WorldWideScience

Sample records for flood elevation determinations

  1. 75 FR 29268 - Proposed Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-25

    ... impact assessment has not been prepared. Regulatory Flexibility Act. As flood elevation determinations.... Approximately 1.7 mile None +714 upstream of Due West Highway. Beaver Creek At the confluence with None +571... confluence with Beaver Creek Tributary 15. Beaver Creek Tributary 1 At the confluence with None +572...

  2. 75 FR 69892 - Final Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-16

    ...: * Elevation in feet (NGVD) + Elevation in feet (NAVD) State City/town/county Source of flooding Location Depth... county +899 City of Norwich, Town boundary. of Greene, Town of North Norwich, Town of Oxford, Town of...). Susquehanna River At the downstream county +965 Town of Afton, Town of boundary. Bainbridge, Village of Afton...

  3. 77 FR 6980 - Final Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-10

    ... in feet (NGVD) + Elevation in feet (NAVD) State City/town/county Source of flooding Location Depth in feet above ground [caret] Elevation in meters (MSL) Modified Unincorporated Areas of Nowata County... Bayou An area bounded by the +100 Town of Mayersville, county boundary to the Unincorporated Areas of...

  4. 76 FR 1535 - Final Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-11

    ... in feet (NGVD) + Elevation in feet (NAVD) State City/town/county Source of flooding Location Depth in feet above ground [caret] Elevation in meters (MSL) Modified Unincorporated Areas of Poinsett County... with the St. Francis River...... +212 Areas of Poinsett County. Approximately 0.45 mile downstream of...

  5. 75 FR 68710 - Final Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-09

    ...: * Elevation in feet (NGVD) + Elevation in feet (NAVD) State City/town/county Source of flooding Location Depth... County, California Docket Nos.: FEMA-B-7762, FEMA-B-7795, and FEMA-B-1053 California Unincorporated Oregon Slough..... City of Montague +2503 Areas of Siskiyou and County. Unincorporated Siskiyou County...

  6. 76 FR 50918 - Final Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-17

    ... in feet (NGVD) + Elevation in feet (NAVD) Depth in feet State City/town/county Source of flooding... affected [caret] Elevation in meters (MSL) Modified Jones County, Texas, and Incorporated Areas Docket No.: FEMA-B-1122 Lake Fort Phantom Hill Just downstream of County +1642 City of Abilene, Highway 1082...

  7. 77 FR 49379 - Final Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-16

    ... in feet (NGVD) + Elevation in feet (NAVD) State City/town/county Source of flooding Location Depth in feet above ground [caret] Elevation in meters (MSL) Modified Unincorporated Areas of Washington County... of the +35 Areas of railroad. Washington County. Approximately 2.1 miles upstream of the railroad...

  8. 75 FR 43418 - Final Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-26

    ... follows: * Elevation in feet (NGVD) + Elevation in feet (NAVD) State City/town/county Source of flooding... +869 Town of Peoria, upstream of Main Street. Unincorporated Areas of Ottawa County. Approximately 1.... Town of Peoria Maps are available for inspection at the Ottawa County Courthouse, 102 East Central...

  9. 76 FR 40670 - Proposed Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-11

    ...) Depth in feet above State City/town/county Source of flooding Location ** ground [caret] Elevation in... Contentnea Creek +76 +77 Town of Black Creek, confluence. Unincorporated Areas of Wilson County... +63 Town of Stantonsburg, confluence. Unincorporated Areas of Wilson County. Approximately 0.8 mile...

  10. 76 FR 66887 - Proposed Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-28

    ...) Depth in feet above State City/town/county Source of flooding Location** ground [caret] Elevation in meters (MSL) Existing Modified Town of Richmond, Vermont Vermont Town of Richmond........ Winooski River... Incorporated Areas Little Thompson River At the downstream side None +4935 Town of Berthoud, of Weld County...

  11. 76 FR 8978 - Proposed Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-16

    .../town/county Source of flooding Location ** ground [caret] Elevation in meters (MSL) Existing Modified Unincorporated Areas of Yolo County, California California Unincorporated Areas of Cache Creek Settling Basin At........ Entire None +901 Town of shoreline Wolcottvill e, Unincorpora ted Areas of LaGrange County. * National...

  12. 76 FR 36482 - Proposed Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-22

    .../town/county Source of flooding Location ** ground [caret] Elevation in meters (MSL) Existing Modified City of Colonial Heights, Virginia Virginia City of Colonial Heights Old Town Creek Approximately 0.63... for inspection at 202 James Avenue, Colonial Heights, VA 23834. Unincorporated Areas of Halifax County...

  13. 76 FR 68107 - Final Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-03

    ... environmental impact assessment has not been prepared. Regulatory Flexibility Act. As flood elevation..., Illinois, and Incorporated Areas Docket No.: FEMA-B-1134 Beaver Creek Approximately 1.58 miles +366... of Main Street extended (River Mile 887). Unnamed Tributary to Beaver Creek Approximately 1,500 feet...

  14. 77 FR 66785 - Proposed Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-07

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY Federal Emergency Management Agency 44 CFR Part 67 [Docket ID FEMA... Elevation Determinations AGENCY: Federal Emergency Management Agency, DHS. ACTION: Proposed rule; correction... sources: Acadiana Coulee, Anselm Coulee, Bayou Carencro, Bayou Parc Perdue, Bayou Queue De Tortue, Beau...

  15. 76 FR 58436 - Proposed Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-21

    ... +725 feet upstream of the U.S. Route 50 West exit ramp. Dickerson Creek Tributary 1......... At the... Flooding Approximately 1,025 None 2 Hawaii County. feet west of the intersection of Waikoloa Beach Drive... intersection of West Kawailani Street and Launa Street. Shallow Flooding Approximately 3.6 miles None 1 Hawaii...

  16. 77 FR 46994 - Proposed Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-07

    ..., it addresses the following flooding sources: Jones Bayou, Mississippi River, and Porter Bayou. DATES... Incorporated Areas'' addressed the following flooding sources: Jones Bayou, Mississippi River, and Porter Bayou.... Approximately 8.1 miles None +162 upstream of the Arkansas River confluence. Porter Bayou Approximately 0.8 mile...

  17. 76 FR 3531 - Final Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-20

    ... proof Flood Insurance Study and FIRM available at the address cited below for each community. The BFEs... (All Jurisdictions) Docket No.: FEMA-B-1085 Duck Lake Entire shoreline within +930 Township of Clarence...

  18. 75 FR 67317 - Proposed Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-02

    ... buildings. Comments on any aspect of the Flood Insurance Study and FIRM, other than the proposed BFEs, will... Approximately 700 feet None +41 City of Brooksville, downstream of Duck Unincorporated Areas Pond Road (at...

  19. 75 FR 34381 - Final Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-17

    .... Interested lessees and owners of real property are encouraged to review the proof Flood Insurance Study and... Incorporated Areas Docket No.: FEMA-B-1035 Duck Creek At the mouth of the +891 City of Warren. Mahoning River...

  20. 75 FR 62057 - Proposed Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-07

    ... buildings. Comments on any aspect of the Flood Insurance Study and FIRM, other than the proposed BFEs, will... State Highway 274. Duck Creek Approximately 925 feet None +458 Unincorporated Areas of downstream of...

  1. 76 FR 8965 - Proposed Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-16

    ... buildings. Comments on any aspect of the Flood Insurance Study and FIRM, other than the proposed BFEs, will.... Approximately 1,320 None +410 feet upstream of Uncle Duck Road. Hall Branch At the Shaws Creek None +426...

  2. 77 FR 3625 - Final Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-25

    ... encouraged to review the proof Flood Insurance Study and FIRM available at the address cited below for each... Duck Pond Unincorporated Areas of Road (at Junction Hernando County. 1NP0170). Approximately 100 feet...

  3. 77 FR 30220 - Final Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-22

    ... proof Flood Insurance Study and FIRM available at the address cited below for each community. The BFEs... Areas of 175. Kaufman County. Approximately 1 mile +342 downstream of State Highway 274. Duck Creek...

  4. 76 FR 21664 - Final Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-18

    ... proof Flood Insurance Study and FIRM available at the address cited below for each community. The BFEs... 2,100 feet +861 upstream of 11th Street. Big Duck Creek At South P Street........ +843 City of...

  5. 75 FR 81957 - Proposed Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-29

    ... of Subjects in 44 CFR Part 67 Administrative practice and procedure, Flood insurance, Reporting and.... Whipple Creek Just downstream of None +28 Unincorporated Areas Northwest Krieger Road. of Clark County...

  6. 77 FR 46980 - Final Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-07

    ... Executive Order 12988. List of Subjects in 44 CFR Part 67 Administrative practice and procedure, Flood... upstream of Northeast 152nd Avenue. Whipple Creek Just downstream of +28 Unincorporated Areas of Northwest...

  7. 76 FR 32896 - Proposed Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-07

    ... buildings. Comments on any aspect of the Flood Insurance Study and FIRM, other than the proposed BFEs, will... Creek confluence. At the downstream side +489 +491 of Oak Gate Lane. Long Branch (of Duck Creek) Bypass.. At the upstream side of +498 +490 City of Mesquite. the Long Branch (of Duck Creek) confluence...

  8. 78 FR 14697 - Final Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-07

    ... Communities affected elevation above ground [caret] Elevation in meters (MSL) Modified Cecil County, Maryland... 1 to Stone Run At the Stone Run +271 Town of Rising Sun, confluence. Unincorporated Areas of Cecil County. Approximately 460 feet +359 downstream of Pierce Road. Tributary 2 to Stone Run At the Stone Run...

  9. 75 FR 31361 - Proposed Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-03

    ... source(s) elevation ground [caret] Elevation Communities affected in meters (MSL) Effective Modified... American Vertical Datum. Depth in feet above ground. [caret] Mean Sea Level, rounded to the nearest 0.1.... Stone County, Mississippi, and Incorporated Areas Church House Branch Approximately 0.5 mile None +211...

  10. 75 FR 29253 - Proposed Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-25

    ...: * Elevation in feet (NGVD) + Elevation in feet (NAVD) Depth in feet above State City/town/county Source of... +21 Town of Ebro, upstream of the Unincorporated Areas confluence with the of Washington County. East... County, Colorado, and Incorporated Areas Willow Creek At the confluence with None +8,154 Unincorporated...

  11. 78 FR 10066 - Final Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-13

    ... follows: * Elevation in feet (NGVD) + Elevation in feet (NAVD) Depth in feet State City/town/county Source...). Scriba Creek Approximately 0.90 mile +546 Town of Amboy. upstream of County Route 23 (Potter Road.... Town of Palermo Maps are available for inspection at the Palermo Town Municipal Offices, 53 County...

  12. 78 FR 21272 - Final Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-10

    ... below for the modified BFEs for each community listed. These modified elevations have been published in... [Amended] 0 2. The tables published under the authority of Sec. 67.11 are amended as follows: * Elevation... Austin. upstream of 29th Avenue Southwest (County Highway 28). At the downstream side of +1205 I and M...

  13. 77 FR 21471 - Final Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-10

    ... elevations have been published in newspapers of local circulation and ninety (90) days have elapsed since... School Creek. Approximately 0.61 mile +605 upstream of the confluence with School Creek. Arkansas River...

  14. 76 FR 3524 - Final Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-20

    ... effects from Kentucky River). the Kentucky River to Garrard County. approximately 932 feet upstream of Old..., City of The Colony, Town of Hebron, Unincorporated Areas of Denton County. Approximately 2,940 feet... Communities affected [caret] Elevation in meters (MSL) Modified Ashley County, Arkansas, and Incorporated...

  15. 77 FR 66788 - Proposed Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-07

    ... Town of Clarkstown. Old Mill Road. Approximately 600 feet +150 +151 downstream of Rockland Lake. Golf..., Orangetown/Town of Town of Orangetown. Clarkstown corporate limit. At the downstream side +67 +66 of Old Mill... and modified elevations, and communities affected for Rockland County, New York (All Jurisdictions...

  16. 78 FR 28780 - Proposed Flood Elevation Determinations for Beaver County, Pennsylvania (All Jurisdictions)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-16

    ...-2013-0002; Internal Agency Docket No. FEMA-B-1147] Proposed Flood Elevation Determinations for Beaver... proposed rule concerning proposed flood elevation determinations for Beaver County, Pennsylvania (All... Beaver County, Pennsylvania. Because FEMA has or will be issuing a Revised Preliminary Flood Insurance...

  17. 78 FR 78808 - Proposed Flood Elevation Determinations for Pierce County, Washington, and Incorporated Areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-27

    ...-2013-0002; Internal Agency Docket No. FEMA-B-7748] Proposed Flood Elevation Determinations for Pierce... proposed rule concerning proposed flood elevation determinations for Pierce County, Washington, and... sources in Pierce County, Washington. On April 16, 2012, FEMA published a proposed rulemaking at 77 FR...

  18. 78 FR 28779 - Proposed Flood Elevation Determinations for Armstrong County, Pennsylvania (All Jurisdictions)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-16

    ... Armstrong County, Pennsylvania (All Jurisdictions) AGENCY: Federal Emergency Management Agency, DHS. ACTION... proposed rule concerning proposed flood elevation determinations for Armstrong County, Pennsylvania (All... sources in Armstrong County, Pennsylvania. Because FEMA has or [[Page 28780

  19. 44 CFR 65.5 - Revision to special hazard area boundaries with no change to base flood elevation determinations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... zones and floodways) it may be feasible to elevate areas with engineered earthen fill above the base... area boundaries with no change to base flood elevation determinations. 65.5 Section 65.5 Emergency... § 65.5 Revision to special hazard area boundaries with no change to base flood elevation determinations...

  20. FEMA DFIRM Base Flood Elevations

    Data.gov (United States)

    Minnesota Department of Natural Resources — The Base Flood Elevation (BFE) table is required for any digital data where BFE lines will be shown on the corresponding Flood Insurance Rate Map (FIRM). Normally,...

  1. Base Flood Elevation (BFE) Lines

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Homeland Security — The Base Flood Elevation (BFE) table is required for any digital data where BFE lines will be shown on the corresponding Flood Insurance Rate Map (FIRM). Normally if...

  2. Base Flood Elevation

    Data.gov (United States)

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — The National Flood Hazard Layer (NFHL) data incorporates all Digital Flood Insurance Rate Map(DFIRM) databases published by FEMA, and any Letters Of Map Revision...

  3. 78 FR 52955 - Changes in Flood Hazard Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-27

    ... community that the Deputy Associate Administrator for Mitigation reconsider the changes. The flood hazard...; Internal Agency Docket No. FEMA-B-1349] Changes in Flood Hazard Determinations AGENCY: Federal Emergency... modification of Base Flood Elevations (BFEs), base flood depths, Special Flood Hazard Area (SFHA) boundaries or...

  4. The 3D Elevation Program—Flood risk management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carswell, William J.; Lukas, Vicki

    2018-01-25

    Flood-damage reduction in the United States has been a longstanding but elusive societal goal. The national strategy for reducing flood damage has shifted over recent decades from a focus on construction of flood-control dams and levee systems to a three-pronged strategy to (1) improve the design and operation of such structures, (2) provide more accurate and accessible flood forecasting, and (3) shift the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) National Flood Insurance Program to a more balanced, less costly flood-insurance paradigm. Expanding the availability and use of high-quality, three-dimensional (3D) elevation information derived from modern light detection and ranging (lidar) technologies to provide essential terrain data poses a singular opportunity to dramatically enhance the effectiveness of all three components of this strategy. Additionally, FEMA, the National Weather Service, and the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) have developed tools and joint program activities to support the national strategy.The USGS 3D Elevation Program (3DEP) has the programmatic infrastructure to produce and provide essential terrain data. This infrastructure includes (1) data acquisition partnerships that leverage funding and reduce duplicative efforts, (2) contracts with experienced private mapping firms that ensure acquisition of consistent, low-cost 3D elevation data, and (3) the technical expertise, standards, and specifications required for consistent, edge-to-edge utility across multiple collection platforms and public access unfettered by individual database designs and limitations.High-quality elevation data, like that collected through 3DEP, are invaluable for assessing and documenting flood risk and communicating detailed information to both responders and planners alike. Multiple flood-mapping programs make use of USGS streamflow and 3DEP data. Flood insurance rate maps, flood documentation studies, and flood-inundation map libraries are products of these

  5. Productivity responses of Acer rubrum and Taxodium distichum seedlings to elevated CO2 and flooding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vann, C.D.; Megonigal, J.P.

    2002-01-01

    Elevated levels of atmospheric CO2 are expected to increase photosynthetic rates of C3 tree species, but it is uncertain whether this will result in an increase in wetland seedling productivity. Separate short-term experiments (12 and 17 weeks) were performed on two wetland tree species, Taxodium distichum and Acer rubrum, to determine if elevated CO2 would influence the biomass responses of seedlings to flooding. T. distichum were grown in replicate glasshouses (n = 2) at CO2 concentrations of 350 or 700 ppm, and A. rubrum were grown in growth chambers at CO2 concentrations of 422 or 722 ppm. Both species were grown from seed. The elevated CO2 treatment was crossed with two water table treatments, flooded and non-flooded. Elevated CO2 increased leaf-level photosynthesis, whole-plant photosynthesis, and trunk diameter of T. distichum in both flooding treatments, but did not increase biomass of T. distichum or A. rubrum. Flooding severely reduced biomass, height, and leaf area of both T. distichum and A. rubrum. Our results suggest that the absence of a CO2-induced increase in growth may have been due to an O2 limitation on root production even though there was a relatively deep (??? 10 cm) aerobic soil surface in the non-flooded treatment. ?? 2001 Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Assessing uncertainty in SRTM elevations for global flood modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawker, L. P.; Rougier, J.; Neal, J. C.; Bates, P. D.

    2017-12-01

    The SRTM DEM is widely used as the topography input to flood models in data-sparse locations. Understanding spatial error in the SRTM product is crucial in constraining uncertainty about elevations and assessing the impact of these upon flood prediction. Assessment of SRTM error was carried out by Rodriguez et al (2006), but this did not explicitly quantify the spatial structure of vertical errors in the DEM, and nor did it distinguish between errors over different types of landscape. As a result, there is a lack of information about spatial structure of vertical errors of the SRTM in the landscape that matters most to flood models - the floodplain. Therefore, this study attempts this task by comparing SRTM, an error corrected SRTM product (The MERIT DEM of Yamazaki et al., 2017) and near truth LIDAR elevations for 3 deltaic floodplains (Mississippi, Po, Wax Lake) and a large lowland region (the Fens, UK). Using the error covariance function, calculated by comparing SRTM elevations to the near truth LIDAR, perturbations of the 90m SRTM DEM were generated, producing a catalogue of plausible DEMs. This allows modellers to simulate a suite of plausible DEMs at any aggregated block size above native SRTM resolution. Finally, the generated DEM's were input into a hydrodynamic model of the Mekong Delta, built using the LISFLOOD-FP hydrodynamic model, to assess how DEM error affects the hydrodynamics and inundation extent across the domain. The end product of this is an inundation map with the probability of each pixel being flooded based on the catalogue of DEMs. In a world of increasing computer power, but a lack of detailed datasets, this powerful approach can be used throughout natural hazard modelling to understand how errors in the SRTM DEM can impact the hazard assessment.

  7. Predicted high-water elevations for selected flood events at the Albert Pike Recreation Area, Ouachita National Forest

    Science.gov (United States)

    D.A. Marion

    2012-01-01

    The hydraulic characteristics are determined for the June 11, 2010, flood on the Little Missouri River at the Albert Pike Recreation Area in Arkansas. These characteristics are then used to predict the high-water elevations for the 10-, 25-, 50-, and 100-year flood events in the Loop B, C, and D Campgrounds of the recreation area. The peak discharge and related...

  8. Hydrological and hydraulic models for determination of flood-prone and flood inundation areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aksoy, Hafzullah; Sadan Ozgur Kirca, Veysel; Burgan, Halil Ibrahim; Kellecioglu, Dorukhan

    2016-05-01

    Geographic Information Systems (GIS) are widely used in most studies on water resources. Especially, when the topography and geomorphology of study area are considered, GIS can ease the work load. Detailed data should be used in this kind of studies. Because of, either the complication of the models or the requirement of highly detailed data, model outputs can be obtained fast only with a good optimization. The aim in this study, firstly, is to determine flood-prone areas in a watershed by using a hydrological model considering two wetness indexes; the topographical wetness index, and the SAGA (System for Automated Geoscientific Analyses) wetness index. The wetness indexes were obtained in the Quantum GIS (QGIS) software by using the Digital Elevation Model of the study area. Flood-prone areas are determined by considering the wetness index maps of the watershed. As the second stage of this study, a hydraulic model, HEC-RAS, was executed to determine flood inundation areas under different return period-flood events. River network cross-sections required for this study were derived from highly detailed digital elevation models by QGIS. Also river hydraulic parameters were used in the hydraulic model. Modelling technology used in this study is made of freely available open source softwares. Based on case studies performed on watersheds in Turkey, it is concluded that results of such studies can be used for taking precaution measures against life and monetary losses due to floods in urban areas particularly.

  9. Hydrological and hydraulic models for determination of flood-prone and flood inundation areas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Aksoy

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Geographic Information Systems (GIS are widely used in most studies on water resources. Especially, when the topography and geomorphology of study area are considered, GIS can ease the work load. Detailed data should be used in this kind of studies. Because of, either the complication of the models or the requirement of highly detailed data, model outputs can be obtained fast only with a good optimization. The aim in this study, firstly, is to determine flood-prone areas in a watershed by using a hydrological model considering two wetness indexes; the topographical wetness index, and the SAGA (System for Automated Geoscientific Analyses wetness index. The wetness indexes were obtained in the Quantum GIS (QGIS software by using the Digital Elevation Model of the study area. Flood-prone areas are determined by considering the wetness index maps of the watershed. As the second stage of this study, a hydraulic model, HEC-RAS, was executed to determine flood inundation areas under different return period-flood events. River network cross-sections required for this study were derived from highly detailed digital elevation models by QGIS. Also river hydraulic parameters were used in the hydraulic model. Modelling technology used in this study is made of freely available open source softwares. Based on case studies performed on watersheds in Turkey, it is concluded that results of such studies can be used for taking precaution measures against life and monetary losses due to floods in urban areas particularly.

  10. NOAA predicts moderate flood potential in Midwest, elevated risk of ice

    Science.gov (United States)

    March 20, 2014 U.S. Spring Flood Risk Map for 2014. U.S. Spring Flood Risk Map for 2014. (Credit: NOAA moderate flood potential in Midwest, elevated risk of ice jams; California and Southwest stuck with drought minor or moderate risk of exceeding flood levels this spring with the highest threat in the southern

  11. 46 CFR 174.080 - Flooding on self-elevating and surface type units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Flooding on self-elevating and surface type units. 174... Drilling Units § 174.080 Flooding on self-elevating and surface type units. (a) On a surface type unit or... superstructure deck where superstructures are fitted must be assumed to be subject to simultaneous flooding. (b...

  12. Comparing the Performance of Commonly Available Digital Elevation Models in GIS-based Flood Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ybanez, R. L.; Lagmay, A. M. A.; David, C. P.

    2016-12-01

    With climatological hazards increasing globally, the Philippines is listed as one of the most vulnerable countries in the world due to its location in the Western Pacific. Flood hazards mapping and modelling is one of the responses by local government and research institutions to help prepare for and mitigate the effects of flood hazards that constantly threaten towns and cities in floodplains during the 6-month rainy season. Available digital elevation maps, which serve as the most important dataset used in 2D flood modelling, are limited in the Philippines and testing is needed to determine which of the few would work best for flood hazards mapping and modelling. Two-dimensional GIS-based flood modelling with the flood-routing software FLO-2D was conducted using three different available DEMs from the ASTER GDEM, the SRTM GDEM, and the locally available IfSAR DTM. All other parameters kept uniform, such as resolution, soil parameters, rainfall amount, and surface roughness, the three models were run over a 129-sq. kilometer watershed with only the basemap varying. The output flood hazard maps were compared on the basis of their flood distribution, extent, and depth. The ASTER and SRTM GDEMs contained too much error and noise which manifested as dissipated and dissolved hazard areas in the lower watershed where clearly delineated flood hazards should be present. Noise on the two datasets are clearly visible as erratic mounds in the floodplain. The dataset which produced the only feasible flood hazard map is the IfSAR DTM which delineates flood hazard areas clearly and properly. Despite the use of ASTER and SRTM with their published resolution and accuracy, their use in GIS-based flood modelling would be unreliable. Although not as accessible, only IfSAR or better datasets should be used for creating secondary products from these base DEM datasets. For developing countries which are most prone to hazards, but with limited choices for basemaps used in hazards

  13. 76 FR 62006 - Proposed Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-06

    ...,485 None +13 Unincorporated Areas of feet downstream of Clay County. Fern Avenue. Approximately 150... upstream of Reinhold Tree Farm Road. South Prong Double Branch Approximately 0.6 mile None +59...

  14. 75 FR 22699 - Final Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-30

    ... La Vista. At South 168th Street.... +1100 Approximately 300 feet +1177 upstream of South 204th Street.... upstream of the Sarpy County, City of La confluence with South Vista, City of Papillion Creek. Papillion... Creek (with levees)..... Just downstream of South +999 City of Bellevue, City of 48th Street. La Vista...

  15. 76 FR 46705 - Proposed Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-03

    ... of State Lake County. Route 40. Approximately 2.6 miles +6 +7 upstream of State Route 44. Vista Lake... at 705 West University Avenue, Lafayette, LA 70506. City of Youngsville Maps are available for inspection at 305 Iberia Street, Youngsville, LA 70592. Town of Broussard Maps are available for inspection...

  16. 75 FR 52868 - Final Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-30

    ... Highway. Turkey Creek Approximately 0.7 mile +565 City of Center Point, downstream of Old City of Clay... inspection at 6757 Old Springville Road, Pinson, AL 35126. City of Homewood Maps are available for inspection.... downstream of South Lone Tree Road. Approximately 1,800 feet +6,949 upstream of Lake Mary Road. Peak View...

  17. 76 FR 8984 - Proposed Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-16

    .... Lemon Creek Approximately 0.27 mile None [caret]23 City and Borough of downstream of Glacier Juneau... Vertical Datum. Depth in feet above ground. [caret] Mean Lower Low Water. ** BFEs to be changed include the...

  18. 78 FR 45877 - Final Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-30

    .... Approximately 0.23 mile [caret] 31 upstream of Egan Drive. Lemon Creek Approximately 0.27 mile [caret] 23 City... American Vertical Datum. Depth in feet above ground. [caret] Mean Lower Low Water. ADDRESSES City and...

  19. 76 FR 79098 - Final Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-21

    ... of North Eagle Drive. Oak Creek Just upstream of the +5253 Town of Rockvale, Town of unnamed railroad... Channel....... At the confluence with +1758 City of Abilene. Cat Claw Creek. Just upstream of Nonesuch...

  20. 77 FR 49367 - Final Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-16

    ... within the scope of the Regulatory Flexibility Act, 5 U.S.C. 601- 612, a regulatory flexibility analysis... shoreline......... +67 Unincorporated Areas of Polk County. London Creek Watershed Unnamed Pond-- Entire shoreline......... +70 Unincorporated Areas of ICPR Node 28A1. Polk County. London Creek Watershed Unnamed...

  1. 77 FR 49360 - Final Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-16

    ... confluence. Casey Branch (backwater effects from From the Dale Hollow Lake +663 Unincorporated Areas of Dale Hollow Lake). confluence to Cumberland County. approximately 0.5 mile upstream of the Dale Hollow Lake.... Dale Hollow Lake (Obey River) Entire shoreline within +663 Unincorporated Areas of community...

  2. 75 FR 77762 - Final Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-14

    .... approximately 1.1 mile upstream of the confluence with Green River Lake. Snake Creek (backwater effects from... Mason Road. Pine Run Approximately 400 feet +752 City of Mason. downstream of Kings Mill Road...

  3. 76 FR 70397 - Proposed Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-14

    ... Branch Road. Salt Lick Branch (backwater effects At the Licking River None +924 Unincorporated Areas of... upstream of West County Road 100 North. Goose Creek At the upstream side of None +591 City of Logansport.... Approximately 355 feet None +901 upstream of Clyde Holliday Cemetery Road. Brushy Fork (backwater effects from...

  4. 77 FR 76420 - Final Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-28

    ... Road. Salt Lick Branch (backwater effects At the Licking River +924 Unincorporated Areas from Licking... +3206 At the intersection of Slide Road and 58th Street......... +3256 * National Geodetic Vertical...). confluence. of Magoffin County. Approximately 355 feet +901 upstream of Clyde Holliday Cemetery Road. [[Page...

  5. 75 FR 18091 - Final Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-09

    ... Areas Docket No.: FEMA-B-1032 Salt Branch Intersection of Unnamed +163 Unincorporated Areas of Road and... Huntsville. upstream of Green Cove Road. Approximately 75 feet +682 downstream of Drake Avenue. * National.... Approximately 180 feet +575 downstream of Hester Cut Road. Heartsill Creek Tributary 1 At the confluence with...

  6. 75 FR 62048 - Proposed Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-07

    ... Brown Street, Runnells, IA 50237. Unincorporated Areas of Polk County Maps are available for inspection... Sugar Creek Approximately 250 feet None +1080 Township of Wayne. downstream of U.S. Route 322... Addison. upstream of Robert Brown Road. Approximately 1.25 mile None +1386 upstream of Robert Brown Road...

  7. 76 FR 45485 - Proposed Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-29

    ... Creek (backwater effects from Tennessee River), McCormick Creek (backwater effects from Ohio River... effects from Tennessee River), Lee Creek (backwater effects from Tennessee River), McCormick Creek... Tennessee River confluence. McCormick Creek (backwater effects From the Cumberland None +343 Unincorporated...

  8. 75 FR 6600 - Proposed Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-10

    ... Main Street, Lexington, OH 44904. McCormick County, South Carolina, and Incorporated Areas Clark Hill Reservoir/Lake Thurmond.. Entire shoreline None +339 Unincorpo rated Areas (within county). of McCormick... inspection at the County Administrator's Office, 362 Airport Road, McCormick, SC 29835. Unincorporated Areas...

  9. 76 FR 72627 - Final Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-25

    ... addresses are listed in the table below. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Luis Rodriguez, Chief, Engineering.... Paul, Unincorporated Areas of Dakota County. Approximately 10,200 feet +714 upstream of I-35. Mud Creek..., Rosemount, MN 55068. [[Page 72634

  10. 76 FR 35111 - Final Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-16

    ... addresses are listed in the table below. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Luis Rodriguez, Chief, Engineering... downstream of Saint Paul of Blackstone, Town of Street. Grafton, Town of Millbury, Town of Millville, Town of... Blackstone Maps are available for inspection at the Town Hall, 15 Saint Paul Street, Blackstone, MA 01504...

  11. 75 FR 77598 - Proposed Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-13

    ..., identified by Docket No. FEMA-B-1167, to Luis Rodriguez, Chief, Engineering Management Branch, Federal... Rodriguez, Chief, Engineering Management Branch, Federal Insurance and Mitigation Administration, Federal.... Paul, Tributary 12 Peruque Creek. Unincorporated Areas of St. Charles County. Approximately 0.4 mile...

  12. 75 FR 59989 - Final Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-29

    ... Road. Caracol Creek Approximately 600 feet +770 City of San Antonio. upstream of the confluence with... Stage Road. Leon Creek Tributary M Approximately 1,300 feet +1,202 City of San Antonio. downstream of... Northwest Loop 1604. Unnamed Tributary 5 to Caracol......... Approximately 900 feet +828 City of San Antonio...

  13. 75 FR 50955 - Proposed Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-18

    ... community may at any time enact stricter requirements of its own or pursuant to policies established by... terminus of Halcyon Drive. Coffin Brook Just upstream of the None +133 Town of Berwick. confluence with... Brook Tributary 1 Just upstream of the None +141 Town of Berwick. confluence with Coffin Brook. Just...

  14. 76 FR 8906 - Final Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-16

    ...-B-1014 Sugar Creek Approximately 2,000 feet +469 Town of West Terre Haute, downstream of Conrail... Approximately 1,214 feet +470 Town of West Terre Haute, upstream of I-70. Unincorporated Areas of Vigo County... West Terre Haute Maps are available for inspection at the Town Hall, 500 National Avenue, West Terre...

  15. 76 FR 23528 - Proposed Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-27

    ... Kill Approximately 1.15 None +276 Town of Princetown. miles downstream of Giffords Church Road. Approximately 1.16 None +292 miles upstream of Giffords Church Road. Poentic Kill At the Mohawk River None +231... Plank Unincorporated Areas Road. of East Baton Rouge Parish. Approximately 500 feet None +101 upstream...

  16. 78 FR 48813 - Final Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-12

    ... Road. Approximately 1.16 miles +292 upstream of Giffords Church Road. Poentic Kill At the Mohawk River... mile upstream of Johnson Cemetery Road. Big Reedy Creek (Backwater effects from From the confluence.... approximately 935 feet upstream of Penrod Road. Deerlick Creek Tributary 6 (Backwater From the confluence with...

  17. 75 FR 29238 - Proposed Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-25

    ... City, Cow Creek. City of Richmond, City of Rosenberg, City of Sugar Land, Fort Bend County L.I.D. 2... available for inspection at 402 Morton Street, Richmond, TX 77469. City of Rosenberg Maps are available for inspection at 2110 4th Street, Rosenberg, TX 77471. City of Sugar Land Maps are available for inspection at...

  18. 75 FR 3171 - Final Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-20

    ... Executive Order 12866 of September 30, 1993, Regulatory Planning and Review, 58 FR 51735. Executive Order... Street, Baldwyn, MS 38824. City of Tupelo Maps are available for inspection at the Planning Department... Maps are available for inspection at City Hall, 120 Miner Avenue West, Ladysmith, WI 54848...

  19. 76 FR 54134 - Final Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-31

    ... under the criteria of section 3(f) of Executive Order 12866 of September 30, 1993, Regulatory Planning... Unincorporated Areas of Pacific Railroad. Park County. Approximately 4.14 miles +4953 downstream of Tom Miner...

  20. 76 FR 39800 - Proposed Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-07

    ... Planning and Review. This proposed rule is not a significant regulatory action under the criteria of... Idaho Springs Maps are available for inspection at City Hall, 1711 Miner Street, Idaho Springs, CO 80452.... Town of Macclesfield Maps are available for inspection at the Edgecombe County Planning Department, 201...

  1. 75 FR 60013 - Proposed Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-29

    ... Planning and Review. This proposed rule is not a significant regulatory action under the criteria of.... Approximately 4.14 None +4953 miles downstream of Tom Miner Creek Road. Yellowstone River East Branch...

  2. 76 FR 70386 - Proposed Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-14

    ..., Alabama, and Incorporated Areas Audubon Ditch At the upstream side of +185 +184 City of Montgomery. Norman... available for inspection at 36535 Green Street, New Baltimore, MI 48047. Township of Chesterfield Maps are...

  3. 76 FR 26976 - Proposed Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-10

    ..., identified by Docket No. FEMA-B-1193, to Luis Rodriguez, Chief, Engineering Management Branch, Federal... Rodriguez, Chief, Engineering Management Branch, Federal Insurance and Mitigation Administration, Federal... comments to Luis Rodriguez, Chief, Engineering Management Branch, Federal Insurance and Mitigation...

  4. 76 FR 9714 - Proposed Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-22

    ..., identified by Docket No. FEMA-B- 1170, to Luis Rodriguez, Chief, Engineering Management Branch, Federal... INFORMATION CONTACT: Luis Rodriguez, Chief, Engineering Management Branch, Federal Insurance and Mitigation...

  5. 78 FR 14738 - Proposed Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-07

    ... comments, identified by Docket No. FEMA-B- 1145, to Luis Rodriguez, Chief, Engineering Management Branch... CONTACT: Luis Rodriguez, Chief, Engineering Management Branch, Federal Insurance and Mitigation... exact locations of all BFEs to be changed. Send comments to Luis Rodriguez, Chief, Engineering...

  6. 77 FR 51744 - Proposed Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-27

    ... may submit comments, identified by Docket No. FEMA-B- 1083, to Luis Rodriguez, Chief, Engineering... FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Luis Rodriguez, Chief, Engineering Management Branch, Federal Insurance and...

  7. 76 FR 12665 - Proposed Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-08

    ..., identified by Docket No. FEMA-B- 1069, to Luis Rodriguez, Chief, Engineering Management Branch, Federal... INFORMATION CONTACT: Luis Rodriguez, Chief, Engineering Management Branch, Federal Insurance and Mitigation... to Luis Rodriguez, Chief, Engineering Management Branch, Federal Insurance and Mitigation...

  8. 78 FR 8089 - Proposed Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-05

    .... FEMA-B- 1233, to Luis Rodriguez, Chief, Engineering Management Branch, Federal Insurance and Mitigation... (email) [email protected] . FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Luis Rodriguez, Chief... comments to Luis Rodriguez, Chief, Engineering Management Branch, Federal Insurance and Mitigation...

  9. 75 FR 75949 - Proposed Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-07

    ..., identified by Docket No. FEMA-B-1161, to Luis Rodriguez, Chief, Engineering Management Branch, Federal... Rodriguez, Chief, Engineering Management Branch, Federal Insurance and Mitigation Administration, Federal... changed. Send comments to Luis Rodriguez, Chief, Engineering Management Branch, Federal Insurance and...

  10. 76 FR 8986 - Proposed Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-16

    ..., identified by Docket No. FEMA-B-1176, to Luis Rodriguez, Chief, Engineering Management Branch, Federal... Rodriguez, Chief, Engineering Management Branch, Federal Insurance and Mitigation Administration, Federal... comments to Luis Rodriguez, Chief, Engineering Management Branch, Federal Insurance and Mitigation...

  11. 75 FR 78664 - Proposed Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-16

    ... submit comments, identified by Docket No. FEMA-B-1169, to Luis Rodriguez, Chief, Engineering Management... INFORMATION CONTACT: Luis Rodriguez, Chief, Engineering Management Branch, Federal Insurance and Mitigation... to Luis Rodriguez, Chief, Engineering Management Branch, Federal Insurance and Mitigation...

  12. 76 FR 26981 - Proposed Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-10

    .... ADDRESSES: You may submit comments, identified by Docket No. FEMA-B- 1175, to Luis Rodriguez, Chief... . FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Luis Rodriguez, Chief, Engineering Management Branch, Federal... changed. Send comments to Luis Rodriguez, Chief, Engineering Management Branch, Federal Insurance and...

  13. 76 FR 50952 - Proposed Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-17

    ..., identified by Docket No. FEMA-B-1210, to Luis Rodriguez, Chief, Engineering Management Branch, Federal... Rodriguez, Chief, Engineering Management Branch, Federal Insurance and Mitigation Administration, Federal... repository (see below) for exact locations of all BFEs to be changed. Send comments to Luis Rodriguez, Chief...

  14. 77 FR 51743 - Proposed Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-27

    ... Rodriguez, Chief, Engineering Management Branch, Federal Insurance and Mitigation Administration, [email protected] . FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Luis Rodriguez, Chief, Engineering Management... of all BFEs to be changed. Send comments to Luis Rodriguez, Chief, Engineering Management Branch...

  15. 77 FR 15664 - Proposed Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-16

    ... submit comments, identified by Docket No. FEMA-B- 1207, to Luis Rodriguez, Chief, Engineering Management... INFORMATION CONTACT: Luis Rodriguez, Chief, Engineering Management Branch, Federal Insurance and Mitigation... exact locations of all BFEs to be changed. Send comments to Luis Rodriguez, Chief, Engineering...

  16. 76 FR 13569 - Proposed Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-14

    ..., identified by Docket No. FEMA-B- 1155, to Luis Rodriguez, Chief, Engineering Management Branch, Federal... Rodriguez, Chief, Engineering Management Branch, Federal Insurance and Mitigation Administration, Federal...

  17. 76 FR 13571 - Proposed Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-14

    ... Rodriguez, Chief, Engineering Management Branch, Federal Insurance and Mitigation Administration, [email protected] . FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Luis Rodriguez, Chief, Engineering Management Branch... exact locations of all BFEs to be changed. Send comments to Luis Rodriguez, Chief, Engineering...

  18. 76 FR 73534 - Proposed Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-29

    ... submit comments, identified by Docket No. FEMA-B-1230, to Luis Rodriguez, Chief, Engineering Management... INFORMATION CONTACT: Luis Rodriguez, Chief, Engineering Management Branch, Federal Insurance and Mitigation... BFEs to be changed. Send comments to Luis Rodriguez, Chief, Engineering Management Branch, Federal...

  19. 77 FR 50665 - Proposed Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-22

    ...-B- 1127, to Luis Rodriguez, Chief, Engineering Management Branch, Federal Insurance and Mitigation... (email) [email protected] . FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Luis Rodriguez, Chief... repository (see below) for exact locations of all BFEs to be changed. Send comments to Luis Rodriguez, Chief...

  20. 76 FR 46701 - Proposed Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-03

    ..., identified by Docket No. FEMA-B-1207, to Luis Rodriguez, Chief, Engineering Management Branch, Federal... Rodriguez, Chief, Engineering Management Branch, Federal Insurance and Mitigation Administration, Federal... repository (see below) for exact locations of all BFEs to be changed. Send comments to Luis Rodriguez, Chief...

  1. 77 FR 67324 - Proposed Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-09

    ... comments, identified by Docket No. FEMA-B- 1233, to Luis Rodriguez, Chief, Engineering Management Branch... CONTACT: Luis Rodriguez, Chief, Engineering Management Branch, Federal Insurance and Mitigation... to Luis Rodriguez, Chief, Engineering Management Branch, Mitigation Directorate, Federal Emergency...

  2. 76 FR 26982 - Proposed Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-10

    ...- 1021, to Luis Rodriguez, Chief, Engineering Management Branch, Federal Insurance and Mitigation... (e- mail) [email protected] . FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Luis Rodriguez, Chief... locations of all BFEs to be changed. Send comments to Luis Rodriguez, Chief, Engineering Management Branch...

  3. 76 FR 13570 - Proposed Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-14

    ... Rodriguez, Chief, Engineering Management Branch, Federal Insurance and Mitigation Administration, [email protected] . FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Luis Rodriguez, Chief, Engineering Management Branch... to Luis Rodriguez, Chief, Engineering Management Branch, Mitigation Directorate, Federal Emergency...

  4. 76 FR 46715 - Proposed Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-03

    ..., identified by Docket No. FEMA-B- 1101, to Luis Rodriguez, Chief, Engineering Management Branch, Federal... Rodriguez, Chief, Engineering Management Branch, Federal Insurance and Mitigation Administration, Federal... repository (see below) for exact locations of all BFEs to be changed. Send comments to Luis Rodriguez, Chief...

  5. 76 FR 45215 - Proposed Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-28

    ..., identified by Docket No. FEMA-B- 1075, to Luis Rodriguez, Chief, Engineering Management Branch, Federal...: Luis Rodriguez, Chief, Engineering Management Branch, Federal Insurance and Mitigation Administration... changed. Send comments to Luis Rodriguez, Chief, Engineering Management Branch, Federal Insurance and...

  6. 76 FR 61649 - Proposed Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-05

    ... submit comments, identified by Docket No. FEMA-B-1221, to Luis Rodriguez, Chief, Engineering Management... INFORMATION CONTACT: Luis Rodriguez, Chief, Engineering Management Branch, Federal Insurance and Mitigation... changed. Send comments to Luis Rodriguez, Chief, Engineering Management Branch, Federal Insurance and...

  7. 75 FR 78647 - Proposed Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-16

    ..., identified by Docket No. FEMA-B-1163, to Luis Rodriguez, Chief, Engineering Management Branch, Federal... Rodriguez, Chief, Engineering Management Branch, Federal Insurance and Mitigation Administration, Federal... below) for exact locations of all BFEs to be changed. Send comments to Luis Rodriguez, Chief...

  8. 76 FR 3590 - Proposed Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-20

    ..., identified by Docket No. FEMA-B-1171, to Luis Rodriguez, Chief, Engineering Management Branch, Federal... Rodriguez, Chief, Engineering Management Branch, Federal Insurance and Mitigation Administration, Federal... changed. Send comments to Luis Rodriguez, Chief, Engineering Management Branch, Federal Insurance and...

  9. 77 FR 50667 - Proposed Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-22

    ...-B- 1104, to Luis Rodriguez, Chief, Engineering Management Branch, Federal Insurance and Mitigation... (email) [email protected] . FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Luis Rodriguez, Chief... below) for exact locations of all BFEs to be changed. [[Page 50668

  10. 77 FR 67325 - Proposed Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-09

    ... comments, identified by Docket No. FEMA-B- 1229, to Luis Rodriguez, Chief, Engineering Management Branch... CONTACT: Luis Rodriguez, Chief, Engineering Management Branch, Federal Insurance and Mitigation... locations of all BFEs to be changed. Send comments to Luis Rodriguez, Chief, Engineering Management Branch...

  11. 76 FR 50960 - Proposed Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-17

    ... Whaley Road. Taylors Branch At the Briery Run +64 +61 City of Kinston, confluence. Unincorporated Areas.... Approximately 0.5 mile None +81 upstream of Stantonsburg Road. Swift Creek Approximately 0.4 mile None +59 City... Areas of Pitt County. Approximately 360 feet None +68 upstream of Thomas Langston Road. Swift Creek...

  12. 75 FR 68738 - Proposed Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-09

    ... +156 +155 upstream of Taylors Store Road (Secondary Road 1004). Polecat Branch At the confluence with...). Just upstream of U.S. +151 +152 Route 64. Swift Creek Approximately 1.8 miles +90 +88 City of Rocky...

  13. 78 FR 78993 - Proposed Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-27

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY Federal Emergency Management Agency [Docket ID FEMA-2013-0002... Insurance Study (FIS) report for each community are available for inspection at both the online location and... effective FIRM and FIS report for each community are accessible online through the FEMA Map Service Center...

  14. 75 FR 23595 - Final Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-04

    ... 72482. Mesa County, Colorado, and Incorporated Areas Docket No.: FEMA-B-1049 Gold Star Canyon Just above... Middlesex Maps are available for inspection at 1200 Mountain Avenue, Middlesex, NJ 08846. City of New... Indian upstream of the southern Reservation (Turtle corporate limit of Mountain Band). Belcourt...

  15. 75 FR 29264 - Proposed Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-25

    ... upstream of the Wake County. confluence with the Little River. At the Wake County +306 +307 boundary. Horse... None +605 upstream of the confluence with School Creek. Salt Creek Approximately 0.60 mile None +557..., Stephenville, TX 76401. Limestone County, Texas, and Incorporated Areas Salt River Just upstream of State None...

  16. 75 FR 44155 - Final Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-28

    .... Approximately 1,400 feet +7776 upstream of West Grimes Creek Road. Junction Creek At Pleasant Drive in Durango.... Unincorporated Areas of La Plata County Maps are available for inspection at 1060 East 2nd Avenue, Durango, CO.... Pepin County. Approximately 6,000 feet +717 upstream of the confluence with Bear Creek. Mississippi...

  17. 77 FR 26959 - Final Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-08

    ... River At the Mississippi County +335 Unincorporated Areas of boundary. Scott County. At the Alexander... 75110. Preston County, West Virginia, and Incorporated Areas Docket No.: FEMA-B-1166 Back Run At the...

  18. 75 FR 55515 - Proposed Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-13

    ... Road. Township of Hollenback, Township of Rice, Township of Wright. Approximately 535 feet None +1526 upstream of Dale Drive. Black Creek Approximately 910 feet None +1461 Borough of West upstream of Hazleton.... Township of Rice Maps are available for inspection at the Rice Township Building, 3000 Church Road...

  19. 75 FR 78650 - Proposed Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-16

    .... west and south, the William M. Whittington Channel Levee to the east, and the confluence with Silver.... north, west, and south, and the William M. Whittington Canal Levee to the east. Yazoo River (backwater...

  20. 75 FR 23642 - Proposed Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-04

    ... available for inspection at the Douglas County Courthouse, 401 South Center Street, Tuscola, IL 61953. Mason... of drive approximately Mason County. 230 feet north of north entrance to Linwood Lake Estates Road...: None +471 Unincorporated Areas of Approximately 2,470 Mason County. feet north of County Highway 1/East...

  1. 77 FR 46972 - Final Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-07

    ... Division, 2400 Broadway Southeast, Albuquerque, NM 87102. Le Flore County, Oklahoma, and Incorporated Areas.... Unincorporated Areas of Le Flore County. At the downstream side of +490 U.S. Route 59. Caston Creek Approximately.... Areas of Le Flore County. Approximately 500 feet +470 upstream of the confluence with Mountain Creek...

