mixed effects models revealed evidence of significant contextual effects at local and regional scales. The results highlight the importance of the geographic scale of

  7. Long-Term Impact of Soil Management on Microbial Biomass C, N and P in Rice-Based Cropping System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    A 12-year field experiment was conducted to investigate the effect of different tillage methods and fertilization systems on microbial biomass C, N and P of a gray fluvo-aguic soil in rice-based cropping system. Five fertilization treatments were designed under conventional tillage (CT) or no tillage (NT) system: no fertilizer (CK); chemical fertilizer only (CF); combining chemical fertilizer with pig manure (PM); combining chemical fertilizer with crop straw (CS) and fallow (F). The results showed that biomass C, N and P were enriched in the surface layer of no-tilled soil, whereas they distributed relatively evenly in the tilled soil, which might result from enrichment of crop residue, organic manure and mineral fertilizer, and surficial development of root systems under NT. Under the cultivation system, NT had slightly greater biomass C, N and P at 0~5 cm depth, significantly less biomass C, N and P at 5~15 cm depth, less microbial biomass C, N and equivalent biomass P at 15~30 cm depth as compared to CT, indicating that tillage was beneficial for the multiplication of organisms in the plowed layer of soil. Under the fallow system, biomass C, N and P in the surface layer were significantly greater for NT than CT while their differences between the two tillage methods were negligible in the deeper layers. In the surface layer, biomass C, N and P in the soils amended with organic manure combined with mineral fertilizers were significantly greater than those of the treatments only with mineral fertilizers and the control. Soils without fertilizer had the least biomass nutrient contents among the five fertilization treatments. Obviously, the long-term application of organic manure could maintain the higher activity of microorganisms in soils. The amounts of biomass C, N and P in the fallowed soils varied with the tillage methods; they were much greater under NT than under CT, especially in the surface layer, suggesting that the frequent plowing could decrease

  8. Floor interaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Marianne Graves; Krogh, Peter; Ludvigsen, Martin;

    2005-01-01

    Within architecture, there is a long tradition of careful design of floors. The design has been concerned with both decorating floors and designing floors to carry information. Ubiquitous computing technology offers new opportunities for designing interactive floors. This paper presents three...... different interactive floor concepts. Through an urban perspective it draws upon the experiences of floors in architecture, and provides a set of design issues for designing interactive floors....

  9. Planktonic food web structure at a coastal time-series site: I. Partitioning of microbial abundances and carbon biomass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caron, David A.; Connell, Paige E.; Schaffner, Rebecca A.; Schnetzer, Astrid; Fuhrman, Jed A.; Countway, Peter D.; Kim, Diane Y.

    2017-03-01

    Biogeochemistry in marine plankton communities is strongly influenced by the activities of microbial species. Understanding the composition and dynamics of these assemblages is essential for modeling emergent community-level processes, yet few studies have examined all of the biological assemblages present in the plankton, and benchmark data of this sort from time-series studies are rare. Abundance and biomass of the entire microbial assemblage and mesozooplankton (>200 μm) were determined vertically, monthly and seasonally over a 3-year period at a coastal time-series station in the San Pedro Basin off the southwestern coast of the USA. All compartments of the planktonic community were enumerated (viruses in the femtoplankton size range [0.02-0.2 μm], bacteria + archaea and cyanobacteria in the picoplankton size range [0.2-2.0 μm], phototrophic and heterotrophic protists in the nanoplanktonic [2-20 μm] and microplanktonic [20-200 μm] size ranges, and mesozooplankton [>200 μm]. Carbon biomass of each category was estimated using standard conversion factors. Plankton abundances varied over seven orders of magnitude across all categories, and total carbon biomass averaged approximately 60 μg C l-1 in surface waters of the 890 m water column over the study period. Bacteria + archaea comprised the single largest component of biomass (>1/3 of the total), with the sum of phototrophic protistan biomass making up a similar proportion. Temporal variability at this subtropical station was not dramatic. Monthly depth-specific and depth-integrated biomass varied 2-fold at the station, while seasonal variances were generally web structure and function at this coastal observatory.

  10. Microbial biomass and biological activity of soils and soil-like bodies in coastal oases of Antarctica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikitin, D. A.; Marfenina, O. E.; Kudinova, A. G.; Lysak, L. V.; Mergelov, N. S.; Dolgikh, A. V.; Lupachev, A. V.

    2017-09-01

    The method of luminescent microscopy has been applied to study the structure of the microbial biomass of soils and soil-like bodies in East (the Thala Hills and Larsemann Hills oases) and West (Cape Burks, Hobbs coast) Antarctica. According to Soil Taxonomy, the studied soils mainly belong to the subgroups of Aquic Haploturbels, Typic Haploturbels, Typic Haplorthels, and Lithic Haplorthels. The major contribution to their microbial biomass belongs to fungi. The highest fungal biomass (up to 790 μg C/g soil) has been found in the soils with surface organic horizons in the form of thin moss/lichen litters, in which the development of fungal mycelium is most active. A larger part of fungal biomass (70-98%) is represented by spores. For the soils without vegetation cover, the accumulation of bacterial and fungal biomass takes place in the horizons under surface desert pavements. In the upper parts of the soils without vegetation cover and in the organic soil horizons, the major part (>60%) of fungal mycelium contains protective melanin pigments. Among bacteria, the high portion (up to 50%) of small filtering forms is observed. A considerable increase (up to 290.2 ± 27 μg C/g soil) in the fungal biomass owing to the development of yeasts has been shown for gley soils (gleyzems) developing from sapropel sediments under subaquatic conditions and for the algal-bacterial mat on the bottom of the lake (920.7 ± 46 μg C/g soil). The production of carbon dioxide by the soils varies from 0.47 to 2.34 μg C-CO2/(g day). The intensity of nitrogen fixation in the studied samples is generally low: from 0.08 to 55.85 ng C2H4/(g day). The intensity of denitrification varies from 0.09 to 19.28 μg N-N2O/(g day).

  11. Influence of soil management practices and substrate availability on microbial biomass and its activities in some haplic luvisols

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Friedel, Jurgen K. [University Hohenheeim, Stuttgart (Germany)

    1996-07-01

    Soil microbial biomass and activities are sensitive indicators of management effects. Higher contents of microbial biomass and higher activities, for example, are found with crop rotations in contrast to bare fallow and mono culture systems. The main reason for these differences is a higher input of crop and root residues in crop rotation systems, leading to more microbial available substrate. The objectives of this study were to describe indices for microbial available substrate in arable soils depending on management practices, and to relate them with soil microbial biomass and activities. At two locations (Muttergarten and hinger Hof near the University of Hohenheim, Stuttgart, SW-Germany), adenosine triphosphate (ATP) contents and microbial activities were measured in haplic Luviosls. As indices for microbial available substrate, water soluble organic carbon compounds in soils were determined and decomposable young soil organic matter was calculated from organic fertilizers and crop and root residues using empirical decomposition functions. Higher ATP contents and microbial activities were observed along with organic fertilization (liquid cattle manure) than with mineral fertilization. Shallow cultivation with a rotary cultivator led to higher values of microbial properties in the upper part of the Ap horizon than ploughing. Soil microbial parameters were higher in plots under a rape-cereals crop rotation, compared to a legumes-cereals crop rotation. Microbial biomass and its activities were related more closely to decomposable young soil organic matter than to soil humus content or to any other soil property. Water soluble organic carbon compounds did not prove as an indicator of microbial available substrate. [Spanish] La biomasa y la actividad microbianas son indicadores sensibles de los efectos del manejo del suelo. Por ejemplo, con la rotacion de cultivos se obtiene un contenido y una actividad mayores de la biomasa microbiana en contraste con el simple

  12. Mercury in soils and microbial biomass of the South Kirgizstan subregion of the biosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vadim, Ermakov; Valentina, Danilova; Ul'yana, Gulyaeva

    2016-04-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to clear up the role of soil microflora in the mercury concentration by microorganisms as they are related to a problem of the soil remediation. To complete the tasks as assigned, 150 samples of both various soils formed over the ore bodies outside the ore occurrence zones and waste dumps have been taken in the areas of South Kirgizstan Some 45 soil samples (horizon A, 0-20 cm) and dumps were used for microbiological analyses [1, 2]. The soil cover as seen in the work areas is represented by Haplic Calcisols (gray) soils. All the soils are generally calcareous, in some cases salted, and have various compositions. To grow the microbial biomass in order to determine mercury content levels in there, some soil media characterized by natural concentrations, ratios and forms of the compounds of these metals were used The results showed that the mercury concentrations in soils of the sampling area varied from 0.028 to 357.3 mg/kg. The highest metal content indices (up to 357.3 mg/kg) were found for soils formed over ores, and waste dumps. The lowest mercury content (0.028 to 0.066 mg/kg) was found for soils of the control area. The data on mercury and/or antimony accumulation by the biomass of soil microorganisms grown in soil media are represented. The soil samples having various mercury levels were collected in the South Kirgizstan subregion of the biosphere. It was established that the accumulation of the metals by soil microflora depends on their content in the soil, the microorganism growth is strongly inhibited at mercury concentration of 300 mg/kg in soil. A direct and reliable correlation between the metal content level in soils and their concentration by microorganisms is found. Within the background sites a tendency of increase in mercury extraction from the soil with 1 M HCl solution, in particular from salted soils is observed. In contrast, in the conditions of an excess of mercury content in soils of ore grounds, a weak

  13. Soil resources and climate jointly drive variations in microbial biomass carbon and nitrogen in China's forest ecosystems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. H. Zhou

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Microbial metabolism plays a key role in regulating the biogeochemical cycle of forest ecosystems, but the mechanisms driving microbial growth are not well understood. Here, we synthesized 689 measurements on soil microbial biomass carbon (Cmic and nitrogen (Nmic and related parameters from 207 independent studies published during the past 15 years across China's forest ecosystems. Our objectives were to (1 examine patterns in Cmic, Nmic, and microbial quotient (i.e., Cmic / Csoil and Nmic / Nsoil rates by climate zones and management regimes for these forests; and (2 identify the factors driving the variability in the Cmic, Nmic, and microbial quotient. There was a large variability in Cmic (390.2 mg kg−1, Nmic (60.1 mg kg−1, Cmic : Nmic ratio (8.25, Cmic / Csoil rate (1.92 %, and Nmic / Nsoil rate (3.43 % across China's forests, with coefficients of variation varying from 61.2 to 95.6 %. The natural forests had significantly greater Cmic and Nmic than the planted forests, but had less Cmic : Nmic ratio and Cmic / Csoil rate. Soil resources and climate together explained 24.4–40.7 % of these variations. The Cmic : Nmic ratio declined slightly with the Csoil : Nsoil ratio, and changed with latitude, mean annual temperature and precipitation, suggesting a plastic homeostasis of microbial carbon-nitrogen stoichiometry. The Cmic / Csoil and Nmic / Nsoil rates were responsive to soil resources and climate differently, suggesting that soil microbial assimilation of carbon and nitrogen be regulated by different mechanisms. We conclude that soil resources and climate jointly drive microbial growth and metabolism, and also emphasize the necessity of appropriate procedures for data compilation and standardization in cross-study syntheses.

  14. Microbial Biomass C,N and P in Disturbed Dry Tropical Forest Soils, India

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    J.S.SINGH; D.P.SINGH; A.K.KASHYAP

    2010-01-01

    Variations in microbial biomass C(MB-C),N(MB-N)and P(MB-P)along a gradient of different dominant vegetation covers(natural forest,mixed deciduous forest,disturbed savanna and grassland ecosystems)in dry tropical soils of Vindhyan Plateau,India were studied from January 2005 to December 2005.The water holding capacity,organic C,total N,total P and soil moisture content were comparatively higher in forest soils than in the savanna and grassland sites.Across different study sites the mean annual MB-C,MB-N and MB-P at 0-15 cm soil depth varied from 312.05 ± 4.22to 653.40 ± 3.17,32.16 ± 6.25 to 75.66 ± 7.21 and 18.94 ± 2.94 to 30.83 ± 23.08 μg g-1 dry soil,respectively.At all the investigated sites,the maximum MB-C,MB-N and MB-P occurred during the dry period(summer season)and the minimum in wet period(rainy season).In the present study,soil MB-C,MB-N and MB-P were higher at the forest sites compared to savanna and grassland sites.The differences in MB-C,MB-N and MB-P were significant(P mixed deciduous forest > savanna > grassland.The results suggested that deforestation and land use practices(conversion of forest into savanna and grassland)caused the alterations in soil properties,which as a consequence,led to reduction in soil nutrients and MB-C,MB-N and MB-P in the soil of disturbed sites(grassland and savanna)compared to undisturbed forest ecosystems.

  15. Ambient ultraviolet radiation in the Arctic reduces root biomass and alters microbial community composition but has no effects on microbial biomass

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rinnan, R.; Keinänen, M.M.; Kasurinen, A.

    2005-01-01

    that microbial community composition was altered by UV reduction. Although the UV responses were slight considering the large dose difference between the treatments (from near-ambient to up to 90% UV-B reduction), we cannot rule out the possibility that the recovery of ozone layer would change the below...

  16. Effects of acetylene at low concentrations on nitrification, mineralization and microbial biomass nitrogen concentrations in forest soils

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG TengYu; XU XingKai; LUO XianBao; HAN Lin; WANG YingHong; PAN GenXing

    2009-01-01

    Temperate forest surface soils at the varying distances from main trunks (e.g., Pinus koraiensis and Quercus mongolica) were used to study the effects of acetylene (C2H2) at low concentrations on nitri-fication, mineralization and microbial biomass N concentrations of the soils, and to assess the contri-bution of heterotrophic nitrification to nitrous oxide (N2O) emissions from soils. The use of acetylene at partial pressures within a range from 10 to 100 Pa C2H2 in headspace gas gave a significant decrease in N2O emission at soil moisture of c. 45% water-filled porosity space, and the decrease was almost the same in each soil after exposure of C2H2 at low concentrations. Heterotrophic nitrification could ac-count for 21%-48% of total N2O emission from each soil; the contribution would increase with in-creasing distances from the Pinus koraiensis trunks rather than from the Quercus mongolica trunks.Under the experimental conditions, the use of C2H2 at low concentrations showed no significant influ-ence on soil microbial biomass N, net N mineralization and microbial respiration. However, 100 Pa C2H2in headspace gas could reduce carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions from soils. According to the rapid consumption of 10 Pa C2H2 by forest soils and convenience for laboratory incubations, 50 Pa C2H2 in headspace gas can be used to study the origin of N2O emissions from forest soils under aerobic con-ditions and the key associated driving mechanisms. The N2O and CO2 emissions from the soils at the same distances from the Quercus mongolica trunks were larger than those from the Pinus koraiensis trunks, and both emissions decreased as the distances from trunks increased. The stepwise regression analysis showed that 95% of the variability in soil CO2 emissions could be accounted for by the con-centrations of soil total C and water soluble organic C and soil pH, and that 72% of the variability in soil N2O emissions could be accounted for by the concentrations of soil total N

  17. Microbial plankton assemblages, composition and biomass, during two ice-free periods in a deep high mountain lake (Estany Redó, Pyrenees

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvana HALAC

    1999-08-01

    Full Text Available Microbial plankton composition and biomass were monitored for two ice-free periods in a deep oligotrophic high-mountain lake (Redó, Pyrenees. Phytoplankton dominated microbial biomass, while the relationship between total water-column-integrated autotrophic and heterotrophic biomass ranged from 1.5 to 6.5 (an average of 4.4. Heterotrophic biomass was dominated by bacteria (an average of 47 %, but heterotrophic nanoflagellates and, to a lesser degree, ciliates occasionally constituted a sizeable proportion. In general, the microbial biomass ratios were 10:2:2:1 for PHY:BAC:HNF:CIL. About one hundred eukaryotic species were found, although most of them in low abundance and frequency. Phytoplankton biomass was dominated by flagellated chrysophytes and dinoflagellates (an average of 40 and 32% respectively; occasionally cryptophytes (in deep layers and chlorococcal chlorophytes (during the autumn mixing period were also significant. In the two years sampled, the maximum phytoplankton diversity was observed during the autumn mixing period. Heterotrophic flagellate biomass was dominated by chrysophytes (78% on average, but sporadically a non-identified species reached high abundances. Oligotrichs, (an average of 43% of total ciliate biomass dominated the ciliate community, still other groups (gymnostomatida and prostomatida were also significant. Bacteria biomass was largely homogeneous throughout the two periods, but size segregation was observed especially when the lake was stratified, with larger bacteria appearing in the upper layers. The highest planktonic microbial biomass occurred during the mixing periods, mainly during spring. But no clear relationships were found between the temporal distribution of bacteria, phytoplankton, heterotrophic flagellate and ciliate biomass.

  18. Leaf-cutter ant fungus gardens are biphasic mixed microbial bioreactors that convert plant biomass to polyols with biotechnological applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Somera, Alexandre F; Lima, Adriel M; Dos Santos-Neto, Álvaro J; Lanças, Fernando M; Bacci, Maurício

    2015-07-01

    Leaf-cutter ants use plant matter to culture the obligate mutualistic basidiomycete Leucoagaricus gongylophorus. This fungus mediates ant nutrition on plant resources. Furthermore, other microbes living in the fungus garden might also contribute to plant digestion. The fungus garden comprises a young sector with recently incorporated leaf fragments and an old sector with partially digested plant matter. Here, we show that the young and old sectors of the grass-cutter Atta bisphaerica fungus garden operate as a biphasic solid-state mixed fermenting system. An initial plant digestion phase occurred in the young sector in the fungus garden periphery, with prevailing hemicellulose and starch degradation into arabinose, mannose, xylose, and glucose. These products support fast microbial growth but were mostly converted into four polyols. Three polyols, mannitol, arabitol, and inositol, were secreted by L. gongylophorus, and a fourth polyol, sorbitol, was likely secreted by another, unidentified, microbe. A second plant digestion phase occurred in the old sector, located in the fungus garden core, comprising stocks of microbial biomass growing slowly on monosaccharides and polyols. This biphasic operation was efficient in mediating symbiotic nutrition on plant matter: the microbes, accounting for 4% of the fungus garden biomass, converted plant matter biomass into monosaccharides and polyols, which were completely consumed by the resident ants and microbes. However, when consumption was inhibited through laboratory manipulation, most of the plant polysaccharides were degraded, products rapidly accumulated, and yields could be preferentially switched between polyols and monosaccharides. This feature might be useful in biotechnology.

  19. Effects of nitrogen and phosphorus additions on soil microbial biomass and community structure in two reforested tropical forests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Lei; Gundersen, Per; Zhang, Wei; Zhang, Tao; Chen, Hao; Mo, Jiangming

    2015-09-01

    Elevated nitrogen (N) deposition may aggravate phosphorus (P) deficiency in forests in the warm humid regions of China. To our knowledge, the interactive effects of long-term N deposition and P availability on soil microorganisms in tropical replanted forests remain unclear. We conducted an N and P manipulation experiment with four treatments: control, N addition (15 g N m-2·yr-1), P addition (15 g P m-2·yr-1), and N and P addition (15 + 15 g N and P m-2·yr-1, respectively) in disturbed (planted pine forest with recent harvests of understory vegetation and litter) and rehabilitated (planted with pine, but mixed with broadleaf returning by natural succession) forests in southern China. Nitrogen addition did not significantly affect soil microbial biomass, but significantly decreased the abundance of gram-negative bacteria PLFAs in both forest types. Microbial biomass increased significantly after P addition in the disturbed forest but not in the rehabilitated forest. No interactions between N and P additions on soil microorganisms were observed in either forest type. Our results suggest that microbial growth in replanted forests of southern China may be limited by P rather than by N, and this P limitation may be greater in disturbed forests.

  20. Larger phylogenetic distances in litter mixtures: lower microbial biomass and higher C/N ratios but equal mass loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Xu; Berg, Matty P; Butenschoen, Olaf; Murray, Phil J; Bartish, Igor V; Cornelissen, Johannes H C; Dong, Ming; Prinzing, Andreas

    2015-05-07

    Phylogenetic distances of coexisting species differ greatly within plant communities, but their consequences for decomposers and decomposition remain unknown. We hypothesized that large phylogenetic distance of leaf litter mixtures increases differences of their litter traits, which may, in turn, result in increased resource complementarity or decreased resource concentration for decomposers and hence increased or decreased chemical transformation and reduction of litter. We conducted a litter mixture experiment including 12 common temperate tree species (evolutionarily separated by up to 106 Myr), and sampled after seven months, at which average mass loss was more than 50%. We found no effect of increased phylogenetic distance on litter mass loss or on abundance and diversity of invertebrate decomposers. However, phylogenetic distance decreased microbial biomass and increased carbon/nitrogen (C/N) ratios of litter mixtures. Consistently, four litter traits showed (marginally) significant phylogenetic signal and in three of these traits increasing trait difference decreased microbial biomass and increased C/N. We suggest that phylogenetic proximity of litter favours microbial decomposers and chemical transformation of litter owing to a resource concentration effect. This leads to a new hypothesis: closely related plant species occurring in the same niche should promote and profit from increased nutrient availability.

  1. Temporal variations in microbial biomass C and cellulolytic enzyme activity in arable soils: effects of organic matter input

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Debosz, K.; Rasmussen, Peter Have; Pedersen, A. R.

    1999-01-01

    Temporal variations in soil microbial biomass C concentration and in activity of extracellular enzymes of the cellulolytic complex were investigated in a field experiment after eight years of cultivation with either low organic matter input (low-OM) or high organic matter input (high-OM). The cul......Temporal variations in soil microbial biomass C concentration and in activity of extracellular enzymes of the cellulolytic complex were investigated in a field experiment after eight years of cultivation with either low organic matter input (low-OM) or high organic matter input (high......-OM). The cultivation systems differed in whether their source of fertiliser was mainly mineral or organic, in whether a winter cover crop was grown, and whether straw was mulched or removed. Sampling occurred at approximately monthly intervals, over a period of two years. Distinct temporal variations in microbial......) and an endocellulase activity of 44.2 +/- 1.1 nmol g(-1) h(-1). (C) 1999 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved....

  2. Microbial control of silver mineralization at a sea-floor hydrothermal site on the northern Gorda Ridge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zierenberg, R.A.; Schiffman, P.

    1990-01-01

    THE Sea Cliff hydrothermal field, on the northern Gorda Ridge, contains mounds and chimneys of hydrothermally precipitated sulphide and sulphate minerals typical of sea-floor hydrothermal vent sites1. In addition, large areas of the sea floor are covered by subhorizontal hydrothermal crusts. Samples of the crust recovered by submersible are composed of intensely altered fragments of basalt and basaltic hyaloclastite cemented by amorphous silica and chalcedony with less abundant barite, and minor amounts of base-metal sulphide minerals2. Some surfaces of the crust were formerly colonized by bacterial mats, which are locally preserved by replacement and overgrowth of the bacterial filaments by metal sulphide minerals and amorphous silica. The bacterial filaments are selectively replaced by prousite (Ag3AsS3), pearceite3 (Ag14.7-XCu1.3+xAs2S11), chalcopyrite (CuFeS2) and rarely by galena (PbS). Our observations suggest that bacterially mediated processes selectively precipitate silver, arsenic and copper, and that biological processes may contribute to precious-metal enrichment in some sea-floor hydrothermal base-metal sulphide deposits.

  3. Characteristics of carbon and nitrogen of soil microbial biomass and their relationships with soil nutrients in Cunninghamia lanceolata plantations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HE Youjun; WANG Qingkui; WANG Silong; YU Xiaojun

    2007-01-01

    The soil microbial biomass and nutrient status under the native broadleaved forest and Cunninghamia lanceolata plantations at the Huitong National Research Station of Forest Ecosystem (in Hunan Province,midland of China) were examined in this study.The results showed that after the native broadleaved forest was replaced by mono-cultured C.lanceolata or C.lanceolata,soil microbial biomass and nutrient pool decreased significantly.In the 0-10cm soil layer,the concentrations of soil microbial carbon and nitrogen in the broadleaved forest were 800.5 and 84.5 mg/kg,respectively.These were 1.90 and 1.03 times as much as those in the first rotation of the C.lanceolata plantation,and 2.16 and 1.27 times as much as those in the second rotation of the plantation,respectively.While in the 10-20 cm soil layer,the microbial carbon and nitrogen in the broadleaved forest were 475.4 and 63.3 mg/kg,respectively.These were 1.86 and 1.60 times as much as those in the first rotation,and 2.11 and 1.76times as much as those in the second rotation,respectively.Soil nutrient pools,such as total nitrogen,total potassium,NH,+-N,and available potassium,also declined after the C.lanceolata plantation replaced the native broadleaved forest,or Chinese fir was planted continuously.Less litter and slower decay rate in pure Chinese fir plantation were the crucial factors leading to the decrease of soil microbial biomass and nutrient pool in this area.Human disturbance,especially slash-burning and site preparation,was another factor leading to the decrease.There were significant positive correlations between soil microbial carbon and nitrogen and soil nutrients.To improve soil quality and maintain sustainable productivity, some measures,including planting mixed conifer with hardwood,preserving residues after harvest,and adopting scientific site preparation,should be taken.

  4. Responses of soil microbial biomass and enzyme activities to tillage and fertilization systems in soybean (Glycine max L. production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gholamreza Heidari

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Tillage operation and fertilizer type play important roles in soil properties as far as soil microbial condition is concerned. Information regarding the simultaneous evaluation of the effect of long-term tillage and fertilization on the soil microbial traits of soybean farms is not available. Accordingly, it was hypothesized that, the microbial biomass and enzyme activity, more often than not, respond quickly to changes in soil tillage and fertilization. Therefore, the experiments were aimed at analyzing the responses of soil microbial traits to tillage and fertilization in a soybean field in Kurdistan University, Iran. The field soil is categorized into coarse Loamy, mixed, superactive, calcareous, and mesic Typic Xerorthents. The experiments were arranged in split plot, based on randomized complete block design with three replications. Main plots consisted of long-term (since 2002 tillage systems including conventional tillage (CT, minimum tillage (MT and no-tillage (NT. Eight fertilization methods were employed in the sub-plots, including (F1: farmyard manure (FYM; (F2: compost; (F3: chemical fertilizers; (F4: FYM + compost; (F5: FYM + chemical fertilizers; (F6: compost + chemical fertilizers; (F7: FYM + compost + chemical fertilizers and (F8: Control (without fertilizer. The highest microbial biomass carbon (385.1 μg was observed in NT-F4 treatment. The NT treatment comparatively recorded higher values of acid phosphatase (189.1 μg PNP g-1 h-1, alkaline phosphatase (2879.6 μg PNP g-1 h-1 and dehydrogenase activity (68.1 μg PNP g-1 h-1. The soil treated with a mixture of compost and FYM inputs had the maximum urease activity of all tillage treatments. Organically manured treatment (F4 showed more activity in dehydrogenase (85.7 μg PNP g-1 h-1, acid phosphatase (199.1 µg PNP g-1 h-1 and alkaline phosphatase (3183.6 µg PNP g-1 h-1 compared to those treated with chemical fertilizers. In NT-F4 treatment, using on-farm inputs is most

  5. Generation of Electricity and Analysis of Microbial Communities in Wheat Straw Biomass-Powered Microbial Fuel Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Yifeng; Min, Booki; Huang, L.

    2009-01-01

    Coulombic efficiencies (CEs) ranged from 37.1 to 15.5% corresponding to the initial hydrolysate concentrations from 250 to 2000 mg-COD/L. The suspended bacteria found were different from the bacteria immobilized in the biofilm, and they played different roles in electricity generation from hydrolysate......Electricity generation from wheat straw hydrolysate and the microbial ecology of electricity producing microbial communities developed in two chamber microbial fuel cells (MFCs) were investigated. Power density reached 123 mW/m2 with an initial hydrolysate concentration of 1000 mg-COD/L while....... Bacteria in the biofilm were consortia with sequences similar to Bacteroidetes (40% of sequences), Alphaproteobacteria (20%), Bacilli (20%), Deltaproteobacteria (10%), and Gammaproteobacteria (10%), while suspended consortia were predominated by Bacilli (22.2%). Results from this study can contribute...

  6. Structure of the microbial biomass and trophic groups of nematodes in soddy-podzolic soils of a postagrogenic succession in the southern taiga (Tver oblast)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Migunova, V. D.; Kurakov, A. V.

    2014-05-01

    The structure of the microbial biomass and trophic nematode groups were studied in soddy-podzolic soils under phytocenoses of a secondary succession initiated by the growth of forests on agricultural lands in the southern taiga. The microbial biomass became greater with the increasing amount of fungal mycelium, and the bacterial pool little changed in these soils. Bacteriovorous nematodes predominated (64% of the total number of nematodes) in the soils of a potato field, where the bacterial biomass was maximal; it was greater or close to the fungal biomass. In the soil under a mown meadow, where the fungal biomass was greater, the populations of fungivorous and bacteriovorous nematodes were close in number and share in the nematode complex (by 40%). In the soil under a spruce forest (climax stage), the main biomass pool was composed of fungi (97%), whose biomass is maximal, while fungivorous nematodes and nematodes with a mixed type of feeding occupy the dominant positions (69% in the nematode complex). In the course of the succession, the number of fungivorous and bacteriovorous nematodes decreased, but their ratio increased from 0.4 in the soil of the potato field to 0.8-1.0 under the meadows and mixed forest and to 2.0 in the soil under the sorrel spruce forest. These changes corresponded to the increasing microbial pool and the share of the fungal biomass in it.

  7. Differential nutrient limitation of soil microbial biomass and metabolic quotients (qCO2): is there a biological stoichiometry of soil microbes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartman, Wyatt H; Richardson, Curtis J

    2013-01-01

    Variation in microbial metabolism poses one of the greatest current uncertainties in models of global carbon cycling, and is particularly poorly understood in soils. Biological Stoichiometry theory describes biochemical mechanisms linking metabolic rates with variation in the elemental composition of cells and organisms, and has been widely observed in animals, plants, and plankton. However, this theory has not been widely tested in microbes, which are considered to have fixed ratios of major elements in soils. To determine whether Biological Stoichiometry underlies patterns of soil microbial metabolism, we compiled published data on microbial biomass carbon (C), nitrogen (N), and phosphorus (P) pools in soils spanning the global range of climate, vegetation, and land use types. We compared element ratios in microbial biomass pools to the metabolic quotient qCO2 (respiration per unit biomass), where soil C mineralization was simultaneously measured in controlled incubations. Although microbial C, N, and P stoichiometry appeared to follow somewhat constrained allometric relationships at the global scale, we found significant variation in the C∶N∶P ratios of soil microbes across land use and habitat types, and size-dependent scaling of microbial C∶N and C∶P (but not N∶P) ratios. Microbial stoichiometry and metabolic quotients were also weakly correlated as suggested by Biological Stoichiometry theory. Importantly, we found that while soil microbial biomass appeared constrained by soil N availability, microbial metabolic rates (qCO2) were most strongly associated with inorganic P availability. Our findings appear consistent with the model of cellular metabolism described by Biological Stoichiometry theory, where biomass is limited by N needed to build proteins, but rates of protein synthesis are limited by the high P demands of ribosomes. Incorporation of these physiological processes may improve models of carbon cycling and understanding of the effects of

  8. Seasonal variations and effects of nutrient applications on N and P and microbial biomass under two temperate heathland plants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Pia Lund; Andresen, Louise Christoffersen; Michelsen, Anders;

    2009-01-01

    Eutrofication is a threat against nutrient-poor habitats as increased amounts of nutrients in ecosystems may cause changes in the vegetation. Nitrogen (N) deposition leads to conversion of Calluna heathlands into graminoid dominated heath, but low availability of P may hinder or slow down...... this process. In this study the soil properties under two dominant heathland plants, the dwarf shrub Calluna vulgaris and the grass Deschampsia flexuosa, were investigated, with focus on nutrient content in the organic top soil and soil microbes during the main growing season and effects of nutrient amendments....... The microbial biomass on the other hand was positively related to soil water content in fertilized plots indicating that this was due to an indirect effect of enhanced nutrient availability. Microbial N and P pools were respectively 1000 and 100 times higher than the pool of inorganic N and P, and microbes...

  9. Nitrogen deposition and management practices increase soil microbial biomass carbon but decrease diversity in Moso bamboo plantations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Quan; Song, Xinzhang; Gu, Honghao; Gao, Fei

    2016-06-15

    Because microbial communities play a key role in carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) cycling, changes in the soil microbial community may directly affect ecosystem functioning. However, the effects of N deposition and management practices on soil microbes are still poorly understood. We studied the effects of these two factors on soil microbial biomass carbon (MBC) and community composition in Moso bamboo plantations using high-throughput sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene. Plantations under conventional (CM) or intensive management (IM) were subjected to one of four N treatments for 30 months. IM and N addition, both separately and in combination, significantly increased soil MBC while decreasing bacterial diversity. However, increases in soil MBC were inhibited when N addition exceeded 60 kg N∙ha(-1)∙yr(-1). IM increased the relative abundances of Actinobacteria and Crenarchaeota but decreased that of Acidobacteria. N addition increased the relative abundances of Acidobacteria, Crenarchaeota, and Actinobacteria but decreased that of Proteobacteria. Soil bacterial diversity was significantly related to soil pH, C/N ratio, and nitrogen and available phosphorus content. Management practices exerted a greater influence over regulation of the soil MBC and microbial diversity compared to that of N deposition in Moso bamboo plantations.

  10. Nitrogen deposition and management practices increase soil microbial biomass carbon but decrease diversity in Moso bamboo plantations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Quan; Song, Xinzhang; Gu, Honghao; Gao, Fei

    2016-06-01

    Because microbial communities play a key role in carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) cycling, changes in the soil microbial community may directly affect ecosystem functioning. However, the effects of N deposition and management practices on soil microbes are still poorly understood. We studied the effects of these two factors on soil microbial biomass carbon (MBC) and community composition in Moso bamboo plantations using high-throughput sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene. Plantations under conventional (CM) or intensive management (IM) were subjected to one of four N treatments for 30 months. IM and N addition, both separately and in combination, significantly increased soil MBC while decreasing bacterial diversity. However, increases in soil MBC were inhibited when N addition exceeded 60 kg N•ha‑1•yr‑1. IM increased the relative abundances of Actinobacteria and Crenarchaeota but decreased that of Acidobacteria. N addition increased the relative abundances of Acidobacteria, Crenarchaeota, and Actinobacteria but decreased that of Proteobacteria. Soil bacterial diversity was significantly related to soil pH, C/N ratio, and nitrogen and available phosphorus content. Management practices exerted a greater influence over regulation of the soil MBC and microbial diversity compared to that of N deposition in Moso bamboo plantations.

  11. Abundance and biomass responses of microbial food web components to hydrology and environmental gradients within a floodplain of the River Danube.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palijan, Goran

    2012-07-01

    This study investigated the relationships of time-dependent hydrological variability and selected microbial food web components. Samples were collected monthly from the Kopački Rit floodplain in Croatia, over a period of 19 months, for analysis of bacterioplankton abundance, cell size and biomass; abundance of heterotrophic nanoflagellates and nanophytoplankton; and concentration of chlorophyll a. Similar hydrological variability at different times of the year enabled partition of seasonal effects from hydrological changes on microbial community properties. The results suggested that, unlike some other studies investigating sites with different connectivity, bacterioplankton abundance, and phytoplankton abundance and biomass increased during lentic conditions. At increasing water level, nanophytoplankton showed lower sensitivity to disturbance in comparison with total phytoplankton biomass: this could prolong autotrophic conditions within the floodplain. Bacterioplankton biomass, unlike phytoplankton, was not impacted by hydrology. The bacterial biomass less affected by hydrological changes can be an important additional food component for the floodplain food web. The results also suggested a mechanism controlling bacterial cell size independent of hydrology, as bacterial cell size was significantly decreased as nanoflagellate abundance increased. Hydrology, regardless of seasonal sucession, has the potential to structure microbial food webs, supporting microbial development during lentic conditions. Conversely, other components appear unaffected by hydrology or may be more strongly controlled by biotic interactions. This research, therefore, adds to understanding on microbial food web interactions in the context of flood and flow pulses in river-floodplain ecosystems.

  12. Relationship Between Soil Microbial Biomass C and N and Mineralizable Nitrogen in Some Arable Soils on Loess Plateau

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOUJIANBIN; LISHENGXIU

    1998-01-01

    The chloroform fumigation-incubation metho was used to measur the soil microbial biomass C(SMBC) and N(SMBN) in 16 loessial soils sampled from Ansai,Yongshou and Yangling in Shaanxi Province.The SMBC ontents in the soils ranged from 75.9 to 301.0μg C g-1 with an average of 206.μgCg-1,accounting for 1.36%-6.24% of the total soil organic C with an average of 3.07%,and the SMBN contents from 0.51 to 68.40μg Ng-1 with an average of 29.4μg N g-1,accounting for 0.20%-5.65% of the total N in the soils with an average of 3.36%.A close relationship was found between SMBC and SMBN,and they both were positively correlated with total organic C, total N,NaOH hydrolizable N and mineralizable N.These results confirmed tha soil microbial biomass had a comparative role in nutrient cycles of soils.

  13. Effects of slow-release urea fertilizers on urease activity, microbial biomass, and nematode communities in an aquic brown soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiao, Xiaoguang; Liang, Wenju; Chen, Lijun; Zhang, Haijun; Li, Qi; Wang, Peng; Wen, Dazhong

    2005-05-01

    A field experiment was carried out at the Shenyang Experimental Station of Ecology (CAS) in order to study the effects of slow-release urea fertilizers high polymer-coated urea (SRU1), SRU1 mixed with dicyandiamide DCD (SRU2), and SRU1 mixed with calcium carbide CaC2 (SRU3) on urease activity, microbial biomass C and N, and nematode communities in an aquic brown soil during the maize growth period. The results demonstrated that the application of slow-release urea fertilizers inhibits soil urease activity and increases the soil NH4+-N content. Soil available N increment could promote its immobilization by microorganisms. Determination of soil microbial biomass N indicated that a combined application of coated urea and nitrification inhibitors increased the soil active N pool. The population of predators/omnivores indicated that treatment with SRU2 could provide enough soil NH4+-N to promote maize growth and increased the food resource for the soil fauna compared with the other treatments.

  14. Changes in microbial properties and nutrient dynamics in bagasse and coir during vermicomposting: quantification of fungal biomass through ergosterol estimation in vermicompost.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pramanik, P

    2010-05-01

    In this experiment, different microorganisms viz., Trichoderma viridae, Aspergillus niger and Bacillus megaterium were inoculated in bagasse and coir with the objective to study their effect on nutrient dynamics and microbial properties, specially effect on fungal status in these waste materials. Fungal biomass (FBC) was calculated from the ergosterol content in the vermicompost samples. Inoculation of B. megaterium registered comparatively higher TP content in the final stabilized product. Vermicomposting increased microbial biomass carbon (MBC) and nitrogen (MBN) content in bagasse and coir. Microbial biomass carbon to nitrogen ratio (MBC/ MBN) was comparatively narrower in fungi inoculated vermicomposts and FBC/MBC ratio was increased up to 11.69 from 9.51 of control during vermicomposting.

  15. The good, the bad or the ugly: Microbial biomass of biogas residues as a contributor to soil carbon cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coban, H.; Miltner, A.; Kaestner, M.

    2013-12-01

    Loss of soil organic matter is a recent problem in soils all over the world. This can be related to enhanced mineralization of the soil organic matter due to land use change, which is a source of anthropogenic carbon dioxide increase. For example, the carbon input from plant residues is reduced because of the increased cultivation of bioenergy crops. In order to avoid soil degradation, application of biogas residues is a common practice in such areas. Biogas residues are side products of biogas production and contain microbial biomass. Application of these residues as soil additive influences the soil microorganisms as well as the carbon cycle. We study this effect by incubating 13C-labeled biogas residues in an arable soil from the Static Fertilization Experiment in Bad Lauchstaedt, Germany. Labeled residues were produced via labeling of active microbial biomass by addition of KH13CO3 to biogas reactors. High enrichment in the various phospholipid fatty acids proved the successful labeling of the biomass. The labeled biogas residues are being long-term incubated in the soil. During incubation, we monitor the fate of the carbon by analyzing the label in phospholipid fatty acids, amino acids as well as carbon dioxide. This allows us to trace the fate of the biogas residues-derived C in soil and to quantify the effect on the transformation of the natural soil organic matter (e.g. negative effects such as priming effects). Also, microbial community dynamics will be determined using molecular biology tools such as denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) and real-time quantitative PCR (Q-PCR). In order to prevent potentially negative effects, various additives such as charred biomaterials, clays and chopped bark will be tested to improve the carbon storage in soil. In conclusion, this study investigates the fate and impact of biogas residues used as a soil additive on the soil microbial community and amount of soil organic matter. It is aimed to understand and

  16. Microbial biomass and basal respiration in Sub-Antarctic and Antarctic soils in the areas of some Russian polar stations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Abakumov

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Antarctica is the unique place for pedological investigations. Soils of Antarctica have been studied intensively during the last century. Antarctic logistic provides the possibility to scientists access the terrestrial landscapes mainly in the places of polar stations. That is why the main and most detailed pedological investigations were conducted in Mc Murdo Valleys, Transantarctic Mountains, South Shetland Islands, Larsemann hills and Schirmacher Oasis. Investigations were conducted during the 53rd and 55th Russian Antarctic expeditions on the base of soil pits and samples collected in Sub-Antarctic and Antarctic regions. Soils of diverse Antarctic landscapes were studied with aim to assess the microbial biomass level, basal respiration rates and metabolic activity of microbial communities. The investigation conducted shows that soils of Antarctic are quite different in profile organization and carbon content. In general, Sub-Antarctic soils are characterized by more developed humus (sod organo-mineral horizons as well as the upper organic layer. The most developed organic layers were revealed in peat soils of King-George Island, where its thickness reach even 80 cm. These soils as well as soils under guano are characterized by the highest amount of total organic carbon (TOC 7.22–33.70%. Coastal and continental soils of Antarctic are presented by less developed Leptosols, Gleysols, Regolith and rare Ornhitosol with TOC levels about 0.37–4.67%. The metabolic ratios and basal respiration were higher in Sub-Antarctic soils than in Antarctic ones which can be interpreted as result of higher amounts of fresh organic remnants in organic and organo-mineral horizons. Also the soils of King-George island have higher portion of microbial biomass (max 1.54 mg g−1 than coastal (max 0.26 mg g−1 and continental (max 0.22 mg g−1 Antarctic soils. Sub-Antarctic soils mainly differ from Antarctic ones in increased organic layers thickness and total

  17. Effects of Hurricane-Felled Tree Trunks on Soil Carbon, Nitrogen, Microbial Biomass, and Root Length in a Wet Tropical Forest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Jean Lodge

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Decaying coarse woody debris can affect the underlying soil either by augmenting nutrients that can be exploited by tree roots, or by diminishing nutrient availability through stimulation of microbial nutrient immobilization. We analyzed C, N, microbial biomass C and root length in closely paired soil samples taken under versus 20–50 cm away from large trunks of two species felled by Hugo (1989 and Georges (1998 three times during wet and dry seasons over the two years following the study conducted by Georges. Soil microbial biomass, % C and % N were significantly higher under than away from logs felled by both hurricanes (i.e., 1989 and 1998, at all sampling times and at both depths (0–10 and 10–20 cm. Frass from wood boring beetles may contribute to early effects. Root length was greater away from logs during the dry season, and under logs in the wet season. Root length was correlated with microbial biomass C, soil N and soil moisture (R = 0.36, 0.18, and 0.27, respectively; all p values < 0.05. Microbial biomass C varied significantly among seasons but differences between positions (under vs. away were only suggestive. Microbial C was correlated with soil N (R = 0.35. Surface soil on the upslope side of the logs had significantly more N and microbial biomass, likely from accumulation of leaf litter above the logs on steep slopes. We conclude that decaying wood can provide ephemeral resources that are exploited by tree roots during some seasons.

  18. Effects of Nitrogen and Water on Soil Enzyme Activity and Soil Microbial Biomass in Stipa baicalensis Steppe,Inner Mongolia of North China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    WANG Jie

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, eight nitrogen treatments were applied at 0 g·m -2(N0, 1.5 g·m -2(N15, 3.0 g·m -2(N30, 5.0 g·m -2(N50, 10.0 g·m -2(N100, 15.0 g·m -2(N150, 20.0 g·m -2(N200, 30.0 g·m -2(N300 as NH 4 NO 3 and adding water to simulate summer rainfall of 100 mm, the interactive experiment was set to explore the effects of nitrogen and water addition in Stipa baicalensis steppe on soil nutrients, enzyme activities and soil microbial biomass. The results showed that the nitrogen and water addition changed soil physico-chemical factors obviously, the content of soil total organic carbon, total nitrogen, nitrate nitrogen and ammonium nitrogen increased along with the increasing of application rate of nitrogen, on the contrary, the soil pH value had decreasing trend. Appropriate application of nitrogen could enhance the activity of urease and catalase but decreased the activity of polyphenol oxidase. Nitrogen and water addition had significant effect on soil microbial biomass C and N. Higher level of N fertilizer significantly reduced microbial biomass C, and the microbial biomass N was on the rise with the application rate of nitrogen. The addition of water could slow the inhibition of nitrogen to microorganism and increase the microbial biomass C and N. A closed relationship existed in soil nutrient, activities of soil enzyme and soil microbial biomass C and N. The significantly positive correlation existed between total N, organic C, nitrate N and catalase, significantly negative correlation between nitrate N, ammonium N, total N and polyphenol oxidase. Microbial biomass N was significantly positive correlated with total N, nitrate N, ammonium N, catalase, phosphatase, and was negative correlated with polyphenol oxidase. Microbial biomass C was significantly positive correlated with polyphenol oxidase, and was negative correlated with catalase.

  19. Are variations in heterotrophic soil respiration related to changes in substrate availability and microbial biomass carbon in the subtropical forests?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Hui; Chen, Xiaomei; Xiao, Guoliang; Guenet, Bertrand; Vicca, Sara; Shen, Weijun

    2015-12-01

    Soil temperature and moisture are widely-recognized controlling factors on heterotrophic soil respiration (Rh), although they often explain only a portion of Rh variability. How other soil physicochemical and microbial properties may contribute to Rh variability has been less studied. We conducted field measurements on Rh half-monthly and associated soil properties monthly for two years in four subtropical forests of southern China to assess influences of carbon availability and microbial properties on Rh. Rh in coniferous forest was significantly lower than that in the other three broadleaf species-dominated forests and exhibited obvious seasonal variations in the four forests (P carbon (DOC) were significantly important to Rh variations, but the effect of DOC content on Rh was confounded with temperature, as revealed by partial mantel test. Microbial biomass carbon (MBC) was significantly related to Rh variations across forests during the warm season (P = 0.043). Our results suggest that DOC and MBC may be important when predicting Rh under some conditions, and highlight the complexity by mutual effects of them with environmental factors on Rh variations.

  20. Spectroscopic descriptors for dynamic changes of soluble microbial products from activated sludge at different biomass growth phases under prolonged starvation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maqbool, Tahir; Cho, Jinwoo; Hur, Jin

    2017-10-15

    In this study, the spectroscopic indices of soluble microbial products (SMP) were explored using absorption and fluorescence spectroscopy to identify different distinctive biomass growth phases (i.e., exponential phase, pseudo-endogenous phase, and endogenous phase) and to describe the microbial activity of activated sludge in a batch type bioreactor under prolonged starvation. The optical descriptors, including UV absorption at 254 nm (UVA254), spectral slope, absorbance slope index (ASI), biological index (BIX), humification index (HIX), and the ratio of tryptophan-like to humic-like components (C1/C2), were examined to describe the dynamic changes in SMP. These indices were mostly associated with dissolved organic carbon (DOC) of SMPs and specific oxygen uptake rate (SOUR). Among those, ASI was the most strongly correlated with the SOUR data for the pseudo-endogenous and the endogenous periods. Although the three microbial phases were well discriminated using the spectral slope, BIX, and the C1/C2 ratio, the C1/C2 ratio can be suggested as the most preferable indicator as it can also trace the changes of the relative abundance of proteins to humic-like substances in SMPs. The suggested spectroscopic descriptors were reasonably explained by the general trends of decreased large-sized biopolymer fractions (e.g., proteins) and increased humic substrates (HS) with starvation time, which were detected by size exclusion chromatography. This study provides a novel insight into the strong potential of using optical descriptors to easily probe microbial status in biological treatment systems. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Impact of phenazine-1-carboxylic acid upon iron speciation and microbial biomass in the rhizosphere of wheat

    Science.gov (United States)

    LeTourneau, M.; Marshall, M.; Grant, M.; Freeze, P.; Cliff, J. B.; Lai, B.; Strawn, D. G.; Thomashow, L. S.; Weller, D. M.; Harsh, J. B.

