WorldWideScience

Sample records for flight diffraction combining

  1. Ultrasonic testing using time of flight diffraction technique (TOFD)

    Khurram Shahzad; Ahmad Mirza Safeer Ahmad; Muhammad Asif Khan

    2009-04-01

    This paper describes the ultrasonic testing using Time Flight Diffraction (TOFD) Technique for welded samples having different types and sizes of defects. TOFD is a computerized ultrasonic system, able to scan, store and evaluate indications in terms of location, through thickness and length in a more easy and convenient. Time of Flight Diffraction Technique (TOFD) is more fast and easy technique for ultrasonic testing as we can examine a weld i a single scan along the length of the weld with two probes known as D-scan. It shows the image of the complete weld with the defect information. The examinations were performed on carbon steel samples used for ultrasonic testing using 70 degree probes. The images for different type of defects were obtained. (author)

  2. Time of flight Laue fiber diffraction studies of perdeuterated DNA

    Forsyth, V.T.; Whalley, M.A.; Mahendrasingam, A.; Fuller, W. [Keele Univ. (United Kingdom)] [and others

    1994-12-31

    The diffractometer SXD at the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory ISIS pulsed neutron source has been used to record high resolution time-of-flight Laue fiber diffraction data from DNA. These experiments, which are the first of their kind, were undertaken using fibers of DNA in the A conformation and prepared using deuterated DNA in order to minimis incoherent background scattering. These studies complement previous experiments on instrument D19 at the Institute Laue Langevin using monochromatic neutrons. Sample preparation involved drawing large numbers of these deuterated DNA fibers and mounting them in a parallel array. The strategy of data collection is discussed in terms of camera design, sample environment and data collection. The methods used to correct the recorded time-of-flight data and map it into the final reciprocal space fiber diffraction dataset are also discussed. Difference Fourier maps showing the distribution of water around A-DNA calculated on the basis of these data are compared with results obtained using data recorded from hydrogenated A-DNA on D19. Since the methods used for sample preparation, data collection and data processing are fundamentally different for the monochromatic and Laue techniques, the results of these experiments also afford a valuable opportunity to independently test the data reduction and analysis techniques used in the two methods.

  3. ATLAS - analysis of time-of-flight diffraction data from liquid and amorphous samples

    Soper, A.K.; Howells, W.S.; Hannon, A.C.

    1989-05-01

    The purpose of this manual is to describe a package of data analysis routines which have been developed at the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory for the analysis of time-of-flight diffraction data from liquids, gases, and amorphous materials. There is no fundamental barrier to diffraction data being accurately analysed to structure factor or even pair correlation function within a very short time of the completion of the experiment. Section 1 describes the time-of-flight neutron diffraction experiment and looks at diffraction theory. Section 2 indicates the steps in data analysis of time-of-flight diffraction data and Section 3 gives details of how to run the procedures. (author)

  4. Appearance of maxima of combined type in Moessbauer diffraction

    Kolpakov, A.V.; Ovchinnikova, E.N.; Kuz'min, R.N.

    1978-01-01

    An appearance of Bragg maxima in the Moessbauer diffraction pattern due to a combined hyperfine interaction on nuclei in a crystal is discussed. By a combined interaction one means presence on the nuclei of a magnetic field and tensor of electric field gradient. The structure RFe 2 R=Pu, Np, V, Zr, Tm) is considered. It has been shown that when a scattering system is in fields of several actions with various symmetries, the diffraction pattern is not an additive superposition of diffraction patterns of magnetic and electric quadrupole scatterings. In this case the diffraction patterns of magnetic and electric quadrupole scatterings. In this case the diffraction spectra have maxima forbidden by the extinction laws in diffraction in the presence of only a magnetic field or only electric quadrupole interaction

  5. Time-of-flight pulsed neutron diffraction of molten salts

    Fukushima, Y; Misawa, M; Suzuki, K [Tohoku Univ., Sendai (Japan). Research Inst. for Iron, Steel and Other Metals

    1975-06-01

    In this work, the pulsed neutron diffraction of molten alkali metal nitrate and bismuth trihalide was measured by the time-of-flight method. An electron linear accelerator was used as the pulsed neutron source. All the measurements were carried out with the T-O-F neutron diffractometer installed on the 300 MeV electron lineac. Molten NaNO/sub 3/ and RbNO/sub 3/ were adopted as the samples for alkali metal nitrate. The measurement is in progress for KNO/sub 3/ and LiNO/sub 3/. As the first step of the study on bismuth-bismuth trihalide system, the temperature dependence of structure factors was observed for BiCl/sub 3/, BiBr/sub 3/ and BiI/sub 3/ in the liquid state. The structure factors Sm(Q) for molten NaNO/sub 3/ at 340/sup 0/C and RbNO/sub 3/ at 350/sup 0/C were obtained, and the form factor F/sub 1/(Q) for single NO/sub 3//sup -/ radical with equilateral triangle structure was calculated. In case of molten NaNO/sub 3/, the first peak of Sm(Q) is simply smooth and a small hump can be observed in the neighbourhood of the first minimum Q position. The first peak of Sm(Q) for molten RbNO/sub 3/ is divided into two peaks, whereas a hump at the first minimum becomes big, and shifts to the low Q side of the second peak. The size of the NO/sub 3//sup -/ radical in molten NaNO/sub 3/ is a little smaller than that in molten RbNO/sub 3/. The values of the bond length in the NO/sub 3//sup -/ radical are summarized for crystal state and liquid state. The temperature dependence of the structure factor S(Q) was observed for BiCl/sub 3/, BiBr/sub 3/ and BiI/sub 3/, and shown in a figure.

  6. A method of combining STEM image with parallel beam diffraction and electron-optical conditions for diffractive imaging

    He Haifeng; Nelson, Chris

    2007-01-01

    We describe a method of combining STEM imaging functionalities with nanoarea parallel beam electron diffraction on a modern TEM. This facilitates the search for individual particles whose diffraction patterns are needed for diffractive imaging or structural studies of nanoparticles. This also lays out a base for 3D diffraction data collection

  7. The different structural scales of the breast and their impact on time-of-flight and diffraction tomography

    Huang, Lianjie [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Huthwaite, Peter [IMPERIAL COLLEGE LONDON; Simonetti, Francesco [IMPERIAL COLLEGE LONDON

    2010-02-11

    Ultrasound tomography is an attractive imaging method for the detection of breast cancer. The complex anatomy of the breast with its different spatial scales and material property contrasts make accurate reconstructions very challenging. This paper proposes a hybrid approach whereby Travel-of-Flight and Diffraction Tomography are combined together to achieve high-resolution and high-accuracy sound-speed reconstructions. The method is validated with several numerical phantoms.

  8. Time-of-Flight Three Dimensional Neutron Diffraction in Transmission Mode for Mapping Crystal Grain Structures

    Cereser, Alberto; Strobl, Markus; Hall, Stephen A.

    2017-01-01

    constituting the material. This article presents a new non-destructive 3D technique to study centimeter-sized bulk samples with a spatial resolution of hundred micrometers: time-of-flight three-dimensional neutron diffraction (ToF 3DND). Compared to existing analogous X-ray diffraction techniques, ToF 3DND......-of-flight neutron beamline. The technique was developed and tested with data collected at the Materials and Life Science Experimental Facility of the Japan Proton Accelerator Complex (J-PARC) for an iron sample. We successfully reconstructed the shape of 108 grains and developed an indexing procedure...

  9. Visualization of time-of-flight neutron diffraction data

    Mikkelson, D.J.; Price, D.L.; Worlton, T.G.

    1995-01-01

    The glass, liquids and amorphous materials diffractometer (GLAD) is a new instrument at the intense pulsed neutron source (IPNS) at Argonne National Laboratory. The GLAD currently has 218 linear position sensitive detectors arranged in five banks. Raw data collected from the instrument are typically split into 1000-1500 angular groups each of which contains approximately 2000 time channels. In order to obtain a meaningful overview of such a large amount of data, an interactive system to view the data has been designed. The system was implemented in C using the graphical kernel system (GKS) for portability.The system treats data from each bank of detectors as a three-dimensional data set with detector number, position along detector and time of flight as the three coordinate axes. The software then slices the data parallel to any of the coordinate planes and displays the slices as images. This approach has helped with the detailed analysis of detector electronics, verification of instrument calibration and resolution determination. In addition, it has helped to identify low-level background signals and provided insight into the overall operation of the instrument. ((orig.))

  10. Incident spectrum determination for time-of-flight neutron powder diffraction data analysis

    Hodges, J. P.

    1998-01-01

    Accurate characterization of the incident neutron spectrum is an important requirement for precise Rietveld analysis of time-of-flight powder neutron diffraction data. Without an accurate incident spectrum the calculated model for the measured relative intensities of individual Bragg reflections will possess systematic errors. We describe a method for obtaining an accurate numerical incident spectrum using data from a transmitted beam monitor

  11. Proceedings of the 1986 workshop on advanced time-of-flight neutron powder diffraction

    Lawson, A.C.; Smith, K. (comps.)

    1986-09-01

    This report contains abstracts of talks and summaries of discussions from a small workshop held to discuss the future of time-of-flight neutron powder diffraction and its implementation at the Los Alamos Neutron Scattering Center. 47 refs., 3 figs.

  12. Proceedings of the 1986 workshop on advanced time-of-flight neutron powder diffraction

    Lawson, A.C.; Smith, K.

    1986-09-01

    This report contains abstracts of talks and summaries of discussions from a small workshop held to discuss the future of time-of-flight neutron powder diffraction and its implementation at the Los Alamos Neutron Scattering Center. 47 refs., 3 figs

  13. Time-of-flight diffraction at pulsed neutron sources: An introduction to the symposium

    Jorgensen, J.D.

    1994-01-01

    In the 25 years since the first low-power demonstration experiments, pulsed neutron sources have become as productive as reactor sources for many types of diffraction experiments. The pulsed neutron sources presently operating in the United States, England, and Japan offer state of the art instruments for powder and single crystal diffraction, small angle scattering, and such specialized techniques as grazing-incidence neutron reflection, as well as quasielastic and inelastic scattering. In this symposium, speakers review the latest advances in diffraction instrumentation for pulsed neutron sources and give examples of some of the important science presently being done. In this introduction to the symposium, I briefly define the basic principles of pulsed neutron sources, review their development, comment in general terms on the development of time-of-flight diffraction instrumentation for these sources, and project how this field will develop in the next ten years

  14. Rietveld refinement with time-of-flight powder diffraction data from pulsed neutron sources

    David, W.I.F.; Jorgensen, J.D.

    1990-10-01

    The recent development of accelerator-based pulsed neutron sources has led to the widespread use of the time-of-flight technique for neutron powder diffraction. The properties of the pulsed source make possible unusually high resolution over a wide range of d spacings, high count rates, and the ability to collect complete data at fixed scattering angles. The peak shape and other instrument characteristics can be accurately modelled, which make Rietveld refinement possible for complex structures. In this paper we briefly review the development of the Rietveld method for time-of-flight diffraction data from pulsed neutron sources and discuss the latest developments in high resolution instrumentation and advanced Rietveld analysis methods. 50 refs., 12 figs., 14 tabs

  15. Time of flight diffraction technique and applications for retaining rings and turbine discs

    Ashwin, P.

    1990-01-01

    During recent times the term Time of Flight has become a popular phrase in ultrasonic terminology. It is true to say that since ultrasonic energy was first applied for NDE applications, we have used the time of flight to measure the material thickness and establish the presence of discontinuities in metals and other materials. However, as digital ultrasonic systems have evolved we have added new terminology to the field of nondestructive testing, such that phrases as Time of Flight are often misunderstood or over used. Conventional ultrasonic practice (meaning code based ultrasonic inspection) is in most reliant on the measurement of the reflected amplitude response to establish the presence and size of material discontinuities, where the time of flight is the measurement of the ultrasound as it travels to and from the reflector. This industry standard technique has on many occasions been questioned in terms of its value, especially during defect sizing applications. To address the known limitations of amplitude based sizing criteria, a new technique was developed referred to as Time Of Flight Diffraction -TOFD. Instead of using the amount of ultrasonic energy reflected by a discontinuity, TOFD relies on an aspect of ultrasonics that until more recently has been ignored or overlooked. This is the phenomena of diffracted ultrasonic energy, Using diffracted energy it is possible to more accurately measure the size of a defect. More recently the technique has been used for the detection of defects, where due to the imaging capabilities of the instrumentation used, TOFD has illustrated the presence of defects which could not be identified by other ultrasonic methods

  16. Combining zonal refractive and diffractive aspheric multifocal intraocular lenses.

    Muñoz, Gonzalo; Albarrán-Diego, César; Javaloy, Jaime; Sakla, Hani F; Cerviño, Alejandro

    2012-03-01

    To assess visual performance with the combination of a zonal refractive aspheric multifocal intraocular lens (MIOL) (Lentis Mplus, Oculentis GmbH) and a diffractive aspheric MIOL (Acri.Lisa 366, Acri.Tech GmbH). This prospective interventional cohort study comprised 80 eyes from 40 cataract patients (mean age: 65.5±7.3 years) who underwent implantation of the Lentis Mplus MIOL in one eye and Acri.Lisa 366 MIOL in the fellow eye. The main outcome measures were refraction; monocular and binocular uncorrected and corrected distance, intermediate, and near visual acuities; monocular and binocular defocus curves; binocular photopic contrast sensitivity function compared to a monofocal intraocular lens (IOL) control group (40 age-matched pseudophakic patients implanted with the AR-40e [Abbott Medical Optics]); and quality of vision questionnaire. Binocular uncorrected visual acuities were 0.12 logMAR (0.76 decimal) or better at all distances measured between 6 m and 33 cm. The Lentis Mplus provided statistically significant better vision than the Acri.Lisa at distances between 2 m and 40 cm, and the Acri.Lisa provided statistically significant better vision than the Lentis Mplus at 33 cm. Binocular defocus curve showed little drop-off at intermediate distances. Photopic contrast sensitivity function for distance and near were similar to the monofocal IOL control group except for higher frequencies. Moderate glare (15%), night vision problems (12.5%), and halos (10%) were reported. Complete independence of spectacles was achieved by 92.5% of patients. The combination of zonal refractive aspheric and diffractive aspheric MIOLs resulted in excellent uncorrected binocular distance, intermediate, and near vision, with low incidence of significant photic phenomena and high patient satisfaction. Copyright 2012, SLACK Incorporated.

  17. A time-of-flight spectrometer for neutron diffraction under high pressure or at high temperature

    Roult, G.; Buevoz, J.L.

    1975-01-01

    For high pressure neutron diffraction studies (40 kilobars) the sample is placed in a very thick cell. In order to allow the neutron beam to go through the cell loosing as little intensity as possible, the inner part is kept solid while the external part has some windows facing the incident and reflected beam. The window dimensions are small (a few millimeters wide and a few centimeters long). There are two alternatives: to have the window either in a perpendicular plane or in a plane parallel to the axis. In the first case a fixed wavelength spectrometer can be used but the sample is small and the contribution of the cell to the diffraction pattern is relatively great. In the second case samples can be something like ten times greater and the cell contribution can be eliminated but a fixed wavelength spectrometer cannot be used. Thus the time-of-flight method is very convenient. The second alternative was chosen

  18. Thermal diffuse scattering in time-of-flight neutron diffraction studied on SBN single crystals

    Prokert, F.; Savenko, B.N.; Balagurov, A.M.

    1994-01-01

    At time-of-flight (TOF) diffractometer D N-2, installed at the pulsed reactor IBR-2 in Dubna, Sr x Ba 1-x Nb 2 O 6 mixed single crystals (SBN-x) of different compositions (0.50 < x< 0.75) were investigated between 15 and 773 K. The diffraction patterns were found to be strongly influenced by the thermal diffuse scattering (TDS). The appearance of the TDS from the long wavelength acoustic models of vibration in single crystals is characterized by the ratio of the velocity of sound to the velocity of neutron. Due to the nature of the TOF Laue diffraction technique used on D N-2, the TDS around Bragg peaks has rather a complex profile. An understanding of the TDS close to Bragg peaks is essential in allowing the extraction of the diffuse scattering occurring at the diffuse ferroelectric phase transition in SBN crystals. 11 refs.; 9 figs.; 1 tab. (author)

  19. Overview of diffraction gratings technologies for space-flight satellites and astronomy

    Cotel, Arnaud; Liard, Audrey; Desserouer, Frédéric; Bonnemason, Francis; Pichon, Pierre

    2014-09-01

    The diffraction gratings are widely used in Space-flight satellites for spectrograph instruments or in ground-based telescopes in astronomy. The diffraction gratings are one of the key optical components of such systems and have to exhibit very high optical performances. HORIBA Jobin Yvon S.A.S. (part of HORIBA Group) is in the forefront of such gratings development for more than 40 years. During the past decades, HORIBA Jobin Yvon (HJY) has developed a unique expertise in diffraction grating design and manufacturing processes for holographic, ruled or etched gratings. We will present in this paper an overview of diffraction grating technologies especially designed for space and astronomy applications. We will firstly review the heritage of the company in this field with the space qualification of different grating types. Then, we will describe several key grating technologies developed for specific space or astronomy projects: ruled blazed low groove density plane reflection grating, holographic blazed replica plane grating, high-groove density holographic toroidal and spherical grating and transmission Fused Silica Etched (FSE) grismassembled grating.

  20. Measurement of residual strain in composites by means of time-of- flight neutron diffraction

    Kupperman, D.S.; Majumdar, S.; Richardson, J.; Saigal, A.

    1993-01-01

    Neutron diffraction time-of-flight measurements using the Intense Pulsed Neutron Source at Argonne National Laboratory have been employed to study strain in various metal- and ceramic-matrix composites. For example, measurements carried out to 900 C on a composite composed of a titanium alloy matrix and silicon carbide fibers have been used to validate theoretical assumptions in the prediction of fabrication-induced residual stress. Sapphire reinforced nickel aluminide composites have also been studied. Studies of a high-temperature ceramic superconducting composite consisting of yttrium barium copper oxide and silver with various volume fractions of silver have also been carried out. The results of these studies have provided information on the effect of Ag content on interface bonding. In addition, ceramic-matrix composites with randomly dispersed ceramic whiskers with varying fiber content have been investigated

  1. Combined inclusive diffractive cross sections measured with forward proton spectrometers at HERA

    Ruspa, Marta

    2013-01-01

    A combination is presented of the inclusive diffractive cross section measurements made by the H1 and ZEUS Collaborations at HERA. The analysis uses samples of diffractive deep inelastic scattering data where leading protons are detected by dedicated spectrometers. Correlations of systematic uncertainties are taken into account by the combination method, resulting in improved precision.

  2. Combined inclusive diffractive cross sections measured with forward proton spectrometers at HERA

    Ruspa, Marta [Univ. Piemonte Orientale, via Solaroli 17, 28100 Novara (Italy); Collaboration: H1 Collaboration; ZEUS Collaboration

    2013-04-15

    A combination is presented of the inclusive diffractive cross section measurements made by the H1 and ZEUS Collaborations at HERA. The analysis uses samples of diffractive deep inelastic scattering data where leading protons are detected by dedicated spectrometers. Correlations of systematic uncertainties are taken into account by the combination method, resulting in improved precision.

  3. 'Ab initio' structure solution from electron diffraction data obtained by a combination of automated diffraction tomography and precession technique

    Mugnaioli, E.; Gorelik, T.; Kolb, U.

    2009-01-01

    Using a combination of our recently developed automated diffraction tomography (ADT) module with precession electron technique (PED), quasi-kinematical 3D diffraction data sets of an inorganic salt (BaSO 4 ) were collected. The lattice cell parameters and their orientation within the data sets were found automatically. The extracted intensities were used for 'ab initio' structure analysis by direct methods. The data set covered almost the complete set of possible symmetrically equivalent reflections for an orthorhombic structure. The structure solution in one step delivered all heavy (Ba, S) as well as light atoms (O). Results of the structure solution using direct methods, charge flipping and maximum entropy algorithms as well as structure refinement for three different 3D electron diffraction data sets were presented.

  4. The spectral combination characteristic of grating and the bi-grating diffraction imaging effect

    2007-01-01

    This paper reports on a new property of grating, namely spectral combination, and on bi-grating diffraction imaging that is based on spectral combination. The spectral combination characteristic of a grating is the capability of combining multiple light beams of different wavelengths incident from specific angles into a single beam. The bi-grating diffraction imaging is the formation of the image of an object with two gratings: the first grating disperses the multi-color light beams from the object and the second combines the dispersed light beams to form the image. We gave the conditions necessary for obtaining the spectral combination. We also presented the equations that relate the two gratings’ spatial frequencies, diffraction orders and positions necessary for obtaining the bi-grating diffraction imaging.

  5. Five years of testing using the simi-automated ultrasonic time of flight diffraction system

    Webber, S.A.

    2002-01-01

    This paper provides a brief description of the Time of Flight Diffraction (TOFD) test system and also describes a couple of case histories where the system has been successfully applied. The T.O.F.D. system has been contrasted with the conventional manual ultrasonic technique. Whilst the T.O.F.D. system has proven potential, and is without doubt a valuable tool that will continue to gain market share in the inspection industry, conventional manual ultrasonics still has its part to play and will survive for some time to come. One of the outstanding issues facing the T.O.F.D. systems is the question of acceptance testing which is still the predominant convention specified in most standards. Training for a T.O.F.D. system technician is particularly important and the author suggests there are more traps for the unwary than with the conventional manual ultrasonic systems. The overall judgement of the T.O.F.D. system is that it is a most welcome and powerful tool in the hands of the right operator and will do much to boost the prominence of Non-Destructive Testing

  6. Crystallization Kinetics of Nanocrystalline Materials by Combined X-ray Diffraction and Differential Scanning Calorimetry Experiments

    Gil-González, E.; Perejón, A.; Sánchez-Jiménez, P. E.; Medina-Carrasco, S.; Kupčík, Jaroslav; Šubrt, Jan; Criado, J. M.; Pérez-Maqueda, L. A.

    2018-01-01

    Roč. 18, č. 5 (2018), s. 3107-3116 ISSN 1528-7483 Institutional support: RVO:61388980 Keywords : nanocrysalline alloys * combined X ray diffraction * crystallization kinetics Subject RIV: CA - Inorganic Chemistry OBOR OECD: Inorganic and nuclear chemistry Impact factor: 4.055, year: 2016

  7. The IPNS rietveld analysis software package for TOF [time-of-flight] powder diffraction data: Recent developments

    Rotella, F.J.; Richardson, J.W. Jr.

    1987-01-01

    A system of FORTRAN programs for the analysis of time-of-flight (TOF) neutron powder diffraction data via the Rietveld method at IPNS has been modified recently, making it possible to analyze data that exhibit diffraction maxima broadened due to anisotropic strain and that can be modeled by individual atomic anharmonic thermal vibrations. The observation of noncrystalline scattering in data from some powder samples has led to the development of software to fit such scattering by a function related to a radial distribution function through Fourier-filtering techniques. The ''user friendliness'' of the IPNS Rietveld package has been enhanced by the development of ''RIETVELD,'' a menu-based VAX/VMS command language routine for interactive file manipulation and program execution

  8. Spatial Power Combining Amplifier for Ground and Flight Applications

    Velazco, J. E.; Taylor, M.

    2016-11-01

    Vacuum-tube amplifiers such as klystrons and traveling-wave tubes are the workhorses of high-power microwave radiation generation. At JPL, vacuum tubes are extensively used in ground and flight missions for radar and communications. Vacuum tubes use electron beams as the source of energy to achieve microwave power amplification. Such electron beams operate at high kinetic energies and thus require high voltages to function. In addition, vacuum tubes use compact cavity and waveguide structures that hold very intense radio frequency (RF) fields inside. As the operational frequency is increased, the dimensions of these RF structures become increasingly smaller. As power levels and operational frequencies are increased, the highly intense RF fields inside of the tubes' structures tend to arc and create RF breakdown. In the case of very high-power klystrons, electron interception - also known as body current - can produce thermal runaway of the cavities that could lead to the destruction of the tube. The high voltages needed to power vacuum tubes tend to require complicated and cumbersome power supplies. Consequently, although vacuum tubes provide unmatched high-power microwaves, they tend to arc, suffer from thermal issues, and require failure-prone high-voltage power supplies. In this article, we present a new concept for generating high-power microwaves that we refer to as the Spatial Power Combining Amplifier (SPCA). The SPCA is very compact, requires simpler, lower-voltage power supplies, and uses a unique power-combining scheme wherein power from solid-state amplifiers is coherently combined. It is a two-port amplifier and can be used inline as any conventional two-port amplifier. It can deliver its output power to a coaxial line, a waveguide, a feed, or to any microwave load. A key feature of this new scheme is the use of higher-order-mode microwave structures to spatially divide and combine power. Such higher-order-mode structures have considerably larger cross

  9. Combined X-ray and neutron fibre diffraction studies of biological and synthetic polymers

    Parrot, I.M.; Urban, V.; Gardner, K.H.; Forsyth, V.T.

    2005-01-01

    The fibrous state is a natural one for polymer molecules which tend to assume regular helical conformations rather than the globular structures characteristic of many proteins. Fibre diffraction therefore has broad application to the study of a wide range of biological and synthetic polymers. The purpose of this paper is to illustrate the general scope of the method and in particular to demonstrate the impact of a combined approach involving both X-ray and neutron diffraction methods. While the flux of modern X-ray synchrotron radiation sources allows high quality datasets to be recorded with good resolution within a very short space of time, neutron studies can provide unique information through the ability to locate hydrogen or deuterium atoms that are often difficult or impossible to locate using X-ray methods. Furthermore, neutron fibre diffraction methods can, through the ability to selectively label specific parts of a structure, be used to highlight novel aspects of polymer structure that can not be studied using X-rays. Two examples are given. The first describes X-ray and neutron diffraction studies of conformational transitions in DNA. The second describes structural studies of the synthetic high-performance polymer poly(p-phenylene terephthalamide) (PPTA), known commercially as Kevlar[reg] or Twaron[reg

  10. Combined X-ray and neutron fibre diffraction studies of biological and synthetic polymers.

    Parrot, I. M. [Institut Laue-Langevin (ILL); Urban, Volker S [ORNL; Gardner, K. H. [DuPont Experimental Station; Forsyth, V. T. [Institut Laue Langevin and Keele University

    2005-04-01

    The fibrous state is a natural one for polymer molecules which tend to assume regular helical conformations rather than the globular structures characteristic of many proteins. Fibre diffraction therefore has broad application to the study of a wide range of biological and synthetic polymers. The purpose of this paper is to illustrate the general scope of the method and in particular to demonstrate the impact of a combined approach involving both X-ray and neutron diffraction methods. While the flux of modern X-ray synchrotron radiation sources allows high quality datasets to be recorded with good resolution within a very short space of time, neutron studies can provide unique information through the ability to locate hydrogen or deuterium atoms that are often difficult or impossible to locate using X-ray methods. Furthermore, neutron fibre diffraction methods can, through the ability to selectively label specific parts of a structure, be used to highlight novel aspects of polymer structure that can not be studied using X-rays. Two examples are given. The first describes X-ray and neutron diffraction studies of conformational transitions in DNA. The second describes structural studies of the synthetic high-performance polymer poly(p-phenylene terephthalamide) (PPTA), known commercially as Kevlar{reg_sign} or Twaron{reg_sign}.

  11. Combined X-ray and neutron fibre diffraction studies of biological and synthetic polymers

    Parrot, I. M.; Urban, V.; Gardner, K. H.; Forsyth, V. T.

    2005-08-01

    The fibrous state is a natural one for polymer molecules which tend to assume regular helical conformations rather than the globular structures characteristic of many proteins. Fibre diffraction therefore has broad application to the study of a wide range of biological and synthetic polymers. The purpose of this paper is to illustrate the general scope of the method and in particular to demonstrate the impact of a combined approach involving both X-ray and neutron diffraction methods. While the flux of modern X-ray synchrotron radiation sources allows high quality datasets to be recorded with good resolution within a very short space of time, neutron studies can provide unique information through the ability to locate hydrogen or deuterium atoms that are often difficult or impossible to locate using X-ray methods. Furthermore, neutron fibre diffraction methods can, through the ability to selectively label specific parts of a structure, be used to highlight novel aspects of polymer structure that can not be studied using X-rays. Two examples are given. The first describes X-ray and neutron diffraction studies of conformational transitions in DNA. The second describes structural studies of the synthetic high-performance polymer poly(p-phenylene terephthalamide) (PPTA), known commercially as Kevlar® or Twaron®.

  12. Combined X-ray and neutron fibre diffraction studies of biological and synthetic polymers

    Parrot, I.M. [Institut Laue Langevin, 6 Rue Jules Horowitz, 38042 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France); Institute of Science and Technology in Medicine, Keele University Medical School, Staffordshire ST4 7QB (United Kingdom); Urban, V. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, P.O. Box 2008, Oak Ridge, TN 37831-6100 (United States); Gardner, K.H. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering University of Delaware, Newark, DE 19719 (United States); Forsyth, V.T. [Institut Laue Langevin, 6 Rue Jules Horowitz, 38042 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France) and Institute of Science and Technology in Medicine, Keele University Medical School, Staffordshire ST4 7QB (United Kingdom)]. E-mail: tforsyth@ill.fr

    2005-08-15

    The fibrous state is a natural one for polymer molecules which tend to assume regular helical conformations rather than the globular structures characteristic of many proteins. Fibre diffraction therefore has broad application to the study of a wide range of biological and synthetic polymers. The purpose of this paper is to illustrate the general scope of the method and in particular to demonstrate the impact of a combined approach involving both X-ray and neutron diffraction methods. While the flux of modern X-ray synchrotron radiation sources allows high quality datasets to be recorded with good resolution within a very short space of time, neutron studies can provide unique information through the ability to locate hydrogen or deuterium atoms that are often difficult or impossible to locate using X-ray methods. Furthermore, neutron fibre diffraction methods can, through the ability to selectively label specific parts of a structure, be used to highlight novel aspects of polymer structure that can not be studied using X-rays. Two examples are given. The first describes X-ray and neutron diffraction studies of conformational transitions in DNA. The second describes structural studies of the synthetic high-performance polymer poly(p-phenylene terephthalamide) (PPTA), known commercially as Kevlar[reg] or Twaron[reg].

  13. Photon-counting-based diffraction phase microscopy combined with single-pixel imaging

    Shibuya, Kyuki; Araki, Hiroyuki; Iwata, Tetsuo

    2018-04-01

    We propose a photon-counting (PC)-based quantitative-phase imaging (QPI) method for use in diffraction phase microscopy (DPM) that is combined with a single-pixel imaging (SPI) scheme (PC-SPI-DPM). This combination of DPM with the SPI scheme overcomes a low optical throughput problem that has occasionally prevented us from obtaining quantitative-phase images in DPM through use of a high-sensitivity single-channel photodetector such as a photomultiplier tube (PMT). The introduction of a PMT allowed us to perform PC with ease and thus solved a dynamic range problem that was inherent to SPI. As a proof-of-principle experiment, we performed a comparison study of analogue-based SPI-DPM and PC-SPI-DPM for a 125-nm-thick indium tin oxide (ITO) layer coated on a silica glass substrate. We discuss the basic performance of the method and potential future modifications of the proposed system.

  14. Effects of gauge volume on pseudo-strain induced in strain measurement using time-of-flight neutron diffraction

    Suzuki, Hiroshi; Harjo, Stefanus; Abe, Jun; Xu, Pingguang; Aizawa, Kazuya; Akita, Koichi

    2013-01-01

    Spurious or pseudo-strains observed in time-of-flight (TOF) neutron diffraction due to neutron attenuation, surface-effects and a strain distribution within the gauge volume were investigated. Experiments were carried out on annealed and bent ferritic steel bars to test these effects. The most representative position in the gauge volume corresponds to the neutron-weighted center of gravity (ncog), which takes into account variations in intensity within the gauge volume due to neutron attenuation and/or absence of material in the gauge volume. The average strain in the gauge volume was observed to be weighted towards the ncog position but following an increase in the size of the gauge volume the weighted average strain was changed because of the change in the ncog position when a strain gradient appeared within the gauge volume. On the other hand, typical pseudo-strains, which are well known, did appear in through-surface strain measurements when the gauge volume was incompletely filled by the sample. Tensile pseudo-strains due to the surface-effect increased near the sample surface and exhibited a similar trend regardless of the size of the gauge volume, while the pseudo-strains increased faster for the smaller gauge volume. Furthermore, a pseudo-strain due to a change in the ncog position was observed even when the gauge volume was perfectly filled in the sample, and it increased with an increase in the size of the gauge volume. These pseudo-strains measured were much larger than those simulated by the conventional modeling, whereas they were simulated by taking into account an incident neutron beam divergence additionally in the model. Therefore, the incident divergence of the incident neutron beam must be carefully designed to avoid pseudo-strains in time-of-flight neutron diffractometry

  15. Combining the multilevel fast multipole method with the uniform geometrical theory of diffraction

    A. Tzoulis

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The presence of arbitrarily shaped and electrically large objects in the same environment leads to hybridization of the Method of Moments (MoM with the Uniform Geometrical Theory of Diffraction (UTD. The computation and memory complexity of the MoM solution is improved with the Multilevel Fast Multipole Method (MLFMM. By expanding the k-space integrals in spherical harmonics, further considerable amount of memory can be saved without compromising accuracy and numerical speed. However, until now MoM-UTD hybrid methods are restricted to conventional MoM formulations only with Electric Field Integral Equation (EFIE. In this contribution, a MLFMM-UTD hybridization for Combined Field Integral Equation (CFIE is proposed and applied within a hybrid Finite Element - Boundary Integral (FEBI technique. The MLFMM-UTD hybridization is performed at the translation procedure on the various levels of the MLFMM, using a far-field approximation of the corresponding translation operator. The formulation of this new hybrid technique is presented, as well as numerical results.

  16. On the combination of molecular replacement and single-wavelength anomalous diffraction phasing for automated structure determination

    Panjikar, Santosh; Parthasarathy, Venkataraman; Lamzin, Victor S.; Weiss, Manfred S.; Tucker, Paul A.

    2009-01-01

    The combination of molecular replacement and single-wavelength anomalous diffraction improves the performance of automated structure determination with Auto-Rickshaw. A combination of molecular replacement and single-wavelength anomalous diffraction phasing has been incorporated into the automated structure-determination platform Auto-Rickshaw. The complete MRSAD procedure includes molecular replacement, model refinement, experimental phasing, phase improvement and automated model building. The improvement over the standard SAD or MR approaches is illustrated by ten test cases taken from the JCSG diffraction data-set database. Poor MR or SAD phases with phase errors larger than 70° can be improved using the described procedure and a large fraction of the model can be determined in a purely automatic manner from X-ray data extending to better than 2.6 Å resolution

  17. Combined inclusive diffractive cross sections measured with forward proton spectrometers in deep inelastic ep scattering at HERA

    Aaron, F.D.; Abt, I.; Adamczyk, L.; Adamus, M.; Aggarwal, R.; Alexa, C.; Andreev, V.; Antonelli, S.; Antonioli, P.; Antonov, A.; Arneodo, M.; Arslan, O.; Aushev, V.; Aushev, Y.; Bachynska, O.; Backovic, S.; Baghdasaryan, A.; Baghdasaryan, S.; Bamberger, A.; Barakbaev, A.N.; Barbagli, G.; Bari, G.; Barreiro, F.; Barrelet, E.; Bartel, W.; Bartosik, N.; Bartsch, D.; Basile, M.; Begzsuren, K.; Behnke, O.; Behr, J.; Behrens, U.; Bellagamba, L.; Belousov, A.; Belov, P.; Bertolin, A.; Bhadra, S.; Bindi, M.; Bizot, J.C.; Blohm, C.; Bokhonov, V.; Bondarenko, K.; Boos, E.G.; Borras, K.; Boscherini, D.; Bot, D.; Boudry, V.; Bozovic-Jelisavcic, I.; Bold, T.; Brummer, N.; Bracinik, J.; Brandt, G.; Brinkmann, M.; Brisson, V.; Britzger, D.; Brock, I.; Brownson, E.; Brugnera, R.; Bruncko, D.; Bruni, A.; Bruni, G.; Brzozowska, B.; Bunyatyan, A.; Bussey, P.J.; Bylinkin, A.; Bylsma, B.; Bystritskaya, L.; Caldwell, A.; Campbell, A.J.; Cantun Avila, K.B.; Capua, M.; Carlin, R.; Catterall, C.D.; Ceccopieri, F.; Cerny, K.; Cerny, V.; Chekanov, S.; Chekelian, V.; Chwastowski, J.; Ciborowski, J.; Ciesielski, R.; Cifarelli, L.; Cindolo, F.; Contin, A.; Contreras, J.G.; Cooper-Sarkar, A.M.; Coppola, N.; Corradi, M.; Corriveau, F.; Costa, M.; Coughlan, J.A.; Cvach, J.; D'Agostini, G.; Dainton, J.B.; Dal Corso, F.; Daum, K.; Delcourt, B.; Delvax, J.; Dementiev, R.K.; Derrick, M.; Devenish, R.C.E.; De Pasquale, S.; De Wolf, E.A.; del Peso, J.; Diaconu, C.; Dobre, M.; Dobur, D.; Dodonov, V.; Dolgoshein, B.A.; Dolinska, G.; Dossanov, A.; Doyle, A.T.; Drugakov, V.; Dubak, A.; Durkin, L.S.; Dusini, S.; Eckerlin, G.; Egli, S.; Eisenberg, Y.; Eliseev, A.; Elsen, E.; Ermolov, P.F.; Eskreys, A.; Fang, S.; Favart, L.; Fazio, S.; Fedotov, A.; Felst, R.; Feltesse, J.; Ferencei, J.; Ferrando, J.; Ferrero, M.I.; Figiel, J.; Fischer, D.J.; Fleischer, M.; Fomenko, A.; Forrest, M.; Foster, B.; Gabathuler, E.; Gach, G.; Galas, A.; Gallo, E.; Garfagnini, A.; Gayler, J.; Geiser, A.; Ghazaryan, S.; Gialas, I.; Gizhko, A.; Gladilin, L.K.; Gladkov, D.; Glasman, C.; Glazov, A.; Goerlich, L.; Gogitidze, N.; Gogota, O.; Golubkov, Yu.A.; Gottlicher, P.; Gouzevitch, M.; Grab, C.; Grabowska-Bold, I.; Grebenyuk, A.; Grebenyuk, J.; Greenshaw, T.; Gregor, I.; Grigorescu, G.; Grindhammer, G.; Grzelak, G.; Gueta, O.; Guzik, M.; Gwenlan, C.; Huttmann, A.; Haas, T.; Habib, S.; Haidt, D.; Hain, W.; Hamatsu, R.; Hart, J.C.; Hartmann, H.; Hartner, G.; Henderson, R.C.W.; Hennekemper, E.; Henschel, H.; Herbst, M.; Herrera, G.; Hildebrandt, M.; Hilger, E.; Hiller, K.H.; Hladky, J.; Hochman, D.; Hoffmann, D.; Hori, R.; Horisberger, R.; Hreus, T.; Huber, F.; Ibrahim, Z.A.; Iga, Y.; Ingbir, R.; Ishitsuka, M.; Jacquet, M.; Jakob, H.P.; Janssen, X.; Januschek, F.; Jones, T.W.; Jonsson, L.; Jungst, M.; Jung, H.; Kadenko, I.; Kahle, B.; Kananov, S.; Kanno, T.; Kapichine, M.; Karshon, U.; Karstens, F.; Katkov, I.I.; Kaur, P.; Kaur, M.; Kenyon, I.R.; Keramidas, A.; Khein, L.A.; Kiesling, C.; Kim, J.Y.; Kisielewska, D.; Kitamura, S.; Klanner, R.; Klein, M.; Klein, U.; Kleinwort, C.; Koffeman, E.; Kogler, R.; Kondrashova, N.; Kononenko, O.; Kooijman, P.; Korol, Ie.; Korzhavina, I.A.; Kostka, P.; Kotanski, A.; Kotz, U.; Kowalski, H.; Kramer, M.; Kretzschmar, J.; Kruger, K.; Kuprash, O.; Kuze, M.; Landon, M.P.J.; Lange, W.; Lastovicka-Medin, G.; Laycock, P.; Lebedev, A.; Lee, A.; Lendermann, V.; Levchenko, B.B.; Levonian, S.; Levy, A.; Libov, V.; Limentani, S.; Ling, T.Y.; Lipka, K.; Lisovyi, M.; List, B.; List, J.; Lobodzinska, E.; Lobodzinski, B.; Lohmann, W.; Lohr, B.; Lohrmann, E.; Long, K.R.; Longhin, A.; Lontkovskyi, D.; Lopez-Fernandez, R.; Lubimov, V.; Lukina, O.Yu.; Maeda, J.; Magill, S.; Makarenko, I.; Malinovski, E.; Malka, J.; Mankel, R.; Margotti, A.; Marini, G.; Martin, J.F.; Martyn, H.U.; Mastroberardino, A.; Mattingly, M.C.K.; Maxfield, S.J.; Mehta, A.; Melzer-Pellmann, I.A.; Mergelmeyer, S.; Meyer, A.B.; Meyer, H.; Meyer, J.; Miglioranzi, S.; Mikocki, S.; Milcewicz-Mika, I.; Idris, F.Mohamad; Monaco, V.; Montanari, A.; Moreau, F.; Morozov, A.; Morris, J.V.; Morris, J.D.; Mujkic, K.; Muller, K.; Musgrave, B.; Nagano, K.; Namsoo, T.; Nania, R.; Naumann, Th.; Newman, P.R.; Niebuhr, C.; Nigro, A.; Nikitin, D.; Ning, Y.; Nobe, T.; Notz, D.; Nowak, G.; Nowak, K.; Nowak, R.J.; Nuncio-Quiroz, A.E.; Oh, B.Y.; Okazaki, N.; Olkiewicz, K.; Olsson, J.E.; Onishchuk, Yu.; Ozerov, D.; Pahl, P.; Palichik, V.; Pandurovic, M.; Papageorgiu, K.; Parenti, A.; Pascaud, C.; Patel, G.D.; Paul, E.; Pawlak, J.M.; Pawlik, B.; Pelfer, P.G.; Pellegrino, A.; Perez, E.; Perlanski, W.; Perrey, H.; Petrukhin, A.; Picuric, I.; Piotrzkowski, K.; Pirumov, H.; Pitzl, D.; Placakyte, R.; Plucinski, P.; Pokorny, B.; Pokrovskiy, N.S.; Polifka, R.; Polini, A.; Povh, B.; Proskuryakov, A.S.; Przybycien, M.; Radescu, V.; Raicevic, N.; Raval, A.; Ravdandorj, T.; Reeder, D.D.; Reimer, P.; Reisert, B.; Ren, Z.; Repond, J.; Ri, Y.D.; Rizvi, E.; Robertson, A.; Robmann, P.; Roloff, P.; Roosen, R.; Rostovtsev, A.; Rotaru, M.; Rubinsky, I.; Ruiz Tabasco, J.E.; Rusakov, S.; Ruspa, M.; Sacchi, R.; Salek, D.; Samson, U.; Sankey, D.P.C.; Sartorelli, G.; Sauter, M.; Sauvan, E.; Savin, A.A.; Saxon, D.H.; Schioppa, M.; Schlenstedt, S.; Schleper, P.; Schmidke, W.B.; Schmitt, S.; Schneekloth, U.; Schoeffel, L.; Schonberg, V.; Schoning, A.; Schorner-Sadenius, T.; Schultz-Coulon, H.C.; Schwartz, J.; Sciulli, F.; Sefkow, F.; Shcheglova, L.M.; Shehzadi, R.; Shimizu, S.; Shtarkov, L.N.; Shushkevich, S.; Singh, I.; Skillicorn, I.O.; Slominski, W.; Sloan, T.; Smith, W.H.; Sola, V.; Solano, A.; Soloviev, Y.; Son, D.; Sopicki, P.; Sosnovtsev, V.; South, D.; Spaskov, V.; Specka, A.; Spiridonov, A.; Stadie, H.; Stanco, L.; Staykova, Z.; Steder, M.; Stefaniuk, N.; Stella, B.; Stern, A.; Stewart, T.P.; Stifutkin, A.; Stoicea, G.; Stopa, P.; Straumann, U.; Suchkov, S.; Susinno, G.; Suszycki, L.; Sykora, T.; Sztuk-Dambietz, J.; Szuba, J.; Szuba, D.; Tapper, A.D.; Tassi, E.; Terron, J.; Theedt, T.; Thompson, P.D.; Tiecke, H.; Tokushuku, K.; Tomaszewska, J.; Tran, T.H.; Traynor, D.; Truol, P.; Trusov, V.; Tsakov, I.; Tseepeldorj, B.; Tsurugai, T.; Turcato, M.; Turkot, O.; Turnau, J.; Tymieniecka, T.; Vazquez, M.; Valkarova, A.; Vallee, C.; Van Mechelen, P.; Vazdik, Y.; Verbytskyi, A.; Viazlo, O.; Vlasov, N.N.; Walczak, R.; Wan Abdullah, W.A.T.; Wegener, D.; Whitmore, J.J.; Wichmann, K.; Wiggers, L.; Wing, M.; Wlasenko, M.; Wolf, G.; Wolfe, H.; Wrona, K.; Wunsch, E.; Yagues-Molina, A.G.; Yamada, S.; Yamazaki, Y.; Yoshida, R.; Youngman, C.; Zabiegalov, O.; Zacek, J.; Zalesak, J.; Zawiejski, L.; Zenaiev, O.; Zeuner, W.; Zhang, Z.; Zhautykov, B.O.; Zhmak, N.; Zhokin, A.; Zichichi, A.; Zlebcik, R.; Zohrabyan, H.; Zolkapli, Z.; Zomer, F.; Zotkin, D.S.; Zarnecki, A.F.

    2012-10-10

    A combination of the inclusive diffractive cross section measurements made by the H1 and ZEUS Collaborations at HERA is presented. The analysis uses samples of diffractive deep inelastic ep scattering data at a centre-of-mass energy sqrt(s) = 318 GeV where leading protons are detected by dedicated spectrometers. Correlations of systematic uncertainties are taken into account, resulting in an improved precision of the cross section measurement which reaches 6% for the most precise points. The combined data cover the range 2.5 < Q2 < 200 GeV2 in photon virtuality, 0.00035 < xIP < 0.09 in proton fractional momentum loss, 0.09 < |t| < 0.55 GeV2 in squared four-momentum transfer at the proton vertex and 0.0018 < beta < 0.816 in beta = x/xIP, where x is the Bjorken scaling variable.

  18. Crack sizing by the time-of-flight diffraction method, in the light of recent international round-robin trials, (UKAEA, DDT and PISC II)

    Curtis, G.J.

    1987-01-01

    In 1980-81, Harwell developed a mini-computer controlled multi-probe defect detection and sizing system based on the ultrasonic time-of-flight/diffraction principle introduced by Silk. This system proved to be capable of fully automatic data collection from the PWR girth-weld simulation Plates 1 and 2 in the Defect Detection Trials of 1981-82. The speed of collection and subsequent analysis was such that a report on the defects found could be filed within 48 hours. The mode of operation adopted simulated minimum time of access to the defects, and was intended to define that dimension of a defect which has greatest significance, i.e. the through-thickness dimension. In 1984, for the PISC II Trial, the approach adopted changed to emphasize the three-dimensional location and sizing capabilities of the time-of-flight/diffraction method. Data collection and analysis became highly interactive and the mode of operation simulated NDE at the manufacturing stage of a pressure vessel. The purpose of this paper is to indicate the defect through-thickness sizing capability of TOFD achieved in the 1981-82 Defect Detection Trials and the defect mapping capability achieved in the 1984 PISC II Trial

  19. Efficient generation of 3.9 W of diffraction-limited green light with spectrally combined tapered diode lasers

    Müller, André; Jensen, Ole Bjarlin; Andersen, Peter E.

    We propose an efficient concept increasing the power of diode laser systems in the visible spectral range. In comparison with second harmonic generation of single emitters, spectral beam combining with subsequent sum-frequency generation enhances the available power significantly. Combining two...... 1060 nm tapered diode lasers, we achieve a 2.5-3.2 fold increase of green light with a maximum power of 3.9 Watts in a diffraction-limited beam. At this level, diode lasers have a high application potential, for example, within the biomedical field. In order to enhance the power even further, our...

  20. Combining operando synchrotron X-ray tomographic microscopy and scanning X-ray diffraction to study lithium ion batteries

    Pietsch, Patrick; Hess, Michael; Ludwig, Wolfgang; Eller, Jens; Wood, Vanessa

    2016-06-01

    We present an operando study of a lithium ion battery combining scanning X-ray diffraction (SXRD) and synchrotron radiation X-ray tomographic microscopy (SRXTM) simultaneously for the first time. This combination of techniques facilitates the investigation of dynamic processes in lithium ion batteries containing amorphous and/or weakly attenuating active materials. While amorphous materials pose a challenge for diffraction techniques, weakly attenuating material systems pose a challenge for attenuation-contrast tomography. Furthermore, combining SXRD and SRXTM can be used to correlate processes occurring at the atomic level in the crystal lattices of the active materials with those at the scale of electrode microstructure. To demonstrate the benefits of this approach, we investigate a silicon powder electrode in lithium metal half-cell configuration. Combining SXRD and SRXTM, we are able to (i) quantify the dissolution of the metallic lithium electrode and the expansion of the silicon electrode, (ii) better understand the formation of the Li15Si4 phase, and (iii) non-invasively probe kinetic limitations within the silicon electrode. A simple model based on the 1D diffusion equation allows us to qualitatively understand the observed kinetics and demonstrates why high-capacity electrodes are more prone to inhomogeneous lithiation reactions.

  1. Combining operando synchrotron X-ray tomographic microscopy and scanning X-ray diffraction to study lithium ion batteries

    Pietsch, Patrick; Hess, Michael; Ludwig, Wolfgang; Eller, Jens; Wood, Vanessa

    2016-01-01

    We present an operando study of a lithium ion battery combining scanning X-ray diffraction (SXRD) and synchrotron radiation X-ray tomographic microscopy (SRXTM) simultaneously for the first time. This combination of techniques facilitates the investigation of dynamic processes in lithium ion batteries containing amorphous and/or weakly attenuating active materials. While amorphous materials pose a challenge for diffraction techniques, weakly attenuating material systems pose a challenge for attenuation-contrast tomography. Furthermore, combining SXRD and SRXTM can be used to correlate processes occurring at the atomic level in the crystal lattices of the active materials with those at the scale of electrode microstructure. To demonstrate the benefits of this approach, we investigate a silicon powder electrode in lithium metal half-cell configuration. Combining SXRD and SRXTM, we are able to (i) quantify the dissolution of the metallic lithium electrode and the expansion of the silicon electrode, (ii) better understand the formation of the Li15Si4 phase, and (iii) non-invasively probe kinetic limitations within the silicon electrode. A simple model based on the 1D diffusion equation allows us to qualitatively understand the observed kinetics and demonstrates why high-capacity electrodes are more prone to inhomogeneous lithiation reactions. PMID:27324109

  2. Combining MHD Airbreathing and Fusion Rocket Propulsion for Earth-to-Orbit Flight

    Froning, H. D. Jr; Yang, Yang; Momota, H.; Burton, E.; Miley, G. H.; Luo, Nie

    2005-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that Single-State-to-Orbit (SSTO) vehicle propellant can be reduced by Magnets-Hydro-Dynamic (MHD) processes that minimize airbreathing propulsion losses and propellant consumption during atmospheric flight. Similarly additional reduction in SSTO propellant is enabled by Inertial Electrostatic Confinement (IEC) fusion, whose more energetic reactions reduce rocket propellant needs. MHD airbreathing propulsion during an SSTO vehicle's initial atmospheric flight phase and IEC fusion propulsion during its final exo-atmospheric flight phase is therefore being explored. Accomplished work is not yet sufficient for claiming such a vehicle's feasibility. But takeoff and propellant mass for an MHD airbreathing and IEC fusion vehicle could be as much as 25 and 40 percent less than one with ordinary airbreathing and IEC fusion; and as much as 50 and 70 percent less than SSTO takeoff and propellant mass with MHD airbreathing and chemical rocket propulsion. Thus this unusual combined cycle engine shows great promise for performance gains beyond contemporary combined-cycle airbreathing engines

  3. Flight times to the heliopause using a combination of solar and radioisotope electric propulsion

    Ohndorf, Andreas [DLR Deutsches Zentrum fuer Luft- und Raumfahrt e.V., Wessling (Germany); Dachwald, Bernd [FH Univ. of Applied Sciences, Aachen (Germany); Seboldt, Wolfgang [DLR Deutsches Zentrum fuer Luft- und Raumfahrt e.V., Koeln (Germany); Loeb, Horst W.; Schartner, Karl-Heinz [Giessen Univ. (Germany)

    2011-07-01

    We investigate the interplanetary flight of a low-thrust space probe to the heliopause, located at a distance of about 200 AU from the Sun. Our goal was to reach this distance within the 25 years postulated by ESA for such a mission (which is less ambitious than the 15-year goal set by NASA). Contrary to solar sail concepts and combinations of ballistic and electrically propelled flight legs, we have investigated whether the set flight time limit could also be kept with a combination of solar-electric propulsion and a second, RTG-powered upper stage. The used ion engine type was the RIT-22 for the first stage and the RIT-10 for the second stage. Trajectory optimization was carried out with the low-thrust optimization program InTrance, which implements the method of Evolutionary Neurocontrol, using Artificial Neural Networks for spacecraft steering and Evolutionary Algorithms to optimize the Neural Networks' parameter set. Based on a parameter space study, in which the number of thrust units, the unit's specific impulse, and the relative size of the solar power generator were varied, we have chosen one configuration as reference. The transfer time of this reference configuration was 29.6 years and the fastest one, which is technically more challenging, still required 28.3 years. As all flight times of this parameter study were longer than 25 years, we further shortened the transfer time by applying a launcher-provided hyperbolic excess energy up to 49 km{sup 2}/s{sup 2}. The resulting minimal flight time for the reference configuration was then 27.8 years. The following, more precise optimization to a launch with the European Ariane 5 ECA rocket reduced the transfer time to 27.5 years. This is the fastest mission design of our study that is flexible enough to allow a launch every year. The inclusion of a fly-by at Jupiter finally resulted in a flight time of 23.8 years, which is below the set transfer-time limit. However, compared to the 27.5-year transfer

  4. New opportunities for 3D materials science of polycrystalline materials at the micrometre lengthscale by combined use of X-ray diffraction and X-ray imaging

    Ludwig, W.; King, A.; Reischig, P.

    2009-01-01

    Non-destructive, three-dimensional (3D) characterization of the grain structure in mono-phase polycrystalline materials is an open challenge in material science. Recent advances in synchrotron based X-ray imaging and diffraction techniques offer interesting possibilities for mapping 3D grain shapes....... A recent extension of this methodology, termed X-ray diffraction contrast tomography (DCT), combines the principles of X-ray diffraction imaging, three-dimensional X-ray diffraction microscopy (3DXRD) and image reconstruction from projections. DCT provides simultaneous access to 3D grain shape...

  5. Crystal structure relation between tetragonal and orthorhombic CsAlD{sub 4}: DFT and time-of-flight neutron powder diffraction studies

    Bernert, Thomas; Krech, Daniel; Felderhoff, Michael; Weidenthaler, Claudia [Department of Heterogeneous Catalysis, Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kohlenforschung, Muelheim/Ruhr (Germany); Kockelmann, Winfried [Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Harwell Oxford, Didcot (United Kingdom); Frankcombe, Terry J. [Research School of Chemistry, The Australian National University, Canberra, ACT (Australia); School of Physical, Environmental and Mathematic Sciences, The University of New South Wales, Canberra, ACT (Australia)

    2015-11-15

    The crystal structures of orthorhombic and tetragonal CsAlD{sub 4} were refined from time-of-flight neutron powder diffraction data starting from atomic positions predicted from DFT calculations. The earlier proposed crystal structure of orthorhombic CsAlH{sub 4} is confirmed. For tetragonal CsAlH{sub 4}, DFT calculations predicted a crystal structure in I4{sub 1}/amd as potential minimum structure, while from neutron diffraction studies of CsAlD{sub 4} best refinement is obtained for a disordered structure in the space group I4{sub 1}/a, with a = 5.67231(9) Aa, c = 14.2823(5) Aa. While the caesium atoms are located on the Wyckoff position 4b and aluminium at Wyckoff position 4a, there are two distinct deuterium positions at the Wyckoff position 16f with occupancies of 50 % each. From this structure, the previously reported phase transition between the orthorhombic and tetragonal polymorphs could be explained. (Copyright copyright 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  6. Combined inclusive diffractive cross sections measured with foreward proton spectrometers in deep inelastic ep scattering at HERA

    Aaron, F.D. [National Institute for Physics and Nuclear Engineering (NIPNE), Bucharest (Romania); Bucharest Univ. (Romania). Faculty of Physics; Abramowicz, H. [Tel Aviv Univ. (Israel). School of Physics; Max Planck Institute for Physics, Munich (Germany); Abt, I. [Max Planck Institute for Physics, Munich (DE)] (and others)

    2012-07-15

    A combination of the inclusive diffractive cross section measurements made by the H1 and ZEUS Collaborations at HERA is presented. The analysis uses samples of diffractive deep inelastic ep scattering data at a centre-of-mass energy {radical}(s)=318 GeV where leading protons are detected by dedicated spectrometers. Correlations of systematic uncertainties are taken into account, resulting in an improved precision of the cross section measurement which reaches 6% for the most precise points. The combined data cover the range 2.5

  7. Design of combined magnetic field system for magnetic-bottle time-of-flight spectrometer

    Wang Chao; Tian Jinshou; Zhang Meizhi; Kang Yifan

    2011-01-01

    Based on the primary requirement for the magnetic field system in magnetic-bottle time-of-flight spectrometer, an appropriate combined inhomogeneous magnetic field system is designed. The inhomogeneous higher magnetic field part, with the highest field of 1.2 T, is produced by the combination of a permanent magnet and a pole piece with optimized shape. The magnet,known as NdFeB magnet,is one of rare earth permanent magnets in N52. The guiding uniform magnetic field of 1.0 x 10 -3 T is provided by solenoid, with length of 3 m and radius of 3 cm. The pitch between the pole piece and the near end of used solenoid is determined to be 5 cm, which can satisfy the actual engineering needs. (authors)

  8. Rhombohedral PLZT piezoelectric microfibers: a combined Raman and X-ray diffraction study

    Kozielski, Lucjan; Buixaderas, Elena; Clemens, Frank

    2014-11-01

    A combination of micro- and macro-scale structural characterization methods was implemented for clarification of the influence of different sintering atmospheres on the structural properties of Pb1-xLax(ZryTi1-y)O3 (PLZT) fibers. Three powders, PbZrO3 and ZrO2 (PZ + Z), PbZrO3 (PZ), and PbZrO3 + PbO (PZ + P), were used for the generation of protective atmospheres. Vibrations corresponding to the rhombohedral phase in (Pb0.93La0.07)(Zr0.65Ti0.35)O3 fibers were measured and mapped along the section of the fibers by micro-Raman spectroscopy. Comparison of the Raman data with the evolution of the unit cell parameters indicates that the PZ + Z protective atmosphere ensures the best properties during the PLZT sintering at the temperature of 1250 °C for 6 hours.

  9. Measurement of residual stress fields in FHPP welding: a comparison between DSPI combined with hole-drilling and neutron diffraction

    Viotti, Matias R.; Albertazzi, Armando; Staron, Peter; Pisa, Marcelo

    2013-04-01

    This paper shows a portable device to measure mainly residual stress fields outside the optical bench. This system combines the traditional hole drilling technique with Digital Speckle Pattern Interferometry. The novel feature of this device is the high degree of compaction since only one base supports simultaneously the measurement module and the hole-drilling device. The portable device allows the measurement of non-uniform residual stresses in accordance with the ASTM standard. In oil and gas offshore industries, alternative welding procedures among them, the friction hydro pillar processing (FHPP) is highlighted and nowadays is an important maintenance tool since it has the capability to produce structure repairs without risk of explosions. In this process a hole is drilled and filled with a consumable rod of the same material. The rod, which could be cylindrical or conical, is rotated and pressed against the hole, leading to frictional heating. In order to assess features about the residual stress distribution generated by the weld into the rod as well as into the base material around the rod, welded samples were evaluated by neutron diffraction and by the hole drilling technique having a comparison between them. For the hole drilling technique some layers were removed by using electrical discharge machining (EDM) after diffraction measurements in order to assess the bulk stress distribution. Results have shown a good agreement between techniques.

  10. Numerical simulation of divergent rocket-based-combined-cycle performances under the flight condition of Mach 3

    Cui, Peng; Xu, WanWu; Li, Qinglian

    2018-01-01

    Currently, the upper operating limit of the turbine engine is Mach 2+, and the lower limit of the dual-mode scramjet is Mach 4. Therefore no single power systems can operate within the range between Mach 2 + and Mach 4. By using ejector rockets, Rocket-based-combined-cycle can work well in the above scope. As the key component of Rocket-based-combined-cycle, the ejector rocket has significant influence on Rocket-based-combined-cycle performance. Research on the influence of rocket parameters on Rocket-based-combined-cycle in the speed range of Mach 2 + to Mach 4 is scarce. In the present study, influences of Mach number and total pressure of the ejector rocket on Rocket-based-combined-cycle were analyzed numerically. Due to the significant effects of the flight conditions and the Rocket-based-combined-cycle configuration on Rocket-based-combined-cycle performances, flight altitude, flight Mach number, and divergence ratio were also considered. The simulation results indicate that matching lower altitude with higher flight Mach numbers can increase Rocket-based-combined-cycle thrust. For another thing, with an increase of the divergent ratio, the effect of the divergent configuration will strengthen and there is a limit on the divergent ratio. When the divergent ratio is greater than the limit, the effect of divergent configuration will gradually exceed that of combustion on supersonic flows. Further increases in the divergent ratio will decrease Rocket-based-combined-cycle thrust.

  11. A 3D implementation of ray tracing combined with diffraction on facets: Verification and a potential application

    Clarke, Adrian J.M.; Hesse, Evelyn; Ulanowski, Zbigniew; Kaye, Paul H.

    2006-01-01

    A 3D implementation of a new model of light scattering applicable to dielectric faceted objects is introduced. The model combines standard geometric optics with diffraction on individual facets. It can be applied to any faceted geometry. The model adds no significant computational overheads to classical geometric optics yet provides much improved results. Initial results for long hexagonal columns are compared to SVM and appear favourable. 2D scattering patterns are calculated for a hexagonal column in a fixed orientation and compared to those created by ice analogue crystals in the laboratory with close agreement. The comparison includes the observation of a guided wave propagating along the length of the column. The new model is then applied to a selection of geometries to illustrate how it could be used to aid particle characterization, particularly in the case of cirrus ice

  12. Broadband and High Sensitive Time-of-Flight Diffraction Ultrasonic Transducers Based on PMNT/Epoxy 1–3 Piezoelectric Composite

    Dongxu Liu

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available 5–6 MHz PMNT/epoxy 1–3 composites were prepared by a modified dice-and-fill method. They exhibit excellent properties for ultrasonic transducer applications, such as ultrahigh thickness electromechanical coupling coefficient kt (85.7%, large piezoelectric coefficient d33 (1209 pC/N, and relatively low acoustic impedance Z (1.82 × 107 kg/(m2·s. Besides, two types of Time-of-Flight Diffraction (TOFD ultrasonic transducers have been designed, fabricated, and characterized, which have different matching layer schemes with the acoustic impedance of 4.8 and 5.7 × 106 kg/(m2·s, respectively. In the detection on a backwall of 12.7 mm polystyrene, the former exhibits higher detectivity, the relative pulse-echo sensitivity and −6 dB relative bandwidth are −21.93 dB and 102.7%, respectively, while the later exhibits broader bandwidth, the relative pulse-echo sensitivity and −6 dB relative bandwidth are −24.08 dB and 117.3%, respectively. These TOFD ultrasonic transducers based on PMNT/epoxy 1–3 composite exhibit considerably improved performance over the commercial PZT/epoxy 1–3 composite TOFD ultrasonic transducer.

  13. First spin-resolved electron distributions in crystals from combined polarized neutron and X-ray diffraction experiments

    Maxime Deutsch

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Since the 1980s it has been possible to probe crystallized matter, thanks to X-ray or neutron scattering techniques, to obtain an accurate charge density or spin distribution at the atomic scale. Despite the description of the same physical quantity (electron density and tremendous development of sources, detectors, data treatment software etc., these different techniques evolved separately with one model per experiment. However, a breakthrough was recently made by the development of a common model in order to combine information coming from all these different experiments. Here we report the first experimental determination of spin-resolved electron density obtained by a combined treatment of X-ray, neutron and polarized neutron diffraction data. These experimental spin up and spin down densities compare very well with density functional theory (DFT calculations and also confirm a theoretical prediction made in 1985 which claims that majority spin electrons should have a more contracted distribution around the nucleus than minority spin electrons. Topological analysis of the resulting experimental spin-resolved electron density is also briefly discussed.

  14. First spin-resolved electron distributions in crystals from combined polarized neutron and X-ray diffraction experiments.