  2. 76 FR 59361 - Proposed Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-26

    ... Castle Maps are available for inspection at 32535 Bowie Street, White Castle, LA 70788. Le Flore County.... Unincorporated Areas of Le Flore County. At the downstream side None +490 of U.S. Route 59. Caston Creek... City of Poteau, downstream of Kansas Unincorporated Areas City Southern Railroad. of Le Flore County...

  3. 75 FR 23608 - Final Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-04

    ... Potter County. 287 and South Parsley Road. Playa Lake 6 Approximately 1,000 feet +3624 City of Amarillo... feet +3596 City of Amarillo, northeast of the Unincorporated Areas of intersection of Parsley Potter... County. intersection of Highway 287 and South Parsley Road. Playa Lake 4 At the intersection of +3699...

  4. 75 FR 59184 - Proposed Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-27

    .... Ponding Area 17 Ponding area bounded by None *51 City of Deltona. Applegate Terrace to the north, East... south. Ponding Area 20 Ponding area bounded by None *51 City of Deltona. Gallagher Avenue to the north... Road to the east. Ponding Area 33 Ponding area bounded by None *51 City of Deltona. Coventry Street to...

  5. 77 FR 73324 - Final Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-10

    ..., Tulip Avenue to the south, and Apricot Avenue to the west. Ponding Area Area bound by East +51... south, and Balsam Street to the west. Ponding Area Area bound by East Thyme +51 Unincorporated Areas of... Street to the west. Ponding Area Area bound by Verano +51 Unincorporated Areas of Drive to the north...

  6. 77 FR 49373 - Final Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-16

    ... under the criteria of section 3(f) of Executive Order 12866 of September 30, 1993, Regulatory Planning... with +829 Unincorporated Areas of Taylor Fork). Taylor Fork to Madison County. approximately 1,950 feet upstream of the confluence with Taylor Fork. Otter Creek Approximately 0.7 mile +800 City of Richmond...

  7. 75 FR 29290 - Proposed Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-25

    ... rule is not a significant regulatory action under the criteria of section 3(f) of Executive Order 12866... the confluence None +829 Unincorporated Areas of from Taylor Fork). with Taylor Fork to Madison County. approximately 1,950 feet upstream of the confluence with Taylor Fork. Otter Creek Approximately 0.7 mile None...

  8. 75 FR 32684 - Proposed Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-09

    ... feet downstream of Duff Road. West Cane Run (Backwater effects From the confluence None +466 Unincorpor... Building, Leitchfield, KY 42754. Baltimore County, Maryland, and Incorporated Areas Gwynns Falls Just...

  9. 75 FR 29296 - Proposed Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-25

    ... Tanana An area north of the Tanana +431 +432 Fairbanks-North Star River and Chena River. River levee and... of Old Airport Road and Mitchell Expressway to the west. An area north of the Tanana None +446 River...)....... Approximately 460 feet None +1004 Unincorporated Areas upstream of West Charles of Fayette County. Street. City...

  10. 76 FR 39011 - Final Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-05

    ... Dam No. 11. Approximately 7.4 miles + 625 Village of Bagley. upstream of Lock and Dam No. 10... Jefferson Street, Lancaster, WI 53813. Village of Bagley Maps are available for inspection at 400 South Jackley Lane, Bagley, WI 53801. Village of Potosi Maps are available for inspection at 105 North Main...

  11. 77 FR 76929 - Final Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-31

    ... Rocky Shelby County. Hollow Lane. Approximately 416 feet +464 upstream of Rocky Hollow Lane. Ivy Branch... of County Road 280 (Old Highway 280). Lee Branch Approximately 884 feet +553 City of Birmingham, City... +608 upstream of Hugh Daniel Drive. Lee Brook At the upstream side of +417 City of Helena. County Road...

  12. 76 FR 73537 - Proposed Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-29

    ... Hollow Lane. Ivy Branch (backwater effects from At the downstream side None +683 City of Chelsea, North.... Approximately 469 feet None +683 upstream of County Road 280 (Old Highway 280). Lee Branch Approximately 884... of Shelby County. Approximately 350 feet None +608 upstream of Hugh Daniel Drive. Lee Brook At the...

  13. 75 FR 31347 - Proposed Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-03

    ... River. Approximately 250 feet +10 +12 upstream of Grace Terrace. Cedar Swamp Creek At the confluence... Jacksonville. Ninemile Creek. Approximately 1,600 None +14 feet upstream of Old Kings Road. Ninemile Creek... Jacksonville. Ninemile Creek. Approximately 2,100 None +22 feet upstream of Old Kings Road. North Fork Sixmile...

  14. 78 FR 10072 - Final Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-13

    ... River. Approximately 250 feet +12 upstream of Grace Terrace. Cedar Swamp Creek At the confluence with +9.... Ninemile Creek. Approximately 1,600 feet +14 upstream of Old Kings Road. Ninemile Creek Tributary 2 At the.... Approximately 2,100 feet +22 upstream of Old Kings Road. North Fork Sixmile Creek At the confluence with +20...

  15. 76 FR 35119 - Final Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-16

    ... inspection at 301 King Street, Alexandria, VA 22314. Town of Ennis, Montana Docket No.: FEMA-B-1083 Montana... downstream of Grace Avenue. Lancaster County. Approximately 1.0 mile +433 downstream of Old Lansford Road...

  16. 77 FR 51745 - Proposed Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-27

    ... of downstream of 2nd Street. Cecil County. Approximately 1,136 feet None +11 upstream of Old... of the Chester County boundary. Dogwood Run At the Little Elk Creek +21 +22 Town of Elkton... Creek). downstream of Old Elk Neck Cecil County. Road. Approximately 1,939 feet None +11 upstream of Old...

  17. 76 FR 39305 - Final Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-06

    ... Town of Middlebury, upstream of the Unincorporated Areas of confluence with the Elkhart County. Little... Ditch At the confluence with +810 Town of Wakarusa, Baugo Creek. Unincorporated Areas of Elkhart County... 52601. Iowa County, Iowa, and Incorporated Areas Docket No.: FEMA-B-1089 Old Mans Creek Approximately 1...

  18. 75 FR 55507 - Proposed Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-13

    ... County, New York (All Jurisdictions) Berricks Creek Approximately 45 feet None +753 Town of Hamburg... Unincorporated Areas of the Broad River. Cherokee County. Approximately 0.9 mile None +493 upstream of Old... confluence with None +575 Town of Eleanor, the Kanawha River. Unincorporated Areas of Putnam County...

  19. 75 FR 43479 - Proposed Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-26

    ... at the Lyme Town Hall, 480 Hamburg Road, Old Lyme, CT 06371. Town of Old Lyme Maps are available for inspection at the Old Lyme Town Hall, 52 Lyme Street, Old Lyme, CT 06371. Barnstable County, Massachusetts... Road. Four Mile River Just upstream of +9 +10 Town of Old Lyme. railroad. Approximately 1,200 +9 +10...

  20. 75 FR 61377 - Proposed Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-05

    ..., Environmental Consideration. An environmental impact assessment has not been prepared. Regulatory Flexibility..., OK 73075. Beaver County, Pennsylvania (All Jurisdictions) Beaver River Approximately 50 feet None... upstream of Angela Drive. North Fork Little Beaver Creek...... At the confluence with None +911 Township of...

  1. 75 FR 75945 - Proposed Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-07

    ... CFR part 10, Environmental Consideration. An environmental impact assessment has not been prepared... mile of Skagit County. east of Beaver Marsh Road. Approximately 1,600 feet 3 +19 east of the intersection of Beaver Marsh Road and Marsh Road. [[Page 75948

  2. 76 FR 76055 - Final Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-06

    ... from the requirements of 44 CFR part 10, Environmental Consideration. An environmental impact... Whiting Main Beaver Dam Ditch Just downstream of +684 Town of Merrillville. Broadway. Approximately 1,000... downstream of 91st +689 Avenue. Main Beaver Dam Ditch Approximately 730 feet +690 Town of Schererville west...

  3. 75 FR 19895 - Final Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-16

    ... CFR part 10, Environmental Consideration. An environmental impact assessment has not been prepared... Areas Docket No.: FEMA-B-1032 Beaver Dam Lake Entire shoreline +874 City of Beaver Dam, City of Fox Lake, Unincorporated Areas of Dodge County. Beaver Dam River Approximately 377 feet +841 City of Beaver Dam, downstream...

  4. 77 FR 76916 - Final Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-31

    ... from the requirements of 44 CFR part 10, Environmental Consideration. An environmental impact... upstream of State Route 166. Beaver Creek At the Sweetwater Creek +871 Unincorporated Areas of confluence. Douglas County. Approximately 500 feet +1006 upstream of Patty Court. Beaver Creek Tributary A At the...

  5. 76 FR 5769 - Proposed Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-02

    ... Ridge Way. At the upstream side of None +1313 Mills Lane. Cross Creek Tributary 1 At the Cross Creek... +1355 feet upstream of West Easy Street. Unnamed Tributary to Puppy Creek.... Approximately 370 feet.... Blair Gap Run Approximately 0.59 mile None +1136 Township of Allegheny. upstream of Mill Road...

  6. 78 FR 36099 - Final Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-17

    ... within the scope of the Regulatory Flexibility Act, 5 U.S.C. 601- 612, a regulatory flexibility analysis... Surprise, the Central Arizona Unincorporated Areas of Project Canal. Maricopa County. Stage Coach Pass Wash...

  7. 76 FR 56724 - Proposed Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-14

    ... Town of Clarkstown. Hackensack River confluence. At the upstream side of +248 +247 Little Tor Road... Emergency Management Agency. [FR Doc. 2011-23413 Filed 9-13-11; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 9110-12-P ...

  8. 78 FR 5738 - Final Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-28

    ... newspapers of local circulation and ninety (90) days have elapsed since that publication. The Deputy... Town of Moultonborough, confluence. Town of Sandwich. Approximately 1.70 miles +587 upstream of School... for inspection at the Town Hall, 68 School Street, Effingham, NH 03882. Town of Hart's Location Maps...

  9. 75 FR 68714 - Final Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-09

    ... available for inspection at 6622 Wilson Mills Road, Mayfield, OH 44143. Village of Moreland Hills Maps are available for inspection at 4350 S.O.M. Center Road, Moreland Hills, OH 44022. Kent County, Rhode Island... Village of Moreland upstream of Woodland Hills. Road. Approximately 1,200 feet +789 upstream of Woodland...

  10. 75 FR 5930 - Proposed Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-05

    ... include BFEs located on the stream reach between the referenced locations above. Please refer to the... 20472. ADDRESSES City of Fort Ransom Maps are available for inspection at P.O. Box 17, Fort Ransom, ND 58033. City of Lisbon Maps are available for inspection at P.O. Box 1079, Lisbon, ND 58054...

  11. 77 FR 26968 - Final Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-08

    ... upstream of Port-Hudson Pride Road. Sheet flow between McCarroll Drive and At North Jefferson Place 1 City.... Road. Approximately 0.9 mile +335 upstream of Wagener Trail Road. Dry Branch At the Hollow Creek West +217 Unincorporated Areas of confluence. Aiken County. Approximately 1,200 feet +318 upstream of Dry...

  12. 76 FR 59960 - Proposed Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-28

    ... Areas Agua Caliente Split Flow Approximately 1,500 +2584 +2583 Unincorporated Areas of feet upstream of... Agua Caliente Wash divergence. Agua Caliente Spur Flow Approximately 0.5 mile +2594 +2593... upstream of East Tanque Verde Road. Agua Caliente Wash Approximately 130 feet +2566 +2567 City of Tucson...

  13. 75 FR 29219 - Proposed Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-25

    ... County. approximately 268 feet upstream of Robbin Lane. * National Geodetic Vertical Datum. + North... Judge, 516 Fairway Drive, Brandenburg, KY 40108. Scott County, Kentucky, and Incorporated Areas Dry Run...

  14. 76 FR 39063 - Proposed Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-05

    ...,000 None +6802 feet upstream of Rodeo Road. Arroyo De La Piedra Approximately 300 feet +7099 +7103... +7043 City of Santa Fe. upstream of the Arroyo De La Piedra confluence. Approximately 600 feet None.... Approximately 0.3 mile None +7780 upstream of La Entrada. East Arroyo De La Piedra At the Arroyo De La None...

  15. 77 FR 71702 - Final Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-04

    .... Antores confluence. Approximately 1,000 feet +6802 upstream of Rodeo Road. Arroyo De La Piedra... Piedra confluence. Approximately 600 feet +7320 upstream of Camino Encantado. Arroyo Saiz At the upstream.... Approximately 0.3 mile +7780 upstream of La Entrada. East Arroyo De La Piedra At the Arroyo De La +7199 City of...

  16. 77 FR 21476 - Final Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-10

    ... State Highway 115. Black River Approximately 9,000 feet +268 City of Pocahontas, downstream of the... the confluence with +269 City of Pocahontas, the Black River. Unincorporated Areas of Randolph County...). Swan Creek At the confluence with +69 City of Lambertville. the Delaware River. Approximately 40 feet...

  17. 75 FR 62751 - Proposed Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-13

    ..., Naples, FL 34112. Alpena County, Michigan (All Jurisdictions) Lake Huron From approximately 1.3 None +583 City of Alpena, miles northwest of the Township of Alpena. intersection of Rockport Road and Old Grade... and Brousseau Road. Long Lake Entire shoreline within None +651 Township of Alpena. Alpena County...

  18. 76 FR 69665 - Final Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-09

    .... Alpena County, Michigan (All Jurisdictions) Docket No.: FEMA-B-1151 Lake Huron From approximately 1.3 + 583 City of Alpena, Township miles northwest of the of Alpena. intersection of Rockport Road and Old... Road and Brousseau Road. [[Page 69669

  19. 76 FR 36373 - Final Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-22

    ... confluence with Cedar Oglesby, City of Ottawa, Creek. City of Peru, Unincorporated Areas of La Salle County..., Ottawa, IL 61350. City of Peru Maps are available for inspection at City Hall, 1727 4th Street, Peru, IL... available for inspection at 220 Clay Street, Cedar Falls, IA 50613. City of Dunkerton [[Page 36379

  20. 75 FR 11468 - Final Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-11

    ... feet +44 upstream of Wolf Ridge Road. Gum Tree Branch Approximately 100 feet +25 City of Prichard... Approximately 2,600 feet +153 Unincorporated Areas of upstream of Snow Road. Mobile County. Approximately 12,420 feet +183 upstream of Snow Road. Unnamed Branch Approximately 100 feet +88 City of Prichard. downstream...

  1. 77 FR 21485 - Final Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-10

    ..., Milwaukee, St. Paul and Pacific Railroad. Clear Creek At the confluence with + 1180 City of Clear Lake... City of Mason City, upstream of Chicago, Unincorporated Areas of Milwaukee, St. Paul and Cerro Gordo... at the Chariton County Courthouse, 306 South Cherry Street, Keytesville, MO 65261. Village of Dalton...

  2. 75 FR 78654 - Proposed Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-16

    ... Approximately 1,400 None +611 City of Miami, Town of feet upstream of the Arrow Rock, Town of Cooper County... Street, New Cordell, OK 73632. Bedford County, Pennsylvania (All Jurisdictions) Georges Creek...

  3. 76 FR 50920 - Final Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-17

    ... Butternut Lake Entire shoreline......... + 1216 Unincorporated Areas of Polk County, Village of Luck. Clam............ + 1210 Unincorporated Areas of Polk County, Village of Luck. Sand Lake Entire shoreline......... + 1124... Village Hall, 404 Main Street, Balsam Lake, WI 54810. Village of Luck Maps are available for inspection at...

  4. 76 FR 26968 - Proposed Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-10

    ... upstream side of +745 +759 City of Avondale, City Armour Road. of North Kansas City. Approximately 150 feet.... Rock Creek Tributary 11.2 At the upstream side of +752 +758 City of North Kansas Armour Road. City...

  5. 75 FR 62061 - Proposed Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-07

    ... extending approximately 510 feet east along Sandy Drive. * National Geodetic Vertical Datum. Depth in feet above ground. + North American Vertical Datum. [caret] Mean Sea Level, rounded to the nearest 0.1 meter... Club Drain. [[Page 62063

  6. 76 FR 70403 - Proposed Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-14

    .... Littlefield Lake Entire shoreline....... None +911 Township of Gilmore. Scott Lake Drain Entire shoreline... +913 Township of Broomfield, community. Township of Deerfield. * National Geodetic Vertical Datum. + North American Vertical Datum. Depth in feet above ground. [caret] Mean Sea Level, rounded to the...

  7. 76 FR 43923 - Final Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-22

    ... Approximately 30 feet downstream of I-64 +22 *National Geodetic Vertical Datum. +North American Vertical Datum... Center Street. * National Geodetic Vertical Datum. + North American Vertical Datum. Depth in feet above... +864 upstream of Wallace Street. Moon and Hamilton County Drain......... At the Detention Area F +861...

  8. 76 FR 76060 - Final Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-06

    ... Illinois Route 34. * National Geodetic Vertical Datum. + North American Vertical Datum. Depth in feet above... Vertical Datum. + North American Vertical Datum. Depth in feet above ground. [caret] Mean Sea Level..., Michigan (All Jurisdictions) Docket No.: FEMA-B-1089 Alward Drain At the confluence with +615 Charter...

  9. 77 FR 45262 - Final Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-31

    ..., 450 Bastion Road, Halifax, PA 17032. Township of Lower Paxton Maps are available for inspection at the... downstream side of +609 Borough of Tunkhannock, the railroad bridge. Township of Tunkhannock. Approximately 0.7 mile +655 upstream of Bridge Street. Tributary No. 1 to Swale Brook......... At the Swale Brook...

  10. 75 FR 31377 - Proposed Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-03

    ... that the community is required either to adopt or to show evidence of having in effect in order to... (Backwater effects from Walnut with Walnut Creek. of Fairfield County, Creek). Village of Thurston... County. Approximately 250 None +918 feet downstream of Refugee Road. Wilson Creek At the confluence None...

  11. 75 FR 23600 - Final Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-04

    ... feet +571 upstream of the confluence with Millers Creek. Dale Hollow Lake (Wolf River) At the... upstream of the confluence with Spring Creek. Lake Cumberland Just upstream of the Wolf +760 Unincorporated...

  12. 76 FR 21695 - Proposed Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-18

    ... County. At the Betts Spring None +571 Branch and Bradford Creek confluence. Big Cove Creek Approximately.... Approximately 0.7 mile None +677 upstream of the Big Cove Creek confluence. Blue Spring Creek Approximately 400... Road. Approximately 450 feet None +748 upstream of Spragins Hollow Road Northwest. East Fork Pinhook...

  13. 76 FR 72661 - Proposed Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-25

    ... Smithfield, Township of Stroud. Approximately 1,250 None +635 feet upstream of Spring Mountain Lane... upstream of Steam Hollow Road. Dundaff Creek At the East Branch +1052 +1047 Township of Clifford...

  14. 75 FR 8814 - Final Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-26

    ... Approximately 118 feet +190 City of Hattiesburg. downstream of Spring Hill Drive. Approximately 1,460 feet +208... 1.280 mile upstream of Hollow Road. Approximately 1.288 mile +1204 upstream of Hollow Road. Tully...

  15. 75 FR 59181 - Proposed Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-27

    ... of Cold State Route 9D. Spring, Village of Nelsonville. Approximately 852 feet None +369 upstream of... Approximately 500 feet +218 +219 Town of Putnam Valley. upstream of the confluence with Peekskill Hollow Creek... Philipstown Maps are available for inspection at the Philipstown Town Hall, 238 Main Street, Cold Spring, NY...

  16. 77 FR 66555 - Final Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-06

    ... Jefferson City. confluence. Approximately 80 feet +606 upstream of Mesa Avenue. Frog Hollow Tributary At the... the confluence with Newport Creek. Spring Run Approximately 110 feet +576 Borough of Ashley. upstream...

  17. 77 FR 76998 - Proposed Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-31

    ... Spring Hollow (backwater effects from Green River), Pitman Creek (backwater effects from Green River... (backwater effects from Green River), Pipe Spring Hollow (backwater effects from Green River), Pitman Creek... Butler County. to approximately 1,550 feet downstream of G. Southerland Road. Pipe Spring Hollow...

  18. 78 FR 6745 - Final Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-31

    ...,250 feet +635 upstream of Spring Mountain Lane. Cranberry Creek at Paradise At the upstream side of +715 Township of Paradise. Browns Hill Road. Approximately 200 feet +1092 upstream of Snowbird Lane..., Schoonover Municipal Building, 25 Municipal Drive, East Stroudsburg, PA 18301. Township of Paradise Maps are...

  19. 75 FR 78617 - Final Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-16

    .... Rockport Creek Approximately 2,300 feet +260 Unincorporated Areas of downstream of Martin Hot Spring County. Luther King Boulevard. Approximately 1,300 feet +263 downstream of Martin Luther King Boulevard. Town...

  20. 76 FR 10253 - Final Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-24

    ... Martin Luther King Jr. Boulevard, Room 310, Evansville, IN 47708. Marion County, Kansas, and Incorporated... at the Evansville Civic Center Complex, Building Commission Department, 1 Northwest Martin Luther King Jr. Boulevard, Room 310, Evansville, IN 47708. Unincorporated Areas of Vanderburgh County Maps are...

  1. 75 FR 5925 - Proposed Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-05

    ... Spring County. Martin Luther King Boulevard. Approximately 1,300 None +263 feet downstream of Martin Luther King Boulevard. Town Creek Approximately 2,300 None +253 Unincorporated Areas of feet downstream...

  2. 77 FR 66737 - Final Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-07

    ... confluence. Williamsburg County. Approximately 0.9 mile +33 upstream of Hemingway Highway. Boggy Swamp B... Town of Hemingway, confluence. Unincorporated Areas of Williamsburg County. Approximately 0.3 mile +50... Unincorporated Areas of confluence. Williamsburg County. Approximately 1.3 miles +35 upstream of Hemingway...

  3. 76 FR 19007 - Proposed Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-06

    ... County. Approximately 0.9 mile None +33 upstream of Hemingway Highway. Boggy Swamp B Approximately 0.9... +74 upstream of Old Forreston Road. Muddy Creek At the Clarks Creek None +29 Town of Hemingway.... Approximately 1.3 miles None +35 upstream of Hemingway Highway. Spring Branch A At the Clapps Swamp None +65...

  4. 75 FR 14091 - Final Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-24

    ... approximately 0.65 mile Rock Island County, City upstream of the Mercer/ of East Moline, City of Rock Island county Moline, City of Rock boundary and 1.7 mile Island, Village of downstream of the Andalusia, Village... Byron, Village of Rapids City. The Whitside/Rock Island + 588 county boundary (River Mile 512.25...

  5. 75 FR 59634 - Final Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-28

    ... Courthouse, 100 East Springfield Street, Virginia, IL 62691. Adams County, Indiana, and Incorporated Areas... Unnamed Stream off of Turkey Creek..... At the confluence with +329 City of Henderson. Turkey Creek.... ADDRESSES City of Henderson Maps are available for inspection at City Hall, 400 West Main Street, Henderson...

  6. 77 FR 19112 - Final Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-30

    ... Township of Lima, River. Township of Scio, Township of Webster, Village of Dexter. Just upstream of North... Webster Maps are available for inspection at 5665 Webster Church Road, Dexter, MI 48130. Village of Barton... Dexter Maps are available for inspection at 6880 Dexter-Pinckney Road, Dexter, MI 48130. Meeker County...

  7. 76 FR 19018 - Proposed Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-06

    ...). confluence. At the downstream side +179 +181 of National Avenue. Coffee Creek (backwater effects from At the..., Centralia, WA 98531. City of Chehalis Maps are available for inspection at 1321 South Market Boulevard...

  8. 77 FR 41323 - Final Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-13

    ... upstream of Westbrook Loop. Shaw Creek-Wide Hollow Creek Walmart At the Wide Hollow Creek +1151 City of...-Wide Hollow Creek Walmart At the Wide Hollow Creek +1149 City of Yakima. Overflow 2. confluence...

  9. 76 FR 20606 - Proposed Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-13

    ... Loop. Shaw Creek--Wide Hollow Creek At the Wide Hollow None +1151 City of Yakima. Walmart Overflow 1... Hollow Creek At the Wide Hollow None +1149 City of Yakima. Walmart Overflow 2. Creek confluence...

  10. 76 FR 29656 - Final Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-23

    ..., Unincorporated Areas of Canyon County. Just upstream of Lone +2450 Tree Lane/Ustick Road. Renshaw Canal Just... with +632 Unincorporated Areas of Kentucky River). Cow Creek to Estill County. approximately 0.7 mile... of Clearcreek Road. Cow Creek (backwater effects from From the confluence with +632 Unincorporated...

  11. 78 FR 9831 - Final Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-12

    ... downstream of Nahunta Greene County. Road. Approximately 0.4 mile +75 upstream of Apple Tree Road. Bear Creek... upstream of Beaman Old Creek Road. Cow Branch At the Nahunta Swamp +60 Unincorporated Areas of confluence. Greene County. Approximately 2.1 miles +114 upstream of Cow Branch Road. [[Page 9839

  12. Flood Insurance Rate Maps and Base Flood Elevations, FIRM, DFIRM, BFE, Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) - Flood Insurance Rate Maps (FIRM), Published in 2011, 1:1200 (1in=100ft) scale, Polk County Government.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC Local Govt | GIS Inventory — Flood Insurance Rate Maps and Base Flood Elevations, FIRM, DFIRM, BFE dataset current as of 2011. Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) - Flood Insurance Rate...

  13. Morphological Analyses and Simulated Flood Elevations in a Watershed with Dredged and Leveed Stream Channels, Wheeling Creek, Eastern Ohio

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherwood, James M.; Huitger, Carrie A.; Ebner, Andrew D.; Koltun, G.F.

    2008-01-01

    The USGS, in cooperation with the Ohio Emergency Management Agency, conducted a study in the Wheeling Creek Basin to (1) evaluate and contrast land-cover characteristics from 2001 with characteristics from 1979 and 1992; (2) compare current streambed elevation, slope, and geometry with conditions present in the late 1980s; (3) look for evidence of channel filling and over widening in selected undredged reaches; (4) estimate flood elevations for existing conditions in both undredged and previously dredged reaches; (5) evaluate the height of the levees required to contain floods with selected recurrence intervals in previously dredged reaches; and (6) estimate flood elevations for several hypothetical dredging and streambed aggradation scenarios in undredged reaches. The amount of barren land in the Wheeling Creek watershed has decreased from 20 to 1 percent of the basin area based on land-cover characteristics from 1979 and 2001. Barren lands appear to have been converted primarily to pasture, presumably as a result of surface-mine reclamation. Croplands also decreased from 13 to 8 percent of the basin area. The combined decrease in barren lands and croplands is approximately offset by the increase in pasture. Stream-channel surveys conducted in 1987 and again in 2006 at 21 sites in four previously dredged reaches of Wheeling Creek indicate little change in the elevation, slope, and geometry of the channel at most sites. The mean change in width-averaged bed and thalweg elevations for the 21 cross sections was 0.1 feet. Bankfull widths, mean depths, and cross-sectional areas measured at 12 sites in undredged reaches were compared to estimates determined from regional equations. The mean percentage difference between measured and estimated bankfull widths was -0.2 percent, suggesting that bankfull widths in the Wheeling Creek Basin are generally about the same as regional averages for undisturbed basins of identical drainage area. For bankfull mean depth and cross

  14. Towards the optimal fusion of high-resolution Digital Elevation Models for detailed urban flood assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leitão, J. P.; de Sousa, L. M.

    2018-06-01

    Newly available, more detailed and accurate elevation data sets, such as Digital Elevation Models (DEMs) generated on the basis of imagery from terrestrial LiDAR (Light Detection and Ranging) systems or Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs), can be used to improve flood-model input data and consequently increase the accuracy of the flood modelling results. This paper presents the first application of the MBlend merging method and assesses the impact of combining different DEMs on flood modelling results. It was demonstrated that different raster merging methods can have different and substantial impacts on these results. In addition to the influence associated with the method used to merge the original DEMs, the magnitude of the impact also depends on (i) the systematic horizontal and vertical differences of the DEMs, and (ii) the orientation between the DEM boundary and the terrain slope. The greater water depth and flow velocity differences between the flood modelling results obtained using the reference DEM and the merged DEMs ranged from -9.845 to 0.002 m, and from 0.003 to 0.024 m s-1 respectively; these differences can have a significant impact on flood hazard estimates. In most of the cases investigated in this study, the differences from the reference DEM results were smaller for the MBlend method than for the results of the two conventional methods. This study highlighted the importance of DEM merging when conducting flood modelling and provided hints on the best DEM merging methods to use.

  15. The Importance of Precise Digital Elevation Models (DEM) in Modelling Floods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demir, Gokben; Akyurek, Zuhal

    2016-04-01

    Digital elevation Models (DEM) are important inputs for topography for the accurate modelling of floodplain hydrodynamics. Floodplains have a key role as natural retarding pools which attenuate flood waves and suppress flood peaks. GPS, LIDAR and bathymetric surveys are well known surveying methods to acquire topographic data. It is not only time consuming and expensive to obtain topographic data through surveying but also sometimes impossible for remote areas. In this study it is aimed to present the importance of accurate modelling of topography for flood modelling. The flood modelling for Samsun-Terme in Blacksea region of Turkey is done. One of the DEM is obtained from the point observations retrieved from 1/5000 scaled orthophotos and 1/1000 scaled point elevation data from field surveys at x-sections. The river banks are corrected by using the orthophotos and elevation values. This DEM is named as scaled DEM. The other DEM is obtained from bathymetric surveys. 296 538 number of points and the left/right bank slopes were used to construct the DEM having 1 m spatial resolution and this DEM is named as base DEM. Two DEMs were compared by using 27 x-sections. The maximum difference at thalweg of the river bed is 2m and the minimum difference is 20 cm between two DEMs. The channel conveyance capacity in base DEM is larger than the one in scaled DEM and floodplain is modelled in detail in base DEM. MIKE21 with flexible grid is used in 2- dimensional shallow water flow modelling. The model by using two DEMs were calibrated for a flood event (July 9, 2012). The roughness is considered as the calibration parameter. From comparison of input hydrograph at the upstream of the river and output hydrograph at the downstream of the river, the attenuation is obtained as 91% and 84% for the base DEM and scaled DEM, respectively. The time lag in hydrographs does not show any difference for two DEMs and it is obtained as 3 hours. Maximum flood extents differ for the two DEMs

  16. Guidelines for determining flood flow frequency—Bulletin 17C

    Science.gov (United States)

    England, John F.; Cohn, Timothy A.; Faber, Beth A.; Stedinger, Jery R.; Thomas, Wilbert O.; Veilleux, Andrea G.; Kiang, Julie E.; Mason, Robert R.

    2018-03-29

    Accurate estimates of flood frequency and magnitude are a key component of any effective nationwide flood risk management and flood damage abatement program. In addition to accuracy, methods for estimating flood risk must be uniformly and consistently applied because management of the Nation’s water and related land resources is a collaborative effort involving multiple actors including most levels of government and the private sector.Flood frequency guidelines have been published in the United States since 1967, and have undergone periodic revisions. In 1967, the U.S. Water Resources Council presented a coherent approach to flood frequency with Bulletin 15, “A Uniform Technique for Determining Flood Flow Frequencies.” The method it recommended involved fitting the log-Pearson Type III distribution to annual peak flow data by the method of moments.The first extension and update of Bulletin 15 was published in 1976 as Bulletin 17, “Guidelines for Determining Flood Flow Frequency” (Guidelines). It extended the Bulletin 15 procedures by introducing methods for dealing with outliers, historical flood information, and regional skew. Bulletin 17A was published the following year to clarify the computation of weighted skew. The next revision of the Bulletin, the Bulletin 17B, provided a host of improvements and new techniques designed to address situations that often arise in practice, including better methods for estimating and using regional skew, weighting station and regional skew, detection of outliers, and use of the conditional probability adjustment.The current version of these Guidelines are presented in this document, denoted Bulletin 17C. It incorporates changes motivated by four of the items listed as “Future Work” in Bulletin 17B and 30 years of post-17B research on flood processes and statistical methods. The updates include: adoption of a generalized representation of flood data that allows for interval and censored data types; a new method

  17. Analysis the Accuracy of Digital Elevation Model (DEM) for Flood Modelling on Lowland Area

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zainol Abidin, Ku Hasna Zainurin Ku; Razi, Mohd Adib Mohammad; Bukari, Saifullizan Mohd

    2018-04-01

    Flood is one type of natural disaster that occurs almost every year in Malaysia. Commonly the lowland areas are the worst affected areas. This kind of disaster is controllable by using an accurate data for proposing any kinds of solutions. Elevation data is one of the data used to produce solutions for flooding. Currently, the research about the application of Digital Elevation Model (DEM) in hydrology was increased where this kind of model will identify the elevation for required areas. University of Tun Hussein Onn Malaysia is one of the lowland areas which facing flood problems on 2006. Therefore, this area was chosen in order to produce DEM which focussed on University Health Centre (PKU) and drainage area around Civil and Environment Faculty (FKAAS). Unmanned Aerial Vehicle used to collect aerial photos data then undergoes a process of generating DEM according to three types of accuracy and quality from Agisoft PhotoScan software. The higher the level of accuracy and quality of DEM produced, the longer time taken to generate a DEM. The reading of the errors created while producing the DEM shows almost 0.01 different. Therefore, it has been identified there are some important parameters which influenced the accuracy of DEM.

  18. Determining the Financial Impact of Flood Hazards in Ungaged Basins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cotterman, K. A.; Gutenson, J. L.; Pradhan, N. R.; Byrd, A.

    2017-12-01

    Many portions of the Earth lack adequate authoritative or in situ data that is of great value in determining natural hazard vulnerability from both anthropogenic and physical perspective. Such locations include the majority of developing nations, which do not possess adequate warning systems and protective infrastructure. The lack of warning and protection from natural hazards make these nations vulnerable to the destructive power of events such as floods. The goal of this research is to demonstrate an initial workflow with which to characterize flood financial hazards with global datasets and crowd-sourced, non-authoritative data in ungagged river basins. This workflow includes the hydrologic and hydraulic response of the watershed to precipitation, characterized by the physics-based modeling application Gridded Surface-Subsurface Hydrologic Analysis (GSSHA) model. In addition, data infrastructure and resources are available to approximate the human impact of flooding. Open source, volunteer geographic information (VGI) data can provide global coverage of elements at risk of flooding. Additional valuation mechanisms can then translate flood exposure into percentage and financial damage to each building. The combinations of these tools allow the authors to remotely assess flood hazards with minimal computational, temporal, and financial overhead. This combination of deterministic and stochastic modeling provides the means to quickly characterize watershed flood vulnerability and will allow emergency responders and planners to better understand the implications of flooding, both spatially and financially. In either a planning, real-time, or forecasting scenario, the system will assist the user in understanding basin flood vulnerability and increasing community resiliency and preparedness.

  19. Floods and Flash Flooding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Floods and flash flooding Now is the time to determine your area’s flood risk. If you are not sure whether you ... If you are in a floodplain, consider buying flood insurance. Do not drive around barricades. If your ...

  20. 77 FR 76499 - Changes in Flood Hazard Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-28

    ... Federal, State, or regional entities. These new or modified flood hazard determinations are used to meet... Orlando, FL 32801. South John Young Parkway, Orlando, FL 32839. Orange (FEMA Docket No.: B- Unincorporated... Orlando, FL 32801. South John Young Parkway, Orlando, FL 32839. Pinellas (FEMA Docket No.: B- City of...

  1. 77 FR 74856 - Changes in Flood Hazard Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-18

    ... entities. These new or modified flood hazard determinations are used to meet the floodplain management.... Marathon, FL 33050. Orange (FEMA Docket No.: B- City of Orlando (11- The Honorable Buddy Dyer, Permitting Services, 400 May 9, 2012 120186 1249). 04-8127P). Mayor, City of Orlando, South Orange Avenue, P.O. Box...

  2. 75 FR 29201 - Changes in Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-25

    ... 23, 2009 080046 1070). Denver (09-08-0620P). 9, 2009; Denver Hickenlooper, Mayor, Post. City and... 9, 2009 180057 1070). 05-0815P). 10, 2009; The Miller, Mayor, City of Elkhart Truth. Elkhart...; The Rodino, President, (09-05-0815P). Elkhart Truth. Elkhart County Board of Commissioners, 117 North...

  3. 76 FR 68325 - Changes in Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-04

    ..., Orlando, FL 32801. Pasco (FEMA Docket No.: B- Unincorporated areas May 6, 2011; May 13, The Honorable Ann... September 21, 2010 480131 1205). 0342P). October 7, 2010; Terrell, Mayor, City of The Allen American. Allen...

  4. 76 FR 77155 - Changes in Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-12

    ... respective addresses are listed in the table below. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Luis Rodriguez, Chief... Honorable Paul June 30, 2011 421847 03-0172P). March 2, 2011; The Wentzler, Chairman, Williamsport Sun...

  5. 75 FR 82275 - Changes in Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-30

    ... respective addresses are listed in the table below. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Luis Rodriguez, Chief..., CA 95110. Ventura City of Simi Valley July 9, 2010; July The Honorable Paul November 15, 2010 060421...

  6. 76 FR 20554 - Changes in Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-13

    ... addresses are listed in the table below. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Luis Rodriguez, Chief, Engineering... Honorable Paul February 14, 2011 460180 1165). 08-0469P). 15, 2010, The Argus Zimmer, Mayor, City of Leader...

  7. 76 FR 21660 - Changes in Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-18

    ... respective addresses are listed in the table below. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Luis Rodriguez, Chief...: Adams City of Commerce City February 1, 2011; The Honorable Paul June 8, 2011 080006 (10-08-0226P...

  8. 75 FR 78613 - Changes in Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-16

    ... respective addresses are listed in the table below. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Luis Rodriguez, Chief..., The Honorable Paul Zimmer, February 14, 2011.... 460180 (10-08-0469P)........ October 15, 2010, Mayor...

  9. 76 FR 50913 - Changes in Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-17

    ... respective addresses are listed in the table below. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Luis Rodriguez, Chief..., Huntsville, AL 35801. Madison City of Madison (10- June 30, 2011; July The Honorable Paul November 4, 2011... Paul September 12, 2011 450170 of Richland County 2011; The Columbia Livingston, Chairman, (11-04-1879P...

  10. 76 FR 60748 - Changes in Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-30

    ... respective addresses are listed in the table below. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Luis Rodriguez, Chief...: Linn City of Marion (11-07- August 11, 2011; The Honorable Paul Rehn, December 16, 2011 190191 1284P...

  11. 75 FR 82274 - Changes in Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-30

    ... respective addresses are listed in the table below. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Luis Rodriguez, Chief..., Currituck, NC 27929. South Carolina: Richland Unincorporated areas May 28, 2010; June The Honorable Paul...

  12. 75 FR 7955 - Changes in Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-23

    ... Honorable James A. December 31, 2008 390348 2056P) January 19, 2009; Smith, Mayor, City of Morning Journal...; August The Honorable Jeff December 4, 2009 481028 (09-06-0609P) 6, 2009; Austin Coleman, Mayor, City...; Austin T. Biscoe, Travis 0609P) American Statesman. County Judge, 314 West 11th Street, Suite 520, Austin...

  13. 75 FR 18074 - Changes in Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-09

    ...). Marietta Daily County Board of Journal. Commissioners, 100 Cherokee Street, Marietta, GA 30090. Illinois...). Sun Journal. 406 Craven Street, New Bern, NC 28560. Durham City of Durham (08-04- August 27, 2009; The..., 1001 Preston Street, Suite 911, Houston, TX 77002. Travis City of Austin (09-06- October 12, 2009; The...

  14. 75 FR 29195 - Changes in Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-25

    ..., City of Lubbock, Lubbock Avalanche- P.O. Box 2000, Lubbock, Journal. TX 79457. Travis City of Austin..., Mayor, City Austin American of Austin, P.O. Box Statesman. 1088, Austin, TX 78767. Virginia: City of...

  15. 76 FR 43194 - Changes in Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-20

    ..., Supervisor, Town The Journal News. of Orangetown, 26 Orangeburg Road, Orangeburg, NY 10962. Oklahoma..., Saginaw, TX 76179. Travis City of Austin (10-06- January 19, 2011; The Honorable Lee May 20, 2011 480624 1794P). January 26, 2011; Leffingwell, Mayor, City The Austin American- of Austin, P.O. Box Statesman...

  16. 76 FR 68322 - Changes in Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-04

    ... 10, 2011; The Honorable David September 6, 2011 010217 of Jefferson County August 17, 2011... 420417 Haverford (11-03- 12, 2011; The Daily Wechsler, President, 0098P). Times. Township of Haverford...

  17. 76 FR 39009 - Changes in Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-05

    ..., 2011; Ruane, Mayor, City of The News-Press. Sanibel, 800 Dunlop Road, Sanibel, FL 33957. Lee, (FEMA... No.: B- Town of Kill Devil November 9, 2010; The Honorable Raymond October 29, 2010 375353 1191). Hills (10-04-3184P). November 16, 2010; Sturza, Mayor, Town of The Coastland Times. Kill Devil Hills, P...

  18. 76 FR 21662 - Changes in Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-18

    ... of The Arizona Cave Creek, 37622 Cave Business Gazette. Creek Road, Cave Creek, AZ 85331. California... Kill Devil November 9, 2010; The Honorable Raymond October 29, 2010 375353 Hills, (10-04-3184P). November 16, 2010; Sturza, Mayor, Town of The Coastland Times. Kill Devil Hills, P.O. Box 1719, Kill Devil...

  19. 75 FR 29211 - Changes in Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-25

    ..., Regulatory Planning and Review, 58 FR 51735. Executive Order 13132, Federalism. This final rule involves no...-0320P). 21, 2009; Rock Kaumo, Mayor, City of Springs Daily Rock Springs, 212 D Rocket[dash]Miner. Street...

  20. 76 FR 26943 - Changes in Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-10

    ... under the criteria of section 3(f) of Executive Order 12866 of September 30, 1993, Regulatory Planning...-0509P). March 29, 2011; The Demshar, Mayor, City of Rocket-Miner. Rock Springs, 212 D Street, Rock... 560087 of Sweetwater County March 29, 2011; The Dellai Boese, Chairman, (10-08-0509P). Rocket-Miner...

  1. 75 FR 7956 - Changes in Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-23

    ... Executive Order 12866 of September 30, 1993, Regulatory Planning and Review, 58 FR 51735. Executive Order... Springs, 212 D Rocket Miner. Street, Rock Springs, WY 82901. (Catalog of Federal Domestic Assistance No...

  2. 75 FR 78606 - Changes in Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-16

    ... under the criteria of section 3(f) of Executive Order 12866 of September 30, 1993, Regulatory Planning... Reservation, 500 Miner. Merriman Avenue, Needles, CA 92363. Arizona: Pinal Town of Florence..... September 24...

  3. 76 FR 8900 - Changes in Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-16

    .... Burleyson Drive, Dalton, GA 30720. Hawaii: Hawaii (FEMA Docket No.: B- Unincorporated areas April 30, 2010; May The Honorable William P. September 7, 2010 155166 1135). of Hawaii County (09- 7, 2010; Hawaii Kenoi, Mayor, Hawaii 09-1789P). Tribune-Herald. County, 25 Aupuni Street, Hilo, HI 96720. Hawaii (FEMA...

  4. 75 FR 18082 - Changes in Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-09

    ... Democrat. Adams Street, Tallahassee, FL 32301. Hawaii: Hawaii Unincorporated areas August 12, 2009; The Honorable William P. December 17, 2009 155166 of Hawaii County (08- August 19, 2009; Kenoi, Mayor, Hawaii 09-1858P). Hawaii Tribune- County, 25 Aupuni Herald. Street, Hilo, HI 96720. Kansas: Johnson City of...

  5. 75 FR 81892 - Changes in Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-29

    ..., 500 San Sebastian View, St. Augustine, FL 32084. Hawaii: Hawaii (FEMA Docket No.: B- Unincorporated areas April 16, 2010; The Honorable William P. August 23, 2010 155166 1124) of Hawaii County (09- April 23, 2010; Kenoi, Mayor, Hawaii 09-1398P). Hawaii Tribune- County, 25 Aupuni Herald. Street, Hilo, HI...

  6. 75 FR 78610 - Changes in Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-16

    ...)........ Citizen. County, 1407 Burleyson Drive, Dalton, GA 30720. Hawaii: Hawaii Unincorporated areas April 30, 2010, May The Honorable William P. September 7, 2010.... 155166 of Hawaii County. 7, 2010, Hawaii Kenoi, Mayor, County of (09-09-1789P)........ Tribune-Herald. Hawaii, 25 Aupuni Street, Hilo, HI 96720. Idaho...

  7. 75 FR 11744 - Changes in Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-12

    ... Aupuni Street, Hilo, HI 96720. Hawaii (FEMA Docket No: B- Unincorporated areas March 12, 2009; The... 09-1568P). Hawaii Tribune- County, 25 Aupuni Herald. Street, Hilo, HI 96720. Idaho: Blaine (FEMA.... Chairperson, Henry County Board of Commissioners, 140 Henry Parkway, McDonough, GA 30253. Hawaii: Hawaii (FEMA...

  8. 75 FR 35672 - Changes in Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-23

    ... of Commissioners, P.O. Box 398, Fort Myers, FL 33902. Hawaii: Hawaii Unincorporated areas April 16, 2010; The Honorable William P. August 23, 2010 155166 of Hawaii County (09- April 23, 2010; Kenoi, Mayor, Hawaii 09-1398P). Hawaii Tribune- County, 25 Aupuni Herald. Street, Hilo, HI 96720. Illinois: St...

  9. 76 FR 43603 - Changes in Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-21

    .... Hawaii: Hawaii (FEMA Docket No.: B- Unincorporated areas January 3, 2011; The Honorable William P. May 10, 2011 155166 1191). of Hawaii County (10- January 10, 2011; Kenoi, Mayor, Hawaii 09-3793P). The Hawaii Tribune- County, 25 Aupuni Herald. Street, Hilo, HI 96720. North Carolina: Alamance (FEMA Docket No.: B...

  10. 75 FR 78615 - Changes in Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-16

    ... East Avenue, Cedartown, GA 30125. Hawaii: Hawaii Unincorporated areas June 10, 2010, June The Honorable William P. October 15, 2010..... 155166 of Hawaii County. 17, 2010, Hawaii Kenoi, Mayor, Hawaii (09-09-2120P)........ Tribune-Herald. County, 25 Aupuni Street, Hilo, HI 96720. Kansas: Johnson City of Fairway...

  11. 77 FR 55785 - Proposed Flood Elevation Determinations; Correction

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-11

    ...-B- 1145, to Luis Rodriguez, Chief, Engineering Management Branch, Federal Insurance and Mitigation... (email) [email protected] . FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Luis Rodriguez, Chief... comments to Luis Rodriguez, Chief, Engineering Management Branch, Federal Insurance and Mitigation...

  12. 77 FR 55784 - Proposed Flood Elevation Determinations; Correction

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-11

    ... comments, identified by Docket No. FEMA-B- 1110, to Luis Rodriguez, Chief, Engineering Management Branch... CONTACT: Luis Rodriguez, Chief, Engineering Management Branch, Federal Insurance and Mitigation...

  13. 76 FR 58411 - Changes in Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-21

    ..., Mayor, City of Antonio Express- San Antonio, P.O. Box News. 839966, San Antonio, TX 78283. Collin (FEMA.... Potter and Randall (FEMA City of Amarillo (10- August 20, 2010; The Honorable Debra August 13, 2010...- Amarillo, P.O. Box 1971, News. Amarillo, TX 79105. Rockwall (FEMA Docket No.: B- City of Rockwall (10...

  14. 75 FR 82272 - Changes in Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-30

    ... West Valley Forge Road, King of Prussia, PA 19406. Texas: Potter and Randall City of Amarillo (10..., City of The Amarillo Globe- Amarillo, P.O. Box 1971, News. Amarillo, TX 79105. Brazoria Unincorporated... 480076 1185P). August 16, 2010; Martin, Mayor, City of The Alvin Sun. Manvel, P.O. Box 187, Manvel, TX...

  15. 77 FR 425 - Changes in Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-05

    .... Johns Unincorporated areas October 5, 2011; The Honorable Joseph February 9, 2012 125147 of St. Johns... Journal. South, Willard, UT 84340. Wyoming: Campbell City of Gillette (11- October 18, 2011; The Honorable...-Record. 201 East 5th Street, Gillette, WY 82717. Campbell Unincorporated areas October 18, 2011; The...

  16. 76 FR 20553 - Changes in Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-13

    ... 170480 (10-05-2793P). 30, 2010, The Saas, Mayor, Village of Northwest Herald. Huntley, 10987 Main Street... 170480 (10-05-2799P). 23, 2010, The Saas, Mayor, Village of Northwest Herald. Huntley, 10987 Main Street...