    2015-12-01

    Phenazine-1-carboxylic acid (PCA) is a redox-active antibiotic produced by diverse bacterial taxa, and has been shown to facilitate interactions between biofilms and iron (hydr)oxides in culture systems (Wang et al. 2011, J Bacteriol 192: 365). Because rhizobacterial biofilms are a major sink for plant-derived carbon and source for soil organic matter (SOM), and Fe (hydr)oxides have reactive surfaces that influence the stability of microbial biomass and SOM, PCA-producing rhizobacteria could influence soil carbon fluxes. Large populations of Pseudomonas fluorescens strains producing PCA in concentrations up to 1 μg/g root have been observed in the rhizosphere of non-irrigated wheat fields covering 1.56 million hectares of central Washington state. This is one of the highest concentrations ever reported for a natural antibiotic in a terrestrial ecosystem (Mavrodi et al. 2012, Appl Environ Microb 78: 804). Microscopic comparisons of PCA-producing (PCA+) and non-PCA-producing (PCA-) rhizobacterial colony morphologies, and comparisons of Fe extractions from rhizosphere soil inoculated with PCA+ and PCA- strains suggest that PCA promotes biofilm development as well as dramatic Fe transformations throughout the rhizosphere (unpublished data). In order to illustrate PCA-mediated interactions between biofilms and Fe (hydr)oxides in the rhizosphere, identify the specific Fe phases favored by PCA, and establish the ramifications for stability and distribution of microbial biomass and SOM, we have collected electron micrographs, X-ray fluorescence images, X-ray absorption near-edge spectra, and secondary-ion mass spectrometry images of wheat root sections inoculated with 15N-labelled PCA+ or PCA- rhizobacteria. These images and spectra allow us to assess the accumulation, turnover, and distribution of microbial biomass, the associations between Fe and other nutrients such as phosphorus, and the redox status and speciation of iron in the presence and absence of PCA. This

  2. Characterization of three plant biomass-degrading microbial consortia by metagenomics- and metasecretomics-based approaches

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jiménez, Diego Javier; Brossi, Maria Julia de Lima; Schückel, Julia

    2016-01-01

    ), switchgrass (SG-M) and corn stover (CS-M) under aerobic and mesophilic conditions. Molecular fingerprintings, bacterial 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) gene amplicon sequencing and metagenomic analyses showed that the three microbial consortia were taxonomically distinct. Based on the taxonomic affiliation......). The highest degradation rates of lignin (~59 %) were observed with SG-M, whereas CS-M showed a high consumption of cellulose and hemicellulose. Analyses of the carbohydrate-active enzymes in the three microbial consortia showed the dominance of glycosyl hydrolases (e.g. of families GH3, GH43, GH13, GH10, GH29...

  3. Microbial biodiesel production from oil palm biomass hydrolysate using marine Rhodococcus sp. YHY01.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatia, Shashi Kant; Kim, Junyoung; Song, Hun-Seok; Kim, Hyun Joong; Jeon, Jong-Min; Sathiyanarayanan, Ganesan; Yoon, Jeong-Jun; Park, Kyungmoon; Kim, Yun-Gon; Yang, Yung-Hun

    2017-06-01

    The effect of various biomass derived inhibitors (i.e. furfural, hydroxymethylfurfural (HMF), vanillin, 4-hydroxy benzaldehyde (4-HB) and acetate) was investigated for fatty acid accumulation in Rhodococcus sp. YHY 01. Rhodococcus sp. YHY01 was able to utilize acetate, vanillin, and 4-HB for biomass production and fatty acid accumulation. The IC50 value for furfural (3.1mM), HMF (3.2mM), vanillin (2.0mM), 4-HB (2.7mM) and acetate (3.7mM) was calculated. HMF and vanillin affect fatty acid composition and increase saturated fatty acid content. Rhodococcus sp. YHY 01 cultured with empty fruit bunch hydrolysate (EFBH) as the main carbon source resulted in enhanced biomass (20%) and fatty acid productivity (37%), in compression to glucose as a carbon source. Overall, this study showed the beneficial effects of inhibitory molecules on growth and fatty acid production, and support the idea of biomass hydrolysate utilization for biodiesel production by avoiding complex efforts to remove inhibitory compounds. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Colloid-based multiplexed method for screening plant biomass-degrading glycoside hydrolase activities in microbial communities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reindl, W.; Deng, K.; Gladden, J.M.; Cheng, G.; Wong, A.; Singer, S.W.; Singh, S.; Lee, J.-C.; Yao, J.-S.; Hazen, T.C.; Singh, A.K; Simmons, B.A.; Adams, P.D.; Northen, T.R.

    2011-05-01

    The enzymatic hydrolysis of long-chain polysaccharides is a crucial step in the conversion of biomass to lignocellulosic biofuels. The identification and characterization of optimal glycoside hydrolases is dependent on enzyme activity assays, however existing methods are limited in terms of compatibility with a broad range of reaction conditions, sample complexity, and especially multiplexity. The method we present is a multiplexed approach based on Nanostructure-Initiator Mass Spectrometry (NIMS) that allowed studying several glycolytic activities in parallel under diverse assay conditions. Although the substrate analogs carried a highly hydrophobic perfluorinated tag, assays could be performed in aqueous solutions due colloid formation of the substrate molecules. We first validated our method by analyzing known {beta}-glucosidase and {beta}-xylosidase activities in single and parallel assay setups, followed by the identification and characterization of yet unknown glycoside hydrolase activities in microbial communities.

  5. RESPONSE OF SOIL MICROBIAL BIOMASS AND COMMUNITY COMPOSITION TO CHRONIC NITROGEN ADDITIONS AT HARVARD FOREST

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soil microbial communities may respond to anthropogenic increases in ecosystem nitrogen (N) availability, and their response may ultimately feedback on ecosystem carbon and N dynamics. We examined the long-term effects of chronic N additions on soil microbes by measuring soil mi...

  6. Metabolic diversity and microbial biomass in forest soils across climatic and tree species diversity gradients

    OpenAIRE

    Carnol, Monique; Bosman, Bernard; Vanoppen, Astrid; De Wandeler, Hans; Muys, Bart

    2013-01-01

    The biogeochemical cycling in forest ecosystems is highly dependent on the interactions between plants and soil. Tree species affect element cycling through deposition in throughfall, litterfall, microbial activities in soil and rhizosphere processes. Tree species diversification has been suggested for maintaining forest ecosystem services and combining provisioning and supporting services within multifunctional and sustainable forestry. However, the understanding of the role of biodiversity ...

  7. Prediction of Microbial Growth Rate versus Biomass Yield by a Metabolic Network with Kinetic Parameters

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Adadi, Roi; Volkmer, Benjamin; Milo, Ron; Heinemann, Matthias; Shlomi, Tomer

    2012-01-01

    Identifying the factors that determine microbial growth rate under various environmental and genetic conditions is a major challenge of systems biology. While current genome-scale metabolic modeling approaches enable us to successfully predict a variety of metabolic phenotypes, including maximal bio

  8. Abundance, production and stabilization of microbial biomass under conventional and reduced tillage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groenigen, van K.J.; Bloem, J.; Baath, E.; Boeckx, P.; Rousk, J.; Bodé, S.; Forristal, P.D.; Jones, M.B.

    2010-01-01

    Soil tillage practices affect the soil microbial community in various ways, with possible consequences for nitrogen (N) losses, plant growth and soil organic carbon (C) sequestration. As microbes affect soil organic matter (SOM) dynamics largely through their activity, their impact may not be deduce

  9. Prediction of Microbial Growth Rate versus Biomass Yield by a Metabolic Network with Kinetic Parameters

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Adadi, Roi; Volkmer, Benjamin; Milo, Ron; Heinemann, Matthias; Shlomi, Tomer

    Identifying the factors that determine microbial growth rate under various environmental and genetic conditions is a major challenge of systems biology. While current genome-scale metabolic modeling approaches enable us to successfully predict a variety of metabolic phenotypes, including maximal

  10. The effect of Eulaliopsis binata on the physi-chemical properties, microbial biomass, and enzymatic activities in Cd-Pb polluted soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Hui; Xiang, Yanci; Zou, Dongsheng

    2016-10-01

    Pot culture experiment using mining wasteland soil was carried out to study the effect of Eulaliopsis binata on the heavy-metal polluted soil with the growth of 90, 180, 270, and 360 days. Soil nutritional components, heavy metal, microbial biomass, and enzymatic activities were analyzed in this study, and the control group had no plants. The results showed that heavy metal contents decreased with E. binata growth, extractable Cd and Pb decreased 28 and 15 % after 1 year, but the difference was not significant compared with the control. While soil nutritional components, microbial biomass and enzymatic activities increased significantly as compared with the control. Comparing with pre-experiment, soil organic matter, N, P, K, microbial biomass C, N, P, invertase, urease, acid phosphatase, and catalase increased 0.9, 1.1, 3.0, 1.1, 0.4, 0.3, and 0.5 times, respectively. The indexes of soil nutritional components, microbial biomass, and enzymatic activities are positively correlated to each other, while they are negatively correlated to heavy metal content respectively. E. binata has positive influence on Cd-Pb pollution soil and broad application prospects in remediating heavy-metal polluted soil.

  11. Dynamics of soil organic carbon and microbial biomass carbon in relation to water erosion and tillage erosion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiaojun, Nie; Jianhui, Zhang; Zhengan, Su

    2013-01-01

    Dynamics of soil organic carbon (SOC) are associated with soil erosion, yet there is a shortage of research concerning the relationship between soil erosion, SOC, and especially microbial biomass carbon (MBC). In this paper, we selected two typical slope landscapes including gentle and steep slopes from the Sichuan Basin, China, and used the (137)Cs technique to determine the effects of water erosion and tillage erosion on the dynamics of SOC and MBC. Soil samples for the determination of (137)Cs, SOC, MBC and soil particle-size fractions were collected on two types of contrasting hillslopes. (137)Cs data revealed that soil loss occurred at upper slope positions of the two landscapes and soil accumulation at the lower slope positions. Soil erosion rates as well as distribution patterns of the erosion is the major process of soil redistribution in the gentle slope landscape, while tillage erosion acts as the dominant process of soil redistribution in the steep slope landscape. In gentle slope landscapes, both SOC and MBC contents increased downslope and these distribution patterns were closely linked to soil redistribution rates. In steep slope landscapes, only SOC contents increased downslope, dependent on soil redistribution. It is noticeable that MBC/SOC ratios were significantly lower in gentle slope landscapes than in steep slope landscapes, implying that water erosion has a negative effect on the microbial biomass compared with tillage erosion. It is suggested that MBC dynamics are closely associated with soil redistribution by water erosion but independent of that by tillage erosion, while SOC dynamics are influenced by soil redistribution by both water erosion and tillage erosion.

  12. Distribution of microbial biomass and the potential for anaerobic respiration in Hanford Site 300 Area subsurface sediment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Xueju; Kennedy, David W.; Peacock, Aaron D.; McKinley, James P.; Resch, Charles T.; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Konopka, Allan

    2012-02-01

    Subsurface sediments were recovered from a 52 m deep borehole cored in the 300 Area of the Hanford Site in southeastern Washington State to assess the potential for biogeochemical transformation of radionuclide contaminants. Microbial analyses were made on 17 sediment samples traversing multiple geological units: the oxic coarse-grained Hanford formation (9-17.4 m), the oxic fine-grained upper Ringold Formation (17.7-18.1 m), and the reduced Ringold Formation (18.3-52m). Microbial biomass (measured as phospholipid) ranged from 7-974 pmols per g in discrete samples, with the highest numbers found in the Hanford formation. On average, strata below 17.4 m had 13-fold less biomass than those from shallower strata. The nosZ gene encoding nitrous oxide reductase had an abundance of 5-17% relative to total 16S rRNA genes below 18.3 m and <5% above 18.1 m. Most nosZ sequences were affiliated with Ochrobactrum anthropi (97% sequence similarity) or had a nearest neighbor of Achromobacter xylosoxidans (90% similarity). Passive multilevel sampling of groundwater geochemistry demonstrated a redox gradient in the 1.5 m region between the Hanford-Ringold formation contact and the Ringold oxic-anoxic interface. Within this zone, copies of the dsrA gene and Geobacteraceae had the highest relative abundance. The majority of dsrA genes detected near the interface were related to Desulfotomaculum sp.. These analyses indicate that the region just below the contact between the Hanford and Ringold formations is a zone of active biogeochemical redox cycling.

  13. Dynamics of Soil Organic Carbon and Microbial Biomass Carbon in Relation to Water Erosion and Tillage Erosion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiaojun, Nie; Jianhui, Zhang; Zhengan, Su

    2013-01-01

    Dynamics of soil organic carbon (SOC) are associated with soil erosion, yet there is a shortage of research concerning the relationship between soil erosion, SOC, and especially microbial biomass carbon (MBC). In this paper, we selected two typical slope landscapes including gentle and steep slopes from the Sichuan Basin, China, and used the 137Cs technique to determine the effects of water erosion and tillage erosion on the dynamics of SOC and MBC. Soil samples for the determination of 137Cs, SOC, MBC and soil particle-size fractions were collected on two types of contrasting hillslopes. 137Cs data revealed that soil loss occurred at upper slope positions of the two landscapes and soil accumulation at the lower slope positions. Soil erosion rates as well as distribution patterns of the erosion is the major process of soil redistribution in the gentle slope landscape, while tillage erosion acts as the dominant process of soil redistribution in the steep slope landscape. In gentle slope landscapes, both SOC and MBC contents increased downslope and these distribution patterns were closely linked to soil redistribution rates. In steep slope landscapes, only SOC contents increased downslope, dependent on soil redistribution. It is noticeable that MBC/SOC ratios were significantly lower in gentle slope landscapes than in steep slope landscapes, implying that water erosion has a negative effect on the microbial biomass compared with tillage erosion. It is suggested that MBC dynamics are closely associated with soil redistribution by water erosion but independent of that by tillage erosion, while SOC dynamics are influenced by soil redistribution by both water erosion and tillage erosion. PMID:23717530

  14. Responses of soil microbial biomass and soil respiration to rainfall%土壤微生物量和土壤呼吸对降雨的响应

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    苏慧敏; 李叙勇; 欧阳扬

    2011-01-01

    To discern the responds of soil microbial biomass and soil respiration to rainfall, we continuously determined changes in soil microbial biomass and soil respiration after and before rainfall. The results showed that soil microbial biomass and soil respiration increased sharply after rainfall and then reduced gradually. Comparing the values after and before for the first rainfall, the soil microbial biomass carbon, nitrogen and soil respiration increased 3.08, 2.83 and 2.50 times, respectively. Comparing the values after and before for the second rainfall, the soil microbial biomass carbon, nitrogen and soil respiration increased 1.08, 1.63 and 1.68 times, respectively. The surge effect of soil microbial biomass and soil respiration lasted only one day. The third rainfall was only 0.40 mm, the range of soil microbial biomass and soil respiration was unconspicuous.%本研究在北京门头沟龙凤岭水土保持科技示范园内进行,降雨前后连续测定土壤微生物量和土壤呼吸,探讨土壤微生物量和土壤呼吸对降雨的响应.结果表明:干旱的土壤降雨后土壤微生物量和土壤呼吸骤升随后逐渐衰减,第1场降雨后土壤微生物量碳、氮和土壤呼吸分别是干旱期的3.08、2.83、2.50倍,第2场降雨后土壤微生物量碳、氮和土壤呼吸分别是干旱期的1.08、1.63、1.68倍,降雨使土壤微生物量和土壤呼吸产生的激增效应仅持续1d.第3场降雨量仅为0.40 mm,土壤微生物量和土壤呼吸增加的幅度不是很大.

  15. Microbial biomass and activity in litter during the initial development of pure and mixed plantations of Eucalyptus grandis and Acacia mangium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Bini

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Studies on microbial activity and biomass in forestry plantations often overlook the role of litter, typically focusing instead on soil nutrient contents to explain plant and microorganism development. However, since the litter is a significant source of recycled nutrients that affect nutrient dynamics in the soil, litter composition may be more strongly correlated with forest growth and development than soil nutrient contents. This study aimed to test this hypothesis by examining correlations between soil C, N, and P; litter C, N, P, lignin content, and polyphenol content; and microbial biomass and activity in pure and mixed second-rotation plantations of Eucalyptus grandis and Acacia mangium before and after senescent leaf drop. The numbers of cultivable fungi and bacteria were also estimated. All properties were correlated with litter C, N, P, lignin and polyphenols, and with soil C and N. We found higher microbial activity (CO2 evolution in litter than in soil. In the E. grandis monoculture before senescent leaf drop, microbial biomass C was 46 % higher in litter than in soil. After leaf drop, this difference decreased to 16 %. In A. mangium plantations, however, microbial biomass C was lower in litter than in soil both before and after leaf drop. Microbial biomass N of litter was approximately 94 % greater than that of the soil in summer and winter in all plantations. The number of cultivable fungi and bacteria increased after leaf drop, especially so in the litter. Fungi were also more abundant in the E. grandis litter. In general, the A. mangium monoculture was associated with higher levels of litter lignin and N, especially after leaf drop. In contrast, the polyphenol and C levels in E. grandis monoculture litter were higher after leaf drop. These properties were negatively correlated with total soil C and N. Litter in the mixed stands had lower C:N and C:P ratios and higher N, P, and C levels in the microbial biomass. This suggests more

  16. BioDry: An Inexpensive, Low-Power Method to Preserve Aquatic Microbial Biomass at Room Temperature.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven J Tuorto

    Full Text Available This report describes BioDry (patent pending, a method for reliably preserving the biomolecules associated with aquatic microbial biomass samples, without the need of hazardous materials (e.g. liquid nitrogen, preservatives, etc., freezing, or bulky storage/sampling equipment. Gel electrophoresis analysis of nucleic acid extracts from samples treated in the lab with the BioDry method indicated that molecular integrity was protected in samples stored at room temperature for up to 30 days. Analysis of 16S/18S rRNA genes for presence/absence and relative abundance of microorganisms using both 454-pyrosequencing and TRFLP profiling revealed statistically indistinguishable communities from control samples that were frozen in liquid nitrogen immediately after collection. Seawater and river water biomass samples collected with a portable BioDry "field unit", constructed from off-the-shelf materials and a battery-operated pumping system, also displayed high levels of community rRNA preservation, despite a slight decrease in nucleic acid recovery over the course of storage for 30 days. Functional mRNA and protein pools from the field samples were also effectively conserved with BioDry, as assessed by respective RT-PCR amplification and western blot of ribulose-1-5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase. Collectively, these results demonstrate that BioDry can adequately preserve a suite of biomolecules from aquatic biomass at ambient temperatures for up to a month, giving it great potential for high resolution sampling in remote locations or on autonomous platforms where space and power are limited.

  17. Microbial biomass and viral infections of heterotrophic prokaryotes in the sub-surface layer of the central Arctic Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steward, Grieg F.; Fandino, Laura B.; Hollibaugh, James T.; Whitledge, Terry E.; Azam, Farooq

    2007-10-01

    Seawater samples were collected for microbial analyses between 55 and 235 m depth across the Arctic Ocean during the SCICEX 97 expedition (03 September-02 October 1997) using a nuclear submarine as a research platform. Abundances of prokaryotes (range 0.043-0.47×10 9 dm -3) and viruses (range 0.68-11×10 9 dm -3) were correlated ( r=0.66, n=150) with an average virus:prokaryote ratio of 26 (range 5-70). Biomass of prokaryotes integrated from 55 to 235 m ranged from 0.27 to 0.85 g C m -2 exceeding that of phytoplankton (0.005-0.2 g C m -2) or viruses (0.02-0.05 g C m -2) over the same depth range by an order of magnitude on average. Using transmission electron microscopy (TEM), we estimated that 0.5% of the prokaryote community on average (range 0-1.4%) was visibly infected with viruses, which suggests that very little of prokaryotic secondary production was lost due to viral lysis. Intracellular viruses ranged from 5 to >200/cell, with an average apparent burst size of 45±38 (mean±s.d.; n=45). TEM also revealed the presence of putative metal-precipitating bacteria in 8 of 13 samples, which averaged 0.3% of the total prokaryote community (range 0-1%). If these prokaryotes are accessible to protistan grazers, the Fe and Mn associated with their capsules might be an important source of trace metals to the planktonic food web. After combining our abundance and mortality data with data from the literature, we conclude that the biomass of prokaryoplankton exceeds that of phytoplankton when averaged over the upper 250 m of the central Arctic Ocean and that the fate of this biomass is poorly understood.

  18. Cost-effective Chlorella biomass production from dilute wastewater using a novel photosynthetic microbial fuel cell (PMFC).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Jinxing; Wang, Zhiwei; Zhang, Junyao; Waite, T David; Wu, Zhichao

    2017-01-01

    While microalgae have been suggested as a promising substitute to conventional fossil fuels, their cost effective cultivation and harvesting constitutes a major challenge. In the work described here, a novel photosynthetic microbial fuel cell (PMFC) in which a stainless steel mesh with biofilm formed on it serves as both the cathode and filtration material has been developed. Results of this study reveal that, in addition to inducing oxygen reduction reactions under illumination, the biocathode is effective in preventing the washout of algae during continuous operation, resulting in retained biomass concentrations reaching 3.5-6.5 g L(-1). The maximum output current density reached ∼200 mA m(-2) under irradiation, which is comparable with recent PMFC studies. Microbial diversity analyses targeting 16S and 18S rRNA genes indicated that the eukaryotic species belonging to the genus Chlorella was able to sustain its community dominance (>96%) over other competing species over the course of the studies. In the absence of catalysts such as Pt, a consortium of photosynthetic organisms including plant growth-promoting bacteria such as Azospirillum and Rhizobium were overrepresented in the biofilm, with these organisms most likely contributing to cathodic electron transfer. Energy flow analysis suggested that the PMFC system held the potential to achieve theoretical energy balance in simultaneous algae production and wastewater treatment.

  19. Some soil properties and microbial biomass of Pinus maritima, Pinus pinea and Eucalyptus camaldulensis from the Eastern Mediterranean coasts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nacide Kizildag

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Salt-affected soils occupy wide areas that have ecological importance in semi-arid and arid regions. Excessive amounts of salt have adverse effects on soil physical and chemical properties and also on the microbiological processes. The soils of Pinus maritima, Pinus pinea, and Eucalyptus camaldulensis were found to be under salinity stress in the present study area. Thus, the carbon, nitrogen, phosphorus contents, microbial biomass, and carbon mineralization were determined in the soils sampled from the Tarsus-Karabucak Forest of the Eastern Mediterranean Region (Turkey. Method: Carbon mineralization of all samples was measured by the CO2 respiration method over 30 d at 28�C and constant moisture. Results: There were no significant differences in the carbon mineralization among the soils. The average fungi count in 1 g of air dried soils of E. camaldulensis, P. pinea, and P. maritima were found to be a 72000 colony forming unit (cfu/g, 25300 cfu/g, and 28500 cfu/g, respectively. The total bacterial counts were 4x103 cfu/g, 10x103 cfu/g, and 7x103 cfu/g and the counts of anaerobic bacteria were 17800 cfu/g, 42900 cfu/g, and 27300 cfu/g, respectively. Conclusion: It is possible to conclude that salt, as an ecological factor, had no effect on microbial activity. This may be as a result of heavy rains which decreased the salt concentrations of the soil in the sampling region.

  20. Microbial Production of Short Chain Fatty Acids from Lignocellulosic Biomass: Current Processes and Market

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivan Baumann

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Biological production of organic acids from conversion of biomass derivatives has received increased attention among scientists and engineers and in business because of the attractive properties such as renewability, sustainability, degradability, and versatility. The aim of the present review is to summarize recent research and development of short chain fatty acids production by anaerobic fermentation of nonfood biomass and to evaluate the status and outlook for a sustainable industrial production of such biochemicals. Volatile fatty acids (VFAs such as acetic acid, propionic acid, and butyric acid have many industrial applications and are currently of global economic interest. The focus is mainly on the utilization of pretreated lignocellulosic plant biomass as substrate (the carbohydrate route and development of the bacteria and processes that lead to a high and economically feasible production of VFA. The current and developing market for VFA is analyzed focusing on production, prices, and forecasts along with a presentation of the biotechnology companies operating in the market for sustainable biochemicals. Finally, perspectives on taking sustainable product of biochemicals from promise to market introduction are reviewed.

  1. Microbial Production of Short Chain Fatty Acids from Lignocellulosic Biomass: Current Processes and Market.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumann, Ivan; Westermann, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Biological production of organic acids from conversion of biomass derivatives has received increased attention among scientists and engineers and in business because of the attractive properties such as renewability, sustainability, degradability, and versatility. The aim of the present review is to summarize recent research and development of short chain fatty acids production by anaerobic fermentation of nonfood biomass and to evaluate the status and outlook for a sustainable industrial production of such biochemicals. Volatile fatty acids (VFAs) such as acetic acid, propionic acid, and butyric acid have many industrial applications and are currently of global economic interest. The focus is mainly on the utilization of pretreated lignocellulosic plant biomass as substrate (the carbohydrate route) and development of the bacteria and processes that lead to a high and economically feasible production of VFA. The current and developing market for VFA is analyzed focusing on production, prices, and forecasts along with a presentation of the biotechnology companies operating in the market for sustainable biochemicals. Finally, perspectives on taking sustainable product of biochemicals from promise to market introduction are reviewed.

  2. Layer-by-layer assembly surface modified microbial biomass for enhancing biorecovery of secondary gold.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Ying; Zhu, Nengwu; Kang, Naixin; Cao, Yanlan; Shi, Chaohong; Wu, Pingxiao; Dang, Zhi; Zhang, Xiaoping; Qin, Benqian

    2017-02-01

    Enhancement of the biosorption capacity for gold is highly desirable for the biorecovery of secondary gold resources. In this study, polyethylenimine (PEI) was grafted on Shewanella haliotis surface through layer-by-layer assembly approach so as to improve the biosorption capacity of Au(III). Results showed that the relative contribution of amino group to the biosorption of Au(III) was the largest one (about 44%). After successful grafting 1, 2 and 3-layer PEI on the surface of biomass, the biosorption capacity significantly enhanced from 143.8mg/g to 597.1, 559.1, and 536.8mg/g, respectively. Interestingly, the biomass modified with 1-layer PEI exhibited 4.2 times higher biosorption capacity than the untreated control. When 1-layer modified biomass was subjected to optimizing the various conditions by response surface methodology, the theoretical maximum adsorption capacity could reach up to 727.3mg/g. All findings demonstrated that PEI modified S. haliotis was effective for enhancing gold biorecovery.

  3. Root systems and soil microbial biomass under no-tillage system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Venzke Filho Solismar de Paiva

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Some root parameters such as distribution, length, diameter and dry matter are inherent to plant species. Roots can influence microbial population during vegetative cycle through the rhizodeposits and, after senescence, integrating the soil organic matter pool. Since they represent labile substrates, especially regarding nitrogen, they can determine the rate of nutrient availability to the next crop cultivated under no-tillage (NT. The root systems of two crop species: maize (Zea mays L. cultivar Cargill 909 and soybean [Glycine max (L. Merr.] cultivar Embrapa 59, were compared in the field, and their influence on spatial distribution of the microbial C and N in a clayey-textured Typic Hapludox cultivated for 22 years under NT, at Tibagi, State of Paraná (PR, Brazil, was determined. Digital image processing and nail-plate techniques were used to evaluate 40 plots of a 80 ´ 50 ´ 3 cm soil profile. It was observed that 36% and 30% of the maize and soybeans roots, respectively, are concentrated in the 0 to 10 cm soil layer. The percent distribution of root dry matter was similar for both crops. The maize roots presented a total of 1,324 kg C ha-1 and 58 kg N ha-1, with higher root dry matter density and more roots in decomposition in the upper soil layer, decreasing with depth. The soybean roots (392 kg C ha-1 and 21 kg N ha-1 showed higher number of thinner roots and higher density per length unity compared to the maize. The maize roots enhanced microbial-C down to deeper soil layers than did the soybean roots. The microbial N presented a better correlation with the concentration of thin active roots and with roots in decomposition or in indefinite shape, possibly because of higher concentration of C and N easily assimilated by soil microorganisms.

  4. Tree species diversity effects on soil microbial biomass, diversity and activity across European forest types

    OpenAIRE

    Carnol, Monique; Baeten, Lander; Bosman, Bernard; De Wandeler, Hans; Muys, Bart

    2014-01-01

    Increasing tree species diversity in forests might contribute to ecosystem-service maintenance, as well as to the reconciliation of regulating, provisioning and supporting services within the frame of multifunctional and sustainable forestry. Individual tree species influence biogeochemical cycling through element deposition (throughfall, litterfall), and through microbial activities in the soil. Yet, the influence of mixing tree species on these ecosystem processes is unclear, in particular ...

  5. Microbial biomass increases with tree species diversity in European forest soils

    OpenAIRE

    Carnol, Monique; Baeten, Lander; Bosman, Bernard; Malchair, Sandrine; Vanoppen, Astrid; De Wandeler, Hans; Muys, Bart

    2015-01-01

    Increasing tree species diversity in forests might contribute to ecosystem-service maintenance, as well as to the reconciliation of regulating, provisioning and supporting services within the frame of multifunctional and sustainable forestry. Individual tree species influence biogeochemical cycling through element deposition (throughfall, litterfall), and through microbial activities in the soil. Yet, the influence of mixing tree species on these ecosystem processes is unclear, in particular ...

  6. Microbial biomass and necromass turnover times in the contrasting seafloor settings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mhatre, Snehit

    2017-01-01

    Survival of microorganisms in the nutrient and energy deprived conditions of deep biosphere has been a topic of interest for geomicrobiologists. During his PhD, Snehit Mhatre studied slow microbial activity in the subsurface marine sediments from recent to 10 million years in relation to the degr......Survival of microorganisms in the nutrient and energy deprived conditions of deep biosphere has been a topic of interest for geomicrobiologists. During his PhD, Snehit Mhatre studied slow microbial activity in the subsurface marine sediments from recent to 10 million years in relation...... to the degradability of buried organic matter using a revised stereo-isomeric D:L-amino acid model. Additionally, he also showed that a protein L-isoaspartate methyltransferase gene coding for a protein involved in repairing cellular damage caused due to extreme nutrient and energy limitations is widely distributed...... in the deep biosphere microbial community. His work therefore opens a new avenue in exploring the possible mechanisms involved in facilitating the long-term survival of microorganisms under energy-deprived conditions. The PhD degree was completed at the Center for Geomicrobiology, department of Bioscience...

  7. [Characteristics of soil microbial biomass carbon and soil water soluble organic carbon in the process of natural restoration of Karst forest].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Zong-Sheng; Fu, Yu-Hong; Yu, Li-Fei

    2012-10-01

    By the method of taking space instead of time, an incubation test was conducted to study the characteristics of soil microbial biomass carbon and water soluble organic carbon in the process of natural restoration of Karst forest in Maolan Nature Reserve, Guizhou Province of Southwest China. The soil microbial biomass carbon content and soil basal respiration decreased with increasing soil depth but increased with the process of the natural restoration, soil microbial quotient increased with increasing soil depth and with the process of restoration, and soil water soluble organic carbon content decreased with increasing soil depth. In the process of the natural restoration, surface soil water soluble organic carbon content increased, while sublayer soil water soluble organic carbon content decreased after an initial increase. The ratio of soil water soluble organic carbon to total soil organic carbon increased with increasing soil depth but decreased with the process of restoration. Soil quality increased with the process of restoration. Also, the quality and quantity of soil organic carbon increased with the process of restoration, in which, soil microbial biomass carbon content had the greatest change, while soil water soluble organic carbon content had less change.

  8. [Effects of Different Residue Part Inputs of Corn Straws on CO2 Efflux and Microbial Biomass in Clay Loam and Sandy Loam Black Soils].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Si-yi; Liang, Ai-zhen; Yang, Xue-ming; Zhang, Xiao-ping; Jia, Shu-xia; Chen, Xue-wen; Zhang, Shi-xiu; Sun, Bing-jie; Chen, Sheng-long

    2015-07-01

    The decomposed rate of crop residues is a major determinant for carbon balance and nutrient cycling in agroecosystem. In this study, a constant temperature incubation study was conducted to evaluate CO2 emission and microbial biomass based on four different parts of corn straw (roots, lower stem, upper stem and leaves) and two soils with different textures (sandy loam and clay loam) from the black soil region. The relationships between soil CO2 emission, microbial biomass and the ratio of carbon (C) to nitrogen (N) and lignin of corn residues were analyzed by the linear regression. Results showed that the production of CO2 was increased with the addition of different parts of corn straw to soil, with the value of priming effect (PE) ranged from 215. 53 µmol . g-1 to 335. 17 µmol . g -1. Except for corn leaves, the cumulative CO2 production and PE of clay loam soil were significantly higher than those in sandy loam soil. The correlation of PE with lignin/N was obviously more significant than that with lignin concentration, nitrogen concentration and C/N of corn residue. The addition of corn straw to soil increased the contents of MBC and MBN and decreased MBC/MBN, which suggested that more nitrogen rather than carbon was conserved in microbial community. The augmenter of microbial biomass in sandy loam soil was greater than that in clay loam soil, but the total dissolved nitrogen was lower. Our results indicated that the differences in CO2 emission with the addition of residues to soils were primarily ascribe to the different lignin/N ratio in different corn parts; and the corn residues added into the sandy loam soil could enhance carbon sequestration, microbial biomass and nitrogen holding ability relative to clay loam soil.

  9. Seasonal Variation in Soil Microbial Biomass, Bacterial Community Composition and Extracellular Enzyme Activity in Relation to Soil Respiration in a Northern Great Plains Grassland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilton, E.; Flanagan, L. B.

    2014-12-01

    Soil respiration rate is affected by seasonal changes in temperature and moisture, but is this a direct effect on soil metabolism or an indirect effect caused by changes in microbial biomass, bacterial community composition and substrate availability? In order to address this question, we compared continuous measurements of soil and plant CO2 exchange made with an automatic chamber system to analyses conducted on replicate soil samples collected on four dates during June-August. Microbial biomass was estimated from substrate-induced respiration rate, bacterial community composition was determined by 16S rRNA amplicon pyrosequencing, and β-1,4-N-acetylglucosaminidase (NAGase) and phenol oxidase enzyme activities were assayed fluorometrically or by absorbance measurements, respectively. Soil microbial biomass declined from June to August in strong correlation with a progressive decline in soil moisture during this time period. Soil bacterial species richness and alpha diversity showed no significant seasonal change. However, bacterial community composition showed a progressive shift over time as measured by Bray-Curtis dissimilarity. In particular, the change in community composition was associated with increasing relative abundance in the alpha and delta classes, and declining abundance of the beta and gamma classes of the Proteobacteria phylum during June-August. NAGase showed a progressive seasonal decline in potential activity that was correlated with microbial biomass and seasonal changes in soil moisture. In contrast, phenol oxidase showed highest potential activity in mid-July near the time of peak soil respiration and ecosystem photosynthesis, which may represent a time of high input of carbon exudates into the soil from plant roots. This input of exudates may stimulate the activity of phenol oxidase, a lignolytic enzyme involved in the breakdown of soil organic matter. These analyses indicated that seasonal change in soil respiration is a complex

  10. Adenosine triphosphate concentration in relation to microbial biomass in aquatic systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cunningham, H.W. Jr.

    1977-01-01

    Analyses of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) extracted from a sediment community by the sulfuric acid method are complicated by inhibitions from inorganic and organic compounds. Inhibitions by inorganic compounds are reversible while those by organic compounds are irreversible. The primary inhibition by organic compounds results by complexing with acid-soluble fulvic acids which will prevent the detection of as much as 80% of the ATP present in a sample by the luciferin-luciferase reaction. Analytical techniques were developed to parially circumvent such interferences. Biomass interpretations from ATP concentrations in aquatic systems are complicated by the diversity of the microbiota and by the variability in the carbon to ATP ratio caused by environmental conditions. However, when levels of ATP are considered as a physiological condition of a sedimentary community, this data provide a means to interpret community metabolism not available hitherto.

  11. Adenosine triphosphate concentration in relation to microbial biomass in aquatic systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cunningham, H.W. Jr.

    1977-01-01

    Analyses of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) extracted from a sediment community of an aquatic ecosystem by the sulfuric acid method are complicated by inhibitions from inorganic and organic compounds. Inhibitions by inorganic compounds are reversible while those by organic compounds are irreversible. The primary inhibition by organic compounds results by complexing with acid-soluble fulvic acids which will prevent the detection of as much as 80% of the ATP present in a sample by the luciferin-luciferase reaction. Analytical techniques were developed to partially circumvent such interferences. Biomass interpretations from ATP concentrations in aquatic systems are complicated by the diversity of the microbiota and by the variability in the carbon to ATP ratio caused by environmental conditions. However, when levels of ATP are considered as a physiological condition of a sedimentary community, this data provides a means to interpret community metabolism not available hitherto.

  12. Toxicity of cadmium to soil microbial biomass and its activity: Effect of incubation time on Cd ecological dose in a paddy soil

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIAO Min; LUO Yun-kuo; ZHAO Xiao-min; Huang Chang-yong

    2005-01-01

    Cadmium (Cd) is ubiquitous in the human environment and has toxic effect on soil microbial biomass or its activity,including microbial biomass carbon (Cmic), dehydrogenase activity (DHA) and basal respiration (BR), etc., Cmic, DHA, BR were used as bioindicators of the toxic effect of Cd in soil. This study was conducted to determine the effects of Cd on soil microbial biomass and its activity in a paddy soil. The inhibition of microbial biomass and its activity by different Cd concentrations was described by the kinetic model (M1) and the sigmoid dose-response model (M2) in order to calculate three ecological doses of Cd:ED50, ED10 and ED5. Results showed that M2 was better fit than M1 for describing the ecological toxicity dose effect of cadmium on soil microbial biomass and its activity in a paddy soil. M2 for ED values (mg/kg soil) of Cmic, DHA, BR best fitted the measured paddy soil bioindicators. M2 showed that all ED values (mg/kg) increased in turn with increased incubation time. ED50, ED10 and ED5 of Cmic with M2 were increased in turn from 403.2, 141.1,100.4 to 1000.7, 230.9, 144.8, respectively, after 10 d to 60 d of incubation. ED50, ED10 and ED5 of DHA with M2 increased in turn from 67.6, 6.2, 1.5 to 101.1, 50.9, 41.0, respectively, after 10 d to 60 d of incubation. ED50, ED10 and ED5 of BR with M2 increased in turn from 149.7, 6.5, 1.8 to 156.5, 50.8, 35.5, respectively,after 10 d to 60 d of incubation. So the ecological dose increased in turn with increased incubation time for M2 showed that toxicity of cadmium to soil microbial biomass and its activity was decreased with increased incubation time.

  13. Effects of Cotton Straw Incorporation on Soil Microbial Biomass Carbon, Nitrogen and Phosphorus in Long-Term Continuous Cropping Cotton Field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    GUO Cheng-zang

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available This study explored the effect of straw incorporation on the content of soil microbial biomass carbon (SMBC, microbial biomass nitrogen (SMBN and microbial biomass phosphorus(SMBP in the continuous cropping cotton field. Results showed that cotton straw incorporation could increase the content of SMBC, SMBN and SMBP significantly in different soil layers. Besides, with the time of continuous cropping increasing, the content of SMBC, SMBN and SMBP were all remarkably raised in the straw incorporation treatment. However, with the time of continuous cropping increasing, the content of SMBC, SMBN and SMBP were all remarkably declined in the straw removal treatment. In 0~20 cm soil layer, compared with the straw removal, both SMBC content and SMBN content with 5, 10, 15 years continuous cropping treatments in the straw incorporation treatment were increased by 20.8%, 67.2%, 70.4% and 22.2%, 81.2%, 85.4%, respectively, and the SMBP content in the straw incorporation treatment was increased by 22.3%, 81.2%, 85.3%, respectively. Under the cotton straw incorporation, in 0~20 cm soil layer, compared with the 5, 10, 15, 20, 25 years continuous cropping, both SMBC content and SMBN content in 30 years were increased by 116.6%, 86.2%, 101.6%, 28.9%, 8.99% and 114.1%, 82.1%, 99.65%, 27.8%, 7.15%, respectively, and the SMBP content in 30 years was increased by 65.7%, 6.9%, 34.2%, 1.4%, 2.2%, respectively. The content of SMBC, SMBN, SMBP in different soil layers decreased in the order as 0~20 cm> 20~40 cm> 40~60 cm. Consequently, cotton straw incorporation could significantly increase the the content of soil microbial biomass carbon, microbial biomass nitrogen and microbial biomass phosphorus in the long-term continuous cropping cotton field, besides it could alleviate the negative impact of cotton continuous cropping, so that it would be beneficial to improve the soil quality and soil fertility.

  14. Microbial communities of biomethanization digesters fed with raw and heat pre-treated microalgae biomasses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanz, Jose Luis; Rojas, Patricia; Morato, Ana; Mendez, Lara; Ballesteros, Mercedes; González-Fernández, Cristina

    2017-02-01

    Microalgae biomasses are considered promising feedstocks for biofuel and methane productions. Two Continuously Stirred Tank Reactors (CSTR), fed with fresh (CSTR-C) and heat pre-treated (CSTR-T) Chlorella biomass were run in parallel in order to determine methane productions. The methane yield was 1.5 times higher in CSTR-T with regard to CSTR-C. Aiming to understand the microorganism roles within of the reactors, the sludge used as an inoculum (I), plus raw (CSTR-C) and heat pre-treated (CSTR-T) samples were analyzed by high-throughput pyrosequencing. The bacterial communities were dominated by Proteobacteria, Bacteroidetes, Chloroflexi and Firmicutes. Spirochaetae and Actinobacteria were only detected in sample I. Proteobacteria, mainly Alfaproteobacteria, were by far the dominant phylum within of the CSTR-C bioreactor. Many of the sequences retrieved were related to bacteria present in activated sludge treatment plants and they were absent after thermal pre-treatment. Most of the sequences affiliated to the Bacteroidetes were related to uncultured groups. Anaerolineaceae was the sole family found of the Chloroflexi phylum. All of the genera identified of the Firmicutes phylum carried out macromolecule hydrolysis and by-product fermentation. The proteolytic bacteria were prevalent over the saccharolytic microbes. The percentage of the proteolytic genera increased from the inoculum to the CSTR-T sample in a parallel fashion with an available protein increase owing to the high protein content of Chlorella. To relate the taxa identified by high-throughput sequencing to their functional roles remains a future challenge.

  15. Effects of Organic-Loading-Rate Reduction on Sludge Biomass and Microbial Community in a Deteriorated Pilot-Scale Membrane Bioreactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Yuya; Hori, Tomoyuki; Navarro, Ronald R; Naganawa, Ryuichi; Habe, Hiroshi; Ogata, Atsushi

    2016-09-29

    The effects of a precipitous decrease in the inlet organic loading rate on sludge reductions and the microbial community in a membrane bioreactor were investigated. The sludge biomass was markedly reduced to 47.4% of the initial concentration (approximately 15,000 mg L(-1)) within 7 d after the organic loading rate was decreased by half (450 to 225 mg chemical oxygen demand L(-1) d(-1)). An analysis of the microbial community structure using high-throughput sequencing revealed an increase in the abundance of facultative predatory bacteria-related operational taxonomic units as well as microorganisms tolerant to environmental stress belonging to the classes Deinococci and Betaproteobacteria.

  16. Psychrophilic Biomass Producers in the Trophic Chain of the Microbial Community of Lake Untersee, Antarctica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pikuta, Elena V.; Hoover, Richard B.

    2010-01-01

    The study of photosynthetic microorganisms from the Lake Untersee samples showed dispersed distribution of phototrophs within 80 m water column. Lake Untersee represents a unique ecosystem that experienced complete isolation: sealed by the Anuchin Glacier for many millennia. Consequently, its biocenosis has evolved over a significant period of time without exchange or external interaction with species from other environments. The major producers of organic matter in Lake Untersee are represented by phototrophic and chemolithotrophic microorganisms. This is the traditional trophic scheme for lacustrine ecosystems on Earth. Among the phototrophs, diatoms were not found, which differentiates this lake from other known ecosystems. The dominant species among phototrophs was Chlamydomonas sp. with typical morphostructure: green chloroplasts, bright red round spot, and two polar flagella near the opening. As expected, the physiology of studied phototrophs was limited by low temperature, which defined them as obligate psychrophilic microorganisms. By the quantity estimation of methanogenesis in this lake, the litho-autotrophic production of organic matter is competitive with phototrophic production. However, pure cultures of methanogens have not yet been obtained. We discuss the primary producers of organic matter and the participation of our novel psychrophilic homoacetogen into the litho-autotrophic link of biomass production in Lake Untersee.

  17. Immobilization of microbial cell and yeast cell and its application to biomass conversion using radiation techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaetsu, Isao; Kumakura, Minoru; Fujimura, Takashi; Kasai, Noboru; Tamada, Masao

    The recent results of immobilization of cellulase-producing cells and ethanol-fermentation yeast by radiation were reported. The enzyme of cellulase produced by immobilized cells was used for saccharification of lignocellulosic wastes and immobilized yeast cells were used for fermentation reaction from glucose to ethanol. The wastes such as chaff and bagasse were treated by γ-ray or electron-beam irradiation in the presence of alkali and subsequent mechanical crushing, to form a fine powder less than 50 μm in diameter. On the other hand, Trichoderma reesei as a cellulase-producing microbial cell was immobilized on a fibrous carrier having a specific porous structure and cultured to produce cellulase. The enzymatic saccharification of the pretreated waste was carried out using the produced cellulase. The enhanced fermentation process to produce ethanol from glucose with the immobilized yeast by radiation was also studied. The ethanol productivity of immobilized growing yeast cells thus obtained was thirteen times that of free yeast cells in a 1:1 volume of liquid medium to immobilized yeast cells.

  18. RELATIONSHIPS BETWEEN SOIL MICROBIAL BIOMASS, AGGREGATE STABILITY AND AGGREGATE ASSOCIATED-C: A MECHANISTIC APPROACH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrizia Guidi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available For the identification of C pools involved in soil aggregation, a physically-based aggregate fractionation was proposed, and  additional pretreatments were used in the measurement of the 1-2 mm aggregate stability in order to elucidate the relevance of the role of soil microorganisms with respect to the different aggregate breakdown mechanisms. The study was carried out on three clay loam Regosols, developed on calcareous shales, known history of organic cultivation.Our results showed that the soil C pool controlling the process of stabilisation of aggregates was related to the microbial community. We identified the resistance to fast wetting as the major mechanism of aggregate stability driven by microorganims. The plausible hypothesis is that organic farming promotes fungi growth, improving water repellency of soil aggregates by fungal hydrophobic substances. By contrast, we failed in the identification of C pools controlling the formation of aggregates, probably because of the disturbance of mechanical tillage which contributes to the breakdown of soil aggregates.The physically-based aggregate fractionation proposed in this study resulted useful in the  mechanistically understanding of the role of microorganisms in soil aggregation and it might be suggested for studying the impact of management on C pools, aggregates properties and their relationships in agricultural soils.

