WorldWideScience

Sample records for flexor tendon repair

  1. Wide-Awake Primary Flexor Tendon Repair, Tenolysis, and Tendon Transfer

    OpenAIRE

    Tang, Jin Bo

    2015-01-01

    Tendon surgery is unique because it should ensure tendon gliding after surgery. Tendon surgery now can be performed under local anesthesia without tourniquet, by injecting epinephrine mixed with lidocaine, to achieve vasoconstriction in the area of surgery. This method allows the tendon to move actively during surgery to test tendon function intraoperatively and to ensure the tendon is properly repaired before leaving the operating table. I applied this method to primary flexor tendon repair ...

  2. Wide-Awake Primary Flexor Tendon Repair, Tenolysis, and Tendon Transfer

    OpenAIRE

    Tang, Jin Bo

    2015-01-01

    Tendon surgery is unique because it should ensure tendon gliding after surgery. Tendon surgery now can be performed under local anesthesia without tourniquet, by injecting epinephrine mixed with lidocaine, to achieve vasoconstriction in the area of surgery. This method allows the tendon to move actively during surgery to test tendon function intraoperatively and to ensure the tendon is properly repaired before leaving the operating table. I applied this method to primary flexor tendon repair ...

  3. Should we think about wrist extensor after flexor tendon repair?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aline M Ferreira

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To evaluate the activity of wrist extensor muscle, correlating with wrist motion during gripping after flexor tendon repair. Design: Cross-sectional clinical measurement study. Setting: Laboratory for biomechanics and rehabilitation. Subjects: A total of 11 patients submitted to rehabilitation by early passive motion of the fingers with wrist flexion position were evaluated after 8 weeks of fingers flexor tendon repair and 11 healthy volunteers, all ranging from 20 to 37 years of age. Intervention: Volunteers performed an isometric standardized gripping task. Main measures: We used electrogoniometry to analyze wrist range of motion and surface electromyography, considering 100% maximum voluntary contraction to represent the amplitude of electromyographic activity of the extensor carpi radialis and flexor digitorum superficialis. Results: Patients with flexor tendon repair showed co-activation deficit between wrist extensor (extensor carpi radialis and flexor finger muscles (flexor digitorum superficialis during gripping in the intermediate phase of rehabilitation, despite some recovering mobility for wrist extension (p ≤ 0.05. A moderate correlation between range of motion and extensor carpi radialis was present only for injured group (r = 0.32. Total active motion score, which represents finger active excursion, was regular or poor in 65% of cases, all with nerve repair associated. Conclusion: Wrist extensors have an important synergist role at handgrip, although some imbalance can be present after flexor tendon repair. These preliminary findings suggest that emphasis could be directed to add synergistic wrist motion in rehabilitation protocols after flexor tendon repair. Future studies with early active rehabilitation are necessary.

  4. The use of Teno Fix tendon repair device in a patient with multiple flexor tendon ruptures

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    Flexor tendon laceration repairs remain challenging despite numerous advances in hand surgery. Although progress on this vital subject matter has been achieved, there continues to be discussion over which surgical technique produces the optimal result. Currently there are several recommended surgical repair options for the lacerated flexor tendon. However, these repairs continue to have possible significant complications including adhesions, decreased range of motion, gapping, and post operat...

  5. A technique for introducing looped sutures in flexor tendon repair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamath B

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Stronger flexor tendon repairs facilitate early active motion therapy protocols. Core sutures using looped suture material provide 1 ½ to twice the strength of Kessler′s technique (with four strand and six strand Tsuge technique respectively. The technique is well-described and uses preformed looped sutures (supramid. This is not available in many countries and we describe a technique whereby looped sutures can be introduced in flexor tendon repair by the use of 23 G hypodermic needle and conventional 4.0 or 5.0 sutures. This is an alternative when the custom made preformed sutures are not available. This can be practiced in zone 3 to zone 5 repairs. Technical difficulties limit its use in zone 2 repairs.

  6. A new barbed device for repair of flexor tendons.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Hirpara, K M

    2012-02-01

    We split 100 porcine flexor tendons into five groups of 20 tendons for repair. Three groups were repaired using the Pennington modified Kessler technique, the cruciate or the Savage technique, one using one new device per tendon and the other with two new devices per tendon. Half of the tendons received supplemental circumferential Silfverskiold type B cross-stitch. The repairs were loaded to failure and a record made of their bulk, the force required to produce a 3 mm gap, the maximum force applied before failure and the stiffness. When only one device was used repairs were equivalent to the Pennington modified Kessler for all parameters except the force to produce a 3 mm gap when supplemented with a circumferential repair, which was equivalent to the cruciate. When two devices were used the repair strength was equivalent to the cruciate repair, and when the two-device repair was supplemented with a circumferential suture the force to produce a 3 mm gap was equivalent to that of the Savage six-strand technique.

  7. Recent advances in flexor tendon repair

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.C.H.M. van der Meulen (Jacques)

    1971-01-01

    markdownabstractThe prognosis for restoration of good function after the treatment of a tendon lesion in 'no-man's land' is influenced by a number of factors which may be summarized as follows: - The nature of the injury. - The amplitude of the tendon excursion. - The motility of the

  8. Recent advances in flexor tendon repair

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.C.H.M. van der Meulen (Jacques)

    1971-01-01

    markdownabstractThe prognosis for restoration of good function after the treatment of a tendon lesion in 'no-man's land' is influenced by a number of factors which may be summarized as follows: - The nature of the injury. - The amplitude of the tendon excursion. - The motility of the hand. -

  9. Surface Modification Counteracts Adverse Effects Associated with Immobilization after Flexor Tendon Repair

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    Although post-rehabilitation is routinely performed following flexor tendon repair, in some clinical scenarios post-rehabilitation must be delayed. We investigated modification of the tendon surface using carbodiimide derivatized hyaluronic acid and lubricin (cd-HA-Lub) to maintain gliding function following flexor tendon repair with postoperative immobilization in a in vivo canine model. Flexor digitorum profundus tendons from the 2nd and 5th digits of one forepaw of six dogs were transected...

  10. Comparing Biomechanical Properties, Repair Times, and Value of Common Core Flexor Tendon Repairs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chauhan, Aakash; Schimoler, Patrick; Miller, Mark C; Kharlamov, Alexander; Merrell, Gregory A; Palmer, Bradley A

    2017-04-01

    The aim of the study was to compare biomechanical strength, repair times, and repair values for zone II core flexor tendon repairs. A total of 75 fresh-frozen human cadaveric flexor tendons were harvested from the index through small finger and randomized into one of 5 repair groups: 4-stranded cross-stitch cruciate (4-0 polyester and 4-0 braided suture), 4-stranded double Pennington (2-0 knotless barbed suture), 4-stranded Pennington (4-0 double-stranded braided suture), and 6-stranded modified Lim-Tsai (4-0 looped braided suture). Repairs were measured in situ and their repair times were measured. Tendons were linearly loaded to failure and multiple biomechanical values were measured. The repair value was calculated based on operating room costs, repair times, and suture costs. Analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Tukey post hoc statistical analysis were used to compare repair data. The braided cruciate was the strongest repair ( P > .05) but the slowest ( P > .05), and the 4-stranded Pennington using double-stranded suture was the fastest ( P > .05) to perform. The total repair value was the highest for braided cruciate ( P > .05) compared with all other repairs. Barbed suture did not outperform any repairs in any categories. The braided cruciate was the strongest of the tested flexor tendon repairs. The 2-mm gapping and maximum load to failure for this repair approached similar historical strength of other 6- and 8-stranded repairs. In this study, suture cost was negligible in the overall repair cost and should be not a determining factor in choosing a repair.

  11. A review of current concepts in flexor tendon repair: physiology, biomechanics, surgical technique and rehabilitation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rohit Singh

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Historically, the surgical treatment of flexor tendon injuries has always been associated with controversy. It was not until 1967, when the paper entitled Primary repair of flexor tendons in no man’s land was presented at the American Society of Hand Surgery, which reported excellent results and catalyzed the implementation of this technique into world-wide practice. We present an up to date literature review using PubMed and Google Scholar where the terms flexor tendon, repair and rehabilitation were used. Topics covered included functional anatomy, nutrition, biomechanics, suture repair, repair site gapping, and rehabilitation. This article aims to provide a comprehensive and complete overview of flexor tendon repairs.

  12. CLINICAL IMPLICATIONS OF CEREBRAL REORGANISATION AFTER PRIMARY DIGITAL FLEXOR TENDON REPAIR

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Coert, J. H.; Stenekes, M. W.; Paans, A. M. J.; Nicolai, J. -P. A.; De Jong, B. M.

    After flexor tendon injury, most attention is given to the quality of the tendon repair and postoperative early passive dynamic mobilisation. Schemes for active mobilisation have been developed to prevent tendon adhesions and joint stiffness. This paper describes five patients to demonstrate the

  13. Flexor Tendon Injuries

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Media Find a Hand Surgeon Home Anatomy Flexor Tendon Injuries Email to a friend * required fields From * ... move the fingers through cord-like extensions called tendons, which connect the muscles to bone. The flexor ...

  14. Animal Models for Tendon Repair Experiments: A Comparison of Pig, Sheep and Human Deep Flexor Tendons in Zone II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peltz, Tim Sebastian; Hoffman, Stuart William; Scougall, Peter James; Gianoutsos, Mark Peter; Savage, Robert; Oliver, Rema Antoinette; Walsh, William Robert

    2017-09-01

    This laboratory study compared pig, sheep and human deep flexor tendons in regards to their biomechanical comparability. To investigate the relevant biomechanical properties for tendon repair experiments, the tendons resistance to cheese-wiring (suture drag/splitting) was assessed. Cheese-wiring of a suture through a tendon is an essential factor for repair gapping and failure in a tendon repair. Biomechanical testing showed that forces required to pulling a uniform suture loop through sheep or pig tendons in Zone II were higher than in human tendons. At time point zero of testing these differences did not reach statistical significance, but differences became more pronounced when forces were measured beyond initial cheese-wiring (2 mm, 5 mm and 10 mm). The stronger resistance to cheese-wiring was more pronounced in the pig tendons. Also regarding size and histology, sheep tendons were more comparable to human tendons than pig tendons. Differences in tendon bio-properties should be kept in mind when comparing and interpreting the results of laboratory tendon experiments.

  15. Extrusion of bone anchor suture following flexor digitorum profundus tendon avulsion injury repair.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Tiong, William H C

    2011-09-01

    Flexor digitorum profundus (FDP) zone I tendon avulsion injury is traditionally repaired with a pullout suture technique. More recently, bone anchor sutures have been used as a viable alternative and have largely replaced areas in hand surgery where pullout suture technique was once required. To date, there have been very few complications reported related to bone anchor suture use in FDP tendon reattachment to the bone. We report a very unusual case of extrusion of bone anchor through the nailbed, 6 years after zone I FDP tendon avulsion injury repair and a brief review of literature.

  16. Catastrophic Failure of an Infected Achilles Tendon Rupture Repair Managed with Combined Flexor Hallucis Longus and Peroneus Brevis Tendon Transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simonson, Devin C; Elliott, Andrew D; Roukis, Thomas S

    2016-01-01

    Deep infection is one of the most devastating complications following repair of an Achilles tendon rupture. Treatment requires not only culture-driven antibiotic therapy, but more importantly, appropriate débridement of some or even all of the Achilles tendon. This may necessitate delayed reconstruction of the Achilles tendon. The authors present a successful case of reconstruction of a chronically infected Achilles tendon in an otherwise healthy 43-year-old man via a multistaged approach using the flexor hallucis longus and peroneus brevis tendons. We also provide a brief review of the literature regarding local tendon transfer used in the reconstruction of Achilles tendon rupture. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. A comparison of repair methods for gap healing in equine flexor tendon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertone, A L; Stashak, T S; Smith, F W; Norrdin, R W

    1990-01-01

    In nine horses (18 forelimbs), a 3 cm section of superficial digital flexor tendon was removed and the tendons were repaired with immobilization for 6 weeks and (1) no suture (n = 6); (2) a double locking loop tenorrhaphy with carbon fiber (n = 6); or (3) a double locking loop tenorrhaphy with size 2 nylon suture (n = 6). Clinical assessment, gross evaluation, morphometry, histology, and mechanical testing were performed on two limbs from each treatment group at weeks 6, 12, and 24. At weeks 6 and 12, the unsutured tissue was less mature than the tissue sutured with nylon. By week 24, the carbon fiber repair had breaking stress (mean, 12.5 M Pa) similar to the unsutured repair (mean, 10.6 M Pa). There was necrosis and a granulomatous foreign body reaction around the carbon fiber. The nylon suture repair had significantly greater strength per unit area (mean breaking stress, 20.4 M Pa) because of a smaller area of repair tissue in the gap (mean, 3.6 cm2). At week 24, the nylon suture repair tissue was the most mature with the least inflammation of the three repair methods. A nylon double locking loop suture was the preferred method for equine flexor tenorrhaphy of a tendon gap because of greater breaking stress, histologic maturity, biocompatibility, and the adequate functional and cosmetic outcome.

  18. Augmented Repair of an Achilles Tendon Rupture Using the Flexor Digitorum Lateralis Tendon in a Toy Poodle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katayama, Masaaki

    2016-11-01

    To report appositional augmentation of Achilles tendon rupture in a toy breed dog with an intact flexor digitorum lateralis (FDL) muscle tendon. Clinical case report. Two-year-old spayed female Toy Poodle with Achilles tendon rupture. The Achilles tendon was accidentally ruptured by hair clippers during grooming. The dog demonstrated a plantigrade stance without digital flexion of the right hind limb. The ruptured gastrocnemius and superficial digital flexor tendons were sutured to their respective cut ends using a simple locking loop pattern under a surgical microscope. The repair site was appositionally augmented by the caudally retracted intact FDL. An aluminum splint was applied on the plantar aspect to immobilize the tarsal joint for the first 2 weeks, after which a soft bandage was applied for another 2 weeks. At the 7 month follow-up no lameness was detected during walking and no complications associated with decreased FDL function such as digital contracture were observed. The range of motion of the tarsal joint had improved and could be flexed to ∼60° and extended fully. Use of the FDL is feasible for augmenting Achilles tendon repair in toy breed dogs. © Copyright 2016 by The American College of Veterinary Surgeons.

  19. Clinical use of a combined grasping and locking core suture technique for flexor tendon repair in zone II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Qattan, Mohammad M

    2013-12-01

    Previous authors have used either a grasping or a locking technique for flexor tendon repair in zone II. A combined (grasping and locking) 10-strand repair was used by the author in 22 adults (n = 28 fingers) with lacerations of both flexor tendons in zone II. The combined repair is known to be strong (mean tensile strength of 164 N), and the technique was used in selected cases who were thought to be at higher risk of rupture either because of excessive digital oedema (in early tendon repairs) or because of tendon retraction (in late primary tendon repairs). The 10-strand repair was bulky and, hence, only the profundus tendon was repaired; and "venting" of the pulley system was done proximal to the repair site as recommended by other authors. Supervised early active mobilisation was done immediately after the operation. At final follow-up, the outcome was calculated using the original Strickland-Glogovac grading system. There were no ruptures and the final outcome was considered excellent in 19 patients (n = 25 fingers), good in two patients (n = 2 fingers), and fair in the remaining patient (n = 1 finger). It was concluded that the bulky 10-strand repair may be used for zone II finger flexor tendon lacerations as long as a profundus-(?) only repair and "venting" of the pulley system are performed.

  20. Effects of motor imagery on hand function during immobilization after flexor tendon repair

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stenekes, Martin W.; Geertzen, Jan H.; Nicolai, Jean-Philippe A.; de Jong, Bauke M.; Mulder, Theo

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine whether motor imagery during the immobilization period after flexor tendon injury results in a faster recovery of central mechanisms of hand function. DESIGN: Randomized controlled trial. SETTING: Tertiary referral hospital. PARTICIPANTS: Patients (N=28) after surgical flexor

  1. Flexor tendon repair: a comparative study between a knotless barbed suture repair and a traditional four-strand monofilament suture repair.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Joyce, C W

    2014-01-01

    We compared the tensile strength of a novel knotless barbed suture method with a traditional four-strand Adelaide technique for flexor tendon repairs. Forty fresh porcine flexor tendons were transected and randomly assigned to one of the repair groups before repair. Biomechanical testing demonstrated that the tensile strengths between both tendon groups were very similar. However, less force was required to create a 2 mm gap in the four-strand repair method compared with the knotless barbed technique. There was a significant reduction in the cross-sectional area in the barbed suture group after repair compared with the Adelaide group. This would create better gliding within the pulley system in vivo and could decrease gapping and tendon rupture.

  2. Home-based rehabilitation in the postoperative treatment of flexor tendon repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanmartín-Fernández, M; Fernández-Bran, B; Couceiro-Otero, J

    To evaluate the results and complications of flexor tendon repair in which a home-based rehabilitation program was utilized without the assistance of a hand therapist during the first 4postoperative weeks. Between July 2009 and July 2014, a total of 21 digits in 15 patients were treated in our institution for complete laceration of the flexor tendons within the flexor pulley system (zone 1 and 2). Passive and active exercises performed by the patients themselves were started the morning after the operation. Data, as range-of-motion and complications, were collected 6months after the surgery. Fifteen digits had full recovery of flexion. One patient suffered a rupture in the fifth postoperative week. Ten of the 21 digits developed a flexion contracture of the proximal interphalangeal joint; in 5 the contracture was less or equal to 10° without impairment of function or aesthetics. Over recent decades, specialized hand therapy has been of great importance in the postoperative treatment of hand diseases. Unfortunately, these professionals are not always available in our area in the first days after surgery. With this protocol, the patient is in charge of carrying out the postoperative exercises, which could lead to a worse final result and a higher rate of complications. The home-based rehabilitation program yielded complete recovery of joint mobility in most cases with a low complication rate. Copyright © 2017 SECOT. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  3. [Graft reconstruction of flexor tendons].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pauchard, N; Pedeutour, B; Dautel, G

    2014-12-01

    The improvement of primary flexor tendon repair has limited the indications of secondary repairs to neglected initial wound care and deficiencies in the surgical technique or rehabilitation. The surgical and rehabilitation care is complex and prolonged, requiring full cooperation of the patient. That is why the surgeon must evaluate patient's ability to integrate instructions and to comply with a long and demanding protocol. The functional needs of the patient are important in treatment decisions and the surgeon should not hesitate to use an appropriate surgical alternative (tenodesis, arthrodesis, tendon transfer, etc.). After a brief historical review, the authors discuss the indications, technical procedures and finally the results of one-stage and two-stage flexor tendon graft, which despite mixed results keep a real place in our current armamentarium.

  4. Growth factor and protease expression during different phases of healing after rabbit deep flexor tendon repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berglund, M E; Hart, D A; Reno, C; Wiig, M

    2011-06-01

    The purpose of the study was to contribute to the mapping of molecular events during flexor tendon healing, in particular the growth factors insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and nerve growth factor (NGF), matrix metalloproteinases (MMP-3 and MMP-13) and their inhibitors (tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinases, TIMP-1 and TIMP-3, and the protease cathepsin K. In a rabbit model of flexor tendon injury, the mRNA expression for the growth factors, MMPs and TIMPs were measured in tendon and tendon sheath tissue at several time points (3, 6, 21, and 42 days) representing different phases of the healing process. We found that MMP-13 remained increased during the study period, whereas MMP-3 returned to normal levels within the first week after injury. TIMP-3 was down-regulated in the tendon sheaths. Cathepsin K was up-regulated in tendons and sheaths after injury. NGF was present in both tendons and sheaths, but unaltered. IGF-1 exhibited a late increase in the tendons, while VEGF was down-regulated at the later time points. In conclusion, we have demonstrated the presence of NGF in flexor tendons. MMP-13 expression appears to play a more protracted role in flexor tendon healing than MMP-3. The relatively low levels of endogenous IGF-1 and VEGF mRNA following injury support their potential beneficial role as exogenous modulators to optimize tendon healing and strength without increasing adhesion formation.

  5. Tendon repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    Repair of tendon ... Tendon repair can be performed using: Local anesthesia (the immediate area of the surgery is pain-free) ... a cut on the skin over the injured tendon. The damaged or torn ends of the tendon ...

  6. An Overview of the Management of Flexor Tendon Injuries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffin, M; Hindocha, S; Jordan, D; Saleh, M; Khan, W

    2012-01-01

    Flexor tendon injuries still remain a challenging condition to manage to ensure optimal outcome for the patient. Since the first flexor tendon repair was described by Kirchmayr in 1917, several approaches to flexor tendon injury have enabled successful repairs rates of 70-90%. Primary surgical repair results in better functional outcome compared to secondary repair or tendon graft surgery. Flexor tendon injury repair has been extensively researched and the literature demonstrates successful repair requires minimal gapping at the repair site or interference with tendon vascularity, secure suture knots, smooth junction of tendon end and having sufficient strength for healing. However, the exact surgical approach to achieve success being currently used among surgeons is still controversial. Therefore, this review aims to discuss the results of studies demonstrating the current knowledge regarding the optimal approach for flexor tendon repair. Post-operative rehabilitation for flexor tendon surgery is another area, which has caused extensive debate in hand surgery. The trend to more active mobilisation protocols seems to be favoured but further study in this area is needed to find the protocol, which achieves function and gliding but avoids rupture of the tendons. Lastly despite success following surgery complications commonly still occur post surgery, including adhesion formation, tendon rupture and stiffness of the joints. Therefore, this review aims to discuss the appropriate management of these difficulties post surgery. New techniques in management of flexor tendon will also be discussed including external laser devices, addition of growth factors and cytokines. PMID:22431948

  7. PXL01 in sodium hyaluronate for improvement of hand recovery after flexor tendon repair surgery: randomized controlled trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monica E Wiig

    Full Text Available Postoperative adhesions constitute a substantial clinical problem in hand surgery. Fexor tendon injury and repair result in adhesion formation around the tendon, which restricts the gliding function of the tendon, leading to decreased digit mobility and impaired hand recovery. This study evaluated the efficacy and safety of the peptide PXL01 in preventing adhesions, and correspondingly improving hand function, in flexor tendon repair surgery.This prospective, randomised, double-blind trial included 138 patients admitted for flexor tendon repair surgery. PXL01 in carrier sodium hyaluronate or placebo was administered around the repaired tendon. Efficacy was assessed by total active motion of the injured finger, tip-to-crease distance, sensory function, tenolysis rate and grip strength, and safety parameters were followed, for 12 months post-surgery.The most pronounced difference between the treatment groups was observed at 6 months post-surgery. At this timepoint, the total active motion of the distal finger joint was improved in the PXL01 group (60 vs. 41 degrees for PXL01 vs. placebo group, p = 0.016 in PPAS. The proportion of patients with excellent/good digit mobility was higher in the PXL01 group (61% vs. 38%, p = 0.0499 in PPAS. Consistently, the PXL01 group presented improved tip-to-crease distance (5.0 vs. 15.5 mm for PXL01 vs. placebo group, p = 0.048 in PPAS. Sensory evaluation showed that more patients in the PXL01 group felt the thinnest monofilaments (FAS: 74% vs. 35%, p = 0.021; PPAS: 76% vs. 35%, p = 0.016. At 12 months post-surgery, more patients in the placebo group were considered to benefit from tenolysis (30% vs. 12%, p = 0.086 in PPAS. The treatment was safe, well tolerated, and did not increase the rate of tendon rupture.Treatment with PXL01 in sodium hyaluronate improves hand recovery after flexor tendon repair surgery. Further clinical trials are warranted to determine the most efficient dose and

  8. PXL01 in sodium hyaluronate for improvement of hand recovery after flexor tendon repair surgery: randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiig, Monica E; Dahlin, Lars B; Fridén, Jan; Hagberg, Lars; Larsen, Sören E; Wiklund, Kerstin; Mahlapuu, Margit

    2014-01-01

    Postoperative adhesions constitute a substantial clinical problem in hand surgery. Fexor tendon injury and repair result in adhesion formation around the tendon, which restricts the gliding function of the tendon, leading to decreased digit mobility and impaired hand recovery. This study evaluated the efficacy and safety of the peptide PXL01 in preventing adhesions, and correspondingly improving hand function, in flexor tendon repair surgery. This prospective, randomised, double-blind trial included 138 patients admitted for flexor tendon repair surgery. PXL01 in carrier sodium hyaluronate or placebo was administered around the repaired tendon. Efficacy was assessed by total active motion of the injured finger, tip-to-crease distance, sensory function, tenolysis rate and grip strength, and safety parameters were followed, for 12 months post-surgery. The most pronounced difference between the treatment groups was observed at 6 months post-surgery. At this timepoint, the total active motion of the distal finger joint was improved in the PXL01 group (60 vs. 41 degrees for PXL01 vs. placebo group, p = 0.016 in PPAS). The proportion of patients with excellent/good digit mobility was higher in the PXL01 group (61% vs. 38%, p = 0.0499 in PPAS). Consistently, the PXL01 group presented improved tip-to-crease distance (5.0 vs. 15.5 mm for PXL01 vs. placebo group, p = 0.048 in PPAS). Sensory evaluation showed that more patients in the PXL01 group felt the thinnest monofilaments (FAS: 74% vs. 35%, p = 0.021; PPAS: 76% vs. 35%, p = 0.016). At 12 months post-surgery, more patients in the placebo group were considered to benefit from tenolysis (30% vs. 12%, p = 0.086 in PPAS). The treatment was safe, well tolerated, and did not increase the rate of tendon rupture. Treatment with PXL01 in sodium hyaluronate improves hand recovery after flexor tendon repair surgery. Further clinical trials are warranted to determine the most efficient dose and health

  9. Ultrasonographic assessment of flexor tendon mobilization: Effect of different protocols on tendon excursion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.-W.H. Korstanje (Jan-Wiebe); J. Soeters (Johannes); A.R. Schreuders (Ton); P.C. Amadio (Peter ); S.E.R. Hovius (Steven); H.J. Stam (Henk); R.W. Selles (Ruud)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Different mobilization protocols have been proposed for rehabilitation after hand flexor tendon repair to provide tendon excursion sufficient to prevent adhesions. Several cadaver studies have shown that the position of the neighboring fingers influences tendon excursions of

  10. Ultrasonographic assessment of flexor tendon mobilization: Effect of different protocols on tendon excursion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.-W.H. Korstanje (Jan-Wiebe); J. Soeters (Johannes); A.R. Schreuders (Ton); P.C. Amadio (Peter ); S.E.R. Hovius (Steven); H.J. Stam (Henk); R.W. Selles (Ruud)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Different mobilization protocols have been proposed for rehabilitation after hand flexor tendon repair to provide tendon excursion sufficient to prevent adhesions. Several cadaver studies have shown that the position of the neighboring fingers influences tendon excursions of

  11. Repair of flexor tendon defects of rabbit with tissue engineering method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    何清义; 李起鸿; 陈秉礼; 王智彪

    2002-01-01

    To repair rabbit tendon defects with tissue engineering method. Methods: The third passage of fetal skin fibroblast cells was labeled with 5-bromo-2' deoxyuridine (Brdu) and then seeded on human amnion extracellular matrix (HA-ECM). Using 1 cm-long-Achilles tendon .defects as repairing models in the experimental group, tendon defects were core bridged with polydioxanone (PDS) and then capsulated with the complex of fibroblasts-HA-ECM. In the control group I, defective tendons were sutured with PDS following the former procedure and capsulated with HA-ECM (without fibroblasts). In the control group Ⅱ,only PDS was applied to connect the defective tendons.Gross examination, light microscopy, scanning electronmicroscopy and biomechanical measurement of the repaired tendons were respectively performed at postoperative 1, 2, 3 month as well as immunohistochemical examination. Results: The optimal cell concentration for seeding fibroblasts was 3.5 × 106 cells/ml. Cells grew well and radiated or paralleled on HA-ECM. Immunohistochemistry showed that the labeled seed fibroblasts played an important role in tendonization. The results of light microscopy,electron microscopy, and biomechanical assessment suggested that the rate and quality of tendonization in the experimental group was superior to those of the control group Ⅰ and Ⅱ. The tensile strength in the experimental group was the greatest, the next was in the control group Ⅰ,and the worst in the control group Ⅱ ( P < 0.05). Conclusions: HA-ECM is the excellent carrier for fibroblasts. Fibroblasts-HA-ECM complex has the capability to repair tendon defect and to tendonize with rapid rate and good performance three months after operation. Its tensile strength is 81.8% of that of normal tendon.

  12. Bundles of spider silk, braided into sutures, resist basic cyclic tests: potential use for flexor tendon repair.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathleen Hennecke

    Full Text Available Repair success for injuries to the flexor tendon in the hand is often limited by the in vivo behaviour of the suture used for repair. Common problems associated with the choice of suture material include increased risk of infection, foreign body reactions, and inappropriate mechanical responses, particularly decreases in mechanical properties over time. Improved suture materials are therefore needed. As high-performance materials with excellent tensile strength, spider silk fibres are an extremely promising candidate for use in surgical sutures. However, the mechanical behaviour of sutures comprised of individual silk fibres braided together has not been thoroughly investigated. In the present study, we characterise the maximum tensile strength, stress, strain, elastic modulus, and fatigue response of silk sutures produced using different braiding methods to investigate the influence of braiding on the tensile properties of the sutures. The mechanical properties of conventional surgical sutures are also characterised to assess whether silk offers any advantages over conventional suture materials. The results demonstrate that braiding single spider silk fibres together produces strong sutures with excellent fatigue behaviour; the braided silk sutures exhibited tensile strengths comparable to those of conventional sutures and no loss of strength over 1000 fatigue cycles. In addition, the braiding technique had a significant influence on the tensile properties of the braided silk sutures. These results suggest that braided spider silk could be suitable for use as sutures in flexor tendon repair, providing similar tensile behaviour and improved fatigue properties compared with conventional suture materials.

  13. Bundles of Spider Silk, Braided into Sutures, Resist Basic Cyclic Tests: Potential Use for Flexor Tendon Repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hennecke, Kathleen; Redeker, Joern; Kuhbier, Joern W.; Strauss, Sarah; Allmeling, Christina; Kasper, Cornelia; Reimers, Kerstin; Vogt, Peter M.

    2013-01-01

    Repair success for injuries to the flexor tendon in the hand is often limited by the in vivo behaviour of the suture used for repair. Common problems associated with the choice of suture material include increased risk of infection, foreign body reactions, and inappropriate mechanical responses, particularly decreases in mechanical properties over time. Improved suture materials are therefore needed. As high-performance materials with excellent tensile strength, spider silk fibres are an extremely promising candidate for use in surgical sutures. However, the mechanical behaviour of sutures comprised of individual silk fibres braided together has not been thoroughly investigated. In the present study, we characterise the maximum tensile strength, stress, strain, elastic modulus, and fatigue response of silk sutures produced using different braiding methods to investigate the influence of braiding on the tensile properties of the sutures. The mechanical properties of conventional surgical sutures are also characterised to assess whether silk offers any advantages over conventional suture materials. The results demonstrate that braiding single spider silk fibres together produces strong sutures with excellent fatigue behaviour; the braided silk sutures exhibited tensile strengths comparable to those of conventional sutures and no loss of strength over 1000 fatigue cycles. In addition, the braiding technique had a significant influence on the tensile properties of the braided silk sutures. These results suggest that braided spider silk could be suitable for use as sutures in flexor tendon repair, providing similar tensile behaviour and improved fatigue properties compared with conventional suture materials. PMID:23613793

  14. MRI in flexor tendon rupture after collagenase injection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khurana, Shruti [Lady Hardinge Medical College, New Delhi (India); Wadhwa, Vibhor [University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Little Rock, AR (United States); Chhabra, Avneesh [UT Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX (United States); Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD (United States); Amirlak, Bardia [UT Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX (United States)

    2017-02-15

    Flexor tendon rupture is an unusual complication following collagenase injection to relieve contractures. These patients require a close follow-up and in the event of tendon rupture, a decision has to be made whether to repair the tendon or manage the complication conservatively. The authors report the utility of MRI in the prognostication and management of a patient with Dupuytren's contracture, who underwent collagenase injection and subsequently developed flexor digitorum profundus tendon rupture. (orig.)

  15. PXL01 in sodium hyaluronate for improvement of hand recovery after flexor tendon repair surgery: randomized controlled trial

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Wiig, Monica E; Dahlin, Lars B; Fridén, Jan; Hagberg, Lars; Larsen, Sören E; Wiklund, Kerstin; Mahlapuu, Margit

    2014-01-01

    .... Fexor tendon injury and repair result in adhesion formation around the tendon, which restricts the gliding function of the tendon, leading to decreased digit mobility and impaired hand recovery...

  16. Clinical outcomes of early active mobilization following flexor tendon repair using the six-strand technique: short- and long-term evaluations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moriya, K; Yoshizu, T; Maki, Y; Tsubokawa, N; Narisawa, H; Endo, N

    2015-03-01

    We evaluated the factors influencing outcomes of flexor tendon repair in 112 fingers using a six-strand suture with the Yoshizu #1 technique and early postoperative active mobilization in 101 consecutive patients. A total of 32 fingers had injuries in Zone I, 78 in Zone II, and two in Zone III. The mean follow-up period was 6 months; 16 patients (19 fingers) participated in long-term follow-up of 2 to 16 years. The total active motion was 230° SD 29°; it correlated negatively with age. The total active motion was 231° SD 28° after repair of the lacerated flexor digitorum superficialis tendon, and was 205° SD 37° after excision of the flexor digitorum superficialis tendon ends (p = 0.0093). A total of 19 fingers showed no significant increases in total active motion more than 2 years after surgery. The rupture rate was 5.4% in our patients and related to surgeons' level of expertise. Five out of six ruptured tendons were repaired by inexperienced surgeons. Level of Evidence IV.

  17. 屈指肌腱术后早期活动与康复%Early mobilization program and rehabilitation after flexor tendon repair

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    梁乙刚; 宋海涛; 田万成; 国建文; 卢全中

    2002-01-01

    Objective To investigate the methods and significance of early mobilization to the function rehabilitation after flexor tendon repair.Methods 286 complete flexor tendon amputation in 116 cases which was not combined with fractures were repaired.From the third day after operation,the digits were mobilized with a combination of assisted passive flexion and active extension simultaneously in the first 4 weeks.The digits flexing and extending scope was increased gradually controlled by doctors.Unassisted active flexion extension exercises begun 4 weeks after operation.The injured fingers were given physical therapy of voice band therapy 4 weeks postoperatively,ultrashort wave treatment 4 weeks and wax hot therapy 6 week postoperatively.Patients were followed up once weekly to be instructed how to go on functional training after they were discharged.Results Patients were followed up from 6 to 18 months.The function recovery of the corresponding fingers was evaluated by TAM method which included 192 excellent digits(77.1% ),25 fine digits(10.0% ),15 normal digits(6.0% ) and 17 bad digits (6.8% ).Conclusion It was inevitable for the repaired tendon to be adhered to the around tissue.Early mobilization of relevant injured fingers could enhance formation of non limited adhesion,increase excursion of the reconditioned tendon and revert tendon intensity at early time.Early mobilization should begin at 3 days after operation.

  18. Use of the Taguchi method for biomechanical comparison of flexor-tendon-repair techniques to allow immediate active flexion. A new method of analysis and optimization of technique to improve the quality of the repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singer, G; Ebramzadeh, E; Jones, N F; Meals, R

    1998-10-01

    The current trend toward early active flexion after repair of the flexor tendons necessitates a stronger repair than that provided by a modified Kessler technique with use of 4-0 nylon suture. The purpose of the current study was to determine, with use of the Taguchi method of analysis, the strongest and most consistent repair of the flexor tendons. Flexor tendons were obtained from fresh-frozen hands of human cadavera. Eight flexor tendons initially were repaired with the modified Kessler technique with use of 4-0 nylon core suture and 6-0 nylon epitenon suture. A test matrix was used to analyze a total of twenty variables in sixty-four tests. These variables included eight techniques for core-suture repair, four types of core suture, two sizes of core suture, four techniques for suture of the epitenon, and two distances from the repair site for placement of the core suture. After each repair, the specimens were mounted in a servohydraulic mechanical testing machine for tension-testing to failure. The optimum combination of variables was determined, with the Taguchi method, to be an augmented Becker technique with use of 3-0 Mersilene core suture, placed 0.75 centimeter from the cut edge with volar epitenon suture. The four-strand, double modified Kessler technique provided the second strongest repair. Five tendons that had been repaired with use of the optimum combination then were tested and compared with tendons that had been repaired with the standard modified Kessler technique. With the optimum combination of variables, the strength of the repair improved from a mean (and standard deviation) of 17.2 +/- 2.9 to 128 +/- 5.6 newtons, and the stiffness improved from a mean of 4.6 to 16.2 newtons per millimeter.

  19. Biomechanical and Macroscopic Evaluations of the Effects of 5-Fluorouracil on Partially Divided Flexor Tendon Injuries in Rabbits

    OpenAIRE

    Shkelzen B Duci; Arifi, Hysni M; Ahmeti, Hasan R; Suzana Manxhuka-Kerliu; , Burim Neziri; Agon Y. Mekaj; Shpetim Lajqi; Labinot Shahini

    2015-01-01

    Background: The main goals of flexor tendon surgery are to restore digital motion by providing tendon healing and to preserve tendon gliding. Our purpose was to investigate the effects of 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) on tendon adhesions in partially divided profundus flexor tendons (flexor digitorum profundus [FDPs]) following surgical repair and in partially divided FDPs without surgical repair, and to compare the results of the repair versus the nonrepair of zone two injuries via macroscopic and b...

  20. BIOMECHANICS AND HISTOLOGICAL ANALYSIS IN RABBIT FLEXOR TENDONS REPAIRED USING THREE SUTURE TECHNIQUES (FOUR AND SIX STRANDS) WITH EARLY ACTIVE MOBILIZATION

    Science.gov (United States)

    Severo, Antônio Lourenço; Arenhart, Rodrigo; Silveira, Daniela; Ávila, Aluísio Otávio Vargas; Berral, Francisco José; Lemos, Marcelo Barreto; Piluski, Paulo César Faiad; Lech, Osvandré Luís Canfield; Fukushima, Walter Yoshinori

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Analyzing suture time, biomechanics (deformity between the stumps) and the histology of three groups of tendinous surgical repair: Brazil-2 (4-strands) which the end knot (core) is located outside the tendon, Indiana (4-strands) and Tsai (6-strands) with sutures technique which the end knot (core) is inner of the tendon, associated with early active mobilization. Methods: The right calcaneal tendons (plantar flexor of the hind paw) of 36 rabbits of the New Zealand breed (Oryctolagus cuniculus) were used in the analysis. This sample presents similar size to human flexor tendon that has approximately 4.5 mm (varying from 2mm). The selected sample showed the same mass (2.5 to 3kg) and were male or female adults (from 8 ½ months). For the flexor tendons of the hind paws, sterile and driven techniques were used in accordance to the Committee on Animal Research and Ethics (CETEA) of the University of the State of Santa Catarina (UDESC), municipality of Lages, in Brazil (protocol # 1.33.09). Results: In the biomechanical analysis (deformity) carried out between tendinous stumps, there was no statistically significant difference (p>0.01). There was no statistical difference in relation to surgical time in all three suture techniques with a mean of 6.0 minutes for Tsai (6- strands), 5.7 minutes for Indiana (4-strands) and 5.6 minutes for Brazil (4-strands) (p>0.01). With the early active mobility, there was qualitative and quantitative evidence of thickening of collagen in 38.9% on the 15th day and in 66.7% on the 30th day, making the biological tissue stronger and more resistant (p=0.095). Conclusion: This study demonstrated that there was no histological difference between the results achieved with an inside or outside end knot with respect to the repaired tendon and the number of strands did not affect healing, vascularization or sliding of the tendon in the osteofibrous tunnel, which are associated with early active mobility, with the repair techniques

  1. Removal of a silicone tendon prosthesis six years after insertion for flexor tendon reconstruction: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tolga Eryilmaz

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Two-staged flexor tendon repair rely on the effect of the pseudo-tendon sheath that developed by the effect of the silicone tendon prosthesis. The second stage of the reconstruction is performed 1 to 6 months after the first operation by removal of the silicone tendon prosthesis and tendon grafting. In this study, we are presenting a removal of silicone prosthesis 6 years after insertion for flexor tendon reconstruction. [Hand Microsurg 2012; 1(1.000: 40-42

  2. The application of the improved suture technique to repair the flexor tendon injury in zone Ⅱb%改进的缝合技术在Ⅱb区屈肌腱损伤中的应用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王献伟

    2016-01-01

    目的:探讨应用改进的缝合技术修复Ⅱb区屈肌腱损伤的临床疗效。方法2013年10月-2014年8月,对12例Ⅱb区屈肌腱损伤患者采用了改进的缝合技术,缩短浅肌腱“V”形桡侧束断端,尺侧束相对弧形延长,为深肌腱在鞘管内滑行提供新的空间,深肌腱不再走原解剖“V”形隧道内,改走相对延长后的尺侧浅肌腱束浅面,重建屈指功能。结果12例术后获得6~12个月随访,屈伸功能恢复良好,按中华医学会手外科学会上肢部分功能评定试用标准评定,优8例,良3例,可1例。结论手指Ⅱb区采用改进的缝合技术使深肌腱在延长后的尺侧浅腱束浅面滑行,克服了传统技术缝合后使深层一个深肌腱缝合口必须在浅肌腱两个缝合口之间的“V”形隧道滑行的弊端,从而减少了被卡压和粘连的风险,该技术的改进既修复了浅深肌腱又减少了肌腱粘连,可最大限度满足手指屈曲功能要求,疗效满意。%Objective The study discussed the clinical efficacy of applying the improved suture tech-nique to repair the flexor tendon injury in zoneⅡb. Methods From October 2013 to August 2014, the improved suture technique was used in repairing flexor tendon injuries in zone,Ⅱb in 12 cases. By shorten the "V" type radialis fasciculus broken ends of superficial flexor tendon and relatively ex-tend the ulnar fasciculus in a arc-shaped way, the improved suture technique provided more room for the profundal tendon, and to move in the sheathing canal. Instead of moving in the originally anatomic V-shaped tunnel, the profundus flexor tendon goes into the extended range in the shad-ow side of ulnar fasciculus of superficial flexor tendon, which could rebuild the flexion function. Results After the operation, according to the upper extremity functional evaluation standard set up by hand surgery branch of Chinese Medical Association, 8 cases were excellent, 3 were

  3. Achilles tendon repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    Achilles tendon rupture-surgery; Percutaneous Achilles tendon rupture repair ... To fix your torn Achilles tendon, the surgeon will: Make a cut down the back of your heel Make several small cuts rather than one large cut ...

  4. A comparative analysis of the outcome of flexor tendon repair in the index and little fingers: does the little finger fare worse?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orkar, K S; Watts, C; Iwuagwu, F C

    2012-01-01

    The clinical and hand therapy notes of 180 patients who had single digit flexor tendon repairs in zones I and II from January 2000 to December 2004 were reviewed. Data from 60 index and 108 little fingers at 5 weeks, 8 weeks and 12 weeks follow-up visits were included. In zone I injuries, there was a statistically significant difference in flexion contracture (worse in the little fingers ) at all follow-up points. Although the range of motion and percentage of patients in the excellent category of the Strickland and Glogovac criteria were greater in the index finger group than the little finger for zone I and II injuries, these differences were not statistically significant. The rupture rate was also higher in the little finger group.

  5. Flexor Tendon Pulley Injuries in Rock Climbers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Elizabeth A; Lien, John R

    2017-02-01

    Closed pulley ruptures are rare in the general population but occur more frequently in rock climbers due to biomechanical demands on the hand. Injuries present with pain and swelling over the affected pulley, and patients may feel or hear a pop at the time of injury. Sequential pulley ruptures are required for clinical bowstringing of the flexor tendons. Ultrasound confirms diagnosis of pulley rupture and evaluates degree of displacement of the flexor tendons. Isolated pulley ruptures frequently are treated conservatively with early functional rehabilitation. Sequential pulley ruptures require surgical reconstruction. Most climbers are able to return to their previous activity level.

  6. Early mobilization and rehabilitation after flexor tendon repair%屈指肌腱术后早期活动与康复

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    宋海涛; 田万成; 卢全中; 潘希贵; 康庆林; 潘风雨

    2001-01-01

    目的 探讨屈指肌腱修复术后早期功能锻炼的方法与意义。方 法 对116例(286指)无合并骨折的屈指肌腱断裂给予修复,术后3日起开始被动 屈曲并辅以主动伸指练习,幅度循序渐进,4周后开始非辅助性训练,并依次给予音频、超 短波及蜡疗等理疗;出院后每周随访1次,继续指导患者功能锻炼。结果  随访97例(249指),时间6~18个月,采用TAM评定患指功能,优192指(77.1%),良25指 (10.0%),可15指(6.0%),差17指(6.8%)。结论 腱周粘连在 肌腱修复过程中不可避免,早期活动促进形成非限制性粘连,增加修复腱在腱鞘内滑动度, 早期恢复腱强度;早期活动宜从术后第3天开始。%Objective To investigate the methods and signi ficance of early mobilization to the function restoration after flexor tendon re pair. Methods 286 complete flexor tendon amputation not combined with fractures in 116 cases were repaired. From the third day after op eration, the digits were mobilized with a combination of assisted passive flexio n and active extension simultaneously for the first 4 weeks. The scope of flexin g and extending digits was increased gradually controlled by doctors. Unassisted active flexion-extension exercises began 4 weeks postoperatively. The mean act ive proximal and distal interphalangeal range of motion one week postoperatively was 5°~10° and 10°~20° respectively, 4 weeks postoperatively 40°~50° a nd 50°~70°. The injured fingers were given physical therapy of voice band the rapy 4 weeks postoperatively, supershortwave treatment 4 weeks and wax-hot ther apy 6 weeks postoperatively. Patients were followed up once weekly to be instruc ted how to go on functional training after they were discharged. Results  97 patients (249 fingers) were followed up from 6 to 18 months. The fu nction recovery of the corresponding fingers was evaluated by TAM method

  7. Ultrasonographic assessment of flexor tendon mobilization: effect of different protocols on tendon excursion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korstanje, Jan-Wiebe H; Soeters, Johannes N M; Schreuders, Ton A R; Amadio, Peter C; Hovius, Steven E R; Stam, Henk J; Selles, Ruud W

    2012-03-07

    Different mobilization protocols have been proposed for rehabilitation after hand flexor tendon repair to provide tendon excursion sufficient to prevent adhesions. Several cadaver studies have shown that the position of the neighboring fingers influences tendon excursions of the injured finger. We hypothesized that the positions of adjacent fingers influence the long finger flexor digitorum profundus tendon excursion, measured both absolutely and relative to the surrounding tissue of the tendon. Long finger flexor digitorum profundus tendon excursions and surrounding tissue movement were measured in zone V in eleven healthy subjects during three different rehabilitation protocols and two experimental models: (1) an active four-finger mobilization protocol, (2) a passive four-finger mobilization protocol, (3) a modified Kleinert mobilization protocol, (4) an experimental modified Kleinert flexion mobilization model, and (5) an experimental modified Kleinert extension mobilization model. Tendon excursions were measured with use of a frame-to-frame analysis of high-resolution ultrasound images. The median absolute long finger flexor digitorum profundus tendon excursions were 23.4, 17.8, 10.0, 13.9, and 7.6 mm for the active four-finger mobilization protocol, the passive four-finger mobilization protocol, the modified Kleinert mobilization protocol, the experimental modified Kleinert flexion mobilization model, and the experimental modified Kleinert extension mobilization model, respectively, and these differences were all significant (p ≤ 0.041). The corresponding relative flexor digitorum profundus tendon excursions were 11.2, 8.5, 7.2, 10.4, and 5.6 mm. Active four-finger mobilization protocol excursions were significantly (p = 0.013) greater than passive four-finger mobilization protocol excursions but were not significantly greater than experimental modified Kleinert flexion mobilization model excursions (p =0.213). The present study demonstrated large and

  8. Flexor tendon tissue engineering: acellularization of human flexor tendons with preservation of biomechanical properties and biocompatibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pridgen, Brian C; Woon, Colin Y L; Kim, Maxwell; Thorfinn, Johan; Lindsey, Derek; Pham, Hung; Chang, James

    2011-08-01

    Acellular human tendons are a candidate scaffold for tissue engineering flexor tendons of the hand. This study compared acellularization methods and their compatibility with allogeneic human cells. Human flexor tendons were pretreated with 0.1% ethylenediaminetetracetic acid (EDTA) for 4  h followed by 24  h treatments of 1% Triton X-100, 1% tri(n-butyl)phosphate, or 0.1% or 1% sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) in 0.1% EDTA. Outcomes were assessed histologically by hematoxylin and eosin and SYTO green fluorescent nucleic acid stains and biochemically by a QIAGEN DNeasy kit, Sircol collagen assay, and 1,9 dimethylmethylene blue glycosaminoglycan assay. Mechanical data were collected using a Materials Testing System to pull to failure tendons acellularized with 0.1% SDS. Acellularized tendons were re-seeded in a suspension of human dermal fibroblasts. Attachment of viable cells to acellularized tendon was assessed biochemically by a cell viability assay and histologically by a live/dead stain. Data are reported as mean±standard deviation. Compared with the DNA content of fresh tendons (551±212  ng DNA/mg tendon), only SDS treatments significantly decreased DNA content (1% SDS [202.8±37.4  ng DNA/mg dry weight tendon]; 0.1% SDS [189±104  ng DNA/mg tendon]). These findings were confirmed by histology. There was no decrease in glycosaminoglycans or collagen following acellularization with SDS. There was no difference in the ultimate tensile stress (55.3±19.2 [fresh] vs. 51.5±6.9 [0.1% SDS] MPa). Re-seeded tendons demonstrated attachment of viable cells to the tendon surface using a viability assay and histology. Human flexor tendons were acellularized with 0.1% SDS in 0.1% EDTA for 24  h with preservation of mechanical properties. Preservation of collagen and glycoaminoglycans and re-seeding with human cells suggest that this scaffold is biocompatible. This will provide a promising scaffold for future human flexor tendon tissue engineering studies to

  9. Biologics for tendon repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Docheva, Denitsa; Müller, Sebastian A; Majewski, Martin; Evans, Christopher H

    2015-04-01

    Tendon injuries are common and present a clinical challenge to orthopedic surgery mainly because these injuries often respond poorly to treatment and require prolonged rehabilitation. Therapeutic options used to repair ruptured tendons have consisted of suture, autografts, allografts, and synthetic prostheses. To date, none of these alternatives has provided a successful long-term solution, and often the restored tendons do not recover their complete strength and functionality. Unfortunately, our understanding of tendon biology lags far behind that of other musculoskeletal tissues, thus impeding the development of new treatment options for tendon conditions. Hence, in this review, after introducing the clinical significance of tendon diseases and the present understanding of tendon biology, we describe and critically assess the current strategies for enhancing tendon repair by biological means. These consist mainly of applying growth factors, stem cells, natural biomaterials and genes, alone or in combination, to the site of tendon damage. A deeper understanding of how tendon tissue and cells operate, combined with practical applications of modern molecular and cellular tools could provide the long awaited breakthrough in designing effective tendon-specific therapeutics and overall improvement of tendon disease management.

  10. Rare causes of closed rupture of the flexor tendon

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stenekes, Martin W.; Ruttermann, Mike; Werker, Paul M. N.

    Closed injuries to the flexor tendon are relatively rare. We present three rare causes of closed injury to the flexor tendon. Early recognition and adequate treatment by a specialised hand surgeon are crucial for the prognosis of such cases. Delayed diagnosis and treatment often require secondary

  11. Rare causes of closed rupture of the flexor tendon

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stenekes, Martin W.; Ruttermann, Mike; Werker, Paul M. N.

    2014-01-01

    Closed injuries to the flexor tendon are relatively rare. We present three rare causes of closed injury to the flexor tendon. Early recognition and adequate treatment by a specialised hand surgeon are crucial for the prognosis of such cases. Delayed diagnosis and treatment often require secondary re

  12. Bilateral spontaneous rupture of flexor digitorum profundus tendons.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Sullivan, S T

    2012-02-03

    Spontaneous tendon rupture is an unusual condition usually associated with underlying disease processes such as rheumatoid arthritis, chronic renal failure or bony abnormalities of the hand. We report a case of spontaneous, non-concurrent bilateral rupture of flexor profundus tendons in an otherwise healthy individual. Treatment was successful and consisted of a two-stage reconstruction of the ruptured tendon.

  13. Addressing stage II posterior tibial tendon dysfunction: biomechanically repairing the osseous structures without the need of performing the flexor digitorum longus transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiDomenico, Lawrence A; Thomas, Zachary M; Fahim, Ramy

    2014-07-01

    The clinical presentation of adult flatfoot can range from a flexible deformity with normal joint integrity to a rigid, arthritic flat foot. Debate still exists regarding the surgical management of stage II deformities, especially in the presence of medial column instability. This article reviews and discusses various surgical options for the correction of stage II flatfoot reconstructive procedures. The authors discuss their opinion that is not always necessary to transfer the flexor digitorum longus tendon to provide relief and stability in this patient population. The anatomy, diagnosis, and current treatments of flexible flatfoot deformity are discussed. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. [Flexor hallucis tendon transfer combined with an interference screw reconstruction for chronic Achilles tendon rupture of Kuwada IV].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Jun-feng; Zhu, Yang-yi

    2015-05-01

    To explore the clinical effect of interference screw and flexor hallucis longus tendon as augmentation material in repair of chronic Achilles tendon rupture. From September 2010 to June 2012,26 patients with chronic Achilles tendon rupture were treated, including 18 males and 8 females with an average age of 44.2 years old (20 to 66 years old). All patients were unilateral damage. MRI showed the Achilles tendon.ends' distance was 6.0 to 9.0 cm. The postoperative complications were observed. The curative effect was assessed by American Orthopedic Foot and Ankle Society and Leppilahti score. All the 26 patients were followed up for 18 to 68 months (means 30.4 months). No neurological injury and infection of incision occurred, all patients were stage I incision healing. The shape and function of the ankle were recovered well. The average AOFAS score increased from 52.27±12.30 preoperatively to 90.92±6.36 postoperatively. Leppilahti Achilles Tendon Repair score increased from 34.23±12.86 preoperatively to 90.00±5.10 postoperatively. The flexor hallucis tendon transfer with an interference screw technique for repairing the chronic Achilles tendon rupture of type IV of Kuwada had advantages of simple operation, quick recovery, firm tendon fixation, and less complications.

  15. Biomechanical and Macroscopic Evaluations of the Effects of 5-Fluorouracil on Partially Divided Flexor Tendon Injuries in Rabbits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duci, Shkelzen B; Arifi, Hysni M; Ahmeti, Hasan R; Manxhuka-Kerliu, Suzana; Neziri, Burim; Mekaj, Agon Y; Lajqi, Shpetim; Shahini, Labinot

    2015-06-20

    The main goals of flexor tendon surgery are to restore digital motion by providing tendon healing and to preserve tendon gliding. Our purpose was to investigate the effects of 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) on tendon adhesions in partially divided profundus flexor tendons (flexor digitorum profundus [FDPs]) following surgical repair and in partially divided FDPs without surgical repair, and to compare the results of the repair versus the nonrepair of zone two injuries via macroscopic and biomechanical evaluations of tendon adhesions. We used 32 adult male European rabbits (Oryctolagus cunniculus) weighing from 2.5 to 3.5 kg. The study was performed on the deep flexor tendons of the second and third digits of the right hind paws of the rabbits; thus, a total of 64 tendons were examined in this study. Based on the results achieved in our experimental study, the load (N) significantly increased in subgroup 1a in which the tendons were surgically repaired and were not treated with 5-FU compared with subgroup 2a in which tendons were surgically repaired and treated with 5-FU. The load (N) significantly increased in subgroup 1a in which the tendons were surgically repaired and were not treated with 5-FU compared to subgroup 2a in which the tendons were surgically repaired and treated with 5-FU. Therefore, these results revealed a decrease in adhesion formation in the subgroup that was treated with 5-FU due to increased resistance to tendon adhesions during their excursion through the tendon sheath, which in this case required greater traction force.

  16. Biomechanical and Macroscopic Evaluations of the Effects of 5-Fluorouracil on Partially Divided Flexor Tendon Injuries in Rabbits

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shkelzen B Duci; Hysni M Arifi; Hasan R Ahmeti; Suzana Manxhuka-Kerliu; Burim Neziri; Agon Y Mekaj; Shpetim Lajqi

    2015-01-01

    Background:The main goals of flexor tendon surgery are to restore digital motion by providing tendon healing and to preserve tendon gliding.Our purpose was to investigate the effects of 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) on tendon adhesions in partially divided profundus flexor tendons (flexor digitorum profundus [FDPs]) following surgical repair and in partially divided FDPs without surgical repair,and to compare the results of the repair versus the nonrepair of zone two injuries via macroscopic and biomechanical evaluations of tendon adhesions.Methods:We used 32 adult male European rabbits (Oryctolagus cunniculus) weighing from 2.5 to 3.5 kg.The study was performed on the deep flexor tendons of the second and third digits of the right hind paws of the rabbits;thus,a total of 64 tendons were examined in this study.Results:Based on the results achieved in our experimental study,the load (N) significantly increased in subgroup 1a in which the tendons were surgically repaired and were not treated with 5-FU compared with subgroup 2a in which tendons were surgically repaired and treated with 5-FU.Conclusions:The load (N) significantly increased in subgroup 1 a in which the tendons were surgically repaired and were not treated with 5-FU compared to subgroup 2a in which the tendons were surgically repaired and treated with 5-FU.Therefore,these results revealed a decrease in adhesion formation in the subgroup that was treated with 5-FU due to increased resistance to tendon adhesions during their excursion through the tendon sheath,which in this case required greater traction force.

  17. Biomechanical and Macroscopic Evaluations of the Effects of 5-Fluorouracil on Partially Divided Flexor Tendon Injuries in Rabbits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duci, Shkelzen B; Arifi, Hysni M; Ahmeti, Hasan R; Manxhuka-Kerliu, Suzana; Neziri, Burim; Mekaj, Agon Y; Lajqi, Shpetim; Shahini, Labinot

    2015-01-01

    Background: The main goals of flexor tendon surgery are to restore digital motion by providing tendon healing and to preserve tendon gliding. Our purpose was to investigate the effects of 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) on tendon adhesions in partially divided profundus flexor tendons (flexor digitorum profundus [FDPs]) following surgical repair and in partially divided FDPs without surgical repair, and to compare the results of the repair versus the nonrepair of zone two injuries via macroscopic and biomechanical evaluations of tendon adhesions. Methods: We used 32 adult male European rabbits (Oryctolagus cunniculus) weighing from 2.5 to 3.5 kg. The study was performed on the deep flexor tendons of the second and third digits of the right hind paws of the rabbits; thus, a total of 64 tendons were examined in this study. Results: Based on the results achieved in our experimental study, the load (N) significantly increased in subgroup 1a in which the tendons were surgically repaired and were not treated with 5-FU compared with subgroup 2a in which tendons were surgically repaired and treated with 5-FU. Conclusions: The load (N) significantly increased in subgroup 1a in which the tendons were surgically repaired and were not treated with 5-FU compared to subgroup 2a in which the tendons were surgically repaired and treated with 5-FU. Therefore, these results revealed a decrease in adhesion formation in the subgroup that was treated with 5-FU due to increased resistance to tendon adhesions during their excursion through the tendon sheath, which in this case required greater traction force. PMID:26063369

  18. Biomechanical and Macroscopic Evaluations of the Effects of 5-Fluorouracil on Partially Divided Flexor Tendon Injuries in Rabbits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shkelzen B Duci

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The main goals of flexor tendon surgery are to restore digital motion by providing tendon healing and to preserve tendon gliding. Our purpose was to investigate the effects of 5-fluorouracil (5-FU on tendon adhesions in partially divided profundus flexor tendons (flexor digitorum profundus [FDPs] following surgical repair and in partially divided FDPs without surgical repair, and to compare the results of the repair versus the nonrepair of zone two injuries via macroscopic and biomechanical evaluations of tendon adhesions. Methods: We used 32 adult male European rabbits (Oryctolagus cunniculus weighing from 2.5 to 3.5 kg. The study was performed on the deep flexor tendons of the second and third digits of the right hind paws of the rabbits; thus, a total of 64 tendons were examined in this study. Results: Based on the results achieved in our experimental study, the load (N significantly increased in subgroup 1a in which the tendons were surgically repaired and were not treated with 5-FU compared with subgroup 2a in which tendons were surgically repaired and treated with 5-FU. Conclusions: The load (N significantly increased in subgroup 1a in which the tendons were surgically repaired and were not treated with 5-FU compared to subgroup 2a in which the tendons were surgically repaired and treated with 5-FU. Therefore, these results revealed a decrease in adhesion formation in the subgroup that was treated with 5-FU due to increased resistance to tendon adhesions during their excursion through the tendon sheath, which in this case required greater traction force.

  19. Extensor tendon repair an overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mansoor Bin Fayed

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The incidence of extensor injuries is more than that of flexor tendon injuries. This is to a great extent because of the extensors being superficially placed and covered by skin and subcutaneous tissue over the distal part of the upper extremity. Thus they are more vulnerable to blunt and sharp trauma, the proximal and distal forearm present with laceration and cut with sharp weapon. Extensor tendon injuries are often taken lightly by many, repairs being taken-up at the ER. Repair is done in or if the retrieval of tendon ends is difficult or the wound is complicated with associated injuries such as fractures or in cases of tendon retraction. Delayed primary repair can be undertaken from 7-10 days. Assessment of the injured finger has to be very meticulous. Extension of finger is brought about by the interossei and lumbricals which are the short muscles of the hand. They extend the proximal interphalangeal joints and distal interphalangeal joints and flex metacarpophalangeal joint, these intrinsic muscles are innervated by the ulnar and median nerves. The long extensors are innervated by the radial nerve, they primarily extend the metacarpophalangeal joints and also interphalangeal joints. In cases of injury the intrinsic system may compensate for an extensor deficit. Closed injuries of zone I may be managed by splinting of the distal interphalangeal joints and open injuries in the zone I and II can be treated with tenodermodesis. Proximal interphalangeal joints and distal interphalangeal joints are immobilized in zone 3 and 4. Metacarpophalangeal joint is immobilized in full extension and the wrist in 10o extension.

  20. Human flexor tendon tissue engineering: decellularization of human flexor tendons reduces immunogenicity in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raghavan, Shyam S; Woon, Colin Y L; Kraus, Armin; Megerle, Kai; Choi, Matthew S S; Pridgen, Brian C; Pham, Hung; Chang, James

    2012-04-01

    In mutilating hand injuries, tissue engineered tendon grafts may provide a reconstructive solution. We have previously described a method to decellularize cadaveric human flexor tendons while preserving mechanical properties and biocompatibility. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the immunogenicity and strength of these grafts when implanted into an immunocompetent rat model. Cadaveric human flexor tendons were divided into two groups. Group 1 was untreated, and Group 2 was decellularized by treatment with sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS), ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA), and peracetic acid (PAA). Both groups were then analyzed for the presence of major histocompatibility complexes by immunohistochemistry (IHC). Pair-matched tendons from each group were then placed into the dorsal subcutaneous tissue and anchored to the spinal ligaments of Wistar rats for 2 or 4 weeks, and harvested. The infiltration of B-cells and macrophages was determined using IHC. The explants where then subjected to mechanical testing to determine the ultimate tensile stress (UTS) and elastic modulus (EM). Statistical analysis was performed using a paired Student's t-test. The decellularization protocol successfully removed cells and MHC-1 complexes. At 2 weeks after implantation, there was increased infiltration of B-cells in Group 1 (untreated) compared with Group 2 (acellular), both in the capsule and tendon substance. There was improved ultimate tensile stress (UTS, 42.7 ± 8.3 vs. 22.8 ± 7.8 MPa, ptendons that were decellularized. At 4 weeks, there was continued B-cell infiltration in Group 1 (untreated) compared with Group 2 (acellular). There was no appreciable difference in macrophage infiltration at both time points. At 4 weeks Group 2 (acellular) demonstrated persistently greater UTS (40.5 ± 9.1 vs. 14.6 ± 4.2 MPa, ptendons that were decellularized with SDS, EDTA, and PAA resulted in removal of cellular antigens and a decreased immune response when placed into Wistar

  1. Single-stage reconstruction of flexor tendons with vascularized tendon transfers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavadas, P C; Pérez-García, A; Thione, A; Lorca-García, C

    2015-03-01

    The reconstruction of finger flexor tendons with vascularized flexor digitorum superficialis (FDS) tendon grafts (flaps) based on the ulnar vessels as a single stage is not a popular technique. We reviewed 40 flexor tendon reconstructions (four flexor pollicis longus and 36 finger flexors) with vascularized FDS tendon grafts in 38 consecutive patients. The donor tendons were transferred based on the ulnar vessels as a single-stage procedure (37 pedicled flaps, three free flaps). Four patients required composite tendon and skin island transfer. Minimum follow-up was 12 months, and functional results were evaluated using a total active range of motion score. Multiple linear regression analysis was performed to evaluate the factors that could be associated with the postoperative total active range of motion. The average postoperative total active range of motion (excluding the thumbs) was 178.05° (SD 50°). The total active range of motion was significantly lower for patients who were reconstructed with free flaps and for those who required composite tendon and skin island flap. Age, right or left hand, donor/motor tendon and pulley reconstruction had no linear effect on total active range of motion. Overall results were comparable with a published series on staged tendon grafting but with a lower complication rate. Vascularized pedicled tendon grafts/flaps are useful in the reconstruction of defects of finger flexor tendons in a single stage, although its role in the reconstructive armamentarium remains to be clearly established. © The Author(s) 2014.

  2. Retrieval of the retracted flexor tendons for long fingers: New tip.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahed, K; Moujtahid, M; Nechad, M

    2014-09-01

    Zone II flexor tendon injuries continue to be a challenge for hand surgeons. During the injury event, the tendon ends may retract towards the palm. Retrieval of these lacerated ends can be problematic because the tendon sheath is unstretchable. This demanding surgery requires a precise repair technique where the tendon stumps are handled in an atraumatic manner. Microtrauma to the tendon sheath must be avoided as this can induce adhesions and lead to poor functional outcomes. Several retrieval methods for retracted tendon ends have been described in published studies. In this technical note, we will describe a technical variation that streamlines the surgical procedure and uses commonly available materials. This simple trick makes the procedure easier and avoids having to suture the tendon to the tubing. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  3. Resurfacing with Chemically Modified Hyaluronic Acid and Lubricin for Flexor Tendon Reconstruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Chunfeng; Hashimoto, Takahiro; Kirk, Ramona L.; Thoreson, Andrew R.; Jay, Gregory D.; Moran, Steven L.; An, Kai-Nan; Amadio, Peter C.

    2013-01-01

    We assessed surface coating with carbodiimide derivatized hyaluronic acid combined with lubricin (cd-HA-Lubricin) as a way to improve extrasynovial tendon surface quality and, consequently, the functional results in flexor tendon reconstruction, using a canine in vivo model. The second and fifth flexor digitorum profundus tendons from 14 dogs were reconstructed with autologs peroneus longus (PL) tendons 6 weeks after a failed primary repair. One digit was treated with cd-HA-Lubricin, and the other was treated with saline as the control. Six weeks following grafting, the digits and graft tendons were functionally and histologically evaluated. Adhesion score, normalized work of flexion, graft friction in zone II, and adhesion breaking strength at the proximal repair site in zone III were all lower in the cd-HA-Lubricin treated group compared to the control group. The strength at the distal tendon/bone interface was decreased in the cd-HA-Lubricin treated grafts compared to the control grafts. Histology showed inferior healing in the cd-HA-Lubricin group at both proximal and distal repair sites. However, cd-HA-Lubricin treatment did not result in any gap or rupture at either the proximal or distal repair sites. These results demonstrate that cd-HA-Lubricin can eliminate graft adhesions and improve digit function, but that treatment may have an adverse effect on tendon healing. PMID:23335124

  4. Resurfacing with chemically modified hyaluronic acid and lubricin for flexor tendon reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Chunfeng; Hashimoto, Takahiro; Kirk, Ramona L; Thoreson, Andrew R; Jay, Gregory D; Moran, Steven L; An, Kai-Nan; Amadio, Peter C

    2013-06-01

    We assessed surface coating with carbodiimide derivatized hyaluronic acid combined with lubricin (cd-HA-Lubricin) as a way to improve extrasynovial tendon surface quality and, consequently, the functional results in flexor tendon reconstruction, using a canine in vivo model. The second and fifth flexor digitorum profundus tendons from 14 dogs were reconstructed with autologs peroneus longus (PL) tendons 6 weeks after a failed primary repair. One digit was treated with cd-HA-Lubricin, and the other was treated with saline as the control. Six weeks following grafting, the digits and graft tendons were functionally and histologically evaluated. Adhesion score, normalized work of flexion, graft friction in zone II, and adhesion breaking strength at the proximal repair site in zone III were all lower in the cd-HA-Lubricin treated group compared to the control group. The strength at the distal tendon/bone interface was decreased in the cd-HA-Lubricin treated grafts compared to the control grafts. Histology showed inferior healing in the cd-HA-Lubricin group at both proximal and distal repair sites. However, cd-HA-Lubricin treatment did not result in any gap or rupture at either the proximal or distal repair sites. These results demonstrate that cd-HA-Lubricin can eliminate graft adhesions and improve digit function, but that treatment may have an adverse effect on tendon healing.

  5. Flexor Tendon Ruptures After Distal Scaphoid Excision for Scaphotrapeziotrapezoid Osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deren, Matthew E; Mitchell, Charles H; Weiss, Arnold-Peter C

    2017-09-01

    Distal scaphoid excision is one treatment option for osteoarthritis of the scaphotrapeziotrapezoid (STT) joint following failure of conservative measures. Potential complications of this procedure include injury to the carpal ligaments, cartilage, and radial artery. A single case was identified by the senior author, and the medical record was reviewed for surgical notes, progress notes, and radiographs. A 68-year-old male sustained ruptures of the flexor digitorum superficialis (FDS) and flexor digitorum profundus to the index finger 3 years following a distal scaphoid excision for symptomatic STT osteoarthritis. He required a flexor tendon reconstruction using the remaining FDS tendon for graft incorporated with a Pulvertaft weave. His midcarpal pain continued after recovery of his index finger function, eventually requiring a 4-corner fusion of the wrist. Flexor tendon rupture is a previously unreported complication of distal scaphoid excision for STT arthritis.

  6. The Effects of Bio-Lubricating Molecules on Flexor Tendon Reconstruction in A Canine Allograft Model In Vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Chunfeng; Wei, Zhuang; Kirk, Ramona L.; Thoreson, Andrew R.; Jay, Gregory D.; Moran, Steven L.; An, Kai-Nan; Amadio, Peter C.

