WorldWideScience

Sample records for flood elevation determinations

  1. 75 FR 59989 - Final Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-29

    ... Lufkin. downstream of Bonita Street. Approximately 230 feet +304 upstream of Martin Luther King Drive... SECURITY Federal Emergency Management Agency 44 CFR Part 67 Final Flood Elevation Determinations AGENCY... (FEMA) makes the final determinations listed below for the modified BFEs for each community...

  2. 76 FR 39063 - Proposed Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-05

    ... City Hall, 100 North Martin Luther King Jr. Avenue, Waukegan, IL 60085. City of Zion Maps are available... SECURITY Federal Emergency Management Agency 44 CFR Part 67 Proposed Flood Elevation Determinations AGENCY... make determinations of BFEs and modified BFEs for each community listed below, in accordance...

  3. 75 FR 5925 - Proposed Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-05

    ... 2,300 None +260 Unincorporated Areas of feet downstream of Hot Spring County. Martin Luther King Boulevard. Approximately 1,300 None +263 feet downstream of Martin Luther King Boulevard. Town Creek... SECURITY Federal Emergency Management Agency 44 CFR Part 67 Proposed Flood Elevation Determinations...

  4. 75 FR 8814 - Final Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-26

    ...Base (1% annual-chance) Flood Elevations (BFEs) and modified BFEs are made final for the communities listed below. The BFEs and modified BFEs are the basis for the floodplain management measures that each community is required either to adopt or to show evidence of being already in effect in order to qualify or remain qualified for participation in the National Flood Insurance Program...

  5. 76 FR 8906 - Final Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-16

    ....: FEMA-B-1014 Sugar Creek Approximately 2,000 feet +469 Town of West Terre Haute, downstream of Conrail... Mexico Base Flood Elevation +6-17 City of Lake Charles, changes ranging from 6 City of Sulphur, City...

  6. 78 FR 8089 - Proposed Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-05

    ... represents the flooding sources, location of referenced elevations, effective and modified elevations, and... the floodplain management criteria required by 44 CFR 60.3, are the minimum that are required. They... Creek, and Muncy Creek. Those tables contained inaccurate information as to the location of...

  7. 77 FR 423 - Changes in Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-05

    ... SECURITY Federal Emergency Management Agency 44 CFR Part 65 Changes in Flood Elevation Determinations... participation in the National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP). These modified BFEs, together with the floodplain...). Asheville Citizen- 205 College Street, Times. Suite 300, Asheville, NC 28801. Davidson (FEMA Docket...

  8. 77 FR 46994 - Proposed Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-07

    ..., it addresses the following flooding sources: Jones Bayou, Mississippi River, and Porter Bayou. DATES... Incorporated Areas'' addressed the following flooding sources: Jones Bayou, Mississippi River, and Porter Bayou.... Approximately 8.1 miles None +162 upstream of the Arkansas River confluence. Porter Bayou Approximately 0.8 mile...

  9. 76 FR 43923 - Final Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-22

    ... participation in the National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP). DATES: The date of issuance of the Flood Insurance Rate Map (FIRM) showing BFEs and modified BFEs for each community. This date may be obtained by... Approximately 275 feet downstream of Big Bethel +9 Road. Approximately 20 feet upstream of the confluence...

  10. 75 FR 14091 - Final Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-24

    ... participation in the National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP). DATES: The date of issuance of the Flood Insurance Rate Map (FIRM) showing BFEs and modified BFEs for each community. This date may be obtained by...-1035 Big Creek South Ely Street......... + 713 City of Bertram. Big Creek Road + 719 Cedar Lake...

  11. 75 FR 68714 - Final Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-09

    ... Docket No.: FEMA-B-1069 Arroyo Hermanos At the confluence with +6448 City of Las Vegas. Gallinas Creek... Domestic Assistance No. 97.022, ``Flood Insurance.'') Dated: October 29, 2010. Sandra K. Knight, Deputy...

  12. 76 FR 26980 - Proposed Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-10

    ... Lake Michigan and White Ditch in La Porte County, Indiana. The City of Michiana Shores should have been... Porte County, Indiana, and Incorporated Areas'' addressed several flooding sources, including...

  13. 76 FR 19007 - Proposed Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-06

    .... Williamsburg County. Approximately 0.4 mile None +21 upstream of the Big Dam Swamp confluence. Smith Swamp At... section 110 of the Flood Disaster Protection Act of 1973, 42 U.S.C. 4104, and 44 CFR 67.4(a). These.... Sec. 67.4 2. The tables published under the authority of Sec. 67.4 are proposed to be amended...

  14. 75 FR 43479 - Proposed Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-26

    ... section 110 of the Flood Disaster Protection Act of 1973, 42 U.S.C. 4104, and 44 CFR 67.4(a). These.... Sec. 67.4 2. The tables published under the authority of Sec. 67.4 are proposed to be amended as... Street. Summet Brook (Backwater effects from Approximately 2,800 None +363 Town of Shrewsbury. Big...

  15. 78 FR 29652 - Final Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-21

    ... referenced Depth in feet Communities affected elevation above ground Elevation in meters (MSL) Modified.... Burns Bayou Approximately 1,860 feet +76 Unincorporated Areas of upstream of Collins Lane. Richland Parish. Just upstream of U.S. +79 Route 80. Burns Bayou Tributary No. 1 At the lower confluence +77 Town...

  16. 76 FR 61649 - Proposed Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-05

    ... Planning and Review. This proposed rule is not a significant regulatory action under the criteria of... follows: * Elevation in feet (NGVD) + Elevation in feet (NAVD) Depth in feet above State City/town/county... City of Lubbock......... Playa System E1 At the intersection of Avenue T and 40th Street +3208 +3206 At...

  17. 75 FR 62061 - Proposed Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-07

    ..., these elevations, once finalized, will be used by insurance agents and others to calculate appropriate... Cecil County. Egypt Road. Approximately 977 feet +259 +260 downstream of Elbow Road. Dogwood Run At...

  18. 75 FR 75945 - Proposed Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-07

    ..., these elevations, once finalized, will be used by insurance agents and others to calculate appropriate... 2nd Street and of Skagit County. 3rd Street. At the intersection of 1 +39 Freeway Drive and Cameron...

  19. 75 FR 61377 - Proposed Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-05

    ..., these elevations, once finalized, will be used by insurance agents and others to calculate appropriate... Cameron Ditch At the confluence with +1007 +1009 City of Blair. the Missouri River. Just downstream of...

  20. 77 FR 12501 - Changes in Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-01

    ... Herald. Martin Luther King Jr. Boulevard, Chapel Hill, NC 27514. Stanly City of Albemarle (11- November 3... SECURITY Federal Emergency Management Agency 44 CFR Part 65 Changes in Flood Elevation Determinations... to this determination for the listed communities. From the date of the second publication of...

  1. 77 FR 59767 - Changes in Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-01

    ..., Mayor, The Chapel Hill Town of Chapel Hill, 405 Herald. Martin Luther King, Jr. Boulevard, Chapel Hill... SECURITY Federal Emergency Management Agency 44 CFR Part 65 Changes in Flood Elevation Determinations... final determinations listed below of the modified BFEs for each community listed. These modified...

  2. 75 FR 3171 - Final Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-20

    ... Elevation in meters (MSL) Modified Washington County, Minnesota, and Incorporated Areas Docket No.: FEMA-B..., City of Lakeland Shores, City of Marine on St. Croix, City of Oak Park Heights, City of St. Mary's... Washington County. West Metcalf Marsh Entire shoreline......... +813 City of Afton. White Rock Lake...

  3. 75 FR 29219 - Proposed Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-25

    ..., these elevations, once finalized, will be used by insurance agents and others to calculate appropriate... South Van Dorn Street. Approximately +94 +95 600 feet upstream of South Van Dorn Street. Cameron Run... +84 +90 of I-395. Hooffs Run At the +11 +12 confluence with Cameron Run. Approximately None +18 260...

  4. 75 FR 29253 - Proposed Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-25

    .... Washington County. Approximately 100 feet None +109 downstream of State Road 77. Flat Creek At the confluence... Elevation in meters (MSL) Existing Modified City of Hampton, Virginia Virginia City of Hampton... ground. Mean Sea Level, rounded to the nearest 0.1 meter. ** BFEs to be changed include the...

  5. 76 FR 22054 - Changes in Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-20

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY Federal Emergency Management Agency 44 CFR Part 65 Changes in Flood Elevation Determinations... Smart Sr., Chairman, Board of Shopper. Selectmen, 34 Town Farm Road, P.O. Box 9, Hollis, ME...

  6. 76 FR 23 - Changes in Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-03

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY Federal Emergency Management Agency 44 CFR Part 65 Changes in Flood Elevation Determinations... 0538P). 20, 2010; The Smart Sr., Chairman, Board of Shopper. Selectman, 34 Town Farm Road, Hollis,...

  7. 76 FR 72961 - Flood Hazard Determinations (Including Flood Elevation Determinations)-Change in Notification and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-28

    ..., etc.) and provide both a physical address and an internet address where the specific flood elevations... both a physical address and an internet address where the specific flood hazards (as shown in a Flood... published in the Federal Register on or after December 1, 2011. ADDRESSES: The docket for this notice...

  8. 78 FR 28779 - Proposed Flood Elevation Determinations for Armstrong County, Pennsylvania (All Jurisdictions)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-16

    ... Armstrong County, Pennsylvania (All Jurisdictions) AGENCY: Federal Emergency Management Agency, DHS. ACTION... proposed rule concerning proposed flood elevation determinations for Armstrong County, Pennsylvania (All... sources in Armstrong County, Pennsylvania. Because FEMA has or ] will be issuing a Revised...

  9. 76 FR 49674 - Changes in Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-11

    ...; The Enslow, Mayor, City of News Tribune. Sumner, City Hall, 1104 Maple Street, Sumner, WA 98390. King... Forest Home Avenue, Greenfield, WI 53220. (Catalog of Federal Domestic Assistance No. 97.022, ``Flood...

  10. 78 FR 8416 - Changes in Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-06

    ... 1244). 06-1933P). December 5, 2011; Baldwin, Mayor, City of The Daily Commercial Schertz, 1400 Schertz... Assistance No. 97.022, ``Flood Insurance.'') James A. Walke, Acting Deputy Associate Administrator...

  11. 77 FR 50626 - Changes in Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-22

    ... 12866 of September 30, 1993, Regulatory Planning and Review, 58 FR 51735. Executive Order 13132... seq.; Reorganization Plan No. 3 of 1978, 3 CFR, 1978 Comp., p. 329; E.O. 12127, 44 FR 19367, 3 CFR... be used to calculate flood insurance premium rates for new buildings and their contents. DATES:...

  12. 76 FR 58411 - Changes in Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-21

    ... 12866 of September 30, 1993, Regulatory Planning and Review, 58 FR 51735. Executive Order 13132... et seq.; Reorganization Plan No. 3 of 1978, 3 CFR, 1978 Comp., p. 329; E.O. 12127, 44 FR 19367, 3 CFR... be used to calculate flood insurance premium rates for new buildings and their contents. DATES:...

  13. 78 FR 78808 - Proposed Flood Elevation Determinations for Pierce County, Washington, and Incorporated Areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-27

    ... Pierce County, Washington, and Incorporated Areas AGENCY: Federal Emergency Management Agency, DHS... its proposed rule concerning proposed flood elevation determinations for Pierce County, Washington... sources in Pierce County, Washington. On April 16, 2012, FEMA published a proposed rulemaking at 77 FR...

  14. FEMA DFIRM Base Flood Elevations

    Data.gov (United States)

    Minnesota Department of Natural Resources — The Base Flood Elevation (BFE) table is required for any digital data where BFE lines will be shown on the corresponding Flood Insurance Rate Map (FIRM). Normally,...

  15. Base Flood Elevation (BFE) Lines

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Homeland Security — The Base Flood Elevation (BFE) table is required for any digital data where BFE lines will be shown on the corresponding Flood Insurance Rate Map (FIRM). Normally if...

  16. Base Flood Elevation

    Data.gov (United States)

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — The National Flood Hazard Layer (NFHL) data incorporates all Digital Flood Insurance Rate Map(DFIRM) databases published by FEMA, and any Letters Of Map Revision...

  17. Sensitivity of Coastal Flood Risk Assessments to Digital Elevation Models

    OpenAIRE

    Bas van de Sande; Claartje Hoyng; Joost Lansen

    2012-01-01

    Most coastal flood risk studies make use of a Digital Elevation Model (DEM) in addition to a projected flood water level in order to estimate the flood inundation and associated damages to property and livelihoods. The resolution and accuracy of a DEM are critical in a flood risk assessment, as land elevation largely determines whether a location will be flooded or will remain dry during a flood event. Especially in low lying deltaic areas, the land elevation variation is usually in the order...

  18. Flood Insurance Rate Maps and Base Flood Elevations, FIRM, DFIRM, BFE - MO 2014 Springfield FEMA Base Flood Elevations (SHP)

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC State | GIS Inventory — This polyline layer indicates the approximate effective FEMA Base Flood Elevation (BFE) associated with the corresponding Special Flood Hazard Area (SFHA). Each line...

  19. Flood Insurance Rate Maps and Base Flood Elevations, FIRM, DFIRM, BFE - MO 2010 Springfield FEMA Base Flood Elevations (SHP)

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This polyline layer indicates the approximate effective FEMA Base Flood Elevations (BFE) associated with the corresponding Special Flood Hazard Area (SFHA). Each...

  20. 2013 FEMA Base Flood Elevation

    Data.gov (United States)

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — The National Flood Hazard Layer (NFHL) data incorporates all Digital Flood Insurance Rate Map(DFIRM) databases published by FEMA, and any Letters Of Map Revision...

  1. Sensitivity of Coastal Flood Risk Assessments to Digital Elevation Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bas van de Sande

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Most coastal flood risk studies make use of a Digital Elevation Model (DEM in addition to a projected flood water level in order to estimate the flood inundation and associated damages to property and livelihoods. The resolution and accuracy of a DEM are critical in a flood risk assessment, as land elevation largely determines whether a location will be flooded or will remain dry during a flood event. Especially in low lying deltaic areas, the land elevation variation is usually in the order of only a few decimeters, and an offset of various decimeters in the elevation data has a significant impact on the accuracy of the risk assessment. Publicly available DEMs are often used in studies for coastal flood risk assessments. The accuracy of these datasets is relatively low, in the order of meters, and is especially low in comparison to the level of accuracy required for a flood risk assessment in a deltaic area. For a coastal zone area in Nigeria (Lagos State an accurate LiDAR DEM dataset was adopted as ground truth concerning terrain elevation. In the case study, the LiDAR DEM was compared to various publicly available DEMs. The coastal flood risk assessment using various publicly available DEMs was compared to a flood risk assessment using LiDAR DEMs. It can be concluded that the publicly available DEMs do not meet the accuracy requirement of coastal flood risk assessments, especially in coastal and deltaic areas. For this particular case study, the publically available DEMs highly overestimated the land elevation Z-values and thereby underestimated the coastal flood risk for the Lagos State area. The findings are of interest when selecting data sets for coastal flood risk assessments in low-lying deltaic areas.

  2. Flood Insurance Rate Maps and Base Flood Elevations, FIRM, DFIRM, BFE - MO 2014 Springfield FEMA Base Flood Elevations (SHP)

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This polyline layer indicates the approximate effective FEMA Base Flood Elevation (BFE) associated with the corresponding Special Flood Hazard Area (SFHA). Each line...

  3. 78 FR 78995 - Proposed Flood Hazard Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-27

    ... determinations, which may include additions or modifications of any Base Flood Elevation (BFE), base flood depth... Beverly Shores Town Hall, 500 South Broadway, Beverly Shores, IN 46301. Town of Burns Harbor Building Department, 1240 North Boo Road, Burns Harbor, IN 46304. Town of Chesterton Building Department, 726 Broadway...

  4. Determining the Optimum Post Spacing of LIDAR-Derived Elevation Data in Varying Terrain for Flood Hazard Mapping Purposes in North Carolina and Texas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berglund, Judith; Davis, Bruce; Estep, Lee

    2004-01-01

    The major flood events in the United States in the past few years have made it apparent that many floodplain maps being used by State governments are outdated and inaccurate. In response, many Stated have begun to update their Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) Digital Flood Insurance Rate Maps. Accurate topographic data is one of the most critical inputs for floodplain analysis and delineation. Light detection and ranging (LIDAR) altimetry is one of the primary remote sensing technologies that can be used to obtain high-resolution and high-accuracy digital elevation data suitable for hydrologic and hydraulic (H&H) modeling, in part because of its ability to "penetrate" various cover types and to record geospatial data from the Earth's surface. However, the posting density or spacing at which LIDAR collects the data will affect the resulting accuracies of the derived bare Earth surface, depending on terrain type and land cover type. For example, flat areas are thought to require higher or denser postings than hilly areas to capture subtle changes in the topography that could have a significant effect on flooding extent. Likewise, if an area has dense understory and overstory, it may be difficult to receive LIDAR returns from the Earth's surface, which would affect the accuracy of that bare Earth surface and thus would affect flood model results. For these reasons, NASA and FEMA have partnered with the State of North Carolina and with the U.S./Mexico Foundation in Texas to assess the effect of LIDAR point density on the characterization of topographic variation and on H&H modeling results for improved floodplain mapping. Research for this project is being conducted in two areas of North Carolina and in the City of Brownsville, Texas, each with a different type of terrain and varying land cover/land use. Because of various project constraints, LIDAR data were acquired once at a high posting density and then decimated to coarser postings or densities. Quality

  5. Base (100-year) flood elevations for selected sites in Marion County, Missouri

    Science.gov (United States)

    Southard, Rodney E.; Wilson, Gary L.

    1998-01-01

    The primary requirement for community participation in the National Flood Insurance Program is the adoption and enforcement of floodplain management requirements that minimize the potential for flood damages to new construction and avoid aggravating existing flooding conditions. This report provides base flood elevations (BFE) for a 100-year recurrence flood for use in the management and regulation of 14 flood-hazard areas designated by the Federal Emergency Management Agency as approximate Zone A areas in Marion County, Missouri. The one-dimensional surface-water flow model, HEC-RAS, was used to compute the base (100-year) flood elevations for the 14 Zone A sites. The 14 sites were located at U.S., State, or County road crossings and the base flood elevation was determined at the upstream side of each crossing. The base (100-year) flood elevations for BFE 1, 2, and 3 on the South Fork North River near Monroe City, Missouri, are 627.7, 579.2, and 545.9 feet above sea level. The base (100-year) flood elevations for BFE 4, 5, 6, and 7 on the main stem of the North River near or at Philadelphia and Palmyra, Missouri, are 560.5, 539.7, 504.2, and 494.4 feet above sea level. BFE 8 is located on Big Branch near Philadelphia, a tributary to the North River, and the base (100-year) flood elevation at this site is 530.5 feet above sea level. One site (BFE 9) is located on the South River near Monroe City, Missouri. The base (100-year) flood elevation at this site is 619.1 feet above sea level. Site BFE 10 is located on Bear Creek near Hannibal, Missouri, and the base (100-year) elevation is 565.5 feet above sea level. The four remaining sites (BFE 11, 12, 13, and 14) are located on the South Fabius River near Philadelphia and Palmyra, Missouri. The base (100-year) flood elevations for BFE 11, 12, 13, and 14 are 591.2, 578.4, 538.7, and 506.9 feet above sea level.

  6. Optimal house elevation for reducing flood-related losses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xian, Siyuan; Lin, Ning; Kunreuther, Howard

    2017-05-01

    FEMA recommends that houses in coastal flood zones be elevated to at least 1 foot above the base flood elevation (BFE). However, this guideline is not specific and ignores characteristics of houses that affect their vulnerability. An economically optimal elevation level (OEL) is proposed that minimizes the combined cost of elevation and cumulative insurance premiums over the lifespan of the house. As an illustration, analysis is performed for various coastal houses in Ortley Beach, NJ. Compared with the strategy of raising houses to 1 foot above BFE, the strategy of raising houses to their OELs is much more economical for the homeowners. Elevating to the OELs also significantly reduces government spending on subsidizing low-income homeowners through, for example, a voucher program, to mitigate flood risk. These results suggest that policy makers should consider vulnerability factors in developing risk-reduction strategies. FEMA may recommend OELs to homeowners based on their flood hazards as well as house characteristics or at least providing more information and tools to homeowners to assist them in making more economical decisions. The OEL strategy can also be coupled with a voucher program to make the program more cost-effective.

  7. 78 FR 52956 - Proposed Flood Hazard Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-27

    ... 77662. City of Pinehurst Pinehurst City Hall, 2497 Martin Luther King Jr. Drive, Orange, TX 77630. City... SECURITY Federal Emergency Management Agency Proposed Flood Hazard Determinations AGENCY: Federal Emergency... Register (78 FR 36220-36222) a proposed flood hazard determination notice that contained an erroneous...

  8. Flood Insurance Rate Maps and Base Flood Elevations, FIRM, DFIRM, BFE, flood plains, Published in 2008, 1:24000 (1in=2000ft) scale, Box Elder County.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Flood Insurance Rate Maps and Base Flood Elevations, FIRM, DFIRM, BFE dataset, published at 1:24000 (1in=2000ft) scale, was produced all or in part from Other...

  9. 44 CFR 65.12 - Revision of flood insurance rate maps to reflect base flood elevations caused by proposed...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 44 Emergency Management and Assistance 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Revision of flood insurance rate maps to reflect base flood elevations caused by proposed encroachments. 65.12 Section 65.12... INSURANCE AND HAZARD MITIGATION National Flood Insurance Program IDENTIFICATION AND MAPPING OF...

  10. Hydrological and hydraulic models for determination of flood-prone and flood inundation areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aksoy, Hafzullah; Sadan Ozgur Kirca, Veysel; Burgan, Halil Ibrahim; Kellecioglu, Dorukhan

    2016-05-01

    Geographic Information Systems (GIS) are widely used in most studies on water resources. Especially, when the topography and geomorphology of study area are considered, GIS can ease the work load. Detailed data should be used in this kind of studies. Because of, either the complication of the models or the requirement of highly detailed data, model outputs can be obtained fast only with a good optimization. The aim in this study, firstly, is to determine flood-prone areas in a watershed by using a hydrological model considering two wetness indexes; the topographical wetness index, and the SAGA (System for Automated Geoscientific Analyses) wetness index. The wetness indexes were obtained in the Quantum GIS (QGIS) software by using the Digital Elevation Model of the study area. Flood-prone areas are determined by considering the wetness index maps of the watershed. As the second stage of this study, a hydraulic model, HEC-RAS, was executed to determine flood inundation areas under different return period-flood events. River network cross-sections required for this study were derived from highly detailed digital elevation models by QGIS. Also river hydraulic parameters were used in the hydraulic model. Modelling technology used in this study is made of freely available open source softwares. Based on case studies performed on watersheds in Turkey, it is concluded that results of such studies can be used for taking precaution measures against life and monetary losses due to floods in urban areas particularly.

  11. Simplified Flood Inundation Mapping Based On Flood Elevation-Discharge Rating Curves Using Satellite Images in Gauged Watersheds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Younghun Jung

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available This study suggests an approach to obtain flood extent boundaries using spatial analysis based on Landsat-5 Thematic Mapper imageries and the digital elevation model. The suggested approach firstly extracts the flood inundation areas using the ISODATA image-processing algorithm from four Landsat 5TM imageries. Then, the ground elevations at the intersections of the extracted flood extent boundaries and the specified river cross sections are read from the digital elevation to estimate the elevation-discharge relationship. Lastly, the flood extent is generated based on the estimated elevation-discharge relationship. The methodology was tested over two river reaches in Indiana, United States. The estimated elevation-discharge relationship showed a good match with the correlation coefficients varying between 0.82 and 0.99. In addition, self-validation was also performed for the estimated spatial extent of the flood by comparing it to the waterbody extracted from the Landsat images used to develop the elevation-discharge relationship. The result indicated that the match between the estimated and the extracted flood extents was better with higher flood magnitude. We expect that the suggested methodology will help under-developed and developing countries to obtain flood maps, which have difficulties getting flood maps through traditional approaches based on computer modeling.

  12. Determination of design floods using storm data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stallings, Eugene A.

    1987-12-01

    A brief historical perspective of hydrologic analyses used in the determination of spillway sizing is presented. The paper describes the procedures for determining a reasonable upper limit of flood potential for a given drainage basin. A previous paper by the National Weather Service detailed the development of probable maximum precipitation estimates. These estimates form the basis for the determination of spillway design floods which are used to size spillways of major reservoirs for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. Nationwide, the Corps has constructed hundreds of reservoirs which are operated for flood control, navigation, hydroelectric power and other purposes. These reservoirs are sized based on storm data and must withstand the most severe flood likely to occur. The paper also describes the design data including antecedent storms, infiltration, unit hydrographs and other hydrologic data used to convert probable maximum precipitation estimates into spillway design floods. Emphasis is given on designing safe reservoirs versus design flood selection based on economical considerations. Finally, a brief discussion of the similarities of design floods used by the other Federal construction agencies is presented.

  13. Flood Insurance Rate Maps and Base Flood Elevations, FIRM, DFIRM, BFE, FEMA Base Flood Elevations - line shapefile, Published in 2010, 1:2400 (1in=200ft) scale, Effingham County Board Of Commissioners.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Flood Insurance Rate Maps and Base Flood Elevations, FIRM, DFIRM, BFE dataset, published at 1:2400 (1in=200ft) scale, was produced all or in part from Published...

  14. 75 FR 64165 - Final Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-19

    ... Approximately 265 feet +269 City of Kenedy. downstream of South 2nd Street. Ojo de Agua Creek Approximately 1... 860 feet +287 upstream of the confluence with Tributary 9 to Ojo de Agua Watershed. San Antonio...

  15. 76 FR 59960 - Proposed Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-28

    ..., Arizona, and Incorporated Areas Agua Caliente Split Flow Approximately 1,500 +2584 +2583 Unincorporated... +2593 downstream of the Agua Caliente Wash divergence. Agua Caliente Spur Flow Approximately 0.5 mile... mile +2623 +2624 upstream of East Tanque Verde Road. Agua Caliente Wash Approximately 130 feet...

  16. 75 FR 5894 - Final Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-05

    ..., Unincorporated Areas of Colbert County. 0.5 mile downstream of +515 Pepi Drive. Sink Hole 10 South of 6th Street, +493 City of Muscle Shoals. between Elledge Lane and Industrial Drive. Sink Hole 10A At Oak Villa Drive, +494 City of Muscle Shoals. approximately 550 feet west of Elledge Lane. Sink Hole 10B Bordered by...

  17. 77 FR 45262 - Final Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-31

    ... the Village Hall, 170 Monroe Street, East Brooklyn, IL 60474. Village of Seneca ] Maps are available... Incorporated Areas Docket No.: FEMA-B-7753 Kelly Ditch Approximately 900 feet +388 City of Boonville, upstream.... Kelly Creek Tributary Approximately 0.45 mile +1365 Unincorporated Areas of downstream of Farm...

  18. 76 FR 23528 - Proposed Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-27

    ... Outlet and Snell Creek confluence. Lake Marion Creek Outlet At the Lake Marion None +67 Unincorporated Areas of Creek and Snell Creek Polk County. confluence. At the Lake Marion None +68 confluence. Lake...--ICPR Node 28W91. Polk County. Snell Creek At the Lake Marion None +67 Unincorporated Areas of Creek and...

  19. 77 FR 49367 - Final Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-16

    ... confluence. At the Lake Marion Creek +67 Outlet and Snell Creek confluence. Lake Marion Creek Outlet At the Lake Marion Creek +67 Unincorporated Areas of and Snell Creek Polk County. confluence. At the Lake... Unincorporated Areas of Area--ICPR Node 28W91. Polk County. Snell Creek At the Lake Marion Creek +67...

  20. 75 FR 23642 - Proposed Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-04

    ... Havana. Approximately 600 feet north of Hurst Street/ East boundary: Approximately 125 feet west of... 330 feet east of Pearl Street extended. Ponding North boundary: None +460 City of Havana... Street and Hurst Street. Ponding North boundary: None +460 City of Havana. Approximately 100 feet south...

  1. 76 FR 79098 - Final Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-21

    ... boundary: +468 City of Havana. Approximately 470 feet north of Mason Street/ East boundary: Approximately 1...: +472 City of Havana. Approximately 80 feet south of intersection of Tinkham Street and Lincoln Street... Promenade Street. Ponding North boundary: +469 City of Havana. Approximately 810 feet south of Wagner Avenue...

  2. 78 FR 9831 - Final Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-12

    ... Unincorporated Areas of Craven County Maps are available for inspection at the Craven County GIS/Mapping... ground. Mean Sea Level, rounded to the nearest 0.1 meter. ADDRESSES City of Lincoln Maps are available... inspection at the Planning Department, 301 South Brooks Street, 3rd Floor, Wake Forest, NC...

  3. 75 FR 23600 - Final Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-04

    ... and Review, 58 FR 51735. Executive Order 13132, Federalism. This final rule involves no policies that... 1978, 3 CFR, 1978 Comp., p. 329; E.O. 12127, 44 FR 19367, 3 CFR, 1979 Comp., p. 376. Sec. 67.11 0 2... Hannibal, Unincorporated Areas of Marion County. At Veterans Road......... +685 Mississippi...

  4. 76 FR 5769 - Proposed Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-02

    ... +1249 City of Rogers. feet downstream of Willow Ridge Way. At the upstream side of None +1313 Mills Lane... Street. Unnamed Tributary to Puppy Creek.... Approximately 370 feet None +1273 City of Lowell. upstream... Township of Allegheny. upstream of Mill Road. Approximately 0.69 mile None +1141 upstream of Mill...

  5. 77 FR 26959 - Final Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-08

    ...,875 feet +1249 City of Rogers. downstream of Willow Ridge Way. At the upstream side of Mills +1313... Tributary to Puppy Creek........ Approximately 370 feet upstream +1273 City of Lowell. of West Monroe Avenue... Jonestown Maps are available for inspection at the Borough Building, 295 South Mill Street, Jonestown,...

  6. 78 FR 10066 - Final Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-13

    ... downstream of Greenpasture Road (State Route 1141). ] Swift Creek Approximately 0.6 mile +78 Unincorporated.... Approximately 0.4 mile +155 upstream of Taylors Store Road (Secondary Road 1004). ] Polecat Branch At the... downstream of Red Oak of Nashville. Road (Secondary Road 1003). Just upstream of U.S. +152 Route 64. Swift...

  7. 76 FR 49676 - Final Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-11

    ... Scott Road (at the Borough of Franklin corporate limit). * National Geodetic Vertical Datum. + North... County, South Carolina, and Incorporated Areas Docket No.: FEMA-B-1115 Bailey Creek Approximately 600... Creek. Anderson County. Approximately 100 feet +692 downstream of Scotts Bridge Road. Jones Creek...

  8. 78 FR 45879 - Final Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-30

    ... Porte County, Indiana, and Incorporated Areas Docket No.: FEMA-B-1155 Lake Michigan Entire shoreline within + 585 Town of Michiana Shores, community. Unincorporated Areas of La Porte County. Lake Michigan... Shores, downstream of Michiana City of Michigan City, Drive. Unincorporated Areas of La Porte...

  9. 75 FR 68744 - Proposed Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-09

    ... the Gilmer County Courthouse, 1 Broad Street, Ellijay, GA 30540. La Porte County, Indiana, and..., Unincorporated Areas of La Porte County. Lake Michigan Entire shoreline within +587 +585 Town of Long Beach... Shores, City of Drive. Michigan City, Unincorporated Areas of La Porte County. Approximately 1,840...

  10. 75 FR 62048 - Proposed Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-07

    ... ground. Mean Sea Level, rounded to the nearest 0.1 meter. ** BFEs to be changed include the listed... the I-35 Polk County. crossing. Approximately 1.6 mile +831 +833 upstream of the I-35 crossing... Level, rounded to the nearest 0.1 meter. ** BFEs to be changed include the listed downstream...

  11. 77 FR 76916 - Final Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-31

    ... Office, 2800 King Street, Smyrna, GA 30080. Unincorporated Areas of Cobb County Maps are available for... Unincorporated Areas of King Drive. Gwinnett County. Approximately 0.43 mile +1082 upstream of East Rock Quarry... confluence with Peekskill Hollow Creek. At the county boundary... +393 Stephens Brook Approximately 250...

  12. 75 FR 67304 - Proposed Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-02

    ... Street, Rockvale, CO 81244. Town of Williamsburg Maps are available for inspection at 1 John Street..., City of Lambertville, Township of Alexandria, Township of Delaware, Township of Holland, Township of.... Musconetcong River At the confluence with +158 +159 Township of Holland. the Delaware River. Approximately 1...

  13. 75 FR 59634 - Final Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-28

    .... upstream of the confluence with Goodwin Hallow. Approximately 3,150 feet +1170 upstream of the confluence with Goodwin Hallow. * National Geodetic Vertical Datum. + North American Vertical Datum. Depth in...

  14. 76 FR 45485 - Proposed Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-29

    ...Gilligan Creek (backwater effects from Ohio River), Ohio River, Phelps Creek (backwater effects from Ohio River), Phelps Creek Tributary 2 (backwater effects from Ohio River), Sandy Creek (backwater effects... (backwater effects from Ohio River), McGilligan Creek (backwater effects from Ohio River), Phelps...

  15. 77 FR 3625 - Final Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-25

    ... FEMA-B-1164 Apple Run/Horner Drain At the confluence with +688 Township of Canton, Sines Drain.... Approximately 1,650 feet +586 southwest of the intersection of Woodruff Road and Torry Avenue. Sines Drain At...

  16. 76 FR 50443 - Proposed Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-15

    ... feet downstream of the Maple Street Bridge. Matfield River At the Bridge Street None +33 Town of East... Forest Road Bridge. At the Hockomock River None +63 confluence. Tributary A Just upstream of the None +71...

  17. 76 FR 272 - Final Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-04

    ... River Forest +787 Unincorporated Areas of Rd. Spartanburg County. Approximately 400 feet +864 upstream... with Little Buck Creek. Maple Creek Just upstream of New Woodruff +854 City of Greer, Road...

  18. 75 FR 29238 - Proposed Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-25

    .... Approximately 125 feet None +1,412 downstream of Forest Avenue. West Branch Susquehanna River... Maple Pierce County. Avenue (County Highway S). At Maple Avenue (County None +833 Highway S). * National...

  19. 76 FR 73537 - Proposed Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-29

    ... Pelham, Unincorporated Forest Circle. Areas of Shelby County. Approximately 730 feet None +499 upstream... Newnan. confluence. Approximately 700 feet +931 +928 upstream of Maple Drive. Tributary 2 to Wahoo Creek...

  20. 75 FR 28511 - Proposed Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-21

    .... approximately 340 feet upstream of Forest Oak Church Road. Cypress Creek (Backwater effects From approximately 0... Maple Street. Approximately 1,500 None +764 feet upstream of Maple Street. Shiawassee River...

  1. 77 FR 41323 - Final Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-13

    ... downstream of the Maple Street Bridge. Matfield River At the Bridge Street +33 Town of East Bridgewater... Forest Road Bridge. At the Hockomock River +63 confluence. Tributary A Just upstream of the +71 Town of...

  2. 75 FR 69892 - Final Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-16

    ... CONTACT: Roy E. Wright, Deputy Director, Risk Analysis Division, Federal Insurance and Mitigation... Flexibility Act, 5 U.S.C. 601- 612, a regulatory flexibility analysis is not required. Regulatory... feet downstream of U.S. Route *339 Brookport. 45. Approximately 2,460 feet upstream of U.S. Route 45...

  3. 78 FR 6745 - Final Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-31

    ... for inspection at the Jackson Township Municipal Building, 2162 State Route 715, Stroudsburg, PA 18360....S.C. 601- 612, a regulatory flexibility analysis is not required. Regulatory Classification. This... +323 Township of Smithfield. confluence. Approximately 0.5 mile +323 upstream of State Route 2028. Buck...

  4. 77 FR 46972 - Final Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-07

    ....S.C. 601- 612, a regulatory flexibility analysis is not required. Regulatory Classification. This... at the Planning Department, Development and Building Services Division, 600 2nd Street Northwest... +490 U.S. Route 59. Caston Creek Approximately 100 feet +463 City of Poteau, Town of upstream of the...

  5. 76 FR 20606 - Proposed Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-13

    ....; Reorganization Plan No. 3 of 1978, 3 CFR, 1978 Comp., p. 329; E.O. 12127, 44 FR 19367, 3 CFR, 1979 Comp., p. 376... Yakima. Walmart Overflow 1. Creek confluence. Approximately 1,307 None +1158 feet upstream of South 64th Avenue. Shaw Creek--Wide Hollow Creek At the Wide Hollow None +1149 City of Yakima. Walmart Overflow...

  6. 78 FR 48813 - Final Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-12

    ... with Tallow Branch. Little Reedy Creek (Backwater effects From the confluence with +429 Unincorporated... Dunbar- Leetown Road. Tallow Branch (Backwater effects from From the confluence with +426...

  7. 77 FR 76998 - Proposed Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-31

    ... River), Tallow Branch (backwater effects from Green River), Welch Creek (backwater effects from Green... effects from Green River), Tallow Branch (backwater effects from Green River), Welch Creek (backwater... Butler County. to approximately 0.6 mile upstream of the confluence with Tallow Branch. Little...

  8. 76 FR 29656 - Final Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-23

    ... County. approximately 1.2 miles upstream of the confluence with Robinson Creek. ] Tallow Creek Tributary 4 (backwater From the confluence with +831 Unincorporated Areas of effects from Tallow Creek). Tallow Creek to Taylor County. approximately 920 feet upstream of Bradfordsville Road. Wilson...

  9. 76 FR 21664 - Final Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-18

    ... North.. +805 City of Anderson, Town of Chesterfield, Town of Country Club Heights, Town of River Forest..., 100 West State Street, Pendleton, IN 46064. Town of River Forest Maps are available for inspection at 53 River Forest Street, Anderson, IN 46011. Town of Woodlawn Heights Maps are available...

  10. 75 FR 31368 - Proposed Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-03

    ... Old Unincorporated Areas Tucson Road. of Santa Cruz County. Approximately 100 feet +3873 +3872... Main Street, Danville, KY 40422. ] Logan County, Kentucky, and Incorporated Areas Proctor Branch Approximately 400 feet None +525 City of Russellville, upstream of Bismarck Unincorporated Areas Lane. of...

  11. 76 FR 70386 - Proposed Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-14

    ... feet +226 +225 City of Montgomery. effects from Camp Creek). upstream of the Camp Creek confluence... that the community is required either to adopt or to show evidence of having in effect in order to... None +196 City of Montgomery. (backwater effects from Baldwin confluence. Slough). At the...

  12. 76 FR 50960 - Proposed Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-17

    ... 1.5 miles None +65 upstream of Beaman Old Creek Road. Cow Branch At the Nahunta Swamp +61 +60 Unincorpo rated Areas confluence. of Greene County. Approximately 2.1 miles None +114 upstream of Cow Branch... County. Approximately 0.4 mile None +54 upstream of Jolly Road. Indian Well Swamp Approximately 0.8 mile...

  13. 76 FR 46705 - Proposed Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-03

    ... Saffron None +45 Unincorporated Areas of Avenue to the north, Lake County. State Route 44 to the east, and... west. Multiple Ponding Areas Area bound by Saffron None +48 Unincorporated Areas of Avenue to the north... Ponding Areas Area bound by Saffron None +49 Unincorporated Areas of Avenue to the north, Lake...

  14. 77 FR 73324 - Final Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-10

    ... to the south, and Royal Trails Road to the west. Multiple Ponding Areas Area bound by Saffron +45... west. Multiple Ponding Areas Area bound by Saffron +48 Unincorporated Areas of Avenue to the north... Ponding Areas Area bound by Saffron +49 Unincorporated Areas of Avenue to the north, Lake...

  15. 75 FR 22699 - Final Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-30

    ... +582 upstream of South Riverside Avenue. Robbins Drain At the confluence with +580 Township of the St. Clair River. Cottrellville. Approximately 500 feet +580 downstream of Nautical Lane. Robbins Drain... +581 Robbins Drain. South Channel/St. Clair River At the confluence with +579 City of Algonac, City of...

  16. 76 FR 26968 - Proposed Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-10

    ....; Reorganization Plan No. 3 of 1978, 3 CFR, 1978 Comp., p. 329; E.O. 12127, 44 FR 19367, 3 CFR, 1979 Comp., p. 376.... Approximately 0.5 mile None +860 downstream of North Home Avenue. Holmes Creek At the Fishing River +770 +763... +865 +863 upstream of County Road BB. Old Maids Creek Approximately 980 feet None +896 City...

  17. 75 FR 55480 - Final Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-13

    ... Diversion.. Just upstream of Porter +582 Town of Niagara. Road. At the confluence with +582 Cayuga Creek... Boulevard. Twelvemile Creek Approximately 2.0 miles +300 Town of Porter, Town of upstream of Fitch Road..., 6570 Campbell Boulevard, Lockport, NY 14094. Town of Porter Maps are available for inspection at the...

  18. 76 FR 76060 - Final Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-06

    .... Approximately 125 feet +607 upstream of James Street. County Drain No. 4 & 43 At the confluence with +597... 1515 Baldwin Street, Jenison, MI 49429. Charter Township of Holland Maps are available for...

  19. 76 FR 36373 - Final Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-22

    ... FEMA-B-1139 Browns River Approximately 1,500 feet +354 Town of Essex, Town of upstream of Brown River.... Town of Bolton Maps are available for inspection at the Town Hall, 3045 Theodore Roosevelt...

  20. 77 FR 26968 - Final Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-08

    ... 71282. Village of Richmond Maps are available for inspection at 598 Wood Street, Richmond, LA 71282.... downstream of the confluence with Bear Rock Run. Approximately 1,480 feet +1862 downstream of the confluence with Bear Rock Run. Little Paint Creek Approximately 0.77 mile +1734 Township of Richland. upstream...

  1. 76 FR 39011 - Final Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-05

    ... Unincorporated Areas of Highway 6. Wood County. Approximately 1,650 feet + 678 upstream of State Highway 25. Rock...-B-1115 Birch Creek-Pouges Run Approximately 720 feet + 624 City of Brazil, downstream of White Rock Unincorporated Areas of Road. Clay County. Approximately 1.29 miles + 652 upstream of White Rock Road. *...

  2. 75 FR 18091 - Final Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-09

    ... Datum. + North American Vertical Datum. Depth in feet above ground. Mean Sea Level, rounded to the... ground. Mean Sea Level, rounded to the nearest 0.1 meter. ADDRESSES City of Barling Maps are available... Highway 19. Whittenburg Creek Approximately 120 feet +725 Unincorporated Areas of downstream of Snake Road...

  3. 75 FR 55515 - Proposed Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-13

    ... feet None +1098 Town of Lehman. downstream of Shady Lane. Approximately 410 feet None +1099 downstream... downstream of I-81. Pikes Creek Approximately 815 feet None +1127 Town of Lehman. downstream of State Route... inspection at City Hall, 40 East Market Street, Wilkes-Barre, PA 18711. Town of Lehman Maps are available...

  4. 75 FR 67317 - Proposed Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-02

    ... County Courthouse, 208 Main Street, Newport, AR 72112. Hernando County, Florida, and Incorporated Areas... Unincorporated Areas Pond Road (at Junction of Hernando County. 1NP0170). Approximately 100 feet None +236... +56 City of Brooksville, downstream of Unincorporated Areas Weatherly Road (at of Hernando...

  5. 75 FR 44155 - Final Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-28

    ... of Durand, downstream of the new U.S. Unincorporated Areas of Route 10 bridge. Pepin County.... ADDRESSES City of Durand Maps are available for inspection at City Hall, 104 East Main Street, Durand,...

  6. 77 FR 21476 - Final Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-10

    ... 30 feet +771 downstream of Durand Avenue (State Highway 11). Unnamed Tributary No. 18 to Kilbourn... +762 upstream of Durand Avenue (State Highway 11). Unnamed Tributary No. 39 to Des Plaines At the... at the Mount Pleasant Village Hall, 6126 Durand Avenue, Racine, Wisconsin 53406. Village...

  7. 76 FR 21693 - Proposed Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-18

    ... Grove. Approximately 30 feet None +771 downstream of Durand Avenue (State Highway 11). Unnamed Tributary... Plaines River. Racine County. Approximately 2,750 None +762 feet upstream of Durand Avenue (State Highway... Hall, 6126 Durand Avenue, Racine, Wisconsin 53406. Village of Sturtevant Maps are available...

  8. 75 FR 31347 - Proposed Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-03

    ... +336 upstream of the Brono Road bridge. Resurrection River At the confluence with +17 +16 City of Seward, Kenai Resurrection Bay. Peninsula Borough. Approximately 1.6 mile +75 +74 upstream of the Alaskan... +17 +16 City of Seward, Kenai Resurrection Bay. Peninsula Borough. At the confluence with None +189...

  9. 78 FR 29654 - Final Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-21

    ... mile +336 upstream of the Brono Road bridge. Resurrection River At the confluence with +16 City of Seward, Kenai Resurrection Bay. Peninsula Borough. Approximately 1.6 mile +74 upstream of the Alaskan... +16 City of Seward, Kenai Resurrection Bay. Peninsula Borough. At the confluence with +189 Grouse...

  10. 75 FR 52868 - Final Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-30

    ... Green Crest Drive. Valley Creek Approximately 0.5 mile +431 City of Bessemer, downstream of Power Unincorporated Areas of Plant Road. Jefferson County. Approximately 0.5 mile +440 upstream of Power Plant Road. * National Geodetic Vertical Datum. + North American Vertical Datum. Depth in feet above ground. Mean Sea...

  11. 75 FR 62057 - Proposed Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-07

    .... feet downstream of the Access Road Bridge. Approximately 100 feet None +647 downstream of the Access Road Bridge. * National Geodetic Vertical Datum. + North American Vertical Datum. Depth in feet above... Brooklyn Branch At the confluence with None +457 City of Forney. Mustang Creek. Approximately 1,382 None...

  12. 76 FR 8965 - Proposed Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-16

    ... Unincorporated Areas of feet downstream of Platte County. Water Treatment Plant Road. Approximately 1,400 None +822 feet downstream of Water Treatment Plant Road. Walnut Creek At the Rush Creek +764 +768 City of... Road. Hunter Branch At the South Fork None +235 Unincorporated Areas of Edisto River Aiken County...

  13. 75 FR 55507 - Proposed Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-13

    ... Shore Road Village of Blasdell. culvert. At the upstream Village None +591 of Blasdell/City of... Approximately 260 feet None +1,220 Township of Rose. upstream of the confluence with Sandy Lick Creek... mile None +1,212 downstream of White Street. Sandy Lick Creek Approximately 0.28 mile None +1,216...

  14. 77 FR 19112 - Final Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-30

    ... Sumter County. approximately 7.3 miles upstream of County Road 85. Sandy Creek Approximately 1 mile +115... Maps are available for inspection at 199 Barton Shore Drive, Ann Arbor, MI 48105. Village of Dexter... Approximately 1,000 feet +852 Unincorporated Areas of upstream of the Garvin County. confluence with Keel Sandy...

  15. 78 FR 10072 - Final Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-13

    .... upstream of Blue Eagle Way. At the confluence with +26 Mount Pleasant Creek. Mount Pleasant Creek Tributary... of Jacksonville. the Ortega River. Just downstream of Connie +71 Jean Road. Ortega River Tributary...

  16. 75 FR 68738 - Proposed Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-09

    .... Township of Hopewell. Approximately 0.4 mile +47 +46 upstream of State Route 29 (River Road). Miry Run At... within None +605 City of Bayfield, City community. of Washburn, Red Cliff Band of Lake Superior Chippewa... Maps are available for inspection at 119 Washington Avenue, Washburn, WI 54891. Red Cliff Band of...