  19. Spatial variation in organic carbon,nutrients and microbial biomass contents of paddy soils in a hilly red soil region

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TANG Guoyong; XIAO Heai; SU Yirong; HUANG Daoyou; LIU Shoulong; HUANG Min; TONG Chengli; WU Jinshui

    2007-01-01

    The contents of soil organic C (SOC),total N (TN),total P (TP),dissolved N (DN),Olsen-P,and microbial biomass C,N,P (BC,BN,BP) of 254 paddy soils (0-18 cm in depth) in a hilly red soil region of subtropical zone of China were studied.The results showed that the contents of SOC,TN,BC,BN and DN of paddy soils at the bottom of hills were 14.6%,13.6%,24.6%,20.4% and 95.8% higher than those at the foothill,respectively.The Olsen-P content of paddy soils at the foothill was 33.3% higher than that at the bottom of hills.However,the differences in TP,Bp and available P (the sum of Bp and Olsen-P) contents were not significant between the two positions.In addition,the ratios of soil C/P,BC/BP and BC/SOC of paddy soils at the bottom of hills were 12.7%,28.5% and 8.2% higher than those at the foothill,respectively,but the differences in ratios of soil C/N,BC/BN,BN/TN and Bp/TP were not statistically significant between various positions.

  20. Fluctuation of microbial activities after influent load variations in a full-scale SBR. Recovery of the biomass after starvation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cabezas, Angela; Draper, Patricia; Etchebehere, Claudia [Universidad de la Republica, Montevideo (Uruguay). Catedra de Microbiologia, Facultad de Quimica y Facultad de Ciencias

    2009-10-15

    Due to variations in the production levels, a full-scale sequencing batch reactor (SBR) for post-treatment of tannery wastewater was exposed to low and high ammonia load periods. In order to study how these changes affected the N-removal capacity, the microbiology of the reactor was studied by a diverse set of techniques including molecular tools, activity tests, and microbial counts in samples taken along 3 years. The recover capacity of the biomass was also studied in a lab-scale reactor operated with intermittent aeration without feeding for 36 days. The results showed that changes in the feeding negatively affected the nitrifying community, but the nitrogen removal efficiencies could be restored after the concentration stress. Species substitution was observed within the nitrifying bacteria, Nitrosomonas europaea and Nitrobacter predominated initially, and after an ammonia overload period, Nitrosomonas nitrosa and Nitrospira became dominant. Some denitrifiers, with nirS related to Alicycliphilus, Azospirillum, and Marinobacter nirS, persisted during long-term reactor operation, but the community fluctuated both in composition and in abundance. This fluctuating community may better resist the continuous changes in the feeding regime. Our results showed that a nitrifying-denitrifying SBR could be operated with low loads or even without feeding during production shut down periods. (orig.)

  1. Microbial community distribution and activity dynamics of granular biomass in a CANON reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vázquez-Padín, Jose; Mosquera-Corral, Anuska; Campos, Jose Luis; Méndez, Ramón; Revsbech, Niels Peter

    2010-08-01

    The application of microelectrodes to measure oxygen and nitrite concentrations inside granules operated at 20 degrees C in a CANON (Complete Autotrophic Nitrogen-removal Over Nitrite) reactor and the application of the FISH (Fluorescent In Situ Hybridization) technique to cryosectioned slices of these granules showed the presence of two differentiated zones inside of them: an external nitrification zone and an internal anammox zone. The FISH analysis of these layers allowed the identification of Nitrosomonas spp. and Candidatus Kuenenia Stutgartiensis as the main populations carrying out aerobic and anaerobic ammonia oxidation, respectively. Concentration microprofiles measured at different oxygen concentrations in the bulk liquid (from 1.5 to 35.2 mg O(2) L(-1)) revealed that oxygen was consumed in a surface layer of 100-350 microm width. The obtained consumption rate of the most active layers was of 80 g O(2) (L(granule))(-1) d(-1). Anammox activity was registered between 400 and 1000 microm depth inside the granules. The nitrogen removal capacity of the studied sequencing batch reactor containing the granular biomass was of 0.5 g N L(-1) d(-1). This value is similar to the mean nitrogen removal rate obtained from calculations based on in- and outflow concentrations. Information obtained in the present work allowed the establishment of a simple control strategy based on the measurements of NH(4)(+) and NO(2)(-) in the bulk liquid and acting over the dissolved oxygen concentration in the bulk liquid and the hydraulic retention time of the reactor. (c) 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Effect of Pre-emergence Herbicides on Microbial Biomass and Biochemical Processes in a Typic Fluvaquent Soil Amended with Farm Yard Manure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Amal Chandra; Barman, Saurav; Das, Ritwika

    2015-09-01

    Application of thiobencarb, pendimethalin and pretilachlor at rates of 7.5, 10.0 and 2.5 kg a.i. ha(-1), respectively, under laboratory conditions, significantly increased microbial biomass C, N and P, resulting in greater availability of C, N and P in soil amended with farm yard manure. Application of thiobencarb highly induced microbial biomass C (46.3 %) and N (40.6 %), while pretilachlor and thiobencarb augmented microbial biomass P to the extent of 14.9 % and 14.1 %, respectively. Application of pendimethalin retained the highest amount of total N (19.9 %), soluble NO3 (-) (56 %) and available P (69.5 %) in soil. A similar trend was recorded with thiobencarb for oxidizable organic C (18.1 %) and with pretilachlor for exchangeable NH4 (+) (65.8 %). At the end of the experiment, the highest stimulation of bacteria was recorded with thiobencarb (29.6 %), while pretilachlor harboured the maximum number of actinomycetes (37.2 %) and fungi (40 %) in soil compared to the untreated control.

  3. Dynamics of microbial biomass and respiratory activity during late summer in a site of Arctic Kongsfjorden

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosabruna La Ferla

    2014-06-01

    The Kongsfjorden was affected by inflow of Atlantic water as well as glacier melt water runoff (Cottier et al., 2005. The experiment comprised 5 samplings performed during a 7 day period in MDI station. For each sampling, photosynthetically active radiation (PAR, temperature and conductivity (salinity were recorded along the water column with a PNF-300 profiler and a SeaBird Electronics SBE-911 plus profiler, respectively . Water samples were taken at five different depths (surface, 5, 25, 50 and 100 m to determine nutrients, particulate organic carbon, prokaryotes and phytoplankton biomass, and community respiration. In addition, prokaryotes sunk with the particulate matter were studied into the sediment trap positioned in the MDI during the period between June and September 2013. The latter assessment allowed us to determine the flow of prokaryotes, conveyed from organic matter sinking, throughout the summer. Due to melting of the glaciers in the surface water of the study site, there were sediment loads which strongly limited light penetration and low irradiance (~0.7% E0+ at 5 meters below the surface. Along the water column the intrusion of the salty and warm Atlantic water was visible in the study site and the warm core was at about 25 m depth. PO4 concentrations ranged between 0.43 (surface and 1 µM (100 m and in general the values increased from surface to bottom. NH4, NO2 and NO3 significantly changed along the vertical and with time and varied between 0.39 and 5.05µM, 0.01 and 0.67µM, 0.001 and 4.18µM, respectively. Prokaryotic abundances and cell volumes ranged between 5.6 and 15.9 E+05 cells ml-1 and 0.033 and 0.093 µm3, respectively. These latter parameters showed a peak at 25 m depth in the core of incoming Atlantic water. This evidence was not determined in chlorophyll a (range 0.034-1.102 mg m-3, where the highest values were determined at the surface and 5 m depth. Speculations will be made on the variability of the fluxes of carbon

  4. Enhanced microbial biomass assay using mutant luciferase resistant to benzalkonium chloride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hattori, Noriaki; Sakakibara, Tatsuya; Kajiyama, Naoki; Igarashi, Toshinori; Maeda, Masako; Murakami, Seiji

    2003-08-15

    In a biomass assay based on adenosine 5(')-triphosphate (ATP) bioluminescence, extracellular ATP is removed; then intracellular ATP is extracted from the microorganism by an ATP extractant and subsequently reacted with luciferase. To provide a highly sensitive assay, the concentration of benzalkonium chloride (BAC) in the ATP extractant was optimized by using a mutant luciferase resistant to BAC. The use of 0.2% BAC, which was acceptable for the luciferase, simultaneously achieved the maximum extraction of intracellular ATP from microorganisms and the inactivation of the ATP-eliminating enzymes for removal of extracellular ATP. The detection limit (blank+3 SD) for ATP was 1.8x10(-14)M (1.8x10(-18)mol/assay) in the presence of the ATP extractant with coefficients of variation of 0.7 to 6.3%. The reagent system coupled with the ATP-eliminating enzymes allowed for the detection of 93 colony-forming units (CFU)/ml of Escherichia coli ATCC 25922, 170CFU/ml of Pseudomonas aeruginosa ATCC 27853, 170CFU/ml of Proteus mirabilis ATCC 29906, 68CFU/ml of Staphylococcus aureus ATCC 25923, and 7.7CFU/ml of Bacillus subtilis ATCC 6051. The yeast cell of Saccharomyces cerevisiae IFO 10217 could be detected at 1CFU/ml. With 54 kinds of microorganisms, the average ATP extraction efficiency compared to the trichloroacetic acid extraction method was 81.0% in 24 strains among gram-negative bacteria, 99.4% in 13 strains among gram-positive bacteria, and 97.0% in 17 strains among yeast. The ATP contents of the gram-negative bacteria, gram-positive bacteria, and yeasts ranged from 0.40 to 2.70x10(-18)mol/CFU (mean=1.5x10(-18)mol/CFU), from 0.41 to 16.7x10(-18)mol/CFU (mean=5.5x10(-18)mol/CFU), and from 0.714 to 54.6x10(-16)mol/CFU (mean=8.00x10(-16)mol/CFU), respectively.

  5. Evaluation of siderite and magnetite formation in BIFs by pressure-temperature experiments of Fe(III) minerals and microbial biomass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halama, Maximilian; Swanner, Elizabeth D.; Konhauser, Kurt O.; Kappler, Andreas

    2016-09-01

    Anoxygenic phototrophic Fe(II)-oxidizing bacteria potentially contributed to the deposition of Archean banded iron formations (BIFs), before the evolution of cyanobacterially-generated molecular oxygen (O2), by using sunlight to oxidize aqueous Fe(II) and precipitate Fe(III) (oxyhydr)oxides. Once deposited at the seafloor, diagenetic reduction of the Fe(III) (oxyhydr)oxides by heterotrophic bacteria produced secondary Fe(II)-bearing minerals, such as siderite (FeCO3) and magnetite (Fe3O4), via the oxidation of microbial organic carbon (i.e., cellular biomass). During deeper burial at temperatures above the threshold for life, thermochemical Fe(III) reduction has the potential to form BIF-like minerals. However, the role of thermochemical Fe(III) reduction of primary BIF minerals during metamorphism, and its impact on mineralogy and geochemical signatures in BIFs, is poorly understood. Consequently, we simulated the metamorphism of the precursor and diagenetic iron-rich minerals (ferrihydrite, goethite, hematite) at low-grade metamorphic conditions (170 °C, 1.2 kbar) for 14 days by using (1) mixtures of abiotically synthesized Fe(III) minerals and either microbial biomass or glucose as a proxy for biomass, and (2) using biogenic minerals formed by phototrophic Fe(II)-oxidizing bacteria. Mössbauer spectroscopy and μXRD showed that thermochemical magnetite formation was limited to samples containing ferrihydrite and glucose, or goethite and glucose. No magnetite was formed from Fe(III) minerals when microbial biomass was present as the carbon and electron sources for thermochemical Fe(III) reduction. This could be due to biomass-derived organic molecules binding to the mineral surfaces and preventing solid-state conversion to magnetite. Mössbauer spectroscopy revealed siderite contents of up to 17% after only 14 days of incubation at elevated temperature and pressure for all samples with synthetic Fe(III) minerals and biomass, whereas 6% of the initial Fe(III) was

  6. Enhancement of the microbial community biomass and diversity during air sparging bioremediation of a soil highly contaminated with kerosene and BTEX.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kabelitz, Nadja; Machackova, Jirina; Imfeld, Gwenaël; Brennerova, Maria; Pieper, Dietmar H; Heipieper, Hermann J; Junca, Howard

    2009-03-01

    In order to obtain insights in complexity shifts taking place in natural microbial communities under strong selective pressure, soils from a former air force base in the Czech Republic, highly contaminated with jet fuel and at different stages of a bioremediation air sparging treatment, were analyzed. By tracking phospholipid fatty acids and 16S rRNA genes, a detailed monitoring of the changes in quantities and composition of the microbial communities developed at different stages of the bioventing treatment progress was performed. Depending on the length of the air sparging treatment that led to a significant reduction in the contamination level, we observed a clear shift in the soil microbial community being dominated by Pseudomonads under the harsh conditions of high aromatic contamination to a status of low aromatic concentrations, increased biomass content, and a complex composition with diverse bacterial taxonomical branches.

  7. Enhancement of the microbial community biomass and diversity during air sparging bioremediation of a soil highly contaminated with kerosene and BTEX

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kabelitz, Nadja; Heipieper, Hermann J. [Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research (UFZ), Leipzig (Germany). Dept. of Bioremediation; Machackova, Jirina [Earth Tech CZ s.r.o., Prague (Czech Republic); Imfeld, Gwenael [Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research (UFZ), Leipzig (Germany). Dept. of Isotope Biogeochemistry; Brennerova, Maria [Czech Academy of Sciences, Prague (CZ). Inst. of Microbiology (IMIC); Pieper, Dietmar H.; Junca, Howard [Helmholtz Centre for Infection Research (HZI), Braunschweig (Germany). Biodegradation Research Group

    2009-03-15

    In order to obtain insights in complexity shifts taking place in natural microbial communities under strong selective pressure, soils from a former air force base in the Czech Republic, highly contaminated with jet fuel and at different stages of a bioremediation air sparging treatment, were analyzed. By tracking phospholipid fatty acids and 16S rRNA genes, a detailed monitoring of the changes in quantities and composition of the microbial communities developed at different stages of the bioventing treatment progress was performed. Depending on the length of the air sparging treatment that led to a significant reduction in the contamination level, we observed a clear shift in the soil microbial community being dominated by Pseudomonads under the harsh conditions of high aromatic contamination to a status of low aromatic concentrations, increased biomass content, and a complex composition with diverse bacterial taxonomical branches. (orig.)

  8. 施氮肥对荒漠草原土壤微生物种群及微生物量的影响%Effects of Nitrogen Fertilization on Desert Grassland Soil Microbial Population and Microbial Biomass

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郭永盛; 李俊华; 李鲁华; 危常州; 褚贵新; 王飞; 董鹏

    2011-01-01

    [Objective] The aim of the article was set to analyze the effects of nitrogen fertilization on soil microbial population and microbial biomass in desert grassland to know their response to nitrogen fertilizer and to clarify the indication effects of microorganism on environmental qualtiy change . [ Method ] The dilution plate count chloroform and fumigation - K2SO4 extraction of nitrogen were used to study the effect of nitrogen fertilization on three different environments: the microbial population and desert grassland microbial biomass carbon, microbial biomass N ( Bc, BN) . [ Result]Soil bacteria is the main specie in the soil, followed by actinomycetes and fungi is the least ; N fertilizer can significantly increase all three populations of soil rmcrobial, the ratio was increased by 13 . 5% - 427 . 6% , 7. 8% - 88. 2% and 16. 7% - 180. 6 % , respectively; N fertilizer can significantly increas microbial biomass carbon, nitrogen, the ratio was 29 .8% - 110.8% and 51.2% - 161.7% , respectively , effect of N fercilization on soil microbial populations and microbial biomass of the extent of precipitation and fertilization in the environment is related to the precipitation,the greater precipitation, the more obvious influence, the effect of fertilization is less obvious with the deepening of the soil. [ Conclusion] Nitrogen changes in soil microbial populations and SMBc, SMBN, different fertilization environment can also lead to the difference of soil microbial populations and SMBc, SMBN .%[目的]通过分析施氮肥对土壤微生物种群及微生物量,认识荒漠草原土壤微生物种群及微生物量对氮肥的响应,明确微生物对环境质量变化的指示作用.[方法]应用稀释平板计数法和氯仿熏蒸-K2SO4提取法分别研究施氮肥对三种不同环境的荒漠草原土壤微生物种群及微生物量碳、微生物量氮(Bc,BN)之间的影响.[结果]在土壤中细菌为土壤微生物的主要种群,其次

  9. Soil microbial biomass in organic farming system Biomassa microbiana do solo em sistemas orgânicos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ademir Sérgio Ferreira de Araújo

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Agricultural production systems have to combine management practices in order to sustain soil's profitability and quality. Organic farming is gaining worldwide acceptance and has been expanding at an annual rate of 20% in the last decade, accounting for over 24 million hectares worldwide. Organic practices avoid applications of synthetic fertilizers and pesticides, rely on organic inputs and recycling for nutrient supply, and emphasize cropping system design and biological processes for pest management, as defined by organic farming regulation in the world. In comparison with conventional farming, organic farming has potential benefits in improving food quality and safety. Plant production in organic farming mainly depends on nutrient release as a function of mineralization processes in soils. The build-up of a large and active soil microbial biomass is important pool of accessible nutrients, therefore, is an important priority in organic farming. In organic farming, there is positive effect of quantity and quality of inputs of organic residues on soil microbial biomass. In this way, the organic systems are extremely important for the increase of the soil fertility and the maintenance of the environmental sustainability.A produção agrícola tem de combinar práticas para prover a sustentabilidade do solo. A agricultura orgânica está ganhando aceitação mundial e cresce à taxa anual de 20% na última década, contabilizando mais de 24 milhões de hectares. As práticas orgânicas evitam o uso de fertilizantes sintéticos e pesticidas, enfatiza a aplicação de matéria orgânica, como também a reciclagem de nutrientes e de processos biológicos para manejo de pragas, através das regras dos sistemas orgânicos no mundo. Em comparação com a agricultura convencional, os sistemas orgânicos têm potencial de melhorar a qualidade e a segurança dos alimentos. A produção das plantas no sistema orgânico depende da liberação de nutrientes

  10. Long-term impact of sewage sludge application on soil microbial biomass: An evaluation using meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charlton, Alex; Sakrabani, Ruben; Tyrrel, Sean; Rivas Casado, Monica; McGrath, Steve P; Crooks, Bill; Cooper, Pat; Campbell, Colin D

    2016-12-01

    The Long-Term Sludge Experiments (LTSE) began in 1994 as part of continuing research into the effects of sludge-borne heavy metals on soil fertility. The long-term effects of Zn, Cu, and Cd on soil microbial biomass carbon (Cmic) were monitored for 8 years (1997-2005) in sludge amended soils at nine UK field sites. To assess the statutory limits set by the UK Sludge (Use in Agriculture) Regulations the experimental data has been reviewed using the statistical methods of meta-analysis. Previous LTSE studies have focused predominantly on statistical significance rather than effect size, whereas meta-analysis focuses on the magnitude and direction of an effect, i.e. the practical significance, rather than its statistical significance. The results presented here show that significant decreases in Cmic have occurred in soils where the total concentrations of Zn and Cu fall below the current UK statutory limits. For soils receiving sewage sludge predominantly contaminated with Zn, decreases of approximately 7-11% were observed at concentrations below the UK statutory limit. The effect of Zn appeared to increase over time, with increasingly greater decreases in Cmic observed over a period of 8 years. This may be due to an interactive effect between Zn and confounding Cu contamination which has augmented the bioavailability of these metals over time. Similar decreases (7-12%) in Cmic were observed in soils receiving sewage sludge predominantly contaminated with Cu; however, Cmic appeared to show signs of recovery after a period of 6 years. Application of sewage sludge predominantly contaminated with Cd appeared to have no effect on Cmic at concentrations below the current UK statutory limit. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  11. Evaluation of the microbial diversity in a horizontal-flow anaerobic immobilized biomass reactor treating linear alkylbenzene sulfonate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duarte, I C S; Oliveira, L L; Saavedra, N K D; Fantinatti-Garboggini, F; Oliveira, V M; Varesche, M B A

    2008-06-01

    The purpose of this work was to assess the degradation of linear alkylbenzene sulfonate (LAS) in a horizontal-flow anaerobic immobilized biomass (HAIB) reactor. The reactor was filled with polyurethane foam where the sludge from a sanitary sewage treatment was immobilized. The hydraulic detention time (HDT) used in the experiments was of 12 h. The reactor was fed with synthetic substrate (410 mg l(-1) of meat extract, 115 mg l(-1) of starch, 80 mg l(-1) of saccharose, 320 mg l(-1) of sodium bicarbonate and 5 ml l(-1) of salt solution) in the following stages of operation: SI-synthetic substrate, SII-synthetic substrate with 7 mg l(-1) of LAS, SIII-synthetic substrate with 14 mg l(-1) of LAS and SIV-synthetic substrate containing yeast extract (substituting meat extract) and 14 mg l(-1) of LAS, without starch. At the end of the experiment (313 days) a degradation of approximately 35% of LAS was achieved. The higher the concentration of LAS, the greater the amount of foam for its adsorption. This is necessary because the isotherm of LAS adsorption in the foam is linear for the studied concentrations (2 to 50 mg l(-1)). Microscopic analyses of the biofilm revealed diverse microbial morphologies, while Denaturing Gradient Gel Eletrophoresis (DGGE) profiling showed variations in the population of total bacteria and sulphate-reducing bacteria (SRB). The 16S rRNA gene sequencing and phylogenetic analyses revealed that the members of the order Clostridiales were the major components of the bacterial community in the last reactor operation step.

  12. Contrasting responses between vegetation and soil microbial biomass and nutrient pools may exacerbate the detrimental impacts of climate change in a semiarid shrubland ecosystem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Querejeta, José Ignacio; León-Sánchez, Lupe; Nicolás, Emilio; Prieto, Iván; Ondoño, Sara; Maestre, Fernando; García-Izquierdo, Carlos

    2017-04-01

    We conducted a 4-year manipulative experiment in a semiarid shrubland in Southeastern Spain in which we simulated the warmer and drier climate conditions forecasted for the Mediterranean Region. We evaluated the effects of warming (W), rainfall reduction (RR) and their combination (W+RR) on the performance of a native plant community, with a focus on six coexisting shrub species. Warming (W and W+RR treatments) consistently decreased net photosynthesis rates and water use efficiency across species throughout the study. Shoot dry biomass production was strongly decreased by the three climate manipulation treatments in all the target species. Leaf nutrient (N, P, K, Fe, Zn, Cu) concentrations and pool sizes in foliage were consistently decreased by warming across species, indicating reduced plant nutrient uptake and status. Plant survival rate at the end of the 4 yr. study period was also drastically decreased by experimental warming. In contrast to the strong detrimental effects of warming on plant performance, microbial biomass in rhizosphere soil increased in response to warming. However, despite increased soil microbial biomass, the activity and/or production efficiency of key microbial extracellular enzymes for soil nutrient cycling (phosphatase, urease, glycine-aminopeptidase) were significantly decreased by warming, suggesting slowed N and P mobilization and cycling rates and increased microbial immobilization, especially in the W+RR treatment. Overall, the data indicate that a warmer and drier climate could shift the competitive balance between plants and soil microbes, thereby exacerbating nutrient limitation of photosynthesis and water use efficiency, with detrimental feedback effects on vegetation productivity and cover in this dryland ecosystem.

  13. Assessment of the microbial biomass carbon, nitrogen and phosphorus in relation to physico-chemical properties of Acric Luvisols in Ibadan South West, Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adedayo Omowumi Oyedele

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Maintenance of soil quality is a key component of agriculture sustainability and there is an increase in the use of soil microbial parameters as sensitive indicators. This study aimed to determine the impact of different agricultural land uses on soil microbial biomass and also study the interrelationships between microbial biomass carbon (MBC, μgCg-1, Nitrogen (MBN, μgN g-1 and Phosphorus (MBP, μgC g-1 with the physicochemical characteristics of the soil. A total of 100 soil samples were taken from four different agricultural land uses viz., (cocoa plantation, grazed land, arable land and fallow land. Average MBC was 200.04 μgCg-1, 189.24 μgCg-1, 180.04 μgCg-1 and 129.18 μgCg-1; average MBN was 19.84 μgNg-1, 18.16 μgNg-1, 17.60 μgNg-1 and 12.74 μgNg-1 while the average MBP was 7.62 μgPg-1, 7.26 μgPg-1, 7.22 μgPg-1 and 6.40 μgPg-1 for cocoa plantation, grazed land, arable land and fallow land respectively. One-Way ANOVA showed a significant difference in microbial biomass C, N and P among the study areas. MBC, MBN and MBP were significantly correlated to the physico-chemical properties of the soil (P>0.05 under the same ecological conditions. The results may help to infer the best agricultural land-use strategies to improve soil fertility and can also be a useful indicator in evaluating soil quality and fertility.

  14. Sedimentary organic biomarkers suggest detrimental effects of PAHs on estuarine microbial biomass during the 20th century in San Francisco Bay, CA, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nilsen, Elena B.; Rosenbauer, Robert J.; Fuller, Christopher C.; Jaffe, Bruce E.

    2014-01-01

    Hydrocarbon contaminants are ubiquitous in urban aquatic ecosystems, and the ability of some microbial strains to degrade certain polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) is well established. However, detrimental effects of petroleum hydrocarbon contamination on nondegrader microbial populations and photosynthetic organisms have not often been considered. In the current study, fatty acid methyl ester (FAME) biomarkers in the sediment record were used to assess historical impacts of petroleum contamination on microbial and/or algal biomass in South San Francisco Bay, CA, USA. Profiles of saturated, branched, and monounsaturated fatty acids had similar concentrations and patterns downcore. Total PAHs in a sediment core were on average greater than 20× higher above ∼200 cm than below, which corresponds roughly to the year 1900. Isomer ratios were consistent with a predominant petroleum combustion source for PAHs. Several individual PAHs exceeded sediment quality screening values. Negative correlations between petroleum contaminants and microbial and algal biomarkers – along with high trans/cis ratios of unsaturated FA, and principle component analysis of the PAH and fatty acid records – suggest a negative impacts of petroleum contamination, appearing early in the 20th century, on microbial and/or algal ecology at the site.

  15. Soil microbial biomass and population in response to seasonal variation and age in Gmelina arborea plantations in south-western Nigeria

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jonathan C.Onyekwelu

    2012-01-01

    Abstract: We investigated the Effects of plantation development,seasons,and soil depth on soil microbial indices in Gmelina arborea plantations in south-western Nigeria.Soil samples were obtained from the soil depths of 0-15 and 15-30 cm from plantations of six different ages during the rainy season,dry seasons,and their transitions.We used plate count and fumigation-extraction methods to determine microbe population and microbial biomass carbon (MB-C) and nitrogen (MB-N),respectively.Plantation age did not affect microbial indices,implying a non-significant effect of plantation development on microbial communities.It could also imply that soil microbial indices had already stabilized in the sampled plantations.Seasonal variation and soil depth had significant effects on microbial indices.At 0-15 cm soil depth,mean MB-C increased from 50.74 μg·g-1 during the peak of the dry season (i.e.March) to 99.58 μg·g-1 during the peak of the rainy season (i.e.September),while it increased from 36.22 μg·g-1 to 75.31 μg·g-1 at 15-30 cm soil depth between the same seasonal periods.Bacteria populations and MB-N showed similar increasing trends.Correlations.between MB-C,MB-N,microbe populations,and rainfall were positive and linear.Significantly higher microbial activities took place in the plantations during the rainy season,increased with soil wetness,and decreased at greater soil depth.

  16. Thalassic biogas production from sea wrack biomass using different microbial seeds: cow manure, marine sediment and sea wrack-associated microflora.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marquez, Gian Powell B; Reichardt, Wolfgang T; Azanza, Rhodora V; Klocke, Michael; Montaño, Marco Nemesio E

    2013-04-01

    Sea wrack (dislodged sea grasses and seaweeds) was used in biogas production. Fresh water scarcity in island communities where sea wrack could accumulate led to seawater utilization as liquid substrate. Three microbial seeds cow manure (CM), marine sediment (MS), and sea wrack-associated microflora (SWA) were explored for biogas production. The average biogas produced were 2172±156 mL (MS), 1223±308 mL (SWA) and 551±126 mL (CM). Though methane potential (396.9 mL(CH4) g(-1) volatile solid) computed from sea wrack proximate values was comparable to other feedstocks, highest methane yield was low (MS=94.33 mL(CH4) g(-1) VS). Among the microbial seeds, MS proved the best microbial source in utilizing sea wrack biomass and seawater. However, salinity (MS=42‰) observed exceeded average seawater salinity (34‰). Hence, methanogenic activity could have been inhibited. This is the first report on sea wrack biomass utilization for thalassic biogas production.

  17. [Effects of nitrogen fertilization on seasonal dynamics of soil microbial biomass carbon and nitrogen in Larix gmelinii and Fraxinus mandshurica plantations].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Shu-xi; Zhao, Yan-li; Sun, Yue; Chen, Li; Wang, Zheng-quan

    2009-09-01

    This paper studied the seasonal dynamics of soil microbial biomass C (Cmic) and N (Nmic), and of bacteria (cfu(b)), fungi (cfu(f)), and actinomyces (cfu(a)) in Larix gmelinii and Fraxinus mandshurica plantations in 2007-2008 under N fertilization. The two-year averaged soil Cmic and Nmic in L. gmelinii plantation were 13.8% and 18.3% lower than those in F. mandshurica plantation, respectively, but the soil Cmic and Nmic in the two plantations had similar seasonal patterns, being the lowest in May and the highest in September. The Cmic and Nmic, and the cfu(b), cfu(r), and cfu(a), were all greater in topsoil (0-10 cm) than in subsoil (10-20 cm), but the seasonal patterns of cfu(b), cfu(f), and cfu(a), were different from those of Cmic and Nmic. N fertilization decreased the Cmic and Nmic, and the cfu(b), cfu(f), and cfu(a), significantly, with the decrements of Cmic and Nmic being 24% and 63% in L. gmelinii plantation, and 51% and 68% in F. mandshurica, respectively, which suggested that N fertilization limited soil microbial biomass and altered soil microbial communities in the two plantations.

  18. Microbial Biomass and Numbers

    OpenAIRE

    Fliessbach, A.; Widmer, F

    2005-01-01

    With growing concern about the protection of soil quality and biodiversity many countries have established regional and national programmes to monitor soil quality. This book reviews the theory and practice of a range of the various microbiological methods used within these programmes. The first section gives an overview of approaches to monitoring, evaluating and managing soil quality. The second section provides a practical handbook with detailed descriptions of the methods. The methods are...

  19. Effects of Long-Term Combined Application of Organic and Mineral Fertilizers on Microbial Biomass, Soil Enzyme Activities and Soil Fertility

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Juan; ZHAO Bing-qiang; LI Xiu-ying; JIANG Rui-bo; So Hwat Bing

    2008-01-01

    Soil health is important for the sustainable development of terrestrial ecosystem.In this paper,we studied the relationship between soil quality and soil microbial properties such as soil microbial biomass and soil enzyme activities in order to illustrate the function of soil microbial properties as bio-indicators of soil health.In this study,microbial biomass C and N contents(Cmic&Nmic),soil enzyme activities,and soil fertility with different fertilizer regimes were carried out based on a 15-year long-term fertilizer experiment in Drab Fluvo-aquic soil in Changping County,Beijing,China.At this site,7 different treatments were established in 1991.They were in a wheat-maize rotation receiving either no fertilizer(CK),mineral fertilizers(NPK),mineral fertilizers with wheat straw incorporated(NPKW),mineral fertilizers with incremental wheat straw incorporated(NPKW+),mineral fertilizers plus swine manure(NPKM),mineral fertilizers plus incremental swine manure(NPKM+)or mineral fertilizers with maize straw incorporated(NPKS).In different fertilization treatments Cmic changed from 96.49 to 500.12 mg kg-1,and Nmic changed from 35.89 to 101.82 mg kg-1.Compared with CK,the other treatments increased Cmic&Nmic,Cmic/Corg(organic C)ratios,Cmic/Nmic,urease activity,soil organic matter(SOM),soil total nitrogen(STN),and soil total phosphorus(STP).All these properties in treatment with fertilizers input NPKM+ were the highest.Meantime,long-term combined application of mineral fertilizers with organic manure or crop straw could significantly decrease the soil pH in Fluvo-aquic soil(the pH around 8.00 in this experimental soil).Some of soil microbial properties(Cmic/Nmic,urease activity)were positively correlated with soil nutrients.Cmic/Nmic was significantly correlated with SOM and STN contents.The correlation between catalase activity and soil nutrients was not significant.In addition,except of catalase activity,the soil pH in this experiment was negatively correlated with soil

  20. Biomassa microbiana em amostras de solos secadas ao ar e reumedecidas Microbial biomass in air dried and rewetted soil samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antônio Samarão Gonçalves

    2002-05-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo do trabalho foi avaliar a viabilidade do condicionamento de amostras como terra fina secada ao ar (TFSA por curto período, para a determinação do carbono da biomassa microbiana (BMS-C, pelo método da fumigaçãoextração, e verificar a respiração microbiana basal (RB do solo. O condicionamento como TFSA, procedendo-se à fumigação para a análise da BMS-C imediatamente ou 24 horas após o reumedecimento, proporcionou valores de BMS-C para os solos Podzólicos, Latossolo Vermelho-Amarelo álico e Orgânico, semelhantes aos valores dos seus controles. Os solos Glei Pouco Húmico e Vertissolo apresentaram valores de BMS-C similares aos do controle a partir de 24 horas de incubação; o solo Planossolo arenoso apresentou valores similares aos do controle com 72 horas, e a Rendizina, com 168 horas de incubação. Na maioria dos solos, a RB determinada na TFSA apresentou valores maiores do que os do tratamento-controle, quando avaliada imediatamente ou 24 horas após o reumedecimento a 60% da capacidade máxima de retenção de água, seguida de queda e manutenção em níveis semelhantes ao do controle nos períodos subseqüentes. O précondicionamento, de curta duração, como TFSA, é promissor para a determinação da BMS-C, quando níveis e períodos adequados de reumedecimento são adotados.The objective of this work was to evaluate the utilization of short term air dried soil samples in a determination of soil microbial biomass (SMB-C, by a fumigationextraction method, and soil microbial basal respiration (BR. Zero time or 24 hours rewetting incubation period before fumigation procedure gave values of SMB-C similar to those of the control for the Podzolic soils, Allic RedYellow Latosol and Organic soil. Low Humic Gley and Vertisol soils gave values of SMB-C similar to those of the control for periods of incubation equal or higher than 24 hours. Planosol (sandy soil and Rendzina soils gave values of SMB-C similar to the

  1. Signature lipid biomarkers for in situ microbial biomass, community structure and nutritional status of deep subsurface microbiota in relation to geochemical gradients. Final technical report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    White, D.C.; Ringelberg, D.B.

    1998-02-01

    To obtain a better understanding of the microbial ecology of the deep subsurface, it was necessary to employ alternate techniques for the identification of microorganisms in situ. Classical microbiological techniques assay only those organisms which are culturable with bias occurring towards the media selected. Since culturable microorganisms typically represents only 0.1 to 10% of the extant microbiota, techniques for the direct assay of microorganisms in situ were needed. The analysis of cellular lipid biomarkers is a technique whereby microbial communities can be assayed directly in a variety of environmental matrices. Through the quantitative recovery of lipid biomarkers, estimations of cell biomass, community composition and community nutritional and/or physiological status can be obtained.

  2. Soil amendment with Pseudomonas fluorescens CHA0: lasting effects on soil biological properties in soils low in microbial biomass and activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fliessbach, Andreas; Winkler, Manuel; Lutz, Matthias P; Oberholzer, Hans-Rudolf; Mäder, Paul

    2009-05-01

    Pseudomonas fluorescens strains are used in agriculture as plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR). Nontarget effects of released organisms should be analyzed prior to their large-scale use, and methods should be available to sensitively detect possible changes in the environments the organism is released to. According to ecological theory, microbial communities with a greater diversity should be less susceptible to disturbance by invading organisms. Based on this principle, we laid out a pot experiment with field-derived soils different in their microbial biomass and activity due to long-term management on similar parent geological material (loess). We investigated the survival of P. fluorescens CHA0 that carried a resistance toward rifampicin and the duration of potential changes of the soil microflora caused by the inoculation with the bacterium at the sowing date of spring wheat. Soil microbial biomass (C(mic), N(mic)) basal soil respiration (BR), qCO(2), dehydrogenase activity (DHA), bacterial plate counts, mycorrhiza root colonization, and community level substrate utilization were analyzed after 18 and 60 days. At the initial stage, soils were clearly different with respect to most of the parameters measured, and a time-dependent effect between the first and the second set point were attributable to wheat growth and the influence of roots. The effect of the inoculum was small and merely transient, though significant long-term changes were found in soils with a relatively low level of microbial biomass. Community level substrate utilization as an indicator of changes in microbial community structure was mainly changed by the growth of wheat, while other experimental factors were negligible. The sensitivity of the applied methods to distinguish the experimental soils was in decreasing order N(mic), DHA, C(mic), and qCO(2). Besides the selective enumeration of P. fluorescens CHA0 rif(+), which was only found in amended soils, methods to distinguish the

  3. Abundance, biomass and size structure of the microbial assemblage in the high mountain lake Gossenköllesee (Tyrol, Austria during the ice-free period

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roland PSENNER

    1999-08-01

    Full Text Available The abundance, biomass and morphology of the microbial components (picocyanobacteria, heterotrophic bacteria, heterotrophic and autotrophic nanoflagellates, ciliates of the pelagic food web of Gossenköllesee were investigated over two summer periods. The density of bacteria remained relatively stable not only over time but also in vertical profiles (2.5-5.5x105 cells ml-1. Bacterial biomass ranged between 35 to 63 mgC m-2 (5.4-15.3 μgC l-1. Small rod shaped bacteria with mean cell volumes of ~0.05 μm3 dominated numerically but filamentous forms (longer than 10 μm, mainly found in the upper water layers, amounting to more than 65% of the total bacterial biomass, increased the mean cell volume up to 0.27 μm3 (SD=0.88. Bacterial biomass represented between 48 and 86% of the total microbial biomass (40 - 90 mgC m-2, however at 8 m depth the biomass of heterotrophic flagellates (HNF reached up to 26 mgC m-3 (2,852 cells ml-1. From 0-4 m depth small spherical HNF species with cell volumes 3 were dominant, whereas in deeper water layers large flagellates with cell volumes >50 μm3 dominated throughout the sampling period. Ciliate abundance was low in the upper part of the water column. Only Askenasia chlorelligera and Urotricha cf pelagica occurred with numbers of up to 1,500 cells l-1. At 8 m depth, Balanion planctonicum was the dominant species throughout the study period reaching numbers of up to 16,000 cells l-1. Ciliate abundance was significantly correlated with chlorophyll-a concentrations (rs=0.55, p <0.01 confirming the algivory of the dominant species. No significant correlation was found between the parameters of chlorophylla, bacteria and HNF but the abundance of ciliates was negatively correlated with the length of bacteria (rs= -0.41, p <0.05.

  4. Effects of slow-release urea fertilizers on urease activity,microbial biomass, and nematode communities in an aquic brown soil

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIAO; Xiaoguang; LIANG; Wenju; CHEN; Lijun; ZHANG; Haijun

    2005-01-01

    A field experiment was carried out at the Shenyang Experimental Station of Ecology (CAS) in order to study the effects of slow-release urea fertilizers high polymer-coated urea (SRU1), SRU1 mixed with dicyandiamide DCD (SRU2), and SRU1 mixed with calcium carbide CaC2 (SRU3) on urease activity, microbial biomass C and N, and nematode communities in an aquic brown soil during the maize growth period. The results demonstrated that the application of slow-release urea fertilizers inhibits soil urease activity and increases the soil NH4+-N content.Soil available N increment could promote its immobilization by microorganisms. Determination of soil microbial biomass N indicated that a combined application of coated urea and nitrification inhibitors increased the soil active N pool. The population of predators/omnivores indicated that treatment with SRU2 could provide enough soil NH4+-N to promote maize growth and increased the food resource for the soil fauna compared with the other treatments.

  5. Cultivation of high-biomass crops on coal mine spoil banks: Can microbial inoculation compensate for high doses of organic matter?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gryndler, M.; Sudova, R.; Puschel, D.; Rydlova, J.; Janouskova, M.; Vosatka, M. [Academy of Science Czech Republic, Pruhonice (Czech Republic)

    2008-09-15

    Two greenhouse experiments were focused on the application of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) and plant growth promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR) in planting of high-biomass crops on reclaimed spoil banks. In the first experiment, we tested the effects of different organic amendments on growth of alfalfa and on the introduced microorganisms. While growth of plants was supported in substrate with compost amendment, mycorrhizal colonization was suppressed. Lignocellulose papermill waste had no negative effects on AMF, but did not positively affect growth of plants. The mixture of these two amendments was found to be optimal in both respects, plant growth and mycorrhizal development. Decreasing doses of this mixture amendment were used in the second experiment, where the effects of microbial inoculation (assumed to compensate for reduced doses of organic matter) on growth of two high-biomass crops, hemp and reed canarygrass, were studied. Plant growth response to microbial inoculation was either positive or negative, depending on the dose of the applied amendment and plant species.

  6. Seasonal variation in soil microbial biomass carbon and nitrogen in an artificial sand-binding vegetation area in Shapotou, northern China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YuYan Zhou; XuanMing Zhang; XiaoHong Jia; JinQin Ma; YanHong Gao

    2013-01-01

    In this study, seasonal variation characteristics of surface soil microbial biomass carbon (MBC) and soil microbial biomass nitrogen (MBN) of an artificial vegetation area located in Shapotou for different time periods were studied using the chloroform fumigation method, and the results were compared with those of near-natural vegetation areas and mobile dunes. Results showed that the MBC and MBN levels in the 0-5 cm soil layer were higher in autumn than in summer and spring. As the prolongation of vegetation restoration raised the MBC and MBN levels in summer and autumn, no clear variation was found in spring. However, the MBC and MBN in 5-20 cm had no obvious seasonal variation. During summer and autumn, the variation trend of MBC and MBN in the vertical direction was shown to be 0-5>5-10>10-20 cm in the vegetation area, while for mobile dunes, the MBC and MBN levels increased as the depth increased. The natural vegetation area was shown to possess the highest MBC and MBN levels, and yet mobile dunes have the lowest MBC and MBN levels. MBC and MBN levels in artificial sand-binding vegetation increased with the prolongation of vegetation restoration, indicating that the succession of sand-binding vegetation will result in the ac-cumulation of soil carbon and nitrogen, as well as the restoration of soil fertility.

  7. Cultivation of high-biomass crops on coal mine spoil banks: can microbial inoculation compensate for high doses of organic matter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gryndler, Milan; Sudová, Radka; Püschel, David; Rydlová, Jana; Janousková, Martina; Vosátka, Miroslav

    2008-09-01

    Two greenhouse experiments were focused on the application of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) and plant growth promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR) in planting of high-biomass crops on reclaimed spoil banks. In the first experiment, we tested the effects of different organic amendments on growth of alfalfa and on the introduced microorganisms. While growth of plants was supported in substrate with compost amendment, mycorrhizal colonization was suppressed. Lignocellulose papermill waste had no negative effects on AMF, but did not positively affect growth of plants. The mixture of these two amendments was found to be optimal in both respects, plant growth and mycorrhizal development. Decreasing doses of this mixture amendment were used in the second experiment, where the effects of microbial inoculation (assumed to compensate for reduced doses of organic matter) on growth of two high-biomass crops, hemp and reed canarygrass, were studied. Plant growth response to microbial inoculation was either positive or negative, depending on the dose of the applied amendment and plant species.

  8. Responses of soil microbial biomass and bacterial community structure to closed-off management (an ecological natural restoration measures): A case study of Dongting Lake wetland, middle China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Juan; Wu, Haipeng; Zhang, Chang; Zeng, Guangming; Liang, Jie; Guo, Shenglian; Li, Xiaodong; Huang, Lu; Lu, Lunhui; Yuan, Yujie

    2016-09-01

    Soil microbial biomass (SMB) and bacterial community structure, which are critical to global ecosystem and fundamental ecological processes, are sensitive to anthropogenic activities and environmental conditions. In this study, we examined the possible effects of closed-off management (an ecological natural restoration measures, ban on anthropogenic activity, widely employed for many important wetlands) on SMB, soil bacterial community structure and functional marker genes of nitrogen cycling in Dongting Lake wetland. Soil samples were collected from management area (MA) and contrast area (CA: human activities, such as hunting, fishing and draining, are permitted) in November 2013 and April 2014. Soil properties, microbial biomass carbon (MBC), and bacterial community structure were investigated. Comparison of the values of MA and CA showed that SMB and bacterial community diversity of the MA had a significant increase after 7 years closed-off management. The mean value of Shannon-Weiner diversity index of MA and CA respectively were 2.85 and 2.07. The gene copy numbers of 16S rRNA and nosZ of MA were significant higher than those of CA. the gene copy numbers of ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA) and nirK of MA were significant lower than those of CA. However, there was no significant change in the gene copy numbers of ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) and nirS.

  9. Microbial biomass and basal respiration of selected Sub-Antarctic and Antarctic soils in the areas of some Russian polar stations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abakumov, E.; Mukhametova, N.

    2014-07-01

    Antarctica is a unique place for soil, biological, and ecological investigations. Soils of Antarctica have been studied intensively during the last century, when different national Antarctic expeditions visited the sixth continent with the aim of investigating nature and the environment. Antarctic investigations are comprised of field surveys mainly in the terrestrial landscapes, where the polar stations of different countries are situated. That is why the main and most detailed soil surveys were conducted in the McMurdo Valleys, Transantarctic Mountains, South Shetland Islands, Larsemann Hills and the Schirmacher Oasis. Our investigations were conducted during the 53rd and 55th Russian Antarctic expeditions in the base of soil pits, and samples were collected in Sub-Antarctic and Antarctic regions. Sub-Antarctic or maritime landscapes are considered to be very different from Antarctic landscapes due to differing climatic and geogenic conditions. Soils of diverse zonal landscapes were studied with the aim of assessing the microbial biomass level, basal respiration rates and metabolic activity of microbial communities. This investigation shows that Antarctic soils are quite diverse in profile organization and carbon content. In general, Sub-Antarctic soils are characterized by more developed humus (sod) organo-mineral horizons as well as by an upper organic layer. The most developed organic layers were revealed in peat soils of King George Island, where its thickness reach, in some cases, was 80 cm. These soils as well as soils formed under guano are characterized by the highest amount of total organic carbon (TOC), between 7.22 and 33.70%. Coastal and continental Antarctic soils exhibit less developed Leptosols, Gleysols, Regolith and rare Ornhitosol, with TOC levels between 0.37 and 4.67%. The metabolic ratios and basal respiration were higher in Sub-Antarctic soils than in Antarctic ones, which can be interpreted as a result of higher amounts of fresh organic

  10. Impact of land-use and long-term (>150 years) charcoal accumulation on microbial activity, biomass and community structure in temperate soils (Belgium).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardy, Brieuc; Cornelis, Jean-Thomas; Dufey, Joseph E.

    2015-04-01

    In the last decade, biochar has been increasingly investigated as a soil amendment for long-term soil carbon sequestration while improving soil fertility. On the short term, biochar application to soil generally increases soil respiration as well as microbial biomass and activity and affects significantly the microbial community structure. However, such effects are relatively short-term and tend to vanish over time. In our study, we investigated the long-term impact of charcoal accumulation and land-use on soil biota in temperate haplic Luvisols developed in the loess belt of Wallonia (Belgium). Charcoal-enriched soils were collected in the topsoil of pre-industrial (>150 years old) charcoal kilns in forest (4 sites) and cropland (5 sites). The topsoil of the adjacent charcoal-unaffected soils was sampled in a comparable way. Soils were characterized (pH, total, organic and inorganic C, total N, exchangeable Ca, Mg, K, Na, cation exchange capacity and available P) and natural soil organic matter (SOM) and black carbon (BC) contents were determined by differential scanning calorimetry. After rewetting at pF 2.5, soils were incubated during 140 days at 20 °C. At 70 days of incubation, 10 g of each soil were freeze dried in order to measure total microbial biomass and community structure by PLFA analysis. The PLFA dataset was analyzed by principal component analysis (PCA) while soil parameters were used as supplementary variables. For both agricultural and forest soils, the respiration rate is highly related to the total microbial biomass (R²=0.90). Both soil respiration and microbial biomass greatly depend on the SOM content, which indicates that the BC pool is relatively inert microbiologically. Land-use explains most of the variance in the PLFA dataset, largely governing the first principal component of the ACP. In forest soils, we observe a larger proportion of gram + bacteria, actinomycetes and an increased bacteria:fungi ratio compared to cropland, where gram

  11. Effect of Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Fungi on Plant Biomass and the Rhizosphere Microbial Community Structure of Mesquite Grown in Acidic Lead/Zinc Mine Tailings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solís-Domínguez, Fernando A.; Valentín-Vargas, Alexis; Chorover, Jon; Maier, Raina M.