    2014-01-01

    Background Using allograft is an attractive alternative for flexor tendon reconstruction because of the lack of donor morbidity, and better matching to the intrasynovial environment. The purpose of this study was to use biolubricant molecules to modify the graft surface to decrease adhesions and improve digit function. Methods 28 flexor digitorum profundus (FDP) tendons from the 2nd and 5th digits of 14 dogs were first lacerated and repaired to create a model with repair failure and scar digit for tendon reconstruction. Six weeks after the initial surgery, the tendons were reconstructed with FDP allograft tendons obtained from canine cadavers. One graft tendon in each dog was treated with saline as a control and the other was treated with gelatin, carbodiimide derivatized, hyaluronic acid and lubricin (cd-HA-Lubricin). Six weeks postoperatively, digit function, graft mechanics, and biology were analyzed. Results Allograft tendons treated with cd-HA-Lubricin had decreased adhesions at the proximal tendon/graft repair and within flexor sheath, improved digit function, and increased graft gliding ability. The treatment also reduced the strength at the distal tendon to bone repair, but the distal attachment rupture rate was similar for both graft types. Histology showed that viable cells migrated to the allograft, but these were limited to the tendon surface. Conclusion cd-HA-Lubricin treatment of tendon allograft improves digit functional outcomes after flexor tendon reconstruction. However, delayed bone-tendon healing should be a caution. Furthermore, the cell infiltration into the allograft tendons substance should be a target for future studies, to shorten the allograft self-regeneration period. PMID:24445876

  7. Treatment of unfavourable results of flexor tendon surgery: Skin deficiencies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Elliot

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We recently reported a small study at the Federation of European Societies for Surgery of the hand, which was entitled ′What is secondary flexor tendon surgery′? This study concluded that ′secondary flexor tendon surgery′ was a generic name encompassing a multitude of pathologies. Between 10% and 15% of cases exhibited pathology of the skin and subcutaneous fat and required flap reconstruction of these tissues. Skin replacement may be used prophylactically at primary surgery or become necessary at secondary surgery after release of scar contractures, to achieve cover of vital structures. The long-term problem of skin deficiency relating to flexor tendon function is one of loss of extension from longitudinal scar shortening of the integument, even if the flexor tendons are primarily concerned with bending the digits, not straightening them. This loss of extension can only be tolerated in a hand to a certain degree without significant loss of function. This paper is largely an analysis of the flaps available and suitable for different degrees of skin deficiency and at different places along the course of the flexor system. It attempts to dispel the idea that ′any flap will do′ provided the flexors are adequately covered.

  8. Delayed rupture of flexor tendons in zone V complicated by neuritis 18 years following Galeazzi fracture-dislocation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagy, Mathias Thomas; Ghosh, Sabyasachi; Shah, Bhavik; Sankar, Thangasamy

    2014-04-16

    We report a rare case of an 84-year-old woman who presented with delayed, complete rupture of superficial (flexor digitorum superficialis) and deep flexor tendons (flexor digitorum profundus) of the third, fourth and fifth digits of the right hand in zone V of the flexor tendons. The patient, who was otherwise healthy, active and independent, incurred a closed fracture of her right wrist 18 years ago, which was treated conservatively. Current X-rays and operative findings confirmed a malunited Galeazzi fracture-dislocation with volar dislocation of the ulna from the distal radioulnar joint. She underwent surgical treatment to improve her hand function and agonising neuritis symptoms, as she was unable to use her middle, ring and little fingers and had developed severe neuritis of the ulnar nerve. Exploration and repair of the flexor tendons, nerve decompressions and Darrach procedure were performed. On follow-up, the patient showed improvement in hand function with the neuritis completely resolved.

  9. The range of excursion of flexor tendons in Zone V: a comparison of active vs passive flexion mobilisation regimes.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Panchal, J

    1997-10-01

    A number of early postoperative mobilisation regimes have been developed in an attempt to increase tendon excursion and gliding and thereby reduce formation of adhesions following repair of flexor tendons. Early active flexion mobilisation regimes are becoming more popular, and have replaced early passive flexion regimes in many centres. The aim of the present study was: (a) to determine the range of excursion of flexor tendons in Zone V, and (b) to compare the excursion ranges between active (Belfast) and passive (modified Duran) flexion mobilisation regimes postoperatively. This was done (a) in two cadavers, and (b) in two patients intraoperatively, and postoperatively at 10 days, 3 weeks and 6 weeks. With passive flexion, the mean tendon excursion in Zone V in cadavers was 1 mm for flexor digitorum superficialis (FDS), flexor digitorum profundus (FDP) and flexor pollicis longus (FPL) tendons respectively. With simulated active flexion, the mean tendon excursion was 14 mm, 10 mm and 11 mm respectively. The mean tendon excursion in clinical cases intraoperatively following passive flexion was 2 mm for FDS, FDP and FPL respectively; following simulated active flexion it was 10 mm, 11 mm and 11 mm for FDS, FDP and FPL respectively. On the tenth day following repair, the mean excursions of FDS, FDP and FPL were 1 mm, 4 mm and 4 mm on passive flexion as compared to 3 mm, 10 mm and 12 mm on active flexion respectively. Three weeks postoperatively, the mean excursions of FDS, FDP and FPL tendons were 1 mm, 2 mm and 1 mm on passive flexion as compared to 5 mm, 15 mm on active flexion respectively. Six weeks postoperatively, the mean excursions of FDS, FDP and FPL tendons were 9 mm, 7 mm and 4 mm on passive flexion as compared to 12 mm, 33 mm and 20 mm on active flexion respectively. These results demonstrate an increased excursion of repaired flexor tendons in Zone V following an active flexion mobilisation regime as compared to a passive flexion mobilisation regime.

  10. Biomechanical Study of Two Peripheral Suture Methods on Repaired Tendons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Zhenling

    2015-01-01

    Flexor digitorum tendon injuries are challenging conditions to manage to ensure optimal patient outcomes. While several surgical approaches with high success rates have been developed, there remains no gold standard for suture technique for the repair of flexor tendon injuries. In this study, we compared two distinct peripheral suture methods on the strength of repaired tendons. Pig flexor digitorum profundus tendons were used in biomechanical studies and the biomechanical influence on tendon repair of continuous running peripheral suture (CRPS) and continuous locking peripheral suture (CLPS), were compared, using stitch length ranging from 1mm to 5mm. In CRPS, the 1mm stitch length group displayed the highest maximum load and breaking power, which was 1.57 fold higher than the 2mm stitch length group. Pairwise comparison revealed that the 1 and 2mm groups were statistically different from the 3, 4, and 5mm stitch length groups while comparison among the latter groups was not statistically significant. For CLPS, the 1mm group exhibited consistently the highest maximum load strength and breaking power, which was twice the strength displayed by the 2mm group. Pairwise comparisons between groups showed statistical significance. For future repairs of flexor tendon injuries, 1mm stitch length is highly recommended for simple peripheral suture.

  11. Tendon-derived progenitor cells improve healing of collagenase-induced flexor tendinitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durgam, Sushmitha S; Stewart, Allison A; Sivaguru, Mayandi; Wagoner Johnson, Amy J; Stewart, Matthew C

    2016-12-01

    Tendinitis is a common and a performance-limiting injury in athletes. This study describes the value of intralesional tendon-derived progenitor cell (TDPC) injections in equine flexor tendinitis. Collagenase-induced tendinitis was created in both front superficial digital flexor (SDF) tendons. Four weeks later, the forelimb tendon lesions were treated with 1 × 10(7) autogenous TDPCs or saline. Tendinitis was also induced by collagenase in one hind SDF tendon, to study the survival and distribution of DiI-labeled TDPCs 1, 2, 4, and 6 weeks after injection. The remaining normal tendon was used as a "control." Twelve weeks after forelimb TDPC injections, tendons were harvested for assessment of matrix gene expression, biochemical, biomechanical, and histological characteristics. DiI-labeled TDPCs were abundant 1 week after injection but gradually declined over time and were undetectable after 6 weeks. Twelve weeks after TDPC injection, collagens I and III, COMP and tenomodulin mRNA levels were similar (p = 0.3) in both TDPC and saline groups and higher (p < 0.05) than normal tendon. Yield and maximal stresses of the TDPC group were significantly greater (p = 0.005) than the saline group's and similar (p = 0.6) to normal tendon. However, the elastic modulus of the TDPC and saline groups were not significantly different (p = 0.32). Histological assessment of the repair tissues with Fourier transform-second harmonic generation imaging demonstrated that collagen alignment was significantly better (p = 0.02) in TDPC group than in the saline controls. In summary, treating collagenase-induced flexor tendon lesions with TDPCs improved the tensile strength and collagen fiber alignment of the repair tissue. Study Design © 2016 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res 34:2162-2171, 2016. © 2016 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Lubricin Surface Modification Improves Tendon Gliding After Tendon Repair in a Canine Model in Vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taguchi, Manabu; Sun, Yu-Long; Zhao, Chunfeng; Zobitz, Mark E.; Cha, Chung-Ja; Jay, Gregory D.; An, Kai-Nan; Amadio, Peter C.

    2011-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of lubricin on the gliding of repaired flexor digitorum profundus (FDP) tendons in vitro. Canine FDP tendons were completely lacerated, repaired with a modified Pennington technique, and treated with one of the following solutions: saline, carbodiimide derivatized gelatin/hyaluronic acid (cd-HA-gelatin), carbodiimide derivatized gelatin to which lubricin was added in a second step (cd-gelatin + lubricin), or carbodiimide derivatized gelatin/HA + lubricin (cd-HA-gelatin + lubricin). After treatment, gliding resistance was measured up to 1,000 cycles of simulated flexion/extension motion. The increase in average and peak gliding resistance in cd-HA-gelatin, cd-gelatin + lubricin, and cd-HA-gelatin + lubricin tendons was less than the control tendons after 1,000 cycles (p < 0.05). The increase in average gliding resistance of cd-HA-gelatin + lubricin treated tendons was also less than that of the cd-HA-gelatin treated tendons (p < 0.05). The surfaces of the repaired tendons and associated pulleys were assessed qualitatively with scanning electron microscopy and appeared smooth after 1,000 cycles of tendon motion for the cd-HA-gelatin, cd-gelatin + lubricin, and cd-HA-gelatin + lubricin treated tendons, while that of the saline control appeared roughened. These results suggest that tendon surface modification can improve tendon gliding ability, with a trend suggesting that lubricin fixed on the repaired tendon may provide additional improvement over that provided by HA and gelatin alone. PMID:18683890

  13. O ultra-som terapêutico não aumentou as propriedades mecânicas de tendões flexores após reparo Therapeutic ultrasound did not increase the mechanical properties of flexor tendons after their repair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristiane Vitaliano Graminha Romano

    2010-01-01

    /cm², both in continuous mode, group C with 0.6 W/cm² SATA, in pulsated mode at 50% and group D did not receive any ultrasonic treatment. The ultrasonic frequency employed was 1 MHz. After euthanasia, the tendons were dissected and submitted to the mechanical test of traction and qualitative histological analysis. The evaluated mechanical properties were: maximum force, deformation in maximum force and stiffness. RESULTS: There were no statistically significant differences among the experimental groups. CONCLUSION: Therapeutic ultrasound did not improve the mechanical properties of the flexor tendons after repair.

  14. Biologics for tendon repair

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Tendon injuries are common and present a clinical challenge to orthopedic surgery mainly because these injuries often respond poorly to treatment and require prolonged rehabilitation. Therapeutic options used to repair ruptured tendons have consisted of suture, autografts, allografts, and synthetic prostheses. To date, none of these alternatives has provided a successful long-term solution, and often the restored tendons do not recover their complete strength and functionality. Unfortunately,...

  15. Rehabilitation outcomes in patients with early and two-stage reconstruction of flexor tendon injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sade, Ilgin; İnanir, Murat; Şen, Suzan; Çakmak, Esra; Kablanoğlu, Serkan; Selçuk, Barin; Dursun, Nigar

    2016-08-01

    [Purpose] The primary aim of this study was to assess rehabilitation outcomes for early and two-stage repair of hand flexor tendon injuries. The secondary purpose of this study was to compare the findings between treatment groups. [Subjects and Methods] Twenty-three patients were included in this study. Early repair (n=14) and two-stage repair (n=9) groups were included in a rehabilitation program that used hand splints. This retrospective evaluated patients according to their demographic characteristics, including age, gender, injured hand, dominant hand, cause of injury, zone of injury, number of affected fingers, and accompanying injuries. Pain, range of motion, and grip strength were evaluated using a visual analog scale, goniometer, and dynamometer, respectively. [Results] Both groups showed significant improvements in pain and finger flexion after treatment compared with baseline measurements. However, no significant differences were observed between the two treatment groups. Similar results were obtained for grip strength and pinch grip, whereas gross grip was better in the early tendon repair group. [Conclusion] Early and two-stage reconstruction of patients with flexor tendon injuries can be performed with similarly favorable responses and effective rehabilitation programs.

  16. Radial forearm flap plus Flexor Carpi Radialis tendon in Achilles tendon reconstruction: Surgical technique, functional results, and gait analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Innocenti, Marco; Tani, Massimiliano; Carulli, Christian; Ghezzi, Serena; Raspanti, Andrea; Menichini, Giulio

    2015-11-01

    Wound dehiscence, infection, and necrosis of tendon and overlying skin are severe complications after open repairs of Achilles tendon. A simultaneous reconstruction should be provided in a single stage operation. We evaluated the outcomes of one of the possible options: the radial forearm free flap with Flexor Carpi Radialis (FCR) tendon. Between 2006 and 2014, six patients affected by infection and necrosis after Achilles tendon open repair underwent multi-tissutal reconstruction by a composite radial forearm free flap including a vascularized FCR tendon. The mean skin and tendon defect was respectively 9.8 cm × 4.7 cm and 6.5 cm. After reconstruction, patients underwent clinical examination, including the Achilles Tendon Total Rupture Score (ATRS) questionnaire, DASH score, MRI study, and a computer-assisted gait analysis. All flaps survived and no complications were recorded. Full weightbearing was allowed within 2 months after surgery. The mean follow-up was 36.2 months (range 12-96). MRI showed an optimal reconstruction of the tendon. Range of motion was minimally reduced if compared to the contralateral side. Gait analysis showed the recovery of a nearly symmetrical stance phase, time to heel off, and step length of the gate. ATRS and DASH score improved to a mean value of 85.2 (range 83-88) and 8.0 (range 3-15) respectively. This procedure provided an anatomical reconstruction of the Achilles tendon and skin achieving good and objective functional results; donor site morbidity was limited to the sacrifice of the radial artery, which, in our opinion, is a minor drawback if compared to the quality of the results. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Turkey model for flexor tendon research: in vitro comparison of human, canine, turkey, and chicken tendons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadar, Assaf; Thoreson, Andrew R; Reisdorf, Ramona L; Amadio, Peter C; Moran, Steven L; Zhao, Chunfeng

    2017-08-01

    Flexor tendon injuries are one of the most common hand injuries and remain clinically challenging for functional restoration. Canine and chicken have been the most commonly used animal models for flexor tendon-related research but possess several disadvantages. The purpose of this study was to explore a potential turkey model for flexor tendon research. The third digit from human cadaveric hands, canine forepaws, turkey foot, and chicken foot were used for this study. Six digits in each of four species were studied in detail, comparing anatomy of the flexor apparatus, joint range of motioņ tendon excursion, tendon cross-sectional area, work of flexion, gliding resistance at the level of the A2 pulley, modulus of elasticity, suture retention strength, and histology across species. Anatomically, the third digit in the four species displayed structural similarities; however, the tendon cross-sectional area of the turkey and human were similar and larger than canine and chicken. Furthermore, the turkey digit resembles the human's finger with the lack of webbing between digits, similar vascularization, tendon excursion, work of flexion, gliding resistance, mechanical properties, and suture holding strength. More importantly, human and turkey tendons were most similar in histological appearance. Turkey flexor tendons have many properties that are comparable to human flexor tendons which would provide a clinically relevant, economical, nonhuman companion large animal model for flexor tendon research. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Neglected Achilles Tendon Rupture Treated with Flexor Hallucis Longus transfer with two turndown gastrocnemius fascia flap and reinforced with plantaris tendon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Haijiao; Shi, Zengyuan; Xu, Dachuan; Liu, Zhenxin

    2015-09-01

    Neglected Achilles Tendon Ruptures are commonly seen by orthopaedic surgeons. In cases resistant to conservative treatment, a variety of surgical procedures have been utilized in the past. The senior -surgeon at our institution has utilized a technique -employing two turndown fascia flaps fashioned from the proximal Achilles tendon augmented by a tenomyodesis of the flexor hallucis longus and plantaris tendon. The purpose of this study was to assess the clinical outcome of all patients who underwent this procedure. The medical records of 10 cases that underwent this procedure were retrospectively reviewed. We completed data collection sets using the American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society ankle-hind foot scores, isokinetic evaluation, and postoperative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) at 1 year of follow-up. The mean American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society ankle-hind foot scores improved from 64.4±3.54. Isokinetic testing at 30º/sec and 120º/sec revealed an mean deficits of 24.5%, respectively, in the plantar flexion peak torque of the involved ankle than non-involved ankle. The flexor hallucis longus tendon, gastrocnemius fascia flap and plantaris were well -integrated into the Achilles tendon forming a homogenous tendon, which was confirmed in MRI. Our subjective and objective data indicate that the reconstructive technique using flexor hallucis longus transfer with two turndown gastrocnemius fascia flaps and plantaris tendon is a good option for repairing large gap defect of Achilles tendon.

  19. Closed rupture of the flexor tendons caused by carpal bone and joint disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamazaki, H; Kato, H; Hata, Y; Nakatsuchi, Y; Tsuchikane, A

    2007-12-01

    We analysed 21 patients with closed rupture of the flexor tendons caused by carpal bone and joint disorders. The tendon that ruptured depended on the location of the bone perforation into the carpal tunnel. Radiocarpal arthrography was performed in 13 patients and capsular perforation was demonstrated by contrast medium leakage into the carpal canal in 11 patients. This proved a useful diagnostic test. The flexor tendon(s) were reconstructed with free tendon graft in 17 patients, cross-over transfer of flexor tendons from adjacent digits in two and buddying to an adjacent flexor tendon in one patient. Postoperative total active range of motion in the fingers after 13 free tendon graft reconstructions averaged 213 degrees (range 170-265 degrees ). The active range of motion of the thumb-interphalangeal joint after free tendon graft reconstruction in three cases improved from 0 degrees to 33 degrees on average (range 10 degrees -40 degrees ).

  20. Serial superficial digital flexor tendon biopsies for diagnosing and monitoring collagenase-induced tendonitis in horses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José C. de Lacerda Neto

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this investigation was to demonstrate the feasibility of a biopsy technique by performing serial evaluations of tissue samples of the forelimb superficial digital flexor tendon (SDFT in healthy horses and in horses subjected to superficial digital flexor tendonitis induction. Eight adult horses were evaluated in two different phases (P, control (P1 and tendonitis-induced (P2. At P1, the horses were subjected to five SDFT biopsies of the left forelimb, with 24 hours (h of interval. Clinical and ultrasonographic (US examinations were performed immediately before the tendonitis induction, 24 and 48 h after the procedure. The biopsied tendon tissues were analyzed through histology. P2 evaluations were carried out three months later, when the same horses were subjected to tendonitis induction by injection of bacterial collagenase into the right forelimb SDFT. P2 clinical and US evaluations, and SDFT biopsies were performed before, and after injury induction at the following time intervals: after 24, 48, 72 and 96 h, and after 15, 30, 60, 90, 120 and 150 days. The biopsy technique has proven to be easy and quick to perform and yielded good tendon samples for histological evaluation. At P1 the horses did not show signs of localised inflammation, pain or lameness, neither SDFT US alterations after biopsies, showing that the biopsy procedure per se did not risk tendon integrity. Therefore, this procedure is feasible for routine tendon histological evaluations. The P2 findings demonstrate a relation between the US and histology evaluations concerning induced tendonitis evolution. However, the clinical signs of tendonitis poorly reflected the microscopic tissue condition, indicating that clinical presentation is not a reliable parameter for monitoring injury development. The presented method of biopsying SDFT tissue in horses enables the serial collection of material for histological analysis causing no clinical signs and tendon damage seen

  1. Flexor Tendon Sheath Engineering Using Decellularized Porcine Pericardium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Megerle, Kai; Woon, Colin; Kraus, Armin; Raghavan, Shyam; Pham, Hung; Chang, James

    2016-10-01

    The flexor tendon sheath is an ideal target for tissue engineering because it is difficult to reconstruct by conventional surgical methods. The authors hypothesized that decellularized porcine pericardium can be used as a scaffold for engineering a biologically active tendon sheath. The authors' protocol removed cellular material from the pericardium and preserved the structural architecture in addition to the collagen and glycosaminoglycan content. The scaffold was successfully reseeded with human sheath synoviocytes and human adipose-derived stem cells. Cells were evaluated for 8 weeks after reseeding. The reseeded construct demonstrated continuous production of hyaluronic acid, the main component of synovial fluid. After being seeded on the membrane, adipose-derived stem cells demonstrated down-regulation of collagen I and III and up-regulation of hyaluronan synthase 2. The results indicate that decellularized porcine pericardium may be a potential scaffold for engineering a biologically active human tendon sheath.

  2. Mechanical properties of the flexor digitorum profundus tendon attachment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felder, Jerrod J; Guseila, Loredana M; Saranathan, Archana; Shary, Timothy J; Lippitt, Steven B; Elias, John J

    2013-12-01

    The current study was performed to determine the strength and rigidity of the intact flexor digitorum profundus (FDP) tendon attachment and compare the rigidity at the attachment site to the rigidity within a more proximal part of the tendon. Eight cadaveric index fingers were tested to failure of the FDP tendon. Lines were drawn on each tendon with India ink stain at the position of the attachment to bone and 5 mm and 10 mm proximally. Each test was recorded using a high resolution video camera. A minimum of six images per test were used for analysis of tissue deformation. The centroid of each line was computationally identified to characterize the deformation of the tendon between the lines. Force vs. deformation curves were generated for the 5 mm region representing the tendon attachment and the 5 mm region adjacent to the attachment. Stiffness measurements were generated for each curve, and normalized by the initial length to determine the rigidity. The failure strength ranged from 263 N to 548 N, with rigidity values ranging from 2201 N/(mm/mm) to 8714 N/(mm/mm) and from 3459 N/(mm/mm) to 6414 N/(mm/mm) for the attachment and the tendon proximal to the attachment, respectively. The rigidity did not vary significantly between the attachment and proximal tendon based on a Wilcoxon signed rank test (p = 0.2). The measured strength and rigidity establish biomechanical properties for the FDP tendon attachment to bone.

  3. Spontaneous flexor tendon rupture in systemic lupus erythematosus: A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oda, Ryo; Fujiwara, Hiroyoshi; Tokunaga, Daisaku; Kishida, Aiko; Taniguchi, Daigo; Seno, Takahiro; Kawahito, Yutaka; Kubo, Toshikazu

    2016-09-01

    Spontaneous flexor tendon rupture is an unusual complication of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and has not previously been reported. While tendon ruptures in association with SLE have been focused on the previous studies, upper extremity tendon ruptures are infrequently reported in the literature. Here, we present an uncommon case of spontaneous flexor tendon rupture of the ring and little fingers in a patient with SLE and discuss the mechanism of injury and its surgical treatment.

  4. Flexor tendon injuries of hand: experience at Pakistan Institute of Medical Sciences, Islamabad, Pakistan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Muhammad; Hussain, Syed Shahid; Tariq, Farhan; Rafiq, Zulqarnain; Khan, M Ibrahim; Malik, Saleem A

    2007-01-01

    Flexor tendon injury is one of the most common hand injuries. This initial treatment is of the utmost importance because it often determines the final outcome; inadequate primary treatment is likely to give poor long tem results. Various suture techniques have been devised for tendon repair but the modified Kessler's technique is the most commonly used. This study was conducted in order to know the cause, mechanism and the effects of early controlled mobilization after flexor tendon repair and to assess the range of active motion after flexor tendon repair in hand. This study was conducted at the department of Plastic Surgery, Pakistan Institute of Medical Sciences, Islamabad from 1st March 2002 to 31st August 2003. Only adult patients of either sex with an acute injury were included in whom primary or delayed primary tendon repair was undertaken. In all the patients, modified Kessler's technique was used for the repair using non-absorbable monofilament (Prolene 4-0). The wound was closed with interrupted non-absorbable, polyfilament (Silk 4-0) suture. A dorsal splint extending beyond the finger tip to proximal forearm was used with wrist in 20-30 degrees palmer flexion, metacarpophalangeal (MP) joint flexed at 60 degrees. Passive movements of fingers were started from the first post operative day, and for controlled, active movements, a dynamic splint was applied. During this study, 33 patients with 39 digits were studies. 94% of the patients had right dominated hand involvement. 51% had the complete flexor digitorum superficialis (FDS) and flexor digitorum profundus (FDP) injuries. Middle and ring fingers were most commonly involved. Thumb was involved in 9% of the patients. Zone III(46%) was the commonest to be involved followed by zone II (28%). Laceration with sharp object was the most frequent cause of injury. Finger tip to distal palmer crease distance (TPD) was < 2.0 cm in 71% cases (average 2.4cm) at the end of 2nd postoperative week. Total number of

  5. Chondroma within the flexor hallucis longus tendon sheath. A case report and literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brahms, M A; Fumich, R M

    1978-01-01

    Chondromas in tendon sheaths are a rare entity proviously reported in the flexor sheaths on the hand and possibly the foot. This is the first reported case of condroma of the flexor hallucis longus tendon sheath at the ankle region. A literature review with regard to pathogenesis, classification, and recurrence has been presented.

  6. Molecular Biology of Flexor Tendon Healing in Relation to Reduction of Tendon Adhesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legrand, Anais; Kaufman, Yoav; Long, Chao; Fox, Paige M

    2017-09-01

    Tendon injuries are encountered after major and minor hand trauma. Despite meticulous repair technique, adhesion formation can occur, limiting recovery. Although a great deal of progress has been made toward understanding the mechanism of tendon healing and adhesions, clinically applicable solutions to prevent adhesions remain elusive. The goal of this paper is to review the most recent literature relating to the tendon healing and adhesion prevention. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Surgery of the Hand. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Complications of common hand and wrist surgery procedures: flexor and extensor tendon surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Lauren H; Abzug, Joshua M; Osterman, A Lee; Stern, Peter J; Chang, James

    2014-01-01

    Orthopaedic and hand surgeons frequently treat disorders of the flexor and extensor tendon systems. Common conditions, such as trigger finger, de Quervain tenosynovitis, extensor tendon injury, and zone II flexor tendon injury, can be challenging to treat. Complications that limit normal hand function still occur despite advances in surgical techniques and therapy protocols. It is helpful to be aware of the complications related to the treatment of these hand disorders and understand surgical techniques to minimize their frequency.

  8. Outcome of quadriceps tendon repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puranik, Gururaj S; Faraj, Adnan

    2006-04-01

    Complete rupture of the quadriceps tendon is a well-described injury. There is a scarcity of literature relating to the outcome of patients with this injury after surgery. We undertook a retrospective analysis of patients who had surgical repair of their quadriceps tendon at our institution over a 13-year period, totalling 21 patients. Males were more commonly affected, with a male/female ratio of 4:1. The peak incidence was in the sixth decade of life. Assessment consisted of the completion of a functional knee questionnaire and a clinical examination. Symptomatic outcome following surgical repair was good with a mean symptom score generated of 19.16 out of a maximum of 25 using the Rougraff et al scoring system. Most of the patients returned to their pre-injury level of activity. Five degrees deficit and extension lag was present in three patients; these patients had the quadriceps repaired using transosseous sutures. Patients who had direct repair of the tendon using the Bunnell technique had lower Rougraff scores than the rest.

  9. Análise biomecânica e histológica de tendões flexores reparados em coelhos usando três técnicas de sutura (quatro e seis passadas com mobilização ativa precoce Biomechanics and histological analysis in rabbit flexor tendons repaired using three suture techniques (four and six strands with early active mobilization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antônio Lourenço Severo

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Analisar o tempo das suturas, a biomecânica (deformidade entre os cotos tendíneos e a histologia dos três grupos de reparo cirúrgico tendíneo: Brasil-2 (quatro passadas, com técnica de sutura central em que o nó final se encontra fora do tendão; Indiana (quatro passadas; e Tsai (seis passadas, com técnicas de sutura central em que o nó final se encontra no interior do tendão reparado, associados de mobilização ativa precoce. MÉTODOS: O tendão calcâneo direito de 36 coelhos da raça New Zealand foi escolhido para a análise. Este apresenta calibre semelhante ao tendão flexor humano, o qual tem aproximadamente 4,5mm (variando 2mm para mais ou menos. A amostra selecionada apresentava a mesma massa (2,5 a 3kg e eram adultos machos ou fêmeas (a partir de 8½ meses de idade. RESULTADOS: Na análise biomecânica, não houve diferença estatisticamente significativa (p > 0,01. Não houve diferença estatística com relação ao tempo cirúrgico na realização das três técnicas de suturas (p > 0,01. Evidenciou-se, qualitativamente e quantitativamente, com a mobilidade ativa precoce, um espessamento da fibra de colágeno em 38,9% dentro do 15º dia e de 66,7% dentro do período do 30º dia (p = 0,095. CONCLUSÃO: Esta investigação serviu para demonstrar que não houve diferença histológica do nó final da sutura central dentro ou fora do tendão reparado, bem como o número de passadas, no que diz respeito à cicatrização, vascularização ou deformidade do tendão no túnel osteofibroso com as técnicas de reparo aplicadas, associados de mobilização ativa precoce.OBJECTIVE: analyzing suture time, biomechanics (deformity between the stumps and the histology of three groups of tendinous surgical repair: Brazil-2 (4-strands which the end knot (core is located outside the tendon, Indiana (4-strands and Tsai (6-strands with sutures technique which the end knot (core is inner of the tendon, associated with early active

  10. Mobilidade articular dos dedos não lesados pós-reparo em lesão dos tendões flexores da mão Joint range of motion of uninjured fingers after repairs to flexor tendon injuries of the hand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    RB Rabelo

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Verificar a amplitude de movimento (ADM em mãos que sofreram reparo tendinoso dos músculos flexores superficial e profundo dos dedos, comparando os dados de cada dedo na mão lesada e entre mãos lesadas e não lesadas. MÉTODOS: Foi realizada a goniometria ativa em 15 pacientes e 120 dedos, 60 dedos de mãos lesadas e 60 de mãos controle não lesadas. Os sujeitos foram avaliados no momento da retirada da tala gessada, tendo sido realizada a movimentação precoce pelo método de Duran modificado. A partir dos dados goniométricos, foram registrados os valores do índice TAM (Total Active Motion dos dedos nas mãos lesadas e controle. Para análise dos dados, foi acessada a fórmula de índices funcionais proposta pela American Society for Surgery of the Hand (ASSH e para cálculo estatístico, foi escolhido o Modelo de Efeitos Mistos. RESULTADOS: A fórmula da ASSH para os dedos lesados mostrou que 18,33% tiveram a classificação do movimento "bom", 18,33%, "regular" e 63,34%, "pobre". Foram comparadas as médias das medidas em graus de todos os dedos entre si dentro de cada grupo, controle ou lesado, e as médias das medidas entre os grupos, encontrando-se um p-valor significante apenas entre os grupos controle e lesado. Não houve diferença estatística entre o TAM de cada dedo na mão lesada. CONCLUSÃO: Independente de quantos dedos tenham sofrido lesão tendinosa em uma mão, os dedos não lesados também terão suas ADMs ativas diminuídas no período logo após a retirada da imobilização.OBJECTIVE: To assess the range of motion (ROM in hands that underwent tendon repair in the flexor digitorum superficialis and flexor digitorum profundus muscles of the fingers, comparing the data between the fingers on the injured hand, and between the injured and uninjured hands. METHOD: Active goniometry was performed on 15 patients, making a total of 120 fingers (60 on injured hands and 60 on noninjured control hands. The patients

  11. Separate Belly and Tendon of Flexor Digitorum Superficialis to the Fifth Digit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Mohandas; Somayaji, S Nagabhushana; Mishra, Snigdha; Guru, Anitha; Rao, Ashutosh

    2011-11-01

    Variation in the origin of long flexor tendons in the anterior compartment of forearm is common. During routine cadaveric dissection at Melaka Manipal Medical College (Manipal Campus), we observed a separate muscle belly and tendon of flexor digitorum superficialis (FDS) to the fifth digit in the right upper limb of a 60 year-old male cadaver. The anomalous muscle belly originated from the common flexor tendon from the medial epicondyle of the humerus and continued as a thin tendon at the middle of the forearm to get inserted into the middle phalanx of the fifth digit. This can be considered as a case of split flexor digitorum superficialis. Such muscle variations and knowledge of their frequency, appearance, and location can be helpful for surgeons.

  12. DYNAMIC SONOGRAPHY OF THE EQUINE METACARPO(TARSO)PHALANGEAL DIGITAL FLEXOR TENDON SHEATH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiGiovanni, Daria L; Rademacher, Nathalie; Riggs, Laura M; Baumruck, Rebecca A; Gaschen, Lorrie

    2016-11-01

    Palmar/plantar annular desmitis is a common disease that may be associated with adhesions and structures affecting the flexor tendons, which requires tenoscopy to diagnose. The purpose of this descriptive study was to develop a dynamic sonographic technique for evaluating the motion of normal equine flexor tendons in relation to the palmar/plantar annular ligament and to compare findings with horses previously diagnosed with palmar/plantar annular desmitis. Ten healthy adult horses were examined prospectively and the images of four horses diagnosed with palmar/plantar annular desmitis were retrospectively evaluated. Dynamic sonography was performed at the level of the metacarpo/metatarsophalangeal joint by maximally extending and flexing the interphalangeal joints. Palmar/plantar annular ligament thickness (mm), size of any gap between the flexor tendons, and subjectively increased angulation of the long linear echoes of the superficial digital flexor tendon were measured. The presence of gliding motion between the palmar/plantar annular ligament and superficial digital flexor tendon was determined by consensus. Twenty-eight healthy control limbs (16 hind/12 fore) and four with palmar/plantar annular desmitis (3 hind/1 fore) were evaluated. Controls had unrestricted gliding motion between the palmar/plantar annular ligament and flexor tendons and zero to 13° of angulation of the long linear echoes. The four affected horses had restricted gliding motion and between 20-35° angulation of the long linear echoes. Dynamic ultrasound is a feasible technique for detecting restricted flexor tendon and palmar/plantar annular ligament gliding motion, as well as subjectively increased angulation of the long linear echoes of the flexor tendon in affected horses compared with controls and warrants further investigation. © 2016 American College of Veterinary Radiology.

  13. Focal experimental injury leads to widespread gene expression and histologic changes in equine flexor tendons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobson, Else; Jacobsen, Else; Dart, Andrew J; Mondori, Takamitsu; Horadogoda, Neil; Jeffcott, Leo B; Little, Christopher B; Smith, Margaret M

    2015-01-01

    It is not known how extensively a localised flexor tendon injury affects the entire tendon. This study examined the extent of and relationship between histopathologic and gene expression changes in equine superficial digital flexor tendon after a surgical injury. One forelimb tendon was hemi-transected in six horses, and in three other horses, one tendon underwent a sham operation. After euthanasia at six weeks, transected and control (sham and non-operated contralateral) tendons were regionally sampled (medial and lateral halves each divided into six 3 cm regions) for histologic (scoring and immunohistochemistry) and gene expression (real time PCR) analysis of extracellular matrix changes. The histopathology score was significantly higher in transected tendons compared to control tendons in all regions except for the most distal (P ≤ 0.03) with no differences between overstressed (medial) and stress-deprived (lateral) tendon halves. Proteoglycan scores were increased by transection in all but the most proximal region (P tendon, gene expression for aggrecan, versican, biglycan, lumican, collagen types I, II and III, MMP14 and TIMP1 was increased in transected tendons compared with control tendons (P tendon. These extensive changes distant to the focal injury may contribute to poor functional outcomes and re-injury in clinical cases. Our data suggest that successful treatments of focal injuries will need to address pathology in the entire tendon, and that better methods to monitor the development and resolution of tendinopathy are required.

  14. Biological Augmentation of Rotator Cuff Tendon Repair

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kovacevic, David; Rodeo, Scott A

    2008-01-01

    A histologically normal insertion site does not regenerate following rotator cuff tendon-to-bone repair, which is likely due to abnormal or insufficient gene expression and/or cell differentiation at the repair site...

  15. Nonseptic tenosynovitis of the digital flexor tendon sheath caused by longitudinal tears in the digital flexor tendons: a retrospective study of 135 tenoscopic procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arensburg, L; Wilderjans, H; Simon, O; Dewulf, J; Boussauw, B

    2011-11-01

    Longitudinal tears (LTs) of the digital flexor tendons are an important cause of chronic tenosynovitis of the digital flexor tendon sheath (DFTS). The origin of those marginal tears is not yet fully understood. The long-term outcome after medical and surgical treatment is guarded. To determine the prevalence of LTs of the digital flexor tendons in a large population of horses undergoing diagnostic tenoscopy of the DFTS and to assess the outcome of surgical treatment and the factors influencing the outcome. Medical records of 130 horses with chronic tenosynovitis of the DFTS that had tenoscopic surgery between 1999 and 2009 were evaluated. One hundred and thirty-five DFTSs were examined. LTs were diagnosed in 104 DFTSs in 101 horses and long-term follow-up was obtained. Seventy-eight percent of the horses with a nonseptic tenosynovitis of the DFTS had a LT. Preoperative ultrasonographic examination diagnosed tears in 76% of the cases. In showjumpers forelimbs were more frequently affected than hindlimbs (88 vs. 12%), with the right front having a higher incidence of injury than the left front (76 vs. 24%). Seventy-nine percent of the tears involved the deep digital flexor tendon (DDFT) and 87% were located on the lateral tendon border. Thirty-seven horses (38%) returned to an equal or higher level of work. The use of a radiofrequency probe (coblation) was associated with a lower level of performance and decreased the cosmetic end result. Persistence of marked post operative distension of the DFTS carried a poor prognosis for return to previous level of work. A guarded prognosis for future soundness should be given to horses presented for treatment of LTs of the digital flexor tendons. The use of coblation wands had a negative effect on the final outcome. © 2010 EVJ Ltd.

  16. Flexor tendon and synovial gliding during simultaneous and single digit flexion in idiopathic carpal tunnel syndrome.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ettema, A.M.; An, K.N.; Zhao, C.; O'Byrne, M.M.; Amadio, P.C.

    2008-01-01

    The characteristic pathological finding in carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) is non-inflammatory fibrosis of the subsynovial connective tissue (SSCT), which lies between the flexor tendons and the visceral synovium (VS). How this fibrosis might affect tendon function is unknown. To better understand the

  17. Gliding characteristics of flexor tendon and tenosynovium in carpal tunnel syndrome: a pilot study.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ettema, A.M.; Zhao, C.; Amadio, P.C.; O'Byrne, M.M.; An, K.N.

    2007-01-01

    The characteristic pathological finding in carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) is noninflammatory fibrosis of the synovium. How this fibrosis might affect tendon function, if at all, is unknown. The subsynovial connective tissue (SSCT) lies between the flexor tendons and the visceral synovium (VS) of the

  18. Gliding characteristics of flexor tendon and tenosynovium in carpal tunnel syndrome: a pilot study.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ettema, A.M.; Zhao, C.; Amadio, P.C.; O'Byrne, M.M.; An, K.N.

    2007-01-01

    The characteristic pathological finding in carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) is noninflammatory fibrosis of the synovium. How this fibrosis might affect tendon function, if at all, is unknown. The subsynovial connective tissue (SSCT) lies between the flexor tendons and the visceral synovium (VS) of the u

  19. Combined flexor hallucis longus tendon transfer and gastrocnemius recession for reconstruction of gapped chronic achilles tendon ruptures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elgohary, Hatem Elsayed Ahmed; Elmoghazy, Nabil A; Abd Ellatif, Mohammed Serry

    2016-12-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the functional outcomes after a combined FHL transfer and a gastrocnemius recession for treatment of chronic ruptures of Achilles tendon with a gap and to investigate the patient's satisfaction about the great toe function after transfer. 19 patients with chronic rupture of the Achilles tendon with a gap were treated with a flexor halluces longus tendon transfer combined with a gastrocnemius recession, Clinical diagnosis depends on the presence of gap in the tendon on examination, inability of tip toe walking on the affected side and positive calf-squeeze test, MRI was used to confirm the clinical diagnosis. American Orthopedic Foot & Ankle Society hind foot score was used for assessment of the results. The AOFAS score improved significantly from a mean of 65 preoperatively to 94 at the last follow up (ptendon weaved through the stump of the Achilles tendon and those with trans osseous tunnels, the mean AOFAS score at the last follow up was 94.2, 93.8 respectively, no patient complained of big toe dysfunction. Management of chronic rupture of the Achilles tendon with a gap with flexor halluces longus tendon transfer combined with a gastrocnemius recession is a safe and reliable method with a significantly improved functional outcome, muscle advancement through gastrocnemius recession decreases the length of the gap without affecting the muscle function, flexor halluces longus tendon transfer doesn't harm the big toe function. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Physio-therapeutical methods after injuries of the flexor and extensor tendons of a hand

    OpenAIRE

    MUROŇOVÁ, Markéta

    2010-01-01

    This diploma thesis entitled ``Physio-therapeutical methods after injuries of the flexor and extensor tendons of a hand{\\crqq} describes the anatomy of forearm and hand muscles, as well as fascia and tendon loops. The main objective is to summarize a basic knowledge on injuries of the hand{\\crq}s flexor and extensor tendons and physiotherapy of this problem. The work also includes the application of this knowledge into practice by elaboration of case reports of patients with injuries of the h...

  1. Giant cell tumor of the flexor hallucis longus tendon sheath: a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Findling, Jeff; Lascola, Natalie K; Groner, Thomas W

    2011-01-01

    Giant cell tumor of tendon sheath is infrequently documented in the foot and even less near the ankle. This case report involves such a tumor of the flexor hallucis longus tendon presenting at the posterior ankle. Diagnosis was aided by magnetic resonance imaging, and treatment consisted of complete surgical excision. Pathologic examination verified the diagnosis of giant cell tumor of tendon sheath, and follow-up magnetic resonance imaging revealed no remnants or recurrence of tumor 1 year after surgery.

  2. Computerised analysis of standardised ultrasonographic images to monitor the repair of surgically created core lesions in equine superficial digital flexor tendons following treatment with intratendinous platelet rich plasma or placebo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosch, Gerco; René van Weeren, P; Barneveld, Ab; van Schie, Hans T M

    2011-01-01

    The effectiveness of new therapies to treat tendon injuries is difficult to determine and is often based on semi-quantitative methods, such as grey level analysis of ultrasonographic images or subjective pain scores. The alternatives are costly and long-lasting end-stage studies using experimental animals. In this study, a method of ultrasonographic tissue characterisation (UTC), using mathematical analysis of contiguous transverse ultrasonographic images, was used for intra-vital monitoring of the healing trajectory of standardised tendon lesions treated with platelet rich plasma (PRP) or placebo. Using UTC it was possible to detect significant differences between the groups in the various phases of repair. At end stage, over 80% of pixels showed correct alignment in the PRP group, compared with just over 60% in the placebo group (Ptendon lesions in horses.

  3. The high variability of the chiasma plantare and the long flexor tendons: Anatomical aspects of tendon transfer in foot surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pretterklieber, Bettina

    2017-05-01

    As tendon transfer of the flexor hallucis longus (FHL) and the flexor digitorum longus (FDL) is an established procedure, exact knowledge of the formation of the chiasma plantare is of great interest. Although the quadratus plantae (QP) appears to play a major role, it has been rarely addressed in previous studies. The aim of the present study was to reinvestigate the formation of the chiasma plantare and the composition of the long flexor tendons in order to clarify the inexact and partly contradictory descriptions published from 1865 onward. The chiasma plantare and the long flexor tendons in both feet of 50 formalin-fixed specimens of body donors (25 men and women) were analyzed by gross anatomical dissection. It was composed of one (3%), two (69%) or three layers (28%) which were variably established by the tendinous and muscular fibers of the FHL, the FDL and the QP. In 61% the FHL gave one or more slips to the FDL, and in 39% there was a bidirectional interconnection between the two tendons. The slip from the FHL to the FDL largely reinforces the second (45%), or the second and third tendon (46%). Thus, the FHL is involved in the first tendon in all cases, in the second one in 97% of cases, and in the third tendon in about one half of cases (53%). In all instances, the FDL contributes to the third to fourth, in 98% the second, and in at least 39% to the first tendon. The QP reinforces the second to fourth tendon in nearly all cases, the fifth in about one half of cases, and even the first tendon in 14% of cases. In addition, the individual composition of the five long flexor tendons arising from the chiasma plantare was analyzed in detail. Special emphasis was placed on the evaluation of side and sex differences as well as individual symmetry. Furthermore, biomechanical, developmental and phylogenetic aspects were outlined. In terms of the outcome of this study, the FHL appears to be the better donor for tendon transfer to restore lost function, but

  4. Biomechanical risk factors and flexor tendon frictional work in the cadaveric carpal tunnel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kociolek, Aaron M; Tat, Jimmy; Keir, Peter J

    2015-02-05

    Pathological changes in carpal tunnel syndrome patients include fibrosis and thickening of the subsynovial connective tissue (SSCT) adjacent to the flexor tendons in the carpal tunnel. These clinical findings suggest an etiology of excessive shear-strain force between the tendon and SSCT, underscoring the need to assess tendon gliding characteristics representative of repetitive and forceful work. A mechanical actuator moved the middle finger flexor digitorum superficialis tendon proximally and distally in eight fresh frozen cadaver arms. Eighteen experimental conditions tested the effects of three well-established biomechanical predictors of injury, including a combination of two wrist postures (0° and 30° flexion), three tendon velocities (50, 100, 150mm/sec), and three forces (10, 20, 40N). Tendon gliding resistance was determined with two light-weight load cells, and integrated over tendon displacement to represent tendon frictional work. During proximal tendon displacement, frictional work increased with tendon velocity (58.0% from 50-150mm/sec). There was a significant interaction between wrist posture and tendon force. In wrist flexion, frictional work increased 93.0% between tendon forces of 10 and 40N. In the neutral wrist posture, frictional work only increased 33.5% (from 10-40N). During distal tendon displacement, there was a similar multiplicative interaction on tendon frictional work. Concurrent exposure to multiple biomechanical work factors markedly increased tendon frictional work, thus providing a plausible link to the pathogenesis of work-related carpal tunnel syndrome. Additionally, our study provides the conceptual basis to evaluate injury risk, including the multiplicative repercussions of combined physical exposures.

  5. Arthroscopic Quadriceps Tendon Repair: Two Case Reports

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hidetomo Saito

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Recently, although some studies of open repair of the tendon of the quadriceps femoris have been published, there have been no reports in the literature on primary arthroscopic repair. In our present study, we present two cases of quadriceps tendon injury arthroscopically repaired with excellent results. Case 1 involved a 68-year-old man who was injured while shifting his weight to prevent a fall. MRI showed complete rupture at the insertion of the patella of the quadriceps tendon. The rupture was arthroscopically repaired using both suture anchor and pull-out suture fixation methods via bone tunnels (hereafter, pull-out fixation. Two years after surgery, retearing was not observed on MRI and both Japan Orthopedic Association (JOA Knee and Lysholm scores had recovered to 100. Case 2 involved a 50-year-old man who was also injured when shifting his weight to prevent a fall. MRI showed incomplete superficial rupture at the insertion of the patella of the quadriceps tendon. The rupture was arthroscopically repaired using pull-out fixation of six strand sutures. One year after surgery, MRI revealed a healed tendon and his JOA and Lysholm scores were 95 and 100, respectively. Thus, arthroscopic repair may be a useful surgical method for repairing quadriceps tendon injury.

  6. Arthroscopic quadriceps tendon repair: two case reports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, Hidetomo; Shimada, Yoichi; Yamamura, Toshiaki; Yamada, Shin; Sato, Takahiro; Nozaka, Koji; Kijima, Hiroaki; Saito, Kimio

    2015-01-01

    Recently, although some studies of open repair of the tendon of the quadriceps femoris have been published, there have been no reports in the literature on primary arthroscopic repair. In our present study, we present two cases of quadriceps tendon injury arthroscopically repaired with excellent results. Case 1 involved a 68-year-old man who was injured while shifting his weight to prevent a fall. MRI showed complete rupture at the insertion of the patella of the quadriceps tendon. The rupture was arthroscopically repaired using both suture anchor and pull-out suture fixation methods via bone tunnels (hereafter, pull-out fixation). Two years after surgery, retearing was not observed on MRI and both Japan Orthopedic Association (JOA) Knee and Lysholm scores had recovered to 100. Case 2 involved a 50-year-old man who was also injured when shifting his weight to prevent a fall. MRI showed incomplete superficial rupture at the insertion of the patella of the quadriceps tendon. The rupture was arthroscopically repaired using pull-out fixation of six strand sutures. One year after surgery, MRI revealed a healed tendon and his JOA and Lysholm scores were 95 and 100, respectively. Thus, arthroscopic repair may be a useful surgical method for repairing quadriceps tendon injury.

  7. PRP and Metaplasia in repaired tendon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamal Seyed-Forootan

    2014-01-01

    Conclusion: It seems that using PRP has no effect on strengthening the tendons repair and may have some adverse effects. It usage needs further studies to evaluate their probable adverse side effects.

  8. Middle phalanx skeletal morphology in the hand: can it predict flexor tendon size and attachments?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marzke, Mary W; Shrewsbury, Marvin M; Horner, Kristin E

    2007-10-01

    Specific sites on the palmar diaphysis of the manual middle phalanges provide attachment for the flexor digitorum superficialis (FDS) tendon. It has been assumed in the literature that lateral palmar fossae on these bones reflect locations for these attachments and offer evidence for relative size of the flexor tendon. This assumption has led to predictions about relative FDS muscle force potential from sizes of fossae on fossil hominin middle phalanges. Inferences about locomotor capabilities of fossil hominins in turn have been drawn from the predicted force potential of the flexor muscle. The study reported here provides a critical first step in evaluating hypotheses about behavioral implications of middle phalangeal morphology in fossil hominins, by testing the hypothesis that the lateral fossae reflect the size of the FDS tendon and the location of the terminal FDS tendon attachments on the middle phalanx. The middle phalangeal region was dissected in 43 individuals from 16 primate genera, including humans. Qualitative observations were made of tendon attachment locations relative to the lateral fossae. Length measurements of the fossae were tested as predictors of FDS tendon cross-sectional area and of FDS attachment tendon lengths. Our results lead to the conclusion that the hypothesis must be rejected, and that future attention should focus on functional implications of the palmar median bar associated with the lateral fossae.

  9. Technique for and an anatomic guide to forearm tendon repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burnham, Jeremy M; Hollister, Anne M; Rush, David A; Avallone, Thomas J; Shi, Runhua; Jordan, Jenee' C

    2011-06-01

    Forearm lacerations involving muscle bellies are usually treated by repairing muscle fascia. Repair of tendons themselves is stronger and restores normal muscle anatomy better. Tendon repair requires good knowledge of forearm muscle and tendon anatomy. We have made cadaver measurements to produce graphical maps of locations of individual muscles tendons of origin and insertion, some practical guides for finding tendon ends and a simple grasping stitch for intramuscular tendons.

  10. Morphological study of the Golgi tendon organ in equine superficial digital flexor tendon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Takafumi; Hosaka, Yoshinao; Yamamoto, Etsuko; Ueda, Hiromi; Tangkawattana, Prasarn; Takehana, Kazushige

    2004-08-01

    The Golgi tendon organ (GTO) is an encapsulated fusiform mechanoreceptor siding in the musculo-tendinous junction of many animal species. Inhibitory function of afferent nerve fibers distributed from nearby motor units, the organ responds to active tension exerted onto the muscle. The morphological features of the equine GTO have not yet been elucidated. Additionally, there is some controversy regarding to the existence of the GTO in the equine superficial digital flexor tendon (SDFT). Therefore, immunohistochemistry and immunoelectron microscopy using alcian blue (pH 2.5) staining and the silver-enhanced colloidal gold method were carried out to determine both the location and characteristics of the GTO at the musculo-tendinous junction of the SDFT. A GTO with a fusiform structure of approximately 3 mm in length was found in the tendinous part. The lumen of the GTO was divided into compartments by septal cells. Each compartment contained collagen fibrils, nerve fibers and Schwann cells. This is the first report of the equine GTO.

  11. Flexor digitorum profundus tendon anatomy in the forearm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teoman Dogan

    2012-04-01

    Methods: We used 11 forearms belonging to cadavers and fixed with formaldehyde. The forearms numbered 1, 2, 8, 9, 10, 11 were the left and right arms of the same cadavers. Those numbered 3, 4, 5, 6, 7 belonged to different cadavers. Dissections were made by using the atraumatic surgical technique. The tendons were studied to identify the structure and number of the fibers forming them. Results: The presence of a large common tendon was found in 10 of the 11 forearms. In 4 of these, the common tendon included the tendons of all four fingers. While the common tendon included 3 fingers in four forearms, it only included tendons belonging to 2 fingers in two forearms. It was not possible in one forearm to separate the common tendon into its fibers. In another forearm, tendons belonging to each digit were separate and independent starting at the muscle-tendon junction to the attachment points. Conclusion: The majority of the cadaver forearms used in the study displayed a single large FDP tendon in the zone between the muscle-tendon joint to the carpal tunnel entry prior to being distributed into each index. This anatomical feature should be considered in choosing materials and surgical technique for Zone V FDP tendon injuries, as well as in planning the rehabilitation process. [Hand Microsurg 2012; 1(1.000: 25-29

  12. Carpal tunnel syndrome caused by a giant cell tumour of the flexor tendon sheath.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meek, Marcel F; Sheikh, Zahid A; Quinton, David N

    2014-02-01

    A 76-year-old woman developed right carpal tunnel syndrome after being conservatively treated for tenosynovitis of the flexor tendons with associated mild carpal tunnel syndrome. A magnetic resonance imaging scan showed a tumour in the carpal tunnel. Re-exploration showed that the median nerve was being compressed by a giant cell tumour of the flexor tendon sheaths. Appropriate imaging is advised in patients with additional findings (such as swelling) or in patients with secondary carpal tunnel syndrome and incomplete response to conservative treatment, to exclude a space-occupying lesion.

  13. PRP and Metaplasia in repaired tendon

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kamal Seyed-Forootan; Hamid Karimi; Ahmad-Reza Dayani

    2014-01-01

    Objective:To evaluate effects ofPRP injection in strengthening of repaired tendon.Methods:This study was conducted in animal lab of our hospital on20 rats.The animals were divided into two groups randomly and distal third of leftAchillis tendons were cut and then repaired with Vicryl2/0.The first group was control group and in the second group0.5 cc ofPRP was injected into the repair site.After4 weeks all of the rats were executed and70% of tendons were sent randomly for tensilometry and the force that required to rupture the tendons were measured.In next stage the tendons were sent for pathological exam.Results:The force that was needed to rupture the tendon were not significantly different in the two groups.Neovascularization were more prevalent inPRP group but not statistically significant.There were two cases ofCartilage Metaplasia inPRP group.Conclusion:It seems that usingPRP has no effect on strengthening the tendons repair and may have some adverse effects.It usage needs further studies to evaluate their probable adverse side effects.

  14. A review on animal models and treatments for the reconstruction of Achilles and flexor tendons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bottagisio, Marta; Lovati, Arianna B

    2017-03-01

    Tendon is a connective tissue mainly composed of collagen fibers with peculiar mechanical properties essential to functional movements. The increasing incidence of tendon traumatic injuries and ruptures-associated or not with the loss of tissue-falls on the growing interest in the field of tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. The use of animal models is mandatory to deepen the knowledge of the tendon healing response to severe damages or acute transections. Thus, the selection of preclinical models is crucial to ensure a successful translation of effective and safe innovative treatments to the clinical practice. The current review is focused on animal models of tendon ruptures and lacerations or defective injuries with large tissue loss that require surgical approaches or grafting procedures. Data published between 2000 and 2016 were examined. The analyzed articles were compiled from Pub Med-NCBI using search terms, including animal model(s) AND tendon augmentation OR tendon substitute(s) OR tendon substitution OR tendon replacement OR tendon graft(s) OR tendon defect(s) OR tendon rupture(s). This article presents the existing preclinical models - considering their advantages and disadvantages-in which translational progresses have been made by using bioactive sutures or tissue engineering that combines biomaterials with cells and growth factors to efficiently treat transections or large defects of Achilles and flexor tendons.

  15. Repopulation of Intrasynovial Flexor Tendon Allograft with Bone Marrow Stromal Cells: An Ex Vivo Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amadio, Peter C.; Thoreson, Andrew R.; An, Kai-Nan

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Delayed healing is a common problem whenever tendon allografts are used for tendon or ligament reconstruction. Repopulating the allograft with host cells may accelerate tendon regeneration, but cell penetration into the allograft tendon is limited. Processing the tendon surface with slits that guide cells into the allograft substrate may improve healing. The purpose of this study was to describe a surface modification of allograft tendon that includes slits to aid cell repopulation and lubrication to enhance tendon gliding. Methods: Canine flexor digitorum profundus tendons were used for this study. Cyclic gliding resistance was measured over 1000 cycles. Tensile stiffness was assessed for normal tendon, tendon decellularized with trypsin and Triton X-100 (decellularized group), tendon decellularized and perforated with multiple slits (MS group) and tendon decellularized, perforated with slits and treated with a carbodiimide-derivatized hyaluronic acid and gelatin (cd-HA-gelatin) surface modification (MS-SM group). To assess tendon repopulation, bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) were used in the decellularized and MS groups. DNA concentration and histology were evaluated and compared to normal tendons and nonseeded decellularized tendons. Results: The gliding resistance of the decellularized and MS groups was significantly higher compared with the normal group. There was no significant difference in gliding resistance between the decellularized and MS group. Gliding resistance of the normal group and MS-SM group was not significantly different. The Young's modulus was not significantly different among the four groups. The DNA concentration in the MS group was significantly lower than in normal tendons, but significantly higher than in decellularized tendons, with or without BMSCs. Viable BMSCs were found in the slits after 2 weeks in tissue culture. Conclusions: Tendon slits can successfully harbor BMSCs without compromising their survival and without

  16. Sonographic analyses of pulley and flexor tendon in idiopathic trigger finger with interphalangeal joint contracture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Junko; Ishii, Yoshinori; Noguchi, Hideo; Takeda, Mitsuhiro

    2014-06-01

    This study investigated the sonographic appearance of the pulley and flexor tendon in idiopathic trigger finger in correlation with the contracture of the interphalangeal (IP) joint in the thumb or proximal IP (PIP) joint in the other digits. Sonographic measurements using axial images were performed in 177 affected digits including 17 thumbs and 34 other digits judged to have IP or PIP joint contracture and 77 contralateral control digits. The A1 pulley of the contracture group was significantly thicker than that of the non-contracture group in all digits, whereas the flexor tendon was thicker only in digits other than the thumb. In the analysis using calculated cut-off values, A1 pulley thickening in the thumb and A1 pulley and flexor tendon thickening in the other digits showed statistically significant correlations with IP or PIP joint contracture. This study sonographically confirmed previous reports showing that enlargement of the flexor tendons contribute to the pathogenesis of PIP joint contracture. Copyright © 2014 World Federation for Ultrasound in Medicine & Biology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Gliding resistance of flexor tendon associated with carpal tunnel pressure: a biomechanical cadaver study.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhao, C.; Ettema, A.M.; Berglund, L.J.; An, K.N.; Amadio, P.C.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of carpal tunnel pressure on the gliding characteristics of flexor tendons within the carpal tunnel. Eight fresh human cadaver wrists and hands were used. A balloon was inserted into the carpal tunnel to elevate the pressure. The mean gliding r

  18. Achilles Tendon Repair, A Modified Technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sohrab Keyhani

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available   Background: Wound complications following open repair for acute Achilles tendon ruptures (AATR remain the subject of significant debate. The aim of this study is to investigate the effects of covering repaired AATR using well-nourished connective tissues (paratenon and deep fascia to avoid complications after open repair.   Methods: In this case series study, open repair was performed for 32 active young patients with AATR. After the tendon was repaired, the deep fascia and paratenon was used to cover the Achilles tendon. Patients were followed for two years and any wound complication was recorded. During the last visit, the American Orthopedic Foot and Ankle Society (AOFAS ankle-hind foot score was completed for all patients. Calf circumference and ankle range of motion were measured and compared with the contralateral side. Patients were asked about returning to previous sports activities and limitations with footwear. Results: Only, one patient developed deep wound infection (3%. None of the patients had any discomfort around the operation area, limitation with footwear, sural nerve injury, re-rupture, and skin adhesion. The AOFAS score averaged 92.5±6. Two patients (7% were unable to return to previous sports activities because of moderate pain in heavy physical exercises. The calf circumference and ankle ROM were similar between healthy and operated sides. Conclusion: The present study showed that fascial envelope for full covering of the repaired Achilles tendon may help to prevent the occurrence of wound complications.

  19. Achilles Tendon Repair, A Modified Technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sohrab Keyhani

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Wound complications following open repair for acute Achilles tendon ruptures (AATR remain the subject of significant debate. The aim of this study is to investigate the effects of covering repaired AATR using well-nourished connective tissues (paratenon and deep fascia to avoid complications after open repair.   Methods: In this case series study, open repair was performed for 32 active young patients with AATR. After the tendon was repaired, the deep fascia and paratenon was used to cover the Achilles tendon. Patients were followed for two years and any wound complication was recorded. During the last visit, the American Orthopedic Foot and Ankle Society (AOFAS ankle-hind foot score was completed for all patients. Calf circumference and ankle range of motion were measured and compared with the contralateral side. Patients were asked about returning to previous sports activities and limitations with footwear. Results: Only, one patient developed deep wound infection (3%. None of the patients had any discomfort around the operation area, limitation with footwear, sural nerve injury, re-rupture, and skin adhesion. The AOFAS score averaged 92.5±6. Two patients (7% were unable to return to previous sports activities because of moderate pain in heavy physical exercises. The calf circumference and ankle ROM were similar between healthy and operated sides. Conclusion: The present study showed that fascial envelope for full covering of the repaired Achilles tendon may help to prevent the occurrence of wound complications.

  20. The effect of controlled passive motion in the postoperative rehabilitation of digital flexor tendon injury%控制性被动活动在手屈肌腱损伤术后功能康复后的作用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    丁勇; 马保安; 周勇; 唐农轩

    2002-01-01

    Objective To investigate the effect of controlled passive motion in the postoperative rehabilitation of digital flexor tendon injury.Method 69 patients with 106 fingers involved were reviewed in this study.Average interval between injury and first stage operation was 6.9 months(range 1 to 24 months).Combined with digital nerve repair and scar resection,digital flexor tendon resection and Hunter rods implantation were performed in the first stage operation.During the second stage operation,which performed 2 to 6 months later,palmaris longus or plantaris were grafted into the pseudo sheath formed by Hunter rod.Results All cases were followed for 6 to 24 months(average 11months).Evaluation based on TAM was excellent or good in 84% ,fair in 12% ,poor in 4% . Conclusions Our findings suggest that early controlled passive motion could effectively promote postoperative rehabilitation after digital flexor tendon repair surgery and prevent postoperative adhesion formation.

  1. Human ankle plantar flexor muscle–tendon mechanics and energetics during maximum acceleration sprinting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schache, Anthony G.; Brown, Nicholas A. T.; Pandy, Marcus G.

    2016-01-01

    Tendon elastic strain energy is the dominant contributor to muscle–tendon work during steady-state running. Does this behaviour also occur for sprint accelerations? We used experimental data and computational modelling to quantify muscle fascicle work and tendon elastic strain energy for the human ankle plantar flexors (specifically soleus and medial gastrocnemius) for multiple foot contacts of a maximal sprint as well as for running at a steady-state speed. Positive work done by the soleus and medial gastrocnemius muscle fascicles decreased incrementally throughout the maximal sprint and both muscles performed more work for the first foot contact of the maximal sprint (FC1) compared with steady-state running at 5 m s−1 (SS5). However, the differences in tendon strain energy for both muscles were negligible throughout the maximal sprint and when comparing FC1 to SS5. Consequently, the contribution of muscle fascicle work to stored tendon elastic strain energy was greater for FC1 compared with subsequent foot contacts of the maximal sprint and compared with SS5. We conclude that tendon elastic strain energy in the ankle plantar flexors is just as vital at the start of a maximal sprint as it is at the end, and as it is for running at a constant speed. PMID:27581481

  2. Presence of a long accessory flexor tendon of the toes in surgical treatment for tendinopathy of the insertion of the calcaneal tendon: case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nelson Pelozo Gomes Júnior

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT The presence of accessory tendons in the foot and ankle needs to be recognized, given that depending on their location, they may cause disorders relating either to pain processes or to handling of the surgical findings. We describe the presence of an accessory flexor tendon of the toes, seen in surgical exposure for transferring the long flexor tendon of the hallux to the calcaneus, due to the presence of a disorder of tendinopathy of the insertion of the calcaneal tendon in association with Haglund's syndrome.

  3. Digital flexor tendon contracture treated by tenectomy: different clinical presentations in three cats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Quentin Cabon

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Case series summary Three cats, Siamese or Siamese cross, were presented with a chronic thoracic limb weightbearing lameness. Previous anti-inflammatory administrations were unable to improve lameness consistently in the three cats. Two of the three cats had undergone onychectomy several years before presentation. A permanent flexion of the proximal interphalangeal joint of one or more digits, associated with a difficult and painful extension of the proximal interphalangeal joint, was noticed during orthopedic examination. A digital flexor tendon contracture was suspected and confirmed with radiographic examination. Surgical exploration was then performed. For all cats, treatment consisted of a tenectomy or tenotomy of the superficial and deep digital flexor tendons in order to release the contracture. The three cats responded well to the surgical treatment and became sound around 2–4 weeks after surgery. Relevance and novel information Digital flexor tendon contracture is rarely reported as a cause of lameness in cats. It should be considered in a differential diagnosis of feline lameness whenever onychectomy has been performed in the past. The precise etiology that explains this tendon contracture is unknown, but trauma or breed predisposition could represent potential causes.

  4. The effects of dynamic stretching on plantar flexor muscle-tendon tissue properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samukawa, Mina; Hattori, Masaki; Sugama, Naoko; Takeda, Naoki

    2011-12-01

    Dynamic stretching is commonly used in warm-up routines for athletic activities. Even though several positive effects of dynamic stretching on athletic performance have been reported, the effects on the muscle-tendon unit (MTU) itself are still unclear. The objective of this study is to determine the effects of dynamic stretching on the ankle plantar flexor muscle-tendon properties by use of ultrasonography. Twenty healthy male subjects participated in the present study. The subjects were asked to engage in dynamic stretching of plantar flexors for 30 s and to repeat for 5 sets. Ankle dorsiflexion ROM was measured before and after the dynamic stretching. Changes in the displacement of the myotendinous junction (MTJ), pennation angle, and fascicle length were also determined by using ultrasonography. Ankle dorsiflexion ROM increased significantly after the dynamic stretching (p MTJ was observed until the second stretching set (p MTJ was found, indicating some change in the tendon tissues. Therefore, dynamic stretching of the plantar flexors was considered an effective means of lengthening the tendon tissues. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Digital flexor tendon contracture treated by tenectomy: different clinical presentations in three cats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Quentin Cabon

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Case series summary Three cats, Siamese or Siamese cross, were presented with a chronic thoracic limb weightbearing lameness. Previous anti-inflammatory administrations were unable to improve lameness consistently in the three cats. Two of the three cats had undergone onychectomy several years before presentation. A permanent flexion of the proximal interphalangeal joint of one or more digits, associated with a difficult and painful extension of the proximal interphalangeal joint, was noticed during orthopedic examination. A digital flexor tendon contracture was suspected and confirmed with radiographic examination. Surgical exploration was then performed. For all cats, treatment consisted of a tenectomy or tenotomy of the superficial and deep digital flexor tendons in order to release the contracture. The three cats responded well to the surgical treatment and became sound around 2–4 weeks after surgery. Relevance and novel information Digital flexor tendon contracture is rarely reported as a cause of lameness in cats. It should be considered in a differential diagnosis of feline lameness whenever onychectomy has been performed in the past. The precise etiology that explains this tendon contracture is unknown, but trauma or breed predisposition could represent potential causes.

  6. Minimally invasive flexor hallucis longus transfer in management of acute achilles tendon rupture associated with tendinosis: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lui, Tun Hing

    2012-04-01

    Chronic tendinopathy is characterized by pain in the tendon, generally at the start and completion of exercise. However, tendinosis may lead to decreased blood flow, increased stiffness of the tendon and reduced tensile strength, and predispose to rupture. Operative treatment is indicated to restore the function of the Achilles tendon and alleviate the prerupture heel cord pain. A case of acute Achilles tendon rupture with extensive tendinosis that was successfully treated with minimally invasive flexor hallucis longus transfer is reported.

  7. Focal experimental injury leads to widespread gene expression and histologic changes in equine flexor tendons.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Else Jacobson

    Full Text Available It is not known how extensively a localised flexor tendon injury affects the entire tendon. This study examined the extent of and relationship between histopathologic and gene expression changes in equine superficial digital flexor tendon after a surgical injury. One forelimb tendon was hemi-transected in six horses, and in three other horses, one tendon underwent a sham operation. After euthanasia at six weeks, transected and control (sham and non-operated contralateral tendons were regionally sampled (medial and lateral halves each divided into six 3 cm regions for histologic (scoring and immunohistochemistry and gene expression (real time PCR analysis of extracellular matrix changes. The histopathology score was significantly higher in transected tendons compared to control tendons in all regions except for the most distal (P ≤ 0.03 with no differences between overstressed (medial and stress-deprived (lateral tendon halves. Proteoglycan scores were increased by transection in all but the most proximal region (P < 0.02, with increased immunostaining for aggrecan, biglycan and versican. After correcting for location within the tendon, gene expression for aggrecan, versican, biglycan, lumican, collagen types I, II and III, MMP14 and TIMP1 was increased in transected tendons compared with control tendons (P < 0.02 and decreased for ADAMTS4, MMP3 and TIMP3 (P < 0.001. Aggrecan, biglycan, fibromodulin, and collagen types I and III expression positively correlated with all histopathology scores (P < 0.001, whereas lumican, ADAMTS4 and MMP14 expression positively correlated only with collagen fiber malalignment (P < 0.001. In summary, histologic and associated gene expression changes were significant and widespread six weeks after injury to the equine SDFT, suggesting rapid and active development of tendinopathy throughout the entire length of the tendon. These extensive changes distant to the focal injury may contribute to poor functional outcomes

  8. Focal Experimental Injury Leads to Widespread Gene Expression and Histologic Changes in Equine Flexor Tendons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobsen, Else; Dart, Andrew J.; Mondori, Takamitsu; Horadogoda, Neil; Jeffcott, Leo B.; Little, Christopher B.; Smith, Margaret M.