  17. 75 FR 5909 - Proposed Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-05

    ... City of Crossett. feet downstream of Main Street. Approximately 1,200 None +131 feet downstream of Main...., Washington, DC 20472. ADDRESSES City of Crossett Maps are available for inspection at City Hall, Main Street, Crossett, AR 71635. Hempstead County, Arkansas, and Incorporated Areas Black Branch Approximately 0.60...

  18. 75 FR 43418 - Final Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-26

    ....: FEMA-B-1021 Northeast Drain Approximately 5,276 feet +4,216 City of Clovis, downstream of Humphry... Level, rounded to the nearest 0.1 meter. ADDRESSES City of Clovis Maps are available for inspection at 321 Connelly Street, Clovis, NM 88101. Unincorporated Areas of Curry County Maps are available...

  19. 77 FR 30220 - Final Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-22

    .... Jackman Brook (backwater effects from Just upstream of Parish +18 Town of Georgetown. Parker River). Road.... Charlie Creek At the Cane Creek +377 City of Camden, confluence. Unincorporated Areas of Benton...

  20. 77 FR 66555 - Final Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-06

    ... Approximately 590 feet +1098 Township of Lehman. downstream of Shady Lane. Approximately 410 feet +1099... Township of Lehman. downstream of State Route 29. Approximately 700 feet +1127 downstream of State Route 29... at City Hall, 40 East Market Street, Wilkes-Barre, PA 18711. Township of Lehman Maps are available...

  1. 78 FR 43821 - Final Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-22

    ... community. LaGrange County. Little Turkey Lake Entire shoreline......... +930 Unincorporated Areas of La... County. Pigeon Lake Entire shoreline......... +848 Unincorporated Areas of LaGrange County. Pretty Lake... +882 upstream of County Highway V. Little Baraboo River (backwater effects At the Baraboo River...

  2. 75 FR 34381 - Final Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-17

    ... east of County Road 88. Zone AE Area Area north of King Road, +23 Unincorporated Areas of south of... above Holcomb Bridge +884 City of Berkeley Lake, Road. City of Duluth, City of Sugar Hill, City of... of Sugar Hill Maps are available for inspection at 4988 West Broad Street, Sugar Hill, GA 30518. City...

  3. 76 FR 35119 - Final Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-16

    ... for inspection at 301 King Street, Alexandria, VA 22314. Town of Ennis, Montana Docket No.: FEMA-B... the confluence with Catawba River Tributary 11. Sugar Creek At the confluence with the +486...

  4. 76 FR 1121 - Proposed Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-07

    ... Falls, confluence. City of Seaforth, City of Vesta, Unincorporated Areas of Redwood County... Seaforth Maps are available for inspection at 205 Oak Street, Seaforth, MN 56287. City of Vesta Maps are available for inspection at 150 Front Street West, Vesta, MN 56292. Unincorporated Areas of Redwood...

  5. 78 FR 14700 - Final Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-07

    ... of Seaforth, City of Vesta, Unincorporated Areas of Redwood County. Approximately 0.88 mile +1,067... Maps are available for inspection at 414 Dewey Street, Seaforth, MN 56287. City of Vesta Maps are available for inspection at 150 Front Street West, Vesta, MN 56292. Unincorporated Areas of Redwood...

  6. 76 FR 3531 - Final Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-20

    ... Executive Order 12866 of September 30, 1993, Regulatory Planning and Review, 58 FR 51735. Executive Order....C. 4001 et seq.; Reorganization Plan No. 3 of 1978, 3 CFR, 1978 Comp., p. 329; E.O. 12127, 44 FR.... Approximately 4.15 miles +861 upstream of Spring Street. Turton Creek Approximately 100 feet +730 City...

  7. 78 FR 36098 - Final Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-17

    ... 510 North Broadway, 4th Floor, Billings, MT 59101. Unincorporated Areas of Yellowstone County Maps are available for inspection at 217 North 27th Street, Billings, MT 59101. (Catalog of Federal Domestic... 12866 of September 30, 1993, Regulatory Planning and Review, 58 FR 51735. Executive Order...

  8. 77 FR 49360 - Final Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-16

    ... confluence. Mud Camp Creek (backwater effects from From the Cumberland River +539 Unincorporated Areas of... Salem Road. Red Creek Approximately 1.8 miles +37 Unincorporated Areas of downstream of Red Creek George County. Road. Approximately 2.9 miles +46 upstream of Red Creek Road. * National Geodetic Vertical...

  9. 77 FR 71702 - Final Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-04

    ... Mascaras confluence. Approximately 100 feet +7338 upstream of Camino Del Norte. Arroyo De La Paz At the... +7320 upstream of Camino Encantado. Arroyo Saiz At the upstream side of +7191 City of Santa Fe. Avenida...

  10. 75 FR 31377 - Proposed Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-03

    ..., Bozeman, MT 59771. ] Lincoln County, New Mexico, and Incorporated Areas Brady Canyon At the confluence... Unincorporated Areas Sugar Grove Road. of Fairfield County. Approximately 650 None +886 feet upstream of...

  11. 76 FR 72627 - Final Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-25

    ... confluence with +929 Unincorporated Areas of Chub Creek. Dakota County. Approximately 1,250 feet +944... inspection at City Hall, 1011 Sibley Memorial Highway, Lilydale, MN 55118. City of Mendota Maps are available... Maps are available for inspection at City Hall, 1011 Victoria Curve, Mendota Heights, MN 55118. City...

  12. 76 FR 36044 - Proposed Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-21

    ... County. Approximately 1.0 mile None +606 upstream of Ghost Creek Road. Little River Tributary 1 At the.... Approximately 0.6 mile None +670 upstream of Pamela Lane. Shell Creek Approximately 1,330 None +541 City...

  13. 78 FR 45877 - Final Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-30

    ... Trinity Drive. Fritz Cove At the southern end of 23 City and Borough of Mendenhall Peninsula. Juneau... Mendenhall Peninsula Road. Approximately 0.5 mile 26 southwest of the intersection of Point Lena Loop Road... Juneau. Highway. Approximately 1.4 miles 106 upstream of Glacier Highway. Mendenhall River Approximately...

  14. 76 FR 8984 - Proposed Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-16

    ... downstream of Trinity Drive. Fritz Cove At the southern end of None 23 City and Borough of Mendenhall... of the Juneau. intersection of Engineers Cutoff Road and Mendenhall Peninsula Road. Approximately 0.5... miles None 106 upstream of Glacier Highway. Mendenhall River Approximately 1.14 None 23 City and Borough...

  15. 77 FR 73394 - Proposed Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-10

    ... + 1226 downstream of the intersection of Craig Street and Garden Avenue. Approximately 0.2 mile None + 1226 downstream of the intersection of Craig Street and Garden Avenue. Approximately 0.38 mile None.... * National Geodetic Vertical Datum. + North American Vertical Datum. Depth in feet above ground. Mean...

  16. 78 FR 22222 - Proposed Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-15

    ... downstream of the intersection of Craig Street and Garden Avenue. Approximately 0.2 mile None +1226 downstream of the intersection of Craig Street and Garden Avenue. Approximately 0.38 mile None +1226.... * National Geodetic Vertical Datum. + North American Vertical Datum. Depth in feet above ground. Mean...

  17. 76 FR 13572 - Proposed Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-14

    ... County. Road and Calhoun Road. Approximately 400 feet 3 +30 south of the levee between Moores Garden Road... Vertical Datum. + North American Vertical Datum. Depth in feet above ground. Mean Sea Level, rounded to...

  18. 75 FR 59181 - Proposed Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-27

    ... Philipstown. downstream of U.S. Route 9. Approximately 1.6 mile None +517 upstream of Briars Road. Croton.... Croton Falls Reservoir Entire shoreline....... None +311 Town of Carmel, Town of Southeast. East Branch Croton River At the confluence with +311 +310 Town of Southeast, the Croton Falls Village of...

  19. 76 FR 54134 - Final Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-31

    ... +550 Prairie Dell Road. Busch Creek At the confluence with +480 City of Washington, Dubois Creek. Unincorporated Areas of Franklin County. Approximately 460 feet +582 upstream of Schroeder Lane. Dubois Creek...

  20. 77 FR 50668 - Proposed Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-22

    ... Creek Tributary M-C.2, Wiggins Creek, and Willow Creek. DATES: Comments are to be submitted on or before... Creek Tributary M-C.2, Wiggins Creek, and Willow Creek. That table contained inaccurate information as... Old Bullard Road. Wiggins Creek At the downstream side None +327 Unincorporated Areas of of...

  1. 75 FR 31361 - Proposed Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-03

    ... Incorporated Areas Church House Branch Approximately 0.5 mile None +211 City of Wiggins. downstream of East 5th... feet None +171 City of Wiggins, downstream of Unincorporated Areas Clubhouse Drive. of Stone County... None +174 City of Wiggins. Flint Creek. Approximately 350 feet None +254 upstream of Annis Lane....

  2. 77 FR 73393 - Proposed Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-10

    ..., Hazel Creek (backwater effects from Ohio River), Humphrey Creek (backwater effects from Ohio River..., Hazel Creek (backwater effects from Ohio River), Humphrey Creek (backwater effects from Ohio River... upstream of confluence with Shawnee Creek Slough. Hazel Creek (backwater effects from From the confluence...

  3. 76 FR 54415 - Proposed Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-01

    ... River), Mud Camp Creek (backwater effects from Cumberland River), Otter Creek (backwater effects from... Rodriguez, Chief, Engineering Management Branch, Federal Insurance and Mitigation Administration, Federal....rodriguez1@dhs.gov . FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Luis Rodriguez, Chief, Engineering Management...

  4. 77 FR 7540 - Final Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-13

    ... CONTACT: Luis Rodriguez, Chief, Engineering Management Branch, Federal Insurance and Mitigation... inspection at the Engineering Department, 623 Garrison Avenue, Suite 409, Fort Smith, AR 72901.... upstream of the confluence with Wolf Camp Run. Approximately 1.32 miles +1215 upstream of the...

  5. 77 FR 76929 - Final Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-31

    ... CONTACT: Luis Rodriguez, Chief, Engineering Management Branch, Federal Insurance and Mitigation..., Unincorporated Areas of Shelby County. Approximately 0.9 mile +567 upstream of County Road 340. Camp...

  6. 75 FR 78617 - Final Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-16

    ... downstream of Martin Hot Spring County. Luther King Boulevard. Approximately 1,300 feet +263 downstream of Martin Luther King Boulevard. Town Creek Approximately 2,300 feet +253 Unincorporated Areas of...

  7. 76 FR 10253 - Final Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-24

    ... Department, 1 Northwest Martin Luther King Jr. Boulevard, Room 310, Evansville, IN 47708. Unincorporated..., Building Commission Department, 1 Northwest Martin Luther King Jr. Boulevard, Room 310, Evansville, IN... Street. Bunch Creek At Martin Tram Road +37 Unincorporated Areas of Allen Parish. Approximately...

  8. 75 FR 29268 - Proposed Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-25

    ... the Buchanan County, confluence with Village of Lewis And Blacksnake Creek. Clark. Mitchell Avenue... Street, St. Joseph, MO 64501. Village of Lewis And Clark Maps are available for inspection at the Village.... Anderson County. Approximately 2,900 None +620 feet upstream of Gene Forester Road. Canoe Creek Tributary 6...

  9. 75 FR 59184 - Proposed Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-27

    ... by None *31 City of Deltona. Leland Drive to the north and west, Fisher Drive to the south, and..., Parma Drive to the west, Lake Helen Osteen Road to the south, and Snow Drive to the east. Ponding Area... Boulevard to the south, and Lake Helen Osteen Road to the east. Ponding Area 33 Ponding area bounded by...

  10. 76 FR 58436 - Proposed Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-21

    ... to Cole County. River). approximately 0.58 mile upstream of State Route 179. Moreau River (backwater... approximately 750 feet downstream of Missouri Pacific Railroad. Moreau River Tributary 6 At the upstream side...

  11. 78 FR 78993 - Proposed Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-27

    ... location and the respective Community Map Repository address listed in the table below. Additionally, the..., together with the floodplain management criteria required by 44 CFR 60.3, are the minimum that are required... each community are available for inspection at both the online location and the respective...

  12. 76 FR 68107 - Final Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-03

    ... of Lee County Maps are available for inspection at 909 Avenue A, Opelika, AL 36801. Hardin County... Unincorporated Areas of upstream of IL-1. Hardin County. Approximately 1.92 miles +366 upstream of IL-1. Ohio... extended (River Mile Hardin County, Village 894). of Elizabethtown. Approximately 1.97 miles +359...

  13. 75 FR 61373 - Proposed Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-05

    ... inspection at the Old Shawneetown Village Hall, 332 Washington Street, Shawneetown, IL 62984. ] Hardin County... upstream of IL-1. Hardin County. Approximately 1.92 mile None +366 upstream of IL-1. Ohio River... (River of Hardin County, Mile 894). Village of Elizabethtown. Approximately 1.97 mile +358 +359...

  14. 77 FR 21485 - Final Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-10

    ... Creek (backwater effects from From the Doxies Creek + 631 Unincorporated Areas of Missouri River.... Highway VV to approximately 225 feet downstream of U.S. Route 24. Doxies Creek (backwater effects from...

  15. 76 FR 8978 - Proposed Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-16

    ... Unincorpora (backwater Doxies ted Areas effects from Creek of Chariton Missouri River). confluence County. to... ly 225 feet downstream of U.S. Route 24 Doxies Creek From +633 +631 Unincorpora (backwater...

  16. 76 FR 50920 - Final Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-17

    ... Approximately 1,219 feet + 355 Town of Great Falls, downstream of U.S. Route Unincorporated Areas of 21. Chester... + 297 Town of Great Falls, downstream of Brooklyn Unincorporated Areas of Road. Chester County... for inspection at City Hall, 100 West End Street, Chester, SC 29706. Town of Great Falls Maps...

  17. 75 FR 23608 - Final Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-04

    ... floodprone areas in accordance with 44 CFR part 60. Interested lessees and owners of real property are... Lake County/New +311 Madrid County, Missouri/ Fulton County, Kentucky, boundary (River Mile...

  18. 76 FR 35111 - Final Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-16

    ... Executive Order 12866 of September 30, 1993, Regulatory Planning and Review, 58 FR 51735. Executive Order....C. 4001 et seq.; Reorganization Plan No. 3 of 1978, 3 CFR, 1978 Comp., p. 329; E.O. 12127, 44 FR... River Just downstream of State +385 Town of Shrewsbury. Highway 140. At the Town of Grafton...

  19. 77 FR 67324 - Proposed Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-09

    ... provides corrections to that table, to be used in lieu of the information published at 76 FR 73537. The... In the proposed rule published at 76 FR 73537, in the November 29, 2011, issue of the Federal... +787 +783 Township of Davidson, Tributary 1 confluence. Township of Shrewsbury. Approximately 0.76...

  20. 77 FR 21471 - Final Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-10

    ... the +883 City of Georgetown, Red River of the North. Unincorporated Areas of Clay County. Just... Unincorporated Areas of Red River of the North. Clay County. Approximately 2,500 feet +896 downstream of Wall... +888 Unincorporated Areas of Red River of the North. Clay County. At the divergence from County +893...

  1. 75 FR 19895 - Final Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-16

    ... Red Clay Road. Bates Creek At the confluence with +1529 Eastern Band of Cherokee Hanging Dog Creek.... Approximately 130 feet +2233 upstream of Red Clay Road. Alarka Creek At the confluence with the +1710...

  2. 75 FR 29290 - Proposed Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-25

    ... with the floodplain management criteria required by 44 CFR 60.3, are the minimum that are required... rule is not a significant regulatory action under the criteria of section 3(f) of Executive Order 12866.... ] Approximately 0.57 mile None +166 upstream of Disney Road. * National Geodetic Vertical Datum. + North...

  3. 75 FR 77762 - Final Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-14

    ... CONTACT: Luis Rodriguez, Chief, Engineering Management Branch, Federal Insurance and Mitigation... (e-mail) luis.rodriguez1@dhs.gov . SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: The Federal Emergency Management Agency... Docket No.: FEMA-B-1080 Dasher Creek Approximately 0.51 mile +47 City of Rincon, upstream of...

  4. 77 FR 49379 - Final Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-16

    ... Creek. Juniata River Approximately 1.72 miles +638 Township of Porter. upstream of Bridge Street... Maps are available for inspection at the Logan Township Building, 7228 Diamond Valley, Alexandria, PA... Road, Huntingdon, PA 16652. Township of Porter Maps are available for inspection at the Porter...

  5. 75 FR 81957 - Proposed Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-29

    ... the confluence with Shaver Creek. Juniata River Approximately 1.72 miles None +638 Township of Porter... are available for inspection at the Logan Township Building, 7228 Diamond Valley, Alexandria, PA 16611..., Huntingdon, PA 16652. Township of Porter Maps are available for inspection at the Porter Township...

  6. 76 FR 46701 - Proposed Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-03

    ... Town Hall, 6 Holland Street, Moultonborough, NH 03254. Town of Ossipee Maps are available for..., Mitigation, Department of Homeland Security, Federal Emergency Management Agency. BILLING CODE 9110-12-P ...

  7. 76 FR 3524 - Final Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-20

    ... Approximately 1,250 feet +825 City of Amazonia, upstream of the Buchanan Unincorporated Areas of County boundary..., rounded to the nearest 0.1 meter. ADDRESSES City of Amazonia Maps are available for inspection at 441 Spring Street, Amazonia, MO 64421. Unincorporated Areas of Andrew County Maps are available...

  8. 75 FR 6600 - Proposed Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-10

    ... Andrew County, City Buchanan County of Amazonia. boundary. Approximately 1,200 *831 +833 feet downstream... Street, SW., Washington, DC 20472. ADDRESSES City of Amazonia Maps are available for inspection at 441 Spring Street, Amazonia, MO 64421. ] Unincorporated Areas of Andrew County Maps are available...

  9. Elevation Certificates for Flood Prone Structures, Building Dept has required elevation certs when house falls inside flood zone - paper copies only, Published in 2010, 1:2400 (1in=200ft) scale, Effingham County Government.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC Local Govt | GIS Inventory — Elevation Certificates for Flood Prone Structures dataset current as of 2010. Building Dept has required elevation certs when house falls inside flood zone - paper...

  10. Flood Damage Analysis: First Floor Elevation Uncertainty Resulting from LiDAR-Derived Digital Surface Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José María Bodoque

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The use of high resolution ground-based light detection and ranging (LiDAR datasets provides spatial density and vertical precision for obtaining highly accurate Digital Surface Models (DSMs. As a result, the reliability of flood damage analysis has improved significantly, owing to the increased accuracy of hydrodynamic models. In addition, considerable error reduction has been achieved in the estimation of first floor elevation, which is a critical parameter for determining structural and content damages in buildings. However, as with any discrete measurement technique, LiDAR data contain object space ambiguities, especially in urban areas where the presence of buildings and the floodplain gives rise to a highly complex landscape that is largely corrected by using ancillary information based on the addition of breaklines to a triangulated irregular network (TIN. The present study provides a methodological approach for assessing uncertainty regarding first floor elevation. This is based on: (i generation an urban TIN from LiDAR data with a density of 0.5 points·m−2, complemented with the river bathymetry obtained from a field survey with a density of 0.3 points·m−2. The TIN was subsequently improved by adding breaklines and was finally transformed to a raster with a spatial resolution of 2 m; (ii implementation of a two-dimensional (2D hydrodynamic model based on the 500-year flood return period. The high resolution DSM obtained in the previous step, facilitated addressing the modelling, since it represented suitable urban features influencing hydraulics (e.g., streets and buildings; and (iii determination of first floor elevation uncertainty within the 500-year flood zone by performing Monte Carlo simulations based on geostatistics and 1997 control elevation points in order to assess error. Deviations in first floor elevation (average: 0.56 m and standard deviation: 0.33 m show that this parameter has to be neatly characterized in order

  11. Flood Insurance Rate Maps and Base Flood Elevations, FIRM, DFIRM, BFE, From FEMA, Published in 2007, 1:1200 (1in=100ft) scale, Town of Cary NC.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Flood Insurance Rate Maps and Base Flood Elevations, FIRM, DFIRM, BFE dataset, published at 1:1200 (1in=100ft) scale, was produced all or in part from LIDAR...

  12. Flood Insurance Rate Maps and Base Flood Elevations, FIRM, DFIRM, BFE, contract to updata FEMA data due 2009, Published in unknown, Washoe County.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Flood Insurance Rate Maps and Base Flood Elevations, FIRM, DFIRM, BFE dataset as of unknown. It is described as 'contract to updata FEMA data due 2009'. Data by...

  13. Flood Insurance Rate Maps and Base Flood Elevations, FIRM, DFIRM, BFE, contract to updata FEMA data due 2009, Published in 2009, Washoe County.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Flood Insurance Rate Maps and Base Flood Elevations, FIRM, DFIRM, BFE dataset as of 2009. It is described as 'contract to updata FEMA data due 2009'. Data by...

  14. Elevation Certificates for Flood Prone Structures, Published in unknown, Sauk County.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Elevation Certificates for Flood Prone Structures dataset as of unknown. Data by this publisher are often provided in Sauk County Coordinate System coordinate...

  15. Direct local building inundation depth determination in 3-D point clouds generated from user-generated flood images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griesbaum, Luisa; Marx, Sabrina; Höfle, Bernhard

    2017-07-01

    In recent years, the number of people affected by flooding caused by extreme weather events has increased considerably. In order to provide support in disaster recovery or to develop mitigation plans, accurate flood information is necessary. Particularly pluvial urban floods, characterized by high temporal and spatial variations, are not well documented. This study proposes a new, low-cost approach to determining local flood elevation and inundation depth of buildings based on user-generated flood images. It first applies close-range digital photogrammetry to generate a geo-referenced 3-D point cloud. Second, based on estimated camera orientation parameters, the flood level captured in a single flood image is mapped to the previously derived point cloud. The local flood elevation and the building inundation depth can then be derived automatically from the point cloud. The proposed method is carried out once for each of 66 different flood images showing the same building façade. An overall accuracy of 0.05 m with an uncertainty of ±0.13 m for the derived flood elevation within the area of interest as well as an accuracy of 0.13 m ± 0.10 m for the determined building inundation depth is achieved. Our results demonstrate that the proposed method can provide reliable flood information on a local scale using user-generated flood images as input. The approach can thus allow inundation depth maps to be derived even in complex urban environments with relatively high accuracies.

  16. Morphological Analyses and Simulated Flood Elevations in a Watershed with Dredged and Leveed Stream Channels, Wheeling Creek, Eastern Ohio

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherwood, James M.; Huitger, Carrie A.; Ebner, Andrew D.; Koltun, G.F.

    2008-01-01

    The USGS, in cooperation with the Ohio Emergency Management Agency, conducted a study in the Wheeling Creek Basin to (1) evaluate and contrast land-cover characteristics from 2001 with characteristics from 1979 and 1992; (2) compare current streambed elevation, slope, and geometry with conditions present in the late 1980s; (3) look for evidence of channel filling and over widening in selected undredged reaches; (4) estimate flood elevations for existing conditions in both undredged and previously dredged reaches; (5) evaluate the height of the levees required to contain floods with selected recurrence intervals in previously dredged reaches; and (6) estimate flood elevations for several hypothetical dredging and streambed aggradation scenarios in undredged reaches. The amount of barren land in the Wheeling Creek watershed has decreased from 20 to 1 percent of the basin area based on land-cover characteristics from 1979 and 2001. Barren lands appear to have been converted primarily to pasture, presumably as a result of surface-mine reclamation. Croplands also decreased from 13 to 8 percent of the basin area. The combined decrease in barren lands and croplands is approximately offset by the increase in pasture. Stream-channel surveys conducted in 1987 and again in 2006 at 21 sites in four previously dredged reaches of Wheeling Creek indicate little change in the elevation, slope, and geometry of the channel at most sites. The mean change in width-averaged bed and thalweg elevations for the 21 cross sections was 0.1 feet. Bankfull widths, mean depths, and cross-sectional areas measured at 12 sites in undredged reaches were compared to estimates determined from regional equations. The mean percentage difference between measured and estimated bankfull widths was -0.2 percent, suggesting that bankfull widths in the Wheeling Creek Basin are generally about the same as regional averages for undisturbed basins of identical drainage area. For bankfull mean depth and cross

  17. 78 FR 9406 - Final Flood Hazard Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-08

    ... Georgetown......... Georgetown Township Office, 1515 Baldwin Street, Jenison, MI 49428. Charter Township of... Domestic Assistance No. 97.022, ``Flood Insurance.'') James A. Walke, Acting Deputy Associate...

  18. Hydrologic analysis of a flood based on a new Digital Elevation Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishio, M.; Mori, M.

    2015-06-01

    These The present study aims to simulate the hydrologic processes of a flood, based on a new, highly accurate Digital Elevation Model (DEM). The DEM is provided by the Ministry of Land, Infrastructure, Transport and Tourism (MLIT) of Japan, and has a spatial resolution of five meters. It was generated by the new National Project in 2012. The Hydrologic Engineering Center - Hydrologic Modeling System (HEC-HMS) is used to simulate the hydrologic process of a flood of the Onga River in Iizuka City, Japan. A large flood event in the typhoon season in 2003 caused serious damage around the Iizuka City area. Precise records of rainfall data from the Automated Meteorological Data Acquisition System (AMeDAS) were input into the HEC-HMS. The estimated flood area of the simulation results by HEC-HMS was identical to the observed flood area. A watershed aggregation map is also generated by HEC-HMS around the Onga River.

  19. Flood Insurance Rate Maps and Base Flood Elevations, FIRM, DFIRM, BFE, FEMA Flood Insurance Rate Maps, Published in 2005, 1:24000 (1in=2000ft) scale, Lafayette County Land Records.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Flood Insurance Rate Maps and Base Flood Elevations, FIRM, DFIRM, BFE dataset, published at 1:24000 (1in=2000ft) scale, was produced all or in part from Other...

  20. Flood Insurance Rate Maps and Base Flood Elevations, FIRM, DFIRM, BFE, Chattahoochee-Flint Regional Data Q3 Flood Data, Published in 2006, 1:12000 (1in=1000ft) scale, Chattahoochee-Flint Regional Development.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Flood Insurance Rate Maps and Base Flood Elevations, FIRM, DFIRM, BFE dataset, published at 1:12000 (1in=1000ft) scale, was produced all or in part from LIDAR...

  1. Flood Insurance Rate Maps and Base Flood Elevations, FIRM, DFIRM, BFE, Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) - Flood Insurance Rate Maps (FIRM), Published in 2011, 1:1200 (1in=100ft) scale, Polk County, Wisconsin.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Flood Insurance Rate Maps and Base Flood Elevations, FIRM, DFIRM, BFE dataset, published at 1:1200 (1in=100ft) scale, was produced all or in part from Other...

  2. Flood Insurance Rate Maps and Base Flood Elevations, FIRM, DFIRM, BFE, FEMA Floodway and Flood Boundary Maps, Published in 2005, 1:24000 (1in=2000ft) scale, Lafayette County Land Records.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Flood Insurance Rate Maps and Base Flood Elevations, FIRM, DFIRM, BFE dataset, published at 1:24000 (1in=2000ft) scale, was produced all or in part from Other...

  3. Priority-flood: An optimal depression-filling and watershed-labeling algorithm for digital elevation models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, Richard; Lehman, Clarence; Mulla, David

    2014-01-01

    Depressions (or pits) are areas within a digital elevation model that are surrounded by higher terrain, with no outlet to lower areas. Filling them so they are level, as fluid would fill them if the terrain was impermeable, is often necessary in preprocessing DEMs. The depression-filling algorithm presented here - called Priority-Flood - unifies and improves the work of a number of previous authors who have published similar algorithms. The algorithm operates by flooding DEMs inwards from their edges using a priority queue to determine the next cell to be flooded. The resultant DEM has no depressions or digital dams: every cell is guaranteed to drain. The algorithm is optimal for both integer and floating-point data, working in O(n) and O(n log2 n) time, respectively. It is shown that by using a plain queue to fill depressions once they have been found, an O(m log2 m) time-complexity can be achieved, where m does not exceed the number of cells n. This is the lowest time complexity of any known floating-point depression-filling algorithm. In testing, this improved variation of the algorithm performed up to 37% faster than the original. Additionally, a parallel version of an older, but widely used, depression-filling algorithm required six parallel processors to achieve a run-time on par with what the newer algorithm's improved variation took on a single processor. The Priority-Flood Algorithm is simple to understand and implement: the included pseudocode is only 20 lines and the included C++ reference implementation is under a hundred lines. The algorithm can work on irregular meshes as well as 4-, 6-, 8-, and n-connected grids. It can also be adapted to label watersheds and determine flow directions through either incremental elevation changes or depression carving. In the case of incremental elevation changes, the algorithm includes safety checks not present in prior works.

  4. Flood Insurance Rate Maps and Base Flood Elevations, FIRM, DFIRM, BFE, Kent County Digital Flood Insurance Rate Map Database (DFIRM); DFIRM_Kent10; he Digital Flood Insurance Rate Map (DFIRM) Database depicts flood risk information and supporting data used to develop the risk data., Published in 2011, 1:4800 (1in=400ft) scale, State of Rhode Island and Providence Plantations.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Flood Insurance Rate Maps and Base Flood Elevations, FIRM, DFIRM, BFE dataset, published at 1:4800 (1in=400ft) scale, was produced all or in part from Other...

  5. Flood Insurance Rate Maps and Base Flood Elevations, FIRM, DFIRM, BFE, Newport County Digital Flood Insurance Rate Map Database (DFIRM); DFIRM_Newport10; The Digital Flood Insurance Rate Map (DFIRM) Database depicts flood risk information and supporting data used to develop the risk data., Published in 2011, 1:4800 (1in=400ft) scale, State of Rhode Island and Providence Plantations.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Flood Insurance Rate Maps and Base Flood Elevations, FIRM, DFIRM, BFE dataset, published at 1:4800 (1in=400ft) scale, was produced all or in part from Other...

  6. The Importance of Precise Digital Elevation Models (DEM) in Modelling Floods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demir, Gokben; Akyurek, Zuhal

    2016-04-01

    Digital elevation Models (DEM) are important inputs for topography for the accurate modelling of floodplain hydrodynamics. Floodplains have a key role as natural retarding pools which attenuate flood waves and suppress flood peaks. GPS, LIDAR and bathymetric surveys are well known surveying methods to acquire topographic data. It is not only time consuming and expensive to obtain topographic data through surveying but also sometimes impossible for remote areas. In this study it is aimed to present the importance of accurate modelling of topography for flood modelling. The flood modelling for Samsun-Terme in Blacksea region of Turkey is done. One of the DEM is obtained from the point observations retrieved from 1/5000 scaled orthophotos and 1/1000 scaled point elevation data from field surveys at x-sections. The river banks are corrected by using the orthophotos and elevation values. This DEM is named as scaled DEM. The other DEM is obtained from bathymetric surveys. 296 538 number of points and the left/right bank slopes were used to construct the DEM having 1 m spatial resolution and this DEM is named as base DEM. Two DEMs were compared by using 27 x-sections. The maximum difference at thalweg of the river bed is 2m and the minimum difference is 20 cm between two DEMs. The channel conveyance capacity in base DEM is larger than the one in scaled DEM and floodplain is modelled in detail in base DEM. MIKE21 with flexible grid is used in 2- dimensional shallow water flow modelling. The model by using two DEMs were calibrated for a flood event (July 9, 2012). The roughness is considered as the calibration parameter. From comparison of input hydrograph at the upstream of the river and output hydrograph at the downstream of the river, the attenuation is obtained as 91% and 84% for the base DEM and scaled DEM, respectively. The time lag in hydrographs does not show any difference for two DEMs and it is obtained as 3 hours. Maximum flood extents differ for the two DEMs

  7. Geochemistry and flooding as determining factors of plant species composition in Dutch winter-flooded riverine grasslands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beumer, Victor; van Wirdum, Geert; Beltman, Boudewijn; Griffioen, Jasper; Grootjans, Ab P; Verhoeven, Jos T A

    2008-08-25

    Dutch water policy aims for more frequent, controlled flooding of river valley floodplains to avoid unwanted flooding elsewhere; in anticipation of increased flooding risks resulting from climate changes. Controlled flooding usually takes place in winter in parts of the valleys which had not been subject to flooding in the last decades. It may thus affect existing nature with its conservation values. The goal of this study was to clarify the geochemical and hydrological factors determining plant species composition of winter-flooded river valley grasslands. A correlative study was carried out in 43 sites in 13 Dutch river valley floodplains, with measurements of flooding regime, vegetation composition, soil nutrients and soil pH status. With the use of canonical correspondence analysis (CCA) the plant species composition was investigated in relation to the geochemical variables and the winter winter-flooding regime. We found that the distributions of target species and non-target species were clearly correlated with geochemical characteristics and flooding regime. Clustering of sites within the CCA plots has led us to distinguish between four types of winter flooding in our areas: floodplains with (a) accumulating rain water, (b) low groundwater levels flooded with river water, (c) discharging groundwater and (d) high groundwater levels flooded with river water. Our major conclusions are (1) the winter groundwater level of winter-flooded grasslands was important for evaluating the effects of winter flooding on the geochemistry and plant species composition, and (2) winter winter-flooding effects were largely determined by the nature of the flooding. A high frequency of flooding particularly favoured a small set of common plant species. In areas with groundwater seepage, winter flooding may provide geochemical conditions suitable for diverse vegetation types with rare species. Rainwater flooded sites appeared less suitable for most target species.

  8. Flood Insurance Rate Maps and Base Flood Elevations, FIRM, DFIRM, BFE - FLOODPLAINS_BFE_DFIRM_IDNR_IN: DFIRM Floodplain Base Flood Elevation Lines for 86 of 92 Counties in Indiana (Indiana Department of Natural Resources, 1:12,000, Line Shapefile)

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This line layer represents base flood elevations (BFEs) created from FEMA Flood Rate Insurance Maps (FIRM). BFE lines indicate the rounded whole-foot water surface...

  9. Elevation Certificates for Flood Prone Structures, Building Dept has required elevation certs when house falls inside flood zone - paper copies only, Published in 2010, 1:2400 (1in=200ft) scale, Effingham County Board Of Commissioners.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Elevation Certificates for Flood Prone Structures dataset, published at 1:2400 (1in=200ft) scale, was produced all or in part from Field Survey/GPS information...

  10. Floods and Flash Flooding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Floods and flash flooding Now is the time to determine your area’s flood risk. If you are not sure whether you ... If you are in a floodplain, consider buying flood insurance. Do not drive around barricades. If your ...

  11. Elevation Certificates for Flood Prone Structures, Published in 1995, 1:600 (1in=50ft) scale, County of Lexington.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Elevation Certificates for Flood Prone Structures dataset, published at 1:600 (1in=50ft) scale, was produced all or in part from Field Survey/GPS information as...

  12. Perspectives on open access high resolution digital elevation models to produce global flood hazard layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sampson, Christopher; Smith, Andrew; Bates, Paul; Neal, Jeffrey; Trigg, Mark

    2015-12-01

    Global flood hazard models have recently become a reality thanks to the release of open access global digital elevation models, the development of simplified and highly efficient flow algorithms, and the steady increase in computational power. In this commentary we argue that although the availability of open access global terrain data has been critical in enabling the development of such models, the relatively poor resolution and precision of these data now limit significantly our ability to estimate flood inundation and risk for the majority of the planet's surface. The difficulty of deriving an accurate 'bare-earth' terrain model due to the interaction of vegetation and urban structures with the satellite-based remote sensors means that global terrain data are often poorest in the areas where people, property (and thus vulnerability) are most concentrated. Furthermore, the current generation of open access global terrain models are over a decade old and many large floodplains, particularly those in developing countries, have undergone significant change in this time. There is therefore a pressing need for a new generation of high resolution and high vertical precision open access global digital elevation models to allow significantly improved global flood hazard models to be developed.

  13. Contribution of river floods, hurricanes, and cold fronts to elevation change in a deltaic floodplain, northern Gulf of Mexico, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bevington, Azure E.; Twilley, Robert R.; Sasser, Charles E.; Holm, Guerry O.

    2017-05-01

    Deltas are globally important locations of diverse ecosystems, human settlement, and economic activity that are threatened by reductions in sediment delivery, accelerated sea level rise, and subsidence. Here we investigated the relative contribution of river flooding, hurricanes, and cold fronts on elevation change in the prograding Wax Lake Delta (WLD). Sediment surface elevation was measured across 87 plots, eight times from February 2008 to August 2011. The high peak discharge river floods in 2008 and 2011 resulted in the greatest mean net elevation gain of 5.4 to 4.9 cm over each flood season, respectively. The highest deltaic wetland sediment retention (13.5% of total sediment discharge) occurred during the 2008 river flood despite lower total and peak discharge compared to 2011. Hurricanes Gustav and Ike resulted in a total net elevation gain of 1.2 cm, but the long-term contribution of hurricane derived sediments to deltaic wetlands was estimated to be just 22% of the long-term contribution of large river floods. Winter cold front passage resulted in a net loss in elevation that is equal to the elevation gain from lower discharge river floods and was consistent across years. This amount of annual loss in elevation from cold fronts could effectively negate the long-term land building capacity within the delta without the added elevation gain from both high and low discharge river floods. The current lack of inclusion of cold front elevation loss in most predictive numerical models likely overestimates the land building capacity in areas that experience similar forcings to WLD.

  14. Flood Insurance Rate Maps and Base Flood Elevations, FIRM, DFIRM, BFE, DFIRM's from NC Floodplain Mapping Program, Published in 2009, 1:12000 (1in=1000ft) scale, Iredell County GIS.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Flood Insurance Rate Maps and Base Flood Elevations, FIRM, DFIRM, BFE dataset, published at 1:12000 (1in=1000ft) scale, was produced all or in part from LIDAR...

  15. Flood Insurance Rate Maps and Base Flood Elevations, FIRM, DFIRM, BFE, s_bfe.shp; FEMA; Update Frequency is every five or ten years, Published in 2008, Athens-Clarke County Planning Department.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Flood Insurance Rate Maps and Base Flood Elevations, FIRM, DFIRM, BFE dataset, was produced all or in part from Field Survey/GPS information as of 2008. It is...

  16. Flood Insurance Rate Maps and Base Flood Elevations, FIRM, DFIRM, BFE, FEMA FIRM Boundary, Published in 2010, 1:2400 (1in=200ft) scale, Effingham County Board Of Commissioners.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Flood Insurance Rate Maps and Base Flood Elevations, FIRM, DFIRM, BFE dataset, published at 1:2400 (1in=200ft) scale, was produced all or in part from Published...

  17. Flood Insurance Rate Maps and Base Flood Elevations, FIRM, DFIRM, BFE, FEMA DFIRM preliminary map out now, published in 2009, Published in 2009, 1:24000 (1in=2000ft) scale, Brown County, WI.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Flood Insurance Rate Maps and Base Flood Elevations, FIRM, DFIRM, BFE dataset, published at 1:24000 (1in=2000ft) scale, was produced all or in part from Other...

  18. Flood Insurance Rate Maps and Base Flood Elevations, FIRM, DFIRM, BFE, FEMA Product, Published in 2009, 1:600 (1in=50ft) scale, Jefferson County Land Information Office.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Flood Insurance Rate Maps and Base Flood Elevations, FIRM, DFIRM, BFE dataset, published at 1:600 (1in=50ft) scale, was produced all or in part from Published...

  19. Flood Insurance Rate Maps and Base Flood Elevations, FIRM, DFIRM, BFE, SummitCoBFE-The Digital Flood Insurance Rate Map (DFIRM) Database depicts flood risk information and supporting data used to develop the risk data., Published in 2006, 1:24000 (1in=2000ft) scale, State of Utah Automated Geographic Reference Center.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Flood Insurance Rate Maps and Base Flood Elevations, FIRM, DFIRM, BFE dataset, published at 1:24000 (1in=2000ft) scale, was produced all or in part from Other...

  20. Improved estimation of flood parameters by combining space based SAR data with very high resolution digital elevation data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Zwenzner

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Severe flood events turned out to be the most devastating catastrophes for Europe's population, economy and environment during the past decades. The total loss caused by the August 2002 flood is estimated to be 10 billion Euros for Germany alone. Due to their capability to present a synoptic view of the spatial extent of floods, remote sensing technology, and especially synthetic aperture radar (SAR systems, have been successfully applied for flood mapping and monitoring applications. However, the quality and accuracy of the flood masks and derived flood parameters always depends on the scale and the geometric precision of the original data as well as on the classification accuracy of the derived data products. The incorporation of auxiliary information such as elevation data can help to improve the plausibility and reliability of the derived flood masks as well as higher level products. This paper presents methods to improve the matching of flood masks with very high resolution digital elevation models as derived from LiDAR measurements for example. In the following, a cross section approach is presented that allows the dynamic fitting of the position of flood mask profiles according to the underlying terrain information from the DEM. This approach is tested in two study areas, using different input data sets. The first test area is part of the Elbe River (Germany where flood masks derived from Radarsat-1 and IKONOS during the 2002 flood are used in combination with a LiDAR DEM of 1 m spatial resolution. The other test data set is located on the River Severn (UK and flood masks derived from the TerraSAR-X satellite and aerial photos acquired during the 2007 flood are used in combination with a LiDAR DEM of 2 m pixel spacing. By means of these two examples the performance of the matching technique and the scaling effects are analysed and discussed. Furthermore, the systematic flood mapping capability of the different imaging systems are

  1. Floods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Floods are common in the United States. Weather such as heavy rain, thunderstorms, hurricanes, or tsunamis can ... is breached, or when a dam breaks. Flash floods, which can develop quickly, often have a dangerous ...

  2. 75 FR 82272 - Changes in Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-30

    ...-0510P). 30, 2010; The Times Upper Merion Township Herald. Manager, 175 West Valley Forge Road, King of... Joe King, August 26, 2010 485458 of Brazoria County August 16, 2010; Brazoria County Judge, (10-06... 25, 2010; The Honorable Eric Hogue, December 30, 2010 480759 1838P). September 1, 2010; Mayor,...

  3. 77 FR 1887 - Changes in Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-12

    ... Rico Planning Board, Roberto Sanchez Vilella Governmental Center, North Building, 16th Floor, De Diego Avenue International Baldorioty de Castro Avenue San Juan, PR 00940. Texas: Bexar City of San Antonio... West Advocate. Juan Linn Street Victoria, TX 77901. ] Virginia: Henrico Unincorporated areas...

  4. 77 FR 12746 - Changes in Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-02

    ..., North Building, 16th Floor, De Diego Avenue International Baldorioty de Castro Avenue, San Juan, PR...). November 10, 2011; Armstrong, Mayor, City The Victoria of Victoria, 105 West Advocate. Juan Linn...

  5. 76 FR 2837 - Changes in Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-18

    ... Business 8401 West Monroe Street, Gazette. Peoria, AZ 85345. ] Arizona: Maricopa Unincorporated areas...-8400P). Tallahassee Democrat. South Monroe Street, Tallahassee, FL 32301. Florida: Okaloosa... Sarasota (10- November 5, 2010, The Honorable Kelly M. Oct. 28, 2010........ 125150 04-6569P). November...

  6. 76 FR 20554 - Changes in Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-13

    ...). 1908P). 28, 2010, The Barrett, Mayor, City of Arizona Business Peoria, 8401 West Monroe Gazette. Street..., Nov. The Honorable Kelly M. October 28, 2010 125150 1172). 04-6569P). 12, 2010, The Kirschner,...

  7. 76 FR 26941 - Changes in Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-10

    ... 1135). (10-04-0448P). April 23, 2010; The Mayor, Town of Chapel Chapel Hill Herald. Hill, 405 Martin Luther King Jr. Boulevard, Chapel Hill, NC 27514. ] (Catalog of Federal Domestic Assistance No. 97.022... 28348. Cumberland (FEMA Docket No.: Unincorporated areas July 26, 2010; Mr. James E. Martin, November...

  8. 75 FR 18076 - Changes in Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-09

    ... Docket No: B- City of Fort Worth March 3, 2009; March The Honorable Michael J. February 23, 2009 480596...). Waukesha Freeman. Waukesha County Board of Supervisors, 515 West Moreland Boulevard, Waukesha, WI...

  9. 77 FR 21516 - Proposed Flood Elevation Determinations; Correction

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-10

    ... Creek--West Tributary, Council Creek, Dairy Creek, Dawson Creek, Deer Creek, Erickson Creek, Fanno Creek... Creek, Deer Creek, Erickson Creek, Glencoe Swale, Golf Creek, Gordon Creek, Hall Center Creek, Hall... Avenue. Erickson Creek Approximately 211 feet +174 +175 City of Beaverton. upstream of Southwest 144th...

  10. 76 FR 21662 - Changes in Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-18

    ... and Review, 58 FR 51735. Executive Order 13132, Federalism. This interim rule involves no policies..., 1978 Comp., p. 329; E.O. 12127, 44 FR 19367, 3 CFR, 1979 Comp., p. 376. Sec. 65.4 0 2. The tables... Honorable Vincent June 24, 2011 040129 (10-09-2786P). February 24, 2011; Francia, Mayor, Town of The...

  11. 76 FR 79093 - Changes in Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-21

    ..., 2011; May 8, Mr. Jon B. Roberts, City September 6, 2011 080159 1199). Springs (11-08- 2011; The... Docket No.: B- City of St. George May 31, 2011; June The Honorable Daniel D. May 24, 2011 490177 1211). (11-08-0214P). 7, 2011; The McArthur, Mayor, City of Spectrum. St. George, 175 East 200 North, St...

  12. 75 FR 7956 - Changes in Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-23

    ... of News Journal. Smyrna, 315 South Lowry Street, Smyrna, TN 37167. Wilson Unincorporated areas July 8..., 2009 170194 of Douglas County 22, 2009; Tuscola Schable, Chair, Douglas (09-05-1421P). Journal. County... Journal. Tuscola, 214 North Main Street, Tuscola, IL 61953. Nevada: Clark Unincorporated areas July...

  13. 77 FR 44498 - Changes in Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-30

    ...- Unincorporated areas Nov. 25, 2011, Dec. The Honorable Wilson Nov. 17, 2011 120080 1240). of Escambia County 2, 2011, The Robertson, Chairman, (11-04-7674P). Pensacola News Escambia County Board of Journal..., 2011, The Indian Cadden, Mayor, Town of River Press Journal. Indian River Shores, 6001 North...

  14. 75 FR 29201 - Changes in Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-25

    ... (09-05-1227P). Bulletin. County Administration, 151 4th Street Southeast, Rochester, MN 55904. Olmsted... 275246 1063). 05-1227P). 2, 2009; Post- Brede, Mayor, City of Bulletin. Rochester, 201 4th Street..., P.O. Box 413, Deadwood, SD 57732. Tennessee: Wilson (FEMA Docket No: City of Mt. Juliet June...

  15. 76 FR 20553 - Changes in Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-13

    ..., KS 66212. Missouri: Phelps City of Rolla (10-07- Sept. 27, 2010, The Honorable William S. February 2... News. Street, Rolla, MO 65401. Phelps Unincorporated areas Sept. 27, 2010, The Honorable Randy February 2, 2011 290284 of Phelps County (10- October 4, 2010, Verkamp, Presiding 07-0800P). The Rolla...