    Deutsch, Maxime; Gillon, Béatrice; Claiser, Nicolas; Gillet, Jean-Michel; Lecomte, Claude; Souhassou, Mohamed

    2014-05-01

    Since the 1980s it has been possible to probe crystallized matter, thanks to X-ray or neutron scattering techniques, to obtain an accurate charge density or spin distribution at the atomic scale. Despite the description of the same physical quantity (electron density) and tremendous development of sources, detectors, data treatment software etc., these different techniques evolved separately with one model per experiment. However, a breakthrough was recently made by the development of a common model in order to combine information coming from all these different experiments. Here we report the first experimental determination of spin-resolved electron density obtained by a combined treatment of X-ray, neutron and polarized neutron diffraction data. These experimental spin up and spin down densities compare very well with density functional theory (DFT) calculations and also confirm a theoretical prediction made in 1985 which claims that majority spin electrons should have a more contracted distribution around the nucleus than minority spin electrons. Topological analysis of the resulting experimental spin-resolved electron density is also briefly discussed.

  15. Combined Raman/LIBS spectrometer elegant breadboard: built and tested - and flight model spectrometer unit

    Ahlers, B.; Hutchinson, I.; Ingley, R.

    2017-11-01

    A spectrometer for combined Raman and Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) is amongst the different instruments that have been pre-selected for the Pasteur payload of the ExoMars rover. It is regarded as a fundamental, next-generation instrument for organic, mineralogical and elemental characterisation of Martian soil, rock samples and organic molecules. Raman spectroscopy and LIBS will be integrated into a single instrument sharing many hardware commonalities [1]. The combined Raman / LIBS instrument has been recommended as the highest priority mineralogy instrument to be included in the rover's analytical laboratory for the following tasks: Analyse surface and sub-surface soil and rocks on Mars, identify organics in the search for life and determine soil origin & toxicity. The synergy of the system is evident: the Raman spectrometer is dedicated to molecular analysis of organics and minerals; the LIBS provides information on the sample's elemental composition. An international team, under ESA contract and with the leadership of TNO Science and Industry, has built and tested an Elegant Bread Board (EBB) of the combined Raman / LIBS instrument. The EBB comprises a specifically designed, extremely compact, spectrometer with high resolution over a large wavelength range, suitable for both Raman spectroscopy and LIBS measurements. The EBB also includes lasers, illumination and imaging optics as well as fibre optics for light transfer. A summary of the functional and environmental requirements together with a description of the optical design and its expected performance are described in [2]. The EBB was developed and constructed to verify the instruments' end-to-end functional performance with natural samples. The combined Raman / LIBS EBB realisation and test results of natural samples will be presented. For the Flight Model (FM) instrument, currently in the design phase, the Netherlands will be responsible for the design, development and verification of the

  16. Combining control input with flight path data to evaluate pilot performance in transport aircraft.

    Ebbatson, Matt; Harris, Don; Huddlestone, John; Sears, Rodney

    2008-11-01

    When deriving an objective assessment of piloting performance from flight data records, it is common to employ metrics which purely evaluate errors in flight path parameters. The adequacy of pilot performance is evaluated from the flight path of the aircraft. However, in large jet transport aircraft these measures may be insensitive and require supplementing with frequency-based measures of control input parameters. Flight path and control input data were collected from pilots undertaking a jet transport aircraft conversion course during a series of symmetric and asymmetric approaches in a flight simulator. The flight path data were analyzed for deviations around the optimum flight path while flying an instrument landing approach. Manipulation of the flight controls was subject to analysis using a series of power spectral density measures. The flight path metrics showed no significant differences in performance between the symmetric and asymmetric approaches. However, control input frequency domain measures revealed that the pilots employed highly different control strategies in the pitch and yaw axes. The results demonstrate that to evaluate pilot performance fully in large aircraft, it is necessary to employ performance metrics targeted at both the outer control loop (flight path) and the inner control loop (flight control) parameters in parallel, evaluating both the product and process of a pilot's performance.

  17. A combined diffraction and dielectric properties investigation of Ba3MnNb2O9 complex perovskites

    Liu Yun; Withers, Ray L.; Whichello, A.P.; Noren, Lasse; Ting, Valeska; Brink, Frank; Fitz Gerald, John D.

    2005-01-01

    A combined synthesis, diffraction and dielectric properties investigation of the dependence (and effect) of Mn 2+ /Nb 5+ ordering in Ba 3 MnNb 2 O 9 (BMN) upon annealing atmosphere and processing conditions has been carried out. Annealing in different atmospheres was not found to significantly alter either nominal stoichiometry or structure type. The obtained structure type (disordered metrically cubic or ordered trigonal) as well as the measured electrical properties (in particular, the dielectric loss) were, however, found to be sensitive to the synthesis route. Samples obtained via solid-state reaction were found to be predominantly of 1:2 Mn 2+ /Nb 5+ ordered, P3-bar m1 trigonal structure type whereas samples obtained via an aqueous solution route were found to be of a Mn 2+ /Nb 5+ 'disordered', metrically cubic structure type. All solid-state synthesized samples showed reasonable dielectric properties. The microwave dielectric constant and dielectric quality factor, Q, at 8GHz of an as-synthesized BMN sample were 38 and 100, respectively. By contrast, the dielectric loss of the metrically cubic, Mn 2+ /Nb 5+ 'disordered' samples obtained via an aqueous solution synthesis process were significantly worse

  18. A neutron spectrometer based on the combination of time-of-flight and Larmor modulation

    Mulder, F.M.; Kreuger, R.; Grigoriev, S.V.; Kraan, W.H.; Rekveldt, M.Th.; Van Well, A.A.

    1999-01-01

    A study on the feasibility of neutron beam instrumentation that applies Larmor modulation for incoming, and time-of-flight for scattered wavelength determination (or vice versa) is currently under way at IRI. The instrument resulting from this combination can in principle measure quasi elastic and inelastic scattering with a flexible resolution and dynamic range. An important difference with current spectrometers is that there is no selection of neutron wavelengths for either the incoming beam (direct geometry) or scattered beam (inverted geometry). Therefore much of the available flux is used and there is no a priory selection of the energy transfer range and resolution. This instrument will be mainly applicable for quasi-elastic scattering and complex line shapes that are extended over a broad range in energy transfer. Line shapes can be measured directly in Fourier space, which is often advantageous. Due to signal to noise considerations, this instrument will be less suitable for the determination of weak, discrete energy transfer signals. A requirement for the Larmor modulator is that it can work with a white neutron beam. This can be realised for neutrons having a wavelength above ∼ 0.1 nm by use of 'adiabatic resonance π flippers'. This type of instrument may be applied at the future ESS pulsed neutron source in order to complement current spectrometers. (author)

  19. Combining endoscopic ultrasound with Time-Of-Flight PET: The EndoTOFPET-US Project

    Frisch, Benjamin

    2013-01-01

    The EndoTOFPET-US collaboration develops a multimodal imaging technique for endoscopic exams of the pancreas or the prostate. It combines the benefits of high resolution metabolic imaging with Time-Of-Flight Positron Emission Tomography (TOF PET) and anatomical imaging with ultrasound (US). EndoTOFPET-US consists of a PET head extension for a commercial US endoscope and a PET plate outside the body in coincidence with the head. The high level of miniaturization and integration creates challenges in fields such as scintillating crystals, ultra-fast photo-detection, highly integrated electronics, system integration and image reconstruction. Amongst the developments, fast scintillators as well as fast and compact digital SiPMs with single SPAD readout are used to obtain the best coincidence time resolution (CTR). Highly integrated ASICs and DAQ electronics contribute to the timing performances of EndoTOFPET. In view of the targeted resolution of around 1 mm in the reconstructed image, we present a prototype dete...

  20. 3-D growth of a short fatigue crack within a polycrystalline microstructure studied using combined diffraction and phase-contrast X-ray tomography

    Herbig, M.; King, Andrew; Reischig, Peter

    2011-01-01

    X-ray diffraction contrast tomography is a recently developed, non-destructive synchrotron imaging technique which characterizes microstructure and grain orientation in polycrystalline materials in three dimensions. By combining it with propagation-based phase-contrast tomography it is possible t...

  1. X-ray diffraction stress analysis of interrupted titanium nitride films: Combining the sin2ψ and crystallite group methods

    Sinkovits, Theo; Zhao, Yue; O'Brien, Rebecca; Dowey, Steve

    2014-01-01

    Interruptions during film growth have been discussed by researchers to assist in understanding the evolution of stress in physical vapour deposition films. A change in intrinsic stress is directly related to microstructure, hence careful analysis of stress in films can provide valuable structure–stress correlated information. In this study we discuss the use of combining two X-ray diffraction (XRD) stress analysis methods to elucidate the effect of interruptions during growth on the residual stress of TiN films. The sin 2 ψ and crystallite group method (CGM), scanning the (220) peaks from all grains in the film and only (111) oriented crystallites respectively, were used to analyse residual stress in standard and interrupted cathodic arc TiN films 1.5, 3.5 and 6.5 μm thick, grown on high-speed steel substrates. The sin 2 ψ method does not reveal any changes in stress with interruptions, however, measurements using the CGM show increased compressive stress and increased a 0 in the resultant TiN films. A comparison of results from both XRD methods indicates that an increased compressive stress from interruptions could be due to an increased number of defects in (111) oriented grains during the interruptions which would also affect a 0 as evident. In both methods, compressive stresses are found to decrease with increased thickness of films. - Highlights: • Interrupting TiN film growth increases compressive stress in (111) grains. • Increased stress is believed to be caused by defects incorporated into or not annealed out of (111) grains. • A comparison of sin 2 ψ and CGM results reveals differences in stress. • Compressive stress decreases as TiN films increase in thickness from 1.5 μm to 6.5 μm

  2. Multi-UAV Flight using Virtual Structure Combined with Behavioral Approach

    Kownacki Cezary

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Implementations of multi-UAV systems can be divided mainly into two different approaches, centralised system that synchronises positions of each vehicle by a ground station and an autonomous system based on decentralised control, which offers more flexibility and independence. Decentralisation of multi-UAV control entails the need for information sharing between all vehicles, what in some cases could be problematic due to a significant amount of data to be sent over the wireless network. To improve the reliability and the throughput of information sharing inside the formation of UAVs, this paper proposes an approach that combines virtual structure with a leader and two flocking behaviours. Each UAV has assigned different virtual migration point referenced to the leader's position which is simultaneously the origin of a formation reference frame. All migration points create together a virtual rigid structure. Each vehicle uses local behaviours of cohesion and repulsion respectively, to track its own assigned point in the structure and to avoid a collision with the previous UAV in the structure. To calculate parameters of local behaviours, each UAV should know position and attitude of the leader to define the formation reference frame and also the actual position of the previous UAV in the structure. Hence, information sharing can be based on a chain of local peer-to-peer communication between two consecutive vehicles in the structure. In such solution, the information about the leader could be sequentially transmitted from one UAV to another. Numerical simulations were prepared and carried out to verify the effectiveness of the presented approach. Trajectories recorded during those simulations show collective, coherence and collision-free flights of the formation created with five UAVs.

  3. Combined neutron and synchrotron X-ray diffraction study of Sr/Mg-doped lanthanum gallates up to high temperatures

    Guenter, M. M.; Lerch, M.; Boysen, H.; Toebbens, D.; Suard, E.; Baehtz, C.

    2006-08-01

    Combined neutron diffraction and high-resolution synchrotron X-ray powder diffraction methods have been used to examine the crystal structures of two sample sets of Sr/Mg-doped Lanthanum gallate with the compositions La0.9Sr0.1Ga1-yMgyO3-0.5(0.1+y) (y=0, 0.1, 0.2) and La0.8Sr0.2Ga1-yMgyO3-0.5(0.2+y) (y=0.15, 0.2) up to 900 °C. At room temperature all samples of the first series exhibit orthorhombic structures with space group Imma: La0.9Sr0.1GaO2.95: a=5.4904(1)Å, b=7.7757(1)Å, c=5.5229(1)Å; La0.9Sr0.1Ga0.9Mg0.1O2.9: a=5.5100(1)Å, b=7.8080(1)Å, c=5.5411(1)Å; La0.9Sr0.1Ga0.8Mg0.2O2.85: a=5.5269(1)Å, b=7.8318(2)Å, c=5.5459(1)Å. The samples of the second series have the cubic perovskite structure with space group Pm3¯m at room temperature: La0.8Sr0.2Ga0.85Mg0.15O2.825: a=3.9160(1)Å; La0.8Sr0.2Ga0.8Mg0.20O2.80: a=3.9195(1)Å. Samples of the first series transform from the orthorhombic to a rhombohedral (Imma→R3¯c) structure at ˜170 °C for La0.9Sr0.1GaO2.95, at ˜430 °C for La0.9Sr0.1Ga0.9Mg0.1O2.9, and between 600 and 700 °C for La0.9Sr0.1Ga0.8Mg0.2O2.85. Both La0.8Sr0.2Ga0.85Mg0.15O2.825 and La0.8Sr0.2Ga0.8Mg0.2 show no structural deviations from the cubic aristotype over the whole temperature range. The room temperature Imma structures of the first series are justified by a domain model and are rationalized in terms of static disorder increasing with Mg content, thus driving the phase transition temperatures to higher values in agreement with tolerance factor considerations. The distortion of the rhombohedral high-temperature phases (octahedra tilting and compression) and the effect of phase transitions on the ionic conductivity are discussed.

  4. Combined experimental powder X-ray diffraction and DFT data to obtain the lowest energy molecular conformation of friedelin

    Oliveira, Djalma Menezes de; Mussel, Wagner da Nova; Duarte, Lucienir Pains; Silva, Gracia Divina de Fatima; Duarte, Helio Anderson; Gomes, Elionai Cassiana de Lima; Guimaraes, Luciana; Vieira Filho, Sidney A.

    2012-01-01

    Friedelin molecular conformers were obtained by Density Functional Theory (DFT) and by ab initio structure determination from powder X-ray diffraction. Their conformers with the five rings in chair-chair-chair-boat-boat, and with all rings in chair, are energy degenerated in gas-phase according to DFT results. The powder diffraction data reveals that rings A, B and C of friedelin are in chair, and rings D and E in boat-boat, conformation. The high correlation values among powder diffraction data, DFT and reported single crystal data indicate that the use of conventional X-ray diffractometer can be applied in routine laboratory analysis in the absence of a single-crystal diffractometer. (author)

  5. Combined experimental powder X-ray diffraction and DFT data to obtain the lowest energy molecular conformation of friedelin

    Oliveira, Djalma Menezes de; Mussel, Wagner da Nova; Duarte, Lucienir Pains; Silva, Gracia Divina de Fatima; Duarte, Helio Anderson; Gomes, Elionai Cassiana de Lima [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Dept. de Quimica; Guimaraes, Luciana [Universidade Federal de Sao Joao Del-Rei (UFSJ), MG (Brazil). Dept. de Ciencias Naturais; Vieira Filho, Sidney A., E-mail: bibo@ef.ufop.br [Universidade Federal de Ouro Preto (UFOP), MG (Brazil). Dept. de Farmacia

    2012-07-01

    Friedelin molecular conformers were obtained by Density Functional Theory (DFT) and by ab initio structure determination from powder X-ray diffraction. Their conformers with the five rings in chair-chair-chair-boat-boat, and with all rings in chair, are energy degenerated in gas-phase according to DFT results. The powder diffraction data reveals that rings A, B and C of friedelin are in chair, and rings D and E in boat-boat, conformation. The high correlation values among powder diffraction data, DFT and reported single crystal data indicate that the use of conventional X-ray diffractometer can be applied in routine laboratory analysis in the absence of a single-crystal diffractometer. (author)

  6. New opportunities for 3D materials science of polycrystalline materials at the micrometre lengthscale by combined use of X-ray diffraction and X-ray imaging

    Ludwig, W., E-mail: ludwig@esrf.fr [Universite de Lyon, INSA-Lyon, MATEIS CNRS UMR 5510, 69621Villeurbanne (France); European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, BP220, 38043 Grenoble (France); King, A. [European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, BP220, 38043 Grenoble (France); School of Materials, University of Manchester, Manchester, M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Reischig, P. [European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, BP220, 38043 Grenoble (France); Herbig, M. [Universite de Lyon, INSA-Lyon, MATEIS CNRS UMR 5510, 69621Villeurbanne (France); Lauridsen, E.M.; Schmidt, S. [Riso National Laboratory for Sustainable Energy, Technical University of Denmark, P.O. Box 49, DK-4000 Roskilde (Denmark); Proudhon, H.; Forest, S. [MINES ParisTech, Centre des materiaux, CNRS UMR 7633, BP 87, 91003 Evry Cedex (France); Cloetens, P.; Roscoat, S. Rolland du [European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, BP220, 38043 Grenoble (France); Buffiere, J.Y. [Universite de Lyon, INSA-Lyon, MATEIS CNRS UMR 5510, 69621Villeurbanne (France); Marrow, T.J. [School of Materials, University of Manchester, Manchester, M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Poulsen, H.F. [Riso National Laboratory for Sustainable Energy, Technical University of Denmark, P.O. Box 49, DK-4000 Roskilde (Denmark)

    2009-10-25

    Non-destructive, three-dimensional (3D) characterization of the grain structure in mono-phase polycrystalline materials is an open challenge in material science. Recent advances in synchrotron based X-ray imaging and diffraction techniques offer interesting possibilities for mapping 3D grain shapes and crystallographic orientations for certain categories of polycrystalline materials. Direct visualisation of the three-dimensional grain boundary network or of two-phase (duplex) grain structures by means of absorption and/or phase contrast techniques may be possible, but is restricted to specific material systems. A recent extension of this methodology, termed X-ray diffraction contrast tomography (DCT), combines the principles of X-ray diffraction imaging, three-dimensional X-ray diffraction microscopy (3DXRD) and image reconstruction from projections. DCT provides simultaneous access to 3D grain shape, crystallographic orientation and local attenuation coefficient distribution. The technique applies to the larger range of plastically undeformed, polycrystalline mono-phase materials, provided some conditions on grain size and texture are fulfilled. The straightforward combination with high-resolution microtomography opens interesting new possibilities for the observation of microstructure related damage and deformation mechanisms in these materials.

  7. New opportunities for 3D materials science of polycrystalline materials at the micrometre lengthscale by combined use of X-ray diffraction and X-ray imaging

    Ludwig, W.; King, A.; Reischig, P.; Herbig, M.; Lauridsen, E.M.; Schmidt, S.; Proudhon, H.; Forest, S.; Cloetens, P.; Roscoat, S. Rolland du; Buffiere, J.Y.; Marrow, T.J.; Poulsen, H.F.

    2009-01-01

    Non-destructive, three-dimensional (3D) characterization of the grain structure in mono-phase polycrystalline materials is an open challenge in material science. Recent advances in synchrotron based X-ray imaging and diffraction techniques offer interesting possibilities for mapping 3D grain shapes and crystallographic orientations for certain categories of polycrystalline materials. Direct visualisation of the three-dimensional grain boundary network or of two-phase (duplex) grain structures by means of absorption and/or phase contrast techniques may be possible, but is restricted to specific material systems. A recent extension of this methodology, termed X-ray diffraction contrast tomography (DCT), combines the principles of X-ray diffraction imaging, three-dimensional X-ray diffraction microscopy (3DXRD) and image reconstruction from projections. DCT provides simultaneous access to 3D grain shape, crystallographic orientation and local attenuation coefficient distribution. The technique applies to the larger range of plastically undeformed, polycrystalline mono-phase materials, provided some conditions on grain size and texture are fulfilled. The straightforward combination with high-resolution microtomography opens interesting new possibilities for the observation of microstructure related damage and deformation mechanisms in these materials.

  8. Systematic investigation of lard polymorphism using combined DSC and time-resolved synchrotron X-ray diffraction

    Kalnin, D.J.E.; Lesieur, P.; Artzner, F.; Keller, G.; Ollivon, M.

    2005-01-01

    The polymorphic behavior of lard was systematically investigated by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) while simultaneously monitoring the formation of the different crystal forms with X-ray diffraction (XRDT). To interpret the complex polymorphic evolution of the sample analyzed by regular

  9. Diffraction. Powder, amorphous, liquid

    Sosnowska, I.M.

    1999-01-01

    Neutron powder diffraction is a unique tool to observe all possible diffraction effects appearing in crystal. High-resolution neutron diffractometers have to be used in this study. Analysis of the magnetic structure of polycrystalline materials requires the use of high-resolution neutron diffraction in the range of large interplanar distances. As distinguished from the double axis diffractometers (DAS), which show high resolution only at small interplanar distances, TOF (time-of-flight) diffractometry offers the best resolution at large interplanar distances. (K.A.)

  10. Monte Carlo study of particle production in diffractive proton-proton collisions at √(s) = 13 TeV with the very forward detector combined with central information

    Zhou, Qi-Dong [Nagoya University, Institute for Space-Earth Environmental Research, Nagoya (Japan); Itow, Yoshitaka; Sako, Takashi [Nagoya University, Institute for Space-Earth Environmental Research, Nagoya (Japan); Nagoya University, Kobayashi-Maskawa Institute, Nagoya (Japan); Menjo, Hiroaki [Nagoya University, Graduate School of Science, Nagoya (Japan)

    2017-04-15

    Very forward (VF) detectors in hadron colliders, having unique sensitivity to diffractive processes, can be a powerful tool for studying diffractive dissociation by combining them with central detectors. Several Monte Carlo simulation samples in p-p collisions at √(s) = 13 TeV were analyzed, and different nondiffractive and diffractive contributions were clarified through differential cross sections of forward neutral particles. Diffraction selection criteria in the VF-triggered-event samples were determined by using the central track information. The corresponding selection applicable in real experiments has ∼ 100% purity and 30-70% efficiency. Consequently, the central information enables classification of the forward productions into diffraction and nondiffraction categories; in particular, most of the surviving events from the selection belong to low-mass diffraction events at log{sub 10}(ξ{sub x}) < -5.5. Therefore, the combined method can uniquely access the low-mass diffraction regime experimentally. (orig.)

  11. Application of combined multivariate techniques for the description of time-resolved powder X-ray diffraction data

    Taris, A.; Grosso, M.; Brundu, M.; Guida, V.; Viani, Alberto

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 50, č. 2 (2017), s. 451-461 ISSN 1600-5767 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LO1219 Keywords : in situ X-ray powder diffraction * amorphous content * chemically bonded ceramic s * statistical total correlation spectroscopy * multivariate curve resolution Subject RIV: JJ - Other Materials OBOR OECD: Materials engineering Impact factor: 2.495, year: 2016 http://journals.iucr.org/j/issues/2017/02/00/ap5006/index.html

  12. Combined effect of space flight and radiation on skeletal muscles of rats

    Ilyina-Kakueva, E.I.; Portugalov, V.V.

    1977-01-01

    Skeletal muscles of rats flown for 20.5 d aboard the biosatellite Cosmos-690 and irradiated with a dose of 800 rads on the 10th flight day were studied. The radiation exposure aggravated the severity of atrophic and dystrophic processes in m. soleus and atrophic process in m. gastrocnemius that developed under the conditions of weightlessness and hypokinesia. At the same time, an exposure to penetrating radiation did not affect the muscles where no flight-induced pathologies occurred. The radiation affected the pattern of reparation in those regions of the soleus muscle that developed pathology inflight, slowed down resorption of the connective tissue formed during the pathological process, and inhibited the course of the reparative process

  13. miniPixD : a compact sample analysis system which combines X-ray imaging and diffraction

    Moss, Robert; Crews, Chiaki; Speller, Robert; Wilson, Matthew

    2017-01-01

    This paper introduces miniPixD : a new, compact system that utilises transmission X-ray imaging and X-ray diffraction (XRD) to locate and identify materials of interest within an otherwise opaque volume. The system and the embodied techniques have utility in security screening, medical diagnostics, non-destructive testing (NDT) and quality assurance (QA). This paper outlines the design of the system including discussion on the choice of components and presents some data from relevant samples which are compared to other energy dispersive and angular dispersive XRD techniques.

  14. Combining x-ray diffraction contrast tomography and mesoscale grain growth simulations in strontium titanate: An integrated approach for the investigation of microstructure evolution

    Syha, Melanie; Baürer, Michael; Rheinheimer, Wolfgang

    2013-01-01

    Motivated by the recently reported a growth anomaly in strontium titatate bulk samples1, the microstructure of bulk strontium titanate has been investigated by an integrated approach comprising conventional metallography, three dimensional X-ray diffraction contrast tomography (DCT)2, and the obs......Motivated by the recently reported a growth anomaly in strontium titatate bulk samples1, the microstructure of bulk strontium titanate has been investigated by an integrated approach comprising conventional metallography, three dimensional X-ray diffraction contrast tomography (DCT)2......, and the observation of pore shapes in combination with mesoscale grain growth simulations. The microstructural evolution in strontium titanate has been characterized alternating ex-situ annealing and high energy X-ray DCT measurements, resulting in three dimensional microstructure reconstructions which...

  15. Stress distribution in mechanically surface treated Ti-2.5Cu determined by combining energy-dispersive synchrotron and neutron diffraction

    Maawad, E.; Brokmeier, H.-G.; Hofmann, M.; Genzel, Ch.; Wagner, L.

    2010-01-01

    Mechanical surface treatments such as shot peening (SP) or ball-burnishing (BB) induce plastic deformation close to the surface resulting in work-hardening and compressive residual stresses. It enhances the fatigue performance by retarding or even suppressing micro-crack growth from the surface into the interior. SP and BB were carried out on a solution heat treated (SHT) Ti-2.5Cu. The investigations of compressive and balancing tensile residual stresses need a combination of energy-dispersive synchrotron (ED) and neutron diffraction. Essential for the stress distribution is the stress state before surface treatments which was determined by neutron diffraction. Results show that the maximum compressive stress and its depth play an important role to improve the fatigue performance.

  16. Hemoglobin redux: combining neutron and X-ray diffraction with mass spectrometry to analyse the quaternary state of oxidized hemoglobins

    Mueser, Timothy C., E-mail: timothy.mueser@utoledo.edu; Griffith, Wendell P. [Department of Chemistry, University of Toledo, Toledo, OH 43606 (United States); Kovalevsky, Andrey Y. [Bioscience Division, MS M888, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Guo, Jingshu; Seaver, Sean [Department of Chemistry, University of Toledo, Toledo, OH 43606 (United States); Langan, Paul [Department of Chemistry, University of Toledo, Toledo, OH 43606 (United States); Bioscience Division, MS M888, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Hanson, B. Leif [Department of Chemistry, University of Toledo, Toledo, OH 43606 (United States)

    2010-11-01

    X-ray and neutron diffraction studies of cyanomethemoglobin are being used to evaluate the structural waters within the dimer–dimer interface involved in quaternary-state transitions. Improvements in neutron diffraction instrumentation are affording the opportunity to re-examine the structures of vertebrate hemoglobins and to interrogate proton and solvent position changes between the different quaternary states of the protein. For hemoglobins of unknown primary sequence, structural studies of cyanomethemoglobin (CNmetHb) are being used to help to resolve sequence ambiguity in the mass spectra. These studies have also provided additional structural evidence for the involvement of oxidized hemoglobin in the process of erythrocyte senescence. X-ray crystal studies of Tibetan snow leopard CNmetHb have shown that this protein crystallizes in the B state, a structure with a more open dyad, which possibly has relevance to RBC band 3 protein binding and erythrocyte senescence. R-state equine CNmetHb crystal studies elaborate the solvent differences in the switch and hinge region compared with a human deoxyhemoglobin T-state neutron structure. Lastly, comparison of histidine protonation between the T and R state should enumerate the Bohr-effect protons.

  17. Characterization of lattice damage in ion implanted silicon: a Monte Carlo simulation combined with double crystal X-ray diffraction

    Cembali, F.; Mazzone, A.M.; Servidori, M.; Gabilli, E.; Lotti, R.

    1985-01-01

    Double crystal X-ray diffractometry is applied to the characterization of damage in silicon samples, irradiated with 60 keV self-ions for doses ranging from 5 x 10 12 cm -2 to the threshold for amorphisation. The samples were also electron beam annealed in such a condition as to give rise to a temperature of 800 0 C. The in-depth strain and atomic disorder distributions, due to the implantation defects, were determined for the specimens before and after high temperature annealing. This was possible by application of the dynamical theory of X-ray diffraction from imperfect crystals and by taking into account the diffuse (thermal, Compton) scattering accompanying Bragg diffraction intensity measurements. Transmission electron microscopy observations, in conventional (planar) and cross-section mode, were also performed. The results of these analyses were compared with a complex simulation method, designed to account for the physical origin of the disorder. The method consists of a Monte Carlo simulation of the damage growth during implantation and of the defect annealing and clustering in a warm lattice. The evolution of disorder is examined either in the phase of spontaneous annealing subsequent to the implantation or during the externally induced annealing. Theory and experiments led to a close characterization of damage in terms of cluster size, type and concentration, both before and after annealing. (author)

  18. Structure of 3 at.% and 9 at.% Si-doped HfO{sub 2} from combined refinement of X-ray and neutron diffraction patterns

    Zhao, Lili [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, North Carolina State University, NC 27695 (United States); School of Information Science and Technology, Northwest University, Xi' an 710127 (China); Hou, Dong; Usher, Tedi-Marie; Iamsasri, Thanakorn; Fancher, Chris M.; Forrester, Jennifer S. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, North Carolina State University, NC 27695 (United States); Nishida, Toshikazu [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Florida, FL 32611 (United States); Moghaddam, Saeed [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, University of Florida, FL 32611 (United States); Jones, Jacob L., E-mail: jacobjones@ncsu.edu [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, North Carolina State University, NC 27695 (United States)

    2015-10-15

    The crystal structure of 3 at.% and 9 at.% Si-doped HfO{sub 2} powder was determined through refinements using X-ray and neutron diffraction patterns. The lattice parameters, atomic positions, dopant occupancy, and the second phase fraction were determined with high precision using a combined full pattern fitting via the Rietveld method. The results show that both 3 at.% and 9 at.% Si-doped HfO{sub 2} powder exhibit the monoclinic crystal structure with P 1 2{sub 1}/c 1 space group. Through the combined refinement, the crystal structure parameters, especially for the positions and occupancies of the lighter atoms, were more precisely determined compared to independent X-ray diffraction refinement. Although the ionic radius of Si{sup 4+} is smaller than Hf{sup 4+}, with increasing Si occupancy, the unit cell volume slightly increases; possible mechanisms for this effect are discussed. Moreover, the refined results provide evidence of the existence of a non-equilibrium phase of Hf{sub x}Si{sub 1−x}O{sub 2}. The second phase (SiO{sub 2}) fraction is determined as 0.17 at.% for 3 at.% Si-doped HfO{sub 2} powders and 1.7 at.% for 9 at.% Si-doped HfO{sub 2} powders. - Highlights: • X-ray and neutron diffraction patterns were used to determine crystal structure. • Results from independent refinements and a combined refinement were compared. • Highly precise structural parameters were obtained by the combined refinement. • Structural data of 3 at.% and 9 at.% Si-doped HfO{sub 2} are provided. • The unit cell volume slightly increases with Si concentration from 3 to 9 at.%.

  19. Reuse fo a Cold War Surveillance Drone to Flight Test a NASA Rocket Based Combined Cycle Engine

    Brown, T. M.; Smith, Norm

    1999-01-01

    Plans for and early feasibility investigations into the modification of a Lockheed D21B drone to flight test the DRACO Rocket Based Combined Cycle (RBCC) engine are discussed. Modifications include the addition of oxidizer tanks, modern avionics systems, actuators, and a vehicle recovery system. Current study results indicate that the D21B is a suitable candidate for this application and will allow demonstrations of all DRACO engine operating modes at Mach numbers between 0.8 and 4.0. Higher Mach numbers may be achieved with more extensive modification. Possible project risks include low speed stability and control, and recovery techniques.

  20. Diffractive interactions

    Del Duca, V.; Marage, P.

    1996-08-01

    The general framework of diffractive deep inelastic scattering is introduced and reports given in the session on diffractive interactions at the international workshop on deep-inelastic scattering and related phenomena, Rome, April 1996, are presented. (orig.)

  1. Electronic structure of nanoscale Cu/Pt alloys: A combined X-ray diffraction and X-ray absorption investigations

    Chen Xing; Chu Wangsheng; Cai Quan; Xia Dingguo; Wu Zhonghua; Wu Ziyu

    2006-01-01

    PVP-protected Cu/Pt clusters were prepared by glycol/water reduction method and characterized with transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and absorption spectra. TEM and XRD analysis show that the Cu/Pt clusters with different molar ratio have fcc structure with particle size of about 4 nm, while the lattice parameters in these clusters reduce with increasing Cu concentration. From the X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) at Cu-K edge and Pt-L 2,3 edge, we demonstrate that the d-electronic states of Cu and Pt are affected by the local environment as a function of Cu/Pt molar ratio. With increasing Cu concentration, Pt loses a fraction of 5d electrons and the hybridization between p- and d-states at Cu sites is enhanced

  2. Electronic structure of nanoscale Cu/Pt alloys: A combined X-ray diffraction and X-ray absorption investigations

    Chen Xing [Beijing Synchrotron Radiation Facility, Institute of High Energy Physics, CAS, Beijing (China); Graduate School of the Chinese Academy of Sciences, 100864 Beijing (China); Chu Wangsheng [Beijing Synchrotron Radiation Facility, Institute of High Energy Physics, CAS, Beijing (China); University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, 230036 (China); Cai Quan [Beijing Synchrotron Radiation Facility, Institute of High Energy Physics, CAS, Beijing (China); Graduate School of the Chinese Academy of Sciences, 100864 Beijing (China); Xia Dingguo [College of Environmental and Energy Engineering, Beijing University of Technology, 100022 Beijing (China); Wu Zhonghua [Beijing Synchrotron Radiation Facility, Institute of High Energy Physics, CAS, Beijing (China); Wu Ziyu [Beijing Synchrotron Radiation Facility, Institute of High Energy Physics, CAS, Beijing (China) and National Center for Nanoscience and Technology (China)]. E-mail: wuzy@ihep.ac.cn

    2006-11-15

    PVP-protected Cu/Pt clusters were prepared by glycol/water reduction method and characterized with transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and absorption spectra. TEM and XRD analysis show that the Cu/Pt clusters with different molar ratio have fcc structure with particle size of about 4 nm, while the lattice parameters in these clusters reduce with increasing Cu concentration. From the X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) at Cu-K edge and Pt-L{sub 2,3} edge, we demonstrate that the d-electronic states of Cu and Pt are affected by the local environment as a function of Cu/Pt molar ratio. With increasing Cu concentration, Pt loses a fraction of 5d electrons and the hybridization between p- and d-states at Cu sites is enhanced.

  3. Diffraction theory

    Bouwkamp, C.J.

    1954-01-01

    A critical review is presented of recent progress in classical diffraction theory. Both scalar and electromagnetic problems are discussed. The report may serve as an introduction to general diffraction theory although the main emphasis is on diffraction by plane obstacles. Various modifications of

  4. Efficient concept for generation of diffraction-limited green light by sum-frequency generation of spectrally combined tapered diode lasers

    Müller, André; Jensen, Ole Bjarlin; Hasler, Karl-Heinz

    2012-01-01

    In order to increase the power of visible diode laser systems in an efficient manner, we propose spectral beam combining with subsequent sum-frequency generation. We show that this approach, in comparison with second harmonic generation of single emitters, can enhance the available power signific......In order to increase the power of visible diode laser systems in an efficient manner, we propose spectral beam combining with subsequent sum-frequency generation. We show that this approach, in comparison with second harmonic generation of single emitters, can enhance the available power...... significantly. By combining two distributed Bragg reflector tapered diode lasers we achieve a 2.5–3.2 fold increase in power and a maximum of 3.9 W of diffraction-limited green light. At this power level, green diode laser systems have a high application potential, e.g., within the biomedical field. Our concept...

  5. In situ analysis of elemental depth distributions in thin films by combined evaluation of synchrotron x-ray fluorescence and diffraction

    Mainz, R.; Klenk, R.

    2011-01-01

    In this work we present a method for the in situ analysis of elemental depth distributions in thin films using a combined evaluation of synchrotron x-ray fluorescence and energy-dispersive x-ray diffraction signals. We recorded diffraction and fluorescence signals simultaneously during the reactive annealing of thin films. By means of the observed diffraction signals, the time evolution of phases in the thin films during the annealing processes can be determined. We utilized this phase information to parameterize the depth distributions of the elements in the films. The time-dependent fluorescence signals were then taken to determine the parameters representing the parameterized depth distributions. For this latter step, we numerically calculated the fluorescence intensities for a given set of depth distributions. These calculations handle polychromatic excitation and arbitrary functions of depth distributions and take into account primary and secondary fluorescence. Influences of lateral non-uniformities of the films, as well as the accuracy limits of the method, are investigated. We apply the introduced method to analyze the evolution of elemental depth distributions and to quantify the kinetic parameters during a synthesis process of CuInS 2 thin films via the reactive annealing of Cu-In precursors in a sulfur atmosphere.

  6. Monitoring of facial stress during space flight: Optical computer recognition combining discriminative and generative methods

    Dinges, David F.; Venkataraman, Sundara; McGlinchey, Eleanor L.; Metaxas, Dimitris N.

    2007-02-01

    Astronauts are required to perform mission-critical tasks at a high level of functional capability throughout spaceflight. Stressors can compromise their ability to do so, making early objective detection of neurobehavioral problems in spaceflight a priority. Computer optical approaches offer a completely unobtrusive way to detect distress during critical operations in space flight. A methodology was developed and a study completed to determine whether optical computer recognition algorithms could be used to discriminate facial expressions during stress induced by performance demands. Stress recognition from a facial image sequence is a subject that has not received much attention although it is an important problem for many applications beyond space flight (security, human-computer interaction, etc.). This paper proposes a comprehensive method to detect stress from facial image sequences by using a model-based tracker. The image sequences were captured as subjects underwent a battery of psychological tests under high- and low-stress conditions. A cue integration-based tracking system accurately captured the rigid and non-rigid parameters of different parts of the face (eyebrows, lips). The labeled sequences were used to train the recognition system, which consisted of generative (hidden Markov model) and discriminative (support vector machine) parts that yield results superior to using either approach individually. The current optical algorithm methods performed at a 68% accuracy rate in an experimental study of 60 healthy adults undergoing periods of high-stress versus low-stress performance demands. Accuracy and practical feasibility of the technique is being improved further with automatic multi-resolution selection for the discretization of the mask, and automated face detection and mask initialization algorithms.

  7. Combined resistive and laser heating technique for in situ radial X-ray diffraction in the diamond anvil cell at high pressure and temperature

    Miyagi, Lowell [Department of Geology and Geophysics, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah 84112 (United States); Department of Earth Sciences, Montana State University, Bozeman, Montana 59717 (United States); Kanitpanyacharoen, Waruntorn; Kaercher, Pamela; Wenk, Hans-Rudolf; Alarcon, Eloisa Zepeda [Department of Earth and Planetary Science, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Raju, Selva Vennila [Advanced Light Source, Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); HiPSEC, Department of Physics, University of Nevada, Las Vegas, Nevada 89154 (United States); Knight, Jason; MacDowell, Alastair [Advanced Light Source, Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Williams, Quentin [Department of Earth and Planetary Science, University of California, Santa Cruz, California 95064 (United States)

    2013-02-15

    To extend the range of high-temperature, high-pressure studies within the diamond anvil cell, a Liermann-type diamond anvil cell with radial diffraction geometry (rDAC) was redesigned and developed for synchrotron X-ray diffraction experiments at beamline 12.2.2 of the Advanced Light Source. The rDAC, equipped with graphite heating arrays, allows simultaneous resistive and laser heating while the material is subjected to high pressure. The goals are both to extend the temperature range of external (resistive) heating and to produce environments with lower temperature gradients in a simultaneously resistive- and laser-heated rDAC. Three different geomaterials were used as pilot samples to calibrate and optimize conditions for combined resistive and laser heating. For example, in Run1, FeO was loaded in a boron-mica gasket and compressed to 11 GPa then gradually resistively heated to 1007 K (1073 K at the diamond side). The laser heating was further applied to FeO to raise temperature to 2273 K. In Run2, Fe-Ni alloy was compressed to 18 GPa and resistively heated to 1785 K (1973 K at the diamond side). The combined resistive and laser heating was successfully performed again on (Mg{sub 0.9}Fe{sub 0.1})O in Run3. In this instance, the sample was loaded in a boron-kapton gasket, compressed to 29 GPa, resistive-heated up to 1007 K (1073 K at the diamond side), and further simultaneously laser-heated to achieve a temperature in excess of 2273 K at the sample position. Diffraction patterns obtained from the experiments were deconvoluted using the Rietveld method and quantified for lattice preferred orientation of each material under extreme conditions and during phase transformation.

  8. Combining X-ray Absorption and X-ray Diffraction Techniques for in Situ Studies of Chemical Transformations in Heterogeneous Catalysis: Advantages and Limitations

    Frenkel, A.I.; Hanson, J.; Wang, Q.; Marinkovic, N.; Chen, J.G.; Barrio, L.; Si, R.; Lopez Camara, A.; Estrella, A.M.; Rodriguez, J.A.

    2011-01-01

    Recent advances in catalysis instrumentations include synchrotron-based facilities where time-resolved X-ray scattering and absorption techniques are combined in the same in situ or operando experiment to study catalysts at work. To evaluate the advances and limitations of this method, we performed a series of experiments at the new XAFS/XRD instrument in the National Synchrotron Light Source. Nearly simultaneous X-ray diffraction (XRD) and X-ray absorption fine-structure (XAFS) measurements of structure and kinetics of several catalysts under reducing or oxidizing conditions have been performed and carefully analyzed. For CuFe 2 O 4 under reducing conditions, the combined use of the two techniques allowed us to obtain accurate data on kinetics of nucleation and growth of metallic Cu. For the inverse catalyst CuO/CeO 2 that underwent isothermal reduction (with CO) and oxidation (with O 2 ), the XAFS data measured in the same experiment with XRD revealed strongly disordered Cu species that went undetected by diffraction. These and other examples emphasize the unique sensitivity of these two complementary methods to follow catalytic processes in the broad ranges of length and time scales.

  9. Order-disorder-reorder process in thermally treated dolomite samples: a combined powder and single-crystal X-ray diffraction study

    Zucchini, A.; Comodi, P.; Katerinopoulou, A.; Balic-Zunic, T.; McCammon, C.; Frondini, F.

    2012-04-01

    A combined powder and single-crystal X-ray diffraction analysis of dolomite [CaMg(CO3)2] heated to 1,200°C at 3 GPa was made to study the order-disorder-reorder process. The order/disorder transition is inferred to start below 1,100°C, and complete disorder is attained at approximately 1,200°C. Twinned crystals characterized by high internal order were found in samples annealed over 1,100°C, and their fraction was found to increase with temperature. Evidences of twinning domains combined with probable remaining disordered portions of the structure imply that reordering processes occur during the quench. Twin domains are hereby proposed as a witness to thermally induced intra-layer-type cation disordering.

  10. Near-diffraction-limited segmented broad area diode laser based on off-axis spectral beam combining

    Jensen, O.B.; Thestrup Nielsen, Birgitte; Andersen, Peter E.

    2006-01-01

    -feedback scheme we are able to improve the beam quality of the laser by a factor of 23 from M-2 = 55 for the free-running diode laser to M-2 = 2.4 for the laser with feedback at a drive current of 2.2 A. The improved M-2 value is a factor of 3.4 below M-2 = 8.2 for a single free-running segment. This is the first......The beam quality of a 500-mu m-wide broad area diode laser with five active segments has been improved beyond the beam quality of the individual segments. The principle of this new laser system is based on off-axis feedback in combination with spectral beam combining. By using a double...... time that the beam quality of a segmented broad area diode laser has been improved beyond the beam quality of the individual segments....

  11. Determination of electronic and atomic properties of surface, bulk and buried interfaces: Simultaneous combination of hard X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction

    Rubio-Zuazo, J., E-mail: rubio@esrf.fr [SpLine, Spanish CRG BM25 Beamline at the ESRF, ESRF, B.P. 220, F-38043 Grenoble (France); Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Madrid, ICMM, CSIC, Cantoblanco, E-28049 Madrid (Spain); Castro, G.R. [SpLine, Spanish CRG BM25 Beamline at the ESRF, ESRF, B.P. 220, F-38043 Grenoble (France); Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Madrid, ICMM, CSIC, Cantoblanco, E-28049 Madrid (Spain)

    2013-10-15

    Highlights: •We have developed a novel and exceptional tool for non-destructive characterization of bulk and buried interfaces that combine XRD and HAXPES. •We studied the correlation between the atomic, electronic and transport properties of oxygen deficient manganite thin films. •The diffraction data showed a cooperative tilt of the MnO{sub 6} block along the out-of-plane direction. •We shown the absence of the conventional basal plane rotation for the oxygen deficient samples. -- Abstract: Hard X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (HAXPES) is a powerful novel emerging technique for bulk compositional, chemical and electronic properties determination in a non-destructive way. It benefits from the exceptionally large escape depth of high kinetic energy photoelectrons enabling the study of bulk and buried interfaces up to several tens of nanometres depth. Its advantage over conventional XPS is based on the long mean free path of high kinetic energetic photoelectrons. Using the advantage of tuneable X-ray radiation provided by synchrotron sources the photoelectron kinetic energy, i.e. the information depth can be changed and consequently electronic and compositional depth profiles can be obtained. The combination of HAXPES with an atomic structure sensitive technique, as X-ray diffraction, opens a new research field with great potential for many systems in which their electronic properties are intimately linked to their crystallographic structure. At SpLine, the Spanish CRG Beamline at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF) we have developed a novel and exceptional set-up that combine grazing incidence X-ray diffraction (GIXRD) and HAXPES. Both techniques can be operated simultaneously on the same sample and using the same excitation source. The set-up includes a heavy 2S+3D diffractometer and UHV chamber equipped with an electrostatic analyzer. The UHV chamber has also MBE evaporation sources, an ion gun, a LEED optic, a sample heating and cooling

  12. Evaluation of Poisson's ratio and Young's modulus of nitride films by combining grazing incidence X-ray diffraction and laser curvature techniques

    Chen, H.-Y.; Chen, J.-H.; Lu, F.-H.

    2007-01-01

    Measurements of Poisson's ratio and the Young's modulus of thin films have been problematic. In this work, evaluation of both Poisson's ratio and Young's modulus is conducted using grazing incidence X-ray diffraction combined with measurement of the induced stress. Poisson's ratio was evaluated from analysis of the X-ray diffraction data to obtain a strain-cos 2 α.sin 2 ψ plot. Moreover, the Young's modulus of the films could be also calculated from that plot as well as from the residual stress, which could be determined by a measurement of stress induced substrate curvature. The ternary nitride TiAlN is used as a model system for the evaluation. The films, prepared by cathodic arc plasma deposition, exhibited a strong (111) preferred orientation and a composition corresponding to Ti 0.6 Al 0.4 N. The measured Poisson's ratio and the Young's modulus of the films were 0.143 ± 0.003 and 310 ± 20 GPa, respectively, which are comparable to those reported in the literature

  13. Combined Approach for the Structural Characterization of Alkali Fluoroscandates: Solid-State NMR, Powder X-ray Diffraction, and Density Functional Theory Calculations.

    Rakhmatullin, Aydar; Polovov, Ilya B; Maltsev, Dmitry; Allix, Mathieu; Volkovich, Vladimir; Chukin, Andrey V; Boča, Miroslav; Bessada, Catherine

    2018-02-05

    The structures of several fluoroscandate compounds are presented here using a characterization approach combining powder X-ray diffraction and solid-state NMR. The structure of K 5 Sc 3 F 14 was fully determined from Rietveld refinement performed on powder X-ray diffraction data. Moreover, the local structures of NaScF 4 , Li 3 ScF 6 , KSc 2 F 7 , and Na 3 ScF 6 compounds were studied in detail from solid-state 19 F and 45 Sc NMR experiments. The 45 Sc chemical shift ranges for six- and seven-coordinated scandium environments were defined. The 19 F chemical shift ranges for bridging and terminal fluorine atoms were also determined. First-principles calculations of the 19 F and 45 Sc NMR parameters were carried out using plane-wave basis sets and periodic boundary conditions (CASTEP), and the results were compared with the experimental data. A good agreement between the calculated shielding constants and experimental chemical shifts was obtained. This demonstrates the good potential of computational methods in spectroscopic assignments of solid-state 45 Sc NMR spectroscopy.

  14. Combined operando X-ray diffraction-electrochemical impedance spectroscopy detecting solid solution reactions of LiFePO4 in batteries.

    Hess, Michael; Sasaki, Tsuyoshi; Villevieille, Claire; Novák, Petr

    2015-09-08

    Lithium-ion batteries are widely used for portable applications today; however, often suffer from limited recharge rates. One reason for such limitation can be a reduced active surface area during phase separation. Here we report a technique combining high-resolution operando synchrotron X-ray diffraction coupled with electrochemical impedance spectroscopy to directly track non-equilibrium intermediate phases in lithium-ion battery materials. LiFePO4, for example, is known to undergo phase separation when cycled under low-current-density conditions. However, operando X-ray diffraction under ultra-high-rate alternating current and direct current excitation reveal a continuous but current-dependent, solid solution reaction between LiFePO4 and FePO4 which is consistent with previous experiments and calculations. In addition, the formation of a preferred phase with a composition similar to the eutectoid composition, Li0.625FePO4, is evident. Even at a low rate of 0.1C, ∼20% of the X-ray diffractogram can be attributed to non-equilibrium phases, which changes our understanding of the intercalation dynamics in LiFePO4.

  15. Combining chemical and electric-nuclear propulsion for high speed flight

    Murthy, S.N.B.; Froning, H.D.

    1991-01-01

    In the development of propulsion for the high speed (greater than Mach 8) regime of a SSTO vehicle, an alternative to a combination of scramjets and conventional chemical rockets is a nuclear system such as the dense plasma fusion engine operated with aneutronic fuels. Several variants are then possible in the manner of energizing the working fluid. An attempt has been made to compare the effectiveness of nuclear and scramjet engines with respect to weights and utilization of energy availability. It is shown that nuclear engines can be as effective as the optimized combustion engines, and will yield a considerable reduction in GTOW in earth-based missions, and have a special use in other planetary atmospheres in which combustion may be difficult but collection and processing of working fluid is feasible. 9 refs

  16. 3-D growth of a short fatigue crack within a polycrystalline microstructure studied using combined diffraction and phase-contrast X-ray tomography

    Herbig, Michael [Universite de Lyon, Lyon, MATEIS, UMR5510 CNRS, 69621 Villeurbanne (France); King, Andrew [GKSS-Research Centre, Geesthacht (Germany); Reischig, Peter [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany); Proudhon, Henry [MINES ParisTech, Centre des materiaux, CNRS UMR 7633, BP 87, 91003 Evry Cedex (France); Lauridsen, Erik M. [Riso-DTU, Technical University of Denmark, Roskilde (Denmark); Marrow, James [Manchester Materials Science Centre, Manchester (United Kingdom); Buffiere, Jean-Yves [Universite de Lyon, Lyon, MATEIS, UMR5510 CNRS, 69621 Villeurbanne (France); Ludwig, Wolfgang, E-mail: wolfgang.ludwig@insa-lyon.fr [Universite de Lyon, Lyon, MATEIS, UMR5510 CNRS, 69621 Villeurbanne (France); European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, Grenoble, France, BP 220, 38043 Grenoble (France)

    2011-01-15

    X-ray diffraction contrast tomography is a recently developed, non-destructive synchrotron imaging technique which characterizes microstructure and grain orientation in polycrystalline materials in three dimensions. By combining it with propagation-based phase-contrast tomography it is possible to get a full picture description for the analysis of local crack growth rate of short fatigue cracks in three dimensions: the three-dimensional crack morphology at different propagation stages, and the shape and orientation of the grains around the crack. An approach has been developed on the metastable beta titanium alloy Ti 21S that allows for visualization and analysis of the growth rate and crystallographic orientation of the fracture surface.

  17. 3-D growth of a short fatigue crack within a polycrystalline microstructure studied using combined diffraction and phase-contrast X-ray tomography

    Herbig, Michael; King, Andrew; Reischig, Peter; Proudhon, Henry; Lauridsen, Erik M.; Marrow, James; Buffiere, Jean-Yves; Ludwig, Wolfgang

    2011-01-01

    X-ray diffraction contrast tomography is a recently developed, non-destructive synchrotron imaging technique which characterizes microstructure and grain orientation in polycrystalline materials in three dimensions. By combining it with propagation-based phase-contrast tomography it is possible to get a full picture description for the analysis of local crack growth rate of short fatigue cracks in three dimensions: the three-dimensional crack morphology at different propagation stages, and the shape and orientation of the grains around the crack. An approach has been developed on the metastable beta titanium alloy Ti 21S that allows for visualization and analysis of the growth rate and crystallographic orientation of the fracture surface.

  18. Radial composition of single InGaN nanowires: a combined study by EDX, Raman spectroscopy, and X-ray diffraction

    Gomez-Gomez, M.; Garro, N.; Cantarero, A. [Institut de Ciencia dels Materials, Universitat de Valencia, Paterna (Spain); Segura-Ruiz, J.; Martinez-Criado, G.; Chu, M.H. [European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, Experiments Division, Grenoble (France); Denker, C.; Malindretos, J.; Rizzi, A. [IV. Physikalisches Institut, Georg-August-Universitaet Goettingen (Germany)

    2013-10-15

    The radial alloy distribution of In{sub x} Ga{sub 1-x}N nanowires grown by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy has been investigated by three different techniques with nanometric spatial resolution and capability to study single nanowires. Energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy radial line-scans revealed a gradient in the alloy composition of individual nanowires. Resonant Raman scattering and spatially resolved X-ray diffraction showed the existence of three distinctive regions with different alloy composition. The combination of the three techniques provides robust evidence of the spontaneous formation of a core-shell structure with a thin Ga-richer shell wrapping an In-rich core at the bottom part of the nanowires. This composition-modulated nanostructure offers an attractive way to explore new device concepts in fully epitaxial nanowire-based solar cells. (copyright 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  19. Radial composition of single InGaN nanowires: a combined study by EDX, Raman spectroscopy, and X-ray diffraction

    Gomez-Gomez, M.; Garro, N.; Cantarero, A.; Segura-Ruiz, J.; Martinez-Criado, G.; Chu, M.H.; Denker, C.; Malindretos, J.; Rizzi, A.

    2013-01-01

    The radial alloy distribution of In x Ga 1-x N nanowires grown by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy has been investigated by three different techniques with nanometric spatial resolution and capability to study single nanowires. Energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy radial line-scans revealed a gradient in the alloy composition of individual nanowires. Resonant Raman scattering and spatially resolved X-ray diffraction showed the existence of three distinctive regions with different alloy composition. The combination of the three techniques provides robust evidence of the spontaneous formation of a core-shell structure with a thin Ga-richer shell wrapping an In-rich core at the bottom part of the nanowires. This composition-modulated nanostructure offers an attractive way to explore new device concepts in fully epitaxial nanowire-based solar cells. (copyright 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  20. Intergrown new zeolite beta polymorphs with interconnected 12-ring channels solved by combining electron crystallography and single-crystal X-ray diffraction

    Yu, Zhengbao

    2012-10-09

    Two new polymorphs of zeolite beta, denoted as SU-78A and SU-78B, were synthesized by employing dicyclohexylammonium hydroxides as organic structure-directing agents. The structure was solved by combining transmission electron microscopy and single-crystal X-ray diffraction. SU-78 is an intergrowth of SU-78A and SU-78B and contains interconnected 12-ring channels in three directions. The two polymorphs are built from the same building layer, similar to that for the zeolite beta family. The layer stacking in SU-78, however, is different from those in zeolite beta polymorph A, B, and C, showing new zeolite framework topologies. SU-78 is thermally stable up to 600 °C. © 2012 American Chemical Society.

  1. Modern techniques of structural neutron diffraction

    Aksenov, V.L.; )

    1997-01-01

    Modern techniques of neutron diffraction for structural investigations are analyzed. The time-of-flight method and the reverse time-of-flight method are considered briefly. Characteristics of two-crystal and time-of-flight neutron diffractometers are compared. It is pointed that in the future, the great importance will be possessed the development of high-resolution Fourier neutron diffractometers [ru

  2. A combined neutron and x-ray diffraction study of short- and intermediate-range structural characteristics of Ge-As sulfide glasses

    Uzun, S Soyer; Sen, S; Benmore, C J; Aitken, B G

    2008-01-01

    A combination of neutron and x-ray diffraction has been employed to study the compositional dependence of the atomic structures of Ge x As x S 100-2x glasses with S concentration varying between 33.3 and 70.0 at.%. The nearest-neighbor coordination numbers of Ge and As atoms are always found to be 4 and 3, respectively, irrespective of the glass composition. Ge and As atoms have primarily heteropolar bonding to S atoms in stoichiometric and S-excess glasses with x≤18.2. Low and intermediate levels of deficiency of S (20≤x≤25) are accommodated via the formation of homopolar As-As bonds while Ge atoms remain primarily bonded to four S atoms, resulting in As-rich regions in the glass structure. Ge starts to participate in metal-metal bonding only in the highly S-deficient glasses with 27.5≤x≤33.3. The intermediate-range order and its topological influence on atomic packing in these three compositional regions, in the order of increasing deficiency in S, are controlled by (a) a mixed GeS 2 and As 2 S 3 network, (b) the coexistence of a GeS 2 network and As clusters, and (c) large Ge-As metal-rich regions. This evolution of the intermediate-range structure with composition is consistent with the corresponding variation of the position, intensity and width of the first sharp diffraction peak in the structure factor

  3. Combined near- and far-field high-energy diffraction microscopy dataset for Ti-7Al tensile specimen elastically loaded in situ

    Turner, Todd J.; Shade, Paul A.; Bernier, Joel V.; Li, Shiu Fai; Schuren, Jay C.; Lind, Jonathan; Lienert, Ulrich; Kenesei, Peter; Suter, Robert M.; Blank, Basil; Almer, Jonathan

    2016-03-18

    High-energy diffraction microscopy (HEDM) constitutes a suite of combined X-ray characterization methods, which hold the unique advantage of illuminating the microstructure and micromechanical state of a material during concurrent in situ mechanical deformation. The data generated from HEDM experiments provides a heretofore unrealized opportunity to validate meso-scale modeling techniques, such as crystal plasticity finite element modeling (CPFEM), by explicitly testing the accuracy of these models at the length scales where the models predict their response. Combining HEDM methods with in situ loading under known and controlled boundary conditions represents a significant challenge, inspiring the recent development of a new high-precision rotation and axial motion system for simultaneously rotating and axially loading a sample. In this paper, we describe the initial HEDM dataset collected using this hardware on an alpha-titanium alloy (Ti-7Al) under in situ tensile deformation at the Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory. We present both near-field HEDM data that maps out the grain morphology and intragranular crystallographic orientations and far-field HEDM data that provides the grain centroid, grain average crystallographic orientation, and grain average elastic strain tensor for each grain. Finally, we provide a finite element mesh that can be utilized to simulate deformation in the volume of this Ti-7Al specimen. The dataset supporting this article is available in the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) repository (http://hdl.handle.net/11256/599).

  4. A combined time-of-flight and depth-of-interaction detector for total-body positron emission tomography

    Berg, Eric, E-mail: eberg@ucdavis.edu; Roncali, Emilie; Du, Junwei; Cherry, Simon R. [Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of California, Davis, One Shields Avenue, Davis, California 95616 (United States); Kapusta, Maciej [Molecular Imaging, Siemens Healthcare, Knoxville, Tennessee 37932 (United States)

    2016-02-15

    Purpose: In support of a project to build a total-body PET scanner with an axial field-of-view of 2 m, the authors are developing simple, cost-effective block detectors with combined time-of-flight (TOF) and depth-of-interaction (DOI) capabilities. Methods: This work focuses on investigating the potential of phosphor-coated crystals with conventional PMT-based block detector readout to provide DOI information while preserving timing resolution. The authors explored a variety of phosphor-coating configurations with single crystals and crystal arrays. Several pulse shape discrimination techniques were investigated, including decay time, delayed charge integration (DCI), and average signal shapes. Results: Pulse shape discrimination based on DCI provided the lowest DOI positioning error: 2 mm DOI positioning error was obtained with single phosphor-coated crystals while 3–3.5 mm DOI error was measured with the block detector module. Minimal timing resolution degradation was observed with single phosphor-coated crystals compared to uncoated crystals, and a timing resolution of 442 ps was obtained with phosphor-coated crystals in the block detector compared to 404 ps without phosphor coating. Flood maps showed a slight degradation in crystal resolvability with phosphor-coated crystals; however, all crystals could be resolved. Energy resolution was degraded by 3%–7% with phosphor-coated crystals compared to uncoated crystals. Conclusions: These results demonstrate the feasibility of obtaining TOF–DOI capabilities with simple block detector readout using phosphor-coated crystals.

  5. A combined segmented anode gas ionization chamber and time-of-flight detector for heavy ion elastic recoil detection analysis

    Ström, Petter; Petersson, Per; Rubel, Marek; Possnert, Göran

    2016-10-01

    A dedicated detector system for heavy ion elastic recoil detection analysis at the Tandem Laboratory of Uppsala University is presented. Benefits of combining a time-of-flight measurement with a segmented anode gas ionization chamber are demonstrated. The capability of ion species identification is improved with the present system, compared to that obtained when using a single solid state silicon detector for the full ion energy signal. The system enables separation of light elements, up to Neon, based on atomic number while signals from heavy elements such as molybdenum and tungsten are separated based on mass, to a sample depth on the order of 1 μm. The performance of the system is discussed and a selection of material analysis applications is given. Plasma-facing materials from fusion experiments, in particular metal mirrors, are used as a main example for the discussion. Marker experiments using nitrogen-15 or oxygen-18 are specific cases for which the described improved species separation and sensitivity are required. Resilience to radiation damage and significantly improved energy resolution for heavy elements at low energies are additional benefits of the gas ionization chamber over a solid state detector based system.

  6. A combined time-of-flight and depth-of-interaction detector for total-body positron emission tomography

    Berg, Eric; Roncali, Emilie; Du, Junwei; Cherry, Simon R.; Kapusta, Maciej

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: In support of a project to build a total-body PET scanner with an axial field-of-view of 2 m, the authors are developing simple, cost-effective block detectors with combined time-of-flight (TOF) and depth-of-interaction (DOI) capabilities. Methods: This work focuses on investigating the potential of phosphor-coated crystals with conventional PMT-based block detector readout to provide DOI information while preserving timing resolution. The authors explored a variety of phosphor-coating configurations with single crystals and crystal arrays. Several pulse shape discrimination techniques were investigated, including decay time, delayed charge integration (DCI), and average signal shapes. Results: Pulse shape discrimination based on DCI provided the lowest DOI positioning error: 2 mm DOI positioning error was obtained with single phosphor-coated crystals while 3–3.5 mm DOI error was measured with the block detector module. Minimal timing resolution degradation was observed with single phosphor-coated crystals compared to uncoated crystals, and a timing resolution of 442 ps was obtained with phosphor-coated crystals in the block detector compared to 404 ps without phosphor coating. Flood maps showed a slight degradation in crystal resolvability with phosphor-coated crystals; however, all crystals could be resolved. Energy resolution was degraded by 3%–7% with phosphor-coated crystals compared to uncoated crystals. Conclusions: These results demonstrate the feasibility of obtaining TOF–DOI capabilities with simple block detector readout using phosphor-coated crystals

  7. Diffraction dissociation

    Abarbanel, H.

    1972-01-01

    An attempt is made to analyse the present theoretical situation in the field of diffraction scattering. Two not yet fully answered questions related with a typical diffraction process AB→CD, namely: what is the structure of the transition matrix elements, and what is the structure of the exchange mechanism responsible for the scattering, are formulated and various proposals for answers are reviewed. Interesting general statement that the products (-1)sup(J)P, where J and P are respectively spin and parity, is conserved at each vertex has been discussed. The exchange mechanism in diffractive scattering has been considered using the language of the complex J-plane as the most appropriate. The known facts about the exchange mechanism are recalled and several routs to way out are proposed. The idea to consider the moving pole and associated branch points as like a particle and the associated two and many particle unitarity cuts is described in more details. (S.B.)

  8. Diffraction attraction

    Anon.

    1986-01-01

    Elastic scattering – when colliding particles 'bounce' off each other like billiard balls – has always had a special interest for high energy physicists. While its simplicity makes for deep analogies with classical ideas like diffraction, its jbtle details also test our understanding of the intricate inner mechanisms which drive particle interactions. With a new stock of elastic scattering data now available thanks to experiments at the CERN proton-antiproton Collider, and with studies at higher energies imminent or planned, some seventy physicists gathered in the magnificent chateau at Blois, France, for a 'Workshop on Elastic and Diffractive Scattering at the Collider and Beyond'

  9. Diffractive scattering

    De Wolf, E.A.

    2002-01-01

    We discuss basic concepts and properties of diffractive phenomena in soft hadron collisions and in deep-inelastic scattering at low Bjorken-x. The paper is not a review of the rapidly developing field but presents an attempt to show in simple terms the close inter-relationship between the dynamics of high-energy hadronic and deep-inelastic diffraction. Using the saturation model of Golec-Biernat and Wusthoff as an example, a simple explanation of geometrical scaling is presented. The relation between the QCD anomalous multiplicity dimension and the Pomeron intercept is discussed.