    2015-01-01

    It is not known how extensively a localised flexor tendon injury affects the entire tendon. This study examined the extent of and relationship between histopathologic and gene expression changes in equine superficial digital flexor tendon after a surgical injury. One forelimb tendon was hemi-transected in six horses, and in three other horses, one tendon underwent a sham operation. After euthanasia at six weeks, transected and control (sham and non-operated contralateral) tendons were regionally sampled (medial and lateral halves each divided into six 3cm regions) for histologic (scoring and immunohistochemistry) and gene expression (real time PCR) analysis of extracellular matrix changes. The histopathology score was significantly higher in transected tendons compared to control tendons in all regions except for the most distal (P ≤ 0.03) with no differences between overstressed (medial) and stress-deprived (lateral) tendon halves. Proteoglycan scores were increased by transection in all but the most proximal region (P < 0.02), with increased immunostaining for aggrecan, biglycan and versican. After correcting for location within the tendon, gene expression for aggrecan, versican, biglycan, lumican, collagen types I, II and III, MMP14 and TIMP1 was increased in transected tendons compared with control tendons (P < 0.02) and decreased for ADAMTS4, MMP3 and TIMP3 (P < 0.001). Aggrecan, biglycan, fibromodulin, and collagen types I and III expression positively correlated with all histopathology scores (P < 0.001), whereas lumican, ADAMTS4 and MMP14 expression positively correlated only with collagen fiber malalignment (P < 0.001). In summary, histologic and associated gene expression changes were significant and widespread six weeks after injury to the equine SDFT, suggesting rapid and active development of tendinopathy throughout the entire length of the tendon. These extensive changes distant to the focal injury may contribute to poor functional outcomes and re

  9. Amputation of finger by horse bite with complete avulsion of both flexor tendons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koren, Lior; Stahl, Shalom; Rovitsky, Alexey; Peled, Eli

    2011-08-08

    Amputation of fingers with tendon avulsion occurs through a traction injury, and most occur through a ring avulsion mechanism. Usually the flexor digitorum profundus is torn out with the amputated finger. Replantation usually is recommended only when the amputation is distal to the flexor digitorum superficialis insertion. Animal bites are relatively common, with a decreasing order of frequency of dogs, cats, and humans. Horse bites are relatively infrequent but are associated with crush injuries and tissue loss when they occur. This article describes a 23-year-old man with amputation of his middle finger at the level of the proximal phalanx after being bitten by a horse. The amputated stump was avulsed with the middle finger flexor digitorum profundus and flexor digitorum superficialis torn from the muscle-tendon junction from approximately the middle of the forearm. The patient had no other injuries, and he was able to move his other 4 fingers with only mild pain. As the amputated digit was not suitable for replantation, the wound was irrigated and debrided. The edges of the phalanx were trimmed, and the edges of the wound were sutured. Tetanus toxoid and rabies vaccine were administered, along with intravenous amoxicillin and clavulanic acid. The patient was discharged from the hospital 2 days later, with no sign of infection of the wound or compartment syndrome of the forearm. This case demonstrates the weakest point in the myotendinous junction and emphasizes the importance of a careful physical examination in patients with a traumatic amputation. Copyright 2011, SLACK Incorporated.

  10. Low molecular weight heparin impairs tendon repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Virchenko, O; Aspenberg, P; Lindahl, T L

    2008-03-01

    Thrombin has many biological properties similar to those of growth factors. In a previous study, we showed that thrombin improves healing of the rat tendo Achillis. Low molecular weight heparin (LMWH) inhibits the activity and the generation of thrombin. We therefore considered that LMWH at a thromboprophylactic dose might inhibit tendon repair. Transection of the tendo Achillis was carried out in 86 rats and the healing tested mechanically. Low molecular weight heparin (dalateparin) was either injected a few minutes before the operation and then given continuously with an osmotic mini pump for seven days, or given as one injection before the operation. In another experiment ,we gave LMWH or a placebo by injection twice daily. The anti-factor Xa activity was analysed. Continuous treatment with LMWH impaired tendon healing. After seven days, this treatment caused a 33% reduction in force at failure, a 20% reduction in stiffness and a 67% reduction in energy uptake. However, if injected twice daily, LMWH had no effect on tendon healing. Anti-factor Xa activity was increased by LMWH treatment, but was normal between intermittent injections. Low molecular weight heparin delays tendon repair if given continuously, but not if injected intermittently, probably because the anti-factor Xa activity between injections returns to normal, allowing sufficient thrombin stimulation for repair. These findings indicate the need for caution in the assessment of long-acting thrombin and factor Xa inhibitors.

  11. Tissue engineering of flexor tendons: the effect of a tissue bioreactor on adipoderived stem cell-seeded and fibroblast-seeded tendon constructs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angelidis, Ioannis K; Thorfinn, Johan; Connolly, Ian D; Lindsey, Derek; Pham, Hung M; Chang, James

    2010-09-01

    Tissue-engineered flexor tendons could eventually be used for reconstruction of large tendon defects. The goal of this project was to examine the effect of a tissue bioreactor on the biomechanical properties of tendon constructs seeded with adipoderived stem cells (ASCs) and fibroblasts (Fs). Rabbit rear paw flexor tendons were acellularized and seeded with ASCs or Fs. A custom bioreactor applied a cyclic mechanical load of 1.25 N at 1 cycle/minute for 5 days onto the tendon constructs. Three additional groups were used as controls: fresh tendons and tendons reseeded with either ASCs or Fs that were not exposed to the bioreactor treatment and were left in stationary incubation for 5 days. We compared the ultimate tensile stress (UTS) and elastic modulus (EM) of bioreactor-treated tendons with the unloaded control tendons and fresh tendons. Comparison across groups was assessed using one-way analysis of variance with the significance level set at ptendons that were exposed to cyclic load were significantly higher than those of unloaded control tendons. Acellularized tendon constructs that were reseeded with ASCs and exposed to a cyclic load had a UTS of 66.76 MPa and an EM of 906.68 MPa; their unloaded equivalents had a UTS of 47.90 MPa and an EM of 715.57 MPa. Similar trends were found in the fibroblast-seeded tendon constructs that were exposed to the bioreactor treatment. The bioreactor-treated tendons approached the UTS and EM values of fresh tendons. Histologically, we found that cells reoriented themselves parallel to the direction of strain in response to cyclic strain. The application of cyclic strain on seeded tendon constructs that were treated with the bioreactor helped achieve a UTS and an EM comparable with those of fresh tendons. Bioreactor pretreatment and alternative cell lines, such as ASCs and Fs, might therefore contribute to the in vitro production of strong tendon material. Copyright 2010. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  12. Digital flexion contracture and severe carpal tunnel syndrome due to tophaceus infiltration of wrist flexor tendon: first manifestation of gout.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández-Cortés, P; Caba, M; Gómez-Sánchez, R; Gómez-Morales, M

    2011-11-09

    The authors report an unusual case of flexor tenosynovitis, severe carpal tunnel syndrome, and triggering at the carpal tunnel as the first manifestation of gout. A 69-year-old man presented with digital flexion contracture and severe carpal tunnel syndrome of his right hand and was treated surgically. A flexor tenosynovectomy and a median nerve neurolysis were performed through an extended carpal tunnel approach. The sublimis and the profundus tendons were involved. Partial ruptures and multiple whitish lesions suggestive of tophacceous infiltration of the flexor tendons were seen. Macroscopically, the removed synovial tissue was involved by multiple whitish nodules that were milimetric in size and was suggestive of monosodium urate crystals deposits. By light microscopy examination, numerous nonnecrotizing granulomas of different sizes were observed that were compounded by large aggregations of acellular nonpolarized material, surrounded by epithelioid histiocytes, mononuclear cells, and foreign body multinucleated giant cells. Postoperatively, the patient recovered with resolution of the median nerve symptoms and a near-to-full range of motion of the affected digits.To the authors' knowledge, this patient is the first case report with flexor tendons tophacceous infiltration as the first clinical sign of gout. Gouty flexor tenosynovitis can occur in the absence of a long history of gout. A high index of suspicion is paramount to the initiation of proper management. Operative treatment of gouty flexor tenosynovitis is mandatory to debulk tophaceous deposits, improve tendon gliding, and decompress nerves. Routine uric acid determination could be helpful in the preoperative evaluation of patients with flexor tenosynovitis.

  13. Giant cell tumour of tendon sheath with simultaneous two tendon involvement of the foot treated with excision of the tumour and reconstruction of the flexor retinaculum using tibialis posterior tendon in a paediatric patient: A rare case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiwari, Vivek; Ansari, Tahir; Mittal, Samarth; Sharma, Pankaj; Nalwa, Aasma

    2015-12-01

    Giant cell tumour of tendon sheath is a benign soft tissue tumour arising from the tendon sheath. The involvement of foot and ankle by such tumours is relatively rare. Children are not commonly afflicted by this condition. All such tumours are reported to arise either from a single tendon sheath or one joint. We report a case of giant cell tumour of tendon sheath in a 12-year-old child, arising simultaneously from the tendon sheaths of tibialis posterior and flexor digitorum longus tendons, as well as extending into the ankle joint. It was treated by complete excision of the mass along with the tendon sheaths with reconstruction of the flexor retinaculum. The location of the tumour, age of the patient, diffuse nature of the tumour and novel technique of reconstruction of the flexor retinaculum make this case extremely rare and the first to be reported in literature.

  14. Repetitive differential finger motion increases shear strain between the flexor tendon and subsynovial connective tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tat, Jimmy; Kociolek, Aaron M; Keir, Peter J

    2013-10-01

    Non-inflammatory fibrosis and thickening of the subsynovial connective tissue (SSCT) are characteristic in carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) patients. These pathological changes have been linked to repetitive hand tasks that create shear forces between the flexor tendons and SSCT. We measured the relative motion of the flexor digitorum superficialis tendon and SSCT during two repetitive finger tasks using color Doppler ultrasound. Twelve participants performed flexion-extension cycles for 30 min with the long finger alone (differential movement) and with all four fingers together (concurrent movement). Shear strain index (SSI, a relative measure of excursion in flexion and extension) and maximum velocity ratio (MVR, the ratio of SSCT versus tendon during flexion and extension) were used to represent shear. A linear effect of exertion time was significant and corresponded with larger tendon shear in differential motion. The flexion SSI increased 20.4% from the first to the 30th minute, while MVR decreased 8.9% in flexion and 8.7% in extension. No significant changes were found during concurrent motion. These results suggest that exposure to repetitive differential finger tasks may increase the risk of shear injury in the carpal tunnel. Copyright © 2013 Orthopaedic Research Society.

  15. Functional results after surgical repair of quadriceps tendon rupture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Baere, T; Geulette, B; Manche, E; Barras, L

    2002-04-01

    We present the long-term results of surgical repair of a traumatic rupture of the quadriceps tendon in a group of 24 patients with a mean age of 58 years. There were 21 male and 3 female patients. Fifteen patients were seen for clinical control after a mean follow-up of 75 months and they all presented with some quadriceps muscle atrophy. Twelve patients had normal knee mobility, three had a flexion deformity of 10 degrees and two had less than 120 degrees of knee flexion. Active knee extension was normal in all patients. Three patients experienced some decrease in stability of their knee joint. Subjectively all patients were satisfied with the result. Nine patients underwent a Cybex-test for evaluation of the isokinetic force of knee flexion and extension, with a comparison between the injured and the uninjured side. For concentric force there was a mean deficit at low speed of 36.1% for the quadriceps muscle; at high speed it was 28.2%. For the knee flexors, the deficits were 30.7% and 27.2% respectively. Regarding eccentric force, the mean deficit for knee extensors was 13.8% and 0.25% respectively and for knee flexors 6.5% and 5.5% respectively.

  16. Gross and histological evaluation of early lesions of navicular bone and deep digital flexor tendon in horses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Komosa Marcin

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The study aimed at evaluation of pathological lesions on flexor surface of navicular bone and deep digital flexor tendon in horses graded in standard X-ray examination as 2 (fair. The evaluation was performed on fifteen horses (6-9 years of age. Analysis procedure involved examining navicular bones on X-ray pictures, post-slaughter preparation of navicular bones from the hoof capsule, macroscopic evaluation of fibrocartilage on flexor surface, and analysis of histologic preparations. In horses with navicular bones graded as 2, early pathological changes have already developed, even if such horses were not lame. The pathological changes included fibrillation and disruption of deep digital flexor tendon surface, loss of fibrocartillage in sagittal ridge area of navicular bone, thinning of subchondral bone on its flexor surface, and fibromyxoid changes in chondroid matrix. In terms of clinical relevance, more studies are needed to understand the sequence of changes in a better way.

  17. Tendon elastic strain energy in the human ankle plantar-flexors and its role with increased running speed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Adrian; Schache, Anthony G; Lin, Yi-Chung; Pandy, Marcus G

    2014-09-01

    The human ankle plantar-flexors, the soleus and gastrocnemius, utilize tendon elastic strain energy to reduce muscle fiber work and optimize contractile conditions during running. However, studies to date have considered only slow to moderate running speeds up to 5 m s(-1). Little is known about how the human ankle plantar-flexors utilize tendon elastic strain energy as running speed is advanced towards maximum sprinting. We used data obtained from gait experiments in conjunction with musculoskeletal modeling and optimization techniques to calculate muscle-tendon unit (MTU) work, tendon elastic strain energy and muscle fiber work for the ankle plantar-flexors as participants ran at five discrete steady-state speeds ranging from jogging (~2 m s(-1)) to sprinting (≥8 m s(-1)). As running speed progressed from jogging to sprinting, the contribution of tendon elastic strain energy to the positive work generated by the MTU increased from 53% to 74% for the soleus and from 62% to 75% for the gastrocnemius. This increase was facilitated by greater muscle activation and the relatively isometric behavior of the soleus and gastrocnemius muscle fibers. Both of these characteristics enhanced tendon stretch and recoil, which contributed to the bulk of the change in MTU length. Our results suggest that as steady-state running speed is advanced towards maximum sprinting, the human ankle plantar-flexors continue to prioritize the storage and recovery of tendon elastic strain energy over muscle fiber work.

  18. Transcription factor EGR1 directs tendon differentiation and promotes tendon repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerquin, Marie-Justine; Charvet, Benjamin; Nourissat, Geoffroy; Havis, Emmanuelle; Ronsin, Olivier; Bonnin, Marie-Ange; Ruggiu, Mathilde; Olivera-Martinez, Isabel; Robert, Nicolas; Lu, Yinhui; Kadler, Karl E.; Baumberger, Tristan; Doursounian, Levon; Berenbaum, Francis; Duprez, Delphine

    2013-01-01

    Tendon formation and repair rely on specific combinations of transcription factors, growth factors, and mechanical parameters that regulate the production and spatial organization of type I collagen. Here, we investigated the function of the zinc finger transcription factor EGR1 in tendon formation, healing, and repair using rodent animal models and mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). Adult tendons of Egr1–/– mice displayed a deficiency in the expression of tendon genes, including Scx, Col1a1, and Col1a2, and were mechanically weaker compared with their WT littermates. EGR1 was recruited to the Col1a1 and Col2a1 promoters in postnatal mouse tendons in vivo. Egr1 was required for the normal gene response following tendon injury in a mouse model of Achilles tendon healing. Forced Egr1 expression programmed MSCs toward the tendon lineage and promoted the formation of in vitro–engineered tendons from MSCs. The application of EGR1-producing MSCs increased the formation of tendon-like tissues in a rat model of Achilles tendon injury. We provide evidence that the ability of EGR1 to promote tendon differentiation is partially mediated by TGF-β2. This study demonstrates EGR1 involvement in adult tendon formation, healing, and repair and identifies Egr1 as a putative target in tendon repair strategies. PMID:23863709

  19. Transcription factor EGR1 directs tendon differentiation and promotes tendon repair

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Guerquin, Marie-Justine; Charvet, Benjamin; Nourissat, Geoffroy; Havis, Emmanuelle; Ronsin, Olivier; Bonnin, Marie-Ange; Ruggiu, Mathilde; Olivera-Martinez, Isabel; Robert, Nicolas; Lu, Yinhui; Kadler, Karl E; Baumberger, Tristan; Doursounian, Levon; Berenbaum, Francis; Duprez, Delphine

    2013-01-01

    Tendon formation and repair rely on specific combinations of transcription factors, growth factors, and mechanical parameters that regulate the production and spatial organization of type I collagen...

  20. Percutaneous & Mini Invasive Achilles tendon repair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmont Michael R

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Rupture of the Achilles tendon is a considerable cause of morbidity with reduced function following injury. Recent studies have shown little difference in outcome between the techniques of open and non-operative treatment using an early active rehabilitation programme. Meta-analyses have shown that non-operative management has increased risk of re-rupture whereas surgical intervention has risks of complications related to the wound and iatrogenic nerve injury. Minimally invasive surgery has been adopted as a way of reducing infections rates and wound breakdown however avoiding iatrogenic nerve injury must be considered. We discuss the techniques and outcomes of percutaneous and minimally invasive repairs of the Achilles tendon.

  1. Passive mobilization for restoring hand function after surgical flexor tendon and ulnar nerve repair%早期运动对指V区屈肌腱损伤伴尺神经损伤修复术后患者手部功能的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄琴; 高春华; 陈燕花; 刘莉; 吴中文

    2015-01-01

    目的 探讨早期运动对指V区屈肌腱损伤伴尺神经损伤修复术后患者手部功能的影响.方法 选取指V区屈肌腱损伤伴尺神经损伤修复术后患者53例,按照随机数字表法将其分为观察组(26例、88指)和对照组(27例、91指).术后给予2组患者常规治疗;术后4周时,2组患者开始进行主被动活动训练,观察组在此基础上于术后第8天开始进行早期运动.术后第12周,采用总主动活动度(TAM)测定法、周围神经感觉功能评价及肩臂手残疾问卷(DASH)对2组患者的手部功能进行评定,记录患者的腕关节主动活动度及握力.结果 术后第12周时,观察组TAM明显优于对照组,差异有统计学意义(P<0.05).与对照组比较,观察组在腕关节掌屈、背伸、尺偏、桡偏4种状态下的主动活动度[(56.08±11.05)°、(49.31±9.67)°、(32.50±8.10)°、(23.65±6.34)°]较为优异,差异有统计学意义(P<0.05).术后第12周时,观察组握力百分比、神经修复后手功能及DASH值均优于对照组,差异有统计学意义(P<0.05).结论 早期运动可促进指V区屈肌腱损伤伴尺神经损伤修复术后患者的手部功能恢复,有效提高患者对患手功能恢复的满意度,值得临床应用、推广.%Objective To explore the effects of early active mobilization on hand function after zone 5 flexor tendon and ulnar nerve repair.Methods Fifty-five patients who had received primary repair in zone 5 of a flexor tendon and the ulnar nerve were randomly divided into an observation group (26 cases, 88 digits) and a control group (27 cases, 91 digits).Both groups were given routine treatment after the operation, and started to do active and passive exercise 4 weeks later.The observation group was additionally forced to do active range of motion exercise training starting 8 days after the operation.Twelve weeks after the operation, the hand function of both groups was assessed using the total active motion (TAM

  2. Using of Tendinous Plasty in Treatment of Patients with Flexor Tendons of 2–5 Fingers Injury in “Critical” Zone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.I. Kireev

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Injury of both superficial and deep tendons of fingers flexors needs to carry out tendinous plasty with excision of distal part of superficial flexor muscle tendon. Use of length measuring method for tendinous transplant allows us to avoid the flexion contracture in future and appearance of functional insufficiency of flexion during postoperative period and rehabilitation of patient.

  3. Effects of roxarsone and monensin on digital flexoral tendons of broiler chickens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rath, N C; Chapman, H D; Fitz-Coy, S H; Balog, J M; Huff, G R; Huff, W E

    1998-04-01

    Roxarsone and monensin are common poultry feed additives that are used alone or in combination with other drugs to improve growth and feed utilization in young birds. The effects of monensin and roxarsone on the physiology of flexoral tendons of broiler chickens were examined to understand their relationships to leg weakness that have been occasionally associated with these drugs. Day-old chickens were fed either roxarsone or monensin for a period of 6 wk with two regimens of each of the drugs (roxarsone, 45.4 or 90.8 g/ton feed; monensin, 100 or 150 g/ton feed). None of the treatments had any adverse effect on the growth of the birds or caused any significant leg problem. Roxarsone at 45.4 g/ton caused a significant gain in body weight. The biomechanical strength of digital flexoral tendons was measured in several ways. There were no statistical differences in load at break, the modulus of elasticity, or stress or strain levels between different treatment groups and birds that received no medication. There were no differences in collagen, proteoglycan, and pyridinoline content of tendons. Sequential extraction of tendons with different solvents revealed a significant increase in the percentage of guanidine HCl extractible collagens in monensin-treated birds, and a decrease in the acid extractible collagen in both roxarsone- and monensin-treated groups. The relative content of collagen in acid extractible collagens were significantly small relative to total collagen content. Majority of collagen (84 to 90%) was extractible with pepsin. About 8 to 11% of total collagen was resistant to pepsin that was extractible with collagenase; this did not differ between treatment groups. Roxarsone treatment had no effect on the guanidine soluble collagen pool. The effect of monensin on the increase in guanidine soluble pool of collagen may relate to its disruptive effects on cellular secretory processes, which may be of significance in modulating connective tissue function in

  4. Comparison of elasticity of human tendon and aponeurosis in knee extensors and ankle plantar flexors in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubo, Keitaro; Kanehisa, Hiroaki; Fukunaga, Tetsuo

    2005-05-01

    The purposes of this study were to compare the elasticity of tendon and aponeurosis in human knee extensors and ankle plantar flexors in vivo and to examine whether the maximal strain of tendon was correlated to that of aponeurosis. The elongation of tendon and aponeurosis during isometric knee extension (n = 23) and ankle plantar flexion (n = 22), respectively, were determined using a real-time ultrasonic apparatus, while the participants performed ramp isometric contractions up to voluntary maximum. To calculate the strain values from the measured elongation, we measured the respective length of tendon and aponeurosis. For the knee extensors, the maximal strain of aponeurosis (12.1 +/- 2.8 %) was significantly greater than that of the patella tendon (8.3 +/- 2.4 %), p aponeurosis in ankle plantar flexors (2.7 +/- 1.4 %), p plantar flexors there was no significant correlation between maximal strain of tendon and aponeurosis. These results would be important for understanding the different roles of tendon and aponeurosis during human movements and for more accurate muscle modeling.

  5. Influence of different length of core suture purchase among suture row on the strength of 6-strand tendon repairs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okubo, Hirotaka; Kusano, Nozomu; Kinjo, Masaki; Kanaya, Fuminori

    2015-01-01

    In multi-strand suture methods consisting of several suture rows, the different length of core suture purchase between each suture row may affect the strength of repairs. We evaluated the influence of the different length of core suture purchase between each suture row on the strength of 6-strand tendon repairs. Rabbit flexor tendons were repaired by using a triple-looped suture technique in which the suture purchase length in each suture row was modified. Group 1, all lengths are 8-mm. Group 2, all lengths are 10-mm. Group 3, two are 10-mm and one is 8-mm. Group 4, one is 10-mm and two are 8-mm. The repaired tendons were subjected to load-to-failure test. The gap strength was significantly greater in Group 1 and Group 2 than in Group 3 and Group 4. This study demonstrates that maintaining equal core suture purchase lengths of each suture row increases the gap resistance.

  6. Cortical Button Fixation: A Better Patellar Tendon Repair?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ode, Gabriella E; Piasecki, Dana P; Habet, Nahir A; Peindl, Richard D

    2016-10-01

    Patellar tendon ruptures require surgical repair to optimize outcomes, but no consensus exists regarding the ideal repair technique. Cortical button fixation is a secure method for tendon repair that has not been studied in patellar tendons. Cortical button repair is biomechanically superior to the standard transpatellar repair and biomechanically equivalent to suture anchor repair. Controlled laboratory study. Twenty-three fresh-frozen cadaveric knees were used to compare 3 techniques of patellar tendon repair after a simulated rupture at the inferior pole of the patella. Repairs were performed at 45° of flexion using a standard transpatellar suture repair (n = 7), polyetheretherketone (PEEK) suture anchor repair (n = 8), or cortical button repair (n = 8). All specimens were tested on a custom apparatus to simulate cyclic open kinetic chain quadriceps contraction from extension to 90(o) of flexion. Outcomes of gap formation up to 250 cycles, maximum load to failure, and mode of failure were evaluated. Cortical button repair had significantly less gap formation than anchor repair after 1 cycle (P button repair sustained significantly higher loads to failure than anchor repair and suture repair (P button repairs either failed through the suture (n = 5), secondary failure of the patellar tendon (n = 2), or subsidence of the button through the anterior cortex of the patella (n = 1). Patellar tendon repair using cortical button fixation demonstrated mechanical advantages over suture repair and anchor repair in cadaveric specimens. Cortical button fixation showed less cyclic gap formation and withstood at least twice the load to failure of the construct. The biomechanical superiority of cortical button fixation may impart clinical advantages in accelerating postoperative rehabilitation. © 2016 The Author(s).

  7. [Medial flexor digitorum longus tendon augmentation and lateral foot column lengthening or reorienting triple arthrodesis as surgical therapy of posterior tibial tendon dysfunction].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Speck, M; Klaue, K

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the alignment and functional outcome after surgical augmentation of the tibialis posterior by tendon transfer and lateral column lengthening by osteotomy of the os calcis, calcaneo-cuboidal arthrodesis or reorientating triple arthrodesis. From 1991 to 1999 41 patients with the clinical and radiological diagnosis of dysfunction of the tibialis posterior tendon underwent surgical exploration and repair. These 41 patients (22 women, 19 men) had an average age of 44.3 years (range, 19-69 years) and had been symptomatic for an average of 2.3 years (range, 6 months to 6 years). All patients had the symptoms of a painful flatfoot deformity without dynamic support along the medioplantar aspect. Flexor digitorum longus (FDL) tendon transfer as reconstruction of the tibialis posterior tendon was performed in the cases without major deformity (n = 77). Patients underwent FDL transfer and lengthening osteotomy (n = 15) of the os calcis or calcaneocuboidal (c-c) arthrodesis (n = 12) if passive correction of the foot deformity was still possible and reorientating triple arthrodesis (n = 7) when a fixed flatfoot deformity had developed. AOFAS score and radiological examination were used preoperatively and in the follow-up. The AOFAS score improved for stage 1 patients after a mean follow-up of 43 months with FDL transfer from a preoperative mean of 54 to 84 points, for stage II patients with FDL transfer and lengthening osteotomy (mean follow-up 36 m) from 47 to 92 points, with c-c arthrodesis (follow-up 66 m) from 48 to 86 points, and for stage III patients with triple arthrodesis from 42 to 72 points. In two patients, the deformity failed to improve (stage I) necessitating a revision surgery with a calceneo-cuboidal lengthening arthrodesis for relapsing deformity. In order to correct deformity and provide substantial relief of foot pain and dysfunction, we recommend the transfer of the FDL tendon in flexible flat foot deformity together

  8. Racing performance of Thoroughbreds with superficial digital flexor tendonitis treated with desmotomy of the accessory ligament of the superficial digital flexor tendon: 332 cases (1989-2003).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Alaine J; Bramlage, Larry R

    2014-06-15

    To assess postoperative probability of racing, career longevity, and convalescent time in Thoroughbred racehorses with moderate to severe superficial digital flexor tendonitis (SDFT) in the forelimbs treated by desmotomy of the accessory ligament of the superficial digital flexor tendon (ie, superior check ligament desmotomy [SCLD]). Retrospective case series. 332 Thoroughbred racehorses with SDFT consecutively treated by means of SCLD. Medical records and racing records were reviewed to assess return to racing, number of races completed, time to first race, and lifetime performance. The horses were categorized as raced or unraced prior to and after surgery. Descriptive statistics including age and treated limb were also recorded. Of 332 horses, 228 (69%) returned to racing following injury and treatment. Seventy-eight of 118 (66%) horses that had not raced prior to injury and 150 of 214 (70%) horses that had raced prior to injury raced after treatment. Seventeen of 39 (44%) horses ≥ 5 years old raced following injury and treatment and 211 of 293 (72%) horses ≤ 4 years old returned to racing. There was no difference in the percentages of horses returning to racing for 2-, 3-, or 4-year olds. Postoperative infections occurred in 6 of the 332 (2%) horses. Median time to first race for horses that raced after surgery was 302 days (range, 48 to 1,120 days; mean ± SD, 341 ± 153 days), with a median of 8 starts/horse after surgery (range, 1 to 109 starts; mean ± SD, 14 ± 15.8 starts). Of 228 horses that returned to racing, 159 (70%) raced ≥ 5 times after surgery. Sex and treated limb did not have a significant effect on return to racing. However, horses ≥ 5 years old were significantly less likely to return to racing, compared with younger horses. In horses with unilateral SDFT and racing was not significantly different between horses treated bilaterally versus unilaterally. 228 of 332 (69%) horses with SDFT of the forelimb treated with SCLD successfully

  9. Using the zebrafish to understand tendon development and repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, J W; Galloway, J L

    2017-01-01

    Tendons are important components of our musculoskeletal system. Injuries to these tissues are very common, resulting from occupational-related injuries, sports-related trauma, and age-related degeneration. Unfortunately, there are few treatment options, and current therapies rarely restore injured tendons to their original function. An improved understanding of the pathways regulating their development and repair would have significant impact in stimulating the formulation of regenerative-based approaches for tendon injury. The zebrafish provides an ideal system in which to perform genetic and chemical screens to identify new pathways involved in tendon biology. Until recently, there had been few descriptions of tendons and ligaments in the zebrafish and their similarity to mammalian tendon tissues. In this chapter, we describe the development of the zebrafish tendon and ligament tissues in the context of their gene expression, structure, and interactions with neighboring musculoskeletal tissues. We highlight the similarities with tendon development in higher vertebrates, showing that the craniofacial tendons and ligaments in zebrafish morphologically, molecularly, and structurally resemble mammalian tendons and ligaments from embryonic to adult stages. We detail methods for fluorescent in situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry as an assay to examine morphological changes in the zebrafish musculoskeleton. Staining assays such as these could provide the foundation for screen-based approaches to identify new regulators of tendon development, morphogenesis, and repair. These discoveries would provide new targets and pathways to study in the context of regenerative medicine-based approaches to improve tendon healing. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. From collagen to tenocyte : How the equine superficial digital flexor tendon responds to physiologic challenges and physical therapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lin, Yi-Lo

    2005-01-01

    Introduction Injuries to the equine superficial digital flexor tendon (SDFT) play a prominent role in the orthopaedic disorders and form an important threat to both the equine athletic potential and welfare. Therefore this thesis aims at in-depth understanding the development of ECM composition in

  11. Active Achilles tendon kinesitherapy accelerates Achilles tendon repair by promoting neurite regeneration☆

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jielile, Jiasharete; Aibai, Minawa; Sabirhazi, Gulnur; Shawutali, Nuerai; Tangkejie, Wulanbai; Badelhan, Aynaz; Nuerduola, Yeermike; Satewalede, Turde; Buranbai, Darehan; Hunapia, Beicen; Jialihasi, Ayidaer; Bai, Jingping; Kizaibek, Murat

    2012-01-01

    Active Achilles tendon kinesitherapy facilitates the functional recovery of a ruptured Achilles tendon. However, protein expression during the healing process remains a controversial issue. New Zealand rabbits, aged 14 weeks, underwent tenotomy followed immediately by Achilles tendon microsurgery to repair the Achilles tendon rupture. The tendon was then immobilized or subjected to postoperative early motion treatment (kinesitherapy). Mass spectrography results showed that after 14 days of motion treatment, 18 protein spots were differentially expressed, among which, 12 were up-regulated, consisting of gelsolin isoform b and neurite growth-related protein collapsing response mediator protein 2. Western blot analysis showed that gelsolin isoform b was up-regulated at days 7–21 of motion treatment. These findings suggest that active Achilles tendon kinesitherapy promotes the neurite regeneration of a ruptured Achilles tendon and gelsolin isoform b can be used as a biomarker for Achilles tendon healing after kinesitherapy. PMID:25317130

  12. Active Achilles tendon kinesitherapy accelerates Achilles tendon repair by promoting neurite regeneration

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jiasharete Jielile; Beicen Hunapia; Ayidaer Jialihasi; Jingping Bai; Murat Kizaibek; Minawa Aibai; Gulnur Sabirhazi; Nuerai Shawutali; Wulanbai Tangkejie; Aynaz Badelhan; Yeermike Nuerduola; Turde Satewalede; Darehan Buranbai

    2012-01-01

    Active Achilles tendon kinesitherapy facilitates the functional recovery of a ruptured Achilles tendon. However, protein expression during the healing process remains a controversial issue. New Zealand rabbits, aged 14 weeks, underwent tenotomy followed immediately by Achilles tendon microsurgery to repair the Achilles tendon rupture. The tendon was then immobilized or subjected to postoperative early motion treatment (kinesitherapy). Mass spectrography results showed that after 14 days of motion treatment, 18 protein spots were differentially expressed, among which, 12 were up-regulated, consisting of gelsolin isoform b and neurite growth-related protein collapsing response mediator protein 2. Western blot analysis showed that gelsolin isoform b was up-regulated at days 7–21 of motion treatment. These findings suggest that active Achilles tendon kinesitherapy promotes the neurite regeneration of a ruptured Achilles tendon and gelsolin isoform b can be used as a biomarker for Achilles tendon healing after kinesitherapy.

  13. Postoperative rehabilitation of tendon of flexor digitorum after injury%显微外科修复屈指肌腱损伤术后的康复治疗

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    方军; 高克海; 李华壮

    2002-01-01

    Background: Muscle tendon healing and peritendinous tissue adhesion are major contradictions after operation of tendon injury of flexor digitorum.Best recovery of the finger function results from effective prevention of tendon adhesion.

  14. Alternate technique in managing adhesions after zone 3 extensor tendon repair: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gangatharam, Sudhagar; LeBlanc, Monique

    2013-03-01

    Extensor tendon injuries are given less importance than the flexor tendon injuries; however, the extensor mechanism is more complicated than flexor tendon system, and regaining satisfactory function is a challenge. It has been reported that loss of digital flexion would affect grasp and power grip imposing greater functional loss than digital extensor lag. Zone 3 extensor tendon management is complex because of excessive scar formation limiting composite digital flexion and extension. The adhesions are more common if the tendon is immobilized for long period. The purpose of this care report is to describe the alternate technique in managing adhesion after prolong immobilization in zone 3 extensor tendon injuries.

  15. Histological and Immunohistochemical Evaluation of Autologous Cultured Bone Marrow Mesenchymal Stem Cells and Bone Marrow Mononucleated Cells in Collagenase-Induced Tendinitis of Equine Superficial Digital Flexor Tendon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crovace, Antonio; Lacitignola, Luca; Rossi, Giacomo; Francioso, Edda

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare treatment with cultured bone marrow stromal cells (cBMSCs), bone marrow Mononucleated Cells (BMMNCs), and placebo to repair collagenase-induced tendinitis in horses. In six adult Standardbred horses, 4000 IU of collagenase were injected in the superficial digital flexor tendon (SDFT). Three weeks after collagenase treatment, an average of either 5.5 × 106 cBMSCs or 1.2 × 108 BMMNCs, fibrin glue, and saline solution was injected intralesionally in random order. In cBMSC- and BMMNCS-treated tendons, a high expression of cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMP) and type I collagen, but low levels of type III collagen were revealed by immunohistochemistry, with a normal longitudinally oriented fiber pattern. Placebo-treated tendons expressed very low quantities of COMP and type I collagen but large numbers of randomly oriented type III collagen fibers. Both cBMSC and BMMNCS grafts resulted in a qualitatively similar heling improvement of tendon extracellular matrix, in terms of the type I/III collagen ratio, fiber orientation, and COMP expression. PMID:20445779

  16. The Effect of Surface Modification on Gliding Ability of Decellularized Flexor Tendon in a Canine Model In Vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozasa, Yasuhiro; Amadio, Peter C.; Thoreson, Andrew R.; An, Kai-Nan; Zhao, Chunfeng

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the gliding ability and mechanical properties of decellularized intrasynovial tendons without and with surface modification designed to reduce gliding resistance. Methods Thirty-three canine flexor digitorum profundus tendons were randomly assigned to one of 3 groups: untreated fresh tendons, to serve as a control; tendons decellularized with trypsin and Triton X-100; and tendons decellularized as in group 2 with surface modification using carbodiimide-derivatized hyaluronic acid and gelatin (cd- HA-gelatin). Tendons were subjected to cyclic friction testing for 1000 cycles with subsequent tensile stiffness testing. The surface roughness after 1000 cycles was qualitatively evaluated using scanning electron microscopy. Results The gliding resistance of the decellularized group was significantly higher than that of both the control and cd-HA-gelatin tendons (0.20N, 0.09N and 0.11N after the first cycle, 0.41N, 0.09N and 0.14N after 1000 cycles, respectively).Gliding resistance between the control and cd-HA-gelatin groups was not significantly different. The Young modulus was not significantly different between the 3 groups. The surfaces of the control and cd-HA-gelatin treated tendons appeared smooth after 1000 cycles, while those of the decellularized tendons appeared rougher under scanning electron microscopy observation. Conclusions Decellularization with trypsin and Triton X-100 did not change tendon stiffness. However, this treatment, while effective in removing cells, adversely altered the tendon surface, both in appearance and gliding resistance. Surface modification with cd- HA-gelatin improved the tendon surface smoothness and significantly decreased the gliding resistance. Clinical Relevance The combination of decellularization and surface modification may improve the function of tendon allografts when used clinically. PMID:23849733

  17. Mechanism of decimeter wave in the prevention of flexor tendon adhesion%分米波防治屈肌腱粘连的机制研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    田德虎; 郭明珂; 米立新; 韩久卉; 张经歧; 张仲; 杨联平

    2005-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Tendon injury is a common injury in the department of hand surgery. The postoperative recovery of hand function is always affected by tendon adhesion after tendon repair. To prevent tendon adhesion, especially the adhesion after flexor tendon repair is always the key in the rehabilitation of hand surgery.OBJECTIVE: To investigate the impact of decimeter wave therapy on tendon adhesion and healing after flexor tendon repair.DESIGN: Randomized controlled study based on experimental animal SETTING: Provincial Institute of Orthopaedics.MATERIALS: The study was conducted in Hebei Provincial Institute of Orthopaedics from January 2001 to June 2003. Totally 28 Leghorn chickens were randomly divided into decimeter wave therapy group and operation control group.METHODS: The flexor digitorum profundus tendons of Leghorn chickens were transected and repaired. Decimeter wave therapy was applied to the toes on chickens of decimeter wave therapy group. Animals were executed at week 3 or 6 after operation for macroscopical observation and histological observation under optical and electron microscopes, and biomechanical analysis.MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Principle index: results of macroscopical observation and the observatory results under optical and electron microscope, and the results of biomechanics. Secondary index: results of the classification of tendon adhesion and healing.RESULTS: It could be seen under macroscopical and histological observation that the adhesion significantly reduced in decimeter wave therapy group. The protein synthesis of fibroblast was significantly more than that of the control group under electron microscope. As indicated by biomechanical analysis, the tendon gliding distance[ (5.37 ± 1.06) mm at week 3, (6.76 ± 1.52) mm at week 6]and the rehabilitative compliance( 1. 04 ± 0.65 at week 3)of decimeter wave therapy group were bigger than those of the control group respectively [ (4.43 ±1.03) mm, (5.33±1.27)mmand0.63±0.31](P <0

  18. Biology and augmentation of tendon-bone insertion repair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lui PPY

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Surgical reattachment of tendon and bone such as in rotator cuff repair, patellar-patella tendon repair and anterior cruciate ligament (ACL reconstruction often fails due to the failure of regeneration of the specialized tissue ("enthesis" which connects tendon to bone. Tendon-to-bone healing taking place between inhomogenous tissues is a slow process compared to healing within homogenous tissue, such as tendon to tendon or bone to bone healing. Therefore special attention must be paid to augment tendon to bone insertion (TBI healing. Apart from surgical fixation, biological and biophysical interventions have been studied aiming at regeneration of TBI healing complex, especially the regeneration of interpositioned fibrocartilage and new bone at the healing junction. This paper described the biology and the factors influencing TBI healing using patella-patellar tendon (PPT healing and tendon graft to bone tunnel healing in ACL reconstruction as examples. Recent development in the improvement of TBI healing and directions for future studies were also reviewed and discussed.

  19. Structure of retracted tendons after staged repair following continuous traction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farshad, Mazda; Gerber, Christian; Snedeker, Jess G; Frauenfelder, Thomas; Meyer, Dominik C

    2011-12-01

    The effect of staged repair involving continuous re-lengthening of the retracted musculotendinous unit after rotator cuff tear is not known. We quantified changes in chronically retracted tendons undergoing no repair or a staged repair involving an initial re-lengthening of the musculotendinous unit by traction in a sheep model of massive rotator cuff tear. Infraspinatus tendons of 12 sheep were released and allowed to retract for 4 months. Repair was performed after the retracted musculotendinous unit had been progressively returned to its original length through continuous traction in 8 sheep (group I). In the other 4 sheep (group II) traction was not successful and the tendons remained retracted. Tendon structure was assessed macroscopically, by MRI, histology, and TEM. Normalized to their contralateral controls, at sacrifice, tendon thickness was unchanged in group I (116%, n.s) and increased in group II (129%, P Retracted musculotendinous units have deteriorated tendons, characterized by increased collagen fiber crimp, and ultrastructural collagen fibril atrophy and disorganization. Continuous traction may arrest and partially restore degenerative changes in retracted tendon. The findings of this study might contribute to new approaches for the treatment of chronic "irreparable" rotator cuff tears.

  20. Flexor pollicis longus repair in a patient with Linburg-Comstock anomaly: A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehmet Unal

    2016-08-01

    Results: At the end of the rehabilitation program, the thumb recovered full range of motion, and physical examination revealed synchronous flexion movement (synkinesis of the thumb and index finger. Conclusion: Flexor pollicis longus tendon lacerations are common in the clinical practice of hand surgeons. Making a separate proximal wrist incision is a very useful technique to reach a proximal tendon stump. Otherwise, aggressive maneuvers may cause additional damage to the tendons involved and result in unpredicted outcomes. The attempts to retrieve the tendon at the injury site resulted in failure and gave a tethering sensation to the surgeon who recalled the Linburg-Comstock anomaly. [Hand Microsurg 2016; 5(2.000: 88-91

  1. Stress examination of flexor tendon pulley rupture in the crimp grip position: a 1.5-Tesla MRI cadaver study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bayer, Thomas; Janka, Rolf [University of Erlangen-Nuremberg, Department of Radiology, Erlangen (Germany); Fries, Simon [Cantonal Hospital Lucerne, Orthopaedic Department, Wolhusen (Switzerland); Schweizer, Andreas [University of Zurich, Department of Orthopaedics, Balgrist, Zurich (Switzerland); Schoeffl, Isabelle [Klinikum Bamberg, Department of Pediatrics, Bamberg (Germany); Bongartz, Georg [University Basel, Department of Radiology, Basel (Switzerland)

    2015-01-15

    The objectives of this study were the evaluation of flexor tendon pulley rupture of the fingers in the crimp grip position using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and the comparison of the results with MRI in the neutral position in a cadaver study. MRI in the crimp grip position and in the neutral position was performed in 21 cadaver fingers with artificially created flexor tendon pulley tears (combined pulley rupture, n = 14; single pulley rupture, n = 7). Measurement of the distance between the tendon and bone was performed. Images were evaluated by two readers, first independently and in cases of discrepancy in consensus. Sensitivity and specificity for detecting combined pulley ruptures were calculated. Tendon bone distances were significantly higher in the crimp grip position than in the neutral position. Sensitivity and specificity for detecting combined pulley rupture were 92.86 % and 100 % respectively in the crimp grip position and 78.57 % and 85.71 % respectively in the neutral position. Kappa values for interobserver reliability were 0.87 in the crimp grip position and 0.59 in the neutral position. MRI examination in the crimp grip position results in higher tendon bone distances by subjecting the pulleys to a higher strain, which facilitates image evaluation with higher interobserver reliability, higher sensitivity, and higher specificity for combined pulley rupture compared with examination in the neutral position. (orig.)

  2. Anatomical Description of the Presence and Variability of the Digital Manica Flexoria in the Equine Digital Flexor Tendon Sheath.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordana, M; Cornillie, P; Oosterlinck, M; Simoens, P; Pille, F; Martens, A

    2017-02-01

    During endoscopy (tenoscopy) of the distal aspect of the equine digital flexor tendon sheath (DFTS), the digital manica flexoria can be visualized connecting the distal branches of the superficial digital flexor tendon. However, this structure has been inconsistently described and variably named in the veterinary literature. The objectives of this study were to describe the presence, configuration and variability of the digital manica flexoria in the equine distal limb. Dissection of 144 equine cadaveric limbs revealed the presence of this structure in all the feet, although different types and conformations were identified. In the forelimbs, a membranous digital manica flexoria predominated (94%; P digital manica flexoria predominated (93%; P digital manica flexoria towards the distal DFTS was only possible in 22 of the 144 limbs, all forelimbs. Clinicians should be aware of the intra- and inter-individual anatomical variations of the digital manica flexoria to avoid misinterpretation during ultrasonographic and tenoscopic examinations of the DFTS.

  3. MRI findings in Kirner deformity: normal insertion of the flexor digitorum profundus tendon without soft-tissue enhancement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jaejoon; Ahn, Joong Kyong; Koh, Eun-Mi; Cha, Hoon-Suk [Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Department of Medicine, Samsung Medical Center, Seoul (Korea); Choi, Sang-Hee [Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Samsung Medical Center, Seoul (Korea)

    2010-09-15

    Kirner deformity is characterized by volar and radial incurvature of the distal phalanx of the 5th finger. A proposed causative mechanism includes abnormal distal insertion of the flexor digitorum profundus tendon along the volar surface of the distal phalanx of the 5th finger. A chronic inflammatory process or altered vascularisation of the soft tissues has also been suggested as the underlying causative mechanism based on MRI findings. We present a teenage boy with Kirner deformity, along with supplementary imaging of his father who also has the deformity, to illustrate MRI findings that dispute the above hypotheses. MRI in both son and father show normal insertion of the deep flexor tendon and no signs of inflammation. (orig.)

  4. [Rotator cuff repair with decellularized tendon slices for enhancing tendon-bone healing in rabbits].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Juan; Liu, Guoming; Ning, Liangju; Luo, Jingcong; Huang, Fuguo; Qin, Tingwu

    2013-09-01

    To investigate the effect of canine decellularized tendon slices (DTSs) on tendon-bone healing in repairing rotator cuff injury of rabbit. Canine DTSs were prepared by repetitive freeze/thaw 5 times combined with nuclease processing for 12 hours from the adult Beagles Achilles tendons. Histological observation and cytocompatibility evaluation for the canine DTSs were performed in vitro. Twenty-four mature male New Zealand white rabbits, weighing 2.5-3.0 kg, were randomly selected. U-shaped defect of more than 50% of normal tendon in width and 8 mm in length was made in infraspinatus tendons of unilateral limb as the experimental group; the canine DTSs were used to repair defect, and the insertion of infraspinatus tendon on greater tuberosity of humerus was reconstructed in the experimental group. No treatment was done on the contralateral limb as the control group. At 4, 8, and 12 weeks after operation, the specimens were harvested for histological observation and biomechanical test. Histological examination showed that collagen fibers of canine DTSs were well preserved, without residual cells. The cytocompatibility examination showed that fibroblasts attached well to canine DTSs. Biomechanical test showed that the maximum load and stiffness increased significantly with time, and the maximum load and stiffness at 12 weeks were significantly higher than those at 4 and 8 weeks (P tendon-bone insertion. In the experimental group at 4 weeks, the tendon-bone interface was filled with granulation tissue, and a small amount of Sharpey's fibers-like connected the tendon to bone; granulation tissue disappeared, and fibroblasts, Sharpey's fiber, new cartilage, and chondrocytes significantly increased with time; tendon-bone interface became mature, but the tide line was not observed between the unmineralized fibrocartilage and mineralized fibrocartilage. Canine DTSs prepared by repetitive freeze/thaw 5 times combined with nuclease processing for 12 hours, can enhance the

  5. Reproducibility of a non-invasive ultrasonic technique of tendon force measurement, determined in vitro in equine superficial digital flexor tendons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crevier-Denoix, Nathalie; Ravary-Plumioën, Bérangère; Evrard, Delphine; Pourcelot, Philippe

    2009-09-18

    A non-invasive ultrasonic (US) technique of tendon force measurement has been recently developed. It is based on the relationship demonstrated between the speed of sound (SOS) in a tendon and the traction force applied to it. The objectives of the present study were to evaluate the variability of this non-linear relationship among 7 equine superficial digital flexor (SDF) tendons, and the reproducibility of SOS measurements in these tendons over successive loading cycles and tests. Seven SDF tendons were equipped with an US probe (1MHz), secured in contact with the skin overlying the tendon metacarpal part. The tendons were submitted to a traction test consisting in 5 cycles of loading/unloading between 50 and 4050N. Four tendons out of the 7 were submitted to 5 additional cycles up to 5550N. The SOS-tendon force relationships appeared similar in shape, although large differences in SOS levels were observed among the tendons. Reproducibility between cycles was evaluated from the root mean square of the standard deviations (RMS-SD) of SOS values observed every 100N, and of force values every 2m/s. Reproducibility of SOS measurements revealed high between successive cycles: above 500N the RMS-SD was less than 2% of the corresponding traction force. Reproducibility between tests was lower, partly due to the experimental set-up; above 500N the difference between the two tests stayed nevertheless below 15% of the corresponding mean traction force. The reproducibility of the US technique here demonstrated in vitro has now to be confirmed in vivo.

  6. The use of suture anchors to repair the ruptured quadriceps tendon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bushnell, Brandon D; Whitener, George B; Rubright, James H; Creighton, R Alexander; Logel, Kevin J; Wood, Mark L

    2007-07-01

    Quadriceps tendon rupture is an incapacitating injury that usually requires surgical repair. Traditional repair methods involve transpatellar suture tunnels, but recent reports have introduced the idea of using suture anchors to repair the ruptured tendon. We present 5 cases of our technique of using suture anchors to repair the ruptured quadriceps tendon.

  7. Evaluation of Tensile Strength of the Superficial Digital Flexor Tendon in Horses Subjected to Transcutaneous Electrical Neural Stimulation Therapeutic Regimen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davood Sharifi

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available We would like to sincerely express our gratitude to the university of Tehran and faculty of veterinary medicine research council for approval and financial support for this extensive evaluation of tensile strength of the superficial digital flexor tendon in horses subjected to Transcutaneous Electrical Neural Stimulation (TENS therapeutic regimen Problems statement: The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of TENS on the tensile strength of experimentally traumatized SDFT in horses. Approach: Eight adult castrated horses between 4-9 years -old and 310- 395 Kg body - weight were considered. The left fore -limb superficial digital flexor tendon of each horse was splitted longitudinally in the middle portion in full thickness of 10 cm in length using B.P. blade (15 Times strike, then the connective tissue and skin were approximated using No 2 Nylon. Horses were divided into two groups of control and treated with 4 horses each. No treatment was given to control one, whereas treated group was subjected to the transcutaneous electrical neural stimulation (Newtens 900c therapeutic regimens10 min daily with intensity of 80 µs, 100 Hz frequency for 14 days. After 60 days, the full length of SDFT (20 cm was removed from the right normal countralaleral and left traumatized tendon of control and treated limbs of all horses to be subjected to test of tensile strength using Zwick/Roell MDTL Machine with speed of 0.07 mM sec-1 having Proportional Integral Deferential (PID controller. In assessing the variation obtained data was analyzed using paired-t-test. Results: Data of the tensile strength was revealed an average 0.6625 KN for normal SDFT, 0.6375 KN for treated tendon and 0.6175 KN for control tendon .There was significant improvement in regaining tensile strength in treated tendons comparison to control ones in Conclusion: TENS significantly accelerated healing and remodeling of traumatized tendon to regain its tensile strength.

  8. FUNCTIONAL-ANATOMY OF THE SOFT-TISSUES OF THE HAND AND WRIST - INVIVO EXCURSION MEASUREMENT OF THE FLEXOR POLLICIS LONGUS-TENDON USING MRI

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    HAM, SJ; KONINGS, JG; WOLF, RFE; MOOYAART, EL

    1993-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the flexor pollicis longus-tendon (FPL-tendon) with the thumb in different positions allows the in vivo assessment of its abduction-adduction/flexion excursion. Measurements can also be performed in different positions of the wrist. In our study, the mean

  9. FUNCTIONAL-ANATOMY OF THE SOFT-TISSUES OF THE HAND AND WRIST - INVIVO EXCURSION MEASUREMENT OF THE FLEXOR POLLICIS LONGUS-TENDON USING MRI

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    HAM, SJ; KONINGS, JG; WOLF, RFE; MOOYAART, EL

    1993-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the flexor pollicis longus-tendon (FPL-tendon) with the thumb in different positions allows the in vivo assessment of its abduction-adduction/flexion excursion. Measurements can also be performed in different positions of the wrist. In our study, the mean excursio

  10. Computer aided quantification of pathological features for flexor tendon pulleys on microscopic images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yung-Chun; Chen, Hsin-Chen; Shih, Hui-Hsuan; Yang, Tai-Hua; Yang, Hsiao-Bai; Yang, Dee-Shan; Su, Fong-Chin; Sun, Yung-Nien

    2013-01-01

    Quantifying the pathological features of flexor tendon pulleys is essential for grading the trigger finger since it provides clinicians with objective evidence derived from microscopic images. Although manual grading is time consuming and dependent on the observer experience, there is a lack of image processing methods for automatically extracting pulley pathological features. In this paper, we design and develop a color-based image segmentation system to extract the color and shape features from pulley microscopic images. Two parameters which are the size ratio of abnormal tissue regions and the number ratio of abnormal nuclei are estimated as the pathological progression indices. The automatic quantification results show clear discrimination among different levels of diseased pulley specimens which are prone to misjudgments for human visual inspection. The proposed system provides a reliable and automatic way to obtain pathological parameters instead of manual evaluation which is with intra- and interoperator variability. Experiments with 290 microscopic images from 29 pulley specimens show good correspondence with pathologist expectations. Hence, the proposed system has great potential for assisting clinical experts in routine histopathological examinations.

  11. Computer Aided Quantification of Pathological Features for Flexor Tendon Pulleys on Microscopic Images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yung-Chun Liu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Quantifying the pathological features of flexor tendon pulleys is essential for grading the trigger finger since it provides clinicians with objective evidence derived from microscopic images. Although manual grading is time consuming and dependent on the observer experience, there is a lack of image processing methods for automatically extracting pulley pathological features. In this paper, we design and develop a color-based image segmentation system to extract the color and shape features from pulley microscopic images. Two parameters which are the size ratio of abnormal tissue regions and the number ratio of abnormal nuclei are estimated as the pathological progression indices. The automatic quantification results show clear discrimination among different levels of diseased pulley specimens which are prone to misjudgments for human visual inspection. The proposed system provides a reliable and automatic way to obtain pathological parameters instead of manual evaluation which is with intra- and interoperator variability. Experiments with 290 microscopic images from 29 pulley specimens show good correspondence with pathologist expectations. Hence, the proposed system has great potential for assisting clinical experts in routine histopathological examinations.

  12. Freeze-dried allograft-mediated gene or protein delivery of growth and differentiation factor 5 reduces reconstructed murine flexor tendon adhesions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svensson, Sys Hasslund; Dadali, Tulin; Ulrich-Vinther, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Advances in allograft processing have opened new horizons for clinical adaptation of flexor tendon allografts as delivery scaffolds for antifibrotic therapeutics. Recombinant adeno-associated-virus (rAAV) gene delivery of the growth and differentiation factor 5 (GDF-5) has been previously...... associated with antifibrotic effects in a mouse model of flexor tendoplasty. In this study, we compared the effects of loading freeze-dried allografts with different doses of GDF-5 protein or rAAV-Gdf5 on flexor tendon healing and adhesions. We first optimized the protein and viral loading parameters using...... reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), and in vivo bioluminescent imaging. We then reconstructed flexor digitorum longus (FDL) tendons of the mouse hindlimb with allografts loaded with low and high doses of recombinant GDF-5 protein and r...

  13. Tendon repair augmented with a novel circulating stem cell population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daher, Robert J; Chahine, Nadeen O; Razzano, Pasquale; Patwa, Sohum A; Sgaglione, Nicholas J; Grande, Daniel A

    2011-01-01

    Tendon ruptures are common sports-related injuries that are often treated surgically by the use of sutures followed by immobilization. However, tendon repair by standard technique is associated with long healing time and often suboptimal repair. Methods to enhance tendon repair time as well as the quality of repair are currently unmet clinical needs. Our hypothesis is that the introduction of a unique stem cell population at the site of tendon transection would result in an improved rate and quality of repair. Achilles tendons of fifty-one Sprague-Dawley rats were transected and suture-repaired. In half of the rats, a biodegradable scaffold seeded with allogenic circulating stem cells was placed as an onlay to the defect site in addition to the suture repair. The other half was treated with suture alone to serve as the control group. Animals were randomized to a two-, four-, or six-week time group. At the time of necropsy, tendons were harvested and prepared for either biomechanical or histological analysis. Histological slides were evaluated in a blinded fashion with the use of a grading scale. By two weeks, the experimental group demonstrated a significant improvement in repair compared to controls with no failures. Average histological scores of 0.6 and 2.6 were observed for the experimental and control group respectively. The experimental group demonstrated complete bridging of the transection site with parallel collagen fiber arrangement. By four weeks, both groups showed a continuing trend of healing, with the scaffold group exceeding the histological quality of the tissue repaired with suture alone. Biomechanically, the experimental group had a decreasing cross-sectional area with time which was also associated with a significant increase in the ultimate tensile strength of the tendons, reaching 4.2MPa by six weeks. The experimental group also achieved a significantly higher elastic toughness by six weeks and saw an increase in the tensile modulus, reaching

  14. Direct Repair without Augmentation of Patellar Tendon Avulsion following TKA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ravi Mittal

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Complications involving the extensor mechanism after TKA are potentially disastrous. We are reporting a case of patellar tendon rupture from tibial tuberosity following total knee arthroplasty. We managed it by direct repair with fiberwire using Krackow suture technique without augmentation. Our long term result has been very encouraging. Our method is a safe and better method of management of patellar tendon avulsion following TKA when it happens without any tissue loss.

  15. Direct Repair without Augmentation of Patellar Tendon Avulsion following TKA

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Complications involving the extensor mechanism after TKA are potentially disastrous. We are reporting a case of patellar tendon rupture from tibial tuberosity following total knee arthroplasty. We managed it by direct repair with fiberwire using Krackow suture technique without augmentation. Our long term result has been very encouraging. Our method is a safe and better method of management of patellar tendon avulsion following TKA when it happens without any tissue loss.

  16. Biomimetic Scaffold Design for Functional and Integrative Tendon Repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xinzhi; Bogdanowicz, Danielle; Erisken, Cevat; Lee, Nancy M.; Lu, Helen H.

    2012-01-01

    Rotator cuff tears represent the most common shoulder injuries in the United States. The debilitating effect of this degenerative condition coupled with the high incidence of failure associated with existing graft choices underscore the clinical need for alternative grafting solutions. The two critical design criteria for the ideal tendon graft would require the graft to not only exhibit physiologically relevant mechanical properties but also be able to facilitate functional graft integration by promoting the regeneration of the native tendon-to-bone interface. Centered on these design goals, this review will highlight current approaches to functional and integrative tendon repair. In particular, the application of biomimetic design principles through the use of nanofiber- and nanocomposite-based scaffolds for tendon tissue engineering will be discussed. This review will begin with nanofiber-based approaches to functional tendon repair, followed by a section highlighting the exciting research on tendon-to-bone interface regeneration, with an emphasis on implementation of strategic biomimicry in nanofiber scaffold design and the concomitant formation of graded multi-tissue systems for integrative soft tissue repair. This review will conclude with a summary and future directions section. PMID:22244070

  17. Achilles Tendon Rupture: Avoiding Tendon Lengthening during Surgical Repair and Rehabilitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maquirriain, Javier

    2011-01-01

    Achilles tendon rupture is a serious injury for which the best treatment is still controversial. Its primary goal should be to restore normal length and tension, thus obtaining an optimal function. Tendon elongation correlates significantly with clinical outcome; lengthening is an important cause of morbidity and may produce permanent functional impairment. In this article, we review all factors that may influence the repair, including the type of surgical technique, suture material, and rehabilitation program, among many others. PMID:21966048

  18. Short Term Results of Arthroscopic Repair of Subscapularis Tendon Tear

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zohreh Zafarani

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Background:Despite being the largest rotator cuff tendon of the shoulder,the function and clinical relevance of subscapularis pathology has been largely ignored in the literature.Although many studies have focused on subscapularis tears recently,majority of them reported techniques for open repair. The advent of arthroscopy and   arthroscopic repair techniques has opened new frontiers in the diagnosis and repair of torn rotator cuff tendons, including the subscapularis.In this article,we review shortterm results of arthroscopic subscapularis repair. Method: Ten patients with subscapularis tendon tear of the rotator cuff were studied   prospectively including 8 men and 2 women with an average age of 49.7±12.8 years and an average delay in treatment of 23.3 months. Clinical outcomes, including the UCLAscore were assessed in all patients after 3 months of the surgery. Results: 6 patients were followed regularly for more than 6 months,while other 4 patients had a follow-up period of more than a year. The pain score improved from 1.75 to 9 and the UCLA score from 8.8 to 30.6.Conclusions: rthroscopic repair of subscapularis tendon tear results in significant subjective and objective improvement and high levels of patient satisfaction.  

  19. Direct Repair of Chronic Achilles Tendon Ruptures Using Scar Tissue Located Between the Tendon Stumps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasuda, Toshito; Shima, Hiroaki; Mori, Katsunori; Kizawa, Momoko; Neo, Masashi

    2016-07-20

    Several surgical procedures for chronically ruptured Achilles tendons have been reported. Resection of the interposed scar tissue located between the tendon stumps and reconstruction using normal autologous tissue have been well described. We developed a direct repair procedure that uses scar tissue, which obviates the need to use normal autologous tissue. Thirty consecutive patients with Achilles tendon ruptures with a delay in diagnosis of >4 weeks underwent removal of a section of scar and healing tissue with direct primary suture of the ends of the tendon without the use of allograft or autograft. Patients were followed for a mean time of 33 months. Preoperative and postoperative clinical outcomes were measured with the Achilles Tendon Total Rupture Score (ATRS) and the American Orthopaedic Foot & Ankle Society (AOFAS) ankle-hindfoot score. In addition, the patients underwent preoperative and postoperative functional measurements and magnetic resonance imaging. Lastly, we evaluated the histology of the interposed healing tissue. The mean AOFAS scores were 82.8 points preoperatively and 98.1 points postoperatively. The mean postoperative ATRS was 92.0 points. At the time of the latest follow-up, none of the patients had experienced tendon reruptures or difficulties in walking or climbing stairs, and all except 2 patients could perform a single-limb heel rise. All athletes had returned to their pre-injury level of sports participation. Preoperative T2-weighted magnetic resonance imaging showed that 22 Achilles tendons were thickened with diffuse intratendinous high-signal alterations, and 8 Achilles tendons were thinned. Postoperative T2-weighted magnetic resonance imaging findings included fusiform-shaped tendon thickening and homogeneous low-signal alterations of the tendons in all patients. Histologically, the interposed scar tissue consisted of dense collagen fibers. Shortening of the tissue between the 2 tendon ends that included healing scar and direct

  20. Ex vivo penetration of low-level laser light through equine skin and flexor tendons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duesterdieck-Zellmer, Katja F; Larson, Maureen K; Plant, Thomas K; Sundholm-Tepper, Andrea; Payton, Mark E

    2016-09-01

    OBJECTIVE To measure penetration efficiencies of low-level laser light energy through equine skin and to determine the fraction of laser energy absorbed by equine digital flexor tendons (superficial [SDFT] and deep [DDFT]). SAMPLE Samples of skin, SDFTs, and DDFTs from 1 metacarpal area of each of 19 equine cadavers. PROCEDURES A therapeutic laser with wavelength capabilities of 800 and 970 nm was used. The percentage of energy penetration for each wavelength was determined through skin before and after clipping and then shaving of hair, through shaved skin over SDFTs, and through shaved skin, SDFTs, and DDFTs (positioned in anatomically correct orientation). Influence of hair color; skin preparation, color, and thickness; and wavelength on energy penetration were assessed. RESULTS For haired skin, energy penetration was greatest for light-colored hair and least for dark-colored hair. Clipping or shaving of skin improved energy penetration. Light-colored skin allowed greatest energy penetration, followed by medium-colored skin and dark-colored skin. Greatest penetration of light-colored skin occurred with the 800-nm wavelength, whereas greatest penetration of medium- and dark-colored skin occurred with the 970-nm wavelength. As skin thickness increased, energy penetration of samples decreased. Only 1% to 20% and 0.1% to 4% of energy were absorbed by SDFTs and DDFTs, respectively, depending on skin color, skin thickness, and applied wavelength. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Results indicated that most laser energy directed through equine skin was absorbed or scattered by the skin. To achieve delivery of energy doses known to positively affect cells in vitro to equine SDFTs and DDFTs, skin preparation, color, and thickness and applied wavelength must be considered.

  1. Diffusion of mepivacaine to adjacent synovial structures after intrasynovial analgesia of the digital flexor tendon sheath.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordana, M; Martens, A; Duchateau, L; Haspeslagh, M; Vanderperren, K; Oosterlinck, M; Pille, F

    2016-05-01

    Controversy exists about the specificity of diagnostic analgesia of the digital flexor tendon sheath (DFTS) in horses. To evaluate the degree of diffusion of mepivacaine from the equine DFTS to adjacent synovial structures. Crossover experiment. Under general anaesthesia, the DFTS of one front and one hindlimb of 8 horses were injected simultaneously with mepivacaine. Synovial fluid samples of the injected DFTS, the adjacent metacarpo-/metatarsophalangeal (MCP/MTP) joint, proximal interphalangeal joint, distal interphalangeal joint, navicular bursa and contralateral MCP/MTP joint were collected 15 min post injection (T15) from one of the injected limbs and 60 min post injection (T60) from the other limb. Venous blood samples were obtained at T0, T15 and T60 to evaluate systemic distribution of mepivacaine. After a 2-week washout period, the procedure was repeated using the same limbs but reversing the time of sampling (front vs. hindlimbs). The concentration of mepivacaine in samples was measured with a commercial ELISA kit. Mepivacaine concentrations in the DFTS samples, at both T15 (5077 mg/l) and T60 (3503 mg/l), exceeded those estimated sufficient to produce synovial analgesia (100 mg/l or 300 mg/l). Mepivacaine was found in all synovial structures adjacent to the injected DFTS and in the contralateral MCP/MTP joints, but concentrations were low, with a maximum value of only 3.2 mg/l. With the exception of the navicular bursa samples, the mepivacaine concentrations in the adjacent synovial structures were significantly higher at T60 than at T15 (Pmepivacaine concentrations were found in the ipsilateral than the contralateral MCP/MTP joints at T60 (Pmepivacaine concentrations at T15 and T60 than at T0 (PMepivacaine injected into the DFTS of horses diffuses towards adjacent synovial structures without achieving clinically relevant concentrations. © 2015 EVJ Ltd.

  2. Individual flexor tendon identification within the carpal tunnel: A semi-automated analysis method for serial cross-section magnetic resonance images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicole M Kunze

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Nicole M Kunze1, Jessica E Goetz2, Daniel R Thedens3, Thomas E Baer2, Ericka A Lawler2, Thomas D Brown21Department of Biomedical Engineering, 2Department of Orthopaedics and Rehabilitation, 3Department of Radiology, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA, USAAbstract: Carpal tunnel syndrome is commonly viewed as resulting from chronic mechanical insult of the median nerve by adjacent anatomical structures. Both the median nerve and its surrounding soft tissue structures are well visualized on magnetic resonance (MR images of the wrist and hand. Addressing nerve damage from impingement of flexor digitorum tendons co-occupying the tunnel is attractive, but to date has been restricted by a lack of means for making individual identifications of the respective tendons. In this image analysis work, we have developed a region-growing method to positively identify each individual digital flexor tendon within the carpal tunnel by tracking it from a more distal MR section where the respective tendon identities are unambiguous. Illustratively, the new method was applied to MRI scans from four different subjects in a variety of hand poses. Conventional shape measures yielded less discriminatory information than did evaluations of individual tendon location and arrangement. This new method of rapid identification of individual tendons will facilitate analysis of tendon/nerve interactions within the tunnel, thereby providing better information about mechanical insult of the median nerve.Keywords: carpal tunnel syndrome, magnetic resonance imaging, region growing, digital flexor tendons

  3. An objective functional evaluation of the flexor carpi ulnaris set of triple tendon transfer in radial nerve palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latheef, L; Bhardwaj, P; Sankaran, A; Sabapathy, S R

    2017-02-01

    This study reports an objective assessment of postoperative function of 11 triple transfers for high radial palsies, using pronator teres for wrist extension, flexor carpi ulnaris for finger extension and palmaris longus for thumb extension. The mean follow-up was 3.3 years. Assessment was done by recording the active ranges of wrist motion, grip strength, wrist and finger strength and work simulation. The mean strength and range of wrist extension were 42% and 86%, respectively, of the contralateral wrist. Other measured movements were within the functional range and work simulation confirmed good restoration of function. The mean DASH score was 3.45, with no patient reporting any specific functional complaints. This study shows that even though the range of wrist motion and the strength of the wrist and fingers are less than normal, hand function remains good. We conclude that the flexor carpi ulnaris set of tendon transfer works well. 3.

  4. Tendon and Ligament Regeneration and Repair: Clinical Relevance and Developmental Paradigm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuan, Rocky S.