    2011-01-01

    Mine tailings in arid and semi-arid environments are barren of vegetation and subject to eolian dispersion and water erosion. Revegetation is a cost-effective strategy to reduce erosion processes and has wide public acceptance. A major cost of revegetation is the addition of amendments, such as compost, to allow plant establishment. In this paper we explore whether arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) can help support plant growth in tailings at a reduced compost concentration. A greenhouse experiment was performed to determine the effects of three AMF inocula on biomass, shoot accumulation of heavy metals, and changes in the rhizosphere microbial community structure of the native plant Prosopis juliflora (mesquite). Plants were grown in an acidic lead/zinc mine tailings amended with 10% (w/w) compost amendment, which is slightly sub-optimal for plant growth in these tailings. After two months, AMF-inoculated plants showed increased dry biomass and root length (p tailings. Mesquite shoot tissue lead and zinc concentrations did not exceed domestic animal toxicity limits regardless of whether AMF inoculation was used. The rhizosphere microbial community structure was assessed using denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) profiles of the small subunit RNA gene for bacteria and fungi. Canonical correspondence analysis (CCA) of DGGE profiles showed that the rhizosphere fungal community structure at the end of the experiment was significantly different from the community structure in the tailings, compost, and AMF inocula prior to planting. Further, CCA showed that AMF inoculation significantly influenced the development of both the fungal and bacterial rhizosphere community structures after two months. The changes observed in the rhizosphere microbial community structure may be either a direct effect of the AMF inocula, caused by changes in plant physiology induced by AMF, or a combination of both mechanisms. PMID:21211826

  12. Effect of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi on plant biomass and the rhizosphere microbial community structure of mesquite grown in acidic lead/zinc mine tailings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solís-Domínguez, Fernando A; Valentín-Vargas, Alexis; Chorover, Jon; Maier, Raina M

    2011-02-15

    Mine tailings in arid and semi-arid environments are barren of vegetation and subject to eolian dispersion and water erosion. Revegetation is a cost-effective strategy to reduce erosion processes and has wide public acceptance. A major cost of revegetation is the addition of amendments, such as compost, to allow plant establishment. In this paper we explore whether arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) can help support plant growth in tailings at a reduced compost concentration. A greenhouse experiment was performed to determine the effects of three AMF inocula on biomass, shoot accumulation of heavy metals, and changes in the rhizosphere microbial community structure of the native plant Prosopis juliflora (mesquite). Plants were grown in an acidic lead/zinc mine tailings amended with 10% (w/w) compost amendment, which is slightly sub-optimal for plant growth in these tailings. After two months, AMF-inoculated plants showed increased dry biomass and root length (p<0.05) and effective AMF colonization compared to controls grown in uninoculated compost-amended tailings. Mesquite shoot tissue lead and zinc concentrations did not exceed domestic animal toxicity limits regardless of whether AMF inoculation was used. The rhizosphere microbial community structure was assessed using denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) profiles of the small subunit RNA gene for bacteria and fungi. Canonical correspondence analysis (CCA) of DGGE profiles showed that the rhizosphere fungal community structure at the end of the experiment was significantly different from the community structure in the tailings, compost, and AMF inocula prior to planting. Further, CCA showed that AMF inoculation significantly influenced the development of both the fungal and bacterial rhizosphere community structures after two months. The changes observed in the rhizosphere microbial community structure may be either a direct effect of the AMF inocula, caused by changes in plant physiology induced by

  13. [Effects of long-term fertilization on microbial biomass carbon and nitrogen and on carbon source utilization of microbes in a red soil].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Feng-xia; Zhang, Wei-hua; Xu, Ming-gang; Zhang, Wen-ju; Li, Zhao-qiang; Zhang, Jing-ye

    2010-11-01

    In order to explore the effects of long-term fertilization on the microbiological characters of red soil, soil samples were collected from a 19-year long-term experimental field in Qiyang of Hunan, with their microbial biomass carbon (MBC) and nitrogen (MBN) and microbial utilization ratio of carbon sources analyzed. The results showed that after 19-year fertilization, the soil MBC and MBN under the application of organic manure and of organic manure plus inorganic fertilizers were 231 and 81 mg x kg(-1) soil, and 148 and 73 mg x kg(-1) soil, respectively, being significantly higher than those under non-fertilization, inorganic fertilization, and inorganic fertilization plus straw incorporation. The ratio of soil MBN to total N under the application of organic manure and of organic manure plus inorganic fertilizers was averagely 6.0%, significantly higher than that under non-fertilization and inorganic fertilization. Biolog-ECO analysis showed that the average well color development (AWCD) value was in the order of applying organic manure plus inorganic fertilizers = applying organic manure > non-fertilization > inorganic fertilization = inorganic fertilization plus straw incorporation. Under the application of organic manure or of organic manure plus inorganic fertilizers, the microbial utilization rate of carbon sources, including carbohydrates, carboxylic acids, amino acids, polymers, phenols, and amines increased; while under inorganic fertilization plus straw incorporation, the utilization rate of polymers was the highest, and that of carbohydrates was the lowest. Our results suggested that long-term application of organic manure could increase the red soil MBC, MBN, and microbial utilization rate of carbon sources, improve soil fertility, and maintain a better crop productivity.

  14. Effects of heavy metals contained in soil irrigated with a mixture of sewage sludge and effluent for thirty years on soil microbial biomass and plant growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katanda, Y.; Mushonga, C.; Banganayi, F.; Nyamangara, J.

    The use of sewage effluent as a source of nutrients and water in peri-urban crop production is widespread in developing countries. A study was conducted in 2005 at Crowborough and Firle farms (near Harare) to assess effect of Cd on microbial biomass and activity, effect of sewage sludge and effluent on soybean (Glycine max L (Merr)) nodulation, and uptake of Zn and Cu by lettuce ( Lactuca sativa L.), mustard rape ( Brassica juncea L.), covo ( Brassica napus) and star grass ( Cynodon nlemfuensis). The soil that was used had been irrigated with sewage sludge and effluent for 30 years. Soil collected from Crowborough farm was enriched with Cd to different concentrations (0.4-5 mg Cd kg -1 soil) using Cd(NO 3) 2 and microbial biomass C and N (chloroform-incubation extraction) and respiration rates (CO 2 evolution) determined. A similar experiment to determine the effect of repeated addition of small amounts of Cd to soil over time on the same parameters was conducted. Three vegetables and star grass were grown in a pot experiment and harvested at six weeks after transplanting for the determination of above ground dry matter yield, and Zn and Cu, uptake. In another pot experiment, two soybean varieties, Magoye and Solitaire, were harvested after eight weeks and nodule number and effectiveness, and above ground dry matter yield were then determined. Cd significantly decreased biomass C (68%) and N (73%). Microbial respiration also significantly decreased. It was concluded that long-term application of sewage sludge and effluent to soil has negative effects on soil micro organisms, including Rhizobia. These micro organisms are essential for N-fixation. The damage to Rhizobia, caused diminished nodulation of soybean. Mustard rape and lettuce can accumulate Zn and Cu beyond toxic limits without apparent reduction in growth thereby posing a serious concern to the food chain. The consumption of mustard rape and lettuce grown on soil amended with sewage sludge and effluent at

  15. Pelvic Floor Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... NICHD Research Information Clinical Trials Resources and Publications Pelvic Floor Disorders: Condition Information Skip sharing on social media links Share this: Page Content What is the pelvic floor? The term "pelvic floor" refers to the group ...

  16. Thermophilic and cellulolytic consortium isolated from composting plants improves anaerobic digestion of cellulosic biomass: Toward a microbial resource management approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinet, R; Destain, J; Hiligsmann, S; Thonart, P; Delhalle, L; Taminiau, B; Daube, G; Delvigne, F

    2015-01-01

    A cellulolytic consortium was isolated from a composting plant in order to boost the initial hydrolysis step encountered in anaerobic digestion. Improvement of the cellulose degradation, as well as biogas production, was observed for the cultures inoculated with the exogenous consortium. Metagenomics analyses pointed out a weak richness (related to the number of OTUs) of the exogenous consortium induced by the selective pressure (cellulose as sole carbon source) met during the initial isolation steps. Main microbial strains determined were strictly anaerobic and belong to the Clostridia class. During cellulose anaerobic degradation, pH drop induced a strong modification of the microbial population. Despite the fact that richness and evenness were very weak, the exogenous consortium was able to adapt and to maintain the cellulolytic degradation potential. This important result point out the fact that simplified microbial communities could be used in order to increase the robustness of mixed cultures involved in environmental biotechnology. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Monitoring Subsurface Microbial Biomass, Community Composition and Physiological Status during Biological Uranium Reduction with Acetate Addition using Lipid Analysis, DNA Arrays and q-PCR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peacock, A. D.; Long, P. E.; N'Guessan, L.; Williams, K. H.; Chandler, D.

    2011-12-01

    Our objectives for this effort were to investigate microbial community dynamics during each of the distinct terminal electron accepting phases that occur during long-term acetate addition for the immobilization of Uranium. Groundwater was collected from four wells (one up gradient and three down gradient) at three different depths and at four different times (pre-acetate injection, peak iron reduction, iron/sulfate reduction transition and during heavy sulfate reduction). Phospholipid fatty acid analysis (PLFA) results from ground water showed that microbial biomass was highest during Iron reduction and then lower during the transition from Iron reduction to Sulfate reduction and lowest during Sulfate reduction. Microbial community composition parameters as measured by PLFA showed distinct differences with terminal electron accepting status. Monounsaturated PLFA that have been shown to correspond with Gram-negative bacteria and Geobacteracea increased markedly with Iron reduction and then decreased with the onset of sulfate reduction. Bacterial physiological stress levels as measured by PLFA fluctuated with terminal electron acceptor status. Low bacterial stress levels coincided with pre-donor addition and Iron reduction but were much higher during Iron to Sulfate transition and during Sulfate reduction. Microarray results showed the expected progression of microbial signatures from Iron to Sulfate -reducers with changes in acetate amendment and in situ field conditions. The microarray response for Geobacter was highly correlated with qPCR for the same target gene (R2 = 0.84). Probes targeting Desulfobacter and Desulfitobacterium were the most reactive during the Iron to Sulfate transition and into Sulfate reduction, with a consistent Desulfotomaculum signature throughout the field experiment and a general decrease in Geobacter signal to noise ratios during the onset of Sulfate reducing conditions. Nitrate reducers represented by Dechloromonas and Dechlorosoma

  18. Influence of forage sorghum systems under different tillage practices on microbial biomass and soil C/N pools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorghum has become a popular annual forage and silage crop in the Southern Great Plains. Most sorghum hybrids require higher nitrogen fertilization for sustainable biomass production and subsequent removal for grazing or hay. Higher nitrogen application and monoculture sorghum systems can negatively...

  19. Introductory guide to floors and flooring

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Billingham, PA

    1977-01-01

    Full Text Available ........................................................................ Soft floor coverings 39 Carpets ......................................................................................... 40 Laying carpets ............................................................................. 44 Wooden floors... the glue that holds the finish, causing woodwork to swell and some carpets to rot. It can carry with it dissolved salts from thesoil and thegarden and deposit theseon the floor, spoiling the finish and even flaking stonework. Water vapour can sometimes...

  20. Temporal variations in microbial biomass C and cellulolytic enzyme activity in arable soils: effects of organic matter input

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Debosz, K.; Rasmussen, Peter Have; Pedersen, A. R.

    1999-01-01

    -OM). The cultivation systems differed in whether their source of fertiliser was mainly mineral or organic, in whether a winter cover crop was grown, and whether straw was mulched or removed. Sampling occurred at approximately monthly intervals, over a period of two years. Distinct temporal variations in microbial...

  1. Evaluation of optimum roughage to concentrate ratio in maize stover based complete rations for efficient microbial biomass production using in vitro gas production technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Ramana Reddy

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Aim: A study was undertaken to evaluate the optimum roughage to concentrate ratio in maize stover (MS based complete diets for efficient microbial biomass production (EMBP using in vitro gas production technique. Materials and Methods: MS based complete diets with roughage to concentrate ratio of 100:0, 90:10, 80:20, 70:30, 60:40, 50:50, 40:60, and 30:70 were formulated, and 200 mg of oven-dried sample was incubated in water bath at 39°C along with media (rumen liquor [RL] - buffer in in vitro gas syringes to evaluate the gas production. The gas produced was recorded at 8 and 24 h of inc ubation. In vitro organic matter digestibility (IVOMD, metabolizable energy (ME, truly digestible organic matter (TDOM, partitioning factor (PF, and EMBP were calculated using appropriate formulae. Ammonia nitrogen and total volatile fatty acids (TVFAs production were analyzed in RL fluid-media mixture after 24 h of incubation. Results: In vitro gas production (ml at 24 h incubation, IVOMD, ME, TDOM, TVFA concentration, and ammonia nitrogen production were increased (p<0.01 in proportion to the increase in the level of concentrate in the diet. Significantly (p<0.01 higher PF and EMBP was noticed in total mixed ration with roughage to concentrate ratio of 60:40 and 50:50 followed by 70:30 and 40:60. Conclusion: Based on the results, it was concluded that the MS can be included in complete rations for ruminants at the level of 50-60% for better microbial biomass synthesis which in turn influences the performance of growing sheep.

  2. IN VITRO FERMENTABILITY, DEGRADABILITY AND MICROBIAL BIOMASS PRODUCT OF COMPLETE RATION CONTAINING A COMBINATION OF FIELD GRASS, CONCENTRATE AND NUTRIENT RICH SUPPLEMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D.S. Wahyuni

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this experiment was to obtain an optimum combination between field grass,concentrate and Nutrient Rich Supplement (NRS based on in vitro study using Hohenheim gas test. Theexperimental diets were: R1 (control diet = 70% field grass + 30% concentrate, R2 (70% field grass +25% concentrate + 5% NRS, R3 (70% field grass + 20% concentrate + 10% NRS and R4 (70% fieldgrass + 15% concentrate + 15% NRS. A randomized block design with four treatments and fourreplications was carried out. Buffalo rumen fluid was taken in different time and was used as block orreplication. Data were analyzed by Analysis of Variance (ANOVA. Significant differences amongtreatments were determined by contrast orthogonal. The results showed that total gas production andtotal VFA concentration were highest (P<0.05 in R4 among the treatments. Addition of 15% NRS incomplete ration (R4 increased NH3 concentration 10.34%. Addition of 10% NRS and 15% NRS incomplete ration (R3 and R4 improved the microbial biomass product compared to control and 5% NRSin complete ration (R1 and R2. Dry matter (DM and organic matter (OM degradability weresignificantly higher (P<0.01 in 10% NRS and 5% NRS in complete ration (R3 and R2 compared tocontrol and 15% NRS in complete ration (R1 and R4. It was concluded that combination between 70%field grass, 20% concentrate and 10% NRS in complete ration (R3 was more optimal for improving gasproduction, total VFA, NH3 concentration, microbial biomass product, dry matter degradability andorganic matter degradability, compared to control ration.

  3. Compound-specific 15N stable isotope probing of N assimilation by the soil microbial biomass: a new methodological paradigm in soil N cycling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charteris, A. F.; Knowles, T. D. J.; Michaelides, K.; Evershed, R. P.

    2015-10-01

    A compound-specific nitrogen-15 stable isotope probing (15N-SIP) technique is described which allows investigation of the fate of inorganic- or organic-N amendments to soils. The technique uses gas chromatography-combustion-isotope ratio mass spectrometry (GC-C-IRMS) to determine the δ15N values of individual amino acids (AAs; determined as N-acetyl, O-isopropyl derivatives) as proxies of biomass protein production. The δ15N values are used together with AA concentrations to quantify N assimilation of 15N-labelled substrates by the soil microbial biomass. The utility of the approach is demonstrated through incubation experiments using inorganic 15N-labelled substrates ammonium (15NH4+) and nitrate (15NO3-) and an organic 15N-labelled substrate, glutamic acid (15N-Glu). Assimilation of all the applied substrates was undetectable based on bulk soil properties, i.e. % total N (% TN), bulk soil N isotope composition and AA concentrations, all of which remained relatively constant throughout the incubation experiments. In contrast, compound-specific AA δ15N values were highly sensitive to N assimilation, providing qualitative and quantitative insights into the cycling and fate of the applied 15N-labelled substrates. The utility of this 15N-AA-SIP technique is considered in relation to other currently available methods for investigating the microbially-mediated assimilation of nitrogenous substrates into the soil organic N pool. This approach will be generally applicable to the study of N cycling in any soil, or indeed, in any complex ecosystem.

  4. Effect of incorporation of walnut cake (Juglans regia in concentrate mixture on degradation of dry matter, organic matter and production of microbial biomass in vitro in goat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohsin Ahmad Mir

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Aim: This study was carried out to investigate the effect of incorporation of different level of walnut cake in concentrate mixture on in vitro dry matter degradation in order to determine its level of supplementation in ruminant ration. Materials and Methods: Walnut cake was used @ 0, 10, 15, 20, 25 and 30% level to formulate an iso-nitrogenous concentrate mixtures and designated as T1, T2, T3, T4, T5 and T6 respectively. The different formulae of concentrate mixtures were used for in vitro gas production studies using goat rumen liquor with wheat straw in 40:60 ratio. Proximate composition, fiber fractionation and calcium and phosphrous content of walnut cake were estimated. Result: The per cent IVDMD value of T1 and T2 diets was 68.42 ± 1.20 and 67.25 ± 1.37 respectively which was found highest (P<0.05 T3, T4, T5 and T6. Similar trend was also found for TDOM and MBP. Inclusion of walnut cake at 10% level in the concentrate mixture does not affect in vitro dry matter digestibility (IVDMD, truly degradable organic matter (TDOM, mg/200 mg DM, total gas production, microbial biomass production (MBP and efficiency of microbial biomass production (EMP. Conclusion: It is concluded that walnut cake incorporation up to 10% level in the iso -nitrogenous concentrate mixture has no any negative effect on in vitro digestibility of dry matter (DM, TDOM, MBP, EMP and total gas production in goat.

  5. Effects of land use pattern on soil microbial biomass carbon m Xishuangbanna%土地利用方式对西双版纳热带森林土壤微生物生物量碳的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    方丽娜; 杨效东; 杜杰

    2011-01-01

    In January 2006 - September 2007 , a controlled litter-removal and root-cutting experiment was conducted to study the effects of different land use patterns ( secondary forest or rubber plantation) on soil microbial biomass carbon in Xishuangbanna. China. After the secondary forest converted into rubber plantation . soil nutrient contents and plant carbon input decreased obviously , and soil microbial biomass carbon had a significant decrease. These two forest types had a higher soil microbial biomass carbon in rainy season than in dry season. In secondary forest, soil microbial biomass carbon was significantly positively correlated with soil temperature; while in rubber plantation. the microbial biomass carbon was positively correlated with soil moisture. In secondary forest,soil microbial biomass carbon was controlled by the nutrient inputs from plant roots. but less affected by litter amount. Also in secondary forest, soil microbial biomass carbon was significantly positively correlated with fine-root biomass and its C and N inputs. In rubber plantation. both the fineroot biomass and its C and N inputs and the litter amount had lesser effects on soil microbial biomass carbon. These results suggested that planting rubber induced the decreases of soil nutrient contents and pH value. and. added with serious artificial disturbances. reduced the soil microbial biomass carbon and changed its controlling factors. which in turn would affect other soil ecological processes.%2006年1月至2007年9月,通过去除凋落物和切根控制试验,研究了热带森林不同土地利用方式(次生林/橡胶林)对西双版纳热带森林土壤微生物生物量碳的影响.结果表明:次生林转变为橡胶林后,土壤养分及植物碳输入均明显减少,土壤微生物生物量碳显著降低;两种林型雨季土壤微生物生物量碳均高于干季,其中次生林土壤微生物生物量碳与土壤温度呈显著正相关,而橡胶林则与土壤湿度呈正相

  6. Effects of Different Long-term Fertilizer Managements on Microbial Biomass Carbon, Microbial Biomass Nitrogen and Microbial Quotient in Paddy Soil during Barley Growth Periods%长期施肥对大麦生育期双季稻田土壤微生物生物量碳、氮和微生物商的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    唐海明; 郭立君; 肖小平; 汤文光; 孙继民; 汪柯; 李微艳

    2015-01-01

    Fertilizer inputs is the most important agricultural management practice affecting soil carbon and nitrogen content. Moreover, soil carbon and nitrogen provide a direct source for soil organisms. In China, only few studies have been conducted on the influence of long-term fertilizer and organic matter with fertilizer application on the soil microbiological properties. Our objective was to explore the characteristics of soil microbial biomass carbon (w(SMBC)), soil microbial biomass nitrogen (w(SMBN)) and soil microbial quotient in paddy soil during barley (Hordaum vulgare L.) growth periods with different long−term fertilizer managements in the double cropping rice system, we analyzed thew(SMBC),w(SMBN), soil microbial quotient and grain yield of barley by using mineral fertilizer alone (MF), rice residues plus mineral fertilizer (RF), 30% organic matter and 70% mineral fertilizer (OM1), 60% organic matter and 40% mineral fertilizer (OM2), and without fertilizer (CK). The long-term experiment was set up in 1986 in Ningxiang county, Hunan province, China. The results showed that different fertilization managements on paddy soil over the 28 years significantly affected soil chemical and microbial properties. That is, thew(SMBC),w(SMBN) and soil microbial quotient in paddy soil were increased by long-term fertilizer managements during barley growth periods. Meanwhile, thew(SMBC),w(SMBN) and soil microbial quotient reached the maximum at heading stage of barley. The activities ofw(SMBC) were increased by 20.04%, 26.47%, 45.94% and 51.42% with MF, RF, OM1 and OM2 at heading stage of barley, and the activities ofw(SMBN) were increased by 12.87%, 18.42%, 32.16 % and 36.55% with MF, RF, OM1 and OM2 at heading stage of barley compared with the CK, respectively. Furthermore, thew(SMBC),w(SMBN) and soil microbial quotient with OM1 and OM2 was significantly higher than that of MF, RF, CK at the main growth stages of barley. And thew(SMBC),w(SMBN) and soil microbial quotient

  7. Organic carbon, influent microbial diversity and temperature strongly influence algal diversity and biomass in raceway ponds treating raw municipal wastewater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Dae-Hyun; Ramanan, Rishiram; Heo, Jina; Kang, Zion; Kim, Byung-Hyuk; Ahn, Chi-Yong; Oh, Hee-Mock; Kim, Hee-Sik

    2015-09-01

    Algae based wastewater treatment coupled to biofuel production has financial benefits and practical difficulties. This study evaluated the factors influencing diversity and growth of indigenous algal consortium cultivated on untreated municipal wastewater in a high rate algal pond (HRAP) for a period of 1 year using multivariate statistics. Diversity analyses revealed the presence of Chlorophyta, Cyanophyta and Bacillariophyta. Dominant microalgal genera by biovolume in various seasons were Scenedesmus sp., Microcystis sp., and Chlorella sp. Scenedesmus sp., persisted throughout the year but none of three strains co-dominated with the other. The most significant factors affecting genus dominance were temperature, inflow cyanophyta and organic carbon concentration. Cyanophyta concentration affected microalgal biomass and diversity, whereas temperature impacted biomass. Preferred diversity of microalgae is not sustained in wastewater systems but is obligatory for biofuel production. This study serves as a guideline to sustain desired microalgal consortium in wastewater treatment plants for biofuel production.

  8. Factors Controlling Soil Microbial Biomass and Bacterial Diversity and Community Composition in a Cold Desert Ecosystem: Role of Geographic Scale

    OpenAIRE

    Horn, David J. van; Lee Van Horn, M.; Barrett, John E.; Gooseff, Michael N.; Altrichter, Adam E; Geyer, Kevin M; Lydia H Zeglin; Takacs-Vesbach, Cristina D.

    2013-01-01

    Understanding controls over the distribution of soil bacteria is a fundamental step toward describing soil ecosystems, understanding their functional capabilities, and predicting their responses to environmental change. This study investigated the controls on the biomass, species richness, and community structure and composition of soil bacterial communities in the McMurdo Dry Valleys, Antarctica, at local and regional scales. The goals of the study were to describe the relationships between ...

  9. Changes in soil particulate organic matter, microbial biomass, and activity following afforestation of marginal agricultural lands in a semi-arid area of northeast China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Rong; Zeng, De-Hui

    2010-07-01

    Afforestation of agricultural lands has been one of the major land use changes in China in recent decades. To better understand the effect of such land use change on soil quality, we investigated selected soil physical, chemical and microbial properties (0-15 cm depth) in marginal agricultural land and a chronosequence of poplar (Populus euramericana cv. 'N3016') plantations (5-, 10-, 15- and 20-years old) in a semi-arid area of Northeast China. Soil bulk density significantly declined after conversion of agricultural lands to poplar plantations. Soil total organic carbon (TOC) and nitrogen (TN) concentrations, microbial biomass C (MBC) and potential N mineralization rate (PNM) decreased initially following afforestation of agricultural lands, and then increased with stand development. However, soil metabolic quotient (qCO(2)) exhibited a reverse trend. In addition, soil particulate organic matter C (POM-C) and N (POM-N) concentrations showed no significant changes in the first 10 years following afforestation, and then increased with stand age. These findings demonstrated that soil quality declined initially following afforestation of agricultural lands in semi-arid regions, and then recovered with stand development. Following 15 years of afforestation, many soil quality parameters recovered to the values found in agricultural land. We propose that change in soil quality with stand age should be considered in determining optimum rotation length of plantations and best management practices for afforestation programs.

  10. Effect of lake water on algal biomass and microbial community structure in municipal wastewater-based lab-scale photobioreactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krustok, I; Truu, J; Odlare, M; Truu, M; Ligi, T; Tiirik, K; Nehrenheim, E

    2015-08-01

    Photobioreactors are a novel environmental technology that can produce biofuels with the simultaneous removal of nutrients and pollutants from wastewaters. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of lake water inoculation on the production of algal biomass and phylogenetic and functional structure of the algal and bacterial communities in municipal wastewater-treating lab-scale photobioreactors. Inoculating the reactors with lake water had a significant benefit to the overall algal biomass growth and nutrient reduction in the reactors with wastewater and lake water (ratio 70/30 v/v). The metagenome-based survey showed that the most abundant algal phylum in these reactors was Chlorophyta with Scenedesmus being the most prominent genus. The most abundant bacterial phyla were Proteobacteria and Bacteroidetes with most dominant families being Sphingobacteriaceae, Cytophagaceae, Flavobacteriaceae, Comamonadaceae, Planctomycetaceae, Nocardiaceae and Nostocaceae. These photobioreactors were also effective in reducing the overall amount of pathogens in wastewater compared to reactors with wastewater/tap water mixture. Functional analysis of the photobioreactor metagenomes revealed an increase in relative abundance genes related to photosynthesis, synthesis of vitamins important for auxotrophic algae and decrease in virulence and nitrogen metabolism subsystems in lake water reactors. The results of the study indicate that adding lake water to the wastewater-based photobioreactor leads to an altered bacterial community phylogenetic and functional structure that could be linked to higher algal biomass production, as well as to enhanced nutrient and pathogen reduction in these reactors.

  11. Biogas Production from Protein-Rich Biomass: Fed-Batch Anaerobic Fermentation of Casein and of Pig Blood and Associated Changes in Microbial Community Composition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovács, Etelka; Wirth, Roland; Maróti, Gergely; Bagi, Zoltán; Rákhely, Gábor; Kovács, Kornél L.

    2013-01-01

    It is generally accepted as a fact in the biogas technology that protein-rich biomass substrates should be avoided due to inevitable process inhibition. Substrate compositions with a low C/N ratio are considered difficult to handle and may lead to process failure, though protein-rich industrial waste products have outstanding biogas generation potential. This common belief has been challenged by using protein-rich substrates, i.e. casein and precipitated pig blood protein in laboratory scale continuously stirred mesophilic fed-batch biogas fermenters. Both substrates proved suitable for sustained biogas production (0.447 L CH4/g protein oDM, i.e. organic total solids) in high yield without any additives, following a period of adaptation of the microbial community. The apparent key limiting factors in the anaerobic degradation of these proteinaceous materials were the accumulation of ammonia and hydrogen sulfide. Changes in time in the composition of the microbiological community were determined by next-generation sequencing-based metagenomic analyses. Characteristic rearrangements of the biogas-producing community upon protein feeding and specific differences due to the individual protein substrates were recognized. The results clearly demonstrate that sustained biogas production is readily achievable, provided the system is well-characterized, understood and controlled. Biogas yields (0.45 L CH4/g oDM) significantly exceeding those of the commonly used agricultural substrates (0.25-0.28 L CH4/g oDM) were routinely obtained. The results amply reveal that these high-energy-content waste products can be converted to biogas, a renewable energy carrier with flexible uses that can replace fossil natural gas in its applications. Process control, with appropriate acclimation of the microbial community to the unusual substrate, is necessary. Metagenomic analysis of the microbial community by next-generation sequencing allows a precise determination of the alterations in

  12. Biogas production from protein-rich biomass: fed-batch anaerobic fermentation of casein and of pig blood and associated changes in microbial community composition.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Etelka Kovács

    Full Text Available It is generally accepted as a fact in the biogas technology that protein-rich biomass substrates should be avoided due to inevitable process inhibition. Substrate compositions with a low C/N ratio are considered difficult to handle and may lead to process failure, though protein-rich industrial waste products have outstanding biogas generation potential. This common belief has been challenged by using protein-rich substrates, i.e. casein and precipitated pig blood protein in laboratory scale continuously stirred mesophilic fed-batch biogas fermenters. Both substrates proved suitable for sustained biogas production (0.447 L CH4/g protein oDM, i.e. organic total solids in high yield without any additives, following a period of adaptation of the microbial community. The apparent key limiting factors in the anaerobic degradation of these proteinaceous materials were the accumulation of ammonia and hydrogen sulfide. Changes in time in the composition of the microbiological community were determined by next-generation sequencing-based metagenomic analyses. Characteristic rearrangements of the biogas-producing community upon protein feeding and specific differences due to the individual protein substrates were recognized. The results clearly demonstrate that sustained biogas production is readily achievable, provided the system is well-characterized, understood and controlled. Biogas yields (0.45 L CH4/g oDM significantly exceeding those of the commonly used agricultural substrates (0.25-0.28 L CH4/g oDM were routinely obtained. The results amply reveal that these high-energy-content waste products can be converted to biogas, a renewable energy carrier with flexible uses that can replace fossil natural gas in its applications. Process control, with appropriate acclimation of the microbial community to the unusual substrate, is necessary. Metagenomic analysis of the microbial community by next-generation sequencing allows a precise determination of the

  13. Biogas production from protein-rich biomass: fed-batch anaerobic fermentation of casein and of pig blood and associated changes in microbial community composition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovács, Etelka; Wirth, Roland; Maróti, Gergely; Bagi, Zoltán; Rákhely, Gábor; Kovács, Kornél L

    2013-01-01

    It is generally accepted as a fact in the biogas technology that protein-rich biomass substrates should be avoided due to inevitable process inhibition. Substrate compositions with a low C/N ratio are considered difficult to handle and may lead to process failure, though protein-rich industrial waste products have outstanding biogas generation potential. This common belief has been challenged by using protein-rich substrates, i.e. casein and precipitated pig blood protein in laboratory scale continuously stirred mesophilic fed-batch biogas fermenters. Both substrates proved suitable for sustained biogas production (0.447 L CH4/g protein oDM, i.e. organic total solids) in high yield without any additives, following a period of adaptation of the microbial community. The apparent key limiting factors in the anaerobic degradation of these proteinaceous materials were the accumulation of ammonia and hydrogen sulfide. Changes in time in the composition of the microbiological community were determined by next-generation sequencing-based metagenomic analyses. Characteristic rearrangements of the biogas-producing community upon protein feeding and specific differences due to the individual protein substrates were recognized. The results clearly demonstrate that sustained biogas production is readily achievable, provided the system is well-characterized, understood and controlled. Biogas yields (0.45 L CH4/g oDM) significantly exceeding those of the commonly used agricultural substrates (0.25-0.28 L CH4/g oDM) were routinely obtained. The results amply reveal that these high-energy-content waste products can be converted to biogas, a renewable energy carrier with flexible uses that can replace fossil natural gas in its applications. Process control, with appropriate acclimation of the microbial community to the unusual substrate, is necessary. Metagenomic analysis of the microbial community by next-generation sequencing allows a precise determination of the alterations in

  14. Effects of Nutrient Management on Soil Microbial Biomass in Farmland%养分管理对农田土壤微生物量的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    于丽; 杨殿林; 赖欣

    2015-01-01

    Soil microorganisms are closely related to soil quality, soil health, plant productivity and agricultural sus-tainable development.Any disturbance on soil microbes could affect a long-term productivity of the soil, and it might have serious consequences.Numerous results of studies showed that the type, period, level and mode of fertilizer ap-plication could change the composition of the soil, thereby affect soil microbial growth and reproduction.This paper briefly introduced several determination methods for microbial biomass and reviewed the influence of nutrient manage-ments on soil microbial biomass in farmland eco-system, so as to understand the changes of soil quality under different soil nutrient management caused by the human exploitation on soil, to expect and to provide theoretic bases for the ag-ricultural sustainable development and ecological environment protection.%土壤微生物与土壤质量、健康、植物的生产力和农业的可持续发展密切相关。任何对土壤中微生物的扰动都可能影响土壤的长期生产力,并可能产生严重后果。大量研究结果表明,肥料类型、施肥处理年限长短、施肥水平高低及施肥措施都会造成土壤成分的变化,进而影响土壤中微生物的生长以及繁殖。简要介绍了微生物量的几种测定方法,综述了各种养分管理措施对农田生态系统中土壤微生物量的影响,从而了解土壤微生物因人类对土壤的利用而发生的变化,以期为农业的可持续发展和生态环境的保护提供理论依据。

  15. Characterization of humus microbial communities in adjacent forest types that differ in nitrogen availability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leckie, S E; Prescott, C E; Grayston, S J; Neufeld, J D; Mohn, W W

    2004-07-01

    To address the link between soil microbial community composition and soil processes, we investigated the microbial communities in forest floors of two forest types that differ substantially in nitrogen availability. Cedar-hemlock (CH) and hemlock-amabilis fir (HA) forests are both common on northern Vancouver Island, B.C., occurring adjacently across the landscape. CH forest floors have low nitrogen availability and HA high nitrogen availability. Total microbial biomass was assessed using chloroform fumigation-extraction and community composition was assessed using several cultivation-independent approaches: denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) of the bacterial communities, ribosomal intergenic spacer analysis (RISA) of the bacterial and fungal communities, and phospholipid fatty acid (PLFA) profiles of the whole microbial community. We did not detect differences in the bacterial communities of each forest type using DGGE and RISA, but differences in the fungal communities were detected using RISA. PLFA analysis detected subtle differences in overall composition of the microbial community between the forest types, as well as in particular groups of organisms. Fungal PLFAs were more abundant in the nitrogen-poor CH forests. Bacteria were proportionally more abundant in HA forests than CH in the lower humus layer, and Gram-positive bacteria were proportionally more abundant in HA forests irrespective of layer. Bacterial and fungal communities were distinct in the F, upper humus, and lower humus layers of the forest floor and total biomass decreased in deeper layers. These results indicate that there are distinct patterns in forest floor microbial community composition at the landscape scale, which may be important for understanding nutrient availability to forest vegetation.

  16. Increasing cell biomass in Saccharomyces cerevisiae increases recombinant protein yield: the use of a respiratory strain as a microbial cell factory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hedfalk Kristina

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recombinant protein production is universally employed as a solution to obtain the milligram to gram quantities of a given protein required for applications as diverse as structural genomics and biopharmaceutical manufacture. Yeast is a well-established recombinant host cell for these purposes. In this study we wanted to investigate whether our respiratory Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain, TM6*, could be used to enhance the productivity of recombinant proteins over that obtained from corresponding wild type, respiro-fermentative strains when cultured under the same laboratory conditions. Results Here we demonstrate at least a doubling in productivity over wild-type strains for three recombinant membrane proteins and one recombinant soluble protein produced in TM6* cells. In all cases, this was attributed to the improved biomass properties of the strain. The yield profile across the growth curve was also more stable than in a wild-type strain, and was not further improved by lowering culture temperatures. This has the added benefit that improved yields can be attained rapidly at the yeast's optimal growth conditions. Importantly, improved productivity could not be reproduced in wild-type strains by culturing them under glucose fed-batch conditions: despite having achieved very similar biomass yields to those achieved by TM6* cultures, the total volumetric yields were not concomitantly increased. Furthermore, the productivity of TM6* was unaffected by growing cultures in the presence of ethanol. These findings support the unique properties of TM6* as a microbial cell factory. Conclusions The accumulation of biomass in yeast cell factories is not necessarily correlated with a proportional increase in the functional yield of the recombinant protein being produced. The respiratory S. cerevisiae strain reported here is therefore a useful addition to the matrix of production hosts currently available as its improved biomass

  17. Microbial surface displayed enzymes based biofuel cell utilizing degradation products of lignocellulosic biomass for direct electrical energy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Shuqin; Hou, Chuantao; Liang, Bo; Feng, Ruirui; Liu, Aihua

    2015-09-01

    In this work, a bacterial surface displaying enzyme based two-compartment biofuel cell for the direct electrical energy conversion from degradation products of lignocellulosic biomass is reported. Considering that the main degradation products of the lignocellulose are glucose and xylose, xylose dehydrogenase (XDH) displayed bacteria (XDH-bacteria) and glucose dehydrogenase (GDH) displayed bacteria (GDH-bacteria) were used as anode catalysts in anode chamber with methylene blue as electron transfer mediator. While the cathode chamber was constructed with laccase/multi-walled-carbon nanotube/glassy-carbon-electrode. XDH-bacteria exhibited 1.75 times higher catalytic efficiency than GDH-bacteria. This assembled enzymatic fuel cell exhibited a high open-circuit potential of 0.80 V, acceptable stability and energy conversion efficiency. Moreover, the maximum power density of the cell could reach 53 μW cm(-2) when fueled with degradation products of corn stalk. Thus, this finding holds great potential to directly convert degradation products of biomass into electrical energy.

  18. Soil Microbial Biomass Dynamics and Influence Factors in Larix gmelinii Forest in Daxing' an Mountains%兴安落叶松林土壤微生物生物量季节动态及影响因素

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邸雪颖; 耿莹莹; 孙龙; 胡海清

    2012-01-01

    The seasonal dynamics of soil microbial biomass carbon and nitrogen in a Larix gmelinii forest in Tahe Forestry Bureau of Daxing' an Mountains were studied by using the chloroform fumigation extraction method. The relationships between soil microbial biomass dynamics and environmental factors were also analyzed. Results showed that the microbial biomass carbon ranged from 70.02 to 1 065.38 mg · kg-1, and the microbial biomass nitrogen from 15.63 to 75.18 mg · kg-1 in larch forest. The microbial biomass carbon and nitrogen basically showed an upward trend from May to June and a downward trend from June to August, and reached the maximum value in September, then began to decline, which exhibited a seasonal variation pattern with 1 -2 peaks. Pearson correlation analysis indicated that the microbial biomass carbon was significantly correlated with microbial biomass nitrogen( P<0. 05). The microbial biomass carbon was negatively correlated with soil temperature(P<0.05), and positively correlated with soil organic content and soil total nitrogen(P<0.01). The microbial biomass nitrogen was positively correlated with soil organic content and soil total nitrogen ( P<0.01).%应用氯仿熏蒸浸提法测定了大兴安岭塔河地区兴安落叶松林(Larix gmelinii Rupr.)土壤微生物生物量碳(Cm)和微生物量氮(Nm)的季节动态变化,并研究了其与土壤养分因子和土壤环境因子的关系.结果表明:兴安落叶松林的Cm的变化范围为70.02 ~1 065.38 mg·kg-1,其Nm的变化范围依次为:15.63 ~75.18 mg· kg-1.Cm和Nm基本于5-6月呈上升趋势、6-8月呈下降趋势,9月又达到一个最大值,之后开始下降,其中出现1~2个峰值的季节变化格局.Pearson相关分析表明,Cm与Nm呈显著相关(P<0.05),Cm与土壤温度(Ts)呈显著负相关(P<0.05),Cm与土壤有机碳(Cs.o)和土壤全氮(NT)呈极显著正相关(P<0.O1).Nm与土壤有机碳(Cs.o)和土壤全氮(NT)呈极显著正相关(P<0.01).

  19. Effect of Fertilization on Soil Respiration and Microbial Biomass Carbon during Maize Growth Period%玉米生长过程中施肥对土壤呼吸和微生物量碳的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    葛高飞; 梁永超

    2011-01-01

    The change disciplinarian of soil respiration and microbial biomass C during maize growth were studied to illuminate relation between disciplinarian and fertilization, and between disciplinarian and soil types. The effects of maize growth and fertilization on soil respiration and microbial biomass C were investigated in representative soil of south and north China (black and red soil) in pot experiment. The results showed that soil respiration and microbial biomass C changed with different growth stages, fertilization treatments and soil textures. The effect of maize growth on contents of soil total N and organic matter, and soil respiration in black soil was not obvious, but soil microbial biomass C increased with maize growth, and reached maximum at maize large bugle stage. However, soil total N, organic matter, soil respiration and microbial biomass C in red soil increased with maize growth, and showed maximum at maize large bugle stage. During the maize growth, organic manure treatments increased soil respiration and microbial biomass C in black and red soil, but inorganic fertilizers treatments had a little effect on them. Fertilization treatments showed no significant effects on soil total N and organic matter content in black soil, however, significantly increased soil respiration and microbial biomass C content in red soil. Besides, organic manure treatments decreased soil microbial metabolic quotient, but inorganic fertilizers treatments increased soil microbial metabolic quotient both in Black soil and in red soil. In conclusion, not only maize growth stages and fertilization treatments but also soil texture influenced soil respiration and microbial biomass C content.%为了阐明玉米生长中土壤呼吸和微生物生物量碳的变化规律与施肥和土壤类型间的关系,运用盆栽试验研究了玉米生长和施肥处理对中国南北典型土壤(黑土和红壤)的土壤呼吸和微生物生物量碳的影响.结果表明,施肥条件下,

  20. Biomassa e atividades microbianas em solo sob pastagem com diferentes lotações de ovinos Biomass and microbial activity in pasture soil under different sheep grazing pressure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martha Regina Lucizano Garcia

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Os efeitos da lotação de animais na produção de ovinos têm sido bastante estudados. No entanto, informações sobre seus efeitos na biomassa e nas atividades microbianas e, em conseqüência, na fertilidade do solo de pastagens são escassas. Neste trabalho, os efeitos da lotação de ovinos (LO na biomassa e nas atividades microbianas responsáveis pela transformação dos compostos do C e N em solo de clima subtropical foram avaliados. As amostras de solo foram coletadas nas camadas de 0-10 e 10-20 cm de pastos com baixa LO (5 animais ha-1, alta LO (40-50 animais ha-1 e com ausência de animais, em um delineamento inteiramente casualizado em parcelas subdivididas, com seis repetições. Os maiores valores de biomassa microbiana e das atividades respiratória, nitrificante e enzimática (urease e protease foram encontrados nos solos dos pastos com baixa LO. Estes pastos também acumularam as maiores quantidades de matéria orgânica e N total. Essas variáveis foram reduzidas nos pastos sem animais ou com alta LO. Vegetação descontínua e intensa mineralização podem ter acarretado a diminuição dessas variáveis nos pastos com alta LO. Alta correlação foi obtida entre matéria orgânica, C orgânico e N total com as quantidades de biomassa microbiana e a atividade enzimática. A camada de 0-10 cm apresentou valores maiores das variáveis estudadas do que os encontrados na camada de 10-20 cm.The effect of grazing pressure in sheep production has been studied, but not in relation to soil microbiological parameters or the consequences on soil fertility. The effect of grazing pressure (GP by sheep on biomass and microbial activity related to C and N compounds cycling in subtropical region soil was studied. Soil samples were collected from the 0-10 cm and 10-20 cm layers in pastures with low GP (5 animals ha-1, high GP (40-50 animals ha-1 and in absence of animals, in a completely randomized design with 6 replicates. The highest values

  1. Co-fermentation of acetate and sugars facilitating microbial lipid production on acetate-rich biomass hydrolysates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Zhiwei; Zhou, Wenting; Shen, Hongwei; Yang, Zhonghua; Wang, Guanghui; Zuo, Zhenyu; Hou, Yali; Zhao, Zongbao K

    2016-05-01

    The process of lignocellulosic biomass routinely produces a stream that contains sugars plus various amounts of acetic acid. As acetate is known to inhibit the culture of microorganisms including oleaginous yeasts, little attention has been paid to explore lipid production on mixtures of acetate and sugars. Here we demonstrated that the yeast Cryptococcus curvatus can effectively co-ferment acetate and sugars for lipid production. When mixtures of acetate and glucose were applied, C. curvatus consumed both substrates simultaneously. Similar phenomena were also observed for acetate and xylose mixtures, as well as acetate-rich corn stover hydrolysates. More interestingly, the replacement of sugar with equal amount of acetate as carbon source afforded higher lipid titre and lipid content. The lipid products had fatty acid compositional profiles similar to those of cocoa butter, suggesting their potential for high value-added fats and biodiesel production. This co-fermentation strategy should facilitate lipid production technology from lignocelluloses.