  10. Diffractive Scattering

    Wolf, E.A. de

    2002-01-01

    We discuss basic concepts and properties of diffractive phenomena in soft hadron collisions and in deep-inelastic scattering at low Bjorken - x. The paper is not a review of the rapidly developing field but presents an attempt to show in simple terms the close inter-relationship between the dynamics of high-energy hadronic and deep-inelastic diffraction. Using the saturation model of Golec-Biernat and Wuesthoff as an example, a simple explanation of geometrical scaling is presented. The relation between the QCD anomalous multiplicity dimension and the Pomeron intercept is discussed. (author)

  11. Diffraction attraction

    Anon.

    1986-03-15

    Elastic scattering – when colliding particles 'bounce' off each other like billiard balls – has always had a special interest for high energy physicists. While its simplicity makes for deep analogies with classical ideas like diffraction, its jbtle details also test our understanding of the intricate inner mechanisms which drive particle interactions. With a new stock of elastic scattering data now available thanks to experiments at the CERN proton-antiproton Collider, and with studies at higher energies imminent or planned, some seventy physicists gathered in the magnificent chateau at Blois, France, for a 'Workshop on Elastic and Diffractive Scattering at the Collider and Beyond'.

  12. A hybrid method combining the Time-Domain Method of Moments, the Time-Domain Uniform Theory of Diffraction and the FDTD

    A. Becker

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available In this paper a hybrid method combining the Time-Domain Method of Moments (TD-MoM, the Time-Domain Uniform Theory of Diffraction (TD-UTD and the Finite-Difference Time-Domain Method (FDTD is presented. When applying this new hybrid method, thin-wire antennas are modeled with the TD-MoM, inhomogeneous bodies are modelled with the FDTD and large perfectly conducting plates are modelled with the TD-UTD. All inhomogeneous bodies are enclosed in a so-called FDTD-volume and the thin-wire antennas can be embedded into this volume or can lie outside. The latter avoids the simulation of white space between antennas and inhomogeneous bodies. If the antennas are positioned into the FDTD-volume, their discretization does not need to agree with the grid of the FDTD. By using the TD-UTD large perfectly conducting plates can be considered efficiently in the solution-procedure. Thus this hybrid method allows time-domain simulations of problems including very different classes of objects, applying the respective most appropriate numerical techniques to every object.

  13. Powder diffraction

    Hart, M.

    1995-12-31

    the importance of x-ray powder diffraction as an analytical tool for phase identification of materials was first pointed out by Debye and Scherrer in Germany and, quite independently, by Hull in the US. Three distinct periods of evolution lead to ubiquitous application in many fields of science and technology. In the first period, until the mid-1940`s, applications were and developed covering broad categories of materials including inorganic materials, minerals, ceramics, metals, alloys, organic materials and polymers. During this formative period, the concept of quantitative phase analysis was demonstrated. In the second period there followed the blossoming of technology and commercial instruments became widely used. The history is well summarized by Parrish and by Langford and Loueer. By 1980 there were probably 10,000 powder diffractometers in routine use, making it the most widely used of all x-ray crystallographic instruments. In the third, present, period data bases became firmly established and sophisticated pattern fitting and recognition software made many aspects of powder diffraction analysis routine. High resolution, tunable powder diffractometers were developed at sources of synchrotron radiation. The tunability of the spectrum made it possible to exploit all the subtleties of x-ray spectroscopy in diffraction experiments.

  14. Powder diffraction

    Hart, M.

    1995-01-01

    The importance of x-ray powder diffraction as an analytical tool for phase identification of materials was first pointed out by Debye and Scherrer in Germany and, quite independently, by Hull in the US. Three distinct periods of evolution lead to ubiquitous application in many fields of science and technology. In the first period, until the mid-1940's, applications were and developed covering broad categories of materials including inorganic materials, minerals, ceramics, metals, alloys, organic materials and polymers. During this formative period, the concept of quantitative phase analysis was demonstrated. In the second period there followed the blossoming of technology and commercial instruments became widely used. The history is well summarized by Parrish and by Langford and Loueer. By 1980 there were probably 10,000 powder diffractometers in routine use, making it the most widely used of all x-ray crystallographic instruments. In the third, present, period data bases became firmly established and sophisticated pattern fitting and recognition software made many aspects of powder diffraction analysis routine. High resolution, tunable powder diffractometers were developed at sources of synchrotron radiation. The tunability of the spectrum made it possible to exploit all the subtleties of x-ray spectroscopy in diffraction experiments

  15. A novel technique combining high-resolution synchrotron x-ray microtomography and x-ray diffraction for characterization of micro particulates

    Merrifield, David R; Ramachandran, Vasuki; Roberts, Kevin J; Armour, Wesley; Axford, Danny; Basham, Mark; Connolley, Thomas; Evans, Gwyndaf; McAuley, Katherine E; Owen, Robin L; Sandy, James

    2011-01-01

    The processing of solids, such as crystals, is strongly influenced by the surface properties of the material. In recent years the pharmaceutical industry has shown great interest in identifying, or chemically speciating, the molecular components of crystal faces. Formerly, characterization of the molecular identity of crystal faces was restricted to the study of large single crystals. This would have been primarily for structure determination as part of the drug registration process. Diamond Light Source in Oxfordshire is a new synchrotron facility in the UK, having 18 operational beamlines with 4 more in the construction phase. Beamlines at this medium energy light source enable the study of micron-sized objects in great detail. It is well known that x-ray microtomography (XMT) can be used to investigate the external morphology of a crystal whereas x-ray diffraction (XRD) is used to study the molecular orientation, structure and packing within the crystal. The objective of this research is to assess the feasibility of, and thereby develop a new methodology for, characterizing the molecular identity of a particular face of a crystalline particle at a scale of scrutiny of 20–50 µm by combining these two powerful techniques. This work demonstrates the application of XMT and XRD to investigate respectively the shape and crystalline phase/orientation of relevant test crystals. This research has applications in the pharmaceutical industry in that when the exact molecular nature of a particular face is known, the important physico-pharmaceutical properties stemming from that can be better understood. Some initial data are presented and discussed

  16. Revealing Lattice Expansion of Small-Pore Zeolite Catalysts during the Methanol-to-Olefins Process Using Combined Operando X-ray Diffraction and UV-vis Spectroscopy.

    Goetze, Joris; Yarulina, Irina; Gascon, Jorge; Kapteijn, Freek; Weckhuysen, Bert M

    2018-03-02

    In small-pore zeolite catalysts, where the size of the pores is limited by eight-ring windows, aromatic hydrocarbon pool molecules that are formed inside the zeolite during the Methanol-to-Olefins (MTO) process cannot exit the pores and are retained inside the catalyst. Hydrocarbon species whose size is comparable to the size of the zeolite cage can cause the zeolite lattice to expand during the MTO process. In this work, the formation of retained hydrocarbon pool species during MTO at a reaction temperature of 400 °C was followed using operando UV-vis spectroscopy. During the same experiment, using operando X-ray Diffraction (XRD), the expansion of the zeolite framework was assessed, and the activity of the catalyst was measured using online gas chromatography (GC). Three different small-pore zeolite frameworks, i.e., CHA, DDR, and LEV, were compared. It was shown using operando XRD that the formation of retained aromatic species causes the zeolite lattice of all three frameworks to expand. Because of the differences in the zeolite framework dimensions, the nature of the retained hydrocarbons as measured by operando UV-vis spectroscopy is different for each of the three zeolite frameworks. Consequently, the magnitude and direction of the zeolite lattice expansion as measured by operando XRD also depends on the specific combination of the hydrocarbon species and the zeolite framework. The catalyst with the CHA framework, i.e., H-SSZ-13, showed the biggest expansion: 0.9% in the direction along the c -axis of the zeolite lattice. For all three zeolite frameworks, based on the combination of operando XRD and operando UV-vis spectroscopy, the hydrocarbon species that are likely to cause the expansion of the zeolite cages are presented; methylated naphthalene and pyrene in CHA, 1-methylnaphthalene and phenalene in DDR, and methylated benzene and naphthalene in LEV. Filling of the zeolite cages and, as a consequence, the zeolite lattice expansion causes the

  17. Revealing Lattice Expansion of Small-Pore Zeolite Catalysts during the Methanol-to-Olefins Process Using Combined Operando X-ray Diffraction and UV–vis Spectroscopy

    2018-01-01

    In small-pore zeolite catalysts, where the size of the pores is limited by eight-ring windows, aromatic hydrocarbon pool molecules that are formed inside the zeolite during the Methanol-to-Olefins (MTO) process cannot exit the pores and are retained inside the catalyst. Hydrocarbon species whose size is comparable to the size of the zeolite cage can cause the zeolite lattice to expand during the MTO process. In this work, the formation of retained hydrocarbon pool species during MTO at a reaction temperature of 400 °C was followed using operando UV–vis spectroscopy. During the same experiment, using operando X-ray Diffraction (XRD), the expansion of the zeolite framework was assessed, and the activity of the catalyst was measured using online gas chromatography (GC). Three different small-pore zeolite frameworks, i.e., CHA, DDR, and LEV, were compared. It was shown using operando XRD that the formation of retained aromatic species causes the zeolite lattice of all three frameworks to expand. Because of the differences in the zeolite framework dimensions, the nature of the retained hydrocarbons as measured by operando UV–vis spectroscopy is different for each of the three zeolite frameworks. Consequently, the magnitude and direction of the zeolite lattice expansion as measured by operando XRD also depends on the specific combination of the hydrocarbon species and the zeolite framework. The catalyst with the CHA framework, i.e., H-SSZ-13, showed the biggest expansion: 0.9% in the direction along the c-axis of the zeolite lattice. For all three zeolite frameworks, based on the combination of operando XRD and operando UV–vis spectroscopy, the hydrocarbon species that are likely to cause the expansion of the zeolite cages are presented; methylated naphthalene and pyrene in CHA, 1-methylnaphthalene and phenalene in DDR, and methylated benzene and naphthalene in LEV. Filling of the zeolite cages and, as a consequence, the zeolite lattice expansion causes the

  18. Revealing Lattice Expansion of Small-Pore Zeolite Catalysts during the Methanol-to-Olefins Process Using Combined Operando X-ray Diffraction and UV–vis Spectroscopy

    Goetze, Joris

    2018-02-06

    In small-pore zeolite catalysts, where the size of the pores is limited by eight-ring windows, aromatic hydrocarbon pool molecules that are formed inside the zeolite during the Methanol-to-Olefins (MTO) process cannot exit the pores and are retained inside the catalyst. Hydrocarbon species whose size is comparable to the size of the zeolite cage can cause the zeolite lattice to expand during the MTO process. In this work, the formation of retained hydrocarbon pool species during MTO at a reaction temperature of 400 °C was followed using operando UV–vis spectroscopy. During the same experiment, using operando X-ray Diffraction (XRD), the expansion of the zeolite framework was assessed, and the activity of the catalyst was measured using online gas chromatography (GC). Three different small-pore zeolite frameworks, i.e., CHA, DDR, and LEV, were compared. It was shown using operando XRD that the formation of retained aromatic species causes the zeolite lattice of all three frameworks to expand. Because of the differences in the zeolite framework dimensions, the nature of the retained hydrocarbons as measured by operando UV–vis spectroscopy is different for each of the three zeolite frameworks. Consequently, the magnitude and direction of the zeolite lattice expansion as measured by operando XRD also depends on the specific combination of the hydrocarbon species and the zeolite framework. The catalyst with the CHA framework, i.e., H-SSZ-13, showed the biggest expansion: 0.9% in the direction along the c-axis of the zeolite lattice. For all three zeolite frameworks, based on the combination of operando XRD and operando UV–vis spectroscopy, the hydrocarbon species that are likely to cause the expansion of the zeolite cages are presented; methylated naphthalene and pyrene in CHA, 1-methylnaphthalene and phenalene in DDR, and methylated benzene and naphthalene in LEV. Filling of the zeolite cages and, as a consequence, the zeolite lattice expansion causes the

  19. Diffraction gauging

    Wilkens, P.H.

    1978-01-01

    This system of gauging is now being designed to fit on an Excello NC lathe to measure the form, accuracy, and size of external contoured surfaces as they approach the finish machined size. A template profile of the finished workpiece, but 0.003 in. bigger on radius, will be aligned with the workpiece using a reference diameter and face on the machining fixture to leave a gap between the profile of the template and workpiece. A helium--neon laser beam will be projected through this gap using a rotating retroreflector and a fixed laser. The resulting diffraction pattern produced by the laser beam passing through the template to workpiece gap will be reflected and focused on a fixed diode array via a second retroreflector which moves and remains in optical alignment with the first. These retroreflectors will be rotated about a center that will enable the laser beam, which is shaped in a long slit, to scan the template workpiece gap from the pole to the equator of the workpiece. The characteristic diffraction pattern will be detected by the fixed diode array, and the signal levels from this array will be processed in a mini-computer programmed to produce a best fit through the two minima of the diode signals. The separation of the two minima will yield the size of the workpiece to template gap and this information will be presented to the machine tool operator

  20. Proton diffraction

    Den Besten, J.L.; Jamieson, D.N.; Allen, L.J.

    1998-01-01

    The Lindhard theory on ion channeling in crystals has been widely accepted throughout ion beam analysis for use in simulating such experiments. The simulations use a Monte Carlo method developed by Barret, which utilises the classical 'billiard ball' theory of ions 'bouncing' between planes or tubes of atoms in the crystal. This theory is not valid for 'thin' crystals where the planes or strings of atoms can no longer be assumed to be of infinite proportions. We propose that a theory similar to that used for high energy electron diffraction can be applied to MeV ions, especially protons, in thin crystals to simulate the intensities of transmission channeling and of RBS spectra. The diffraction theory is based on a Bloch wave solution of the Schroedinger equation for an ion passing through the periodic crystal potential. The widely used universal potential for proton-nucleus scattering is used to construct the crystal potential. Absorption due to thermal diffuse scattering is included. Experimental parameters such as convergence angle, beam tilt and scanning directions are considered in our calculations. Comparison between theory and experiment is encouraging and suggests that further work is justified. (authors)

  1. DNA hydration studied by neutron fiber diffraction

    Fuller, W.; Forsyth, V.T.; Mahendrasingam, A.; Langan, P.; Pigram, W.J. [Keele Univ. (United Kingdom)] [and others

    1994-12-31

    The development of neutron high angle fiber diffraction to investigate the location of water around the deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) double-helix is described. The power of the technique is illustrated by its application to the D and A conformations of DNA using the single crystal diffractometer, D19, at the Institute Laue-Langevin, Grenoble and the time of flight diffractometer, SXD, at the Rutherford Appleton ISIS Spallation Neutron Source. These studies show the existence of bound water closely associated with the DNA. The patterns of hydration in these two DNA conformations are quite distinct and are compared to those observed in X-ray single crystal studies of two-stranded oligodeoxynucleotides. Information on the location of water around the DNA double-helix from the neutron fiber diffraction studies is combined with that on the location of alkali metal cations from complementary X-ray high angle fiber diffraction studies at the Daresbury Laboratory SRS using synchrotron radiation. These analyses emphasize the importance of viewing DNA, water and ions as a single system with specific interactions between the three components and provide a basis for understanding the effect of changes in the concentration of water and ions in inducing conformations] transitions in the DNA double-helix.

  2. DNA hydration studied by neutron fiber diffraction

    Fuller, W.; Forsyth, V.T.; Mahendrasingam, A.; Langan, P.; Pigram, W.J.

    1994-01-01

    The development of neutron high angle fiber diffraction to investigate the location of water around the deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) double-helix is described. The power of the technique is illustrated by its application to the D and A conformations of DNA using the single crystal diffractometer, D19, at the Institute Laue-Langevin, Grenoble and the time of flight diffractometer, SXD, at the Rutherford Appleton ISIS Spallation Neutron Source. These studies show the existence of bound water closely associated with the DNA. The patterns of hydration in these two DNA conformations are quite distinct and are compared to those observed in X-ray single crystal studies of two-stranded oligodeoxynucleotides. Information on the location of water around the DNA double-helix from the neutron fiber diffraction studies is combined with that on the location of alkali metal cations from complementary X-ray high angle fiber diffraction studies at the Daresbury Laboratory SRS using synchrotron radiation. These analyses emphasize the importance of viewing DNA, water and ions as a single system with specific interactions between the three components and provide a basis for understanding the effect of changes in the concentration of water and ions in inducing conformations] transitions in the DNA double-helix

  3. Neutron diffraction on pulsed sources

    Aksenov, V.L.; Balagurov, A.M.

    2016-01-01

    The possibilities currently offered and major scientific problems solved by time-of-flight neutron diffraction are reviewed. The reasons for the rapid development of the method over the last two decades has been mainly the emergence of third generation pulsed sources with a MW time-averaged power and advances in neutron-optical devices and detector systems. The paper discusses some historical aspects of time-of-flight neutron diffraction and examines the contribution to this method by F.L.Shapiro whose 100th birth anniversary was celebrated in 2015. The state of the art with respect to neutron sources for studies on output beams is reviewed in a special section. [ru

  4. The use of pattern decomposition to study the combined X-ray diffraction effects of crystallite size and stacking faults in ex-oxalate zinc oxide

    Langford, J.I.; Boultif, A.; Auffredic, J.P.; Louer, D.

    1993-01-01

    The microstructure of ZnO powder, obtained from thermal decomposition of the oxalate and studied previously by electron microscopy and adsorption calorimetry, was investigated by means of X-ray powder diffraction pattern decomposition. A Williamson-Hall plot revealed that some lines were broadened solely due to the effects of crystallite size, whereas other breadths included a contribution due to stacking faults. Spherical and cylindrical models are used to describe the form of the crystallites and procedures are presented for separating 'size' effects from 'mistake' broadening. This leads to estimates of the mean dimensions of the crystallites and the stacking-fault probability. The analysis demonstrates that, with good-quality data for a large number of reflections, a considerable amount of detailed information can be obtained about microstructure. On the other hand, it reveals some of the limitations of current procedures for modelling diffraction line profiles. (orig.)

  5. Stress evaluation in thin films: Micro-focus synchrotron X-ray diffraction combined with focused ion beam patterning for d{sub o} evaluation

    Baimpas, Nikolaos, E-mail: nikolaos.baimpas@eng.ox.ac.uk [University of Oxford, Dept. of Engineering Science (United Kingdom); Le Bourhis, Eric [University of Poitiers, Institut P' , Laboratoire de Physique des Matériaux, Poitiers (France); Eve, Sophie [ENSICAEN, CRISMAT, Caen (France); Thiaudière, Dominique [Synchrotron SOLEIL, L' Orme des Merisiers Saint-Aubin, Paris (France); Hardie, Christopher [University of Oxford, Materials Department (United Kingdom); Korsunsky, Alexander M. [University of Oxford, Dept. of Engineering Science (United Kingdom)

    2013-12-31

    Nanocrystalline metallic coatings of sub-micron thickness are widely used in modern microelectronic applications. In X-ray diffraction experiments to determine both the residual and applied stresses in nanocrystalline coatings, one difficult challenge that comes up invariably is the determination of the strain-free lattice spacing d{sub o}. The present study addresses this challenge by using the focused ion beam (FIB) to generate a built-in strain-free reference by patterning (milling) a 50 × 50 μm{sup 2} region of the coating to produce an array of small stress-relieved “islands” ∼ 0.8 × 0.8 μm{sup 2} each. Transmission X-ray diffraction setup was used for data collection at DIFFABS beamline (Synchrotron SOLEIL, France). A 150 nm-thick multi-layered W–Cu nano-composite thin film on polyimide (Kapton®) substrate was studied. The samples were loaded incrementally using a compact uniaxial loading device, and micro-beam diffraction data were collected on and away from the reference array. It was shown experimentally that the “island” array remained approximately strain free throughout the experiment, providing an on-board d{sub o} lattice spacing reference. The changing lattice spacing d in the coating was also monitored away from the array, to deduce the elastic strain evolution during deformation. The results and their implications are presented and discussed. - Highlights: • In situ deformation study of laminate polycrystalline W–Cu thin films • Focused ion beam (FIB) patterning of an array of “islands” on thin films surface • X-ray diffraction on island-patterned region • Constant strain on “islands” independently of the deformation of the substrate.

  6. Structure and thermal expansion of Ca9Gd(VO4)7: A combined powder-diffraction and dilatometric study of a Czochralski-grown crystal

    Paszkowicz, Wojciech; Shekhovtsov, Alexei; Kosmyna, Miron; Loiko, Pavel; Vilejshikova, Elena; Minikayev, Roman; Romanowski, Przemysław; Wierzchowski, Wojciech; Wieteska, Krzysztof; Paulmann, Carsten; Bryleva, Ekaterina; Belikov, Konstantin; Fitch, Andrew

    2017-11-01

    Materials of the Ca9RE(VO4)7 (CRVO) formula (RE = rare earth) and whitlockite-related structures are considered for applications in optoelectronics, e.g., in white-light emitting diodes and lasers. In the CRVO structure, the RE atoms are known to share the site occupation with Ca atoms at two or three among four Ca sites, with partial occupancy values depending on the choice of the RE atom. In this work, the structure and quality of a Czochralski-grown crystal of this family, Ca9Gd(VO4)7 (CGVO), are studied using X-ray diffraction methods. The room-temperature structure is refined using the powder diffraction data collected at a high-resolution synchrotron beamline ID22 (ESRF, Grenoble); for comparison purposes, a laboratory diffraction pattern was collected and analyzed, as well. The site occupancies are discussed on the basis of comparison with literature data of isostructural synthetic crystals of the CRVO series. The results confirm the previously reported site-occupation scheme and indicate a tendency of the CGVO compound to adopt a Gd-deficient composition. Moreover, the thermal expansion coefficient is determined for CGVO as a function of temperature in the 302-1023 K range using laboratory diffraction data. Additionally, for CGVO and six other single crystals of the same family, thermal expansion is studied in the 298-473 K range, using the dilatometric data. The magnitude and anisotropy of thermal expansion, being of importance for laser applications, are discussed for these materials.

  7. Kinematic analysis of the flight phase of the Nordic combined and ski jump on a large hill (HS-134 m) during the 2009 Nordic World Ski Championships.

    Svoboda, Zdenek; Janura, Miroslav; Cabell, Lee; Janurová, Eva

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the execution of the flight phase in the Nordic combined (NC) among three groups of competitors, representing different skill levels, and to compare them with three groups of ski jumpers (SJs). Thirty NC and thirty SJ competitors, who performed ski jumps on an HS-134 m jumping hill, were divided into three subgroups based on jump length execution. Two-dimensional (2-D) kinematic data were collected from the lower extremities, trunks, and skis of the competitors. The SJ group had a smaller lower extremity angle ( p jump lengths comparable to those of the SJ competitors by having significantly higher in-run velocities.

  8. Residual stress determination in oxide layers at different length scales combining Raman spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction: Application to chromia-forming metallic alloys

    Guerain, Mathieu; Grosseau-Poussard, Jean-Luc; Geandier, Guillaume; Panicaud, Benoit; Tamura, Nobumichi; Kunz, Martin; Dejoie, Catherine; Micha, Jean-Sebastien; Thiaudière, Dominique; Goudeau, Philippe

    2017-11-01

    In oxidizing environments, the protection of metals and alloys against further oxidation at high temperature is provided by the oxide film itself. This protection is efficient only if the formed film adheres well to the metal (substrate), i.e., without microcracks and spalls induced by thermomechanical stresses. In this study, the residual stresses at both macroscopic and microscopic scales in the oxide film adhering to the substrate and over the damaged areas have been rigorously determined on the same samples for both techniques. Ni-30Cr and Fe-47Cr alloys have been oxidized together at 900 and 1000 °C, respectively, to create films with a thickness of a few microns. A multi-scale approach was adopted: macroscopic stress was determined by conventional X-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy, while microscopic residual stress mappings were performed over different types of bucklings using Raman micro-spectroscopy and synchrotron micro-diffraction. A very good agreement is found at macro- and microscales between the residual stress values obtained with both techniques, giving confidence on the reliability of the measurements. In addition, relevant structural information at the interface between the metallic substrate and the oxide layer was collected by micro-diffraction, a non-destructive technique that allows mapping through the oxide layer, and both the grain size and the crystallographic orientation of the supporting polycrystalline metal located either under a buckling or not were measured.

  9. Direct mass measurements in the light neutron-rich region using a combined energy and time-of-flight technique

    Pillai, C.; Swenson, L.W.; Vieira, D.J.; Butler, G.W.; Wouters, J.M.; Rokni, S.H.; Vaziri, K.; Remsberg, L.P.

    1985-01-01

    This experiment has demonstrated that direct mass measurements can be performed (albeit of low precision in this first attempt) using the M proportional to ET 2 method. This technique has the advantage that many particle-bound nuclei, produced in fragmentation reactions can be measured simultaneously, independent of their N or Z. The main disadvantage of this approach is that both energy and time-of-flight must be measured precisely on an absolute scale. Although some mass walk with N and Z was observed in this experiment, these uncertainties were largely removed by extrapolating the smooth dependence observed for known nuclei which lie closer to the valley of β-stability. Mass measurements for several neutron-rich light nuclei ranging from 17 C to 26 Ne have been performed. In all cases these measurements agree with the latest mass compilation of Wapstra and Audi. The masses of 20 N and 24 F have been determined for the first time

  10. When combined X-ray and polarized neutron diffraction data challenge high-level calculations: spin-resolved electron density of an organic radical.

    Voufack, Ariste Bolivard; Claiser, Nicolas; Lecomte, Claude; Pillet, Sébastien; Pontillon, Yves; Gillon, Béatrice; Yan, Zeyin; Gillet, Jean Michel; Marazzi, Marco; Genoni, Alessandro; Souhassou, Mohamed

    2017-08-01

    Joint refinement of X-ray and polarized neutron diffraction data has been carried out in order to determine charge and spin density distributions simultaneously in the nitronyl nitroxide (NN) free radical Nit(SMe)Ph. For comparison purposes, density functional theory (DFT) and complete active-space self-consistent field (CASSCF) theoretical calculations were also performed. Experimentally derived charge and spin densities show significant differences between the two NO groups of the NN function that are not observed from DFT theoretical calculations. On the contrary, CASSCF calculations exhibit the same fine details as observed in spin-resolved joint refinement and a clear asymmetry between the two NO groups.

  11. Effectiveness of cognitive behavioral therapy integrated with systematic desensitization, cognitive behavioral therapy combined with eye movement desensitization and reprocessing therapy, and cognitive behavioral therapy combined with virtual reality exposure therapy methods in the treatment of flight anxiety: a randomized trial.

    Triscari, Maria Teresa; Faraci, Palmira; Catalisano, Dario; D'Angelo, Valerio; Urso, Viviana

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of the research was to compare the effectiveness of the following treatment methods for fear of flying: cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) integrated with systematic desensitization, CBT combined with eye movement desensitization and reprocessing therapy, and CBT combined with virtual reality exposure therapy. Overall, our findings have proven the efficacy of all interventions in reducing fear of flying in a pre- to post-treatment comparison. All groups showed a decrease in flight anxiety, suggesting the efficiency of all three treatments in reducing self-report measures of fear of flying. In particular, our results indicated significant improvements for the treated patients using all the treatment programs, as shown not only by test scores but also by participation in the post-treatment flight. Nevertheless, outcome measures maintained a significant effect at a 1-year follow-up. In conclusion, combining CBT with both the application of eye movement desensitization and reprocessing treatment and the virtual stimuli used to expose patients with aerophobia seemed as efficient as traditional cognitive behavioral treatments integrated with systematic desensitization.

  12. A combined temperature-dependent electron and single-crystal X-ray diffraction study of the fresnoite compound Rb2V4+V25+O8

    Withers, R.L.; Hoeche, Thomas; Liu Yun; Esmaeilzadeh, Saeid; Keding, Ralf; Sales, Brian

    2004-01-01

    High-purity Rb 2 V 3 O 8 has been grown and temperature-dependent electron and single-crystal X-ray diffraction used to carefully investigate its fresnoite-type reciprocal lattice. In contrast to other recently investigated representatives of the fresnoite family of compounds, Rb 2 V 3 O 8 is not incommensurately modulated with an incommensurate basal plane primary modulation wave vector given by q∼0.3 *. A careful low-temperature electron diffraction study has, however, revealed the existence of weak incommensurate satellite reflections characterized by the primitive primary modulation wave vector q 1 ∼0.16c*. The reciprocal space positioning of these incommensurate satellite reflections, the overall (3+1)-d superspace group symmetry, as well as the shapes of the refined displacement ellipsoids determined from single-crystal XRD refinement, are all consistent with their arising from a distinct type of condensed rigid unit modes (RUMs) of distortion of the Rb 2 V 3 O 8 parent structure

  13. A high-efficiency spin-resolved photoemission spectrometer combining time-of-flight spectroscopy with exchange-scattering polarimetry

    Jozwiak, Chris M.; Graff, Jeff; Lebedev, Gennadi; Andresen, Nord; Schmid, Andreas; Fedorov, Alexei; El Gabaly, Farid; Wan, Weishi; Lanzara, Alessandra; Hussain, Zahid

    2010-04-13

    We describe a spin-resolved electron spectrometer capable of uniquely efficient and high energy resolution measurements. Spin analysis is obtained through polarimetry based on low-energy exchange scattering from a ferromagnetic thin-film target. This approach can achieve a similar analyzing power (Sherman function) as state-of-the-art Mott scattering polarimeters, but with as much as 100 times improved efficiency due to increased reflectivity. Performance is further enhanced by integrating the polarimeter into a time-of-flight (TOF) based energy analysis scheme with a precise and flexible electrostatic lens system. The parallel acquisition of a range of electron kinetic energies afforded by the TOF approach results in an order of magnitude (or more) increase in efficiency compared to hemispherical analyzers. The lens system additionally features a 90 degrees bandpass filter, which by removing unwanted parts of the photoelectron distribution allows the TOF technique to be performed at low electron drift energy and high energy resolution within a wide range of experimental parameters. The spectrometer is ideally suited for high-resolution spin- and angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (spin-ARPES), and initial results are shown. The TOF approach makes the spectrometer especially ideal for time-resolved spin-ARPES experiments.

  14. Intergrown new zeolite beta polymorphs with interconnected 12-ring channels solved by combining electron crystallography and single-crystal X-ray diffraction

    Yu, Zhengbao; Han, Yu; Zhao, Lan; Huang, Shiliang; Zheng, Qiyu; Lin, Shuangzheng; Cõ rdova, Armando C.; Zou, Xiaodong; Sun, Junliang

    2012-01-01

    Two new polymorphs of zeolite beta, denoted as SU-78A and SU-78B, were synthesized by employing dicyclohexylammonium hydroxides as organic structure-directing agents. The structure was solved by combining transmission electron microscopy and single

  15. Developments in diffraction databases

    Jenkins, R.

    1999-01-01

    Full text: There are a number of databases available to the diffraction community. Two of the more important of these are the Powder Diffraction File (PDF) maintained by the International Centre for Diffraction Data (ICDD), and the Inorganic Crystal Structure Database (ICSD) maintained by Fachsinformationzentrum (FIZ, Karlsruhe). In application, the PDF has been used as an indispensable tool in phase identification and identification of unknowns. The ICSD database has extensive and explicit reference to the structures of compounds: atomic coordinates, space group and even thermal vibration parameters. A similar database, but for organic compounds, is maintained by the Cambridge Crystallographic Data Centre. These databases are often used as independent sources of information. However, little thought has been given on how to exploit the combined properties of structural database tools. A recently completed agreement between ICDD and FIZ, plus ICDD and Cambridge, provides a first step in complementary use of the PDF and the ICSD databases. The focus of this paper (as indicated below) is to examine ways of exploiting the combined properties of both databases. In 1996, there were approximately 76,000 entries in the PDF and approximately 43,000 entries in the ICSD database. The ICSD database has now been used to calculate entries in the PDF. Thus, to derive d-spacing and peak intensity data requires the synthesis of full diffraction patterns, i.e., we use the structural data in the ICSD database and then add instrumental resolution information. The combined data from PDF and ICSD can be effectively used in many ways. For example, we can calculate PDF data for an ideally random crystal distribution and also in the absence of preferred orientation. Again, we can use systematic studies of intermediate members in solid solutions series to help produce reliable quantitative phase analyses. In some cases, we can study how solid solution properties vary with composition and

  16. Rapid determination of trace nitrophenolic organics in water by combining solid-phase extraction with surface-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry.

    Chen, Y C; Shiea, J; Sunner, J

    2000-01-01

    A rapid technique for the screening of trace compounds in water by combining solid-phase extraction (SPE) with activated carbon surface-assisted laser desorption/ionization (SALDI) time-of-flight mass spectrometry is demonstrated. Activated carbon is used both as the sorbent in SPE and as the solid in the SALDI matrix system. This eliminates the need for an SPE elution process. After the analytes have been adsorbed on the surfaces of the activated carbon during SPE extraction, the activated carbon is directly mixed with the SALDI liquid and mass spectrometric analysis is performed. Trace phenolic compounds in water were used to demonstrate the effectiveness of the method. The detection limit for these compounds is in the ppb to ppt range. Copyright 2000 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  17. Miracle Flights

    ... a Flight Get Involved Events Shop Miles Contact Miracle Flights Blog Giving Tuesday 800-359-1711 Thousands of children have been saved, but we still have miles to go. Request a Flight Click Here to Donate - Your ...

  18. Combined Synchrotron X-ray Diffraction and Digital Image Correlation Technique for Measurement of Austenite Transformation with Strain in TRIP-assisted Steels

    Poling, Whitney A.; Savic, Vesna; Hector, Louis G.; Sachdev, Anil K.; Hu, Xiaohua; Devaraj, Arun; Abu-Farha, Fadi

    2016-04-05

    The strain-induced, diffusionless shear transformation of retained austenite to martensite during straining of transformation induced plasticity (TRIP) assisted steels increases strain hardening and delays necking and fracture leading to exceptional ductility and strength, which are attractive for automotive applications. A novel technique that provides the retained austenite volume fraction variation with strain in TRIP-assisted steels with improved precision is presented. Digital images of the gauge section of tensile specimens were first recorded up to selected plastic strains with a stereo digital image correlation (DIC) system. The austenite volume fraction was measured by synchrotron X-ray diffraction from small squares cut from the gage section. Strain fields in the squares were then computed by localizing the strain measurement to the corresponding region of a given square during DIC post-processing of the images recorded during tensile testing. Results obtained for a QP980 steel are used to study the influence of initial volume fraction of austenite and the austenite transformation with strain on tensile mechanical behavior.

  19. Void and Phase Evolution during the Processing of Bi-2212 Superconducting Wires monitored by combined fast Synchrotron Micro-tomography and X-Ray Diffraction

    Scheuerlein, C; Scheel, M; Jiang, J; Kametani, F; Malagoli, A; Hellstrom, E E; Larbalestier, D C

    2011-01-01

    Recent study of the current-limiting mechanisms in Bi-2212 round wires has suggested that agglomeration of the residual Bi-2212 powder porosity into bubbles of filament-diameter size occurs on melting the Bi-2212 filaments. These pores introduce a major obstacle to current flow, which greatly reduces the critical current density (Jc). Here we present an in situ non-destructive tomographic and diffraction study of the changes occurring during the heat treatment of wires and starting powder, as well as a room temperature study of ex situ processed wires. The in situ through-process study shows that the agglomeration of residual porosity is more complex than previously seen. Filament changes start with coalescence of the quasi-uniform and finely divided powder porosity into lens-shaped defects at about 850 0C when the Bi-2201 impurity phase decomposes before the Bi-2212 starts to melt. These lens-shaped voids grow to bubbles of a filament diameter on melting of the Bi-2212 and continue to lengthen and then to ag...

  20. Ferromagnetic interaction in an asymmetric end-to-end azido double-bridged copper(II) dinuclear complex: a combined structure, magnetic, polarized neutron diffraction and theoretical study.

    Aronica, Christophe; Jeanneau, Erwann; El Moll, Hani; Luneau, Dominique; Gillon, Béatrice; Goujon, Antoine; Cousson, Alain; Carvajal, Maria Angels; Robert, Vincent

    2007-01-01

    A new end-to-end azido double-bridged copper(II) complex [Cu(2)L(2)(N(3))2] (1) was synthesized and characterized (L=1,1,1-trifluoro-7-(dimethylamino)-4-methyl-5-aza-3-hepten-2-onato). Despite the rather long Cu-Cu distance (5.105(1) A), the magnetic interaction is ferromagnetic with J= +16 cm(-1) (H=-JS(1)S(2)), a value that has been confirmed by DFT and high-level correlated ab initio calculations. The spin distribution was studied by using the results from polarized neutron diffraction. This is the first such study on an end-to-end system. The experimental spin density was found to be localized mainly on the copper(II) ions, with a small degree of delocalization on the ligand (L) and terminal azido nitrogens. There was zero delocalization on the central nitrogen, in agreement with DFT calculations. Such a picture corresponds to an important contribution of the d(x2-y2) orbital and a small population of the d(z2) orbital, in agreement with our calculations. Based on a correlated wavefunction analysis, the ferromagnetic behavior results from a dominant double spin polarization contribution and vanishingly small ionic forms.

  1. Status of the Neutron Imaging and Diffraction Instrument IMAT

    Kockelmann, Winfried; Burca, Genoveva; Kelleher, Joe F.; Kabra, Saurabh; Zhang, Shu-Yan; Rhodes, Nigel J.; Schooneveld, Erik M.; Sykora, Jeff; Pooley, Daniel E.; Nightingale, Jim B.; Aliotta, Francesco; Ponterio, Rosa C.; Salvato, Gabriele; Tresoldi, Dario; Vasi, Cirino; McPhate, Jason B.; Tremsin, Anton S.

    A cold neutron imaging and diffraction instrument, IMAT, is currently being constructed at the ISIS second target station. IMAT will capitalize on time-of-flight transmission and diffraction techniques available at a pulsed neutron source. Analytical techniques will include neutron radiography, neutron tomography, energy-selective neutron imaging, and spatially resolved diffraction scans for residual strain and texture determination. Commissioning of the instrument will start in 2015, with time-resolving imaging detectors and two diffraction detector prototype modules. IMAT will be operated as a user facility for material science applications and will be open for developments of time-of-flight imaging methods.

  2. Ongoing Analyses of Rocket Based Combined Cycle Engines by the Applied Fluid Dynamics Analysis Group at Marshall Space Flight Center

    Ruf, Joseph H.; Holt, James B.; Canabal, Francisco

    2001-01-01

    This paper presents the status of analyses on three Rocket Based Combined Cycle (RBCC) configurations underway in the Applied Fluid Dynamics Analysis Group (TD64). TD64 is performing computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analysis on a Penn State RBCC test rig, the proposed Draco axisymmetric RBCC engine and the Trailblazer engine. The intent of the analysis on the Penn State test rig is to benchmark the Finite Difference Navier Stokes (FDNS) code for ejector mode fluid dynamics. The Draco analysis was a trade study to determine the ejector mode performance as a function of three engine design variables. The Trailblazer analysis is to evaluate the nozzle performance in scramjet mode. Results to date of each analysis are presented.

  3. Ongoing Analysis of Rocket Based Combined Cycle Engines by the Applied Fluid Dynamics Analysis Group at Marshall Space Flight Center

    Ruf, Joseph; Holt, James B.; Canabal, Francisco

    1999-01-01

    This paper presents the status of analyses on three Rocket Based Combined Cycle configurations underway in the Applied Fluid Dynamics Analysis Group (TD64). TD64 is performing computational fluid dynamics analysis on a Penn State RBCC test rig, the proposed Draco axisymmetric RBCC engine and the Trailblazer engine. The intent of the analysis on the Penn State test rig is to benchmark the Finite Difference Navier Stokes code for ejector mode fluid dynamics. The Draco engine analysis is a trade study to determine the ejector mode performance as a function of three engine design variables. The Trailblazer analysis is to evaluate the nozzle performance in scramjet mode. Results to date of each analysis are presented.

  4. On the Habitability of Desert Varnish: A Combined Study by Micro-Raman Spectroscopy, X-ray Diffraction, and Methylated Pyrolysis-Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry.

    Malherbe, C; Hutchinson, I B; Ingley, R; Boom, A; Carr, A S; Edwards, H; Vertruyen, B; Gilbert, B; Eppe, G

    2017-11-01

    In 2020, the ESA ExoMars and NASA Mars 2020 missions will be launched to Mars to search for evidence of past and present life. In preparation for these missions, terrestrial analog samples of rock formations on Mars are studied in detail in order to optimize the scientific information that the analytical instrumentation will return. Desert varnishes are thin mineral coatings found on rocks in arid and semi-arid environments on Earth that are recognized as analog samples. During the formation of desert varnishes (which takes many hundreds of years), organic matter is incorporated, and microorganisms may also play an active role in the formation process. During this study, four complementary analytical techniques proposed for Mars missions (X-ray diffraction [XRD], Raman spectroscopy, elemental analysis, and pyrolysis-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry [Py-GC-MS]) were used to interrogate samples of desert varnish and describe their capacity to sustain life under extreme scenarios. For the first time, both the geochemistry and the organic compounds associated with desert varnish are described with the use of identical sets of samples. XRD and Raman spectroscopy measurements were used to nondestructively interrogate the mineralogy of the samples. In addition, the use of Raman spectroscopy instruments enabled the detection of β-carotene, a highly Raman-active biomarker. The content and the nature of the organic material in the samples were further investigated with elemental analysis and methylated Py-GC-MS, and a bacterial origin was determined to be likely. In the context of planetary exploration, we describe the habitable nature of desert varnish based on the biogeochemical composition of the samples. Possible interference of the geological substrate on the detectability of pyrolysis products is also suggested. Key Words: Desert varnish-Habitability-Raman spectroscopy-Py-GC-MS-XRD-ExoMars-Planetary science. Astrobiology 17, 1123-1137.

  5. On the Habitability of Desert Varnish: A Combined Study by Micro-Raman Spectroscopy, X-ray Diffraction, and Methylated Pyrolysis-Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry

    Malherbe, C.; Hutchinson, I. B.; Ingley, R.; Boom, A.; Carr, A. S.; Edwards, H.; Vertruyen, B.; Gilbert, B.; Eppe, G.

    2017-11-01

    In 2020, the ESA ExoMars and NASA Mars 2020 missions will be launched to Mars to search for evidence of past and present life. In preparation for these missions, terrestrial analog samples of rock formations on Mars are studied in detail in order to optimize the scientific information that the analytical instrumentation will return. Desert varnishes are thin mineral coatings found on rocks in arid and semi-arid environments on Earth that are recognized as analog samples. During the formation of desert varnishes (which takes many hundreds of years), organic matter is incorporated, and microorganisms may also play an active role in the formation process. During this study, four complementary analytical techniques proposed for Mars missions (X-ray diffraction [XRD], Raman spectroscopy, elemental analysis, and pyrolysis-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry [Py-GC-MS]) were used to interrogate samples of desert varnish and describe their capacity to sustain life under extreme scenarios. For the first time, both the geochemistry and the organic compounds associated with desert varnish are described with the use of identical sets of samples. XRD and Raman spectroscopy measurements were used to nondestructively interrogate the mineralogy of the samples. In addition, the use of Raman spectroscopy instruments enabled the detection of β-carotene, a highly Raman-active biomarker. The content and the nature of the organic material in the samples were further investigated with elemental analysis and methylated Py-GC-MS, and a bacterial origin was determined to be likely. In the context of planetary exploration, we describe the habitable nature of desert varnish based on the biogeochemical composition of the samples. Possible interference of the geological substrate on the detectability of pyrolysis products is also suggested.

  6. Combining selective sequential extractions, X-Ray Absorption Spectroscopy, and X-Ray Powder Diffraction for Cu (II speciation in soil and mineral phases

    Tatiana Minkina

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Interaction of Cu (II ions with the matrix of soil and mineral phases of layered silicates was assessed by the Miller method of selective sequential fractionation and a set of synchrotron X-ray methods, including X-ray powder diffraction (XRD and X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XANES. It was shown that the input of Cu into Calcic Chernozem in the form of monoxide (CuO and salt (Cu(NO32 affected the transformation of Cu compounds and their affinity for metal-bearing phases. It was found that the contamination of soil with a soluble Cu(II salt increased the bioavailability of the metal and the role of organic matter and Fe oxides in the fixation and retention of Cu. During the incubation of soil with Cu monoxide, the content of the metal in the residual fractions increased, which was related to the possible entry of Cu in the form of isomorphic impurities into silicates, as well as to the incomplete dissolution of exogenic compounds at the high level of their input into the soil. A mechanism for the structural transformation of minerals was revealed, which showed that ion exchange processes result in the sorption of Cu (II ions from the saturated solution by active sites on the internal surface of the lattice of dioctahedral aluminosilicates. Surface hydroxyls at the octahedral aluminum atom play the main role. X-ray diagnostics revealed that excess Cu(II ions are removed from the system due to the formation and precipitation of coarsely crystalline Cu(NO3(OH3.

  7. Novel organic NLO material bis(N-phenylbiguanidium(1+)) oxalate - A combined X-ray diffraction, DSC and vibrational spectroscopic study of its unique polymorphism

    Matulková, Irena; Císařová, Ivana; Vaněk, Přemysl; Němec, Petr; Němec, Ivan

    2017-01-01

    Three polymorphic modifications of bis(N-phenylbiguanidium(1+)) oxalate are reported, and their characterization is discussed in this paper. The non-centrosymmetric bis(N-phenylbiguanidium(1+)) oxalate (I), which was obtained from an aqueous solution at 313 K, belongs to the monoclinic space group Cc (a = 6.2560(2) Å, b = 18.6920(3) Å, c = 18.2980(5) Å, β = 96.249(1)°, V = 2127.0(1) Å3, Z = 4, R = 0.0314 for 4738 observed reflections). The centrosymmetric bis(N-phenylbiguanidium(1+)) oxalate (II) was obtained from an aqueous solution at 298 K and belongs to the monoclinic space group P21/n (a = 6.1335(3) Å, b = 11.7862(6) Å, c = 14.5962(8) Å, β = 95.728(2)°, V = 1049.90(9) Å3, Z = 4, R = 0.0420 for 2396 observed reflections). The cooling of the centrosymmetric phase (II) leads to the formation of bis(N-phenylbiguanidium(1+)) oxalate (III) (a = 6.1083(2) Å, b = 11.3178(5) Å, c = 14.9947(5) Å, β = 93.151(2)°, V = 1035.05(8) Å3, Z = 4, R = 0.0345 for 2367 observed reflections and a temperature of 110 K), which also belongs to the monoclinic space group P21/n. The crystal structures of the three characterized phases are generally based on layers of isolated N-phenylbiguanidium(1 +) cations separated by oxalate anions and interconnected with them by several types of N-H...O hydrogen bonds. The observed phases generally differ not only in their crystal packing but also in the lengths and characteristics of their hydrogen bonds. The thermal behaviour of the prepared compounds was studied using the DSC method in the temperature range from 90 K up to a temperature near the melting point of each crystal. The bis(N-phenylbiguanidium(1+)) oxalate (II) crystals exhibit weak reversible thermal effects on the DSC curve at 147 K (heating run). Further investigation of this effect, which was assigned to the isostructural phase transformation, was performed using FTIR, Raman spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction analysis in a wide temperature range.

  8. Diffraction coherence in optics

    Françon, M; Green, L L

    2013-01-01

    Diffraction: Coherence in Optics presents a detailed account of the course on Fraunhofer diffraction phenomena, studied at the Faculty of Science in Paris. The publication first elaborates on Huygens' principle and diffraction phenomena for a monochromatic point source and diffraction by an aperture of simple form. Discussions focus on diffraction at infinity and at a finite distance, simplified expressions for the field, calculation of the path difference, diffraction by a rectangular aperture, narrow slit, and circular aperture, and distribution of luminous flux in the airy spot. The book th

  9. Diffraction and Unitarity

    Dremin, I. M.

    I begin with a tribute to V.N. Gribov and then come to a particular problem which would be of interest for him. His first paper on reggeology was devoted to elastic scatterings of hadrons. Here, using the unitarity relation in combination with experimental data about the elastic scattering in the diffraction cone, I show how the shape and the darkness of the interaction region of colliding protons change with the increase of their energies. In particular, the collisions become fully absorptive at small impact parameters at LHC energies that results in some special features of inelastic processes as well. The possible evolution with increasing energy of the shape from the dark core at the LHC to the fully transparent one at higher energies is discussed. It implies that the terminology of the black disk would be replaced by the black torus.

  10. Spin transitions in La{sub 0.7} Ba{sub 0.3}CoO{sub 3} thin films revealed by combining Raman spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction

    Othmen, Zied; Oueslati, Meherzi [Unité Nanomatériaux et Photonique, Faculty of Sciences of Tunis, Tunis El-Manar University, 2092 Tunis (Tunisia); Copie, Olivier; Gemeiner, Pascale; Dkhil, Brahim [Laboratoire Structures, Propriétés et Modélisation des Solides, Centrale Supélec, CNRS-UMR 8580, Université Paris-Saclay (France); Daoudi, Kais [Unité Nanomatériaux et Photonique, Faculty of Sciences of Tunis, Tunis El-Manar University, 2092 Tunis (Tunisia); Department of Applied Physics and Astronomy, College of Sciences, University of Sharjah, P.O. Box 27272, Sharjah (United Arab Emirates); Boudard, Michel [Univ. Grenoble Alpes, LMGP, F-38000 Grenoble (France)

    2016-07-07

    In cobaltite, the spin states transitions of Co{sup 3+/4+} ions govern the magnetic and electronic conduction properties. These transitions are strain-sensitive and can be varied using external parameters, including temperature, hydrostatic pressure, or chemical stresses through ionic substitutions. In this work, using temperature dependent Raman spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction, the epitaxial strain effects on both structural and vibrational properties of La{sub 0.7} Ba{sub 0.3} CoO{sub 3} (LBCO) cobaltite thin films are investigated. All Raman active phonon modes as well as the structure are found to be strongly affected. Both Raman modes and lattice parameter evolutions show temperature changes correlated with magnetic and electronic transitions properties. Combining Raman spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction appears as a powerful approach to probe the spin transition in thin film cobaltite. Our results provide insight into strong spin-charge-phonon coupling in LBCO thin film. This coupling manifests as vibrational transition with temperature in the Raman spectra near the ferromagnetic spin ordered transition at 220 K.

  11. Phase behavior in diffraction

    Checon, A.

    1983-01-01

    Theoretical formulation of a straight edge diffraction shows a phase difference of π/2 between the incoming and diffracted waves. Experiments using two straight edges do not confirm the π/2 difference but suggest that the incoming wave is in phase with the wave diffracted into the shadowed region of the edge and out of phase by a factor of π with the wave diffracted into the illuminated region. (Author) [pt

  12. Hard diffraction and rapidity gaps

    Brandt, A.

    1995-09-01

    The field of hard diffraction, which studies events with a rapidity gap and a hard scattering, has expanded dramatically recently. A review of new results from CDF, D OE, H1 and ZEUS will be given. These results include diffractive jet production, deep-inelastic scattering in large rapidity gap events, rapidity gaps between high transverse energy jets, and a search for diffractive W-boson production. The combination of these results gives new insight into the exchanged object, believed to be the pomeron. The results axe consistent with factorization and with a hard pomeron that contains both quarks and gluons. There is also evidence for the exchange of a strongly interacting color singlet in high momentum transfer (36 2 ) events

  13. Solid phase extraction in combination with comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography coupled to time-of-flight mass spectrometry for the detailed investigation of volatiles in South African red wines

    Weldegergis, B.T.; Crouch, A.M.; Górecki, T.; Villiers, de A.

    2011-01-01

    Comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography in combination with time-of-flight mass spectrometry (GC × GC–TOFMS) has been applied for the analysis of volatile compounds in three young South African red wines. In spite of the significant benefits offered by GC × GC–TOFMS for the separation and

  14. Neutron diffraction and lattice defects

    Hamaguchi, Yoshikazu

    1974-01-01

    Study on lattice defects by neutron diffraction technique is described. Wave length of neutron wave is longer than that of X-ray, and absorption cross-section is small. Number of defects observed by ESR is up to several defects, and the number studied with electron microscopes is more than 100. Information obtained by neutron diffraction concerns the number of defects between these two ranges. For practical analysis, several probable models are selected from the data of ESR or electron microscopes, and most probable one is determined by calculation. Then, defect concentration is obtained from scattering cross section. It is possible to measure elastic scattering exclusively by neutron diffraction. Minimum detectable concentration estimated is about 0.5% and 10 20 - 10 21 defects per unit volume. A chopper and a time of flight system are used as a measuring system. Cold neutrons are obtained from the neutron sources inserted into reactors. Examples of measurements by using similar equipments to PTNS-I system of Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute are presented. Interstitial concentration in the graphite irradiated by fast neutrons is shown. Defects in irradiated MgO were also investigated by measuring scattering cross section. Study of defects in Ge was made by measuring total cross section, and model analysis was performed in comparison with various models. (Kato, T.)

  15. Structure of magnesium selenate enneahydrate, MgSeO4·9H2O, from 5 to 250 K using neutron time-of-flight Laue diffraction.

    Fortes, A Dominic; Alfè, Dario; Hernández, Eduardo R; Gutmann, Matthias J

    2015-06-01

    The complete structure of MgSeO4·9H2O has been refined from neutron single-crystal diffraction data obtained at 5, 100, 175 and 250 K. It is monoclinic, space group P2₁/c, Z = 4, with unit-cell parameters a = 7.222 (2), b = 10.484 (3), c = 17.327 (4) Å, β = 109.57 (2)°, and V = 1236.1 (6) Å(3) [ρ(calc) = 1770 (1) kg m(-3)] at 5 K. The structure consists of isolated [Mg(H2O)6](2+) octahedra, [SeO4](2-) tetrahedra and three interstitial lattice water molecules, all on sites of symmetry 1. The positions of the H atoms agree well with those inferred on the basis of geometrical considerations in the prior X-ray powder diffraction structure determination: no evidence of orientational disorder of the water molecules is apparent in the temperature range studied. Six of the nine water molecules are hydrogen bonded to one another to form a unique centrosymmetric dodecamer, (H2O)12. Raman spectra have been acquired in the range 170-4000 cm(-1) at 259 and 78 K; ab initio calculations, using density functional theory, have been carried out in order to aid in the analysis of the Raman spectrum as well as providing additional insights into the geometry and thermodynamics of the hydrogen bonds. Complementary information concerning the thermal expansion, crystal morphology and the solubility are also presented.

  16. Explanation and observability of diffraction in time

    Torrontegui, E.; Muga, J. G.; Munoz, J.; Ban, Yue

    2011-01-01

    Diffraction in time (DIT) is a fundamental phenomenon in quantum dynamics due to time-dependent obstacles and slits. It is formally analogous to diffraction of light, and is expected to play an increasing role in the design of coherent matter wave sources, as in the atom laser, to analyze time-of-flight information and emission from ultrafast pulsed excitations, and in applications of coherent matter waves in integrated atom-optical circuits. We demonstrate that DIT emerges robustly in quantum waves emitted by an exponentially decaying source and provide a simple explanation of the phenomenon, as an interference of two characteristic velocities. This allows for its controllability and optimization.

  17. Diffraction at TOTEM

    Giani, S; Niewiadomski, H; Antchev, G; Aspell, P; Avati, V; Bagliesi, M G; Berardi, V; Berretti, M; Besta, M; Bozzo, M; Brücken, E; Buzzo, A; Cafagna, F; Calicchio, M; Catanesi, M G

    2010-01-01

    The primary objective of the TOTEM experiment at the LHC is the measurement of the total proton-proton cross section with the luminosity-independent method and the study of elastic proton-proton cross-section over a wide |t|-range. In addition TOTEM also performs a comprehensive study of diffraction, spanning from cross-section measurements of individual diffractive processes to the analysis of their event topologies. Hard diffraction will be studied in collaboration with CMS taking advantage...

  18. Diffraction at TOTEM

    Antchev, G.; Aspell, P.; Avati, V.; Bagliesi, M.G.; Berardi, V.; Berretti, M.; Bottigli, U.; Bozzo, M.; Brucken, E.; Buzzo, A.; Cafagna, F.; Calicchio, M.; Catanesi, M.G.; Catastini, P.L.; Cecchi, R.

    2008-01-01

    The TOTEM experiment at the LHC measures the total proton-proton cross section with the luminosity-independent method and the elastic proton-proton cross-section over a wide |t|-range. It also performs a comprehensive study of diffraction, spanning from cross-section measurements of individual diffractive processes to the analysis of their event topologies. Hard diffraction will be studied in collaboration with CMS taking advantage of the large common rapidity coverage for charged and neutral...

  19. Trace metal analysis in arctic aerosols by an inductively coupled plasma-time of flight-mass spectrometer combined with an inductively heated vaporizer

    Luedke, Christian; Skole, Jochen; Taubner, Kerstin; Kriews, Michael

    2005-01-01

    Two newly developed instruments were combined to analyze the trace metal content in size separated arctic aerosols during the measurement campaign ASTAR 2004 (Arctic Study of Tropospheric Aerosols, Clouds and Radiation 2004) at Spitsbergen in May-June 2004. The aim of this extensive aerosol measurement campaign was to obtain a database for model-calculations of arctic aerosol, which play an important role in the global climate change. The ASTAR project was centered on two aircraft measurement campaigns, scheduled from 2004 to 2005, addressing both aerosol and cloud measurements, combined with ground-based and satellite observations. In the present paper one example for the analysis of ground-based aerosol particles is described. The sampling of aerosol particles was performed in a well-known manner by impaction of the particles on cleaned graphite targets. By means of a cascade impactor eight size classes between 0.35 and 16.6 μm aerodynamic diameters were separated. To analyze the metal content in the aerosol particles the targets were rapidly heated up to 2700 deg. C in an inductively heated vaporizer system (IHVS). An argon flow transports the vaporized sample material into the inductively coupled plasma (ICP) used as ionization source for the time of flight-mass spectrometer (TOF-MS). The simultaneous extraction of the ions from the plasma, as realized in the TOF instrument, allows to obtain the full mass spectrum of the sample during the vaporization pulse without any limitation in the number of elements detected. With optimized experimental parameters the element content in arctic aerosol particles was determined in a mass range between 7 Li and 209 Bi. Comparing the size distribution of the elemental content of the aerosol particles, two different meteorological situations were verified. For calibration acidified reference solutions were placed on the cleaned target inside the IHVS. The limits of detection (LOD) for the element mass on the target range

  20. In-situ time-of-flight neutron diffraction study of the structure evolution of electrode materials in a commercial battery with LiNi0.8Co0.15Al0.05O2 cathode

    Bobrikov, I. A.; Samoylova, N. Yu.; Sumnikov, S. V.; Ivanshina, O. Yu.; Vasin, R. N.; Beskrovnyi, A. I.; Balagurov, A. M.

    2017-12-01

    A commercial lithium-ion battery with LiNi0.8Co0.15Al0.05O2 (NCA) cathode has been studied in situ using high-intensity and high-resolution neutron diffraction. Structure and phase composition of the battery electrodes have been probed during charge-discharge in different cycling modes. The dependence of the anode composition on the charge rate has been determined quantitatively. Different kinetics of Li (de)intercalation in the graphite anode during charge/discharge process have been observed. Phase separation of the cathode material has not been detected in whole voltage range. Non-linear dependencies of the unit cell parameters, atomic and layer spacing on the lithium content in the cathode have been observed. Measured dependencies of interatomic spacing and interlayer spacing, and unit cell parameters of the cathode structure on the lithium content could be qualitatively explained by several factors, such as variations of oxidation state of cation in oxygen octahedra, Coulomb repulsion of oxygen layers, changes of average effective charge of oxygen layers and van der Waals interactions between MeO2-layers at high level of the NCA delithiation.

  1. The use of combined three-dimensional electron backscatter diffraction and energy dispersive X-ray analysis to assess the characteristics of the gamma/gamma-prime microstructure in alloy 720Li™

    Child, D.J.; West, G.D.; Thomson, R.C.

    2012-01-01

    Multiple three-dimensional reconstructions of a γ/γ′ phase structure in Alloy 720Li have been carried out by employing a serial milling technique with simultaneous electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) and energy dispersive x-ray (EDX) analysis data collection. Combining EBSD data with EDX is critical in obtaining maps to distinguish between the chemically differing, but crystallographically similar γ and γ′ phases present in the alloy studied. EDX is shown to allow the differentiation of γ and γ′ phases, with EBSD providing increased grain shape accuracy. The combination of data sources also allowed identification of coherent γ/γ′ phase interfaces that would not be identified using solely EBSD or EDX. The study identifies a region of grain banding within the alloy, which provides the basis for a three-dimensional comparison and discussion of γ′ phase size between coarse and fine grain regions, whilst also identifying coherent γ′ phase interfaces, possible only using both EDX and EBSD systems simultaneously. The majority of the γ′ phase lies in the range of 1–10 μm in non-banded regions, with a detectable particle size limit of 500 nm being established. The validity of the reconstruction has been demonstrated using an electron interaction volumes model, and an assessment of the validity of EBSD and EDX data sources is discussed showing γ′ phase connectivity in all dimensions. -- Highlights: ► Use of combined EBSD/EDX for the 3D analysis of gamma prime in a Ni-based alloy. ► Assessment of 3D reconstruction accuracy using CASINO. ► Observation and validation of gamma prime phase connectivity throughout the alloy. ► Identification and characterisation of grain banding in gamma prime. ► Distinction of phase coherency between gamma and gamma prime.

  2. The use of combined three-dimensional electron backscatter diffraction and energy dispersive X-ray analysis to assess the characteristics of the gamma/gamma-prime microstructure in alloy 720Li Trade-Mark-Sign

    Child, D.J., E-mail: d.child@lboro.ac.uk [Department of Materials, Loughborough University, Loughborough, Leicestershire, LE11 3TU (United Kingdom); West, G.D., E-mail: g.west@lboro.ac.uk [Department of Materials, Loughborough University, Loughborough, Leicestershire, LE11 3TU (United Kingdom); Thomson, R.C., E-mail: r.c.thomson@lboro.ac.uk [Department of Materials, Loughborough University, Loughborough, Leicestershire, LE11 3TU (United Kingdom)

    2012-03-15

    Multiple three-dimensional reconstructions of a {gamma}/{gamma} Prime phase structure in Alloy 720Li have been carried out by employing a serial milling technique with simultaneous electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) and energy dispersive x-ray (EDX) analysis data collection. Combining EBSD data with EDX is critical in obtaining maps to distinguish between the chemically differing, but crystallographically similar {gamma} and {gamma} Prime phases present in the alloy studied. EDX is shown to allow the differentiation of {gamma} and {gamma} Prime phases, with EBSD providing increased grain shape accuracy. The combination of data sources also allowed identification of coherent {gamma}/{gamma} Prime phase interfaces that would not be identified using solely EBSD or EDX. The study identifies a region of grain banding within the alloy, which provides the basis for a three-dimensional comparison and discussion of {gamma} Prime phase size between coarse and fine grain regions, whilst also identifying coherent {gamma} Prime phase interfaces, possible only using both EDX and EBSD systems simultaneously. The majority of the {gamma} Prime phase lies in the range of 1-10 {mu}m in non-banded regions, with a detectable particle size limit of 500 nm being established. The validity of the reconstruction has been demonstrated using an electron interaction volumes model, and an assessment of the validity of EBSD and EDX data sources is discussed showing {gamma} Prime phase connectivity in all dimensions. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Use of combined EBSD/EDX for the 3D analysis of gamma prime in a Ni-based alloy. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Assessment of 3D reconstruction accuracy using CASINO. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Observation and validation of gamma prime phase connectivity throughout the alloy. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Identification and characterisation of grain banding in gamma prime. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Distinction of phase coherency

  3. Observables of QCD diffraction

    Mieskolainen, Mikael; Orava, Risto

    2017-03-01

    A new combinatorial vector space measurement model is introduced for soft QCD diffraction. The model independent mathematical construction resolves experimental complications; the theoretical framework of the approach includes the Good-Walker view of diffraction, Regge phenomenology together with AGK cutting rules and random fluctuations.

  4. Borehole radar diffraction tomography

    Cho, Seong Jun; Kim, Jung Ho; Yi, Myeong Jong; Chung, Seung Hwan; Lee, Hee Il [Korea Institute of Geology Mining and Materials, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1997-12-01

    Tomography is widely used as imaging method for determining subsurface structure. Among the reconstruction algorithms for tomographic imaging, travel time tomography is almost applied to imaging subsurface. But isolated small body comparable with the wavelength could not be well recognized by travel time tomography. Other tomographic method are need to improve the imaging process. In the study of this year, diffraction tomography was investigated. The theory for diffraction tomography is based on the 1st-order Born approximation. Multisource holography, which is similar to Kirchihoff migration, is compared with diffraction tomography. To improve 1st-order Born diffraction tomography, two kinds of filter designed from multisource holography and 2-D green function, respectively, applied on the reconstructed image. The algorithm was tested for the numerical modeling data of which algorithm consists of the analytic computation of radar signal in transmitter and receiver regions and 2-D FDM scheme for the propagation of electromagnetic waves in media. The air-filled cavity model to show a typical diffraction pattern was applied to diffraction tomography imaging, and the result shows accurate location and area of cavity. But the calculated object function is not well matched the real object function, because the air-filled cavity model is not satisfied week scattered inhomogeneity for 1st born approximation, and the error term is included in estimating source wavelet from received signals. In spite of the object function error, the diffraction tomography assist for interpretation of subsurface as if conducted with travel time tomography. And the fracture model was tested, 1st born diffraction tomographic image is poor because of limited view angle coverage and violation of week scatter assumption, but the filtered image resolve the fracture somewhat better. The tested diffraction tomography image confirms effectiveness of filter for enhancing resolution. (author). 14

  5. Non-diffractive waves

    Hernandez-Figueroa, Hugo E; Recami, Erasmo

    2013-01-01

    This continuation and extension of the successful book ""Localized Waves"" by the same editors brings together leading researchers in non-diffractive waves to cover the most important results in their field and as such is the first to present the current state.The well-balanced presentation of theory and experiments guides readers through the background of different types of non-diffractive waves, their generation, propagation, and possible applications. The authors include a historical account of the development of the field, and cover different types of non-diffractive waves, including Airy

  6. A new bridge technique for neutron tomography and diffraction measurements

    Burca, G.; James, J.A.; Kockelmann, W.; Fitzpatrick, M.E.; Zhang, S.Y.; Hovind, J.; Langh, R. van

    2011-01-01

    An attractive feature of neutron techniques is the ability to identify hidden materials and structures inside engineering components and objects of art and archaeology. Bearing this in mind we are investigating a new technique, 'Tomography Driven Diffraction' (TDD), that exploits tomography data to guide diffraction experiments on samples with complex structures and shapes. The technique can be used utilising combinations of individual tomography and diffraction instruments, such as NEUTRA (PSI, CH) and ENGIN-X (ISIS, UK), but is also suitable for new combined imaging and diffraction instruments such as the JEEP synchrotron engineering instrument (DIAMOND, UK) and the proposed IMAT neutron imaging and diffraction instrument (ISIS, UK).