    2014-01-01

    Tendon and ligament (T/L) are dense connective tissues connecting bone to muscle and bone to bone, respectively. Similar to other musculoskeletal tissues, T/L arise from the somitic mesoderm, but they are derived from a recently discovered somitic compartment, the syndetome. The adjacent sclerotome and myotome provide inductive signals to the interposing syndetome, thereby upregulating the expression of the transcription factor Scleraxis, which in turn leads to further tenogenic and ligamentogenic differentiation. These advances in the understanding of T/L development have been sought to provide a knowledge base for improving the healing of T/L injuries, a common clinical challenge due to the intrinsically poor natural healing response. Specifically, the three most common tendon injuries involve tearing of the rotator cuff of the shoulder, the flexor tendon of the hand, and the Achilles tendon. At present, injuries to these tissues are treated by surgical repair and/or conservative approaches, including biophysical modalities such as physical rehabilitation and cryotherapy. Unfortunately, the healing tissue forms fibrovascular scar and possesses inferior mechanical and biochemical properties as compared to native T/L. Therefore, tissue engineers have sought to improve upon the natural healing response by augmenting the injured tissue with cells, scaffolds, bioactive agents, and mechanical stimulation. These strategies show promise, both in vitro and in vivo, for improving T/L healing. However, several challenges remain in restoring full T/L function following injury, including uncertainties over the optimal combination of these biological agents as well how to best deliver tissue engineered elements to the injury site. A greater understanding of the molecular mechanisms involved in T/L development and natural healing, coupled with the capability of producing complex biomaterials to deliver multiple growth factors with high spatiotemporal resolution and specificity

  5. [Electrophysiological and morphological changes in muscle-flexors of the fingers after injuries of the tendons in children].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danilov, A A; Sokoliuk, A M; Boiko, N A; Kutsenko, P I

    1989-01-01

    The investigation of bioelectrical activity of flexors of the fingers in children at different terms after the injury and subsequent restoration of the tendons allowed to determine the dynamics of bioelectrogenesis of the muscles. Decrease in bioelectrical activity of the muscles was most expressed and stable during the first 6 months after the injury. The morphological studies carried out at that time demonstrated presence of lysis of some muscle fibers. Complete restoration of bioelectrical activity of the muscles was observed after suture of the tendons and autotendoplastn which was performed not later thay 4-6 months after the trauma. The investigation of dynamics of restoration of bioelectrical activity of the muscles allowed to determine the optimal terms for performing tendolysis.

  6. Correlations between mean echogenicity and material properties of normal and diseased equine superficial digital flexor tendons: an in vitro segmental approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crevier-Denoix, N; Ruel, Y; Dardillat, C; Jerbi, H; Sanaa, M; Collobert-Laugier, C; Ribot, X; Denoix, J-M; Pourcelot, P

    2005-11-01

    The objective of this study was to test the hypothesis that tendon echogenicity is associated with the material properties of the corresponding tendon site, especially in case of lesions, due to local changes in tendon matrix composition. Four normal and nine spontaneously injured equine superficial digital flexor tendons (SDFT) were isolated then ultrasonographically examined under tension, in a special device placed in a water bath. Ultrasonographic transversal images (7.5MHz linear transducer) of five segments along each tendon were digitized, and analyzed in order to measure the mean cross-sectional area (MCSA) and mean echogenicity (ME) of each segment. The tendons were then tested in traction until rupture in a testing machine. For each segment, stress and strain were determined throughout the test, and the elastic modulus (EM) was evaluated. The tendon lesions were also documented by histology. No correlation was found between ME and the material properties of normal tendon segments. At the rupture sites of the nine diseased tendons, ME was positively correlated with maximal stress and EM, whereas no correlation was demonstrated with maximal strain. Besides, a positive correlation was demonstrated between ME and both MCSA and EM, when the three metacarpal segments of the diseased tendons were considered. Although ME gives only rough information about tendon matrix structure, it does show, under these in vitro conditions, significant correlations with material properties of pathological tendon segments, which may improve the functional significance and therefore the prognostic value of the ultrasonographic examination of tendon lesions.

  7. Current Approaches and Future Trends to Promote Tendon Repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morais, D S; Torres, J; Guedes, R M; Lopes, M A

    2015-09-01

    Tendons are composed by extracellular collagen fibres arranged in regular arrays and are responsible to transmit tensile forces from a muscle to a bone. Due to their poor healing ability, in some cases tendons injuries are debilitating impairments that affect life quality among adult population worldwide. In the last years, attending to the social and economic concern associated to the high prevalence of tendons injuries and the limited success of the available current treatments, several scaffolds have been developed. Some of these scaffolds are intended to be used as graft-augmentation devices and others to fully replace a damaged tendon. The synthetic ones present superior mechanical characteristics compared to biological scaffolds. However, attending to the specific tendons physiology, even the synthetic scaffolds still don´t present the ideal mechanical properties to accomplish a complete and long-term functional tissue repair. Therefore, to enhance tendogenesis when using a tendon engineering approach, several methodologies have been developed to associate with scaffolds, including surface modification and cell seeding.

  8. Biochemical characterisation of navicular hyaline cartilage, navicular fibrocartilage and the deep digital flexor tendon in horses with navicular disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viitanen, M; Bird, J; Smith, R; Tulamo, R-M; May, S A

    2003-10-01

    The study hypothesis was that navicular disease is a process analogous to degenerative joint disease, which leads to changes in navicular fibrocartilage and in deep digital flexor tendon (DDFT) matrix composition and that the process extends to the adjacent distal interphalangeal joint. The objectives were to compare the biochemical composition of the navicular articular and palmar cartilages from 18 horses with navicular disease with 49 horses with no history of front limb lameness, and to compare navicular fibrocartilage with medial meniscus of the stifle and collateral cartilage of the hoof. Cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMP), deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA), total glycosaminoglycan (GAG), metalloproteinases MMP-2 and MMP-9 and water content in tissues were measured. Hyaline cartilage had the highest content of COMP and COMP content in hyaline cartilage and tendon was higher in lame horses than in sound horses (phyaline cartilage was higher in lame horses than in sound horses. The MMP-2 amounts were significantly higher in tendons compared to other tissue types. Overall, 79% of the lame horses with lesions had MMP-9 in their tendons and the amount was higher than in sound horses (phyaline and fibrocartilage as well as the DDFT with potential implications for the pathogenesis and management of the condition.

  9. Augmented Repair of Acute Achilles Tendon Rupture Using an Allograft Tendon Weaving Technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Xiaowei; Huang, Gan; Ji, Ying; Ao, Rong guang; Yu, Baoqing; Zhu, Ya Long

    2015-01-01

    Achilles tendon rupture is a common injury, especially in those who are physically active. Although open surgery is a widely used option for the treatment of acute Achilles tendon rupture, the optimal treatment is still disputed. In our study, 59 patients with unilateral, closed, acute rupture of the Achilles tendon were treated by open surgery using an allograft weave to augment the repair. All the surgeries were performed within 1 to 4 days after injury. The mean American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society ankle-hindfoot score was recorded as 91.20 (range 88 to 95), 95.34 (range 92 to 98), and 98.27 (range 97 to 99) at the 3-, 6-, and 12-month follow-up visit, respectively. At the final follow-up visit, the mean difference between the mid-calf circumference of the injured and uninjured legs was 0.19 (range -0.03 to 1.50) cm (p = .43). At the final follow-up visit, the mean difference between the vertical distances from the plantar surface of the heel to the ground for the injured and uninjured lower extremities was 0.44 (range -0.03 to 0.5) cm (p = .17). Augmented repair using the allograft tendon weaving technique provided satisfactory tendon strength and functional outcomes and a timely return to the patients' activities. Copyright © 2015 American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. The Effectiveness of Open Repair Versus Percutaneous Repair for an Acute Achilles Tendon Rupture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krueger, Heidi; David, Shannon

    2016-12-01

    Clinical Scenario: There are 2 approaches available for surgical repair of the Achilles tendon: open or percutaneous. However, there is controversy over which repair is superior. Focused Clinical Question: Which type of surgery is better in providing the best overall patient outcome, open or percutaneous repair, in physically active men and women with acute Achilles tendon ruptures? Summary of Search, "Best Evidence" Appraised, and Key Findings: The literature was searched for studies of level 3 evidence or higher that investigated the effectiveness of open repair versus percutaneous repair on acute Achilles tendon ruptures in physically active men and women. The literature search resulted in 3 studies for possible inclusion. All 3 good-quality studies were included. Clinical Bottom Line: There is supporting evidence to indicate that percutaneous repair is the best option for Achilles tendon surgery when it comes to the physically active population. Percutaneous repair has faster surgery times, less risk of complications, and faster recovery times over having an open repair, although it is acknowledged that every patient has a different situation and best individual option may vary patient to patient.

  11. Chiasma crurale: intersection of the tibialis posterior and flexor digitorum longus tendons above the ankle. Magnetic resonance imaging-anatomic correlation in cadavers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buck, Florian M. [VA San Diego Medical Center, Department of Radiology, San Diego, CA (United States); Institut fuer Diagnostische Radiologie, Zurich (Switzerland); Gheno, Ramon; Nico, Marcelo A.C.; Trudell, Debra J.; Resnick, Donald [VA San Diego Medical Center, Department of Radiology, San Diego, CA (United States); Haghighi, Parviz [VA San Diego Medical Center, Department of Pathology, San Diego, CA (United States)

    2010-06-15

    To determine the precise anatomy and magnetic resonance (MR) imaging appearance of the chiasma crurale in cadavers, paying special attention to degenerative changes Twelve fresh human ankles were harvested from 11 nonembalmed cadavers (mean age at death 77 years) and used according to institutional guidelines. MR imaging and MR tenography were used to investigate the anatomy of the chiasma crurale using proton density-weighted sequences. The gross anatomy of the chiasma crurale was evaluated and compared to the MR imaging findings. Histology was used to elucidate further the structure of the chiasma crurale. Above the chiasma, five specimens had a small amount of fat tissue between the tibialis posterior and flexor digitorum longus tendon. In all specimens both tendons had a sheath below the chiasma but not above it. At the central portion of the chiasma there was no soft tissue between the tendons, except in two specimens that showed an anatomic variant consisting of a thick septum connecting the tibial periosteum and the deep transverse fascia of the leg. In MR images, eight specimens showed what were believed to be degenerative changes in the tendons at the level of the chiasma. However, during gross inspection and histologic analysis of the specimens, there was no tendon degeneration visible. At the central portion of the chiasma, there is no tissue between the tibialis posterior and flexor digitorum longus tendons unless there is an anatomic variant. At the chiasma crurale, areas with irregular tendon surfaces are normal findings and are not associated with tendon degeneration (fraying). (orig.)

  12. Repair of acute Achilles tendon ruptures using Lynn method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tolga Tolunay

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Efficiency assessment of Lynn method onopen primary repair of acute Achilles tendon ruptures.Methods: Data were evaluated from 19 patients whotreated with the Lynne method due to acute Achilles tendonrupture. Average follow-up length was 12.3 months(range 8-15 months. Dominant side was the right sideby all patients and all patients were males. Plantaris tendonaugmentation was applied after end-to-end repair bymodified Kessler suture technique.Results: The mean postoperative AOFAS score (TheAmerican Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society hindfootclinical outcome scores was 93.5 (range 82-100. Theaverage of Achilles tendon postoperative assessmentscore, as developed by Thermann and colleagues, was93.3. Both assessment scores were between 90-100 andwere evaluated as very good. None of the patients developedpost-operative wound infection. The Thompson testwas negative on all patients and bilateral motor strengthwas 5/5.Conclusion: Lynn method, especially in young and activepatients with acute Achilles tendon rupture is a methodthat should be considered in treatment protocols.Key words: Achilles tendon, Lynn method, AOFAS score

  13. Outcome of early active mobilization after extensor tendon repair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saini Narender

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Traditionally the repaired extensor tendons have been treated postoperatively in static splints for several weeks, leading to formation of adhesions and prolonged rehabilitation. Early mobilization using dynamic splints is common, but associated with many shortcomings. We attempted to study the results of early active mobilization, using a simple static splint, and easy-to-follow rehabilitation plan. Materials and Methods: In a prospective study 26 cases of cut extensor tendons in Zone V to VIII were treated with primary or delayed primary repair. Following this, early active mobilization was undertaken, using an easy-to-follow rehabilitation plan. The results were assessed according to the criteria of Dargan at six weeks and one year. Results: All the 26 patients were followed up for one year. 20 out of 26 patients were below 30 years of age, involving the dominant hand more commonly (16 patients, 62%. Agriculture instruments were the most common mode of injury (13 patients, 50%. The common site for injury was extensor zone VI (42%, n = 11. Conclusion: Rehabilitation done for repaired extensor tendon injuries by active mobilization plan using a simple static splint has shown good results.

  14. Synthetic Mesh Augmentation of Acute and Subacute Quadriceps Tendon Repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrey, Matthew C; Barlow, Jonathan D; Abdel, Matthew P; Hanssen, Arlen D

    2016-01-01

    Quadriceps tendon rupture is an uncommon injury. To date, surgical results have been less than favorable. A novel repair technique that uses Marlex mesh (C R Bard, Murray Hill, New Jersey) has been developed. Use of this repair may allow earlier range of motion and functional restoration of extension. The authors sought to evaluate the technical feasibility, durability, and postoperative function of this repair. This study retrospectively analyzed 8 knees (7 patients) operated on with this technique from 1990 to 2011. Mean follow-up was 9 years. Average age at the time of injury was 69 years. Mean operative time was 130 minutes. No perioperative complications occurred, no patients had clinical evidence of failure, and no patients required subsequent reoperation. Mean flexion at final follow-up was 100°. Of the 8 knees, 7 knees had no extensor lag at final follow-up. Marlex mesh augmentation for quadriceps tendon ruptures has promising clinical results, despite significant comorbidities. The results showed that the technique was feasible, with low cost and reasonable operative time. The clinical results were durable, with no intraoperative complications, no re-ruptures, rare extension lag, and good range of motion. Therefore, synthetic mesh augmentation is a feasible option in acute quadriceps tendon ruptures.

  15. Spontaneous flexor tendon rupture due to an insufficiency fracture of the hamate hook in a patient with systemic lupus erythematosus: A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toshihiro Hosokawa

    2016-01-01

    Conclusion: When we encounter a case of spontaneous flexor tendon rupture in a patient with systemic disease such as SLE or long-term steroid use, attention should be paid to the state of the carpal bones and joints as they sometimes accompany unexpected causes.

  16. Tensile strength of a weave tendon suture using tendons of different sizes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazurek, Tomasz; Strankowski, Michał; Ceynowa, Marcin; Rocławski, Marek

    2011-05-01

    This study compared the maximum load, stress, elongation at failure and the mode of failure of three kinds of tendons most frequently used for tendon grafting and tendon transfers, using the Pulvertaft weave suture. Sixty tendons were used from fresh human cadaver upper and lower extremities. The performed repairs included: 9 specimens of flexor digitorum superficialis or profundus tendon with flexor digitorum superficialis or profundus tendon (thick-thick suture), 10 specimens of flexor digitorum superficialis or profundus tendon with palmaris longus tendon (thick-medium thin suture), and 10 specimens of flexor digitorum superficialis or profundus tendon with plantaris tendon (thick-thin suture). Material testing machine was used to test repairs to failure. The mean maximum load at failure increased with the thickness of donor tendon. For the thick-thick specimen, the maximum load at failure was 125 newtons (N), for the thick-medium thin specimen it was 86,8N, and for the thick-thin it was 65,2N. These differences were all statistically significant. The active rehabilitation protocol is possible only with thick-thick connections used, the strength of the thick-medium thin connection is on the border of indications for the active rehabilitation protocol, and the thick-thin connection strength is sufficient only for the passive rehabilitation protocol. Copyright © 2010. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  17. Nonoperative, dynamic treatment of acute achilles tendon rupture: influence of early weightbearing on biomechanical properties of the plantar flexor muscle-tendon complex-a blinded, randomized, controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barfod, Kristoffer Weisskirchner; Bencke, Jesper; Lauridsen, Hanne Bloch; Dippmann, Christian; Ebskov, Lars; Troelsen, Anders

    2015-01-01

    Acute Achilles tendon rupture alters the biomechanical properties of the plantar flexor muscle-tendon complex that can affect functional performance and the risk of repeat injury. The purpose of the present study was to compare the biomechanical properties of the plantar flexor muscle-tendon complex in patients randomized to early weightbearing or non-weightbearing in the nonoperative treatment of Achilles tendon rupture. A total of 60 patients were randomized to full weightbearing from day 1 of treatment or non-weightbearing for 6 weeks. After 6 and 12 months, the peak passive torque at 20° dorsiflexion, the stiffness during slow stretching, and the maximal strength were measured in both limbs. The stiffness of the plantar flexor muscle-tendon complex in the terminal part of dorsiflexion was significantly increased (p = .024) in the non-weightbearing group at 12 months. The peak passive torque was significantly lower for the affected limb at 6 months (91%; p = .01), and the stiffness was significantly lower for the affected limb during the early part of dorsiflexion at 6 (67%; p tendon complex in the terminal part of dorsiflexion was found in the non-weightbearing group. The altered stiffness and strength in the affected limb could affect the coordination of gait and running. Copyright © 2015 American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. The Effect of Phospholipids (Surfactant) on Adhesion and Biomechanical Properties of Tendon: A Rat Achilles Tendon Repair Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dabak, T Kursat; Sertkaya, Omer; Acar, Nuray; Donmez, B Ozgur; Ustunel, Ismail

    2015-01-01

    Adhesion of the tendon is a major challenge for the orthopedic surgeon during tendon repair. Manipulation of biological environment is one of the concepts to prevent adhesion. Lots of biochemicals have been studied for this purpose. We aimed to determine the effect of phospholipids on adhesion and biomechanical properties of tendon in an animal tendon repair model. Seventy-two Wistar rats were divided into 4 groups. Achilles tendons of rats were cut and repaired. Phospholipids were applied at two different dosages. Tendon adhesion was determined histopathologically and biomechanical test was performed. At macroscopic evaluation of adhesion, there are statistically significant differences between multiple-dose phospholipid injection group and Control group and also hyaluronic acid group and Control group (p 0.008). Ultimate strength was highest at hyaluronic acid injection group and lowest at multiple-dose phospholipid injection group. Single-dose phospholipids (surfactant) application may have a beneficial effect on the tendon adhesion. Although multiple applications of phospholipids seem the most effective regime to reduce the tendon adhesion among groups, it deteriorated the biomechanical properties of tendon.

  19. Advances of stem cell based-therapeutic approaches for tendon repair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lidi Liu

    2017-04-01

    The translational potential of this article: This paper reviews recent progress on stem cell-based therapeutic approaches for tendon repair, which highlights its translational potential and challenges.

  20. [Evaluation of surgical repair of distal biceps tendon ruptures].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behounek, J; Hrubina, M; Skoták, M; Krumpl, O; Zahálka, M; Dvorák, J; Fucík, M

    2009-02-01

    PURPOSE OF THE STUDY To present the results of surgical repair of ruptures of the distal tendon of the biceps brachii muscle and thus show the adequacy of this treatment. MATERIAL Between 1987 and 2006, 19 patients had surgery for distal biceps tendon rupture. Only one side was affected in each patient. All patients were men between 28 and 69 years (average age, 47.5 years) at the time of injury (surgery). When the patients were evaluated at the end of 2007, 18 patients were included, because one died a year after surgery. METHODS The surgical repair always included a single-incision anatomical reattachment into the radial tuberosity. In 11 patients, a modified Mac Reynolds method with screw and washer fixation was used; in seven patients the insertion was fixed with Mitek anchors and, in one, it was sutured to the adjacent soft tissues. The average follow-up was 7 years (range, 1 to 20.5 years). The patients were evaluated for the cause of injury, their physical activity, age, dominance of the injured arm, surgical procedure and complications. RESULTS In 18 patients surgical repair was done early and, in one, at 16 days after injury. In all of them the tendon was detached from its site of insertion, but never torn. The intra-operative complications included, in one patient, bleeding owing to iatrogenic damage to a branch of the brachial artery, and difficult separation of the tendon due to its previous healed injury in another patient. Early post-operative complications included superficial skin necrosis in one patient and transient neurological deficit of the dorsal brand of the radial nerve and of the lateral cutaneous nerve of the forearm in two and one patient, respectively. The late complications were heterotropic ossification in three patients and screw migration in the one treated by the Mac Reynolds method. Excellent results were recorded in 11 patients (61 %), and good outcomes with a slight restriction of motion or muscle strength not limiting the

  1. Dupuytren’s disease and needle aponeurotomy: rupture of a deep common flexor tendon: A case report and literature review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otayek, Salma; Pierrart, Jérôme; Masmejean, Emmanuel H.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: The Percutaneous Needle Aponeurotomy (PNA) is a known and validated non-surgical treatment for Dupuytren’s disease with a low rate of complications. Initially described for purely palmar forms, the indications extended to digital adhesions. Numerous surgeons remain hesitant about performing the PNA for digital treatment because of the risk of lesions in the noble structures. In literature, one complication is still rare, even non-existent, i.e. the tendon rupture. Case Presentation: We are reporting here the case of a rupture of the deep common flexor tendon, secondary to a needle aponeurotomy, for a recurring digital form in a 72-year-old woman. We performed surgical treatment by tenodesis of the distal stump and resection of the proximal stump. The result was satisfactory. Conclusion: The purpose of describing this case is to report this rare complication leading to surgical revision. Within our team, we do not recommend performing PNAs for digital cases, and even less so for recurrences. For those who wish to perform the PNA, they need to know some technical artifices that enable these complications to be reduced, albeit not eliminated. PMID:28116281

  2. The structural and mechanical properties of the Achilles tendon 2 years after surgical repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geremia, Jeam Marcel; Bobbert, Maarten Frank; Casa Nova, Mayra; Ott, Rafael Duvelius; Lemos, Fernando de Aguiar; Lupion, Raquel de Oliveira; Frasson, Viviane Bortoluzzi; Vaz, Marco Aurélio

    2015-06-01

    Acute ruptures of the Achilles tendon affect the tendon's structural and mechanical properties. The long-term effects of surgical repair on these properties remain unclear. To evaluate effects of early mobilization versus traditional immobilization rehabilitation programs 2 years after surgical Achilles tendon repair, by comparing force-elongation and stress-strain relationships of the injured tendon to those of the uninjured tendon. A group of males with previous Achilles tendon rupture (n=18) and a group of healthy male controls (n=9) participated. Achilles tendon rupture group consisted of patients that had received early mobilization (n=9) and patients that had received traditional immobilization with a plaster cast (n=9). Comparisons of tendon structural and mechanical properties were made between Achilles tendon rupture and healthy control groups, and between the uninjured and injured sides of the two rehabilitation groups in Achilles tendon rupture group. Ultrasound was used to determine bilaterally tendon cross-sectional area, tendon resting length, and tendon elongation as a function of torque during maximal voluntary plantar flexion. From these data, Achilles tendon force-elongation and stress-strain relationships were determined. The Achilles tendon rupture group uninjured side was not different from healthy control group. Structural and mechanical parameters of the injured side were not different between the Achilles tendon rupture early mobilization and the immobilization groups. Compared to the uninjured side, the injured side showed a reduction in stress at maximal voluntary force, in Young's modulus and in stiffness. Two years post-surgical repair, the Achilles tendon mechanical properties had not returned to the uninjured contralateral tendon values. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Age-related greater Achilles tendon compliance is not associated with larger plantar flexor muscle fascicle strains in senior women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Csapo, R; Malis, V; Hodgson, J; Sinha, S

    2014-04-15

    The aim of the present study was to test the hypothesis that the age-associated decrease of tendon stiffness would necessitate greater muscle fascicle strains to produce similar levels of force during isometric contraction. Greater fascicle strains could force sarcomeres to operate in less advantageous regions of their force-length and force-velocity relationships, thus impairing the capacity to generate strong and explosive contractions. To test this hypothesis, sagittal-plane dynamic velocity-encoded phase-contrast magnetic resonance images of the gastrocnemius medialis (GM) muscle and Achilles tendon (AT) were acquired in six young (YW; 26.1 ± 2.3 yr) and six senior (SW; 76.7 ± 8.3 yr) women during submaximal isometric contraction (35% maximum voluntary isometric contraction) of the plantar flexor muscles. Multiple GM fascicle lengths were continuously determined by automatically tracking regions of interest coinciding with the end points of muscle fascicles evenly distributed along the muscle's proximo-distal length. AT stiffness and Young's modulus were measured as the slopes of the tendon's force-elongation and stress-strain curves, respectively. Despite significantly lower AT stiffness at older age (YW: 120.2 ± 52.3 N/mm vs. SW: 53.9 ± 44.4 N/mm, P = 0.040), contraction-induced changes in GM fascicle lengths were similar in both age groups at equal levels of absolute muscular force (4-5% fascicle shortening in both groups), and even significantly larger in YW (YW: 11-12% vs. SW: 6-8% fascicle shortening) at equal percentage of maximum voluntary contraction. These results suggest that factors other than AT stiffness, such as age-associated changes in muscle composition or fascicle slack, might serve as compensatory adaptations, limiting the degree of fascicle strains upon contraction.

  4. Functional results from reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament using the central third of the patellar ligament and flexor tendons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcos George de Souza Leao

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT OBJECTIVES: To evaluate knee function in patients undergoing reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL using the central third of the patellar ligament or the medial flexor tendons of the knee, i.e. quadruple ligaments from the semitendinosus and gracilis (ST-G, by means of the Knee Society Score (KSS and the Lysholm scale. METHODS: This was a randomized prospective longitudinal study on 40 patients who underwent arthroscopic ACL reconstruction between September 2013 and August 2014. They comprised 37 males and three females, with ages ranging from 16 to 52 years. The patients were numbered randomly from 1 to 40: the even numbers underwent surgical correction using the ST-G tendons and the odd numbers, using the patellar tendon. Functional evaluations were made using the KSS and Lysholm scale, applied in the evening before the surgical procedure and six months after the operation. RESULTS: From the statistical analysis, it could be seen that the patients' functional capacity was significantly greater after the operation than before the operation. There was strong evidence that the two forms of therapy had similar results ( p= >0.05, in all the comparisons. CONCLUSIONS: The results from the ACL reconstructions were similar with regard to functional recovery of the knee and improvement of quality of life, independent of the type of graft. It was not possible to identify the best method of surgical treatment. The surgeon's clinical and technical experience and the patient are the factors that determine the choice of graft type for use in ACL surgery.

  5. Observation of tendon repair in animal model using second-harmonic-generation microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hase, Eiji; Minamikawa, Takeo; Sato, Katsuya; Takahashi, Mitsuhiko; Yasui, Takashi

    2016-03-01

    Tendon rupture is a trauma difficult to recover the condition before injury. In previous researches, tensile test and staining method have been widely used to elucidate the mechanism of the repair process from the viewpoints of the mechanical property and the histological findings. However, since both methods are destructive and invasive, it is difficult to obtain both of them for the same sample. If both the mechanical property and the histological findings can be obtained from the same sample, one may obtain new findings regarding mechanisms of tendon repairing process. In this paper, we used second-harmonic-generation (SHG) microscopy, showing high selectivity and good image contrast to collagen molecules as well as high spatial resolution, optical three-dimensional sectioning, deep penetration, and without additional staining. Since SHG light intensity sensitively reflects the structural maturity of collagen molecule and its aggregates, it will be a good indicator for the repairing degree of the ruptured tendon. From comparison of SHG images between the 4-weeks-repaired tendon and the sound tendon in the animal model, we confirmed that SHG light intensity of the repaired tendon was significantly lower than that of the sound tendon, indicating that the collagen structure in the repaired tendon is still immature. Furthermore, we performed both SHG imaging and the tensile test for the same sample, and confirmed a correlation between them. This result shows a potential of SHG light for an indicator of the histological and mechanical recovery of the ruptured tendon.

  6. Digital Necrosis After Lidocaine and Epinephrine Injection in the Flexor Tendon Sheath Without Phentolamine Rescue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jacques X; Gray, Jason; Lalonde, Donald H; Carr, Nicholas

    2017-02-01

    The literature generally supports the safety of epinephrine injection in the digits, but recent case reports describe ischemic adverse events associated with the use of lidocaine and epinephrine in which phentolamine rescue was not performed. We present a case of finger necrosis and subsequent amputation in a patient after 1% lidocaine with 1:100,000 epinephrine was injected in the fat and flexor sheaths in the palm for a 3-finger trigger release. Phentolamine rescue was not performed. All surgeons who use epinephrine in the finger should be prepared to reverse vasoconstriction with phentolamine rescue if there is persistently inadequate perfusion of the fingertip.

  7. Rotator cuff repair with a tendon-fibrocartilage-bone composite bridging patch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Xiaoxi; Chen, Qingshan; Thoreson, Andrew R; Qu, Jin; An, Kai-Nan; Amadio, Peter C; Steinmann, Scott P; Zhao, Chunfeng

    2015-11-01

    To compare the mechanical performance of a rotator cuff repaired with a novel tendon-fibrocartilage-bone composite bridging patch vs the traditional Mason-Allen repair in an in vitro canine model. Twenty shoulders and 10 bridging patches from patellar tendon were harvested. The patches were trimmed and sliced into 2 layers. An infraspinatus tendon tear was created in each shoulder. Modified Mason-Allen sutures were used to repair the infraspinatus tendon to the greater tuberosity, with or without the bridging patch (bridging patch group and controls, respectively). Shoulders were loaded to failure under displacement control at a rate of 0.5mm/s. The ultimate tensile load was significantly higher in the bridging patch group than control (mean [SD], 365.46 [36.45] vs 272.79 [48.88] N; Pinfraspinatus tendon repair site was significantly higher than the control repair site (93.96 [27.72] vs 42.62 [17.48] N/mm Ptendon-fibrocartilage-bone composite bridging patch achieved higher ultimate tensile load and stiffness at the patch-greater tuberosity repair site compared with traditional repair in a canine model. This composite tissue transforms the traditional tendon-to-bone healing interface (with dissimilar tissues) into a pair of bone-to-bone and tendon-to-tendon interfaces, which may improve healing quality and reduce retear rate. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Stenosing Tenosynovitis of the Flexor Hallucis Longus Tendon Associated with the Plantar Capsular Accessory Ossicle at the Interphalangeal Joint of the Great Toe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Song Ho Chang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This report presents a case of stenosing tenosynovitis of the flexor hallucis longus tendon associated with the plantar capsular accessory ossicle at the interphalangeal joint of the great toe, which was confirmed by intraoperative observation and was successfully treated with surgical resection of the ossicle. As the plantar capsular accessory ossicle was not visible radiographically due to the lack of ossification, ultrasonography was helpful for diagnosing this disorder.

  9. Stenosing Tenosynovitis of the Flexor Hallucis Longus Tendon Associated with the Plantar Capsular Accessory Ossicle at the Interphalangeal Joint of the Great Toe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Song Ho; Naito, Masashi

    2017-01-01

    This report presents a case of stenosing tenosynovitis of the flexor hallucis longus tendon associated with the plantar capsular accessory ossicle at the interphalangeal joint of the great toe, which was confirmed by intraoperative observation and was successfully treated with surgical resection of the ossicle. As the plantar capsular accessory ossicle was not visible radiographically due to the lack of ossification, ultrasonography was helpful for diagnosing this disorder. PMID:28255483

  10. Arthroscopic Release of Flexor Hallucis Longus Tendon Sheath in Female Ballet Dancers: Dynamic Pathology, Surgical Technique, and Return to Dancing Performance

    OpenAIRE

    Funasaki, Hiroki; Hayashi, Hiroteru; Sakamoto, Kanako; Tsuruga, Rei; Marumo, Keishi

    2015-01-01

    Stenosing tenosynovitis of the flexor hallucis longus (FHL) tendon is known as a major overuse lesion in female dancers. We describe arthroscopic surgical techniques in relation to the dynamic pathology of the disease. Crepitus and pain on moving the great toe with the ankle in plantar flexion on preoperative examination confirm the diagnosis of FHL stenosing tenosynovitis even if the os trigonum is not evident. The ankle is approached through standard posterolateral and posteromedial portals...

  11. Macrophage sub-populations and the lipoxin A4 receptor implicate active inflammation during equine tendon repair.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephanie Georgina Dakin

    Full Text Available Macrophages (Mφ orchestrate inflammatory and reparatory processes in injured connective tissues but their role during different phases of tendon healing is not known. We investigated the contribution of different Mφ subsets in an equine model of naturally occurring tendon injury. Post mortem tissues were harvested from normal (uninjured, sub-acute (3-6 weeks post injury and chronically injured (>3 months post injury superficial digital flexor tendons. To determine if inflammation was present in injured tendons, Mφ sub-populations were quantified based on surface antigen expression of CD172a (pan Mφ, CD14(highCD206(low (pro-inflammatory M1Mφ, and CD206(high (anti-inflammatory M2Mφ to assess potential polarised phenotypes. In addition, the Lipoxin A(4 receptor (FPR2/ALX was used as marker for resolving inflammation. Normal tendons were negative for both Mφ and FPR2/ALX. In contrast, M1Mφ predominated in sub-acute injury, whereas a potential phenotype-switch to M2Mφ polarity was seen in chronic injury. Furthermore, FPR2/ALX expression by tenocytes was significantly upregulated in sub-acute but not chronic injury. Expression of the FPR2/ALX ligand Annexin A1 was also significantly increased in sub-acute and chronic injuries in contrast to low level expression in normal tendons. The combination of reduced FPR2/ALX expression and persistence of the M2Mφ phenotype in chronic injury suggests a potential mechanism for incomplete resolution of inflammation after tendon injury. To investigate the effect of pro-inflammatory mediators on lipoxin A(4 (LXA(4 production and FPR2/ALX expression in vitro, normal tendon explants were stimulated with interleukin-1 beta and prostaglandin E(2. Stimulation with either mediator induced LXA(4 release and maximal upregulation of FPR2/ALX expression after 72 hours. Taken together, our data suggests that although tenocytes are capable of mounting a protective mechanism to counteract inflammatory stimuli, this

  12. Macrophage Sub-Populations and the Lipoxin A4 Receptor Implicate Active Inflammation during Equine Tendon Repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dakin, Stephanie Georgina; Werling, Dirk; Hibbert, Andrew; Abayasekara, Dilkush Robert Ephrem; Young, Natalie Jayne; Smith, Roger Kenneth Whealands; Dudhia, Jayesh

    2012-01-01

    Macrophages (Mϕ) orchestrate inflammatory and reparatory processes in injured connective tissues but their role during different phases of tendon healing is not known. We investigated the contribution of different Mϕ subsets in an equine model of naturally occurring tendon injury. Post mortem tissues were harvested from normal (uninjured), sub-acute (3–6 weeks post injury) and chronically injured (>3 months post injury) superficial digital flexor tendons. To determine if inflammation was present in injured tendons, Mϕ sub-populations were quantified based on surface antigen expression of CD172a (pan Mϕ), CD14highCD206low (pro-inflammatory M1Mϕ), and CD206high (anti-inflammatory M2Mϕ) to assess potential polarised phenotypes. In addition, the Lipoxin A4 receptor (FPR2/ALX) was used as marker for resolving inflammation. Normal tendons were negative for both Mϕ and FPR2/ALX. In contrast, M1Mϕ predominated in sub-acute injury, whereas a potential phenotype-switch to M2Mϕ polarity was seen in chronic injury. Furthermore, FPR2/ALX expression by tenocytes was significantly upregulated in sub-acute but not chronic injury. Expression of the FPR2/ALX ligand Annexin A1 was also significantly increased in sub-acute and chronic injuries in contrast to low level expression in normal tendons. The combination of reduced FPR2/ALX expression and persistence of the M2Mϕ phenotype in chronic injury suggests a potential mechanism for incomplete resolution of inflammation after tendon injury. To investigate the effect of pro-inflammatory mediators on lipoxin A4 (LXA4) production and FPR2/ALX expression in vitro, normal tendon explants were stimulated with interleukin-1 beta and prostaglandin E2. Stimulation with either mediator induced LXA4 release and maximal upregulation of FPR2/ALX expression after 72 hours. Taken together, our data suggests that although tenocytes are capable of mounting a protective mechanism to counteract inflammatory stimuli, this appears to be of

  13. Trigger finger following partial flexor tendon laceration: Magnetic resonance imaging-assisted diagnosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Couceiro, Jose; Fraga, Javier; Sanmartin, Marcos

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Post-traumatic trigger finger is considerably rarer than normal trigger finger. The diagnosis is usually made on a clinical basis. This can be obscured; however, by concurrent pathological conditions. We report a case of post-traumatic trigger finger in which diagnosis was aided by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Presentation of case Our patient is a 32-year-old male who had a previous laceration with a subsequent surgery for infectious tenosynovitis. The MRI showed the impinging tendon tag. Surgical excision of the tag successfully solved the case. Discussion The use of imaging studies for the diagnosis of post-traumatic trigger finger has been previously reported, the authors described a variation on the contour of the pulley system. The full lacerated tendon tag can be seen on our patient's MRI. Conclusion On this case, the use of MRI was a useful aid for the differential diagnosis of post-traumattic trigger finger. PMID:25765739

  14. Bone Reduction Clamp to Gain Length in Repairing Chronic Achilles Tendon Ruptures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckley, Patrick S; Pedowitz, David I

    2016-11-01

    Chronic Achilles tendon ruptures occur after an unrecognized, untreated, or misdiagnosed acute Achilles tendon rupture and present a potentially debilitating injury for the patient. Various techniques have been described to reconstruct the Achilles tendon after chronic ruptures. The technique chosen depends on the length of tendon defect that is present after debridement. If the tendon gap is greater than 3 cm, additional techniques are generally used, as direct repair is often not possible. The authors present a novel intraoperative technique using pointed reduction clamps to gain and maintain length of the Achilles tendon to decrease the gap between ends of the Achilles tendon and allow for end-to-end repair when it may have otherwise not been possible. [Orthopedics. 2016; 39(6):e1223-e1225.]. Copyright 2016, SLACK Incorporated.

  15. Knee flexor strength recovery following hamstring tendon harvest for anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction: a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clare Ardern

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available The hamstring tendons are an increasingly popular graft choice for anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction due to preservation of quadriceps function and the absence of anterior knee pain post-operatively. Two commonly used hamstring grafts are a quadruple strand semitendinosus graft (4ST and a double strand semitendinosus-double strand gracilis graft (2ST-2G. It has been suggested that concurrent harvest of the semitendinsous and gracilis tendons may result in sub-optimal hamstring strength recovery as the gracilis may play a role in reinforcing the semitendinosus particularly in deep knee flexion angles. The objective of this systematic review was to synthesize the findings of available literature and determine whether semitendinosus and gracilis harvest lead to post-operative hamstring strength deficits when compared to semitendinosus harvest alone. Seven studies were identified which compared hamstring strength outcomes between the common hamstring graft types. The methodological quality of each paper was assessed, and where possible effect sizes were calculated to allow comparison of results across studies. No differences were reported between the groups in isokinetic hamstring strength. Deficits in hamstring strength were reported in the 2ST-2G groups when compared to the 4ST groups in isometric strength testing at knee flexion angles ≥70°, and in the standing knee flexion angle. Preliminary evidence exists to support the hypothesis that harvesting the semitendinosus tendon alone is preferable to harvesting in combination with the gracilis tendon for minimizing post-operative hamstring strength deficits at knee flexion angles greater than 70°. However, due to the paucity of research comparing strength outcomes between the common hamstring graft types, further investigation is warranted to fully elucidate the implications for graft harvest.

  16. Repaired supraspinatus tendons in clinically improving patients: Early postoperative findings and interval changes on MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jung Eun; Park, Ji Seon; Ryu, Kyung Nam; Rhee, Yong Girl [Kyung Hee University Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Yoon, So Hee; Park, So Young; Jin Wook [Dept. of Radiology, Kyung Hee University Hospital at Gangdong, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-04-15

    To demonstrate and further determine the incidences of repaired supraspinatus tendons on early postoperative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings in clinically improving patients and to evaluate interval changes on follow-up MRIs. Fifty patients, who showed symptomatic and functional improvements after supraspinatus tendon repair surgery and who underwent postoperative MRI twice with a time interval, were included. The first and the second postoperative MRIs were obtained a mean of 4.4 and 11.5 months after surgery, respectively. The signal intensity (SI) patterns of the repaired tendon on T2-weighted images from the first MRI were classified into three types of heterogeneous high SI with fluid-like bright high foci (type I), heterogeneous high SI without fluid-like bright high foci (type II), and heterogeneous or homogeneous low SI (type III). Interval changes in the SI pattern, tendon thickness, and rotator cuff interval thickness between the two postoperative MRIs were evaluated. The SI patterns on the first MRI were type I or II in 45 tendons (90%) and type III in five (10%). SI decreased significantly on the second MRI (p < 0.050). The mean thickness of repaired tendons and rotator cuff intervals also decreased significantly (p < 0.050). Repaired supraspinatus tendons exhibited high SI in 90% of clinically improving patients on MRI performed during the early postsurgical period. The increased SI and thickness of the repaired tendon decreased on the later MRI, suggesting a gradual healing process rather than a retear.

  17. Reconstruction of Posterior Interosseous Nerve Injury Following Biceps Tendon Repair: Case Report and Cadaveric Study

    OpenAIRE

    Mokhtee, David B.; Brown, Justin M.; Mackinnon, Susan E.; Tung, Thomas H.

    2008-01-01

    Surgical repair of distal biceps tendon rupture is a technically challenging procedure that has the potential for devastating and permanently disabling complications. We report two cases of posterior interosseous nerve (PIN) injury following successful biceps tendon repair utilizing both the single-incision and two-incision approaches. We also describe our technique of posterior interosseous nerve repair using a medial antebrachial cutaneous nerve graft (MABC) and a new approach to the termin...

  18. A Clinical Trial with Brazilian Arnica (Solidago chilensis Meyen) Glycolic Extract in the Treatment of Tendonitis of Flexor and Extensor Tendons of Wrist and Hand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, Ary Gomes; Machado, Elbe Rodrigues; de Almeida, Leonardo Mendes; Nunes, Ricardo Marcelo Menezes; Giesbrecht, Patrícia Caldeira Pena; Costa, Regina Mamed; Costa, Helber B; Romão, Wanderson; Kuster, Ricardo Machado

    2015-06-01

    One of the Brazilian arnicas, Solidago chilensis Meyen, is a species of the Asteraceae family. This plant is known by this common name because it shares remarkably similar organoleptic properties with the genus Arnica L., also within the family Asteraceae. We examined the effectiveness of the S. chilensis fluid extract used externally for treating tendinitis of flexor and extensor tendons of wrist and hand in placebo-controlled double-blind clinical pharmacological studies. This study was approved by the Ethical Committee for Scientific Research in Human Beings at University Vila Velha-UVV. Two daily skin applications on the arm skin of a gel cream containing a 5% glycolic plant extract were administered to eight volunteers for 21 days. Among the volunteers, one of their arms was used as the placebo group, and the other one was used as a test group. Statistical data analyses demonstrated a significant reduction in the perception of pain in the arms in the test group, when it was compared to those receiving only the placebo.

  19. The role of human ankle plantar flexor muscle-tendon interaction and architecture in maximal vertical jumping examined in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farris, Dominic James; Lichtwark, Glen A; Brown, Nicholas A T; Cresswell, Andrew G

    2016-02-01

    Humans utilise elastic tendons of lower limb muscles to store and return energy during walking, running and jumping. Anuran and insect species use skeletal structures and/or dynamics in conjunction with similarly compliant structures to amplify muscle power output during jumping. We sought to examine whether human jumpers use similar mechanisms to aid elastic energy usage in the plantar flexor muscles during maximal vertical jumping. Ten male athletes performed maximal vertical squat jumps. Three-dimensional motion capture and a musculoskeletal model were used to determine lower limb kinematics that were combined with ground reaction force data in an inverse dynamics analysis. B-mode ultrasound imaging of the lateral gastrocnemius (GAS) and soleus (SOL) muscles was used to measure muscle fascicle lengths and pennation angles during jumping. Our results highlighted that both GAS and SOL utilised stretch and recoil of their series elastic elements (SEEs) in a catapult-like fashion, which likely serves to maximise ankle joint power. The resistance of supporting of body weight allowed initial stretch of both GAS and SOL SEEs. A proximal-to-distal sequence of joint moments and decreasing effective mechanical advantage early in the extension phase of the jumping movement were observed. This facilitated a further stretch of the SEE of the biarticular GAS and delayed recoil of the SOL SEE. However, effective mechanical advantage did not increase late in the jump to aid recoil of elastic tissues. © 2016. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  20. Reconstruction of posterior interosseous nerve injury following biceps tendon repair: case report and cadaveric study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mokhtee, David B; Brown, Justin M; Mackinnon, Susan E; Tung, Thomas H

    2009-06-01

    Surgical repair of distal biceps tendon rupture is a technically challenging procedure that has the potential for devastating and permanently disabling complications. We report two cases of posterior interosseous nerve (PIN) injury following successful biceps tendon repair utilizing both the single-incision and two-incision approaches. We also describe our technique of posterior interosseous nerve repair using a medial antebrachial cutaneous nerve graft (MABC) and a new approach to the terminal branches of the posterior interosseous nerve that makes this reconstruction possible. Finally, we advocate consideration for identification of the posterior interosseous nerve prior to reattachment of the biceps tendon to the radial tuberosity.

  1. Arthroscopic Release of Flexor Hallucis Longus Tendon Sheath in Female Ballet Dancers: Dynamic Pathology, Surgical Technique, and Return to Dancing Performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Funasaki, Hiroki; Hayashi, Hiroteru; Sakamoto, Kanako; Tsuruga, Rei; Marumo, Keishi

    2015-12-01

    Stenosing tenosynovitis of the flexor hallucis longus (FHL) tendon is known as a major overuse lesion in female dancers. We describe arthroscopic surgical techniques in relation to the dynamic pathology of the disease. Crepitus and pain on moving the great toe with the ankle in plantar flexion on preoperative examination confirm the diagnosis of FHL stenosing tenosynovitis even if the os trigonum is not evident. The ankle is approached through standard posterolateral and posteromedial portals. A 4.0-mm-diameter 30° arthroscope is used. Soft tissues around the talus are cleared with a motorized shaver and a radiofrequency device. The posterior aspects of the talus, os trigonum, and FHL tendon surrounded by the tendon sheath are visualized. The dynamic pathology of the FHL tendon is well observed on passive motion of the great toe. The prominent bone fragment of the talus is removed and the tendon sheath is cut with a retrograde knife and a motorized shaver from the superior border down to the entrance of the fibro-osseous tunnel. Arthroscopic release of the FHL tendon sheath is a useful and easy method to directly approach the dynamic pathology of FHL tenosynovitis in female ballet dancers.

  2. Flexor Tenorrhaphy Using Absorbable Suture Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyung Joo Kang

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Background Nonabsorbable sutures are favorable for repairing flexor tendons. However,absorbable sutures have performed favorably in an animal model.Methods Two-strand sutures using the interlocking modified Kessler method with polydioxanoneabsorbable sutures 4-0 were used to repair completely ruptured flexor tendons in 55 fingersfrom 41 consecutive patients. The medical records of average 42 follow up weeks were analyzedretrospectively. The data analyzed using the chi-squared test, and Fisher’s exact test was used forpostoperative complications. The results were compared with those of other studies.Results Among the index, middle, ring, and little fingers were injured in 9, 17, 16, and13 fingers, respectively. The injury levels varied from zone 1 to 5. Of the 55 digits in ourstudy, there were 26 (47% isolated flexor digitorum profundus (FDP injuries and 29 (53%combined FDP and with flexor digitorum superficialis injuries. Pulley repair was also conducted.Concomitant injuries of blood vessels and nerves were found in 17 patients (23 fingers; nerveinjuries occurred in 5 patients (10 fingers. Two patients had ruptures (3.6%, and one patienthad two adhesions (3.6%. Using the original Strickland criteria, all the patients were assessedto be excellent or good. Also, fibrosis and long-term foreign body tissue reactions such as stitchgranuloma were less likely occurred in our study. Compared to the Cullen’s report that usednonabsorbable sutures, there was no significant difference in the rupture or adhesion rates.Conclusions Therefore, this study suggests that appropriate absorbable core sutures can beused safely for flexor tendon repairs.

  3. Therapeutic Effects of Doxycycline on the Quality of Repaired and Unrepaired Achilles Tendons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Quynhhoa T; Norelli, Jolanta B; Graver, Adam; Ekstein, Charles; Schwartz, Johnathan; Chowdhury, Farzana; Drakos, Mark C; Grande, Daniel A; Chahine, Nadeen O

    2017-07-01

    Achilles tendon tears are devastating injuries, especially to athletes. Elevated matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) activity after a tendon injury has been associated with deterioration of the collagen network and can be inhibited with doxycycline (Doxy). Daily oral administration of Doxy will enhance the histological, molecular, and biomechanical quality of transected Achilles tendons. Additionally, suture repair will further enhance the quality of repaired tendons. Controlled laboratory study. Randomized unilateral Achilles tendon transection was performed in 288 adult male Sprague-Dawley rats. The injured tendons were either unrepaired (groups 1 and 2) or surgically repaired (groups 3 and 4). Animals from groups 2 and 4 received Doxy daily through oral gavage, and animals from groups 1 and 3 served as controls (no Doxy). Tendons were harvested at 1.5, 3, 6, and 9 weeks after the injury (n = 18 per group and time point). The quality of tendon repair was evaluated based on the histological grading score, collagen fiber orientation, gene expression, and biomechanical properties. In surgically repaired samples, Doxy enhanced the quality of tendon repair compared with no Doxy ( P = .0014). Doxy had a significant effect on collagen fiber dispersion, but not principal fiber angle. There was a significant effect of time on the gene expression of MMP-3, MMP-9 and TIMP1, and Doxy significantly decreased MMP-3 expression at 9 weeks. Doxy treatment with surgical repair increased the dynamic modulus at 6 weeks but not at 9 weeks after the injury ( P Doxy also increased the equilibrium modulus and decreased creep strain irrespective of the repair group. Doxy did not have a significant effect on the histology or biomechanics of unrepaired tendons. The findings indicate that daily oral administration of Doxy accelerated matrix remodeling and the dynamic and equilibrium biomechanics of surgically repaired Achilles tendons, although such enhancements were most evident at the 3- to 6

  4. 异体肌腱移植术后早期形态学观察和生物力学研究%Morphology and biomechanical evaluation of flexor tendon allograft in its early healing period

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙燕琨; 张友乐; 诸寅; 陶剑锋; 李翔

    2010-01-01

    Objective To investigate the morphology and biomechanical characteristic of early period flexor tendon allograft and to discuss the feasibility of early mobilization of tendon allograft.Methods Thirty New Zealand rabbits were randomized into tendon autograft and allograft groups.The second and third flexor digitorum profundus tendons were cut and sutured back in the autograft group and repaired by deep frozen flexor tendons in the allogaft group.The tendons were harvested 3,7,14,28 and 56 days postoperatively for gross observation,H&E staining and histological examination.The biomechanical tests included rupture force,2 mm gap formation force and the resistance of tendon gliding.Results The healing procedure of tendon allografts began later and last longer than tendon autografts.There was no dense tendon adhesion until 2 weeks postoperatively in the allograft group.Dense adhesion was observed 4 weeks postoperatively.Biomechanical tests showed decreased strength during tendon healing.Resistance to tendon gliding was smaller than rupture force and2 mm gap formation force three days and one week postoperatively.At 2 weeks resistance increased while tendon strength decreased.At 4 weeks resistance to tendon gliding was bigger than rupture force and 2 mm gap formation force due to the formation of adhesion.By the time of 8 weeks postoperatively the tendon had formed density adhesion with the surrounding tissue.Conclusion It is relatively safe for early mobilization within the first week of tendon allografting,due to the fact that tendon strength is bigger than resistance to gliding.%目的 通过观察新西兰大白兔异体肌腱移植术后早期的组织学形态并检测其生物力学性质,评估异体肌腱移植后是否适合进行早期功能锻炼.方法 取新西兰大白兔30只分成自体肌腱移植和异体肌腱移植两组,分别于术后3 d、1周、2周、4周、8周时取肌腱进行大体观察,HE染色后行组织学切片观察,生物力学检

  5. Ruptured human Achilles tendon has elevated metabolic activity up to 1 year after repair

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eliasson, Pernilla; Couppé, Christian; Lonsdale, Markus

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE: Following Achilles tendon rupture, running is often allowed after 6 months. However, tendon healing is slow and the metabolic status of the tendon at this point is unknown. The purpose of this study was to investigate tendon metabolism (glucose uptake) and vascularization at 3, 6 and 12...... months after Achilles tendon rupture as measured using PET and power Doppler ultrasonography (PDUS). METHODS: The study group comprised 23 patients with surgically repaired Achilles tendon rupture who were investigated at 3 months (n = 7), 6 months (n = 7) and 12 months (n = 9) after surgery. The triceps...... surae complex was loaded over 20 min of slow treadmill walking while a radioactive tracer ((18)F-FDG) was administered prior to PET. Vascularization was measured in terms of PDUS flow activity, and patient-reported outcomes were scored using the Achilles tendon rupture score (ATRS) and sports assessment...

  6. Evaluation of Elastic Stiffness in Healing Achilles Tendon After Surgical Repair of a Tendon Rupture Using In Vivo Ultrasound Shear Wave Elastography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Li-ning; Wan, Wen-bo; Wang, Yue-xiang; Jiao, Zi-yu; Zhang, Li-hai; Luo, Yu-kun; Tang, Pei-fu

    2016-04-09

    BACKGROUND There has been no published report assessing the mechanical properties of a repaired Achilles tendon after surgery using shear wave elastography (SWE). The aim of this study was to investigate the changes in mechanical properties of the healing Achilles tendon after surgical repair of a tendon rupture using ultrasound SWE and how these changes correlate with tendon function. MATERIAL AND METHODS Twenty-six patients who underwent surgical repair for Achilles tendon rupture were examined with ultrasound SWE coupled with a linear array transducer (4-15 MHz). The elasticity values of the repaired Achilles tendon in a longitudinal view were measured at 12, 24, and 48 weeks postoperatively. Functional outcomes were assessed with the American Orthopedic Foot and Ankle Society (AOFAS) rating system at 12, 24, and 48 weeks postoperatively. General linear regression analysis and correlation coefficients were used to analyze the relationship between elasticity and the AOFAS score. RESULTS There were significant differences with respect to the mean elasticity values and functional scores of the repaired Achilles tendon at 12, 24, and 48 weeks postoperatively (all PTendon function was positively correlated with the elasticity of the repaired Achilles tendon (P=0.0003). CONCLUSIONS Our findings suggest that SWE can provide biomechanical information for evaluating the mechanical properties of healing Achilles tendon and predict Achilles tendon function.

  7. Histomorphometric and ultrastructural analysis of the tendon-bone interface after rotator cuff repair in a rat model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanazawa, Tomonoshin; Gotoh, Masafumi; Ohta, Keisuke; Honda, Hirokazu; Ohzono, Hiroki; Shimokobe, Hisao; Shiba, Naoto; Nakamura, Kei-Ichiro

    2016-09-20

    Successful rotator cuff repair requires biological anchoring of the repaired tendon to the bone. However, the histological structure of the repaired tendon-bone interface differs from that of a normal tendon insertion. We analysed differences between the normal tendon insertion and the repaired tendon-bone interface after surgery in the mechanical properties, histomorphometric analysis, and 3-dimensional ultrastructure of the cells using a rat rotator cuff repair model. Twenty-four adult Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats underwent complete cuff tear and subsequent repair of the supraspinatus tendon. The repaired tendon-bone interface was evaluated at 4, 8, and 12 weeks after surgery. At each time point, shoulders underwent micro-computed tomography scanning and biomechanical testing (N = 6), conventional histology and histomorphometric analysis (N = 6), and ultrastructural analysis with focused ion beam/scanning electron microscope (FIB/SEM) tomography (N = 4). We demonstrated that the cellular distribution between the repaired tendon and bone at 12 weeks after surgery bore similarities to the normal tendon insertion. However, the ultrastructure of the cells at any time point had a different morphology than those of the normal tendon insertion. These morphological differences affect the healing process, partly contributing to re-tearing at the repair site. These results may facilitate future studies of the regeneration of a normal tendon insertion.

  8. Effect of glenohumeral abduction angle on the mechanical interaction between the supraspinatus and infraspinatus tendons for the intact, partial-thickness torn, and repaired supraspinatus tendon conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andarawis-Puri, Nelly; Kuntz, Andrew F; Ramsey, Matthew L; Soslowsky, Louis J

    2010-07-01

    Rotator cuff tears are difficult to manage because of the structural and mechanical inhomogeneity of the supraspinatus tendon. Previously, we showed that with the arm at the side, the supraspinatus and infraspinatus tendons mechanically interact such that conditions that increase supraspinatus tendon strain, such as load or full-thickness tears, also increase infraspinatus tendon strain. This suggests that the infraspinatus tendon may shield the supraspinatus tendon from further injury while becoming at increased risk of injury itself. In this study, the effect of glenohumeral abduction angle on the interaction between the two tendons was evaluated for supraspinatus tendon partial-thickness tears and two repair techniques. Principal strains were quantified in both tendons for 0 degrees , 30 degrees , and 60 degrees of glenohumeral abduction. Results showed that interaction between the two tendons is interrupted by an increase in abduction angle for all supraspinatus tendon conditions evaluated. Infraspinatus tendon strain was lower at 30 degrees and 60 degrees than at 0 degrees abduction angle. In conclusion, interaction between the supraspinatus and infraspinatus tendons is interrupted with increase in abduction angle. Additionally, 30 degrees abduction should be further evaluated for management of rotator cuff tears and repairs as it is the angle at which both supraspinatus and infraspinatus tendon strain is decreased.

  9. Long-term Results of Chronic Achilles Tendon Ruptures Repaired With V-Y Tendon Plasty and Fascia Turndown.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guclu, Berk; Basat, H Cagdas; Yildirim, Tugrul; Bozduman, Omer; Us, Ali Kemal

    2016-07-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the long-term follow-up results of V-Y tendon plasty with fascia turndown, for repairing chronic Achilles tendon ruptures. Seventeen patients (12 males, 5 females), who were diagnosed with chronic Achilles tendon rupture and met the inclusion criteria, were included in the study. These patients received treatment by means of V-Y tendon plasty with fascia turndown from January 1995 to December 2001. Clinical outcomes of the patients were assessed by using isokinetic strength testing, questioning the patient regarding residual discomfort, pain, or swelling and having the ability to perform heel rises and using American Orthopaedic Foot & Ankle Society's (AOFAS's) Ankle-Hind Foot Scale score. Mean follow-up duration was 16 years (13-18 years). Mean time from the injury to operative treatment was 7 months. Mean operative defect of Achilles tendon in neutral position after debridement was 6 cm. During the follow-up, the mean calf atrophy was 3.4 cm. The mean 30 degrees/s plantarflex and 120 degrees/s plantarflex peak torques were 89 and 45 Nm, respectively. The mean 30 degrees/s plantarflex peak torque deficiency was 16%. The mean 120 degrees/s plantarflex peak torque deficiency was 17%. The average peak torque deficiency was 17%. The pre- and postoperative mean AOFAS Ankle-Hindfoot Scale scores were 64 and 95, respectively. No patient had a rerupture. Superficial wound infection was treated with oral antibiotic therapy in 2 patients (11%). The V-Y tendon plasty with fascia turndown for repairing chronic Achilles tendon ruptures yielded results comparable with the literature regarding clinical outcomes. This method did not require synthetic materials for augmentation and was an economic alternative compared to other repair methods. Level III, retrospective comparative study. © The Author(s) 2016.

  10. Revascularisation pattern of ruptured flexor tendon grafts in anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction: A histological study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figueroa, D; Martínez, R; Calvo, R; Scheu, M; Gallegos, M; Vaisman, A; Martínez, C; González, A

    For successful anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction, revascularisation and histological maturation are necessary, as their failure can cause graft rupture. The purpose of this study was to describe differences in the histological maturation of early failed plasty (less than 12 months after surgery) and late failed plasty (more than 12 months after surgery) in patients with re-rupture after ACL reconstruction with hamstring tendons. A descriptive observational study was conducted on a consecutive series of 20 patients whose ACL reconstruction had failed. Graft biopsy samples were obtained during the revision surgery from the proximal, medial, and distal graft remnants. The samples were evaluated by light microscopy, and the vascularity and maturation of the samples were established by histological scoring. The most common aetiology of reconstruction failure (86.6%) was a specific event with non-contact mechanism. The patients with re-rupture of their ACL plasty less than 12 months after surgery had substance vessels that were less deep. The distal segment of the graft in those patients showed a delay in histological maturation with fewer collagen fibres. In patients whose ACL grafts failed less than 12 months after surgery, a lower distribution of blood vessels and collagen fibres was found that were less ordered in the distal graft. These results indicate a delay in maturation, which leads to a higher risk of graft failure. Copyright © 2016 SECOT. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  11. Acute effects of static stretching on muscle-tendon mechanics of quadriceps and plantar flexor muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouvier, Tom; Opplert, Jules; Cometti, Carole; Babault, Nicolas

    2017-07-01

    This study aimed to determine the acute effects of static stretching on stiffness indexes of two muscle groups with a contrasting difference in muscle-tendon proportion. Eleven active males were tested on an isokinetic dynamometer during four sessions randomly presented. Two sessions were dedicated to quadriceps and the two others to triceps surae muscles. Before and immediately after the stretching procedure (5 × 30 s), gastrocnemius medialis and rectus femoris fascicle length and myotendinous junction elongation were determined using ultrasonography. Passive and maximal voluntary torques were measured. Fascicle and myotendinous junction stiffness indexes were calculated. After stretching, maximal voluntary torque similarly decreased for both muscle groups. Passive torque significantly decreased on triceps surae and remained unchanged on quadriceps muscles. Fascicle length increased similarly for both muscles. However, myotendinous junction elongation remained unchanged for gastrocnemius medialis and increased significantly for rectus femoris muscle. Fascicle stiffness index significantly decreased on medial gastrocnemius and remained unchanged on rectus femoris muscle. In contrast, myotendinous junction stiffness index similarly decreased on both muscles. Depending on the muscle considered, the present results revealed different acute stretching effects. This muscle dependency appeared to affect primarily fascicle stiffness index rather than the myotendinous junction.

  12. MOLECULAR PATHOBIOLOGICAL AND SCANNING ELECTRON MICROSCOPIC CHANGES IN HORSE TENDON CELLS TREA TED WITH ENROFLOXACIN

    OpenAIRE

    A. Khan1 and J. Halper

    2003-01-01

    Fluoroquinolone (FQNL) antibiotics have been used widely in horses because of their broad-spectrum bactericidal activity and relative safety, however, their use is not without risk. Tendonitis and spontaneous tendon rupture have been reported in people during or following therapy with FQNLs. To evaluate the potential damage of enrofloxacin (ENRO) on the equine superficial digital flexor tendon (SOFT), an equine cell culture system as an in vitro model of equine tendon injury and repair was de...

  13. Augmented Versus Nonaugmented Repair of Acute Achilles Tendon Rupture: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yi-Jun; Zhang, Chi; Wang, Quan; Lin, Xiang-Jin

    2017-04-01

    Although simple end-to-end repair of the Achilles tendon is common, many augmented repair protocols have been implemented for acute Achilles tendon rupture. However, whether augmented repair is better than nonaugmented repair of an acute Achilles tendon rupture is still unknown. To conduct a meta-analysis to determine whether augmented surgical repair of an acute Achilles tendon rupture improved subjective patient satisfaction without an increase in rerupture rates. Secondary outcomes assessed included infections, ankle range of motion, calf muscle strength, and minor complications. Meta-analysis. A systematic literature search of peer-reviewed articles was conducted to identify all randomized controlled trials (RCTs) comparing augmented repair and nonaugmented repair for acute Achilles tendon rupture from January 1980 to August 2016 in the electronic databases of PubMed, Web of Science (SCI-E/SSCI/A&HCI), and EMBASE. The keywords (Achilles tendon rupture) AND (surg* OR operat* OR repair* OR augment* OR non-augment* OR end-to-end OR sutur*) were combined, and results were limited to human RCTs and controlled clinical trials published in the English language. Four RCTs involving 169 participants were eligible for inclusion; 83 participants were treated with augmented repair and 86 were treated with nonaugmented repair. Augmented repair led to similar responses when compared with nonaugmented repair for acute Achilles tendon rupture (93% vs 90%, respectively; P = .53). The rerupture rates showed no significant difference for augmented versus nonaugmented repair (7.2% vs 9.3%, respectively; P = .69). No differences in superficial and deep infections occurred in augmented (7 infections) and nonaugmented (8 infections) repair groups during postoperative follow-up ( P = .89). The average incisional infection rate was 8.4% with augmented repair and 9.3% with nonaugmented repair. No significant differences in other complications were found between augmented (7.2%) and

  14. Experimental study of the effects of helium-neon laser radiation on repair of injured tendon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yong-Qing; Li, Zhu-Yi; Weng, Long-Jiang; An, Mei; Li, Kai-Yun; Chen, Shao-Rong; Wang, Jian-Xin; Lu, Yu

    1993-03-01

    Despite extensive research into the biology of tendon healing, predictably restoring normal function to a digit after a flexor tendon laceration remains one of the most difficult problems facing the hand surgeon. The challenge of simultaneously achieving tendon healing while minimizing the peritendinous scar formation, which limits tendon gliding, has captured the attention of investigators for many years. It has been said that low-power density helium-neon laser radiation had effects on anti-inflammation, detumescence, progressive wound healing, and reducing intestinal adhesions. This experimental study aims at whether helium-neon laser can reduce injured tendon adhesions and improve functional recovery of the injured tendon. Fifty white Leghorn hens were used. Ten were randomly assigned as a normal control group, the other forty were used in the operation. After anesthetizing them with Amytal, a half of the profundus tendons of the second and third foretoes on both sides of the feet were cut. Postoperatively, the hens moved freely in the cages. One side of the toes operated on were randomly chosen as a treatment group, the other side served as an untreated control group. The injured tendon toes in the treatment group were irradiated for twenty minutes daily with a fiber light needle of helium-neon laser therapeutic apparatus (wavelength, 6328 angstroms) at a constant power density of 12.74 mW/cm2, the first exposure taking place 24 hours after the operation. The longest course of treatment was 3 weeks. The control group was not irradiated. At 3 days, 1, 2, 3, and 5 weeks after surgery, 8 hens were sacrificed and their tendons were examined. The experimental results: (1) active, passive flexion and tendon gliding functional recovery were significantly better in the treatment group (p tendon at the cut site were significantly smaller in the treatment group (p tendon adhesions were significantly lighter in the treatment group (p tendon extrinsic healing, reducing

  15. Importance of anatomically locating the infrapatellar branch of the saphenous nerve in reconstructing the anterior cruciate ligament using flexor tendons,

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julio Cesar Gali

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective:To describe the path of the infrapatellar branch of the saphenous nerve (IBSN using the medial joint line, anterior tibial tuberosity (ATT, tibial collateral ligament and a horizontal line parallel to the medial joint line that passes over the ATT, as reference points, in order to help surgeons to diminish the likelihood of injuring this nerve branch during reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL using flexor tendons.Methods:Ten frozen knees that originated from amputations were examined. Through anatomical dissection performed with the specimens flexed, we sought to find the IBSN, from its most medial and proximal portion to its most lateral and distal portion. Following this, the anatomical specimens were photographed and, using the ImageJ software, we determined the distance from the IBSN to the medial joint line and to a lower horizontal line going through the ATT and parallel to the first line. We also measured the angle of the direction of the path of the nerve branch in relation to this lower line.Results:The mean angle of the path of the nerve branch in relation to the lower horizontal line was 17.50 ±6.17°. The mean distance from the IBSN to the medial joint line was 2.61 ± 0.59 cm and from the IBSN to the lower horizontal line, 1.44 ±0.51 cm.Conclusion:The IBSN was found in all the knees studied. In three knees, we found a second branch proximal to the first one. The direction of its path was always from proximal and medial to distal and lateral. The IBSN was always proximal and medial to the ATT and distal to the medial joint line. The medial angle between its direction and a horizontal line going through the ATT was 17.50 ± 6.17°.

  16. Distal limb desensitisation following analgesia of the digital flexor tendon sheath in horses using four different techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordana, M; Martens, A; Duchateau, L; Vanderperren, K; Saunders, J; Oosterlinck, M; Pille, F

    2014-07-01

    Controversy exists about the desensitisation obtained after diagnostic analgesia of the digital flexor tendon sheath (DFTS) during lameness examinations. To determine whether DFTS analgesia results in inadvertent desensitisation of the palmar/plantar digital nerves and whether this depends on the injection technique used. Crossover experimental study. The DFTS of 9 horses were injected with local anaesthetic solution and radiodense contrast medium using one of the following techniques: Proximal (at lateral proximal recess of the DFTS), Axial (axial to the lateral proximal sesamoid bone), Base (at base of the lateral proximal sesamoid bone), and Distal (at palmar/plantar mid-pastern). In total, 72 injections were performed. Skin desensitisation at the heel bulbs was tested with a dynamometer before and at 15, 30, 90 and 120 min after injection. Overall, complete desensitisation of a heel bulb at one or more time points after injection occurred in 22 limbs (30.6%). An additional 7 limbs were partially desensitised. Complete skin desensitisation occurred in 10, 3, 4 and 5 limbs using the Proximal, Axial, Base and Distal techniques respectively. Significant differences between techniques were only found at T30. The probability of skin desensitisation at the heel bulbs was 4 times higher when using the Proximal compared with the Axial and Base techniques in the forelimbs, and 3 times higher compared with the Axial and Distal techniques in the hindlimbs. Skin desensitisation nearly always occurred exclusively on the lateral heel bulb. Bilateral desensitisation only occurred in 5 limbs. Anaesthesia of the palmar/plantar digital nerves with distal limb desensitisation often occurs after DFTS analgesia. A higher chance of desensitisation exists when injecting the proximal DFTS recess. It is advisable to verify skin sensitivity at the heel bulbs after DFTS analgesia to avoid false interpretations about the origin of pain causing lameness. © 2013 EVJ Ltd.

  17. Lesões crônicas de tendões flexores na mão: reconstrução em dois estágios Chronic flexor tendon lesions: reconstruction in two stages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samuel Ribak

    2002-06-01

    Full Text Available Os autores apresentam resultados de tratamento de lesões crônicas dos tendões flexores na mão, usando técnica em dois estágios. O primeiro pelo implante de prótese de silicone e o segundo com enxerto de tendão. Dão detalhes de técnica, e analisam seus resultados comparando-os com os da literatura. Chegam a conclusão que a técnica dá resultados satisfatórios na maioria dos casos.The authors present the results of a two-stage treatment of chronic flexor tendon injuries of the hand. In the first stage a silicone prosthesis is implanted and in the second stage a tendon graft. Details of the technique and results of the analysis are presented and compared with the scientific literature. The authors concluded that satisfactory results were achieved in most of the cases.

  18. Xenograft scaffold full-wrap reinforcement of Krackow achilles tendon repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wisbeck, Jacob M; Parks, Brent G; Schon, Lew C

    2012-03-07

    Standard 4-strand repair of Achilles tendon tears is effective, but additional strength may be desirable in patients who are compromised or those with reruptures. Use of a xenograft scaffold has not been investigated biomechanically in Achilles tendon repair. This study compared stiffness, gap formation, and ultimate load to failure with Krackow repair vs Krackow repair augmented with xenograft scaffold in 6 matched pairs of fresh-frozen human lower extremities. The Achilles tendon was transected 4 cm above the calcaneal insertion. Specimens were randomized to receive standard Krackow repair or Krackow repair augmented with a porcine xenograft scaffold. The graft was wrapped around the repaired tendon, sutured to itself with 2-0 FiberWire (Arthrex, Naples, Florida), and attached to the tendon distally and proximally and then medially and laterally. Specimens were loaded for 200 cycles between 5 and 30 N. Load to 5-mm gapping and load to ultimate failure were measured. Xenograft scaffold augmentation of standard Krakow Achilles tendon repair was significantly stronger and stiffer than standard Krackow repair in a biomechanical model immediately after repair (39.0±8.8 vs 24.4±4.6 N/mm; P=.01). The augmented repair group had significantly higher load to ultimate failure than did the Krackow group (862.7±174.0 vs 479.5±65.5 N; P<.01). Biological factors remain to be investigated, but this augmentation method could provide additional strength in patients who are compromised or those with reruptures.