  17. 77 FR 50626 - Changes in Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-22

    .... Street, Peoria, AZ 85345. Colorado: Arapahoe (FEMA Docket No.: B- City of Centennial December 8, 2011... of The Littleton Centennial, 13133 East Independent. Arapahoe Road, Centennial, CO 80112. Arapahoe (FEMA Docket No.: B- City of Centennial December 8, 2011; The Honorable Cathy Noon, April 13, 2012...

  18. 77 FR 12501 - Changes in Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-01

    ... Monroe Business Gazette. Street, Peoria, AZ 85345. Colorado: Arapahoe City of Centennial December 8, 2011... Littleton Centennial, 13133 East Independent. Arapahoe Road, Centennial, CO 80112. Arapahoe City of Centennial December 8, 2011; The Honorable Cathy Noon, April 13, 2012 080315 (11-08-1095P). December 15, 2011...

  19. 75 FR 35682 - Changes in Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-23

    ...; The Honorable Fran Cook, March 26, 2010 080073 1096). (10-08-0009P)........ November 26, 2009; Mayor... Ramsey (09-05- November 20, 2009; The Honorable Thomas G. December 14, 2009 270681 B-1096). 4652P...

  20. 76 FR 79093 - Changes in Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-21

    ..., 2011; The Honorable Thomas E. June 2, 2011 350146 1203). (10-06-2588P). February 2, 2011; Swisstack..., 2011 480214 1205). 06-2130P). February 8, 2011; Cook, Mayor, City of El The El Paso Times. Paso, 2...; May The Honorable John F. May 13, 2011 480214 1205). 06-3638P). 27, 2011; The El Cook, Mayor, City of...

  1. 77 FR 20994 - Changes in Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-09

    ...; Thomas, Jr., Mayor, City The Coastal Courier. of Hinesville, 115 East Martin Luther King, Jr. Drive...). August 18, 2011; Cook, Mayor, City of El The El Paso Times. Paso, 2 Civic Center Plaza, 10th Floor, El...

  2. 76 FR 50915 - Changes in Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-17

    ... Honorable Thomas E. August 26, 2010 350146 No.: B-1124). (10-06-0995P). April 28, 2010; The Swisstack, Mayor..., July 20, 2010; July The Honorable David Cook, November 24, 2010 480606 1162). (10-06-0427P). 27, 2010...

  3. 75 FR 23593 - Changes in Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-04

    ... Fran Cook, March 26, 2010 080073 08-0009P). November 26, 2009; Mayor, Town of Fraser, Middle Park Times... (09- November 20, 2009; The Honorable Thomas G. December 14, 2009 270681 05-4652P). November 27, 2009...

  4. 75 FR 18088 - Changes in Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-09

    ... 0491P). November 17, 2009; Nolan, Mayor, City of Press-Enterprise. Corona, 400 South Vincentia Avenue..., City of Casper Star-Tribune. Casper, 200 North David Street, Casper, WY 82601. Natrona Unincorporated...

  5. 75 FR 29205 - Changes in Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-25

    ... Business Review. Collins Avenue, Suite 250, Sunny Isles Beach, FL 33160. Osceola City of St. Cloud (09... Morrow (09-04- February 12, 2010; The Honorable Jim June 21, 2010 130045 4735P). Februrary 19, 2010...

  6. 76 FR 8905 - Changes in Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-16

    ...- December 8, 2010; The Honorable Jim December 24, 2010 060766 3624P). December 15, 2010; Frazier, Mayor...- December 15, 2010; The Honorable Joe December 8, 2010 375350 04-8305P). December 22, 2010; Collins, Mayor...

  7. 76 FR 18938 - Changes in Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-06

    ... Isles Beach, 18070 Review. Collins Avenue, Sunny Isles Beach, FL 33160. Monroe (FEMA Docket No.: B.... Jim Schmidt, December 24, 2010 460277 No.: B-1156) of Lincoln County August 26, 2010; Chairman...

  8. 75 FR 81484 - Changes in Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-28

    ...: Arapahoe (FEMA Docket No.: B- City of Englewood (10- February 25, 2010; The Honorable Jim February 18, 2010..., 18070 Business Review. Collins Avenue, Suite 250, Sunny Isles Beach, FL 33160. Monroe (FEMA Docket No...: Clayton (FEMA Docket No.: B- City of Morrow (09-04- February 12, 2010; The Honorable Jim June 21, 2010...

  9. 75 FR 29199 - Changes in Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-25

    ..., February 25, 2010; The Honorable Jim February 18, 2010 085074 (10-08-0001P). March 5, 2010; The Woodward.... Commissioners, P.O. Box 850, Eagle, CO 81631. Larimer City of Fort Collins, February 8, 2010; The Honorable Doug February 24, 2010 080102 (09-08-0465P). February 15, 2010; Hutchinson, Mayor, City Fort Collins of Fort...

  10. 78 FR 49121 - Changes in Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-13

    ..., 2011; June Mr. Raymond E. Sines, July 01, 2011 390771 of Lake County (10- 21, 2011; The News President.... Sines, December 16, 2011 390771 of Lake County (11- August 18, 2011; President, Lake County 05-2150P...

  11. 77 FR 1884 - Changes in Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-12

    ... County August 12, 2011; Craft, Chairman, St. (11-04-4362P). The St. Lucie News- Lucie County Board of... Sun-News. Miyagishima, Mayor, City of Las Cruces, 700 North Main Street, Las Cruces, NM 88004. New.... June 16, 2011 360497 02-2163P). December 31, 2010; Bloomberg, Mayor, City The Chief. of New York, City...

  12. 76 FR 58409 - Changes in Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-21

    ...). 30, 2011; The Las Daniel Gallegos Cruces Sun-News. Miyagishima, Mayor, City of Las Cruces, 700 North... Honorable Michael R. June 16, 2011 360497 02-2163P). December 31, 2010; Bloomberg, Mayor, City The Chief. of... News. Drive, Thorndale, PA 19372. Chester Township of West March 4, 2011; March The Honorable Edward G...

  13. 76 FR 20551 - Changes in Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-13

    ... Daily Schillerstrom, Chairman, 05-1256P). Herald. DuPage County Board, Jack T. Knuepfer Administration... Chairman, Board of Spectator. Selectmen, Swansea Town Hall Annex, 68 Stevens Road, Swansea, MA 02777...). 8, 2010, The Easton Administrator, Enterprise News. 136 Elm Street, Easton, MA 02356. Bristol Town...

  14. 76 FR 50420 - Changes in Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-15

    ... 20, 2010, Schillerstrom, Chairman, (10-05-1256P). The Daily Herald. DuPage County Board, Jack T..., Easton Administrator, The Enterprise News. 136 Elm Street, Easton, MA 02356. Bristol (FEMA Docket No. B...-0021P). November 22, 2010, Easton Administrator, The Enterprise News. 136 Elm Street, Easton, MA 02356...

  15. 77 FR 3391 - Changes in Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-24

    ..., City 3899P). The Honolulu Star- and County of Honolulu, Advertiser. 530 South King Street, Room 300... Stephen F. February 27, 2012 560081 of Campbell County October 28, 2011; Hughes, Chairman, (11-08-0781P...

  16. 76 FR 17 - Changes in Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-03

    ...: Collier (FEMA Docket No.: B- City of Marco Island February 19, 2010; Mr. Stephen T. Thompson, February 9... & Advance. Lynchburg, 900 Church Street, Lynchburg, VA 24504. Washington: King (FEMA Docket No.: B-1121.... King (FEMA Docket No.: B-1121) Unincorporated areas February 5, 2010; The Honorable Dow February 26...

  17. 76 FR 79090 - Changes in Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-21

    ... changes in a newspaper of local circulation, any person has ninety (90) days in which to request through... and name of State and county Location and case No. newspaper where Chief executive, officer Effective..., Gettysburg Times. Township of Franklin Board of Supervisors, 55 Scott School Road, Cashtown, PA 17310...

  18. 77 FR 44498 - Changes in Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-30

    ... Avenue, Colorado Springs, CO 80903. Routt (FEMA Docket No.: B- Town of Hayden (11-08- Nov. 6, 2011, Nov... Pilot & Hayden, 178 West Today. Jefferson Avenue, Hayden, CO 81639. Weld (FEMA Docket No.: B-1244) City...

  19. 75 FR 18084 - Changes in Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-09

    ... Street SW., Washington, DC 20472, (202) 646-2820, or (e-mail) [email protected] . SUPPLEMENTARY....; Reorganization Plan No. 3 of 1978, 3 CFR, 1978 Comp., p. 329; E.O. 12127, 44 FR 19367, 3 CFR, 1979 Comp., p. 376..., 2009; Wasserman, Mayor, City The Argus. of Freemont, 3300 Capitol Avenue, Fremont, CA 94538. San Diego...

  20. 75 FR 35674 - Changes in Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-23

    ..., DC 20472, (202) 646-2820, or (e-mail) [email protected] . SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: The Federal... 1978, 3 CFR, 1978 Comp., p. 329; E.O. 12127, 44 FR 19367, 3 CFR, 1979 Comp., p.376. Sec. 65.4 [Amended... Argus. of Freemont, 3300 Capitol Avenue, Fremont, CA 94538. Riverside (FEMA Docket No.: B- City of...

  1. 76 FR 2837 - Changes in Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-18

    ... Herald-Gazette. Barnesville, 109 Forsyth Street, Barnesville, GA 30204. Georgia: Tift City of Tifton (09..., Chairman, Tift County The Tifton Gazette. Board of Commissioners, P.O. Box 229, Tifton, GA 31793. Georgia... Tift Avenue, Tifton, GA 31794. [[Page 2839

  2. 76 FR 40815 - Changes in Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-12

    ...). November 26, 2010; Cater, Jr., Mayor, City The Tifton Gazette. of Tifton, P.O. Box 229, Tifton, GA 31793.... Commission, 225 North Tift Avenue, Tifton, GA 31794. Mississippi: DeSoto (FEMA Docket City of Olive Branch... Broad Street, Winder, GA 30680. Bryan (FEMA Docket No.: B- City of Richmond Hill November 3, 2010; The...

  3. 75 FR 18076 - Changes in Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-09

    ...; Chairman, Coconino (08-09-1418P). Arizona Daily Sun. County Board of Supervisors, 219 East Cherry Avenue... February 13, 2009; The Honorable Paul Biane, June 19, 2009 060270 No: B-1044). of San Bernardino February...

  4. 76 FR 23 - Changes in Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-03

    .... Street, Suite 301, Lincoln, NE 68508. Virginia: City of Fairfax City of Fairfax (10- June 14, 2010; June.... June 24, 2010 230169 01-1532P). 19, 2010; The Times- Henderson, Chairman, Record. Board of Selectman, P...

  5. 77 FR 31216 - Changes in Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-25

    ..., Building B, 2nd Floor, Evans, GA 30809. Nevada: Clark (FEMA Docket No.: B- City of Henderson (11- October 6..., City of The Las Vegas Henderson, 240 Water Review-Journal. Street, Henderson, NV 89015. Clark (FEMA... 50 Journal. South, Willard, UT 84340. Virginia: Fauquier (FEMA Docket No.: B- Unincorporated areas...

  6. 76 FR 22054 - Changes in Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-20

    .... June 24, 2010 230169 1143). 01-1532P). 19, 2010; The Times Henderson, Chairman, Record. Board of.... Selectboard, P.O. Box 217, Wilmington, VT 05363. Virginia: Independent City of City of Fairfax (10-03- June 14...

  7. 76 FR 76052 - Changes in Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-06

    ... City of Orlando (11- June 30, 2011; July The Honorable Buddy Dyer, November 4, 2011 120186 04-2561P). 7, 2011; The Mayor, City of Orlando, Orlando Weekly. 400 South Orange Avenue, 3rd Floor, Orlando, FL 32808. Orange City of Orlando (11- September 29, 2011; The Honorable Buddy Dyer, September 20, 2011 120186 04...

  8. 76 FR 44276 - Changes in Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-25

    ...] 0 2. The tables published under the authority of Sec. 65.4 are amended as follows: Date and name of... modification Community No. notice was published of community No. Delaware: New Castle Town of Odessa (11-03..., Richland Hills, TX 76182. Travis City of Austin (10-06- December 30, 2010; The Honorable Lee December 23...

  9. 75 FR 18090 - Changes in Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-09

    ...] 0 2. The tables published under the authority of Sec. 65.4 are amended as follows: Date and name of... modification Community notice was published of community No. New York: Suffolk Town of Southampton March 4... Austin (09-06- March 10, 2010; The Honorable Lee July 15, 2010 480624 3398P). March 17, 2010; Leffingwell...

  10. Floods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Floods are common in the United States. Weather such as heavy rain, thunderstorms, hurricanes, or tsunamis can ... is breached, or when a dam breaks. Flash floods, which can develop quickly, often have a dangerous ...

  11. Merging LIDAR digital terrain model with direct observed elevation points for urban flood numerical simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arrighi, Chiara; Campo, Lorenzo

    2017-04-01

    In last years, the concern about the economical and lives loss due to urban floods has grown hand in hand with the numerical skills in simulating such events. The large amount of computational power needed in order to address the problem (simulating a flood in a complex terrain such as a medium-large city) is only one of the issues. Among them it is possible to consider the general lack of exhaustive observations during the event (exact extension, dynamic, water level reached in different parts of the involved area), needed for calibration and validation of the model, the need of considering the sewers effects, and the availability of a correct and precise description of the geometry of the problem. In large cities the topographic surveys are in general available with a number of points, but a complete hydraulic simulation needs a detailed description of the terrain on the whole computational domain. LIDAR surveys can achieve this goal, providing a comprehensive description of the terrain, although they often lack precision. In this work an optimal merging of these two sources of geometrical information, measured elevation points and LIDAR survey, is proposed, by taking into account the error variance of both. The procedure is applied to a flood-prone city over an area of 35 square km approximately starting with a DTM from LIDAR with a spatial resolution of 1 m, and 13000 measured points. The spatial pattern of the error (LIDAR vs points) is analysed, and the merging method is tested with a series of Jackknife procedures that take into account different densities of the available points. A discussion of the results is provided.

  12. The influence of digital elevation model resolution on overland flow networks for modelling urban pluvial flooding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leitão, J P; Boonya-Aroonnet, S; Prodanović, D; Maksimović, C

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents the developments towards the next generation of overland flow modelling of urban pluvial flooding. Using a detailed analysis of the Digital Elevation Model (DEM) the developed GIS tools can automatically generate surface drainage networks which consist of temporary ponds (floodable areas) and flow paths and link them with the underground network through inlets. For different commercially-available Rainfall-Runoff simulation models, the tool will generate the overland flow network needed to model the surface runoff and pluvial flooding accurately. In this paper the emphasis is placed on a sensitivity analysis of ponds and preferential overland flow paths creation. Different DEMs for three areas were considered in order to compare the results obtained. The DEMs considered were generated using different acquisition techniques and hence represent terrain with varying levels of resolution and accuracy. The results show that DEMs can be used to generate surface flow networks reliably. As expected, the quality of the surface network generated is highly dependent on the quality and resolution of the DEMs and successful representation of buildings and streets.

  13. Determining optimum aging time using novel core flooding equipment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ahkami, Mehrdad; Chakravarty, Krishna Hara; Xiarchos, Ioannis

    2016-01-01

    the optimum aging time regardless of variations in crude oil, rock, and brine properties. State of the art core flooding equipment has been developed that can be used for consistently determining the resistivity of the coreplug during aging and waterflooding using advanced data acquisition software......New methods for enhanced oil recovery are typically developed using core flooding techniques. Establishing reservoir conditions is essential before the experimental campaign commences. The realistic oil-rock wettability can be obtained through optimum aging of the core. Aging time is affected....... In the proposed equipment, independent axial and sleeve pressure can be applied to mimic stresses at reservoir conditions. 10 coreplugs (four sandstones and six chalk samples) from the North Sea have been aged for more than 408 days in total and more than 29000 resistivity data points have been measured...

  14. Hydrology, vegetation, and soils of four north Florida River flood plains with an evaluation of state and federal wetland determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Light, H.M.; Darst, M.R.; MacLaughlin, M.T.; Sprecher, S.W.

    1993-01-01

    A study of hydrologic conditions, vegetation, and soils was made in wetland forests of four north Florida streams from 1987 to 1990. The study was conducted by the U.S. Geological Survey in cooperation with the Florida Department of Environmental Regulation to support State and Federal efforts to improve wetland delineation methodology in flood plains. Plant communities and soils were described and related to topographic position and long-term hydrologic conditions at 10 study plots located on 4 streams. Detailed appendixes give average duration, frequency, and depth of flooding; canopy, subcanopy, and ground-cover vegetation; and taxonomic classification, series, and profile descriptions of soils for each plot. Topographic relief, range in stage, and depth of flooding were greatest on the alluvial flood plain of the Ochlockonee River, the largest of the four streams. Soils were silty in the lower elevations of the flood plain, and tree communities were distinctly different in each topographic zone. The Aucilla River flood plain was dominated by levees and terraces with very few depressions or low backwater areas. Oaks dominated the canopy of both lower and upper terraces of the Aucilla flood plain. Telogia Creek is a blackwater stream that is a major tributary of the Ochlockonee River. Its low, wet flood plain was dominated by Wyssa ogeche (Ogeechee tupelo) trees, had soils with mucky horizons, and was inundated by frequent floods of very short duration. The St. Marks River, a spring-fed stream with high base flow, had the least topographic relief and lowest range in stage of the four streams. St. Marks soils had a higher clay content than the other streams, and limestone bedrock was relatively close to the surface. Wetland determinations of the study plots based on State and Federal regulatory criteria were evaluated. Most State and Federal wetland determinations are based primarily on vegetation and soil characteristics because hydrologic records are usually not

  15. Flooding and Flood Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, K.N.; Fallon, J.D.; Lorenz, D.L.; Stark, J.R.; Menard, Jason; Easter, K.W.; Perry, Jim

    2011-01-01

    Floods result in great human disasters globally and nationally, causing an average of $4 billion of damages each year in the United States. Minnesota has its share of floods and flood damages, and the state has awarded nearly $278 million to local units of government for flood mitigation projects through its Flood Hazard Mitigation Grant Program. Since 1995, flood mitigation in the Red River Valley has exceeded $146 million. Considerable local and state funding has been provided to manage and mitigate problems of excess stormwater in urban areas, flooding of farmlands, and flood damages at road crossings. The cumulative costs involved with floods and flood mitigation in Minnesota are not known precisely, but it is safe to conclude that flood mitigation is a costly business. This chapter begins with a description of floods in Minneosta to provide examples and contrasts across the state. Background material is presented to provide a basic understanding of floods and flood processes, predication, and management and mitigation. Methods of analyzing and characterizing floods are presented because they affect how we respond to flooding and can influence relevant practices. The understanding and perceptions of floods and flooding commonly differ among those who work in flood forecasting, flood protection, or water resource mamnagement and citizens and businesses affected by floods. These differences can become magnified following a major flood, pointing to the need for better understanding of flooding as well as common language to describe flood risks and the uncertainty associated with determining such risks. Expectations of accurate and timely flood forecasts and our ability to control floods do not always match reality. Striving for clarity is important in formulating policies that can help avoid recurring flood damages and costs.

  16. Inundation Analysis of Reservoir Flood Based on Computer Aided Design (CAD and Digital Elevation Model (DEM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiqing Li

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available GIS (Geographic Information System can be used to combine multiple hydrologic data and geographic data for FIA (Flood Impact Assessment. For a developing country like China, a lot of geographic data is in the CAD (Computer Aided Design format. The commonly used method for converting CAD into DEM may result in data loss. This paper introduces a solution for the conversion between CAD data and DEM data. The method has been applied to the FIA based on the topographic map of CAD in Hanjiang River. When compared with the other method, the new method solves the data loss problem. Besides, the paper use GIS to simulate the inundation range, area, and the depth distribution of flood backwater. Based on the analysis, the author concludes: (1 the differences of the inundation areas between the flood of HQ100 and the flood of HQ50 are small. (2 The inundation depth shows a decreasing trend along the upstream of the river. (3 The inundation area less than 4 m in flood of HQ50 is larger than that in flood of HQ100, the result is opposite when the inundation depth is greater than 4 m. (4 The flood loss is 392.32 million RMB for flood of HQ50 and 610.02 million RMB for flood of HQ100. The method can be applied to FIA.

  17. Determination of adsorption parameters in numerical simulation for polymer flooding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Pengyu; Li, Aifen; Luo, Shuai; Dang, Xu

    2018-02-01

    A study on the determination of adsorption parameters for polymer flooding simulation was carried out. The study mainly includes polymer static adsorption and dynamic adsorption. The law of adsorption amount changing with polymer concentration and core permeability was presented, and the one-dimensional numerical model of CMG was established under the support of a large number of experimental data. The adsorption laws of adsorption experiments were applied to the one-dimensional numerical model to compare the influence of two adsorption laws on the historical matching results. The results show that the static adsorption and dynamic adsorption abide by different rules, and differ greatly in adsorption. If the static adsorption results were directly applied to the numerical model, the difficulty of the historical matching will increase. Therefore, dynamic adsorption tests in the porous medium are necessary before the process of parameter adjustment in order to achieve the ideal history matching result.

  18. 12 CFR 22.6 - Required use of standard flood hazard determination form.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Required use of standard flood hazard determination form. 22.6 Section 22.6 Banks and Banking COMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY... the Act. The standard flood hazard determination form may be used in a printed, computerized, or...

  19. Determinants of elevated healthcare utilization in patients with COPD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernhard-Scharf Barbara J

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD imparts a substantial economic burden on western health systems. Our objective was to analyze the determinants of elevated healthcare utilization among patients with COPD in a single-payer health system. Methods Three-hundred eighty-nine adults with COPD were matched 1:3 to controls by age, gender and area of residency. Total healthcare cost 5 years prior recruitment and presence of comorbidities were obtained from a computerized database. Health related quality of life (HRQoL indices were obtained using validated questionnaires among a subsample of 177 patients. Results Healthcare utilization was 3.4-fold higher among COPD patients compared with controls (p Conclusion Comorbidity burden determines elevated utilization for COPD patients. Decision makers should prioritize scarce health care resources to a better care management of the "most costly" patients.

  20. Exploitation of Documented Historical Floods for Achieving Better Flood Defense

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Slobodan Kolaković

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Establishing Base Flood Elevation for a stream network corresponding to a big catchment is feasible by interdisciplinary approach, involving stochastic hydrology, river hydraulics, and computer aided simulations. A numerical model calibrated by historical floods has been exploited in this study. The short presentation of the catchment of the Tisza River in this paper is followed by the overview of historical floods which hit the region in the documented period of 130 years. Several well documented historical floods provided opportunity for the calibration of the chosen numerical model. Once established, the model could be used for investigation of different extreme flood scenarios and to establish the Base Flood Elevation. The calibration has shown that the coefficient of friction in case of the Tisza River is dependent both on the actual water level and on the preceding flood events. The effect of flood plain maintenance as well as the activation of six potential detention ponds on flood mitigation has been examined. Furthermore, the expected maximum water levels have also been determined for the case if the ever observed biggest 1888 flood hit the region again. The investigated cases of flood superposition highlighted the impact of tributary Maros on flood mitigation along the Tisza River.

  1. Updating flood maps efficiently using existing hydraulic models, very-high-accuracy elevation data, and a geographic information system; a pilot study on the Nisqually River, Washington

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Joseph L.; Haluska, Tana L.; Kresch, David L.

    2001-01-01

    A method of updating flood inundation maps at a fraction of the expense of using traditional methods was piloted in Washington State as part of the U.S. Geological Survey Urban Geologic and Hydrologic Hazards Initiative. Large savings in expense may be achieved by building upon previous Flood Insurance Studies and automating the process of flood delineation with a Geographic Information System (GIS); increases in accuracy and detail result from the use of very-high-accuracy elevation data and automated delineation; and the resulting digital data sets contain valuable ancillary information such as flood depth, as well as greatly facilitating map storage and utility. The method consists of creating stage-discharge relations from the archived output of the existing hydraulic model, using these relations to create updated flood stages for recalculated flood discharges, and using a GIS to automate the map generation process. Many of the effective flood maps were created in the late 1970?s and early 1980?s, and suffer from a number of well recognized deficiencies such as out-of-date or inaccurate estimates of discharges for selected recurrence intervals, changes in basin characteristics, and relatively low quality elevation data used for flood delineation. FEMA estimates that 45 percent of effective maps are over 10 years old (FEMA, 1997). Consequently, Congress has mandated the updating and periodic review of existing maps, which have cost the Nation almost 3 billion (1997) dollars. The need to update maps and the cost of doing so were the primary motivations for piloting a more cost-effective and efficient updating method. New technologies such as Geographic Information Systems and LIDAR (Light Detection and Ranging) elevation mapping are key to improving the efficiency of flood map updating, but they also improve the accuracy, detail, and usefulness of the resulting digital flood maps. GISs produce digital maps without manual estimation of inundated areas between

  2. Geochemistry and flooding as determining factors of plant species composition in Dutch winter-flooded riverine grasslands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beumer, V.; Wirdum, G. van; Beltman, B.; Griffioen, J.; Grootjans, A.P.; Verhoeven, J.T.A.

    2008-01-01

    Dutch water policy aims for more frequent, controlled flooding of river valley floodplains to avoid unwanted flooding elsewhere; in anticipation of increased flooding risks resulting from climate changes. Controlled flooding usually takes place in winter in parts of the valleys which had not been

  3. Determination of Flood Reduction Alternatives for Climate Change Adaptation in Gyeongancheon basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, D.; Joo, H. J.; Jung, J.; Kim, H. S.

    2017-12-01

    Recently, the frequency of extreme rainfall event has increased due to the climate change and the impermeable area in an urban watershed has also increased due to the rapid urbanization. Therefore, the flood risk is increasing and we ought to prepare countermeasures for flood damage reduction. For the determination of appropriate measures or alternatives, firstly, this study estimated the frequency based rainfall considering the climate change according to the each target period(reference : 1971˜2010, Target period Ⅰ : 2011˜2040, Target period Ⅱ : 2041˜2070, Target period Ⅲ : 2071˜2100). Then the future flood discharge was computed by using HEC-HMS model. We set 5 sizes of drainage pumps and detention ponds respectively as the flood reduction alternatives and the flood level in the river was obtained by each alternative through HEC-RAS model. The flood inundation map was constructed using topographical data and flood water level in the river and the economic analysis was conducted for the flood damage reduction studies using Multi Dimensional Flood Damage Analysis (MD-FDA) tool. As a result of the effectiveness analysis of the flood reduction alternatives, the flood level by drainage pump was reduced by 0.06m up to 0.44m while it was reduced by 0.01m up to 1.86m in the case of the detention pond. The flooded area was shrunk by up to 32.64% from 0.3% and inundation depth was also dropped. As a result of a comparison of the Benefit/Cost ratio estimated by the economic analysis, a detention pond E in the target period Ⅰ and the pump D in the periods Ⅱ and Ⅲ were considered as the appropriate alternatives for the flood damage reduction under the climate change. AcknowledgementsThis research was supported by Basic Science Research Program through the National Research Foundation of Korea(NRF) funded by the Ministry of Science, ICT & Future Planning(2017R1A2B3005695)

  4. Determining tropical cyclone inland flooding loss on a large scale through a new flood peak ratio-based methodology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Czajkowski, Jeffrey; Michel-Kerjan, Erwann; Villarini, Gabriele; Smith, James A

    2013-01-01

    In recent years, the United States has been severely affected by numerous tropical cyclones (TCs) which have caused massive damages. While media attention mainly focuses on coastal losses from storm surge, these TCs have inflicted significant devastation inland as well. Yet, little is known about the relationship between TC-related inland flooding and economic losses. Here we introduce a novel methodology that first successfully characterizes the spatial extent of inland flooding, and then quantifies its relationship with flood insurance claims. Hurricane Ivan in 2004 is used as illustration. We empirically demonstrate in a number of ways that our quantified inland flood magnitude produces a very good representation of the number of inland flood insurance claims experienced. These results highlight the new technological capabilities that can lead to a better risk assessment of inland TC flood. This new capacity will be of tremendous value to a number of public and private sector stakeholders dealing with disaster preparedness. (letter)

  5. The determinants of private flood mitigation measures in Germany - evidence from a nationwide survey

    OpenAIRE

    Osberghaus, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    Public flood protection cannot totally eliminate the risk of flooding. Hence, private mitigation measures which proactively protect homes from being flooded or reduce flood damage are an essential part of modern flood risk management. This study analyses private flood mitigation measures among German households. The dataset covers more than 6000 households from all parts of the country, including flood plains as well as areas which are typically not at a high risk of riverine flooding. The re...

  6. Flood Hazard Assessment for the Savannah River Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, K.F.

    1999-01-01

    'A method was developed to determine the probabilistic flood elevation curves for certain Savannah River Site (SRS) facilities. This paper presents the method used to determine the probabilistic flood elevation curve for F-Area due to runoff from the Upper Three Runs basin. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 420.1, Facility Safety, outlines the requirements for Natural Phenomena Hazard (NPH) mitigation for new and existing DOE facilities. The NPH considered in this paper is flooding. The facility-specific probabilistic flood hazard curve defines as a function of water elevation the annual probability of occurrence or the return period in years. Based on facility-specific probabilistic flood hazard curves and the nature of facility operations (e.g., involving hazardous or radioactive materials), facility managers can design permanent or temporary devices to prevent the propagation of flood on site, and develop emergency preparedness plans to mitigate the consequences of floods.'

  7. Determination of minimum flood flow for regeneration of floodplain forest from inundated forest width-stage curve

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Song-hao Shang

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Floods are essential for the regeneration and growth of floodplain forests in arid and semiarid regions. However, river flows, and especially flood flows, have decreased greatly with the increase of water diversion from rivers and/or reservoir regulation, resulting in severe deterioration of floodplain ecosystems. Estimation of the flood stage that will inundate the floodplain forest is necessary for the forest's restoration or protection. To balance water use for economic purposes and floodplain forest protection, the inundated forest width method is proposed for estimating the minimum flood stage for floodplain forests from the inundated forest width-stage curve. The minimum flood stage is defined as the breakpoint of the inundated forest width-stage curve, and is determined directly or analytically from the curve. For the analytical approach, the problem under consideration is described by a multi-objective optimization model, which can be solved by the ideal point method. Then, the flood flow at the minimum flood stage (minimum flood flow, which is useful for flow regulation, can be calculated from the stage-discharge curve. In order to protect the forest in a river floodplain in a semiarid area in Xinjiang subject to reservoir regulation upstream, the proposed method was used to determine the minimum flood stage and flow for the forest. Field survey of hydrology, topography, and forest distribution was carried out at typical cross sections in the floodplain. Based on the survey results, minimum flood flows for six typical cross sections were estimated to be between 306 m3/s and 393 m3/s. Their maximum, 393 m3/s, was considered the minimum flood flow for the study river reach. This provides an appropriate flood flow for the protection of floodplain forest and can be used in the regulation of the upstream reservoir.

  8. Simulated and observed 2010 flood-water elevations in selected river reaches in the Moshassuck and Woonasquatucket River Basins, Rhode Island

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarriello, Phillip J.; Straub, David E.; Westenbroek, Stephen M.

    2014-01-01

    Heavy persistent rains from late February through March 2010 caused severe flooding and set, or nearly set, peaks of record for streamflows and water levels at many long-term U.S. Geological Survey streamgages in Rhode Island. In response to this flood, hydraulic models were updated for selected reaches covering about 33 river miles in Moshassuck and Woonasquatucket River Basins from the most recent approved Federal Emergency Management Agency flood insurance study (FIS) to simulate water-surface elevations (WSEs) from specified flows and boundary conditions. Reaches modeled include the main stem of the Moshassuck River and its main tributary, the West River, and three tributaries to the West River—Upper Canada Brook, Lincoln Downs Brook, and East Branch West River; and the main stem of the Woonasquatucket River. All the hydraulic models were updated to Hydrologic Engineering Center-River Analysis System (HEC-RAS) version 4.1.0 and incorporate new field-survey data at structures, high-resolution land-surface elevation data, and flood flows from a related study. The models were used to simulate steady-state WSEs at the 1- and 2-percent annual exceedance probability (AEP) flows, which is the estimated AEP of the 2010 flood in the Moshassuck River Basin and the Woonasquatucket River, respectively. The simulated WSEs were compared to the high-water mark (HWM) elevation data obtained in these basins in a related study following the March–April 2010 flood, which included 18 HWMs along the Moshassuck River and 45 HWMs along the Woonasquatucket River. Differences between the 2010 HWMs and the simulated 2- and 1-percent AEP WSEs from the FISs and the updated models developed in this study varied along the reach. Most differences could be attributed to the magnitude of the 2- and 1-percent AEP flows used in the FIS and updated model flows. Overall, the updated model and the FIS WSEs were not appreciably different when compared to the observed 2010 HWMs along the

  9. Determination of soil degradation from flooding for estimating ecosystem services in Slovakia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hlavcova, Kamila; Szolgay, Jan; Karabova, Beata; Kohnova, Silvia

    2015-04-01

    Floods as natural hazards are related to soil health, land-use and land management. They not only represent threats on their own, but can also be triggered, controlled and amplified by interactions with other soil threats and soil degradation processes. Among the many direct impacts of flooding on soil health, including soil texture, structure, changes in the soil's chemical properties, deterioration of soil aggregation and water holding capacity, etc., are soil erosion, mudflows, depositions of sediment and debris. Flooding is initiated by a combination of predispositive and triggering factors and apart from climate drivers it is related to the physiographic conditions of the land, state of the soil, land use and land management. Due to the diversity and complexity of their potential interactions, diverse methodologies and approaches are needed for describing a particular type of event in a specific environment, especially in ungauged sites. In engineering studies and also in many rainfall-runoff models, the SCS-CN method has remained widely applied for soil and land use-based estimations of direct runoff and flooding potential. The SCS-CN method is an empirical rainfall-runoff model developed by the USDA Natural Resources Conservation Service (formerly called the Soil Conservation Service or SCS). The runoff curve number (CN) is based on the hydrological soil characteristics, land use, land management and antecedent saturation conditions of soil. Since the method and curve numbers were derived on the basis of an empirical analysis of rainfall-runoff events from small catchments and hillslope plots monitored by the USDA, the use of the method for the conditions of Slovakia raises uncertainty and can cause inaccurate results in determining direct runoff. The objective of the study presented (also within the framework of the EU-FP7 RECARE Project) was to develop the SCS - CN methodology for the flood conditions in Slovakia (and especially for the RECARE pilot site

  10. Determining the optimum cell size of digital elevation model for ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    These methods were applied to determine the level artifacts (interpolation error) in DEM surface as well as derived stream ... the storage disk and computer's processing power. Thus, such .... The concept of entropy or theory of information.

  11. Prevalence and Determinants of Chronic Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder After Floods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Long; Tan, Hongzhuan; Cofie, Reuben; Hu, Shimin; Li, Yan; Zhou, Jia; Yang, Tubao; Tang, Xuemin; Cui, Guanghui; Liu, Aizhong

    2015-10-01

    To explore the prevalence and determinants of chronic post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) among flood victims. A cross-sectional survey was carried out in 2014 among individuals who had experienced the 1998 floods and had been diagnosed with PTSD in 1999 in Hunan, China. Cluster sampling was used to select subjects from the areas that had been surveyed in 1999. PTSD was diagnosed according to DSM-IV criteria, social support was measured according to a Social Support Rating Scale, coping style was measured according to a Simplified Coping Style Questionnaire, and personality was measured by use of the revised Eysenck Personality Questionnaire Short Scale for Chinese. Data were collected through face-to-face interviews by use of a structured questionnaire. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was used to reveal the determinants of chronic PTSD. A total of 123 subjects were interviewed, 17 of whom (14.4%) were diagnosed with chronic PTSD. Chronic PTSD was significantly associated with disaster stressors (odds ratio [OR]: 1.74; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.22-2.47), nervousness (OR: 1.09; 95% CI: 1.01-1.17), and social support (OR: 0.85; 95 CI%: 0.74-0.98). Chronic PTSD in flood victims is significantly associated with disaster stressors, nervousness, and social support. These factors may play important roles in identifying persons at high risk of chronic PTSD.

  12. Flood Hazard Recurrence Frequencies for C-, F-, E-, S-, H-, Y-, and Z-Areas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, K.F.

    1999-01-01

    A method was developed to determine the probabilistic flood elevation curves for Savannah River Site facilities. This report presents the method used to determine the probabilistic flood elevation curves for C-, F-, E-, H-, S-, Y-, and Z-Areas due to runoff from the Upper Three Runs and Fourmile Branch basins

  13. Optimization of the resolution of remotely sensed digital elevation model to facilitate the simulation and spatial propagation of flood events in flat areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karapetsas, Nikolaos; Skoulikaris, Charalampos; Katsogiannos, Fotis; Zalidis, George; Alexandridis, Thomas

    2013-04-01

    The use of satellite remote sensing products, such as Digital Elevation Models (DEMs), under specific computational interfaces of Geographic Information Systems (GIS) has fostered and facilitated the acquisition of data on specific hydrologic features, such as slope, flow direction and flow accumulation, which are crucial inputs to hydrology or hydraulic models at the river basin scale. However, even though DEMs of different resolution varying from a few km up to 20m are freely available for the European continent, these remotely sensed elevation data are rather coarse in cases where large flat areas are dominant inside a watershed, resulting in an unsatisfactory representation of the terrain characteristics. This scientific work aims at implementing a combing interpolation technique for the amelioration of the analysis of a DEM in order to be used as the input ground model to a hydraulic model for the assessment of potential flood events propagation in plains. More specifically, the second version of the ASTER Global Digital Elevation Model (GDEM2), which has an overall accuracy of around 20 meters, was interpolated with a vast number of aerial control points available from the Hellenic Mapping and Cadastral Organization (HMCO). The uncertainty that was inherent in both the available datasets (ASTER & HMCO) and the appearance of uncorrelated errors and artifacts was minimized by incorporating geostatistical filtering. The resolution of the produced DEM was approximately 10 meters and its validation was conducted with the use of an external dataset of 220 geodetic survey points. The derived DEM was then used as an input to the hydraulic model InfoWorks RS, whose operation is based on the relief characteristics contained in the ground model, for defining, in an automated way, the cross section parameters and simulating the flood spatial distribution. The plain of Serres, which is located in the downstream part of the Struma/Strymon transboundary river basin shared

  14. Determination of times maximum insulation in case of internal flooding by pipe break

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Varas, M. I.; Orteu, E.; Laserna, J. A.

    2014-01-01

    This paper demonstrates the process followed in the preparation of the Manual of floods of Cofrentes NPP to identify the allowed maximum time available to the central in the isolation of a moderate or high energy pipe break, until it affects security (1E) participating in the safe stop of Reactor or in pools of spent fuel cooling-related equipment , and to determine the recommended isolation mode from the point of view of the location of the break or rupture, of the location of the 1E equipment and human factors. (Author)

  15. 77 FR 59880 - Proposed Flood Elevation Determinations for the City of McCleary, WA

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-01

    ... Luis Rodriguez, Chief, Engineering Management Branch, Federal Insurance and Mitigation Administration...) [email protected] . FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Luis Rodriguez, Chief, Engineering...

  16. Flood Hazard Assessment for the Savannah River Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, K.F.

    2000-01-01

    A method was developed to determine the probabilistic flood elevation curves for certain Savannah River Site (SRS) facilities. This paper presents the method used to determine the probabilistic flood elevation curve for F-Area due to runoff from the Upper Three Runs basin. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 420.1, Facility Safety, outlines the requirements for Natural Phenomena Hazard (NPH) mitigation for new and existing DOE facilities. The NPH considered in this paper is flooding. The facility-specific probabilistic flood hazard curve defines as a function of water elevation the annual probability of occurrence or the return period in years. Based on facility-specific probabilistic flood hazard curves and the nature of facility operations (e.g., involving hazardous or radioactive materials), facility managers can design permanent or temporary devices to prevent the propagation of flood on site, and develop emergency preparedness plans to mitigate the consequences of floods. A method was developed to determine the probabilistic flood hazard curves for SRS facilities. The flood hazard curves for the SRS F-Area due to flooding in the Upper Three Runs basin are presented in this paper

  17. Commonalities and Differences in Flood-Generating Processes across the US

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, X.; Troy, T. J.

    2017-12-01

    There is significant damage caused by flood, and the flood risk is increasing in the future, but there is large uncertainty in future decadal projections of flooding. In order to improve these projections, we must first turn to the past to understand the physical mechanisms that lead to flooding in basins across spatial scales and elevation ranges. To do this, we calculated the seasonality of annual maximum flows and other climatic factors to identify the flood-generating process in 2566 basins across the continental US. For most regions, the seasonality of heavy precipitation is not in phase with the seasonality of flooding, pointing to the importance of antecedent soil moisture and snow in determining flooding over much of the US. To determine the characteristic conditions leading to a flood, we classified all floods into those with different rainfall durations and with/without snow presence. Analyzing the influence of elevation, slope and drainage area, we identified patterns: the probability of flooding due to long duration precipitation increases as drainage area increases and snow present during a flood becomes increasingly likely as average basin elevation increases. To better understand the relationship between heavy rainfall and high streamflow, we calculated conditioned probability of occurrence. The southeastern US has a higher probability of occurrence for extreme Q with the same level of extreme precipitation in winter and spring than the northern US. This work is the first to look at how flood mechanisms vary across the continental US with drainage area, climate, and elevation.

  18. Revising time series of the Elbe river discharge for flood frequency determination at gauge Dresden

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Bartl

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available The German research programme RIsk MAnagment of eXtreme flood events has accomplished the improvement of regional hazard assessment for the large rivers in Germany. Here we focused on the Elbe river at its gauge Dresden, which belongs to the oldest gauges in Europe with officially available daily discharge time series beginning on 1 January 1890. The project on the one hand aimed to extend and to revise the existing time series, and on the other hand to examine the variability of the Elbe river discharge conditions on a greater time scale. Therefore one major task were the historical searches and the examination of the retrieved documents and the contained information. After analysing this information the development of the river course and the discharge conditions were discussed. Using the provided knowledge, in an other subproject, a historical hydraulic model was established. Its results then again were used here. A further purpose was the determining of flood frequency based on all pre-processed data. The obtained knowledge about historical changes was also used to get an idea about possible future variations under climate change conditions. Especially variations in the runoff characteristic of the Elbe river over the course of the year were analysed. It succeeded to obtain a much longer discharge time series which contain fewer errors and uncertainties. Hence an optimized regional hazard assessment was realised.

  19. Revising time series of the Elbe river discharge for flood frequency determination at gauge Dresden

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartl, S.; Schümberg, S.; Deutsch, M.

    2009-11-01

    The German research programme RIsk MAnagment of eXtreme flood events has accomplished the improvement of regional hazard assessment for the large rivers in Germany. Here we focused on the Elbe river at its gauge Dresden, which belongs to the oldest gauges in Europe with officially available daily discharge time series beginning on 1 January 1890. The project on the one hand aimed to extend and to revise the existing time series, and on the other hand to examine the variability of the Elbe river discharge conditions on a greater time scale. Therefore one major task were the historical searches and the examination of the retrieved documents and the contained information. After analysing this information the development of the river course and the discharge conditions were discussed. Using the provided knowledge, in an other subproject, a historical hydraulic model was established. Its results then again were used here. A further purpose was the determining of flood frequency based on all pre-processed data. The obtained knowledge about historical changes was also used to get an idea about possible future variations under climate change conditions. Especially variations in the runoff characteristic of the Elbe river over the course of the year were analysed. It succeeded to obtain a much longer discharge time series which contain fewer errors and uncertainties. Hence an optimized regional hazard assessment was realised.

  20. Atmospheric dinitrogen fixation in the flooded rhizosphere as determined by the N-15 isotope technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshida, Tomio; Yoneyama, Tadakatsu.

    1980-01-01

    Atmospheric nitrogen fixation in the rice rhizosphere was determined under in situ conditions of growing flooded rice using the N-15 isotope method. The whole plant growing in a pot at a reproductive stage was placed in a specially designed glass container and exposed to a 15 N 2 atmosphere. The amounts of total nitrogen fixed in the rice rhizosphere under the experimental conditions were 1366, 592, 878, and 698 μg per pot containing 0.4 kg of soil during 15 N 2 exposure for 7 to 13 days in the four experiments conducted in this study. It was also found that the nitrogen fixed in the rice rhizosphere was translocated into other plant parts. Nineteen to 25% of the total atmospheric nitrogen fixed in the rice rhizosphere was found in the roots, leaves and stems, and ears of the rice plants during the 15 N 2 exposure period. (author)

  1. Apparatuses and methods of determining if a person operating equipment is experiencing an elevated cognitive load

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watkins, Michael L.; Keller, Paul Edwin; Amaya, Ivan A.

    2015-06-16

    A method of, and apparatus for, determining if a person operating equipment is experiencing an elevated cognitive load, wherein the person's use of a device at a first time is monitored so as to set a baseline signature. Then, at a later time, the person's use of the device is monitored to determine the person's performance at the second time, as represented by a performance signature. This performance signature can then be compared against the baseline signature to predict whether the person is experiencing an elevated cognitive load.

  2. Flood hazard assessment for the Savannah River Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, K.F.

    2000-01-01

    A method was developed to determine the probabilistic flood elevation curves for certain Savannah River Site (SRS) facilities. This paper presents the method used to determine the probabilistic flood elevation curve for F-Area due to runoff from the Upper Three Runs basin. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 420.1, Facility Safety, outlines the requirements for Natural Phenomena Hazard (NPH) mitigation for new and existing DOE facilities. The NPH considered in this paper is flooding. The facility-specific probabilistic flood hazard curve defines as a function of water elevation the annual probability of occurrence or the return period in years. Based on facility-specific probabilistic flood hazard curves and the nature of facility operations (e.g., involving hazardous or radioactive materials), facility managers can design permanent or temporary devices to prevent the propagation of flood on site, and develop emergency preparedness plans to mitigate the consequences of floods. The flood hazard curves for the SRS F-Area due to flooding in the Upper Three Runs basin are presented in this paper

  3. Flood Hazard Recurrence Frequencies for the Savannah River Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, K.F.

    2001-01-01

    Department of Energy (DOE) regulations outline the requirements for Natural Phenomena Hazard (NPH) mitigation for new and existing DOE facilities. The NPH considered in this report is flooding. The facility-specific probabilistic flood hazard curve defines, as a function of water elevation, the annual probability of occurrence or the return period in years. The facility-specific probabilistic flood hazard curves provide basis to avoid unnecessary facility upgrades, to establish appropriate design criteria for new facilities, and to develop emergency preparedness plans to mitigate the consequences of floods. A method based on precipitation, basin runoff and open channel hydraulics was developed to determine probabilistic flood hazard curves for the Savannah River Site. The calculated flood hazard curves show that the probabilities of flooding existing SRS major facilities are significantly less than 1.E-05 per year

  4. Land-use change interacts with climate to determine elevational species redistribution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Fengyi; Lenoir, Jonathan; Bonebrake, Timothy C

    2018-04-03

    Climate change is driving global species redistribution with profound social and economic impacts. However, species movement is largely constrained by habitat availability and connectivity, of which the interaction effects with climate change remain largely unknown. Here we examine published data on 2798 elevational range shifts from 43 study sites to assess the confounding effect of land-use change on climate-driven species redistribution. We show that baseline forest cover and recent forest cover change are critical predictors in determining the magnitude of elevational range shifts. Forest loss positively interacts with baseline temperature conditions, such that forest loss in warmer regions tends to accelerate species' upslope movement. Consequently, not only climate but also habitat loss stressors and, importantly, their synergistic effects matter in forecasting species elevational redistribution, especially in the tropics where both stressors will increase the risk of net lowland biotic attrition.

  5. The feasibility of using neural networks for determination of control rod elevation in a PWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garis, N.S.; Temesvari, E.; Pazsit, I.