  7. Mineralogical applications of electron diffraction. 1. Theory and techniques

    Ross, Malcolm; Christ, C.L.

    1958-01-01

    The small wavelengths used in electron-diffraction experiments and the thinness of the crystals necessary for the transmission of the electron beam combine to require a somewhat different diffraction geometry for the interpretation of electron-diffraction patterns than is used in the interpretation of X-ray diffraction patterns. This geometry, based on the reciprocal lattice concept and geometrical construction of Ewald, needed for the interpretation.

  8. High energy diffraction

    Berger, C.

    1995-11-01

    Recent experiments on total hadronic cross sections are reviewed together with results on photo- and electroproduction of vector mesons. New data on diffractive deep inelastic scattering shed light on the nature of the pomeron. (orig.)

  9. Diffraction at TOTEM

    Antchev, G.; Avati, V.; Bagliesi, M.G.; Berardi, V.; Berretti, M.; Bottigli, U.; Bozzo, M.; Brucken, E.; Buzzo, A.; Cafagna, F.; Calicchio, M.; Catanesi, M.G.; Catastini, P.L.; Cecchi, R.; Ciocci, M.A.; Deile, M.; Dimovasili, E.; Eggert, K.; Eremin, V.; Ferro, F.; Garcia, F.; Giani, S.; Greco, V.; Heino, J.; Hilden, T.; Kaspar, J.; Kopal, J.; Kundrat, V.; Kurvinen, K.; Lami, S.; Latino, G.; Lauhakangas, R.; Lippmaa, E.; Lokajicek, M.; Lo Vetere, M.; Lucas Rodriguez, F.; Macri, M.; Magazzu, G.; Meucci, M.; Minutoli, S.; Niewiadomski, H.; Noschis, E.; Notarnicola, G.; Oliveri, E.; Oljemark, F.; Orava, R.; Oriunno, M.; Osterberg, K.; Palazzi, P.; Pedreschi, E.; Petajajarvi, J.; Quinto, M.; Radermacher, E.; Radicioni, E.; Ravotti, F.; Rella, G.; Robutti, E.; Ropelewski, L.; Ruggiero, G.; Rummel, A.; Saarikko, H.; Sanguinetti, G.; Santroni, A.; Scribano, A.; Sette, G.; Snoeys, W.; Spinella, F.; Squillacioti, P.; Ster, A.; Taylor, C.; Trummal, A.; Turini, N.; Whitmore, J.; Wu, J.

    2009-01-01

    The TOTEM experiment at the LHC measures the total proton-proton cross section with the luminosity-independent method and the elastic proton-proton cross-section over a wide |t|-range. It also performs a comprehensive study of diffraction, spanning from cross-section measurements of individual diffractive processes to the analysis of their event topologies. Hard diffraction will be studied in collaboration with CMS taking advantage of the large common rapidity coverage for charged and neutral particle detection and the large variety of trigger possibilities even at large luminosities. TOTEM will take data under all LHC beam conditions including standard high luminosity runs to maximize its physics reach. This contribution describes the main features of the TOTEM physics programme including measurements to be made in the early LHC runs. In addition, a novel scheme to extend the diffractive proton acceptance for high luminosity runs by installing proton detectors at IP3 is described.

  10. Diffraction at TOTEM

    Giani, S; Antchev, G; Aspell, P; Avati, V; Bagliesi, M G; Berardi, V; Berretti, M; Besta, M; Bozzo, M; Brücken, E; Buzzo, A; Cafagna, F; Calicchio, M; Catanesi, M G; Cecchi, R; Ciocci, M A; Dadel, P; Deile, M; Dimovasili, E; Eggert, K; Eremin, V; Ferro, F; Fiergolski, A; García, F; Greco, V; Grzanka, L; Heino, J; Hildén, T; Kaspar, J; Kopal, J; Kundrát, V; Kurvinen, K; Lami, S; Latino, G; Lauhakangas, R; Leszko, R; Lippmaa, E; Lokajícek, M; Lo Vetere, M; Lucas Rodriguez, F; Macrí, M; Magazzù, G; Meucci, M; Minutoli, S; Notarnicola, G; Oliveri, E; Oljemark, F; Orava, R; Oriunno, M; Österberg, K; Pedreschi, E; Petäjäjärvi, J; Prochazka, J; Quinto, M; Radermacher, E; Radicioni, E; Ravotti, F; Rella, G; Robutti, E; Ropelewski, L; Rostkowski, M; Ruggiero, G; Rummel, A; Saarikko, H; Sanguinetti, G; Santroni, A; Scribano, A; Sette, G; Snoeys, W; Spinella, F; Ster, A; Taylor, C; Trummal, A; Turini, N; Whitmore, J; Wu, J; Zalewski, M

    2010-01-01

    The primary objective of the TOTEM experiment at the LHC is the measurement of the total proton-proton cross section with the luminosity-independent method and the study of elastic proton-proton cross-section over a wide |t|-range. In addition TOTEM also performs a comprehensive study of diffraction, spanning from cross-section measurements of individual diffractive processes to the analysis of their event topologies. Hard diffraction will be studied in collaboration with CMS taking advantage of the large common rapidity coverage for charged and neutral particle detection and the large variety of trigger possibilities even at large luminosities. TOTEM will take data under all LHC beam conditions including standard high luminosity runs to maximise its physics reach. This contribution describes the main features of the TOTEM diffractive physics programme including measurements to be made in the early LHC runs.

  11. Duality in diffraction dissociations

    Santoro, Alberto.

    1977-01-01

    Diffractive dissociations (aN→a*πN) are naturally explained and a model that accounts for the three-variable correlation (mass-transfer-Jackson angle correlation) is presented. This model takes into account the three possible exchanges: t (pion), u(a*) and s(a) channel exchanger. The physical consequences of the model are: a strong mass-slope correlation due to the zeros of the amplitude, a factorization of diffractive dissociations (factorization of the Pomeron), the possibility of extending this model to double diffractive dissociation and diffraction by nuclei. This model was applied to the NN→NπN reaction. Using the usual parameters of the Deck model, a comparison is made with experiments for all available distributions. the strong slope of the peak at 1400 MeV is naturally explained [fr

  12. DIFFRACTION SYNCHRONIZATION OF LASERS,

    semiconductor lasers while suppressing parasitic generation in the plane of the mirror. The diffraction coupling coefficient of open resonators is calculated, and the stability conditions of the synchronized system is determined.

  13. X-ray diffraction 2 - diffraction principles

    O'Connor, B.

    1999-01-01

    Full text: The computation of powder diffraction intensities is based on the principle that the powder pattern comprises the summation of the intensity contributions from each of the crystallites (or single crystals) in the material. Therefore, it is of value for powder diffractionists to appreciate the form of the expression for calculating single crystal diffraction pattern intensities. This knowledge is especially important for Rietveld analysis practitioners in terms of the (i) mathematics of the method and (ii) retrieving single crystal structure data from the literature. We consider the integrated intensity from a small single crystal being rotated at velocity ω through the Bragg angle θ for reflection (hkl).... I(hkl) = [l o /ω]. [e 4 /m 2 c 4 ]. [λ 3 δV F(hkl) 2 /υ 2 ].[(1+cos 2 2θ)/2sin2θ] where e, m and c are the usual fundamental constants; λ is the x-ray wavelength, δV is the crystallite volume; F(hkl) is the structure factor; υ is the unit cell volume; and (1+cos 2 θ)/2sin2θ] is the Lorentz-polarisation factor for an unpolarised incident beam. The expression does not include a contribution for extinction. The influence of factors λ, δV, F(hkl) and υ on the intensities should be appreciated by powder diffractionists, especially the structure factor, F(hkl), which is responsible for the fingerprint nature of diffraction patterns, such as the rise and fall of intensity from peak to peak. The structure factor expression represents the summation of the scattered waves from each of the j scattering centres (i e atoms) in the unit cell: F(hkl) Σ f j exp[2πi (h.x j +k.y i +l. z i )] T j . Symbol f is the scattering factor (representing the atom-type scattering efficiency); (x, y, z) are the fractional position coordinates of atom j within the unit cell; and T is the thermal vibration factor for the atom given by: T j = 8π 2 2 > sin 2 θ/λ 2 with 2 > being the mean-square vibration amplitude of the atom (assumed to be isotropic). The

  14. Thermal diffuse scattering in angular-dispersive neutron diffraction

    Popa, N.C.; Willis, B.T.M.

    1998-01-01

    The theoretical treatment of one-phonon thermal diffuse scattering (TDS) in single-crystal neutron diffraction at fixed incident wavelength is reanalysed in the light of the analysis given by Popa and Willis [Acta Cryst. (1994), (1997)] for the time-of-flight method. Isotropic propagation of sound with different velocities for the longitudinal and transverse modes is assumed. As in time-of-flight diffraction, there exists, for certain scanning variables, a forbidden range in the one-phonon TDS of slower-than-sound neutrons, and this permits the determination of the sound velocity in the crystal. A fast algorithm is given for the TDS correction of neutron diffraction data collected at a fixed wavelength: this algorithm is similar to that reported earlier for the time-of-flight case. (orig.)

  15. Flight Planning

    1991-01-01

    Seagull Technology, Inc., Sunnyvale, CA, produced a computer program under a Langley Research Center Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) grant called STAFPLAN (Seagull Technology Advanced Flight Plan) that plans optimal trajectory routes for small to medium sized airlines to minimize direct operating costs while complying with various airline operating constraints. STAFPLAN incorporates four input databases, weather, route data, aircraft performance, and flight-specific information (times, payload, crew, fuel cost) to provide the correct amount of fuel optimal cruise altitude, climb and descent points, optimal cruise speed, and flight path.

  16. Mixed-linker UiO-66: structure-property relationships revealed by a combination of high-resolution powder X-ray diffraction and density functional theory calculations.

    Taddei, Marco; Tiana, Davide; Casati, Nicola; van Bokhoven, Jeroen A; Smit, Berend; Ranocchiari, Marco

    2017-01-04

    The use of mixed-linker metal-organic frameworks (MIXMOFs) is one of the most effective strategies to modulate the physical-chemical properties of MOFs without affecting the overall crystal structure. In many instances, MIXMOFs have been recognized as solid solutions, with random distribution of ligands, in agreement with the empirical rule known as Vegard's law. In this work, we have undertaken a study combining high-resolution powder X-ray diffraction (HR-PXRD) and density functional theory (DFT) calculations with the aim of understanding the reasons why UiO-66-based amino- and bromo-functionalized MIXMOFs (MIXUiO-66) undergo cell expansion obeying Vegard's law and how this behaviour is related to their physical-chemical properties. DFT calculations predict that the unit cell in amino-functionalized UiO-66 experiences only minor expansion as a result of steric effects, whereas major modification to the electronic features of the framework leads to weaker metal-linker interaction and consequently to the loss of stability at higher degrees of functionalization. For bromo-functionalized UiO-66, steric repulsion due to the size of bromine yields a large cell expansion, but the electronic features remain very similar to pristine UiO-66, preserving the stability of the framework upon functionalization. MIXUiO-66 obtained by either direct synthesis or by post-synthetic exchange shows Vegard-like behaviour, suggesting that both preparation methods yield solid solutions, but the thermal stability and the textural properties of the post-synthetic exchanged materials do not display a clear dependence on the chemical composition, as observed for the MOFs obtained by direct synthesis.

  17. Effectiveness of cognitive behavioral therapy integrated with systematic desensitization, cognitive behavioral therapy combined with eye movement desensitization and reprocess­ing therapy, and cognitive behavioral therapy combined with virtual reality exposure therapy methods in the treatment of flight anxiety: a randomized trial

    Triscari MT

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Maria Teresa Triscari,1 Palmira Faraci,2 Dario Catalisano,3 Valerio D’Angelo,1 Viviana Urso1 1Laboratory for Psychosomatic Disorders, Local Health Trust, Palermo, Italy; 2Faculty of Human and Social Sciences, University of Enna “Kore”, Enna, Italy; 3Italian Flight Safety Committee, Aeroporto di Fiumicino, Fiumicino (RM, Italy Abstract: The purpose of the research was to compare the effectiveness of the following treatment methods for fear of flying: cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT integrated with systematic desensitization, CBT combined with eye movement desensitization and reprocessing therapy, and CBT combined with virtual reality exposure therapy. Overall, our findings have proven the efficacy of all interventions in reducing fear of flying in a pre- to post-treatment comparison. All groups showed a decrease in flight anxiety, suggesting the efficiency of all three treatments in reducing self-report measures of fear of flying. In particular, our results indicated significant improvements for the treated patients using all the treatment programs, as shown not only by test scores but also by participation in the post-treatment flight. Nevertheless, outcome measures maintained a significant effect at a 1-year follow-up. In conclusion, combining CBT with both the application of eye movement desensitization and reprocessing treatment and the virtual stimuli used to expose patients with aerophobia seemed as efficient as traditional cognitive behavioral treatments integrated with systematic desensitization. Keywords: flight anxiety, fear of flying, aerophobia, cognitive behavioral therapy, EMDR, VRET 

  18. Submicron X-ray diffraction

    MacDowell, Alastair; Celestre, Richard; Tamura, Nobumichi; Spolenak, Ralph; Valek, Bryan; Brown, Walter; Bravman, John; Padmore, Howard; Batterman, Boris; Patel, Jamshed

    2000-01-01

    At the Advanced Light Source in Berkeley the authors have instrumented a beam line that is devoted exclusively to x-ray micro diffraction problems. By micro diffraction they mean those classes of problems in Physics and Materials Science that require x-ray beam sizes in the sub-micron range. The instrument is for instance, capable of probing a sub-micron size volume inside micron sized aluminum metal grains buried under a silicon dioxide insulating layer. The resulting Laue pattern is collected on a large area CCD detector and automatically indexed to yield the grain orientation and deviatoric (distortional) strain tensor of this sub-micron volume. A four-crystal monochromator is then inserted into the beam, which allows monochromatic light to illuminate the same part of the sample. Measurement of diffracted photon energy allows for the determination of d spacings. The combination of white and monochromatic beam measurements allow for the determination of the total strain/stress tensor (6 components) inside each sub-micron sized illuminated volume of the sample

  19. Diffraction Techniques in Structural Biology

    Egli, Martin

    2016-01-01

    A detailed understanding of chemical and biological function and the mechanisms underlying the molecular activities ultimately requires atomic-resolution structural data. Diffraction-based techniques such as single-crystal X-ray crystallography, electron microscopy, and neutron diffraction are well established and they have paved the road to the stunning successes of modern-day structural biology. The major advances achieved in the last 20 years in all aspects of structural research, including sample preparation, crystallization, the construction of synchrotron and spallation sources, phasing approaches, and high-speed computing and visualization, now provide specialists and nonspecialists alike with a steady flow of molecular images of unprecedented detail. The present unit combines a general overview of diffraction methods with a detailed description of the process of a single-crystal X-ray structure determination experiment, from chemical synthesis or expression to phasing and refinement, analysis, and quality control. For novices it may serve as a stepping-stone to more in-depth treatises of the individual topics. Readers relying on structural information for interpreting functional data may find it a useful consumer guide. PMID:27248784

  20. Molecular structure and conformational composition of 1,3-dihydroxyacetone studied by combined analysis of gas-phase electron diffraction data, rotational constants, and results of theoretical calculations. Ideal gas thermodynamic properties of 1,3-dihydroxyacetone.

    Dorofeeva, Olga V; Vogt, Natalja; Vogt, Jürgen; Popik, Mikhail V; Rykov, Anatolii N; Vilkov, Lev V

    2007-07-19

    The molecular structure of 1,3-dihydroxyacetone (DHA) has been studied by gas-phase electron diffraction (GED), combined analysis of GED and microwave (MW) data, ab initio, and density functional theory calculations. The equilibrium re structure of DHA was determined by a joint analysis of the GED data and rotational constants taken from the literature. The anharmonic vibrational corrections to the internuclear distances (re-ra) and to the rotational constants (B(i)e-B(i)0) needed for the estimation of the re structure were calculated from the B3LYP/cc-pVTZ cubic force field. It was found that the experimental data are well reproduced by assuming that DHA consists of a mixture of three conformers. The most stable conformer of C2v symmetry has two hydrogen bonds, whereas the next two lowest energy conformers (Cs and C1 symmetry) have one hydrogen bond and their abundance is about 30% in total. A combined analysis of GED and MW data led to the following equilibrium structural parameters (re) of the most abundant conformer of DHA (the uncertainties in parentheses are 3 times the standard deviations): r(C=O)=1.215(2) A, r(C-C)=1.516(2) A, r(C-O)=1.393(2) A, r(C-H)=1.096(4) A, r(O-H)=0.967(4) A, angleC-C=O=119.9(2) degrees, angleC-C-O=111.0(2) degrees, angleC-C-H=108.2(7) degrees, angleC-O-H=106.5(7) degrees. These structural parameters reproduce the experimental B(i)0 values within 0.05 MHz. The experimental structural parameters are in good agreement with those obtained from theoretical calculations. Ideal gas thermodynamic functions (S degrees (T), C degrees p(T), and H degrees (T)-H degrees (0)) of DHA were calculated on the basis of experimental and theoretical molecular parameters obtained in this work. The enthalpy of formation of DHA, -523+/-4 kJ/mol, was calculated by the atomization procedure using the G3X method.

  1. Diffraction. Single crystal, magnetic

    Heger, G.

    1999-01-01

    The analysis of crystal structure and magnetic ordering is usually based on diffraction phenomena caused by the interaction of matter with X-rays, neutrons, or electrons. Complementary information is achieved due to the different character of X-rays, neutrons and electrons, and hence their different interactions with matter and further practical aspects. X-ray diffraction using conventional laboratory equipment and/or synchrotron installations is the most important method for structure analyses. The purpose of this paper is to discuss special cases, for which, in addition to this indispensable part, neutrons are required to solve structural problems. Even though the huge intensity of modern synchrotron sources allows in principle the study of magnetic X-ray scattering the investigation of magnetic structures is still one of the most important applications of neutron diffraction. (K.A.)

  2. Correlating Atom Probe Crystallographic Measurements with Transmission Kikuchi Diffraction Data.

    Breen, Andrew J; Babinsky, Katharina; Day, Alec C; Eder, K; Oakman, Connor J; Trimby, Patrick W; Primig, Sophie; Cairney, Julie M; Ringer, Simon P

    2017-04-01

    Correlative microscopy approaches offer synergistic solutions to many research problems. One such combination, that has been studied in limited detail, is the use of atom probe tomography (APT) and transmission Kikuchi diffraction (TKD) on the same tip specimen. By combining these two powerful microscopy techniques, the microstructure of important engineering alloys can be studied in greater detail. For the first time, the accuracy of crystallographic measurements made using APT will be independently verified using TKD. Experimental data from two atom probe tips, one a nanocrystalline Al-0.5Ag alloy specimen collected on a straight flight-path atom probe and the other a high purity Mo specimen collected on a reflectron-fitted instrument, will be compared. We find that the average minimum misorientation angle, calculated from calibrated atom probe reconstructions with two different pole combinations, deviate 0.7° and 1.4°, respectively, from the TKD results. The type of atom probe and experimental conditions appear to have some impact on this accuracy and the reconstruction and measurement procedures are likely to contribute further to degradation in angular resolution. The challenges and implications of this correlative approach will also be discussed.

  3. Diffraction in nuclear scattering

    Wojciechowski, H.

    1986-01-01

    The elastic scattering amplitudes for charged and neutral particles have been decomposed into diffractive and refractive parts by splitting the nuclear elastic scattering matrix elements into components responsible for these effects. It has been shown that the pure geometrical diffractive effect which carries no information about the nuclear interaction is always predominant at forward angle of elastic angular distributions. This fact suggests that for strongly absorbed particles only elastic cross section at backward angles, i.e. the refractive cross section, can give us basic information about the central nuclear potential. 12 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab. (author)

  4. Dynamics from diffraction

    Goodwin, Andrew L.; Tucker, Matthew G.; Cope, Elizabeth R.; Dove, Martin T.; Keen, David A.

    2006-01-01

    We explore the possibility that detailed dynamical information might be extracted from powder diffraction data. Our focus is a recently reported technique that employs statistical analysis of atomistic configurations to calculate dynamical properties from neutron total scattering data. We show that it is possible to access the phonon dispersion of low-frequency modes using such an approach, without constraining the results in terms of some pre-defined dynamical model. The high-frequency regions of the phonon spectrum are found to be less well preserved in the diffraction data

  5. Jets and diffraction results from HERA

    Buniatyan, A.

    2014-01-01

    The latest results on precision measurements of jet and diffractive cross sections obtained by the H1 and ZEUS experiments at HERA are reported. The inclusive jet and multi-jet cross-sections are used in QCD calculations at next-to-leading order (NLO) to determine the strong coupling α s . The cross-section measurements for diffractive inclusive DIS processes with a leading proton in the final state are combined for the H1 and ZEUS experiments in order to improve the precision and extend the kinematic range. The di-jet cross sections are measured in diffractive DIS with a leading proton and compared with QCD predictions based on diffractive parton densities in the proton. The cross sections for exclusive heavy vector meson photoproduction are studied in terms of the momentum transfer at the proton vertex and of the photon-proton centre-of-mass energy. (author)

  6. Diffraction at collider energies

    Frankfurt, L.L.

    1992-01-01

    Lessons with ''soft'' hadron physics to explain (a) feasibility to observe and to investigate color transparency, color opacity effects at colliders; (b) significant probability and specific features of hard diffractive processes; (c) feasibility to investigate components of parton wave functions of hadrons with minimal number of constituents. This new physics would be more important with increase of collision energy

  7. Diffraction through partial identity

    Blum, W.

    1981-06-01

    A model of diffraction dissociation is proposed in which the quantum-mechanical interference between the incoming and the outgoing wave determines the cross-section. This interference occurs due to the finite life-time of the excited state. (orig.)

  8. Diffractive optics for industrial and commercial applications

    Turunen, J. [Joensuu Univ. (Finland); Wyrowski, F. [eds.] [Jena Univ. (Germany)

    1997-12-31

    The following topics were dealt with: diffractive optics, diffraction gratings, optical system design with diffractive optics, continuous-relief diffractive lenses and microlens arrays, diffractive bifocal intraocular lenses, diffractive laser resonators, diffractive optics for semiconductor lasers, diffractive elements for optical image processing, photorefractive crystals in optical measurement systems, subwavelenth-structured elements, security applications, diffractive optics for solar cells, holographic microlithography. 999 refs.

  9. Flight Test of an Intelligent Flight-Control System

    Davidson, Ron; Bosworth, John T.; Jacobson, Steven R.; Thomson, Michael Pl; Jorgensen, Charles C.

    2003-01-01

    inputs with the outputs provided to instrumentation only. The IFCS was not used to control the airplane. In another stage of the flight test, the Phase I pre-trained neural network was integrated into a Phase III version of the flight control system. The Phase I pretrained neural network provided realtime stability and control derivatives to a Phase III controller that was based on a stochastic optimal feedforward and feedback technique (SOFFT). This combined Phase I/III system was operated together with the research flight-control system (RFCS) of the F-15 ACTIVE during the flight test. The RFCS enables the pilot to switch quickly from the experimental- research flight mode back to the safe conventional mode. These initial IFCS ACP flight tests were completed in April 1999. The Phase I/III flight test milestone was to demonstrate, across a range of subsonic and supersonic flight conditions, that the pre-trained neural network could be used to supply real-time aerodynamic stability and control derivatives to the closed-loop optimal SOFFT flight controller. Additional objectives attained in the flight test included (1) flight qualification of a neural-network-based control system; (2) the use of a combined neural-network/closed-loop optimal flight-control system to obtain level-one handling qualities; and (3) demonstration, through variation of control gains, that different handling qualities can be achieved by setting new target parameters. In addition, data for the Phase-II (on-line-learning) neural network were collected, during the use of stacked-frequency- sweep excitation, for post-flight analysis. Initial analysis of these data showed the potential for future flight tests that will incorporate the real-time identification and on-line learning aspects of the IFCS.

  10. Contribution to diffraction theory

    Chako, N.

    1966-11-01

    In a first part, we have given a general and detailed treatment of the modern theory of diffraction. The rigorous theory is formulated as a boundary value problem of the wave equation or Maxwell equations. However, up to the present time, such a program of treating diffraction by optical systems, even for simple optical instruments, has not been realized due to the complicated character of the boundary conditions. The recent developments show clearly the nature of the approximation of the classical theories originally due to Fresnel and Young, later formulated in a rigorous manner by Kirchhoff and Rubinowicz, respectively and, at the same time the insufficiency of these theories in explaining a number of diffraction phenomena. Furthermore, we have made a study of the limitations of the approximate theories and the recent attempts to improve these. The second part is devoted to a general mathematical treatment of the theory of diffraction of optical systems including aberrations. After a general and specific analysis of geometrical and wave aberrations along classical and modern (Nijboer) lines, we have been able to evaluate the diffraction integrals representing the image field at any point in image space explicitly, when the aberrations are small. Our formulas are the generalisations of all anterior results obtained by previous investigators. Moreover, we have discussed the Zernike-Nijboer theory of aberration and generalised it not only for rotational systems, but also for non-symmetric systems as well, including the case of non circular apertures. The extension to non-circular apertures is done by introducing orthogonal functions or polynomials over such aperture shapes. So far the results are valid for small aberrations, that is to say, where the deformation of the real wave front emerging from the optical system is less than a wave length of light or of the electromagnetic wave from the ideal wave front. If the aberrations are large, then one must employ the

  11. Report from the neutron diffraction work group

    1978-08-01

    This progress report of the neutron diffraction group at the Hahn Meitner Institute in Berlin comprises the following contributions: Three-dimensional critical properties of CsNiF 3 around the Neel point; Spin waves in CsNiF 3 with an applied magnetic field; Solitons in CsNiF 3 : Their experimental evidence and their thermodynamics; Neutron diffraction study of DAG at very low temperatures and in external magnetic field; Neutron diffraction investigation of tricritical behaviour in DyPO 4 ; Crystalline modifications and structural phase transitions of NaOH; Gitterdynamik von Cerhydrid; Investigation of the ferroelectric-ferroelastic phase transition in KH 2 PO 4 and RbH 2 PO 4 by means of γ-ray diffractometry; A γ-ray diffractometer for systematic measurements of absolute structure factors; Electron density in pyrite by combined γ-ray and neutron diffraction measurements: Thermal parameters from short wavelength neutron data; Accurate determination of temperature parameters from neutron diffraction data: Direct observation of the thermal diffuse scattering from silicon using perfect crystals; A Compton spectrometer for momentum density studies using 412 keV γ-radiation; Investigation of the electronic structure of Niobiumhydrides by means of gamma-ray Compton scattering; Interpretation of Compton profile data in position space; High resolution neutron scattering measurements on single crystals using a horizontally bent monochromator and a multidetecter; Statistical analysis of neutron diffraction studies of proteins. (orig.) [de

  12. X-ray diffraction

    Einstein, J.R.; Wei, C.H.

    1982-01-01

    We have been interested in structural elucidation by x-ray diffraction of compounds of biological interest. Understanding exactly how atoms are arranged in three-dimensional arrays as molecules can help explain the relationship between structure and functions. The species investigated may vary in size and shape; our recent studies included such diverse substances as antischistosomal drugs, a complex of cadmium with nucleic acid base, nitrate salts of adenine, and proteins

  13. Quasi-Bragg diffraction of atoms

    Domen, K.F.E.M.; Jansen, M.A.H.M.; Leeuwen, van K.A.H.

    2006-01-01

    We report on a novel atomic beamsplitter. It combines the advantages of Bragg scattering (transfer possible into a single, very high diffraction order due to adiabatic conservation of ‘transverse kinetic energy’) with the convenience of tuning the splitting angle simply by adjusting a magnetic

  14. Axial channeling in electron diffraction

    Ichimiya, A.; Lehmpfuhl, G.

    1978-01-01

    Kossel patterns from Silicon and Niobium were obtained with a convergent electron beam. An intensity maximum in the direction of the zone axes [001] and [111] of Nb was interpreted as axial channeling. The intensity distribution in Kossel patterns was calculated by means of the Bloch wave picture of the dynamical theory of electron diffraction. Particularly zone axis patterns were calculated for different substance-energy combinations and they were compared with experimental observations. The intensity distribution in the calculated Kossel patterns was very sensitive to the model of absorption and it was found that a treatment of the absorption close to the model of Humphreys and Hirsch [Phil. Mag. 18, 115 (1968)] gave the best agreement with the experimental observations. Furthermore it is shown which Bloch waves are important for the intensity distribution in the Kossel patterns, how they are absorbed and how they change with energy. (orig.) [de

  15. Diffraction by disordered polycrystalline fibers

    Stroud, W.J.; Millane, R.P.

    1995-01-01

    X-ray diffraction patterns from some polycrystalline fibers show that the constituent microcrystallites are disordered. The relationship between the crystal structure and the diffracted intensities is then quite complicated and depends on the precise kind and degree of disorder present. The effects of disorder on diffracted intensities must be included in structure determinations using diffraction data from such specimens. Theory and algorithms are developed here that allow the full diffraction pattern to be calculated for a disordered polycrystalline fiber made up of helical molecules. The model accommodates various kinds of disorder and includes the effects of finite crystallite size and cylindrical averaging of the diffracted intensities from a fiber. Simulations using these methods show how different kinds, or components, of disorder produce particular diffraction effects. General properties of disordered arrays of helical molecules and their effects on diffraction patterns are described. Implications for structure determination are discussed. (orig.)

  16. X-ray diffraction

    Vries, J.L. de.

    1976-01-01

    The seventh edition of Philips' Review of literature on X-ray diffraction begins with a list of conference proceedings on the subject, organised by the Philips' organisation at regular intervals in various European countries. This is followed by a list of bulletins. The bibliography is divided according to the equipment (cameras, diffractometers, monochromators) and its applications. The applications are subdivided into sections for high/low temperature and pressure, effects due to the equipment, small angle scattering and a part for stress, texture and phase analyses of metals and quantitative analysis of minerals

  17. Diffractive DIS: Where are we?

    Nikolaev, N.N.

    2001-01-01

    A brief review of the modern QCD theory of diffractive DIS is given. The recent progress has been remarkably rapid, all the principal predictions from the color dipole approach to diffraction - the (Q 2 + m V 2 ) scaling, the pattern of SCHNC, shrinkage of the diffraction cone in hard diffractive DIS, the strong impact of longitudinal gluons in inclusive J/Ψ production at Tevatron - have been confirmed experimentally

  18. Eclipse takeoff and flight

    1998-01-01

    This 25-second clip shows the QF-106 'Delta Dart' tethered to the USAF C-141A during takeoff and in flight. NASA Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, supported a Kelly Space and Technology, Inc. (KST)/U.S. Air Force project known as Eclipse, which demonstrated a reusable tow launch vehicle concept. The purpose of the project was to demonstrate a reusable tow launch vehicle concept that had been conceived and patented by KST. Kelly Space obtained a contract with the USAF Research Laboratory for the tow launch demonstration project under the Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) program. The USAF SBIR contract included the modifications to turn the QF-106 into the Experimental Demonstrator #1 (EXD-01), and the C141A aircraft to incorporate the tow provisions to link the two aircraft, as well as conducting flight tests. The demonstration consisted of ground and flight tests. These tests included a Combined Systems Test of both airplanes joined by a tow rope, a towed taxi test, and six towed flights. The primary goal of the project was demonstrating the tow phase of the Eclipse concept using a scaled-down tow aircraft (C-141A) and a representative aerodynamically-shaped aircraft (QF-106A) as a launch vehicle. This was successfully accomplished. On December 20, 1997, NASA research pilot Mark Stucky flew a QF-106 on the first towed flight behind an Air Force C-141 in the joint Eclipse project with KST to demonstrate the reusable tow launch vehicle concept developed by KST. Kelly hoped to use the data from the tow tests to validate a tow-to-launch procedure for reusable space launch vehicles. Stucky flew six successful tow tests between December 1997 and February 6, 1998. On February 6, 1998, the sixth and final towed flight brought the project to a successful completion. Preliminary flight results determined that the handling qualities of the QF-106 on tow were very stable; actual flight measured values of tow rope tension were well within predictions

  19. Protein secondary structure and stability determined by combining exoproteolysis and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry.

    Villanueva, Josep; Villegas, Virtudes; Querol, Enrique; Avilés, Francesc X; Serrano, Luis

    2002-09-01

    In the post-genomic era, several projects focused on the massive experimental resolution of the three-dimensional structures of all the proteins of different organisms have been initiated. Simultaneously, significant progress has been made in the ab initio prediction of protein three-dimensional structure. One of the keys to the success of such a prediction is the use of local information (i.e. secondary structure). Here we describe a new limited proteolysis methodology, based on the use of unspecific exoproteases coupled with matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS), to map quickly secondary structure elements of a protein from both ends, the N- and C-termini. We show that the proteolytic patterns (mass spectra series) obtained can be interpreted in the light of the conformation and local stability of the analyzed proteins, a direct correlation being observed between the predicted and the experimentally derived protein secondary structure. Further, this methodology can be easily applied to check rapidly the folding state of a protein and characterize mutational effects on protein conformation and stability. Moreover, given global stability information, this methodology allows one to locate the protein regions of increased or decreased conformational stability. All of this can be done with a small fraction of the amount of protein required by most of the other methods for conformational analysis. Thus limited exoproteolysis, together with MALDI-TOF MS, can be a useful tool to achieve quickly the elucidation of protein structure and stability. Copyright 2002 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  20. Diffractive flat panel solar concentrators of a novel design

    De Jong, T.M.; de Boer, D.K.G.; Bastiaansen, C.W.M.

    2016-01-01

    A novel design for a flat panel solar concentrator is presented which is based on a light guide with a grating applied on top that diffracts light into total internal reflection. By combining geometrical and diffractive optics the geometrical concentration ratio is optimized according to the

  1. High resolution X-ray diffraction studies on unirradiated

    High-resolution X-ray diffraction technique, employing a three-crystal monochromator–collimator combination is used to study the irradiation induced defects in flux grown Sr-hexaferrite crystals irradiated with 50 MeV Li3+ ion beams at room temperature with a fluence value of 1 × 1014 ions/cm2. The diffraction curves of the ...

  2. Cubic-tetragonal phase transition in Ca sub 0 sub . sub 0 sub 4 Sr sub 0 sub . sub 9 sub 6 TiO sub 3 a combined specific heat and neutron diffraction study

    Gallardo, M C; Romero, F J; Cerro, J D; Seifert, F; Redfern, S A T

    2003-01-01

    The specific heat corresponding to the tetragonal-to-cubic transition in Ca sub 0 sub . sub 0 sub 4 Sr sub 0 sub . sub 9 sub 6 TiO sub 3 perovskite has been measured by conduction calorimetry. The order parameter of the transition has been obtained by means of neutron diffraction at low temperatures. Comparison of calorimetric data with the evolution of the order parameter indicates that this transition seems to follow a mean field Landau potential as in SrTiO sub 3. The linear behaviour of the excess of entropy versus temperature suggests that a 2-4 Landau potential is sufficient to describe the transition.

  3. TOF neutron diffraction study of archaeological ceramics

    Kockelmann, W.; Kirfel, A.

    1999-01-01

    Complete text of publication follows. The time-of flight (TOF) neutron diffractometer ROTAX [1] at ISIS has been used for identification and quantitative phase analysis of archaeological pottery. Neutron diffraction yields mineral phase fractions which, in parallel with information obtained from other archaeometric examination techniques, can provide a fingerprint that can be used to identify provenance and reconstruct methods of manufacturing of an archaeological ceramic product. Phase fractions obtained from a 13th century Rhenish stoneware jar compare well with those obtained from a powder sample prepared from the same fragment. This indicates that reliable results can be obtained by illuminating a large piece or even an intact ceramic object making TOF neutron diffraction a truly non-destructive examination technique. In comparison to X-ray diffraction, information from the bulk sample rather than from surface regions is obtained. ROTAX allows for a simple experimental set-up, free of sample movements. Programmes of archaeological study on ROTAX involve Russian samples (Upper-Volga culture, 5000-2000 BC), Greek pottery, (Agora/Athens, 500-300 BC), and medieval German earthenware and stoneware ceramics (Siegburg waster heap, 13-15th century). (author)

  4. Surface diffusion studies by optical diffraction techniques

    Xiao, X.D.

    1992-11-01

    The newly developed optical techniques have been combined with either second harmonic (SH) diffraction or linear diffraction off a monolayer adsorbate grating for surface diffusion measurement. Anisotropy of surface diffusion of CO on Ni(l10) was used as a demonstration for the second harmonic dim reaction method. The linear diffraction method, which possesses a much higher sensitivity than the SH diffraction method, was employed to study the effect of adsorbate-adsorbate interaction on CO diffusion on Ni(l10) surface. Results showed that only the short range direct CO-CO orbital overlapping interaction influences CO diffusion but not the long range dipole-dipole and CO-NI-CO interactions. Effects of impurities and defects on surface diffusion were further explored by using linear diffraction method on CO/Ni(110) system. It was found that a few percent S impurity can alter the CO diffusion barrier height to a much higher value through changing the Ni(110) surface. The point defects of Ni(l10) surface seem to speed up CO diffusion significantly. A mechanism with long jumps over multiple lattice distance initiated by CO filled vacancy is proposed to explain the observed defect effect

  5. Untangling the methane chemistry in interstellar and solar system ices toward ionizing radiation: a combined infrared and reflectron time-of-flight analysis.

    Abplanalp, Matthew J; Jones, Brant M; Kaiser, Ralf I

    2018-02-21

    Pure methane (CH 4 /CD 4 ) ices were exposed to three ionizing radiation sources at 5.5 K under ultrahigh vacuum conditions to compare the complex hydrocarbon spectrum produced across several interstellar environments. These irradiation sources consisted of energetic electrons to simulate secondary electrons formed in the track of galactic cosmic rays (GCRs), Lyman α (10.2 eV; 121.6 nm) photons simulated the internal VUV field in a dense cloud, and broadband (112.7-169.8 nm; 11.0-7.3 eV) photons which mimic the interstellar ultra-violet field. The in situ chemical evolution of the ices was monitored via Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and during heating via mass spectrometry utilizing a quadrupole mass spectrometer with an electron impact ionization source (EI-QMS) and a reflectron time-of-flight mass spectrometer with a photoionization source (PI-ReTOF-MS). The FTIR analysis detected six small hydrocarbon products from the three different irradiation sources: propane [C 3 H 8 (C 3 D 8 )], ethane [C 2 H 6 (C 2 D 6 )], the ethyl radical [C 2 H 5 (C 2 D 5 )], ethylene [C 2 H 4 (C 2 D 4 )], acetylene [C 2 H 2 (C 2 D 2 )], and the methyl radical [CH 3 (CD 3 )]. The sensitive PI-ReTOF-MS analysis identified a complex array of products with different products being detected between experiments with general formulae: C n H 2n+2 (n = 4-8), C n H 2n (n = 3-9), C n H 2n-2 (n = 3-9), C n H 2n-4 (n = 4-9), and C n H 2n-6 (n = 6-7) from electron irradiation and C n H 2n+2 (n = 4-8), C n H 2n (n = 3-10), C n H 2n-2 (n = 3-11), C n H 2n-4 (n = 4-11), C n H 2n-6 (n = 5-11), and C n H 2n-8 (n = 6-11) from broadband photolysis and Lyman α photolysis. These experiments show that even the simplest hydrocarbon can produce important complex hydrocarbons such as C 3 H 4 and C 4 H 6 isomers. Distinct isomers from these groups have been shown to be important reactants in the synthesis of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons like indene (C 9 H 8 ) and naphthalene (C 10 H 8

  6. Analysis of the Constituents in “Zhu She Yong Xue Shuan Tong” by Ultra High Performance Liquid Chromatography with Quadrupole Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometry Combined with Preparative High Performance Liquid Chromatography

    Lin-Lin Wang

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available “Zhu She Yong Xue Shuan Tong” lyophilized powder (ZSYXST, consists of a series of saponins extracted from Panax notoginseng, which has been widely used in China for the treatment of strokes. In this study, an ultra-high performance liquid chromatography with quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry (UHPLC-Q-TOF/MS combined with preparative high performance liquid chromatography (PHPLC method was developed to rapidly identify both major and minor saponins in ZSYXST. Some high content components were removed through PHPLC in order to increase the sensitivity of the trace saponins. Then, specific characteristic fragment ions in both positive and negative mode were utilized to determine the types of aglycone, saccharide, as well as the saccharide chain linkages. As a result, 94 saponins, including 20 pairs of isomers and ten new compounds, which could represent higher than 98% components in ZSYXST, were identified or tentatively identified in commercial ZSYXST samples.

  7. Lattice strain measurements on sandstones under load using neutron diffraction

    Frischbutter, A.; Neov, D.; Scheffzük, Ch.; Vrána, M.; Walther, K.

    2000-11-01

    Neutron diffraction methods (both time-of-flight- and angle-dispersive diffraction) are applied to intracrystalline strain measurements on geological samples undergoing uniaxial increasing compressional load. The experiments were carried out on Cretaceous sandstones from the Elbezone (East Germany), consisting of >95% quartz which are bedded but without crystallographic preferred orientation of quartz. From the stress-strain relation the Young's modulus for our quartz sample was determined to be (72.2±2.9) GPa using results of the neutron time-of-flight method. The influence of different kinds of bedding in sandstones (laminated and convolute bedding) could be determined. We observed differences of factor 2 (convolute bedding) and 3 (laminated bedding) for the elastic stiffness, determined with angle dispersive neutron diffraction (crystallographic strain) and with strain gauges (mechanical strain). The data indicate which geological conditions may influence the stress-strain behaviour of geological materials. The influence of bedding on the stress-strain behaviour of a laminated bedded sandstone was indicated by direct residual stress measurements using neutron time-of-flight diffraction. The measurements were carried out six days after unloading the sample. Residual strain was measured for three positions from the centre to the periphery and within two radial directions of the cylinder. We observed that residual strain changes from extension to compression in a different manner for two perpendicular directions of the bedding plane.

  8. Atomic resolution three-dimensional electron diffraction microscopy

    Miao Jianwei; Ohsuna, Tetsu; Terasaki, Osamu; Hodgson, Keith O.; O'Keefe, Michael A.

    2002-01-01

    We report the development of a novel form of diffraction-based 3D microscopy to overcome resolution barriers inherent in high-resolution electron microscopy and tomography. By combining coherent electron diffraction with the oversampling phasing method, we show that the 3D structure of a nanocrystal can be determined ab initio at a resolution of 1 Angstrom from 29 simulated noisy diffraction patterns. This new form of microscopy can be used to image the 3D structures of nanocrystals and noncrystalline samples, with resolution limited only by the quality of sample diffraction

  9. Inclusive measurements on diffractive processes in ep collisions

    Janssen, Xavier

    2007-01-01

    Measurements from the H1 and ZEUS collaborations of the diffractive deep-inelastic scattering process, ep → eXY, where Y is a proton or a low mass proton excitation, are presented for photon virtualities in the range 2.2 2 2 and squared four-momentum transfer at the proton vertex satisfying | t | 2 . Diffractive parton distribution functions and their uncertainties are determined from a next-to-leading order DGLAP QCD analysis. Combining measurements of the inclusive diffractive deep-inelastic scattering process with an analysis of diffractive di jet production allows a very sensitive determination of both quark and gluon distributions. (author)

  10. Imipenem-avibactam: a novel combination for the rapid detection of carbapenemase activity in Enterobacteriaceae and Acinetobacter baumannii by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry.

    Oviaño, Marina; Bou, Germán

    2017-02-01

    In the present study, we propose a novel matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS)-based method for detecting carbapenemase-producing Enterobacteriaceae and Acinetobacter baumannii. For this, we analyzed a series of 131 isolates. Among them, a total of 115 Enterobacteriaceae: 79 of them carrying a carbapenemase enzyme (15bla KPC , 7bla NDM , 11bla IMP , 12bla VIM , and 34bla OXA-48 ) and 16 A. baumannii isolates: 15 of them carrying carbapenemases (10bla OXA-23, 2bla OXA-58, 2bla OXA-24 , and 1bla OXA-237 ). The rest of the isolates were noncarbapenemase producers and used as negative controls. The isolates were submitted to susceptibility testing using a combination of imipenem-avibactam and analysis by the MALDI-TOF Biotyper Compass software (Bruker Daltonik, Germany). The assay showed an overall sensitivity and specificity for carbapenemase detection of 98% and 100%, respectively. The combination of imipenem and avibactam displayed activity against KPC and OXA-48-producing Enterobacteriaceae and thus represents a new strategy for identifying and confirming these carbapenemases. However, the combination did not provide any benefit over A. baumannii. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Birefringent coherent diffraction imaging

    Karpov, Dmitry; dos Santos Rolo, Tomy; Rich, Hannah; Kryuchkov, Yuriy; Kiefer, Boris; Fohtung, E.

    2016-10-01

    Directional dependence of the index of refraction contains a wealth of information about anisotropic optical properties in semiconducting and insulating materials. Here we present a novel high-resolution lens-less technique that uses birefringence as a contrast mechanism to map the index of refraction and dielectric permittivity in optically anisotropic materials. We applied this approach successfully to a liquid crystal polymer film using polarized light from helium neon laser. This approach is scalable to imaging with diffraction-limited resolution, a prospect rapidly becoming a reality in view of emergent brilliant X-ray sources. Applications of this novel imaging technique are in disruptive technologies, including novel electronic devices, in which both charge and spin carry information as in multiferroic materials and photonic materials such as light modulators and optical storage.

  12. Bisphosphonate ISS Flight Experiment

    LeBlanc, Adrian; Matsumoto, Toshio; Jones, Jeffrey; Shapiro, Jay; Lang, Thomas; Shackleford, Linda; Smith, Scott M.; Evans, Harlan; Spector, Elizabeth; Ploutz-Snyder, Robert; hide

    2014-01-01

    The bisphosphonate study is a collaborative effort between the NASA and JAXA space agencies to investigate the potential for antiresorptive drugs to mitigate bone changes associated with long-duration spaceflight. Elevated bone resorption is a hallmark of human spaceflight and bed rest (common zero-G analog). We tested whether an antiresorptive drug in combination with in-flight exercise would ameliorate bone loss and hypercalcuria during longduration spaceflight. Measurements include DXA, QCT, pQCT, and urine and blood biomarkers. We have completed analysis of 7 crewmembers treated with alendronate during flight and the immediate postflight (R+week) data collection in 5 of 10 controls without treatment. Both groups used the advanced resistive exercise device (ARED) during their missions. We previously reported the pre/postflight results of crew taking alendronate during flight (Osteoporosis Int. 24:2105-2114, 2013). The purpose of this report is to present the 12-month follow-up data in the treated astronauts and to compare these results with preliminary data from untreated crewmembers exercising with ARED (ARED control) or without ARED (Pre-ARED control). Results: the table presents DXA and QCT BMD expressed as percentage change from preflight in the control astronauts (18 Pre-ARED and the current 5 ARED-1-year data not yet available) and the 7 treated subjects. As shown previously the combination of exercise plus antiresorptive is effective in preventing bone loss during flight. Bone measures for treated subjects, 1 year after return from space remain at or near baseline values. Except in one region, the treated group maintained or gained bone 1 year after flight. Biomarker data are not currently available for either control group and therefore not presented. However, data from other studies with or without ARED show elevated bone resorption and urinary Ca excretion while bisphosphonate treated subjects show decreases during flight. Comparing the two control

  13. Six-axis multi-anvil press for high-pressure, high-temperature neutron diffraction experiments

    Sano-Furukawa, A., E-mail: sano.asami@jaea.go.jp; Hattori, T. [Quantum Beam Science Center, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan); J-PARC Center, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan); Arima, H. [Institute for Materials Research, Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan); Yamada, A. [The University of Shiga Prefecture, Shiga 522-8533 (Japan); Tabata, S.; Kondo, M.; Nakamura, A. [Sumitomo Heavy Industries Co., Ltd., Ehime 792-0001 (Japan); Kagi, H.; Yagi, T. [Geochemical Research Center, Graduate School of Science, The University of Tokyo, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan)

    2014-11-15

    We developed a six-axis multi-anvil press, ATSUHIME, for high-pressure and high-temperature in situ time-of-flight neutron powder diffraction experiments. The press has six orthogonally oriented hydraulic rams that operate individually to compress a cubic sample assembly. Experiments indicate that the press can generate pressures up to 9.3 GPa and temperatures up to 2000 K using a 6-6-type cell assembly, with available sample volume of about 50 mm{sup 3}. Using a 6-8-type cell assembly, the available conditions expand to 16 GPa and 1273 K. Because the six-axis press has no guide blocks, there is sufficient space around the sample to use the aperture for diffraction and place an incident slit, radial collimators, and a neutron imaging camera close to the sample. Combination of the six-axis press and the collimation devices realized high-quality diffraction pattern with no contamination from the heater or the sample container surrounding the sample. This press constitutes a new tool for using neutron diffraction to study the structures of crystals and liquids under high pressures and temperatures.

  14. Boundary diffraction wave integrals for diffraction modeling of external occulters

    Cady, E.

    2012-01-01

    An occulter is a large diffracting screen which may be flown in conjunction with a telescope to image extrasolar planets. The edge is shaped to minimize the diffracted light in a region beyond the occulter, and a telescope may be placed in this dark shadow to view an extrasolar system with the starlight removed. Errors in position, orientation, and shape of the occulter will diffract additional light into this region, and a challenge of modeling an occulter system is to accurately and quickly...

  15. Effect of Pressure on Valence and Structural Properties of YbFe2Ge2 Heavy Fermion Compound A Combined Inelastic X-ray Spectroscopy, X-ray Diffraction, and Theoretical Investigation

    Kumar, Ravhi S.; Svane, Axel; Vaitheeswaran; #8741; , Ganapathy; Kanchana, Venkatakrishnan; Antonio, Daniel; Cornelius, Andrew L.; Bauer, Eric D.; Xiao, Yuming; Chow, Paul (Aarhus); (CIW); (Hyderabad - India); (IIT-India); (LANL); (UNLV)

    2016-06-03

    The crystal structure and the Yb valence of the YbFe2Ge2 heavy fermion compound was measured at room temperature and under high pressures using high-pressure powder X-ray diffraction and X-ray absorption spectroscopy via both partial fluorescence yield and resonant inelastic X-ray emission techniques. Furthermore, the measurements are complemented by first-principles density functional theoretical calculations using the self-interaction corrected local spin density approximation investigating in particular the magnetic structure and the Yb valence. While the ThCr2Si2-type tetragonal (I4/mmm) structure is stable up to 53 GPa, the X-ray emission results show an increase of the Yb valence from v = 2.72(2) at ambient pressure to v = 2.93(3) at ~9 GPa, where at low temperature a pressure-induced quantum critical state was reported.

  16. (Na,□)5[MnO2]13 nanorods: a new tunnel structure for electrode materials determined ab initio and refined through a combination of electron and synchrotron diffraction data

    Mugnaioli, Enrico; Gemmi, Mauro; Merlini, Marco; Gregorkiewitz, Michele

    2016-01-01

    (Nax□1 − x)5[MnO2]13 has been synthesized with x = 0.80 (4), corresponding to Na0.31[MnO2]. This well known material is usually cited as Na0.4[MnO2] and is believed to have a romanèchite-like framework. Here, its true structure is determined, ab initio, by single-crystal electron diffraction tomography (EDT) and refined both by EDT data applying dynamical scattering theory and by the Rietveld method based on synchrotron powder diffraction data (χ2 = 0.690, R wp = 0.051, R p = 0.037, R F2 = 0.035). The unit cell is monoclinic C2/m, a = 22.5199 (6), b = 2.83987 (6), c = 14.8815 (4) Å, β = 105.0925 (16)°, V = 918.90 (4) Å3, Z = 2. A hitherto unknown [MnO2] framework is found, which is mainly based on edge- and corner-sharing octahedra and comprises three types of tunnels: per unit cell, two are defined by S-shaped 10-rings, four by egg-shaped 8-rings, and two by slightly oval 6-rings of Mn polyhedra. Na occupies all tunnels. The so-determined structure excellently explains previous reports on the electrochemistry of (Na,□)5[MnO2]13. The trivalent Mn3+ ions concentrate at two of the seven Mn sites where larger Mn—O distances and Jahn–Teller distortion are observed. One of the Mn3+ sites is five-coordinated in a square pyramid which, on oxidation to Mn4+, may easily undergo topotactic transformation to an octahedron suggesting a possible pathway for the transition among different tunnel structures. PMID:27910840

  17. Switching between solid solution and two-phase regimes in the Li1-xFe1-yMnyPO4 cathode materials during lithium (de)insertion: combined PITT, in situ XRPD and electron diffraction tomography study

    Drozhzhin, Oleg A.; Sumanov, Vasiliy D.; Karakulina, Olesia M.; Abakumov, Artem M.; Hadermann, Joke; Baranov, Andrey N.; Stevenson, Keith J.; Antipov, Evgeny V.

    2016-01-01

    The electrochemical properties and phase transformations during (de)insertion of Li + in LiFePO 4 , LiFe 0.9 Mn 0.1 PO 4 and LiFe 0.5 Mn 0.5 PO 4 are studied by means of galvanostatic cycling, potential intermittent titration technique (PITT) and in situ X-ray powder diffraction. Different modes of switching between the solid solution and two-phase regimes are revealed which are influenced by the Mn content in Li 1-x Fe 1-y Mn y PO 4 . Additionally, an increase in electrochemical capacity with the Mn content is observed at high rates of galvanostatic cycling (10C, 20C), which is in good agreement with the numerically estimated contribution of the solid solution mechanism determined from PITT data. The observed asymmetric behavior of the phase transformations in Li 1-x Fe 0.5 Mn 0.5 PO 4 during charge and discharge is discussed. For the first time, the crystal structures of electrochemically deintercalated Li 1-x Fe 0.5 Mn 0.5 PO 4 with different Li content – LiFe 0.5 Mn 0.5 PO 4 , Li 0.5 Fe 0.5 Mn 0.5 PO 4 and Li 0.1 Fe 0.5 Mn 0.5 PO 4 – are refined, including the occupancy factors of the Li position. This refinement is done using electron diffraction tomography data. The crystallographic analyses of Li 1-x Fe 0.5 Mn 0.5 PO 4 reveal that at x = 0.5 and 0.9 the structure retains the Pnma symmetry and the main motif of the pristine x = 0 structure without noticeable short range order effects.

  18. Diffraction radiation from relativistic particles

    Potylitsyn, Alexander Petrovich; Strikhanov, Mikhail Nikolaevich; Tishchenko, Alexey Alexandrovich

    2010-01-01

    This book deals with diffraction radiation, which implies the boundary problems of electromagnetic radiation theory. Diffraction radiation is generated when a charged particle moves in a vacuum near a target edge. Diffraction radiation of non-relativistic particles is widely used to design intense emitters in the cm wavelength range. Diffraction radiation from relativistic charged particles is important for noninvasive beam diagnostics and design of free electron lasers based on Smith-Purcell radiation which is diffraction radiation from periodic structures. Different analytical models of diffraction radiation and results of recent experimental studies are presented in this book. The book may also serve as guide to classical electrodynamics applications in beam physics and electrodynamics. It can be of great use for young researchers to develop skills and for experienced scientists to obtain new results.

  19. Diffraction radiation from relativistic particles

    Potylitsyn, Alexander Petrovich; Ryazanov, Mikhail Ivanovich; Strikhanov, Mikhail Nikolaevich; Tishchenko, Alexey Alexandrovich

    2010-01-01

    This book deals with diffraction radiation, which implies the boundary problems of electromagnetic radiation theory. Diffraction radiation is generated when a charged particle moves in a vacuum near a target edge. Diffraction radiation of non-relativistic particles is widely used to design intense emitters in the cm wavelength range. Diffraction radiation from relativistic charged particles is important for noninvasive beam diagnostics and design of free electron lasers based on Smith-Purcell radiation which is diffraction radiation from periodic structures. Different analytical models of diffraction radiation and results of recent experimental studies are presented in this book. The book may also serve as guide to classical electrodynamics applications in beam physics and electrodynamics. It can be of great use for young researchers to develop skills and for experienced scientists to obtain new results. (orig.)

  20. CMS results on hard diffraction

    INSPIRE-00107098

    2013-01-01

    In these proceedings we present CMS results on hard diffraction. Diffractive dijet production in pp collisions at $\\sqrt{s}$=7 TeV is discussed. The cross section for dijet production is presented as a function of $\\tilde{\\xi}$, representing the fractional momentum loss of the scattered proton in single-diffractive events. The observation of W and Z boson production in events with a large pseudo-rapidity gap is also presented.

  1. Holographic analysis of diffraction structure factors

    Marchesini, S.; Bucher, J.J.; Shuh, D.K.; Fabris, L.; Press, M.J.; West, M.W.; Hussain, Z.; Mannella, N.; Fadley, C.S.; Van Hove, M.A.; Stolte, W.C.

    2002-01-01

    We combine the theory of inside-source/inside-detector x-ray fluorescence holography and Kossel lines/ x ray standing waves in kinematic approximation to directly obtain the phases of the diffraction structure factors. The influence of Kossel lines and standing waves on holography is also discussed. We obtain partial phase determination from experimental data obtaining the sign of the real part of the structure factor for several reciprocal lattice vectors of a vanadium crystal

  2. Causal aspects of diffraction

    Crawford, G.N.

    1981-01-01

    The analysis is directed at a causal description of photon diffraction, which is explained in terms of a wave exerting real forces and providing actual guidance to each quantum of energy. An undulatory PSI wave is associated with each photon, and this wave is assumed to imply more than an informative probability function, so that it actually carries real energy, in much the same way as does an electro-magnetic wave. Whether or not it may be in some way related to the electromagnetic wave is left as a matter of on-going concern. A novel application of the concept of a minimum energy configuration is utilized; that is, a system of energy quanta seeks out relative positions and orientations of least mutual energy, much as an electron seeks its Bohr radius as a position of least mutual energy. Thus the concept implies more a guiding interaction of the PSI waves than an interfering cancellation of these waves. Similar concepts have been suggested by L. de Broglie and D. Bohm

  3. Study of optical Laue diffraction

    Chakravarthy, Giridhar; Allam, Srinivasa Rao; Satyanarayana, S. V. M.; Sharan, Alok

    2014-01-01

    We present the study of the optical diffraction pattern of one and two-dimensional gratings with defects, designed using desktop pc and printed on OHP sheet using laser printer. Gratings so prepared, using novel low cost technique provides good visual aid in teaching. Diffraction pattern of the monochromatic light (632.8nm) from the grating so designed is similar to that of x-ray diffraction pattern of crystal lattice with point defects in one and two-dimensions. Here both optical and x-ray diffractions are Fraunhofer. The information about the crystalline lattice structure and the defect size can be known

  4. Gluon radiation in diffractive electroproduction

    Buchmueller, W.; McDermott, M.F.; Hebecker, A.

    1996-07-01

    Order α s -correlations to the diffractive structure functions F L D and F 2 D at large Q 2 and small x are evaluated in the semiclassical approach, where the initial proton is treated as a classical colour field. The diffractive final state contains a fast gluon in addition to a quark-antiquark pair. Two of these partons may have large transverse momentum. Our calculations lead to an intuitive picture of deep-inelastic diffractive processes which is very similar to Bjorken's aligned-jet model. Both diffractive structure functions contain leading twist contributions from high-p perpendicular to jets. (orig.)

  5. Study of optical Laue diffraction

    Chakravarthy, Giridhar, E-mail: cgiridhar84@gmail.com, E-mail: aloksharan@email.com; Allam, Srinivasa Rao, E-mail: cgiridhar84@gmail.com, E-mail: aloksharan@email.com; Satyanarayana, S. V. M., E-mail: cgiridhar84@gmail.com, E-mail: aloksharan@email.com; Sharan, Alok, E-mail: cgiridhar84@gmail.com, E-mail: aloksharan@email.com [Department of Physics, Pondicherry University, Puducherry-605014 (India)

    2014-10-15

    We present the study of the optical diffraction pattern of one and two-dimensional gratings with defects, designed using desktop pc and printed on OHP sheet using laser printer. Gratings so prepared, using novel low cost technique provides good visual aid in teaching. Diffraction pattern of the monochromatic light (632.8nm) from the grating so designed is similar to that of x-ray diffraction pattern of crystal lattice with point defects in one and two-dimensions. Here both optical and x-ray diffractions are Fraunhofer. The information about the crystalline lattice structure and the defect size can be known.

  6. Experimental and theoretical study of rotationally inelastic diffraction of H2(D2) from methyl-terminated Si(111)

    Nihill, Kevin J.; Hund, Zachary M.; Sibener, S. J.; Muzas, Alberto; Cueto, Marcos del; Díaz, Cristina; Frankcombe, Terry; Plymale, Noah T.; Lewis, Nathan S.; Martín, Fernando

    2016-01-01

    Fundamental details concerning the interaction between H 2 and CH 3 –Si(111) have been elucidated by the combination of diffractive scattering experiments and electronic structure and scattering calculations. Rotationally inelastic diffraction (RID) of H 2 and D 2 from this model hydrocarbon-decorated semiconductor interface has been confirmed for the first time via both time-of-flight and diffraction measurements, with modest j = 0 → 2 RID intensities for H 2 compared to the strong RID features observed for D 2 over a large range of kinematic scattering conditions along two high-symmetry azimuthal directions. The Debye-Waller model was applied to the thermal attenuation of diffraction peaks, allowing for precise determination of the RID probabilities by accounting for incoherent motion of the CH 3 –Si(111) surface atoms. The probabilities of rotationally inelastic diffraction of H 2 and D 2 have been quantitatively evaluated as a function of beam energy and scattering angle, and have been compared with complementary electronic structure and scattering calculations to provide insight into the interaction potential between H 2 (D 2 ) and hence the surface charge density distribution. Specifically, a six-dimensional potential energy surface (PES), describing the electronic structure of the H 2 (D 2 )/CH 3 −Si(111) system, has been computed based on interpolation of density functional theory energies. Quantum and classical dynamics simulations have allowed for an assessment of the accuracy of the PES, and subsequently for identification of the features of the PES that serve as classical turning points. A close scrutiny of the PES reveals the highly anisotropic character of the interaction potential at these turning points. This combination of experiment and theory provides new and important details about the interaction of H 2 with a hybrid organic-semiconductor interface, which can be used to further investigate energy flow in technologically relevant systems.

  7. Metabolites identification of harmane in vitro/in vivo in rats by ultra-performance liquid chromatography combined with electrospray ionization quadrupole time-of-flight tandem mass spectrometry.

    Li, Shuping; Liu, Wei; Teng, Liang; Cheng, Xuemei; Wang, Zhengtao; Wang, Changhong

    2014-04-01

    Harmane, a β-carboline alkaloid with a wide spectrum of pharmacological activities, is naturally present in the human diet, in numerous foodstuffs and in hallucinogenic plants such as Peganum harmala, Banisteriopsis caapi and Tribulus terrestris. However, the precise metabolic fate of harmane remains unknown. In order to know whether harmane is extensively metabolized, a rapid and sensitive method using ultra-performance liquid chromatography combined with electrospray ionization quadrupole time-of-flight tandem mass spectrometry (UPLC/ESI-QTOF-MS) was used to analyze the metabolic profile of harmane in vitro and in vivo in rats. A total of 21 metabolites were identified from the rat liver microsomes and rat liver S9 (9), rat urine (11), feces (16), bile (16), and plasma (10) after a single oral administration of harmane using MetaboLynx™ and MassFragment ™ software tools. It indicated that the biliary and faecal clearance were the major excretion routes for harmane as well as its metabolites. The specific CLogP values combined with different acidic and alkaline mobile phase were helpful and useful for distinguishing N-oxidation and monohydroxylation metabolites. The metabolic transformation pathways of harmane included monohydroxylation, dihydroxylation, N-oxidation, O-glucuronide conjugation, O-sulphate conjugation, and glutathione conjugation. In conclusion, this study showed an insight into the metabolism of harmane. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Application of neutron diffraction in characterization of texture evolution during high-temperature creep in magnesium alloys

    Sediako, A.; Shook, S.; Vogel, S.; Sediako, D.