  19. Efficacy of a mesenchymal stem cell loaded surgical mesh for tendon repair in rats

    OpenAIRE

    Schon, Lew C.; Gill, Nicholas; Thorpe, Margaret; Davis, Joel; Nadaud, Joshua; Kim, Jooyoung; Molligan, Jeremy; Zhang, Zijun

    2014-01-01

    Objectives The purpose of this study was to investigate the efficacy of a composite surgical mesh for delivery of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) in tendon repair. Methods The MSC-loaded mesh composed of a piece of conventional surgical mesh and a layer of scaffold, which supported MSC-embedded alginate gel. A 3-mm defect was surgically created at the Achilles tendon-gastrocnemius/soleus junction in 30 rats. The tendon defects were repaired with either 1) MSC-loaded mesh; or 2) surgical mesh on...

  20. Relevância da ultra-sonografia dos tendões flexores em cavalos Puro Sangue de corrida na adaptação ao treinamento Significance of flexor tendon ultrasonography in training thoroughbred horses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolina Roxana Greig

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available Vinte e quatro potros Puro Sangue de Corrida (PSC, com dois anos de idade foram avaliados ultra-sonograficamente, durante o período final da doma e início de treinamento, através da imagem transversal dos tendões flexor digital superficial (TFDS e profundo (TFDP. As avaliações foram realizadas com intervalos de 15 dias. A área transversal (AT, a textura dos ecos e a ecogenicidade dos tendões foram avaliadas nas sete zonas da região metacarpiana através de um programa de mensuração de imagens do próprio aparelho de ultra-sonografia. Durante a doma e treinamento, houve diminuição da AT na zona IA e IIIA (PThe cross-sectional area (CSA of the superficial digital flexor tendon (SDFT and deep digital flexor tendon (DDFT of twenty four thoroughbreds was ultrasonographically evaluated before and during their initial training to determine the effect of exercise on the tendon CSA, texture and echogenicity to characterize the response to training. Ultrasonographic transverse images of the left forelimb were obtained every fifteen days. The SDFT CSA of zones IA and IIIA showed a decrease (P<0.05, f=0.010 e f=0.023 res. during the breaking and training period and an increase (P< 0.05 of zone IIIC (f=0.039. Evaluating just the training period, SDFT CSA results of zones IA, IIIA and IIIC were similar. The DDFT showed no variation during the breaking phase but when the training phase was evaluated there was a decrease (P<0.05 in zones IA (f=0.006 and IIIA (f=0.006. Evaluating both breaking and training periods the DDFT showed a decrease (P<0.05 in zones IA (f=0.027, IIIA (f=0.0001 and IIIB (f=0.0031. Fiber texture and tendon echogenicity showed no significant difference between breaking and last reading during training. This study provides evidence of variation of adaptation among the ultrasonographic zones of both SDFT and DDFT to exercise during training of thoroughbred horses. Ultra-sonography is not the most indicated method to evaluate the

  1. Percutaneous Repair Technique for Acute Achilles Tendon Rupture with Assistance of Kirschner Wire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Ze-yang; Chai, Ming-xiang; Liu, Yue-ju; Zhang, Xiao-ran; Zhang, Tao; Song, Lian-xin; Ren, Zhi-xin; Wu, Xi-rui

    2015-11-01

    The aim of this study is to introduce a self-designed, minimally invasive technique for repairing an acute Achilles tendon rupture percutaneously. Comparing with the traditional open repair, the new technique provides obvious advantages of minimized operation-related lesions, fewer wound complications as well as a higher healing rate. However, a percutaneous technique without direct vision may be criticized by its insufficient anastomosis of Achilles tendon and may also lead to the lengthening of the Achilles tendon and a reduction in the strength of the gastrocnemius. To address the potential problems, we have improved our technique using a percutaneous Kirschner wire leverage process before suturing, which can effectively recover the length of the Achilles tendon and ensure the broken ends are in tight contact. With this improvement in technique, we have great confidence that it will become the treatment of choice for acute Achilles tendon ruptures. © 2015 Chinese Orthopaedic Association and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  2. Improvement of tendon repair using muscle grafts transduced with TGF-β1 cDNA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Majewski

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Tendon rupture is a common injury. Inadequate endogenous repair often leaves patients symptomatic, with tendons susceptible to re-rupture. Administration of certain growth factors improves tendon healing in animal models, but their delivery remains a challenge. Here we evaluated the delivery of TGF-β1 to tendon defects by the implantation of genetically modified muscle grafts. Rat muscle biopsies were transduced with recombinant adenovirus encoding TGF-β1 and grafted onto surgically transected Achilles tendons in recipient animals. Tissue regenerates were compared to those of controls by biomechanical testing as well as histochemical and immunohistochemical analyses. Healing was greatly accelerated when genetically modified grafts were implanted into tendon defects, with the resulting repair tissue gaining nearly normal histological appearance as early as 2 weeks postoperatively. This was associated with decreased deposition of type III collagen in favour of large fibre bundles indicative of type I collagen. These differences in tendon composition coincided with accelerated restoration of mechanical strength. Tendon thickness increased in gene-treated animals at weeks 1 and 2, but by week 8 became significantly lower than that of controls suggesting accelerated remodelling. Thus localised TGF-β1 delivery via adenovirus-modified muscle grafts improved tendon healing in this rat model and holds promise for clinical application.

  3. Repair of Achilles tendon rupture using autologous semitendinosus graft in a kidney transplant recipient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchida, Ryohei; Natsuume, Takashi; Yoneda, Kenji; Fuji, Takeshi

    2014-01-01

    Insertional Achilles tendon injuries can be difficult to treat when minimal tendon tissue remains for anastomosis. Moreover, in the chronic case with tendon shortening, operative repair can be more difficult than acute rupture. It is particularly desirable to reinforce the tendons, in addition to performing primary repair, in patients with renal or systemic diseases because of the accelerated collagen degeneration. Many techniques have been described for the surgical management of Achilles tendon rupture; however, none has shown clear superiority. We report the case of a 50-year-old renal transplant patient with a spontaneous distal Achilles tendon injury that we repaired using the pull-out technique reinforced with an autologous semitendinosus graft. At 2 years postoperatively, the ankle-hindfoot scale score was 92 points, and the postoperative course was without complication. We believe that the free hamstring tendon autograft is advantageous for this repair, because it is easy to handle, has limited donor site morbidity, and preserves the structures around the ankle. Copyright © 2014 American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Outcome of arthroscopic subscapularis tendon repair: Are the results improving with improved techniques and equipment?: A retrospective case series

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G R Arun

    2016-01-01

    Conclusion: At a median followup of 2 years, 95% of patients had a good to excellent result after an arthroscopic subscapularis tendon repair. We conclude that the midterm results show that arthroscopic subscapularis repair remains a good option for the treatment of patients with subscapularis tendon repair.

  5. A minimally invasive "overwrapping" technique for repairing neglected ruptures of the Achilles tendon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lui, Tun Hing

    2014-01-01

    About 10% to 25% of acute ruptures of the Achilles tendon go undiagnosed for some time beyond what would be optimal for repair and a return to optimal function. Managing these chronic or neglected ruptures is a surgical challenge, because the tendon ends retract and atrophy and could develop a short, fibrous distal stump. In the present report, a patient with a ruptured right Achilles tendon, neglected for approximately 10 years, is described. The chronically injured tendon was successfully treated by overwrapping the interposed scar at the rupture site. This minimally invasive technique restored tension to the tendon, a prerequisite for which was the presence of functional triceps surae, confirmed by identification of gross contraction of the muscle during tiptoeing. The procedure is contraindicated when the scar tissue is not intact and does not have sufficient laxity to allow adequate dorsiflexion of the ankle after overwrapping the tendon or when the triceps surae are nonfunctional.

  6. Entrapment of Common Peroneal Nerve by Surgical Suture following Distal Biceps Femoris Tendon Repair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aki Fukuda

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We describe entrapment of the common peroneal nerve by a suture after surgical repair of the distal biceps femoris tendon. Complete rupture of the distal biceps femoris tendon of a 16-year-old male athlete was surgically repaired. Postoperative common peroneal nerve palsy was evident, but conservative treatment did not cause any neurological improvement. Reexploration revealed that the common peroneal nerve was entrapped by the surgical suture. Complete removal of the suture and external neurolysis significantly improved the palsy. The common peroneal nerve is prone to damage as a result of its close proximity to the biceps femoris tendon and it should be identified during surgical repair of a ruptured distal biceps femoris tendon.

  7. Clinical results of percutaneous repair of ruptured Achilles tendon with MR imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagao, Noritaka; Hamanishi, Hirotsugu (Fujiwara Hospital, Kyoto (Japan))

    1993-11-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging was performed to evaluate the usefulness of percutaneous repair according to the modified method of Bunnell for Achilles tendon rupture. The subjects were four men and 4 women, whose ages ranged from 22 to 62 years with a mean of 38.6. No surgical complications, including recurrent rupture, neurological damage and infections, were encountered. Three months after surgery, dorsiflexion of foot was recovered to the degree of the healthy foot. Jogging became possible 5 or 6 months later. The healthy Achilles tendon was seen as low signal intensity, and the ruptured site was seen as high signal intensity on T2-weighted images. Postoperative MR images showed tightness of the Achilles tendon. Signals in the repair site were shifted from isointensity to hypointensity with recovery. The tendon, mainly surrounding the reptured site, was thickened. In conclusion, MR imaging was useful in confirming the ruptured site and evaluating the condition of repair. (N.K.).

  8. Gastrocnemius myotendinous flap for patellar or quadriceps tendon repair, or both.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhomberg, M; Schwabegger, A H; Ninkovic, M; Bauer, T; Ninkovic, M

    2000-08-01

    The authors' experience with simultaneous reconstruction of the quadriceps femoris or patellar tendon or both and soft tissue defect using a musculotendinous unit of the gastrocnemius muscle is presented. Five patients with a partial or complete defect of the quadriceps or patellar tendon or both and additional large soft tissue defects underwent reconstruction applying this technique as a one-stage surgical procedure in different variations. In cases with a partial defect of the tendon or loss of tendon thickness, the thick aponeurosis from the deeper aspect of the gastrocnemius was dissected and transferred as a pedicled tendon flap to reconstruct the tendon defect. In cases with a complete defect of the tendon, the superficial layer of the Achilles tendon together with the deep aponeurotic layer of the gastrocnemius muscle served to reconstruct the tendon. In both procedures the gastrocnemius muscle belly provided soft tissue coverage and was covered with a split thickness skin graft. One patient had a marginal deep necrosis develop that had to be covered with the other gastrocnemius muscle in a second operation. One patient with chronic polyarthritis and infection of his knee prosthesis declined additional reconstruction surgery and had the leg amputated. The average followup was 3.5 years. All patients achieved good results in active extension of the knee with an extension deficit of only 5 degrees to 15 degrees. The range of flexion was at least 90 degrees. The surgical technique described in this report provides functional tendon reconstruction and adequate soft tissue repair simultaneously.

  9. Ruptured human Achilles tendon has elevated metabolic activity up to 1 year after repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eliasson, Pernilla; Couppé, Christian; Lonsdale, Markus; Svensson, René B; Neergaard, Christian; Kjær, Michael; Friberg, Lars; Magnusson, S Peter

    2016-09-01

    Following Achilles tendon rupture, running is often allowed after 6 months. However, tendon healing is slow and the metabolic status of the tendon at this point is unknown. The purpose of this study was to investigate tendon metabolism (glucose uptake) and vascularization at 3, 6 and 12 months after Achilles tendon rupture as measured using PET and power Doppler ultrasonography (PDUS). The study group comprised 23 patients with surgically repaired Achilles tendon rupture who were investigated at 3 months (n = 7), 6 months (n = 7) and 12 months (n = 9) after surgery. The triceps surae complex was loaded over 20 min of slow treadmill walking while a radioactive tracer ((18)F-FDG) was administered prior to PET. Vascularization was measured in terms of PDUS flow activity, and patient-reported outcomes were scored using the Achilles tendon rupture score (ATRS) and sports assessment (VISA-A) questionnaire. Relative glucose uptake ((18)F-FDG) was higher in repaired tendons than in intact tendons at all time-points (6, 3 and 1.6 times higher at 3, 6 and 12 months, respectively; P ≤ 0.001), and was also higher in the tendon core than in the periphery at 3 and 6 months (P ≤ 0.02), but lower at 12 months (P = 0.06). Relative glucose uptake was negatively related to ATRS at 6 months after repair (r = -0.89, P ≤ 0.01). PDUS flow activity was higher in repaired tendons than in intact tendons at 3 and 6 months (P tendon. Indeed, metabolic activity remained elevated for more than 1 year after injury despite normalized vascularization. The robust negative correlation between tendon metabolism and patient-reported outcome suggests that a high metabolic activity 6 months after the injury may be related to a poor clinical healing outcome.

  10. Surgical repair of acute Achilles tendon rupture with an end-to-end tendon suture and tendon flap.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corradino, B; Di Lorenzo, S; Calamia, C; Moschella, F

    2015-08-01

    Achilles tendon ruptures are becoming more common. Complications after open or minimally invasive surgery are: recurrent rupture (2-8%), wound breakdown, deep infections, granuloma, and fistulas. The authors expose their experience with a personal technique. In 8 patients with acute rupture of Achilles tendon the surgery was performed at least 25 days after trauma. Clinical exam and MR demonstrated in all case a total lesion of tendon. After a posterolateral skin incision the tendon stumps were debrided and suture in end-to-end fashion. A tendon flap was harvested from the proximal part of the tendon, in order to protect and reinforce the suture itself. A plaster cast was applied for 3 weeks and the patients started the rehabilitation protocol. After 4 months all patients returned to pre-injury daily activities. The mean follow up was 13 months (ranged between 6 and 24 months). No major complications occurred. The posterolateral skin incision, not above the tendon, preserves the vascularity of the soft tissues, allows identifying and not accidentally injuring the sural nerve, and prevents the cutaneous scar is overlapped the tendon. In this way is favoured physiological tendon sliding. The preparation of the flap tendon does not weaken the overall strength of the tendon and protects the tendon suture. The tension on sutured stumps is less than being spread over a larger area. In our sample of 8 patients the absence of short-and long-term complications and the rapid functional recovery after surgery suggest that the technique used is safe and effective. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Treatment of degenerative Achilles'tendon rupture using V-Y tendinous flap and transfer of flexor hallucis longus tendon%V-Y肌腱瓣结合屈(足母)长肌腱转移治疗退变的跟腱断裂

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    沈宇辉; 刘津浩; 徐向阳

    2008-01-01

    目的 介绍V-Y肌腱瓣结合屈(足母)长肌腱转移治疗退变的跟腱断裂的术式、手术指征及疗效.方法 2003年10月至2006年5月对21例跟腱断裂采用V-Y肌腱瓣结合屈躅长肌腱转移治疗,其中采用铆钉17例,界面螺钉4例.介绍该手术方法,并根据文献和实践总结手术指征. 结果 本组所有患者获得12~18个月(平均14个月)随访.根据Arner-Lindholm疗效评价标准:优19例,良2例.术后伤口均一期愈合,随访期间跟腱无再次断裂,无伤口感染,无皮肤坏死,踝关节活动好,无僵直,无神经血管损伤.行走步态基本正常,对前足推进影响不大.该术式修复强度允许跟腱早期功能锻炼. 结论 采用V-Y肌腱瓣结合足屈(足母)长肌腱治疗跟腱断裂疗效好,该术式适用于跟腱组织退变、炎症和部分缺损(<3cm)患者,术中单纯V-Y肌腱瓣修补强度不够可采用屈(足母)长肌腱转移.%Objective To introduce the technique.indication and outcome of treatment of degenerative Achilles'rupture with transfer of flexor hallucis longus tendon and V-Y tendinous flap. Methods From October 2003 to May 2006,21 cases of degenerative Achilles'tendon rupture were treated in our department using transfer of flexor hallucis longus tendon and V-Y tendinous flap.Rivets were used in 17 cases and surface screws in 4.They were followed up for 12 to 18 months(average,14). Results According to the Arner-Lindholm criteria for curative results,19 of the 21 cases were excellent and 2 good.Follow-ups revealed no Achilles'tendon re-rupture,infection,skin necrosis,stiff ankle,or injury to nerves and vessels.Walking gaits nearly recovered to normal.The repair strength allowed early functional exercise of the Achilles'tendon. Conclusion Transfer of flexor hallucis longus tendon combined with V-Y tendinous flap can cure the degenerative Achilles'tendon ruptures and defects of Achilles'tendon within 3 cm.

  12. Suture anchor repair of patellar tendon rupture after total knee arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamath, Atul F; Shah, Roshan P; Summers, Nathan; Israelite, Craig L

    2013-12-01

    Extensor mechanism disruption after total knee arthroplasty (TKA) is a complex problem that often requires surgical repair for functional deficits. We present a brief technical note on suture anchor fixation of a patellar tendon rupture after TKA. A surgical technique and literature review follows. Although suture anchor fixation is well described for tendinous repairs in other areas of orthopedic surgery, no study has discussed the use of suture anchors in patellar tendon repair after TKA. The technique must be evaluated in more patients with longer follow-up before adoption.

  13. Suture anchor repair of quadriceps tendon rupture after total knee arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Tae Won B; Kamath, Atul F; Israelite, Craig L

    2011-08-01

    Disruption of the extensor mechanism after total knee arthroplasty (TKA) is a devastating complication, usually requiring surgical repair. Although suture anchor fixation is well described for repair of the ruptured native knee quadriceps tendon, no study has discussed the use of suture anchors in quadriceps repair after TKA. We present an illustrative case of successful suture anchor fixation of the quadriceps mechanism after TKA. The procedure has been performed in a total of 3 patients. A surgical technique and brief review of the literature follows. Suture anchor fixation of the quadriceps tendon is a viable option in the setting of rupture after TKA.

  14. Biomechanical properties of Achilles tendon repair augmented with a bioadhesive-coated scaffold

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brodie, Michael; Vollenweider, Laura; Murphy, John L; Xu Fangmin; Lyman, Arinne; Lew, William D; Lee, Bruce P, E-mail: b-lee@nerites.com [Nerites Corporation, 505 S. Rosa Road, Suite 123, Madison, WI 53719 (United States)

    2011-02-15

    The Achilles tendon is the most frequently ruptured tendon. Both acute and chronic (neglected) tendon ruptures can dramatically affect a patient's quality of life, and require a prolonged period of recovery before return to pre-injury activity levels. This paper describes the use of an adhesive-coated biologic scaffold to augment primary suture repair of transected Achilles tendons. The adhesive portion consisted of a synthetic mimic of mussel adhesive proteins that can adhere to various surfaces in a wet environment, including biologic tissues. When combined with biologic scaffolds such as bovine pericardium or porcine dermal tissues, these adhesive constructs demonstrated lap shear adhesive strengths significantly greater than that of fibrin glue, while reaching up to 60% of the strength of a cyanoacrylate-based adhesive. These adhesive constructs were wrapped around transected cadaveric porcine Achilles tendons repaired with a combination of parallel and three-loop suture patterns. Tensile mechanical testing of the augmented repairs exhibited significantly higher stiffness (22-34%), failure load (24-44%), and energy to failure (27-63%) when compared to control tendons with suture repair alone. Potential clinical implications of this novel adhesive biomaterial are discussed.

  15. Outcomes of acute Achilles tendon rupture repair with bone marrow aspirate concentrate augmentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stein, Benjamin E; Stroh, David Alex; Schon, Lew C

    2015-05-01

    Optimal treatment of acute Achilles tendon ruptures remains controversial. Positive results using stem-cell-bearing concentrates have been reported with other soft-tissue repairs, but no studies exist on outcomes of bone marrow aspirate concentrate (BMAC) augmentation in primary Achilles tendon repair. We reviewed patients with sport-related Achilles tendon ruptures treated via open repair augmented with BMAC injection from 2009 to 2011. Data on operative complications, strength, range of motion, rerupture, calf circumference and functional improvement through progressive return to sport and the Achilles tendon Total Rupture Score (ATRS) were analysed. A total of 27 patients (28 tendons) treated with open repair and BMAC injection were identified (mean age 38.3 ± 9.6 years). At mean follow-up of 29.7 ± 6.1 months, there were no reruptures. Walking without a boot was at 1.8 ± 0.7 months, participation in light activity was at 3.4 ± 1.8 months and 92% (25 of 27) of patients returned to their sport at 5.9 ± 1.8 months. Mean ATRS at final follow-up was 91 (range 72-100) points. One case of superficial wound dehiscence healed with local wound care. No soft-tissue masses, bone formation or tumors were observed in the operative extremity. Excellent results, including no re-ruptures and early mobilisation, were observed in this small cohort with open Achilles tendon repair augmented by BMAC. No adverse outcomes of biologic treatment were observed with this protocol. The efficacy of BMAC in the operative repair of acute Achilles tendon ruptures warrants further study. IV - Therapeutic.

  16. Biomechanical evaluation of varying the number of loops in a repair of a physiological model of Achilles tendon rupture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grieco, Preston W; Frumberg, David B; Weinberg, Maxwell; Pivec, Robert; Naziri, Qais; Uribe, Jaime A

    2015-04-01

    Numerous suturing techniques have been described to treat Achilles tendon ruptures. No prior studies have evaluated frayed tendon ends on construct strength and whether this allows for less extensile exposure. Forty bovine Achilles tendons were divided into groups: 1 control and 4 experimental. Experimental groups were sectioned with ends frayed longitudinally in 2 mm intervals for 2 cm with no fraying for the control group. Four-stand Krackow sutures were used for repairs with 3 loops in the control group, 2 loops in frayed section for experimental groups, and varying numbers of loops (1-4) in healthy tendon. Samples were tested in loading cells at 100 N and 190 N for 1000 cycles. Gap width and maximum load failure were measured. Gapping was tendon (10.9-13.9 mm). Most early catastrophic failures (5/8) occurred in groups with 1-2 loops in healthy tendon. Two failures at 100 N occurred in 1-loop healthy tendons. The least failures occurred in controls (2/8), at 190 N. Suture loops incorporated into frayed tendon portions predisposed repairs to significantly greater gapping and lower maximal failure forces than 4-strand Krackow repairs in unfrayed tendons. We cannot recommend attempting more limited exposures with sutures in frayed tendon as this may lead to early repair failure. We provided a physiologic model utilizing frayed tendon ends that resembles in vivo Achilles tendon rupture. © The Author(s) 2014.

  17. Biomechanical study of four modified Kessler flexor tendon suture teclmiques%四种与Kessler相关的屈肌腱缝合方法的生物力学研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    柯尊山; 芮永军; 寿奎水; 汤锦波

    2009-01-01

    Objective To compare tensile strength of four different modified Kessler flexor tendon suture techniques. Methods Forty flexor digitorum profundus tendons of white pig hind limbs were transected and repaired using 4 suture techniques, with 10 tendons for each technique. The four suture techniques were Kessler, Double Kessler, Running suture and Kessler plus Running suture. After suturing, 2 mm gap formation force and failure load of the sutures were tested. One-way ANOVA was applied for statistic comparison of each technique. Results Double Kessler suture technique has the greatest tensile strength with its failure load, fonowed by Kessler plus Running suture, Kessler and Running suture. Kessler plus Running suture method had the greatest 2 mm gap formation force, followed by Double Kessler, Running suture and Kessler technique. Conclusion Kessler plus Running suture can better endure early finger active mobilization.%目的 研究四种与Kessler相关的屈肌腱缝合方法 对肌腱修复抗张强度的影响.方法 采用新鲜猪后肢跖深屈肌腱,将40根肌腱分为4组,每组10根,横行切断,以Kessler法、DoubleKessler法、Running suture法、Kessler+Running suture法缝合.检测缝合后肌腱2mm间隙形成的负荷、最大抗张强度,采用ANOVA法进行统计分析.结果 对于肌腱的横断伤,最大抗张强度DoubleKessler法Kessler+Running suture法Kessler法Running suture法. 2mm间隙形成的负荷Kessler+Running suture法Double Kessler法Rumming suture法Kessler法.结论 肌腱横行损伤修复时,采用强生3-0编织缝合线,Kessler+Running suture法能够满足临床早期功能锻炼的强度要求.

  18. Surgical repair of chronic complete hamstring tendon rupture in the adult patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cross, M J; Vandersluis, R; Wood, D; Banff, M

    1998-01-01

    Complete rupture of the hamstring tendons in the adult is a rare injury. This report discusses complete rupture of the hamstring tendons in nine patients treated by late operative repair. All patients were referred from outside centers for a second opinion after failed nonoperative treatment. The diagnosis was made quite easily on clinical grounds and was confirmed at surgery. Surgical treatment in all cases consisted of reattachment of the hamstring tendons to the origin on the ischium, and in all cases it was necessary to perform neurolysis of the sciatic nerve. Good results were achieved in all cases, at follow-up all patients were satisfied with the surgery.

  19. An Alternative Bundle-to-Bundle Suturing Technique for Repairing Fresh Achilles Tendon Rupture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Jingjing; Yu, Bin; Xie, Ming; Huang, Ruokun; Xiao, Kai

    2016-01-01

    The main concern about conventional Achilles tendon repair surgical techniques is how to maintain the initial strength of the ruptured Achilles tendon through complicated suturing methods. The primary surgical problem lies in the properties of the soft tissue; the deterioration of the Achilles tendon, especially in its elasticity; and the surface lubricity of the local tissues. In the present study, we describe an innovative bundle-to-bundle suturing method that addresses these potential problems. Copyright © 2016 American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Evidence that translocation of collagen fibril segments plays a role in early intrinsic tendon repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunn, J Stephen; Ehrlich, H Paul

    2012-02-01

    Severed tendon repair advances with either a scar through extrinsic repair or regeneration through intrinsic repair. The authors examined whether intrinsic tendon repair reintroduces embryonic fibrillogenesis, whereby preformed collagen fibril segments are incorporated into growing collagen fibers at wound edges. Isolated tendons from 10-day-old chicken embryos were suspended in 1 mg/ml of the antibiotic gentamicin for 90 days, which released fibril segments that were fluorescently tagged with rhodamine. Tendons isolated from 14-day-old chicken embryos were wounded to half their diameter and then maintained as explants in stationary organ culture. Fluorescent-tagged fibril segments were introduced to wounded tendon explants in the presence of high concentrations of neomycin, an antibiotic; cycloheximide, a protein synthesis inhibitor; cytochalasin D, a disruptor of microfilaments; and colchicine, a disruptor of microtubules. At 24 hours, explants were viewed by means of fluorescent microscopy. Untreated, wounded tendon explants showed the translocation of fluorescent-tagged fibril segments from the explant surface to accumulation at wound edges. In the presence of high concentrations of neomycin, cytochalasin D, or colchicine, fluorescent-tagged fibril segments failed to accumulate at wound edges and were retained on the explant surface. Inhibition of protein synthesis by cycloheximide did not alter the accumulation of fluorescent-tagged fibril segments at wound edges. Inhibiting fluorescent-tagged fibril segment accumulation by antibiotics is consistent with their role in releasing fibril segments. Experimental findings show fibril segment translocation and accumulation at wound edges involves microfilaments and microtubules, but not protein synthesis. The experiments support the hypothesis that intrinsic tendon repair advances through the incorporation of fibril segments at wound edges.

  1. Sonography of the Achilles Tendon After Complete Rupture Repair: What the Radiologist Should Know.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gitto, Salvatore; Draghi, Anna Guja; Bortolotto, Chandra; Draghi, Ferdinando

    2016-12-01

    This review aims to provide the radiologist with simple and systematic guidelines for evaluation of the Achilles tendon after complete rupture repair. Currently, there is a plethora of nonsurgical and surgical treatments, but sonographic examination has shown no significant differences between them. A systematic analysis of several parameters (morphologic characteristics, structure, color Doppler vascularization, and mobility) should be undertaken. Morphologically, the repaired tendon is larger, wider, or both. The loss of the fibrillary structure, inhomogeneity, and the surgical material in the context of the tendon are "normal" aspects after a repaired rupture. The presence of fluid collections when affecting greater than 50% of the surface of the tendon and extensive calcifications should be considered pathologic aspects. In the immediate postoperative period, there is the absence of vascularization detectable by color Doppler imaging. During the first 3 months, there is an increase in intratendinous vascularization with hypervascularization. From 3 to 6 months, stabilization and regression of the vascularization occur. Beyond the first 6 months, the hypervascularization is pathologic. The pattern of motion is, generally, reduced considerably more often in surgically treated tendons than in non-surgically treated ones. Elastography generally shows a hard appearance, with only a relatively heterogeneous pattern. In conclusion, a treated tendon will never regain a normal sonographic appearance, and the operator must distinguish between normal posttreatment changes and real pathologic characteristics. © 2016 by the American Institute of Ultrasound in Medicine.

  2. Postoperative MR imaging and ultrasonography of surgically repaired Achilles tendon ruptures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karjalainen, P.T. [Helsinki Univ. Central Hospital (Finland). Dept. of Radiology; Ahovuo, J. [Helsinki Univ. Central Hospital (Finland). Dept. of Radiology; Pihlajamaeki, H.K. [Helsinki Univ. Central Hospital (Finland). Dept. of Orthopaedics and Traumatology; Soila, K. [Mount Sinai Medical Center, Miami Beach, FL (United States). Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology; Aronen, H.J. [Helsinki Univ. Central Hospital (Finland). Dept. of Radiology

    1996-09-01

    Purpose: To evaluate and compare MR and US findings in an unselected group of patients with 1-3 year-old surgically repaired complete ruptures of the Achilles tendon. Material and Methods: Thirteen patients with complete Achilles tendon rupture underwent clinical, MR and US examinations. The average time interval from rupture to postoperative imaging was 18 months. Results: The cross-sectional area of a postoperative tendon was 4.2 times that of the unaffected side. The shape of the operated tendon was more rounded than the unaffected side and it had irregular margins both in MR imaging and in US examination. In 4 of 13 cases an intratendinous area of intermediate to high signal intensity on proton density- and T2-weighted images was seen on MR. The size of this area varied from 4 to 18% of the cross-sectional tendon area. Two patients with the largest intratendinous area had poor clinical outcome. On US the tendon had mixed echogenicity in all cases and the tendon bands were thinner and shorter than normal. Comparison of dimension between MR and US revealed that in a.p. dimension the correlation was good (r=0.87, p=0.001), but in transversal width there was no significant correlation (r=0.58, p=0.06). Conclusion: The increased size and round irregular area of the operated Achilles tendon rupture was well detected by both MR and US, but intratendinous lesions were seen only by MR. (orig.).

  3. A Case of Heel Cord Pain After Repair of Acute Achilles Tendon Rupture: Treated by Endoscopic Adhesiolysis of the Achilles Tendon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lui, Tun Hing

    2016-10-01

    The causes of heel cord pain after repair of acute rupture of the Achilles tendon are unclear. The proposed etiologies include nonabsorbable suture granuloma formation, alteration of the pain receptors threshold in the tendon, and distension of the paratenon by the hypertrophied tendon, underlying tendinopathy, postrepair neovascularization, and peritendinous fibrous adhesion. We present an endoscopic technique of adhesiolysis of the Achilles tendon to deal with the various possible causes of postrepair heel cord pain. Therapeutic, Level 4: Case report. © 2015 The Author(s).

  4. A leucine-rich diet and exercise affect the biomechanical characteristics of the digital flexor tendon in rats after nutritional recovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbosa, Alexandre Wesley Carvalho; Benevides, Gustavo Pereira; Alferes, Leda Maria Totti; Salomão, Emilianne Miguel; Gomes-Marcondes, Maria Cristina Cintra; Gomes, Laurecir

    2012-01-01

    An increase in the capacity of athletic performance depends on adequate nutrition, which ensures optimal function of the musculoskeletal system, including tendon stability. However, little is known about the status of tendons and extracellular matrix modifications during malnutrition and nutritional recovery when leucine is used in response to exercise conditioning. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the collagen content and biomechanical aspects of the deep digital flexor tendon (DDFT) in malnourished rats submitted to nutritional recovery (control diet or leucine-rich diet) and aerobic physical activity. After 60 days of undernourishment (6% protein diet), the malnourished rats were subsequently nutritionally recovered with a control diet or leucine-rich diet and trained or not (swimming, without overload) for 5 weeks. The biomechanical analysis and quantification of hydroxyproline were assessed in the DDFT in all experimental groups. The leucine-rich diet increased hydroxyproline content in the tension region, independently of the training. In the compression region, hydroxyproline content was higher in the malnourished and leucine-trained groups. Biomechanical analysis showed a lower load in the malnourished and all-trained groups. The lowest stress was observed with control-trained animals. The nutritional-recovered groups showed higher strain values corresponding to control group, while the lowest values were observed in malnourished and trained groups. The results suggest that a leucine-rich diet stimulates collagen synthesis of the DDFT, especially when in combination with physical exercise, and seems to determine the increase of resistance and the biomechanical characteristics of tendons.

  5. Percutaneous repair followed by accelerated rehabilitation for acute Achilles tendon ruptures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Mouazzen, Louay; Rajakulendran, Karthig; Najefi, Ali; Ahad, Nurul

    2015-12-01

    To evaluate the outcome after percutaneous repair followed by accelerated rehabilitation for acute Achilles tendon ruptures. 21 men and 9 women (mean age, 41 years) underwent percutaneous repair by a single senior surgeon for acute Achilles tendon ruptures, followed by early weight bearing and accelerated rehabilitation. Outcome measures included the Achilles tendon re-rupture rate, the Achilles tendon total rupture score (ATRS) at 3 and 6 months, the incidence of sural nerve injury, wound infection, wound dehiscence, patient satisfaction, and the time to return to pre-rupture activity. The mean follow-up period was 12.5 months. The mean ATRS score improved from 57.65 at 3 months to 86.95 at 6 months (ptendon re-rupture, sural nerve injury, wound dehiscence, or deep infection. Two patients developed a superficial wound infection, which was resolved with oral flucloxacillin. Two patients had a mass at the transverse incision, but neither had any symptoms or functional restriction. All patients were able to bear full weight comfortably without the walker boot at 8 weeks, and return to their work by 3 months. The mean time to return to pre-rupture activity, including sports, was 10.4 months. The mean satisfaction rate was 87% at 6 months. Percutaneous repair of the Achilles tendon followed by early weight bearing and accelerated rehabilitation achieves good functional outcome.

  6. MR assessment of the repaired rotator cuff: prevalence, size, location, and clinical relevance of tendon rerupture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mellado, J.M. [Hospital Reina Sofia de Tudela, Servicio de Radiodiagnostico, Tudela, Navarra (Spain); Calmet, J.; Ballabriga, J.; Gine, J. [Hospital Universitari de Tarragona Joan XXIII, Servei de Cirurgia Ortopedica i Traumatologia, Tarragona (Spain); Olona, M. [Hospital Universitari de Tarragona Joan XXIII, Servei de Medicina Preventiva i Epidemiologia, Tarragona (Spain); Camins, A. [Hospital Universitari de Tarragona Joan XXIII, Institut de Diagnostic per la Imatge, Tarragona (Spain); Perez del Palomar, L. [Hospital Ernest Lluch, Servicio de Radiologia, Calatayud, Zaragoza (Spain)

    2006-10-15

    The objectives of this study were to use magnetic resonance (MR) imaging to evaluate the prevalence, size, location, and clinical relevance of tendon rerupture following complete repair of full-thickness rotator cuff tear (RCT). A total of 78 surgically proven full-thickness rotator cuff tears in 74 patients were retrospectively included in the study. Clinical assessment was performed using the University of California at Los Angeles score. Postoperative MR imaging was evaluated to determine prevalence, size, and location of tendon rerupture. At a mean 48.4 months' follow-up, 62 shoulders (79.5%) had favorable outcomes and 45 shoulders (57.6%) showed rerupture on MR imaging studies. Reruptures were significantly more prevalent among patients with intermediate-to-bad outcomes (81.3%), with surgically demonstrated two-tendon tears (78.9%) or three-tendon tears (100%), and with preoperative fatty degeneration of the supraspinatus muscle greater than 1 (91.6%). Reruptures were also significantly larger in those subgroups. Complete repair of RCT of all sizes may have favorable outcomes in a significant proportion of patients in spite of a high prevalence of reruptures. Preoperative tear size and degree of muscle fatty degeneration influence the prevalence and rerupture size. After repair of supraspinatus tears, reruptures tend to invade the posterior aspect of the tendon. (orig.)

  7. EXPERIMENTAL STUDY ON HUMAN AMNIOTIC MEMBRANE FOR REPAIRING TENDON SHEATH DEFECT%人羊膜修复腱鞘缺损的实验研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    高鸣; 赵红芳; 田德虎; 于昆仑; 白江博; 董瑞一; 张国辉

    2013-01-01

    目的 探讨人羊膜修复鸡足趾腱鞘缺损后防止肌腱粘连的可行性和有效性.方法 取行剖腹产术产妇自愿捐赠的胎盘,制备大小为1.5 cm×1.0 cm的羊膜片.3~6月龄健康雄性来亨鸡40只,体重(1.86±0.04)kg,取双足第3趾制备肌腱、腱鞘损伤模型.“8”字缝合修复肌腱后,右足采用羊膜片修复缺损腱鞘(A组),左足缺损腱鞘不作处理(B组).术后1、2、4、6周各取10只实验动物行大体及组织学观察,并按照Tang等肌腱粘连大体观察分级标准进行分级,生物力学试验测定肌腱滑移度及总屈趾角度.结果 术后实验动物均存活至实验完成,切口均愈合良好.随术后时间延长,大体及组织学观察显示两组均有假鞘(新生腱鞘)形成,但A组假鞘较B组成熟、光滑.术后1、6周A组肌腱粘连分级均明显优于B组,差异有统计学意义(P< 0.05).生物力学试验测定示,术后1、2周两组肌腱滑移度比较,差异均无统计学意义(P> 0.05),4、6周时A组肌腱滑移度均较B组长(P<0.05).术后1、2、4、6周A组总屈趾角度均小于B组,差异有统计学意义(P<0.05).结论 采用人羊膜修复鸡腱鞘缺损能有效预防肌腱粘连,利于肌腱滑动功能的恢复.%Objective To investigate the feasibility and effect of human amniotic membrane in prevention of tendon adhension after tendon sheat defect repair. Methods The amniotic membrane in size of 1.5 cm × 1.0 cm was harvested from human placenta which was voluntary donated from maternal after cesarean. Forty healthy male Leghorn chicken (aged 3-6 months) were selected, weighing (1.86 ± 0.04) kg. The model of flexor digitorum profundus tendon and tendon sheath defects was established at the third toe. After repair of the flexor digitorum profundus tendon, the human amniotic membrane was used to repair the tendon sheath defect in the right foot (group A), but tendon sheath defect was not repaired in the left foot (group B) . At 1, 2, 4

  8. A review of surgical repair methods and patient outcomes for gluteal tendon tears.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebert, Jay R; Bucher, Thomas A; Ball, Simon V; Janes, Gregory C

    2015-01-01

    Advanced hip imaging and surgical findings have demonstrated that a common cause of greater trochanteric pain syndrome (GTPS) is gluteal tendon tears. Conservative measures are initially employed to treat GTPS and manage gluteal tears, though patients frequently undergo multiple courses of non-operative treatment with only temporary pain relief. Therefore, a number of surgical treatment options for recalcitrant GTPS associated with gluteal tears have been reported. These have included open trans-osseous or bone anchored suture techniques, endoscopic methods and the use of tendon augmentation for repair reinforcement. This review describes the anatomy, pathophysiology and clinical presentation of gluteal tendon tears. Surgical techniques and patient reported outcomes are presented. This review demonstrates that surgical repair can result in improved patient outcomes, irrespective of tear aetiology, and suggests that the patient with "trochanteric bursitis" should be carefully assessed as newer surgical techniques show promise for a condition that historically has been managed conservatively.

  9. [Early functional passive mobilization of flexor tendon injuries of the hand (zone 2) : Exercise with an exoskeleton compared to physical therapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gülke, Joachim; Mentzel, Martin; Krischak, Gert; Gulkin, David; Dornacher, Daniel; Wachter, Nikolaus

    2017-07-20

    These days there are different types of aftercare following flexor tendon injury. Patients in this study received a dynamic Kleinert protocol and additionally two different postoperative treatments. Both treatment groups were compared to each other and results were put into perspective when compared to other treatment options. Sixty-two patients presenting with clean lesions of the two flexor tendons in zone 2 received postoperative treatment with a dynamic Kleinert protocol. Patients were randomly divided into either Group I (physical therapy) or Group II (exoskeleton). Range of motion was assessed after 6, 12 and 18 weeks. In addition, we measured the Strickland score and grip strength at the 18-week follow-up. DASH scores were obtained at weeks 12 and 18. Regardless of the received postoperative treatment, range of motion was predominantly limited in the proximal interphalangeal and distal interphalangeal joints after 6 weeks. This deficit decreased with time and almost full range of motion was achieved after 18 weeks. Grip strength measured 75% (Group I) and 78% (Group II) of the healthy hand's level. Good functional outcome was observed in the DASH scores after 12 weeks, which improved further, measuring 7.5 (Group I) and 6.8 (Group II) at the 18-week follow-up. We did not see any clinically relevant differences between the two patient groups. Regarding possible reruptures, the Kleinert protocol delivers a safe treatment regime. The possible disadvantage of flexion contractures with the Kleinert protocol was not seen in our measurements. Additional motion exercises using an exoskeleton delivered comparable results to classic physical therapy.

  10. Long-term follow-up of flexor digitorum longus transfer and calcaneal osteotomy for stage II posterior tibial tendon dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chadwick, C; Whitehouse, S L; Saxby, T S

    2015-03-01

    Flexor digitorum longus transfer and medial displacement calcaneal osteotomy is a well-recognised form of treatment for stage II posterior tibial tendon dysfunction. Although excellent short- and medium-term results have been reported, the long-term outcome is unknown. We reviewed the clinical outcome of 31 patients with a symptomatic flexible flat-foot deformity who underwent this procedure between 1994 and 1996. There were 21 women and ten men with a mean age of 54.3 years (42 to 70). The mean follow-up was 15.2 years (11.4 to 16.5). All scores improved significantly (p Foot and Ankle Society (AOFAS) score improved from 48.4 pre-operatively to 90.3 (54 to 100) at the final follow-up. The mean pain component improved from 12.3 to 35.2 (20 to 40). The mean function score improved from 35.2 to 45.6 (30 to 50). The mean visual analogue score for pain improved from 7.3 to 1.3 (0 to 6). The mean Short Form-36 physical component score was 40.6 (sd 8.9), and this showed a significant correlation with the mean AOFAS score (r = 0.68, p = 0.005). A total of 27 patients (87%) were pain free and functioning well at the final follow-up. We believe that flexor digitorum longus transfer and calcaneal osteotomy provides long-term pain relief and satisfactory function in the treatment of stage II posterior tibial tendon dysfunction. ©2015 The British Editorial Society of Bone & Joint Surgery.

  11. [No influence of physiotherapy on outcome after open repair of achilles tendon ruptures?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ateschrang, A; Gratzer, C; Rolauffs, B; Glatzle, J; Weise, K; Braun, A

    2008-12-01

    Many studies have been performed to analyse the influence of surgical techniques and the postoperative aftercare after Achilles tendon ruptures on the outcome. However, there is no study investigating the influence of physiotherapy on outcome after surgical repair and standardised early functional rehabilitation of Achilles tendon rupture, so that this was the objective of the present study. In this retrospective study, 104 patients with Achilles tendon ruptures, all treated by open repair followed by a standardised early rehabilitation, were evaluated by the Thermann score. The average age was 42 years. We could identify 3 patient groups. Group I (n=23) did not receive any physiotherapy. Group II (n=41) received physiotherapy for 3-6 weeks, and group III (n=40) received more than 6 weeks of physiotherapy. Physiotherapy consisted of 3 units per week. Each unit lasted for 30 min. All groups were compared statistically via variance analysis. Group I scored on average 88.8 points, group II 88.6 and group III 87.0 points. There were no statistically significant differences between the three groups (p=0.50). The age of patients had also no relevant influence on the outcome (p=0.48). Physiotherapy and age of the patients involved were not found to influence the outcome after open augmented repair of Achilles tendon ruptures followed by a standardised early rehabilitation. These results should be confirmed by a prospective randomised trial. Also elderly patients participating in demanding sport activities should receive a surgical repair.

  12. What is the significance of tendon suture purchase?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, J B; de Wit, T; Hovius, S E R; McGrouther, D A; Walbeehm, E T

    2009-08-01

    Repairs have been performed on porcine flexor tendons and subjected to tensile stress measurements to determine the effects and mechanism of core suture purchase (the length of the suture bite). Eighty-four pig trotter flexor profundus tendons were divided and repaired using four lengths of core suture purchase (1.33, 1, 0.66 and 0.33 cm) using a double modified Kessler repair (four strands, two knots) with a peripheral epitendinous suture. Tendon purchase was achieved by either bilateral equal purchase lengths or with one tendon purchase at a fixed depth of 1 cm. A separate group of tendons were incubated in blood for 24 hours to simulate the wound environment prior to testing. Tensile tests demonstrated a progressive increase of repair strength with purchase length. With the exception of the 0.33 cm group, video analysis demonstrated the mode of failure as suture failure and not due to suture pullout. Therefore, the increase in breaking strength cannot be attributed to a better grip of the tendon ends, but to the mechanical characteristics of the suture polymer. The tendency for the incubated tendons to fail more consistently by pullout rather than suture failure, particularly in the shorter purchase lengths, emphasises the importance of studying tendon purchase in vivo. The significance of ex vivo mechanical testing should be considered with caution.

  13. Free Biceps Tendon Autograft to Augment Arthroscopic Rotator Cuff Repair

    OpenAIRE

    Obma, Padraic R.

    2013-01-01

    Arthroscopic rotator cuff repairs have become the standard of treatment for all sizes of tears over the past several years. Current healing rates reported in the literature are quite good, but improving the healing potential of rotator cuff repairs remains a challenging problem. There has been an increase recently in the use of augmentation of rotator cuff repairs with xenografts or synthetics for large and massive tears. Biceps tenodesis is often indicated as part of the treatment plan while...

  14. Prospective randomized clinical trial of aggressive rehabilitation after acute Achilles tendon ruptures repaired with Dresden technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De la Fuente, Carlos; Peña y Lillo, Roberto; Carreño, Gabriel; Marambio, Hugo

    2016-03-01

    Rupture of the Achilles tendon is a common injury during working years. Aggressive rehabilitation may provide better outcomes, but also a greater chance of re-rupture. To determine if aggressive rehabilitation has better clinical outcomes for Achilles tendon function, Triceps surae function, one-leg heel rise capacity and lower complication rate during twelve weeks after percutaneous Achilles tendon repair compared to conventional rehabilitation. Randomized controlled trial. Thirty-nine patients were prospectively randomized. The aggressive group (n=20, 41.4 ± 8.3 years) received rehabilitation from the first day after surgery. The conventional group (n=19, 41.7 ± 10.7 years) rested for 28 days, before rehabilitation started. The statistical parameters were the Achilles tendon rupture score (ATRS), verbal pain scale, time to return to work, pain medication consumption, Achilles tendon strength, dorsiflexion range of motion (RoM), injured-leg calf circumference, calf circumference difference, one-leg heel rise repetition and difference, re-rupture rate, strength deficit rate, and other complication rates. Mixed-ANOVA and Bonferroni's post hoc test were performed for multiple comparisons. Student's t-test was performed for parameters measured on the 12th week. The aggressive group with respect to the conventional group had a higher ATRS; lower verbal pain score; lower pain medication consumption; early return to work; higher Achilles tendon strength; higher one-leg heel rise repetitions; and lower one-leg heel rise difference. The re-rupture rate was 5% and 5%, the strength deficit rate was 42% and 5%, and other complications rate was 11% and 15% in the conventional and aggressive group, respectively. Patients with Dresden repair and aggressive rehabilitation have better clinical outcomes, Achilles tendon function and one-leg heel rise capacity without increasing the postoperative complications rate after 12 weeks compared to rehabilitation with immobilization and

  15. Percutaneous, Minimally Invasive Repair of Traumatic and Simultaneous Rupture of Both Achilles Tendons: A Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zietek, Pawel; Karaczun, Maciej; Kruk, Bartosz; Szczypior, Karina

    2016-01-01

    Achilles injury is a common musculoskeletal disorder. Bilateral rupture of the Achilles tendon, however, is much less common and usually occurs spontaneously. Complete, traumatic, and bilateral ruptures are rare and typically require long periods of immobilization before the patient can return to full weightbearing. A 52-year-old male was hospitalized for bilateral traumatic rupture to both Achilles tendons. No risk factors for tendon rupture were found. Blood samples revealed no peripheral blood pathologic features. Both tendons were repaired with percutaneous, minimally invasive surgery using the Achillon(®) tendon suture system. Rehabilitation was begun 4 weeks later. An ankle-foot orthosis was prescribed to provide ankle support with an adjustable range of movement, and active plantar flexion was set at 0° to 30°. The patient remained non-weightbearing with the ankle-foot orthosis device and performed active range-of-motion exercises. At 8 weeks after surgery, we recommended that he begin walking with partial weightbearing using a foot-tibial orthosis with the range of motion set to 45° plantar flexion and 15° dorsiflexion. At 10 weeks postoperatively, he was encouraged to return to full weightbearing on both feet. Beginning rehabilitation as soon as possible after minimally invasive surgery, compared with 6 weeks of immobilization after surgery, provided a rapid resumption to full weightbearing. We emphasize the clinical importance of a safe, simple treatment program that can be followed for a patient with damage to the Achilles tendons. To our knowledge, ours is the first report of minimally invasive repair of bilateral simultaneous traumatic rupture of the Achilles tendon. Copyright © 2016 American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. A composite medial plantar flap for the repair of an achilles' tendon defect: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumont, C E; Kessler, J

    2001-12-01

    The surgical management of infected necrosis of the Achilles' tendon and overlying skin is very demanding, and reconstruction with vascularized tendon and skin flaps is considered the benchmark procedure. The authors report a 65-year-old man who sustained a chronic wound after operative repair of a chronic rupture of the Achilles' tendon. A pedicled medial plantar flap including the surrounding vascularized plantar aponeurosis was elevated. The plantar aponeurosis was split and used to bridge the 4-cm-long tendon defect. The flap donor site was covered with a thin skin graft. The flap survived completely without recurrence of the infection. At the 7-month follow-up, the reconstructed Achilles' tendon showed a good functional result and a normal range of dorsi- and plantar flexion of the foot. This technique is of great interest in comparison with free flaps because it does not require vascular anastomosis in a septic environment or a secondary debulking operation, yet it still provides both vascularized tendon and skin graft.

  17. Concerted and adaptive alignment of decorin dermatan sulfate filaments in the graded organization of collagen fibrils in the equine superficial digital flexor tendon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Takafumi; Imamura, Yasutada; Suzuki, Daisuke; Hosaka, Yoshinao; Ueda, Hiromi; Hiramatsu, Kohzy; Takehana, Kazushige

    2012-02-01

    The equine superficial digital flexor tendon (SDFT) has a graded distribution of collagen fibril diameters, with predominantly small-diameter fibrils in the region of the myotendinous junction (MTJ), a gradual increase in large-diameter fibrils toward the osteotendinous junction (OTJ), and a mixture of small- and large-diameter fibrils in the middle metacarpal (MM) region. In this study, we investigated the ultrastructure of the SDFT, to correlate the spatial relationship of the collagen fibrils with the graded distribution. The surface-to-surface distances of pairs of fibrils were found to be almost constant over the entire tendon. However, the center-to-center distances varied according to fibril diameter. Decorin is the predominant proteoglycan in normal mature tendons, and has one dermatan sulfate (DS) or chondroitin sulfate (CS) filament as a side chain which is associated with the surfaces of the collagen fibrils via its core protein. We identified a coordinated arrangement of decorin DS filaments in the equine SDFT. The sizes of the decorin DS filaments detected by Cupromeronic blue staining showed a unique regional variation; they were shortest in the MM region and longer in the MTJ and OTJ regions, and a considerable number of filaments were arranged obliquely to adjacent collagen fibrils in the MTJ region. This regional variation of the filaments may be an adaptation to lubricate the interfibrillar space in response to local mechanical requirements. The results of this study suggest that the MTJ region, which receives the muscular contractile force first, acts as a buffer for mechanical forces in the equine SDFT. © 2011 The Authors. Journal of Anatomy © 2011 Anatomical Society.

  18. Effect of timing of surgical SSP tendon repair on muscle alterations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uhthoff, Hans K; Coletta, Elizabeth; Trudel, Guy

    2014-11-01

    To investigate the impacts of delayed repairs of a supraspinatus tendon tear on the supraspinatus muscle, we used an animal model data from two previously published studies in which one supraspinatus (SSP) tendon was detached. In one cohort, the rabbits were killed in groups of 10 at 4, 8, and 12 weeks. In the other cohort, a repair was done at these time points, 12 rabbits each, and the animals killed were 12 weeks later. SSP fossa volume (Muscle belly plus extramuscular fat [e-fat] volume), percentage of intramuscular fat (i-fat), and muscle tissue volume (muscle belly volume minus i-fat), as well as CT determination of e-fat and i-fat of both cohorts, were compared. Fossa volume increased (p Muscle belly and muscle tissue volumes did not increase after repair (p > 0.05), but early repair prevented further volume losses, a fact not seen after 8 and 12 weeks delay of repair. No reversal of e-fat or of i-fat occurred, in fact i-fat almost doubled after 4 weeks delay of repair (p fat results. We conclude that early repair prevented loss of muscle belly and muscle tissue volumes, but that it has no positive influence on fat accumulation. © 2014 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Perfusion of the Rotator Cuff Tendon According to the Repair Configuration Using an Indocyanine Green Fluorescence Arthroscope: A Preliminary Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sae Hoon; Cho, Won-Sang; Joung, Ho-Yun; Choi, Young Eun; Jung, Minwoong

    2017-03-01

    The disturbance of rotator cuff tendon perfusion has been connected with the suture-bridge configuration repair (SBCR) technique; however, in vivo assessments of the tendon blood supply have been problematic with other modalities. An evaluation of tissue perfusion by an indocyanine green (ICG) fluorescence arthroscope has been developed to counteract this difficulty. To verify the hindrance of perfusion in SBCR, we used an ICG fluorescence camera to compare parallel-type transosseous repair (PTR) and SBCR in rabbits immediately and at 3 days after rotator cuff repair. Controlled laboratory study. Acute rotator cuff repair was performed on the shoulders of 10 rabbits. Both shoulders were repaired using either PTR or SBCR. For PTR, simple repair was performed through 2 parallel transosseous tunnels created using a microdrill. For SBCR, 2 additional crisscross transosseous tunnels were added to mimic arthroscopic SBCR. Immediately after repair, ICG was injected through the ear vein, and images were recorded using an ICG fluorescence camera. Tendon perfusion was compared by measuring fluorescence intensity using ImageJ software in both methods. At 3 days after rotator cuff repair, a reassessment of ICG fluorescence was performed. In addition, as a subsidiary study, a comparison of each repair method and a healthy tendon was performed (PTR vs healthy tendon and SBCR vs healthy tendon). Six rabbits (3 for each comparison) were included. Immediately after rotator cuff repair, the mean (±SD) grayscale intensity of ICG fluorescence was weaker in SBCR than PTR in 10 specimens (65.9 ± 47.6 vs 84.3 ± 53.4 per pixel, respectively; P = .003). At 3 days after repair, 8 specimens were included in the analysis because suture strands failed in 2 specimens in SBCR. The mean intensity of fluorescence was still weaker in SBCR compared with PTR (52.5 ± 13.7 vs 60.2 ± 22.7 per pixel, respectively; P = .077). The mean fluorescence intensity compared with a healthy tendon was 83.2%

  20. Speckle-Tracking Sonographic Assessment of Longitudinal Motion of the Flexor Tendon and Subsynovial Tissue in Carpal Tunnel Syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Doesburg, Margriet H. M.; Yoshii, Yuichi; Henderson, Jacqueline; Villarraga, Hector R.; Moran, Steven L.; Amadio, Peter C.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives-The aim of this study was to image both tendon and subsynovial connective tissue movement in patients with carpal tunnel syndrome and healthy control volunteers, using sonography with speckle tracking. To estimate accuracy of this tracking method, we used in vivo measurements during surge

  1. Tendinopatía del tendón flexor digital superficial y desmopatía del ligamento suspensorio en caballos: fisiopatología y terapias regenerativas Superficial digital flexor tendon tendinopathy and suspensory ligament desmopathy in horses: pathophysiology and regenerative therapies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JU Carmona

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Las lesiones de tendones y ligamentos son frecuentes en caballos. Las estructuras más afectadas son el tendón digital flexor superficial (SDFT y el ligamento suspensor (LS. La forma clínica de estas patologías generalmente es crónica y de naturaleza degenerativa. Los tratamientos comúnmente empleados no producen curación definitiva del problema. Una gran mayoría de pacientes recaen o no vuelven a recuperar su capacidad atlética inicial. El avance del conocimiento molecular de la fisiopatología de las tendinopatías y desmopatías del hombre, caballo y otros animales ha permitido evidenciar la presencia de citocinas catabólicas, las cuales posiblemente sean responsables del trastorno general observado en estas patologías. El objetivo actual del tratamiento de estos problemas es la regeneración y no la reparación (cicatriz del tejido lesionado. En el caballo se han descrito tratamientos experimentales y clínicos novedosos. Estos tratamientos incluyen la inyección de aspirados de médula ósea, células madre mesenquimales, factores de crecimiento recombinantes como el factor de crecimiento insulínico tipo I y plasma rico en plaquetas (también llamado concentrado autólogo de plaquetas, entre otros. Los resultados observados han sido prometedores cuando estas novedosas terapias han sido empleadas. Sin embargo, al igual que lo que sucede con otros tratamientos, es necesario realizar más investigaciones para demostrar que su uso clínico puede ser efectivo y seguro en caballos.Tendon and ligament injuries are frequent in horses. The superficial digital flexor tendon (SDFT and the suspensory ligament (SL are the most frequently affected structures. The clinical form of these pathologies is generally chronic and degenerative. The treatments commonly used do not result in a definitive cure of the problem and most of the patients relapse or do not recover their initial athletic capacity. Advances in molecular pathophysiology of

  2. Rotator Interval Lesion and Damaged Subscapularis Tendon Repair in a High School Baseball Player

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomoyuki Muto

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In 2013, a 16-year-old baseball pitcher visited Nobuhara Hospital complaining of shoulder pain and limited range of motion in his throwing shoulder. High signal intensity in the rotator interval (RI area (ball sign, injured subscapularis tendon, and damage to both the superior and middle glenohumeral ligaments were identified using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI. Repair of the RI lesion and partially damaged subscapularis tendon was performed in this pitcher. During surgery, an opened RI and dropping of the subscapularis tendon were observed. The RI was closed in a 90° externally rotated and abducted position. To reconfirm the exact repaired state of the patient, arthroscopic examination was performed from behind. However, suture points were not visible in the >30° externally rotated position, which indicates that the RI could not be correctly repaired with the arthroscopic procedure. One year after surgery, the patient obtained full function of the shoulder and returned to play at a national convention. Surgical repair of the RI lesion should be performed in exactly the correct position of the upper extremity.

  3. Autologous tendon-derived cell-seeded nanofibrous scaffolds improve rotator cuff repair in an age-dependent fashion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huegel, Julianne; Kim, Dong Hwa; Cirone, James M; Pardes, Adam M; Morris, Tyler R; Nuss, Courtney A; Mauck, Robert L; Soslowsky, Louis J; Kuntz, Andrew F

    2017-06-01

    Rotator cuff tendon tears are one of the most common shoulder pathologies, especially in the aging population. Due to a poor healing response and degenerative changes associated with aging, rotator cuff repair failure remains common. Although cell-based therapies to augment rotator cuff repair appear promising, it is unknown whether the success of such a therapy is age-dependent. We hypothesized that autologous cell therapy would improve tendon-to-bone healing across age groups, with autologous juvenile cells realizing the greatest benefit. In this study, juvenile, adult, and aged rats underwent bilateral supraspinatus tendon repair with augmentation of one shoulder with autologous tendon-derived cell-seeded polycaprolactone scaffolds. At 8 weeks, shoulders treated with cells in both juvenile and aged animals exhibited increased cellularity, increased collagen organization, and improved mechanical properties. No changes between treated and control limbs were seen in adult rats. These findings suggest that cell delivery during supraspinatus repair initiates earlier matrix remodeling in juvenile and aged animals. This may be due to the relative "equilibrium" of adult tendon tissue with regards to catabolic and anabolic processes, contrasted with actively growing juvenile tendons and degenerative aged tendons. This study demonstrates the potential for autologous cell-seeded scaffolds to improve repairs in both the juvenile and aged population. © 2016 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res 35:1250-1257, 2017. © 2016 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Management of Extensor Tendon Injuries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffin, M; Hindocha, S; Jordan, D; Saleh, M; Khan, W

    2012-01-01

    Extensor tendon injuries are very common injuries, which inappropriately treated can cause severe lasting impairment for the patient. Assessment and management of flexor tendon injuries has been widely reviewed, unlike extensor injuries. It is clear from the literature that extensor tendon repair should be undertaken immediately but the exact approach depends on the extensor zone. Zone I injuries otherwise known as mallet injuries are often closed and treated with immobilisaton and conservative management where possible. Zone II injuries are again conservatively managed with splinting. Closed Zone III or ‘boutonniere’ injuries are managed conservatively unless there is evidence of displaced avulsion fractures at the base of the middle phalanx, axial and lateral instability of the PIPJ associated with loss of active or passive extension of the joint or failed non-operative treatment. Open zone III injuries are often treated surgically unless splinting enable the tendons to come together. Zone V injuries, are human bites until proven otherwise requires primary tendon repair after irrigation. Zone VI injuries are close to the thin paratendon and thin subcutaneous tissue which strong core type sutures and then splinting should be placed in extension for 4-6 weeks. Complete lacerations to zone IV and VII involve surgical primary repair followed by 6 weeks of splinting in extension. Zone VIII require multiple figure of eight sutures to repair the muscle bellies and static immobilisation of the wrist in 45 degrees of extension. To date there is little literature documenting the quality of repairing extensor tendon injuries however loss of flexion due to extensor tendon shortening, loss of flexion and extension resulting from adhesions and weakened grip can occur after surgery. This review aims to provide a systematic examination method for assessing extensor injuries, presentation and management of all type of extensor tendon injuries as well as guidance on

  5. Preinjury and postinjury running analysis along with measurements of strength and tendon length in a patient with a surgically repaired Achilles tendon rupture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silbernagel, Karin Grävare; Willy, Richard; Davis, Irene

    2012-06-01

    Case report. The Achilles tendon is the most frequently ruptured tendon, and the incidence of Achilles tendon rupture has increased in the last decade. The rupture generally occurs without any preceding warning signs, and therefore preinjury data are seldom available. This case represents a unique opportunity to compare preinjury running mechanics with postinjury evaluation in a patient with an Achilles tendon rupture. A 23-year-old female sustained a right complete Achilles tendon rupture while playing soccer. Running mechanics data were collected preinjury, as she was a healthy participant in a study on running analysis. In addition, patient-reported symptoms, physical activity level, strength, ankle range of motion, heel-rise ability, Achilles tendon length, and running kinetics were evaluated 1 year after surgical repair. During running, greater ankle dorsiflexion and eversion and rearfoot abduction were noted on the involved side postinjury when compared to preinjury data. In addition, postinjury, the magnitude of all kinetics data was lower on the involved limb when compared to the uninvolved limb. The involved side displayed differences in strength, ankle range of motion, heel rise, and tendon length when compared to the uninvolved side 1 year after injury. Despite a return to normal running routine and reports of only minor limitations with running, considerable changes were noted in running biomechanics 1 year after injury. Calf muscle weakness and Achilles tendon elongation were also found when comparing the involved and uninvolved sides.

  6. Enhancement of Achilles tendon repair mediated by matrix metalloproteinase inhibition via systemic administration of doxycycline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kessler, Michael W; Barr, Jerome; Greenwald, Robert; Lane, Lewis B; Dines, Joshua S; Dines, David M; Drakos, Mark C; Grande, Daniel A; Chahine, Nadeen O

    2014-04-01

    Collagenases or matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) have been shown to play an important role in the matrix degradation cascade associated with Achilles tendon rupture and disease. The goal of this study was to examine the effects of daily administration of doxycycline (Doxy) through oral gavage on MMP activity and on the repair quality of Achilles tendons in vivo. Our findings indicate that Achilles tendon transection resulted in increasing MMP-8 activity from 2 to 6 weeks post-injury, with peak increases in activity occurring at 4 weeks post-injury. Doxy adiministration at clinically relevant serum concentrations was found to significantly inhibit MMP activity after continuous treatment for 4 weeks, but not for continuous administration for shorter durations (96 h or 2 weeks). Extended doxy administration was also associated with improved collagen fibril organization, and enhanced biomechanical properties (stiffness, ultimate tensile strength, maximum load to failure, and elastic toughness). Our findings indicate that a temporal delay exists between Achilles tendon transection and associated increases in MMP-8 activity in situ. Our findings suggest that inhibition of MMP-8 at its peak activity levels ameliorates fibrosis development and improves biomechanical properties of the Achilles tendon. © 2013 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Evaluation of absorbable and nonabsorbable sutures for repair of achilles tendon rupture with a suture-guiding device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kocaoglu, Baris; Ulku, Tekin Kerem; Gereli, Arel; Karahan, Mustafa; Turkmen, Metin

    2015-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the functional and clinical results of Achilles tendon repairs with an Achilles tendon suture-guiding device using nonabsorbable versus absorbable sutures. We hypothesized that the absorbable suture would have clinical results comparable to those of the nonabsorbable suture for Achilles tendon repair with an Achilles tendon suture-guiding system. From January 2010 to September 2013, 48 consecutive patients who had sustained a spontaneous rupture of the Achilles tendon underwent operative repair with an Achilles tendon suture-guiding device using 2 different suture types. All ruptures were acute. The patients were divided equally into 2 groups according to suture type. In the nonabsorbable suture group, No. 2 braided nonabsorbable polyethylene terephthalate sutures were used, and in the absorbable suture group, braided absorbable polyglactin sutures were used. The average age of the patients was 38 years (range, 28-50 years). Functional outcome scores and complications were evaluated. All patients had an intact Achilles repair after surgery. The American Orthopaedic Foot & Ankle Society (AOFAS) hindfoot clinical outcome scores were 98 (range, 90-100) in the nonabsorbable suture group and 96.8 (range, 87-100) in the absorbable suture group. All patients returned to their previous work. The absorbable suture group had fewer postoperative complications (0%) than the nonabsorbable suture group (12.5%) (P Achilles tendon repair by an Achilles tendon suture-guiding system was associated with a lower incidence of suture reaction; however, functionally the results were not notably different from those using a traditional nonabsorbable suture. We conclude that repair with absorbable sutures is appropriate for Achilles tendon ruptures. Level II, prospective comparative study. © The Author(s) 2015.

  8. One-stage repair of hand tendon injuries by DIKFIM:a report of 126 cases%可吸收医用膜在手肌腱损伤一期修复中的应用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    程青; 刘利波; 李军尧

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the therapeutic effects of one-stage repair of hand tendon injuries by DIKFIM. Methods: 126 patients with(285 tendons) hand injuries were enrolled, 86 male and 40 female, aging from 5 to 60 years, with an average of 31.6 years. Forty-two patients were cut by glasses, 44 by knife, 28 patients by saw and 12 patients got crushed. The flexor tendon injuries(98 cases 182 tendons) in this study consisted of 11 cases(12 tendons) of Ⅰ zone, 37 cases(63 tendons) of Ⅱ zone, 26 cases(47 tendons) of Ⅲ zone, 10 cases(26 tendons) of Ⅳ zone and 14 cases(34 tendons) of Ⅴ zone. The extensor tendon injuries were 28 cases(103 tendons). Seventy-two patients complicated with injuries of blood vessel and nerve, and 55 patients also hand fingers fractures. All the patients were treated with modified Kessler method to repair tendon and given DIKFIM at one-stage, and were given early rehabilitation step by step. In the control group of 120 patients with (282 tendons) hand injuries, 78 patients were male and 42 patients were female, aging from 8 to 62 years, with an average of 33.2 years. Fifty patients were cut by glasses, 38 by knife, 22 patients saw, and 10 patients crushed. The flexor tendon injuries(88 cases 180 tendons) consisted of 14 cases( 14 tendons) of Ⅰ zone, 35 cases(64 tendons) of Ⅱ zone, 20 cases(44 tendons) of Ⅲ zone, 10 cases(22 tendons) of Ⅳ zone and 9 cases(36 tendons) of Ⅴ zone.The extensor tendon injuries were 32 cases( 102 tendons). Sixty-eight patients complicated with injuries of blood vessel and nerve, and 50 patients also hand fingers fractures. All the patients were treated with modified Kessler method to repair their tendons, and were given early rehabilitation. Results: After the treatment, 126 patients were followed up from 3 to 24 months. According to TAM standard,59 patients recovered excellently, 52 well, 10 moderately fine and 5 failed, curative rate being 88.10% (P <0.05, compared with the control group

  9. Dynamic Observation on the Effects of Different Suture Techniques on the Biomechanical Properties in the Healing of Tendons

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    To identify the best suture techniques for the tendon repair, the biomechanical properties of tendons sutured by different methods were dynamically examined. 140 chickens were divided into 2 groups equally: group A and group B. The tendon of the right side was subjected to injury-repair process, and the tendons of the left sides served as controls in both groups. In group A, "figure-of8" suture, modified Kessler suture and Bunnell suture were used for the 2nd to 4th paws respectively, while in group B, Kleinert suture, Tsuge suture and Ikuta suture were used. On the day 0, 3,7, 14, 21, 28, 42 after operation, 10 animals were sacrificed and the flexor tendons of both sides were harvested for strength test. The results showed that the initial strength of the repaired tendons and the strength after 6 weeks following tendon cut were far below those of intact tendons, irrespective of suture techniques used. With the 6 techniques, the Pmax of tendons repaired by Tsuge suture was increased continually, reaching the highest value on the 42nd day. The Pmax of tendons sutured by the modified Kessler suture was slightly lower than that by Tsuge suture, but it was increased steadily in healing. The tendons repaired by figure-of-8 suture yielded the lowest Pmax. It was concluded that Tsuge suture and modified Kessler suture were the best techniques for tendon repair.