  16. 75 FR 18082 - Changes in Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-09

    ..., 9200 Tribune. Pigeon Roost Road, Olive Branch, MS 38654. Missouri: Phelps Unincorporated areas August 11, 2009; The Honorable Randy December 16, 2009 290824 of Phelps County (09- August 18, 2009; Verkamp, Presiding 07-0033P). Rolla Daily News. Commissioner, Phelps County Commission, 200 North Main Street,...

  17. 78 FR 49121 - Changes in Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-13

    .... Raymond E. Sines, July 01, 2011 390771 of Lake County (10- 21, 2011; The News President, Lake County 05...: Lake (FEMA Docket No.: B-1219) Unincorporated areas August 11, 2011; Mr. Raymond E. Sines, December 16...

  18. 75 FR 29210 - Changes in Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-25

    ... and Review, 58 FR 51735. Executive Order 13132, Federalism. This interim rule involves no policies..., 1978 Comp., p. 329; E.O. 12127, 44 FR 19367, 3 CFR, 1979 Comp., p. 376. Sec. 65.4 0 2. The tables...; The Gerlach, Mayor, City of Johnson County Sun. Overland Park, 8500 Santa Fe Drive, Overland Park,...

  19. 76 FR 77155 - Changes in Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-12

    ... modified BFEs for new buildings and their contents. DATES: These modified BFEs are currently in effect on... within the scope of the Regulatory Flexibility Act, 5 U.S.C. 601- 612, a regulatory flexibility analysis.... Fishkill, 330 State Route 376, Hopewell Junction, NY 12533. Oklahoma: Oklahoma City of Oklahoma City...

  20. 75 FR 35674 - Changes in Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-23

    ... 77803. Collin (FEMA Docket No.: B- City of Allen November 12, 2009; The Honorable Stephen March 19, 2010... Ballard Street, Yorktown, VA 23690. Washington: King (FEMA Docket No.: B-1088) City of Redmond October...

  1. 75 FR 29199 - Changes in Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-25

    ...: Collier City of Marco Island, February 19, 2010; Mr. Stephen T. Thompson, February 9, 2010 120426 (09-04..., Suite 910, Ogden, UT 84401. Washington: King City of Snoqualmie, February 5, 2010; The Honorable Matt.... Snoqualmie, P.O. Box 987, Snoqualmie, WA 98065. King Unincorporated areas February 5, 2010; The Honorable...

  2. 77 FR 3391 - Changes in Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-24

    ... King Street, Room 300, Honolulu, HI 96813. Mississippi: Lee City of Saltillo (10- November 4, 2011; The...; The Honorable Stephen F. February 27, 2012 560081 of Campbell County October 28, 2011;...

  3. 75 FR 82275 - Changes in Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-30

    ... July 22, 2010; July Mr. Doug Gilpin, November 26, 2010 120296 of Sumter County (10- 29, 2010; Sumter... 28613. ] Catawba City of Newton (10-04- July 7, 2010; July The Honorable Robert A. July 30, 2010...

  4. 75 FR 18084 - Changes in Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-09

    ... October 16, 2009; The Honorable James February 20, 2010 060296 (08-09-1888P). October 23, 2009; Desmond..., Lexington, KY 40507. North Carolina: Cumberland........ Unincorporated Areas October 7, 2009; Mr. James E... 510119 of Prince William November 4, 2009; Stewart, Chairman, County (09-03-1773P). News &...

  5. 76 FR 50913 - Changes in Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-17

    ... notice was published of community No. Alabama: Baldwin City of Gulf Shores June 10, 2011; June The... Shores P.O. Box 299 Gulf Shores, AL 36547. Baldwin City of Orange Beach June 22, 2011; June The Honorable..., Columbia, SC 29201. Lexington Unincorporated areas May 5, 2011;May 12, The Honorable James E. June 13,...

  6. 77 FR 425 - Changes in Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-05

    ... notice was published of community No. Alabama: Baldwin City of Gulf Shores October 7, 2011; The Honorable.... Gulf Shores, 1905 West 1st Street, Gulf Shores, AL 36547. Baldwin City of Gulf Shores October 11, 2011..., Evans, GA 30809. ] Liberty City of Hinesville September 30, 2011; The Honorable James September 26,...

  7. 76 FR 68325 - Changes in Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-04

    ... Effective date of modification Community notice was published of community No. Alabama: Baldwin (FEMA Docket...- Unincorporated areas April 7, 2011; April Mr. James Dinneen, August 12, 2011 125155 1199). of Volusia County 14.... Pennsylvania: Cumberland (FEMA Township of Upper November 15, 2010; The Honorable James G. March 22,...

  8. 77 FR 20994 - Changes in Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-09

    ... Effective date of modification Community No. No. notice was published of community Alabama: Baldwin (FEMA... Street, Gulf Shores, AL 36547. Baldwin (FEMA Docket No.: B- City of Gulf Shores October 11, 2011; The... September 30, 2011; The Honorable James September 26, 2011 130125 1235). (11-04-0768P). October 7,...

  9. 75 FR 11744 - Changes in Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-12

    ..., 2009; April The Honorable James E. August 7, 2009 315275 1052). 07-1022P). 9, 2009; Papillion Blinn.... Wisconsin: St. Croix (FEMA Docket Village of Baldwin April 28, 2009; May The Honorable Donald April 16, 2009 550380 No: B-1055). (09-05-1751P). 5, 2009; The McGee, President, Baldwin Bulletin. Village of Baldwin,...

  10. 76 FR 18938 - Changes in Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-06

    ... Daily Regalado, Mayor, City of Business Review. Miami, 3500 Pan American Drive, Miami, FL 33133. Miami... August 24, 2010; The Honorable Peter December 29, 2010 130207 1172). (10-04-1925P). August 31, 2010...

  11. 75 FR 78613 - Changes in Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-16

    ... and Review, 58 FR 51735. Executive Order 13132, Federalism. This interim rule involves no policies..., 1978 Comp., p. 329; E.O. 12127, 44 FR 19367, 3 CFR, 1979 Comp., p. 376. Sec. 65.4 0 2. The tables..., 2010, The Honorable Norma September 30, 2010... 060359 (10-09-1399P)........ October 20, 2010,...

  12. 75 FR 29205 - Changes in Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-25

    ... Unincorporated areas March 14, 2010; The Honorable Ron C. July 19, 2010 130059 of Columbia County March 21, 2010.... Hill, 405 Martin Luther King Jr. Boulevard, Chapel Hill, NC 27514. Wake City of Raleigh (09- January...

  13. 75 FR 18088 - Changes in Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-09

    ..., 305 Century Parkway, Allen, TX 75013. Collin City of Plano (09-06- November 12, 2009; The Honorable Phil Dyer, March 19, 2010 480140 0276P). November 19, 2009; Mayor, City of Plano, Plano Star Courier. 1520 Avenue K, Plano, TX 75074. Dallas City of Garland (09- November 6, 2009; The Honorable Ronald...

  14. 76 FR 8905 - Changes in Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-16

    ... City of Plano (10-06- December 9, 2010; The Honorable Phil Dyer, April 15, 2011 480140 1746P). December 16, 2010; Mayor, City of Plano, The Plano Star 1520 Avenue K, Plano, TX Courier. 75086. Utah:...

  15. 77 FR 20992 - Changes in Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-09

    ..., below the eight row, the table should appear as follows: Texas: Collin City of Plano (10-06- June 23, 2011; June The Honorable Phil August 31, 2010 480140 0997P). 30, 2011; The Plano Dyer, Mayor, City of Star Courier. Plano, 1520 Avenue K, Plano, TX 75074. BILLING CODE 1505-01-D...

  16. 76 FR 58409 - Changes in Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-21

    ... 17112. Collin City of Plano (10-06- June 23, 2011; June The Honorable Phil Dyer, August 31, 2010 480140 0997P). 30, 2011; The Plano Mayor, City of Plano, Star Courier. 1520 Avenue K, Plano, TX 75074....

  17. 76 FR 39009 - Changes in Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-05

    ... 17316. Texas: Collin, (FEMA Docket No.: B- City of Plano (10-06- December 9, 2010; The Honorable Phil Dyer, April 15, 2011 480140 1177). 1746P). December 16, 2010; Mayor, City of Plano, The Plano Star- 1520 Avenue K, Plano, TX Courier. 75074. Utah: Salt Lake, (FEMA Docket No.: City of West...

  18. 77 FR 1884 - Changes in Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-12

    ... 37174. Texas: Collin (FEMA Docket No.: B-1215) City of Plano (10-06- June 23, 2011; June The Honorable Phil Dyer, August 31, 2010 480140 0997P). 30, 2011; The Plano Mayor, City of Plano, Star Courier. 1520 Avenue K, Plano, TX 75074. Comal (FEMA Docket No.: B-1215). City of New Braunfels May 31, 2011; June...

  19. 76 FR 50423 - Changes in Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-15

    ... May 31, 2011; June The Honorable October 5, 2011 040073 of Pima County, (11- 7, 2011; The Daily Ram n... 370002 (10-04-4375P). 2011; The Times- Wall, Mayor, City of News. Burlington, P.O. Box 1358,...

  20. 75 FR 35672 - Changes in Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-23

    ... August 19, 2010 060375 of Sonoma County (09- April 21, 2010; The Brown, Chair, Sonoma 09-2125P). Press..., Murfreesboro, TN 37130. Texas: Kerr Unincorporated areas April 20, 2010; The Honorable Pat Tinley, August 25.... Tarrant City of Keller (09-06- April 14, 2010; The Honorable Pat August 19, 2010 480602 2005P). April 21...

  1. 76 FR 68322 - Changes in Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-04

    ..., TX 75040. Denton and Tarrant City of Fort Worth June 28, 2011; July The Honorable Betsy November 2..., TX 75601. Tarrant City of Euless (10- March 4, 2011; March The Honorable Mary Lib July 11, 2011... Drive, Euless, TX 76039. Tarrant City of Keller (10- April 8, 2010, April The Honorable Pat April...

  2. 76 FR 60748 - Changes in Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-30

    ... Rockwall County Rockwall, 385 South News. Goliad Street, Rockwall, TX 75087. Tarrant City of Arlington (11.... Tarrant City of Fort Worth May 6, 2011; May 13, The Honorable Michael September 12, 2011 480596 (10-06... Street, Fort Worth, TX 76102. Tarrant City of Saginaw (10- May 6, 2011; May 13, The Honorable...

  3. 75 FR 35670 - Changes in Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-23

    ...; The Oklahoman. Linley, Mayor, City of Del City, P.O. Box 15177, Del City, OK 73155. ] Texas: Tarrant..., 2010; Dittrich, Mayor, City of Star-Telegram. Benbrook, P.O. Box 26569, Benbrook, TX 76126. Tarrant..., 2010; Star- Manager, City of Telegram. Benbrook, 911 Winscott Road, Benbrook, TX 76126. Tarrant City...

  4. 77 FR 31216 - Changes in Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-25

    ... 76201. Johnson and Tarrant (FEMA City of Burleson (11- October 12, 2011; The Honorable Ken February 16.... County Judge, 501 North Thompson Street, Suite 401, Conroe, TX 77301. ] Tarrant (FEMA Docket No.: B- City..., Arlington, TX 76010. Tarrant (FEMA Docket No.: B- City of Crowley (11- November 3, 2011; The Honorable...

  5. 76 FR 50420 - Changes in Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-15

    ...- Town of Easton, (11- November 15, 2010, Mr. David Colton, Town of November 2, 2010 250053 1181). 01... Drive, Overland Park, KS 66212. Massachusetts: Bristol (FEMA Docket No. B- Town of Easton, (11- November 1, 2010, Mr. David Colton, Town of October 26, 2010 250053 1181). 01-0022P). November 8,...

  6. 76 FR 20551 - Changes in Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-13

    .... Selectmen, Swansea Town Hall Annex, 68 Stevens Road, Swansea, MA 02777. Bristol Town of Easton (11-01- Nov. 1, 2010, Nov. Mr. David Colton, Town of October 26, 2010 250053 0022P). 8, 2010, The Easton..., Nov. Mr. David Colton, Town of November 2, 2010 250053 0021P). 22, 2010, The Easton...

  7. 75 FR 29208 - Changes in Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-25

    ... Unincorporated areas December 3, 2009, The Honorable David April 9, 2010 080124 of Montrose County December 10.... Mississippi: Hinds City of Jackson (09- January 15, 2010, The Honorable Harvey December 31, 2009 280072...

  8. 76 FR 44276 - Changes in Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-25

    ... Honorable Kathy August 5, 2011 100066 0744P). April 7, 2011; The Harvey, Mayor, Town of Middletown Odessa, P... Santa Fe (10- March 3, 2011; March The Honorable David Coss, February 24, 2011 350070 06-2026P)....

  9. 76 FR 26943 - Changes in Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-10

    ..., 1st Floor, Hollister, CA 95023. Ventura City of Simi Valley March 9, 2011; March The Honorable Bob Huber, July 14, 2011 060421 (10-09-3242P). 16, 2011; The Mayor, City of Simi Ventura County Star. Valley, 2929 Tapo Canyon Road, Simi Valley, CA 93063. Colorado: Arapahoe City of Littleton (11- March 18,...

  10. 76 FR 50915 - Changes in Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-17

    ... Adams County, (10- February 24, 2011; ``Skip'' Fischer 08-0748P). The Northglenn- Chairman, Adams County... The Honorable Michael J. November 17, 2010 480596 1162). (10-06-1675P). 20, 2010; The Fort...

  11. 75 FR 7955 - Changes in Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-23

    ..., 2009 480234 06-1930P) 30, 2009; Fort Bend Thompson, Mayor, City Sun. of Sugar Land, P.O. Box 110, Sugar..., 210 Martin Luther King Jr. Boulevard, Madison, WI 53703. Dane Village of De Forest July 24, 2009; July...

  12. 76 FR 35753 - Changes in Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-20

    ..., Billings, MT 59107. Nevada: Douglas Unincorporated areas April 6, 2011; April The Honorable Michael A... and Review, 58 FR 51735. Executive Order 13132, Federalism. This interim rule involves no policies..., 1978 Comp., p. 329; E.O. 12127, 44 FR 19367, 3 CFR, 1979 Comp., p. 376. Sec. 65.4 0 2. The...

  13. 77 FR 20997 - Changes in Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-09

    ... 21, 2011 120040 1231). Beach (11-04-3579P). 5, 2011; The Sun- Mayor, Town of Hillsboro Sentinel..., 2011; The Fort McGrail, Mayor, City of Worth Star-Telegram. Keller, 1100 Bear Creek Parkway, Keller, TX... County Judge, 710 South Sun. Main Street, Suite 101, Georgetown, TX 78626. (Catalog of Federal...

  14. 76 FR 52879 - Changes in Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-24

    ... Board of News-Press. Commissioners, 100 3rd Street, Castle Rock, CO 80104. Douglas (FEMA Docket No.: B.... Commissioners, 100 3rd Street, Castle Rock, CO 80104. * * * * * * * 0 2. On the same page, in the same table... Fort Mayor, City of Worth Star-Telegram. Mansfield, 1200 East Broad Street, Mansfield, TX...

  15. 76 FR 76052 - Changes in Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-06

    ..., Castle Rock, CO 80104. Larimer Unincorporated areas September 8, 2011; The Honorable Tom September 29.... Wyoming: Fremont City of Lander (11-08- September 11, 2011; The Honorable Mick Wolfe, January 16,...

  16. 76 FR 43194 - Changes in Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-20

    ... Honorable Nelson W. November 5, 2010 480035 of Bexar County (09- November 19, 2010; Wolff, Bexar County 06.... Bexar Unincorporated areas September 28, 2010; The Honorable Nelson W. February 2, 2011 480035 of...

  17. 76 FR 17 - Changes in Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-03

    ... Lincoln Gazette. Street, Lowell, AR 72745. Crawford (FEMA Docket No.: B- City of Alma (09-06- February 10..., City Alma Journal. of Alma, 804 Fayetteville Avenue, Alma, AR 72921. St. Francis (FEMA Docket No.: City...- Sarasota, 1565 1st Tribune. Street, Room 101, Sarasota, FL 34236. Georgia: Cobb (FEMA Docket No.:...

  18. 76 FR 79090 - Changes in Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-21

    ..., 2011 230171 01-2103P). October 4, 2011; of Kittery Manager, 200 The Portsmouth Rogers Road Extension... Richard J. September 27, 2011 350002 (11-06-0465P). October 11, 2011; Berry, Mayor, City of The... Honorable Richard L. January 12, 2012 390173 (11-05-2052P). September 14, 2011; Stage, Mayor, City of...

  19. 75 FR 18086 - Changes in Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-09

    ..., 2009; The Hume, Mayor, City of Elk Sacramento Bee. Grove, 8401 Laguna Palms Way, Elk Grove, CA 95758...). Ventura County Board of Supervisors, 800 South Victoria Avenue, Ventura, CA 93009. Colorado: Grand (FEMA... Board of Commissioners, P.O. Box 264, Hot Sulphur Springs, CO 80451. Florida: Charlotte (FEMA...

  20. 75 FR 78607 - Changes in Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-16

    ...)........ Great Falls Tribune. Board of Commissioners, 325 2nd Avenue North, Great Falls, MT 59401. North Carolina... 57013. Texas: Wichita City of Wichita Falls August 20, 2010, The Honorable Glenn December 27, 2010.... 480662 (10-06-1225P)........ August 27, 2010, Barham, Mayor, City of Wichita Falls Times Wichita Falls,...

  1. 75 FR 29211 - Changes in Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-25

    ... County 05-0486P). State Journal. Executive, City County Building, Room 118, 210 Martin Luther King, Jr... Docket City of Shasta Lake July 20, 2009; July Ms. Carol Martin, City of July 10, 2009 060758 No.:...

  2. 75 FR 18079 - Changes in Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-09

    ... Statesman Journal. Salem, 555 Liberty Street Southeast, Room 220, Salem, OR 97301. Pennsylvania: Adams City... 14, 2009; Coons, New Castle County County (09-03- The News Journal. Executive, 87 Reads Way 0870P... 135157 04-5599P). 2009; Atlanta Franklin, Mayor, City of Journal- Atlanta, 55 Trinity...

  3. 75 FR 78610 - Changes in Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-16

    ... Frank V. April 28, 2010....... 125096 (10-04-4136P)........ 2010, St. Petersburg Hibbard, Mayor, City of... North Carson Street, Suite 2, Carson City, NV 89701. New Mexico: Dona Ana City of Las Cruces... May 7...

  4. 76 FR 8900 - Changes in Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-16

    ... Frank V. April 28, 2010 125096 1135). (10-04-4136P). 2010; St. Hibbard, Mayor, City of Petersburg Times..., Suite 2, Carson City, NV 89701. New Mexico: ] Dona Ana (FEMA Docket No.: B- City of Las Cruces May 7...

  5. 75 FR 81484 - Changes in Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-28

    ....: B- Unincorporated areas November 9, 2009; The Honorable Frank March 16, 2010 125155 1129). of..., Harrisonville, MO 64701. New Mexico: Dona Ana (FEMA Docket City of Las Cruces February 5, 2010; The Honorable...

  6. 75 FR 29195 - Changes in Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-25

    ..., Mayor, City Toledo Blade. of Toledo, 1 Government Center, 640 Jackson, Suite 2200, Toledo, OH 43604. Miami City of Troy (09-05- December 14, 2009; The Honorable Michael December 30, 2009 390402 3442P). December 21, 2009; Beamish, Mayor, City of Troy Daily News. Troy, 100 South Market Street, Troy, OH...

  7. Merging LIDAR digital terrain model with direct observed elevation points for urban flood numerical simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arrighi, Chiara; Campo, Lorenzo

    2017-04-01

    In last years, the concern about the economical and lives loss due to urban floods has grown hand in hand with the numerical skills in simulating such events. The large amount of computational power needed in order to address the problem (simulating a flood in a complex terrain such as a medium-large city) is only one of the issues. Among them it is possible to consider the general lack of exhaustive observations during the event (exact extension, dynamic, water level reached in different parts of the involved area), needed for calibration and validation of the model, the need of considering the sewers effects, and the availability of a correct and precise description of the geometry of the problem. In large cities the topographic surveys are in general available with a number of points, but a complete hydraulic simulation needs a detailed description of the terrain on the whole computational domain. LIDAR surveys can achieve this goal, providing a comprehensive description of the terrain, although they often lack precision. In this work an optimal merging of these two sources of geometrical information, measured elevation points and LIDAR survey, is proposed, by taking into account the error variance of both. The procedure is applied to a flood-prone city over an area of 35 square km approximately starting with a DTM from LIDAR with a spatial resolution of 1 m, and 13000 measured points. The spatial pattern of the error (LIDAR vs points) is analysed, and the merging method is tested with a series of Jackknife procedures that take into account different densities of the available points. A discussion of the results is provided.

  8. The influence of digital elevation model resolution on overland flow networks for modelling urban pluvial flooding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leitão, J P; Boonya-Aroonnet, S; Prodanović, D; Maksimović, C

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents the developments towards the next generation of overland flow modelling of urban pluvial flooding. Using a detailed analysis of the Digital Elevation Model (DEM) the developed GIS tools can automatically generate surface drainage networks which consist of temporary ponds (floodable areas) and flow paths and link them with the underground network through inlets. For different commercially-available Rainfall-Runoff simulation models, the tool will generate the overland flow network needed to model the surface runoff and pluvial flooding accurately. In this paper the emphasis is placed on a sensitivity analysis of ponds and preferential overland flow paths creation. Different DEMs for three areas were considered in order to compare the results obtained. The DEMs considered were generated using different acquisition techniques and hence represent terrain with varying levels of resolution and accuracy. The results show that DEMs can be used to generate surface flow networks reliably. As expected, the quality of the surface network generated is highly dependent on the quality and resolution of the DEMs and successful representation of buildings and streets.

  9. Flood Insurance Rate Maps and Base Flood Elevations, FIRM, DFIRM, BFE - MO 2010 Greene County Special Flood Hazard Area Lines (SHP)

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This polyline layer represents the approximate effective Special Flood Hazard Area (SFHA) boundary for Greene County Missouri. This boundary became effective in...

  10. Flood Insurance Rate Maps and Base Flood Elevations, FIRM, DFIRM, BFE - MO 2014 Greene County Special Flood Hazard Area Lines (SHP)

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This polyline layer represents the approximate effective Special Flood Hazard Area (SFHA) boundary for Greene County Missouri. This boundary became effective in...

  11. Flooding and Flood Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, K.N.; Fallon, J.D.; Lorenz, D.L.; Stark, J.R.; Menard, Jason; Easter, K.W.; Perry, Jim

    2011-01-01

    Floods result in great human disasters globally and nationally, causing an average of $4 billion of damages each year in the United States. Minnesota has its share of floods and flood damages, and the state has awarded nearly $278 million to local units of government for flood mitigation projects through its Flood Hazard Mitigation Grant Program. Since 1995, flood mitigation in the Red River Valley has exceeded $146 million. Considerable local and state funding has been provided to manage and mitigate problems of excess stormwater in urban areas, flooding of farmlands, and flood damages at road crossings. The cumulative costs involved with floods and flood mitigation in Minnesota are not known precisely, but it is safe to conclude that flood mitigation is a costly business. This chapter begins with a description of floods in Minneosta to provide examples and contrasts across the state. Background material is presented to provide a basic understanding of floods and flood processes, predication, and management and mitigation. Methods of analyzing and characterizing floods are presented because they affect how we respond to flooding and can influence relevant practices. The understanding and perceptions of floods and flooding commonly differ among those who work in flood forecasting, flood protection, or water resource mamnagement and citizens and businesses affected by floods. These differences can become magnified following a major flood, pointing to the need for better understanding of flooding as well as common language to describe flood risks and the uncertainty associated with determining such risks. Expectations of accurate and timely flood forecasts and our ability to control floods do not always match reality. Striving for clarity is important in formulating policies that can help avoid recurring flood damages and costs.

  12. Parallel Priority-Flood depression filling for trillion cell digital elevation models on desktops or clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, Richard

    2016-11-01

    Algorithms for extracting hydrologic features and properties from digital elevation models (DEMs) are challenged by large datasets, which often cannot fit within a computer's RAM. Depression filling is an important preconditioning step to many of these algorithms. Here, I present a new, linearly scaling algorithm which parallelizes the Priority-Flood depression-filling algorithm by subdividing a DEM into tiles. Using a single-producer, multi-consumer design, the new algorithm works equally well on one core, multiple cores, or multiple machines and can take advantage of large memories or cope with small ones. Unlike previous algorithms, the new algorithm guarantees a fixed number of memory access and communication events per subdivision of the DEM. In comparison testing, this results in the new algorithm running generally faster while using fewer resources than previous algorithms. For moderately sized tiles, the algorithm exhibits ∼60% strong and weak scaling efficiencies up to 48 cores, and linear time scaling across datasets ranging over three orders of magnitude. The largest dataset on which I run the algorithm has 2 trillion (2×1012) cells. With 48 cores, processing required 4.8 h wall-time (9.3 compute-days). This test is three orders of magnitude larger than any previously performed in the literature. Complete, well-commented source code and correctness tests are available for download from a repository.

  13. Improved mapping of flood extent and flood depth using space based SAR data in combination with very high resolution digital elevation data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zwenzner, H.

    2009-04-01

    Due to their capability to present a synoptic view of the spatial extent of floods, remote sensing technology, and especially synthetic aperture radar (SAR) systems, have been successfully applied for flood mapping and monitoring applications during the past decades. However, the quality and accuracy of the flood masks and derived flood parameters highly depend on the geometric precision of the satellite data as well as on the classification accuracy of the derived water mask. The incorporation of high resolution elevation data from LiDAR measurements for example can help to improve the plausibility and reliability of the flood masks. On the basis of the improved flood masks more sophisticated parameters such as inundation depth can be derived. A cross section approach is presented that allows the dynamic fitting of the position of the flood mask profiles according to the underlying terrain information from the DEM. The method was tested on the River Severn (UK), for which TerraSAR-X stripmap data with 3 meters pixel spacing acquired during the 2007 summer flood are used in combination with a LiDAR DEM of 2 meters pixel size. Initially, the cross sections were established perpendicularly to the major flow direction along the 7 km reach of the River Severn. The profile spacing was set to 50 meters. For each cross section profile the water level was extracted at the position of the left and the right border of the flood. On the basis of the longitudinal profile, which contains the sequence of all cross section profiles, a moving average was applied on the water levels in order to get a smooth water surface and to reduce single outliers. However, in case of obvious irregularities in the water levels illustrated in the longitudinal profile and caused by misclassification the respective cross-sections had to be excluded from further analysis. It must be taken into account, that the approach is mainly affected by possible classification errors in the dimension of more

  14. Elevations and discharges produced by a simulated flood wave on the lower Sabine River, Louisiana and Texas, caused by a theoretical dam failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neely, Braxtel L.; Stiltner, Gloria J.

    1979-01-01

    The Toledo Bend Reservoir is located on the lower Sabine River between Louisiana and Texas. Two mathematical models were coupled to calculate the flood wave that would result from the theoretical failure of 25 percent of Toledo Bend Dam and route the wave downstream to Orange, Tex. Computations assumed failure (1) at the peak of the 100-year flood when discharge of the Sabine River is 102,000 cubic feet per second and (2) when the average discharge is 10,000 cubic feet per second. Two techniques were used in the dam-break model. The method of characteristics was used to propagate the shock wave following dam failure. The linear implicit finite-difference solution was used to route the flood wave following shock wave dissipation. The magnitude of the flow was determined for Burkeville, Bon Wier, Ruliff, and Orange, Tex., along the lower Sabine River. For these sites, respectively, the following peak elevations were calculated: 119, 82, 31, and 13 feet for the 100-year flood and 110, 75, 27, and 9 feet for the average discharge. (Woodard-USGS)

  15. Flood modeling using WMS model for determining peak flood discharge in southwest Iran case study: Simili basin in Khuzestan Province

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoseini, Yaser; Azari, Arash; Pilpayeh, Alireza

    2016-10-01

    It is of high importance to determine the flood discharge of different basins, in studies on water resources. However, it is necessary to use new models to determine flood hydrograph parameters. Therefore, it will be beneficial to conduct studies to calibrate the models, keeping in mind the local conditions of different regions. Therefore, this study was carried out to determine the peak flood discharge of a basin located in Southwest Iran, using the TR-20, TR55, and HEC-1 methods of the WMS model (watershed modeling system). The obtained results were compared with empirical values, as well as those of the soil conservation service (SCS) approach. Based on the results obtained, the TR55 method of the WMS model recorded the highest agreement with empirical values in Southwest Iran.

  16. 78 FR 14571 - Changes in Flood Hazard Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-06

    ... Insurance Study (FIS) reports, currently in effect for the listed communities. The flood hazard... effect in order to remain qualified for participation in the National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP... Docket No.: B- Town of Camp Verde The Honorable Bob Town Clerk's Office, December 31, 2012 040131...

  17. 77 FR 76499 - Changes in Flood Hazard Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-28

    ... Flood Insurance Rate Maps (FIRMs), and in some cases the Flood Insurance Study (FIS) reports, currently... officer Community map Community State and county Location and case No. of community repository Effective... Honorable Gay Laramie County September 27, 2012 560029 1268). of Laramie County Woodhouse,...

  18. Elevation Certificates for Flood Prone Structures, FEMA FIRM panels & Q3 data;contract to update in progress, Published in unknown, Washoe County.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Elevation Certificates for Flood Prone Structures dataset, was produced all or in part from Hardcopy Maps information as of unknown. It is described as 'FEMA...

  19. 77 FR 74856 - Changes in Flood Hazard Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-18

    ... Community map repository modification No. Alabama: Baldwin (FEMA Docket No.: City of Gulf Shores The.... ] (Catalog of Federal Domestic Assistance No. 97.022, ``Flood Insurance.'') Dated: November 28, 2012. James...

  20. 77 FR 76494 - Changes in Flood Hazard Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-28

    ... No. Alabama: Baldwin (FEMA Docket No.: B- City of Gulf Shores The Honorable Robert Community.... (Catalog of Federal Domestic Assistance No. 97.022, ``Flood Insurance.'') James A. Walke, Acting...

  1. Elevation trends and shrink-swell response of wetland soils to flooding and drying

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cahoon, Donald R.; Perez, Brian C.; Segura, Bradley D.; Lynch, James C.

    2011-01-01

    Given the potential for a projected acceleration in sea-level rise to impact wetland sustainability over the next century, a better understanding is needed of climate-related drivers that influence the processes controlling wetland elevation. Changes in local hydrology and groundwater conditions can cause short-term perturbations to marsh elevation trends through shrink—swell of marsh soils. To better understand the magnitude of these perturbations and their impacts on marsh elevation trends, we measured vertical accretion and elevation dynamics in microtidal marshes in Texas and Louisiana during and after the extreme drought conditions that existed there from 1998 to 2000. In a Louisiana marsh, elevation was controlled by subsurface hydrologic fluxes occurring below the root zone but above the 4 m depth (i.e., the base of the surface elevation table benchmark) that were related to regional drought and local meteorological conditions, with marsh elevation tracking water level variations closely. In Texas, a rapid decline in marsh elevation was related to severe drought conditions, which lowered local groundwater levels. Unfragmented marshes experienced smaller water level drawdowns and more rapid marsh elevation recovery than fragmented marshes. It appears that extended drawdowns lead to increased substrate consolidation making it less resilient to respond to future favorable conditions. Overall, changes in water storage lead to rapid and large short-term impacts on marsh elevation that are as much as five times greater than the long-term elevation trend, indicating the importance of long-term, high-resolution elevation data sets to understand the prolonged effects of water deficits on marsh elevation change.

  2. Determinants of elevated healthcare utilization in patients with COPD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernhard-Scharf Barbara J

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD imparts a substantial economic burden on western health systems. Our objective was to analyze the determinants of elevated healthcare utilization among patients with COPD in a single-payer health system. Methods Three-hundred eighty-nine adults with COPD were matched 1:3 to controls by age, gender and area of residency. Total healthcare cost 5 years prior recruitment and presence of comorbidities were obtained from a computerized database. Health related quality of life (HRQoL indices were obtained using validated questionnaires among a subsample of 177 patients. Results Healthcare utilization was 3.4-fold higher among COPD patients compared with controls (p Conclusion Comorbidity burden determines elevated utilization for COPD patients. Decision makers should prioritize scarce health care resources to a better care management of the "most costly" patients.

  3. 78 FR 10187 - Changes in Flood Hazard Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-13

    ... modification No. Alabama: Baldwin City of Gulf The Honorable Community Development http:// March 11, 2013... Street, index.php/alabama/ City of Gulf Gulf Shores, AL baldwin/. Shores, P.O. 36547. Box 299, Gulf... Domestic Assistance No. 97.022, ``Flood Insurance.'') James A. Walke, Acting Deputy Associate...

  4. 78 FR 747 - Changes in Flood Hazard Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-04

    ... areas of F. Tavaglione, Flood Control www.r9map.org/ Riverside County Chairman, and Water Docs/12-09-0462P- (12-09-0462P). Riverside County Conservation 060245- Board of District, 1995 102IAC.pdf..., Solano Department, 675 Docs/12-09-1553P- 1553P). County Board of Texas Street, 060631- Supervisors,...

  5. 78 FR 72911 - Changes in Flood Hazard Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-04

    .... North Litchfield Road, Goodyear, AZ 85338. Maricopa Unincorporated The Honorable Max Flood Control http...- Executive, 515 230, Waukesha, lomc. 1048P). West Moreland WI 53188. Boulevard, Room 320, Waukesha, WI 53188..., Avenue, www.msc.fema.gov/ 5752P). Village Bellevue, WI lomc. President, 54311. Village of Bellevue,...

  6. 77 FR 77085 - Changes in Flood Hazard Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-31

    ... Insurance Study (FIS) reports, currently in effect for the listed communities. The flood hazard... The Honorable Sean 5291 East 60th April 11, 2012 080006 (11-08-0367P). Ford, Sr., Mayor, Avenue...-0747P). Ford, Sr., Mayor, Avenue, Commerce City of Commerce City, CO 80022. City, 7887 East 60th...

  7. 38 CFR 36.4705 - Required use of standard flood hazard determination form.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS (CONTINUED) LOAN GUARANTY Sale of Loans, Guarantee of Payment, and Flood... in appendix A of 44 CFR part 65) when determining whether the building or mobile home offered...

  8. Satellite techniques for determining the geopotential of sea surface elevations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pisacane, V. L.

    1986-01-01

    Spaceborne altimetry with measurement accuracies of a few centimeters which has the potential to determine sea surface elevations necessary to compute accurate three-dimensional geostrophic currents from traditional hydrographic observation is discussed. The limitation in this approach is the uncertainties in knowledge of the global and ocean geopotentials which produce satellite and height uncertainties about an order of magnitude larger than the goal of about 10 cm. The quantitative effects of geopotential uncertainties on processing altimetry data are described. Potential near term improvements, not requiring additional spacecraft, are discussed. Even though there is substantial improvements at the longer wavelengths, the oceanographic goal will be achieved. The geopotential research mission (GRM) is described which should produce geopotential models that are capable of defining the ocean geoid to 10 cm and near-earth satellite position. The state of the art and the potential of spaceborne gravimetry is described as an alternative approach to improve our knowledge of the geopotential.

  9. Flood regime and leaf fall determine soil inorganic nitrogen dynamics in semiarid riparian forests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, J J Follstad; Dahm, C N

    2008-04-01

    Flow regulation has reduced the exchange of water, energy, and materials between rivers and floodplains, caused declines in native plant populations, and advanced the spread of nonnative plants. Naturalized flow regimes are regarded as a means to restore degraded riparian areas. We examined the effects of flood regime (short [SIFI] vs. long [LIFI] inter-flood interval) on plant community and soil inorganic nitrogen (N) dynamics in riparian forests dominated by native Populus deltoides var. wislizenii Eckenwalder (Rio Grande cottonwood) and nonnative Tamarix chinensis Lour. (salt cedar) along the regulated middle Rio Grande of New Mexico. The frequency of inundation (every 2-3 years) at SIFI sites better reflected inundation patterns prior to the closure of an upstream dam relative to the frequency of inundation at LIFI sites (> or =10 years). Riparian inundation at SIFI sites varied from 7 to 45 days during the study period (April 2001-July 2004). SIFI vs. LIFI sites had higher soil moisture but greater groundwater table elevation fluctuation in response to flooding and drought. Rates of net N mineralization were consistently higher at LIFI vs. SIFI sites, and soil inorganic N concentrations were greatest at sites with elevated leaf-litter production. Sites with stable depth to ground water (approximately 1.5 m) supported the greatest leaf-litter production. Reduced leaf production at P. deltoides SIFI sites was attributed to drought-induced recession of ground water and prolonged inundation. We recommend that natural resource managers and restoration practitioners (1) utilize naturalized flows that help maintain riparian groundwater elevations between 1 and 3 m in reaches with mature P. deltoides or where P. deltoides revegetation is desired, (2) identify areas that naturally undergo long periods of inundation and consider restoring these areas to seasonal wetlands, and (3) use native xeric-adapted riparian plants to revegetate LIFI and SIFI sites where

  10. Ecophysiological determinants of plant performance under flooding: a comparative study among seven plant families

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mommer, L.; Lenssen, J.P.M.; Huber, H.; Visser, E.J.W.; Kroon, de H.

    2006-01-01

    1 Plant performance of species in river floodplains is negatively affected by submergence, due to severely hampered gas exchange under water. Several individual traits have been shown to determine flooding tolerance, but the interrelationships among these traits and their effects on plant performanc

  11. River bed Elevation Changes and Increasing Flood Hazards in the Nisqually River at Mount Rainier National Park, Washington

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halmon, S.; Kennard, P.; Beason, S.; Beaulieu, E.; Mitchell, L.

    2006-12-01

    Mount Rainier, located in Southwestern Washington, is the most heavily glaciated volcano of the Cascade Mountain Range. Due to the large quantities of glaciers, Mount Rainier also has a large number of braided rivers, which are formed by a heavy sediment load being released from the glaciers. As sediment builds in the river, its bed increases, or aggrades,its floodplain changes. Some contributions to a river's increased sediment load are debris flows, erosion, and runoff, which tend to carry trees, boulders, and sediment downstream. Over a period of time, the increased sediment load will result in the river's rise in elevation. The purpose of this study is to monitor aggradation rates, which is an increase in height of the river bed, in one of Mount Rainier's major rivers, the Nisqually. The studied location is near employee offices and visitor attractions in Longmire. The results of this study will also provide support to decision makers regarding geological hazard reduction in the area. The Nisqually glacier is located on the southern side of the volcano, which receives a lot of sunlight, thus releasing large amounts of snowmelt and sediment in the summer. Historical data indicate that several current features which may contribute to future flooding, such as the unnatural uphill slope to the river, which is due to a major depositional event in the late 1700s where 15 ft of material was deposited in this area. Other current features are the glaciers surrounding the Nisqually glacier, such as the Van Trump and Kaultz glaciers that produced large outbursts, affecting the Nisqually River and the Longmire area in 2001, 2003, and 2005. In an effort to further explore these areas, the research team used a surveying device, total station, in the Nisqually River to measure elevation change and angles of various positions within ten cross sections along the Longmire area. This data was then put into GIS for analyzation of its current sediment level and for comparison to

  12. Determination of minimum flood flow for regeneration of floodplain forest from inundated forest width-stage curve

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Song-hao SHANG; Xiao-min MAO

    2010-01-01

    Floods are essential for the regeneration and growth of floodplain forests in arid and semiarid regions.However,river flows,and especially flood flows,have decreased greatly with the increase of water diversion from rivers and/or reservoir regulation,resulting in severe deterioration of floodplain ecosystems.Estimation of the flood stage that will inundate the floodplain forest is necessary for the forest's restoration or protection.To balance water use for economic purposes and floodplain forest protection,the inundated forest width method is proposed for estimating the minimum flood stage for floodplain forests from the inundated forest width-stage curve.The minimum flood stage is defined as the breakpoint of the inundated forest width-stage curve,and is determined directly or analytically from the curve.For the analytical approach,the problem under consideration is described by a multi-objective optimization model,which can be solved by the ideal point method.Then,the flood flow at the minimum flood stage(minimum flood flow),which is useful for flow regulation,can be calculated from the stage-discharge curve.In order to protect the forest in a river floodplain in a semiarid area in Xinjiang subject to reservoir regulation upstream,the proposed method was used to determine the minimum flood stage and flow for the forest.Field survey of hydrology,topography,and forest distribution was carried out at typical cross sections in the floodplain.Based on the survey results,minimum flood flows for six typical cross sections were estimated to be between 306 m3/s and 393 m3/s.Their maximum,393 m3/s,was considered the minimum flood flow for the study river reach.This provides an appropriate flood flow for the protection of floodplain forest and can be used in the regulation of the upstream reservoir.

  13. Simulated and observed 2010 flood-water elevations in selected river reaches in the Moshassuck and Woonasquatucket River Basins, Rhode Island

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarriello, Phillip J.; Straub, David E.; Westenbroek, Stephen M.

    2014-01-01

    Heavy persistent rains from late February through March 2010 caused severe flooding and set, or nearly set, peaks of record for streamflows and water levels at many long-term U.S. Geological Survey streamgages in Rhode Island. In response to this flood, hydraulic models were updated for selected reaches covering about 33 river miles in Moshassuck and Woonasquatucket River Basins from the most recent approved Federal Emergency Management Agency flood insurance study (FIS) to simulate water-surface elevations (WSEs) from specified flows and boundary conditions. Reaches modeled include the main stem of the Moshassuck River and its main tributary, the West River, and three tributaries to the West River—Upper Canada Brook, Lincoln Downs Brook, and East Branch West River; and the main stem of the Woonasquatucket River. All the hydraulic models were updated to Hydrologic Engineering Center-River Analysis System (HEC-RAS) version 4.1.0 and incorporate new field-survey data at structures, high-resolution land-surface elevation data, and flood flows from a related study. The models were used to simulate steady-state WSEs at the 1- and 2-percent annual exceedance probability (AEP) flows, which is the estimated AEP of the 2010 flood in the Moshassuck River Basin and the Woonasquatucket River, respectively. The simulated WSEs were compared to the high-water mark (HWM) elevation data obtained in these basins in a related study following the March–April 2010 flood, which included 18 HWMs along the Moshassuck River and 45 HWMs along the Woonasquatucket River. Differences between the 2010 HWMs and the simulated 2- and 1-percent AEP WSEs from the FISs and the updated models developed in this study varied along the reach. Most differences could be attributed to the magnitude of the 2- and 1-percent AEP flows used in the FIS and updated model flows. Overall, the updated model and the FIS WSEs were not appreciably different when compared to the observed 2010 HWMs along the

  14. Determination of bioavailable contaminants in the lower Missouri River following the flood of 1993

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petty, J.D.; Poulton, B.C.; Charbonneau, C.S.; Huckins, J.N.; Jones, S.B.; Cameron, J.T.; Prest, H.F.

    1998-01-01

    The semipermeable membrane device (SPMD) technology was employed to determine the presence of bioavailable organochlorine pesticides (OCs), polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), and polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs)in the water of the main stem of the lower Missouri River and three of its tributaries. The SPMDs were deployed in 1994 following the extensive flood of 1993. Specifically, the SPMDs were deployed for 28 days at Wilson State Park, IA; Nebraska City, NE; Parkville, MO; the Kansas River in Kansas City, KS; Napoleon, MO; the Grand River; Glasgow, MO; the Missouri River upstream from the confluence of the Gasconade River; the Gasconade River, and Hermann, MO. Contaminant residues were found at all sites and at higher concentrations than found in the earlier pre-flood sampling. For example, in the present study, dieldrin was found to range from a low of 110 ng/sample in the Gasconade River to a high of 2000 ng/sample at Glasgow, while in the pre- flood sampling, dieldrin ranged from a low of 64 ng/sample at Sioux City to a high of 800 ng/sample at Glasgow. In contrast to the 1992 sampling, residues of PCBs were found at all 1994 sampling sites except the Gasconade River. Samples from Wilson State Park and the Grand River had 3100 and 2700 ng of PCBs/sample, respectively. These two concentrations are about an order of magnitude higher than the older sites and are likely indicative of point source inputs. PAHs were present in SPMD samples from three sites near Kansas City. The contaminant residues sequestered by the SPMDs represent an estimation of the bioavailable (via respiration) contaminants present in the main stem of the lower Missouri River and three of its major tributaries following an extensive flood event.The semipermeable membrane device (SPMD) technology was employed to determine the presence of bioavailable organochlorine pesticides, polychlorinated biphenyls, and polyaromatic hydrocarbons in the water of the main stem of the lower Missouri River and

  15. Spatial Analysis in Determination Of Flood Prone Areas Using Geographic Information System and Analytical Hierarchy Process at Sungai Sembrong's Catchment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bukari, S. M.; Ahmad, M. A.; Wai, T. L.; Kaamin, M.; Alimin, N.

    2016-07-01

    Floods that struck Johor state in 2006 and 2007 and the East Coastal in 2014 have triggered a greatly impact to the flood management here in Malaysia. Accordingly, this study conducted to determine potential areas of flooding, especially in Batu Pahat district since it faces terrifying experienced with heavy flood. This objective is archived by using the application of Geographic Information Systems (GIS) on study area of flood risk location at the watershed area of Sungai Sembrong. GIS functions as spatial analysis is capable to produce new information based on analysis of data stored in the system. Meanwhile the Analytical Hierarchy Process (AHP) was used as a method for setting up in decision making concerning the existing data. By using AHP method, preparation and position of the criteria and parameters required in GIS are neater and easier to analyze. Through this study, a flood prone area in the watershed of Sungai Sembrong was identified with the help of GIS and AHP. Analysis was conducted to test two different cell sizes, which are 30 and 5. The analysis of flood prone areas were tested on both cell sizes with two different water levels and the results of the analysis were displayed by GIS. Therefore, the use of AHP and GIS are effective and able to determine the potential flood plain areas in the watershed area of Sungai Sembrong.

  16. Prevalence and Determinants of Chronic Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder After Floods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Long; Tan, Hongzhuan; Cofie, Reuben; Hu, Shimin; Li, Yan; Zhou, Jia; Yang, Tubao; Tang, Xuemin; Cui, Guanghui; Liu, Aizhong

    2015-10-01

    To explore the prevalence and determinants of chronic post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) among flood victims. A cross-sectional survey was carried out in 2014 among individuals who had experienced the 1998 floods and had been diagnosed with PTSD in 1999 in Hunan, China. Cluster sampling was used to select subjects from the areas that had been surveyed in 1999. PTSD was diagnosed according to DSM-IV criteria, social support was measured according to a Social Support Rating Scale, coping style was measured according to a Simplified Coping Style Questionnaire, and personality was measured by use of the revised Eysenck Personality Questionnaire Short Scale for Chinese. Data were collected through face-to-face interviews by use of a structured questionnaire. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was used to reveal the determinants of chronic PTSD. A total of 123 subjects were interviewed, 17 of whom (14.4%) were diagnosed with chronic PTSD. Chronic PTSD was significantly associated with disaster stressors (odds ratio [OR]: 1.74; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.22-2.47), nervousness (OR: 1.09; 95% CI: 1.01-1.17), and social support (OR: 0.85; 95 CI%: 0.74-0.98). Chronic PTSD in flood victims is significantly associated with disaster stressors, nervousness, and social support. These factors may play important roles in identifying persons at high risk of chronic PTSD.

  17. PROBZONES - Generalized 100- and 500-year flood zones for Seaside, Oregon, determined by probabilistic tsunami hazard analysis

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — PROBZONES is a generalized polygon layer outlining areas in the Seaside-Gearhart, Oregon, area subject to the 100-year and 500-year flood as determined by...