    2010-01-01

    A good combination of room-temperature and elevated temperature strength and ductility, good salt-spray corrosion resistance and excellent diecastability are frequently among the main considerations in development of a new magnesium alloy for automotive industry. Unfortunately, there has been much lesser effort in development of wrought-stock alloys for high temperature applications. Extrudability and high temperature performance of wrought material become important factors in an effort to develop new wrought alloys and processing technologies. This paper shows some results received in creep testing and studies of in-creep texture evolution for several wrought magnesium alloys developed for use in elevated- temperature applications. Along with others 'traditional' characterization techniques of metals' performance in high- temperature creep, neutron diffraction was employed in this study to analyze evolution of crystallographic texture during creep deformation. The paper compares two methods of texture analysis in neutron diffraction studies: based on monochromatic (reactor-source) beam and white neutron beam (time-of-flight method, synchrotron). The time-of-flight (TOF) spectrometer illuminates the sample with a non-filtered beam of neutrons and captures the readings with an encircled detector array. This provides a very fast and detailed picture of the crystallographic texture for the bulk of the sample. As the white beam retains all neutron wavelengths, it takes much less time to collect statistically-valid dataset for the diffraction pattern. On the other hand, the monochromatic beam setup includes a monochromatic crystal that filters out a specific wavelength. The diffracted beam is then captured by a much simpler neutron detector. This setup is more flexible, allowing for choosing various wavelengths (depending on the sample material) but obviously requiring more time for statistically viable data collection. These studies were performed using E3 neutron

  9. Diffractive optics and nanophotonics resolution below the diffraction limit

    Minin, Igor

    2016-01-01

    In this book the authors present several examples of techniques used to overcome the Abby diffraction limit using flat and 3D diffractive optical elements, photonic crystal lenses, photonic jets, and surface plasmon diffractive optics. The structures discussed can be used in the microwave and THz range and also as scaled models for optical frequencies. Such nano-optical microlenses can be integrated, for example, into existing semiconductor heterostructure platforms for next-generation optoelectronic applications. Chapter 1 considers flat diffractive lenses and innovative 3D radiating structures including a conical millimeter-wave Fresnel zone plate (FZP) lens proposed for subwavelength focusing. In chapter 2 the subwavelength focusing properties of diffractive photonic crystal lenses are considered and it is shown that at least three different types of photonic crystal lens are possible.  With the aim of achieving subwavelength focusing, in chapter 3 an alternative mechanism to produce photonic jets at Tera...

  10. Flight to America

    Güneli Gün

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Güneli Gün’s memoir piece truly combines the excitement of the young traveler with the humor of the mature narrator. Born in Izmir, Turkey, she breaks her engagement to a young but conservative Turkish architect and overcomes her father’s concerns to eventually study at Hollins College, Virginia. Addressing topics such as breaking out of a traditional society, being torn between the home country and the imagined new home, and finding comfort in the arts, “Flight to America” compellingly reflects Güneli Gün’s mastery as a storyteller.

  11. Electron diffraction from carbon nanotubes

    Qin, L-C

    2006-01-01

    The properties of a carbon nanotube are dependent on its atomic structure. The atomic structure of a carbon nanotube can be defined by specifying its chiral indices (u, v), that specify its perimeter vector (chiral vector), with which the diameter and helicity are also determined. The fine electron beam available in a modern transmission electron microscope (TEM) offers a unique probe to reveal the atomic structure of individual nanotubes. This review covers two aspects related to the use of the electron probe in the TEM for the study of carbon nanotubes: (a) to understand the electron diffraction phenomena for inter-pretation of the electron diffraction patterns of carbon nanotubes and (b) to obtain the chiral indices (u, v), of the carbon nanotubes from the electron diffraction patterns. For a nanotube of a given structure, the electron scattering amplitude from the carbon nanotube is first described analytically in closed form using the helical diffraction theory. From a known structure as given by the chiral indices (u, v), its electron diffraction pattern can be calculated and understood. The reverse problem, i.e. assignment of the chiral indices from an electron diffraction pattern of a carbon nanotube, is approached from the relationship between the electron scattering intensity distribution and the chiral indices (u, v). We show that electron diffraction patterns can provide an accurate and unambiguous assignment of the chiral indices of carbon nanotubes. The chiral indices (u, v) can be read indiscriminately with a high accuracy from the intensity distribution on the principal layer lines in an electron diffraction pattern. The symmetry properties of electron diffraction from carbon nanotubes and the electron diffraction from deformed carbon nanotubes are also discussed in detail. It is shown that 2mm symmetry is always preserved for single-walled carbon nanotubes, but it can break down for multiwalled carbon nanotubes under some special circumstances

  12. Stepwise effects of the BCR sequential chemical extraction procedure on dissolution and metal release from common ferromagnesian clay minerals: A combined solution chemistry and X-ray powder diffraction study

    Ryan, P.C. [Geology Department, Middlebury College, Middlebury, Vermont 05753 (United States)], E-mail: pryan@middlebury.edu; Hillier, S. [Macaulay Institute, Aberdeen, AB15 8QH UK (United Kingdom); Wall, A.J. [Department of Geosciences, Penn State University, University Park, Pennsylvania, 16802 (United States)

    2008-12-15

    Sequential extraction procedures (SEPs) are commonly used to determine speciation of trace metals in soils and sediments. However, the non-selectivity of reagents for targeted phases has remained a lingering concern. Furthermore, potentially reactive phases such as phyllosilicate clay minerals often contain trace metals in structural sites, and their reactivity has not been quantified. Accordingly, the objective of this study is to analyze the behavior of trace metal-bearing clay minerals exposed to the revised BCR 3-step plus aqua regia SEP. Mineral quantification based on stoichiometric analysis and quantitative powder X-ray diffraction (XRD) documents progressive dissolution of chlorite (CCa-2 ripidolite) and two varieties of smectite (SapCa-2 saponite and SWa-1 nontronite) during steps 1-3 of the BCR procedure. In total, 8 ({+-} 1) % of ripidolite, 19 ({+-} 1) % of saponite, and 19 ({+-} 3) % of nontronite (% mineral mass) dissolved during extractions assumed by many researchers to release trace metals from exchange sites, carbonates, hydroxides, sulfides and organic matter. For all three reference clays, release of Ni into solution is correlated with clay dissolution. Hydrolysis of relatively weak Mg-O bonds (362 kJ/mol) during all stages, reduction of Fe(III) during hydroxylamine hydrochloride extraction and oxidation of Fe(II) during hydrogen peroxide extraction are the main reasons for clay mineral dissolution. These findings underscore the need for precise mineral quantification when using SEPs to understand the origin/partitioning of trace metals with solid phases.

  13. Thermally-induced crystallization behaviour of 80GeSe2–20Ga2Se3 glass as probed by combined X-ray diffraction and PAL spectroscopy

    Shpotyuk, O.; Calvez, L.; Petracovschi, E.; Klym, H.; Ingram, A.; Demchenko, P.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Chalcogenide Ge–Ga–Se glasses were annealed at 380 °C for 10, 25 and 50 h. • Crystallization of glasses during annealing indicates formation of crystals. • Structural changes are described by two-state positron trapping model. • Modification leading to nucleation and fragmentation of free volume of glasses. • The Ge–Ga–Se systems cannot be classified as typical pseudo-binary system. -- Abstract: Crystallization behaviour of 80GeSe 2 –20Ga 2 Se 3 glass caused by thermal annealing at 380 °C for 10, 25 and 50 h are studied using X-ray diffraction and positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy. It is shown that the structural changes caused by crystallization can be adequately described by positron trapping modes determined within two-state model. The observed changes in defect-related component in the fit of experimental positron lifetime spectra for annealed glasses testifies in a favour of structural fragmentation of larger free volume entities into smaller ones with preceding nucleation in the initial stage of thermal annealing. Because of strong deviation in defect-free bulk positron lifetime from corresponding additive values proper to boundary constituents, the studied glasses cannot be considered as typical representatives of pseudo-binary cut-section

  14. Thermally-induced crystallization behaviour of 80GeSe{sub 2}–20Ga{sub 2}Se{sub 3} glass as probed by combined X-ray diffraction and PAL spectroscopy

    Shpotyuk, O., E-mail: shpotyuk@novas.lviv.ua [Scientific Research Company “Carat”, 202, Stryjska str., Lviv 79031 (Ukraine); Institute of Physics of Jan Dlugosz University, 13/15, al. Armii Krajowej, Czestochowa 42201 (Poland); Calvez, L.; Petracovschi, E. [Equipe Verres et Céramiques, UMR-CNRS 6226, Institute des Sciences chimiques de Rennes, Université de Rennes 1, 35042 Rennes Cedex (France); Klym, H. [Lviv polytechnic National University, 12 Bandera str., Lviv 79013 (Ukraine); Ingram, A. [Physics Faculty of Opole University of Technology, 75, Ozimska str., Opole 45370 (Poland); Demchenko, P. [Ivan Franko National University of Lviv, 6, Kyryla and Mefodiya Str., Lviv 79005 (Ukraine)

    2014-01-05

    Highlights: • Chalcogenide Ge–Ga–Se glasses were annealed at 380 °C for 10, 25 and 50 h. • Crystallization of glasses during annealing indicates formation of crystals. • Structural changes are described by two-state positron trapping model. • Modification leading to nucleation and fragmentation of free volume of glasses. • The Ge–Ga–Se systems cannot be classified as typical pseudo-binary system. -- Abstract: Crystallization behaviour of 80GeSe{sub 2}–20Ga{sub 2}Se{sub 3} glass caused by thermal annealing at 380 °C for 10, 25 and 50 h are studied using X-ray diffraction and positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy. It is shown that the structural changes caused by crystallization can be adequately described by positron trapping modes determined within two-state model. The observed changes in defect-related component in the fit of experimental positron lifetime spectra for annealed glasses testifies in a favour of structural fragmentation of larger free volume entities into smaller ones with preceding nucleation in the initial stage of thermal annealing. Because of strong deviation in defect-free bulk positron lifetime from corresponding additive values proper to boundary constituents, the studied glasses cannot be considered as typical representatives of pseudo-binary cut-section.

  15. Profiling an electrospray plume by laser-induced fluorescence and Fraunhofer diffraction combined to mass spectrometry: influence of size and composition of droplets on charge-state distributions of electrosprayed proteins.

    Girod, Marion; Dagany, Xavier; Boutou, Véronique; Broyer, Michel; Antoine, Rodolphe; Dugourd, Philippe; Mordehai, Alex; Love, Craig; Werlich, Mark; Fjeldsted, John; Stafford, George

    2012-07-14

    We investigated how physico-chemical properties of charged droplets are affected by the electrospray process, using simultaneous in situ measurements by laser-induced fluorescence (LIF), Fraunhofer diffraction and mass spectrometry. For this purpose, we implemented a laser-induced-fluorescence profiling setup in conjunction with a fast, high-resolution particle sizing scheme on a modified Agilent Jet Stream electrospray source coupled to a single quadrupole mass analyser. The optical setup permits us to profile the solvent fractionation and the size of the droplets as they evaporate in an electrospray plume by measuring both the angular scattering pattern and emission spectra of a solvatochromic fluorescent dye. Mass spectra are recorded simultaneously. These mass spectrometry and optical spectroscopy investigations allow us to study the relation between the observed charge-state distributions of protein anions and physico-chemical properties of evaporating droplets in the spray plume. By mixing water with methanol, a refolding of cytochrome C is observed as the water percentage increases in the plume due to the preponderant evaporation of volatile methanol.

  16. Persistence of Mixed and Non-intermediate Valence in the High-Pressure Structure of Silver(I,III) Oxide, AgO: A Combined Raman, X-ray Diffraction (XRD), and Density Functional Theory (DFT) Study.

    Grzelak, Adam; Gawraczyński, Jakub; Jaroń, Tomasz; Somayazulu, Maddury; Derzsi, Mariana; Struzhkin, Viktor; Grochala, Wojciech

    2017-05-15

    The X-ray diffraction data collected up to ca. 56 GPa and the Raman spectra measured up to 74.8 GPa for AgO, or Ag I Ag III O 2 , which is a prototypical mixed valence (disproportionated) oxide, indicate that two consecutive phase transitions occur: the first-order phase transition occurs between 16.1 GPa and 19.7 GPa, and a second-order phase transition occurs at ca. 40 GPa. All polymorphic forms host the square planar [Ag III O 4 ] units typical of low-spin Ag III . The disproportionated Imma form persists at least up to 74.8 GPa, as indicated by Raman spectra. Theoretical hybrid density functional theory (DFT) calculations show that the first-order transition is phonon-driven. AgO stubbornly remains disproportionated up to at least 100 GPa-in striking contrast to its copper analogue-and the fundamental band gap of AgO is ∼0.3 eV at this pressure and is weakly pressure-dependent. Metallization of AgO is yet to be achieved.

  17. Tolerance analysis on diffraction efficiency and polychromatic integral diffraction efficiency for harmonic diffractive optics

    Shan, Mao

    2016-10-01

    In this dissertation, the mathematical model of effect of manufacturing errors including microstructure relative height error and relative width error on diffraction efficiency for the harmonic diffractive optical elements (HDEs) is set up. According to the expression of the phase delay and diffraction efficiency of the HDEs, the expression of diffraction efficiency of refraction and diffractive optical element with the microstructure height and periodic width errors in fabrication process is presented in this paper. Furthermore, the effect of manufacturing errors on diffraction efficiency for the harmonic diffractive optical elements is studied, and diffraction efficiency change is analyzed as the relative microstructure height-error in the same and in the opposite sign as well as relative width-error in the same and in the opposite sign. Example including infrared wavelength with materials GE has been discussed in this paper. Two kinds of manufacturing errors applied in 3.7 4.3um middle infrared and 8.7-11.5um far infrared optical system which results in diffraction efficiency and PIDE of HDEs are studied. The analysis results can be used for manufacturing error control in micro-structure height and periodic width. Results can be used for HDEs processing.

  18. Computer Simulation of Diffraction Patterns.

    Dodd, N. A.

    1983-01-01

    Describes an Apple computer program (listing available from author) which simulates Fraunhofer and Fresnel diffraction using vector addition techniques (vector chaining) and allows user to experiment with different shaped multiple apertures. Graphics output include vector resultants, phase difference, diffraction patterns, and the Cornu spiral…

  19. Combined use of liquid chromatography-hybrid quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry (LC-QTOF-MS) and high performance liquid chromatography with photodiode array detector (HPLC-DAD) in systematic toxicological analysis.

    Broecker, Sebastian; Pragst, Fritz; Bakdash, Abdulsallam; Herre, Sieglinde; Tsokos, Michael

    2011-10-10

    Time of flight mass spectrometry provides new possibilities of substance identification by determination of the molecular formula from accurate molecular mass and isotope pattern. However, the huge number of possible isomers requires additional evidence. As a suitable way for routine performance of systematic toxicological analysis, a method for combined use of liquid chromatography-hybrid quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry (LC-QTOF-MS) and high performance liquid chromatography with diode array detector (HPLC-DAD) was developed and applied to blood samples from 77 death cases. The blood samples were prepared by extraction with CH(2)Cl(2) and by protein precipitation with acetonitrile (1:4 (v/v)). The evaporated extracts were reconstituted in 35% acetonitril/0.1% formic acid/H(2)O and aliquots were injected for analysis by LC-QTOF-MS (Agilent 6530) and HPLC-DAD (Agilent 1200). A valve switching system enabled simultaneous operation of both separated chromatographic lines under their respective optimal conditions using the same autosampler. The ESI-QTOF-MS instrument was run in data dependent acquisition mode with switching between MS and MS/MS (cycle time 1.1s) and measuring the full mass spectra and the collision induced dissociation (CID) fragment spectra of all essential [M+H](+) ions. Libraries of accurate mass CID spectra (~2500 substances) and of DAD-UV spectra (~3300 substances) of the authors were used for substance identification. The application of this procedure is demonstrated in detail at four examples with multiple drug intake or administration. In the 77 cases altogether 198 substances were identified (87 by DAD and 195 by QTOF-MS) with a frequency between 1 and 20. In practical application, the sample preparation proved to be suitable for both techniques and for a wide variety of substances with different polarity. The automatic performance of the measurements was efficient and robust. Mutual confirmation, decrease of false positive and

  20. A Combined Variable-Temperature Neutron Diffraction and Thermogravimetric Analysis Study on a Promising Oxygen Electrode, SrCo0.9Nb0.1O3-δ, for Reversible Solid Oxide Fuel Cells.

    Yang, Tianrang; Wang, Jie; Chen, Yan; An, Ke; Ma, Dong; Vogt, Thomas; Huang, Kevin

    2017-10-11

    The present study investigates the temperature-structure-stoichiometry relationship of a promising oxygen electrode SrCo 0.9 Nb 0.1 O 3-δ over a temperature (T) range from room temperature (RT) to 900 °C. The techniques employed are variable-temperature neutron diffraction (VTND) and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). At T < 75 °C, VTND reveals a tetragonal (P4/mmm) structure with a G-type magnetic ordering. Above 75 °C, the nucleus structure remains the same, while the magnetic ordering disappears. A phase transition from tetragonal (P4/mmm) to cubic (Pm3̅m) is observed at 412 °C, where the two Co sites and three O sites in the P4/mmm phase converge to one equivalent site, respectively. The phase transition temperature coincides with the peak temperature of oxygen uptake obtained by TGA. It is also observed that the Nb dopant has no preferred Co site to occupy. The oxygen vacancies are mostly located at the O3 site surrounding the Co2 site in the P4/mmm structure. The intermediate-spin state of Co 3+ at the Co2 site is responsible for the observed distortions of CoO 6 octahedra, i.e., elongation of Co2O 6 octahedra and shortening of Co1O 6 octahedra along the c-axis, which is a phenomenon known as Jahn-Teller distortion. At high temperatures, large thermal displacement factor for O 2- is observed with high concentration of oxygen vacancies, providing a structural environment favorable to high O 2- conductivity in Nb-doped SrCoO 3 -based oxygen electrode materials.

  1. Applications of TOF neutron diffraction in archaeometry

    Kockelmann, W. [Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, ISIS Facility, Chilton (United Kingdom); Siano, S.; Bartoli, L. [Istituto di Fisica Applicata - CNR, Sesto Fiorentino (Italy); Visser, D. [Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, ISIS Facility, Chilton (United Kingdom); Netherlands Organisation for Scientific Research (NWO), Den Haag (Netherlands); Hallebeek, P. [Netherlands Institute for Cultural Heritage (ICN), Amsterdam (Netherlands); Traum, R. [Kunsthistorisches Museum Wien, Muenzkabinett, Vienna (Austria); Linke, R.; Schreiner, M. [Akademie der Bildenden Kuenste, Institut fuer Wissenschaften und Technologien in der Kunst, Vienna (Austria); Kirfel, A. [Universitaet Bonn, Mineralogisch-Petrologisches Institut, Bonn (Germany)

    2006-05-15

    Neutron radiation meets the demand for a versatile diagnostic probe for collecting information from the interior of large, undisturbed museum objects or archaeological findings. Neutrons penetrate through coatings and corrosion layers deep into centimetre-thick materials, a property that makes them ideal for non-destructive examination of objects for which sampling is impractical or unacceptable. A particular attraction of neutron techniques for archaeologists and conservation scientists is the prospect of locating hidden materials and structures inside objects. Time-of-flight (TOF) neutron diffraction allows for the examination of mineral and metal phase contents, crystal structures, grain orientations, and microstructures as well as micro- and macro strains. A promising application is texture analysis which may provide clues to the deformation history of the material, and hence to specific working processes. Here we report on instructive examples of TOF neutron diffraction, including phase analyses of medieval Dutch tin-lead spoons, texture analyses of bronze specimens as well as of 16th-century silver coins. (orig.)

  2. Nanostructure Diffraction Gratings for Integrated Spectroscopy and Sensing

    Guo, Junpeng (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    The present disclosure pertains to metal or dielectric nanostructures of the subwavelength scale within the grating lines of optical diffraction gratings. The nanostructures have surface plasmon resonances or non-plasmon optical resonances. A linear photodetector array is used to capture the resonance spectra from one of the diffraction orders. The combined nanostructure super-grating and photodetector array eliminates the use of external optical spectrometers for measuring surface plasmon or optical resonance frequency shift caused by the presence of chemical and biological agents. The nanostructure super-gratings can be used for building integrated surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) spectrometers. The nanostructures within the diffraction grating lines enhance Raman scattering signal light while the diffraction grating pattern of the nanostructures diffracts Raman scattering light to different directions of propagation according to their wavelengths. Therefore, the nanostructure super-gratings allows for the use of a photodetector array to capture the surface enhanced Raman scattering spectra.

  3. Use of neutron diffraction and laser-induced plasma spectroscopy in integrated authentication methodologies of copper alloy artefacts

    Siano, S.; Bartol, L.; Mencaglia, A.A.; Agresti, J.; Miccio, M.

    2009-01-01

    The present study approaches the general problem of the authentication of copper alloy artefacts of art and historical interest using non-invasive analytical techniques. It aims to demonstrate that a suitable combination of time-of-flight neutron diffraction and laser-induced plasma spectroscopy in integrated multidisciplinary authentication methodologies can provide crucial data for discriminating between genuine archaeological objects and modern counterfeits. After introducing the methodology, which is dedicated in particular to copper alloy figurines of ancient style, two representative authentication case studies are discussed. The results of the work provide evidence that the combination of multiphase analysis using TOF-N D and elemental depth profiles provided by Lips makes it possible to solve most of the present authentication problems.

  4. Metabolomics Study of Resina Draconis on Myocardial Ischemia Rats Using Ultraperformance Liquid Chromatography/Quadrupole Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometry Combined with Pattern Recognition Methods and Metabolic Pathway Analysis

    Yunpeng Qi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Resina draconis (bright red resin isolated from Dracaena cochinchinensis, RD has been clinically used for treatment of myocardial ischemia (MI for many years. However, the mechanisms of its pharmacological action on MI are still poorly understood. This study aimed to characterize the plasma metabolic profiles of MI and investigate the mechanisms of RD on MI using ultraperformance liquid chromatography/quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry-based metabolomics combined with pattern recognition methods and metabolic pathway analysis. Twenty metabolite markers characterizing metabolic profile of MI were revealed, which were mainly involved in aminoacyl-tRNA biosynthesis, phenylalanine, tyrosine, and tryptophan biosynthesis, vascular smooth muscle contraction, sphingolipid metabolism, and so forth. After RD treatment, however, levels of seven MI metabolite markers, including phytosphingosine, sphinganine, acetylcarnitine, cGMP, cAMP, L-tyrosine, and L-valine, were turned over, indicating that RD is likely to alleviate MI through regulating the disturbed vascular smooth muscle contraction, sphingolipid metabolism, phenylalanine metabolism, and BCAA metabolism. To our best knowledge, this is the first comprehensive study to investigate the mechanisms of RD for treating MI, from a metabolomics point of view. Our findings are very valuable to gain a better understanding of MI metabolic profiles and provide novel insights for exploring the mechanisms of RD on MI.

  5. Grazing incidence diffraction : A review

    Gilles, B [LTPCM, ENSEEG. St. Martin d` Heres. (France)

    1996-09-01

    Different Grazing Incidence Diffraction (GID) methods for the analysis of thin films and multilayer structures are reviewed in three sections: the reflectivity is developed in the first one, which includes the non-specular diffuse scattering. The second one is devoted to the extremely asymmetric Bragg diffraction and the third one to the in-plane Bragg diffraction. Analytical formulations of the scattered intensities are developed for each geometry, in the framework of the kinetical analysis as well as the dynamical theory. Experimental examples are given to illustrate the quantitative possibility of the GID techniques.

  6. Diffraction dissociation at the LHC

    Jenkovszky, Laszlo [Bogolyubov Institute for Theoretical Physics (BITP), Ukrainian National Academy of Sciences 14-b, Metrolohichna str., Kiev, 03680, Ukraine and Wigner Research Centre for Physics, Hungarian Academy of Sciences 1525 Budapest, POB 49 (Hungary); Orava, Risto [Institute of Physics, Division of Elementary Particle Physics, P.O. Box 64 (Gustaf Haellstroeminkatu 2a), FI-00014 University of Helsinki, Finland and CERN, CH-1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Salii, Andrii [Bogolyubov Institute for Theoretical Physics (BITP), Ukrainian National Academy of Sciences 14-b, Metrolohichna str., Kiev, 03680 (Ukraine)

    2013-04-15

    We report on recent calculations of low missing mass single (SD) and double (DD) diffractive dissociation at LHC energies. The calculations are based on a dual-Regge model, dominated by a single Pomeron exchange. The diffractively excited states lie on the nucleon trajectory N*, appended by the isolated Roper resonance. Detailed predictions for the squared momentum transfer and missing mass dependence of the differential and integrated single-and double diffraction dissociation in the kinematical range of present and future LHC measurements are given.

  7. Diffraction dissociation at the LHC

    Jenkovszky, László; Orava, Risto; Salii, Andrii

    2013-01-01

    We report on recent calculations of low missing mass single (SD) and double (DD) diffractive dissociation at LHC energies. The calculations are based on a dual-Regge model, dominated by a single Pomeron exchange. The diffractively excited states lie on the nucleon trajectory N*, appended by the isolated Roper resonance. Detailed predictions for the squared momentum transfer and missing mass dependence of the differential and integrated single-and double diffraction dissociation in the kinematical range of present and future LHC measurements are given.

  8. The diffractive achromat full spectrum computational imaging with diffractive optics

    Peng, Yifan

    2016-07-11

    Diffractive optical elements (DOEs) have recently drawn great attention in computational imaging because they can drastically reduce the size and weight of imaging devices compared to their refractive counterparts. However, the inherent strong dispersion is a tremendous obstacle that limits the use of DOEs in full spectrum imaging, causing unacceptable loss of color fidelity in the images. In particular, metamerism introduces a data dependency in the image blur, which has been neglected in computational imaging methods so far. We introduce both a diffractive achromat based on computational optimization, as well as a corresponding algorithm for correction of residual aberrations. Using this approach, we demonstrate high fidelity color diffractive-only imaging over the full visible spectrum. In the optical design, the height profile of a diffractive lens is optimized to balance the focusing contributions of different wavelengths for a specific focal length. The spectral point spread functions (PSFs) become nearly identical to each other, creating approximately spectrally invariant blur kernels. This property guarantees good color preservation in the captured image and facilitates the correction of residual aberrations in our fast two-step deconvolution without additional color priors. We demonstrate our design of diffractive achromat on a 0.5mm ultrathin substrate by photolithography techniques. Experimental results show that our achromatic diffractive lens produces high color fidelity and better image quality in the full visible spectrum. © 2016 ACM.

  9. Towards automated diffraction tomography: Part I-Data acquisition

    Kolb, U.; Gorelik, T.; Kuebel, C.; Otten, M.T.; Hubert, D.

    2007-01-01

    The ultimate aim of electron diffraction data collection for structure analysis is to sample the reciprocal space as accurately as possible to obtain a high-quality data set for crystal structure determination. Besides a more precise lattice parameter determination, fine sampling is expected to deliver superior data on reflection intensities, which is crucial for subsequent structure analysis. Traditionally, three-dimensional (3D) diffraction data are collected by manually tilting a crystal around a selected crystallographic axis and recording a set of diffraction patterns (a tilt series) at various crystallographic zones. In a second step, diffraction data from these zones are combined into a 3D data set and analyzed to yield the desired structure information. Data collection can also be performed automatically, with the recent advances in tomography acquisition providing a suitable basis. An experimental software module has been developed for the Tecnai microscope for such an automated diffraction pattern collection while tilting around the goniometer axis. The module combines STEM imaging with diffraction pattern acquisition in nanodiffraction mode. It allows automated recording of diffraction tilt series from nanoparticles with a size down to 5 nm

  10. Helicopter Flight Procedures for Community Noise Reduction

    Greenwood, Eric

    2017-01-01

    A computationally efficient, semiempirical noise model suitable for maneuvering flight noise prediction is used to evaluate the community noise impact of practical variations on several helicopter flight procedures typical of normal operations. Turns, "quick-stops," approaches, climbs, and combinations of these maneuvers are assessed. Relatively small variations in flight procedures are shown to cause significant changes to Sound Exposure Levels over a wide area. Guidelines are developed for helicopter pilots intended to provide effective strategies for reducing the negative effects of helicopter noise on the community. Finally, direct optimization of flight trajectories is conducted to identify low noise optimal flight procedures and quantify the magnitude of community noise reductions that can be obtained through tailored helicopter flight procedures. Physically realizable optimal turns and approaches are identified that achieve global noise reductions of as much as 10 dBA Sound Exposure Level.

  11. Experimental technique of stress analyses by neutron diffraction

    Sun, Guangai; Chen, Bo; Huang, Chaoqiang

    2009-09-01

    The structures and main components of neutron diffraction stress analyses spectrometer, SALSA, as well as functions and parameters of each components are presented. The technical characteristic and structure parameters of SALSA are described. Based on these aspects, the choice of gauge volume, method of positioning sample, determination of diffraction plane and measurement of zero stress do are discussed. Combined with the practical experiments, the basic experimental measurement and the related settings are introduced, including the adjustments of components, pattern scattering, data recording and checking etc. The above can be an instruction for stress analyses experiments by neutron diffraction and neutron stress spectrometer construction. (authors)

  12. Neutron diffraction studies of glasses

    Wright, A.C.

    1987-01-01

    A survey is given of the application of neutron diffraction to structural studies of oxide and halide glasses. As with crystalline materials, neutron and X-ray diffraction are the major structural probes for glasses and other amorphous solids, particularly in respect of intermediate range order. The glasses discussed mostly have structures which are dominated by a network in which the bonding is predominantly covalent. The examples discussed demonstrate the power of the neutron diffraction technique in the investigation of the structures of inorganic glasses. The best modern diffraction experiments are capable of providing accurate data with high real space resolution, which if used correctly, are an extremely fine filter for the various structural models proposed in the literature. 42 refs

  13. Diffraction at a Straight Edge

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 20; Issue 5. Diffraction at a Straight Edge: A Gem from Sommerfeld's Work in Classical Physics. Rajaram Nityananda. General Article Volume 20 Issue 5 May 2015 pp 389-400 ...

  14. Neutron Powder Diffraction in Sweden

    Tellgren, R.

    1986-01-01

    Neutron powder diffraction in Sweden has developed around the research reactor R2 in Studsvik. The article describes this facility and presents a historical review of research results obtained. It also gives some ideas of plans for future development

  15. Tomography with energy dispersive diffraction

    Stock, S. R.; Okasinski, J. S.; Woods, R.; Baldwin, J.; Madden, T.; Quaranta, O.; Rumaiz, A.; Kuczewski, T.; Mead, J.; Krings, T.; Siddons, P.; Miceli, A.; Almer, J. D.

    2017-09-01

    X-ray diffraction can be used as the signal for tomographic reconstruction and provides a cross-sectional map of the crystallographic phases and related quantities. Diffraction tomography has been developed over the last decade using monochromatic x-radiation and an area detector. This paper reports tomographic reconstruction with polychromatic radiation and an energy sensitive detector array. The energy dispersive diffraction (EDD) geometry, the instrumentation and the reconstruction process are described and related to the expected resolution. Results of EDD tomography are presented for two samples containing hydroxyapatite (hAp). The first is a 3D-printed sample with an elliptical crosssection and contains synthetic hAp. The second is a human second metacarpal bone from the Roman-era cemetery at Ancaster, UK and contains bio-hAp which may have been altered by diagenesis. Reconstructions with different diffraction peaks are compared. Prospects for future EDD tomography are also discussed.

  16. Diffraction at a Straight Edge

    IAS Admin

    teaching and understanding physics. ... and mathematical footing, using electromagnetic theory and the proper ... this article, we will use the word diffraction to cover all experiments ..... PES Institute of Technology. Campus ... communication!)

  17. Experimental studies of diffractive phenomena

    Cool, R.L.

    1984-01-01

    The coherent inelastic scattering process, usually called inclusive diffraction dissociation, is discussed. Topics include: t and M/sub x/ dependence, factorization, finite mass sum rule and charged particle multiplicities. 6 references, 14 figures

  18. Diffractive flat panel solar concentrators of a novel design.

    de Jong, Ties M; de Boer, Dick K G; Bastiaansen, Cees W M

    2016-07-11

    A novel design for a flat panel solar concentrator is presented which is based on a light guide with a grating applied on top that diffracts light into total internal reflection. By combining geometrical and diffractive optics the geometrical concentration ratio is optimized according to the principles of nonimaging optics, while the thickness of the device is minimized due to the use of total internal reflection.

  19. Diffractive production and hadron structure

    Nussinov, S.; Szwed, J.

    1979-01-01

    Analysis of diffractive production on nuclei implied cross sections of the diffractively produced system on nucleons which are smaller than the corresponding projectile nucleon cross sections. A natural explanation for this feature is provided in the Good-Walker coherent production formalism. A specific realization of the Good-Walker formalism stated in terms of quarks and connecting electric flux tubes and some ensuing consequences are also discussed briefly. (Auth.)

  20. CONFERENCE: Elastic and diffractive scattering

    White, Alan

    1989-09-15

    Elastic scattering, when particles appear to 'bounce' off each other, and the related phenomena of diffractive scattering are currently less fashionable than the study of hard scattering processes. However this could change rapidly if unexpected results from the UA4 experiment at the CERN Collider are confirmed and their implications tested. These questions were highlighted at the third 'Blois Workshop' on Elastic and Diffractive Scattering, held early in May on the Evanston campus of Northwestern University, near Chicago.

  1. Theoretical review of diffractive phenomena

    Golec-Biernat, K.

    2005-01-01

    We review QCD based descriptions of diffractive deep inelastic scattering emphasising the role of models with parton saturation. These models provide natural explanation of such experimentally observed facts as the constant ratio of σ diff /σ tot as a function of the Bjorken variable x, and Regge factorization of diffractive parton distributions. The Ingelman-Schlein model and the soft color interaction model are also presented

  2. The Diffraction Response Interpolation Method

    Jespersen, Søren Kragh; Wilhjelm, Jens Erik; Pedersen, Peder C.

    1998-01-01

    Computer modeling of the output voltage in a pulse-echo system is computationally very demanding, particularly whenconsidering reflector surfaces of arbitrary geometry. A new, efficient computational tool, the diffraction response interpolationmethod (DRIM), for modeling of reflectors in a fluid...... medium, is presented. The DRIM is based on the velocity potential impulseresponse method, adapted to pulse-echo applications by the use of acoustical reciprocity. Specifically, the DRIM operates bydividing the reflector surface into planar elements, finding the diffraction response at the corners...

  3. Suspended DNA structural characterization by TEM diffraction

    Marini, Monica

    2017-12-01

    In this work, micro-fabrication, super-hydrophobic properties and a physiologically compatible preparation step are combined and tailored to obtain background free biological samples to be investigated by Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) diffraction technique. The validation was performed evaluating a well-known parameter such as the DNA interbases value. The diffraction spacing measured is in good agreement with those obtained by HRTEM direct metrology and by traditional X-Ray diffraction. This approach addresses single molecule studies in a simplified and reproducible straightforward way with respect to more conventional and widely used techniques. In addition, it overcomes the need of long and elaborated samples preparations: the sample is in its physiological environment and the HRTEM data acquisition occurs without any background interference, coating, staining or additional manipulation. The congruence in the results reported in this paper makes the application of this approach extremely promising towards those molecules for which crystallization remains a hurdle, such as cell membrane proteins and fibrillar proteins.

  4. Neutron diffraction from holographic gratings in PMMA

    Havermeyer, F.; Kraetzig, E.; Rupp, R.A.; Schubert, D.W.

    1999-01-01

    Complete text of publication follows. By definition photorefractive materials change the refractive index for light under the action of light. Using the spatially modulated light intensity pattern from the interference of two plane waves, volume phase gratings with accurately defined spacings can be produced. Depending on the material there are many physical origins for these gratings, but in most cases they are linked to a density modulation and, consequently, to a refractive index grating for neutrons. By diffraction of light or neutrons from such gratings even small refractive index changes down to Δn ∼ 10 -7 - 10 -9 can be measured. In our photopolymer system PMMA/MMA (poly(methyl methacrylate) with a content of 10-20% of the residual monomer methyl methacrylate) inhomogeneous illumination leads to local post-polymerisation processes of the residual monomer. The resulting light-optical refractive index grating is caused by the modulation of the monomer/polymer ratio as well as by the modulation of the total density. Only by the unique combination of methods for light and neutron diffraction, available at HOLONS (Holography and Neutron Scattering, instrument at the GKSS research centre), both contributions can be separated. We discuss the angular dependence of the neutron diffraction efficiency for weakly and strongly (efficiencies up to 60% have been achieved) modulated gratings and propose a simple model for the evaluation of the gratings. (author)

  5. Suspended DNA structural characterization by TEM diffraction

    Marini, Monica; Allione, Marco; Lopatin, Sergei; Moretti, Manola; Giugni, Andrea; Torre, Bruno; Di Fabrizio, Enzo M.

    2017-01-01

    In this work, micro-fabrication, super-hydrophobic properties and a physiologically compatible preparation step are combined and tailored to obtain background free biological samples to be investigated by Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) diffraction technique. The validation was performed evaluating a well-known parameter such as the DNA interbases value. The diffraction spacing measured is in good agreement with those obtained by HRTEM direct metrology and by traditional X-Ray diffraction. This approach addresses single molecule studies in a simplified and reproducible straightforward way with respect to more conventional and widely used techniques. In addition, it overcomes the need of long and elaborated samples preparations: the sample is in its physiological environment and the HRTEM data acquisition occurs without any background interference, coating, staining or additional manipulation. The congruence in the results reported in this paper makes the application of this approach extremely promising towards those molecules for which crystallization remains a hurdle, such as cell membrane proteins and fibrillar proteins.

  6. Revisit to diffraction anomalous fine structure

    Kawaguchi, T.; Fukuda, K.; Tokuda, K.; Shimada, K.; Ichitsubo, T.; Oishi, M.; Mizuki, J.; Matsubara, E.

    2014-01-01

    The diffraction anomalous fine structure method has been revisited by applying this measurement technique to polycrystalline samples and using an analytical method with the logarithmic dispersion relation. The diffraction anomalous fine structure (DAFS) method that is a spectroscopic analysis combined with resonant X-ray diffraction enables the determination of the valence state and local structure of a selected element at a specific crystalline site and/or phase. This method has been improved by using a polycrystalline sample, channel-cut monochromator optics with an undulator synchrotron radiation source, an area detector and direct determination of resonant terms with a logarithmic dispersion relation. This study makes the DAFS method more convenient and saves a large amount of measurement time in comparison with the conventional DAFS method with a single crystal. The improved DAFS method has been applied to some model samples, Ni foil and Fe 3 O 4 powder, to demonstrate the validity of the measurement and the analysis of the present DAFS method

  7. Identification of regioisomers of methylated kaempferol and quercetin by ultra high performance liquid chromatography quadrupole time-of-flight (UHPLC–QTOF) tandem mass spectrometry combined with diagnostic fragmentation pattern analysis

    Ma, Chengying; Lv, Haipeng; Zhang, Xinzhong; Chen, Zongmao; Shi, Jiang; Lu, Meiling; Lin, Zhi

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: •Found methane elimination is position-specific for methylated flavonols. •Found retro Diels–Alder fragments retained methoxy at original ring of flavonols. •Proposed a diagnostic pattern for discriminating regioisomers of flavonols. •Identified the specificity of three novel flavonol O-methyltransferases. •Identified six biologically active compounds and four new compounds. -- Abstract: The O-methylation of active flavonoids can enhance their antiallergic, anticancerous, and cardioprotective effects depending on the methylation position. Thus, it is biologically and pharmacologically important to differentiate methylated flavonoid regioisomers. In this study, we examined the regioisomers of methylated kaempferol and quercetin using ultra high performance liquid chromatography quadrupole time-of-flight tandem mass spectrometry. The methyl groups on the flavonoids can generally be cleaved as methyl radicals in a position-independent manner. We found that methyl groups can be cleaved as methane. If there are protons adjacent the methoxy on the flavonol rings, intra-molecule proton transfer can occur via collision-induced dissociation, and one molecule of methane can then be eliminated. The remaining charged fragment ([M+H−CH 4 ] + ) reflects the adjacent structure and is specific to the methoxy position. Furthermore, the retro Diels–Alder (RDA) fragmentation of methylated flavonols can generate fragments with the methoxy at the original methylated ring. Combining the position-specific [M+H−CH 4 ] + fragment with the RDA fragments provides a diagnostic pattern for rapidly identifying methylated regioisomeric flavonols. Along with their retention behaviour, we have successfully identified ten regioisomers of methylated kaempferol and quercetin, which include six compounds previously reported in plants and shown to be biologically active. The developed approach is sensitive, rapid, reliable, and requires few standard compounds. It is highly

  8. Development of a comprehensive screening method for more than 300 organic chemicals in water samples using a combination of solid-phase extraction and liquid chromatography-time-of-flight-mass spectrometry.

    Chau, Hong Thi Cam; Kadokami, Kiwao; Ifuku, Tomomi; Yoshida, Yusuke

    2017-12-01

    A comprehensive screening method for 311 organic compounds with a wide range of physicochemical properties (log Pow -2.2-8.53) in water samples was developed by combining solid-phase extraction with liquid chromatography-high-resolution time-of-flight mass spectrometry. Method optimization using 128 pesticides revealed that tandem extraction with styrene-divinylbenzene polymer and activated carbon solid-phase extraction cartridges at pH 7.0 was optimal. The developed screening method was able to extract 190 model compounds with average recovery of 80.8% and average relative standard deviations (RSD) of 13.5% from spiked reagent water at 0.20 μg L -1 , and 87.1% recovery and 10.8% RSD at 0.05 μg L -1 . Spike-recovery testing (0.20 μg L -1 ) using real sewage treatment plant effluents resulted in an average recovery and average RSD of 190 model compounds of 77.4 and 13.1%, respectively. The method was applied to the influent and effluent of five sewage treatment plants in Kitakyushu, Japan, with 29 out of 311 analytes being observed at least once. The results showed that this method can screen for a large number of chemicals with a wide range of physicochemical properties quickly and at low operational cost, something that is difficult to achieve using conventional analytical methods. This method will find utility in target screening of hazardous chemicals with a high risk in environmental waters, and for confirming the safety of water after environmental incidents.

  9. Proteomic analysis of proteins expressing in regions of rat brain by a combination of SDS-PAGE with nano-liquid chromatography-quadrupole-time of flight tandem mass spectrometry

    Maekawa Tsuyoshi

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Most biological functions controlled by the brain and their related disorders are closely associated with activation in specific regions of the brain. Neuroproteomics has been applied to the analysis of whole brain, and the general pattern of protein expression in all regions has been elucidated. However, the comprehensive proteome of each brain region remains unclear. Results In this study, we carried out comparative proteomics of six regions of the adult rat brain: thalamus, hippocampus, frontal cortex, parietal cortex, occipital cortex, and amygdala using semi-quantitative analysis by Mascot Score of the identified proteins. In order to identify efficiently the proteins that are present in the brain, the proteins were separated by a combination of SDS-PAGE on a C18 column-equipped nano-liquid chromatograph, and analyzed by quadrupole-time of flight-tandem-mass spectrometry. The proteomic data show 2,909 peptides in the rat brain, with more than 200 identified as region-abundant proteins by semi-quantitative analysis. The regions containing the identified proteins are membrane (20.0%, cytoplasm (19.5%, mitochondrion (17.1%, cytoskeleton (8.2%, nucleus (4.7%, extracellular region (3.3%, and other (18.0%. Of the identified proteins, the expressions of glial fibrillary acidic protein, GABA transporter 3, Septin 5, heat shock protein 90, synaptotagmin, heat shock protein 70, and pyruvate kinase were confirmed by immunoblotting. We examined the distributions in rat brain of GABA transporter 3, glial fibrillary acidic protein, and heat shock protein 70 by immunohistochemistry, and found that the proteins are localized around the regions observed by proteomic analysis and immunoblotting. IPA analysis indicates that pathways closely related to the biological functions of each region may be activated in rat brain. Conclusions These observations indicate that proteomics in each region of adult rat brain may provide a novel way to

  10. Diffraction and single-crystal elastic constants of Inconel 625 at room and elevated temperatures determined by neutron diffraction

    Wang, Zhuqing; Stoica, Alexandru D.; Ma, Dong; Beese, Allison M.

    2016-01-01

    In this work, diffraction and single-crystal elastic constants of Inconel 625 have been determined by means of in situ loading at room and elevated temperatures using time-of-flight neutron diffraction. Theoretical models proposed by Voigt, Reuss, and Kroner were used to determine single-crystal elastic constants from measured diffraction elastic constants, with the Kroner model having the best ability to capture experimental data. The magnitude of single-crystal elastic moduli, computed from single-crystal elastic constants, decreases and the single crystal anisotropy increases as temperature increases, indicating the importance of texture in affecting macroscopic stress at elevated temperatures. The experimental data reported here are of great importance in understanding additive manufacturing of metallic components as: diffraction elastic constants are required for computing residual stresses from residual lattice strains measured using neutron diffraction, which can be used to validate thermomechanical models of additive manufacturing, while single-crystal elastic constants can be used in crystal plasticity modeling, for example, to understand mechanical deformation behavior of additively manufactured components.

  11. Diffraction and single-crystal elastic constants of Inconel 625 at room and elevated temperatures determined by neutron diffraction

    Wang, Zhuqing [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Stoica, Alexandru D. [Chemical and Engineering Materials Division, Neutron Sciences Directorate, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Ma, Dong, E-mail: dongma@ornl.gov [Chemical and Engineering Materials Division, Neutron Sciences Directorate, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Beese, Allison M., E-mail: amb961@psu.edu [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States)

    2016-09-30

    In this work, diffraction and single-crystal elastic constants of Inconel 625 have been determined by means of in situ loading at room and elevated temperatures using time-of-flight neutron diffraction. Theoretical models proposed by Voigt, Reuss, and Kroner were used to determine single-crystal elastic constants from measured diffraction elastic constants, with the Kroner model having the best ability to capture experimental data. The magnitude of single-crystal elastic moduli, computed from single-crystal elastic constants, decreases and the single crystal anisotropy increases as temperature increases, indicating the importance of texture in affecting macroscopic stress at elevated temperatures. The experimental data reported here are of great importance in understanding additive manufacturing of metallic components as: diffraction elastic constants are required for computing residual stresses from residual lattice strains measured using neutron diffraction, which can be used to validate thermomechanical models of additive manufacturing, while single-crystal elastic constants can be used in crystal plasticity modeling, for example, to understand mechanical deformation behavior of additively manufactured components.

  12. Advanced x-ray stress analysis method for a single crystal using different diffraction plane families

    Imafuku, Muneyuki; Suzuki, Hiroshi; Sueyoshi, Kazuyuki; Akita, Koichi; Ohya, Shin-ichi

    2008-01-01

    Generalized formula of the x-ray stress analysis for a single crystal with unknown stress-free lattice parameter was proposed. This method enables us to evaluate the plane stress states with any combination of diffraction planes. We can choose and combine the appropriate x-ray sources and diffraction plane families, depending on the sample orientation and the apparatus, whenever diffraction condition is satisfied. The analysis of plane stress distributions in an iron single crystal was demonstrated combining with the diffraction data for Fe{211} and Fe{310} plane families

  13. Flight plan optimization

    Dharmaseelan, Anoop; Adistambha, Keyne D.

    2015-05-01

    Fuel cost accounts for 40 percent of the operating cost of an airline. Fuel cost can be minimized by planning a flight on optimized routes. The routes can be optimized by searching best connections based on the cost function defined by the airline. The most common algorithm that used to optimize route search is Dijkstra's. Dijkstra's algorithm produces a static result and the time taken for the search is relatively long. This paper experiments a new algorithm to optimize route search which combines the principle of simulated annealing and genetic algorithm. The experimental results of route search, presented are shown to be computationally fast and accurate compared with timings from generic algorithm. The new algorithm is optimal for random routing feature that is highly sought by many regional operators.

  14. Neutron diffraction and oxide research

    Hunter, B.; Howard, C.J.; Kennedy, B.J.

    1999-01-01

    Oxide compounds form a large class of interesting materials that have a diverse range of mechanical and electronic properties. This diversity and its commercial implications has had a significant impact on physics research. This is particularly evident in the fields of superconductivity magnetoresistivity and ferroelectricity, where discoveries in the last 15 years have given rise to significant shifts in research activities. Historically, oxides have been studied for many years, but it is only recently that significant effort has been diverted to the study of oxide materials for their application to mechanical and electronic devices. An important property of such materials is the atomic structure, for the determination of which diffraction techniques are ideally suited. Recent examples of structure determinations using neutron diffraction in oxide based systems are high temperature superconductors, where oxygen defects are a key factor. Here, neutron diffraction played a major role in determining the effect of oxygen on the superconducting properties. Similarly, neutron diffraction has enjoyed much success in the determination of the structures of the manganate based colossal magnetoresistive (CMR) materials. In both these cases the structure plays a pivotal role in determining theoretical models of the electronic properties. The neutron scattering group at ANSTO has investigated several oxide systems using neutron powder diffraction. Two such systems are presented in this paper; the zirconia-based materials that are used as engineering materials, and the perovskite-based oxides that include the well known cuprate superconductors and the manganate CMR materials

  15. High-energy particle diffraction

    Barone, V.; Predazzi, E.

    2002-01-01

    This monograph gives a comprehensive and up-to-date overview of soft and hard diffraction processes in strong interaction physics. The first part covers the general formalism (the optical analogy, the eikonal picture, high-energy kinematics, S-matrix theory) and soft hadron-hadron scattering (including the Regge theory) in a complete and mature presentation. It can be used as a textbook in particle physics classes. The remainder of the book is devoted to the 'new diffraction': the pomeron in QCD, low-x physics, diffractive deep inelastic scattering and related processes, jet production etc. It presents recent results and experimental findings and their phenomenological interpretations. This part addresses graduate students as well as researchers. (orig.)

  16. Diffraction of high energy electrons

    Bourret, A.

    1981-10-01

    The diffraction of electrons by a crystal is examined to study its structure. As the electron-substance interaction is strong, it must be treated in a dynamic manner. Using the N waves theory and physical optics the base equations giving the wave at the outlet are deduced for a perfect crystal and their equivalence is shown. The more complex case of an imperfect crystal is then envisaged in these two approaches. In both cases, only the diffraction of high energy electrons ( > 50 KeV) are considered since in the diffraction of slow electrons back scattering cannot be ignored. Taking into account an increasingly greater number of beams, through fast calculations computer techniques, enables images to be simulated in very varied conditions. The general use of the Fast Fourier Transform has given a clear cut practical advantage to the multi-layer method [fr

  17. Powder diffraction from a continuous microjet of submicrometer protein crystals.

    Shapiro, D A; Chapman, H N; Deponte, D; Doak, R B; Fromme, P; Hembree, G; Hunter, M; Marchesini, S; Schmidt, K; Spence, J; Starodub, D; Weierstall, U

    2008-11-01

    Atomic-resolution structures from small proteins have recently been determined from high-quality powder diffraction patterns using a combination of stereochemical restraints and Rietveld refinement [Von Dreele (2007), J. Appl. Cryst. 40, 133-143; Margiolaki et al. (2007), J. Am. Chem. Soc. 129, 11865-11871]. While powder diffraction data have been obtained from batch samples of small crystal-suspensions, which are exposed to X-rays for long periods of time and undergo significant radiation damage, the proof-of-concept that protein powder diffraction data from nanocrystals of a membrane protein can be obtained using a continuous microjet is shown. This flow-focusing aerojet has been developed to deliver a solution of hydrated protein nanocrystals to an X-ray beam for diffraction analysis. This method requires neither the crushing of larger polycrystalline samples nor any techniques to avoid radiation damage such as cryocooling. Apparatus to record protein powder diffraction in this manner has been commissioned, and in this paper the first powder diffraction patterns from a membrane protein, photosystem I, with crystallite sizes of less than 500 nm are presented. These preliminary patterns show the lowest-order reflections, which agree quantitatively with theoretical calculations of the powder profile. The results also serve to test our aerojet injector system, with future application to femtosecond diffraction in free-electron X-ray laser schemes, and for serial crystallography using a single-file beam of aligned hydrated molecules.

  18. Manned Flight Simulator (MFS)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Aircraft Simulation Division, home to the Manned Flight Simulator (MFS), provides real-time, high fidelity, hardware-in-the-loop flight simulation capabilities...

  19. Light diffraction through a feather

    Pérez García, Hugo;

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We have used a feather to study light diffraction, in a qualitative as well as in a quantitative manner. Experimental measurement of the separation between the bright spots obtained with a laser pointer allowed the determination of the space between feather's barbs and barbules. The results we have obtained agree satisfactorily with those corresponding to a typical feather. Due to the kind of materials, the related concepts and the experimental results, this activity becomes an excellent didactic resource suitable for studying diffraction, both in introductory undergraduate as well as in secondary school physics courses.

  20. CONFERENCE: Elastic and diffractive scattering

    White, Alan

    1989-01-01

    Elastic scattering, when particles appear to 'bounce' off each other, and the related phenomena of diffractive scattering are currently less fashionable than the study of hard scattering processes. However this could change rapidly if unexpected results from the UA4 experiment at the CERN Collider are confirmed and their implications tested. These questions were highlighted at the third 'Blois Workshop' on Elastic and Diffractive Scattering, held early in May on the Evanston campus of Northwestern University, near Chicago

  1. Dynamical theory of neutron diffraction

    Sears, V.F.

    1978-01-01

    We present a review of the dynamical theory of neutron diffraction by macroscopic bodies which provides the theoretical basis for the study of neutron optics. We consider both the theory of dispersion, in which it is shown that the coherent wave in the medium satisfies a macroscopic one-body Schroedinger equation, and the theory of reflection, refraction, and diffraction in which the above equation is solved for a number of special cases of interest. The theory is illustrated with the help of experimental results obtained over the past 10 years by a number of new techniques such as neutron gravity refractometry. Pendelloesung interference, and neutron interferometry. (author)

  2. Diffractive dissociation and new quarks

    White, A.R.

    1983-04-01

    We argue that the chiral limit of QCD can be identified with the strong (diffractive dissociation) coupling limit of reggeon field theory. Critical Pomeron scaling at high energy must then be directly related to an infra-red fixed-point of massless QCD and so requires a large number of flavors. This gives a direct argument that the emergence of diffraction-peak scaling, KNO scaling etc. at anti p-p colliders are evidence of a substantial quark structure still to be discovered

  3. Gaussian beam diffraction in weakly anisotropic inhomogeneous media

    Kravtsov, Yu.A., E-mail: kravtsov@am.szczecin.p [Institute of Physics, Maritime University of Szczecin, Szczecin 70-500 (Poland); Space Research Institute, Russian Academy of Science, Moscow 117 997 (Russian Federation); Berczynski, P., E-mail: pawel.berczynski@ps.p [Institute of Physics, West Pomeranian University of Technology, Szczecin 70-310 (Poland); Bieg, B., E-mail: b.bieg@am.szczecin.p [Institute of Physics, Maritime University of Szczecin, Szczecin 70-500 (Poland)

    2009-08-10

    Combination of quasi-isotropic approximation (QIA) of geometric optics with paraxial complex geometric optics (PCGO) is suggested, which allows describing both diffraction and polarization evolution of Gaussian electromagnetic beams in weakly anisotropic inhomogeneous media. Combination QIA/PCGO reduces Maxwell equations to the system of the ordinary differential equations of the first order and radically simplifies solution of various problems, related to microwave plasma diagnostics, including plasma polarimetry, interferometry and refractometry in thermonuclear reactors. Efficiency of the method is demonstrated by the example of electromagnetic beam diffraction in a linear layer of magnetized plasma with parameters, modeling tokamak plasma in the project ITER.

  4. Gaussian beam diffraction in weakly anisotropic inhomogeneous media

    Kravtsov, Yu.A.; Berczynski, P.; Bieg, B.

    2009-01-01

    Combination of quasi-isotropic approximation (QIA) of geometric optics with paraxial complex geometric optics (PCGO) is suggested, which allows describing both diffraction and polarization evolution of Gaussian electromagnetic beams in weakly anisotropic inhomogeneous media. Combination QIA/PCGO reduces Maxwell equations to the system of the ordinary differential equations of the first order and radically simplifies solution of various problems, related to microwave plasma diagnostics, including plasma polarimetry, interferometry and refractometry in thermonuclear reactors. Efficiency of the method is demonstrated by the example of electromagnetic beam diffraction in a linear layer of magnetized plasma with parameters, modeling tokamak plasma in the project ITER.

  5. Reconstructing an icosahedral virus from single-particle diffraction experiments

    Saldin, D. K.; Poon, H.-C.; Schwander, P.; Uddin, M.; Schmidt, M.

    2011-08-01

    The first experimental data from single-particle scattering experiments from free electron lasers (FELs) are now becoming available. The first such experiments are being performed on relatively large objects such as viruses, which produce relatively low-resolution, low-noise diffraction patterns in so-called ``diffract-and-destroy'' experiments. We describe a very simple test on the angular correlations of measured diffraction data to determine if the scattering is from an icosahedral particle. If this is confirmed, the efficient algorithm proposed can then combine diffraction data from multiple shots of particles in random unknown orientations to generate a full 3D image of the icosahedral particle. We demonstrate this with a simulation for the satellite tobacco necrosis virus (STNV), the atomic coordinates of whose asymmetric unit is given in Protein Data Bank entry 2BUK.

  6. Computational imaging using lightweight diffractive-refractive optics

    Peng, Yifan

    2015-11-23

    Diffractive optical elements (DOE) show great promise for imaging optics that are thinner and more lightweight than conventional refractive lenses while preserving their light efficiency. Unfortunately, severe spectral dispersion currently limits the use of DOEs in consumer-level lens design. In this article, we jointly design lightweight diffractive-refractive optics and post-processing algorithms to enable imaging under white light illumination. Using the Fresnel lens as a general platform, we show three phase-plate designs, including a super-thin stacked plate design, a diffractive-refractive-hybrid lens, and a phase coded-aperture lens. Combined with cross-channel deconvolution algorithm, both spherical and chromatic aberrations are corrected. Experimental results indicate that using our computational imaging approach, diffractive-refractive optics is an alternative candidate to build light efficient and thin optics for white light imaging.

  7. Computational imaging using lightweight diffractive-refractive optics

    Peng, Yifan; Fu, Qiang; Amata, Hadi; Su, Shuochen; Heide, Felix; Heidrich, Wolfgang

    2015-01-01

    Diffractive optical elements (DOE) show great promise for imaging optics that are thinner and more lightweight than conventional refractive lenses while preserving their light efficiency. Unfortunately, severe spectral dispersion currently limits the use of DOEs in consumer-level lens design. In this article, we jointly design lightweight diffractive-refractive optics and post-processing algorithms to enable imaging under white light illumination. Using the Fresnel lens as a general platform, we show three phase-plate designs, including a super-thin stacked plate design, a diffractive-refractive-hybrid lens, and a phase coded-aperture lens. Combined with cross-channel deconvolution algorithm, both spherical and chromatic aberrations are corrected. Experimental results indicate that using our computational imaging approach, diffractive-refractive optics is an alternative candidate to build light efficient and thin optics for white light imaging.

  8. Dedicated software for diffractive optics design and simulation

    Firsov, A; Brzhezinskaya, M; Erko, A; Firsov, A; Svintsov, A

    2013-01-01

    An efficient software package for the structure design and simulation of imaging properties of diffraction optical elements has been developed. It operates with point source and consists of: the ZON software, to calculate the structure of an optical element in transmission and reflection; the KRGF software, to simulate the diffraction properties of an ideal optical element with point source; the DS software, to calculate the diffraction properties by taking into consideration material and shadowing effects. Optional software allows simulation with a real non-point source. Zone plate thickness profile, source shape as well as substrate curvature are considered in this calculation. This is especially important for the diffractive focusing elements and gratings at a total external reflection, given that the lateral size of the structure can be up to 1 m. The program package can be used in combination with the Nanomaker software to prepare data for ion and e-beam surface modifications and corrections.

  9. Insect flight muscle metabolism

    Horst, D.J. van der; Beenakkers, A.M.Th.; Marrewijk, W.J.A. van

    1984-01-01

    The flight of an insect is of a very complicated and extremely energy-demanding nature. Wingbeat frequency may differ between various species but values up to 1000 Hz have been measured. Consequently metabolic activity may be very high during flight and the transition from rest to flight is

  10. High Resolution Powder Diffraction and Structure Determination

    Cox, D. E.

    1999-01-01

    It is clear that high-resolution synchrotrons X-ray powder diffraction is a very powerful and convenient tool for material characterization and structure determination. Most investigations to date have been carried out under ambient conditions and have focused on structure solution and refinement. The application of high-resolution techniques to increasingly complex structures will certainly represent an important part of future studies, and it has been seen how ab initio solution of structures with perhaps 100 atoms in the asymmetric unit is within the realms of possibility. However, the ease with which temperature-dependence measurements can be made combined with improvements in the technology of position-sensitive detectors will undoubtedly stimulate precise in situ structural studies of phase transitions and related phenomena. One challenge in this area will be to develop high-resolution techniques for ultra-high pressure investigations in diamond anvil cells. This will require highly focused beams and very precise collimation in front of the cell down to dimensions of 50 (micro)m or less. Anomalous scattering offers many interesting possibilities as well. As a means of enhancing scattering contrast it has applications not only to the determination of cation distribution in mixed systems such as the superconducting oxides discussed in Section 9.5.3, but also to the location of specific cations in partially occupied sites, such as the extra-framework positions in zeolites, for example. Another possible application is to provide phasing information for ab initio structure solution. Finally, the precise determination of f as a function of energy through an absorption edge can provide useful information about cation oxidation states, particularly in conjunction with XANES data. In contrast to many experiments at a synchrotron facility, powder diffraction is a relatively simple and user-friendly technique, and most of the procedures and software for data analysis

  11. CMS results on soft diffraction

    INSPIRE-00086121

    2013-01-01

    We present measurements of soft single- and double-diffractive cross sections, as well as of forward rapidity gap cross sections at 7 TeV at the LHC, and compare the results to other measurements and to theoretical predictions implemented in various Monte Carlo simulations.

  12. LEED (Low Energy Electron Diffraction)

    Aberdam, M.

    1973-01-01

    The various types of systems studied by LEED, and for which the geometry of diffraction patterns is exploited, are reviewed, intensity profiles being another source of information. Two representative approaches of the scattering phenomenon are examined; the band structure theory and the T matrix approach [fr

  13. A QCD analysis of ZEUS diffractive data

    Chekanov, S.; Derrick, M.; Magill, S. [Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL (US)] (and others)

    2009-11-15

    ZEUS inclusive diffractive cross-section measurements have been used in a DGLAP next-to-leading-order QCD analysis to extract the diffractive parton distribution functions. Data on diffractive dijet production in deep inelastic scattering have also been included to constrain the gluon density. Predictions based on the extracted parton densities are compared to diffractive charm and dijet photoproduction data. (orig.)

  14. A QCD analysis of ZEUS diffractive data

    Chekanov, S.; Derrick, M.; Magill, S.

    2009-11-01

    ZEUS inclusive diffractive cross-section measurements have been used in a DGLAP next-to-leading-order QCD analysis to extract the diffractive parton distribution functions. Data on diffractive dijet production in deep inelastic scattering have also been included to constrain the gluon density. Predictions based on the extracted parton densities are compared to diffractive charm and dijet photoproduction data. (orig.)

  15. Electro-optic diffraction grating tuned laser

    Hughes, R.S.

    1975-01-01

    An electro-optic diffraction grating tuned laser comprising a laser medium, output mirror, retro-reflective grating and an electro-optic diffraction grating beam deflector positioned between the laser medium and the reflective diffraction grating is described. An optional angle multiplier may be used between the electro-optic diffraction grating and the reflective grating. (auth)

  16. Identification of regioisomers of methylated kaempferol and quercetin by ultra high performance liquid chromatography quadrupole time-of-flight (UHPLC–QTOF) tandem mass spectrometry combined with diagnostic fragmentation pattern analysis

    Ma, Chengying; Lv, Haipeng; Zhang, Xinzhong; Chen, Zongmao; Shi, Jiang [Tea Research Institute, Chinese Academy of Agricultural Sciences, 9 Meiling South Road, Hangzhou, Zhejiang 310008 (China); Lu, Meiling, E-mail: meilinglu@hotmail.com [Chemical Analysis Group, Agilent Technologies, No. 3 Wangjing North Road, Chaoyang Distr., Beijing 100102 (China); Lin, Zhi, E-mail: linz@mail.tricaas.com [Tea Research Institute, Chinese Academy of Agricultural Sciences, 9 Meiling South Road, Hangzhou, Zhejiang 310008 (China)

    2013-09-17

    Highlights: •Found methane elimination is position-specific for methylated flavonols. •Found retro Diels–Alder fragments retained methoxy at original ring of flavonols. •Proposed a diagnostic pattern for discriminating regioisomers of flavonols. •Identified the specificity of three novel flavonol O-methyltransferases. •Identified six biologically active compounds and four new compounds. -- Abstract: The O-methylation of active flavonoids can enhance their antiallergic, anticancerous, and cardioprotective effects depending on the methylation position. Thus, it is biologically and pharmacologically important to differentiate methylated flavonoid regioisomers. In this study, we examined the regioisomers of methylated kaempferol and quercetin using ultra high performance liquid chromatography quadrupole time-of-flight tandem mass spectrometry. The methyl groups on the flavonoids can generally be cleaved as methyl radicals in a position-independent manner. We found that methyl groups can be cleaved as methane. If there are protons adjacent the methoxy on the flavonol rings, intra-molecule proton transfer can occur via collision-induced dissociation, and one molecule of methane can then be eliminated. The remaining charged fragment ([M+H−CH{sub 4}]{sup +}) reflects the adjacent structure and is specific to the methoxy position. Furthermore, the retro Diels–Alder (RDA) fragmentation of methylated flavonols can generate fragments with the methoxy at the original methylated ring. Combining the position-specific [M+H−CH{sub 4}]{sup +} fragment with the RDA fragments provides a diagnostic pattern for rapidly identifying methylated regioisomeric flavonols. Along with their retention behaviour, we have successfully identified ten regioisomers of methylated kaempferol and quercetin, which include six compounds previously reported in plants and shown to be biologically active. The developed approach is sensitive, rapid, reliable, and requires few standard

  17. Profile analysis of neutron powder diffraction data at ISIS

    David, W.I.F.; Ibberson, R.M.; Matthewman, J.C.