    1996-08-01

    This paper presents the results of a preliminary study on using neural networks for determination of the axial position of control rods in PWRs. The method is based on the dependence of the axial flux profile on control rod elevation in a reactor. This flux profile can be measured by e.g. a moveable detector in an operating plant. However, in this preliminary study the flux profile is only calculated using an advanced core code for several axial positions of a partially inserted control rod. The calculated fluxes with corresponding positions of the control rod are used for training a neural network. Using the trained network it is then possible to determine the unknown axial position of a control rod elevation from the corresponding axial flux profile. 10 refs

  6. River flooding due to intense precipitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, James C.

    2014-01-01

    River stage can rise and cause site flooding due to local intense precipitation (LIP), dam failures, snow melt in conjunction with precipitation or dam failures, etc. As part of the re-evaluation of the design basis as well as the PRA analysis of other external events, the likelihood and consequence of river flooding leading to the site flooding need to be examined more rigorously. To evaluate the effects of intense precipitation on site structures, the site watershed hydrology and pond storage are calculated. To determine if river flooding can cause damage to risk-significant systems, structures, and components (SSC), water surface elevations are analyzed. Typically, the amount and rate of the input water is determined first. For intense precipitation, the fraction of the rainfall in the watershed drainage area not infiltrated into the ground is collected in the river and contributes to the rise of river water elevation. For design basis analysis, the Probable Maximum Flood (PMF) is evaluated using the Probable Maximum Precipitation (PMP) based on the site topography/configuration. The peak runoff flow rate and water surface elevations resulting from the precipitation induced flooding can then be estimated. The runoff flow hydrograph and peak discharge flows can be developed using the synthetic hydrograph method. The standard step method can then be used to determine the water surface elevations along the river channel. Thus, the flood water from the local intense precipitation storm and excess runoff from the nearby river can be evaluated to calculate the water surface elevations, which can be compared with the station grade floor elevation to determine the effects of site flooding on risk-significant SSCs. The analysis needs to consider any possible diversion flow and the effects of changes to the site configurations. Typically, the analysis is performed based on conservative peak rainfall intensity and the assumptions of failure of the site drainage facilities

  7. The influence of the physico-geographical factors which determine floods in small basins from the Romanian Carpathians

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Popovici, Felicia

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to present the influence of the climatic, physical and geographical factors (precipitations,geology, soil, vegetation, anthropogenic impact) to the maximum discharge, factors that generate the floods in small basins situated in the west part of Oriental Carpathians, Romania. For the period of study (1 975 - 2000), is very important to analyse: - the maximum discharge which are produced; - the more important elements of floods; - the characteristics of the precipitations and runoff coefficients which are produced in the basins considered.(Gurghiu, Tarnave, Sovata, Bistra, Hodos, Homorodul Mare si Homorodul Mic, Rastolita.) Tables and graphics are coming to illustrate with accuracy the relationships between the characteristics of the rainfalls and geographical conditions of the main floods produced in these basins. The reason of these analyse is to determine useful parameters for the prediction and forecast of the floods in small basins, because these basins have a high-speed reaction to the inputs elements (precipitations and its characteristics).(Author)

  8. Environmental impact of flood: the study of arsenic speciation in exchangeable fraction of flood deposits of Warta river (Poland) in determination of "finger prints" of the pollutants origin and the ways of the migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozak, Lidia; Skolasińska, Katarzyna; Niedzielski, Przemysław

    2012-09-01

    The paper presents the application of the hyphenated technique - high-performance liquid chromatography with atomic absorption spectrometry detection with hydride generation (HPLC-HG-AAS) - in the determinations of inorganic forms of arsenic: As(III) and As(V) in the exchangeable fraction of flood deposits. The separation of analytical signals of the determined arsenic forms was obtained using an ion-exchange column in a chromatographic system with the atomic absorption spectrometer as a detector, at the determination limits of 5 ngg(-1) for As(III) and 10 ngg(-1) for As(V). Flood deposits were collected after big flood event in valley of the Warta river which took place in summer 2010. Samples of overbank deposits were taken in Poznań agglomeration and vicinity (NW Poland). The results of determinations of arsenic forms in the exchangeable fraction of flood deposits allowed indication of a hypothetical path of deposits migration transported by a river during flood and environmental threats posed by their deposition by flood. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. The determination of risk areas for muddy floods based on a worst-case erosion modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saathoff, Ulfert; Schindewolf, Marcus; Annika Arévalo, Sarah

    2013-04-01

    Soil erosion and muddy floods are a frequently occurring hazard in the German state of Saxony, because of the topography and the high relief energy together with the high proportion of arable land. Still, the events are rather heterogeneously distributed and we do not know where damage is likely to occur. The goal of this study is to locate hot spots for the risk of muddy floods, with the objective to prevent high economic damage in future. We applied a soil erosion and deposition map of Saxony, calculated with the process based soil erosion model EROSION 3D. This map shows the potential soil erosion and transported sediment for worst case soil conditions and a 10 year rain storm event. Furthermore, a map of the current landuse in the state is used. From the landuse map, we extracted those areas that are especially vulnerable to muddy floods, like residential and industrial areas, infrastructural facilities (e.g. power plants, hospitals) and highways. In combination with the output of the soil erosion model, the amount of sediment, that enters each single landuse entity, is calculated. Based on this data, a state-wide map with classified risks is created. The results are furthermore used to identify the risk of muddy floods for each single municipality in Saxony. The results are evaluated with data of real occurred muddy flood events with documented locations during the period between 2000 and 2010. Additionally, plausibility tests are performed for selected areas (examination of landuse, topography and soil). The results prove to be plausible and most of the documented events can be explained by the modelled risk map. The created map can be used by different institutions like city and traffic planners, to estimate the risk of muddy flood occurrence at specific locations. Furthermore, the risk map can serve insurance companies to evaluate the insurance risk of a building. To make them easily accessible, the risk map will be published online via a web GIS

  10. Flood Hazard Recurrence Frequencies for A-, K- and L-Areas, and Revised Frequencies for C-, F-, E-, S-, H-, Y- and Z-Areas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, K.F.

    2000-01-01

    Department of Energy (DOE) Order 420.1, Facility Safety, outlines the requirements for Natural Phenomena Hazard (NPH) mitigation for new and existing DOE facilities. The NPH considered in this report is flooding. The facility-specific probabilistic flood hazard curve defines as a function of water elevation the annual probability of occurrence or the return period in years. Based on facility-specific probabilistic flood hazard curves and the nature of facility operations (e.g., involving hazardous or radioactive materials), facility managers can design permanent or temporary devices to prevent the propagation of flood on site, and develop emergency preparedness plans to mitigate the consequences of floods. Methods were developed to determine the probabilistic flood elevation curves for Savannah River Site (SRS) facilities. This report presents the methods used to determine the probabilistic flood elevation curves for A-, K-, C-, F-, E-, H-, S-, Y-, Z- and L-Areas

  11. An Approach to Flooding Inundation Combining the Streamflow Prediction Tool (SPT) and Downscaled Soil Moisture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cotterman, K. A.; Follum, M. L.; Pradhan, N. R.; Niemann, J. D.

    2017-12-01

    Flooding impacts numerous aspects of society, from localized flash floods to continental-scale flood events. Many numerical flood models focus solely on riverine flooding, with some capable of capturing both localized and continental-scale flood events. However, these models neglect flooding away from channels that are related to excessive ponding, typically found in areas with flat terrain and poorly draining soils. In order to obtain a holistic view of flooding, we combine flood results from the Streamflow Prediction Tool (SPT), a riverine flood model, with soil moisture downscaling techniques to determine if a better representation of flooding is obtained. This allows for a more holistic understanding of potential flood prone areas, increasing the opportunity for more accurate warnings and evacuations during flooding conditions. Thirty-five years of near-global historical streamflow is reconstructed with continental-scale flow routing of runoff from global land surface models. Elevation data was also obtained worldwide, to establish a relationship between topographic attributes and soil moisture patterns. Derived soil moisture data is validated against observed soil moisture, increasing confidence in the ability to accurately capture soil moisture patterns. Potential flooding situations can be examined worldwide, with this study focusing on the United States, Central America, and the Philippines.

  12. Determination of Curve Number for snowmelt-runoff floods in a small catchment

    OpenAIRE

    L. Hejduk; A. Hejduk; K. Banasik

    2015-01-01

    One of the widely used methods for predicting flood runoff depth from ungauged catchments is the curve number (CN) method, developed by Soil Conservation Service (SCS) of US Department of Agriculture. The CN parameter can be computed directly from recorded rainfall depths and direct runoff volumes in case of existing data. In presented investigations, the CN parameter has been computed for snowmelt-runoff events based on snowmelt and rainfall measurements. All required data ...

  13. Flood hazard zoning in Yasooj region, Iran, using GIS and multi-criteria decision analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omid Rahmati

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Flood is considered to be the most common natural disaster worldwide during the last decades. Flood hazard potential mapping is required for management and mitigation of flood. The present research was aimed to assess the efficiency of analytical hierarchical process (AHP to identify potential flood hazard zones by comparing with the results of a hydraulic model. Initially, four parameters via distance to river, land use, elevation and land slope were used in some part of the Yasooj River, Iran. In order to determine the weight of each effective factor, questionnaires of comparison ratings on the Saaty's scale were prepared and distributed to eight experts. The normalized weights of criteria/parameters were determined based on Saaty's nine-point scale and its importance in specifying flood hazard potential zones using the AHP and eigenvector methods. The set of criteria were integrated by weighted linear combination method using ArcGIS 10.2 software to generate flood hazard prediction map. The inundation simulation (extent and depth of flood was conducted using hydrodynamic program HEC-RAS for 50- and 100-year interval floods. The validation of the flood hazard prediction map was conducted based on flood extent and depth maps. The results showed that the AHP technique is promising of making accurate and reliable prediction for flood extent. Therefore, the AHP and geographic information system (GIS techniques are suggested for assessment of the flood hazard potential, specifically in no-data regions.

  14. Revision to flood hazard evaluation for the Savannah River Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buckley, R. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Werth, D. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2014-08-25

    Requirements for the Natural Phenomena Hazard (NPH) mitigation for new and existing Department of Energy (DOE) facilities are outlined in DOE Order 420.1. This report examines the hazards posed by potential flooding and represents an update to two previous reports. The facility-specific probabilistic flood hazard curve is defined as the water elevation for each annual probability of precipitation occurrence (or inversely, the return period in years). New design hyetographs for both 6-hr and 24-hr precipitation distributions were used in conjunction with hydrological models of various basins within the Savannah River Site (SRS). For numerous locations of interest, peak flow discharge and flood water elevation were determined. In all cases, the probability of flooding of these facilities for a 100,000 year precipitation event is negligible.

  15. Elevation data for floodplain mapping

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Committee on Floodplain Mapping Technologies; National Research Council; Division on Earth and Life Studies; National Research Council

    2007-01-01

    .... Elevation Data for Floodplain Mapping shows that there is sufficient two-dimensional base map imagery to meet FEMA's flood map modernization goals, but that the three-dimensional base elevation data...

  16. Determination of Curve Number for snowmelt-runoff floods in a small catchment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Hejduk

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available One of the widely used methods for predicting flood runoff depth from ungauged catchments is the curve number (CN method, developed by Soil Conservation Service (SCS of US Department of Agriculture. The CN parameter can be computed directly from recorded rainfall depths and direct runoff volumes in case of existing data. In presented investigations, the CN parameter has been computed for snowmelt-runoff events based on snowmelt and rainfall measurements. All required data has been gathered for a small agricultural catchment (A = 23.4 km2 of Zagożdżonka river, located in Central Poland. The CN number received from 28 snowmelt-runoff events has been compared with CN computed from rainfall-runoff events for the same catchment. The CN parameter, estimated empirically varies from 64.0 to 94.8. The relation between CN and snowmelt depth was investigated in a similar procedure to relation between CN and rainfall depth.

  17. "Physically-based" numerical experiment to determine the dominant hillslope processes during floods?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaume, Eric; Esclaffer, Thomas; Dangla, Patrick; Payrastre, Olivier

    2016-04-01

    To study the dynamics of hillslope responses during flood event, a fully coupled "physically-based" model for the combined numerical simulation of surface runoff and underground flows has been developed. A particular attention has been given to the selection of appropriate numerical schemes for the modelling of both processes and of their coupling. Surprisingly, the most difficult question to solve, from a numerical point of view, was not related to the coupling of two processes with contrasted kinetics such as surface and underground flows, but to the high gradient infiltration fronts appearing in soils, source of numerical diffusion, instabilities and sometimes divergence. The model being elaborated, it has been successfully tested against results of high quality experiments conducted on a laboratory sandy slope in the early eighties, which is still considered as a reference hillslope experimental setting (Abdul & Guilham). The model appeared able to accurately simulate the pore pressure distributions observed in this 1.5 meter deep and wide laboratory hillslope, as well as its outflow hydrograph shapes and the measured respective contributions of direct runoff and groundwater to these outflow hydrographs. Based on this great success, the same model has been used to simulate the response of a theoretical 100-meter wide and 10% sloped hillslope, with a 2 meter deep pervious soil and impervious bedrock. Three rain events have been tested: a 100 millimeter rainfall event over 10 days, over 1 day or over one hour. The simulated responses are hydrologically not realistic and especially the fast component of the response, that is generally observed in the real-world and explains flood events, is almost absent of the simulated response. Thinking a little about the whole problem, the simulation results appears totally logical according to the proposed model. The simulated response, in fact a recession hydrograph, corresponds to a piston flow of a relatively uniformly

  18. Commercial radioimmunoassay for beta subunit of human chorionic gonadotropin: falsely positive determinations due to elevated serum luteinizing hormone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fowler, J.E. Jr.; Platoff, G.E.; Kubrock, C.A.; Stuzman, R.E.

    1982-01-01

    Among 17 men who had received seemingly curative treatment for unilateral non-seminomatous germ cell tumors for the testis and who had consistently normal serum human chorionic gonadotropin (HCG) levels at a reference laboratory, 7 (41%) had at least one falsely positive commercial serum HCG determination. To investigate the cause of these falsely positive determinations the authors measured the cross reactivity of luteinizing hormone (LH) and follicle stimulating hormone (FSH) standards in the commercial HCG assay, and studied the relationships between commercial HCG levels and serum LH levels, serum FSH levels and gonadal status in men with and without normal gonadal function. The falsely positive HCG determinations appeared to be due to elevated serum LH levels and cross reactivity of LH in the commercial HCG assay because: 1) there was substantial cross reactivity of the LH standards in the commercial assay, 2) the serum LH was elevated in four of six men with solitary testes, 3) there was a striking correlation between elevated serum LH levels and falsely elevated commercial HCG levels in ten men with solitary or absent testes, and 4) there were no falsely positive HCG determinations in 13 normal men but there were falsely positive HCG determinations in seven of ten anorchid men

  19. Development of flood index by characterisation of flood hydrographs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharya, Biswa; Suman, Asadusjjaman

    2015-04-01

    In recent years the world has experienced deaths, large-scale displacement of people, billions of Euros of economic damage, mental stress and ecosystem impacts due to flooding. Global changes (climate change, population and economic growth, and urbanisation) are exacerbating the severity of flooding. The 2010 floods in Pakistan and the 2011 floods in Australia and Thailand demonstrate the need for concerted action in the face of global societal and environmental changes to strengthen resilience against flooding. Due to climatological characteristics there are catchments where flood forecasting may have a relatively limited role and flood event management may have to be trusted upon. For example, in flash flood catchments, which often may be tiny and un-gauged, flood event management often depends on approximate prediction tools such as flash flood guidance (FFG). There are catchments fed largely by flood waters coming from upstream catchments, which are un-gauged or due to data sharing issues in transboundary catchments the flow of information from upstream catchment is limited. Hydrological and hydraulic modelling of these downstream catchments will never be sufficient to provide any required forecasting lead time and alternative tools to support flood event management will be required. In FFG, or similar approaches, the primary motif is to provide guidance by synthesising the historical data. We follow a similar approach to characterise past flood hydrographs to determine a flood index (FI), which varies in space and time with flood magnitude and its propagation. By studying the variation of the index the pockets of high flood risk, requiring attention, can be earmarked beforehand. This approach can be very useful in flood risk management of catchments where information about hydro-meteorological variables is inadequate for any forecasting system. This paper presents the development of FI and its application to several catchments including in Kentucky in the USA

  20. Floating Characteristics of Rudders and Elevators in Spinning Attitudes as Determined From Hinge-Moment-Coefficient Data With Application to Personal-Owner-Type Airplanes

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Bihrle, William

    1950-01-01

    A study was made of available rudder and elevator hinge-moment-coefficient-coefficient data in order to determine the floating characteristics of various types of rudders and elevators in spinning attitudes...

  1. Tree mortality in response to typhoon-induced floods and mudslides is determined by tree species, size, and position in a riparian Formosan gum forest in subtropical Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tzeng, Hsy-Yu; Wang, Wei; Tseng, Yen-Hsueh; Chiu, Ching-An; Kuo, Chu-Chia; Tsai, Shang-Te

    2018-01-01

    Global warming-induced extreme climatic changes have increased the frequency of severe typhoons bringing heavy rains; this has considerably affected the stability of the forest ecosystems. Since the Taiwan 921 earthquake occurred in 21 September 1999, the mountain geology of the Island of Taiwan has become unstable and typhoon-induced floods and mudslides have changed the topography and geomorphology of the area; this has further affected the stability and functions of the riparian ecosystem. In this study, the vegetation of the unique Aowanda Formosan gum forest in Central Taiwan was monitored for 3 years after the occurrence of floods and mudslides during 2009-2011. Tree growth and survival, effects of floods and mudslides, and factors influencing tree survival were investigated. We hypothesized that (1) the effects of floods on the survival are significantly different for each tree species; (2) tree diameter at breast height (DBH) affects tree survival-i.e., the larger the DBH, the higher the survival rate; and (3) the relative position of trees affects tree survival after disturbances by floods and mudslides-the farther trees are from the river, the higher is their survival rate. Our results showed that after floods and mudslides, the lifespans of the major tree species varied significantly. Liquidambar formosana displayed the highest flood tolerance, and the trunks of Lagerstoemia subcostata began rooting after disturbances. Multiple regression analysis indicated that factors such as species, DBH, distance from sampled tree to the above boundary of sample plot (far from the riverbank), and distance from the upstream of the river affected the lifespans of trees; the three factors affected each tree species to different degrees. Furthermore, we showed that insect infestation had a critical role in determining tree survival rate. Our 3-year monitoring investigation revealed that severe typhoon-induced floods and mudslides disturbed the riparian vegetation in the

  2. Tree mortality in response to typhoon-induced floods and mudslides is determined by tree species, size, and position in a riparian Formosan gum forest in subtropical Taiwan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tzeng, Hsy-Yu; Wang, Wei; Tseng, Yen-Hsueh; Chiu, Ching-An; Kuo, Chu-Chia

    2018-01-01

    Global warming-induced extreme climatic changes have increased the frequency of severe typhoons bringing heavy rains; this has considerably affected the stability of the forest ecosystems. Since the Taiwan 921 earthquake occurred in 21 September 1999, the mountain geology of the Island of Taiwan has become unstable and typhoon-induced floods and mudslides have changed the topography and geomorphology of the area; this has further affected the stability and functions of the riparian ecosystem. In this study, the vegetation of the unique Aowanda Formosan gum forest in Central Taiwan was monitored for 3 years after the occurrence of floods and mudslides during 2009–2011. Tree growth and survival, effects of floods and mudslides, and factors influencing tree survival were investigated. We hypothesized that (1) the effects of floods on the survival are significantly different for each tree species; (2) tree diameter at breast height (DBH) affects tree survival–i.e., the larger the DBH, the higher the survival rate; and (3) the relative position of trees affects tree survival after disturbances by floods and mudslides–the farther trees are from the river, the higher is their survival rate. Our results showed that after floods and mudslides, the lifespans of the major tree species varied significantly. Liquidambar formosana displayed the highest flood tolerance, and the trunks of Lagerstoemia subcostata began rooting after disturbances. Multiple regression analysis indicated that factors such as species, DBH, distance from sampled tree to the above boundary of sample plot (far from the riverbank), and distance from the upstream of the river affected the lifespans of trees; the three factors affected each tree species to different degrees. Furthermore, we showed that insect infestation had a critical role in determining tree survival rate. Our 3-year monitoring investigation revealed that severe typhoon-induced floods and mudslides disturbed the riparian vegetation

  3. Predicting location-specific extreme coastal floods in the future climate by introducing a probabilistic method to calculate maximum elevation of the continuous water mass caused by a combination of water level variations and wind waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leijala, Ulpu; Björkqvist, Jan-Victor; Johansson, Milla M.; Pellikka, Havu

    2017-04-01

    Future coastal management continuously strives for more location-exact and precise methods to investigate possible extreme sea level events and to face flooding hazards in the most appropriate way. Evaluating future flooding risks by understanding the behaviour of the joint effect of sea level variations and wind waves is one of the means to make more comprehensive flooding hazard analysis, and may at first seem like a straightforward task to solve. Nevertheless, challenges and limitations such as availability of time series of the sea level and wave height components, the quality of data, significant locational variability of coastal wave height, as well as assumptions to be made depending on the study location, make the task more complicated. In this study, we present a statistical method for combining location-specific probability distributions of water level variations (including local sea level observations and global mean sea level rise) and wave run-up (based on wave buoy measurements). The goal of our method is to obtain a more accurate way to account for the waves when making flooding hazard analysis on the coast compared to the approach of adding a separate fixed wave action height on top of sea level -based flood risk estimates. As a result of our new method, we gain maximum elevation heights with different return periods of the continuous water mass caused by a combination of both phenomena, "the green water". We also introduce a sensitivity analysis to evaluate the properties and functioning of our method. The sensitivity test is based on using theoretical wave distributions representing different alternatives of wave behaviour in relation to sea level variations. As these wave distributions are merged with the sea level distribution, we get information on how the different wave height conditions and shape of the wave height distribution influence the joint results. Our method presented here can be used as an advanced tool to minimize over- and

  4. Determination of the potentiostatic stability of PEMFC electro catalysts at elevated temperatures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dam, V.A.T.; Jayasayee, K.; Bruijn, de F.A.

    2009-01-01

    The electrochemical stability of platinum on carbon catalyst (Hispec TM 4000, Johnson Matthey) has been investigated predominantly at constant potentials ranging from 0.95 to 1.25 V at elevated temperatures. By combining a quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) with electrochemical techniques, dynamic

  5. The single-biopsy approach in determining protein synthesis in human slow-turning-over tissue: use of flood-primed, continuous infusion of amino acid tracer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, Lars; Reitelseder, Søren; Dideriksen, Kasper

    2014-01-01

    Muscle protein synthesis (MPS) rate is determined conventionally by obtaining two or more tissue biopsies during a primed, continuous infusion of a stable isotopically labeled amino acid. The purpose of the present study was to test whether tracer priming given as a flooding dose, thereby securing....... In conclusion, the flood-primed, continuous infusion protocol using phenylalanine as tracer can validly be used to measure the protein synthesis rate in human in vivo experiments by obtaining only a single tissue biopsy after a prolonged infusion period....

  6. Establishment and Practical Application of Flood Warning Stage in Taiwan's River

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Sheng-Hsueh; Chia Yeh, Keh-

    2017-04-01

    In the face of extreme flood events or the possible impact of climate change, non-engineering disaster prevention and early warning work is particularly important. Taiwan is an island topography with more than 3,900 meters of high mountains. The length of the river is less than 100 kilometers. Most of the watershed catchment time is less than 24 hours, which belongs to the river with steep slope and rapid flood. Every year in summer and autumn, several typhoon events invade Taiwan. Typhoons often result in rainfall events in excess of 100 mm/hr or 250 mm/3hr. In the face of Taiwan's terrain and extreme rainfall events, flooding is difficult to avoid. Therefore, most of the river has embankment protection, so that people do not have to face every year flooding caused by economic and life and property losses. However, the river embankment protection is limited. With the increase of the hydrological data, the design criteria for the embankment protection standards in the past was 100 year of flood return period and is now gradually reduced to 25 or 50 year of flood return period. The river authorities are not easy to rise the existing embankment height. The safety of the river embankment in Taiwan is determined by the establishment of the flood warning stage to cope with the possible increase in annual floods and the impact of extreme hydrological events. The flood warning stage is equal to the flood control elevation minus the flood rise rate multiply by the flood early warning time. The control elevation can be the top of the embankment, the design flood level of the river, the embankment gap of the river section, the height of the bridge beam bottom, etc. The flood rise rate is consider the factors such as hydrological stochastic and uncertain rainfall and the effect of flood discharge operation on the flood in the watershed catchment area. The maximum value of the water level difference between the two hours or five hours before the peak value of the analysis

  7. The development of flood map in Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakaria, Siti Fairus; Zin, Rosli Mohamad; Mohamad, Ismail; Balubaid, Saeed; Mydin, Shaik Hussein; MDR, E. M. Roodienyanto

    2017-11-01

    In Malaysia, flash floods are common occurrences throughout the year in flood prone areas. In terms of flood extent, flash floods affect smaller areas but because of its tendency to occur in densely urbanized areas, the value of damaged property is high and disruption to traffic flow and businesses are substantial. However, in river floods especially the river floods of Kelantan and Pahang, the flood extent is widespread and can extend over 1,000 square kilometers. Although the value of property and density of affected population is lower, the damage inflicted by these floods can also be high because the area affected is large. In order to combat these floods, various flood mitigation measures have been carried out. Structural flood mitigation alone can only provide protection levels from 10 to 100 years Average Recurrence Intervals (ARI). One of the economically effective non-structural approaches in flood mitigation and flood management is using a geospatial technology which involves flood forecasting and warning services to the flood prone areas. This approach which involves the use of Geographical Information Flood Forecasting system also includes the generation of a series of flood maps. There are three types of flood maps namely Flood Hazard Map, Flood Risk Map and Flood Evacuation Map. Flood Hazard Map is used to determine areas susceptible to flooding when discharge from a stream exceeds the bank-full stage. Early warnings of incoming flood events will enable the flood victims to prepare themselves before flooding occurs. Properties and life's can be saved by keeping their movable properties above the flood levels and if necessary, an early evacuation from the area. With respect to flood fighting, an early warning with reference through a series of flood maps including flood hazard map, flood risk map and flood evacuation map of the approaching flood should be able to alert the organization in charge of the flood fighting actions and the authority to

  8. Scenario-based tsunami risk assessment using a static flooding approach and high-resolution digital elevation data: An example from Muscat in Oman

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Bastian; Hoffmann, Gösta; Reicherter, Klaus

    2016-04-01

    Knowledge of tsunami risk and vulnerability is essential to establish a well-adapted Multi Hazard Early Warning System, land-use planning and emergency management. As the tsunami risk for the coastline of Oman is still under discussion and remains enigmatic, various scenarios based on historical tsunamis were created. The suggested inundation and run-up heights were projected onto the modern infrastructural setting of the Muscat Capital Area. Furthermore, possible impacts of the worst-case tsunami event for Muscat are discussed. The approved Papathoma Tsunami Vulnerability Assessment Model was used to model the structural vulnerability of the infrastructure for a 2 m tsunami scenario, depicting the 1945 tsunami and a 5 m tsunami in Muscat. Considering structural vulnerability, the results suggest a minor tsunami risk for the 2 m tsunami scenario as the flooding is mainly confined to beaches and wadis. Especially traditional brick buildings, still predominant in numerous rural suburbs, and a prevalently coast-parallel road network lead to an increased tsunami risk. In contrast, the 5 m tsunami scenario reveals extensively inundated areas and with up to 48% of the buildings flooded, and therefore consequently a significantly higher tsunami risk. We expect up to 60000 damaged buildings and up to 380000 residents directly affected in the Muscat Capital Area, accompanied with a significant loss of life and damage to vital infrastructure. The rapid urbanization processes in the Muscat Capital Area, predominantly in areas along the coast, in combination with infrastructural, demographic and economic growth will additionally increase the tsunami risk and therefore emphasizes the importance of tsunami risk assessment in Oman.

  9. Impact of elevated CO2 and temperature on soil C and N dynamics in relation to CH4 and N2O emissions from tropical flooded rice (Oryza sativa L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharyya, P; Roy, K S; Neogi, S; Dash, P K; Nayak, A K; Mohanty, S; Baig, M J; Sarkar, R K; Rao, K S

    2013-09-01

    A field experiment was carried out to investigate the impact of elevated carbon dioxide (CO2) (CEC, 550 μmol mol(-1)) and elevated CO2+elevated air temperature (CECT, 550 μmol mol(-1) and 2°C more than control chamber (CC)) on soil labile carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) pools, microbial populations and enzymatic activities in relation to emissions of methane (CH4) and nitrous oxide (N2O) in a flooded alluvial soil planted with rice cv. Naveen in open top chambers (OTCs). The labile soil C pools, namely microbial biomass C, readily mineralizable C, water soluble carbohydrate C and potassium permanganate oxidizable C were increased by 27, 23, 38 and 37% respectively under CEC than CC (ambient CO2, 394 μmol mol(-1)). The total organic carbon (TOC) in root exudates was 28.9% higher under CEC than CC. The labile N fractions were also increased significantly (29%) in CEC than CC. Methanogens and denitrifier populations in rhizosphere were higher under CEC and CECT. As a result, CH4 and N2O-N emissions were enhanced by 26 and 24.6% respectively, under CEC in comparison to open field (UC, ambient CO2, 394 μmol mol(-1)) on seasonal basis. The global warming potential (GWP) was increased by 25% under CEC than CC. However, emissions per unit of grain yield under elevated CO2 and temperature were similar to those observed at ambient CO2. The stimulatory effect on CH4 and N2O emissions under CEC was linked with the increased amount of soil labile C, C rich root exudates, lowered Eh, higher Fe(+2) concentration and increased activities of methanogens and extracellular enzymes. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Evolutionary history and novel biotic interactions determine plant responses to elevated CO2 and nitrogen fertilization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachel Wooliver

    Full Text Available A major frontier in global change research is predicting how multiple agents of global change will alter plant productivity, a critical component of the carbon cycle. Recent research has shown that plant responses to climate change are phylogenetically conserved such that species within some lineages are more productive than those within other lineages in changing environments. However, it remains unclear how phylogenetic patterns in plant responses to changing abiotic conditions may be altered by another agent of global change, the introduction of non-native species. Using a system of 28 native Tasmanian Eucalyptus species belonging to two subgenera, Symphyomyrtus and Eucalyptus, we hypothesized that productivity responses to abiotic agents of global change (elevated CO2 and increased soil N are unique to lineages, but that novel interactions with a non-native species mediate these responses. We tested this hypothesis by examining productivity of 1 native species monocultures and 2 mixtures of native species with an introduced hardwood plantation species, Eucalyptus nitens, to experimentally manipulated soil N and atmospheric CO2. Consistent with past research, we found that N limits productivity overall, especially in elevated CO2 conditions. However, monocultures of species within the Symphyomyrtus subgenus showed the strongest response to N (gained 127% more total biomass in elevated CO2 conditions, whereas those within the Eucalyptus subgenus did not respond to N. Root:shoot ratio (an indicator of resource use was on average greater in species pairs containing Symphyomyrtus species, suggesting that functional traits important for resource uptake are phylogenetically conserved and explaining the phylogenetic pattern in plant response to changing environmental conditions. Yet, native species mixtures with E. nitens exhibited responses to CO2 and N that differed from those of monocultures, supporting our hypothesis and highlighting that both

  11. Improvement of LCM model and determination of model parameters at watershed scale for flood events in Hongde Basin of China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Li

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Considering the fact that the original two-parameter LCM model can only be used to investigate rainfall losses during the runoff period because the initial abstraction is not included, the LCM model was redefined as a three-parameter model, including the initial abstraction coefficient λ, the initial abstraction Ia, and the rainfall loss coefficient R. The improved LCM model is superior to the original two-parameter model, which only includes r and R, where r is the initial rainfall loss index and can be calculated with λ using the Soil Conservation Service curve number (SCS-CN method, with r=1/(1+λ. The trial method was used to determine the parameter values of the improved LCM model at the watershed scale for 15 flood events in the Hongde Basin in China. The results show that larger r values are associated with smaller R values, and the parameter R ranges widely from 0.5 to 2.0. In order to improve the practicability of the LCM model, r=0.833 with λ=0.2 is reasonable for simplifying calculation. When the LCM model is applied to arid and semi-arid regions, rainfall without yielding runoff should be deducted from the total rainfall for more accurate estimation of rainfall-runoff.

  12. Local Matrix Metalloproteinase 9 Level Determines Early Clinical Presentation of ST-Segment-Elevation Myocardial Infarction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishiguchi, Tsuyoshi; Tanaka, Atsushi; Taruya, Akira; Emori, Hiroki; Ozaki, Yuichi; Orii, Makoto; Shiono, Yasutsugu; Shimamura, Kunihiro; Kameyama, Takeyoshi; Yamano, Takashi; Yamaguchi, Tomoyuki; Matsuo, Yoshiki; Ino, Yasushi; Kubo, Takashi; Hozumi, Takeshi; Hayashi, Yasushi; Akasaka, Takashi

    2016-12-01

    Early clinical presentation of ST-segment-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) and non-ST-segment-elevation myocardial infarction affects patient management. Although local inflammatory activities are involved in the onset of MI, little is known about their impact on early clinical presentation. This study aimed to investigate whether local inflammatory activities affect early clinical presentation. This study comprised 94 and 17 patients with MI (STEMI, 69; non-STEMI, 25) and stable angina pectoris, respectively. We simultaneously investigated the culprit lesion morphologies using optical coherence tomography and inflammatory activities assessed by shedding matrix metalloproteinase 9 (MMP-9) and myeloperoxidase into the coronary circulation before and after stenting. Prevalence of plaque rupture, thin-cap fibroatheroma, and lipid arc or macrophage count was higher in patients with STEMI and non-STEMI than in those with stable angina pectoris. Red thrombus was frequently observed in STEMI compared with others. Local MMP-9 levels were significantly higher than systemic levels (systemic, 42.0 [27.9-73.2] ng/mL versus prestent local, 69.1 [32.2-152.3] ng/mL versus poststent local, 68.0 [35.6-133.3] ng/mL; Pclinical presentation in patients with MI. Local inflammatory activity for atherosclerosis needs increased attention. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  13. THE USE OF LIDAR AND VOLUNTEERED GEOGRAPHIC INFORMATION TO MAP FLOOD EXTENTS AND INUNDATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. McDougall

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Floods are one of the most destructive natural disasters that threaten communities and properties. In recent decades, flooding has claimed more lives, destroyed more houses and ruined more agricultural land than any other natural hazard. The accurate prediction of the areas of inundation from flooding is critical to saving lives and property, but relies heavily on accurate digital elevation and hydrologic models. The 2011 Brisbane floods provided a unique opportunity to capture high resolution digital aerial imagery as the floods neared their peak, allowing the capture of areas of inundation over the various city suburbs. This high quality imagery, together with accurate LiDAR data over the area and publically available volunteered geographic imagery through repositories such as Flickr, enabled the reconstruction of flood extents and the assessment of both area and depth of inundation for the assessment of damage. In this study, approximately 20 images of flood damaged properties were utilised to identify the peak of the flood. Accurate position and height values were determined through the use of RTK GPS and conventional survey methods. This information was then utilised in conjunction with river gauge information to generate a digital flood surface. The LiDAR generated DEM was then intersected with the flood surface to reconstruct the area of inundation. The model determined areas of inundation were then compared to the mapped flood extent from the high resolution digital imagery to assess the accuracy of the process. The paper concludes that accurate flood extent prediction or mapping is possible through this method, although its accuracy is dependent on the number and location of sampled points. The utilisation of LiDAR generated DEMs and DSMs can also provide an excellent mechanism to estimate depths of inundation and hence flood damage

  14. The Use of LIDAR and Volunteered Geographic Information to Map Flood Extents and Inundation

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDougall, K.; Temple-Watts, P.

    2012-07-01

    Floods are one of the most destructive natural disasters that threaten communities and properties. In recent decades, flooding has claimed more lives, destroyed more houses and ruined more agricultural land than any other natural hazard. The accurate prediction of the areas of inundation from flooding is critical to saving lives and property, but relies heavily on accurate digital elevation and hydrologic models. The 2011 Brisbane floods provided a unique opportunity to capture high resolution digital aerial imagery as the floods neared their peak, allowing the capture of areas of inundation over the various city suburbs. This high quality imagery, together with accurate LiDAR data over the area and publically available volunteered geographic imagery through repositories such as Flickr, enabled the reconstruction of flood extents and the assessment of both area and depth of inundation for the assessment of damage. In this study, approximately 20 images of flood damaged properties were utilised to identify the peak of the flood. Accurate position and height values were determined through the use of RTK GPS and conventional survey methods. This information was then utilised in conjunction with river gauge information to generate a digital flood surface. The LiDAR generated DEM was then intersected with the flood surface to reconstruct the area of inundation. The model determined areas of inundation were then compared to the mapped flood extent from the high resolution digital imagery to assess the accuracy of the process. The paper concludes that accurate flood extent prediction or mapping is possible through this method, although its accuracy is dependent on the number and location of sampled points. The utilisation of LiDAR generated DEMs and DSMs can also provide an excellent mechanism to estimate depths of inundation and hence flood damage

  15. Swiss Re Global Flood Hazard Zones: Know your flood risk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinukollu, R. K.; Castaldi, A.; Mehlhorn, J.

    2012-12-01

    Floods, among all natural disasters, have a great damage potential. On a global basis, there is strong evidence of increase in the number of people affected and economic losses due to floods. For example, global insured flood losses have increased by 12% every year since 1970 and this is expected to further increase with growing exposure in the high risk areas close to rivers and coastlines. Recently, the insurance industry has been surprised by the large extent of losses, because most countries lack reliable hazard information. One example has been the 2011 Thailand floods where millions of people were affected and the total economic losses were 30 billion USD. In order to assess the flood risk across different regions and countries, the flood team at Swiss Re based on a Geomorphologic Regression approach, developed in house and patented, produced global maps of flood zones. Input data for the study was obtained from NASA's Shuttle Radar Topographic Mission (SRTM) elevation data, Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) Global Digital Elevation Model (GDEM) and HydroSHEDS. The underlying assumptions of the approach are that naturally flowing rivers shape their channel and flood plain according to basin inherent forces and characteristics and that the flood water extent strongly depends on the shape of the flood plain. On the basis of the catchment characteristics, the model finally calculates the probability of a location to be flooded or not for a defined return period, which in the current study was set to 100 years. The data is produced at a 90-m resolution for latitudes 60S to 60N. This global product is now used in the insurance industry to inspect, inform and/or insure the flood risk across the world.

  16. Elevation data for floodplain mapping

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Committee on Floodplain Mapping Technologies; National Research Council; Division on Earth and Life Studies; National Research Council

    2007-01-01

    Floodplain maps serve as the basis for determining whether homes or buildings require flood insurance under the National Flood Insurance Program run by the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA). Approximately...

  17. Experimental determination of the flood wave transformation and the sediment resuspension in a small regulated stream in an agricultural catchment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Zumr

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the methodology used for artificial flood experiments conducted in a small artificial, trained (regulated channel on the Nučice experimental agricultural catchment (0.5 km2, central Czech Republic, and the results of the experiments. The aim was to monitor the transformation of the flood wave and the sediment transport within the channel. Two series of experiments were carried out in contrasting initial conditions: (a in September, when the stream banks were dry, the baseflow was negligible, and the channel was fully overgrown with vegetation; and (b in March, when the stream banks were almost water saturated, the baseflow was above the annual average, and there was no vegetation present. Within each campaign, three successive flood waves, each with an approximate volume of 17 m3 and peak flow of ca. 40 L s−1, were pumped into the upper part of the catchment drainage channel. The transformation of the flood wave and the sediment transport regime within an approximately 400 m long channel section were monitored by measuring the discharge, the turbidity, and the electrical conductivity in three profiles along the stream. On the basis of the results, it was concluded that there is a considerable amount of deposited sediment, even in the well-trained and straight channel that can be re-mobilized by small floods. Part of the recorded sediment therefore originates from the particles deposited during previous soil erosion events. The flood waves initiated in dissimilar instream conditions progressed differently – we show that the saturation of the channel banks, the stream vegetation and the actual baseflow had a strong influence on the flood transformation and the sediment regime in the channel. The sediment moves quickly in winter and early spring, but in the later part of the year the channel serves as a sediment trap and the resuspension is slower, if dense vegetation is present.

  18. Adjustable Robust Strategies for Flood Protection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Postek, Krzysztof; den Hertog, Dick; Kind, J.; Pustjens, Chris

    2016-01-01

    Flood protection is of major importance to many flood-prone regions and involves substantial investment and maintenance costs. Modern flood risk management requires often to determine a cost-efficient protection strategy, i.e., one with lowest possible long run cost and satisfying flood protection

  19. Determinants of property damage recovery time amongst households affected by an extreme flood event in Metro Manila, Philippines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jamil Paolo Francisco

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available This study identified the factors that influence household recovery following an extreme flood event, measured in terms of the length of time to repair, rebuild or replace damaged private property. Data was obtained through a survey of 400 households in Marikina City in Metro Manila, Philippines. Results from the empirical analysis indicated that household income, access to credit (borrowing, the use of a flood alarm system, access to safe shelter, membership in a community organisation, adoption of disaster-specific anticipatory measures and adoption of general preventive measures significantly reduced the time it took for affected households to recover from property damage. Evacuation, relief aid, type of housing, education, household size and frequency of flooding in the area did not have significant effects.

  20. [Determinants of the elevated factor VIII activity in patients following venous thromboembolism].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lech, Monika; Kościelniak, Barbara; Bryk, Agata; Undas, Anetta

    2016-01-01

    Activity of factor VIII (FVIII) increased above 150% of reference range predisposes to venous thromboembolism (VTE). The aim of this study was to identify predictors of increased FVIII activity in patients following VTE. 241 (38% men) patients presented due to objectively documented VTE episode at least 3 months ago were included in this study. FVIII activity was measured using a clotting assay on the analyzer BCS XP. Among 241 patients with VTE, activity of FVIII above 150% (FVIII ≥ 150%) was observed in 96 (40%). These patients were older (p = 0.035) and their concentrations of fibrinogen and C-reactive protein (CRP) were higher by 12% and 88% (p 200%) and this group was also older (p = 0.015), more patients in that group had obesity (p = 0.015), idiopathic VTE (p = 0.043), less of them had positive family history (p = 0.010) and they were characterized by fibrinogen and CRP increased by 28% (p 200% (p = 0.016). The activity of FVIII in patients after VTE episode is influenced by age, concentration of fibrinogen, bilirubin, hemoglobin, glucose, CRP and homocysteine. Our results suggest the role of environmental factors, mainly inflammatory response in maintaining elevated FVIII activity following VTE.

  1. Realistic modelling of external flooding scenarios - A multi-disciplinary approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brinkman, J.L.

    2014-01-01

    Extreme phenomena, such as storm surges or high river water levels, may endanger the safety of nuclear power plants (NPPs) by inundation of the plant site with subsequent damage on safety-related buildings. Flooding may result in simultaneous failures of safety-related components, such as service water pumps and electrical equipment. In addition, the accessibility of the plant may be impeded due to flooding of the plant environment. These consequences are so severe that, (re)assessments of flood risk and flood protection measures should be based on accurate state-of-the-art methods. Dutch nuclear regulations require that a nuclear power plant shall withstand all external initiating events with a return period lower than one million years. For external flooding, this requirement is the basis of the so-called nuclear design level (nucleair ontwerp peil, NOP) of the buildings for external flooding, i.e. the water level at which a system - among others, the nuclear island and the ultimate heat sink - should still function properly. In determining the NOP, the mean water level, wave height and wave behaviour during storm surges are taken into account. This concept could also be used to implement external flooding in a PSA, by assuming that floods exceeding NOP levels directly lead to core damage. However, this straightforward modelling ignores some important aspects: the first is the mitigating effect of the external flood protection as dikes or dunes; the second aspect is that although water levels lower than NOP will not directly lead to core damage, they could do so indirectly as a result of combinations of system loss by flooding and random failure of required safety systems that have to bring the plant in a safe, stable state. Time is a third aspect: failure mechanisms need time to develop and time (via duration of the flood) determines the amount of water on site. This paper describes a PSA approach that takes the (structural) reliability of the external defences

  2. Continuous hydrologic simulation and flood-frequency, hydraulic, and flood-hazard analysis of the Blackberry Creek watershed, Kane County, Illinois

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soong, David T.; Straub, Timothy D.; Murphy, Elizabeth A.

    2006-01-01

    Results of hydrologic model, flood-frequency, hydraulic model, and flood-hazard analysis of the Blackberry Creek watershed in Kane County, Illinois, indicate that the 100-year and 500-year flood plains range from approximately 25 acres in the tributary F watershed (a headwater subbasin at the northeastern corner of the watershed) to almost 1,800 acres in Blackberry Creek main stem. Based on 1996 land-cover data, most of the land in the 100-year and 500-year flood plains was cropland, forested and wooded land, and grassland. A relatively small percentage of urban land was in the flood plains. The Blackberry Creek watershed has undergone rapid urbanization in recent decades. The population and urbanized lands in the watershed are projected to double from the 1990 condition by 2020. Recently, flood-induced damage has occurred more frequently in urbanized areas of the watershed. There are concerns about the effect of urbanization on flood peaks and volumes, future flood-mitigation plans, and potential effects on the water quality and stream habitats. This report describes the procedures used in developing the hydrologic models, estimating the flood-peak discharge magnitudes and recurrence intervals for flood-hazard analysis, developing the hydraulic model, and the results of the analysis in graphical and tabular form. The hydrologic model, Hydrological Simulation Program-FORTRAN (HSPF), was used to perform the simulation of continuous water movements through various patterns of land uses in the watershed. Flood-frequency analysis was applied to an annual maximum series to determine flood quantiles in subbasins for flood-hazard analysis. The Hydrologic Engineering Center-River Analysis System (HEC-RAS) hydraulic model was used to determine the 100-year and 500-year flood elevations, and to determine the 100-year floodway. The hydraulic model was calibrated and verified using high water marks and observed inundation maps for the July 17-18, 1996, flood event. Digital

  3. Elevating your elevator talk

    Science.gov (United States)

    An important and often overlooked item that every early career researcher needs to do is compose an elevator talk. The elevator talk, named because the talk should not last longer than an average elevator ride (30 to 60 seconds), is an effective method to present your research and yourself in a clea...

  4. Determining noncondensible gas fractions at elevated temperatures and pressures using wet and dry bulb temperature measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Griffith, P.; Bowman, J.

    1987-01-01

    The work reported in this note was undertaken to provide a method of determining the noncondensible gas fractions in a steam-gas mixture such as might be found in large reactor safety experiment like LOFT. In essence, the method used involves measuring the wet and dry bulb temperatures and using an algorithm, in place of the psychometric chart, to determine the partial pressure of the noncondensible gas in the mixture. In accomplishing this, the authors did the following: (1) extended the use of wet and dry-bulb temperature readings to determine mixture composition up to a temperature of 589 K and a pressure of 4.13 x 10 6 Pa. (2) developed an algorithm to reduce the data (3) found which materials would survive those temperatures

  5. Coupled nutrient cycling determines tropical forest trajectory under elevated CO2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouskill, N.; Zhu, Q.; Riley, W. J.

    2017-12-01

    Tropical forests have a disproportionate capacity to affect Earth's climate relative to their areal extent. Despite covering just 12 % of land surface, tropical forests account for 35 % of global net primary productivity and are among the most significant of terrestrial carbon stores. As atmospheric CO2 concentrations increase over the next century, the capacity of tropical forests to assimilate and sequester anthropogenic CO2 depends on limitation by multiple factors, including the availability of soil nutrients. Phosphorus availability has been considered to be the primary factor limiting metabolic processes within tropical forests. However, recent evidence points towards strong spatial and temporal co-limitation of tropical forests by both nitrogen and phosphorus. Here, we use the Accelerated Climate Modeling for Energy (ACME) Land Model (ALMv1-ECA-CNP) to examine how nutrient cycles interact and affect the trajectory of the tropical forest carbon sink under, (i) external nutrient input, (ii) climate (iii) elevated CO2, and (iv) a combination of 1-3. ALMv1 includes recent theoretical advances in representing belowground competition between roots, microbes and minerals for N and P uptake, explicit interactions between the nitrogen and phosphorus cycles (e.g., phosphatase production and nitrogen fixation), the dynamic internal allocation of plant N and P resources, and the integration of global datasets of plant physiological traits. We report nutrient fertilization (N, P, N+P) predictions for four sites in the tropics (El Verde, Puerto Rico, Barro Colorado Island, Panama, Manaus, Brazil and the Osa Peninsula, Coast Rica) to short-term nutrient fertilization (N, P, N+P), and benchmarking of the model against a meta-analysis of forest fertilization experiments. Subsequent simulations focus on the interaction of the carbon, nitrogen, and phosphorus cycles across the tropics with a focus on the implications of coupled nutrient cycling and the fate of the tropical

  6. Genetic context determines susceptibility to intraocular pressure elevation in a mouse pigmentary glaucoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cosma Ioan M

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background DBA/2J (D2 mice develop an age-related form of glaucoma. Their eyes progressively develop iris pigment dispersion and iris atrophy followed by increased intraocular pressure (IOP and glaucomatous optic nerve damage. Mutant alleles of the Gpnmb and Tyrp1 genes are necessary for the iris disease, but it is unknown whether alleles of other D2 gene(s are necessary for the distinct later stages of disease. We initiated a study of congenic strains to further define the genetic requirements and disease mechanisms of the D2 glaucoma. Results To further understand D2 glaucoma, we created congenic strains of mice on the C57BL/6J (B6 genetic background. B6 double-congenic mice carrying D2-derived Gpnmb and Tyrp1 mutations develop a D2-like iris disease. B6 single-congenics with only the Gpnmb and Tyrp1 mutations develop milder forms of iris disease. Genetic epistasis experiments introducing a B6 tyrosinase mutation into the congenic strains demonstrated that both the single and double-congenic iris diseases are rescued by interruption of melanin synthesis. Importantly, our experiments analyzing mice at ages up to 27 months indicate that the B6 double-congenic mice are much less prone to IOP elevation and glaucoma than are D2 mice. Conclusion As demonstrated here, the Gpnmb and Tyrp1 iris phenotypes are both individually dependent on tyrosinase function. These results support involvement of abnormal melanosomal events in the diseases caused by each gene. In the context of the inbred D2 mouse strain, the glaucoma phenotype is clearly influenced by more genes than just Gpnmb and Tyrp1. Despite the outward similarity of pigment-dispersing iris disease between D2 and the B6 double-congenic mice, the congenic mice are much less susceptible to developing high IOP and glaucoma. These new congenic strains provide a valuable new resource for further studying the genetic and mechanistic complexity of this form of glaucoma.