  2. Biomass, microbial activity and mycorrhizal fungi in land farming soil of petrochemical wastes; Biomassa, atividade microbiana e fungos micorrizicos em solo de 'landfarming' de residuos petroquimicos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paula, Alessandra M. de [Universidade de Sao Paulo, Piracicaba, SP (Brazil). Escola Superior de Agricultura Luis de Queiroz ESALQ/USP]. E-mail: ampaula@esalq.usp.br; Soares, Claudio R.F.S.; Siqueira, Jose O. [Universidade Federal de Lavras, MG (Brazil). Dept. de Ciencia do Solo]. E-mail: ampaula@esalq.usp.br; crfsoares@gmail; siqueira@ufla.br

    2006-04-15

    In the present study the microbial biomass, heterotrophic activity and the occurrence of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) were evaluated in soil samples from a land farming area that has been used for petrochemical waste treatment for the last fifteen years. Laboratory analysis and greenhouse assays were conducted in order to evaluate soil biological conditions and the effects of inoculation with AMF (Glomus clarum and Paraglomus occultum) on growth of six plant species with potential to establish in soil affected by oil pollutants. Values for soil microbial biomass and biochemical indicators (basal and induced soil respiration) were in the typical range found in non-contaminated soils, but the values for qCO{sub 2} were in the high range. In spite of the indication of microbial stress, the results suggest the presence of metabolically active microbial communities in the soil. However, the relatively low activities of {beta}-glucosidase, acid phosphatase and urease, indicate interferences on biochemical processes that may affect the degradation of residues transformation by the soil community. Abundant occurrence of AMF in either spontaneous or introduced plants was also observed. Inoculation with AMF had significant effects on alfalfa, brachiaria grass and sorghum, but no effects on elephant grass. The results of the present study indicate the existence of microbial populations tolerant to the toxic components of petrochemical wastes that were continuously applied to this soil. (author)

  3. Effects of fumigation with metam-sodium on soil microbial biomass, respiration, nitrogen transformation, bacterial community diversity and genes encoding key enzymes involved in nitrogen cycling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jun; Huang, Bin; Wang, Qiuxia; Li, Yuan; Fang, Wensheng; Han, Dawei; Yan, Dongdong; Guo, Meixia; Cao, Aocheng

    2017-11-15

    Metam-sodium (MS) is widely used as a soil pre-plant fumigant as methyl bromide is phased out of agriculture. However, the information about how fumigation with MS affects the soil microbial community is still limited. In this study, a 66-day-long experiment was conducted to ascertain the effects of MS on soil substrate-induced respiration (SIR), microbial biomass nitrogen (MBN), NH4(+)-N and NO3(-)-N concentrations, as well as the abundance of the total bacteria and fungi and the expression of genes involved in nitrogen cycling. In addition, 16S rRNA amplicon sequencing was used to investigate the effect of MS on the soil bacterial community. The half-lives of high and low doses of methyl isothiocyanate (MITC) are 10.51h and 9.93h, respectively. MS caused a short-term inhibition of SIR, MBN; had an accumulation effect on NH4(+)-N concentration in the short term; reduced the abundance of the total bacteria and fungi; and suppressed the expression of the nifH, AOA-amoA, anammox bacteria, nosZ, nirS, and narG. In addition, under the influence of MS, soil bacterial diversity decreased significantly in the long term, bacterial community structure was affected, and there was a shift in the predominant population; for example, some genera, such as Paenibacillus and Luteimonas, significantly increased in number. These changes in bacterial flora may be closely related to the growth of crops. Our study provides useful information for environmental safety assessments of MS in China. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  4. 茶园土壤团聚体中微生物量碳、氮的分布特征%Distribution Characteristics of Microbial Biomass Carbon and Nitrogen in Soil Aggregates Under Tea Plantation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘敏英; 郑子成; 李廷轩

    2011-01-01

    [目的]弄清茶园土壤团聚体中微生物量碳、氮的分布特征,以期反映退耕还茶模式对土壤团聚体及其养分循环的影响,为协调区域土地利用及退耕还林(茶)工程的实施提供依据.[方法]采用野外调查和室内分析相结合的方法,以撂荒地和按树人工林为对照,就茶园土壤团聚体中微生物量碳、氮的分布特征进行了研究.[结果](1)茶园和对照撂荒地、按树人工林土壤团聚体中有机碳含量基本随团聚体直径的减小而增加,最大值均集中于<0.25 mm团聚体中;(2)茶园及对照地土壤微生物量碳、氮含量则基本随团聚体直径的减小而降低,其中茶园土壤团聚体中微生物量碳、氮含量最大值分布于5-2 mm团聚体中,茶园土壤除了<0.25 mm团聚体外,其微生物量碳、氮的含量均高于撂荒地和按树人工林同直径团聚体;(3)茶园及对照地土壤团聚体微生物熵基本随团聚体直径的减小而降低,其中茶园土壤团聚体微生物熵最大值分布于5-2 mm团聚体中,其分布规律与微生物量碳、氮基本一致.[结论]与撂荒地、按树人工林相比,茶园土壤团聚体中微生物量碳、氮较为丰富,大团聚体中的含量尤为突出,表明退耕还茶是研究区一种较为理想的退耕模式.%[Objective] The distribution of microbial biomass carbon and microbial biomass nitrogen in soil aggregates of tea planted area was studied on purpose to reflect the influence of tea plantation on soil aggregates and its nutrient cycling, which can provide evidence for coordinating regional land use and returning farmland to forest/tea project. [Method] On the basis of field investigation and laboratory analysis, abandoned land and eucalyptus plantation were selected as contrasts, distribution features of microbial biomass carbon and microbial biomass nitrogen in soil aggregates under tea plantation were studied. [Result] The content of soil aggregates organic carbon

  5. Assessment of the microbial growth potential of slow sand filtrate with the biomass production potential test in comparison with the assimilable organic carbon method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Kooij, Dick; Veenendaal, Harm R; van der Mark, Ed J; Dignum, Marco

    2017-07-04

    Slow sand filtration is the final treatment step at four surface-water supplies in the Netherlands. The microbial growth potential (MGP) of the finished water was measured with the assimilable organic carbon (AOC) method using pure cultures and the biomass production potential (BPP) test. In the BPP test, water samples were incubated untreated at 25 °C and the active-biomass concentration was measured by adenosine tri-phosphate (ATP) analysis. Addition of a river-water inoculum improved the test performance and characteristic growth and maintenance profiles of the water were obtained. The maximum ATP concentration attained within seven days and the cumulative biomass production after 14 days of incubation (BPC14, d ng ATP L(-1)) showed highly significant and strong linear relationships with the AOC in the slow sand filtrates. The lowest AOC and BPC14 levels were observed in the supplies applying dune filtration without ozonation in post treatment, with AOC/TOC = 1.7 ± 0.3 μg acetate-C equivalents mg(-1) C and BPC14/TOC = 16.3 ± 2.2 d ng ATP mg(-1) C, corresponding with 1.2 ± 0.19 ng ATP mg(-1) C. These characteristics may represent the lowest specific MGP of natural organic matter achievable by biofiltration at temperatures ≤20 °C. The AOC and BPC14 concentrations in the slow sand filtrate of the supply treating lake water by ozonation with granular-activated-carbon filtration and slow sand filtration as post treatment increased with decreasing temperature. The BPP test revealed that this slow sand filtrate sampled at 2 °C contained growth-promoting compounds that were not detected with the AOC test. These observations demonstrate the utility of the BPP test for assessing the MGP of drinking water and show the performance limits of biofiltration for MGP reduction. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Mixed-Up Floors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, Richard

    2001-01-01

    Examines the maintenance management problems inherent in cleaning multiple flooring materials revealing the need for school officials to keep it simple when choosing flooring types. Also highlighted is a carpet recycling program used by Wright State University (Ohio). (GR)

  7. 人工湿地土壤微生物生物量碳与污水净化效果的关系%Relationship of Soil Microbial Biomass Carbon and Nutrient Removal Rates in Constructed Wetlands

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王萌; 许新; 陈章和

    2013-01-01

    微生物在人工湿地污水净化过程中发挥着重要作用,微生物生物量碳是微生物的重要表征之一.为探讨人工湿地土壤微生物量碳与污水净化效果的关系,以表面流人工湿地为研究对象,分别研究了不同植物人工湿地土壤微生物生物量碳和净化效果的时空变化及其相关性.结果显示,4种植物湿地表层(0-5 cm)微生物生物量碳极显著高于深层(15-20 cm)的测量值(P<0.01).人工湿地污染物去除效果与微生物生物量碳具有相同的季节变化规律,都呈单峰型的季节格局,夏秋季较高,冬春季较低.微生物生物量碳与人工湿地COD、BOD5和TN的去除呈显著正相关(P<0.05).水鬼蕉湿地具有较高的微生物生物量碳,而污染物去除率一般较低,这表明不同湿地微生物生物量碳与污染物去除率的相关性呈现不确定性.%Soil microorganisms are involved in all the biochemical processes which occur in soils, and they play a vital role in wastewater purification. Microbial biomass carbon is an important indicator of soil fertility, so we guess it is probably closely related to wastewater purification. For understanding whether relationship between nutrient removal rates and microbial biomass carbon existed, monoculture constructed wetlands of four plant species (Ph rag mites australis Trin. ex Steud., Hymenocallis littoralis (Jack.) Salisb., Canna indica Linn., Cyperus flabelliformis Rottb.) were built, and during a 2-month period, microbial biomass carbon and nutrient removal rates were measured. The results indicated that microbial biomass carbon in surface soil (0-5 cm) was significantly higher (P<0.01) than that in the deeper soil (15-20 cm). Both microbial biomass carbon and nutrient removal rates were higher during summer and autumn and lower during spring and winter. The removal rates of COD, BOD5 and total nitrogen were significantly correlated with microbial biomass carbon (P<0.05). In addition

  8. High-rate nitrogen removal and microbial community of an up-flow anammox reactor with ceramics as biomass carrier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Yuhui; Li, Dong; Li, Xiangkun; Yang, Liu; Ding, An; Zhang, Jie

    2014-10-01

    Nitrogen removal performance and responsible microbial community of anammox process at low temperatures, and long term effect of dissolved oxygen (DO) on the performance of anammox process were investigated in a biofilm reactor, which was operated at 33±1°C (159d) and 20±2°C (162d) with an influent DO concentration of 0.7-1.5mgL(-1). Nitrogen removal recovered to 70% after 2wk with the temperature drastically decreasing from 33±1°C to 20±2°C. At 20±2°C, the average effluent (NH4(+)-N+NO2(-)-N) concentration was 0.08±0.08mgL(-1) at a hydraulic retention time of 1.5h. A total nitrogen removal efficiency of the reactor of 1.0gNL(-1)d(-1) was obtained for up to one month while the nitrogen loading rate was 1.16gNL(-1)d(-1). Results of T-RFLP and 16S rRNA phylogenic analysis revealed that Candidatus Jettenia asiatica, as confirmed to adapt to low temperature, was considered to be responsible for the stable and high nitrogen removal performance.

  9. Baseline Assessment of Mesophotic Reefs of the Vitória-Trindade Seamount Chain Based on Water Quality, Microbial Diversity, Benthic Cover and Fish Biomass Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meirelles, Pedro M.; Amado-Filho, Gilberto M.; Pereira-Filho, Guilherme H.; Pinheiro, Hudson T.; de Moura, Rodrigo L.; Joyeux, Jean-Christophe; Mazzei, Eric F.; Bastos, Alex C.; Edwards, Robert A.; Dinsdale, Elizabeth; Paranhos, Rodolfo; Santos, Eidy O.; Iida, Tetsuya; Gotoh, Kazuyoshi; Nakamura, Shota; Sawabe, Tomoo; Rezende, Carlos E.; Gadelha, Luiz M. R.; Francini-Filho, Ronaldo B.; Thompson, Cristiane; Thompson, Fabiano L.

    2015-01-01

    Seamounts are considered important sources of biodiversity and minerals. However, their biodiversity and health status are not well understood; therefore, potential conservation problems are unknown. The mesophotic reefs of the Vitória-Trindade Seamount Chain (VTC) were investigated via benthic community and fish surveys, metagenomic and water chemistry analyses, and water microbial abundance estimations. The VTC is a mosaic of reef systems and includes fleshy algae dominated rhodolith beds, crustose coralline algae (CCA) reefs, and turf algae dominated rocky reefs of varying health levels. Macro-carnivores and larger fish presented higher biomass at the CCA reefs (4.4 kg per frame) than in the rhodolith beds and rocky reefs (0.0 to 0.1 kg per frame). A larger number of metagenomic sequences identified as primary producers (e.g., Chlorophyta and Streptophyta) were found at the CCA reefs. However, the rocky reefs contained more diseased corals (>90%) than the CCA reefs (~40%) and rhodolith beds (~10%). Metagenomic analyses indicated a heterotrophic and fast-growing microbiome in rocky reef corals that may possibly lead to unhealthy conditions possibly enhanced by environmental features (e.g. light stress and high loads of labile dissolved organic carbon). VTC mounts represent important hotspots of biodiversity that deserve further conservation actions. PMID:26090804

  10. Baseline Assessment of Mesophotic Reefs of the Vitoria-Trindade Seamount Chain Based on Water Quality, Microbial Diversity, Benthic Cover and Fish Biomass Data.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro M Meirelles

    Full Text Available Seamounts are considered important sources of biodiversity and minerals. However, their biodiversity and health status are not well understood; therefore, potential conservation problems are unknown. The mesophotic reefs of the Vitória-Trindade Seamount Chain (VTC were investigated via benthic community and fish surveys, metagenomic and water chemistry analyses, and water microbial abundance estimations. The VTC is a mosaic of reef systems and includes fleshy algae dominated rhodolith beds, crustose coralline algae (CCA reefs, and turf algae dominated rocky reefs of varying health levels. Macro-carnivores and larger fish presented higher biomass at the CCA reefs (4.4 kg per frame than in the rhodolith beds and rocky reefs (0.0 to 0.1 kg per frame. A larger number of metagenomic sequences identified as primary producers (e.g., Chlorophyta and Streptophyta were found at the CCA reefs. However, the rocky reefs contained more diseased corals (>90% than the CCA reefs (~40% and rhodolith beds (~10%. Metagenomic analyses indicated a heterotrophic and fast-growing microbiome in rocky reef corals that may possibly lead to unhealthy conditions possibly enhanced by environmental features (e.g. light stress and high loads of labile dissolved organic carbon. VTC mounts represent important hotspots of biodiversity that deserve further conservation actions.

  11. Baseline Assessment of Mesophotic Reefs of the Vitória-Trindade Seamount Chain Based on Water Quality, Microbial Diversity, Benthic Cover and Fish Biomass Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meirelles, Pedro M; Amado-Filho, Gilberto M; Pereira-Filho, Guilherme H; Pinheiro, Hudson T; de Moura, Rodrigo L; Joyeux, Jean-Christophe; Mazzei, Eric F; Bastos, Alex C; Edwards, Robert A; Dinsdale, Elizabeth; Paranhos, Rodolfo; Santos, Eidy O; Iida, Tetsuya; Gotoh, Kazuyoshi; Nakamura, Shota; Sawabe, Tomoo; Rezende, Carlos E; Gadelha, Luiz M R; Francini-Filho, Ronaldo B; Thompson, Cristiane; Thompson, Fabiano L

    2015-01-01

    Seamounts are considered important sources of biodiversity and minerals. However, their biodiversity and health status are not well understood; therefore, potential conservation problems are unknown. The mesophotic reefs of the Vitória-Trindade Seamount Chain (VTC) were investigated via benthic community and fish surveys, metagenomic and water chemistry analyses, and water microbial abundance estimations. The VTC is a mosaic of reef systems and includes fleshy algae dominated rhodolith beds, crustose coralline algae (CCA) reefs, and turf algae dominated rocky reefs of varying health levels. Macro-carnivores and larger fish presented higher biomass at the CCA reefs (4.4 kg per frame) than in the rhodolith beds and rocky reefs (0.0 to 0.1 kg per frame). A larger number of metagenomic sequences identified as primary producers (e.g., Chlorophyta and Streptophyta) were found at the CCA reefs. However, the rocky reefs contained more diseased corals (>90%) than the CCA reefs (~40%) and rhodolith beds (~10%). Metagenomic analyses indicated a heterotrophic and fast-growing microbiome in rocky reef corals that may possibly lead to unhealthy conditions possibly enhanced by environmental features (e.g. light stress and high loads of labile dissolved organic carbon). VTC mounts represent important hotspots of biodiversity that deserve further conservation actions.

  12. High-throughput sequencing-based microbial characterization of size fractionated biomass in an anoxic anammox reactor for low-strength wastewater at low temperatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wenru; Yang, Dianhai; Chen, Wenjing; Gu, Xiao

    2017-05-01

    The microbial characterization of three size-fractionated sludge obtained from a suspended-growth anoxic anammox reactor treating low-strength wastewater at low temperatures were investigated by using high-throughput sequencing. Particularly, the spatial variability in relative abundance of microorganisms involved in nitrogen metabolism were analyzed in detail. Results showed that population segregation did occur in the reactor. It was found, for the first time, that the genus Nitrotoga was enriched only in large granules (>400μm). Three anammox genus including Candidatus Jettenia, Brocadia and Kuenenia were detected. Among them, Candidatus Brocadia and Kuenenia preferred to grow in large-sized granules (>400μm), whereas Candidatus Jettenia dominated in small- and moderate-sized sludge (<400μm). The members of genus Candidatus Jettenia appeared to play the vital role in nitrogen removal, since sludge with diameters smaller than 400μm accounted for 81.55% of the total biomass. However, further studies are required to identify the activity of different-size sludge.

  13. Microbial Biomass Carbon Trends in Black and Red Soils Under Single Straw Application: Effect of Straw Placement, Mineral N Addition and Tillage

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Quantifying trends in soil microbial biomass carbon (SMBC) under contrasting management conditions is important in understanding the dynamics of soil organic matter (SOM) in soils and in ensuring their sustainable use. Against such a background, a 60-day greenhouse simulation experiment was carried out to study the effects of straw placement, mineral N source, and tillage on SMBC dynamics in two contrasting soils, red soil (Ferrasol) and black soil (Acrisol). The treatments included straw addition + buried (T1);straw addition + mineral N (T2); and straw addition + tillage (T3). Straw was either buried in the soil or placed on the surface. Sampling was done every 15 days. Straw placement, addition of external mineral N sources (Urea, 46 % N) and soil type affected SMBC. SMBC levels decreased with exposure durations (15 days, 30 days, 45 days, and 60 days). Rate of SMBC fixation was more in buried straw than in surface placed straw at all sampling dates in both soils. Addition of an external N source significantly increased SMBC level. Soil pH increased in both soil types, with a greater increase in black soil than in red soil. The study could not, however, statistically account for the effect of tillage on SMBC levels because of the limited effect of our tillage method due to the artificial barrier to mechanical interference supplied by the mesh bags,although differences in absolute values were quite evident between treatments T1 and T3.``

  14. Impact of Trichloroethylene Exposure on the Microbial Diversity and Protein Expression in Anaerobic Granular Biomass at 37°C and 15°C

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alma Siggins

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Granular biomass from a laboratory-scale anaerobic bioreactor trial was analysed to identify changes in microbial community structure and function in response to temperature and trichloroethylene (TCE. Two bioreactors were operated at 37°C, while two were operated at 15°C. At the time of sampling, one of each temperature pair of bioreactors was exposed to process failure-inducing concentrations of TCE (60 mg L−1 while the other served as a TCE-free control. Bacterial community structure was investigated using denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE and 16S rRNA gene clone library analysis. Temperature was identified as an important factor for bacterial community composition, while minor differences were associated with trichloroethylene supplementation. Proteobacteria was the dominant phylum in all bioreactors, while clone library analysis revealed a higher proportion of Bacteroidetes-, Chloroflexi-, and Firmicutes-like clones at 15°C than at 37°C. Comparative metaproteomics in the presence and absence of TCE was carried out by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DGE, and 28 protein spots were identified, with putative functions related to cellular processes, including methanogenesis, glycolysis, the glyoxylate cycle, and the methyl malonyl pathway. A good agreement between metaproteomic species assignment and phylogenetic information was observed, with 10 of the identified proteins associated with members of the phylum Proteobacteria.

  15. Bioethanol Production From Cellulose by Candida tropicalis, as An Alternative Microbial Agent to Produce Ethanol from Lignocellulosic Biomass

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hermansyah

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: Candida tropicalis isolated from Tuak is a potentially useful microorganism for the ethanol production from lignocellulosic biomass and it can be alterbative agent replacing Saccharomyces cerevisae for fermentation process. Although C.tropicalis could not convert all carbohydrates content of lignocellulosic into bioethanol, however it is able to grow on medium in the presence of either xylose or arabinose as carbon source. Our result showed that fermentation of 10 % (w/v cellulosic as sole carbon source produced 2.88% (v/v ethanol by C.tropicalis. This ethanol production was lower than usage of 10% (w/v dextrose as sole carbon source medium which producing 5.51% (v/v ethanol. Based upon our expreiment indicated that C.tropicalis is able to conduct two main process in converting of cellulosic material- to ethanol which is hydrolysis the degradation of cellulose into glucose, and fermentation the process the conversion glucose into bioethanol. Keywords : Candida tropicalis, bioethanol, fermentation, cellulosic Abstrak (Indonesian: Candida tropicalis yang diisiolasi dari Tuak adalah agen yang berpotensi dalam produksi etanol dari biomasa lignoselulosa dan dapat dijadikan agen alternatif menggantikan Saccharomyces cerevisiae pada proses fernentasi. Walaupun C.tropicalis tidak dapat mengkonversi semua kandungan karbohidrat lignoselulosamenjadi etanol, akan tetapi C.tropicalis mampu tumbuh pada media dengan xilosa atau arabinosa sebagaisumber karbon. Hasil kami menunjukkan bahwa dengan mengguankan C.tropicalis fermentasi 10% (w/v selulosa sebagai satu-satunya sumber karbon menghasilkan 2,88% (v/v etanol, Produksi etanol ini lebih rendah jika menggunakan 10% (w/v dekstrosa sebagai satu satunya sumber karbon yang menghasilkan 5,51% (v/v etanol. Berdasarkan percobaan menunjukkan bahwa C.tropicalis mampu melakukan dua proses utama dalam mengkonversi material selulosa menjadi etanol yaitu hidrolisis degradasi selulosa menjadi glukosa, dan

  16. Soil Microbial Biomass Acts as Source and Sink of Energy Material C Flou in Mountainous Soils of Guizhou.%贵州山区土壤中微生物生物量是 能源物质碳流动的源与汇

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    朴河春; 洪业汤; 袁芷云

    2001-01-01

    The soil microbial biomass,the living fraction of organic matter,contains energy material-organic carbon compounds,which is derived from plant residue-generated soil organic matter.This study investigated the relationships between microbial biomass C and organic C with environmental parameters.The results indicate that soil microbial biomass is highly sensitive to the changes of environmental conditions in soils,and converts easily to available organic C compounds,and acts as source and sink of energy material C flow.Therefore,it plays an important role in soil organic matter decomposition.The turnover of soil microbial biomass is an important pathway of soil organic matter decomposition.

  17. Mesophilic and thermophilic conditions select for unique but highly parallel microbial communities to perform carboxylate platform biomass conversion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emily B Hollister

    Full Text Available The carboxylate platform is a flexible, cost-effective means of converting lignocellulosic materials into chemicals and liquid fuels. Although the platform's chemistry and engineering are well studied, relatively little is known about the mixed microbial communities underlying its conversion processes. In this study, we examined the metagenomes of two actively fermenting platform communities incubated under contrasting temperature conditions (mesophilic 40°C; thermophilic 55 °C, but utilizing the same inoculum and lignocellulosic feedstock. Community composition segregated by temperature. The thermophilic community harbored genes affiliated with Clostridia, Bacilli, and a Thermoanaerobacterium sp, whereas the mesophilic community metagenome was composed of genes affiliated with other Clostridia and Bacilli, Bacteriodia, γ-Proteobacteria, and Actinobacteria. Although both communities were able to metabolize cellulosic materials and shared many core functions, significant differences were detected with respect to the abundances of multiple Pfams, COGs, and enzyme families. The mesophilic metagenome was enriched in genes related to the degradation of arabinose and other hemicellulose-derived oligosaccharides, and the production of valerate and caproate. In contrast, the thermophilic community was enriched in genes related to the uptake of cellobiose and the transfer of genetic material. Functions assigned to taxonomic bins indicated that multiple community members at either temperature had the potential to degrade cellulose, cellobiose, or xylose and produce acetate, ethanol, and propionate. The results of this study suggest that both metabolic flexibility and functional redundancy contribute to the platform's ability to process lignocellulosic substrates and are likely to provide a degree of stability to the platform's fermentation processes.

  18. Changes in enzymatic activities and microbial properties in vermicompost of water hyacinth as affected by pre-composting and fungal inoculation: a comparative study of ergosterol and chitin for estimating fungal biomass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pramanik, P

    2010-01-01

    In this experiment, three different fungal species, viz. Trichoderma viridae, Aspergillus niger and Phanerochaete chrysosporium, were inoculated in 7 day and 15 day partially decomposed water hyacinth to study their effect on enzymatic activities, microbial respiration and fungal biomass of the final stabilized product. The results suggested that increasing the duration of pre-composting from 7 days to 15 days did not show any significant effect on the activities of hydrolytic enzymes. Inoculation of fungi significantly (P vermicomposts. Inoculation of P. chrysosporium in initial organic waste registered the highest chitin content in vermicompost. A comparison of fungal biomass and chitin content revealed a conversion factor of 2.628 with a standard deviation of 0.318. Due to significant correlation (r = 0.864), this conversion factor allows for the calculation of fungal biomass from chitin, which is comparatively more stable than ergosterol.

  19. 模拟大气氮沉降对不同树种土壤微生物生物量的影响%Effects of Simulated Atmospheric Nitrogen Deposition on Soil Microbial Biomass of Different Tree Species

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郭萍萍; 郑丽丽; 黄幸然; 吴旺旺; 卓振华; 易志刚

    2015-01-01

    energy flow in ecosystem. Nitrogen deposition can influence the growth and proliferation of microorganisms, which can change the community structure and function, and then affect the material circulation and energy flow of soil ecosystem. Nitrogen deposition was simulated in laboratory, and the effects of nitrogen deposition on the soil microbes were examined with phospholipid fatty acids technique with different tree species, namely Schima superba, Ormosia pinnata, Pinus massoniana and Acacia mangium. The results showed that bacteria, over 40%of soil microbial biomass, was the main component of soil microbial biomass at current nitrogen deposition. Both sampling times (P<0.01) and tree species (P<0.05) had significant effects on the total soil microbial biomass and bacteria biomass. Soil microbial biomass (the total soil microorganisms, bacteria, fungi and actinomycetes) in October were higher than those in April for the same tree species, with the highest for Acacia mangium (total soil microbial biomass was 76.78 nmol·g-1, bacteria biomass was 33.94 nmol·g-1, fungi biomass was 6.91 nmol·g-1, actinomycetes biomass was 8.38 nmol·g-1) and the lowest for Schima superba (total soil microbial biomass was 57.89 nmol·g-1, bacteria biomass was 24.79 nmol·g-1, fungi biomass was 4.16 nmol·g-1, actinomycetes biomass was 5.57 nmol·g-1) in April, and the highest for Ormosia pinnata (total soil microbial biomass was 92.67 nmol·g-1, bacteria biomass was 38.85 nmol·g-1, fungi biomass was 8.09 nmol·g-1, actinomycetes biomass was 9.27 nmol·g-1) and the lowest for Schima superba (total soil microbial biomass was 71.10 nmol·g-1, bacteria biomass was 30.79 nmol·g-1, fungi biomass was 4.90 nmol·g-1, actinomycetes biomass was 7.04 nmol·g-1) in October. Actinomycete was effected significantly by the interaction of tree species and sampling times (P<0.05). The result also indicated that the total microbial biomass had significantly positive correlation with ammonium nitrogen (P

  20. SUSTAINABLE TRAILER FLOORING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Lu

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Different trailer flooring materials, including wood-based, aluminum, steel, and synthetic plastic floors, were evaluated in accordance with their durability and sustainability to our natural environment. Wood-based trailer flooring is an eco-friendly product. It is the most sustainable trailer flooring material compared with fossil fuel-intensive steel, aluminum, and plastics. It is renewable and recyclable. Oak, hard maple, and apitong are strong and durable hardwood species that are currently extensively used for trailer flooring. For manufacture, wood-based flooring is higher in energy efficiency and lower in carbon emission than steel, aluminum and plastics. Moreover, wood per se is a natural product that sequesters carbon. Accordingly, using more wood-based trailer flooring is effective to reduce global warming.

  1. Martian base agriculture: The effect of low gravity on water flow, nutrient cycles, and microbial biomass dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maggi, Federico; Pallud, Céline

    2010-11-01

    The latest advances in bioregenerative strategies for long-term life support in extraterrestrial outposts such as on Mars have indicated soil-based cropping as an effective approach for waste decomposition, carbon sequestration, oxygen production, and water biofiltration as compared to hydroponics and aeroponics cropping. However, it is still unknown if cropping using soil systems could be sustainable in a Martian greenhouse under a gravity of 0.38 g. The most challenging aspects are linked to the gravity-induced soil water flow; because water is crucial in driving nutrient and oxygen transport in both liquid and gaseous phases, a gravitational acceleration lower than g = 9.806 m s -2 could lead to suffocation of microorganisms and roots, with concomitant emissions of toxic gases. The effect of Martian gravity on soil processes was investigated using a highly mechanistic model previously tested for terrestrial crops that couples soil hydraulics and nutrient biogeochemistry. Net leaching of NO3- solute, gaseous fluxes of NH 3, CO 2, N 2O, NO and N 2, depth concentrations of O 2, CO 2 and dissolved organic carbon (DOC), and pH in the root zone were calculated for a bioregenerative cropping unit under gravitational acceleration of Earth and for its homologous on Mars, but under 0.38 g. The two cropping units were treated with the same fertilizer type and rate, and with the same irrigation regime, but under different initial soil moisture content. Martian gravity reduced water and solute leaching by about 90% compared to Earth. This higher water holding capacity in soil under Martian gravity led to moisture content and nutrient concentrations that favoured the metabolism of various microbial functional groups, whose density increased by 5-10% on Mars as compared to Earth. Denitrification rates became substantially more important than on Earth and ultimately resulted in 60%, 200% and 1200% higher emissions of NO, N 2O and N 2 gases, respectively. Similarly, O 2 and DOC

  2. Absolute Quantification of Individual Biomass Concentrations in a Methanogenic Coculture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Junicke, H.; Abbas, B.; Oentoro, J.; Van Loosdrecht, M.; Kleerebezem, R.

    2014-01-01

    Identification of individual biomass concentrations is a crucial step towards an improved understanding of anaerobic digestion processes and mixed microbial conversions in general. The knowledge of individual biomass concentrations allows for the calculation of biomass specific conversion rates whic

  3. Absolute Quantification of Individual Biomass Concentrations in a Methanogenic Coculture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Junicke, H.; Abbas, B.; Oentoro, J.; Van Loosdrecht, M.; Kleerebezem, R.

    2014-01-01

    Identification of individual biomass concentrations is a crucial step towards an improved understanding of anaerobic digestion processes and mixed microbial conversions in general. The knowledge of individual biomass concentrations allows for the calculation of biomass specific conversion rates

  4. Biomasa microbiana y actividad ureasa del suelo en una pradera permanente pastoreada de Chile Soil microbial biomass and urease activity in a grazed permanent pasture from Chile

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro Antonio Núñez Ramos

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available En los sistemas de pasturas; la productividad de la pradera puede estar influenciada por el manejo; debido a su impacto sobre los microorganismos del suelo y el reciclaje de nutrientes. El objetivo de este trabajo fue evaluar la biomasa microbiana (BM del suelo asociada al nitrógeno (BMN; carbono (BMC y la actividad ureasa (AU en una pradera permanente del sur de Chile. Entre la primavera de 2005 y el invierno de 2006 fueron evaluados dos sistemas de pastoreo: pastoreo intenso (PI; pastoreo suave (PS y un tratamiento control (C. El diseño fue en bloques al azar con tres repeticiones. En relación a los valores promedios medidos de las variables en pre y post pastoreo; se produjo un incremento en los contenidos de CB en un 21,8 y 8,6% para PI y PS; mientras que en el control fue sólo de 1,9%. Los contenidos de NB también fueron incrementados en un 16 y 19% para PI y PS; respectivamente en comparación con el control (4%. La actividad ureasa aumentó en 13 y 27% para PI y PS; respectivamente en comparación con el control (5%. El pastoreo; produce un flujo más alto de residuos orgánicos en el suelo; lo que estimula la actividad de la biomasa microbiana y; por tanto; aumentó la AU y los contenidos de CB y NB. Esto sugiere que; en los sistemas de pastoreo; se mejora la fertilidad biológica de los suelos y la disponibilidad de nutrientes.In pasture systems, management practices can affect pasture productivity differently due to their impact on soil microorganisms and nutrient cycling. The objective of this study was to evaluate the relationship between soil microbial biomass (MB nitrogen (MBN, carbon (MBC and urease activity (UA in a permanent pasture in southern Chile. Two grazing systems were evaluated between spring 2005 and winter 2006 : heavy grazing (HG, light grazing (LG and a control treatment (C. Treatments were arranged in a randomized block design with three replications. Concerning the average values of the variables measured at

  5. Biomassa microbiana, em um Argissolo Vermelho, em diferentes coberturas vegetais, em área cultivada com mandioca = Microbial biomass on an Oxisol in cassava using different cover species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fábio Martins Mercante

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Objetivou-se avaliar a influência de cultivos de mandioca, em diferentes sistemas de manejo sobre a biomassa microbiana de solo, sua atividade e índices derivados. O estudo foi conduzido no Município de Glória de Dourados, Estado do Mato Grosso doSul, em Argissolo Vermelho, de textura arenosa, em sistema de preparo convencional, plantio direto, sobre resíduos culturais de mucuna, sorgo e milheto, além de sistema com vegetação nativa, usado como referencial para comparação. As avaliações foram realizadasem seis épocas distintas: maio/2003, junho/2003, novembro/2003, abril/2004, agosto/2004 e novembro/2004. A presença ou ausência de resíduos vegetais influenciou diretamente a microbiota do solo, indicando que o uso de plantas de cobertura, no cultivo de mandioca,favorece a melhoria da qualidade do solo, representando alternativa promissora para melhor manejo desta cultura.The objective of this work was to evaluate the effect of cassava cultivation under different management practices on soil microbial biomass, its activity and its derived indexes. The field experiment was carried out in Glória de Dourados, Mato Grosso do Sul State, Brazil, in a sandy soil (Oxisol, under conventional drilling, no-tillage system under Estilozobium pruriens, Sorghum bicolor and Pennisetum glaucum mulching, compared to the native vegetation system. Evaluations were done in May/2003, June/2003, November/2003,April/2004 and November/2004. Soil microbiota was directly influenced by the presence or absence of vegetable residues, indicating that the use of covering plants in cassava cultivation favors the improvement of soil quality, representing a promising alternative for better management practices of this cultivation.

  6. [Soil soluble organic matter, microbial biomass, and enzyme activities in forest plantations in degraded red soil region of Jiangxi Province, China].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Yu-mei; Chen, Cheng-long; Xu, Zhi-hong; Liu, Yuan-qiu; Ouyang, Jing; Wang, Fang

    2010-09-01

    Taking the adjacent 18-year-old pure Pinus massoniana pure forest (I), P. massoniana, Liquidamber fomosana, and Schima superba mixed forest (II), S. superba pure forest (III), L. fomosana (IV) pure forest, and natural restoration fallow land (CK) in Taihe County of Jiangxi Province as test sites, a comparative study was made on their soil soluble organic carbon (SOC) and nitrogen (SON), soil microbial biomass C (MBC) and N (MBN), and soil urease and asparaginase activities. In 0-10 cm soil layer, the pool sizes of SOC, SON, MBC, and MBN at test sites ranged in 354-1007 mg x kg(-1), 24-73 mg x kg(-1), 203-488 mg x kg(-1), and 24-65 mg x kg(-1), and the soil urease and asparaginase activities were 95-133 mg x kg(-1) x d(-1) and 58-113 mg x kg(-1) x d(-1), respectively. There were significant differences in the pool sizes of SOC, SON, MBC, and MBN and the asparaginase activity among the test sites, but no significant difference was observed in the urease activity. The pool sizes of SOC and SON were in the order of IV > CK > III > I > II, those of MBC and MBN were in the order of CK > IV > III > I > II, and asparaginase activity followed the order of IV > CK > III > II > I. With the increase of soil depth, the pool sizes of SOC, SON, MBC, and MBN and the activities of soil asparaginase and urease decreased. In 0-20 cm soil layer, the SOC, SON, MBC, MBN, total C, and total N were highly correlated with each other, soil asparaginase activity was highly correlated with SOC, SON, TSN, total C, total N, MBC, and MBN, and soil urease activity was highly correlated with SON, TSN, total C, MBC and MBN.

  7. 玉米和大豆秸秆还田对黑土微生物量及呼吸的影响%Effects of Corn and Soybean Residues Return on Microbial Biomass and Respiration in a Black Soil

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘四义; 贾淑霞; 张晓平; 陈学文; 张士秀; 孙冰洁; 陈升龙; 窦永静

    2014-01-01

    土壤微生物量和呼吸对秸秆还田后的分解转化及碳固存效果有着显著的响应。为了探明在还田条件下,不同类型秸秆及其碳氮含量对土壤微生物量和呼吸的影响,研究将玉米和大豆不同植株部位秸秆与耕层黑土混合,置于25℃恒温条件下培养61 d。在第61 d测定土壤的微生物量碳( MBC)、微生物量氮( MBN)、矿质态氮和微生物呼吸速率,并分析比较它们在不同处理中的差异及其与秸秆C、 N含量之间的相互关系。结果显示,不同类型秸秆添加下的土壤MBC大小表现为:大豆根>玉米茎下部>大豆茎>玉米叶>玉米茎顶部>玉米根>大豆叶,土壤MBN的大小表现为:玉米茎下部>玉米叶>大豆根>玉米根>玉米茎顶部>大豆茎>大豆叶。除大豆叶外,其它处理的土壤MBC/MBN均显著小于空白处理。秸秆含碳量与MBC、 MBN、 MBC/MBN、微生物呼吸速率、呼吸熵之间均有显著的相关关系,而秸秆含碳量与土壤矿质氮含量之间有极显著的负相关关系。土壤MBC、微生物呼吸速率、微生物呼吸熵均与秸秆含氮量呈明显负相关关系。不同秸秆添加下的微生物呼吸速率和呼吸熵的大小表现基本一致,且呼吸速率、呼吸熵两者之间具有极显著的相关关系。大豆茎、大豆叶的呼吸速率和呼吸熵显著大于玉米秸秆2倍左右。研究说明秸秆还田促进了细菌、放线菌等C/N较低的微生物生长繁殖,含氮量高的秸秆不利于还田后期微生物生物量、微生物呼吸速率及活性的保持,土壤微生物活性比微生物量对秸秆分解、微生物呼吸速率的影响更大。图1,表3,参33。%Soil microbial biomass play an important role in the decomposition and transformation of residues returned to soil .In order to evaluate the effects of residue types and its carbon and nitrogen concentration on soil microbial biomass and

  8. 哀牢山山顶苔藓矮林林冠腐殖土的养分含量和微生物生物量特征%Physical and Chemical Properties and Microbial Biomass of Canopy Soil in the Montane Cloud Forest in Ailao Mountains

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李泽西; 刘文耀; 陈林; 宋亮

    2011-01-01

    山顶苔藓矮林是中国西南地区热带、亚热带高山顶部一类重要而特殊的湿性常绿阔叶林,附生植物非常发达,其中以分解、半分解枯死残留物为主的林冠腐殖土是山地森林生态系统一个重要的养分库.以云南哀牢山山顶苔藓矮林为对象,对其林冠腐殖土及林下0~10 cm,10~20 cm和20~40 cm地表不同深度土壤的营养元素含量、微生物生物量及呼吸速率等进行了分析和测定.结果表明,该山顶苔藓矮林中林冠腐殖土中有机C、全N、全Ca、全P和全Na的含量,水解N、NH4+-N与NO3-N以及速效K、速效P的含量明显地高于林下地表各层土壤;在土壤微生物生物量C、N和呼吸速率方面,雨季大于旱季,林冠腐殖土明显高于林下地表冠层土壤,而且随着林地土层深度的增加,其养分含量和生化活性出现出显著下降的趋势.林冠腐殖土较高的养分含量和生化活性在林冠繁茂的附生植物生长发育和维持林冠附生植物多样性格局方面具有重要的生态功能.%As an important component of the mossy dwarf forest (MDF), canopy soil provides essential substrates and nutrients for the growth of abundant epiphytes. In this study, nutrient status, microbial biomass and soil respiration of the canopy soil and forest floor soils at different depths (0 ~ 10 cm, 10 ~20 cm and 20 ~40 cm) were analyzed and comprised in MDF in Ailao Mountain, Yunnan. The concentrations of organic C, total N, total Ca, total P, total Na and cation exchange capacity were significantly higher in the canopy soil than forest floor soil. The higher concentration of available K, available P, available N, NH4 + - N, and NO3 - - N were also found in the canopy soil while it decreased gradually with increase of soil depth in the forest floor. The microbial C, N, and respiration rate were greater in the canopy soil than soil on the forest floor. The forest canopy soil has an important ecological function

  9. Stable N isotope values of black spruce ecosystem components integrate source N isotope values, soil fertility, and microbial biomass: a natural and experimental study from Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayor, J. R.; Schuur, T.; Mack, M. C.; Nettelton Hollingsworth, T.; Bååth, E.

    2009-12-01

    The productivity and ecosystem dynamics of many northern ecosystems are limited by nitrogen (N) availability. Understanding N dynamics is especially important in boreal forests where slight changes in N availability can have profound effects on ecosystem productivity and diversity of plants and microbes. However, because N cycling processes vary profoundly in time and space, assessing ecosystem N supply and cycling pathways are difficult even with frequent measurements. Recent soil, plant, and fungal meta-analyses have indicated that stable isotopes of N may provide just such an integrative measure of N cycling by recording pathways of N flux through ecosystems. Here we present N stable isotope patterns across 30 plots varying in natural fertility and in 4 blocks of 16 experimentally fertilized plots of mature black spruce forest in central Alaska. We measured soil N isotope ratios of NO3, NH4, and salt extracted dissolved organic N (DON) using persulfate oxidation coupled to the bacterial denitrifier technique. The soil N isotope values varied from 15 to -26‰ across the landscape and were a poor predictor of the variability in plant N isotope values ranging from 5-11‰. Instead a combination of fungal biomass (PLFA 18:2ω6,9), fungal ingrowth, cation exchange capacity, and resin extractable phosphate (P) were better explanatory variables in a multiple regression context. This suggests that plant N isotope ratios are a product of numerous soil and microbial processes and not simply a direct reflection of source N pools. Denitrification in soils and ectomycorrhizal (ECM) assimilation and delivery of N were also likely causal as each influence pathways of N cycling that can alter the N isotope values of source and receiving pools. In contrast with the very low N environment present in our natural gradient, we found that N fertilization, both singly and in conjunction with P, caused the N isotope values of foliage, fine roots, soil N, and fungal fruiting bodies to

  10. Supporting shop floor intelligence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carstensen, Peter; Schmidt, Kjeld; Wiil, Uffe Kock

    1999-01-01

    Many manufacturing enterprises are now trying to introduce various forms of flexible work organizations on the shop floor. However, existing computer-based production planning and control systems pose severe obstacles for autonomous working groups and other kinds of shop floor control to become r......-to-day production planning by supporting intelligent and responsible workers in their situated coordination activities on the shop floor....

  11. School Flooring Factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGrath, John

    2012-01-01

    With all of the hype that green building is receiving throughout the school facility-management industry, it's easy to overlook some elements that may not be right in front of a building manager's nose. It is helpful to examine the role floor covering plays in a green building project. Flooring is one of the most significant and important systems…

  12. Microbial Energy Production from Biomass

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Plugge, C.M.; Lier, van J.B.; Stams, A.J.M.; Jeison, D.A.

    2010-01-01

    In the context of wastewater treatment, Bioelectrochemical Systems (BESs) have gained considerable interest in the past few years, and several BES processes are on the brink of application to this area. This book, written by a large number of world experts in the different sub-topics, describes the

  13. Spatial Variability of Plant Available Water, Soil Organic Carbon, and Microbial Biomass under Divergent Land Uses: A Comparison among Regression-Kriging, Cokriging, and Regression-Cokriging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiani, M.; Hernandez Ramirez, G.; Quideau, S.

    2016-12-01

    Improved knowledge about the spatial variability of plant available water (PAW), soil organic carbon (SOC), and microbial biomass carbon (MBC) as affected by land-use systems can underpin the identification and inventory of beneficial ecosystem good and services in both agricultural and wild lands. Little research has been done that addresses the spatial patterns of PAW, SOC, and MBC under different land use types at a field scale. Therefore, we collected 56 soil samples (5-10 cm depth increment), using a nested cyclic sampling design within both a native grassland (NG) site and an irrigated cultivated (IC) site located near Brooks, Alberta. Using classical statistical and geostatistical methods, we characterized the spatial heterogeneities of PAW, SOC, and MBC under NG and IC using several geostatistical methods such as ordinary kriging (OK), regression-kriging (RK), cokriging (COK), and regression-cokriging (RCOK). Converting the native grassland to irrigated cultivated land altered soil pore distribution by reducing macroporosity which led to lower saturated water content and half hydraulic conductivity in IC compared to NG. This conversion also decreased the relative abundance of gram-negative bacteria, while increasing both the proportion of gram-positive bacteria and MBC concentration. At both studied sites, the best fitted spatial model was Gaussian based on lower RSS and higher R2 as criteria. The IC had stronger degree of spatial dependence and longer range of spatial auto-correlation revealing a homogenization of the spatial variability of soil properties as a result of intensive, recurrent agricultural activities. Comparison of OK, RK, COK, and RCOK approaches indicated that cokriging method had the best performance demonstrating a profound improvement in the accuracy of spatial estimations of PAW, SOC, and MBC. It seems that the combination of terrain covariates such as elevation and depth-to-water with kriging techniques offers more capability for

  14. Evaluation of microbial biomass C and N content of the soils cultivated with vetch (Vicia sativa L. and alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    İlyas Bolat

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Legume forage crops have the ability of retaining free nitrogen in the air through symbiotic Rhizobium bacteria found in their roots. Additionally, microbial biomass (MB–an essential living component of soil and a significant factor influencing plant nutrient dynamics–is considered to be accurate indicator of soil’s biological condition. Given the aforementioned aspects, soil MB C (Cmic and MB N (Nmic of different legume forage crops were investigated in this study. Soil samples were taken in order to identify certain physical and chemical characteristics of the soil using volume cylinders (0 – 6.5 cm depth from Vicia sativa L. (VSP and Medicago sativa L. planted (MSP areas. To determine the Cmic and Nmic contents, topsoil samples were also taken from 0 – 6.5 cm depth. Cmic and Nmic contents were identified using chloroform – fumigation – extraction method. There was no statistical significance for particle density, bulk density, electrical conductivity, CaCO3 %, and decomposition ratio (Corg/Ntotal of the VSP and MSP soil (P > 0.05. However, some other soil characteristics such as temperature, porosity, sand, silt and clay contents, pH, organic C and total N differed significantly (P < 0.05. Compared to VSP soil, the Cmic contents were determined to be 27 % higher (P < 0.05 in MSP soil. In VSP soil, the soil Nmic content ranged from 83.38 µg g-1 to 124.67 µg g-1, while it ranged from 91.62 µg g-1 to 187.07 µg g-1 in MSP soil. The Nmic content of the MSP soil was observed to be approximately 35 % higher than VSP soil, and a statistically significant difference (P < 0.05 was noticed between the two. Moreover, a significant positive correlation was found not only between the Cmic and organic C contents (r = 0.667; P < 0.05 but also between the Nmic and total N contents of MSP and VSP soil (r = 0.881; P < 0.01. The results of the study revealed that soil Cmic and Nmic values differ as the types of planted legume forage crops

  15. Water-Extractable Carbon Pools and Microbial Biomass Carbon in Sodic Water-Irrigated Soils Amended with Gypsum and Organic Manures

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    O.P.CHOUDHARY; J.K.GILL; BIJAY-SINGH

    2013-01-01

    Microbial biomass carbon (MBC),a small fraction of soil organic matter,has a rapid turnover rate and is a reservoir of labile nutrients.The water-extractable carbon pools provide a fairly good estimate of labile C present in soil and can be easily quantified.Changes in soil MBC and water-extractable organic carbon pools were studied in a 14-year long-term experiment in plots of rice-wheat rotation irrigated with canal water (CW),sodic water (SW,10-12.5 mmolc L-1 residual sodium carbonate),and SW amended with gypsum with or without application of organic amendments including farmyard manure (FYM),green manure (GM),and wheat straw (WS).Irrigation with SW increased soil exchangeable sodium percentage by more than 13 times compared to irrigation with CW.Sodic water irrigation significantly decreased hot water-extractable organic carbon (HWOC) from 330 to 286 mg kg-1 soil and cold water-extractable organic carbon (CWOC) from 53 to 22 mg kg-1 soil in the top 0-7.5 cm soil layer.In the lower soil layer (7.5-15 cm),reduction in HWOC was not significant.Application of gypsum alone resulted in a decrease in HWOC in the SW plots,whereas an increase was recorded in the SW plots with application of both gypsum and organic amendments in both the soil layers.Nevertheless,application of gypsum and organic amendments increased the mean CWOC as compared with application of gypsum alone.CWOC was significantly correlated with MBC but did not truly reflect the changes in MBC in the treatments with gypsum and organic amendments applied.For the treatments without organic amendments,HWOC was negatively correlated with MBC (r =-0.57*)in the 0-7.5 cm soil layer,whereas for the treatments with organic amendments,both were positively correlated.Irrigation with SW significantly reduced the rice yield by 3 t ha-1 and the yield of rice and wheat by 5 t ha-1 as compared to irrigation with canal water.Application of amendments significantly increased rice and wheat yields.Both the rice yield and

  16. Atividade microbiana, carbono e nitrogênio da biomassa microbiana em plantações de eucalipto, em seqüência de idades Activity, carbon and nitrogen of microbial biomass in eucalypt plantations in an age sequence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrícia Anjos Bittencourt Barreto

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Em plantações florestais, a atividade microbiana tem grande relevância para a ciclagem de nutrientes e a fertilidade do solo, uma vez que esses ecossistemas, devido a seus característicos longos períodos de rotação, proporcionam um contínuo aporte de serapilheira e morte de raízes, que contribuem para a manutenção e elevação do teor de matéria orgânica do solo. O objetivo deste trabalho foi caracterizar a atividade e a biomassa microbiana em solos sob plantações de eucalipto em distintas idades de cultivo. Foram avaliadas alterações na biomassa e atividade microbiana em solo e serapilheira de plantações de eucalipto com 1, 3, 5 e 13 anos de idade crescendo sob condições edafoclimáticas semelhantes. Encontraram-se maiores teores de C e N microbiano da serapilheira do que no solo, sugerindo que a serapilheira seria uma importante reserva de C e N microbiano em povoamentos de eucalipto. Não se verificou tendência de aumento ou diminuição da biomassa e da atividade microbiana com as idades das plantações, o que, provavelmente, decorreu do fato dos povoamentos estudados corresponderem a áreas de reforma. A qualidade orgânica da serapilheira influenciou diretamente a atividade, o C e N da biomassa microbiana da serapilheira. Os indicadores mais sensíveis para aferir variações dos solos das plantações de eucalipto foram os teores de C orgânico e N total, e na serapilheira foram os atributos microbianos, os teores de celulose, lignina e N.Microbial activity is highly relevant for nutrient cycling and soil fertility in forest plantations. Due to the long growth cycles, continuous litter production and dead roots contribute to storage and increase of soil organic matter. Changes in soil and litter microbial biomass and activity under 1, 3, 5 and 13-year-old eucalypt plantations were evaluated. Soil and climate conditions were the same at the sites. Microbial biomass C and N were higher in litter than in soil. Then

  17. Path Analysis Between Soil Microbial Biomass and Soil Nutrient Contents in Cover Cropping System of Vineyard%行间生草葡萄园土壤微生物量与土壤养分的通径分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    惠竹梅; 岳泰新; 张振文

    2011-01-01

    Two perennial legumes (white clover and alfalfa) and a perennial grass (tall fescue) were sown in inter-rows of Cabernet sauvignon vineyard. The effects of inter-row cover cropping on soil microbial bio-mass, respiration strengths, microbial quotient, soil nutrient contents and their relationships were studied with clean tillage as control. Results showed that white clover and alfalfa increased the contents of soil organic matter and soil total N significantly, and decreased available P contents; tall fescue significantly decreased soil organic matter and available K contents. The soil microbial biomass carbon contents of white clover, alfalfa and tall fescue increased 65. 2% , 61. 6% ,6. 7% , respectively, and soil microbial biomass nitrogen contents increased 53. 6% , 52. 4% , 15. 0% , respectively, compared with control. The soil microbial quotients in cover cropping treatments were increased significantly, but the soil respirations had no significant differences between cover crop treatments and control. The soil microbial indicators showed significant positive correlations with soil organic matter, total N, hydrolyzable N and available K, and significant negative correlations with total P and available P. Path analysis indicated that in the vineyard intercropping system, soil hydrolyzable N and total N were direct factors affecting the accumulation of soil microbial biomass, respiration strengths and microbial quotient.%在酿酒葡萄(Vitis vini era)园行间播种白三叶草(Tri folium repens L.)、紫花苜蓿(Medicago sativa L.)和高羊茅(Festuca arundinacea Schreb),以清耕为对照,研究了土壤微生物量、土壤微生物呼吸强度和土壤微生物熵的变化及其与土壤养分的关系.结果表明:与清耕(对照)相比,白三叶草和紫花苜蓿处理显著提高了土壤有机质、全氮含量,显著降低了速效磷含量;而高羊茅处理土壤有机质和速效钾含量显著低于清耕.白三叶草、紫花苜蓿和高羊

  18. A Sea Floor Penetrometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    processed through an analog-to-digital (A/D) converter, and stored in the memory of a mini-computer. Computer algorithms are applied to the deceleration data to provide real-time sea floor classification.