  18. Determination of minimum flood flow for regeneration of floodplain forest from inundated forest width-stage curve

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Song-hao Shang

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Flood is essential for the regeneration and growth of floodplain forests in arid and semiarid regions. However, river flow, especially the flood, had changed greatly with the increase of water diversion from rivers and/or reservoir regulation, which may result in severer deterioration of the floodplain ecosystems. The estimation of appropriate flood stage to inundate the floodplain forests is necessary for their restoration or protection in flow regulation. To balance the economical water use and flood for the floodplain forest, we proposed the inundated forest width method to estimate minimum flood stage for floodplain forests from the inundated forest width – stage curve. The minimum flood stage was defined as the breakpoint of the inundated forest width – stage curve, and could be determined directly from the curve or analytically. For the latter case, the problem under consideration was described by a multi-objective optimization model, which can be solved by the ideal point method. In order to protect the forest in a river floodplain in semiarid area in Xinjiang that subjected to reservoir regulation in the upstream, the proposed method was used to determine the minimum flood stage and flow for the forest. Field survey on hydrology, topography and forest distribution was carried out at representative cross sections in the floodplain. Based on the surveying results, minimum flood flows for six representative cross sections were estimated to be 306 m3/s to 393 m3/s. Their maximum, 393 m3/s, was taken as the minimum flood flow for the studying river reach. It provides an appropriate flood flow for the protection of floodplain forest and can be used in the regulation of the upstream reservoir.

  19. Development of a flood-warning network and flood-inundation mapping for the Blanchard River in Ottawa, Ohio

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitehead, Matthew T.

    2011-01-01

    Digital flood-inundation maps of the Blanchard River in Ottawa, Ohio, were created by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) in cooperation with the U.S. Department of Agriculture, Natural Resources Conservation Service and the Village of Ottawa, Ohio. The maps, which correspond to water levels (stages) at the USGS streamgage at Ottawa (USGS streamgage site number 04189260), were provided to the National Weather Service (NWS) for incorporation into a Web-based flood-warning Network that can be used in conjunction with NWS flood-forecast data to show areas of predicted flood inundation associated with forecasted flood-peak stages. Flood profiles were computed by means of a step-backwater model calibrated to recent field measurements of streamflow. The step-backwater model was then used to determine water-surface-elevation profiles for 12 flood stages with corresponding streamflows ranging from less than the 2-year and up to nearly the 500-year recurrence-interval flood. The computed flood profiles were used in combination with digital elevation data to delineate flood-inundation areas. Maps of the Village of Ottawa showing flood-inundation areas overlain on digital orthophotographs are presented for the selected floods. As part of this flood-warning network, the USGS upgraded one streamgage and added two new streamgages, one on the Blanchard River and one on Riley Creek, which is tributary to the Blanchard River. The streamgage sites were equipped with both satellite and telephone telemetry. The telephone telemetry provides dual functionality, allowing village officials and the public to monitor current stage conditions and enabling the streamgage to call village officials with automated warnings regarding flood stage and/or predetermined rates of stage increase. Data from the streamgages serve as a flood warning that emergency management personnel can use in conjunction with the flood-inundation maps by to determine a course of action when flooding is imminent.

  20. 44 CFR 65.6 - Revision of base flood elevation determinations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... topographic changes must demonstrate that any topographic changes have not resulted in a floodway encroachment... should be shown on a topographic map of suitable scale and contour interval. (12) If a community or other... accounting for the effects of the changes. (iv) New hydraulic analysis and profiles using the new...

  1. Visual Sensing for Urban Flood Monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo, Shi-Wei; Wu, Jyh-Horng; Lin, Fang-Pang; Hsu, Ching-Han

    2015-08-14

    With the increasing climatic extremes, the frequency and severity of urban flood events have intensified worldwide. In this study, image-based automated monitoring of flood formation and analyses of water level fluctuation were proposed as value-added intelligent sensing applications to turn a passive monitoring camera into a visual sensor. Combined with the proposed visual sensing method, traditional hydrological monitoring cameras have the ability to sense and analyze the local situation of flood events. This can solve the current problem that image-based flood monitoring heavily relies on continuous manned monitoring. Conventional sensing networks can only offer one-dimensional physical parameters measured by gauge sensors, whereas visual sensors can acquire dynamic image information of monitored sites and provide disaster prevention agencies with actual field information for decision-making to relieve flood hazards. The visual sensing method established in this study provides spatiotemporal information that can be used for automated remote analysis for monitoring urban floods. This paper focuses on the determination of flood formation based on image-processing techniques. The experimental results suggest that the visual sensing approach may be a reliable way for determining the water fluctuation and measuring its elevation and flood intrusion with respect to real-world coordinates. The performance of the proposed method has been confirmed; it has the capability to monitor and analyze the flood status, and therefore, it can serve as an active flood warning system.

  2. Visual Sensing for Urban Flood Monitoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shi-Wei Lo

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available With the increasing climatic extremes, the frequency and severity of urban flood events have intensified worldwide. In this study, image-based automated monitoring of flood formation and analyses of water level fluctuation were proposed as value-added intelligent sensing applications to turn a passive monitoring camera into a visual sensor. Combined with the proposed visual sensing method, traditional hydrological monitoring cameras have the ability to sense and analyze the local situation of flood events. This can solve the current problem that image-based flood monitoring heavily relies on continuous manned monitoring. Conventional sensing networks can only offer one-dimensional physical parameters measured by gauge sensors, whereas visual sensors can acquire dynamic image information of monitored sites and provide disaster prevention agencies with actual field information for decision-making to relieve flood hazards. The visual sensing method established in this study provides spatiotemporal information that can be used for automated remote analysis for monitoring urban floods. This paper focuses on the determination of flood formation based on image-processing techniques. The experimental results suggest that the visual sensing approach may be a reliable way for determining the water fluctuation and measuring its elevation and flood intrusion with respect to real-world coordinates. The performance of the proposed method has been confirmed; it has the capability to monitor and analyze the flood status, and therefore, it can serve as an active flood warning system.

  3. Derivation of charts for determining the horizontal tail load variation with any elevator motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearson, Henry A

    1943-01-01

    The equations relating the wing and tail loads are derived for a unit elevator displacement. These equations are then converted into a nondimensional form and charts are given by which the wing- and tail-load-increment variation may be determined under dynamic conditions for any type of elevator motion and for various degrees of airplane stability. In order to illustrate the use of the charts, several examples are included in which the wing and tail loads are evaluated for a number of types of elevator motion. Methods are given for determining the necessary derivatives from results of wind-tunnel tests when such tests are available.

  4. Revising time series of the Elbe river discharge for flood frequency determination at gauge Dresden

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Bartl

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available The German research programme RIsk MAnagment of eXtreme flood events has accomplished the improvement of regional hazard assessment for the large rivers in Germany. Here we focused on the Elbe river at its gauge Dresden, which belongs to the oldest gauges in Europe with officially available daily discharge time series beginning on 1 January 1890. The project on the one hand aimed to extend and to revise the existing time series, and on the other hand to examine the variability of the Elbe river discharge conditions on a greater time scale. Therefore one major task were the historical searches and the examination of the retrieved documents and the contained information. After analysing this information the development of the river course and the discharge conditions were discussed. Using the provided knowledge, in an other subproject, a historical hydraulic model was established. Its results then again were used here. A further purpose was the determining of flood frequency based on all pre-processed data. The obtained knowledge about historical changes was also used to get an idea about possible future variations under climate change conditions. Especially variations in the runoff characteristic of the Elbe river over the course of the year were analysed. It succeeded to obtain a much longer discharge time series which contain fewer errors and uncertainties. Hence an optimized regional hazard assessment was realised.

  5. Estimation of parametric flood hydrograph determined by means of Strupczewski method in the Vistula and Odra catchments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gądek Wiesław

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available While determining theoretical flood hydrographs, different methods of their construction are used depending on the needs of the problem or the scope of the project. It should be remembered that these methods differ mainly with the principle of the waveform averaging, which may be done either according to the flow or time. The hydrographs may be divided into nonparametric (determining on the basis of registered floods and parametric (using mathematical description of the flood course. One of the analytical methods is Strupczewski method which has two parameters: responsible for the waveform and specifies the base flow, the flow above which values of hydrograph are calculated. The functional description uses the Pearson type III density distribution.

  6. Database assessment of CMIP5 and hydrological models to determine flood risk areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Limlahapun, Ponthip; Fukui, Hiromichi

    2016-11-01

    Solutions for water-related disasters may not be solved with a single scientific method. Based on this premise, we involved logic conceptions, associate sequential result amongst models, and database applications attempting to analyse historical and future scenarios in the context of flooding. The three main models used in this study are (1) the fifth phase of the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project (CMIP5) to derive precipitation; (2) the Integrated Flood Analysis System (IFAS) to extract amount of discharge; and (3) the Hydrologic Engineering Center (HEC) model to generate inundated areas. This research notably focused on integrating data regardless of system-design complexity, and database approaches are significantly flexible, manageable, and well-supported for system data transfer, which makes them suitable for monitoring a flood. The outcome of flood map together with real-time stream data can help local communities identify areas at-risk of flooding in advance.

  7. Local Equivalent Water Thickness Determination as a Source of Data for Flood Phenomenon Observation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biryło, Monika; Nastula, Jolanta

    2012-01-01

    In the paper a flood phenomenon is analyzed. For this purpose data from GRACE satellites (Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment) was used. Filtered data presented in a form of millimeters of Equivalent Water Thickness (EWT) was interpolated in places where flood in 2010 had happened (south of Poland). On a basis of graph where time series of EWT were presented, some conclusions were made. For the thesis confirmation meteorological WGHM and hydrological NOAA models were added to the GRACE model.

  8. Elevational differences in developmental plasticity determine phenological responses of grasshoppers to recent climate warming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckley, Lauren B; Nufio, César R; Kirk, Evan M; Kingsolver, Joel G

    2015-06-22

    Annual species may increase reproduction by increasing adult body size through extended development, but risk being unable to complete development in seasonally limited environments. Synthetic reviews indicate that most, but not all, species have responded to recent climate warming by advancing the seasonal timing of adult emergence or reproduction. Here, we show that 50 years of climate change have delayed development in high-elevation, season-limited grasshopper populations, but advanced development in populations at lower elevations. Developmental delays are most pronounced for early-season species, which might benefit most from delaying development when released from seasonal time constraints. Rearing experiments confirm that population, elevation and temperature interact to determine development time. Population differences in developmental plasticity may account for variability in phenological shifts among adults. An integrated consideration of the full life cycle that considers local adaptation and plasticity may be essential for understanding and predicting responses to climate change.

  9. Elevational differences in developmental plasticity determine phenological responses of grasshoppers to recent climate warming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckley, Lauren B.; Nufio, César R.; Kirk, Evan M.; Kingsolver, Joel G.

    2015-01-01

    Annual species may increase reproduction by increasing adult body size through extended development, but risk being unable to complete development in seasonally limited environments. Synthetic reviews indicate that most, but not all, species have responded to recent climate warming by advancing the seasonal timing of adult emergence or reproduction. Here, we show that 50 years of climate change have delayed development in high-elevation, season-limited grasshopper populations, but advanced development in populations at lower elevations. Developmental delays are most pronounced for early-season species, which might benefit most from delaying development when released from seasonal time constraints. Rearing experiments confirm that population, elevation and temperature interact to determine development time. Population differences in developmental plasticity may account for variability in phenological shifts among adults. An integrated consideration of the full life cycle that considers local adaptation and plasticity may be essential for understanding and predicting responses to climate change. PMID:26041342

  10. Flood of April 2007 in Southern Maine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lombard, Pamela J.

    2009-01-01

    Up to 8.5 inches of rain fell from April 15 through 18, 2007, in southern Maine. The rain - in combination with up to an inch of water from snowmelt - resulted in extensive flooding. York County, Maine, was declared a presidential disaster area following the event. The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA), determined peak streamflows and recurrence intervals at 24 locations and peak water-surface elevations at 63 sites following the April 2007 flood. Peak streamflows were determined with data from continuous-record streamflow-gaging stations where available and through hydraulic models where station data were not available. The flood resulted in peak streamflows with recurrence intervals greater than 100 years throughout most of York County, and recurrence intervals up to 50 years in Cumberland County. Peak flows for selected recurrence intervals varied from less than 10 percent to greater than 100 percent different than those in the current FEMA flood-insurance studies due to additional data or newer regression equations. Water-surface elevations observed during the April 2007 flood were bracketed by elevation profiles in FEMA flood-insurance studies with the same recurrence intervals as the recurrence intervals bracketing the observed peak streamflows at seven sites, with higher elevation-profile recurrence intervals than streamflow recurrence intervals at six sites, and with lower elevation-profile recurrence intervals than streamflow recurrence intervals at one site. The April 2007 flood resulted in higher peak flows and water-surface elevations than the flood of May 2006 in coastal locations in York County, and lower peak flows and water-surface elevations than the May 2006 flood further from the coast and in Cumberland County. The Mousam River watershed with over 13 dams and reservoirs was severely impacted by both events. Analyses indicate that the April 2007 peak streamflows in the Mousam River watershed

  11. Distribution of vascular epiphytes along a tropical elevational gradient: disentangling abiotic and biotic determinants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Yi; Liu, Guangfu; Zang, Runguo; Zhang, Jian; Lu, Xinghui; Huang, Jihong

    2016-01-22

    Epiphytic vascular plants are common species in humid tropical forests. Epiphytes are influenced by abiotic and biotic variables, but little is known about the relative importance of direct and indirect effects on epiphyte distribution. We surveyed 70 transects (10 m × 50 m) along an elevation gradient (180 m-1521 m) and sampled all vascular epiphytes and trees in a typical tropical forest on Hainan Island, south China. The direct and indirect effects of abiotic factors (climatic and edaphic) and tree community characteristics on epiphytes species diversity were examined. The abundance and richness of vascular epiphytes generally showed a unimodal curve with elevation and reached maximum value at ca. 1300 m. The species composition in transects from high elevation (above 1200 m) showed a more similar assemblage. Climate explained the most variation in epiphytes species diversity followed by tree community characteristics and soil features. Overall, climate (relative humidity) and tree community characteristics (tree size represented by basal area) had the strongest direct effects on epiphyte diversity while soil variables (soil water content and available phosphorus) mainly had indirect effects. Our study suggests that air humidity is the most important abiotic while stand basal area is the most important biotic determinants of epiphyte diversity along the tropical elevational gradient.

  12. Determining which land management practices reduce catchment scale flood risk and where to implement them for optimum effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pattison, Ian; Lane, Stuart; Hardy, Richard; Reaney, Sim

    2010-05-01

    The theoretical basis for why changes in land management might increase flood risk are well known, but proving them through numerical modelling still remains a challenge. In large catchments, like the River Eden in Cumbria, NW England, one of the reasons for this is that it is unfeasible to test multiple scenarios in all their possible locations. We have developed two linked approaches to refine the number of scenarios and locations using 1) spatial downscaling and 2) participatory decision making, which potentially should increase the likelihood of finding a link between land use and downstream flooding. Firstly, land management practices can have both flood reducing and flood increasing effects, depending on their location. As a result some areas of the catchment are more important in determining downstream flood risk than others, depending on the land use and hydrological connectivity. We apply a downscaling approach to identify which sub-catchments are most important in explaining downstream flooding. This is important because it is in these areas that management options are most likely to have a positive and detectable effect. Secondly, once the dominant sub-catchment has been identified, the land management scenarios that are both feasible and likely to impact flood risk need to be determined. This was done through active stakeholder engagement. The stakeholder group undertook a brainstorming exercise, which suggested about 30 different rural land management scenarios, which were mapped on to a literature-based conceptual framework of hydrological processes. Then these options were evaluated based on five criteria: relevance to catchment, scientific effectiveness, testability, robustness/uncertainty and feasibility of implementation. The suitability of each scenario was discussed and prioritised by the stakeholder group based on scientific needs and expectations and local suitability and feasibility. The next stage of the participatory approach was a mapping

  13. Determination of the indicators for working with area flooding under nonisothermic filtering conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ushakov, V.V.; Borisov, Yu.P.; Rozenberg, M.D.; Teslyuk, Ye.V.

    1983-01-01

    Engineering methods were developed for computing the nonisothermic displacement of oil by water under conditions of area systems of flooding for layered-heterogeneous beds. It is indicated that the mathematical model realized on a computer which takes into consideration the most important physical phenomena provides the possibility of fully performing the studies and analyzing the technological indicators.

  14. Flood Insurance Rate Maps and Base Flood Elevations, FIRM, DFIRM, BFE - FLOODPLAINS_CROSSSECTION_DFIRM_IDNR_IN: DFIRM Floodplain Cross section Lines for 86 of 92 Counties in Indiana (Indiana Department of Natural Resources, 1:12,000, Line Shapefile)

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This line layer represents cross sections (XS) created from FEMA Flood Rate Insurance Maps (FIRM). These lines represent the locations of channel surveys performed...

  15. Determination of properties of Proterozoic continental flood basalts of western part from North Qilian Mountains

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    夏林圻; 夏祖春; 赵江天; 徐学义; 杨合群; 赵东宏

    1999-01-01

    Proterozoic volcanic rocks of the western part from the North Qilian Mountains are the products of continental rift volcanism, belonging to continental flood basalts, the petrogeochemistry of which apears to suggest that they are derived from sub-lithospheric mantle plume sources, but that they also show evidence of continental lithosphere components involvement. Their formation is the consequences of plume-lithosphere interactions and is precursive to the opening of the North Qilian Early-Paleozoic ocean basin.

  16. Flood insurance in Canada: implications for flood management and residential vulnerability to flood hazards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oulahen, Greg

    2015-03-01

    Insurance coverage of damage caused by overland flooding is currently not available to Canadian homeowners. As flood disaster losses and water damage claims both trend upward, insurers in Canada are considering offering residential flood coverage in order to properly underwrite the risk and extend their business. If private flood insurance is introduced in Canada, it will have implications for the current regime of public flood management and for residential vulnerability to flood hazards. This paper engages many of the competing issues surrounding the privatization of flood risk by addressing questions about whether flood insurance can be an effective tool in limiting exposure to the hazard and how it would exacerbate already unequal vulnerability. A case study investigates willingness to pay for flood insurance among residents in Metro Vancouver and how attitudes about insurance relate to other factors that determine residential vulnerability to flood hazards. Findings indicate that demand for flood insurance is part of a complex, dialectical set of determinants of vulnerability.

  17. Flood Insurance in Canada: Implications for Flood Management and Residential Vulnerability to Flood Hazards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oulahen, Greg

    2015-03-01

    Insurance coverage of damage caused by overland flooding is currently not available to Canadian homeowners. As flood disaster losses and water damage claims both trend upward, insurers in Canada are considering offering residential flood coverage in order to properly underwrite the risk and extend their business. If private flood insurance is introduced in Canada, it will have implications for the current regime of public flood management and for residential vulnerability to flood hazards. This paper engages many of the competing issues surrounding the privatization of flood risk by addressing questions about whether flood insurance can be an effective tool in limiting exposure to the hazard and how it would exacerbate already unequal vulnerability. A case study investigates willingness to pay for flood insurance among residents in Metro Vancouver and how attitudes about insurance relate to other factors that determine residential vulnerability to flood hazards. Findings indicate that demand for flood insurance is part of a complex, dialectical set of determinants of vulnerability.

  18. Flood hazard zoning in Yasooj region, Iran, using GIS and multi-criteria decision analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omid Rahmati

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Flood is considered to be the most common natural disaster worldwide during the last decades. Flood hazard potential mapping is required for management and mitigation of flood. The present research was aimed to assess the efficiency of analytical hierarchical process (AHP to identify potential flood hazard zones by comparing with the results of a hydraulic model. Initially, four parameters via distance to river, land use, elevation and land slope were used in some part of the Yasooj River, Iran. In order to determine the weight of each effective factor, questionnaires of comparison ratings on the Saaty's scale were prepared and distributed to eight experts. The normalized weights of criteria/parameters were determined based on Saaty's nine-point scale and its importance in specifying flood hazard potential zones using the AHP and eigenvector methods. The set of criteria were integrated by weighted linear combination method using ArcGIS 10.2 software to generate flood hazard prediction map. The inundation simulation (extent and depth of flood was conducted using hydrodynamic program HEC-RAS for 50- and 100-year interval floods. The validation of the flood hazard prediction map was conducted based on flood extent and depth maps. The results showed that the AHP technique is promising of making accurate and reliable prediction for flood extent. Therefore, the AHP and geographic information system (GIS techniques are suggested for assessment of the flood hazard potential, specifically in no-data regions.

  19. Revising time series of the Elbe river discharge for flood frequency determination at gauge Dresden

    OpenAIRE

    Bartl, S; S. Schümberg; Deutsch, M

    2009-01-01

    The German research programme RIsk MAnagment of eXtreme flood events has accomplished the improvement of regional hazard assessment for the large rivers in Germany. Here we focused on the Elbe river at its gauge Dresden, which belongs to the oldest gauges in Europe with officially available daily discharge time series beginning on 1 January 1890. The project on the one hand aimed to extend and to revise the existing time series, and on the other hand to examine the variability of the Elbe riv...

  20. Threshold determination and hazard evaluation of the disaster about drought/flood sudden alternation in Huaihe River basin, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Zhonghui; Li, Ning; Wu, Xianhua

    2017-08-01

    Based on the related impact factors of precipitation anomaly referred in previous research, eight atmospheric circulation indicators in pre-winter and spring picked out by correlation analysis as the independent variables and the hazard levels of drought/flood sudden alternation index (DFSAI) as the dependent variables were used to construct the nonlinear and nonparametric classification and regression tree (CART) for the threshold determination and hazard evaluation on bimonthly and monthly scales in Huaihe River basin. Results show that the spring indicators about Arctic oscillation index (AOI_S), Asia polar vortex area index (APVAI_S), and Asian meridional circulation index (AMCI_S) were extracted as the three main impact factors, which were proved to be suitable for the hazard levels assessment of the drought/flood sudden alternation (DFSA) disaster based on bimonthly scale. On monthly scale, AOI_S, northern hemisphere polar vortex intensity index in pre-winter (NHPVII_PW), and AMCI_S are the three primary variables in hazard level prediction of DFSA in May and June; NHPVII_PW, AMCI_PW, and AMCI_S are for that in June and July; NHPVII_PW and EASMI are for that in July and August. The type of the disaster (flood to drought/drought to flood/no DFSA) and hazard level under different conditions also can be obtained from each model. The hazard level and type were expressed by the integer from - 3 to 3, which change from the high level of disaster that flood to drought (level - 3) to the high level of the reverse type (level 3). The middle number 0 represents no DFSA. The high levels of the two sides decrease progressively to the neutralization (level 0). When AOI_S less than - 0.355, the disaster of the quick turn from drought to flood is more apt to happen (level 1) on bimonthly scale; when AOI_S less than - 1.32, the same type disaster may occur (level 2) in May and June on monthly scale. When NHPVII_PW less than 341.5, the disaster of the quick turn from flood to

  1. Ecological determinants of mating system within and between three Fagus sylvatica populations along an elevational gradient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gauzere, Julie; Klein, Etienne K; Oddou-Muratorio, Sylvie

    2013-10-01

    Studies addressing the variation of mating system between plant populations rarely account for the variability of these parameters between individuals within populations, although this variability is often non-negligible. Here, we propose a new direct method based on paternity analyses (Mixed Effect Mating Model) to estimate individual migration (mi ) and selfing rates (si ) together with the pollen dispersal kernel. Using this method and the KINDIST approach, we investigated the variation of mating system parameters within and between three populations of Fagus sylvatica along an elevational gradient. Among the mother trees, si varied from 0% to 48%, mi varied from 12% to 86% and the effective number of pollen donors (Nepi ) varied from 2 to 364. The mating patterns differed along the gradient, the top population showing higher m and lower s, and a trend to higher Nep than the bottom populations. The phenological lag shaped long-distance pollen flow both within population (by increasing mi at mother-tree level) and between populations (by increasing m at high elevation). Rather than the mate density, the canopy density was detected as a major mating system determinant within population; it acted as a barrier to pollen flow, decreasing the proportion of long-distance pollen flow and increasing si . Overall, the effects of ecological factors on mating system were not the same within vs. between populations across the gradient, and these factors also differed from those traditionally found to shape variation at range-wide scale, highlighting the interest of multiscale approaches.

  2. Analytical basis for determining slope lines in grid digital elevation models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orlandini, Stefano; Moretti, Giovanni; Gavioli, Andrea

    2014-01-01

    An analytical basis for the determination of slope lines in grid digital elevation models is provided by using the D8-LTD method (eight slope directions, least transverse deviation). The D8-LTD method's capability to predict consistently exact slope lines as the grid cell size goes to zero is shown analytically by applying mathematical analysis methods. The use of cumulative, least transverse deviations is found to be the key factor allowing for globally unbiased approximations of slope lines. The D8-LTD method's properties are also demonstrated numerically by using digital elevation models of a synthetic sloping surface obtained from the Himmelblau function. It is shown that slope lines obtained from the D8-LTD method can approximate the exact slope lines as close as desired by selecting a grid cell size that is small enough. In contrast, the standard D8 method is found to produce significantly biased results even when small grid cells are used. The D8-LTD method outperforms the D8 method over a wide range of grid cell sizes (up to 20 m in this application), beyond which grid cell size becomes too large to validly represent the underlying sloping surface. It is therefore concluded that the D8-LTD method should be used in preference to the standard D8 method in order to obtain slope lines that are only limited in reliability by the detail of topographic data, and not by the accuracy of the slope direction method applied.

  3. Satellite techniques for determining the geopotential for sea-surface elevations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pisacane, V. L.

    1984-01-01

    Spaceborne altimetry with measurement accuracies of a few centimeters which has the potential to determine sea surface elevations necessary to compute accurate three-dimensonal geostrophic currents from traditional hydrographic observation is discussed. The limitation in this approach is the uncertainties in knowledge of the global and ocean geopotentials which produce satellite and height uncertainties about an order of magnitude larger than the goal of about 10 cm. The quantative effects of geopotential uncertainties on processing altimetry data are described. Potential near term improvements, not requiring additional spacecraft, are discussed. Even though there is substantial improvements at the longer wavelengths, the oceanographic goal will be achieved. The geopotential research mission (GRM) is described which should produce goepotential models that are capable of defining the ocean geid to 10 cm and near-Earth satellite position. The state of the art and the potential of spaceborne gravimetry is described as an alternative approach to improve our knowledge of the geopotential.

  4. Geographic Information System and Remote Sensing Applications in Flood Hazards Management: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dano Umar Lawal

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study is to examine and review the various applications of GIS and remote sensing tools in flood disaster management as opposed to the conventional means of recording the hydrological parameters, which in many cases failed to capture an extreme event. In the recent years, GIS along with remote sensing has become the key tools in flood disaster monitoring and management. Advancement particularly in the area of remote sensing application has developed gradually from optical remote sensing to microwave or radar remote sensing, which has proved a profound capability of penetrating a clouded sky and provided all weather capabilities compared to the later (optical remote sensing in flood monitoring, mapping, and management. The main concern here is delineation of flood prone areas and development of flood hazard maps indicating the risk areas likely to be inundated by significant flooding along with the damageable objects maps for the flood susceptible areas. Actually, flood depth is always considered to be the basic aspect in flood hazard mapping, and therefore in determining or estimating the flood depth, a Digital Elevation Model data (DEM is considered to be the most appropriate means of determining the flood depth from a remotely sensed data or hydrological data. Accuracy of flood depth estimation depends mainly on the resolution of the DEM data in a flat terrain and in the regions that experiences monsoon seasons such as the developing countries of Asia where there is a high dependence on agriculture, which made any effort for flood estimation or flood hazard mapping difficult due to poor availability of high resolution DEM. More so the idea of Web-based GIS is gradually becoming a reality, which plays an important role in the flood hazard management. Therefore, this paper provides a review of applications of GIS and remote sensing technology in flood disaster monitoring and management.

  5. Projected Flood Risks in China Based on CMIP5

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Ying; ZHANG Bing; ZHOU Bo-Tao; DONG Si-Yan; YU Li; LI Rou-Ke

    2014-01-01

    Based on the simulations of 22 CMIP5 models in combination with socio-economic data and terrain elevation data, the spatial distribution of risk levels of flood disaster and the vulnerability to flood hazards in China are projected under the RCP8.5 for the near term period (2016-2035), medium term period (2046-2065) and long term period (2080-2099), respectively. The results show that regions with high flood hazard levels are mainly located in Southeast China, while the vulnerability to flood hazards is high in eastern China. Under the RCP8.5 greenhouse gas emissions scenario, future high flood risk levels will mainly appear in the eastern part of Sichuan, in major part of East China, and in the provinces of Hebei, Beijing, and Tianjin. The major cities in Northeast China, some areas in Shaanxi and Shanxi, as well as the coastal areas in southeastern China will also encounter high flood risks. Compared with the baseline period, the regional flood risk levels will increase towards the end of the 21st century, although the occurrences of floods change little. Due to the coarse resolution of the climate models and the indistinct methodology for determining the weight coefficients, large uncertainty still exists in the projection of flood risks.

  6. Determination of Curve Number for snowmelt-runoff floods in a small catchment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hejduk, L.; Hejduk, A.; Banasik, K.

    2015-06-01

    One of the widely used methods for predicting flood runoff depth from ungauged catchments is the curve number (CN) method, developed by Soil Conservation Service (SCS) of US Department of Agriculture. The CN parameter can be computed directly from recorded rainfall depths and direct runoff volumes in case of existing data. In presented investigations, the CN parameter has been computed for snowmelt-runoff events based on snowmelt and rainfall measurements. All required data has been gathered for a small agricultural catchment (A = 23.4 km2) of Zagożdżonka river, located in Central Poland. The CN number received from 28 snowmelt-runoff events has been compared with CN computed from rainfall-runoff events for the same catchment. The CN parameter, estimated empirically varies from 64.0 to 94.8. The relation between CN and snowmelt depth was investigated in a similar procedure to relation between CN and rainfall depth.

  7. Tsunami flooding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geist, Eric; Jones, Henry; McBride, Mark; Fedors, Randy

    2013-01-01

    Panel 5 focused on tsunami flooding with an emphasis on Probabilistic Tsunami Hazard Analysis (PTHA) as derived from its counterpart, Probabilistic Seismic Hazard Analysis (PSHA) that determines seismic ground-motion hazards. The Panel reviewed current practices in PTHA and determined the viability of extending the analysis to extreme design probabilities (i.e., 10-4 to 10-6). In addition to earthquake sources for tsunamis, PTHA for extreme events necessitates the inclusion of tsunamis generated by submarine landslides, and treatment of the large attendant uncertainty in source characterization and recurrence rates. Tsunamis can be caused by local and distant earthquakes, landslides, volcanism, and asteroid/meteorite impacts. Coastal flooding caused by storm surges and seiches is covered in Panel 7. Tsunamis directly tied to earthquakes, the similarities with (and path forward offered by) the PSHA approach for PTHA, and especially submarine landslide tsunamis were a particular focus of Panel 5.

  8. Idaho National Laboratory Materials and Fuels Complex Natural Phenomena Hazards Flood Assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gerald Sehlke; Paul Wichlacz

    2010-12-01

    This report presents the results of flood hazards analyses performed for the Materials and Fuels Complex (MFC) and the adjacent Transient Reactor Experiment and Test Facility (TREAT) located at Idaho National Laboratory. The requirements of these analyses are provided in the U.S. Department of Energy Order 420.1B and supporting Department of Energy (DOE) Natural Phenomenon Hazard standards. The flood hazards analyses were performed by Battelle Energy Alliance and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. The analyses addressed the following: • Determination of the design basis flood (DBFL) • Evaluation of the DBFL versus the Critical Flood Elevations (CFEs) for critical existing structures, systems, and components (SSCs).

  9. Determining the optimum cell size of digital elevation model for hydrologic application

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Arabinda Sharma; K N Tiwari; P B S Bhadoria

    2011-08-01

    Scale is one of the most important but unsolved issues in various scientific disciplines that deal with spatial data. The arbitrary choice of grid cell size for contour interpolated digital elevation models (DEM) is one of the major sources of uncertainty in the hydrologic modelling process. In this paper, an attempt was made to identify methods for determining an optimum cell size for a contour interpolated DEM in prior to hydrologic modelling. Twenty-meter interval contour lines were used to generate DEMs of five different resolutions, viz., 30, 45, 60, 75, and 90 m using TOPOGRID algorithm. The obtained DEMs were explored for their intrinsic quality using four different methods, i.e., sink analysis, fractal dimension of derived stream network, entropy measurement and semivariogram modelling. These methods were applied to determine the level artifacts (interpolation error) in DEM surface as well as derived stream network, spatial information content and spatial variability respectively. The results indicated that a 90 m cell size is sufficient to capture the terrain variability for subsequent hydrologic modelling in the study area. The significance of this research work is that it provides methods which DEM users can apply to select an appropriate DEM cell size in prior to detailed hydrologic modelling.

  10. Development of a flood-warning system and flood-inundation mapping in Licking County, Ohio

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostheimer, Chad J.

    2012-01-01

    Digital flood-inundation maps for selected reaches of South Fork Licking River, Raccoon Creek, North Fork Licking River, and the Licking River in Licking County, Ohio, were created by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with the Ohio Department of Transportation; U.S. Department of Transportation, Federal Highway Administration; Muskingum Watershed Conservancy District; U.S. Department of Agriculture, Natural Resources Conservation Service; and the City of Newark and Village of Granville, Ohio. The inundation maps depict estimates of the areal extent of flooding corresponding to water levels (stages) at the following USGS streamgages: South Fork Licking River at Heath, Ohio (03145173); Raccoon Creek below Wilson Street at Newark, Ohio (03145534); North Fork Licking River at East Main Street at Newark, Ohio (03146402); and Licking River near Newark, Ohio (03146500). The maps were provided to the National Weather Service (NWS) for incorporation into a Web-based flood-warning system that can be used in conjunction with NWS flood-forecast data to show areas of predicted flood inundation associated with forecasted flood-peak stages. As part of the flood-warning streamflow network, the USGS re-installed one streamgage on North Fork Licking River, and added three new streamgages, one each on North Fork Licking River, South Fork Licking River, and Raccoon Creek. Additionally, the USGS upgraded a lake-level gage on Buckeye Lake. Data from the streamgages and lake-level gage can be used by emergency-management personnel, in conjunction with the flood-inundation maps, to help determine a course of action when flooding is imminent. Flood profiles for selected reaches were prepared by calibrating steady-state step-backwater models to selected, established streamgage rating curves. The step-backwater models then were used to determine water-surface-elevation profiles for up to 10 flood stages at a streamgage with corresponding streamflows ranging from approximately

  11. Flood Risk Analysis and Flood Potential Losses Assessment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    The heavy floods in the Taihu Basin showed increasing trend in recent years. In thiswork, a typical area in the northern Taihu Basin was selected for flood risk analysis and potentialflood losses assessment. Human activities have strong impact on the study area' s flood situation (asaffected by the polders built, deforestation, population increase, urbanization, etc. ), and havemade water level higher, flood duration shorter, and flood peaks sharper. Five years of differentflood return periods [(1970), 5 (1962), 10 (1987), 20 (1954), 50 (1991)] were used to cal-culate the potential flood risk area and its losses. The potential flood risk map, economic losses,and flood-impacted population were also calculated. The study's main conclusions are: 1 ) Humanactivities have strongly changed the natural flood situation in the study area, increasing runoff andflooding; 2) The flood risk area is closely related with the precipitation center; 3) Polder construc-tion has successfully protected land from flood, shortened the flood duration, and elevated waterlevel in rivers outside the polders; 4) Economic and social development have caused flood losses toincrease in recent years.

  12. Probabilistic flood extent estimates from social media flood observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brouwer, Tom; Eilander, Dirk; van Loenen, Arnejan; Booij, Martijn J.; Wijnberg, Kathelijne M.; Verkade, Jan S.; Wagemaker, Jurjen

    2017-05-01

    The increasing number and severity of floods, driven by phenomena such as urbanization, deforestation, subsidence and climate change, create a growing need for accurate and timely flood maps. In this paper we present and evaluate a method to create deterministic and probabilistic flood maps from Twitter messages that mention locations of flooding. A deterministic flood map created for the December 2015 flood in the city of York (UK) showed good performance (F(2) = 0.69; a statistic ranging from 0 to 1, with 1 expressing a perfect fit with validation data). The probabilistic flood maps we created showed that, in the York case study, the uncertainty in flood extent was mainly induced by errors in the precise locations of flood observations as derived from Twitter data. Errors in the terrain elevation data or in the parameters of the applied algorithm contributed less to flood extent uncertainty. Although these maps tended to overestimate the actual probability of flooding, they gave a reasonable representation of flood extent uncertainty in the area. This study illustrates that inherently uncertain data from social media can be used to derive information about flooding.

  13. "Physically-based" numerical experiment to determine the dominant hillslope processes during floods?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaume, Eric; Esclaffer, Thomas; Dangla, Patrick; Payrastre, Olivier

    2016-04-01

    To study the dynamics of hillslope responses during flood event, a fully coupled "physically-based" model for the combined numerical simulation of surface runoff and underground flows has been developed. A particular attention has been given to the selection of appropriate numerical schemes for the modelling of both processes and of their coupling. Surprisingly, the most difficult question to solve, from a numerical point of view, was not related to the coupling of two processes with contrasted kinetics such as surface and underground flows, but to the high gradient infiltration fronts appearing in soils, source of numerical diffusion, instabilities and sometimes divergence. The model being elaborated, it has been successfully tested against results of high quality experiments conducted on a laboratory sandy slope in the early eighties, which is still considered as a reference hillslope experimental setting (Abdul & Guilham). The model appeared able to accurately simulate the pore pressure distributions observed in this 1.5 meter deep and wide laboratory hillslope, as well as its outflow hydrograph shapes and the measured respective contributions of direct runoff and groundwater to these outflow hydrographs. Based on this great success, the same model has been used to simulate the response of a theoretical 100-meter wide and 10% sloped hillslope, with a 2 meter deep pervious soil and impervious bedrock. Three rain events have been tested: a 100 millimeter rainfall event over 10 days, over 1 day or over one hour. The simulated responses are hydrologically not realistic and especially the fast component of the response, that is generally observed in the real-world and explains flood events, is almost absent of the simulated response. Thinking a little about the whole problem, the simulation results appears totally logical according to the proposed model. The simulated response, in fact a recession hydrograph, corresponds to a piston flow of a relatively uniformly

  14. Uncertainty in flood risk mapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonçalves, Luisa M. S.; Fonte, Cidália C.; Gomes, Ricardo

    2014-05-01

    A flood refers to a sharp increase of water level or volume in rivers and seas caused by sudden rainstorms or melting ice due to natural factors. In this paper, the flooding of riverside urban areas caused by sudden rainstorms will be studied. In this context, flooding occurs when the water runs above the level of the minor river bed and enters the major river bed. The level of the major bed determines the magnitude and risk of the flooding. The prediction of the flooding extent is usually deterministic, and corresponds to the expected limit of the flooded area. However, there are many sources of uncertainty in the process of obtaining these limits, which influence the obtained flood maps used for watershed management or as instruments for territorial and emergency planning. In addition, small variations in the delineation of the flooded area can be translated into erroneous risk prediction. Therefore, maps that reflect the uncertainty associated with the flood modeling process have started to be developed, associating a degree of likelihood with the boundaries of the flooded areas. In this paper an approach is presented that enables the influence of the parameters uncertainty to be evaluated, dependent on the type of Land Cover Map (LCM) and Digital Elevation Model (DEM), on the estimated values of the peak flow and the delineation of flooded areas (different peak flows correspond to different flood areas). The approach requires modeling the DEM uncertainty and its propagation to the catchment delineation. The results obtained in this step enable a catchment with fuzzy geographical extent to be generated, where a degree of possibility of belonging to the basin is assigned to each elementary spatial unit. Since the fuzzy basin may be considered as a fuzzy set, the fuzzy area of the basin may be computed, generating a fuzzy number. The catchment peak flow is then evaluated using fuzzy arithmetic. With this methodology a fuzzy number is obtained for the peak flow

  15. Development of flood index by characterisation of flood hydrographs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharya, Biswa; Suman, Asadusjjaman

    2015-04-01

    In recent years the world has experienced deaths, large-scale displacement of people, billions of Euros of economic damage, mental stress and ecosystem impacts due to flooding. Global changes (climate change, population and economic growth, and urbanisation) are exacerbating the severity of flooding. The 2010 floods in Pakistan and the 2011 floods in Australia and Thailand demonstrate the need for concerted action in the face of global societal and environmental changes to strengthen resilience against flooding. Due to climatological characteristics there are catchments where flood forecasting may have a relatively limited role and flood event management may have to be trusted upon. For example, in flash flood catchments, which often may be tiny and un-gauged, flood event management often depends on approximate prediction tools such as flash flood guidance (FFG). There are catchments fed largely by flood waters coming from upstream catchments, which are un-gauged or due to data sharing issues in transboundary catchments the flow of information from upstream catchment is limited. Hydrological and hydraulic modelling of these downstream catchments will never be sufficient to provide any required forecasting lead time and alternative tools to support flood event management will be required. In FFG, or similar approaches, the primary motif is to provide guidance by synthesising the historical data. We follow a similar approach to characterise past flood hydrographs to determine a flood index (FI), which varies in space and time with flood magnitude and its propagation. By studying the variation of the index the pockets of high flood risk, requiring attention, can be earmarked beforehand. This approach can be very useful in flood risk management of catchments where information about hydro-meteorological variables is inadequate for any forecasting system. This paper presents the development of FI and its application to several catchments including in Kentucky in the USA

  16. RASOR flood modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beckers, Joost; Buckman, Lora; Bachmann, Daniel; Visser, Martijn; Tollenaar, Daniel; Vatvani, Deepak; Kramer, Nienke; Goorden, Neeltje

    2015-04-01

    Decision making in disaster management requires fast access to reliable and relevant information. We believe that online information and services will become increasingly important in disaster management. Within the EU FP7 project RASOR (Rapid Risk Assessment and Spatialisation of Risk) an online platform is being developed for rapid multi-hazard risk analyses to support disaster management anywhere in the world. The platform will provide access to a plethora of GIS data that are relevant to risk assessment. It will also enable the user to run numerical flood models to simulate historical and newly defined flooding scenarios. The results of these models are maps of flood extent, flood depths and flow velocities. The RASOR platform will enable to overlay historical event flood maps with observations and Earth Observation (EO) imagery to fill in gaps and assess the accuracy of the flood models. New flooding scenarios can be defined by the user and simulated to investigate the potential impact of future floods. A series of flood models have been developed within RASOR for selected case study areas around the globe that are subject to very different flood hazards: • The city of Bandung in Indonesia, which is prone to fluvial flooding induced by heavy rainfall. The flood hazard is exacerbated by land subsidence. • The port of Cilacap on the south coast of Java, subject to tsunami hazard from submarine earthquakes in the Sunda trench. • The area south of city of Rotterdam in the Netherlands, prone to coastal and/or riverine flooding. • The island of Santorini in Greece, which is subject to tsunamis induced by landslides. Flood models have been developed for each of these case studies using mostly EO data, augmented by local data where necessary. Particular use was made of the new TanDEM-X (TerraSAR-X add-on for Digital Elevation Measurement) product from the German Aerospace centre (DLR) and EADS Astrium. The presentation will describe the flood models and the

  17. The single-biopsy approach in determining protein synthesis in human slow-turning-over tissue: use of flood-primed, continuous infusion of amino acid tracer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, Lars; Reitelseder, Søren; Dideriksen, Kasper

    2014-01-01

    Muscle protein synthesis (MPS) rate is determined conventionally by obtaining two or more tissue biopsies during a primed, continuous infusion of a stable isotopically labeled amino acid. The purpose of the present study was to test whether tracer priming given as a flooding dose, thereby securing...

  18. Establishment and Practical Application of Flood Warning Stage in Taiwan's River

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Sheng-Hsueh; Chia Yeh, Keh-

    2017-04-01

    In the face of extreme flood events or the possible impact of climate change, non-engineering disaster prevention and early warning work is particularly important. Taiwan is an island topography with more than 3,900 meters of high mountains. The length of the river is less than 100 kilometers. Most of the watershed catchment time is less than 24 hours, which belongs to the river with steep slope and rapid flood. Every year in summer and autumn, several typhoon events invade Taiwan. Typhoons often result in rainfall events in excess of 100 mm/hr or 250 mm/3hr. In the face of Taiwan's terrain and extreme rainfall events, flooding is difficult to avoid. Therefore, most of the river has embankment protection, so that people do not have to face every year flooding caused by economic and life and property losses. However, the river embankment protection is limited. With the increase of the hydrological data, the design criteria for the embankment protection standards in the past was 100 year of flood return period and is now gradually reduced to 25 or 50 year of flood return period. The river authorities are not easy to rise the existing embankment height. The safety of the river embankment in Taiwan is determined by the establishment of the flood warning stage to cope with the possible increase in annual floods and the impact of extreme hydrological events. The flood warning stage is equal to the flood control elevation minus the flood rise rate multiply by the flood early warning time. The control elevation can be the top of the embankment, the design flood level of the river, the embankment gap of the river section, the height of the bridge beam bottom, etc. The flood rise rate is consider the factors such as hydrological stochastic and uncertain rainfall and the effect of flood discharge operation on the flood in the watershed catchment area. The maximum value of the water level difference between the two hours or five hours before the peak value of the analysis

  19. Flood-inundation maps for the Yellow River at Plymouth, Indiana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menke, Chad D.; Bunch, Aubrey R.; Kim, Moon H.