  7. Flood duration determines the reproduction success of fish in artificial oxbows in a floodplain of a potamal river

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Janáč, Michal; Ondračková, Markéta; Jurajda, Pavel; Valová, Zdenka; Reichard, Martin

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 19, č. 4 (2010), s. 644-655 ISSN 0906-6691 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LC522 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60930519 Keywords : young-of-the-year * flood pulse concept * regression * recruitment * reproductive guilds Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour Impact factor: 1.432, year: 2010

  8. Measurement procedure for the determination of thermal exchange coefficient for subsea pipelines at elevated pressure levels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Azevedo, Luis Fernando A.; Farias, Paula S.C.; Martins, Fabio J.W.A.; Rabello, Pedro C.; Barros Junior, Julio M. [Pontificia Universidade Catolica (PUC-Rio), RJ (Brazil). Dept. de Engenharia Mecanica; Lopes Junior, Fernando M.; Silva Junior, Jose Fernando; Castro, Adriana M.; Santos, Augusto A.; Pessanha, Maikon C.R. [Technip, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2009-12-19

    The present paper describes a methodology successfully employed to determine the Thermal Exchange Coefficient - TEC - for insulated sub sea flexible lines up to a pressure level of 200 bar. In this methodology, controlled internal electrical heating was employed, together with temperature sensors installed at the inner and outer surfaces of the line. The instrumented line sample was placed in a hyperbaric chamber filled with water. Two methods were employed in parallel to determine the line TEC value. In the first method, the TEC value was determined by direct measurement of the radial heat flux by the use of heat flux sensors. The readings of these sensors, together with the inner-to-outer surface temperature difference and geometric parameters, yielded the desired TEC value. In the second method, the radial heat flux was obtained as the difference between the total energy generated by the electrical heater installed in the interior of the sample and the heat losses through the end connectors, evaluated by the readings of temperature sensors installed in covers that surrounded the end connectors. The knowledge of the cover geometry, thermal properties and the temperature readings allowed for an accurate estimate of the heat lost through the covers. Both measuring methods were backed by a detailed uncertainty analysis. A calibration procedure of the second method was performed from zero to 100 bar, the pressure range where the calibration of the heat flux sensor is valid. Beyond 100 bar and up to 200 bar, the TEC values were obtained by the second method, corrected by the calibration procedure extrapolated from the 0-100 bar range. The TEC values obtained were valid under an uncertainty level of {+-} 5%. (author)

  9. Diffraction and single-crystal elastic constants of Inconel 625 at room and elevated temperatures determined by neutron diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Zhuqing; Stoica, Alexandru D.; Ma, Dong; Beese, Allison M.

    2016-01-01

    In this work, diffraction and single-crystal elastic constants of Inconel 625 have been determined by means of in situ loading at room and elevated temperatures using time-of-flight neutron diffraction. Theoretical models proposed by Voigt, Reuss, and Kroner were used to determine single-crystal elastic constants from measured diffraction elastic constants, with the Kroner model having the best ability to capture experimental data. The magnitude of single-crystal elastic moduli, computed from single-crystal elastic constants, decreases and the single crystal anisotropy increases as temperature increases, indicating the importance of texture in affecting macroscopic stress at elevated temperatures. The experimental data reported here are of great importance in understanding additive manufacturing of metallic components as: diffraction elastic constants are required for computing residual stresses from residual lattice strains measured using neutron diffraction, which can be used to validate thermomechanical models of additive manufacturing, while single-crystal elastic constants can be used in crystal plasticity modeling, for example, to understand mechanical deformation behavior of additively manufactured components.

  10. Diffraction and single-crystal elastic constants of Inconel 625 at room and elevated temperatures determined by neutron diffraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Zhuqing [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Stoica, Alexandru D. [Chemical and Engineering Materials Division, Neutron Sciences Directorate, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Ma, Dong, E-mail: dongma@ornl.gov [Chemical and Engineering Materials Division, Neutron Sciences Directorate, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Beese, Allison M., E-mail: amb961@psu.edu [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States)

    2016-09-30

    In this work, diffraction and single-crystal elastic constants of Inconel 625 have been determined by means of in situ loading at room and elevated temperatures using time-of-flight neutron diffraction. Theoretical models proposed by Voigt, Reuss, and Kroner were used to determine single-crystal elastic constants from measured diffraction elastic constants, with the Kroner model having the best ability to capture experimental data. The magnitude of single-crystal elastic moduli, computed from single-crystal elastic constants, decreases and the single crystal anisotropy increases as temperature increases, indicating the importance of texture in affecting macroscopic stress at elevated temperatures. The experimental data reported here are of great importance in understanding additive manufacturing of metallic components as: diffraction elastic constants are required for computing residual stresses from residual lattice strains measured using neutron diffraction, which can be used to validate thermomechanical models of additive manufacturing, while single-crystal elastic constants can be used in crystal plasticity modeling, for example, to understand mechanical deformation behavior of additively manufactured components.

  11. Mice lacking pituitary tumor transforming gene show elevated exposure of DGalNAc carbohydrate determinants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lutsyk A. D.

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To investigate the influence of pituitary tumor transforming gene (pttg-1 knockout on glycome of parenchimal organs by means of lectin histochemistry. Methods. DGalNAc, DGlcNAc, NeuNAc carbohydrate determinants were labelled with soybean agglutinin (SBA and wheat germ agglutinin (WGA, conjugated to peroxidase, with subsequent visualization of the lectin-binding sites with diaminobenzidine. The testes and kidneys of murine strain BL6/C57 with the pttg-1 gene knockout (PTTG-KO were compared to the wild type (PTTG-WT animals, both groups 1 month of age. Results. Knockout of the pttg-1 gene was accompanied by enhanced exposure of the DGalNAc sugar residues within the Golgi complex of secondary spermatocytes, in a brush border of renal tubules and on the lumenal surface of collecting ducts. Conclusions. This study suggests that knockout of the pttg-1 gene may lead to the changes in carbohydrate processing in mammalian organism.

  12. Determination of Elevator and Rudder Hinge Forces on the Learjet Model 55 Aircraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boroughs, R. R.; Padmanabhan, V.

    1983-01-01

    The empennage structure on the Learjet 55 aircraft was quite similar to the empennage structure on earlier Learjet models. However, due to an important structural change in the vertical fin along with the new loads environment on the 50 series aircraft, a structural test was required on the vertical fin, but the horizontal tail was substantiated by a comparative analysis with previous tests. NASTRAN analysis was used to investigate empennage deflections, stress levels, and control surface hinge forces. The hinge force calculations were made with the control surfaces in the deflected as well as undeflected configurations. A skin panel buckling analysis was also performed, and the non-linear effects of buckling were simulated in the NASTRAN model to more accurately define internal loads and stress levels. Comparisons were then made between the Model 55 and the Model 35/36 stresses and internal forces to determine which components were qualified by previous tests. Some of the methods and techniques used in this analysis are described.

  13. Smoky River coal flood risk mapping study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2004-06-01

    The Canada-Alberta Flood Damage Reduction Program (FDRP) is designed to reduce flood damage by identifying areas susceptible to flooding and by encouraging application of suitable land use planning, zoning, and flood preparedness and proofing. The purpose of this study is to define flood risk and floodway limits along the Smoky River near the former Smoky River Coal (SRC) plant. Alberta Energy has been responsible for the site since the mine and plant closed in 2000. The study describes flooding history, available data, features of the river and valley, calculation of flood levels, and floodway determination, and includes flood risk maps. The HEC-RAS program is used for the calculations. The flood risk area was calculated using the 1:100 year return period flood as the hydrological event. 7 refs., 11 figs., 7 tabs., 3 apps.

  14. Use of Single-Tow Ceramic Matrix Minicomposites to Determine Fundamental Room and Elevated Temperature Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almansour, Amjad S.

    The room and high temperature mechanical properties of continuous ceramic fiber reinforced matrix composites makes them attractive for implementation in aerospace and nuclear applications. However, the effect of fiber content has not been addressed in previous work. Therefore, single tow composites with fiber content ranging from 3 to 47 % was studied. Single fiber tow minicomposite is the basic architectural feature of woven and laminate ceramic matrix composites (CMCs). An in depth understanding of the initiation and evolution of damage in various ceramic fiber reinforced minicomposites with different fiber volume fractions and interphases was investigated employing several non-destructive evaluation techniques. A new technique is used to determine matrix crack content based on a damage parameter derived from speed of sound measurements which is compared with the established method using cumulative energy of Acoustic Emission (AE) events. Also, a modified theoretical model was implemented to obtain matrix stress at the onset of matrix cracking. Room temperature tensile, high temperature creep rupture and high temperature oxidation degradation loading conditions were all considered and composites' constituents were characterized. Moreover, fibers/matrix load sharing was modeled in creep and fiber volume fraction effect on load transfer was investigated using derived theoretical models. Fibers and matrix creep parameters, load transfer model results and numerical model methodology were used to construct minicomposites' creep strain model to predict creep damage of the different fiber type and content minicomposites. Furthermore, different fiber volume fractions ceramic matrix minicomposites' electrical resistivity temperature dependence isn't well understood. Therefore, the influence of fiber content, heat treatment cycles and creep on electrical resistivity measurements of SiC/SiC minicomposites were also studied here. Next, minicomposites' testing and

  15. Determining pH at elevated pressure and temperature using in situ ¹³C NMR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surface, J Andrew; Wang, Fei; Zhu, Yanzhe; Hayes, Sophia E; Giammar, Daniel E; Conradi, Mark S

    2015-02-03

    We have developed an approach for determining pH at elevated pressures and temperatures by using (13)C NMR measurements of inorganic carbon species together with a geochemical equilibrium model. The approach can determine in situ pH with precision better than 0.1 pH units at pressures, temperatures, and ionic strengths typical of geologic carbon sequestration systems. A custom-built high pressure NMR probe was used to collect (13)C NMR spectra of (13)C-labeled CO2 reactions with NaOH solutions and Mg(OH)2 suspensions at pressures up to 107 bar and temperatures of 80 °C. The quantitative nature of NMR spectroscopy allows the concentration ratio [CO2]/[HCO3(-)] to be experimentally determined. This ratio is then used with equilibrium constants calculated for the specific pressure and temperature conditions and appropriate activity coefficients for the solutes to calculate the in situ pH. The experimentally determined [CO2]/[HCO3(-)] ratios agree well with the predicted values for experiments performed with three different concentrations of NaOH and equilibration with multiple pressures of CO2. The approach was then applied to experiments with Mg(OH)2 slurries in which the change in pH could track the dissolution of CO2 into solution, rapid initial Mg(OH)2 dissolution, and onset of magnesium carbonate precipitation.

  16. Determination of bench-mark elevations at Bethel Island and vicinity, Contra Costa and San Joaquin counties, California, 1987

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blodgett, J.C.; Ikehara, M.E.; McCaffrey, William F.

    1988-01-01

    Elevations of 49 bench marks in the southwestern part of the Sacramento-San Joaquin River Delta were determined during October and November 1987. A total of 58 miles of level lines were run in the vicinity of Bethel Island and the community of Discovery Bay. The datum of these surveys is based on a National Geodetic Survey bench mark T934 situated on bedrock 10.5 mi east of Mount Diablo and near Marsh Creek Reservoir. The accuracy of these levels, based on National Geodetic Survey standards, was of first, second, and third order, depending on the various segments surveyed. Several bench marks were noted as possibly being stable, but most show evidence of instability. (USGS)

  17. Flood study of the Suncook River in Epsom, Pembroke, and Allenstown, New Hampshire, 2009

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flynn, Robert H.

    2010-01-01

    On May 15, 2006, a breach in the riverbank caused an avulsion in the Suncook River in Epsom, NH. The breach in the riverbank and subsequent avulsion changed the established flood zones along the Suncook River; therefore, a new flood study was needed to reflect this change and aid in flood recovery and restoration. For this flood study, the hydrologic and hydraulic analyses for the Suncook River were conducted by the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Federal Emergency Management Agency. This report presents water-surface elevations and profiles determined using the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers one-dimensional Hydrologic Engineering Center River Analysis System model, also known as HEC-RAS. Steady-state water-surface profiles were developed for the Suncook River from its confluence with the Merrimack River in the Village of Suncook (in Allenstown and Pembroke, NH) to the upstream corporate limit of the town of Epsom, NH (approximately 15.9 river miles). Floods of magnitudes that are expected to be equaled or exceeded once on the average during any 2-, 5-, 10-, 25-, 50-, 100-, or 500-year period (recurrence interval) were modeled using HEC-RAS. These flood events are referred to as the 2-, 5-, 10-, 25-, 50-, 100-, and 500-year floods and have a 50-, 20-, 10-, 4-, 2-, 1-, and 0.2-percent chance, respectively, of being equaled or exceeded during any year. The 10-, 50-, 100-, and 500-year flood events are important for flood-plain management, determination of flood-insurance rates, and design of structures such as bridges and culverts. The analyses in this study reflect flooding potentials that are based on existing conditions in the communities of Epsom, Pembroke, and Allenstown at the time of completion of this study (2009). Changes in the 100-year recurrence-interval flood elevation from the 1979 flood study were typically less than 2 feet with the exception of a location 900 feet upstream from the avulsion that, because of backwater from the dams in the

  18. 44 CFR 68.11 - Determination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 44 Emergency Management and Assistance 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Determination. 68.11 Section... § 68.11 Determination. The board shall render its written decision within 45 days after the conclusion... Administrator for review and approval. The Administrator shall make the final base flood elevation determination...

  19. Determining the axial power profile of partly flooded fuel in a compact core assembled in reactor LR-0

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Košťál, Michal; Švadlenková, Marie; Baroň, Petr; Rypar, Vojtěch; Milčák, Ján

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Fission density in partly flooded compact core. • Calculation of fission density axial profile. • Significant calculational under prediction of experimental axial profile. - Abstract: Measurement and calculation of the axial power profile near the boundary of a moderated and non-moderated core is used to analyze the suitability of the neutron-physical process description, mainly the angular cross-section of a water-moderated uranium system. This is also an important issue because it affects the radiation situation above the partly flooded core of a water-moderated reactor. Axial power profiles of various fuel pins irradiated on reactor LR-0 were measured and the results were compared with MCNP6 code calculations using the ENDF/B-VII.0 nuclear data library. The calculated power profile in positions above the moderator level significantly underestimates experimental results. This might be caused by an improper description of the angular distribution of scattered neutrons in a water-moderated uranium system.

  20. Evaluation and Optimization Study on a Hybrid EOR Technique Named as Chemical-Alternating-Foam Floods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xu Xingguang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This work presents a novel Enhanced Oil Recovery (EOR method called Chemical-Alternating-Foam (CAF floods in order to overcome the drawbacks of the conventional foam flooding such as insufficient amount of in-situ foams, severe foam collapse and surfactant retention. The first part of this research focused on the comparison of conventional foam floods and CAF floods both of which had the same amount of gas and chemicals. It showed that: (1 CAF floods possessed the much greater Residual Resistance Factor (RRF at elevated temperature; (2 the accumulative oil recovery of the CAF floods was 10%-15% higher than that of the conventional foam flooding. After 1.8 Pore Volume (PV injection, the oil recovery reached the plateau for both methods; (3 CAF floods yielded the most amount of incremental oil at the 98% water cut (water content in the effluent, while the continuous foam floods achieved the best performance at 60% water cut. The second part of this work determined the optimal foam quality (gas/liquid ratio or the volume percent gas within foam, chemical/foam slug size ratio, cycle number and injection sequence for the CAF floods. It was found that the CAF was endowed with the peak performance if the foam quality, chemical/foam slug size ratio, cycle number was fixed at 80%, 1:1 and 3 respectively with the chemical slug being introduced ahead of the foam slug. Through systematic and thorough research, the proposed hybrid process has been approved to be a viable and effective method significantly strengthening the conventional foam flooding.

  1. Low physical activity is a determinant for elevated blood pressure in high cardiovascular risk obstructive sleep apnea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendelson, Monique; Tamisier, Renaud; Laplaud, David; Dias-Domingos, Sonia; Baguet, Jean-Philippe; Moreau, Laurent; Koltes, Christian; Chavez, Léonidas; de Lamberterie, Gilles; Herengt, Frédéric; Levy, Patrick; Flore, Patrice; Pépin, Jean-Louis

    2014-08-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is associated with cardiovascular morbidity, including hypertension. Beyond the severity of nocturnal hypoxia, other factors such as metabolic abnormalities but also sedentary behaviors and insufficient physical activity may contribute to elevated blood pressure (BP). To clarify the respective role of these factors as determinants of BP in OSA patients, we examined the relationship between BP and anthropometrics, severity of sleep apnea, and objectively measured physical activity and sedentary behaviors. Ninety-five adults presenting with OSA (apnea-hypopnea index > 10 events/h) and high cardiovascular risk (63.3 ± 8.8 y; body mass index: 29.9 ± 4.9 kg/m(2); apnea-hypopnea index: 41.3 ± 17.5/h; cardiovascular risk score: 13.5 ± 3.7%) were included. Physical activity and sedentary behaviors were objectively assessed by actigraphy, and self-measured home BP monitoring was measured. Logistic regression models adjusted for sex, age, and body mass index were built to identify the predictors of self-measured morning and evening BP. Physical activity was significantly related to obesity but not to the severity of sleep apnea or sleepiness. Sedentary behaviors were associated with self-measured morning and evening systolic BP (r = 0.32, P = .002; r = 0.29, P = .004). Steps per day were inversely associated with evening BP (r = -0.27, P = .01). Univariate analysis identified steps/d and time spent in vigorous physical activity as determinants for evening self-measured BP. In multivariate analysis, only steps/d were identified as a significant determinant of evening BP. Physical activity is the major determinant for evening BP in adults with OSA presenting high cardiovascular risk. Our results emphasize the need for lifestyle counseling programs in combination with CPAP to encourage regular physical activity in OSA subjects to obtain better BP control. (ClinicalTrials.gov registration NCT01226641.)

  2. Drivers of flood damage on event level

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kreibich, H.; Aerts, J. C. J. H.; Apel, H.

    2016-01-01

    Flood risk is dynamic and influenced by many processes related to hazard, exposure and vulnerability. Flood damage increased significantly over the past decades, however, resulting overall economic loss per event is an aggregated indicator and it is difficult to attribute causes to this increasing...... trend. Much has been learned about damaging processes during floods at the micro-scale, e.g. building level. However, little is known about the main factors determining the amount of flood damage on event level. Thus, we analyse and compare paired flood events, i.e. consecutive, similar damaging floods...... example are the 2002 and 2013 floods in the Elbe and Danube catchments in Germany. The 2002 flood caused the highest economic damage (EUR 11600 million) due to a natural hazard event in Germany. Damage was so high due to extreme flood hazard triggered by extreme precipitation and a high number...

  3. Estimated Flood-Inundation Mapping for the Upper Blue River, Indian Creek, and Dyke Branch in Kansas City, Missouri, 2006-08

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Brian P.; Huizinga, Richard J.

    2008-01-01

    In the interest of improved public safety during flooding, the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the city of Kansas City, Missouri, completed a flood-inundation study of the Blue River in Kansas City, Missouri, from the U.S. Geological Survey streamflow gage at Kenneth Road to 63rd Street, of Indian Creek from the Kansas-Missouri border to its mouth, and of Dyke Branch from the Kansas-Missouri border to its mouth, to determine the estimated extent of flood inundation at selected flood stages on the Blue River, Indian Creek, and Dyke Branch. The results of this study spatially interpolate information provided by U.S. Geological Survey gages, Kansas City Automated Local Evaluation in Real Time gages, and the National Weather Service flood-peak prediction service that comprise the Blue River flood-alert system and are a valuable tool for public officials and residents to minimize flood deaths and damage in Kansas City. To provide public access to the information presented in this report, a World Wide Web site (http://mo.water.usgs.gov/indep/kelly/blueriver) was created that displays the results of two-dimensional modeling between Hickman Mills Drive and 63rd Street, estimated flood-inundation maps for 13 flood stages, the latest gage heights, and National Weather Service stage forecasts for each forecast location within the study area. The results of a previous study of flood inundation on the Blue River from 63rd Street to the mouth also are available. In addition the full text of this report, all tables and maps are available for download (http://pubs.usgs.gov/sir/2008/5068). Thirteen flood-inundation maps were produced at 2-foot intervals for water-surface elevations from 763.8 to 787.8 feet referenced to the Blue River at the 63rd Street Automated Local Evaluation in Real Time stream gage operated by the city of Kansas City, Missouri. Each map is associated with gages at Kenneth Road, Blue Ridge Boulevard, Kansas City (at Bannister Road), U.S. Highway 71

  4. A Study of Flood Evacuation Center Using GIS and Remote Sensing Technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mustaffa, A. A.; Rosli, M. F.; Abustan, M. S.; Adib, R.; Rosli, M. I.; Masiri, K.; Saifullizan, B.

    2016-07-01

    This research demonstrated the use of Remote Sensing technique and GIS to determine the suitability of an evacuation center. This study was conducted in Batu Pahat areas that always hit by a series of flood. The data of Digital Elevation Model (DEM) was obtained by ASTER database that has been used to delineate extract contour line and elevation. Landsat 8 image was used for classification purposes such as land use map. Remote Sensing incorporate with GIS techniques was used to determined the suitability location of the evacuation center from contour map of flood affected areas in Batu Pahat. GIS will calculate the elevation of the area and information about the country of the area, the road access and percentage of the affected area. The flood affected area map may provide the suitability of the flood evacuation center during the several levels of flood. The suitability of evacuation centers can be determined based on several criteria and the existing data of the evacuation center will be analysed. From the analysis among 16 evacuation center listed, there are only 8 evacuation center suitable for the usage during emergency situation. The suitability analysis was based on the location and the road access of the evacuation center toward the flood affected area. There are 10 new locations with suitable criteria of evacuation center proposed on the study area to facilitate the process of rescue and evacuating flood victims to much safer and suitable locations. The results of this study will help in decision making processes and indirectly will help organization such as fire-fighter and the Department of Social Welfare in their work. Thus, this study can contribute more towards the society.

  5. Flood-inundation maps for Lake Champlain in Vermont and in northern Clinton County, New York

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flynn, Robert H.; Hayes, Laura

    2016-06-30

    Digital flood-inundation maps for an approximately100-mile length of Lake Champlain in Addison, Chittenden, Franklin, and Grand Isle Counties in Vermont and northern Clinton County in New York were created by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) in cooperation with the International Joint Commission (IJC). The flood-inundationmaps, which can be accessed through the International Joint Commission (IJC) Web site at http://www.ijc.org/en_/, depict estimates of the areal extent flooding correspondingto selected water levels (stages) at the USGS lake gage on the Richelieu River (Lake Champlain) at Rouses Point, N.Y. (station number 04295000). In this study, wind and seiche effects (standing oscillating wave with a long wavelength) were not taken into account and the flood-inundation mapsreflect 11 stages (elevations) for Lake Champlain that are static for the study length of the lake. Near-real-time stages at this lake gage, and others on Lake Champlain, may be obtained on the Internet from the USGS National Water Information System at http://waterdata.usgs.gov/ or the National Weather Service Advanced Hydrologic Prediction Service at http:/water.weather.gov/ahps/, which also forecasts flood hydrographs at the Richelieu River (Lake Champlain) at Rouses Point.Static flood boundary extents were determined for LakeChamplain in Addison, Chittenden, Franklin, and Grand Isle Counties in Vermont and northern Clinton County in New York using recently acquired (2013–2014) lidar (light detection and ranging) and may be referenced to any of the five USGS lake gages on Lake Champlain. Of these five lakgages, USGS lake gage 04295000, Richelieu River (Lake Champlain) at Rouses Point, N.Y., is the only USGS lake gage that is also a National Weather Service prediction location. Flood boundary extents for the Lake Champlain static flood-inundation map corresponding to the May 201 flood(103.2 feet [ft], National Geodetic Vertical Datum [NGVD] 29) were evaluated by comparing these boundary

  6. Towards a better understanding of flood generation and surface water inundation mechanisms using NASA remote sensing data products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucey, J.; Reager, J. T., II; Lopez, S. R.

    2017-12-01

    Floods annually cause several weather-related fatalities and financial losses. According to NOAA and FEMA, there were 43 deaths and 18 billion dollars paid out in flood insurance policies during 2005. The goal of this work is to improve flood prediction and flood risk assessment by creating a general model of predictability of extreme runoff generation using various NASA products. Using satellite-based flood inundation observations, we can relate surface water formation processes to changes in other hydrological variables, such as precipitation, storage and soil moisture, and understand how runoff generation response to these forcings is modulated by local topography and land cover. Since it is known that a flood event would cause an abnormal increase in surface water, we examine these underlying physical relationships in comparison with the Dartmouth Flood Observatory archive of historic flood events globally. Using ground water storage observations (GRACE), precipitation (TRMM or GPCP), land use (MODIS), elevation (SRTM) and surface inundation levels (SWAMPS), an assessment of geological and climate conditions can be performed for any location around the world. This project utilizes multiple linear regression analysis evaluating the relationship between surface water inundation, total water storage anomalies and precipitation values, grouped by average slope or land use, to determine their statistical relationships and influences on inundation data. This research demonstrates the potential benefits of using global data products for early flood prediction and will improve our understanding of runoff generation processes.

  7. Development of flood-inundation maps for the Mississippi River in Saint Paul, Minnesota

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czuba, Christiana R.; Fallon, James D.; Lewis, Corby R.; Cooper, Diane F.

    2014-01-01

    Digital flood-inundation maps for a 6.3-mile reach of the Mississippi River in Saint Paul, Minnesota, were developed through a multi-agency effort by the U.S. Geological Survey in cooperation with the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers and in collaboration with the National Weather Service. The inundation maps, which can be accessed through the U.S. Geological Survey Flood Inundation Mapping Science Web site at http://water.usgs.gov/osw/flood_inundation/ and the National Weather Service Advanced Hydrologic Prediction Service site at http://water.weather.gov/ahps/inundation.php, depict estimates of the areal extent and depth of flooding corresponding to selected water levels (stages) at the U.S. Geological Survey streamgage at the Mississippi River at Saint Paul (05331000). The National Weather Service forecasted peak-stage information at the streamgage may be used in conjunction with the maps developed in this study to show predicted areas of flood inundation. In this study, flood profiles were computed for the Mississippi River by means of a one-dimensional step-backwater model. The hydraulic model was calibrated using the most recent stage-discharge relation at the Robert Street location (rating curve number 38.0) of the Mississippi River at Saint Paul (streamgage 05331000), as well as an approximate water-surface elevation-discharge relation at the Mississippi River at South Saint Paul (U.S. Army Corps of Engineers streamgage SSPM5). The model also was verified against observed high-water marks from the recent 2011 flood event and the water-surface profile from existing flood insurance studies. The hydraulic model was then used to determine 25 water-surface profiles for flood stages at 1-foot intervals ranging from approximately bankfull stage to greater than the highest recorded stage at streamgage 05331000. The simulated water-surface profiles were then combined with a geographic information system digital elevation model, derived from high-resolution topography

  8. Geospatial Analysis for the Determination of Hydro-Morphological Characteristics and Assessment of Flash Flood Potentiality in Arid Coastal Plains: A Case in Southwestern Sinai, Egypt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed Wahid

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Coastal plains with a unique geographic setting and renewable natural resources are promising for sustainable development; however, these areas may be subjected to some environmental hazards due to their geological setting. One of those hazards is the seasonal flash flood that can threaten existing and future development projects in such critical areas. Southwestern Sinai, Egypt, is a coastal plain that is characterized by complex geological setting an arid climate with seasonal rainfall which can result in a high runoff. The aim of this work is to model spatially the runoff amount and density related to flash flood development and to create a flash flood hazard map of the plain as an example of coastal plain in a desert environment with large and complex hydrologic setting. In this research, ASTER images are used to develop a digital elevation model (DEM and land use/land cover (LULC data sets of the study area. Geographic information system (GIS was used to perform runoff and ash potential flood analyses of the created databases and to show distributed runoff and flooding potential in spatial maps. A module was created in a GIS environment to develop a flash flood potential index map. It was clear that the main two factors controlling runoff amounts and flash flood potential in such kinds of areas are the slope and soil types. The final dataset map procedure by this work can be very helpful in land use planning by highlighting the areas subjected to flash floods.    Análisis Geoespacial para Determinar las Características Hidromorfológicas y Evaluar las Inundaciones Potenciales en Llanuras Costeras Áridas: Caso de Estudio en el Suroccidente de Sinaí, Egipto  Resumen Las llanuras costeras que poseen recursos naturales renovables y una configuración geográfíca única son promisorias para el desarrollo sostenible. Estas áreas, sin embargo, son objeto de algunas amenazas ambientales debido a su escenario geológico. Una de

  9. Land Use Measures are Underused in Flood Risk Mitigation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brink, van den A.; Neuvel, J.J.M. (Jeroen)

    2010-01-01

    New research in the Netherlands indicates that spatial planning to manage flood risk, such as the elevation of residential areas and the exclusion of vulnerable land uses from flood-prone areas, is underused. Its use appears to depend on governmental requirements, previous experience of flooding and

  10. Assessment of the effectiveness of flood adaptation strategies for HCMC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lasage, R.; Veldkamp, T. I. E.; de Moel, H.; Van, T. C.; Phi, H. L.; Vellinga, P.; Aerts, J. C. J. H.

    2014-06-01

    Coastal cities are vulnerable to flooding, and flood risk to coastal cities will increase due to sea-level rise. Moreover, Asian cities in particular are subject to considerable population growth and associated urban developments, increasing this risk even more. Empirical data on vulnerability and the cost and benefits of flood risk reduction measures are therefore paramount for sustainable development of these cities. This paper presents an approach to explore the impacts of sea-level rise and socio-economic developments on flood risk for the flood-prone District 4 in Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam, and to develop and evaluate the effects of different adaptation strategies (new levees, dry- and wet proofing of buildings and elevating roads and buildings). A flood damage model was developed to simulate current and future flood risk using the results from a household survey to establish stage-damage curves for residential buildings. The model has been used to assess the effects of several participatory developed adaptation strategies to reduce flood risk, expressed in expected annual damage (EAD). Adaptation strategies were evaluated assuming combinations of both sea-level scenarios and land-use scenarios. Together with information on costs of these strategies, we calculated the benefit-cost ratio and net present value for the adaptation strategies until 2100, taking into account depreciation rates of 2.5% and 5%. The results of this modelling study indicate that the current flood risk in District 4 is USD 0.31 million per year, increasing up to USD 0.78 million per year in 2100. The net present value and benefit-cost ratios using a discount rate of 5 % range from USD -107 to -1.5 million, and from 0.086 to 0.796 for the different strategies. Using a discount rate of 2.5% leads to an increase in both net present value and benefit-cost ratio. The adaptation strategies wet-proofing and dry-proofing generate the best results using these economic indicators. The information

  11. Probabilistic Flood Defence Assessment Tools

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Slomp Robert

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The WTI2017 project is responsible for the development of flood defence assessment tools for the 3600 km of Dutch primary flood defences, dikes/levees, dunes and hydraulic structures. These tools are necessary, as per January 1st 2017, the new flood risk management policy for the Netherlands will be implemented. Then, the seven decades old design practice (maximum water level methodology of 1958 and two decades old safety standards (and maximum hydraulic load methodology of 1996 will formally be replaced by a more risked based approach for the national policy in flood risk management. The formal flood defence assessment is an important part of this new policy, especially for flood defence managers, since national and regional funding for reinforcement is based on this assessment. This new flood defence policy is based on a maximum allowable probability of flooding. For this, a maximum acceptable individual risk was determined at 1/100 000 per year, this is the probability of life loss of for every protected area in the Netherlands. Safety standards of flood defences were then determined based on this acceptable individual risk. The results were adjusted based on information from cost -benefit analysis, societal risk and large scale societal disruption due to the failure of critical infrastructure e.g. power stations. The resulting riskbased flood defence safety standards range from a 300 to a 100 000 year return period for failure. Two policy studies, WV21 (Safety from floods in the 21st century and VNK-2 (the National Flood Risk in 2010 provided the essential information to determine the new risk based safety standards for flood defences. The WTI2017 project will provide the safety assessment tools based on these new standards and is thus an essential element for the implementation of this policy change. A major issue to be tackled was the development of user-friendly tools, as the new assessment is to be carried out by personnel of the

  12. Extending flood damage assessment methodology to include ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Optimal and sustainable flood plain management, including flood control, can only be achieved when the impacts of flood control measures are considered for both the man-made and natural environments, and the sociological aspects are fully considered. Until now, methods/models developed to determine the influences ...

  13. Composite Flood Risk for Virgin Island

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Composite Flood Risk layer combines flood hazard datasets from Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) flood zones, NOAA's Shallow Coastal Flooding, and the National Hurricane Center SLOSH model for Storm Surge inundation for category 1, 2, and 3 hurricanes.Geographic areas are represented by a grid of 10 by 10 meter cells and each cell has a ranking based on variation in exposure to flooding hazards: Moderate, High and Extreme exposure. Geographic areas in each input layers are ranked based on their probability of flood risk exposure. The logic was such that areas exposed to flooding on a more frequent basis were given a higher ranking. Thus the ranking incorporates the probability of the area being flooded. For example, even though a Category 3 storm surge has higher flooding elevations, the likelihood of the occurrence is lower than a Category 1 storm surge and therefore the Category 3 flood area is given a lower exposure ranking. Extreme exposure areas are those areas that are exposed to relatively frequent flooding.The ranked input layers are then converted to a raster for the creation of the composite risk layer by using cell statistics in spatial analysis. The highest exposure ranking for a given cell in any of the three input layers is assigned to the corresponding cell in the composite layer.For example, if an area (a cell) is rank as medium in the FEMA layer, moderate in the SLOSH layer, but extreme in the SCF layer, the cell will be considere

  14. Towards a Flood Severity Index

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kettner, A.; Chong, A.; Prades, L.; Brakenridge, G. R.; Muir, S.; Amparore, A.; Slayback, D. A.; Poungprom, R.

    2017-12-01

    Flooding is the most common natural hazard worldwide, affecting 21 million people every year. In the immediate moments following a flood event, humanitarian actors like the World Food Program need to make rapid decisions ( 72 hrs) on how to prioritize affected areas impacted by such an event. For other natural disasters like hurricanes/cyclones and earthquakes, there are industry-recognized standards on how the impacted areas are to be classified. Shake maps, quantifying peak ground motion, from for example the US Geological Survey are widely used for assessing earthquakes. Similarly, cyclones are tracked by Joint Typhoon Warning Center (JTWC) and Global Disaster Alert and Coordination System (GDACS) who release storm nodes and tracks (forecasted and actual), with wind buffers and classify the event according to the Saffir-Simpson Hurricane Wind Scale. For floods, the community is usually able to acquire unclassified data of the flood extent as identified from satellite imagery. Most often no water discharge hydrograph is available to classify the event into recurrence intervals simply because there is no gauging station, or the gauging station was unable to record the maximum discharge due to overtopping or flood damage. So, the question remains: How do we methodically turn a flooded area into classified areas of different gradations of impact? Here, we present a first approach towards developing a global applicable flood severity index. The flood severity index is set up such that it considers relatively easily obtainable physical parameters in a short period of time like: flood frequency (relating the current flood to historical events) and magnitude, as well as land cover, slope, and where available pre-event simulated flood depth. The scale includes categories ranging from very minor flooding to catastrophic flooding. We test and evaluate the postulated classification scheme against a set of past flood events. Once a severity category is determined, socio

  15. Catastrophe loss modelling of storm-surge flood risk in eastern England.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muir Wood, Robert; Drayton, Michael; Berger, Agnete; Burgess, Paul; Wright, Tom

    2005-06-15

    Probabilistic catastrophe loss modelling techniques, comprising a large stochastic set of potential storm-surge flood events, each assigned an annual rate of occurrence, have been employed for quantifying risk in the coastal flood plain of eastern England. Based on the tracks of the causative extratropical cyclones, historical storm-surge events are categorized into three classes, with distinct windfields and surge geographies. Extreme combinations of "tide with surge" are then generated for an extreme value distribution developed for each class. Fragility curves are used to determine the probability and magnitude of breaching relative to water levels and wave action for each section of sea defence. Based on the time-history of water levels in the surge, and the simulated configuration of breaching, flow is time-stepped through the defences and propagated into the flood plain using a 50 m horizontal-resolution digital elevation model. Based on the values and locations of the building stock in the flood plain, losses are calculated using vulnerability functions linking flood depth and flood velocity to measures of property loss. The outputs from this model for a UK insurance industry portfolio include "loss exceedence probabilities" as well as "average annualized losses", which can be employed for calculating coastal flood risk premiums in each postcode.

  16. Flood risk governance arrangements in Europe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matczak, P.; Lewandowski, J.; Choryński, A.; Szwed, M.; Kundzewicz, Z. W.

    2015-06-01

    The STAR-FLOOD (Strengthening and Redesigning European Flood Risk Practices Towards Appropriate and Resilient Flood Risk Governance Arrangements) project, funded by the European Commission, investigates strategies for dealing with flood risk in six European countries: Belgium, the UK, France, the Netherlands, Poland and Sweden and in 18 vulnerable urban regions in these countries. The project aims to describe, analyse, explain, and evaluate the main similarities and differences between the selected EU Member States in terms of development and performance of flood risk governance arrangements. It also discusses the scientific and societal importance of these similarities and differences. Attention is paid to identification and characterization of shifts in flood risk governance arrangements and in flood risk management strategies and to determination of triggering factors and restraining factors. An assessment of a change of resilience and appropriateness (legitimacy, effectiveness, efficiency) of flood risk governance arrangements in Poland is presented and comparison with other European countries is offered.

  17. Flood risk governance arrangements in Europe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Matczak

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The STAR-FLOOD (Strengthening and Redesigning European Flood Risk Practices Towards Appropriate and Resilient Flood Risk Governance Arrangements project, funded by the European Commission, investigates strategies for dealing with flood risk in six European countries: Belgium, the UK, France, the Netherlands, Poland and Sweden and in 18 vulnerable urban regions in these countries. The project aims to describe, analyse, explain, and evaluate the main similarities and differences between the selected EU Member States in terms of development and performance of flood risk governance arrangements. It also discusses the scientific and societal importance of these similarities and differences. Attention is paid to identification and characterization of shifts in flood risk governance arrangements and in flood risk management strategies and to determination of triggering factors and restraining factors. An assessment of a change of resilience and appropriateness (legitimacy, effectiveness, efficiency of flood risk governance arrangements in Poland is presented and comparison with other European countries is offered.

  18. Soil properties determine the elevational patterns of base cations and micronutrients in the plant-soil system up to the upper limits of trees and shrubs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ruzhen; Wang, Xue; Jiang, Yong; Cerdà, Artemi; Yin, Jinfei; Liu, Heyong; Feng, Xue; Shi, Zhan; Dijkstra, Feike A.; Li, Mai-He

    2018-03-01

    To understand whether base cations and micronutrients in the plant-soil system change with elevation, we investigated the patterns of base cations and micronutrients in both soils and plant tissues along three elevational gradients in three climate zones in China. Base cations (Ca, Mg, and K) and micronutrients (Fe, Mn, and Zn) were determined in soils, trees, and shrubs growing at lower and middle elevations as well as at their upper limits on Balang (subtropical, SW China), Qilian (dry temperate, NW China), and Changbai (wet temperate, NE China) mountains. No consistent elevational patterns were found for base cation and micronutrient concentrations in both soils and plant tissues (leaves, roots, shoots, and stem sapwood). Soil pH, soil organic carbon (SOC), total soil nitrogen (TN), the SOC to TN ratio (C : N), and soil extractable nitrogen (NO3- and NH4+) determined the elevational patterns of soil exchangeable Ca and Mg and available Fe, Mn, and Zn. However, the controlling role of soil pH and SOC was not universal as revealed by their weak correlations with soil base cations under tree canopies at the wet temperate mountain and with micronutrients under both tree and shrub canopies at the dry temperate mountain. In most cases, soil base cation and micronutrient availabilities played fundamental roles in determining the base cation and micronutrient concentrations in plant tissues. An exception existed for the decoupling of leaf K and Fe with their availabilities in the soil. Our results highlight the importance of soil physicochemical properties (mainly SOC, C : N, and pH) rather than elevation (i.e., canopy cover and environmental factors, especially temperature), in determining base cation and micronutrient availabilities in soils and subsequently their concentrations in plant tissues.

  19. Soil properties determine the elevational patterns of base cations and micronutrients in the plant–soil system up to the upper limits of trees and shrubs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Wang

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available To understand whether base cations and micronutrients in the plant–soil system change with elevation, we investigated the patterns of base cations and micronutrients in both soils and plant tissues along three elevational gradients in three climate zones in China. Base cations (Ca, Mg, and K and micronutrients (Fe, Mn, and Zn were determined in soils, trees, and shrubs growing at lower and middle elevations as well as at their upper limits on Balang (subtropical, SW China, Qilian (dry temperate, NW China, and Changbai (wet temperate, NE China mountains. No consistent elevational patterns were found for base cation and micronutrient concentrations in both soils and plant tissues (leaves, roots, shoots, and stem sapwood. Soil pH, soil organic carbon (SOC, total soil nitrogen (TN, the SOC to TN ratio (C : N, and soil extractable nitrogen (NO3− and NH4+ determined the elevational patterns of soil exchangeable Ca and Mg and available Fe, Mn, and Zn. However, the controlling role of soil pH and SOC was not universal as revealed by their weak correlations with soil base cations under tree canopies at the wet temperate mountain and with micronutrients under both tree and shrub canopies at the dry temperate mountain. In most cases, soil base cation and micronutrient availabilities played fundamental roles in determining the base cation and micronutrient concentrations in plant tissues. An exception existed for the decoupling of leaf K and Fe with their availabilities in the soil. Our results highlight the importance of soil physicochemical properties (mainly SOC, C : N, and pH rather than elevation (i.e., canopy cover and environmental factors, especially temperature, in determining base cation and micronutrient availabilities in soils and subsequently their concentrations in plant tissues.

  20. Flood model for Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palán, Ladislav; Punčochář, Petr

    2017-04-01

    Looking on the impact of flooding from the World-wide perspective, in last 50 years flooding has caused over 460,000 fatalities and caused serious material damage. Combining economic loss from ten costliest flood events (from the same period) returns a loss (in the present value) exceeding 300bn USD. Locally, in Brazil, flood is the most damaging natural peril with alarming increase of events frequencies as 5 out of the 10 biggest flood losses ever recorded have occurred after 2009. The amount of economic and insured losses particularly caused by various flood types was the key driver of the local probabilistic flood model development. Considering the area of Brazil (being 5th biggest country in the World) and the scattered distribution of insured exposure, a domain covered by the model was limited to the entire state of Sao Paolo and 53 additional regions. The model quantifies losses on approx. 90 % of exposure (for regular property lines) of key insurers. Based on detailed exposure analysis, Impact Forecasting has developed this tool using long term local hydrological data series (Agencia Nacional de Aguas) from riverine gauge stations and digital elevation model (Instituto Brasileiro de Geografia e Estatística). To provide most accurate representation of local hydrological behaviour needed for the nature of probabilistic simulation, a hydrological data processing focused on frequency analyses of seasonal peak flows - done by fitting appropriate extreme value statistical distribution and stochastic event set generation consisting of synthetically derived flood events respecting realistic spatial and frequency patterns visible in entire period of hydrological observation. Data were tested for homogeneity, consistency and for any significant breakpoint occurrence in time series so the entire observation or only its subparts were used for further analysis. The realistic spatial patterns of stochastic events are reproduced through the innovative use of d-vine copula

  1. Floods in Colorado

    Science.gov (United States)

    Follansbee, Robert; Sawyer, Leon R.

    1948-01-01

    The first records of floods in Colorado antedated the settlement of the State by about 30 years. These were records of floods on the Arkansas and Republican Rivers in 1826. Other floods noted by traders, hunters and emigrants, some of whom were on their way to the Far West, occurred in 1844 on the Arkansas River, and by inference on the South Platte River. Other early floods were those on the Purgatoire, the Lower Arkansas, and the San Juan Rivers about 1859. The most serious flood since settlement began was that on the Arkansas River during June 1921, which caused the loss of about 100 lives and an estimated property loss of $19,000,000. Many floods of lesser magnitude have occurred, and some of these have caused loss of life and very considerable property damage. Topography is the chief factor in determining the location of storms and resulting floods. These occur most frequently on the eastern slope of the Front Range. In the mountains farther west precipitation is insufficient to cause floods except during periods of melting snow, in June. In the southwestern part of the State, where precipitation during periods of melting snow is insufficient to cause floods, the severest floods yet experienced resulted from heavy rains in September 1909 and October 1911. In the eastern foothills region, usually below an altitude of about 7,500 feet and extending for a distance of about 50 miles east of the mountains, is a zone subject to rainfalls of great intensity known as cloudbursts. These cloudbursts are of short duration and are confined to very small areas. At times the intensity is so great as to make breathing difficult for those exposed to a storm. The areas of intense rainfall are so small that Weather Bureau precipitation stations have not been located in them. Local residents, being cloudburst conscious, frequently measure the rainfall in receptacles in their yards, and such records constitute the only source of information regarding the intensity. A flood

  2. Improvements in fast-response flood modeling: desktop parallel computing and domain tracking

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Judi, David R [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Mcpherson, Timothy N [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Burian, Steven J [UNIV. OF UTAH

    2009-01-01

    It is becoming increasingly important to have the ability to accurately forecast flooding, as flooding accounts for the most losses due to natural disasters in the world and the United States. Flood inundation modeling has been dominated by one-dimensional approaches. These models are computationally efficient and are considered by many engineers to produce reasonably accurate water surface profiles. However, because the profiles estimated in these models must be superimposed on digital elevation data to create a two-dimensional map, the result may be sensitive to the ability of the elevation data to capture relevant features (e.g. dikes/levees, roads, walls, etc...). Moreover, one-dimensional models do not explicitly represent the complex flow processes present in floodplains and urban environments and because two-dimensional models based on the shallow water equations have significantly greater ability to determine flow velocity and direction, the National Research Council (NRC) has recommended that two-dimensional models be used over one-dimensional models for flood inundation studies. This paper has shown that two-dimensional flood modeling computational time can be greatly reduced through the use of Java multithreading on multi-core computers which effectively provides a means for parallel computing on a desktop computer. In addition, this paper has shown that when desktop parallel computing is coupled with a domain tracking algorithm, significant computation time can be eliminated when computations are completed only on inundated cells. The drastic reduction in computational time shown here enhances the ability of two-dimensional flood inundation models to be used as a near-real time flood forecasting tool, engineering, design tool, or planning tool. Perhaps even of greater significance, the reduction in computation time makes the incorporation of risk and uncertainty/ensemble forecasting more feasible for flood inundation modeling (NRC 2000; Sayers et al

  3. An expanded model: flood-inundation maps for the Leaf River at Hattiesburg, Mississippi, 2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    Storm, John B.