  19. Radiant Floor Cooling Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Bjarne W.

    2008-01-01

    In many countries, hydronic radiant floor systems are widely used for heating all types of buildings such as residential, churches, gymnasiums, hospitals, hangars, storage buildings, industrial buildings, and smaller offices. However, few systems are used for cooling.This article describes a floor...... cooling system that includes such considerations as thermal comfort of the occupants, which design parameters will influence the cooling capacity and how the system should be controlled. Examples of applications are presented....

  20. Carbono orgânico e biomassa microbiana do solo em plantios de Acacia mangium no Cerrado de Roraima Soil organic carbon and soil microbial biomass in Acacia mangium plantation in the Savanna of Roraima

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Magda Oliveira Simões

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo do estudo foi avaliar os efeitos de plantios de Acacia mangium, localizados no cerrado em Roraima, sobre o carbono orgânico e biomassa microbiana do solo. Foram realizadas amostragens de solo nas profundidades de 0-20 cm e 20-40 cm em dois plantios de A. mangium com cerca de cinco anos de idade, e em duas áreas de Cerrado nativo consideradas referência. Um dos plantios de A. mangium (localizado na Fazenda Cigolina correspondeu a um plantio homogêneo (espa��amento de 3,6 m entre linhas e 2,0 m entre plantas enquanto que o outro (localizado no Campo Experimental Água Boa - CEAB correspondeu a um plantio em faixas com duas linhas de plantio (espaçamento de 6 m entre linhas, 2,5 m entre plantas e cerca de 30 m entre faixas. As amostras de solo foram analisadas quanto ao carbono orgânico, carbono da biomassa microbiana, respiração basal do solo e quociente metabólico, além de atributos químicos de fertilidade. Foi verificado que os plantios de A. mangium não proporcionaram aumentos significativos do carbono orgânico do solo em comparação às áreas de referência. Entretanto, na média geral, esses plantios proporcionaram aumento do carbono da biomassa microbiana do solo e redução do quociente metabólico, indicando a possibilidade de acúmulo de carbono orgânico no solo em longo prazo. Também foi observado que, em comparação ao plantio da fazenda Cigolina e às áreas de referência, o carbono microbiano do solo foi maior e acompanhado de menor quociente metabólico no plantio de A. mangium no CEAB, mostrando que a estrutura de plantio exerceu influência sobre a biomassa microbiana do solo.The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of Acacia mangium plantation in the Roraima's Savanna, on soil organic carbon and soil microbial biomass. Soil samplings were collected on the depths of 0-20 cm and 20-40 cm in two Acacia mangium plantation sites, about five years old, and in two sites of native savanna as

  1. Carbono, nitrogênio e atividade da biomassa microbiana em diferentes estruturas de serapilheira de uma floresta natural Carbon, nitrogen, and microbial biomass activity in different litter structures of a natural forest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. T. Monteiro

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo deste trabalho foi avaliar a influência da qualidade nutricional e orgânica sobre a atividade C e N da biomassa microbiana em diferentes estruturas da serapilheira de uma mata atlântica montana no entorno do Parque Estadual do Desengano-RJ. As amostras de serapilheira foram coletadas em setembro de 1999. Realizou-se a separação das estruturas em: folhas, galhos e raízes superficiais; mistura de material mais fragmentado (estrutura F e matéria orgânica menor que 2 mm (estrutura H. A qualidade nutricional e orgânica da serapilheira influenciou a atividade da biomassa microbiana. Das estruturas, as folhas apresentaram uma biomassa microbiana mais eficiente na imobilização de C e N. O qCO2 foi um indicador de condições de estresse, presença de celulose e polifenol, para a biomassa microbiana nas diferentes estruturas. Utilizando a técnica de agrupamento de Tocher, observou-se a formação de três grupos distintos. Um constituído pelas raízes superficiais e estrutura H; o segundo pelas folhas e o terceiro grupo pela estrutura F. Por meio da contribuição relativa dos caracteres para a divergência entre as estruturas, a variável que mais contribuiu foi a relação polifenol: N, seguida do carbono da biomassa microbiana, polifenol, celusose e relação lignina: N.The objective of this work was to evaluate the influence of the organic and nutritional quality on the activity and C and N contents of the microbial biomass in different structures of litter from a Mountain Atlantic Forest from around the Desengano State Park-RJ, Brazil. Litter samples were collected in September 1999. The litter structures were leaves, branches, and superficial roots; fine debris (F structure; and organic matter smaller than 2 mm (H structure. The nutritional and organic litter quality influenced the activity of the microbial biomass. The leaves had the most efficient microbial biomass in the immobilization of C and N. The qCO2 (metabolic

  2. Alterações na biomassa e na atividade microbiana da serapilheira e do solo, em decorrência da substituição de cobertura florestal nativa por plantações de eucalipto, em diferentes sítios da Região Sudeste do Brasil Microbial biomass and activity in soil and forest litter of eucalyptus plantations and native vegetation in Southeastern Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emanuela Forestieri da Gama-Rodrigues

    2008-08-01

    caused by management techniques. In this study, these characteristics were used to evaluate changes in forest litter and soil where the native forest was replaced by eucalyptus plantations in four southeastern areas of Brazil. The amounts of forest litter were higher in eucalyptus stands than in the native forest due to the higher C:N ratio of the material. The impact of the conversion of native forest into eucalyptus stands on soil and forest floor properties varied in the site-specific characteristics analyzed. Differences between the contents of microbial biomass C and N in eucalypt and native vegetation were more frequently observed in the soil than in forest litter. Forest litter microbial biomass represented a larger reservoir of C and N than soil microbial biomass, representing a relevant component for C and N cycling in these ecosystems.

  3. [Pelvic floor and pregnancy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fritel, X

    2010-05-01

    Congenital factor, obesity, aging, pregnancy and childbirth are the main risk factors for female pelvic floor disorders (urinary incontinence, anal incontinence, pelvic organ prolapse, dyspareunia). Vaginal delivery may cause injury to the pudendal nerve, the anal sphincter, or the anal sphincter. However the link between these injuries and pelvic floor symptoms is not always determined and we still ignore what might be the ways of prevention. Of the many obstetrical methods proposed to prevent postpartum symptoms, episiotomy, delivery in vertical position, delayed pushing, perineal massage, warm pack, pelvic floor rehabilitation, results are disappointing or limited. Caesarean section is followed by less postnatal urinary incontinence than vaginal childbirth. However this difference tends to disappear with time and following childbirth. Limit the number of instrumental extractions and prefer the vacuum to forceps could reduce pelvic floor disorders after childbirth. Ultrasound examination of the anal sphincter after a second-degree perineal tear is useful to detect and repair infra-clinic anal sphincter lesions. Scientific data is insufficient to justify an elective cesarean section in order to avoid pelvic floor symptoms in a woman without previous disorders.

  4. Enzyme activity and microbial biomass in an Oxisol amended with sewage sludge contaminated with nickel Atividade enzimática e biomassa microbiana num Latossolo tratado com lodo de esgoto contaminado com níquel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcos Donizeti Revoredo

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available The role of nickel in soils of tropical areas under the application of sewage sludge is still not very well known. This study was carried out under greenhouse conditions in Jaboticabal, São Paulo State, Brazil, with the objective of evaluating the impact of the application of sewage sludge previously contaminated with rates of nickel (329, 502, 746 and 1119 mg kg-1, dry basis on a soil cropped with sorghum, in relation to soil enzyme activity and soil microbial biomass. Soil samples were collected at the beginning and the end of the experiment. The experimental design was completely randomized, with five treatments (control and four rates of Ni in the sewage sludge and four replications. C and N of the soil microbial biomass and enzyme activities (acid and alkaline phosphatases were sensitive indicators for impact evaluation caused by sewage sludge contaminated with nickel. There were positive correlations between "total" and extractable nickel (Mehlich 1 with C-microbial biomass and negative with the microbial C/N relationship. N-microbial biomass correlated positively with "total" and extractable Ni at the last sampling. At the end of the experiment, the acid phosphatase activity correlated negatively with "total" Ni while the alkaline phosphatase correlated with both forms of the metal.O comportamento do níquel em solos de regiões tropicais, principalmente quando adicionado através de lodos de esgoto, ainda é pouco conhecido. O estudo foi conduzido em casa de vegetação, localizada no município de Jaboticabal, Estado de São Paulo, Brasil, com o objetivo de avaliar o impacto da aplicação de lodo de esgoto contaminado com níquel (329, 502, 746 e 1119 mg kg-1, base seca sobre a atividade enzimática e a biomassa microbiana de um solo cultivado com sorgo. As amostras de solo foram coletadas em duas épocas (início e final do experimento. O delineamento utilizado foi o inteiramente casualizado, com cinco tratamentos (testemunha

  5. Cooling Floor AC Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jun, Lu; Hao, Ding; Hong, Zhang; Ce, Gao Dian

    The present HVAC equipments for the residential buildings in the Hot-summer-and-Cold-winter climate region are still at a high energy consuming level. So that the high efficiency HVAC system is an urgently need for achieving the preset government energy saving goal. With its advantage of highly sanitary, highly comfortable and uniform of temperature field, the hot-water resource floor radiation heating system has been widely accepted. This paper has put forward a new way in air-conditioning, which combines the fresh-air supply unit and such floor radiation system for the dehumidification and cooling in summer or heating in winter. By analyze its advantages and limitations, we found that this so called Cooling/ Heating Floor AC System can improve the IAQ of residential building while keep high efficiency quality. We also recommend a methodology for the HVAC system designing, which will ensure the reduction of energy cost of users.

  6. Biomassa e atividade microbianas do solo sob influência de chumbo e da rizosfera da soja micorrizada Soil microbial biomass and activity under the influence of lead addition and mycorrhizal soybean rhizosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Adrián López de Andrade

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo deste trabalho foi avaliar o efeito da adição de chumbo (Pb ao solo na biomassa e atividade microbianas do solo sob influência da rizosfera de soja micorrizada. O trabalho foi realizado em casa de vegetação, com delineamento inteiramente casualizado num esquema fatorial 4x2x2 utilizando-se 0, 150, 300 e 600 mg dm-3 de Pb, inoculação ou não do fungo micorrízico arbuscular (FMA, Glomus macrocarpum, e duas épocas de amostragem - florescimento e maturação da soja. Avaliaram-se o C da biomassa microbiana, a liberação de CO2 do solo e a atividade de três enzimas, desidrogenase, fosfatase alcalina e arilssulfatase. O Pb afetou negativamente o C da biomassa e a atividade da microbiota rizosférica, ocorrendo interação entre a presença de propágulos de FMA e o estádio de desenvolvimento da planta. A atividade da fosfatase alcalina foi a mais afetada pelas altas concentrações de Pb adicionadas ao solo, com redução de 60% na sua atividade, mostrando-se um indicador sensível do estresse metabólico da comunidade microbiana do solo causado pelo excesso de chumbo. A micorrização da soja influenciou de forma direta a microbiota rizosférica, resultando em maior atividade e biomassa, principalmente no estádio de maturação da soja. A microbiota do solo apresentou sintomas de estresse decorrentes da adição de chumbo.The objective of this work was to evaluate the effects of lead addition on soil microbial biomass and activity under the influence of the rhizosphere of mycorrhizal soybean. The experimental design was completely randomized and arranged in a 4x2x2 factorial scheme, using 0, 150, 300 and 600 mg dm-3, inoculation or not of the arbuscular mycorrhizal fungus (AMF Glomus macrocarpum and two sampling periods: soybean flowering and maturity. Microbial biomass C, soil respiration and the activity of three soil enzymes (deshydrogenase, alkaline phosphatase and arilsulphatase were determined. The most affected enzyme

  7. 控释肥膜壳对土壤酶活性及微生物量碳氮磷的影响%Effects of Controlled-Release Fertilizer Residual Coating on Enzyme and Microbial Biomass Carbon Nitrogen Phosphorus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孔静; 刘双; 徐林林; 董元杰; 王艳华

    2012-01-01

    选用硫膜和树脂膜两种肥料膜壳,每种设置3个浓度梯度,研究了控释肥膜壳对土壤酶活性及微生物量碳氮磷的影响。结果表明,施用硫膜和树脂膜一定程度上对土壤生物学性质产生了影响。膜壳对土壤酶活性的影响主要表现在对脲酶和过氧化氢酶活性上,而对土壤磷酸酶活性影响不大。成熟期施用硫膜和树脂膜处理显著提高了土壤脲酶活性,这与结荚期有所不同,说明硫膜能提高花生成熟期土壤脲酶活性。树脂膜和硫膜处理均以中等量(2g/kg)处理时微生物量碳和氮含量最大,施用控释肥残膜处理显著降低了微生物量磷含量。%Sulfur film and resin film were used in this study, and each membrane shell was set by three concent.ration gradients. We studied the effects of the membrane shell on soil enzyme activities and microbial biomass carbon nitrogen and phosphorus. The results showed that application of sulfur film and resin film caused a certain extent effect on soil biological properties and the membrane shell caused a significantly effect on the urease and catalase activities, and little effect on soil phosphatase activity. At maturity stage, the sulfur mem- brane treatments significantly increased soil urease activity, which was different from the podding stage. was biggest of microbial biomass carbon and nitrogen content when the aoplication rate was moderate There (2g/kg). In addition, application of sulfur film and resin film significantly reduced the microbial biomass phosphorus content.

  8. Effect of different farming methods on soil microbial biomass and soil fertility%耕作方式对土壤微生物和土壤肥力的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李升东; 王法宏; 司纪升; 孔令安; 刘建军; 冯波; 张宾

    2009-01-01

    通过2年田间定位试验,对比研究了免耕+秸秆覆盖、旋耕+秸秆覆盖和传统耕作:三种耕作方式对土壤温度、土壤呼吸速率、土壤微生物数量和土壤肥力状况的影响.结果表明:秸秆覆盖对地温的影响存在"双重效应";土壤温度、土壤呼吸速率和土壤微生物量碳三者之间存在凸面关系;秸秆还田后耕作措施对土壤0~10和10~20 cm的微生物数量的影响不同,但均能增加土壤微生物量;土壤微生物能够加快秸秆中的有机碳向土壤有机质的转化速率;土壤微生物量碳可以作为反映土壤生产力状况的重要生物学指标之一.%The ability of agrosystems to increase soil organic matter by sequestering atmospheric CO_2 and restoring organic matter pools is of importance for crop production. An experiment was conducted over 2006 to 2008 cropping years to investigate the dy-namics of soil microbial biomass and soil fertility in wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) fields. The results showed that residue retention had dual effects on soil temperature. A positive relationship between soil temperature and soil respiration rate was consistently ob-served over these years. Residue retention increased soil microbial biomass at 0~10 and 10~20 cm depths with three planting meth-ods. Soil microorganism enhanced the transformation of straw organic carbon to soil organic matter. Based on these data, we con-clude that soil microbial biomass may be as a biological indicator to reflect soil productivity.

  9. Temperature dependence of nitrogen mineralization and microbial status in OH horizon of a temperate forest ecosystem

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ali Bagherzadeh; Rainer Brumme; Friedrich Beese

    2008-01-01

    It was hypothesized that increasing air and/or soil temperature would increase rates of microbial processes including litter decomposition and net N mineralization, resulting in greater sequestration of carbon and nitrogen in humus, and consequently development in OH horizon (humus horizon). To quantify the effect of temperature on biochemical processes controlling the rate of OH layer development three adjacent forest floors under beech, Norway spruce and mixed species stands were investigated at Solling forest, Germany by an incubation experiment of OH layer for three months. Comparing the fitted curves for temperature sensitivity of OH layers in relation to net N mineralization revealed positive correlation across all sites. For the whole data set of all stands, a Q10 (temperature sensitivity index) value of 2.35-2.44 dependent on the measured units was found to be adequate for describing the temperature dependency of net N mineralization at experimental site. Species-specific differences of substrate quality did not result in changes in biochemical properties of OH horizon of the forest floors. Temperature elevation increased net N mineralization without significant changes in microbial status in the range of 1 to 15℃. A low Cmic /Corg (microbial carbon/organic carbon) ratio at 20℃ indicated that the resource availability for decomposers has been restricted as reflected in significant decrease of microbial biomass.

  10. Microbial gardening in the ocean's twilight zone: detritivorous metazoans benefit from fragmenting, rather than ingesting, sinking detritus: fragmentation of refractory detritus by zooplankton beneath the euphotic zone stimulates the harvestable production of labile and nutritious microbial biomass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayor, Daniel J; Sanders, Richard; Giering, Sarah L C; Anderson, Thomas R

    2014-12-01

    Sinking organic particles transfer ∼10 gigatonnes of carbon into the deep ocean each year, keeping the atmospheric CO2 concentration significantly lower than would otherwise be the case. The exact size of this effect is strongly influenced by biological activity in the ocean's twilight zone (∼50-1,000 m beneath the surface). Recent work suggests that the resident zooplankton fragment, rather than ingest, the majority of encountered organic particles, thereby stimulating bacterial proliferation and the deep-ocean microbial food web. Here we speculate that this apparently counterintuitive behaviour is an example of 'microbial gardening', a strategy that exploits the enzymatic and biosynthetic capabilities of microorganisms to facilitate the 'gardener's' access to a suite of otherwise unavailable compounds that are essential for metazoan life. We demonstrate the potential gains that zooplankton stand to make from microbial gardening using a simple steady state model, and we suggest avenues for future research.

  11. Microbial community biomass and structure in saline and non-saline soils associated with salt, boran tolerant poplar clones grown for the phytoremediation of selenium

    Science.gov (United States)

    The effect of naturally-occurring salts, boron (B), and selenium (Se) on soil microbial community composition associated with plants during different growing seasons used in bioremediation strategies is not known. This information is needed for developing sustainable remediation practices as soil mi...

  12. Pelvic floor muscle function in women with pelvic floor dysfunction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tibaek, Sigrid; Dehlendorff, Christian

    2014-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to investigate the level of pelvic floor muscle (PFM) function in women with pelvic floor dysfunction (PFD) referred by gynaecologists and urologists for in-hospital pelvic floor muscle training (PFMT), and to identity associated factors for a low level of PFM fu...

  13. Effects of applying coal ash and fertilizers on soil microbial biomass and enzyme activity%粉煤灰结合施肥对土壤微生物和酶活性的效应

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杜慧玲; 李恋卿; 潘根兴; 王建锁; 姚永平; 张俊珍

    2001-01-01

    在以前对粉煤灰改良石灰性土壤对其理化性质和养分效应研究的基础上,分析了小麦不同生育期土壤中微生物数量和几种重要的土壤酶的活性,旨在探讨石灰性褐土施用粉煤灰配合有机肥对土壤环境生物质量的效应。结果表明,每公顷施用粉煤灰150 t以上显著提高了土壤中各种微生物的数量,对土壤酶活性也有显著的作用,尤其是对小麦灌浆期脲酶的活性有显著的促进作用。因此,施用粉煤灰可以改善土壤的生物活性,从而达到保护和治理土壤环境的效果。%The paper analyzed the soil microbial biomass and soil enzymes activity during wheat growth stages for studying the effects of applying coal ash, chemical fertilizer and green manure on soil biological quality in calcic cinnamon clay soils. The results showed that the soil microbial biomass and enzyme activity were increased especially for urease enzyme in wheat milking stage when the application rate was 150 t/hm2 for coal ash.

  14. Pelvic floor muscle training exercises

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003975.htm Pelvic floor muscle training exercises To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Pelvic floor muscle training exercises are a series of exercises ...

  15. Bacterial Flux by Net Precipitation from the Phyllosphere to the Forest Floor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pound, P.; Van Stan, J. T., II; Moore, L. D.; Bittar, T.

    2016-12-01

    Transport pathways of microbes between ecosystem spheres (atmosphere, phyllosphere, and pedosphere) represent major fluxes in nutrient cycles and have the potential to significantly affect microbial ecological processes. We quantified a previously unexamined microbial flux from the phyllosphere to the pedosphere during rainfall and found it to be substantial. Net rainfall bacterial fluxes for throughfall and stemflow were quantified using flow cytometry and a quantitative Polymerase Chain Reaction (qPCR) assay for a Quercus virginiana (Mill., southern live oak) forest with heavy epiphyte cover of Tillandsia usneoides (L., Spanish moss) and Pleopeltis polypodiodes (L., resurrection fern) in coastal Georgia (Southeast USA). Total net precipitation flux of bacteria was 15 quadrillion cells year-1 ha-1, which (assuming a bacterial cell mass of 1 pg) is approximately 15 kg of bacterial biomass supply per year. Stemflow generation was low in this stand (rarely exceeded 10 L storm-1) yet still delivered half the annual net precipitation flux due to high bacterial concentration. The role of this previously unquantified bacterial flux in the forest floor has also been under studied, yet it may be significant by contributing functional community members (if living) or labile lysates (if dead).

  16. The Influence of Stress Treatments on the Microbial Biomass and the Rate of Decomposition of Humified Matter in Soils Containing Different Amounts of Clay

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Lasse Holst

    1983-01-01

    with CHCl3. Air-drying, C addition (unlabeled glucose), heating (80.degree. C), and grinding of the soils accelerated the evolution of labeled CO2. Grinding and heating had the largest effect, increasing CO2 evolution during the first 10 days by a factor of 15 to 22 relative to untreated soil. Air......-drying had the least effect; it increased the CO2 evolution 7-9 times. The accelerating effect was still measurable during the 3rd month of incubation when the CO2 evolution was 1.2 to 1.9 times that from untreated soil. The treatments also affected the labeled biomass; air-drying had the least effect...... originating from straw. The addition of unlabeled glucose accelerated the evolution of labeled CO2-C in all 4 soils. The size of the effect on CO2 evolution and on the biomass was similar to that of air-drying. Grinding killed a larger percentage of the biomass in the sandy soil than in the soils with a high...

  17. Chronic pelvic floor dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartmann, Dee; Sarton, Julie

    2014-10-01

    The successful treatment of women with vestibulodynia and its associated chronic pelvic floor dysfunctions requires interventions that address a broad field of possible pain contributors. Pelvic floor muscle hypertonicity was implicated in the mid-1990s as a trigger of major chronic vulvar pain. Painful bladder syndrome, irritable bowel syndrome, fibromyalgia, and temporomandibular jaw disorder are known common comorbidities that can cause a host of associated muscular, visceral, bony, and fascial dysfunctions. It appears that normalizing all of those disorders plays a pivotal role in reducing complaints of chronic vulvar pain and sexual dysfunction. Though the studies have yet to prove a specific protocol, physical therapists trained in pelvic dysfunction are reporting success with restoring tissue normalcy and reducing vulvar and sexual pain. A review of pelvic anatomy and common findings are presented along with suggested physical therapy management.

  18. Elevated CO2 increases Cs uptake and alters microbial communities and biomass in the rhizosphere of Phytolacca americana Linn (pokeweed) and Amaranthus cruentus L. (purple amaranth) grown on soils spiked with various levels of Cs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Ningning; Zhang, Ximei; Wang, Fangli; Zhang, Changbo; Tang, Shirong

    2012-10-01

    General concern about increasing global atmospheric CO(2) levels owing to the ongoing fossil fuel combustion and elevated levels of radionuclides in the environment, has led to growing interest in the responses of plants to interactive effects of elevated CO(2) and radionuclides in terms of phytoremediation and food safety. To assess the combined effects of elevated CO(2) and cesium contamination on plant biomass, microbial activities in the rhizosphere soil and Cs uptake, Phytolacca americana Linn (pokeweed, C3 specie) and Amaranthus cruentus L. (purple amaranth, C4 specie) were grown in pots of soils containing five levels of cesium (0, 100, 300, 500 and 1000 mg Cs kg(-1)) under two levels of CO(2) (360 and 860 μL L(-1), respectively). Shoot and root biomass of P. americana and Amaranthus crentus was generally higher under elevated CO(2) than under ambient CO(2) for all treatments. Both plant species exhibited higher Cs concentration in the shoots and roots under elevated CO(2) than ambient CO(2). For P. americana grown at 0, 100, 300, 500 and 1000 mg Cs kg(-1), the increase magnitude of Cs concentration due to elevated CO(2) was 140, 18, 11, 34 and 15% in the shoots, and 150, 20, 14, 15 and 19% in the roots, respectively. For A. cruentus, the corresponding value was 118, 28, 21, 14 and 17% in the shoots, and 126, 6, 11, 17 and 22% in the roots, respectively. Higher bioaccumulation factors were noted for both species grown under elevated CO(2) than ambient CO(2). The populations of bacteria, actinomycetes and fungi, and the microbial C and N in the rhizosphere soils of both species were higher at elevated CO(2) than at ambient CO(2) with the same concentration of Cs. The results suggested that elevated CO(2) significantly affected plant biomass, Cs uptake, soil C and N concentrations, and community composition of soil microbes associated with P. americana and A. cruentus roots. The knowledge gained from this investigation constitutes an important advancement in

  19. Bacteria diversity and microbial biomass in forest, pasture and fallow soils in the southwestern Amazon basin Diversidade de bacteria e biomassa microbiana em solos sob floresta, pastagem e capoeira no sudoeste da Amazônia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karina Cenciani

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available It is well-known that Amazon tropical forest soils contain high microbial biodiversity. However, anthropogenic actions of slash and burn, mainly for pasture establishment, induce profound changes in the well-balanced biogeochemical cycles. After a few years the grass yield usually declines, the pasture is abandoned and is transformed into a secondary vegetation called "capoeira" or fallow. The aim of this study was to examine how the clearing of Amazon rainforest for pasture affects: (1 the diversity of the Bacteria domain evaluated by Polymerase Chain Reaction and Denaturing Gradient Gel Electrophoresis (PCR-DGGE, (2 microbial biomass and some soil chemical properties (pH, moisture, P, K, Ca, Mg, Al, H + Al, and BS, and (3 the influence of environmental variables on the genetic structure of bacterial community. In the pasture soil, total carbon (C was between 30 to 42 % higher than in the fallow, and almost 47 % higher than in the forest soil over a year. The same pattern was observed for N. Microbial biomass in the pasture was about 38 and 26 % higher than at fallow and forest sites, respectively, in the rainy season. DGGE profiling revealed a lower number of bands per area in the dry season, but differences in the structure of bacterial communities among sites were better defined than in the wet season. The bacterial DNA fingerprints in the forest were stronger related to Al content and the Cmic:Ctot and Nmic:Ntot ratios. For pasture and fallow sites, the structure of the Bacteria domain was more associated with pH, sum of bases, moisture, total C and N and the microbial biomass. In general microbial biomass in the soils was influenced by total C and N, which were associated with the Bacteria domain, since the bacterial community is a component and active fraction of the microbial biomass. Results show that the genetic composition of bacterial communities in Amazonian soils changed along the sequence forest-pasture-fallow.Os solos da floresta

  20. Biomass pretreatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hennessey, Susan Marie; Friend, Julie; Elander, Richard T; Tucker, III, Melvin P

    2013-05-21

    A method is provided for producing an improved pretreated biomass product for use in saccharification followed by fermentation to produce a target chemical that includes removal of saccharification and or fermentation inhibitors from the pretreated biomass product. Specifically, the pretreated biomass product derived from using the present method has fewer inhibitors of saccharification and/or fermentation without a loss in sugar content.

  1. 放牧与围栏内蒙古针茅草原土壤微生物生物量碳、氮变化及微生物群落结构PLFA分析%Analysis of Microbial Biomass C, N and Soil Microbial Community Structure of Stipa Steppes Using PLFA at Grazing and Fenced in Inner Mongolia, China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵帅; 张静妮; 赖欣; 杨殿林; 赵建宁; 李刚; 邹雨坤

    2011-01-01

    Soil microbial biomass and community structure were analyzed by using chloroform-fumigation extraction and phospholipid fatty acid( PLFA ) methods, based on 3 different Stipe types(Stipa baicalensis meadow steppe, Stipa grandis typical steppe, and Stipa krylovii typical steppe) in Hulunbeier in Inner Mongolia. The results showed that there were significant differences in soil microbial biomass and community structure at grazing and fenced steppes inside and outside fence. Soil microbial biomass carbon, nitrogen content ranged from 166.6 mg·kg-1 to 703.5 mg·kg-1, 30.34 mg·kg-1 to 92.15 mg·kg-1, respectively. The analysis of Chloroform-fumigation extraction showed that the microbial biomass at Stipa baicalensis meadow steppe was largest, followed by Stipagrandis typical steppe, and the lowest was at Stipa krylovii typical steppe. The microbial biomass at the fenced plots in Stipa baicalensis meadow steppe and Stipa grandis typical steppe was significantly lower than that at the grazing plots, and there was no difference in Stipa krylovii typical steppe. The results of PLFAs displayed that Stipa communities in Inner Mongolia showed abundant species and quantity in soil microbial communities. Total 28 PLFAs biomarkers were detected in the soil samples, with saturated fatty acids and branched fatty acids accounting for 2/3, Stipa baicalensis meadow steppe had the highest content of fatty acid, being 27.3 nmol·g-1. The bacteria PLFAs and total PLFAs in the fenced plots were much higher than those at the grazing plots. The changes of fungi PLFAs varied with different grassland types. Grazing decreased significantly the ratio of gram-positive bacteria PLFAs/gram-negative bacterium PLFAs(GP PLFAs/GN PLFAs ) and remarkably increased the ratio of bacterial PLFAs/fnngi PLFAs except at Stipa krylovii typical steppe. Principal component analysis(PCA) indicated that soil microbial community structure was influenced by different regimes of grassland utilization, grazing

  2. Biomassa, atividade microbiana e fungos micorrízicos em solo de "landfarming" de resíduos petroquímicos Biomass, microbial activity and mycorrhizal fungi in landfarming soil of petrochemical wastes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandra M. de Paula

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Avaliaram-se, no presente trabalho, a biomassa microbiana, atividade heterotrófica e a ocorrência de fungos micorrízicos arbusculares (FMAs de um solo de área de "landfarming" de resíduo petroquímico durante 15 anos. Realizaram-se análises laboratoriais e ensaios em casa de vegetação para avaliar as condições biológicas do solo e o efeito da inoculação com FMAs (Glomus clarum e Paraglomus occultum no crescimento de seis espécies vegetais com potencial para estabelecimento nesses solos. A biomassa microbiana e os indicadores de atividade bioquímica (respiração basal, respiração induzida por substrato e qCO2 apresentaram-se em valores típicos de solos não contaminados, exceto para o qCO2, que foram bem elevados. Esses resultados indicam a presença de comunidades microbianas ativas mas se verificou baixa atividade das enzimas b-glicosidase, fosfatase ácida e urease, indicando interferências nos processos bioquímicos do solo o que poderá comprometer sua capacidade de transformar os resíduos. Verificou-se também a ocorrência abundante de FMAs em plantas espontâneas ou introduzidas. Foi notória a resposta positiva da inoculação com FMAs sobre o crescimento da alfafa, braquiária e sorgo, porém sem influência no crescimento do capim-elefante. Esses resultados apontam a existência de populações microbianas tolerantes aos componentes tóxicos dos resíduos petroquímicos aplicados continuamente ao solo estudado.In the present study the microbial biomass, heterotrophic activity and the occurrence of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF were evaluated in soil samples from a landfarming area that has been used for petrochemical waste treatment for the last fifteen years. Laboratory analysis and greenhouse assays were conducted in order to evaluate soil biological conditions and the effects of inoculation with AMF (Glomus clarum and Paraglomus occultum on growth of six plant species with potential to establish in soil

  3. Biomass recalcitrance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Felby, Claus

    2009-01-01

    , enzymatic hydrolysis, and product fermentation options. Biomass Recalcitrance is essential reading for researchers, process chemists and engineers working in biomass conversion, also plant scientists working in cell wall biology and plant biotechnology. This book examines the connection between biomass...... - this collective resistance is known as "biomass recalcitrance." Breakthrough technologies are needed to overcome barriers to developing cost-effective processes for converting biomass to fuels and chemicals. This book examines the connection between biomass structure, ultrastructure, and composition......, to resistance to enzymatic deconstruction, with the aim of discovering new cost-effective technologies for biorefineries. It contains chapters on topics extending from the highest levels of biorefinery design and biomass life-cycle analysis, to detailed aspects of plant cell wall structure, chemical treatments...

  4. Size and Persistence of the Microbial Biomass Formed during the Humification of Glucose Hemicellulose Cellulose, and Straw in Soils Containing Different Amounts of Clay

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Lasse Holst

    1983-01-01

    as CO2, compared with only 23% of the barley-C.The humified matter that remained in the soils after 3 months decayed at almost the same rate whether the origin of the matter was glucose, hemicellulose, cellulose or straw; this rate was, on the whole, independent of the caly content of the soils. Half...... straw. The half-life of labelled C in biomass during the second year of incubation ranged from 2 to 3 years.Native C in biomass ranged from 0.5 to 1.4% of the total C in native soil organic matter, the highest values occurring in the clay-rich soils. The half-life of native soil C, estimated from CO2......14C-labelled substrates were incubated at 20°C in 4 soils with clay contents ranging from 6 to 34%. Glucose was most readily decomposed, followed in order by hemicellulose, cellulose, maize straw, and barley straw. After the first 10 days of incubation, about 60% of the glucose-C had left the soils...

  5. 钒对土壤微生物生物量和酶活性的影响%Impact of Vanadium on Enzyme Activity and Microbial Biomass in Soils

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    田丽燕; 黄仁豪

    2013-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the impact of vanadium at different concentration on enzyme activity and microbial biomass in soils.[Method] Using pot experiments in the growth cabinet,we would like to investigate the changes of the soil enzyme activity and microbial biomass at different growing stages of rape (Brassica juncea L.) at different soil vanadium concentrations (soil background value was 147 mg/kg,spiked with 0,50,100,150,250 and 500 mg/kg of exogenous vanadium).[Result] Among all enzymes examined,polyphenol oxidase was most sensitive to soil vanadium.Addition of 50 mg/kg vanadium decreased its activity up to 56% of the control probably due to the vanadium toxicity.In comparison,the activities of sucrase,urease and catalase was less affected by soil vanadium.Surprisingly,the activity of sucrase,urease and catalase at the rape seedling stage differed significantly from at the maturity stage,highlighting the potential impact of plant growth on the vanadium-soil enzyme interaction.Different soil vanadium concentrations led to increases of microbial biomass to different extents.However,the correlation between soil microbial biomass carbon and phosphorus with vanadium concentrations was insignificant.This revealed that the presence of additional factors (eg.plant) affected soil microbial biomass carbon and phosphorus aside from soil vanadium.[Conclusion] Polyphenol oxidase may be considered as an indicator of soil vanadium contamination.Due to the highly complicated interaction between vanadium and soil biological activities during plant growth,more investigations are required to reveal the mechanisms beyond our findings here.%[目的]研究钒对土壤微生物生物量和酶活性的影响.[方法]采用盆栽试验,设置6个水平的外源钒添加处理(0、50、100、150、250,、500 mg/kg),测定不同钒浓度在油菜(Brassica juncea L.)生长的不同阶段对土壤微生物生物量和酶活性的影响.[结果]多酚氧化酶活性随钒浓度

  6. Biomassa e atividade microbiana do solo em sistemas de produção olerícola orgânica e convencional Biomass and soil microbial activity on horticulture organic and conventional crop systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rogério Otávio Schmidt

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available O cultivo de olerícolas pode ser produzido no sistema convencional utilizando defensivos agrícolas e fertilizantes sintéticos, ou no sistema orgânico, quando não há a utilização de defensivos sintéticos e tem como principal fonte de adubação, resíduos orgânicos. Este trabalho teve como objetivo avaliar a biomassa e a atividade microbiana do solo em sistemas de cultivo orgânico e convencional com suas respectivas áreas de referência. Para isso, foram coletadas amostras de solo em três propriedades agrícolas com sistema de cultivo convencional e outras três com sistema de cultivo orgânico, além de suas respectivas áreas de referência. Foram determinados o carbono e nitrogênio microbiano e total, e a respiração basal após 57 dias de incubação. A maior variação na taxa de respiração basal entre a área de produção e a área de referência foi observada no sistema orgânico. Os teores de nutrientes no solo, carbono e nitrogênio microbianos foram maiores nas áreas de produção do que os encontrados nas áreas de referência.The horticultural crops can be produced with the conventional system using pesticides and synthetic fertilizers, or organic system where there is no use of synthetic pesticides and its main source of nutrients are organic wastes. This study aimed to assess the biomass and soil microbial activity in organic production systems and conventional with their respective reference areas. In this study, soil samples were sampled in three farms with conventional tillage and three other with organ system, and their respective reference areas. It was determined total carbon and nitrogen and microbial, and microbial activity after 57 days of incubation. The greatest variation in basal respiration rate between the respective production area and reference area was observed in the organic system. The nutrients in the soil microbial carbon and nitrogen were higher in the production areas than those in the

  7. Biogas production from spent rose hips (Rosa canina L.): fraction separation, organic loading and co-digestion with N-rich microbial biomass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osojnik Črnivec, Ilja Gasan; Muri, Petra; Djinović, Petar; Pintar, Albin

    2014-11-01

    Complex waste streams originating from extraction processes containing residual organic solvents and increased C/N ratios have not yet been considered as feedstock for biogas production to a great extent. In this study, spent rosehip (Rosa canina L.) solid residue (64%VS, 22 MJ/kg HHV, 30C/1N) was obtained from an industrial ethanol aided extraction process, and extensively examined in an automated batch bioreactor system for biogas production. Fraction separation of the compact lignocellulosic seeds increased the available sugar and ethanol content, resulting in high biogas potential of the sieved residue (516 NL/kg VS'). In co-digestion of spent rosehip substrate with non-deactivated nitrogen rich microbial co-substrates, methanogenesis was favored (Y(m) > 68%(CH4)). In individual digestion of microbial co-substrates, this was not the case, as biogas with 28 vol.% N2 was produced from activated sludge supplement. Therefore, effective inhibition of exogenous microbiota was achieved in the presence of carbonaceous spent rose hip.

  8. [Pelvic floor muscle training and pelvic floor disorders in women].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thubert, T; Bakker, E; Fritel, X

    2015-05-01

    Our goal is to provide an update on the results of pelvic floor rehabilitation in the treatment of urinary incontinence and genital prolapse symptoms. Pelvic floor muscle training allows a reduction of urinary incontinence symptoms. Pelvic floor muscle contractions supervised by a healthcare professional allow cure in half cases of stress urinary incontinence. Viewing this contraction through biofeedback improves outcomes, but this effect could also be due by a more intensive and prolonged program with the physiotherapist. The place of electrostimulation remains unclear. The results obtained with vaginal cones are similar to pelvic floor muscle training with or without biofeedback or electrostimulation. It is not known whether pelvic floor muscle training has an effect after one year. In case of stress urinary incontinence, supervised pelvic floor muscle training avoids surgery in half of the cases at 1-year follow-up. Pelvic floor muscle training is the first-line treatment of post-partum urinary incontinence. Its preventive effect is uncertain. Pelvic floor muscle training may reduce the symptoms associated with genital prolapse. In conclusion, pelvic floor rehabilitation supervised by a physiotherapist is an effective short-term treatment to reduce the symptoms of urinary incontinence or pelvic organ prolapse.

  9. Biomass recalcitrance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Felby, Claus

    2009-01-01

    Alternative and renewable fuels derived from lignocellulosic biomass offer a promising alternative to conventional energy sources, and provide energy security, economic growth, and environmental benefits. However, plant cell walls naturally resist decomposition from microbes and enzymes - this co......Alternative and renewable fuels derived from lignocellulosic biomass offer a promising alternative to conventional energy sources, and provide energy security, economic growth, and environmental benefits. However, plant cell walls naturally resist decomposition from microbes and enzymes...... - this collective resistance is known as "biomass recalcitrance." Breakthrough technologies are needed to overcome barriers to developing cost-effective processes for converting biomass to fuels and chemicals. This book examines the connection between biomass structure, ultrastructure, and composition......, to resistance to enzymatic deconstruction, with the aim of discovering new cost-effective technologies for biorefineries. It contains chapters on topics extending from the highest levels of biorefinery design and biomass life-cycle analysis, to detailed aspects of plant cell wall structure, chemical treatments...

  10. Involvement and interaction of microbial communities in the transformation and stabilization of chromium during the composting of tannery effluent treated biomass of Vallisneria spiralis L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shukla, O P; Rai, U N; Dubey, Smita

    2009-04-01

    Tannery effluent treated with aquatic macrophyte Vallisneria spiralis L. for 14 d showed significant improvement in physico-chemical properties and reduction in Cr concentration. Accumulation of Cr was found maximum in roots (358 microg g(-1)dw) as compared to shoot (62 microg g(-1)dw) of the plant. A laboratory scale composter was designed with the objectives to investigate the physico-chemical changes and role of microbes in stabilization and transformation of Cr in the composting material. Results revealed that the composting process was quick within 7-21 d as indicated by peak time for various physico-chemical parameters and drop in C/N ratio up to acceptable limit. The profile of microbial communities indicated that population of anaerobic, aerobic and nitrifying bacteria increased quickly at the initial phase, and reached a peak level of 4.2 x 10(6), 9.78 x 10(8) and 9.32 x 10(9) CFU g(-1), respectively at 21 d; while population of actinomycetes and fungi was found maximum i.e. 3.29 x 10(7) and 9.7 x 10(6) CFU g(-1), respectively, after 35 d of composting. Overall bacterial population dominated over the actinomycetes and fungi during the composting process. Cr((VI)) was transformed to Cr((III)) due to the microbial activity during the process. Sequential extraction of Cr fractionation showed its stabilization via changing into organic matter-bound and residual fractions during the composting.

  11. 长期试验土壤理化性质和微生物量的研究进展%Research Progress on Soil Physical and Chemical Property and Microbial Biomass of Long-term Experiment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    马星竹

    2013-01-01

      通过分析、总结长期试验的研究进展,研究长期试验的特点、意义和研究内容,综述了长期试验对土壤理化性质、土壤微生物量的影响,有助于该学科研究的纵深发展与广泛利用。目前,长期试验通常采取2种方法,分别是“长期”和“定位”,其具有时间的长期性和气候的重复性等特点,能够克服各种生态因素差异对试验带来的影响和制约;其与土壤理化性状和微生物特性等关系密切,对研究农业生产有着重要的科学价值,为不同措施对土壤性质的影响提供研究场所。%Through analyzing and summarizing the progress of long-tem experiment ,studying the characteris-tics ,meaning and contents of long-term experiment ,the effects of long-term experiment on soil physical and chemical property and soil microbial biomass ,long-term experiment progresses at home and abroad were ana-lyzed and summarized .At present ,long-term experiment ,which chooses methods of ‘long-term’ and ‘located’ , has the characteristics of long time and repeatability of climate ,could overcome influence and restraint of exper-iment from different ecological factors ;Long-term experiment has close relationship with soil physical and chemical property and soil microbial biomass ,which would be important for modern agriculture ,provide field for studying the effect of different measures on soil properties .