  10. Percutaneous Tenolig(®) repair under intra-operative ultrasonography guidance in acute Achilles tendon rupture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacoste, S; Féron, J M; Cherrier, B

    2014-12-01

    Acute Achilles tendon rupture can be treated conservatively or surgically. Open surgery restores tendon continuity but carries a risk of skin complications. Tenolig(®) is a device designed for the percutaneous biological treatment of acute Achilles tendon rupture. Earlier studies found high rates of recurrent tears and nerve injury after Tenolig(®) repair. We hypothesised that intra-operative ultrasonography during Tenolig(®) repair would decrease the post-operative complication rate and improve functional outcomes. We studied 75 consecutive patients with a mean age of 39.9 years. The injury was sports-related in 82.8% of cases. Mean distance from the calcaneal tendon attachment to the tear was 5cm and mean time from injury to repair was 4.2 days. All patients underwent Tenolig(®) repair under ultrasound guidance followed by early rehabilitation therapy with partial weight bearing started after 3 weeks. Mean follow-up was 20.7 months and no patient was lost to follow-up. A single patient (1.3%) experienced rerupture and none had permanent sural nerve damage. Mean time to sports resumption was 8.6 months, with two-thirds of patients returning to their previous level of sporting activities. The mean AOFAS functional score was 95 and the mean ATRS score was 91.3. Our experience suggests that intra-operative ultrasonography, a non-invasive, widely available, and accurate tool, provided improved control of Tenolig(®) suture position. Ultrasonography provided valuable guidance during this demanding procedure and allowed the very early initiation of rehabilitation therapy. Another crucial factor is patient education about the physical therapy programme. Attention to this point allowed us to obtain robust and reliable functional outcomes in a population predominantly composed of athletes. Level IV. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  11. Repair of the torn distal biceps tendon by endobutton fixation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ravi K Gupta

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: A number of techniques have been described to reattach the torn distal biceps tendon to the bicipital tuberosity. We report a retrospective analysis of single incision technique using an endobutton fixation in sports persons. Materials and Methods: The present series include nine torn distal biceps tendons in eight patients, fixed anatomically to the radial tuberosity with an endobutton by using a single incision surgical technique; seven patients had suffered the injuries during contact sports. The passage of the endobutton was facilitated by using a blunt tipped pin in order to avoid injury to the posterior interosseous nerve. The patients were evaluated by Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder and Hand (DASH score and Mayo elbow score. Results: The average age of the patients was 27.35 years (range 21-42 years. Average follow-up was 41.5 months (range 24-102 months. The final average flexion extension arc was 0°-143°, while the average pronation and supination angles were 77° (range 70°-82° and 81° (range 78°-85°, respectively at the last followup. All the patients had a Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder and Hand (DASH score of 0 and a Mayo elbow score of 100 each. All the seven active sports persons were able to get back to their respective game. There was no nerve injury or any other complication. Conclusions: The surgical procedure used by us is a simple, safe and reproducible technique giving minimal morbidity and better cosmetic results.

  12. Tissue-engineered tendon constructs for rotator cuff repair in sheep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novakova, Stoyna S; Mahalingam, Vasudevan D; Florida, Shelby E; Mendias, Christopher L; Allen, Answorth; Arruda, Ellen M; Bedi, Asheesh; Larkin, Lisa M

    2017-06-28

    Current rotator cuff repair commonly involves the use of single or double row suture techniques, and despite successful outcomes, failure rates continue to range from 20 to 95%. Failure to regenerate native biomechanical properties at the enthesis is thought to contribute to failure rates. Thus, the need for technologies that improve structural healing of the enthesis after rotator cuff repair is imperative. To address this issue, our lab has previously demonstrated enthesis regeneration using a tissue-engineered graft approach in a sheep anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) repair model. We hypothesized that our tissue-engineered graft designed for ACL repair also will be effective in rotator cuff repair. The goal of this study was to test the efficacy of our Engineered Tissue Graft for Rotator Cuff (ETG-RC) in a rotator cuff tear model in sheep and compare this novel graft technology to the commonly used double row suture repair technique. Following a 6-month recovery, the grafted and contralateral shoulders were removed, imaged using X-ray, and tested biomechanically. Additionally, the infraspinatus muscle, myotendinous junction, enthesis, and humeral head were preserved for histological analysis of muscle, tendon, and enthesis structure. Our results showed that our ETC-RCs reached 31% of the native tendon tangent modulus, which was a modest, non-significant, 11% increase over that of the suture-only repairs. However, the histological analysis showed the regeneration of a native-like enthesis in the ETG-RC-repaired animals. This advanced structural healing may improve over longer times and may diminish recurrence rates of rotator cuff tears and lead to better clinical outcomes. © 2017 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res. © 2017 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Professional Athletes' Return to Play and Performance After Operative Repair of an Achilles Tendon Rupture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trofa, David P; Miller, J Chance; Jang, Eugene S; Woode, Denzel R; Greisberg, Justin K; Vosseller, J Turner

    2017-06-01

    Most Achilles tendon ruptures are sports related. However, few studies have examined and compared the effect of surgical repair for complete ruptures on return to play (RTP), play time, and performance across multiple sports. To examine RTP and performance among professional athletes after Achilles tendon repair and compare pre- versus postoperative functional outcomes of professional athletes from different major leagues in the United States. Cohort study; Level of evidence, 3. National Basketball Association (NBA), National Football League (NFL), Major League Baseball (MLB), and National Hockey League (NHL) athletes who sustained a primary complete Achilles tendon rupture treated surgically between 1989 and 2013 were identified via public injury reports and press releases. Demographic information and performance-related statistics were recorded for 2 seasons before and after surgery and compared with matched controls. Statistical analyses were used to assess differences in recorded metrics. Of 86 athletes screened, 62 met inclusion criteria including 25 NBA, 32 NFL, and 5 MLB players. Nineteen (30.6%) professional athletes with an isolated Achilles tendon rupture treated surgically were unable to return to play. Among athletes who successfully returned to play, game participation averaged 75.4% ( P .05). When individual sports were compared, NBA players were most significantly affected, experiencing significant decreases in games played, play time, and performance. An Achilles tendon rupture is a devastating injury that prevents RTP for 30.6% of professional players. Athletes who do return play in fewer games, have less play time, and perform at a lower level than their preinjury status. However, these functional deficits are seen only at 1 year after surgery compared with matched controls, such that players who return to play can expect to perform at a level commensurate with uninjured controls 2 years postoperatively.

  14. Magic angle effect on low field magnetic resonance images in the superficial digital flexor tendon in the equine proximal pastern region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherlock, C E; Mair, T S

    2016-11-01

    Recognition of artefacts is an essential component of the accurate interpretation of diagnostic images. This study aimed to investigate the presence of magic angle effect in the superficial digital flexor tendon (SDFT) in the equine proximal pastern region. The proximal pastern of four cadaver limbs was imaged using a 0.27 Tesla magnet with high-resolution sequences that are commonly utilised in clinical equine practice. The limbs were imaged in a neutral position and positions that simulated the horse 'leaning in', 'leaning out' and having internal and external rotation of the distal limb. Signal intensity changes in the SDFT were described and compared. The simulated 'leaning in' and external rotation positions resulted in increased signal intensity in the axial and middle thirds of the lateral half of the SDFT on sequences with short echo times. The simulated 'leaning out' and internal rotation positions resulted in increased signal intensity in the axial and middle thirds of the medial half of the SDFT on sequences with short echo times. These signal intensity changes did not occur or were only mild and inconsistent on T2 fast spin echo sequences with longer echo times. The increases in signal intensity in the SDFT are consistent with a position-induced magic angle artefact that has been noted in clinical cases. Attention to positioning of the equine distal limb is essential during clinical imaging; radiologists should be aware of position-induced artefacts to ensure accurate image interpretation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Comparison of Transverse Intraosseous Loop Technique and Pull Out Suture for Reinsertion of the Flexor Digitorum Profundus tendon. A Retrospective Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rigó, István Zoltán; Røkkum, Magne

    2013-12-01

    We compared the results of two methods for reinsertion of flexor digitorum profundus tendons retrospectively. In 35 fingers of 29 patients pull-out suture and in 13 fingers of 11 patients transverse intraosseous loop technique was performed with a mean follow-up of 8 and 6 months, respectively. Eleven and nine fingers achieved "excellent" or "good" function according to Strickland and Glogovac at 8 weeks; 20 and ten at the last control in the pull-out and transverse intraosseous loop groups, respectively. The difference at 8 weeks was statistically significant in favour of the transverse intraosseous loop group. Ten patients underwent 12 complications in the pull-out group (four superficial infections; one rerupture, one PIP and one DIP joint contracture, one adhesion, two granulomas, one nail deformity and one carpal tunnel syndrome) and four of them were reoperated (one carpal tunnel release, one teno-arthrolysis and two resections of granuloma). There was no complication and no reoperation in the transverse intraosseous loop group, the difference being statistically significant for the former. In our study the transverse intraosseous loop technique seemed to be a safe alternative with possibly better functional results compared to the pull-out suture.

  16. Septic ankle with purulence tracking up the flexor hallucis longus tendon sheath leading to deep venous thrombosis/pulmonary embolism and compartment syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waryasz, Gregory R; McClure, Philip; Vopat, Bryan G

    2015-06-01

    The differential diagnosis for lower extremity swelling and ankle pain is broad and can have overlapping and related diagnoses. If there is concern for more than one diagnosis, the practitioner should perform a thorough physical examination, order the appropriate studies, and perform the correct procedures to completely diagnose and treat the patient. This article presents the case of a 19-year-old male who presented with 5 days of left ankle pain, fevers, and swelling without any known trauma to the area. Physical examination was concerning for a septic ankle joint, cellulitis, deep venous thrombosis, and compartment syndrome. Duplex venous ultrasound confirmed a deep venous thrombosis in the popliteal vein. Joint aspiration of the ankle had gross purulence with the presence of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus. The patient was taken emergently to the operating room where he was found to have gross purulence in the deep posterior compartment, medial and lateral soft tissues of the ankle, and gross purulence in the ankle joint. The deep posterior compartment also had significant muscle necrosis and evidence of compartment syndrome. This case presents the possibility of a septic ankle leading to compartment syndrome and deep venous thrombosis/pulmonary embolism due to the intra-articular nature of the flexor hallucis longus tendon sheath. Case report, Level IV. © 2014 The Author(s).

  17. 拇长屈肌腱转位结合挤压螺钉重建KuwadaⅣ型陈旧性跟腱断裂%Flexor hallucis tendon transfer combined with an interference screw reconstruction for chronic Achilles tendon rup-ture of Kuwada IV

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杜俊锋; 朱仰义

    2015-01-01

    Objective:To explore the clinical effect of interference screw and flexor hallucis longus tendon as augmenta⁃tion material in repair of chronic Achilles tendon rupture. Methods:From September 2010 to June 2012,26 patients with chronic Achilles tendon rupture were treated,including 18 males and 8 females with an average age of 44.2 years old(20 to 66 years old). All patients were unilateral damage. MRI showed the Achilles tendon ends' distance was 6.0 to 9.0 cm. The postoperative complications were observed. The curative effect was assessed by American Orthopedic Foot and Ankle Society and Leppilahti score. Results:All the 26 patients were followed up for 18 to 68 months(means 30.4 months). No neurological injury and infection of incision occurred,all patients were stage I incision healing. The shape and function of the ankle were re⁃covered well. The average AOFAS score increased from 52.27±12.30 preoperatively to 90.92±6.36 postoperatively. Leppilahti Achilles Tendon Repair score increased from 34.23 ± 12.86 preoperatively to 90.00 ± 5.10 postoperatively. Conclusion:The flexor hallucis tendon transfer with an interference screw technique for repairing the chronic Achilles tendon rupture of type IV of Kuwada had advantages of simple operation,quick recovery,firm tendon fixation,and less complications.%目的:探讨拇长屈肌腱转位后应用挤压螺钉重建陈旧性KuwadaⅣ型跟腱断裂的临床效果。方法:回顾性分析2010年9月至2012年6月,拇长屈肌腱转位后采用挤压螺钉固定重建26例陈旧性跟腱断裂患者的临床资料,其中男18例,女8例;年龄20~66岁,平均44.2岁。所有患者为单侧损伤。MRI显示跟腱断端距离为6.0~9.0 cm。观察术后并发症情况,并采用美国足踝外科协会(American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society,AOFAS)踝与后足评分及Leppilahti跟腱修复评分进行评价疗效。结果:26例获得随访,时间18~68个月,平均30.4个月。

  18. The Neglected Achilles Tendon Rupture Repaired With Allograft: A Review of 14 Cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ofili, Kene P; Pollard, Jason D; Schuberth, John M

    Various surgical techniques have been reported for the repair of neglected Achilles tendon ruptures, including V-Y advancements, synthetic augmentations, and collagen implants. The use of an Achilles tendon allograft allows bridging of large defects without donor site morbidity, with a relative ease of technique and adequate graft availability. The present retrospective report focused on the outcomes of a series of 14 patients with neglected ruptures treated with an Achilles tendon allograft. Patients were included in the present series if they had ≥12 months of postoperative follow-up data available and the allograft had been used without any adjunctive procedures. Of the 14 patients, 6 were female (43%) and 8 were male (57%), with a mean follow-up period of 16.1 ± 3 (range 12 to 27) months. The mean interval from the initial injury to surgery was 6.9 ± 5 (range 1 to 28) months. The mean intraoperative defect size was 7.0 ± 3 (range 4 to 15) cm. A calcaneal block was used in 2 patients (14%). All patients were able to perform a single heel rise at a mean of 27 ± 11 (range 12 to 37) weeks postoperatively. Weightbearing in normal shoe gear was achieved at a mean of 13.5 ± 3 (range 12 to 17) weeks. Complications included 1 delayed union (7%) of the calcaneal bone block. Repair of the neglected Achilles tendon rupture with an allograft appears to be an acceptable approach, with good overall outcomes and low risk. These results suggest that this method of repair compares favorably with established alternatives. Copyright © 2016 American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Performance outcomes after repair of complete achilles tendon ruptures in national basketball association players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amin, Nirav H; Old, Andrew B; Tabb, Loni P; Garg, Rohit; Toossi, Nader; Cerynik, Douglas L

    2013-08-01

    A complete rupture of the Achilles tendon is a devastating injury. Variables affecting return to competition and performance changes for National Basketball Association (NBA) players are not readily evident. Players in the NBA who ruptured their Achilles tendons and who underwent surgical repair would have more experience in the league, and the performance of those who were able to return to competition would be decreased when compared with their performance before injury and with their control-matched peers. Cohort study; Level of evidence, 3. Data for 18 basketball players with Achilles tendon repair over a 23-year period (1988-2011) were obtained from injury reports, press releases, and player profiles. Variables included age, body mass index (BMI), player position, and number of years playing in the league. Individual season statistics were obtained, and the NBA player efficiency rating (PER) was calculated for 2 seasons before and after injury. Controls were matched by playing position, number of seasons played, and performance statistics. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed to assess the effect of each factor. At the time of injury, the average age was 29.7 years, average BMI was 25.6, and average playing experience was 7.6 years. Seven players never returned to play an NBA game, whereas 11 players returned to play 1 season, with 8 of those players returning for ≥2 seasons. Players who returned missed an average of 55.9 games. The PER was reduced by 4.57 (P = .003) in the first season and by 4.38 (P = .010) in the second season. When compared with controls, players demonstrated a significant decline in the PER the first season (P = .038) and second season (P = .081) after their return. The NBA players who returned to play after repair of complete Achilles tendon ruptures showed a significant decrease in playing time and performance. Thirty-nine percent of players never returned to play.

  20. Repair of Double Head Pectoralis Major Tendon Avulsion into its Native Footprint Using Bi-cortical EndoButtons and Tendon Sliding Technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prabhu, Jagadish; Faqi, Mohammed Khalid; Alkhalifa, Fahad; Tayara, Bader Kamal; Awad, Rashad Khamis

    2017-01-01

    Injuries to the pectoralis major muscle are relatively infrequent. The mechanism of injury is usually an eccentric shortening of the pectoralis major under heavy load, such as when performing a bench press exercise. We report a case that presented to us with a history of sudden pain in the left pectoral region while doing heavy bench press exercise. The patient sustained a type III D pectoralis muscle –tendon avulsion. Surgical repair was done through a bi-cortical tendon sliding technique using two cortical buttons. In this article we describe our modifications to the previously described surgical technique for the pectoralis major tendon repair using the EndoButton and tension – slide technique, aiming to overcome the possible complications. PMID:28217216

  1. MOLECULAR PATHOBIOLOGICAL AND SCANNING ELECTRON MICROSCOPIC CHANGES IN HORSE TENDON CELLS TREA TED WITH ENROFLOXACIN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Khan1 and J. Halper

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available Fluoroquinolone (FQNL antibiotics have been used widely in horses because of their broad-spectrum bactericidal activity and relative safety, however, their use is not without risk. Tendonitis and spontaneous tendon rupture have been reported in people during or following therapy with FQNLs. To evaluate the potential damage of enrofloxacin (ENRO on the equine superficial digital flexor tendon (SOFT, an equine cell culture system as an in vitro model of equine tendon injury and repair was developed. The effects of ENRO on tendon cell cultures established from equine SOFT were studied. The data thus collected demonstrated that ENRO inhibited cell proliferation, induced morphological changes and altered proteoglycan synthesis in equine tendon cell cultures. Interestingly, these effects were more pronounced in juvenile tendon cells as compared to adult horses, It. is hypothesized that morphological changes and inhibition of cell proliferation is a result of impaired production of proteoglycans and other glycoproteins in the extracellular matrix of ENRO-treated tendon cells.

  2. Hyaluronic Acid Accelerates Tendon-to-Bone Healing After Rotator Cuff Repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honda, Hirokazu; Gotoh, Masafumi; Kanazawa, Tomonoshin; Ohzono, Hiroki; Nakamura, Hidehiro; Ohta, Keisuke; Nakamura, Kei-Ichiro; Fukuda, Kanji; Teramura, Takeshi; Hashimoto, Takashi; Shichijo, Shigeki; Shiba, Naoto

    2017-09-01

    There is growing evidence that the subacromial injection of hyaluronic acid (HA) is effective for pain relief in rotator cuff tears; however, its effect on tendon-to-bone healing remains unknown. To examine the effect of HA on the chondrogenesis of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) in vitro and on tendon-to-bone healing in a rotator cuff repair model. Controlled laboratory study. Bilateral complete tears of the infraspinatus tendon were made in rabbits and subsequently repaired. Before closure, 1 mL HA was applied to the repaired site, and phosphate-buffered saline was used in the opposite side as a control. Biomechanical, histological, and immunohistochemical analyses were performed at 4, 8, and 12 weeks after surgery. After euthanizing each animal, the bone marrow was isolated from the femoral bone in the same rabbits. Then, MSCs were cultured in media for chondrogenic differentiation, and the chondral pellet production and cartilage-related gene expression levels in the cells were examined at various concentrations of HA. At 4 and 8 weeks after surgery, ultimate load-to-failure was significantly greater in the HA group than in the control group (45.61 ± 9.0 N vs 32.42 ± 9.4 N at 4 weeks, 90.7 ± 16.0 N vs 66.97 ± 10.0 N at 8 weeks; both P .05). Linear stiffness was not significant throughout the time point evaluation. The chondroid formation area at the tendon-bone interface stained by safranin O (control vs HA group) was 0.33% ± 0.7% versus 13.5% ± 12.3% at 4 weeks after surgery ( P .05), and 1.8% ± 4.0% versus 5.4% ± 4.2% at 12 weeks after surgery ( P > .05). Compared with the control group, HA significantly increased the volume of cartilaginous pellet produced by MSCs (0.0016 ± 0.0015 mm(3) at 0 mg/mL of HA, 0.0041 ± 0.0023 mm(3) at 1.0 mg/mL, and 0.0041 ± 0.0018 mm(3) at 4.0 mg/mL), with increased mRNA expression (relative ratio to control) of type 2 collagen (1.34 ± 0.38), SOX9 (1.58 ± 0.31), and aggrecan (1.30 ± 0.22) genes in the pellet ( P

  3. [PART-KESSLER TECHNIQUE WITH SUTURE ANCHOR IN REPAIR OF SPONTANEOUS Achilles TENDON RUPTURE].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Jie; Duan, Liang; Li, Weiwei; Wei, Wenbo

    2016-02-01

    To summarize the application and experience of repairing spontaneous Achilles tendon rupture by part-Kessler technique with suture anchor. Between January 2011 and December 2013, 31 patients with spontaneous Achilles tendon rupture were treated by part-Kessler technique with suture anchor. Of 31 cases, 23 were male and 8 were female, aged 16-53 years (mean, 38 years). The left side was involved in 15 cases and the right side in 16 cases. The causes of injury included sudden heel pain and walking weakness during sports in 22 cases; no surefooted down-stairs, slip, and carrying heavy loads in 9 cases. The distance from broken site to the calcaneus adhension of Achilles tendon was 3-6 cm (mean, 4.2 cm). The time from injury to operation was 7 hours to 4 days (mean, 36.8 hours). All incisions healed by first intention without nerve injury or adhering with skin. The patients were followed up 6-24 months (mean, 15 months). All patients could complete 25 times heel raising without difficulty at 6 months after operation. No Achilles tendon rupture occurred again during follow-up. At 6 months after operation, the range of motion of the ankle joint in dorsiflexion and plantar flexion showed no significant difference between normal and affected sides (t=0.648, P=0.525; t=0.524, P=0.605). The circumference of the affected leg was significantly smaller than that of normal leg at 6 months after operation (t=2.074, P=0.041), but no significant difference was found between affected and normal sides at 12 months after operation (t=0.905, P=0.426). The American Orthopedic Foot and Ankle Society (AOFAS) scores at 6, 12, 18, and 24 months after operation were significantly higher than preoperative score (P0.05). Repairing spontaneous Achilles tendon rupture by part-Kessler technique with suture anchor can supply strong strain and decrease the shear forces of suture. So part-Kessler technique with suture anchor is successful in repairing spontaneous Achilles tendon rupture.

  4. Early active mobilisation versus immobilisation after extrinsic extensor tendon repair: A prospective randomised trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R K Patil

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Whether to splint the extensor tendon repairs or to mobilise them early is debatable. Recently, mobilisation has shown favourable results in a few studies. This study was aimed to compare the two favoured protocols (immobilisation vs. early active motion in Indian population. Patients and Methods: Between June 2005 and June 2007, patients with extensor tendon injuries in zones V-VIII were randomly distributed in two groups: Group A, early active motion; and group B, immobilisation. Their results at 8 and 12 weeks and 6 months were compared. Results: Patients in early active motion group were found to have better total active motion and early return to work. This difference was statistically significant up to 12 weeks, but not at 6 months. Conclusion: Early active motion following extensor tendon repair hastens patients′ recovery and helps patients to gain complete range of motion at earlier postoperative period. With improved grip strength, the early return to work is facilitated, though these advantages are not sustained statistically significantly over long term.

  5. 肌腱损伤的修复材料%Materials for repair of tendon injury

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陆勇军; 刘富顺

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Currently, there are many problems that need to be solved in tendon repair research, including mechanismresearch of tendon suture and adhesion, exaltation the quality of tendon healing, improvement of suture materials and methods,study on tensile strength between joint of tendon, as well as biomaterials of tissue-engineered tendon. These are importantissues that affect the research and development of tendon repair.OBJECTIVE: To assess the trend of the academic literature in the field of the material for repair of tendon injuries and to providereference for depth analysis by using Web of Science database.DESIGN: Bibliometric data analysis.DATA RETRIEVAL: An electronic search was performed by the first author in Web of Science database for related literature ofmaterial in repair of tendon injury using the key words of "tendon injury", "material" and "repair", from 2002-01 to 2011-12, todescribe its distribution characteristics.SELECTION CRITERIA: Peer-reviewed study on material for repair of tendon injuries of published literature, including the type ofdocument of article, review, proceeding paper. Exclusive criteria: ?The article need to be collected by manual searches andphone retrieval. ?Unpublished papers. ?Correction.MAIN OUTCOME MEASUREMENTS: In SCI database, academic journal articles published year, literature number, subjectcategory, type of document, authors, source journals, proceeding paper, institutions, distribution of the country and region,distribution of the funds, language of Journal, literature citations were analyzed.RESULTS: ?A total of 156 research literature related to material for repair of tendon injuries were retrieved in Web of Sciencedatabase in the past 10 years. There are 141 articles and 13 reviews. From the trends of the number of literature, the number ofpapers was gradually increased. The number of related literatures in this field reached a peak in 2009 (n=28). The studies werefocused on bone science and surgery, followed

  6. Surgical repair of the gluteal tendons: a report of 72 cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, Michael J; Walton, Judie R; Walsh, Nichola A

    2011-12-01

    Lateral hip pain is a common problem in middle-aged women. This pain is usually attributed to trochanteric bursitis and treated as such. This study reports the results of investigation, the findings at surgery, the operative technique, the histopathologic findings, and the results of gluteal tendon repair in 72 patients with long-standing trochanteric pain and reports a classification of the operative findings. Six patients (7%) in the original study cohort of 89 patients were lost to follow-up, but of the remaining patients, 65 of 72, or 90%, were pain-free or had minimal pain (P gluteal tendons causing chronic lateral hip pain addresses the problem directly and reliably relieves the symptoms of so-called "trochanteric bursitis."

  7. Artificial tendon materials in repair of sports-induced tendon injury%人工肌腱材料与运动性肌腱损伤的修复

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    谢黎红

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Sports- or disease-induced tendon injury often leads to limb dysfunction if not be repaired in time, following an implantation of artificial tendon, the tissue can be formed similar to biological tendon.OBJECTIVE: To analyze the principle of sports tendon injury and application value of artificial tendon in sports tendon injuries.METHODS: PubMed database and CNKI database were searched from 1990 to 2010 for articles about the application of artificial tendon in sports tendon injury.RESULTS AND CONCLUSION: Excessive exercise can lead to tendon injuries, artificial tendon comprises cells, growth factors,and biodegradable materials. Once implanted into human body, artificial tendon can restore the original biological characteristics of tendon, some tendons can even proliferate and synthesize collagen. With the artificial tendon scaffold degrades, a new tendon tissue will be gradually form in the patient's body with similar function and morphology to normal tendon. More new artificial tendons for treatment of sports tendon injury and fracture will appear with the development of tissue engineering.%背景:运动或疾病导致肌腱损伤,若未予以及时修复常会导致肢体功能障碍,植入人工肌腱后,可形成类似生物腱的组织.目的:分析运动导致肌腱损伤的原理,以及人工肌腱在运动导致的肌腱损伤的应用价值.方法:作者检索1990/2010 PubMed数据库及中国知网数据库检索与人工肌腱在运动导致的肌腱损伤的应用的相关研究.结果与结论:过度运动可导致肌腱断裂损伤,人工肌腱由细胞、生长因子及可降解生物材料构成,在植入人体后,能恢复患者肌腱原有的生物学特性,部分人工肌腱甚至可以增殖和合成胶原.随人工肌腱支架材料的降解,患者体内将逐渐形成在功能和形态上与正常肌腱相似的新生肌腱组织.且随组织工程学的发展,将出现更多应用于运动导致的肌腱损伤、断裂等疾病治疗的新型人工肌腱.

  8. Radiological and Clinical Evaluation of the Transosseous Cortical Button Technique in Distal Biceps Tendon Repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caekebeke, Pieter; Vermeersch, Nicolas; Duerinckx, Joris; van Riet, Roger

    2016-12-01

    One of the options to repair a ruptured distal biceps tendon to the radial tuberosity is by means of a transosseous cortical button. Although excellent functional outcomes have been reported, no studies have been performed to quantify the effect of the transosseous fixation technique on the radius. Our study evaluated the clinical outcome and radiological outcome of this technique. The main goal of this study was to evaluate the radiographic evolution of the bone tunnel in the radius. Patients with an acute distal biceps tendon rupture treated with a transosseous cortical button were invited to take part in the study. Fourteen patients were included in the final analysis. All patients were evaluated both clinically and by computed tomography scanning of the proximal radius after a minimum follow-up of 2 years. Outcomes were recorded using the visual analog scale score for pain, the Mayo Elbow Performance Score, and Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder, and Hand scores. Bone tunnel volume was measured with semiautomated computed tomography segmentation using image-processing software. There were no failures of fixation in the patient group examined. Elbow mobility, arm, and forearm circumference were symmetric for all patients. Average visual analog scale for pain was less than 2. Mean Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder, and Hand score and Mayo Elbow Performance Score were 2.3 and 97.6, respectively. Computed tomography images showed an average closure of the radial bony tunnel of 64% of the initial volume. Biceps tendon repair with cortical button fixation only shows partial tunnel closure. This could reduce the risk of potential complications due to osteolysis, such as radius fracture or hardware failure. Functional results were excellent and comparable to other fixation methods. The role of interference screws in transosseous cortical button techniques to strengthen the repair and to avoid osteolysis may therefore be questioned. Therapeutic IV. Copyright © 2016

  9. Ligament and tendon repair with an absorbable polymer-coated carbon fiber stent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, H; Weiss, A B; Parsons, J R

    1986-01-01

    Ribbon-like composite structures of filamentous carbon fiber and absorbable polymers have been used in the repair and replacement of both tendons and ligaments. The composite acts as a scaffold upon which new collagenous tissue can grow and has proved successful in a variety of animal models. The results of the first three years of human clinical trials have revealed ingrowth potential similar to that seen in the animal studies. Most patients have shown significant improvement, with many demonstrating good to excellent stability and function.

  10. A Prospective Study of Platelet-Rich Plasma as Biological Augmentation for Acute Achilles Tendon Rupture Repair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian Zou

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Acute Achilles tendon rupture is one of the most common tendon injuries in adults. We hypothesized that Platelet-Rich Plasma (PRP can be used as biological augmentation for surgical treatment of acute Achilles tendon rupture. Our study is a prospective randomized controlled trial. Patients with acute Achilles tendon rupture undergoing surgical repair were randomly assigned into either control group or PRP group. End-to-end modified Krackow suture was performed in both groups. In the PRP group, PRP was injected into the paratenon sheath and around the ruptured tissue after the tendon was repaired. Postoperatively we evaluated isokinetic muscle strength at 3, 6, 12, and 24 months. In addition, ankle ROM, calf circumference, Leppilahti score, and the SF-36 score were evaluated at 6, 12, and 24 months after operation. At 3 months, the PRP group had better isokinetic muscle. The PRP group also achieved higher SF-36 and Leppilahti scores at 6 and 12 months. At 24 months, the PRP group had an improved ankle range of motion compared to the control group. Our study results suggest that PRP can serve as a biological augmentation to acute Achilles tendon rupture repair and improves both short and midterm functional outcomes.

  11. A Prospective Study of Platelet-Rich Plasma as Biological Augmentation for Acute Achilles Tendon Rupture Repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Jian; Mo, Xiaolian; Shi, Zhongmin; Li, Tanzhu; Xue, Jianfeng; Mei, Guohua; Li, Xiaolin

    2016-01-01

    Acute Achilles tendon rupture is one of the most common tendon injuries in adults. We hypothesized that Platelet-Rich Plasma (PRP) can be used as biological augmentation for surgical treatment of acute Achilles tendon rupture. Our study is a prospective randomized controlled trial. Patients with acute Achilles tendon rupture undergoing surgical repair were randomly assigned into either control group or PRP group. End-to-end modified Krackow suture was performed in both groups. In the PRP group, PRP was injected into the paratenon sheath and around the ruptured tissue after the tendon was repaired. Postoperatively we evaluated isokinetic muscle strength at 3, 6, 12, and 24 months. In addition, ankle ROM, calf circumference, Leppilahti score, and the SF-36 score were evaluated at 6, 12, and 24 months after operation. At 3 months, the PRP group had better isokinetic muscle. The PRP group also achieved higher SF-36 and Leppilahti scores at 6 and 12 months. At 24 months, the PRP group had an improved ankle range of motion compared to the control group. Our study results suggest that PRP can serve as a biological augmentation to acute Achilles tendon rupture repair and improves both short and midterm functional outcomes.

  12. Diseases of the tendons and tendon sheaths.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steiner, Adrian; Anderson, David E; Desrochers, André

    2014-03-01

    Contracted flexor tendon leading to flexural deformity is a common congenital defect in cattle. Arthrogryposis is a congenital syndrome of persistent joint contracture that occurs frequently in Europe as a consequence of Schmallenberg virus infection of the dam. Spastic paresis has a hereditary component, and affected cattle should not be used for breeding purposes. The most common tendon avulsion involves the deep digital flexor tendon. Tendon disruptions may be successfully managed by tenorrhaphy and external coaptation or by external coaptation alone. Medical management alone is unlikely to be effective for purulent tenosynovitis. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Localized Giant Cell Tumors of the Flexor Tendon Sheath of the Finger: An Analysis of Twenty Five Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asli Tanrivermis Sayit

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The aims of this retrospective study were to evaluate localized giant cell tumors of the tendon sheath (GCTTS with Magnetic Resonance (MR imaging findings and to review the epidemiological features of the disease. We also evaluated the literature regarding GCTTS and performed an analysis of the available information. Material and Method: We retrospectively reviewed the MR images of 25 histologically proven cases of GCTTS of the finger during the period between 2012-2014. In addition, a retrospective analysis of the patients’ records was carried out, and age, gender, site and size of lesion, recurrence, and MRI findings were reviewed. Results: The patients were predominantly female (n = 16 and had a mean age of 51.9 ± 12.8 years. Nine patients were male with a mean age of 45.1 ± 13.4 years. The size of the tumors ranged from 6 mm to 30 mm, with a mean size of 15.3±6.8 mm. Tumors were present on the right hand in 15 patients and on the left hand in 10 patients. Among women, 11 tumors were located on the right hand and 5 were found on the left. In men, 4 of the tumors were located on the right hand and 5 were on the left. The most frequent digit on which tumors were found was the index finger, accounting for 40% of cases (n=10. The most frequent location was the index finger for both women (n=6 and men (n=4. All of the lesions were described as well-circumscribed, encapsulated, lobulated, or multilobulated solitary masses with MR imaging. Signal intensity on T1 weighted images (WI was equal to that of skeletal muscle in 23 cases. In two cases, signal intensity was slightly higher. On T2WIs, the signal intensities tended to be between those of skeletal muscle and fat in all of the cases. All of the lesions showed mild to moderate contrast enhancement when compared with precontrast images. There was no statistically significant differences between male and female patients in terms of age, tumor side, involved digit, and highest tumor size

  14. Diabetes mellitus impairs tendon-bone healing after rotator cuff repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bedi, Asheesh; Fox, Alice J.S.; Harris, Paul E.; Deng, Xiang-Hua; Ying, Liang; Warren, Russell F.; Rodeo, Scott A.

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Studies have demonstrated a significant decrease in skeletal mass, bone mineral density, and impaired fracture healing in the diabetic population. However, the effect of sustained hyperglycemia on tendon-to-bone healing is unknown. Materials and methods Forty-eight male, Lewis rats underwent unilateral detachment of the supraspinatus tendon followed by immediate anatomic repair with transosseous fixation. In the experimental group (n = 24), diabetes was induced preoperatively via intraperitoneal injection of streptozotocin (STZ, 65 mg/kg) and confirmed with both pre- and post-STZ injection intraperitoneal glucose tolerance tests (IPGTT). Animals were sacrificed at 1 and 2 weeks post-operatively for biomechanical, histomorphometric, and immunohistochemical analysis. Serum hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) levels were measured at 2 weeks postoperatively. Statistical comparisons were performed using Student t tests with significance set at P diabetic compared to control animals (P diabetic and control groups, respectively (P Diabetic animals demonstrated significantly less fibrocartilage and organized collagen, and increased AGE deposition at the tendon-bone interface (P diabetic animals demonstrated a significantly reduced ultimate load-to-failure (4.79 ± 1.33N vs 1.60 ± 1.67N and 13.63 ± 2.33N vs 6.0 ± 3.24N for control versus diabetic animals at 1 and 2 weeks, respectively) and stiffness compared to control animals (P diabetic patients with poor glycemic control. Level of Evidence Basic Science Study. PMID:20303293

  15. Clinical outcomes after repair of quadriceps tendon rupture: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciriello, Vincenzo; Gudipati, Suribabu; Tosounidis, Theodoros; Soucacos, P N; Giannoudis, Peter V

    2012-11-01

    The existing evidence regarding the management of quadriceps tendon rupture remains obscure. The aim of the current review is to investigate the characteristics, the different techniques employed and to analyse the clinical outcomes following surgical repair of quadriceps tendon rupture. An Internet based search of the English literature of the last 25 years was carried out. Case reports and non-clinical studies were excluded. The methodological quality of the included studies was assessed using the Coleman Methodology Score. All data regarding mechanism and site of rupture, type of treatment, time elapsed between diagnosis and repair, patients' satisfaction, clinical outcome, return to pre-injury activities, complications and recurrence rates were extracted and analysed. Out of 474 studies identified, 12 met the inclusion criteria. The average of Coleman Methodology Score was 50.46/100. In total 319 patients were analysed with a mean age of 57 years (16-85). The mean time of follow-up was 47.5 months (3 months to 24 years). The most common mechanism of injury was simple fall (61.5%). Spontaneous ruptures were reported in 3.2% of cases. The most common sites of tear were noted between 1cm and 2 cm of the superior pole of the patella and, in the older people, at the osseotendinous junction. The most frequently used repair technique was patella drill holes (50% of patients). Simple sutures were used in mid-substance ruptures. Several reinforcement techniques were employed in case of poor quality or retraction of the torn ends of tendon. The affected limb was immobilised in a cast for a period of 3-10 weeks. Quadriceps muscular atrophy and muscle strength deficit were present in most of the cases. Worst results were noted in delayed repairs. Reported complications included heterotopic ossifications in 6.9% of patients, deep venous thrombosis or pulmonary embolism in 2.5%, superficial infection in 1.2% and deep infection in 1.1%. It appears that the type of surgical

  16. Reconstrution of the posterior cruciate ligament using knee flexing tendons for the autograft Reconstrução do ligamento cruzado posterior com os enxertos dos tendões dos músculos flexores do joelho

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Alberto Cury Faustino

    2003-04-01

    Full Text Available The author describes his experience in the treatment of chronic posterior instability of the knee with hamstring tendon autografts. Thirteen patients were operated on using the same surgical technique. Followed after a period of 18 to 47 months.O autor descreve a experiência no tratamento da instabilidade posterior crônica do joelho com os enxertos dos tendões dos músculos flexores. Utilizando a mesma técnica cirúrgica foram operados 13 pacientes e acompanhados por um período de 18 a 47 meses.

  17. Comparison of the tendon damage caused by four different anchor systems used in transtendon rotator cuff repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qing-Song; Liu, Sen; Zhang, Qiuyang; Xue, Yun; Ge, Dongxia; O'Brien, Michael J; Savoie, Felix H; You, Zongbing

    2012-01-01

    Objectives. The objective of this study was to compare the damage to the rotator cuff tendons caused by four different anchor systems. Methods. 20 cadaveric human shoulder joints were used for transtendon insertion of four anchor systems. The Healix Peek, Fastin RC, Bio-Corkscrew Suture, and Healix Transtend anchors were inserted through the tendons using standard transtendon procedures. The areas of tendon damage were measured. Results. The areas of tendon damage (mean ± standard deviation, n = 7) were 29.1 ± 4.3 mm(2) for the Healix Peek anchor, 20.4 ± 2.3 mm(2) for the Fastin RC anchor, 23.4 ± 1.2 mm(2) for the Bio-Corkscrew Suture anchor, 13.7 ± 3.2 mm(2) for the Healix Transtend anchor inserted directly, and 9.1 ± 2.1 mm(2) for the Healix Transtend anchor inserted through the Percannula system (P anchors). Conclusions. In a cadaver transtendon rotator cuff repair model, smaller anchors caused less damage to the tendon tissues. The Healix Transtend implant system caused the least damage to the tendon tissues. Our findings suggest that smaller anchors should be considered when performing transtendon procedures to repair partial rotator cuff tears.

  18. Multi-Layer Electrospun Membrane Mimicking Tendon Sheath for Prevention of Tendon Adhesions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shichao Jiang

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Defect of the tendon sheath after tendon injury is a main reason for tendon adhesions, but it is a daunting challenge for the biomimetic substitute of the tendon sheath after injury due to its multi-layer membrane-like structure and complex biologic functions. In this study, a multi-layer membrane with celecoxib-loaded poly(l-lactic acid-polyethylene glycol (PELA electrospun fibrous membrane as the outer layer, hyaluronic acid (HA gel as middle layer, and PELA electrospun fibrous membrane as the inner layer was designed. The anti-adhesion efficacy of this multi-layer membrane was compared with a single-layer use in rabbit flexor digitorum profundus tendon model. The surface morphology showed that both PELA fibers and celecoxib-loaded PELA fibers in multi-layer membrane were uniform in size, randomly arrayed, very porous, and smooth without beads. Multi-layer membrane group had fewer peritendinous adhesions and better gliding than the PELA membrane group and control group in gross and histological observation. The similar mechanical characteristic and collagen expression of tendon repair site in the three groups indicated that the multi-layer membrane did not impair tendon healing. Taken together, our results demonstrated that such a biomimetic multi-layer sheath could be used as a potential strategy in clinics for promoting tendon gliding and preventing adhesion without poor tendon healing.

  19. Comparison of Achilles tendon repair techniques in a sheep model using a cross-linked acellular porcine dermal patch and platelet-rich plasma fibrin matrix for augmentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarrafian, Tiffany L; Wang, Hali; Hackett, Eileen S; Yao, Jian Q; Shih, Mei-Shu; Ramsay, Heather L; Turner, A Simon

    2010-01-01

    The primary goal of this study was to evaluate a cross-linked acellular porcine dermal patch (APD), as well as platelet-rich plasma fibrin matrix (PRPFM), for repair of acute Achilles tendon rupture in a sheep model. The 2 surgically transected tendon ends were reapproximated in groups 1 and 2, whereas a gap was left between the tendon ends in group 3. APD was used to reinforce the repair in group 2, and autologous PRPFM was used to fill the gap, which was also reinforced with APD, in group 3. All sheep were humanely euthanized at 24 weeks after the repair, and biomechanical and histological testing were performed. Tensile strength testing showed a statistically significant difference in elongation between the operated limb and the unoperated contralateral limb in groups 1 and 3, but not in group 2. All operated tendons appeared healed with no apparent fibrosis under light and polarized microscopy. In group 1, all surgical separation sites were identifiable, and healing occurred via increasing tendon thickness. In group 2, healing occurred with new tendon fibers across the separation, without increasing tendon thickness in 2 out of 6 animals. Group 3 showed complete bridging of the gap, with no change in tendon thickness in 2 out of 6 animals. In groups 2 and 3, peripheral integration of the APD to tendon fibers was observed. These findings support the use of APD, alone or with PRPFM, to augment Achilles tendon repair in a sheep model.

  20. V-shaped double-row distal triceps tendon repair: a novel technique using unicortical button fixation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheiderer, Bastian; Lacheta, Lucca; Imhoff, Andreas B; Siebenlist, Sebastian

    2017-03-14

    This report was designed to present a novel technique combining suture anchor and unicortical button fixation for distal triceps tendon repair. For anatomical reinsertion of an acute distal triceps tendon rupture, two suture anchors and one unicortical button forming a V-shaped configuration were used. The operative approach is described in detail. Excellent clinical and functional results were achieved in the early postoperative phase. The patient reached full elbow range of motion and extension muscle strength (5/5) compared to the uninjured arm 12 weeks after surgery. Complications did not occur. This is the first report using unicortical button fixation in distal triceps tendon repair with promising preliminary results. Technical description, case report, Level V.

  1. Rotator cuff repair using a decellularized tendon slices graft: an in vivo study in a rabbit model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Juan; Liu, Guo-Ming; Ning, Liang-Ju; Zhang, Yi; Luo, Jing-Cong; Huang, Fu-Guo; Qin, Ting-Wu

    2015-05-01

    Although varieties of surgical repair techniques and materials have been used to repair rotator cuff defects, re-tearing frequently occurs. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the postoperative outcomes of rotator cuff repairs with a decellularized tendon slices (DTSs) graft in a rabbit model. Large defects in the infraspinatus tendons were created bilaterally in 21 rabbits. The graft group underwent reconstruction of the defects with the DTSs grafts, while the defect group did not undergo any treatment. The specimens underwent histological observation, biomechanical testing, and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) detection at 4, 8, and 12 weeks after surgery. In addition, 2 rabbits that were not operated on were used for MRI detection as a normal reference. Histological analysis revealed that the graft promoted host cell ingrowth and tissue integration, and a tendon-like structure developed at 12 weeks. The ultimate tensile load had a significant difference between specimens at 4 and 12 weeks in the graft group, but there was no significant difference between the graft group and the defect group. In the graft group, the stiffness at 12 weeks was significantly greater than that at 4 or 8 weeks, and it was also greater than the stiffness in the defect group at 12 weeks. MRI demonstrated that the signal strength of the regenerative tissue from the graft group at 12 weeks was similar to that of normal infraspinatus tendon. The DTSs graft allowed for incorporation of host tendon and improved the biomechanical performance of the regenerative tendon. Therefore, the graft could be a promising bioscaffold to enhance the surgical repair of large rotator cuff defects and consequently improve the clinical outcome of rotator cuff tears.

  2. Is the Dresden technique a mechanical design of choice suitable for the repair of middle third Achilles tendon ruptures? A biomechanical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de la Fuente, C; Carreño-Zillmann, G; Marambio, H; Henríquez, H

    2016-01-01

    To compare the mechanical failure of the Dresden technique for Achilles tendon repair with the double modified Kessler technique controlled repair technique. The maximum resistance of the two repair techniques are also compared. A total of 30 Achilles tendon ruptures in bovine specimens were repaired with an Ethibond(®) suture to 4.5cm from the calcaneal insertion. Each rupture was randomly distributed into one of two surgical groups. After repair, each specimen was subjected to a maximum traction test. The mechanical failure (tendon, suture, or knot) rates (proportions) were compared using the exact Fisher test (α=.05), and the maximum resistances using the Student t test (α=.05). There was a difference in the proportions of mechanical failures, with the most frequent being a tendon tear in the Dresden technique, and a rupture of the suture in the Kessler technique. The repair using the Dresden technique performed in the open mode, compared to the Kessler technique, has a more suitable mechanical design for the repair of middle third Achilles tendon ruptures on developing a higher tensile resistance in 58.7%. However, its most common mechanical failure was a tendon tear, which due to inappropriate loads could lead to lengthening of the Achilles tendon. Copyright © 2016 SECOT. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  3. Biomechanical in vitro validation of intramedullary cortical button fixation for distal biceps tendon repair: a new technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siebenlist, Sebastian; Lenich, Andreas; Buchholz, Arne; Martetschläger, Frank; Eichhorn, Stefan; Heinrich, Petra; Fingerle, Alexander; Doebele, Stefan; Sandmann, Gunther H; Millett, Peter J; Stöckle, Ulrich; Elser, Florian

    2011-08-01

    Extramedullary cortical button-based fixation for distal biceps tendon ruptures exhibits maximum load to failure in vitro but cannot restore the anatomic footprint and has the potential risk for injury to the posterior interosseous nerve. Double intramedullary cortical button fixation repair provides superior fixation strength to the bone when compared with single extramedullary cortical button-based repair. Controlled laboratory study. The technique of intramedullary cortical button fixation with 1 or 2 buttons was compared with single extramedullary cortical button-based repair using 12 paired human cadaveric elbows. All specimens underwent computed tomography analysis to determine intramedullary dimensions of the radial tuberosity as well as the thickness of the anterior and posterior cortices before biomechanical testing. Maximum load to failure and failure modes were recorded. For baseline measurements, the native tendon was tested for maximum load to failure. The intramedullary area of the radial tuberosity provides sufficient space for single or double intramedullary cortical button implantation. The mean thickness of the anterior cortex was 1.13 ± 0.15 mm, and for the posterior cortex it was 1.97 ± 0.48 mm (P button fixation with a mean load to failure of 455 ± 103 N, versus 275 ± 44 N for single intramedullary cortical button fixation (P button-based technique (P = .003). There were no statistically significant differences between single intramedullary and single extramedullary button fixation repair (P = .081). The mean load to failure for the native tendon was 379 ± 87 N. Double intramedullary cortical button fixation provides the highest load to failure in the specimens tested. Double intramedullary cortical button fixation provides reliable fixation strength to the bone for distal biceps tendon repair and potentially minimizes the risk of posterior interosseous nerve injury. Further, based on a 2-point-fixation, this method may offer a wider, more

  4. Bridge tendon graft in no man's land: an experimentalstudy in chickens

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the morphological characteristics of the bridge tendon grafting in no man’s land to reconstruct the tendon defect and the effect of passive mobilization on it. Methods: A 2 cm defect was made in bilateral flexor digitorum profundus tendons of the middle chicken toes,and was then transplanted to the opposite site to serve as a segmental autograft tendon. Postoperatively, passive mobilization of the left and right middle toes began at 5 and 21 d separately. Specimens were studied by light, scanning and transmission electron microscopy at 5, 10, 21 and 35d. Results: Early repair of the tendon-graft of the left middle toes was made by proliferation and ingrowth of the epitenon cells intermingled with newly-formed collagen fibers. A gliding surface formed at 10 and 21 d. The tendon graft itself played an active role in the repair. In contrast,adhesions obliterated the surface and occupied the space between the tendon graft and surrounding tissues in the right middle toes. Conclusions: It indicates that the use of the segmental bridge tendon graft in no man's land coupled with early passive motion stimulates an intrisic repair process in both the tendon stump and the autogenous tendon graft and results in a functional healing.

  5. Role of tissue engineered tendon in tendon repair%组织工程化肌腱在肌腱修复过程中的作用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李荣

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To review the research progress of tendon tissue engineering in the process of tendon repair.METHODS: A computer-based search of PubMed database and VIP database from January 1993 to October 2009 was performed for articles regarding the tendon tissue engineering, bio-mechanical analysis of tendon scaffolds, biomaterials'application in tendon tissue engineering and tissue engineering technology in the clinical application of tendon defect repair.English key words are "tendon transplantation, tissue engineering, biological material, cell stent", Chinese key words are "tendon transplantation, tissue engineering, biomaterials, cell scaffold". A total of 132 literatures were screened out.RESULTS: At present, the tendon tissue engineering research has achieved remarkable results, but there are still some problems for clinical practice and mass production. Many issues need to be further studied and solved prior to tissue engineering truly becomes a treatment of tendon defect and fu nctional reconstruction, such as the best source of seed cells, the ideal scaffold material, the best culture conditions and detection methods of implantation in vivo.CONCLUSION: Truly realizing the replacement of human tissues and organs with the in vitro prefabricated living implant, still faces many challenges.%目的:综述肌腱组织工程在肌腱修复过程中的应用进展.方法:应用计算机检索1993-01/2009-10 PubMed数据库及维普数据库有关肌腱组织工程研究进展、肌腱支架材料生物力学分析、生物材料在肌腱组织工程中应用及组织工程技术在修复肌腱缺损临床应用方面的相关文献,英文检索词为"tendon transplantation,tissue engineering,biologicalmaterial,cell stent",中文检索词为"肌腱移植,组织工程,生物材料,细胞支架".检索文献量总计132篇. 结果:目前组织工程化肌腱的研究已经取得了显著的成果,但要真正应用于临床,大批量生产,仍存在一些问题.诸

  6. MRI of anterior cruciate ligament repair with patellar and hamstring tendon autografts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jansson, K.A.; Karjalainen, P.T. [Dept. of Radiology, Helsinki University Central Hospital (Finland); Harilainen, A.; Sandelin, J.; Tallroth, K. [ORTON Hospital, Helsinki (Finland); Soila, K. [Dept. of Radiology, Mount Sinai Medical Center, Miami Beach, FL (United States); Aronen, H.J. [Dept. of Radiology, Helsinki University Central Hospital (Finland); Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology, Kuopio University Hospital (Finland)

    2001-01-01

    Objective. Several MRI sequences were used to evaluate the 2-year postoperative appearance of asymptomatic knee with a torn anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstructed with bone-patellar tendon-bone (BTB) and semitendinosus and gracilis (STG) tendon autografts.Design and patients. Two groups with successful repair of ACL tear with BTB (n=10) or STG (n=10) autografts were imaged at 1.5 T with sagittal and oblique coronal proton density-, T2-weighted and sagittal STIR sequences and plain and contrast-enhanced oblique coronal T1-weighted sequences. The appearance of the graft and periligamentous tissues was evaluated.Results. In all 20 cases, the ACL graft showed homogeneous, low signal intensity with periligamentous streaks of intermediate signal intensity on T2-weighted images. In 10 cases, localised areas of intermediate signal intensity were seen in the intra-articular segment of the graft on proton density- and T1-weighted images. The graft itself did not show enhancement in either of the two groups, but mild to moderate periligamentous enhancement was detected in 10 cases.Conclusion. The MRI appearance of ACL autograft is variable on proton density- and T1-weighted images. Periligamentous tissue showing contrast enhancement is a typical MRI finding after clinically successful ACL reconstruction. (orig.)

  7. Functional Outcomes of Achilles Tendon Minimally Invasive Repair Using 4- and 6-Strand Nonabsorbable Suture: A Cohort Comparison Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carmont, Michael R.; Zellers, Jennifer A.; Brorsson, Annelie; Olsson, Nicklas; Nilsson-Helander, Katarina; Karlsson, Jon; Silbernagel, Karin Grävare

    2017-01-01

    Background: The aim of management of Achilles tendon rupture is to reduce tendon lengthening and maximize function while reducing the rerupture rate and minimizing other complications. Purpose: To determine changes in Achilles tendon resting angle (ATRA), heel-rise height, patient-reported outcomes, return to play, and occurrence of complications after minimally invasive repair of Achilles tendon ruptures using nonabsorbable sutures. Study Design: Cohort study; Level of evidence, 3. Methods: Between March 2013 and August 2015, a total of 70 patients (58 males, 12 females) with a mean age of 42 ± 8 years were included and evaluated at 6 weeks and 3, 6, 9, and 12 months after repair of an Achilles tendon rupture. Surgical repair was performed using either 4-strand or 6-strand nonabsorbable sutures. After surgery, patients were mobilized, fully weightbearing using a functional brace. Early active movement was permitted starting at 2 weeks. Results: There were no significant differences in the ATRA, Achilles Tendon Total Rupture Score (ATRS), and Heel-Rise Height Index (HRHI) between the 4- and 6-strand repairs. The mean (SD) relative ATRA was –13.1° (6.6°) (dorsiflexion) following injury; this was reduced to 7.6° (4.8°) (plantar flexion) directly after surgery. During initial rehabilitation at 6 weeks, the relative ATRA was 0.6° (7.4°) (neutral) and –7.0° (5.3°) (dorsiflexion) at 3 months, after which ATRA improved significantly with time to 12 months (P = .005). At 12 months, the median ATRS was 93 (range, 35-100), and the mean (SD) HRHI and Heel-Rise Repetition Index were 81% (0.22%) and 82.9% (0.17%), respectively. The relative ATRA at 3 and 12 months correlated with HRHI (r = 0.617, P Achilles tendon repair. The use of a nonabsorbable suture during minimally invasive repair when used together with accelerated rehabilitation did not prevent the development of an increased relative ATRA. The ATRA at 3 months after surgery correlated with heel

  8. Neuromechanical Modulation of the Achilles Tendon During Bilateral Hopping in Patients with Unilateral Achilles Tendon Rupture, Over 1 Year After Surgical Repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oda, Hiroyuki; Sano, Kanae; Kunimasa, Yoko; Komi, Paavo V; Ishikawa, Masaki

    2017-06-01

    Patients who have had an Achilles tendon (AT) rupture repaired are potentially at higher risk for re-rupture than those without previous rupture. Little attention has been given to the neuromechanical modulation of muscle-tendon interaction and muscle activation profiles during human dynamic movements after AT rupture repair. The purpose of this study was to examine muscle-tendon behavior and muscle activation during bilateral hopping. We enrolled nine subjects who had undergone surgical repair of unilateral AT rupture within the past 1-2 years. Subjects performed bilateral hopping while we took ultrasound, kinematic, and electromyogram recordings and measurements. AT behaviors were also recorded. We then compared responses between values obtained from the ruptured AT leg (LEGATR) and non-ruptured AT leg (LEGNOR). During hopping, the AT stretching amplitudes were greater in the LEGATR than in the LEGNOR, although the peak AT force and stiffness were smaller in the LEGATR than in the LEGNOR. The AT negative mechanical work did not show any significant differences between both legs. However, positive works were significantly lower in the LEGATR than in the LEGNOR. Electromyogram patterns in both soleus and tibialis anterior muscles clearly differed after ground contact for the LEGATR and the LEGNOR. These results suggest that the repaired ruptured AT can be compliant and have insufficient Young's modulus, which can influence mechanical responses in muscle activities. The modulation of agonist-antagonist muscle activities corresponding to the different levels of stiffness between the LEGATR and the LEGNOR may not be fully functioning during the pre-activation phase.

  9. Differences of RNA Expression in the Tendon According to Anatomic Outcomes in Rotator Cuff Repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Jin-Ok; Chung, Jin-Young; Kim, Do Hoon; Im, Wooseok; Kim, Sae Hoon

    2017-06-01

    Despite increased understanding of the pathophysiology of rotator cuff tears and the evolution of rotator cuff repair, healing failure remains a substantial problem. The critical roles played by biological factors have been emphasized, but little is known of the implications of gene expression profile differences at the time of repair. To document the relationship between the perioperative gene expression of healed and unhealed rotator cuffs by RNA microarray analysis. Case-control study; Level of evidence, 3. Superior (supraspinatus involvement) and posterosuperior (supraspinatus and infraspinatus involvement) tears were included in the study. Samples of rotator cuff tendons were prospectively collected during rotator cuff surgery. Three samples were harvested at the tendon ends of tears from the anterior, middle (apex), and posterior parts using an arthroscopic punch. Seven patients with an unhealed rotator cuff were matched one-to-one with patients with a healed rotator cuff by sex, age, tear size, and fatty degeneration of rotator cuff muscles. mRNA microarray analysis was used to identify genetic differences between healed and unhealed rotator cuff tendons. Gene ontology and gene association files were obtained from the Gene Ontology Consortium, and the Gene Ontology system in DAVID was used to identify enhanced biological processes. Microarray analyses identified 262 genes that were differentially expressed by at least 1.5-fold between the healed and unhealed groups. Overall, in the healed group, 103 genes were significantly downregulated, and 159 were significantly upregulated. DAVID Functional Annotation Cluster analysis showed that in the healed group, the genes most upregulated were related to the G protein-coupled receptor protein signaling pathway and to the neurological system. On the other hand, the genes most downregulated were related to immune and inflammatory responses. BMP5 was the gene most upregulated in the healed group, and the majority of

  10. Repair versus shaving of partial-thickness articular-sided tears of the upper subscapularis tendon. A prospective randomized controlled trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    RANDELLI, PIETRO; ARRIGONI, PAOLO; ALIPRANDI, ALBERTO; SDAO, SILVANA; RAGONE, VINCENZA; D’AMBROSI, RICCARDO; RANDELLI, FILIPPO; CABITZA, PAOLO; BANFI, GIUSEPPE

    2015-01-01

    Purpose the purpose of this study was to evaluate whether treating partial-thickness articular-sided tears of the upper subscapularis (SSC) tendon with a dedicated suture anchor would result in an internal rotation strength improvement compared with simple shaving of the SSC tendon and footprint. Methods twenty-six patients with a limited SSC tendon tear (equal or inferior to the most superior centimeter) in association with a posterosuperior cuff lesion were prospectively randomized to two treatments: repair with a dedicated suture anchor versus shaving of the tendon and footprint. The patients also underwent long head of the biceps (LHB) treatment and posterosuperior cuff tear repair. In each patient the following parameters were measured both preoperatively and at a minimum follow-up of 2.5 years: strength in internal rotation in the bear-hug testing position (using a digital tensiometer), DASH score and Constant scores. MRI assessment of tendon healing was performed at the final follow-up. Results twenty of the 26 patients (76%) were reviewed after a mean follow-up time of 42 months: 11 patients had undergone SSC tendon repair and nine simple shaving. At final follow-up no significant differences were found between the repaired and shaving group in strength in internal rotation (9.5 ± 3.8 kg versus 10.3±5.4 kg; p=0.7). The DASH score and Constant score also failed to show significant differences between the two groups. Furthermore, no significant difference in SSC tendon healing rate was observed on MRI evaluation. Conclusions partial-thickness articular-sided tear of the upper SSC tendon in association with a posterosuperior rotator cuff repair and LHB treatment, when limited to the superior centimeter of the SSC tendon, shows a comparable performance in terms of strength in internal rotation either after simple shaving or a tendon-to-bone repair. Level of evidence Level II, prospective comparative study. PMID:26889466

  11. Accelerated rehabilitation following Achilles tendon repair after acute rupture - Development of an evidence-based treatment protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brumann, Mareen; Baumbach, Sebastian F; Mutschler, Wolf; Polzer, Hans

    2014-11-01

    The acute rupture of the Achilles tendon is a protracted injury. Surgery is only the beginning of a long rehabilitation period. Therefore, the rehabilitation protocol is an integral aspect to restore the pre-injury activity level. Despite several trials available comparing different treatment regimes, there is still no consensus regarding the optimal protocol. Consequently, the aim of our study was to systematically search the evidence available and define a precise rehabilitation programme after operative repair of acute Achilles tendon rupture based on the trials with the highest level of evidence. We performed a systematic literature search in Medline, Embase and Cochrane library. We identified twelve randomized controlled trials comparing different treatment regimes after operative repair of the Achilles tendon. Five trials compared full to non weight bearing, all applying immobilization in equinus. Immediate full weight bearing led to significant higher patient satisfaction, earlier ambulation and return to pre-injury activity. Four trials compared early ankle mobilization to immobilization. All trials found mobilization to be superior as it shortens time to return to work and sports significantly. Three trials compared the combination of full weight bearing and early ankle mobilization to immobilization. This combination was most beneficial. Patients showed significantly higher satisfaction, less use of rehabilitation resources, earlier return to pre-injury activities and further demonstrated significantly increased calf muscle strength, reduced atrophy and tendon elongation. No study found an increased rerupture rate for the more progressive treatment. In conclusion, the rehabilitation protocol after Achilles tendon repair should allow immediate full weight bearing. After the second postoperative week controlled ankle mobilization by free plantar flexion and limited dorsiflexion at 0° should be applied. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. The Achilles tendon resting angle as an indirect measure of Achilles tendon length following rupture, repair, and rehabilitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael R. Carmont

    2015-04-01

    Conclusion: The ATRA increases following injury, is reduced by surgery, and then increases again during initial rehabilitation. The angle also correlates with patient-reported symptoms early in the rehabilitation phase and with heel-rise height after 1 year. The ATRA might be considered a simple and effective means to evaluate Achilles tendon function 1 year after the rupture.

  13. Novel treatment of a failed quadriceps tendon repair in a diabetic patient using a patella-quadriceps tendon allograft.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Druskin, Sasha C; Rodeo, Scott A

    2013-07-01

    Recurrent quadriceps tendon rupture is a debilitating condition that may be challenging to treat, especially in the presence of systemic disease such as diabetes mellitus (Bedi et al., J Shoulder Elbow Surg 19:978-988, 2010; Chbnou and Frenette, Am J Physiol Regul Integr Comp Physiol 5:R952-R957, 2004; Chen et al., J Shoulder Elbow Surg 5:416-421, 2003). Many surgical treatment protocols have been proposed (Azar, in Canale and Beatty, eds., Campbell's Operative Orthopedics, Mosby/Elsevier, Philadelphia, PA, 2008; Ilan et al., J Am Acad Orthop Surg 3:192-200, 2003; Rodeo and Izawa, in Garrett et al., eds., Principles and Practice of Orthopedic Sports Medicine, Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, Philadelphia, PA, 2000). We report the case of a diabetic male with multiple treatment failures. He ultimately sustained a good outcome following treatment with a novel surgical technique that utilized a patella quadriceps tendon allograft. Tendon allograft-to-native bone healing had previously failed in this patient, so we used a bone-tendon construct allograft to provide an allograft bone-to-native bone healing site. Now, 13 months postoperative, the patient has increased strength, minimal pain, 20 ° of extensor lag and 130 ° of flexion.

  14. Semitendinosus and gracilis free muscle-tendon graft for repair of massive rotator cuff tears: surgical technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gigante, Antonio; Bottegoni, Carlo; Milano, Giuseppe; Riccio, Michele; Dei Giudici, Luca

    2016-01-01

    Massive rotator cuff tears are difficult to treat surgically due to retraction, degeneration and fraying of the ends of torn tendons, severe fatty infiltration and atrophy of the respective muscles. Procedures developed to close the gap between the rotator cuff and the greater tuberosity of the humerus, such as soft tissue release may be inadequate for large tears. Human or porcine dermal allografts still have uncertain benefits, and tendon transfers seem to be associated with poor outcomes, donor site morbidity and altered mechanics. Reverse total shoulder arthroplasty has limited durability and is not indicated in young patients with high functional demands. We developed a new technique for repairing massive rotator cuff tears by semitendinosus and gracilis myotendinous grafting. This novel therapeutic option allows massive rotator cuff tears to be repaired using autologous material that is adequate and adaptable, making it possible to cover any width of defect. The technique is low-invasive and not technically demanding, with minimal donor site morbidity.

  15. Clinical and biomechanical outcome of minimal invasive and open repair of the Achilles tendon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chan Alexander

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction With evolutions in surgical techniques, minimally invasive surgical (MIS repair with Achillon applicator has been introduced. However, there is still a lack of literature to investigate into the clinical merits of MIS over open surgery. This study aims to investigate the correlation between clinical outcome, gait analysis and biomechanical properties comparing both surgical methods. Materials and methods A single centre retrospective review on all the consecutive operated patients between January 2004 and December 2008 was performed. Twenty-six patients (19 male and 7 female; age 40.4 ± 9.2 years had experienced a complete Achilles tendon rupture with operative repair. Nineteen of the patients, 10 MIS versus 9 open repairs (13 men with a mean age of 40.54 ± 10.43 (range 23-62 yrs and 6 women with a mean age of 45.33 ± 7.71 (range 35-57 yrs were further invited to attend a thorough clinical assessment using Holz's scale and biomechanical evaluation at a mean of 25.3 months after operation. This study utilized the Cybex II isokinetic dynamometer to assess the isokinetic peak force of plantar-flexion and dorsiflexion of both ankles. The patients were also invited to return to our Gait Laboratory for analysis. The eight-infrared camera motion capture system (VICON, UK was utilized for the acquisition of kinematic variables. Their anthropometric data was measured according to the Davis and coworkers' standard. Results The mean operative time and length of hospital stay were shorter in the MIS group. The operative time was 54.55 ± 15.15 minutes versus 68.80 ± 18.23 minutes of the MIS group and Open group respectively (p = 0.045, whereas length of stay was 3.36 ± 1.21 days versus 6.40 ± 3.70 days respectively (p = 0.039. There is statistically significant decrease (p = 0.005 in incision length in MIS group than the open surgery group, 3.23 ± 1.10 cm versus 9.64 ± 2.55 cm respectively. Both groups attained similar Holz

  16. A combined variation of Palmaris longus and Flexor digitorum superficialis: Case report and review of literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernardes, A; Melo, C; Pinheiro, S

    2016-12-01

    The muscles of the anterior compartment of the forearm often exhibit anatomic variations. During dissection of the upper right limb of a preserved cadaver, morphological variations in the Palmaris longus and Flexor digitorum superficialis muscles were found. The Palmaris longus muscular fibers converged to a tendon that passed beneath the Flexor retinaculum, and inserted at the base of the middle phalanx of the fourth digit, replacing the tendon of Flexor digitorum superficialis. The Flexor digitorum superficialis was divided into two muscular heads: a digastric medial head giving tendons to the second and fifth digits, and a lateral head giving one tendon to the third digit. All these tendons were inserted in the respective digits by two bundles between which were located the tendon of the Flexor digitorum profundus muscle. Variations of flexor muscles must be documented because of their clinical significance and their potential use of these muscles in orthopaedic and reconstructive surgery. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  17. 转化生长因子β1中和抗体对转化生长因子β诱导肌腱胶原和术后粘连的影响%Effects of transforming growth factor beta 1 neutralizing antibody on collagen production and adhesion formation of the flexor tendon

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    潘维敏; 夏长所; 杨选影; 孙康

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Studies have showed that transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1) could yield to the collagen synthesis and adhesion formation of tendon cells at the process of healing. OBJECTIVE: To investigate the preventive effect of TGF-β1 neutralizing antibody on the collagen production and adhesion formation of flexor tendon. DESIGN, TIME AND SETTING: Randomized grouping observational experiments were performed in the Experimental Animal Center of Tongji Medical College between September 2005 and June 2006. MATERIALS: New Zealand white rabbits aged 2-5 months, weighing 3.5-4.5 kg. TGF was offered by Santa Cruz Biotechnology, USA. METHODS: Sheath fibroblasts, epitenon tenocytes, and endotenon tenocytes were obtained from rabbit flexor tendons. Cells were divided into two groups at random. In the experiment group, each cell culture was supplemented with 1 μg/L of TGF-β at increasing dose (0.1, 0.5, 1.0 mg/L) of TGF-β1 neutralizing antibody. No reagents were given in the control group. Collagen Ⅰ production was measured by enzyme-linked immunoabsorbent assay. Eighty-four adult New Zealand white rabbit forepaws underwent sharp transection of middle toe flexor digitorum profundus, followed by immediate repair. Thirty-six adult New Zealand white rabbit were divided into three groups randomly (n=12), injecting with the saline, 1.0 mg/L TGF-β1 neutralizing antibody and 2.0 mg/L TGF-β1 neutralizing antibody into tendon sheath respectively. Tendons were harvested at 4 and 8 weeks to conduct adhesion detection, biomechanical testing, histological evaluation and scanning electron microscopy observation. The remaining 48 New Zealand white rabbits were divided into two groups randomly (n=24), undergoing the saline and 1,0 mg/L TGF-β1 neutralizing antibody injection in tendon sheath respectively. Tendons were harvested at an increasing time interval (1, 2, 4, 8 weeks) and analyzed by in situ hybridization to determine the mRNA expression of TGF-β1 and collagen

  18. Arthroscopic Removal and Rotator Cuff Repair Without Acromioplasty for the Treatment of Symptomatic Calcifying Tendinitis of the Supraspinatus Tendon

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Background: Calcified rotator cuff tendinitis is a common cause of chronic shoulder pain that leads to significant pain and functional limitations. Although most patients respond well to conservative treatment, some eventually require surgical treatment. Purpose: To evaluate the clinical outcome with arthroscopic removal of calcific deposit and rotator cuff repair without acromioplasty for the treatment of calcific tendinitis of the supraspinatus tendon. Study Design: Case series; Level of ev...