    2016-11-16

    Digital flood-inundation maps for a 4.9-mile reach of the Yellow River at Plymouth, Indiana (Ind.), were created by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) in cooperation with the Indiana Office of Community and Rural Affairs. The flood-inundation maps, which can be accessed through the USGS Flood Inundation Mapping Science Web site at http://water.usgs.gov/osw/flood_inundation/, depict estimates of the areal extent and depth of flooding corresponding to selected water levels (stages) at the USGS streamgage 05516500, Yellow River at Plymouth, Ind. Current conditions for estimating near-real-time areas of inundation using USGS streamgage information may be obtained on the Internet at http://waterdata.usgs.gov/in/nwis/uv?site_no=05516500. In addition, information has been provided to the National Weather Service (NWS) for incorporation into their Advanced Hydrologic Prediction Service (AHPS) flood-warning system (http:/water.weather.gov/ahps/). The NWS AHPS forecasts flood hydrographs at many sites that are often collocated with USGS streamgages, including the Yellow River at Plymouth, Ind. NWS AHPS-forecast peak-stage information may be used in conjunction with the maps developed in this study to show predicted areas of flood and forecasts of flood hydrographs at this site.For this study, flood profiles were computed for the Yellow River reach by means of a one-dimensional step-backwater model. The hydraulic model was calibrated by using the current stage-discharge relations at the Yellow River streamgage, in combination with the flood-insurance study for Marshall County (issued in 2011). The calibrated hydraulic model was then used to determine eight water-surface profiles for flood stages at 1-foot intervals referenced to the streamgage datum and ranging from bankfull to the highest stage of the current stage-discharge rating curve. The 1-percent annual exceedance probability flood profile elevation (flood elevation with recurrence intervals within 100 years) is within

  20. Predicting location-specific extreme coastal floods in the future climate by introducing a probabilistic method to calculate maximum elevation of the continuous water mass caused by a combination of water level variations and wind waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leijala, Ulpu; Björkqvist, Jan-Victor; Johansson, Milla M.; Pellikka, Havu

    2017-04-01

    Future coastal management continuously strives for more location-exact and precise methods to investigate possible extreme sea level events and to face flooding hazards in the most appropriate way. Evaluating future flooding risks by understanding the behaviour of the joint effect of sea level variations and wind waves is one of the means to make more comprehensive flooding hazard analysis, and may at first seem like a straightforward task to solve. Nevertheless, challenges and limitations such as availability of time series of the sea level and wave height components, the quality of data, significant locational variability of coastal wave height, as well as assumptions to be made depending on the study location, make the task more complicated. In this study, we present a statistical method for combining location-specific probability distributions of water level variations (including local sea level observations and global mean sea level rise) and wave run-up (based on wave buoy measurements). The goal of our method is to obtain a more accurate way to account for the waves when making flooding hazard analysis on the coast compared to the approach of adding a separate fixed wave action height on top of sea level -based flood risk estimates. As a result of our new method, we gain maximum elevation heights with different return periods of the continuous water mass caused by a combination of both phenomena, "the green water". We also introduce a sensitivity analysis to evaluate the properties and functioning of our method. The sensitivity test is based on using theoretical wave distributions representing different alternatives of wave behaviour in relation to sea level variations. As these wave distributions are merged with the sea level distribution, we get information on how the different wave height conditions and shape of the wave height distribution influence the joint results. Our method presented here can be used as an advanced tool to minimize over- and

  1. Development of a Rapid Qualitative Assay for Determining Elevated Antibody Levels to Periodontopathic Organisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-01-01

    another report, showed no elevation in IgM or IgA in these patients, with some-elevation of total~lgG (Rahney et’aL. 1981)’. Murray & Genco (1980) found...leukotoxic activity compared to 24% of normal, 39%of adult periodontitis,.,and 38% of ANUG sera. Genco et at. (1980b) found that.89% of LJP patients...Aactinomycetemcomitans have been notedin patients with rapidly progressive disease ( Genco et al. 1985). Theserum antibody response in adult periodontitis is more

  2. Optimal strategies for flood prevention

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eijgenraam, Carel; Brekelmans, Ruud; den Hertog, Dick; Roos, C.

    2016-01-01

    Flood prevention policy is of major importance to the Netherlands since a large part of the country is below sea level and high water levels in rivers may also cause floods. In this paper we propose a dike height optimization model to determine economically efficient flood protection standards. We i

  3. Incorporating the effect of DEM resolution and accuracy for improved flood inundation mapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saksena, Siddharth; Merwade, Venkatesh

    2015-11-01

    Topography plays a major role in determining the accuracy of flood inundation areas. However, many areas in the United States and around the world do not have access to high quality topographic data in the form of Digital Elevation Models (DEM). For such areas, an improved understanding of the effects of DEM properties such as horizontal resolution and vertical accuracy on flood inundation maps may eventually lead to improved flood inundation modeling and mapping. This study attempts to relate the errors arising from DEM properties such as spatial resolution and vertical accuracy to flood inundation maps, and then use this relationship to create improved flood inundation maps from coarser resolution DEMs with low accuracy. The results from the five stream reaches used in this study show that water surface elevations (WSE) along the stream and the flood inundation area have a linear relationship with both DEM resolution and accuracy. This linear relationship is then used to extrapolate the water surface elevations from coarser resolution DEMs to get water surface elevations corresponding to a finer resolution DEM. Application of this approach show that improved results can be obtained from flood modeling by using coarser and less accurate DEMs, including public domain datasets such as the National Elevation Dataset and Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) DEMs. The improvement in the WSE and its application to obtain better flood inundation maps is dependent on the study reach characteristics such as land use, valley shape, reach length and width. Application of the approach presented in this study on more reaches may lead to development of guidelines for flood inundation mapping using coarser resolution and less accurate topographic datasets.

  4. Predicting Trigger Level for Ice Jam Flooding of the lower Mohawk River using LiDAR and GIS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, J.; Marsellos, A.; Garver, J.

    2011-12-01

    Ice jams are an annual occurrence along the Mohawk River in upstate New York. The jams commonly result in significant flooding especially when the progress of the ice is impeded by obstructions to the channel and flood plain. To minimize flooding hazards it is critical to know the trigger level of flooding so that we can better understand chronic jam points and simulate flooding events as jams occur as the lower Mohawk. A better understanding of jamming and trigger points may facilitate measures to reduce flooding and avoid the costly damage associated with these hazards. To determine the flood trigger level for one segment of the lower Mohawk we used Air-LiDAR elevation data to construct a digital elevation model to simulate a flooding event. The water flood simulation using a LiDAR elevation model allows accurate water level measurements for determining trigger levels of ice dam flooding. The study area comprises three sections of the lower Mohawk River from the (Before location) to the (After location), which are constrained by lock stations centered at the New York State Canal System Lock 9 (E9 Lock) and the B&M Rail Bridge at the Schenectady International (SI) Plant. This area is notorious for ice jams including one that resulted in a major flooding event on January 25th, 2010 which resulted in flood levels at 74.4 m in the upper portion of the second section of the study area (Lock 9) and at 73.4 m in the lower portion (SI plant). Minimum and maximum elevation levels were found to determine the values at which up stream water builds up and when flooding occurs. From these values, we are able to predict the flooding as the ice jam builds up and breaks as it progresses downstream. Similar methodology is applied to find the trigger points for flooding along other sections of the Mohawk River constrained by lock stations, and it may provide critical knowledge as to how to better manage the hazard of flooding due to ice jams.

  5. The Use of LIDAR and Volunteered Geographic Information to Map Flood Extents and Inundation

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDougall, K.; Temple-Watts, P.

    2012-07-01

    Floods are one of the most destructive natural disasters that threaten communities and properties. In recent decades, flooding has claimed more lives, destroyed more houses and ruined more agricultural land than any other natural hazard. The accurate prediction of the areas of inundation from flooding is critical to saving lives and property, but relies heavily on accurate digital elevation and hydrologic models. The 2011 Brisbane floods provided a unique opportunity to capture high resolution digital aerial imagery as the floods neared their peak, allowing the capture of areas of inundation over the various city suburbs. This high quality imagery, together with accurate LiDAR data over the area and publically available volunteered geographic imagery through repositories such as Flickr, enabled the reconstruction of flood extents and the assessment of both area and depth of inundation for the assessment of damage. In this study, approximately 20 images of flood damaged properties were utilised to identify the peak of the flood. Accurate position and height values were determined through the use of RTK GPS and conventional survey methods. This information was then utilised in conjunction with river gauge information to generate a digital flood surface. The LiDAR generated DEM was then intersected with the flood surface to reconstruct the area of inundation. The model determined areas of inundation were then compared to the mapped flood extent from the high resolution digital imagery to assess the accuracy of the process. The paper concludes that accurate flood extent prediction or mapping is possible through this method, although its accuracy is dependent on the number and location of sampled points. The utilisation of LiDAR generated DEMs and DSMs can also provide an excellent mechanism to estimate depths of inundation and hence flood damage

  6. THE USE OF LIDAR AND VOLUNTEERED GEOGRAPHIC INFORMATION TO MAP FLOOD EXTENTS AND INUNDATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. McDougall

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Floods are one of the most destructive natural disasters that threaten communities and properties. In recent decades, flooding has claimed more lives, destroyed more houses and ruined more agricultural land than any other natural hazard. The accurate prediction of the areas of inundation from flooding is critical to saving lives and property, but relies heavily on accurate digital elevation and hydrologic models. The 2011 Brisbane floods provided a unique opportunity to capture high resolution digital aerial imagery as the floods neared their peak, allowing the capture of areas of inundation over the various city suburbs. This high quality imagery, together with accurate LiDAR data over the area and publically available volunteered geographic imagery through repositories such as Flickr, enabled the reconstruction of flood extents and the assessment of both area and depth of inundation for the assessment of damage. In this study, approximately 20 images of flood damaged properties were utilised to identify the peak of the flood. Accurate position and height values were determined through the use of RTK GPS and conventional survey methods. This information was then utilised in conjunction with river gauge information to generate a digital flood surface. The LiDAR generated DEM was then intersected with the flood surface to reconstruct the area of inundation. The model determined areas of inundation were then compared to the mapped flood extent from the high resolution digital imagery to assess the accuracy of the process. The paper concludes that accurate flood extent prediction or mapping is possible through this method, although its accuracy is dependent on the number and location of sampled points. The utilisation of LiDAR generated DEMs and DSMs can also provide an excellent mechanism to estimate depths of inundation and hence flood damage

  7. Scenario-based tsunami risk assessment using a static flooding approach and high-resolution digital elevation data: An example from Muscat in Oman

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Bastian; Hoffmann, Gösta; Reicherter, Klaus

    2016-04-01

    Knowledge of tsunami risk and vulnerability is essential to establish a well-adapted Multi Hazard Early Warning System, land-use planning and emergency management. As the tsunami risk for the coastline of Oman is still under discussion and remains enigmatic, various scenarios based on historical tsunamis were created. The suggested inundation and run-up heights were projected onto the modern infrastructural setting of the Muscat Capital Area. Furthermore, possible impacts of the worst-case tsunami event for Muscat are discussed. The approved Papathoma Tsunami Vulnerability Assessment Model was used to model the structural vulnerability of the infrastructure for a 2 m tsunami scenario, depicting the 1945 tsunami and a 5 m tsunami in Muscat. Considering structural vulnerability, the results suggest a minor tsunami risk for the 2 m tsunami scenario as the flooding is mainly confined to beaches and wadis. Especially traditional brick buildings, still predominant in numerous rural suburbs, and a prevalently coast-parallel road network lead to an increased tsunami risk. In contrast, the 5 m tsunami scenario reveals extensively inundated areas and with up to 48% of the buildings flooded, and therefore consequently a significantly higher tsunami risk. We expect up to 60000 damaged buildings and up to 380000 residents directly affected in the Muscat Capital Area, accompanied with a significant loss of life and damage to vital infrastructure. The rapid urbanization processes in the Muscat Capital Area, predominantly in areas along the coast, in combination with infrastructural, demographic and economic growth will additionally increase the tsunami risk and therefore emphasizes the importance of tsunami risk assessment in Oman.

  8. Impact of elevated CO2 and temperature on soil C and N dynamics in relation to CH4 and N2O emissions from tropical flooded rice (Oryza sativa L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharyya, P; Roy, K S; Neogi, S; Dash, P K; Nayak, A K; Mohanty, S; Baig, M J; Sarkar, R K; Rao, K S

    2013-09-01

    A field experiment was carried out to investigate the impact of elevated carbon dioxide (CO2) (CEC, 550 μmol mol(-1)) and elevated CO2+elevated air temperature (CECT, 550 μmol mol(-1) and 2°C more than control chamber (CC)) on soil labile carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) pools, microbial populations and enzymatic activities in relation to emissions of methane (CH4) and nitrous oxide (N2O) in a flooded alluvial soil planted with rice cv. Naveen in open top chambers (OTCs). The labile soil C pools, namely microbial biomass C, readily mineralizable C, water soluble carbohydrate C and potassium permanganate oxidizable C were increased by 27, 23, 38 and 37% respectively under CEC than CC (ambient CO2, 394 μmol mol(-1)). The total organic carbon (TOC) in root exudates was 28.9% higher under CEC than CC. The labile N fractions were also increased significantly (29%) in CEC than CC. Methanogens and denitrifier populations in rhizosphere were higher under CEC and CECT. As a result, CH4 and N2O-N emissions were enhanced by 26 and 24.6% respectively, under CEC in comparison to open field (UC, ambient CO2, 394 μmol mol(-1)) on seasonal basis. The global warming potential (GWP) was increased by 25% under CEC than CC. However, emissions per unit of grain yield under elevated CO2 and temperature were similar to those observed at ambient CO2. The stimulatory effect on CH4 and N2O emissions under CEC was linked with the increased amount of soil labile C, C rich root exudates, lowered Eh, higher Fe(+2) concentration and increased activities of methanogens and extracellular enzymes.

  9. Flood Modeling and Simulation using iRIC: A Case Study of Kabul City

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shokory Jamal Abdul Naser

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In Afghanistan, floods are common and measures must be taken to protect people and property from damage. There is, however, a lack of detailed observations and research on this subject in this area. Therefore, flood simulation models are needed to identify flood-prone areas. In this study, International River Interface Cooperative (iRIC program that is river flow and riverbed variation analysis software with several solvers has been used. Nays2DFlood solver that simulates 2dimenstional plane flow has applied to a past flood in Kabul city. River discharge from two inflow points and averaged precipitation from three rain gauges at the time of flooding given as input to the model including DEM (Digital Elevation Model data. The iRIC was confirmed as a 90-m grid digital elevation model to determine the position of streamlines correctly. However, the highest flood depth was overestimated because the 90-m grids were too coarse to detect the slight slope of the riverbed in some areas. Then the elevation of the riverbed modified using data acquired from Google Earth, and the simulation results improved. Moreover, it was found that river water rather than rainfall was the main cause of the flooding.

  10. Evolutionary history and novel biotic interactions determine plant responses to elevated CO2 and nitrogen fertilization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachel Wooliver

    Full Text Available A major frontier in global change research is predicting how multiple agents of global change will alter plant productivity, a critical component of the carbon cycle. Recent research has shown that plant responses to climate change are phylogenetically conserved such that species within some lineages are more productive than those within other lineages in changing environments. However, it remains unclear how phylogenetic patterns in plant responses to changing abiotic conditions may be altered by another agent of global change, the introduction of non-native species. Using a system of 28 native Tasmanian Eucalyptus species belonging to two subgenera, Symphyomyrtus and Eucalyptus, we hypothesized that productivity responses to abiotic agents of global change (elevated CO2 and increased soil N are unique to lineages, but that novel interactions with a non-native species mediate these responses. We tested this hypothesis by examining productivity of 1 native species monocultures and 2 mixtures of native species with an introduced hardwood plantation species, Eucalyptus nitens, to experimentally manipulated soil N and atmospheric CO2. Consistent with past research, we found that N limits productivity overall, especially in elevated CO2 conditions. However, monocultures of species within the Symphyomyrtus subgenus showed the strongest response to N (gained 127% more total biomass in elevated CO2 conditions, whereas those within the Eucalyptus subgenus did not respond to N. Root:shoot ratio (an indicator of resource use was on average greater in species pairs containing Symphyomyrtus species, suggesting that functional traits important for resource uptake are phylogenetically conserved and explaining the phylogenetic pattern in plant response to changing environmental conditions. Yet, native species mixtures with E. nitens exhibited responses to CO2 and N that differed from those of monocultures, supporting our hypothesis and highlighting that both

  11. Proper estimation of hydrological parameters from flood forecasting aspects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyamoto, Mamoru; Matsumoto, Kazuhiro; Tsuda, Morimasa; Yamakage, Yuzuru; Iwami, Yoichi; Yanami, Hitoshi; Anai, Hirokazu

    2016-04-01

    The hydrological parameters of a flood forecasting model are normally calibrated based on an entire hydrograph of past flood events by means of an error assessment function such as mean square error and relative error. However, the specific parts of a hydrograph, i.e., maximum discharge and rising parts, are particularly important for practical flood forecasting in the sense that underestimation may lead to a more dangerous situation due to delay in flood prevention and evacuation activities. We conducted numerical experiments to find the most proper parameter set for practical flood forecasting without underestimation in order to develop an error assessment method for calibration appropriate for flood forecasting. A distributed hydrological model developed in Public Works Research Institute (PWRI) in Japan was applied to fifteen past floods in the Gokase River basin of 1,820km2 in Japan. The model with gridded two-layer tanks for the entire target river basin included hydrological parameters, such as hydraulic conductivity, surface roughness and runoff coefficient, which were set according to land-use and soil-type distributions. Global data sets, e.g., Global Map and Digital Soil Map of the World (DSMW), were employed as input data for elevation, land use and soil type. The values of fourteen types of parameters were evenly sampled with 10,001 patterns of parameter sets determined by the Latin Hypercube Sampling within the search range of each parameter. Although the best reproduced case showed a high Nash-Sutcliffe Efficiency of 0.9 for all flood events, the maximum discharge was underestimated in many flood cases. Therefore, two conditions, which were non-underestimation in the maximum discharge and rising parts of a hydrograph, were added in calibration as the flood forecasting aptitudes. The cases with non-underestimation in the maximum discharge and rising parts of the hydrograph also showed a high Nash-Sutcliffe Efficiency of 0.9 except two flood cases

  12. Determining elastic and shear moduli of cold-formed steel at elevated temperatures using a new sonic resonance method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmadi, Mehdi; Zhang, Haifeng; Yu, Cheng; Wahrmund, Joshua

    2014-01-01

    An understanding of the mechanical properties of cold-formed steel (CFS) at elevated temperatures is critical for the design of CFS structures and analysis of these structures under fire; however, not much literature exists on mechanical properties at elevated temperatures. We report the measurements of elastic and shear moduli for CFS (ASTM-A1003) at elevated temperatures up to 350°C using a novel sonic resonance method. A Bode 100 network analyser was used to excite the CFS samples hanging inside a high-temperature furnace via a simple tweeter-type speaker, and for each the response signal was then detected by a Polytec OFV-5000 Laser Vibrometer Controller (Polytec Inc. Irvine, CA 92618). The resonance frequencies in both flexural and torsional modes are measured by the network analyser as a function of temperature, which allowed us to determine the elastic and the shear moduli. Both the elastic and the shear moduli decrease as the temperature increases. The results reported can be used in the CFS structure design and modelling at elevated temperatures. The new experimental methodology has been validated by a classical coupon test.

  13. Improving riparian wetland conditions based on infiltration and drainage behavior during and after controlled flooding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russo, Tess A.; Fisher, Andrew T.; Roche, James W.

    2012-04-01

    SummaryWe present results of an observational and modeling study of the hydrologic response of a riparian wetland to controlled flooding. The study site is located in Poopenaut Valley, Yosemite National Park (USA), adjacent to the Tuolumne River. This area is flooded periodically by releases from the Hetch Hetchy Reservoir, and was monitored during one flood sequence to assess the relative importance of inundation versus groundwater rise in establishing and maintaining riparian wetland conditions, defined on the basis of a minimum depth and duration of soil saturation, and to determine how restoration benefits might be achieved while reducing total flood discharge. Soil moisture data show how shallow soils were wetted by both inundation and a rising water table as the river hydrograph rose repeatedly during the controlled flood. The shallow groundwater aquifer under wetland areas responded quickly to conditions in the adjacent river, demonstrating a good connection between surface and subsurface regimes. The observed soil drainage response helped to calibrate a numerical model that was used to test scenarios for controlled flood releases. Modeling of this groundwater-wetland system suggests that inundation of surface soils is the most effective mechanism for developing wetland conditions, although an elevated water table helps to extend the duration of soil saturation. Achievement of wetland conditions can be achieved with a smaller total flood release, provided that repeated cycling of higher and lower river elevations is timed to benefit from the characteristic drainage behavior of wetland soils. These results are robust to modest variations in the initial water table elevation, as might result from wetter or dryer conditions prior to a flood. However, larger changes to initial water table elevation, as could be associated with long term climate change or drought conditions, would have a significant influence on wetland development. An ongoing controlled flooding

  14. Determining During-Storm Precipitation Phase and the Rain/Snow Transition Elevation in a Mountain Basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marks, D. G.; Winstral, A. H.; Reba, M. L.; Pomeroy, J. W.; Kumar, M.

    2012-12-01

    Determining precipitation phase is required to properly correct precipitation gage data for wind effects, to determine the hydrologic response to a precipitation event, and for hydrologic modeling when rain will be treated differently snow. In this paper we present a comparison of several methods for determining precipitation phase using 12 years of hourly precipitation, weather and snow data from a long-term measurement site at Reynolds Mtn. East (RME), a headwater catchment within the Reynolds Creek Experimental Watershed (RCEW), in the Owyhee Mountains of Idaho, USA. Methods are based on thresholds of 1) air temperature (Ta) at 0°C, 2) dual Ta threshold -1°C to +3°C, 3) dewpoint temperature (Td) 0°C, and 4) wet bulb temperature (Tw) 0°C. The comparison shows that at the RME Grove site, the dual threshold approach predicts too much snow, while Ta, Td and Tw are generally similar, predicting over the 12 year-period equivalent snow volume and indicating that during storms at this location the cloud level is at or close to the surface. In an effort to test the methods across an elevation range during a large mixed-phase storm we present an analysis of measured and estimated precipitation phase along a transect of seven measurement sites across 380 m of elevation within the rain/snow transition zone. We use data from a 1.8 km2 drainage, (1488-1868 m), within the RCEW, collected during a large precipitation event that occurred in late December 2005. The event began as snow at all elevations and over the course of 4 hours transitioned to rain at the lowest through highest elevations. Using 15-minute measurements of precipitation, changes in snow depth (zs), Ta, Td and Tw, we show that in this mountain basin, when the cloud-level is near the surface precipitation phase is linked to the during-storm humidity. By measuring humidity along an elevation gradient during the storm we are able to reliably estimate precipitation phase and effectively track the elevation of

  15. Flood hazard and flood risk assessment at the local spatial scale: a case study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matej Vojtek

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available With regard to minimizing flood damage, there are measures of different character each of which has its justification and plays an important role in flood protection. Implementation of traditional flood protection measures is still very important; however, an increasing role should be played particularly by flood prevention and flood risk management. The paper presents a case study on flood hazard and flood risk assessment at the local spatial scale using geographic information systems, remote sensing, and hydraulic modelling. As for determining flood hazard in the model area, which has 3.23 km2, the estimation of maximum flood discharges and hydraulic modelling were important steps. The results of one-dimensional hydraulic modelling, which are water depth and flow velocity rasters, were the basis for determining flood hazard and flood risk. In order to define flood risk, the following steps were applied: determining flood intensity on the basis of water depth and flow velocity rasters, determining flood hazard using three categories (low, medium, and high based on flood intensity, defining vulnerability for the classes of functional areas using three categories of acceptable risk (low, medium, and high, and lastly determination of flood risk which represents a synthesis of flood hazard and vulnerability of the model area.

  16. Determinants of property damage recovery time amongst households affected by an extreme flood event in Metro Manila, Philippines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jamil Paolo Francisco

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available This study identified the factors that influence household recovery following an extreme flood event, measured in terms of the length of time to repair, rebuild or replace damaged private property. Data was obtained through a survey of 400 households in Marikina City in Metro Manila, Philippines. Results from the empirical analysis indicated that household income, access to credit (borrowing, the use of a flood alarm system, access to safe shelter, membership in a community organisation, adoption of disaster-specific anticipatory measures and adoption of general preventive measures significantly reduced the time it took for affected households to recover from property damage. Evacuation, relief aid, type of housing, education, household size and frequency of flooding in the area did not have significant effects.

  17. Flood regime and water table determines tree distribution in a forest-savanna gradient in the Brazilian Pantanal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira-Júnior, Walnir G; Schaefer, Carlos E G R; Cunha, Cátia N; Duarte, Temilze G; Chieregatto, Luiz C; Carmo, Flávia M S

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to recognized the preferential location of species of the tree sinusiae in response to a moisture gradient in Pantanal Matogrossense, Brazil. We established sampling plots of arboreal sinusiae along a soil moisture and flood gradient. Piezometers were installed, allowing monthly measurements of water table depth and flood height during one year. Detrended Correspondence Analysis, Gradient Direct Analysis, Multi-response Permutation Procedures and Indicator Species Analysis were performed to evaluate the effect of moisture gradient on tree distribution. The annual variation of water table is shallower and similar in Seasonally Flooded Forest and Termite Savanna, with increasing depths in Open Savanna, Savanna Forest and Dry Forest. Circa 64% of the species were characterized as having a preferential location in "terrestrial habitats normally not subjected to inundation", while 8% preferentially occur in "wet habitats". Lowest tree richness in flood-affected vegetation types is related to both present-day high climatic seasonality and Late Pleistocene dry paleoclimates in the Pantanal wetland. The tree distribution across different formations in the Pantanal shows a direct relationship with soil moisture gradient.

  18. 44 CFR 60.3 - Flood plain management criteria for flood-prone areas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... without causing collapse, displacement, or other structural damage to the elevated portion of the building...) The elevated portion of the building and supporting foundation system shall not be subject to collapse... proposed building sites will be reasonably safe from flooding. If a proposed building site is in a flood...

  19. Drug-drug interactions as a determinant of elevated lithium serum levels in daily clinical practice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wilting, [No Value; Movig, KL; Moolenaar, M; Hekster, YA; Brouwers, [No Value; Heerdink, ER; Nolen, WA; Egberts, AC

    2005-01-01

    Objective: Lithium is a drug with a narrow therapeutic window. Concomitantly used medication is a potentially influencing factor of lithium serum concentrations. We conducted a multicentre retrospective case-control study with the aim of investigating lithium-related drug interactions as determinant

  20. Drug-drug interactions as a determinant of elevated lithium serum levels in daily clinical practice.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wilting, I.; Movig, K.L.L.; Moolenaar, M.; Hekster, Y.A.; Brouwers, J.R.B.J.; Heerdink, E.R.; Nolen, W.A.; Egberts, A.C.G.

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Lithium is a drug with a narrow therapeutic window. Concomitantly used medication is a potentially influencing factor of lithium serum concentrations. We conducted a multicentre retrospective case-control study with the aim of investigating lithium-related drug interactions as determinant

  1. Elevating your elevator talk

    Science.gov (United States)

    An important and often overlooked item that every early career researcher needs to do is compose an elevator talk. The elevator talk, named because the talk should not last longer than an average elevator ride (30 to 60 seconds), is an effective method to present your research and yourself in a clea...

  2. Smoky River coal flood risk mapping study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2004-06-01

    The Canada-Alberta Flood Damage Reduction Program (FDRP) is designed to reduce flood damage by identifying areas susceptible to flooding and by encouraging application of suitable land use planning, zoning, and flood preparedness and proofing. The purpose of this study is to define flood risk and floodway limits along the Smoky River near the former Smoky River Coal (SRC) plant. Alberta Energy has been responsible for the site since the mine and plant closed in 2000. The study describes flooding history, available data, features of the river and valley, calculation of flood levels, and floodway determination, and includes flood risk maps. The HEC-RAS program is used for the calculations. The flood risk area was calculated using the 1:100 year return period flood as the hydrological event. 7 refs., 11 figs., 7 tabs., 3 apps.

  3. Genetic context determines susceptibility to intraocular pressure elevation in a mouse pigmentary glaucoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cosma Ioan M

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background DBA/2J (D2 mice develop an age-related form of glaucoma. Their eyes progressively develop iris pigment dispersion and iris atrophy followed by increased intraocular pressure (IOP and glaucomatous optic nerve damage. Mutant alleles of the Gpnmb and Tyrp1 genes are necessary for the iris disease, but it is unknown whether alleles of other D2 gene(s are necessary for the distinct later stages of disease. We initiated a study of congenic strains to further define the genetic requirements and disease mechanisms of the D2 glaucoma. Results To further understand D2 glaucoma, we created congenic strains of mice on the C57BL/6J (B6 genetic background. B6 double-congenic mice carrying D2-derived Gpnmb and Tyrp1 mutations develop a D2-like iris disease. B6 single-congenics with only the Gpnmb and Tyrp1 mutations develop milder forms of iris disease. Genetic epistasis experiments introducing a B6 tyrosinase mutation into the congenic strains demonstrated that both the single and double-congenic iris diseases are rescued by interruption of melanin synthesis. Importantly, our experiments analyzing mice at ages up to 27 months indicate that the B6 double-congenic mice are much less prone to IOP elevation and glaucoma than are D2 mice. Conclusion As demonstrated here, the Gpnmb and Tyrp1 iris phenotypes are both individually dependent on tyrosinase function. These results support involvement of abnormal melanosomal events in the diseases caused by each gene. In the context of the inbred D2 mouse strain, the glaucoma phenotype is clearly influenced by more genes than just Gpnmb and Tyrp1. Despite the outward similarity of pigment-dispersing iris disease between D2 and the B6 double-congenic mice, the congenic mice are much less susceptible to developing high IOP and glaucoma. These new congenic strains provide a valuable new resource for further studying the genetic and mechanistic complexity of this form of glaucoma.

  4. Methods for estimating peak discharge and flood boundaries of streams in Utah

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, B.E.; Lindskov, K.L.

    1983-01-01

    Equations for estimating 2-, 5-, 10-, 25-, 50-, and 100-year peak discharges and flood depths at ungaged sites in Utah were developed using multiple-regression techniques. Ratios of 500- to 100-year values also were determined. The peak discharge equations are applicable to unregulated streams and the flood depth equations are applicable to the unregulated flow in natural stream channels. The flood depth data can be used to approximate flood prone areas. Drainage area and mean basin elevation are the two basin characteristics needed to use these equations. The standard error of estimate ranges from 38% to 74% for the 100-year peak discharge and from 23% to 33% for the 100-year flood depth. Five different flood mapping methods are described. Streams are classified into four categories as a basis for selecting a flood mapping method. Procedures for transferring flood depths obtained from the regression equations to a flood boundary map are outlined. Also, previous detailed flood mapping by government agencies and consultants is summarized to assist the user in quality control and to minimize duplication of effort. Methods are described for transferring flood frequency data from gaged to ungaged sites on the same stream. Peak discharge and flood depth frequency relations and selected basin characteristics data, updated through the 1980 water year, are tabulated for more than 300 gaging stations in Utah and adjoining states. In addition, weighted estimates of peak discharge relations based on the station data and the regression estimates are provided for each gaging station used in the regression analysis. (Author 's abstract)

  5. Measurement procedure for the determination of thermal exchange coefficient for subsea pipelines at elevated pressure levels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Azevedo, Luis Fernando A.; Farias, Paula S.C.; Martins, Fabio J.W.A.; Rabello, Pedro C.; Barros Junior, Julio M. [Pontificia Universidade Catolica (PUC-Rio), RJ (Brazil). Dept. de Engenharia Mecanica; Lopes Junior, Fernando M.; Silva Junior, Jose Fernando; Castro, Adriana M.; Santos, Augusto A.; Pessanha, Maikon C.R. [Technip, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2009-12-19

    The present paper describes a methodology successfully employed to determine the Thermal Exchange Coefficient - TEC - for insulated sub sea flexible lines up to a pressure level of 200 bar. In this methodology, controlled internal electrical heating was employed, together with temperature sensors installed at the inner and outer surfaces of the line. The instrumented line sample was placed in a hyperbaric chamber filled with water. Two methods were employed in parallel to determine the line TEC value. In the first method, the TEC value was determined by direct measurement of the radial heat flux by the use of heat flux sensors. The readings of these sensors, together with the inner-to-outer surface temperature difference and geometric parameters, yielded the desired TEC value. In the second method, the radial heat flux was obtained as the difference between the total energy generated by the electrical heater installed in the interior of the sample and the heat losses through the end connectors, evaluated by the readings of temperature sensors installed in covers that surrounded the end connectors. The knowledge of the cover geometry, thermal properties and the temperature readings allowed for an accurate estimate of the heat lost through the covers. Both measuring methods were backed by a detailed uncertainty analysis. A calibration procedure of the second method was performed from zero to 100 bar, the pressure range where the calibration of the heat flux sensor is valid. Beyond 100 bar and up to 200 bar, the TEC values were obtained by the second method, corrected by the calibration procedure extrapolated from the 0-100 bar range. The TEC values obtained were valid under an uncertainty level of {+-} 5%. (author)

  6. Mice lacking pituitary tumor transforming gene show elevated exposure of DGalNAc carbohydrate determinants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lutsyk A. D.

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To investigate the influence of pituitary tumor transforming gene (pttg-1 knockout on glycome of parenchimal organs by means of lectin histochemistry. Methods. DGalNAc, DGlcNAc, NeuNAc carbohydrate determinants were labelled with soybean agglutinin (SBA and wheat germ agglutinin (WGA, conjugated to peroxidase, with subsequent visualization of the lectin-binding sites with diaminobenzidine. The testes and kidneys of murine strain BL6/C57 with the pttg-1 gene knockout (PTTG-KO were compared to the wild type (PTTG-WT animals, both groups 1 month of age. Results. Knockout of the pttg-1 gene was accompanied by enhanced exposure of the DGalNAc sugar residues within the Golgi complex of secondary spermatocytes, in a brush border of renal tubules and on the lumenal surface of collecting ducts. Conclusions. This study suggests that knockout of the pttg-1 gene may lead to the changes in carbohydrate processing in mammalian organism.

  7. Determination of Elevator and Rudder Hinge Forces on the Learjet Model 55 Aircraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boroughs, R. R.; Padmanabhan, V.

    1983-01-01

    The empennage structure on the Learjet 55 aircraft was quite similar to the empennage structure on earlier Learjet models. However, due to an important structural change in the vertical fin along with the new loads environment on the 50 series aircraft, a structural test was required on the vertical fin, but the horizontal tail was substantiated by a comparative analysis with previous tests. NASTRAN analysis was used to investigate empennage deflections, stress levels, and control surface hinge forces. The hinge force calculations were made with the control surfaces in the deflected as well as undeflected configurations. A skin panel buckling analysis was also performed, and the non-linear effects of buckling were simulated in the NASTRAN model to more accurately define internal loads and stress levels. Comparisons were then made between the Model 55 and the Model 35/36 stresses and internal forces to determine which components were qualified by previous tests. Some of the methods and techniques used in this analysis are described.

  8. 44 CFR 68.11 - Determination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 44 Emergency Management and Assistance 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Determination. 68.11 Section... § 68.11 Determination. The board shall render its written decision within 45 days after the conclusion... Administrator for review and approval. The Administrator shall make the final base flood elevation determination...

  9. Using LiDAR surveys to document floods: A case study of the 2008 Iowa flood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Bo; Krajewski, Witold F.; Goska, Radek; Young, Nathan

    2017-10-01

    Can we use Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR), an emergent remote sensing technology with wide applications, to document floods with high accuracy? To explore the feasibility of this application, we propose a method to extract distributed inundation depths from a LiDAR survey conducted during flooding. This method consists of three steps: (1) collecting LiDAR data during flooding; (2) classifying the LiDAR observational points as flooded water surface points and non-flooded points, and generating a floodwater surface elevation model; and (3) subtracting the bare earth Digital Terrain Model (DTM) from the flood surface elevation model to obtain a flood depth map. We applied this method to the 2008 Iowa flood in the United States and evaluated the results using the high-water mark measurements, flood extent extracted from SPOT (Small Programmable Object Technology) imagery, and the near-simultaneously acquired aerial photography. The root mean squared error of the LiDAR-derived floodwater surface profile to high-water marks was 30 cm, the consistency between the two flooded areas derived from LiDAR and SPOT imagery was 72% (81% if suspicious isolated ponds in the SPOT-derived extent were removed), and LiDAR-derived flood extent had a horizontal resolution of ∼3 m. This work demonstrates that LiDAR technology has the potential to provide calibration and validation reference data with appreciable accuracy for improved flood inundation modeling.

  10. Flooding On

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YIN PUMIN

    2010-01-01

    @@ Drenched riverside towns in central and south parts of China were preparing for even worse flooding as water levels in the country's huge rivers surged and rainstorms continued. As of July 27,accumulated precipitation since June 16 in 70 percent of the drainage areas of the Yangtze River had exceeded 50 mm,after three rounds of rainstorms,said Cai Qihua,Deputy Director of the Yangtze River Flood Control and Drought Relief Headquarters.

  11. Determination of bench-mark elevations at Bethel Island and vicinity, Contra Costa and San Joaquin counties, California, 1987

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blodgett, J.C.; Ikehara, M.E.; McCaffrey, William F.

    1988-01-01

    Elevations of 49 bench marks in the southwestern part of the Sacramento-San Joaquin River Delta were determined during October and November 1987. A total of 58 miles of level lines were run in the vicinity of Bethel Island and the community of Discovery Bay. The datum of these surveys is based on a National Geodetic Survey bench mark T934 situated on bedrock 10.5 mi east of Mount Diablo and near Marsh Creek Reservoir. The accuracy of these levels, based on National Geodetic Survey standards, was of first, second, and third order, depending on the various segments surveyed. Several bench marks were noted as possibly being stable, but most show evidence of instability. (USGS)

  12. Evaluation and Optimization Study on a Hybrid EOR Technique Named as Chemical-Alternating-Foam Floods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xu Xingguang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This work presents a novel Enhanced Oil Recovery (EOR method called Chemical-Alternating-Foam (CAF floods in order to overcome the drawbacks of the conventional foam flooding such as insufficient amount of in-situ foams, severe foam collapse and surfactant retention. The first part of this research focused on the comparison of conventional foam floods and CAF floods both of which had the same amount of gas and chemicals. It showed that: (1 CAF floods possessed the much greater Residual Resistance Factor (RRF at elevated temperature; (2 the accumulative oil recovery of the CAF floods was 10%-15% higher than that of the conventional foam flooding. After 1.8 Pore Volume (PV injection, the oil recovery reached the plateau for both methods; (3 CAF floods yielded the most amount of incremental oil at the 98% water cut (water content in the effluent, while the continuous foam floods achieved the best performance at 60% water cut. The second part of this work determined the optimal foam quality (gas/liquid ratio or the volume percent gas within foam, chemical/foam slug size ratio, cycle number and injection sequence for the CAF floods. It was found that the CAF was endowed with the peak performance if the foam quality, chemical/foam slug size ratio, cycle number was fixed at 80%, 1:1 and 3 respectively with the chemical slug being introduced ahead of the foam slug. Through systematic and thorough research, the proposed hybrid process has been approved to be a viable and effective method significantly strengthening the conventional foam flooding.

  13. Estimated Flood-Inundation Mapping for the Upper Blue River, Indian Creek, and Dyke Branch in Kansas City, Missouri, 2006-08

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Brian P.; Huizinga, Richard J.

    2008-01-01

    In the interest of improved public safety during flooding, the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the city of Kansas City, Missouri, completed a flood-inundation study of the Blue River in Kansas City, Missouri, from the U.S. Geological Survey streamflow gage at Kenneth Road to 63rd Street, of Indian Creek from the Kansas-Missouri border to its mouth, and of Dyke Branch from the Kansas-Missouri border to its mouth, to determine the estimated extent of flood inundation at selected flood stages on the Blue River, Indian Creek, and Dyke Branch. The results of this study spatially interpolate information provided by U.S. Geological Survey gages, Kansas City Automated Local Evaluation in Real Time gages, and the National Weather Service flood-peak prediction service that comprise the Blue River flood-alert system and are a valuable tool for public officials and residents to minimize flood deaths and damage in Kansas City. To provide public access to the information presented in this report, a World Wide Web site (http://mo.water.usgs.gov/indep/kelly/blueriver) was created that displays the results of two-dimensional modeling between Hickman Mills Drive and 63rd Street, estimated flood-inundation maps for 13 flood stages, the latest gage heights, and National Weather Service stage forecasts for each forecast location within the study area. The results of a previous study of flood inundation on the Blue River from 63rd Street to the mouth also are available. In addition the full text of this report, all tables and maps are available for download (http://pubs.usgs.gov/sir/2008/5068). Thirteen flood-inundation maps were produced at 2-foot intervals for water-surface elevations from 763.8 to 787.8 feet referenced to the Blue River at the 63rd Street Automated Local Evaluation in Real Time stream gage operated by the city of Kansas City, Missouri. Each map is associated with gages at Kenneth Road, Blue Ridge Boulevard, Kansas City (at Bannister Road), U.S. Highway 71

  14. Flood-inundation maps for Lake Champlain in Vermont and in northern Clinton County, New York

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flynn, Robert H.; Hayes, Laura

    2016-06-30

    Digital flood-inundation maps for an approximately100-mile length of Lake Champlain in Addison, Chittenden, Franklin, and Grand Isle Counties in Vermont and northern Clinton County in New York were created by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) in cooperation with the International Joint Commission (IJC). The flood-inundationmaps, which can be accessed through the International Joint Commission (IJC) Web site at http://www.ijc.org/en_/, depict estimates of the areal extent flooding correspondingto selected water levels (stages) at the USGS lake gage on the Richelieu River (Lake Champlain) at Rouses Point, N.Y. (station number 04295000). In this study, wind and seiche effects (standing oscillating wave with a long wavelength) were not taken into account and the flood-inundation mapsreflect 11 stages (elevations) for Lake Champlain that are static for the study length of the lake. Near-real-time stages at this lake gage, and others on Lake Champlain, may be obtained on the Internet from the USGS National Water Information System at http://waterdata.usgs.gov/ or the National Weather Service Advanced Hydrologic Prediction Service at http:/water.weather.gov/ahps/, which also forecasts flood hydrographs at the Richelieu River (Lake Champlain) at Rouses Point.Static flood boundary extents were determined for LakeChamplain in Addison, Chittenden, Franklin, and Grand Isle Counties in Vermont and northern Clinton County in New York using recently acquired (2013–2014) lidar (light detection and ranging) and may be referenced to any of the five USGS lake gages on Lake Champlain. Of these five lakgages, USGS lake gage 04295000, Richelieu River (Lake Champlain) at Rouses Point, N.Y., is the only USGS lake gage that is also a National Weather Service prediction location. Flood boundary extents for the Lake Champlain static flood-inundation map corresponding to the May 201 flood(103.2 feet [ft], National Geodetic Vertical Datum [NGVD] 29) were evaluated by comparing these boundary

  15. A rainfall design method for spatial flood risk assessment: considering multiple flood sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, X.; Tatano, H.

    2015-08-01

    Information about the spatial distribution of flood risk is important for integrated urban flood risk management. Focusing on urban areas, spatial flood risk assessment must reflect all risk information derived from multiple flood sources: rivers, drainage, coastal flooding etc. that may affect the area. However, conventional flood risk assessment deals with each flood source independently, which leads to an underestimation of flood risk in the floodplain. Even in floodplains that have no risk from coastal flooding, flooding from river channels and inundation caused by insufficient drainage capacity should be considered simultaneously. For integrated flood risk management, it is necessary to establish a methodology to estimate flood risk distribution across a floodplain. In this paper, a rainfall design method for spatial flood risk assessment, which considers the joint effects of multiple flood sources, is proposed. The concept of critical rainfall duration determined by the concentration time of flooding is introduced to connect response characteristics of different flood sources with rainfall. A copula method is then adopted to capture the correlation of rainfall amount with different critical rainfall durations. Rainfall events are designed taking advantage of the copula structure of correlation and marginal distribution of rainfall amounts within different critical rainfall durations. A case study in the Otsu River Basin, Osaka prefecture, Japan was conducted to demonstrate this methodology.

  16. A rainfall design method for spatial flood risk assessment: considering multiple flood sources

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    X. Jiang

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Information about the spatial distribution of flood risk is important for integrated urban flood risk management. Focusing on urban areas, spatial flood risk assessment must reflect all risk information derived from multiple flood sources: rivers, drainage, coastal flooding etc. that may affect the area. However, conventional flood risk assessment deals with each flood source independently, which leads to an underestimation of flood risk in the floodplain. Even in floodplains that have no risk from coastal flooding, flooding from river channels and inundation caused by insufficient drainage capacity should be considered simultaneously. For integrated flood risk management, it is necessary to establish a methodology to estimate flood risk distribution across a floodplain. In this paper, a rainfall design method for spatial flood risk assessment, which considers the joint effects of multiple flood sources, is proposed. The concept of critical rainfall duration determined by the concentration time of flooding is introduced to connect response characteristics of different flood sources with rainfall. A copula method is then adopted to capture the correlation of rainfall amount with different critical rainfall durations. Rainfall events are designed taking advantage of the copula structure of correlation and marginal distribution of rainfall amounts within different critical rainfall durations. A case study in the Otsu River Basin, Osaka prefecture, Japan was conducted to demonstrate this methodology.

  17. Development of flood-inundation maps for the Mississippi River in Saint Paul, Minnesota

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czuba, Christiana R.; Fallon, James D.; Lewis, Corby R.; Cooper, Diane F.

    2014-01-01

    Digital flood-inundation maps for a 6.3-mile reach of the Mississippi River in Saint Paul, Minnesota, were developed through a multi-agency effort by the U.S. Geological Survey in cooperation with the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers and in collaboration with the National Weather Service. The inundation maps, which can be accessed through the U.S. Geological Survey Flood Inundation Mapping Science Web site at http://water.usgs.gov/osw/flood_inundation/ and the National Weather Service Advanced Hydrologic Prediction Service site at http://water.weather.gov/ahps/inundation.php, depict estimates of the areal extent and depth of flooding corresponding to selected water levels (stages) at the U.S. Geological Survey streamgage at the Mississippi River at Saint Paul (05331000). The National Weather Service forecasted peak-stage information at the streamgage may be used in conjunction with the maps developed in this study to show predicted areas of flood inundation. In this study, flood profiles were computed for the Mississippi River by means of a one-dimensional step-backwater model. The hydraulic model was calibrated using the most recent stage-discharge relation at the Robert Street location (rating curve number 38.0) of the Mississippi River at Saint Paul (streamgage 05331000), as well as an approximate water-surface elevation-discharge relation at the Mississippi River at South Saint Paul (U.S. Army Corps of Engineers streamgage SSPM5). The model also was verified against observed high-water marks from the recent 2011 flood event and the water-surface profile from existing flood insurance studies. The hydraulic model was then used to determine 25 water-surface profiles for flood stages at 1-foot intervals ranging from approximately bankfull stage to greater than the highest recorded stage at streamgage 05331000. The simulated water-surface profiles were then combined with a geographic information system digital elevation model, derived from high-resolution topography

  18. A Study of Flood Evacuation Center Using GIS and Remote Sensing Technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mustaffa, A. A.; Rosli, M. F.; Abustan, M. S.; Adib, R.; Rosli, M. I.; Masiri, K.; Saifullizan, B.

    2016-07-01

    This research demonstrated the use of Remote Sensing technique and GIS to determine the suitability of an evacuation center. This study was conducted in Batu Pahat areas that always hit by a series of flood. The data of Digital Elevation Model (DEM) was obtained by ASTER database that has been used to delineate extract contour line and elevation. Landsat 8 image was used for classification purposes such as land use map. Remote Sensing incorporate with GIS techniques was used to determined the suitability location of the evacuation center from contour map of flood affected areas in Batu Pahat. GIS will calculate the elevation of the area and information about the country of the area, the road access and percentage of the affected area. The flood affected area map may provide the suitability of the flood evacuation center during the several levels of flood. The suitability of evacuation centers can be determined based on several criteria and the existing data of the evacuation center will be analysed. From the analysis among 16 evacuation center listed, there are only 8 evacuation center suitable for the usage during emergency situation. The suitability analysis was based on the location and the road access of the evacuation center toward the flood affected area. There are 10 new locations with suitable criteria of evacuation center proposed on the study area to facilitate the process of rescue and evacuating flood victims to much safer and suitable locations. The results of this study will help in decision making processes and indirectly will help organization such as fire-fighter and the Department of Social Welfare in their work. Thus, this study can contribute more towards the society.

  19. Assessment of the effectiveness of flood adaptation strategies for HCMC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lasage, R.; Veldkamp, T. I. E.; de Moel, H.; Van, T. C.; Phi, H. L.; Vellinga, P.; Aerts, J. C. J. H.