    1992-05-01

    The aim of this manual is to document the current suite of time-of-flight neutron powder diffraction profile refinement programs available to ISIS users. Aspects of data collation and normalisation specific to the individual diffraction instruments are dealt with elsewhere. It will be assumed the user has produced a suitable data file (.DAT file) containing the profile data consisting of point by point values of the corrected diffraction profile across the pattern. The analysis of neutron powder diffraction data at ISIS by profile refinement utilises a suite of ''in-house'' written and supported programs based on the Cambridge Crystallography Subroutine Library (CCSL). A quick scan through the CCSL manual will give the user a general feel for the procedure to adopt in the use of the library and hence of the profile codes. The instructions documented in this handbook are complementary to those in the more specialist CCSL manual, and consequently go into no great detail regarding technical details of any of the CCSL routines. The programs may be run from each individual user account, for example [USER01], once the appropriate login procedure has been set-up by the instrument scientists. The programs are mostly activated by one line commands and only a basic knowledge of a VAX editor should be required; details can be found in the ''VAX primer'' available from Computer Support. (Author)

  18. Diffraction efficiency calculations of polarization diffraction gratings with surface relief

    Nazarova, D.; Sharlandjiev, P.; Berberova, N.; Blagoeva, B.; Stoykova, E.; Nedelchev, L.

    2018-03-01

    In this paper, we evaluate the optical response of a stack of two diffraction gratings of equal one-dimensional periodicity. The first one is a surface-relief grating structure; the second, a volume polarization grating. This model is based on our experimental results from polarization holographic recordings in azopolymer films. We used films of commercially available azopolymer (poly[1-[4-(3-carboxy-4-hydroxyphenylazo) benzenesulfonamido]-1,2-ethanediyl, sodium salt]), shortly denoted as PAZO. During the recording process, a polarization grating in the volume of the material and a relief grating on the film surface are formed simultaneously. In order to evaluate numerically the optical response of this “hybrid” diffraction structure, we used the rigorous coupled-wave approach (RCWA). It yields stable numerical solutions of Maxwell’s vector equations using the algebraic eigenvalue method.

  19. Stirling to Flight Initiative

    Hibbard, Kenneth E.; Mason, Lee S.; Ndu, Obi; Smith, Clayton; Withrow, James P.

    2016-01-01

    NASA has a consistent need for radioisotope power systems (RPS) to enable robotic scientific missions for planetary exploration that has been present for over four decades and will continue into the foreseeable future, as documented in the most recent Planetary Science Decadal Study Report. As RPS have evolved throughout the years, there has also grown a desire for more efficient power systems, allowing NASA to serve as good stewards of the limited plutonium-238 (238Pu), while also supporting the ever-present need to minimize mass and potential impacts to the desired science measurements. In fact, the recent Nuclear Power Assessment Study (NPAS) released in April 2015 resulted in several key conclusion regarding RPS, including affirmation that RPS will be necessary well into the 2030s (at least) and that 238Pu is indeed a precious resource requiring efficient utilization and preservation. Stirling Radioisotope Generators (SRGs) combine a Stirling cycle engine powered by a radioisotope heater unit into a single generator system. Stirling engine technology has been under development at NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) in partnership with the Department of Energy (DOE) since the 1970's. The most recent design, the 238Pu-fueled Advanced Stirling Radioisotope Generator (ASRG), was offered as part of the NASA Discovery 2010 Announcement of Opportunity (AO). The Step-2 selections for this AO included two ASRG-enabled concepts, the Titan Mare Explorer (TiME) and the Comet Hopper (CHopper), although the only non-nuclear concept, InSight, was ultimately chosen. The DOE's ASRG contract was terminated in 2013. Given that SRGs utilize significantly less 238Pu than traditional Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generators (RTGs) - approximately one quarter of the nuclear fuel, to produce similar electrical power output - they provide a technology worthy of consideration for meeting the aforementioned NASA objectives. NASA's RPS Program Office has recently investigated a new Stirling to

  20. Digital diffractive optics: Have diffractive optics entered mainstream industry yet?

    Kress, Bernard; Hejmadi, Vic

    2010-05-01

    When a new technology is integrated into industry commodity products and consumer electronic devices, and sold worldwide in retail stores, it is usually understood that this technology has then entered the realm of mainstream technology and therefore mainstream industry. Such a leap however does not come cheap, as it has a double edge sword effect: first it becomes democratized and thus massively developed by numerous companies for various applications, but also it becomes a commodity, and thus gets under tremendous pressure to cut down its production and integration costs while not sacrificing to performance. We will show, based on numerous examples extracted from recent industry history, that the field of Diffractive Optics is about to undergo such a major transformation. Such a move has many impacts on all facets of digital diffractive optics technology, from the optical design houses to the micro-optics foundries (for both mastering and volume replication), to the final product integrators or contract manufacturers. The main causes of such a transformation are, as they have been for many other technologies in industry, successive technological bubbles which have carried and lifted up diffractive optics technology within the last decades. These various technological bubbles have been triggered either by real industry needs or by virtual investment hype. Both of these causes will be discussed in the paper. The adjective ""digital"" in "digital diffractive optics" does not refer only, as it is done in digital electronics, to the digital functionality of the element (digital signal processing), but rather to the digital way they are designed (by a digital computer) and fabricated (as wafer level optics using digital masking techniques). However, we can still trace a very strong similarity between the emergence of micro-electronics from analog electronics half a century ago, and the emergence of digital optics from conventional optics today.

  1. Microgravity Flight - Accommodating Non-Human Primates

    Dalton, Bonnie P.; Searby, Nancy; Ostrach, Louis

    1994-01-01

    Spacelab Life Sciences-3 (SLS-3) was scheduled to be the first United States man-tended microgravity flight containing Rhesus monkeys. The goal of this flight as in the five untended Russian COSMOS Bion flights and an earlier American Biosatellite flight, was to understand the biomedical and biological effects of a microgravity environment using the non-human primate as human surrogate. The SLS-3/Rhesus Project and COSMOS Primate-BIOS flights all utilized the rhesus monkey, Macaca mulatta. The ultimate objective of all flights with an animal surrogate has been to evaluate and understand biological mechanisms at both the system and cellular level, thus enabling rational effective countermeasures for future long duration human activity under microgravity conditions and enabling technical application to correction of common human physiological problems within earth's gravity, e.g., muscle strength and reloading, osteoporosis, immune deficiency diseases. Hardware developed for the SLS-3/Rhesus Project was the result of a joint effort with the French Centre National d'Etudes Spatiales (CNES) and the United States National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) extending over the last decade. The flight hardware design and development required implementation of sufficient automation to insure flight crew and animal bio-isolation and maintenance with minimal impact to crew activities. A variety of hardware of varying functional capabilities was developed to support the scientific objectives of the original 22 combined French and American experiments, along with 5 Russian co-investigations, including musculoskeletal, metabolic, and behavioral studies. Unique elements of the Rhesus Research Facility (RRF) included separation of waste for daily delivery of urine and fecal samples for metabolic studies and a psychomotor test system for behavioral studies along with monitored food measurement. As in untended flights, telemetry measurements would allow monitoring of

  2. Encoded diffractive optics for full-spectrum computational imaging

    Heide, Felix

    2016-09-16

    Diffractive optical elements can be realized as ultra-thin plates that offer significantly reduced footprint and weight compared to refractive elements. However, such elements introduce severe chromatic aberrations and are not variable, unless used in combination with other elements in a larger, reconfigurable optical system. We introduce numerically optimized encoded phase masks in which different optical parameters such as focus or zoom can be accessed through changes in the mechanical alignment of a ultra-thin stack of two or more masks. Our encoded diffractive designs are combined with a new computational approach for self-calibrating imaging (blind deconvolution) that can restore high-quality images several orders of magnitude faster than the state of the art without pre-calibration of the optical system. This co-design of optics and computation enables tunable, full-spectrum imaging using thin diffractive optics.

  3. Encoded diffractive optics for full-spectrum computational imaging

    Heide, Felix; Fu, Qiang; Peng, Yifan; Heidrich, Wolfgang

    2016-01-01

    Diffractive optical elements can be realized as ultra-thin plates that offer significantly reduced footprint and weight compared to refractive elements. However, such elements introduce severe chromatic aberrations and are not variable, unless used in combination with other elements in a larger, reconfigurable optical system. We introduce numerically optimized encoded phase masks in which different optical parameters such as focus or zoom can be accessed through changes in the mechanical alignment of a ultra-thin stack of two or more masks. Our encoded diffractive designs are combined with a new computational approach for self-calibrating imaging (blind deconvolution) that can restore high-quality images several orders of magnitude faster than the state of the art without pre-calibration of the optical system. This co-design of optics and computation enables tunable, full-spectrum imaging using thin diffractive optics.

  4. Improved fatty acid detection in micro-algae and aquatic meiofauna species using a direct thermal desorption interface combined with comprehensive gas chromatography-time-of-flight mass spectrometry

    Akoto, L.; Stellaard, F.; Irth, H.; Vreuls, R.J.J.; Pel, R.

    2008-01-01

    Comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography (GC × GC) with time-of-flight mass spectrometry detection is used to profile the fatty acid composition of whole/intact aquatic microorganisms such as the common fresh water green algae Scenedesmus acutus and the filamentous cyanobacterium Limnothrix

  5. Improved fatty acid detection in micro-algae and aquatic meiofauna species using a direct thermal desorption interface combined with comprehensive gas chromatography–time-of-flight mass spectrometry

    Akoto, L.; Stellaard, F.; Irth, H.; Vreuls, R.J.J.; Pel, R.

    2008-01-01

    Comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography (GC × GC) with time-of-flight mass spectrometry detection is used to profile the fatty acid composition of whole/intact aquatic microorganisms such as the common fresh water green algae Scenedesmus acutus and the filamentous cyanobacterium Limnothrix

  6. Improved fatty acid detection in micro-algae and aquatic meiofauna species using a direct thermal desorption interface combined with comprehensive gas chromatography-time-of-flight mass spectrometry

    Akoto, Lawrence; Stellaard, Frans; Irth, Hubertus; Vreuls, Rene J. J.; Pel, Roel

    2008-01-01

    Comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography (GC x GC) with time-of-flight mass spectrometry detection is used to profile the fatty acid composition of whole/intact aquatic microorganisms such as the common fresh water green algae Scenedesmus acutus and the filamentous cyanobacterium Limnothrix

  7. Industrial applications of neutron diffraction

    Felcher, G.P.

    1989-01-01

    Neutron diffraction (or, to be more general, neutron scattering) is a most versatile and universal tool, which has been widely employed to probe the structure, the dynamics and the magnetism of condensed matter. Traditionally used for fundamental research in solid state physics, this technique more recently has been applied to problems of immediate industrial interest, as illustrated in examples covering the main fields of endeavour. 14 refs., 14 figs

  8. Neutron diffraction and Vitamin E

    Harroun, T A; Marquardt, D; Katsaras, J; Atkinson, J, E-mail: tharroun@brocku.ca

    2010-11-01

    It is generally accepted that neutron diffraction from model membrane systems is an effective biophysical technique for determining membrane structure. Here we describe an example of how deuterium labelling can elucidate the location of specific membrane soluble molecules, including a brief discussion of the technique itself. We show that deuterium labelled {alpha}-tocopherol sits upright in the bilayer, as might be expected, but at very different locations within the bilayer, depending on the degree of lipid chain unsaturation.

  9. Diffraction dissociation and elastic scattering

    Verebryusov, V.S.; Ponomarev, L.A.; Smorodinskaya, N.Ya.

    1987-01-01

    In the framework of Regge scheme with supercritical pomeron a model is suggested for the NN-scattering amplitude which takes into account the contribution introduced to the intermediate state by diffraction dissociation (DD) processes. The DD amplitude is written in terms of the Deck model which has been previously applied to describing the main DD features. The calculated NN cross sections are compared with those obtained experimentally. Theoretical predictions for higher energy are presented

  10. Diffraction from relief gratings on a biomimetic elastomer cast

    Guerrero, Raphael A.; Aranas, Erika B.

    2010-01-01

    Biomimetic optical elements combine the optimized designs of nature with the versatility of materials engineering. We employ a beetle carapace as the template for fabricating relief gratings on an elastomer substrate. Biological surface features are successfully replicated by a direct casting procedure. Far-field diffraction effects are discussed in terms of the Fraunhofer approximation in Fourier space.

  11. Synchrotron powder diffraction on Aztec blue pigments

    Sanchez del Rio, M. [European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, B.P. 220, Grenoble Cedex (France); Gutierrez-Leon, A.; Castro, G.R.; Rubio-Zuazo, J. [Spanish CRG Beamline at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, SpLine, B.P. 220, Grenoble Cedex (France); Solis, C. [Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Instituto de Fisica, Mexico, D.F. (Mexico); Sanchez-Hernandez, R. [INAH Subdireccion de Laboratorios y Apoyo Academico, Mexico, D.F. (Mexico); Robles-Camacho, J. [INAH Centro Regional Michoacan, Morelia, Michoacan (Mexico); Rojas-Gaytan, J. [INAH Direccion de Salvamento Arqueologico, Naucalpan de Juarez (Mexico)

    2008-01-15

    Some samples of raw blue pigments coming from an archaeological rescue mission in downtown Mexico City have been characterized using different techniques. The samples, some recovered as a part of a ritual offering, could be assigned to the late Aztec period (XVth century). The striking characteristic of these samples is that they seem to be raw pigments prior to any use in artworks, and it was possible to collect a few {mu}g of pigment after manual grain selection under a microscopy monitoring. All pigments are made of indigo, an organic colorant locally known as anil or xiuhquilitl. The colorant is always found in combination with an inorganic matrix, studied by powder diffraction. In one case the mineral base is palygorskite, a rare clay mineral featuring micro-channels in its structure, well known as the main ingredient of the Maya blue pigment. However, other samples present the minerals sepiolite (a clay mineral of the palygorskite family) and calcite. Another sample contains barite, a mineral never reported in prehispanic paints. We present the results of characterization using high resolution powder diffraction recorded at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (BM25A, SpLine beamline) complemented with other techniques. All of them gave consistent results on the composition. A chemical test on resistance to acids was done, showing a high resistance for the palygorskite and eventually sepiolite compounds, in good agreement with the excellent resistance of the Maya blue. (orig.)

  12. Synchrotron powder diffraction on Aztec blue pigments

    Sánchez Del Río, M.; Gutiérrez-León, A.; Castro, G. R.; Rubio-Zuazo, J.; Solís, C.; Sánchez-Hernández, R.; Robles-Camacho, J.; Rojas-Gaytán, J.

    2008-01-01

    Some samples of raw blue pigments coming from an archaeological rescue mission in downtown Mexico City have been characterized using different techniques. The samples, some recovered as a part of a ritual offering, could be assigned to the late Aztec period (XVth century). The striking characteristic of these samples is that they seem to be raw pigments prior to any use in artworks, and it was possible to collect a few μg of pigment after manual grain selection under a microscopy monitoring. All pigments are made of indigo, an organic colorant locally known as añil or xiuhquilitl. The colorant is always found in combination with an inorganic matrix, studied by powder diffraction. In one case the mineral base is palygorskite, a rare clay mineral featuring micro-channels in its structure, well known as the main ingredient of the Maya blue pigment. However, other samples present the minerals sepiolite (a clay mineral of the palygorskite family) and calcite. Another sample contains barite, a mineral never reported in prehispanic paints. We present the results of characterization using high resolution powder diffraction recorded at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (BM25A, SpLine beamline) complemented with other techniques. All of them gave consistent results on the composition. A chemical test on resistance to acids was done, showing a high resistance for the palygorskite and eventually sepiolite compounds, in good agreement with the excellent resistance of the Maya blue.

  13. Flight code validation simulator

    Sims, Brent A.

    1996-05-01

    An End-To-End Simulation capability for software development and validation of missile flight software on the actual embedded computer has been developed utilizing a 486 PC, i860 DSP coprocessor, embedded flight computer and custom dual port memory interface hardware. This system allows real-time interrupt driven embedded flight software development and checkout. The flight software runs in a Sandia Digital Airborne Computer and reads and writes actual hardware sensor locations in which Inertial Measurement Unit data resides. The simulator provides six degree of freedom real-time dynamic simulation, accurate real-time discrete sensor data and acts on commands and discretes from the flight computer. This system was utilized in the development and validation of the successful premier flight of the Digital Miniature Attitude Reference System in January of 1995 at the White Sands Missile Range on a two stage attitude controlled sounding rocket.

  14. Flight control actuation system

    Wingett, Paul T. (Inventor); Gaines, Louie T. (Inventor); Evans, Paul S. (Inventor); Kern, James I. (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    A flight control actuation system comprises a controller, electromechanical actuator and a pneumatic actuator. During normal operation, only the electromechanical actuator is needed to operate a flight control surface. When the electromechanical actuator load level exceeds 40 amps positive, the controller activates the pneumatic actuator to offset electromechanical actuator loads to assist the manipulation of flight control surfaces. The assistance from the pneumatic load assist actuator enables the use of an electromechanical actuator that is smaller in size and mass, requires less power, needs less cooling processes, achieves high output forces and adapts to electrical current variations. The flight control actuation system is adapted for aircraft, spacecraft, missiles, and other flight vehicles, especially flight vehicles that are large in size and travel at high velocities.

  15. Bat flight: aerodynamics, kinematics and flight morphology.

    Hedenström, Anders; Johansson, L Christoffer

    2015-03-01

    Bats evolved the ability of powered flight more than 50 million years ago. The modern bat is an efficient flyer and recent research on bat flight has revealed many intriguing facts. By using particle image velocimetry to visualize wake vortices, both the magnitude and time-history of aerodynamic forces can be estimated. At most speeds the downstroke generates both lift and thrust, whereas the function of the upstroke changes with forward flight speed. At hovering and slow speed bats use a leading edge vortex to enhance the lift beyond that allowed by steady aerodynamics and an inverted wing during the upstroke to further aid weight support. The bat wing and its skeleton exhibit many features and control mechanisms that are presumed to improve flight performance. Whereas bats appear aerodynamically less efficient than birds when it comes to cruising flight, they have the edge over birds when it comes to manoeuvring. There is a direct relationship between kinematics and the aerodynamic performance, but there is still a lack of knowledge about how (and if) the bat controls the movements and shape (planform and camber) of the wing. Considering the relatively few bat species whose aerodynamic tracks have been characterized, there is scope for new discoveries and a need to study species representing more extreme positions in the bat morphospace. © 2015. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  16. Capital Flight from Russia

    Prakash Loungani; Paolo Mauro

    2000-01-01

    This paper documents the scale of capital flight from Russia, compares it with that observed in other countries, and reviews policy options. The evidence from other countries suggests that capital flight can be reversed once reforms take hold. The paper argues that capital flight from Russia can only be curbed through a medium-term reform strategy aimed at improving governance and macroeconomic performance, and strengthening the banking system. Capital controls result in costly distortions an...

  17. Theseus in Flight

    1996-01-01

    The twin pusher propeller-driven engines of the Theseus research aircraft can be clearly seen in this photo, taken during a 1996 research flight at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California. The Theseus aircraft, built and operated by Aurora Flight Sciences Corporation, Manassas, Virginia, was a unique aircraft flown at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, under a cooperative agreement between NASA and Aurora. Dryden hosted the Theseus program, providing hangar space and range safety for flight testing. Aurora Flight Sciences was responsible for the actual flight testing, vehicle flight safety, and operation of the aircraft. The Theseus remotely piloted aircraft flew its maiden flight on May 24, 1996, at Dryden. During its sixth flight on November 12, 1996, Theseus experienced an in-flight structural failure that resulted in the loss of the aircraft. As of the beginning of the year 2000, Aurora had not rebuilt the aircraft. Theseus was built for NASA under an innovative, $4.9 million fixed-price contract by Aurora Flight Sciences Corporation and its partners, West Virginia University, Morgantown, West Virginia, and Fairmont State College, Fairmont, West Virginia. The twin-engine, unpiloted vehicle had a 140-foot wingspan, and was constructed largely of composite materials. Powered by two 80-horsepower, turbocharged piston engines that drove twin 9-foot-diameter propellers, Theseus was designed to fly autonomously at high altitudes, with takeoff and landing under the active control of a ground-based pilot in a ground control station 'cockpit.' With the potential ability to carry 700 pounds of science instruments to altitudes above 60,000 feet for durations of greater than 24 hours, Theseus was intended to support research in areas such as stratospheric ozone depletion and the atmospheric effects of future high-speed civil transport aircraft engines. Instruments carried aboard Theseus also would be able to validate satellite

  18. International Centre for Diffraction Data (ICDD)

    Hubbard, C.R.; O'Connor, B.H.

    2002-01-01

    Full text: The ICDD is a not-for-profit organisation comprising approximately 300 of the world's leading x-ray scientists. It is dedicated to collecting, editing, publishing and distributing powder diffraction data for the identification of crystalline materials. The membership of the ICDD consists of worldwide representation from academe, government and industry. It is our mission to continue as the world centre for quality x-ray powder diffraction data to meet the needs of the technical community. Through the combined efforts of the members and its staff of 40 at ICDD Headquarters, the organisation serves the x-ray analysis community (i) by producing the ICDD Powder Diffraction File (PDF) and other data base products for materials characterisation; (ii) through x-ray analysis education programs and conference management (including the Denver X-ray Conference); and (iii) through philanthropic initiatives such as scholarship support for postgraduate students working in the field. The current Release 2001 of the PDF (PDF-2) contains 87,500 measured patterns and 49,000 patterns calculated from the ICSD database. The number of PDF patterns in this latest release has increased by approximately 3,000, including some 2,500 measured patterns. The quality of the database is being continuously improved through the organisation's Grant-in-Aid program whereby diffractionists around the world contribute to the measurement of patterns for new materials and to the improvement of existing PDF data. The organisation is devoting much attention to the needs of the bioscience community. The database will soon feature a much-expanded set of patterns for organic, polymer, pharmaceutical and biomaterials. The ICDD is about to release a relational database (RDB) version of the PDF (PDF-4) which will give users a very sophisticated tool for data mining. The PDF-4 will provide a quantum leap in data mining techniques, and will soon lead to the PDF being cross-linked to other diffraction

  19. Flight research and testing

    Putnam, Terrill W.; Ayers, Theodore G.

    1989-01-01

    Flight research and testing form a critical link in the aeronautic research and development chain. Brilliant concepts, elegant theories, and even sophisticated ground tests of flight vehicles are not sufficient to prove beyond a doubt that an unproven aeronautical concept will actually perform as predicted. Flight research and testing provide the ultimate proof that an idea or concept performs as expected. Ever since the Wright brothers, flight research and testing were the crucible in which aeronautical concepts were advanced and proven to the point that engineers and companies are willing to stake their future to produce and design aircraft. This is still true today, as shown by the development of the experimental X-30 aerospace plane. The Dryden Flight Research Center (Ames-Dryden) continues to be involved in a number of flight research programs that require understanding and characterization of the total airplane in all the aeronautical disciplines, for example the X-29. Other programs such as the F-14 variable-sweep transition flight experiment have focused on a single concept or discipline. Ames-Dryden also continues to conduct flight and ground based experiments to improve and expand the ability to test and evaluate advanced aeronautical concepts. A review of significant aeronautical flight research programs and experiments is presented to illustrate both the progress being made and the challenges to come.

  20. Flight Standards Automation System -

    Department of Transportation — FAVSIS supports Flight Standards Service (AFS) by maintaining their information on entities such as air carriers, air agencies, designated airmen, and check airmen....

  1. Multiplexing schemes for an achromatic programmable diffractive lens

    Millan, M S; Perez-Cabre, E; Oton, J [Technical University of Catalonia, Dep. Optics and Optometry, Terrassa-Barcelona, 08222 (Spain)], E-mail: millan@oo.upc.edu

    2008-11-01

    A multiplexed programmable diffractive lens, displayed on a pixelated liquid crystal device under broadband illumination, is proposed to compensate for the severe chromatic aberration that affects diffractive elements. The proposed lens is based on multiplexing a set of sublenses with a common focal length for different wavelengths. We consider different types of integration of the optical information (spatial only, temporal only and hybrid spatial-temporal) combined with a proper selection of the spectral bandwidth. The properties and limits of the achromatic programmable multiplexed lens are described. Experimental results are presented and discussed.

  2. Multiplexing schemes for an achromatic programmable diffractive lens

    Millan, M S; Perez-Cabre, E; Oton, J

    2008-01-01

    A multiplexed programmable diffractive lens, displayed on a pixelated liquid crystal device under broadband illumination, is proposed to compensate for the severe chromatic aberration that affects diffractive elements. The proposed lens is based on multiplexing a set of sublenses with a common focal length for different wavelengths. We consider different types of integration of the optical information (spatial only, temporal only and hybrid spatial-temporal) combined with a proper selection of the spectral bandwidth. The properties and limits of the achromatic programmable multiplexed lens are described. Experimental results are presented and discussed.

  3. Time-dependent Bragg diffraction by multilayer gratings

    André, Jean-Michel; Jonnard, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    Time-dependent Bragg diffraction by multilayer gratings working by reflection or by transmission is investigated. The study is performed by generalizing the time-dependent coupled-wave theory previously developed for one-dimensional photonic crystals (André J-M and Jonnard P 2015 J. Opt. 17 085609) and also by extending the Takagi–Taupin approach of the dynamical theory of diffraction. The indicial response is calculated. It presents a time delay with a transient time that is a function of the extinction length for reflection geometry and of the extinction length combined with the thickness of the grating for transmission geometry. (paper)

  4. Diffractive optical elements for transformation of modes in lasers

    Sridharan, Arun K.; Pax, Paul H.; Heebner, John E.; Drachenberg, Derrek R.; Armstrong, James P.; Dawson, Jay W.

    2015-09-01

    Spatial mode conversion modules are described, with the capability of efficiently transforming a given optical beam profile, at one plane in space into another well-defined optical beam profile at a different plane in space, whose detailed spatial features and symmetry properties can, in general, differ significantly. The modules are comprised of passive, high-efficiency, low-loss diffractive optical elements, combined with Fourier transform optics. Design rules are described that employ phase retrieval techniques and associated algorithms to determine the necessary profiles of the diffractive optical components. System augmentations are described that utilize real-time adaptive optical techniques for enhanced performance as well as power scaling.

  5. Diffraction limited focusing with controllable arbitrary three-dimensional polarization

    Chen, Weibin; Zhan, Qiwen

    2010-01-01

    We propose a new approach that enables full control over the three-dimensional state of polarization and the field distribution near the focus of a high numerical aperture objective lens. By combining the electric dipole radiation and a vectorial diffraction method, the input field at the pupil plane for generating arbitrary three-dimensionally oriented linear polarization at the focal point with a diffraction limited spot size is found analytically by solving the inverse problem. Arbitrary three-dimensional elliptical polarization can be obtained by introducing a second electric dipole oriented in the orthogonal plane with appropriate amplitude and phase differences

  6. Diffractive dijet and W production in CDF

    Goulianos, K.

    1998-01-01

    Results on diffractive dijet and W-boson production from CDF are reviewed and compared with predictions based on factorization of the diffractive structure function of the proton measured in deep inelastic scattering at HERA

  7. A theoretical overview on single hard diffraction

    Wuesthoff, M.

    1996-01-01

    The concept of the Pomeron structure function and its application in Single Hard Diffraction at hadron colliders and in diffractive Deep Inelastic Scattering is critically reviewed. Some alternative approaches are briefly surveyed with a focus on QCD inspired models

  8. Coherent Diffractive Imaging at LCLS

    Schulz, Joachim

    2010-03-01

    Soft x-ray FEL light sources produce ultrafast x-ray pulses with outstanding high peak brilliance. This might enable the structure determination of proteins that cannot be crystallized. The deposited energy would destroy the molecules completely, but owing to the short pulses the destruction will ideally only happen after the termination of the pulse. In order to address the many challenges that we face in attempting molecular diffraction, we have carried out experiments in coherent diffraction from protein nanocrystals at the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) at SLAC. The periodicity of these objects gives us much higher scattering signals than uncrystallized proteins would. The crystals are filtered to sizes less than 2 micron, and delivered to the pulsed X-ray beam in a liquid jet. The effects of pulse duration and fluence on the high-resolution structure of the crystals have been studied. Diffraction patterns are recorded at a repetition rate of 30 Hz with pnCCD detectors. This allows us to take 108,000 images per hour. With 2-mega-pixel-detectors this gives a data-rate of more than 400 GB per hour. The automated sorting and evaluation of hundreds of thousands images is another challenge of this kind of experiments. Preliminary results will be presented on our first LCLS experiments. This work was carried out as part of a collaboration, for which Henry Chapman is the spokesperson. The collaboration consists of CFEL DESY, Arizona State University, SLAC, Uppsala University, LLNL, The University of Melbourne, LBNL, the Max Planck Institute for Medical Research, and the Max Planck Advanced Study Group (ASG) at the CFEL. The experiments were carried out using the CAMP apparatus, which was designed and built by the Max Planck ASG at CFEL. The LCLS is operated by Stanford University on behalf of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Basic Energy Sciences.

  9. An experiment in diffractive physics

    Santoro, Alberto

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of this talk is to show one of the next future experiment in diffractive Physics which will be installed at the DO experiment at Tevatron/Fermilab for run II, and the importance for Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD) as the theory of the strong interactions. The apparatus that we have developed is the Forward Proton Detector (FPD) to be introduced on the beam line of the Tevatron at both sides of the DO detector. The FPD is composed by a set of Roman Pots as we will see in the text below

  10. Magnetic structures: neutron diffraction studies

    Bouree-Vigneron, F.

    1990-01-01

    Neutron diffraction is often an unequivocal method for determining magnetic structures. Here we present some typical examples, stressing the sequence through experiments, data analysis, interpretation and modelisation. Two series of compounds are chosen: Tb Ni 2 Ge 2 and RBe 13 (R = Gd, Tb, Dy, Ho, Er). Depending on the nature of the elements, the magnetic structures produced can be commensurate, incommensurate or even show a transition between two such phases as a function of temperature. A model, taking magnetic exchange and anisotropy into account, will be presented in the case of commensurate-incommensurate magnetic transitions in RBe 13

  11. Hard scattering and a diffractive trigger

    Berger, E.L.; Collins, J.C.; Soper, D.E.; Sterman, G.

    1986-02-01

    Conclusions concerning the properties of hard scattering in diffractively produced systems are summarized. One motivation for studying diffractive hard scattering is to investigate the interface between Regge theory and perturbative QCD. Another is to see whether diffractive triggering can result in an improvement in the signal-to-background ratio of measurements of production of very heavy quarks. 5 refs

  12. Diffractive optical elements for space communication terminals

    Herzig, Hans-Peter; Ehbets, Peter; Teijido, Juan M.; Weible, Kenneth J.; Heimbeck, Hans-Joerg

    2007-01-01

    The potential of diffractive optical elements for advanced laser communication terminals has been investigated. Applications include beam shaping of high- power laser diode arrays, optical filter elements for position detection and hybrid (refractive/diffractive) elements. In addition, we present a design example of a miniaturized terminal including diffractive optics.

  13. Undergraduate Experiment with Fractal Diffraction Gratings

    Monsoriu, Juan A.; Furlan, Walter D.; Pons, Amparo; Barreiro, Juan C.; Gimenez, Marcos H.

    2011-01-01

    We present a simple diffraction experiment with fractal gratings based on the triadic Cantor set. Diffraction by fractals is proposed as a motivating strategy for students of optics in the potential applications of optical processing. Fraunhofer diffraction patterns are obtained using standard equipment present in most undergraduate physics…

  14. X-43A Flight Controls

    Baumann, Ethan

    2006-01-01

    A viewgraph presentation detailing X-43A Flight controls at NASA Dryden Flight Research Center is shown. The topics include: 1) NASA Dryden, Overview and current and recent flight test programs; 2) Unmanned Aerial Vehicle Synthetic Aperture Radar (UAVSAR) Program, Program Overview and Platform Precision Autopilot; and 3) Hyper-X Program, Program Overview, X-43A Flight Controls and Flight Results.

  15. X-ray diffraction measurements in KCl shocked along [100

    D'Almeida, T.; Gupta, Y.M.

    2000-01-01

    Real time x-ray diffraction measurements were used to examine the polymorphic phase transformation in KCl shocked along the [100] direction. Shock wave continuum data, obtained previously by Hayes, were used to design the experiments and to predict diffraction from KCl shocked to different peak stresses. Here, we present the results obtained below the transition stress: between 1.4 and 2 GPa. Diffraction data obtained were quantitatively related to macroscopic compression. Interplanar spacing measurements revealed isotropic compression of the unit cell in contrast to previously reported results. Above the transition stress, descriptions of the atomic arrangement with respect to shock propagation (not available in the literature) are required for setting up the detection system. Hence, continuum results in combination with various crystallographic considerations were utilized to obtain data above the transition stress

  16. Dynamical diffraction in periodic multilayers

    Sears, V F

    1997-01-01

    Exact reflectivity curves are calculated numerically for various periodic multilayers using the optical matrix method in order to test the dynamical theory of diffraction. The theory is generally valid for values of the bilayer thickness d up to about 100 A. For somewhat larger values of d, where the theory begins to break down, the initial discrepancy is in the phase of the oscillations in the wings of the peaks. For very large values of d, where the first-order Bragg peak approaches the edge of the mirror reflection, two general types of multilayers can be distinguished. In the first (typified in the present work by Ni/Ti), there is a large (30% or more) reduction in the actual value of the critical wave vector for total reflection while, in the second (typified here by Fe/Ge), there is very little reduction (3 % or so). The origin of these two very different types of behavior is explained. It is also shown that, within the dynamical theory of diffraction, the change in the position of the center of the Dar...

  17. The analysis of powder diffraction data

    David, W.I.F.; Harrison, W.T.A.

    1986-01-01

    The paper reviews neutron powder diffraction data analysis, with emphasis on the structural aspects of powder diffraction and the future possibilities afforded by the latest generation of very high resolution neutron and x-ray powder diffractometers. Traditional x-ray powder diffraction techniques are outlined. Structural studies by powder diffraction are discussed with respect to the Rietveld method, and a case study in the Rietveld refinement method and developments of the Rietveld method are described. Finally studies using high resolution powder diffraction at the Spallation Neutron Source, ISIS at the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory are summarized. (U.K.)

  18. Dynamic Flight Simulation Utilizing High Fidelity CFD-Based Nonlinear Reduced Order Model, Phase II

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Nonlinear Dynamic Flight Simulation (NL-DFS) system will be developed in the Phase II project by combining the classical nonlinear rigid-body flight dynamics...

  19. Aging Enhances Indirect Flight Muscle Fiber Performance yet Decreases Flight Ability in Drosophila

    Miller, Mark S.; Lekkas, Panagiotis; Braddock, Joan M.; Farman, Gerrie P.; Ballif, Bryan A.; Irving, Thomas C.; Maughan, David W.; Vigoreaux, Jim O. (IIT); (Vermont)

    2008-10-02

    We investigated the effects of aging on Drosophila melanogaster indirect flight muscle from the whole organism to the actomyosin cross-bridge. Median-aged (49-day-old) flies were flight impaired, had normal myofilament number and packing, barely longer sarcomeres, and slight mitochondrial deterioration compared with young (3-day-old) flies. Old (56-day-old) flies were unable to beat their wings, had deteriorated ultrastructure with severe mitochondrial damage, and their skinned fibers failed to activate with calcium. Small-amplitude sinusoidal length perturbation analysis showed median-aged indirect flight muscle fibers developed greater than twice the isometric force and power output of young fibers, yet cross-bridge kinetics were similar. Large increases in elastic and viscous moduli amplitude under active, passive, and rigor conditions suggest that median-aged fibers become stiffer longitudinally. Small-angle x-ray diffraction indicates that myosin heads move increasingly toward the thin filament with age, accounting for the increased transverse stiffness via cross-bridge formation. We propose that the observed protein composition changes in the connecting filaments, which anchor the thick filaments to the Z-disk, produce compensatory increases in longitudinal stiffness, isometric tension, power and actomyosin interaction in aging indirect flight muscle. We also speculate that a lack of MgATP due to damaged mitochondria accounts for the decreased flight performance.

  20. Rapid Detection and Identification of Candidemia by Direct Blood Culturing on Solid Medium by Use of Lysis-Centrifugation Method Combined with Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption Ionization–Time of Flight Mass Spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS)

    Idelevich, Evgeny A.; Grünastel, Barbara

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Candida sepsis is a life-threatening condition with increasing prevalence. In this study, direct blood culturing on solid medium using a lysis-centrifugation procedure enabled successful Candida species identification by matrix-assisted laser desorption–ionization time of flight mass spectrometry on average 3.8 h (Sabouraud agar) or 7.4 h (chocolate agar) before the positivity signal for control samples in Bactec mycosis-IC/F or Bactec Plus aerobic/F bottles, respectively. Direct culturing on solid medium accelerated candidemia diagnostics compared to that with automated broth-based systems. PMID:27795344

  1. Rapid Detection and Identification of Candidemia by Direct Blood Culturing on Solid Medium by Use of Lysis-Centrifugation Method Combined with Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption Ionization-Time of Flight Mass Spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS).

    Idelevich, Evgeny A; Grünastel, Barbara; Becker, Karsten

    2017-01-01

    Candida sepsis is a life-threatening condition with increasing prevalence. In this study, direct blood culturing on solid medium using a lysis-centrifugation procedure enabled successful Candida species identification by matrix-assisted laser desorption-ionization time of flight mass spectrometry on average 3.8 h (Sabouraud agar) or 7.4 h (chocolate agar) before the positivity signal for control samples in Bactec mycosis-IC/F or Bactec Plus aerobic/F bottles, respectively. Direct culturing on solid medium accelerated candidemia diagnostics compared to that with automated broth-based systems. Copyright © 2016 American Society for Microbiology.

  2. Diffractive X-Ray Telescopes

    Skinner, G.K.; Skinner, G.K

    2010-01-01

    Diffractive X-ray telescopes using zone plates, phase Fresnel lenses, or related optical elements have the potential to provide astronomers with true imaging capability with resolution several orders of magnitude better than available in any other waveband. Lenses that would be relatively easy to fabricate could have an angular resolution of the order of micro arc seconds or even better, that would allow, for example, imaging of the distorted spacetime in the immediate vicinity of the supermassive black holes in the center of active galaxies What then is precluding their immediate adoption Extremely long focal lengths, very limited bandwidth, and difficulty stabilizing the image are the main problems. The history and status of the development of such lenses is reviewed here and the prospects for managing the challenges that they present are discussed atmospheric absorption

  3. Encapsulation process for diffraction gratings.

    Ratzsch, Stephan; Kley, Ernst-Bernhard; Tünnermann, Andreas; Szeghalmi, Adriana

    2015-07-13

    Encapsulation of grating structures facilitates an improvement of the optical functionality and/or adds mechanical stability to the fragile structure. Here, we introduce novel encapsulation process of nanoscale patterns based on atomic layer deposition and micro structuring. The overall size of the encapsulated structured surface area is only restricted by the size of the available microstructuring and coating devices; thus, overcoming inherent limitations of existing bonding processes concerning cleanliness, roughness, and curvature of the components. Finally, the process is demonstrated for a transmission grating. The encapsulated grating has 97.5% transmission efficiency in the -1st diffraction order for TM-polarized light, and is being limited by the experimental grating parameters as confirmed by rigorous coupled wave analysis.

  4. In-flight Assessment of Lower Body Negative Pressure as a Countermeasure for Post-flight Orthostatic Intolerance

    Charles, J. B.; Stenger, M. B.; Phillips, T. R.; Arzeno, N. M.; Lee, S. M. C.

    2009-01-01

    Introduction. We investigated the efficacy of combining fluid loading with sustained lower body negative pressure (LBNP) to reverse orthostatic intolerance associated with weightlessness during and immediately after Space Shuttle missions. Methods. Shuttle astronauts (n=13) underwent 4 hours of LBNP at -30 mm(Hg) and ingested water and salt ( soak treatment) during flight in two complementary studies. In the first study (n=8), pre-flight heart rate (HR) and blood pressure (BP) responses to an LBNP ramp (5-min stages of -10 mm(Hg) steps to -50 mm(Hg) were compared to responses in-flight one and two days after LBNP soak treatment. In the second study (n=5), the soak was performed 24 hr before landing, and post-flight stand test results of soak subjects were compared with those of an untreated cohort (n=7). In both studies, the soak was scheduled late in the mission and was preceded by LBNP ramp tests at approximately 3-day intervals to document the in-flight loss of orthostatic tolerance. Results. Increased HR and decreased BP responses to LBNP were evident early in-flight. In-flight, one day after LBNP soak, HR and BP responses to LBNP were not different from pre-flight, but the effect was absent the second day after treatment. Post-flight there were no between-group differences in HR and BP responses to standing, but all 5 treatment subjects completed the 5-minute stand test whereas 2 of 7 untreated cohort subjects did not. Discussion. Exaggerated HR and BP responses to LBNP were evident within the first few days of space flight, extending results from Skylab. The combined LBNP and fluid ingestion countermeasure restored in-flight LBNP HR and BP responses to pre-flight levels and provided protection of post-landing orthostatic function. Unfortunately, any benefits of the combined countermeasure were offset by the complexity of its implementation, making it inappropriate for routine application during Shuttle flights.

  5. Inclusive measurement of diffractive deep-inelastic scattering at HERA

    Aaron, F.D.; Alexa, C.; Rotaru, M.; Stoicea, G.; Andreev, V.; Belousov, A.; Eliseev, A.; Fomenko, A.; Gogitidze, N.; Lebedev, A.; Malinovski, E.; Rusakov, S.; Shtarkov, L.N.; Soloviev, Y.; Vazdik, Y.; Backovic, S.; Dubak, A.; Lastovicka-Medin, G.; Picuric, I.; Raicevic, N.; Baghdasaryan, A.; Baghdasaryan, S.; Zohrabyan, H.; Barrelet, E.; Bartel, W.; Belov, P.; Brandt, G.; Brinkmann, M.; Britzger, D.; Campbell, A.J.; Eckerlin, G.; Elsen, E.; Felst, R.; Fischer, D.J.; Fleischer, M.; Gayler, J.; Ghazaryan, S.; Glazov, A.; Gouzevitch, M.; Grebenyuk, A.; Habib, S.; Haidt, D.; Kleinwort, C.; Kraemer, M.; Levonian, S.; Lipka, K.; List, B.; List, J.; Lobodzinski, B.; Meyer, A.B.; Meyer, J.; Niebuhr, C.; Nowak, K.; Olsson, J.E.; Pahl, P.; Panagoulias, I.; Papadopoulou, T.; Petrukhin, A.; Pitzl, D.; Placakyte, R.; Radescu, V.; Schmitt, S.; Sefkow, F.; Shushkevich, S.; South, D.; Steder, M.; Wuensch, E.; Begzsuren, K.; Ravdandorj, T.; Tseepeldorj, B.; Bizot, J.C.; Brisson, V.; Delcourt, B.; Jacquet, M.; Pascaud, C.; Tran, T.H.; Zhang, Z.; Zomer, F.; Boudry, V.; Moreau, F.; Specka, A.; Bozovic-Jelisavcic, I.; Pandurovic, M.; Bracinik, J.; Kenyon, I.R.; Newman, P.R.; Thompson, P.D.; Bruncko, D.; Cerny, V.; Ferencei, J.; Bunyatyan, A.; Bylinkin, A.; Bystritskaya, L.; Fedotov, A.; Lubimov, V.; Ozerov, D.; Rostovtsev, A.; Zhokin, A.; Cantun Avila, K.B.; Contreras, J.G.; Ruiz Tabasco, J.E.; Ceccopieri, F.; Delvax, J.; Wolf, E.A. de; Favart, L.; Hreus, T.; Janssen, X.; Roosen, R.; Staykova, Z.; Mechelen, P. van; Cerny, K.; Pokorny, B.; Polifka, R.; Salek, D.; Valkarova, A.; Zacek, J.; Zlebcik, R.; Chekelian, V.; Dossanov, A.; Grindhammer, G.; Kiesling, C.; Coughlan, J.A.; Morris, J.V.; Sankey, D.P.C.; Cvach, J.; Hladky, J.; Reimer, P.; Zalesak, J.; Dainton, J.B.; Gabathuler, E.; Greenshaw, T.; Klein, M.; Kluge, T.; Kretzschmar, J.; Laycock, P.; Maxfield, S.J.; Mehta, A.; Patel, G.D.; Daum, K.; Meyer, H.; Diaconu, C.; Hoffmann, D.; Sauvan, E.; Vallee, C.; Dobre, M.; Kogler, R.; Dodonov, V.; Povh, B.; Egli, S.; Hildebrandt, M.; Horisberger, R.; Feltesse, J.; Perez, E.; Schoeffel, L.; Goerlich, L.; Mikocki, S.; Milcewicz-Mika, I.; Nowak, G.; Sopicki, P.; Turnau, J.; Grab, C.; Henderson, R.C.W.; Sloan, T.; Hennekemper, E.; Herbst, M.; Krueger, K.; Lendermann, V.; Schultz-Coulon, H.C.; Henschel, H.; Hiller, K.H.; Kostka, P.; Lange, W.; Naumann, T.; Herrera, G.; Lopez-Fernandez, R.; Huber, F.; Pirumov, H.; Sauter, M.; Schoening, A.; Joensson, L.; Jung, H.; Kapichine, M.; Morozov, A.; Nikitin, D.; Palichik, V.; Spaskov, V.; Landon, M.P.J.; Rizvi, E.; Traynor, D.; Martyn, H.U.; Mueller, K.; Robmann, P.; Straumann, U.; Truoel, P.; Stella, B.; Sykora, T.; Tsakov, I.; Wegener, D.

    2012-01-01

    The diffractive process ep→eXY, where Y denotes a proton or its low mass excitation with M Y 2 ≤ 1600 GeV 2 , the square of the four-momentum transfer at the proton vertex vertical stroke t vertical stroke 2 and the longitudinal momentum fraction of the incident proton carried by the colourless exchange x P P , Q 2 and β=x/x P where x is the Bjorken scaling variable. These measurements are made after selecting diffractive events by demanding a large empty rapidity interval separating the final state hadronic systems X and Y. High statistics measurements covering the data taking periods 1999-2000 and 2004-2007 are combined with previously published results in order to provide a single set of diffractive cross sections from the H1 experiment using the large rapidity gap selection method. The combined data represent a factor between three and thirty increase in statistics with respect to the previously published results. The measurements are compared with predictions from NLO QCD calculations based on diffractive parton densities and from a dipole model. The proton vertex factorisation hypothesis is tested. (orig.)

  6. Inclusive measurement of diffractive deep-inelastic scattering at HERA

    Aaron, F.D.; Alexa, C.; Rotaru, M.; Stoicea, G.; Andreev, V.; Belousov, A.; Eliseev, A.; Fomenko, A.; Gogitidze, N.; Lebedev, A.; Malinovski, E.; Rusakov, S.; Shtarkov, L.N.; Soloviev, Y.; Vazdik, Y.; Backovic, S.; Dubak, A.; Lastovicka-Medin, G.; Picuric, I.; Raicevic, N.; Baghdasaryan, A.; Baghdasaryan, S.; Zohrabyan, H.; Barrelet, E.; Bartel, W.; Belov, P.; Brandt, G.; Brinkmann, M.; Britzger, D.; Campbell, A.J.; Eckerlin, G.; Elsen, E.; Felst, R.; Fischer, D.J.; Fleischer, M.; Gayler, J.; Ghazaryan, S.; Glazov, A.; Gouzevitch, M.; Grebenyuk, A.; Habib, S.; Haidt, D.; Kleinwort, C.; Kraemer, M.; Levonian, S.; Lipka, K.; List, B.; List, J.; Lobodzinski, B.; Meyer, A.B.; Meyer, J.; Niebuhr, C.; Nowak, K.; Olsson, J.E.; Pahl, P.; Panagoulias, I.; Papadopoulou, T.; Petrukhin, A.; Pitzl, D.; Placakyte, R.; Radescu, V.; Schmitt, S.; Sefkow, F.; Shushkevich, S.; South, D.; Steder, M.; Wuensch, E.; Begzsuren, K.; Ravdandorj, T.; Tseepeldorj, B.; Bizot, J.C.; Brisson, V.; Delcourt, B.; Jacquet, M.; Pascaud, C.; Tran, T.H.; Zhang, Z.; Zomer, F.; Boudry, V.; Moreau, F.; Specka, A.; Bozovic-Jelisavcic, I.; Pandurovic, M.; Bracinik, J.; Kenyon, I.R.; Newman, P.R.; Thompson, P.D.; Bruncko, D.; Cerny, V.; Ferencei, J.; Bunyatyan, A.; Bylinkin, A.; Bystritskaya, L.; Fedotov, A.; Lubimov, V.; Ozerov, D.; Rostovtsev, A.; Zhokin, A.; Cantun Avila, K.B.; Contreras, J.G.; Ruiz Tabasco, J.E.; Ceccopieri, F.; Delvax, J.; Wolf, E.A. de; Favart, L.; Hreus, T.; Janssen, X.; Roosen, R.; Staykova, Z.; Mechelen, P. van; Cerny, K.; Pokorny, B.; Polifka, R.; Salek, D.; Valkarova, A.; Zacek, J.; Zlebcik, R.; Chekelian, V.; Dossanov, A.; Grindhammer, G.; Kiesling, C.; Coughlan, J.A.; Morris, J.V.; Sankey, D.P.C.; Cvach, J.; Hladky, J.; Reimer, P.; Zalesak, J.; Dainton, J.B.; Gabathuler, E.; Greenshaw, T.; Klein, M.; Kluge, T.; Kretzschmar, J.; Laycock, P.; Maxfield, S.J.; Mehta, A.; Patel, G.D.; Daum, K.; Meyer, H.; Diaconu, C.; Hoffmann, D.; Sauvan, E.; Vallee, C.; Dobre, M.; Kogler, R.; Dodonov, V.; Povh, B.; Egli, S.; Hildebrandt, M.; Horisberger, R.; Feltesse, J.; Perez, E.; Schoeffel, L.; Goerlich, L.; Mikocki, S.; Milcewicz-Mika, I.; Nowak, G.; Sopicki, P.; Turnau, J.; Grab, C.; Henderson, R.C.W.; Sloan, T.; Hennekemper, E.; Herbst, M.; Krueger, K.; Lendermann, V.; Schultz-Coulon, H.C.; Henschel, H.; Hiller, K.H.; Kostka, P.; Lange, W.; Naumann, T.; Herrera, G.; Lopez-Fernandez, R.; Huber, F.; Pirumov, H.; Sauter, M.; Schoening, A.; Joensson, L.; Jung, H.; Kapichine, M.; Morozov, A.; Nikitin, D.; Palichik, V.; Spaskov, V.; Landon, M.P.J.; Rizvi, E.; Traynor, D.; Martyn, H.U.; Mueller, K.; Robmann, P.; Straumann, U.; Truoel, P.; Stella, B.; Sykora, T.; Tsakov, I.; Wegener, D.; Collaboration: H1 Collaboration

    2012-07-15

    The diffractive process ep{yields}eXY, where Y denotes a proton or its low mass excitation with M{sub Y}<1.6 GeV, is studied with the H1 experiment at HERA. The analysis is restricted to the phase space region of the photon virtuality 3{<=}Q{sup 2}{<=} 1600 GeV {sup 2}, the square of the four-momentum transfer at the proton vertex vertical stroke t vertical stroke < 1.0 GeV {sup 2} and the longitudinal momentum fraction of the incident proton carried by the colourless exchange x{sub P}<0.05. Triple differential cross sections are measured as a function of x{sub P}, Q {sup 2} and {beta}=x/x{sub P} where x is the Bjorken scaling variable. These measurements are made after selecting diffractive events by demanding a large empty rapidity interval separating the final state hadronic systems X and Y. High statistics measurements covering the data taking periods 1999-2000 and 2004-2007 are combined with previously published results in order to provide a single set of diffractive cross sections from the H1 experiment using the large rapidity gap selection method. The combined data represent a factor between three and thirty increase in statistics with respect to the previously published results. The measurements are compared with predictions from NLO QCD calculations based on diffractive parton densities and from a dipole model. The proton vertex factorisation hypothesis is tested. (orig.)

  7. Engineering related neutron diffraction measurements probing strains, texture and microstructure

    Clausen, Bjorn [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Brown, Donald W [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Tome, Carlos N [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Balogh, Levente [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Vogel, Sven C [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-01-01

    Neutron diffraction has been used for engineering applications for nearly three decades. The basis of the technique is powder diffraction following Bragg's Law. From the measured diffraction patterns information about internal, or residual, strain can be deduced from the peak positions, texture information can be extracted from the peak intensities, and finally the peak widths can provide information about the microstructure, e.g. dislocation densities and grain sizes. The strains are measured directly from changes in lattice parameters, however, in many cases it is non-trivial to determine macroscopic values of stress or strain from the measured data. The effects of intergranular strains must be considered, and combining the neutron diffraction measurements with polycrystal deformation modeling has proven invaluable in determining the overall stress and strain values of interest in designing and dimensioning engineering components. Furthelmore, the combined use of measurements and modeling has provided a tool for elucidating basic material properties, such as critical resolved shear stresses for the active deformation modes and their evolution as a function of applied deformation.

  8. Inclusive measurement of diffractive deep-inelastic scattering at HERA

    Aaron, F.D. [National Institute for Physics and Nuclear Engineering (NIPNE), Bucharest (Romania); Bucharest Univ. (Romania). Faculty of Physics; Alexa, C. [National Institute for Physics and Nuclear Engineering (NIPNE), Bucharest (Romania); Andreev, V. [Lebedev Physical Institute, Moscow (RU)] (and others)

    2012-03-15

    The diffractive process ep {yields} eXY, where Y denotes a proton or its low mass excitation with M{sub Y}<1.6 GeV, is studied with the H1 experiment at HERA. The analysis is restricted to the phase space region of the photon virtuality 3{<=} Q{sup 2} {<=}1600 GeV{sup 2}, the square of the four-momentum transfer at the proton vertex vertical stroke t vertical stroke <1.0 GeV{sup 2} and the longitudinal momentum fraction of the incident proton carried by the colourless exchange x{sub P}<0.05. Triple differential cross sections are measured as a function of x{sub P}, Q{sup 2} and {beta}=x/x{sub P} where x is the Bjorken scaling variable. These measurements are made after selecting diffractive events by demanding a large empty rapidity interval separating the final state hadronic systems X and Y. High statistics measurements covering the data taking periods 1999-2000 and 2004-2007 are combined with previously published results in order to provide a single set of diffractive cross sections from the H1 experiment using the large rapidity gap selection method. The combined data represent a factor between three and thirty increase in statistics with respect to the previously published results. The measurements are compared with predictions from NLO QCD calculations based on diffractive parton densities and from a dipole model. The proton vertex factorisation hypothesis is tested. (orig.)

  9. Initial Flight Test of the Production Support Flight Control Computers at NASA Dryden Flight Research Center

    Carter, John; Stephenson, Mark

    1999-01-01

    The NASA Dryden Flight Research Center has completed the initial flight test of a modified set of F/A-18 flight control computers that gives the aircraft a research control law capability. The production support flight control computers (PSFCC) provide an increased capability for flight research in the control law, handling qualities, and flight systems areas. The PSFCC feature a research flight control processor that is "piggybacked" onto the baseline F/A-18 flight control system. This research processor allows for pilot selection of research control law operation in flight. To validate flight operation, a replication of a standard F/A-18 control law was programmed into the research processor and flight-tested over a limited envelope. This paper provides a brief description of the system, summarizes the initial flight test of the PSFCC, and describes future experiments for the PSFCC.

  10. Nonlinear and diffraction effects in propagation of N-waves in randomly inhomogeneous moving media.

    Averiyanov, Mikhail; Blanc-Benon, Philippe; Cleveland, Robin O; Khokhlova, Vera

    2011-04-01

    Finite amplitude acoustic wave propagation through atmospheric turbulence is modeled using a Khokhlov-Zabolotskaya-Kuznetsov (KZK)-type equation. The equation accounts for the combined effects of nonlinearity, diffraction, absorption, and vectorial inhomogeneities of the medium. A numerical algorithm is developed which uses a shock capturing scheme to reduce the number of temporal grid points. The inhomogeneous medium is modeled using random Fourier modes technique. Propagation of N-waves through the medium produces regions of focusing and defocusing that is consistent with geometrical ray theory. However, differences up to ten wavelengths are observed in the locations of fist foci. Nonlinear effects are shown to enhance local focusing, increase the maximum peak pressure (up to 60%), and decrease the shock rise time (about 30 times). Although the peak pressure increases and the rise time decreases in focal regions, statistical analysis across the entire wavefront at a distance 120 wavelengths from the source indicates that turbulence: decreases the mean time-of-flight by 15% of a pulse duration, decreases the mean peak pressure by 6%, and increases the mean rise time by almost 100%. The peak pressure and the arrival time are primarily governed by large scale inhomogeneities, while the rise time is also sensitive to small scales.

  11. Diffraction properties study of reflection volume holographic grating in dispersive photorefractive material under ultra-short pulse readout

    Yi Yingyan; Liu Deming; Liu Hairong, E-mail: yiyingyan0410@163.com [Wuhan National Laboratory for Optoelectronics, School of Optoelectronic Science and Engineering, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan, 430074 (China)

    2011-02-01

    Based on the modified Kogelnik diffraction efficiency equation, we study the diffraction intensity spectrum and the total diffraction efficiency of reflection volume holographic gratings in photorefractive media. Taking photorefractive LiNbO{sub 3} crystal as an example, the effect of the grating parameters and the pulse width on the diffraction properties is presented under the influence of crystal material dispersion. Under the combined effects, the diffraction pulse profiles and the total diffraction efficiency are compared with and without crystal material dispersion. The results show that the dispersion will decrease the diffraction intensity. Moreover, when pulse width is smaller or the grating spacing and the grating thickness are larger, the influence of dispersion on diffraction is large. The results of our paper can be used in pulse shaping applications.

  12. Core Flight Software

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The AES Core Flight Software (CFS) project purpose is to analyze applicability, and evolve and extend the reusability of the CFS system originally developed by...

  13. Bragg's Law diffraction simulations for electron backscatter diffraction analysis

    Kacher, Josh; Landon, Colin; Adams, Brent L.; Fullwood, David

    2009-01-01

    In 2006, Angus Wilkinson introduced a cross-correlation-based electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) texture analysis system capable of measuring lattice rotations and elastic strains to high resolution. A variation of the cross-correlation method is introduced using Bragg's Law-based simulated EBSD patterns as strain free reference patterns that facilitates the use of the cross-correlation method with polycrystalline materials. The lattice state is found by comparing simulated patterns to collected patterns at a number of regions on the pattern using the cross-correlation function and calculating the deformation from the measured shifts of each region. A new pattern can be simulated at the deformed state, and the process can be iterated a number of times to converge on the absolute lattice state. By analyzing an iteratively rotated single crystal silicon sample and recovering the rotation, this method is shown to have an angular resolution of ∼0.04 o and an elastic strain resolution of ∼7e-4. As an example of applications, elastic strain and curvature measurements are used to estimate the dislocation density in a single grain of a compressed polycrystalline Mg-based AZ91 alloy.

  14. Adaptive structures flight experiments

    Martin, Maurice

    The topics are presented in viewgraph form and include the following: adaptive structures flight experiments; enhanced resolution using active vibration suppression; Advanced Controls Technology Experiment (ACTEX); ACTEX program status; ACTEX-2; ACTEX-2 program status; modular control patch; STRV-1b Cryocooler Vibration Suppression Experiment; STRV-1b program status; Precision Optical Bench Experiment (PROBE); Clementine Spacecraft Configuration; TECHSAT all-composite spacecraft; Inexpensive Structures and Materials Flight Experiment (INFLEX); and INFLEX program status.

  15. Magnesium and Space Flight

    Scott M. Smith

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Magnesium is an essential nutrient for muscle, cardiovascular, and bone health on Earth, and during space flight. We sought to evaluate magnesium status in 43 astronauts (34 male, 9 female; 47 ± 5 years old, mean ± SD before, during, and after 4–6-month space missions. We also studied individuals participating in a ground analog of space flight (head-down-tilt bed rest; n = 27 (17 male, 10 female, 35 ± 7 years old. We evaluated serum concentration and 24-h urinary excretion of magnesium, along with estimates of tissue magnesium status from sublingual cells. Serum magnesium increased late in flight, while urinary magnesium excretion was higher over the course of 180-day space missions. Urinary magnesium increased during flight but decreased significantly at landing. Neither serum nor urinary magnesium changed during bed rest. For flight and bed rest, significant correlations existed between the area under the curve of serum and urinary magnesium and the change in total body bone mineral content. Tissue magnesium concentration was unchanged after flight and bed rest. Increased excretion of magnesium is likely partially from bone and partially from diet, but importantly, it does not come at the expense of muscle tissue stores. While further study is needed to better understand the implications of these findings for longer space exploration missions, magnesium homeostasis and tissue status seem well maintained during 4–6-month space missions.

  16. Magnesium and Space Flight

    Smith, Scott M.; Zwart, Sara R.

    2015-01-01

    Magnesium is an essential nutrient for muscle, cardiovascular, and bone health on Earth, and during space flight. We sought to evaluate magnesium status in 43 astronauts (34 male, 9 female; 47 ± 5 years old, mean ± SD) before, during, and after 4–6-month space missions. We also studied individuals participating in a ground analog of space flight (head-down-tilt bed rest; n = 27 (17 male, 10 female), 35 ± 7 years old). We evaluated serum concentration and 24-h urinary excretion of magnesium, along with estimates of tissue magnesium status from sublingual cells. Serum magnesium increased late in flight, while urinary magnesium excretion was higher over the course of 180-day space missions. Urinary magnesium increased during flight but decreased significantly at landing. Neither serum nor urinary magnesium changed during bed rest. For flight and bed rest, significant correlations existed between the area under the curve of serum and urinary magnesium and the change in total body bone mineral content. Tissue magnesium concentration was unchanged after flight and bed rest. Increased excretion of magnesium is likely partially from bone and partially from diet, but importantly, it does not come at the expense of muscle tissue stores. While further study is needed to better understand the implications of these findings for longer space exploration missions, magnesium homeostasis and tissue status seem well maintained during 4–6-month space missions. PMID:26670248

  17. Diffraction efficiency enhancement of femtosecond laser-engraved diffraction gratings due to CO2 laser polishing

    Choi, Hun-Kook; Jung, Deok; Sohn, Ik-Bu; Noh, Young-Chul; Lee, Yong-Tak; Kim, Jin-Tae; Ahsan, Shamim

    2014-01-01

    This research demonstrates laser-assisted fabrication of high-efficiency diffraction gratings in fused-silica glass samples. Initially, femtosecond laser pulses are used to engrave diffraction gratings on the glass surfaces. Then, these micro-patterned glass samples undergo CO 2 laser polishing process. unpolished diffraction gratings encoded in the glass samples show an overall diffraction efficiency of 18.1%. diffraction gratings imprinted on the glass samples and then polished four times by using a CO 2 laser beam attain a diffraction efficiency of 32.7%. We also investigate the diffraction patterns of the diffraction gratings encoded on fused-silica glass surfaces. The proposed CO 2 laser polishing technique shows great potential in patterning high-efficiency diffraction gratings on the surfaces of various transparent materials.

  18. Inelastic nucleon diffraction at high energy

    Goggi, G.

    1975-01-01

    Experiments carried out at ISR and at FNAL which have yielded a substantial amount of data on double diffraction processes, which were unambiguously indentified and measured and which provide new tools to study the dynamical properties shared by different classes of diffractive reactions are identified. In this review interest is focused on the experimental aspects of inclusive and exclusive results both on single and double diffraction and on the problems arising from their comparison. Problems covered include; inclusive and semi-inclusive diffraction, multiparticle inclusive studies, single-particle inclusive studies, resonance region, high mass region, exclusive single diffractive reactions, mass spectra, cross sections, t-dependence, decay angular properties, and double diffraction. (U.K.)