  19. Avaliação do resultado da reconstrução artroscópica do ligamento cruzado anterior do joelho com enxerto dos tendões flexores Evaluation of the results of arthroscopic ACL reconstruction with autogenous flexor tendons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandre Almeida

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Avaliar o resultado da reconstrução do ligamento cruzado anterior (LCA com o autoenxerto dos tendões flexores da coxa. Serão analisados os dados com relação ao sexo, ao índice de massa corporal (IMC e a associação com fratura no membro inferior (MI. MÉTODOS: Foi analisado um grupo de 265 pacientes submetidos à artroscopia do joelho para fins de reconstrução do LCA com enxerto ipsilateral dos tendões flexores da coxa no período de 6 de julho de 2000 a 19 de novembro de 2007. RESULTADOS: 176 pacientes foram avaliados com média de 34,95 ± 18,8 meses (mediana 31 meses (IIQ: 20-48 meses. A avaliação mínima foi aos 12 meses e a máxima aos 87 meses. Obtivemos 138 (78,4% pacientes com resultado excelente, 22 (12,5% com resultado bom, oito (4,5% com resultado regular e oito (4,5% pacientes apresentaram resultado ruim. Não foi considerada significativa a maior incidência de bons e excelentes resultados para o sexo masculino (p = 0,128, para os pacientes com IMC OBJETIVE: To evaluate the results of single band arthroscopic anterior cruciate ligament (ACL reconstruction with flexor tendon autografts. We analyzed data about sex, body mass index (BMI and lower limb fracture associated with the initial trauma. METHODS: Two hundred and sixty-five patients who underwent arthroscopic anterior cruciate ligament (ACL reconstruction with ipsilateral thigh flexor tendon autografts from July 6, 2000, to November 19, 2007, were evaluated. RESULTS: One hundred and seventy-six patients were evaluated at an average follow up time of 34.95 ± 18.8 months (Median 31 months (IIQ: 20 - 48 months. The minimum evaluation time was 12 months and the maximum 87 months. One hundred and thirty-eight (78.4% patients had excellent results, 22 (12.5% patients good, 8 (4.5% patients fair, and 8 (4.5% poor results. No statistical significance was found for the better results for males (p = 0.128, for patients with a BMI < 25 (p = 0.848, or for patients

  20. Pyogenic flexor tenosynovitis leading to an amputation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evgeniou, Evgenios; Iyer, Srinivasan

    2012-08-24

    Flexor tenosynovitis is an aggressive closed-space infection of the digital flexor tendon sheaths of the hand. We present a case of pyogenic flexor tenosynovitis in an immunocompromised patient and discuss the importance of early diagnosis and referral to a specialist hand surgery unit. A 61-year-old man visited his general practitioner because of swelling and tenderness of his left index finger. The patient was discharged on oral antibiotics but returned 4 days after because of deterioration of his symptoms and was referred to a plastic surgery unit. A diagnosis of flexor tenosynovitis was made and the patient required multiple debridements in theatre, resulting in the amputation of the infected finger. Pyogenic flexor tenosynovitis is a relatively common but often misdiagnosed hand infection. Patients with suspected flexor tenosynovitis should be referred and treated early to avoid significant morbidity, especially when risk factors for poor prognosis are present.

  1. Acute Achilles tendon rupture: Mini-incision repair with double-Tsuge loop suture vs. open repair with modified Kessler suture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Chongyang; Qu, Wei

    2015-08-01

    Achilles tendon rupture is a common injury of the foot and ankle. However, the optimal treatment strategy for Achilles tendon rupture is still not established. This study was conducted to compare the efficacy and complications of mini-incision repair with double-Tsuge loop sutures and open repair with modified Kessler sutures. We evaluated data from 60 patients with acute closed Achilles tendon ruptures who underwent mini-incision repair with double-Tsuge loop sutures (n = 30) or open repair with modified Kessler sutures (n = 30) from 2006 to 2010 in an ongoing prospective study conducted by us and have finished at least 18-month follow-up or finished the study. The AOFAS Ankle-Hindfoot score, ATRS, maximal ankle range of motion and the time to achieve 20 continuous single heel raises after operation were recorded to compare the efficacy. The complications were also evaluated. During a mean follow-up of 25 months after surgery, the time to achieve 20 continuous single heel raises after operation of patients in Group Mini was significantly shorter than patients in Group Open. Moreover, the mini-incision with double-Tsuge repair was associated with a significantly shorter operating time, smaller incision length, and lower rate of complications. The mini-incision with double-Tsuge suture method in our study was shown to provide earlier strength recovery, as well as shorter operation time, less complications and improved cosmetic appearance. Copyright © 2014 Royal College of Surgeons of Edinburgh (Scottish charity number SC005317) and Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Pectoralis major tendon repair: a biomechanical study of suture button versus transosseous suture techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, William; Gheduzzi, Sabina; Packham, Iain

    2015-09-01

    Pectoralis major tendon avulsion injury benefits from surgical repair. The technique used and speed of rehabilitation in this demanding population remains subject to debate. We performed a biomechanical study comparing suture button (Pec Button™, Arthrex, Naples, FL) with a transosseous suture technique (FibreWire, Arthrex, Naples, FL). Freshly slaughtered porcine humeri were prepared to model a single transosseous suture or suture button repair. A static, tensile load to failure experiment and a cyclic, tensile load experiment to model standard (10,000 cycles) and accelerated rehabilitation (20,000 cycles) philosophies were tested. The mode of failure, yield and ultimate failure load, extension (clinical failure >10 mm) and the resistance to cyclic loading was measured. The mode of failure was suture fracture in all the static load experiments with 10/11 occurring as the suture passed through the button and 7/11 as the suture passed through the bone tunnels. There was a significant difference in yield load, favouring transosseous suture [p = 0.009, suture button (SB) 673.0 N (647.2-691.7 N), transosseous suture (TOS) 855.0 N (750.0-891.4 N)] and median extension, favouring suture button [p = 0.009, SB 8.8 mm (5.0-12.4 mm), TOS 15.2 mm (13.2-17.1 mm)]. 2/3 transosseous suture and 0/3 suture buttons failed before completing 20,000 cycles. The difference in mean number of cycles completed was non-significant. The difference in mean extension was 5.1 mm (SB 6.7 mm, TOS 11.7 mm). Both techniques show advantages. The difference in extension is likely to be more clinically relevant than load tolerated at failure, which is well above physiological levels. The findings do not support an accelerated rehabilitation model.

  3. Hip flexor strain - aftercare

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... flexor - aftercare; Hip flexor injury - aftercare; Hip flexor tear - aftercare; Iliopsoas strain - aftercare; Strained iliopsoas muscle - aftercare; Torn iliopsoas muscle - aftercare; Psoas strain - aftercare

  4. Clinical Outcomes and Complications of Percutaneous Achilles Repair System Versus Open Technique for Acute Achilles Tendon Ruptures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Andrew R; Jones, Carroll P; Cohen, Bruce E; Davis, W Hodges; Ellington, J Kent; Anderson, Robert B

    2015-11-01

    Limited incision techniques for acute Achilles tendon ruptures have been developed in recent years to improve recovery and reduce postoperative complications compared with traditional open repair. The purpose of this retrospective cohort study was to analyze the clinical outcomes and postoperative complications between acute Achilles tendon ruptures treated using a percutaneous Achilles repair system (PARS [Arthrex, Inc, Naples, FL]) versus open repair and evaluate the overall outcomes for operatively treated Achilles ruptures. Between 2005 and 2014, 270 consecutive cases of operatively treated acute Achilles tendon ruptures were reviewed (101 PARS, 169 open). Patients with Achilles tendinopathy, insertional ruptures, chronic tears, or less than 3-month follow-up were excluded. Operative treatment consisted of a percutaneous technique (PARS) using a 2-cm transverse incision with FiberWire (Arthrex, Inc, Naples, FL) sutures or open repair using a 5- to 8-cm posteromedial incision with FiberWire in a Krackow fashion reinforced with absorbable sutures. Patient demographics were recorded along with medical comorbidities, activity at injury, time from injury to surgery, length of follow-up, return to baseline activities by 5 months, and postoperative complications. The most common activity during injury for both groups was basketball (PARS: 39%, open: 47%). A greater number of patients treated with PARS were able to return to baseline physical activities by 5 months compared with the open group (PARS: 98%, open: 82%; P = .0001). There were no significant differences (P > .05) between groups in rates of rerupture (P = 1.0), sural neuritis (P = .16), wound dehiscence (P = .74), superficial (P = .29) and/or deep infection (P = .29), or reoperation (P = .13). There were no deep vein thromboses (DVTs) or reruptures in either group. In the PARS group, there were no cases of sural neuritis, 3 cases (3%) of superficial wound dehiscence, and 2 reoperations (2%) for superficial

  5. Return to Function, Complication, and Reoperation Rates Following Primary Pectoralis Major Tendon Repair in Military Service Members.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nute, Drew W; Kusnezov, Nicholas; Dunn, John C; Waterman, Brian R

    2017-01-04

    Pectoralis major tendon ruptures have become increasingly common injuries among young, active individuals over the past 30 years; however, there is presently a paucity of reported outcome data. We investigated the ability to return to full preoperative level of function, complications, reoperation rates, and risk factors for failure following surgical repair of the pectoralis major tendon in a cohort of young, highly active individuals. All U.S. active-duty military patients undergoing pectoralis major tendon repair between 2008 and 2013 were identified from the Military Health System using the Management Analysis and Reporting Tool (M2). Demographic characteristics, injury characteristics, and trends in preoperative and postoperative self-reported pain scale (0 to 10) and strength were extracted. The ability to return to the full preoperative level of function and rates of rerupture and reoperation were the primary outcome measures. Univariate analysis followed by multivariate analysis identified significant variables. A total of 257 patients with pectoralis major tendon repair were identified with a mean follow-up (and standard deviation) of 47.8 ± 17 months (range, 24 to 90 months). At the time of the latest follow-up, 242 patients (94%) were able to return to the full preoperative level of military function. Fifteen patients (5.8%) were unable to return to duty because of persistent upper-extremity disability. A total of 15 reruptures occurred in 14 patients (5.4%). Increasing body mass index and active psychiatric conditions were significant predictors of inability to return to function (odds ratio, 1.56 [p = 0.0001] for increasing body mass index; and odds ratio, 6.59 [p = 0.00165] for active psychiatric conditions) and total failure (odds ratio, 1.26 [p = 0.0012] for increasing body mass index; and odds ratio, 2.73 [p = 0.0486] for active psychiatric conditions). We demonstrate that 94% of patients were able to return to the full preoperative level of

  6. Effect of glenohumeral abduction angle on the mechanical interaction between the supraspinatus and infraspinatus tendons for the intact, partial-thickness torn, and repaired supraspinatus tendon conditions

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Andarawis-Puri, Nelly; Kuntz, Andrew F; Ramsey, Matthew L; Soslowsky, Louis J

    2010-01-01

    .... Previously, we showed that with the arm at the side, the supraspinatus and infraspinatus tendons mechanically interact such that conditions that increase supraspinatus tendon strain, such as load...

  7. Effect of phototherapy with light-emitting diodes (890 nm) on tendon repair: an experimental model in sheep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Mattos, Luiz Henrique Lima; Álvarez, Luis Emiliano Cisneros; Yamada, Ana Lúcia Miluzzi; Hussni, Carlos Alberto; Rodrigues, Celso Antonio; Watanabe, Marcos Jun; Alves, Ana Liz Garcia

    2015-01-01

    The effect of phototherapy with 890-nm light-emitting diodes (LEDs) on the healing of experimentally induced tendinitis in sheep was evaluated in this study. Partial tenotomies measuring 0.2 cm wide × 0.5 cm long were performed on the second third of the superficial digital flexor tendons of 10 healthy sheep. The animals were divided into two groups: "treated" (TG), treated with LEDs at the aforementioned wavelength, and "control" (CG), a control group treated with a placebo. Kinesiotherapy, which consisted of 5-min walks on grassy ground, was performed on both groups. B-mode and power Doppler ultrasonographies (US) were performed to evaluate the tendon healing process during the first 14 days after surgery and on the 21st and 28th postoperative days. Biopsies were performed on day 28 for the histopathological assessment of neovascularisation and the pattern of the tendon fibres. The absence of lameness and a significant improvement (p < 0.05) in the sensitivity to pain during palpation were observed in the treated group. Furthermore, a significant reduction in oedema and an increased number of vessels (p < 0.05) were observed in this group with the B-mode and power Doppler US, respectively. No significant difference in the evolution of the lesion was found. There was a histological difference (p < 0.05) in neovascularisation in the treated group. Phototherapy with 890-nm light-emitting diodes decreases the inflammatory process.

  8. Surgical Strategy for the Chronic Achilles Tendon Rupture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yangjing; Yang, Liu; Yin, Li; Duan, Xiaojun

    2016-01-01

    Background. Chronic Achilles tendon rupture is usually misdiagnosed and treated improperly. This study aims to better understand the treatment of chronic Achilles tendon rupture. Methods. Patients who were not able to perform a single-limb heel rise were chosen. Pre- and postoperative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) were conducted. By evaluating the presence or absence of Achilles tendon stumps and the gap length of rupture, V-Y advancement, gastrocnemius fascial turndown flap, or flexor halluces longus tendon transfer were selected for tendon repair. The function of ankle and foot was assessed by American Orthopaedic Foot & Ankle Society (AOFAS) ankle-hindfoot scores and Achilles Tendon Total Rupture Score (ATRS). Results. Twenty-nine patients were followed up. One patient had superficial incision infection, which was healed after debridement and oral antibiotics. Three months postoperatively, MRI showed some signs of inflammation, which disappeared at one or two years postoperatively. All patients were able to perform a single-limb heel rise. Mean AOFAS scores and ATRS scores were increased at the latest follow-up. Conclusion. Surgical options can be determined by evaluating the presence of the Achilles tendon stumps and the gap length, which can avoid using the nearby tendon and yield satisfactory functional results.

  9. Surgical Strategy for the Chronic Achilles Tendon Rupture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yangjing Lin

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Chronic Achilles tendon rupture is usually misdiagnosed and treated improperly. This study aims to better understand the treatment of chronic Achilles tendon rupture. Methods. Patients who were not able to perform a single-limb heel rise were chosen. Pre- and postoperative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI were conducted. By evaluating the presence or absence of Achilles tendon stumps and the gap length of rupture, V-Y advancement, gastrocnemius fascial turndown flap, or flexor halluces longus tendon transfer were selected for tendon repair. The function of ankle and foot was assessed by American Orthopaedic Foot & Ankle Society (AOFAS ankle-hindfoot scores and Achilles Tendon Total Rupture Score (ATRS. Results. Twenty-nine patients were followed up. One patient had superficial incision infection, which was healed after debridement and oral antibiotics. Three months postoperatively, MRI showed some signs of inflammation, which disappeared at one or two years postoperatively. All patients were able to perform a single-limb heel rise. Mean AOFAS scores and ATRS scores were increased at the latest follow-up. Conclusion. Surgical options can be determined by evaluating the presence of the Achilles tendon stumps and the gap length, which can avoid using the nearby tendon and yield satisfactory functional results.

  10. Knotless Repair of Achilles Tendon Rupture in an Elite Athlete: Return to Competition in 18 Weeks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrne, Paul A; Hopper, Graeme P; Wilson, William T; Mackay, Gordon M

    Rupture of the Achilles tendon is an increasingly common injury, particularly in physically active males, and current evidence favors minimally invasive surgical repair. We describe the case of a 36-year-old male elite bobsled athlete with complete rupture of the Achilles tendon. He was treated with surgical repair of the ruptured tendon using an innovative, minimally invasive procedure based on an internal bracing concept and was able to undergo early mobilization and aggressive physiotherapy rehabilitation. His recovery was such that he returned to training at 13 weeks postoperatively and participated in an international competition at 18 weeks, winning a World Cup silver medal. He subsequently raced at the 2014 Winter Olympic Games at 29 weeks after surgery. At >2 years since his injury, he has experienced no complications or reinjury. This represents an exceptional recovery that far exceeds the standard expected for such injuries. The use of this technique for athletes could enable accelerated return to sporting activity and attainment of their preinjury activity levels.

  11. Tendon Collagen Crosslinking Offers Potential to Improve Suture Pullout in Rotator Cuff Repair: An Ex Vivo Sheep Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camenzind, Roland S; Wieser, Karl; Fessel, Gion; Meyer, Dominik C; Snedeker, Jess G

    2016-08-01

    The suture-tendon interface is often the weakest link in tendon to bone repair of massive rotator cuff tears. Genipin is a low-toxicity collagen crosslinker derived from the gardenia fruit that has been shown to augment collagen tissue strength and mechanically arrest tendon-tear progression. The purpose of the current study was to evaluate whether genipin crosslinking can sufficiently augment the suture-tendon interface to improve suture pullout strength using simple single-loop sutures and the modified Mason-Allen technique. The study also aimed to assess whether time of genipin treatment is a relevant factor in efficacy. In an ex vivo (cadaveric) sheep rotator cuff tendon model, a total of 142 suture pullout tests were performed on 32 infraspinatus tendons. Each tendon was prepared with three single-loop stitches. Two groups were pretreated by incubation in genipin solution for either 4 hours or 24 hours. Two corresponding control groups were incubated in phosphate buffered saline for the same periods. The same test protocol was applied to tendons using modified Mason-Allen technique stitch patterns. Each suture was loaded to failure on a universal materials testing machine. Suture pullout force, stiffness, and work to failure were calculated from force-displacement data, and then compared among the groups. Median single-loop pullout force on tendons incubated for 24 hours in genipin yielded an approximately 30% increase in maximum pullout force for single-loop stitches with a median of 73 N (range, 56-114 N) compared with 56 N (range, 40-69 N; difference of medians = 17 N; p = 0.028), with corresponding increases in the required work to failure but not stiffness. Genipin treatment for 4 hours showed no added benefit for suture-pullout behavior (46 N, [range, 35-95 N] versus 45 N, [range, 28-63 N]; difference of medians, 1 N; p = 1). No tested genipin crosslinking conditions indicated benefit for tendons grasped using the modified Mason-Allen technique after 4

  12. Repair of Chronic Achilles Ruptures Has a High Incidence of Venous Thromboembolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bullock, Mark J; DeCarbo, William T; Hofbauer, Mark H; Thun, Joshua D

    2016-11-23

    Background Despite the low incidence of deep vein thrombosis (DVT) in foot and ankle surgery, some authors report a high incidence of symptomatic DVT following Achilles tendon rupture. The purpose of this study was to identify DVT risk factors inherent to Achilles tendon repair to determine which patients may benefit from prophylaxis. Methods One hundred and thirteen patient charts were reviewed following elective and nonelective Achilles tendon repair. For elective repair of insertional or noninsertional Achilles tendinopathy, parameters examined included lateral versus prone positioning and the presence versus absence of a flexor hallucis longus transfer. For nonelective repair, acute Achilles tendon ruptures were compared to chronic Achilles tendon ruptures. Results Of 113 Achilles tendon repairs, 3 venous thromboembolism (VTE) events (2.65%) occurred including 2 pulmonary emboli (1.77%). Seventeen of these repairs were chronic Achilles tendon ruptures, and all 3 VTE events (17.6%) occurred within this subgroup. Elevated body mass index was associated with VTE in patients with chronic Achilles ruptures although this did not reach significance (P = .064). No VTE events were reported after repair of 28 acute tendon ruptures or after 68 elective repairs of tendinopathy. Two patients with misdiagnosed partial Achilles tendon tears were excluded because they experienced a VTE event 3 weeks and 5 weeks after injury, prior to surgery. Conclusion In our retrospective review, chronic Achilles ruptures had a statistically significant higher incidence of VTE compared with acute Achilles ruptures (P = .048) or elective repair (P = .0069). Pharmaceutical anticoagulation may be considered for repair of chronic ruptures. Repair of acute ruptures and elective repair may not warrant routine prophylaxis due to a lower incidence of VTE.

  13. Obesity/Type II diabetes alters macrophage polarization resulting in a fibrotic tendon healing response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ackerman, Jessica E; Geary, Michael B; Orner, Caitlin A; Bawany, Fatima; Loiselle, Alayna E

    2017-01-01

    Type II Diabetes (T2DM) dramatically impairs the tendon healing response, resulting in decreased collagen organization and mechanics relative to non-diabetic tendons. Despite this burden, there remains a paucity of information regarding the mechanisms that govern impaired healing of diabetic tendons. Mice were placed on either a high fat diet (T2DM) or low fat diet (lean) and underwent flexor tendon transection and repair surgery. Healing was assessed via mechanical testing, histology and changes in gene expression associated with collagen synthesis, matrix remodeling, and macrophage polarization. Obese/diabetic tendons healed with increased scar formation and impaired mechanical properties. Consistent with this, prolonged and excess expression of extracellular matrix (ECM) components were observed in obese/T2DM tendons. Macrophages are involved in both inflammatory and matrix deposition processes during healing. Obese/T2DM tendons healed with increased expression of markers of pro-inflammatory M1 macrophages, and elevated and prolonged expression of M2 macrophages markers that are involved in ECM deposition. Here we demonstrate that tendons from obese/diabetic mice heal with increased scar formation and increased M2 polarization, identifying excess M2 macrophage activity and matrix synthesis as a potential mechanism of the fibrotic healing phenotype observed in T2DM tendons, and as such a potential target to improve tendon healing in T2DM.

  14. Sirius red staining in the study of tendon repair%天狼猩红染色法在肌腱胶原形态分析中的应用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王继宏; 温树正

    2011-01-01

    Objective To observe the applied value of Sirius red staining in the study on tendon repair. Methods Thirty ten-month old fowls were randomly divided into groups A, B and C (10 each group). The flexor tendon was cut off in the third toe then suture it.A group,B group,C group,respectively after 2 weeks,4 weeks,8weeks drawn and did the specimens biomechanical test,sirius red staining,immunohistochemical staining,the specimens were evaluated by means of macroscopic observation.Results A group within the section of tendon suture a small number of collagen fibers,arranged in sparse,thin collagen type Ⅲ to the main;B group within the section of tendon suture collagen fibers are more disordered,Ⅰ,Ⅲ collagen staggered;C group tendon suture paragraph quantity of collagen fibers,with thick main type Ⅰ collagen;a small number of fibroblasts,tendon cell maturation.Conclusion Sirius red staining of collagen fibers can be dyed simultaneously in the same slide show type Ⅰ and Ⅲ collagen,is to study the tendon collagen fibers in the repair of major staining.Tendon healing in the early to slim type Ⅲ collagen-based,healing late stage Ⅰ collagen-based thick.%目的 探讨天狼猩红染色法在肌腱胶原形态分析中的应用价值.方法 将30只10个月龄雄性Leghorn鸡随机分为A、B、C 组,每组10只.将每只鸡的左足第Ⅲ趾造成挤压撕脱伤模型,用改良Kessler缝合法缝接.A组、B组、C组分别于术后2周、4周、8周取材,对标本进行磷钨酸苏木素染色、天狼猩红染色、免疫组织化学染色等观察.结果 A组腱缝合段内的胶原纤维数量少,排列稀疏,以纤细的Ⅲ型胶原为主;B组腱缝合段内的胶原纤维数量较多,排列紊乱,Ⅰ、Ⅲ型胶原交错排列;C组腱缝合段内的胶原纤维数量多,以粗大的Ⅰ型胶原为主,成纤维细胞数量少,腱细胞成熟.结论 天狼猩红染色法在胶原纤维的染色中可在同一张切片中同时显示Ⅰ型和Ⅲ型胶原,是

  15. ARTHROSCOPIC REPAIR OF SMALL AND MEDIUM TEARS OF THE SUPRASPINATUS MUSCLE TENDON: EVALUATION OF THE CLINICAL AND FUNCTIONAL OUTCOMES AFTER TWO YEARS OF FOLLOW-UP

    OpenAIRE

    Ikemoto,Roberto Yukio; Murachovsky, Joel; Nascimento, Luís Gustavo Prata; Bueno,Rogério Serpone; Almeida,Luis Henrique; Strose,Eric; Castiglia,Marcello Teixeira

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the clinical and functional outcomes from arthroscopic repairs on small and medium-sized tears of the supraspinatus muscle tendon. Methods: 129 cases of isolated small and medium tears of the supraspinatus muscle tendon were evaluated retrospectively. The average duration of pain was 29 months. The average joint range of motion comprised active elevation of 136°, lateral rotation of 58° and medial rotation at T12 level; and the preoperative functional UCLA score average...

  16. Repair of distal biceps brachii tendon assessed with 3-T magnetic resonance imaging and correlation with functional outcome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alemann, Guillaume; Dietsch, Emmanuel [University Hospital of Besancon, Department of Musculoskeletal Imaging, Besancon (France); Gallinet, David; Obert, Laurent [University Hospital of Besancon, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Besancon (France); Kastler, Bruno; Aubry, Sebastien [University Hospital of Besancon, Department of Musculoskeletal Imaging, Besancon (France); Franche Comte University, I4S Laboratory-EA 4268-IFR 133, Besancon (France)

    2015-05-01

    Objectives were to study the MRI appearance of the repaired distal biceps tendon (DBT), anatomically reinserted, and to search for a correlation between tendon measurements and functional results. Twenty-five patients (mean age, 49 ± 4.9 years old) who benefited from 3-T MRI follow-up of the elbow after surgical reinsertion of the DBT were retrospectively included and compared to a control group (n = 25; mean age, 48 ± 10 years old). MRI was performed during the month of clinical follow-up and on average 22 months after surgery. Delayed complications (secondary avulsion, new rupture), intratendinous osteoma, tendinous signal on T1-weighted (T1{sub w}) and fat-suppressed proton density-weighted (FS-PD{sub w}) images as well as DBT measurements were recorded. The maximum isometric elbow flexion strength (MEFS) and range of motion of the elbow were assessed. Repaired DBT demonstrated a heterogeneous but normally fibrillar structure. Its low T1{sub w} signal was less pronounced than that of normal tendons, and the FS-PD{sub W} image signal was similar to that of T1{sub w} images. MRI detected seven osteomas (Se = 53 % vs. plain radiography), one textiloma and one secondary avulsion. Repaired DBT measurements were significantly correlated with MEFS (dominant arm R2: 0.38; nondominant arm R2: 0.54); this correlation involved the insertion surface (Δ = -75.7 mm{sup 2}, p = 0.046), transverse diameter (Δ = -2.6 mm, p = 0.018), anteroposterior diameter at the level of the radial head (Δ = -3.9 mm, p = 0.001) and DBT cross-sectional area (Δ = -50.2 mm{sup 2}, p = 0.003). The quality of functional outcome after anatomical elbow rehabilitation of DBT correlates with the extent of tendinous hypertrophy during the healing process. (orig.)

  17. Physical activity modulates nerve plasticity and stimulates repair after Achilles tendon rupture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bring, Daniel K-I; Kreicbergs, Andris; Renstrom, Per A F H; Ackermann, Paul W

    2007-02-01

    In a rat model of tendon rupture using semiquantitative methodology, healing was assessed according to the diameter of newly organized collagen and the occurrence of the sensory neuropeptides (SP, CGRP) in relation to different levels of physical activity. Normally, innervation of the Achilles tendon is confined to the paratenon. After rupture new nerve fibers grow into the tendon proper, but disappear after healing. In a first experiment to establish peak tissue and nerve regeneration after rupture, tendon tissues from freely moving rats were collected consecutively over 16 weeks. A peak increase in organized collagen and nerve ingrowth was observed between week 2 to 4 post rupture. Therefore, in a second experiment week 4 was chosen to assess the effect of physical activity on tendon healing in three groups of rats, that is, wheel running, plaster treated, and freely moving (controls). In the wheel-running group, the diameter of newly organized collagen was 94% ( p = 0.001) greater than that in the plaster-treated group and 48% ( p = 0.02) greater than that in the controls. Inversely, the neuronal occurrence of CGRP in the tendon proper was 57% ( p = 0.02) lower in the wheel-running group than that in the plaster-treated group and 53% ( p = 0.02) lower than that in the controls, suggesting an earlier neuronal in-growth and disappearance in the more active group. Physical activity speeds up tendon healing, which may prove to be linked to accelerated neuronal plasticity.

  18. Outcomes of digital zone IV and V and thumb zone TI to TIV extensor tendon repairs using a running interlocking horizontal mattress technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altobelli, Grant G; Conneely, Stacy; Haufler, Christina; Walsh, Maura; Ruchelsman, David E

    2013-06-01

    Biomechanical evidence has demonstrated that the running interlocking horizontal mattress (RIHM) repair for extensor tendon lacerations is significantly stronger, with higher ultimate load to failure and less tendon shortening compared with other techniques. We investigated the efficacy and safety of primary extensor tendon repair using the RIHM repair technique in the fingers followed by the immediate controlled active motion protocol, and in the thumb followed by a dynamic extension protocol. We conducted a retrospective review of all patients undergoing extensor tendon repair from August 2009 to April 2012 by single surgeon in an academic hand surgery practice. The inclusion criteria were simple extensor tendon lacerations in digital zones IV and V and thumb zones TI to TIV and primary repair performed using the RIHM technique. We included 8 consecutive patients with 9 tendon lacerations (3 in the thumb). One patient underwent a concomitant dorsal hand rotation flap for soft tissue coverage. We used a 3-0 nonabsorbable braided suture to perform a running simple suture in 1 direction to obtain a tension-free tenorrhaphy, followed by an RIHM corset-type suture using the same continuous strand in the opposite direction. Average time to surgery was 10 days (range, 3-33 d). Mean follow-up was 15 weeks (range, 10-26 wk). We applied the immediate controlled active motion protocol to all injuries except those in the thumb, where we used a dynamic extension protocol instead. Using the criteria of Miller, all 9 tendon repairs achieved excellent or good results. There were no tendon ruptures or extensor lags. No patients required secondary surgery for tenolysis or joint release. No wound complications occurred. The RIHM technique for primary extensor tendon repairs in zone IV and V and T1 to TIV is safe, allows for immediate controlled active motion in the fingers and an immediate dynamic extension protocol in the thumb, and achieves good to excellent functional outcomes

  19. Valores biométricos obtidos por ultra-sonografia dos tendões flexores e ligamentos acessório inferior e suspensório da região metacárpica palmar de cavalos Mangalarga Marchador Biometric values obtained by ultrasonography of flexor tendons and inferior accessory and suspensory ligaments of the palmar metacarpal region in Mangalarga Marchador horses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F.A. Aristizábal M.

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available Determinou-se a área transversal (AT dos tendões e ligamentos da região metacárpica palmar de 15 cavalos da raça Mangalarga Marchador. As áreas transversais do tendão do músculo flexor digital superficial (TFDS, do tendão do músculo flexor digital profundo (TFDP, do ligamento acessório inferior (LA e do ligamento suspensório (LS foram determinadas mediante ultra-sonografia, em sete zonas distintas (1A, 1B, 2A, 2B, 3A, 3B e 3C. Os valores médios da AT para TFDS foram: zona 1A, 1,07±0,13; zona 1B, 0,97±0,12; zona 2A, 0,77±0,08; zona 2B, 0,68±0,12; zona 3A, 0,74±0,10; zona 3B, 0,86±0,10; e zona 3C, 1,33±0,24. Para TFDP foram: zona 1A, 1,09±0,12; zona 1B, 0,99±0,14; zona 2A, 0,72±0,11; zona 2B, 0,63±0,10; zona 3A, 0,71±0,14; zona 3B, 0,87±0,14; e zona 3C, 1,39±0,20. Para LA foram: zona 1A, 1,17±0,14; zona 1B, 0,85±0,11; zona 2A, 0,73±0,12; zona 2B, 0,60±0,16; e zona 3A, 0,42±0,15. Para LS foram: zona 1A, 0,82±0,14; zona 1B, 1,23±0,15; zona 2A, 1,21±0,15; zona 2B, 1,18±0,14; e zona 3A, 1,20±0,31. A AT de cada estrutura avaliada foi similar entre membros torácicos, considerando a mesma zona estudada. Não houve diferença significativa entre a AT do TFDS e a do TFDP.The transversal area (TA of tendons and ligaments located in the palmar metacarpal region was studied in 15 Mangalarga Marchador horses without locomotor pathology. The superficial digital flexor tendon (SDFT, deep digital flexor tendon (DDFP, accessory ligament of the deep digital flexor tendon (AL-DDFP, and suspensory ligament (TIOM were examined by ultrasonography, at seven different zones (1A, 1B, 2A, 2B, 3A, 3B e 3C, to determine the TA. The mean TA values for SDFT were: zone 1A, 1.07±0.13; zone 1B, 0.97±0.12; zone 2A, 0.77±0.08; zone 2B, 0.68±0.12; zone 3A, 0.74±0.10; zone 3B, 0.86±0.10; and zone 3C, 1.33±0.24. For DDFT were: zone 1A, 1.09±0.12; zone 1B, 0.99±0.14; zone 2A, 0.72±0.11; zone 2B, 0.63±0.10; zone 3A, 0.71±0.14; zone 3B, 0

  20. Fatal Pulmonary Embolism following Achilles Tendon Repair: A Case Report and a Review of the Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asim M. Makhdom

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Deep venous thrombosis (DVT is a significant source of morbidity in orthopaedic surgery. It can progress to a pulmonary embolism, a significant source of mortality. Up to date, patients with Achilles tendon rupture routinely do not receive DVT chemical prophylaxis. We are presenting a case of fatal pulmonary embolism after a surgically treated Achilles tendon rupture in a forty-two-year-old male healthy patient. In the current body of the literature, the reported incidence of DVT after Achilles tendon rupture is highly variable ranging from less than 1% to 34%, and there is a disagreement in the international guidelines regarding the need of chemical DVT prophylaxis with this type of injury. Further research needs to be conducted to investigate the risks and benefits of chemical DVT prophylaxis following Achilles tendon rupture. For low-risk patients, the use of milder forms of prophylaxis such as aspirin should also be explored.

  1. Adipose derived stromal vascular fraction improves early tendon healing: an experimental study in rabbits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehdi Behfar

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Tendon never restores the complete biological and mechanical properties after healing. Bone marrow and recently adipose tissue have been used as the sources of mesenchymal stem cells, which have been proven to enhance tendon healing. Stromal vascular fraction (SVF, derived from adipose tissue by an enzymatic digestion, represents an alternative source of multipotent cells, which undergo differentiation into multiple lineages to be used in regenerative medicine. In the present study, we investigated potentials of this source on tendon healing. Twenty rabbits were divided into control and treatment groups. Five rabbits were used as donors of adipose tissue. The injury model was unilateral complete transection through the middle one third of deep digital flexor tendon. Immediately after suture repair, either fresh stromal vascular fraction from enzymatic digestion of adipose tissue or placebo was intratendinously injected into the suture site in treatments and controls, respectively. Cast immobilization was continued for two weeks after surgery. Animals were sacrificed at the third week and tendons underwent histological, immunohistochemical, and mechanical evaluations. By histology, improved fibrillar organization and remodeling of neotendon were observed in treatment group. Immunohistochemistry revealed an insignificant increase in collagen type III and I expression in treatments over controls. Mechanical testing showed significant increase in maximum load and energy absorption in SVF treated tendons. The present study showed that intratendinous injection of uncultured adipose derived stromal vascular fraction improved structural and mechanical properties of repaired tendon and it could be an effective modality for treating tendon laceration.

  2. Number of ruptured tendons and surgical delay as prognostic factors for the surgical repair of extensor tendon ruptures in the rheumatoid wrist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakuma, Yu; Ochi, Kensuke; Iwamoto, Takuji; Saito, Asami; Yano, Koichiro; Naito, Yurino; Yoshida, Shinji; Ikari, Katsunori; Momohara, Shigeki

    2014-02-01

    Extensor tendon ruptures in the rheumatoid wrist are usually restored by extensor tendon reconstruction surgery. However, the factors significantly correlated with the outcomes of extensor tendon reconstruction have not been defined. We examined factors showing a statistically significant correlation with postoperative active motion after tendon reconstruction. Spontaneous extensor tendon ruptures of 66 wrists in patients (mean age, 52.6 yrs) with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) were evaluated. All patients underwent tendon reconstruction surgery with wrist arthroplasty or arthrodesis. Active ranges of motion of the affected fingers were evaluated at 12 weeks postsurgery. Statistical significance was determined using multiple and single regression analyses. Forty-six (69.6%) wrists had "good" results, while 13 (19.7%) and 7 (10.6%) wrists had "fair" and "poor" results, respectively. In multiple regression analysis, an increased number of ruptured tendons and the age at operation were independent variables significantly correlated with the postoperative active motion of reconstructed tendons (p = 0.009). Single regression analysis also showed a significant association between the number of ruptured tendons and surgical delay (p = 0.02). The number of ruptured extensor tendons was significantly correlated with the results of tendon reconstruction, and the number of ruptured tendons was significantly correlated with preoperative surgical delay. Our results indicate that, in patients presenting with possible finger extensor tendon rupture, rheumatologists should consult with hand surgeons promptly to preserve hand function.

  3. A novel repair method for the treatment of acute Achilles tendon rupture with minimally invasive approach using button implant: a biomechanical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huri, Gazi; Biçer, Ömer Sunkar; Ozgözen, Levent; Uçar, Yurdanur; Garbis, Nickolas G; Hyun, Yoon Suk

    2013-12-01

    Minimally invasive Q3 repair has been proposed for acute Achilles tendon rupture with low rate of complications. However there are still controversies about optimal technique. In this study we aimed to describe Endobutton-assisted modified Bunnell configuration as a new Achilles tendon repair technique and evaluate its biomechanical properties comparing with native tendon and Krackow technique. 27 ovine Achilles tendons were obtained and randomly placed into 3 groups with 9 specimens ineach. The Achilles tendons were repaired with Endobutton-assisted modified Bunnell technique in group 1, Krackow suture technique in group 2 and group 3 was defined as the control group including native tendons. Unidirectional tensile loading to failure was performed at 25mm/min. Biomechanicalproperties such as peak force to failure (N), stress at peak (MPa), elongation at failure, and Young'smodulus (GPa) was measured for each group. All groups were compared with each other using one-wayANOVA followed by the Tukey HSD multiple comparison test (a=0.05). The average peak force (N) to failure of group 1 and group 2 and control group was 415.6±57.6, 268.1±65.2 and 704.5±85.8, respectively. There was no statistically significant difference between native tendon and group 1 for the amount elongation at failure (p>0.05). Regarding the results, we concluded that Endobutton-assisted modified Bunnell technique provides stronger fixation than conventional techniques. It may allow early range of motion and can be easily applied in minimally invasive and percutaneous methods particularly for cases with poor quality tendon at the distal part of rupture. Level II, Biomechanical research study. Copyright © 2013 European Foot and Ankle Society. All rights reserved.

  4. Longitudinal Long-term Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Clinical Follow-up After Single-Row Arthroscopic Rotator Cuff Repair: Clinical Superiority of Structural Tendon Integrity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heuberer, Philipp R; Smolen, Daniel; Pauzenberger, Leo; Plachel, Fabian; Salem, Sylvia; Laky, Brenda; Kriegleder, Bernhard; Anderl, Werner

    2017-05-01

    The number of arthroscopic rotator cuff surgeries is consistently increasing. Although generally considered successful, the reported number of retears after rotator cuff repair is substantial. Short-term clinical outcomes are reported to be rarely impaired by tendon retears, whereas to our knowledge, there is no study documenting long-term clinical outcomes and tendon integrity after arthroscopic rotator cuff repair. To investigate longitudinal long-term repair integrity and clinical outcomes after arthroscopic rotator cuff reconstruction. Case series; Level of evidence, 4. Thirty patients who underwent arthroscopic rotator cuff repair with suture anchors for a full-tendon full-thickness tear of the supraspinatus or a partial-tendon full-thickness tear of the infraspinatus were included. Two and 10 years after initial arthroscopic surgery, tendon integrity was analyzed using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA) score and Constant score as well as subjective questions regarding satisfaction with the procedure and return to normal activity were used to evaluate short- and long-term outcomes. At the early MRI follow-up, 42% of patients showed a full-thickness rerupture, while 25% had a partial rerupture, and 33% of tendons remained intact. The 10-year MRI follow-up (129 ± 11 months) showed 50% with a total rerupture, while the other half of the tendons were partially reruptured (25%) or intact (25%). The UCLA and Constant scores significantly improved from preoperatively (UCLA total: 50.6% ± 20.2%; Constant total: 44.7 ± 10.5 points) to 2 years (UCLA total: 91.4% ± 16.0% [ P integrity important goals of future research efforts.

  5. AUGMENTATION VS NONAUGMENTATION TECHNIQUES FOR OPEN REPAIRS OF ACHILLES TENDON RUPTURES WITH EARLY FUNCTIONAL TREATMENT: A PROSPECTIVE RANDOMIZED STUDY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gündüz Tezeren

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available A prospective randomized study was conducted in order to compare augmentation technique versus nonaugmentation technique, followed by early functional postoperative treatment, for operative repair of Achilles tendon ruptures. Twenty-four consecutive patients were assigned to two groups. Group I included 12 patients treated with Lindholm augmentation technique, whereas group II included 12 patients treated with modified Kessler end-to-end repair. Thereafter, these patients had postoperative management with a below-knee-cast for three weeks. The physioteraphy was initiated immediately after the cast was removed. Full weight bearing was allowed after five weeks postoperatively in the both groups. Two patients had reruptures in group II, whereas group I had prolonged operative time significantly. The patients with reruptures underwent reoperations and at the most final follow-up, it was observed that they could not resume to sporting activities. The other objective and subjective results were similar between two groups. Because of quite high rerupture rate in the group of patients treated with nonaugmentation technique, we favor functional postoperative treatment with early ankle movement in the patients treated with augmentation technique for the management of acute rupture of the Achilles tendon

  6. Mesenchymal stem cell therapy regenerates the native bone-tendon junction after surgical repair in a degenerative rat model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geoffroy Nourissat

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The enthesis, which attaches the tendon to the bone, naturally disappears with aging, thus limiting joint mobility. Surgery is frequently needed but the clinical outcome is often poor due to the decreased natural healing capacity of the elderly. This study explored the benefits of a treatment based on injecting chondrocyte and mesenchymal stem cells (MSC in a new rat model of degenerative enthesis repair. METHODOLOGY: The Achilles' tendon was cut and the enthesis destroyed. The damage was repaired by classical surgery without cell injection (group G1, n = 52 and with chondrocyte (group G2, n = 51 or MSC injection (group G3, n = 39. The healing rate was determined macroscopically 15, 30 and 45 days later. The production and organization of a new enthesis was assessed by histological scoring of collagen II immunostaining, glycoaminoglycan production and the presence of columnar chondrocytes. The biomechanical load required to rupture the bone-tendon junction was determined. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The spontaneous healing rate in the G1 control group was 40%, close to those observed in humans. Cell injection significantly improved healing (69%, p = 0.0028 for G2 and p = 0.006 for G3 and the load-to-failure after 45 days (p<0.05 over controls. A new enthesis was clearly produced in cell-injected G2 and G3 rats, but not in the controls. Only the MSC-injected G3 rats had an organized enthesis with columnar chondrocytes as in a native enthesis 45 days after surgery. CONCLUSIONS: Cell therapy is an efficient procedure for reconstructing degenerative entheses. MSC treatment produced better organ regeneration than chondrocyte treatment. The morphological and biomechanical properties were similar to those of a native enthesis.

  7. 改良式小针刀治疗屈指肌腱狭窄性腱鞘炎300例临床分析%Aclinical analysis of treating 300 cases of flexor tendon stenosing tenosynovitis by acupuncture

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    魏军义; 张春蕾

    2013-01-01

      小针刀疗法是一种介于手术方法和非手术疗法之间的闭合性松解术,是基于颈肩腰腿痛病因及病理解剖,吸收现代西医及自然科学成果,再加以创造而成的医学学科。本人将传统式小针刀加以改良,用于治疗屈指肌腱狭窄性腱鞘炎,其疗效明显优于原有治疗方法,深受广大患者的好评。%  Small knife therapy is a cross between a closed lysis between the surgical and non-surgical therapy, based on the neck and back pain etiology and pathological anatomy, absorption of modern medicine and science results, coupled with the creation of medical disciplines. Traditional small knife for treating stenosing tenosynovitis of the flexor tendon was improved, significantly better than the original treatment, the majority of the patients.

  8. Musculoskeletal responses of 2-year-old Thoroughbred horses to early training. 3. In vivo ultrasonographic assessment of the cross-sectional area and echogenicity of the superficial digital flexor tendon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perkins, N R; Rogers, C W; Firth, E C; Anderson, B H

    2004-10-01

    To determine if the superficial digital flexor tendon (SDFT) of young Thoroughbred horses changed in size and echogenicity in association with early race training. Cross-sectional area (CSA) and echogenicity were determined ultrasonographically at five levels of the SDFT of the forelimbs of 2-year-old fillies (n=14), corresponding to 4, 8, 12, 16 and 20 cm distal to the accessory carpal bone (DACB). Measurements were made before and after a 13-week period in which a trained group of seven horses was compared with another group of seven untrained horses. Level below the accessory carpal bone had a significant effect on CSA and Level 8 was smaller than all other levels except Level 12, while Level 12 was smaller than Levels 4 and 20 but not different from Levels 8 and 16. There was a significant interaction between level and time due to effects observed at Level 8. The CSA at Level 8 measured pre-training was different from that of Levels 4 and 20 in both pre- and post-training groups (pmaturity may play a role in limiting this increase.

  9. Cell- and gene-based approaches to tendon regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nixon, Alan J; Watts, Ashlee E; Schnabel, Lauren V

    2012-02-01

    Repair of rotator cuff tears in experimental models has been significantly improved by the use of enhanced biologic approaches, including platelet-rich plasma, bone marrow aspirate, growth factor supplements, and cell- and gene-modified cell therapy. Despite added complexity, cell-based therapies form an important part of enhanced repair, and combinations of carrier vehicles, growth factors, and implanted cells provide the best opportunity for robust repair. Bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells provide a stimulus for repair in flexor tendons, but application in rotator cuff repair has not shown universally positive results. The use of scaffolds such as platelet-rich plasma, fibrin, and synthetic vehicles and the use of gene priming for stem cell differentiation and local anabolic and anti-inflammatory impact have both provided essential components for enhanced tendon and tendon-to-bone repair in rotator cuff disruption. Application of these research techniques in human rotator cuff injury has generally been limited to autologous platelet-rich plasma, bone marrow concentrate, or bone marrow aspirates combined with scaffold materials. Cultured mesenchymal progenitor therapy and gene-enhanced function have not yet reached clinical trials in humans. Research in several animal species indicates that the concept of gene-primed stem cells, particularly embryonic stem cells, combined with effective culture conditions, transduction with long-term integrating vectors carrying anabolic growth factors, and development of cells conditioned by use of RNA interference gene therapy to resist matrix metalloproteinase degradation, may constitute potential advances in rotator cuff repair. This review summarizes cell- and gene-enhanced cell research for tendon repair and provides future directions for rotator cuff repair using biologic composites.

  10. Mesenchymal stem cells from a hypoxic culture improve and engraft Achilles tendon repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Tung-Fu; Yew, Tu-Lai; Chiang, En-Rung; Ma, Hsiao-Li; Hsu, Chih-Yuan; Hsu, Shan-Hui; Hsu, Yuan-Tong; Hung, Shih-Chieh

    2013-05-01

    Bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) from humans cultured under hypoxic conditions increase bone healing capacity. Rat MSCs cultured under hypoxic conditions increase the tendon healing potential after transplantation into injured Achilles tendons. Controlled laboratory study. Biomechanical testing, histological analysis, and bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) labeling/collagen immunohistochemistry were performed to demonstrate that augmentation of an Achilles tendon rupture site with hypoxic MSCs increases healing capacity compared with normoxic MSCs and controls. Fifty Sprague-Dawley rats were used for the experiments, with 2 rats as the source of bone marrow MSCs. The cut Achilles tendons in the rats were equally divided into 3 groups: hypoxic MSC, normoxic MSC, and nontreated (vehicle control). The uncut tendons served as normal uncut controls. Outcome measures included mechanical testing in 24 rats, histological analysis, and BrdU labeling/collagen immunohistochemistry in another 24 rats. The ultimate failure load in the hypoxic MSC group was significantly greater than that in the nontreated or normoxic MSC group at 2 weeks after incision (2.1 N/mm(2) vs 1.1 N/mm(2) or 1.9 N/mm(2), respectively) and at 4 weeks after incision (5.5 N/mm(2) vs 1.7 N/mm(2) or 2.7 N/mm(2), respectively). The ultimate failure load in the hypoxic MSC group at 4 weeks after incision (5.5 N/mm(2)) was close to but still significantly less than that of the uncut tendon (7.2 N/mm(2)). Histological analysis as determined by the semiquantitative Bonar histopathological grading scale revealed that the hypoxic MSC group underwent a significant improvement in Achilles tendon healing both at 2 and 4 weeks when compared with the nontreated or normoxic MSC group via statistical analysis. Immunohistochemistry further demonstrated that the hypoxic and normoxic MSC groups had stronger immunostaining for type I and type III collagen than did the nontreated group both at 2 and 4 weeks after

  11. 腓骨长肌腱移位修复陈旧性跟腱断裂%Long fibular muscle tendon transposition in repair of old Achilles tendon rupture

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张胜强

    2013-01-01

    Objective To investigate the effect of peroneus longus tendon for treatment of old Achilles tendon rupture. Methods The peroneus longus tendon was cut near the ending point, and transposed via subcutaneous tunnel for repair of Achilles tendon rupture. Results 15 cases were followed up for 18 ~24 months. 2 cases got delayed wound healing. After rehabilitation, patients were allowed full weight-bearing on the 10th postoperative week. No recurrence of Achilles tendon rupture was found. According to Arner-Lindholm efficacy evaluation, the results were excellent in 10 cases, and good in 5 cases. Conclusions Long fibular muscle tendon transposition for repair of old rupture of Achilles tendon is effective for fast rehabilitation, and good effect.%目的 探讨腓骨长肌腱治疗陈旧性跟腱断裂的疗效.方法 腓骨长肌腱近止点处切断,经皮下隧道移位修复跟腱断裂.结果 15例均获随访,时间18~24 个月.2例出现伤口延迟愈合.经康复锻炼,患者均在术后10周左右弃拐完全负重行走,未发生跟腱断裂.疗效按Arner-Lindholm标准评定:优10 例,良5 例.结论 腓骨长肌腱移位修复陈旧性跟腱断裂,康复较快,疗效满意.

  12. Mini-invasive surgical repair of the Achilles tendon--does it reduce post-operative morbidity?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharyya, Mayukh; Gerber, Bruno

    2009-02-01

    The surgical benefit of minimally invasive tendo Achilles repair (n = 25) with early weight-bearing mobilisation after rupture of the tendo Achilles was compared with operative treatment using an open technique (n = 34) with full weight-bearing after 8 weeks of surgical repair. The minimally invasive technique provided no evidence of wound problems and a functional benefit from early weight-bearing mobilisation. However, we noted that increased post-operative morbidity in terms of wound infection (n = 7) leading to delayed wound healing and wound pain requiring opiate-based analgesia post-operatively in the open repair group may have an additional impact on the patients and health care providers. This study showed that the mini-invasive open surgical repair of the Achilles tendon with the Achillon instrument and early weight-bearing mobilisation in an orthosis for the accelerated rehabilitation may offer cost-effectiveness and less financial burden on the health care provider in terms of associated nursing and physiotherapy costs.

  13. Effect of creatine supplementation on muscle damage and repair following eccentrically-induced damage to the elbow flexor muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKinnon, Neal B; Graham, Mitchell T; Tiidus, Peter M

    2012-01-01

    We investigated effects of creatine (Cr) supplementation (CrS) on exercise-induced muscle damage. Untrained males and females (N = 27) ages 18-25, with no CrS history in the past 4 months, were randomly assigned to CrS (creatine and carbohydrate) (n = 9), placebo (P) (carbohydrate only) (n = 9), or control (C) (no supplements) groups (n = 9). Participants followed a 5-day Cr loading protocol of 40 g·day(-1), divided for 5 days prior to exercise, reduced to 10 g g·day(-1) for 5 days following exercise. Testing consisted of 5 maximal isometric contractions at 90 arm flexion with the preferred arm on a CYBEX NORM dynamometer, assessed prior to, immediately following, and 24, 48, 72, and 96 hours post muscle-damaging procedures. Damage was induced to the elbow flexor muscles using 6 sets of 10 eccentric contractions at 75 °/sec, 90 °/sec and 120 °/sec. Participants were asked to rate their muscle soreness on a scale of 1-10. Data was analyzed using repeated-measures ANOVA, with an alpha of 0.05. No significant differences were found between muscle force loss and rate of recovery or muscle soreness between groups over the 96 hr recovery period (p > 0.05). Across all 3 experimental groups an initial decrease in force was observed, followed by a gradual recovery. Significant differences were found between baseline and all others times (p = 0.031,0 .022, 0.012, 0.001 respectively), and between the 48 hour and 96 hour time periods (p = 0.034). A weak negative correlation between subjectively rated muscle soreness and mean peak isometric force loss (R(2) = 0.0374 at 96 hours), suggested that muscle soreness and muscle force loss may not be directly related. In conclusion, 5 days of Cr loading, followed by a Cr maintenance protocol did not reduce indices of muscle damage or speed recovery of upper body muscles following eccentrically induced muscle damage.

  14. EFFECT OF CREATINE SUPPLEMENTATION ON MUSCLE DAMAGE AND REPAIR FOLLOWING ECCENTRICALLY-INDUCED DAMAGE TO THE ELBOW FLEXOR MUSCLES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neal B. McKinnon

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available We investigated effects of creatine (Cr supplementation (CrS on exercise-induced muscle damage. Untrained males and females (N = 27 ages 18-25, with no CrS history in the past 4 months, were randomly assigned to CrS (creatine and carbohydrate (n = 9, placebo (P (carbohydrate only (n = 9, or control (C (no supplements groups (n = 9. Participants followed a 5-day Cr loading protocol of 40 g·day-1, divided for 5 days prior to exercise, reduced to 10 g g·day-1 for 5 days following exercise. Testing consisted of 5 maximal isometric contractions at 90 arm flexion with the preferred arm on a CYBEX NORM dynamometer, assessed prior to, immediately following, and 24, 48, 72, and 96 hours post muscle-damaging procedures. Damage was induced to the elbow flexor muscles using 6 sets of 10 eccentric contractions at 75 °/sec, 90 °/sec and 120 °/sec. Participants were asked to rate their muscle soreness on a scale of 1-10. Data was analyzed using repeated-measures ANOVA, with an alpha of 0.05. No significant differences were found between muscle force loss and rate of recovery or muscle soreness between groups over the 96 hr recovery period (p > 0.05. Across all 3 experimental groups an initial decrease in force was observed, followed by a gradual recovery. Significant differences were found between baseline and all others times (p = 0.031,0 .022, 0.012, 0.001 respectively, and between the 48 hour and 96 hour time periods (p = 0.034. A weak negative correlation between subjectively rated muscle soreness and mean peak isometric force loss (R2 = 0.0374 at 96 hours, suggested that muscle soreness and muscle force loss may not be directly related. In conclusion, 5 days of Cr loading, followed by a Cr maintenance protocol did not reduce indices of muscle damage or speed recovery of upper body muscles following eccentrically induced muscle damage

  15. A rare instance of an accessory long flexor to the second toe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georgiev GP

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available During routine anatomical dissection a rare case of a flexor digitorum accessorius longus muscle was observed. This muscle arose with a well-formed muscular belly from the lower part of the lateral intermuscular septum, and then passed obliquely downward and medially deep to the calcaneal tendon in the canal of the flexor hallucis longus. In the sole region the aberrant muscle prolonged in a thin tendon that divided into two parts: superficial and deep. The superficial part attached to the tendon of the flexor digitorum longus for the second toe; the deep part of the tendon joined the tendon of the quadratus plantae and also an additional portion of the flexor hallucis longus tendon to the second toe. The possible clinical implications of this muscle in practical surgery and also in imaging radiology are reviewed.

  16. Development of siRNA Technology to Prevent Scar Formation in Tendon Repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-01

    trials are underway to regulate protein and gene expression to modify diseases such as leukemia, Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy, and inflammatory...HO, Nixon AJ. Temporal expression of growth factors and matrix molecules in healing tendon lesions . J Orthop Res 2005;23:84-92. 16. Tsubone T, Moran

  17. [A simplified technique for repair of quadriceps tendon rupture by transpatellar PDS-cord].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosseini, H; Agneskirchner, J D; Lobenhoffer, P

    2005-06-01

    Quadriceps tendon ruptures are relatively unusual injuries caused by direct or more frequently indirect trauma. Since complete ruptures lead to loss of active extension of the knee joint, operative treatment is usually indicated. Several techniques are described in the literature. However, relatively little is known about the functional outcome after operative treatment of acute quadriceps tendon ruptures. We present a new operative technique using a 1.3-mm PDS cord passed through a transverse drill hole in the proximal pole of the patella. We operated ten consecutive cases of complete quadriceps tendon ruptures with the technique described between January 2000 and June 2003. Eight of ten patients were evaluated after a mean follow-up time of 38 months by physical examination, IKDC Subjective score, Lysholm and Tegner score as well as an isokinetic test of the quadriceps strength. No complications were noted in this period. The average postoperative scores were 87 (IKDC), 98 (Lysholm), and 4.5 (Tegner). Isokinetic testing showed an average of 25% quadriceps strength deficit. The operative treatment of complete quadriceps tendon ruptures using a PDS cord through a drill hole in the patella is a safe and effective technique permitting functional postoperative treatment.

  18. [Quadriceps and patellar tendon ruptures].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grim, C; Lorbach, O; Engelhardt, M

    2010-12-01

    Ruptures of the quadriceps or patellar tendon are uncommon but extremely relevant injuries. Early diagnosis and surgical treatment with a stable suture construction are mandatory for a good postoperative clinical outcome. The standard methods of repair for quadriceps and patellar tendon injuries include the placement of suture loops through transpatellar tunnels. Reinforcement with either a wire cerclage or a PDS cord is used in patellar tendon repair. The PDS cord can also be applied as augmentation in quadriceps tendon repair. In secondary patellar tendon repair an autologous semitendinosus graft can be used. For chronic quadriceps tendon defects a V-shaped tendon flap with a distal footing is recommended. The different methods of repair should lead to early functional postoperative treatment. The clinical outcome after surgical treatment of patellar and quadriceps tendon ruptures is mainly good.

  19. Microvesicles secreted from equine amniotic cells and their potential role in in vitro cell tendon repair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Perrini

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The regenerative mechanisms ascribed to mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs are classified into 3 categories: differentiating into damaged cell types, supplying nutrients, and improving survival/functions of the endogenous cells via paracrine actions. However, because of the inhospitable microenvironment of the injured tissues, a proportion of the implanted MSCs may quickly die, suggesting that other mechanisms might be present. This notion is supported by the overlapping beneficial effect (in terms of time of healing resulted  after the injection of AMCs or of amniotic mesenchymal cells - conditioned medium (AMC-CM  in equine spontaneous injured tendons and ligaments. Microvesicles (MVs released by cells are an integral component of the cell-to-cell communication network involved in tissue regeneration.In the present study, MVs secreted by AMCs were investigated with Nanosigth instrument and TEM. Then, the in vitro incorporation of MVs into equine tendon cells was studied by a dose-response curve. Lastly, the ability of MVs to counteract an in vitro inflammatory process induced by lipolysaccaride on tendon cells was studied evaluating the expression of pro-inflammatory genes like metallopeptidase (MPP 1 and 13, and prostaglandin-endoperoxide synthase 2 (COX2. Results demonstrated that AMCs secreted MVs ranging in size from 100 to 1000 nm with a prevalence of 100-200 nm large MVs. Tendon cells were able to uptake them with an inverse relationship between concentration and time. The greatest incorporation was detectable at 40x106 MVs/ml after 72h. MVs induced down-regulation of MMP1 and MMP13, suggesting that they may have contributed, along with soluble factors, to in vivo tendon regeneration.

  20. Can platelet-rich plasma have a role in Achilles tendon surgical repair?

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Carli, Angelo; Lanzetti, Riccardo Maria; Ciompi, Alessandro; Lupariello, Domenico; Vadalà, Antonio; Argento, Giuseppe; Ferretti, Andrea; Vulpiani, M C; Vetrano, M

    2016-07-01

    Our hypothesis was that the Achilles tendon healing process after surgical treatment would be promoted by PRP with a faster return to sports activities. Thirty patients with Achilles tendon rupture and surgically treated with a combined mini-open and percutaneous technique were prospectively enroled in the study. Patients were alternately case-by-case assigned to Group A (control group; 15 patients) or Group B (study group; 15 patients). In Group B, PRP was locally infiltrated both during surgery and 14 days after surgery. Patients in both groups were followed up at 1, 3, 6 and 24 months post-operatively via physical examination, VAS, FAOS and VISA-A scales; ultrasonography (US) and MRI were also conducted at one and 6 months; at the 6-month follow-up, isokinetic and jumping capacity tests were also performed. The VAS, FAOS and VISA-A scale showed no difference between the two groups at 1, 3, 6 and 24 months post-operatively. Isokinetic evaluation showed no differences at both angular speeds. Jumping evaluation showed no difference at 6 months. Also US evaluation showed no differences. MRI data analysis before administration of gadolinium did not reveal significant differences between the two groups. Moreover, after intravenous injection of gadolinium, patients in Group B showed signal enhancement in 30 % of patients compared to 80 % in Group A at 6 months, as indirect evidence of better tendon remodelling (P Achilles tendon ruptures surgically treated with and without addition of PRP is shown by present study. Clinical results, morphological features and jumping capability were similar in both groups. The addition of PRP to the surgical treatment of Achilles tendon rupture does not appear to offer superior clinical and functional results. IV.

  1. The comparison of macroscopic and histologic healing of side-to-side (SS) tenorrhaphy technique and primer tendon repair in a rabbit model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dogramaci, Yunus; Uruc, Vedat; Ozden, Raif; Duman, Ibrahim Gökhan; Kalaci, Aydiner; Altuğ, Muhammed Enes; Işler, Cafer Tayar; Atik, Esin

    2014-07-01

    The side-to-side (SS) tenorrhaphy technique has been used in tendon transfer surgery. The mechanical properties of SS tendon suture have been studied previously. However, the histo-pathological healing of the SS tenorrhaphy of the tendons is unknown. The aim of this study was to assess the gross and histological effects of SS tenorrhaphy in a rabbit model. Twenty New Zealand rabbits were used. The extensor hallucis longus and tibialis anterior tendon were sewed SS at the level distal to the ankle joint. The patellar tendon (PT) at the same side was used as control group. A unilateral midline incision was made and repaired with a single suture. The animals were killed at the 12th week postoperatively. The histological sections were obtained from the side of surgery from each group. Each sample was stained with hematoxylene and eosin (H&E). Gross and microscopic healing was compared between the two groups. Gross examination of the control group showed complete healing with a thin peri-tendinous sheath formation around the suture site, whereas in the study group, a thick peri-tendinous sheath was formed around the area of the tendon-tendon anastomosis. In the control group, at the 12th week after surgery, the healing was almost completed in all samples. In the study group, a thick fibro vascular sheath has formed around the side of anastomosis. In all specimens few inter-digitations were observed between the tendons;however, the trough was still present. The result of the current study showed that histological healing and union of SS tenorrhaphy differ from that in primary tendon injury and healing. Further studies are required to clarify the healing stages at the tenorrhaphy site.

  2. Adipose-derived stromal vascular fraction improves tendon healing in rabbits

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mehdi Behfar; Farshid Sarrafzadeh-Rezaei; Rahim Hobbenaghi; Nowruz Delirezh; Bahram Dalir-Naghadeh

    2011-01-01

    Objective:To evaluate the potential effects of uncultured adipose-derived stromal vascular fraction on tendon healing.Methods:Twenty five adult male New Zealand white rabbits weighing 2.5-3.0 kg were used.Five rabbits were used as donors of adipose tissue and the rest were divided into control and treatment groups.The injury model was completed by unilateral tenotomy through the middle one third of deep digital flexor tendon.Immediately after suture repair,either fresh stromal vascular fraction from enzymatic digestion of adipose tissue or placebo was intratendinously injected at tendon stumps in treatment and control groups,respectively.Immobilization with cast was continued for two weeks after surgery.Animals were sacrificed at eight weeks after surgery and tendons underwent histological,immunohistochemical,and mechanical evaluations.Statistical analyses of quantitative and qualitative data were assessed using one-way analysis of variance and MannWhitney U-test,respectively.Results:Histological evaluations demonstrated superior fibrillar linearity and continuity,and decreased vascularity in treatment group indicated improved organization and remodeling of neotendons.Immunohistochemistry demonstrated a significant increase in collagen I expression in treatment group.Ultimate load and energy absorption capacity were both significantly increased in cell-treated repairs compared with controls.Conclusion: The present study shows that intratendinous injection of uncultured adipose-derived stromal vascular fraction results in improved structural and mechanical properties of tendon repairs and it could be an effective modality for treating tendon injury.

  3. Medial Gastrocnemius Myotendinous Junction Displacement and Plantar-Flexion Strength in Patients Treated With Immediate Rehabilitation After Achilles Tendon Repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De la Fuente, Carlos I; Lillo, Roberto Peña Y; Ramirez-Campillo, Rodrigo; Ortega-Auriol, Pablo; Delgado, Mauricio; Alvarez-Ruf, Joel; Carreño, Gabriel

    2016-12-01

    Pathologic plantar flexion frequently occurs after operative repair of the Achilles tendon (AT) because of immobilization and non-weight bearing in the first weeks of traditional rehabilitation. Novel rehabilitation strategies that apply mobilization and weight bearing have been proposed, but their effects on medial gastrocnemius myotendinous junction displacement (MJD) and isometric plantar-flexion strength (PFS) are unknown. To compare the effects of 12 weeks of immediate versus traditional rehabilitation on MJD and PFS in patients with percutaneous AT repair and to compare AT rupture scores (ATRSs) during follow-up. Controlled laboratory study. Human performance laboratory. A total of 26 amateur soccer players (age = 42.3 ± 9.7 years, body mass index = 29.5 ± 3.9 kg/m(2)) with percutaneous AT repair. Athletes were randomly divided into 2 groups: an immediate group, given physical therapy from day 1 to day 84, and a traditional group, given physical therapy from day 29 to day 84. We used repeated-measures analysis of variance to compare the data. We measured MJD and PFS at days 28 (fourth week), 56 (eighth week), and 84 (12th week) after AT repair. After 12 weeks of rehabilitation, we observed a large clinically meaningful effect and statistical difference between groups. At day 28, the immediate group showed higher values for PFS (P = .002), MJD (P = .02), and ATRS (P = .002) than the traditional group. At day 56, the immediate group presented higher values for MJD (P = .02) and ATRS (P = .009). At day 84, the immediate group registered more MJD (P = .001). Compared with traditional rehabilitation, 12 weeks of immediate rehabilitation after percutaneous AT repair resulted in better MJD, PFS, and ATRS after 4 weeks; better MJD and ATRS after 8 weeks; and better MJD after 12 weeks.

  4. Tendon Transfer Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Z Videos Infographics Symptom Picker Anatomy Bones Joints Muscles Nerves Vessels Tendons About Hand Surgery What is a Hand Surgeon? What is ... include: Repair or transfer of nerves Repair of muscle or tendon Splinting or fusion of joints Find a hand surgeon in your area to discuss the best ...

  5. Tendon Gradient Mineralization for Tendon to Bone Interface Integration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, Jin; Thoreson, Andrew R.; Chen, Qingshan; An, Kai-Nan; Amadio, Peter C.; Zhao, Chunfeng

    2014-01-01

    Tendon-to-bone integration is a great challenge for tendon or ligament reconstruction regardless of use of autograft or allograft tendons. We mineralized the tendon, thus transforming the tendon-to-bone into a “bone-to-bone” interface for healing. Sixty dog flexor digitorum profundus (FDP) tendons were divided randomly into 5 groups: 1) normal FDP tendon, 2) CaP (Non-extraction and mineralization without fetuin), 3) CaPEXT (Extraction by Na2HPO4 and mineralization without fetuin), 4) CaPFetuin (Non-extraction and mineralization with fetuin), and 5) CaPEXTFetuin (Extraction and mineralization with fetuin). The calcium and phosphate content significantly increased in tendons treated with combination of extraction and fetuin compared to the other treatments. Histology also revealed a dense mineral deposition throughout the tendon outer layers and penetrated into the tendon to a depth of 200 μm in a graded manner. Compressive moduli were significantly lower in the four mineralized groups compared with normal control group. No significant differences in maximum failure strength or stiffness were found in the suture pull-out test among all groups. Mineralization of tendon alters the interface from tendon to bone into mineralized tendon to bone, which may facilitate tendon-to-bone junction healing following tendon or ligament reconstruction. PMID:23939935

  6. Tendon gradient mineralization for tendon to bone interface integration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, Jin; Thoreson, Andrew R; Chen, Qingshan; An, Kai-Nan; Amadio, Peter C; Zhao, Chunfeng

    2013-11-01

    Tendon-to-bone integration is a great challenge for tendon or ligament reconstruction regardless of use of autograft or allograft tendons. We mineralized the tendon, thus transforming the tendon-to-bone into a "bone-to-bone" interface for healing. Sixty dog flexor digitorum profundus (FDP) tendons were divided randomly into five groups: (1) normal FDP tendon, (2) CaP (non-extraction and mineralization without fetuin), (3) CaPEXT (Extraction by Na2 HPO4 and mineralization without fetuin), (4) CaPFetuin (non-extraction and mineralization with fetuin), and (5) CaPEXTFetuin (extraction and mineralization with fetuin). The calcium and phosphate content significantly increased in tendons treated with combination of extraction and fetuin compared to the other treatments. Histology also revealed a dense mineral deposition throughout the tendon outer layers and penetrated into the tendon to a depth of 200 µm in a graded manner. Compressive moduli were significantly lower in the four mineralized groups compared with normal control group. No significant differences in maximum failure strength or stiffness were found in the suture pull-out test among all groups. Mineralization of tendon alters the interface from tendon to bone into mineralized tendon to bone, which may facilitate tendon-to-bone junction healing following tendon or ligament reconstruction.