    2014-06-01

    Coastal cities are vulnerable to flooding, and flood risk to coastal cities will increase due to sea-level rise. Moreover, Asian cities in particular are subject to considerable population growth and associated urban developments, increasing this risk even more. Empirical data on vulnerability and the cost and benefits of flood risk reduction measures are therefore paramount for sustainable development of these cities. This paper presents an approach to explore the impacts of sea-level rise and socio-economic developments on flood risk for the flood-prone District 4 in Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam, and to develop and evaluate the effects of different adaptation strategies (new levees, dry- and wet proofing of buildings and elevating roads and buildings). A flood damage model was developed to simulate current and future flood risk using the results from a household survey to establish stage-damage curves for residential buildings. The model has been used to assess the effects of several participatory developed adaptation strategies to reduce flood risk, expressed in expected annual damage (EAD). Adaptation strategies were evaluated assuming combinations of both sea-level scenarios and land-use scenarios. Together with information on costs of these strategies, we calculated the benefit-cost ratio and net present value for the adaptation strategies until 2100, taking into account depreciation rates of 2.5% and 5%. The results of this modelling study indicate that the current flood risk in District 4 is USD 0.31 million per year, increasing up to USD 0.78 million per year in 2100. The net present value and benefit-cost ratios using a discount rate of 5 % range from USD -107 to -1.5 million, and from 0.086 to 0.796 for the different strategies. Using a discount rate of 2.5% leads to an increase in both net present value and benefit-cost ratio. The adaptation strategies wet-proofing and dry-proofing generate the best results using these economic indicators. The information

  20. Probabilistic Flood Defence Assessment Tools

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Slomp Robert

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The WTI2017 project is responsible for the development of flood defence assessment tools for the 3600 km of Dutch primary flood defences, dikes/levees, dunes and hydraulic structures. These tools are necessary, as per January 1st 2017, the new flood risk management policy for the Netherlands will be implemented. Then, the seven decades old design practice (maximum water level methodology of 1958 and two decades old safety standards (and maximum hydraulic load methodology of 1996 will formally be replaced by a more risked based approach for the national policy in flood risk management. The formal flood defence assessment is an important part of this new policy, especially for flood defence managers, since national and regional funding for reinforcement is based on this assessment. This new flood defence policy is based on a maximum allowable probability of flooding. For this, a maximum acceptable individual risk was determined at 1/100 000 per year, this is the probability of life loss of for every protected area in the Netherlands. Safety standards of flood defences were then determined based on this acceptable individual risk. The results were adjusted based on information from cost -benefit analysis, societal risk and large scale societal disruption due to the failure of critical infrastructure e.g. power stations. The resulting riskbased flood defence safety standards range from a 300 to a 100 000 year return period for failure. Two policy studies, WV21 (Safety from floods in the 21st century and VNK-2 (the National Flood Risk in 2010 provided the essential information to determine the new risk based safety standards for flood defences. The WTI2017 project will provide the safety assessment tools based on these new standards and is thus an essential element for the implementation of this policy change. A major issue to be tackled was the development of user-friendly tools, as the new assessment is to be carried out by personnel of the

  1. Determinants and impact of microvascular obstruction in successfully reperfused ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction. Assessment by magnetic resonance imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bogaert, Jan; Kalantzi, Maria; Dymarkowski, Steven [Gasthuisberg University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Leuven (Belgium); Rademakers, Frank E.; Janssens, Stefan [Gasthuisberg University Hospital, Department of Cardiology, Leuven (Belgium)

    2007-10-15

    Microvascular obstruction (MVO) is an important and independent determinant of post-infarct remodeling. Fifty-two patients with a successfully reperfused ST-segment elevation acute myocardial infarction (MI) were studied with MRI in the first week and at 4 months post-infarction. On early (i.e., 2-5 min) post-contrast MRI, MVO was detected in 32 patients with an MVO to infarct ratio of 36.3 {+-} 24.9%. On late (i.e., 10-25 min) post-contrast MRI, MVO was detected in only 27 patients, with an MVO to infarct ratio of 15.9 {+-} 13.9%. MVO infarcts (n = 32) were associated with higher cardiac enzymes (troponin I, P = 0.016), and lower pre-revascularization thrombolysis in myocardial infarction (TIMI) flow (P = 0.018) than non-MVO infarcts (n = 20). Infarct size was larger in MVO infarcts (25.0 {+-} 14.3 g) than non-MVO infarcts (12.5 {+-} 7.9 g), P = 0.0007. Systolic wall thickening in the infarct and peri-infarct area, and left ventricular (LV) ejection fraction (EF) were worse in MVO (46.1 {+-} 7.2%) than non-MVO infarcts (50.5 {+-} 6.6%, P = 0.038). At 4 months, MVO infarcts showed more adverse remodeling and lack of functional improvement, whereas non-MVO infarcts improved significantly (LV EF at 4 months, MVO, 47.5 {+-} 7.8%, P = 0.31; non-MVO, 55.2 {+-} 10.3%, P = 0.0028). In the majority of patients with successfully reperfused ST-segment elevation MI, MVO is observed, whose present and maximal extent can be best evaluated on early post-contrast MRI. Presence of MVO is associated with more extensive infarctions, and characterized by greater adverse LV remodeling and lack of functional recovery. (orig.)

  2. Numerical modeling of seawater flow through the flooding system of dry docks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Najafi-Jilani, A.; Naghavi, A.

    2009-12-01

    Numerical simulations have been carried out on the flooding system of a dry dock in design stage and to be located at the south coasts of Iran. The main goals of the present investigation are to evaluate the flooding time as well as the seawater flow characteristics in the intake channels of the dock. The time dependent upstream and downstream boundary conditions of the flooding system are imposed in the modeling. The upstream boundary condition is imposed in accordance with the tidal fluctuations of sea water level. At the downstream, the gradually rising water surface elevation in the dry dock is described in a transient boundary condition. The numerical results are compared with available laboratory measured data and a good agreement is obtained. The seawater discharge through the flooding system and the required time to filling up the dry dock is determined at the worst case. The water current velocity and pressure on the rigid boundaries are also calculated and discussed.

  3. Composite Flood Risk for Virgin Island

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Composite Flood Risk layer combines flood hazard datasets from Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) flood zones, NOAA's Shallow Coastal Flooding, and the National Hurricane Center SLOSH model for Storm Surge inundation for category 1, 2, and 3 hurricanes.Geographic areas are represented by a grid of 10 by 10 meter cells and each cell has a ranking based on variation in exposure to flooding hazards: Moderate, High and Extreme exposure. Geographic areas in each input layers are ranked based on their probability of flood risk exposure. The logic was such that areas exposed to flooding on a more frequent basis were given a higher ranking. Thus the ranking incorporates the probability of the area being flooded. For example, even though a Category 3 storm surge has higher flooding elevations, the likelihood of the occurrence is lower than a Category 1 storm surge and therefore the Category 3 flood area is given a lower exposure ranking. Extreme exposure areas are those areas that are exposed to relatively frequent flooding.The ranked input layers are then converted to a raster for the creation of the composite risk layer by using cell statistics in spatial analysis. The highest exposure ranking for a given cell in any of the three input layers is assigned to the corresponding cell in the composite layer.For example, if an area (a cell) is rank as medium in the FEMA layer, moderate in the SLOSH layer, but extreme in the SCF layer, the cell will be considere

  4. Combating Floods

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1998-01-01

    In summer and autumn of 1998, the river vatleys of the Changjiang, Songhua and Nenjiang rivers were stricken by exceptionally serious floods, As of the, 22nd of August, the flooded areas stretched over 52.4 million acres. More than 223 million people were affected by the flood. 4.97 million houses were ruined, economic losses totaled RMB 166 billion, and most tragically, 3,004 people lost their byes. It was one of the costliest disasters in Chinese history. Millions of People’s Liberation Army soldiers and local people joined hands to battle the floodwaters. Thanks to their unified efforts and tenacious struggle, they successfully withstood the rising, water, resumed production and began to rebuild their homes.

  5. Low physical activity is a determinant for elevated blood pressure in high cardiovascular risk obstructive sleep apnea

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Mendelson, Monique; Tamisier, Renaud; Laplaud, David; Dias-Domingos, Sonia; Baguet, Jean-Philippe; Moreau, Laurent; Koltes, Christian; Chavez, Léonidas; de Lamberterie, Gilles; Herengt, Frédéric; Levy, Patrick; Flore, Patrice; Pépin, Jean-Louis

    2014-01-01

    .... Beyond the severity of nocturnal hypoxia, other factors such as metabolic abnormalities but also sedentary behaviors and insufficient physical activity may contribute to elevated blood pressure (BP...

  6. Analysis of Flood Hazards for the Materials and Fuels Complex at the Idaho National Laboratory Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skaggs, Richard; Breithaupt, Stephen A.; Waichler, Scott R.; Kim, Taeyun; Ward, Duane L.

    2010-11-01

    Researchers at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory conducted a flood hazard analysis for the Materials and Fuels Complex (MFC) site located at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) site in southeastern Idaho. The general approach for the analysis was to determine the maximum water elevation levels associated with the design-basis flood (DBFL) and compare them to the floor elevations at critical building locations. Two DBFLs for the MFC site were developed using different precipitation inputs: probable maximum precipitation (PMP) and 10,000 year recurrence interval precipitation. Both precipitation inputs were used to drive a watershed runoff model for the surrounding upland basins and the MFC site. Outflows modeled with the Hydrologic Engineering Centers Hydrologic Modeling System were input to the Hydrologic Engineering Centers River Analysis System hydrodynamic flood routing model.

  7. Analysis of Flood Hazards for the Materials and Fuels Complex at the Idaho National Laboratory Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skaggs, Richard; Breithaupt, Stephen A.; Waichler, Scott R.; Kim, Taeyun; Ward, Duane L.

    2010-11-01

    Researchers at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory conducted a flood hazard analysis for the Materials and Fuels Complex (MFC) site located at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) site in southeastern Idaho. The general approach for the analysis was to determine the maximum water elevation levels associated with the design-basis flood (DBFL) and compare them to the floor elevations at critical building locations. Two DBFLs for the MFC site were developed using different precipitation inputs: probable maximum precipitation (PMP) and 10,000 year recurrence interval precipitation. Both precipitation inputs were used to drive a watershed runoff model for the surrounding upland basins and the MFC site. Outflows modeled with the Hydrologic Engineering Centers Hydrologic Modeling System were input to the Hydrologic Engineering Centers River Analysis System hydrodynamic flood routing model.

  8. Validation of the flooding dose technique to determine fractional rates of protein synthesis in a model bivalve species, the blue mussel (Mytilus edulis L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarthy, Ian D; Nicholls, Ruth; Malham, Shelagh K; Whiteley, Nia M

    2016-01-01

    For the first time, use of the flooding dose technique using (3)H-Phenylalanine is validated for measuring whole-animal and tissue-specific rates of protein synthesis in the blue mussel Mytilus edulis (61mm shell length; 4.0g fresh body mass). Following injection, the phenylalanine-specific radioactivities in the gill, mantle and whole-animal free pools were elevated within one hour and remained elevated and stable for up to 6h following injection of (3)H-phenylalanine into the posterior adductor muscle. Incorporation of (3)H-phenylalanine into body protein was linear over time following injection and the non-significant intercepts for the regressions suggested incorporation into body protein occurred rapidly after injection. These results validate the technique for measuring rates of protein synthesis in mussels. There were no differences in the calculated rates following 1-6h incubation in gill, mantle or whole-animal and fractional rates of protein synthesis from the combined time course data were 9.5±0.8%d(-1) for the gill, 2.5±0.3%d(-1) for the mantle and 2.6±0.3%d(-1) for the whole-animal, respectively (mean values±SEM). The whole-animal absolute rate of protein synthesis was calculated as 18.9±0.6mg protein day(-1). The use of this technique in measuring one of the major components of maintenance metabolism and growth will provide a valuable and convenient tool in furthering our understanding of the protein metabolism and energetics of this keystone marine invertebrate and its ability to adjust and respond to fluctuations, such as that expected as a result of climate change.

  9. Method for determining the elevation of a point on a work site represented in a triangular irregular network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koehrsen, Craig L. (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    A site database structure for storing elevation data for access by an application program being executed on a control system on a work machine. The data is stored in a Triangular Irregular Network (TIN). The elevation of a point on the work site based on the three points forming the triangle containing the point.

  10. Elevation and vegetation determine Cryptosporidium oocyst shedding by yellow-bellied marmots (Marmota flaviventris in the Sierra Nevada Mountains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diego Montecino-Latorre

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Wildlife are increasingly recognized as important biological reservoirs of zoonotic species of Cryptosporidium that might contaminate water and cause human exposure to this protozoal parasite. The habitat range of the yellow-bellied marmot (Marmota flaviventris overlaps extensively with the watershed boundaries of municipal water supplies for California communities along the foothills of the Sierra Nevada. We conducted a cross-sectional epidemiological study to estimate the fecal shedding of Cryptosporidium oocysts by yellow-bellied marmots and to quantify the environmental loading rate and determine risk factors for Cryptosporidium fecal shedding in this montane wildlife species. The observed proportion of Cryptosporidium positive fecal samples was 14.7% (33/224, positive number relative to total number samples and the environmental loading rate was estimated to be 10,693 oocysts animal-1 day-1. Fecal shedding was associated with the elevation and vegetation status of their habitat. Based on a portion of the 18s rRNA gene sequence of 2 isolates, the Cryptosporidium found in Marmota flaviventris were 99.88%–100% match to multiple isolates of C. parvum in the GenBank.

  11. Drivers of flood damage on event level

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kreibich, H.; Aerts, J. C. J. H.; Apel, H.

    2016-01-01

    Flood risk is dynamic and influenced by many processes related to hazard, exposure and vulnerability. Flood damage increased significantly over the past decades, however, resulting overall economic loss per event is an aggregated indicator and it is difficult to attribute causes to this increasing...... trend. Much has been learned about damaging processes during floods at the micro-scale, e.g. building level. However, little is known about the main factors determining the amount of flood damage on event level. Thus, we analyse and compare paired flood events, i.e. consecutive, similar damaging floods...... that occurred in the same area. In analogy to ’Paired catchment studies’ - a well-established method in hydrology to understand how changes in land use affect streamflow – we will investigate how and why resulting flood damage in a region differed between the first and second consecutive flood events. One...

  12. Flooding On

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    Drenched riverside towns in central and south parts of China were preparing for even worse flooding aswater levels in the country’s huge rivers surged and rainstorms continued.As of July 27,accumulated precipitation since June 16 in 70 percent of the drainage

  13. Flood model for Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palán, Ladislav; Punčochář, Petr

    2017-04-01

    Looking on the impact of flooding from the World-wide perspective, in last 50 years flooding has caused over 460,000 fatalities and caused serious material damage. Combining economic loss from ten costliest flood events (from the same period) returns a loss (in the present value) exceeding 300bn USD. Locally, in Brazil, flood is the most damaging natural peril with alarming increase of events frequencies as 5 out of the 10 biggest flood losses ever recorded have occurred after 2009. The amount of economic and insured losses particularly caused by various flood types was the key driver of the local probabilistic flood model development. Considering the area of Brazil (being 5th biggest country in the World) and the scattered distribution of insured exposure, a domain covered by the model was limited to the entire state of Sao Paolo and 53 additional regions. The model quantifies losses on approx. 90 % of exposure (for regular property lines) of key insurers. Based on detailed exposure analysis, Impact Forecasting has developed this tool using long term local hydrological data series (Agencia Nacional de Aguas) from riverine gauge stations and digital elevation model (Instituto Brasileiro de Geografia e Estatística). To provide most accurate representation of local hydrological behaviour needed for the nature of probabilistic simulation, a hydrological data processing focused on frequency analyses of seasonal peak flows - done by fitting appropriate extreme value statistical distribution and stochastic event set generation consisting of synthetically derived flood events respecting realistic spatial and frequency patterns visible in entire period of hydrological observation. Data were tested for homogeneity, consistency and for any significant breakpoint occurrence in time series so the entire observation or only its subparts were used for further analysis. The realistic spatial patterns of stochastic events are reproduced through the innovative use of d-vine copula

  14. An expanded model: flood-inundation maps for the Leaf River at Hattiesburg, Mississippi, 2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    Storm, John B.

    2014-01-01

    Digital flood-inundation maps for a 6.8-mile reach of the Leaf River at Hattiesburg, Mississippi (Miss.), were created by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) in cooperation with the City of Hattiesburg, City of Petal, Forrest County, Mississippi Emergency Management Agency, Mississippi Department of Homeland Security, and the Emergency Management District. The inundation maps, which can be accessed through the USGS Flood Inundation Mapping Science Web site at http://water.usgs.gov/osw/flood_inundation/, depict estimates of the areal extent and depth of flooding corresponding to selected water levels (stages) at the USGS streamgage at Leaf River at Hattiesburg, Miss. (station no. 02473000). Current conditions for estimating near-real-time areas of inundation by use of USGS streamgage information may be obtained on the Internet at http://waterdata.usgs.gov/. In addition, the information has been provided to the National Weather Service (NWS) for incorporation into their Advanced Hydrologic Prediction Service (AHPS) flood warning system (http://water.weather.gov/ahps/). The NWS forecasts flood hydrographs at many places that are often colocated with USGS streamgages. NWS-forecasted peak-stage information may be used in conjunction with the maps developed in this study to show predicted areas of flood inundation. In this study, flood profiles were computed for the stream reach by means of a one-dimensional step-backwater model. The model was calibrated by using the most current stage-discharge relations at the Leaf River at Hattiesburg, Miss. streamgage (02473000) and documented high-water marks from recent and historical floods. The hydraulic model was then used to determine 13 water-surface profiles for flood stages at 1.0-foot intervals referenced to the streamgage datum and ranging from bankfull to approximately the highest recorded water level at the streamgage. The simulated water-surface profiles were then combined with a geographic information system (GIS

  15. 清原县山洪灾害预警指标遴选与临界值确定方法%The determine method of the critical value of mountain flood disaster warning indicators and selection in Qingyuan County

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    齐永才

    2015-01-01

    清原县独特的自然地理环境决定了该县山洪灾害频发,历史山洪灾害造成的经济损失巨大,有效防御山洪灾害是全县防汛工作的重点。本文结合清原县山洪灾害防御工程体系的建设,对山洪灾害预警指标的遴选与确定进行了简要的阐述、分析,以期为山洪灾害预警预报体系构建提供参考。%Qingyuan unique natural and geographical environment determines the county ’s flood disasters fre-quently,and caused huge economic losses;an effective defense torrential flood disaster is focused on by the county.In this paper,the construction of Qingyuan mountain flood prevention engineering system for the selec-tion and determination of flood disasters early warning indicators are expounded and analyzed briefly ,in order to provide a reference for forecasting flood disasters in early warning system.

  16. Flood inundation extent in storage cell mode

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    G.; Farahi; Saeed; Reza; Khodashenas; B.; Ghahraman; K.; Esmaeeli

    2009-01-01

    An understanding of floodplain processes in general and floodplains flooding in particular are vital issues for river engineers and managers. Insufficient observations of flood inundation extent and the infrequent nature of flood inundation necessitate some sort of predictive tools. In this paper flood inundation extent has been simulated by HEC-RAS software in two storage cell and normal modes and capabilities and limitations of the two models have been determined by comparing simulated and observed flood inundation extent which occurred in the study area on Feb 4th, 2004.

  17. Flood inundation extent in storage cell mode

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    G.Farahi; Saeed Reza Khodashenas; B.Ghahraman; K.Esmaeeli

    2009-01-01

    An understanding of floodplaln processes In general and floodplains flooding in particular are vital issues for river engineers and managers.Insufficient observations of flood inundation extent and the infrequent nature of flood inundation necessitate some sort of predictive tools.In this paper flood in-undation extent has been simulated by HEC-RAS software in two storage cell and normal modes and capabilities and limitations of the two models have been determined by comparing simulated and ob-served flood inundation extent which occurred in the study area on Feb 4th, 2004.

  18. Strength in Numbers: Describing the Flooded Area of Isolated Wetlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Terrie M.; Haag, Kim H.

    2006-01-01

    Thousands of isolated, freshwater wetlands are scattered across the karst1 landscape of central Florida. Most are small (less than 15 acres), shallow, marsh and cypress wetlands that flood and dry seasonally. Wetland health is threatened when wetland flooding patterns are altered either by human activities, such as land-use change and ground-water pumping, or by changes in climate. Yet the small sizes and vast numbers of isolated wetlands in Florida challenge our efforts to characterize them collectively as a statewide water resource. In the northern Tampa Bay area of west-central Florida alone, water levels are measured monthly in more than 400 wetlands by the Southwest Florida Water Management Distirct (SWFWMD). Many wetlands have over a decade of measurements. The usefulness of long-term monitoring of wetland water levels would greatly increase if it described not just the depth of water at a point in the wetland, but also the amount of the total wetland area that was flooded. Water levels can be used to estimate the flooded area of a wetland if the elevation contours of the wetland bottom are determined by bathymetric mapping. Despite the recognized importance of the flooded area to wetland vegetation, bathymetric maps are not available to describe the flooded areas of even a representative number of Florida's isolated wetlands. Information on the bathymetry of isolated wetlands is rare because it is labor intensive to collect the land-surface elevation data needed to create the maps. Five marshes and five cypress wetlands were studied by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) during 2000 to 2004 as part of a large interdisciplinary study of isolated wetlands in central Florida. The wetlands are located either in municipal well fields or on publicly owned lands (fig. 1). The 10 wetlands share similar geology and climate, but differ in their ground-water settings. All have historical water-level data and multiple vegetation surveys. A comprehensive report by Haag and

  19. Flood-inundation maps for the West Branch Susquehanna River near the Boroughs of Lewisburg and Milton, Pennsylvania

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roland, Mark A.; Hoffman, Scott A.

    2014-01-01

    Digital flood-inundation maps for an approximate 8-mile reach of the West Branch Susquehanna River from approximately 2 miles downstream from the Borough of Lewisburg, extending upstream to approximately 1 mile upstream from the Borough of Milton, Pennsylvania, were created by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) in cooperation with the Susquehanna River Basin Commission (SRBC). The inundation maps, which can be accessed through the USGS Flood Inundation Mapping Science Web site at http://water.usgs.gov/osw/flood_inundation/, depict the estimated areal extent and depth of flooding corresponding to selected water levels (stages) at the USGS streamgage 01553500, West Branch Susquehanna River at Lewisburg, Pa. In addition, the information has been provided to the Susquehanna River Basin Commission (SRBC) for incorporation into their Susquehanna Inundation Map Viewer (SIMV) flood warning system (http://maps.srbc.net/simv/). The National Weather Service (NWS) forecasted peak-stage information (http://water.weather.gov/ahps) for USGS streamgage 01553500, West Branch Susquehanna River at Lewisburg, Pa., may be used in conjunction with the maps developed in this study to show predicted areas of flood inundation. In this study, flood profiles were computed for the stream reach by means of a one-dimensional step-backwater model. Calibration of the model was achieved using the most current stage-discharge relations (rating number 11.1) at USGS streamgage 01553500, West Branch Susquehanna River at Lewisburg, Pa., a documented water-surface profile from the December 2, 2010, flood, and recorded peak stage data. The hydraulic model was then used to determine 26 water-surface profiles for flood stages at 1-foot intervals referenced to the streamgage datum ranging from 14 feet (ft) to 39 ft. Modeled flood stages, as defined by NWS, include Action Stage, 14 ft; Flood Stage, 18 ft; Moderate Flood Stage, 23 ft; and Major Flood Stage, 28 ft. Geographic information system (GIS) technology

  20. An evaluation of methods for determining during-storm precipitation phase and the rain/snow transition elevation at the surface in a mountain basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marks, D.; Winstral, A.; Reba, M.; Pomeroy, J.; Kumar, M.

    2013-05-01

    Determining surface precipitation phase is required to properly correct precipitation gage data for wind effects, to determine the hydrologic response to a precipitation event, and for hydrologic modeling when rain will be treated differently from snow. In this paper we present a comparison of several methods for determining precipitation phase using 12 years of hourly precipitation, weather and snow data from a long-term measurement site at Reynolds Mountain East (RME), a headwater catchment within the Reynolds Creek Experimental Watershed (RCEW), in the Owyhee Mountains of Idaho, USA. Methods are based on thresholds of (1) air temperature (Ta) at 0 °C, (2) dual Ta threshold, -1 to 3 °C, (3) dewpoint temperature (Td) at 0 °C, and (4) wet bulb temperature (Tw) at 0 °C. The comparison shows that at the RME Grove site, the dual threshold approach predicts too much snow, while Ta, Td and Tw are generally similar predicting equivalent snow volumes over the 12 year-period indicating that during storms the cloud level is at or close to the surface at this location. To scale up the evaluation of these methods we evaluate them across a 380 m elevation range in RCEW during a large mixed-phase storm event. The event began as snow at all elevations and over the course of 4 h transitioned to rain at the lowest through highest elevations. Using 15-minute measurements of precipitation, changes in snow depth (zs), Ta, Td and Tw, at seven sites through this elevation range, we found precipitation phase linked to the during-storm surface humidity. By measuring humidity along an elevation gradient during the storm we are able to track changes in Td to reliably estimate precipitation phase and effectively track the elevation of the rain/snow transition during the event.

  1. Towards a 1km resolution global flood risk model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bates, Paul; Neal, Jeff; Sampson, Chris; Smith, Andy

    2014-05-01

    Recent advances in computationally efficient numerical algorithms and new High Performance Computing architectures now make high (1-2km) resolution global hydrodynamic models a realistic proposition. However in many areas of the world the data sets and tools necessary to undertake such modelling do not currently exist. In particular, five major problems need to be resolved: (1) the best globally available terrain data (SRTM) was generated from X-band interferometric radar data which does not penetrate vegetation canopies and which has significant problems in determining ground elevations in urban areas; (2) a global river bathymetry data set does not currently exist; (3) most river channels globally are less than the smallest currently resolvable grid scale (1km) and therefore require a sub-grid treatment; (4) a means to estimate the magnitude of the T year flood at any point along the global river network does not currently exist; and (5) a large proportion of flood losses are generated by off-floodplain surface water flows which are not well represented in current hydrodynamic modelling systems. In this paper we propose solutions to each of these five issues as part of a concerted effort to develop a 1km (or better) resolution global flood hazard model. We describe the new numerical algorithms, computer architectures and computational resources used, and demonstrate solutions to the five previously intractable problems identified above. We conduct a validation study of the modelling against satellite imagery of major flooding on the Mississippi-Missouri confluence plain in the central USA before outlining a proof-of-concept regional study for SE Asia as a step towards a global scale model. For SE Asia we simulate flood hazard for ten different flood return periods over the entire Thailand, Cambodia, Vietnam, Malaysia and Laos region at 1km resolution and show that the modelling produces coherent, consistent and sensible simulations of extent and water depth.

  2. Flooding in Illinois, April-June 2002

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avery, Charles; Smith, D.F.

    2002-01-01

    Widespread flooding occurred throughout most of Illinois in spring 2002 as a result of multiple intense rainstorms that moved through the State during an extended 2-month period from the third week in April through the month of May in central and southern Illinois, the first week in June in northern Illinois, and the second week in June in west-central Illinois. The scale of flooding was highly variable in time and intensity throughout the State. A Federal disaster was declared for central and southern Illinois to deal with the extensive damage incurred during the severe weather, and to provide emergency aid relief. Discharge and stage records for the flood periods described above are presented for 193 streamflow-gaging stations throughout Illinois and in drainages just upstream of the State. New maximum instantaneous discharge was recorded at 12 stations during this flood period, and new maximum stage was recorded at 15 stations. Flood stage was exceeded for at least 1 day during this 2-month period at 67 of the 82 stations with established flood-stage elevations given by the National Weather Service. Of the 162 streamflowgaging stations with an established flood-frequency distribution, a 5-year or greater flood discharge was recorded at 87 stations, and a 100-year or greater flood discharge occurred at six stations.

  3. Flood-inundation maps for the North Branch Elkhart River at Cosperville, Indiana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Moon H.; Johnson, Esther M.

    2014-01-01

    Digital flood-inundation maps for a reach of the North Branch Elkhart River at Cosperville, Indiana (Ind.), were created by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) in cooperation with the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Detroit District. The inundation maps, which can be accessed through the USGS Flood Inundation Mapping Science Web site at http://water.usgs.gov/osw/flood_inundation/ depict estimates of the areal extent and depth of flooding corresponding to selected water levels (stages) at USGS streamgage 04100222, North Branch Elkhart River at Cosperville, Ind. Current conditions for estimating near-real-time areas of inundation using USGS streamgage information may be obtained on the Internet at http://waterdata.usgs.gov/in/nwis/uv?site_no=04100222. In addition, information has been provided to the National Weather Service (NWS) for incorporation into their Advanced Hydrologic Prediction Service (AHPS) flood warning system (http:/water.weather.gov/ahps/). The NWS AHPS forecasts flood hydrographs at many places that are often colocated with USGS streamgages, including the North Branch Elkhart River at Cosperville, Ind. NWS AHPS-forecast peak-stage information may be used in conjunction with the maps developed in this study to show predicted areas of flood inundation. For this study, flood profiles were computed for the North Branch Elkhart River reach by means of a one-dimensional step-backwater model. The hydraulic model was calibrated by using the most current stage-discharge relations at USGS streamgage 04100222, North Branch Elkhart River at Cosperville, Ind., and preliminary high-water marks from the flood of March 1982. The calibrated hydraulic model was then used to determine four water-surface profiles for flood stages at 1-foot intervals referenced to the streamgage datum and ranging from bankfull to the highest stage of the current stage-discharge rating curve. The simulated water-surface profiles were then combined with a geographic information system (GIS

  4. LAMINATION METHOD OF FLOOD WADIS AND PROJECTION OF THE LAMINATED FLOOD HYDROGRAPH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Ladjel

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The catastrophic floods in semi-arid areas are often caused by floods storm that occur at any time during the year, including the hot season. The prevention of these floods could be done by the construction of small dam hills. This requires the control of theoretical concepts hydrological sizing, especially the hydrological structure to evacuate floods. We suggest a method to calculate the optimal regulation flow of the flood and also the development of a direct calculation formula of a laminated maximum flow. The analysis of the hydro graph’s analogy at the input and the output of the dam, allow searching the dependencies between their characteristics. knowing the characteristics of the hydrograph flood of the project and the reserved capacity for the amortization of the flood, we can directly determine the laminated maximum flow and project the hydrograph of the laminated flood.

  5. Evidence of floods on the Potomac River from anatomical abnormalities in the wood of flood-plain trees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanosky, Thomas M.

    1983-01-01

    Ash trees along the Potomac River flood plain near Washington, D.C., were studied to determine changes in wood anatomy related to flood damage, and anomalous growth was compared to flood records for April 15 to August 31, 1930-79. Collectively, anatomical evidence was detected for 33 of the 34 growing-season floods during the study period. Evidence of 12 floods prior to 1930 was also noted, including catastrophic ones in 1889 and 1924. Trees damaged after the transition from earlywood to latewood growth typically formed ' flood rings ' of enlarged vessels within the latewood zone. Trees damaged near the beginning of the growth year developed flood rings within, or contiguous with, the earlywood. Both patterns are assumed to have developed when flood-damaged trees produced a second crop of leaves. Trees damaged by high-magnitude floods developed well formed flood rings along the entire height and around the entire circumference of the stem. Small floods were generally associated wtih diffuse or discontinuous anomalies restricted to stem apices. Frequency of flood rings was positively related to flood magnitude, and time of flood generation during the tree-growth season was estimated from the radial position of anomalous growth relative to annual ring width. Reconstructing tree heights in a year of flood-ring formation gives a minimum stage estimate along local stream reaches. Some trees provided evidence of numerous floods. Those with the greatest number of flood rings grew on frequently flooded surfaces subject to flood-flow velocities of at least 1 m/s, and more typically greater than 2 m/s. Tree size, more than age, was related to flood-ring formation. Trees kept small by frequent flood damage had more flood rings than taller trees of comparable age. (USGS)

  6. 基于ArcGIS的洪水淹没分析与三维模拟%Analysis and 3D Simulation of Flood Inundation Based on ArcGIS System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙君; 奚赛英; 尤迪; 郑付涛

    2012-01-01

    Determining flood inundation area is core of flood damage assessment and flood control decision.Using ArcMap tool,natural flood prevention capacity of the analysis region is classified by non-source flood analysis method based on TIN data.The flood inundation area is extracted and statistical calculated with given water level condition,and the relation formula of flood level elevation and inundation area is also established,which is applied to flood inundation rapid prediction.3D simulation of non-source flood progressive inundation considering raising flood level is provided.%洪水淹没范围的确定是洪灾损失评估和防洪决策的核心环节。基于TIN数据,运用ArcMap,采用"无源淹没分析"方法对区域天然防洪能力进行划分;实现了在给定水位条件下,对洪水淹没范围提取与统计计算,建立了洪水水位高程和淹没面积关系公式,并用于洪水淹没快速预测;运用ArcScene,对水位抬升的"无源渐进淹没"情况进行了三维模拟。

  7. Hydrology, geomorphology, and flood profiles of the Mendenhall River, Juneau, Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neal, Edward G.; Host, Randy H.

    1999-01-01

    Water-surface-profile elevations for the 2-, 20-, 25-, 50-, and 100-year floods were computed for the Mendenhall River near Juneau, Alaska, using the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Hydrologic Engineering Center River Analysis System model. The peak discharges for the selected recurrence intervals were determined using the standard log-Pearson type III method. Channel cross sections were surveyed at 60 locations to define hydraulic characteristics over a 5.5-mile reach of river beginning at Mendenhall Lake outlet and extending to the river mouth. A peak flow of 12,400 cubic feet per second occurred on the Mendenhall River on October 20, 1998. This discharge is equivalent to about a 10-year flood on the Mendenhall River and floodmarks produced by this flood were surveyed and used to calibrate the model. The study area is currently experiencing land-surface uplift rates of about 0.05 foot per year. This high rate of uplift has the potential to cause incision or downcutting of the river channel through lowering of the base level. Vertical datum used in the study area was established about 37 years before the most recent surveys of river-channel geometry. The resulting difference between land-surface elevations and sea level continues to increase. Continuing incision of the river channel combined with increased land-surface elevations with respect to sea level may result in computed flood profiles that are higher than actual existing conditions in the tidally influenced reach of the river.

  8. Flood loss reduction of private households due to building precautionary measures -- lessons learned from the Elbe flood in August 2002

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Kreibich

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Building houses in inundation areas is always a risk, since absolute flood protection is impossible. Where settlements already exist, flood damage must be kept as small as possible. Suitable means are precautionary measures such as elevated building configuration or flood adapted use. However, data about the effects of such measures are rare, and consequently, the efficiency of different precautionary measures is unclear. To improve the knowledge about efficient precautionary measures, approximately 1200 private households, which were affected by the 2002 flood at the river Elbe and its tributaries, were interviewed about the flood damage of their buildings and contents as well as about their precautionary measures. The affected households had little flood experience, i.e. only 15% had experienced a flood before. 59% of the households stated that they did not know, that they live in a flood prone area. Thus, people were not well prepared, e.g. just 11% had used and furnished their house in a flood adapted way and only 6% had a flood adapted building structure. Building precautionary measures are mainly effective in areas with frequent small floods. But also during the extreme flood event in 2002 building measures reduced the flood loss. From the six different building precautionary measures under study, flood adapted use and adapted interior fitting were the most effective ones. They reduced the damage ratio for buildings by 46% and 53%, respectively. The damage ratio for contents was reduced by 48% due to flood adapted use and by 53% due to flood adapted interior fitting. The 2002 flood motivated a relatively large number of people to implement private precautionary measures, but still much more could be done. Hence, to further reduce flood losses, people's motivation to invest in precaution should be improved. More information campaigns and financial incentives should be issued to encourage precautionary measures.

  9. Assessment of Flooded Areas Projections and Floods Potential Impacts Applying Remote Sensing Imagery and Demographic Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, D. A.; Carriello, F.; Fernandes, P. J. F.; Garofolo Lopes, L.; Siqueira Júnior, J. L.

    2016-06-01

    Assessing vulnerability and potential impacts associated with extreme discharges requires an accurate topographic description in order to estimate the extension of flooded areas. However, in most populated regions, topographic data obtained by in-situ measurements is not available. In this case, digital elevation models derived from remote sensing date are usually applied. Moreover, this digital elevation models have intrinsic errors that introduce bigger uncertainty in results than the associated to hydrological projections. On the other hand, estimations of flooded areas through remote sensing images provide accurate information, which could be used for the construction of river level-flooded area relationships regarding vulnerability assessment. In this work, this approach is applied for the city of Porto Velho in the Brazilian Amazonia to assess potential vulnerability to floods associated with climate change projections. The approach is validated using census data, provided by the Brazilian Institute of Geography and Statistics, and information about socio-economical injuries associated to historical floods, provided by the Brazilian Civil Defence. Hydrological projections under climate change are carried out using several downscaling of climate projections as inputs in a hydrological model. Results show more accurate estimation of flood impacts than the obtained using digital elevation models derivate from remote sensing data. This reduces uncertainties in the assessment of vulnerability to floods associated with climate change in the region.

  10. Determination of vapor-liquid equilibrium data in microfluidic segmented flows at elevated pressures using Raman spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luther, Sebastian K; Stehle, Simon; Weihs, Kristian; Will, Stefan; Braeuer, Andreas

    2015-08-18

    A fast, noninvasive, and efficient analytical measurement strategy for the characterization of vapor-liquid equilibria (VLE) is presented, which is based on phase (state of matter) selective Raman spectroscopy in multiphase flows inside microcapillay systems (MCS). Isothermal VLE data were measured in binary and ternary mixtures composed of acetone, water, carbon dioxide or nitrogen at elevated pressures up to 10 MPa and temperatures up to 333 K. For validation, the obtained data were compared with literature data and reference measurements in a high-pressure variable volume cell. Additionally, the mixtures were investigated at temperatures and pressures where no data is available in literature to extend the high-pressure VLE database.

  11. Urban flood risk assessment using sewer flooding databases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caradot, Nicolas; Granger, Damien; Chapgier, Jean; Cherqui, Frédéric; Chocat, Bernard

    2011-01-01

    Sustainable water management is a global challenge for the 21st century. One key aspect remains protection against urban flooding. The main objective is to ensure or maintain an adequate level of service for all inhabitants. However, level of service is still difficult to assess and the high-risk locations difficult to identify. In this article, we propose a methodology, which (i) allows water managers to measure the service provided by the urban drainage system with regard to protection against urban flooding; and (ii) helps stakeholders to determine effective strategies for improving the service provided. One key aspect of this work is to use a database of sewer flood event records to assess flood risk. Our methodology helps urban water managers to assess the risk of sewer flooding; this approach does not seek to predict flooding but rather to inform decision makers on the current level of risk and on actions which need to be taken to reduce the risk. This work is based on a comprehensive definition of risk, including territorial vulnerability and perceptions of urban water stakeholders. This paper presents the results and the methodological contributions from implementing the methodology on two case studies: the cities of Lyon and Mulhouse.

  12. Flood-inundation maps for the East Fork White River near Bedford, Indiana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fowler, Kathleen K.

    2014-01-01

    Digital flood-inundation maps for an 1.8-mile reach of the East Fork White River near Bedford, Indiana (Ind.) were created by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) in cooperation with the Indiana Department of Transportation. The inundation maps, which can be accessed through the USGS Flood Inundation Mapping Science Web site at http://water.usgs.gov/osw/flood_inundation/ depict estimates of the areal extent and depth of flooding corresponding to selectedwater levels (stages) at USGS streamgage 03371500, East Fork White River near Bedford, Ind. Current conditions for estimating near-real-time areas of inundation using USGS streamgage information may be obtained on the Internet at http://waterdata.usgs.gov/in/nwis/uv?site_no=03371500. In addition, information has been provided to the National Weather Service (NWS) for incorporation into their Advanced Hydrologic Prediction Service (AHPS) flood warning system (http://water.weather.gov/ahps/). The NWS forecasts flood hydrographs at many places that are often colocated with USGS streamgages, including the East Fork White River near Bedford, Ind. NWS-forecasted peak-stage information may be used in conjunction with the maps developed in this study to show predicted areas of flood inundation. For this study, flood profiles were computed for the East Fork White River reach by means of a one-dimensional step-backwater model. The hydraulic model was calibrated by using the most current stage-discharge relations at USGS streamgage 03371500, East Fork White River near Bedford, Ind., and documented high-water marks from the flood of June 2008. The calibrated hydraulic model was then used to determine 20 water-surface profiles for flood stages at 1-foot intervals referenced to the streamgage datum and ranging from bankfull to the highest stage of the current stage-discharge rating curve. The simulated water-surface profiles were then combined with a geographic information system (GIS) digital elevation model (DEM, derived from

  13. Drivers of flood damage on event level

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreibich, Heidi

    2016-04-01

    Flood risk is dynamic and influenced by many processes related to hazard, exposure and vulnerability. Flood damage increased significantly over the past decades, however, resulting overall economic loss per event is an aggregated indicator and it is difficult to attribute causes to this increasing trend. Much has been learned about damaging processes during floods at the micro-scale, e.g. building level. However, little is known about the main factors determining the amount of flood damage on event level. Thus, we analyse and compare paired flood events, i.e. consecutive, similar damaging floods that occurred in the same area. In analogy to 'Paired catchment studies' - a well-established method in hydrology to understand how changes in land use affect streamflow - we will investigate how and why resulting flood damage in a region differed between the first and second consecutive flood events. One example are the 2002 and 2013 floods in the Elbe and Danube catchments in Germany. The 2002 flood caused the highest economic damage (EUR 11600 million) due to a natural hazard event in Germany. Damage was so high due to extreme flood hazard triggered by extreme precipitation and a high number of resulting dyke breaches. Additionally, exposure hotspots like the city of Dresden at the Elbe river as well as some smaller municipalities at the river Mulde (e.g. Grimma, Eilenburg, Bitterfeld, Dessau) were severely impacted. However, affected parties and authorities learned from the extreme flood in 2002, and many governmental flood risk programs and initiatives were launched. Considerable improvements since 2002 occurred on many levels that deal with flood risk reduction and disaster response, in particular in 1) increased flood prevention by improved spatial planning, 2) an increased number of property-level mitigation measures, 3) more effective early warning and improved coordination of disaster response and 4) a more targeted maintenance of flood defence systems and their

  14. Social media for disaster response during floods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eilander, D.; van de Vries, C.; Baart, F.; van Swol, R.; Wagemaker, J.; van Loenen, A.

    2015-12-01

    During floods it is difficult to obtain real-time accurate information about the extent and severity of the hazard. This information is very important for disaster risk reduction management and crisis relief organizations. Currently, real-time information is derived from few sources such as field reports, traffic camera's, satellite images and areal images. However, getting a real-time and accurate picture of the situation on the ground remains difficult. At the same time, people affected by natural hazards increasingly share their observations and their needs through digital media. Unlike conventional monitoring systems, Twitter data contains a relatively large number of real-time ground truth observations representing both physical hazard characteristics and hazard impacts. In the city of Jakarta, Indonesia, the intensity of unique flood related tweets during a flood event, peaked at almost 900 tweets per minute during floods in early 2015. Flood events around the world in 2014/2015 yielded large numbers of flood related tweets: from Philippines (85.000) to Pakistan (82.000) to South-Korea (50.000) to Detroit (20.000). The challenge here is to filter out useful content from this cloud of data, validate these observations and convert them to readily usable information. In Jakarta, flood related tweets often contain information about the flood depth. In a pilot we showed that this type of information can be used for real-time mapping of the flood extent by plotting these observations on a Digital Elevation Model. Uncertainties in the observations were taken into account by assigning a probability to each observation indicating its likelihood to be correct based on statistical analysis of the total population of tweets. The resulting flood maps proved to be correct for about 75% of the neighborhoods in Jakarta. Further cross-validation of flood related tweets against (hydro-) meteorological data is to likely improve the skill of the method.

  15. Integrating Fluvial and Oceanic Drivers in Operational Flooding Forecasts for San Francisco Bay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herdman, Liv; Erikson, Li; Barnard, Patrick; Kim, Jungho; Cifelli, Rob; Johnson, Lynn

    2016-04-01

    The nine counties that make up the San Francisco Bay area are home to 7.5 million people and these communties are susceptible to flooding along the bay shoreline and inland creeks that drain to the bay. A forecast model that integrates fluvial and oceanic drivers is necessary for predicting flooding in this complex urban environment. The U.S. Geological Survey ( USGS) and National Weather Service (NWS) are developing a state-of-the-art flooding forecast model for the San Francisco Bay area that will predict watershed and ocean-based flooding up to 72 hours in advance of an approaching storm. The model framework for flood forecasts is based on the USGS-developed Coastal Storm Modeling System (CoSMoS) that was applied to San Francisco Bay under the Our Coast Our Future project. For this application, we utilize Delft3D-FM, a hydrodynamic model based on a flexible mesh grid, to calculate water levels that account for tidal forcing, seasonal water level anomalies, surge and in-Bay generated wind waves from the wind and pressure fields of a NWS forecast model, and tributary discharges from the Research Distributed Hydrologic Model (RDHM), developed by the NWS Office of Hydrologic Development. The flooding extent is determined by overlaying the resulting water levels onto a recently completed 2-m digital elevation model of the study area which best resolves the extensive levee and tidal marsh systems in the region. Here we present initial pilot results of hindcast winter storms in January 2010 and December 2012, where the flooding is driven by oceanic and fluvial factors respectively. We also demonstrate the feasibility of predicting flooding on an operational time scale that incorporates both atmospheric and hydrologic forcings.

  16. Flooding and Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Clearinghouse for Educational Facilities, 2011

    2011-01-01

    According to the Federal Emergency Management Agency, flooding is the nation's most common natural disaster. Some floods develop slowly during an extended period of rain or in a warming trend following a heavy snow. Flash floods can occur quickly, without any visible sign of rain. Catastrophic floods are associated with burst dams and levees,…

  17. Mega deposits and erosive features related to the glacial lake Nedre Glomsjø outburst flood, southeastern Norway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Høgaas, Fredrik; Longva, Oddvar

    2016-11-01

    In this paper we present a suite of erosional remnants, mega deposits and subtle bar morphology that we relate to the outburst flood from the glacial lake Nedre Glomsjø at the end of the last Ice Age. By using large datasets of airborne LiDAR data implemented in a geographic information system (GIS), we have mapped flood related features along the Glomma and Vrangselva rivers in southeastern Norway. The unprecedented overview of the valley reaches obtained by the vegetation-free LiDAR-derived digital elevation models (DEM) has revealed a set of hitherto undocumented landforms. Persisting erosive lines - indicators of the uppermost flooded level - are carved into surficial deposits in the hillsides and are found as high as 80-90 m above the modern valley floor. By using the indicators as an upper flood boundary, we have computed cross-sectional profiles showing that the flood in some reaches inundated more than 120 000 m2 of the valley. Large, streamlined bed forms, which we interpret as flood bars, drape sections of the valley floor, some several kilometers long. The most morphologically striking - pendant bars - are developed behind flood flow projections, such as bedrock knolls or in lee of a valley bend. Flood bars occur in the entire study area, but are more widespread in the north and generally decrease in size moving in a downstream direction. Kettle holes and ice-block obstacle marks from icebergs arrested during the flood are common. These features support the theory of a catastrophic drainage event, but also indicate a pattern of differential erosion and deposition that allowed us to interpret palaeoflow on individual bars. Vast aeolian dune fields in the region are interpreted as a secondary product of the flood, as deposits related to the event were mobilised by northerly winds momentarily after the flood waned. The dune fields cover an excess of 50 km2 and reveal that the region was a highly active periglacial desert after the flood. Our mapping

  18. Potential flood volume of Himalayan glacial lakes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Fujita

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Glacial lakes are potentially dangerous sources of glacial lake outburst floods (GLOFs, and represent a serious natural hazard in Himalayan countries. Despite the development of various indices aimed at determining the outburst probability, an objective evaluation of the thousands of Himalayan glacial lakes has yet to be completed. In this study we propose a single index, based on the depression angle from the lakeshore, which allows the lakes to be assessed using remotely sensed digital elevation models (DEMs. We test our approach on five lakes in Nepal, Bhutan, and Tibet using images taken by the declassified Hexagon KH-9 satellite before these lakes experienced an outburst flood. All five lakes had a steep lakefront area (SLA, on which a depression angle was steeper than our proposed threshold of 10° before the GLOF event, but the SLA was no longer evident after the events. We further calculated the potential flood volume (PFV; i.e., the maximum volume of floodwater that could be released if the lake surface was lowered sufficiently to eradicate the SLA. This approach guarantees repeatability to assess the possibility of GLOF hazards because it requires no particular expertise to carry out, though the PFV does not quantify the GLOF risk. We calculated PFVs for more than 2000 Himalayan glacial lakes using visible band images and DEMs of ASTER data. The PFV distribution follows a power-law function. We found that 794 lakes did not have an SLA, and consequently had a PFV of zero, while we also identified 49 lakes with PFVs of over 10 million m3, which is a comparable volume to that of recorded major GLOFs. This PFV approach allows us to preliminarily identify and prioritize those Himalayan glacial lakes that require further detailed investigation on GLOF hazards and risk.