  12. 模拟氮沉降对杉木人工林土壤可溶性有机碳和微生物量碳的影响%Effects of Simulated Nitrogen Deposition on Soil Dissolved Organic Carbon and Microbial Biomass Carbon in a Chinese Fir Plantation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    袁颖红; 樊后保; 刘文飞; 张子文; 孟庆银; 胡锋; 李辉信

    2012-01-01

    在杉木人工林中开展模拟氮沉降试验,设计N0(对照)、N1(60kg N/hm2.a)、N2(120kg N/hm2.a)和N3(240kg N/hm2.a)4种氮沉降水平。通过连续7年的处理后,研究外加氮源对土壤可溶性有机碳及微生物量碳的影响及与土壤酶活性的关系。相同N沉降处理下,土壤有机碳、可溶性有机碳和微生物量碳均随土层加深而降低。氮沉降对土壤有机碳具有促进作用,中-低氮沉降(N1、N2)增加幅度大,高氮沉降(N3)增加幅度小。低氮(N1)处理促进土壤微生物生物量C增加,而中、高氮(N2、N3)则抑制;各氮沉降处理土壤可溶性有机碳含量从高到低的顺序为:N3、N2〉N1〉N0。40-60cm土壤微生物量碳与蔗糖酶、纤维素酶呈极显著正相关关系,与淀粉酶、多酚氧化酶、过氧化物酶呈极显著负相关关系;除40-60cm土层的β-葡糖苷酶外,各层土壤可溶性有机碳与土壤蔗糖酶、纤维素酶和β-葡糖苷酶活性呈极显著正相关关系,与淀粉酶、多酚氧化酶和过氧化物酶呈极显著负相关关系。因此,氮沉降增加将会对土壤碳累积与分解过程产生较大的影响。%This study evaluated the effects of nitrogen deposition on soil dissolved organic carbon(DOC) and microbial biomass carbon(MBC) in a Chinese fir plantation subject to simulated nitrogen deposition for seven years at Shaxian state forest farm of Fujian province.Nitrogen loadings were designed at 4 levels as N0(control),N1,N2 and N3 at the doses of 0,60,120,240 kg N/(hm2·a),respectively.Each treatment comprised three replicate plots of 20 m×20 m which were sprayed with CO(NH2)2 solutions on the forest floor at the beginning of each month,lasting from January 2004 to the sampling time,March 2010.Soil dissolved organic carbon and soil microbial biomass carbon all decreased significantly with the increasing of soil depth at the same level of nitrogen deposition

  13. A culture-independent study of free-living fungi in biological soil crusts of the Colorado Plateau: their diversity and relative contribution to microbial biomass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bates, Scott T; Garcia-Pichel, Ferran

    2009-01-01

    Molecular methodologies were used to investigate free-living fungal communities associated with biological soil crusts (BSCs), along km-scale transects on the Colorado Plateau (USA). Two cyanobacteria-dominated crust types that did not contain significant lichen cover were examined. Fungal community diversity and composition were assessed with PCR-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) fingerprinting and sequencing, and fungi-specific quantitative PCR was used to measure fungal population densities as compared with those of bacteria. Our results clearly indicate that free-living fungi, while ubiquitous in BSCs, are less diverse and contribute far less biomass than their bacterial counterparts. Biological soil crust fungal community structure differed from that of uncrusted soils in their surroundings. Phylogenetic analyses placed the majority of BSC fungi within the Ascomycota, confirmed the importance of dematiaceous fungi, and pointed to members of the genera Alternaria and Acremonium as the most common free-living fungi in these crusts. Phylotypes potentially representing novel taxa were recovered, as were several belonging to the Basidiomycota that would not have been readily recognized by culture-dependant means.

  14. Effects of Seasonal Snow Cover on the Dynamics of Soil Microbial Biomass Carbon and Nitrogen, in an Alpine Meadow%季节性雪被对高寒草甸土壤微生物量碳、氮动态的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘琳; 杨春华; 李昕

    2011-01-01

    [Objective] The effects of seasonal snow cover on the dynamics of soil microbial biomass carbon and nitrogen in the alpine meadow were explored. [ Method] Based on the natural distribution difference of snow cover, three snow regimes in the alpine meadow ecosystem at the eastern margin of Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau were set up, including a shallow and short duration snowpack ( SS) , a moderate snow depth and medium duration snowpack ( MS), as well as a deep and long duration snowpack ( DS). The soil temperature and soil moisture content in different snow regimes in the during the autumn-winter transition stage of 2008 were measured. And the dynamic changes of soil microbial biomass carbon and nitrogen in different snow regimes were studied. [ Result] The average monthly soil temperature, the daily maximum soil temperature mean in each month, the daily minimum soil temperature mean in each month all showed significant quadratic function relation with snow depth. The snow depth and soil temperature difference had significant effects on the soil moisture content. At the end of autumn-winter transition stage, the soil microbial biomass carbon in DS declined markedly after a significant increase. The soil microbial biomass nitrogen in SS increased significantly after stable SS (about 10 cm) was formed. The contents of soil microbial biomass carbon and soil microbial biomass nitrogen both showed the significant cubic function relation with soil temperature. [ Conclusion ] Because seasonal snow cover affected soil temperature and soil moisture significantly, the significant difference of the dynamics of soil microbial biomass carbon and soil microbial biomass nitrogen in the alpine meadow were induced.%[目的]探索季节性雪被对高寒草甸土壤微生物量碳、氮动态的影响.[方法]根据自然雪被分布的差异,在青藏高原东南缘的高寒草甸生态系统中设置3条雪梯度样带(深雪、中雪和浅雪),于2008年秋冬过渡期监测各样带

  15. 无机氮和葡萄糖添加对土壤微生物生物量和活性的影响%EFFECT OF AMENDMENT OF INORGANIC NITROGEN AND GLUCOSE ON SOIL MICROBIAL BIOMASS AND ACTIVITY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    于跃跃; 赵炳梓

    2012-01-01

    Changes in soil microbial biomass carbon and enzyme activity in fluvo-aquic soil of the North China Plain were investigated after the soil, with or without cellulose, was amended with inorganic nitrogen and glucose in the experiment of incubation under constant temperature and humidity. The experiment was designed to have 8 treatments, I. E. Control (CK) , addition of inorganic nitrogen (N) , addition of glucose (G) , addition of cellulose (C) , addition of glucose and inorganic nitrogen (C + N), addition of inorganic nitrogen in soil with cellulose ( C + N ) , addition of glucose treatment in soil with cellulose ( C + G) , and addition of glucose and inorganic nitrogen in soil with cellulose ( C + G + N). Cumulative soil carbon dioxide release, microbial biomass carbon and activities of dehydrogenase, p-glucosidase, catalase, and alkaline phosphatase were measured, separately at various intervals during the 33 days of incubation. Results show that in all microbial parameters no significant difference existed between CK and Treatment C. As against Treatments CK and C, all the treatments displayed a significant increase in cumulative carbon dioxide release, with Treatment C + G + N listed on the topmost. Treatments G, G + N, C + G, and C + G + N all showed an obvious increment in Cmic content and DHD, APH activity, particularly during the first two weeks of the incubation, while Treatments N and C + N displayed similarly like CK result. The findings implied that glucose could significantly increase microbial activity, but inorganic nitrogen could not The effects of glucose and inorganic nitrogen on GLU and CAT were not obvious and in most cases no significant difference was found between different treatments. Correlation analysis demonstrates that carbon dioxide release rate was always positively related to APH activity, but not to Cmic and other enzymes activities and their relationships varied with the time of incubation, which was probably due to variation of the

  16. Monitoring of the CO2 emission and the contents of microbial biomass in agroecosystems on gray forest soils of the Cisbaikal region under conditions of fluoride pollution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pomazkina, L. V.

    2015-08-01

    The influence of the technogenic pollution of gray forest soils in the forest-steppe zone of the Cisbaikal region with fluorides emitted by aluminum smelters on the functioning and state of local agroecosystems was studied within the framework of a long-term agroecological monitoring program. Hydrothermic conditions of the growing season during the monitoring period (1997-2012) were compared with the climatic norm (1961-1990). It was found that the adverse effect of the technogenic pollution on the agroecosystem becomes more pronounced during the years with abnormal weather conditions. An increase in the CO2 emission into the atmosphere as a response of the microbial complex to the rise in the air temperatures was characterized by the linear dependence irrespectively of the degree of soil contamination. The methods of systems analysis were applied to generalize the results. The considered agroecosystem was studied as the system of particular components (soil-microorganisms-plants-atmosphere) integrated by the carbon fluxes. The regimes of the agroecosystem functioning and the ecological loads on it were estimated on the basis of data on the fluxes of net mineralized and (re)immobilized carbon. The environmental factors affecting the state and functioning of the agroecosystem were identified.

  17. Vermicomposting of toxic weed--Lantana camara biomass: chemical and microbial properties changes and assessment of toxicity of end product using seed bioassay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suthar, Surindra; Sharma, Priyanka

    2013-09-01

    This work illustrates the results of vermicomposting trials of noxious weed - Lantana camara (LL) leaf litter spiked with cow dung (CD) in different ratios (0%, 20%, 40%, 60% and 80%) using Eisenia fetida. A total of five treatments were established and changes in chemical and microbial properties of vermibeds have been observed for 60 days. In all treatments, a decrease in pH (19.5-30.7%), total organic carbon (TOC) (12-23%) and C:N ratio (25-35%), but increase in ash content (16-40%), total N(N(tot)) (11-32%), available phosphorous (P(avail)) (445-629%), exchangeable potassium (K(exch)) (63-156%) exchangeable calcium (Ca(exch)) (67-94%),and N-NO3(-) (164-499%) was recorded. Vermibeds with 40-60% LL (T2 and T3) showed better mineralization rate. The number of fungi, bacteria and actinomycetes showed 0.33-1.67-fold, 0.72-2.33-fold and 2.03-2.99-fold increase, respectively after vermicomposting process. The germination index (GI) was between 47% and 83% in all vermicomposts as indicated by seed bioassay test. Results thus suggested that Lantana may be a potential source for vermicompost production for sustainable agriculture.

  18. Floor heating maximizes residents` comfort

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tirkkanen, P.; Wikstroem, T.

    1996-11-01

    Storing heat in floors by using economical night-time electricity does not increase the specific consumption of heating. According to studies done by IVO, the optimum housing comfort is achieved if the room is heated mainly by means of floor heating that is evened out by window or ceiling heating, or by a combination of all three forms of heating. (orig.)

  19. Floor heating maximizes residents` comfort

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tirkkanen, P.; Wikstroem, T.

    1996-11-01

    Storing heat in floors by using economical night-time electricity does not increase the specific consumption of heating. According to studies done by IVO, the optimum housing comfort is achieved if the room is heated mainly by means of floor heating that is evened out by window or ceiling heating, or by a combination of all three forms of heating. (orig.)

  20. Anorectal and pelvic floor anatomy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. Stoker

    2009-01-01

    The anorectum and pelvic floor are crucial in maintaining continence, facilitating evacuation, providing pelvic organ support while in females the pelvic floor is part of the birth canal. The anal sphincter is a multilayered cylindrical structure, including the smooth muscle internal sphincter and t

  1. CHANGES IN MICROBIAL AND PHYSICOCHEMICAL SOIL PROPERTIES ASSOCIATE WITH CHARCOAL PRODUCTION IN TEMPERATE FOREST (QUERCUS SPP IN SANTA ROSA, GTO. MEXICO.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Blanca Estela Gómez Luna

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available The temperate forest of Quercus spp. Santa Rosa is one ofthe most extensive forests in central Mexico. In this forest,charcoal is produced traditionally by rural communities.This study evaluated the impact of the activity of charcoalproduction in three sampling sites of the forest, soil fromthe impact site, land adjacent to the site of charcoalproduction and control soil without charcoal productionactivity on physicochemical and microbiological properties.We determined pH, concentration of macro-and microelementswas performed by calculating microbial colonyforming units (CFU of bacteria, fungi, actinomycetes andpromoting growth of plants rhizobacteria (PGPR. Finally,we determined microbial biomass by fumigation-incubationmethod. On the floor of coal production, an increase in pH,the concentration of cations forming bases (Ca2 + and K+and a high regard microbial fungi, bacteria andactinomycetes, but the microbial biomass and organicmatter content was higher in the control soil, in terms ofRPCP only isolated in the soil adjacent to coal productionsite and the control soil. The physicochemical changesproduced by the warming effect of soil significantlyaffected the microbial community favoring the reduction orelimination of dominant groups sensitive to hightemperatures that are actively involved in the dynamics ofsoil processes

  2. Laparoscopy for pelvic floor disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Geluwe, B; Wolthuis, A; D'Hoore, A

    2014-02-01

    Surgical treatment of pelvic floor disorders has significantly evolved during the last decade, with increasing understanding of anatomy, pathophysiology and the minimally-invasive 'revolution' of laparoscopic surgery. Laparoscopic pelvic floor repair requires a thorough knowledge of pelvic floor anatomy and its supportive components before repair of defective anatomy is possible. Several surgical procedures have been introduced and applied to treat rectal prolapse syndromes. Transabdominal procedures include a variety of rectopexies with the use of sutures or prosthesis and with or without resection of redundant sigmoid colon. Unfortunately there is lack of one generally accepted standard treatment technique. This article will focus on recent advances in the management of pelvic floor disorders affecting defecation, with a brief overview of contemporary concepts in pelvic floor anatomy and different laparoscopic treatment options.

  3. Dinâmica do carbono da biomassa microbiana em cinco épocas do ano em diferentes sistemas de manejo do solo no cerrado Microbial biomass carbon dynamics in different soil management systems in the cerrado

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eloisa Aparecida Belleza Ferreira

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Em um Latossolo Vermelho argiloso, na Embrapa Cerrados, em Planaltina, Distrito Federal, foram selecionadas uma área com vegetação de Cerrado (CE e seis parcelas de um experimento de longa duração (20 anos: arado de discos pré-plantio (ADPP; arado de discos pós-colheita (ADPC; plantio direto a partir do segundo ano em área preparada com arado de discos em 1979, primeiro ano de cultivo (PDAD; arado de aivecas pré-plantio (AVPP; arado de aivecas pós-colheita (AVPC; e plantio direto a partir do segundo ano em área preparada com arado de aivecas em 1979, primeiro ano de cultivo (PDAV. Foram estimados o carbono da biomassa microbiana e o carbono orgânico do solo (Csolo em cinco profundidades: 0-5, 5-10, 10-20, 20-30 e 30-40 cm; e em cinco épocas do ano: na época da colheita da soja (abril/2000; no final do período chuvoso, após aração pós-colheita da soja (maio/2000; no período seco, sem nenhuma cultura no campo (agosto/2000; no início do período chuvoso, no plantio do milho (novembro/2000; e na floração da cultura do milho (fevereiro/2001. Considerando todo o período de estudo, os teores de C da biomassa microbiana (Cmic e de Csolo foram menores nas camadas mais profundas em todos os sistemas de manejo e no Cerrado. No solo sob sistema plantio direto, os teores de Cmic e Csolo decresceram das camadas mais superficiais para as mais profundas e de forma mais acentuada que no solo sob sistemas convencionais. No CE, a biomassa microbiana constituiu-se em maior percentagem do carbono orgânico total do solo, em comparação aos sistemas cultivados, que não apresentaram diferenças entre si.Microbial biomass carbon and organic carbon were measured in a long-term field experiment (20 years in Planaltina, DF, Brazil, under corn-soybean crop rotation. Six management systems were selected: disk plow before planting (ADPP; disk plow after harvesting (ADPC, no-till after disk plowing in the first year (PDAD; moldboard plow before

  4. Microbial communities in microcosm soils treated with battery waste

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Battery waste is one of the most destructive hazards to our environment, especially to the soil. In order to understand the effects of the battery waste on the microbial communities in soil, microcosm soils were treated with the powder made from the battery waste. Microbial biomass and respiration were measured after 15, 30, 45, and 60 days of the treatment, and catabolic capability and Biolog profile were determined after 60 days. Microbial biomass was declined by all treatments, while microbial respiration and catabolic capability were enhanced. Although microbial biomass recovered after a period of incubation, microbial respiratory quotient, catabolic capability and community structure remained significantly affected. Our results also suggest that microbial respiratory quotient and Biolog parameters are more sensitive than microbial biomass to the battery stress on bioavailability.

  5. Crustal Ages of the Ocean Floor - Poster

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Crustal Ages of the Ocean Floor Poster was created at NGDC using the Crustal Ages of the Ocean Floor database draped digitally over a relief of the ocean floor...

  6. Quantifying the coarse-root biomass of intensively managed loblolly pine plantations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashley T. Miller; H. Lee Allen; Chris A. Maier

    2006-01-01

    Most of the carbon accumulation during a forest rotation is in plant biomass and the forest floor. Most of the belowground biomass in older loblolly pine (Pinus taeda L.) forests is in coarse roots, and coarse roots persist longer after harvest than aboveground biomass and fine roots. The main objective was to assess the carbon accumulation in coarse...

  7. Early understory biomass response to organic matter removal and soil compaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felix Jr. Ponder

    2008-01-01

    In the Missouri Ozarks, 6 and 8 years after treatment, understory biomass differences between bole only harvesting (BO) and whole-tree plus forest floor harvesting were not different; neither were there understory biomass differences between no compaction and severe compaction. Separation of the biomass into broad species categories (trees, shrubs, annuals, perennials...

  8. Nitrous oxide fluxes from forest floor, tree stems and canopies of boreal tree species during spring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haikarainen, Iikka; Halmeenmäki, Elisa; Machacova, Katerina; Pihlatie, Mari

    2017-04-01

    Boreal forests are considered as small sources of atmospheric nitrous oxide (N2O) due to microbial N2O production in the soils. Recent evidence shows that trees may play an important role in N2O exchange of forest ecosystems by offering pathways for soil produced N2O to the atmosphere. To confirm magnitude, variability and the origin of the tree mediated N2O emissions more research is needed, especially in boreal forests which have been in a minority in such investigation. We measured forest floor, tree stem and shoot N2O exchange of three boreal tree species at the beginning of the growing season (13.4.-13.6.2015) at SMEAR II station in Hyytiälä, located in Southern Finland (61˚ 51´N, 24˚ 17´E, 181 a.s.l.). The fluxes were measured in silver birch (Betula pendula), downy birch (B. pubescens) and Norway spruce (Picea abies) on two sites with differing soil type and characteristics (paludified and mineral soil), vegetation cover and forest structure. The aim was to study the vertical profile of N2O fluxes at stem level and to observe temporal changes in N2O fluxes over the beginning of the growing season. The N2O exchange was determined using the static chamber technique and gas chromatographic analyses. Scaffold towers were used for measurements at multiple stem heights and at the canopy level. Overall, the N2O fluxes from the forest floor and trees at both sites were very small and close to the detection limit. The measured trees mainly emitted N2O from their stems and shoots, while the forest floor acted as a sink of N2O at the paludified site and as a small source of N2O at the mineral soil site. Stem emissions from all the trees at both sites were on average below 0.5 μg N2O m-2 of stem area h-1, and the shoot emissions varied between 0.2 and 0.5 ng N2O m-2 g-1 dry biomass. When the N2O fluxes were scaled up to the whole forest ecosystem, based on the tree biomass and stand density, the N2O emissions from birch and spruce trees at the paludified site

  9. Influence of Grazing Intensity on the Soil Organic Carbon and Microbial Biomass Carbon of Meadow Steppe in Zhaosu Area%放牧强度对昭苏草甸草原土壤有机碳及微生物碳的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    蒲宁宁; 孙宗玖; 范燕敏; 杨合龙

    2013-01-01

    采用2 a短期小区控制放牧试验,设置了不放牧(0头牛/hm2)、轻度放牧(0.38头牛/hm 2)、中度放牧(0.64头牛/hm2)、重度放牧(0.90头牛/hm2)4个处理,在伊犁昭苏草甸草原上研究放牧强度对草地土壤有机碳、土壤微生物量碳及土壤微生物商的影响.结果表明,短期放牧条件下,随放牧强度的增加,0~30 cm土层土壤微生物量碳含量及土壤微生物熵均呈先增加后降低趋势;短期放牧下,放牧强度对土壤有机碳含量影响较小(P>0.05),对土壤微生物量碳含量的影响较显著(P<0.05),土壤微生物量碳对放牧的响应较土壤有机碳更敏感:中度放牧下土壤微生物量碳含量明显高于对照、轻度放牧和重度放牧(P<0.05),0~10 cm土层、10~20 cm土层、20~30 cm土层微生物量碳含量依次为1 074.77,667.94,392.54 mg/kg.无论放牧与否,土壤微生物量碳含量、土壤有机碳含量及土壤微生物商均随剖面深度的增加呈现显著降低趋势.%The influence of grazing intensity,including the control (0 cattle/hm-2),light grazing (0.38 cattle/bm2),moderate grazing (0.64 cattle/hm2) and heavy grazing (0.90 cattle/hm2) on the soil organic carbon,soil microbial biomass carbon and soil microbial quotient in Zhaosu Meadow Steppe by plot control grazing experiment during 2-years was studied.The result showed that during the short grazing period the content of soil microbial biomass carbon and soil microbial quotient of 0-30 cm appeared the trend of first increasing then decreasing with the increase of grazing intensity.The grazing intensity has smaller influence on content of soil organic carbon under grazing in a short period (P >0.05),but it had more significant influence on soil organic carbon,which indicated that the response to grazing of soil microbial biomass carbon was more sensitive than that of soil organic carbon.The content of soil microbial biomass carbon under moderate grazing was higher than that

  10. Effects of Chemical Fertilizer Reduction on Soil Microbiological and Microbial Biomass in Wheat Field%化肥减量对麦田土壤微生物量及微生物区系的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王庆; 海江波; 岳忠娜; 门倩

    2012-01-01

    In order to explore the effects of chemical fertilizer reduction with organic fertilizer application on soil microbes,winter wheat was planted under diffierent fertilizer treatments.4 chemical fertilizer(NPK) levels of 100%,70%,50% and 30%,and three organic fertilizer(M) level of 18 000,25 500 and 34 500 kg·km-2(representing with LM,MM and HM,respectively) were selected in the experiment with single NPK application as CK.In the treatments with 100% NPK,the explicating amount of urea,diammonium phosphate and potassium sulfate per hectare were 251.8,255.7 and 375.2 kg·km-2,respectively).The serial dilution plate culture method and chloroform evaporated method were used to determine the difference of soil microbial carbon,nitrogen contents and the distribution of microbial flora with different treatment.The results indicated that the together application of organic and inorganic fertilizers significantly increased the content of soil microbial carbon and nitrogen,the number of microbes such as bacteria,nitrogen-fixing bacteria,actinomyces,but did not affect the number of soil fungus.The effect of fertilizers rose with the increasing of organic fertilizer under no reducing of chemical fertilizer.the best treatment was 50%NPK + MM when reducing chemical fertilizer.It illustrated that moderate fertilizer reduction with matching application of organic fertilizer could improve soil microbial biomass in favor of soil fertility.%为了解化肥减量和有机培肥配施对冬小麦田土壤微生物的影响,以单施常量化肥(表示为NPK,分别施尿素、磷酸二铵和硫酸钾251.8、255.7和375.2kg.km-2)为对照,设置不同化肥(不减量、减量30%、减量50%和减量70%)和有机肥(18 000、25 500和34 500kg.km-2,分别用LM、MM和HM表示)配施处理,采用系列稀释平板法和氯仿熏蒸培养法分别测定了不同处理下土壤微生物量碳、氮以及微生物区系分布的差异。结果表明,有机无机

  11. Biomass [updated

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turhollow Jr, Anthony F [ORNL

    2016-01-01

    Biomass resources and conversion technologies are diverse. Substantial biomass resources exist including woody crops, herbaceous perennials and annuals, forest resources, agricultural residues, and algae. Conversion processes available include fermentation, gasification, pyrolysis, anaerobic digestion, combustion, and transesterification. Bioderived products include liquid fuels (e.g. ethanol, biodiesel, and gasoline and diesel substitutes), gases, electricity, biochemical, and wood pellets. At present the major sources of biomass-derived liquid fuels are from first generation biofuels; ethanol from maize and sugar cane (89 billion L in 2013) and biodiesel from vegetable oils and fats (24 billion liters in 2011). For other than traditional uses, policy in the forms of mandates, targets, subsidies, and greenhouse gas emission targets has largely been driving biomass utilization. Second generation biofuels have been slow to take off.

  12. Flooring choices for newborn ICUs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, R D

    2007-12-01

    Floors are a major element of newborn intensive care unit (NICU) construction. They provide visual cues, sound control, and with certain materials, some degree of physical comfort for workers. Flooring materials may entail a significant cost for installation and upkeep and can have substantial ecological impact, both in the choice of the flooring itself, as well as the substances used to clean it. In this article the important aspects to consider for each factor are explored and recommendations are offered for appropriate choices in various NICU areas.

  13. Simulation of Biomass Accumulation Pattern in Vapor-Phase Biofilters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xi, Jin-Ying; Hu, Hong-Ying; Zhang, Xian

    2012-06-01

    Existence of inert biomass and its impact on biomass accumulation patterns and biofilter performance were investigated. Four biofilters were set up in parallel to treat gaseous toluene. Each biofilter operated under different inlet toluene loadings for 100 days. Two microbial growth models, one with an inert biomass assumption and the other without, were established and compared. Results from the model with the inert biomass assumption showed better agreement with the experimental data than those based on the model without the inert biomass assumption thus verifying that inert biomass accumulation cannot be ignored in the long-term operation of biofilters. According to the model with an inert biomass assumption, the ratio of active biomass to total biomass will decrease and the inert biomass will become dominant in total biomass after a period of time. Filter bed structure simulation results showed that the void fraction is more sensitive to biomass accumulation than the specific surface area. The final void fraction of the biofilters with the highest inlet toluene loading is only 67% of its initial level while the final specific surface area is 82%. Identification and quantification of inert biomass will give a better understanding of biomass accumulation in biofilters and will result in a more exact simulation of biomass change during long-term operations. Results also indicate that an ideal biomass control technique should be able to remove most inert biomass while simultaneously preserving as much active biomass as possible.

  14. Simulation of Biomass Accumulation Pattern in Vapor-Phase Biofilters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xi, Jin-Ying; Hu, Hong-Ying; Zhang, Xian

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Existence of inert biomass and its impact on biomass accumulation patterns and biofilter performance were investigated. Four biofilters were set up in parallel to treat gaseous toluene. Each biofilter operated under different inlet toluene loadings for 100 days. Two microbial growth models, one with an inert biomass assumption and the other without, were established and compared. Results from the model with the inert biomass assumption showed better agreement with the experimental data than those based on the model without the inert biomass assumption thus verifying that inert biomass accumulation cannot be ignored in the long-term operation of biofilters. According to the model with an inert biomass assumption, the ratio of active biomass to total biomass will decrease and the inert biomass will become dominant in total biomass after a period of time. Filter bed structure simulation results showed that the void fraction is more sensitive to biomass accumulation than the specific surface area. The final void fraction of the biofilters with the highest inlet toluene loading is only 67% of its initial level while the final specific surface area is 82%. Identification and quantification of inert biomass will give a better understanding of biomass accumulation in biofilters and will result in a more exact simulation of biomass change during long-term operations. Results also indicate that an ideal biomass control technique should be able to remove most inert biomass while simultaneously preserving as much active biomass as possible. PMID:22693411

  15. Spatio-temporal dynamics of soil microbial biomass carbon in Populus tremula plantations in the southeast of Shandong Province%鲁东南杨树人工林土壤微生物生物量碳的时空动态

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    尉海东; 董彬

    2013-01-01

      为探讨土壤微生物生物量碳在鲁东南杨树Populus tremuloides人工林生态系统碳循环中的作用,利用氯仿熏蒸法测定了杨树人工林的土壤微生物生物量碳,研究了其时空动态及其与土壤有机碳的关系.结果表明:中龄杨树人工林和成熟杨树人工林土壤微生物生物量碳的变化范围分别为120.69~323.92 mg·kg-1和183.69~418.21 mg·kg-1,基本呈双峰趋势,生长季开始前下降、生长季结束时上升.土壤微生物生物量碳峰值均出现在4月和10月,最低值均出现在12月.0-20 cm土层土壤微生物生物量碳季节变化均较明显.两种林龄的杨树人工林土壤微生物生物量碳均随土层深度的增加而显著降低,土壤微生物生物量碳主要集中在0-40 cm土层,约占总土壤微生物生物量碳的89.77%~91.00%.成熟杨树人工林土壤微生物生物量碳显著高于中龄杨树人工林的.土壤微生物生物量碳与土壤有机碳含量呈极显著正相关(r2=0.946, p﹤0.01).微生物熵随土层深度的增加而升高,说明土壤有机碳逐渐由土壤表层向土壤深层转移,土壤处于碳积累状态,土壤呈碳汇功能.%Absract: To explore the role of soil microbial biomass carbon in ecosystem carbon cycle of Populus tremula plantations in the southeast of Shandong Province, the seasonal dynamics and vertical distributions of soil microbial biomass carbon in two ages Populus tremula plantations were studied by using the chloroform fumigation extraction method.And the relationships between soil microbial biomass carbon and soil organic carbon were also analyzed.Results showed that the microbial biomass carbon in middle-aged Populus tremuloides plantation(MAP)and mature Populus tremuloides plantation (MP) ranged from 120.69~323.92 mg·kg-1 and 183.69~418.21 mg·kg-1, respectively. The soil microbial biomass carbon basically showed a downward trend before growing season began and an upward trend with growing season end

  16. Evaluating the Changes in Structure and Biomass of Three Common Forest-floor Mosses in Cutovers and Primary Spruce Forest in the Eastern Tibetan Plateau%青藏高原东部原始云杉林及其系列采伐迹地3个林地藓类种群结构与生物量的差异性评估

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    包维楷; 雷波

    2009-01-01

    Forest felling is known to seriously affect forest-floor bryophyte population development, but few studies have done to investigate the temporal change of bryophyte population along the cutover restoration process. Selecting three preponderant forest-floor mosses distributing extensively in primary coniferous forests in the eastern Tibetan Plateau, Actinothuidium hookeri, Hylocomium splendens and Thuidium cymbifolium, we investigated their frequency, cover and biomass, as well as vascular plant cover (including herbs and shrubs) and litter, in four cutovers with similar background but with different felling time and a nearby primary spruce forest in Ramtang, Sichuan and compared their differences in population structure and biomass. We aimed to assess their changes in structure and biomass of the three moss populations following forest felling. In particular, we tried to test two hypotheses: 1) Forest-floor moss populations would decline significantly after forest felling due to environmental alteration; and 2) they would be gradually restored during the early natural restoration process of cutover vegetation. We found: 1) the three mosses all showed significant differences in cover and biomass between the cutovers and the primary spruce forest, confirming the first hypothesis; however, 2) all the three populations did not show apparent differences in population structure and biomass along the cutover restoration chronosequence, disagreeing with the second hypothesis. The large variability in cover and biomass in the cutovers, on a microhabitat scale, indicated that these three populations were more dynamic in the cutovers than in the primary spruce forest. Spearman rank correlation analysis revealed that both tree and herb covers were crucial factors impacting forest floor bryophyte population biomass. Our results suggested that the features of the three moss populations in the cutovers were indicative of their ecological adaptations and reproductive strategies

  17. Channel Floor Yardangs

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Released 19 July 2004 The atmosphere of Mars is a dynamic system. Water-ice clouds, fog, and hazes can make imaging the surface from space difficult. Dust storms can grow from local disturbances to global sizes, through which imaging is impossible. Seasonal temperature changes are the usual drivers in cloud and dust storm development and growth. Eons of atmospheric dust storm activity has left its mark on the surface of Mars. Dust carried aloft by the wind has settled out on every available surface; sand dunes have been created and moved by centuries of wind; and the effect of continual sand-blasting has modified many regions of Mars, creating yardangs and other unusual surface forms. The yardangs in this image are forming in channel floor deposits. The channel itself is funneling the wind to cause the erosion. Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude 4.5, Longitude 229.7 East (133.3 West). 19 meter/pixel resolution. Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time. NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from

  18. Electric Catalysis Degradation Effect of Microbial Fuel Cell in Marine Sediment:a Novel Green Technology of Ecosystem in-Situ Remediation for Oil Pollutant on Ocean Floor%海泥细菌电池电催化降解效应--一种海底石油污染生态原位修复绿色新技术

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    付哲平

    2016-01-01

    海底石油污染可导致长期的生态灾难。一般海洋石油污染防治技术无法用于海底环境。文章描述了一种绿色的海底石油污染生态原位修复新技术,利用沉积层生物燃料电池电催化加速降解效应,即利用海底沉积层(海泥)中的多种细菌以石油污染物为营养物,代谢产生的电子被电池正极和负载消耗掉,反过来促进细菌加速降解污染物。该技术既可在海底加速石油污染物降解速率,又可原位产生电能驱动监测仪器工作,还可用于原位监测生态修复进展,故具有重要的应用前景。%Oil pollutant in marine sediment can cause long-term severe ecological disaster and the nowadays common treatment technologies can’t be suitable to ocean floor environment.A novel green ecological recovery technology on ocean floor was described in the paper by utilizing an elec-tric catalysis degradation effect of microbial fuel cell in marine sediment.Its principle is that vari-ous bacteria in sea mud take advantage of oil pollutant as nutrients and metabolize to produce a large amount of electrons and these electrons are exhausted by applied monitor and positive pole in its cell circuit.The novel technology will have important and versatile prospects for its higher degradation rate,higher power output for electric equipment to work for a long time and in situ monitoring of ecosystem recovery.

  19. The shop floor scheduling game

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Riezebos, Jan; Slomp, Jannes

    1995-01-01

    The aim of the shop floor scheduling game is getting participants acquainted with: - developing robust planning and scheduling procedures; - accepting orders under uncertainty and competition; - using information from cost accounting in scheduling; - creating an adequate communication structure

  20. Biomassa microbiana, colóides orgânicos e nitrogênio inorgânico durante a vermicompostagem de diferentes substratos Microbial biomass, organic colloids and inorganic nitrogen, during vermicomposting of some substrates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriana Maria de Aquino

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo deste trabalho foi avaliar as modificações que ocorrem no substrato durante a vermicompostagem, utilizando-se biomassa microbiana, formas de N mineral, relação C/N e colóides orgânicos totais. As seguintes misturas foram utilizadas como substratos para a vermicompostagem: esterco, esterco + bagaço na proporção de 1:1, e esterco + bagaço + guandu na proporção de 2:1:1. As misturas foram feitas com base em volume e acondicionadas em canteiros de 0,4 m³. Trezentas minhocas da espécie Eisenia foetida e 100 da Eudrilus eugeniae foram introduzidas em cada canteiro. A cada 20 dias, aproximadamente, num total de 126 dias, foram realizadas as amostragens para a realização das análises. O delineamento experimental adotado foi o de blocos ao acaso, com três repetições em esquema fatorial de 3x8 (três substratos e oito épocas de amostragens. As modificações na biomassa microbiana, quociente metabólico e o conteúdo de nitrato e amônio, não possibilitaram caracterizar a época da maturidade dos vermicompostos. O esterco leva cerca de 70 dias para apresentar relação C/N estável, o esterco + bagaço e o esterco + bagaço + guandu levam 90 dias. A determinação dos colóides orgânicos totais é bastante simples, mas não possibilita caracterizar a maturidade dos vermicompostos.The objetive of this work was to evaluate modifications in the microbial biomass, metabolic quotient, types of mineral nitrogen, C/N ratio, and total organic colloids concentration. The following variations in the substrate composition were utilized: pure cattle manure, pure cattle manure + sugarcane bagasse 1:1 ratio, and pure cattle manure + sugarcane bagasse + leaves of Cajanus cajan 2:1:1 ratio. The mixture was made on volume bases and the substrate composition filled boxes of 0.4 m³. Three hundred earthworms of the species Eisenia foetida and 100 of Eudrillus eugeniae were introduced in the boxes. Every 20 days, approximately, samples were

  1. Functional anatomy of pelvic floor

    OpenAIRE

    Salvatore Rocca Rossetti

    2016-01-01

    Generally, descriptions of the pelvic floor are discordant, since its complex structures and the complexity of pathological disorders of such structures; commonly the descriptions are sectorial, concerning muscles, fascial developments, ligaments and so on. On the contrary to understand completely nature and function of the pelvic floor it is necessary to study it in the most unitary view and in the most global aspect, considering embriology, philogenesy, anthropologic development and its mul...

  2. [Effects of snow pack removal on soil microbial biomass carbon and nitrogen and the number of soil culturable microorganisms during wintertime in alpine Abies faxoniana forest of western Sichuan, Southwest China].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yu-Lian; Wu, Fu-Zhong; He, Zhen-Hua; Xu, Zhen-Feng; Liu, Yang; Yang, Wan-Qin; Tan, Bo

    2012-07-01

    To understand the effects of the lack of snow pack under global warming on the characteristics of soil microorganisms during wintertime, a snow-shading experiment was conducted in a primary fir (Abies faxoniana) forest after snow pack removal, with the soil microbial biomass carbon (MBC) and nitrogen (MBN) and soil culturable microorganisms (bacteria and fungi) at the stages of snow forming, snow covering, and snow melting investigated. Snow pack removal had significant effects on the soil MBC and MBN and the number of soil culturable bacteria and fungi, but the responses of the culturable microorganisms differed with the stages of snow-shading. Under the condition of snow pack removal, the MBC and MBN in soil organic layer decreased significantly at the early stages of snow forming and snow melting but increased significantly at snow covering stage and at the later stage of snow melting, and the number of culturable bacteria decreased significantly from the early stage of snow forming to the stage of snow covering while that of culturable fungi had a significant increase from the early stage of snow forming to the stage of snow melting. After snow melting, the MBC and the number of culturable fungi in soil organic layer had a significant decrease, the number of cultural bacteria was in adverse, but the MBN had less change. The MBC and MBN and the number of culturable microorganisms in soil mineral layer had the similar variation trends as those in soil organic layer, but the fluctuations were smaller. It was suggested that snow pack removal changed the ratio of culturable bacteria to culturable fungi, showing positive effects on the number of soil culturable fungi during wintertime in alpine Abies faxoniana forest of western Sichuan.

  3. Study on microbial degradation of tar-wash wastewater and tar in biomass gasification by microorganisms.%微生物降解生物质气化洗焦废水和焦油的研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨秀山; 赵军; 骆海鹏; 钱城; 董雪

    2001-01-01

    A strain conserved in the lab of Department of Biology, Capital Normal University was utilized to treat tar-wash wastewater and crude tar in order to solve the problem of tar pollution in the biomass gasification. When tar-wash wastewater concentrations were 6, 10 and 15ml/L, the COD removal rates reached 75.2%, 83.9%, and 63.1%, respectively. When tar concentrations were 0.56 and 1.0g/L, the COD removal rates reached 82.7% and 72.3%, respectively. Phenol microbial conversion indicated that the phenol highest degradation rate was 98.8%. This strain possessed the ability to degradade tar-wash wastewater and tar in the bomass gasification.%为解决在生物质气化中的焦油污染问题,用首都师范大学生物系微生物实验室保存的微生物菌种对生物质气化洗焦废水和焦油进行处理.当洗焦废水浓度分别为6, 10和15mL/L时,经微生物降解后,COD去除率分别达到75.2%,83.9%和63.1%.以焦油为底物,在焦油浓度为0.56和 1.0g/L时,COD去除率分别达到82.7%和72.3%.苯酚的最高降解率为98.8%.此菌种具有降解生物质气化洗焦废水和焦油的能力.

  4. Biomassa microbiana em amostras umedecidas após secagem ao ar de solos de toposeqüência de pastagens Microbial biomass in air dried and moisturized soil samples from toposequences of pasture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Samarão Gonçalves

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Neste experimento avaliou-se o carbono da biomassa microbiana do solo (C-BMS em diferentes solos sob topossequência de pastagem e a viabilidade de utilizar amostras condicionadas na forma de terra fina seca ao ar (TFSA. Observou-se para C-BMS, separação dos conteúdos entre os diferentes tipos de solo. A época de inverno favoreceu a C-BMS, elevando-se em 60% em relação ao verão. Na comparação realizada entre os solos preparados na forma de TFSA e com a metodologia de fumigação-extração não se detectou diferença significativa, encontrando-se correlações significativas para os dois métodos de preparo das amostras, o que estabelece um panorama promissor no uso desta metodologia, embora seja necessário maior aprofundamento neste aspecto.In this experiment we evaluated microbial biomass carbon (C-SMB from different soils under toposequences of pasture and the viability of the use of air dried soil samples (ADSS. C-SMB showed separation of values between different soil types. Winter season favored C-SMB being 60% higher in relation to summer. In comparison between the two soil sample preparation methods, ADSS and the classical one, there was no statistical. Significant correlations were observed between the two methods. This gives a positive perspective to the use of this new approach, even thought more study is necessary.

  5. Nitrogênio, carbono e atividade da biomassa microbiana do solo em plantações de eucalipto Carbon, nitrogen and activity of microbial biomass in soil under eucalypt plantations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emmanuela Forestieri da Gama-Rodrigues

    2005-12-01

    teor de argila permitiram um modelo preditivo que explicasse a variação destes atributos nos diferentes municípios. A umidade atual do solo explicou 87% da variação dos teores de N-NO3- e de N total; em torno de 71% do C orgânico e de 48 e 55% da variação do CBM e NBM, respectivamente. As regressões simples do N-NO3- com o CBM ou NBM apresentaram baixa capacidade preditiva, porém, quando conjugadas com os teores de C orgânico ou N total, por meio de regressão linear múltipla, aumentaram a capacidade preditiva da mineralização do N.A considerable part of eucalypt plantations in Brazil grows on low-fertility soils for which fertilization techniques and nutrient cycling processes are important to elevate and maintain the forest production. The response of these plantations to nitrogen fertilization has been relatively low, indicating that the soil has been capable of supplying part of the plant demand. Microbial biomass N is considered a readily available fraction, but little is known about the biotic and abiotic factors that affect its dynamics in eucalypt plantations in Brazil. Therefore, the objective of this work was to evaluate the variation of nitrogen in microbial biomass (NBM of the soil and other related characteristics in seven-year-old eucalypt plantations in several soil and climatic conditions of the Brazilian Southeast. Soil samples (0-10 cm deep were collected from March to November 1995. The NBM content ranged from 9.17 to 103.71 µg g-1, being significantly influenced by sampling time. This variation was explained by the combination of rainfall with soil C or N content. Clay content also had a strong influence on the variation. N-NH4+was the predominant form of mineral N. Carbon content and CBM (carbon of the microbial biomass ranged from 2.78 to 12.32 g kg-1 and from 43.39 to 401.06 µg g-1, respectively. The RA (accumulated soil respiration ranged from 14.57 to 79.42 µg g-1 and the qCO2 (metabolic quotient ranged from 862 to 8026 µg g-1

  6. Cyanobacterial biomass as carbohydrate and nutrient feedstock for bioethanol production by yeast fermentation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Möllers, K Benedikt; Canella, D.; Jørgensen, Henning

    2014-01-01

    Background: Microbial bioconversion of photosynthetic biomass is a promising approach to the generation of biofuels and other bioproducts. However, rapid, high-yield, and simple processes are essential for successful applications. Here, biomass from the rapidly growing photosynthetic marine...

  7. Tangential Floor in a Classroom Setting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marti, Leyla

    2012-01-01

    This article examines floor management in two classroom sessions: a task-oriented computer lesson and a literature lesson. Recordings made in the computer lesson show the organization of floor when a task is given to students. Temporary or "incipient" side floors (Jones and Thornborrow, 2004) emerge beside the main floor. In the literature lesson,…

  8. Biomass potential

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Asplund, D. [VTT Energy, Espoo (Finland)

    1996-12-31

    Biomass resources of the industrialised countries are enormous, if only a small fraction of set-aside fields were used for energy crops. Forest resources could also be utilised more efficiently than at present for large-scale energy production. The energy content of the annual net growth of the total wood biomass is estimated to be 180 million toe in Europe without the former USSR, and about 50 million toe of that in the EC area, in 1990. Presently, the harvesting methods of forest biomass for energy production are not yet generally competitive. Among the most promising methods are integrated harvesting methods, which supply both raw material to the industry and wood fuel for energy production. Several new methods for separate harvesting of energy wood are being developed in many countries. (orig.)

  9. Effects of Plant Diversity, Functional Group Composition, and Fertilization on Soil Microbial Properties in Experimental Grassland: e0125678

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Tanja Strecker; Romain L Barnard; Pascal A Niklaus; Michael Scherer-Lorenzen; Alexandra Weigelt; Stefan Scheu; Nico Eisenhauer

    2015-01-01

    ... in a long-term biodiversity experiment in semi-natural grassland (Jena Experiment). Plant species richness enhanced microbial basal respiration and microbial biomass, but did not significantly affect microbial specific respiration...

  10. 不同利用方式下红壤微生物生物量及代谢功能多样性的变化%Changes of Microbial Biomass and Functional Diversity in Red Soil Under Different Land Use Types

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘明; 李忠佩; 张桃林

    2009-01-01

    Changes of microbial biomass and functional diversity in red soil were determined under different land use types. Results showed that land use type significantly influenced the various aspects of soil quality. Soil microbial biomass was higher in paddy soil, but medium in grassland and forestry, while in arid-land soil the contents of microbial biomass C and N were minimum (4.3% and 13.7% of those in paddy soil respectively). Microbial functional diversity was higher in paddy soil, while bacterial diversity was lower in arid-land, forestry and grassland, fungal functional diversity was lowest in arid-land soil. Microbial biomass and functional diversity, as an early and sensitive indicator, could be used to evaluate the effect of land use type or management on soil quality.%研究了不同农林利用方式下红壤微生物生物量和代谢功能多样性等土壤质量指标的变化.结果表明:不同利用方式对土壤质量各指标造成了显著的影响;稻田的微生物生物量碳、氮最高,林地和草地微生物生物量次之,旱地的微生物生物量碳、氮最低(分别是稻田利用方式的4.3% 和 13.7%);稻田的微生物代谢功能多样性最高,旱地、林地和草地的细菌代谢功能多样性较低,旱地的真菌代谢功能多样性最低;微生物生物量和代谢功能多样性可以作为反映土壤质量变化的早期敏感的指标,用来衡量管理措施的改变对土壤质量造成的影响.

  11. Biomass IGCC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salo, K.; Keraenen, H. [Enviropower Inc., Espoo (Finland)

    1996-12-31

    Enviropower Inc. is developing a modern power plant concept based on pressurised fluidized-bed gasification and gas turbine combined cycle (IGCC). The process is capable of maximising the electricity production with a variety of solid fuels - different biomass and coal types - mixed or separately. The development work is conducted on many levels. These and demonstration efforts are highlighted in this article. The feasibility of a pressurised gasification based processes compared to competing technologies in different applications is discussed. The potential of power production from biomass is also reviewed. (orig.) 4 refs.

  12. Effects of Transgenic Bt Cotton Biomass on Soil Microbial Community Structure,Based on Pospholipid Fatty Acid Analysis%转基因棉花不同生物量对土壤微生物群落结构的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    范巧兰; 陈耕; 李永山; 张冬梅; 柴永峰; 李燕娥

    2012-01-01

    用磷脂脂肪酸图谱分析方法评价了3个转基因棉花品种(晋棉26、晋棉44、中棉所41)和它们相应的近等位非转基因棉花品种(晋棉7、冀合492、中棉所23)不同生物量对土壤微生物群落结构的影响.每个品种生物量为0g,2 g,4 g,6 g,8 g粉碎棉株与200 g土混匀,在28 ℃培养箱中培养45 d后进行分析.结果表明,随着棉花生物量的增加,土壤微生物总量显著增加,而且土壤微生物群落结构发生明显变化,细菌和放线菌所占比例明显减少,真菌比例显著增加.转基因棉花与非转基因棉花的差异因品种和还田量而表现不同.%We evaluated the effects of transgenic Bt cotton biomass on soil microbial communities using soil incubation and phospholipid fatty acid (PFLA) analysis. We used three transgenic Bt cotton lines (Jinmian 26, Jinmian 44, and CCRI 41) and their isogenic non-Bt cotton lines (Jinmian 7, Jihe 492, and CCRI 23). Different plant biomasses (0, 2, 4, 6, and 8 g) were mixed with 200 g of soil for each line, and incubated at 28 ℃ for 45 days. The total concentration of PLFAs significantly increased with increasing cotton biomass, and the microbial community was characterized by a predominance of fungi in the soil amended with cotton biomass in comparison with the control(soil without cotton biomass). In contrast, the microbial community was characterized by a predominance of bacteria and actinomycetes in the control soil. Differences between Bt-cotton and non-Bt soils depended on cotton lines and cotton biomass in the soil.