  7. Desequilíbrios musculares entre flexores dorsais e plantares do tornozelo após tratamento conservador e acelerado da ruptura do tendão calcâneo Muscle imbalance between ankle dorsiflexors and plantarflexors after conservative and accelerated treatment of Achilles tendon rupture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandre Mayer

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available A ruptura do tendão calcâneo (TC reduz a sobrecarga mecânica dos flexores plantares (FP do tornozelo. Essa alteração muda o equilíbrio natural entre os FP e flexores dorsais (FD do tornozelo. O objetivo do estudo foi avaliar as razões isocinéticas concêntricas convencionais de torque de pacientes submetidos a tratamento cirúrgico de ruptura aguda do TC após dois protocolos diferentes de reabilitação. Após procedimento cirúrgico para reconstrução do TC, a amostra foi dividida de forma intencional em dois grupos: conservador (GC, 11 homens, 41,3±7,9 anos e grupo acelerado (GA, 13 homens, 43,5±13,7 anos. O GC permaneceu com imobilização gessada no tornozelo por seis semanas (tratamento tradicional, enquanto o GA usou uma órtese robofoot em posição neutra e, após duas semanas, iniciou mobilização e apoio precoce do tornozelo, com reabilitação por seis semanas. Após 3 meses de pós-operatório, a razão do torque concêntrico máximo dos FD pelos FP do tornozelo foi avaliada por dinamômetro isocinético. As razões de torque do lado operado se mantiveram superiores às do lado saudável mesmo após 3 meses de pós-operatório (pAchilles tendon rupture reduces ankle plantarflexor (PF muscles mechanical overload. This change in the ankle joint mechanics changes the natural muscle balance between dorsiflexor (DF and PF muscles. The purpose of this study was to assess such imbalance by concentric conventional isokinetic torque ratios of patients who underwent different rehabilitation protocols after surgical repair of the Achilles tendon. After surgery, subjects were assigned to either a conservative or to an accelerated rehabilitation group. The conservative group (11 men, 41.3±7.9 years old remained with a plaster cast for 6 weeks after surgery. The accelerated group (13 men, 43.5±13,7 years old used a"robofoot" cast for 2 weeks and underwent ankle mobilization and early weight bearing for a period of 6 weeks post

  8. Hallazgos ultrasonográficos del tendón flexor digital superficial de la región del metacarpo en 40 equinos de polo Ultrasonographic findings in the superficial digital flexor tendon of the metacarpus in 40 polo horses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Tuemmers

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available El presente trabajo se refiere a un estudio ultrasonográfico de la región palmar del metacarpo principal en ambas extremidades anteriores de 40 equinos del Club de Polo Mahuida, ubicado en la comuna de Colina, Región Metropolitana (Chile, 30 días previo a la temporada de polo, con la finalidad de detectar cambios ultrasonográficos en el tendón flexor digital superficial (TFDS. Para el examen se utilizó un equipo ultrasonográfico marca Pie Medical modelo Scanner 100 LC VET con un transductor lineal de 7.5 MHz de frecuencia. A partir del análisis de las imágenes proyectadas se determinó la presencia o ausencia de alteraciones ultrasonográficas de cada ejemplar. Los resultados de este estudio indican que un 48% de los ejemplares presentó alteraciones del TFDS y la mayor cantidad de lesiones comprometió a las zonas ecográficas 4 y 5 y la con menos daño fueron las zonas siete y uno, en ambas extremidades. Además, se determinó que la técnica ultrasonografíca es un eficiente método de detección de alteraciones tendíneas y debería ser rutinario en el manejo deportivo de los equinos de polo.Ultrasonographic examination was used to define changes in the superficial digital flexor tendon (SDTF of the palmar region of the metacarpus in both fore limbs of 40 horses at the Polo Club Mahuida, in the Metropolitan Region (Chile. The ultrasonographic examination was carried out about 30 days prior to the polo season using a Medical Foot Scanner model 100 LC VET with a transducer linear of 7,5 MHz of frequency. From the analysis of the images the presence or absence of ultrasonographic alterations was determined. The results of this study indicate that 48% of the horses presented lesions, mainly located in the ecographic zones 4 and 5, and in a lesser extent in zones 7 and 1, in both fore limbs. It was concluded that ultrasonography should be routinely used as a method of diagnosis of tendineous alternations when handling polo horses.

  9. The cross-sectional area of the superficial digital flexor tendon of trained and untrained Thoroughbred racehorses Área transversal do tendão flexor digital superficial de cavalos Puro Sangue Inglês de corrida em treinamento e sem treinamento

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Guiomar Matos Santiago Reis

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Twenty Thoroughbred racehorses were ultrasonographically evaluated to determine the relation between normal values of the cross-sectional area (CSA of the right and left forelimbs superficial digital flexor tendons (SDFT in the metacarpal region for trained and untrained Thoroughbreds racehorses. Ultrasonography revealed that CSA at 26cm distal to the accessory carpal bone is larger than other proximal levels, for either left or right forelimbs. In addition, the CSA at 2, 4, 6, 8, 10, 12 and 14cm distal to the accessory carpal bone of the left forelimb are larger (P0.05 between left and right forelimb for CSA of the SDFT, at any level, for either trained or untrained horses, and there was no significant difference between untrained or trained horses for the CSA of right forelimb. In conclusion, the CSA of the left forelimb SDFT for horses that had been in continuous race training remains larger when they were trained anticlockwise, contrary to horses that had not been training for more than one year.Vinte cavalos da raça Puro Sangue Inglês de corrida foram submetidos a exame ultrassonográfico, com o intuito de determinar a relação entre os valores normais da área do tendão flexor digital superficial (TFDS na região metacarpiana dos membros torácicos direito e esquerdo, em cavalos com e sem treinamento. O exame ultrassonográfico revelou que a área do tendão 26cm distal ao osso acessório do carpo é maior em comparação com as alturas proximais, tanto nos membros torácicos esquerdos, como nos membros torácicos direitos. Além disso, a área do TFDS nas alturas 2, 4, 6, 8, 10, 12 e 14cm, no membro torácico esquerdo, é maior (P0,05 nas áreas do TFDS entre os membros torácicos direito e esquerdo, tanto para os animais em treinamento, como para os animais sem treinamento. Também não foi encontrada diferença significativa em comparação com o membro direito dos cavalos em treinamento e sem treinamento. Conclui-se que os cavalos

  10. Treatment of knee arthrofibrosis and quadriceps insufficiency after patellar tendon repair: a case report including use of the graston technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Black, Douglass W

    2010-06-23

    Arthrofibrosis of the knee is a surgical complication that can limit range of motion, inhibit muscle activity, and decrease patient function. Optimal conservative treatment has not been well established in the literature, leaving a clinician with limited evidence for treatment planning. Described here is part of the rehabilitative course of care for a patient with arthrofibrotic limitations after a mid-substance patellar tendon repair with augmentation. Marked limitations in knee flexion range of motion and quadriceps activity were addressed using the Graston Technique to deal with soft-tissue adhesions; traditional physical therapy care was also provided. Clear improvement in range of motion and quadriceps activity and function was noted over the course of 5 treatments during 1 month. Treatment process and clinical reasoning are offered to promote understanding and to facilitate future inquiry.

  11. Ultrasound evaluation of the distal migration of the long head of biceps tendon following tenotomy in patients undergoing arthroscopic repair of tears of the rotator cuff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karataglis, D; Papadopoulos, P; Boutsiadis, A; Fotiadou, A; Ditsios, K; Hatzokos, I; Christodoulou, A

    2012-11-01

    This study evaluates the position of the long head of biceps tendon using ultrasound following simple tenotomy, in patients with arthroscopically repaired rotator cuff tears. In total, 52 patients with a mean age of 60.7 years (45 to 75) underwent arthroscopic repair of the rotator cuff and simple tenotomy of the long head of biceps tendon. At two years post-operatively, ultrasound revealed that the tendon was inside the bicipital groove in 43 patients (82.7%) and outside in nine (17.3%); in six of these it was lying just outside the groove and in the remaining three (5.8%) it was in a remote position with a positive Popeye Sign. A dynamic ultrasound scan revealed that the tenotomised tendons had adhered to the surrounding tissues (autotenodesis).The initial condition of the tendon influenced its final position (p Popeye sign was statistically influenced by the pre-operative co-existence of supraspinatus and subscapularis tears (p Popeye sign.

  12. A biomechanical comparison of tendon-bone interface motion and cyclic loading between single-row, triple-loaded cuff repairs and double-row, suture-tape cuff repairs using biocomposite anchors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barber, F Alan; Drew, Otis R

    2012-09-01

    To compare tendon-bone interface motion and cyclic loading in a single-row, triple-loaded anchor repair with a suture-tape, rip-stop, double-row rotator cuff repair. Using 18 human shoulders from 9 matched cadaveric pairs, we created 2 groups of rotator cuff repairs. Group 1 was a double-row, rip-stop, suture-tape construct. Group 2 was a single-row, triple-loaded construct. Before mechanical testing, the supraspinatus footprint was measured with calipers. A superiorly positioned digital camera optically measured the tendon footprint motion during 60° of humeral internal and external rotation. Specimens were secured at a fixed angle not exceeding 45° in reference to the load. After preloading, each sample was cycled between 10 N and 100 N for 200 cycles at 1 Hz, followed by destructive testing at 33 mm/s. A digital camera with tracking software measured the repair displacement at 100 and 200 cycles. Ultimate load and failure mode for each sample were recorded. The exposed anterior footprint border (6.5% ± 6%) and posterior footprint border (0.9% ± 1.7%) in group 1 were statistically less than the exposed anterior footprint border (30.3% ± 17%) and posterior footprint border (29.8% ± 14%) in group 2 (P = .003 and P triple-loaded, single-row repair on mechanical testing. No double-row or single-row constructs showed 5 mm of displacement after the first 100 cycles. The most common failure mode for both constructs was suture tearing through the tendon. Differences in cuff fixation influence rotational tendon movement and may influence postoperative healing. Stronger repair constructs still fail at the suture-tendon interface. Copyright © 2012 Arthroscopy Association of North America. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Estudo comparativo da reconstrução do LCA com o posicionamento anatômico dos túneis entre o tendão patelar e os tendões flexores Comparative study of ACL reconstruction with anatomical positioning of the tunnels using the patellar tendon versus hamstring tendon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vitor Barion Castro de Pádua

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Comparar a reconstrução do LCA com posicionamento anatômico dos túneis entre os tendões flexores e o tendão patelar. MÉTODOS: Foram avaliados 52 pacientes prospectivamente submetidos à reconstrução do LCA segundo a técnica de Chambat, com o posicionamento anatômico dos túneis realizados de fora para dentro. Foram divididos em grupo A, 27 pacientes, utilizando-se o tendão patelar como enxerto, e grupo B, 25 pacientes, utilizando-se os tendões flexores. RESULTADOS: No grupo A, 26 pacientes estavam muito satisfeitos ou satisfeitos, e um insatisfeito; no grupo B, 25 pacientes estavam muito satisfeitos ou satisfeitos (p = 0,990. Segundo a escala de Lysholm, o grupo A atingiu a média de 96,11 e o grupo B, 95,32 (p = 0,594. Quanto ao IKDC pré-operatório, 100% dos pacientes do grupo A e 92% do grupo B eram IKDC C ou D (p = 0,221; na avaliação com mínimo de dois anos de seguimento, 96% do grupo A e 92% do grupo B eram IKDC A ou B (p = 0,256. O teste de Lachman, pivot shift, o retorno às atividades esportivas e o diferencial comparativo da translação anterior (RolimeterTM também não apresentaram diferença estatisticamente significante. No grupo A, 5 pacientes (18,5% não conseguiam ajoelhar em superfície rígida; nenhum paciente do grupo B apresentou essa queixa. CONCLUSÃO: A reconstrução do LCA apresenta resultados semelhantes utilizando-se os tendões flexores ou tendão patelar com o posicionamento anatômico dos túneis. A perfuração de fora para dentro do túnel femoral é uma opção reprodutível e precisa no posicionamento correto do túnel femoral.OBJECTIVE: To compare ACL reconstruction with anatomical positioning of the tunnels using the hamstring or patellar tendons. METHODS: We prospectively evaluated 52 patients who underwent ACL reconstruction using the Chambat's technique, with anatomical positioning of the tunnels drilled outside in. They were divided into group A, with 27 patients, using the

  14. Autologous hamstring tendon used for revision of quadiceps tendon tears.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCormick, Frank; Nwachukwu, Benedict U; Kim, Jaehon; Martin, Scott D

    2013-04-01

    A paucity of literature exists on quadriceps tendon reruptures. Failed quadriceps tendon repair can cause significant morbidity and disability. Surgical management of quadriceps tendon rerupture can be challenging due to tissue degeneration, tendon retraction, muscle atrophy, and poor bone fixation. A lack of guidance in the literature exists on the appropriate surgical techniques for managing quadriceps tendon reruptures.This article describes the case of a male recreational athlete with a failed primary quadriceps tendon repair who presented 10 months after rerupture. Examination was significant for morbid obesity, assisted ambulation, and a significant defect at the superior pole of the patella on the affected side. Intraoperative findings were consistent with a 2.0- to 4.5-cm tendon defect across the extensor mechanism with complete retinaculi tears. The authors performed a novel surgical approach for revision of quadriceps tears using a bilateral hamstring autograft through a quadriceps tendon weave and a transosseous patellar repair. Tendon length was restored, and extensor mechanism tension was reapproximated. Postoperatively, the patient achieved a good outcome and had returned to full, painless, sport participation at 2-year follow-up.This surgical technique is suitable for revision quadriceps tendon repairs of large tendon gap defects, repairs desiring tendon-to-bone in-growth, and repairs requiring large-force transmission across the repair.

  15. Physiotherapy after thumb extensor tendon repair in Verdan zone III. Case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szczechowicz, Jakub; Pieniążek, Marek

    2014-01-01

    Finger tendon injuries represent very common consequences of hand injuries and, if not properly treated, can lead to substantial hand function impairment and interfere with activities of daily living. This article presents the results of rehabilitation of a female patient after thumb extensor tendon injury in Verdan's zone III. Based on standard diagnostic work-up (assessment of the active range of motion), we calculated the degree of functional hand function impairment according to Swanson's method. The diagnostic procedures also comprised measurements of dynamometric grip strength and precise grasp. The examinations were performed on four occasions, the first one during the first visit, and the last one a month after completion of the rehabilitation treatment in our Centre. Test results were used to design the treatment programme, which included among others the author's modification of Kleinert's dynamic reverse thumb splinting, peg-board exercises, physical therapy, individual therapy and home-based exercises. 1. The modified dynamic splint of our design fulfilled its task as both a preventive and therapeutic measure. 2. The dynamic splinting programme administered enabled early initiation of post-operative rehabilitation, which led to a very high degree of recovery of thumb and hand function. 3. The functional recovery outcomes achieved by our patient indicate the advisability of routine incorporation of full dynamic splinting in post-operative rehabilitation programmes of patients with thumb extensor tendon injuries.

  16. [Molecular repair mechanisms using the Intratissue Percutaneous Electrolysis technique in patellar tendonitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abat, F; Valles, S L; Gelber, P E; Polidori, F; Stitik, T P; García-Herreros, S; Monllau, J C; Sanchez-Ibánez, J M

    2014-01-01

    To investigate the molecular mechanisms of tissue response after treatment with the Intratissue Percutaneous Electrolysis (EPI(®)) technique in collagenase-induced tendinopathy in Sprague-Dawley rats. Tendinopathy was induced by injecting 50 μg of type i collagenase into the patellar tendon of 24 Sprague Dawley rats of 7 months of age and weighting 300 g. The sample was divided into 4 groups: the control group, collagenase group, and two EPI(®) technique treatment groups of 3 and 6 mA, respectively. An EPI(®) treatment session was applied, and after 3 days, the tendons were analysed using immunoblotting and electrophoresis techniques. An analysis was also made of cytochrome C protein, Smac/Diablo, vascular endothelial growth factor and its receptor 2, as well as the nuclear transcription factor peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma. A statistically significant increase, compared to the control group, was observed in the expression of cytochrome C, Smac/Diablo, vascular endothelial growth factor, its receptor 2 and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma in the groups in which the EPI(®) technique was applied. EPI(®) technique produces an increase in anti-inflammatory and angiogenic molecular mechanisms in collagenase-induced tendon injury in rats. Copyright © 2013 SECOT. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  17. Soft tissue tenodesis of the long head of the biceps tendon associated to the Roman Bridge repair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maffulli Nicola

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Rotator cuff tears are frequently associated with pathologies of the long head of the biceps tendon (LHBT. Tenotomy and tenodesis of the LHBT are commonly used to manage disorders of the LHBT. Methods We present an arthroscopic soft tissue LHBT tenodesis associated with a Roman Bridge (double pulley – suture bridges repair Results Two medial row 5.5-mm Bio-Corkscrew suture anchors (Arthrex, Naples, FL, double-loaded with No. 2 FiberWire sutures (Arthrex, Naples, FL, are placed in the medial aspect of the footprint. A shuttle is passed through an anterior point of the rotator cuff and through the LHBT by means of a Penetrator or a BirdBeak suture passer (Arthrex, Naples, FL. A tenotomy of the LHBT is performed. All the sutures from the anteromedial anchor are passed through a single anterior point in the rotator cuff using a shuttle technique. All the sutures from the posteromedial anchor are passed through a single posterior point in the rotator cuff. The sutures in the medial row are tied using the double pulley technique. A suture limb is retrieved from each of the medial anchors and manually tied as a six-throw surgeon's knot over a metal rod. The two free suture limbs are pulled to transport the knot over the top of the tendon bridge. The two free suture limbs are then used to produce suture bridges over the tendon, using a Pushlock (Arthrex, Naples, FL, placed 1 cm distal to the lateral edge of the footprint. The same double pulley – suture bridges technique is repeated for the other two suture limbs from the two medial anchors. Conclusion This technique allows to perform a double pulley – suture bridges repair for a rotator cuff tear, associated with a soft tissue tenodesis for the management of LHBT pathology. The tenodesis of the LHBT is performed just with the passage of a shuttle inside the LHBT, after passing it through the anterior portion of the rotator cuff, with successive detachment of the LHBT from the

  18. Irrigación arterial del músculo interóseo y del ligamento accesorio del músculo flexor digital profundo en la mano del caballo Arterial blood supply to the interosseus muscle and accessory ligament of the deep digital flexor tendon in the horse hand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. NATALI

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available El objetivo de este trabajo es el estudio del origen y distribución de las ramas arteriales al músculo interóseo y al ligamento accesorio del músculo flexor digital profundo de la mano del caballo. Se disecaron 20 manos a las que les fue inyectada la arteria mediana con látex coloreado. Las ramas arteriales entran al músculo interóseo por la cara dorsal y palmar del cuerpo y por sus bordes medial y lateral. Cada tendón de inserción del músculo interóseo recibió importantes ramas arteriales por su cara dorsal y palmar. El origen de la mayor arteria a la cara dorsal del músculo interóseo fue siempre la arteria nutricia del hueso metacarpiano III. Las ramas arteriales al músculo interóseo tuvieron un diámetro de menos de 0,5 mm hasta 1 mm. Las arterias más importantes de acuerdo a su calibre se encuentran en la cara dorsal del cuerpo y en los tendones de inserción del músculo interóseo. El buen poder regenerativo del músculo interóseo en las zonas más frecuentemente afectadas de desmitis, puede relacionarse con la mayor irrigación de las mismas encontradas en este trabajo. En cuanto al ligamento accesorio, el tercio proximal, resultó ser la parte mejor irrigada. El mayor número de ramas arteriales se encontró por la cara dorsal y borde medial del ligamento. El origen de las ramas a la cara dorsal fue el componente palmar del arco palmar profundo. Las arterias que llegaron por el borde medial se originaron de la arteria radial y de la arteria digital palmar común II. En todos los casos las ramas al ligamento accesorio fueron finas, menos de 0,5 mm de diámetroThis study was conducted to describe the arterial blood supply to the interosseus muscle (IM and the accessory ligament of the deep digital flexor tendon (AL. Twenty horses hands were injected with red latex through the median artery. Branches to the IM were found along the margins and both surfaces of the muscle. Each distal branch of the IM was supplied along the

  19. Long-Term Results of Mini-Open Repair Technique in the Treatment of Acute Achilles Tendon Rupture: A Prospective Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taşatan, Ersin; Emre, Tuluhan Yunus; Demircioğlu, Demet Tekdöş; Demiralp, Bahtiyar; Kırdemir, Vecihi

    2016-01-01

    An ideal surgical treatment of acute Achilles tendon rupture includes restoring the original length of the tendon, minimizing possible adhesions with the surrounding tissues, minimizing the risk of repeat rupture, alleviating wound problems, and providing an acceptable cosmetic outcome. In the mini-open repair technique, unlike the percutaneous repair technique, the quality of the tenodesis can be visualized without disturbing the healing potential of the surrounding tissues, thus minimizing wound problems. The purpose of the present study was to assess the long-term results of the mini-open repair technique in patients with acute Achilles tendon rupture. A total of 20 consecutive patients with acute Achilles tendon rupture, admitted to our inpatient clinic from October 2003 to March 2008, were included in the present study. The patients underwent Achilles tenodesis with the mini-open repair technique, and each patient was followed up for 5 years. The study was completed in April 2013. The surgical procedure was performed with the assistance of a device designed in our orthosis laboratories, similarly to that defined by Assal et al. Of the 20 patients, 18 were male and 2 were female. Their mean age was 39.3 (range 21 to 55) years. The Achilles tendon rupture was located on the left side in 15 patients (75%) and on the right side in 5 patients (25%). The mean follow-up duration was 58.5 (range 18 to 60) months and no complications occurred during the follow-up period, including repeat rupture, wound site infection, and sural nerve injury. The mean American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society scale score for the patients was 99.2 (range 94 to 100) points at the final follow-up visit. All our patients were able to return to work and sporting activities. According to the Trillat scores, the outcome was excellent in 19 patients and good in 1 patient at the 18th postoperative month. No complaint, such as pain or loss of function, that might have a negative effect on the

  20. The tendon approximator device in traumatic injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forootan, Kamal S; Karimi, Hamid; Forootan, Nazilla-Sadat S

    2015-01-01

    Precise and tension-free approximation of two tendon endings is the key predictor of outcomes following tendon lacerations and repairs. We evaluate the efficacy of a new tendon approximator device in tendon laceration repairs. In a comparative study, we used our new tendon approximator device in 99 consecutive patients with laceration of 266 tendons who attend a university hospital and evaluated the operative time to repair the tendons, surgeons' satisfaction as well as patient's outcomes in a long-term follow-up. Data were compared with the data of control patients undergoing tendon repair by conventional method. Totally 266 tendons were repaired by approximator device and 199 tendons by conventional technique. 78.7% of patients in first group were male and 21.2% were female. In approximator group 38% of patients had secondary repair of cut tendons and 62% had primary repair. Patients were followed for a mean period of 3years (14-60 months). Time required for repair of each tendon was significantly reduced with the approximator device (2 min vs. 5.5 min, ptendon repair were identical in the two groups and were not significantly different. 1% of tendons in group A and 1.2% in group B had rupture that was not significantly different. The new nerve approximator device is cheap, feasible to use and reduces the time of tendon repair with sustained outcomes comparable to the conventional methods.

  1. Biologics for tendon repair☆

    Science.gov (United States)

    Docheva, Denitsa; Müller, Sebastian A.; Majewski, Martin; Evans, Christopher H.

    2015-01-01

    Tendon injuries are common and present a clinical challenge to orthopedic surgery mainly because these injuries often respond poorly to treatment and require prolonged rehabilitation. Therapeutic options used to repair ruptured tendons have consisted of suture, autografts, allografts, and synthetic prostheses. To date, none of these alternatives has provided a successful long-term solution, and often the restored tendons do not recover their complete strength and functionality. Unfortunately, our understanding of tendon biology lags far behind that of other musculoskeletal tissues, thus impeding the development of new treatment options for tendon conditions. Hence, in this review, after introducing the clinical significance of tendon diseases and the present understanding of tendon biology, we describe and critically assess the current strategies for enhancing tendon repair by biological means. These consist mainly of applying growth factors, stem cells, natural biomaterials and genes, alone or in combination, to the site of tendon damage. A deeper understanding of how tendon tissue and cells operate, combined with practical applications of modern molecular and cellular tools could provide the long awaited breakthrough in designing effective tendon-specific therapeutics and overall improvement of tendon disease management. PMID:25446135

  2. Achilles tendon disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinfeld, Steven B

    2014-03-01

    Achilles tendon disorders include tendinosis, paratenonitis, insertional tendinitis, retrocalcaneal bursitis, and frank rupture. Patients present with pain and swelling in the posterior aspect of the ankle. Magnetic resonance imaging and ultrasound are helpful in confirming the diagnosis and guiding treatment. Nonsurgical management of Achilles tendon disorders includes nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, physical therapy, bracing, and footwear modification. Surgical treatment includes debridement of the diseased area of the tendon with direct repair. Tendon transfer may be necessary to augment the strength of the Achilles tendon. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. The mechanics of PLGA nanofiber scaffolds with biomimetic gradients in mineral for tendon-to-bone repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipner, J; Liu, W; Liu, Y; Boyle, J; Genin, G M; Xia, Y; Thomopoulos, S

    2014-12-01

    along the length of the scaffolds, and Raman spectroscopic analysis revealed that the mineral produced was hydroxylapatite. Mechanical testing showed that the stiffness gradient using the new method was significantly steeper. By analyzing the scaffolds using micromechanical modeling techniques and extrapolating from our experimental results, we present evidence that the new mineralization protocol has the potential to achieve levels of stiffness adequate to contribute to enhanced repair of tendon-to-bone attachments.

  4. Comparison of the Tendon Damage Caused by Four Different Anchor Systems Used in Transtendon Rotator Cuff Repair

    OpenAIRE

    Qing-Song Zhang; Sen Liu; Qiuyang Zhang; Yun Xue; Dongxia Ge; Michael J O'Brien; Savoie, Felix H.; Zongbing You

    2012-01-01

    Objectives. The objective of this study was to compare the damage to the rotator cuff tendons caused by four different anchor systems. Methods. 20 cadaveric human shoulder joints were used for transtendon insertion of four anchor systems. The Healix Peek, Fastin RC, Bio-Corkscrew Suture, and Healix Transtend anchors were inserted through the tendons using standard transtendon procedures. The areas of tendon damage were measured. Results. The areas of tendon damage (mean ± standard deviation, ...

  5. Effect of single- and double-row rotator cuff repair at the tendon-to-bone interface: preliminary results using an in vivo sheep model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baums, M H; Schminke, B; Posmyk, A; Miosge, N; Klinger, H-M; Lakemeier, S

    2015-01-01

    The clinical superiority of the double-row technique is still a subject of controversial debate in rotator cuff repair. We hypothesised that the expression of different collagen types will differ between double-row and single-row rotator cuff repair indicating a faster healing response by the double-row technique. Twenty-four mature female sheep were randomly assembled to two different groups in which a surgically created acute infraspinatus tendon tear was fixed using either a modified single- or double-row repair technique. Shoulder joints from female sheep cadavers of identical age, bone maturity, and weight served as untreated control cluster. Expression of type I, II, and III collagen was observed in the tendon-to-bone junction along with recovering changes in the fibrocartilage zone after immunohistological tissue staining at 1, 2, 3, 6, 12, and 26 weeks postoperatively. Expression of type III collagen remained positive until 6 weeks after surgery in the double-row group, whereas it was detectable for 12 weeks in the single-row group. In both groups, type I collagen expression increased after 12 weeks. Type II collagen expression was increased after 12 weeks in the double-row versus single-row group. Clusters of chondrocytes were only visible between week 6 and 12 in the double-row group. The study demonstrates differences regarding the expression of type I and type III collagen in the tendon-to-bone junction following double-row rotator cuff repair compared to single-row repair. The healing response in this acute repair model is faster in the double-row group during the investigated healing period.

  6. Magnetic resonance evaluation of anterior cruciate ligament repair using the patellar tendon double bone block technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Autz, G.; Singson, R.D. (St. Luke' s Roosevelt Hospital Center, New York, NY (United States). Dept. of Radiology); Goodwin, C. (St. Luke' s Roosevelt Hospital Center, New York, NY (United States). Dept. of Orthopedics)

    1991-11-01

    The magnetic resonance (MR) appearance of the anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction was determined in 20 clinically stable and 2 clinically unstable knees for a total of 22 examinations. All patients studied had undergone knee reconstruction using the patellar tendon as graft material. The reconstructed anterior cruciate ligament varies in appearance. It appeared as a thick, well-defined, low signal band on T1- and T2-weighted sagittal and coronal images in 14 of 22 examinations. The remaining 8 knees showed a graft having one or more thin and attenuated, low signal intensity bands in the sagittal and/or coronal plane. Arthroscopy confirmed an intact but lax graft in the clinically unstable knees. (orig.).

  7. Morphology of the humeral insertion of the supraspinatus and infraspinatus tendons: Application to rotator cuff repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lumsdaine, William; Smith, Adam; Walker, Rowan G; Benz, Daniel; Mohammed, Khalid D; Stewart, Fiona

    2015-09-01

    In shoulder surgery, a precise understanding of anatomical relationships is required for accurate reconstruction. Reports in recent literature have challenged the traditional definitions of the humeral footprints of the supraspinatus and infraspinatus tendons. This study aims to precisely delineate these footprints. The rotator cuffs of 54 shoulders from 27 Australian Caucasoid donor cadavers were examined. The tendinous portions were dissected down to their region/footprint of attachment upon the humerus. Measurements of those footprints, upon the greater and lesser tuberosities, were made. Those measurements were statistically analyzed for any association with age, sex, height, or side. Twenty-seven cadavers had an average age at death of 74.9 (± 12.8), 56% were male, average height was 168 (± 8.6) cm. Due to premorbid fracture, or degeneration, 11 shoulders were excluded. The footprint of the supraspinatus was triangular, with a medial, anteroposterior length of 20.4 ± 4.2 mm. Its lateral anteroposterior length was 6.3 ± 1.6 mm and its maximal mediolateral width was 6.6 ± 2.7 mm. Its calculated area was 122.0 ± 66.6 mm(2). The footprint of the infraspinatus was trapezoidal, with a medial anteroposterior length 22.6 ± 3.0 mm. Its lateral anteroposterior length was 25.4 ± 3.3mm and its maximal mediolateral width was 12.0 ± 2.7 mm. Its calculated area was 294.9 ± 74.1 mm(2). There was no statistical correlation between size of the footprint and age, sex, side, or height. The humeral footprints of the supraspinatus and infraspinatus tendons upon the greater tuberosity were distinct. The lateral border of the infraspinatus' humeral attachment extended much farther anteriorly upon the highest facet of the greater tuberosity than in traditional descriptions. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. The Use of Hyaluronic Acid after Tendon Surgery and in Tendinopathies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michele Abate

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Viscosupplementation with hyaluronic acid is safe and effective in the management of osteoarthritis, but its use in the treatment of tendon disorders has received less attention. The aim of this review is to summarize the current knowledge on this topic, evaluating experimental and clinical trials. A search of English-language articles was performed using the key search terms “hyaluronic acid” or “viscosupplementation” combined with “tendon,” “tendinopathy,“ “adhesions,“ or “gliding,“ independently. In quite all the experimental studies, performed after surgical procedures for tendon injuries or in the treatment of chronic tendinopathies, using different hyaluronic acid compounds, positive results (reduced formation of scars and granulation tissue after tendon repair, less adhesions and gliding resistance, and improved tissue healing were observed. In a limited number of cases, hyaluronic acid has been employed in clinical practice. After flexor tendon surgery, a greater total active motion and fingers function, with an earlier return to work and daily activities, were observed. Similarly, in patients suffering from elbow, patellar, and shoulder tendons disorders, pain was reduced, and function improved. The positive effect of hyaluronic acid can be attributed to the anti-inflammatory activity, enhanced cell proliferation, and collagen deposition, besides the lubricating action on the sliding surface of the tendon.

  9. 阔筋膜移植修复跟腱缺损的临床疗效%The clinical research of fascia graft to repair achilles tendon defect

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    冯涛; 孙中建; 吴敬红; 李宏磊; 徐鹏

    2015-01-01

    Objective To discuss the clinical effect of fascia graft to repair Achilles tendon defect. Methods Adopt the method of broad fascia graft to repair Achilles tendon defect treatment of the patients (19 cases), rehabilitation plan and follow-up visit. Results 1 case in 19 patients lost follow-up, the rest of the 18 cases were followed up for 8 months to 5 years postoperatively, 3 years on average, according to standard Arner - Lindhobm evaluation decision, 8 cases were excellent, 10 cases were good. Conclusion The broad fascia graft to repair Achilles tendon defect, can obtain good clinical effect.%目的:探讨应用阔筋膜移植修复跟腱缺损的临床疗效。方法2002年5月-2010年9月,采用阔筋膜移植修复跟腱缺损19例,术后制定康复计划并随访疗效。结果19例中1例失访,其余18例术后随访8个月~5年,平均3年,按Arner-Lindhobm评定标准判定,优8例,良10例。结论采用阔筋膜移植修复跟腱缺损,可获得良好的临床效果。

  10. Hamstring tendons insertion - an anatomical study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristiano Antonio Grassi

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To study the anatomy of the hamstring tendons insertion and anatomical rela-tionships. METHODS: Ten cadaver knees with medial and anterior intact structures were selected. The dissection was performed from anteromedial access to exposure of the insertion of the flexor tendons (FT, tibial plateau (TP and tibial tuberosity (TT. A needle of 40 × 12 and a caliper were used to measure the distance of the tibial plateau of the knee flexor tendons insertion at 15 mm from the medial border of the patellar tendon and tibial tuberosity to the insertion of the flexor tendons of the knee. The angle between tibial plateau and the insertion of the flexor tendons of the knee (A-TP-FT was calculated using Image Pro Plus software. RESULTS: The mean distance TP-FT was 41 ± 4.6 mm. The distance between the TT-FT was 6.88 ± 1 mm. The (A-TP-FT was 20.3 ± 4.9°. CONCLUSION: In the anterior tibial flexor tendons are about 40 mm from the plateau with an average of 20°.

  11. Outcomes and complications of percutaneous versus open repair of acute Achilles tendon rupture: A meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Bo; Liu, Yang; Kan, Shunli; Zhang, Di; Xu, Hong; Liu, Feifei; Ning, Guangzhi; Feng, Shiqing

    2017-04-01

    Acute Achilles tendon rupture (AATR) is a frequent injury occurring dominantly in young to middle-aged males. Outcomes and complications between percutaneous and open repair are still controversial. Thus, the purpose of this meta-analysis is to evaluate the outcomes and complications of these two operative methods. We searched multiple databases: PubMed, Web of Science, EMBASE and the Cochrane Library up to October 2016. Two reviewers independently screened the studies for eligibility, evaluated the quality and extracted data from eligible studies, with confirmation by cross-checking. The major results and conclusions were concluded, and the different complication rates and functional outcomes were compared. Meta-analysis was processed by Rev Man 5.3 software. Five randomized controlled trials (RCTs) and seven retrospective cohort studies involving 815 patients met the inclusion criteria. The sural nerve injury rate in the percutaneous group was significantly higher (RR = 3.52, 95%CI 1.45 to 8.57, P = 0.006). However, deep infection rate in the open group was higher (RR = 0.33, 95%CI 0.11 to 0.96, P = 0.04) and subgroup analysis of five RCTs showed no significant difference (RR = 0.42, 95%CI 0.09 to 2.10, P = 0.29). No significant difference was seen regarding the rate of re-rupture. The time of operation in the percutaneous group was shorter (RR = -1.99, 95%CI -3.81 to -0.80, P = 0.001). American Orthopedic Foot and Ankle Society (AOFAS) ankle-hindfoot score showed statistically different in the two groups. Other functional outcomes were similar in the two groups. Percutaneous repair has the advantages of operation time, deep infection and AOFAS score. The functional outcomes were similar in two treatment groups except AOFAS score. Despite the higher incidence of sural nerve injury, we still believe that percutaneous repair is superior to open repair for treating AATR. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  12. 腓骨肌腱修复跟腱断裂24例的临床分析%Peroneal tendon repair achilles tendon rupture of 24 cases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄春吉

    2009-01-01

    目的 分析腓骨长肌腱用于修复跟腱断裂的手术方法 和经验.方法 将腓骨长肌腱在远端处切断,经皮下隧道移位修复跟腱断裂24例.结果根据Arner-Lindholm评定标准,24例中优14例,良10例.未发生跟腱再次断裂.2例出现伤口感染,1例出现皮肤与跟腱粘连.结论 对疑有跟腱断裂的患者未进行认真的体检是导致跟腱断裂误诊的重要原因.避免误诊、尽早手术及循序渐进的术后康复锻炼是提高疗效的有效措施.用腓骨长肌腱重建陈旧性和某些急性跟腱断裂是一种安全可行、疗效满意的手术方法 .%Objective To conclude the method and experience of reconstruction of achilles tendon rupture with peroneus longus tendon transfer.Methods In 24 cases,reconstruction the achilles tendon ruptured by cutting the peroneus longus tendon at the distal end and transferred through subcutaneous tunnel.Results According to ArnerLindholm critera,14 cases were graded as excellent,10 cases as good.No rerupture of Achilles tendon occurred.There were 2 cases occurred wound infection and 1 conglutination.Conclusions The suspected Achilles tendon rupture in patients with a serious medical examination did not lead to an achilles tendon rupture is the major cause of misdiagnosis.Avoid misdiagnosis,as soon as possible after surgery and gradual rehabilitation exercise is to improve the efficacy of effective measures.The peroneus longus tendon transfer is a safe and satisfied way to reconstructing the old and certain fresh rupture of the Achilles tendon.

  13. Preservation of bursal-sided tendon in partial-thickness articular-sided rotator cuff tears: a novel arthroscopic transtendon anatomic repair technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Sang-Jin; Jeong, Jae-Hoon; Jeon, Yoon Sang; Kim, Rag Gyu

    2016-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to introduce a novel arthroscopic transtendon anatomic repair technique that spares the intact bursal-sided tendon in articular-sided partial-thickness rotator cuff tears (PTRCT) and to present shoulder functional outcomes in patients with symptomatic articular-sided PCRCT that involves more than 50 % of its thickness after arthroscopic repair using a novel technique. Eighteen patients with symptomatic articular-sided PCRCT involving more than 50 % of the tendon's thickness underwent arthroscopic repair using a devised technique. The devised technique restores only the torn articular portion of the rotator cuff at the anatomical footprint using a suture anchor, and preserves the integrity of the corresponding bursal-sided tendon by tying knots at the most lateral bursal side on the subacromial space. Clinical and functional outcome using ASES and Constant scores were evaluated. The structural integrity of the rotator cuff was evaluated by MRI at 6 months postoperatively. Pain relief and shoulder functional outcomes were encouraging during the recovery phase after operation. ASES (preoperative 54.0 ± 10.3 to postoperative 92.6 ± 8.0), Constant score (61.2 ± 8.5-88.0 ± 5.3), VAS for pain (4.9 ± 2.6-0.6 ± 0.7) improved significantly after arthroscopic transtendon anatomic repair (p rotator cuff retears on 6-month MRI. No complications related to surgical procedures had occurred. The devised technique of arthroscopic transtendon repair provided satisfactory functional outcomes without postoperative discomforts. This technique minimizes over-tightening of the articular layer and reduces tension mismatches between the articular and bursal layers, which are considered as important factors for improvement of postoperative shoulder motion.

  14. Augmenting tendon and ligament repair with platelet-rich plasma (PRP).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Ting; Zhang, Chang-Qing; Wang, James H-C

    2013-08-11

    Tendon and ligament injuries (TLI) commonly occur in athletes and non-athletes alike, and remarkably debilitate patients' athletic and personal abilities. Current clinical treatments, such as reconstruction surgeries, do not adequately heal these injuries and often result in the formation of scar tissue that is prone to re-injury. Platelet-rich plasma (PRP) is a widely used alternative option that is also safe because of its autologous nature. PRP contains a number of growth factors that are responsible for its potential to heal TLIs effectively. In this review, we provide a comprehensive report on PRP. While basic science studies in general indicate the potential of PRP to treat TLIs effectively, a review of existing literature on the clinical use of PRP for the treatment of TLIs indicates a lack of consensus due to varied treatment outcomes. This suggests that current PRP treatment protocols for TLIs may not be optimal, and that not all TLIs may be effectively treated with PRP. Certainly, additional basic science studies are needed to develop optimal treatment protocols and determine those TLI conditions that can be treated effectively.

  15. Percutaneous repair of Achilles tendon ruptures with Tenolig: quantitative analysis of postural control and gait pattern.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mezzarobba, S; Bortolato, S; Giacomazzi, A; Fancellu, G; Marcovich, R; Valentini, R

    2012-12-01

    Surgical approach in Achilles tendon's rupture involved during the last years has becoming safer and less invasive as possible. Lots of study investigate the outcomes of the mini-invasive technique with Tenolig proving its good results, but never in the long-term. Our study want to emphasize the effectiveness of this treatment exploring the postural and gait patterns in a 24-month follow up. Patients did self-training exercises without specific supervision, instead of a particular postoperative rehabilitation protocol. We compared 21 patients to a control group of 19 health subjects using a clinical examination, a podobarometric and an optokinetic analysis. Data shows no differences in time-distance parameters, despite a reduction of propulsion phase data, confirmed also by kinetic analysis. Podobarometric results show only a decrease in the anterior pressure of the injured limb (p=0.09). In standing an increase of anterior-posterior oscillation of the COP (center of pressure) (p=0.03). The results underline the long-term outcome effectiveness of the technique but some functional alterations remain. This could be the reason of the weakness, which always affected the patients. Reduction of the triceps elongation and restoration of strength during the propulsion phase should be the key points in postoperative physiotherapy. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Short and long terms healing of the experimentally transverse sectioned tendon in rabbits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oryan Ahmad

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The incidences of tendon injuries in certain sections of human or animal populations such as athletes are high, but every human or animal, regardless of age or level of activity experiences some degree of tendon injury. In spite of the various investigations of injuries and treatment, comprehensive studies dealing with the histological, ultrastructural and biomechanical aspects of healing of load-bearing tendons are rare. This study was designed to compare the outcome of healing of the transverse sectioned superficial digital flexor tendon (SDFT after 28 and 84 days post injury (DPI in rabbits. Methods Forty white New Zealand mature female rabbits were randomly divided into two equal groups of 28 and 84 DPI After tenotomy and surgical repair of the left SDFT, the injured legs were casted for 14 days. The weight of the animals, tendon diameter, and clinical, radiographic and ultrasonographic evaluations were conducted at weekly intervals. The animals were euthanized on 28 and 84 DPI and the tendons were evaluated for histopathological, ultrastructural, biomechanical and percentage dry weight parameters. Results Although the clinical, ultrastructural, morphological and biomechanical properties of the injured tendons on day 84 showed a significant improvement compared to those of the 28 DPI, these parameters were still significantly inferior to their normal contra-lateral tendons. Conclusions This study showed that tendon healing is very slow and at 84 days post-injury the morphological and biomechanical parameters were still inferior to the normal tendons and many collagen fibrils still had the same diameter as those seen at 28 DPI.

  17. Repair of full-thickness tendon injury using connective tissue progenitors efficiently derived from human embryonic stem cells and fetal tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Shahar; Leshansky, Lucy; Zussman, Eyal; Burman, Michael; Srouji, Samer; Livne, Erella; Abramov, Natalie; Itskovitz-Eldor, Joseph

    2010-10-01

    The use of stem cells for tissue engineering (TE) encourages scientists to design new platforms in the field of regenerative and reconstructive medicine. Human embryonic stem cells (hESC) have been proposed to be an important cell source for cell-based TE applications as well as an exciting tool for investigating the fundamentals of human development. Here, we describe the efficient derivation of connective tissue progenitors (CTPs) from hESC lines and fetal tissues. The CTPs were significantly expanded and induced to generate tendon tissues in vitro, with ultrastructural characteristics and biomechanical properties typical of mature tendons. We describe a simple method for engineering tendon grafts that can successfully repair injured Achilles tendons and restore the ankle joint extension movement in mice. We also show the CTP's ability to differentiate into bone, cartilage, and fat both in vitro and in vivo. This study offers evidence for the possibility of using stem cell-derived engineered grafts to replace missing tissues, and sets a basic platform for future cell-based TE applications in the fields of orthopedics and reconstructive surgery.

  18. Differences between the cell populations from the peritenon and the tendon core with regard to their potential implication in tendon repair

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cadby, Jennifer A; Buehler, Evelyne; Godbout, Charles; van Weeren, P René; Snedeker, Jess G

    2014-01-01

    The role of intrinsic and extrinsic healing in injured tendons is still debated. In this study, we characterized cell plasticity, proliferative capacity, and migration characteristics as proxy measures of healing potential in cells derived from the peritenon (extrinsic healing) and compared these to

  19. Bi-pedicled V-Y gastrocnemius myocutaneous flap for repairing Achilles tendon and overlying skin defect: the anatomic basis and clinical application

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Yong-qing; ZHU Yue-liang; YANG Jun; LI Jun; DING Jing; LU Sheng

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To study the anatomic basis of the bi-pedicled V-Y gastrocnemius myocutaneous flap for repairing the composite Achilles tendon defect. Methods: The pedicle anatomy of the bi-pedicled V-Y gastrocnemius myocutaneous flap was examined on 30 cadaver specimens. The sliding distances of the flap were measured at different knee flexion degrees. The bi-pedicled V-Y gastrocnemius myocutaneous flap was applied in 12 cases of Achilles tendon defect with simultaneous skin and soft tissue defect. Results: The sural arteries could be classified into four types. After cutting off the gastrocnemius origin with a "Z-shaped" incision, the sliding distance of the flap reached (3.7±0.5)cm when the knee flexed 0°,(4.9±0.7)cm when the knee flexed 30°,(6.7±0.7)cm when the knee flexed 60°and (9.2±0.9)cm when the knee flexed 90°. All the defects healed. The patients recovered ambulation with satisfactory knee and ankle function.The follow-up was 4 months -12 years. Conclusions: Different sural artery types should be noticed during the harvest of the bi-pedicled V-Y gastrocnemius myocutaneous flap. With 90°knee flexion,this flap is suitable for one-stage repair of composite Achilles tendon defect within 9.2 cm±0.9 cm.

  20. Application of different biomaterials in Achilles tendon repair%不同生物材料修复跟腱损伤的应用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李敏; 李广杰

    2011-01-01

    背景:构建组织工程化肌腱的关键是寻找适于肌腱细胞黏附、生长及功能分化的支架材料.目的:评价不同生物材料在跟腱损伤修复中的效果.方法:以"生物材料,跟腱,修复" 为关键词在万方数据库中检索1985-01/2011-01关于生物材料治疗跟腱缺损的文章.结果与结论:陈旧性跟腱断裂难以自行愈合及修复,易遗留疼痛及功能障碍.长期以来,不少学者对跟腱缺损的治疗进行了较多的研究,从自体肌腱移植、同种异体肌腱移植到人工肌腱移植、组织工程肌腱移植等,实践证明这些方法手段都存在一定的优点和缺点.虽然肌腱组织工程中支架材料的研究与应用已经取得了一些成功,但是目前应用的材料或存在生物相容性问题、降解性问题或存在力学性能差、难加工成型等缺陷,与理想的支架材料还存在很大差距.%BACKGROUND: The key to construct tissue engineered tendon is to look for appropriate scaffold materials for tendon cell adhesion, growth and functional differentiation.OBJECTIVE: To assess the effects of different biomaterials on Achilles tendon injury.METHODS: “Biomaterial, Achilles tendon, repair” were used as keywords to retrieve articles about biomaterials for treatment of Achilles tendon injuries published 1985-01/2011-01 in Wanfang database.RESULTS AND CONCLUSION: Self-healing and repair of old Achilles tendon rupture is difficult, and pain and dysfunction easily occur. Over the years, there are many studies about treatment of Achilles tendon injuries from autologous tendon graft and tendon allograft to artificial tendon and tissue-engineered tendon. The above-mentioned methods have their own advantages and disadvantages. Although studies on scaffold materials for tissue-engineered tendon have achieved some results, the poor biocompatibility, degradation or mechanical properties as well as difficulty to molding lead to a great difference from ideal scaffold

  1. 改良膝降动脉为蒂大收肌腱骨皮瓣修跟复合组织缺损%Repair of Achilles tendon composite defect using osteocutaneous flap of adductor magnus tendon pedicled with

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王海文; 顾荣; 江新明; 曾德庆; 江吉勇

    2011-01-01

    目的 探讨改良膝降动脉为蒂的大收肌腱骨皮瓣修复跟区跟腱复合组织缺损方法及效果.方法对3例外伤致足跟区跟腱止点伴跟骨及皮肤软组织缺损的患者,采用以膝降动脉为蒂的隐动脉穿支皮瓣修复跟区皮肤缺损,以膝降动脉关节支为蒂的大收肌腱骨瓣移植修复跟区复合组织缺损.其中跟区皮肤缺损面积为7 cm×9 cm~5 cm×7 cm,跟腱缺损长度为6~8 cm,切取皮瓣面积为8 cm×10cm~6 cm×8cm,大收肌腱切取长度为7~9cm.结果 3例复合组织瓣全部顺利成活,术后随访6~12个月,皮瓣感觉恢复S3-4,双足提踵试验及单足提踵试验均阴性,步态恢复均正常.结论应用隐动脉穿支设计皮瓣,皮瓣设计于大腿内侧,改良了隐动脉皮瓣设计于小腿内侧,造成切口过大,分离血管蒂较长等缺点,疗效可靠,是目前较理想修复方法.%Objective To evaluate clinical effects of osteocutaneous flap of adductor magnus tendon pedicled with descending genicular artery on repair of Achilles tendon composite defect. Methods Osteocutaneous flap of adductor magnus tendon pedicied with descending genicular artery were individually designed and surgically used on 3 Cases with traumatic Achilles tendon defects, combined with soft tissue and Calcaneal bone damage. The area of skin defect was ranged from 7 cmx9 cm to 5 Cm x7 cm, and the length of Achilles tendon defect was 6 - 8 cm. During the operation , the flaps was designed as ScmxlOcm to 6cmx 8cm, with the cutting length of the adductor magnus tendon 7~ 9 cm . Results: All 3 cases were followed-up for 6 to 12 months. The transplanted tissue flap survived well. The texture, appearance and function of the flap were excellent. Conclusions It is a ideal way to repair of Achilles tendon composite defect, using osteocutaneous flap of adductor magnus tendon pedicled with descending genicular artery, which avoiding the severe surgical trauma and the extended isolation of vessels.

  2. Effect of Complications After Minimally Invasive Surgical Repair of Acute Achilles Tendon Ruptures Report on 211 Cases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Metz, Roderik; van der Heijden, Geert J. M. G.; Verleisdonk, Egbert-Jan M. M.; Kolfschoten, Nicky; Verhofstad, Michiel H. J.; van der Werken, Christiaan

    2011-01-01

    Background: Complications of acute Achilles tendon rupture treatment are considered to negatively influence outcome, but the relevance of these effects is largely unknown. Purpose: The Achilles Tendon Total Rupture Score (ATRS) was used to determine level of disability in patients with minimally inv

  3. Osteotendinous repair of bilateral spontaneous quadriceps tendon ruptures with the Krackow technique in two patients with chronic renal failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kara, Adnan; Sari, Seçkin; Şeker, Ali; Öztürk, Irfan

    2013-01-01

    Although unilateral traumatic quadriceps tendon rupture is a relatively frequent pathology, bilateral non-traumatic spontaneous ruptures are uncommon and are usually associated with chronic renal failure, hyperparathyroidism, gout, and systemic lupus erythematosus. This paper aimed to discuss two patients with chronic renal failure treated with the Krackow suture technique for spontaneous bilateral quadriceps tendon rupture.

  4. Effect of Complications After Minimally Invasive Surgical Repair of Acute Achilles Tendon Ruptures Report on 211 Cases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Metz, Roderik; van der Heijden, Geert J. M. G.; Verleisdonk, Egbert-Jan M. M.; Kolfschoten, Nicky; Verhofstad, Michiel H. J.; van der Werken, Christiaan

    2011-01-01

    Background: Complications of acute Achilles tendon rupture treatment are considered to negatively influence outcome, but the relevance of these effects is largely unknown. Purpose: The Achilles Tendon Total Rupture Score (ATRS) was used to determine level of disability in patients with minimally inv

  5. Effects of flunixin meglumine on experimental tendon wound healing: A histopathological and mechanical study in rabbits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehdi Behfar

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Tendons are frequently targets of injury in sports and work. Whether nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs have beneficial effects on tendon healing is still a matter of debate. This study was conducted to evaluate effects of flunixin meglumine (FM on tendon healing after experimentally induced acute trauma. Twenty eight adult male New Zealand White rabbits were subjected to complete transection of deep digital flexor tendons followed by suture placement. Treatment group received intramuscular injection of FM for three days, and controls received placebo. Subsequently, cast immobilization was continued for two weeks. Animals were sacrificed four weeks after surgery and tissue samples were taken. The histological evaluations revealed improved structural characteristics of neotendon formation including fibrillar linearity, fibrillar continuity and neovascularization in treatment group compared to those of controls (p 0.05. Mechanical evaluation revealed significant increase in load-related material properties including ultimate load, yield load, energy absorption and ultimate stress in treatment group compared to those of control group (p 0.05. The present study showed that intramuscular injection of FM resulted in improved structural and mechanical properties of tendon repairs and it could be an effective treatment for acute tendon injuries like severance and laceration.

  6. Effects of flunixin meglumine on experimental tendon wound healing: A histopathological and mechanical study in rabbits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behfar, Mehdi; Hobbenaghi, Rahim; Sarrafzadeh-Rezaei, Farshid

    2013-01-01

    Tendons are frequently targets of injury in sports and work. Whether nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) have beneficial effects on tendon healing is still a matter of debate. This study was conducted to evaluate effects of flunixin meglumine (FM) on tendon healing after experimentally induced acute trauma. Twenty eight adult male New Zealand White rabbits were subjected to complete transection of deep digital flexor tendons followed by suture placement. Treatment group received intramuscular injection of FM for three days, and controls received placebo. Subsequently, cast immobilization was continued for two weeks. Animals were sacrificed four weeks after surgery and tissue samples were taken. The histological evaluations revealed improved structural characteristics of neotendon formation including fibrillar linearity, fibrillar continuity and neovascularization in treatment group compared to those of controls (p 0.05). Mechanical evaluation revealed significant increase in load-related material properties including ultimate load, yield load, energy absorption and ultimate stress in treatment group compared to those of control group (p 0.05). The present study showed that intramuscular injection of FM resulted in improved structural and mechanical properties of tendon repairs and it could be an effective treatment for acute tendon injuries like severance and laceration.

  7. Damage-induced hydrolyses modelling of biodegradable polymers for tendons and ligaments repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vieira, André C; Guedes, Rui M; Tita, Volnei

    2015-09-18

    The use of biodegradable synthetic grafts to repair injured ligaments may overcome the disadvantages of other solutions. Apart from biological compatibility, these devices shall also be functionally compatible and temporarily displayed, during the healing process, adequate mechanical support. Laxity of these devices is an important concern. This can cause failure since it may result in joint instability. Laxity results from a progressive accumulation of plastic strain during the cyclic loading. The functional compatibility of a biodegradable synthetic graft and, therefore, the global mechanical properties of the scaffold during degradation, can be optimised using computer-aiding and numerical tools. Therefore, in this work, the ability of numerical tools to predict the mechanical behaviour of the device during its degradation is discussed. Computational approaches based on elastoplastic and viscoplastic constitutive models are also presented. These models enable to simulate the plastic strain accumulation. These computational approaches, where the material model parameters depend on the hydrolytic degradation damage, are calibrated using experimental data measured from biodegradable suture fibres at different degradation steps. Due to durability requirements the selected materials are polydioxone (PDO) and polylactic acid and poly-caprolactone blend (PLA-PCL). Computational approaches investigated are able to predict well the experimental results for both materials, in full strain range until rupture and for different degradation steps. These approaches can be further used in more complex fibrous structures, to predict its global mechanical behaviour during degradation process.

  8. Elastographic characteristics of the metacarpal tendons in horses without clinical evidence of tendon injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lustgarten, Meghann; Redding, W Rich; Labens, Raphael; Morgan, Michel; Davis, Weston; Seiler, Gabriela S

    2014-01-01

    Tendon and ligament injuries are common causes of impaired performance in equine athletes. Gray-scale ultrasonography is the current standard method for diagnosing and monitoring these injuries, however this modality only provides morphologic information. Elastography is an ultrasound technique that allows detection and measurement of tissue strain, and may provide valuable mechanical information about equine tendon and ligament injuries. The purpose of this study was to determine the feasibility, reproducibility, and repeatability of elastography; and to describe elastographic characteristics of metacarpal tendons in sound horses. Nineteen legs for 17 clinically sound horses without evidence of musculoskeletal pathology were included. Elastographic images of the superficial and deep digital flexor tendons and the branches of the suspensory ligament (tendon of the interosseous muscle) were described quantitatively and qualitatively. There was no statistically significant difference between operators (P = 0.86) nor within operators (P = 0.93). For qualitative assessments, reproducibility (0.46) was moderate and repeatability (0.78) was good. Similar to human Achilles tendons, equine tendons were classified as predominantly hard using elastography. There was no statistically significant difference in stiffness of the flexor tendons (P = 0.96). No significant difference in stiffness was found with altered leg position during standing (P = 0.84) and while nonweight bearing (P = 0.61). The flexor tendons were softer when imaged in longitudinal versus transverse planes (P tendons and ligaments of the distal forelimb in horses. © 2013 American College of Veterinary Radiology.

  9. Tendonitis (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tendonitis is the inflammation, irritation, and swelling of a tendon. It can occur as a result of ... repetitive strain on the forearm muscles can cause tendonitis. The most common symptom of tendonitis is pain, ...

  10. 组织工程修复肩袖损伤促进腱骨愈合的研究进展%Progress in tissue-engineering for tendon-to-bone healing after rotator cuff repair

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵晨; 王蕾

    2015-01-01

    Rotator cuff injury, considered as a resource of pain, disability and dyssomnia to serious decline in the quality of life, is a common disorder of the shoulder joint. Basic principles of rotator cuff repair aim at achieving high initial ifxation strength, maintaining mechanical stability and restoring the anatomic healing of the cuff tendon. After the routine surgical procedure for rotator cuff repair, the biology and histology of the normal enthesis are not restored. Tendon-to-bone healing occurs with a ifbrovascular scar tissue interface that is mechanically inferior to the native insertion site, which may lead to high re-rupture rate. For these reasons, new approaches are required to improve structural healing. Tissue engineering strategies have been suggested to improve the biological environment around the bone-tendon interface and to promote regeneration of the native insertion site. Although experimental applications of growth factors and scaffolds on animal models demonstrate promising results, techniques which can be used in human rotator cuff repair are still very limited. Tissue engineering to improve tendon-to-bone healing has bright future and requires more research before its clinical applications. This review will outline therapies of growth factors, scaffolds and stem cells in tendon healing and rotator cuff repair.

  11. Triple extensor digiti minimi tendon: An anatomic variation

    OpenAIRE

    Elif Sari

    2014-01-01

    This case report describes an unusual variation of the extensor digiti minimi tendon discovered during extensor tendon repair in the emergency room. Knowledge of this variation may be helpful for the tendon transfers and tendon surgery that need tendon graft. [Hand Microsurg 2014; 3(2.000): 56-58

  12. Scaffolds in Tendon Tissue Engineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Umile Giuseppe Longo

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Tissue engineering techniques using novel scaffold materials offer potential alternatives for managing tendon disorders. Tissue engineering strategies to improve tendon repair healing include the use of scaffolds, growth factors, cell seeding, or a combination of these approaches. Scaffolds have been the most common strategy investigated to date. Available scaffolds for tendon repair include both biological scaffolds, obtained from mammalian tissues, and synthetic scaffolds, manufactured from chemical compounds. Preliminary studies support the idea that scaffolds can provide an alternative for tendon augmentation with an enormous therapeutic potential. However, available data are lacking to allow definitive conclusion on the use of scaffolds for tendon augmentation. We review the current basic science and clinical understanding in the field of scaffolds and tissue engineering for tendon repair.

  13. Tension-free cuff repairs with excision of macroscopic tendon lesions and muscular advancement: results in a prospective series with limited fatty muscular degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goutallier, D; Postel, J M; Van Driessche, S; Godefroy, D; Radier, C

    2006-01-01

    Recurrent tears after rotator cuff repairs are frequent. These could be influenced by excessive tension on a degenerated tendinous stump and by fatty degeneration of the cuff muscles. The goal of this study was to evaluate the anatomic and functional results of tension-free cuff repairs with the excision of macroscopic tendon lesions in a series with limited muscular fatty degeneration of the infraspinatus and a global fatty degeneration index of rotator cuff muscles equal to or lower than 2. We studied 27 tears, comprising 13 cases involving both supraspinatus and infraspinatus tears, 13 cases with 3-tendon tears, and 1 case with only a supraspinatus tear. All shoulders were operated on through a transacromial approach easily repaired with 2 titanium screws with washers. To obtain a repair without tension, a single advancement was performed in 20 cases and a double advancement of both the supraspinatus and infraspinatus was done in 7 cases. The shoulders were evaluated clinically preoperatively and postoperatively with the non-weighted Constant score and anatomically with computed arthrotomography scans. The mean age at operation was 59.5 years, and the length of follow-up ranged from 1 to 4 years. Of the cuffs, 23 (85%) were watertight 1 year after surgery. No predictive factor of retear could be found. The functional improvement was statistically significant only for watertight cuffs, with an improvement of the Constant score from 57.8 to 75. The only predictive factor of functional outcome in this watertight group was the preoperative Constant score. Single and double advancements yielded similar functional results regardless of the extent of the initial tear, provided that the cuff was watertight at revision.

  14. Biomechanical comparison of interference screw and cortical button with screw hybrid technique for distal biceps brachii tendon repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arianjam, Afshin; Camisa, William; Leasure, Jeremi M; Montgomery, William H

    2013-11-01

    Various fixation techniques have been described for ruptured distal biceps tendons. The authors hypothesized that no significant differences would be found between the mean failure strength, maximum strength, and stiffness of the interference screw and hybrid technique. Fourteen fresh-frozen human cadaveric elbows were prepared. Specimens were randomized to either interference screw or hybrid cortical button with screw fixation. The tendon was pulled at a rate of 4 mm/s until failure. Failure strength, maximum strength, and stiffness were measured and compared. Failure strength, maximum strength, and stiffness were 294±81.9 N, 294±82.1 N, and 64.4±40.5 N/mm, respectively, for the interference screw technique and 333±129 N, 383±121 N, and 56.2±40.5 N/mm, respectively, for the hybrid technique. No statistically significant difference existed between the screw and hybrid technique in failure strength, maximum strength, or stiffness (P>.05). The interference screws primarily failed by pullout of the screw and tendon, whereas in the hybrid technique, failure occurred with screw pullout followed by tearing of the biceps tendon. The results suggest that this hybrid technique is nearly as strong and stiff as the interference screw alone. Although the hybrid technique facilitates tensioning of the reconstructed tendon, the addition of the cortical button did not significantly improve the failure strength of the interference screw alone. Copyright 2013, SLACK Incorporated.

  15. Nonoperative, dynamic treatment of acute achilles tendon rupture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barfod, Kristoffer Weisskirchner; Bencke, Jesper; Lauridsen, Hanne Bloch

    2015-01-01

    Acute Achilles tendon rupture alters the biomechanical properties of the plantar flexor muscle-tendon complex that can affect functional performance and the risk of repeat injury. The purpose of the present study was to compare the biomechanical properties of the plantar flexor muscle-tendon...... complex in patients randomized to early weightbearing or non-weightbearing in the nonoperative treatment of Achilles tendon rupture. A total of 60 patients were randomized to full weightbearing from day 1 of treatment or non-weightbearing for 6 weeks. After 6 and 12 months, the peak passive torque at 20......° dorsiflexion, the stiffness during slow stretching, and the maximal strength were measured in both limbs. The stiffness of the plantar flexor muscle-tendon complex in the terminal part of dorsiflexion was significantly increased (p = .024) in the non-weightbearing group at 12 months. The peak passive torque...

  16. Reconstruction of Kuwada grade IV chronic achilles tendon rupture by minimally invasive technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miao, Xudong; Wu, Yongping; Tao, Huimin; Yang, Disheng; Huang, Lu

    2016-01-01

    Background: Transfer of a flexor hallucis longus (FHL) tendon can not only reconstruct the Achilles tendon but also provide ischemic tendinous tissues with a rich blood supply to enhance wound healing. This retrospective study aims to investigate clinical outcomes in patients who underwent repair of Kuwada grade IV chronic Achilles tendon rupture with long hallucis longus tendons harvested using a minimally invasive technique. Materials and Methods: 35 patients who were treated for Kuwada grade IV Achilles tendon injuries from July 2006 to June 2011 were included in this retrospective study. The age ranged between 23 and 71 years. The duration from primary injury to surgery ranged from 29 days to 34 months (mean value, 137.6 days). All 35 patients had difficulties in lifting their calves. Thirty two were followed up for a mean 32.2 months (range 18–72 months), whereas three were lost to followup. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed that the tendon rupture gap ranged from 6.0 to 9.2 cm. During surgery, a 2.0 cm minor incision was made vertically in the medial plantar side of the midfoot, and a 1.5 cm minor transverse incision was made in the plantar side of the interphalangeal articulation of the great toe to harvest the FHL tendon, and the tendon was fixed to the calcaneus with suture anchors. Postoperative appearance and function were evaluated by physiotherapists based American Orthopedic Foot and Ankle Society-ankle and hindfoot score (AOFAS-AH), and Leppilahti Achilles tendon ratings. Results: Results were assessed in 32 patients. Except for one patient who suffered complications because of wound disruption 10 days after the operation, all other patients had primary wound healing, with 28 of 32 able to go up on their toes at last followup. The AOFAS-AH score was increased from preoperative (51.92 ± 7.08) points to (92.56 ± 6.71) points; Leppilahti Achilles tendon score was increased from preoperative (72.56 ± 7.43) to (92.58 ± 5.1). There were

  17. Flexor accessorius longus: A rare variation of the deep extrinsic digital flexors of the leg and its phylogenetic significance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaijesh P

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Anomalies of the calf muscles are rare. One such anomalous muscle, known as the Muscle Flexor accessorius longus (also named accessorius ad accessorium, accessorius secondus, accessory flexor digitorum longus or pronator pedis is of morphological significance. When present, this originates in the deep fascia of the tibia or fibula and inserts in the foot either into the flexor digitorum accessorius or into the tendons of the flexor digitorum longus. In this report we present a discussion of the morphological significance and phylogenetic history of one such muscle observed. In this case report we describe an anomalous calf muscle which extends from the popliteal region, runs along the posterior compartment of the leg, reaches the sole and is inserted to the flexor digitorum longus muscle. This kind of muscle variations are considered to be the higher origin of the flexor digitorum accessorius muscle of the sole. Here we discuss the phylogenetic history of this muscle as this muscle variant is present in some primitive mammals, absent in apes and in this particular case appeared as one of the muscles of the flexor compartment of the leg.

  18. Flexor Digitorum Accessorius Longus: Importance of Posterior Ankle Endoscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batista, Jorge Pablo; del Vecchio, Jorge Javier; Golanó, Pau; Vega, Jordi

    2015-01-01

    Endoscopy for the posterior region of the ankle through two portals is becoming more widespread for the treatment of a large number of conditions which used to be treated with open surgery years ago. The tendon of the flexor hallucis longus (FHL) travels along an osteofibrous tunnel between the posterolateral and posteromedial tubercles of the talus. Chronic inflammation of this tendon may lead to painful stenosing tenosynovitis. The aim of this report is to describe two cases depicting an accessory tendon which is an anatomical variation of the flexor hallucis longus in patients with posterior friction syndrome due to posterior ankle impingement and associated with a posteromedial osteochondral lesion of the talus. The anatomical variation (FDAL) described was a finding during an endoscopy of the posterior region of the ankle, and we have spared it by sectioning the superior flexor retinaculum only. The accessory flexor digitorum longus is an anatomical variation and should be taken into account when performing an arthroscopy of the posterior region of the ankle. We recommend this treatment on this type of injury although we admit this does not make a definite conclusion. PMID:26060592

  19. Flexor Digitorum Accessorius Longus: Importance of Posterior Ankle Endoscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge Pablo Batista

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Endoscopy for the posterior region of the ankle through two portals is becoming more widespread for the treatment of a large number of conditions which used to be treated with open surgery years ago. The tendon of the flexor hallucis longus (FHL travels along an osteofibrous tunnel between the posterolateral and posteromedial tubercles of the talus. Chronic inflammation of this tendon may lead to painful stenosing tenosynovitis. The aim of this report is to describe two cases depicting an accessory tendon which is an anatomical variation of the flexor hallucis longus in patients with posterior friction syndrome due to posterior ankle impingement and associated with a posteromedial osteochondral lesion of the talus. The anatomical variation (FDAL described was a finding during an endoscopy of the posterior region of the ankle, and we have spared it by sectioning the superior flexor retinaculum only. The accessory flexor digitorum longus is an anatomical variation and should be taken into account when performing an arthroscopy of the posterior region of the ankle. We recommend this treatment on this type of injury although we admit this does not make a definite conclusion.

  20. Stenosing flexor tenosynovitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraemer, B A; Young, V L; Arfken, C

    1990-07-01

    A review of 253 consecutive digits with stenosing flexor tenosynovitis was done to clarify the respective role of steroid injection and surgical release in the management of stenosing flexor tenosynovitis. Treatment selection was based on the patient's age and severity of presenting complaints. In patients aged 10 years or more, analysis showed no statistically significant difference between results with steroid injection and surgical release. Surgical treatment was associated with higher cost and more complications. Based on this review, we recommend up to three injections of 20 mg of triamcinolone into the digital flexor sheath as the initial management of nonlocking, stenosing flexor tenosynovitis in adults. Initial management by surgical release is reserved for children and patients with digits locked in flexion.

  1. Radiologic findings of the flexor pollicis longus hypoplasia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alicioglu, Banu [Trakya University Medical School, Department of Radiologyy, Edirne (Turkey)

    2007-06-15

    A case of a 10-year-old boy with hypoplasia of the flexor pollicis longus and without other associated anomalies and trauma history is reported. Flexor pollicis longus tendon anomalies are rare; several types of this congenital anomaly have been reported in the literature. The diagnosis should be considered to the conditions of a patient who was unable to flex the interphalangeal joint of the thumb. Hypoplastic thumb or absent interphalangeal joint crease may be a diagnostic feature in such cases. We preoperatively present the radiological findings of this rare congenital anomaly. Ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) features have never been reported in the literature. (orig.)

  2. Spontaneous bilateral quadriceps tendon rupture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vigneswaran, N; Lee, K; Yegappan, M

    2007-11-01

    Spontaneous bilateral quadriceps tendon ruptures are uncommon. We present a 30-year-old man with end-stage renal failure, who sustained this injury, and subsequently had surgical repair of both tendons on separate occasions. He has since regained full range of movement of both knees.

  3. A preliminary study on the effect of ultrasound therapy on the healing of surgically severed achilles tendons in five dogs.