    2014-01-01

    Digital flood-inundation maps for a 6.8-mile reach of the Leaf River at Hattiesburg, Mississippi (Miss.), were created by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) in cooperation with the City of Hattiesburg, City of Petal, Forrest County, Mississippi Emergency Management Agency, Mississippi Department of Homeland Security, and the Emergency Management District. The inundation maps, which can be accessed through the USGS Flood Inundation Mapping Science Web site at http://water.usgs.gov/osw/flood_inundation/, depict estimates of the areal extent and depth of flooding corresponding to selected water levels (stages) at the USGS streamgage at Leaf River at Hattiesburg, Miss. (station no. 02473000). Current conditions for estimating near-real-time areas of inundation by use of USGS streamgage information may be obtained on the Internet at http://waterdata.usgs.gov/. In addition, the information has been provided to the National Weather Service (NWS) for incorporation into their Advanced Hydrologic Prediction Service (AHPS) flood warning system (http://water.weather.gov/ahps/). The NWS forecasts flood hydrographs at many places that are often colocated with USGS streamgages. NWS-forecasted peak-stage information may be used in conjunction with the maps developed in this study to show predicted areas of flood inundation. In this study, flood profiles were computed for the stream reach by means of a one-dimensional step-backwater model. The model was calibrated by using the most current stage-discharge relations at the Leaf River at Hattiesburg, Miss. streamgage (02473000) and documented high-water marks from recent and historical floods. The hydraulic model was then used to determine 13 water-surface profiles for flood stages at 1.0-foot intervals referenced to the streamgage datum and ranging from bankfull to approximately the highest recorded water level at the streamgage. The simulated water-surface profiles were then combined with a geographic information system (GIS

  4. Coping capacities for improving adaptation pathways for flood protection in Can Tho, Vietnam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pathirana, A.; Radhakrishnan, M.; Quan, N. H.; Gersonius, B.; Ashley, R.; Zevenbergen, C.

    2016-12-01

    Studying the evolution of coping and adaptation capacities is a prerequisite for preparing an effective flood management plan for the future, especially in the dynamic and fast changing cities of developing countries. The objectives, requirements, targets, design and performance of flood protection measures will have to be determined after taking into account, or in conjunction with, the coping capacities. A methodology is presented based on adaptation pathways to account for coping capacities and to assess the effect on flood protection measures. The adaptation pathways method determines the point of failure of a particular strategy based on the change in an external driver, a point in time or a socio economic situation where / at which the strategy can no longer meet its objective. Pathways arrived at based on this methodology reflect future reality by considering changing engineering standards along with future uncertainties, risk taking abilities and adaptation capacities. This pathways based methodology determines the Adaptation tipping points (ATP), `time of occurrence of ATP' of flood protection measures after accounting for coping capacities, evaluates the measures and then provides the means to determine the adaptation pathways. Application of this methodology for flood protection measures in Can Tho city in the Mekong delta reveals the effect of coping capacity on the usefulness of flood protection measures and the delay in occurrence of tipping points. Consideration of coping capacity in the system owing to elevated property floor levels lead to the postponement of tipping points and improved the adaptation pathways comprising flood protection measures such as dikes. This information is useful to decision makers for planning and phasing of investments in flood protection.

  5. Flood-inundation maps for the Driftwood River and Sugar Creek near Edinburgh, Indiana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fowler, Kathleen K.; Kim, Moon H.; Menke, Chad D.

    2012-01-01

    Digital flood-inundation maps for an 11.2 mile reach of the Driftwood River and a 5.2 mile reach of Sugar Creek, both near Edinburgh, Indiana, were created by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) in cooperation with the Camp Atterbury Joint Maneuver Training Center, Edinburgh, Indiana. The inundation maps, which can be accessed through the USGS Flood Inundation Mapping Science Web site at http://water.usgs.gov/osw/flood_inundation/, depict estimates of the areal extent of flooding corresponding to selected water levels (stages) at the USGS streamgage 03363000 Driftwood River near Edinburgh, Ind. Current conditions at the USGS streamgage in Indiana may be obtained on the Internet at http://waterdata.usgs.gov/in/nwis/current/?type=flow. In addition, the information has been provided to the National Weather Service (NWS) for incorporation into their Advanced Hydrologic Prediction Service (AHPS) flood warning system at http://water.weather.gov/ahps/. The NWS forecasts flood hydrographs at many places that are often collocated at USGS streamgages. That forecasted peak-stage information, also available on the Internet, may be used in conjunction with the maps developed in this study to show predicted areas of flood inundation. For this study, flood profiles were computed for the stream reaches by means of a one-dimensional step-backwater model. The model was calibrated using the most current stage-discharge relations at the USGS streamgage 03363000 Driftwood River near Edinburgh, Ind. The hydraulic model was then used to determine elevations throughout the study reaches for nine water-surface profiles for flood stages at 1-ft intervals referenced to the streamgage datum and ranging from bankfull to nearly the highest recorded water level at the USGS streamgage 03363000 Driftwood River near Edinburgh, Ind. The simulated water-surface profiles were then combined with a geospatial digital elevation model (derived from Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) data) in order to

  6. Graded Elevation of c-Jun in Schwann Cells In Vivo: Gene Dosage Determines Effects on Development, Remyelination, Tumorigenesis, and Hypomyelination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fazal, Shaline V; Gomez-Sanchez, Jose A; Wagstaff, Laura J; Musner, Nicolo; Otto, Georg; Janz, Martin; Mirsky, Rhona; Jessen, Kristján R

    2017-12-13

    Schwann cell c-Jun is implicated in adaptive and maladaptive functions in peripheral nerves. In injured nerves, this transcription factor promotes the repair Schwann cell phenotype and regeneration and promotes Schwann-cell-mediated neurotrophic support in models of peripheral neuropathies. However, c-Jun is associated with tumor formation in some systems, potentially suppresses myelin genes, and has been implicated in demyelinating neuropathies. To clarify these issues and to determine how c-Jun levels determine its function, we have generated c-Jun OE/+ and c-Jun OE/OE mice with graded expression of c-Jun in Schwann cells and examined these lines during development, in adulthood, and after injury using RNA sequencing analysis, quantitative electron microscopic morphometry, Western blotting, and functional tests. Schwann cells are remarkably tolerant of elevated c-Jun because the nerves of c-Jun OE/+ mice, in which c-Jun is elevated ∼6-fold, are normal with the exception of modestly reduced myelin thickness. The stronger elevation of c-Jun in c-Jun OE/OE mice is, however, sufficient to induce significant hypomyelination pathology, implicating c-Jun as a potential player in demyelinating neuropathies. The tumor suppressor P19 ARF is strongly activated in the nerves of these mice and, even in aged c-Jun OE/OE mice, there is no evidence of tumors. This is consistent with the fact that tumors do not form in injured nerves, although they contain proliferating Schwann cells with strikingly elevated c-Jun. Furthermore, in crushed nerves of c-Jun OE/+ mice, where c-Jun levels are overexpressed sufficiently to accelerate axonal regeneration, myelination and function are restored after injury. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT In injured and diseased nerves, the transcription factor c-Jun in Schwann cells is elevated and variously implicated in controlling beneficial or adverse functions, including trophic Schwann cell support for neurons, promotion of regeneration, tumorigenesis

  7. Operational flood forecasting, warning and response for multi-scale flood risks in developing cities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rogelis Prada, M.C.

    2016-01-01

    Flood early warning systems are recognized as one of the most effective flood risk management instruments when correctly embedded in comprehensive flood risk management strategies and policies. Many efforts around the world are being put in place to advance the components that determine the

  8. Elevated CO2 stimulates marsh elevation gain, counterbalancing sea-level rise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langley, J Adam; McKee, Karen L; Cahoon, Donald R; Cherry, Julia A; Megonigal, J Patrick

    2009-04-14

    Tidal wetlands experiencing increased rates of sea-level rise (SLR) must increase rates of soil elevation gain to avoid permanent conversion to open water. The maximal rate of SLR that these ecosystems can tolerate depends partly on mineral sediment deposition, but the accumulation of organic matter is equally important for many wetlands. Plant productivity drives organic matter dynamics and is sensitive to global change factors, such as rising atmospheric CO(2) concentration. It remains unknown how global change will influence organic mechanisms that determine future tidal wetland viability. Here, we present experimental evidence that plant response to elevated atmospheric [CO(2)] stimulates biogenic mechanisms of elevation gain in a brackish marsh. Elevated CO(2) (ambient + 340 ppm) accelerated soil elevation gain by 3.9 mm yr(-1) in this 2-year field study, an effect mediated by stimulation of below-ground plant productivity. Further, a companion greenhouse experiment revealed that the CO(2) effect was enhanced under salinity and flooding conditions likely to accompany future SLR. Our results indicate that by stimulating biogenic contributions to marsh elevation, increases in the greenhouse gas, CO(2), may paradoxically aid some coastal wetlands in counterbalancing rising seas.

  9. Elevated CO2 stimulates marsh elevation gain, counterbalancing sea-level rise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langley, J. Adam; McKee, Karen L.; Cahoon, Donald R.; Cherry, Julia A.; Megonigal, J. Patrick

    2009-01-01

    Tidal wetlands experiencing increased rates of sea-level rise (SLR) must increase rates of soil elevation gain to avoid permanent conversion to open water. The maximal rate of SLR that these ecosystems can tolerate depends partly on mineral sediment deposition, but the accumulation of organic matter is equally important for many wetlands. Plant productivity drives organic matter dynamics and is sensitive to global change factors, such as rising atmospheric CO2 concentration. It remains unknown how global change will influence organic mechanisms that determine future tidal wetland viability. Here, we present experimental evidence that plant response to elevated atmospheric [CO2] stimulates biogenic mechanisms of elevation gain in a brackish marsh. Elevated CO2 (ambient + 340 ppm) accelerated soil elevation gain by 3.9 mm yr−1 in this 2-year field study, an effect mediated by stimulation of below-ground plant productivity. Further, a companion greenhouse experiment revealed that the CO2 effect was enhanced under salinity and flooding conditions likely to accompany future SLR. Our results indicate that by stimulating biogenic contributions to marsh elevation, increases in the greenhouse gas, CO2, may paradoxically aid some coastal wetlands in counterbalancing rising seas. PMID:19325121

  10. Flood-inundation maps for the West Branch Susquehanna River near the Boroughs of Lewisburg and Milton, Pennsylvania

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roland, Mark A.; Hoffman, Scott A.

    2014-01-01

    Digital flood-inundation maps for an approximate 8-mile reach of the West Branch Susquehanna River from approximately 2 miles downstream from the Borough of Lewisburg, extending upstream to approximately 1 mile upstream from the Borough of Milton, Pennsylvania, were created by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) in cooperation with the Susquehanna River Basin Commission (SRBC). The inundation maps, which can be accessed through the USGS Flood Inundation Mapping Science Web site at http://water.usgs.gov/osw/flood_inundation/, depict the estimated areal extent and depth of flooding corresponding to selected water levels (stages) at the USGS streamgage 01553500, West Branch Susquehanna River at Lewisburg, Pa. In addition, the information has been provided to the Susquehanna River Basin Commission (SRBC) for incorporation into their Susquehanna Inundation Map Viewer (SIMV) flood warning system (http://maps.srbc.net/simv/). The National Weather Service (NWS) forecasted peak-stage information (http://water.weather.gov/ahps) for USGS streamgage 01553500, West Branch Susquehanna River at Lewisburg, Pa., may be used in conjunction with the maps developed in this study to show predicted areas of flood inundation. In this study, flood profiles were computed for the stream reach by means of a one-dimensional step-backwater model. Calibration of the model was achieved using the most current stage-discharge relations (rating number 11.1) at USGS streamgage 01553500, West Branch Susquehanna River at Lewisburg, Pa., a documented water-surface profile from the December 2, 2010, flood, and recorded peak stage data. The hydraulic model was then used to determine 26 water-surface profiles for flood stages at 1-foot intervals referenced to the streamgage datum ranging from 14 feet (ft) to 39 ft. Modeled flood stages, as defined by NWS, include Action Stage, 14 ft; Flood Stage, 18 ft; Moderate Flood Stage, 23 ft; and Major Flood Stage, 28 ft. Geographic information system (GIS) technology

  11. Flood-inundation maps for the North Branch Elkhart River at Cosperville, Indiana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Moon H.; Johnson, Esther M.

    2014-01-01

    Digital flood-inundation maps for a reach of the North Branch Elkhart River at Cosperville, Indiana (Ind.), were created by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) in cooperation with the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Detroit District. The inundation maps, which can be accessed through the USGS Flood Inundation Mapping Science Web site at http://water.usgs.gov/osw/flood_inundation/ depict estimates of the areal extent and depth of flooding corresponding to selected water levels (stages) at USGS streamgage 04100222, North Branch Elkhart River at Cosperville, Ind. Current conditions for estimating near-real-time areas of inundation using USGS streamgage information may be obtained on the Internet at http://waterdata.usgs.gov/in/nwis/uv?site_no=04100222. In addition, information has been provided to the National Weather Service (NWS) for incorporation into their Advanced Hydrologic Prediction Service (AHPS) flood warning system (http:/water.weather.gov/ahps/). The NWS AHPS forecasts flood hydrographs at many places that are often colocated with USGS streamgages, including the North Branch Elkhart River at Cosperville, Ind. NWS AHPS-forecast peak-stage information may be used in conjunction with the maps developed in this study to show predicted areas of flood inundation. For this study, flood profiles were computed for the North Branch Elkhart River reach by means of a one-dimensional step-backwater model. The hydraulic model was calibrated by using the most current stage-discharge relations at USGS streamgage 04100222, North Branch Elkhart River at Cosperville, Ind., and preliminary high-water marks from the flood of March 1982. The calibrated hydraulic model was then used to determine four water-surface profiles for flood stages at 1-foot intervals referenced to the streamgage datum and ranging from bankfull to the highest stage of the current stage-discharge rating curve. The simulated water-surface profiles were then combined with a geographic information system (GIS

  12. Application of gis on determination of flood prone areas and critical arterial road network by using chaid method in bandung area

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Darwin

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Floods in Bandung area often occur when the rainfall is high then the water volume exceed the capacity of Citarum watershed. Floods cause economic and social losses. The purpose of this research is to get the GIS application model in the estimation of puddle area and road network in Bandung Metropolitan Area has disturbed.Geospatial map preparation methodology used statistical data from 11041 flood points, which divided into two groups, 7729 flood points to estimate the decision tree model and 3312 flood points to validate the model. The process of making flood vulnerability maps is approached by Chi-square Automatic Interaction Detection (CHAID method, and validation using Receiver Operating Characteristic (ROC method. Validation results in the area under the curve with a value of 93.1% for success rate and 92.7% for the prediction level.Chaid result is class 0 - 0,047 covering 76,68% area; Grades of 0.047-0.307 include 5.37%; Grades 0.307 - 0.599 (Low covering 5.36%; Grades 0.599 to 0.4444 include 5.31% and grade 0.844-1 (high covering 7.27% of the research area. Flood-prone road network is Link from Rancaekek (Area of PT Kahatex, link from Solokan Jeruk (Cicalengka-Majalaya, Link Baleendah, and linkDayeuhkolot (M.Toha - Andir

  13. Estimation of flood environmental effects using flood zone mapping techniques in Halilrood Kerman, Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boudaghpour, Siamak; Bagheri, Majid; Bagheri, Zahra

    2014-01-01

    High flood occurrences with large environmental damages have a growing trend in Iran. Dynamic movements of water during a flood cause different environmental damages in geographical areas with different characteristics such as topographic conditions. In general, environmental effects and damages caused by a flood in an area can be investigated from different points of view. The current essay is aiming at detecting environmental effects of flood occurrences in Halilrood catchment area of Kerman province in Iran using flood zone mapping techniques. The intended flood zone map was introduced in four steps. Steps 1 to 3 pave the way to calculate and estimate flood zone map in the understudy area while step 4 determines the estimation of environmental effects of flood occurrence. Based on our studies, wide range of accuracy for estimating the environmental effects of flood occurrence was introduced by using of flood zone mapping techniques. Moreover, it was identified that the existence of Jiroft dam in the study area can decrease flood zone from 260 hectares to 225 hectares and also it can decrease 20% of flood peak intensity. As a result, 14% of flood zone in the study area can be saved environmentally.

  14. The Three Gorges Dam: Does the Flooding Time Determine the Distribution of Schistosome-Transmitting Snails in the Middle and Lower Reaches of the Yangtze River, China?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Yang

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Schistosomiasis is one of the most devastating tropical diseases in the world. Oncomelania hupensis is the only intermediate host of Schistosoma japonicum, and its growth and development are sensitive to environmental factors. The Three Gorges Dam has substantially altered the water level in the Yangtze River. This study focused on the impact of the flooding time on the occurrence of Oncomelania snails in Hunan Province, China. Methods: The data regarding Oncomelania snails were collected from the Schistosomiasis Atlas of the People’s Republic of China. Air temperature, hours of daylight and relative humidity from 1995 to 2002 were collected from the China Meteorological Data Sharing Service System. The data for rainfall and days inundated with water were collected from the Hunan flood control information system and hydrological stations in Hunan Province. A generalized additive model was used to estimate the impact of these factors on the presence or absence of snails. Results: The number of days inundated with water in the areas with snails ranged from 56 to 212 days. However, 82 percent of the areas without snails were inundated with water less than 60 days. The lowest air temperature in a year in the areas without snails ranges from −2.88 °C to −2.10 °C, and the range was from −2.88 °C to −2.34 °C for areas with snails. Annual rainfall in the areas with snails ranged from 989 to 1565 mm, and the range was from 1230 mm to 1647 mm for the areas without snails. The results from the generalized additive model showed that the number of days inundated with water, lowest air temperature in a year, annual rainfall, days of daily rainfall greater than 0.1 mm, and hours of daylight were the factors that significantly affect the occurrence of snails in Hunan Province, China. Conclusions: The number of days inundated with water may be a key factor determining the geographical distribution of Oncomelania snails in Hunan Province

  15. Flood loss reduction of private households due to building precautionary measures -- lessons learned from the Elbe flood in August 2002

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Kreibich

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Building houses in inundation areas is always a risk, since absolute flood protection is impossible. Where settlements already exist, flood damage must be kept as small as possible. Suitable means are precautionary measures such as elevated building configuration or flood adapted use. However, data about the effects of such measures are rare, and consequently, the efficiency of different precautionary measures is unclear. To improve the knowledge about efficient precautionary measures, approximately 1200 private households, which were affected by the 2002 flood at the river Elbe and its tributaries, were interviewed about the flood damage of their buildings and contents as well as about their precautionary measures. The affected households had little flood experience, i.e. only 15% had experienced a flood before. 59% of the households stated that they did not know, that they live in a flood prone area. Thus, people were not well prepared, e.g. just 11% had used and furnished their house in a flood adapted way and only 6% had a flood adapted building structure. Building precautionary measures are mainly effective in areas with frequent small floods. But also during the extreme flood event in 2002 building measures reduced the flood loss. From the six different building precautionary measures under study, flood adapted use and adapted interior fitting were the most effective ones. They reduced the damage ratio for buildings by 46% and 53%, respectively. The damage ratio for contents was reduced by 48% due to flood adapted use and by 53% due to flood adapted interior fitting. The 2002 flood motivated a relatively large number of people to implement private precautionary measures, but still much more could be done. Hence, to further reduce flood losses, people's motivation to invest in precaution should be improved. More information campaigns and financial incentives should be issued to encourage precautionary measures.

  16. Mount St. Helens Project. Cowlitz River Levee Systems, 2009 Level of Flood Protection Update Summary

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-04

    of Flood Protection Update Summary Draft December 2009 Page F-5 soil in unsaturated region. So those equipotential lines above phreatic surface are...Lexington levee where a 50 percent probability of failure is assumed when the water surface is at the top of the levee and a 100 percent chance of failure...is assumed when the water surface is above the top of the levee. Additionally, for cases where the SWL is determined to be the same elevation as

  17. Structural master plan of flood mitigation measures

    OpenAIRE

    A. Heidari

    2009-01-01

    Flood protection is one of the practical methods in damage reduction. Although it not possible to be completely protected from flood disaster but major part of damages can be reduced by mitigation plans. In this paper, the optimum flood mitigation master plan is determined by economic evaluation in trading off between the construction costs and expected value of damage reduction as the benefits. Size of the certain mitigation alternative is also be obtained by risk analysis by accepting possi...

  18. Social media for disaster response during floods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eilander, D.; van de Vries, C.; Baart, F.; van Swol, R.; Wagemaker, J.; van Loenen, A.

    2015-12-01

    During floods it is difficult to obtain real-time accurate information about the extent and severity of the hazard. This information is very important for disaster risk reduction management and crisis relief organizations. Currently, real-time information is derived from few sources such as field reports, traffic camera's, satellite images and areal images. However, getting a real-time and accurate picture of the situation on the ground remains difficult. At the same time, people affected by natural hazards increasingly share their observations and their needs through digital media. Unlike conventional monitoring systems, Twitter data contains a relatively large number of real-time ground truth observations representing both physical hazard characteristics and hazard impacts. In the city of Jakarta, Indonesia, the intensity of unique flood related tweets during a flood event, peaked at almost 900 tweets per minute during floods in early 2015. Flood events around the world in 2014/2015 yielded large numbers of flood related tweets: from Philippines (85.000) to Pakistan (82.000) to South-Korea (50.000) to Detroit (20.000). The challenge here is to filter out useful content from this cloud of data, validate these observations and convert them to readily usable information. In Jakarta, flood related tweets often contain information about the flood depth. In a pilot we showed that this type of information can be used for real-time mapping of the flood extent by plotting these observations on a Digital Elevation Model. Uncertainties in the observations were taken into account by assigning a probability to each observation indicating its likelihood to be correct based on statistical analysis of the total population of tweets. The resulting flood maps proved to be correct for about 75% of the neighborhoods in Jakarta. Further cross-validation of flood related tweets against (hydro-) meteorological data is to likely improve the skill of the method.

  19. Hydrochemical aspects of the Aue pit flooding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meyer, J.; Jenk, U.; Schuppan, W.; Knappik, R.

    1998-01-01

    WISMUT is conducting controlled flooding of underground mines at the Schlema-Alberoda and Poehla sites. Flooding of the Poehla mine lasted from January 1992 through September 1995. Flooding at the Niederschlema-Alberoda site began in July 1990 and will continue to approximately 2002. In mid-1998 the flood level had reached the - 420 m level which is about 1,400 m above the lowest mine level. Only ground waters with low mineral and pollutant content are used for flooding purposes. Typically, the flooding process results in elevated levels of mineral salts and of uranium, radium, arsenic, iron, and manganese in flooding waters. However, the mobilised part of these contaminants represents only a small fraction of potential concentrations contained in the surrounding rock. Geochemical and hydrochemical conditions at both mines are characterised by the presence of carbonate buffers and by neutral pH and intermediate to low Eh. Decrease due to oxidation of sulphides in the long term is unlikely. Environmentally relevant metals in flooding waters may be dissolved, colloidal, or suspended solids with uranium present as uranyl carbonate complexes. Intensity of mobilisation is primarily a function of kinetic processes. Post flooding conditions at the Poehla subsite exhibit specific hydrochemical phenomena such as extremely reduced SO 4 concentrations and an increase in Ra concentrations over time. Continued flood monitoring will provide the basis for more in-depth interpretation and prognosis of contaminant mobilisation. Current investigations focus on technically feasible in situ control of mine flooding at the Schlema-Alberoda site to reduce contaminant mobilisation. At both sites water treatment plants are either on stream or under construction. (orig.)

  20. Flood-inundation maps for the Saddle River from Rochelle Park to Lodi, New Jersey, 2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoppe, Heidi L.; Watson, Kara M.

    2012-01-01

    Digital flood-inundation maps for a 2.75-mile reach of the Saddle River from 0.2 mile upstream from the Interstate 80 bridge in Rochelle Park to 1.5 miles downstream from the U.S. Route 46 bridge in Lodi, New Jersey, were created by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) in cooperation with the New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection (NJDEP). The inundation maps, which can be accessed through the USGS Flood Inundation Mapping Science Web site at http://water.usgs.gov/osw/flood_inundation, depict estimates of the areal extent and depth of flooding corresponding to selected water levels (stages) at the USGS streamgage at Saddle River at Lodi, New Jersey (station 01391500). Current conditions for estimating near real-time areas of inundation using USGS streamgage information may be obtained on the Internet at http://waterdata.usgs.gov/nwis/uv?site_no=01391500. The National Weather Service (NWS) forecasts flood hydrographs at many places that are often collocated with USGS streamgages. NWS-forecasted peak-stage information may be used in conjunction with the maps developed in this study to show predicted areas of flood inundation. In this study, flood profiles were computed for the stream reach by means of a one-dimensional step-backwater model. The model was calibrated using the most current stage-discharge relations at the Saddle River at Lodi, New Jersey streamgage and documented high-water marks from recent floods. The hydraulic model was then used to determine 11 water-surface profiles for flood stages at the Saddle River streamgage at 1-ft intervals referenced to the streamgage datum, North American Vertical Datum of 1988 (NAVD 88), and ranging from bankfull, 0.5 ft below NWS Action Stage, to the extent of the stage-discharge rating, which is approximately 1 ft higher than the highest recorded water level at the streamgage. Action Stage is the stage which when reached by a rising stream the NWS or a partner needs to take some type of mitigation action in

  1. Flood-inundation maps for the Wabash River at Lafayette, Indiana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Moon H.

    2018-05-10

    Digital flood-inundation maps for an approximately 4.8-mile reach of the Wabash River at Lafayette, Indiana (Ind.) were created by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) in cooperation with the Indiana Office of Community and Rural Affairs. The inundation maps, which can be accessed through the USGS Flood Inundation Mapping Science web site at https://water.usgs.gov/osw/flood_inundation/, depict estimates of the areal extent and depth of flooding corresponding to selected water levels (stages) at USGS streamgage 03335500, Wabash River at Lafayette, Ind. Current streamflow conditions for estimating near-real-time areas of inundation using USGS streamgage information may be obtained on the internet at https://waterdata.usgs.gov/in/nwis/uv?site_no=03335500. In addition, information has been provided to the National Weather Service (NWS) for incorporation into their Advanced Hydrologic Prediction Service (AHPS) flood-warning system (https://water.weather.gov/ahps/). The NWS AHPS forecasts flood hydrographs at many places that are often colocated with USGS streamgages, including the Wabash River at Lafayette, Ind. NWS AHPS-forecast peak-stage information may be used with the maps developed in this study to show predicted areas of flood inundation.For this study, flood profiles were computed for the Wabash River reach by means of a one-dimensional step-backwater model. The hydraulic model was calibrated by using the most current stage-discharge relations at USGS streamgage 03335500, Wabash River at Lafayette, Ind., and high-water marks from the flood of July 2003 (U.S. Army Corps of Engineers [USACE], 2007). The calibrated hydraulic model was then used to determine 23 water-surface profiles for flood stages at 1-foot intervals referenced to the streamgage datum and ranging from bankfull to the highest stage of the current stage-discharge rating curve. The simulated water-surface profiles were then combined with a geographic information system digital elevation model derived

  2. Flood-inundation maps for the East Fork White River at Columbus, Indiana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lombard, Pamela J.

    2013-01-01

    Digital flood-inundation maps for a 5.4-mile reach of the East Fork White River at Columbus, Indiana, from where the Flatrock and Driftwood Rivers combine to make up East Fork White River to just upstream of the confluence of Clifty Creek with the East Fork White River, were created by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) in cooperation with the Indiana Department of Transportation. The inundation maps, which can be accessed through the USGS Flood Inundation Mapping Science Web site at http://water.usgs.gov/osw/flood_inundation, depict estimates of the areal extent of flooding corresponding to selected water levels (stages) at USGS streamgage 03364000, East Fork White River at Columbus, Indiana. Current conditions at the USGS streamgage may be obtained on the Internet from the USGS National Water Information System (http://waterdata.usgs.gov/in/nwis/uv/?site_no=03364000&agency_cd=USGS&). The National Weather Service (NWS) forecasts flood hydrographs for the East Fork White River at Columbus, Indiana at their Advanced Hydrologic Prediction Service (AHPS) flood warning system Website (http://water.weather.gov/ahps/), that may be used in conjunction with the maps developed in this study to show predicted areas of flood inundation. In this study, flood profiles were computed for the stream reach by means of a one-dimensional step-backwater model. The hydraulic model was calibrated by using the most current stage-discharge relation at USGS streamgage 03364000, East Fork White River at Columbus, Indiana. The calibrated hydraulic model was then used to determine 15 water-surface profiles for flood stages at 1-foot (ft) intervals referenced to the streamgage datum and ranging from bankfull to approximately the highest recorded water level at the streamgage. The simulated water-surface profiles were then combined with a geographic information system digital elevation model (derived from Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) data), having a 0.37-ft vertical accuracy and a 1.02 ft

  3. Flood-inundation maps for the East Fork White River near Bedford, Indiana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fowler, Kathleen K.

    2014-01-01

    Digital flood-inundation maps for an 1.8-mile reach of the East Fork White River near Bedford, Indiana (Ind.) were created by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) in cooperation with the Indiana Department of Transportation. The inundation maps, which can be accessed through the USGS Flood Inundation Mapping Science Web site at http://water.usgs.gov/osw/flood_inundation/ depict estimates of the areal extent and depth of flooding corresponding to selectedwater levels (stages) at USGS streamgage 03371500, East Fork White River near Bedford, Ind. Current conditions for estimating near-real-time areas of inundation using USGS streamgage information may be obtained on the Internet at http://waterdata.usgs.gov/in/nwis/uv?site_no=03371500. In addition, information has been provided to the National Weather Service (NWS) for incorporation into their Advanced Hydrologic Prediction Service (AHPS) flood warning system (http://water.weather.gov/ahps/). The NWS forecasts flood hydrographs at many places that are often colocated with USGS streamgages, including the East Fork White River near Bedford, Ind. NWS-forecasted peak-stage information may be used in conjunction with the maps developed in this study to show predicted areas of flood inundation. For this study, flood profiles were computed for the East Fork White River reach by means of a one-dimensional step-backwater model. The hydraulic model was calibrated by using the most current stage-discharge relations at USGS streamgage 03371500, East Fork White River near Bedford, Ind., and documented high-water marks from the flood of June 2008. The calibrated hydraulic model was then used to determine 20 water-surface profiles for flood stages at 1-foot intervals referenced to the streamgage datum and ranging from bankfull to the highest stage of the current stage-discharge rating curve. The simulated water-surface profiles were then combined with a geographic information system (GIS) digital elevation model (DEM, derived from

  4. Flooding and Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Clearinghouse for Educational Facilities, 2011

    2011-01-01

    According to the Federal Emergency Management Agency, flooding is the nation's most common natural disaster. Some floods develop slowly during an extended period of rain or in a warming trend following a heavy snow. Flash floods can occur quickly, without any visible sign of rain. Catastrophic floods are associated with burst dams and levees,…

  5. Structural master plan of flood mitigation measures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Heidari

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Flood protection is one of the practical methods in damage reduction. Although it not possible to be completely protected from flood disaster but major part of damages can be reduced by mitigation plans. In this paper, the optimum flood mitigation master plan is determined by economic evaluation in trading off between the construction costs and expected value of damage reduction as the benefits. Size of the certain mitigation alternative is also be obtained by risk analysis by accepting possibility of flood overtopping. Different flood mitigation alternatives are investigated from various aspects in the Dez and Karun river floodplain areas as a case study in south west of IRAN. The results show that detention dam and flood diversion are the best alternatives of flood mitigation methods as well as enforcing the flood control purpose of upstream multipurpose reservoirs. Dyke and levees are not mostly justifiable because of negative impact on down stream by enhancing routed flood peak discharge magnitude and flood damages as well.

  6. Decision Support for Flood Event Prediction and Monitoring

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mioc, Darka; Anton, François; Liang, Gengsheng

    2007-01-01

    In this paper the development of Web GIS based decision support system for flood events is presented. To improve flood prediction we developed the decision support system for flood prediction and monitoring that integrates hydrological modelling and CARIS GIS. We present the methodology for data...... integration, floodplain delineation, and online map interfaces. Our Web-based GIS model can dynamically display observed and predicted flood extents for decision makers and the general public. The users can access Web-based GIS that models current flood events and displays satellite imagery and digital...... elevation model integrated with flood plain area. The system can show how the flooding prediction based on the output from hydrological modeling for the next 48 hours along the lower Saint John River Valley....

  7. Street floods in Metro Manila and possible solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lagmay, Alfredo Mahar; Mendoza, Jerico; Cipriano, Fatima; Delmendo, Patricia Anne; Lacsamana, Micah Nieves; Moises, Marc Anthony; Pellejera, Nicanor; Punay, Kenneth Niño; Sabio, Glenn; Santos, Laurize; Serrano, Jonathan; Taniza, Herbert James; Tingin, Neil Eneri

    2017-09-01

    Urban floods from thunderstorms cause severe problems in Metro Manila due to road traffic. Using Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR)-derived topography, flood simulations and anecdotal reports, the root of surface flood problems in Metro Manila is identified. Majority of flood-prone areas are along the intersection of creeks and streets located in topographic lows. When creeks overflow or when rapidly accumulated street flood does not drain fast enough to the nearest stream channel, the intersecting road also gets flooded. Possible solutions include the elevation of roads or construction of well-designed drainage structures leading to the creeks. Proposed solutions to the flood problem of Metro Manila may avoid paralyzing traffic problems due to short-lived rain events, which according to Japan International Cooperation Agency (JICA) cost the Philippine economy 2.4billionpesos/day. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  8. Flood of July 21, 1975 in Mercer County, New Jersey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stankowski, Stephen J.; Schopp, Robert D.; Velnich, Anthony J.

    1975-01-01

    Intense rainfall during the evening of July 20 and early morning hours of July 21, 1975 caused flooding of unprecedented magnitude in highly urbanized Mercer County, New Jersey. Over 6 inches (152 millimetres) of rainfall was recorded during a 10-hour period at Trenton, the capital of New Jersey. No lives were lost but damages to highways and bridges, to industrial, business, and residential buildings, to farmlands and crops, and to water supply systems were severe. This report illustrates the magnitude of the flood and provides hydrologic data needed for planning and design to control or lessen damages from future floods. It includes discussions of the antecedent conditions and meteorological aspects of the storm; a description of the flood and comparison to previous floods; a summary of flood stages and discharges; a discussion of flood frequency; and photomosaics which show inundated areas. More than 200 high-water marks are described as to location and elevation above mean sea level.

  9. An Agent-Based Model of Evolving Community Flood Risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tonn, Gina L; Guikema, Seth D

    2017-11-17

    Although individual behavior plays a major role in community flood risk, traditional flood risk models generally do not capture information on how community policies and individual decisions impact the evolution of flood risk over time. The purpose of this study is to improve the understanding of the temporal aspects of flood risk through a combined analysis of the behavioral, engineering, and physical hazard aspects of flood risk. Additionally, the study aims to develop a new modeling approach for integrating behavior, policy, flood hazards, and engineering interventions. An agent-based model (ABM) is used to analyze the influence of flood protection measures, individual behavior, and the occurrence of floods and near-miss flood events on community flood risk. The ABM focuses on the following decisions and behaviors: dissemination of flood management information, installation of community flood protection, elevation of household mechanical equipment, and elevation of homes. The approach is place based, with a case study area in Fargo, North Dakota, but is focused on generalizable insights. Generally, community mitigation results in reduced future damage, and individual action, including mitigation and movement into and out of high-risk areas, can have a significant influence on community flood risk. The results of this study provide useful insights into the interplay between individual and community actions and how it affects the evolution of flood risk. This study lends insight into priorities for future work, including the development of more in-depth behavioral and decision rules at the individual and community level. © 2017 Society for Risk Analysis.

  10. Implementation of Fully Coupled Heat and Mass Transport Model to Determine Temperature and Moisture State at Elevated Temperatures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pecenko, R.; Hozjan, Tomaz; Svensson, Staffan

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study is to present precise numerical formulation to determine temperature and moisture state of timber in the situation prior pyrolysis. The strong formulations needed for an accurate description of the physics are presented and discussed as well as their coupling terms. From...

  11. Automatic Algorithm for the Determination of the Anderson-wilkins Acuteness Score In Patients With St Elevation Myocardial Infarction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fakhri, Yama; Sejersten, Maria; Schoos, Mikkel Malby

    2016-01-01

    using 50 ECGs. Each ECG lead (except aVR) was manually scored according to AW-score by two independent experts (Exp1 and Exp2) and automatically by our designed algorithm (auto-score). An adjudicated manual score (Adj-score) was determined between Exp1 and Exp2. The inter-rater reliabilities (IRRs...

  12. Geomorphic changes caused by the 2011 flood at selected sites along the lower Missouri River and comparison to historical floods: Chapter H in 2011 floods of the central United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juracek, Kyle E.

    2014-01-01

    An analysis of recent and historical U.S. Geological Survey streamgage information was used to assess geomorphic changes caused by the 2011 flood, in comparison to selected historical floods, at three streamgage sites along the lower Missouri River—Sioux City, Iowa; Omaha, Nebraska; and Kansas City, Missouri. Channel-width change was not evident at the three streamgage sites following the 2011 flood and likely was inhibited by bank stabilization. Pronounced changes in channel-bed elevation were indicated. At Sioux City and Omaha, the geomorphic effects of the 2011 flood were similar in terms of the magnitude of channelbed scour and recovery. At both sites, the 2011 flood caused pronounced scour (about 3 feet) of the channel bed; however, at Omaha, most of the channel-bed scour occurred after the flood had receded. More than 1 year after the flood, the channel bed had only partially recovered (about 1 foot) at both sites. Pronounced scour (about 3 feet at Sioux City and about 1.5 feet at Omaha) also was caused by the 1952 flood, which had a substantially larger peak discharge but was much shorter in duration at both sites. Again, at Omaha, most of the channel- bed scour occurred after the flood had receded. At Sioux City, substantial recovery of the channel bed (about 2.5 feet) was documented 1 year after the 1952 flood. Recovery to the pre-flood elevation was complete by April 1954. The greater recovery following the 1952 flood, compared to the 2011 flood, likely was related to a more abundant sediment supply because the flood predated the completion of most of the main-stem dam, channelization, and bank stabilization projects. At Omaha, following the 1952 flood, the channel bed never fully recovered to its pre-flood elevation. The geomorphic effect of the 2011 flood at Kansas City was fill (about 1 foot) on the channel bed followed by relative stability. The 1952 flood, which had a substantially larger peak discharge but was much shorter in duration, caused

  13. TIME SERIES CHARACTERISTIC ANALYSIS OF RAINFALL, LAND USE AND FLOOD DISCHARGE BASED ON ARIMA BOX-JENKINS MODEL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abror Abror

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Indonesia located in tropic area consists of wet season and dry season. However, in last few years, in river discharge in dry season is very little, but in contrary, in wet season, frequency of flood increases with sharp peak and increasingly great water elevation. The increased flood discharge may occur due to change in land use or change in rainfall characteristic. Both matters should get clarity. Therefore, a research should be done to analyze rainfall characteristic, land use and flood discharge in some watershed area (DAS quantitatively from time series data. The research was conducted in DAS Gintung in Parakankidang, DAS Gung in Danawarih, DAS Rambut in Cipero, DAS Kemiri in Sidapurna and DAS Comal in Nambo, located in Tegal Regency and Pemalang Regency in Central Java Province. This research activity consisted of three main steps: input, DAS system and output. Input is DAS determination and selection and searching secondary data. DAS system is early secondary data processing consisting of rainfall analysis, HSS GAMA I parameter, land type analysis and DAS land use. Output is final processing step that consisting of calculation of Tadashi Tanimoto, USSCS effective rainfall, flood discharge, ARIMA analysis, result analysis and conclusion. Analytical calculation of ARIMA Box-Jenkins time series used software Number Cruncher Statistical Systems and Power Analysis Sample Size (NCSS-PASS version 2000, which result in time series characteristic in form of time series pattern, mean square errors (MSE, root mean square ( RMS, autocorrelation of residual and trend. Result of this research indicates that composite CN and flood discharge is proportional that means when composite CN trend increase then flood discharge trend also increase and vice versa. Meanwhile, decrease of rainfall trend is not always followed with decrease in flood discharge trend. The main cause of flood discharge characteristic is DAS management characteristic, not change in

  14. HYDRAULIC SIMULATION OF FLASH FLOOD AS TRIGGERED BY NATURAL DAM BREAK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanuar Tri Kurniawan

    2015-05-01

    Calibration model result showed that the height of natural dam significantly influence changes of water surface elevation at control point. Tracing of flood result in reconstruction of January 2006 flood showed the conformity with the real event. It was observed from the arrival time of flood at certain location. From obtained results, it can be concluded that simulation modeling gave the acceptable results.

  15. A Cascading Storm-Flood-Landslide Guidance System: Development and Application in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Ziyue; Tang, Guoqiang; Long, Di; Ma, Meihong; Hong, Yang

    2016-04-01

    Flash floods and landslides, triggered by storms, often interact and cause cascading effects on human lives and property. Satellite remote sensing data has significant potential use in analysis of these natural hazards. As one of the regions continuously affected by severe flash floods and landslides, Yunnan Province, located in Southwest China, has a complex mountainous hydrometeorology and suffers from frequent heavy rainfalls from May through to late September. Taking Yunnan as a test-bed, this study proposed a Cascading Storm-Flood-Landslide Guidance System to progressively analysis and evaluate the risk of the multi-hazards based on multisource satellite remote sensing data. First, three standardized rainfall amounts (average daily amount in flood seasons, maximum 1h and maximum 6h amount) from the products of Topical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) Multi-satellite Precipitation Analysis (TMPA) were used as rainfall indicators to derive the StorM Hazard Index (SMHI). In this process, an integrated approach of the Analytic Hierarchy Process (AHP) and the Information-Entropy theory was adopted to determine the weight of each indicator. Then, land cover and vegetation cover data from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) products, soil type from the Harmonized World Soil Database (HWSD) soil map, and slope from the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) data were add as semi-static geo-topographical indicators to derive the Flash Flood Hazard Index (FFHI). Furthermore, three more relevant landslide-controlling indicators, including elevation, slope angle and soil text were involved to derive the LandSlide Hazard Index (LSHI). Further inclusion of GDP, population and prevention measures as vulnerability indicators enabled to consecutively predict the risk of storm to flash flood and landslide, respectively. Consequently, the spatial patterns of the hazard indices show that the southeast of Yunnan has more possibility to encounter with storms

  16. Flood-inundation maps for Indian Creek and Tomahawk Creek, Johnson County, Kansas, 2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, Arin J.; Studley, Seth E.

    2016-01-25

    Digital flood-inundation maps for a 6.4-mile upper reach of Indian Creek from College Boulevard to the confluence with Tomahawk Creek, a 3.9-mile reach of Tomahawk Creek from 127th Street to the confluence with Indian Creek, and a 1.9-mile lower reach of Indian Creek from the confluence with Tomahawk Creek to just beyond the Kansas/Missouri border at State Line Road in Johnson County, Kansas, were created by the U.S. Geological Survey in cooperation with the city of Overland Park, Kansas. The flood-inundation maps, which can be accessed through the U.S. Geological Survey Flood Inundation Mapping Science Web site at http://water.usgs.gov/osw/flood_inundation/, depict estimates of the areal extent and depth of flooding corresponding to selected water levels (stages) at the U.S. Geological Survey streamgages on Indian Creek at Overland Park, Kansas; Indian Creek at State Line Road, Leawood, Kansas; and Tomahawk Creek near Overland Park, Kansas. Near real time stages at these streamgages may be obtained on the Web from the U.S. Geological Survey National Water Information System at http://waterdata.usgs.gov/nwis or the National Weather Service Advanced Hydrologic Prediction Service at http://water.weather.gov/ahps/, which also forecasts flood hydrographs at these sites.Flood profiles were computed for the stream reaches by means of a one-dimensional step-backwater model. The model was calibrated for each reach by using the most current stage-discharge relations at the streamgages. The hydraulic models were then used to determine 15 water-surface profiles for Indian Creek at Overland Park, Kansas; 17 water-surface profiles for Indian Creek at State Line Road, Leawood, Kansas; and 14 water-surface profiles for Tomahawk Creek near Overland Park, Kansas, for flood stages at 1-foot intervals referenced to the streamgage datum and ranging from bankfull to the next interval above the 0.2-percent annual exceedance probability flood level (500-year recurrence interval). The

  17. Flood-inundation maps for the DuPage River from Plainfield to Shorewood, Illinois, 2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Elizabeth A.; Sharpe, Jennifer B.

    2013-01-01

    Digital flood-inundation maps for a 15.5-mi reach of the DuPage River from Plainfield to Shorewood, Illinois, were created by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) in cooperation with the Will County Stormwater Management Planning Committee. The inundation maps, which can be accessed through the USGS Flood Inundation Mapping Science Web site at http://water.usgs.gov/osw/flood_inundation/ depict estimates of the areal extent of flooding corresponding to selected water levels (gage heights or stages) at the USGS streamgage at DuPage River at Shorewood, Illinois (sta. no. 05540500). Current conditions at the USGS streamgage may be obtained on the Internet at http://waterdata.usgs.gov/usa/nwis/uv?05540500. In addition, the information has been provided to the National Weather Service (NWS) for incorporation into their Advanced Hydrologic Prediction Service (AHPS) flood warning system (http://water.weather.gov/ahps/). The NWS forecasts flood hydrographs at many places that are often colocated with USGS streamgages. The NWS-forecasted peak-stage information, also shown on the DuPage River at Shorewood inundation Web site, may be used in conjunction with the maps developed in this study to show predicted areas of flood inundation. In this study, flood profiles were computed for the stream reach by means of a one-dimensional step-backwater model. The hydraulic model was then used to determine nine water-surface profiles for flood stages at 1-ft intervals referenced to the streamgage datum and ranging from NWS Action stage of 6 ft to the historic crest of 14.0 ft. The simulated water-surface profiles were then combined with a Digital Elevation Model (DEM) (derived from Light Detection And Ranging (LiDAR) data) by using a Geographic Information System (GIS) in order to delineate the area flooded at each water level. These maps, along with information on the Internet regarding current gage height from USGS streamgages and forecasted stream stages from the NWS, provide emergency

  18. Simulated and observed 2010 floodwater elevations in the Pawcatuck and Wood Rivers, Rhode Island

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarriello, Phillip J.; Straub, David E.; Smith, Thor E.

    2014-01-01

    Heavy, persistent rains from late February through March 2010 caused severe flooding that set, or nearly set, peaks of record for streamflows and water levels at many long-term U.S. Geological Survey streamgages in Rhode Island. In response to this flood, hydraulic models of Pawcatuck River (26.9 miles) and Wood River (11.6 miles) were updated from the most recent approved U.S. Department of Homeland Security-Federal Emergency Management Agency flood insurance study (FIS) to simulate water-surface elevations (WSEs) for specified flows and boundary conditions. The hydraulic models were updated to Hydrologic Engineering Center-River Analysis System (HEC-RAS) using steady-state simulations and incorporate new field-survey data at structures, high resolution land-surface elevation data, and updated flood flows from a related study. The models were used to simulate the 0.2-percent annual exceedance probability (AEP) flood, which is the AEP determined for the 2010 flood in the Pawcatuck and Wood Rivers. The simulated WSEs were compared to high-water mark (HWM) elevation data obtained in a related study following the March–April 2010 flood, which included 39 HWMs along the Pawcatuck River and 11 HWMs along the Wood River. The 2010 peak flow generally was larger than the 0.2-percent AEP flow, which, in part, resulted in the FIS and updated model WSEs to be lower than the 2010 HWMs. The 2010 HWMs for the Pawcatuck River averaged about 1.6 feet (ft) higher than the 0.2-percent AEP WSEs simulated in the updated model and 2.5 ft higher than the WSEs in the FIS. The 2010 HWMs for the Wood River averaged about 1.3 ft higher than the WSEs simulated in the updated model and 2.5 ft higher than the WSEs in the FIS. The improved agreement of the updated simulated water elevations to observed 2010 HWMs provides a measure of the hydraulic model performance, which indicates the updated models better represent flooding at other AEPs than the existing FIS models.