  19. A computationally efficient depression-filling algorithm for digital elevation models, applied to proglacial lake drainage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berends, Constantijn J.; van de Wal, Roderik S. W.

    2016-12-01

    Many processes govern the deglaciation of ice sheets. One of the processes that is usually ignored is the calving of ice in lakes that temporarily surround the ice sheet. In order to capture this process a "flood-fill algorithm" is needed. Here we present and evaluate several optimizations to a standard flood-fill algorithm in terms of computational efficiency. As an example, we determine the land-ocean mask for a 1 km resolution digital elevation model (DEM) of North America and Greenland, a geographical area of roughly 7000 by 5000 km (roughly 35 million elements), about half of which is covered by ocean. Determining the land-ocean mask with our improved flood-fill algorithm reduces computation time by 90 % relative to using a standard stack-based flood-fill algorithm. This implies that it is now feasible to include the calving of ice in lakes as a dynamical process inside an ice-sheet model. We demonstrate this by using bedrock elevation, ice thickness and geoid perturbation fields from the output of a coupled ice-sheet-sea-level equation model at 30 000 years before present and determine the extent of Lake Agassiz, using both the standard and improved versions of the flood-fill algorithm. We show that several optimizations to the flood-fill algorithm used for filling a depression up to a water level, which is not defined beforehand, decrease the computation time by up to 99 %. The resulting reduction in computation time allows determination of the extent and volume of depressions in a DEM over large geographical grids or repeatedly over long periods of time, where computation time might otherwise be a limiting factor. The algorithm can be used for all glaciological and hydrological models, which need to trace the evolution over time of lakes or drainage basins in general.

  20. Determining the Suitability of Different Digital Elevation Models and Satellite Images for Fancy Maps. An Example of Cyprus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drachal, J.; Kawel, A. K.

    2016-06-01

    The article describes the possibility of developing an overall map of the selected area on the basis of publicly available data. Such a map would take the form designed by the author with the colors that meets his expectations and a content, which he considers to be appropriate. Among the data available it was considered the use of satellite images of the terrain in real colors and, in the form of shaded relief, digital terrain models with different resolutions of the terrain mesh. Specifically the considered data were: MODIS, Landsat 8, GTOPO-30, SRTM-30, SRTM-1, SRTM-3, ASTER. For the test area the island of Cyprus was chosen because of the importance in tourism, a relatively small area and a clearly defined boundary. In the paper there are shown and discussed various options of the Cyprus terrain image obtained synthetically from variants of Modis, Landsat and digital elevation models of different resolutions.

  1. Street floods in Metro Manila and possible solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lagmay, Alfredo Mahar; Mendoza, Jerico; Cipriano, Fatima; Delmendo, Patricia Anne; Lacsamana, Micah Nieves; Moises, Marc Anthony; Pellejera, Nicanor; Punay, Kenneth Niño; Sabio, Glenn; Santos, Laurize; Serrano, Jonathan; Taniza, Herbert James; Tingin, Neil Eneri

    2017-09-01

    Urban floods from thunderstorms cause severe problems in Metro Manila due to road traffic. Using Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR)-derived topography, flood simulations and anecdotal reports, the root of surface flood problems in Metro Manila is identified. Majority of flood-prone areas are along the intersection of creeks and streets located in topographic lows. When creeks overflow or when rapidly accumulated street flood does not drain fast enough to the nearest stream channel, the intersecting road also gets flooded. Possible solutions include the elevation of roads or construction of well-designed drainage structures leading to the creeks. Proposed solutions to the flood problem of Metro Manila may avoid paralyzing traffic problems due to short-lived rain events, which according to Japan International Cooperation Agency (JICA) cost the Philippine economy 2.4billionpesos/day. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  2. Decision Support for Flood Event Prediction and Monitoring

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mioc, Darka; Anton, François; Liang, Gengsheng

    2007-01-01

    In this paper the development of Web GIS based decision support system for flood events is presented. To improve flood prediction we developed the decision support system for flood prediction and monitoring that integrates hydrological modelling and CARIS GIS. We present the methodology for data...... integration, floodplain delineation, and online map interfaces. Our Web-based GIS model can dynamically display observed and predicted flood extents for decision makers and the general public. The users can access Web-based GIS that models current flood events and displays satellite imagery and digital...... elevation model integrated with flood plain area. The system can show how the flooding prediction based on the output from hydrological modeling for the next 48 hours along the lower Saint John River Valley....

  3. Application of elevated temperature-dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction for determination of organophosphorus pesticides residues in aqueous samples followed by gas chromatography-flame ionization detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farajzadeh, Mir Ali; Afshar Mogaddam, Mohammad Reza; Rezaee Aghdam, Samaneh; Nouri, Nina; Bamorrowat, Mahdi

    2016-12-01

    In the present study, an elevated temperature, dispersive, liquid-liquid microextraction/gas chromatography-flame ionization detection was investigated for the determination, pre-concentration, and extraction of six organophosphorus pesticides (malathion, phosalone, dichlorvos, diazinon, profenofos, and chlorpyrifos) residues in fruit juice and aqueous samples. A mixture of 1,2-dibromoethane (extraction solvent) and dimethyl sulfoxide (disperser solvent) was injected rapidly into the sample solution heated at an elevated temperature. Analytical parameters, including enrichment factors (1600-2075), linearity (r>0.994), limits of detection (0.82-2.72ngmL(-1)) and quantification (2.60-7.36ngmL(-1)), relative standard deviations (<7%) and extraction recoveries (64-83%), showed the high efficiency of the method developed for analysis of the target analytes. The proposed procedure was used effectively to analyse selected analytes in river water and fruit juice, and diazinon was found at ngmL(-1) concentrations in apple juice.

  4. Coupling Fluvial and Oceanic Drivers in Flooding Forecasts for San Francisco Bay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herdman, L.; Kim, J.; Cifelli, R.; Barnard, P.; Erikson, L. H.; Johnson, L. E.; Chandrasekar, V.

    2016-12-01

    San Francisco Bay is a highly urbanized estuary and the surrounding communities are susceptible to flooding along the bay shoreline and inland rivers and creeks that drain to the Bay. A forecast model that integrates fluvial and oceanic drivers is necessary for predicting flooding in this complex urban environment. This study introduces the state-of-the-art coupling of the USGS Coastal Storm Modeling System (CoSMoS) with the NWS Research Distributed Hydrologic Model (RDHM) for San Francisco Bay. For this application, we utilize Delft3D-FM, a hydrodynamic model based on a flexible mesh grid, to calculate water levels that account for tidal forcing, seasonal water level anomalies, surge and in-Bay generated wind waves from the wind and pressure fields of a NWS forecast model. The tributary discharges from RDHM are dynamic, meteorologically driven allowing for operational use of CoSMoS which has previously relied on statistical estimates of river discharge. The flooding extent is determined by overlaying the resulting maximum water levels onto a recently updated 2-m digital elevation model of the study area which best resolves the extensive levee and tidal marsh systems in the region. The results we present here are focused on the interaction of the Bay and the Napa River watershed. This study demonstrates the interoperability of the CoSMoS and RDHM prediction models. We also use this pilot region to examine storm flooding impacts in a series of storm scenarios that simulate 5-100yr return period events in terms of either coastal or fluvial events. These scenarios demonstrate the wide range of possible flooding outcomes considering rainfall recurrence intervals, soil moisture conditions, storm surge, wind speed, and tides (spring and neap). With a simulated set of over 25 storm scenarios we show how the extent, level, and duration of flooding is dependent on these atmospheric and hydrologic parameters and we also determine a range of likely flood events.

  5. Storage and flood routing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, R.W.; Godfrey, R.G.

    1960-01-01

    The basic equations used in flood routing are developed from the law of continuity. In each method the assumptions are discussed to enable the user to select an appropriate technique. In the stage-storage method the storage is related to the mean gage height in the reach under consideration. In the discharge-storage method the storage is determined, from weighted values of inflow and outflow discharge. In the reservoir-storage method the storage is considered as a function of outflow discharge alone. A detailed example is given for each method to illustrate that particular technique.

  6. Millennial scale variability in high magnitude flooding across Britain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macdonald, N.

    2014-09-01

    The last decade has witnessed severe flooding across much of the globe, but have these floods really been exceptional? Globally, relatively few instrumental river flow series extend beyond 50 years, with short records presenting significant challenges in determining flood risk from high-magnitude floods. A perceived increase in extreme floods in recent years has decreased public confidence in conventional flood risk estimates; the results affect society (insurance costs), individuals (personal vulnerability) and companies (e.g. water resource managers - flood/drought risk). Here we show how historical records from Britain have improved understanding of high magnitude floods, by examining past spatial and temporal variability. The findings identify that whilst recent floods are notable, several comparable periods of increased flooding are identifiable historically, with periods of greater frequency (flood-rich periods) or/and larger floods. The use of historical records identifies that the largest floods often transcend single catchments affecting regions and that the current flood rich period is not exceptional.

  7. Flood-inundation maps for Indian Creek and Tomahawk Creek, Johnson County, Kansas, 2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, Arin J.; Studley, Seth E.

    2016-01-25

    Digital flood-inundation maps for a 6.4-mile upper reach of Indian Creek from College Boulevard to the confluence with Tomahawk Creek, a 3.9-mile reach of Tomahawk Creek from 127th Street to the confluence with Indian Creek, and a 1.9-mile lower reach of Indian Creek from the confluence with Tomahawk Creek to just beyond the Kansas/Missouri border at State Line Road in Johnson County, Kansas, were created by the U.S. Geological Survey in cooperation with the city of Overland Park, Kansas. The flood-inundation maps, which can be accessed through the U.S. Geological Survey Flood Inundation Mapping Science Web site at http://water.usgs.gov/osw/flood_inundation/, depict estimates of the areal extent and depth of flooding corresponding to selected water levels (stages) at the U.S. Geological Survey streamgages on Indian Creek at Overland Park, Kansas; Indian Creek at State Line Road, Leawood, Kansas; and Tomahawk Creek near Overland Park, Kansas. Near real time stages at these streamgages may be obtained on the Web from the U.S. Geological Survey National Water Information System at http://waterdata.usgs.gov/nwis or the National Weather Service Advanced Hydrologic Prediction Service at http://water.weather.gov/ahps/, which also forecasts flood hydrographs at these sites.Flood profiles were computed for the stream reaches by means of a one-dimensional step-backwater model. The model was calibrated for each reach by using the most current stage-discharge relations at the streamgages. The hydraulic models were then used to determine 15 water-surface profiles for Indian Creek at Overland Park, Kansas; 17 water-surface profiles for Indian Creek at State Line Road, Leawood, Kansas; and 14 water-surface profiles for Tomahawk Creek near Overland Park, Kansas, for flood stages at 1-foot intervals referenced to the streamgage datum and ranging from bankfull to the next interval above the 0.2-percent annual exceedance probability flood level (500-year recurrence interval). The

  8. A Cascading Storm-Flood-Landslide Guidance System: Development and Application in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Ziyue; Tang, Guoqiang; Long, Di; Ma, Meihong; Hong, Yang

    2016-04-01

    Flash floods and landslides, triggered by storms, often interact and cause cascading effects on human lives and property. Satellite remote sensing data has significant potential use in analysis of these natural hazards. As one of the regions continuously affected by severe flash floods and landslides, Yunnan Province, located in Southwest China, has a complex mountainous hydrometeorology and suffers from frequent heavy rainfalls from May through to late September. Taking Yunnan as a test-bed, this study proposed a Cascading Storm-Flood-Landslide Guidance System to progressively analysis and evaluate the risk of the multi-hazards based on multisource satellite remote sensing data. First, three standardized rainfall amounts (average daily amount in flood seasons, maximum 1h and maximum 6h amount) from the products of Topical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) Multi-satellite Precipitation Analysis (TMPA) were used as rainfall indicators to derive the StorM Hazard Index (SMHI). In this process, an integrated approach of the Analytic Hierarchy Process (AHP) and the Information-Entropy theory was adopted to determine the weight of each indicator. Then, land cover and vegetation cover data from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) products, soil type from the Harmonized World Soil Database (HWSD) soil map, and slope from the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) data were add as semi-static geo-topographical indicators to derive the Flash Flood Hazard Index (FFHI). Furthermore, three more relevant landslide-controlling indicators, including elevation, slope angle and soil text were involved to derive the LandSlide Hazard Index (LSHI). Further inclusion of GDP, population and prevention measures as vulnerability indicators enabled to consecutively predict the risk of storm to flash flood and landslide, respectively. Consequently, the spatial patterns of the hazard indices show that the southeast of Yunnan has more possibility to encounter with storms

  9. HYDRAULIC SIMULATION OF FLASH FLOOD AS TRIGGERED BY NATURAL DAM BREAK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanuar Tri Kurniawan

    2015-05-01

    Calibration model result showed that the height of natural dam significantly influence changes of water surface elevation at control point. Tracing of flood result in reconstruction of January 2006 flood showed the conformity with the real event. It was observed from the arrival time of flood at certain location. From obtained results, it can be concluded that simulation modeling gave the acceptable results.

  10. Real-Time Application of Multi-Satellite Precipitation Analysis for Floods and Landslides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adler, Robert; Hong, Yang; Huffman, George

    2007-01-01

    Satellite data acquired and processed in real time now have the potential to provide the spacetime information on rainfall needed to monitor flood and landslide events around the world. This can be achieved by integrating the satellite-derived forcing data with hydrological models and landslide algorithms. Progress in using the TRMM Multi-satellite Precipitation Analysis (TMPA) as input to flood and landslide forecasts is outlined, with a focus on understanding limitations of the rainfall data and impacts of those limitations on flood/landslide analyses. Case studies of both successes and failures will be shown, as well as comparison with ground comparison data sets-- both in terms of rainfall and in terms of flood/landslide events. In addition to potential uses in real-time, the nearly ten years of TMPA data allow retrospective running of the models to examine variations in extreme events. The flood determination algorithm consists of four major components: 1) multi-satellite precipitation estimation; 2) characterization of land surface including digital elevation from NASA SRTM (Shuttle Radar Terrain Mission), topography-derived hydrologic parameters such as flow direction, flow accumulation, basin, and river network etc.; 3) a hydrological model to infiltrate rainfall and route overland runoff; and 4) an implementation interface to relay the input data to the models and display the flood inundation results to potential users and decision-makers, In terms of landslides, the satellite rainfall information is combined with a global landslide susceptibility map, derived from a combination of global surface characteristics (digital elevation topography, slope, soil types, soil texture, and land cover classification etc.) using a weighted linear combination approach. In those areas identified as "susceptible" (based on the surface characteristics), landslides are forecast where and when a rainfall intensity/duration threshold is exceeded. Results are described

  11. Application of Multi-Satellite Precipitation Analysis to Floods and Landslides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adler, Robert; Hong, Yang; Huffman, George

    2007-01-01

    Satellite data acquired and processed in real time now have the potential to provide the spacetime information on rainfall needed to monitor flood and landslide events around the world. This can be achieved by integrating the satellite-derived forcing data with hydrological models and landslide algorithms. Progress in using the TRMM Multi-satellite Precipitation Analysis (TMPA) as input to flood and landslide forecasts is outlined, with a focus on understanding limitations of the rainfall data and impacts of those limitations on flood/landslide analyses. Case studies of both successes and failures will be shown, as well as comparison with ground comparison data sets both in terms of rainfall and in terms of flood/landslide events. In addition to potential uses in real-time, the nearly ten years of TMPA data allow retrospective running of the models to examine variations in extreme events. The flood determination algorithm consists of four major components: 1) multi-satellite precipitation estimation; 2) characterization of land surface including digital elevation from NASA SRTM (Shuttle Radar Terrain Mission), topography-derived hydrologic parameters such as flow direction, flow accumulation, basin, and river network etc.; 3) a hydrological model to infiltrate rainfall and route overland runoff; and 4) an implementation interface to relay the input data to the models and display the flood inundation results to potential users and decision-makers. In terms of landslides, the satellite rainfall information is combined with a global landslide susceptibility map, derived from a combination of global surface characteristics (digital elevation topography, slope, soil types, soil texture, and land cover classification etc.) using a weighted linear combination approach. In those areas identified as "susceptible" (based on the surface characteristics), landslides are forecast where and when a rainfall intensity/duration threshold is exceeded. Results are described

  12. Effectiveness and reliability analysis of emergency measures for flood prevention

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lendering, K.T.; Jonkman, S.N.; Kok, M.

    2014-01-01

    During flood events emergency measures are used to prevent breaches in flood defences. However, there is still limited insight in their reliability and effectiveness. The objective of this paper is to develop a method to determine the reliability and effectiveness of emergency measures for flood

  13. 32 CFR 643.31 - Policy-Flood hazards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Policy-Flood hazards. 643.31 Section 643.31... ESTATE Policy § 643.31 Policy—Flood hazards. Each Determination of Availability Report will include an evaluation of the flood hazards, if any, relative to the property involved in the proposed outgrant...

  14. Effectiveness and reliability analysis of emergency measures for flood prevention

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lendering, K.T.; Jonkman, S.N.; Kok, M.

    2014-01-01

    During flood events emergency measures are used to prevent breaches in flood defences. However, there is still limited insight in their reliability and effectiveness. The objective of this paper is to develop a method to determine the reliability and effectiveness of emergency measures for flood def

  15. Effect of Urban Green Spaces and Flooded Area Type on Flooding Probability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyomin Kim

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Countermeasures to urban flooding should consider long-term perspectives, because climate change impacts are unpredictable and complex. Urban green spaces have emerged as a potential option to reduce urban flood risks, and their effectiveness has been highlighted in notable urban water management studies. In this study, flooded areas in Seoul, Korea, were divided into four flooded area types by cluster analysis based on topographic and physical characteristics and verified using discriminant analysis. After division by flooded area type, logistic regression analysis was performed to determine how the flooding probability changes with variations in green space area. Type 1 included regions where flooding occurred in a drainage basin that had a flood risk management infrastructure (FRMI. In Type 2, the slope was steep; the TWI (Topographic Wetness Index was relatively low; and soil drainage was favorable. Type 3 represented the gentlest sloping areas, and these were associated with the highest TWI values. In addition, these areas had the worst soil drainage. Type 4 had moderate slopes, imperfect soil drainage and lower than average TWI values. We found that green spaces exerted a considerable influence on urban flooding probabilities in Seoul, and flooding probabilities could be reduced by over 50% depending on the green space area and the locations where green spaces were introduced. Increasing the area of green spaces was the most effective method of decreasing flooding probability in Type 3 areas. In Type 2 areas, the maximum hourly precipitation affected the flooding probability significantly, and the flooding probability in these areas was high despite the extensive green space area. These findings can contribute towards establishing guidelines for urban spatial planning to respond to urban flooding.

  16. Forecasting Extreme Flooding in South Asia (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webster, P. J.

    2010-12-01

    In most years there is extensive flooding across India, Pakistan and Bangladesh. On average, 40 million people are displaced by floods in India and half that many again in Bangladesh. Occasionally, even more extensive and severe flooding occurs across South Asia. In 2007 and 2008 the Brahmaputra flooded three times causing severe disruption of commerce, agriculture and life in general. Systems set up by an international collaboration predicted these Bangladesh floods with an operational system at the 10 and 15-day horizon. These forecasts determined the risk of flooding and allowed the Bangladeshis in peril to prepare, harvesting crops and storing of household and agricultural assets. Savings in increments of annual income resulted form the forecasts. In July and August 2010, severe flooding occurred in Pakistan causing horrendous damage and loss of life. But these floods were also predictable at the 10-day time scale if the same forecasting system developed for Bangladesh had been implemented. Similar systems could be implemented in India but would require local cooperation. We describe the manner in which quantified probabilistic precipitation forecasts, coupled with hydrological models can provide useful and timely extended warnings of flooding.

  17. Implementation of Fully Coupled Heat and Mass Transport Model to Determine Temperature and Moisture State at Elevated Temperatures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pecenko, R.; Hozjan, Tomaz; Svensson, Staffan

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study is to present precise numerical formulation to determine temperature and moisture state of timber in the situation prior pyrolysis. The strong formulations needed for an accurate description of the physics are presented and discussed as well as their coupling terms. From the...

  18. Flood risks and willingness to purchase flood insurance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karlinger, M.R.; Attanasi, E.D.

    1980-01-01

    Computer simulation experiments were conducted to determine the effects of alternative sources of uncertainty on the willingness to pay for flood insurance. Two alternative insurance protection schemes were investigated: coinsurance and fixed coverage. The question investigated is to what extent does the insurance scheme influence how purchasers respond to risks? Floods were assumed to be log normally distributed and the effects on the purchase of insurance of uncertainties in the parameters of the distribution were explored using response surface analysis. Results indicate that fixed coverage insurance provisions shift most of the uncertainty in the physical parameters governing natural disaster occurrences away from the insuree and onto the insurer. The results also show that the form of the damage function has little effect on the demand for flood insurance.- Authors

  19. Estimation of flood design hydrographs using bivariate analysis (copula and distributed hydrological modelling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Candela

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper a procedure to derive Flood Design Hydrographs (FDH using a bivariate representation of rainfall forcing (rainfall duration and intensity using copulas, which describe and model the correlation between these two variables independently of the marginal laws involved, coupled with a distributed rainfall-runoff model is presented. Rainfall-runoff modelling for estimating the hydrological response at the outlet of a watershed used a conceptual fully distributed procedure based on the soil conservation service – curve number method as excess rainfall model and a distributed unit hydrograph with climatic dependencies for the flow routing. Travel time computation, based on the definition of a distributed unit hydrograph, has been performed, implementing a procedure using flow paths determined from a digital elevation model (DEM and roughness parameters obtained from distributed geographical information. In order to estimate the return period of the FDH which give the probability of occurrence of a hydrograph flood peaks and flow volumes obtained through R-R modeling has been statistically treated via copulas. The shape of hydrograph has been generated on the basis of a modeled flood events, via cluster analysis. The procedure described above was applied to a case study of Imera catchment in Sicily, Italy. The methodology allows a reliable and estimation of the Design Flood Hydrograph and can be used for all the flood risk applications, i.e. evaluation, management, mitigation, etc.

  20. Ho Chi Minh City adaptation to increasing risk of coastal and fluvial floods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scussolini, Paolo; Lasage, Ralph

    2016-04-01

    Coastal megacities in southeast Asia are a hotspot of vulnerability to floods. In such contexts, the combination of fast socio-economic development and of climate change impacts on precipitation and sea level generates concerns about the flood damage to people and assets. This work focuses on Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam, for which we estimate the present and future direct risk from river and coastal floods. A model cascade is used that comprises the Saigon river basin and the urban network, plus the land-use-dependent damaging process. Changes in discharge for five return periods are simulated, enabling the probabilistic calculation of the expected annual economic damage to assets, for differnt scenarios of global emissions, local socio-economic growth, and land subsidence, up to year 2100. The implementation of a range of adaptation strategies is simulated, including building dykes, elevating, creating reservoirs, managing water and sediment upstream, flood-proofing, halting groundwater abstraction. Results are presented on 1) the relative weight of each future driver in determining the flood risk of Ho Chi Minh, and 2) the efficiency and feasibility of each adaptation strategy.

  1. Simulated and observed 2010 floodwater elevations in the Pawcatuck and Wood Rivers, Rhode Island

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarriello, Phillip J.; Straub, David E.; Smith, Thor E.

    2014-01-01

    Heavy, persistent rains from late February through March 2010 caused severe flooding that set, or nearly set, peaks of record for streamflows and water levels at many long-term U.S. Geological Survey streamgages in Rhode Island. In response to this flood, hydraulic models of Pawcatuck River (26.9 miles) and Wood River (11.6 miles) were updated from the most recent approved U.S. Department of Homeland Security-Federal Emergency Management Agency flood insurance study (FIS) to simulate water-surface elevations (WSEs) for specified flows and boundary conditions. The hydraulic models were updated to Hydrologic Engineering Center-River Analysis System (HEC-RAS) using steady-state simulations and incorporate new field-survey data at structures, high resolution land-surface elevation data, and updated flood flows from a related study. The models were used to simulate the 0.2-percent annual exceedance probability (AEP) flood, which is the AEP determined for the 2010 flood in the Pawcatuck and Wood Rivers. The simulated WSEs were compared to high-water mark (HWM) elevation data obtained in a related study following the March–April 2010 flood, which included 39 HWMs along the Pawcatuck River and 11 HWMs along the Wood River. The 2010 peak flow generally was larger than the 0.2-percent AEP flow, which, in part, resulted in the FIS and updated model WSEs to be lower than the 2010 HWMs. The 2010 HWMs for the Pawcatuck River averaged about 1.6 feet (ft) higher than the 0.2-percent AEP WSEs simulated in the updated model and 2.5 ft higher than the WSEs in the FIS. The 2010 HWMs for the Wood River averaged about 1.3 ft higher than the WSEs simulated in the updated model and 2.5 ft higher than the WSEs in the FIS. The improved agreement of the updated simulated water elevations to observed 2010 HWMs provides a measure of the hydraulic model performance, which indicates the updated models better represent flooding at other AEPs than the existing FIS models.

  2. Peak Discharge, Flood Profile, Flood Inundation, and Debris Movement Accompanying the Failure of the Upper Reservoir at the Taum Sauk Pump Storage Facility near Lesterville, Missouri

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rydlund, Jr., Paul H.

    2006-01-01

    The Taum Sauk pump-storage hydroelectric power plant located in Reynolds County, Missouri, uses turbines that operate as pumps and hydraulic head generated by discharging water from an upper to a lower reservoir to produce electricity. A 55-acre upper reservoir with a 1.5- billion gallon capacity was built on top of Proffit Mountain, approximately 760 feet above the floodplain of the East Fork Black River. At approximately 5:16 am on December 14, 2005, a 680-foot wide section of the upper reservoir embankment failed suddenly, sending water rushing down the western side of Proffit Mountain and emptying into the floodplain of East Fork Black River. Flood waters from the upper reservoir flowed downstream through Johnson's Shut-Ins State Park and into the lower reservoir of the East Fork Black River. Floods such as this present unique challenges and opportunities to analyze and document peak-flow characteristics, flood profiles, inundation extents, and debris movement. On December 16, 2005, Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) data were collected and used to support hydraulic analyses, forensic failure analyses, damage extent, and mitigation of future disasters. To evaluate the impact of sedimentation in the lower reservoir, a bathymetric survey conducted on December 22 and 23, 2005, was compared to a previous bathymetric survey conducted in April, 2005. Survey results indicated the maximum reservoir capacity difference of 147 acre-feet existed at a pool elevation of 730 feet. Peak discharge estimates of 289,000 cubic feet per second along Proffit Mountain and 95,000 cubic feet per second along the East Fork Black River were determined through indirect measurement techniques. The magnitude of the embankment failure flood along the East Fork Black River was approximately 4 times greater than the 100-year flood frequency estimate of 21,900 cubic feet per second, and approximately 3 times greater than the 500-year flood frequency estimate of 30,500 cubic feet per second

  3. Developments in remote sensing technology enable more detailed urban flood risk analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denniss, A.; Tewkesbury, A.

    2009-04-01

    digital airborne sensors, both optical and lidar, to produce the input layer for surface water flood modelling. A national flood map product has been created. The new product utilises sophisticated modelling techniques, perfected over many years, which harness graphical processing power. This product will prove particularly valuable for risk assessment decision support within insurance/reinsurance, property/environmental, utilities, risk management and government agencies. However, it is not just the ground elevation that determines the behaviour of surface water. By combining height information (surface and terrain) with high resolution aerial photography and colour infrared imagery, a high definition land cover mapping dataset (LandBase) is being produced, which provides a precise measure of sealed versus non sealed surface. This will allows even more sophisticated modelling of flood scenarios. Thus, the value of airborne survey data can be demonstrated by flood risk analysis down to individual addresses in urban areas. However for some risks, an even more detailed survey may be justified. In order to achieve this, Infoterra is testing new 360˚ mobile lidar technology. Collecting lidar data from a moving vehicle allows each street to be mapped in very high detail, allowing precise information about the location, size and shape of features such as kerbstones, gullies, road camber and building threshold level to be captured quickly and accurately. These data can then be used to model the problem of overland flood risk at the scale of individual properties. Whilst at present it might be impractical to undertake such detailed modelling for all properties, these techniques can certainly be used to improve the flood risk analysis of key locations. This paper will demonstrate how these new high resolution remote sensing techniques can be combined to provide a new resolution of detail to aid urban flood modelling.

  4. South China Flooded

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    Vehicles traverse a flooded street in Liuzhou, guangxi zhuang Autonomous Region, on May 19.heavy rainstorms repeatedly struck China this month, triggering floods, mudflows and landslides. hunan, guangdong and Jiangxi provinces and Chongqing Municipality were the worst hit.

  5. Flood Control Structures

    Data.gov (United States)

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — The National Flood Hazard Layer (NFHL) data incorporates all Digital Flood Insurance Rate Map(DFIRM) databases published by FEMA, and any Letters Of Map Revision...

  6. Flooding: Prioritizing protection?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peduzzi, Pascal

    2017-09-01

    With climate change, urban development and economic growth, more assets and infrastructures will be exposed to flooding. Now research shows that investments in flood protection are globally beneficial, but have varied levels of benefit locally.

  7. Flood Hazard Area

    Data.gov (United States)

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — The National Flood Hazard Layer (NFHL) data incorporates all Digital Flood Insurance Rate Map(DFIRM) databases published by FEMA, and any Letters Of Map Revision...

  8. Flood Hazard Boundaries

    Data.gov (United States)

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — The National Flood Hazard Layer (NFHL) data incorporates all Digital Flood Insurance Rate Map(DFIRM) databases published by FEMA, and any Letters Of Map Revision...

  9. A new method for the determination of carboxyhemoglobin in blood of newborns. Possible clinical implications of elevated levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zwart, A; Siepel, H; Heerspink, W

    1990-01-01

    Spectral differences between hemoglobin derivatives from adult-(HbA) and fetal-hemoglobin (HbF) make the accurate determination of carboxyhemoglobin (COHb) troublesome in blood of newborns. Only the newest dedicated instruments for the determination of COHb take these differences into account. However, since there are virtually no spectral differences between both hemoglobins in the deoxygenated state, reduction of neonatal blood with sodium dithionite eliminates that spectrophotometric error. Based on this principle, an easy, fast and accurate method for the determination of COHb in minimal amounts of blood was developed; equally well suited for blood of newborns and adults. The instrument used with this new method is a general purpose centrifugal clinical chemistry analyzer (COBAS-FARA, Roche, Basle, Switzerland). After the reduction of blood with sodium dithionite, a simple two component system (Hb and COHb) is formed, which can be spectrophotometrically quantitated by measuring at two suitable wavelengths, i.e., 579 nm and 534 nm. The COHb fraction is calculated with the help of: COHb % = 177.73.(A534/A579)-176.66. Comparison with the OSM3 Hemoximeter (Radiometer A/S, Denmark) for 145 adult blood samples with varying COHb levels (0-30%) yielded a mean difference in COHb % of about 0.06% (SD = 0.38). For fetal blood (N = 63) about the same difference was found when the OSM3 was used in the so-called fetal mode, while comparison with the regular adult mode yielded a difference of about 3.1%. This indicates that the new method is indeed not disturbed by the spectral differences between HbA and HbF.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  10. Flood Risk Regional Flood Defences: Technical report

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lendering, K.T.

    2015-01-01

    Historically the Netherlands have always had to deal with the threat of flooding, both from the rivers and the sea as well as from heavy rainfall. The country consists of a large amount of polders, which are low lying areas of land protected from flooding by embankments. These polders require an

  11. Flood Risk Regional Flood Defences: Technical report

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lendering, K.T.

    2015-01-01

    Historically the Netherlands have always had to deal with the threat of flooding, both from the rivers and the sea as well as from heavy rainfall. The country consists of a large amount of polders, which are low lying areas of land protected from flooding by embankments. These polders require an ext

  12. Protein Requirements Are Elevated in Endurance Athletes after Exercise as Determined by the Indicator Amino Acid Oxidation Method.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroyuki Kato

    Full Text Available A higher protein intake has been recommended for endurance athletes compared with healthy non-exercising individuals based primarily on nitrogen balance methodology. The aim of this study was to determine the estimated average protein requirement and recommended protein intake in endurance athletes during an acute 3-d controlled training period using the indicator amino acid oxidation method. After 2-d of controlled diet (1.4 g protein/kg/d and training (10 and 5km/d, respectively, six male endurance-trained adults (28±4 y of age; Body weight, 64.5±10.0 kg; VO2peak, 60.3±6.7 ml·kg-1·min-1; means±SD performed an acute bout of endurance exercise (20 km treadmill run prior to consuming test diets providing variable amounts of protein (0.2-2.8 g·kg-1·d-1 and sufficient energy. Protein was provided as a crystalline amino acid mixture based on the composition of egg protein with [1-13C]phenylalanine provided to determine whole body phenylalanine flux, 13CO2 excretion, and phenylalanine oxidation. The estimated average protein requirement was determined as the breakpoint after biphasic linear regression analysis with a recommended protein intake defined as the upper 95% confidence interval. Phenylalanine flux (68.8±8.5 μmol·kg-1·h-1 was not affected by protein intake. 13CO2 excretion displayed a robust bi-phase linear relationship (R2 = 0.86 that resulted in an estimated average requirement and a recommended protein intake of 1.65 and 1.83 g protein·kg-1·d-1, respectively, which was similar to values based on phenylalanine oxidation (1.53 and 1.70 g·kg-1·d-1, respectively. We report a recommended protein intake that is greater than the RDA (0.8 g·kg-1·d-1 and current recommendations for endurance athletes (1.2-1.4 g·kg-1·d-1. Our results suggest that the metabolic demand for protein in endurance-trained adults on a higher volume training day is greater than their sedentary peers and current recommendations for athletes based

  13. Automatic Algorithm for the Determination of the Anderson-wilkins Acuteness Score In Patients With St Elevation Myocardial Infarction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fakhri, Yama; Sejersten-Ripa, Maria; Schoos, Mikkel Malby

    2016-01-01

    percutaneous coronary intervention regardless of patient reported symptom duration. However, due to the complexity of the score, its manual interpretation is time consuming and therefore has not been applied in clinical practice. Automation of this score could facilitate clinical application. Therefore, we...... aimed to develop and validate an automatic algorithm for the AW-score. Methods: The AW-score (obtained from presenting ECG), assesses changes in ST-T-segments, T-waves and Q-waves. Each lead is designated an acuteness phase (1A, 1B, 2A or 2B) and the overall score is calculated. AW-score ranges from 1...... using 50 ECGs. Each ECG lead (except aVR) was manually scored according to AW-score by two independent experts (Exp1 and Exp2) and automatically by our designed algorithm (auto-score). An adjudicated manual score (Adj-score) was determined between Exp1 and Exp2. The inter-rater reliabilities (IRRs...

  14. Determination of Scattering and Absorption Coefficients for Plasma-Sprayed Yttria-Stabilized Zirconia Thermal Barrier Coatings at Elevated Temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eldridge, Jeffrey I.; Spuckler, Charles M.; Markham, James R.

    2009-01-01

    The temperature dependence of the scattering and absorption coefficients for a set of freestanding plasma-sprayed 8 wt% yttria-stabilized zirconia (8YSZ) thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) was determined at temperatures up to 1360 C in a wavelength range from 1.2 micrometers up to the 8YSZ absorption edge. The scattering and absorption coefficients were determined by fitting the directional-hemispherical reflectance and transmittance values calculated by a four-flux Kubelka Munk method to the experimentally measured hemispherical-directional reflectance and transmittance values obtained for five 8YSZ thicknesses. The scattering coefficient exhibited a continuous decrease with increasing wavelength and showed no significant temperature dependence. The scattering is primarily attributed to the relatively temperature-insensitive refractive index mismatch between the 8YSZ and its internal voids. The absorption coefficient was very low (less than 1 per centimeter) at wavelengths between 2 micrometers and the absorption edge and showed a definite temperature dependence that consisted of a shift of the absorption edge to shorter wavelengths and an increase in the weak absorption below the absorption edge with increasing temperature. The shift in the absorption edge with temperature is attributed to strongly temperature-dependent multiphonon absorption. While TBC hemispherical transmittance beyond the absorption edge can be predicted by a simple exponential decrease with thickness, below the absorption edge, typical TBC thicknesses are well below the thickness range where a simple exponential decrease in hemispherical transmittance with TBC thickness is expected. [Correction added after online publication August 11, 2009: "edge to a shorter wavelengths" has been updated as edge to shorter wavelengths."

  15. High-magnitude flooding across Britain since AD 1750

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macdonald, Neil; Sangster, Heather

    2017-03-01

    The last decade has witnessed severe flooding across much of the globe, but have these floods really been exceptional? Globally, relatively few instrumental river flow series extend beyond 50 years, with short records presenting significant challenges in determining flood risk from high-magnitude floods. A perceived increase in extreme floods in recent years has decreased public confidence in conventional flood risk estimates; the results affect society (insurance costs), individuals (personal vulnerability) and companies (e.g. water resource managers). Here, we show how historical records from Britain have improved understanding of high-magnitude floods, by examining past spatial and temporal variability. The findings identify that whilst recent floods are notable, several comparable periods of increased flooding are identifiable historically, with periods of greater frequency (flood-rich periods). Statistically significant relationships between the British flood index, the Atlantic Meridional Oscillation and the North Atlantic Oscillation Index are identified. The use of historical records identifies that the largest floods often transcend single catchments affecting regions and that the current flood-rich period is not unprecedented.

  16. Flood Mitigation of Nyando River Using Duflow Modelling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Joleha

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Duflow surface water hydrodynamic model has been applied using a case study from Nyando catchment in the western part of Kenya in Africa to simulate various extreme flood behaviours and their retardation levels by using selected structural measures as flood mitigation techniques. The objective of this case study was to establish a design flood recommendable for mitigation, and to identify the most cost effective flood mitigation structure. Various design flows are simulated against the different proposed structures hence, the optimal structure can be recommended when economical, social and environmental constraints are considered in the decision making process. The proposed four flood mitigation structures flood plain extension, embankment (dykes, channel by-pass, and green-storage were simulated for 20-year recurrence interval flood to determine their individual responses in storing excess water. The result shows that building a green-storage is the best and optimal structure for flood mitigation.

  17. Beyond 'flood hotspots': Modelling emergency service accessibility during flooding in York, UK

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coles, Daniel; Yu, Dapeng; Wilby, Robert L.; Green, Daniel; Herring, Zara

    2017-03-01

    This paper describes the development of a method that couples flood modelling with network analysis to evaluate the accessibility of city districts by emergency responders during flood events. We integrate numerical modelling of flood inundation with geographical analysis of service areas for the Ambulance Service and the Fire & Rescue Service. The method was demonstrated for two flood events in the City of York, UK to assess the vulnerability of care homes and sheltered accommodation. We determine the feasibility of emergency services gaining access within the statutory 8- and 10-min targets for high-priority, life-threatening incidents 75% of the time, during flood episodes. A hydrodynamic flood inundation model (FloodMap) simulates the 2014 pluvial and 2015 fluvial flood events. Predicted floods (with depth >25 cm and areas >100 m2) were overlain on the road network to identify sites with potentially restricted access. Accessibility of the city to emergency responders during flooding was quantified and mapped using; (i) spatial coverage from individual emergency nodes within the legislated timeframes, and; (ii) response times from individual emergency service nodes to vulnerable care homes and sheltered accommodation under flood and non-flood conditions. Results show that, during the 2015 fluvial flood, the area covered by two of the three Fire & Rescue Service stations reduced by 14% and 39% respectively, while the remaining station needed to increase its coverage by 39%. This amounts to an overall reduction of 6% and 20% for modelled and observed floods respectively. During the 2014 surface water flood, 7 out of 22 care homes (32%) and 15 out of 43 sheltered accommodation nodes (35%) had modelled response times above the 8-min threshold from any Ambulance station. Overall, modelled surface water flooding has a larger spatial footprint than fluvial flood events. Hence, accessibility of emergency services may be impacted differently depending on flood mechanism

  18. Identifying how the strategies used to evaluate flood damages can affect the results of the evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eleutério, Julian; Rozan, Anne; Mosé, Robert

    2010-05-01

    The evaluation of flood damages is a complex interdisciplinary task which demands great efforts on assessment and modelling processes. Several methods and models can be used in practice to evaluate flood damages. On the one hand, hydrological and hydrodynamic aspects of floods shall be modelled in order to forecast different characteristics of floods, e.g. return period, flood extent, water depth, duration of submersion and flow speed. Different hydrological assumptions can take place when determining return periods of extreme events. Several hydrodynamic models can be used to simulate floods. These models have different levels of complexity and different acquisition, implementation and maintenance costs. On the other hand, geographic, engineering, social and economic aspects of the system exposed to floods shall be assessed, e.g. assets location, vulnerability characteristics, susceptibility to suffer damages. Once again, several methods and datasets with different liability and different levels of feasibility can be used to assess these characteristics. Uncertainty exists all over the evaluation process. When reducing uncertainty on the evaluation results by improving the strategies used, we could generate the elevation of the costs of the evaluation and compromise its feasibility. To deal with feasibility of the evaluation process and with uncertainty on the evaluation results is a big scientific and operational challenge. The aim of this paper is to develop a research framework to analyze the impact of different strategies used to evaluate flood damages on the feasibility of the evaluation and on the liability of its results. The two main parts of the evaluation process are discussed: (1) the hydrodynamic simulation of flood events and its hydrological components and (2) the assessment of assets vulnerability to floods. The framework compares two aspects of the evaluation: uncertainty - variability of the evaluation results according to the choice of models and

  19. Flood of April and May 2008 in Northern Maine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lombard, Pamela J.

    2010-01-01

    Severe flooding occurred in Aroostook and Penobscot Counties in northern Maine between April 28 and May 1, 2008, and was most extreme in the town of Fort Kent. Peak streamflows in northern Aroostook County were the result of a persistent heavy snowpack that caused high streamflows when it quickly melted during the third week of April 2008. Snowmelt was followed by from two to four inches of rainfall over a 2-day period in northern Maine. Peak water-surface elevations resulting from the flood were obtained from 13 continuous-record streamgages and 63 surveyed high-water marks in Aroostook and Penobscot Counties. Peak streamflows were obtained from 20 sites on 15 streams through stage/discharge rating curves or hydraulic flow models. Peak water-surface elevations and streamflows were the highest ever recorded at seven continuous-record streamgages, which had between 25 and 84 years of record in northern Aroostook County. The annual exceedance probability (the percent chance of exceeding the streamflow recorded during the April/May 2008 flood during any given year) at six streamgages in northern Maine was equal to or less than 1 percent. Data from flood-insurance studies published by the Federal Emergency Management Agency were available for five of the locations analyzed for the April/May 2008 flood and were compared to streamflows and observed peak water-surface elevations from the 2008 flood. Water-surface elevations that would be expected given the observed flow as applied to the effective flood insurance studies ranged from between 1 and 4 feet from the water-surface elevations observed during the 2008 flood. Differences were likely the result of up to 30 years of additional data for the calculation of recurrence intervals and the fact that hydraulic models used for the models had not previously been calibrated to a flood of this magnitude.

  20. Real-time flood extent maps based on social media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eilander, Dirk; van Loenen, Arnejan; Roskam, Ruud; Wagemaker, Jurjen

    2015-04-01

    information, we project the water depth observations in tweets on a digital elevation model using a flood-fill algorithm. Based on statistical methods we combine the large numbers of observations in order to create time series of flood extent maps. Early results indicate this method is very promising.

  1. Web-based flood database for Colorado, water years 1867 through 2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohn, Michael S.; Jarrett, Robert D.; Krammes, Gary S.; Mommandi, Amanullah

    2013-01-01

    In order to provide a centralized repository of flood information for the State of Colorado, the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Colorado Department of Transportation, created a Web-based geodatabase for flood information from water years 1867 through 2011 and data for paleofloods occurring in the past 5,000 to 10,000 years. The geodatabase was created using the Environmental Systems Research Institute ArcGIS JavaScript Application Programing Interface 3.2. The database can be accessed at http://cwscpublic2.cr.usgs.gov/projects/coflood/COFloodMap.html. Data on 6,767 flood events at 1,597 individual sites throughout Colorado were compiled to generate the flood database. The data sources of flood information are indirect discharge measurements that were stored in U.S. Geological Survey offices (water years 1867–2011), flood data from indirect discharge measurements referenced in U.S. Geological Survey reports (water years 1884–2011), paleoflood studies from six peer-reviewed journal articles (data on events occurring in the past 5,000 to 10,000 years), and the U.S. Geological Survey National Water Information System peak-discharge database (water years 1883–2010). A number of tests were performed on the flood database to ensure the quality of the data. The Web interface was programmed using the Environmental Systems Research Institute ArcGIS JavaScript Application Programing Interface 3.2, which allows for display, query, georeference, and export of the data in the flood database. The data fields in the flood database used to search and filter the database include hydrologic unit code, U.S. Geological Survey station number, site name, county, drainage area, elevation, data source, date of flood, peak discharge, and field method used to determine discharge. Additional data fields can be viewed and exported, but the data fields described above are the only ones that can be used for queries.

  2. Flood-inundation maps for the Wabash River at Memorial Bridge at Vincennes, Indiana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fowler, Kathleen K.; Menke, Chad D.