  19. Diffraction of polarized light on periodic structures

    Bukanina, V; Divakov, D; Tyutyunnik, A; Hohlov, A

    2012-01-01

    Periodic structures as photonic crystals are widely used in modern laser devices, communication technologies and for creating various beam splitters and filters. Diffraction gratings are applied for creating 3D television sets, DVD and Blu-ray drives and reflective structures (Berkley mirror). It is important to simulate diffraction on such structures to design optical systems with predetermined properties based on photonic crystals and diffraction gratings. Methods of simulating diffraction on periodic structures uses theory of Floquet-Bloch and rigorous coupled-wave analysis (RCWA). Current work is dedicated to analysis of photonic band gaps and simulating diffraction on one-dimensional binary diffraction grating using RCWA. The Maxwell's equations for isotropic media and constitutive relations based on the cgs system were used as a model.

  20. Theory of edge diffraction in electromagnetics

    Ufimtsev, Pyotr

    2009-01-01

    This book is an essential resource for researchers involved in designing antennas and RCS calculations. It is also useful for students studying high frequency diffraction techniques. It contains basic original ideas of the Physical Theory of Diffraction (PTD), examples of its practical application, and its validation by the mathematical theory of diffraction. The derived analytic expressions are convenient for numerical calculations and clearly illustrate the physical structure of the scattered field.

  1. Nonlinear diffraction from a virtual beam

    Saltiel, Solomon M.; Neshev, Dragomir N.; Krolikowski, Wieslaw

    2010-01-01

    We observe experimentally a novel type of nonlinear diffraction in the process of two-wave mixing on a nonlinear quadratic grating.We demonstrate that when the nonlinear grating is illuminated simultaneously by two noncollinear beams, a second-harmonic diffraction pattern is generated by a virtual...... beam propagating along the bisector of the two pump beams. The observed iffraction phenomena is a purely nonlinear effect that has no analogue in linear diffraction...

  2. Diffraction limit of refractive compound lens

    Kolchevsky, N.N.; Petrov, P.V.

    2015-01-01

    A compound X-ray and neutron lenses is an array of lenses with a common axis. The resolution limited by aberration and by diffraction. Diffraction limit comes from theory based on absorption aperture of the compound refractive lenses. Beam passing through transparent lenses form Airy pattern. Results of calculation of diffraction resolution limit for non-transparent X-ray and neutron lenses are discussed. (authors)

  3. Diffractive variable beam splitter: optimal design.

    Borghi, R; Cincotti, G; Santarsiero, M

    2000-01-01

    The analytical expression of the phase profile of the optimum diffractive beam splitter with an arbitrary power ratio between the two output beams is derived. The phase function is obtained by an analytical optimization procedure such that the diffraction efficiency of the resulting optical element is the highest for an actual device. Comparisons are presented with the efficiency of a diffractive beam splitter specified by a sawtooth phase function and with the pertinent theoretical upper bound for this type of element.

  4. Theory of hard diffraction and rapidity gaps

    Del Duca, V.

    1995-06-01

    In this talk we review the models describing the hard diffractive production of jets or more generally high-mass states in presence of rapidity gaps in hadron-hadron and lepton-hadron collisions. By rapidity gaps we mean regions on the lego plot in (pseudo)-rapidity and azimuthal angle where no hadrons are produced, between the jet(s) and an elastically scattered hadron (single hard diffraction) or between two jets (double hard diffraction). (orig.)

  5. High-energy electron diffraction and microscopy

    Peng, L M; Whelan, M J

    2011-01-01

    This book provides a comprehensive introduction to high energy electron diffraction and elastic and inelastic scattering of high energy electrons, with particular emphasis on applications to modern electron microscopy. Starting from a survey of fundamental phenomena, the authors introduce the most important concepts underlying modern understanding of high energy electron diffraction. Dynamical diffraction in transmission (THEED) and reflection (RHEED) geometries is treated using ageneral matrix theory, where computer programs and worked examples are provided to illustrate the concepts and to f

  6. Twenty years of diffraction at the Tevatron

    Goulianos, K.; Rockefeller U.

    2005-01-01

    Results on diffractive particle interactions from the Fermilab Tevatron (bar p)p collider are placed in perspective through a QCD inspired phenomenological approach, which exploits scaling and factorization properties observed in data. The results discussed are those obtained by the CDF Collaboration from a comprehensive set of single, double, and multigap soft and hard diffraction processes studied during the twenty year period since 1985, when the CDF diffractive program was proposed and the first Blois Workshop was held

  7. Theory of hard diffraction and rapidity gaps

    Del Duca, V.

    1996-01-01

    In this talk we review the models describing the hard diffractive production of jets or more generally high-mass states in presence of rapidity gaps in hadron-hadron and lepton-hadron collisions. By rapidity gaps we mean regions on the lego plot in (pseudo)-rapidity and azimuthal angle where no hadrons are produced, between the jet(s) and an elastically scattered hadron (single hard diffraction) or between two jets (double hard diffraction). copyright 1996 American Institute of Physics

  8. Diffractive charm and jet production at HERA

    Savin, Alexander A.

    2003-01-01

    A new high precision inclusive measurement of the diffractive production of D* ± (2010) mesons in deep inelastic scattering (DIS) in the kinematic region Q 2 >1.5 GeV 2 , 0.02 IP 2 2 , 165 2 , χ IP < 0.03 are presented. Diffractive parton densities extracted using a NLO DGLAP QCD fit are used for comparisons with diffractive DIS and PHP dijet and open charm cross sections at HERA and the Tevatron, thus testing the factorization properties of hard diffraction

  9. Undergraduate experiment with fractal diffraction gratings

    Monsoriu, Juan A; Furlan, Walter D; Pons, Amparo; Barreiro, Juan C; Gimenez, Marcos H

    2011-01-01

    We present a simple diffraction experiment with fractal gratings based on the triadic Cantor set. Diffraction by fractals is proposed as a motivating strategy for students of optics in the potential applications of optical processing. Fraunhofer diffraction patterns are obtained using standard equipment present in most undergraduate physics laboratories and compared with those obtained with conventional periodic gratings. It is shown that fractal gratings produce self-similar diffraction patterns which can be evaluated analytically. Good agreement is obtained between experimental and numerical results.

  10. Diffractive interactions of hadrons at high energies

    Goulianos, K.

    1982-01-01

    Elastic scattering, inclusive single diffraction dissociation and total cross section results are reviewed, with emphasis on the inter-relationship among the parameters that characterize these processes

  11. DAST in Flight

    1980-01-01

    The modified BQM-34 Firebee II drone with Aeroelastic Research Wing (ARW-1), a supercritical airfoil, during a 1980 research flight. The remotely-piloted vehicle, which was air launched from NASA's NB-52B mothership, participated in the Drones for Aerodynamic and Structural Testing (DAST) program which ran from 1977 to 1983. The DAST 1 aircraft (Serial #72-1557), pictured, crashed on 12 June 1980 after its right wing ripped off during a test flight near Cuddeback Dry Lake, California. The crash occurred on the modified drone's third free flight. These are the image contact sheets for each image resolution of the NASA Dryden Drones for Aerodynamic and Structural Testing (DAST) Photo Gallery. From 1977 to 1983, the Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, (under two different names) conducted the DAST Program as a high-risk flight experiment using a ground-controlled, pilotless aircraft. Described by NASA engineers as a 'wind tunnel in the sky,' the DAST was a specially modified Teledyne-Ryan BQM-34E/F Firebee II supersonic target drone that was flown to validate theoretical predictions under actual flight conditions in a joint project with the Langley Research Center, Hampton, Virginia. The DAST Program merged advances in electronic remote control systems with advances in airplane design. Drones (remotely controlled, missile-like vehicles initially developed to serve as gunnery targets) had been deployed successfully during the Vietnamese conflict as reconnaissance aircraft. After the war, the energy crisis of the 1970s led NASA to seek new ways to cut fuel use and improve airplane efficiency. The DAST Program's drones provided an economical, fuel-conscious method for conducting in-flight experiments from a remote ground site. DAST explored the technology required to build wing structures with less than normal stiffness. This was done because stiffness requires structural weight but ensures freedom from flutter-an uncontrolled, divergent oscillation of

  12. Unified Nonlinear Flight Dynamics and Aeroelastic Simulator Tool, Phase I

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — ZONA Technology, Inc. (ZONA) proposes a R&D effort to develop a Unified Nonlinear Flight Dynamics and Aeroelastic Simulator (UNFDAS) Tool that will combine...

  13. Propulsion systems for vertical flight aircraft

    Brooks, A.

    1990-01-01

    The present evaluation of VTOL airframe/powerplant integration configurations combining high forward flight speed with safe and efficient vertical flight identifies six configurations that can be matched with one of three powerplant types: turboshafts, convertible-driveshaft lift fans, and gas-drive lift fans. The airframes configurations are (1) tilt-rotor, (2) folded tilt-rotor, (3) tilt-wing, (4) rotor wing/disk wing, (5) lift fan, and (6) variable-diameter rotor. Attention is given to the lift-fan VTOL configuration. The evaluation of these configurations has been conducted by both a joint NASA/DARPA program and the NASA High Speed Rotorcraft program. 7 refs.

  14. Laboratory and In-Flight In-Situ X-ray Imaging and Scattering Facility for Materials, Biotechnology and Life Sciences

    2003-01-01

    We propose a multifunctional X-ray facility for the Materials, Biotechnology and Life Sciences Programs to visualize formation and behavior dynamics of materials, biomaterials, and living organisms, tissues and cells. The facility will combine X-ray topography, phase micro-imaging and scattering capabilities with sample units installed on the goniometer. This should allow, for the first time, to monitor under well defined conditions, in situ, in real time: creation of imperfections during growth of semiconductors, metal, dielectric and biomacromolecular crystals and films, high-precision diffraction from crystals within a wide range of temperatures and vapor, melt, solution conditions, internal morphology and changes in living organisms, tissues and cells, diffraction on biominerals, nanotubes and particles, radiation damage, also under controlled formation/life conditions. The system will include an ultrabright X-ray source, X-ray mirror, monochromator, image-recording unit, detectors, and multipurpose diffractometer that fully accommodate and integrate furnaces and samples with other experimental environments. The easily adjustable laboratory and flight versions will allow monitoring processes under terrestrial and microgravity conditions. The flight version can be made available using a microsource combined with multilayer or capillary optics.

  15. Capital Flight and Economic Performance

    Beja, Edsel Jr.

    2007-01-01

    Capital flight aggravates resource constraints and contributes to undermine long-term economic growth. Counterfactual calculations on the Philippines suggest that capital flight contributed to lower the quality of long-term economic growth. Sustained capital flight over three decades means that capital flight had a role for the Philippines to lose the opportunities to achieve economic takeoff. Unless decisive policy actions are taken up to address enduring capital flight and manage the macroe...

  16. Recent estimates of capital flight

    Claessens, Stijn; Naude, David

    1993-01-01

    Researchers and policymakers have in recent years paid considerable attention to the phenomenon of capital flight. Researchers have focused on four questions: What concept should be used to measure capital flight? What figure for capital flight will emerge, using this measure? Can the occurrence and magnitude of capital flight be explained by certain (economic) variables? What policy changes can be useful to reverse capital flight? The authors focus strictly on presenting estimates of capital...

  17. Perseus Post-flight

    1991-01-01

    Crew members check out the Perseus proof-of-concept vehicle on Rogers Dry Lake, adjacent to the Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, after a test flight in 1991. Perseus B is a remotely piloted aircraft developed as a design-performance testbed under NASA's Environmental Research Aircraft and Sensor Technology (ERAST) project. Perseus is one of several flight vehicles involved in the ERAST project. A piston engine, propeller-powered aircraft, Perseus was designed and built by Aurora Flight Sciences Corporation, Manassas, Virginia. The objectives of Perseus B's ERAST flight tests have been to reach and maintain horizontal flight above altitudes of 60,000 feet and demonstrate the capability to fly missions lasting from 8 to 24 hours, depending on payload and altitude requirements. The Perseus B aircraft established an unofficial altitude record for a single-engine, propeller-driven, remotely piloted aircraft on June 27, 1998. It reached an altitude of 60,280 feet. In 1999, several modifications were made to the Perseus aircraft including engine, avionics, and flight-control-system improvements. These improvements were evaluated in a series of operational readiness and test missions at the Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California. Perseus is a high-wing monoplane with a conventional tail design. Its narrow, straight, high-aspect-ratio wing is mounted atop the fuselage. The aircraft is pusher-designed with the propeller mounted in the rear. This design allows for interchangeable scientific-instrument payloads to be placed in the forward fuselage. The design also allows for unobstructed airflow to the sensors and other devices mounted in the payload compartment. The Perseus B that underwent test and development in 1999 was the third generation of the Perseus design, which began with the Perseus Proof-Of-Concept aircraft. Perseus was initially developed as part of NASA's Small High-Altitude Science Aircraft (SHASA) program, which later evolved

  18. Aerodynamics of bird flight

    Dvořák Rudolf

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Unlike airplanes birds must have either flapping or oscillating wings (the hummingbird. Only such wings can produce both lift and thrust – two sine qua non attributes of flying.The bird wings have several possibilities how to obtain the same functions as airplane wings. All are realized by the system of flight feathers. Birds have also the capabilities of adjusting the shape of the wing according to what the immediate flight situation demands, as well as of responding almost immediately to conditions the flow environment dictates, such as wind gusts, object avoidance, target tracking, etc. In bird aerodynamics also the tail plays an important role. To fly, wings impart downward momentum to the surrounding air and obtain lift by reaction. How this is achieved under various flight situations (cruise flight, hovering, landing, etc., and what the role is of the wing-generated vortices in producing lift and thrust is discussed.The issue of studying bird flight experimentally from in vivo or in vitro experiments is also briefly discussed.

  19. Evaluating diffraction-based overlay

    Li, Jie; Tan, Asher; Jung, JinWoo; Goelzer, Gary; Smith, Nigel; Hu, Jiangtao; Ham, Boo-Hyun; Kwak, Min-Cheol; Kim, Cheol-Hong; Nam, Suk-Woo

    2012-03-01

    We evaluate diffraction-based overlay (DBO) metrology using two test wafers. The test wafers have different film stacks designed to test the quality of DBO data under a range of film conditions. We present DBO results using traditional empirical approach (eDBO). eDBO relies on linear response of the reflectance with respect to the overlay displacement within a small range. It requires specially designed targets that consist of multiple pads with programmed shifts. It offers convenience of quick recipe setup since there is no need to establish a model. We measure five DBO targets designed with different pitches and programmed shifts. The correlations of five eDBO targets and the correlation of eDBO to image-based overlay are excellent. The targets of 800nm and 600nm pitches have better dynamic precision than targets of 400nm pitch, which agrees with simulated results on signal/noise ratio. 3σ of less than 0.1nm is achieved for both wafers using the best configured targets. We further investigate the linearity assumption of eDBO algorithm. Simulation results indicate that as the pitch of DBO targets gets smaller, the nonlinearity error, i.e., the error in the overlay measurement results caused by deviation from ideal linear response, becomes bigger. We propose a nonlinearity correction (NLC) by including higher order terms in the optical response. The new algorithm with NLC improves measurement consistency for DBO targets of same pitch but different programmed shift, due to improved accuracy. The results from targets with different pitches, however, are improved marginally, indicating the presence of other error sources.

  20. Achieving optimum diffraction based overlay performance

    Leray, Philippe; Laidler, David; Cheng, Shaunee; Coogans, Martyn; Fuchs, Andreas; Ponomarenko, Mariya; van der Schaar, Maurits; Vanoppen, Peter

    2010-03-01

    Diffraction Based Overlay (DBO) metrology has been shown to have significantly reduced Total Measurement Uncertainty (TMU) compared to Image Based Overlay (IBO), primarily due to having no measurable Tool Induced Shift (TIS). However, the advantages of having no measurable TIS can be outweighed by increased susceptibility to WIS (Wafer Induced Shift) caused by target damage, process non-uniformities and variations. The path to optimum DBO performance lies in having well characterized metrology targets, which are insensitive to process non-uniformities and variations, in combination with optimized recipes which take advantage of advanced DBO designs. In this work we examine the impact of different degrees of process non-uniformity and target damage on DBO measurement gratings and study their impact on overlay measurement accuracy and precision. Multiple wavelength and dual polarization scatterometry are used to characterize the DBO design performance over the range of process variation. In conclusion, we describe the robustness of DBO metrology to target damage and show how to exploit the measurement capability of a multiple wavelength, dual polarization scatterometry tool to ensure the required measurement accuracy for current and future technology nodes.

  1. Vectorial diffraction properties of THz vortex Bessel beams.

    Wu, Zhen; Wang, Xinke; Sun, Wenfeng; Feng, Shengfei; Han, Peng; Ye, Jiasheng; Yu, Yue; Zhang, Yan

    2018-01-22

    A vortex Bessel beam combines the merits of an optical vortex and a Bessel beam, including a spiral wave front and a non-diffractive feature, which has immense application potentials in optical trapping, optical fabrication, optical communications, and so on. Here, linearly and circularly polarized vortex Bessel beams in the terahertz (THz) frequency range are generated by utilizing a THz quarter wave plate, a spiral phase plate, and Teflon axicons with different opening angles. Taking advantage of a THz focal-plane imaging system, vectorial diffraction properties of the THz vortex Bessel beams are comprehensively characterized and discussed, including the transverse (Ex, Ey) and longitudinal (Ez) polarization components. The experimental phenomena are accurately simulated by adopting the vectorial Rayleigh diffraction integral. By varying the opening angle of the axicon, the characteristic parameters of these THz vortex Bessel beams are exhibited and compared, including the light spot size, the diffraction-free range, and the phase evolution process. This work provides the precise experimental and theoretical bases for the comprehension and application of a THz vortex Bessel beam.

  2. Influence of seismic diffraction for high-resolution imaging: applications in offshore Malaysia

    Bashir, Yasir; Ghosh, Deva Prasad; Sum, Chow Weng

    2018-04-01

    Small-scale geological discontinuities are not easy to detect and image in seismic data, as these features represent themselves as diffracted rather than reflected waves. However, the combined reflected and diffracted image contains full wave information and is of great value to an interpreter, for instance enabling the identification of faults, fractures, and surfaces in built-up carbonate. Although diffraction imaging has a resolution below the typical seismic wavelength, if the wavelength is much smaller than the width of the discontinuity then interference effects can be ignored, as they would not play a role in generating the seismic diffractions. In this paper, by means of synthetic examples and real data, the potential of diffraction separation for high-resolution seismic imaging is revealed and choosing the best method for preserving diffraction are discussed. We illustrate the accuracy of separating diffractions using the plane-wave destruction (PWD) and dip frequency filtering (DFF) techniques on data from the Sarawak Basin, a carbonate field. PWD is able to preserve the diffraction more intelligently than DFF, which is proven in the results by the model and real data. The final results illustrate the effectiveness of diffraction separation and possible imaging for high-resolution seismic data of small but significant geological features.

  3. Efficient flapping flight of pterosaurs

    Strang, Karl Axel

    In the late eighteenth century, humans discovered the first pterosaur fossil remains and have been fascinated by their existence ever since. Pterosaurs exploited their membrane wings in a sophisticated manner for flight control and propulsion, and were likely the most efficient and effective flyers ever to inhabit our planet. The flapping gait is a complex combination of motions that sustains and propels an animal in the air. Because pterosaurs were so large with wingspans up to eleven meters, if they could have sustained flapping flight, they would have had to achieve high propulsive efficiencies. Identifying the wing motions that contribute the most to propulsive efficiency is key to understanding pterosaur flight, and therefore to shedding light on flapping flight in general and the design of efficient ornithopters. This study is based on published results for a very well-preserved specimen of Coloborhynchus robustus, for which the joints are well-known and thoroughly described in the literature. Simplifying assumptions are made to estimate the characteristics that can not be inferred directly from the fossil remains. For a given animal, maximizing efficiency is equivalent to minimizing power at a given thrust and speed. We therefore aim at finding the flapping gait, that is the joint motions, that minimize the required flapping power. The power is computed from the aerodynamic forces created during a given wing motion. We develop an unsteady three-dimensional code based on the vortex-lattice method, which correlates well with published results for unsteady motions of rectangular wings. In the aerodynamic model, the rigid pterosaur wing is defined by the position of the bones. In the aeroelastic model, we add the flexibility of the bones and of the wing membrane. The nonlinear structural behavior of the membrane is reduced to a linear modal decomposition, assuming small deflections about the reference wing geometry. The reference wing geometry is computed for

  4. Flight Planning in the Cloud

    Flores, Sarah L.; Chapman, Bruce D.; Tung, Waye W.; Zheng, Yang

    2011-01-01

    This new interface will enable Principal Investigators (PIs), as well as UAVSAR (Uninhabited Aerial Vehicle Synthetic Aperture Radar) members to do their own flight planning and time estimation without having to request flight lines through the science coordinator. It uses an all-in-one Google Maps interface, a JPL hosted database, and PI flight requirements to design an airborne flight plan. The application will enable users to see their own flight plan being constructed interactively through a map interface, and then the flight planning software will generate all the files necessary for the flight. Afterward, the UAVSAR team can then complete the flight request, including calendaring and supplying requisite flight request files in the expected format for processing by NASA s airborne science program. Some of the main features of the interface include drawing flight lines on the map, nudging them, adding them to the current flight plan, and reordering them. The user can also search and select takeoff, landing, and intermediate airports. As the flight plan is constructed, all of its components are constantly being saved to the database, and the estimated flight times are updated. Another feature is the ability to import flight lines from previously saved flight plans. One of the main motivations was to make this Web application as simple and intuitive as possible, while also being dynamic and robust. This Web application can easily be extended to support other airborne instruments.

  5. Structure determination of modulated structures by powder X-ray diffraction and electron diffraction

    Zhou, Z.Y.; Palatinus, Lukáš; Sun, J.L.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 3, č. 11 (2016), s. 1351-1362 ISSN 2052-1553 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : electron diffraction * incommensurate structure * powder diffraction Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 4.036, year: 2016

  6. Perseus in Flight

    1991-01-01

    The Perseus proof-of-concept vehicle flies over Rogers Dry Lake at the Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, to test basic design concepts for the remotely-piloted, high-altitude vehicle. Perseus B is a remotely piloted aircraft developed as a design-performance testbed under NASA's Environmental Research Aircraft and Sensor Technology (ERAST) project. Perseus is one of several flight vehicles involved in the ERAST project. A piston engine, propeller-powered aircraft, Perseus was designed and built by Aurora Flight Sciences Corporation, Manassas, Virginia. The objectives of Perseus B's ERAST flight tests have been to reach and maintain horizontal flight above altitudes of 60,000 feet and demonstrate the capability to fly missions lasting from 8 to 24 hours, depending on payload and altitude requirements. The Perseus B aircraft established an unofficial altitude record for a single-engine, propeller-driven, remotely piloted aircraft on June 27, 1998. It reached an altitude of 60,280 feet. In 1999, several modifications were made to the Perseus aircraft including engine, avionics, and flight-control-system improvements. These improvements were evaluated in a series of operational readiness and test missions at the Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California. Perseus is a high-wing monoplane with a conventional tail design. Its narrow, straight, high-aspect-ratio wing is mounted atop the fuselage. The aircraft is pusher-designed with the propeller mounted in the rear. This design allows for interchangeable scientific-instrument payloads to be placed in the forward fuselage. The design also allows for unobstructed airflow to the sensors and other devices mounted in the payload compartment. The Perseus B that underwent test and development in 1999 was the third generation of the Perseus design, which began with the Perseus Proof-Of-Concept aircraft. Perseus was initially developed as part of NASA's Small High-Altitude Science Aircraft (SHASA

  7. X-ray topography and multiple diffraction

    Chang, S.-L.

    1983-01-01

    A short summary on X-ray topography, which is based on the dynamical theory of X-ray diffraction, is made. The applications and properties related to the use of the multiple diffraction technique are analized and discussed. (L.C.) [pt

  8. Diffraction of radiation from channelled charged particles

    Baryshevskij, V.G.; Grubich, A.O.; Dubovskaya, I.Ya.

    1978-01-01

    An explicit expression for cross-section and radiation spectrum at diffraction is calculated. It is shown that photons emitted by channelled particles form a typical diffraction pattern which contains information about the crystal structure. It is also shown that the change of the longitudinal energy of the particle caused by the radiation braking becomes important when the particle energy is increased. (author)

  9. Classical system underlying a diffracting quantum billiard

    Manan Jain

    2018-01-05

    Jan 5, 2018 ... Wave equation; rays; quantum chaos. PACS Nos 03.65.Ge; 05.45.Mt; 42.25.Fx. 1. Introduction. Diffraction [1] is a complex wave phenomenon which manifests classically and quantum mechanically. Among a wide range of systems where diffraction becomes important, there is an interesting situation of.

  10. Non-diffractive optically variable security devices

    Renesse, R.L. van

    1991-01-01

    At the past optical security conferences attention was focused on diffractive structures, e.g. holograms, embossed gratings and thin—film devices, as security elements on valuable documents. The main reasons for this emphasis are, that the iridescent effect of such diffractive optically variable

  11. Correlations in the hadronic double diffractive dissociation

    Goldegol, Alexandre.

    1991-05-01

    A given reaction of double diffractive dissociation is studied based on the three-component Deck Model. The correlations among the diffractive slope, the effective mass of the dissociated particle sub-system and the dissociation angle in the Gottfried-Jackson are studied based in this model. 9 refs, 19 figs

  12. Uniform asymptotic theory of edge diffraction

    Lewis, R.M.; Boersma, J.; Oughstun, K.E.

    1992-01-01

    Geometrical optics fails to account for the phenomenon of diffraction, i.e., the existence of nonzero fields in the geometrical shadow. Keller's geometrical theory of diffraction accounts for this phenomenon by providing correction terms to the geometrical optics field, in the form of a

  13. Uniform asymptotic theory of edge diffraction

    Lewis, R.M.; Boersma, J.

    1969-01-01

    Geometrical optics fails to account for the phenomenon of diffraction, i.e., the existence of nonzero fields in the geometrical shadow. Keller's geometrical theory of diffraction accounts for this phenomenon by providing correction terms to the geometrical optics field, in the form of a

  14. Flight calls and orientation

    Larsen, Ole Næsbye; Andersen, Bent Bach; Kropp, Wibke

    2008-01-01

    flight calls was simulated by sequential computer controlled activation of five loudspeakers placed in a linear array perpendicular to the bird's migration course. The bird responded to this stimulation by changing its migratory course in the direction of that of the ‘flying conspecifics' but after about......  In a pilot experiment a European Robin, Erithacus rubecula, expressing migratory restlessness with a stable orientation, was video filmed in the dark with an infrared camera and its directional migratory activity was recorded. The flight overhead of migrating conspecifics uttering nocturnal...... 30 minutes it drifted back to its original migration course. The results suggest that songbirds migrating alone at night can use the flight calls from conspecifics as additional cues for orientation and that they may compare this information with other cues to decide what course to keep....

  15. Anisotropic thermal expansion of MgSiN2 from 10 to 300 K as measured by neutron diffraction

    Bruls, R.J.; Hintzen, H.T.J.M.; Metselaar, R.; Loong, C.K.

    2000-01-01

    The lattice parameters of orthorhombic MgSiN2 as a function of the temperature have been determined from time-of-flight neutron powder diffraction. The results indicate that MgSiN2, just like several other adamantine-type crystals, exhibits a relatively small thermal expansion coefficient at low

  16. Restoration of diffracted far field at the output of circular diffraction waveplate

    Hovhannisyan, D; Margaryan, H; Abrahamyan, V; Hakobyan, N; Tabiryan, N

    2014-01-01

    The light propagation in an anisotropic periodic media, such us circular diffraction waveplate (CDW) by a finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) technique is studied. The FDTD numerical simulation and the subsequent Fourier transform of the diffracted electric near field was been used for study of ability of CDW to diffract a laser beam and simultaneously convert polarization state. The FDTD simulation results used to restore the diffracted electric far field at the CDW output. an abstract

  17. Identification of metabolites in human and rat urine after oral administration of Xiao-Qing-Long-Tang granule using ultra high performance liquid chromatography combined with quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry.

    Zhou, Lei; Zhang, Qiang; Qi, Wen; Yan, Shuai; Qu, Jialin; Makino, Toshiaki; Yuan, Dan

    2017-09-01

    Xiao-Qing-Long-Tang is a traditional Chinese formula used for the treatment of cold syndrome, bronchitis, and nasal allergies for thousands of years. However, the in vivo integrated metabolism of its multiple components and the active chemical constituents of Xiao-Qing-Long-Tang remain unknown. In this study, a method using ultra high performance liquid chromatography coupled with quadrupole time-of-flight tandem mass spectrometry was established for the detection and identification of the metabolites in human and rat urine after oral administration of Xiao-Qing-Long-Tang. A total of 19 compounds were detected or tentatively identified in human urine samples, including eight prototypes and 11 metabolites. Also, a total of 50 compounds were detected or tentatively identified in rat urine samples, including 15 prototypes and 35 metabolites detected with either a highly sensitive extracted ion chromatogram method or the MS E determination using Mass Fragment software. Our results indicated that phase Ⅱ reactions (e.g. glucuronidation and sulfation) were the main metabolic pathways of flavones, while phase I reactions (e.g. demethylation and hydroxylation) were the major metabolic reaction for alkaloids, lignans, and ginger essential oil. This investigation provided important structural information on the metabolism of Xiao-Qing-Long-Tang and provided evidence to obtain a more comprehensive metabolic profile. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  18. Fingerprint analysis and quality consistency evaluation of flavonoid compounds for fermented Guava leaf by combining high-performance liquid chromatography time-of-flight electrospray ionization mass spectrometry and chemometric methods.

    Wang, Lu; Tian, Xiaofei; Wei, Wenhao; Chen, Gong; Wu, Zhenqiang

    2016-10-01

    Guava leaves are used in traditional herbal teas as antidiabetic therapies. Flavonoids are the main active of Guava leaves and have many physiological functions. However, the flavonoid compositions and activities of Guava leaves could change due to microbial fermentation. A high-performance liquid chromatography time-of-flight electrospray ionization mass spectrometry method was applied to identify the varieties of the flavonoids in Guava leaves before and after fermentation. High-performance liquid chromatography, hierarchical cluster analysis and principal component analysis were used to quantitatively determine the changes in flavonoid compositions and evaluate the consistency and quality of Guava leaves. Monascus anka Saccharomyces cerevisiae fermented Guava leaves contained 2.32- and 4.06-fold more total flavonoids and quercetin, respectively, than natural Guava leaves. The flavonoid compounds of the natural Guava leaves had similarities ranging from 0.837 to 0.927. The flavonoid compounds from the Monascus anka S. cerevisiae fermented Guava leaves had similarities higher than 0.993. This indicated that the quality consistency of the fermented Guava leaves was better than that of the natural Guava leaves. High-performance liquid chromatography fingerprinting and chemometric analysis are promising methods for evaluating the degree of fermentation of Guava leaves based on quality consistency, which could be used in assessing flavonoid compounds for the production of fermented Guava leaves. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. Identification and analysis of chemical constituents and rat serum metabolites in Suan-Zao-Ren granule using ultra high performance liquid chromatography quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry combined with multiple data processing approaches.

    Du, Yiyang; He, Bosai; Li, Qing; He, Jiao; Wang, Di; Bi, Kaishun

    2017-07-01

    Suan-Zao-Ren granule is widely used to treat insomnia in China. However, because of the complexity and diversity of the chemical compositions in traditional Chinese medicine formula, the comprehensive analysis of constituents in vitro and in vivo is rather difficult. In our study, an ultra high performance liquid chromatography with quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry and the PeakView® software, which uses multiple data processing approaches including product ion filter, neutral loss filter, and mass defect filter, method was developed to characterize the ingredients and rat serum metabolites in Suan-Zao-Ren granule. A total of 101 constituents were detected in vitro. Under the same analysis conditions, 68 constituents were characterized in rat serum, including 35 prototype components and 33 metabolites. The metabolic pathways of main components were also illustrated. Among them, the metabolic pathways of timosaponin AI were firstly revealed. The bioactive compounds mainly underwent the phase I metabolic pathways including hydroxylation, oxidation, hydrolysis, and phase II metabolic pathways including sulfate conjugation, glucuronide conjugation, cysteine conjugation, acetycysteine conjugation, and glutathione conjugation. In conclusion, our results showed that this analysis approach was extremely useful for the in-depth pharmacological research of Suan-Zao-Ren granule and provided a chemical basis for its rational. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. The Profiling and Identification of the Absorbed Constituents and Metabolites of Guizhi Decoction in Rat Plasma and Urine by Rapid Resolution Liquid Chromatography Combined with Quadrupole-Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometry

    Xiang, Hongjun; Zhang, Lishi; Song, Jiannan; Fan, Bin; Nie, Yinglan; Bai, Dong; Lei, Haimin

    2016-01-01

    Guizhi decoction (GZD), a well-known traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) prescription consisting of Ramulus Cinnamomi, Radix Paeoniae Alba, Radix Glycyrrhizae, Fructus Jujubae and Rhizoma Zingiberis Recens, is usually used for the treatment of common colds, influenza, and other pyretic conditions in the clinic. However, the absorbed ingredients and metabolic compounds of GZD have not been reported. In this paper, a method incorporating rapid resolution liquid chromatography (RRLC) with quadrupole-time-of-flight mass spectrometry (Q-TOF-MS) was used to identify ingredients after oral administration of GZD. Identification of the primary components in GZD, drug-containing serum and urine samples was carried out in order to investigate the assimilation and metabolites of the decoction in vivo. By comparing the total ion chromatograms (TICs) of GZD, a total of 71 constituents were detected or characterized. By comparing TICs of blank and dosed rat plasma, a total of 15 constituents were detected and identified as prototypes according to their retention time (tR) and MS, MS/MS data. Based on this, neutral loss scans of 80 and 176 Da in samples of rat plasma and urine helped us to identify most of the metabolites. Results showed that the predominant metabolic pathways of (epi) catechin and gallic acid were sulfation, methylation, glucuronidation and dehydroxylation; the major metabolic pathways of flavone were hydrolysis, sulfation and glucuronidation. Furthermore, degradation, oxidation and ring fission were found to often occur in the metabolism process of GZD in vivo. PMID:27626411

  1. Uniting Electron Crystallography and Powder Diffraction

    Shankland, Kenneth; Meshi, Louisa; Avilov, Anatoly; David, William

    2012-01-01

    The polycrystalline and nanocrystalline states play an increasingly important role in exploiting the properties of materials, encompassing applications as diverse as pharmaceuticals, catalysts, solar cells and energy storage. A knowledge of the three-dimensional atomic and molecular structure of materials is essential for understanding and controlling their properties, yet traditional single-crystal X-ray diffraction methods lose their power when only polycrystalline and nanocrystalline samples are available. It is here that powder diffraction and single-crystal electron diffraction techniques take over, substantially extending the range of applicability of the crystallographic principles of structure determination.  This volume, a collection of teaching contributions presented at the Crystallographic Course in Erice in 2011, clearly describes the fundamentals and the state-of-the-art of powder diffraction and electron diffraction methods in materials characterisation, encompassing a diverse range of discipl...

  2. ALOFT Flight Test Report

    1977-10-01

    wmmmmmmmmmmmm i ifmu.immM\\]i\\ ßinimm^mmmmviwmmiwui »vimtm twfjmmmmmmi c-f—rmSmn NWC TP 5954 ALOFT Flight Test Report by James D. Ross anrJ I.. M...responsible i"- u conducting the ALOFT Flight Test Program and made contributions to this report: J. Basden , R. ".estbrook, L. Thompson, J. Willians...REPORT DOCUMENTATION PAGE READ INSTRUCTIONS BEFORE COMPLETING FORM 7. AUTMORC«; <oss James D./Xo L. M.y&ohnson IZATION NAME AND ADDRESS Naval

  3. Speech Recognition Interfaces Improve Flight Safety

    2013-01-01

    "Alpha, Golf, November, Echo, Zulu." "Sierra, Alpha, Golf, Echo, Sierra." "Lima, Hotel, Yankee." It looks like some strange word game, but the combinations of words above actually communicate the first three points of a flight plan from Albany, New York to Florence, South Carolina. Spoken by air traffic controllers and pilots, the aviation industry s standard International Civil Aviation Organization phonetic alphabet uses words to represent letters. The first letter of each word in the series is combined to spell waypoints, or reference points, used in flight navigation. The first waypoint above is AGNEZ (alpha for A, golf for G, etc.). The second is SAGES, and the third is LHY. For pilots of general aviation aircraft, the traditional method of entering the letters of each waypoint into a GPS device is a time-consuming process. For each of the 16 waypoints required for the complete flight plan from Albany to Florence, the pilot uses a knob to scroll through each letter of the alphabet. It takes approximately 5 minutes of the pilot s focused attention to complete this particular plan. Entering such a long flight plan into a GPS can pose a safety hazard because it can take the pilot s attention from other critical tasks like scanning gauges or avoiding other aircraft. For more than five decades, NASA has supported research and development in aviation safety, including through its Vehicle Systems Safety Technology (VSST) program, which works to advance safer and more capable flight decks (cockpits) in aircraft. Randy Bailey, a lead aerospace engineer in the VSST program at Langley Research Center, says the technology in cockpits is directly related to flight safety. For example, "GPS navigation systems are wonderful as far as improving a pilot s ability to navigate, but if you can find ways to reduce the draw of the pilot s attention into the cockpit while using the GPS, it could potentially improve safety," he says.

  4. Mapping residual and internal stress in materials by neutron diffraction

    Withers, Ph.J.

    2007-01-01

    Neutron diffraction provides one of the few means of mapping residual stresses deep within the bulk of materials and components. This article reviews the basic scientific methodology by which internal strains and stresses are inferred from recorded diffraction peaks. Both conventional angular scans and time-of-flight measurements are reviewed and compared. Their complementarity with analogous synchrotron X-ray methods is also highlighted. For measurements to be exploited in structural integrity calculations underpinning the safe operation of engineering components, measurement standards have been defined and the major findings are summarised. Examples are used to highlight the unique capabilities of the method showing how it can provide insights ranging from the basic physics of slip mechanisms in hexagonal polycrystalline materials, through the materials optimisation of stress induced transformations in smart nano-materials, to the industrial introduction of novel friction welding processes exploiting stress residual measurements transferred from prototype sub-scale tests to the joining of full-scale aero-engine assemblies. (author)

  5. Automated ISS Flight Utilities

    Offermann, Jan Tuzlic

    2016-01-01

    EVADES output. As mentioned above, GEnEVADOSE makes extensive use of ROOT version 6, the data analysis framework developed at the European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), and the code is written to the C++11 standard (as are the other projects). My second project is the Automated Mission Reference Exposure Utility (AMREU).Unlike GEnEVADOSE, AMREU is a combination of three frameworks written in both Python and C++, also making use of ROOT (and PyROOT). Run as a combination of daily and weekly cron jobs, these macros query the SRAG database system to determine the active ISS missions, and query minute-by-minute radiation dose information from ISS-TEPC (Tissue Equivalent Proportional Counter), one of the radiation detectors onboard the ISS. Using this information, AMREU creates a corrected data set of daily radiation doses, addressing situations where TEPC may be offline or locked up by correcting doses for days with less than 95% live time (the total amount time the instrument acquires data) by averaging the past 7 days. As not all errors may be automatically detectable, AMREU also allows for manual corrections, checking an updated plaintext file each time it runs. With the corrected data, AMREU generates cumulative dose plots for each mission, and uses a Python script to generate a flight note file (.docx format) containing these plots, as well as information sections to be filled in and modified by the space weather environment officers with information specific to the week. AMREU is set up to run without requiring any user input, and it automatically archives old flight notes and information files for missions that are no longer active. My other projects involve cleaning up a large data set from the Charged Particle Directional Spectrometer (CPDS), joining together many different data sets in order to clean up information in SRAG SQL databases, and developing other automated utilities for displaying information on active solar regions, that may be used by the

  6. Characterization of a polychromatic neutron beam diffracted by pyrolytic graphite crystals

    Byun, S H; Choi, H D

    2002-01-01

    The beam spectrum for polychromatic neutrons diffracted by pyrolytic graphite crystals was characterized. The theoretical beam spectrum was obtained using the diffraction model for a mosaic crystal. The lattice vibration effects were included in the calculation using the reported vibration amplitude of the crystal and the measured time-of-flight spectra in the thermal region. The calculated beam spectrum was compared with the results obtained in the absence of thermal motion. The lattice vibration effects became more important for the higher diffraction orders and a large decrease in the neutron flux induced by the vibrations was identified in the epithermal region. The validity of the beam spectrum was estimated by comparing with the effective quantities determined from prompt gamma-ray measurements and Cd-ratios measured both for 1/nu and non-1/nu nuclides.

  7. Software for Managing Inventory of Flight Hardware

    Salisbury, John; Savage, Scott; Thomas, Shirman

    2003-01-01

    The Flight Hardware Support Request System (FHSRS) is a computer program that relieves engineers at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) of most of the non-engineering administrative burden of managing an inventory of flight hardware. The FHSRS can also be adapted to perform similar functions for other organizations. The FHSRS affords a combination of capabilities, including those formerly provided by three separate programs in purchasing, inventorying, and inspecting hardware. The FHSRS provides a Web-based interface with a server computer that supports a relational database of inventory; electronic routing of requests and approvals; and electronic documentation from initial request through implementation of quality criteria, acquisition, receipt, inspection, storage, and final issue of flight materials and components. The database lists both hardware acquired for current projects and residual hardware from previous projects. The increased visibility of residual flight components provided by the FHSRS has dramatically improved the re-utilization of materials in lieu of new procurements, resulting in a cost savings of over $1.7 million. The FHSRS includes subprograms for manipulating the data in the database, informing of the status of a request or an item of hardware, and searching the database on any physical or other technical characteristic of a component or material. The software structure forces normalization of the data to facilitate inquiries and searches for which users have entered mixed or inconsistent values.

  8. Aircraft digital flight control technical review

    Davenport, Otha B.; Leggett, David B.

    1993-01-01

    The Aircraft Digital Flight Control Technical Review was initiated by two pilot induced oscillation (PIO) incidents in the spring and summer of 1992. Maj. Gen. Franklin (PEO) wondered why the Air Force development process for digital flight control systems was not preventing PIO problems. Consequently, a technical review team was formed to examine the development process and determine why PIO problems continued to occur. The team was also to identify the 'best practices' used in the various programs. The charter of the team was to focus on the PIO problem, assess the current development process, and document the 'best practices.' The team reviewed all major USAF aircraft programs with digital flight controls, specifically, the F-15E, F-16C/D, F-22, F-111, C-17, and B-2. The team interviewed contractor, System Program Office (SPO), and Combined Test Force (CTF) personnel on these programs. The team also went to NAS Patuxent River to interview USN personnel about the F/A-18 program. The team also reviewed experimental USAF and NASA systems with digital flight control systems: X-29, X-31, F-15 STOL and Maneuver Technology Demonstrator (SMTD), and the Variable In-Flight Stability Test Aircraft (VISTA). The team also discussed the problem with other experts in the field including Ralph Smith and personnel from Calspan. The major conclusions and recommendations from the review are presented.

  9. Rietveld analysis using powder diffraction data with anomalous scattering effect obtained by focused beam flat sample method

    Tanaka, Masahiko, E-mail: masahiko@spring8.or.jp; Katsuya, Yoshio, E-mail: katsuya@spring8.or.jp; Sakata, Osami, E-mail: SAKATA.Osami@nims.go.jp [Synchrotron X-ray Station at SPring-8, National Institute for Materials Science 1-1-1 Kouto, Sayo, Hyogo 679-5198 (Japan)

    2016-07-27

    Focused-beam flat-sample method (FFM) is a new trial for synchrotron powder diffraction method, which is a combination of beam focusing optics, flat shape powder sample and area detectors. The method has advantages for X-ray diffraction experiments applying anomalous scattering effect (anomalous diffraction), because of 1. Absorption correction without approximation, 2. High intensity X-rays of focused incident beams and high signal noise ratio of diffracted X-rays 3. Rapid data collection with area detectors. We applied the FFM to anomalous diffraction experiments and collected synchrotron X-ray powder diffraction data of CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} (inverse spinel structure) using X-rays near Fe K absorption edge, which can distinguish Co and Fe by anomalous scattering effect. We conducted Rietveld analyses with the obtained powder diffraction data and successfully determined the distribution of Co and Fe ions in CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} crystal structure.

  10. Rietveld analysis using powder diffraction data with anomalous scattering effect obtained by focused beam flat sample method

    Tanaka, Masahiko; Katsuya, Yoshio; Sakata, Osami

    2016-01-01

    Focused-beam flat-sample method (FFM) is a new trial for synchrotron powder diffraction method, which is a combination of beam focusing optics, flat shape powder sample and area detectors. The method has advantages for X-ray diffraction experiments applying anomalous scattering effect (anomalous diffraction), because of 1. Absorption correction without approximation, 2. High intensity X-rays of focused incident beams and high signal noise ratio of diffracted X-rays 3. Rapid data collection with area detectors. We applied the FFM to anomalous diffraction experiments and collected synchrotron X-ray powder diffraction data of CoFe_2O_4 (inverse spinel structure) using X-rays near Fe K absorption edge, which can distinguish Co and Fe by anomalous scattering effect. We conducted Rietveld analyses with the obtained powder diffraction data and successfully determined the distribution of Co and Fe ions in CoFe_2O_4 crystal structure.

  11. Analysis of phloem protein patterns from different organs of Cucurbita maxima Duch. by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time of flight mass spectroscopy combined with sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis.

    Kehr, J; Haebel, S; Blechschmidt-Schneider, S; Willmitzer, L; Steup, M; Fisahn, J

    1999-02-01

    Sieve tubes mediate the long-distance transport of nutrients and signals between source and sink organs of plants. To detect mobile phloem proteins that are differentially distributed in source and sink organs of Cucurbita maxima, we used both one-dimensional gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS). Both techniques revealed that phloem protein patterns depend on the sampling site: whilst several proteins were consistently observed in all phloem samples studied others appeared to occur in a organ-specific manner. For a characterization and identification of distinct phloem polypeptides, two approaches were chosen. First, protein bands resolved by SDS-PAGE were eluted from the polyacrylamide gel and the masses of the proteins were then determined by MALDI-TOF MS. Second, proteins resolved by SDS-PAGE were subjected to proteolytic degradation and the resulting peptides were analyzed by MALDI-TOF MS: the masses of the proteolytic peptides were used for a database search. By the latter approach, three mobile phloem compounds were identified as the phloem-specific protein PP2 (D.E. Bostwick et al., 1992, The Plant Cell 4, 1539-1548) a chymotrypsin and an aspartic proteinase inhibitor. None of the other polypeptides studied corresponded to any of the protein sequences present in the database. Furthermore, MALDI-TOF MS analyses indicated that some of the mobile phloem proteins occur in a covalently modified form and that the extent of the modification depends upon the plant organ.

  12. High-energy X-ray diffraction studies of disordered materials

    Kohara, Shinji; Suzuya, Kentaro

    2003-01-01

    With the arrival of the latest generation of synchrotron sources and the introduction of advanced insertion devices (wigglers and undulators), the high-energy (E≥50 keV) X-ray diffraction technique has become feasible, leading to new approaches in the quantitative study of the structure of disordered materials. High-energy X-ray diffraction has several advantages: higher resolution in real space due to a wide range of scattering vector Q, smaller correction terms (especially the absorption correction), reduction of truncation errors, the feasibility of running under extreme environments, including high-temperatures and high-pressures, and the ability to make direct comparisons between X-ray and neutron diffraction data. Recently, high-energy X-ray diffraction data have been combined with neutron diffraction data from a pulsed source to provide more detailed and reliable structural information than that hitherto available

  13. Range Flight Safety Requirements

    Loftin, Charles E.; Hudson, Sandra M.

    2018-01-01

    The purpose of this NASA Technical Standard is to provide the technical requirements for the NPR 8715.5, Range Flight Safety Program, in regards to protection of the public, the NASA workforce, and property as it pertains to risk analysis, Flight Safety Systems (FSS), and range flight operations. This standard is approved for use by NASA Headquarters and NASA Centers, including Component Facilities and Technical and Service Support Centers, and may be cited in contract, program, and other Agency documents as a technical requirement. This standard may also apply to the Jet Propulsion Laboratory or to other contractors, grant recipients, or parties to agreements to the extent specified or referenced in their contracts, grants, or agreements, when these organizations conduct or participate in missions that involve range flight operations as defined by NPR 8715.5.1.2.2 In this standard, all mandatory actions (i.e., requirements) are denoted by statements containing the term “shall.”1.3 TailoringTailoring of this standard for application to a specific program or project shall be formally documented as part of program or project requirements and approved by the responsible Technical Authority in accordance with NPR 8715.3, NASA General Safety Program Requirements.

  14. Weather and Flight Testing

    Wiley, Scott

    2007-01-01

    This viewgraph document reviews some of the weather hazards involved with flight testing. Some of the hazards reviewed are: turbulence, icing, thunderstorms and winds and windshear. Maps, pictures, satellite pictures of the meteorological phenomena and graphs are included. Also included are pictures of damaged aircraft.

  15. Pegasus hypersonic flight research

    Curry, Robert E.; Meyer, Robert R., Jr.; Budd, Gerald D.

    1992-01-01

    Hypersonic aeronautics research using the Pegasus air-launched space booster is described. Two areas are discussed in the paper: previously obtained results from Pegasus flights 1 and 2, and plans for future programs. Proposed future research includes boundary-layer transition studies on the airplane-like first stage and also use of the complete Pegasus launch system to boost a research vehicle to hypersonic speeds. Pegasus flight 1 and 2 measurements were used to evaluate the results of several analytical aerodynamic design tools applied during the development of the vehicle as well as to develop hypersonic flight-test techniques. These data indicated that the aerodynamic design approach for Pegasus was adequate and showed that acceptable margins were available. Additionally, the correlations provide insight into the capabilities of these analytical tools for more complex vehicles in which design margins may be more stringent. Near-term plans to conduct hypersonic boundary-layer transition studies are discussed. These plans involve the use of a smooth metallic glove at about the mid-span of the wing. Longer-term opportunities are proposed which identify advantages of the Pegasus launch system to boost large-scale research vehicles to the real-gas hypersonic flight regime.

  16. Flight telerobotic servicer legacy

    Shattuck, Paul L.; Lowrie, James W.

    1992-11-01

    The Flight Telerobotic Servicer (FTS) was developed to enhance and provide a safe alternative to human presence in space. The first step for this system was a precursor development test flight (DTF-1) on the Space Shuttle. DTF-1 was to be a pathfinder for manned flight safety of robotic systems. The broad objectives of this mission were three-fold: flight validation of telerobotic manipulator (design, control algorithms, man/machine interfaces, safety); demonstration of dexterous manipulator capabilities on specific building block tasks; and correlation of manipulator performance in space with ground predictions. The DTF-1 system is comprised of a payload bay element (7-DOF manipulator with controllers, end-of-arm gripper and camera, telerobot body with head cameras and electronics module, task panel, and MPESS truss) and an aft flight deck element (force-reflecting hand controller, crew restraint, command and display panel and monitors). The approach used to develop the DTF-1 hardware, software and operations involved flight qualification of components from commercial, military, space, and R controller, end-of-arm tooling, force/torque transducer) and the development of the telerobotic system for space applications. The system is capable of teleoperation and autonomous control (advances state of the art); reliable (two-fault tolerance); and safe (man-rated). Benefits from the development flight included space validation of critical telerobotic technologies and resolution of significant safety issues relating to telerobotic operations in the Shuttle bay or in the vicinity of other space assets. This paper discusses the lessons learned and technology evolution that stemmed from developing and integrating a dexterous robot into a manned system, the Space Shuttle. Particular emphasis is placed on the safety and reliability requirements for a man-rated system as these are the critical factors which drive the overall system architecture. Other topics focused on include

  17. Diffraction contrast imaging using virtual apertures

    Gammer, Christoph; Burak Ozdol, V.; Liebscher, Christian H.; Minor, Andrew M.

    2015-01-01

    Two methods on how to obtain the full diffraction information from a sample region and the associated reconstruction of images or diffraction patterns using virtual apertures are demonstrated. In a STEM-based approach, diffraction patterns are recorded for each beam position using a small probe convergence angle. Similarly, a tilt series of TEM dark-field images is acquired. The resulting datasets allow the reconstruction of either electron diffraction patterns, or bright-, dark- or annular dark-field images using virtual apertures. The experimental procedures of both methods are presented in the paper and are applied to a precipitation strengthened and creep deformed ferritic alloy with a complex microstructure. The reconstructed virtual images are compared with conventional TEM images. The major advantage is that arbitrarily shaped virtual apertures generated with image processing software can be designed without facing any physical limitations. In addition, any virtual detector that is specifically designed according to the underlying crystal structure can be created to optimize image contrast. - Highlights: • A dataset containing all structural information of a given position is recorded. • The dataset allows reconstruction of virtual diffraction patterns or images. • Specific virtual apertures are designed to image precipitates in a complex alloy. • Virtual diffraction patterns from arbitrarily small regions can be established. • Using STEM diffraction to record the dataset is more efficient than TEM dark-field

  18. Echocardiography in the flight program

    Charles, John B.; Bungo, Michael W.; Mulvagh, Sharon L.

    1991-01-01

    Observations on American and Soviet astronauts have documented the association of changes in cardiovascular function during orthostasis with space flight. A basic understanding of the cardiovascular changes occurring in astronauts requires the determination of cardiac output and total peripheral vascular resistance as a minimum. In 1982, we selected ultrasound echocardiography as our means of acquiring this information. Ultrasound offers a quick, non-invasive and accurate means of determining stroke volume which, when combined with the blood pressure and heart rate measurements of the stand test, allows calculation of changes in peripheral vascular resistance, the body's major response to orthostatic stress. The history of echocardiography in the Space Shuttle Program is discussed and the results are briefly presented.

  19. Stroke in Commercial Flights.

    Álvarez-Velasco, Rodrigo; Masjuan, Jaime; DeFelipe, Alicia; Corral, Iñigo; Estévez-Fraga, Carlos; Crespo, Leticia; Alonso-Cánovas, Araceli

    2016-04-01

    Stroke on board aircraft has been reported in retrospective case series, mainly focusing on economy class stroke syndrome. Data on the actual incidence, pathogenesis, and prognosis of stroke in commercial flights are lacking. A prospective registry was designed to include all consecutive patients referred from an international airport (40 million passengers a year) to our hospital with a diagnosis of ischemic stroke or transient ischemic attack and onset of symptoms during a flight or immediately after landing. Forty-four patients (32 ischemic strokes and 12 transient ischemic attacks) were included over a 76-month period (January 2008 to April 2014). The estimated incidence of stroke was 1 stroke in 35 000 flights. Pathogeneses of stroke or transient ischemic attack were atherothrombotic in 16 (36%), economy class stroke syndrome in 8 (18%), cardioembolic in 7 (16%), arterial dissection in 4 (9%), lacunar stroke in 4 (9%), and undetermined in 5 (12%) patients. Carotid stenosis >70% was found in 12 (27%) of the patients. Overall prognosis was good, and thrombolysis was applied in 44% of the cases. The most common reason for not treating patients who had experienced stroke onset midflight was the delay in reaching the hospital. Only 1 patient with symptom onset during the flight prompted a flight diversion. We found a low incidence of stroke in the setting of air travel. Economy class stroke syndrome and arterial dissection were well represented in our sample. However, the main pathogenesis was atherothrombosis with a high proportion of patients with high carotid stenosis. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  20. Spectroscopic imaging, diffraction, and holography with x-ray photoemission

    1992-02-01

    X-ray probes are capable of determining the spatial structure of an atom in a specific chemical state, over length scales from about a micron all the way down to atomic resolution. Examples of these probes include photoemission microscopy, energy-dependent photoemission diffraction, photoelectron holography, and X-ray absorption microspectroscopy. Although the method of image formation, chemical-state sensitivity, and length scales can be very different, these X-ray techniques share a common goal of combining a capability for structure determination with chemical-state specificity. This workshop will address recent advances in holographic, diffraction, and direct imaging techniques using X-ray photoemission on both theoretical and experimental fronts. A particular emphasis will be on novel structure determinations with atomic resolution using photoelectrons

  1. Expression, purification and preliminary diffraction studies of PhnP

    Podzelinska, Kateryna; He, Shumei; Soares, Alexei; Zechel, David; Hove-Jensen, Bjarne; Jia, Zongchao

    2008-01-01

    PhnP, a member of the C—P lyase pathway, was crystallized by the sitting-drop vapour-diffusion method and the initial diffraction-pattern analysis is reported. PhnP belongs to a 14-gene operon that supports the growth of Escherichia coli on alkylphosphonates as a sole source of phosphorus; however, the exact biochemistry of phosphonate degradation by this pathway is poorly understood. The protein was recombinantly expressed in Escherichia coli and purified to homogeneity. Sitting-drop vapour diffusion in combination with microseeding was used to obtain crystals that were suitable for X-ray diffraction. Data were collected to 1.3 Å and the crystals belonged to space group C2, with unit-cell parameters a = 111.65, b = 75.41, c = 83.23 Å, α = γ = 90, β = 126.3°

  2. Spectroscopic imaging, diffraction, and holography with x-ray photoemission

    1992-02-01

    X-ray probes are capable of determining the spatial structure of an atom in a specific chemical state, over length scales from about a micron all the way down to atomic resolution. Examples of these probes include photoemission microscopy, energy-dependent photoemission diffraction, photoelectron holography, and X-ray absorption microspectroscopy. Although the method of image formation, chemical-state sensitivity, and length scales can be very different, these X-ray techniques share a common goal of combining a capability for structure determination with chemical-state specificity. This workshop will address recent advances in holographic, diffraction, and direct imaging techniques using X-ray photoemission on both theoretical and experimental fronts. A particular emphasis will be on novel structure determinations with atomic resolution using photoelectrons.

  3. Quantitative convergent beam electron diffraction measurements of bonding in alumina

    Johnson, A.W.S.

    2002-01-01

    Full text: The QCBED technique of measuring accurate structure factors has been made practical by advances in energy filtering, computing and in the accurate measurement of intensity. Originally attempted in 1965 by the late Peter Goodman (CSIRO, Melbourne) while working with Gunter Lehmpfuhl (Fritz Haber Institut, Berlin), QCBED has been successfully developed and tested in the last decade on simple structures such as Si and MgO. Our work on Alumina is a step up in complexity and has shown that extinction in X-ray diffraction is not correctable to the precision required. In combination with accurate X-ray diffraction, QCBED promises to revolutionize the accuracy of bonding charge density measurements, experimental results which are of significance in the development of Density Functional Theory used in predictive chemistry. Copyright (2002) Australian Society for Electron Microscopy Inc

  4. Refractive and diffractive scattering in the interstellar medium

    Cordes, J.M.; Pidwerbetsky, A.; Lovelace, R.V.E.

    1986-01-01

    Radio wave propagation through electron-density fluctuations in the ISM is studied. Observable propagation effects are explored using a one-dimensional thin-screen model for the turbulent medium. Diffraction caused by stochastic small-scale irregularities is combined with refraction from deterministic large-scale irregularities. Some of the effects are illustrated with numerical simulations of the wave propagation. Multiple imaging is considered, delineating the possible effects and discussing their extensions to two-dimensional screens and extended three-dimensional media. The case where refraction as well as diffraction is caused by a stochastic medium with a spectrum of a given form is considered. The magnitudes of observable effects is estimated for representative spectra that may be relevant to the ISM. The importance of the various effects for timing and scintillation observations of pulsars, VLBI observations of galactic and extragalactic radio sources, and for variability measurements of extragalactic sources is assessed. 47 references

  5. The PIAA Coronagraph: Optical design and Diffraction Effects

    Pluzhnik, E. A.; Guyon, O.; Ridgway, S.; Martinache, F.; Woodruff, R.; Blain, C.; Galicher, R.

    2005-12-01

    Properly apodized pupils are suitable for high dynamical range imaging of extrasolar terrestrial planets. Phase-induced amplitude apodization (PIAA) of the telescope pupil (Guyon 2003) combines the advantages of classical pupil apodization with full throughput, no loss of angular resolution and low chromaticity. Diffraction propagation effects can decrease both the achieved contrast and the spectral bandwidth of the coronagraph. We show here how the diffraction effects in the PIAA optics can be corrected by an appropriate optical design. The proposed hybrid coronagraph design preserves the 10-10 PSF contrast at ≈ 1.5 λ /d required for efficient exoplanet imaging over the whole visible spectrum. This work was carried out under JPL contract numbers 1254445 and 1257767 for Development of Technologies for the Terrestrial Planet Finder Mission, with the support and hospitality of the National Astronomical Observatory of Japan.

  6. MAX: Development of a Laue diffraction lens for nuclear astrophysics

    Barriere, N.; Ballmoos, P. von; Skinner, G.; Smither, B.; Bastie, P.; Hinglais, E.; Abrosimov, N.; Alvarez, J.M.; Andersen, K.; Courtois, P.; Halloin, H.; Harris, M.; Isern, J.; Jean, P.; Knoedlseder, J.; Ubertini, P.; Vedrenne, G.; Weidenspointner, G.; Wunderer, C.

    2006-01-01

    The next generation of instrumentation for nuclear astrophysics will have to achieve an improvement in sensitivity by a factor of 10-100 over present technologies. With the focusing gamma-ray telescope MAX we take up this challenge and propose to combine the required sensitivity with high spectral and angular resolution, and the capability to measure the polarization of the photons. MAX is a space-borne crystal diffraction telescope, featuring a broad-band Laue lens optimized for the observation of compact sources in two wide energy bands of high astrophysical relevance. Gamma rays will be focused from the large collecting area of a crystal diffraction lens onto a very small detector volume. As a consequence, the signal to background ratio is greatly enhanced, leading to unprecedented sensitivities

  7. ADVANTAGES OF DIFFRACTIVE OPTICAL ELEMENTS APPLICATION IN SIMPLE OPTICAL IMAGING SYSTEMS

    N. D. Zoric

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals with the influence of diffractive optical elements on the optical aberrations. The correction of optical aberrations was investigated in the simple optical systems with one and two lenses (singlet and doublet. The advantages of diffractive optical elements are their ability to generate arbitrary complex wave fronts from a piece of optical material that is essentially flat. The optical systems consisting of the standard surfaces were designed and optimized by using the same starting points. Further, the diffractive and aspheric surfaces were introduced into the developed systems. The resulting hybrid systems were optimized. To compare the complicity of the development of narrow field systems and wide field optical systems, the optimization has been done separately for these two types of the instruments. The optical systems were designed by using special Optical Design Software. Тhe characteristics of designed diffractive surfaces were controlled in Software DIFSYS 2.30. Due to the application of diffractive optical elements the longitudinal chromatic aberration was 5 times reduced for the narrow field systems. The absolute value of Seidel coefficient related to the spherical aberration was reduced in the range of 0.03. Considering that diffractive optical elements have the known disadvantages, like possible parasitic diffraction orders and probable decrease of the transmission, we also developed and analyzed the optical systems with combined aspheric and diffractive surfaces. A combination of the aspheric and diffractive surfaces in the optical disk system of the disk reading lens, gave cutting down of the longitudinal color aberrations almost 15 times on-axis, comparing to the lens consisting of the aspherical and standard surfaces. All of the designed diffractive optical elements possess the parameters within the fabrication limits.

  8. Two-dimensional x-ray diffraction

    He, Bob B

    2009-01-01

    Written by one of the pioneers of 2D X-Ray Diffraction, this useful guide covers the fundamentals, experimental methods and applications of two-dimensional x-ray diffraction, including geometry convention, x-ray source and optics, two-dimensional detectors, diffraction data interpretation, and configurations for various applications, such as phase identification, texture, stress, microstructure analysis, crystallinity, thin film analysis and combinatorial screening. Experimental examples in materials research, pharmaceuticals, and forensics are also given. This presents a key resource to resea

  9. A scattering approach to sea wave diffraction

    Corradini, M. L., E-mail: letizia.corradini@unicam.it; Garbuglia, M., E-mail: milena.garbuglia@unicam.it; Maponi, P., E-mail: pierluigi.maponi@unicam.it [University of Camerino, via Madonna delle Carceri, 9, 62032, Camerino (Italy); Ruggeri, M., E-mail: ru.marco@faggiolatipumps.it [Faggiolati Pumps S.p.A., Z.Ind Sforzacosta, 62100, Macerata (Italy)

    2016-06-08

    This paper intends to show a model for the diffraction of sea waves approaching an OWC device, which converts the sea waves motion into mechanical energy and then electrical energy. This is a preliminary study to the optimisation of the device, in fact the computation of sea waves diffraction around the device allows the estimation of the sea waves energy which enters into the device. The computation of the diffraction phenomenon is the result of a sea waves scattering problem, solved with an integral equation method.

  10. Ultrafast electron diffraction using an ultracold source

    M. W. van Mourik

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The study of structural dynamics of complex macromolecular crystals using electrons requires bunches of sufficient coherence and charge. We present diffraction patterns from graphite, obtained with bunches from an ultracold electron source, based on femtosecond near-threshold photoionization of a laser-cooled atomic gas. By varying the photoionization wavelength, we change the effective source temperature from 300 K to 10 K, resulting in a concomitant change in the width of the diffraction peaks, which is consistent with independently measured source parameters. This constitutes a direct measurement of the beam coherence of this ultracold source and confirms its suitability for protein crystal diffraction.

  11. Diffraction enhanced x-ray imaging

    Thomlinson, W.; Zhong, Z.; Johnston, R.E.; Sayers, D.