  19. Data Elevator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2017-04-29

    Data Elevator: Efficient Asynchronous Data Movement in Hierarchical Storage Systems Multi-layer storage subsystems, including SSD-based burst buffers and disk-based parallel file systems (PFS), are becoming part of HPC systems. However, software for this storage hierarchy is still in its infancy. Applications may have to explicitly move data among the storage layers. We propose Data Elevator for transparently and efficiently moving data between a burst buffer and a PFS. Users specify the final destination for their data, typically on PFS, Data Elevator intercepts the I/O calls, stages data on burst buffer, and then asynchronously transfers the data to their final destination in the background. This system allows extensive optimizations, such as overlapping read and write operations, choosing I/O modes, and aligning buffer boundaries. In tests with large-scale scientific applications, Data Elevator is as much as 4.2X faster than Cray DataWarp, the start-of-art software for burst buffer, and 4X faster than directly writing to PFS. The Data Elevator library uses HDF5's Virtual Object Layer (VOL) for intercepting parallel I/O calls that write data to PFS. The intercepted calls are redirected to the Data Elevator, which provides a handle to write the file in a faster and intermediate burst buffer system. Once the application finishes writing the data to the burst buffer, the Data Elevator job uses HDF5 to move the data to final destination in an asynchronous manner. Hence, using the Data Elevator library is currently useful for applications that call HDF5 for writing data files. Also, the Data Elevator depends on the HDF5 VOL functionality.

  20. Protein Requirements Are Elevated in Endurance Athletes after Exercise as Determined by the Indicator Amino Acid Oxidation Method.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroyuki Kato

    Full Text Available A higher protein intake has been recommended for endurance athletes compared with healthy non-exercising individuals based primarily on nitrogen balance methodology. The aim of this study was to determine the estimated average protein requirement and recommended protein intake in endurance athletes during an acute 3-d controlled training period using the indicator amino acid oxidation method. After 2-d of controlled diet (1.4 g protein/kg/d and training (10 and 5km/d, respectively, six male endurance-trained adults (28±4 y of age; Body weight, 64.5±10.0 kg; VO2peak, 60.3±6.7 ml·kg-1·min-1; means±SD performed an acute bout of endurance exercise (20 km treadmill run prior to consuming test diets providing variable amounts of protein (0.2-2.8 g·kg-1·d-1 and sufficient energy. Protein was provided as a crystalline amino acid mixture based on the composition of egg protein with [1-13C]phenylalanine provided to determine whole body phenylalanine flux, 13CO2 excretion, and phenylalanine oxidation. The estimated average protein requirement was determined as the breakpoint after biphasic linear regression analysis with a recommended protein intake defined as the upper 95% confidence interval. Phenylalanine flux (68.8±8.5 μmol·kg-1·h-1 was not affected by protein intake. 13CO2 excretion displayed a robust bi-phase linear relationship (R2 = 0.86 that resulted in an estimated average requirement and a recommended protein intake of 1.65 and 1.83 g protein·kg-1·d-1, respectively, which was similar to values based on phenylalanine oxidation (1.53 and 1.70 g·kg-1·d-1, respectively. We report a recommended protein intake that is greater than the RDA (0.8 g·kg-1·d-1 and current recommendations for endurance athletes (1.2-1.4 g·kg-1·d-1. Our results suggest that the metabolic demand for protein in endurance-trained adults on a higher volume training day is greater than their sedentary peers and current recommendations for athletes based

  1. Lessons Learned from Southeast Asian Floods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osti, R.; Tanaka, S.

    2009-04-01

    At certain scales, flood has always been the lifeline of many people from Southeast Asian countries. People are traditionally accustomed to living with such floods and their livelihood is adjusted accordingly to optimize the benefits from the floods. However, large scale flood occasionally turns into the disaster and causes massive destruction not only in terms of human causalities but also damage to economic, ecological and social harmonies in the region. Although economic growth is prevailing in a relative term, the capacity of people to cope with such extreme events is weakening therefore the flood disaster risk is increasing in time. Recent examples of flood disaster in the region clearly show the increasing severity of disaster impact. This study reveals that there are many factors, which directly or indirectly influence the change. This paper considers the most prominent natural and socio-economic factors and analyzes their trend with respect to flood disasters in each country's context. A regional scale comparative analysis further helps to exchange the know how and to determine what kind of strategy and policy are lacking to manage the floods in a long run. It is also helpful in identifying the critical sectors that should be addressed first to mitigate the potential damage from the floods.

  2. Effect of Urban Green Spaces and Flooded Area Type on Flooding Probability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyomin Kim

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Countermeasures to urban flooding should consider long-term perspectives, because climate change impacts are unpredictable and complex. Urban green spaces have emerged as a potential option to reduce urban flood risks, and their effectiveness has been highlighted in notable urban water management studies. In this study, flooded areas in Seoul, Korea, were divided into four flooded area types by cluster analysis based on topographic and physical characteristics and verified using discriminant analysis. After division by flooded area type, logistic regression analysis was performed to determine how the flooding probability changes with variations in green space area. Type 1 included regions where flooding occurred in a drainage basin that had a flood risk management infrastructure (FRMI. In Type 2, the slope was steep; the TWI (Topographic Wetness Index was relatively low; and soil drainage was favorable. Type 3 represented the gentlest sloping areas, and these were associated with the highest TWI values. In addition, these areas had the worst soil drainage. Type 4 had moderate slopes, imperfect soil drainage and lower than average TWI values. We found that green spaces exerted a considerable influence on urban flooding probabilities in Seoul, and flooding probabilities could be reduced by over 50% depending on the green space area and the locations where green spaces were introduced. Increasing the area of green spaces was the most effective method of decreasing flooding probability in Type 3 areas. In Type 2 areas, the maximum hourly precipitation affected the flooding probability significantly, and the flooding probability in these areas was high despite the extensive green space area. These findings can contribute towards establishing guidelines for urban spatial planning to respond to urban flooding.

  3. Determination of Scattering and Absorption Coefficients for Plasma-Sprayed Yttria-Stabilized Zirconia Thermal Barrier Coatings at Elevated Temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eldridge, Jeffrey I.; Spuckler, Charles M.; Markham, James R.

    2009-01-01

    The temperature dependence of the scattering and absorption coefficients for a set of freestanding plasma-sprayed 8 wt% yttria-stabilized zirconia (8YSZ) thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) was determined at temperatures up to 1360 C in a wavelength range from 1.2 micrometers up to the 8YSZ absorption edge. The scattering and absorption coefficients were determined by fitting the directional-hemispherical reflectance and transmittance values calculated by a four-flux Kubelka Munk method to the experimentally measured hemispherical-directional reflectance and transmittance values obtained for five 8YSZ thicknesses. The scattering coefficient exhibited a continuous decrease with increasing wavelength and showed no significant temperature dependence. The scattering is primarily attributed to the relatively temperature-insensitive refractive index mismatch between the 8YSZ and its internal voids. The absorption coefficient was very low (less than 1 per centimeter) at wavelengths between 2 micrometers and the absorption edge and showed a definite temperature dependence that consisted of a shift of the absorption edge to shorter wavelengths and an increase in the weak absorption below the absorption edge with increasing temperature. The shift in the absorption edge with temperature is attributed to strongly temperature-dependent multiphonon absorption. While TBC hemispherical transmittance beyond the absorption edge can be predicted by a simple exponential decrease with thickness, below the absorption edge, typical TBC thicknesses are well below the thickness range where a simple exponential decrease in hemispherical transmittance with TBC thickness is expected. [Correction added after online publication August 11, 2009: "edge to a shorter wavelengths" has been updated as edge to shorter wavelengths."

  4. The impact of bathymetry input on flood simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khanam, M.; Cohen, S.

    2017-12-01

    Flood prediction and mitigation systems are inevitable for improving public safety and community resilience all over the worldwide. Hydraulic simulations of flood events are becoming an increasingly efficient tool for studying and predicting flood events and susceptibility. A consistent limitation of hydraulic simulations of riverine dynamics is the lack of information about river bathymetry as most terrain data record water surface elevation. The impact of this limitation on the accuracy on hydraulic simulations of flood has not been well studies over a large range of flood magnitude and modeling frameworks. Advancing our understanding of this topic is timely given emerging national and global efforts for developing automated flood predictions systems (e.g. NOAA National Water Center). Here we study the response of flood simulation to the incorporation of different bathymetry and floodplain surveillance source. Different hydraulic models are compared, Mike-Flood, a 2D hydrodynamic model, and GSSHA, a hydrology/hydraulics model. We test a hypothesis that the impact of inclusion/exclusion of bathymetry data on hydraulic model results will vary in its magnitude as a function of river size. This will allow researcher and stake holders more accurate predictions of flood events providing useful information that will help local communities in a vulnerable flood zone to mitigate flood hazards. Also, it will help to evaluate the accuracy and efficiency of different modeling frameworks and gage their dependency on detailed bathymetry input data.

  5. An elevator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loginovskiy, V.I.; Medinger, N.V.; Rasskazov, V.A.; Solonitsyn, V.A.

    1983-01-01

    An elevator is proposed which includes a body, spring loaded cams and a shut-off ring. To increase the reliability of the elevator by eliminating the possibility of spontaneous shifting of the shut-off ring, the latter is equipped with handles hinged to it and is made with evolvent grooves. The cams are equipped with rollers installed in the evolvent grooves of the shut off ring, where the body is made with grooves for the handles.

  6. Impacts of repetitive floods and satisfaction with flood relief efforts: A case study of the flood-prone districts in Thailand’s Ayutthaya province

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nawhath Thanvisitthpon

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This research investigates the impacts of the repetitive flooding on the inhabitants of the four flood-prone districts in Thailand’s central province of Ayutthaya: Pranakorn Si Ayutthaya, Sena, Bang Ban, and Pak Hai. In addition, the residents’ satisfaction levels with the flood relief efforts and operations of the local authorities were examined and analyzed. The research revealed that most local residents have adapted to co-exist with the repetitive floods, an example of which is the elevation of the houses a few meters above the ground where the living quarter is on the upper level. The findings also indicated that the repetitive flooding incurred substantial post-flood repair costs, in light of the low income-earning capabilities of the locals. However, the flood-recovery financial aids was incommensurate with the actual expenditures, contributing to the lowest average satisfaction score among the inhabitants with regard to the adequacy of the post-flood repair and restoration financial aid. Furthermore, the research identified the differences between districts on the satisfaction with the flood relief efforts. The disparity could be attributed to the extent of coordination and participation of the local residents and their local leaders in the flood-related measures.

  7. Climate change, uncertainty and investment in flood risk reduction

    OpenAIRE

    Pol, van der, T.D.

    2015-01-01

    Economic analysis of flood risk management strategies has become more complex due to climate change. This thesis investigates the impact of climate change on investment in flood risk reduction, and applies optimisation methods to support identification of optimal flood risk management strategies. Chapter 2 provides an overview of cost-benefit analysis (CBA) of flood risk management strategies under climate change uncertainty and new information. CBA is applied to determine optimal dike height...

  8. Developments in remote sensing technology enable more detailed urban flood risk analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denniss, A.; Tewkesbury, A.

    2009-04-01

    digital airborne sensors, both optical and lidar, to produce the input layer for surface water flood modelling. A national flood map product has been created. The new product utilises sophisticated modelling techniques, perfected over many years, which harness graphical processing power. This product will prove particularly valuable for risk assessment decision support within insurance/reinsurance, property/environmental, utilities, risk management and government agencies. However, it is not just the ground elevation that determines the behaviour of surface water. By combining height information (surface and terrain) with high resolution aerial photography and colour infrared imagery, a high definition land cover mapping dataset (LandBase) is being produced, which provides a precise measure of sealed versus non sealed surface. This will allows even more sophisticated modelling of flood scenarios. Thus, the value of airborne survey data can be demonstrated by flood risk analysis down to individual addresses in urban areas. However for some risks, an even more detailed survey may be justified. In order to achieve this, Infoterra is testing new 360˚ mobile lidar technology. Collecting lidar data from a moving vehicle allows each street to be mapped in very high detail, allowing precise information about the location, size and shape of features such as kerbstones, gullies, road camber and building threshold level to be captured quickly and accurately. These data can then be used to model the problem of overland flood risk at the scale of individual properties. Whilst at present it might be impractical to undertake such detailed modelling for all properties, these techniques can certainly be used to improve the flood risk analysis of key locations. This paper will demonstrate how these new high resolution remote sensing techniques can be combined to provide a new resolution of detail to aid urban flood modelling.

  9. Assessment of Three Flood Hazard Mapping Methods: A Case Study of Perlis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azizat, Nazirah; Omar, Wan Mohd Sabki Wan

    2018-03-01

    Flood is a common natural disaster and also affect the all state in Malaysia. Regarding to Drainage and Irrigation Department (DID) in 2007, about 29, 270 km2 or 9 percent of region of the country is prone to flooding. Flood can be such devastating catastrophic which can effected to people, economy and environment. Flood hazard mapping can be used is an important part in flood assessment to define those high risk area prone to flooding. The purposes of this study are to prepare a flood hazard mapping in Perlis and to evaluate flood hazard using frequency ratio, statistical index and Poisson method. The six factors affecting the occurrence of flood including elevation, distance from the drainage network, rainfall, soil texture, geology and erosion were created using ArcGIS 10.1 software. Flood location map in this study has been generated based on flooded area in year 2010 from DID. These parameters and flood location map were analysed to prepare flood hazard mapping in representing the probability of flood area. The results of the analysis were verified using flood location data in year 2013, 2014, 2015. The comparison result showed statistical index method is better in prediction of flood area rather than frequency ratio and Poisson method.

  10. Peak Discharge, Flood Profile, Flood Inundation, and Debris Movement Accompanying the Failure of the Upper Reservoir at the Taum Sauk Pump Storage Facility near Lesterville, Missouri

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rydlund, Jr., Paul H.

    2006-01-01

    The Taum Sauk pump-storage hydroelectric power plant located in Reynolds County, Missouri, uses turbines that operate as pumps and hydraulic head generated by discharging water from an upper to a lower reservoir to produce electricity. A 55-acre upper reservoir with a 1.5- billion gallon capacity was built on top of Proffit Mountain, approximately 760 feet above the floodplain of the East Fork Black River. At approximately 5:16 am on December 14, 2005, a 680-foot wide section of the upper reservoir embankment failed suddenly, sending water rushing down the western side of Proffit Mountain and emptying into the floodplain of East Fork Black River. Flood waters from the upper reservoir flowed downstream through Johnson's Shut-Ins State Park and into the lower reservoir of the East Fork Black River. Floods such as this present unique challenges and opportunities to analyze and document peak-flow characteristics, flood profiles, inundation extents, and debris movement. On December 16, 2005, Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) data were collected and used to support hydraulic analyses, forensic failure analyses, damage extent, and mitigation of future disasters. To evaluate the impact of sedimentation in the lower reservoir, a bathymetric survey conducted on December 22 and 23, 2005, was compared to a previous bathymetric survey conducted in April, 2005. Survey results indicated the maximum reservoir capacity difference of 147 acre-feet existed at a pool elevation of 730 feet. Peak discharge estimates of 289,000 cubic feet per second along Proffit Mountain and 95,000 cubic feet per second along the East Fork Black River were determined through indirect measurement techniques. The magnitude of the embankment failure flood along the East Fork Black River was approximately 4 times greater than the 100-year flood frequency estimate of 21,900 cubic feet per second, and approximately 3 times greater than the 500-year flood frequency estimate of 30,500 cubic feet per second

  11. Flood Hazard Area

    Data.gov (United States)

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — The National Flood Hazard Layer (NFHL) data incorporates all Digital Flood Insurance Rate Map(DFIRM) databases published by FEMA, and any Letters Of Map Revision...

  12. Flood Hazard Boundaries

    Data.gov (United States)

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — The National Flood Hazard Layer (NFHL) data incorporates all Digital Flood Insurance Rate Map(DFIRM) databases published by FEMA, and any Letters Of Map Revision...

  13. Monocular Elevation Deficiency - Double Elevator Palsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Español Condiciones Chinese Conditions Monocular Elevation Deficiency/ Double Elevator Palsy En Español Read in Chinese What is monocular elevation deficiency (Double Elevator Palsy)? Monocular Elevation Deficiency, also known by the ...

  14. Flood Risk Regional Flood Defences : Technical report

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kok, M.; Jonkman, S.N.; Lendering, K.T.

    2015-01-01

    Historically the Netherlands have always had to deal with the threat of flooding, both from the rivers and the sea as well as from heavy rainfall. The country consists of a large amount of polders, which are low lying areas of land protected from flooding by embankments. These polders require an

  15. FloodProBE: technologies for improved safety of the built environment in relation to flood events

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ree, C.C.D.F. van; Van, M.A.; Heilemann, K.; Morris, M.W.; Royet, P.; Zevenbergen, C.

    2011-01-01

    The FloodProBE project started as a FP7 research project in November 2009. Floods, together with wind related storms, are considered the major natural hazard in the EU in terms of risk to people and assets. In order to adapt urban areas (in river and coastal zones) to prevent flooding or to be better prepared for floods, decision makers need to determine how to upgrade flood defences and increasing flood resilience of protected buildings and critical infrastructure (power supplies, communications, water, transport, etc.) and assess the expected risk reduction from these measures. The aim of the FloodProBE-project is to improve knowledge on flood resilience and flood protection performance for balancing investments in flood risk management in urban areas. To this end, technologies, methods and tools for assessment purposes and for the adaptation of new and existing buildings and critical infrastructure are developed, tested and disseminated. Three priority areas are addressed by FloodProBE. These are: (i) vulnerability of critical infrastructure and high-density value assets including direct and indirect damage, (ii) the assessment and reliability of urban flood defences including the use of geophysical methods and remote sensing techniques and (iii) concepts and technologies for upgrading weak links in flood defences as well as construction technologies for flood proofing buildings and infrastructure networks to increase the flood resilience of the urban system. The primary impact of FloodProBE in advancing knowledge in these areas is an increase in the cost-effectiveness (i.e. performance) of new and existing flood protection structures and flood resilience measures.

  16. Geodetic Control Points, Benchmarks; Vertical elevation bench marks for monumented geodetic survey control points for which mean sea level elevations have been determined., Published in 1995, 1:24000 (1in=2000ft) scale, Rhode Island and Providence Plantations.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC State | GIS Inventory — Geodetic Control Points dataset current as of 1995. Benchmarks; Vertical elevation bench marks for monumented geodetic survey control points for which mean sea level...

  17. Use of Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) to Obtain High-Resolution Elevation Data for Sussex County, Delaware

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barlow, Roger A.; Nardi, Mark R.; Reyes, Betzaida

    2008-01-01

    Sussex County, Delaware, occupies a 938-square-mile area of low relief near sea level in the Atlantic Coastal Plain. The county is bounded on the east by the Delaware Bay and the Atlantic Ocean, including a barrier-island system, and inland bays that provide habitat for valuable living resources. Eastern Sussex County is an area of rapid population growth with a long-established beach-resort community, where land elevation is a key factor in determining areas that are appropriate for development. Of concern to State and local planners are evacuation routes inland to escape flooding from severe coastal storms, as most major transportation routes traverse areas of low elevation that are subject to inundation. The western half of the county is typically rural in character, and land use is largely agricultural with some scattered forest land cover. Western Sussex County has several low-relief river flood-prone areas, where accurate high-resolution elevation data are needed for Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) Digital Flood Insurance Rate Map (DFIRM) studies. This fact sheet describes the methods and techniques used to collect and process LiDAR elevation data, the generation of the digital elevation model (DEM) and the 2-foot contours, and the quality-assurance procedures and results. It indicates where to view metadata on the data sets and where to acquire bare-earth mass points, DEM data, and contour data.

  18. Assessment of channel changes, model of historical floods, and effects of backwater on flood stage, and flood mitigation alternatives for the Wichita River at Wichita Falls, Texas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winters, Karl E.; Baldys, Stanley

    2011-01-01

    In cooperation with the City of Wichita Falls, the U.S. Geological Survey assessed channel changes on the Wichita River at Wichita Falls, Texas, and modeled historical floods to investigate possible causes and potential mitigation alternatives to higher flood stages in recent (2007 and 2008) floods. Extreme flooding occurred on the Wichita River on June 30, 2007, inundating 167 homes in Wichita Falls. Although a record flood stage was reached in June 2007, the peak discharge was much less than some historical floods at Wichita Falls. Streamflow and stage data from two gages on the Wichita River and one on Holliday Creek were used to assess the interaction of the two streams. Changes in the Wichita River channel were evaluated using historical aerial and ground photography, comparison of recent and historical cross sections, and comparison of channel roughness coefficients with those from earlier studies. The floods of 2007 and 2008 were modeled using a one-dimensional step-backwater model. Calibrated channel roughness was larger for the 2007 flood compared to the 2008 flood, and the 2007 flood peaked about 4 feet higher than the 2008 flood. Calibration of the 1941 flood yielded a channel roughness coefficient (Manning's n) of 0.030, which represents a fairly clean natural channel. The step-backwater model was also used to evaluate the following potential mitigation alternatives: (1) increasing the capacity of the bypass channel near River Road in Wichita Falls, Texas; (2) removal of obstructions near the Scott Avenue and Martin Luther King Junior Boulevard bridges in Wichita Falls, Texas; (3) widening of aggraded channel banks in the reach between Martin Luther King Junior Boulevard and River Road; and (4) reducing channel bank and overbank roughness. Reductions in water-surface elevations ranged from 0.1 foot to as much as 3.0 feet for the different mitigation alternatives. The effects of implementing a combination of different flood-mitigation alternatives were

  19. Flood-inundation maps for the Wabash River at Memorial Bridge at Vincennes, Indiana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fowler, Kathleen K.; Menke, Chad D.

    2017-08-23

    Digital flood-inundation maps for a 10.2-mile reach of the Wabash River from Sevenmile Island to 3.7 mile downstream of Memorial Bridge (officially known as Lincoln Memorial Bridge) at Vincennes, Indiana, were created by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) in cooperation with the Indiana Office of Community and Rural Affairs. The inundation maps, which can be accessed through the USGS Flood Inundation Mapping Science Web site at http://water.usgs.gov/osw/flood_inundation/ depict estimates of the areal extent and depth of flooding corresponding to selected water levels (stages) at USGS streamgage 03343010, Wabash River at Memorial Bridge at Vincennes, Ind. Near-real-time stages at this streamgage may be obtained on the Internet from the USGS National Water Information System at http://waterdata.usgs.gov/ or the National Weather Service (NWS) Advanced Hydrologic Prediction Service at http:/water.weather.gov/ahps/, which also forecasts flood hydrographs at this site.For this study, flood profiles were computed for the Wabash River reach by means of a one-dimensional stepbackwater model. The hydraulic model was calibrated by using the most current stage-discharge relations at USGS streamgage 03343010, Wabash River at Memorial Bridge at Vincennes, Ind., and preliminary high-water marks from a high-water event on April 27, 2013. The calibrated hydraulic model was then used to determine 19 water-surface profiles for flood stages at 1-foot intervals referenced to the streamgage datum and ranging from 10 feet (ft) or near bankfull to 28 ft, the highest stage of the current stage-discharge rating curve. The simulated water-surface profiles were then combined with a Geographic Information System (GIS) digital elevation model (DEM, derived from Light Detection and Ranging [lidar] data having a 0.98-ft vertical accuracy and 4.9-ft horizontal resolution) in order to delineate the area flooded at each water level.The availability of these maps—along with Internet information

  20. Real-time flood extent maps based on social media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eilander, Dirk; van Loenen, Arnejan; Roskam, Ruud; Wagemaker, Jurjen

    2015-04-01

    information, we project the water depth observations in tweets on a digital elevation model using a flood-fill algorithm. Based on statistical methods we combine the large numbers of observations in order to create time series of flood extent maps. Early results indicate this method is very promising.

  1. Flood-inundation maps for a nine-mile reach of the Des Plaines River from Riverwoods to Mettawa, Illinois

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Elizabeth A.; Soong, David T.; Sharpe, Jennifer B.

    2012-01-01

    Digital flood-inundation maps for a 9-mile reach of the Des Plaines River from Riverwoods to Mettawa, Illinois, were created by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) in cooperation with the Lake County Stormwater Management Commission and the Villages of Lincolnshire and Riverwoods. The inundation maps, which can be accessed through the USGS Flood Inundation Mapping Science Web site at http://water.usgs.gov/osw/flood_inundation/, depict estimates of the areal extent of flooding corresponding to selected water levels (gage heights) at the USGS streamgage at Des Plaines River at Lincolnshire, Illinois (station no. 05528100). Current conditions at the USGS streamgage may be obtained on the Internet at http://waterdata.usgs.gov/usa/nwis/uv?05528100. In addition, this streamgage is incorporated into the Advanced Hydrologic Prediction Service (AHPS) flood warning system (http://water.weather.gov/ahps/) by the National Weather Service (NWS). The NWS forecasts flood hydrographs at many places that are often co-located at USGS streamgages. The NWS forecasted peak-stage information, also shown on the Des Plaines River at Lincolnshire inundation Web site, may be used in conjunction with the maps developed in this study to show predicted areas of flood inundation. In this study, flood profiles were computed for the stream reach by means of a one-dimensional step-backwater model. The hydraulic model was then used to determine seven water-surface profiles for flood stages at roughly 1-ft intervals referenced to the streamgage datum and ranging from the 50- to 0.2-percent annual exceedance probability flows. The simulated water-surface profiles were then combined with a Geographic Information System (GIS) Digital Elevation Model (DEM) (derived from Light Detection And Ranging (LiDAR) data) in order to delineate the area flooded at each water level. These maps, along with information on the Internet regarding current gage height from USGS streamgages and forecasted stream stages from

  2. Urban pluvial flood prediction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorndahl, Søren Liedtke; Nielsen, Jesper Ellerbæk; Jensen, David Getreuer

    2016-01-01

    Flooding produced by high-intensive local rainfall and drainage system capacity exceedance can have severe impacts in cities. In order to prepare cities for these types of flood events – especially in the future climate – it is valuable to be able to simulate these events numerically both...... historically and in real-time. There is a rather untested potential in real-time prediction of urban floods. In this paper radar data observations with different spatial and temporal resolution, radar nowcasts of 0–2 h lead time, and numerical weather models with lead times up to 24 h are used as inputs...... to an integrated flood and drainage systems model in order to investigate the relative difference between different inputs in predicting future floods. The system is tested on a small town Lystrup in Denmark, which has been flooded in 2012 and 2014. Results show it is possible to generate detailed flood maps...

  3. Keurbooms Estuary floods and sedimentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eckart H. Schumann

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The Keurbooms Estuary at Plettenberg Bay lies on a wave-dominated, microtidal coast. It has a dune-topped sandy barrier, or barrier dune, almost 4 km long, with a narrow back-barrier lagoon connected to its source rivers, the Keurbooms and Bitou. The estuary exits to the sea through this barrier dune, and it is the geomorphology and mouth position in relation to floods, which is the subject of this paper. Measurements of rainfall, water level, waves and high- and low-tide water lines were used to analyse the mouth variability over the years 2006–2012. Two major floods occurred during this time, with the first in November 2007 eroding away more than 500 000 m3 of sediment. The new mouth was established at the Lookout Rocks limit – the first time since 1915. The second flood occurred in July 2012 and opened up a new mouth about 1 km to the north-east; high waves also affected the position of the breach. The mouth has a tendency to migrate southwards against the longshore drift, but at any stage this movement can be augmented or reversed. The effectiveness of floods in breaching a new mouth through the barrier dune depends on the flood size and the nature of the exit channel in the back-barrier lagoon. Other factors such as ocean waves, sea level, vegetative state of the dune and duration of the flood are also important and can determine where the breach occurs, and if the new mouth will dominate the old mouth.

  4. FLOOD MENACE IN KADUNA METROPOLIS: IMPACTS ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dr A.B.Ahmed

    damage, causes of flooding, human response to flooding and severity of ... from moving out. Source of ... Man responds to flood hazards through adjustment, flood abatement ... action to minimize or ameliorate flood hazards; flood abatement.

  5. 33 CFR 203.42 - Inspection of non-Federal flood control works.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... PROCEDURES Rehabilitation Assistance for Flood Control Works Damaged by Flood or Coastal Storm: The Corps Rehabilitation and Inspection Program § 203.42 Inspection of non-Federal flood control works. (a) Required... will conduct an IEI to determine if the flood control work meets minimum engineering and maintenance...

  6. Determination of times maximum insulation in case of internal flooding by pipe break; Determinacion de los tiempos maximos de aislamiento en caso de inundacion interna por rotura de tuberia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Varas, M. I.; Orteu, E.; Laserna, J. A.

    2014-07-01

    This paper demonstrates the process followed in the preparation of the Manual of floods of Cofrentes NPP to identify the allowed maximum time available to the central in the isolation of a moderate or high energy pipe break, until it affects security (1E) participating in the safe stop of Reactor or in pools of spent fuel cooling-related equipment , and to determine the recommended isolation mode from the point of view of the location of the break or rupture, of the location of the 1E equipment and human factors. (Author)

  7. Improving Gas Flooding Efficiency

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reid Grigg; Robert Svec; Zheng Zeng; Alexander Mikhalin; Yi Lin; Guoqiang Yin; Solomon Ampir; Rashid Kassim

    2008-03-31

    This study focuses on laboratory studies with related analytical and numerical models, as well as work with operators for field tests to enhance our understanding of and capabilities for more efficient enhanced oil recovery (EOR). Much of the work has been performed at reservoir conditions. This includes a bubble chamber and several core flood apparatus developed or modified to measure interfacial tension (IFT), critical micelle concentration (CMC), foam durability, surfactant sorption at reservoir conditions, and pressure and temperature effects on foam systems.Carbon dioxide and N{sub 2} systems have been considered, under both miscible and immiscible conditions. The injection of CO2 into brine-saturated sandstone and carbonate core results in brine saturation reduction in the range of 62 to 82% brine in the tests presented in this paper. In each test, over 90% of the reduction occurred with less than 0.5 PV of CO{sub 2} injected, with very little additional brine production after 0.5 PV of CO{sub 2} injected. Adsorption of all considered surfactant is a significant problem. Most of the effect is reversible, but the amount required for foaming is large in terms of volume and cost for all considered surfactants. Some foams increase resistance to the value beyond what is practical in the reservoir. Sandstone, limestone, and dolomite core samples were tested. Dissolution of reservoir rock and/or cement, especially carbonates, under acid conditions of CO2 injection is a potential problem in CO2 injection into geological formations. Another potential change in reservoir injectivity and productivity will be the precipitation of dissolved carbonates as the brine flows and pressure decreases. The results of this report provide methods for determining surfactant sorption and can be used to aid in the determination of surfactant requirements for reservoir use in a CO{sub 2}-foam flood for mobility control. It also provides data to be used to determine rock permeability

  8. Study to determine the technical and economic feasibility of reclaiming chemicals used in micellar polymer and low tension surfactant flooding. Final report. [Ultrafiltration membranes and reverse osmosis membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stephens, R.H.; Himmelblau, A.; Donnelly, R.G.

    1978-02-01

    Energy Resources Company has developed a technology for use with enhanced oil recovery to achieve emulsion breaking and surfactant recovery. By using ultrafiltration membranes, the Energy Resources Company process can dewater an oil-in-water type emulsion expected from enhanced oil recovery projects to the point where the emulsion can be inverted and treated using conventional emulsion-treating equipment. By using a tight ultrafiltration membrane or a reverse osmosis membrane, the Energy Resources Company process is capable of recovering chemicals such as surfactants used in micellar polymer flooding.

  9. Estimating design flood and HEC-RAS modelling approach for flood analysis in Bojonegoro city

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prastica, R. M. S.; Maitri, C.; Hermawan, A.; Nugroho, P. C.; Sutjiningsih, D.; Anggraheni, E.

    2018-03-01

    Bojonegoro faces flood every year with less advanced prevention development. Bojonegoro city development could not peak because the flood results material losses. It affects every sectors in Bojonegoro: education, politics, economy, social, and infrastructure development. This research aims to analyse and to ensure that river capacity has high probability to be the main factor of flood in Bojonegoro. Flood discharge analysis uses Nakayasu synthetic unit hydrograph for period of 5 years, 10 years, 25 years, 50 years, and 100 years. They would be compared to the water maximum capacity that could be loaded by downstream part of Bengawan Solo River in Bojonegoro. According to analysis result, Bengawan Solo River in Bojonegoro could not able to load flood discharges. Another method used is HEC-RAS analysis. The conclusion that shown by HEC-RAS analysis has the same view. It could be observed that flood water loading is more than full bank capacity elevation in the river. To conclude, the main factor that should be noticed by government to solve flood problem is river capacity.

  10. Uncertainties and constraints on breaching and their implications for flood loss estimation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muir Wood, Robert; Bateman, William

    2005-06-15

    Around the coasts of the southern North Sea, flood risk is mediated everywhere by the performance of natural and man-made flood defences. Under the conditions of extreme surge with tide water levels, the performance of the defences determines the extent of inland flooding. Sensitivity tests reveal the enormous increase in the volume of water that can pass through a defence once breaching is initiated, with a 1m reduction in sill elevation doubling the loss. Empirical observations of defence performance in major storm surges around the North Sea reveal some of the principal controls on breaching. For the same defence type, the maximum size and depth of a breach is a function of the integral of the hydraulic gradient across the defence, which is in turn determined by the elevation of the floodplain and the degree to which water can continue to flow inland away from the breach. The most extensive and lowest floodplains thereby "generate" the largest breaches. For surges that approach the crest height, the weaker the protection of the defence, the greater the number of breaches. Defence reinforcement reduces both the number and size of the breaches.

  11. Effect of catchment properties and flood generation regime on copula selection for bivariate flood frequency analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filipova, Valeriya; Lawrence, Deborah; Klempe, Harald

    2018-02-01

    Applying copula-based bivariate flood frequency analysis is advantageous because the results provide information on both the flood peak and volume. More data are, however, required for such an analysis, and it is often the case that only data series with a limited record length are available. To overcome this issue of limited record length, data regarding climatic and geomorphological properties can be used to complement statistical methods. In this paper, we present a study of 27 catchments located throughout Norway, in which we assess whether catchment properties, flood generation processes and flood regime have an effect on the correlation between flood peak and volume and, in turn, on the selection of copulas. To achieve this, the annual maximum flood events were first classified into events generated primarily by rainfall, snowmelt or a combination of these. The catchments were then classified into flood regime, depending on the predominant flood generation process producing the annual maximum flood events. A contingency table and Fisher's exact test were used to determine the factors that affect the selection of copulas in the study area. The results show that the two-parameter copulas BB1 and BB7 are more commonly selected in catchments with high steepness, high mean annual runoff and rainfall flood regime. These findings suggest that in these types of catchments, the dependence structure between flood peak and volume is more complex and cannot be modeled effectively using a one-parameter copula. The results illustrate that by relating copula types to flood regime and catchment properties, additional information can be supplied for selecting copulas in catchments with limited data.

  12. Influence of spreading urbanization in flood areas on flood damage in Slovenia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Komac, B; Zorn, M; Natek, K

    2008-01-01

    Damage caused by natural disasters in Slovenia is frequently linked to the ignoring of natural factors in spatial planning. Historically, the construction of buildings and settlements avoided dangerous flood areas, but later we see increasing construction in dangerous areas. During the floods in 1990, the most affected buildings were located on ill-considered locations, and the majority was built in more recent times. A similar situation occurred during the floods of September 2007. Comparing the effects of these floods, we determined that damage was always greater due to the urbanization of flood areas. This process furthermore increasingly limits the 'manoeuvring space' for water management authorities, who due to the torrential nature of Slovenia's rivers can not ensure the required level of safety from flooding for unsuitably located settlements and infrastructure. Every year, the Environmental Agency of the Republic of Slovenia issues more than one thousand permits for interventions in areas that affect the water regime, and through decrees the government allows construction in riparian zones, which is supposedly forbidden by the Law on Water. If we do not take measures with more suitable policies for spatial planning, we will no long have the possibility in future to reduce the negative consequences of floods. Given that torrential floods strike certain Slovene regions every three years on average and that larger floods occur at least once a decade, it is senseless to lay the blame on climate change.

  13. Elevator wheel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhornik, V.I.; Cherkov, Ye.M.; Simonov, A.A.

    1982-01-01

    An elevator wheel is suggested for unloading a sunken product from a bath of a heavy-average separator including discs of a bucket with inner walls, and covering sheets hinged to the buckets. In order to improve the degree of dehydration of the removed product, the inner wall of each bucket is made of sheets installed in steps with gaps of one in relation to the other.

  14. Partitioning of soil CO2 efflux in un-manipulated and experimentally flooded plots of a temperate fen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wunderlich, S.; Borken, W.

    2012-08-01

    Peatlands store large amounts of organic carbon, but the carbon stock is sensitive to changes in precipitation or water table manipulations. Restoration of drained peatlands by drain blocking and flooding is a common measure to conserve and augment the carbon stock of peatland soils. Here, we report to what extent flooding affected the contribution of heterotrophic and rhizosphere respiration to soil CO2 efflux in a grass-dominated mountain fen in Germany. Soil CO2 efflux was measured in three un-manipulated control plots and three flooded plots in two consecutive years. Flooding was achieved by permanent irrigation during the growing seasons. Radiocarbon signatures of CO2 from different sources including soil CO2 efflux, incubated peat cores and live grass roots were repeatedly analyzed for partitioning of soil CO2 efflux. Additionally, heterotrophic respiration and its radiocarbon signature were determined by eliminating rhizosphere respiration in trenched subplots (only control). In the control plots, rhizosphere respiration determined by 14C signatures contributed between 47 and 61% during the growing season, but was small (4 ± 8%) immediately before budding. Trenching revealed a smaller rhizosphere contribution of 33 ± 8% (2009) and 22 ± 9% (2010) during growing seasons. Flooding reduced annual soil CO2 efflux of the fen by 42% in 2009 and by 30% in 2010. The reduction was smaller in 2010 mainly through naturally elevated water level in the control plots. A one-week interruption of irrigation caused a strong short-lived increase in soil CO2 efflux, demonstrating the sensitivity of the fen to water table drawdown near the peat surface. The reduction in soil CO2 efflux in the flooded plots diminished the relative proportion of rhizosphere respiration from 56 to 46%, suggesting that rhizosphere respiration was slightly more sensitive to flooding than heterotrophic respiration.

  15. Interpreting the impact of flood forecasts by combining policy analysis studies and flood defence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Slomp Robert

    2016-01-01

    Rijkswaterstaat. Other organisations use these forecasts to define the consequences of the forecast, to take measures (as the evacuation of camping places on rivers banks or lake shores or to estimate the conditional probability of failure of a flood defence. Increasing the resilience of the population by disseminating information from both policy studies (flood scenarios and flood forecasts has been the project goal of the MEGO project “Module Evacuatie Grote Overstromingen”, an information tool for large scale evacuation due to floods. This information is available on a national website. The MEGO project has focussed on making the information from two major policy studies on flood risk available, the first sturdy determined new risk-based standards for flood defences (WV21. The second study determined the current flood risk (VNK-2. The MEGO database contains a selection of verified flood scenario’s. For each scenario the hydraulic loads which will cause a flood are known as are the probabilities of flooding and predicted casualties and damages. Overland flow maps are available. MEGO combines this data with the flood forecast, open data of the “Cadastre” (national Registry, the national digital terrain model (AHN and the main infrastructure (local, regional and national. The site offers prepared and real time maps for professionals during a crisis, and tools to increase risk awareness for citizens. The software was recently renamed national water and flood information system, “Landelijk Informatiesysteem Water en Overstromingen (LIWO ’ when it went live in 2016. In LIWO the second goal of MEGO was realized, by adding the information from flood forecasts. It is an open source model.

  16. Validation of a Global Hydrodynamic Flood Inundation Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bates, P. D.; Smith, A.; Sampson, C. C.; Alfieri, L.; Neal, J. C.

    2014-12-01

    In this work we present first validation results for a hyper-resolution global flood inundation model. We use a true hydrodynamic model (LISFLOOD-FP) to simulate flood inundation at 1km resolution globally and then use downscaling algorithms to determine flood extent and depth at 90m spatial resolution. Terrain data are taken from a custom version of the SRTM data set that has been processed specifically for hydrodynamic modelling. Return periods of flood flows along the entire global river network are determined using: (1) empirical relationships between catchment characteristics and index flood magnitude in different hydroclimatic zones derived from global runoff data; and (2) an index flood growth curve, also empirically derived. Bankful return period flow is then used to set channel width and depth, and flood defence impacts are modelled using empirical relationships between GDP, urbanization and defence standard of protection. The results of these simulations are global flood hazard maps for a number of different return period events from 1 in 5 to 1 in 1000 years. We compare these predictions to flood hazard maps developed by national government agencies in the UK and Germany using similar methods but employing detailed local data, and to observed flood extent at a number of sites including St. Louis, USA and Bangkok in Thailand. Results show that global flood hazard models can have considerable skill given careful treatment to overcome errors in the publicly available data that are used as their input.

  17. A dimension reduction method for flood compensation operation of multi-reservoir system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, B.; Wu, S.; Fan, Z.

    2017-12-01

    Multiple reservoirs cooperation compensation operations coping with uncontrolled flood play vital role in real-time flood mitigation. This paper come up with a reservoir flood compensation operation index (ResFCOI), which formed by elements of flood control storage, flood inflow volume, flood transmission time and cooperation operations period, then establish a flood cooperation compensation operations model of multi-reservoir system, according to the ResFCOI to determine a computational order of each reservoir, and lastly the differential evolution algorithm is implemented for computing single reservoir flood compensation optimization in turn, so that a dimension reduction method is formed to reduce computational complexity. Shiguan River Basin with two large reservoirs and an extensive uncontrolled flood area, is used as a case study, results show that (a) reservoirs' flood discharges and the uncontrolled flood are superimposed at Jiangjiaji Station, while the formed flood peak flow is as small as possible; (b) cooperation compensation operations slightly increase in usage of flood storage capacity in reservoirs, when comparing to rule-based operations; (c) it takes 50 seconds in average when computing a cooperation compensation operations scheme. The dimension reduction method to guide flood compensation operations of multi-reservoir system, can make each reservoir adjust its flood discharge strategy dynamically according to the uncontrolled flood magnitude and pattern, so as to mitigate the downstream flood disaster.

  18. Flood plain analysis for Petris, , Troas, and Monoros, tia watersheds, the Arad department, Romania

    Science.gov (United States)

    Győri, M.-M.; Haidu, I.

    2012-04-01

    The present study sets out to determine the flood plains corresponding to flood discharges having 10, 50 and 100 year recurrence intervals on the Monoroštia, Petriš and Troaš Rivers, located in Western Romania, the Arad department. The data of the study area is first collected and pre-processed in ArcGIS. It consists of land use data, soil data, the DEM, stream gauges' and meteorological stations' locations, on the basis of which the watersheds' hydrologic parameters' are computed using the Geospatial Hydrologic Modelling Extension (HEC Geo-HMS). HEC Geo-HMS functions as an interface between ArcGIS and HEC-HMS (Hydrologic Engineering Centre- Hydrologic Modelling System) and converts the data collected and generated in ArcGIS to data useable by HEC-HMS. The basin model component in HEC-HMS represents the physical watershed. It facilitates the effective rainfall computation on the basis of the input hyetograph, passing the results to a transform function that converts the excess precipitation into runoff at the subwatersheds' outlet. This enables the estimation and creation of hydrographs for the ungauged watersheds. In the present study, the results are achieved through the SCS CN loss method and the SCS Unit hydrograph transform method. The simulations use rainfall data that is registered at the stations situated in the catchments' vicinity, data that spans over two decades (1989-2009) and which allows the rainfall hyetographs to be determined for the above mentioned return periods. The model will be calibrated against measured streamflow data from the gauging stations on the main rivers, leading to the adjustment of watershed parameters, such as the CN parameter. As the flood discharges for 10, 50 and 100 year return periods have been determined, the profile of the water surface elevation along the channel will be computed through a steady flow analysis, with HEC-RAS (Hydrologic Engineering Centre- River Analysis System). For each of the flood frequencies, a

  19. Flood Extent Mapping for Namibia Using Change Detection and Thresholding with SAR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Stephanie; Fatoyinbo, Temilola E.; Policelli, Frederick

    2014-01-01

    A new method for flood detection change detection and thresholding (CDAT) was used with synthetic aperture radar (SAR) imagery to delineate the extent of flooding for the Chobe floodplain in the Caprivi region of Namibia. This region experiences annual seasonal flooding and has seen a recent renewal of severe flooding after a long dry period in the 1990s. Flooding in this area has caused loss of life and livelihoods for the surrounding communities and has caught the attention of disaster relief agencies. There is a need for flood extent mapping techniques that can be used to process images quickly, providing near real-time flooding information to relief agencies. ENVISAT/ASAR and Radarsat-2 images were acquired for several flooding seasons from February 2008 to March 2013. The CDAT method was used to determine flooding from these images and includes the use of image subtraction, decision based classification with threshold values, and segmentation of SAR images. The total extent of flooding determined for 2009, 2011 and 2012 was about 542 km2, 720 km2, and 673 km2 respectively. Pixels determined to be flooded in vegetation were typically flooding in vegetation was much greater (almost one third of the total flooded area). The time to maximum flooding for the 2013 flood season was determined to be about 27 days. Landsat water classification was used to compare the results from the new CDAT with SAR method; the results show good spatial agreement with Landsat scenes.

  20. Disentangling ecological, allometric and evolutionary determinants of the relationship between seed mass and elevation: insights from multiple analyses of 1355 angiosperm species on the eastern Tibetan Plateau

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Qi, Wei; Guo, Shuqing; Chen, Xuelin; Cornelissen, J.H.C.; Bu, Haiyan; Du, Guozhen; Cui, Xianliang; Li, Wenjin; Liu, Kun

    2014-01-01

    Variation in abiotic conditions along altitudinal gradients may sort plant species from regional species pools according to their seed mass. With increasing elevation, seed mass is expected to be either larger for its advantage during seedling establishment in stressful high-elevation environments

  1. An elevator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gusev, A.S.; Peshkov, L.P.; Rozin, M.M.; Shestov, A.G.

    1983-01-01

    An elevator is proposed which includes a body, a flap, a lock with a catch and a spring-loaded shut-off clamp in the form of upper and lower horizontal levers which are connected by a handle and an axle and one end of which is made in the form of an eccentric cam. The size of the eccentricity of the cam of the levers is increased toward the handle of the clamp in order to increase the operational reliability and to extend the service life.

  2. An elevator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rastorguyev, M.A.; Maloyarovslavtesv, D.A.; Prokopov, O.I.; Tukayev, Sh.V.; Zanilov, I.F.

    1983-01-01

    An elevator is proposed which includes a body with a turning collar locking device and a rod with longitudinal grooves, which are flexibly linked with jaws positioned in grooves in the body. To increase safety through ensuring automatic locking of the jaws in the closed position, the locking device is made in the form of head on wedges, spring loaded relative to the collar and made with cams and positioned with the capability of interacting with the grooves of the rod and through the cams with the collar.

  3. Flood maps in Europe - methods, availability and use

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Moel, H.; van Alphen, J.; Aerts, J. C. J. H.

    2009-03-01

    To support the transition from traditional flood defence strategies to a flood risk management approach at the basin scale in Europe, the EU has adopted a new Directive (2007/60/EC) at the end of 2007. One of the major tasks which member states must carry out in order to comply with this Directive is to map flood hazards and risks in their territory, which will form the basis of future flood risk management plans. This paper gives an overview of existing flood mapping practices in 29 countries in Europe and shows what maps are already available and how such maps are used. Roughly half of the countries considered have maps covering as good as their entire territory, and another third have maps covering significant parts of their territory. Only five countries have very limited or no flood maps available yet. Of the different flood maps distinguished, it appears that flood extent maps are the most commonly produced floods maps (in 23 countries), but flood depth maps are also regularly created (in seven countries). Very few countries have developed flood risk maps that include information on the consequences of flooding. The available flood maps are mostly developed by governmental organizations and primarily used for emergency planning, spatial planning, and awareness raising. In spatial planning, flood zones delimited on flood maps mainly serve as guidelines and are not binding. Even in the few countries (e.g. France, Poland) where there is a legal basis to regulate floodplain developments using flood zones, practical problems are often faced which reduce the mitigating effect of such binding legislation. Flood maps, also mainly extent maps, are also created by the insurance industry in Europe and used to determine insurability, differentiate premiums, or to assess long-term financial solvency. Finally, flood maps are also produced by international river commissions. With respect to the EU Flood Directive, many countries already have a good starting point to map

  4. Flood maps in Europe – methods, availability and use

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. C. J. H. Aerts

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available To support the transition from traditional flood defence strategies to a flood risk management approach at the basin scale in Europe, the EU has adopted a new Directive (2007/60/EC at the end of 2007. One of the major tasks which member states must carry out in order to comply with this Directive is to map flood hazards and risks in their territory, which will form the basis of future flood risk management plans. This paper gives an overview of existing flood mapping practices in 29 countries in Europe and shows what maps are already available and how such maps are used. Roughly half of the countries considered have maps covering as good as their entire territory, and another third have maps covering significant parts of their territory. Only five countries have very limited or no flood maps available yet. Of the different flood maps distinguished, it appears that flood extent maps are the most commonly produced floods maps (in 23 countries, but flood depth maps are also regularly created (in seven countries. Very few countries have developed flood risk maps that include information on the consequences of flooding. The available flood maps are mostly developed by governmental organizations and primarily used for emergency planning, spatial planning, and awareness raising. In spatial planning, flood zones delimited on flood maps mainly serve as guidelines and are not binding. Even in the few countries (e.g. France, Poland where there is a legal basis to regulate floodplain developments using flood zones, practical problems are often faced which reduce the mitigating effect of such binding legislation. Flood maps, also mainly extent maps, are also created by the insurance industry in Europe and used to determine insurability, differentiate premiums, or to assess long-term financial solvency. Finally, flood maps are also produced by international river commissions. With respect to the EU Flood Directive, many countries already have a good starting

  5. The 3D Elevation Program: summary for Hawaii

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carswell, William J.