    2017-08-23

    Digital flood-inundation maps for a 10.2-mile reach of the Wabash River from Sevenmile Island to 3.7 mile downstream of Memorial Bridge (officially known as Lincoln Memorial Bridge) at Vincennes, Indiana, were created by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) in cooperation with the Indiana Office of Community and Rural Affairs. The inundation maps, which can be accessed through the USGS Flood Inundation Mapping Science Web site at http://water.usgs.gov/osw/flood_inundation/ depict estimates of the areal extent and depth of flooding corresponding to selected water levels (stages) at USGS streamgage 03343010, Wabash River at Memorial Bridge at Vincennes, Ind. Near-real-time stages at this streamgage may be obtained on the Internet from the USGS National Water Information System at http://waterdata.usgs.gov/ or the National Weather Service (NWS) Advanced Hydrologic Prediction Service at http:/water.weather.gov/ahps/, which also forecasts flood hydrographs at this site.For this study, flood profiles were computed for the Wabash River reach by means of a one-dimensional stepbackwater model. The hydraulic model was calibrated by using the most current stage-discharge relations at USGS streamgage 03343010, Wabash River at Memorial Bridge at Vincennes, Ind., and preliminary high-water marks from a high-water event on April 27, 2013. The calibrated hydraulic model was then used to determine 19 water-surface profiles for flood stages at 1-foot intervals referenced to the streamgage datum and ranging from 10 feet (ft) or near bankfull to 28 ft, the highest stage of the current stage-discharge rating curve. The simulated water-surface profiles were then combined with a Geographic Information System (GIS) digital elevation model (DEM, derived from Light Detection and Ranging [lidar] data having a 0.98-ft vertical accuracy and 4.9-ft horizontal resolution) in order to delineate the area flooded at each water level.The availability of these maps—along with Internet information

  3. The glycation site specificity of human serum transferrin is a determinant for transferrin's functional impairment under elevated glycaemic conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, André M N; Sousa, Paulo R H; Coimbra, João T S; Brás, Natércia F; Vitorino, Rui; Fernandes, Pedro A; Ramos, Maria J; Rangel, Maria; Domingues, Pedro

    2014-07-01

    The mechanisms involving iron toxicity in diabetes mellitus are not completely understood. However, the spontaneous reaction of reducing sugars with protein amino groups, known as glycation, has been shown to compromise the action of Tf (transferrin), the systemic iron transporter. In order to understand the structural alterations that impair its function, Tf was glycated in vitro and the modification sites were determined by MS. Iron binding to glycated Tf was assessed and a computational approach was conducted to study how glycation influences the iron-binding capacity of this protein. Glycated Tf samples were found to bind iron less avidly than non-modified Tf and MS results revealed 12 glycation sites, allowing the establishment of Lys534 and Lys206 as the most vulnerable residues to this modification. Their increased susceptibility to glycation was found to relate to their low side-chain pKa values. Lys534 and Lys206 participate in hydrogen bonding crucial for iron stabilization in the C- and N-lobes of the protein respectively, and their modification is bound to influence iron binding. Furthermore, the orientation of the glucose residues at these sites blocks the entrance to the iron-binding pocket. Molecular dynamics simulations also suggested that additional loss of iron binding capacity may result from the stereochemical effects induced by the glycation of lysine residues that prevent the conformational changes (from open to closed Tf forms) required for metal binding. Altogether, the results indicate that Tf is particularly vulnerable to glycation and that this modification targets spots that are particularly relevant to its function.

  4. Quality control of the RMS US flood model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jankowfsky, Sonja; Hilberts, Arno; Mortgat, Chris; Li, Shuangcai; Rafique, Farhat; Rajesh, Edida; Xu, Na; Mei, Yi; Tillmanns, Stephan; Yang, Yang; Tian, Ye; Mathur, Prince; Kulkarni, Anand; Kumaresh, Bharadwaj Anna; Chaudhuri, Chiranjib; Saini, Vishal

    2016-04-01

    The RMS US flood model predicts the flood risk in the US with a 30 m resolution for different return periods. The model is designed for the insurance industry to estimate the cost of flood risk for a given location. Different statistical, hydrological and hydraulic models are combined to develop the flood maps for different return periods. A rainfall-runoff and routing model, calibrated with observed discharge data, is run with 10 000 years of stochastic simulated precipitation to create time series of discharge and surface runoff. The 100, 250 and 500 year events are extracted from these time series as forcing for a two-dimensional pluvial and fluvial inundation model. The coupling of all the different models which are run on the large area of the US implies a certain amount of uncertainty. Therefore, special attention is paid to the final quality control of the flood maps. First of all, a thorough quality analysis of the Digital Terrain model and the river network was done, as the final quality of the flood maps depends heavily on the DTM quality. Secondly, the simulated 100 year discharge in the major river network (600 000 km) is compared to the 100 year discharge derived using extreme value distribution of all USGS gauges with more than 20 years of peak values (around 11 000 gauges). Thirdly, for each gauge the modelled flood depth is compared to the depth derived from the USGS rating curves. Fourthly, the modelled flood depth is compared to the base flood elevation given in the FEMA flood maps. Fifthly, the flood extent is compared to the FEMA flood extent. Then, for historic events we compare flood extents and flood depths at given locations. Finally, all the data and spatial layers are uploaded on geoserver to facilitate the manual investigation of outliers. The feedback from the quality control is used to improve the model and estimate its uncertainty.

  5. Developing flood-inundation maps for Johnson Creek, Portland, Oregon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stonewall, Adam J.; Beal, Benjamin A.

    2017-04-14

    Digital flood-inundation maps were created for a 12.9‑mile reach of Johnson Creek by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS). The flood-inundation maps depict estimates of water depth and areal extent of flooding from the mouth of Johnson Creek to just upstream of Southeast 174th Avenue in Portland, Oregon. Each flood-inundation map is based on a specific water level and associated streamflow at the USGS streamgage, Johnson Creek at Sycamore, Oregon (14211500), which is located near the upstream boundary of the maps. The maps produced by the USGS, and the forecasted flood hydrographs produced by National Weather Service River Forecast Center can be accessed through the USGS Flood Inundation Mapper Web site (http://wimcloud.usgs.gov/apps/FIM/FloodInundationMapper.html).Water-surface elevations were computed for Johnson Creek using a combined one-dimensional and two‑dimensional unsteady hydraulic flow model. The model was calibrated using data collected from the flood of December 2015 (including the calculated streamflows at two USGS streamgages on Johnson Creek) and validated with data from the flood of January 2009. Results were typically within 0.6 foot (ft) of recorded or measured water-surface elevations from the December 2015 flood, and within 0.8 ft from the January 2009 flood. Output from the hydraulic model was used to create eight flood inundation maps ranging in stage from 9 to 16 ft. Boundary condition hydrographs were identical in shape to those from the December 2015 flood event, but were scaled up or down to produce the amount of streamflow corresponding to a specific water-surface elevation at the Sycamore streamgage (14211500). Sensitivity analyses using other hydrograph shapes, and a version of the model in which the peak flow is maintained for an extended period of time, showed minimal variation, except for overbank areas near the Foster Floodplain Natural Area.Simulated water-surface profiles were combined with light detection and ranging (lidar

  6. Flood Impact Modelling and Natural Flood Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owen, Gareth; Quinn, Paul; ODonnell, Greg

    2016-04-01

    Local implementation of Natural Flood Management methods are now being proposed in many flood schemes. In principal it offers a cost effective solution to a number of catchment based problem as NFM tackles both flood risk and WFD issues. However within larger catchments there is the issue of which subcatchments to target first and how much NFM to implement. If each catchment has its own configuration of subcatchment and rivers how can the issues of flood synchronisation and strategic investment be addressed? In this study we will show two key aspects to resolving these issues. Firstly, a multi-scale network water level recorder is placed throughout the system to capture the flow concentration and travel time operating in the catchment being studied. The second is a Flood Impact Model (FIM), which is a subcatchment based model that can generate runoff in any location using any hydrological model. The key aspect to the model is that it has a function to represent the impact of NFM in any subcatchment and the ability to route that flood wave to the outfall. This function allows a realistic representation of the synchronisation issues for that catchment. By running the model in interactive mode the user can define an appropriate scheme that minimises or removes the risk of synchornisation and gives confidence that the NFM investment is having a good level of impact downstream in large flood events.

  7. Use of Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) to Obtain High-Resolution Elevation Data for Sussex County, Delaware

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barlow, Roger A.; Nardi, Mark R.; Reyes, Betzaida

    2008-01-01

    Sussex County, Delaware, occupies a 938-square-mile area of low relief near sea level in the Atlantic Coastal Plain. The county is bounded on the east by the Delaware Bay and the Atlantic Ocean, including a barrier-island system, and inland bays that provide habitat for valuable living resources. Eastern Sussex County is an area of rapid population growth with a long-established beach-resort community, where land elevation is a key factor in determining areas that are appropriate for development. Of concern to State and local planners are evacuation routes inland to escape flooding from severe coastal storms, as most major transportation routes traverse areas of low elevation that are subject to inundation. The western half of the county is typically rural in character, and land use is largely agricultural with some scattered forest land cover. Western Sussex County has several low-relief river flood-prone areas, where accurate high-resolution elevation data are needed for Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) Digital Flood Insurance Rate Map (DFIRM) studies. This fact sheet describes the methods and techniques used to collect and process LiDAR elevation data, the generation of the digital elevation model (DEM) and the 2-foot contours, and the quality-assurance procedures and results. It indicates where to view metadata on the data sets and where to acquire bare-earth mass points, DEM data, and contour data.

  8. Urban pluvial flood prediction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorndahl, Søren Liedtke; Nielsen, Jesper Ellerbæk; Jensen, David Getreuer

    2016-01-01

    Flooding produced by high-intensive local rainfall and drainage system capacity exceedance can have severe impacts in cities. In order to prepare cities for these types of flood events – especially in the future climate – it is valuable to be able to simulate these events numerically both...... historically and in real-time. There is a rather untested potential in real-time prediction of urban floods. In this paper radar data observations with different spatial and temporal resolution, radar nowcasts of 0–2 h lead time, and numerical weather models with lead times up to 24 h are used as inputs...... to an integrated flood and drainage systems model in order to investigate the relative difference between different inputs in predicting future floods. The system is tested on a small town Lystrup in Denmark, which has been flooded in 2012 and 2014. Results show it is possible to generate detailed flood maps...

  9. Prognostic value and determinants of a hypointense infarct core in T2-weighted cardiac magnetic resonance in acute reperfused ST-elevation-myocardial infarction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eitel, Ingo; Kubusch, Konrad; Strohm, Oliver; Desch, Steffen; Mikami, Yoko; de Waha, Suzanne; Gutberlet, Matthias; Schuler, Gerhard; Friedrich, Matthias G; Thiele, Holger

    2011-07-01

    A hypointense core of infarcted myocardium in T2-weighted cardiovascular MRI (CMR) has been used as a noninvasive marker for intramyocardial hemorrhage. However, the clinical significance of such findings not yet been established. The aim of this study was to evaluate determinants and prognostic impact of a hypointense infarct core in T2-weighted CMR images, studied in patients after acute, reperfused ST-elevation-myocardial infarction. We analyzed 346 patients with ST-elevation-myocardial infarction undergoing primary angioplasty core in T2-weighted images, and late microvascular obstruction. Patients were categorized into 2 groups defined by the presence or absence of a hypointense core. The primary end point of the study was occurrence of major adverse cardiovascular events defined as death, reinfarction, and congestive heart failure within 6 months after infarction. A hypointense core was present in 122 (35%) patients and was associated with larger infarcts, greater amount of microvascular obstruction, less myocardial salvage, and impaired left ventricular function (P core was a strong univariable predictor of major adverse cardiovascular events (hazard ratio, 2.59; confidence interval, 1.27 to 5.27) and was significantly associated with an increased major adverse cardiovascular events rate (16.4% versus 7.0%, P = 0.006) 6 months after infarction. A hypointense infarct core within the area at risk of reperfused infarcted myocardium in T2-weighted CMR is closely related to infarct size, microvascular obstruction, and impaired left ventricular function, with subsequent adverse clinical outcome.

  10. Catchment scale afforestation for mitigating flooding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, Mhari; Quinn, Paul; Bathurst, James; Birkinshaw, Stephen

    2016-04-01

    After the 2013-14 floods in the UK there were calls to 'forest the uplands' as a solution to reducing flood risk across the nation. At present, 1 in 6 homes in Britain are at risk of flooding and current EU legislation demands a sustainable, 'nature-based solution'. However, the role of forests as a natural flood management technique remains highly controversial, due to a distinct lack of robust evidence into its effectiveness in reducing flood risk during extreme events. SHETRAN, physically-based spatially-distributed hydrological models of the Irthing catchment and Wark forest sub-catchments (northern England) have been developed in order to test the hypothesis of the effect trees have on flood magnitude. The advanced physically-based models have been designed to model scale-related responses from 1, through 10, to 100km2, a first study of the extent to which afforestation and woody debris runoff attenuation features (RAFs) may help to mitigate floods at the full catchment scale (100-1000 km2) and on a national basis. Furthermore, there is a need to analyse the extent to which land management practices, and the installation of nature-based RAFs, such as woody debris dams, in headwater catchments can attenuate flood-wave movement, and potentially reduce downstream flood risk. The impacts of riparian planting and the benefits of adding large woody debris of several designs and on differing sizes of channels has also been simulated using advanced hydrodynamic (HiPIMS) and hydrological modelling (SHETRAN). With the aim of determining the effect forestry may have on flood frequency, 1000 years of generated rainfall data representative of current conditions has been used to determine the difference between current land-cover, different distributions of forest cover and the defining scenarios - complete forest removal and complete afforestation of the catchment. The simulations show the percentage of forestry required to have a significant impact on mitigating

  11. Assessment of coastal flood risk in a changing climate along the northern Gulf of Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilskie, M. V.; Hagen, S. C.; Passeri, D. L.; Alizad, K.

    2014-12-01

    Coastal regions around the world are susceptible to a variety of natural disasters causing extreme inundation. It is anticipated that the vulnerability of coastal cities will increase due to the effects of climate change, and in particular sea level rise (SLR). We have developed a novel framework to construct a physics-based storm surge model that includes projections of coastal floodplain dynamics under climate change scenarios. Numerous experiments were conducted and it was concluded that a number of influencing factors, other than SLR, should be included in future assessments of coastal flooding under climate change; e.g., shoreline changes, barrier island morphology, salt marsh migration, and population dynamics. These factors can significantly affect the path, pattern, and magnitude of flooding depths and inundation along the coastline (Bilskie et al., 2014; Passeri et al., 2014). Using these factors, a storm surge model of the northern Gulf of Mexico (NGOM) representing present day conditions is modified to characterize the future outlook of the landscape. This adapted model is then used to assess flood risk in terms of the 100-year floodplain surface under SLR scenarios. A suite of hundreds of synthetic storms, derived by JPM-OS (Joint Probability Method - Optimum Sampling), are filtered to obtain the storms necessary to represent the statistically determined 100-year floodplain. The NGOM storm surge model is applied to simulate the synthetic storms and determine, for each storm, the flooding surface and depth, for four SLR scenarios for the year 2100 as prescribed by Parris et al. (2012). The collection of results facilitate the estimation of water surface elevation vs. frequency curves across the floodplain and the statistically defined 100-year floodplain is extracted. This novel method to assess coastal flooding under climate change can be performed across any coastal region worldwide, and results provide awareness of regions vulnerable to extreme

  12. Geodetic Control Points, Benchmarks; Vertical elevation bench marks for monumented geodetic survey control points for which mean sea level elevations have been determined., Published in 1995, 1:24000 (1in=2000ft) scale, Rhode Island and Providence Plantations.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC State | GIS Inventory — Geodetic Control Points dataset current as of 1995. Benchmarks; Vertical elevation bench marks for monumented geodetic survey control points for which mean sea level...

  13. Determination of times maximum insulation in case of internal flooding by pipe break; Determinacion de los tiempos maximos de aislamiento en caso de inundacion interna por rotura de tuberia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Varas, M. I.; Orteu, E.; Laserna, J. A.

    2014-07-01

    This paper demonstrates the process followed in the preparation of the Manual of floods of Cofrentes NPP to identify the allowed maximum time available to the central in the isolation of a moderate or high energy pipe break, until it affects security (1E) participating in the safe stop of Reactor or in pools of spent fuel cooling-related equipment , and to determine the recommended isolation mode from the point of view of the location of the break or rupture, of the location of the 1E equipment and human factors. (Author)

  14. Improving Gas Flooding Efficiency

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reid Grigg; Robert Svec; Zheng Zeng; Alexander Mikhalin; Yi Lin; Guoqiang Yin; Solomon Ampir; Rashid Kassim

    2008-03-31

    This study focuses on laboratory studies with related analytical and numerical models, as well as work with operators for field tests to enhance our understanding of and capabilities for more efficient enhanced oil recovery (EOR). Much of the work has been performed at reservoir conditions. This includes a bubble chamber and several core flood apparatus developed or modified to measure interfacial tension (IFT), critical micelle concentration (CMC), foam durability, surfactant sorption at reservoir conditions, and pressure and temperature effects on foam systems.Carbon dioxide and N{sub 2} systems have been considered, under both miscible and immiscible conditions. The injection of CO2 into brine-saturated sandstone and carbonate core results in brine saturation reduction in the range of 62 to 82% brine in the tests presented in this paper. In each test, over 90% of the reduction occurred with less than 0.5 PV of CO{sub 2} injected, with very little additional brine production after 0.5 PV of CO{sub 2} injected. Adsorption of all considered surfactant is a significant problem. Most of the effect is reversible, but the amount required for foaming is large in terms of volume and cost for all considered surfactants. Some foams increase resistance to the value beyond what is practical in the reservoir. Sandstone, limestone, and dolomite core samples were tested. Dissolution of reservoir rock and/or cement, especially carbonates, under acid conditions of CO2 injection is a potential problem in CO2 injection into geological formations. Another potential change in reservoir injectivity and productivity will be the precipitation of dissolved carbonates as the brine flows and pressure decreases. The results of this report provide methods for determining surfactant sorption and can be used to aid in the determination of surfactant requirements for reservoir use in a CO{sub 2}-foam flood for mobility control. It also provides data to be used to determine rock permeability

  15. Flood-hazard study: 100-year flood stage for Lucerne Lake, San Bernadino County, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busby, Mark William

    1977-01-01

    A study of the flood hydrology of Lucerne Valley, Calif., was made to develop the 100-year stage for Lucerne Lake. Synthetic-hydrologic techniques were used; and the 100-year flood stage was estimated to be at an elevation of 2,849.3 feet above mean sea level. Channel dimensions were measured at 59 sites in Lucerne Valley. Dranage area-discharge relations developed from channel-geometry data for sites nearby were used to estimate the discharge at 12 additional sites where channel geometry could not be measured. In order to compute the total volume discharge into the playa, the peak discharges were converted to volumes. From the Apple Valley report (Busby, 1975) the equation formulated from the relation between peak discharge and flood volume for the deserts of California was used to compute the flood volumes for routing into Lucerne Lake. (Woodard-USGS)

  16. Study to determine the technical and economic feasibility of reclaiming chemicals used in micellar polymer and low tension surfactant flooding. Final report. [Ultrafiltration membranes and reverse osmosis membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stephens, R.H.; Himmelblau, A.; Donnelly, R.G.

    1978-02-01

    Energy Resources Company has developed a technology for use with enhanced oil recovery to achieve emulsion breaking and surfactant recovery. By using ultrafiltration membranes, the Energy Resources Company process can dewater an oil-in-water type emulsion expected from enhanced oil recovery projects to the point where the emulsion can be inverted and treated using conventional emulsion-treating equipment. By using a tight ultrafiltration membrane or a reverse osmosis membrane, the Energy Resources Company process is capable of recovering chemicals such as surfactants used in micellar polymer flooding.

  17. Interpreting the impact of flood forecasts by combining policy analysis studies and flood defence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Slomp Robert

    2016-01-01

    Rijkswaterstaat. Other organisations use these forecasts to define the consequences of the forecast, to take measures (as the evacuation of camping places on rivers banks or lake shores or to estimate the conditional probability of failure of a flood defence. Increasing the resilience of the population by disseminating information from both policy studies (flood scenarios and flood forecasts has been the project goal of the MEGO project “Module Evacuatie Grote Overstromingen”, an information tool for large scale evacuation due to floods. This information is available on a national website. The MEGO project has focussed on making the information from two major policy studies on flood risk available, the first sturdy determined new risk-based standards for flood defences (WV21. The second study determined the current flood risk (VNK-2. The MEGO database contains a selection of verified flood scenario’s. For each scenario the hydraulic loads which will cause a flood are known as are the probabilities of flooding and predicted casualties and damages. Overland flow maps are available. MEGO combines this data with the flood forecast, open data of the “Cadastre” (national Registry, the national digital terrain model (AHN and the main infrastructure (local, regional and national. The site offers prepared and real time maps for professionals during a crisis, and tools to increase risk awareness for citizens. The software was recently renamed national water and flood information system, “Landelijk Informatiesysteem Water en Overstromingen (LIWO ’ when it went live in 2016. In LIWO the second goal of MEGO was realized, by adding the information from flood forecasts. It is an open source model.

  18. Flood Extent Mapping for Namibia Using Change Detection and Thresholding with SAR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Stephanie; Fatoyinbo, Temilola E.; Policelli, Frederick

    2014-01-01

    A new method for flood detection change detection and thresholding (CDAT) was used with synthetic aperture radar (SAR) imagery to delineate the extent of flooding for the Chobe floodplain in the Caprivi region of Namibia. This region experiences annual seasonal flooding and has seen a recent renewal of severe flooding after a long dry period in the 1990s. Flooding in this area has caused loss of life and livelihoods for the surrounding communities and has caught the attention of disaster relief agencies. There is a need for flood extent mapping techniques that can be used to process images quickly, providing near real-time flooding information to relief agencies. ENVISAT/ASAR and Radarsat-2 images were acquired for several flooding seasons from February 2008 to March 2013. The CDAT method was used to determine flooding from these images and includes the use of image subtraction, decision based classification with threshold values, and segmentation of SAR images. The total extent of flooding determined for 2009, 2011 and 2012 was about 542 km2, 720 km2, and 673 km2 respectively. Pixels determined to be flooded in vegetation were typically flooding in vegetation was much greater (almost one third of the total flooded area). The time to maximum flooding for the 2013 flood season was determined to be about 27 days. Landsat water classification was used to compare the results from the new CDAT with SAR method; the results show good spatial agreement with Landsat scenes.

  19. Water Tables, Flooding, and Water Use by Riparian Phreatophyte Communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thibault, J. R.; Cleverly, J. R.; Dahm, C.

    2010-12-01

    Phreatophytic riparian vegetation relies heavily on ground water transported from upstream sources. In the American southwest, the phenology of native phreatophytes, e.g., Rio Grande cottonwood, (Populus deltoides) is also dependent on seasonal flooding, which has been greatly diminished by hydrologic alterations and competing allocations. In this semi-arid, water-scarce region, a long history of agriculture and a rapidly expanding population impose limits on water available for ecological purposes, such as managed, restorative flooding. At native and non-native (e.g., saltcedar, (Tamarix spp.)) sites along the Rio Grande floodplain of central New Mexico, eddy covariance flux towers and monitoring wells are deployed to quantify evapotranspiration (ET) and investigate relationships between ET, water table (WT) depth, and flooding. Season-long measurements have been completed over several years in flooding and non-flooding sites under climatic conditions fluctuating from wet to extreme drought. Total growing season ET declines with deeper WTs across sites, with robust correlations where strong hydrologic connections exist between the river and ground water. As such, wet years with elevated WTs result in greater annual ET. However, ET responds less clearly to floods within the growing season. Longer duration floods lasting several weeks are more typical earlier in the growing season, associated with sufficient snowmelt runoff. Extensive spring flooding in two recent years coincided with significantly higher ET at a young, mixed stand, but had no effect on ET at a mature saltcedar forest. Summer monsoons and drier springs typically bring more transitory flood pulses with rapid WT ascent and decline measured in days. Elevated ET occurred during only one of several shorter flood pulses, at a saltcedar site during an otherwise dry spring. ET was not affected by monsoon flood pulses. Recruitment of native vegetation requires spring floods with favorable timing, magnitude

  20. Paleohydraulic Reconstruction of Modern Large Floods at Subcritical Speed in a Confined Valley: Proof of Concept

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricio Bohorquez

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The present study aims to show the accuracy of paleoflood reconstruction techniques based on two-dimensional (2D hydraulic modelling of a large flood. Using this reconstruction technique, we determined trends in flood stages over time in a regulated river. A stretch of the Guadalquivir River (Southern Spain was selected as the study site. High-resolution orthophotos and LiDAR (Light Detection and Ranging elevations were acquired just after modern floods. They were used for the identification and location of stage indicators. In addition, water gradients were estimated from gauging records, documentary information and paleostage indicators (PSIs in two situations: (i pre-vegetation encroachment; and (ii post-vegetation encroachment due to upstream impoundment. Standard two-dimensional, flow depth-averaged equations over fixed beds were used in the hydraulic modelling. In a first stage, long records of instrumental data at gauging stations and documentary evidence of flood levels served to calibrate the input parameters of the hydraulic model. In a second stage, paleoflood signatures within sedimentary and botanical sequences served to verify the flood stages in the numerical simulations not only at the river reach where instrumental data exist but also in the downstream river reach. Interestingly, the rating curve obtained from the combined use of documentary information and imagery was nearly as accurate as gauging measurements. The thoughtful comparison of 2D modelled hydraulic variables against inferred values from PSIs and instrumental data supports the paleoflood reconstruction method over fixed beds. Vegetation encroachment provoked 10% deeper floods at the water discharge of 2000 m3 · s−1, which implied an increase of Manning’s roughness coefficient from 0.04 to 0.055 s · m−1/3 in less than 15 years.

  1. Connections between winter snowpack and subsequent spring floods in Norway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlichting, Lena; Engeland, Kolbjørn; Holmqvist, Erik; Bache Stranden, Heidi

    2016-04-01

    In Norway many inland and mountainous catchments have a hydrological regime where snow accumulates during winter. The runoff is delayed until the snow melts during spring. These processes are important for flood forecasting and water resource management, such as operation of hydropower reservoirs. It is commonly assumed that spring flood volume and peak linked to antecedent conditions such as winter snowpack, i.e. a large winter snowpack results in a high spring flood. The aims of this study are (i) to identify for which catchments a high correlation between snow water equivalent (SWE) at the end of the snow accumulation season and the subsequent spring flood, and (ii) establish regression models for these catchments to be used for seasonal flood forecasting. Daily runoff data from 43 distributed catchments all over Norway, each with at least 50 years of observations and a flood regime which is significantly influenced by snowmelt, were used. For each of these catchments we extracted SWE, precipitation and temperature on daily resolution from the on gridded data of Senorge.no. A peak-over-threshold approach was used to select independent flood events above the 90-th percentile. Maximum discharge, duration and volume were calculated for each event. The contribution of rain and snowmelt to each flood was additionally determined, based on snowmelt, precipitation and temperature data. The spring flood was defined as the first flood event that occurs after the date of maximum SWE, and the snowmelt contribution of at least 70%. The contribution of rain to a spring flood is independent of maximum SWE, resulting in a weaker correlation between maximum SWE and spring flood size. We therefore scaled the flood with the percentage of snow contribution to the flood event in order to adjust for the contribution from rain. The correlations between SWE and the spring flood were higher for scaled spring floods than for the unscaled ones. The results show for half of the stations a

  2. A Large-Scale Experiment to Determine the Effectiveness of Controlled Floods and Tamarisk Removal in Rehabilitating the Green River, Dinosaur National Monument, Colorado

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, J. C.; Cooper, D. J.; Larson, G. P.

    2002-12-01

    A large-scale field experiment is underway on the Green River in the Canyon of Lodore to evaluate the effectiveness of tamarisk (Tamarix ramosissima) removal and increased magnitude and duration of floods released from Flaming Gorge Dam (FGD) for the purpose of increasing active channel width and increasing entrainment rates on gravel bars where there are large proportions of fines. Results to date demonstrate that effectiveness varies with small scale geomorphic setting, and that channel widening in some parts of the river may be impossible without regular removal, which is unlikely. Our approach is important in channel rehabilitation planning, yet the difficulties of conducting such experiments are apparent in the first 2 yrs of the project. All tamarisk are being removed in 3, 0.8 to 1.6 km long study reaches. Three control reaches, immediately upstream or downstream from removal reaches, are also being monitored. We are making detailed measurements of scour and fill, substrate, and composition of riparian vegetation communities in removal and control reaches, and in response to high flood releases from FGD. Difficulties in implementation of the experiment include the multi-year process of tamarisk removal. Tamarisk immediately reestablishes itself on moist substrate following removal; thus, some parts of removal reaches have young tamarisk seedlings and other parts have tamarisk not yet removed. Experimental dam releases have not yet occurred due to drought in the watershed and other water delivery imperatives. We have also compared the distribution of tamarisk on the nearby Yampa River, where an unregulated flow regime exists and where tamarisk are absent or in low densities. The comparison between the distribution, density, and age characteristics of tamarisk on the 2 streams will lead to recommendations as to the sites on the Green River where eradication efforts are best directed. Despite the difficulties of experiment implementation, such large

  3. Flood inundation maps for the Wabash and Eel Rivers at Logansport, Indiana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fowler, Kathleen K.

    2014-01-01

    Digital flood-inundation maps for an 8.3-mile reach of the Wabash River and a 7.6-mile reach of the Eel River at Logansport, Indiana (Ind.), were created by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) in cooperation with the Indiana Office of Community and Rural Affairs. The inundation maps, which can be accessed through the USGS Flood Inundation Mapping Science Web site at http://water.usgs.gov/osw/flood_inundation/, depict estimates of the areal extent and depth of flooding corresponding to selected water levels (stages) at USGS streamgage Wabash River at Logansport, Ind. (sta. no. 03329000) and USGS streamgage Eel River near Logansport, Ind. (sta. no. 03328500). Current conditions for estimating near-real-time areas of inundation using USGS streamgage information may be obtained on the Internet at http://waterdata.usgs.gov/. In addition, information has been provided to the National Weather Service (NWS) for incorporation into their Advanced Hydrologic Prediction Service (AHPS) flood warning system http:/water.weather.gov/ahps/). The NWS forecasts flood hydrographs at many places that are often colocated with USGS streamgages. NWS-forecasted peak-stage information may be used in conjunction with the maps developed in this study to show predicted areas of flood inundation. For this study, flood profiles were computed for the stream reaches by means of a one-dimensional step-backwater model developed by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. The hydraulic model was calibrated by using the most current stage-discharge relations at USGS streamgages 03329000, Wabash River at Logansport, Ind., and 03328500, Eel River near Logansport, Ind. The calibrated hydraulic model was then used to determine five water-surface profiles for flood stage at 1-foot intervals referenced to the Wabash River streamgage datum, and four water-surface profiles for flood stages at 1-foot intervals referenced to the Eel River streamgage datum. The stages range from bankfull to approximately the highest

  4. Popular myths about flooding in Western Washington

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Joseph L.

    2011-01-01

    Floods are the most destructive natural hazard in the Nation, causing more deaths and financial loss in the 20th century than any other natural disaster. The most significant 20 riverine floods of the 20th century for which data are available have killed more than 1,843 people and caused more than $50 billion (uninflated) in damages (Perry, 2000). One of the most common means of describing the severity of a flood is a comparison to the "100-year flood." In the last decade, increasing attention has been paid to the fact that some regions, notably the Pacific Northwest, have experienced numerous so-called "100-year" floods in the span of a few years. Part of the confusion stems from the statistical nature of the "100-year flood" (Greene, 1996); however, another part of the confusion is the fact that the statistics are calculated for specific sites (streamgages) on specific rivers, rather than for a region as a whole. Scientists with the U.S. Geological Survey have begun to investigate how the likelihood of flooding may be determined on a regional basis (Troutman and Karlinger, 2003).

  5. NASA Global Flood Mapping System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Policelli, Fritz; Slayback, Dan; Brakenridge, Bob; Nigro, Joe; Hubbard, Alfred

    2017-01-01

    Product utility key factors: Near real time, automated production; Flood spatial extent Cloudiness Pixel resolution: 250m; Flood temporal extent; Flash floods short duration on ground?; Landcover--Water under vegetation cover vs open water

  6. Numerical modeling of seawater flow through the flooding system of dry docks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Najafi-Jilani

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Numerical simulations have been carried out on the flooding system of a dry dock in design stage and to be located at the south coasts of Iran. The main goals of the present investigation are to evaluate the flooding time as well as the seawater flow characteristics in the intake channels of the dock. The time dependent upstream and downstream boundary conditions of the flooding system are imposed in the modeling. The upstream boundary condition is imposed in accordance with the tidal fluctuations of sea water level. At the downstream, the gradually rising water surface elevation in the dry dock is described in a transient boundary condition. The numerical results are compared with available laboratory measured data and a good agreement is obtained. The seawater discharge through the flooding system and the required time to filling up the dry dock is determined at the worst case. The water current velocity and pressure on the rigid boundaries are also calculated and discussed.

  7. Spatio-temporal variation of flood vulnerability at the Poyang Lake Ecological Economic Zone, Jiangxi Province, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ping; Chen, Xiaoling

    2012-01-01

    For a long time areas of Poyang Lake have been threatened by floods. It is therefore important to assess flood vulnerability in this area. A composite flood vulnerability index was developed using an indicator approach to detect spatial distribution and temporal variation of flood vulnerability in the Poyang Lake Ecological Economic Zone (abbreviated to PLEEZ). Thematic maps of flood vulnerability showed a spatially ring-shaped distribution. The flood vulnerability ranking of one unit negatively correlated with the distance between the unit and the lake. Although flood vulnerability in PLEEZ declined significantly, the spatial distribution hardly changed from 1997 to 2006. The degree of flood vulnerability is highly related to exposure; variations in flood vulnerability are influenced by sensitivity and adaptive capacity. Based on correlation analysis, three proxies were identified as determinants of flood vulnerability variation over the past 10 years. This approach could provide policymakers with important flood risk information and entry points for flood management.

  8. Magnitude of flood flows for selected annual exceedance probabilities for streams in Massachusetts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarriello, Phillip J.

    2017-05-11

    The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Massachusetts Department of Transportation, determined the magnitude of flood flows at selected annual exceedance prob­abilities (AEPs) at streamgages in Massachusetts and from these data developed equations for estimating flood flows at ungaged locations in the State. Flood magnitudes were deter­mined for the 50-, 20-, 10-, 4-, 2-, 1-, 0.5-, and 0.2-percent AEPs at 220 streamgages, 125 of which are in Massachusetts and 95 are in the adjacent States of Connecticut, New Hamp­shire, New York, Rhode Island, and Vermont. AEP flood flows were computed for streamgages using the expected moments algorithm weighted with a recently computed regional skew­ness coefficient for New England.Regional regression equations were developed to estimate the magnitude of floods for selected AEP flows at ungaged sites from 199 selected streamgages and for 60 potential explanatory basin characteristics. AEP flows for 21 of the 125 streamgages in Massachusetts were not used in the final regional regression analysis, primarily because of regulation or redundancy. The final regression equations used general­ized least squares methods to account for streamgage record length and correlation. Drainage area, mean basin elevation, and basin storage explained 86 to 93 percent of the variance in flood magnitude from the 50- to 0.2-percent AEPs, respec­tively. The estimates of AEP flows at streamgages can be improved by using a weighted estimate that is based on the magnitude of the flood and associated uncertainty from the at-site analysis and the regional regression equations. Weighting procedures for estimating AEP flows at an ungaged site on a gaged stream also are provided that improve estimates of flood flows at the ungaged site when hydrologic characteristics do not abruptly change.Urbanization expressed as the percentage of imperviousness provided some explanatory power in the regional regression; however, it was not statistically

  9. Detection and characterization of enteric viruses in flood water from the 2011 thai flood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngaosuwankul, Nathamon; Thippornchai, Narin; Yamashita, Akifumi; Vargas, Ronald E Morales; Tunyong, Witawat; Mahakunkijchareon, Yuvadee; Ikuta, Kazuyoshi; Singhasivanon, Pratap; Okabayashi, Tamaki; Leaungwutiwong, Pornsawan

    2013-01-01

    Severe flooding, which is associated with numerous outbreaks of a wide range of infectious diseases, particularly those caused by enteric viruses, occurred in all areas of Thailand in 2011. To determine the prevalence of five human enteric viruses, namely enterovirus, rotavirus (RV), norovirus (NV), hepatitis A virus (HAV), and hepatitis E virus, in the flood water, 100 water samples were collected from flood-damaged areas in central Thailand. Viral RNA was extracted from concentrated samples and analyzed by RT-PCR and sequencing. NV was the most commonly detected pathogen in the tested samples (14%). RV and HAV were detected in 9% and 7% of samples, respectively. This study is the first to detect enteric viral genes in flood water in Thailand. Furthermore, it is the first to detect an NV gene in any type of environmental water in Thailand. These results provide useful information for estimating the risk of flood waterborne viral infection.

  10. EXPERIMENTAL STUDY OF LANDSLIDE DAM-BREAK FLOOD OVER ERODIBLE BED IN OPEN CHANNELS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YAN Jun; CAO Zhi-xian; LIU Huai-han; CHEN Li

    2009-01-01

    Large-scale landslide dams may block the river flow and cause inundation upstream,and subsequently fail and result in severe flooding and damage in the downstream.The need for enhanced understanding of the inundation and flooding is evident.This article presents an experimental study of the inundation and landslide dam-break flooding over erodible bed in open channels.A set of automatic water-level probes is deployed to record the highly transient stage,and the post-flooding channel bed elevation is measured.New experimental data resources are provided for understanding the processes of landslide-induced flooding and for testing mathematical rivers models.

  11. Flood Hazard Mapping by Using Geographic Information System and Hydraulic Model: Mert River, Samsun, Turkey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vahdettin Demir

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, flood hazard maps were prepared for the Mert River Basin, Samsun, Turkey, by using GIS and Hydrologic Engineering Centers River Analysis System (HEC-RAS. In this river basin, human life losses and a significant amount of property damages were experienced in 2012 flood. The preparation of flood risk maps employed in the study includes the following steps: (1 digitization of topographical data and preparation of digital elevation model using ArcGIS, (2 simulation of flood lows of different return periods using a hydraulic model (HEC-RAS, and (3 preparation of flood risk maps by integrating the results of (1 and (2.

  12. Implementation and Evaluation of the Streamflow Statistics (StreamStats) Web Application for Computing Basin Characteristics and Flood Peaks in Illinois

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishii, Audrey; Soong, David T.; Sharpe, Jennifer B.

    2010-01-01

    Illinois StreamStats (ILSS) is a Web-based application for computing selected basin characteristics and flood-peak quantiles based on the most recently (2010) published (Soong and others, 2004) regional flood-frequency equations at any rural stream location in Illinois. Limited streamflow statistics including general statistics, flow durations, and base flows also are available for U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) streamflow-gaging stations. ILSS can be accessed on the Web at http://streamstats.usgs.gov/ by selecting the State Applications hyperlink and choosing Illinois from the pull-down menu. ILSS was implemented for Illinois by obtaining and projecting ancillary geographic information system (GIS) coverages; populating the StreamStats database with streamflow-gaging station data; hydroprocessing the 30-meter digital elevation model (DEM) for Illinois to conform to streams represented in the National Hydrographic Dataset 1:100,000 stream coverage; and customizing the Web-based Extensible Markup Language (XML) programs for computing basin characteristics for Illinois. The basin characteristics computed by ILSS then were compared to the basin characteristics used in the published study, and adjustments were applied to the XML algorithms for slope and basin length. Testing of ILSS was accomplished by comparing flood quantiles computed by ILSS at a an approximately random sample of 170 streamflow-gaging stations computed by ILSS with the published flood quantile estimates. Differences between the log-transformed flood quantiles were not statistically significant at the 95-percent confidence level for the State as a whole, nor by the regions determined by each equation, except for region 1, in the northwest corner of the State. In region 1, the average difference in flood quantile estimates ranged from 3.76 percent for the 2-year flood quantile to 4.27 percent for the 500-year flood quantile. The total number of stations in region 1 was small (21) and the mean

  13. Estimated flood-inundation mapping for the Lower Blue River in Kansas City, Missouri, 2003-2005

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Brian P.; Rydlund, Paul H.

    2006-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the city of Kansas City, Missouri, began a study in 2003 of the lower Blue River in Kansas City, Missouri, from Gregory Boulevard to the mouth at the Missouri River to determine the estimated extent of flood inundation in the Blue River valley from flooding on the lower Blue River and from Missouri River backwater. Much of the lower Blue River flood plain is covered by industrial development. Rapid development in the upper end of the watershed has increased the volume of runoff, and thus the discharge of flood events for the Blue River. Modifications to the channel of the Blue River began in late 1983 in response to the need for flood control. By 2004, the channel had been widened and straightened from the mouth to immediately downstream from Blue Parkway to convey a 30-year flood. A two-dimensional depth-averaged flow model was used to simulate flooding within a 2-mile study reach of the Blue River between 63rd Street and Blue Parkway. Hydraulic simulation of the study reach provided information for the design and performance of proposed hydraulic structures and channel improvements and for the production of estimated flood-inundation maps and maps representing an areal distribution of water velocity, both magnitude and direction. Flood profiles of the Blue River were developed between Gregory Boulevard and 63rd Street from stage elevations calculated from high water marks from the flood of May 19, 2004; between 63rd Street and Blue Parkway from two-dimensional hydraulic modeling conducted for this study; and between Blue Parkway and the mouth from an existing one-dimensional hydraulic model by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. Twelve inundation maps were produced at 2-foot intervals for Blue Parkway stage elevations from 750 to 772 feet. Each map is associated with National Weather Service flood-peak forecast locations at 63rd Street, Blue Parkway, Stadium Drive, U.S. Highway 40, 12th Street, and the Missouri River

  14. Extreme Storm Surges and Coastal Flooding: Intangible Flood Losses in Integrated Risk Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D.R. Dassanayake

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available German coasts are often affected by extreme storm surges which have already led to major damages along the coastline in the past. The joint research project “XtremRisK” was initiated with the main objective of enhancing the knowledge with respect to the uncertainties of extreme storm surge predictions as well as quantifying exemplarily the flood risk under current conditions and future climate scenarios for two pilot sites in Germany: Sylt Island representative for an open coast and Hamburg for an estuarine urban area. Flood risk is generally determined by the product of the flooding probability and the possible losses associated with the flood event. Flood losses are categorized as tangible and intangible depending on whether or not the losses can be assessed in monetary values. Up to date, intangible loses are not or only partially incorporated in flood risk analysis due to the lack of appropriate evaluation and integration methodologies. This study focuses on developing methodologies for the evaluation of intangible losses due to flooding and for their integration with tangible losses in flood risk analysis

  15. On Flood Alert

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    lina braces fora particularly dangerous flood season in the wake of disastrous rainstorms Aseries of heavy storms since early May led to severe flooding and landslides in south and southwest China,causing heavy casualties and economic losses. Severe convective weather such as downpours,

  16. Discover Floods Educators Guide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Project WET Foundation, 2009

    2009-01-01

    Now available as a Download! This valuable resource helps educators teach students about both the risks and benefits of flooding through a series of engaging, hands-on activities. Acknowledging the different roles that floods play in both natural and urban communities, the book helps young people gain a global understanding of this common--and…

  17. Flood hazard and flood risk assessment using a time series of satellite images: a case study in Namibia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skakun, Sergii; Kussul, Nataliia; Shelestov, Andrii; Kussul, Olga

    2014-08-01

    In this article, the use of time series of satellite imagery to flood hazard mapping and flood risk assessment is presented. Flooded areas are extracted from satellite images for the flood-prone territory, and a maximum flood extent image for each flood event is produced. These maps are further fused to determine relative frequency of inundation (RFI). The study shows that RFI values and relative water depth exhibit the same probabilistic distribution, which is confirmed by Kolmogorov-Smirnov test. The produced RFI map can be used as a flood hazard map, especially in cases when flood modeling is complicated by lack of available data and high uncertainties. The derived RFI map is further used for flood risk assessment. Efficiency of the presented approach is demonstrated for the Katima Mulilo region (Namibia). A time series of Landsat-5/7 satellite images acquired from 1989 to 2012 is processed to derive RFI map using the presented approach. The following direct damage categories are considered in the study for flood risk assessment: dwelling units, roads, health facilities, and schools. The produced flood risk map shows that the risk is distributed uniformly all over the region. The cities and villages with the highest risk are identified. The proposed approach has minimum data requirements, and RFI maps can be generated rapidly to assist rescuers and decisionmakers in case of emergencies. On the other hand, limitations include: strong dependence on the available data sets, and limitations in simulations with extrapolated water depth values.

  18. Experimental determination of the Rashba coefficient in InSb/InAlSb quantum wells at zero magnetic field and elevated temperatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leontiadou, M A; Litvinenko, K L; Gilbertson, A M; Pidgeon, C R; Branford, W R; Cohen, L F; Fearn, M; Ashley, T; Emeny, M T; Murdin, B N; Clowes, S K

    2011-01-26

    We report the optical measurement of the spin dynamics at elevated temperatures and in zero magnetic field for two types of degenerately doped n-InSb quantum wells (QWs), one asymmetric (sample A) and one symmetric (sample B) with regards to the electrostatic potential across the QW. Making use of three directly determined experimental parameters: the spin lifetime, τ(s), the sheet carrier concentration, n, and the electron mobility, μ, we directly extract the zero-field spin splitting. For the asymmetric sample where the Rashba interaction is the dominant source of spin splitting, we deduce a room temperature Rashba parameter of α = 0.09 ± 0.1 eV Å which is in good agreement with calculations and we estimate the Rashba coefficient α(0) (a figure of merit for the ease with which electron spins can be modulated via an electric field). We review the merits/limitations of this approach and the implications of our findings for spintronic devices.

  19. Experimental determination of the Rashba coefficient in InSb/InAlSb quantum wells at zero magnetic field and elevated temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leontiadou, M A; Litvinenko, K L; Murdin, B N; Clowes, S K [Advanced Technology Institute, University of Surrey, Guildford GU2 7XH (United Kingdom); Gilbertson, A M; Branford, W R; Cohen, L F [Blackett Laboratory, Imperial College, London SW7 2BZ (United Kingdom); Pidgeon, C R [Department of Physics, Heriot-Watt University, Edinburgh EH14 4AS (United Kingdom); Fearn, M; Ashley, T; Emeny, M T, E-mail: s.clowes@surrey.ac.uk [QinetiQ Ltd, St Andrews Road, Malvern WR14 3PS (United Kingdom)

    2011-01-26

    We report the optical measurement of the spin dynamics at elevated temperatures and in zero magnetic field for two types of degenerately doped n-InSb quantum wells (QWs), one asymmetric (sample A) and one symmetric (sample B) with regards to the electrostatic potential across the QW. Making use of three directly determined experimental parameters: the spin lifetime, {tau}{sub s}, the sheet carrier concentration, n, and the electron mobility, {mu}, we directly extract the zero-field spin splitting. For the asymmetric sample where the Rashba interaction is the dominant source of spin splitting, we deduce a room temperature Rashba parameter of {alpha} = 0.09 {+-} 0.1 eV A which is in good agreement with calculations and we estimate the Rashba coefficient {alpha}{sub 0} (a figure of merit for the ease with which electron spins can be modulated via an electric field). We review the merits/limitations of this approach and the implications of our findings for spintronic devices.

  20. Improving remote sensing flood assessment using volunteered geographical data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Schnebele

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available A new methodology for the generation of flood hazard maps is presented fusing remote sensing and volunteered geographical data. Water pixels are identified utilizing a machine learning classification of two Landsat remote sensing scenes, acquired before and during the flooding event as well as a digital elevation model paired with river gage data. A statistical model computes the probability of flooded areas as a function of the number of adjacent pixels classified as water. Volunteered data obtained through Google news, videos and photos are added to modify the contour regions. It is shown that even a small amount of volunteered ground data can dramatically improve results.