    1997-09-01

    Diffraction enhanced imaging (DEI) is a new x-ray radiographic imaging modality using synchrotron x-rays which produces images of thick absorbing objects that are almost completely free of scatter. They show dramatically improved contrast over standard imaging applied to the same phantoms. The contrast is based not only on attenuation but also the refraction and diffraction properties of the sample. The diffraction component and the apparent absorption component (absorption plus extinction contrast) can each be determined independently. This imaging method may improve the image quality for medical applications such as mammography

  12. Accurate Charge Densities from Powder Diffraction

    Bindzus, Niels; Wahlberg, Nanna; Becker, Jacob

    Synchrotron powder X-ray diffraction has in recent years advanced to a level, where it has become realistic to probe extremely subtle electronic features. Compared to single-crystal diffraction, it may be superior for simple, high-symmetry crystals owing to negligible extinction effects and minimal...... peak overlap. Additionally, it offers the opportunity for collecting data on a single scale. For charge densities studies, the critical task is to recover accurate and bias-free structure factors from the diffraction pattern. This is the focal point of the present study, scrutinizing the performance...

  13. Diffraction and diffusion in room acoustics

    Rindel, Jens Holger; Rasmussen, Birgit

    1996-01-01

    Diffraction and diffusion are two phenomena that are both related to the wave nature of sound. Diffraction due to the finite size of reflecting surfaces and the design of single reflectors and reflector arrays are discussed. Diffusion is the result of scattering of sound reflected from surfaces...... that are not plane but curved or irregular. The importance of diffusion has been demonstrated in concert halls. Methods for the design of diffusing surfaces and the development of new types of diffusers are reviewed. Finally, the importance of diffraction and diffusion in room acoustic computer models is discussed....

  14. Hard diffraction at HERA and Tevatron

    Kaidalov, A.B.

    2001-01-01

    A relation between hard diffraction at HERA and Tevatron is discussed. A model, which takes into account unitarity effects is developed for interaction of high-energy virtual photons with nucleons. It is shown that this model gives a good description of HERA data on both total γ* p total cross section and diffractive dissociation of virtual photons in a broad region of Q 2 . It is shown how to describe the CDF data on diffractive jet production at Tevatron using an information on distribution of partons in the Pomeron from HERA experiments

  15. Novel Aspects of Hard Diffraction in QCD

    Brodsky, Stanley J.

    2005-01-01

    Initial- and final-state interactions from gluon-exchange, normally neglected in the parton model have a profound effect in QCD hard-scattering reactions, leading to leading-twist single-spin asymmetries, diffractive deep inelastic scattering, diffractive hard hadronic reactions, and nuclear shadowing and antishadowing--leading-twist physics not incorporated in the light-front wavefunctions of the target computed in isolation. I also discuss the use of diffraction to materialize the Fock states of a hadronic projectile and test QCD color transparency

  16. New diffractive results from the Tevatron

    Gallinaro, Michele; /Rockefeller U.

    2005-05-01

    Experimental results in diffractive processes are summarized and a few notable characteristics described in terms of Quantum Chromodynamics. Exclusive dijet production is used to establish a benchmark for future experiments in the quest for diffractive Higgs production at the Large Hadron Collider. Using new data from the Tevatron and dedicated diffractive triggers, no excess over a smooth falling distribution for exclusive dijet events could be found. Stringent upper limits on the exclusive dijet production cross section are presented. The quark/gluon composition of dijet final states is used to provide additional hints on exclusive dijet production.

  17. Diffraction tomography for plasma refractive index measurements

    Howard, J.; Nazikian, R.; Sharp, L.E.

    1989-01-01

    Measurement of the properties of probing beams of coherent electromagnetic radiation yields essential information about the line of sight integrated plasma refractive index. Presented is a scalar diffraction treatment of forward angle scattering plasma diagnostics based on the diffraction projection theorem first presented by E. Wolf in 1969. New results are obtained for near field scattering from probing Gaussian beams and it is demonstrated that the effects of diffraction need to be addressed for tomographic inversion of near field scattering and interferometry data. 33 refs., 10 figs

  18. Commercial air travel and in-flight pulmonary hypertension.

    Smith, Thomas G; Chang, Rae W; Robbins, Peter A; Dorrington, Keith L

    2013-01-01

    It has recently been shown that commercial air travel triggers hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction and modestly increases pulmonary artery pressure in healthy passengers. There is large interindividual variation in hypoxic pulmonary vasoreactivity, and some passengers may be at risk of developing flight-induced pulmonary hypertension, with potentially dangerous consequences. This study sought to determine whether it is possible for a susceptible passenger to develop pulmonary hypertension in response to a routine commercial flight. Using in-flight echocardiography, a passenger was studied during a 6-h commercial flight from London to Dubai. The passenger was generally well and frequently traveled by air, but had been diagnosed with Chuvash polycythemia, a genetic condition that is associated with increased hypoxic pulmonary vasoreactivity. Hematocrit had been normalized with regular venesection. During the flight, arterial oxygen saturation fell to a minimum of 96% and systolic pulmonary artery pressure (sPAP) rapidly increased into the pulmonary hypertensive range. The in-flight increase in sPAP was 50%, reaching a peak of 45 mmHg. This study has established that an asymptomatic but susceptible passenger can rapidly develop in-flight pulmonary hypertension even during a medium-haul flight. Prospective passengers at risk from such responses, including those who have cardiopulmonary disease or increased hypoxic pulmonary vasoreactivity, could benefit from preflight evaluation with a hypoxia altitude simulation test combined with simultaneous echocardiography (HAST-echo). The use of in-flight supplementary oxygen should be considered for susceptible individuals, including all patients diagnosed with Chuvash polycythemia.

  19. Experimental and theoretical study of rotationally inelastic diffraction of H{sub 2}(D{sub 2}) from methyl-terminated Si(111)

    Nihill, Kevin J.; Hund, Zachary M.; Sibener, S. J., E-mail: s-sibener@uchicago.edu [The James Franck Institute and Department of Chemistry, The University of Chicago, 929 E. 57th Street, Chicago, Illinois 60637 (United States); Muzas, Alberto; Cueto, Marcos del [Departamento de Química, Módulo 13, Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, 28049 Madrid (Spain); Díaz, Cristina [Departamento de Química, Módulo 13, Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, 28049 Madrid (Spain); Condensed Matter Physics Center (IFIMAC), Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, 28049 Madrid (Spain); Frankcombe, Terry [School of Physical, Environmental and Mathematical Sciences, University of New South Wales, Canberra ACT 2610 (Australia); Plymale, Noah T.; Lewis, Nathan S. [Division of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Beckman Institute and Kavli Nanoscience Institute, California Institute of Technology, 210 Noyes Laboratory, 127-72, Pasadena, California 91125 (United States); Martín, Fernando [Departamento de Química, Módulo 13, Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, 28049 Madrid (Spain); Condensed Matter Physics Center (IFIMAC), Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, 28049 Madrid (Spain); Instituto Madrileño de Estudios Avanzados en Nanociencia (IMDEA-Nanociencia), Cantoblanco, 28049 Madrid (Spain)

    2016-08-28

    Fundamental details concerning the interaction between H{sub 2} and CH{sub 3}–Si(111) have been elucidated by the combination of diffractive scattering experiments and electronic structure and scattering calculations. Rotationally inelastic diffraction (RID) of H{sub 2} and D{sub 2} from this model hydrocarbon-decorated semiconductor interface has been confirmed for the first time via both time-of-flight and diffraction measurements, with modest j = 0 → 2 RID intensities for H{sub 2} compared to the strong RID features observed for D{sub 2} over a large range of kinematic scattering conditions along two high-symmetry azimuthal directions. The Debye-Waller model was applied to the thermal attenuation of diffraction peaks, allowing for precise determination of the RID probabilities by accounting for incoherent motion of the CH{sub 3}–Si(111) surface atoms. The probabilities of rotationally inelastic diffraction of H{sub 2} and D{sub 2} have been quantitatively evaluated as a function of beam energy and scattering angle, and have been compared with complementary electronic structure and scattering calculations to provide insight into the interaction potential between H{sub 2} (D{sub 2}) and hence the surface charge density distribution. Specifically, a six-dimensional potential energy surface (PES), describing the electronic structure of the H{sub 2}(D{sub 2})/CH{sub 3}−Si(111) system, has been computed based on interpolation of density functional theory energies. Quantum and classical dynamics simulations have allowed for an assessment of the accuracy of the PES, and subsequently for identification of the features of the PES that serve as classical turning points. A close scrutiny of the PES reveals the highly anisotropic character of the interaction potential at these turning points. This combination of experiment and theory provides new and important details about the interaction of H{sub 2} with a hybrid organic-semiconductor interface, which can be used

  20. Application of a trap-free two-dimensional liquid chromatography combined with ion trap/time-of-flight mass spectrometry for separation and characterization of impurities and isomers in cefpiramide.

    Wang, Jian; Xu, Yu; Wen, Chunmei; Wang, Zhijian

    2017-11-01

    High-resolution mass spectrometry had been routinely used for structure identification of impurity. However, all LC-MS methods were based on a volatile mobile phase, and a non-volatile system is used in the official analytical method of United States Pharmacopoeia for cefpiramide which limited the use of mass spectrometry for structure characterization of the impurities. Here we presented the utilization of a trap-free two-dimensional liquid chromatography coupled to high resolution ion trap/time-of-flight mass spectrometry (2D LC-IT-TOF MS) with positive and negative modes of electrospray ionization for characterization of eight impurities in cefpiramide. Trap-free two-dimensional liquid chromatography and online desalting technique made it possible to characterize the impurity in cefpiramide in the condition of official standard, and the TIC chromatogram of LC-MS was in conformity with the LC chromatogram of the official analytical method in the peak sequence of impurities, which could further improve the method of official monographs in pharmacopoeias. Each peak separated by the non-volatile mobile phase was trapped by a 20 μL quantitative loop then transferred into a system with a volatile mobile phase connected to a MS detector. In the first dimension, the column was Kromasil C 8 analytical column (250 mm × 4.6 mm, 5 μm) with a non-volatile salt mobile phase at the flow rate of 0.8 mL min -1 . In the second dimension, the column was Shimadzu Shim-pack GISS C 18 (50 mm × 2.1 mm, 1.9 μm) with a volatile salt mobile phase at the flow rate of 0.3 mL min -1 . Through the multiple heart-cutting 2D-LC approach and online desalting technique, the problem of incompatibility between non-volatile salt mobile phase and mass spectrometry was solved completely. The fragmentation behavior of cefpiramide and its eight impurities were studied. The structures of eight impurities in cefpiramide drug substance were deduced based on the HPLC-MS n data, in

  1. Retrieving Balloon Data in Flight

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — NASA's Ultra Long Duration Balloon (ULDB) program will soon make flights lasting up to 100 days. Some flights may generate high data rates and retrieving this data...

  2. Measurement and QCD analysis of diffractive jet cross sections in deep inelastic scattering at HERA

    Mozer, M.U.

    2006-07-24

    Differential cross sections for the production of two jets in diffractive deep inelastic scattering (DIS) at HERA are presented. The process studied is of the type ep{yields}eXY, where the central hadronic system X contains at least two jets and is separated from the system Y by a gap in rapidity. The forward system Y consists of an elastically scattered proton or a low mass dissociation system. The data were taken with the H1 detector during the years of 1999 and 2000 and correspond to an integrated luminosity of 51.5 pb{sup -1}. The measured cross sections are compared to fixed order NLO QCD predictions, that use diffractive parton densities which have previously been determined by a NLO QCD analysis of inclusive diffractive DIS at H1. The prediction and the data show significant differences. However, the dijet cross section is dominated by the diffractive gluon density, which can be extracted by the above mentioned analysis only with considerable uncertainty. Hence a combined QCD analysis of the previously published inclusive diffractive data and the dijet data is performed. This combined fit analysis allows the determination of diffractive quark and gluon densities with comparable precision. The common description of inclusive diffractive data and the dijet data confirms QCD factorization. (orig.)

  3. Characterization of Polycrystalline Materials Using Synchrotron X-ray Imaging and Diffraction Techniques

    Ludwig, Wolfgang; King, A.; Herbig, M.

    2010-01-01

    The combination of synchrotron radiation x-ray imaging and diffraction techniques offers new possibilities for in-situ observation of deformation and damage mechanisms in the bulk of polycrystalline materials. Minute changes in electron density (i.e., cracks, porosities) can be detected using...... propagation based phase contrast imaging, a 3-D imaging mode exploiting the coherence properties of third generation synchrotron beams. Furthermore, for some classes of polycrystalline materials, one may use a 3-D variant of x-ray diffraction imaging, termed x-ray diffraction contrast tomography. X-ray...

  4. Neutron Larmor diffraction measurements for materials science

    Repper, J.; Keller, T.; Hofmann, M.; Krempaszky, C.; Petry, W.; Werner, E.

    2010-01-01

    Neutron Larmor diffraction (LD) is a high-resolution diffraction technique based on the Larmor precession of polarized neutrons. In contrast to conventional diffraction, LD does not depend on the accurate measurement of Bragg angles, and thus the resolution is independent of the beam collimation and monochromaticity. At present, a relative resolution for the determination of the crystal lattice spacing d of Δd/d∼10 -6 is achieved, i.e. at least one order of magnitude superior to conventional neutron or X-ray techniques. This work is a first step to explore the application of LD to high-resolution problems in the analysis of residual stresses, where both the accurate measurement of absolute d values and the possibility of measuring type II and III stresses may provide additional information beyond those accessible by conventional diffraction techniques. Data obtained from Inconel 718 samples are presented.

  5. ALADIN - Advanced Laue Diffraction Instruments using Neutrons

    Lemee-Cailleau, M.H.; Ouladdiaf, B.; McIntyre, G.J.

    2011-01-01

    Laue diffraction techniques have proven to be very attractive to a broad user community interested in obtaining detailed structural information on very small single-crystal samples or needing data collection speeds comparable to those available with the powder diffraction technique. However our experience has clearly demonstrated the negative effect of up-stream monochromatic instruments on the quality of Laue data. In order to obtain Laue diffraction data with a statistical accuracy similar to that achieved on a monochromatic instrument (neutron or X-rays), the project ALADIN (for Advanced Laue Diffraction Instruments using Neutrons) aims to: -) construct a Laue-dedicated thermal neutron guide, with m=2 super-mirror coating, providing access to the desirable wavelength bandwidth; -) installation of one of the ILL Laue diffractometers (VIVALDI or CYCLOPS) on this new guide. (authors)

  6. Diffraction analysis of the microstructure of materials

    Scardi, Paolo

    2004-01-01

    Diffraction Analysis of the Microstructure of Materials provides an overview of diffraction methods applied to the analysis of the microstructure of materials. Since crystallite size and the presence of lattice defects have a decisive influence on the properties of many engineering materials, information about this microstructure is of vital importance in developing and assessing materials for practical applications. The most powerful and usually non-destructive evaluation techniques available are X-ray and neutron diffraction. The book details, among other things, diffraction-line broadening methods for determining crystallite size and atomic-scale strain due, e.g. to dislocations, and methods for the analysis of residual (macroscale) stress. The book assumes only a basic knowledge of solid-state physics and supplies readers sufficient information to apply the methods themselves.

  7. Nonlinearity management and diffraction management for the ...

    Variational equations and partial differential equation have been simulated numerically. Analytical and numerical studies have shown that nonlinearity management and diffraction management stabilize the pulse against decay or collapse providing undisturbed propagation even for larger energies of the incident beam.

  8. Diffractive optics: design, fabrication, and test

    O'Shea, Donald C

    2004-01-01

    This book provides the reader with the broad range of materials that were discussed in a series of short courses presented at Georgia Tech on the design, fabrication, and testing of diffractive optical elements (DOEs...

  9. The logarithmic slope in diffractive DIS

    Gay Ducati, M.B.; Goncalves, V.P.; Machado, M.V.T.

    2002-01-01

    The logarithmic slope of diffractive structure function is a potential observable to separate the hard and soft contributions in diffraction, allowing to disentangle the QCD dynamics at small-x region. In this paper we extend our previous analyzes and calculate the diffractive logarithmic slope for three current approaches in the literature: (i) the Bartels-Wusthoff model, based on perturbative QCD, (ii) the CKMT model, based on Regge theory and (iii) the Golec-Biernat-Wusthoff model which assumes that the saturation phenomena is present in the HERA kinematic region. We analyze the transition region of small to large momentum transfer and verify that future experimental results on the diffractive logarithmic slope could discriminate between these approaches

  10. Neutron Larmor diffraction measurements for materials science

    Repper, J., E-mail: julia_repper@web.de [Forschungsneutronenquelle Heinz Maier-Leibnitz (FRM II), TU Muenchen, 85747 Garching (Germany); Keller, T. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Festkoerperforschung, 70569 Stuttgart (Germany)] [Forschungsneutronenquelle Heinz Maier-Leibnitz (FRM II), TU Muenchen, 85747 Garching (Germany); Hofmann, M. [Forschungsneutronenquelle Heinz Maier-Leibnitz (FRM II), TU Muenchen, 85747 Garching (Germany); Krempaszky, C. [Christian-Doppler-Labor fuer Werkstoffmechanik von Hochleistungslegierungen, TU Muenchen, 85747 Garching (Germany); Petry, W. [Forschungsneutronenquelle Heinz Maier-Leibnitz (FRM II), TU Muenchen, 85747 Garching (Germany); Werner, E. [Lehrstuhl fuer Werkstoffkunde und Werkstoffmechanik, TU Muenchen, 85747 Garching (Germany)

    2010-05-15

    Neutron Larmor diffraction (LD) is a high-resolution diffraction technique based on the Larmor precession of polarized neutrons. In contrast to conventional diffraction, LD does not depend on the accurate measurement of Bragg angles, and thus the resolution is independent of the beam collimation and monochromaticity. At present, a relative resolution for the determination of the crystal lattice spacing d of {Delta}d/d{approx}10{sup -6} is achieved, i.e. at least one order of magnitude superior to conventional neutron or X-ray techniques. This work is a first step to explore the application of LD to high-resolution problems in the analysis of residual stresses, where both the accurate measurement of absolute d values and the possibility of measuring type II and III stresses may provide additional information beyond those accessible by conventional diffraction techniques. Data obtained from Inconel 718 samples are presented.

  11. Diffraction analysis of customized illumination technique

    Lim, Chang-Moon; Kim, Seo-Min; Eom, Tae-Seung; Moon, Seung Chan; Shin, Ki S.

    2004-05-01

    Various enhancement techniques such as alternating PSM, chrome-less phase lithography, double exposure, etc. have been considered as driving forces to lead the production k1 factor towards below 0.35. Among them, a layer specific optimization of illumination mode, so-called customized illumination technique receives deep attentions from lithographers recently. A new approach for illumination customization based on diffraction spectrum analysis is suggested in this paper. Illumination pupil is divided into various diffraction domains by comparing the similarity of the confined diffraction spectrum. Singular imaging property of individual diffraction domain makes it easier to build and understand the customized illumination shape. By comparing the goodness of image in each domain, it was possible to achieve the customized shape of illumination. With the help from this technique, it was found that the layout change would not gives the change in the shape of customized illumination mode.

  12. Diffraction by m-bonacci gratings

    Monsoriu, Juan A; Giménez, Marcos H; Furlan, Walter D; Barreiro, Juan C; Saavedra, Genaro

    2015-01-01

    We present a simple diffraction experiment with m-bonacci gratings as a new interesting generalization of the Fibonacci ones. Diffraction by these non-conventional structures is proposed as a motivational strategy to introduce students to basic research activities. The Fraunhofer diffraction patterns are obtained with the standard equipment present in most undergraduate physics labs and are compared with those obtained with regular periodic gratings. We show that m-bonacci gratings produce discrete Fraunhofer patterns characterized by a set of diffraction peaks which positions are related to the concept of a generalized golden mean. A very good agreement is obtained between experimental and numerical results and the students’ feedback is discussed. (paper)

  13. Diffractive beauty production at the LHC

    Eggert, K.; Morsch, A.

    1994-01-01

    Using the framework of Pomeron exchange to describe diffractive pp collisions at the LHC we discuss beauty production in those events. The cross sections for beauty production at different diffractive masses and the topology for the beauty particles and the underlying event are given. When triggering on large diffractive masses, the beauty system is boosted into the Pomeron hemisphere opposite the underlying event, which tends to follow the excited proton direction. This may offer some advantages for the acceptance of beauty and its reconstruction in forward spectrometers. For the identification of diffractive events at the LHC collider, we present a scheme to measure the momentum loss of forward protons in the range 2x10 -3 < Δp/p <0.1. This momentum loss can be determined with a precision of about 10%. ((orig.))

  14. Single-diffractive Drell-Yan pair production at the LHC

    Ceccopieri, Federico Alberto [Universita degli Studi di Perugia, Dipartimento di Fisica e Geologia, Perugia (Italy); Universite de Liege, IFPA, Liege (Belgium); INFN, Sezione di Perugia (Italy)

    2017-01-15

    We present predictions for single-diffractive low-mass Drell-Yan pair production in pp collisions at the LHC at √(s) = 13 TeV. Predictions are obtained adopting a factorised form for the relevant cross sections and are based on a new set of diffractive parton distributions resulting from the QCD analysis of combined HERA leading proton data. We discuss a number of observables useful to characterise the expected factorisation breaking effects. (orig.)

  15. Comparative study of structural properties of trehalose water solutions by neutron diffraction, synchrotron radiation and simulation

    Cesaro, A.; Magazu, V.; Migliardo, F.; Sussich, F.; Vadala, M

    2004-07-15

    Neutron diffraction measurements combined with H/D substitution have been performed on trehalose aqueous solutions as a function of temperature and concentration by using the SANDALS diffractometer at ISIS Facility (UK). The findings point out a high capability of trehalose to strongly affect the tetrahedral hydrogen bond network of water. The neutron diffraction results are also compared with simulation and experimental data obtained by synchrotron radiation on the phospholipid bilayer membranes (DPPC)/trehalose/H{sub 2}O ternary system.

  16. Diffraction enhanced imaging: a simple model

    Zhu Peiping; Yuan Qingxi; Huang Wanxia; Wang Junyue; Shu Hang; Chen Bo; Liu Yijin; Li Enrong; Wu Ziyu

    2006-01-01

    Based on pinhole imaging and conventional x-ray projection imaging, a more general DEI (diffraction enhanced imaging) equation is derived using simple concepts in this paper. Not only can the new DEI equation explain all the same problems as with the DEI equation proposed by Chapman, but also some problems that cannot be explained with the old DEI equation, such as the noise background caused by small angle scattering diffracted by the analyser

  17. Diffraction enhanced imaging: a simple model

    Zhu Peiping; Yuan Qingxi; Huang Wanxia; Wang Junyue; Shu Hang; Chen Bo; Liu Yijin; Li Enrong; Wu Ziyu [Beijing Synchrotron Radiation Facility, Institute of High Energy Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China)

    2006-10-07

    Based on pinhole imaging and conventional x-ray projection imaging, a more general DEI (diffraction enhanced imaging) equation is derived using simple concepts in this paper. Not only can the new DEI equation explain all the same problems as with the DEI equation proposed by Chapman, but also some problems that cannot be explained with the old DEI equation, such as the noise background caused by small angle scattering diffracted by the analyser.

  18. Tunable Beam Diffraction in Infiltrated Microstructured Fibers

    Rosberg, Christian Romer; Bennet, Francis H.; Neshev, Dragomir N.

    We experimentally study beam propagation in two dimensional photonic lattices in microstructured optical fibers infiltrated with high index liquids. We demonstrate strongly tunable beam diffraction by dynamically varying the coupling between individual lattice sites.......We experimentally study beam propagation in two dimensional photonic lattices in microstructured optical fibers infiltrated with high index liquids. We demonstrate strongly tunable beam diffraction by dynamically varying the coupling between individual lattice sites....

  19. Bragg diffraction of fermions at optical potentials

    Deh, Benjamin

    2008-01-01

    This thesis describes the Bragg diffraction of ultracold fermions at an optical potential. A moving optical lattice was created, by overlaying two slightly detuned lasers. Atoms can be diffracted at this lattice if the detuning fulfills the Bragg condition for resting atoms. This Bragg diffraction is analyzed systematically in this thesis. To this end Rabi oscillations between the diffraction states were driven, as well in the weakly interacting Bragg regime, as in the strongly interacting Kapitza-Dirac regime. Simulations, based on a driven two-, respectively multilevel-system describe the observed effects rather well. Furthermore, the temporal evolution of the diffracted states in the magnetic trapping potential was studied. The anharmonicity of the trap in use and the scattering cross section for p-wave collisions in a 6 Li system was determined from the movement of these states. Moreover the momentum distribution of the fermions was measured with Bragg spectroscopy and first signs of Fermi degeneracy were found. Finally an interferometer with fermions was build, exhibiting a coherence time of more than 100 μs. With this, the possibility for measurement and manipulation of ultracold fermions with Bragg diffraction could bee shown. (orig.)

  20. When fast atom diffraction turns 3D

    Zugarramurdi, Asier; Borisov, Andrei G.

    2013-01-01

    Fast atom diffraction at surfaces (FAD) in grazing incidence geometry is characterized by the slow motion in the direction perpendicular to the surface and fast motion parallel to the surface plane along a low index direction. It is established experimentally that for the typical surfaces the FAD reveals the 2D diffraction patterns associated with exchange of the reciprocal lattice vector perpendicular to the direction of fast motion. The reciprocal lattice vector exchange along the direction of fast motion is negligible. The usual approximation made in the description of the experimental data is then to assume that the effective potential leading to the diffraction results from the averaging of the 3D surface potential along the atomic strings forming the axial channel. In this work we use full quantum wave packet propagation calculations to study theoretically the possibility to observe the 3D diffraction in FAD experiments. We show that for the surfaces with large unit cell, such as can be the case for reconstructed or vicinal surfaces, the 3D diffraction can be observed. The reciprocal lattice vector exchange along the direction of fast motion leads to several Laue circles in the diffraction pattern

  1. The dynamics of diffracted rays in foams

    Tufaile, A., E-mail: tufaile@usp.br; Tufaile, A.P.B.

    2015-12-18

    We have studied some aspects of the optics of the light scattering in foams. This paper describes the difference between rays and diffracted rays from the point of view of geometrical theory of diffraction. We have represented some bifurcations of light rays using dynamical systems. Based on our observations of foams, we created a solid optical device. The interference patterns of light scattering in foams forming Airy fringes were explored observing the pattern named as the eye of Horus. In the cases we examine, these Airy fringes are associated with light scattering in curved surfaces, while the halo formation is related to the law of edge diffraction. We are proposing a Pohl interferometer using a three-sided bubble/Plateau border system. - Highlights: • We obtained halos scattering light in foams. • We model the light scattering in foams using the geometrical theory of diffraction. • We examine the difference between rays and the diffracted rays. • We developed optical devices for diffracted rays.

  2. Daedalus - Last Dryden flight

    1988-01-01

    The Daedalus 88, with Glenn Tremml piloting, is seen here on its last flight for the NASA Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California. The Light Eagle and Daedalus human powered aircraft were testbeds for flight research conducted at Dryden between January 1987 and March 1988. These unique aircraft were designed and constructed by a group of students, professors, and alumni of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology within the context of the Daedalus project. The construction of the Light Eagle and Daedalus aircraft was funded primarily by the Anheuser Busch and United Technologies Corporations, respectively, with additional support from the Smithsonian Air and Space Museum, MIT, and a number of other sponsors. To celebrate the Greek myth of Daedalus, the man who constructed wings of wax and feathers to escape King Minos, the Daedalus project began with the goal of designing, building and testing a human-powered aircraft that could fly the mythical distance, 115 km. To achieve this goal, three aircraft were constructed. The Light Eagle was the prototype aircraft, weighing 92 pounds. On January 22, 1987, it set a closed course distance record of 59 km, which still stands. Also in January of 1987, the Light Eagle was powered by Lois McCallin to set the straight distance, the distance around a closed circuit, and the duration world records for the female division in human powered vehicles. Following this success, two more aircraft were built, the Daedalus 87 and Daedalus 88. Each aircraft weighed approximately 69 pounds. The Daedalus 88 aircraft was the ship that flew the 199 km from the Iraklion Air Force Base on Crete in the Mediterranean Sea, to the island of Santorini in 3 hours, 54 minutes. In the process, the aircraft set new records in distance and endurance for a human powered aircraft. The specific areas of flight research conducted at Dryden included characterizing the rigid body and flexible dynamics of the Light Eagle, investigating sensors for an

  3. Flight Crew Health Maintenance

    Gullett, C. C.

    1970-01-01

    The health maintenance program for commercial flight crew personnel includes diet, weight control, and exercise to prevent heart disease development and disability grounding. The very high correlation between hypertension and overweight in cardiovascular diseases significantly influences the prognosis for a coronary prone individual and results in a high rejection rate of active military pilots applying for civilian jobs. In addition to physical fitness the major items stressed in pilot selection are: emotional maturity, glucose tolerance, and family health history.

  4. Flight Software Math Library

    McComas, David

    2013-01-01

    The flight software (FSW) math library is a collection of reusable math components that provides typical math utilities required by spacecraft flight software. These utilities are intended to increase flight software quality reusability and maintainability by providing a set of consistent, well-documented, and tested math utilities. This library only has dependencies on ANSI C, so it is easily ported. Prior to this library, each mission typically created its own math utilities using ideas/code from previous missions. Part of the reason for this is that math libraries can be written with different strategies in areas like error handling, parameters orders, naming conventions, etc. Changing the utilities for each mission introduces risks and costs. The obvious risks and costs are that the utilities must be coded and revalidated. The hidden risks and costs arise in miscommunication between engineers. These utilities must be understood by both the flight software engineers and other subsystem engineers (primarily guidance navigation and control). The FSW math library is part of a larger goal to produce a library of reusable Guidance Navigation and Control (GN&C) FSW components. A GN&C FSW library cannot be created unless a standardized math basis is created. This library solves the standardization problem by defining a common feature set and establishing policies for the library s design. This allows the libraries to be maintained with the same strategy used in its initial development, which supports a library of reusable GN&C FSW components. The FSW math library is written for an embedded software environment in C. This places restrictions on the language features that can be used by the library. Another advantage of the FSW math library is that it can be used in the FSW as well as other environments like the GN&C analyst s simulators. This helps communication between the teams because they can use the same utilities with the same feature set and syntax.

  5. Combined XRD and XAS

    Ehrlich, S.N.; Hanson, J.C.; Lopez Camara, A.; Barrio, L.; Estrella, M.; Zhou, G.; Si, R.; Khalid, S.; Wang, Q.

    2011-01-01

    X-ray diffraction (XRD) and X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) are complementary techniques for investigating the structure of materials. XRD probes long range order and XAFS probes short range order. We have combined the two techniques at one synchrotron beamline, X18A at the NSLS, allowing samples to be studied in a single experiment. This beamline will allow for coordinated measurements of local and long range structural changes in chemical transformations and phase transitions using both techniques.

  6. Radioastron flight operations

    Altunin, V. I.; Sukhanov, K. G.; Altunin, K. R.

    1993-01-01

    Radioastron is a space-based very-long-baseline interferometry (VLBI) mission to be operational in the mid-90's. The spacecraft and space radio telescope (SRT) will be designed, manufactured, and launched by the Russians. The United States is constructing a DSN subnet to be used in conjunction with a Russian subnet for Radioastron SRT science data acquisition, phase link, and spacecraft and science payload health monitoring. Command and control will be performed from a Russian tracking facility. In addition to the flight element, the network of ground radio telescopes which will be performing co-observations with the space telescope are essential to the mission. Observatories in 39 locations around the world are expected to participate in the mission. Some aspects of the mission that have helped shaped the flight operations concept are: separate radio channels will be provided for spacecraft operations and for phase link and science data acquisition; 80-90 percent of the spacecraft operational time will be spent in an autonomous mode; and, mission scheduling must take into account not only spacecraft and science payload constraints, but tracking station and ground observatory availability as well. This paper will describe the flight operations system design for translating the Radioastron science program into spacecraft executed events. Planning for in-orbit checkout and contingency response will also be discussed.

  7. The adsorption of methanol and water on SAPO-34: in situ and ex situ X-ray diffraction studies

    Wragg, David S.; Johnsen, Rune; Norby, Poul

    2010-01-01

    The adsorption of methanol on SAPO-34 has been studied using a combination of in situ synchrotron powder X-ray diffraction to follow the process and ex situ high resolution powder diffraction to determine the structure. The unit cell volume of SAPO-34 is found to expand by 0.5% during methanol ad...

  8. Water-wave diffraction and radiation by multiple three-dimensional bodies over a mild-slope bottom

    Ruiz, Pau Mercadé; Ferri, Francesco; Kofoed, Jens Peter

    2017-01-01

    Highlights •A tool to model wave diffraction and radiation in mild-slope bottoms is proposed. •The tool combines a mild-slope equation model with diffraction transfer matrices. •The tool predictions are verified against analytical solutions for two test problems....

  9. Time-of-flight 3D Neutron Diffraction for Multigrain Crystallography

    Cereser, Alberto

    of the individual grains within the sample. The experiments were conducted at the single crystal diffractometer SENJU at the Japanese neutron source J-PARC. The choice of this instrument was motivated by its large coverage of the reciprocal space. The instrument had to undergo modifications to enable ToF 3DND...... for indexing SENJU data, which then serves as prior information to restrict the extinction spots that belong to the same grain. The ToF 3DND methods are verified through the study of two different samples: an Iron rod and a shape memory alloy (SMA) CoNiGa bi-crystal. Part of this verification involves...

  10. Time-of-Flight Three Dimensional Neutron Diffraction in Transmission Mode for Mapping Crystal Grain Structures

    Cereser, Alberto; Strobl, Markus; Hall, Stephen A.

    2017-01-01

    The physical properties of polycrystalline materials depend on their microstructure, which is the nano- to centimeter scale arrangement of phases and defects in their interior. Such microstructure depends on the shape, crystallographic phase and orientation, and interfacing of the grains constitu...

  11. Development of splitting convergent beam electron diffraction (SCBED)

    Houdellier, Florent, E-mail: Florent.Houdellier@cemes.fr [CEMES-CNRS, 29 Rue Jeanne Marvig, 31055 Toulouse (France); Röder, Falk [CEMES-CNRS, 29 Rue Jeanne Marvig, 31055 Toulouse (France); Triebenberg Lab, Institut für Strukturphysik, Technische Universität Dresden, D-01062 Dresden (Germany); Snoeck, Etienne [CEMES-CNRS, 29 Rue Jeanne Marvig, 31055 Toulouse (France)

    2015-12-15

    Using a combination of condenser electrostatic biprism with dedicated electron optic conditions for sample illumination, we were able to split a convergent beam electron probe focused on the sample in two half focused probes without introducing any tilt between them. As a consequence, a combined convergent beam electron diffraction pattern is obtained in the back focal plane of the objective lens arising from two different sample areas, which could be analyzed in a single pattern. This splitting convergent beam electron diffraction (SCBED) pattern has been tested first on a well-characterized test sample of Si/SiGe multilayers epitaxially grown on a Si substrate. The SCBED pattern contains information from the strained area, which exhibits HOLZ lines broadening induced by surface relaxation, with fine HOLZ lines observed in the unstrained reference part of the sample. These patterns have been analyzed quantitatively using both parts of the SCBED transmitted disk. The fine HOLZ line positions are used to determine the precise acceleration voltage of the microscope while the perturbed HOLZ rocking curves in the stained area are compared to dynamical simulated ones. The combination of these two information leads to a precise evaluation of the sample strain state. Finally, several SCBED setups are proposed to tackle fundamental physics questions as well as applied materials science ones and demonstrate how SCBED has the potential to greatly expand the range of applications of electron diffraction and electron holography. - Highlights: • Using a condenser biprism, we split the CBED pattern in two half-CBED disks. • We have determined the electron optical conditions used to perform various SCBED. • We propose new applications possible for this new SCBED configuration.

  12. Inclusive Measurement of Diffractive Deep-Inelastic Scattering at HERA

    Aaron, F.D.

    2012-07-18

    The diffractive process ep \\rightarrow eXY, where Y denotes a proton or its low mass excitation with MY < 1.6 GeV, is studied with the H1 experiment at HERA. The analysis is restricted to the phase space region of the photon virtuality 3 \\leq Q2 \\leq 1600 GeV2, the square of the four-momentum transfer at the proton vertex |t| < 1.0 GeV2 and the longitudinal momentum fraction of the incident proton carried by the colourless exchange xIP < 0.05. Triple differential cross sections are measured as a function of xIP, Q2 and beta = x/xIP where x is the Bjorken scaling variable. These measurements are made after selecting diffractive events by demanding a large empty rapidity interval separating the final state hadronic systems X and Y . High statistics measurements covering the data taking periods 1999-2000 and 2004-2007 are combined with previously published results in order to provide a single set of diffractive cross sections from the H1 experiment using the large rapidity gap selection method. The comb...

  13. Nanostructured diffractive optical devices for soft X-ray microscopes

    Hambach, D; Schneider, G

    2001-01-01

    The new transmission X-ray microscope (TXM) installed at the BESSY II electron storage ring uses an off-axis transmission zone plate (OTZ) as diffractive and focusing element of the condenser-monochromator setup. A high resolution micro-zone plate (MZP) forms a magnified image on a CCD-detector. Both, the OTZ with an active area of up to 24 mm sup 2 and the MZP with zone widths as small as 25 nm are generated by a process including electron beam lithography (EBL), dry etching and subsequent electroplating of nickel on top of silicon membrane substrates with about 100-150 nm thickness. The combination of a larger zone width and the usage of nickel zone structures allows to increase the diffraction efficiency of the condenser element at least by a factor of 3 compared to the earlier used KZP7 condenser zone plate in the TXM at BESSY I. Groove diffraction efficiencies of 21.6% and 14.7% were measured for MZP objectives with 40 and 25 nm outermost zone width, respectively.

  14. Measuring Spray Droplet Size from Agricultural Nozzles Using Laser Diffraction

    Fritz, Bradley K.; Hoffmann, W. Clint

    2016-01-01

    When making an application of any crop protection material such as an herbicide or pesticide, the applicator uses a variety of skills and information to make an application so that the material reaches the target site (i.e., plant). Information critical in this process is the droplet size that a particular spray nozzle, spray pressure, and spray solution combination generates, as droplet size greatly influences product efficacy and how the spray moves through the environment. Researchers and product manufacturers commonly use laser diffraction equipment to measure the spray droplet size in laboratory wind tunnels. The work presented here describes methods used in making spray droplet size measurements with laser diffraction equipment for both ground and aerial application scenarios that can be used to ensure inter- and intra-laboratory precision while minimizing sampling bias associated with laser diffraction systems. Maintaining critical measurement distances and concurrent airflow throughout the testing process is key to this precision. Real time data quality analysis is also critical to preventing excess variation in the data or extraneous inclusion of erroneous data. Some limitations of this method include atypical spray nozzles, spray solutions or application conditions that result in spray streams that do not fully atomize within the measurement distances discussed. Successful adaption of this method can provide a highly efficient method for evaluation of the performance of agrochemical spray application nozzles under a variety of operational settings. Also discussed are potential experimental design considerations that can be included to enhance functionality of the data collected. PMID:27684589

  15. Intraocular camera for retinal prostheses: Refractive and diffractive lens systems

    Hauer, Michelle Christine

    The focus of this thesis is on the design and analysis of refractive, diffractive, and hybrid refractive/diffractive lens systems for a miniaturized camera that can be surgically implanted in the crystalline lens sac and is designed to work in conjunction with current and future generation retinal prostheses. The development of such an intraocular camera (IOC) would eliminate the need for an external head-mounted or eyeglass-mounted camera. Placing the camera inside the eye would allow subjects to use their natural eye movements for foveation (attention) instead of more cumbersome head tracking, would notably aid in personal navigation and mobility, and would also be significantly more psychologically appealing from the standpoint of personal appearances. The capability for accommodation with no moving parts or feedback control is incorporated by employing camera designs that exhibit nearly infinite depth of field. Such an ultracompact optical imaging system requires a unique combination of refractive and diffractive optical elements and relaxed system constraints derived from human psychophysics. This configuration necessitates an extremely compact, short focal-length lens system with an f-number close to unity. Initially, these constraints appear highly aggressive from an optical design perspective. However, after careful analysis of the unique imaging requirements of a camera intended to work in conjunction with the relatively low pixellation levels of a retinal microstimulator array, it becomes clear that such a design is not only feasible, but could possibly be implemented with a single lens system.

  16. Blazed Grating Resonance Conditions and Diffraction Efficiency Optical Transfer Function

    Stegenburgs, Edgars

    2017-01-08

    We introduce a general approach to study diffraction harmonics or resonances and resonance conditions for blazed reflecting gratings providing knowledge of fundamental diffraction pattern and qualitative understanding of predicting parameters for the most efficient diffraction.

  17. Blazed Grating Resonance Conditions and Diffraction Efficiency Optical Transfer Function

    Stegenburgs, Edgars; Alias, Mohd Sharizal B.; Ng, Tien Khee; Ooi, Boon S.

    2017-01-01

    We introduce a general approach to study diffraction harmonics or resonances and resonance conditions for blazed reflecting gratings providing knowledge of fundamental diffraction pattern and qualitative understanding of predicting parameters for the most efficient diffraction.

  18. Multiple Image Radiography With Diffraction Enhanced Imaging For Breast Specimen

    Oltulu, Oral; Zhong Zhong; Hasnah, Moumen; Chapman, Dean

    2007-01-01

    Biological samples are of great interest for many imaging techniques. The samples usually contain small structures and weak absorption properties. The combinations of weak signals with overlying structures make feature recognition difficult in many cases. In the x-ray regime, a relatively new imaging technique Diffraction Enhanced Imaging (DEI) has superior tissue contrast over conventional radiography and is proven to be very sensitive method. Multiple images taken by DEI are called Multiple Image Radiography (MIR). The purpose of this study is to validate the potential application of the method and to show that MIR-DEI method may give more information about the sample

  19. Nutrition, endocrinology, and body composition during space flight

    Lane, H. W.; Gretebeck, R. J.; Smith, S. M.

    1998-01-01

    Space flight induces endocrine changes that perturb metabolism. This altered metabolism affects both the astronauts' body composition and the nutritional requirements necessary to maintain their health. During the last 25 years, a combination of studies conducted on Skylab (the first U.S. space laboratory), U.S. Shuttle flights, and Soviet and Russian flights provides a range of data from which general conclusions about energy and protein requirements can be drawn. We have reviewed the endocrine data from those studies and related it to changes in body composition. From these data it appears that protein and energy intake of astronauts are similar to those on Earth. However, a combination of measures, including exercise, appropriate diet, and, potentially, drugs, is required to provide the muscle health needed for long duration space flight.

  20. Quantitative damage imaging using Lamb wave diffraction tomography

    Zhang Hai-Yan; Ruan Min; Zhu Wen-Fa; Chai Xiao-Dong

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we investigate the diffraction tomography for quantitative imaging damages of partly through-thickness holes with various shapes in isotropic plates by using converted and non-converted scattered Lamb waves generated numerically. Finite element simulations are carried out to provide the scattered wave data. The validity of the finite element model is confirmed by the comparison of scattering directivity pattern (SDP) of circle blind hole damage between the finite element simulations and the analytical results. The imaging method is based on a theoretical relation between the one-dimensional (1D) Fourier transform of the scattered projection and two-dimensional (2D) spatial Fourier transform of the scattering object. A quantitative image of the damage is obtained by carrying out the 2D inverse Fourier transform of the scattering object. The proposed approach employs a circle transducer network containing forward and backward projections, which lead to so-called transmission mode (TMDT) and reflection mode diffraction tomography (RMDT), respectively. The reconstructed results of the two projections for a non-converted S0 scattered mode are investigated to illuminate the influence of the scattering field data. The results show that Lamb wave diffraction tomography using the combination of TMDT and RMDT improves the imaging effect compared with by using only the TMDT or RMDT. The scattered data of the converted A0 mode are also used to assess the performance of the diffraction tomography method. It is found that the circle and elliptical shaped damages can still be reasonably identified from the reconstructed images while the reconstructed results of other complex shaped damages like crisscross rectangles and racecourse are relatively poor. (special topics)

  1. Improving estimation of flight altitude in wildlife telemetry studies

    Poessel, Sharon; Duerr, Adam E.; Hall, Jonathan C.; Braham, Melissa A.; Katzner, Todd

    2018-01-01

    Altitude measurements from wildlife tracking devices, combined with elevation data, are commonly used to estimate the flight altitude of volant animals. However, these data often include measurement error. Understanding this error may improve estimation of flight altitude and benefit applied ecology.There are a number of different approaches that have been used to address this measurement error. These include filtering based on GPS data, filtering based on behaviour of the study species, and use of state-space models to correct measurement error. The effectiveness of these approaches is highly variable.Recent studies have based inference of flight altitude on misunderstandings about avian natural history and technical or analytical tools. In this Commentary, we discuss these misunderstandings and suggest alternative strategies both to resolve some of these issues and to improve estimation of flight altitude. These strategies also can be applied to other measures derived from telemetry data.Synthesis and applications. Our Commentary is intended to clarify and improve upon some of the assumptions made when estimating flight altitude and, more broadly, when using GPS telemetry data. We also suggest best practices for identifying flight behaviour, addressing GPS error, and using flight altitudes to estimate collision risk with anthropogenic structures. Addressing the issues we describe would help improve estimates of flight altitude and advance understanding of the treatment of error in wildlife telemetry studies.

  2. Effect of substrate material selection on polychromatic integral diffraction efficiency for multilayer diffractive optics in oblique incident situation

    Zhang, Bo; Cui, Qingfeng; Piao, Mingxu

    2018-05-01

    The effect of substrate material selection for multilayer diffractive optical elements (MLDOEs) on polychromatic integral diffraction efficiency (PIDE) is studied in the oblique incident situation. A mathematical model of substrate material selection is proposed to obtain the high PIDE with large incident angle. The extended expression of the microstructure heights with consideration of incident angle is deduced to calculate the PIDE difference Δ η bar(λ) for different substrate material combinations. The smaller value of Δ η bar(λ) indicates the more optimal substrate material combination in a wide incident angle range. Based on the deduced mathematical model, different MLDOEs are analyzed in visible and infrared wavebands. The results show that the three-layer DOEs can be applied in larger incident angle situation than the double-layer DOEs in visible waveband. When the two substrate materials are the same, polycarbonate (PC) is more reasonable than poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) as the middle filling optical material for the three-layer DOEs. In the infrared waveband, the PIDE decreases in the LWIR are obviously smaller than that in the MWIR for the same substrate material combination, and the PIDE cannot be calculated when the incident angle larger than critical angle. The analysis results can be used to guide the hybrid optical system design with MLDOEs.

  3. Quantitative phase analysis by neutron diffraction

    Lee, Chang Hee; Song, Su Ho; Lee, Jin Ho; Shim, Hae Seop [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea)

    1999-06-01

    This study is to apply quantitative phase analysis (QPA) by neutron diffraction to the round robin samples provided by the International Union of Crystallography(IUCr). We measured neutron diffraction patterns for mixed samples which have several different weight percentages and their unique characteristic features. Neutron diffraction method has been known to be superior to its complementary methods such as X-ray or Synchrotron, but it is still accepted as highly reliable under limited conditions or samples. Neutron diffraction has strong capability especially on oxides due to its scattering cross-section of the oxygen and it can become a more strong tool for analysis on the industrial materials with this quantitative phase analysis techniques. By doing this study, we hope not only to do one of instrument performance tests on our HRPD but also to improve our ability on the analysis of neutron diffraction data by comparing our QPA results with others from any advanced reactor facilities. 14 refs., 4 figs., 6 tabs. (Author)

  4. Hard Diffraction - from Blois 1985 to 2005

    Gunnar, Ingelman [Uppsala Univ., High Energy Physics (Sweden)

    2005-07-01

    The idea of diffractive processes with a hard scale involved, to resolve the underlying parton dynamics, was presented at the first Blois conference in 1985 and experimentally verified a few years later. Today hard diffraction is an attractive research field with high-quality data and new theoretical models. The trend from Regge-based pomeron models to QCD-based parton level models has given insights on QCD dynamics involving perturbative gluon exchange mechanisms. In the new QCD-based models, the pomeron is not part of the proton wave function, but diffraction is an effect of the scattering process. Models based on interactions with a colour background field provide an interesting approach which avoids conceptual problems of pomeron-based models, such as the pomeron flux, and provide a basis for common theoretical framework for all final states, diffractive gap events as well as non-diffractive events. Finally, the new process of gaps between jets provides strong evidence for the BFKL dynamics as predicted since long by QCD, but so far hard to establish experimentally.

  5. Deep-inelastic electron-proton diffraction

    Dainton, J.B.

    1995-11-01

    Recent measurements by the H1 collaboration at HERA of the cross section for deep-inelastic electron-proton scattering in which the proton interacts with minimal energy transfer and limited 4-momentum transfer squared are presented in the form of the contribution F 2 D(3) to the proton structure function F 2 . By parametrising the cross section phenomenologically in terms of a leading effective Regge pole exchange and comparing the result with a similar parametrisation of hadronic pp physics, the proton interaction is demonstrated to be dominantly of a diffractive nature. The quantitative interpretation of the parametrisation in terms of the properties of an effective leading Regge pole exchange, the pomeron (IP), shows that there is no evidence for a 'harder' BFKL-motivated IP in such deep-inelastic proton diffraction. The total contribution of proton diffraction to deep-inelastic electron-proton scattering is measured to be ∝10% and to be rather insensitive to Bjorken-x and Q 2 . A first measurement of the partonic structure of diffractive exchange is presented. It is shown to be readily interpreted in terms of the exchange of gluons, and to suggest that the bulk of diffractive momentum transfer is carried by a leading gluon. (orig.)

  6. Hard diffraction and deep inelastic scattering

    Bjorken, J.D.

    1994-04-01

    Since the advent of hard-collision physics, the study of diffractive processes - shadow physics - has been less prominent than before. However, there is now a renewed interest in the subject, especially in that aspect which synthesizes the short-distance, hard-collision phenomena with the classical physics of large rapidity-gaps. This is especially stimulated by the recent data on deep-inelastic scattering from HERA, as well as the theoretical work which relates to it. The word diffraction is sometimes used by high-energy physicists in a loose way. The author defines this term to mean: A diffractive process occurs if and only if there is a large rapidity gap in the produced-particle phase space which is not exponentially suppressed. Here a rapidity gap means essentially no hadrons produced into the rapidity gap (which operates in the open-quotes legoclose quotes phase-space of pseudo-rapidity and azimuthal angle). And non-exponential suppression implies that the cross-section for creating a gap with width Δη does not have a power-law decrease with increasing subenergy s=e Δη , but behaves at most like some power of pseudorapidity Δη∼log(s). The term hard diffraction shall simply refer to those diffractive process which have jets in the final-state phase-space

  7. Neutron-diffraction measurements of stress

    Holden, T.M.

    1995-01-01

    Experiments on bent steam-generator tubing have shown that different diffraction peaks, (1 1 1) or (0 0 2), give different results for the sign and magnitude of the stress and strain. From an engineering standpoint, the macroscopic stress field cannot be both positive and negative in the same volume, so this difference must be due to intergranular effects superposed on the macroscopic stress field. Uniaxial tensile test experiments with applied stresses beyond the 0.2% offset yield stress, help to understand this anomaly, by demonstrating the different strain response to applied stress along different crystallographic axes.When Zr-alloys are cooled from elevated temperatures, thermal stresses always develop, so that it is difficult to obtain a stress-free lattice spacing from which residual strains may be derived. From measurements of the temperature dependence of lattice spacing, the temperature at which the thermal stresses vanish may be found. From the lattice spacing at this temperature the stress-free lattice spacings at room temperature can be obtained readily.To interpret the measured strains in terms of macroscopic stress fields it is necessary to know the diffraction elastic constants. Neutron diffraction measurements of the diffraction elastic constants in a ferritic steel for the [1 1 0], [0 0 2] and [2 2 2] crystallographic axes, in directions parallel and perpendicular to the applied stress are compared with theoretical diffraction elastic constants. (orig.)

  8. Multiwavelength anomalous diffraction and diffraction anomalous fine structure to study composition and strain of semiconductor nano structures

    Favre-Nicolin, V.; Proietti, M.G.; Leclere, C.; Renevier, H.; Katcho, N.A.; Richard, M.I.

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to illustrate the use of Multi-Wavelength Anomalous Diffraction (MAD) and Diffraction Anomalous Fine Structure (DAFS) spectroscopy for the study of structural properties of semiconductor nano-structures. We give a brief introduction on the basic principles of these techniques providing a detailed bibliography. Then we focus on the data reduction and analysis and we give specific examples of their application on three different kinds of semiconductor nano-structures: Ge/Si nano-islands, AlN capped GaN/AlN Quantum Dots and AlGaN/AlN Nano-wires. We show that the combination of MAD and DAFS is a very powerful tool to solve the structural problem of these materials of high technological impact. In particular, the effects of composition and strain on diffraction are disentangled and composition can be determined in a reliable way, even at the interface between nano-structure and substrate. We show the great possibilities of this method and give the reader the basic tools to undertake its use. (authors)

  9. Three-dimensional electron diffraction as a complementary technique to powder X-ray diffraction for phase identification and structure solution of powders.

    Yun, Yifeng; Zou, Xiaodong; Hovmöller, Sven; Wan, Wei

    2015-03-01

    Phase identification and structure determination are important and widely used techniques in chemistry, physics and materials science. Recently, two methods for automated three-dimensional electron diffraction (ED) data collection, namely automated diffraction tomography (ADT) and rotation electron diffraction (RED), have been developed. Compared with X-ray diffraction (XRD) and two-dimensional zonal ED, three-dimensional ED methods have many advantages in identifying phases and determining unknown structures. Almost complete three-dimensional ED data can be collected using the ADT and RED methods. Since each ED pattern is usually measured off the zone axes by three-dimensional ED methods, dynamic effects are much reduced compared with zonal ED patterns. Data collection is easy and fast, and can start at any arbitrary orientation of the crystal, which facilitates automation. Three-dimensional ED is a powerful technique for structure identification and structure solution from individual nano- or micron-sized particles, while powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD) provides information from all phases present in a sample. ED suffers from dynamic scattering, while PXRD data are kinematic. Three-dimensional ED methods and PXRD are complementary and their combinations are promising for studying multiphase samples and complicated crystal structures. Here, two three-dimensional ED methods, ADT and RED, are described. Examples are given of combinations of three-dimensional ED methods and PXRD for phase identification and structure determination over a large number of different materials, from Ni-Se-O-Cl crystals, zeolites, germanates, metal-organic frameworks and organic compounds to intermetallics with modulated structures. It is shown that three-dimensional ED is now as feasible as X-ray diffraction for phase identification and structure solution, but still needs further development in order to be as accurate as X-ray diffraction. It is expected that three-dimensional ED methods

  10. Three-dimensional electron diffraction as a complementary technique to powder X-ray diffraction for phase identification and structure solution of powders

    Yifeng Yun

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Phase identification and structure determination are important and widely used techniques in chemistry, physics and materials science. Recently, two methods for automated three-dimensional electron diffraction (ED data collection, namely automated diffraction tomography (ADT and rotation electron diffraction (RED, have been developed. Compared with X-ray diffraction (XRD and two-dimensional zonal ED, three-dimensional ED methods have many advantages in identifying phases and determining unknown structures. Almost complete three-dimensional ED data can be collected using the ADT and RED methods. Since each ED pattern is usually measured off the zone axes by three-dimensional ED methods, dynamic effects are much reduced compared with zonal ED patterns. Data collection is easy and fast, and can start at any arbitrary orientation of the crystal, which facilitates automation. Three-dimensional ED is a powerful technique for structure identification and structure solution from individual nano- or micron-sized particles, while powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD provides information from all phases present in a sample. ED suffers from dynamic scattering, while PXRD data are kinematic. Three-dimensional ED methods and PXRD are complementary and their combinations are promising for studying multiphase samples and complicated crystal structures. Here, two three-dimensional ED methods, ADT and RED, are described. Examples are given of combinations of three-dimensional ED methods and PXRD for phase identification and structure determination over a large number of different materials, from Ni–Se–O–Cl crystals, zeolites, germanates, metal–organic frameworks and organic compounds to intermetallics with modulated structures. It is shown that three-dimensional ED is now as feasible as X-ray diffraction for phase identification and structure solution, but still needs further development in order to be as accurate as X-ray diffraction. It is expected that three

  11. Rocket Flight Path

    Jamie Waters

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available This project uses Newton’s Second Law of Motion, Euler’s method, basic physics, and basic calculus to model the flight path of a rocket. From this, one can find the height and velocity at any point from launch to the maximum altitude, or apogee. This can then be compared to the actual values to see if the method of estimation is a plausible. The rocket used for this project is modeled after Bullistic-1 which was launched by the Society of Aeronautics and Rocketry at the University of South Florida.

  12. Flight Mechanics Project

    Steck, Daniel

    2009-01-01

    This report documents the generation of an outbound Earth to Moon transfer preliminary database consisting of four cases calculated twice a day for a 19 year period. The database was desired as the first step in order for NASA to rapidly generate Earth to Moon trajectories for the Constellation Program using the Mission Assessment Post Processor. The completed database was created running a flight trajectory and optimization program, called Copernicus, in batch mode with the use of newly created Matlab functions. The database is accurate and has high data resolution. The techniques and scripts developed to generate the trajectory information will also be directly used in generating a comprehensive database.

  13. Eclipse - tow flight closeup and release

    1998-01-01

    This clip, running 15 seconds in length, shows the QF-106 'Delta Dart' gear down, with the tow rope secured to the attachment point above the aircraft nose. First there is a view looking back from the C-141A, then looking forward from the nose of the QF-106, and finally a shot of the aircraft being released from the tow rope. NASA Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, supported a Kelly Space and Technology, Inc. (KST)/U.S. Air Force project known as Eclipse, which demonstrated a reusable tow launch vehicle concept. The purpose of the project was to demonstrate a reusable tow launch vehicle concept that had been conceived and patented by KST. Kelly Space obtained a contract with the USAF Research Laboratory for the tow launch demonstration project under the Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) program. The USAF SBIR contract included the modifications to turn the QF-106 into the Experimental Demonstrator #1 (EXD-01), and the C141A aircraft to incorporate the tow provisions to link the two aircraft, as well as conducting flight tests. The demonstration consisted of ground and flight tests. These tests included a Combined Systems Test of both airplanes joined by a tow rope, a towed taxi test, and six towed flights. The primary goal of the project was demonstrating the tow phase of the Eclipse concept using a scaled-down tow aircraft (C-141A) and a representative aerodynamically-shaped aircraft (QF-106A) as a launch vehicle. This was successfully accomplished. On December 20, 1997, NASA research pilot Mark Stucky flew a QF-106 on the first towed flight behind an Air Force C-141 in the joint Eclipse project with KST to demonstrate a reusable tow launch vehicle concept developed by KST. Kelly Space and Technology hoped to use the data from the tow tests to validate a tow-to-launch procedure for reusable space launch vehicles. Stucky flew six successful tow tests between December 1997 and February 6, 1998. On February 6, 1998, the sixth and final towed

  14. Diffractive corrections to the muon Bremsstrahlung

    Kel'ner, S.R.; Fedotov, A.M.

    1999-01-01

    The corrections to the muon Bremsstrahlung cross section due to diffraction of hard photons on nuclei are obtained. In this process the momentum is transmitted to a nucleus not by a charged particle but by the photon the interaction of which with the nucleus can be considered as diffraction on weakly absorbing ball. The amplitude of the process interferes with the usual Bremsstrahlung amplitude, therefore in the cross section together with the diffraction correction the interference term also appears, possessing different sings for μ + and μ - . The photon emission cross section also depends on the sing of muon charge and for muon energy about 10 TeV the difference between the cross section may reach 10%. The corrections to the radiation energy loss are also calculated [ru

  15. Adaptable Diffraction Gratings With Wavefront Transformation

    Iazikov, Dmitri; Mossberg, Thomas W.; Greiner, Christoph M.

    2010-01-01

    Diffraction gratings are optical components with regular patterns of grooves, which angularly disperse incoming light by wavelength. Traditional diffraction gratings have static planar, concave, or convex surfaces. However, if they could be made so that they can change the surface curvature at will, then they would be able to focus on particular segments, self-calibrate, or perform fine adjustments. This innovation creates a diffraction grating on a deformable surface. This surface could be bent at will, resulting in a dynamic wavefront transformation. This allows for self-calibration, compensation for aberrations, enhancing image resolution in a particular area, or performing multiple scans using different wavelengths. A dynamic grating gives scientists a new ability to explore wavefronts from a variety of viewpoints.

  16. Diffractive elements performance in chromatic confocal microscopy

    Garzon, J; Duque, D; Alean, A; Toledo, M; Meneses, J; Gharbi, T

    2011-01-01

    The Confocal Laser Scanning Microscopy (CLSM) has been widely used in the semiconductor industry and biomedicine because of its depth discrimination capability. Subsequent to this technique has been developed in recent years Chromatic Confocal Microscopy. This method retains the same principle of confocal and offers the added advantage of removing the axial movement of the moving system. This advantage is usually accomplished with an optical element that generates a longitudinal chromatic aberration and a coding system that relates the axial position of each point of the sample with the wavelength that is focused on each. The present paper shows the performance of compact chromatic confocal microscope when some different diffractive elements are used for generation of longitudinal chromatic aberration. Diffractive elements, according to the process and manufacturing parameters, may have different diffraction efficiency and focus a specific wavelength in a specific focal position. The performance assessment is carried out with various light sources which exhibit an incoherent behaviour and a broad spectral width.

  17. The design of macromolecular crystallography diffraction experiments

    Evans, Gwyndaf; Axford, Danny; Owen, Robin L.

    2011-01-01

    Thoughts about the decisions made in designing macromolecular X-ray crystallography experiments at synchrotron beamlines are presented. The measurement of X-ray diffraction data from macromolecular crystals for the purpose of structure determination is the convergence of two processes: the preparation of diffraction-quality crystal samples on the one hand and the construction and optimization of an X-ray beamline and end station on the other. Like sample preparation, a macromolecular crystallography beamline is geared to obtaining the best possible diffraction measurements from crystals provided by the synchrotron user. This paper describes the thoughts behind an experiment that fully exploits both the sample and the beamline and how these map into everyday decisions that users can and should make when visiting a beamline with their most precious crystals

  18. Rietveld analysis, powder diffraction and cement

    Peterson, V.

    2002-01-01

    Full text: Phase quantification of cement is essential in its industrial use, however many methods are inaccurate and/or time consuming. Powder diffraction is one of the more accurate techniques used for quantitative phase analysis of cement. There has been an increase in the use of Rietveld refinement and powder diffraction for the analysis and phase quantification of cement and its components in recent years. The complex nature of cement components, existence of solid solutions, polymorphic variation of phases and overlapping phase peaks in diffraction patterns makes phase quantification of cements by powder diffraction difficult. The main phase in cement is alite, a solid solution of tricalcium silicate. Tricalcium silicate has been found to exist in seven modifications in three crystal systems, including triclinic, monoclinic, and rhombohedral structures. Hence, phase quantification of cements using Rietveld methods usually involves the simultaneous modelling of several tricalcium silicate structures to fit the complex alite phase. An industry ordinary Portland cement, industry and standard clinker, and a synthetic tricalcium silicate were characterised using neutron, laboratory x-ray and synchrotron powder diffraction. Diffraction patterns were analysed using full-profile Rietveld refinement. This enabled comparison of x-ray, neutron and synchrotron data for phase quantification of the cement and examination of the tricalcium silicate. Excellent Rietveld fits were achieved, however the results showed that the quantitative phase analysis results differed for some phases in the same clinker sample between various data sources. This presentation will give a short introduction about cement components including polymorphism, followed by the presentation of some problems in phase quantification of cements and the role of Rietveld refinement in solving these problems. Copyright (2002) Australian X-ray Analytical Association Inc

  19. Glancing angle synchrotron X-ray diffraction

    Cernik, R J [Daresbury Lab., Warrington, WA (United States)

    1996-09-01

    This paper describes in basic detail some of the techniques that can be used to study thin films and surfaces. These are all in the X-ray region and cover reflectivity, diffraction form polycrystalline films, textured films and single crystal films. Other effects such as fluorescence and diffuse scattering are mentioned but not discussed in detail. Two examples of the reflectivity from multilayers and the diffraction from iron oxide films are discussed. The advantages of the synchrotron for these studies is stressed and the experimental geometries that can be employed are described i detail. A brief bibliography is provided at the end to accompany this part of the 1996 Frascati school.

  20. Film thickness determination by grazing incidence diffraction

    Battiston, G A; Gerbasi, R [CNR, Padua (Italy). Istituto di Chimica e Tecnologie Inorganiche e dei Materiali Avanzati

    1996-09-01

    Thin films deposited via MOCVD (Metal Organic Chemical Vapour Deposition) are layers in the thickness range of a few manometers to about ten micrometers. An understanding of the physics and chemistry of films is necessary for a better comprehension of the phenomena involved in the film deposition procedure and its optimisation. Together with the crystalline phase a parameter that must be determined is the thickness of the layer. In this work the authors present a method for the measurement of the film thickness. This procedure, based on diffraction intensity absorption of the X-rays, both incident and diffracted in passing through the layers, resulted quite simple, rapid and non-destructive.