    2016-01-01

    Elevation data are essential to a broad range of applications, including forest resources management, wildlife and habitat management, national security, recreation, and many others. For the State of Hawaii, elevation data are critical for infrastructure and construction management, flood risk management, geologic resource assessment and hazard mitigation, natural resources conservation, coastal zone management, and other business uses. Today, high-density light detection and ranging (lidar) data are the primary sources for deriving elevation models and other datasets. Federal, State, Tribal, U.S. territorial, and local agencies work in partnership to (1) replace data that are older and of lower quality and (2) provide coverage where publicly accessible data do not exist. A joint goal of State and Federal partners is to acquire consistent, statewide coverage to support existing and emerging applications enabled by lidar data.The National Enhanced Elevation Assessment evaluated multiple elevation data acquisition options to determine the optimal data quality and data replacement cycle relative to cost to meet the identified requirements of the user community. The evaluation demonstrated that lidar acquisition at quality level 2 for the conterminous United States, Hawaii, and selected U.S. territories, and quality level 5 interferometric synthetic aperture radar (IfSAR) data for Alaska, all with a 6- to 10-year acquisition cycle, provided the highest benefit/cost ratios. The 3D Elevation Program (3DEP) initiative selected an 8-year acquisition cycle for the respective quality levels. 3DEP, managed by the U.S. Geological Survey, the Office of Management and Budget Circular A–16 lead agency for terrestrial elevation data, responds to the growing need for high-quality topographic data and a wide range of other three-dimensional (3D) representations of the Nation’s natural and constructed features.

  6. The 3D Elevation Program: summary for Puerto Rico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carswell, William J.

    2016-02-03

    Elevation data are essential to a broad range of applications, including forest resources management, wildlife and habitat management, scientific research, national security, recreation, and many others. For the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico, elevation data are critical for flood risk management, landslide mitigation, natural resources conservation, sea level rise and subsidence, coastal zone management, infrastructure and construction management, and other business uses. Today, high-density light detection and ranging (lidar) data are the primary sources for deriving elevation models and other datasets. Federal, State, Tribal, U.S. territorial, and local agencies work in partnership to (1) replace data that are older and of lower quality and (2) provide coverage where publicly accessible data do not exist. A joint goal of State and Federal partners is to acquire consistent, statewide coverage to support existing and emerging applications enabled by lidar data.The National Enhanced Elevation Assessment evaluated multiple elevation data acquisition options to determine the optimal data quality and data replacement cycle relative to cost to meet the identified requirements of the user community. The evaluation demonstrated that lidar acquisition at quality level 2 for the conterminous United States, Hawaii, and selected U.S. territories, and quality level 5 interferometric synthetic aperture radar (IfSAR) data for Alaska, all with a 6- to 10-year acquisition cycle, provided the highest benefit/cost ratios. The 3D Elevation Program (3DEP) initiative selected an 8-year acquisition cycle for the respective quality levels. 3DEP, managed by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), the Office of Management and Budget Circular A‒16 lead agency for terrestrial elevation data, responds to the growing need for high-quality topographic data and a wide range of other three-dimensional (3D) representations of the Nation’s natural and constructed features.

  7. The role of floodplain restoration in mitigating flood risk, Lower Missouri River, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobson, Robert B.; Lindner, Garth; Bitner, Chance; Hudson, Paul F.; Middelkoop, Hans

    2015-01-01

    Recent extreme floods on the Lower Missouri River have reinvigorated public policy debate about the potential role of floodplain restoration in decreasing costs of floods and possibly increasing other ecosystem service benefits. The first step to addressing the benefits of floodplain restoration is to understand the interactions of flow, floodplain morphology, and land cover that together determine the biophysical capacity of the floodplain. In this article we address interactions between ecological restoration of floodplains and flood-risk reduction at 3 scales. At the scale of the Lower Missouri River corridor (1300 km) floodplain elevation datasets and flow models provide first-order calculations of the potential for Missouri River floodplains to store floods of varying magnitude and duration. At this same scale assessment of floodplain sand deposition from the 2011 Missouri River flood indicates the magnitude of flood damage that could potentially be limited by floodplain restoration. At the segment scale (85 km), 1-dimensional hydraulic modeling predicts substantial stage reductions with increasing area of floodplain restoration; mean stage reductions range from 0.12 to 0.66 m. This analysis also indicates that channel widening may contribute substantially to stage reductions as part of a comprehensive strategy to restore floodplain and channel habitats. Unsteady 1-dimensional flow modeling of restoration scenarios at this scale indicates that attenuation of peak discharges of an observed hydrograph from May 2007, of similar magnitude to a 10 % annual exceedance probability flood, would be minimal, ranging from 0.04 % (with 16 % floodplain restoration) to 0.13 % (with 100 % restoration). At the reach scale (15–20 km) 2-dimensional hydraulic models of alternative levee setbacks and floodplain roughness indicate complex processes and patterns of flooding including substantial variation in stage reductions across floodplains depending on

  8. Flood inundation maps for the Wabash and Eel Rivers at Logansport, Indiana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fowler, Kathleen K.

    2014-01-01

    Digital flood-inundation maps for an 8.3-mile reach of the Wabash River and a 7.6-mile reach of the Eel River at Logansport, Indiana (Ind.), were created by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) in cooperation with the Indiana Office of Community and Rural Affairs. The inundation maps, which can be accessed through the USGS Flood Inundation Mapping Science Web site at http://water.usgs.gov/osw/flood_inundation/, depict estimates of the areal extent and depth of flooding corresponding to selected water levels (stages) at USGS streamgage Wabash River at Logansport, Ind. (sta. no. 03329000) and USGS streamgage Eel River near Logansport, Ind. (sta. no. 03328500). Current conditions for estimating near-real-time areas of inundation using USGS streamgage information may be obtained on the Internet at http://waterdata.usgs.gov/. In addition, information has been provided to the National Weather Service (NWS) for incorporation into their Advanced Hydrologic Prediction Service (AHPS) flood warning system http:/water.weather.gov/ahps/). The NWS forecasts flood hydrographs at many places that are often colocated with USGS streamgages. NWS-forecasted peak-stage information may be used in conjunction with the maps developed in this study to show predicted areas of flood inundation. For this study, flood profiles were computed for the stream reaches by means of a one-dimensional step-backwater model developed by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. The hydraulic model was calibrated by using the most current stage-discharge relations at USGS streamgages 03329000, Wabash River at Logansport, Ind., and 03328500, Eel River near Logansport, Ind. The calibrated hydraulic model was then used to determine five water-surface profiles for flood stage at 1-foot intervals referenced to the Wabash River streamgage datum, and four water-surface profiles for flood stages at 1-foot intervals referenced to the Eel River streamgage datum. The stages range from bankfull to approximately the highest

  9. Bucket elevator

    OpenAIRE

    Chromek, Jiří

    2013-01-01

    Cílem této bakalářské práce je návrh svislého korečkového elevátoru, který má sloužit k dopravě obilovin s dopravní výškou 19 m a dopravovaným množstvím 100 t/hod. Práce se skládá z popisu korečkového elevátoru a jeho hlavních částí, zmiňující se v úvodní rešerši. Tato práce je zaměřena na funkční a kapacitní výpočet, určení pohonu a napínacího zařízení. Další výpočet je kontrolní, skládající se z pevnostní kontroly hnacího hřídele, výpočtu pera, životnosti ložisek a výpočtu napínacího zaříze...

  10. Techniques for estimating flood-depth frequency relations for streams in West Virginia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiley, J.B.

    1987-01-01

    Multiple regression analyses are applied to data from 119 U.S. Geological Survey streamflow stations to develop equations that estimate baseline depth (depth of 50% flow duration) and 100-yr flood depth on unregulated streams in West Virginia. Drainage basin characteristics determined from the 100-yr flood depth analysis were used to develop 2-, 10-, 25-, 50-, and 500-yr regional flood depth equations. Two regions with distinct baseline depth equations and three regions with distinct flood depth equations are delineated. Drainage area is the most significant independent variable found in the central and northern areas of the state where mean basin elevation also is significant. The equations are applicable to any unregulated site in West Virginia where values of independent variables are within the range evaluated for the region. Examples of inapplicable sites include those in reaches below dams, within and directly upstream from bridge or culvert constrictions, within encroached reaches, in karst areas, and where streams flow through lakes or swamps. (Author 's abstract)

  11. Flood Hazard Mapping by Using Geographic Information System and Hydraulic Model: Mert River, Samsun, Turkey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vahdettin Demir

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, flood hazard maps were prepared for the Mert River Basin, Samsun, Turkey, by using GIS and Hydrologic Engineering Centers River Analysis System (HEC-RAS. In this river basin, human life losses and a significant amount of property damages were experienced in 2012 flood. The preparation of flood risk maps employed in the study includes the following steps: (1 digitization of topographical data and preparation of digital elevation model using ArcGIS, (2 simulation of flood lows of different return periods using a hydraulic model (HEC-RAS, and (3 preparation of flood risk maps by integrating the results of (1 and (2.

  12. Magnitude of flood flows for selected annual exceedance probabilities for streams in Massachusetts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarriello, Phillip J.

    2017-05-11

    The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Massachusetts Department of Transportation, determined the magnitude of flood flows at selected annual exceedance prob­abilities (AEPs) at streamgages in Massachusetts and from these data developed equations for estimating flood flows at ungaged locations in the State. Flood magnitudes were deter­mined for the 50-, 20-, 10-, 4-, 2-, 1-, 0.5-, and 0.2-percent AEPs at 220 streamgages, 125 of which are in Massachusetts and 95 are in the adjacent States of Connecticut, New Hamp­shire, New York, Rhode Island, and Vermont. AEP flood flows were computed for streamgages using the expected moments algorithm weighted with a recently computed regional skew­ness coefficient for New England.Regional regression equations were developed to estimate the magnitude of floods for selected AEP flows at ungaged sites from 199 selected streamgages and for 60 potential explanatory basin characteristics. AEP flows for 21 of the 125 streamgages in Massachusetts were not used in the final regional regression analysis, primarily because of regulation or redundancy. The final regression equations used general­ized least squares methods to account for streamgage record length and correlation. Drainage area, mean basin elevation, and basin storage explained 86 to 93 percent of the variance in flood magnitude from the 50- to 0.2-percent AEPs, respec­tively. The estimates of AEP flows at streamgages can be improved by using a weighted estimate that is based on the magnitude of the flood and associated uncertainty from the at-site analysis and the regional regression equations. Weighting procedures for estimating AEP flows at an ungaged site on a gaged stream also are provided that improve estimates of flood flows at the ungaged site when hydrologic characteristics do not abruptly change.Urbanization expressed as the percentage of imperviousness provided some explanatory power in the regional regression; however, it was not statistically

  13. Implementation and Evaluation of the Streamflow Statistics (StreamStats) Web Application for Computing Basin Characteristics and Flood Peaks in Illinois

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishii, Audrey L.; Soong, David T.; Sharpe, Jennifer B.

    2010-01-01

    Illinois StreamStats (ILSS) is a Web-based application for computing selected basin characteristics and flood-peak quantiles based on the most recently (2010) published (Soong and others, 2004) regional flood-frequency equations at any rural stream location in Illinois. Limited streamflow statistics including general statistics, flow durations, and base flows also are available for U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) streamflow-gaging stations. ILSS can be accessed on the Web at http://streamstats.usgs.gov/ by selecting the State Applications hyperlink and choosing Illinois from the pull-down menu. ILSS was implemented for Illinois by obtaining and projecting ancillary geographic information system (GIS) coverages; populating the StreamStats database with streamflow-gaging station data; hydroprocessing the 30-meter digital elevation model (DEM) for Illinois to conform to streams represented in the National Hydrographic Dataset 1:100,000 stream coverage; and customizing the Web-based Extensible Markup Language (XML) programs for computing basin characteristics for Illinois. The basin characteristics computed by ILSS then were compared to the basin characteristics used in the published study, and adjustments were applied to the XML algorithms for slope and basin length. Testing of ILSS was accomplished by comparing flood quantiles computed by ILSS at a an approximately random sample of 170 streamflow-gaging stations computed by ILSS with the published flood quantile estimates. Differences between the log-transformed flood quantiles were not statistically significant at the 95-percent confidence level for the State as a whole, nor by the regions determined by each equation, except for region 1, in the northwest corner of the State. In region 1, the average difference in flood quantile estimates ranged from 3.76 percent for the 2-year flood quantile to 4.27 percent for the 500-year flood quantile. The total number of stations in region 1 was small (21) and the mean

  14. Discover Floods Educators Guide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Project WET Foundation, 2009

    2009-01-01

    Now available as a Download! This valuable resource helps educators teach students about both the risks and benefits of flooding through a series of engaging, hands-on activities. Acknowledging the different roles that floods play in both natural and urban communities, the book helps young people gain a global understanding of this common--and…

  15. The Upper Mississippi River floodscape: spatial patterns of flood inundation and associated plant community distributions

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeJager, Nathan R.; Rohweder, Jason J.; Yin, Yao; Hoy, Erin E.

    2016-01-01

    Questions How is the distribution of different plant communities associated with patterns of flood inundation across a large floodplain landscape? Location Thirty-eight thousand nine hundred and seventy hectare of floodplain, spanning 320 km of the Upper Mississippi River (UMR). Methods High-resolution elevation data (Lidar) and 30 yr of daily river stage data were integrated to produce a ‘floodscape’ map of growing season flood inundation duration. The distributions of 16 different remotely sensed plant communities were quantified along the gradient of flood duration. Results Models fitted to the cumulative frequency of occurrence of different vegetation types as a function of flood duration showed that most types exist along a continuum of flood-related occurrence. The diversity of community types was greatest at high elevations (0–10 d of flooding), where both upland and lowland community types were found, as well as at very low elevations (70–180 d of flooding), where a variety of lowland herbaceous communities were found. Intermediate elevations (20–60 d of flooding) tended to be dominated by floodplain forest and had the lowest diversity of community types. Conclusions Although variation in flood inundation is often considered to be the main driver of spatial patterns in floodplain plant communities, few studies have quantified flood–vegetation relationships at broad scales. Our results can be used to identify targets for restoration of historical hydrological regimes or better anticipate hydro-ecological effects of climate change at broad scales.

  16. Multi-vendor, multicentre comparison of contrast-enhanced SSFP and T2-STIR CMR for determining myocardium at risk in ST-elevation myocardial infarction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nordlund, David; Klug, Gert; Heiberg, Einar; Koul, Sasha; Larsen, Terje H.; Hoffmann, Pavel; Metzler, Bernhard; Erlinge, David; Atar, Dan; Aletras, Anthony H.; Carlsson, Marcus; Engblom, Henrik; Arheden, Håkan

    2016-01-01

    Aims Myocardial salvage, determined by cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (CMR), is used as end point in cardioprotection trials. To calculate myocardial salvage, infarct size is related to myocardium at risk (MaR), which can be assessed by T2-short tau inversion recovery (T2-STIR) and contrast-enhanced steady-state free precession magnetic resonance imaging (CE-SSFP). We aimed to determine how T2-STIR and CE-SSFP perform in determining MaR when applied in multicentre, multi-vendor settings. Methods and results A total of 215 patients from 17 centres were included after percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) for ST-elevation myocardial infarction. CMR was performed within 1–8 days. These patients participated in the MITOCARE or CHILL-MI cardioprotection trials. Additionally, 8 patients from a previous study, imaged 1 day post-CMR, were included. Late gadolinium enhancement, T2-STIR, and CE-SSFP images were acquired on 1.5T MR scanners (Philips, Siemens, or GE). In 65% of the patients, T2-STIR was of diagnostic quality compared with 97% for CE-SSFP. In diagnostic quality images, there was no difference in MaR by T2-STIR and CE-SSFP (bias: 0.02 ± 6%, P = 0.96, r2 = 0.71, P < 0.001), or between treatment and control arms. No change in size or quality of MaR nor ability to identify culprit artery was seen over the first week after the acute event (P = 0.44). Conclusion In diagnostic quality images, T2-STIR and CE-SSFP provide similar estimates of MaR, were constant over the first week, and were not affected by treatment. CE-SSFP had a higher degree of diagnostic quality images compared with T2 imaging for sequences from two out of three vendors. Therefore, CE-SSFP is currently more suitable for implementation in multicentre, multi-vendor clinical trials. PMID:27002140

  17. Flood action plans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Slopek, R.J.

    1995-01-01

    Safe operating procedures developed by TransAlta Utilities for dealing with flooding, resulting from upstream dam failures or extreme rainfalls, were presented. Several operating curves developed by Monenco AGRA were described, among them the No Overtopping Curve (NOC), the Safe Filling Curve (SFC), the No Spill Curve (NSC) and the Guaranteed Fill Curve (GFC). The concept of an operational comfort zone was developed and defined. A flood action plan for all operating staff was created as a guide in case of a flooding incident. Staging of a flood action plan workshop was described. Dam break scenarios pertinent to the Bow River were developed for subsequent incorporation into a Flood Action Plan Manual. Evaluation of the technical presentations made during workshops were found them to have been effective in providing operating staff with a better understanding of the procedures that they would perform in an emergency. 8 figs

  18. Missoula flood dynamics and magnitudes inferred from sedimentology of slack-water deposits on the Columbia Plateau, Washington

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, G.A.

    1993-01-01

    Sedimentological study of late Wisconsin, Missoula-flood slack-water sediments deposited along the Columbia and Tucannon Rivers in southern Washington reveals important aspects of flood dynamics. Most flood facies were deposited by energetic flood surges (velocities>6 m/sec) entering protected areas along the flood tract, or flowing up and then directly out of tributary valleys. True still-water facies are less voluminous and restricted to elevations below 230 m. High flood stages attended the initial arrival of the flood wave and were not associated with subsequent hydraulic ponding upslope from channel constrictions. Among 186 flood beds studied in 12 sections, 57% have bioturbated tops, and about half of these bioturbated beds are separated from overlying flood beds by nonflood sediments. A single graded flood bed was deposited at most sites during most floods. Sequences in which 2-9 graded beds were deposited during a single flood are restricted to low elevations. These sequences imply complex, multi-peaked hydrographs in which the first flood surge was generally the largest, and subsequent surges were attenuated by water already present in slack-water areas. Slack-water - sediment stratigraphy suggests a wide range of flood discharges and volumes. Of >40 documented late Wisconsin floods that inundated the Pasco Basin, only about 20 crossed the Palouse-Snake divide. Floods younger than the set-S tephras from Mount St.Helens were generally smaller than earlier floods of late Wisconsin age, although most still crossed the Palouse-Snake divide. These late floods primarily traversed the Cheney-Palouse scabland because stratigraphy of slack-water sediment along the Columbia River implies that the largest flood volumes did not enter the Pasco Basin by way of the Columbia River. 47 refs., 17 figs., 2 tabs

  19. Flood extent and water level estimation from SAR using data-model integration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ajadi, O. A.; Meyer, F. J.

    2017-12-01

    Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) images have long been recognized as a valuable data source for flood mapping. Compared to other sources, SAR's weather and illumination independence and large area coverage at high spatial resolution supports reliable, frequent, and detailed observations of developing flood events. Accordingly, SAR has the potential to greatly aid in the near real-time monitoring of natural hazards, such as flood detection, if combined with automated image processing. This research works towards increasing the reliability and temporal sampling of SAR-derived flood hazard information by integrating information from multiple SAR sensors and SAR modalities (images and Interferometric SAR (InSAR) coherence) and by combining SAR-derived change detection information with hydrologic and hydraulic flood forecast models. First, the combination of multi-temporal SAR intensity images and coherence information for generating flood extent maps is introduced. The application of least-squares estimation integrates flood information from multiple SAR sensors, thus increasing the temporal sampling. SAR-based flood extent information will be combined with a Digital Elevation Model (DEM) to reduce false alarms and to estimate water depth and flood volume. The SAR-based flood extent map is assimilated into the Hydrologic Engineering Center River Analysis System (Hec-RAS) model to aid in hydraulic model calibration. The developed technology is improving the accuracy of flood information by exploiting information from data and models. It also provides enhanced flood information to decision-makers supporting the response to flood extent and improving emergency relief efforts.

  20. Flood protection of Crystal River Unit 3 Nuclear Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noble, R.M.; Simpson, B.

    1975-01-01

    To satisfy U.S. Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) safety criteria, a required evaluation of the worst site-related flood is performed for the Crystal River Plant, located on the Gulf Coast of Florida, the probable maximum stillwater flood levels are likely to be a result of the probable maximum hurricane. Flood protection requirements for the Crystal River Plant are determined by considering the most severe combination of probable maximum hurricane parameters for the Gulf Coast Region. These parameters are used as input to a model of hurricane surge generation and attendant wave activity in order to determine the maximum flood levels at the Crystal River Plant. 4 refs

  1. A new method to determine the water activity and the net isosteric heats of sorption for low moisture foods at elevated temperatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tadapaneni, Ravi Kiran; Yang, Ren; Carter, Brady; Tang, Juming

    2017-12-01

    In recent years, research studies have shown that the thermal resistance of foodborne pathogens in the low moisture foods is greatly influenced by the water activity (a w ) at temperatures relevant to thermal treatments for pathogen control. Yet, there has been a lack of an effective method for accurate measurement of a w at those temperatures. Thus, the main aim of this study was to evaluate a new method for measuring a w of food samples at elevated temperatures. An improved thermal cell with a relative humidity and temperature sensor was used to measure the a w of the three different food samples, namely, organic wheat flour, almond flour, and non-fat milk powder, over the temperature range between 20 and 80°C. For a constant moisture content, the a w data was used to estimate the net isosteric heat of sorption (q st ). The q st values were then used in the Clausius Clapeyron equation (CCE) equation to estimate the moisture sorption isotherm for all test food samples at different temperatures. For all the tested samples of any fixed moisture content, a w value generally increased with the temperature. The energy for sorption decreased with increasing moisture content. With the experimentally determined q st value, CCE describes well about the changes in a w of the food samples between 20 and 80°C. This study presents a method to obtain a w of a food sample for a specific moisture content at different temperatures which could be extended to obtain q st values for different moisture contents and hence, the moisture sorption isotherm of a food sample at different temperatures. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Flood analyses for Department of Energy Y-12, ORNL and K-25 Plants. Flood analyses in support of flood emergency planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-05-01

    The study involved defining the flood potential and local rainfall depth and duration data for the Department of Energy's (DOE) Y-12, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), and K-25 plants. All three plants are subject to flooding from the Clinch River. In addition, the Y-12 plant is subject to flooding from East Fork Poplar and Bear Creeks, the ORNL plant from Whiteoak Creek and Melton Branch, and the K-25 plant from Poplar Creek. Determination of flood levels included consideration of both rainfall events and postulated failures of Norris and Melton Hill Dams in seismic events

  3. Distillation Column Flooding Predictor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    George E. Dzyacky

    2010-11-23

    The Flooding Predictor™ is a patented advanced control technology proven in research at the Separations Research Program, University of Texas at Austin, to increase distillation column throughput by over 6%, while also increasing energy efficiency by 10%. The research was conducted under a U. S. Department of Energy Cooperative Agreement awarded to George Dzyacky of 2ndpoint, LLC. The Flooding Predictor™ works by detecting the incipient flood point and controlling the column closer to its actual hydraulic limit than historical practices have allowed. Further, the technology uses existing column instrumentation, meaning no additional refining infrastructure is required. Refiners often push distillation columns to maximize throughput, improve separation, or simply to achieve day-to-day optimization. Attempting to achieve such operating objectives is a tricky undertaking that can result in flooding. Operators and advanced control strategies alike rely on the conventional use of delta-pressure instrumentation to approximate the column’s approach to flood. But column delta-pressure is more an inference of the column’s approach to flood than it is an actual measurement of it. As a consequence, delta pressure limits are established conservatively in order to operate in a regime where the column is never expected to flood. As a result, there is much “left on the table” when operating in such a regime, i.e. the capacity difference between controlling the column to an upper delta-pressure limit and controlling it to the actual hydraulic limit. The Flooding Predictor™, an innovative pattern recognition technology, controls columns at their actual hydraulic limit, which research shows leads to a throughput increase of over 6%. Controlling closer to the hydraulic limit also permits operation in a sweet spot of increased energy-efficiency. In this region of increased column loading, the Flooding Predictor is able to exploit the benefits of higher liquid

  4. Flood Risk Assessment in Urban Areas Based on Spatial Analytics and Social Factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Costas Armenakis

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Flood maps alone are not sufficient to determine and assess the risks to people, property, infrastructure, and services due to a flood event. Simply put, the risk is almost zero to minimum if the flooded region is “empty” (i.e., unpopulated, has not properties, no industry, no infrastructure, and no socio-economic activity. High spatial resolution Earth Observation (EO data can contribute to the generation and updating of flood risk maps based on several aspects including population, economic development, and critical infrastructure, which can enhance a city’s flood mitigation and preparedness planning. In this case study for the Don River watershed, Toronto, the flood risk is determined and flood risk index maps are generated by implementing a methodology for estimating risk based on the geographic coverage of the flood hazard, vulnerability of people, and the exposure of large building structures to flood water. Specifically, the spatial flood risk index maps have been generated through analytical spatial modeling which takes into account the areas in which a flood hazard is expected to occur, the terrain’s morphological characteristics, socio-economic parameters based on demographic data, and the density of large building complexes. Generated flood risk maps are verified through visual inspection with 3D city flood maps. Findings illustrate that areas of higher flood risk coincide with areas of high flood hazard and social and building exposure vulnerability.

  5. Forecasting characteristics of flood effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khamutova, M. V.; Rezchikov, A. F.; Kushnikov, V. A.; Ivaschenko, V. A.; Bogomolov, A. S.; Filimonyuk, L. Yu; Dolinina, O. N.; Kushnikova, E. V.; Shulga, T. E.; Tverdokhlebov, V. A.; Fominykh, D. S.

    2018-05-01

    The article presents the development of a mathematical model of the system dynamics. Mathematical model allows forecasting the characteristics of flood effects. Model is based on a causal diagram and is presented by a system of nonlinear differential equations. Simulated characteristics are the nodes of the diagram, and edges define the functional relationships between them. The numerical solution of the system of equations using the Runge-Kutta method was obtained. Computer experiments to determine the characteristics on different time interval have been made and results of experiments have been compared with real data of real flood. The obtained results make it possible to assert that the developed model is valid. The results of study are useful in development of an information system for the operating and dispatching staff of the Ministry of the Russian Federation for Civil Defence, Emergencies and Elimination of Consequences of Natural Disasters (EMERCOM).

  6. Iowa Flood Information System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demir, I.; Krajewski, W. F.; Goska, R.; Mantilla, R.; Weber, L. J.; Young, N.

    2011-12-01

    The Iowa Flood Information System (IFIS) is a web-based platform developed by the Iowa Flood Center (IFC) to provide access to flood inundation maps, real-time flood conditions, flood forecasts both short-term and seasonal, flood-related data, information and interactive visualizations for communities in Iowa. The key element of the system's architecture is the notion of community. Locations of the communities, those near streams and rivers, define basin boundaries. The IFIS provides community-centric watershed and river characteristics, weather (rainfall) conditions, and streamflow data and visualization tools. Interactive interfaces allow access to inundation maps for different stage and return period values, and flooding scenarios with contributions from multiple rivers. Real-time and historical data of water levels, gauge heights, and rainfall conditions are available in the IFIS by streaming data from automated IFC bridge sensors, USGS stream gauges, NEXRAD radars, and NWS forecasts. Simple 2D and 3D interactive visualizations in the IFIS make the data more understandable to general public. Users are able to filter data sources for their communities and selected rivers. The data and information on IFIS is also accessible through web services and mobile applications. The IFIS is optimized for various browsers and screen sizes to provide access through multiple platforms including tablets and mobile devices. The IFIS includes a rainfall-runoff forecast model to provide a five-day flood risk estimate for around 500 communities in Iowa. Multiple view modes in the IFIS accommodate different user types from general public to researchers and decision makers by providing different level of tools and details. River view mode allows users to visualize data from multiple IFC bridge sensors and USGS stream gauges to follow flooding condition along a river. The IFIS will help communities make better-informed decisions on the occurrence of floods, and will alert communities

  7. Flood risk analysis procedure for nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wagner, D.P.

    1982-01-01

    This paper describes a methodology and procedure for determining the impact of floods on nuclear power plant risk. The procedures are based on techniques of fault tree and event tree analysis and use the logic of these techniques to determine the effects of a flood on system failure probability and accident sequence occurrence frequency. The methodology can be applied independently or as an add-on analysis for an existing risk assessment. Each stage of the analysis yields useful results such as the critical flood level, failure flood level, and the flood's contribution to accident sequence occurrence frequency. The results of applications show the effects of floods on the risk from nuclear power plants analyzed in the Reactor Safety Study

  8. Diversity and above-ground biomass patterns of vascular flora induced by flooding in the drawdown area of China's Three Gorges Reservoir.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiang Wang

    Full Text Available Hydrological alternation can dramatically influence riparian environments and shape riparian vegetation zonation. However, it was difficult to predict the status in the drawdown area of the Three Gorges Reservoir (TGR, because the hydrological regime created by the dam involves both short periods of summer flooding and long-term winter impoundment for half a year. In order to examine the effects of hydrological alternation on plant diversity and biomass in the drawdown area of TGR, twelve sites distributed along the length of the drawdown area of TGR were chosen to explore the lateral pattern of plant diversity and above-ground biomass at the ends of growing seasons in 2009 and 2010. We recorded 175 vascular plant species in 2009 and 127 in 2010, indicating that a significant loss of vascular flora in the drawdown area of TGR resulted from the new hydrological regimes. Cynodon dactylon and Cyperus rotundus had high tolerance to short periods of summer flooding and long-term winter flooding. Almost half of the remnant species were annuals. Species richness, Shannon-Wiener Index and above-ground biomass of vegetation exhibited an increasing pattern along the elevation gradient, being greater at higher elevations subjected to lower submergence stress. Plant diversity, above-ground biomass and species distribution were significantly influenced by the duration of submergence relative to elevation in both summer and previous winter. Several million tonnes of vegetation would be accumulated on the drawdown area of TGR in every summer and some adverse environmental problems may be introduced when it was submerged in winter. We conclude that vascular flora biodiversity in the drawdown area of TGR has dramatically declined after the impoundment to full capacity. The new hydrological condition, characterized by long-term winter flooding and short periods of summer flooding, determined vegetation biodiversity and above-ground biomass patterns along the

  9. Modeling urban flood risk territories for Riga city

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piliksere, A.; Sennikovs, J.; Virbulis, J.; Bethers, U.; Bethers, P.; Valainis, A.

    2012-04-01

    the Gumbell extreme value analysis. The hydrological modelling driven by the temperature and precipitation data series from regional climate models were used for evaluation of rain event maximums in the future periods. The usage of the climate model data in hydrological models causes systematic errors; therefore the bias correction method (Sennikovs, Bethers, 2009) was applied for determination of the future rainfall intensities. SWMM model was built for the urban area. Objects of hydraulic importance (manifold, penstock, ditch, pumping station, weir, well, catchment sub-basin etc.) were included in the model. There exist pure rain sewage system and mixed rain-water/household sewage system in Riga. Sewage system with wastewater load proportional to population density was taken account and calibrated. Model system was calibrated for a real rain event against the water flux time series into sewage treatment plant of Riga. High resolution (~1.5 points per square meter) digital terrain map was used as the base for finite element mesh for the geospatial mapping of results of hydraulic calculations. Main results of study are (1) detection of the hot spots of densely populated urban areas; (2) identification of the weak chains of the melioration and sewage systems; (3) mapping the elevation of ground water mainly caused by snow melting. A.Piliksere, A.Valainis, J.Seņņikovs, (2011), A flood risk assessment for Riga city taking account climate changes, EGU, Vienna, Austria. EPA, (2004), Storm water management model. User's manual version 5.0. US Environmental Protection Agency J.Sennikovs, U.Bethers, (2009), Statistical downscaling method of regional climate model results for hydrological modelling. 18th World IMACS/MODSIM Congress, Cairns, Australia.

  10. Using remotely sensed data and stochastic models to simulate realistic flood hazard footprints across the continental US

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bates, P. D.; Quinn, N.; Sampson, C. C.; Smith, A.; Wing, O.; Neal, J. C.

    2017-12-01

    Remotely sensed data has transformed the field of large scale hydraulic modelling. New digital elevation, hydrography and river width data has allowed such models to be created for the first time, and remotely sensed observations of water height, slope and water extent has allowed them to be calibrated and tested. As a result, we are now able to conduct flood risk analyses at national, continental or even global scales. However, continental scale analyses have significant additional complexity compared to typical flood risk modelling approaches. Traditional flood risk assessment uses frequency curves to define the magnitude of extreme flows at gauging stations. The flow values for given design events, such as the 1 in 100 year return period flow, are then used to drive hydraulic models in order to produce maps of flood hazard. Such an approach works well for single gauge locations and local models because over relatively short river reaches (say 10-60km) one can assume that the return period of an event does not vary. At regional to national scales and across multiple river catchments this assumption breaks down, and for a given flood event the return period will be different at different gauging stations, a pattern known as the event `footprint'. Despite this, many national scale risk analyses still use `constant in space' return period hazard layers (e.g. the FEMA Special Flood Hazard Areas) in their calculations. Such an approach can estimate potential exposure, but will over-estimate risk and cannot determine likely flood losses over a whole region or country. We address this problem by using a stochastic model to simulate many realistic extreme event footprints based on observed gauged flows and the statistics of gauge to gauge correlations. We take the entire USGS gauge data catalogue for sites with > 45 years of record and use a conditional approach for multivariate extreme values to generate sets of flood events with realistic return period variation in

  11. Framework for probabilistic flood risk assessment in an Alpine region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneeberger, Klaus; Huttenlau, Matthias; Steinberger, Thomas; Achleitner, Stefan; Stötter, Johann

    2014-05-01

    Flooding is among the natural hazards that regularly cause significant losses to property and human lives. The assessment of flood risk delivers crucial information for all participants involved in flood risk management and especially for local authorities and insurance companies in order to estimate the possible flood losses. Therefore a framework for assessing flood risk has been developed and is introduced with the presented contribution. Flood risk is thereby defined as combination of the probability of flood events and of potential flood damages. The probability of occurrence is described through the spatial and temporal characterisation of flood. The potential flood damages are determined in the course of vulnerability assessment, whereas, the exposure and the vulnerability of the elements at risks are considered. Direct costs caused by flooding with the focus on residential building are analysed. The innovative part of this contribution lies on the development of a framework which takes the probability of flood events and their spatio-temporal characteristic into account. Usually the probability of flooding will be determined by means of recurrence intervals for an entire catchment without any spatial variation. This may lead to a misinterpretation of the flood risk. Within the presented framework the probabilistic flood risk assessment is based on analysis of a large number of spatial correlated flood events. Since the number of historic flood events is relatively small additional events have to be generated synthetically. This temporal extrapolation is realised by means of the method proposed by Heffernan and Tawn (2004). It is used to generate a large number of possible spatial correlated flood events within a larger catchment. The approach is based on the modelling of multivariate extremes considering the spatial dependence structure of flood events. The input for this approach are time series derived from river gauging stations. In a next step the

  12. Outburst Flood Simulation Model for Optimizing the Solo River Floods Emergency Response Activities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuli Priyana

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available This study aims to develop flood inundation based on several flood level. The results of this study are: (a land use in the study area is divided into (1 urban area (the Business Area which includes regional administrative center, shopping area, and office area, (2 residential areas (single home region, the region multi- unit house (residence, settlement areas and apartments, (3 industrial estate (industrial estates are less dense and dense industrial area, (4 the surface area covered with vegetation (forest - thicket, meadow area, and the area of land productive rice fields and fields, (5 the area of open land and vacant land that is intended (the city park , cemetery and park area, and (6 transportation area and the pavement surface area (area train station and bus terminal region, (b the preparation of spatial database in this study in the form of data or data vector altitude of Digital Elevation Model (DEM. District of Jebres there are 56 points of elevation and District of Pasar Kliwon there are 48 points of elevation. Elevation of the study area ranged from 88,9 mpdal up to 127.65 mdpal and (c the higher the flood inundation scenarios impact on land use in the study area are also getting bigger. Most obvious impact under scenario 2 m area of 296 601 m , while the smallest impact under scenario 1 m with an area of 77 693 m 2 2 impact. Extensive simulation results based on the total impact amounts to 544 756 m.

  13. Health impacts of floods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Weiwei; FitzGerald, Gerard Joseph; Clark, Michele; Hou, Xiang-Yu

    2010-01-01

    Floods are the most common hazard to cause disasters and have led to extensive morbidity and mortality throughout the world. The impact of floods on the human community is related directly to the location and topography of the area, as well as human demographics and characteristics of the built environment. The aim of this study is to identify the health impacts of disasters and the underlying causes of health impacts associated with floods. A conceptual framework is developed that may assist with the development of a rational and comprehensive approach to prevention, mitigation, and management. This study involved an extensive literature review that located >500 references, which were analyzed to identify common themes, findings, and expert views. The findings then were distilled into common themes. The health impacts of floods are wide ranging, and depend on a number of factors. However, the health impacts of a particular flood are specific to the particular context. The immediate health impacts of floods include drowning, injuries, hypothermia, and animal bites. Health risks also are associated with the evacuation of patients, loss of health workers, and loss of health infrastructure including essential drugs and supplies. In the medium-term, infected wounds, complications of injury, poisoning, poor mental health, communicable diseases, and starvation are indirect effects of flooding. In the long-term, chronic disease, disability, poor mental health, and poverty-related diseases including malnutrition are the potential legacy. This article proposes a structured approach to the classification of the health impacts of floods and a conceptual framework that demonstrates the relationships between floods and the direct and indirect health consequences.

  14. Flood-inundation maps for the Saluda River from Old Easley Bridge Road to Saluda Lake Dam near Greenville, South Carolina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benedict, Stephen T.; Caldwell, Andral W.; Clark, Jimmy M.

    2013-01-01

    Digital flood-inundation maps for a 3.95-mile reach of the Saluda River from approximately 815 feet downstream from Old Easley Bridge Road to approximately 150 feet downstream from Saluda Lake Dam near Greenville, South Carolina, were developed by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS). The inundation maps, which can be accessed through the USGS Flood Inundation Mapping Science Web site at http://water.usgs.gov/osw/flood_inundation/, depict estimates of the areal extent and depth of flooding corresponding to selected water levels (stages) at the USGS streamgage at Saluda River near Greenville, South Carolina (station 02162500). Current conditions at the USGS streamgage may be obtained through the National Water Information System Web site at http://waterdata.usgs.gov/sc/nwis/uv/?site_no=02162500&PARAmeter_cd=00065,00060,00062. The National Weather Service (NWS) forecasts flood hydrographs at many places that are often collocated with USGS streamgages. Forecasted peak-stage information is available on the Internet at the NWS Advanced Hydrologic Prediction Service (AHPS) flood-warning system Web site (http://water.weather.gov/ahps/) and may be used in conjunction with the maps developed in this study to show predicted areas of flood inundation.In this study, flood profiles were computed for the stream reach by means of a one-dimensional step-backwater model. The model was calibrated using the most current stage-streamflow relations at USGS streamgage station 02162500, Saluda River near Greenville, South Carolina. The hydraulic model was then used to determine water-surface profiles for flood stages at 1.0-foot intervals referenced to the streamgage datum and ranging from approximately bankfull to 2 feet higher than the highest recorded water level at the streamgage. The simulated water-surface profiles were then exported to a geographic information system, ArcGIS, and combined with a digital elevation model (derived from Light Detection and Ranging [LiDAR] data with a 0

  15. Flood-inundation maps for Suwanee Creek from the confluence of Ivy Creek to the Noblin Ridge Drive bridge, Gwinnett County, Georgia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musser, Jonathan W.

    2012-01-01

    Digital flood-inundation maps for a 6.9-mile reach of Suwanee Creek, from the confluence of Ivy Creek to the Noblin Ridge Drive bridge, were developed by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) in cooperation with Gwinnett County, Georgia. The inundation maps, which can be accessed through the USGS Flood Inundation Mapping Science Web site at http://water.usgs.gov/osw/flood_inundation/, depict estimates of the areal extent and depth of flooding corresponding to selected water levels (stages) at the USGS streamgage at Suwanee Creek at Suwanee, Georgia (02334885). Current stage at this USGS streamgage may be obtained at http://waterdata.usgs.gov/ and can be used in conjunction with these maps to estimate near real-time areas of inundation. The National Weather Service (NWS) is incorporating results from this study into the Advanced Hydrologic Prediction Service (AHPS) flood-warning system (http://water.weather.gov/ahps/). The NWS forecasts flood hydrographs at many places that commonly are collocated at USGS streamgages. The forecasted peak-stage information for the USGS streamgage at Suwanee Creek at Suwanee (02334885), available through the AHPS Web site, may be used in conjunction with the maps developed in this study to show predicted areas of flood inundation. A one-dimensional step-backwater model was developed using the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers HEC-RAS software for Suwanee Creek and was used to compute flood profiles for a 6.9-mile reach of the creek. The model was calibrated using the most current stage-discharge relations at the Suwanee Creek at Suwanee streamgage (02334885). The hydraulic model was then used to determine 19 water-surface profiles for flood stages at the Suwanee Creek streamgage at 0.5-foot intervals referenced to the streamgage. The profiles ranged from just above bankfull stage (7.0 feet) to approximately 1.7 feet above the highest recorded water level at the streamgage (16.0 feet). The simulated water-surface profiles were then combined

  16. Aquatic chemistry of flood events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klavins, Maris; Rodinov, Valery

    2015-04-01

    During flood events a major discharge of water and dissolved substances happens. However flood waters very much differs from water composition during low-water events. Aquatic chemistry of flood waters also is of importance at the calculation of loadings as well as they might have major impact on water quality in receiving water bodies (lakes, coastal waters and seas). Further flood regime of rivers is subjected to changes due to climate change and growing impact of human activities. The aim of this study is to analyse water chemical composition changes during flood events in respect to low water periods, character of high-water events and characteristics of the corresponding basin. Within this study, the concentrations of major dissolved substances in the major rivers of Latvia have been studied using monitoring data as well as field studies during high water/ low water events. As territories of studies flows of substances in river basins/subbasins with different land-use character and different anthropogenic impacts has been studied to calculate export values depending on the land-use character. Impact of relations between dissolved substances and relations in respect to budgets has been calculated. The dynamics of DOC, nutrient and major dissolved substance flows depending on landuse pattern and soil properties in Latvia has been described, including emissions by industrial and agricultural production. In these changes evidently climate change signals can be identified. The water chemistry of a large number of rivers during flood events has been determined and the possible impact of water chemical composition on DOC and nutrient flows has been evaluated. Long-term changes (1977-2013) of concentrations of dissolved substances do not follow linear trends but rather show oscillating patterns, indicating impact of natural factors, e.g. changing hydrological and climatic conditions. There is a positive correlation between content of inert dissolved substances and

  17. Nogales flood detention study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norman, Laura M.; Levick, Lainie; Guertin, D. Phillip; Callegary, James; Guadarrama, Jesus Quintanar; Anaya, Claudia Zulema Gil; Prichard, Andrea; Gray, Floyd; Castellanos, Edgar; Tepezano, Edgar; Huth, Hans; Vandervoet, Prescott; Rodriguez, Saul; Nunez, Jose; Atwood, Donald; Granillo, Gilberto Patricio Olivero; Ceballos, Francisco Octavio Gastellum

    2010-01-01

    Flooding in Ambos Nogales often exceeds the capacity of the channel and adjacent land areas, endangering many people. The Nogales Wash is being studied to prevent future flood disasters and detention features are being installed in tributaries of the wash. This paper describes the application of the KINEROS2 model and efforts to understand the capacity of these detention features under various flood and urbanization scenarios. Results depict a reduction in peak flow for the 10-year, 1-hour event based on current land use in tributaries with detention features. However, model results also demonstrate that larger storm events and increasing urbanization will put a strain on the features and limit their effectiveness.

  18. Urban flood risk warning under rapid urbanization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yangbo; Zhou, Haolan; Zhang, Hui; Du, Guoming; Zhou, Jinhui

    2015-05-01

    In the past decades, China has observed rapid urbanization, the nation's urban population reached 50% in 2000, and is still in steady increase. Rapid urbanization in China has an adverse impact on urban hydrological processes, particularly in increasing the urban flood risks and causing serious urban flooding losses. Urban flooding also increases health risks such as causing epidemic disease break out, polluting drinking water and damaging the living environment. In the highly urbanized area, non-engineering measurement is the main way for managing urban flood risk, such as flood risk warning. There is no mature method and pilot study for urban flood risk warning, the purpose of this study is to propose the urban flood risk warning method for the rapidly urbanized Chinese cities. This paper first presented an urban flood forecasting model, which produces urban flood inundation index for urban flood risk warning. The model has 5 modules. The drainage system and grid dividing module divides the whole city terrain into drainage systems according to its first-order river system, and delineates the drainage system into grids based on the spatial structure with irregular gridding technique; the precipitation assimilation module assimilates precipitation for every grids which is used as the model input, which could either be the radar based precipitation estimation or interpolated one from rain gauges; runoff production module classifies the surface into pervious and impervious surface, and employs different methods to calculate the runoff respectively; surface runoff routing module routes the surface runoff and determines the inundation index. The routing on surface grid is calculated according to the two dimensional shallow water unsteady flow algorithm, the routing on land channel and special channel is calculated according to the one dimensional unsteady flow algorithm. This paper then proposed the urban flood risk warning method that is called DPSIR model based

  19. Legitimizing differentiated flood protection levels

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thomas, Hartmann; Spit, Tejo

    2016-01-01

    The European flood risk management plan is a new instrument introduced by the Floods Directive. It introduces a spatial turn and a scenario approach in flood risk management, ultimately leading to differentiated flood protection levels on a catchment basis. This challenges the traditional sources of

  20. Flood Inundation Modelling in the Kuantan River Basin using 1D-2D Flood Modeller coupled with ASTER-GDEM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Z. F.; Gisen, J. I.; Akbari, A.

    2018-03-01

    Topography dataset is an important input in performing flood inundation modelling. However, it is always difficult to obtain high resolution topography that provide accurate elevation information. Fortunately, there are some open source topography datasets available with reasonable resolution such as SRTM and ASTER-GDEM. In Malaysia particularly in Kuantan, the modelling research on the floodplain area is still lacking. This research aims to: a) to investigate the suitability of ASTER-GDEM to be applied in the 1D-2D flood inundation modelling for the Kuantan River Basin; b) to generate flood inundation map for Kuantan river basin. The topography dataset used in this study is ASTER-GDEM to generate physical characteristics of watershed in the basin. It is used to perform rainfall runoff modelling for hydrological studies and to delineate flood inundation area in the Flood Modeller. The results obtained have shown that a 30m resolution ASTER-GDEM is applicable as an input for the 1D-2D flood modelling. The simulated water level in 2013 has NSE of 0.644 and RSME of 1.259. As a conclusion, ASTER-GDEM can be used as one alternative topography datasets for flood inundation modelling. However, the flood level obtained from the hydraulic modelling shows low accuracy at flat urban areas.