  13. Functional anatomy of pelvic floor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salvatore Rocca Rossetti

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Generally, descriptions of the pelvic floor are discordant, since its complex structures and the complexity of pathological disorders of such structures; commonly the descriptions are sectorial, concerning muscles, fascial developments, ligaments and so on. On the contrary to understand completely nature and function of the pelvic floor it is necessary to study it in the most unitary view and in the most global aspect, considering embriology, philogenesy, anthropologic development and its multiple activities others than urological, gynaecological and intestinal ones. Recent acquirements succeeded in clarifying many aspects of pelvic floor activity, whose musculature has been investigated through electromyography, sonography, magnetic resonance, histology, histochemistry, molecular research. Utilizing recent research concerning not only urinary and gynecologic aspects but also those regarding statics and dynamics of pelvis and its floor, it is now possible to study this important body part as a unit; that means to consider it in the whole body economy to which maintaining upright position, walking and behavior or physical conduct do not share less than urinary, genital, and intestinal functions. It is today possible to consider the pelvic floor as a musclefascial unit with synergic and antagonistic activity of muscular bundles, among them more or less interlaced, with multiple functions and not only the function of pelvic cup closure.

  14. Functional anatomy of pelvic floor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocca Rossetti, Salvatore

    2016-03-31

    Generally, descriptions of the pelvic floor are discordant, since its complex structures and the complexity of pathological disorders of such structures; commonly the descriptions are sectorial, concerning muscles, fascial developments, ligaments and so on. On the contrary to understand completely nature and function of the pelvic floor it is necessary to study it in the most unitary view and in the most global aspect, considering embriology, philogenesy, anthropologic development and its multiple activities others than urological, gynaecological and intestinal ones. Recent acquirements succeeded in clarifying many aspects of pelvic floor activity, whose musculature has been investigated through electromyography, sonography, magnetic resonance, histology, histochemistry, molecular research. Utilizing recent research concerning not only urinary and gynecologic aspects but also those regarding statics and dynamics of pelvis and its floor, it is now possible to study this important body part as a unit; that means to consider it in the whole body economy to which maintaining upright position, walking and behavior or physical conduct do not share less than urinary, genital, and intestinal functions. It is today possible to consider the pelvic floor as a musclefascial unit with synergic and antagonistic activity of muscular bundles, among them more or less interlaced, with multiple functions and not only the function of pelvic cup closure.

  15. Characterisation of microbial biocoenosis in vertical subsurface flow constructed wetlands

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tietz, Alexandra [Institute of Sanitary Engineering and Water Pollution Control, BOKU - University of Natural Resources and Applied Life Sciences, Vienna, Muthgasse 18, A-1190 Vienna (Austria)]. E-mail: alexandra.tietz@boku.ac.at; Kirschner, Alexander [Clinical Institute for Hygiene and Medical Microbiology, Department for Water Hygiene - Medical University of Vienna, Kinderspitalgasse 15, A-1090 Vienna (Austria); Langergraber, Guenter [Institute of Sanitary Engineering and Water Pollution Control, BOKU - University of Natural Resources and Applied Life Sciences, Vienna, Muthgasse 18, A-1190 Vienna (Austria); Sleytr, Kirsten [Institute of Sanitary Engineering and Water Pollution Control, BOKU - University of Natural Resources and Applied Life Sciences, Vienna, Muthgasse 18, A-1190 Vienna (Austria); Haberl, Raimund [Institute of Sanitary Engineering and Water Pollution Control, BOKU - University of Natural Resources and Applied Life Sciences, Vienna, Muthgasse 18, A-1190 Vienna (Austria)

    2007-07-15

    In this study a quantitative description of the microbial biocoenosis in subsurface vertical flow constructed wetlands fed with municipal wastewater was carried out. Three different methods (substrate induced respiration, ATP measurement and fumigation-extraction) were applied to measure the microbial biomass at different depths of planted and unplanted systems. Additionally, bacterial biomass was determined by epifluorescence microscopy and productivity was measured via {sup 14}C leucine incorporation into bacterial biomass. All methods showed that > 50% of microbial biomass and bacterial activity could be found in the first cm and about 95% in the first 10 cm of the filter layer. Bacterial biomass in the first 10 cm of the filter body accounted only for 16-19% of the total microbial biomass. Whether fungi or methodical uncertainties are mainly responsible for the difference between microbial and bacterial biomass remains to be examined. A comparison between the purification performance of planted and unplanted pilot-scale subsurface vertical flow constructed wetlands (PSCWs) showed no significant difference with the exception of the reduction of enterococci. The microbial biomass in all depths of the filter body was also not different in planted and unplanted systems. Compared with data from soils the microbial biomass in the PSCWs was high, although the specific surface area of the used sandy filter material available for biofilm growth was lower, especially in the beginning of the set-up of the PSCWs, due to missing clay and silt fraction.

  16. Exogenous organic materials applied to paddy field improving soil microbial biomass C, N and dissolved organic C, N%有机物料输入稻田提高土壤微生物碳氮及可溶性有机碳氮

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈安强; 付斌; 鲁耀; 段宗颜; 胡万里

    2015-01-01

    Soil microbial biomass C, N and dissolved organic C, N are the most active organic C components, and they can serve as important and also sensitive indexes for soil in response to disturbance. The change in characteristics of soil microbial biomass C (MBC), N (MBN) and dissolved organic C (DOC), N (DON) and their interrelations were studied by setting the field plot experiment with an addition of exogenous organic materials at different organic carbon rate. The results showed that soil microbial biomass C, N and dissolved organic C, N under the combined application of mineral fertilizers and biochar, maize straw, cow dung and pine needle were significantly (P<0.05) greater than those under no fertilizer (CK) and mineral fertilizers application treatments, respectively, with an average of 23.52% and 12.66% (MBC), 42.68% and 24.02% (MBN), 14.70% and 9.99% (DOC), 22.32% and 21.79% (DON) higher than those under CK and chemical fertilizers, respectively. For the treatments of combination of mineral fertilizers and different organic materials, soil microbial biomass C, N and dissolved organic C, N in the treatment of mineral fertilizers plus cow dung were the highest, they were 26.20% (MBC), 49.54% (MBN), 19.29% (DOC) and 32.81% (DON) respectively more than those of CK treatment, and next came the treatments of mineral fertilizers plus biochar or maize straw. Soil microbial biomass C, N and dissolved organic C, N were the lowest in the treatment of mineral fertilizers with pine needle incorporated. These differences were caused by the carbon, nitrogen contents and their component differences in quality of organic materials, different microbial communities and their ability to use carbon, nitrogen in organic materials, etc. The content of soil dissolved organic C (308.87 mg/kg soil) was less than microbial biomass C content (474.71 mg/kg soil), and the content of soil dissolved organic N (53.07 mg/kg soil) was less than microbial biomass N content (34.79 mg/kg soil). The

  17. Microbial desulfurization of coal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Danzet, C.; Buonfiglio, V.; Polidoro, M.; Valenti, P. (Rome Univ. La Sapienza (Italy). Ist. di Microbiologia)

    This paper reviews the biochemical and economics aspects of coal desulfurization processes involving the use of thermophile microorganisms such as sulfolobus, currently believed to be the the only type of microorganism capable of degrading both inorganic (pyrite-containing) and organic sulfur compounds. Comments are also made on the feasibility of the development of an in-lab, microbial based method for the transformation of the lignin component, obtained in the processing, by anaerobic fermentation, of lignocellulosic biomass, into humic acid.

  18. Soil thermal conductivity, organic matter, activity and microbial biomass in crops systems of passion fruit in Toro, Valle del Cauca, Colombia Conductividad térmica del suelo, materia orgánica, actividad y biomasa microbianas en sistemas de cultivo de maracuyá en Toro, Valle del Cauca

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pérez Jesús

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available The study evaluated the relationship among soil thermal conductivity (λ organic matter, activity and microbial biomass. In three systems of passion fruit crop (ecological, transitional and conventional in the municipality of Toro, Valle del Cauca, Colombia. In samples taken at random in two depths (0-15 and 15-30 cm, biological properties microbial activity (C-CO2; microbial biomass (microbial C - fumigation, extraction - and physical and chemical properties (organic matter, pH, humidity, texture, apparent density, porosity (traditional methods and thermal conductivity of the soil (electrothermal method were measured. The results were analyzed program SAS through models of lineal regression, LSD and Duncan. There were highly significant differences in organic matter, activity and microbial biomass and thermal conductivity of the soil at both depths.The most notorious among ecological and conventional crops. High correlations of direct proportionality were calculated among thermal conductivity of the soil (λ and soil organic matter, for the three crop systems. The ecological crop increased these properties and activity and microbial biomass. Key words: Passiflora edulis Sims var flavicarpa, crop systems, soil thermal conductivity, organic matter, activity and microbial biomass.El estudio evaluó la relación entre la conductividad térmica del suelo (λ, la materia orgánica, la actividad y la biomasa microbianas. En tres sistemas de cultivo de maracuyá (agroecológico, transición y convencional en el municipio de Toro (Valle del Cauca, en nueve puntos por manejo se tomaron muestras al azar a dos profundidades (0-15 y 15-30 cm y se midieron propiedades biológicas: (actividad microbiana (C-CO2; biomasa microbiana (C microbiano –fumigación, extracción– y propiedades físicas y químicas (materia orgánica, pH, humedad, textura, densidad aparente, porosidad (métodos tradicionales y conductividad térmica del suelo (m

  19. Consistent effects of canopy vs. understory nitrogen addition on the soil exchangeable cations and microbial community in two contrasting forests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Leilei; Zhang, Hongzhi; Liu, Tao; Zhang, Weixin; Shao, Yuanhu; Ha, Denglong; Li, Yuanqiu; Zhang, Chuangmao; Cai, Xi-an; Rao, Xingquan; Lin, Yongbiao; Zhou, Lixia; Zhao, Ping; Ye, Qing; Zou, Xiaoming; Fu, Shenglei

    2016-05-15

    Anthropogenic N deposition has been well documented to cause substantial impacts on the chemical and biological properties of forest soils. In most studies, however, atmospheric N deposition has been simulated by directly adding N to the forest floor. Such studies thus ignored the potentially significant effect of some key processes occurring in forest canopy (i.e., nitrogen retention) and may therefore have incorrectly assessed the effects of N deposition on soils. Here, we conducted an experiment that included both understory addition of N (UAN) and canopy addition of N (CAN) in two contrasting forests (temperate deciduous forest vs. subtropical evergreen forest). The goal was to determine whether the effects on soil exchangeable cations and microbial biomass differed between CAN and UAN. We found that N addition reduced pH, BS (base saturation) and exchangeable Ca and increased exchangeable Al significantly only at the temperate JGS site, and reduced the biomass of most soil microbial groups only at the subtropical SMT site. Except for soil exchangeable Mn, however, effects on soil chemical properties and soil microbial community did not significantly differ between CAN and UAN. Although biotic and abiotic soil characteristics differ significantly and the responses of both soil exchangeable cations and microbial biomass were different between the two study sites, we found no significant interactive effects between study site and N treatment approach on almost all soil properties involved in this study. In addition, N addition rate (25 vs. 50 kg N ha(-1) yr(-1)) did not show different effects on soil properties under both N addition approaches. These findings did not support previous prediction which expected that, by bypassing canopy effects (i.e., canopy retention and foliage fertilization), understory addition of N would overestimate the effects of N deposition on forest soil properties, at least for short time scale.

  20. Cambios en el porcentaje de sodio intercambiable (PSI) y la relación de absorción de sodio (RAS) de un suelo y su influencia en la actividad y biomasa microbiana Changes specific absortion rate (SAR) and exchange sodium percentaje (ESP) of a soil and its influence on microbial activity and biomass

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cesar A Gasca

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Con el objetivo de evaluar los cambios en el PSI, la RAS y su influencia en la actividad y biomasa microbiana del suelo, se aplicaron diversas concentraciones de vinaza como enmienda procedente de la industria de alcohol carburante, sobre un suelo afectado por sodicidad con severas limitaciones en las condiciones físicas, químicas y biológicas. Se aplicó un diseño en bloques completos al azar que incluye cuatro tratamientos y tres repeticiones, y muestreos de suelo al inicio y final del proceso a tres profundidades (0-20, 20-40 y 40-60 cm), cuyas variables de respuesta a medir fueron la respiración, C- biomasa microbiana, MO%, pH, CIC, CE, RAS y PSI. La actividad biológica (CO2) y el C-biomasa microbiana mostraron incrementos significativos en el rango ideal para el establecimento del cultivo de caña.To evaluate changes in ESP, SAR and its influence on the activity and soil microbial biomass, different concentrations of vinasse from the fuel ethanol industry as an amendment were applied on a soil affected by sodicity with strong physical, chemical and biological limitations. A randomized complete block design was used involving four treatments and three replications, which included soil sampling at the beginning and the end of the process at three different depths (0-20, 20-40 and 40-60 cm). Variables measured were respiration, microbial biomass C, OM%, pH, CIC, EC, SAR and ESP. Biological activity (CO2) and microbial biomass, C showed a significant increase in the ideal range for planting of sugar cane crop.

  1. Carbono da biomassa microbiana em solo cultivado com soja sob diferentes sistemas de manejo nos Cerrados Microbial biomass carbon in soil cultivated with soybean, under different management systems in Cerrado

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kátia Sueli Sivek Perez

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo deste trabalho foi quantificar o carbono da biomassa microbina de solo, cultivado com soja em diferentes sistemas de manejo. Os sistemas de manejo foram semeadura direta, uma gradagem, subsolagem e duas gradagens, realizadas num Latossolo Vermelho-Amarelo argiloso. As amostras de solo foram coletadas em cinco profundidades (0-5, 5-10, 10-20, 20-30 e 30-40 cm e em quatro épocas (antes do preparo do solo, 30 dias após a germinação, floração e após a colheita da soja. Foram coletadas, também, amostras de solo na mesma profundidade e na mesma época, em uma área de vegetação nativa (Cerrado sensu strictu, adjacente ao experimento. A subsolagem apresentou os maiores valores de carbono aos 30 dias após a germinação (865,7 mg kg-1 de solo. Este valor foi reduzido para 80,3 mg kg-1 de solo na floração. Os valores de carbono na semeadura direta mantiveram-se mais estáveis, principalmente na camada de 0-20 cm. As camadas de 0-5 e 5-10 cm apresentaram diferença na maioria das épocas estudadas e das demais camadas. A subsolagem mostrou o menor valor do carbono orgânico do solo, após a colheita da soja. Não houve correlação entre a relação carbono da biomassa microbiana/carbono orgânico e os nutrientes do solo na subsolagemThe aim of this study was to quantify soil microbial biomass carbon in a soybean crop under different soil management systems no-tillage, single harrowing, subsoiling and two harrowing, on a clay Red-Yellow Latossol in the Cerrado region. Soils were studied at five depths 0-5, 5-10, 10-20, 20-30 and 30-40 cm. Four periods were observed before soil preparation; 30 days after germination; flowering stage and after harvesting soybean plants. The same measurements were taken under the same conditions in an area of native cerrado vegetation, adjacent to the experiment (Cerrado sensu strictu. Subsoiling showed highest carbon values 30 days after germination (865.7 mg kg-1 of soil. This was reduced to less

  2. Effects of fire on soil nitrogen dynamics and microbial biomass in savannas of Central Brazil Efeitos do fogo na dinâmica do nitrogênio no solo e biomassa microbiana em área de Cerrado

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriela Bielefeld Nardoto

    2003-08-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this work was to study the effects of fire on net N mineralization and soil microbial biomass in burned and unburned cerrado stricto sensu sites. The study was carried out from April 1998 to April 2000. The pH values were significantly higher in the burned site while soil moisture content was significantly higher in the unburned site (PO objetivo deste trabalho foi estudar o efeito do fogo sobre as taxas de mineralização líquida de N e biomassa microbiana do solo em áreas de cerrado stricto sensu. O estudo foi realizado entre abril de 1998 e abril de 2000. O pH foi maior na área queimada enquanto o teor de umidade do solo foi maior na área sem queima (P<0,05. A razão C/N do solo foi de 22/1. A concentração de N nítrico disponível ficou entre 1,5 e 2,8 mg kg-1 de matéria seca enquanto a de N amoniacal variou entre 3 e 34 mg kg-1 de matéria seca na área queimada e entre 3 e 22 mg kg-1 de matéria seca na área sem queima. A concentração de N amoniacal aumentou significativamente após o fogo (P<0,05. Pequenos acúmulos de N nítrico no solo ocorreram somente durante curto período na estação chuvosa. A biomassa microbiana teve seu pico máximo em novembro de 1998, chegando a 850 mg kg-1 de C no solo da área queimada. Os dados indicam que o pico da atividade microbiana ocorreu no início das chuvas, com um período inicial de imobilização seguido de mineralização líquida. Ambas as áreas apresentaram um mesmo padrão de mineralização/imobilização, mas com menor produção anual de N mineral na área queimada (14,7 kg ha-1 por ano na área sem queima e 3,8 kg ha-1 por ano na área queimada, um ano após a queima.

  3. Effect of Nitrogen Fertilization on Soil Microbial Biomass and Community Structure of Picea koraiensis Planat tion in Maoershan Mountains of Northeastern China%施氮肥对东北帽儿山云杉人工林土壤微生物生物量和群落结构的影响1)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    尉建埔; 张洁; 王文娜; 王政权; 谷加存

    2016-01-01

    采用磷脂脂肪酸( PLFA)方法,研究了施氮肥对东北帽儿山地区云杉人工林的土壤微生物生物量和群落结构的影响。结果表明:与对照相比,施肥使土壤微生物总生物量在表层(0~10 cm)和亚表层(>10~20 cm)分别下降了28.5%和11.5%。施肥也使细菌、真菌、革兰氏阳性菌生物量比对照显著降低,但是革兰氏阴性菌比对照组显著增加,而对放线菌无显著影响。施肥导致土壤部分理化因子也发生了显著改变,特别是施肥处理下硝态氮质量分数在表层和亚表层分别提高了10倍和6倍,而pH值在表层和亚表层显著下降。因此,施氮肥可以显著改变云杉人工林土壤的理化性质,导致土壤微生物生物量下降和土壤微生物群落结构的改变。%We studied the effect of nitrogen ( N) fertilization on soil microbial community structure in Picea koraiensis plantation by using phospholipids fatty acids ( PLFA) in Maoershan Mounntains of Northeastern China .The total microbial biomass in surface and subsurface soil was decreased by 28.5%and 11.5%, respectively, under the N fertilization treatment .The bio-mass of bacteria , fungi , Gram-positive bacteria ( G+) was decreased significantly in the treatment plots than that in the control, while the Gram-negative bacteria (G-) was increased significantly.However, N fertilization did not change the bi-omass of actinomycete .Compared with the control , N fertilization changed soil chemical characteristics , particularly with NO-3-N concentration increasing by 10-and 6-fold in surface and subsurface soil , respectively , and with soil pH decrea-sing.Therefore, N fertilization could change soil chemical properties in P.koraiensis plantation, leading to the decrease of soil microbial biomass and the shift of microbial community structure .

  4. Biomass shock pretreatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holtzapple, Mark T.; Madison, Maxine Jones; Ramirez, Rocio Sierra; Deimund, Mark A.; Falls, Matthew; Dunkelman, John J.

    2014-07-01

    Methods and apparatus for treating biomass that may include introducing a biomass to a chamber; exposing the biomass in the chamber to a shock event to produce a shocked biomass; and transferring the shocked biomass from the chamber. In some aspects, the method may include pretreating the biomass with a chemical before introducing the biomass to the chamber and/or after transferring shocked biomass from the chamber.

  5. [Sanitary-hygienic assessment of microbial biofertilizer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arkhipchenko, N A; Akhtemava, G A; Lebedeva, T V; Voronina, A A; Makhan'kova, T I; Pavlova, M M; Shteĭntsaĭg, T A

    1991-10-01

    Biological treatment of sewage from pig-breeding complexes allowed to produce microbial biomass and primary sediments. The mixture of these components (1:1) after rendering harmless and drying out become the high effective biofertilizer. The results of chronic experiment on sanitary status of soil (microbial and helminthological indexes) under this biofertilizer usage are discussed, and the harmlessness of it is demonstrated.

  6. Steel-board composite floors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Couchman, G.H.; Tomà, A.W.; Brekelmans, J.W.P.M.; Brande, E.L.M.G. van den

    1999-01-01

    Work currently underway in Holland aDd the UK aims to increase the already considerable potential for light steel framing in buildings by developing rules for so-called "dry composites". This paper discusses both theoretical and experimental work to develop validated design mies for floor systems co

  7. Branding on the Shop Floor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gyimóthy, Szilvia; Jonas, Louise Rygaard

    2010-01-01

    , a Danish supermarket chain. During the implementation of the “Best Butcher in Town”-project, Kvickly’s shop floor becomes an engineered servicescape where the norms of good salesmanship must be performed. By documenting the disloyal behaviour of butchers, we demonstrate that the affective commitment...

  8. Timber floors strengthened with concrete

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blass, H.J.; Linden, M.L.R. van der; Schlager, M.

    1998-01-01

    Timber-concrete composite (tcc) beams may be used for the renovation of old timber floors. Although these systems are not new (Pokulka, 1997) and form a simple and practical solution, they are not widely adopted. One of the reasons for this is the Jack of uniform design rules. In this research progr

  9. Steel-board composite floors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Couchman, G.H.; Tomà, A.W.; Brekelmans, J.W.P.M.; Brande, E.L.M.G. van den

    1999-01-01

    Work currently underway in Holland aDd the UK aims to increase the already considerable potential for light steel framing in buildings by developing rules for so-called "dry composites". This paper discusses both theoretical and experimental work to develop validated design mies for floor systems

  10. Timber floors strengthened with concrete

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blass, H.J.; Linden, M.L.R. van der; Schlager, M.

    1998-01-01

    Timber-concrete composite (tcc) beams may be used for the renovation of old timber floors. Although these systems are not new (Pokulka, 1997) and form a simple and practical solution, they are not widely adopted. One of the reasons for this is the Jack of uniform design rules. In this research

  11. Carbon content of forest floor and mineral soil in Mediterranean Pinus spp. and Oak stands in acid soils in Northern Spain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herrero, C.; Turrión, M.B.; Pando, V.; Bravo, F.

    2016-07-01

    Aim of the study: The aim of the study was to determine the baseline carbon stock in forest floor and mineral soils in pine and oak stands in acid soils in Northern Spain. Area of study: The study area is situated in northern Spain (42° N, 4° W) on “Paramos y Valles” region of Palencia. aterial and methods: An extensive monitoring composed of 48 plots (31 in pine and 17 in oak stands) was carried out. Litter layers and mineral soil samples, at depths of 0-30 cm and 30-60 cm, were taken in each plot. An intensive monitoring was also performed by sampling 12 of these 48 plots selected taken in account species forest composition and their stand development stage. Microbial biomass C (CMB), C mineralization (CRB), and soil organic C balance at stand level were determined in surface soil samples of intensive monitoring. Main results: No differences in soil C content were detected in the two forest ecosystems up to 60 cm depth (53.0±25.8 Mg C ha-1 in Pinus spp. plantations and 60.3±43.8 Mg C ha-1 in oak stands). However, differences in total C (CT), CMB and CRB were found in the upper 10 cm of the soils depending on the stand development stage in each species forest composition (Pinus nigra, Pinus pinaster, Pinus sylvestris and Quercus pyrenaica). Plots with high development stage exhibited significant lower metabolic quotient (qCO2), so, meant more efficient utilization of C by the microbial community. The C content in the forest floor was higher in pine stands (13.7±0.9 Mg C ha-1) than in oak stands (5.4±0.7 Mg C ha-1). A greater turnover time was found in pine ecosystems vs. oak stands. In contrast, forest floor H layer was nonexistent in oak stands. Research highlights: Results about litterfall, forest floor and mineral soil dynamics in this paper can be used strategically to reach environmental goals in new afforestation programs and sustainable forest management approaches. (Author)

  12. Community genomics among stratified microbial assemblages in the ocean's interior

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    DeLong, Edward F; Preston, Christina M; Mincer, Tracy

    2006-01-01

    Microbial life predominates in the ocean, yet little is known about its genomic variability, especially along the depth continuum. We report here genomic analyses of planktonic microbial communities in the North Pacific Subtropical Gyre, from the ocean's surface to near-sea floor depths. Sequence...

  13. Raise the Floor When Remodeling Science Labs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nation's Schools, 1972

    1972-01-01

    A new remodeling idea adopts the concept of raised floor covering gas, water, electrical, and drain lines. The accessible floor has removable panels set into an adjustable support frame 24 inches above a concrete subfloor. (Author)

  14. How Are Pelvic Floor Disorders Commonly Treated?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Information Clinical Trials Resources and Publications How are pelvic floor disorders commonly treated? Skip sharing on social media ... Treatment Nonsurgical treatments commonly used for PFDs include: Pelvic floor muscle training (PFMT). Also called Kegel (pronounced KEY- ...

  15. How Are Pelvic Floor Disorders Diagnosed?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Information Clinical Trials Resources and Publications How are pelvic floor disorders diagnosed? Skip sharing on social media links ... fee ). This test is used to evaluate the pelvic floor and rectum while the patient is having a ...

  16. 7 CFR 2902.39 - Floor strippers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... Floor strippers. (a) Definition. Products that are formulated to loosen waxes, resins, or varnishes from floor surfaces. They can be in either liquid or gel form, and may also be used with or without... 7 Agriculture 15 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Floor strippers. 2902.39 Section 2902.39...

  17. Microbial production host selection for converting second-generation feedstocks into bioproducts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rumbold, K.; Buijsen, H.J.J. van; Overkamp, K.M.; Groenestijn, J.W. van; Punt, P.J.; Werf, M.J.V.D.

    2009-01-01

    Increasingly lignocellulosic biomass hydrolysates are used as the feedstock for industrial fermentations. These biomass hydrolysates are complex mixtures of different fermentable sugars, but also inhibitors and salts that affect the performance of the microbial production host. The performance of si

  18. Characteristics of soil microbial biomass and community composition in three types of plantations in southern subtropical area of China%南亚热带3种人工林土壤微生物生物量和微生物群落结构特征

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王卫霞; 史作民; 罗达; 刘世荣; 卢立华

    2013-01-01

    以我国南亚热带格木、红椎和马尾松人工林为对象,采用氯仿熏蒸浸提法和磷脂脂肪酸法(PLFA)分析了林地土壤微生物生物量和微生物群落结构组成.结果表明:林分和季节因素均显著影响土壤微生物生物量、总PLFAs量、细菌PLFAs量和真菌PLFAs量,且干季林分下的土壤微生物生物量、总PLFAs量、单个PLFA量均大于雨季.红椎人工林土壤微生物生物量碳(MBC)和总PLFAs量最高,而格木人工林土壤微生物生物量氮(MBN)最高.土壤pH值对土壤丛枝菌根真菌(16:1 ω5c)的影响达到极显著正相关水平.土壤总PLFAs量、革兰氏阳性菌(G+)以及腐生真菌(18:2ω6,9c)、革兰氏阳性菌/革兰氏阴性菌(G+/G-)与土壤有机碳、全氮和全磷显著相关,表明土壤有机碳、全氮、全磷含量是影响该地区土壤微生物数量和种类的重要因素.外生菌根真菌(18:1ω9c)和丛枝菌根真菌与土壤碳氮比值呈极显著相关.%By using fumigation-extraction method and phospholipid fatty acids (PLFAs) analysis,this paper studied the characteristics of soil microbial biomass and community composition in the Erythrophleum fordii,Castanopsis hystrix,and Pinus massoniana plantations in south subtropical China.The soil microbial biomass,total PLFAs,bacterial PLFAs,and fungal PLFAs in the plantations were significantly affected by the plantation type and season,and the soil microbial biomass,total PLFAs,and individual PLFA signatures were higher in dry season than in rainy season.The C.hystrix plantation had the highest soil microbial biomass carbon and total PLFAs,while the E.fordii plantation had the highest soil microbial biomass nitrogen.There was a significant positive correlation between the soil pH and arbuscular mycorrhizal fungal (AMF) PLFA (16:1ω5c).The soil total PLFAs,gram-positive bacterial PLFAs,saprophytic fungal PLFA (18:2ω6,9c),and the ratio of gram-positive to gram-negative bacterial PLFAs were significantly

  19. Characteristics of soil microbial biomass carbon and soil water soluble organic carbon in the process of natural restoration of Karst forest%喀斯特森林自然恢复中土壤微生物生物量碳与水溶性有机碳特征

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄宗胜; 符裕红; 喻理飞

    2012-01-01

    2011年9月,采用空间代替时间方法,研究了贵州茂兰国家级自然保护区退化喀斯特森林自然恢复中土壤微生物生物量碳和水溶性有机碳特征.结果表明:研究期间,土壤微生物生物量碳含量、基础呼吸随土壤深度增加而减少,随自然恢复的进程而增加;微生物熵随土壤深度增加和恢复的进程增加;水溶性有机碳含量随土壤深度增加而减少,随自然恢复的进程表层土增加,下层先增加后减少;水溶性有机碳与有机碳的比值随土壤深度增加而增加,随自然恢复的进程而减少;土壤质量、有机碳的质与量随自然恢复的进程而提高,其中微生物量碳变化最大,而水溶性有机碳变化不显著.%By the method of taking space instead of time, an incubation test was -conducted to study the characteristics of soil microbial biomass carbon and water soluble organic carbon in the process of natural restoration of Karst forest in Maolan Nature Reserve, Guizhou Province of Southwest China. The soil microbial biomass carbon content and soil basal respiration decreased with increasing soil depth but increased with the process of the natural restoration, soil microbial quotient increased with increasing soil depth and with the process of restoration, and soil water soluble organic carbon content decreased with increasing soil depth. In the process of the natural restoration, surface soil water soluble organic carbon content increased, while sublayer soil water soluble organic carbon content decreased after an initial increase. The ratio of soil water soluble organic carbon to total soil organic carbon increased with increasing soil depth but decreased with the process of restoration. Soil quality increased with the process of restoration. Also, the quality and quantity of soil organic carbon increased with the process of restoration, in which, soil microbial biomass carbon content had the greatest change, while soil water soluble

  20. Obesity and pelvic floor dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramalingam, Kalaivani; Monga, Ash

    2015-05-01

    Obesity is associated with a high prevalence of pelvic floor disorders. Patients with obesity present with a range of urinary, bowel and sexual dysfunction problems as well as uterovaginal prolapse. Urinary incontinence, faecal incontinence and sexual dysfunction are more prevalent in patients with obesity. Uterovaginal prolapse is also more common than in the non-obese population. Weight loss by surgical and non-surgical methods plays a major role in the improvement of these symptoms in such patients. The treatment of symptoms leads to an improvement in their quality of life. However, surgical treatment of these symptoms may be accompanied by an increased risk of complications in obese patients. A better understanding of the mechanism of obesity-associated pelvic floor dysfunction is essential.

  1. [Surgical dilemmas. Sinus floor elevation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    ten Bruggenkate, C M; Schulten, E A J M; Zijderveld, S A

    2008-12-01

    Limited alveolar bone height prevents the placement of dental implants. Sinus floor elevation is an internal augmentation of the maxillary sinus that allows implants to be placed. The principle of this surgical procedure is the preparation of a 'top hinge door', that is raised together with the Schneiderian membrane in the cranial direction. The space which created under this lid is filled with a bone transplant. Autogenous bone is the standard transplant material, despite the fact that a second surgery site is necessary. Under certain circumstances bone substitutes can be used, with a longer healing phase. If sufficient alveolar bone height is available to secure implant stability, simultaneous implantation and sinus floor elevation are possible. Considering the significant anatomical variation in the region of the maxillary sinus, a sound knowledge of the anatomy is of great importance.

  2. Seasonal dynamics in soil microbial biomass carbon and nitrogen and microbial quantity in a forest-alpine tundra ecotone, Eastern Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau, China%青藏高原东缘高山森林-苔原交错带土壤微生物生物量碳、氮和可培养微生物数量的季节动态

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘洋; 张健; 闫帮国; 黄旭; 徐振锋; 吴福忠

    2012-01-01

    为了了解青藏高原东缘高山森林-苔原交错带土壤微生物的特征和季节变化,研究了米亚罗鹧鸪山原始针叶林、林线、树线、密灌丛、疏灌丛和高山草甸土壤微生物生物量碳(MBC)、氮(MBN)和可培养微生物数量的季节动态.结果表明,植被类型和季节动态对MBC、MBN和微生物数量都有显著影响.不同时期的微生物在各植被类型间分布有差异,植物生长季初期和生长季中期,树线以上群落的MBC高于树线下的群落,而到生长季未期恰恰相反,暗针叶林、林线和树线的MBC显著升高,各植被之间MBC的差异减小;微生物数量基本上也是以树线为界,树线以下群落土壤微生物数量显著低于树线以上群落,其中密灌丛的细菌数量最高;可培养微生物数量为生长季末期>生长季初期>生长季中期.生长季末期真菌数量显著增加,且MBC/MBN最高.统计分析表明,MBN与细菌、真菌、放线菌数量存在显著的相关关系,而MBC仅与真菌数量存在显著相关关系(p<0.05).植物生长季末期大量的凋落物输入和雪被覆盖可能是微生物季节变异的外在因素,而土壤微生物和高山植物对有效氮的竞争可能是微生物季节变异的内在因素.植物生长季初期对氮的吸收和土壤微生物在植物生长季末期对氮的固定加强了高山生态系统对氮的利用.气候变暖可能会延长高山植物的生长季,增加高山土壤微生物生物量,加速土壤有机质的分解,进而改变高山土壤碳的固存速率.%Aims The forest-alpine tundra ecotone is one of the most conspicuous climate-driven ecological boundaries. However, dynamics of soil microbial biomass and quantity during different stages of the growing season in the ecotone remain unclear. Our objective was to understand the temporal and spatial variations of microbial biomass and quantity to explore the main drivers in the ecotone. Methods We collected soil

  3. Branding on the Shop Floor

    OpenAIRE

    Szilvia Gyimóthy; Louise Rygaard Jonas

    2010-01-01

    Service branding is a particular form of emotional management, where employees are regarded as adaptable media, who can be trained to convey corporate values while interacting with customers. This paper examines the identity work of butchers during the brand revitalisation campaign of Kvickly, a Danish supermarket chain. During the implementation of the “Best Butcher in Town”-project, Kvickly’s shop floor becomes an engineered servicescape where the norms of good salesmanship must be performe...

  4. Nitrogênio da biomassa microbiana em solo de Cerrado com aplicação de fertilizante nitrogenado Microbial biomass nitrogen in cerrado soil with nitrogen fertilizer application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thais Rodrigues Coser

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo deste trabalho foi avaliar o efeito da adubação nitrogenada no nitrogênio da biomassa microbiana do solo (N BMS, em diferentes profundidades, em um Latossolo Vermelho-Amarelo cultivado com cevada. O experimento foi instalado em junho de 2004, em área experimental de primeiro ano de plantio direto, anteriormente cultivada com milheto por três anos e posteriormente com soja por duas safras. Foram utilizados os seguintes tratamentos: quatro doses de nitrogênio (30, 60, 90 e 120 kg ha-1 e o controle sem adubação nitrogenada. As amostras de solo foram coletadas em quatro profundidades: 0-5, 5-10, 10-20 e 20-30 cm, com três repetições e em três épocas: perfilhamento pleno, floração e logo após a colheita. O N BMS e a razão N BMS:Ntotal diminuíram com a profundidade. Doses mais elevadas de nitrogênio não aumentaram o N BMS. O Ntotal não foi alterado nas diferentes doses de nitrogênio, mas diminuiu com a profundidade. Houve correlação negativa entre o N BMS e o pH do solo em todas as doses de nitrogênio, com exceção na dose zero. Houve também, correlação positiva entre a razão N BMS:Ntotal e o N BMS, porém não entre a razão N BMS:Ntotal e o Ntotal.The objective of this work was to evaluate the effect of different nitrogen doses and soil depths on soil microbial biomass nitrogen (N SMB in a sandy textured Oxisol, cultivated with barley. The experiment was established in June, 2004, in an area which had been cultivated with millet for three years and subsequently with soya beans for two seasons. The treatments were four doses of nitrogen (30, 60, 90 e 120 kg ha-1 and a control without any dose. Soil samples were collected in four depths: 0-5, 5-10, 10-20 e 20-30 cm, comprising three replicates and three sampling periods: tillering, flowering and right after the harvest. The N SMB and N SMB:Ntotal decreased according to depth. Higher doses of nitrogen did not increase the N SMB. The Ntotal was not altered with

  5. Effects of the decomposition of poplar and aider mixed leaf litters on soil microbial biomass%杨树和桤木落叶混合分解对土壤微生物生物量的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈琴; 方升佐; 田野

    2012-01-01

    通过室内培养,研究了杨树和江南桤木落叶混合分解过程中两种落叶的混合比例及落叶添加方式对土壤微生物生物量的影响.结果表明:落叶混合比例对土壤微生物生物量碳(MBC)、氮(MBN)均有显著的影响.培养30 d,江南桤木落叶比例为50%以上的土壤MBC和MBN显著高于纯杨树落叶处理及对照;75 d时,江南桤木落叶比例≥40%的土壤MBC和≥30%的土壤MBN均显著高于纯杨树落叶处理及对照;135 d后,江南桤木落叶比例≥20%的土壤MBC和≥40%的土壤MBN均显著高于纯杨树落叶处理及对照.不同混合比例的土壤MBC/MBN无显著差异,总体呈前期增长后期下降的变化趋势.杨树和江南桤木落叶混合分解对土壤MBC和MBN有显著的协同促进作用.在整个培养过程中,落叶添加方式对土壤MBC、MBN和MBC/MBN无显著影响.%An incubation test was conducted to study the effects of the decomposition of poplar and trabeculate alder leaf litters with different mixed ratios and under different application ways on soil microbial biomass carbon (MBC) and nitrogen (MBN). The mixed ratio of the litters had significant effects on soil MBC and MBN. On the 30th day of incubation, soil MBC and MBN were significantly higher in the treatments with ≥50% of alder litter than in the treatment with poplar litter only and the control. On the 75th day of incubation, the soil MBC in the treatments with ≥40% of alder litter and the soil MBN in the treatments with ≥30% of alder litter were significantly greater than those in the treatment with poplar litter only and the control. After 135 days incubation, soil MBC and MBN were significant higher in the treatments with ≥20% and ≥40% of alder litter than in the treatment with poplar litter only and the control, respectively. There was no significant difference in the soil MBC/MBN between the treatments with different mixed ratios of poplar and alder leaf litters and the

  6. 黑碳添加对杉木人工林土壤微生物量碳氮的影响%Effects of Black Carbon Application on Soil Microbial Biomass Carbon and Nitrogen in the Plantation of Cunninghamia Lanceolata

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李芳芳; 高人; 尹云锋; 杨玉盛; 马红亮; 李淑香

    2011-01-01

    As a common soil component, black carbon (BC) plays an important role in forest carbon and nitrogen cycles. However, few studies on effects of BC application on soil microbial biomass car- bon (MBC) and nitrogen (MBN) in forest soils have been conducted. BC produced from the pyrolysis of branch and leaf litters of Cunninghamia lanceolata at 350 ℃ in capped muffle furnace for 2 h was incorporated into test soil at rates of 0% (CO), 1% (C1) and 5% (C5) based on dried soil mass, and incubated for 28 days at 25 ℃. The results showed that the MBC decreased quickly under different treatments at the early stage of incubation, but increased steadily in later phase. The MBN increased gradually with incubation duration under the higher BC-amended treatments, but the pattern was signif- icantly different for the unamended soil, and tended to decrease throughout the experiment. Higher ap- plication levels provided further enhancement of MBC and MBN with the order as C5 〉 C1 〉 C0. In ad- dition, DOC and DON decreased with BC application and incubation duration.%向杉木人工林土壤中分别添加不同用量黑碳,以0%(C0)、1%(C1)和5%(C5)添加量(质量分数)作为不同处理,通过28d室内培养实验,研究了黑碳添加对土壤微生物量碳(ymc)和微生物量氮(MBN)的影响.结果表明,各处理土攘MBC含量变化趋势是前期急剧减少,后期增加,并趋于稳定;黑碳添加在一定程度上缓解了土壤MBN含量的减少,并随着黑碳添加量的增加,土壤MBN含量呈现增加的趋势.整个培养过程中,除第1d外,黑碳添加处理的土壤MBC和MBN含量始终高于对照处理,C5〉C1〉CO.同时,土壤可溶性碳(DOC)和可溶性氮(DON)含量也因黑碳的添加而呈现减少的趋势.

  7. Linear Alkylbenzenesulfonates in indoor Floor Dust

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wolkoff, Peder; Madsen, Jørgen Øgaard

    1999-01-01

    The amount of Linear Alkylbenzenesulfonates (LAS) in the particle fraction of floor dust sampled from 7 selected public buildings varied between 34 and 1500 microgram per gram dust, while the contents of the fibre fractions generally were higher with up to 3500 microgram LAS/g dust. The use...... of a cleaning agent with LAS resulted in an increase of the amount of LAS in the floor dust after floor wash relative to just before floor wash. However, the most important source of LAS in the indoor floor dust appears to be residues of detergent in clothing. Thus, a newly washed shirt contained 2960 microgram...

  8. Biomass torrefaction mill

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sprouse, Kenneth M.

    2016-05-17

    A biomass torrefaction system includes a mill which receives a raw biomass feedstock and operates at temperatures above 400 F (204 C) to generate a dusty flue gas which contains a milled biomass product.

  9. Biomass torrefaction mill

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sprouse, Kenneth M.

    2016-05-17

    A biomass torrefaction system includes a mill which receives a raw biomass feedstock and operates at temperatures above 400 F (204 C) to generate a dusty flue gas which contains a milled biomass product.

  10. Influencia de la aplicación de vinaza en actividad y biomasa microbiana en un Entic Dystropept y un Fluventic haplustoll del Valle del Cauca, Colombia Influence of the vinasse application on activity and microbial biomass in an Entic dystropept and a Fluventic haplustoll soils of the Cauca Valley, Colombia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra Patricia Montenegro Gómez

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Con la aplicación de vinaza, residuo de la producción de alcohol carburante a partir de la caña de azúcar, se evaluó el efecto sobre la actividad y biomasa microbiana del suelo y el suministro de K+ al cultivo de maíz dulce (Zea Mays en un Entic Dystropept y un Fluventic Haplustoll del Valle del Cauca, Colombia. Se utilizó un diseño completamente al azar con cuatro tratamientos y cinco repeticiones: T1 (100% requerimiento de K+ con KCl, T2 (100% requerimiento de K+ con vinaza, T3 (50% requerimiento de K+ con KCl +50% con vinaza y T4 (25% requerimiento de K+ con KCl +75% con vinaza. Se estimó biomasa microbiana por el método de fumigación-extracción. Se realizó análisis de varianza, prueba de comparación de medias, regresiones y correlaciones (SAS. Se presentaron diferencias significativas en la actividad y biomasa microbiana por época de muestreo y entre los diferentes muestreos; al final del cultivo el Entic Dystropept presentó el contenido más alto de biomasa microbiana-C en el T2, mientras que en el Fluventic Haplustoll fue en el T1. El menor qCO2 fue para el T2 del Entic Distropept y T1 del Fluventic Haplustoll, estos tratamientos presentaron mayor acumulación de biomasa en cada suelo respectivamente T2 (30 450 kg ha-1 y T1 (21 015.6 kg ha-1.With the vinasse application, a residue from the production of fuel ethanol from sugarcane, the effect on the activity of soil microbial biomass an the supply of K+ to crop sweet corn (Zea Mays in two soils of the Cauca Valley, Colombia were evaluated: Entic Dystropept and Fluventic Haplustoll . Was used a completely randomized design with four replications and five treatments: T1 (100% requirement of K+ with KCl, T2 (100% requirement of K+ with vinasse, T3 (50% requirement of K+ with KCl + 50% with vinasse, T4 (25% requirement of K+ with KCl +75% with vinasse. The microbial biomass was estimated by the fumigation-extraction method. The results were evaluated using analysis of variance

  11. Energy from Biomass for Conversion of Biomass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abolins, J.; Gravitis, J.

    2009-01-01

    Along with estimates of minimum energy required by steam explosion pre-treatment of biomass some general problems concerning biomass conversion into chemicals, materials, and fuels are discussed. The energy necessary for processing biomass by steam explosion auto-hydrolysis is compared with the heat content of wood and calculated in terms of the amount of saturated steam consumed per unit mass of the dry content of wood biomass. The fraction of processed biomass available for conversion after steam explosion pre-treatment is presented as function of the amount of steam consumed per unit mass of the dry content of wood. The estimates based on a simple model of energy flows show the energy required by steam explosion pre-treatment of biomass being within 10% of the heat content of biomass - a realistic amount demonstrating that energy for the process can be supplied from a reasonable proportion of biomass used as the source of energy for steam explosion pre-treatment.

  12. Biomassa e atividade microbiana em solo sob diferentes sistemas de manejo na região fisiográfica Campos das Vertentes - MG Soil biomass and microbial activity under different management systems in the physiographic region Campos das Vertentes - Minas gerais

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rubens Ribeiro da Silva

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available A biomassa e a atividade microbiana têm sido apontadas como indicadores adequados de alterações provocadas por diferentes sistemas de uso e manejo do solo. O objetivo deste trabalho foi avaliar as alterações na biomassa e na atividade microbiana de um Latossolo Vermelho-Amarelo ácrico típico, sob Cerrado nativo e diferentes sistemas de manejo, na região fisiográfica Campos das Vertentes, Minas Gerais. Os sistemas avaliados foram: cultivo convencional com batata (CCB; cultivo com batata, sucedido por aveia e rotação com milho (CBAM; cultivo convencional com milho (CCM; plantio direto com milho (PDM; cultivo convencional com eucalipto (CCE; e o Cerrado nativo (CN como referência. Foram coletadas amostras de solo nas profundidades de 0-10, 10-20 e 20-30 cm, analisados o C microbiano (Cmic e a respiração basal e calculados o quociente metabólico (qCO2 e a relação Cmic/C orgânico. A biomassa e a atividade microbiana foram influenciadas pelos diferentes sistemas de manejo do solo, e as condições mais satisfatórias para a microbiota do solo ocorreram no Cerrado nativo. O manejo mais intensivo do solo e o uso frequente de agrotóxicos, característicos dos sistemas CCB e CBAM, determinaram redução nos teores de Cmic, menores valores da relação Cmic/C orgânico e maiores valores de qCO2, indicando uma provável condição de estresse para a biomassa microbiana.Biomass and microbial activity have been suggested as appropriate indicators of changes caused by different land use and management systems. The objective of this study was to evaluate alterations in biomass and microbial activity of a typic acric Red-Yellow Latosol (Oxisol, under native Cerrado and different management systems, in the physiographic region Campos das Vertentes, state of Minas Gerais. The evaluated systems were: conventional tillage with potato (CCB; potato followed by oat in rotation with corn (CBAM; conventional tillage with corn (CCM; no-till with corn

  13. [Functional aspects of pelvic floor surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagenlehner, F M E; Gunnemann, A; Liedl, B; Weidner, W

    2009-11-01

    Pelvic floor dysfunctions are frequently seen in females. The human pelvic floor is a complex structure and heavily stressed throughout female life. Recent findings in the functional anatomy of the pelvic floor have led to a much better understand-ing, on the basis of which enormous improvements in the therapeutic options have arisen. The pelvic floor activity is regulated by three main muscular forces that are responsible for vaginal tension and suspension of the pelvic floor -organs, bladder and rectum. For different reasons laxity in the vagina or its supporting ligaments as a result of altered connective tissue can distort this functional anatomy. A variety of symptoms can derive from these pelvic floor dysfunctions, such as urinary urge and stress incontinence, abnormal bladder emptying, faecal incontinence, obstructive bowel disease syndrome and pelvic pain. Pelvic floor reconstruction is nowadays driven by the concept that in the case of pelvic floor symptoms restoration of the anatomy will translate into restoration of the physiology and ultimately improve the patients' symptoms. The exact surgical reconstruction of the anatomy is there-fore almost exclusively focused on the restoration of the lax pelvic floor ligaments. An exact identification of the anatomic lesions preoperatively is eminently necessary, to allow for an exact anatomic reconstruction with respect to the muscular forces of the pelvi